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Sample records for heat stable antiviral

  1. Oyster viperin retains direct antiviral activity and its transcription occurs via a signalling pathway involving a heat-stable haemolymph protein.

    PubMed

    Green, Timothy J; Speck, Peter; Geng, Lu; Raftos, David; Beard, Michael R; Helbig, Karla J

    2015-12-01

    Little is known about the response of non-model invertebrates, such as oysters, to virus infection. The vertebrate innate immune system detects virus-derived nucleic acids to trigger the type I IFN pathway, leading to the transcription of hundreds of IFN-stimulated genes (ISGs) that exert antiviral functions. Invertebrates were thought to lack the IFN pathway based on the absence of IFN or ISGs encoded in model invertebrate genomes. However, the oyster genome encodes many ISGs, including the well-described antiviral protein viperin. In this study, we characterized oyster viperin and showed that it localizes to caveolin-1 and inhibits dengue virus replication in a heterologous model. In a second set of experiments, we have provided evidence that the haemolymph from poly(I : C)-injected oysters contains a heat-stable, protease-susceptible factor that induces haemocyte transcription of viperin mRNA in conjunction with upregulation of IFN regulatory factor. Collectively, these results support the concept that oysters have antiviral systems that are homologous to the vertebrate IFN pathway.

  2. Antiviral activities of heated dolomite powder.

    PubMed

    Motoike, Koichi; Hirano, Shozo; Yamana, Hideaki; Onda, Tetsuhiko; Maeda, Takayoshi; Ito, Toshihiro; Hayakawa, Motozo

    2008-12-01

    The effect of the heating conditions of dolomite powder on its antiviral activity was studied against the H5N3 avian influenza virus. Calcium oxide (CaO) and magnesium oxide (MgO), obtained by the thermal decomposition of dolomite above 800 degrees C, were shown to have strong antiviral activity, but the effect was lessened when the heating temperature exceeded 1400 degrees C. Simultaneous measurement of the crystallite size suggested that the weakening of the activity was due to the considerable grain growth of the oxides. It was found that the presence of Mg in dolomite contributed to the deterrence of grain growth of the oxides during the heating process. Although both CaO and MgO exhibited strong antiviral activity, CaO had the stronger activity but quickly hydrated in the presence of water. On the other hand, the hydration of MgO took place gradually under the same conditions. Separate measurements using MgO and Mg(OH)2 revealed that MgO had a higher antiviral effect than Mg(OH)2. From the overall experiments, it was suggested that the strong antiviral activity of dolomite was related to the hydration reaction of CaO.

  3. Protein modification during antiviral heat bioprocessing.

    PubMed

    Smales, C M; Pepper, D S; James, D C

    2000-01-20

    Heat treatment is routinely used in the preparation of therapeutic protein biopharmaceuticals as a means of viral inactivation. However, in undertaking virucidal heat treatments, a balance must be found between the bioprocessing conditions, virus kill, and the maintenance of protein integrity. In this study, we utilize a simple model protein, hen egg-white lysozyme, to investigate the relationship between antiviral bioprocess conditions (protein formulation and temperature) and the extent and type of protein modification. A variety of industrially relevant wet- and dry-heat treatments were undertaken, using formulations that included sucrose as a thermostabilizing excipient. Although there was no evidence of lysozyme aggregation or crosslinking during any of the heat treatments, using liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization-mass spectroscopy (LC-ESI-MS) and peptide mapping we show that protein modifications do occur with increasingly harsh heat treatment. Modifications were predominantly found after wet-heat treatment, the major covalent modification of lysozyme under these conditions being glycation of Lys(97), by either glucose or fructose derived from hydrolyzed sucrose. The extent of sucrose hydrolysis was itself dependent on both the duration of heat treatment and formulation composition. Advanced glycation end products (AGEs) and additional unidentified products were also present in protein samples subjected to extended heat treatment. AGEs were derived primarily from initial glycation by fructose and not glucose. These findings have implications for the improvement of bioprocesses to ensure protein product quality.

  4. Protein modifications during antiviral heat bioprocessing and subsequent storage.

    PubMed

    Smales, C M; Pepper, D S; James, D C

    2001-01-01

    Antiviral heat treatment is routinely used in the bioprocessing of therapeutic proteins as a means of reducing viral load. However, in protein formulations containing sucrose this form of bioprocessing can lead to protein modifications. Using a model protein, hen egg white lysozyme, we investigated the effects of antiviral heat treatments in the presence of sucrose on protein integrity during subsequent long-term protein storage. Although heat treatment alone resulted in protein modification, subsequent medium- to long-term storage of both lyophilized and liquid samples at room temperature or above led to further protein modifications. The majority of these modifications were due to the formation of glycation and advanced glycation end products via the reaction of reducing sugars and their autoxidation products (derived from hydrolyzed sucrose) with function groups on the protein surface. These findings have implications for the improvement of therapeutic protein bioprocessing to ensure protein product quality.

  5. Antiviral Protection via RdRP-Mediated Stable Activation of Innate Immunity

    PubMed Central

    Painter, Meghan M.; Morrison, James H.; Zoecklein, Laurie J.; Rinkoski, Tommy A.; Watzlawik, Jens O.; Papke, Louisa M.; Warrington, Arthur E.; Bieber, Allan J.; Matchett, William E.; Turkowski, Kari L.; Poeschla, Eric M.; Rodriguez, Moses

    2015-01-01

    For many emerging and re-emerging infectious diseases, definitive solutions via sterilizing adaptive immunity may require years or decades to develop, if they are even possible. The innate immune system offers alternative mechanisms that do not require antigen-specific recognition or a priori knowledge of the causative agent. However, it is unclear whether effective stable innate immune system activation can be achieved without triggering harmful autoimmunity or other chronic inflammatory sequelae. Here, we show that transgenic expression of a picornavirus RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRP), in the absence of other viral proteins, can profoundly reconfigure mammalian innate antiviral immunity by exposing the normally membrane-sequestered RdRP activity to sustained innate immune detection. RdRP-transgenic mice have life-long, quantitatively dramatic upregulation of 80 interferon-stimulated genes (ISGs) and show profound resistance to normally lethal viral challenge. Multiple crosses with defined knockout mice (Rag1, Mda5, Mavs, Ifnar1, Ifngr1, and Tlr3) established that the mechanism operates via MDA5 and MAVS and is fully independent of the adaptive immune system. Human cell models recapitulated the key features with striking fidelity, with the RdRP inducing an analogous ISG network and a strict block to HIV-1 infection. This RdRP-mediated antiviral mechanism does not depend on secondary structure within the RdRP mRNA but operates at the protein level and requires RdRP catalysis. Importantly, despite lifelong massive ISG elevations, RdRP mice are entirely healthy, with normal longevity. Our data reveal that a powerfully augmented MDA5-mediated activation state can be a well-tolerated mammalian innate immune system configuration. These results provide a foundation for augmenting innate immunity to achieve broad-spectrum antiviral protection. PMID:26633895

  6. Antiviral Protection via RdRP-Mediated Stable Activation of Innate Immunity.

    PubMed

    Painter, Meghan M; Morrison, James H; Zoecklein, Laurie J; Rinkoski, Tommy A; Watzlawik, Jens O; Papke, Louisa M; Warrington, Arthur E; Bieber, Allan J; Matchett, William E; Turkowski, Kari L; Poeschla, Eric M; Rodriguez, Moses

    2015-12-01

    For many emerging and re-emerging infectious diseases, definitive solutions via sterilizing adaptive immunity may require years or decades to develop, if they are even possible. The innate immune system offers alternative mechanisms that do not require antigen-specific recognition or a priori knowledge of the causative agent. However, it is unclear whether effective stable innate immune system activation can be achieved without triggering harmful autoimmunity or other chronic inflammatory sequelae. Here, we show that transgenic expression of a picornavirus RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRP), in the absence of other viral proteins, can profoundly reconfigure mammalian innate antiviral immunity by exposing the normally membrane-sequestered RdRP activity to sustained innate immune detection. RdRP-transgenic mice have life-long, quantitatively dramatic upregulation of 80 interferon-stimulated genes (ISGs) and show profound resistance to normally lethal viral challenge. Multiple crosses with defined knockout mice (Rag1, Mda5, Mavs, Ifnar1, Ifngr1, and Tlr3) established that the mechanism operates via MDA5 and MAVS and is fully independent of the adaptive immune system. Human cell models recapitulated the key features with striking fidelity, with the RdRP inducing an analogous ISG network and a strict block to HIV-1 infection. This RdRP-mediated antiviral mechanism does not depend on secondary structure within the RdRP mRNA but operates at the protein level and requires RdRP catalysis. Importantly, despite lifelong massive ISG elevations, RdRP mice are entirely healthy, with normal longevity. Our data reveal that a powerfully augmented MDA5-mediated activation state can be a well-tolerated mammalian innate immune system configuration. These results provide a foundation for augmenting innate immunity to achieve broad-spectrum antiviral protection.

  7. Evaluation of protein modification during anti-viral heat bioprocessing by electrospray ionization mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Smales, C M; Pepper, D S; James, D C

    2001-01-01

    During the preparation of therapeutic plasma and recombinant protein biopharmaceuticals heat-treatment is routinely applied as a means of viral inactivation. However, as most proteins denature and aggregate under heat stress, it is necessary to add thermostabilizing excipients to protein formulations destined for anti-viral heat-treatment in order to prevent protein damage. Anti-viral heat-treatment bioprocessing therefore requires that a balance be found between the bioprocessing conditions, virus kill and protein integrity. In this study we have utilized a simple model protein, beta-lactoglobulin, to investigate the relationship between virucidal heat-treatment conditions (protein formulation and temperature) and the type and extent of protein modification in the liquid state. A variety of industrially relevant heat-treatments were undertaken, using formulations that included sucrose as a thermostabilizing excipient. Using liquid chromatography/electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (LC/ESI-MS) we show here that protein modifications do occur with increasingly harsh heat-treatment. The predominant modification under these conditions was protein glycation by either glucose or fructose derived from hydrolyzed sucrose. Advanced glycation end products and additional unidentified products were also present in beta-lactoglobulin protein samples subjected to extended heat-treatment. These findings have implications for the improvement of anti-viral heat-treatment bioprocesses to ensure the safety and efficacy of protein biopharmaceuticals. CopyrightCopyright 2001 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  8. Strong antiviral activity of heated and hydrated dolomite--preliminary investigation.

    PubMed

    Yamana, Hideaki; Ito, Hiroshi; Ito, Toshihiro; Murase, Toshiyuki; Motoike, Koichi; Wakabayashi, Kazuo; Otsuki, Koichi

    2007-02-01

    Heated and hydrated naturally occurring dolomite showed very strong antiviral activity. Infectivity of avian and human influenza, avian infectious bronchitis (coronavirus), Newcastle disease (paramyxovirus) and avian laryngotracheitis (herpesvirus) viruses dropped at least 1,000 fold following contact with the dolomite for five minutes at 4 degrees C. Dolomite is expected to be useful to inhibit the incidence of emerging and re-emerging infectious diseases.

  9. Heat-stable Escherichia coli enterotoxin production in vivo.

    PubMed Central

    Whipp, S C; Moon, H W; Lyon, N C

    1975-01-01

    Hysterectomy-derived, colostrum-deprived piglets were infected with enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli on day 4 of life. Samples of feces and intestinal contents were collected and tested in infant mice for enterotoxic activity. Positive enterotoxic responses were observed in mice given filtrates of feces and intestinal contents from piglets infected withe enterotoxigenic E. coli known to produce heat-stable enterotoxin but not heat-liabile enterotoxin in vitro. It is concluded that heat-stable enterotoxigenic E. coli induce diarrhea by production of heat-stable enterotoxin in vivo. PMID:1097335

  10. Storage-stable foamable polyurethane is activated by heat

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1966-01-01

    Polyurethane foamable mixture remains inert in storage unit activated to produce a rapid foaming reaction. The storage-stable foamable composition is spread as a paste on the surface of an expandable structure and, when heated, yields a rigid open-cell polyurethane foam that is self-bondable to the substrate.

  11. Investigation of Si(001) stable surfaces in alternating current heating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doi, T.; Koguchi, M.

    2016-11-01

    The topography of a Si(001) vicinal surface is investigated using reflection electron microscopy (REM) during alternating current (AC) heating of the surface in ultra-high vacuum. The normal direction of the surface is slightly tilted from the [001] direction at θx or θy on the x or y axis (they are orthogonal <110> directions in the Si(001) surface), and the average widths of the terraces (a or b in x or y axis) are determined by θx or θy; the direction perpendicular to the incidence electron beam on the surface is selected as the x (horizontal) axis in each REM image. Alternating current heating changes each initial surface from stable to double-domain (DD), in which 2 × 1 and 1 × 2 terraces are arranged regularly with approximately equal width, at its transition temperature Tc; the dimer rows are parallel to the x or y axis in the 1 × 2 or 2 × 1 terraces. There are two types of stable surfaces in the vicinal surface. At temperatures below its Tc, the surface with horizontally (vertically) long terraces, where b < a (b > a), changes to a 2 × 1 (1 × 2) surface with wide 2 × 1 (1 × 2) and narrow 1 × 2 (2 × 1) terraces. The terrace, the short side of which is parallel to its dimer row direction, grows to create a stable surface by thermal diffusion of Si atoms at temperatures below Tc. During AC heating, thermal diffusion plays a key role in analyzing the kinetics of the atoms on the surface because the thermal effect acts as the driving force for the atoms that have not yet evaporated from the surface. Then, by evaporating atoms from the vicinal surface, AC heating creates a DD surface at temperatures between its Tc and 1100 °C and a rugged surface consisting of small 2 × 1 and 1 × 2 terraces at temperatures above 1100 °C.

  12. Production of coagulase, deoxyribonuclease and heat-stable deoxyribonuclease by canine isolates of staphylococci.

    PubMed

    Wierup, M

    1978-12-01

    Staphylococci isolated from different infections in dogs have been investigated for production of coagulase, deoxyribonuclease (DNase) and heat-stable DNase. Alll coagulase-positive strains (220) also produced DNase and heat-stable nuclease. However, 4 out of 15 coagulase-negative strains were also positive in both the DNase and the heat-stable DNase tests. Several tests for DNase and heat-stable DNase were evaluated. No strains were DNase-positive, heat-stable DNase-negative, or vice-versa.

  13. Immunological Interrelationships of Coliform Heat-Labile and Heat-Stable Enterotoxins

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-09-01

    FA, Engert RF: Immunological interrelationships between cholera toxin and the heat -labile and hoat-stable enterotoxins of coliform bacteria . Infec...When Date Enterd) -3- SUMMARY These investigations (a) established the fact that species of coliform bacteria other than ETEC strains of E. coZi...elaborate enterotoxins which alter gastrointestinal physiology, and (b) showed that immunization with either E. coli (ETEC) LT or ST toxin arouses an

  14. Heat-stable proteins and abscisic acid action in barley aleurone cells

    SciTech Connect

    Jacobsen, J.V. ); Shaw, D.C. )

    1989-12-01

    ({sup 35}S)Methionine labeling experiments showed that abscisic acid (ABA) induced the synthesis of at least 25 polypeptides in mature barley (Hordeum vulgare) aleurone cells. The polypeptides were not secreted. Whereas most of the proteins extracted from aleurone cells were coagulated by heating to 100{degree}C for 10 minutes, most of the ABA-induced polypeptides remained in solution (heat-stable). ABA had little effect on the spectrum of polypeptides that were synthesized and secreted by aleurone cells, and most of these secreted polypeptides were also heat-stable. Coomassie blue staining of sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gels indicated that ABA-induced polypeptides already occurred in high amounts in mature aleurone layers having accumulated during grain development. About 60% of the total protein extracted from mature aleurone was heat stable. Amino acid analyses of total preparations of heat-stable and heat-labile proteins showed that, compared to heat-labile proteins, heat-stable intracellular proteins were characterized by higher glutamic acid/glutamine (Glx) and glycine levels and lower levels of neutral amino acids. Secreted heat-stable proteins were rich in Glx and proline. The possibilities that the accumulation of the heat-stable polypeptides during grain development is controlled by ABA and that the function of these polypeptides is related to their abundance and extraordinary heat stability are considered.

  15. Protein modification during anti-viral heat-treatment bioprocessing of factor VIII concentrates, factor IX concentrates, and model proteins in the presence of sucrose.

    PubMed

    Smales, C Mark; Pepper, Duncan S; James, David C

    2002-01-05

    To ensure the optimal safety of plasma derived and new generation recombinant proteins, heat treatment is customarily applied in the manufacturing of such biopharmaceuticals as a means of viral inactivation. In subjecting proteins to anti-viral heat-treatment it is necessary to use high concentrations of thermostabilizing excipients to prevent protein damage, and it is therefore imperative that the correct balance between bioprocessing conditions, maintenance of protein integrity and virus kill is found. In this study we have utilized model proteins (lysozyme, fetuin, and human serum albumin) and plasma-derived therapeutic proteins (factor VIII and factor IX) to investigate the protein modifications that occur during anti-viral heat treatment. Specifically, we investigated the relationship between bioprocessing conditions and the type and extent of protein modification under a variety of industrially relevant wet and lyophilized heat treatments using sucrose as a thermostabilizing agent. Heat treatment led to the formation of disulfide crosslinks and aggregates in proteins containing free cysteine residues. Terminal oligosaccharide sialic acid residues were hydrolyzed from the glycan moieties of glycoproteins during anti-viral heat treatment. Heat treatment promoted sucrose hydrolysis to yield glucose and fructose, leading, in turn, to the glycation of lysine amino groups in those proteins containing di-lysine motifs. During extended hear treatments, 1,2-dicarbonyl type advanced glycation end-products were also formed. Glycation-type modifications were more prevalent in wet heat-treated protein formulations.

  16. A stable and accurate partitioned algorithm for conjugate heat transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meng, F.; Banks, J. W.; Henshaw, W. D.; Schwendeman, D. W.

    2017-09-01

    We describe a new partitioned approach for solving conjugate heat transfer (CHT) problems where the governing temperature equations in different material domains are time-stepped in an implicit manner, but where the interface coupling is explicit. The new approach, called the CHAMP scheme (Conjugate Heat transfer Advanced Multi-domain Partitioned), is based on a discretization of the interface coupling conditions using a generalized Robin (mixed) condition. The weights in the Robin condition are determined from the optimization of a condition derived from a local stability analysis of the coupling scheme. The interface treatment combines ideas from optimized-Schwarz methods for domain-decomposition problems together with the interface jump conditions and additional compatibility jump conditions derived from the governing equations. For many problems (i.e. for a wide range of material properties, grid-spacings and time-steps) the CHAMP algorithm is stable and second-order accurate using no sub-time-step iterations (i.e. a single implicit solve of the temperature equation in each domain). In extreme cases (e.g. very fine grids with very large time-steps) it may be necessary to perform one or more sub-iterations. Each sub-iteration generally increases the range of stability substantially and thus one sub-iteration is likely sufficient for the vast majority of practical problems. The CHAMP algorithm is developed first for a model problem and analyzed using normal-mode theory. The theory provides a mechanism for choosing optimal parameters in the mixed interface condition. A comparison is made to the classical Dirichlet-Neumann (DN) method and, where applicable, to the optimized-Schwarz (OS) domain-decomposition method. For problems with different thermal conductivities and diffusivities, the CHAMP algorithm outperforms the DN scheme. For domain-decomposition problems with uniform conductivities and diffusivities, the CHAMP algorithm performs better than the typical OS

  17. A stable and accurate partitioned algorithm for conjugate heat transfer

    DOE PAGES

    Meng, F.; Banks, J. W.; Henshaw, W. D.; ...

    2017-04-25

    We describe a new partitioned approach for solving conjugate heat transfer (CHT) problems where the governing temperature equations in different material domains are time-stepped in a implicit manner, but where the interface coupling is explicit. The new approach, called the CHAMP scheme (Conjugate Heat transfer Advanced Multi-domain Partitioned), is based on a discretization of the interface coupling conditions using a generalized Robin (mixed) condition. The weights in the Robin condition are determined from the optimization of a condition derived from a local stability analysis of the coupling scheme. The interface treatment combines ideas from optimized-Schwarz methods for domain-decomposition problems togethermore » with the interface jump conditions and additional compatibility jump conditions derived from the governing equations. For many problems (i.e. for a wide range of material properties, grid-spacings and time-steps) the CHAMP algorithm is stable and second-order accurate using no sub-time-step iterations (i.e. a single implicit solve of the temperature equation in each domain). In extreme cases (e.g. very fine grids with very large time-steps) it may be necessary to perform one or more sub-iterations. Each sub-iteration generally increases the range of stability substantially and thus one sub-iteration is likely sufficient for the vast majority of practical problems. The CHAMP algorithm is developed first for a model problem and analyzed using normal-mode the- ory. The theory provides a mechanism for choosing optimal parameters in the mixed interface condition. A comparison is made to the classical Dirichlet-Neumann (DN) method and, where applicable, to the optimized- Schwarz (OS) domain-decomposition method. For problems with different thermal conductivities and dif- fusivities, the CHAMP algorithm outperforms the DN scheme. For domain-decomposition problems with uniform conductivities and diffusivities, the CHAMP algorithm performs better than the

  18. Heat Stable Polymers: Polyphenylene and Other Aromatic Polymers

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1977-01-01

    Thermomechanical Analyzer. eTg observed only after heating the sample above Tm and quenching in liquid nitrogen. fTc = 310 0C. gunable to observe Tg due... chlorinated hydrocarbons such as tetrachloroethane ;vid chloroform, although the highly phenylated (R = C6 H5) polymers tended to crystallize from

  19. Ex vivo promoter analysis of antiviral heat shock cognate 70B gene in Anopheles gambiae

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Seokyoung; Sim, Cheolho; Byrd, Brian D; Collins, Frank H; Hong, Young S

    2008-01-01

    Background The Anopheles gambiae heat shock cognate gene (hsc70B) encodes a constitutively expressed protein in the hsp70 family and it functions as a molecular chaperone for protein folding. However, the expression of hsc70B can be further induced by certain stimuli such as heat shock and infection. We previously demonstrated that the An. gambiae hsc70B is induced during o'nyong-nyong virus (ONNV) infection and subsequently suppresses ONNV replication in the mosquito. To further characterize the inducibility of hsc70B by ONNV infection in An. gambiae, we cloned a 2.6-kb region immediately 5' upstream of the starting codon of hsc70B into a luciferase reporter vector (pGL3-Basic), and studied its promoter activity in transfected Vero cells during infection with o'nyong-nyong, West Nile and La Crosse viruses. Results Serial deletion analysis of the hsc70B upstream sequence revealed that the putative promoter is likely located in a region 1615–2150 bp upstream of the hsc70B starting codon. Sequence analysis of this region revealed transcriptional regulatory elements for heat shock element-binding protein (HSE-bind), nuclear factor κB (NF-κB), dorsal (Dl) and fushi-tarazu (Ftz). Arbovirus infection, regardless of virus type, significantly increased the hsc70B promoter activity in transfected Vero cells. Conclusion Our results further validate the transcriptional activation of hsc70B during arbovirus infection and support the role of specific putative regulatory elements. Induction by three taxonomically distinct arboviruses suggests that the HSC70B protein may be expressed to cope with cellular stress imposed during infection. PMID:18986525

  20. A heat-stable hepatitis B vaccine formulation.

    PubMed

    Jezek, Jan; Chen, Dexiang; Watson, Lynne; Crawford, Jill; Perkins, Shalimar; Tyagi, Anil; Jones-Braun, LaToya

    2009-08-01

    The purpose of the present study was to develop a formulation of recombinant hepatitis B vaccine with improved stability at elevated temperatures. A validated in vitro antigen reactivity assay was used to measure the stability of the vaccine. The formulation development focused on modification of the interactions between the antigen and aluminum hydroxide adjuvant and subsequent optimization of the ionic aqueous environment of the adsorbed vaccine. A formulation of hepatitis B vaccine containing 40 mM histidine and 40 mM phosphate at pH 5.2 had considerably improved stability at elevated temperatures as measured by the in vitro antigen reactivity assay. The formulation exhibited 9-week stability at 55 degrees C and was subsequently shown to be stable both at 37 degrees C and at 45 degrees C for at least 6 months based on the in vitro antigen reactivity and immunogenicity in mice. The formulation comprises only excipients which have a history of safe use in approved drug products. The new vaccine formulation has the potential to be used outside the cold chain for part of its shelf life. This may improve the immunization coverage, simplify the logistics for outreach immunization, and ensure the potency of the vaccine in areas where the cold chain is insufficient.

  1. Antiviral Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Stalder, Hans

    1977-01-01

    The current status of antiviral therapy is reviewed, including discussion of older approaches together with more recently developed chemotherapy. Following the introduction dealing with pathophysiological aspects of virus disease, the different approaches to antiviral therapy are presented. The reasons for the slow progress in antiviral therapy are discussed. These include: 1. the necessity of intracellular penetration of drugs acting on viral replication; 2. the severe toxicity of most antiviral drugs; 3. the narrow antiviral spectrum of most of these agents; 4. the difficulty of making a rapid etiological diagnosis in view of the necessity of starting (specific?) treatment early in the course of the disease; 5. the difficult evaluation of beneficial as compared with deleterious effects of antiviral therapy. After a detailed review of clinically tested substances, including immunoglobulins, synthetic antiviral drugs (amantadine, nucleoside analogs, thiosemicarbazones and photodynamic dyes) and interferon, a guide concerning indications and application of specific antiviral therapy is presented. Although at present there are few indications, clinicians should be aware of the (present and future) possibilities of antiviral therapy. PMID:341538

  2. Mechanisms of protein modification during model anti-viral heat-treatment bioprocessing of beta-lactoglobulin variant A in the presence of sucrose.

    PubMed

    Smales, C M; Pepper, D S; James, D C

    2000-10-01

    To ensure the safety of plasma and recombinant therapeutic proteins, heat treatment is routinely applied to these biopharmaceuticals as a means of virus inactivation. However, to maintain protein integrity during heat treatment it is necessary to use high concentrations of thermostabilizing excipients, such as sucrose, in order to prevent protein damage. In this study we describe the covalent modifications inferred to a model protein, beta-lactoglobulin A, that occur during typical and extended anti-viral heat treatments. The chemical derivation and mechanisms by which these modifications arise are addressed. Heat treatment initiated hydrolysis of sucrose to glucose and fructose, which in turn were degraded to glyoxal. Glyoxal and the free reducing sugars reacted with free amino groups in beta-lactoglobulin A to yield Maillard glycation adducts and advanced glycation end products (AGEs). The major mechanism for AGE formation was via degradation of glucose-derived Schiff-base adducts. Heat treatment and glycation of beta-lactoglobulin A resulted in thiol-disulphide interchange reactions leading to protein oligomerization. A small population of beta-lactoglobulin A non-disulphide-linked dimers were also observed with increasingly harsh heat treatments. These findings have implications for (i) improvements in the safety and efficacy of heat-treated protein biopharmaceuticals and (ii) our understanding of the mechanisms of protein glycation and AGE adduct formation.

  3. Geodynamo Models With a Thick Stable Layer and Heterogeneous CMB Heat Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christensen, U. R.

    2015-12-01

    The upward revision of the thermal conductivity in the Earth's core makes it plausible that the mean heat flow at the core-mantle boundary (CMB) could be only afraction of what can be conducted down the core adiabat (perhaps one half). The upper part of the fluid core would be stably stratified to substantial depth. This is inconsistent with evidence for upwelling flow near the CMB from observations ofof magnetic flux expulsion. Heat flow at the CMB is likely very heterogeneous and would still be superadiabatic in some regions of the CMB. The dynamics of such a system is unclear. Gubbins et al. (Phys. Earth Planet. Int., in press, 2015)suggest that the locally unstable gradient would mix up the stable layer as a wholeand replace it by a weakly convecting one. We study dynamo models driven by a codensity flux from the inner core. On the outer boundary an inverse (on average) gradient is imposed, leading to stable stratification of the top 40% of the fluid shell. In addition to control cases with homogeneous CMB flux, we run models with two unstableregions centered on the equator. In the latter cases a predominantly horizontal circulation in a thin layer immediately below the outer boundary redistributes the heat that is conducted radially upward in the stable layer and transports ittowards the high heat-flow spots. Radial flow below these spots does not penetrate deeply into the stable layer, nor does the layer become mixed up to a significant degree. A dynamo operates in the convecting deep interior, however, its dipole moment is low in comparison to the Earth value. Heat flow heterogeneity at the CMB does not sem to solve the problems that exist for the geodynamo when the average heat flux is substantially subadiabatic.

  4. Highly Stable and Conductive Microcapsules for Enhancement of Joule Heating Performance

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Nanocarbons show great promise for establishing the next generation of Joule heating systems, but suffer from the limited maximum temperature due to precociously convective heat dissipation from electrothermal system to surrounding environment. Here we introduce a strategy to eliminate such convective heat transfer by inserting highly stable and conductive microcapsules into the electrothermal structures. The microcapsule is composed of encapsulated long-chain alkanes and graphene oxide/carbon nanotube hybrids as core and shell material, respectively. Multiform carbon nanotubes in the microspheres stabilize the capsule shell to resist volume-change-induced rupture during repeated heating/cooling process, and meanwhile enhance the thermal conductance of encapsulated alkanes which facilitates an expeditious heat exchange. The resulting microcapsules can be homogeneously incorporated in the nanocarbon-based electrothermal structures. At a dopant of 5%, the working temperature can be enhanced by 30% even at a low voltage and moderate temperature, which indicates a great value in daily household applications. Therefore, the stable and conductive microcapsule may serve as a versatile and valuable dopant for varieties of heat generation systems. PMID:27002594

  5. Highly Stable and Conductive Microcapsules for Enhancement of Joule Heating Performance.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Zhaoliang; Jin, Jidong; Xu, Guang-Kui; Zou, Jianli; Wais, Ulrike; Beckett, Alison; Heil, Tobias; Higgins, Sean; Guan, Lunhui; Wang, Ying; Shchukin, Dmitry

    2016-04-26

    Nanocarbons show great promise for establishing the next generation of Joule heating systems, but suffer from the limited maximum temperature due to precociously convective heat dissipation from electrothermal system to surrounding environment. Here we introduce a strategy to eliminate such convective heat transfer by inserting highly stable and conductive microcapsules into the electrothermal structures. The microcapsule is composed of encapsulated long-chain alkanes and graphene oxide/carbon nanotube hybrids as core and shell material, respectively. Multiform carbon nanotubes in the microspheres stabilize the capsule shell to resist volume-change-induced rupture during repeated heating/cooling process, and meanwhile enhance the thermal conductance of encapsulated alkanes which facilitates an expeditious heat exchange. The resulting microcapsules can be homogeneously incorporated in the nanocarbon-based electrothermal structures. At a dopant of 5%, the working temperature can be enhanced by 30% even at a low voltage and moderate temperature, which indicates a great value in daily household applications. Therefore, the stable and conductive microcapsule may serve as a versatile and valuable dopant for varieties of heat generation systems.

  6. Immunization of swine with heat-stable Escherichia coli enterotoxin coupled to a carrier protein does not protect suckling pigs against an Escherichia coli strain that produces heat-stable enterotoxin.

    PubMed Central

    Moon, H W; Baetz, A L; Giannella, R A

    1983-01-01

    Pregnant swine were immunized parenterally with purified heat-stable Escherichia coli enterotoxin that was made antigenic by coupling it to bovine immunoglobulin G. Immunized swine had high titers of antitoxin in serum and colostrum as measured by radioimmunoassay. However, the heat-stable enterotoxin neutralizing titers of the serum and colostrum from immunized swine were comparatively low. Newborn pigs suckling their immunized dams were not protected against challenge with porcine enterotoxigenic E. coli that produce heat-stable toxin but do not produce heat-labile toxin. PMID:6339398

  7. Immunologic Interrelationships of Coliform Heat-Labile and Heat-Stable Enterotoxins

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-01-15

    immunization program to prevent diarrheal disease due to Intestinal contamination by enterotoxigenic straing of coliform bacteria . We have found that...pnotobiotic rats are challenged by intestinal contamination with strains of E. coli which produce the heat-labile toxin , FOB W 13 -niouos wI, soov esis...extended protection against challenge with either this toxin or viable strains of LT-producing E. coZi. Current investigations are addressed at

  8. Stable water isotope and surface heat flux simulation using ISOLSM: Evaluation against in-situ measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Mick Y.; Wang, Lixin; Parkes, Stephen D.; Strauss, Josiah; McCabe, Matthew F.; Evans, Jason P.; Griffiths, Alan D.

    2015-04-01

    The stable isotopes of water are useful tracers of water sources and hydrological processes. Stable water isotope-enabled land surface modeling is a relatively new approach for characterizing the hydrological cycle, providing spatial and temporal variability for a number of hydrological processes. At the land surface, the integration of stable water isotopes with other meteorological measurements can assist in constraining surface heat flux estimates and discriminate between evaporation (E) and transpiration (T). However, research in this area has traditionally been limited by a lack of continuous in-situ isotopic observations. Here, the National Centre for Atmospheric Research stable isotope-enabled Land Surface Model (ISOLSM) is used to simulate the water and energy fluxes and stable water isotope variations. The model was run for a period of one month with meteorological data collected from a coastal sub-tropical site near Sydney, Australia. The modeled energy fluxes (latent heat and sensible heat) agreed reasonably well with eddy covariance observations, indicating that ISOLSM has the capacity to reproduce observed flux behavior. Comparison of modeled isotopic compositions of evapotranspiration (ET) against in-situ Fourier Transform Infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) measured bulk water vapor isotopic data (10 m above the ground), however, showed differences in magnitude and temporal patterns. The disparity is due to a small contribution from local ET fluxes to atmospheric boundary layer water vapor (∼1% based on calculations using ideal gas law) relative to that advected from the ocean for this particular site. Using ISOLSM simulation, the ET was partitioned into E and T with 70% being T. We also identified that soil water from different soil layers affected T and E differently based on the simulated soil isotopic patterns, which reflects the internal working of ISOLSM. These results highlighted the capacity of using the isotope-enabled models to discriminate

  9. Explaining Mercury's Magnetic Field Observables Using Dynamo Models with Stable Layers and Laterally Variable Heat Flux

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Z.; Zuber, M. T.; Stanley, S.

    2013-12-01

    Mercury's surface magnetic field is unique among planetary fields for its weak intensity, spin-aligned axisymmetry, and large dipole offset (Anderson et al., 2011). Reproducing these features with dynamo models is challenging and requires additions to the 'standard' dynamo setup. Here we explain the magnetic field observables by a combination of two effects: (1) a stably-stratified layer at the top of the outer core, and (2) a low-degree spherical harmonic (SH) heat flux variation at the core-mantle boundary (CMB). A stably-stratified layer at the top of the outer core was proposed by Stevenson (1980,1982) to explain the weak intensity and axisymmetry of Saturn's magnetic field. Recent studies (Christensen, 2006, Christensen & Wicht, 2008) used a stable layer to produce the low-intensity and axisymmetric features of Mercury's magnetic field, but didn't typically produce a dipole offset similar to the observed value. Stratification in Mercury's upper core region can occur due to a sub-adiabatic heat flux or an enrichment of sulfur there. Mercury's equator-to-north pole crustal thinning trend suggests a low degree SH global crustal thickness pattern, which can result in heat flux variability at the CMB. We use the Kuang & Bloxham (1999) numerical dynamo scheme to model Mercury's magnetic field generation. We use an internal structure model for Mercury that has a stably-stratified layer at the top of the outer core. We also apply degree-1 SH heat flux variations at the CMB. We vary the stable layer thickness, the inner core size and the magnitude of the CMB heat flux variations. We find models that can produce surface magnetic fields with a weak intensity, high axisymmetry and a large offset, similar to the observed features of Mercury.

  10. Purification and characterization of Vibrio cholerae non-O1 heat-stable enterotoxin.

    PubMed Central

    Arita, M; Takeda, T; Honda, T; Miwatani, T

    1986-01-01

    A toxin which causes rapid fluid accumulation in a suckling mouse assay and which was produced by Vibrio cholerae non-O1 was investigated. The toxin was purified from the culture supernatant of V. cholerae non-O1 (strain A-5) by ammonium sulfate fractionation, hydroxyapatite treatment, ethanol extraction, column chromatographies on SP-Sephadex C-50 and DEAE-Sephadex A-25, and high-pressure liquid chromatography on a Lichrosorb RP-8 column. About 1.4 X 10(5)-fold purification was achieved, with a recovery of about 12%. Although the crude preparation was heat labile, the purified toxin was heat stable. The minimum effective dose of purified toxin was about 5 ng in the suckling mouse assay. The amino acid composition of the purified toxin was determined to be Asp(3), Glu(1), Ala(1), half-Cys(6), Ile(2), Leu(1), Phe(1), and Pro(1). These data show the production of a new type of heat-stable enterotoxin (NAG-ST) by V. cholerae non-O1. PMID:3957432

  11. Environment-friendly route for stable aqueous dispersion of reduced graphene oxide for heat transfer application.

    PubMed

    Ota, Jyotiranjan; Hait, S K; Ramakumar, S S V; Basu, B; Malhotra, R K

    2013-08-01

    A simultaneous functionalization and reduction route to prepare stable dispersion of reduced graphene oxide from graphene oxide has been described. Diethanol amine has been introduced for the first time as an environment friendly reducing agent in a simple reflux reaction. Diethanol amine acts as a reducing agent and helps to enhance the stability of dispersion, making hydrogen bonding by virtue of two functional groups. The prepared dispersion of 0.025 mg/mL concentration is stable for months together and has a zeta potential value -45 V at room temperature. UV-Vis study shows peak at 264 nm that is signatory for reduced graphene oxide. TEM images confirm spread thin sheets of graphene of few hundred nanometer lateral dimension. Thermal diffusivity studies suggest nearly 60% enhancement for the dispersion in comparison to base fluid, water. This suggests graphene dispersion is promising for heat transfer applications.

  12. Activation of the heat-stable polypeptide of the ATP-dependent proteolytic system.

    PubMed Central

    Ciechanover, A; Heller, H; Katz-Etzion, R; Hershko, A

    1981-01-01

    It had been shown previously that the heat-stable polypeptide of the ATP-dependent proteolytic system of reticulocytes, designated APF-1, forms covalent conjugates with protein substrates in an ATP-requiring process. We now describe an enzyme that carries out the activation by ATP of the polypeptide with pyrophosphate displacement. The formation of AMP-polypeptide and transfer of the polypeptide to a secondary acceptor are suggested by an APF-1 requirement for ATP-PPi and ATP-AMP exchange reactions, respectively. With radiolabeled polypeptide, an ATP-dependent labeling of the enzyme was shown to be by a linkage that is acid stable but is labile to treatment with mild alkali, hydroxylamine, borohydride, or mercuric salts. It therefore appears that the AMP-polypeptide undergoes attack by an -SH group of the enzyme to form a thiolester. PMID:6262770

  13. Identification of heat-stable A-factor from Myxococcus xanthus.

    PubMed Central

    Kuspa, A; Plamann, L; Kaiser, D

    1992-01-01

    The asg mutants of Myxococcus xanthus fail to produce a set of related substances called A-factor. A-factor is released into the medium and is required early in fruiting body development. Lacking A-factor, the asg mutants are defective in aggregation, sporulation, and expression of most genes whose products appear later than 1 h after development is induced by starvation. Previous work has shown that these defects are reversed when A-factor, released by developing wild-type cells, is added to asg mutant cells. Part of the material in conditioned medium with A-factor activity is heat stable and dialyzable. This low-molecular-weight A-factor consists of a mixture of amino acids and peptides. Fifteen single amino acids have A-factor activity, and 11 of these are found in conditioned medium. Mixtures of amino acids have a total activity approximately equal to the sum of the activities of their constituents. Conditioned medium also contains peptides with A-factor activity. Pure peptides have A-factor activity, and their specific activities are equal to or less than the sum of the activities of their constituent amino acids. There is no evidence for a specialized A-factor peptide in conditioned medium, one with a specific activity greater than the sum of its constituent amino acids. About half of the heat-stable A-factor activity in conditioned medium can be accounted for by free amino acids, and the remaining half can be accounted for by peptides. It is argued that heat-stable A-factor induces A-dependent gene expression not by the nutritional action of amino acids but through a chemosensory circuit. PMID:1577697

  14. Method and system to reclaim functional sites on a sorbent contaminated by heat stable salts

    DOEpatents

    Krutka, Holly; Sjostrom, Sharon; Morris, William J.

    2016-03-08

    The objective of this invention is to develop a method to reclaim functional sites on a CO.sub.2 sorbent that have reacted with an acid gas (other than CO.sub.2) to form heat stable salts (HSS). HSS are a significant concern for dry sorbent based CO.sub.2 capture because over time the buildup of HSS will reduce the overall functionality of the CO.sub.2 sorbent. A chemical treatment can remove the non-CO.sub.2 acid gas and reclaim functional sites that can then be used for further CO.sub.2 adsorption.

  15. Production and properties of heat-stable extracellular hemolysin from Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, M K; Boese-Marrazzo, D

    1980-01-01

    Of 12 strains of Pseudomonas aeruginosa, 10 were found to produce heat-stable extracellular hemolysin in highly aerated peptone broth supplemented with glycerol, fructose, or mannitol. Glucose supported good hemolysin production only in medium that was highly buffered. The yield of both cells and hemolysin was lower with organic acids as supplement. Growth-limiting phosphate concentrations produced maximum hemolysin levels. Purified hemolysin preparations contained two hemolytic glycolipids. The kinetics of hemolysis at various levels of purified lysin and the effects of variation in lysin and erythrocyte concentration are described. Images Fig. 3 PMID:6776058

  16. The effects of Ohmic heating and stable radiation on magnetic tearing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tachi, T.; Steinolfson, R. S.; Van Hoven, G.

    1983-01-01

    A study is made of the effect of a temperature-dependent Coulomb-like resistivity on the planar tearing mode. The local evolution of the temperature is described by an energy equation which includes Joule heating and optically thin radiation. The resulting system of coupled linear magnetohydrodynamic equations is solved numerically, and eigenfunctions and growth rates are obtained. In the absence of radiation, there are two distinct solutions above a critical value of the magnetic Reynolds number S, a tearing-like mode and a Joule-heating mode. Below this point, the growth rates coalesce into a conjugate-complex pair. When stable radiation (dR/dT greater than 0) is added, the heating mode disappears and a modified tearing excitation exists to much lower values of S before its growth is cut off by Ohmic heating. Examples are given for solar coronal parameters, and for those characteristic of fusion-research devices. The introduction of an effective value for the resistivity, in the presence of energy transport, allows a simple qualitative discussion of the different modes.

  17. Comprehensive ribotyping scheme for heat-stable serotypes of Campylobacter jejuni.

    PubMed Central

    Fitzgerald, C; Owen, R J; Stanley, J

    1996-01-01

    Strains from diverse sources belonging to all 47 heat-stable Penner serotypes of Campylobacter jejuni were examined for polymorphism around the 16S rRNA genes. Penner serotype reference strains and a group of nonserotypeable isolates were included in the study. Complete typeability was obtained; 30 distinct PstI and 42 HaeIII polymorphisms were found. Three bands were detected in almost all strains with these enzymes, confirming that three copies of the 16S rRNA gene are typical for C.jejuni. By combination of the two enzyme polymorphisms, 77 16S ribotypes were defined among the 261 strains analyzed. With two exceptions, no specific association was observed between these ribotypes and heat-stable serotypes. Nine serotypes were homogeneous with respect to the 16S ribotype. Most nonserotypeable strains belonged to ribotypes defined elsewhere in the study. The 16S ribotypes of C.jejuni described here were not found in strains of Campylobacter coli, and vice versa. PMID:8788998

  18. Molecular homogeneity of heat-stable enterotoxins produced by bovine enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Saeed, A M; Magnuson, N S; Sriranganathan, N; Burger, D; Cosand, W

    1984-01-01

    Heat-stable enterotoxins (STs) from four strains of bovine enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli representing four serogroups were purified to homogeneity by utilizing previously published purification schemata. Biochemical characterization of the purified STs showed that they met the basic criteria for the heat-stable enterotoxins of E. coli. Amino acid analysis of the purified STs revealed that they were peptides of identical amino acid composition. This composition consisted of 18 residues of 10 different amino acids, 6 of which were cysteine. The amino acid composition of the four ST peptides was identical to that reported for the STs of human and porcine E. coli. In addition, complete sequence analysis of two of the ST peptides and partial sequencing of several others revealed strong homology to the sequences of STs from human and porcine E. coli and to the sequence predicted from the last 18 codons of the transposon Tn1681. There was also substantial homology to the sequence predicted from the ST-coding genetic element of human E. coli, which may indicate the existence of identical bioactive configuration among ST peptides of E. coli strains of various host origins. These data support the hypothesis that STs produced by human, bovine, and porcine E. coli are coded by a closely related genetic element which may have originated from a single, widely disseminated transposon. Images PMID:6376355

  19. Safe atmosphere entry of an isotope heat source with a single stable trim attitude at hypersonic speeds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levy, L. L., Jr.; Burns, R. K.

    1972-01-01

    A theoretical investigation has been made to design an isotope heat source capable of satisfying the conflicting thermal requirements of steady-state operation and atmosphere entry. The isotope heat source must transfer heat efficiently to a heat exchange during normal operation with a power system in space, and in the event of a mission abort, it must survive the thermal environment of atmosphere entry and ground impact without releasing radioactive material. A successful design requires a compatible integration of the internal components of the heat source with the external aerodynamic shape. To this end, configurational, aerodynamic, motion, and thermal analyses were coupled and iterated during atmosphere entries at suborbital through superorbital velocities at very shallow and very steep entry angles. Results indicate that both thermal requirements can be satisfied by a heat source which has a single stable aerodynamic orientation at hypersonic speeds. For such a design, the insulation material required to adequately protect the isotope fuel from entry heating need extend only half way around the fuel capsule on the aerodynamically stable (wind-ward) side of the heat source. Thus, a low-thermal-resistance, conducting heat path is provided on the opposite side of the heat source through which heat can be transferred to an adjacent heat exchanger during normal operation without exceeding specified temperature limits.

  20. Thermally and chemically stable mixed valence copper oxide cluster ions revealed by post heating.

    PubMed

    Morita, Keisuke; Sakuma, Kazuko; Miyajima, Ken; Mafuné, Fumitaka

    2013-10-10

    Copper oxide clusters, Cu(n)O(m)(+) (n = 5-12), were prepared in the gas phase by laser ablation of a copper metal rod in the presence of oxygen diluted in He as the carrier gas. The stoichiometry of the cluster ions was investigated using mass spectrometry. The number ratio of copper atoms and oxygen atoms in Cu(n)O(m)(+) was distributed from n:m = 1:1-3:2, which was not affected significantly by the concentration of oxygen in the carrier gas as long as it exceeded 2%. When the cluster ions were heated up to 573 K downstream of the cluster source (post heating), Cu(n)O(m)(+) (n:m ≈ 3:2) clusters were selectively and dominantly formed as a result of thermal dissociation. No further changes in the ratio were observed when the clusters were heated up to 623 K. From the stoichiometry, Cu(n)O(m)(+) is considered to comprise both Cu(I) and Cu(II). Hence, the mixed valence states are found to be thermally stable for the small clusters in the gas phase, but they are not stable in the bulk phase. In addition to the thermal stability, we observed reactivity of Cu(n)O(m)(+) with CO molecules. It was found that Cu12O8(+) hardly binds to CO and that Cu9O6(+) and Cu6O4(+) along with other clusters with n:m ≈ 3:2 bind to CO very weakly, whereas CO attaches strongly to oxygen-rich clusters with release of an oxygen molecule.

  1. Clostridium botulinum neurotoxin type B is heat-stable in milk and not inactivated by pasteurization.

    PubMed

    Rasooly, Reuven; Do, Paula M

    2010-12-08

    Foodborne botulism is caused by the ingestion of foods containing botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs). To study the heat stability of Clostridium botulinum neurotoxins, we needed to measure and compare the activity of botulinum neurotoxins, serotypes A and B, under various pasteurization conditions. Currently, the only accepted assay to detect active C. botulinum neurotoxin is an in vivo mouse bioassay, which raises ethical concerns with regard to the use of experimental animals. In this study, noninvasive methods were used to simultaneously detect and distinguish between active BoNT serotypes A and B in one reaction and sample. We developed an enzymatic activity assay employing internally quenched fluorogenic peptides corresponding to SNAP-25, for BoNT-A, and VAMP2, for BoNT-B, as an alternative method to the mouse bioassay. Because each peptide is labeled with different fluorophores, we were able to distinguish between these two toxins. We used this method to analyze the heat stability of BoNT-A and BoNT-B. This study reports that conventional milk pasteurization (63 °C, 30 min) inactivated BoNT serotype A; however, serotype B is heat-stable in milk and not inactivated by pasteurization. Using this activity assay, we also showed that the commonly used food processes such as acidity and pasteurization, which are known to inhibit C. botulinum growth and toxin production, are more effective in inactivating BoNT serotype A than serotype B when conventional pasteurization (63 °C, 30 min) is used.

  2. Characterization of a heat-stable protein with antimicrobial activity from Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Park, Seong-Cheol; Lee, Jung Ro; Shin, Sun-Oh; Park, Yoonkyung; Lee, Sang Yeol; Hahm, Kyung-Soo

    2007-10-26

    A heat-stable protein with antimicrobial activity was isolated from Arabidopsis thaliana plants by buffer-soluble extraction and two chromatographic procedures. The results of MALDI-TOF analysis revealed that the isolated protein shares high sequence identity with aspen SP1. To determine the exact antimicrobial properties of this protein, a cDNA encoding the protein was isolated from an A. thaliana leaf cDNA library and named AtHS1. AtHS1 mRNA was induced by exposure to external stresses, such as salicylic acid and jasmonic acid. We also analyzed the antimicrobial activity of recombinant AtHS1 expressed in Escherichia coli. This protein inhibited pathogenic fungal strains, except for Phytophthora infestans and Phytophthora nicotianae, and it exhibited antibacterial activity against E. coli and Staphylococcus aureus. These results suggest that AtHS1 shows good potential for use as a natural material in the study of antimicrobial agents.

  3. Radiolabeled Escherichia coli heat-stable enterotoxin analogs for in vivo imaging of colorectal cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giblin, M. F.; Sieckman, G. L.; Owen, N. K.; Hoffman, T. J.; Forte, L. R.; Volkert, W. A.

    2005-12-01

    The human Escherichia coli heat-stable enterotoxin (STh, amino acid sequence N1SSNYCCELCCNPACTGCY19) binds specifically to the guanylate cyclase C (GC-C) receptor, which is present in high density on the apical surface of normal intestinal epithelial cells as well as on the surface of human colon cancer cells. In the current study, two STh analogs were synthesized and evaluated in vitro and in vivo. Both analogs shared identical 6-19 core sequences, and had N-terminal pendant DOTA moieties. The analogs differed in the identity of a 6 amino acid peptide sequence intervening between DOTA and the 6-19 core. In one analog, the peptide was an RGD-containing sequence found in human fibronectin (GRGDSP), while in the other this peptide sequence was randomly scrambled (GRDSGP). The results indicated that the presence of the human fibronectin sequence in the hybrid peptide did not affect tumor localization in vivo.

  4. Cure and curse: E. coli heat-stable enterotoxin and its receptor guanylyl cyclase C.

    PubMed

    Weiglmeier, Philipp R; Rösch, Paul; Berkner, Hanna

    2010-09-01

    Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) associated diarrhea is responsible for roughly half a million deaths per year, the majority taking place in developing countries. The main agent responsible for these diseases is the bacterial heat-stable enterotoxin STa. STa is secreted by ETEC and after secretion binds to the intestinal receptor guanylyl cyclase C (GC-C), thus triggering a signaling cascade that eventually leads to the release of electrolytes and water in the intestine. Additionally, GC-C is a specific marker for colorectal carcinoma and STa is suggested to have an inhibitory effect on intestinal carcinogenesis. To understand the conformational events involved in ligand binding to GC-C and to devise therapeutic strategies to treat both diarrheal diseases and colorectal cancer, it is paramount to obtain structural information on the receptor ligand system. Here we summarize the currently available structural data and report on physiological consequences of STa binding to GC-C in intestinal epithelia and colorectal carcinoma cells.

  5. Purification and some properties of a novel heat-stable cis-toluene dihydrodiol dehydrogenase.

    PubMed Central

    Simpson, H D; Green, J; Dalton, H

    1987-01-01

    cis-Toluene dihydrodiol dehydrogenase was purified 200-fold from cells of a thermotolerant Bacillus species grown with toluene as the sole source of carbon and energy. The purified enzyme preparation was remarkably heat-stable and exhibited a half-life of 100 min at 80 degrees C, the temperature optimum. The activation energy of the reaction was 36 kJ.mol-1. Isoelectric focusing indicated that the pI of the native enzyme was 6.4 and that of the denatured enzyme 6.5. Although the pH optimum was 9.8, the enzyme was most stable at pH 8. The Mr of the enzyme was approx. 172,000 as determined by gel filtration and 166,000 by polyacrylamide-gel electrophoresis. The enzyme was composed of six apparently identical subunits with Mr values of 29,500. Kinetic analysis revealed that the Km for cis-toluene dihydrodiol was 92 microM and for NAD+ was 80 microM. The apparent Km values for cis-benzene dihydrodiol and cis-naphthalene dihydrodiol were 330 microM and 51 microM respectively. The enzyme was inhibited by mercurials but was unaffected by metal-ion chelators. Steady-state kinetics and product-inhibition patterns suggested that the enzyme mechanism was ordered Bi Bi. PMID:3446178

  6. Heat stable alkaline phosphatase from thermophiles. Final report, March-October 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Combie, J.D.; Runnion, K.N.; Williamson, M.L.

    1994-07-01

    Alkaline phosphatase has been the most widely used enzyme for colorimetric immunoassays. The current potential for this enzyme lies in biosensors, fieldable assay kits, biotechnology applications, degradation of certain nerve agents and pesticides and detoxification of heavy metal waste streams. While the commercial source of this enzyme is predominantly from mammalian tissues, expanded commercial application is restricted by the enzyme's instability at elevated temperatures. Although alkaline phosphatases are ubiquitous in nature, two isolates out of 44 alkaline phosphatase producing isolates occurring in habitats at 50 deg C and above have been isolated possessing extremely stable enzymes. One enzyme retained 98% of original activity following boiling for 1 hr. The secretion of the enzyme by the organism is an added benefit promoting efficient and economical production capability. Procedures for the screening, isolation, and optimal growth and fermentation of organisms acquired from geothermal sources located in Yellowstone National Park, WY are described. Purification was most effectively achieved using size exclusion chromatography where 101% of the activity and 33% of the crude mother liquor protein were recovered. Although the presence of manganese in the assay buffer was observed to significantly elevate the enzyme's catalytic activity, a precipitate incompatibility with calcium chloride, a requirement for high temperature stability, prohibits its use. Bacteria, Fermentation, Alkaline phosphatase, Biosensors, Biotechnology, Heat stable enzymes, Biochemistry, Bioremediation, Thermophilic microorganisms.

  7. Probing heat-stable water-soluble proteins from barley to malt and beer.

    PubMed

    Perrocheau, Ludivine; Rogniaux, Hélène; Boivin, Patrick; Marion, Didier

    2005-07-01

    Proteins determine the quality of barley in malting and brewing end-uses. In this regard, water-soluble barley proteins play a major role in the formation, stability, and texture of head foams. Our objective was to survey the barley seed proteins that could be involved in the foaming properties of beer. Therefore, two-dimensional (2-D) electrophoresis and mass spectrometry were combined to highlight the barley proteins that could resist the heating treatments occurring during malting and brewing processes. As expected, from barley to malt and to beer, most of the heat-stable proteins are disulfide-rich proteins, implicated in the defense of plants against their bio-aggressors, e.g., serpin-like chymotrypsin inhibitors (protein Z), amylase and amylase-protease inhibitors, and lipid transfer proteins (LTP1 and LTP2). For LTP1s, the complex pattern displayed in 2-D electrophoresis could be related to some chemical modifications already described elsewhere, such as acylation or glycation through Maillard reactions, which occur on malting. Our proteomics approach allowed the identification of the numerous proteins present in beer in addition to the major ones already described. The involvement of these proteins in the quality of beer foam can now be evaluated.

  8. E. coli heat-stable enterotoxin and guanylyl cyclase C: new functions and unsuspected actions.

    PubMed Central

    Giannella, Ralph A.; Mann, Elizabeth A.

    2003-01-01

    Some E. coli cause diarrhea by elaborating heat-labile and heat-stable (ST) enterotoxins which stimulate intestinal secretion. E. coli ST's are small peptides which bind to intestinal luminal epithelial cell receptors. The ST receptor, one of a family of receptor-cyclases called guanylyl cyclase C (GC-C), is a membrane spanning protein containing an extracellular binding domain and intracellular protein kinase and catalytic domains. The intestine synthesizes and secretes homologous peptides, guanylin and uroguanylin. The kidney also synthesizes uroguanylin. ST, guanylin or uroguanylin binding to GC-C results in increased cGMP, phosphorylation of the CFTR Cl- channel and secretion. Proguanylin and prouroguanylin circulate in blood and bind to receptors in intestine, kidney, liver, brain etc. In the kidney, they stimulate the excretion of Na+ and K+. Study of GC-C "knock-out" mice reveal that GC-C is important to intestinal salt and water secretion, duodenal bicarbonate secretion, recovery from CCl4-induced liver injury, and to intestinal polyp formation in Min mice lacking GC-C. PMID:12813912

  9. Heat-stable chloroplastic Cu/Zn superoxide dismutase in Chenopodium murale.

    PubMed

    Khanna-Chopra, Renu; Sabarinath, S

    2004-08-06

    Chenopodium murale is a weed species having wide adaptation to different climatic regimes and experiences a temperature range of 5-45 degrees C during its life span. Higher temperatures may result in heat stress, which induces higher ROS production leading to oxidative stress in the plant. Superoxide dismutase enzyme (SOD, EC.1.15.1.1) is ubiquitous, being widely distributed among O(2)(-) consuming organisms and is the first line of defense against oxidative stress. In this study, we have characterized the thermostability of the SOD isozymes from C. murale in vitro. The leaf protein extracts, thylakoidal and stromal fractions were subjected to elevated temperatures ranging from 50 degrees C to boiling and analyzed for activity and isoform pattern of SOD. Out of six SOD isoforms, SOD V showed stability even after boiling the extract for 10min. Under high temperature treatment (>60 degrees C) there was an appearance of a new SOD band with higher electrophoretic mobility. The inhibitor studies and subcellular analysis revealed that the SOD V isoform was a chloroplastic Cu/Zn SOD. The stromal Cu/Zn SOD (SOD V) was more stable than the co-migrating thylakoidal isozyme at 80 degrees C and boiling for 10min. Hence, we report an unusual, constitutive thermostable chloroplastic Cu/Zn SOD from C. murale, which may contribute towards its heat tolerance.

  10. A Human Renal Proximal Tubule Cell Line with Stable Organic Anion Transporter 1 and 3 Expression Predictive for Antiviral-Induced Toxicity.

    PubMed

    Nieskens, Tom T G; Peters, Janny G P; Schreurs, Marieke J; Smits, Niels; Woestenenk, Rob; Jansen, Katja; van der Made, Thom K; Röring, Melanie; Hilgendorf, Constanze; Wilmer, Martijn J; Masereeuw, Rosalinde

    2016-03-01

    Drug-induced nephrotoxicity still hampers drug development, because current translation from in vitro or animal studies to human lacks high predictivity. Often, renal adverse effects are recognized only during clinical stages of drug development. The current study aimed to establish a robust and a more complete human cell model suitable for screening of drug-related interactions and nephrotoxicity. In addition to endogenously expressed renal organic cation transporters and efflux transporters, conditionally immortalized proximal tubule epithelial cells (ciPTEC) were completed by transduction of cells with the organic anion transporter (OAT) 1 or OAT3. Fluorescence-activated cell sorting upon exposure to the OAT substrate fluorescein successfully enriched transduced cells. A panel of organic anions was screened for drug-interactions in ciPTEC-OAT1 and ciPTEC-OAT3. The cytotoxic response to the drug-interactions with antivirals was further examined by cell viability assays. Upon subcloning, concentration-dependent fluorescein uptake was found with a higher affinity for ciPTEC-OAT1 (Km = 0.8 ± 0.1 μM) than ciPTEC-OAT3 (Km = 3.7 ± 0.5 μM). Co-exposure to known OAT1 and/or OAT3 substrates (viz. para-aminohippurate, estrone sulfate, probenecid, furosemide, diclofenac, and cimetidine) in cultures spanning 29 passage numbers revealed relevant inhibitory potencies, confirming the robustness of our model for drug-drug interactions studies. Functional OAT1 was directly responsible for cytotoxicity of adefovir, cidofovir, and tenofovir, while a drug interaction with zidovudine was not associated with decreased cell viability. Our data demonstrate that human-derived ciPTEC-OAT1 and ciPTEC-OAT3 are promising platforms for highly predictive drug screening during early phases of drug development.

  11. Experimental determination of the stable-trim attitudes of two proposed, general-purpose, heat-source modules

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kruse, Robert L.

    1987-01-01

    Ballistic range tests have been conducted to determine the aerodynamically stable trim attitudes of two proposed general-purpose heat-source module configurations. Tests were conducted at speeds of 4.6 km/sec for the concept module, and at both 4.6 km/sec and 1.4 km/sec for the MOD II. Test results indicated that both configurations were stable when launched in the face-on attitude. When launched in the side-on attitude, the MOD II configuration was found to be stable, while tests of the concept module did not give definitive results.

  12. Sweetness determinant sites of brazzein, a small, heat-stable, sweet-tasting protein.

    PubMed

    Assadi-Porter, F M; Aceti, D J; Markley, J L

    2000-04-15

    Brazzein, originally isolated from the fruit of the African plant Pentadiplandra brazzeana Baillon, is the smallest, most heat-stable and pH-stable member of the set of proteins known to have intrinsic sweetness. These properties make brazzein an ideal system for investigating the chemical and structural requirements of a sweet-tasting protein. We have used the three-dimensional structure of the protein (J. E. Caldwell et al. (1998) Nat. Struct. Biol. 5, 427-431) as a guide in designing 15 synthetic genes in expression constructs aimed at delineating the sweetness determinants of brazzein. Protein was produced heterologously in Escherichia coli, isolated, and purified as described in the companion paper (Assadi-Porter, F. M., Aceti, D., Cheng, H., and Markley, J. L., this issue). Analysis by one-dimensional (1)H NMR spectroscopy indicated that all but one of these variants had folded properly under the conditions used. A taste panel compared the gustatory properties of solutions of these proteins to those of sucrose and brazzein isolated from fruit. Of the 14 mutations in the des-pGlu1-brazzein background, four exhibited almost no sweetness, six had significantly reduced sweetness, two had taste properties equivalent to des-pGlu1-brazzein (two times as sweet as the major form of brazzein isolated from fruit which contains pGlu1), and two were about twice as sweet as des-pGlu1-brazzein. Overall, the results suggest that two regions of the protein are critical for the sweetness of brazzein: a region that includes the N- and C-termini of the protein, which are located close to one another, and a region that includes the flexible loop around Arg43. Copyright 2000 Academic Press.

  13. Biochemical Characterization of an Extracellular Heat-Stable Protease from Serratia liquefaciens Isolated from Raw Milk.

    PubMed

    Baglinière, François; Salgado, Rafael Locatelli; Salgado, Cleonice Aparecida; Vanetti, Maria Cristina Dantas

    2017-04-01

    The protease Ser2 secreted by the psychrotrophic strain Serratia liquefaciens L53, a highly proteolytic strain isolated from Brazilian raw milk was purified and characterized. Using azocasein as substrate, Ser2 exhibited activity in a wide range of pH (5 to 10) and temperature (4 to 60 °C). The optimal activity was detected at pH 8.0 and at a temperature of 37 °C. This protease, still active at 4, 7, and 10 °C, was strongly inhibited by chelating agents and by dithiothreitol, a reducing agent. These results confirmed that Ser2 belongs to the peptidase family M10 and requires Ca(2+) , Zn(2+) , and disulfide bridges for stability. This protease is able to hydrolyze three kinds of casein in the preferential order of κ→ β→ α-casein. Highly heat-stable in skimmed, semi-skimmed, and whole milk at 140°C with D-values of 2.8, 3.9, and 4.5 min, respectively, Ser2 showed a residual activity between 87 and 100 percent after heat-treatment of 65 °C for 30 min, 72 °C for 20 s, and 140 °C for 4 s that are commonly used in dairy industries. As the protease AprX that is mainly secreted by Pseudomonas genus, Ser2 could be one of the main causes of UHT milk destabilization during storage. © 2017 Institute of Food Technologists®.

  14. Binding of Escherichia coli heat-stable enterotoxin to rat intestinal cells and brush border membranes.

    PubMed Central

    Frantz, J C; Jaso-Friedman, L; Robertson, D C

    1984-01-01

    The association of heat-stable enterotoxin (STa) produced by enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli 431 with isolated rat intestinal epithelial cells and brush border membranes was characterized. Specific binding of strain 431 125I-STa to a single class of specific high-affinity receptors was saturable and temperature dependent and reached a maximum between 5 and 10 min. A 1,000-fold excess of unlabeled 431 STa competitively displaced 90 to 95% of radiolabeled enterotoxin bound to brush border membranes. In contrast, specific binding of 431 125I-STa to intestinal cells ranged from 40 to 65%. The number of STa-specific receptors on rat intestinal cells determined by Scatchard analysis was 47,520 +/- 14,352 (mean +/- standard error of the mean) per cell, with affinity constants (KaS) of 2.55 X 10(11)and 4.32 x 10(11) liters/mol determined for intestinal cells and brush border membranes, respectively. Villus intestinal cells appeared to possess about twice as many STa receptors as did crypt cells. Dissociation of specifically bound 431 125I-STa from intestinal cells and brush border membranes was minimal (2 to 5%). In addition, neither the rate nor the extent of dissociation was increased by a 1,000-fold excess of unlabeled homologous 431 Sta. Binding experiments with 431 125I-STa and brush border membranes showed that purified unlabeled STas from enterotoxigenic E. coli strains 667 (class 1 porcine enteropathogen), B-41 (bovine enteropathogen), and human strains 213C2 (Mexico) and 153961-2 (Dacca, Bangledesh) exhibited patterns of competitive inhibition similar to those of homologous unlabeled 431 STa (class 2 enteropathogen). A lipid extract which contained gangliosides and glycolipids exhibited dose-dependent competitive inhibition of heat-labile enterotoxin binding to brush border membranes but did not inhibit binding of 431 125I-STa. Purified heat-labile enterotoxin from strain 286C2 did not inhibit binding of 431 STa to brush border membranes. Pronase treatment of

  15. Heat-Stable Dry Powder Oxytocin Formulations for Delivery by Oral Inhalation.

    PubMed

    Fabio, Karine; Curley, Kieran; Guarneri, Joseph; Adamo, Benoit; Laurenzi, Brendan; Grant, Marshall; Offord, Robin; Kraft, Kelly; Leone-Bay, Andrea

    2015-12-01

    In this work, heat stable dry powders of oxytocin (OT) suitable for delivery by oral inhalation were prepared. The OT dry powders were prepared by spray drying using excipients chosen to promote OT stability including trehalose, isoleucine, polyvinylpyrrolidone, citrate (sodium citrate and citric acid), and zinc salts (zinc chloride and zinc citrate). Characterization by laser diffraction indicated that the OT dry powders had a median particle size of 2 μm, making them suitable for delivery by inhalation. Aerodynamic performance upon discharge from proprietary dry powder inhalers was evaluated by Andersen cascade impaction (ACI) and in an anatomically correct airway (ACA) model, and confirmed that the powders had excellent aerodynamic performance, with respirable fractions up to 77% (ACI, 30 L/min). Physicochemical characterization demonstrated that the powders were amorphous (X-ray diffraction) with high glass transition temperature (modulated differential scanning calorimetry, MDSC), suggesting the potential for stabilization of the OT in a glassy amorphous matrix. OT assay and impurity profile were conducted by reverse phase HPLC and liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS) after storage up to 32 weeks at 40°C/75%RH. Analysis demonstrated that OT dry powders containing a mixture of citrate and zinc salts retained more than 90% of initial assay after 32 weeks storage and showed significant reduction in dimers and trisulfide formation (up to threefold reduction compared to control).

  16. Intestinal Enteroids Model Guanylate Cyclase C-Dependent Secretion Induced by Heat-Stable Enterotoxins

    PubMed Central

    Pattison, Amanda M.; Blomain, Erik S.; Merlino, Dante J.; Wang, Fang; Crissey, Mary Ann S.; Kraft, Crystal L.; Rappaport, Jeff A.; Snook, Adam E.; Lynch, John P.

    2016-01-01

    Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) causes ∼20% of the acute infectious diarrhea (AID) episodes worldwide, often by producing heat-stable enterotoxins (STs), which are peptides structurally homologous to paracrine hormones of the intestinal guanylate cyclase C (GUCY2C) receptor. While molecular mechanisms mediating ST-induced intestinal secretion have been defined, advancements in therapeutics have been hampered for decades by the paucity of disease models that integrate molecular and functional endpoints amenable to high-throughput screening. Here, we reveal that mouse and human intestinal enteroids in three-dimensional ex vivo cultures express the components of the GUCY2C secretory signaling axis. ST and its structural analog, linaclotide, an FDA-approved oral secretagog, induced fluid accumulation quantified simultaneously in scores of enteroid lumens, recapitulating ETEC-induced intestinal secretion. Enteroid secretion depended on canonical molecular signaling events responsible for ETEC-induced diarrhea, including cyclic GMP (cGMP) produced by GUCY2C, activation of cGMP-dependent protein kinase (PKG), and opening of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR). Importantly, pharmacological inhibition of CFTR abrogated enteroid fluid secretion, providing proof of concept for the utility of this model to screen antidiarrheal agents. Intestinal enteroids offer a unique model, integrating the GUCY2C signaling axis and luminal fluid secretion, to explore the pathophysiology of, and develop platforms for, high-throughput drug screening to identify novel compounds to prevent and treat ETEC diarrheal disease. PMID:27481254

  17. Prosequence switching: an effective strategy to produce biologically active E. coli heat-stable enterotoxin STh.

    PubMed

    Weiglmeier, Philipp R; Berkner, Hanna; Seebahn, Angela; Vogel, Nico; Schreiber, Rainer; Wöhrl, Birgitta M; Schwarzinger, Stephan; Rösch, Paul

    2014-01-01

    Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) infections account for the majority of cases of acute secretory diarrhea. The causative agents are enterotoxins secreted by ETEC, among them is the heat-stable enterotoxin, STh. STh is a 19-amino acid peptide containing three disulfide bonds that stimulates fluid secretion in the bowel by binding to the receptor domain of intestinal guanylyl cyclase C (GC-C). Since GC-C agonists have pharmacologic potential for diagnosis and treatment of disorders such as constipation-predominant irritable bowel syndrome (IBS-C), chronic constipation, and colorectal carcinoma, it is crucial to develop methods for the large-scale production of STh and related peptides. Here, we present a strategy for recombinant expression of STh that relies on the use of the prosequence of human uroguanylin to support proper folding and disulfide bond formation. The chimeric protein CysCys-STh consisting of the propeptide of uroguanylin as N-terminus and the STh peptide as C-terminus was expressed in E. coli, and an efficient purification protocol was developed. Trypsin digestion of this protein released the enterotoxin which could be obtained in high purity. NMR and mass spectrometry confirmed the identity and homogeneity of the toxin, and its biological activity was confirmed by a cell-based in vivo assay. The expression scheme introduced here represents a cost-efficient and scalable way of STh production.

  18. Purification and cDNA cloning of a new heat-stable allergen from Anisakis simplex.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Yukihiro; Shimakura, Kuniyoshi; Ishizaki, Shoichiro; Nagashima, Yuji; Shiomi, Kazuo

    2007-10-01

    The nematode Anisakis simplex is a representative parasite for marine animals and occasionally causes not only anisakiasis but also allergic reactions in sensitized subjects. Besides the known allergens, a number of unidentified allergens have been suggested to still exist in A. simplex. In this study, a new heat-stable allergen of 15kDa (named Ani s 8) was purified from the third stage larvae of A. simplex by gel filtration on Sephacryl S-300, anion-exchange HPLC on Mono Q and reverse-phase HPLC on TSKgel Phenyl-5PW RP. Analysis by fluorescence ELISA showed that 7 of 28 Anisakis-allergic patients had elevated serum levels of IgE to Ani s 8. On the basis of the determined partial amino acid sequence, the complete sequence of Ani s 8 (composed of 150 amino acid residues) was elucidated by cDNA cloning, in which as many as 32 homologs of the cDNA encoding 10 isoforms of Ani s 8 were detected. Ani s 8 shares amino acid sequence homology (up to 36%) with several members of the SXP/RAL-2 protein family, including Ani s 5 (15kDa) previously identified as an A. simplex allergen. Inhibition ELISA data demonstrated the IgE cross-reactivity between Ani s 8 and Ani s 5.

  19. Detection of genes for heat-stable enterotoxin I in Escherichia coli strains isolated in Brazil.

    PubMed Central

    Maas, R; Silva, R M; Gomes, T A; Trabulsi, L R; Maas, W K

    1985-01-01

    Heat-stable enterotoxin I (STI) can be assayed in intestinal loops of pigs and rabbits and in the gut of infant mice. To produce a simpler and more discriminating assay procedure, we used three gene probes corresponding to three forms of STI called STIa, STIb, and STIc. We tested 159 Brazilian isolates, of which 40 were positive in the infant mouse assay. The STIb and STIc probes are similar (93% DNA homology) and are both different from the STIa probe (70% DNA homology). Of 33 strains that were still active for STI 3 years after their isolation, 25 reacted with both the STIb and STIc probes, 4 reacted with the STIc probe only, and 7 reacted strongly with the STIa probe and weakly or not at all with the other probes. Two strains reacted with all three probes. Further analysis showed that each of these two strains contains a small plasmid that reacts with the STIa probe and a large plasmid that reacts with the STIc probe in one strain and weakly with both the STIa and STIc probes in the other strain. It was also shown that the STIa probe reacts with the cloning vehicle pACYC184 used for the cloning of STIc. We conclude that the gene probes used can identify most STI-producing strains and that in cases of positive responses with several probes careful scrutiny is necessary for analysis. Images PMID:3891629

  20. Jenseniin G, a heat-stable bacteriocin produced by Propionibacterium jensenii P126.

    PubMed Central

    Grinstead, D A; Barefoot, S F

    1992-01-01

    The genus Propionibacterium includes cutaneous species typically found on human skin and the dairy or classical species (Propionibacterium freudenreichii, P. jensenii, P. thoenii, and P. acidipropionici) used industrially for the production of Swiss cheese and propionic acid. Grinstead (1989, M.S. thesis, Iowa State University, Ames) has previously observed that some dairy propionibacteria inhibit other species in the classical grouping. We further investigated the inhibitor(s) produced by P. jensenii P126 (ATCC 4872). An antagonist(s) from anaerobic agar cultures of P126 strongly inhibited two closely related strains of propionibacteria, P. acidipropionici P5 and P. jensenii P54, and Lactobacillus bulgaricus NCDO 1489, Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. lactis ATCC 4797, Lactococcus cremoris NCDO 799, and Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis C2. The inhibitor, designated jenseniin G, was active at pH 7.0; inactivated by treatment with pronase E, proteinase K, and type 14 protease; insensitive to catalase; and stable to freezing, cold storage (4 degrees C, 3 days), and heat (100 degrees C, 15 min). Classification of the inhibitor as a bacteriocin is supported by its proteinaceous nature and its bactericidal activity against L. delbrueckii subsp. lactis ATCC 4797. The lack of detectable plasmids suggests a chromosomal location for the determinant(s) of jenseniin G. Images PMID:1539976

  1. Evaluation of serum sialic acid, heat stable alkaline phosphatase and fucose as markers of breast carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Patel, P S; Baxi, B R; Adhvaryu, S G; Balar, D B

    1990-01-01

    Serum levels of total sialic acid (TSA), lipid bound sialic acid (LSA), heat stable alkaline phosphatase (HSAP) and fucose were measured in 39 patients with breast carcinoma, 14 patients with benign breast diseases and 35 healthy female individuals. Elevated levels of the four biomarkers in breast carcinoma were significant when compared with controls (p less than 0.001). Fucose levels were most sensitive (71.8%), while TSA levels were most specific (64.3%) for breast carcinoma. Sensitivity and specificity were 100% when combinations of LSA with fucose and TSA with HSAP were studied respectively. LSA was significantly elevated in infiltrating duct carcinoma patients compared with lobular carcinoma (p less than 0.001). TSA, HSAP and fucose also had lower mean values in lobular carcinoma as compared to infiltrating duct carcinoma. Increase in the levels of LSA and HSAP after surgical removal of the tumor in breast carcinoma occurred prior to the clinical evidence of the recurrence. The results indicate that the combination of the markers studied might be useful in breast cancer diagnosis and treatment monitoring.

  2. Synthesis of Abscisic Acid-Responsive, Heat-Stable Proteins in Embryonic Axes of Dormant Wheat Grain 1

    PubMed Central

    Ried, Jeffrey L.; Walker-Simmons, Mary K.

    1990-01-01

    Germination of embryonic axes from dormant grain is inhibited by low concentrations of abscisic acid (ABA) compared with axes from nondormant grain. Incubation of dormant grain axes in 0.05 to 50 micromolar ABA caused the prolonged synthesis of a set of heat-stable proteins. Two of these proteins were identified as dehydrins. In nondormant grain axes, 100- to 1000-fold greater ABA concentrations were required to produce similar results. When embryonic axes of dormant wheat (Triticum aestivum) grain were imbibed without ABA, endogenous ABA levels increased 2.5-fold by 4 hours and then gradually declined. Heat-stable proteins were continuously synthesized for at least 18 hours. No increase in endogenous ABA was observed when nondormant grain axes were imbibed. Endogenous ABA levels in nondormant grain axes remained constant at 4 hours and then declined. The nondormant grain axes initially synthesized the heat-stable proteins, but that synthesis disappeared between 8 and 12 hours. These results showing the prolonged synthesis of ABA-responsive, heat-stable proteins by dormant grain axes, demonstrate that biochemical differences occur when axes from dormant compared with nondormant grains are imbibed. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 5 PMID:16667520

  3. Heat treatment giving a stable high temperature micro-structure in cast austenitic stainless steel

    DOEpatents

    Anton, Donald L.; Lemkey, Franklin D.

