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Sample records for heat-shock protein synthesis

  1. Regulation of heat-shock protein synthesis in chicken muscle culture during recovery from heat shock.

    PubMed

    Bag, J

    1983-10-03

    Exposure of chick myotube cultures to a temperature (45 degrees C) higher than their normal growing temperature (37 degrees C) caused extensive synthesis of three major polypeptides of Mr = 25 000, 65 000 and 81 000 referred to as 'heat-shock polypeptides' (hsps). When these cells were allowed to recover from heat-shock treatment at 37 degrees C for 6-8 h, the rate of accumulation of isotope into the 65 000-Mr and 81 000-Mr hsps declined to levels comparable to those in control cultures maintained at 37 degrees C. However, incorporation of isotope in the 25 000-Mr hsp continued at an elevated rate for a longer period than the 65 000-Mr and 81 000-Mr hsps. When heat-shocked cells were allowed to recover at 37 degrees C in the presence of actinomycin D to block new mRNA synthesis, the hsp synthesis as measured by the incorporation of radioactive isotope in these polypeptides continued at levels comparable to those in heat-shocked cells prior to recovery. The block of recovery by actinomycin D was due to the presence of a greater amount of functional hsp mRNAs in the polysomes as compared to untreated controls. The role of competition between the mRNAs for hsps and normal cellular proteins for the translation machinery in regulating protein synthesis during the recovery from heat shock has been discussed.

  2. Synthesis of the low molecular weight heat shock proteins in plants

    SciTech Connect

    Mansfield, M.A.; Key, J.L. )

    1987-08-01

    Heat shock of living tissue induces the synthesis of a unique group of proteins, the heat shock proteins. In plants, the major group of heat shock proteins has a molecular mass of 15 to 25 kilodaltons. Accumulation to these proteins to stainable levels has been reported in only a few species. To examine accumulation of the low molecular weight heat shock proteins in a broader range of species, two-dimensional electrophoresis was used to resolve total protein from the following species: soybean (Glycine max L. Merr., var Wayne), pea (Pisum sativum L., var Early Alaska), sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.), wheat (Triticum asetivum L.), rice (Oryza sativa L., cv IR-36), maize (Zea mays L.), pearl millet (Pennisetum americanum L. Leeke, line 23DB), and Panicum miliaceum L. When identified by both silver staining and incorporation of radiolabel, a diverse array of low molecular weight heat shock proteins was synthesized in each of these species. These proteins accumulated to significant levels after three hours of heat shock but exhibited considerable heterogeneity in isoelectric point, molecular weight, stainability, and radiolabel incorporation. Although most appeared to be synthesized only during heat shock, some were detectable at low levels in control tissue. Compared to the monocots, a higher proportion of low molecular weight heat shock proteins was detectable in control tissues from dicots.

  3. Pharmacological induction of heat shock protein 68 synthesis in cultured rat astrocytes.

    PubMed

    Nishimura, R N; Dwyer, B E

    1995-12-15

    The induction of the highly inducible 70-kDa heat shock protein (HSP 70) is associated with thermotolerance and survival from many other types of stress. This investigation studied the pharmacological induction of HSP 68 (HSP 68 is the rat homolog of human HSP 70) by 1,10-phenanthroline in cultured rat astrocytes under conditions that activated heat shock transcription factor-1 without inducing HSP 68 synthesis. Two conditions that activate heat shock transcription factor-1 and promote its binding to the heat shock element without subsequent transcription of HSP 68 mRNA, intracellular acidosis and exposure to salicylate, showed synthesis of HSP 68 when 1,10-phenanthroline was added to culture medium after the activation of heat shock transcription factor-1. 1,10-phenanthroline mimicked heat shock by inducing HSP 68 mRNA and protein under both conditions. 1,10-phenanthroline added alone to culture medium did not induce the synthesis of HSP 68 or activate heat shock transcription factor-1. These findings strongly suggest a multistep activation for HSP 68 synthesis and also demonstrate that the synthesis of HSP 68 can be pharmacologically regulated.

  4. Induction of heat-shock protein synthesis in chondrocytes at physiological temperatures.

    PubMed

    Madreperla, S A; Louwerenburg, B; Mann, R W; Towle, C A; Mankin, H J; Treadwell, B V

    1985-01-01

    Induction of heat-shock protein (HSP) synthesis is demonstrated in cultured calf-chondrocytes at temperatures shown to occur in normal human cartilage during experiments subjecting intact cadaverous hip joints to the parameters of level walking. A 70,000 MW heat-shock protein (HSP-70) is synthesized by chondrocytes at temperatures above 39 degrees C, while induction of synthesis of a 110,000 MW HSP only occurs at temperatures of 45 degrees C or greater. These differences in critical temperatures for induction, and data showing differences in kinetics of induction and repression of synthesis, suggest that there are differences in the mechanism of induction of the two HSPs. The duration of HSP synthesis and inhibition of synthesis of normal cellular proteins is directly proportional to the duration and magnitude of the temperature rise. Possible relationships between these new findings and the initiation and progression of degenerative joint disease are discussed.

  5. Modulation of heat shock protein 90 affects TGF-β-induced collagen synthesis in human dermal fibroblast cells.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sae Bin; Lim, A-Ram; Rah, Dong Kyun; Kim, Kyung Soo; Min, Hyun Jin

    2016-12-01

    Heat shock protein 90 is a chaperone molecule that aids in proper folding of target proteins. Recently, heat shock protein 90 was found to play a role in would healing through regulation of fibroblast functions. The aim of the present study was to investigate the role of heat shock protein 90 in collagen synthesis in human dermal fibroblasts. The effects of transforming growth factor-β, 17-N-allylamino-17-demethoxygeldanamycin, and transfection of heat shock protein 90 were evaluated by real-time PCR, western blot, and immunofluorescence assays. The Smad 2/3 and Akt pathways were evaluated to identify the signaling pathways involved in collagen synthesis. Heat shock protein 90 and collagen levels were compared in keloid and control tissues by immunohistochemical analysis. The expression of collagen was significantly increased after treatment with transforming growth factor-β, while 17-N-allylamino-17-demethoxygeldanamycin inhibited transforming growth factor-β-induced collagen synthesis. Overexpression of heat shock protein 90 itself with or without transforming growth factor-β increased collagen synthesis. These effects were dependent on Smad 2/3 pathway signaling. Finally, expression of heat shock protein 90 was increased in keloid tissue compared with control tissues. Taken together, these results demonstrate that modulation of heat shock protein 90 influences transforming growth factor-β-induced collagen synthesis via regulation of Smad 2/3 phosphorylation.

  6. Heat shock protein synthesis and trehalose accumulation are not required for induced thermotolerance in depressed Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Gross, C; Watson, K

    1996-03-27

    Intrinsic and heat shock induced thermotolerance of Saccharomyces cerevisiae was investigated in cells grown on glucose and acetate supplemented media. Heat shocked cells (37 degrees C/30 min), in either medium, exhibited induced synthesis of heat shock proteins (hsp) and trehalose. In all cases, with the notable exception of repressed cells of a relatively thermosensitive strain, heat shock acquisition of thermotolerance also occurred in the absence of protein synthesis and coincident decrease in trehalose accumulation. Results indicted that the marked increase in thermotolerance exhibited by non-fermenting (acetate) cells compared with fermenting (glucose) cells was not closely correlated with levels of hsp or trehalose. It was concluded that mechanisms for intrinsic and induced thermotolerance appear to be different and that growth on acetate endows cells with a biochemical predisposition, other than hsp or trehalose, that confers intrinsic tolerance, a factor which may be subject to heat induced modification.

  7. Differentiation-specific decrease in heat shock protein synthesis in 3T3-L1 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Sorhage, F.; Kim, J.; Liu, A.Y.C.; Chen, K.Y.

    1986-05-01

    The regulation of synthesis of heat shock proteins (HSPs) in 3T3-L1 preadipocytes (fibroblasts) and adipocytes was examined using the techniques of pulse labeling with (/sup 35/S)methionine followed by analysis of the pattern and amount of radioactivity incorporated by SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and autoradiography. Exposure of the 3T3-L1 preadipocyte cultures either to elevated temperature (42..mu..C) or to the amino acid analogue canavanine (400 ..mu..g/ml), markedly induced the synthesis of six major HSPs with apparent molecular weights of 105,000, 89,000, 74,000, 72,000, 50,000, and 42,000. The time course of induction of the HSPs by canavanine was significantly delayed as compared to that of heat shock; maximal increase in synthesis of the HSPs was observed at 3-7 hrs after incubation at 42..mu..c and at 22-24 hrs after incubation with 400 ..mu..g/ml canavanine. The magnitude of induction of HSP in the differentiated adipocytes was significantly reduced as compared to that of the undifferentiated fibroblast cells. The reduced expression of HSPs in 3T3-L1 adipocytes appears to be related to the terminal adipogenic differentiation process. The phenomenon was not observed in the control 3T3-C2 cells nor in a transformed variant of the 3T3-L1 cells.

  8. Heat shock protein synthesis and thermotolerance in Cataglyphis, an ant from the Sahara desert.

    PubMed

    Gehring, W J; Wehner, R

    1995-03-28

    The ant Cataglyphis lives in the Sahara desert and is one of the most thermotolerant land animals known. It forages at body temperatures above 50 degrees C, and the critical thermal maxima are at 53.6 +/- 0.8 degrees C for Cataglyphis bombycina and 55.1 +/- 1.1 degrees C for Cataglyphis bicolor. The synthesis and accumulation of heat shock proteins (HSPs) were analyzed in Cataglyphis and compared to Formica, an ant living in more moderate climates, and to two Drosophila species. In Cataglyphis, protein synthesis continues at temperatures up to 45 degrees C as compared to 39 degrees C for Formica and Drosophila. The two Drosophila species, Drosophila melanogaster and Drosophila ambigua, differ with respect to their maximal induction of HSP synthesis and accumulation by 3-4 degrees C. In contrast, the two ant species accumulate HSPs prior to their exposure to heat, and in Cataglyphis the temperature of maximal HSP induction by de novo protein synthesis is only 2 degrees C higher than in Formica. These findings are interpreted as preadaption of the ants prior to exposure to high temperatures.

  9. Heat shock protein synthesis and thermotolerance in Cataglyphis, an ant from the Sahara desert.

    PubMed Central

    Gehring, W J; Wehner, R

    1995-01-01

    The ant Cataglyphis lives in the Sahara desert and is one of the most thermotolerant land animals known. It forages at body temperatures above 50 degrees C, and the critical thermal maxima are at 53.6 +/- 0.8 degrees C for Cataglyphis bombycina and 55.1 +/- 1.1 degrees C for Cataglyphis bicolor. The synthesis and accumulation of heat shock proteins (HSPs) were analyzed in Cataglyphis and compared to Formica, an ant living in more moderate climates, and to two Drosophila species. In Cataglyphis, protein synthesis continues at temperatures up to 45 degrees C as compared to 39 degrees C for Formica and Drosophila. The two Drosophila species, Drosophila melanogaster and Drosophila ambigua, differ with respect to their maximal induction of HSP synthesis and accumulation by 3-4 degrees C. In contrast, the two ant species accumulate HSPs prior to their exposure to heat, and in Cataglyphis the temperature of maximal HSP induction by de novo protein synthesis is only 2 degrees C higher than in Formica. These findings are interpreted as preadaption of the ants prior to exposure to high temperatures. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 PMID:7708762

  10. Influence of temperature stress on in vitro fertilization and heat shock protein synthesis in maize (Zea mays L. ) reproductive tissues

    SciTech Connect

    Dupuis, I.; Dumas, C. )

    1990-10-01

    This study was conducted to investigate the response of maize (Zea mays) male and female mature reproductive tissues to temperature stress. We have tested the fertilization abilities of the stressed spikelets and pollen using in vitro pollination-fertilization to determine their respective tolerance to stress. The synthesis of heat shock proteins (HSPs) was also analyzed in male and female tissues using electrophoresis of {sup 35}S-labeled proteins and fluorography, to establish a relationship between the physiological and molecular responses. Pollen, spikelets, and pollinated spikelets were exposed to selected temperatures (4, 28, 32, 36, or 40{degree}C) and tested using an in vitro fertilization system. The fertilization rate is highly reduced when pollinated spikelets are exposed to temperatures over 36{degree}C. When pollen and spikelets are exposed separately to temperature stress, the female tissues appear resistant to 4 hours of cold stress (4{degree}C) or heat stress (40{degree}C). Under heat shock conditions, the synthesis of a typical set of HSPs is induced in the female tissues. In contrast, the mature pollen is sensitive to heat stress and is responsible for the failure of fertilization at high temperatures. At the molecular level, no heat shock response is detected in the mature pollen.

  11. The effect of age on the synthesis of two heat shock proteins in the hsp70 family.

    PubMed

    Wu, B; Gu, M J; Heydari, A R; Richardson, A

    1993-03-01

    Hepatocytes isolated from male F344 rats were exposed to elevated temperatures (40 degrees C to 45 degrees C), and the incorporation of [35S]-L-methionine into proteins was measured from fluorograms of two-dimensional polyacrylamide gels. The synthesis of two proteins was induced by temperatures of 40 degrees C to 42.5 degrees C; however, 45 degrees C inhibited the synthesis of all proteins. Based on their apparent molecular weights and pI values and their recognition by a monoclonal antibody to the HSP70 gene family, the two proteins induced by hyperthermia were found to be the highly heat-inducible hsp70 and the constitutive hsc70. Because a heat shock of 42.5 degrees C for 30 minutes had very little effect on cell viability and induced the synthesis of hsp70 and hsc70, this heat shock was used to study the effect of age on the ability of hepatocytes to respond to the stress of hyperthermia. Neither hepatocytes isolated from young adult (5-7 months) nor old (25-27 months) rats synthesized detectable amounts of hsp70 when incubated at 37 degrees C. However, heat shock induced the synthesis of both hsp70 and hsc70 in hepatocytes isolated from young adult and old rats. The induction of hsp70 synthesis was significantly lower (37%) for hepatocytes isolated from old rats compared to hepatocytes isolated from young adult rats. However, neither the basal level nor the induced level of hsc70 synthesis changed significantly with age. Thus, aging resulted in a decrease in the ability of hepatocytes to synthesize hsp70 in response to hyperthermia; this effect, however, was specific for hsp70.

  12. Heat shock protein synthesis is induced by diethyl phthalate but not by di(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate in radish (Raphanus sativus).

    PubMed

    Saarma, Kaari; Tarkka, Mika T; Itävaara, Merja; Fagerstedt, Kurt V

    2003-09-01

    The toxicity and effects on protein synthesis of the phthalate esters diethyl phthalate (DEP) and di(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate (DEHP) was studied in radish seedings (Raphanus sativus cv. Kööpenhaminan tori). Phthalate esters are a class of commercially important compounds used mainly as plasticizers in high molecular-weight polymers such as many plastics. They can enter soil through various routes and can affect plant growth and development. First the effect of DEP and DEHP on the growth of radish seedings was determined in an aqueous medium. It was found that DEP, but not DEHP, caused retardation of growth in radish. A further investigation on protein synthesis during DEP-stress was executed by in vivo protein labeling combined with two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2D-PAGE). For comparisons with known stress-induced proteins a similar experiment was done with heat shock, and the induced heat shock proteins (HSPs) were compared with those of DEP-stress. The results showed that certain HSPs can be used as an indicator of DEP-stress, although the synthesis of most HSPs was not affected by DEP. DEP also elicited the synthesis of numerous proteins found only in DEP-treated roots. The toxic effect of phthalate esters and the roles of the induced proteins are discussed.

  13. Carnitine promotes heat shock protein synthesis in adriamycin-induced cardiomyopathy in a neonatal rat experimental model.

    PubMed

    Strauss, M; Anselmi, G; Hermoso, T; Tejero, F

    1998-11-01

    In order to evaluate carnitine protective strategy and its relationship with heat shock protein induction, female Sprague-Dawley neonatal rats, body weight 40 g, were randomized into four groups: control, adriamycin, carnitine and carnitine-adriamycin. Adriamycin was injected i.v. at a dose of 27 mg/kg (0.1 ml). Carnitine was administered i.v. (20 mg/0.1 ml) before each subdose of adriamycin and then per os (180 mg/kg) daily for 12 weeks. Body weight was recorded weekly. Ventricular wall thickness and cellular damage percentage were morphometrically and ultrastructurally determined, respectively. The determinations were realized monthly until the third month after treatment. The heat shock protein 25 content in the supernatant of the homogenized heart tissue was determined by Western blot analysis. Eight and 12 weeks after treatment, body weight and ventricular wall thickness decreased much more in adriamycin groups than in control and carnitine ones. At the same time, electron microscopic analysis of adriamycin left ventricular wall samples showed loss of myofibrils, swollen mitochondria and vacuoles. Carnitine-adriamycin treated rats resemble control groups more than adriamycin treated samples. Moreover, de-novo synthesis of heat shock protein was three times more induced in carnitine-adriamycin rats than in adriamycin ones. Carnitine may enhance the cell-protecting mechanism based on an induction of shock protein, and this first cellular response could reduce the severity of late adriamycin-cardiomiopathy.

  14. Posttranscriptional regulation of hsp70 expression in human cells: effects of heat shock, inhibition of protein synthesis, and adenovirus infection on translation and mRNA stability.

    PubMed Central

    Theodorakis, N G; Morimoto, R I

    1987-01-01

    We have examined the posttranscriptional regulation of hsp70 gene expression in two human cell lines, HeLa and 293 cells, which constitutively express high levels of HSP70. HSP70 mRNA translates with high efficiency in both control and heat-shocked cells. Therefore, heat shock is not required for the efficient translation of HSP70 mRNA. Rather, the main effect of heat shock on translation is to suppress the translatability of non-heat shock mRNAs. Heat shock, however, has a marked effect on the stability of HSP70 mRNA; in non-heat-shocked cells the half-life of HSP70 mRNA is approximately 50 min, and its stability increases at least 10-fold upon heat shock. Moreover, HSP70 mRNA is more stable in cells treated with protein synthesis inhibitors, suggesting that a heat shock-sensitive labile protein regulates its turnover. An additional effect on posttranscriptional regulation of hsp70 expression can be found in adenovirus-infected cells, in which HSP70 mRNA levels decline precipititously late during infection although hsp70 transcription continues unabated. Images PMID:3437893

  15. Heat Shock Proteins: Mediators of Atherosclerotic Development.

    PubMed

    Deniset, Justin F; Pierce, Grant N

    2015-01-01

    Heat shock proteins play important housekeeping roles in a variety of cells within the body during normal control conditions. The many different functions for heat shock proteins in the cell depend upon the specific heat shock protein involved. Each protein is nominally differentiated based upon its molecular size. However, in addition to their role in normal cell function, heat shock proteins may play an even more important role as pro-survival proteins conserved through evolution to protect the cell from a variety of stresses. The ability of a cell to withstand these environmental stresses is critical to its capacity to adapt and remain viable. Loss of this ability may lead to pathological states. Abnormal localization, structure or function of the heat shock proteins has been associated with many pathologies, including those involving heart disease. Heat shock proteins like HSP60 and HSP70 in particular have been identified as playing important roles in inflammation and immune reactions. Inflammation has been identified recently as an important pathological risk factor for heart disease. It is perhaps not surprising therefore, that heat shock protein family has been increasingly identified as an important intracellular pathway associated with inflammatory-mediated heart conditions including atherosclerosis. This paper reviews the evidence in support of a role for heat shock proteins in cardiovascular disease and the potential to target these proteins to alter the progression of atherosclerotic disease.

  16. [Changes in heat shock protein synthesis and thermotolerance of Arabidopsis thaliana seedlings as a result of inhibition of Hsp90 by geldanamycin].

    PubMed

    Kozeko, L G

    2014-01-01

    The influence of geldanamycin (GA), which is a specific inhibitor of heat shock protein Hsp90 activities, on synthesis of Hsp70 and Hsp90 and thermotolerance of Arabidopsis thaliana seedlings has been studied. Incubation of seedlings with GA was shown to induce synthesis of these stress proteins under normal conditions. Treatment of seeds with the Hsp90 inhibitor resulted in the elevated constitutive levels of Hsp70 and Hsp90 in seedlings as well as increased induction of their synthesis under heat shock, at that the effect of GA increased with its concentration. These up-regulation of Hsp promoted thermotolerance of seedlings. The obtained results are considered as evidence for autoregulation of heat shock protein synthesis and regulation of plant tolerance by Hsp90.