    1988-01-01

    A novel micro-structure developed in a cast austenitic stainless steel alloy and a heat treatment thereof are disclosed. The alloy is based on a multicomponent Fe-Cr-Mn-Mo-Si-Nb-C system consisting of an austenitic iron solid solution (.gamma.) matrix reinforced by finely dispersed carbide phases and a heat treatment to produce the micro-structure. The heat treatment includes a prebraze heat treatment followed by a three stage braze cycle heat treatment.

  4. Heat-stable antigen (CD24) as ligand for mouse P-selectin.

    PubMed

    Sammar, M; Aigner, S; Hubbe, M; Schirrmacher, V; Schachner, M; Vestweber, D; Altevogt, P

    1994-07-01

    Heat-stable antigen (HSA)/CD24 is a cell surface molecule expressed by many cell types in the mouse. The molecule has an unusual structure because of its small protein core and extensive glycosylation. In order to study the functional role of the HSA-associated glycoconjugates we have isolated different forms of HSA. Using lectin analysis we provide evidence for extensive heterogeneity in carbohydrate composition and sialic acid linkage. Several HSA forms were recognized by mouse P-selectin-IgG but not E-selectin-IgG in ELISA. As expected, P-selectin-IgG also bound to L2/HNK-1-positive neural glycoproteins (L2-glycoproteins) and sulfatides but not to gangliosides and other control glycoproteins. The binding of P-selectin-IgG to L2-glycoproteins and HSA required bivalent cations. The reactivity to HSA was sensitive to sialidase treatment whereas the binding to L2-glycoproteins was not. Studies with alpha 2-6 sialytransferase indicated that alpha 2-6 linked sialic acid was not involved in the P-selectin binding to HSA. Surprisingly, an L2/HNK-1 specific antibody was found to cross-react with some HSA glycoforms and its binding correlated with P-selectin-IgG reactivity. L2/HNK-1-positive or L2/HNK-1-negative HSA glycoforms were also analyzed after coating to polystyrene beads. Only the L2/HNK-1-positive HSA coated beads were reactive with P-selectin-IgG and could bind to activated bend3 endothelioma cells expressing P-selectin whereas the L2/HNK-1-negative HSA beads did not. It is suggested that in its L2/HNK-1 modified form the HSA molecule on leukocytes could represent a ligand for P-selectin on endothelial cells or platelets.

  5. Influence of heat stable factors from ancient rock salt on the growth behaviour of haloarchaea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pfaffenhuemer, M.; Gruber, C.; Radax, C.; Stan-Lotter, H.

    2003-04-01

    Haloarchaeal strains have been isolated repeatedly from ancient rock salt. Halococcus salifodinae BIp and Halococcus dombrowskii H4 were isolated from different rock salt samples obtained from the salt mine near Bad Ischl, Austria. Based on the geological age of the horizon the salt has been deposited during the Permian period (225 to 280 million years ago). The medium which is commonly used for the cultivation of neutrophilic haloarchaea is called M2 medium. Especially halococci grow very slowly and yield only low densities when cultured in this medium. It was presumed that these microorganisms might grow better using a culture medium with the chemical components of their natural environment. Addition of dissolved and sterile-filtered rock salt to standard M2 medium proved indeed successful. The modified medium (M2S) showed a growth stimulating effect on all tested halococcal strains. Cultures of Halococcus morrhuae DSM 1307, Halococcus salifodinae DSM 8989, Halococcus saccharolyticus DSM 5750 and Halococcus dombrowskii DSM 14522 grown in M2S medium had lower doubling times and reached a greater turbidity compared to cultures grown in M2 medium. In addition representatives of the genera Haloferax, Haloarcula, Halorubrum and Halobacterium, including Halobacterium sp. NRC-1 whose complete genome sequence is known, were cultivated on these media. Halobacterium sp. NRC-1 and Haloarcula hispanica DSM 4426 showed also an increase in growth whereas Haloferax volcanii DSM 3757 and Halorubrum saccharovorum DSM 1137 grew better when cultivated on standard M2 medium. The stimulating effect of the heat stable factors in rock salt on haloarchaea appears correlated with certain proteins that are altered or may be exclusively produced when cells were grown in presence of rock salt as well as changes in morphology and ultrastructure of cells. The establishment of optimized media for haloarchaea is important for further studies concerning insights how haloarchaea are able to

  6. Antiviral Cystine Knot α-Amylase Inhibitors from Alstonia scholaris*

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Phuong Quoc Thuc; Ooi, Justin Seng Geap; Nguyen, Ngan Thi Kim; Wang, Shujing; Huang, Mei; Liu, Ding Xiang; Tam, James P.

    2015-01-01

    Cystine knot α-amylase inhibitors are cysteine-rich, proline-rich peptides found in the Amaranthaceae and Apocynaceae plant species. They are characterized by a pseudocyclic backbone with two to four prolines and three disulfides arranged in a knotted motif. Similar to other knottins, cystine knot α-amylase inhibitors are highly resistant to degradation by heat and protease treatments. Thus far, only the α-amylase inhibition activity has been described for members of this family. Here, we show that cystine knot α-amylase inhibitors named alstotides discovered from the Alstonia scholaris plant of the Apocynaceae family display antiviral activity. The alstotides (As1–As4) were characterized by both proteomic and genomic methods. All four alsotides are novel, heat-stable and enzyme-stable and contain 30 residues. NMR determination of As1 and As4 structures reveals their conserved structural fold and the presence of one or more cis-proline bonds, characteristics shared by other cystine knot α-amylase inhibitors. Genomic analysis showed that they contain a three-domain precursor, an arrangement common to other knottins. We also showed that alstotides are antiviral and cell-permeable to inhibit the early phase of infectious bronchitis virus and Dengue infection, in addition to their ability to inhibit α-amylase. Taken together, our results expand membership of cystine knot α-amylase inhibitors in the Apocynaceae family and their bioactivity, functional promiscuity that could be exploited as leads in developing therapeutics. PMID:26546678

  7. Allergenic Characterization of 27-kDa Glycoprotein, a Novel Heat Stable Allergen, from the Pupa of Silkworm, Bombyx mori.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Kyoung Yong; Son, Mina; Lee, June Yong; Park, Kyung Hee; Lee, Jae-Hyun; Park, Jung-Won

    2016-01-01

    Boiled silkworm pupa is a traditional food in Asia, and patients with silkworm pupa food allergy are common in these regions. Still now only one allergen from silkworm, arginine kinase, has been identified. The purpose of this study was to identify novel food allergens in silkworm pupa by analyzing a protein extract after heat treatment. Heat treated extracts were examined by proteomic analysis. A 27-kDa glycoprotein was identified, expressed in Escherichia coli, and purified. IgE reactivity of the recombinant protein was investigated by ELISA. High molecular weight proteins (above 100 kDa) elicited increased IgE binding after heat treatment compared to that before heat treatment. The molecular identities of these proteins, however, could not be determined. IgE reactivity toward a 27-kDa glycoprotein was also increased after heating the protein extract. The recombinant protein was recognized by IgE antibodies from allergic subjects (33.3%). Glycation or aggregation of protein by heating may create new IgE binding epitopes. Heat stable allergens are shown to be important in silkworm allergy. Sensitization to the 27-kDa glycoprotein from silkworm may contribute to elevation of IgE to silkworm.

  8. Allergenic Characterization of 27-kDa Glycoprotein, a Novel Heat Stable Allergen, from the Pupa of Silkworm, Bombyx mori

    PubMed Central

    Son, Mina; Lee, June Yong

    2016-01-01

    Boiled silkworm pupa is a traditional food in Asia, and patients with silkworm pupa food allergy are common in these regions. Still now only one allergen from silkworm, arginine kinase, has been identified. The purpose of this study was to identify novel food allergens in silkworm pupa by analyzing a protein extract after heat treatment. Heat treated extracts were examined by proteomic analysis. A 27-kDa glycoprotein was identified, expressed in Escherichia coli, and purified. IgE reactivity of the recombinant protein was investigated by ELISA. High molecular weight proteins (above 100 kDa) elicited increased IgE binding after heat treatment compared to that before heat treatment. The molecular identities of these proteins, however, could not be determined. IgE reactivity toward a 27-kDa glycoprotein was also increased after heating the protein extract. The recombinant protein was recognized by IgE antibodies from allergic subjects (33.3%). Glycation or aggregation of protein by heating may create new IgE binding epitopes. Heat stable allergens are shown to be important in silkworm allergy. Sensitization to the 27-kDa glycoprotein from silkworm may contribute to elevation of IgE to silkworm. PMID:26770033

  9. Bactericidal Effect of Selected Antidiarrhoeal Medicinal Plants on Intracellular Heat-Stable Enterotoxin-Producing Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Birdi, Tannaz J.; Brijesh, S.; Daswani, Poonam G.

    2014-01-01

    Diarrhoeal diseases due to enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli continue to be a cause of global concern. Medicinal plants have been gaining popularity as promising antidiarrhoeal agents. In the present study, four antidiarrhoeal plants, viz. Aegle marmelos, Cyperus rotundus, Psidium guajava and Zingiber officinale were screened against a heat-stable toxin-producing enterotoxigenic E. coli strain. Decoctions of these plants were studied for their effect on intracellular killing of the bacterial strain using murine monocytic cell line, J774. [3H] thymidine release assay was used to evaluate the apoptotic/necrotic effect. All plants at concentrations <1% enhanced intracellular killing of the bacteria by J774 cells. However, at higher concentrations, the decoctions induced apoptosis in J774 cells. The study demonstrates that these plants could control diarrhoea caused by heat-stable toxin-producing enterotoxigenic E. coli through their immunomodulatory effect. PMID:25035535

  10. Selection of stable reference genes in heat stressed peripheral blood mononuclear cells of tropically adapted Indian cattle and buffaloes.

    PubMed

    Kishore, Amit; Sodhi, Monika; Khate, Keviletsu; Kapila, Neha; Kumari, Parvesh; Mukesh, Manishi

    2013-01-01

    Eleven reference genes from different functional categories were assessed for their stable expression pattern in heat stressed PBMCs across Indian buffalo and cattle using GeNorm, NormFinder and BestKeeper algorithms. As the first report, we suggest B2M, RPS9 and RPS15a as suitable reference genes for accurate normalization of PBMC transcript data while the ACTB gene is not recommended. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Stable and pH-sensitive protein nanogels made by self-assembly of heat denatured soy protein.

    PubMed

    Chen, Nannan; Lin, Lianzhu; Sun, Weizheng; Zhao, Mouming

    2014-10-01

    In this study, we examined the possibility of preparing stable soy protein nanogels by simply heating homogeneous soy protein dispersion. The protein nanogels formed were characterized by z-average hydrodynamic diameter, polydispersity index, turbidity, ζ-potential, morphology, and their stability to pH and ionic strength change. Soy protein dispersion (1% w/v) was homogeneous around pH 5.9 where it had the lowest polydispersity index (∼0.1). Stable and spherical nanogels were formed by heating soy protein dispersion at pH 5.9 under 95 °C. They sustained constantly low polydispersity index (∼0.1) in the investigated pH range of 6.06-7.0 and 2.6-3.0. The nanogels were pH-sensitive and would swell with pH change. They were stable at 0-200 mM NaCl concentration. Denaturation of soy glycinin was the prerequisite for the formation of stable nanogels. Soy protein nanogels had a core-shell structure with basic polypeptides and β subunits interacting together as the hydrophobic core; and acid polypeptides, α', and α subunits locating outside the core as hydrophilic shell. The inner structure of soy protein nanogels was mainly stabilized by disulfide bonds cross-linked network and hydrophobic interaction. Soy protein nanogels made in this study would be useful as functional ingredients in biotechnological, pharmaceutical, and food industries.

  12. Stable nanoparticles prepared by heating electrostatic complexes of whey protein isolate-dextran conjugate and chondroitin sulfate.

    PubMed

    Dai, Qingyuan; Zhu, Xiuling; Abbas, Shabbar; Karangwa, Eric; Zhang, Xiaoming; Xia, Shuqin; Feng, Biao; Jia, Chengsheng

    2015-04-29

    A simple and green method was developed for preparing the stable biopolymer nanoparticles with pH and salt resistance. The method involved the macromolecular crowding Maillard process and heat-induced gelation process. The conjugates of whey protein isolate (WPI) and dextran were produced by Maillard reaction. The nanoparticles were fabricated by heating electrostatic complexes of WPI-dextran conjugate and chondroitin sulfate (ChS) above the denaturation temperature and near the isoelectric point of WPI. Then, the nanoparticles were characterized by spectrophotometry, dynamic laser scattering, zeta potential, transmission electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy, and scanning electron microscopy. Results showed that the nanoparticles were stable in the pH range from 1.0 to 8.0 and in the presence of high salt concentration of 200 mM NaCl. WPI-dextran conjugate, WPI, and ChS were assembled into the nanoparticles with dextran conjugated to WPI/ChS shell and WPI/ChS core. The repulsive steric interactions, from both dextran covalently conjugated to WPI and ChS electrostatically interacted with WPI, were the major formation mechanism of the stable nanoparticles. As a nutrient model, lutein could be effectively encapsulated into the nanoparticles. Additionally, the nanoparticles exhibited a spherical shape and homogeneous size distribution regardless of lutein loading. The results suggested that the stable nanoparticles from proteins and strong polyelectrolyte polysaccharides would be used as a promising target delivery system for hydrophobic nutrients and drugs at physiological pH and salt conditions.

  13. STABLE HEATING OF CLUSTER COOLING FLOWS BY COSMIC-RAY STREAMING

    SciTech Connect

    Fujita, Yutaka; Ohira, Yutaka

    2011-09-10

    We study heating of cool cores in galaxy clusters by cosmic-ray (CR) streaming using numerical simulations. In this model, CRs are injected by the central active galactic nucleus (AGN) and move outward with Alfven waves. The waves are excited by the streaming itself and become nonlinear. If magnetic fields are large enough, CRs can prevail in and heat the entire core because of a large Alfven velocity. We find that the CR streaming can stably heat both high- and low-temperature clusters for a long time without the assistance of thermal conduction, and it can prevent the development of massive cooling flows. If there is even a minor contribution from thermal conduction, the heating can be stabilized further. We discuss the reason for the stability and indicate that the CR pressure is insensitive to changes in the intracluster medium (ICM) and that the density dependence of the heating term is similar to that of radiative cooling.

  14. Rapid presumptive identification of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis-bovis complex by radiometric determination of heat stable urease

    SciTech Connect

    Gandy, J.H.; Pruden, E.L.; Cox, F.R.

    1983-12-01

    Simple and rapid Bactec methodologies for the determination of neat (unaltered) and heat stable urease activity of mycobacteria are presented. Clinical isolates (63) and stock cultures (32)--consisting of: M. tuberculosis (19), M. bovis (5), M. kansasii (15), M. marinum (4), M. simiae (3), M. scrofulaceum (16), M. gordonae (6), M. szulgai (6), M. flavescens (1), M. gastri (1), M. intracellulare (6), M. fortuitum-chelonei complex (12), and M. smegmatis (1)--were tested for neat urease activity by Bactec radiometry. Mycobacterial isolates (50-100 mg wet weight) were incubated at 35 degrees C for 30 minutes with microCi14C-urea. Urease-positive mycobacteria gave Bactec growth index (GI) values greater than 100 units, whereas urease-negative species gave values less than 10 GI units. Eighty-three isolates possessing neat urease activity were heated at 80 degrees C for 30 minutes followed by incubation at 35 degrees C for 30 minutes with 1 microCi14C-urea. Mycobacterium tuberculosis-bovis complex demonstrated heat-stable urease activity (GI more than 130 units) and could be distinguished from mycobacteria other than tuberculosis (MOTT), which gave GI values equal to or less than 40 units.

  15. Development of a Freeze-Dried, Heat-Stable Influenza Subunit Vaccine Formulation

    PubMed Central

    Flood, Alexander; Chen, Dexiang

    2016-01-01

    An influenza pandemic remains a major public health concern. A key strategy to prevent a pandemic is to stockpile and pre-position stable influenza vaccine to allow rapid deployment in response to an outbreak. However, most influenza vaccines today are formulated as liquids that are stable only within a temperature range of 2°C to 8°C and require use of a cold chain, making vaccine transportation, distribution, and storage complicated and expensive, particularly for developing countries. To support the National Strategy for Pandemic Influenza preparedness in the United States and internationally, we developed two lead dry formulations of stable H1N1 influenza subunit vaccines using freeze-drying technology. The stable formulations contain an excipient combination of a disaccharide, such as sucrose or trehalose, and glycine, in addition to a surfactant and phosphate buffer. The freeze-dried vaccines were shown to be safe and remained immunogenic in an in vivo study in mice. Moreover, the lead formulations demonstrated no significant loss of activity after 40 months at storage temperatures of 25°C and 37°C. This stability can be particularly attractive as it could eliminate the need to use a cold chain for vaccine deployment and facilitate integration of vaccine distribution with general drug distribution where appropriate. These freeze-dried thermostable influenza subunit vaccines could also reduce the frequency of vaccine stockpile turnover, offering a cost-effective option for pandemic preparedness. PMID:27851765

  16. Cloning and sequencing of a cDNA encoding a heat-stable sweet protein, mabinlin II.

    PubMed

    Nirasawa, S; Masuda, Y; Nakaya, K; Kurihara, Y

    1996-11-28

    A cDNA clone encoding a heat-stable sweet protein, mabinlin II (MAB), was isolated and sequenced. The encoded precursor to MAB was composed of 155 amino acid (aa) residues, including a signal sequence of 20 aa, an N-terminal extension peptide of 15 aa, a linker peptide of 14 aa and one residue of C-terminal extension. Comparison of the proteolytic cleavage sites during post-translational processing of MAB precursor with those of like 2S seed-storage proteins of Arabidopsis thaliana, Brassica napus and Bertholletia excelsa shows that the three individual cleavage sites between respective species are conserved.

  17. Antivirals against animal viruses.

    PubMed

    Villa, T G; Feijoo-Siota, L; Rama, J L R; Ageitos, J M

    2016-09-30

    Antivirals are compounds used since the 1960s that can interfere with viral development. Some of these antivirals can be isolated from a variety of sources, such as animals, plants, bacteria or fungi, while others must be obtained by chemical synthesis, either designed or random. Antivirals display a variety of mechanisms of action, and while some of them enhance the animal immune system, others block a specific enzyme or a particular step in the viral replication cycle. As viruses are mandatory intracellular parasites that use the host's cellular machinery to survive and multiply, it is essential that antivirals do not harm the host. In addition, viruses are continually developing new antiviral resistant strains, due to their high mutation rate, which makes it mandatory to continually search for, or develop, new antiviral compounds. This review describes natural and synthetic antivirals in chronological order, with an emphasis on natural compounds, even when their mechanisms of action are not completely understood, that could serve as the basis for future development of novel and/or complementary antiviral treatments.

  18. Photoinduced antiviral carbon nanohorns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyako, Eijiro; Nagata, Hideya; Hirano, Ken; Sakamoto, Kotaro; Makita, Yoji; Nakayama, Ken-ichi; Hirotsu, Takahiro

    2008-02-01

    Nanocarbons, such as carbon nanohorns (CNH) and carbon nanotubes, are materials of interest in many fields of science and technology because of their remarkable physical properties. We report here a novel approach for using NIR laser-driven CNH as an antiviral agent. NIR laser-driven functional CNH complexes could open the way to a new range of antiviral materials.

  19. Heat-stable phytases in transgenic wheat (Triticum aestivum L.): deposition pattern, thermostability, and phytate hydrolysis.

    PubMed

    Brinch-Pedersen, Henrik; Hatzack, Frank; Stöger, Eva; Arcalis, Elsa; Pontopidan, Katrine; Holm, Preben B

    2006-06-28

    The present paper addresses the question of thermotolerance of in planta synthesized heterologous enzymes using phytase as a model. Two individual transgenic wheat materials expressing an Aspergillus fumigatus phytase with a low denaturation temperature (62.5 degrees C) but a high refolding capacity, and a rationally designed consensus phytase engineered to a high denaturation temperature (89.3 degrees C), were evaluated. High levels of endosperm specific expression were ensured by the wheat high molecular weight glutenin 1DX5 promoter. Immunodetection at the light and electron microscopical level shows unequivocally that the heterologous phytase is deposited in the vacuole, albeit that the transformation constructs were designed for secretion to the apoplast. Evaluation of heat stability properties and kinetic properties unraveled that, under these deposition conditions, heat stability based on high unfolding temperature is superior to high refolding capacity and represents a realistic strategy for improving phosphate and mineral bioavailability in cereal-based feed and food.

  20. Activation of a heat-stable cytolytic protein associated with the surface membrane of Naegleria fowleri.

    PubMed Central

    Lowrey, D M; McLaughlin, J

    1985-01-01

    Surface membrane-enriched fractions of Naegleria fowleri obtained after isopycnic centrifugation experiments contain a potent cytolytic activity as determined by hemolysis and 51Cr release assays. This surface membrane cytolysin was unaffected by a treatment at 75 degrees C for 30 min and accounted for 70 to 90% of cytolysis by whole-cell lysates of amoebae. This heat resistance as well as intimate membrane association distinguished the surface membrane cytolytic activity from a second heat-labile cytolytic activity which appears to be latent within lysosomes. The surface membrane cytolysin was found to be specifically activated by diluted samples of lysosomal fractions. The possible role of this surface membrane cytotoxin in the pathogenicity of N. fowleri is discussed. PMID:4055029

  1. Height of layer of intense turbulent heat exchange under conditions of stable atmospheric stratification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamardin, A. P.; Nevzorova, I. V.; Odintsov, S. L.

    2015-11-01

    In the work, we consider estimates of the height of layer of intense turbulent heat exchange in stably stratified atmospheric boundary layer, made with the use of meteorological acoustic radar (sodar). Dependence of this height on temperature gradient is analyzed. Current temperature stratification of the atmosphere in the layer with height up to 1 000 m was determined with the help of MTP-5 meteorological temperature profiler.

  2. Stable "Waterbelt" climates controlled by tropical ocean heat transport: A nonlinear coupled climate mechanism of relevance to Snowball Earth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rose, Brian E. J.

    2015-02-01

    Ongoing controversy about Neoproterozoic Snowball Earth events motivates a theoretical study of stability and hysteresis properties of very cold climates. A coupled atmosphere-ocean-sea ice general circulation model (GCM) has four stable equilibria ranging from 0% to 100% ice cover, including a "Waterbelt" state with tropical sea ice. All four states are found at present-day insolation and greenhouse gas levels and with two idealized ocean basin configurations. The Waterbelt is stabilized against albedo feedback by intense but narrow wind-driven ocean overturning cells that deliver roughly 100 W m-2 heating to the ice edges. This requires three-way feedback between winds, ocean circulation, and ice extent in which circulation is shifted equatorward, following the baroclinicity at the ice margins. The thermocline is much shallower and outcrops in the tropics. Sea ice is snow-covered everywhere and has a minuscule seasonal cycle. The Waterbelt state spans a 46 W m-2 range in solar constant, has a significant hysteresis, and permits near-freezing equatorial surface temperatures. Additional context is provided by a slab ocean GCM and a diffusive energy balance model, both with prescribed ocean heat transport (OHT). Unlike the fully coupled model, these support no more than one stable ice margin, the position of which is slaved to regions of rapid poleward decrease in OHT convergence. Wide ranges of different climates (including the stable Waterbelt) are found by varying the magnitude and spatial structure of OHT in both models. Some thermodynamic arguments for the sensitivity of climate, and ice extent to OHT are presented.

  3. Serological classification of Xanthomonas maltophilia (Pseudomonas maltophilia) based on heat-stable O antigens.

    PubMed Central

    Schable, B; Rhoden, D L; Hugh, R; Weaver, R E; Khardori, N; Smith, P B; Bodey, G P; Anderson, R L

    1989-01-01

    Twenty-six serotypes of Xanthomonas maltophilia were defined by using 15 antisera described by Hugh and Ryschenkow (R. Hugh and E. Ryschenkow, J. Gen. Microbiol. 26:123-132, 1961) and 11 new antisera. The antisera were prepared by immunizing rabbits with bacterial strains heated at 100 degrees C for 2 h. Twelve antisera required adsorptions with cross-reacting heterologous immunizing strains. We tested 275 clinical and environmental strains of X. maltophilia with 26 antisera by the slide agglutination technique. A total of 259 (94.2%) strains were typeable, with 137 (49.8%) strains agglutinating in three antisera. PMID:2473089

  4. Removal of milk fat globules from whey protein concentrate 34% to prepare clear and heat-stable protein dispersions.

    PubMed

    Liu, Gang; Zhong, Qixin

    2014-10-01

    Whey protein concentrates (WPC) are low-cost protein ingredients, but their application in transparent ready-to-drink beverages is limited due to turbidity caused by fat globules and heat instability. In this work, fat globules were removed from WPC 34% (WPC-34) to prepare heat-stable ingredients via the Maillard reaction. The removal of fat globules by acid precipitation and centrifugation was observed to be the most complete at pH 4.0, and the loss of protein was caused by micrometer-sized fat globules and protein aggregates. Spray-dried powder prepared from the transparent supernatant was glycated at 130°C for 20 and 30min or 60°C for 24 and 48h. The 2 groups of samples had comparable heat stability and degree of glycation, evaluated by free amino content and analytical ultracentrifugation, but high-temperature, short-time treatment reduced the color formation during glycation. Therefore, WPC-34 can be processed for application in transparent beverages.

  5. [Expression of thermostable recombiant Luciola lateralis luciferase and development of heat-stable pyrosequencing system].

    PubMed

    Xu, Shu; Zou, Bingjie; Wang, Jianping; Wu, Haiping; Zhou, Guohua

    2012-06-01

    Pyrosequencing is a tool based on bioluminescence reaction for real-time analyzing DNA sequences. The sensitivity of pyrosequencing mainly depends on luciferase in reaction mixture. However, the instability of pyrosequencing reagents caused by fragile wild Photinus pyralis luciferase (PpL) in conventional pyrosequencing usually leads to unsatisfied results, which limits the application of pyrosequencing. In order to improve the stability of pyrosequencing reagents, the coding sequences of mutant thermostable Luciola lateralis luciferase (rt-LlL) was synthesized, and inserted into the plasmid of pET28a(+) to express the thermostable rt-LlL with a 6 x His-tag in the N terminal. The purified rt-LlL with the molecular mass of 60 kDa was obtained by Ni-affinity chromatography. The specific activity of rt-LlL was determined as 4.29 x 10(10) RLU/mg. Moreover, the thermostability of rt-LlL was investigated, and the results showed that rt-LlL had activity at 50 degrees C, and remained 90% of activity after incubated at 40 degrees C for 25 min. Finally, rt-LlL was used to substitute commercial Photinus pyralis luciferase in conventional pyrosequencing reagent to get thermostable pyrosequencing reagent. Comparing with conventional pyrosequencing reagent, the thermostable pyrosequencing reagent is more stable, and it's activity would not lose when incubated at 37 degrees C for 1 h. This study laid foundation of establishing reliable and stable pyrosequencing system which would be applied in Point-of-Care Testing.

  6. Quantum Dot/Siloxane Composite Film Exceptionally Stable against Oxidation under Heat and Moisture.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hwea Yoon; Yoon, Da-Eun; Jang, Junho; Lee, Daewon; Choi, Gwang-Mun; Chang, Joon Ha; Lee, Jeong Yong; Lee, Doh C; Bae, Byeong-Soo

    2016-12-21

    We report on the fabrication of a siloxane-encapsulated quantum dot (QD) film (QD-silox film), which exhibits stable emission intensity for over 1 month even at elevated temperature and humidity. QD-silox films are solidified via free radical addition reaction between oligosiloxane resin and ligand molecules on QDs. We prepare the QD-oligosiloxane resin by sol-gel condensation reaction of silane precursors with QDs blended in the precursor solution, forgoing ligand-exchange of QDs. The resulting QD-oligosiloxane resin remains optically clear after 40 days of storage, in contrast to other QD-containing resins which turn turbid and ultimately form sediments. QDs also disperse uniformly in the QD-silox film, whose photoluminescence (PL) quantum yield (QY) remains nearly unaltered under harsh conditions; for example, 85 °C/5% relative humidity (RH), 85 °C/85% RH, strongly acidic, and strongly basic environments for 40 days. The QD-silox film appears to remain equally emissive even after being immersed into boiling water (100 °C). Interestingly, the PL QY of the QD-silox film noticeably increases when the film is exposed to a moist environment, which opens a new, facile avenue to curing dimmed QD-containing films. Given its excellent stability, we envision that the QD-silox film is best suited in display applications, particularly as a PL-type down-conversion layer.

  7. Heat stable antimicrobial activity of Allium ascalonicum against bacteria and fungi.

    PubMed

    Amin, M; Kapadnis, B P

    2005-08-01

    To study antimicrobial activity of shallot in comparison with that of garlic and onion against 23 strains of fungi and bacteria, water extracts of garlic, shallot and onion bulbs were prepared. Each extract was studied in different forms for their antimicrobial activity viz., fresh extract, dry extract and autoclaved extract. Minimal inhibitory concentration and minimal lethal concentrations of these extracts were determined against all organisms by broth dilution susceptibility test. Fresh extract of garlic showed greater antimicrobial activity as compared to similar extracts of onion and shallot. However, dried and autoclaved extracts of shallot showed more activity than similar extracts of onion and garlic. Fungi were more sensitive to shallot extract than bacteria. Amongst bacteria, B. cereus was most sensitive (MIC=5 mg ml(-1)). The lowest minimum bactericidal concentration of shallot extract amongst bacteria tested was 5 mg ml(-1) for B. cereus. Amongst fungi, Aureobasidium pullulans and Microsporum gypseum were most sensitive (MIC= 0.15 mg ml(-1)). The lowest minimum lethal concentration was 2.5 mg ml(-1) for Microsporum gypseum and Trichophyton mentagrophytes. It was therefore, expected that the antimicrobial principle of shallot was different than the antimicrobial compounds of onion and garlic. In addition, the antimicrobial component of the shallot extract was stable at 121 degrees C.

  8. Characterization of heat-stable enterotoxin from a hypertoxigenic Escherichia coli strain that is pathogenic for cattle.

    PubMed Central

    Saeed, A M; Magnuson, N S; Gay, C C; Greenberg, R N

    1986-01-01

    An enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) strain isolated from a calf with clinical scours was found to produce over 17- to 60-fold more heat-stable enterotoxin (STa) than four laboratory-adapted bovine ETEC strains. The purified STa of this strain was identical to those produced by other ETEC strains. A severe form of scours was induced in 5- to 15-day-old colostrum-fed calves and in 1- to 2-week-old piglets by oral administration of the purified STa. This study demonstrates that STa is a mediator of diarrhea in newborn calves and piglets and that under identical growth conditions diverse strains of bovine ETEC may produce variable amounts of homologous STa's. PMID:3525417

  9. Activation of intestinal CFTR Cl- channel by heat-stable enterotoxin and guanylin via cAMP-dependent protein kinase.

    PubMed Central

    Chao, A C; de Sauvage, F J; Dong, Y J; Wagner, J A; Goeddel, D V; Gardner, P

    1994-01-01

    Heat-stable enterotoxins (STa) produced by pathogenic bacteria induce profound salt and water secretion in the gut, leading to diarrhea. Recently, guanylin, an endogenous peptide with properties similar to STa, was identified. While STa and guanylin bind to the same receptor guanylyl cyclase and raise cell cGMP, the signaling mechanism distal to cGMP remains controversial. Here we show that STa, guanylin and cGMP each activate intestinal Cl- secretion, and that this is abolished by inhibitors of cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA), suggesting that PKA is a major mediator of this effect. These agents induce Cl- secretion only in cells expressing the wild-type CFTR, indicating that this molecule is the final common effector of the signaling pathway. The involvement of CFTR suggests a possible cystic fibrosis heterozygote advantage against STa-induced diarrhea. PMID:7510634

  10. Interaction of Escherichia coli heat-stable enterotoxin (STa) with its putative receptor on the intestinal tract of newborn kids.

    PubMed

    Al-Majali, Ahmad M; Ababneh, Mohammed M; Shorman, M; Saeed, A Mahdi

    2007-02-01

    The elaboration of heat stable enterotoxin (STa) is an important step in the pathogenesis of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC), which causes severe diarrhea in newborn animals. In this study, the distribution of the STa-specific receptors on enterocytes and brush border membrane vesicles (BBMVs) prepared from the anterior jejunum, posterior jejunum, ileum and colon of newborn kids was investigated. The density of STa-receptors on enterocytes and BBMVs was higher in the posterior jejunum than that in other segments of the kids' intestines. Additionally, the affinity of the posterior jejunum STa-receptors was higher than the affinity of receptors present on the epithelium of other intestinal segments. Our findings suggest that the posterior jejunum is a major target for STa within the intestinal tract of newborn kids.

  11. Natural Convection in a Stable Multi Layer Melt Pool with Volumetric Heat Generation

    SciTech Connect

    Sehgal, Bal Raj

    2004-07-01

    This paper describes the results obtained from several sets of experiments, performed over several years in the SIMECO facility a the NPS Division, KTH on natural convection in multi-layered liquid pools with volumetric heat generation in one or more layers. The safety issue, to which these experiments are directed, is that of the thermal loading on the reactor pressure vessel (RPV) wall due to corium melt pool convection in the lower head. Multi layer pools are considered due to the observations made in the RASPLAV (Asmolov et al., 1998) and the MASCA (Asmolov et al.,2003) experimental programs on convection of prototypic material (UO{sub 2}+ZrO{sub 2}+ZR+Fe) melt pools. The SIMECO is a slice facility of 1/8. scale and the corium melt simulants employed have been water, salt water, paraffin and molten salt. Cerrobend was employed as simulant for the metal layer. The implications of the experimental results on the accident management strategy of in-vessel retention, practiced for the Loviisa VVER-440, the Westinghouse's AP-600, AP- 1000, the Framatome's BWR-1000 and KEPCO's Advanced PWR-1400 reactors are discussed. (authors)

  12. Accumulation of Stable Full-Length Circular Group I Intron RNAs during Heat-Shock.

    PubMed

    Andersen, Kasper L; Beckert, Bertrand; Masquida, Benoit; Johansen, Steinar D; Nielsen, Henrik

    2016-10-31

    Group I introns in nuclear ribosomal RNA of eukaryotic microorganisms are processed by splicing or circularization. The latter results in formation of full-length circular introns without ligation of the exons and has been proposed to be active in intron mobility. We applied qRT-PCR to estimate the copy number of circular intron RNA from the myxomycete Didymium iridis. In exponentially growing amoebae, the circular introns are nuclear and found in 70 copies per cell. During heat-shock, the circular form is up-regulated to more than 500 copies per cell. The intron harbours two ribozymes that have the potential to linearize the circle. To understand the structural features that maintain circle integrity, we performed chemical and enzymatic probing of the splicing ribozyme combined with molecular modeling to arrive at models of the inactive circular form and its active linear counterpart. We show that the two forms have the same overall structure but differ in key parts, including the catalytic core element P7 and the junctions at which reactions take place. These differences explain the relative stability of the circular species, demonstrate how it is prone to react with a target molecule for circle integration and thus supports the notion that the circular form is a biologically significant molecule possibly with a role in intron mobility.

  13. Processed Meat Protein and Heat-Stable Peptide Marker Identification Using Microwave-Assisted Tryptic Digestion.

    PubMed

    Montowska, Magdalena; Pospiech, Edward

    2016-12-01

    New approaches to rapid examination of proteins and peptides in complex food matrices are of great interest to the community of food scientists. The aim of the study is to examine the influence of microwave irradiation on the acceleration of enzymatic cleavage and enzymatic digestion of denatured proteins in cooked meat of five species (cattle, horse, pig, chicken and turkey) and processed meat products (coarsely minced, smoked, cooked and semi-dried sausages). Severe protein aggregation occurred not only in heated meat under harsh treatment at 190 °C but also in processed meat products. All the protein aggregates were thoroughly hydrolyzed after 1 h of trypsin treatment with short exposure times of 40 and 20 s to microwave irradiation at 138 and 303 W. There were much more missed cleavage sites observed in all microwave-assisted digestions. Despite the incompleteness of microwave-assisted digestion, six unique peptide markers were detected, which allowed unambiguous identification of processed meat derived from the examined species. Although the microwave-assisted tryptic digestion can serve as a tool for rapid and high-throughput protein identification, great caution and pre-evaluation of individual samples is recommended in protein quantitation.

  14. Processed Meat Protein and Heat-Stable Peptide Marker Identification Using Microwave-Assisted Tryptic Digestion

    PubMed Central

    Pospiech, Edward

    2016-01-01

    Summary New approaches to rapid examination of proteins and peptides in complex food matrices are of great interest to the community of food scientists. The aim of the study is to examine the influence of microwave irradiation on the acceleration of enzymatic cleavage and enzymatic digestion of denatured proteins in cooked meat of five species (cattle, horse, pig, chicken and turkey) and processed meat products (coarsely minced, smoked, cooked and semi-dried sausages). Severe protein aggregation occurred not only in heated meat under harsh treatment at 190 °C but also in processed meat products. All the protein aggregates were thoroughly hydrolyzed after 1 h of trypsin treatment with short exposure times of 40 and 20 s to microwave irradiation at 138 and 303 W. There were much more missed cleavage sites observed in all microwave-assisted digestions. Despite the incompleteness of microwave-assisted digestion, six unique peptide markers were detected, which allowed unambiguous identification of processed meat derived from the examined species. Although the microwave-assisted tryptic digestion can serve as a tool for rapid and high-throughput protein identification, great caution and pre-evaluation of individual samples is recommended in protein quantitation. PMID:28115907

  15. A heat-stable serine proteinase from the extreme thermophilic archaebacterium Sulfolobus solfataricus.

    PubMed

    Burlini, N; Magnani, P; Villa, A; Macchi, F; Tortora, P; Guerritore, A

    1992-08-21

    A proteinase was purified to electrophoretic homogeneity from crude extracts of the thermoacidophilic archaebacterium Sulfolobus solfataricus. Molecular mass values assessed by SDS-PAGE and gel filtration were 54 and 118 kDa, respectively, which points to a dimeric structure of the molecule. An isoelectric point of 5.6 was also determined. The enzyme behaved as a chymotrypsin-like serine proteinase, as shown by the inhibitory effects exerted by phenylmethanesulfonyl fluoride, 3,4-dichloroisocoumarin, tosylphenylalaninechloromethyl ketone and chymostatin. Consistently with the inhibition pattern, the enzyme cleaved chromogenic substrates at the carboxyl side of aromatic or bulky aliphatic amino acids; however, it effectively attacked only a small number of such substrates, thus, displaying a specificity much narrower than and clearly different from that of chymotrypsin. This was confirmed by its inability to digest a set of natural substrate proteins, as well as insulin chains A and B; only after alkylation casein was degraded to some extent. Proteinase activity was significantly stimulated by Mn2+ which acted as a mixed-type nonessential activator. The enzyme also displayed a broad pH optimum in the range 6.5-8.0. Furthermore, it was completely stable up to 90 degrees C; above this temperature it underwent first-order thermal inactivation with half-lives ranging from 342 min (92 degrees C) to 7 min (101 degrees C). At 50 degrees C it could withstand 6 M urea and, to some extent, different organic solvents; however, at 95 degrees C it was extensively inactivated by all of these compounds. None of the chemical physical properties of the enzyme, including amino-acid analysis, provided evidence of a possible relation to other well-known microbial serine proteinases.

  16. Antiviral Cystine Knot α-Amylase Inhibitors from Alstonia scholaris.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Phuong Quoc Thuc; Ooi, Justin Seng Geap; Nguyen, Ngan Thi Kim; Wang, Shujing; Huang, Mei; Liu, Ding Xiang; Tam, James P

    2015-12-25

    Cystine knot α-amylase inhibitors are cysteine-rich, proline-rich peptides found in the Amaranthaceae and Apocynaceae plant species. They are characterized by a pseudocyclic backbone with two to four prolines and three disulfides arranged in a knotted motif. Similar to other knottins, cystine knot α-amylase inhibitors are highly resistant to degradation by heat and protease treatments. Thus far, only the α-amylase inhibition activity has been described for members of this family. Here, we show that cystine knot α-amylase inhibitors named alstotides discovered from the Alstonia scholaris plant of the Apocynaceae family display antiviral activity. The alstotides (As1-As4) were characterized by both proteomic and genomic methods. All four alsotides are novel, heat-stable and enzyme-stable and contain 30 residues. NMR determination of As1 and As4 structures reveals their conserved structural fold and the presence of one or more cis-proline bonds, characteristics shared by other cystine knot α-amylase inhibitors. Genomic analysis showed that they contain a three-domain precursor, an arrangement common to other knottins. We also showed that alstotides are antiviral and cell-permeable to inhibit the early phase of infectious bronchitis virus and Dengue infection, in addition to their ability to inhibit α-amylase. Taken together, our results expand membership of cystine knot α-amylase inhibitors in the Apocynaceae family and their bioactivity, functional promiscuity that could be exploited as leads in developing therapeutics. © 2015 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  17. Different assay conditions for detecting the production and release of heat-labile and heat-stable toxins in enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli isolates.

    PubMed

    Rocha, Letícia B; Ozaki, Christiane Y; Horton, Denise S P Q; Menezes, Caroline A; Silva, Anderson; Fernandes, Irene; Magnoli, Fabio C; Vaz, Tania M I; Guth, Beatriz E C; Piazza, Roxane M F

    2013-12-02

    Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) produce heat-labile (LT) and/or heat-stable enterotoxins (ST). Despite that, the mechanism of action of both toxins are well known, there is great controversy in the literature concerning the in vitro production and release of LT and, for ST, no major concerns have been discussed. Furthermore, the majority of published papers describe the use of only one or a few ETEC isolates to define the production and release of these toxins, which hinders the detection of ETEC by phenotypic approaches. Thus, the present study was undertaken to obtain a better understanding of ST and LT toxin production and release under laboratory conditions. Accordingly, a collection of 90 LT-, ST-, and ST/LT-producing ETEC isolates was used to determine a protocol for toxin production and release aimed at ETEC detection. For this, we used previously raised anti-LT antibodies and the anti-ST monoclonal and polyclonal antibodies described herein. The presence of bile salts and the use of certain antibiotics improved ETEC toxin production/release. Triton X-100, as chemical treatment, proved to be an alternative method for toxin release. Consequently, a common protocol that can increase the production and release of LT and ST toxins could facilitate and enhance the sensitivity of diagnostic tests for ETEC using the raised and described antibodies in the present work.

  18. A pectinmethylesterase gene associated with a heat-stable extract from citrus.

    PubMed

    Arias, Covadonga R; Burns, Jacqueline K

    2002-06-05

    A putative thermostable pectinmethylesterase (TSPME) protein of 36 kDa was isolated from heat-treated citrus finisher pulp. After purification and partial sequencing of the protein, a reverse genetic approach was used to obtain the complete genomic sequence of a new pectinmethylesterase (PME) gene, CsPME4, from Citrus sinensis (L.) Osb. cv. Valencia. The CsPME4 gene contained two exons of 1203 and 690 bp interrupted by a single positionally conserved intron of 1230 bp. A full-length CsPME4 cDNA clone amplified from Valencia orange juice vesicles shared 98% identity with the genomic clone. The encoded protein of the full-length CsPME4 cDNA shared 66 and 39% amino acid identity with the full-length encoded proteins of the citrus PME, CsPME1, and CsPME3, respectively, whereas the predicted mature protein of CsPME4 shared 80 and 61% identity with the predicted mature proteins of CsPME1 and CsPME3, respectively. Southern analysis demonstrated that CsPME4 was present in at least two copies in the Valencia orange genome. Northern analysis revealed that CsPME4 mRNA was accumulated mainly in young and developing tissues of Valencia orange. Several approaches to express recombinant CsPME4 in different systems failed to obtain active protein. Further research will be necessary to successfully express the putative TSPME gene CsPME4 for biochemical characterization.

  19. Variance Method to Determine Turbulent Fluxes of Momentum And Sensible Heat in The Stable Atmospheric Surface Layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Bruin, H. A. R.; Hartogensis, O. K.

    2005-08-01

    Evidence is presented that in the stable atmospheric surface layer turbulent fluxes of heat and momentum can be determined from the standard deviations of longitudinal wind velocity and temperature, σ u and σ T respectively, measured at a single level. An attractive aspect of this method is that it yields fluxes from measurements that can be obtained with two-dimensional sonic anemometers. These instruments are increasingly being used at official weather stations, where they replace the standard cup anemometer wind vane system. With methods such as the one described in this note, a widespread, good quality, flux network can be established, which would greatly benefit the modelling community. It is shown that a ‘variance’ dimensionless height (ζ σ) defined from σ u and σ T is highly related to the ‘conventional’ dimensionless stability parameter ζ=z/L, where z is height and L is the Obukhov length. Empirical functions for ζ σ are proposed that allow direct calculation of heat and momentum fluxes from σ u and σ T. The method performs fairly well also during a night of intermittent turbulence.

  20. Induction of a heat-stable topoisomerase II-DNA cleavable complex by nonintercalative terpenoides, terpentecin and clerocidin.

    PubMed

    Kawada, S; Yamashita, Y; Fujii, N; Nakano, H

    1991-06-01

    Terpentecin and clerocidin, microbial terpenoides, have been known to be potent antitumor antibiotics. However, the critical biochemical target of these terpenoides has not been identified. Our present studies, using purified mammalian topoisomerase II, have shown that terpentecin and clerocidin induce topoisomerase II-mediated DNA cleavage in vitro with comparable potency to that of demethylepipodophyllotoxin ethylidene-beta-D-glucoside. These terpenoides produced a similar DNA cleavage pattern which is distinctly different from those generated in the presence of the known topoisomerase poisons, demethylepipodophyllotoxin ethylidene-beta-D-glucoside and 4'-(9-acridinylamino)methanesulfon-m-anisidide. Brief heating at 65 degrees C, which abolishes completely the cleavable complex with demethylepipodophyllotoxin ethylidene-beta-D-glucoside, of the reaction mixture containing these terpenoides resulted in slight reduction in DNA cleavage. Thus, differently from other topoisomerase II-active antitumor agents, terpentecin and clerocidin induce formation of a cleavable complex which is stable for heat or salt treatments. The lack of significant DNA binding or intercalation activity of terpentecin and clerocidin suggests that topoisomerase II is a cellular target for these drugs.

  1. Associations between Heat-Stable (O) and Heat-Labile (HL) Serogroup Antigens of Campylobacter jejuni: Evidence for Interstrain Relationships within Three O/HL Serovars

    PubMed Central

    Jackson, C. J.; Fox, A. J.; Jones, D. M.; Wareing, D. R. A.; Hutchinson, D. N.

    1998-01-01

    A comparative examination of the heat-stable (O) and heat-labile (HL) serogrouping results for 9,024 sporadic human isolates of Campylobacter jejuni revealed conserved associations between specific O and HL antigens (O/HL serovars). Forty-nine percent of the isolates which grouped for both O and HL antigens belonged to one of three serovars: O 4 complex/HL 1 (17.9%), O 1/HL 2 (16.8%), or O 50/HL 7 (14.5%). Other common serovars were O 2/HL 4 (8.3%), O 6/HL 6 (8.1%), O 53/HL 11 (4.5%), O 19/HL 17 (3.3%), O 5/HL 9 (3.3%), O 9/HL 9 (3.2%), and O 23/HL 5 (3.1%). These 10 serovars accounted for 83.1% of the serogroupable isolates. A large number of strains (41.3%) could be typed by only one of the two methods or could not be serogrouped (11%). Strains belonging to three serovars, O 2/HL 4, O 50/HL 7, and O 23/HL 5, were further characterized by combining data from expressed features (O/HL serogroups, phage groups, and biotypes) with restriction fragment length polymorphism genotypes. These polyphasic data demonstrated that within each serovar, individual isolates showed substantial conservation of both genomic and phenotypic characteristics. The essentially clonal nature of the three serovars confirmed the potential of combined O and HL serogrouping as a practical and phylogenetically valid method for investigating the epidemiology of sporadic C. jejuni infection. PMID:9665996

  2. Development of a vaccine of cross-linked heat-stable and heat-labile enterotoxins that protects against Escherichia coli producing either enterotoxin.

    PubMed Central

    Klipstein, F A; Engert, R F; Clements, J D

    1982-01-01

    A vaccine of cross-linked heat-stable (ST) and heat-labile (LT) toxins that protects against heterologous serotypes of strains of Escherichia coli which produce either the LT or ST enterotoxin was developed by conjugating ST to LT by the carbodiimide reaction. Three interrelated factors were found to affect the composition and properties of the final conjugate: (i) the amount of carbodiimide added to the toxins, (ii) the initial ratio of ST to LT, and (iii) the duration of the conjugation reaction. Optimal conjugation conditions were identified as a carbodiimide-to-toxin ratio of 10:1 by weight, an initial molar ratio of ST to LT of 100:1, and a conjugation reaction time of 96 h. This approach yielded a conjugate that contained 96% by moles and 36% by weight pure ST, determined with radioiodinated pure ST, and 34% by weight semi-pure ST, determined by the Lowry protein method. The retained antigenicities of the conjugated toxins, as determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays, was greater than or equal to 82%, and their toxicities, as determined by the Y1 adrenal cell assay for LT and by the suckling mouse assay for ST, were reduced to less than or equal to 0.15%. Immunization of rats with this cross-linked ST-LT vaccine provided strong protection against challenge with either the LT or the ST toxin or with viable heterologous strains which produce these toxins, either singly or together. These observations indicate that conjugation of ST to LT results in a unique new immunogen in that ST acquires immunogenicity as a function of the reaction, LT retains most of its antigenicity, and the toxic properties of each individual toxin are greatly reduced. PMID:6749682

  3. Antiviral immunity in crustaceans.

    PubMed

    Liu, Haipeng; Söderhäll, Kenneth; Jiravanichpaisal, Pikul

    2009-08-01

    Viral diseases of shrimp have caused negative effects on the economy in several countries in Asia, South America and America, where they have numerous shrimp culture industries. The studies on the immunity of shrimp and other crustaceans have mainly focused on general aspects of immunity and as a consequence little is known about the antiviral responses in crustaceans. The aim of this review is to update recent knowledge of innate immunity against viral infections in crustaceans. Several antiviral molecules have been isolated and characterized recently from decapods. Characterization and identification of these molecules might provide a promising strategy for protection and treatment of these viral diseases. In addition dsRNA-induced antiviral immunity is also included.

  4. TRANSPORT OF HEAT, WATER VAPOR AND CARBON DOXIDE BY LONG PERIOD EDDIES IN THE STABLE BOUNDARY LAYER

    SciTech Connect

    Kurzeja, R.

    2010-07-26

    The vertical transport of heat and trace chemicals for a night in April has been studied with a wavelet analysis and conventional one-hour averages. It was found that for the night of April 20, 2009, turbulent kinetic energy, heat and trace chemicals were transported directed downward from the jet core. The most significant periods for this transport were less than 5 minutes and greater than one hour with intermittent transport taking place in the 5 min to 1 hour time frame. The nocturnal boundary layer is characterized by turbulent intermittency, long period oscillations, and a slow approach to equilibrium, (Mahrt, 1999). Although turbulence is usually maintained by surface friction, downward transport from low-level jets can also play an important role in turbulence maintenance and in the transport of scalars, Mahrt (1999), Banta et al. (2006). The eddy covariance flux measurement technique assumes continuous turbulence which is unusual in the stable boundary because significant flux transport occurs via turbulent eddies whose periods are long compared with the averaging time (Goulden et al., 1996). Systematic error in eddy flux measurements is attributed mainly to the neglect of long period eddies. Banta et al. (2006) noted that observations of turbulence below the low level jet suggested that while upward transport of turbulence kinetic energy (TKE) is common, downward transport from the jet can also occur. They found that in the CASES 99 experiments that turbulence scaled well with the strength of the low-level jet, and that surface cooling was more important than surface roughness. Because nocturnal turbulence is intermittent and non-stationary, the appropriate averaging time for calculation of TKE and EC fluxes is not obvious. Wavelet analysis is, thus, a more suitable analysis tool than conventional Fourier analysis.

  5. Binding of E. coli heat-stable enterotoxin to rat intestinal brush borders and to basolateral membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Guarino, A.; Cohen, M.B.; Overmann, G.; Thompson, M.R.; Giannella, R.A.

    1987-09-01

    We studied the binding of E. coli heat-stable enterotoxin (STa) to rat brush borders (BB) and to basolateral membranes (BLM) using a biologically active monoiodinated radioligand (( /sup 125/I)STa) and highly enriched BB and BLM preparations free of other significant organelle contamination. Binding of (/sup 125/I)STa to BB was specific; time-, temperature-, and pH-dependent; saturable; and partially reversible. Nonlabeled toxin competitively inhibited the binding of radioligand to BB in a dose-related manner. Scatchard analysis revealed a single class of receptors with an apparent affinity constant of 8.7 +/- 1.5 X 10(8) l/mol. Binding was not affected by amino acids, sugars, and lectins. Proteolytic enzymes significantly decreased binding, although several did so by modifying the radioligand. Trypsin inhibited binding without modifying the radioligand thus supporting the proteinaceous nature of the receptor. Since the enrichment in binding activity in the BB over the homogenate was significantly lower than the enrichment in sucrase activity, we concluded that binding activity is probably associated with other membranous domains, but direct examination revealed no binding activity on basolateral membranes.

  6. Reduction of the secretory response to Escherichia coli heat-stable enterotoxin by thiol and disulfide compounds. [Mice

    SciTech Connect

    Greenberg, R.N.; Dunn, J.A.; Guerrant, R.L.

    1983-07-01

    We examined the effects of disulfide and thiol compounds on Escherichia coli heat-stable enterotoxin (ST) and cyclic GMP-induced secretion. Both cystamine and cystine (disulfide compounds) reduced the secretory responses to submaximal doses of ST in suckling mice (at 0.5 mumol per mouse) and reduced ST activation of guanylate cyclase (by 33 to 73% at 1 mM). In higher doses, cystamine completely eradicated a maximally effective ST dose as well. In addition, the sulfhydryl (thiol) compounds cysteamine, cysteine, and acetylcysteine strikingly reduced the secretory response and the guanylate cyclase response to ST. Neither the disulfide nor the thiol compounds tested reduced cyclic GMP-induced secretion. These studies suggest that disulfide and thiol compounds both block ST-induced secretion before its activation of guanylate cyclase. Taken with the work of others, these findings suggest that disulfide compounds may alter the oxidation reduction state of a cell or act directly on the guanylate cyclase enzyme, whereas thiol compounds may inactivate ST itself by breaking its disulfide bridges, or it may alter guanylate cyclase activation by ST. Both families of compounds deserve further consideration among potential antisecretory agents for application in the control of ST-induced diarrhea.

  7. Effect of Escherichia coli heat-stable enterotoxin on cell volume and intracellular inorganic ions of rat intestinal cells.

    PubMed

    Gilles-Baillien, M; Gerday, C; Kaeckenbeeck, A; Flamee, P A; Duchesne, P Y

    1987-11-01

    1.--Electron micrographs of rat jejunum mucosa incubated for 1 h in the presence of Escheria coli heat-stable enterotoxin (STa) in the lumen shows alterations of villous cells as well as of crypt cells. The brush border of mature enterocytes is partially desintegrated and covered with a thick mucus. Crypts are occupied on half of their height by cells very similar to Paneth cells, loaded with numerous large dark inclusions. 2.--Cell volume and intracellular inorganic ion concentrations have been estimated in mucosal scrapings of jejunum sacs, incubated in vitro for 1 or 3 h. The quick action (1 h of incubation) of STa is a swelling of the intestinal calls accompanied by an increase in Na+, Cl- and Ca2+ intracellular concentrations and a decrease in the K+ and Mg2+ ones. The delayed action (3 h of incubation) is an increase of extracellular space and a decrease in cell volume; and at the same time the intracellular concentration of Na+, Cl-, K+, Ca2+ and Mg2+ is augmented. 3.--After 3 h of incubation intestinal cells from the other levels of intestine (duodenum, ileum and colon) show the same variations in cell volume and intracellular inorganic ion concentrations under the influence of STa, as those recorded in the jejunum. 4.--The present work favours the hypothesis that all intestinal cells, villous or cryptic, are involved in the alteration of fluid ion transport ending in diarrhea.

  8. Characterization of a heat stable anti-listerial bacteriocin produced by vancomycin sensitive Enterococcus faecium isolated from idli batter.

    PubMed

    Vijayendra, S V N; Rajashree, K; Halami, Prakash M

    2010-06-01

    Lactic acid bacteria (LAB) are known to produce various types of bacteriocins, ribosomally synthesized polypeptides, which have antibacterial spectrum against many food borne pathogens. Listeria monocytogenes, a pathogenic bacterium, is of particular concern to the food industry because of its ability to grow even at refrigeration temperatures and its tolerance to preservative agents. Some of the bacteriocins of LAB are known to have anti-listerial property. In the present study, the bacteriocin produced by vancomycin sensitive Enterococcus faecium El and J4 isolated from idli batter samples was characterized. The isolates were found to tolerate high temperatures of 60°C for 15 and 30 min and 70°C for 15 min. The bacteriocin was found to be heat stable and had anti-listerial activity. The bacteriocin did not lost anti-listerial activity when treated at 100°C for 30 min or at 121°C for 15 min. The bacteriocin lost its antimicrobial activity after treating with trypsin, protinase-K, protease and peptidase.

  9. Purification and characterization of a heat-stable serine protease inhibitor from the tubers of new potato variety "Golden Valley".

    PubMed

    Kim, Mi-Hyun; Park, Seong-Cheol; Kim, Jin-Young; Lee, Sun Young; Lim, Hak-Tae; Cheong, Hyeonsook; Hahm, Kyung-Soo; Park, Yoonkyung

    2006-08-04

    Potide-G, a small (5578.9 Da) antimicrobial peptide, was isolated from potato tubers (Solanum tuberosum L. cv. Golden Valley) through extraction of the water-soluble fraction, dialysis, ultrafiltration and DEAE-cellulose and C18 reverse-phase high performance liquid chromatography. This antimicrobial peptide was heat-stable and almost completely suppressed the proteolytic activity of trypsin, chymotrypsin and papain, with no hemolytic activity. In addition, potide-G potently inhibited growth of a variety of bacterial (Staphylococcus aureus, Listeria monocytogenes, Escherichia coli, and Clavibacter michiganense subsp. michiganinse) and fungal (Candida albicans and Rhizoctonia solani) strains. Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight (MALDI-TOF) mass spectrometry revealed that the N-terminal sequence (residues from 1 to 11) of the protein is identical to that of potato proteinase inhibitor, a member of the Kunitz superfamily. And like other members of this class of protease inhibitor, potide-G may have a number of beneficial and therapeutic uses.

  10. Linkage of heat-stable enterotoxin activity and ampicillin resistance in a plasmid isolated from an Escherichia coli strain of human origin.

    PubMed Central

    Stieglitz, H; Fonseca, R; Olarte, J; Kupersztoch-Portnoy, Y M

    1980-01-01

    In an Escherichia coli strain of human origin, ampicillin resistance and heat-stable enterotoxin activity were shown by EcoRI restriction endonuclease and genetic analysis to be in an 80-megadalton plasmid. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 PMID:6254890

  11. Targeting heat shock factor 1 as an antiviral strategy against dengue virus replication in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Tsung-Ting; Chen, Chia-Ling; Tsai, Cheng-Chieh; Lin, Chiou-Feng

    2017-09-01

    Fever onset is correlated with viremia in dengue virus (DENV) patients. Heat shock factor 1 (HSF1), a heat stress response host transcription factor, plays a crucial role in regulating multiple cellular functions, as well as the onset of infectious diseases. This study evaluated the role of HSF1 in DENV replication as a means of regulating DENV infection in vitro and in vivo. DENV infection activated HSF1 in both Ca(2+) and protein kinase A-dependent manners. Inhibiting HSF1 effectively reduced DENV replication, not only in THP-1 cells but also in primary human monocytes. Activated HSF1 contributed to DENV replication by upregulating autophagy-related protein (Atg) 7, as autophagy is crucial for virus replication. Heat stress also activated HSF1, which in turn facilitated DENV replication. Activated HSF1, the increased Atg7, and autophagic induction were founded in the DENV-infected brains and pharmacologically inhibiting HSF1 reduced autophagy, viral protein expression, neuropathy, and mortality. These results provide new insight into HSF1 as a novel host factor for DENV infection through its role in facilitating autophagy-regulated viral replication in the brains. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Occurrence of Hybrid Escherichia coli Strains Carrying Shiga Toxin and Heat-Stable Toxin in Livestock of Bangladesh

    PubMed Central

    Johura, Fatema-Tuz; Parveen, Rozina; Islam, Atiqul; Sadique, Abdus; Rahim, Md Niaz; Monira, Shirajum; Khan, Anisur R.; Ahsan, Sunjukta; Ohnishi, Makoto; Watanabe, Haruo; Chakraborty, Subhra; George, Christine M.; Cravioto, Alejandro; Navarro, Armando; Hasan, Badrul; Alam, Munirul

    2017-01-01

    Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) and enterotoxigenic E. coli (ETEC) are important causes of diarrhea in humans and animals worldwide. Although ruminant animals are the main source of STEC, diarrhea due to this pathotype is very low in Bangladesh where ETEC remains the predominant group associated with childhood diarrhea. In the present study, E. coli strains (n = 35) isolated from Bangladesh livestock (goats, sheep, and cattle) and poultry (chicken and ducks) were analyzed for the presence of major virulence factors, such as Shiga toxins (STX-1 and STX-2), heat-labile toxin, and heat-stable toxins (STa and STb). Multiplex polymerase chain reaction results revealed 23 (66%) E. coli strains to be virulent possessing either sta (n = 5), stx (stx1, n = 8; stx2, n = 2), or both (n = 8) genes in varying combinations. Thirty-four percent (8/23) of strains from livestock were hybrid type that carried both stx (either stx1 or stx2) and ETEC-specific enterotoxin gene sta. Serotyping results revealed that the ETEC strains belonged to five serotypes, namely O36:H5, O174:H−, O152:H8, O109:H51, and O8:H21, while the STEC-producing strains belonged to serotypes O76:H19 (n = 3), O43:H2 (n = 2), O87:H16 (n = 2), OR:H2 (n = 1), O110:H16 (n = 1), and O152:H8 (n = 1). The STEC–ETEC hybrid strains belonged to serotypes O76:H19 (n = 3), O43:H2 (n = 2), O87:H16, OR:H2, and O152:H8. Forty percent (2/5) of the ETEC and 20% (2/10) of the STEC strains were multidrug resistant with the highest drug resistance (50%) being found in the hybrid strains. Molecular fingerprinting determined by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis and cluster analyses by dendrogram revealed that, genetically, STEC–ETEC hybrid strains were highly heterogeneous. Multidrug-resistant E. coli STEC–ETEC hybrid strains in domesticated animals pose a public health threat for humans in Bangladesh. PMID:28119905

  13. Occurrence of Hybrid Escherichia coli Strains Carrying Shiga Toxin and Heat-Stable Toxin in Livestock of Bangladesh.

    PubMed

    Johura, Fatema-Tuz; Parveen, Rozina; Islam, Atiqul; Sadique, Abdus; Rahim, Md Niaz; Monira, Shirajum; Khan, Anisur R; Ahsan, Sunjukta; Ohnishi, Makoto; Watanabe, Haruo; Chakraborty, Subhra; George, Christine M; Cravioto, Alejandro; Navarro, Armando; Hasan, Badrul; Alam, Munirul

    2016-01-01

    Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) and enterotoxigenic E. coli (ETEC) are important causes of diarrhea in humans and animals worldwide. Although ruminant animals are the main source of STEC, diarrhea due to this pathotype is very low in Bangladesh where ETEC remains the predominant group associated with childhood diarrhea. In the present study, E. coli strains (n = 35) isolated from Bangladesh livestock (goats, sheep, and cattle) and poultry (chicken and ducks) were analyzed for the presence of major virulence factors, such as Shiga toxins (STX-1 and STX-2), heat-labile toxin, and heat-stable toxins (STa and STb). Multiplex polymerase chain reaction results revealed 23 (66%) E. coli strains to be virulent possessing either sta (n = 5), stx (stx1, n = 8; stx2, n = 2), or both (n = 8) genes in varying combinations. Thirty-four percent (8/23) of strains from livestock were hybrid type that carried both stx (either stx1 or stx2) and ETEC-specific enterotoxin gene sta. Serotyping results revealed that the ETEC strains belonged to five serotypes, namely O36:H5, O174:H-, O152:H8, O109:H51, and O8:H21, while the STEC-producing strains belonged to serotypes O76:H19 (n = 3), O43:H2 (n = 2), O87:H16 (n = 2), OR:H2 (n = 1), O110:H16 (n = 1), and O152:H8 (n = 1). The STEC-ETEC hybrid strains belonged to serotypes O76:H19 (n = 3), O43:H2 (n = 2), O87:H16, OR:H2, and O152:H8. Forty percent (2/5) of the ETEC and 20% (2/10) of the STEC strains were multidrug resistant with the highest drug resistance (50%) being found in the hybrid strains. Molecular fingerprinting determined by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis and cluster analyses by dendrogram revealed that, genetically, STEC-ETEC hybrid strains were highly heterogeneous. Multidrug-resistant E. coli STEC-ETEC hybrid strains in domesticated animals pose a public health threat for humans in Bangladesh.

  14. Comparison of enterotoxic activities of heat-stable enterotoxins from class 1 and class 2 Escherichia coli of swine origin.

    PubMed Central

    Whipp, S C; Moon, H W; Argenzio, R A

    1981-01-01

    Pig small intestine develops age-dependent resistance to some (class 2 strains) enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli while remaining susceptible to others (class 1 strains). This study tested the hypothesis that class 1 and class 2 strains produce different subtypes of heat-stable enterotoxin (ST). The dose-response curves of small intestine to crude ST preparations from a class 1 and a class 2 strain were compared in several species. In infant mice, the class 1 ST preparation was less active than the class 2 ST preparation, whereas in rabbits the preparations were equally potent. However, in 1-, 7-, and 14-week-old pigs, the class 1 ST preparation was more active than the class 2 preparation. At low doses, both preparations caused reduced absorption in pigs of all three age groups, and at high doses the class 1 preparation caused secretion in all three age groups. In contrast, at high doses the class 2 preparation caused secretion in 1-week-old pigs but only reduced absorption in older pigs. when class 1 and class 2 ST preparations were fractionated by methanol extraction, in both cases the mouse-negative, pig-positive activity was associated with the methanol-insoluble fraction and mouse-positive, pig-positive activity was associated with the methanol-soluble fraction. The results are consistent with a hypothesis that class 1 and class 2 strains of enterotoxigenic E. coli produce different subtypes of ST and that the response of pig intestine to ST varies with both age and toxin subtype. PMID:7011991

  15. Effects of age, ambient temperature, and heat-stable Escherichia coli enterotoxin on intestinal transit in infant mice.

    PubMed

    Moon, H W; Fung, P Y; Isaacson, R E; Booth, G D

    1979-07-01

    Some interrelationships among age, ambient temperature, intestinal transit, and enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli infection were studied in an infant mouse model. The transit of dye in the small intestine was accelerated during the response to heat-stable E. coli enterotoxin. Transit in the small intestine of normal mice accelerated with increased age (from less than 17 h to 8 days old) and accelerated with increased ambient temperature (from 25 to 37 degrees C). Transit was more rapid in the jejunum than in the ileum throughout the range of experimental conditions studied. E. coli strains that do not produce any of the pili known facilitate intestinal colonization were cleared from the small intestine more rapidly at 37 degrees C than at 25 degrees C. This clearance was thought to be due to accelerated transit at the higher temperature. In contrast, a strain of E. coli that produces K99 (pili previously shown to facilitate intestinal colonization in other species) was not cleared from the small intestine and colonized more intensively at 37 degrees C than at 25 degrees C. Intensified colonization by this strain was thought to be due to increased production of K99 at the higher temperature. It was suggested that sluggish intestinal transit may also be characteristic of the neonates of other species and be one of the factors predisposing them to intestinal colonization by enteropathogens. It was speculated that this predisposition may be enhanced if the neonates are chilled. However, the effect of ambient temperature on intestinal transit in homeothermic neonates such as pigs, calves, and humans may be different from that in mice because neonatal mice are poikilothermic.

  16. Characterization of Immunological Cross-Reactivity between Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli Heat-Stable Toxin and Human Guanylin and Uroguanylin

    PubMed Central

    Taxt, Arne M.; Diaz, Yuleima; Bacle, Amélie; Grauffel, Cédric; Reuter, Nathalie; Aasland, Rein; Sommerfelt, Halvor

    2014-01-01

    Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) expressing the heat-stable toxin (ST) (human-type [STh] and porcine-type [STp] variants) is among the five most important enteric pathogens in young children living in low- and middle-income countries. ST mediates diarrheal disease through activation of the guanylate cyclase C (GC-C) receptor and is an attractive vaccine target with the potential to confer protection against a wide range of ETEC strains. However, immunological cross-reactivity to the endogenous GC-C ligands guanylin and uroguanylin is a major concern because of the similarities to ST in amino acid sequence, structure, and function. We have investigated the presence of similar epitopes on STh, STp, guanylin, and uroguanylin by analyzing these peptides in eight distinct competitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs). A fraction (27%) of a polyclonal anti-STh antibody and an anti-STh monoclonal antibody (MAb) cross-reacted with uroguanylin, the latter with a 73-fold-lower affinity. In contrast, none of the antibodies raised against STp, one polyclonal antibody and three MAbs, cross-reacted with the endogenous peptides. Antibodies raised against guanylin and uroguanylin showed partial cross-reactivity with the ST peptides. Our results demonstrate, for the first time, that immunological cross-reactions between ST and the endogenous peptides can occur. However, the partial nature and low affinity of the observed cross-reactions suggest that the risk of adverse effects from a future ST vaccine may be low. Furthermore, our results suggest that this risk may be reduced or eliminated by basing an ST immunogen on STp or a selectively mutated variant of STh. PMID:24778111

  17. Regulation of intestinal guanylate cyclase by the heat-stable enterotoxin of Escherichia coli (STa) and protein kinase C.

    PubMed Central

    Crane, J K; Wehner, M S; Bolen, E J; Sando, J J; Linden, J; Guerrant, R L; Sears, C L

    1992-01-01

    The heat-stable enterotoxin of Escherichia coli (STa) stimulates membrane-bound guanylate cyclase in intestinal epithelium and induces fluid and ion secretion. Using the T84 human colon carcinoma cell line as a model, we observed that phorbol esters markedly enhanced STa-stimulated cyclic GMP accumulation in T84 cells (C. S. Weikel, C. L. Spann, C. P. Chambers, J. K. Crane, J. Linden, and E. L. Hewlett, Infect. Immun. 58:1402-1407, 1990). In this study we document that the phorbol ester treatment increases 125I-STa-binding sites as well as membrane-bound guanylate cyclase activity in T84 cells and provide evidence that both effects are mediated by phosphorylation. Guanylate cyclase activity was increased approximately 50% in membranes prepared from intact T84 cells treated with phorbol-12,13-dibutyrate (beta-PDB) and after treatment of homogenates with beta-PDB in a manner dependent on ATP, MgCl2, and cytosol. Similarly, treatment of membranes with purified bovine brain protein kinase C in the presence of appropriate cofactors and beta-PDB resulted in an increase in STa-stimulated guanylate cyclase activity of about 70%. Likewise, the number of 125I-STa-binding sites was increased by about 25 to 40% in membranes prepared from intact cells or homogenates treated with beta-PDB; no effect on binding affinity (Kd = 0.15 nM) was noted. These experiments suggest that protein kinase C may phosphorylate the STa receptor-guanylate cyclase or a closely related protein and increase guanylate cyclase activity. The stimulatory effects of protein kinase C on STa-sensitive guanylate cyclase are opposite in direction to the profound inhibitory effects of the kinase on atrial natriuretic peptide-stimulated guanylate cyclase, demonstrating differential regulation by protein kinases within the guanylate cyclase-receptor family. PMID:1360449

  18. Escherichia coli heat-stable toxin b impairs intestinal epithelial barrier function by altering tight junction proteins.

    PubMed

    Ngendahayo Mukiza, Clément; Dubreuil, J Daniel

    2013-08-01

    Escherichia coli heat-stable toxin b (STb) causes diarrhea in animals. STb binds to sulfatide, its receptor, and is then internalized. In the cytoplasm, through a cascade of events, STb triggers the opening of ion channels, allowing ion secretion and water loss and leading to diarrhea. Tight junctions (TJs) are well known for controlling paracellular traffic of ions and water by forming a physical intercellular barrier in epithelial cells, and some bacterial toxins are known to affect adversely TJs. The present study aimed at determining the effect of STb on TJs. T84 cells were treated for 24 h with purified STb and a nontoxic STb mutant (D30V). Transepithelial resistance (TER), paracellular flux marker, and confocal microscopy were used to analyze the effect of STb on TJs. Purified STb caused a significant reduction of TER parallel to an increase in paracellular permeability compared to the results seen in untreated cells or mutant D30V. The increased paracellular permeability was associated with a marked alteration of F-actin stress fibers. F-actin filament dissolution and condensation were accompanied by redistribution and/or fragmentation of ZO-1, claudin-1, and occludin. These changes were also observed following treatment of T84 cells with an 8-amino-acid peptide found in the STb sequence corresponding to a consensus sequence of Vibrio cholerae Zot toxin. These effects were not observed with a scrambled peptide or mutant D30V. Our findings indicate that STb induces epithelial barrier dysfunction through changes in TJ proteins that could contribute to diarrhea.

  19. Escherichia coli Heat-Stable Toxin b Impairs Intestinal Epithelial Barrier Function by Altering Tight Junction Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Ngendahayo Mukiza, Clément

    2013-01-01

    Escherichia coli heat-stable toxin b (STb) causes diarrhea in animals. STb binds to sulfatide, its receptor, and is then internalized. In the cytoplasm, through a cascade of events, STb triggers the opening of ion channels, allowing ion secretion and water loss and leading to diarrhea. Tight junctions (TJs) are well known for controlling paracellular traffic of ions and water by forming a physical intercellular barrier in epithelial cells, and some bacterial toxins are known to affect adversely TJs. The present study aimed at determining the effect of STb on TJs. T84 cells were treated for 24 h with purified STb and a nontoxic STb mutant (D30V). Transepithelial resistance (TER), paracellular flux marker, and confocal microscopy were used to analyze the effect of STb on TJs. Purified STb caused a significant reduction of TER parallel to an increase in paracellular permeability compared to the results seen in untreated cells or mutant D30V. The increased paracellular permeability was associated with a marked alteration of F-actin stress fibers. F-actin filament dissolution and condensation were accompanied by redistribution and/or fragmentation of ZO-1, claudin-1, and occludin. These changes were also observed following treatment of T84 cells with an 8-amino-acid peptide found in the STb sequence corresponding to a consensus sequence of Vibrio cholerae Zot toxin. These effects were not observed with a scrambled peptide or mutant D30V. Our findings indicate that STb induces epithelial barrier dysfunction through changes in TJ proteins that could contribute to diarrhea. PMID:23716609

  20. Heat stable antigen (mouse CD24) supports myeloid cell binding to endothelial and platelet P-selectin.

    PubMed

    Aigner, S; Ruppert, M; Hubbe, M; Sammar, M; Sthoeger, Z; Butcher, E C; Vestweber, D; Altevogt, P

    1995-10-01

    P-selectin is a Ca(2+)-dependent lectin that participates in leukocyte adhesion to vascular endothelium and platelets. Myeloid cells and a subset of T lymphocytes express carbohydrate ligands at the cell surface. Previously, we suggested that heat stable antigen (HSA/mouse CD24), an extensively glycosylated cell surface molecule on many mouse cells, is a ligand for P-selectin. Here we show that HSA mediates the binding of monocytic cells and neutrophils to P-selectin. The monocytic cell lines ESb-MP and J774, peritoneal exudate cells, and bone marrow neutrophils could bind to lipopolysaccharide-activated bend3 endothelioma cells under rotation-induced shear forces and this binding was inhibited by mAb to P-selectin and HSA. Blocking was weak at room temperature but more efficient at 4 degrees C when integrin-mediated binding was decreased. Also the adhesion of neutrophils to stimulated platelets expressing P-selectin was blocked by HSA- and P-selectin-specific mAb. Latex beads coated with purified HSA from myeloid cells bound to activated endothelioma cells or platelets, and the binding was similarly blocked by mAb to P-selectin and HSA respectively. The HSA-coated beads were stained with P-selectin-IgG, very weakly with L-selectin-IgG but not with E-selectin-IgG. The staining was dependent on divalent cations and treatment with endoglycosidase F or neuraminidase indicated that sialylated N-linked glycans were recognized. The presence of these glycans was confirmed by biosynthetic labeling studies. Our data suggest that HSA, in addition to the recently identified 160 kDa glycoprotein ligand on mouse neutrophils, belongs to a group of monospecific P-selectin ligands on myeloid cells.

  1. Smallpox Antiviral Drug

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-01-01

    Nevirapine 1996 HIV Delavirdine 1997 HIV Abacavir 1998 HIV Efavirenz 1998 HIV Tenofovir 2001 HIV Adefovirn dipivoxil 2002 HBV Emtricitabine 2003 HIV Acyclovir...toxicity, hair loss, and skin changes [De Benedittis et al., 2004]. The other approach to orthopoxvirus antiviral drug discovery is to screen new...Rouzioux C. 2004. Penetration of enfuvirtide, tenofovir, efavirenz , and protease inhibitors in the genital tract of HIV-1-infected men. Aids 18:1958

  2. Smallpox Antiviral Drug

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-01-01

    structural model of the vaccinia virus (VV) I7L proteinase was developed at Transtech Pharma. A unique chemical library of ~ 51,000 compounds was...model of the I7L active site based on the Ulp1 cysteine proteinase (PDB: 1euv). Commercially available small molecule libraries that total...Smallpox, cysteine proteinase , antiviral drug, HTS-screening, rational drug design 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17. LIMITATION OF ABSTRACT 18

  3. Antiviral activity of borage (Echium amoenum).

    PubMed

    Abolhassani, Mohsen

    2010-06-30

    Borage (Echium amoenum) is a large annual plant of the Boraginaceae family that grows in most parts of Europe and in northern parts of Iran. The flower of borage is used as a medicinal herb in various countries as an antifebrile and antidepressant, for treatment of stress, circulatory heart diseases and pulmonary complaints, as a poultice for inflammatory swellings, as a diuretic, laxative, emollient and demulcent, and recently as a possible cancer protective factor. The Iranian borage is used in traditional medicine for infectious diseases and influenza and as an antifebrile. In this report, an aqueous extract of dried borage (Echium amoenum) flowers was tested in vitro for its antiviral activity. Bacteriophage 3C and its specific host, Staphylococcus aureus 8327 were used Aqueous extract of E. amoenum dried flower was prepared and anti-viral activity was determined by agar overlay method and the burst size was determined by one-step growth experiment. Antibacterial activity was determined by disc diffusion, agar-well diffusion and minimum inhibitory concentration methods. The extract showed concentration-dependent antiviral activity against free bacteriophage 3C and reduced the yield of phage from the host Staphylococcus aureus 8327. Antiviral activity of the extract is heat resistant. Autoclaving the extract at 110°C for 1 h did not eliminate its antiviral activity and the effect was similar to the extract that was filter sterilized. However, the activity of the freeze-dried extract was diminished during 90 days of storage at 4°C and the activity of the working solution was diminished in a one-week period at 4°C. These results may provide a justification for the traditional use of the Iranian borage flower for infectious diseases and antifebrile activity.

  4. Antiviral activity of borage (Echium amoenum)

    PubMed Central

    Abolhassani, Mohsen

    2010-01-01

    Introduction Borage (Echium amoenum) is a large annual plant of the Boraginaceae family that grows in most parts of Europe and in northern parts of Iran. The flower of borage is used as a medicinal herb in various countries as an antifebrile and antidepressant, for treatment of stress, circulatory heart diseases and pulmonary complaints, as a poultice for inflammatory swellings, as a diuretic, laxative, emollient and demulcent, and recently as a possible cancer protective factor. The Iranian borage is used in traditional medicine for infectious diseases and influenza and as an antifebrile. In this report, an aqueous extract of dried borage (Echium amoenum) flowers was tested in vitro for its antiviral activity. Material and methods Bacteriophage 3C and its specific host, Staphylococcus aureus 8327 were used Aqueous extract of E. amoenum dried flower was prepared and anti-viral activity was determined by agar overlay method and the burst size was determined by one-step growth experiment. Antibacterial activity was determined by disc diffusion, agar-well diffusion and minimum inhibitory concentration methods. Results The extract showed concentration-dependent antiviral activity against free bacteriophage 3C and reduced the yield of phage from the host Staphylococcus aureus 8327. Antiviral activity of the extract is heat resistant. Autoclaving the extract at 110°C for 1 h did not eliminate its antiviral activity and the effect was similar to the extract that was filter sterilized. However, the activity of the freeze-dried extract was diminished during 90 days of storage at 4°C and the activity of the working solution was diminished in a one-week period at 4°C. Conclusions These results may provide a justification for the traditional use of the Iranian borage flower for infectious diseases and antifebrile activity. PMID:22371772

  5. Effect of Escherichia coli heat-stable enterotoxin, cholera toxin and theophylline on ion transport in porcine colon

    PubMed Central

    Argenzio, R. A.; Whipp, S. C.

    1981-01-01

    1. The effect of heat-stable enterotoxin (ST) of Escherichia coli, cholera toxin (CT), and theophylline (a phosphodiesterase inhibitor) on ion and water transport was studied with an in vivo isolated loop system of the pig colon. 2. All three agents abolished net Na absorption as a result of a decrease in the lumen to blood Na flux alone. With all three agents, net Cl absorption was reduced, but not abolished, and net HCO3 secretion was elicited. Luminal pCO2 was reduced with CT and theophylline from that observed in normal Ringer alone. 3. Theophylline resulted in a prompt and sustained increase in both cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cyclic AMP) and cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cyclic GMP) levels in colonic mucosa studied in vitro. ST selectively elevated cyclic GMP, whereas CT selectively elevated cyclic AMP. These responses paralleled the time course and magnitude of response of the transepithelial electrical potential difference (ψLB) measured in vivo. 4. Ion replacement studies in the presence or absence of theophylline showed that in the absence of Na, Cl absorption was slightly reduced and HCO3 secretion was elicited; no further additive effects of theophylline in the absence of luminal Na were observed. In the absence of luminal Cl, net Na absorption was abolished and HCO3 was absorbed; theophylline resulted in significant net Na and HCO3 secretion. Theophylline also increased ψLB in the absence of either luminal Na or Cl. 5. Results suggest that in the presence of theophylline or enterotoxin, the coupled Na—H and Cl—HCO3 exchange processes that are normally responsible for at least half of the net NaCl absorption by this tissue are interrupted. Active HCO3 secretion is observed and Cl absorption under these conditions can be entirely explained as a consequence of ψLB. Thus, these studies indicate that the colon may participate in the production of diarrhoea of enterotoxigenic origin. They also suggest an important functional role of cyclic

  6. Campomanesia adamantium Peel Extract in Antidiarrheal Activity: The Ability of Inhibition of Heat-Stable Enterotoxin by Polyphenols

    PubMed Central

    Lescano, Caroline Honaiser; de Oliveira, Ivan Pires; Zaminelli, Tiago; Baldivia, Débora da Silva; da Silva, Luan Ramos; Napolitano, Mauro; Silvério, Camila Bitencourt Mendes; Lincopan, Nilton; Sanjinez-Argandoña, Eliana Janet

    2016-01-01

    Campomanesia adamantium (Myrtaceae) is a medicinal plant distributed in Brazilian Cerrado. Different parts of this plant are used in popular medicine for treatment of several diseases like fever, diarrhea, hypercholesterolemia and rheumatism. The aim of this work was to evaluate the inhibition of heat-stable enterotoxin type A (STa) by gallic acid present in the peel of C. adamantium fruit and assays to assess the antidiarrheal activity, anti-inflammatory and cytotoxic properties of peel extract using the T84 cell line model. The possible inhibition exerted by the gallic acid of the peel extract on the STa peptide was inferred by molecular dynamics simulations. The antidiarrheal effects were investigated measuring cGMP accumulation in cells after stimulation by STa toxin and antibacterial activity was assessed. The anti-inflammatory activity was assessed by inhibition of COX-1 and COX-2. MTT and LDH assays were used to evaluate any possible cytotoxic action while the CyQUANT test was used to investigate the effect on cell proliferation. A representation showing how the possible interactions between STa and the gallic acid of the extract might reduce the action of the enterotoxin is presented. C. adamantium peel extract significantly decreased the levels of cGMP in T84 cells. However, no effect on the species of microorganisms was observed. The extract also inhibited COX-1 (IC50 255.70 ± 0.04 ng/mL) and COX-2 (IC50 569.50 ± 0.11 ng/mL) enzymes. Cytotoxicity assay have shown significant changes in cells treated with the extract, which inhibited the cell proliferation until 72 hours of treatment. Direct interactions of phenolic compounds present in the extract with the STa toxin may limit its activity. Curative effect in the diarrhea treatment and its anti-inflammatory action is based on the pharmacological properties, mechanism of action of the C. adamantium peel extract, and no toxic effects of the peel extract presented on this work. PMID:27764241

  7. Purification and characterization of two potent heat-stable protein inhibitors of protein phosphatase 2A from bovine kidney.

    PubMed

    Li, M; Guo, H; Damuni, Z

    1995-02-14

    Two heat-stable protein inhibitors of protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A), tentatively designated I1PP2A and I2PP2A, have been purified to apparent homogeneity from extracts of bovine kidney. The purified preparations of I1PP2A exhibited an apparent M(r) approximately 30,000 and 250,000 as determined by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and gel permeation chromatography on Sephacryl S-300, respectively. In contrast, the purified preparations of I2PP2A exhibited an apparent M(r) approximately 20,000 and 80,000 as determined by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and gel permeation chromatography on Sephacryl S-200, respectively. The purified preparations of I1PP2A and I2PP2A inhibited PP2A with 32P-labeled myelin basic protein, 32P-labeled histone H1, 32P-labeled pyruvate dehydrogenase complex, 32P-labeled phosphorylase, and protamine kinase as substrates. By contrast, I1PP2A and I2PP2A exhibited little effect, if any, on the activity of PP2A with 32P-labeled casein, and did not prevent the autodephosphorylation of PP2A in incubations with the autophosphorylation-activated protein kinase [Guo, H., & Damuni, Z. (1993) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 90, 2500-2504]. The purified preparations of I1PP2A and I2PP2A had little effect, if any, on the activities of protein phosphatase 1, protein phosphatase 2B, protein phosphatase 2C, and pyruvate dehydrogenase phosphatase. With 32P-labeled MBP as a substrate, kinetic analysis according to Henderson showed that I1PP2A and I2PP2A were noncompetitive and displayed a Ki of about 30 and 25 nM, respectively. Following cleavage with Staphylococcus aureus V8 protease, I1PP2A and I2PP2A displayed distinct peptide patterns, indicating that these inhibitor proteins are the products of distinct genes. The N-terminal amino acid sequences of the purified preparations indicate that I1PP2A and I2PP2A are novel proteins.

  8. Development of a heat-stable and orally delivered recombinant M2e-expressing B. subtilis spore-based influenza vaccine.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Guangyu; Miao, Yu; Guo, Yan; Qiu, Hongjie; Sun, Shihui; Kou, Zhihua; Yu, Hong; Li, Junfeng; Chen, Yue; Jiang, Shibo; Du, Lanying; Zhou, Yusen

    2014-01-01

    Highly conserved ectodomain of influenza virus M2 protein (M2e) is an important target for the development of universal influenza vaccines. Today, the use of chemical or genetic fusion constructs have been undertaken to overcome the low immunogenicity of M2e in vaccine formulation. However, current M2e vaccines are neither orally delivered nor heat-stable. In this study, we evaluated the immune efficacy of an orally delivered recombinant M2e vaccine containing 3 molcules of M2e consensus sequence of influenza A viruses, termed RSM2e3. To accomplish this, CotB, a spore coat of Bacillus subtilis (B. subtilis), was used as a fusion partner, and heat-stable nonpathogenic B. subtilis spores were used as the carrier. Our results showed that CotB-M2e3 fusion had no effect on spore structure or function in the resultant recombinant RSM2e3 strain and that heterologous influenza virus M2e protein was successfully displayed on the surface of the recombinant RSM2e3 spore. Importantly, recombinant RSM2e3 spores elicited strong and long-term M2e-specific systemic and mucosal immune responses, completely protecting immunized mice from lethal challenge of A/PR/8/34(H1N1) influenza virus. Taken together, our study forms a solid basis for the development of a novel orally delivered and heat-stable influenza vaccine based on B. subtilis spore surface display.

  9. Broad-spectrum antiviral agents

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Jun-Da; Meng, Wen; Wang, Xiao-Jia; Wang, Hwa-Chain R.

    2015-01-01

    Development of highly effective, broad-spectrum antiviral agents is the major objective shared by the fields of virology and pharmaceutics. Antiviral drug development has focused on targeting viral entry and replication, as well as modulating cellular defense system. High throughput screening of molecules, genetic engineering of peptides, and functional screening of agents have identified promising candidates for development of optimal broad-spectrum antiviral agents to intervene in viral infection and control viral epidemics. This review discusses current knowledge, prospective applications, opportunities, and challenges in the development of broad-spectrum antiviral agents. PMID:26052325

  10. [Antiviral therapy in herpetic keratitis].

    PubMed

    Popa, D P; Ivaşcu, M; Ristea, L

    1994-01-01

    The frequency of ocular herpes has increased in the last time. The pathogenic mechanisms of herpetic ocular inflammation consist in cells degeneration produced by intracell virus accumulation, and immunopathological processes. It is presented the antiviral treatment in ocular herpes and antiviral efficacity of acyclovir, in comparison with other chemotherapeutics.

  11. Antiviral activities of photoactive perylenequinones.

    PubMed

    Hudson, J B; Imperial, V; Haugland, R P; Diwu, Z

    1997-02-01

    Nine perylenequinones (PQ), including some familiar naturally occurring pigments, were compared for their light-mediated antiviral efficacies. Calphostin C was the most active compound against the two target viruses, herpes simplex virus type 1 and Sindbis virus. Hypocrellins A and B were also very active. However, three cercosporin-like PQ were substantially less active in spite of their high quantum yields of singlet oxygen, whereas phleichrome, another efficient singlet oxygen producer, showed no detectable antiviral activity. One other PQ, which was a very weak singlet oxygen producer, also showed no antiviral activity. None of the active compounds showed significant antiviral activity in the dark. Thus, for some groups of PQ there was correlation between quantum yield of singlet oxygen (1O2) and antiviral efficacy, but there are evidently other structural features of PQ that influence activity.

  12. Antiviral Actions of Interferons

    PubMed Central

    Samuel, Charles E.

    2001-01-01

    Tremendous progress has been made in understanding the molecular basis of the antiviral actions of interferons (IFNs), as well as strategies evolved by viruses to antagonize the actions of IFNs. Furthermore, advances made while elucidating the IFN system have contributed significantly to our understanding in multiple areas of virology and molecular cell biology, ranging from pathways of signal transduction to the biochemical mechanisms of transcriptional and translational control to the molecular basis of viral pathogenesis. IFNs are approved therapeutics and have moved from the basic research laboratory to the clinic. Among the IFN-induced proteins important in the antiviral actions of IFNs are the RNA-dependent protein kinase (PKR), the 2′,5′-oligoadenylate synthetase (OAS) and RNase L, and the Mx protein GTPases. Double-stranded RNA plays a central role in modulating protein phosphorylation and RNA degradation catalyzed by the IFN-inducible PKR kinase and the 2′-5′-oligoadenylate-dependent RNase L, respectively, and also in RNA editing by the IFN-inducible RNA-specific adenosine deaminase (ADAR1). IFN also induces a form of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS2) and the major histocompatibility complex class I and II proteins, all of which play important roles in immune response to infections. Several additional genes whose expression profiles are altered in response to IFN treatment and virus infection have been identified by microarray analyses. The availability of cDNA and genomic clones for many of the components of the IFN system, including IFN-α, IFN-β, and IFN-γ, their receptors, Jak and Stat and IRF signal transduction components, and proteins such as PKR, 2′,5′-OAS, Mx, and ADAR, whose expression is regulated by IFNs, has permitted the generation of mutant proteins, cells that overexpress different forms of the proteins, and animals in which their expression has been disrupted by targeted gene disruption. The use of these IFN system

  13. Antiviral immunity in amphibians.

    PubMed

    Chen, Guangchun; Robert, Jacques

    2011-11-01

    Although a variety of virus species can infect amphibians, diseases caused by ranaviruses ([RVs]; Iridoviridae) have become prominent, and are a major concern for biodiversity, agriculture and international trade. The relatively recent and rapid increase in prevalence of RV infections, the wide range of host species infected by RVs, the variability in host resistance among population of the same species and among different developmental stages, all suggest an important involvement of the amphibian immune system. Nevertheless, the roles of the immune system in the etiology of viral diseases in amphibians are still poorly investigated. We review here the current knowledge of antiviral immunity in amphibians, focusing on model species such as the frog Xenopus and the salamander (Ambystoma tigrinum), and on recent progress in generating tools to better understand how host immune defenses control RV infections, pathogenicity, and transmission.

  14. Continuous series of catchment-averaged sensible heat flux from a Large Aperture Scintillometer: efficient estimation of stability conditions and importance of fluxes under stable conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Lathauwer, E.; Samain, B.; Defloor, W.; Pauwels, V. R.

    2011-12-01

    A Large Aperture Scintillometer (LAS) observes the intensity of the atmospheric turbulence across large distances, which is related to the path averaged sensible heat flux, H. This sensible heat flux can then easily be inverted into evapotranspiration rates using the surface energy balance. In this prestentation, two problems in the derivation of continuous series of H from LAS-data are investigated and the importance of nighttime H -fluxes is assessed. Firstly, as a LAS is unable to determine the sign of H, the transition from unstable to stable conditions is evaluated in order to make continuous H-series. Therefore, different algorithms to judge the atmospheric stability for a LAS installed over a distance of 9.5km have been tested. The algorithm based on the diurnal cycle of the refractive index structure parameter, CN2, has been found to be very suitable and operationally the most appropriate. A second issue is the humidity correction for LAS-data, which is performed by using the Bowen ratio (β). As β is taken from ground-based measurements with data gaps, the number of resulting H -values is reduced. Not including this humidity correction results in a marginal error in H, but increases the completeness of the resulting H -series. Applying these conclusions to the two-year time series of the LAS, results in an almost continuous H -time series. As the majority of the time steps has been found to be under stable conditions, there is a clear impact of Hstable on H24h, the 24h average of H. For stable conditions, Hstable -values are mostly negative, and hence lower than the H = 0 assumption as is mostly adopted. For months where stable conditions prevail (Winter), H24h is overestimated using this assumption, and calculation of Hstable is recommended.

  15. The coelomic fluid of the sea urchin Tripneustes depressus shows antiviral activity against Suid herpesvirus type 1 (SHV-1) and rabies virus (RV).

    PubMed

    Salas-Rojas, M; Galvez-Romero, G; Anton-Palma, B; Acevedo, R; Blanco-Favela, F; Aguilar-Setién, A

    2014-01-01

    Several studies have reported that molecules extracted from invertebrates have activity against different viruses, even against those that do not infect these organisms in their environment. One of the main mechanisms against pathogens in these organisms is the production of antimicrobial peptides. The objective of this study was to determine whether the coelomic fluid (CF) of the sea urchin Tripneustes depressus has activity against Suid herpesvirus type 1 (SHV-1) and/or rabies virus (RV). We tested the antiviral activity of CF in neutralizing assays and observed 50% inhibition against SHV-1 lytic plaque formation using 33 μg of CF, whereas 21 μg CF was sufficient to obtain more than 90% inhibition for RV. Cytotoxicity to MDBK and BHK-21 cells was found with whole CF yet was eliminated by heating at 56 or 72 °C (even when using 50 μg of heat-inactivated CF supernatant [SN or thermostable fraction]), and SN retained the antiviral effect. In both cases, the antiviral effect was direct and thermostable (SN 56 and 72 °C), and the best inhibition was observed when CF + virus was incubated prior to the addition of the cells. Therefore, the coelomic fluid of T. depressus has antiviral activity against SHV-1 and RV that is direct and stable at 72 °C. We suggest that further assays should be performed using more accurate methods to characterize new molecules with antiviral activity that may result in new drugs. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Inducing Stable α + β Microstructures during Selective Laser Melting of Ti-6Al-4V Using Intensified Intrinsic Heat Treatments

    PubMed Central

    Barriobero-Vila, Pere; Gussone, Joachim; Haubrich, Jan; Sandlöbes, Stefanie; Da Silva, Julio Cesar; Cloetens, Peter; Schell, Norbert; Requena, Guillermo

    2017-01-01

    Selective laser melting is a promising powder-bed-based additive manufacturing technique for titanium alloys: near net-shaped metallic components can be produced with high resource-efficiency and cost savings. For the most commercialized titanium alloy, namely Ti-6Al-4V, the complicated thermal profile of selective laser melting manufacturing (sharp cycles of steep heating and cooling rates) usually hinders manufacturing of components in a one-step process owing to the formation of brittle martensitic microstructures unsuitable for structural applications. In this work, an intensified intrinsic heat treatment is applied during selective laser melting of Ti-6Al-4V powder using a scanning strategy that combines porosity-optimized processing with a very tight hatch distance. Extensive martensite decomposition providing a uniform, fine lamellar α + β microstructure is obtained along the building direction. Moreover, structural evidence of the formation of the intermetallic α2-Ti3Al phase is provided. Variations in the lattice parameter of β serve as an indicator of the microstructural degree of stabilization. Interconnected 3D networks of β are generated in regions highly affected by the intensified intrinsic heat treatment applied. The results obtained reflect a contribution towards simultaneous selective laser melting-manufacturing and heat treatment for fabrication of Ti-6Al-4V parts. PMID:28772630

  17. How Stable Is Stable?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baehr, Marie

    1994-01-01

    Provides a problem where students are asked to find the point at which a soda can floating in some liquid changes its equilibrium between stable and unstable as the soda is removed from the can. Requires use of Newton's first law, center of mass, Archimedes' principle, stable and unstable equilibrium, and buoyant force position. (MVL)

  18. How Stable Is Stable?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baehr, Marie

    1994-01-01

    Provides a problem where students are asked to find the point at which a soda can floating in some liquid changes its equilibrium between stable and unstable as the soda is removed from the can. Requires use of Newton's first law, center of mass, Archimedes' principle, stable and unstable equilibrium, and buoyant force position. (MVL)

  19. Stability of the Encoding Plasmids and Surface Expression of CS6 Differs in Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) Encoding Different Heat-Stable (ST) Enterotoxins (STh and STp)

    PubMed Central

    Tobias, Joshua; Von Mentzer, Astrid; Loayza Frykberg, Patricia; Aslett, Martin; Page, Andrew J.; Sjöling, Åsa; Svennerholm, Ann-Mari

    2016-01-01

    Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC), one of the most common reasons of diarrhea among infants and children in developing countries, causes disease by expression of either or both of the enterotoxins heat-labile (LT) and heat-stable (ST; divided into human-type [STh] and porcine-type [STp] variants), and colonization factors (CFs) among which CS6 is one of the most prevalent ETEC CFs. In this study we show that ETEC isolates expressing CS6+STh have higher copy numbers of the cssABCD operon encoding CS6 than those expressing CS6+STp. Long term cultivation of up to ten over-night passages of ETEC isolates harboring CS6+STh (n = 10) or CS6+STp (n = 15) showed instability of phenotypic expression of CS6 in a majority of the CS6+STp isolates, whereas most of the CS6+STh isolates retained CS6 expression. The observed instability was a correlated with loss of genes cssA and cssD as examined by PCR. Mobilization of the CS6 plasmid from an unstable CS6+STp isolate into a laboratory E. coli strain resulted in loss of the plasmid after a single over-night passage whereas the plasmid from an CS6+STh strain was retained in the laboratory strain during 10 passages. A sequence comparison between the CS6 plasmids from a stable and an unstable ETEC isolate revealed that genes necessary for plasmid stabilization, for example pemI, pemK, stbA, stbB and parM, were not present in the unstable ETEC isolate. Our results indicate that stable retention of CS6 may in part be affected by the stability of the plasmid on which both CS6 and STp or STh are located. PMID:27054573

  20. Stability of the Encoding Plasmids and Surface Expression of CS6 Differs in Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) Encoding Different Heat-Stable (ST) Enterotoxins (STh and STp).

    PubMed

    Tobias, Joshua; Von Mentzer, Astrid; Loayza Frykberg, Patricia; Aslett, Martin; Page, Andrew J; Sjöling, Åsa; Svennerholm, Ann-Mari

    2016-01-01

    Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC), one of the most common reasons of diarrhea among infants and children in developing countries, causes disease by expression of either or both of the enterotoxins heat-labile (LT) and heat-stable (ST; divided into human-type [STh] and porcine-type [STp] variants), and colonization factors (CFs) among which CS6 is one of the most prevalent ETEC CFs. In this study we show that ETEC isolates expressing CS6+STh have higher copy numbers of the cssABCD operon encoding CS6 than those expressing CS6+STp. Long term cultivation of up to ten over-night passages of ETEC isolates harboring CS6+STh (n = 10) or CS6+STp (n = 15) showed instability of phenotypic expression of CS6 in a majority of the CS6+STp isolates, whereas most of the CS6+STh isolates retained CS6 expression. The observed instability was a correlated with loss of genes cssA and cssD as examined by PCR. Mobilization of the CS6 plasmid from an unstable CS6+STp isolate into a laboratory E. coli strain resulted in loss of the plasmid after a single over-night passage whereas the plasmid from an CS6+STh strain was retained in the laboratory strain during 10 passages. A sequence comparison between the CS6 plasmids from a stable and an unstable ETEC isolate revealed that genes necessary for plasmid stabilization, for example pemI, pemK, stbA, stbB and parM, were not present in the unstable ETEC isolate. Our results indicate that stable retention of CS6 may in part be affected by the stability of the plasmid on which both CS6 and STp or STh are located.

  1. Emerging antiviral drugs.

    PubMed

    De Clercq, Erik

    2008-09-01

    Foremost among the newly described antiviral agents that may be developed into drugs are, for the treatment of human papilloma virus (HPV) infections, cPrPMEDAP; for the treatment of herpes simplex virus (HSV) infections, BAY 57-1293; for the treatment of varicella-zoster virus (VZV) infections, FV-100 (prodrug of Cf 1743); for the treatment of cytomegalovirus (CMV) infections, maribavir; for the treatment of poxvirus infections, ST-246; for the treatment of hepatitis B virus (HBV) infections, tenofovir disoproxil fumarate (TDF) (which in the meantime has already been approved in the EU); for the treatment of various DNA virus infections, the hexadecyloxypropyl (HDP) and octadecyloxyethyl (ODE) prodrugs of cidofovir; for the treatment of orthomyxovirus infections (i.e., influenza), peramivir; for the treatment of hepacivirus infections (i.e., hepatitis C), the protease inhibitors telaprevir and boceprevir, the nucleoside RNA replicase inhibitors (NRRIs) PSI-6130 and R1479, and various non-nucleoside RNA replicase inhibitors (NNRRIs); for the treatment of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infections, integrase inhibitors (INIs) such as elvitegravir, nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTIs) such as apricitabine, non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NNRTIs) such as rilpivirine and dapivirine; and for the treatment of both HCV and HIV infections, cyclosporin A derivatives such as the non-immunosuppressive Debio-025.

  2. Autoimmune disease: A role for new anti-viral therapies?

    PubMed

    Dreyfus, David H

    2011-12-01

    Many chronic human diseases may have an underlying autoimmune mechanism. In this review, the author presents a case of autoimmune CIU (chronic idiopathic urticaria) in stable remission after therapy with a retroviral integrase inhibitor, raltegravir (Isentress). Previous reports located using the search terms "autoimmunity" and "anti-viral" and related topics in the pubmed data-base are reviewed suggesting that novel anti-viral agents such as retroviral integrase inhibitors, gene silencing therapies and eventually vaccines may provide new options for anti-viral therapy of autoimmune diseases. Cited epidemiologic and experimental evidence suggests that increased replication of epigenomic viral pathogens such as Epstein-Barr Virus (EBV) in chronic human autoimmune diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis (RA), systemic lupus Erythematosus (SLE), and multiple sclerosis (MS) may activate endogenous human retroviruses (HERV) as a pathologic mechanism. Memory B cells are the reservoir of infection of EBV and also express endogenous retroviruses, thus depletion of memory b-lymphocytes by monoclonal antibodies (Rituximab) may have therapeutic anti-viral effects in addition to effects on B-lymphocyte presentation of both EBV and HERV superantigens. Other novel anti-viral therapies of chronic autoimmune diseases, such as retroviral integrase inhibitors, could be effective, although not without risk.

  3. Stable, polarized betatron raditation: x-ray absorption spectroscopy in WDM unveiling ultrafast electron heating (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahieu, Benoît; Doepp, Andreas S.; Lifschitz, Agustin; Doche, Antoine; Thaury, Cédric; Corde, Sébastien; Gautier, Julien; Guillaume, Emilien; Malka, Victor; Rousse, Antoine; Jourdain, Noémie; Lecherbourg, Ludovic; Dorchies, Fabien; Ta Phuoc, Kim

    2017-05-01

    Betatron radiation from laser-plasma accelerators reproduces the principle of a synchrotron on a millimeter scale, but featuring femtosecond duration. Here we present the outcome of our latest developments, which now allow us to produce stable and polarized X-ray bursts. Moreover, the X-ray polarization can simply be adjusted by tuning the polarization of the laser driving the process. The excellent stability of the source is expressed in terms of pointing, flux, transverse distribution and critical energy of the spectrum. These combined features make our betatron source particularly suitable for applications in ultrafast X-ray science. In this presentation we will describe the generation process, relying on the ionization injection scheme for laser-plasma acceleration. We will show experimental measurements, numerical results and first applications in time-resolved spectroscopy.

  4. Continuous series of catchment-averaged sensible heat flux from a Large Aperture Scintillometer: efficient estimation of stability conditions and importance of fluxes under stable conditions.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samain, B.; Defloor, W.; Pauwels, V. R. N.

    2012-04-01

    A Large Aperture Scintillometer (LAS) observes the intensity of the atmospheric turbulence across large distances, which is related to the path averaged sensible heat flux, H. Two problems in the derivation of continuous series of H from LAS-data are investigated and the importance of nighttime H -fluxes is assessed. Firstly, as a LAS is unable to determine the sign of H, the transition from unstable to stable conditions is evaluated in order to make continuous H -series. Therefore, different algorithms to judge the atmospheric stability for a LAS installed over a distance of 9.5 km have been tested. The diurnal cycle of the refractive index structure parameter, CN2, results in the best suitable, operational algorithm. A second issue is the humidity correction for LAS-data, which is performed by using the Bowen ratio (β). As β is taken from ground-based measurements with data gaps, the number of resulting H -values is reduced. Not including this humidity correction results in a marginal error in H, but increases the completeness of the resulting H -series. Applying these conclusions to the two-year time series of the LAS, results in an almost continuous H -time series. As the majority of the time steps has been found to be under stable conditions, there is a clear impact of Hstable on H24h ,the 24h average of H. For stable conditions, Hstable -values are mostly negative, and hence lower than the H = 0 W/m2 assumption as is mostly adopted. For months where stable conditions prevail (Winter), H24h is overestimated using this assumption, and calculation of Hstable is recommended.

  5. Cell senescence is an antiviral defense mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Baz-Martínez, Maite; Da Silva-Álvarez, Sabela; Rodríguez, Estefanía; Guerra, Jorge; El Motiam, Ahmed; Vidal, Anxo; García-Caballero, Tomás; González-Barcia, Miguel; Sánchez, Laura; Muñoz-Fontela, César; Collado, Manuel; Rivas, Carmen

    2016-01-01

    Cellular senescence is often considered a protection mechanism triggered by conditions that impose cellular stress. Continuous proliferation, DNA damaging agents or activated oncogenes are well-known activators of cell senescence. Apart from a characteristic stable cell cycle arrest, this response also involves a proinflammatory phenotype known as senescence-associated secretory phenotype (SASP). This, together with the widely known interference with senescence pathways by some oncoviruses, had led to the hypothesis that senescence may also be part of the host cell response to fight virus. Here, we evaluate this hypothesis using vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) as a model. Our results show that VSV replication is significantly impaired in both primary and tumor senescent cells in comparison with non-senescent cells, and independently of the stimulus used to trigger senescence. Importantly, we also demonstrate a protective effect of senescence against VSV in vivo. Finally, our results identify the SASP as the major contributor to the antiviral defense exerted by cell senescence in vitro, and points to a role activating and recruiting the immune system to clear out the infection. Thus, our study indicates that cell senescence has also a role as a natural antiviral defense mechanism. PMID:27849057

  6. Cell senescence is an antiviral defense mechanism.

    PubMed

    Baz-Martínez, Maite; Da Silva-Álvarez, Sabela; Rodríguez, Estefanía; Guerra, Jorge; El Motiam, Ahmed; Vidal, Anxo; García-Caballero, Tomás; González-Barcia, Miguel; Sánchez, Laura; Muñoz-Fontela, César; Collado, Manuel; Rivas, Carmen

    2016-11-16

    Cellular senescence is often considered a protection mechanism triggered by conditions that impose cellular stress. Continuous proliferation, DNA damaging agents or activated oncogenes are well-known activators of cell senescence. Apart from a characteristic stable cell cycle arrest, this response also involves a proinflammatory phenotype known as senescence-associated secretory phenotype (SASP). This, together with the widely known interference with senescence pathways by some oncoviruses, had led to the hypothesis that senescence may also be part of the host cell response to fight virus. Here, we evaluate this hypothesis using vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) as a model. Our results show that VSV replication is significantly impaired in both primary and tumor senescent cells in comparison with non-senescent cells, and independently of the stimulus used to trigger senescence. Importantly, we also demonstrate a protective effect of senescence against VSV in vivo. Finally, our results identify the SASP as the major contributor to the antiviral defense exerted by cell senescence in vitro, and points to a role activating and recruiting the immune system to clear out the infection. Thus, our study indicates that cell senescence has also a role as a natural antiviral defense mechanism.

  7. Design of a Photoreactive Analogue of the Escherichia coli Heat-Stable Enterotoxin STIb: Use in Identifying Its Receptor on Rat Brush Border Membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gariepy, Jean; Schoolnik, Gary K.

    1986-01-01

    The Escherichia coli heat-stable enterotoxin, STIb was prepared by solid-phase peptide synthesis and purified to homogeneity by high-pressure liquid chromatography. This analogue was iodinated and shown to bind specifically to rat intestinal membranes. The radiolabeled peptide was derivatized at the amino terminus with the photoreactive heterobifunctional crosslinking agent N-hydroxysuccinimidyl p-benzoylbenzoate. This photoreactive probe also exhibited binding specificity. It was mixed with rat intestinal brush border membranes and photolyzed in the presence or absence of excess unlabeled STIb. Polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis performed in the presence of sodium dodecyl sulfate and 2-mercaptoethanol indicated that the peptide probe was cross-linked specifically to two molecular species of 57 and 75 kDa. One or both of these molecules appear to constitute the enterotoxin receptor or to be in close proximity to it.

  8. Home delivery of heat-stable vaccines in Indonesia: outreach immunization with a prefilled, single-use injection device.

    PubMed Central

    Sutanto, A.; Suarnawa, I. M.; Nelson, C. M.; Stewart, T.; Soewarso, T. I.

    1999-01-01

    Extending immunization coverage to underserved populations will require innovative immunization strategies. This study evaluated one such strategy: the use of a prefilled, single-use injection device for outreach immunization by village midwives. The device, UniJect, is designed to prevent refilling or reuse. Stored at ambient temperatures for up to 1 month in midwives' homes, vaccine-filled UniJect devices were immediately available for outreach. Between July 1995 and April 1996, 110 midwives on the Indonesia islands of Lombok and Bali visited the homes of newborn infants to deliver hepatitis B vaccine to the infants and tetanus toxoid to their mothers. Observations and interviews showed that the midwives used the device properly and safely to administer approximately 10,000 sterile injections in home settings. There were no problems with excessive heat exposure during the storage or delivery of vaccine. Injection recipients and midwives expressed a strong preference for the UniJect device over a standard syringe. Use of the prefilled device outside the cold chain simplified the logistics and facilitated the speed and efficiency of home visits, while the single-dose format minimized vaccine wastage. PMID:10083709

  9. Home delivery of heat-stable vaccines in Indonesia: outreach immunization with a prefilled, single-use injection device.

    PubMed

    Sutanto, A; Suarnawa, I M; Nelson, C M; Stewart, T; Soewarso, T I

    1999-01-01

    Extending immunization coverage to underserved populations will require innovative immunization strategies. This study evaluated one such strategy: the use of a prefilled, single-use injection device for outreach immunization by village midwives. The device, UniJect, is designed to prevent refilling or reuse. Stored at ambient temperatures for up to 1 month in midwives' homes, vaccine-filled UniJect devices were immediately available for outreach. Between July 1995 and April 1996, 110 midwives on the Indonesia islands of Lombok and Bali visited the homes of newborn infants to deliver hepatitis B vaccine to the infants and tetanus toxoid to their mothers. Observations and interviews showed that the midwives used the device properly and safely to administer approximately 10,000 sterile injections in home settings. There were no problems with excessive heat exposure during the storage or delivery of vaccine. Injection recipients and midwives expressed a strong preference for the UniJect device over a standard syringe. Use of the prefilled device outside the cold chain simplified the logistics and facilitated the speed and efficiency of home visits, while the single-dose format minimized vaccine wastage.

  10. Partial Purification and Characterization of a Heat Stable α-Amylase from a Thermophilic Actinobacteria, Streptomyces sp. MSC702

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Renu; Kumar, Vijay; Kapoor, Vishal

    2014-01-01

    A partial purification and biochemical characterization of the α-amylase from Streptomyces sp. MSC702 were carried out in this study. The optimum operational conditions for enzyme substrate reaction for amylolytic enzyme activity from the strain were evaluated. The optimum pH, temperature, and incubation period for assaying the enzyme were observed to be 5.0, 55°C, and 30 min, respectively. The extracellular extract was concentrated using ammonium sulfate precipitation. It was stable in the presence of metal ions (5 mM) such as K+, Co2+, and Mo2+, whereas Pb2+, Mn2+, Mg2+, Cu2+, Zn2+, Ba2+, Ca2+, Hg2+, Sn2+, Cr3+, Al3+, Ag+, and Fe2+ were found to have inhibitory effects. The enzyme activity was also unstable in the presence of 1% Triton X-100, 1% Tween 80, 5 mM sodium lauryl sulphate, 1% glycerol, 5 mM EDTA, and 5 mM denaturant urea. At temperature 60°C and pH 5.0, the enzyme stability was maximum. α-amylase retained 100% and 34.18% stability for 1 h and 4 h, respectively, at 60°C (pH 7.0). The enzyme exhibited a half-life of 195 min at 60°C temperature. The analysis of kinetic showed that the enzyme has Km of 2.4 mg/mL and Vmax of 21853.0 μmol/min/mg for soluble potato starch. The results indicate that the enzyme reflects their potentiality towards industrial utilization. PMID:25400941

  11. Expression of a heat-stable NADPH-dependent alcohol dehydrogenase in Caldicellulosiruptor bescii results in furan aldehyde detoxification.

    PubMed

    Chung, Daehwan; Verbeke, Tobin J; Cross, Karissa L; Westpheling, Janet; Elkins, James G

    2015-01-01

    Compounds such as furfural and 5-hydroxymethylfurfural (5-HMF) are generated through the dehydration of xylose and glucose, respectively, during dilute-acid pretreatment of lignocellulosic biomass and are also potent microbial growth and fermentation inhibitors. The enzymatic reduction of these furan aldehydes to their corresponding, and less toxic, alcohols is an engineering approach that has been successfully implemented in both Saccharomyces cerevisiae and ethanologenic Escherichia coli, but has not yet been investigated in thermophiles relevant to biofuel production through consolidated bioprocessing (CBP). Developing CBP-relevant biocatalysts that are either naturally resistant to such inhibitors, or are amenable to engineered resistance, is therefore, an important component in making biofuels production from lignocellulosic biomass feasible. A butanol dehydrogenase encoding gene from Thermoanaerobacter pseudethanolicus 39E (Teth39_1597), previously shown to have furfural and 5-HMF reducing capabilities, was cloned into a suicide plasmid, pDCW171 and transformed into a lactate dehydrogenase mutant of Caldicellulosiruptor bescii. Integration of the gene into the C. bescii chromosome was verified via PCR amplification and stable expression was observed up to 75°C. Heterologous expression of the NADPH-dependent BdhA enzyme conferred increased resistance of the engineered strain to both furfural and 5-HMF relative to the wild-type and parental strains. Further, when challenged with 15 mM concentrations of either furan aldehyde, the ability to eliminate furfural or 5-HMF from the culture medium was significantly improved in the engineered strain. A genetically engineered strain of C. bescii (JWCB044) has been constructed that shows both an improved tolerance to furan aldehydes and an improved ability to eliminate furfural and 5-HMF from the culture medium. The work presented here represents the first example of engineering furan aldehyde resistance into a CBP

  12. Antiviral therapy: a perspective

    PubMed Central

    Shahidi Bonjar, Amir Hashem

    2016-01-01

    sufficient research has yielded positive results in animal models, EVAC could be used as a supportive treatment in humans along with conventional antiviral therapies. EVAC would not be suitable for all viral infections, but could be expected to decrease the casualties resulting from blood-borne viral infections. The EVAC approach would be efficient in terms of time, effort, and expenditure in the research and treatment of blood-borne viral infections. PMID:26893542

  13. Effects of age and ambient temperature on the responses of infant mice to heat-stable enterotoxin of Escherichia coli: assay modifications.

    PubMed Central

    Moon, H W; Fung, P Y; Whipp, S C; Isaacson, R E

    1978-01-01

    The response of infant mice to heat-stable enterotoxin from Escherichia coli was affected by the age of the mice (2, 4, 6, and 8 days) and by the ambient temperature (25, 30, and 37 degrees C) after exposure to the enterotoxin. The younger mice and/or mice held at lower temperatures tended to accumulate intestinal fluid (high gut weight/body weight ratios), but older mice and/or mice held at higher temperatures tended to respond with diarrhea and low gut weight/body weight ratios. The standard infant mouse assay forheat-stable E. coli enterotoxin can be simplified, without loss of sensitivity or reliability, by holding the mice at 37 degrees C after exposure and using diarrhea as the index of response. Diarrhea can be detected easily by incorporating dye in the inocula and (at the end of the assay) checking for dye mixed with feces on the rear quarters of the mice or on a sheet of white paper placed under them during incubation. PMID:352935

  14. Cloning, Sequencing, and Characterization of a Heat- and Alkali-Stable Type I Pullulanase from Anaerobranca gottschalkii

    PubMed Central

    Bertoldo, Costanzo; Armbrecht, Martin; Becker, Fiona; Schäfer, Thomas; Antranikian, Garabed; Liebl, Wolfgang

    2004-01-01

    The gene encoding a type I pullulanase was identified from the genome sequence of the anaerobic thermoalkaliphilic bacterium Anaerobranca gottschalkii. In addition, the homologous gene was isolated from a gene library of Anaerobranca horikoshii and sequenced. The proteins encoded by these two genes showed 39% amino acid sequence identity to the pullulanases from the thermophilic anaerobic bacteria Fervidobacterium pennivorans and Thermotoga maritima. The pullulanase gene from A. gottschalkii (encoding 865 amino acids with a predicted molecular mass of 98 kDa) was cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli strain BL21(DE3) so that the protein did not have the signal peptide. Accordingly, the molecular mass of the purified recombinant pullulanase (rPulAg) was 96 kDa. Pullulan hydrolysis activity was optimal at pH 8.0 and 70°C, and under these physicochemical conditions the half-life of rPulAg was 22 h. By using an alternative expression strategy in E. coli Tuner(DE3)(pLysS), the pullulanase gene from A. gottschalkii, including its signal peptide-encoding sequence, was cloned. In this case, the purified recombinant enzyme was a truncated 70-kDa form (rPulAg′). The N-terminal sequence of purified rPulAg′ was found 252 amino acids downstream from the start site, presumably indicating that there was alternative translation initiation or N-terminal protease cleavage by E. coli. Interestingly, most of the physicochemical properties of rPulAg′ were identical to those of rPulAg. Both enzymes degraded pullulan via an endo-type mechanism, yielding maltotriose as the final product, and hydrolytic activity was also detected with amylopectin, starch, β-limited dextrins, and glycogen but not with amylose. This substrate specificity is typical of type I pullulanases. rPulAg was inhibited by cyclodextrins, whereas addition of mono- or bivalent cations did not have a stimulating effect. In addition, rPulAg′ was stable in the presence of 0.5% sodium dodecyl sulfate, 20% Tween

  15. Viral Ancestors of Antiviral Systems

    PubMed Central

    Villarreal, Luis P.

    2011-01-01

    All life must survive their corresponding viruses. Thus antiviral systems are essential in all living organisms. Remnants of virus derived information are also found in all life forms but have historically been considered mostly as junk DNA. However, such virus derived information can strongly affect host susceptibility to viruses. In this review, I evaluate the role viruses have had in the origin and evolution of host antiviral systems. From Archaea through bacteria and from simple to complex eukaryotes I trace the viral components that became essential elements of antiviral immunity. I conclude with a reexamination of the ‘Big Bang’ theory for the emergence of the adaptive immune system in vertebrates by horizontal transfer and note how viruses could have and did provide crucial and coordinated features. PMID:22069523

  16. Viral ancestors of antiviral systems.

    PubMed

    Villarreal, Luis P

    2011-10-01

    All life must survive their corresponding viruses. Thus antiviral systems are essential in all living organisms. Remnants of virus derived information are also found in all life forms but have historically been considered mostly as junk DNA. However, such virus derived information can strongly affect host susceptibility to viruses. In this review, I evaluate the role viruses have had in the origin and evolution of host antiviral systems. From Archaea through bacteria and from simple to complex eukaryotes I trace the viral components that became essential elements of antiviral immunity. I conclude with a reexamination of the 'Big Bang' theory for the emergence of the adaptive immune system in vertebrates by horizontal transfer and note how viruses could have and did provide crucial and coordinated features.

  17. Antivirals in the transplant setting.

    PubMed

    Griffiths, Paul D

    2006-09-01

    Over the past quarter of a century, antiviral drugs have moved from an experimental adventure in transplant patients to a situation where they are used routinely to prevent diseases caused by several viruses. Furthermore, they have significantly reduced several medical complications of transplantation, such as graft rejection, thereby implicating viruses as components of their pathogenesis. By controlling these major complication, the development of these antiviral drugs and their prodrugs, has therefore greatly facilitated the clinical expansion of transplantation, allowing life saving procedures to be offered to more patients who could potentially benefit. This article will briefly summaries which viruses are important following transplantation and outline the evidence-base from randomized controlled clinical trails for the deployment of antiviral drugs to prevent viral diseases.

  18. Precipitation rates and atmospheric heat transport during the Cenomanian greenhouse warming in North America: Estimates from a stable isotope mass-balance model

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ufnar, David F.; Ludvigson, Greg A.; Gonzalez, L.; Grocke, D.R.

    2008-01-01

    Stable isotope mass-balance modeling results of meteoric ??18O values from the Cenomanian Stage of the Cretaceous Western Interior Basin (KWIB) suggest that precipitation and evaporation fluxes were greater than that of the present and significantly different from simulations of Albian KWIB paleohydrology. Sphaerosiderite meteoric ??18O values have been compiled from the Lower Tuscaloosa Formation of southwestern Mississippi (25??N paleolatitude), The Dakota Formation Rose Creek Pit, Fairbury Nebraska (35??N) and the Dunvegan Formation of eastern British Columbia (55??N paleolatitude). These paleosol siderite ??18O values define a paleolatitudinal gradient ranging from - 4.2??? VPDB at 25??N to - 12.5??? VPDB at 55??N. This trend is significantly steeper and more depleted than a modern theoretical siderite gradient (25??N: - 1.7???; 65??N: - 5.6??? VPDB ), and a Holocene meteoric calcite trend (27??N: - 3.6???; 67??N: - 7.4??? VPDB). The Cenomanian gradient is also comparatively steeper than the Albian trend determined for the KWIB in the mid- to high latitudes. The steep latitudinal trend in meteoric ??18O values may be the result of increased precipitation and evaporation fluxes (amount effects) under a more vigorous greenhouse-world hydrologic cycle. A stable-isotope mass-balance model has been used to generate estimates of precipitation and evaporation fluxes and precipitation rates. Estimates of Cenomanian precipitation rates based upon the mass-balance modeling of the KWIB range from 1400??mm/yr at 25??N paleolatitude to 3600??mm/yr at 45??N paleolatitude. The precipitation-evaporation (P-E) flux values were used to delineate zones of moisture surplus and moisture deficit. Comparisons between Cenomanian P-E and modern theoretical siderite, and Holocene calcite latitudinal trends shows an amplification of low-latitude moisture deficits between 5-25??N paleolatitude and moisture surpluses between 40-60??N paleolatitude. The low-latitude moisture deficits

  19. Interchromosomal huddle kickstarts antiviral defense.

    PubMed

    Schoenfelder, Stefan; Fraser, Peter

    2008-07-11

    Long-distance chromosomal interactions are emerging as a potential mechanism of gene expression control. In this issue, Apostolou and Thanos (2008) describe how viral infection elicits interchromosomal associations between the interferon-beta (IFN-beta) gene enhancer and DNA binding sites of the transcription factor NF-kappaB, resulting in the initiation of transcription and an antiviral response.

  20. Novel antiviral activity of chemokines

    SciTech Connect

    Nakayama, Takashi; Shirane, Jumi; Hieshima, Kunio; Shibano, Michiko; Watanabe, Masayasu; Jin, Zhe; Nagakubo, Daisuke; Saito, Takuya; Shimomura, Yoshikazu; Yoshie, Osamu . E-mail: o.yoshie@med.kindai.ac.jp

    2006-07-05

    Antimicrobial peptides are a diverse family of small, mostly cationic polypeptides that kill bacteria, fungi and even some enveloped viruses, while chemokines are a group of mostly cationic small proteins that induce directed migration of leukocytes through interactions with a group of seven transmembrane G protein-coupled receptors. Recent studies have shown that antimicrobial peptides and chemokines have substantially overlapping functions. Thus, while some antimicrobial peptides are chemotactic for leukocytes, some chemokines can kill a wide range of bacteria and fungi. Here, we examined a possible direct antiviral activity of chemokines against an enveloped virus HSV-1. Among 22 human chemokines examined, chemokines such as MIP-1{alpha}/CCL3, MIP-1{beta}/CCL4 and RANTES/CCL5 showed a significant direct antiviral activity against HSV-1. It is intriguing that these chemokines are mostly known to be highly expressed by effector CD8{sup +} T cells. The chemokines with a significant anti-HSV-1 activity commonly bound to HSV-1 virions via envelope glycoprotein gB. Electron microscopy revealed that the chemokines with a significant anti-HSV-1 activity were commonly capable of generating pores in the envelope of HSV-1. Thus, some chemokines have a significant direct antiviral activity against HSV-1 in vitro and may have a potential role in host defense against HSV-1 as a direct antiviral agent.

  1. Antivirals for the common cold.

    PubMed

    Jefferson, T O; Tyrrell, D

    2001-01-01

    The common cold is a ubiquitous short and usually mild illness for which preventive and treatment interventions have been under development since the mid-40s. As our understanding of the disease has increased, more experimental antivirals have been developed. This review attempts to draw together experimental evidence of the effects of these compounds. To identify, assemble, evaluate and (if possible) synthesise the results of published and unpublished randomised controlled trials of the effects of antivirals to prevent or minimise the impact of the common cold. We searched electronic databases, corresponded with researchers and handsearched the archives of the MRC's Common Cold Unit (CCU). We included original reports of randomised and quasi-randomised trials assessing the effects of antivirals on volunteers artificially infected and in individuals exposed to colds in the community. We included 241 studies assessing the effects of Interferons, interferon-inducers and other antivirals on experimental and naturally occurring common colds, contained in 230 reports. We structured our comparisons by experimental or community setting. Although intranasal interferons have high preventive efficacy against experimental colds (protective efficacy 46%, 37% to 54%) and to a lesser extent against natural colds (protective efficacy 24%, 21% to 27%) and are also significantly more effective than placebo in attenuating the course of experimental colds (WMD 15.90, 13.42 to 18.38), their safety profile makes compliance with their use difficult. For example, prolonged prevention of community colds with interferons causes blood-tinged nasal discharge (OR 4.52, 3.78 to 5.41). Dipyridamole (protective efficacy against natural colds 49%, 30% to 62%), ICI 130, 685 (protective efficacy against experimental colds 58%, 35% to 74% ), Impulsin (palmitate) (protective efficacy against natural colds 44%, CI 35% to 52% ) and Pleconaril (protective efficacy against experimental colds 71%, 15% to

  2. Heat Stable Enzymes from Thermophiles

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1998-02-01

    Capillary electrophoresis 67 APPLICATIONS 67 Heavy metal removal from waste water 67 Time 68 Phosphate level 68 Alkaline phosphatase level 68 Heavy...glycerol 0.001 % Bromphenol blue 20 microliters of 1 % stain 5% P-mercaptoethanol 1.0 ml of 100% P-mercaptoethanol water 1.75 ml Store in 1 ml...aliquots at -20 TC 30% Acrylamide (29.2% acrylamide, 0.8% bisacrylamide) Dissolve 29.2 gms acrylamide in about 50 ml water Add 0.8 gms bisacrylamide and

  3. Involvement of protein kinase C in the mechanism of action of Escherichia coli heat-stable enterotoxin (STa) in a human colonic carcinoma cell line, COLO-205

    SciTech Connect

    Gupta, Dyuti Datta; Saha, Subhrajit; Chakrabarti, Manoj K. . E-mail: mkc_niced@yahoo.co.in

    2005-08-01

    The present study was undertaken to determine the involvement of calcium-protein kinase C pathway in the mechanism of action of Escherichia coli heat stable enterotoxin (STa) apart from STa-induced activation of guanylate cyclase in human colonic carcinoma cell line COLO-205, which was used as a model cultured cell line to study the mechanism of action of E. coli STa. In response to E. coli STa, protein kinase C (PKC) activity was increased in a time-dependent manner with its physical translocation from cytosol to membrane. Inhibition of the PKC activity in membrane fraction and inhibition of its physical translocation in response to IP{sub 3}-mediated calcium release inhibitor dantrolene suggested the involvement of intracellular store depletion in the regulation of PKC activity. Among different PKC isoforms, predominant involvement of calcium-dependent protein kinase C (PKC{alpha}) was specified using isotype-specific pseudosubstrate, which showed pronounce enzyme activity. Inhibition of enzyme activity by PKC{alpha}-specific inhibitor Goe6976 and immunoblott study employing isotype-specific antibody further demonstrated the involvement of calcium-dependent isoform of PKC in the mechanism of action of E. coli STa. Moreover, inhibition of guanylate cyclase activity by PKC{alpha}-specific inhibitor Goe6976 suggested the involvement of PKC{alpha} in the regulation of guanylate cyclase activity.

  4. A heat-stable cytotoxic factor produced by Achromobacter xylosoxidans isolated from Brazilian patients with CF is associated with in vitro increased proinflammatory cytokines.

    PubMed

    Mantovani, Rebeca P; Levy, Carlos E; Yano, Tomomasa

    2012-07-01

    Recently, Achromobacter xylosoxidans has been related to chronic lung diseases in patients suffering from cystic fibrosis (CF), but its involvement has not been elucidated. Some virulence properties of A. xylosoxidans isolated from Brazilian patients with CF were revealed in this work. This study examined the production of a cytotoxic factor of A. xylosoxidans capable of stimulating the secretion of inflammatory cytokines (IL-6 and IL-8) from lung mucoepidermoid carcinoma cells (NCI-H292). The cytokines were measured using enzyme-linked immunosorbent (ELISA) assays. To investigate whether the cytotoxic factors may be endotoxins, they were treated with polymyxin B. The culture supernatants of all A. xylosoxidans produced a heat stable, active cytotoxin in NCI-H292 cells capable of leading to intracellular vacuoles and subsequent cell contact loss, chromatin condensation, a picnotic nucleus and cell death. There was a higher concentration of proinflammatory cytokines in the NCI-H292 cells after 24 h of incubation, with the fraction greater than 50 kDa from the culture supernatant. The cytotoxin activity remained even after treatment with polymyxin B, which suggested that the release of IL-6 and IL-8 was not stimulated by lipopolysaccharide (LPS). The cytotoxic factor produced by A. xylosoxidans may represent an important virulence factor, which when associated with CF chronic lung inflammation, may cause tissue damage and decline of lung function. Copyright © 2012 European Cystic Fibrosis Society. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Preliminary results from a microvolume, dynamically heated analytical column for preconcentration and separation of simple gases prior to stable isotopic analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panetta, Robert James; Seed, Mike

    2016-04-01

    Stable isotope applications that call for preconcentration (i.e., greenhouse gas measurements, small carbonate samples, etc.) universally call for cryogenic fluids such as liquid nitrogen, dry ice slurries, or expensive external recirculation chillers. This adds significant complexity, first and foremost in the requirements to store and handle such dangerous materials. A second layer of complexity is the instrument itself - with mechanisms to physically move either coolant around the trap, or move a trap in or out of the coolant. Not to mention design requirements for hardware that can safely isolate the fluid from other sensitive areas. In an effort to simplify the isotopic analysis of gases requiring preconcentration, we have developed a new separation technology, UltiTrapTM (patent pending), which leverage's the proprietary Advanced Purge & Trap (APT) Technology employed in elemental analysers from Elementar Analysensysteme GmbH products. UltiTrapTM has been specially developed as a micro volume, dynamically heated GC separation column. The introduction of solid-state cooling technology enables sub-zero temperatures without cryogenics or refrigerants, eliminates all moving parts, and increases analytical longevity due to no boiling losses of coolant . This new technology makes it possible for the system to be deployed as both a focussing device and as a gas separation device. Initial data on synthetic gas mixtures (CO2/CH4/N2O in air), and real-world applications including long-term room air and a comparison between carbonated waters of different origins show excellent agreement with previous technologies.

  6. Evidence for the presence of heat-stable protein (HPr) and ATP-dependent HPr kinase in heterofermentative lactobacilli lacking phosphoenolpyruvate:glycose phosphotransferase activity.

    PubMed Central

    Reizer, J; Peterkofsky, A; Romano, A H

    1988-01-01

    An analysis of the biochemical basis for the lack of phosphoenolpyruvate:glycose phosphotransferase activity in heterofermentative lactobacilli was carried out. Extracts of Lactobacillus brevis and Lactobacillus buchneri failed to reconstitute phosphotransferase activity of extracts of Staphylococcus aureus mutants impaired in the phosphotransferase system due to the absence of enzyme I, enzyme IILac, or enzyme IIILac activity, suggesting that these lactobacilli lack those phosphotransferase system components. In contrast, complementation tests with an extract of a S. aureus mutant deficient in heat-stable protein (HPr) indicated the presence of HPr activity in heterofermentative lactobacilli. The HPr of L. brevis was purified and shown to have properties similar to those of a typical HPr. In addition, L. brevis possesses an ATP-dependent protein kinase that phosphorylates a serine residue of the endogenous HPr as well as other HPrs of Gram-positive origin. The kinase activity is markedly stimulated by phosphorylated compounds related to sugar metabolism and is negatively modulated by orthophosphate, pyrophosphate, or arsenate and by a low molecular weight endogenous factor. In keeping with the idea of a regulatory role for the phosphorylation of HPr in lactobacilli, a HPr[Ser(P)] phosphatase activity in L. brevis was also demonstrated. On the basis of the finding of HPr and a system for its reversible covalent modification in an organism devoid of a functional phosphotransferase system we propose that, in lactobacilli, HPr has a role in the regulation of pathways other than the phosphotransferase system. Images PMID:2832843

  7. Virulence gene profiling of enteroaggregative Escherichia coli heat-stable enterotoxin 1-harboring E. coli (EAST1EC) derived from sporadic diarrheal patients.

    PubMed

    Konno, Takayuki; Yatsuyanagi, Jun; Saito, Shioko

    2012-04-01

    Between 2007 and 2009, a total of 2168 Escherichia coli strains derived from diarrheal patients, defined as putative diarrheagenic E. coli (DEC), were collected from medical institutions in Akita prefecture, Japan. Thirty five of the strains lacked typical pathogenic determinants of DEC other than astA, which encodes enteroaggregative E. coli (EAggEC) heat-stable enterotoxin 1 (EAST1). These E. coli strains are referred to as EAST1EC. Several studies have suggested a role of EAST1 in diarrhea; however, the correlation between diarrhea and the presence of astA remains inconclusive. To investigate whether EAST1EC strains derived from diarrheal patients shared pathogenic factors other than EAST1, virulence gene profiling of 12 virulence genes - iha, lpfA, ldaG, pilS, pic, pet, irp2, daa, aah, aid, cdtB and hlyA - was carried out. PCR analysis revealed that four of the 35 EAST1EC strains harbored only astA, 24 harbored genes associated with adhesins and intestinal colonization, three strains harbored the gene for α-hemolysin, and 24 strains harbored the gene for a siderophore. These results indicated that some EAST1EC strains harbor various virulence genes associated with distinct E. coli pathotypes, primarily enterohemorrhagic E. coli and EAggEC, which may represent additional pathogenic determinants of EAST1EC.

  8. Binding of Escherichia coli heat-stable toxin and rise of guanylyl cyclase activity in the brush-border membranes of rabbit intestinal epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Bhattacharya, J; Chakrabarti, M K

    1999-03-01

    The study examines the age-related differences in the density of Escherichia coli heat-stable enterotoxin (STa) receptors in the small intestine of rabbits. The number of STa receptors was found to be 1.7 x 10(12) in 14-day old rabbits compared to 2.4 x 10(9) in 14-week old rabbits per milligram brush-border membrane protein. The STa-induced guanylyl cyclase activity in the intestinal brush-border membranes was found to be stimulated by 6.2 folds over the basal enzyme activity in 14-day old rabbits, whereas in the 14-week old rabbits, it was 4 folds over the basal activity. Moreover, the enzyme activity remained lower in the adult rabbits compared to the younger ones. Autoradiographic analysis of sodium dodecyl sulphate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis showed two STa-binding proteins of apparent molecular weights of 140 and 38 kDa in the intestinal brush-border membranes of rabbits.

  9. Henipavirus pathogenesis and antiviral approaches.

    PubMed

    Mathieu, Cyrille; Horvat, Branka

    2015-03-01

    Hendra virus and Nipah virus are closely related, recently emerged zoonotic paramyxoviruses, belonging to the Henipavirus genus. Both viruses induce generalized vasculitis affecting particularly the respiratory tract and CNS. The exceptionally broad species tropism of Henipavirus, the high case fatality rate and person-to-person transmission associated with Nipah virus outbreaks emphasize the necessity of effective antiviral strategies for these intriguing threatening pathogens. Current therapeutic approaches, validated in animal models, target early steps in viral infection; they include the use of neutralizing virus-specific antibodies and blocking membrane fusion with peptides that bind the viral fusion protein. A better understanding of Henipavirus pathogenesis is critical for the further advancement of antiviral treatment, and we summarize here the recent progress in the field.

  10. Antiviral effect of lithium chloride.

    PubMed

    Cernescu, C; Popescu, L; Constantinescu, S; Cernescu, S

    1988-01-01

    Studies in human embryo fibroblasts infected with measles or herpes simplex virus showed a reduction in virus yield when cultures were pretreated with 1-10 mM lithium chloride doses. Maximum effect was obtained by a 1 h treatment with 10 mM lithium chloride, preceding viral infection by 19-24 hours. A specific antiviral effect against measles virus was manifest immediately after culture pretreatment. Intermittent treatment with 10 mM lithium chloride of cultures persistently infected with measles or herpes virus obtained from human myeloid K-562 cell line shows a reduction in the extracellular virus yield. In the K-562/herpes virus system, the culture treatment with lithium chloride and acyclovir (10 microM) has an additive inhibitory effect on virus production. The paper is focused on the mechanism of lithium chloride antiviral action and the expediency of lithium therapy in SSPE (subacute sclerosing panencephalitis).

  11. Antiviral agents derived from novel 1-adamantyl singlet nitrenes.

    PubMed

    Kesel, Andreas J; Weiss, Hans-Christoph; Schönleber, Andreas; Day, Craig W; Barnard, Dale L; Detorio, Mervi A; Schinazi, Raymond F

    2012-12-07

    Amantadine constitutes an interesting, diamond crystal lattice-shaped, antivirally active amine with an inhibitory effect on influenza A viruses causing common 'flu' in humans. Unfortunately, amantadine forfeited most of its therapeutic potential because of resistance development in recent influenza A virus isolates. The antiviral efficacy of amantadine congeners can be chemically modified, resulting in re-constitution, improvement and/or extension of antiviral activities mediated by amino-adamantyls. Newly synthesized compounds were evaluated towards HIV type-1 (HIV-1) replication in primary human lymphocytes. One N-phenacyl amantadine derivative was investigated for inhibiting the in vitro replication of respiratory viruses (influenza A viruses, influenza B virus, human parainfluenza virus type 3 and severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus). Two ketone-stabilized 1-adamantyl singlet nitrenes were discovered serendipitously. To our best knowledge these are the first persistently stable nitrenes to be reported. Their structure was proved by determining the X-ray single crystal structure of one hydrolytic elaboration product. This salt adduct revealed an incommensurately modulated crystal structure, which was solved by extensive computational refinement. We could show that ketone-stabilized 1-adamantyl singlet nitrenes are versatile synthons for the synthesis of antiviral drug candidates. An amantadine-folate conjugate was inhibitory on HIV-1 replication in primary human lymphocytes, and one N-phenacyl amantadine derivative was inhibitory towards low pathogenic avian influenza A virus (H5N1) replication in vitro. These results indicate that the aromatic-aliphatic ketone-stabilized 1-adamantyl singlet nitrenes, beyond being of fundamental interest in organic chemistry, represent versatile synthons for the synthesis of new amantadine-related potentially antiviral drugs.

  12. Peptide-Induced Antiviral Protection by Cytotoxic T Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schulz, Manfred; Zinkernagel, Rolf M.; Hengartner, Hans

    1991-02-01

    A specific antiviral cytotoxic immune response in vivo could be induced by the subcutaneous injection of the T-cell epitope of the lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV) nucleoprotein as an unmodified free synthetic peptide (Arg-Pro-Gln-Ala-Ser-Gly-Val-Tyr-Met-Gly-Asn-Leu-Thr-Ala-Gln) emulsified in incomplete Freund's adjuvant. This immunization rendered mice into a LCMV-specific protective state as shown by the inhibition of LCMV replication in spleens of such mice. The protection level of these mice correlated with the ability to respond to the peptide challenge by CD8^+ virus-specific cytotoxic T cells. This is a direct demonstration that peptide vaccines can be antivirally protective in vivo, thus encouraging further search for appropriate mixtures of stable peptides that may be used as T-cell vaccines.

  13. Can Antiviral Drugs Contain Pandemic Influenza Transmission?

    PubMed Central

    Becker, Niels G.; Wang, Dingcheng

    2011-01-01

    Antiviral drugs dispensed during the 2009 influenza pandemic generally failed to contain transmission. This poses the question of whether preparedness for a future pandemic should include plans to use antiviral drugs to mitigate transmission. Simulations using a standard transmission model that allows for infected arrivals and delayed vaccination show that attempts to contain transmission require relatively few antiviral doses. In contrast, persistent use of antiviral drugs when the reproduction number remains above 1 use very many doses and are unlikely to reduce the eventual attack rate appreciably unless the stockpile is very large. A second model, in which the community has a household structure, shows that the effectiveness of a strategy of dispensing antiviral drugs to infected households decreases rapidly with time delays in dispensing the antivirals. Using characteristics of past pandemics it is estimated that at least 80% of primary household cases must present upon show of symptoms to have a chance of containing transmission by dispensing antiviral drugs to households. To determine data needs, household outbreaks were simulated with 50% receiving antiviral drugs early and 50% receiving antiviral drugs late. A test to compare the size of household outbreaks indicates that at least 100–200 household outbreaks need to be monitored to find evidence that antiviral drugs can mitigate transmission of the newly emerged virus. Use of antiviral drugs in an early attempt to contain transmission should be part of preparedness plans for a future influenza pandemic. Data on the incidence of the first 350 cases and the eventual attack rates of the first 200 hundred household outbreaks should be used to estimate the initial reproduction number R and the effectiveness of antiviral drugs to mitigate transmission. Use of antiviral drugs to mitigate general transmission should cease if these estimates indicate that containment of transmission is unlikely. PMID:21464934

  14. Rapid differentiation of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli that produce heat-stable and heat-labile toxins by frequency-pulsed electron capture gas-liquid chromatography analysis of diarrheal stool specimens.

    PubMed Central

    Brooks, J B; Basta, M T; el Kholy, A M; Moss, C W

    1984-01-01

    Thirty-three stool specimens from infants in the village of Tamooh near Cairo, Egypt, were studied by frequency-pulsed electron capture gas-liquid chromatography (FPEC-GLC). In 13 of the diarrheal cases, the suspected causative agent isolated was Escherichia coli which produced heat-stable toxin (ST), and in 10 other cases E. coli that produced heat-labile toxin (LT) were isolated. Ten control stool samples, collected from infants from whom no pathogenic organisms were isolated, were analyzed at the same time. Comparisons also were made against healthy control stools from individuals in the United States who had been previously analyzed by FPEC-GLC (Brooks et al., J. Clin. Microbiol. 20:549-560, 1984). The stools were suspended in water and centrifuged, and the supernatant was extracted with organic solvents and derivatized to form electron-capturing derivatives of carboxylic acids, hydroxy acids, alcohols, and amines. Results from the study showed distinct differences among the FPEC-GLC profiles of E. coli ST-positive stools, of E. coli LT-positive stools, and of the control stool samples. An unidentified compound appearing in the ether-soluble hydroxy acid fraction from E. coli ST-positive stools was tentatively identified by mass spectrometry as 6-methoxy-2-hydroxyhexanoic acid. 6-Methoxy-2-hydroxyhexanoic acid was found in all stools that contained E. coli ST but was not present either in stools from which E. coli LT was isolated or in control samples. 6-Methoxy-2-hydroxyhexanoic acid may prove to be an important marker for use in the identification of E. coli ST. In addition to 6-methoxy-2-hydroxyhexanoic acid, the carboxylic acid, alcohol, and amine FPEC-GLC profiles obtained from stools were very different between these two organisms. The data indicate that FPEC-GLC analysis of diarrheal stool specimens might be a rapid way to distinguish diarrhea caused by E. coli ST, E. coli LT, Clostridium difficile, and rotavirus. PMID:6394617

  15. Escherichia coli Heat-Stable Enterotoxin Mediates Na+/H+ Exchanger 4 Inhibition Involving cAMP in T84 Human Intestinal Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Beltrán, Ana R.; Carraro-Lacroix, Luciene R.; Bezerra, Camila N. A.; Cornejo, Marcelo; Norambuena, Katrina; Toledo, Fernando; Araos, Joaquín; Pardo, Fabián; Leiva, Andrea; Sanhueza, Carlos; Malnic, Gerhard; Sobrevia, Luis; Ramírez, Marco A.

    2015-01-01

    The enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli strains lead to diarrhoea in humans due to heat-labile and heat-stable (STa) enterotoxins. STa increases Cl-release in intestinal cells, including the human colonic carcinoma T84 cell line, involving increased cGMP and membrane alkalization due to reduced Na+/H+ exchangers (NHEs) activity. Since NHEs modulate intracellular pH (pHi), and NHE1, NHE2, and NHE4 are expressed in T84 cells, we characterized the STa role as modulator of these exchangers. pHi was assayed by the NH4Cl pulse technique and measured by fluorescence microscopy in BCECF–preloaded cells. pHi recovery rate (dpHi/dt) was determined in the absence or presence of 0.25 μmol/L STa (30 minutes), 25 μmol/L HOE-694 (concentration inhibiting NHE1 and NHE2), 500 μmol/L sodium nitroprusside (SNP, spontaneous nitric oxide donor), 100 μmol/L dibutyryl cyclic GMP (db-cGMP), 100 nmol/L H89 (protein kinase A inhibitor), or 10 μmol/L forskolin (adenylyl cyclase activator). cGMP and cAMP were measured in cell extracts by radioimmunoassay, and buffering capacity (ßi) and H+ efflux (JH+) was determined. NHE4 protein abundance was determined by western blotting. STa and HOE-694 caused comparable reduction in dpHi/dt and JH+ (~63%), without altering basal pHi (range 7.144–7.172). STa did not alter ßi value in a range of 1.6 pHi units. The dpHi/dt and JH+ was almost abolished (~94% inhibition) by STa + HOE-694. STa effect was unaltered by db-cGMP or SNP. However, STa and forskolin increased cAMP level. STa–decreased dpHi/dt and JH+ was mimicked by forskolin, and STa + HOE-694 effect was abolished by H89. Thus, incubation of T84 cells with STa results in reduced NHE4 activity leading to a lower capacity of pHi recovery requiring cAMP, but not cGMP. STa effect results in a causal phenomenon (STa/increased cAMP/increased PKA activity/reduced NHE4 activity) ending with intracellular acidification that could have consequences in the gastrointestinal cells function promoting

  16. Escherichia coli Heat-Stable Enterotoxin Mediates Na+/H+ Exchanger 4 Inhibition Involving cAMP in T84 Human Intestinal Epithelial Cells.

    PubMed

    Beltrán, Ana R; Carraro-Lacroix, Luciene R; Bezerra, Camila N A; Cornejo, Marcelo; Norambuena, Katrina; Toledo, Fernando; Araos, Joaquín; Pardo, Fabián; Leiva, Andrea; Sanhueza, Carlos; Malnic, Gerhard; Sobrevia, Luis; Ramírez, Marco A

    2015-01-01

    The enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli strains lead to diarrhoea in humans due to heat-labile and heat-stable (STa) enterotoxins. STa increases Cl-release in intestinal cells, including the human colonic carcinoma T84 cell line, involving increased cGMP and membrane alkalization due to reduced Na+/H+ exchangers (NHEs) activity. Since NHEs modulate intracellular pH (pHi), and NHE1, NHE2, and NHE4 are expressed in T84 cells, we characterized the STa role as modulator of these exchangers. pHi was assayed by the NH4Cl pulse technique and measured by fluorescence microscopy in BCECF-preloaded cells. pHi recovery rate (dpHi/dt) was determined in the absence or presence of 0.25 μmol/L STa (30 minutes), 25 μmol/L HOE-694 (concentration inhibiting NHE1 and NHE2), 500 μmol/L sodium nitroprusside (SNP, spontaneous nitric oxide donor), 100 μmol/L dibutyryl cyclic GMP (db-cGMP), 100 nmol/L H89 (protein kinase A inhibitor), or 10 μmol/L forskolin (adenylyl cyclase activator). cGMP and cAMP were measured in cell extracts by radioimmunoassay, and buffering capacity (ßi) and H+ efflux (JH+) was determined. NHE4 protein abundance was determined by western blotting. STa and HOE-694 caused comparable reduction in dpHi/dt and JH+ (~63%), without altering basal pHi (range 7.144-7.172). STa did not alter ßi value in a range of 1.6 pHi units. The dpHi/dt and JH+ was almost abolished (~94% inhibition) by STa + HOE-694. STa effect was unaltered by db-cGMP or SNP. However, STa and forskolin increased cAMP level. STa-decreased dpHi/dt and JH+ was mimicked by forskolin, and STa + HOE-694 effect was abolished by H89. Thus, incubation of T84 cells with STa results in reduced NHE4 activity leading to a lower capacity of pHi recovery requiring cAMP, but not cGMP. STa effect results in a causal phenomenon (STa/increased cAMP/increased PKA activity/reduced NHE4 activity) ending with intracellular acidification that could have consequences in the gastrointestinal cells function promoting human

  17. Thermally Stable Ni-rich Austenite Formed Utilizing Multistep Intercritical Heat Treatment in a Low-Carbon 10 Wt Pct Ni Martensitic Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jain, Divya; Isheim, Dieter; Zhang, Xian J.; Ghosh, Gautam; Seidman, David N.

    2017-08-01

    Austenite reversion and its thermal stability attained during the transformation is key to enhanced toughness and blast resistance in transformation-induced-plasticity martensitic steels. We demonstrate that the thermal stability of Ni-stabilized austenite and kinetics of the transformation can be controlled by forming Ni-rich regions in proximity of pre-existing (retained) austenite. Atom probe tomography (APT) in conjunction with thermodynamic and kinetic modeling elucidates the role of Ni-rich regions in enhancing growth kinetics of thermally stable austenite, formed utilizing a multistep intercritical ( Quench- Lamellarization- Tempering (QLT)-type) heat treatment for a low-carbon 10 wt pct Ni steel. Direct evidence of austenite formation is provided by dilatometry, and the volume fraction is quantified by synchrotron X-ray diffraction. The results indicate the growth of nm-thick austenite layers during the second intercritical tempering treatment (T-step) at 863 K (590 °C), with austenite retained from first intercritical treatment (L-step) at 923 K (650 °C) acting as a nucleation template. For the first time, the thermal stability of austenite is quantified with respect to its compositional evolution during the multistep intercritical treatment of these steels. Austenite compositions measured by APT are used in combination with the thermodynamic and kinetic approach formulated by Ghosh and Olson to assess thermal stability and predict the martensite-start temperature. This approach is particularly useful as empirical relations cannot be extrapolated for the highly Ni-enriched austenite investigated in the present study.

  18. Detection and genetic analysis of the enteroaggregative Escherichia coli heat-stable enterotoxin (EAST1) gene in clinical isolates of enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (EPEC) strains

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The enteroaggregative E. coli heat-stable enterotoxin 1 (EAST1) encoded by astA gene has been found in enteropathogenic E. coli (EPEC) strains. However, it is not sufficient to simply probe strains with an astA gene probe due to the existence of astA mutants (type 1 and type 2 SHEAST) and EAST1 variants (EAST1 v1-4). In this study, 222 EPEC (70 typical and 152 atypical) isolates were tested for the presence of the astA gene sequence by PCR and sequencing. Results The astA gene was amplified from 54 strains, 11 typical and 43 atypical. Sequence analysis of the PCR products showed that 25 strains, 7 typical and 18 atypical, had an intact astA gene. A subgroup of 7 atypical strains had a variant type of the astA gene sequence, with four non-synonymous nucleotide substitutions. The remaining 22 strains had mutated astA gene with nucleotide deletions or substitutions in the first 8 codons. The RT-PCR results showed that the astA gene was transcribed only by the strains carrying either the intact or the variant type of the astA gene sequence. Southern blot analysis indicated that astA is located in EAF plasmid in typical strains, and in plasmids of similar size in atypical strains. Strains carrying intact astA genes were more frequently found in diarrheic children than in non-diarrheic children (p < 0.05). Conclusion In conclusion, our data suggest that the presence of an intact astA gene may represent an additional virulence determinant in both EPEC groups. PMID:24884767

  19. Inhibition of Heat-Stable Toxin-Induced Intestinal Salt and Water Secretion by a Novel Class of Guanylyl Cyclase C Inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Bijvelds, Marcel J C; Loos, Michaela; Bronsveld, Inez; Hellemans, Ann; Bongartz, Jean-Pierre; Ver Donck, Luc; Cox, Eric; de Jonge, Hugo R; Schuurkes, Jan A J; De Maeyer, Joris H

    2015-12-01

    Many enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli strains produce the heat-stable toxin, STa, which, by activation of the intestinal receptor-enzyme guanylyl cyclase (GC) C, triggers an acute, watery diarrhea. We set out to identify GCC inhibitors that may be of benefit for the treatment of infectious diarrheal disease. Compounds that inhibit STa-induced cyclic guanosine 3',5'-monophosphate (cGMP) production were selected by performing cyclase assays on cells and membranes containing GCC, or the related GCA. The effect of leads on STa/GCC-dependent activation of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator anion channel was investigated in T84 cells, and in porcine and human intestinal tissue. Their effect on STa-provoked fluid transport was assessed in ligated intestinal loops in piglets. Four N-2-(propylamino)-6-phenylpyrimidin-4-one-substituted piperidines were shown to inhibit GCC-mediated cellular cGMP production. The half maximal inhibitory concentrations were ≤ 5 × 10(-7) mol/L, whereas they were >10 times higher for GCA. In T84 monolayers, these leads blocked STa/GCC-dependent, but not forskolin/adenylyl cyclase-dependent, cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator activity. GCC inhibition reduced STa-provoked anion secretion in pig jejunal tissue, and fluid retention and cGMP levels in STa-exposed loops. These GCC inhibitors blocked STa-provoked anion secretion in rectal biopsy specimens. We have identified a novel class of GCC inhibitors that may form the basis for development of future therapeutics for (infectious) diarrheal disease. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  20. Antiviral effects of Glycyrrhiza species.