  17. Synthesis of 19-substituted geldanamycins with altered conformations and their binding to heat shock protein Hsp90

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kitson, Russell R. A.; Chang, Chuan-Hsin; Xiong, Rui; Williams, Huw E. L.; Davis, Adrienne L.; Lewis, William; Dehn, Donna L.; Siegel, David; Roe, S. Mark; Prodromou, Chrisostomos; Ross, David; Moody, Christopher J.

    2013-04-01

    The benzoquinone ansamycin geldanamycin and its derivatives are inhibitors of heat shock protein Hsp90, an emerging target for novel therapeutic agents both in cancer and in neurodegeneration. However, the toxicity of these compounds to normal cells has been ascribed to reaction with thiol nucleophiles at the quinone 19-position. We reasoned that blocking this position would ameliorate toxicity, and that it might also enforce a favourable conformational switch of the trans-amide group into the cis-form required for protein binding. Here, we report an efficient synthesis of such 19-substituted compounds and realization of our hypotheses. Protein crystallography established that the new compounds bind to Hsp90 with, as expected, a cis-amide conformation. Studies on Hsp90 inhibition in cells demonstrated the molecular signature of Hsp90 inhibitors: decreases in client proteins with compensatory increases in other heat shock proteins in both human breast cancer and dopaminergic neural cells, demonstrating their potential for use in the therapy of cancer or neurodegenerative diseases.

  18. A functional heat shock protein 90 chaperone is essential for efficient flock house virus RNA polymerase synthesis in Drosophila cells.

    PubMed

    Castorena, Kathryn M; Weeks, Spencer A; Stapleford, Kenneth A; Cadwallader, Amy M; Miller, David J

    2007-08-01

    The molecular chaperone heat shock protein 90 (Hsp90) is involved in multiple cellular processes including protein maturation, complex assembly and disassembly, and intracellular transport. We have recently shown that a disruption of Hsp90 activity in cultured Drosophila melanogaster cells suppresses Flock House virus (FHV) replication and the accumulation of protein A, the FHV RNA-dependent RNA polymerase. In the present study, we investigated whether the defect in FHV RNA polymerase accumulation induced by Hsp90 suppression was secondary to an effect on protein A synthesis, degradation, or intracellular membrane association. Treatment with the Hsp90-specific inhibitor geldanamycin selectively reduced FHV RNA polymerase synthesis by 80% in Drosophila S2 cells stably transfected with an inducible protein A expression plasmid. The suppressive effect of geldanamycin on protein A synthesis was not attenuated by proteasome inhibition, nor was it sensitive to changes in either the mRNA untranslated regions or protein A intracellular membrane localization. Furthermore, geldanamycin did not promote premature protein A degradation, nor did it alter the extremely rapid kinetics of protein A membrane association. These results identify a novel role for Hsp90 in facilitating viral RNA polymerase synthesis in Drosophila cells and suggest that FHV subverts normal cellular pathways to assemble functional replication complexes.

  19. Regulation of protein turnover by heat shock proteins.

    PubMed

    Bozaykut, Perinur; Ozer, Nesrin Kartal; Karademir, Betul

    2014-12-01

    Protein turnover reflects the balance between synthesis and degradation of proteins, and it is a crucial process for the maintenance of the cellular protein pool. The folding of proteins, refolding of misfolded proteins, and also degradation of misfolded and damaged proteins are involved in the protein quality control (PQC) system. Correct protein folding and degradation are controlled by many different factors, one of the most important of which is the heat shock protein family. Heat shock proteins (HSPs) are in the class of molecular chaperones, which may prevent the inappropriate interaction of proteins and induce correct folding. On the other hand, these proteins play significant roles in the degradation pathways, including endoplasmic reticulum-associated degradation (ERAD), the ubiquitin-proteasome system, and autophagy. This review focuses on the emerging role of HSPs in the regulation of protein turnover; the effects of HSPs on the degradation machineries ERAD, autophagy, and proteasome; as well as the role of posttranslational modifications in the PQC system.

  20. Heat shock protein produced by Helicobacter pylori.

    PubMed

    Yokota, K; Hirai, Y; Haque, M; Hayashi, S; Isogai, H; Sugiyama, T; Nagamachi, E; Tsukada, Y; Fujii, N; Oguma, K

    1994-01-01

    The cells of Helicobacter pylori were suspended in the medium containing 35S-methionine. After a heat shock of the cells at 42 C for 5, 10, and 30 min, the production of proteins was analyzed by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and autoradiography. Out of many proteins produced by the cells, only 66 kDa protein production was dramatically increased by heat treatment. The N-terminal amino acid sequence of 66 kDa protein was quite similar to that of 62 kDa and 54 kDa proteins previously suggested as heat shock protein (HSP) of H. pylori based on the reaction with polyclonal and monoclonal antibodies against HSP 60 family proteins produced by other bacteria. Therefore, it was concluded that H. pylori produces the 66 kDa protein as its major heat shock protein which belongs to HSP 60 family.

  1. Heat shock proteins in porcine ovary: synthesis, accumulation and regulation by stress and hormones.

    PubMed

    Sirotkin, Alexander V; Bauer, Miroslav

    2011-07-01

    The present studies aimed to understand the interrelationships between stress, hormones and heat shock proteins (HSPs) in the ovary. We examined (1) whether HSP70.2, HSP72 and HSP105/110 can be produced and accumulated in porcine ovarian tissue, (2) whether these HSPs could be indicators of stress, i.e. whether two kinds of stress (high temperatures and malnutrition/serum deprivation) can affect them, and (3) whether some hormonal regulators of ovarian functions (insulin-like growth factor (IGF)-I, leptin and follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH)) can affect these HSPs and response of ovaries to HSP-related stress. We analysed the expression of HSP70.2, HSP72 and HSP105/110 mRNA (by using real-time reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction) in porcine ovarian granulosa cells, as well as the accumulation of HSP70 protein (by using sodium dodecyl sulphate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis-Western) in either whole ovarian follicles and granulose cells cultured at normal (37.5°C) or high (41.5°C) temperature, with and without serum and with and without IGF-I, leptin and FSH. Expression of mRNA for HSP70.2, HSP72 and HSP105/110 in ovarian granulosa cells and accumulation of HSP70 protein in whole ovarian follicles and granulosa cells were demonstrated. In all the groups, addition of either IGF-I, leptin and FSH reduced the expression of HSP70.2, HSP72 and HSP105/110 mRNA. Both high temperature, serum deprivation and their combination resulted in increase in mRNAs for all three analysed HSPs. Additions of either IGF-I, leptin and FSH prevented the stimulatory effect of both high temperature and serum deprivation on the transcription of HSP70.2, HSP72 and HSP105/110. In contrast, high temperature reduced accumulation of peptide HSP70 in both ovarian follicles and granulosa cell. Serum deprivation promoted accumulation of HSP70 in granulosa cells, but not in ovarian follicles. Addition of IGF-I, leptin and FSH was able to alter accumulation of HSP70 in both follicles

  2. Investigation of the function of the heat shock proteins in Drosophila melanogaster tissue culture cells.

    PubMed

    Arrigo, A P

    1980-01-01

    The effect of inhibitors of protein synthesis on RNA synthesis was investigated before and during heat shock. The results indicate that proteins specifically made following heat shock might be required for the resumption, after heat shock, of the synthesis of the RNA normally made at 25 degrees C. It has previously been shown that the heat shock proteins, with the exception of hsp 84 are found in the nucleus bound to chromatin at 37 degrees C, and that they move to the cytoplasm on further incubation of the cells at 25 degrees C (Arrigo et al., 1980). Taken together, these results suggest that some protein(s) synthesized during heat shock may be involved in the regulation of RNA synthesis. However evidence is presented showing that the newly synthesized proteins at 37 degrees are not involved in repressing the transcription of most of the genes active before the heat shock.

  3. High hydrostatic pressure induces synthesis of heat-shock proteins and trehalose-6-phosphate synthase in Anastrepha ludens larvae.

    PubMed

    Vargas-Ortiz, Manuel A; Quintana-Castro, Rodolfo; Oliart-Ros, Rosa M; De la Cruz-Medina, Javier; Ramírez de León, José A; Garcia, Hugo S

    2013-04-01

    The Mexican fruit fly (Anastrepha ludens) is responsible for losses of up to 25% of crops such as mango and citrus fruits in Central America and México. The larval life cycle of A. ludens comprises three stages with a duration ranging from 3 to 8 days. Because of the damage caused by A. ludens, several methods of control have been studied and implemented. High hydrostatic pressures (HHP) are currently applied to foods and it is now proposed to be employed to inactivate eggs and larvae of A. ludens. Originally HHP was designed to inactivate microorganisms, since it exerts marked effects on cell morphology, and can affect enzymatic reactions and genetic mechanisms of microbial cells, with no major changes altering the sensory or nutritional quality of the foodstuff. In this study, A. ludens in two larval stages (5- and 8-day-old) were subjected to HHP treatments. The biochemical response of the larvae of A. ludens was dependent on their stage of development. The third larval stage (L3) developed a better protection mechanism based on the synthesis of stress proteins or heat-shock proteins (HSPs) and the enzyme trehalose-6-phosphate synthase, which are linked and possibly act together to achieve greater survivability to stress caused by hydrostatic pressure.

  4. Heat-shock proteins and atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, M Branco; Carlos, A G Palma

    2002-06-01

    In this review the authors focus on the possible role of heat-shock proteins (hsp) in the immune pathogenesis of the atherosclerotic process. The authors discuss evidence showing increased expression of these proteins in the vascular wall of stressed and atherosclerotic vessels and the immune mechanisms which could justify some of the inflammatory aspects that are now currently recognized in atherosclerosis, namely some of the possible hsp immune activating properties and also the possibility of hsp representing an innocent auto-antigen which could be the unwanted target of an immune response, initially directed against microbial heat-shock proteins. Epidemiological evidence linking atherosclerosis and cardiovascular diseases to soluble hsp levels as well as the intensity of anti-hsp immune response is also reviewed.

  5. Heat shock proteins and Drosophila aging

    PubMed Central

    Tower, John

    2010-01-01

    Since their discovery in Drosophila, the heat shock proteins (Hsps) have been shown to regulate both stress resistance and life span. Aging is characterized by increased oxidative stress and the accumulation of abnormal (malfolded) proteins, and these stresses induce Hsp gene expression through the transcription factor HSF. In addition, a subset of Hsps is induced by oxidative stress through the JNK signaling pathway and the transcription factor Foxo. The Hsps counteract the toxicity of abnormal proteins by facilitating protein refolding and turnover, and through other mechanisms including inhibition of apoptosis. The Hsps are up-regulated in tissue-specific patterns during aging, and their expression correlates with, and sometimes predicts, life span, making them ideal biomarkers of aging. The tools available for experimentally manipulating gene function and assaying healthspan in Drosophila provides an unparalleled opportunity to further study the role of Hsps in aging. PMID:20840862

  6. Heat shock proteins and Drosophila aging.

    PubMed

    Tower, John

    2011-05-01

    Since their discovery in Drosophila, the heat shock proteins (Hsps) have been shown to regulate both stress resistance and life-span. Aging is characterized by increased oxidative stress and the accumulation of abnormal (malfolded) proteins, and these stresses induce Hsp gene expression through the transcription factor HSF. In addition, a subset of Hsps is induced by oxidative stress through the JNK signaling pathway and the transcription factor Foxo. The Hsps counteract the toxicity of abnormal proteins by facilitating protein refolding and turnover, and through other mechanisms including inhibition of apoptosis. The Hsps are up-regulated in tissue-specific patterns during aging, and their expression correlates with, and sometimes predicts, life span, making them ideal biomarkers of aging. The tools available for experimentally manipulating gene function and assaying healthspan in Drosophila provides an unparalleled opportunity to further study the role of Hsps in aging.

  7. Mobile phones, heat shock proteins and cancer.

    PubMed

    French, P W; Penny, R; Laurence, J A; McKenzie, D R

    2001-06-01

    There are several reports which indicate that electromagnetic radiation (such as from mobile phones) at non-thermal levels may elicit a biological effect in target cells or tissues. Whether or not these biological effects lead to adverse health effects, including cancer, is unclear. To date there is limited scientific evidence of health issues, and no mechanism by which mobile phone radiation could influence cancer development. In this paper, we develop a theoretical mechanism by which radiofrequency radiation from mobile phones could induce cancer, via the chronic activation of the heat shock response. Upregulation of heat shock proteins (Hsps) is a normal defence response to a cellular stress. However, chronic expression of Hsps is known to induce or promote oncogenesis, metastasis and/or resistance to anticancer drugs. We propose that repeated exposure to mobile phone radiation acts as a repetitive stress leading to continuous expression of Hsps in exposed cells and tissues, which in turn affects their normal regulation, and cancer results. This hypothesis provides the possibility of a direct association between mobile phone use and cancer, and thus provides an important focus for future experimentation.

  8. [Alterations in heat shock protein 70 kDa levels in human neutrophils under the heat shock conditions].

    PubMed

    Boĭko, A A; Vetchinin, S S; Sapozhnikov, A M; Kovalenko, E I

    2014-01-01

    Intracellular content of heat shock proteins of 70 kDa family (HSP70) possessing chaperone and cytoprotective functions depends on specialization and functional activity of the cells. The aim of this study was to analyze the dynamics of constitutive and inducible HSP70 levels evoked by heat shock in human neutrophils, the short-lived fraction of white blood cells providing non-specific defense against bacterial pathogens. Biphasic dynamics of the intracellular HSP70 level with an increase and following decrease in 15-30 min after the heat shock was revealed by flow cytometry. This dynamics was similar for constitutive and inducible forms of HSP70. Pre-incubation of neutrophils with cycloheximide, the inhibitor of protein synthesis, did not change the intracellular HSP70 dynamics registered by flow cytometry indicating that the increased HSP70 level detected immediately after the heat shock was not mediated by de novo protein synthesis. It was confirmed by Western blotting analysis of HSP70 intracellular content. It was suggested that the elevated HSP70 level was related to conformational HSP70 molecule changes and to increased availability of HSP70 epitopes for antibody binding. Using a panel of antibodies specific to the N-terminal ATP-binding or C-terminal substrate-binding domains of HSP70 it has been demonstrated by cell immunofluorescence and flow cytometry methods that the heat shock-associated increase of the intracellular HSP70 level was mediated by HSP70 interaction with antibodies recognizing HSP70 substrate-binding domain. It was demonstrated that the decrease of intracellular HSP70 level after heat treatment could be connected with a release of both inducible and constitutive HSP70 into extracellular space. Our data suggest that stress-induced release of HSP70 from neutrophils is regulated by ABC-transporters.

  9. Altered expression and phosphorylation of amyloid precursor protein in heat shocked neuronal PC12 cells.

    PubMed

    Johnson, G; Refolo, L M; Merril, C R; Wallace, W

    1993-07-01

    The pathology of the Alzheimer's disease (AD) brain, including amyloid plaques, neurofibrillary tangles and neuronal degeneration, indicates that neurons affected by AD exist under conditions of stress. In fact, the brains of AD patients undergo many changes classically associated with the heat shock response, which is one form of a stress response. These changes include reduced protein synthesis, disrupted cytoskeleton, increased number of proteins associated with ubiquitin, and the induction of heat shock proteins. To investigate the response of neurons to stress, we examined neuronal PC12 cells incubated at either 37 degrees C (control cells) or 45 degrees C (heat-shocked cells). After a 30 min exposure at 45 degrees C, the heat-shocked cells exhibited several features characteristic of the classical heat shock response including a 45% reduction in total protein synthesis, the induction of heat shock protein 72, and an increased phosphorylation of the protein synthesis initiation factor eIF-2 alpha. We used this cellular model system to study the neuronal response to stress specifically focusing on protein synthesis elongation factor 2 (EF-2) and the Alzheimer's amyloid precursor protein (APP), the precursor form of beta-amyloid peptide. Hyperphosphorylation of EF-2 has been observed in the neocortex and hippocampus of AD brain. However, in our system, we find no hyperphosphorylation of EF-2 in response to heat shock. Heat-shocked neuronal PC12 cells exhibited two additional APP-like polypeptides not present in controls. We also found a significant decrease in the phosphorylation state of APP in response to heat shock.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  10. Characterization of the major 68 kDa heat shock protein in a rat transformed astroglial cell line.

    PubMed

    Nishimura, R N; Dwyer, B E; de Vellis, J; Clegg, K B

    1992-01-01

    The heat shock response in a transformed astrocyte line was compared with nontransformed astrocytes. The synthesis of HSP 68, the major inducible heat shock protein (HSP 68) was induced by a non-lethal 45 degrees C, 10 min heat shock. Although the incorporation of [35S]methionine into HSP 68 suggested that similar amounts of protein were being synthesized after heat shock, Western immunoblotting demonstrated striking differences in the HSP immunostaining between the two cell types. By one- and 'two-dimensional gel electrophoresis the major 68 kDa heat shock protein (HSP 68) was similar in both cell types. However, HSP 68 from heat shocked, transformed astrocytes did not immunostain with the monoclonal antibody, C-92, which is specific for the major inducible heat shock protein of HeLa cells. In contrast HSP 68 from heat shocked, nontransformed astrocytes immunostained quite well. A polyclonal antibody raised against the inducible 72 kDa heat shock protein of HeLa cells immunostained the HSP 68 from both astrocytes and transformed astrocytes. Analysis of the mRNA from the two cell types after heat shock revealed two bands of approximately 2.5 and 2.8 kb in astrocytes but only a single 2.5 kb band in the heat shocked transformed astroglia. These results suggest that structural differences in the HSP 68 may be present in the transformed astrocytes compared to the normal astrocytes.

  11. Induction of heat shock proteins in response to primary alcohols in Acinetobacter calcoaceticus.

    PubMed

    Benndorf, D; Loffhagen, N; Babel, W

    1999-01-01

    Cells of Acinetobacter calcoaceticus 69-V, a species able to metabolize a range of aliphatic hydrocarbons and alcohols, were confronted with ethanol, butanol, hexanol or heat shock during growth on acetate as sole source of carbon and energy. The primary alcohols and the heat shock led to the synthesis of new proteins or amplified expression of specific, common and general proteins, which were detected by silver staining after two-dimensional gel electrophoresis. Some of the alcohol-inducible proteins were identified as heat shock proteins by comparing protein patterns of alcohol-shocked cells with those of heat-shocked cells, and by N-terminal amino acid sequencing. DnaK was found to be amplified after all treatments, but GroEI only after heat shock and ethanol treatment. The N-terminal amino acid sequence of the protein, which was considerably amplified after alcohol treatment and heat shock, shows homology to HtpG (high temperature protein G). Some of the heat shock proteins induced by ethanol differ from those induced by butanol and hexanol, suggesting there are at least two different signals for the induction of some heat shock proteins by primary alcohols. This could be due to the different localization of ethanol, butanol and hexanol in the membrane, or because higher cytoplasmic concentrations of ethanol than of butanol or hexanol were applied in these tests in order to keep concentrations of the alcohols in the membrane roughly similar. Besides heat shock proteins, a group of proteins were observed which were only induced by butanol and hexanol, possibly indicating the existence of a further defense mechanism against high concentrations of hydrophobic substrates preventing protein denaturation and membrane damage.

  12. The effect of heat stress on gene expression and synthesis of heat-shock and milk proteins in bovine mammary epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Hu, Han; Zhang, Yangdong; Zheng, Nan; Cheng, Jianbo; Wang, Jiaqi

    2016-01-01

    In this study, bovine mammary epithelial cells were used to study stress responses after cells were exposed to 42°C for 0.5, 1, 3, 5, 8 or 12 h, and 38°C as control. The transcription of the genes (HSP27, HSP70 and HSP90) of heat shock protein (Hsp) was significantly enhanced under heat stress (HS). The peak transcription of HSP70 was 14 times the control at 1 h. Expression of proteins Hsp27 and Hsp70 was gradually increased under HS, with rapid deposition of Hsp70 in epithelial cells. The major milk protein genes of β-casein (CSN2) and butyrophilin (BTN1A1) were down-regulated and the synthesis of total caseins was decreased. After the cells were under HS (42°C) for 1 or 5 h, the cells were cultured at 38°C for 1, 6, 12 or 24 h for recovery. When the cells were cultured at 38°C for 24 h after HS for 1 h, the transcription of HSP70, HSP90, CSN2 and BTN reached normal levels. Our results suggest that HS initiated Hsp synthesis and decreased the milk protein synthesis. Hsp70 is extremely sensitive to HS and mainly responsible for mammary cell protection from HS.

  13. Arsenic trioxide induces de novo protein synthesis of annexin-1 in neutrophils: association with a heat shock-like response and not apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Binet, François; Chiasson, Sonia; Girard, Denis

    2008-02-01

    We recently demonstrated that arsenic trioxide (ATO) induced apoptosis in human neutrophils and increased de novo protein synthesis. Here, we identified one of these newly synthesized proteins as annexin-1 (AnxA1), a protein recently found to be proapoptotic in neutrophils when added exogenously. AnxA1 was detected at the cell membrane of ATO-induced neutrophils as well as in the supernatants. Using neutrophils harvested from AnxA1 knockout mice, we found that the proapoptotic activity of ATO was similar in neutrophils, regardless of AnxA1 levels. A second protein was identified as heat shock protein (Hsp) 89alpha. Because ATO is known to induce a HS-like response in a variety of cells, we investigated its ability to induce gene expression of Hsp in neutrophils and found that ATO increases HSP90AA1, HSPA1 and HSPB1 mRNA in these cells. We conclude that ATO-induced neutrophil apoptosis by an AnxA1-independent mechanism. Our data provide the first evidence that ATO induces a stress response in human neutrophils and that de novo synthesis of AnxA1 is related to this event rather than to the proapoptotic activity of ATO.

  14. Potent triazolothione inhibitor of heat-shock protein-90.

    PubMed

    Feldman, Richard I; Mintzer, Bob; Zhu, Daguang; Wu, James M; Biroc, Sandra L; Yuan, Shendong; Emayan, Kumar; Chang, Zheng; Chen, Deborah; Arnaiz, Damian O; Bryant, Judi; Ge, Xue Snow; Whitlow, Marc; Adler, Marc; Polokoff, Mark A; Li, Wei-Wei; Ferrer, Mike; Sato, Takashi; Gu, Jian-Ming; Shen, Jun; Tseng, Jih-Lie; Dinter, Harald; Buckman, Brad

    2009-07-01

    Heat-shock protein-90 is an attractive target for anticancer drugs, as heat-shock protein-90 blockers such as the ansamycin 17-(allylamino)-17-demethoxygeldanamycin greatly reduce the expression of many signaling molecules that are disregulated in cancer cells and are key drivers of tumor growth and metastasis. While 17-(allylamino)-17-demethoxygeldanamycin has shown promise in clinical trials, this compound class has significant template-related drawbacks. In this paper, we describe a new, potent non-ansamycin small-molecule inhibitor of heat-shock protein-90, BX-2819, containing resorcinol and triazolothione rings. Structural studies demonstrate binding of BX-2819 to the ADP/ATP-binding pocket of heat-shock protein-90. The compound blocked expression of heat-shock protein-90 client proteins in cancer cell lines and inhibited cell growth with a potency similar to 17-(allylamino)-17-demethoxygeldanamycin. In a panel of four cancer cell lines, BX-2819 blocked growth with an average IC(50) value of 32 nM (range of 7-72 nM). Efficacy studies demonstrated that treatment with BX-2819 significantly inhibited the growth of NCI-N87 and HT-29 tumors in nude mice, consistent with pharmacodynamic studies showing inhibition of heat-shock protein-90 client protein expression in tumors for greater than 16 h after dosing. These data support further studies to assess the potential of BX-2819 and related analogs for the treatment of cancer.

  15. Heat shock protein induction in rat pancreatic islets by recombinant human interleukin 1 beta.

    PubMed

    Helqvist, S; Polla, B S; Johannesen, J; Nerup, J

    1991-03-01

    Interleukin 1 beta, potentiated by tumour necrosis factor alpha, is cytotoxic to pancreatic Beta cells in vitro. We have hypothesized that interleukin 1 beta induces oxygen free radicals in Beta cells. Since cytotoxicity induced by free radicals and by heat may activate the same cellular repair mechanism (the heat shock response), the aim of this study was to investigate the pattern of protein synthesis in isolated islets after exposure to interleukin 1 beta (150 pg/ml, 24 h), tumour necrosis factor alpha (50 ng/ml, 24 h) heat shock (43 degrees C, 30 min) and H2O2 (0.1 mmol/l, 20 min). By polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, autoradiography, Western-blot analysis and partial peptide mapping of 35S-methionine labelled islets, interleukin 1 beta was found to induce a 73 kilodalton protein belonging to the heat shock protein family heat shock protein 70, a heat shock protein 90, and haem oxygenase. A minor induction of heat shock protein 73 and haem oxygenase was seen after H2O2. Interleukin 1 beta did not induce heat shock proteins in rat thyroid cells, rat mesangial cells or in human monocytes. Tumour necrosis factor alpha did not induce selective protein synthesis. Pre-exposure of islets to heat, tumour necrosis factor alpha, or H2O2 did not prevent the impairment of glucose-stimulated insulin release seen after 24 h of interleukin 1 beta exposure. The data are compatible with free radical induction by interleukin 1 beta. However, the heat shock response is not specific for oxidative injury, and previous studies have shown discrepant effects as to a protective effect of free radical scavengers against interleukin 1 beta-mediated beta-cytotoxicity.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  16. Aging results in an unusual expression of Drosophila heat shock proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Fleming, J.E.; Walton, J.K.; Dubitsky, R.; Bensch, K.G. )

    1988-06-01

    The authors used high-resolution two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis to evaluate the effect of aging on the heat shock response in Drosophila melanogaster. Although the aging process is not well understood at the molecular level, recent observations suggest that quantitative changes in gene expression occur as these fruit flies approach senescence. Such genetic alterations are in accord with our present data, which clearly show marked differences in the synthesis of heat shock proteins between young and old fruit flies. In 10-day-old flies, a heat shock of 20 min results in the expression of 14 new proteins as detectable by two-dimensional electrophoresis of ({sup 35}S)methionine-labeled polypeptides, whereas identical treatment of 45-day-old flies leads to the expression of at least 50 new or highly up-regulated proteins. In addition, there is also a concomitant increase in the rate of synthesis of a number of the normal proteins in the older animals. Microdensitometric determinations of the low molecular weight heat shock polypeptides on autoradiographs of five age groups revealed that their maximum expression occurs at 47 days for a population of flies with a mean life span of 33.7 days. Moreover, a heat shock effect similar to that observed in senescent flies occurs in young flies fed canavanine, an arginine analogue, before heat shock.

  17. Synthesis of Reblastatin, Autolytimycin, Non-Benzoquinone Analogs: Potent Inhibitors of Heat Shock Protein 90 (Hsp90)

    PubMed Central

    Wrona, Iwona E.; Gozman, Alexander; Taldone, Tony; Chiosis, Gabriela; Panek, James S.

    2010-01-01

    A full account of an asymmetric synthesis of reblastatin (1), the first total synthesis of autolytimycin (2) and related structural compounds is described. The syntheses expand the utility of a highly regio-and diastereoselective hydrometalation aldehyde addition sequence to assemble the fully functionalized ansa chain of the natural products. Also documented is an intramolecular copper-mediated amidation reaction to close the 19-membered macrolactams. The amidation reaction was also employed for the generation of structural derivatives (6–9) of phenolic ansamycins. Ansamycin natural products and selected structural analogs were evaluated in a competitive binding assay to breast cancer cell lysate and a cytotoxicity assay. Both reblastatin (1) and autolytimycin (2) were shown to bind the Hsp90 protein with enhanced binding activity (~25 nM) than 17-allylamino-17-demethoxygeldanamycin (17-AAG, 4), a geldanamycin (3) derivative currently under evaluation for treatment of cancer (~100 nM). PMID:20392070

  18. Multiple oligomeric structures of a bacterial small heat shock protein

    PubMed Central

    Mani, Nandini; Bhandari, Spraha; Moreno, Rodolfo; Hu, Liya; Prasad, B. V. Venkataram; Suguna, Kaza

    2016-01-01

    Small heat shock proteins are ubiquitous molecular chaperones that form the first line of defence against the detrimental effects of cellular stress. Under conditions of stress they undergo drastic conformational rearrangements in order to bind to misfolded substrate proteins and prevent cellular protein aggregation. Owing to the dynamic nature of small heat shock protein oligomers, elucidating the structural basis of chaperone action and oligomerization still remains a challenge. In order to understand the organization of sHSP oligomers, we have determined crystal structures of a small heat shock protein from Salmonella typhimurium in a dimeric form and two higher oligomeric forms: an 18-mer and a 24-mer. Though the core dimer structure is conserved in all the forms, structural heterogeneity arises due to variation in the terminal regions. PMID:27053150

  19. Heat shock proteins, end effectors of myocardium ischemic preconditioning?

    PubMed Central

    Guisasola, María Concepcion; Desco, Maria del Mar; Gonzalez, Fernanda Silvana; Asensio, Fernando; Dulin, Elena; Suarez, Antonio; Garcia Barreno, Pedro

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate (1) whether ischemia-reperfusion increased the content of heat shock protein 72 (Hsp72) transcripts and (2) whether myocardial content of Hsp72 is increased by ischemic preconditioning so that they can be considered as end effectors of preconditioning. Twelve male minipigs (8 protocol, 4 sham) were used, with the following ischemic preconditioning protocol: 3 ischemia and reperfusion 5-minute alternative cycles and last reperfusion cycle of 3 hours. Initial and final transmural biopsies (both in healthy and ischemic areas) were taken in all animals. Heat shock protein 72 messenger ribonucleic acid (mRNA) expression was measured by a semiquantitative reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) method using complementary DNA normalized against the housekeeping gene cyclophilin. The identification of heat shock protein 72 was performed by immunoblot. In our “classic” preconditioning model, we found no changes in mRNA hsp72 levels or heat shock protein 72 content in the myocardium after 3 hours of reperfusion. Our experimental model is valid and the experimental techniques are appropriate, but the induction of heat shock proteins 72 as end effectors of cardioprotection in ischemic preconditioning does not occur in the first hours after ischemia, but probably at least 24 hours after it, in the so-called “second protection window.” PMID:17009598

  20. Exposure of gnotobiotic Artemia franciscana larvae to abiotic stress promotes heat shock protein 70 synthesis and enhances resistance to pathogenic Vibrio campbellii

    PubMed Central

    Pineda, Carlos; MacRae, Thomas H.; Sorgeloos, Patrick; Bossier, Peter

    2008-01-01

    Larvae of the brine shrimp Artemia franciscana serve as important feed in fish and shellfish larviculture; however, they are subject to bacterial diseases that devastate entire populations and consequently hinder their use in aquaculture. Exposure to abiotic stress was shown previously to shield Artemia larvae against infection by pathogenic Vibrio, with the results suggesting a mechanistic role for heat shock protein 70. In the current report, combined hypothermic/hyperthermic shock followed by recovery at ambient temperature induced Hsp70 synthesis in Artemia larvae. Thermotolerance was also increased as was protection against infection by Vibrio campbellii, the latter indicated by reduced mortality and lower bacterial load in challenge tests. Resistance to Vibrio improved in the face of declining body mass as demonstrated by measurement of ash-free dry weight. Hypothermic stress only and acute osmotic insult did not promote Hsp70 expression and thermotolerance in Artemia larvae nor was resistance to Vibrio challenge augmented. The data support a causal link between Hsp70 accumulation induced by abiotic stress and enhanced resistance to infection by V. campbellii, perhaps via stimulation of the Artemia immune system. This possibility is now under investigation, and the work may reveal fundamental properties of crustacean immunity. Additionally, the findings are important in aquaculture where development of procedures to prevent bacterial infection of feed stock such as Artemia larvae is a priority. PMID:18347942

  1. Heat Shock Proteins in Tendinopathy: Novel Molecular Regulators

    PubMed Central

    Millar, Neal L.; Murrell, George A. C.

    2012-01-01

    Tendon disorders—tendinopathies—are the primary reason for musculoskeletal consultation in primary care and account for up to 30% of rheumatological consultations. Whilst the molecular pathophysiology of tendinopathy remains difficult to interpret the disease process involving repetitive stress, and cellular load provides important mechanistic insight into the area of heat shock proteins which spans many disease processes in the autoimmune community. Heat shock proteins, also called damage-associated molecular patterns (DAMPs), are rapidly released following nonprogrammed cell death, are key effectors of the innate immune system, and critically restore homeostasis by promoting the reconstruction of the effected tissue. Our investigations have highlighted a key role for HSPs in tendion disease which may ultimately affect tissue rescue mechanisms in tendon pathology. This paper aims to provide an overview of the biology of heat shock proteins in soft tissue and how these mediators may be important regulators of inflammatory mediators and matrix regulation in tendinopathy. PMID:23258952

  2. Synergistic Effects of Toxic Elements on Heat Shock Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Mahmood, Khalid; Mahmood, Qaisar; Irshad, Muhammad; Hussain, Jamshaid

    2014-01-01

    Heat shock proteins show remarkable variations in their expression levels under a variety of toxic conditions. A research span expanded over five decades has revealed their molecular characterization, gene regulation, expression patterns, vast similarity in diverse groups, and broad range of functional capabilities. Their functions include protection and tolerance against cytotoxic conditions through their molecular chaperoning activity, maintaining cytoskeleton stability, and assisting in cell signaling. However, their role as biomarkers for monitoring the environmental risk assessment is controversial due to a number of conflicting, validating, and nonvalidating reports. The current knowledge regarding the interpretation of HSPs expression levels has been discussed in the present review. The candidature of heat shock proteins as biomarkers of toxicity is thus far unreliable due to synergistic effects of toxicants and other environmental factors. The adoption of heat shock proteins as “suit of biomarkers in a set of organisms” requires further investigation. PMID:25136596

  3. Synergistic effects of toxic elements on heat shock proteins.

    PubMed

    Mahmood, Khalid; Jadoon, Saima; Mahmood, Qaisar; Irshad, Muhammad; Hussain, Jamshaid

    2014-01-01

    Heat shock proteins show remarkable variations in their expression levels under a variety of toxic conditions. A research span expanded over five decades has revealed their molecular characterization, gene regulation, expression patterns, vast similarity in diverse groups, and broad range of functional capabilities. Their functions include protection and tolerance against cytotoxic conditions through their molecular chaperoning activity, maintaining cytoskeleton stability, and assisting in cell signaling. However, their role as biomarkers for monitoring the environmental risk assessment is controversial due to a number of conflicting, validating, and nonvalidating reports. The current knowledge regarding the interpretation of HSPs expression levels has been discussed in the present review. The candidature of heat shock proteins as biomarkers of toxicity is thus far unreliable due to synergistic effects of toxicants and other environmental factors. The adoption of heat shock proteins as "suit of biomarkers in a set of organisms" requires further investigation.

  4. Heat Shock Protein (HSP) Drug Discovery and Development: Targeting Heat Shock Proteins in Disease

    PubMed Central

    Shrestha, Liza; Bolaender, Alexander; Patel, Hardik J.; Taldone, Tony

    2016-01-01

    Heat shock proteins (HSPs) present as a double edged sword. While they play an important role in maintaining protein homeostasis in a normal cell, cancer cells have evolved to co-opt HSP function to promote their own survival. As a result, HSPs such as HSP90 have attracted a great deal of interest as a potential anticancer target. These efforts have resulted in over 20 distinct compounds entering clinical evaluation for the treatment of cancer. However, despite the potent anticancer activity demonstrated in preclinical models, to date no HSP90 inhibitor has obtained regulatory approval. In this review we discuss the unique challenges faced in targeting HSPs that have likely contributed to their lack of progress in the clinic and suggest ways to overcome these so that the enormous potential of these compounds to benefit patients can finally be realized. We also provide a guideline for the future development of HSP-targeted agents based on the many lessons learned during the last two decades in developing HSP90 inhibitors. PMID:27072696

  5. Heat shock proteins and protection against ischemic injury.

    PubMed Central

    Dillmann, W H

    1999-01-01

    Heat shock proteins present a complex family of proteins exerting chaperone-like activities that are classified according to their molecular weight. We especially explored protective functions of inducible heat shock protein 70, the mitochondrial heat shock protein 60 and 10, and the small heat shock proteins HSP27 and alphaB-crystallin against ischemic, reoxygenation-mediated injury using transgenic animals and hearts under in vivo conditions and in isolated cardiac myocyte-derived cells using adenoviral vectors. We noted with great interest that differential protective effects are exerted by specific hsps. For example, alpha-B-crystallin and constitutive hsp70 markedly protect microtubular structure in cardiac myocytes from ischemia-induced injury. Inducible hsp70, hsp60 and hsp10 when coexpressed, and hsp27 and alphaB-crystallin have an overall protective effect against ischemic injury as determined by the release of enzymes like creatine kinase and LDH. We did not note inflammatory or immune responses elicited by the expression of hsps in transgenic animals and cardiac myocytes. The specific cell types in which hsps are expressed may contribute to the protective effect of hsps versus their inflammatory and immunogenic effects when expressed in other cell types. PMID:10231010

  6. Decreased levels of heat shock proteins in gut epithelial cells after exposure to plant lectins

    PubMed Central

    Ovelgonne, J; Koninkx, J; Pusztai, A; Bardocz, S; Kok, W; Ewen, S; Hendriks, H; van Dijk, J E

    2000-01-01

    BACKGROUND—The enterocytes of the intestinal epithelium are regularly exposed to potentially harmful substances of dietary origin, such as lectins. Expression of heat shock proteins (HSPs) by this epithelium may be part of a protective mechanism developed by intestinal epithelial cells to deal with noxious components in the intestinal lumen.
AIM—To investigate if the lectins PHA, a lectin from kidney beans (Phaseolus vulgaris) and WGA, a lectin from wheat germ (Triticum aestivum) could modify the heat shock response in gut epithelial cells and to establish the extent of this effect.
METHODS—Jejunal tissue sections from PHA and WGA fed rats were screened for expression of HSP70, HSP72, and HSP90 using monoclonal antibodies. Differentiated Caco-2 cells, the in vitro counterpart of villus enterocytes, were exposed to 100 µg/ml of PHA-E4 or WGA for 48 hours and investigated for changes in DNA and protein synthesis by double labelling with [2-14C]thymidine and L-[methyl-3H]methionine. The relative concentrations of HSP60, HSP70, HSP72, and HSP90 and binding protein (BiP) in these cells exposed to lectins were analysed by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and immunoblotting. To establish if lectin exposed differentiated Caco-2 cells were still capable of producing a heat shock response, these cells received a heat shock (40°C, 41°C, and 42°C) for one hour and were allowed to recover for six hours at 37°C. During heat shock and recovery periods, lectin exposure was continued.
RESULTS—Constitutive levels of HSPs were measured in the intestinal cells of lactalbumin fed (control) rats, as may be expected from the function of this tissue. However, in PHA and WGA fed rats a marked decline in the binding of antibodies against several HSPs to the intestinal epithelium was found. These results were confirmed by in vitro experiments using differentiated Caco-2 cells exposed to PHA-E4 and WGA. However, after exposure to lectins, these cells were still capable

  7. Heat-shock protein ClpL/HSP100 increases penicillin tolerance in Streptococcus pneumoniae.

    PubMed

    Tran, Thao Dang-Hien; Kwon, Hyog-Young; Kim, Eun-Hye; Kim, Ki-Woo; Briles, David E; Pyo, Suhkneung; Rhee, Dong-Kwon

    2011-01-01

    Penicillin resistance and tolerance has been an increasing threat to the treatment of pneumococcal pneumoniae. However, no penicillin tolerance-related genes have been claimed. Here we show that a major heat shock protein ClpL/HSP100 could modulate the expression of a cell wall synthesis enzyme PBP2x, and subsequently increase cell wall thickness and penicillin tolerance in Streptococus pneumoniae.