    PubMed

    Fiore, Cristina; Eisenhut, Michael; Krausse, Rea; Ragazzi, Eugenio; Pellati, Donatella; Armanini, Decio; Bielenberg, Jens

    2008-02-01

    Historical sources for the use of Glycyrrhiza species include ancient manuscripts from China, India and Greece. They all mention its use for symptoms of viral respiratory tract infections and hepatitis. Randomized controlled trials confirmed that the Glycyrrhiza glabra derived compound glycyrrhizin and its derivatives reduced hepatocellular damage in chronic hepatitis B and C. In hepatitis C virus-induced cirrhosis the risk of hepatocellular carcinoma was reduced. Animal studies demonstrated a reduction of mortality and viral activity in herpes simplex virus encephalitis and influenza A virus pneumonia. In vitro studies revealed antiviral activity against HIV-1, SARS related coronavirus, respiratory syncytial virus, arboviruses, vaccinia virus and vesicular stomatitis virus. Mechanisms for antiviral activity of Glycyrrhiza spp. include reduced transport to the membrane and sialylation of hepatitis B virus surface antigen, reduction of membrane fluidity leading to inhibition of fusion of the viral membrane of HIV-1 with the cell, induction of interferon gamma in T-cells, inhibition of phosphorylating enzymes in vesicular stomatitis virus infection and reduction of viral latency. Future research needs to explore the potency of compounds derived from licorice in prevention and treatment of influenza A virus pneumonia and as an adjuvant treatment in patients infected with HIV resistant to antiretroviral drugs.

  1. Broad-spectrum antiviral therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Rider, Todd H; Zook, Christina E; Boettcher, Tara L; Wick, Scott T; Pancoast, Jennifer S; Zusman, Benjamin D

    2011-01-01

    Currently there are relatively few antiviral therapeutics, and most which do exist are highly pathogen-specific or have other disadvantages. We have developed a new broad-spectrum antiviral approach, dubbed Double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) Activated Caspase Oligomerizer (DRACO) that selectively induces apoptosis in cells containing viral dsRNA, rapidly killing infected cells without harming uninfected cells. We have created DRACOs and shown that they are nontoxic in 11 mammalian cell types and effective against 15 different viruses, including dengue flavivirus, Amapari and Tacaribe arenaviruses, Guama bunyavirus, and H1N1 influenza. We have also demonstrated that DRACOs can rescue mice challenged with H1N1 influenza. DRACOs have the potential to be effective therapeutics or prophylactics for numerous clinical and priority viruses, due to the broad-spectrum sensitivity of the dsRNA detection domain, the potent activity of the apoptosis induction domain, and the novel direct linkage between the two which viruses have never encountered.

  2. Oligonucleotide-based antiviral strategies.

    PubMed

    Schubert, S; Kurreck, J

    2006-01-01

    In the age of extensive global traffic systems, the close neighborhood of man and livestock in some regions of the world, as well as inadequate prevention measures and medical care in poorer countries, greatly facilitates the emergence and dissemination of new virus strains. The appearance of avian influenza viruses that can infect humans, the spread of the severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) virus, and the unprecedented raging of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) illustrate the threat of a global virus pandemic. In addition, viruses like hepatitis B and C claim more than one million lives every year for want of efficient therapy. Thus, new approaches to prevent virus propagation are urgently needed. Antisense strategies are considered a very attractive means of inhibiting viral replication, as oligonucleotides can be designed to interact with any viral RNA, provided its sequence is known. The ensuing targeted destruction of viral RNA should interfere with viral replication without entailing negative effects on ongoing cellular processes. In this review, we will give some examples of the employment of antisense oligonucleotides, ribozymes, and RNA interference strategies for antiviral purposes. Currently, in spite of encouraging results in preclinical studies, only a few antisense oligonucleotides and ribozymes have turned out to be efficient antiviral compounds in clinical trials. The advent of RNA interference now seems to be refueling hopes for decisive progress in the field of therapeutic employment of antisense strategies.

  3. Real-Time TaqMan PCR Assay for the Detection of Heat-Labile and Heat-Stable Enterotoxin Genes in a Geographically Diverse Collection of Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli Strains and Stool Specimens.

    PubMed

    Pattabiraman, Vaishnavi; Parsons, Michele B; Bopp, Cheryl A

    2016-04-01

    Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) are an important cause of diarrhea in children under the age of 5 years in developing countries and are the leading bacterial agent of traveler's diarrhea in persons traveling to these countries. ETEC strains secrete heat-labile (LT) and/or heat-stable (ST) enterotoxins that induce diarrhea by causing water and electrolyte imbalance. We describe the validation of a real-time TaqMan PCR (RT-PCR) assay to detect LT, ST1a, and ST1b enterotoxin genes in E. coli strains and in stool specimens. We validated LT/ST1b duplex and ST1a single-plex RT-PCR assay using a conventional PCR assay as a gold standard with 188 ETEC strains and 42 non-ETEC strains. We validated LT/ST1b duplex and ST1a single-plex RT-PCR assay in stool specimens (n = 106) using traditional culture as the gold standard. RT- PCR assay sensitivities for LT, ST1a, and ST1b detection in strains were 100%, 100%, and 98%; specificities were 95%, 98%, and 99%, and Pearson correlation coefficient r was 0.9954 between RT-PCR assay and the gold standard. In stool specimens, RT-PCR assay sensitivities for LT, ST1a, and ST1b detection were 97%, 100%, and 97%; and specificities were 99%, 94%, and 97%. Pearson correlation coefficient r was 0.9975 between RT-PCR results in stool specimens and the gold standard. Limits of detection of LT, ST1a, and ST1b by RT-PCR assay were 0.1 to1.0 pg/μL and by conventional PCR assay were 100 to1000 pg/μL. The accuracy, rapidity and sensitivity of this RT-PCR assay is promising for ETEC detection in public health/clinical laboratories and for laboratories in need of an independent method to confirm results of other culture independent diagnostic tests.

  4. Antiviral activity of medicinal plants of Nilgiris.

    PubMed

    Vijayan, P; Raghu, C; Ashok, G; Dhanaraj, S A; Suresh, B

    2004-07-01

    Medicinal plants have been traditionally used for different kinds of ailments including infectious diseases. There is an increasing need for substances with antiviral activity since the treatment of viral infections with the available antiviral drugs often leads to the problem of viral resistance. Herpes simplex virus (HSV) causes a variety of life threatening diseases. Since the chemotherapeutic agents available for HSV infections are either low in quality or limited in efficiency, there is a need to search for new and more effective antiviral agents for HSV infections. Therefore in the present study 18 plants with ethnomedical background from different families were screened for antiviral activity against HSV-1. Different parts of the plants collected from in and around Ootacamund, Tamil Nadu were extracted with different solvents to obtain crude extracts. These extracts were screened for their cytotoxicity against Vero cell line by assay microculture tetrazolium (MTT) trypan blue dye exclusion, proteins estimation and 3H labeling. Antiviral properties of the plant extracts were determined by cytopathic effect inhibition assay and virus yield reduction assay. Three plant extracts Hypericum mysorense, Hypericum hookerianum and Usnea complanta exhibited significant antiviral activity at a concentration non toxic to the cell line used. The extracts of Melia dubia, Cryptostegia grandiflora and essential oil of Rosmarinus officinalis showed partial activity at higher concentrations. Some of the medicinal plants have shown antiviral activity. Further research is needed to elucidate the active constituents of these plants which may be useful in the development of new and effective antiviral agents.

  5. Naphthyridines with Antiviral Activity - A Review.

    PubMed

    Singh, Inder P; Kumar, Sanjay; Gupta, Shiv

    2017-01-01

    Naphthyridine scaffold is an important pharmacophore in compounds which have shown various biological activities like antiviral, antimicrobial, anticancer, antiinflammatory and analgesic. This scaffold is also reported to exhibit activity against HIV, HCMV, HSV, HPV and HCV. Antiviral activity displayed by many naphthyridine analogs is in nM range. Only few review articles are available in literature which describe about various biological activities of naphthyridines, but there is no comprehensive compilation particularly for antiviral activities. The objective of this review is to compile the literature on anti-viral activities of naphthyridine analogs. SciFinder, Google Scholar and PubMed database were searched with keyword "naphthyridine" and the references obtained were further sorted using keywords "antihiv", "antiviral" and "virus", separately. References obtained were considered to review the antiviral literature of naphthyridines. Literature search using SciFinder database with different keywords gave several references. Only references of antiviral activities of naphthyridine compounds were reviewed. References to in-silico studies alone or on formulation development or on patents were excluded. This review will be helpful for future researches to design and synthesize naphthyridine analogs with improved antiviral activities. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  6. Broad-spectrum antivirals against viral fusion

    PubMed Central

    Vigant, Frederic; Santos, Nuno C.; Lee, Benhur

    2015-01-01

    Effective antivirals have been developed against specific viruses, such as HIV, Hepatitis C virus and influenza virus. This ‘one bug–one drug’ approach to antiviral drug development can be successful, but it may be inadequate for responding to an increasing diversity of viruses that cause significant diseases in humans. The majority of viral pathogens that cause emerging and re-emerging infectious diseases are membrane-enveloped viruses, which require the fusion of viral and cell membranes for virus entry. Therefore, antivirals that target the membrane fusion process represent new paradigms for broad-spectrum antiviral discovery. In this Review, we discuss the mechanisms responsible for the fusion between virus and cell membranes and explore how broad-spectrum antivirals target this process to prevent virus entry. PMID:26075364

  7. Hepatitis C Virus and Antiviral Drug Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Seungtaek; Han, Kwang-Hyub; Ahn, Sang Hoon

    2016-01-01

    Since its discovery in 1989, hepatitis C virus (HCV) has been intensively investigated to understand its biology and develop effective antiviral therapies. The efforts of the previous 25 years have resulted in a better understanding of the virus, and this was facilitated by the development of in vitro cell culture systems for HCV replication. Antiviral treatments and sustained virological responses have also improved from the early interferon monotherapy to the current all-oral regimens using direct-acting antivirals. However, antiviral resistance has become a critical issue in the treatment of chronic hepatitis C, similar to other chronic viral infections, and retreatment options following treatment failure have become important questions. Despite the clinical challenges in the management of chronic hepatitis C, substantial progress has been made in understanding HCV, which may facilitate the investigation of other closely related flaviviruses and lead to the development of antiviral agents against these human pathogens. PMID:27784846

  8. Antiviral active peptide from oyster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Mingyong; Cui, Wenxuan; Zhao, Yuanhui; Liu, Zunying; Dong, Shiyuan; Guo, Yao

    2008-08-01

    An active peptide against herpes virus was isolated from the enzymic hydrolysate of oyster ( Crassostrea gigas) and purified with the definite direction hydrolysis technique in the order of alcalase and bromelin. The hydrolysate was fractioned into four ranges of molecular weight (>10 kDa, 10 5 kDa, 5 1 kDa and <1 kDa) using ultrafiltration membranes and dialysis. The fraction of 10 5 kDa was purified using consecutive chromatographic methods including DEAE Sephadex A-25 column, Sephadex G-25 column, and high performance liquid chromatogram (HPLC) by activity-guided isolation. The antiviral effect of the obtained peptide on herpetic virus was investigated in Vero cells by observing cytopathic effect (CPE). The result shows that the peptide has high inhibitory activity on herpetic virus.

  9. Antiviral Perspectives for Chikungunya Virus

    PubMed Central

    Cherian, Sarah

    2014-01-01

    Chikungunya virus (CHIKV) is a mosquito-borne pathogen that has a major health impact in humans and causes acute febrile illness in humans accompanied by joint pains and, in many cases, persistent arthralgia lasting for weeks to years. CHIKV reemerged in 2005-2006 in several parts of the Indian Ocean islands and India after a gap of 32 years, causing millions of cases. The re-emergence of CHIKV has also resulted in numerous outbreaks in several countries in the eastern hemisphere, with a threat to further expand in the near future. However, there is no vaccine against CHIKV infection licensed for human use, and therapy for CHIKV infection is still mainly limited to supportive care as antiviral agents are yet in different stages of testing or development. In this review we explore the different perspectives for chikungunya treatment and the effectiveness of these treatment regimens and discuss the scope for future directions. PMID:24955364

  10. Antiviral Natural Products and Herbal Medicines

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Liang-Tzung; Hsu, Wen-Chan; Lin, Chun-Ching

    2014-01-01

    Viral infections play an important role in human diseases, and recent outbreaks in the advent of globalization and ease of travel have underscored their prevention as a critical issue in safeguarding public health. Despite the progress made in immunization and drug development, many viruses lack preventive vaccines and efficient antiviral therapies, which are often beset by the generation of viral escape mutants. Thus, identifying novel antiviral drugs is of critical importance and natural products are an excellent source for such discoveries. In this mini-review, we summarize the antiviral effects reported for several natural products and herbal medicines. PMID:24872930

  11. Antiviral therapy of chronic hepatitis B.

    PubMed

    Zoulim, Fabien

    2006-09-01

    Treatment of chronic hepatitis B remains a clinical challenge. Long-term viral suppression is a major goal of antiviral therapy to improve the clinical outcome of the patients. Antiviral treatment of chronic hepatitis B relies currently on immune modulators such as interferon alpha and its pegylated form, and viral polymerase inhibitors. Because of the slow kinetics of viral clearance and the spontaneous viral genome variability, viral mutants resistant to nucleoside analogs may be selected. However, the development of new antiviral agents is rapidly improving the offing of therapy of chronic hepatitis B. These new therapeutic advances are reviewed in this manuscript.

  12. Antiviral effect of ranpirnase against Ebola virus.

    PubMed

    Hodge, Thomas; Draper, Ken; Brasel, Trevor; Freiberg, Alexander; Squiquera, Luis; Sidransky, David; Sulley, Jamie; Taxman, Debra J

    2016-08-01

    The recent epidemic of Ebola has intensified the need for the development of novel antiviral therapeutics that prolong and improve survival against deadly viral diseases. We sought to determine whether ranpirnase, an endoribonuclease from Rana pipiens with a demonstrated human safety profile in phase III oncology trials, can reduce titers of Ebola virus (EBOV) in infected cells, protect mice against mouse-adapted EBOV challenge, and reduce virus levels in infected mice. Our results demonstrate that 0.50 μg/ml ranpirnase is potently effective at reducing EBOV Zaire Kikwit infection in cultured Vero E6 cells (Selectivity Index 47.8-70.2). In a prophylactic study, a single intravenous dose of 0.1 mg/kg ranpirnase protected 70% of mice from progressive infection. Additionally, in a post-exposure prophylactic study, 100% of female mice survived infection after intraperitoneal administration of 0.1 mg/kg ranpirnase for ten days beginning 1 h post challenge. Most of the male counterparts were sacrificed due to weight loss by Study Day 8 or 9; however, the Clinical Activity/Behavior scores of these mice remained low and no significant microscopic pathologies could be detected in the kidneys, livers or spleens. Furthermore, live virus could not be detected in the sera of ranpirnase-treated mice by Study Day 8 or in the kidneys, livers or spleens by Study Day 12, and viral RNA levels declined exponentially by Study Day 12. Because ranpirnase is exceptionally stable and has a long track record of safe intravenous administration to humans, this drug provides a promising new candidate for clinical consideration in the treatment of Ebola virus disease alone or in combination with other therapeutics.

  13. Antiviral treatment of influenza in South Korea.

    PubMed

    Choe, Young June; Lee, Hyunju; Lee, Hoan Jong; Choi, Eun Hwa

    2015-06-01

    Antiviral therapy has an important role in the treatment and chemoprophylaxis of influenza. At present, two classes of antiviral agents, adamantanes and neuraminidase inhibitors, are available for the treatment and chemoprophylaxis of influenza in Korea. Because of the widespread resistance against adamantanes, neuraminidase inhibitors are mainly used. Because each country has a unique epidemiology of influenza, the proper use of antiviral agents should be determined based on local data. Decisions on the clinical practice in the treatment of influenza in South Korea are guided by the local surveillance data, practice guidelines, health insurance system and the resistance patterns of the circulating influenza viruses. This review highlights the role of antiviral agents in the treatment and outcome of influenza in Korea by providing comprehensive information of their clinical usage in Korea.

  14. Antiviral activity in Argentine medicinal plants.

    PubMed

    Kott, V; Barbini, L; Cruañes, M; Muñoz, J D; Vivot, E; Cruañes, J; Martino, V; Ferraro, G; Cavallaro, L; Campos, R

    1999-01-01

    In an ethnopharmacological screening of selected medicinal plants used in Argentina for the treatment of infectious diseases, aqueous extracts of five species were assayed in vitro to detect antiviral activity against herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1), respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) and adenovirus serotype 7 (ADV-7). Polygonum punctatum, Lithraea molleoides, Sebastiania brasiliensis and Sebastiania klotzschiana but not Myrcianthes cisplatensis showed in vitro antiherpetic activity with 50% effective dose (ED50) ranging from 39 to 169 microg/ml. P. punctatum, L. molleoides and M. cisplatensis showed antiviral activity against RSV with ED50 ranging from 78 to 120 microg/ml. None of the extracts had antiviral activity against ADV-7. The differences between their maximal non cytotoxic concentration and their antiviral activity values were high enough to justify further analysis.

  15. Viruses and Antiviral Immunity in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Jie; Cherry, Sara

    2013-01-01

    Viral pathogens present many challenges to organisms, driving the evolution of a myriad of antiviral strategies to combat infections. A wide variety of viruses infect invertebrates, including both natural pathogens that are insect-restricted, and viruses that are transmitted to vertebrates. Studies using the powerful tools available in the model organism Drosophila have expanded our understanding of antiviral defenses against diverse viruses. In this review, we will cover three major areas. First, we will describe the tools used to study viruses in Drosophila. Second, we will survey the major viruses that have been studied in Drosophila. And lastly, we will discuss the well-characterized mechanisms that are active against these diverse pathogens, focusing on non-RNAi mediated antiviral mechanisms. Antiviral RNAi is discussed in another paper in this issue. PMID:23680639

  16. Developing Novel Antimicrobial and Antiviral Textile Products.

    PubMed

    Iyigundogdu, Zeynep Ustaoglu; Demir, Okan; Asutay, Ayla Burcin; Sahin, Fikrettin

    2017-03-01

    In conjunction with an increasing public awareness of infectious diseases, the textile industry and scientists are developing hygienic fabrics by the addition of various antimicrobial and antiviral compounds. In the current study, sodium pentaborate pentahydrate and triclosan are applied to cotton fabrics in order to gain antimicrobial and antiviral properties for the first time. The antimicrobial activity of textiles treated with 3 % sodium pentaborate pentahydrate, 0.03 % triclosan, and 7 % Glucapon has been investigated against a broad range of microorganisms including bacteria, yeast, and fungi. Moreover, modified cotton fabrics were tested against adenovirus type 5 and poliovirus type 1. According to the test results, the modified textile goods attained very good antimicrobial and antiviral properties. Thus, the results of the present study clearly suggest that sodium pentaborate pentahydrate and triclosan solution-treated textiles can be considered in the development of antimicrobial and antiviral textile finishes.

  17. Fluorinated nucleosides as antiviral and antitumor agents.

    PubMed

    Meng, Wei-Dong; Qing, Feng-Ling

    2006-01-01

    The synthesis of nucleosides and analogues with fluoride modifications on the surgar moiety are reviewed, and their biological activities as potential antiviral and anti-tumor agents are also discussed.

  18. SnapShot: antiviral restriction factors.

    PubMed

    Kluge, Silvia F; Sauter, Daniel; Kirchhoff, Frank

    2015-10-22

    Restriction factors are cellular proteins that inhibit viruses at different steps of their replication cycle and represent an important first line of defense against viral pathogens. This SnapShot provides an overview of cell-intrinsic antiviral factors, describes their properties, and illustrates the striking variety of antiviral mechanisms as well the sophisticated viral countermeasures. To view this SnapShot, open or download the PDF. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Chickenpox pneumonia: experience with antiviral treatment.

    PubMed Central

    Davidson, R N; Lynn, W; Savage, P; Wansbrough-Jones, M H

    1988-01-01

    Of 13 patients with chickenpox pneumonia (12 of them adults) treated during 1979-87, 10 received antiviral drugs--nine acyclovir and one vidarabine. Three died despite intensive treatment. Serious secondary infections occurred in six cases. There were no clear indications that antiviral treatment altered the natural history of the condition. Acyclovir may at present be used too late in the course of chickenpox pneumonia to alter its outcome. Images PMID:3175975

  20. Antiviral Drugs: Molecular Modeling and QSAR.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-12-10

    questions related to drug design and our areas of expertise; (3) provide general education to USAMRII)D personnel in our methods and capabilities. In...terms of drug design effort, the antiviral drug development effortat US AMRIrID is in its infancy. Little is known of the structure or biology of the...because of the dearth of information about the viruses, for the antiviral work this approach to drug design is currently unavailable to USAMRIID and to

  1. Stable angina

    MedlinePlus

    ... stable; Angina - chronic; Angina pectoris; Chest pain - angina; CAD - angina; Coronary artery disease - angina; Heart disease - angina ... clot. The most common cause of angina is coronary artery disease . Angina pectoris is the medical term for this ...

  2. Antiviral activity of silymarin against chikungunya virus

    PubMed Central

    Lani, Rafidah; Hassandarvish, Pouya; Chiam, Chun Wei; Moghaddam, Ehsan; Chu, Justin Jang Hann; Rausalu, Kai; Merits, Andres; Higgs, Stephen; Vanlandingham, Dana; Abu Bakar, Sazaly; Zandi, Keivan

    2015-01-01

    The mosquito-borne chikungunya virus (CHIKV) causes chikungunya fever, with clinical presentations such as severe back and small joint pain, and debilitating arthritis associated with crippling pains that persist for weeks and even years. Although there are several studies to evaluate the efficacy of drugs against CHIKV, the treatment for chikungunya fever is mainly symptom-based and no effective licensed vaccine or antiviral are available. Here, we investigated the antiviral activity of three types of flavonoids against CHIKV in vitro replication. Three compounds: silymarin, quercetin and kaempferol were evaluated for their in vitro antiviral activities against CHIKV using a CHIKV replicon cell line and clinical isolate of CHIKV of Central/East African genotype. A cytopathic effect inhibition assay was used to determine their activities on CHIKV viral replication and quantitative reverse transcription PCR was used to calculate virus yield. Antiviral activity of effective compound was further investigated by evaluation of CHIKV protein expression using western blotting for CHIKV nsP1, nsP3, and E2E1 proteins. Briefly, silymarin exhibited significant antiviral activity against CHIKV, reducing both CHIKV replication efficiency and down-regulating production of viral proteins involved in replication. This study may have important consequence for broaden the chance of getting the effective antiviral for CHIKV infection. PMID:26078201

  3. Antiviral symposium and workshop--eighth international meeting.

    PubMed

    Schang, L

    2001-02-01

    The invited speakers for this exciting meeting could be loosely classified into three categories: (i) pre-eminent academic researchers on antivirals; (ii) academic researchers working on basic aspects of virology but whose work may lead to the development of novel antivirals; and, (iii) academic clinicians working with experimental antivirals or with diseases that require new antivirals. As expected from this selection, this meeting explored the future of antivirals, while still paying attention to the development of improved derivatives of currently available drugs.

  4. Anti-HIV, anti-poxvirus, and anti-SARS activity of a nontoxic, acidic plant extract from the Trifollium species Secomet-V/anti-vac suggests that it contains a novel broad-spectrum antiviral.

    PubMed

    Kotwal, Girish J; Kaczmarek, Jennifer N; Leivers, Steven; Ghebremariam, Yohannes T; Kulkarni, Amod P; Bauer, Gabriele; De Beer, Corena; Preiser, Wolfgang; Mohamed, Abdu Rahman

    2005-11-01

    Enveloped animal viruses such as human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), hepatitis B virus, hepatitis C virus, human papillomavirus, Marburg, and influenza are major public health concerns around the world. The prohibitive cost of antiretroviral (ARV) drugs for most HIV-infected patients in sub-Saharan Africa and the serious side effects in those who have access to ARV drugs make a compelling case for the study of complementary and alternative therapies. Such therapies should have scientifically proved antiviral activity and minimal toxic effects. A plant extract, Secomet-V, with an anecdotal indication in humans for promise as an anti-HIV treatment, was investigated. Using a previously described attenuated vaccinia virus vGK5, we established the antiviral activity of Secomet-V. Chemical analysis showed that it has an acidic pH, nontoxic traces of iron (<10 ppm), and almost undetectable levels of arsenic (<1.0 ppm). The color varies from colorless to pale yellow to dark brown. The active agent is heat stable at least up to sterilizing temperature of 121 degrees C. The crude plant extract is a mixture of several small molecules separable by high-pressure liquid chromatography. The HIV viral loads were significantly reduced over several months in a few patients monitored after treatment with Secomet-V. Secomet-V was also found to have antiviral activity against the SARS virus but not against the West Nile virus. Secomet-V, therefore, is a broad-spectrum antiviral, which possibly works by neutralizing viral infectivity, resulting in the prevention of viral attachment.

  5. Advances in Antiviral vaccine development

    PubMed Central

    Graham, Barney S.

    2013-01-01

    Summary Antiviral vaccines have been the most successful biomedical intervention for preventing epidemic viral disease. Vaccination for smallpox in humans and rinderpest in cattle was the basis for disease eradication, and recent progress in polio eradication is promising. While early vaccines were developed empirically by passage in live animals or eggs, more recent vaccines have been developed because of the advent of new technologies, particularly cell culture and molecular biology. Recent technological advances in gene delivery and expression, nanoparticles, protein manufacturing, and adjuvants have created the potential for new vaccine platforms that may provide solutions for vaccines against viral pathogens for which no interventions currently exist. In addition, the technological convergence of human monoclonal antibody isolation, structural biology, and high throughput sequencing is providing new opportunities for atomic-level immunogen design. Selection of human monoclonal antibodies can identify immunodominant antigenic sites associated with neutralization and provide reagents for stabilizing and solving the structure of viral surface proteins. Understanding the structural basis for neutralization can guide selection of vaccine targets. Deep sequencing of the antibody repertoire and defining the ontogeny of the desired antibody responses can reveal the junctional recombination and somatic mutation requirements for B-cell recognition and affinity maturation. Collectively, this information will provide new strategic approaches for selecting vaccine antigens, formulations, and regimens. Moreover, it creates the potential for rational vaccine design and establishing a catalogue of vaccine technology platforms that would be effective against any given family or class of viral pathogens and improve our readiness to address new emerging viral threats. PMID:23947359

  6. Advances in antiviral vaccine development.

    PubMed

    Graham, Barney S

    2013-09-01

    Antiviral vaccines have been the most successful biomedical intervention for preventing epidemic viral disease. Vaccination for smallpox in humans and rinderpest in cattle was the basis for disease eradication, and recent progress in polio eradication is promising. Although early vaccines were developed empirically by passage in live animals or eggs, more recent vaccines have been developed because of the advent of new technologies, particularly cell culture and molecular biology. Recent technological advances in gene delivery and expression, nanoparticles, protein manufacturing, and adjuvants have created the potential for new vaccine platforms that may provide solutions for vaccines against viral pathogens for which no interventions currently exist. In addition, the technological convergence of human monoclonal antibody isolation, structural biology, and high-throughput sequencing is providing new opportunities for atomic-level immunogen design. Selection of human monoclonal antibodies can identify immunodominant antigenic sites associated with neutralization and provide reagents for stabilizing and solving the structure of viral surface proteins. Understanding the structural basis for neutralization can guide selection of vaccine targets. Deep sequencing of the antibody repertoire and defining the ontogeny of the desired antibody responses can reveal the junctional recombination and somatic mutation requirements for B-cell recognition and affinity maturation. Collectively, this information will provide new strategic approaches for selecting vaccine antigens, formulations, and regimens. Moreover, it creates the potential for rational vaccine design and establishing a catalogue of vaccine technology platforms that would be effective against any given family or class of viral pathogens and improve our readiness to address new emerging viral threats. Published 2013. This article is a U.S. Government work and is in the public domain in the USA.

  7. Stable Stratification for Solar Ponds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mehta, G. D.

    1982-01-01

    Stable density gradient forms in pond saturated with disodium phosphate (DSP). Volume of DSP saturated water tends to develop temperature and density layers. Since tests indicate thermal and density gradients remain in equilibrium at heat removal rates of 60 percent or more of heat input rate, pond containing DSP would be suitable for collecting solar energy and transferring it to heat exchanger for practical use.

  8. Antiviral prodrugs - the development of successful prodrug strategies for antiviral chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    De Clercq, Erik; Field, Hugh J

    2006-01-01

    Following the discovery of the first effective antiviral compound (idoxuridine) in 1959, nucleoside analogues, especially acyclovir (ACV) for the treatment of herpesvirus infections, have dominated antiviral therapy for several decades. However, ACV and similar acyclic nucleosides suffer from low aqueous solubility and low bioavailability following oral administration. Derivatives of acyclic nucleosides, typically esters, were developed to overcome this problem and valaciclovir, the valine ester of ACV, was among the first of a new series of compounds that were readily metabolized upon oral administration to produce the antiviral nucleoside in vivo, thus increasing the bioavailility by several fold. Concurrently, famciclovir was developed as an oral formulation of penciclovir. These antiviral 'prodrugs' thus established a principle that has led to many successful drugs including both nucleoside and nucleotide analogues for the control of several virus infections, notably those caused by herpes-, retro- and hepatitisviruses. This review will chart the origins and development of the most important of the antiviral prodrugs to date.

  9. Cold acclimation in genetically related (sibling) deciduous and evergreen peach (Prunus persica [L.] Batsch). II. A 60-kilodalton bark protein in cold-acclimated tissues of peach is heat stable and related to the dehydrin family of proteins.

    PubMed

    Arora, R; Wisniewski, M E

    1994-05-01

    In several plant species, certain cold-regulated proteins share unique properties. These proteins are (a) heat stable and (b) hydrophilic and are related to the Group 2 late embryogenesis abundant or dehydrin family of proteins. Our previous work with sibling deciduous and evergreen peach genotypes demonstrated a correlation between the level of accumulation of certain bark proteins and cold-acclimation potential of these tissues. Here we identify a 60-kD bark protein in peach (Prunus persica [L.] Batsch), PCA60 ("peach cold acclimation"), that is accumulated during cold acclimation and is heat stable. Immunological studies indicated that this protein is related to the dehydrin family of proteins and accumulates at much higher levels in the bark tissues of the deciduous genotype than in the evergreen. Amino acid composition indicated that the 60-kD protein has a compositional bias for glycine (24%), glutamic acid/glutamine (11.4%), aspartic acid/asparagine (10%), and threonine (9.6%), contains relatively low levels of aromatic amino acids (phenylalanine and tyrosine), and is rich in hydrophilic amino acids. A novel characteristic of the 60-kD cold-acclimation protein is the presence of a repeating nine-amino acid sequence. A five-amino acid stretch, which is included within this repeating motif, shares striking homology with other cold-regulated proteins and dehydrins.

  10. Cold acclimation in genetically related (sibling) deciduous and evergreen peach (Prunus persica [L.] Batsch). II. A 60-kilodalton bark protein in cold-acclimated tissues of peach is heat stable and related to the dehydrin family of proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Arora, R; Wisniewski, M E

    1994-01-01

    In several plant species, certain cold-regulated proteins share unique properties. These proteins are (a) heat stable and (b) hydrophilic and are related to the Group 2 late embryogenesis abundant or dehydrin family of proteins. Our previous work with sibling deciduous and evergreen peach genotypes demonstrated a correlation between the level of accumulation of certain bark proteins and cold-acclimation potential of these tissues. Here we identify a 60-kD bark protein in peach (Prunus persica [L.] Batsch), PCA60 ("peach cold acclimation"), that is accumulated during cold acclimation and is heat stable. Immunological studies indicated that this protein is related to the dehydrin family of proteins and accumulates at much higher levels in the bark tissues of the deciduous genotype than in the evergreen. Amino acid composition indicated that the 60-kD protein has a compositional bias for glycine (24%), glutamic acid/glutamine (11.4%), aspartic acid/asparagine (10%), and threonine (9.6%), contains relatively low levels of aromatic amino acids (phenylalanine and tyrosine), and is rich in hydrophilic amino acids. A novel characteristic of the 60-kD cold-acclimation protein is the presence of a repeating nine-amino acid sequence. A five-amino acid stretch, which is included within this repeating motif, shares striking homology with other cold-regulated proteins and dehydrins. PMID:8029367

  11. 18th International Conference on Antiviral Research.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, William M

    2005-08-01

    The 18th International Conference on Antiviral Research (ICAR) was held at the Princess Sofia Hotel in Barcelona, Spain, from 11th-14th April, 2005. This is a yearly international meeting sponsored by the International Society for Antiviral Research (ISAR). The current president of ISAR is John A Secrest 3rd of the Southern Research Institute. The scientific programme committee was chaired by John C Drach from the University of Michigan. ISAR was founded in 1987 to exchange prepublication basic, applied and clinical information on the development of antiviral, chemical and biological agents as well as to promote collaborative research. The ISAR has had a major role in the significant advances of the past decade in the reduction of the societal burdens of viral diseases by the focus of ICAR on the discovery and clinical application of antiviral agents. The 18th ICAR was organised as a series of focus presentations on specific viral groups consisting of oral and poster presentations of original research findings. In addition, the conference included plenary speakers, award presentations, a minisymposium on bioterrorism, and a satellite symposium on clinical antiviral drug developments. The size of the conference (> 50 oral and 250 poster presentations) necessitates limitation to the most noteworthy in the judgment of this reviewer. The current membership of the ISAR is approximately 700 with approximately 50% the membership in attendance.

  12. Flavivirus Infection Impairs Peroxisome Biogenesis and Early Antiviral Signaling.

    PubMed

    You, Jaehwan; Hou, Shangmei; Malik-Soni, Natasha; Xu, Zaikun; Kumar, Anil; Rachubinski, Richard A; Frappier, Lori; Hobman, Tom C

    2015-12-01

    Flaviviruses are significant human pathogens that have an enormous impact on the global health burden. Currently, there are very few vaccines against or therapeutic treatments for flaviviruses, and our understanding of how these viruses cause disease is limited. Evidence suggests that the capsid proteins of flaviviruses play critical nonstructural roles during infection, and therefore, elucidating how these viral proteins affect cellular signaling pathways could lead to novel targets for antiviral therapy. We used affinity purification to identify host cell proteins that interact with the capsid proteins of West Nile and dengue viruses. One of the cellular proteins that formed a stable complex with flavivirus capsid proteins is the peroxisome biogenesis factor Pex19. Intriguingly, flavivirus infection resulted in a significant loss of peroxisomes, an effect that may be due in part to capsid expression. We posited that capsid protein-mediated sequestration and/or degradation of Pex19 results in loss of peroxisomes, a situation that could result in reduced early antiviral signaling. In support of this hypothesis, we observed that induction of the lambda interferon mRNA in response to a viral RNA mimic was reduced by more than 80%. Together, our findings indicate that inhibition of peroxisome biogenesis may be a novel mechanism by which flaviviruses evade the innate immune system during early stages of infection. RNA viruses infect hundreds of millions of people each year, causing significant morbidity and mortality. Chief among these pathogens are the flaviviruses, which include dengue virus and West Nile virus. Despite their medical importance, there are very few prophylactic or therapeutic treatments for these viruses. Moreover, the manner in which they subvert the innate immune response in order to establish infection in mammalian cells is not well understood. Recently, peroxisomes were reported to function in early antiviral signaling, but very little is known

  13. Antiviral Defense Mechanisms in Honey Bees

    PubMed Central

    Brutscher, Laura M.; Daughenbaugh, Katie F.; Flenniken, Michelle L.

    2015-01-01

    Honey bees are significant pollinators of agricultural crops and other important plant species. High annual losses of honey bee colonies in North America and in some parts of Europe have profound ecological and economic implications. Colony losses have been attributed to multiple factors including RNA viruses, thus understanding bee antiviral defense mechanisms may result in the development of strategies that mitigate colony losses. Honey bee antiviral defense mechanisms include RNA-interference, pathogen-associated molecular pattern (PAMP) triggered signal transduction cascades, and reactive oxygen species generation. However, the relative importance of these and other pathways is largely uncharacterized. Herein we review the current understanding of honey bee antiviral defense mechanisms and suggest important avenues for future investigation. PMID:26273564

  14. Current Landscape of Antiviral Drug Discovery

    PubMed Central

    Blair, Wade; Cox, Christopher

    2016-01-01

    Continued discovery and development of new antiviral medications are paramount for global human health, particularly as new pathogens emerge and old ones evolve to evade current therapeutic agents. Great success has been achieved in developing effective therapies to suppress human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and hepatitis B virus (HBV); however, the therapies are not curative and therefore current efforts in HIV and HBV drug discovery are directed toward longer-acting therapies and/or developing new mechanisms of action that could potentially lead to cure, or eradication, of the virus. Recently, exciting early clinical data have been reported for novel antivirals targeting respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) and influenza (flu). Preclinical data suggest that these new approaches may be effective in treating high-risk patients afflicted with serious RSV or flu infections. In this review, we highlight new directions in antiviral approaches for HIV, HBV, and acute respiratory virus infections. PMID:26962437

  15. Stable particles

    SciTech Connect

    Samios, N.P.

    1993-12-31

    I have been asked to review the subject of stable particles, essentially the particles that eventually comprised the meson and baryon octets. with a few more additions -- with an emphasis on the contributions made by experiments utilizing the bubble chamber technique. In this activity, much work had been done by the photographic emulsion technique and cloud chambers-exposed to cosmic rays as well as accelerator based beams. In fact, many if not most of the stable particles were found by these latter two techniques, however, the forte of the bubble chamber (coupled with the newer and more powerful accelerators) was to verify, and reinforce with large statistics, the existence of these states, to find some of the more difficult ones, mainly neutrals and further to elucidate their properties, i.e., spin, parity, lifetimes, decay parameters, etc.

  16. Antiviral activities of Nepalese medicinal plants.

    PubMed

    Taylor, R S; Manandhar, N P; Hudson, J B; Towers, G H

    1996-07-05

    In a screening of plants used traditionally in Nepal to treat diseases that could be caused by viruses, methanol extracts from 21 species were assayed for activity against three mammalian viruses: herpes simplex virus, Sindbis virus and poliovirus. Assays were performed in UV-A or visible light, as well as dark. Individual species of Hypericum, Lygodium, and Maesa exhibited impressive antiviral activities, although their selective effects on the three viruses suggested that the antiviral ingredients were different in each extract. In addition, many of the other extracts showed partial inactivation of one or more test viruses.

  17. Antiviral lectins as potential HIV microbicides.

    PubMed

    Koharudin, Leonardus M I; Gronenborn, Angela M

    2014-08-01

    A growing class of potential antivirals encompasses carbohydrate-binding proteins, such as antibodies and lectins. They block virus entry into host target cells and halt virus transmission from virus-infected cells to non-infected cells, thereby preventing infection. Here, we review the structural basis for the anti-HIV activity of various lectins, describing their structures and determinants of high-affinity oligosaccharide binding. The mechanism of glycan recognition on the gp120 envelope protein by these antiviral lectins may therefore be exploited for developing agents and alternative strategies to prevent HIV transmission. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. [Study of cytotoxic and antiviral effects of some eye drops].

    PubMed

    Dediulescu, Lucreţia; Dediulescu, Daniela Florentina

    2008-01-01

    The study of the cytotoxic and antiviral effect of six commercial mixtures, eye drops type, underlined the advantages of using eye drops with Indomethacin for Herpetic Keratitis, due to the antiviral effect and also for the lack of cytotoxicity.

  19. Antiviral activities of hybrids of two major human leukocyte interferons.

    PubMed Central

    Weck, P K; Apperson, S; Stebbing, N; Gray, P W; Leung, D; Shepard, H M; Goeddel, D V

    1981-01-01

    Four hybrid human leukocyte interferon (LeIF or IFN-alpha) genes have been constructed by in vitro recombination of LeIF-A (IFN-alpha 2) and LeIF-D (IFN-alpha 1) genes at common restriction endonuclease sites located within their coding regions. These hybrid genes have been expressed in E. coli under trp promoter control. The interferons produced [LeIF-AD (BglII), -AD (PvuII), -DA (BglII), -DA (PvuII)] have antiviral properties distinct from the parental molecules LeIF-A and -D, varying considerably in their abilities to inhibit plaque formation by different viruses in a range of mammalian cells. All six of the cloned LeIFs exhibit the heat stability, pH 2 stability and antigenic specificity of natural leukocyte interferons. PMID:6171779

  20. Antiviral Effects of Amphotericin B Methyl Ester

    PubMed Central

    Jordan, George W.; Seet, Elizabeth C.

    1978-01-01

    The methyl ester of amphotericin B (AME) is water soluble, retains antifungal activity, and is significantly less toxic in mammals than amphotericin B. In contrast to amphotericin B, which is not water soluble, AME exhibits antiviral effects against vesicular stomatitis virus, herpes simplex virus types 1 and 2, Sindbis virus, and vaccinia virus in a plaque reduction assay. No antiviral effects could be demonstrated against the unenveloped adenovirus type 4 or echovirus type 11. The extent of virus inactivation was found to be dependent upon the AME concentration, contact time, and temperature. No consistent effect of the virus concentration on the probability of plaque-forming unit inactivation could be determined. The antiviral effects of AME were partially antagonized by the presence of serum. Binding of AME to vesicular stomatitis virus was demonstrated by the comigration of drug and virus in linear sucrose gradients. AME represents a new class of antiviral agents with activity at concentrations relevant to therapeutics. Sterol components of the host cell membrane that become incorporated into the viral envelope are postulated as the site of reaction with AME. PMID:206201

  1. Antiviral therapy: current concepts and practices.

    PubMed Central

    Bean, B

    1992-01-01

    Drugs capable of inhibiting viruses in vitro were described in the 1950s, but real progress was not made until the 1970s, when agents capable of inhibiting virus-specific enzymes were first identified. The last decade has seen rapid progress in both our understanding of antiviral therapy and the number of antiviral agents on the market. Amantadine and ribavirin are available for treatment of viral respiratory infections. Vidarabine, acyclovir, ganciclovir, and foscarnet are used for systemic treatment of herpesvirus infections, while ophthalmic preparations of idoxuridine, trifluorothymidine, and vidarabine are available for herpes keratitis. For treatment of human immunodeficiency virus infections, zidovudine and didanosine are used. Immunomodulators, such as interferons and colony-stimulating factors, and immunoglobulins are being used increasingly for viral illnesses. While resistance to antiviral drugs has been seen, especially among AIDS patients, it has not become widespread and is being intensely studied. Increasingly, combinations of agents are being used: to achieve synergistic inhibition of viruses, to delay or prevent resistance, and to decrease dosages of toxic drugs. New approaches, such as liposomes carrying antiviral drugs and computer-aided drug design, are exciting and promising prospects for the future. PMID:1576586

  2. Antiviral effect of theaflavins against caliciviruses.

    PubMed

    Ohba, Mai; Oka, Tomoichiro; Ando, Takayuki; Arahata, Saori; Ikegaya, Asaka; Takagi, Hirotaka; Ogo, Naohisa; Zhu, Chelsea; Owada, Kazuhiro; Kawamori, Fumihiko; Wang, Qiuhong; Saif, Linda J; Asai, Akira

    2017-04-01

    Caliciviruses are contagious pathogens of humans and various animals. They are the most common cause of viral gastroenteritis in humans, and can cause lethal diseases in domestic animals such as cats, rabbits and immunocompromised mice. In this study, we conducted cytopathic effect-based screening of 2080 selected compounds from our in-house library to find antiviral compounds against three culturable caliciviruses: feline calicivirus, murine norovirus (MNV) and porcine sapovirus (PoSaV). We identified active six compounds, of which two compounds, both related to theaflavins, showed broad antiviral activities against all three caliciviruses; three compounds (abamectin, a mixture of avermectin B1a and B1b; avermectin B1a; and (-)-epigallocatechin gallate hydrate) were effective against PoSaV only; and a heterocyclic carboxamide derivative (BFTC) specifically inhibited MNV infectivity in cell cultures. Further studies of the antiviral mechanism and structure-activity relationship of theaflavins suggested the following: (1) theaflavins worked before the viral entry step; (2) the effect of theaflavins was time- and concentration-dependent; and (3) the hydroxyl groups of the benzocycloheptenone ring were probably important for the anti-calicivirus activity of theaflavins. Theaflavins could be used for the calicivirus research, and as potential disinfectants and antiviral reagents to prevent and control calicivirus infections in animals and humans.

  3. Synthesis and Antiviral Activity of Substituted Quercetins

    PubMed Central

    Thapa, Mahendra; Kim, Yunjeong; Desper, John; Chang, Kyeong-Ok; Hua, Duy H.

    2011-01-01

    Influenza viruses are important pathogens that cause respiratory infections in humans and animals. In addition to vaccination, antiviral drugs against influenza virus play a significant role in controlling viral infections by reducing disease progression and virus transmission. Plant derived polyphenols are associated with antioxidant activity, anti-carcinogenic, and cardio- and neuro-protective actions. Some polyphenols, such as resveratrol and epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG), showed significant anti-influenza activity in vitro and/or in vivo. Recently we showed that quercetin and isoquercetin (quercetin-3-β-D-glucoside), a glucoside form of quercetin, significantly reduced the replication of influenza viruses in vitro and in vivo (isoquercetin). The antiviral effects of isoquercetin were greater than that of quercetin with lower IC50 values and higher in vitro therapeutic index. Thus, we investigated the synthesis and antiviral activities of various quercetin derivatives with substitution of C3, C3’, and C5 hydroxyl functions with various phenolic ester, alkoxy, and aminoalkoxy moieties. Among newly synthesized compounds, quercetin-3-gallate which is structurally related to EGCG showed comparable antiviral activity against influenza virus (porcine H1N1 strain) to that of EGCG with improved in vitro therapeutic index. PMID:22115591

  4. Synthesis and antiviral activity of substituted quercetins.

    PubMed

    Thapa, Mahendra; Kim, Yunjeong; Desper, John; Chang, Kyeong-Ok; Hua, Duy H

    2012-01-01

    Influenza viruses are important pathogens that cause respiratory infections in humans and animals. In addition to vaccination, antiviral drugs against influenza virus play a significant role in controlling viral infections by reducing disease progression and virus transmission. Plant derived polyphenols are associated with antioxidant activity, anti-carcinogenic, and cardio- and neuro-protective actions. Some polyphenols, such as resveratrol and epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG), showed significant anti-influenza activity in vitro and/or in vivo. Recently we showed that quercetin and isoquercetin (quercetin-3-β-d-glucoside), a glucoside form of quercetin, significantly reduced the replication of influenza viruses in vitro and in vivo (isoquercetin). The antiviral effects of isoquercetin were greater than that of quercetin with lower IC(50) values and higher in vitro therapeutic index. Thus, we investigated the synthesis and antiviral activities of various quercetin derivatives with substitution of C3, C3', and C5 hydroxyl functions with various phenolic ester, alkoxy, and aminoalkoxy moieties. Among newly synthesized compounds, quercetin-3-gallate which is structurally related to EGCG showed comparable antiviral activity against influenza virus (porcine H1N1 strain) to that of EGCG with improved in vitro therapeutic index. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Interferon induced IFIT family genes in host antiviral defense

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Secretion of interferons (IFNs) from virus-infected cells is a hallmark of host antiviral immunity and in fact, IFNs exert their antiviral activities through the induction of antiviral proteins. The IFN-induced protein with tetratricopeptide repeats (IFITs) family is among hundreds of IF stimulated ...

  6. Immunological detection of osteocalcin in meat and bone meal: a novel heat stable marker for the investigation of illegal feed adulteration.

    PubMed

    Kreuz, G; Zagon, J; Broll, H; Bernhardt, C; Linke, B; Lampen, A

    2012-01-01

    A sandwich ELISA was developed for the detection of bovine meat and bone meal (BMBM) in feed, based on polyclonal rabbit antibodies raised against the synthetic N-terminal amino acid sequence 1-9 (YLDHWLGAP) of bovine osteocalcin. To set up a sandwich ELISA pair, a commercial mouse monoclonal capture antibody binding to a highly conserved epitope in the mid-fragment of the peptide was employed. It is shown that the bone marker osteocalcin is immunologically well detectable in BMBM extracts obtained by a simple EDTA-based procedure even in a sample heated up to 145°C. Furthermore, a genus-specific restriction of the major specificity to cattle and horse was possible. The observed bi-specificity is consistent with theoretical predictions. The assay sensitivity with bovine osteocalcin of 1 ng was sufficient to enable the detection of 0.1% BMBM in compound plant feed or fish meal, for which no cross reaction was observed. In general the quantification of osteocalcin in extracts is possible using a standard curve procedure with pure bovine osteocalcin.

  7. Detection and sequences of the enteroaggregative Escherichia coli heat-stable enterotoxin 1 gene in enterotoxigenic E. coli strains isolated from piglets and calves with diarrhea.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, T; Nakazawa, M

    1997-01-01

    Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) strains isolated from piglets and calves with diarrhea were tested for the presence of the enteroaggregative E. coli enterotoxin 1 (EAST1) gene sequences by PCR and colony hybridization. The EAST1 gene was found in most porcine ETEC strains with adherence factor K88, especially in those elaborating heat-labile enterotoxin. One porcine ETEC strain with adherence factor K99 was also positive for the EAST1 gene. In contrast, 987P-positive (987P+) ETEC strains from piglets, K99+ ETEC strains from calves, and K99+ F41+ or F41+ ETEC strains from piglets and calves were negative for the EAST1 gene. The K88ab+ or K88ac+ ETEC strains tested possessed the EAST1 gene on a plasmid that was distinct from a K88-encoding plasmid. The EAST1 gene sequences of the K88+ ETEC strains were identical to each other and 99.1 and 98.3% homologous to the previously reported sequences of ETEC strains colonizing humans and enteroaggregative E. coli strains, respectively. The data indicate that the EAST1 gene is distributed among porcine ETEC strains in association with the adherence factor type.

  8. Heat-stable components of wood ear mushroom, Auricularia polytricha (higher Basidiomycetes), inhibit in vitro activity of beta secretase (BACE1).

    PubMed

    Bennett, Louise; Sheean, Paul; Zabaras, Dimitrios; Head, Richard

    2013-01-01

    The consumption of mushrooms has been linked with protection against dementia, including Alzheimer's disease (AD), by several biological pathways including inhibiting beta-site APP-cleaving enzyme (BACE1), which is responsible for releasing toxic β-amyloid peptide in the brain. We have investigated the capacity of several medicinal mushroom species-Auricularia polytricha (wood ear mushroom), Agaricus bisporus (button mushroom), Flammulina velutipes (winter or enoki mushroom), and Lentinus edodes (shiitake mushroom)-in the regulation of BACE1. Mushrooms were subjected to a generic food-compatible processing method to detect process-stable or process-modified products; the effects of processing were interpreted to infer the chemical classes associated with bioactivity. We have shown previously that in addition to enzyme inhibition, in the presence of the BACE1 proenzyme, heteropolymeric species such as heparin can activate BACE1 by modulating access to the catalytic site. We observed both inhibitory and activating components of the various mushrooms. Only BACE1 inhibitory species were detected in unprocessed and processed forms of A. polytricha, whereas the dominant extracted species from A. bisporus, F. velutipes, and L. edodese were activators of BACE1. It is not known whether activating species were masking the presence of inhibitory species in A. bisporus, F. velutipes, and L. edodes. Inhibitory species were attributed to hispidin-derived polyphenols, whereas activating species were attributed to soluble polysaccharides and possibly low-mass Maillard products produced during processing. Larger molecular BACE1-activating species are unlikely to be bioavailable to brain in contrast with possible brain bioavailability of smaller, lipophilic hispidins.

  9. Antiviral immunity following smallpox virus infection: a case-control study.

    PubMed

    Hammarlund, Erika; Lewis, Matthew W; Hanifin, Jon M; Mori, Motomi; Koudelka, Caroline W; Slifka, Mark K

    2010-12-01

    Outbreaks of smallpox (i.e., caused by variola virus) resulted in up to 30% mortality, but those who survived smallpox infection were regarded as immune for life. Early studies described the levels of neutralizing antibodies induced after infection, but smallpox was eradicated before contemporary methods for quantifying T-cell memory were developed. To better understand the levels and duration of immunity after smallpox infection, we performed a case-control study comparing antiviral CD4(+) and CD8(+) T-cell responses and neutralizing antibody levels of 24 smallpox survivors with the antiviral immunity observed in 60 smallpox-vaccinated (i.e., vaccinia virus-immune) control subjects. We found that the duration of immunity following smallpox infection was remarkably similar to that observed after smallpox vaccination, with antiviral T-cell responses that declined slowly over time and antiviral antibody responses that remained stable for decades after recovery from infection. These results indicate that severe, potentially life-threatening disease is not required for the development of sustainable long-term immunity. This study shows that the levels of immunity induced following smallpox vaccination are comparable in magnitude to that achieved through natural variola virus infection, and this may explain the notable success of vaccination in eradicating smallpox, one of the world's most lethal diseases.

  10. Antiviral Immunity following Smallpox Virus Infection: a Case-Control Study▿

    PubMed Central

    Hammarlund, Erika; Lewis, Matthew W.; Hanifin, Jon M.; Mori, Motomi; Koudelka, Caroline W.; Slifka, Mark K.

    2010-01-01

    Outbreaks of smallpox (i.e., caused by variola virus) resulted in up to 30% mortality, but those who survived smallpox infection were regarded as immune for life. Early studies described the levels of neutralizing antibodies induced after infection, but smallpox was eradicated before contemporary methods for quantifying T-cell memory were developed. To better understand the levels and duration of immunity after smallpox infection, we performed a case-control study comparing antiviral CD4+ and CD8+ T-cell responses and neutralizing antibody levels of 24 smallpox survivors with the antiviral immunity observed in 60 smallpox-vaccinated (i.e., vaccinia virus-immune) control subjects. We found that the duration of immunity following smallpox infection was remarkably similar to that observed after smallpox vaccination, with antiviral T-cell responses that declined slowly over time and antiviral antibody responses that remained stable for decades after recovery from infection. These results indicate that severe, potentially life-threatening disease is not required for the development of sustainable long-term immunity. This study shows that the levels of immunity induced following smallpox vaccination are comparable in magnitude to that achieved through natural variola virus infection, and this may explain the notable success of vaccination in eradicating smallpox, one of the world's most lethal diseases. PMID:20926574

  11. Antiviral properties of quinolone-based drugs.

    PubMed

    Richter, Sara; Parolin, Cristina; Palumbo, Manlio; Palù, Giorgio

    2004-06-01

    Quinolones represent an important class of broad-spectrum antibacterials, the main structural features of which are a 1,4 dihydro-4-oxo-quinolinyl moiety bearing an essential carboxyl group at position 3. Quinolones inhibit prokaryotic type II topoisomerases, namely DNA gyrase and, in a few cases, topoisomerase IV, through direct binding to the bacterial chromosome. Based on the hypothesis that these drugs could also bind to the viral nucleic acids or nucleoprotein-complexes, several quinolone derivatives were tested for their antiviral activity. Indeed, antibacterial fluoroquinolones were shown to be effective against vaccinia virus and papovaviruses; these preliminary results prompted the synthesis of modified quinolones to optimize antiviral action and improve selectivity index. The introduction of an aryl group at the piperazine moiety of the fluoroquinolone shifted the activity from antibacterial to antiviral, with a specific action against HIV. The antiviral activity seemed to be related to an inhibitory effect at the transcriptional level, and further evidence suggested a mechanism of action mediated by inhibition of Tat functions. Substitution of the fluorine at position 6 with an amine group to give aryl-piperazinyl-6-amino-quinolones improved the activity and selectivity against HIV-1: the most potent compound of this series was shown to inhibit virus replication through interference with Tat-TAR interaction. A comprehensive SAR investigation was performed based on additional chemical intervention to the quinolone template moiety, such as the introduction of nucleoside derivative functions. The information gained so far will be useful for future rational drug design aimed at developing new compounds with optimized antiviral activity.

  12. TRIM25 Enhances the Antiviral Action of Zinc-Finger Antiviral Protein (ZAP)

    PubMed Central

    Lau, Zerlina; Cheung, Pamela; Schneider, William M.; Bozzacco, Leonia; Buehler, Eugen; Takaoka, Akinori; Rice, Charles M.; Felsenfeld, Dan P.; MacDonald, Margaret R.

    2017-01-01

    The host factor and interferon (IFN)-stimulated gene (ISG) product, zinc-finger antiviral protein (ZAP), inhibits a number of diverse viruses by usurping and intersecting with multiple cellular pathways. To elucidate its antiviral mechanism, we perform a loss-of-function genome-wide RNAi screen to identify cellular cofactors required for ZAP antiviral activity against the prototype alphavirus, Sindbis virus (SINV). In order to exclude off-target effects, we carry out stringent confirmatory assays to verify the top hits. Important ZAP-liaising partners identified include proteins involved in membrane ion permeability, type I IFN signaling, and post-translational protein modification. The factor contributing most to the antiviral function of ZAP is TRIM25, an E3 ubiquitin and ISG15 ligase. We demonstrate here that TRIM25 interacts with ZAP through the SPRY domain, and TRIM25 mutants lacking the RING or coiled coil domain fail to stimulate ZAP’s antiviral activity, suggesting that both TRIM25 ligase activity and its ability to form oligomers are critical for its cofactor function. TRIM25 increases the modification of both the short and long ZAP isoforms by K48- and K63-linked polyubiquitin, although ubiquitination of ZAP does not directly affect its antiviral activity. However, TRIM25 is critical for ZAP’s ability to inhibit translation of the incoming SINV genome. Taken together, these data uncover TRIM25 as a bona fide ZAP cofactor that leads to increased ZAP modification enhancing its translational inhibition activity. PMID:28060952

  13. WITHDRAWN: Antivirals for the common cold.

    PubMed

    Jefferson, T O; Tyrrell, D

    2007-07-18

    The common cold is a ubiquitous short and usually mild illness for which preventive and treatment interventions have been under development since the mid-40s. As our understanding of the disease has increased, more experimental antivirals have been developed. This review attempts to draw together experimental evidence of the effects of these compounds. To identify, assemble, evaluate and (if possible) synthesise the results of published and unpublished randomised controlled trials of the effects of antivirals to prevent or minimise the impact of the common cold. We searched electronic databases, corresponded with researchers and handsearched the archives of the MRC's Common Cold Unit (CCU). We included original reports of randomised and quasi-randomised trials assessing the effects of antivirals on volunteers artificially infected and in individuals exposed to colds in the community. We included 241 studies assessing the effects of Interferons, interferon-inducers and other antivirals on experimental and naturally occurring common colds, contained in 230 reports. We structured our comparisons by experimental or community setting. Although intranasal interferons have high preventive efficacy against experimental colds (protective efficacy 46%, 37% to 54%) and to a lesser extent against natural colds (protective efficacy 24%, 21% to 27%) and are also significantly more effective than placebo in attenuating the course of experimental colds (WMD 15.90, 13.42 to 18.38), their safety profile makes compliance with their use difficult. For example, prolonged prevention of community colds with interferons causes blood-tinged nasal discharge (OR 4.52, 3.78 to 5.41). Dipyridamole (protective efficacy against natural colds 49%, 30% to 62%), ICI 130, 685 (protective efficacy against experimental colds 58%, 35% to 74% ), Impulsin (palmitate) (protective efficacy against natural colds 44%, CI 35% to 52% ) and Pleconaril (protective efficacy against experimental colds 71%, 15% to

  14. Antiviral potential of lactic acid bacteria and their bacteriocins.

    PubMed

    Al Kassaa, I; Hober, D; Hamze, M; Chihib, N E; Drider, D

    2014-12-01

    Emerging resistance to antiviral agents is a growing public health concern worldwide as it was reported for respiratory, sexually transmitted and enteric viruses. Therefore, there is a growing demand for new, unconventional antiviral agents which may serve as an alternative to the currently used drugs. Meanwhile, published literature continues shedding the light on the potency of lactic acid bacteria (LAB) and their bacteriocins as antiviral agents. Health-promoting LAB probiotics may exert their antiviral activity by (1) direct probiotic-virus interaction; (2) production of antiviral inhibitory metabolites; and/or (3) via stimulation of the immune system. The aim of this review was to highlight the antiviral activity of LAB and substances they produce with antiviral activity.

  15. Polyomavirus T Antigens Activate an Antiviral State

    PubMed Central

    Giacobbi, Nicholas S.; Gupta, Tushar; Coxon, Andrew; Pipas, James M.

    2014-01-01

    Ectopic expression of Simian Virus 40 (SV40) large T antigen (LT) in mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) increased levels of mRNAs encoding interferon stimulated genes (ISGs). The mechanism by which T antigen increases levels of ISGs in MEFs remains unclear. We present evidence that expression of T antigen from SV40, Human Polyomaviruses BK (BKV) or JC (JCV) upregulate production of ISGs in MEFs, and subsequently result in an antiviral state, as determined by inhibition of VSV or EMCV growth. The first 136 amino acids of LT are sufficient for these activities. Furthermore, increased ISG expression and induction of the antiviral state requires STAT1. Finally, the RB binding motif of LT is necessary for activation of STAT1. We conclude that the induction of the STAT1 mediated innate immune response in MEFs is a common feature shared by SV40, BKV and JCV. PMID:25589241

  16. Antiviral action of the tumor suppressor ARF

    PubMed Central

    García, María A; Collado, Manuel; Muñoz-Fontela, César; Matheu, Ander; Marcos-Villar, Laura; Arroyo, Javier; Esteban, Mariano; Serrano, Manuel; Rivas, Carmen

    2006-01-01

    Oncogenic viruses frequently target the pathways controlled by tumor suppressor genes, suggesting an extra function for these proteins as antiviral factors. The control exerted by the tumor suppressor Arf on cellular proliferation is crucial to restrict tumor development; however, a potential contribution of Arf to prevent viral infectivity has remained unexplored. In the present study, we investigated the consequences of loss or increased expression of Arf on viral infection. Our results reveal that ARF expression is induced by interferon and after viral infection. Furthermore, we show that ARF protects against viral infection in a gene dosage-dependent manner, and that this antiviral action is mediated in part by PKR through a mechanism that involves ARF-induced release of PKR from nucleophosmin complexes. Finally, Arf-null mice were hypersensitive to viral infection compared to wild-type mice. Together, our results reveal a novel and unexpected role for the tumor suppressor ARF in viral infection surveillance. PMID:16957780

  17. Antiviral and antiretroviral use in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Money, Deborah M

    2003-12-01

    The history of antiviral and antiretroviral therapy is recent compared with many other medical therapies, including traditional antibiotics in pregnancy. There are few long-term data on which to base decisions of management in pregnancy. Accessing up-to-date information is critical to optimizing the safety of care for mothers and their infants. Exposure to medications in pregnancy can be toxic to a fetus in a gestational age-dependent manner. Determination of safe medications for pregnancy must take into consideration the need for certain medications and the possibility of inadvertent exposure in early pregnancy because of unplanned pregnancies. This article reviews the most commonly used antiviral and antiretroviral agents and places emphasis on the issues regarding use in pregnancy.

  18. Antiviral herbs--present and future.

    PubMed

    Huang, Jun; Su, Dan; Feng, Yulin; Liu, Kuangyi; Song, Yonggui

    2014-01-01

    Viral disease is a calamity which absolutely can not be ignored for human health. The emergence of drug resistance and spread of new virus will be the new challenge against viral disease. To find and develop new antivirus agents with properties of safety, significant effect and low toxicity is the pressing question facing humans today. Because of its advantages, including rich resources, low price, less adverse effect, Traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) have become the research focus in antiviral treatment. In recent years, there are numerous articles about the studies from separation of active ingredients to the antiviral mechanism. In this paper, the progress in experimental study was illustrated on the basis of active ingredients, species of virus, mechanism, clinical application. Obviously, TCM have obvious advantages in the treatment of virus infectious disease and has a broad prospect of application.

  19. An antiviral furanoquinone from Paulownia tomentosa Steud.

    PubMed

    Kang, K H; Huh, H; Kim, B K; Lee, C K

    1999-11-01

    A methanol extract of the stem bark of Paulownia tomentosa showed antiviral activity against poliovirus types 1 and 3. Sequential liquid-liquid extraction with n-hexane, chloroform and water, and a silicagel column chromatography resulted in the purification of a compound. The compound was identified as methyl-5-hydroxy-dinaphthol[1,2-2',3']furan-7,12-dione-6-carbox yla te on the basis of spectroscopic data. The component caused a significant reduction of viral cytopathic effect when it was subjected to a standard antiviral assay by using HeLa cells. The EC(50) of the compound against poliovirus type 1 strain Brunhilde, and type 3 strain Leon were 0.3 microg/mL and 0.6 microg/mL, respectively.

  20. Glycodendritic structures: promising new antiviral drugs.

    PubMed

    Rojo, Javier; Delgado, Rafael

    2004-09-01

    DC-SIGN, a C-type lectin expressed by dendritic cells, is able to recognize high mannosylated glycoproteins at the surface of a broad range of pathogens including viruses, bacteria, fungi and parasites. For at least some of these agents this interaction appears to be an important part of the infection process. Therefore, this lectin might be considered in the design of new antiviral drugs. In this manner, multivalent carbohydrate systems based on dendrimers and dendritic polymers are promising candidates as antiviral drugs. Boltorn hyperbranched dendritic polymers functionalized with mannose have been used to inhibit DC-SIGN-mediated infection in an Ebola-pseudotyped viral model. Their physiological solubility, lack of toxicity and especially their low price suggest the application of these glycodendritic polymers for possible formulation as microbicides.

  1. Clinical Implications of Antiviral Resistance in Influenza

    PubMed Central

    Li, Timothy C. M.; Chan, Martin C. W.; Lee, Nelson

    2015-01-01

    Influenza is a major cause of severe respiratory infections leading to excessive hospitalizations and deaths globally; annual epidemics, pandemics, and sporadic/endemic avian virus infections occur as a result of rapid, continuous evolution of influenza viruses. Emergence of antiviral resistance is of great clinical and public health concern. Currently available antiviral treatments include four neuraminidase inhibitors (oseltamivir, zanamivir, peramivir, laninamivir), M2-inibitors (amantadine, rimantadine), and a polymerase inhibitor (favipiravir). In this review, we focus on resistance issues related to the use of neuraminidase inhibitors (NAIs). Data on primary resistance, as well as secondary resistance related to NAI exposure will be presented. Their clinical implications, detection, and novel therapeutic options undergoing clinical trials are discussed. PMID:26389935

  2. Clinical Implications of Antiviral Resistance in Influenza.

    PubMed

    Li, Timothy C M; Chan, Martin C W; Lee, Nelson

    2015-09-14

    Influenza is a major cause of severe respiratory infections leading to excessive hospitalizations and deaths globally; annual epidemics, pandemics, and sporadic/endemic avian virus infections occur as a result of rapid, continuous evolution of influenza viruses. Emergence of antiviral resistance is of great clinical and public health concern. Currently available antiviral treatments include four neuraminidase inhibitors (oseltamivir, zanamivir, peramivir, laninamivir), M2-inibitors (amantadine, rimantadine), and a polymerase inhibitor (favipiravir). In this review, we focus on resistance issues related to the use of neuraminidase inhibitors (NAIs). Data on primary resistance, as well as secondary resistance related to NAI exposure will be presented. Their clinical implications, detection, and novel therapeutic options undergoing clinical trials are discussed.

  3. Optimization of Influenza Antiviral Response in Texas

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-03-01

    defined as having a chronic condition such as asthma, chronic bronchitis, emphysema, coronary 31 heart disease , angina, heart attack, diabetes...States Centers for Disease Control and Prevention down to state and local regions, are prepared to respond to potential influenza. pandetnics with...decision makers at the Texas Department of State Health Services. We input the antiviral release schedule into an independent disease -spread simulation

  4. Antiviral Lead Compounds from Marine Sponges

    PubMed Central

    Sagar, Sunil; Kaur, Mandeep; Minneman, Kenneth P.

    2010-01-01

    Marine sponges are currently one of the richest sources of pharmacologically active compounds found in the marine environment. These bioactive molecules are often secondary metabolites, whose main function is to enable and/or modulate cellular communication and defense. They are usually produced by functional enzyme clusters in sponges and/or their associated symbiotic microorganisms. Natural product lead compounds from sponges have often been found to be promising pharmaceutical agents. Several of them have successfully been approved as antiviral agents for clinical use or have been advanced to the late stages of clinical trials. Most of these drugs are used for the treatment of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and herpes simplex virus (HSV). The most important antiviral lead of marine origin reported thus far is nucleoside Ara-A (vidarabine) isolated from sponge Tethya crypta. It inhibits viral DNA polymerase and DNA synthesis of herpes, vaccinica and varicella zoster viruses. However due to the discovery of new types of viruses and emergence of drug resistant strains, it is necessary to develop new antiviral lead compounds continuously. Several sponge derived antiviral lead compounds which are hopedto be developed as future drugs are discussed in this review. Supply problems are usually the major bottleneck to the development of these compounds as drugs during clinical trials. However advances in the field of metagenomics and high throughput microbial cultivation has raised the possibility that these techniques could lead to the cost-effective large scale production of such compounds. Perspectives on biotechnological methods with respect to marine drug development are also discussed. PMID:21116410

  5. Cobalt Complexes as Antiviral and Antibacterial Agents

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-01-01

    Complexes as Antiviral and Antibacterial Agents Eddie L. Chang 1,*, Christa Simmers 2 and D. Andrew Knight 2,* 1 Center for Bio/Molecular Science and...April 2010; in revised form: 04 May 2010 / Accepted: 14 May 2010 / Published: 26 May 2010 Abstract: Metal ion complexes are playing an increasing...role in the development of antimicrobials. We review here the antimicrobial properties of cobalt coordination complexes in oxidation state 3+. In

  6. Antiviral activities of atractylon from Atractylodis Rhizoma

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Yang; Mai, Jing-Yin; Hou, Tian-Lu; Ping, Jian; Chen, Jian-Jie

    2016-01-01

    Atractylodis Rhizoma is a traditional medicinal herb, which has antibacterial, antiviral, anti-inflammatory and anti-allergic, anticancer, gastroprotective and neuroprotective activities. It is widely used for treating fever, cold, phlegm, edema and arthralgia syndrome in South-East Asian nations. In this study, 6 chemical compositions of Atractylodis Rhizoma were characterized by spectral analysis and their antiviral activities were evaluated in vitro and in vivo. Among them, atractylon showed most significant antiviral activities. Atractylon treatment at doses of 10–40 mg/kg for 5 days attenuated influenza A virus (IAV)-induced pulmonary injury and decreased the serum levels of interleukin (IL)-6, tumor necrosis factor-α and IL-1β, but increased interferon-β (IFN-β) levels. Atractylon treatment upregulated the expression of Toll-like receptor 7 (TLR7), MyD88, tumor necrosis factor receptor-associated factor 6 and IFN-β mRNA but downregulated nuclear factor-κB p65 protein expression in the lung tissues of IAV-infected mice. These results demonstrated that atractylon significantly alleviated IAV-induced lung injury via regulating the TLR7 signaling pathway, and may warrant further evaluation as a possible agent for IAV treatment. PMID:27600871

  7. Antiviral properties of deazaadenine nucleoside derivatives.

    PubMed

    Vittori, S; Dal Ben, D; Lambertucci, C; Marucci, G; Volpini, R; Cristalli, G

    2006-01-01

    Viral infections have menaced human beings since time immemorial, and even today new viral strains that cause lethal diseases are being discovered with alarming frequency. One major example is HIV, the etiological agent of AIDS, which spread up in the last two decades. Very recently, other virus based diseases such as avian flu have spread fear around the world, and hemorrhagic fevers from central Africa serious threaten human health because of their very deadly effects. New antiviral agents are still greatly needed to counter these menaces. Many scientists are involved in this field of research, and many of the recently discovered effective antiviral compounds are nucleoside analogues. Among those derivatives, deazapurine nucleoside analogues have demonstrated potent inhibitory effect of viral replication. This review reports on recently generated data from preparing and testing deazapurine nucleoside derivatives as inhibitors in virus replication systems. Although most of the reported data have been produced in antiHIV, antiHCMV, and antiHSV biological testing, very recently other new important fields of application have been discovered, all in topical subjects of strong interest. In fact, deazapurine nucleosides have been found to be active as chemotherapeutics for some veterinary systemic viral infections, for which no antiviral drugs are licensed yet. Furthermore, they demonstrated efficacy in the inhibition of Hepatitis C virus replication. Finally, these compounds showed high potency as virucides against Ebola Virus, curing Ebola infected mice with a single dose administration.

  8. CRM1 Inhibitors for Antiviral Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Mathew, Cynthia; Ghildyal, Reena

    2017-01-01

    Infectious diseases are a major global concern and despite major advancements in medical research, still cause significant morbidity and mortality. Progress in antiviral therapy is particularly hindered by appearance of mutants capable of overcoming the effects of drugs targeting viral components. Alternatively, development of drugs targeting host proteins essential for completion of viral lifecycle holds potential as a viable strategy for antiviral therapy. Nucleocytoplasmic trafficking pathways in particular are involved in several pathological conditions including cancer and viral infections, where hijacking or alteration of function of key transporter proteins, such as Chromosome Region Maintenance1 (CRM1) is observed. Overexpression of CRM1-mediated nuclear export is evident in several solid and hematological malignancies. Interestingly, CRM1-mediated nuclear export of viral components is crucial in various stages of the viral lifecycle and assembly. This review summarizes the role of CRM1 in cancer and selected viruses. Leptomycin B (LMB) is the prototypical inhibitor of CRM1 potent against various cancer cell lines overexpressing CRM1 and in limiting viral infections at nanomolar concentrations in vitro. However, the irreversible shutdown of nuclear export results in high cytotoxicity and limited efficacy in vivo. This has prompted search for synthetic and natural CRM1 inhibitors that can potentially be developed as broadly active antivirals, some of which are summarized in this review. PMID:28702009

  9. Cycluridine: A novel antiviral effective against flaviviruses.

    PubMed

    Galabov, Angel S; Mukova, Lucia; Abashev, Yuriy P; Wassilewa, Lilia; Tzvetkov, Petko; Minkov, Vassil; Barinskiy, Igor F; Rice, Charles M; Ouzounov, Sergey; Sidzhakova, Dorotea

    2017-08-01

    This review describes the contemporary state of research for antivirals effective against flaviviruses, especially focusing on inhibitors of the pestivirus causative agent of bovine viral diarrhoea virus. We highlight cycluridine, an originally synthesized Mannich's base [a tetrahydro-2(1H)-pyrimidinones derivative], as a highly effective antiviral possessing a strong inhibitory effect on bovine viral diarrhoea virus replication. Cycluridine was active against replication of a wide variety of bovine viral diarrhoea virus strains in cell cultures. The drug-sensitive period in the bovine viral diarrhoea virus replication cycle included the latent period and the exponential phase; a 90-min delay in the peak of viral RNA synthesis was observed. Cycluridine administered orally manifested a pronounced protective effect in calves with natural mucosal disease/viral diarrhoea and calves experimentally infected with bovine viral diarrhoea virus. Its magnitude of activity and selectivity places cycluridine in the lead among all known substances with anti- bovine viral diarrhoea virus activity. Additionally, cycluridine applied subcutaneously showed anti-tick-born encephalitis virus activity, manifesting a marked protective effect in mice infected with tick-born encephalitis virus. Cycluridine could be a prospective antiviral in veterinary and medical practice for the treatment of bovine viral diarrhoea virus and other flavivirus infections.

  10. ANTIVIRAL ACTIVITY OF GENETICIN AGAINST DENGUE VIRUS

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xianchao G.; Mason, Peter W.; Dubovi, Edward J.; Xu, Xiaodong; Bourne, Nigel; Renshaw, Randall W.; Block, Timothy M.; Birk, Alexander V.

    2009-01-01

    The aminoglycoside, geneticin (G418), was recently shown to have antiviral activity against bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV). Since BVDV, dengue virus (DENV) and yellow fever virus (YFV) all belong to the Flaviviridae family, it seemed possible that a common step in their life cycle might be affected by this aminoglycoside. Here it is shown that geneticin prevented the cytopathic effect (CPE) resulting from DENV-2 infection of BHK cells, in a dose-dependent manner with an EC50 value of 3±0.4 μg/ml. Geneticin had no detectable effect on CPE caused byYFV in BHK cells. Geneticin also inhibited DENV-2 viral yield with an EC50 value of 2±0.1 μg/ml and an EC90 value of 20±2 μg/ml. With a CC50 value of 165±5 μg/ml, the selectivity indexof anti-DENV activity of geneticin in BHK cells was established to be 66. Furthermore, 25 μg/ml of geneticin nearly completely blocked plaque formation induced by DENV-2, but not YFV. In addition, geneticin, inhibited DENV-2 viral RNA replication and viral translation. Gentamicin, kanamycin, and the guanidinylated geneticin showed no anti-DENV activity. Neomycin and Paromomycin demonstrated weak antiviral activity at high concentrations. Finally, aminoglycoside-3′-phosphotransferase activity of neomycin-resistant gene abolished antiviral activity of geneticin. PMID:19501253

  11. Antiviral activity of an extract derived from roots of Eleutherococcus senticosus.

    PubMed

    Glatthaar-Saalmüller, B; Sacher, F; Esperester, A

    2001-06-01

    A liquid extract from Eleutherococcus senticosus roots inhibited the productive replication of human rhinovirus (HRV), respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) and influenza A virus in cell cultures infected with these viruses, all of which belong to the RNA type viruses. Analysis of virus production after treatment of the infected cells using plaque-reduction assays showed a strong antiviral activity of the Eleutherococcus extract. In contrast, no effect was detected using the same protocol for cells infected with the DNA viruses, adenovirus (Adeno 5) or herpes simplex type 1 virus (HSV 1). Pre-treatment of cells did not inhibit either virus adsorption or virus replication. The results of the study demonstrate that the Eleutherococcus extract inhibited the replication of all RNA viruses studied so far. This antiviral activity remained stable under the conditions used for drug preparation and storage.

  12. Steroid plus antiviral treatment for Bell's palsy.

    PubMed

    Kang, H M; Jung, S Y; Byun, J Y; Park, M S; Yeo, S G

    2015-05-01

    The effectiveness of antiviral agents for the treatment of Bell's palsy is uncertain. We evaluated whether a steroid with an antiviral agent (S + A group) provided better recovery outcomes than a steroid alone (S group) in patients with Bell's palsy. A total of 1342 patients diagnosed with Bell's palsy who visited the Kyung Hee Medical Center in Seoul, Korea, from 2002 to 2012 were included in this study. Patients in the S + A group were treated with prednisolone and antiviral agents (n = 569) and those in the S group with prednisolone alone (n = 773). Outcomes were measured using the House-Brackmann (HB) scale according to age, initial disease severity, electroneurography (ENoG) findings and underlying comorbidities. The rate of recovery (HB grades I and II) with initially severe Bell's palsy (HB grades V and VI) was higher in the S + A than in the S group (P = 0.001). However, the rates of recovery were similar with initially moderate palsy (HB grades II-IV) (P = 0.502). In patients classified according to age and ENoG-determined severity of palsy, the overall recovery rate was higher in the S + A than in the S group, but the differences were not statistically significant (P > 0.05 for both). The recovery rate without diabetes mellitus (DM) and hypertension (HTN) was higher in the S + A group than in the S group (P = 0.031). But in the patients with HTN and DM, the difference in recovery rates between the S + A and S groups was not statistically significant (P = 0.805). Treatment with a steroid plus antiviral agent resulted in significantly higher recovery rates than steroid therapy alone in patients with initially severe Bell's palsy and without either HTN or DM, and a nonsignificant trend towards higher recovery rates in all patients with Bell's palsy in this study. Antiviral agents may therefore help in the treatment of Bell's palsy. © 2014 The Association for the Publication of the Journal of Internal Medicine.

  13. HIV/HCV Antiviral Drug Interactions in the Era of Direct-acting Antivirals

    PubMed Central

    Rice, Donald P.; Faragon, John J.; Banks, Sarah; Chirch, Lisa M.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Therapy for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and chronic hepatitis C has evolved over the past decade, resulting in better control of infection and clinical outcomes; however, drug-drug interactions remain a significant hazard. Joint recommendations from the American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases and the Infectious Diseases Society of America regarding drug-drug interactions between HIV antiretroviral agents and direct-acting antiviral agents for treatment of hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection are reviewed here. This review is oriented to facilitate appropriate selection of an antiviral therapy regimen for HCV infection based on the choice of antiretroviral therapy being administered and, if necessary, switching antiretroviral regimens. PMID:27777891

  14. Role of phosphate groups on antiviral activity of casein phosphopeptide against feline calicivirus as a surrogate for norovirus.

    PubMed

    Lebetwa, Ntshepisa; Mitani, Takakazu; Nakamura, Soichiro; Katayama, Shigeru

    2017-04-01

    Current research on the gastrointestinal digestion of milk-casein strongly suggests the existence of novel bioactive peptides with antiviral activities that are attributable to their immunostimulatory effects. In the present study, we investigated the antiviral activity of casein peptides rich in phosphate groups, such as casein phosphopeptide (CPP-III). We prepared two types of CPP with different phosphorylation levels to clarify the role of the phosphate group. Further phosphorylation of CPP-III was conducted by dry heating with sodium pyrophosphate, whereas dephosphorylation was performed enzymatically using alkaline phosphatase and alkaline treatment. Feline calicivirus (FCV) strain F9, a typical norovirus surrogate, and Crandell Rees feline kidney cells were used as the target virus and host cells, respectively. Antiviral activity was determined based on the 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide assay and quantitative polymerase chain reaction quantification of antiviral cytokine mRNA expression. Higher cell viability was observed in the host cells treated with phosphorylated CPP-III, and a significant up-regulation of type 1 interferon expression was induced compared to that treated with native CPP-III. However, dephosphorylation of CPP-III resulted in a decrease in the anti-FCV effect. The CPP effect was enhanced by the introduction of additional phosphates and conversely weakened by their elimination. Therefore, CPP-III phosphorylation represents an emerging approach for the production of food-grade antiviral agents. © 2016 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2016 Society of Chemical Industry.

  15. Antiviral therapy for chronic hepatitis B in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Pan, Calvin Q; Lee, Hannah M

    2013-05-01

    The management of chronic hepatitis B (CHB) during pregnancy remains a challenge and involves various aspects of maternal-fetal care. Despite the standard immunoprophylaxis, a significant portion of infants born to highly viremic mothers remain infected with hepatitis B virus (HBV). Emerging data suggest that antiviral therapy in the third trimester can prevent immunoprophylaxis failure. To minimize fetal exposure to antiviral agents, antiviral therapy during pregnancy should be reserved for mothers with advanced disease or who are at risk for hepatic decompensation. Current safety data suggest that lamivudine, telbivudine, or tenofovir may be used during pregnancy. However, the timing in initiating antiviral therapy requires careful assessment of risks and benefit. The authors provide a systematic review of the features of HBV during pregnancy, risk factors for vertical transmission, and evidence-based data on antiviral use during pregnancy. They propose an algorithm to assess the need of antiviral treatment and monitor mothers with CHB.

  16. Determining Mechanism of Action of Antivirals for Respiratory Illness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodriguez, Irma; Dobrovolny, Hana

    2015-03-01

    Viral infections in the respiratory tract are common in humans and can cause serious illness and death. Drug treatment is the principal line of protection against many of these illnesses and many compounds are tested as antivirals. Often the efficacy of these antivirals are determined before a mechanism of action is understood. We use mathematical models to represent the evolution of these diseases and establish which experiments can help determine the mechanism of action of antivirals.

  17. An Outbreak of Diarrhea in Mandera, Kenya, Due to Escherichia coli Serogroup O-Nontypable Strain That Had a Coding Gene for Enteroaggregative E. coli Heat-Stable Enterotoxin 1.

    PubMed

    Ochi, Sadayuki; Shah, Mohammad; Odoyo, Erick; Bundi, Martin; Miringu, Gabriel; Guyo, Sora; Wandera, Ernest; Kathiiko, Cyrus; Kariuki, Samuel; Karama, Mohamed; Tsuji, Takao; Ichinose, Yoshio

    2017-02-08

    In an outbreak of gastroenteritis in December 2009, in Mandera, Kenya, Escherichia coli O-nontypable (ONT) strain was isolated from stool specimens of patients (18/24, 75%). The E. coli ONT organisms could not be assigned to any of the recognized diarrheagenic groups of E. coli However, they possessed the enteroaggregative E. coli heat-stable enterotoxin-1 gene. The cell-free culture filtrates of the E. coli ONT strain isolated from the outbreak cases induced considerable amount of fluid accumulation in suckling mouse intestine, indicating production of an enterotoxic factor(s). These results identify E. coli that did not have any diarrheagenic characteristics except astA as the etiological agent of the diarrheal outbreak in Mandera. It is however considered necessary to characterize the fluid accumulation factor(s) to determine whether any novel toxins were responsible for the fluid accumulation. Moreover, it is important to study dissemination of strains producing the enterotoxic factor(s) to assess their public health significance distribution in the environment. © The American Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene.

  18. Hydrogen bonds and antiviral activity of benzaldehyde derivatives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tolstorozhev, G. B.; Skornyakov, I. V.; Belkov, M. V.; Shadyro, O. I.; Brinkevich, S. D.; Samovich, S. N.

    2012-09-01

    We have obtained the Fourier transform IR spectra of solutions of benzaldehyde derivatives having different antiviral activities against a herpes virus. We observe a correlation between the presence of hydrogen bonds in the benzaldehyde molecules and the appearance of antiviral properties in the compounds. For compounds having antiviral activity, we have obtained spectral data suggesting the existence of hydrogen bonds of the type C=OṡṡṡH-O and O-HṡṡṡO in the molecules. When the hydrogen atom in the hydroxyl groups are replaced by a methyl group, no intramolecular hydrogen bonds are formed and the compounds lose their antiviral activity.

  19. Antiviral potential of a diterpenoid compound sugiol from Metasequoia glyptostroboides.

    PubMed

    Bajpai, Vivek K; Kim, Na-Hyung; Kim, Kangmin; Kang, Sun Chul

    2016-05-01

    This research reports first time antiviral activity of sugiol, a diterpenoid isolated from Metasequoia glyptostroboides in terms of its ability to inhibit in vitro growth of H1N1 influenza virus. Antiviral potential of sugiol was evaluated through hcytopathogenic reduction assay using Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK) cell line. Sugiol (500 μg/ml) was found to exhibit considerable anti-cytopathic effect on MDCK cell line confirming its antiviral efficacy against H1N1 influenza virus. These findings strongly reinforce the suggestion that sugiol could be a candidate of choice in combinational regimen with potential antiviral efficacy.

  20. Antiviral treatment of Argentine hemorrhagic fever.

    PubMed

    Enria, D A; Maiztegui, J I

    1994-01-01

    Argentine hemorrhagic fever is a systemic viral disease caused by Junin virus, with a mortality of 15-30% in untreated individuals. Current specific therapy is highly effective in reducing mortality, and consists of the early administration of immune plasma in defined doses of specific neutralizing antibodies per kg of body weight. However, several reasons suggest the need to investigate alternative therapies. Ribavirin, a broad spectrum antiviral agent, is effective in the treatment of other viral hemorrhagic fevers, and the studies done with Junin virus infections to date indicate that this drug may also have a beneficial effect in Argentine hemorrhagic fever.

  1. AN ANTIVIRAL SUBSTANCE FROM PENICILLIUM FUNICULOSUM

    PubMed Central

    Shope, Richard E.

    1966-01-01

    Helenine, NDV, and statolon, all known inducers of interferon in mice, all exerted a marked antiviral effect against Semliki Forest virus. This AV effect was, so far as can be demonstrated, mediated through, the induced interferon. The same three materials also exerted a marked antipassive immunity effect. All the evidence that can be brought to bear indicates that this API effect like the AV effect is mediated through interferon known to be induced by the three materials. If the API effect does indeed have interferon as its basis, this represents a new and totally unsuspected action of interferon. PMID:5926302

  2. [Antiviral activity of representatives of the family Crassulaceae].

    PubMed

    Shirobokov, V P; Evtushenko, A I; Lapchik, V F; Shirobokova, D N; Suptel', E A

    1981-12-01

    The antiviral properties of the juice of 11 species of the orpine family were studied. 8 of them belonged to the genera Kalanchoe, i. e. Kalanchoe diagremontiona R. Hamet, K. pinnata (Zam.) Persoon, K. Peteri Werd., K. prolifera (Bovie) R. Hamet, K. marnierriana (Mann. et Boit) Jacobs; K. blossfeldiana v. Poelln, K. beharensis Drake del Gastillo, K. waldheimii R. Hamet et Perr and 3 belonged to the Sedum genera, i. e. Sedum telephium L., S. spectabile Boreau, S. acre L. A high virus neutralizing activity of the juice from 4 species of Kalanchoe, i. e. K. blossfeldiana, K. waldheimii, K. pinnata and K. beharensis was shown. Inhibition of the virus infecting activity was observed at the juice dilutions from 1-2 to 1-8000 and higher. The viricidal factor of Kalanchoe is stable. It is not destroyed by ether, alcohol and potassium periodate. It is not absorbed by bentonite at the acid pH values. Addition of cattle serum or purified proteins to the juice resulted in their precipitation which suppressed the viricidal activity of the juice.

  3. Mechanism of TRIM25 Catalytic Activation in the Antiviral RIG-I Pathway

    DOE PAGES

    Sanchez, Jacint G.; Chiang, Jessica J.; Sparrer, Konstantin M. J.; ...

    2016-07-14

    Antiviral response pathways induce interferon by higher-order assembly of signaling complexes called signalosomes. Assembly of the RIG-I signalosome is regulated by K63-linked polyubiquitin chains, which are synthesized by the E3 ubiquitin ligase, TRIM25. We have previously shown that the TRIM25 coiled-coil domain is a stable, antiparallel dimer that positions two catalytic RING domains on opposite ends of an elongated rod. We now show that the RING domain is a separate self-association motif that engages ubiquitin-conjugated E2 enzymes as a dimer. RING dimerization is required for catalysis, TRIM25-mediated RIG-I ubiquitination, interferon induction, and antiviral activity. We also provide evidence that RINGmore » dimerization and E3 ligase activity are promoted by binding of the TRIM25 SPRY domain to the RIG-I effector domain. These results indicate that TRIM25 actively participates in higher-order assembly of the RIG-I signalosome and helps to fine-tune the efficiency of the RIG-I-mediated antiviral response.« less

  4. Mechanism of TRIM25 Catalytic Activation in the Antiviral RIG-I Pathway.

    PubMed

    Sanchez, Jacint G; Chiang, Jessica J; Sparrer, Konstantin M J; Alam, Steven L; Chi, Michael; Roganowicz, Marcin D; Sankaran, Banumathi; Gack, Michaela U; Pornillos, Owen

    2016-08-02

    Antiviral response pathways induce interferon by higher-order assembly of signaling complexes called signalosomes. Assembly of the RIG-I signalosome is regulated by K63-linked polyubiquitin chains, which are synthesized by the E3 ubiquitin ligase, TRIM25. We have previously shown that the TRIM25 coiled-coil domain is a stable, antiparallel dimer that positions two catalytic RING domains on opposite ends of an elongated rod. We now show that the RING domain is a separate self-association motif that engages ubiquitin-conjugated E2 enzymes as a dimer. RING dimerization is required for catalysis, TRIM25-mediated RIG-I ubiquitination, interferon induction, and antiviral activity. We also provide evidence that RING dimerization and E3 ligase activity are promoted by binding of the TRIM25 SPRY domain to the RIG-I effector domain. These results indicate that TRIM25 actively participates in higher-order assembly of the RIG-I signalosome and helps to fine-tune the efficiency of the RIG-I-mediated antiviral response. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Mechanism of TRIM25 Catalytic Activation in the Antiviral RIG-I Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Sanchez, Jacint G.; Chiang, Jessica J.; Sparrer, Konstantin M.J.; Alam, Steven L.; Chi, Michael; Roganowicz, Marcin D.; Sankaran, Banumathi; Gack, Michaela U.; Pornillos, Owen

    2016-01-01

    SUMMARY Antiviral response pathways induce interferon by higher-order assembly of signaling complexes called signalosomes. Assembly of the RIG-I signalosome is regulated by K63-linked polyubiquitin chains, which are synthesized by the E3 ubiquitin ligase, TRIM25. We have previously shown that the TRIM25 coiled-coil domain is a stable, antiparallel dimer that positions two catalytic RING domains on opposite ends of an elongated rod. We now show that the RING domain is a separate self-association motif that engages ubiquitin-conjugated E2 enzymes as a dimer. RING dimerization is required for catalysis, TRIM25-mediated RIG-I ubiquitination, interferon induction, and antiviral activity. We also provide evidence that RING dimerization and E3 ligase activity are promoted by binding of the TRIM25 SPRY domain to the RIG-I effector domain. These results indicate that TRIM25 actively participates in higher-order assembly of the RIG-I signalosome and helps to fine-tune the efficiency of the RIG-I-mediated antiviral response. PMID:27425606

  6. Mechanism of TRIM25 Catalytic Activation in the Antiviral RIG-I Pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Sanchez, Jacint G.; Chiang, Jessica J.; Sparrer, Konstantin M. J.; Alam, Steven L.; Chi, Michael; Roganowicz, Marcin D.; Sankaran, Banumathi; Gack, Michaela U.; Pornillos, Owen

    2016-07-14

    Antiviral response pathways induce interferon by higher-order assembly of signaling complexes called signalosomes. Assembly of the RIG-I signalosome is regulated by K63-linked polyubiquitin chains, which are synthesized by the E3 ubiquitin ligase, TRIM25. We have previously shown that the TRIM25 coiled-coil domain is a stable, antiparallel dimer that positions two catalytic RING domains on opposite ends of an elongated rod. We now show that the RING domain is a separate self-association motif that engages ubiquitin-conjugated E2 enzymes as a dimer. RING dimerization is required for catalysis, TRIM25-mediated RIG-I ubiquitination, interferon induction, and antiviral activity. We also provide evidence that RING dimerization and E3 ligase activity are promoted by binding of the TRIM25 SPRY domain to the RIG-I effector domain. These results indicate that TRIM25 actively participates in higher-order assembly of the RIG-I signalosome and helps to fine-tune the efficiency of the RIG-I-mediated antiviral response.

  7. Inflammatory monocytes hinder antiviral B cell responses

    PubMed Central

    Sammicheli, Stefano; Kuka, Mirela; Di Lucia, Pietro; de Oya, Nereida Jimenez; De Giovanni, Marco; Fioravanti, Jessica; Cristofani, Claudia; Maganuco, Carmela G.; Fallet, Benedict; Ganzer, Lucia; Sironi, Laura; Mainetti, Marta; Ostuni, Renato; Larimore, Kevin; Greenberg, Philip D.; de la Torre, Juan Carlos; Guidotti, Luca G.; Iannacone, Matteo

    2016-01-01

    Antibodies are critical for protection against viral infections. However, several viruses, such as lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV), avoid the induction of early protective antibody responses by poorly understood mechanisms. Here we analyzed the spatiotemporal dynamics of B cell activation to show that, upon subcutaneous infection, LCMV-specific B cells readily relocate to the interfollicular and T cell areas of the draining lymph node where they extensively interact with CD11b+Ly6Chi inflammatory monocytes. These myeloid cells were recruited to lymph nodes draining LCMV infection sites in a type I interferon-, CCR2-dependent fashion and they suppressed antiviral B cell responses by virtue of their ability to produce nitric oxide. Depletion of inflammatory monocytes, inhibition of their lymph node recruitment or impairment of their nitric oxide-producing ability enhanced LCMV-specific B cell survival and led to robust neutralizing antibody production. In conclusion, our results identify inflammatory monocytes as critical gatekeepers that prevent antiviral B cell responses and suggest that certain viruses take advantage of these cells to prolong their persistence within the host. PMID:27868108

  8. Avian Interferons and Their Antiviral Effectors

    PubMed Central

    Santhakumar, Diwakar; Rubbenstroth, Dennis; Martinez-Sobrido, Luis; Munir, Muhammad

    2017-01-01

    Interferon (IFN) responses, mediated by a myriad of IFN-stimulated genes (ISGs), are the most profound innate immune responses against viruses. Cumulatively, these IFN effectors establish a multilayered antiviral state to safeguard the host against invading viral pathogens. Considerable genetic and functional characterizations of mammalian IFNs and their effectors have been made, and our understanding on the avian IFNs has started to expand. Similar to mammalian counterparts, three types of IFNs have been genetically characterized in most avian species with available annotated genomes. Intriguingly, chickens are capable of mounting potent innate immune responses upon various stimuli in the absence of essential components of IFN pathways including retinoic acid-inducible gene I, IFN regulatory factor 3 (IRF3), and possibility IRF9. Understanding these unique properties of the chicken IFN system would propose valuable targets for the development of potential therapeutics for a broader range of viruses of both veterinary and zoonotic importance. This review outlines recent developments in the roles of avian IFNs and ISGs against viruses and highlights important areas of research toward our understanding of the antiviral functions of IFN effectors against viral infections in birds. PMID:28197148

  9. Antiviral Defenses in Plants through Genome Editing

    PubMed Central

    Romay, Gustavo; Bragard, Claude

    2017-01-01

    Plant–virus interactions based-studies have contributed to increase our understanding on plant resistance mechanisms, providing new tools for crop improvement. In the last two decades, RNA interference, a post-transcriptional gene silencing approach, has been used to induce antiviral defenses in plants with the help of genetic engineering technologies. More recently, the new genome editing systems (GES) are revolutionizing the scope of tools available to confer virus resistance in plants. The most explored GES are zinc finger nucleases, transcription activator-like effector nucleases, and clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats/Cas9 endonuclease. GES are engineered to target and introduce mutations, which can be deleterious, via double-strand breaks at specific DNA sequences by the error-prone non-homologous recombination end-joining pathway. Although GES have been engineered to target DNA, recent discoveries of GES targeting ssRNA molecules, including virus genomes, pave the way for further studies programming plant defense against RNA viruses. Most of plant virus species have an RNA genome and at least 784 species have positive ssRNA. Here, we provide a summary of the latest progress in plant antiviral defenses mediated by GES. In addition, we also discuss briefly the GES perspectives in light of the rebooted debate on genetic modified organisms (GMOs) and the current regulatory frame for agricultural products involving the use of such engineering technologies. PMID:28167937

  10. Avian Interferons and Their Antiviral Effectors.

    PubMed

    Santhakumar, Diwakar; Rubbenstroth, Dennis; Martinez-Sobrido, Luis; Munir, Muhammad

    2017-01-01

    Interferon (IFN) responses, mediated by a myriad of IFN-stimulated genes (ISGs), are the most profound innate immune responses against viruses. Cumulatively, these IFN effectors establish a multilayered antiviral state to safeguard the host against invading viral pathogens. Considerable genetic and functional characterizations of mammalian IFNs and their effectors have been made, and our understanding on the avian IFNs has started to expand. Similar to mammalian counterparts, three types of IFNs have been genetically characterized in most avian species with available annotated genomes. Intriguingly, chickens are capable of mounting potent innate immune responses upon various stimuli in the absence of essential components of IFN pathways including retinoic acid-inducible gene I, IFN regulatory factor 3 (IRF3), and possibility IRF9. Understanding these unique properties of the chicken IFN system would propose valuable targets for the development of potential therapeutics for a broader range of viruses of both veterinary and zoonotic importance. This review outlines recent developments in the roles of avian IFNs and ISGs against viruses and highlights important areas of research toward our understanding of the antiviral functions of IFN effectors against viral infections in birds.

  11. Amphipathic DNA polymers exhibit antiviral activity against systemic Murine Cytomegalovirus infection

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Phosphorothioated oligonucleotides (PS-ONs) have a sequence-independent, broad spectrum antiviral activity as amphipathic polymers (APs) and exhibit potent in vitro antiviral activity against a broad spectrum of herpesviruses: HSV-1, HSV-2, HCMV, VZV, EBV, and HHV-6A/B, and in vivo activity in a murine microbiocide model of genital HSV-2 infection. The activity of these agents against animal cytomegalovirus (CMV) infections in vitro and in vivo was therefore investigated. Results In vitro, a 40 mer degenerate AP (REP 9) inhibited both murine CMV (MCMV) and guinea pig CMV (GPCMV) with an IC50 of 0.045 μM and 0.16 μM, respectively, and a 40 mer poly C AP (REP 9C) inhibited MCMV with an IC50 of 0.05 μM. Addition of REP 9 to plaque assays during the first two hours of infection inhibited 78% of plaque formation whereas addition of REP 9 after 10 hours of infection did not significantly reduce the number of plaques, indicating that REP 9 antiviral activity against MCMV occurs at early times after infection. In a murine model of CMV infection, systemic treatment for 5 days significantly reduced virus replication in the spleens and livers of infected mice compared to saline-treated control mice. REP 9 and REP 9C were administered intraperitoneally for 5 consecutive days at 10 mg/kg, starting 2 days prior to MCMV infection. Splenomegaly was observed in infected mice treated with REP 9 but not in control mice or in REP 9 treated, uninfected mice, consistent with mild CpG-like activity. When REP 9C (which lacks CpG motifs) was compared to REP 9, it exhibited comparable antiviral activity as REP 9 but was not associated with splenomegaly. This suggests that the direct antiviral activity of APs is the predominant therapeutic mechanism in vivo. Moreover, REP 9C, which is acid stable, was effective when administered orally in combination with known permeation enhancers. Conclusion These studies indicate that APs exhibit potent, well tolerated antiviral activity

  12. Potential applications for antiviral therapy and prophylaxis in bovine medicine.

    PubMed

    Newcomer, Benjamin W; Walz, Paul H; Givens, M Daniel

    2014-06-01

    Viral disease is one of the major causes of financial loss and animal suffering in today's cattle industry. Increases in global commerce and average herd size, urbanization, vertical integration within the industry and alterations in global climate patterns have allowed the spread of pathogenic viruses, or the introduction of new viral species, into regions previously free of such pathogens, creating the potential for widespread morbidity and mortality in naïve cattle populations. Despite this, no antiviral products are currently commercially licensed for use in bovine medicine, although significant progress has been made in the development of antivirals for use against bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV), foot and mouth disease virus (FMDV) and bovine herpesvirus (BHV). BVDV is extensively studied as a model virus for human antiviral studies. Consequently, many compounds with efficacy have been identified and a few have been successfully used to prevent infection in vivo although commercial development is still lacking. FMDV is also the subject of extensive antiviral testing due to the importance of outbreak containment for maintenance of export markets. Thirdly, BHV presents an attractive target for antiviral development due to its worldwide presence. Antiviral studies for other bovine viral pathogens are largely limited to preliminary studies. This review summarizes the current state of knowledge of antiviral compounds against several key bovine pathogens and the potential for commercial antiviral applications in the prevention and control of several selected bovine diseases.

  13. Antiviral treatment among pregnant women with chronic hepatitis B.

    PubMed

    Fan, Lin; Owusu-Edusei, Kwame; Schillie, Sarah F; Murphy, Trudy V

    2014-01-01

    To describe the antiviral treatment patterns for chronic hepatitis B (CHB) among pregnant and nonpregnant women. Using 2011 MarketScan claims, we calculated the rates of antiviral treatment among women (aged 10-50 years) with CHB. We described the pattern of antiviral treatment during pregnancy and ≥1 month after delivery. We identified 6274 women with CHB during 2011. Among these, 64 of 507 (12.6%) pregnant women and 1151 of 5767 (20.0%) nonpregnant women received antiviral treatment (P < 0.01). Pregnant women were most commonly prescribed tenofovir (73.4%) and lamivudine (21.9%); nonpregnant women were most commonly prescribed tenofovir (50.2%) and entecavir (41.3%) (P < 0.01). Among 48 treated pregnant women with an identifiable delivery date, 16 (33.3%) were prescribed an antiviral before pregnancy and continued treatment for at least one month after delivery; 14 (29.2%) started treatment during the third trimester and continued at least one month after delivery. Among this insured population, pregnant women with CHB received an antiviral significantly less often than nonpregnant women. The most common antiviral prescribed for pregnant women was tenofovir. These data provide a baseline for assessing changes in treatment patterns with anticipated increased use of antivirals to prevent breakthrough perinatal hepatitis B virus infection.

  14. Antiviral Treatment among Pregnant Women with Chronic Hepatitis B

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Lin; Owusu-Edusei, Kwame; Schillie, Sarah F.; Murphy, Trudy V.

    2014-01-01

    Objective. To describe the antiviral treatment patterns for chronic hepatitis B (CHB) among pregnant and nonpregnant women. Methods. Using 2011 MarketScan claims, we calculated the rates of antiviral treatment among women (aged 10–50 years) with CHB. We described the pattern of antiviral treatment during pregnancy and ≥1 month after delivery. Results. We identified 6274 women with CHB during 2011. Among these, 64 of 507 (12.6%) pregnant women and 1151 of 5767 (20.0%) nonpregnant women received antiviral treatment (P < 0.01). Pregnant women were most commonly prescribed tenofovir (73.4%) and lamivudine (21.9%); nonpregnant women were most commonly prescribed tenofovir (50.2%) and entecavir (41.3%) (P < 0.01). Among 48 treated pregnant women with an identifiable delivery date, 16 (33.3%) were prescribed an antiviral before pregnancy and continued treatment for at least one month after delivery; 14 (29.2%) started treatment during the third trimester and continued at least one month after delivery. Conclusion. Among this insured population, pregnant women with CHB received an antiviral significantly less often than nonpregnant women. The most common antiviral prescribed for pregnant women was tenofovir. These data provide a baseline for assessing changes in treatment patterns with anticipated increased use of antivirals to prevent breakthrough perinatal hepatitis B virus infection. PMID:25548510

  15. The effect of infliximab on antiviral antibody profiles in patients with rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Kaufman, Ilana; Moscovici, Yolanda Braun; Abudi, Yair; Sofer, Denit; Mendelson, Ella; Balbir-Gurman, Alexandra; Caspi, Dan; Elkayam, Ori

    2010-01-01

    The duration of humoral immunity in patients treated with immunosuppressive drugs is poorly defined. The objective of the study was to investigate the effect of infliximab on the levels of antiviral antibodies against poliomyelitis, rubella and measles in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients. Fifty-two consecutive RA patients being treated with 3 mg/kg infliximab were prospectively studied. The antiviral antibody profiles for measles, rubella and three serotypes of poliomyelitis were tested on the day of the first infusion of infliximab and 6 months later. The study group comprised 36 women and 16 men (mean age 54 years, range 33-81) with a mean disease duration of 15 +/- 9 years. Forty-two (81%) patients were being treated with methotrexate and 22 (42%) were receiving prednisone. All patients had baseline protective levels of antibodies against measles and the three strains of polio, while 48 (92%) patients had protective antibodies against rubella. No significant change in the levels of antiviral antibodies was observed after 6 months of treatment with infliximab: from 3.67 at baseline to 3.87 IU/ml for measles, 169.50-197.0 IU/ml for rubella. No change was noticed for the geometric mean concentrations of antibodies against strains of poliomyelitis: 366-478 IU/ml for the Mahoney polio strain, 906-845 IU/ml for the MEF strain and 175-196 IU/ml for the Sauket strain. Patients with longstanding RA conserve long-term immunity to common viruses despite the use of immunosuppressive drugs. Levels of antiviral antibodies against measles, rubella and polio remain stable under treatment with infliximab.

  16. In vitro inhibition of angiogenesis by heat and low pH stable hydroalcoholic extract of Peganum harmala seeds via inhibition of cell proliferation and suppression of VEGF secretion.

    PubMed

    Yavari, Niloofar; Emamian, Farnoosh; Yarani, Reza; Reza Mohammadi-Motlagh, Hamid; Mansouri, Kamran; Mostafaie, Ali

    2015-06-01

    Progression of cancer cells is completely dependent on its angiogenesis. Inhibition of tumor angiogenesis has shed new light on cancer treatment. As a result, anti-angiogenesis therapy represents one of the most significant advances in clinical oncology. Peganum harmala L. (Zygophyllaceae) is a native plant from the eastern Iranian region, which is used as a traditional folk medicine. Although some biological properties of this plant are determined, its effect on angiogenesis is still unclear. We investigated the anti-angiogenic effects of heat and low pH stable hydroalcoholic extract of P. harmala seeds on endothelial cells (ECs) proliferation and VEGF secretion. Dried Peganum seeds were purchased from Kermanshah Traditional Bazar in 2011. Hydroalcoholic extract of dried seeds (0, 10, 20, 40, 60, 80, 100, 120, and 150 μg/ml) was used for in vitro evaluation of its cytotoxicity, anti-proliferative, and anti-angiogenic effects on ECs. In vitro effect of the extract on VEGF secretion was assayed using ELISA. Treatment with hydroalcoholic extract at seven different concentrations resulted in significant decrease of ECs proliferation and angiogenesis with an ID50 of ∼ 85 μg/ml. VEGF secretion was (inhibited) decreased by the extracts at concentrations higher than 10 μg/ml. Herbal plant extracts still attract attention owing to their fewer side effects comparing to synthetic drug agents. Current study indicated that hydroalcoholic extract of P. harmala seeds contains a potent anti-angiogenic component, which exerts its inhibitory effect mainly through down-regulation of essential mediators such as VEGF.

  17. The Antiviral Activities and Mechanisms of Marine Polysaccharides: An Overview

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Wei; Wang, Shi-Xin; Guan, Hua-Shi

    2012-01-01

    Recently, the studies on the antiviral activities of marine natural products, especially marine polysaccharides, are attracting more and more attention all over the world. Marine-derived polysaccharides and their lower molecular weight oligosaccharide derivatives have been shown to possess a variety of antiviral activities. This paper will review the recent progress in research on the antiviral activities and the mechanisms of these polysaccharides obtained from marine organisms. In particular, it will provide an update on the antiviral actions of the sulfated polysaccharides derived from marine algae including carrageenans, alginates, and fucans, relating to their structure features and the structure–activity relationships. In addition, the recent findings on the different mechanisms of antiviral actions of marine polysaccharides and their potential for therapeutic application will also be summarized in detail. PMID:23235364

  18. Protein kinase C and the antiviral effect of human interferon.

    PubMed

    Cernescu, C; Constantinescu, S N; Baltă, F; Popescu, L M; Cajal, N

    1989-01-01

    Protein kinase C (PKC) inhibitors: Hidaka's compounds H-7 (10 microM) and H-8 (20 microM), palmitoyl-carnitine (10 microM) and phloretin (50 microM), did not modify the antiviral effect of human natural or recombinant interferon alpha and of natural interferon beta. The tumor promoter 12-o-tetradecanoyl-phorbol-13-acetate (TPA) (200 nM), known as activator of PKC induced an antiviral state when tested on human embryo fibroblasts challenged with the vesicular stomatitis virus. The battery of PKC inhibitors used inhibited the antiviral effect induced by TPA. Palmitoyl-carnitine (10 microM) exerted a toxic effect that was reversed by interferon treatment (2,000 IU/ml interferon alpha). These results suggest that PKC, possibly activated by interferon-receptor interaction, is not essential for inducing the antiviral effect of interferon, but, probably, mediates the antiviral effect of TPA.

  19. Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae possesses an antiviral activity against porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus.

    PubMed

    Lévesque, Cynthia; Provost, Chantale; Labrie, Josée; Hernandez Reyes, Yenney; Burciaga Nava, Jorge A; Gagnon, Carl A; Jacques, Mario

    2014-01-01

    Pigs are often colonized by more than one bacterial and/or viral species during respiratory tract infections. This phenomenon is known as the porcine respiratory disease complex (PRDC). Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae (App) and porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) are pathogens that are frequently involved in PRDC. The main objective of this project was to study the in vitro interactions between these two pathogens and the host cells in the context of mixed infections. To fulfill this objective, PRRSV permissive cell lines such as MARC-145, SJPL, and porcine alveolar macrophages (PAM) were used. A pre-infection with PRRSV was performed at 0.5 multiplicity of infection (MOI) followed by an infection with App at 10 MOI. Bacterial adherence and cell death were compared. Results showed that PRRSV pre-infection did not affect bacterial adherence to the cells. PRRSV and App co-infection produced an additive cytotoxicity effect. Interestingly, a pre-infection of SJPL and PAM cells with App blocked completely PRRSV infection. Incubation of SJPL and PAM cells with an App cell-free culture supernatant is also sufficient to significantly block PRRSV infection. This antiviral activity is not due to LPS but rather by small molecular weight, heat-resistant App metabolites (<1 kDa). The antiviral activity was also observed in SJPL cells infected with swine influenza virus but to a much lower extent compared to PRRSV. More importantly, the PRRSV antiviral activity of App was also seen with PAM, the cells targeted by the virus in vivo during infection in pigs. The antiviral activity might be due, at least in part, to the production of interferon γ. The use of in vitro experimental models to study viral and bacterial co-infections will lead to a better understanding of the interactions between pathogens and their host cells, and could allow the development of novel prophylactic and therapeutic tools.

  20. Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae Possesses an Antiviral Activity against Porcine Reproductive and Respiratory Syndrome Virus

    PubMed Central

    Labrie, Josée; Hernandez Reyes, Yenney; Burciaga Nava, Jorge A.; Gagnon, Carl A.; Jacques, Mario

    2014-01-01

    Pigs are often colonized by more than one bacterial and/or viral species during respiratory tract infections. This phenomenon is known as the porcine respiratory disease complex (PRDC). Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae (App) and porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) are pathogens that are frequently involved in PRDC. The main objective of this project was to study the in vitro interactions between these two pathogens and the host cells in the context of mixed infections. To fulfill this objective, PRRSV permissive cell lines such as MARC-145, SJPL, and porcine alveolar macrophages (PAM) were used. A pre-infection with PRRSV was performed at 0.5 multiplicity of infection (MOI) followed by an infection with App at 10 MOI. Bacterial adherence and cell death were compared. Results showed that PRRSV pre-infection did not affect bacterial adherence to the cells. PRRSV and App co-infection produced an additive cytotoxicity effect. Interestingly, a pre-infection of SJPL and PAM cells with App blocked completely PRRSV infection. Incubation of SJPL and PAM cells with an App cell-free culture supernatant is also sufficient to significantly block PRRSV infection. This antiviral activity is not due to LPS but rather by small molecular weight, heat-resistant App metabolites (<1 kDa). The antiviral activity was also observed in SJPL cells infected with swine influenza virus but to a much lower extent compared to PRRSV. More importantly, the PRRSV antiviral activity of App was also seen with PAM, the cells targeted by the virus in vivo during infection in pigs. The antiviral activity might be due, at least in part, to the production of interferon γ. The use of in vitro experimental models to study viral and bacterial co-infections will lead to a better understanding of the interactions between pathogens and their host cells, and could allow the development of novel prophylactic and therapeutic tools. PMID:24878741

  1. RNA degradation in antiviral immunity and autoimmunity

    PubMed Central

    Rigby, Rachel E.; Rehwinkel, Jan

    2015-01-01

    Post-transcriptional control determines the fate of cellular RNA molecules. Nonsense-mediated decay (NMD) provides quality control of mRNA, targeting faulty cellular transcripts for degradation by multiple nucleases including the RNA exosome. Recent findings have revealed a role for NMD in targeting viral RNA molecules, thereby restricting virus infection. Interestingly, NMD is also linked to immune responses at another level: mutations affecting the NMD or RNA exosome machineries cause chronic activation of defence programmes, resulting in autoimmune phenotypes. Here we place these observations in the context of other links between innate antiviral immunity and type I interferon mediated disease and examine two models: one in which expression or function of pathogen sensors is perturbed and one wherein host-derived RNA molecules with a propensity to activate such sensors accumulate. PMID:25709093

  2. Cytoplasmic nucleic acid sensors in antiviral immunity.

    PubMed

    Ranjan, Priya; Bowzard, J Bradford; Schwerzmann, Joy W; Jeisy-Scott, Victoria; Fujita, Takashi; Sambhara, Suryaprakash

    2009-08-01

    The innate immune system uses pattern recognition receptors (PRRs) to sense invading microbes and initiate a rapid protective response. PRRs bind and are activated by structural motifs, such as nucleic acids or bacterial and fungal cell wall components, collectively known as pathogen-associated molecular patterns. PRRs that recognize pathogen-derived nucleic acids are present in vesicular compartments and in the cytosol of most cell types. Here, we review recent studies of these cytosolic sensors, focusing on the nature of the ligands for DNA-dependent activator of interferon (DAI)-regulatory factors, absent in melanoma 2 (AIM2), and the retinoic acid-inducible gene I-like helicase (RLH) family of receptors, the basis of ligand recognition and the signaling pathways triggered by the activation of these receptors. An increased understanding of these molecular aspects of innate immunity will guide the development of novel antiviral therapeutics.

  3. RNAi: antiviral therapy against dengue virus.

    PubMed

    Idrees, Sobia; Ashfaq, Usman A

    2013-03-01

    Dengue virus infection has become a global threat affecting around 100 countries in the world. Currently, there is no licensed antiviral agent available against dengue. Thus, there is a strong need to develop therapeutic strategies that can tackle this life threatening disease. RNA interference is an important and effective gene silencing process which degrades targeted RNA by a sequence specific process. Several studies have been conducted during the last decade to evaluate the efficiency of siRNA in inhibiting dengue virus replication. This review summarizes siRNAs as a therapeutic approach against dengue virus serotypes and concludes that siRNAs against virus and host genes can be next generation treatment of dengue virus infection.

  4. Progress in RNAi-based antiviral therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Jiehua; Rossi, John J

    2011-01-01

    RNA interference (RNAi) refers to the conserved sequence-specific degradation of message RNA mediated by small interfering (si)RNA duplexes 21-25 nucleotides in length. Given the ability to specifically silence any gene of interest, siRNAs offers several advantages over conventional drugs as potential therapeutic agents for the treatment of human maladies including cancers, genetic disorders, and infectious diseases. Antiviral RNAi strategies have received much attention and several compounds are currently being tested in clinical trials. In particular, the development of siRNA-based HIV (human immunodeficiency virus) therapeutics has progressed rapidly and many recent studies have shown that the use of RNAi could inhibit HIV-1 replication by targeting a number of viral or cellular genes. Therefore, the present chapter mainly focuses on the recent progress of RNAi-based anti-HIV gene therapeutics, with particular attention to molecular targets and delivery strategies of the siRNAs.

  5. Contribution of autophagy to antiviral immunity.

    PubMed

    Rey-Jurado, Emma; Riedel, Claudia A; González, Pablo A; Bueno, Susan M; Kalergis, Alexis M

    2015-11-14

    Although identified in the 1960's, interest in autophagy has significantly increased in the past decade with notable research efforts oriented at understanding as to how this multi-protein complex operates and is regulated. Autophagy is commonly defined as a "self-eating" process evolved by eukaryotic cells to recycle senescent organelles and expired proteins, which is significantly increased during cellular stress responses. In addition, autophagy can also play important roles during human diseases, such as cancer, neurodegenerative and autoimmune disorders. Furthermore, novel findings suggest that autophagy contributes to the host defense against microbial infections. In this article, we review the role of macroautophagy in antiviral immune responses and discuss molecular mechanisms evolved by viral pathogens to evade this process. A role for autophagy as an effector mechanism used both, by innate and adaptive immunity is also discussed.

  6. Antiviral activity of alcohol for surface disinfection.

    PubMed

    Moorer, W R

    2003-08-01

    Bacteria and viruses from the patient's mouth travel with dental splatter and spills. A surface disinfectant should possess antiviral activity as well as antibacterial action. Because of frequent and 'open' application in the dental office, such a disinfectant should be non-toxic, non-allergenic and safe for the hygienist. It now appears that high-concentration alcohol mixtures (i.e. 80% ethanol + 5% isopropanol) are not only excellent antibacterials, but quickly inactivate HIV as well as hepatitis B and hepatitis C viruses. Compared to alternative surface disinfectants, use of high-concentration alcohol for the spray-wipe-spray method of surface disinfection in dentistry appears safe and efficient. However, dried matter should be wiped and hydrated first.

  7. [Mechanisms of imiquimod indirect antiviral activity].

    PubMed

    Hober, D; Ajram, L; Chehadeh, W; Lazrek, M; Goffard, A; Dewilde, A; Wattré, P

    2005-01-01

    The potential role of an immune response in HPV-related anogenital disorders had already been anticipated by clinicians. Indeed the lesions efflorescence and the relapsing HPV infection in HIV positive patients as well as the lack of recurrence in patients with spontaneous cure, provided relevant clues for a likely immune mechanism. At present time, the role of the immune system in the development of HPV-related anogenital disorders is well established : HPV induce a humoral and cell mediated immune response. This response is mainly exerted towards infected cells; it is also exerted at the systemic level, through antibodies synthesis, but this pathway remains a secondary one. Due to the limits of the present therapies (either purely destructive and characterized by the rate of recurrences, or antiviral, but difficult to use), it was necessary to find a new treatment type which enhances the local immune response, results in the disappearance of lesions and allows for a decrease in the risk of recurrences. The original mechanism of action of the first cell-mediated immune response modifier: imiquimod, for local use (Aldara 5 % cream) is an answer to this need. The first positive results observed in vitro and in animals were confirmed in patients with HPV anogenital warts in a double blind placebo-controlled study: imiquimod inhibits HPV replication and results in the condyloma regression. Its action is based on the combined activation of the natural local immunity, by stimulating interferon alpha; and of the acquired immunity, by stimulating a T-cell mediated immune response. Thus imiquimod appears to be an original antiviral compound, because it does not act directly on the virus itself.

  8. AN ANTIVIRAL SUBSTANCE FROM PENICILLIUM FUNICULOSUM

    PubMed Central

    Shope, Richard E.

    1966-01-01

    1. Helenine injected intraperitoneally 24 hr prior to a regularly fatal dose of Semliki Forest virus saves most of the mice to which it is administered. 2. Mice saved by helenine develop no viral immunity and regularly succumb when rechallenged 2 wk later with the same dose of virus from which they were originally saved. 3. The time during which helenine is optimally effective in protecting mice from death by Semliki Forest virus covers a period of approximately 36 hr beginning after about 12 hr and extending to 48 hr before virus infection. When periods of less than 12 hr, or more than 48 hr, elapse between the time of helenine administration and virus inoculation, its protective effectiveness diminishes progressively. 4. Repeated injections of helenine at 2- or 3-day intervals, if continued long enough, exhaust the capacity of a host to respond favorably to helenine administered 24 hr before virus inoculation. 5. Helenine injections at intervals of 4, 3, and 2 wk before its administration 24 hr prior to infection do not decrease the effectiveness of this final dose in protecting mice from fatal infection by the virus. The experimental results here reported indicate that, as suggested by the findings of earlier work, helenine does not act directly as an antiviral substance, but instead exerts its effect through some substance that it induces the host to elaborate. The nature of this induced antiviral substance is as yet unknown though, to judge from the failure of spared mice to acquire viral immunity, it appears to act at a stage in viral replication prior to that at which antigenic viral protein is produced. The findings with helenine and those thus far reported for interferon afford no factual basis for judging the relationship of the two, if any. PMID:5905239

  9. Antifungal and antiviral products of marine organisms

    PubMed Central

    Cheung, Randy Chi Fai; Pan, Wen Liang; Chan, Yau Sang; Yin, Cui Ming; Dan, Xiu Li; Wang, He Xiang; Fang, Evandro Fei; Lam, Sze Kwan; Ngai, Patrick Hung Kui; Xia, Li Xin; Liu, Fang; Ye, Xiu Yun; Zhang, Guo Qing; Liu, Qing Hong; Sha, Ou; Lin, Peng; Ki, Chan; Bekhit, Adnan A; Bekhit, Alaa El-Din; Wan, David Chi Cheong

    2017-01-01

    Marine organisms including bacteria, fungi, algae, sponges, echinoderms, mollusks, and cephalochordates produce a variety of products with antifungal activity including bacterial chitinases, lipopeptides, and lactones; fungal (−)-sclerotiorin and peptaibols, purpurides B and C, berkedrimane B and purpuride; algal gambieric acids A and B, phlorotannins; 3,5-dibromo-2-(3,5-dibromo-2-methoxyphenoxy)phenol, spongistatin 1, eurysterols A and B, nortetillapyrone, bromotyrosine alkaloids, bis-indole alkaloid, ageloxime B and (−)-ageloxime D, haliscosamine, hamigeran G, hippolachnin A from sponges; echinoderm triterpene glycosides and alkene sulfates; molluscan kahalalide F and a 1485-Da peptide with a sequence SRSELIVHQR; and cepalochordate chitotriosidase and a 5026.9-Da antifungal peptide. The antiviral compounds from marine organisms include bacterial polysaccharide and furan-2-yl acetate; fungal macrolide, purpurester A, purpurquinone B, isoindolone derivatives, alterporriol Q, tetrahydroaltersolanol C and asperterrestide A, algal diterpenes, xylogalactofucan, alginic acid, glycolipid sulfoquinovosyldiacylglycerol, sulfated polysaccharide p-KG03, meroditerpenoids, methyl ester derivative of vatomaric acid, lectins, polysaccharides, tannins, cnidarian zoanthoxanthin alkaloids, norditerpenoid and capilloquinol; crustacean antilipopolysaccharide factors, molluscan hemocyanin; echinoderm triterpenoid glycosides; tunicate didemnin B, tamandarins A and B and; tilapia hepcidin 1–5 (TH 1–5), seabream SauMx1, SauMx2, and SauMx3, and orange-spotted grouper β-defensin. Although the mechanisms of antifungal and antiviral activities of only some of the afore-mentioned compounds have been elucidated, the possibility to use those known to have distinctly different mechanisms, good bioavailability, and minimal toxicity in combination therapy remains to be investigated. It is also worthwhile to test the marine antimicrobials for possible synergism with existing drugs. The

  10. Antiviral treatment for Bell's palsy (idiopathic facial paralysis).

    PubMed

    Lockhart, Pauline; Daly, Fergus; Pitkethly, Marie; Comerford, Natalia; Sullivan, Frank

    2009-10-07

    Antiviral agents against herpes simplex virus are widely used in the treatment of idiopathic facial paralysis (Bell's palsy), but their effectiveness is uncertain. Significant morbidity can be associated with severe cases. This review addresses the effect of antiviral therapy on Bell's palsy. We updated the search of the Cochrane Neuromuscular Disease Group Trials Register (December 2008), MEDLINE (from January 1966 to December 8 2008), EMBASE (from January 1980 to December 8 2008) and LILACS (from January 1982 to December 2008). Randomized trials of antivirals with and without corticosteroids versus control therapies for the treatment of Bell's palsy. Twenty-three papers were selected for consideration. Seven trials including 1987 participants met the inclusion criteria, adding five studies to the two in the previous review.Incomplete recovery at one year. There was no significant benefit in the rate of incomplete recovery from antivirals compared with placebo (n = 1886, RR 0.88, 95% CI 0.65 to 1.18). In meta-analyses with some unexplained heterogeneity, the outcome with antivirals was significantly worse than with corticosteroids (n = 768, RR 2.82, 95% CI 1.09 to 7.32) and the outcome with antivirals plus corticosteroids was significantly better than with placebo (n = 658, RR 0.56, 95% CI 0.41 to 0.76).Motor synkinesis or crocodile tears at one year. In single trials, there was no significant difference in long term sequelae comparing antivirals and corticosteroids with corticosteroids alone (n = 99, RR 0.39, 95% CI 0.14 to 1.07) or antivirals with corticosteroids (n = 101, RR 1.03, 95% CI 0.51 to 2.07).Adverse events.There was no significant difference in rates of adverse events between antivirals and placebo (n = 1544, RR 1.06, 95% CI 0.81 to 1.38), between antivirals and corticosteroids (n = 667, RR 0.96, 95% CI 0.65 to 1.41) or between the antiviral-corticosteroid combination and placebo (n = 658, RR 1.15, 95% CI 0.79 to 1.66). High quality evidence showed no

  11. Cherry Valley Ducks Mitochondrial Antiviral-Signaling Protein-Mediated Signaling Pathway and Antiviral Activity Research

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ning; Hong, Tianqi; Li, Rong; Wang, Yao; Guo, Mengjiao; Cao, Zongxi; Cai, Yumei; Liu, Sidang; Chai, Tongjie; Wei, Liangmeng

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondrial antiviral-signaling protein (MAVS), an adaptor protein of retinoic acid-inducible gene I (RIG-I)-like receptors (RLRs)-mediated signal pathway, is involved in innate immunity. In this study, Cherry Valley duck MAVS (duMAVS) was cloned from the spleen and analyzed. duMAVS was determined to have a caspase activation and recruitment domain at N-terminal, followed by a proline-rich domain and a transmembrane domain at C-terminal. Quantitative real-time PCR indicated that duMAVS was expressed in all tissues tested across a broad expression spectrum. The expression of duMAVS was significantly upregulated after infection with duck Tembusu virus (DTMUV). Overexpression of duMAVS could drive the activation of interferon (IFN)-β, nuclear factor-κB, interferon regulatory factor 7, and many downstream factors (such as Mx, PKR, OAS, and IL-8) in duck embryo fibroblast cells. What is more, RNA interference further confirmed that duMAVS was an important adaptor for IFN-β activation. The antiviral assay showed that duMAVS could suppress the various viral replications (DTMUV, novel reovirus, and duck plague virus) at early stages of infection. Overall, these results showed that the main signal pathway mediated by duMAVS and it had a broad-spectrum antiviral ability. This research will be helpful to better understanding the innate immune system of ducks. PMID:27708647

  12. WITHDRAWN. Antiviral treatment for Bell's palsy (idiopathic facial paralysis).

    PubMed

    Gagyor, Ildiko; Madhok, Vishnu B; Daly, Fergus; Somasundara, Dhruvashree; Sullivan, Michael; Gammie, Fiona; Sullivan, Frank

    2015-05-04

    Corticosteroids are widely used in the treatment of idiopathic facial paralysis (Bell's palsy), but the effectiveness of additional treatment with an antiviral agent is uncertain. Significant morbidity can be associated with severe cases of Bell's palsy. To assess the effects of antiviral treatments alone or in combination with any other therapy for Bell's palsy. On 7 October 2014 we searched the Cochrane Neuromuscular Disease Group Specialized Register, CENTRAL, MEDLINE, EMBASE, LILACS, DARE, NHS EED, and HTA. We also reviewed the bibliographies of the identified trials and contacted trial authors and known experts in the field and relevant drug companies to identify additional published or unpublished data. We searched clinical trials registries for ongoing studies. We considered randomised controlled trials or quasi-randomised controlled trials of antivirals with and without corticosteroids versus control therapies for the treatment of Bell's palsy. We excluded trials that had a high risk of bias in several domains. Pairs of authors independently assessed trials for relevance, eligibility, and risk of bias, using standard Cochrane procedures. Eleven trials, including 2883 participants, met the inclusion criteria and are included in the final analysis. We added four studies to the previous review for this update. Some of the trials were small, and a number were at high or unclear risk of bias. Other trials did not meet current best standards in allocation concealment and blinding. Incomplete recoveryWe found no significant benefit from adding antivirals to corticosteroids in comparison with corticosteroids alone for people with Bell's palsy (risk ratio (RR) 0.69, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.47 to 1.02, n = 1715). For people with severe Bell's palsy (House-Brackmann scores of 5 and 6 or the equivalent in other scales), we found a reduction in the rate of incomplete recovery at month six when antivirals plus corticosteroids were used (RR 0.64, 95% CI 0.41 to 0

  13. Optimizing antiviral agents for hepatitis B management in malignant lymphomas.

    PubMed

    Ozoya, Oluwatobi O; Chavez, Julio; Sokol, Lubomir; Dalia, Samir

    2017-02-01

    The global scale of hepatitis B infection is well known but its impact is still being understood. Missed hepatitis B infection impacts lymphoma therapy especially increased risk of hepatitis B virus (HBV) reactivation and poor treatment outcomes. The presence of undiagnosed chronic hepatitis also undermines chronic HBV screening methods that are based on a positive HBsAg alone. The goal of this review is to evaluate the literature for optimizing antiviral therapy for lymphoma patients with HBV infection or at risk of HBV reactivation. Relevant articles for this review were identified by searching PubMed, Embase, Ovid Medline, and Scopus using the following terms, alone and in combination: "chronic hepatitis B", "occult hepatitis B", "special groups", "malignant lymphoma", "non-Hodgkin's lymphoma", "Hodgkin's lymphoma", "immunocompromised host", "immunosuppressive agents", "antiviral", "HBV reactivation". The period of the search was restricted to a 15-year period to limit the search to optimizing antiviral agents for HBV infection in malignant lymphomas [2001-2016]. Several clinical practice guidelines recommend nucleos(t)ide analogues-entecavir, tenofovir and lamivudine among others. These agents are best initiated along with or prior to immunosuppressive therapy. Additional methods recommended for optimizing antiviral therapy include laboratory modalities such as HBV genotyping, timed measurements of HBsAg and HBV DNA levels to measure and predict antiviral treatment response. In conclusion, optimizing antiviral agents for these patients require consideration of geographic prevalence of HBV, cost of antiviral therapy or testing, screening modality, hepatitis experts, type of immunosuppressive therapy and planned duration of therapy.

  14. Highlights of the 30th International Conference on Antiviral Research.

    PubMed

    Andrei, Graciela; Carter, Kara; Janeba, Zlatko; Sampath, Aruna; Schang, Luis M; Tarbet, E Bart; Vere Hodge, R Anthony; Bray, Mike; Esté, José A

    2017-09-01

    The 30th International Conference on Antiviral Research (ICAR) was held in Atlanta, GA, USA from May 18 to 21, 2017. This report provides an account of award lectures, invited keynote addresses and oral presentations during the meeting. The 2017 Gertrude Elion Memorial Lecture Award by Michael Sofia highlighted one of the most important accomplishments in recent drug discovery in antiviral research, the identification of the hepatitis C virus direct-acting antiviral sofosbuvir and new alternatives to combat hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection. The Antonín Holý Lecture Award by David Chu on medicinal chemistry provided an overview of early developments of nucleoside analogs for the treatment of HIV and varicella zoster virus infection and how this knowledge serves to develop new drugs targeting HBV. Priscilla Yang gave the first ISAR Women in Science lecture. She reported on pharmacological validation of new antiviral targets for dengue, Zika and other flaviviruses. The William Prusoff Young Investigator Lecture Award by Maaike Everts described the Alabama Drug Discovery Alliance and the Antiviral Drug Discovery and Development Consortium, and how they are helping to accelerate the development of new antivirals. The 30th ICAR was a success in promoting new discoveries in antiviral drug development and research. The 31st ICAR will be held in Porto, Portugal, June 11-15, 2018. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Novel hepatitis C virus reporter replicon cell lines enable efficient antiviral screening against genotype 1a.

    PubMed

    Robinson, Margaret; Yang, Huiling; Sun, Siu-Chi; Peng, Betty; Tian, Yang; Pagratis, Nikos; Greenstein, Andrew E; Delaney, William E

    2010-08-01

    The hepatitis C virus (HCV) subgenomic replicon is the primary tool for evaluating the activity of anti-HCV compounds in drug discovery research. Despite the prevalence of HCV genotype 1a (approximately 70% of U.S. HCV patients), few genotype 1a reporter replicon cell lines have been described; this is presumably due to the low replication capacity of such constructs in available Huh-7 cells. In this report, we describe the selection of highly permissive Huh-7 cell lines that support robust replication of genotype 1a subgenomic replicons harboring luciferase reporter genes. These novel cell lines support the replication of multiple genotype 1a replicons (including the H77 and SF9 strains), are significantly more permissive to genotype 1a HCV replication than parental Huh7-Lunet cells, and maintain stable genotype 1a replication levels suitable for antiviral screening. We found that the sensitivity of genotype 1a luciferase replicons to known antivirals was highly consistent between individual genotype 1a clonal cell lines but could vary significantly between genotypes 1a and 1b. Sequencing of the nonstructural region of 12 stable replicon cell clones suggested that the enhanced permissivity is likely due to cellular component(s) in these new cell lines rather than the evolution of novel adaptive mutations in the replicons. These new reagents will enhance drug discovery efforts targeting genotype 1a and facilitate the profiling of compound activity among different HCV genotypes and subtypes.

  16. Antiviral Effects of Geranylgeranylacetone: Enhancement of MxA Expression and Phosphorylation of PKR during Influenza Virus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Unoshima, Masako; Iwasaka, Hideo; Eto, Junko; Takita-Sonoda, Yoshiko; Noguchi, Takayuki; Nishizono, Akira

    2003-01-01

    A cyclic polyisoprenoid compound, geranylgeranylacetone (GGA), has been used as antiulcer drug. GGA is also a potent inducer of heat shock proteins (HSPs). HSPs are considered to induce an antiviral effect; however, the detailed mechanism is unknown. To determine whether GGA might show antiviral activity and what the mechanism is, the effect of GGA against influenza virus (strain PR8) infection in vivo and in vitro was investigated. The results demonstrated that GGA treatment strongly suppressed the deleterious consequences of PR8 replication and was accompanied by an increase in HSP70 gene expression in mice. Results from in vitro analyses demonstrated that GGA significantly inhibited the synthesis of PR8-associated proteins and prominently enhanced expression of human myxovirus resistance 1 (MxA) followed by increased HSP70 transcription. Moreover, GGA augmented the expression of an interferon-inducible double-strand RNA-activated protein kinase (PKR) gene and promoted PKR autophosphorylation and concomitantly α subunit of eukaryotic initiation factor 2 phosphorylation during PR8 infection. It is proposed that GGA-induced HSP70 has potent antiviral activity by enhancement of antiviral factors and can clinically achieve protection from influenza virus infection. PMID:12936994

  17. Mechanisms, applications, and perspectives of antiviral RNA silencing in plants

    PubMed Central

    Garcia-Ruiz, Hernan; Ruiz, Mayra Teresa Garcia; Peralta, Sergio Manuel Gabriel; Gabriel, Cristina Betzabeth Miravel; El-Mounadi, Kautar

    2017-01-01

    Viral diseases of plants cause important economic losses due to reduction in crop quality and quantity to the point of threatening food security in some countries. Given the reduced availability of natural sources, genetic resistance to viruses has been successfully engineered for some plant-virus combinations. A sound understanding of the basic mechanisms governing plant-virus interactions, including antiviral RNA silencing, is the foundation to design better management strategies and biotechnological approaches to engineer and implement antiviral resistance in plants. In this review, we present current molecular models to explain antiviral RNA silencing and its application in basic plant research, biotechnology and genetic engineering. PMID:28890589

  18. Hepatitis C Virus Experimental Model Systems and Antiviral drug Research*

    PubMed Central

    Uprichard, Susan L.

    2010-01-01

    An estimated 130 million people worldwide are chronically infected with hepatitis C virus (HCV) making it a leading cause of liver disease worldwide. Because the currently available therapy of pegylated interferon-alpha and ribavirin is only effective in a subset of patients, the development of new HCV antivirals is a healthcare imperative. This review discusses the experimental models available for HCV antiviral drug research, recent advances in HCV antiviral drug development, as well as active research being pursued to facilitate development of new HCV-specific therapeutics. PMID:20960298

  19. An antiviral protein from Bougainvillea spectabilis roots; purification and characterisation.

    PubMed

    Balasaraswathi, R; Sadasivam, S; Ward, M; Walker, J M

    1998-04-01

    An antiviral protein active against mechanical transmission of tomato spotted wilt virus was identified in the root tissues of Bougainvillea spectabilis Willd. Bougainvillea Antiviral Protein I (BAP I) was purified to apparent homogeneity from the roots of Bougainvillea by ammonium sulphate precipitation, CM- and DEAE-Sepharose chromatography and reverse phase HPLC. BAP I is a highly basic protein (pI value > 8.6) with an Mr of 28,000. The N-terminal sequence of BAP I showed homology with other plant antiviral proteins. Preliminary tests suggest that purified BAP I is capable of interfering with in vitro protein synthesis.

  20. Stable Fly Research

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Adult stable flies feed on the blood of humans, pets and livestock, inflicting painful bites. Stable flies need one and sometimes two bloodmeals each day to develop their eggs. Unlike mosquitoes where only the females bloodfeed, both male and female stable flies require blood to reproduce. Stable fl...

  1. Potential Antiviral Agents from Marine Fungi: An Overview.

    PubMed

    Moghadamtousi, Soheil Zorofchian; Nikzad, Sonia; Kadir, Habsah Abdul; Abubakar, Sazaly; Zandi, Keivan

    2015-07-22

    Biodiversity of the marine world is only partially subjected to detailed scientific scrutiny in comparison to terrestrial life. Life in the marine world depends heavily on marine fungi scavenging the oceans of lifeless plants and animals and entering them into the nutrient cycle by. Approximately 150 to 200 new compounds, including alkaloids, sesquiterpenes, polyketides, and aromatic compounds, are identified from marine fungi annually. In recent years, numerous investigations demonstrated the tremendous potential of marine fungi as a promising source to develop new antivirals against different important viruses, including herpes simplex viruses, the human immunodeficiency virus, and the influenza virus. Various genera of marine fungi such as Aspergillus, Penicillium, Cladosporium, and Fusarium were subjected to compound isolation and antiviral studies, which led to an illustration of the strong antiviral activity of a variety of marine fungi-derived compounds. The present review strives to summarize all available knowledge on active compounds isolated from marine fungi with antiviral activity.

  2. International society for antiviral research - 23rd international conference.

    PubMed

    Mason, Vicki L

    2010-06-01

    The 23rd International Conference on Antiviral Research (ICAR), organized by the International Society for Antiviral Research (ISAR) and held in San Francisco, included topics covering new therapeutic developments in the field of antivirals. This conference report highlights selected presentations on CD4-BFFI (Roche Holding AG), a CD4 mAb-based bifunctional HIV entry inhibitor; a CLDC-HBsAg vaccine (Juvaris BioTherapeutics Inc/China National Biotec Group) against HBV; ODE-(S)-MPMPA (University of California San Diego), a potent anti-HCV compound; the anti-human CMV activity exhibited by tricin; the protective activity of Ingavirin against influenza A; and Prosetta Bioconformatics's approach to identifying small-molecule antivirals.

  3. Antiviral chemotherapy in veterinary medicine: current applications and perspectives.

    PubMed

    Dal Pozzo, F; Thiry, E

    2014-12-01

    The current situation in the use of antiviral drugs in veterinary medicine is characterised by a novel and optimistic approach.Viruses of veterinary importance are still used as animal models in the developmentof human therapeutics, but there is growing interest in many of these viruses in the identification of antiviral molecules for use in both livestock and companion animals. The use of antiviral drugs in livestock animals is envisaged for the treatment or control of disease on a large scale (mass treatment), whereas in companion animals an individual approach is favoured. An overview of the most recent examples of research in the use of antivirals in veterinary medicine is presented, with particular emphasis on their in vivo applications.

  4. Dengue Virus Entry as Target for Antiviral Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Alen, Marijke M. F.; Schols, Dominique

    2012-01-01

    Dengue virus (DENV) infections are expanding worldwide and, because of the lack of a vaccine, the search for antiviral products is imperative. Four serotypes of DENV are described and they all cause a similar disease outcome. It would be interesting to develop an antiviral product that can interact with all four serotypes, prevent host cell infection and subsequent immune activation. DENV entry is thus an interesting target for antiviral therapy. DENV enters the host cell through receptor-mediated endocytosis. Several cellular receptors have been proposed, and DC-SIGN, present on dendritic cells, is considered as the most important DENV receptor until now. Because DENV entry is a target for antiviral therapy, various classes of compounds have been investigated to inhibit this process. In this paper, an overview is given of all the putative DENV receptors, and the most promising DENV entry inhibitors are discussed. PMID:22529868

  5. Zika virus: a race in search for antivirals.

    PubMed

    Saiz, Juan-Carlos; Martín-Acebes, Miguel A

    2017-03-27

    Zika virus (ZIKV), a flavivirus transmitted by mosquitoes, was an almost neglected pathogen until its introduction in the Americas in 2015, and its subsequent explosive spread throughout the continent, where it has infected millions of people. The virus has caused social and sanitary alarm, mainly due to its association with severe neurological disorders (Guillain-Barré syndrome, and microcephaly in fetus and newborns). Nowadays, no specific antiviral therapy is available against ZIKV. However, during the past months, a great effort has been made in search for antiviral candidates by using different approaches and methodologies, from testing specific compounds with known antiviral activity to screenings of libraries with hundreds of bioactive molecules. The identified antiviral candidates include drugs targeting viral components, as well as cellular ones. Here, an updated review of what has been done in this line is presented.

  6. Antiviral agents against equid alphaherpesviruses: Current status and perspectives.

    PubMed

    Vissani, María A; Thiry, Etienne; Dal Pozzo, Fabiana; Barrandeguy, María

    2016-01-01

    Equid herpesvirus infections cause respiratory, neurological and reproductive syndromes. Despite preventive and control measures and the availability of vaccines and immunostimulants, herpesvirus infections still constitute a major threat to equine health and for the equine industry worldwide. Antiviral drugs, particularly nucleoside analogues and foscarnet, are successfully used for the treatment of human alphaherpesvirus infections. In equine medicine, the use of antiviral medications in alphaherpesvirus infections would decrease the excretion of virus and diminish the risk of contagion and the convalescent time in affected horses, and would also improve the clinical outcome of equine herpesvirus myeloencephalopathy. The combined use of antiviral compounds, along with vaccines, immune modulators, and effective preventive and control measures, might be beneficial in diminishing the negative impact of alphaherpesvirus infections in horses. The purpose of this review is to analyse the available information regarding the use of antiviral agents against alphaherpesviruses, with particular emphasis on equine alphaherpesvirus infections.

  7. Potential Antiviral Agents from Marine Fungi: An Overview

    PubMed Central

    Zorofchian Moghadamtousi, Soheil; Nikzad, Sonia; Abdul Kadir, Habsah; Abubakar, Sazaly; Zandi, Keivan

    2015-01-01

    Biodiversity of the marine world is only partially subjected to detailed scientific scrutiny in comparison to terrestrial life. Life in the marine world depends heavily on marine fungi scavenging the oceans of lifeless plants and animals and entering them into the nutrient cycle by. Approximately 150 to 200 new compounds, including alkaloids, sesquiterpenes, polyketides, and aromatic compounds, are identified from marine fungi annually. In recent years, numerous investigations demonstrated the tremendous potential of marine fungi as a promising source to develop new antivirals against different important viruses, including herpes simplex viruses, the human immunodeficiency virus, and the influenza virus. Various genera of marine fungi such as Aspergillus, Penicillium, Cladosporium, and Fusarium were subjected to compound isolation and antiviral studies, which led to an illustration of the strong antiviral activity of a variety of marine fungi-derived compounds. The present review strives to summarize all available knowledge on active compounds isolated from marine fungi with antiviral activity. PMID:26204947

  8. Clinical outcomes of patients undergoing antiviral therapy while awaiting liver transplantation.

    PubMed

    Pascasio, Juan Manuel; Vinaixa, Carmen; Ferrer, María Teresa; Colmenero, Jordi; Rubin, Angel; Castells, Lluis; Manzano, María Luisa; Lorente, Sara; Testillano, Milagros; Xiol, Xavier; Molina, Esther; González-Diéguez, Luisa; Otón, Elena; Pascual, Sonia; Santos, Begoña; Herrero, José Ignacio; Salcedo, Magdalena; Montero, José Luis; Sánchez-Antolín, Gloria; Narváez, Isidoro; Nogueras, Flor; Giráldez, Álvaro; Prieto, Martín; Forns, Xavier; Londoño, María-Carlota

    2017-08-24

    Antiviral therapy for the treatment of hepatitis C (HCV) infection has proved to be safe and efficacious in patients with cirrhosis awaiting liver transplantation (LT). However, the information regarding the clinical impact of viral eradication in patients on the waiting list is still limited. The aim of the study was to investigate the probability of delisting in patients who underwent antiviral therapy, and the clinical outcomes of these delisted patients. Observational, multicenter and retrospective analysis was carried out on prospectively collected data from patients positive for HCV, treated with an interferon-free regimen, while awaiting LT in 18 hospitals in Spain. In total, 238 patients were enrolled in the study. The indication for LT was decompensated cirrhosis (with or without hepatocellular carcinoma [HCC]) in 171 (72%) patients, and HCC in 67 (28%) patients. Sustained virologic response (SVR) rate was significantly higher in patients with compensated cirrhosis and HCC (92% vs. 83% in patients with decompensated cirrhosis with or without HCC, p=0.042). Among 122 patients with decompensated cirrhosis without HCC, 29 (24%) were delisted due to improvement. No patient with baseline MELD score >20 was delisted. After delisting (median follow-up of 88weeks), three patients had clinical decompensations and three had de novo HCC. Only two of the patients with HCC had to be re-admitted onto the waiting list. The remaining 23 patients remained stable, with no indication for LT. Antiviral therapy is safe and efficacious in patients awaiting LT. A quarter of patients with decompensated cirrhosis can be delisted asa result of clinical improvement, which appears to be remain stable in most patients. Thus, delisting is a safe strategy that could spare organs and benefit other patients with a more urgent need. Antiviral therapy in patients awaiting liver transplantation is safe and efficacious. Viral eradication allows removal from the waiting list of a quarter of

  9. Antiviral Efficacy of Pyrazofurin against Selected RNA Viruses

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-03-24

    DTIC Antiviral Research, 2 (1982) 33-337 ELECTE31 Elsevier Biomedical Press JUN t4 s ANTIVIRAL EFFICACY OF PYRAZOFURIN AGAINST SELECTED RNA VIRUSES ...hydroxypyrazole-5-carboxamide, markedly inhibited the in vitro replication of a number of RNA viruses including Rift Valley fever (RVF), S Venezuelan equine...encephalomyelitis (VEE), Sandfly, Pichinde, Lassa and LCM virus . Plaque forma- tion was reduced by 80% or more with 2-10 pg/ml of pyrazofurin while 2 ug

  10. Norovirus genetic diversity and evolution: implications for antiviral therapy.

    PubMed

    Rocha-Pereira, Joana; Van Dycke, Jana; Neyts, Johan

    2016-10-01

    Human noroviruses are the leading cause of foodborne illness causing both acute and chronic gastroenteritis. In recent years, a number of vaccine candidates entered (pre-) clinical development and the first efforts to develop antiviral therapy have been made. We here discuss aspects of norovirus genetic evolution, persistence in immunocompromised patients as well as the risk and potential consequences of resistance development toward future antiviral drugs. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Probiotics as Antiviral Agents in Shrimp Aquaculture

    PubMed Central

    Lakshmi, Bestha; Sai Gopal, D. V. R.

    2013-01-01

    Shrimp farming is an aquaculture business for the cultivation of marine shrimps or prawns for human consumption and is now considered as a major economic and food production sector as it is an increasingly important source of protein available for human consumption. Intensification of shrimp farming had led to the development of a number of diseases, which resulted in the excessive use of antimicrobial agents, which is finally responsible for many adverse effects. Currently, probiotics are chosen as the best alternatives to these antimicrobial agents and they act as natural immune enhancers, which provoke the disease resistance in shrimp farm. Viral diseases stand as the major constraint causing an enormous loss in the production in shrimp farms. Probiotics besides being beneficial bacteria also possess antiviral activity. Exploitation of these probiotics in treatment and prevention of viral diseases in shrimp aquaculture is a novel and efficient method. This review discusses the benefits of probiotics and their criteria for selection in shrimp aquaculture and their role in immune power enhancement towards viral diseases. PMID:23738078

  12. Interferons: Success in anti-viral immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Fan-ching; Young, Howard A.

    2014-01-01

    The interferons (IFNs) are glycoproteins with strong antiviral activities that represent one of the first lines of host defense against invading pathogens. These proteins are classified into three groups, Type I, II and III IFNs, based on the structure of their receptors on the cell surface. Due to their ability to modulate immune responses, they have become attractive therapeutic options to control chronic virus infections. In combination with other drugs, Type I IFNs are considered a “standard of care” in suppressing Hepatitis C (HCV) and Hepatitis B (HBV) infections, while Type III IFN has generated encouraging results as a treatment for HCV infection in phase III clinical trials. However, though effective, using IFNs as a treatment is not without the need for caution. IFNs are such powerful cytokines that affect a wide array of cell types; as a result, patients usually experience unpleasant symptoms, with a percentage of patients suffering system wide effects. Thus, constant monitoring is required for patients treated with IFN in order to reach the treatment goals of suppressing virus infection and maintaining quality of life. PMID:25156421

  13. Antiviral activities of coffee extracts in vitro.

    PubMed

    Utsunomiya, Hirotoshi; Ichinose, Masao; Uozaki, Misao; Tsujimoto, Kazuko; Yamasaki, Hisashi; Koyama, A Hajime

    2008-06-01

    Both hot water extracts of coffee grinds and instant coffee solutions inhibited the multiplication of herpes simplex virus type 1, a representative enveloped DNA virus, when they were added to the culture medium of the virus-infected cells at a dose of one fifth the concentration suitable for drinking. The antiherpetic activity was independent of the suppliers (companies) of the coffee grinds and of the locations where the coffee beans were produced. Further characterization revealed that there are two different mechanisms, by which the coffee extracts exert inhibitory activities on the virus infection; (1) a direct inactivation of the infectivity of virus particle (i.e., a virucidal activity) and (2) the inhibition of progeny infectious virus formation at the late stage of viral multiplication in the infected cells. Caffeine, but not quinic acid and chlorogenic acid, inhibited the virus multiplication to some extent, but none of them showed the virucidal activity, suggesting that other component(s) in the coffee extracts must play a role in the observed antiviral activity. In addition, the coffee extracts inhibited the multiplication of poliovirus, a non-enveloped RNA virus, but showed no virucidal effect on this virus.

  14. Viral respiratory diseases: vaccines and antivirals*

    PubMed Central

    Lennette, Edwin H.