  8. Expression of heat shock protein genes in insect stress responses

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The heat shock proteins (HSPs) that are abundantly expressed in insects are important modulators of insect survival. Expression of HSP genes in insects is not only developmentally regulated, but also induced by various stressors in order to confer protection against such stressors. The expression o...

  9. Thermotolerance and Human Performance: Role of Heat Shock Proteins

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-10-01

    and provide a mechanistic basis for the requirement of HSF1 in the regulation of life span and establish a role for SIRT1 in protein homeostasis and...Stress-Inducible Regulation of Heat Shock Factor 1 by the Deacetylase SIRT1 . Science. 2009; 323: 1063-1066. Wilson N, Gisolfi C, Farber J, Hinrichs D

  10. Molecular cloning, phylogenetic analysis and heat shock response of Babesia gibsoni heat shock protein 90

    PubMed Central

    YAMASAKI, Masahiro; TSUBOI, Yoshihiro; TANIYAMA, Yusuke; UCHIDA, Naohiro; SATO, Reeko; NAKAMURA, Kensuke; OHTA, Hiroshi; TAKIGUCHI, Mitsuyoshi

    2016-01-01

    The Babesia gibsoni heat shock protein 90 (BgHSP90) gene was cloned and sequenced. The length of the gene was 2,610 bp with two introns. This gene was amplified from cDNA corresponding to full length coding sequence (CDS) with an open reading frame of 2,148 bp. A phylogenetic analysis of the CDS of HSP90 gene showed that B. gibsoni was most closely related to B. bovis and Babesia sp. BQ1/Lintan and lies within a phylogenetic cluster of protozoa. Moreover, mRNA transcription profile for BgHSP90 exposed to high temperature were examined by quantitative real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. BgHSP90 levels were elevated when the parasites were incubated at 43°C for 1 hr. PMID:27149891

  11. The role of heat shock proteins in kidney disease

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Heat Shock Proteins (HSP) belong to the family of intracellular proteins that are constitutively expressed and are upregulated by various stressors including heat, oxidative and chemical stress. HSP helps in reparative processes, including the refolding of damaged proteins and the removal of irreparably damaged proteins that would initiate cellular death or apoptosis. A growing body of evidence has expanded the role of HSP and defined their role in diseases such as neurodegenerative disorders, cancer, ischemic heart disease and kidney diseases. The protective role of HSP in ischemic renal injury has been described and HSP impairment has been noted in other forms of kidney injuries including post-transplant situation. Further research into the role of HSP in prevention of kidney injury is crucial if translation from the laboratory to patient bedside has to occur. This article aims to be a review of heat shock protein, and its relevance to kidney diseases. PMID:28191532

  12. Heat shock inhibits. alpha. -amylase synthesis in barley aleurone without inhibiting the activity of endoplasmic reticulum marker enzymes

    SciTech Connect

    Sticher, L.; Biswas, A.K.; Bush, D.S.; Jones, R.L. )

    1990-02-01

    The effects of heat shock on the synthesis of {alpha}-amylase and on the membranes of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) of barley (Hordeum vulgare) aleurone were studied. Heat shock, imposed by raising the temperature of incubation from 25{degree}C to 40{degree}C for 3 hours, inhibits the accumulation of {alpha}-amylase and other proteins in the incubation medium of barley aleurone layers treated with gibberellic acid and Ca{sup 2+}. When ER is isolated from heat-shocked aleurone layers, less newly synthesized {alpha}-amylase is found associated with this membrane system. ER membranes, as indicated by the activities of NADH cytochrome c reductase and ATP-dependent Ca{sup 2+} transport, are not destroyed by heat stress, however. Although heat shock did not reduce the activity of ER membrane marker enzymes, it altered the buoyant density of these membranes. Whereas ER from control tissue showed a peak of marker enzyme activity at 27% to 28% sucrose (1.113-1.120 grams per cubic centimeter), ER from heat-shocked tissue peaked at 30% to 32% sucrose (1.127-1.137 grams per cubic centimeter). The synthesis of a group of proteins designated as heat-shock proteins (HSPs) was stimulated by heat shock. These HSPs were localized to different compartments of the aleurone cell. Several proteins ranging from 15 to 30 kilodaltons were found in the ER and the mitochondrial/plasma membrane fractions of heat-shocked cells, but none of the HSPs accumulated in the incubation medium of heat-shocked aleurone layers.

  13. A novel 29-kDa chicken heat shock protein.

    PubMed

    Einat, M F; Haberfeld, A; Shamay, A; Horev, G; Hurwitz, S; Yahav, S

    1996-12-01

    The family of small heat shock proteins is the more variable among the highly conserved superfamily of heat shock proteins (HSP). Using a metabolic labeling procedure with tissue explants, we have detected in chickens a new member of the small HSP family with an apparent molecular weight of 29-kDa. This protein was induced in broiler chickens' heart muscle and lungs following an in vivo heat stress. The 29-kDa band appears after 3 h of heat stress, much later than the induction of HSP 90, HSP 70, and HSP 27. The late onset of induction suggests that HSP 29 plays a more specific role of a "second stage defense protein".

  14. Detection of secreted and temporarily inducible heat shock responsive proteins in mouse testicular tissue.

    PubMed

    Lemaire, L; Heinlein, U A

    1991-01-01

    Temperature-induced effects on the synthesis of murine testicular proteins were investigated by one- and two-dimensional SDS polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Newly synthesized proteins were monitored by incorporation of 35S-methionine and autoradiography. Three heat shock responsive proteins, which are differently affected by elevated temperatures, are described. These proteins represent special examples for how testicular cells respond to environmental stress. One of these proteins, HSl36, is synthesized and secreted at 38 degrees C, whereas at lower, scrotal temperatures it is not detectable. HSlD74 protein is synthesized at elevated temperatures, but only in prepuberal testis, not in adult. Synthesis of the third example, HSR28, is decreased within the seminiferous tubules, but only in those regions which bear cell associations of the elongation stage. These results indicate that the use of DNA probes of the 'heat shock'-gene family might not be sufficient to describe the molecular reasons for impaired spermatogenesis following hyperthermia.

  15. The dynamic state of heat shock proteins in chicken embryo fibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    1986-01-01

    Subcellular fractionation and immunofluorescence microscopy have been used to study the intracellular distributions of the major heat shock proteins, hsp 89, hsp 70, and hsp 24, in chicken embryo fibroblasts stressed by heat shock, allowed to recover and then restressed. Hsp 89 was localized primarily to the cytoplasm except during the restress when a portion of this protein concentrated in the nuclear region. Under all conditions, hsp 89 was readily extracted from cells by detergent. During stress and restress, significant amounts of hsp 70 moved to the nucleus and became resistant to detergent extraction. Some of this hsp 70 was released from the insoluble form in an ATP-dependent reaction. Hsp 24 was confined to the cytoplasm and, during restress, aggregated to detergent-insoluble perinuclear phase-dense granules. These granules dissociated during recovery and hsp 24 could be solubilized by detergent. The nuclear hsps reappeared in the cytoplasm in cells allowed to recover at normal temperatures. Sodium arsenite also induces hsps and their distributions were similar to that observed after a heat shock, except for hsp 89, which remained cytoplasmic. We also examined by immunofluorescence the cytoskeletal systems of chicken embryo fibroblasts subjected to heat shock and found no gross morphological changes in cytoplasmic microfilaments or microtubules. However, the intermediate filament network was very sensitive and collapsed around the nucleus very shortly after a heat shock. The normal intermediate filament morphology reformed when cells were allowed to recover from the stress. Inclusion of actinomycin D during the heat shock--a condition that prevents synthesis of the hsps--did not affect the intermediate filament collapse, but recovery of the normal morphology did not occur. We suggest that an hsp(s) may aid in the formation of the intermediate filament network after stress. PMID:3533955

  16. Transgenic mice expressing the human heat shock protein 70 have improved post-ischemic myocardial recovery.

    PubMed Central

    Plumier, J C; Ross, B M; Currie, R W; Angelidis, C E; Kazlaris, H; Kollias, G; Pagoulatos, G N

    1995-01-01

    Heat shock treatment induces expression of several heat shock proteins and subsequent post-ischemic myocardial protection. Correlations exist between the degree of stress used to induce the heat shock proteins, the amount of the inducible heat shock protein 70 (HSP70) and the level of myocardial protection. The inducible HSP70 has also been shown to be protective in transfected myogenic cells. Here we examined the role of human inducible HSP70 in transgenic mouse hearts. Overexpression of the human HSP70 does not appear to affect normal protein synthesis or the stress response in transgenic mice compared with nontransgenic mice. After 30 min of ischemia, upon reperfusion, transgenic hearts versus nontransgenic hearts showed significantly improved recovery of contractile force (0.35 +/- 0.08 versus 0.16 +/- 0.05 g, respectively, P < 0.05), rate of contraction, and rate of relaxation. Creatine kinase, an indicator of cellular injury, was released at a high level (67.7 +/- 23.0 U/ml) upon reperfusion from nontransgenic hearts, but not transgenic hearts (1.6 +/- 0.8 U/ml). We conclude that high level constitutive expression of the human inducible HSP70 plays a direct role in the protection of the myocardium from ischemia and reperfusion injury. Images PMID:7706492

  17. Heat shock protein coinducers with no effect on protein denaturation specifically modulate the membrane lipid phase

    PubMed Central

    Török, Zsolt; Tsvetkova, Nelly M.; Balogh, Gábor; Horváth, Ibolya; Nagy, Enikő; Pénzes, Zoltán; Hargitai, Judit; Bensaude, Olivier; Csermely, Péter; Crowe, John H.; Maresca, Bruno; Vígh, László

    2003-01-01

    The hydroxylamine derivative bimoclomol (BM) has been shown to activate natural cytoprotective homeostatic responses by enhancing the capability of cells to cope with various pathophysiological conditions. It exerts its effect in synergy with low levels of stress to induce the synthesis of members of major stress protein families. We show here that the presence of BM does not influence protein denaturation in the cells. BM and its derivatives selectively interact with acidic lipids and modulate their thermal and dynamic properties. BM acts as a membrane fluidizer at normal temperature, but it is a highly efficient membrane stabilizer, inhibiting the bilayer–nonbilayer phase transitions during severe heat shock. We suggest that BM and the related compounds modify those domains of membrane lipids where the thermally or chemically induced perturbation of lipid phase is sensed and transduced into a cellular signal, leading to enhanced activation of heat shock genes. BM may be a prototype for clinically safe membrane-interacting drug candidates that rebalance the level and composition of heat shock proteins. PMID:12615993

  18. Characterization of two heat shock proteins (Hsp70/Hsc70) from grass carp (Ctenopharyngodon idella): evidence for their differential gene expression, protein synthesis and secretion in LPS-challenged peripheral blood lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Anying; Zhou, Xiaofei; Wang, Xinyan; Zhou, Hong

    2011-06-01

    Two cDNAs, encoding the stress-inducible 70-kDa heat shock protein (Hsp70) and the constitutively expressed 70-kDa heat shock cognate protein (Hsc70), were isolated from grass carp. The Hsp70 and Hsc70 cDNAs were 2250 bp and 2449 bp in length and contained 1932 bp and 1953 bp open reading frames, respectively. Tissue distribution results showed that Hsp70/Hsc70 was highly expressed in gill, kidney, head kidney and peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBLs). Using grass carp PBLs as a cell model, effects of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) on the mRNA and protein levels of Hsp70/Hsc70 were examined. In this case, LPS increased the mRNA expression of Hsp70 in a time- and dose-dependent manner, but had no effect on Hsc70 mRNA expression. In agreement with this, LPS elevated the intracellular Hsp70 markedly, but not the Hsc70 protein levels in parallel experiments. Furthermore, Hsp70 protein was also detected in culture medium. Moreover, inhibition of LPS on Hsp70 release in a time-dependent manner was observed, indicating that there may be a dynamic balance between Hsp70 stores and Hsp70 release in grass carp PBLs following exposure to LPS. Taken together, these results not only shed new insights into the different regulations of LPS on Hsp70/Hsc70 gene expression, protein synthesis and release, but also provide a basis for further study on the functional role of Hsp70 in fish immune response.

  19. Heat Shock Proteins in Association with Heat Tolerance in Grasses

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Yan; Zhan, Chenyang; Huang, Bingru

    2011-01-01

    The grass family Poaceae includes annual species cultivated as major grain crops and perennial species cultivated as forage or turf grasses. Heat stress is a primary factor limiting growth and productivity of cool-season grass species and is becoming a more significant problem in the context of global warming. Plants have developed various mechanisms in heat-stress adaptation, including changes in protein metabolism such as the induction of heat shock proteins (HSPs). This paper summarizes the structure and function of major HSPs, recent research progress on the association of HSPs with grass tolerance to heat stress, and incorporation of HSPs in heat-tolerant grass breeding. PMID:22084689

  20. Heat shock proteins: applications in health and disease.

    PubMed

    Jindal, S

    1996-01-01

    Heat shock proteins (hsps) assist the assembly, folding and translocation of other proteins, and apparently have a role in protecting cells against injuries and other types of stress. In addition, hsps are frequently recognized by the immune system as predominant antigens during infections and during the progression of certain autoimmune diseases and, thus, might provide a novel route for the development of immunotherapeutics. This review focuses on applications for hsps in health and disease, and discusses the pros and cons of considering them as targets for the development of therapeutics/pharmaceuticals.

  1. Heat shock proteins and their association with major pediatric malignancies.

    PubMed

    Skora, Dorota; Gorska, Magdalena

    2016-01-01

    Heat shock proteins belong to a group of molecular chaperones responsible for the regulation of many intracellular processes. HSPs play a pivotal role in the survival of cells under stressful conditions. Over-expression of these proteins have been found in both healthy and a great number of cancer cells. HSPs may be involved in numerous carcinogenic and chemoresistant processes. Due to that fact, they may be referred to as diagnostic biomarkers of oncogenesis and potential targets for anticancer drugs. Thus, we decided to review the involvement of major HSPs in the most malignant childhood cancers.

  2. Protein disorder reduced in Saccharomyces cerevisiae to survive heat shock

    PubMed Central

    Vicedo, Esmeralda; Gasik, Zofia; Dong, Yu-An; Goldberg, Tatyana; Rost, Burkhard

    2015-01-01

    Recent experiments established that a culture of Saccharomyces cerevisiae (baker’s yeast) survives sudden high temperatures by specifically duplicating the entire chromosome III and two chromosomal fragments (from IV and XII). Heat shock proteins (HSPs) are not significantly over-abundant in the duplication. In contrast, we suggest a simple algorithm to “ postdict ” the experimental results: Find a small enough chromosome with minimal protein disorder and duplicate this region. This algorithm largely explains all observed duplications. In particular, all regions duplicated in the experiment reduced the overall content of protein disorder. The differential analysis of the functional makeup of the duplication remained inconclusive. Gene Ontology (GO) enrichment suggested over-representation in processes related to reproduction and nutrient uptake. Analyzing the protein-protein interaction network (PPI) revealed that few network-central proteins were duplicated. The predictive hypothesis hinges upon the concept of reducing proteins with long regions of disorder in order to become less sensitive to heat shock attack. PMID:26673203

  3. Inhibition of Heat Shock Induction of Heat Shock Protein 70 and Enhancement of Heat Shock Protein 27 Phosphorylation by Quercetin Derivatives

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Rongsheng E.; Kao, Jeffrey L.-F.; Hilliard, Carolyn A.; Pandita, Raj K.; Roti, Joseph L. Roti; Hunt, Clayton R.; Taylor, John-Stephen

    2009-01-01

    Inhibitors of heat-induced heat shock protein 70 (HSP70)a expression have the potential to enhance the therapeutic effectiveness of heat induced radiosensitization of tumors. Among known small molecule inhibitors, quercetin has the advantage of being easily modified for structure-activity studies. Herein, we report the ability of five mono-methyl and five carbomethoxymethyl derivatives of quercetin to inhibit heat-induced HSP70 expression and enhance HSP27 phosphorylation in human cells. While quercetin and several derivatives inhibit HSP70 induction and enhance HSP27 phosphorylation at Ser78, other analogs selectively inhibit HSP70 induction without enhancing HSP27 phosphorylation that would otherwise aid in cell survival. We also show that good inhibitors of HSP70 induction are also good inhibitors of both CK2 and CamKII, kinases that are known to activate HSP70 expression by phosphorylation of heat shock transcription factor 1. Derivatives that show poor inhibition of either or both kinases are not good inhibitors of HSP70 induction, suggesting that quercetin’s effectiveness is due to its ability to inhibit both kinases. PMID:19296652

  4. Expression of heat shock protein 70 is altered by age and diet at the level of transcription.

    PubMed Central

    Heydari, A R; Wu, B; Takahashi, R; Strong, R; Richardson, A

    1993-01-01

    Because heat shock proteins have been shown to play a critical role in protecting cells from hyperthermia and other types of physiological stresses, it was of interest to determine what effect age and caloric restriction have on the ability of cells to regulate the expression of heat shock protein 70 (hsp70), the most prominent and most evolutionarily conserved of the heat shock proteins. Caloric restriction is the only experimental manipulation known to retard aging and increase survival of mammals. The ability of hepatocytes isolated from young/adult (4- to 7-month-old) and old (22- to 28-month-old) male Fischer F344 rats fed ad libitum or a caloric restriction diet (60% of the content of the ad libitum diet) to express hsp70 was determined after a mild heat shock (42.5 degrees C for 30 min). We found that the induction of hsp70 synthesis and mRNA levels by heat shock was 40 to 50% lower in hepatocytes isolated from old rats than in hepatocytes isolated from young rats. Using in situ hybridization, we found that essentially all hepatocytes from the young/adult and old rats expressed hsp70 in response to heat shock; therefore, the age-related decrease in the induction of hsp70 expression was not due to an age-related accumulation of cells that do not respond to heat shock. Measurements of hsp70 mRNA stability and hsp70 transcription demonstrated that the age-related decline in hsp70 expression arose from a decline in hsp70 transcription. Interestingly, the age-related decline in the induction of hsp70 expression was reversed by caloric restriction; e.g., the induction of hsp70 synthesis, mRNA levels, and nuclear transcription were significantly higher in hepatocytes isolated from old rats fed the caloric restricted diet than in hepatocytes isolated from old rats fed ad libitum. The levels of the heat shock transcription factor in nuclear extracts isolated from heat-shocked hepatocytes were measured in a gel shift assay. Binding of the heat shock transcription

  5. A heat shock protein localized to chloroplasts is a member of a eukaryotic superfamily of heat shock proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Vierling, E; Nagao, R T; DeRocher, A E; Harris, L M

    1988-01-01

    We have isolated cDNA clones from soybean and pea that specify nuclear-encoded heat shock proteins (HSPs) which localize to chloroplasts. The mRNAs for these HSPs are undetectable at control temperatures, but increase approximately 150-fold during a 2-h heat shock. Hybridization-selection followed by in vitro translation demonstrates that these HSPs are synthesized as precursor proteins which are processed by the removal of 5-6.5 kd during import into isolated chloroplasts. The nucleotide sequence of the cDNAs shows the derived amino acid sequences of the mature pea and soybean proteins are 79% identical. While the predicted transit peptide encoded by the pea cDNA has some characteristics typical of transit sequences, including high Ser content, multiple basic residues and no acidic residues, it lacks two domains proposed to be important for import and maturation of other chloroplast proteins. The carboxy-terminal region of the chloroplast HSP has significant homology to cytoplasmic HSPs from soybean and other eukaryotes. We hypothesize that the chloroplast HSP shares a common structural and functional domain with low mol. wt HSPs which localize to other parts of the cell, and may have evolved from a nuclear gene. Images PMID:3396532

  6. Targeted heat shock protein 72 for pulmonary cytoprotection.

    PubMed

    Parseghian, Missag H; Hobson, Stephen T; Richieri, Richard A

    2016-06-01

    Heat shock protein 72 (HSP72) is perhaps the most important member of the HSP70 family of proteins, given that it is induced in a wide variety of tissues and cells to combat stress, particularly oxidative stress. Here, we review independent observations of the critical role this protein plays as a pulmonary cytoprotectant and discuss the merits of developing HSP72 as a therapeutic for rapid delivery to cells and tissues after a traumatic event. We also discuss the fusion of HSP72 to a cell-penetrating single-chain Fv antibody fragment derived from mAb 3E10, referred to as Fv-HSP70. This fusion construct has been validated in vivo in a cerebral infarction model and is currently in testing as a clinical therapeutic to treat ischemic events and as a fieldable medical countermeasure to treat inhalation of toxicants caused by terrorist actions or industrial accidents.