    1981-01-01

    Acute respiratory diseases, most of which are generally attributed to viruses, account for about 6% of all deaths and for about 60% of the deaths associated with all respiratory disease. The huge cost attributable to viral respiratory infections as a result of absenteeism and the disruption of business and the burden of medical care makes control of these diseases an important objective. The viruses that infect the respiratory tract fall taxonomically into five viral families. Although immunoprophylaxis would appear to be the logical approach, the development of suitable vaccines has been confronted with numerous obstacles, including antigenic drift and shift in the influenzaviruses, the large number of antigenically distinct immunotypes among rhinoviruses, the occurrence after immunization of rare cases of a severe form of the disease following subsequent natural infection with respiratory syncytial virus, and the risk of oncogenicity of adenoviruses for man. Considerable expenditure on the development of new antiviral drugs has so far resulted in only three compounds that are at present officially approved and licensed for use in the USA. Efforts to improve the tools available for control should continue and imaginative and inventive approaches are called for. However, creativity and ingenuity must operate within the constraints imposed by economic, political, ethical, and legal considerations. PMID:6976841

  15. Viral respiratory diseases: vaccines and antivirals.

    PubMed

    Lennette, E H

    1981-01-01

    Acute respiratory diseases, most of which are generally attributed to viruses, account for about 6% of all deaths and for about 60% of the deaths associated with all respiratory disease. The huge cost attributable to viral respiratory infections as a result of absenteeism and the disruption of business and the burden of medical care makes control of these diseases an important objective. The viruses that infect the respiratory tract fall taxonomically into five viral families. Although immunoprophylaxis would appear to be the logical approach, the development of suitable vaccines has been confronted with numerous obstacles, including antigenic drift and shift in the influenzaviruses, the large number of antigenically distinct immunotypes among rhinoviruses, the occurrence after immunization of rare cases of a severe form of the disease following subsequent natural infection with respiratory syncytial virus, and the risk of oncogenicity of adenoviruses for man. Considerable expenditure on the development of new antiviral drugs has so far resulted in only three compounds that are at present officially approved and licensed for use in the USA. Efforts to improve the tools available for control should continue and imaginative and inventive approaches are called for. However, creativity and ingenuity must operate within the constraints imposed by economic, political, ethical, and legal considerations.

  16. Probiotics as antiviral agents in shrimp aquaculture.

    PubMed

    Lakshmi, Bestha; Viswanath, Buddolla; Sai Gopal, D V R

    2013-01-01

    Shrimp farming is an aquaculture business for the cultivation of marine shrimps or prawns for human consumption and is now considered as a major economic and food production sector as it is an increasingly important source of protein available for human consumption. Intensification of shrimp farming had led to the development of a number of diseases, which resulted in the excessive use of antimicrobial agents, which is finally responsible for many adverse effects. Currently, probiotics are chosen as the best alternatives to these antimicrobial agents and they act as natural immune enhancers, which provoke the disease resistance in shrimp farm. Viral diseases stand as the major constraint causing an enormous loss in the production in shrimp farms. Probiotics besides being beneficial bacteria also possess antiviral activity. Exploitation of these probiotics in treatment and prevention of viral diseases in shrimp aquaculture is a novel and efficient method. This review discusses the benefits of probiotics and their criteria for selection in shrimp aquaculture and their role in immune power enhancement towards viral diseases.

  17. Optimizing Distribution of Pandemic Influenza Antiviral Drugs

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Hsin-Chan; Morton, David P.; Johnson, Gregory P.; Gutfraind, Alexander; Galvani, Alison P.; Clements, Bruce; Meyers, Lauren A.

    2015-01-01

    We provide a data-driven method for optimizing pharmacy-based distribution of antiviral drugs during an influenza pandemic in terms of overall access for a target population and apply it to the state of Texas, USA. We found that during the 2009 influenza pandemic, the Texas Department of State Health Services achieved an estimated statewide access of 88% (proportion of population willing to travel to the nearest dispensing point). However, access reached only 34.5% of US postal code (ZIP code) areas containing <1,000 underinsured persons. Optimized distribution networks increased expected access to 91% overall and 60% in hard-to-reach regions, and 2 or 3 major pharmacy chains achieved near maximal coverage in well-populated areas. Independent pharmacies were essential for reaching ZIP code areas containing <1,000 underinsured persons. This model was developed during a collaboration between academic researchers and public health officials and is available as a decision support tool for Texas Department of State Health Services at a Web-based interface. PMID:25625858

  18. Antiviral activity of lactoferrin towards naked viruses.

    PubMed

    Seganti, Lucilla; Di Biase, Assunta Maria; Marchetti, Magda; Pietrantoni, Agostina; Tinari, Antonella; Superti, Fabiana

    2004-06-01

    It is well known that lactoferrin (Lf) is a potent inhibitor towards several enveloped and naked viruses, such as rotavirus, enterovirus and adenovirus. Lf is resistant to tryptic digestion and breast-fed infants excrete high levels of faecal Lf, so that its effect on viruses replicating in the gastrointestinal tract is of great interest. In this report, we analysed the mechanism of the antiviral action of this protein in three viral models which, despite representing different genoma and replication strategies, share the ability to infect the gut. Concerning the mechanism of action against rotavirus, Lf from bovine milk (BLf) possesses a dual role, preventing virus attachment to intestinal cells by binding to viral particles, and inhibiting a post adsorption step. The BLf effect towards poliovirus is due to the interference with an early infection step but, when the BLf molecule is saturated with Zn+2 ions, it is also capable of inhibiting viral replication after the viral adsorption phase. The anti-adenovirus action of BLf takes place on virus attachment to cell membranes through competition for common glycosaminoglycan receptors and a specific interaction with viral structural polypeptides. Taken together, these findings provide further evidence that Lf is an excellent candidate in the search of natural agents against viral enteric diseases, as it mainly acts by hindering adsorption and internalisation into cells through specific binding to cell receptors and/or viral particles.

  19. Antiviral and antitumor peptides from insects

    PubMed Central

    Chernysh, Sergey; Kim, S. I.; Bekker, G.; Pleskach, V. A.; Filatova, N. A.; Anikin, V. B.; Platonov, V. G.; Bulet, Philippe

    2002-01-01

    Insects can rapidly clear microbial infections by producing a variety of immune-induced molecules including antibacterial and/or antifungal peptides/polypeptides. In this report, we present the isolation, structural characterization, and biological properties of two variants of a group of bioactive, slightly cationic peptides, referred to as alloferons. Two peptides were isolated from the blood of an experimentally infected insect, the blow fly Calliphora vicina (Diptera), with the following amino acid sequences: HGVSGHGQHGVHG (alloferon 1) and GVSGHGQHGVHG (alloferon 2). Although these peptides have no clear homologies with known immune response modifiers, protein database searches established some structural similarities with proteins containing amino acid stretches similar to alloferon. In vitro experiments reveal that the synthetic version of alloferon has stimulatory activities on natural killer lymphocytes, whereas in vivo trials indicate induction of IFN production in mice after treatments with synthetic alloferon. Additional in vivo experiments in mice indicate that alloferon has antiviral and antitumoral capabilities. Taken together, these results suggest that this peptide, which has immunomodulatory properties, may have therapeutic capacities. The fact that insects may produce cytokine-like materials modulating basic mechanisms for human immunity suggests a source of anti-infection and antitumoral biopharmaceuticals. PMID:12235362

  20. Interferons: Success in anti-viral immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Lin, Fan-ching; Young, Howard A

    2014-08-01

    The interferons (IFNs) are glycoproteins with strong antiviral activities that represent one of the first lines of host defense against invading pathogens. These proteins are classified into three groups, Type I, II and III IFNs, based on the structure of their receptors on the cell surface. Due to their ability to modulate immune responses, they have become attractive therapeutic options to control chronic virus infections. In combination with other drugs, Type I IFNs are considered as "standard of care" in suppressing Hepatitis C (HCV) and Hepatitis B (HBV) infections, while Type III IFN has generated encouraging results as a treatment for HCV infection in phase III clinical trials. However, though effective, using IFNs as a treatment is not without the need for caution. IFNs are such powerful cytokines that affect a wide array of cell types; as a result, patients usually experience unpleasant symptoms, with a percentage of patients suffering system wide effects. Thus, constant monitoring is required for patients treated with IFN in order to reach the treatment goals of suppressing virus infection and maintaining quality of life. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Magnetotelluric Data, Stable Distributions and Stable Regression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chave, A. D.

    2013-12-01

    The author has noted for many years that the residuals from robust or bounded influence estimates of the magnetotelluric response function are systematically long tailed compared to a Gaussian or Rayleigh distribution. Consequently, the standard statistical model of a Gaussian core contaminated by a fraction of outlying data is not really valid. However, the typical result is an improvement on ordinary least squares, and has become standard in the electromagnetic induction community. A recent re-evaluation of the statistics of magnetotelluric response function estimation has shown that, in almost all cases, the residuals are alpha stable rather than Gaussian. Alpha stable distributions are characterized by four parameters: a shape parameter lying on (0, 2], a skewness parameter, a scale parameter and a location parameter, and cannot be expressed in closed form except for a few special cases. When the shape parameter is 2, the result is Gaussian, but when it is smaller the resulting distribution has infinite variance. Typical magnetotelluric residuals are alpha stable with a shape parameter lying between 1 and 2. This suggests that robust methods improve response function estimates by eliminating data corresponding to the largest stable residuals while leaving the bulk of the population alone. A better statistical approach is based on stable regression that directly accommodates the actual residual distribution without eliminating the most extreme ones. This paper will introduce such an algorithm, and illustrate its functionality with a variety of magnetotelluric data. Further work remains to produce a robust stable regression algorithm that will eliminate real outliers such as lightning strikes or instrument problems without affecting the bulk stable population. Stable distributions are intimately associated with fractional derivative physical processes. Since the Maxwell equations and the constitutive relations pertaining to the earth do not contain any fractional

  2. Perspective of Use of Antiviral Peptides against Influenza Virus

    PubMed Central

    Skalickova, Sylvie; Heger, Zbynek; Krejcova, Ludmila; Pekarik, Vladimir; Bastl, Karel; Janda, Jozef; Kostolansky, Frantisek; Vareckova, Eva; Zitka, Ondrej; Adam, Vojtech; Kizek, Rene

    2015-01-01

    The threat of a worldwide influenza pandemic has greatly increased over the past decade with the emergence of highly virulent avian influenza strains. The increased frequency of drug-resistant influenza strains against currently available antiviral drugs requires urgent development of new strategies for antiviral therapy, too. The research in the field of therapeutic peptides began to develop extensively in the second half of the 20th century. Since then, the mechanisms of action for several peptides and their antiviral prospect received large attention due to the global threat posed by viruses. Here, we discussed the therapeutic properties of peptides used in influenza treatment. Peptides with antiviral activity against influenza can be divided into three main groups. First, entry blocker peptides such as a Flupep that interact with influenza hemagglutinin, block its binding to host cells and prevent viral fusion. Second, several peptides display virucidal activity, disrupting viral envelopes, e.g., Melittin. Finally, a third set of peptides interacts with the viral polymerase complex and act as viral replication inhibitors such as PB1 derived peptides. Here, we present a review of the current literature describing the antiviral activity, mechanism and future therapeutic potential of these influenza antiviral peptides. PMID:26492266

  3. Current and new cytomegalovirus antivirals and novel animal model strategies.

    PubMed

    McGregor, Alistair

    2010-09-01

    Cytomegalovirus (CMV) is a significant health problem among immunosuppressed individuals. In particular, transplant and AIDS patients and the developing fetus in utero are highly susceptible to CMV. In these vulnerable populations, infection leads to life threatening end organ viral disease or in surviving newborn babies to deafness or to mental retardation. Currently, the most effective way to control CMV infection, given the lack of an effective vaccine, is by antiviral therapy. However, available antivirals suffer from complications associated with prolonged use, such as drug toxicity as well as the emergence of resistant strains of virus. Additionally, since CMV has multiple complex immune evasion strategies, to avoid innate and adaptive immune responses, there is a need for new antiviral development. Any antiviral should be tested in a controlled animal model but species specificity of HCMV precludes the direct study of the virus in an animal model. Consequently, animal CMV in their respective animal host are used to study intervention strategies. In this review, both current and new antiviral strategies are discussed as are the various animal models and strategies to improve existing antiviral animal models by humanizing animal CMV.

  4. The heat shock response restricts virus infection in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Merkling, Sarah H.; Overheul, Gijs J.; van Mierlo, Joël T.; Arends, Daan; Gilissen, Christian; van Rij, Ronald P.

    2015-01-01

    Innate immunity is the first line of defence against pathogens and is essential for survival of the infected host. The fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster is an emerging model to study viral pathogenesis, yet antiviral defence responses remain poorly understood. Here, we describe the heat shock response, a cellular mechanism that prevents proteotoxicity, as a component of the antiviral immune response in Drosophila. Transcriptome analyses of Drosophila S2 cells and adult flies revealed strong induction of the heat shock response upon RNA virus infection. Dynamic induction patterns of heat shock pathway components were characterized in vitro and in vivo following infection with different classes of viruses. The heat shock transcription factor (Hsf), as well as active viral replication, were necessary for the induction of the response. Hsf-deficient adult flies were hypersensitive to virus infection, indicating a role of the heat shock response in antiviral defence. In accordance, transgenic activation of the heat shock response prolonged survival time after infection and enabled long-term control of virus replication to undetectable levels. Together, our results establish the heat shock response as an important constituent of innate antiviral immunity in Drosophila. PMID:26234525

  5. Alteration of Antiviral Signalling by Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms (SNPs) of Mitochondrial Antiviral Signalling Protein (MAVS)

    PubMed Central

    Xing, Fei; Matsumiya, Tomoh; Hayakari, Ryo; Yoshida, Hidemi; Kawaguchi, Shogo; Takahashi, Ippei; Nakaji, Shigeyuki; Imaizumi, Tadaatsu

    2016-01-01

    Genetic variation is associated with diseases. As a type of genetic variation occurring with certain regularity and frequency, the single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) is attracting more and more attention because of its great value for research and real-life application. Mitochondrial antiviral signalling protein (MAVS) acts as a common adaptor molecule for retinoic acid-inducible gene-I (RIG-I)-like receptors (RLRs), which can recognize foreign RNA, including viral RNA, leading to the induction of type I interferons (IFNs). Therefore, MAVS is thought to be a crucial molecule in antiviral innate immunity. We speculated that genetic variation of MAVS may result in susceptibility to infectious diseases. To assess the risk of viral infection based on MAVS variation, we tested the effects of twelve non-synonymous MAVS coding-region SNPs from the National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI) database that result in amino acid substitutions. We found that five of these SNPs exhibited functional alterations. Additionally, four resulted in an inhibitory immune response, and one had the opposite effect. In total, 1,032 human genomic samples obtained from a mass examination were genotyped at these five SNPs. However, no homozygous or heterozygous variation was detected. We hypothesized that these five SNPs are not present in the Japanese population and that such MAVS variations may result in serious immune diseases. PMID:26954674

  6. Another ten stories in antiviral drug discovery (part C): "Old" and "new" antivirals, strategies, and perspectives.

    PubMed

    De Clercq, Erik

    2009-07-01

    The ten stories told here deal with (i) ribavirin as an inhibitor of IMP dehydrogenase and (ii) ribavirin, in combination with pegylated interferon, as the present "standard of care" for hepatitis C; (iii) S-adenosylhomocysteine hydrolase inhibitors as antiviral agents; (iv) new adamantadine derivatives for the treatment of influenza A virus infections; (v) 5-substituted 2'-deoxyuridines (i.e. IDU, TFT) for the treatment of herpes simplex virus (HSV) infections; (vi) acyclic guanosine analogues (e.g. acyclovir) for the treatment of HSV infections; (vii) OMP decarboxylase inhibitors (i.e. pyrazofurin) and CTP synthetase inhibitors (i.e. cyclopentenylcytosine) as possible antiviral agents; (viii) the future of cidofovir (and alkoxyalkyl esters thereof) and ST-246 as potential antipoxvirus agents; (ix) the two decade journey from tivirapine to rilpivirine in the ultimate therapy of HIV infections; and (x) the extension of the therapeutic application of tenofovir disoproxil fumarate (Viread) to the treatment of hepatitis B virus infection, in addition to HIV infection.

  7. PEGylated recombinant human interferon-ω as a long-acting antiviral agent: structure, antiviral activity and pharmacokinetics.

    PubMed

    Yu, Weili; Yu, Changming; Wu, Ling; Fang, Ting; Qiu, Rui; Zhang, Jinlong; Yu, Ting; Fu, Ling; Chen, Wei; Hu, Tao

    2014-08-01

    Recombinant human interferon-ω (rhIFN-ω) exhibits a potent antiviral activity. Because of poor pharmacokinetics (PK) of rhIFN-ω, frequent dosing of rhIFN-ω is necessitated to achieve the sustained antiviral efficacy. PEGylation can efficiently improve the PK of rhIFN-ω while substantially decrease its bioactivity. The structure, antiviral activity and PK of the PEGylated rhIFN-ω were measured to establish their relationship with PEGylation sites, polyethylene glycol (PEG) mass and PEG structure. Accordingly, N-terminus and the lysine residues were selected as the PEGylation sites. PEGs with Mw of 20kDa and 40kDa were used to investigate the effect of PEG mass. Linear and branched PEGs were used to investigate the effect of PEG structure. PEGylation decreased the antiviral activity of rhIFN-ω and improved its PK. The PEGylation sites determine the bioactivity of the PEGylated rhIFN-ω and the conjugated PEG mass determines the PK. N-terminally PEGylated rhIFN-ω with 40kDa linear PEG maintains 21.7% of the rhIFN-ω antiviral activity with a half-life of 139.6h. Thus, N-terminally PEGylated rhIFN-ω with linear 40kDa PEG is a potential antiviral agent for long-acting treatment of the viral diseases.

  8. Angina Pectoris (Stable Angina)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Peripheral Artery Disease Venous Thromboembolism Aortic Aneurysm More Angina Pectoris (Stable Angina) Updated:Sep 19,2016 You may have heard the term “angina pectoris” or “stable angina” in your doctor’s office, but ...

  9. Management of direct antiviral agent failures

    PubMed Central

    Buti, María; Esteban, Rafael

    2016-01-01

    The current standard of care for patients with chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is a combination of direct-acting antiviral agents (DAAs). Most HCV patients treated with these drugs achieve viral elimination, but 1% to 15% fail to attain this objective. Treatment failures are usually related to relapse, and less often to on-treatment viral breakthrough. HCV drug resistant associated substitutions are detected in most patients who do not eliminate the virus. The risk of developing these variants depends on host- and virus-related factors, the properties of the drugs used, and the treatment strategies applied. Patients who carry Resistant Associated Substitutions (RASs) may not obtain benefits from treatment, and are at a risk of disease progression. Whether HCV RASs persist depends on their type: NS3-4A variants often disappear gradually after DAA therapy is stopped, whereas NS5A variants tend to persist for more than 2 years. The best way to prevent emergence of resistant variants is to eliminate the virus at the first treatment using highly potent DAAs with genetic barriers to resistance. For those who fail an NS5A inhibitor, deferral of treatment is recommended pending the availability of additional data if they do not have cirrhosis or reasons for urgent re-treatment. If re-treatment is needed, the most commonly used strategy is sofosbuvir as backbone therapy plus a drug from a class other than that previously used, for 24 weeks. Unless it is contraindicated, weight-based ribavirin should also be added. If available, nucleotide-based (eg, sofosbuvir) triple or quadruple DAA regimens may be considered. The optimal treatment for patients who fail an NS5A inhibitor and those with multidrug-resistant variants remains to be defined, and research efforts should continue to focus on treatment for these patients. PMID:28081594

  10. Antiviral immune responses of bats: a review.

    PubMed

    Baker, M L; Schountz, T; Wang, L-F

    2013-02-01

    Despite being the second most species-rich and abundant group of mammals, bats are also among the least studied, with a particular paucity of information in the area of bat immunology. Although bats have a long history of association with rabies, the emergence and re-emergence of a number of viruses from bats that impact human and animal health has resulted in a resurgence of interest in bat immunology. Understanding how bats coexist with viruses in the absence of disease is essential if we are to begin to develop therapeutics to target viruses in humans and susceptible livestock and companion animals. Here, we review the current status of knowledge in the field of bat antiviral immunology including both adaptive and innate mechanisms of immune defence and highlight the need for further investigations in this area. Because data in this field are so limited, our discussion is based on both scientific discoveries and theoretical predictions. It is hoped that by provoking original, speculative or even controversial ideas or theories, this review may stimulate further research in this important field. Efforts to understand the immune systems of bats have been greatly facilitated in recent years by the availability of partial genome sequences from two species of bats, a megabat, Pteropus vampyrus, and a microbat, Myotis lucifugus, allowing the rapid identification of immune genes. Although bats appear to share most features of the immune system with other mammals, several studies have reported qualitative and quantitative differences in the immune responses of bats. These observations warrant further investigation to determine whether such differences are associated with the asymptomatic nature of viral infections in bats.

  11. Antiviral screening of forty-two Egyptian medicinal plants.

    PubMed

    Soltan, Maha Mohamed; Zaki, Adel Kamal

    2009-10-29

    Egyptian medicinal plants are well known by their diverse uses in traditional folk medicine to cure various ailments including infectious diseases. Forty-two Egyptian medicinal plant species were selected from local market and were subjected to antiviral screening bioassay to investigate and to evaluate their biological activities. Hydro-alcoholic extracts of each species were separately prepared and tested against three viruses: herpes simplex-1 virus (HSV), poliomyelitis-1 virus (POLIO) and vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV). The antiviral activity were determined by means of the end point titration technique (EPTT) that depends on the ability of plant extract dilutions to inhibit the produced cytopathogenic effect (CPE) and expressed as reduction factor (Rf) of the viral titer. Achillea fragrantissima, Jasonia montana and Globularia arabica are found to have antiviral activity against POLIO in a concentration dependent manner at complete non-toxic concentration range 10-100 microg/ml (Rf 10(6)), 10-100 microg/ml (Rf 10(5)) and 50-100 microg/ml (Rf 10(4)), respectively while Tanacetum sinaicum are found to have moderate antiviral activity against POLIO at concentration of 50-100 microg/ml (Rf 10(2)). Ephedra alata and Moringa peregrina are found to have antiviral activity against HSV (Rf 10(4)). Also, the results revealed that Capparis sinaica, Tamarix nilotica and Cyperus rotundus are found to have virucidal effect against HSV. All the forty-two plant species are found to have no reliable antiviral activity against VSV. The specific indications claimed by the traditional healers are confirmed by antiviral test.

  12. [Use of Getah virus for antiviral assay of human interferon].

    PubMed

    Ogiso, Subaru; Shirai, Junsuke; Tuchiya, Yoshinori; Honda, Eiichi

    2005-12-01

    Antiviral assay is used routinely for measuring the biological activity of interferon (IFN). However, the challenge viruses used in these assays are considered dangerous to the animal industry and pose a risk of human infection. For example, the vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) is an important exotic disease agent in domestic animals, and the sindbis virus provokes rash, arthralgia, and fever in humans. Therefore, biosafety needs to be considered when antiviral assays are performed. We chose Getah virus as a candidate challenge virus because it is less hazardous to animals and humans. Crystal violet staining 50% CPE inhibition antiviral assay of human IFN using Getah virus was studied. Antiviral assay using Getah virus and FL cells gave a higher titer of human IFN than did assay using VSV. The titer of human IFN alpha was almost the same as that given by standardized control samples. The titer of human IFN by antiviral assay using Getah virus on the sheet method (IFN reacted the sheeted FL cells) was higher than those of the simultaneous reaction method (IFN reacted the suspending FL cells before sheeted). We therefore consider the sheet method useful for detection of small amounts of IFN. Antiviral assay using Getah virus on MDBK cells gave a lower titer of human IFN alpha than did assay using VSV. However, the adjusting the number of MDBK cells and the titer of Getah virus to get the best condition for CPE appearance, gave similar results in the assays using Getah virus and VSV. We consider that Getah virus is a potentially useful challenge virus for antiviral assay of human IFN.

  13. Targeting viral dsRNA for antiviral prophylaxis

    PubMed Central

    Fei, Zhou; Liu, Yang; Yan, Zhen; Fan, Daiming; Alexander, Alice; Yang, Jing-Hua

    2011-01-01

    Double-stranded (ds)RNA in the infected cells is a trait shared by most if not all viruses. While humans have developed variable immune responses, viruses have also developed countermeasures to defeat dsRNA-induced antiviral strategies. Thus, we proposed a broad antiviral strategy to antagonize the countermeasures of viruses and bypass the dsRNA-induced signals that are readily defeated by viruses. By rewiring the dsRNA-binding proteins in the dsRNA complex and reconnecting them to apoptosis signaling, we created several dsRNA-dependent caspase recruiters, termed dsCAREs, to bypass dsRNA-induced antiviral signals that would otherwise be targeted by viruses. Adenovirus and vesicular stomatitis virus, representing viruses of the dsDNA and negative-stranded RNA viral groups, were used to infect HEK293 cells. The dsCARE chimera was added in medium to evaluate its antiviral activity. The truncated dsCAREs were used as controls. We demonstrate that dsCARE suppresses viral infection starting at 0.1 μg/ml and reaches the peak at 2 μg/ml. The EC50 was ∼0.2 μg/ml. However, it had an undetectable effect on uninfected cells. Further data show that both dsRNA binding and apoptosis activation of dsCARE are essential for its antiviral activity. We conclude that dsRNA is a practical virus-associated molecular pattern that can be targeted for broad and rapid antiviral prophylaxis.—Fei, Z., Liu, Y., Yan, Z., Fan, D., Alexander, A., Yang, J.-H. Targeting viral dsRNA for antiviral prophylaxis. PMID:19880628

  14. Antiviral effects of ascorbic and dehydroascorbic acids in vitro.

    PubMed

    Furuya, Ayami; Uozaki, Misao; Yamasaki, Hisashi; Arakawa, Tsutomu; Arita, Mikio; Koyama, A Hajime

    2008-10-01

    In the present study, ascorbic acid weakly inhibited the multiplication of viruses of three different families: herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1), influenza virus type A and poliovirus type 1. Dehydroascorbic acid, an oxidized form of ascorbic acid and hence without reducing ability, showed much stronger antiviral activity than ascorbic acid, indicating that the antiviral activity of ascorbic acid is due to factors other than an antioxidant mechanism. Moreover, addition of 1 mM Fe3+, which oxidizes ascorbic acid to dehydroascorbic acid and also enhances the formation of hydroxyl radicals by ascorbic acid in the culture media, strongly enhanced the antiviral activity of ascorbic acid to a level significantly stronger than that of dehydroascorbic acid. Although both ascorbic acid and dehydroascorbic acid showed some cytotoxicity, the degree of cytotoxicity of the former was 10-fold higher than the latter, suggesting that the observed antiviral activity of ascorbic acid with and without ferric ion is, at least in part, a secondary result of the cytotoxic effect of the reagent, most likely due to the free radicals. However, the possibility that oxidation of ascorbic acid also contributed to the antiviral effects of ascorbic acid exists, in particular in the presence of ferric ion, since dehydroascorbic acid exhibited a very strong antiviral activity. Characterization of the mode of antiviral action of dehydroascorbic acid revealed that the addition of the reagent even at 11 h post infection almost completely inhibited the formation of progeny infectious virus in the infected cells, indicating that the reagent inhibits HSV-1 multiplication probably at the assembly process of progeny virus particles after the completion of viral DNA replication.

  15. Genetic Fusions of a CFA/I/II/IV MEFA (Multiepitope Fusion Antigen) and a Toxoid Fusion of Heat-Stable Toxin (STa) and Heat-Labile Toxin (LT) of Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) Retain Broad Anti-CFA and Antitoxin Antigenicity

    PubMed Central

    Ruan, Xiaosai; Sack, David A.; Zhang, Weiping

    2015-01-01

    Immunological heterogeneity has long been the major challenge in developing broadly effective vaccines to protect humans and animals against bacterial and viral infections. Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) strains, the leading bacterial cause of diarrhea in humans, express at least 23 immunologically different colonization factor antigens (CFAs) and two distinct enterotoxins [heat-labile toxin (LT) and heat-stable toxin type Ib (STa or hSTa)]. ETEC strains expressing any one or two CFAs and either toxin cause diarrhea, therefore vaccines inducing broad immunity against a majority of CFAs, if not all, and both toxins are expected to be effective against ETEC. In this study, we applied the multiepitope fusion antigen (MEFA) strategy to construct ETEC antigens and examined antigens for broad anti-CFA and antitoxin immunogenicity. CFA MEFA CFA/I/II/IV [CVI 2014, 21(2):243-9], which carried epitopes of seven CFAs [CFA/I, CFA/II (CS1, CS2, CS3), CFA/IV (CS4, CS5, CS6)] expressed by the most prevalent and virulent ETEC strains, was genetically fused to LT-STa toxoid fusion monomer 3xSTaA14Q-dmLT or 3xSTaN12S-dmLT [IAI 2014, 82(5):1823-32] for CFA/I/II/IV-STaA14Q-dmLT and CFA/I/II/IV-STaN12S-dmLT MEFAs. Mice intraperitoneally immunized with either CFA/I/II/IV-STa-toxoid-dmLT MEFA developed antibodies specific to seven CFAs and both toxins, at levels equivalent or comparable to those induced from co-administration of the CFA/I/II/IV MEFA and toxoid fusion 3xSTaN12S-dmLT. Moreover, induced antibodies showed in vitro adherence inhibition activities against ETEC or E. coli strains expressing these seven CFAs and neutralization activities against both toxins. These results indicated CFA/I/II/IV-STa-toxoid-dmLT MEFA or CFA/I/II/IV MEFA combined with 3xSTaN12S-dmLT induced broadly protective anti-CFA and antitoxin immunity, and suggested their potential application in broadly effective ETEC vaccine development. This MEFA strategy may be generally used in multivalent

  16. Genetic fusions of a CFA/I/II/IV MEFA (multiepitope fusion antigen) and a toxoid fusion of heat-stable toxin (STa) and heat-labile toxin (LT) of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) retain broad anti-CFA and antitoxin antigenicity.

    PubMed

    Ruan, Xiaosai; Sack, David A; Zhang, Weiping

    2015-01-01

    Immunological heterogeneity has long been the major challenge in developing broadly effective vaccines to protect humans and animals against bacterial and viral infections. Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) strains, the leading bacterial cause of diarrhea in humans, express at least 23 immunologically different colonization factor antigens (CFAs) and two distinct enterotoxins [heat-labile toxin (LT) and heat-stable toxin type Ib (STa or hSTa)]. ETEC strains expressing any one or two CFAs and either toxin cause diarrhea, therefore vaccines inducing broad immunity against a majority of CFAs, if not all, and both toxins are expected to be effective against ETEC. In this study, we applied the multiepitope fusion antigen (MEFA) strategy to construct ETEC antigens and examined antigens for broad anti-CFA and antitoxin immunogenicity. CFA MEFA CFA/I/II/IV [CVI 2014, 21(2):243-9], which carried epitopes of seven CFAs [CFA/I, CFA/II (CS1, CS2, CS3), CFA/IV (CS4, CS5, CS6)] expressed by the most prevalent and virulent ETEC strains, was genetically fused to LT-STa toxoid fusion monomer 3xSTaA14Q-dmLT or 3xSTaN12S-dmLT [IAI 2014, 82(5):1823-32] for CFA/I/II/IV-STaA14Q-dmLT and CFA/I/II/IV-STaN12S-dmLT MEFAs. Mice intraperitoneally immunized with either CFA/I/II/IV-STa-toxoid-dmLT MEFA developed antibodies specific to seven CFAs and both toxins, at levels equivalent or comparable to those induced from co-administration of the CFA/I/II/IV MEFA and toxoid fusion 3xSTaN12S-dmLT. Moreover, induced antibodies showed in vitro adherence inhibition activities against ETEC or E. coli strains expressing these seven CFAs and neutralization activities against both toxins. These results indicated CFA/I/II/IV-STa-toxoid-dmLT MEFA or CFA/I/II/IV MEFA combined with 3xSTaN12S-dmLT induced broadly protective anti-CFA and antitoxin immunity, and suggested their potential application in broadly effective ETEC vaccine development. This MEFA strategy may be generally used in multivalent

  17. Antiviral treatment for Bell's palsy (idiopathic facial paralysis).

    PubMed

    Gagyor, Ildiko; Madhok, Vishnu B; Daly, Fergus; Somasundara, Dhruvashree; Sullivan, Michael; Gammie, Fiona; Sullivan, Frank

    2015-11-09

    Corticosteroids are widely used in the treatment of idiopathic facial paralysis (Bell's palsy), but the effectiveness of additional treatment with an antiviral agent is uncertain. Significant morbidity can be associated with severe cases of Bell's palsy. This review was first published in 2001 and revised several times, most recently in 2009. This version replaces an update of the review in Issue 7 of the Cochrane Library subsequently withdrawn because of an ongoing investigation into the reliability of data from an included study. To assess the effects of antiviral treatments alone or in combination with any other therapy for Bell's palsy. On 7 October 2014 we searched the Cochrane Neuromuscular Disease Group Specialized Register, CENTRAL, MEDLINE, EMBASE, LILACS, DARE, NHS EED, and HTA. We also reviewed the bibliographies of the identified trials and contacted trial authors and known experts in the field and relevant drug companies to identify additional published or unpublished data. We searched clinical trials registries for ongoing studies. We considered randomised controlled trials or quasi-randomised controlled trials of antivirals with and without corticosteroids versus control therapies for the treatment of Bell's palsy. We excluded trials that had a high risk of bias in several domains. Pairs of authors independently assessed trials for relevance, eligibility, and risk of bias, using standard Cochrane procedures. Ten trials, including 2280 participants, met the inclusion criteria and are included in the final analysis. Some of the trials were small, and a number were at high or unclear risk of bias. Other trials did not meet current best standards in allocation concealment and blinding. Incomplete recoveryWe found a significant benefit from adding antivirals to corticosteroids in comparison with corticosteroids alone for people with Bell's palsy (risk ratio (RR) 0.61, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.39 to 0.97, n = 1315). For people with severe Bell

  18. Antiviral treatment for Bell's palsy (idiopathic facial paralysis).

    PubMed

    Gagyor, Ildiko; Madhok, Vishnu B; Daly, Fergus; Somasundara, Dhruvashree; Sullivan, Michael; Gammie, Fiona; Sullivan, Frank

    2015-07-01

    Corticosteroids are widely used in the treatment of idiopathic facial paralysis (Bell's palsy), but the effectiveness of additional treatment with an antiviral agent is uncertain. Significant morbidity can be associated with severe cases of Bell's palsy. To assess the effects of antiviral treatments alone or in combination with any other therapy for Bell's palsy. On 7 October 2014 we searched the Cochrane Neuromuscular Disease Group Specialized Register, CENTRAL, MEDLINE, EMBASE, LILACS, DARE, NHS EED, and HTA. We also reviewed the bibliographies of the identified trials and contacted trial authors and known experts in the field and relevant drug companies to identify additional published or unpublished data. We searched clinical trials registries for ongoing studies. We considered randomised controlled trials or quasi-randomised controlled trials of antivirals with and without corticosteroids versus control therapies for the treatment of Bell's palsy. We excluded trials that had a high risk of bias in several domains. Pairs of authors independently assessed trials for relevance, eligibility, and risk of bias, using standard Cochrane procedures. Eleven trials, including 2883 participants, met the inclusion criteria and are included in the final analysis. We added four studies to the previous review for this update. Some of the trials were small, and a number were at high or unclear risk of bias. Other trials did not meet current best standards in allocation concealment and blinding. Incomplete recoveryWe found no significant benefit from adding antivirals to corticosteroids in comparison with corticosteroids alone for people with Bell's palsy (risk ratio (RR) 0.69, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.47 to 1.02, n = 1715). For people with severe Bell's palsy (House-Brackmann scores of 5 and 6 or the equivalent in other scales), we found a reduction in the rate of incomplete recovery at month six when antivirals plus corticosteroids were used (RR 0.64, 95% CI 0.41 to 0

  19. Characterization of Poliovirus Variants Selected for Resistance to the Antiviral Compound V-073

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Hong-Mei; Roberts, Jason A.; Moore, Deborah; Anderson, Barbara; Pallansch, Mark A.; Pevear, Daniel C.; Collett, Marc S.

    2012-01-01

    V-073, a small-molecule capsid inhibitor originally developed for nonpolio enterovirus indications is considerably more potent against polioviruses. All poliovirus isolates tested to date (n = 45), including wild, vaccine, vaccine-derived, and laboratory strains, are susceptible to the antiviral capsid inhibitor V-073. We grew poliovirus in the presence of V-073 to allow for the identification of variants with reduced susceptibility to the drug. Sequence analysis of 160 independent resistant variants (80 isolates of poliovirus type 1, 40 isolates each of types 2 and 3) established that V-073 resistance involved a single amino acid change in either of two virus capsid proteins, VP1 (67 of 160 [42%]) or VP3 (93 of 160 [58%]). In resistant variants with a VP1 change, the majority (53 of 67 [79%]) exhibited a substitution of isoleucine at position 194 (equivalent position 192 in type 3) with either methionine or phenylalanine. Of those with a VP3 change, alanine at position 24 was replaced with valine in all variants (n = 93). The resistance phenotype was relatively stable upon passage of viruses in cell culture in the absence of drug. Single-step growth studies showed no substantial differences between drug-resistant variants and the virus stocks from which they were derived, while the resistant viruses were generally more thermally labile than the corresponding drug-susceptible parental viruses. These studies provide a foundation from which to build a greater understanding of resistance to antiviral compound V-073. PMID:22890765

  20. Heat transfer fluids containing nanoparticles

    DOEpatents

    Singh, Dileep; Routbort, Jules; Routbort, A.J.; Yu, Wenhua; Timofeeva, Elena; Smith, David S.; France, David M.

    2016-05-17

    A nanofluid of a base heat transfer fluid and a plurality of ceramic nanoparticles suspended throughout the base heat transfer fluid applicable to commercial and industrial heat transfer applications. The nanofluid is stable, non-reactive and exhibits enhanced heat transfer properties relative to the base heat transfer fluid, with only minimal increases in pumping power required relative to the base heat transfer fluid. In a particular embodiment, the plurality of ceramic nanoparticles comprise silicon carbide and the base heat transfer fluid comprises water and water and ethylene glycol mixtures.

  1. The 17th International Conference on Antiviral Research.

    PubMed

    Buckheit, Robert W

    2004-09-01

    The focus of the 17th International Conference on Antiviral Research was the discovery and development of antiviral agents (chemistry, biology, animal models and clinical trial results) against a variety of human infectious agents including HIV, herpes viruses, hepatitis viruses, respiratory viruses and emerging/re-emerging pathogens. The meeting included the symposium 'Clinical Update on Antiviral Drugs', plenary sessions dedicated to each of the individual classes of infectious agents, a symposium on new developments surrounding emerging pathogens, and three special award lectures, which discussed the history of nucleotide antiviral agents, mechanisms of viral persistence and drug resistance, and the therapy of herpes virus infections. Within each infectious agent session the presentations included those describing the development of new and novel anti-infectives, including research based on the preclinical development of new molecules, and the results of animal modelling and clinical studies on advanced-stage antiviral agents. A summary of the meeting highlights, segregated by infectious agent, will be presented in this review.

  2. Screening for Antiviral Activities of Isolated Compounds from Essential Oils

    PubMed Central

    Astani, Akram; Reichling, Jürgen; Schnitzler, Paul

    2011-01-01

    Essential oil of star anise as well as phenylpropanoids and sesquiterpenes, for example, trans-anethole, eugenol, β-eudesmol, farnesol, β-caryophyllene and β-caryophyllene oxide, which are present in many essential oils, were examined for their antiviral activity against herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) in vitro. Antiviral activity was analyzed by plaque reduction assays and mode of antiviral action was determined by addition of the drugs to uninfected cells, to the virus prior to infection or to herpesvirus-infected cells. Star anise oil reduced viral infectivity by >99%, phenylpropanoids inhibited HSV infectivity by about 60–80% and sesquiterpenes suppressed herpes virus infection by 40–98%. Both, star anise essential oil and all isolated compounds exhibited anti-HSV-1 activity by direct inactivation of free virus particles in viral suspension assays. All tested drugs interacted in a dose-dependent manner with herpesvirus particles, thereby inactivating viral infectivity. Star anise oil, rich in trans-anethole, revealed a high selectivity index of 160 against HSV, whereas among the isolated compounds only β-caryophyllene displayed a high selectivity index of 140. The presence of β-caryophyllene in many essential oils might contribute strongly to their antiviral ability. These results indicate that phenylpropanoids and sesquiterpenes present in essential oils contribute to their antiviral activity against HSV. PMID:20008902

  3. Antiviral Screening of Multiple Compounds against Ebola Virus

    PubMed Central

    Dowall, Stuart D.; Bewley, Kevin; Watson, Robert J.; Vasan, Seshadri S.; Ghosh, Chandradhish; Konai, Mohini M.; Gausdal, Gro; Lorens, James B.; Long, Jason; Barclay, Wendy; Garcia-Dorival, Isabel; Hiscox, Julian; Bosworth, Andrew; Taylor, Irene; Easterbrook, Linda; Pitman, James; Summers, Sian; Chan-Pensley, Jenny; Funnell, Simon; Vipond, Julia; Charlton, Sue; Haldar, Jayanta; Hewson, Roger; Carroll, Miles W.

    2016-01-01

    In light of the recent outbreak of Ebola virus (EBOV) disease in West Africa, there have been renewed efforts to search for effective antiviral countermeasures. A range of compounds currently available with broad antimicrobial activity have been tested for activity against EBOV. Using live EBOV, eighteen candidate compounds were screened for antiviral activity in vitro. The compounds were selected on a rational basis because their mechanisms of action suggested that they had the potential to disrupt EBOV entry, replication or exit from cells or because they had displayed some antiviral activity against EBOV in previous tests. Nine compounds caused no reduction in viral replication despite cells remaining healthy, so they were excluded from further analysis (zidovudine; didanosine; stavudine; abacavir sulphate; entecavir; JB1a; Aimspro; celgosivir; and castanospermine). A second screen of the remaining compounds and the feasibility of appropriateness for in vivo testing removed six further compounds (ouabain; omeprazole; esomeprazole; Gleevec; D-LANA-14; and Tasigna). The three most promising compounds (17-DMAG; BGB324; and NCK-8) were further screened for in vivo activity in the guinea pig model of EBOV disease. Two of the compounds, BGB324 and NCK-8, showed some effect against lethal infection in vivo at the concentrations tested, which warrants further investigation. Further, these data add to the body of knowledge on the antiviral activities of multiple compounds against EBOV and indicate that the scientific community should invest more effort into the development of novel and specific antiviral compounds to treat Ebola virus disease. PMID:27801778

  4. Cytomegalovirus Antivirals and Development of Improved Animal Models

    PubMed Central

    McGregor, Alistair; Choi, K. Yeon

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Cytomegalovirus (CMV) is a ubiquitous pathogen that establishes a life long asymptomatic infection in healthy individuals. Infection of immunesuppressed individuals causes serious illness. Transplant and AIDS patients are highly susceptible to CMV leading to life threatening end organ disease. Another vulnerable population is the developing fetus in utero, where congenital infection can result in surviving newborns with long term developmental problems. There is no vaccine licensed for CMV and current antivirals suffer from complications associated with prolonged treatment. These include drug toxicity and emergence of resistant strains. There is an obvious need for new antivirals. Candidate intervention strategies are tested in controlled pre-clinical animal models but species specificity of HCMV precludes the direct study of the virus in an animal model. Areas covered This review explores the current status of CMV antivirals and development of new drugs. This includes the use of animal models and the development of new improved models such as humanized animal CMV and bioluminescent imaging of virus in animals in real time. Expert Opinion Various new CMV antivirals are in development, some with greater spectrum of activity against other viruses. Although the greatest need is in the setting of transplant patients there remains an unmet need for a safe antiviral strategy against congenital CMV. This is especially important since an effective CMV vaccine remains an elusive goal. In this capacity greater emphasis should be placed on suitable pre-clinical animal models and greater collaboration between industry and academia. PMID:21883024

  5. Antiviral Screening of Multiple Compounds against Ebola Virus.

    PubMed

    Dowall, Stuart D; Bewley, Kevin; Watson, Robert J; Vasan, Seshadri S; Ghosh, Chandradhish; Konai, Mohini M; Gausdal, Gro; Lorens, James B; Long, Jason; Barclay, Wendy; Garcia-Dorival, Isabel; Hiscox, Julian; Bosworth, Andrew; Taylor, Irene; Easterbrook, Linda; Pitman, James; Summers, Sian; Chan-Pensley, Jenny; Funnell, Simon; Vipond, Julia; Charlton, Sue; Haldar, Jayanta; Hewson, Roger; Carroll, Miles W

    2016-10-27

    In light of the recent outbreak of Ebola virus (EBOV) disease in West Africa, there have been renewed efforts to search for effective antiviral countermeasures. A range of compounds currently available with broad antimicrobial activity have been tested for activity against EBOV. Using live EBOV, eighteen candidate compounds were screened for antiviral activity in vitro. The compounds were selected on a rational basis because their mechanisms of action suggested that they had the potential to disrupt EBOV entry, replication or exit from cells or because they had displayed some antiviral activity against EBOV in previous tests. Nine compounds caused no reduction in viral replication despite cells remaining healthy, so they were excluded from further analysis (zidovudine; didanosine; stavudine; abacavir sulphate; entecavir; JB1a; Aimspro; celgosivir; and castanospermine). A second screen of the remaining compounds and the feasibility of appropriateness for in vivo testing removed six further compounds (ouabain; omeprazole; esomeprazole; Gleevec; D-LANA-14; and Tasigna). The three most promising compounds (17-DMAG; BGB324; and NCK-8) were further screened for in vivo activity in the guinea pig model of EBOV disease. Two of the compounds, BGB324 and NCK-8, showed some effect against lethal infection in vivo at the concentrations tested, which warrants further investigation. Further, these data add to the body of knowledge on the antiviral activities of multiple compounds against EBOV and indicate that the scientific community should invest more effort into the development of novel and specific antiviral compounds to treat Ebola virus disease.

  6. Recent developments in antiviral agents against enterovirus 71 infection

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Enterovirus 71 (EV-71) is the main etiological agent of hand, foot and mouth disease (HFMD). Recent EV-71 outbreaks in Asia-Pacific were not limited to mild HFMD, but were associated with severe neurological complications such as aseptic meningitis and brainstem encephalitis, which may lead to cardiopulmonary failure and death. The absence of licensed therapeutics for clinical use has intensified research into anti-EV-71 development. This review highlights the potential antiviral agents targeting EV-71 attachment, entry, uncoating, translation, polyprotein processing, virus-induced formation of membranous RNA replication complexes, and RNA-dependent RNA polymerase. The strategies for antiviral development include target-based synthetic compounds, anti-rhinovirus and poliovirus libraries screening, and natural compound libraries screening. Growing knowledge of the EV-71 life cycle will lead to successful development of antivirals. The continued effort to develop antiviral agents for treatment is crucial in the absence of a vaccine. The coupling of antivirals with an effective vaccine will accelerate eradication of the disease. PMID:24521134

  7. Antiviral therapy for hepatitis B virus-related decompensated cirrhosis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ji Yao

    2012-11-01

    Antiviral therapy is important in patients with hepatitis B virus (HBV)-related decompensated cirrhosis. This therapy is beneficial in most patients for the stabilization or improvement of liver disease; however, advanced cirrhosis with a high Child-Pugh or model for end-stage liver disease (MELD) score may have progressed and does not benefit from antiviral therapy. It is important to identify patients with severe decompensated cirrhosis who will not improve under antiviral therapy and who require liver transplantation as early as possible. Entecavir (ETV) or tenofovir disoproxil fumarate (TDF) is the first-line therapy for nucleos(t)ide analogue (NA)-naive patients with decompensated cirrhosis due to their potent and prompt HBV suppressive effect and low rate of drug-resistant mutations. Patients on antiviral therapy should be monitored for virological and clinical response, compliance, drug resistance and adverse effects as well as surveillance for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Additional studies of TDF and ETV are necessary to determine the optimal agent(s) for treating naive patients and those with drug-resistant decompensated cirrhosis. In order to evaluate the effectiveness of NA for the treatment of decompensated cirrhotic patients in the real world, high quality observational studies such as registration studies of antiviral therapy for HBV-related cirrhosis and a long-term follow-up in China, where a large number of such patients are found, are recommended.

  8. Screening for antiviral activities of isolated compounds from essential oils.

    PubMed

    Astani, Akram; Reichling, Jürgen; Schnitzler, Paul

    2011-01-01

    Essential oil of star anise as well as phenylpropanoids and sesquiterpenes, for example, trans-anethole, eugenol, β-eudesmol, farnesol, β-caryophyllene and β-caryophyllene oxide, which are present in many essential oils, were examined for their antiviral activity against herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) in vitro. Antiviral activity was analyzed by plaque reduction assays and mode of antiviral action was determined by addition of the drugs to uninfected cells, to the virus prior to infection or to herpesvirus-infected cells. Star anise oil reduced viral infectivity by >99%, phenylpropanoids inhibited HSV infectivity by about 60-80% and sesquiterpenes suppressed herpes virus infection by 40-98%. Both, star anise essential oil and all isolated compounds exhibited anti-HSV-1 activity by direct inactivation of free virus particles in viral suspension assays. All tested drugs interacted in a dose-dependent manner with herpesvirus particles, thereby inactivating viral infectivity. Star anise oil, rich in trans-anethole, revealed a high selectivity index of 160 against HSV, whereas among the isolated compounds only β-caryophyllene displayed a high selectivity index of 140. The presence of β-caryophyllene in many essential oils might contribute strongly to their antiviral ability. These results indicate that phenylpropanoids and sesquiterpenes present in essential oils contribute to their antiviral activity against HSV.

  9. Heat pipe array heat exchanger

    DOEpatents

    Reimann, Robert C.

    1987-08-25

    A heat pipe arrangement for exchanging heat between two different temperature fluids. The heat pipe arrangement is in a ounterflow relationship to increase the efficiency of the coupling of the heat from a heat source to a heat sink.

  10. AN ANTIVIRAL SUBSTANCE FROM PENICILLIUM FUNICULOSUM

    PubMed Central

    Shope, Richard E.

    1953-01-01

    A culture of P. funiculosum isolated on Guam proved capable of elaborating a substance which exerted a favorable therapeutic effect against swine influenza virus infections in white mice. The culture was extremely variable and irregular in its production of the antiviral substance, and during maintenance in the laboratory for several years gradually lost this property. Efforts to restore it were unsuccessful. Subsequently it was found that the mold elaborated a substance, now designated helenine, which is therapeutically effective against Columbia SK encephalomyelitis virus infections in mice. Helenine appears to differ from the substance earlier procured from the mold, which was active against swine influenza virus infections in mice. It is frequently present in greater or lesser amount in the fluid portions of stationary cultures of P. funiculosum but is more regularly obtained and in larger amount, from the cellular components of the pellicles. When liberated from these latter by mechanical bruising and fracturing, it goes into solution in the culture fluids. It is precipitable from aqueous solution by 50 per cent acetone. Infected mice injected with helenine in amounts less than the amount which produces a maximal therapeutic effect exhibit a dosage response. Increasing the dose above the optimum fails to increase the therapeutic effect. Helenine exerts its maximum effect when given within the first 10 hours after viral infection but its influence is apparent even when treatment is delayed for up to 24 hours. It is not effective against massive amounts of virus and gives the best therapeutic results when used in the treatment of animals infected with from 10 to 1000 fatal doses of virus. Treatment of infected mice with helenine delays the entrance of virus into their brains for from 24 to 48 hours. The mechanism by which helenine exerts its therapeutic effect against SK virus is not known but the findings presented suggest either that it causes an inhibition or

  11. Antiviral activity produced by an IPNV-carrier EPC cell culture confers resistance to VHSV infection.

    PubMed

    Jurado, María Teresa; García-Valtanen, Pablo; Estepa, Amparo; Perez, Luis

    2013-10-25

    Infectious pancreatic necrosis virus (IPNV), a fish birnavirus, can establish a persistent infection on epithelioma papulosum cyprinid (EPC) cells producing a carrier state where a small fraction of IPNV-infected cells is maintained in the culture after continuous subculture. The EPC(IPNV) cells are resistant to challenge with IPNV as well as to challenge with viral hemorrhagic septicemia virus (VHSV), a rhabdovirus. In this work, the antiviral effect of the IPNV carrier culture conditioned medium (EPC(IPNV)-CM) was tested and analyzed in detail. EPC cells treated with the carrier culture supernatant become protected against VHSV challenge. Size-fractionation by filtration and acid and heat treatment showed that the IPNV persistently infected cells release an acid-resistant soluble factor in the molecular weight fraction bellow 50 kDa. The capacity of the EPC(IPNV)-CM to induce cytokine genes in EPC cells was also determined by real-time RT-PCR. We found that there is a positive correlation between up-regulation of mx gene expression in EPC cells treated with EPC(IPNV)-CM and protection against VHSV challenge. Our findings indicate that the control of IPNV multiplication in the carrier culture as well as the interference with rhabdovirus replication are connected to the production and release of an antiviral (interferon-like) factor to the medium.

  12. [Favipiravir, a new concept of antiviral drug against influenza viruses].

    PubMed

    Reina, J; Reina, N

    2017-04-01

    Favipiravir (T-705) is a new antiviral drug with strong inhibitory activity on RNA-dependent RNA polymerase of most RNA virus genome. All the influenza viruses have been shown fully sensitive to this new antiviral, including genetic strains to neuraminidase inhibitors (oseltamivir) resistance. Its mechanism of action lies in blocking viral replication and induction of lethal mutagenesis which determines the loss of infective activity of influenza viruses. Its activity is particularly intense in the respiratory tract, decreasing the viral load to non-infectious levels. Clinical trials in humans have not yet completed but have very favourable results. It seems that the best therapy would be the combination of favipiravir with oseltamivir; both antivirals are synergistic and avoid the emergence of resistance.

  13. Antiviral selection in the management of acute retinal necrosis

    PubMed Central

    Tam, Patrick MK; Hooper, Claire Y; Lightman, Susan

    2010-01-01

    There is no consensus on the optimal antiviral regimen in the management of acute retinal necrosis, a disease caused by herpetic viruses with devastating consequences for the eye. The current gold standard is based on retrospective case series. Because the incidence of disease is low, few well-designed, randomized trials have evaluated treatment dosage and duration. Newer oral antiviral agents are emerging as alternatives to high-dose intravenous acyclovir, avoiding the need for inpatient intravenous treatment. Drug resistance is uncommon but may also be difficult to identify. Antiviral drugs have few side effects, but special attention needs to be paid to patients who have underlying renal disease, are pregnant or are immunocompromised. PMID:20169044

  14. Antiviral properties from plants of the Mediterranean flora.

    PubMed

    Sanna, G; Farci, P; Busonera, B; Murgia, G; La Colla, P; Giliberti, G

    2015-01-01

    Natural products are a successful source in drug discovery, playing a significant role in maintaining human health. We investigated the in vitro cytotoxicity and antiviral activity of extracts from 18 traditionally used Mediterranean plants. Noteworthy antiviral activity was found in the extract obtained from the branches of Daphne gnidium L. against human immunodeficiency virus type-1 (EC50 = 0.08 μg/mL) and coxsackievirus B5 (EC50 = 0.10 μg/mL). Other relevant activities were found against BVDV, YFV, Sb-1, RSV and HSV-1. Interestingly, extracts from Artemisia arborescens L. and Rubus ulmifolius Schott, as well as those from D. gnidium L., showed activities against two different viruses. This extensive antiviral screening allowed us to identify attractive activities, offering opportunities to develop lead compounds with a great pharmaceutical potential.

  15. Antiviral Treatment for Hepatitis C Virus Infection after Liver Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Sugawara, Yasuhiko; Tamura, Sumihito; Kokudo, Norihiro

    2010-01-01

    A significant proportion of patients with chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection develop liver cirrhosis and complications of end-stage liver disease over two to three decades and require liver transplantation, however, reinfection is common and leads to further adverse events under immunosuppression. Pretransplant antiviral or preemptive therapy is limited to mildly decompensated patients due to poor tolerance. The mainstay of management represents directed antiviral therapy after evidence of recurrence of chronic hepatitis C. Combined pegylated interferon and ribavirin therapy is the current standard treatment with sustained viral response rates of 25% to 45%. The rate is lower than that in the immunocompetent population, partly due to the high prevalence of intolerability. To date, there is no general consensus regarding the antiviral treatment modality, timing, or dosing for HCV in patients with advanced liver disease and after liver transplantation. New anti-HCV drugs to delay disease progression or to enhance viral clearance are necessary. PMID:21151523

  16. Antiviral activities in extracts of Turkish medicinal plants.

    PubMed

    Hudson, J B; Lee, M K; Sener, B; Erdemoglu, N

    2000-01-01

    A total of 16 ethanol extracts of Turkish medicinal plants were evaluated for antiviral activities against herpes simplex virus (HSV) and Sindbis virus (SINV). Extracts of Galanthus elwesii and Rheum ribes showed the most potent anti-HSV activities, while six other extracts had weaker activities. Galanthus elwesii and Leucojum aestivum were the most potent anti-SINV extracts with four others showing weaker activities. In total, five extracts were active against both viruses, three were selective for HSV and one was selective for SINV. Evidence for an antiviral photosensitizer was obtained in two anti-HSV extracts, in which activity was either completely dependent on light, or was con-siderably enhanced by light. Thus, several Turkish medicinal plants appear to be promising sources of antiviral activities.

  17. Antiviral activity of south Brazilian medicinal plant extracts.

    PubMed

    Simões, C M; Falkenberg, M; Mentz, L A; Schenkel, E P; Amoros, M; Girre, L

    1999-07-01

    Brazilian plants are potential sources of useful edible and medicinal plants. Hydromethanolic extracts prepared from 54 medicinal plants used in folk medicine to treat infections were screened for antiviral properties against five different viruses (HSV-1, HSV-2, poliovirus type 2, adenovirus type 2 and VSV). Fifty-two percent of the plant extracts exhibited antiviral against one or more tested viruses. More specifically, 42.6% showed activity against HSV-1 (herpes simplex virus type 1), 42.6% against HSV-2 (herpes simplex virus type 2), 26% against poliovirus and 24% against VSV (vesicular stomatitis virus). None of the extracts was active against adenovirus. Trixis praestans (Vell.) Cabr. and Cunila spicata Benth. extracts were further characterized for antiviral activity.

  18. Search for antiviral activity in higher plant extracts.

    PubMed

    Abad, M J; Guerra, J A; Bermejo, P; Irurzun, A; Carrasco, L

    2000-12-01

    In the course of our search for plant natural products as antiviral agents, extracts of ten plants from the Iberian Peninsula were tested for antiviral activity against herpes simplex type I (HSV-1), vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) and poliovirus type 1. Aqueous extracts of five of these medicinal plants, namely Nepeta nepetella (150-500 microg/mL), Nepeta coerulea (150-500 microg/mL), Nepeta tuberosa (150-500 microg/mL), Dittrichia viscosa (50-125 microg/mL) and Sanguisorba minor magnolii (50-125 microg/mL), showed a clear antiviral activity against two different DNA and RNA viruses, i.e. HSV-1 and VSV. Only the medicinal plant Dittrichia viscosa was active against an additional virus, poliovirus type 1.

  19. Commensal bacteria calibrate the activation threshold of innate antiviral immunity.

    PubMed

    Abt, Michael C; Osborne, Lisa C; Monticelli, Laurel A; Doering, Travis A; Alenghat, Theresa; Sonnenberg, Gregory F; Paley, Michael A; Antenus, Marcelo; Williams, Katie L; Erikson, Jan; Wherry, E John; Artis, David

    2012-07-27

    Signals from commensal bacteria can influence immune cell development and susceptibility to infectious or inflammatory diseases. However, the mechanisms by which commensal bacteria regulate protective immunity after exposure to systemic pathogens remain poorly understood. Here, we demonstrate that antibiotic-treated (ABX) mice exhibit impaired innate and adaptive antiviral immune responses and substantially delayed viral clearance after exposure to systemic LCMV or mucosal influenza virus. Furthermore, ABX mice exhibited severe bronchiole epithelial degeneration and increased host mortality after influenza virus infection. Genome-wide transcriptional profiling of macrophages isolated from ABX mice revealed decreased expression of genes associated with antiviral immunity. Moreover, macrophages from ABX mice exhibited defective responses to type I and type II IFNs and impaired capacity to limit viral replication. Collectively, these data indicate that commensal-derived signals provide tonic immune stimulation that establishes the activation threshold of the innate immune system required for optimal antiviral immunity.

  20. Favipiravir elicits antiviral mutagenesis during virus replication in vivo.

    PubMed

    Arias, Armando; Thorne, Lucy; Goodfellow, Ian

    2014-10-21

    Lethal mutagenesis has emerged as a novel potential therapeutic approach to treat viral infections. Several studies have demonstrated that increases in the high mutation rates inherent to RNA viruses lead to viral extinction in cell culture, but evidence during infections in vivo is limited. In this study, we show that the broad-range antiviral nucleoside favipiravir reduces viral load in vivo by exerting antiviral mutagenesis in a mouse model for norovirus infection. Increased mutation frequencies were observed in samples from treated mice and were accompanied with lower or in some cases undetectable levels of infectious virus in faeces and tissues. Viral RNA isolated from treated animals showed reduced infectivity, a feature of populations approaching extinction during antiviral mutagenesis. These results suggest that favipiravir can induce norovirus mutagenesis in vivo, which in some cases leads to virus extinction, providing a proof-of-principle for the use of favipiravir derivatives or mutagenic nucleosides in the clinical treatment of noroviruses.

  1. The Antiviral Effect of Baicalin on Enterovirus 71 In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xiang; Liu, Yuanyuan; Wu, Tingting; Jin, Yue; Cheng, Jianpin; Wan, Changbiao; Qian, Weihe; Xing, Fei; Shi, Weifeng

    2015-01-01

    Baicalin is a flavonoid compound extracted from Scutellaria roots that has been reported to possess antibacterial, anti-inflammatory, and antiviral activities. However, the antiviral effect of baicalin on enterovirus 71 (EV71) is still unknown. In this study, we found that baicalin showed inhibitory activity on EV71 infection and was independent of direct virucidal or prophylactic effect and inhibitory viral absorption. The expressions of EV71/3D mRNA and polymerase were significantly blocked by baicalin treatment at early stages of EV71 infection. In addition, baicalin could decrease the expressions of FasL and caspase-3, as well as inhibit the apoptosis of EV71-infected human embryonal rhabdomyosarcoma (RD) cells. Altogether, these results indicate that baicalin exhibits potent antiviral effect on EV71 infection, probably through inhibiting EV71/3D polymerase expression and Fas/FasL signaling pathways. PMID:26295407

  2. Antiviral defense in shrimp: from innate immunity to viral infection.

    PubMed

    Wang, Pei-Hui; Huang, Tianzhi; Zhang, Xiaobo; He, Jian-Guo

    2014-08-01

    The culture of penaeid shrimp is rapidly developing as a major business endeavor worldwide. However, viral diseases have caused huge economic loss in penaeid shrimp culture industries. Knowledge of shrimp innate immunity and antiviral responses has made important progress in recent years, allowing the design of better strategies for the prevention and control of shrimp diseases. In this study, we have updated information on shrimp antiviral immunity and interactions between shrimp hosts and viral pathogens. Current knowledge and recent progress in immune signaling pathways (e.g., Toll/IMD-NF-κB and JAK-STAT signaling pathways), RNAi, phagocytosis, and apoptosis in shrimp antiviral immunity are discussed. The mechanism of viral infection in shrimp hosts and the interactions between viruses and shrimp innate immune systems are also analyzed. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Cationic phenylene ethynylene polymers and oligomers exhibit efficient antiviral activity.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ying; Canady, Taylor D; Zhou, Zhijun; Tang, Yanli; Price, Dominique N; Bear, David G; Chi, Eva Y; Schanze, Kirk S; Whitten, David G

    2011-07-01

    The antiviral activities of poly(phenylene ethynylene) (PPE)-based cationic conjugated polyelectrolytes (CPE) and oligo-phenylene ethynylenes (OPE) were investigated using two model viruses, the T4 and MS2 bacteriophages. Under UV/visible light irradiation, significant antiviral activity was observed for all of the CPEs and OPEs; without irradiation, most of these compounds exhibited high inactivation activity against the MS2 phage and moderate inactivation ability against the T4 phage. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and SDS polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) reveal that the CPEs and OPEs exert their antiviral activity by partial disassembly of the phage particle structure in the dark and photochemical damage of the phage capsid protein under UV/visible light irradiation.

  4. Host cell factors as antiviral targets in arenavirus infection.

    PubMed

    Linero, Florencia N; Sepúlveda, Claudia S; Giovannoni, Federico; Castilla, Viviana; García, Cybele C; Scolaro, Luis A; Damonte, Elsa B

    2012-09-01

    Among the members of the Arenaviridae family, Lassa virus and Junin virus generate periodic annual outbreaks of severe human hemorrhagic fever (HF) in endemic areas of West Africa and Argentina, respectively. Given the human health threat that arenaviruses represent and the lack of a specific and safe chemotherapy, the search for effective antiviral compounds is a continuous demanding effort. Since diverse host cell pathways and enzymes are used by RNA viruses to fulfill their replicative cycle, the targeting of a host process has turned an attractive antiviral approach in the last years for many unrelated virus types. This strategy has the additional benefit to reduce the serious challenge for therapy of RNA viruses to escape from drug effects through selection of resistant variants triggered by their high mutation rate. This article focuses on novel strategies to identify inhibitors for arenavirus therapy, analyzing the potential for antiviral developments of diverse host factors essential for virus infection.

  5. Recent Advances in Developing Antiviral Therapies for Respiratory Syncytial Virus.

    PubMed

    Shook, Brian C; Lin, Kai

    2017-04-01

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) infection presents a significant health challenge in small children, the elderly and immunocompromised patients. There is still a high unmet medical need among patients with RSV infection, and no specific antiviral therapy is available. The only approved agents are palivizumab, which has to be given prophylactically, mainly in high-risk infants, and ribavirin, which is rarely used due to toxicity concerns and questionable benefits. Efforts to develop new antiviral agents have been hampered by the perceived need for high safety hurdles in pediatric patient populations use and the lack of well-characterized druggable targets. Despite these challenges, significant progress has been made in discovering multiple classes of inhibitors targeting various stages of the viral life cycle. Several recent proof-of-concept human studies with specific antivirals have shown promising results and completely reinvigorated the field. In this review we discuss the current status of RSV drug development, remaining challenges and future directions.

  6. Vitamin D and the anti-viral state

    PubMed Central

    Beard, Jeremy A.; Bearden, Allison; Striker, Rob

    2012-01-01

    Vitamin D has long been recognized as essential to the skeletal system. Newer evidence suggests that it also plays a major role regulating the immune system, perhaps including immune responses to viral infection. Interventional and observational epidemiological studies provide evidence that vitamin D deficiency may confer increased risk of influenza and respiratory tract infection. Vitamin D deficiency is also prevalent among patients with HIV infection. Cell culture experiments support the thesis that vitamin D has direct anti-viral effects particularly against enveloped viruses. Though vitamin D’s anti-viral mechanism has not been fully established, it may be linked to vitamin D’s ability to up-regulate the anti-microbial peptides LL-37 and human beta defensin 2. Additional studies are necessary to fully elucidate the efficacy and mechanism of vitamin D as an anti-viral agent. PMID:21242105

  7. Sudden sensorineural hearing loss: Is antiviral treatment really necessary?

    PubMed

    Övet, Gültekin; Alataş, Necat; Kocacan, Fatma Nur; Gürcüoğlu, Sermin Selver; Görgülü, Hakan; Güzelkara, Fatih; Övet, Habibe

    2015-01-01

    It was aimed to investigate the necessity of antiviral agents in the ISSHL treatment. In this study, the patients, diagnosed with sudden hearing loss and admitted in the first 7 days of hearing loss were divided into two groups; a combination therapy was administered to one of the groups, and famciclovir was administered to the other group as an antiviral treatment in addition to the combined therapy. Both groups were compared in terms of levels of recovery. No statistically significant difference was found in the recovery rates between the two groups (p=0.7). In this study, the additional antiviral treatment was found to have no effect on the remission rates in patients with ISSHL treated with combined therapy. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Phytochemistry, cytotoxicity and antiviral activity of Eleusine indica (sambau)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iberahim, Rashidah; Yaacob, Wan Ahmad; Ibrahim, Nazlina

    2015-09-01

    Goose grass also known as Eleusine indica (EI) is a local medicinal plant that displays antioxidant, antimicrobial and anticancer activities. The present study is to determine the phytochemical constituents, cytotoxicity and antiviral activities for both crude extract and fraction obtained from the plant. The crude extract contained more secondary metabolites compared to the hexane fraction as gauged using standard phytochemical tests. Cytotoxicity screening against Vero cells using MTT assay showed that the CC50 values for crude extract and hexane fraction were 2.07 and 5.62 mg/ml respectively. The antiviral activity towards Herpes Simplex Virus type 1 (HSV-1) was determined using plaque reduction assay. The selective indices (SI = CC50 / EC50) for both methanol extract and hexane fraction were 12.2 and 6.2 respectively. These results demonstrate that the extract prepared from E. indica possesses phytochemical compound that was non cytotoxic to the cell with potential antiviral activity.

  9. Commensal Bacteria Calibrate the Activation Threshold of Innate Antiviral Immunity

    PubMed Central

    Abt, Michael C.; Osborne, Lisa C.; Monticelli, Laurel A.; Doering, Travis A.; Alenghat, Theresa; Sonnenberg, Gregory F.; Paley, Michael A.; Antenus, Marcelo; Williams, Katie L.; Erikson, Jan; Wherry, E. John; Artis, David

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY Signals from commensal bacteria can influence immune cell development and susceptibility to infectious or inflammatory diseases. However, the mechanisms by which commensal bacteria regulate protective immunity after exposure to systemic pathogens remain poorly understood. Here, we demonstrate that antibiotic-treated (ABX) mice exhibit impaired innate and adaptive antiviral immune responses and substantially delayed viral clearance after exposure to systemic LCMV or mucosal influenza virus. Furthermore, ABX mice exhibited severe bronchiole epithelial degeneration and increased host mortality after influenza virus infection. Genome-wide transcriptional profiling of macrophages isolated from ABX mice revealed decreased expression of genes associated with antiviral immunity. Moreover, macrophages from ABX mice exhibited defective responses to type I and type II IFNs and impaired capacity to limit viral replication. Collectively, these data indicate that commensal-derived signals provide tonic immune stimulation that establishes the activation threshold of the innate immune system required for optimal antiviral immunity. PMID:22705104

  10. Evaluation of Antiviral Activities of Four Local Malaysian Phyllanthus Species against Herpes Simplex Viruses and Possible Antiviral Target

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Wee Chee; Jaganath, Indu Bala; Manikam, Rishya; Sekaran, Shamala Devi

    2013-01-01

    Nucleoside analogues such as acyclovir are effective antiviral drugs against herpes simplex virus infections since its introduction. However, with the emergence of acyclovir-resistant HSV strains particularly in immunocompromised patients, there is a need to develop an alternative antiherpetic drug and plants could be the potential lead. In this study, the antiviral activity of the aqueous extract of four Phyllanthus species were evaluated against herpes simplex virus type-1 (HSV-1) and HSV-2 in Vero cells by quantitative PCR. The protein expressions of untreated and treated infected Vero cells were studied by 2D-gel electrophoresis and Western blot. This is the first study that reported the antiviral activity of P. watsonii. P. urinaria was shown to demonstrate the strongest antiviral activity against HSV-1 and HSV-2, with SI >33.6. Time-of-addition studies suggested that the extract may act against the early infection stage and the replication stage. Protein expression studies indicated that cellular proteins that are involved in maintaining cytoskeletal structure could be potential target for development of antiviral drugs. Preliminary findings indicated that P. urinaria demonstrated potent inhibitory activity against HSV. Hence, further studies such as in vivo evaluation are required for the development of effective antiherpetic drug. PMID:24324358

  11. Development of Tetravalent, Bispecific CCR5 Antibodies with Antiviral Activity against CCR5 Monoclonal Antibody-Resistant HIV-1 Strains▿

    PubMed Central

    Schanzer, Jürgen; Jekle, Andreas; Nezu, Junichi; Lochner, Adriane; Croasdale, Rebecca; Dioszegi, Marianna; Zhang, Jun; Hoffmann, Eike; Dormeyer, Wilma; Stracke, Jan; Schäfer, Wolfgang; Ji, Changhua; Heilek, Gabrielle; Cammack, Nick; Brandt, Michael; Umana, Pablo; Brinkmann, Ulrich

    2011-01-01

    In this study, we describe novel tetravalent, bispecific antibody derivatives that bind two different epitopes on the HIV coreceptor CCR5. The basic protein formats that we applied were derived from Morrison-type bispecific antibodies: whole IgGs to which we connected single-chain antibodies (scFvs) via (Gly4Ser)n sequences at either the C or N terminus of the light chain or heavy chain. By design optimization, including disulfide stabilization of scFvs or introduction of 30-amino-acid linkers, stable molecules could be obtained in amounts that were within the same range as or no less than 4-fold lower than those observed with monoclonal antibodies in transient expression assays. In contrast to monospecific CCR5 antibodies, bispecific antibody derivatives block two alternative docking sites of CCR5-tropic HIV strains on the CCR5 coreceptor. Consequently, these molecules showed 18- to 57-fold increased antiviral activities compared to the parent antibodies. Most importantly, one prototypic tetravalent CCR5 antibody had antiviral activity against virus strains resistant to the single parental antibodies. In summary, physical linkage of two CCR5 antibodies targeting different epitopes on the HIV coreceptor CCR5 resulted in tetravalent, bispecific antibodies with enhanced antiviral potency against wild-type and CCR5 antibody-resistant HIV-1 strains. PMID:21300827

  12. Optimizing antiviral agents for hepatitis B management in malignant lymphomas

    PubMed Central

    Ozoya, Oluwatobi O.; Chavez, Julio; Sokol, Lubomir

    2017-01-01

    The global scale of hepatitis B infection is well known but its impact is still being understood. Missed hepatitis B infection impacts lymphoma therapy especially increased risk of hepatitis B virus (HBV) reactivation and poor treatment outcomes. The presence of undiagnosed chronic hepatitis also undermines chronic HBV screening methods that are based on a positive HBsAg alone. The goal of this review is to evaluate the literature for optimizing antiviral therapy for lymphoma patients with HBV infection or at risk of HBV reactivation. Relevant articles for this review were identified by searching PubMed, Embase, Ovid Medline, and Scopus using the following terms, alone and in combination: “chronic hepatitis B”, “occult hepatitis B”, ”special groups”, “malignant lymphoma”, “non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma”, “Hodgkin’s lymphoma”, “immunocompromised host”, “immunosuppressive agents”, “antiviral”, “HBV reactivation”. The period of the search was restricted to a 15-year period to limit the search to optimizing antiviral agents for HBV infection in malignant lymphomas [2001–2016]. Several clinical practice guidelines recommend nucleos(t)ide analogues-entecavir, tenofovir and lamivudine among others. These agents are best initiated along with or prior to immunosuppressive therapy. Additional methods recommended for optimizing antiviral therapy include laboratory modalities such as HBV genotyping, timed measurements of HBsAg and HBV DNA levels to measure and predict antiviral treatment response. In conclusion, optimizing antiviral agents for these patients require consideration of geographic prevalence of HBV, cost of antiviral therapy or testing, screening modality, hepatitis experts, type of immunosuppressive therapy and planned duration of therapy. PMID:28251118

  13. Antiviral Drugs for Viruses Other Than Human Immunodeficiency Virus

    PubMed Central

    Razonable, Raymund R.

    2011-01-01

    Most viral diseases, with the exception of those caused by human immunodeficiency virus, are self-limited illnesses that do not require specific antiviral therapy. The currently available antiviral drugs target 3 main groups of viruses: herpes, hepatitis, and influenza viruses. With the exception of the antisense molecule fomivirsen, all antiherpes drugs inhibit viral replication by serving as competitive substrates for viral DNA polymerase. Drugs for the treatment of influenza inhibit the ion channel M2 protein or the enzyme neuraminidase. Combination therapy with Interferon-α and ribavirin remains the backbone treatment for chronic hepatitis C; the addition of serine protease inhibitors improves the treatment outcome of patients infected with hepatitis C virus genotype 1. Chronic hepatitis B can be treated with interferon or a combination of nucleos(t)ide analogues. Notably, almost all the nucleos(t) ide analogues for the treatment of chronic hepatitis B possess anti–human immunodeficiency virus properties, and they inhibit replication of hepatitis B virus by serving as competitive substrates for its DNA polymerase. Some antiviral drugs possess multiple potential clinical applications, such as ribavirin for the treatment of chronic hepatitis C and respiratory syncytial virus and cidofovir for the treatment of cytomegalovirus and other DNA viruses. Drug resistance is an emerging threat to the clinical utility of antiviral drugs. The major mechanisms for drug resistance are mutations in the viral DNA polymerase gene or in genes that encode for the viral kinases required for the activation of certain drugs such as acyclovir and ganciclovir. Widespread antiviral resistance has limited the clinical utility of M2 inhibitors for the prevention and treatment of influenza infections. This article provides an overview of clinically available antiviral drugs for the primary care physician, with a special focus on pharmacology, clinical uses, and adverse effects. PMID

  14. Antiviral drugs for viruses other than human immunodeficiency virus.

    PubMed

    Razonable, Raymund R

    2011-10-01

    Most viral diseases, with the exception of those caused by human immunodeficiency virus, are self-limited illnesses that do not require specific antiviral therapy. The currently available antiviral drugs target 3 main groups of viruses: herpes, hepatitis, and influenza viruses. With the exception of the antisense molecule fomivirsen, all antiherpes drugs inhibit viral replication by serving as competitive substrates for viral DNA polymerase. Drugs for the treatment of influenza inhibit the ion channel M(2) protein or the enzyme neuraminidase. Combination therapy with Interferon-α and ribavirin remains the backbone treatment for chronic hepatitis C; the addition of serine protease inhibitors improves the treatment outcome of patients infected with hepatitis C virus genotype 1. Chronic hepatitis B can be treated with interferon or a combination of nucleos(t)ide analogues. Notably, almost all the nucleos(t) ide analogues for the treatment of chronic hepatitis B possess anti-human immunodeficiency virus properties, and they inhibit replication of hepatitis B virus by serving as competitive substrates for its DNA polymerase. Some antiviral drugs possess multiple potential clinical applications, such as ribavirin for the treatment of chronic hepatitis C and respiratory syncytial virus and cidofovir for the treatment of cytomegalovirus and other DNA viruses. Drug resistance is an emerging threat to the clinical utility of antiviral drugs. The major mechanisms for drug resistance are mutations in the viral DNA polymerase gene or in genes that encode for the viral kinases required for the activation of certain drugs such as acyclovir and ganciclovir. Widespread antiviral resistance has limited the clinical utility of M(2) inhibitors for the prevention and treatment of influenza infections. This article provides an overview of clinically available antiviral drugs for the primary care physician, with a special focus on pharmacology, clinical uses, and adverse effects.

  15. INVERSE STABLE SUBORDINATORS

    PubMed Central

    MEERSCHAERT, MARK M.; STRAKA, PETER

    2013-01-01

    The inverse stable subordinator provides a probability model for time-fractional differential equations, and leads to explicit solution formulae. This paper reviews properties of the inverse stable subordinator, and applications to a variety of problems in mathematics and physics. Several different governing equations for the inverse stable subordinator have been proposed in the literature. This paper also shows how these equations can be reconciled. PMID:25045216

  16. RNA interference-mediated intrinsic antiviral immunity in invertebrates.

    PubMed

    Nayak, Arabinda; Tassetto, Michel; Kunitomi, Mark; Andino, Raul

    2013-01-01

    In invertebrates such as insects and nematodes, RNA interference (RNAi) provides RNA-based protection against viruses. This form of immunity restricts viral replication and dissemination from infected cells and viruses, in turn, have evolved evasion mechanisms or RNAi suppressors to counteract host defenses. Recent advances indicate that, in addition to RNAi, other related small RNA pathways contribute to antiviral functions in invertebrates. This has led to a deeper understanding of fundamental aspects of small RNA-based antiviral immunity in invertebrates and its contribution to viral spread and pathogenesis.

  17. Screening of Nepalese medicinal plants for antiviral activity.

    PubMed

    Rajbhandari, M; Wegner, U; Jülich, M; Schöpke, T; Mentel, R

    2001-03-03

    In an ethnopharmacological screening, plants used in Nepalese traditional medicine were evaluated for antiviral activity. Methanolic and methanolic-aqueous extracts derived of 23 species were assayed in two in vitro viral systems, influenza virus/MDCK cells and herpes simplex virus/Vero cells. Two species, Bergenia ligulata and Nerium indicum showed the highest antiinfluenzaviral activity with 50% inhibitory dose of 10 microg/ml. Holoptelia integrifolia and N. indicum exhibited considerable antiviral activity against herpes simplex virus. None of these extracts showed cytotoxic effects. Additionally for B. ligulata and H. integrifolia partial protease inhibitory activity was estimated.

  18. Antiviral activity of eight commonly used medicinal plants in Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Chiang, Lien-Chai; Cheng, Hua-Yew; Liu, Mei-Chi; Chiang, Wen; Lin, Chun-Ching

    2003-01-01

    In an effort to find new antiviral agents from natural products, hot water extracts of eight traditionally used medicinal plants in Taiwan were investigated in vitro for their activities against adenoviruses (ADV) and herpes simplex viruses (HSV). Results demonstrated that all extracts exhibited antiviral activity with different degrees of potency. Only two extracts were active in suppressing both HSV and ADV infections. Three extracts inhibited only ADV infection whereas one extract blocked only HSV infection. These results suggested that the aforementioned medicinal plants merit further investigation.

  19. Quasispecies, error catastrophe, and the antiviral activity of ribavirin.

    PubMed

    Graci, Jason D; Cameron, Craig E

    2002-07-05

    Ribavirin is the first synthetic, broad-spectrum antiviral nucleoside. Despite its more than 30 year history, the mechanism of action of this compound remains unclear and somewhat controversial. Recent data suggest the possibility that the activity of ribavirin against RNA viruses is a reflection of incorporation of ribavirin into the viral genome. Because ribavirin incorporation is not specific, this event leads to lethal mutagenesis of the virus population. The data supporting this new proposal for the mechanism of action of ribavirin are reviewed herein. In addition, we discuss briefly the challenges that remain for development of lethal mutagenesis as an effective antiviral strategy.

  20. Antiviral evaluation of plants from Brazilian Atlantic Tropical Forest.

    PubMed

    Andrighetti-Fröhner, C R; Sincero, T C M; da Silva, A C; Savi, L A; Gaido, C M; Bettega, J M R; Mancini, M; de Almeida, M T R; Barbosa, R A; Farias, M R; Barardi, C R M; Simões, C M O

    2005-06-01

    The antiviral activity of six medicinal plants from Brazilian Atlantic Tropical Forest was investigated against two viruses: herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) and poliovirus type 2 (PV-2). Cuphea carthagenensis and Tillandsia usneoides extracts showed the best antiherpes activity. T. usneoides dichloromethane, ethyl acetate and n-butanol extracts, and Lippia alba n-butanol extract showed inhibition of HSV-1, strain 29R/acyclovir resistant. In addition, only L. alba ethyl acetate extract showed antipoliovirus activity. These results corroborate that medicinal plants can be a rich source of potential antiviral compounds.

  1. Historical perspectives in the development of antiviral agents against poxviruses.

    PubMed

    De Clercq, Erik

    2010-06-01

    The poxvirus vaccinia virus (VV) served as the model virus for which the first antivirals, the thiosemicarbazones, were identified. This dates back to 1950; and, although there is at present no single antiviral drug specifically licensed for the chemotherapy or -prophylaxis of poxvirus infections, numerous candidate compounds have been described over the past 50 years. These compounds include interferon and inducers thereof (i.e., polyacrylic acid), 5-substituted 2'-deoxyuridines (i.e., idoxuridine), IMP dehydrogenase inhibitors, S-adenosylhomocysteine hydrolase inhibitors, acyclic nucleoside phosphonates (such as cidofovir) and alkoxyalkyl prodrugs thereof (such as CMX001), viral egress inhibitors (such as tecovirimat), and cellular kinase inhibitors (such as imatinib).

  2. Interferon: signal molecules involved in its antiviral effect.

    PubMed

    Constantinescu, S N; Cernescu, C; Baltă, F; Popescu, L M

    1989-01-01

    A major problem concerning interferon (IFN)-cell interaction is the second messenger system that transduces the IFN signal. We discuss the evidences existing in literature and our arguments which suggest that the antiviral effect of IFNs alpha and beta are mediated by a membrane mechanism including a phospholipase C dependent hydrolysis of phosphoinositides. The resulting two second messengers: diacylglycerol and inositol triphosphate and subsequent, separate but interacting, signal pathways: activation of protein kinase C and ionic events are tested in respect with the antiviral effect of IFN.

  3. Novel antiviral fucoidan from sporophyll of Undaria pinnatifida (Mekabu).

    PubMed

    Lee, Jung-Bum; Hayashi, Kyoko; Hashimoto, Minoru; Nakano, Takahisa; Hayashi, Toshimitsu

    2004-09-01

    Structural characterization and antiviral activities of fucoidan from sporophyll of Undaria pinnatifida (Mekabu) was examined. The fucoidan was composed of fucose and galactose with an approximately ratio of 1.0:1.1. Degree of substitution of sulfate was 0.72 and its apparent molecular weight was 9,000. Methylation analyses showed that fucoidan had various sugar linkages, and revealed that the fucoidan might have complicated structure. This fucoidan showed potent antiviral activities against herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1), HSV-2, and human cytomegalovirus.

  4. Enhanced antiviral activity of acyclovir loaded into nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Cavalli, Roberta; Donalisio, Manuela; Bisazza, Agnese; Civra, Andrea; Ranucci, Elisabetta; Ferruti, Paolo; Lembo, David

    2012-01-01

    The activity of antivirals can be enhanced by their incorporation in nanoparticulate delivery systems. Peculiar polymeric nanoparticles, based on a β-cyclodextrin-poly(4-acryloylmorpholine) monoconjugate (β-CD-PACM), are proposed as acyclovir carriers. The experimental procedure necessary to obtain the acyclovir-loaded nanoparticles using the solvent displacement preparation method will be described in this chapter. Fluorescent labeled nanoparticles are prepared using the same method for cellular trafficking studies. The biocompatibility assays necessary to obtain safe nanoparticles are reported. Section 4 of this chapter describes the assessment of the antiviral activity of the acyclovir-loaded nanoparticles.

  5. Antiviral and cytotoxic activities of some Indonesian plants.

    PubMed

    Lohézic-Le Dévéhat, F; Bakhtiar, A; Bézivin, C; Amoros, M; Boustie, J

    2002-08-01

    Ten methanolic extracts from eight Indonesian medicinal plants were phytochemically screened and evaluated for antiviral (HSV-1 and Poliovirus) and cytotoxic activities on murine and human cancer lines (3LL, L1210, K562, U251, DU145, MCF-7). Besides Melastoma malabathricum (Melastomataceae), the Indonesian Loranthaceae species among which Elytranthe tubaeflora, E. maingayi, E. globosa and Scurrula ferruginea exhibited attractive antiviral and cytotoxic activities. Piper aduncum (Piperaceae) was found active on Poliovirus. S. ferruginea was selected for further studies because of its activity on the U251 glioblastoma cells.

  6. Chemical analysis and antiviral activity evaluation of Baccharis anomala.

    PubMed

    Venturi, Caroline Rita; Bordignon, Srgio Augusto De Loreto; Roehe, Paulo Michel; Montanha, Jarbas Alves; Cibulski, Samuel Paulo; Gosmann, Grace

    2017-07-19

    The chemical composition and antiviral activity of aqueous extract from Baccharis anomala was studied by bioactivity-guided fractionation. Ethanol precipitation and fractionation by molecular permeation allowed the separation of the anti-herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) active fraction from aqueous extract (Fraction B). Natural Product Reagent A, FeCl3 and thin-layer chromatography indicated the presence of phenolic compounds in the aqueous extract. Fraction B showed pronounced antiviral activity when tested with HSV-1 strains VR733/ATCC and Acyclovir-resistant 29-R, displaying virucidal but not virustatic activity.

  7. Generation and characterization of West Nile pseudo-infectious reporter virus for antiviral screening.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hong-Lei; Ye, Han-Qing; Deng, Cheng-Lin; Liu, Si-Qing; Shi, Pei-Yong; Qin, Cheng-Feng; Yuan, Zhi-Ming; Zhang, Bo

    2017-05-01

    West Nile virus (WNV), a mosquito-borne flavivirus, is an important neurotropic human pathogen. As a biosafety level-3 (BSL-3) agent, WNV is strictly to BSL-3 laboratories for experimentations, thus greatly hindering the development of vaccine and antiviral drug. Here, we developed a novel pseudo-infectious WNV reporter virus expressing the Gaussia luciferase (Gluc). A stable 293TNS1 cell line expressing NS1 was selected for trans-supplying NS1 protein to support the replication of WNV-ΔNS1 virus and WNV-ΔNS1-Gluc reporter virus with large-fragment deletion of NS1. WNV-ΔNS1 virus and WNV-Gluc-ΔNS1 reporter virus were confined to complete their replication cycle in this 293TNS1 cell line, displaying nearly identical growth kinetics to WT WNV although the viral titers were lower than those of WT WNV. The reporter gene was stably maintained in virus genome at least within three rounds of passage in 293TNS1 cell line. Using a known flaviviruses inhibitor, NITD008, we demonstrated that the pseudo-infectious WNV-Gluc-ΔNS1 could be used for antiviral screening. Furthermore, a high-throughput screening (HTS) assay in a 96-well format was optimized and validated using several known WNV inhibitors, indicating that the optimized HTS assay was suitable for high-throughput screening WNV inhibitors. Our work provides a stable and safe tool to handle WNV outside of a BSL-3 facility and facilitates high throughput screening for anti-WNV drugs.

  8. Pharmacokinetics of antiviral polyoxometalates in rats.

    PubMed Central

    Ni, L; Boudinot, F D; Boudinot, S G; Henson, G W; Bossard, G E; Martellucci, S A; Ash, P W; Fricker, S P; Darkes, M C; Theobald, B R

    1994-01-01

    Polyoxometalates are soluble mineral compounds formed principally of oxide anions and early transition metal cations. The polyoxometalates K12H2[P2W12O48].24H2O (JM 1591), K10[P2W18Zn4(H2O)2O68].20H2O (JM 1596), and [(CH3)3NH]8[Si2W18Nb6O77] (JM 2820) demonstrate potent antiviral activity against human immunodeficiency virus types 1 and 2, herpes simplex virus, and cytomegalovirus in vitro. The preclinical pharmacokinetics of these three compounds were characterized after single-dose intravenous administration of 50 mg/kg to rats. Plasma, urine, and feces were collected for 168 h, and polyoxometalate concentrations were determined by atomic emission. Serum protein binding was measured by equilibrium dialysis. All three compounds were highly bound to serum proteins in a concentration-dependent manner. Total and unbound concentrations of the three compounds in plasma declined in a triexponential manner with terminal half-lives of 246.0 +/- 127.0, 438.4 +/- 129.4, and 32.2 +/- 5.37 h (mean +/- standard deviation) for JM 1591, JM 1596, and JM 2820, respectively. Systemic clearances based on total concentrations in plasma were low, averaging 0.016 +/- 0.002, 0.015 +/- 0.002, and 0.018 +/- 0.003 liter/h/kg for JM 1591, JM 1596, and JM 2820, respectively. The clearances of unbound compounds from plasma averaged 0.966 +/- 0.136, 0.050 +/- 0.005, and 0.901 +/- 0.165 liter/h/kg for JM 1591, JM 1596, and JM 2820, respectively. For JM 1596, the clearance of unbound compound from the kidneys was lower than the glomerular filtration rate (0.086 liter/h/kg), suggesting this polyoxometalate underwent renal tubular reabsorption. However, JM 1591 and JM 2820 appeared to undergo tubular secretion. The fraction of the dose recovered in urine was 11.5, 46.8, and 10.6% for JM 1591, JM 1596, and JM 2820, respectively. Approximately 5% of the dose of each polyoxometalate was recovered in feces. The steady-state volume of distribution based on total concentrations averaged 1.44 liters

  9. Effect of Antiviral Therapy on Serum Activity of Angiotensin Converting Enzyme in Patients with Chronic Hepatitis C

    PubMed Central

    Husic-Selimovic, Azra; Sofic, Amela; Huskic, Jasminko; Bulja, Deniz

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Renin-angiotenzin system (RAS) is frequently activated in patients with chronic liver disease. Angiotenzin - II (AT-II), produced by angiotenzin converting enzyme (ACE), has many physiological effects, including an important role in liver fibrogenesis. Combined antiviral therapy with PEG-IFN and ribavirin besides its antiviral effect also leads to a reduction in liver parenchyma fibrosis. Aim of the study: Determining the value of ACE in serum of patients with chronic hepatitis C before and after combined antiviral therapy, as well as the value of ACE activities in sera of the control group. Materials and methods: We studied 50 patients treated at Gastroenterohepatology Department, in the time-period of four years. Value of ACE in serum was determined by Olympus AU 400 device, with application of kit “Infinity TN ACE Liquid Stable Reagent”. HCV RNA levels in sera were measured by real time PCR. HCV RNA test was performed with modular analysis of AMPLICOR and COBAS AMPLICOR HCV MONITOR test v2.0, which has proved infection and was used for quantification of the viruses and monitoring of the patients’ response to therapy. Liver histology was evaluated in accordance with the level of necroinflammation activity and stage of fibrosis. Results: Serum activities of ACE in chronic hepatitis C patients is statistically higher than the values in the control group (p=0.02). Antiviral therapy in chronic hepatitis C patients statistically decreases serum activities of ACE (p= 0.02) and indirectly affects fibrogenesis of the liver parenchyma. Correlation between ACE and ALT activity after the therapy was proved (0.3934). Conclusion: Our findings suggest that the activity of ACE in serum is a good indirect parameter of the liver damage, and could be used as an indirect prognostic factor of the level of liver parenchyma damage. Serum activity of ACE can be used as a parameter for non-invasive assessment of intensity of liver damage. PMID:27147779

  10. Safe and Sensitive Antiviral Screening Platform Based on Recombinant Human Coronavirus OC43 Expressing the Luciferase Reporter Gene

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Liang; Yang, Yang; Ye, Fei; Liu, Gaoshan; Desforges, Marc

    2016-01-01

    Human coronaviruses (HCoVs) cause 15 to 30% of mild upper respiratory tract infections. However, no specific antiviral drugs are available to prevent or treat HCoV infections to date. Here, we developed four infectious recombinant HCoVs-OC43 (rHCoVs-OC43) which express the Renilla luciferase (Rluc) reporter gene. Among these four rHCoVs-OC43, rOC43-ns2DelRluc (generated by replacing ns2 with the Rluc gene) showed robust luciferase activity with only a slight impact on its growth characteristics. Additionally, this recombinant virus remained stable for at least 10 passages in BHK-21 cells. rOC43-ns2DelRluc was comparable to its parental wild-type virus (HCoV-OC43-WT) with respect to the quantity of the antiviral activity of chloroquine and ribavirin. We showed that chloroquine strongly inhibited HCoV-OC43 replication in vitro, with a 50% inhibitory concentration (IC50) of 0.33 μM. However, ribavirin showed inhibition of HCoV-OC43 replication only at high concentrations which may not be applicable to humans in clinical treatment, with an IC50 of 10 μM. Furthermore, using a luciferase-based small interfering RNA (siRNA) screening assay, we identified double-stranded-RNA-activated protein kinase (PKR) and DEAD box RNA helicases (DDX3X) that exhibited antiviral activities, which were further verified by the use of HCoV-OC43-WT. Therefore, rOC43-ns2DelRluc represents a promising safe and sensitive platform for high-throughput antiviral screening and quantitative analysis of viral replication. PMID:27381385

  11. Synthesis and antiviral evaluation of bisnoradamantane sulfites and related compounds.

    PubMed

    Valverde, Elena; Torres, Eva; Guardiola, Salvador; Naesens, Lieve; Vázquez, Santiago

    2011-03-01

    The reaction of a series of 1,2-diols with thionyl chloride led to bisnoradamantane sulfites in very good yields. The reaction has also been applied to related polycyclic scaffolds. The compounds have been tested for antiviral activity but none of them showed to be active. Several attempts to generate and trap SO from these polycyclic sulfites have been unsuccessful.

  12. Synergistic antiviral activity of gemcitabine and ribavirin against enteroviruses.

    PubMed

    Kang, Hyunju; Kim, Chonsaeng; Kim, Dong-eun; Song, Jae-Hyoung; Choi, Miri; Choi, Kwangman; Kang, Mingu; Lee, Kyungjin; Kim, Hae Soo; Shin, Jin Soo; Kim, Janghwan; Han, Sang-Bae; Lee, Mi-Young; Lee, Su Ui; Lee, Chong-Kyo; Kim, Meehyein; Ko, Hyun-Jeong; van Kuppeveld, Frank J M; Cho, Sungchan

    2015-12-01

    Enteroviruses are major causative agents of various human diseases, and some of them are currently considered to be an enormous threat to public health. However, no effective therapy is currently available for the treatment of these infections. We identified gemcitabine, a nucleoside-analog drug used for cancer treatment, from a screen of bioactive chemicals as a novel inhibitor of coxsackievirus B3 (CVB3) and enterovirus 71 (EV71). Gemcitabine potently inhibited the proliferation of CVB3 and EV71, as well as the replication of CVB3 and EV71 replicons, in cells with a low micromolar IC50 (1-5 μM). Its strong inhibitory effect was also observed in cells infected with human rhinoviruses, demonstrating broad-spectrum antiviral effects on enteroviruses. Mechanistically, an extensive analysis excluded the involvement of 2C, 3A, IRES-dependent translation, and also that of polyprotein processing in the antiviral effects of gemcitabine. Importantly, gemcitabine in combination with ribavirin, an antiviral drug currently being used against a few RNA viruses, exhibited a synergistic antiviral effect on the replication of CVB3 and EV71 replicons. Consequently, our results clearly demonstrate a new indication for gemcitabine as an effective broad-spectrum inhibitor of enteroviruses and strongly suggest a new therapeutic strategy using gemcitabine alone or in combination with ribavirin for the treatment of various diseases associated with enterovirus infection.

  13. Pandemic influenza: antiviral preparedness and health care workers.

    PubMed

    Schneider, Ruth B; Benitez, John G; D'Angelo, Anne; Tyo, Kathee

    2010-03-01

    The primary objective of this study was to determine the preparedness for pandemic influenza of hospitals, in terms of amount of antiviral drugs on hand and employee vaccination rates, in the Finger Lakes region (FLR) of western New York. A survey of the 17 FLR hospitals was conducted via e-mail during the period of June 2007 to August 2007. A total of 13 of 17 hospitals responded for a response rate of 76.5%. Only 23.1% of responding hospitals stockpile antiviral drugs. Vaccination rates for personnel with patient contact ranged from 36.8% to 76.1%. Hospitals in the FLR have insufficient quantities of antiviral agents stockpiled to provide for the protection of health care workers, and influenza vaccination rates for health care workers are low. To ensure that a high level of care is maintained during a pandemic, health care workers need to be provided with appropriate protection. This can be accomplished if hospitals stockpile antiviral agents designated for the treatment and prophylaxis of health care workers with patient contact and their families.

  14. Novel antiviral activity of baicalein against dengue virus

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Dengue is a serious arboviral disease currently with no effective antiviral therapy or approved vaccine available. Therefore, finding the effective compound against dengue virus (DENV) replication is very important. Among the natural compounds, bioflavonoids derived mainly from plants are of interest because of their biological and medicinal benefits. Methods In the present study, antiviral activity of a bioflavonoid, baicalein, was evaluated against different stages of dengue virus type 2 (DENV-2) replication in Vero cells using focus forming unit reduction assay and quantitative RT-PCR. Results Baicalein inhibited DENV-2 replication in Vero cells with IC50= 6.46 μg/mL and SI= 17.8 when added after adsorption to the cells. The IC50 against DENV-2 was 5.39 μg/mL and SI= 21.3 when cells were treated 5 hours before virus infection and continuously up to 4 days post infection. Baicalein exhibited direct virucidal effect against DENV-2 with IC 50= 1.55 μg/mL and showed anti-adsorption effect with IC50 = 7.14 μg/mL. Conclusions Findings presented here suggest that baicalein exerts potent antiviral activity against DENV. Baicalein possesses direct virucidal activity against DENV besides its effects against dengue virus adsorption and intracellular replication of DENV-2. Baicalein, hence, should be considered for in vivo evaluation in the development of an effective antiviral compound against DENV. PMID:23140177

  15. Mitochondrial DNA Stress Primes the Antiviral Innate Immune Response

    PubMed Central

    West, A. Phillip; Khoury-Hanold, William; Staron, Matthew; Tal, Michal C.; Pineda, Cristiana M.; Lang, Sabine M.; Bestwick, Megan; Duguay, Brett A.; Raimundo, Nuno; MacDuff, Donna A.; Kaech, Susan M.; Smiley, James R.; Means, Robert E.; Iwasaki, Akiko; Shadel, Gerald S.

    2014-01-01

    Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) is normally present at thousands of copies per cell and is packaged into several hundred higher-order structures termed nucleoids1. The abundant mtDNA-binding protein, transcription factor A mitochondrial (TFAM), regulates nucleoid architecture, abundance, and segregation2. Complete mtDNA depletion profoundly impairs oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS), triggering calcium-dependent stress signaling and adaptive metabolic responses3. However, the cellular responses to mtDNA instability, a physiologically relevant stress observed in many human diseases and aging, remain ill-defined4. Here we show that moderate mtDNA stress elicited by TFAM deficiency engages cytosolic antiviral signaling to enhance the expression of a subset of interferon-stimulated genes (ISG). Mechanistically, we have found that aberrant mtDNA packaging promotes escape of mtDNA into the cytosol, where it engages the DNA sensor cGAS and promotes STING-IRF3-dependent signaling to elevate ISG expression, potentiate type I interferon responses, and confer broad viral resistance. Furthermore, we demonstrate that herpesviruses induce mtDNA stress, which potentiates antiviral signaling and type I interferon responses during infection. Our results further demonstrate that mitochondria are central participants in innate immunity, identify mtDNA stress as a cell-intrinsic trigger of antiviral signaling, and suggest that cellular monitoring of mtDNA homeostasis cooperates with canonical virus sensing mechanisms to fully license antiviral innate immunity. PMID:25642965

  16. Novel drug delivery approaches on antiviral and antiretroviral agents

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Pooja; Chawla, Anuj; Arora, Sandeep; Pawar, Pravin

    2012-01-01

    Viruses have the property to replicate very fast in host cell. It can attack any part of host cell. Therefore, the clinical efficacy of antiviral drugs and its bioavailability is more important concern taken into account to treat viral infections. The oral and parenteral routes of drug administration have several shortcomings, however, which could lead to the search for formulating better delivery systems. Now, a day's novel drug delivery systems (NDDS) proved to be a better approach to enhance the effectiveness of the antivirals and improve the patient compliance and decrease the adverse effect. The NDDS have reduced the dosing frequency and shorten the duration of treatment, thus, which could lead the treatment more cost-effective. The development of NDDS for antiviral and antiretroviral therapy aims to deliver the drug devoid of toxicity, with high compatibility and biodegradability, targeting the drug to specific sites for viral infection and in some instances it also avoid the first pass metabolism effect. This article aims to discuss the usefulness of novel delivery approaches of antiviral agents such as niosomes, microspheres, microemulsions, nanoparticles that are used in the treatment of various Herpes viruses and in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infections. PMID:23057001

  17. Antiviral therapies for managing viral hepatitis in lymphoma patients.

    PubMed

    Merli, Michele; Rattotti, Sara; Gotti, Manuel; Arcaini, Luca

    2017-03-01

    In patients with lymphoma the detection of positive hepatitis B or C viruses (HBV and HCV) serology involves crucial therapeutic consequences. In HBV-infected patients the serological profile of active (HBsAg-positive) or resolved (HBsAg-negative/anti-HBcAb-positive) infection is associated to differential risk of viral reactivation during rituximab-based therapy and require appropriate strategies of monitoring and of antiviral prophylaxis. In HCV-associated NHL patients consolidated data demonstrated that interferon (IFN)-based antiviral therapy (AT) is able to induce lymphoma regression strictly related to viral eradication, while preliminary data of the new direct-acting antivirals (DAAs) are very promising. Areas covered: This review summarizes current evidences about HBV reactivation risk in patients undergoing rituximab-based treatments and appropriate options of antiviral prophylaxis with lamivudine, entecavir or tenofovir, as well as pre-emptive strategy in HBsAg-negative/HBcAb-positive patients. Moreover previous experiences with IFN-based AT as well as recent studies with DAAs in HCV-associated indolent lymphomas or diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) are reviewed. Expert opinion: Entecavir or tenofovir prophylaxis is recommended for HBsAg-positive patients, while universal prophilaxis with lamivudine may be preferred in HBsAg-negative/anti-HBc-positive patients. In asymptomatic patients with HCV-associated indolent lymphoma DAA-based AT should be used as first-line option, while in DLBCL its deliver after immunochemotherapy-induced complete remission is suggested.

  18. Adenovirus infection reverses the antiviral state induced by human interferon.

    PubMed

    Feduchi, E; Carrasco, L

    1987-04-06

    HeLa cells treated with human lymphoblastoid interferon do not synthesize poliovirus proteins. The antiviral state against poliovirus is reversed if cells are previously infected with adenovirus type 5. A late gene product seems to be involved in this reversion, since no effect is observed at early stages of infection or in the presence of aphidicolin.

  19. 75 FR 16151 - Antiviral Drugs Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-31

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Antiviral Drugs Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice. This notice announces a forthcoming meeting of a public advisory committee of the Food and Drug Administration (FDA). The meeting will be open to...

  20. 78 FR 57166 - Antiviral Drugs Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-17

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Antiviral Drugs Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice. This notice announces a forthcoming meeting of a public advisory committee of the Food and Drug Administration (FDA). The meeting will be open to...

  1. Platinum(II)-Acyclovir Complexes: Synthesis, Antiviral and Antitumour Activity

    PubMed Central

    Coluccia, M.; Boccarelli, A.; Cermelli, C.; Portolani, M.; Natile, G.

    1995-01-01

    A platinum(II) complex with the antiviral drug acyclovir was synthesized and its antiviral and anticancer properties were investigated in comparison to those of acyclovir and cisplatin. The platinum-acyclovir complex maintained the antiviral activity of the parent drug acyclovir, though showing a minor efficacy on a molar basis (ID50  =   7.85 and 1.02 μΜ for platinum-acyclovir and cisplatin, respectively). As anticancer agent, the platinum-acyclovir complex was markedly less potent than cisplatin on a mole-equivalent basis, but it was as effective as cisplatin when equitoxic dosages were administered in vivo to P388 leukaemia-bearing mice (%T/C = 209 and 211 for platinum-acyclovir and cisplatin, respectively). The platinum-acyclovir complex was also active against a cisplatin-resistant subline of the P388 leukaemia (%T/C = 140), thus suggesting a different mechanism of action. The DNA interaction properties (sequence specificity and interstrand cross-linking ability) of platinum-acyclovir were also investigated in comparison to those of cisplatin and [Pt(dien)Cl]+, an antitumour-inactive platinum-triamine compound. The results of this study point to a potential new drug endowed, at the same time, with antiviral and anticancer activity and characterized by DNA interaction properties different from those of cisplatin. PMID:18472776

  2. Approved Antiviral Drugs over the Past 50 Years

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    SUMMARY Since the first antiviral drug, idoxuridine, was approved in 1963, 90 antiviral drugs categorized into 13 functional groups have been formally approved for the treatment of the following 9 human infectious diseases: (i) HIV infections (protease inhibitors, integrase inhibitors, entry inhibitors, nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors, nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors, and acyclic nucleoside phosphonate analogues), (ii) hepatitis B virus (HBV) infections (lamivudine, interferons, nucleoside analogues, and acyclic nucleoside phosphonate analogues), (iii) hepatitis C virus (HCV) infections (ribavirin, interferons, NS3/4A protease inhibitors, NS5A inhibitors, and NS5B polymerase inhibitors), (iv) herpesvirus infections (5-substituted 2′-deoxyuridine analogues, entry inhibitors, nucleoside analogues, pyrophosphate analogues, and acyclic guanosine analogues), (v) influenza virus infections (ribavirin, matrix 2 protein inhibitors, RNA polymerase inhibitors, and neuraminidase inhibitors), (vi) human cytomegalovirus infections (acyclic guanosine analogues, acyclic nucleoside phosphonate analogues, pyrophosphate analogues, and oligonucleotides), (vii) varicella-zoster virus infections (acyclic guanosine analogues, nucleoside analogues, 5-substituted 2′-deoxyuridine analogues, and antibodies), (viii) respiratory syncytial virus infections (ribavirin and antibodies), and (ix) external anogenital warts caused by human papillomavirus infections (imiquimod, sinecatechins, and podofilox). Here, we present for the first time a comprehensive overview of antiviral drugs approved over the past 50 years, shedding light on the development of effective antiviral treatments against current and emerging infectious diseases worldwide. PMID:27281742

  3. De novo computer-aided design of novel antiviral agents.

    PubMed

    Massarotti, Alberto; Coluccia, Antonio; Sorba, Giovanni; Silvestri, Romano; Brancale, Andrea

    2012-01-01

    Computer-aided drug design techniques have become an integral part of the drug discovery process. In particular, de novo methodologies can be useful to identify putative ligands for a specific target relying only on the structural information of the target itself. Here we discuss the basic de novo approaches available and their application in antiviral drug design.:

  4. Influenza antivirals currently in late-phase clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Koszalka, Paulina; Tilmanis, Danielle; Hurt, Aeron C

    2017-05-01

    Influenza antiviral drugs are important for the control of influenza, most specifically for the treatment of influenza patients with severe disease following infection with a seasonal influenza virus, a newly emerging influenza strain, or in the event of a pandemic. Many influenza antivirals that are currently under investigation in late-stage clinical trials differ in their mechanism of action compared to drugs currently licensed for the treatment of influenza. Nitazoxanide and DAS181 target components of the host cell and alter the ability of the virus to replicate efficiently, while small molecule drugs such as T705, JNJ63623872 and S-033188 bind to the viral polymerase complex and restrict viral replication. Monoclonal antibodies that are currently in clinical trial for the treatment of influenza most commonly are targeted to the stem region of the haemagglutinin molecule. Early findings from animal models and in vitro studies suggest that many of the new antiviral drugs when tested in combination with oseltamivir have improved effectiveness over monotherapy. Clinical trials assessing both monotherapy and combination therapy are currently under investigation. It is hoped that as new antivirals are licensed, they will improve the standard of care and outcomes for influenza patients with severe disease. © 2017 The Authors. Influenza and Other Respiratory Viruses Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Small molecules with antiviral activity against the Ebola virus.

    PubMed

    Litterman, Nadia; Lipinski, Christopher; Ekins, Sean

    2015-01-01

    The recent outbreak of the Ebola virus in West Africa has highlighted the clear shortage of broad-spectrum antiviral drugs for emerging viruses. There are numerous FDA approved drugs and other small molecules described in the literature that could be further evaluated for their potential as antiviral compounds. These molecules are in addition to the few new antivirals that have been tested in Ebola patients but were not originally developed against the Ebola virus, and may play an important role as we await an effective vaccine. The balance between using FDA approved drugs versus novel antivirals with minimal safety and no efficacy data in humans should be considered. We have evaluated 55 molecules from the perspective of an experienced medicinal chemist as well as using simple molecular properties and have highlighted 16 compounds that have desirable qualities as well as those that may be less desirable. In addition we propose that a collaborative database for sharing such published and novel information on small molecules is needed for the research community studying the Ebola virus.

  6. Small molecules with antiviral activity against the Ebola virus

    PubMed Central

    Litterman, Nadia; Lipinski, Christopher; Ekins, Sean

    2015-01-01

    The recent outbreak of the Ebola virus in West Africa has highlighted the clear shortage of broad-spectrum antiviral drugs for emerging viruses. There are numerous FDA approved drugs and other small molecules described in the literature that could be further evaluated for their potential as antiviral compounds. These molecules are in addition to the few new antivirals that have been tested in Ebola patients but were not originally developed against the Ebola virus, and may play an important role as we await an effective vaccine. The balance between using FDA approved drugs versus novel antivirals with minimal safety and no efficacy data in humans should be considered. We have evaluated 55 molecules from the perspective of an experienced medicinal chemist as well as using simple molecular properties and have highlighted 16 compounds that have desirable qualities as well as those that may be less desirable. In addition we propose that a collaborative database for sharing such published and novel information on small molecules is needed for the research community studying the Ebola virus. PMID:25713700

  7. Antiviral nucleoside analogs phosphorylation by nucleoside diphosphate kinase.

    PubMed

    Gallois-Montbrun, S; Veron, M; Deville-Bonne, D

    2004-05-01

    The reaction of NDP kinase was studied in vitro with several antiviral derivatives, using kinetic steady state and presteady state analysis. The enzyme is highly efficient with natural nucleotides but most of the analogs are slow substrates. The catalytic efficiency, also related to the affinity of the analog, is mainly dependent on the presence of a 3'-OH group on the ribose moiety.

  8. Liposomal Systems as Nanocarriers for the Antiviral Agent Ivermectin

    PubMed Central

    Croci, Romina; Bottaro, Elisabetta; Chan, Kitti Wing Ki; Watanabe, Satoru; Pezzullo, Margherita; Mastrangelo, Eloise; Nastruzzi, Claudio

    2016-01-01

    RNA virus infections can lead to the onset of severe diseases such as fever with haemorrhage, multiorgan failure, and mortality. The emergence and reemergence of RNA viruses continue to pose a significant public health threat worldwide with particular attention to the increasing incidence of flaviviruses, among others Dengue, West Nile Virus, and Yellow Fever viruses. Development of new and potent antivirals is thus urgently needed. Ivermectin, an already known antihelminthic drug, has shown potent effects in vitro on Flavivirus helicase, with EC50 values in the subnanomolar range for Yellow Fever and submicromolar EC50 for Dengue Fever, Japanese encephalitis, and tick-borne encephalitis viruses. However ivermectin is hampered in its application by pharmacokinetic problems (little solubility and high cytotoxicity). To overcome such problems we engineered different compositions of liposomes as ivermectin carriers characterizing and testing them on several cell lines for cytotoxicity. The engineered liposomes were less cytotoxic than ivermectin alone and they showed a significant increase of the antiviral activity in all the Dengue stains tested (1, 2, and S221). In the current study ivermectin is confirmed to be an effective potential antiviral and liposomes, as drug carriers, are shown to modulate the drug activity. All together the results represent a promising starting point for future improvement of ivermectin as antiviral and its delivery. PMID:27242902

  9. Antiviral effect of mefloquine on feline calicivirus in vitro.

    PubMed

    McDonagh, Phillip; Sheehy, Paul A; Fawcett, Anne; Norris, Jacqueline M

    2015-04-17

    Feline calicivirus (FCV) is an important viral pathogen of domestic cats causing clinical signs ranging from mild to severe oral ulceration or upper respiratory tract disease through to a severe fatal systemic disease. Current therapeutic options are limited, with no direct acting antivirals available for treatment. This study screened a panel of 19 compounds for potential antiviral activity against FCV strain F9 and recent field isolates in vitro. Using a resazurin-based cytopathic effect (CPE) inhibition assay, mefloquine demonstrated a marked inhibitory effect on FCV induced CPE, albeit with a relatively low selectivity index. Orthogonal assays confirmed inhibition of CPE was associated with a significant reduction in viral replication. Mefloquine exhibited a strong inhibitory effect against a panel of seven recent FCV isolates from Australia, with calculated IC50 values for the field isolates approximately 50% lower than against the reference strain FCV F9. In vitro combination therapy with recombinant feline interferon-ω, a biological response modifier currently registered for the treatment of FCV, demonstrated additive effects with a concurrent reduction in the IC50 of mefloquine. These results are the first report of antiviral effects of mefloquine against a calicivirus and support further in vitro and in vivo evaluation of this compound as an antiviral therapeutic for FCV.

  10. Modeling rotavirus infection and antiviral therapy using primary intestinal organoids.

    PubMed

    Yin, Yuebang; Bijvelds, Marcel; Dang, Wen; Xu, Lei; van der Eijk, Annemiek A; Knipping, Karen; Tuysuz, Nesrin; Dekkers, Johanna F; Wang, Yijin; de Jonge, Jeroen; Sprengers, Dave; van der Laan, Luc J W; Beekman, Jeffrey M; Ten Berge, Derk; Metselaar, Herold J; de Jonge, Hugo; Koopmans, Marion P G; Peppelenbosch, Maikel P; Pan, Qiuwei

    2015-11-01

    Despite the introduction of oral vaccines, rotavirus still kills over 450,000 children under five years of age annually. The absence of specific treatment prompts research aiming at further understanding of pathogenesis and the development of effective antiviral therapy, which in turn requires advanced experimental models. Given the intrinsic limitations of the classical rotavirus models using immortalized cell lines infected with laboratory-adapted strains in two dimensional cultures, our study aimed to model infection and antiviral therapy of both experimental and patient-derived rotavirus strains using three dimensional cultures of primary intestinal organoids. Intestinal epithelial organoids were successfully cultured from mouse or human gut tissues. These organoids recapitulate essential features of the in vivo tissue architecture, and are susceptible to rotavirus. Human organoids are more permissive to rotavirus infection, displaying an over 10,000-fold increase in genomic RNA following 24h of viral replication. Furthermore, infected organoids are capable of producing infectious rotavirus particles. Treatment of interferon-alpha or ribavirin inhibited viral replication in organoids of both species. Importantly, human organoids efficiently support the infection of patient-derived rotavirus strains and can be potentially harnessed for personalized evaluation of the efficacy of antiviral medications. Therefore, organoids provide a robust model system for studying rotavirus-host interactions and assessing antiviral medications.

  11. Evaluation of antiseptic antiviral activity of chemical agents.

    PubMed

    Geller, Chloé; Finance, Chantal; Duval, Raphaël Emmanuel

    2011-06-01

    Antiviral antisepsis and disinfection are crucial for preventing the environmental spread of viral infections. Emerging viruses and associated diseases, as well as nosocomial viral infections, have become a real issue in medical fields, and there are very few efficient and specific treatments available to fight most of these infections. Another issue is the potential environmental resistance and spread of viral particles. Therefore, it is essential to properly evaluate the efficacy of antiseptics-disinfectants (ATS-D) on viruses. ATS-D antiviral activity is evaluated by (1) combining viruses and test product for an appropriately defined and precise contact time, (2) neutralizing product activity, and (3) estimating the loss of viral infectivity. A germicide can be considered to have an efficient ATS-D antiviral activity if it induces a >3 or >4 log(10) reduction (American and European regulatory agency requirements, respectively) in viral titers in a defined contact time. This unit describes a global methodology for evaluating chemical ATS-D antiviral activity. © 2011 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  12. Cytotoxicity and antiviral activity of methanol extract from Polygonum minus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wahab, Noor Zarina Abd; Bunawan, Hamidun; Ibrahim, Nazlina

    2015-09-01

    A study was carried out to test the cytotoxicity and antiviral effects of methanolic extracts from the leaves and stem of Polygonum minus or kesum. Cytotoxicity tests were performed on Vero cells indicates the LC50 value for leaf extract towards the Vero cells was 875 mg/L and the LC50 value for stem extract was 95 mg/L. The LC50 values indidcate the non-cytotoxic effect of the extracts and worth for further testing. Antiviral test were carried out towards herpes simplex virus infected Vero cells using three concentration of extract which were equivalent to 1.0 LC50, 0.1 LC50 and 0.01 LC50. Three different treatments to detect antiviral activity were used. Mild antiviral activity of the stem extract was detected when cells were treated for 24 hours with plant extract before viral infection. This demonstrates the capability of the test compound to protect the cells from viral attachment and of the possible prophylactic effect of the P. minus stem methanol extract.

  13. 76 FR 62418 - Antiviral Drugs Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-07

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Antiviral Drugs Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice. This notice announces a forthcoming meeting of a public advisory committee of the Food and Drug Administration (FDA). The meeting will be open to the...

  14. Application of electrolysis for inactivation of an antiviral drug that is one of possible selection pressure to drug-resistant influenza viruses.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Toyohide; Hirose, Jun; Wu, Hong; Sano, Kouichi; Katsumata, Takahiro; Tsujibo, Hiroshi; Nakano, Takashi

    2013-12-01

    The recent development of antiviral drugs has led to concern that the release of the chemicals in surface water due to expanded medical use could induce drug-resistant mutant viruses in zoonosis. Many researchers have noted that the appearance of an oseltamivir (Tamiflu(®))-resistant avian influenza mutant virus, which may spread to humans, could be induced by oseltamivir contamination of surface water. Although past studies have reported electrolysis as a possible method for degradation of antineoplastics and antibacterials in water, the validity of the method for treatment of antiviral drugs is unknown. In this study, electrolysis was used to degrade an antiviral prodrug, oseltamivir, and a stable active form, oseltamivir carboxylate, and the degradation process was monitored with HPLC-UV and the neuraminidase inhibitory assay. HPLC-UV-detectable oseltamivir and oseltamivir carboxylate were decomposed by electrolysis within 60 min, and inhibitory activity of neuraminidase decreased below the detection limit of the assay used. Cytotoxic and genotoxic activity were not detected in electrolyzed fluid. These results indicate that electrolysis is a possible treatment for inactivation of the antiviral drug oseltamivir. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Antiviral effect of HPMPC (Cidofovir®), entrapped in cationic liposomes: in vitro study on MDBK cell and BHV-1 virus.

    PubMed

    Korvasová, Zina; Drašar, Lukáš; Mašek, Josef; Turánek Knotigová, Pavlína; Kulich, Pavel; Matiašovic, Ján; Kovařčík, Kamil; Bartheldyová, Eliška; Koudelka, Štěpán; Škrabalová, Michaela; Miller, Andrew D; Holý, Antonín; Ledvina, Miroslav; Turánek, Jaroslav

    2012-06-10

    We designed and synthesised a series of new cationic lipids based on spermine linked to various hydrophobic anchors. These lipids could be potentially useful for the preparation of stable cationic liposomes intended for the construction of drug targeting systems applicable in the field of anticancer/antiviral therapy, vaccine carriers, and vectors for the gene therapy. Low in vitro toxicity was found for these compounds, especially for LD1, in several cell lines. The delivery of both a fluorescence marker (calcein) and antiviral drugs into cells has been achieved owing to a large extent of internalization of cationic liposomes (labelled by Lyssamine-Rhodamine PE or fluorescein-PE) as demonstrated by fluorescent microscopy and quantified by flow cytometry. The bovine herpes virus type 1 (BHV-1) virus infection in vitro model using MDBK cells was employed to study the effect of the established antiviral drug HPMPC (Cidofovir®) developed by Prof. A. Holý. Inhibition of BHV-1 virus replication was studied by quantitative RT-PCR and confirmed by both Hoffman modulation contrast microscopy and transmission electron microscopy. We found that in vitro antiviral activity of HPMPC was significantly improved by formulation in cationic liposomes, which decreased the viral replication by about 2 orders of magnitude. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Antiviral effect of methylated flavonol isorhamnetin against influenza.

    PubMed

    Abdal Dayem, Ahmed; Choi, Hye Yeon; Kim, Young Bong; Cho, Ssang-Goo

    2015-01-01

    Influenza is an infectious respiratory disease with frequent seasonal epidemics that causes a high rate of mortality and morbidity in humans, poultry, and animals. Influenza is a serious economic concern due to the costly countermeasures it necessitates. In this study, we compared the antiviral activities of several flavonols and other flavonoids with similar, but distinct, hydroxyl or methyl substitution patterns at the 3, 3', and 4' positions of the 15-carbon flavonoid skeleton, and found that the strongest antiviral effect was induced by isorhamnetin. Similar to quercetin and kaempferol, isorhamnetin possesses a hydroxyl group on the C ring, but it has a 3'-methyl group on the B ring that is absent in quercetin and kaempferol. Co-treatment and pre-treatment with isorhamnetin produced a strong antiviral effect against the influenza virus A/PR/08/34(H1N1). However, isorhamnetin showed the most potent antiviral potency when administered after viral exposure (post-treatment method) in vitro. Isorhamnetin treatment reduced virus-induced ROS generation and blocked cytoplasmic lysosome acidification and the lipidation of microtubule associated protein1 light chain 3-B (LC3B). Oral administration of isorhamnetin in mice infected with the influenza A virus significantly decreased lung virus titer by 2 folds, increased the survival rate which ranged from 70-80%, and decreased body weight loss by 25%. In addition, isorhamnetin decreased the virus titer in ovo using embryonated chicken eggs. The structure-activity relationship (SAR) of isorhamnetin could explain its strong anti-influenza virus potency; the methyl group located on the B ring of isorhamnetin may contribute to its strong antiviral potency against influenza virus in comparison with other flavonoids.

  17. Discovery of potent broad spectrum antivirals derived from marine actinobacteria.

    PubMed

    Raveh, Avi; Delekta, Phillip C; Dobry, Craig J; Peng, Weiping; Schultz, Pamela J; Blakely, Pennelope K; Tai, Andrew W; Matainaho, Teatulohi; Irani, David N; Sherman, David H; Miller, David J

    2013-01-01

    Natural products provide a vast array of chemical structures to explore in the discovery of new medicines. Although secondary metabolites produced by microbes have been developed to treat a variety of diseases, including bacterial and fungal infections, to date there has been limited investigation of natural products with antiviral activity. In this report, we used a phenotypic cell-based replicon assay coupled with an iterative biochemical fractionation process to identify, purify, and characterize antiviral compounds produced by marine microbes. We isolated a compound from Streptomyces kaviengensis, a novel actinomycetes isolated from marine sediments obtained off the coast of New Ireland, Papua New Guinea, which we identified as antimycin A1a. This compound displays potent activity against western equine encephalitis virus in cultured cells with half-maximal inhibitory concentrations of less than 4 nM and a selectivity index of greater than 550. Our efforts also revealed that several antimycin A analogues display antiviral activity, and mechanism of action studies confirmed that these Streptomyces-derived secondary metabolites function by inhibiting the cellular mitochondrial electron transport chain, thereby suppressing de novo pyrimidine synthesis. Furthermore, we found that antimycin A functions as a broad spectrum agent with activity against a wide range of RNA viruses in cultured cells, including members of the Togaviridae, Flaviviridae, Bunyaviridae, Picornaviridae, and Paramyxoviridae families. Finally, we demonstrate that antimycin A reduces central nervous system viral titers, improves clinical disease severity, and enhances survival in mice given a lethal challenge with western equine encephalitis virus. Our results provide conclusive validation for using natural product resources derived from marine microbes as source material for antiviral drug discovery, and they indicate that host mitochondrial electron transport is a viable target for the

  18. Discovery of Potent Broad Spectrum Antivirals Derived from Marine Actinobacteria

    PubMed Central

    Raveh, Avi; Delekta, Phillip C.; Dobry, Craig J.; Peng, Weiping; Schultz, Pamela J.; Blakely, Pennelope K.; Tai, Andrew W.; Matainaho, Teatulohi; Irani, David N.; Sherman, David H.; Miller, David J.

    2013-01-01

    Natural products provide a vast array of chemical structures to explore in the discovery of new medicines. Although secondary metabolites produced by microbes have been developed to treat a variety of diseases, including bacterial and fungal infections, to date there has been limited investigation of natural products with antiviral activity. In this report, we used a phenotypic cell-based replicon assay coupled with an iterative biochemical fractionation process to identify, purify, and characterize antiviral compounds produced by marine microbes. We isolated a compound from Streptomyces kaviengensis, a novel actinomycetes isolated from marine sediments obtained off the coast of New Ireland, Papua New Guinea, which we identified as antimycin A1a. This compound displays potent activity against western equine encephalitis virus in cultured cells with half-maximal inhibitory concentrations of less than 4 nM and a selectivity index of greater than 550. Our efforts also revealed that several antimycin A analogues display antiviral activity, and mechanism of action studies confirmed that these Streptomyces-derived secondary metabolites function by inhibiting the cellular mitochondrial electron transport chain, thereby suppressing de novo pyrimidine synthesis. Furthermore, we found that antimycin A functions as a broad spectrum agent with activity against a wide range of RNA viruses in cultured cells, including members of the Togaviridae, Flaviviridae, Bunyaviridae, Picornaviridae, and Paramyxoviridae families. Finally, we demonstrate that antimycin A reduces central nervous system viral titers, improves clinical disease severity, and enhances survival in mice given a lethal challenge with western equine encephalitis virus. Our results provide conclusive validation for using natural product resources derived from marine microbes as source material for antiviral drug discovery, and they indicate that host mitochondrial electron transport is a viable target for the

  19. Antiviral triterpenoids from the medicinal plant Schefflera heptaphylla.

    PubMed

    Li, Yaolan; Jiang, Renwang; Ooi, Linda S M; But, Paul P H; Ooi, Vincent E C

    2007-05-01

    Schefflera heptaphylla (L.) Frodin is a principal ingredient of an herbal tea formulation widely used for the treatment of common cold in southern China. An extract of the long leafstalk of the compound leaf of S. heptaphylla exhibited the most potent antiviral activity against respiratory syncytial virus (RSV). Further antiviral-guided fractionation and isolation of the leafstalk extract of S. heptaphylla led to obtain two highly active pure triterpenoids, namely 3alpha-hydroxylup-20(29)-ene-23,28-dioic acid and 3-epi-betulinic acid 3-O-sulfate, together with an inactive saponin, 3alpha-hydroxylup-20(29)-ene-23,28-dioic acid 28-O-alpha-l-rhamnopyranosyl-(1-->4)-O-beta-d-glucopyranosyl-(1-->6)-beta-d-glucopyranoside. An antiviral assay using a cytopathic effect (CPE) reduction method showed that the two triterpenoids possessed broader antiviral activity against respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) with a similar 50% inhibition concentration (IC(50)) value of 6.25 microg/mL, influenza A (H1N1) virus with IC(50) values of 25 and 31.3 microg/mL, Coxsackie B3 (Cox B3) virus with IC(50) values of 12.5 and 20 microg/mL and herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) with IC(50) values of 18.8 and 25 microg/mL, respectively, whereas the saponin did not have antiviral activity against these four viruses at a concentration of 100 microg/mL. Copyright 2007 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  20. Antiviral therapy for chronic hepatitis B: a review.

    PubMed

    Hanazaki, Kazuhiro

    2004-03-01

    Chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection is a well-recognized risk factor for the development of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), which is becoming a more prevalent clinical problem, especially in HBV-endemic areas. It is estimated that 1.25 million people in the United States and more than 300 million people worldwide are chronically infected with HBV. Despite the introduction of universal vaccination against hepatitis B in over 100 countries, persistent HBV infection is still a serious problem worldwide, causing an estimated annual death rate of one million. It may take several decades until the effect of vaccination will be translated into reduced transmission and morbidity. Meanwhile, patients with persistent HBV infection require better antiviral therapeutic modalities than are currently available. It is well accepted that antiviral therapy for chronic hepatitis B is effective to improve prognosis of patients with HBV by preventing development of hepatitis state and HCC. The therapeutic endpoints for hepatitis B treatment are: 1) sustained suppression of HBV replication, as indicated by HBsAg and HBeAg loss, 2) decrease of serum HBV DNA of an undetectable level by a non-PCR method, 3) remission of disease, as shown by normalization of ALT, 4) improvement in liver histology, and 5) reduction of the acute exacerbation, cirrhosis, and HCC. In the present, the antiviral treatment of hepatitis B consists of either interferon alpha or oral lamivudine alone or in combination with existing therapy. Each major antiviral drug of interferon alpha and lamivudine has pros and cons, and effect of combination therapy of both drugs is also still limited. More powerful and safe new antiviral therapies are required to achieve final goal of these therapeutic endpoints. Management of chronic hepatitis B requires significant knowledge of approved pharmacotherapeutic agents and their limitations. Therapeutic options for managing hepatitis infection after liver transplantation (LT

  1. Antiviral Effect of Methylated Flavonol Isorhamnetin against Influenza

    PubMed Central

    Dayem, Ahmed Abdal; Choi, Hye Yeon; Kim, Young Bong; Cho, Ssang-Goo

    2015-01-01

    Influenza is an infectious respiratory disease with frequent seasonal epidemics that causes a high rate of mortality and morbidity in humans, poultry, and animals. Influenza is a serious economic concern due to the costly countermeasures it necessitates. In this study, we compared the antiviral activities of several flavonols and other flavonoids with similar, but distinct, hydroxyl or methyl substitution patterns at the 3, 3′, and 4′ positions of the 15-carbon flavonoid skeleton, and found that the strongest antiviral effect was induced by isorhamnetin. Similar to quercetin and kaempferol, isorhamnetin possesses a hydroxyl group on the C ring, but it has a 3′-methyl group on the B ring that is absent in quercetin and kaempferol. Co-treatment and pre-treatment with isorhamnetin produced a strong antiviral effect against the influenza virus A/PR/08/34(H1N1). However, isorhamnetin showed the most potent antiviral potency when administered after viral exposure (post-treatment method) in vitro. Isorhamnetin treatment reduced virus-induced ROS generation and blocked cytoplasmic lysosome acidification and the lipidation of microtubule associated protein1 light chain 3-B (LC3B). Oral administration of isorhamnetin in mice infected with the influenza A virus significantly decreased lung virus titer by 2 folds, increased the survival rate which ranged from 70–80%, and decreased body weight loss by 25%. In addition, isorhamnetin decreased the virus titer in ovo using embryonated chicken eggs. The structure-activity relationship (SAR) of isorhamnetin could explain its strong anti-influenza virus potency; the methyl group located on the B ring of isorhamnetin may contribute to its strong antiviral potency against influenza virus in comparison with other flavonoids. PMID:25806943

  2. Design of future rabies biologics and antiviral drugs.

    PubMed

    Smith, Todd G; Wu, Xianfu; Franka, Richard; Rupprecht, Charles E

    2011-01-01

    In recent years, no major paradigm shifts have occurred in the utilization of new products for the prevention and control of rabies. Development of new cost-effective rabies biologics and antiviral drugs is critical in continuing to prevent and reduce disease. Current rabies vaccines are highly effective but have developed largely based on technical improvements in the vaccine industry. In the future, alternative approaches for improved vaccines, including novel avirulent rabies virus (RABV) vectors, should be pursued. Any rabies vaccine that is effective without the need for rabies immune globulin (RIG) will contribute fundamentally to disease prevention by reducing the cost and complexity of postexposure prophylaxis (PEP). The lack of high quality, affordable RIG is a continuing problem. Virus-specific monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) will soon fulfill the PEP requirement for passive immunity, currently met with RIG. Several relevant strategies for mAb production, including use of transgenic mice, humanization of mouse mAbs, and generation of human immune libraries, are underway. As a result of successful PEP and pre-exposure prophylaxis in developed countries, until recently, no significant focused efforts have been devoted to RABV-specific antiviral agents. To date, combination therapy including broad spectrum antiviral agents has been successful in only one case, and reports of antiviral activity are often conflicting. Current antiviral strategies target either the nucleoprotein or phosphoprotein, but drugs targeting the viral polymerase should be considered. Considering the lag from creation of new concepts to experimental development and clinical trials, many years will likely elapse between today's ideas and tomorrow's practices. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Epimedium koreanum Nakai Displays Broad Spectrum of Antiviral Activity in Vitro and in Vivo by Inducing Cellular Antiviral State

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Won-Kyung; Weeratunga, Prasanna; Lee, Byeong-Hoon; Park, Jun-Seol; Kim, Chul-Joong; Ma, Jin Yeul; Lee, Jong-Soo

    2015-01-01

    Epimedium koreanum Nakai has been extensively used in traditional Korean and Chinese medicine to treat a variety of diseases. Despite the plant’s known immune modulatory potential and chemical make-up, scientific information on its antiviral properties and mode of action have not been completely investigated. In this study, the broad antiviral spectrum and mode of action of an aqueous extract from Epimedium koreanum Nakai was evaluated in vitro, and moreover, the protective effect against divergent influenza A subtypes was determined in BALB/c mice. An effective dose of Epimedium koreanum Nakaimarkedly reduced the replication of Influenza A Virus (PR8), Vesicular Stomatitis Virus (VSV), Herpes Simplex Virus (HSV) and Newcastle Disease Virus (NDV) in RAW264.7 and HEK293T cells. Mechanically, we found that an aqueous extract from Epimedium koreanum Nakai induced the secretion of type I IFN and pro-inflammatory cytokines and the subsequent stimulation of the antiviral state in cells. Among various components present in the extract, quercetin was confirmed to have striking antiviral properties. The oral administration of Epimedium koreanum Nakai exhibited preventive effects on BALB/c mice against lethal doses of highly pathogenic influenza A subtypes (H1N1, H5N2, H7N3 and H9N2). Therefore, an extract of Epimedium koreanum Nakai and its components play roles as immunomodulators in the innate immune response, and may be potential candidates for prophylactic or therapeutic treatments against diverse viruses in animal and humans. PMID:25609307

  4. Heat Islands

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    EPA's Heat Island Effect Site provides information on heat islands, their impacts, mitigation strategies, related research, a directory of heat island reduction initiatives in U.S. communities, and EPA's Heat Island Reduction Program.

  5. High Frequency Stable Oscillate boiling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Fenfang; Gonzalez-Avila, Silvestre Roberto; Ohl, Claus Dieter

    2015-11-01

    We present an unexpected regime of resonant bubble oscillations on a thin metal film submerged in water, which is continuously heated with a focused CW laser. The oscillatory bubble dynamics reveals a remarkably stable frequency of several 100 kHz and is resolved from the side using video recordings at 1 million frames per second. The emitted sound is measured simultaneously and shows higher harmonics. Once the laser is switched on the water in contact with the metal layer is superheated and an explosively expanding cavitation bubble is generated. However, after the collapse a microbubble is nucleated from the bubble remains which displays long lasting oscillations. Generally, pinch-off from of the upper part of the microbubble is observed generating a continuous stream of small gas bubbles rising upwards. The cavitation expansion, collapse, and the jetting of gas bubbles are detected by the hydrophone and are correlated to the high speed video. We find the bubble oscillation frequency is dependent on the bubble size and surface tension. A preliminary model based on Marangoni flow and heat transfer can explain the high flow velocities observed, yet the origin of bubble oscillation is currently not well understood.

  6. Stable-isotope geochemistry of the Pierina high-sulfidation Au-Ag deposit, Peru: Influence of hydrodynamics on SO42--H2S sulfur isotopic exchange in magmatic-steam and steam-heated environments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fifarek, R.H.; Rye, R.O.

    2005-01-01

    The Pierina high-sulfidation Au-Ag deposit formed 14.5 my ago in rhyolite ash flow tuffs that overlie porphyritic andesite and dacite lavas and are adjacent to a crosscutting and interfingering dacite flow dome complex. The distribution of alteration zones indicates that fluid flow in the lavas was largely confined to structures but was dispersed laterally in the tuffs because of a high primary and alteration-induced permeability. The lithologically controlled hydrodynamics created unusual fluid, temperature, and pH conditions that led to complete SO42--H2S isotopic equilibration during the formation of some magmatic-steam and steam-heated alunite, a phenomenon not previously recognized in similar deposits. Isotopic data for early magmatic hydrothermal and main-stage alunite (??34S=8.5??? to 31.7???; ??18 OSO4=4.9??? to 16.5???; ??18 OOH=2.2??? to 14.4???; ??D=-97??? to -39???), sulfides (??34 S=-3.0??? to 4.3???), sulfur (??34S=-1.0??? to 1.1???), and clay minerals (??18O=4.3??? to 12.5???; ??D=-126??? to -81???) are typical of high-sulfidation epithermal deposits. The data imply the following genetic elements for Pierina alteration-mineralization: (1) fluid and vapor exsolution from an I-type magma, (2) wallrock buffering and cooling of slowing rising vapors to generate a reduced (H2S/SO4???6) highly acidic condensate that mixed with meteoric water but retained a magmatic ??34S???S signature of ???1???, (3) SO2 disproportionation to HSO4- and H2S between 320 and 180 ??C, and (4) progressive neutralization of laterally migrating acid fluids to form a vuggy quartz???alunite-quartz??clay???intermediate argillic???propylitic alteration zoning. Magmatic-steam alunite has higher ??34S (8.5??? to 23.2???) and generally lower ??18OSO4 (1.0 to 11.5???), ??18OOH (-3.4 to 5.9???), and ??D (-93 to -77???) values than predicted on the basis of data from similar occurrences. These data and supporting fluid-inclusion gas chemistry imply that the rate of vapor ascent for this

  7. Risk Factors for Renal Functional Decline in Chronic Hepatitis B Patients Receiving Oral Antiviral Agents.

    PubMed

    Shin, Jung-Ho; Kwon, Hee Jin; Jang, Hye Ryoun; Lee, Jung Eun; Gwak, Geum-Youn; Huh, Wooseong; Jung, Sin-Ho; Lee, Joon Hyeok; Kim, Yoon-Goo; Kim, Dae Joong; Oh, Ha Young

    2016-01-01

    Renal functional decline that is frequently seen during chronic hepatitis B (CHB) treatment can exert adverse effects on overall prognosis. It, however, is difficult to distinguish vulnerable patients who may experience renal dysfunction because most previous CHB studies were conducted in relatively healthy individuals. In this retrospective observational study, renal functional decline in CHB patients receiving oral antiviral agents for more than 6 months was analyzed and risk factors of chronic kidney disease (CKD) progression were determined. Renal functional decline was defined when the estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) decreased by more than 25% from baseline and rapid CKD progression was defined as eGFR decreased by more than 5 mL/min/1.73 m2/y among patients who experienced renal functional decline. A total of 4178 patients were followed up for a median 23 months. Antiviral agents included lamivudine (17.0%), adefovir (3.7%), entecavir (70.4%), telbivudine (0.6%), tenofovir (4.0%), or clevudine (4.3%). Renal functional decline occurred in 706 (16.9%) patients. Based on multivariate Cox regression analysis, age, hypertension, diabetes, history of liver or kidney transplantation, underlying underlying CKD, and simultaneous administration of diuretics increased the hazard ratio for renal functional decline; however, clevudine reduced risk. The eGFR significantly increased over time in patients receiving telbivudine or clevudine compared with lamivudine. Among the 3175 patients followed up for more than 1 year, 407 (12.8%) patients experienced rapid CKD progression. Patients with rapid CKD progression showed lower serum albumin, higher total bilirubin, and prolonged prothrombin time compared with patients with stable renal function, but hepatitis B envelope antigen positivity and hepatitis B virus deoxyribonucleic acid level did not differ between the control and rapid CKD progression groups. Age, diabetes, kidney transplantation, underlying CKD, and

  8. NMR structure of mussel mytilin, and antiviral-antibacterial activities of derived synthetic peptides.

    PubMed

    Roch, Philippe; Yang, Yinshan; Toubiana, Mylène; Aumelas, André

    2008-01-01

    Mytilin is a 34-residue antibacterial peptide from the mussel Mytilus galloprovincialis, which in addition possesses in vitro antiviral activity. The three-dimensional solution structure of the synthetic mytilin was established by using 1H NMR and consists of the common cysteine-stabilized alphabeta motif close to the one observed in the mussel defensin MGD-1. Mytilin is characterized by 8 cysteines engaged in four disulfide bonds (2-27, 6-29, 10-31, and 15-34) only involving the beta-strand II. Hydrophilic and hydrophobic areas of mytilin account for 63% and 37%, respectively, a ratio very close to that of MGD-1 (64% and 36%). One linear and three cyclic fragments were designed from the interstrand loop sequence known to retain the biological activities in MGD-1. Only the fragment of 10 amino acids (C10C) constrained by two disulfide bonds in a stable beta-hairpin structure was able to inhibit the mortality of Palaemon serratus shrimp injected with white spot syndrome virus (WSSV). Fifty percent inhibition was obtained by in vitro pre-incubation of WSSV with 45 microM of C10C compared with 7 microM for mytilin. Interaction between the fragment and the virus occurred very rapidly as 40% survival was recorded after only 1 min of pre-incubation. In addition, C10C was capable of inhibiting in vitro growth of Vibrio splendidus LGP32 (MIC 125 microM), Vibrio anguillarum (MIC 2mM), Micrococcus lysodeikticus and Escherichia coli (MIC 1mM). Destroying the cysteine-stabilized alphabeta structure or shortening the C10C fragment to the C6C fragment with only one disulfide bond resulted in loss of both antiviral and antibacterial activities. Increasing the positive net charge did not enforce the antibacterial activity and completely suppressed the antiviral one. The C10C-designed peptide from mytilin appeared comparable in composition and structure with protegrin, tachyplesin and polyphemusin.

  9. Tracking HCV protease population diversity during transmission and susceptibility of founder populations to antiviral therapy

    PubMed Central

    Khera, Tanvi; Todt, Daniel; Vercauteren, Koen; McClure, C. Patrick; Verhoye, Lieven; Farhoudi, Ali; Bhuju, Sabin; Geffers, Robert; Baumert, Thomas F.; Steinmann, Eike; Meuleman, Philip; Pietschmann, Thomas; Brown, Richard J.P.

    2017-01-01

    Due to the highly restricted species-tropism of Hepatitis C virus (HCV) a limited number of animal models exist for pre-clinical evaluation of vaccines and antiviral compounds. The human-liver chimeric mouse model allows heterologous challenge with clinically relevant strains derived from patients. However, to date, the transmission and longitudinal evolution of founder viral populations in this model have not been characterized in-depth using state-of-the-art sequencing technologies. Focusing on NS3 protease encoding region of the viral genome, mutant spectra in a donor inoculum and individual recipient mice were determined via Illumina sequencing and compared, to determine the effects of transmission on founder viral population complexity. In all transmissions, a genetic bottleneck was observed, although diverse viral populations were transmitted in each case. A low frequency cloud of mutations (<1%) was detectable in the donor inoculum and recipient mice, with single nucleotide variants (SNVs) > 1% restricted to a subset of nucleotides. The population of SNVs >1% was reduced upon transmission while the low frequency SNV cloud remained stable. Fixation of multiple identical synonymous substitutions was apparent in independent transmissions, and no evidence for reversion of T-cell epitopes was observed. In addition, susceptibility of founder populations to antiviral therapy was assessed. Animals were treated with protease inhibitor (PI) monotherapy to track resistance associated substitution (RAS) emergence. Longitudinal analyses revealed a decline in population diversity under therapy, with no detectable RAS >1% prior to therapy commencement. Despite inoculation from a common source and identical therapeutic regimens, unique RAS emergence profiles were identified in different hosts prior to and during therapeutic failure, with complex mutational signatures at protease residues 155, 156 and 168 detected. Together these analyses track viral population complexity at

  10. Encephalomyocarditis virus disrupts stress granules, the critical platform for triggering antiviral innate immune responses.

    PubMed

    Ng, Chen Seng; Jogi, Michihiko; Yoo, Ji-Seung; Onomoto, Koji; Koike, Satoshi; Iwasaki, Takuya; Yoneyama, Mitsutoshi; Kato, Hiroki; Fujita, Takashi

    2013-09-01

    In response to stress, cells induce ribonucleoprotein aggregates, termed stress granules (SGs). SGs are transient loci containing translation-stalled mRNA, which is eventually degraded or recycled for translation. Infection of some viruses, including influenza A virus with a deletion of nonstructural protein 1 (IAVΔNS1), induces SG-like protein aggregates. Previously, we showed that IAVΔNS1-induced SGs are required for efficient induction of type I interferon (IFN). Here, we investigated SG formation by different viruses using green fluorescent protein (GFP)-tagged Ras-Gap SH3 domain binding protein 1 (GFP-G3BP1) as an SG probe. HeLa cells stably expressing GFP-G3BP1 were infected with different viruses, and GFP fluorescence was monitored live with time-lapse microscopy. SG formations by different viruses was classified into 4 different patterns: no SG formation, stable SG formation, transient SG formation, and alternate SG formation. We focused on encephalomyocarditis virus (EMCV) infection, which exhibited transient SG formation. We found that EMCV disrupts SGs by cleavage of G3BP1 at late stages of infection (>8 h) through a mechanism similar to that used by poliovirus. Expression of a G3BP1 mutant that is resistant to the cleavage conferred persistent formation of SGs as well as an enhanced induction of IFN and other cytokines at late stages of infection. Additionally, knockdown of endogenous G3BP1 blocked SG formation with an attenuated induction of IFN and potentiated viral replication. Taken together, our findings suggest a critical role of SGs as an antiviral platform and shed light on one of the mechanisms by which a virus interferes with host stress and subsequent antiviral responses.

  11. A stable argon compound

    PubMed

    Khriachtchev; Pettersson; Runeberg; Lundell; Rasanen

    2000-08-24

    The noble gases have a particularly stable electronic configuration, comprising fully filled s and p valence orbitals. This makes these elements relatively non-reactive, and they exist at room temperature as monatomic gases. Pauling predicted in 1933 that the heavier noble gases, whose valence electrons are screened by core electrons and thus less strongly bound, could form stable molecules. This prediction was verified in 1962 by the preparation of xenon hexafluoroplatinate, XePtF6, the first compound to contain a noble-gas atom. Since then, a range of different compounds containing radon, xenon and krypton have been theoretically anticipated and prepared. Although the lighter noble gases neon, helium and argon are also expected to be reactive under suitable conditions, they remain the last three long-lived elements of the periodic table for which no stable compound is known. Here we report that the photolysis of hydrogen fluoride in a solid argon matrix leads to the formation of argon fluorohydride (HArF), which we have identified by probing the shift in the position of vibrational bands on isotopic substitution using infrared spectroscopy. Extensive ab initio calculations indicate that HArF is intrinsically stable, owing to significant ionic and covalent contributions to its bonding, thus confirming computational predictions that argon should form a stable hydride species with properties similar to those of the analogous xenon and krypton compounds reported before.

  12. Thermally Stable, Piezoelectric and Pyroelectric Polymeric Substrates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simpson, Joycely O. (Inventor); St.Clair, Terry L. (Inventor)

    1999-01-01

    A thermally stable, piezoelectric and pyroelectric polymeric substrate was prepared. This thermally stable, piezoelectric and pyroelectric polymeric substrate may be used to prepare electromechanical transducers, thermomechanical transducers, accelerometers. acoustic sensors, infrared sensors, pressure sensors, vibration sensors, impact sensors, in-situ temperature sensors, in-situ stress/strain sensors, micro actuators, switches, adjustable fresnel lenses, speakers, tactile sensors. weather sensors, micro positioners, ultrasonic devices, power generators, tunable reflectors, microphones, and hydrophones. The process for preparing these polymeric substrates includes: providing a polymeric substrate having a softening temperature greater than 1000 C; depositing a metal electrode material onto the polymer film; attaching a plurality of electrical leads to the metal electrode coated polymeric substrate; heating the metal electrode coated polymeric substrate in a low dielectric medium; applying a voltage to the heated metal electrode coated polymeric substrate to induce polarization; and cooling the polarized metal electrode coated polymeric electrode while maintaining a constant voltage.

  13. Efficient Methods for Stable Distributions

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    are used, corresponding to the common values used in digital signal processing. Five new functions for discrete/quantized stable distributions were...written. • sgendiscrete generates discrete stable random variates. It works by generating continuous stable random variables using the Chambers- Mallows ...with stable distributions. It allows engineers and scientists to analyze data and work with stable distributions within the common matlab environment

  14. Antiviral drug discovery and development: where chemistry meets with biomedicine.

    PubMed

    De Clercq, Erik

    2005-08-01

    The successful development of antiviral drugs is highly dependent on a close interaction and collaboration between the chemist and the biologist (biomedic). This is illustrated by a number of representative examples: S-adenosylhomocysteine (SAH) hydrolase inhibitors which display broad-spectrum antiviral activity, bromovinyldeoxyuridine (BVDU) and derivatives thereof, that are highly selective inhibitors of varicella-zoster virus (VZV), (dideoxy)nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTIs) and non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NNRTIs) which are now widely used in the treatment of HIV infections (AIDS), the bicyclams (i.e. AMD3100) which were originally discovered as anti-HIV agents, then found to be potent CXCR4 antagonists and now being pursued for a number of indications such as stem cell mobilization, and the acyclic nucleoside phosphonates which have heralded a new strategy for the treatment of various DNA virus (herpes-, adeno-, pox-, papillomavirus) infections (cidofovir), hepatitis B (adefovir) and AIDS (tenofovir).

  15. Senataxin suppresses the antiviral transcriptional response and controls viral biogenesis.

    PubMed

    Miller, Matthew S; Rialdi, Alexander; Ho, Jessica Sook Yuin; Tilove, Micah; Martinez-Gil, Luis; Moshkina, Natasha P; Peralta, Zuleyma; Noel, Justine; Melegari, Camilla; Maestre, Ana M; Mitsopoulos, Panagiotis; Madrenas, Joaquín; Heinz, Sven; Benner, Chris; Young, John A T; Feagins, Alicia R; Basler, Christopher F; Fernandez-Sesma, Ana; Becherel, Olivier J; Lavin, Martin F; van Bakel, Harm; Marazzi, Ivan

    2015-05-01

    The human helicase senataxin (SETX) has been linked to the neurodegenerative diseases amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS4) and ataxia with oculomotor apraxia (AOA2). Here we identified a role for SETX in controlling the antiviral response. Cells that had undergone depletion of SETX and SETX-deficient cells derived from patients with AOA2 had higher expression of antiviral mediators in response to infection than did wild-type cells. Mechanistically, we propose a model whereby SETX attenuates the activity of RNA polymerase II (RNAPII) at genes stimulated after a virus is sensed and thus controls the magnitude of the host response to pathogens and the biogenesis of various RNA viruses (e.g., influenza A virus and West Nile virus). Our data indicate a potentially causal link among inborn errors in SETX, susceptibility to infection and the development of neurologic disorders.

  16. Toll-like receptors in antiviral innate immunity

    PubMed Central

    Lester, Sandra N.; Li, Kui

    2014-01-01

    Toll-like receptors (TLRs) are fundamental sensor molecules of the host innate immune system, which detect conserved molecular signatures of a wide range of microbial pathogens and initiate innate immune responses via distinct signaling pathways. Various TLRs are implicated in the early interplay of host cells with invading viruses, which regulates viral replication and/or host responses, ultimately impacting on viral pathogenesis. To survive the host innate defense mechanisms, many viruses have developed strategies to evade or counteract signaling through the TLR pathways, creating an advantageous environment for their propagation. Here we review the current knowledge of the roles TLRs play in antiviral innate immune responses, discuss examples of TLR-mediated viral recognition, and describe strategies used by viruses to antagonize the host antiviral innate immune responses. PMID:24316048

  17. 5th Antiviral Drug Discovery and Development Summit.

    PubMed

    Blair, Wade; Perros, Manos

    2004-08-01

    The 5th Antiviral Drug Discovery and Development Summit provided an up-to-date snapshot of the ongoing developments in the area. The topics covered ranged from updates on recently launched drugs (Kaletra), Fuzeon) and new investigational inhibitors (T-1249, Reverset, UK-427857, L-870810, PA-457, remofovir, VX-950), to the discovery of new antiviral targets and advances in technologies that may provide the substrate for the next generation of therapeutics. It is apparent from the range of presentations that much of today's efforts are focused on developing new classes of HIV inhibitors (gp41, integrase), while there is also considerable progress in hepatitis C, where a number of inhibitors have or should reach proof-of-concept studies in the coming months. Here we provide the highlights of this meeting, with particular emphasis on the new developments in HIV and hepatitis C virus.