  7. Heat-shock protein 27 (Hsp27) as a target of methylglyoxal in gastrointestinal cancer.

    PubMed

    Oya-Ito, Tomoko; Naito, Yuji; Takagi, Tomohisa; Handa, Osamu; Matsui, Hirofumi; Yamada, Masaki; Shima, Keisuke; Yoshikawa, Toshikazu

    2011-07-01

    The molecular mechanisms underlying the posttranslational modification of proteins in gastrointestinal cancer are still unknown. Here, we investigated the role of methylglyoxal modifications in gastrointestinal tumors. Methylglyoxal is a reactive dicarbonyl compound produced from cellular glycolytic intermediates that reacts non-enzymatically with proteins. By using a monoclonal antibody to methylglyoxal-modified proteins, we found that murine heat-shock protein 25 and human heat-shock protein 27 were the major adducted proteins in rat gastric carcinoma mucosal cell line and human colon cancer cell line, respectively. Furthermore, we found that heat-shock protein 27 was modified by methylglyoxal in ascending colon and rectum of patients with cancer. However, methylglyoxal-modified heat-shock protein 25/heat-shock protein 27 was not detected in non cancerous cell lines or in normal subject. Matrix-associated laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry/mass spectrometry analysis of peptide fragments identified Arg-75, Arg-79, Arg-89, Arg-94, Arg-127, Arg-136, Arg-140, Arg-188, and Lys-123 as methylglyoxal modification sites in heat-shock protein 27 and in phosphorylated heat-shock protein 27. The transfer of methylglyoxal-modified heat-shock protein 27 into rat intestinal epithelial cell line RIE was even more effective in preventing apoptotic cell death than that of native control heat-shock protein 27. Furthermore, methylglyoxal modification of heat-shock protein 27 protected the cells against both the hydrogen peroxide- and cytochrome c-mediated caspase activation, and the hydrogen peroxide-induced production of intracellular reactive oxygen species. The levels of lactate converted from methylglyoxal were increased in carcinoma mucosal cell lines. Our results suggest that posttranslational modification of heat-shock protein 27 by methylglyoxal may have important implications for epithelial cell injury in gastrointestinal cancer.

  8. Heat shock proteins (HSP): dermatological implications and perspectives.

    PubMed

    Vidal Magalhães, Wagner; Gouveia Nogueira, Marcelo Fábio; Kaneko, Telma Mary

    2012-01-01

    In recent years, several studies have demonstrated the protective effect of Heat Shock Proteins (HSP) on different organs and tissues under stressful conditions. However, most research explores the performance of those molecular chaperones during immune responses or pathological conditions like cancer, whereas the number of studies related to the performance of HSPs in the skin during diverse natural or physiopathological conditions is very low. Therefore, the aim of this article was to summarize the main concepts concerning the expression and performance of HSPs, from analysis of current medicine and cosmetics publications, as well as exploring the importance of these proteins in the dermatological area in physiological events such as cutaneous aging, skin cancer and wound healing and to present final considerations related to biotechnology performance in this area.

  9. Heat Shock Protein 70: Roles in Multiple Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Mansilla, María José; Montalban, Xavier; Espejo, Carmen

    2012-01-01

    Heat shock proteins (HSP) have long been considered intracellular chaperones that possess housekeeping and cytoprotective functions. Consequently, HSP overexpression was proposed as a potential therapy for neurodegenerative diseases characterized by the accumulation or aggregation of abnormal proteins. Recently, the discovery that cells release HSP with the capacity to trigger proinflammatory as well as immunoregulatory responses has focused attention on investigating the role of HSP in chronic inflammatory autoimmune diseases such as multiple sclerosis (MS). To date, the most relevant HSP is the inducible Hsp70, which exhibits both cytoprotectant and immunoregulatory functions. Several studies have presented contradictory evidence concerning the involvement of Hsp70 in MS or experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), the MS animal model. In this review, we dissect the functions of Hsp70 and discuss the controversial data concerning the role of Hsp70 in MS and EAE. PMID:22669475

  10. [The role of heat shock protein (HSP) in SIRS].

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Toru; Morita, Kiyoshi

    2004-12-01

    Despite recent progress in critical care, sepsis remains a serious problem with high rate of mortality. Although the pathophysiology of sepsis has not been fully elucidated, oxidative stress associated with excessive systemic inflammation plays an important role in its pathogenesis. Oxidative stress conditions principally involving transcriptional activation of genes encoding proteins that participate in the defense against oxidative tissue injuries. One of them is heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1), the rate-limiting enzyme in heme catabolism, as well as the 32 kDa heat shock protein. HO-1 induction has been shown to confer protection, while its abrogation accelerates oxidative tissue injuries. In this review, recent findings concerning the role of HO-1 as a protective response against oxidative stress conditions in sepsis are summarized.

  11. Induction of apoptosis by phenylisocyanate derivative of quercetin: involvement of heat shock protein.

    PubMed

    Ye, Bin; Yang, Jin-Liang; Chen, Li-Juan; Wu, Xian-Xue; Yang, Han-Shuo; Zhao, Ju-Mei; Yuan, Zhi-Ping; Li, Jiong; Wen, Yan-Jun; Mao, Yong-Qiu; Lei, Song; Kan, Bing; Fan, Lin-Yu; Yao, Wen-Xiu; Wang, Rui; Wang, Guo-Qing; Du, Xiao-Bo; Liu, Huan-Yi; Wu, Hong-Bing; Xu, Jian-Rong; Li, Hong-Xia; Zhang, Wei; Zhao, Xia; Wei, Yu-Quan; Cheng, Li

    2007-11-01

    Quercetin, a widely distributed bioflavonoid, inhibits the growth of various tumor cells. The present study was designed to investigate whether a novel quercetin derivative [phenylisocyanate of quercetin (PHICNQ)] exerts antitumor activity against K562 and CT26 tumor cell lines by inducing apoptosis, and to examine the possible mechanism in the phenomenon. The cell proliferation assay of K562 and CT26 tumor cells was determined by the trypan blue dye exclusion test. Apoptosis of PHICNQ-treated cells was determined by morphological analysis, agarose gel DNA electrophoresis and quantitated by flow cytometry after staining with propidium iodide. Cell cycle was evaluated by flow cytometry. The expression of heat shock protein 70 was checked by Western blot analysis. Our results showed that PHICNQ inhibited the proliferation of K562 and CT26 cells in a dose-dependent and time-dependent manner. PHICNQ was 308- and 73-fold more active on CT26 and K562 cells than quercetin, respectively. In addition to this cytostatic effect, treatment of K562 and CT26 tumor cells with PHICNQ induced apoptosis. PHICNQ treatment downregulated the expression of heat shock protein 70 more dramatically than quercetin treatment. These results suggest that PHICNQ is a more powerful antiproliferative derivative than quercetin, with cytostatic and apoptotic effects on K562 and CT26 tumor cells. PHICNQ may trigger apoptosis in tumor cells through inhibition of heat shock protein 70 synthesis and expression.

  12. The interactive association between heat shock factor 1 and heat shock proteins in primary myocardial cells subjected to heat stress.

    PubMed

    Tang, Shu; Chen, Hongbo; Cheng, Yanfen; Nasir, Mohammad Abdel; Kemper, Nicole; Bao, Endong

    2016-01-01

    Heat shock factor 1 (HSF1) is a heat shock transcription factor that rapidly induces heat shock gene transcription following thermal stress. In this study, we subjected primary neonatal rat myocardial cells to heat stress in vitro to create a model system for investigating the trends in expression and association between various heat shock proteins (HSPs) and HSF1 under adverse environmental conditions. After the cells were subjected to heat stress at 42˚C for different periods of time, HSP and HSF1 mRNA and protein levels were detected by qPCR and western blot analysis in the heat-stressed cells. The HSF1 expression levels significantly increased in the cells following 120 min of exposure to heat stess compared to the levels observed at the beginning of heat stress exposure. HSP90 followed a similar trend in expression to HSF1, whereas HSP70 followed an opposite trend. However, no significant changes were observed in the crystallin, alpha B (CRYAB, also known as HSP beta-5) expression levels during the 480‑min period of exposure to heat stress. The interaction between the HSPs and HSF1 was analyzed by STRING 9.1, and it was found that HSF1 interacted with HSP90 and HSP70, and that it did not play a role in regulating CRYAB expression. Based on our findings, HSP70 may suppress HSF1 in rat myocardial cells under conditions of heat stress. Furthermore, our data demonstrate that HSF1 is not the key factor for all HSPs, and this was particularly the case for CRYAB.

  13. The interactive association between heat shock factor 1 and heat shock proteins in primary myocardial cells subjected to heat stress

    PubMed Central

    TANG, SHU; CHEN, HONGBO; CHENG, YANFEN; NASIR, MOHAMMAD ABDEL; KEMPER, NICOLE; BAO, ENDONG

    2016-01-01

    Heat shock factor 1 (HSF1) is a heat shock transcription factor that rapidly induces heat shock gene transcription following thermal stress. In this study, we subjected primary neonatal rat myocardial cells to heat stress in vitro to create a model system for investigating the trends in expression and association between various heat shock proteins (HSPs) and HSF1 under adverse environmental conditions. After the cells were subjected to heat stress at 42°C for different periods of time, HSP and HSF1 mRNA and protein levels were detected by qPCR and western blot analysis in the heat-stressed cells. The HSF1 expression levels significantly increased in the cells following 120 min of exposure to heat stess compared to the levels observed at the beginning of heat stress exposure. HSP90 followed a similar trend in expression to HSF1, whereas HSP70 followed an opposite trend. However, no significant changes were observed in the crystallin, alpha B (CRYAB, also known as HSP beta-5) expression levels during the 480-min period of exposure to heat stress. The interaction between the HSPs and HSF1 was analyzed by STRING 9.1, and it was found that HSF1 interacted with HSP90 and HSP70, and that it did not play a role in regulating CRYAB expression. Based on our findings, HSP70 may suppress HSF1 in rat myocardial cells under conditions of heat stress. Furthermore, our data demonstrate that HSF1 is not the key factor for all HSPs, and this was particularly the case for CRYAB. PMID:26719858

  14. Small heat shock proteins can release light dependence of tobacco seed during germination.

    PubMed

    Koo, Hyun Jo; Park, Soo Min; Kim, Keun Pill; Suh, Mi Chung; Lee, Mi Ok; Lee, Seong-Kon; Xinli, Xia; Hong, Choo Bong

    2015-03-01

    Small heat shock proteins (sHSPs) function as ATP-independent molecular chaperones, and although the production and function of sHSPs have often been described under heat stress, the expression and function of sHSPs in fundamental developmental processes, such as pollen and seed development, have also been confirmed. Seed germination involves the breaking of dormancy and the resumption of embryo growth that accompany global changes in transcription, translation, and metabolism. In many plants, germination is triggered simply by imbibition of water; however, different seeds require different conditions in addition to water. For small-seeded plants, like Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), lettuce (Lactuca sativa), tomato (Solanum lycopersicum), and tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum), light is an important regulator of seed germination. The facts that sHSPs accumulate during seed development, sHSPs interact with various client proteins, and seed germination accompanies synthesis and/or activation of diverse proteins led us to investigate the role of sHSPs in seed germination, especially in the context of light dependence. In this study, we have built transgenic tobacco plants that ectopically express sHSP, and the effect was germination of the seeds in the dark. Administering heat shock to the seeds also resulted in the alleviation of light dependence during seed germination. Subcellular localization of ectopically expressed sHSP was mainly observed in the cytoplasm, whereas heat shock-induced sHSPs were transported to the nucleus. We hypothesize that ectopically expressed sHSPs in the cytoplasm led the status of cytoplasmic proteins involved in seed germination to function during germination without additional stimulus and that heat shock can be another signal that induces seed germination.

  15. Pentylenetetrazol-kindling in mice overexpressing heat shock protein 70.

    PubMed

    Ammon-Treiber, Susanne; Grecksch, Gisela; Angelidis, Charalampos; Vezyraki, Patra; Höllt, Volker; Becker, Axel

    2007-04-01

    Kindling induced by the convulsant pentylenetetrazol (PTZ) is an accepted model of primary generalized epilepsy. Because seizures represent a strong distressing stimulus, stress-induced proteins such as heat shock proteins might counteract the pathology of increased neuronal excitation. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to determine whether PTZ kindling outcome parameters are influenced by heat shock protein 70 (Hsp70) overexpression in Hsp70 transgenic mice as compared to the respective wild-type mice. Kindling was performed by nine intraperitoneal injections of PTZ (ED(16) for induction of clonic-tonic seizures, every 48 h); control animals received saline instead of PTZ. Seven days after the final injection, all mice received a PTZ challenge dose. Outcome parameters included evaluation of seizure stages and overall survival rates. In addition, histopathological findings such as cell number in hippocampal subfields CA1 and CA3 were determined. The onset of the highest convulsion stage was delayed in Hsp70 transgenic mice as compared to wild-type mice, and overall survival during kindling was improved in Hsp70 transgenic mice as compared to wild-type mice. In addition, a challenge dose after termination of kindling produced less severe seizures in Hsp70 transgenic mice than in wild-type mice. PTZ kindling did not result in significant subsequent neuronal cell loss in CA1 or CA3 neither in wild-type mice nor in the Hsp70 transgenic mice. The results of the present experiments clearly demonstrate that overexpression of Hsp70 exerts protective effects regarding seizure severity and overall survival during PTZ kindling. In addition, the decreased seizure severity in Hsp70 transgenic mice after a challenge dose suggests an interference of Hsp70 with the developmental component of kindling.

  16. Immunity to heat shock proteins and arthritic disorders.

    PubMed Central

    van Eden, W

    1999-01-01

    Adjuvant arthritis (AA) is a frequently used model of experimental arthritis. Because of its histopathology, which is reminiscent of rheumatoid arthritis in humans, AA is used as a model for the development of novel anti-inflammatory drugs. Recently, it has become evident that AA is a typical T-cell-mediated autoimmune condition. Therefore, novel immunotherapies targeted to T cells can be developed in this model. Analysis of responding T cells in AA have now led to the definition of various antigens with potential relevance to arthritis, including human arthritic conditions. One such antigen defined in AA is the 60kD heat shock protein. Both T-cell vaccination approaches and active antigen immunizations and antigen toleration approaches have turned out to be effective in suppressing AA. PMID:10231009

  17. A Chrysanthemum Heat Shock Protein Confers Tolerance to Abiotic Stress

    PubMed Central

    Song, Aiping; Zhu, Xirong; Chen, Fadi; Gao, Haishun; Jiang, Jiafu; Chen, Sumei

    2014-01-01

    Heat shock proteins are associated with protection against various abiotic stresses. Here, the isolation of a chrysanthemum cDNA belonging to the HSP70 family is reported. The cDNA, designated CgHSP70, encodes a 647-residue polypeptide, of estimated molecular mass 70.90 kDa and pI 5.12. A sub-cellular localization assay indicated that the cDNA product is deposited in the cytoplasm and nucleus. The performance of Arabidopsis thaliana plants constitutively expressing CgHSP70 demonstrated that the gene enhances tolerance to heat, drought and salinity. When CgHSP70 was stably over-expressed in chrysanthemum, the plants showed an increased peroxidase (POD) activity, higher proline content and inhibited malondialdehyde (MDA) content. After heat stress, drought or salinity the transgenic plants were better able to recover, demonstrating CgHSP70 positive effect. PMID:24663057

  18. Differential expression of proteins in Listeria monocytogenes under thermotolerance-inducing, heat shock, and prolonged heat shock conditions.

    PubMed

    Agoston, Réka; Soni, Kamlesh; Jesudhasan, Palmy R; Russell, William K; Mohácsi-Farkas, Csilla; Pillai, Suresh D

    2009-11-01

    Listeria monocytogenes is a foodborne pathogen capable of employing stress adaptive responses to evade a variety of stressors including temperature stress. We employed two-dimensional gel electrophoresis coupled with matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization-time of flight analysis to study the differential expression of L. monocytogenes (ATCC 43256) soluble proteins at heat shock (60 degrees C) conditions, prolonged heat shock (60 degrees C for 9 minutes) conditions, and thermotolerance-inducing (48 degrees C for 30 minutes followed by 60 degrees C for 9 minutes) conditions. We compared the proteome of L. monocytogenes under these conditions to the proteome at 37 degrees C. Eighteen proteins were differentially expressed at 60 degrees C (6 up-regulated and 12 down-regulated), 21 proteins were differentially expressed (12 up-regulated and 9 down-regulated) when the cells were exposed to 60 degrees C for 9 minutes, and 20 proteins were differentially expressed (10 up-regulated and 10 down-regulated) when cells were initially exposed to 48 degrees C for 30 minutes before 60 degrees C for 9 minutes. There was one unidentifiable protein with observed molecular weight of 50 kDa which was differentially expressed across the three temperature treatments. Thermotolerance-inducing conditions caused the up-regulation of a protein by as much as 12-fold. DnaN, a previously identified stress protein, was up-regulated almost threefold at 60 degrees C. TcsA, a lipoprotein (CD4 T cell-stimulating antigen), and Gap (glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate-dehydrogenase) were selectively expressed under prolonged heat shock conditions suggesting their potential as candidate marker proteins targets for identifying temperature-stressed L. monocytogenes cells.

  19. Characterization of the 70,000 dalton heat shock proteins of Euglena gracilis

    SciTech Connect

    Leustek, T.; Amir-Shapira, D.; Dalie, B.; Weissbach, H.; Brot, N. ); Welch, W. )

    1989-04-01

    The heat shock response of Euglena gracilis was studied and the proteins synthesized were identified. Cells were pulse-labeled with ({sup 35}S) sulfate at 21{degrees}C or 36{degrees}C and the proteins synthesized were analyzed by acrylamide gel analysis. The rate of synthesis of at least 4 major and 6 minor polypeptides, ranging from 25 Kd to 116 Kd increased in both light and dark grown cultures. Two polypeptides, 68 Kd and 69 Kd, were found to cross-react by immunoblot analysis with monoclonal antibodies raised against human 72 and 73 Kd heat shock proteins. Both the 68 Kd and 69 Kd proteins were expressed at 21{degrees}C; however, the synthesis of only the 68 Kd protein increased at 36{degrees}C. The 68 Kd heat inducible protein was present in the cytoplasm and nucleus, but not the chloroplast, in cells grown at 21{degrees}C or exposed to 36{degrees}C. Both 68 Kd and 69 Kd proteins copurified during ATP-agarose affinity chromatography. Preliminary evidence indicates that the 68 Kd protein is phosphorylated in the presence of Ca{sup ++} and these proteins exhibit ATPase activity.

  20. HSF transcription factor family, heat shock response, and protein intrinsic disorder.

    PubMed

    Westerheide, Sandy D; Raynes, Rachel; Powell, Chase; Xue, Bin; Uversky, Vladimir N

    2012-02-01

    Intrinsically disordered proteins are highly abundant in all kingdoms of life, and several protein functional classes, such as transcription factors, transcriptional regulators, hub and scaffold proteins, signaling proteins, and chaperones are especially enriched in intrinsic disorder. One of the unique cellular reactions to protein damaging stress is the so-called heat shock response that results in the upregulation of heat shock proteins including molecular chaperones. This molecular protective mechanism is conserved from prokaryotes to eukaryotes and allows an organism to respond to various proteotoxic stressors, such as heat shock, oxidative stress, exposure to heavy metals, and drugs. The heat shock response- related proteins can be expressed during normal conditions (e.g., during the cell growth and development) or can be induced by various pathological conditions, such as infection, inflammation, and protein conformation diseases. The initiation of the heat shock response is manifested by the activation of the heat shock transcription factors HSF 1, part of a family of related HSF transcription factors. This review analyzes the abundance and functional roles of intrinsic disorder in various heat shock transcription factors and clearly shows that the heat shock response requires HSF flexibility to be more efficient.