  18. Historical Perspectives in the Development of Antiviral Agents Against Poxviruses

    PubMed Central

    De Clercq, Erik

    2010-01-01

    The poxvirus vaccinia virus (VV) served as the model virus for which the first antivirals, the thiosemicarbazones, were identified. This dates back to 1950; and, although there is at present no single antiviral drug specifically licensed for the chemotherapy or -prophylaxis of poxvirus infections, numerous candidate compounds have been described over the past 50 years. These compounds include interferon and inducers thereof (i.e., polyacrylic acid), 5-substituted 2’-deoxyuridines (i.e., idoxuridine), IMP dehydrogenase inhibitors, S-adenosylhomocysteine hydrolase inhibitors, acyclic nucleoside phosphonates (such as cidofovir) and alkoxyalkyl prodrugs thereof (such as CMX001), viral egress inhibitors (such as tecovirimat), and cellular kinase inhibitors (such as imatinib). PMID:21994682

  19. Emerging Role of Ubiquitination in Antiviral RIG-I Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Maelfait, Jonathan

    2012-01-01

    Summary: Detection of viruses by the innate immune system involves the action of specialized pattern recognition receptors. Intracellular RIG-I receptors sense the presence of viral nucleic acids in infected cells and trigger signaling pathways that lead to the production of proinflammatory and antiviral proteins. Over the past few years, posttranslational modification of RIG-I and downstream signaling proteins by different types of ubiquitination has been found to be a key event in the regulation of RIG-I-induced NF-κB and interferon regulatory factor 3 (IRF3) activation. Multiple ubiquitin ligases, deubiquitinases, and ubiquitin binding scaffold proteins contribute to both positive and negative regulation of the RIG-I-induced antiviral immune response. A better understanding of the function and activity of these proteins might eventually lead to the development of novel therapeutic approaches for management of viral diseases. PMID:22390971

  20. Genetic Consequences of Antiviral Therapy on HIV-1.

    PubMed

    Arenas, Miguel

    2015-01-01

    A variety of enzyme inhibitors have been developed in combating HIV-1, however the fast evolutionary rate of this virus commonly leads to the emergence of resistance mutations that finally allows the mutant virus to survive. This review explores the main genetic consequences of HIV-1 molecular evolution during antiviral therapies, including the viral genetic diversity and molecular adaptation. The role of recombination in the generation of drug resistance is also analyzed. Besides the investigation and discussion of published works, an evolutionary analysis of protease-coding genes collected from patients before and after treatment with different protease inhibitors was included to validate previous studies. Finally, the review discusses the importance of considering genetic consequences of antiviral therapies in models of HIV-1 evolution that could improve current genotypic resistance testing and treatments design.

  1. Microbiota-Dependent Priming of Antiviral Intestinal Immunity in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Sansone, Christine L; Cohen, Jonathan; Yasunaga, Ari; Xu, Jie; Osborn, Greg; Subramanian, Harry; Gold, Beth; Buchon, Nicolas; Cherry, Sara

    2015-11-11

    Enteric pathogens must overcome intestinal defenses to establish infection. In Drosophila, the ERK signaling pathway inhibits enteric virus infection. The intestinal microflora also impacts immunity but its role in enteric viral infection is unknown. Here we show that two signals are required to activate antiviral ERK signaling in the intestinal epithelium. One signal depends on recognition of peptidoglycan from the microbiota, particularly from the commensal Acetobacter pomorum, which primes the NF-kB-dependent induction of a secreted factor, Pvf2. However, the microbiota is not sufficient to induce this pathway; a second virus-initiated signaling event involving release of transcriptional paused genes mediated by the kinase Cdk9 is also required for Pvf2 production. Pvf2 stimulates antiviral immunity by binding to the receptor tyrosine kinase PVR, which is necessary and sufficient for intestinal ERK responses. These findings demonstrate that sensing of specific commensals primes inflammatory signaling required for epithelial responses that restrict enteric viral infections.

  2. Preventing and treating secondary bacterial infections with antiviral agents

    PubMed Central

    McCullers, Jonathan A.

    2016-01-01

    Summary Bacterial super-infections contribute to the significant morbidity and mortality associated with influenza and other respiratory virus infections. There are robust animal model data but only limited clinical information on the effectiveness of licensed antiviral agents for the treatment of bacterial complications of influenza. The association of secondary bacterial pathogens with fatal pneumonia during the recent H1N1 influenza pandemic highlights the need for new development in this area. Basic and clinical research into viral-bacterial interactions over the last decade has revealed several mechanisms that underlie this synergism. By applying these insights to antiviral drug development, the potential exists to improve outcomes by means other than direct inhibition of the virus. PMID:21447860

  3. USP13 negatively regulates antiviral responses by deubiquitinating STING

    PubMed Central

    Sun, He; Zhang, Qiang; Jing, Ying-Ying; Zhang, Man; Wang, Hai-Ying; Cai, Zeng; Liuyu, Tianzi; Zhang, Zhi-Dong; Xiong, Tian-Chen; Wu, Yan; Zhu, Qi-Yun; Yao, Jing; Shu, Hong-Bing; Lin, Dandan; Zhong, Bo

    2017-01-01

    STING (also known as MITA) is critical for host defence against viruses and the activity of STING is regulated by ubiquitination. However, the deubiquitination of STING is not fully understood. Here, we show that ubiquitin-specific protease 13 (USP13) is a STING-interacting protein that catalyses deubiquitination of STING. Knockdown or knockout of USP13 potentiates activation of IRF3 and NF-κB and expression of downstream genes after HSV-1 infection or transfection of DNA ligands. USP13 deficiency results in impaired replication of HSV-1. Consistently, USP13 deficient mice are more resistant than wild-type littermates to lethal HSV-1 infection. Mechanistically, USP13 deconjugates polyubiquitin chains from STING and prevents the recruitment of TBK1 to the signalling complex, thereby negatively regulating cellular antiviral responses. Our study thus uncovers a function of USP13 in innate antiviral immunity and provides insight into the regulation of innate immunity. PMID:28534493

  4. Novel drugs targeting Toll-like receptors for antiviral therapy

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Mira C; Shirey, Kari Ann; Pletneva, Lioubov M; Boukhvalova, Marina S; Garzino-Demo, Alfredo; Vogel, Stefanie N; Blanco, Jorge CG

    2014-01-01

    Toll-like receptors (TLRs) are sentinel receptors of the host innate immune system that recognize conserved ‘pathogen-associated molecular patterns’ of invading microbes, including viruses. The activation of TLRs establishes antiviral innate immune responses and coordinates the development of long-lasting adaptive immunity in order to control viral pathogenesis. However, microbe-induced damage to host tissues may release ‘danger-associated molecular patterns’ that also activate TLRs, leading to an overexuberant inflammatory response and, ultimately, to tissue damage. Thus, TLRs have proven to be promising targets as therapeutics for the treatment of viral infections that result in inflammatory damage or as adjuvants in order to enhance the efficacy of vaccines. Here, we explore recent advances in TLR biology with a focus on novel drugs that target TLRs (agonists and antagonists) for antiviral therapy. PMID:25620999

  5. Insects antiviral and anticancer peptides: new leads for the future?

    PubMed

    Slocinska, Malgorzata; Marciniak, Pawel; Rosinski, Grzegorz

    2008-01-01

    Insect produce wide range of protein and peptides as a first fast defense line against pathogen infection. These agents act in different ways including insect immune system activation or by direct impact on the target tumor cells or viruses. It has been shown that some of the insect peptides suppress viral gene and protein expression, rybosilate DNA, whereas others cause membrane lysis, induce apoptosis or arrest cell cycle. Several of the purified and characterized peptides of insect origin are very promising in treating of serious human diseases like human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), herpex simplex virus (HSV) or leukaemia. However, some obstacles need to be overcome. Cytotoxic activity of peptides, susceptibility to proteases or high cost of production remain still unsolved problems. Reports on the peptides antiviral and antitumour mechanisms are scanty. Thus, in this review we present characteristic, mode of action and potential medical applications of insects origin peptides with the antiviral and antitumour activity.

  6. Comparative antiviral (HIV) photoactivity of metalized meso- tetraphenylsulfonated porphyrins.

    PubMed

    Vargas, Franklin; Rivas, Carlos; Zoltan, Tamara; Padrón, Liliana; Izzo, Carla; López, Verónica; Gómez, Lubimar; Pujol, Flor; Rangel, Hector; Garzaro, Domingo; Fabbro, Rona

    2008-03-01

    We have carried out the study of the photochemical properties of a series of synthetic meso-tetraphenylsulfonated porphyrins (TPPMS4) bonded to several metal ions such as: Cu(II), Zn(II), Pd(II), Mn(II), Fe(III), Ni(II) and Co(II) for the optimization of their clinical applications as antiviral agents against the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-1) as well as the study of the in vitro antiviral photoinactivation mechanisms with future application in blood sterilization. A selective inhibition has been determined in the viral growth (HIV-1) when this is irradiated in the presence of the complex TPPFeS4 and TPPMnS4 (photosensitizer-mediated Type I reaction) as well as in the 1O2-mediated (Type II reaction) in the presence of TPPPdS4 and TPPZnS4, remaining cellular viability unaltered in each case.

  7. Unveiling the roles of HBV polymerase for new antiviral strategies

    PubMed Central

    Clark, Daniel N; Hu, Jianming

    2015-01-01

    Infection with HBV is common worldwide, with over 350 million chronic carriers. Chronic HBV infection is associated with cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma. All currently available oral antivirals are directed against the HBV polymerase enzyme, a reverse transcriptase. HBV polymerase contains several important domains and motifs which define its functions and reveal ways to further target it. This enzyme executes many functions required for the HBV replication cycle, including viral RNA binding, RNA packaging, protein priming, template switching, DNA synthesis and RNA degradation. In addition, HBV polymerase must interact with host proteins for its functions. Future therapeutics may inhibit not only the DNA synthesis steps which are carried out by the reverse transcriptase domain (as all current antivirals do) but other domains, functions and interactions which are essential to the HBV replication cycle. PMID:25893003

  8. Direct versus sequential immunoglobulin switch in allergy and antiviral responses.

    PubMed

    Svirshchevskaya, E; Fattakhova, G; Khlgatian, S; Chudakov, D; Kashirina, E; Ryazantsev, D; Kotsareva, O; Zavriev, S

    2016-09-01

    Allergy is characterized by IgE production to innocuous antigens. The question whether the switch to IgE synthesis occurs via direct or sequential pathways is still unresolved. The aim of this work was to analyze the distribution of immunoglobulins (Ig) to house dust mite D. farinae and A. alternata fungus in allergic children with primarily established diagnosis and compare it to Epstein-Barr antiviral (EBV) response in the same patients. In allergy patients the only significant difference was found in allergen specific IgE, likely mediated by a direct isotype switch, while antiviral response was dominated by EBV specific IgG and low level of concordant IgA and IgG4 production consistent with a minor sequential Ig switches. Taken collectively, we concluded that sequential isotype switch is likely to be a much rarer event than a direct one.

  9. Screening of Australian medicinal plants for antiviral activity.

    PubMed

    Semple, S J; Reynolds, G D; O'Leary, M C; Flower, R L

    1998-03-01

    Extracts of 40 different plant species used in the traditional medicine of the Australian Aboriginal people have been investigated for antiviral activity. The extracts have been tested for activity against one DNA virus, human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) and two RNA viruses, Ross River virus (RRV) and poliovirus type 1, at non-cytotoxic concentrations. The most active extracts were the aerial parts of Pterocaulon sphacelatum (Asteraceae) and roots of Dianella longifolia var. grandis (Liliaceae), which inhibited poliovirus at concentrations of 52 and 250 microg/ml, respectively. The extracts of Euphorbia australis (Euphorbiaceae) and Scaevola spinescens (Goodeniaceae) were the most active against HCMV. Extracts of Eremophila latrobei subsp. glabra (Myoporaceae) and Pittosporum phylliraeoides var. microcarpa (Pittosporaceae) exhibited antiviral activity against RRV.

  10. Antiviral Activity of Resveratrol against Human and Animal Viruses

    PubMed Central

    Abba, Yusuf; Hassim, Hasliza; Hamzah, Hazilawati; Noordin, Mohamed Mustapha

    2015-01-01

    Resveratrol is a potent polyphenolic compound that is being extensively studied in the amelioration of viral infections both in vitro and in vivo. Its antioxidant effect is mainly elicited through inhibition of important gene pathways like the NF-κβ pathway, while its antiviral effects are associated with inhibitions of viral replication, protein synthesis, gene expression, and nucleic acid synthesis. Although the beneficial roles of resveratrol in several viral diseases have been well documented, a few adverse effects have been reported as well. This review highlights the antiviral mechanisms of resveratrol in human and animal viral infections and how some of these effects are associated with the antioxidant properties of the compound. PMID:26693226

  11. Mx proteins: antiviral proteins by chance or by necessity?

    PubMed

    Arnheiter, H; Meier, E

    1990-10-01

    The interferon-inducible Mx1 protein is responsible for inborn resistance of mice to influenza. It is now recognized that this protein is a member of a family of interferon-inducible, putative GTP-binding proteins found in many organisms. Thus, these proteins, called the Mx proteins, are found in species that are naturally infected with influenza virus, and also in species that are not. Some Mx proteins display a broader antiviral profile than the one observed for Mx1 in mice. Others, however, may not be antiviral. Two recently discovered GTP-binding proteins, Vps1p in yeast and dynamin in rat, are also related to Mx1. These proteins are synthesized constitutively and serve basic cellular functions.

  12. Antiviral activity of some Nigerian medicinal plant extracts.

    PubMed

    Kudi, A C; Myint, S H

    1999-12-15

    Plants from Northern Nigeria with a history of use in both human and veterinary traditional medicine have been investigated for their antiviral activity and their cytotoxicity determined. Extracts were tested against poliovirus, astrovirus, herpes simplex viruses and parvovirus, using the microtitre plate inhibition tests. Most of the extracts have activity against more than one virus at a dose rate of between 100 and 400 microg/100 microl.

  13. Phospholipid scramblase 1 potentiates the antiviral activity of interferon.

    PubMed

    Dong, Beihua; Zhou, Quansheng; Zhao, Ji; Zhou, Aimin; Harty, Ronald N; Bose, Santanu; Banerjee, Amiya; Slee, Roger; Guenther, Jeanna; Williams, Bryan R G; Wiedmer, Therese; Sims, Peter J; Silverman, Robert H

    2004-09-01

    Phospholipid scramblase 1 (PLSCR1) is an interferon (IFN)- and growth factor-inducible, calcium-binding protein that either inserts into the plasma membrane or binds DNA in the nucleus depending on its state of palmyitoylation. In certain hematopoietic cells, PLSCR1 is required for normal maturation and terminal differentiation from progenitor cells as regulated by select growth factors, where it promotes recruitment and activation of Src kinases. PLSCR1 is a substrate of Src (and Abl) kinases, and transcription of the PLSCR1 gene is regulated by the same growth factor receptor pathways in which PLSCR1 potentiates afferent signaling. The marked transcriptional upregulation of PLSCR1 by IFNs led us to explore whether PLSCR1 plays an analogous role in cellular responses to IFN, with specific focus on antiviral activities. Accordingly, human cells in which PLSCR1 expression was decreased with short interfering RNA were rendered relatively insensitive to the antiviral activity of IFNs, resulting in higher titers of vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) and encephalomyocarditis virus. Similarly, VSV replicated to higher titers in mouse PLSCR1(-/-) embryonic fibroblasts than in identical cells transduced to express PLSCR1. PLSCR1 inhibited accumulation of primary VSV transcripts, similar to the effects of IFN against VSV. The antiviral effect of PLSCR1 correlated with increased expression of a subset of IFN-stimulated genes (ISGs), including ISG15, ISG54, p56, and guanylate binding proteins. Our results suggest that PLSCR1, which is itself an ISG-encoded protein, provides a mechanism for amplifying and enhancing the IFN response through increased expression of a select subset of potent antiviral genes.

  14. Polyphylla saponin I has antiviral activity against influenza A virus

    PubMed Central

    Pu, Xiuying; Ren, Jing; Ma, Xiaolong; Liu, Lu; Yu, Shuang; Li, Xiaoyue; Li, Haibing

    2015-01-01

    Objective: In the present study, the antiviral effects of polyphylla saponin I isolated from Parispolyphylla on influenza A virus are investigated both in vitro and in vivo. Methods: Column chromatography and reversed phase liquid chromatography separation technology were used to extract and purify polyphylla saponin I. The purity of polyphylla saponin I was assayed by high performance liquid chromatography. Methyl thiazolyl tetrazolium assay and analyses of cytopathic effects were performed to examine the antiviral activity of polyphylla saponin I upon MDCK cells infected with influenza A virus. Model mice were made by intranasal inoculation of influenza a virus. Mice infected with influenza A virus were orally administered polyphylla saponin I and oseltamivir twice a day for 5 days to study their antiviral efficacy in vivo. Results: Polyphylla saponin I had no cytotoxicity on MDCK cells at the concentration of 50 μg/mL. Polyphylla saponin I (6.25, 12.5, 25 and 50 μg/mL) and oseltamivir (40 μg/mL) had remarkable inactivation effects on influenza A virus, prevention effects on influenza A virus adsorption on MDCK cells, and inhibitory effects on the reproduction of influenza A virus in MDCK cells. In addition, polyphylla saponin I (5 and 10 mg/kg), and oseltamivir (3 mg/kg) significantly reduced viral hemagglutination titer, improved the pathologic histology of lung tissues, and decreased the mortality of mice infected with influenza A virus. Polyphylla saponin I (5 and 10 mg/kg) prolonged the survival time of mice from 8.5±0.3 days to 13.2±0.5 days, with the prolonged life rates being 49.4% and 55.3%, respectively. Conclusion: Polyphylla saponin I has antiviral activity on influenza A virus both in vitro and in vivo. PMID:26770521

  15. Phosprenyl: a novel drug with antiviral and immunomodulatory activity.

    PubMed

    Danilov, L L; Maltsev, S D; Deyeva, A V; Narovlyansky, A N; Sanin, A V; Ozherelkov, S V; Pronin, A V

    1996-01-01

    A novel antiviral drug with immunomodulatory activity (Phosprenyl) is presented. The main active ingredient of the preparation is polyprenyl phosphates. This medicine is highly efficient against a number of viruses, including HIV in vitro, and tick-borne encephalitis and rabies viruses in the experimental models in vivo. In veterinary practice Phosprenyl is now regarded as an effective therapeutic means for treatment of canine distemper, hepatitis, enteritis, etc.

  16. Mechanisms of antiviral action of plant antimicrobials against murine norovirus.

    PubMed

    Gilling, Damian H; Kitajima, Masaaki; Torrey, Jason R; Bright, Kelly R

    2014-08-01

    Numerous plant compounds have antibacterial or antiviral properties; however, limited research has been conducted with nonenveloped viruses. The efficacies of allspice oil, lemongrass oil, and citral were evaluated against the nonenveloped murine norovirus (MNV), a human norovirus surrogate. The antiviral mechanisms of action were also examined using an RNase I protection assay, a host cell binding assay, and transmission electron microscopy. All three antimicrobials produced significant reductions (P ≤ 0.05) in viral infectivity within 6 h of exposure (0.90 log10 to 1.88 log10). After 24 h, the reductions were 2.74, 3.00, and 3.41 log10 for lemongrass oil, citral, and allspice oil, respectively. The antiviral effect of allspice oil was both time and concentration dependent; the effects of lemongrass oil and citral were time dependent. Based on the RNase I assay, allspice oil appeared to act directly upon the viral capsid and RNA. The capsids enlarged from ≤ 35 nm to up to 75 nm following treatment. MNV adsorption to host cells was not significantly affected. Alternatively, the capsid remained intact following exposure to lemongrass oil and citral, which appeared to coat the capsid, causing nonspecific and nonproductive binding to host cells that did not lead to successful infection. Such contrasting effects between allspice oil and both lemongrass oil and citral suggest that though different plant compounds may yield similar reductions in virus infectivity, the mechanisms of inactivation may be highly varied and specific to the antimicrobial. This study demonstrates the antiviral properties of allspice oil, lemongrass oil, and citral against MNV and thus indicates their potential as natural food and surface sanitizers to control noroviruses. Copyright © 2014, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  17. Mechanisms of Antiviral Action of Plant Antimicrobials against Murine Norovirus

    PubMed Central

    Gilling, Damian H.; Kitajima, Masaaki; Torrey, Jason R.

    2014-01-01

    Numerous plant compounds have antibacterial or antiviral properties; however, limited research has been conducted with nonenveloped viruses. The efficacies of allspice oil, lemongrass oil, and citral were evaluated against the nonenveloped murine norovirus (MNV), a human norovirus surrogate. The antiviral mechanisms of action were also examined using an RNase I protection assay, a host cell binding assay, and transmission electron microscopy. All three antimicrobials produced significant reductions (P ≤ 0.05) in viral infectivity within 6 h of exposure (0.90 log10 to 1.88 log10). After 24 h, the reductions were 2.74, 3.00, and 3.41 log10 for lemongrass oil, citral, and allspice oil, respectively. The antiviral effect of allspice oil was both time and concentration dependent; the effects of lemongrass oil and citral were time dependent. Based on the RNase I assay, allspice oil appeared to act directly upon the viral capsid and RNA. The capsids enlarged from ≤35 nm to up to 75 nm following treatment. MNV adsorption to host cells was not significantly affected. Alternatively, the capsid remained intact following exposure to lemongrass oil and citral, which appeared to coat the capsid, causing nonspecific and nonproductive binding to host cells that did not lead to successful infection. Such contrasting effects between allspice oil and both lemongrass oil and citral suggest that though different plant compounds may yield similar reductions in virus infectivity, the mechanisms of inactivation may be highly varied and specific to the antimicrobial. This study demonstrates the antiviral properties of allspice oil, lemongrass oil, and citral against MNV and thus indicates their potential as natural food and surface sanitizers to control noroviruses. PMID:24907316

  18. Antiviral Strategies for Emerging Influenza Viruses in Remote Communities

    PubMed Central

    Laskowski, Marek; Greer, Amy L.; Moghadas, Seyed M.

    2014-01-01

    Background Due to the lack of timely access to resources for critical care, strategic use of antiviral drugs is crucial for mitigating the impact of novel influenza viruses with pandemic potential in remote and isolated communities. We sought to evaluate the effect of antiviral treatment and prophylaxis of close contacts in a Canadian remote northern community. Methods We used an agent-based, discrete-time simulation model for disease spread in a remote community, which was developed as an in-silico population using population census data. Relative and cumulative age-specific attack rates, and the total number of infections in simulated model scenarios were obtained. Results We found that early initiation of antiviral treatment is more critical for lowering attack rates in a remote setting with a low population-average age compared to an urban population. Our results show that a significant reduction in the relative, age-specific attack rates due to increasing treatment coverage does not necessarily translate to a significant reduction in the overall arrack rate. When treatment coverage varies from low to moderate, targeted prophylaxis has a very limited impact in reducing attack rates and should be offered at a low level (below 10%) to avoid excessive waste of drugs. Conclusions In contrast to previous work, for conservative treatment coverages, our results do not provide any convincing evidence for the implementation of targeted prophylaxis. The findings suggest that public health strategies in remote communities should focus on the wider availability (higher coverage) and timely distribution of antiviral drugs for treatment of clinically ill individuals. PMID:24586937

  19. Norovirus: targets and tools in antiviral drug discovery.

    PubMed

    Rocha-Pereira, Joana; Neyts, Johan; Jochmans, Dirk

    2014-09-01

    The development of antiviral strategies to treat or prevent norovirus infections is a pressing matter. Noroviruses are the number 1 cause of acute gastroenteritis, of foodborne illness, of sporadic gastroenteritis in all age groups and of severe acute gastroenteritis in children less than 5 years old seeking medical assistance [USA/CDC]. In developing countries, noroviruses are linked to significant mortality (~200,000 children <5 years old). Noroviruses are a major culprit for the closure of hospital wards, and associated with increased hospitalization and mortality among the elderly. Transplant patients have significant risk of acquiring persistent norovirus gastroenteritis. Control and prevention strategies are limited to the use of disinfectants and hand sanitizers, whose efficacy is frequently insufficient. Hence, there is an ample need for antiviral treatment and prophylaxis of norovirus infections. The fact that only a handful of inhibitors of norovirus replication have been reported can largely be attributable to the hampering inability to cultivate human noroviruses in cell culture. The Norwalk replicon-bearing cells and the murine norovirus-infected cell lines are the available models to assess in vitro antiviral activity of compounds. Human noroviruses have been shown to replicate (to some extent) in mice, calves, gnotobiotic pigs, and chimpanzees. Infection of interferon-deficient mice with the murine norovirus results in virus-induced diarrhea. Here we review recent developments in understanding which norovirus proteins or host cell factors may serve as targets for inhibition of viral replication. Given the recent advances, significant progress in the search for antiviral strategies against norovirus infections is expected in the upcoming years. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Heat accumulator

    SciTech Connect

    Bracht, A.

    1981-09-29

    A heat accumulator comprises a thermally-insulated reservoir full of paraffin wax mixture or other flowable or meltable heat storage mass, heat-exchangers immersed in the mass, a heat-trap connected to one of the heat-exchangers, and a heat user connected to the other heat-exchanger. Pumps circulate fluids through the heat-trap and the heat-using means and the respective heat-exchangers, and a stirrer agitates and circulates the mass, and the pumps and the stirrer and electric motors driving these devices are all immersed in the mass.

  1. Antiviral and antimicrobial assessment of some selected flavonoids.

    PubMed

    Ozçelik, Berrin; Orhan, Ilkay; Toker, Gülnur

    2006-01-01

    In the current study, the results of antibacterial, antifungal, and antiviral activity tests of four flavonoid derivatives, scandenone (1), tiliroside (2), quercetin-3,7-O-alpha-L-dirhamnoside (3), and kaempferol-3,7-O-alpha-L-dirhamnoside (4), are presented. Antibacterial and antifungal activities of these compounds were tested against Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Proteus mirabilis, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Acinetobacter baumannii, Staphylococcus aureus, Bacillus subtilis, and Enterococcus faecalis, as well as the fungus Candida albicans by a micro-dilution method. On the other hand, both DNA virus Herpes simplex (HSV) and RNA virus Parainfluenza-3 (PI-3) were employed for antiviral assessment of the compounds using Madin-Darby bovine kidney and Vero cell lines. According to our data, all of the compounds tested were found to be quite active against S. aureus and E. faecalis with MIC values of 0.5 microg/ml, followed by E. coli (2 microg/ml), K. pneumoniae (4 microg/ml), A. baumannii (8 micro/g/ml), and B. subtilis (8 microg/ml), while they inhibited C. albicans at 1 microg/ml as potent as ketoconazole. However, only compound 3 displayed an antiviral effect towards PI-3 in the range of 8-32 microg/ml of inhibitory concentration for cytopathogenic effect (CPE).

  2. Antiviral activity of some South American medicinal plants.

    PubMed

    Abad, M J; Bermejo, P; Sanchez Palomino, S; Chiriboga, X; Carrasco, L

    1999-03-01

    Folk medicinal plants are potential sources of useful therapeutic compounds including some with antiviral activities. Extracts prepared from 10 South American medicinal plants (Baccharis trinervis, Baccharis teindalensis, Eupatorium articulatum, Eupatorium glutinosum, Tagetes pusilla, Neurolaena lobata, Conyza floribunda, Phytolacca bogotensis, Phytolacca rivinoides and Heisteria acuminata) were screened for in vitro antiviral activity against herpes simplex type I (HSV-1), vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) and poliovirus type 1. The most potent inhibition was observed with an aqueous extract of B. trinervis, which inhibited HSV-1 replication by 100% at 50-200 micrograms/mL, without showing cytotoxic effects. Good activities were also found with the ethanol extract of H. acuminata and the aqueous extract of E. articulatum, which exhibited antiviral effects against both DNA and RNA viruses (HSV-1 and VSV, respectively) at 125-250 micrograms/mL. The aqueous extracts of T. pusilla (100-250 micrograms/mL), B. teindalensis (50-125 micrograms/mL) and E. glutinosum (50-125 micrograms/mL) also inhibited the replication of VSV, but none of the extracts tested had any effect on poliovirus replication.

  3. Viral infectious disease and natural products with antiviral activity.

    PubMed

    Kitazato, K; Wang, Y; Kobayashi, N

    2007-08-01

    Viral diseases, such as acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS), respiratory diseases, and hepatitis, are the leading causes of death in humans worldwide, despite the tremendous progress in human medicine. The lack of effective therapies and/or vaccines for several viral infections, and the rapid emergence of new drug-resistant viruses have urged a growing need for developing new and effective chemotherapeutic agents to treat viral diseases. Recent advances in the understanding of both the cellular and molecular mechanisms of virus replication have provided the basis for novel therapeutic strategies. Several hundred natural products have been isolated for screening and identifying antiviral activity, and some have been shown to have great medicinal value in preventing and/or ameliorating viral diseases in preclinical and clinical trials. There are innumerable potentially useful medicinal plants and herbs waiting to be evaluated and exploited for therapeutic applications against genetically and functionally diverse virus families. This review focuses on several selected pathogenic viruses, including the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), influenza virus, hepatitis B and C viruses and herpes viruses, and antiviral natural compounds from medicinal plants (herbs), while paying particular attention to promising compounds in preclinical and clinical trials. We also focused our attention on the need to develop effective screening systems for antiviral activity.

  4. Antiviral flavans from the leaves of Pithecellobium clypearia.

    PubMed

    Li, Yaolan; Leung, Kam-Tong; Yao, Fenghe; Ooi, Linda S M; Ooi, Vincent E C

    2006-05-01

    Two new antiviral flavan derivatives were isolated from a methanol extract of leaves of Pithecellobium clypearia as guided by antiviral assays. The structures were characterized, by spectroscopic analyses, as 7-O-galloyltricetifavan (1) and 7,4'-di-O-galloyltricetifavan (2). Cytopathic effect (CPE) reduction assay showed that both compounds 1 and 2 possess antiviral activity against respiratory syncytial virus (RSV), with 50% inhibition concentration (IC(50)) values of 5 and 10 microg/mL, respectively; influenza A (H1N1) virus, with IC(50) values of 15.7 and 30 microg/mL; Coxsackie B3 (Cox B3) virus, with IC(50) values of 12.5 and 25 microg/mL, respectively; and Herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) with IC(50) values of 30 and 20 microg/mL, respectively. Cytotoxicity evaluation using the MTT assay showed that both compounds 1 and 2 were also moderately toxic to several cultured cell lines.

  5. Antiviral and antimicrobial activities of Colombian medicinal plants.

    PubMed

    Lopez, A; Hudson, J B; Towers, G H

    2001-10-01

    Strong antiviral and antimicrobial activities were detected in methanolic extracts of 24 plants used medicinally in the treatment of skin infections in four different regions of Colombia. Thirteen extracts displayed activity against herpes simplex virus (HSV) whereas none was active against poliovirus. The antiviral activity was indicated by a total inhibition of viral cytopathic effects (CPE) at a non-cytotoxic concentration of the extract. The most potent extract was obtained from Byrsonima verbascifolia (L.) HBK. which showed anti-HSV activity at a concentration as low as 2.5 microg/ml. Antimicrobial screening was conducted using the disc diffusion assay against Klebsiella pneumoniae, Escherichia coli, Streptococcus faecalis, Mycobacterium phlei, Bacillus subtilis, Staphylococcus aureus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Salmonella typhimurium and the human pathogenic yeast, Candida albicans. Anti-Candida activity was observed for Piper lanceaefolium HBK. and Juglans neotropica Diels. Twenty-two extracts displayed activity against Gram-positive bacteria whereas none was active against the Gram-negative species. We concluded that these Colombian medicinal plants represent an untapped source of potentially useful antivirals and are worthy of further study.

  6. Arbidol as a broad-spectrum antiviral: an update.

    PubMed

    Blaising, Julie; Polyak, Stephen J; Pécheur, Eve-Isabelle

    2014-07-01

    Arbidol (ARB) is a Russian-made small indole-derivative molecule, licensed in Russia and China for prophylaxis and treatment of influenza and other respiratory viral infections. It also demonstrates inhibitory activity against other viruses, enveloped or not, responsible for emerging or globally prevalent infectious diseases such as hepatitis B and C, gastroenteritis, hemorrhagic fevers or encephalitis. In this review, we will explore the possibility and pertinence of ARB as a broad-spectrum antiviral, after a careful examination of its physico-chemical properties, pharmacokinetics, toxicity, and molecular mechanisms of action. Recent studies suggest that ARB's dual interactions with membranes and aromatic amino acids in proteins may be central to its broad-spectrum antiviral activity. This could impact on the virus itself, and/or on cellular functions or critical steps in virus-cell interactions, thereby positioning ARB as both a direct-acting antiviral (DAA) and a host-targeting agent (HTA). In the context of recent studies in animals and humans, we will discuss the prospective clinical use of ARB in various viral infections.

  7. Human enterovirus 71 protein interaction network prompts antiviral drug repositioning.

    PubMed

    Han, Lu; Li, Kang; Jin, Chaozhi; Wang, Jian; Li, Qingjun; Zhang, Qiling; Cheng, Qiyue; Yang, Jing; Bo, Xiaochen; Wang, Shengqi

    2017-02-21

    As a predominant cause of human hand, foot, and mouth disease, enterovirus 71 (EV71) infection may lead to serious diseases and result in severe consequences that threaten public health and cause widespread panic. Although the systematic identification of physical interactions between viral proteins and host proteins provides initial information for the recognition of the cellular mechanism involved in viral infection and the development of new therapies, EV71-host protein interactions have not been explored. Here, we identified interactions between EV71 proteins and host cellular proteins and confirmed the functional relationships of EV71-interacting proteins (EIPs) with virus proliferation and infection by integrating a human protein interaction network and by functional annotation. We found that most EIPs had known interactions with other viruses. We also predicted ATP6V0C as a broad-spectrum essential host factor and validated its essentiality for EV71 infection in vitro. EIPs and their interacting proteins were more likely to be targets of anti-inflammatory and neurological drugs, indicating their potential to serve as host-oriented antiviral targets. Thus, we used a connectivity map to find drugs that inhibited EIP expression. We predicted tanespimycin as a candidate and demonstrated its antiviral efficiency in vitro. These findings provide the first systematic identification of EV71-host protein interactions, an analysis of EIP protein characteristics and a demonstration of their value in developing host-oriented antiviral therapies.

  8. IFN-λ determines the intestinal epithelial antiviral host defense

    PubMed Central

    Pott, Johanna; Mahlakõiv, Tanel; Mordstein, Markus; Duerr, Claudia U.; Michiels, Thomas; Stockinger, Silvia; Staeheli, Peter; Hornef, Mathias W.

    2011-01-01

    Type I and type III IFNs bind to different cell-surface receptors but induce identical signal transduction pathways, leading to the expression of antiviral host effector molecules. Despite the fact that type III IFN (IFN-λ) has been shown to predominantly act on mucosal organs, in vivo infection studies have failed to attribute a specific, nonredundant function. Instead, a predominant role of type I IFN was observed, which was explained by the ubiquitous expression of the type I IFN receptor. Here we comparatively analyzed the role of functional IFN-λ and type I IFN receptor signaling in the innate immune response to intestinal rotavirus infection in vivo, and determined viral replication and antiviral gene expression on the cellular level. We observed that both suckling and adult mice lacking functional receptors for IFN-λ were impaired in the control of oral rotavirus infection, whereas animals lacking functional receptors for type I IFN were similar to wild-type mice. Using Mx1 protein accumulation as marker for IFN responsiveness of individual cells, we demonstrate that intestinal epithelial cells, which are the prime target cells of rotavirus, strongly responded to IFN-λ but only marginally to type I IFN in vivo. Systemic treatment of suckling mice with IFN-λ repressed rotavirus replication in the gut, whereas treatment with type I IFN was not effective. These results are unique in identifying a critical role of IFN-λ in the epithelial antiviral host defense. PMID:21518880

  9. [Griseochelin methyl ester, a new polyether derivative with antiviral activity].

    PubMed

    Tonew, E; Tonew, M; Graefe, U; Zöpel, P

    1988-10-01

    The methylester of griseochelin (1) is a new chemically-made antiviral derivate of the antibiotic griseochelin isolated from fermentations of Streptomyces griseus. It belongs to the polyether group and possesses antiviral activity against enveloped RNA and DNA viruses cultivated in chicken embryo cells (CEC), namely influenzavirus A/WSN, vesicularstomatitis virus (Indiana), vaccinia virus (Lister) and herpes simplex hominis virus type 1 (Kupka). The methylester of griseochelin failed to show virucidal effects on extracellular influenza vacciniavirus particles or to influence virus adsorption and penetration processes. The antibiotic in concentrations of 125-15 micrograms/ml inhibited the virus-induced cytopathic effect of the above mentioned viruses and caused over 90 per cent plaque reduction. Addition of 1 during a one-step growth cycle of influenzavirus A at 4 and 6 h p.i. resulted in complete suppression of virus multiplication at the control niveau of the virus yield accumulated to the same time point. A partial reversibility of the antiviral action against influenzavirus A could be achieved. Coxsackie A9 virus growth in human fibroblast cells was not affected by the inhibitor. Electron-optical observations showed a failure of the formation of the viral capside proteins of HSV type 1 at the second halftime of the replication cycle in CEC-infected and 1-treated cultures.

  10. Design, synthesis and antiviral activity of novel quinazolinones.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ziwen; Wang, Mingxiao; Yao, Xue; Li, Yue; Tan, Juan; Wang, Lizhong; Qiao, Wentao; Geng, Yunqi; Liu, Yuxiu; Wang, Qingmin

    2012-07-01

    HIV-1 integrase (IN) is a validated therapeutic target for antiviral drug design. However, the emergence of viral strains resistant to clinically studied IN inhibitors demands the discovery of novel inhibitors that are structurally as well as mechanistically different. Herein, a series of quinazolinones were designed and synthesized as novel HIV-1 inhibitors. The new synthetic route provides a practical method for the preparation of 5-hydroxy quinazolinones. Primary bioassay results indicated that most of the quinazolinones possess anti-HIV activity, especially for compound 11b with 77.5% inhibition rate at 10 μM emerged as a new active lead. Most of the synthesized compounds were also found to exhibit good anti-TMV activity, of which compo und 9a showed similar in vivo anti-TMV activity to commercial plant virucide Ribavirin. This work provides a new and efficient approach to evolve novel multi-functional antiviral agents by rational integration and optimization of previously reported antiviral agents.

  11. Insect antiviral innate immunity: pathways, effectors, and connections

    PubMed Central

    Kingsolver, Megan B.; Huang, Zhijing; Hardy, Richard W.

    2014-01-01

    Insects are infected by a wide array of viruses some of which are insect-restricted and pathogenic, and some of which are transmitted by biting insects to vertebrates. The medical and economic importance of these viruses heightens the need to understand the interaction between the infecting pathogen and the insect immune system in order to develop transmission interventions. The interaction of the virus with the insect host innate immune system plays a critical role in the outcome of infection. The major mechanism of antiviral defense is the siRNA pathway that responds through the detection of virus-derived dsRNA to suppress virus replication. However, other innate antimicrobial pathways such as Imd, Toll, Jak-STAT, and the autophagy pathway have also been shown to play important roles in antiviral immunity. In this review we provide an overview of the current understanding of the main insect antiviral pathways and examine recent findings that further our understanding of the roles of these pathways in facilitating a systemic and specific response to infecting viruses. PMID:24120681

  12. Insect antiviral innate immunity: pathways, effectors, and connections.

    PubMed

    Kingsolver, Megan B; Huang, Zhijing; Hardy, Richard W

    2013-12-13

    Insects are infected by a wide array of viruses some of which are insect restricted and pathogenic, and some of which are transmitted by biting insects to vertebrates. The medical and economic importance of these viruses heightens the need to understand the interaction between the infecting pathogen and the insect immune system in order to develop transmission interventions. The interaction of the virus with the insect host innate immune system plays a critical role in the outcome of infection. The major mechanism of antiviral defense is the small, interfering RNA pathway that responds through the detection of virus-derived double-stranded RNA to suppress virus replication. However, other innate antimicrobial pathways such as Imd, Toll, and Jak-STAT and the autophagy pathway have also been shown to play important roles in antiviral immunity. In this review, we provide an overview of the current understanding of the main insect antiviral pathways and examine recent findings that further our understanding of the roles of these pathways in facilitating a systemic and specific response to infecting viruses.

  13. Hepatitis C Virus and Natural Compounds: a New Antiviral Approach?

    PubMed Central

    Calland, Noémie; Dubuisson, Jean; Rouillé, Yves; Séron, Karin

    2012-01-01

    Hepatitis C is a major global health burden with an estimated 160 million infected individuals worldwide. This long-term disease evolves slowly, often leading to chronicity and potentially to liver failure. There is no anti-HCV vaccine, and, until recently, the only treatment available, based on pegylated interferon and ribavirin, was partially effective, and had considerable side effects. With recent advances in the understanding of the HCV life cycle, the development of promising direct acting antivirals (DAAs) has been achieved. Their use in combination with the current treatment has led to encouraging results for HCV genotype 1 patients. However, this therapy is quite expensive and will probably not be accessible for all patients worldwide. For this reason, constant efforts are being made to identify new antiviral molecules. Recent reports about natural compounds highlight their antiviral activity against HCV. Here, we aim to review the natural molecules that interfere with the HCV life cycle and discuss their potential use in HCV therapy. PMID:23202460

  14. Antiviral effect of lithium chloride on feline calicivirus in vitro.

    PubMed

    Wu, Hongxia; Zhang, Xiaozhan; Liu, Chunguo; Liu, Dafei; Liu, Jiasen; Tian, Jin; Qu, Liandong

    2015-12-01

    Feline calicivirus (FCV) is a highly contagious pathogen that causes oral and upper respiratory tract disease in cats. Despite widespread vaccination, the prevalence of FCV remains high. Furthermore, a high gene mutation rate has led to the emergence of variants, and some infections are lethal. To date, there is no effective antiviral drug available for treating FCV infection. Here, we show that lithium chloride (LiCl) effectively suppresses the replication of FCV strain F9 in Crandell-Reese feline kidney (CRFK) cells. The antiviral activity of LiCl occurred primarily during the early stage of infection and in a dose-dependent manner. LiCl treatment also inhibited the cytopathic effect. LiCl treatment exhibited a strong inhibitory effect against a panel of other two reference strains and two recent FCV isolates from China. These results demonstrate that LiCl might be an effective anti-FCV drug for controlling FCV disease. Further studies are required to explore the antiviral activity of LiCl against FCV replication in vivo.

  15. In vitro antiviral effect of germacrone on feline calicivirus.

    PubMed

    Wu, Hongxia; Liu, Yongxiang; Zu, Shaopo; Sun, Xue; Liu, Chunguo; Liu, Dafei; Zhang, Xiaozhan; Tian, Jin; Qu, Liandong

    2016-06-01

    Feline calicivirus (FCV) often causes respiratory tract and oral disease in cats and is a highly contagious virus. Widespread vaccination does not prevent the spread of FCV. Furthermore, the low fidelity of the RNA-dependent RNA polymerase of FCV leads to the emergence of new variants, some of which show increased virulence. Currently, few effective anti-FCV drugs are available. Here, we found that germacrone, one of the main constituents of volatile oil from rhizoma curcuma, was able to effectively reduce the growth of FCV strain F9 in vitro. This compound exhibited a strong anti-FCV effect mainly in the early phase of the viral life cycle. The antiviral effect depended on the concentration of the drug. In addition, germacrone treatment had a significant inhibitory effect against two other reference strains, 2280 and Bolin, and resulted in a significant reduction in the replication of strains WZ-1 and HRB-SS, which were recently isolated in China. This is the first report of antiviral effects of germacrone against a calicivirus, and extensive in vivo research is needed to evaluate this drug as an antiviral therapeutic agent for FCV.

  16. Polar profile of antiviral peptides from AVPpred Database.

    PubMed

    Polanco, Carlos; Samaniego, José Lino; Castañón-González, Jorge Alberto; Buhse, Thomas

    2014-11-01

    Diseases of viral origin in humans are among the most serious threats to health and the global economy. As recent history has shown the virus has a high pandemic potential, among other reasons, due to its ability to spread by air, hence the identification, investigation, containment, and treatment of viral diseases should be considered of paramount importance. In this sense, the bioinformatics research has focused on finding fast and efficient algorithms that can identify highly toxic antiviral peptides and to serve as a first filter, so that trials in the laboratory are substantially reduced. The work presented here contributes to this effort through the use of an algorithm already published by this team, called polarity index method, which identifies with high efficiency antiviral peptides from the exhaustive analysis of the polar profile, using the linear sequence of the peptide. The test carried out included all peptides in APD2 Database and 60 antiviral peptides identified by Kumar and co-workers (Nucleic Acids Res 40:W199-204, 2012), to build its AVPpred algorithm. The validity of the method was focused on its discriminating capacity so we included the 15 sub-classifications of both Databases.

  17. Antiviral response dictated by choreographed cascade of transcription factors

    PubMed Central

    Zaslavsky, Elena; Hershberg, Uri; Seto, Jeremy; Pham, Alissa M.; Marquez, Susanna; Duke, Jamie L.; Wetmur, James G.; tenOever, Benjamin R.; Sealfon, Stuart C.; Kleinstein, Steven H.

    2010-01-01

    The dendritic cell (DC) is a master regulator of immune responses. Pathogenic viruses subvert normal immune function in DCs through the expression of immune antagonists. Understanding how these antagonists interact with the host immune system requires knowledge of the underlying genetic regulatory network that operates during an uninhibited antiviral response. In order to isolate and identify this network, we studied DCs infected with Newcastle Disease Virus (NDV), which is able to stimulate innate immunity and DC maturation through activation of RIG-I signaling, but lacks the ability to evade the human interferon response. To analyze this experimental model, we developed a new approach integrating genome-wide expression kinetics and time-dependent promoter analysis. We found that the genetic program underlying the antiviral cell-state transition during the first 18-hours post-infection could be explained by a single convergent regulatory network. Gene expression changes were driven by a step-wise multi-factor cascading control mechanism, where the specific transcription factors controlling expression changed over time. Within this network, most individual genes are regulated by multiple factors, indicating robustness against virus-encoded immune evasion genes. In addition to effectively recapitulating current biological knowledge, we predicted, and validated experimentally, antiviral roles for several novel transcription factors. More generally, our results show how a genetic program can be temporally controlled through a single regulatory network to achieve the large-scale genetic reprogramming characteristic of cell state transitions. PMID:20164420

  18. Antiviral activity of lanatoside C against dengue virus infection.

    PubMed

    Cheung, Yan Yi; Chen, Karen Caiyun; Chen, Huixin; Seng, Eng Khuan; Chu, Justin Jang Hann

    2014-11-01

    Dengue infection poses a serious threat globally due to its recent rapid spread and rise in incidence. Currently, there is no approved vaccine or effective antiviral drug for dengue virus infection. In response to the urgent need for the development of an effective antiviral for dengue virus, the US Drug Collection library was screened in this study to identify compounds with anti-dengue activities. Lanatoside C, an FDA approved cardiac glycoside was identified as a candidate anti-dengue compound. Our data revealed that lanatoside C has an IC50 of 0.19μM for dengue virus infection in HuH-7 cells. Dose-dependent reduction in dengue viral RNA and viral proteins synthesis were also observed upon treatment with increasing concentrations of lanatoside C. Time of addition study indicated that lanatoside C inhibits the early processes of the dengue virus replication cycle. Furthermore, lanatoside C can effectively inhibit all four serotypes of dengue virus, flavivirus Kunjin, alphavirus Chikungunya and Sindbis virus as well as the human enterovirus 71. These findings suggest that lanatoside C possesses broad spectrum antiviral activity against several groups of positive-sense RNA viruses.

  19. Improving nucleoside diphosphate kinase for antiviral nucleotide analogs activation.

    PubMed

    Gallois-Montbrun, Sarah; Schneider, Benoit; Chen, Yuxing; Giacomoni-Fernandes, Veronique; Mulard, Laurence; Morera, Solange; Janin, Joel; Deville-Bonne, Dominique; Veron, Michel

    2002-10-18

    Antiviral nucleoside analog therapies rely on their incorporation by viral DNA polymerases/reverse transcriptase leading to chain termination. The analogs (3'-deoxy-3'-azidothymidine (AZT), 2',3'-didehydro-2',3'-dideoxythymidine (d4T), and other dideoxynucleosides) are sequentially converted into triphosphate by cellular kinases of the nucleoside salvage pathway and are often poor substrates of these enzymes. Nucleoside diphosphate (NDP) kinase phosphorylates the diphosphate derivatives of the analogs with an efficiency some 10(4) lower than for its natural substrates. Kinetic and structural studies of Dictyostelium and human NDP kinases show that the sugar 3'-OH, absent from all antiviral analogs, is required for catalysis. To improve the catalytic efficiency of NDP kinase on the analogs, we engineered several mutants with a protein OH group replacing the sugar 3'-OH. The substitution of Asn-115 in Ser and Leu-55 in His results in an NDP kinase mutant with an enhanced ability to phosphorylate antiviral derivatives. Transfection of the mutant enzyme in Escherichia coli results in an increased sensitivity to AZT. An x-ray structure at 2.15-A resolution of the Dictyostelium enzyme bearing the serine substitution in complex with the R(p)-alpha-borano-triphosphate derivative of AZT shows that the enhanced activity reflects an improved geometry of binding and a favorable interaction of the 3'-azido group with the engineered serine.

  20. Broad specificity of human phosphoglycerate kinase for antiviral nucleoside analogs.

    PubMed

    Gallois-Montbrun, Sarah; Faraj, Abdesslem; Seclaman, Edward; Sommadossi, Jean-Pierre; Deville-Bonne, Dominique; Véron, Michel

    2004-11-01

    Nucleoside analogs used in antiviral therapies need to be phosphorylated to their tri-phospho counterparts in order to be active on their cellular target. Human phosphoglycerate kinase (hPGK) was recently reported to participate in the last step of phosphorylation of cytidine L-nucleotide derivatives [Krishnan PGE, Lam W, Dutschman GE, Grill SP, Cheng YC. Novel role of 3-phosphoglycerate kinase, a glycolytic enzyme, in the activation of L-nucleoside analogs, a new class of anticancer and antiviral agents. J Biol Chem 2003;278:36726-32]. In the present work, we extended the enzymatic study of human PGK specificity to purine and pyrimidine nucleotide derivatives in both D- and L-configuration. Human PGK demonstrated catalytic efficiencies in the 10(4)-10(5)M(-1)s(-1) range for purine ribo-, deoxyribo- and dideoxyribonucleotide derivatives, either in D- or L-configuration. In contrast, it was poorly active with natural pyrimidine D-nucleotides (less than 10(3)M(-1)s(-1)). Pyrimidine L-enantiomers, which are promising therapeutic analogs against B hepatitis, were 2-25 times better substrates than their D-counterparts. The broad specificity of substrate of human PGK suggests that this enzyme may be involved in the cellular activation of several antiviral nucleoside analogs including dideoxyinosine, acyclovir, L-2'-deoxycytosine and L-2'-deoxythymidine.

  1. Antioxidants: potential antiviral agents for Japanese encephalitis virus infection.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yu; Wang, Zehua; Chen, Huan; Chen, Zongtao; Tian, Yanping

    2014-07-01

    Japanese encephalitis (JE) is prevalent throughout eastern and southern Asia and the Pacific Rim. It is caused by the JE virus (JEV), which belongs to the family Flaviviridae. Despite the importance of JE, little is known about its pathogenesis. The role of oxidative stress in the pathogenesis of viral infections has led to increased interest in its role in JEV infections. This review focuses mainly on the role of oxidative stress in the pathogenesis of JEV infection and the antiviral effect of antioxidant agents in inhibiting JEV production. First, this review summarizes the pathogenesis of JE. The pathological changes include neuronal death, astrocyte activation, and microglial proliferation. Second, the relationship between oxidative stress and JEV infection is explored. JEV infection induces the generation of oxidants and exhausts the supply of antioxidants, which activates specific signaling pathways. Finally, the therapeutic efficacy of a variety of antioxidants as antiviral agents, including minocycline, arctigenin, fenofibrate, and curcumin, was studied. In conclusion, antioxidants are likely to be developed into antiviral agents for the treatment of JE. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  2. Human enterovirus 71 protein interaction network prompts antiviral drug repositioning

    PubMed Central

    Han, Lu; Li, Kang; Jin, Chaozhi; Wang, Jian; Li, Qingjun; Zhang, Qiling; Cheng, Qiyue; Yang, Jing; Bo, Xiaochen; Wang, Shengqi

    2017-01-01

    As a predominant cause of human hand, foot, and mouth disease, enterovirus 71 (EV71) infection may lead to serious diseases and result in severe consequences that threaten public health and cause widespread panic. Although the systematic identification of physical interactions between viral proteins and host proteins provides initial information for the recognition of the cellular mechanism involved in viral infection and the development of new therapies, EV71-host protein interactions have not been explored. Here, we identified interactions between EV71 proteins and host cellular proteins and confirmed the functional relationships of EV71-interacting proteins (EIPs) with virus proliferation and infection by integrating a human protein interaction network and by functional annotation. We found that most EIPs had known interactions with other viruses. We also predicted ATP6V0C as a broad-spectrum essential host factor and validated its essentiality for EV71 infection in vitro. EIPs and their interacting proteins were more likely to be targets of anti-inflammatory and neurological drugs, indicating their potential to serve as host-oriented antiviral targets. Thus, we used a connectivity map to find drugs that inhibited EIP expression. We predicted tanespimycin as a candidate and demonstrated its antiviral efficiency in vitro. These findings provide the first systematic identification of EV71-host protein interactions, an analysis of EIP protein characteristics and a demonstration of their value in developing host-oriented antiviral therapies. PMID:28220872

  3. Immunoenhancing properties and antiviral activity of 7-deazaguanosine in mice.

    PubMed Central

    Smee, D F; Alaghamandan, H A; Gilbert, J; Burger, R A; Jin, A; Sharma, B S; Ramasamy, K; Revankar, G R; Cottam, H B; Jolley, W B

    1991-01-01

    The nucleotide analog 7-deazaguanosine has not previously been reported to possess biological (antiviral or antitumor) properties in cell culture or in vivo. Up to 10(5) U of interferon per ml was detected in mouse sera 1 to 4 h following oral (200-mg/kg of body weight) and intraperitoneal (50-mg/kg) doses of the compound. 7-Deazaguanosine also caused significant activation of natural killer and phagocytic cells but did not augment T- and B-cell blastogenesis. Intraperitoneal treatments of 50, 100, and 200 mg/kg/day administered 24 and 18 h before virus inoculation were highly protective in mice inoculated with lethal doses of Semliki Forest or San Angelo viruses. Less but still significant survivor increases were evident in treated mice infected with banzi or encephalomyocarditis viruses. In most cases, the degree of antiviral activity was similar to that exhibited by the biological response modifier 7-thia-8-oxoguanosine. 7-Thia-8-oxoguanosine was more potent than 7-deazaguanosine against encephalomyocarditis virus in mice, however. Oral efficacy was achieved with 7-deazaguanosine treatments of greater than or equal to 100 mg/kg against all virus infections, whereas 7-thia-8-oxoguanosine is reported to be devoid of oral activity in rodents. Thus, 7-deazaguanosine represents the first reported orally active nucleoside biological response modifier exhibiting broad-spectrum antiviral activity against particular types of RNA viruses. PMID:1707603

  4. Antiviral and antiproliferative effects of canine interferon-λ1.

    PubMed

    Ichihashi, Tomonori; Asano, Atsushi; Usui, Tatsufumi; Takeuchi, Takashi; Watanabe, Yasuko; Yamano, Yoshiaki

    2013-11-15

    Interferon (IFN)-λs, members of the type III IFN group, were recently identified in several vertebrates. Although IFN-λs have the potential to be utilized as antiviral and antitumor agents in veterinary medicine, the biological properties of IFN-λs have not yet been studied in companion animals. In this study, we analyzed the expression of canine IFN-λs and their receptors, produced a recombinant canine IFN-λ1 protein, and investigated its antiviral and antiproliferative activities using a canine kidney epithelial cell line, MDCK cells. MDCK cells were found to express type III IFN molecules, IFN-λ1 and IFN-λ3, and the receptors, IFNλR1 and IL10R2. IFN-λ1 was induced faster than IFN-λ3 by stimulation with poly (I:C). His-tagged IFN-λ1 protein expressed in Escherichia coli inhibited cytolytic plaque formation by influenza A virus infection, and induced the expression of interferon-stimulated genes, Mx1 and OAS1, in MDCK cells. In addition, recombinant IFN-λ1 inhibited the proliferation of MDCK cells slightly. These effects were observed in a dose-dependent manner. These results indicate that canine IFN-λ1 has antiviral effect, and suggest the potential applicability of canine IFN-λ1 as a therapeutic agent.

  5. Favipiravir elicits antiviral mutagenesis during virus replication in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Arias, Armando; Thorne, Lucy; Goodfellow, Ian

    2014-01-01

    Lethal mutagenesis has emerged as a novel potential therapeutic approach to treat viral infections. Several studies have demonstrated that increases in the high mutation rates inherent to RNA viruses lead to viral extinction in cell culture, but evidence during infections in vivo is limited. In this study, we show that the broad-range antiviral nucleoside favipiravir reduces viral load in vivo by exerting antiviral mutagenesis in a mouse model for norovirus infection. Increased mutation frequencies were observed in samples from treated mice and were accompanied with lower or in some cases undetectable levels of infectious virus in faeces and tissues. Viral RNA isolated from treated animals showed reduced infectivity, a feature of populations approaching extinction during antiviral mutagenesis. These results suggest that favipiravir can induce norovirus mutagenesis in vivo, which in some cases leads to virus extinction, providing a proof-of-principle for the use of favipiravir derivatives or mutagenic nucleosides in the clinical treatment of noroviruses. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.03679.001 PMID:25333492

  6. Mx Proteins: Antiviral Gatekeepers That Restrain the Uninvited

    PubMed Central

    Verhelst, Judith; Hulpiau, Paco

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY Fifty years after the discovery of the mouse Mx1 gene, researchers are still trying to understand the molecular details of the antiviral mechanisms mediated by Mx proteins. Mx proteins are evolutionarily conserved dynamin-like large GTPases, and GTPase activity is required for their antiviral activity. The expression of Mx genes is controlled by type I and type III interferons. A phylogenetic analysis revealed that Mx genes are present in almost all vertebrates, usually in one to three copies. Mx proteins are best known for inhibiting negative-stranded RNA viruses, but they also inhibit other virus families. Recent structural analyses provide hints about the antiviral mechanisms of Mx proteins, but it is not known how they can suppress such a wide variety of viruses lacking an obvious common molecular pattern. Perhaps they interact with a (partially) symmetrical invading oligomeric structure, such as a viral ribonucleoprotein complex. Such an interaction may be of a fairly low affinity, in line with the broad target specificity of Mx proteins, yet it would be strong enough to instigate Mx oligomerization and ring assembly. Such a model is compatible with the broad “substrate” specificity of Mx proteins: depending on the size of the invading viral ribonucleoprotein complexes that need to be wrapped, the assembly process would consume the necessary amount of Mx precursor molecules. These Mx ring structures might then act as energy-consuming wrenches to disassemble the viral target structure. PMID:24296571

  7. Antiviral agents and HIV prevention: controversies, conflicts, and consensus

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Myron S.; Muessig, Kathryn E.; Smith, M. Kumi; Powers, Kimberly A.; Kashuba, Angela D.M.

    2013-01-01

    Antiviral agents can be used to prevent HIV transmission before exposure as preexpo-sure prophylaxis (PrEP), after exposure as postexposure prophylaxis, and as treatment of infected people for secondary prevention. Considerable research has shed new light on antiviral agents for PrEP and for prevention of secondary HIV transmission. While promising results have emerged from several PrEP trials, the challenges of poor adherence among HIV-negative clients and possible increase in sexual risk behaviors remain a concern. In addition, a broader pipeline of antiviral agents for PrEP that focuses on genital tract pharmacology and safety and resistance issues must be developed. Antiretroviral drugs have also been used to prevent HIV transmission from HIV-infected patients to their HIV-discordant sexual partners. The HIV Prevention Trials Network 052 trial demonstrated nearly complete prevention of HIV transmission by early treatment of infection, but the generalizability of the results to other risk groups – including intravenous drug users and MSM – has not been determined. Most importantly, the best strategy for use of antiretroviral agents to reduce the spread of HIV at either the individual level or the population level has not been developed, and remains the ultimate goal of this area of investigation. PMID:22507927

  8. Antiviral Effect of Interferon Lambda Against Lymphocytic Choriomeningitis Virus.

    PubMed

    Lukacikova, Lubomira; Oveckova, Ingrid; Betakova, Tatiana; Laposova, Katarina; Polcicova, Katarina; Pastorekova, Silvia; Pastorek, Jaromir; Tomaskova, Jana

    2015-07-01

    Lambda interferons inhibit replication of many viruses, but their role in the inhibition of lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV) infection remains unclear. In this study, we examined the antiviral effects of interferon (IFN)-λ2 and IFN-λ3 against LCMV in A549 cells. We found that IFN-λ2 is a more potent inhibitor of LCMV strain MX compared with IFN-λ3, whereas both cytokines have similar antiviral effects against an immunosuppressive variant of LCMV, clone-13. We also demonstrated that the antiviral activity of IFN-λ2 is more effective if it is delivered early rather than after establishment of a long-term infection, suggesting that virus replication is only partially responsive to the cytokine. In agreement with this observation, we showed that LCMV infection significantly reduces IFNLR1 mRNA expression in infected cells. In addition, LCMV infection, to some extent, compromises the signal transduction pathway of IFN-λ2. This implies that IFN receptors as well as their downstream signaling components could be selectively targeted either directly by LCMV proteins or indirectly by cellular factor(s) that are induced or activated by LCMV infection.

  9. Antiviral activity of lauryl gallate against animal viruses.

    PubMed

    Hurtado, Carolina; Bustos, Maria Jose; Sabina, Prado; Nogal, Maria Luisa; Granja, Aitor G; González, Maria Eugenia; Gónzalez-Porqué, Pedro; Revilla, Yolanda; Carrascosa, Angel L

    2008-01-01

    Antiviral compounds are needed in the control of many animal and human diseases. We analysed the effect of the antitumoural drug lauryl gallate on the infectivity of the African swine fever virus among other DNA (herpes simplex and vaccinia) and RNA (influenza, porcine transmissible gastroenteritis and Sindbis) viruses, paying attention to its effect on the viability of the corresponding host cells. Viral production was strongly inhibited in different cell lines at non-toxic concentrations of the drug (1-10 microM), reducing the titres 3->5 log units depending on the multiplicity of infection. In our model system (African swine fever virus in Vero cells), the addition of the drug 1 h before virus adsorption completely abolished virus productivity in a one-step growth virus cycle. Interestingly, no inhibitory effect was observed when lauryl gallate was added after 5-8 h post-infection. Both cellular and viral DNA synthesis and late viral transcription were inhibited by the drug; however, the early viral protein synthesis and the virus-mediated increase of p53 remained unaffected. Activation of the apoptotic effector caspase-3 was not detected after lauryl gallate treatment of Vero cells. Furthermore, the presence of the drug abrogated the activation of this protease induced by the virus infection. Lauryl gallate is a powerful antiviral agent against several pathogens of clinical and veterinary importance. The overall results indicate that a cellular factor or function might be the target of the antiviral action of alkyl gallates.

  10. Metabolism and function of hepatitis B virus cccDNA: Implications for the development of cccDNA-targeting antiviral therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Ju-Tao; Guo, Haitao

    2015-01-01

    Persistent hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection relies on the stable maintenance and proper functioning of a nuclear episomal form of the viral genome called covalently closed circular (ccc) DNA. One of the major reasons for the failure of currently available antiviral therapeutics to achieve a cure of chronic HBV infection is their inability to eradicate or inactivate cccDNA. In this review article, we summarize our current understanding of cccDNA metabolism in hepatocytes and the modulation of cccDNA by host pathophysiological and immunological cues. Perspectives on the future investigation of cccDNA biology, as well as strategies and progress in therapeutic elimination and/or transcriptional silencing of cccDNA through rational design and phenotypic screenings, are also discussed. This article forms part of a symposium in Antiviral Research on “An unfinished story: from the discovery of the Australia antigen to the development of new curative therapies for hepatitis B.” PMID:26272257

  11. Discovery of a Broad-Spectrum Antiviral Compound That Inhibits Pyrimidine Biosynthesis and Establishes a Type 1 Interferon-Independent Antiviral State.

    PubMed

    Chung, Dong-Hoon; Golden, Jennifer E; Adcock, Robert S; Schroeder, Chad E; Chu, Yong-Kyu; Sotsky, Julie B; Cramer, Daniel E; Chilton, Paula M; Song, Chisu; Anantpadma, Manu; Davey, Robert A; Prodhan, Aminul I; Yin, Xinmin; Zhang, Xiang

    2016-08-01

    Viral emergence and reemergence underscore the importance of developing efficacious, broad-spectrum antivirals. Here, we report the discovery of tetrahydrobenzothiazole-based compound 1, a novel, broad-spectrum antiviral lead that was optimized from a hit compound derived from a cytopathic effect (CPE)-based antiviral screen using Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus. Compound 1 showed antiviral activity against a broad range of RNA viruses, including alphaviruses, flaviviruses, influenza virus, and ebolavirus. Mechanism-of-action studies with metabolomics and molecular approaches revealed that the compound inhibits host pyrimidine synthesis and establishes an antiviral state by inducing a variety of interferon-stimulated genes (ISGs). Notably, the induction of the ISGs by compound 1 was independent of the production of type 1 interferons. The antiviral activity of compound 1 was cell type dependent with a robust effect observed in human cell lines and no observed antiviral effect in mouse cell lines. Herein, we disclose tetrahydrobenzothiazole compound 1 as a novel lead for the development of a broad-spectrum, antiviral therapeutic and as a molecular probe to study the mechanism of the induction of ISGs that are independent of type 1 interferons.

  12. Discovery of a Broad-Spectrum Antiviral Compound That Inhibits Pyrimidine Biosynthesis and Establishes a Type 1 Interferon-Independent Antiviral State

    PubMed Central

    Adcock, Robert S.; Schroeder, Chad E.; Chu, Yong-Kyu; Sotsky, Julie B.; Cramer, Daniel E.; Chilton, Paula M.; Song, Chisu; Anantpadma, Manu; Davey, Robert A.; Prodhan, Aminul I.; Yin, Xinmin; Zhang, Xiang

    2016-01-01

    Viral emergence and reemergence underscore the importance of developing efficacious, broad-spectrum antivirals. Here, we report the discovery of tetrahydrobenzothiazole-based compound 1, a novel, broad-spectrum antiviral lead that was optimized from a hit compound derived from a cytopathic effect (CPE)-based antiviral screen using Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus. Compound 1 showed antiviral activity against a broad range of RNA viruses, including alphaviruses, flaviviruses, influenza virus, and ebolavirus. Mechanism-of-action studies with metabolomics and molecular approaches revealed that the compound inhibits host pyrimidine synthesis and establishes an antiviral state by inducing a variety of interferon-stimulated genes (ISGs). Notably, the induction of the ISGs by compound 1 was independent of the production of type 1 interferons. The antiviral activity of compound 1 was cell type dependent with a robust effect observed in human cell lines and no observed antiviral effect in mouse cell lines. Herein, we disclose tetrahydrobenzothiazole compound 1 as a novel lead for the development of a broad-spectrum, antiviral therapeutic and as a molecular probe to study the mechanism of the induction of ISGs that are independent of type 1 interferons. PMID:27185801

  13. Conjugation of a nonspecific antiviral sapogenin with a specific HIV fusion inhibitor: a promising strategy for discovering new antiviral therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chao; Lu, Lu; Na, Heya; Li, Xiangpeng; Wang, Qian; Jiang, Xifeng; Xu, Xiaoyu; Yu, Fei; Zhang, Tianhong; Li, Jinglai; Zhang, Zhenqing; Zheng, Baohua; Liang, Guodong; Cai, Lifeng; Jiang, Shibo; Liu, Keliang

    2014-09-11

    Triterpene saponins are a major group of active components in natural products with nonspecific antiviral activities, while T20 peptide (enfuvirtide), which contains a helix zone-binding domain (HBD), is a gp41-specific HIV-1 fusion inhibitor. In this paper, we report the design, synthesis, and structure-activity relationship (SAR) of a group of hybrid molecules in which bioactive triterpene sapogenins were covalently attached to the HBD-containing peptides via click chemistry. We found that either the triterpenes or peptide part alone showed weak activity against HIV-1 Env-mediated cell-cell fusion, while the hybrids generated a strong cooperative effect. Among them, P26-BApc exhibited anti-HIV-1 activity against both T20-sensitive and -resistant HIV-1 strains and improved pharmacokinetic properties. These results suggest that this scaffold design is a promising strategy for developing new HIV-1 fusion inhibitors and possibly novel antiviral therapeutics against other viruses with class I fusion proteins.

  14. The Stable Pairing Problem

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greenwell, Raymond N.; Seabold, Daniel E.

    2014-01-01

    The Gale-Shapley stable marriage theorem is a fascinating piece of twentieth-century mathematics that has many practical applications--from labor markets to school admissions--yet is accessible to secondary school mathematics students. David Gale and Lloyd Shapley were both mathematicians and economists who published their work on the Stable…

  15. The Stable Pairing Problem

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greenwell, Raymond N.; Seabold, Daniel E.

    2014-01-01

    The Gale-Shapley stable marriage theorem is a fascinating piece of twentieth-century mathematics that has many practical applications--from labor markets to school admissions--yet is accessible to secondary school mathematics students. David Gale and Lloyd Shapley were both mathematicians and economists who published their work on the Stable…

  16. Stable unstable reliability theory.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Hoben; Lohaus, Arnold; Domsch, Holger

    2012-05-01

    Classical reliability theory assumes that individuals have identical true scores on both testing occasions, a condition described as stable. If some individuals' true scores are different on different testing occasions, described as unstable, the estimated reliability can be misleading. A model called stable unstable reliability theory (SURT) frames stability or instability as an empirically testable question. SURT assumes a mixed population of stable and unstable individuals in unknown proportions, with w(i) the probability that individual i is stable. w(i) becomes i's test score weight which is used to form a weighted correlation coefficient r(w) which is reliability under SURT. If all w(i) = 1 then r(w) is the classical reliability coefficient; thus classical theory is a special case of SURT. Typically r(w) is larger than the conventional reliability r, and confidence intervals on true scores are typically shorter than conventional intervals. r(w) is computed with routines in a publicly available R package. ©2011 The British Psychological Society.

  17. The Synthetic Antiviral Drug Arbidol Inhibits Globally Prevalent Pathogenic Viruses

    PubMed Central

    Pécheur, Eve-Isabelle; Borisevich, Viktoriya; Halfmann, Peter; Morrey, John D.; Smee, Donald F.; Prichard, Mark; Mire, Chad E.; Kawaoka, Yoshihiro; Geisbert, Thomas W.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Arbidol (ARB) is a synthetic antiviral originally developed to combat influenza viruses. ARB is currently used clinically in several countries but not in North America. We have previously shown that ARB inhibits in vitro hepatitis C virus (HCV) by blocking HCV entry and replication. In this report, we expand the list of viruses that are inhibited by ARB and demonstrate that ARB suppresses in vitro infection of mammalian cells with Ebola virus (EBOV), Tacaribe arenavirus, and human herpesvirus 8 (HHV-8). We also confirm suppression of hepatitis B virus and poliovirus by ARB. ARB inhibited EBOV Zaire Kikwit infection when added before or at the same time as virus infection and was less effective when added 24 h after EBOV infection. Experiments with recombinant vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) expressing the EBOV Zaire glycoprotein showed that infection was inhibited by ARB at early stages, most likely at the level of viral entry into host cells. ARB inhibited HHV-8 replication to a similar degree as cidofovir. Our data broaden the spectrum of antiviral efficacy of ARB to include globally prevalent viruses that cause significant morbidity and mortality. IMPORTANCE There are many globally prevalent viruses for which there are no licensed vaccines or antiviral medicines. Some of these viruses, such as Ebola virus or members of the arenavirus family, rapidly cause severe hemorrhagic diseases that can be fatal. Other viruses, such as hepatitis B virus or human herpesvirus 8 (HHV-8), establish persistent infections that cause chronic illnesses, including cancer. Thus, finding an affordable, effective, and safe drug that blocks many viruses remains an unmet medical need. The antiviral drug arbidol (ARB), already in clinical use in several countries as an anti-influenza treatment, has been previously shown to suppress the growth of many viruses. In this report, we expand the list of viruses that are blocked by ARB in a laboratory setting to include Ebola virus

  18. The Synthetic Antiviral Drug Arbidol Inhibits Globally Prevalent Pathogenic Viruses.

    PubMed

    Pécheur, Eve-Isabelle; Borisevich, Viktoriya; Halfmann, Peter; Morrey, John D; Smee, Donald F; Prichard, Mark; Mire, Chad E; Kawaoka, Yoshihiro; Geisbert, Thomas W; Polyak, Stephen J

    2016-01-06

    Arbidol (ARB) is a synthetic antiviral originally developed to combat influenza viruses. ARB is currently used clinically in several countries but not in North America. We have previously shown that ARB inhibits in vitro hepatitis C virus (HCV) by blocking HCV entry and replication. In this report, we expand the list of viruses that are inhibited by ARB and demonstrate that ARB suppresses in vitro infection of mammalian cells with Ebola virus (EBOV), Tacaribe arenavirus, and human herpesvirus 8 (HHV-8). We also confirm suppression of hepatitis B virus and poliovirus by ARB. ARB inhibited EBOV Zaire Kikwit infection when added before or at the same time as virus infection and was less effective when added 24 h after EBOV infection. Experiments with recombinant vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) expressing the EBOV Zaire glycoprotein showed that infection was inhibited by ARB at early stages, most likely at the level of viral entry into host cells. ARB inhibited HHV-8 replication to a similar degree as cidofovir. Our data broaden the spectrum of antiviral efficacy of ARB to include globally prevalent viruses that cause significant morbidity and mortality. There are many globally prevalent viruses for which there are no licensed vaccines or antiviral medicines. Some of these viruses, such as Ebola virus or members of the arenavirus family, rapidly cause severe hemorrhagic diseases that can be fatal. Other viruses, such as hepatitis B virus or human herpesvirus 8 (HHV-8), establish persistent infections that cause chronic illnesses, including cancer. Thus, finding an affordable, effective, and safe drug that blocks many viruses remains an unmet medical need. The antiviral drug arbidol (ARB), already in clinical use in several countries as an anti-influenza treatment, has been previously shown to suppress the growth of many viruses. In this report, we expand the list of viruses that are blocked by ARB in a laboratory setting to include Ebola virus, Tacaribe arenavirus

  19. SYNTHESIS, METABOLIC STABILITY AND ANTIVIRAL EVALUATION OF VARIOUS ALKOXYALKYL ESTERS OF CIDOFOVIR AND (S)-[3-HYDROXY-2-(PHOSPHONOMETHOXY)PROPYL]ADENINE

    PubMed Central

    Ruiz, Jacqueline; Beadle, James R.; Buller, R. Mark; Schreiwer, Jill; Prichard, Mark N.; Keith, Kathy A.; Lewis, Kenneth C.; Hostetler, Karl Y.

    2011-01-01

    Alkoxyalkyl esters of cidofovir (CDV) are orally active agents which inhibit the replication of a variety of double stranded DNA (dsDNA) viruses including variola, vaccinia, ectromelia, herpes simplex virus, cytomegalovirus, adenovirus and others. One of these compounds, hexadecyloxypropyl-CDV (HDP-CDV, CMX001) is in clinical development for prevention and treatment of poxvirus infection, vaccination complications, and for infections caused by cytomegalovirus, adenovirus, herpesviruses and other dsDNA viruses. This class of lipid analogs is potentially prone to undergo omega oxidation of the alkyl moiety which can lead to a short chain carboxylic acid lacking antiviral activity. To address this issue, we synthesized a series of alkoxyalkyl or alkyl glycerol esters of CDV and (S)-HPMPA having modifications in the structure of the alkyl residue. Antiviral activity was assessed in cells infected with vaccinia, cowpox or ectromelia viruses. Metabolic stability was determined in S9 membrane fractions from rat, guinea pig, monkey and human liver. All compounds had substantial antiviral activity in cells infected with vaccinia, cowpox or ectromelia. Metabolic stability was lowest in monkey liver S9 incubations where rapid disappearance of HDP-CDV and HDP-(S)-HPMPA was noted. Metabolic stability in monkey preparations increased substantially when a ω-1 methyl group (15-methyl-HDP-CDV) or a terminal cyclopropyl residue (14-cyclopropyl-tetradecyloxypropyl-CDV) was present in the alkyl chain. The most stable compound was 1-O-octadecyl-2-O-benzyl-sn-glycero-3-CDV (ODBG-CDV) which was not metabolized extensively by monkey liver S9. In rat, guinea pig or human liver S9 incubations, most of the modified antiviral compounds were considerably more stable. PMID:21493074

  20. Heat-induced solubilization of curcumin in kinetically stable pluronic P123 micelles and vesicles: An exploit of slow dynamics of the micellar restructuring processes in the aqueous pluronic system.

    PubMed

    Ganguly, R; Kunwar, A; Dutta, B; Kumar, S; Barick, K C; Ballal, A; Aswal, V K; Hassan, P A

    2017-04-01

    Wide therapeutic potential combined with low cost and negligible toxicity makes curcumin one of the most sought after drugs in recent times. Its poor aqueous solubility and low bioavailability are often overcome by using micelles and vesicles as its carriers. The substances that are commonly used for this purpose are a class of nonionic surfactants called pluronics. Solubilization of curcumin in aqueous systems of these surfactants is carried out by thin film hydration method presumably because slow dynamics of micellar restructuring processes in them creates hindrance for direct solubilization. In this manuscript, we show that this problem can be overcome and curcumin can be solubilized directly in pluronic P123 micellar solutions by heating them to the phase separation temperature in the presence of curcumin. The obtained curcumin containing micellar solutions show cytotoxicity on human breast carcinoma (MCF7) cells with IC50 values similar to that shown by free curcumin solution. Addition of mucoadhesive polymer κ-Carrageenan into these solutions converts them to curcumin containing gels and patches with rheological properties suitable for topical application. These solutions also exhibit systematic spherical-to-worm like micellar-to-vesicular structural transitions in the presence of NaCl. The large curcumin containing aggregates thus formed show kinetic stability with respect to dilution, which is an important attribute for drug delivery application. Characterization of the micellar and vesicular systems and gels were carried out by SANS, DLS and rheological measurements. The obtained results represent first systematic study on solubilization of curcumin in pluronic aggregates of various shapes and size.