  1. Associations between heat shock protein 70 genetic polymorphisms and calving traits in crossbred Brahman cows

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Stressors such as heat, cold, toxins, and oxygen deprivation are known to induce heat shock proteins. Genetic polymorphisms associated with heat shock protein genes have been associated with decreased male and female fertility. Our objectives were to 1) confirm single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) ...

  2. NF-κB signaling pathway is inhibited by heat shock independently of active transcription factor HSF1 and increased levels of inducible heat shock proteins.

    PubMed

    Janus, Patryk; Pakuła-Cis, Małgorzata; Kalinowska-Herok, Magdalena; Kashchak, Natalia; Szołtysek, Katarzyna; Pigłowski, Wojciech; Widlak, Wieslawa; Kimmel, Marek; Widlak, Piotr

    2011-12-01

    NF-κB transcription factor regulates numerous genes important for inflammation, immune responses and cell survival. HSF1 is the primary transcription factor activated under stress conditions that is responsible for induction of genes encoding heat shock proteins. Previous studies have shown that the NF-κB activation pathway is blocked by heat shock possibly involving heat shock proteins. Here, we investigate whether active HSF1 inhibited this pathway in the absence of stress conditions. Activation of the NF-κB pathway and expression of NF-κB-dependent genes were analyzed in TNFα-stimulated U-2 OS human osteosarcoma cells that were either heat-shocked or engineered to express a constitutively active form of HSF1 in the absence of heat shock. As expected, heat shock resulted in a general blockade in the degradation of the IκBα inhibitor, nuclear translocation of NF-κB and expression of NF-κB-dependent target genes. In marked contrast, the presence of constitutively active HSF1 did not block TNFα-induced activation of the NF-κB pathway or expression of a set of the NF-κB-dependent genes. We conclude that in the absence of heat shock, the NF-κB activation pathway is inhibited by neither active HSF1 transcription factor nor by increased levels of HSF1-induced heat shock proteins.

  3. Plasmodium falciparum heat shock protein 70 lacks immune modulatory activity.

    PubMed

    Pooe, Ofentse Jacob; Köllisch, Gabriele; Heine, Holger; Shonhai, Addmore

    2017-02-14

    Heat shock protein 70 (Hsp70) family are conserved molecules that constitute a major part of the cell's protein folding machinery. The role of Hsp70s of parasitic origin in host cell immune modulation has remained contentious. This is largely due to the fact that several studies implicating Hsp70 in immune modulation rely on the use of recombinant protein derived from bacteria which is often fraught contamination. Thus, in the current study, we expressed recombinant Plasmodium falciparum Hsp70 (PfHsp70) using in three bacterial expression hosts: E. coli XL1 Blue, E. coli ClearColi BL21 and Brevibacillus choshinensis, respectively. We further investigated the immunostimulatory capability of the protein by assessing cytokine production by murine immune cells cultured in the presence of the protein. Recombinant PfHsp70 obtained from E. coli XL1 Blue expression host induced IL6 and IL8 cytokines. On the other hand, PfHsp70 produced in E. coli ClearColi and B. choshinensis expression systems was associated with no detectable traces of LPS and exhibited no immunomodulatory activity. Our findings suggest that PfHsp70 does not possess immunomodulatory function. Furthermore, our study suggests that E. coli ClearColi and B. choshinensis are versatile for the production of recombinant protein for use in immunomodulatory studies.

  4. Heat Shock Proteins: Cellular and molecular mechanisms in the CNS

    PubMed Central

    Stetler, R. Anne; Gan, Yu; Zhang, Wenting; Liou, Anthony K.; Gao, Yanqin; Cao, Guodong; Chen, Jun

    2010-01-01

    Emerging evidence describe heat shock proteins (HSPs) as critical regulators in normal neural physiological function as well as in cell stress responses. The functions of HSPs represent an enormous and diverse range of cellular activities, far beyond the originally identified role in protein folding and chaperoning. Now understood to be involved in processes such as synaptic transmission, autophagy, ER stress response, protein kinase and cell death signaling as well as protein chaperone and folding, manipulation of HSPs have robust effects on the fate of cells in neurological injury and disease states. The ongoing exploration of multiple HSP superfamilies has underscored the pluripotent nature of HSPs in the cellular context, and demanded the recent restructuring of the nomenclature referring to these families to reflect a re-organization based on structure and function. In keeping with this re-organization, we have first discussed the HSP superfamilies in terms of protein structure, regulation and expression and distribution in the brain. We then explore major cellular functions of HSPs that are relevant to neural physiological states, and from there discuss known and proposed HSP impact on major neurological disease states. This review article presents a three-part discussion on the array of HSPs families relevant to neuronal tissue, their cellular functions, and the exploration of therapeutic targets of these proteins in the context of neurological diseases. PMID:20685377

  5. Involvement of heat shock proteins in gluten-sensitive enteropathy.

    PubMed

    Sziksz, Erna; Pap, Domonkos; Veres, Gábor; Fekete, Andrea; Tulassay, Tivadar; Vannay, Ádám

    2014-06-07

    Gluten-sensitive enteropathy, also known as coeliac disease (CD), is an autoimmune disorder occurring in genetically susceptible individuals that damages the small intestine and interferes with the absorption of other nutrients. As it is triggered by dietary gluten and related prolamins present in wheat, rye and barley, the accepted treatment for CD is a strict gluten-free diet. However, a complete exclusion of gluten-containing cereals from the diet is often difficult, and new therapeutic strategies are urgently needed. A class of proteins that have already emerged as drug targets for other autoimmune diseases are the heat shock proteins (HSPs), which are highly conserved stress-induced chaperones that protect cells against harmful extracellular factors. HSPs are expressed in several tissues, including the gastrointestinal tract, and their levels are significantly increased under stress circumstances. HSPs exert immunomodulatory effects, and also play a crucial role in the maintenance of epithelial cell structure and function, as they are responsible for adequate protein folding, influence the degradation of proteins and cell repair processes after damage, and modulate cell signalling, cell proliferation and apoptosis. The present review discusses the involvement of HSPs in the pathophysiology of CD. Furthermore, HSPs may represent a useful therapeutic target for the treatment of CD due to the cytoprotective, immunomodulatory, and anti-apoptotic effects in the intestinal mucosal barrier.

  6. Riboflavin protects mice against liposaccharide-induced shock through expression of heat shock protein 25

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Riboflavin (vitamin B2) is a water-soluble vitamin essential for normal cellular functions, growth and development. The study was aimed at investigating the effects of vitamin B2 on the survival rate, and expressions of tissue heat shock protein 25 (HSP25) and heat shock factor 1 (HSF1) in mice und...

  7. Heat-shock response in cultured chick embryo chondrocytes. Osteonectin is a secreted heat-shock protein.

    PubMed

    Neri, M; Descalzi-Cancedda, F; Cancedda, R

    1992-04-15

    We investigated the induction of specific protein expression by heat shock in dedifferentiated and hypertrophic chick embryo chondrocytes in a culture system that allows 'in vitro' differentiation of cartilage cells [Castagnola, P., Moro, G., Descalzi-Cancedda, F. and Cancedda, R. (1986) J. Cell. Biol. 102, 2310-2317]. As control, we used cultures of embryonic fibroblasts from the whole body and from the skin. In the cell lysates of all cultures we identified four major heat-shock proteins (HSP), with a molecular size corresponding to HSP families previously described (HSP 90, HSP 70, HSP 47 and HSP 26). Some of these proteins were constantly induced when the temperature was raised, others were expressed in a more variable manner. Differences also existed in the relative amount of the HSP synthesized by the four cultures. When we specifically investigated HSP species released into the culture medium, we observed a 43-45 kDa protein constantly expressed and secreted in large amount by the cells. On the basis of its biochemical characteristic and its precipitation by specific antibodies, this protein has been identified as osteonectin (SPARC, BM-40).

  8. Report on the VIIth International Symposium on Heat Shock Proteins in Biology & Medicine.

    PubMed

    Calderwood, Stuart K; Hightower, Lawrence E

    2015-03-01

    This seventh symposium in a series on heat shock proteins in biology and medicine was held November 1-5, 2014, at the Hilton Hotel in Old Town Alexandria, Virginia. Approximately 70 participants including principal investigators, postdoctoral fellows, and graduate students were in attendance. The major themes were: new properties of heat shock proteins (HSPs) and heat shock factor (HSF) and role in the etiology of cancer, molecular chaperones in aging, extracellular HSPs in inflammation and immunity, role of heat shock and the heat shock response in immunity and cancer, protein aggregation disorders and HSP expression, and Hsp70 in blood cell differentiation. The next meeting is planned for the fall of 2016 in the same venue.

  9. EXTRACELLULAR HEAT SHOCK PROTEINS: A NEW LOCATION, A NEW FUNCTION

    PubMed Central

    De Maio, Antonio; Vazquez, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    The expression of heat shock proteins (hsp) is a basic and well conserved cellular response to an array of stresses. These proteins are involved in the repair of cellular damage induced by the stress, which is necessary for the salutary resolution from the insult. Moreover, they confer protection from subsequent insults, which has been coined stress tolerance. Since these proteins are expressed in subcellular compartments, it was thought that their function during stress conditions was circumscribed to the intracellular environment. However, it is now well established that hsp can also be present outside cells where they appear to display a function different than the well understood chaperone role. Extracellular hsp act as alert stress signals priming other cells, particularly of the immune system, to avoid the propagation of the insult and favor resolution. Since the majority of hsp do not possess a secretory peptide signal, they are likely be exported by a non-classical secretory pathway. Different mechanisms have been proposed to explain the export of hsp, including translocation across the plasma membrane and release associated with lipid vesicles, as well as the passive release after cell death by necrosis. Extracellular hsp appear in various flavors, including membrane-bound and membrane-free forms. All of these variants of extracellular hsp suggest that their interactions with cells may be quite diverse, both in target cell types and the activation signaling pathways. This review addresses some of our current knowledge about the release and relevance of extracellular hsp. PMID:23807250

  10. Heat Shock Proteins in Dermatophytes: Current Advances and Perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Martinez-Rossi, Nilce M.; Jacob, Tiago R.; Sanches, Pablo R.; Peres, Nalu T.A.; Lang, Elza A.S.; Martins, Maíra P.; Rossi, Antonio

    2016-01-01

    Heat shock proteins (HSPs) are proteins whose transcription responds rapidly to temperature shifts. They constitute a family of molecular chaperones, involved in the proper folding and stabilisation of proteins under physiological and adverse conditions. HSPs also assist in the protection and recovery of cells exposed to a variety of stressful conditions, including heat. The role of HSPs extends beyond chaperoning proteins, as they also participate in diverse cellular functions, such as the assembly of macromolecular complexes, protein transport and sorting, dissociation of denatured protein aggregates, cell cycle control, and programmed cell death. They are also important antigens from a variety of pathogens, are able to stimulate innate immune cells, and are implicated in acquired immunity. In fungi, HSPs have been implicated in virulence, dimorphic transition, and drug resistance. Some HSPs are potential targets for therapeutic strategies. In this review, we discuss the current understanding of HSPs in dermatophytes, which are a group of keratinophilic fungi responsible for superficial mycoses in humans and animals. Computational analyses were performed to characterise the group of proteins in these dermatophytes, as well as to assess their conservation and to identify DNA-binding domains (5′-nGAAn-3′) in the promoter regions of the hsp genes. In addition, the quantification of the transcript levels of few genes in a pacC background helped in the development of an extended model for the regulation of the expression of the hsp genes, which supports the participation of the pH-responsive transcriptional regulator PacC in this process. PMID:27226766

  11. A nuclear protein associated with lethal heat shock of HL-60 cells.

    PubMed

    Pipkin, J L; Hinson, W G; Lyn-Cook, L E; Burns, E R; Sheehan, D; Casciano, D A

    1992-09-01

    The responses to stress in living cells are well known. Thermal stress causes decreased protein synthesis as well as rapid induction of heat shock proteins (hsps), or alternately termed stress proteins (sps). The exposure of cultured promyelocytic leukemia cells (HL-60) to a 45 degrees C lethal heat shock for 1 h elicited synthesis and phosphorylation of a polypeptide M(r) 48,000 and pI 7.5 (p 48) as visualized by two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel ultra-microelectrophoresis. p 48, which was not observed at sublethal temperatures (39 and 41 degrees C), was synthesized during all phases of the cell cycle but was phosphorylated only in G0 + G1 and S-phases. The appearance of p 48 was marked by a concomitant and reciprocal reduction in hsps or sps 70 and 90. Distinct protease V8 fragment maps of p 48, hsps 70 and 90 in conjunction with immunochemical determination indicated vast differences in their primary structures. These facts suggest that p 48 was not formed from coalesced breakdown products of hsps 70 or 90. Western blotting showed that p 48 possessed the same immunochemical determinants as two other proteins with the same molecular mass but different isoelectric points. In an association assay, p 48 was shown to bind with actins and hsp 90 from HL-60 nuclei.

  12. Decrease in penicillin susceptibility due to heat shock protein ClpL in Streptococcus pneumoniae.

    PubMed

    Tran, Thao Dang-Hien; Kwon, Hyog-Young; Kim, Eun-Hye; Kim, Ki-Woo; Briles, David E; Pyo, Suhkneung; Rhee, Dong-Kwon

    2011-06-01

    Antibiotic resistance and tolerance are increasing threats to global health as antibiotic-resistant bacteria can cause severe morbidity and mortality and can increase treatment cost 10-fold. Although several genes contributing to antibiotic tolerance among pneumococci have been identified, we report here that ClpL, a major heat shock protein, could modulate cell wall biosynthetic enzymes and lead to decreased penicillin susceptibility. On capsular type 1, 2, and 19 genetic backgrounds, mutants lacking ClpL were more susceptible to penicillin and had thinner cell walls than the parental strains, whereas a ClpL-overexpressing strain showed a higher resistance to penicillin and a thicker cell wall. Although exposure of Streptococcus pneumoniae D39 to penicillin inhibited expression of the major cell wall synthesis gene pbp2x, heat shock induced a ClpL-dependent increase in the mRNA levels and protein synthesized by pbp2x. Inducible ClpL expression correlated with PBP2x expression and penicillin susceptibility. Fractionation and electron micrograph data revealed that ClpL induced by heat shock is localized at the cell wall, and the ΔclpL showed significantly reduced net translocation of PBP2x into the cell wall. Moreover, coimmunoprecipitation with either ClpL or PBP2x antibody followed by reprobing with ClpL or PBP2x antibody showed an interaction between ClpL and PBP2x after heat stress. This interaction was confirmed by His tag pulldown assay with either ClpLHis₆ or PBP2xHis₆. Thus, ClpL stabilized pbp2x expression, interacted with PBP2x, and facilitated translocation of PBP2x, a key protein of cell wall synthesis process, contributing to the decrease of antibiotic susceptibility in S. pneumoniae.

  13. Heat shock factor 2 is associated with the occurrence of lung cancer by enhancing the expression of heat shock proteins

    PubMed Central

    Zhong, Yun-Hua; Cheng, Hong-Zhong; Peng, Hao; Tang, Shi-Cong; Wang, Ping

    2016-01-01

    Cancer is the leading cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide, particularly lung cancer. Heat shock proteins and their upstream heat shock factors are involved in the occurrence of cancer and have been widely researched. However, the role of heat shock factor 2 (HSF2) in lung cancer remains unclear. In the present study, expression levels of HSF2 in lung cancer tissues from 50 lung cancer patients were detected by reverse transcription quantitative polymerase chain reaction, and 76% (38/50) were upregulated compared with the matched normal tissues. This suggested possible involvement of HSF2 in lung cancer. To additionally investigate the role of HSF2 in lung cancer occurrence, a plasmid encoding HSF2 was constructed. HSF2 was over expressed in normal lung epithelial BEAS-2B cells and lung cancer A549 cells. The results showed that HSF2 overexpression promoted cell proliferation and cell migration in BEAS-2B and A549 cells. Additional experiments showed that the HSF2-induced cell proliferation and cell migration were dependent on induction of HSPs, particularly HSP27 and HSP90, as co-transfection of HSP27 small interfering RNA (siRNA) or HSP90 siRNA attenuated HSF2-induced cell growth and migration. In conclusion, the present study showed that HSF2 is aberrantly expressed in lung cancer, and it may be an upstream regulator of HSPs, which may strongly affect cell growth and cell migration. Additional studies are required to explain the detailed mechanism between lung cancer, HSF2, HSPs and other possible signaling pathways. PMID:28101237

  14. The Role of Heat Shock Proteins in Antigen Cross Presentation

    PubMed Central

    Murshid, Ayesha; Gong, Jianlin; Calderwood, Stuart K.

    2012-01-01

    Heat shock proteins (HSPs) are molecular chaperones that bind tumor antigens and mediate their uptake into antigen presenting cells. HSP–antigen complexes are then directed toward either the MHC class I pathway through antigen cross presentation or the conventional class II pathway, leading to activation of T cell subsets. Uptake of HSP-chaperoned polypeptides can involve both receptor-mediated and receptor-independent routes, and mechanisms of antigen sorting between the Class I and II pathways after uptake are currently under investigation. The processes involved in internalization of HSP–antigen complexes differ somewhat from the mechanisms previously determined for (unchaperoned) particulate and free soluble antigens. A number of studies show that HSP-facilitated antigen cross presentation requires uptake of the complexes by scavenger receptors (SR) followed by processing in the proteasome, and loading onto MHC class I molecules. In this review we have examined the roles of HSPs and SR in antigen uptake, sorting, processing, cell signaling, and activation of innate and adaptive immunity. PMID:22566944

  15. Heat shock protein expression enhances heat tolerance of reptile embryos.

    PubMed

    Gao, Jing; Zhang, Wen; Dang, Wei; Mou, Yi; Gao, Yuan; Sun, Bao-Jun; Du, Wei-Guo

    2014-09-22

    The role of heat shock proteins (HSPs) in heat tolerance has been demonstrated in cultured cells and animal tissues, but rarely in whole organisms because of methodological difficulties associated with gene manipulation. By comparing HSP70 expression patterns among representative species of reptiles and birds, and by determining the effect of HSP70 overexpression on embryonic development and hatchling traits, we have identified the role of HSP70 in the heat tolerance of amniote embryos. Consistent with their thermal environment, and high incubation temperatures and heat tolerance, the embryos of birds have higher onset and maximum temperatures for induced HSP70 than do reptiles, and turtles have higher onset and maximum temperatures than do lizards. Interestingly, the trade-off between benefits and costs of HSP70 overexpression occurred between life-history stages: when turtle embryos developed at extreme high temperatures, HSP70 overexpression generated benefits by enhancing embryo heat tolerance and hatching success, but subsequently imposed costs by decreasing heat tolerance of surviving hatchlings. Taken together, the correlative and causal links between HSP70 and heat tolerance provide, to our knowledge, the first unequivocal evidence that HSP70 promotes thermal tolerance of embryos in oviparous amniotes.

  16. The bromodomain protein BRD4 regulates splicing during heat shock

    PubMed Central

    Hussong, Michelle; Kaehler, Christian; Kerick, Martin; Grimm, Christina; Franz, Alexandra; Timmermann, Bernd; Welzel, Franziska; Isensee, Jörg; Hucho, Tim; Krobitsch, Sylvia; Schweiger, Michal R.

    2017-01-01

    The cellular response to heat stress is an ancient and evolutionarily highly conserved defence mechanism characterised by the transcriptional up-regulation of cyto-protective genes and a partial inhibition of splicing. These features closely resemble the proteotoxic stress response during tumor development. The bromodomain protein BRD4 has been identified as an integral member of the oxidative stress as well as of the inflammatory response, mainly due to its role in the transcriptional regulation process. In addition, there are also several lines of evidence implicating BRD4 in the splicing process. Using RNA-sequencing we found a significant increase in splicing inhibition, in particular intron retentions (IR), following heat treatment in BRD4-depleted cells. This leads to a decrease of mRNA abundancy of the affected transcripts, most likely due to premature termination codons. Subsequent experiments revealed that BRD4 interacts with the heat shock factor 1 (HSF1) such that under heat stress BRD4 is recruited to nuclear stress bodies and non-coding SatIII RNA transcripts are up-regulated. These findings implicate BRD4 as an important regulator of splicing during heat stress. Our data which links BRD4 to the stress induced splicing process may provide novel mechanisms of BRD4 inhibitors in regard to anti-cancer therapies. PMID:27536004

  17. The role of small heat shock proteins in parasites.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Morales, Deyanira; Espinoza, Bertha

    2015-09-01

    The natural life cycle of many protozoan and helminth parasites involves exposure to several hostile environmental conditions. Under these circumstances, the parasites arouse a cellular stress response that involves the expression of heat shock proteins (HSPs). Small HSPs (sHSPs) constitute one of the main families of HSPs. The sHSPs are very divergent at the sequence level, but their secondary and tertiary structures are conserved and some of its members are related to α-crystallin from vertebrates. They are involved in a variety of cellular processes. As other HSPs, the sHSPs act as molecular chaperones; however, they have shown other activities apparently not related to chaperone action. In this review, the diverse activities of sHSPs in the major genera of protozoan and helminth parasites are described. These include stress response, development, and immune response, among others. In addition, an analysis comparing the sequences of sHSPs from some parasites using a distance analysis is presented. Because many parasites face hostile conditions through its life cycles the study of HSPs, including sHSPs, is fundamental.

  18. The role of heat shock protein 90 in the regulation of tumor cell apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Kaigorodova, E V; Ryazantseva, N V; Novitskii, V V; Belkina, M V; Maroshkina, A N

    2011-02-01

    Programmed death of Jurkat tumor cells was studied under conditions of culturing with 17-AAG selective inhibitor of heat shock protein with a molecular weight of 90 kDa and etoposide. Apoptosis realization was evaluated by fluorescent microscopy with FITC-labeled annexin V and propidium iodide. Activity of caspase-3 was evaluated spectrophotometrically. Inhibition of heat shock protein with a molecular weight of 90 kDa activated the apoptotic program in Jurkat tumor cells and etoposide-induced apoptosis. The heat shock protein with a molecular weight of 90 kDa acted as apoptosis inhibitor in tumor cells.

  19. Induction of heat-shock response and alterations of protein phosphorylation by a novel topoisomerase II inhibitor, withangulatin A, in 9L rat brain tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Lee, W C; Lin, K Y; Chen, C M; Chen, Z T; Liu, H J; Lai, Y K

    1991-10-01

    Withangulatin A is a newly identified in vitro topoisomerase II inhibitor isolated from the Chinese antitumor herb Physalis angulata. In vivo, it was found to be cytotoxic, capable of suppressing general protein synthesis and of inducing the synthesis of a small set of proteins including those generated by heat-shock treatment. The 70 kDa protein generated by withangulatin A was unequivocally identified as the heat-shock protein 70 (HSP70) since both proteins migrated to the same position on two-dimensional polyacrylamide gels, could be recognized by a monoclonal antibody to human HSP70, and exhibited identical peptide maps. The induction of protein synthesis by withangulatin A was regulated at the transcriptional level since it was aborted in cells pre-treated with actinomycin D. However, the initiation of this process did not require de novo protein synthesis since it was not affected by cycloheximide. Other cellular effect of withangulatin A was alterations of protein phosphorylation including an enhancement of phosphorylation of a 65 kDa protein which was also detected in the heat-shocked cells. Moreover, this process was observed within 7.5 min after the initial heat treatment which is much faster than the onset of HSP synthesis. Therefore, increased phosphorylation of the 65 kDa protein may represent one of the earliest signals generated by both heat-shock and withangluatin A and may be involved in the upstream regulation of heat-shock response in cells.

  20. Heat Shock Protein 27 Mediated Signaling in Viral Infection

    PubMed Central

    Rajaiya, Jaya; Yousuf, Mohammad A.; Singh, Gurdeep; Stanish, Heather; Chodosh, James

    2013-01-01

    Heat shock proteins (HSPs) play a critical role in many intracellular processes, including apoptosis and delivery of other proteins to intracellular compartments. Small HSPs have been shown previously to participate in many cellular functions, including IL-8 induction. Human adenovirus infection activates intracellular signaling, involving particularly the c-Src and mitogen-activated protein kinases [Natarajan, K., et al. (2003) J. Immunol. 170, 6234–6243]. HSP27 and MK2 are also phosphorylated, and c-Src, and its downstream targets, p38, ERK1/2, and c-Jun-terminal kinase (JNK), differentially mediate IL-8 and MCP-1 expression. Specifically, activation and translocation of transcription factor NFκB-p65 occurs in a p38-dependent fashion [Rajaiya, J., et al. (2009) Mol. Vision 15, 2879–2889]. Herein, we report a novel role for HSP27 in an association of p38 with NFκB-p65. Immunoprecipitation assays of virus-infected but not mock-infected cells revealed a signaling complex including p38 and NFκB-p65. Transfection with HSP27 short interfering RNA (siRNA) but not scrambled RNA disrupted this association and reduced the level of IL-8 expression. Transfection with HSP27 siRNA also reduced the level of nuclear localization of NFκB-p65 and p38. By use of tagged p38 mutants, we found that amino acids 279–347 of p38 are necessary for the association of p38 with NFκB-p65. These studies strongly suggest that HSP27, p38, and NFκB-p65 form a signalosome in virus-infected cells and influence downstream expression of pro-inflammatory mediators. PMID:22734719

  1. KPNA3-knockdown eliminates the second heat shock protein peak associated with the heat shock response of male silkworm pupae (Bombyx mori) by reducing heat shock factor transport into the nucleus.

    PubMed

    Li, Jun; Wei, Guoqing; Wang, Lei; Qian, Cen; Li, Kedong; Zhang, Congfen; Dai, Lishang; Sun, Yu; Liu, Dongran; Zhu, Baojian; Liu, Chaoliang

    2016-01-10

    In this study, we investigated the role of karyopherin alpha 3 in the heat shock response in male silkworm pupae. Karyopherin alpha recognizes the classical nuclear location sequence on proteins and transports them into the nucleus by forming a trimetric complex with karyopherin beta. Three predicted karyopherin alphas (KPNA1, KPNA2 and KPNA3) have been identified from the silkworm Bombyx mori. Pull-down assay result showed that KPNA3 can pull down heat shock transcription factor (HSF) from proteins extracted from tissues using non-denature lysis buffer. After 45 °C heat shock on male B. mori pupae for 30 min, we identified two heat shock protein (HSP) mRNA expression peaks correlating with HSP19.9, HSP20.4 and HSP25.4 at 4 h (peak 1) and 24 h (peak 2). The second peak was eliminated after knockdown of KPNA3. Similar results were obtained following knockdown of HSF, which is the trans-activating factor of heat shock. However, KPNA3 knockdown was not accompanied by the decreased HSF protein levels at 24 h after heat shock which were observed following HSF knockdown. We also expressed recombinant protein GST-KPNA3 and His-HSF in Escherichia coli to perform GST pull-down assay and the result confirmed the interaction between KPNA3 and HSF. We concluded that KPNA3 knockdown eliminates the second heat shock protein peak in the heat shock response of male silkworm pupae by reducing HSF transport into the nucleus.

  2. Molecular identification and expression of heat shock cognate 70 (hsc70) and heat shock protein 70 (hsp70) genes in the Pacific oyster Crassostrea gigas

    PubMed Central

    Boutet, Isabelle; Tanguy, Arnaud; Rousseau, Sabrina; Auffret, Michel; Moraga, Dario

    2003-01-01

    The 70-kDa heat shock protein (Hsp) family is composed of both environmentally inducible (Hsp) and constitutively expressed (Hsc) family members. We sequenced 2 genes encoding an Hsp70 and an Hsc70 in the Pacific oyster Crassostrea gigas. The Cghsc70 gene contained introns, whereas the Cghsp70 gene did not. Moreover, the corresponding amino acid sequences of the 2 genes presented all the characteristic motifs of the Hsp70 family. We also investigated the expression of Hsp70 in tissues of oysters experimentally exposed to metal. A recombinant Hsc72 was used as an antigen to produce a polyclonal antibody to quantify soluble Hsp70 by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay in protein samples extracted from oysters. Our results showed that metals (copper and cadmium) induced a decrease in cytosolic Hsp70 level in gills and digestive gland of oysters experimentally exposed to metal. These data suggest that metals may inhibit stress protein synthesis. PMID:12820657

  3. Examination of KNK437- and quercetin-mediated inhibition of heat shock-induced heat shock protein gene expression in Xenopus laevis cultured cells.

    PubMed

    Manwell, Laurie A; Heikkila, John J

    2007-11-01

    We examined the effect of quercetin (3,3',4',5,7-pentahydroxyflavon) and KNK437 (N-formyl-3,4-methylenedioxy-benzylidene-gamma-butyrolactam), a benzylidene lactam compound, on heat-induced heat shock protein (hsp) gene expression in Xenopus laevis A6 kidney epithelial cells. In previous studies, both quercetin and KNK437 inhibited heat shock factor activity resulting in a repression of hsp mRNA and protein accumulation in human cultured cells. In this first study of the effect of these hsp gene expression inhibitors in a non-mammalian cell line, we report that both quercetin and KNK437 reduced the heat shock-induced accumulation of hsp30, hsp47 and hsp70 mRNA in X. laevis cultured cells. However, these inhibitors had no effect on the relative level of a non-heat shock protein mRNA, ef1alpha, in either control or heat shocked cells. Western blot and immunocytochemical analyses revealed that quercetin partially inhibited HSP30 protein accumulation. In contrast, HSP30 protein was not detectable in KNK437-treated cells. Finally, treatment of A6 cells with KNK437 inhibited the heat shock-induced acquisition of thermotolerance, as determined by preservation of actin filaments and cellular morphology using immunocytochemistry and laser scanning confocal microscopy.

  4. Circulating Heat Shock Protein 70 in Health, Aging and Disease

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Heat shock proteins (Hsp) are ubiquitously synthesised in virtually all species and it is hypothesised that they might have beneficial health effects. Recent studies have identified circulating Hsp as an important mediator in inflammation - the effects of low-grade inflammation in the aging process are overwhelming. While much is known about intracellular Hsp70, scant data exist on circulating Hsp70 in the aging context. Therefore, the objectives of this study were to investigate the effect of age and disease on circulating Hsp70 and, in particular, to evaluate the association between circulating Hsp70 and inflammatory parameters. Results Serum Hsp70, Interleukin (IL) -10, IL-6 and Tumor Necrosis Factor (TNF) alpha concentrations were determined in 90 hospitalised geriatric patients (aged 83 ± 6 years) and in 200 community-dwelling control subjects (100 elderly, aged 74 ± 5 years, and 100 young, aged 23 ± 3 years). In the community-dwelling elderly, serum Hsp70 and IL-10 concentrations were significantly lower and IL-6 was significantly higher when compared to healthy young control subjects. Elderly patients presenting inflammation (CRP serum levels ≥5 mg/L) showed significantly (p = 0.007) higher Hsp70 values; and Hsp70 correlated positively (p < 0.001) with IL-6 and CRP, but not with TNF-alpha or IL-10. A significant association was also noted between Hsp70 levels and the degree of dependency and cognitive decline in geriatric patients. Conclusions The present data provide new evidence that serum concentration of Hsp70 decreases with age in a normal population. Our study also shows that higher levels of Hsp70 are associated with inflammation and frailty in elderly patients. PMID:21443787

  5. Neurite outgrowth of NG108-15 cells induced by heat shock protein 90 inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Jin, Erika; Sano, Mamoru

    2008-12-01

    We previously reported that radicicol (Rad) and geldanamycin (Geld), heat shock protein 90 (Hsp90) inhibitors, potentiate neurite growth of cultured sensory neurons from chick embryo. We now show that the antibiotics induce neurite growth in NG108-15 cells. Treatment of the cells with these drugs caused transient decrease in protein levels of Raf1, ERK1/2, phosphorylated ERK1/2, Akt1, and CDK4. The neurite growth of NG108-15 induced by the inhibitors was blocked by actynomycin D, but the neurite growth stimulated by dbcAMP in the cells was not affected. The neurite growth could be due to a change in the synthesis of some specific protein(s) and is speculated to be due to the transient downregulation of particular-signaling molecules stabilized by Hsp90.

  6. BH3-only protein BIM mediates heat shock-induced apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Mahajan, Indra M; Chen, Miao-Der; Muro, Israel; Robertson, John D; Wright, Casey W; Bratton, Shawn B

    2014-01-01

    Acute heat shock can induce apoptosis through a canonical pathway involving the upstream activation of caspase-2, followed by BID cleavage and stimulation of the intrinsic pathway. Herein, we report that the BH3-only protein BIM, rather than BID, is essential to heat shock-induced cell death. We observed that BIM-deficient cells were highly resistant to heat shock, exhibiting short and long-term survival equivalent to Bax(-/-)Bak(-/-) cells and better than either Bid(-/-) or dominant-negative caspase-9-expressing cells. Only Bim(-/-) and Bax(-/-)Bak(-/-) cells exhibited resistance to mitochondrial outer membrane permeabilization and loss of mitochondrial inner membrane potential. Moreover, while dimerized caspase-2 failed to induce apoptosis in Bid(-/-) cells, it readily did so in Bim(-/-) cells, implying that caspase-2 kills exclusively through BID, not BIM. Finally, BIM reportedly associates with MCL-1 following heat shock, and Mcl-1(-/-) cells were indeed sensitized to heat shock-induced apoptosis. However, pharmacological inhibition of BCL-2 and BCL-X(L) with ABT-737 also sensitized cells to heat shock, most likely through liberation of BIM. Thus, BIM mediates heat shock-induced apoptosis through a BAX/BAK-dependent pathway that is antagonized by antiapoptotic BCL-2 family members.

  7. Immediate induction of heat shock proteins is not protective against cryopreservation in normal human fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Park, S J; Choi, H R; Nam, K M; Na, J I; Huh, C H; Park, K C

    2013-01-01

    Heat shock proteins (HSPs) were first identified as proteins whose synthesis was enhanced by stresses, such as increased temperature. HSPs can protect cells from various cytotoxic factors by stabilizing proteins. Thus, it could be hypothesized that heat induced HSPs can provide protective effects against cryopreservation-induced cell death. The aim of this study was to determine whether induction of HSPs can increase the cell viability of normal human fibroblasts after cryopreservation. Cytotoxic effects of heat treatment were tested and the induction of HSPs was assessed by examining time-dependent HSP expression. A cell counting method using fluorescence microscopy was used to determine the viability of cells. In addition, the effects of geranylgeranylacetone were evaluated in terms of HSP expression and cytoskeleton changes. The results of this study showed that immediate induction of HSPs does not protect normal human fibroblasts against cryopreservation-induced cell death possibly by inducing cytoskeleton changes.

  8. The Stress Granule RNA-Binding Protein TIAR-1 Protects Female Germ Cells from Heat Shock in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Huelgas-Morales, Gabriela; Silva-García, Carlos Giovanni; Salinas, Laura S; Greenstein, David; Navarro, Rosa E

    2016-04-07

    In response to stressful conditions, eukaryotic cells launch an arsenal of regulatory programs to protect the proteome. One major protective response involves the arrest of protein translation and the formation of stress granules, cytoplasmic ribonucleoprotein complexes containing the conserved RNA-binding proteins TIA-1 and TIAR. The stress granule response is thought to preserve mRNA for translation when conditions improve. For cells of the germline-the immortal cell lineage required for sexual reproduction-protection from stress is critically important for perpetuation of the species, yet how stress granule regulatory mechanisms are deployed in animal reproduction is incompletely understood. Here, we show that the stress granule protein TIAR-1 protects the Caenorhabditis elegans germline from the adverse effects of heat shock. Animals containing strong loss-of-function mutations in tiar-1 exhibit significantly reduced fertility compared to the wild type following heat shock. Analysis of a heat-shock protein promoter indicates that tiar-1 mutants display an impaired heat-shock response. We observed that TIAR-1 was associated with granules in the gonad core and oocytes during several stressful conditions. Both gonad core and oocyte granules are dynamic structures that depend on translation; protein synthesis inhibitors altered their formation. Nonetheless, tiar-1 was required for the formation of gonad core granules only. Interestingly, the gonad core granules did not seem to be needed for the germ cells to develop viable embryos after heat shock. This suggests that TIAR-1 is able to protect the germline from heat stress independently of these structures.

  9. The Stress Granule RNA-Binding Protein TIAR-1 Protects Female Germ Cells from Heat Shock in Caenorhabditis elegans

    PubMed Central

    Huelgas-Morales, Gabriela; Silva-García, Carlos Giovanni; Salinas, Laura S.; Greenstein, David; Navarro, Rosa E.

    2016-01-01

    In response to stressful conditions, eukaryotic cells launch an arsenal of regulatory programs to protect the proteome. One major protective response involves the arrest of protein translation and the formation of stress granules, cytoplasmic ribonucleoprotein complexes containing the conserved RNA-binding proteins TIA-1 and TIAR. The stress granule response is thought to preserve mRNA for translation when conditions improve. For cells of the germline—the immortal cell lineage required for sexual reproduction—protection from stress is critically important for perpetuation of the species, yet how stress granule regulatory mechanisms are deployed in animal reproduction is incompletely understood. Here, we show that the stress granule protein TIAR-1 protects the Caenorhabditis elegans germline from the adverse effects of heat shock. Animals containing strong loss-of-function mutations in tiar-1 exhibit significantly reduced fertility compared to the wild type following heat shock. Analysis of a heat-shock protein promoter indicates that tiar-1 mutants display an impaired heat-shock response. We observed that TIAR-1 was associated with granules in the gonad core and oocytes during several stressful conditions. Both gonad core and oocyte granules are dynamic structures that depend on translation; protein synthesis inhibitors altered their formation. Nonetheless, tiar-1 was required for the formation of gonad core granules only. Interestingly, the gonad core granules did not seem to be needed for the germ cells to develop viable embryos after heat shock. This suggests that TIAR-1 is able to protect the germline from heat stress independently of these structures. PMID:26865701

  10. Heat shock protein 70 of Naegleria fowleri is important factor for proliferation and in vitro cytotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Song, Kyoung-Ju; Song, Kyung-Hui; Kim, Jong-Hyun; Sohn, Hae-Jin; Lee, Yang-Jin; Park, Chang-Eun; Shin, Ho-Joon

    2008-07-01

    To evaluate the role of heat shock 70 protein (HSP70) in free-living amoeba, a constitutive and inducible heat shock 70 gene of pathogenic Naegleria fowleri has previously been cloned, characterized, and named as Nf-cHSP70. The Nf-cHSP70 is localized in the cytoplasm, pseudopodia, and phagocytic food-cups. To investigate the role of Nf-cHSP70 in the pathogenicity of N. fowleri, the synthesis of N. fowleri HSP70 was first inhibited with benzylidene lactam compound (KNK437), and Nf-cHSP70 gene was knock-downed with antisense oligomers, which were designed with a start region-specific antisense oligonucleotides (24 oligomers) and modified with phosphorothioate. KNK437 inhibited the induction of N. fowleri HSP70 in a dose-dependent manner. In addition, 300 muM KNK437 reduced the proliferation of N. fowleri to 79.4% of untreated control (100%). Nf-cHSP70 knock-downed N. fowleri with antisense oligomers showed 68.5% reduction of proliferation in comparison with untreated control (100%). The cytotoxicity of N. fowleri against CHO target cells was reduced to 42.1% by KNK437 and 68.6% by antisense oligomers. These results suggest that the cloned Nf-cHSP70 plays an important role in the proliferation and cytotoxicity of pathogenic N. fowleri.

  11. Hsp56: a novel heat shock protein associated with untransformed steroid receptor complexes.

    PubMed

    Sanchez, E R

    1990-12-25

    The recently-described p59 protein has been shown to be associated with untransformed steroid receptors present in rabbit uterus and rat liver cytosols (Tai, P. K., Maeda, Y., Nakao, K., Wakim, N. G., Duhring, J. L., and Faber, L. E. (1986) Biochemistry 25, 5269-5275; Renoir, J.-M., Radanyi, C., Faber, L. E., and Baulieu, E.-E. (1990) J. Biol. Chem. 265, 10740-10745), while a smaller version of this protein (p56) interacts with glucocorticoid receptors in human IM-9 cell cytosols (Sanchez, E. R., Faber, L. E., Henzel, W. J., and Pratt, W. B. (1990) Biochemistry 29, 5145-5152). In addition to interacting with glucocorticoid receptors, the p56 protein of IM-9 cell cytosol is also found as part of a large heteromeric complex that contains both the 70-kDa and 90-kDa heat shock proteins (hsp70 and hsp90, respectively). Given this association of p56 with the two major stress proteins, I have speculated that p56 may itself be a heat shock protein. In this paper, the effect of heat stress on the rate of synthesis of p56 is determined. Intact IM-9 cells were exposed to 37 or 43 degrees C for 4 h, followed by pulse-labeling with [35S]methionine. Analysis of whole cytosolic extracts by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and autoradiography reveal an increased rate of radiolabeling for hsp70, hsp90, hsp100, ad hsp110, but no heat-inducible protein of smaller relative molecular mass is detected. However, immune-purification of p56 from normal and heat-stressed cytosols with the EC1 monoclonal antibody results in the presence of a 56-kDa protein that exhibits an increased rate of synthesis in response to heat stress. The results of two-dimensional gel Western blots employing the EC1 antibody demonstrate that this heat-inducible protein is indeed the EC1-reactive p56 protein and that the induction effect is not due to unequal yields of p56 during immune-purification. Heat stress has no effect on the composition of the p56.hsp.70.hsp90 complex, except that

  12. Heat shock protein 70 and anti–heat shock protein 70 antibodies in nasal secretions of patients with chronic rhinosinusitis

    PubMed Central

    Tsybikov, Namjil N.; Egorova, Elena V.; Kuznik, Boris I.; Fefelova, Elena V.

    2016-01-01

    Background: The issue of heat shock protein (HSP) 70 and anti-HSP70 antibodies in chronic rhinosinusitis (CRS) has never been explored. Objective: To determine the nasal secretion (NS) levels of HSP70 and anti-HSP70 antibodies in patients with CRS with nasal polyps (CRSwNP) and patients with CRS without nasal polyps (CRSsNP), and to evaluate their associations with CRS clinical severity and correlation with NS interleukin (IL), IL-5 and interferon λ. Methods: CRS severity was determined by Lund-Mackay scores. Levels of immunoglobulin E (IgE), IL-4, IL-5, interferon λ, HSP70, and anti-HSP70 antibody levels in NS were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Results: Forty-six patients with CRSsNP (25 women [54.3%] and 21 men [45.7%], mean [standard deviation {SD}]) age, 34.1 ± 12.3 years; 54 patients with CRSwNP (24 women [44.4%] and 30 men [55.6%], mean [SD] age, 37.9 ± 17.5 years). A group of 40 healthy subjects served as controls. Compared with the controls (with a mean [SD] NS HSP70 level of 0.05 ± 0.03 μg/mL), mean [SD] NS HSP70 levels in both the CRSsNP group (0.16 ± 0.07 μg/mL) and CRSwNP group (0.21 ± 0.10 μg/mL) were increased (p < 0.001). Similarly, the mean (SD) NS anti-HSP70 antibody levels were significantly higher in patients with CRSwNP (0.25 ± 0.09 optical density value [ODV]) compared with CRSsNP (0.13 ± 0.04 ODV) (p < 0.001) and healthy controls (0.14 ± 0.02 ODV) (p < 0.001). NS HSP70 in subjects with CRSwNP showed a significant positive correlation with the Lund-Mackay score (r = 0.31; p < 0.05). NS levels of either HSP70 or anti-HSP70 antibodies were strongly correlated with NS IL-4 in the CRSwNP group (r = 0.62, p < 0.001; and r = 0.69, p < 0.001, respectively). Conclusion: NS concentrations of HSP70 and secretory IgA anti HSP70 antibodies are increased in CRSwNP (but not in CRSsNP) and correlate positively with the Lund-Mackay score, NS IL-4, and NS IL-5. PMID:27103555

  13. Heat shock proteins as key biological targets of the marine natural cyclopeptide perthamide C.

    PubMed

    Margarucci, Luigi; Monti, Maria Chiara; Mencarelli, Andrea; Cassiano, Chiara; Fiorucci, Stefano; Riccio, Raffaele; Zampella, Angela; Casapullo, Agostino

    2012-04-01

    Linking bioactive compounds to their cellular targets is a central challenge in chemical biology. Herein we report the mode of action of perthamide C, a natural cyclopeptide isolated from the marine sponge Theonella swinhoei. Through an emerging mass spectrometry-based chemical proteomics approach, Heat Shock Protein 90 and Glucose Regulated Protein 94 were identified as key targets of perthamide C and this evidence has been validated using surface plasmon resonance. The ability of perthamide C to influence heat shock protein-mediated cell apoptosis revealed that this marine metabolite could be a good candidate for the development of a lead compound with therapeutic applications based on apoptosis modulation.

  14. Heat Shock Protein Induction in Human Cells by CO2 Laser Irradiation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-06-14

    Boorstein W. A review of the role of 70 kD heat shock proteins in protein translocation across membranes. Antonie Van Leeuwenhoek 1990:58:137-46. 32...1991;65:363-366. 55. Young DB. Stress proteins and the immune response. Antonie Van Leeuwenhoek 1990;58:203-208. 56. Craig EA, Kramer J, Kosic-Smithers

  15. Cardioprotective effects of 70-kDa heat shock protein in transgenic mice.

    PubMed Central

    Radford, N B; Fina, M; Benjamin, I J; Moreadith, R W; Graves, K H; Zhao, P; Gavva, S; Wiethoff, A; Sherry, A D; Malloy, C R; Williams, R S

    1996-01-01

    Heat shock proteins are proposed to limit injury resulting from diverse environmental stresses, but direct metabolic evidence for such a cytoprotective function in vertebrates has been largely limited to studies of cultured cells. We generated lines of transgenic mice to express human 70-kDa heat shock protein constitutively in the myocardium. Hearts isolated from these animals demonstrated enhanced recovery of high energy phosphate stores and correction of metabolic acidosis following brief periods of global ischemia sufficient to induce sustained abnormalities of these variables in hearts from nontransgenic littermates. These data demonstrate a direct cardioprotective effect of 70-kDa heat shock protein to enhance postischemic recovery of the intact heart. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 3 PMID:8637874

  16. A review of acquired thermotolerance, heat shock proteins, and molecular chaperones in archaea

    SciTech Connect

    Trent, J.D.

    1996-05-01

    Acquired thermotolerance, the associated synthesis of heat-shock proteins (HSPs) under stress conditions, and the role of HSPs as molecular chaperones under normal growth conditions have been studied extensively in eukaryotes and bacteria, whereas research in these areas in archaea is only beginning. All organisms have evolved a variety of strategies for coping with high-temperature stress, and among these strategies is the increased synthesis of HSPs. The facts that both high temperatures and chemical stresses induce the HSPs and that some of the HSPs recognize and bind to unfolded proteins in vitro have led to the theory that the function of HSPs is to prevent protein aggregation in vivo. The facts that some HSPs are abundant under normal growth conditions and that they assist in protein folding in vitro have led to the theory that they assist protein folding in vivo; in this role, they are referred to as molecular chaperones. The limited research on acquired thermotolerance, HSPs, and molecular chaperones in archaea, particularly the hyperthermophilic archaea, suggests that these extremophiles provide a new perspective in these areas of research, both because they are members of a separate phylogenetic domain and because they have evolved to live under extreme conditions.

  17. Two RpoH homologs responsible for the expression of heat shock protein genes in Sinorhizobium meliloti.

    PubMed

    Ono, Y; Mitsui, H; Sato, T; Minamisawa, K

    2001-02-01

    We identified two rpoH-related genes encoding sigma32-like proteins from Sinorhizobium meliloti, a nitrogen-fixing root-nodule symbiont of alfalfa. The genes, rpoH1 and rpoH2, are functionally similar to rpoH of Escherichia coli because they partially complemented an E. coli rpoH null mutant. We obtained evidence indicating that these genes are involved in the heat shock response in S. meliloti. Following an increase in temperature, synthesis of several putative heat shock proteins (Hsps) was induced in cultures of wild-type cells: the most prominent were 66- and 60-kDa proteins, both of which are suggested to represent GroEL species. The other Hsps could divided into two groups based on differences in synthesis kinetics: synthesis of the first group peaked 5-10 min, and expression of the other group 30 min, after temperature upshift. In the rpoH1 mutant, inducible synthesis of the former group was markedly reduced, whereas that of the latter group was not affected. Synthesis of both the 66- and 60-kDa proteins was partially reduced. While no appreciable effect was observed in the rpoH2 single mutant, the rpoH2 mutation had a synergistic effect on the 60-kDa protein in the rpoH1- background. The results indicate that two distinct mechanisms are involved in the heat shock response of S. meliloti: one requires the rpoH1 function, while rpoH2 can substitute in part for the rpoH1 function. Moreover, the rpoH1 mutant and rpoH1 rpoH2 double mutant exhibited Nod+ Fix- and Nod- phenotypes, respectively, on alfalfa.

  18. Biology of the Heat Shock Response and Protein Chaperones: Budding Yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) as a Model System

    PubMed Central

    Verghese, Jacob; Abrams, Jennifer; Wang, Yanyu

    2012-01-01

    Summary: The eukaryotic heat shock response is an ancient and highly conserved transcriptional program that results in the immediate synthesis of a battery of cytoprotective genes in the presence of thermal and other environmental stresses. Many of these genes encode molecular chaperones, powerful protein remodelers with the capacity to shield, fold, or unfold substrates in a context-dependent manner. The budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae continues to be an invaluable model for driving the discovery of regulatory features of this fundamental stress response. In addition, budding yeast has been an outstanding model system to elucidate the cell biology of protein chaperones and their organization into functional networks. In this review, we evaluate our understanding of the multifaceted response to heat shock. In addition, the chaperone complement of the cytosol is compared to those of mitochondria and the endoplasmic reticulum, organelles with their own unique protein homeostasis milieus. Finally, we examine recent advances in the understanding of the roles of protein chaperones and the heat shock response in pathogenic fungi, which is being accelerated by the wealth of information gained for budding yeast. PMID:22688810

  19. Heat shock protein 72 (Hsp72) improves long term recovery after focal cerebral ischemia in mice.

    PubMed

    Xu, Lijun; Xiong, Xiaoxing; Ouyang, Yibing; Barreto, George; Giffard, Rona

    2011-01-25

    Many brain protective strategies have been tested over short survival intervals, but few have been examined for long term benefit. The inducible member of the Heat shock protein 70 (Hsp70) family, Heat shock protein 72 (Hsp72), has been widely found to reduce ischemic injury. Here we assessed outcome in Hsp72 transgenic overexpressing mice and wild type littermates for one month following transient focal ischemia. Hsp72 reduced infarct area lost and improved behavioral outcome on rotarod and foot fault at one month. Thus protection by Hsp72 overexpression is long lasting, and includes improved recovery of motor function over one month.

  20. Stress- and mitogen-induced phosphorylation of the small heat shock protein Hsp25 by MAPKAP kinase 2 is not essential for chaperone properties and cellular thermoresistance.

    PubMed Central

    Knauf, U; Jakob, U; Engel, K; Buchner, J; Gaestel, M

    1994-01-01

    Small heat shock proteins (sHsps) show a very rapid stress- and mitogen-dependent phosphorylation by MAPKAP kinase 2. Based on this observation, phosphorylation of sHsps was thought to play a key role in mediating thermoresistance immediately after heat shock, before the increased synthesis of heat shock proteins becomes relevant. We have analysed the phosphorylation dependence of the chaperone and thermoresistance-mediating properties of the small heat shock protein Hsp25. Surprisingly, overexpression of Hsp25 mutants, which are not phosphorylated in the transfected cells, confers the same thermoresistant phenotype as overexpression of wild type Hsp25, which is either mono- or bis-phosphorylated at serine residues 15 and 86 within the cells. Furthermore, in vitro phosphorylated Hsp25 shows the same oligomerization properties and the same chaperone activity as the nonphosphorylated protein. No differences between phosphorylated and nonphosphorylated Hsp25 are detected in preventing thermal aggregation of unfolding proteins and assisting refolding of denatured proteins. The results suggest that chaperone properties of the small heat shock proteins contribute to the increased cellular thermoresistance in a phosphorylation-independent manner. Images PMID:7905823

  1. Baculovirus replication induces the expression of heat shock proteins in vivo and in vitro

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A recent handful of studies have linked baculovirus infection with the induction of heat shock proteins, a highly conserved family of cytoprotective proteins. Here, we demonstrate baculovirus-stimulated upregulation of hsp70 transcription in the natural host, Helicoverpa zea. Larvae lethally infec...

  2. Phylogenetic analysis of heat shock proteins in Glassy-winged sharpshooter (Homalodisca vitripennis)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Heat shock proteins were identified in the glassy-winged sharpshooter, GWSS, Homalodisca vitripennis. The overall importance and function of HSPs lie in their ability to maintain protein integrity and activity during stressful conditions, such as extreme heat, cold, drought, or other stresses. The G...

  3. Human immune response directed against Plasmodium falciparum heat shock-related proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, N; Zhao, Y; Graves, P; Perez Folgar, J; Maloy, L; Zheng, H

    1990-01-01

    Heat shock-related stress proteins present in all eucaryotes and procaryotes have been shown to be immune targets in a broad range of infections. We have analyzed sera from people exposed primarily to Plasmodium falciparum for specific antibodies against two heat shock-related proteins (proteins similar to the heat shock protein with a molecular weight of 75,000 [Pfhsp] and a glucose-regulated protein with a molecular weight of 72,000 [Pfgrp]). In an immunoprecipitation analysis with metabolically labeled parasites and synthetic peptides in an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, specific antibodies against Pfhsp and Pfgrp were detected in the sera of these individuals. Sera from people exposed to a different human malarial parasite, Plasmodium vivax, did not react with the peptides in an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Southern blot analysis with DNA isolated from P. falciparum from different geographical locations showed a conservation of genes for these stress proteins; thus, they are likely to be immune targets in various endemic areas. Lymphocytes from two tested immune donors responded in proliferation assays to purified Pfhsp and Pfgrp and purified recombinant proteins. However, a similar response was also seen in lymphocytes from nonimmune individuals and has raised questions pertaining to a generalized responsiveness of lymphocytes to some common determinants present in heat shock-related proteins in various pathogens. Images PMID:1691147

  4. Retaspimycin hydrochloride (IPI-504): a novel heat shock protein inhibitor as an anticancer agent.

    PubMed

    Hanson, Britt Erika; Vesole, David H

    2009-09-01

    Heat shock proteins are vital to cell survival under conditions of stress. They bind client proteins to assist in protein stabilization, translocation of polypeptides across cell membranes and recovery of proteins from aggregates. Heat shock protein inhibitors are a diverse group of novel agents that have been demonstrated to have pro-apoptotic effects on malignant cells through inhibition of ATP binding on the ATP/ADP-binding pocket of the heat shock protein. Initial development of heat shock protein 90 inhibitors, geldanamycin and 17-AAG, were limited by hepatotoxicity and the need for solvent carrying agents. In contrast, retaspimycin, or IPI-504, a derivative of geldanamycin and 17-AAG, is highly soluble in water and generally well tolerated. In Phase I/II trials, retaspimycin has shown activity in NSCLC and gastrointestinal stromal tumor. The most promising activity was observed in gastrointestinal stromal tumors. Phase I/II trials are currently underway to evaluate the dosing schedules and activity of IPI-504 in breast cancer. Given the in vitro activity in diffuse large B-cell lymphoma, mantle cell lymphoma, melanoma, leukemia and pancreatic cancer, current and future trials are of clinical interest. This article reviews IPI-504 and its utility in a wide variety of cancer phenotypes.

  5. Genes for Drosophila small heat shock proteins are regulated differently by ecdysterone

    SciTech Connect

    Amin, J.; Voellmy, R. ); Mestril, R. )

    1991-12-01

    Genes for small heat shock proteins (hsp27 to hsp22) are activated in late third-instar larvae of Drosophila melanogaster in the absence of heat stress. This regulation has been stimulated in cultured Drosophila cells in which the genes are activated by the addition of ecdysterone. Sequence elements (HERE) involved in ecdysterone regulation of the hsp27 and hsp23 genes have been defined by transfection studies and have recently been identified as binding sites for ecdysterone receptor. The authors report here that the shp27 and hsp23 genes are regulated differently by ecdysterone. The hsp27 gene is activated rapidly by ecdysterone, even in the absence of protein synthesis. In contrast, high-level expression of the hsp23 gene begins only after a lag of about 6 h, is dependent on the continuous presence of ecdysterone, and is sensitive to low concentrations of protein synthesis inhibitors. Transfection experiments with reported constructs show that this difference in regulation is at the transcriptional level. Synthetic hsp27 or hsp23 HERE sequences confer hsp27- or hsp23-type ecdysterone regulation on a basal promoter. These findings indicate that the hsp27 gene is primary, and the hsp23 gene is mainly a secondary, hormone-responsive gene. Ecdysterone receptor is implied to play a role in the regulation of both genes.

  6. BAG3 Is a Modular, Scaffolding Protein that physically Links Heat Shock Protein 70 (Hsp70) to the Small Heat Shock Proteins.

    PubMed

    Rauch, Jennifer N; Tse, Eric; Freilich, Rebecca; Mok, Sue-Ann; Makley, Leah N; Southworth, Daniel R; Gestwicki, Jason E

    2017-01-06

    Small heat shock proteins (sHsps) are a family of ATP-independent molecular chaperones that are important for binding and stabilizing unfolded proteins. In this task, the sHsps have been proposed to coordinate with ATP-dependent chaperones, including heat shock protein 70 (Hsp70). However, it is not yet clear how these two important components of the chaperone network are linked. We report that the Hsp70 co-chaperone, BAG3, is a modular, scaffolding factor to bring together sHsps and Hsp70s. Using domain deletions and point mutations, we found that BAG3 uses both of its IPV motifs to interact with sHsps, including Hsp27 (HspB1), αB-crystallin (HspB5), Hsp22 (HspB8), and Hsp20 (HspB6). BAG3 does not appear to be a passive scaffolding factor; rather, its binding promoted de-oligomerization of Hsp27, likely by competing for the self-interactions that normally stabilize large oligomers. BAG3 bound to Hsp70 at the same time as Hsp22, Hsp27, or αB-crystallin, suggesting that it might physically bring the chaperone families together into a complex. Indeed, addition of BAG3 coordinated the ability of Hsp22 and Hsp70 to refold denatured luciferase in vitro. Together, these results suggest that BAG3 physically and functionally links Hsp70 and sHsps.

  7. Absolute protein quantification of the yeast chaperome under conditions of heat shock

    PubMed Central

    Mackenzie, Rebecca J.; Lawless, Craig; Holman, Stephen W.; Lanthaler, Karin; Beynon, Robert J.; Grant, Chris M.; Hubbard, Simon J.

    2016-01-01

    Chaperones are fundamental to regulating the heat shock response, mediating protein recovery from thermal‐induced misfolding and aggregation. Using the QconCAT strategy and selected reaction monitoring (SRM) for absolute protein quantification, we have determined copy per cell values for 49 key chaperones in Saccharomyces cerevisiae under conditions of normal growth and heat shock. This work extends a previous chemostat quantification study by including up to five Q‐peptides per protein to improve confidence in protein quantification. In contrast to the global proteome profile of S. cerevisiae in response to heat shock, which remains largely unchanged as determined by label‐free quantification, many of the chaperones are upregulated with an average two‐fold increase in protein abundance. Interestingly, eight of the significantly upregulated chaperones are direct gene targets of heat shock transcription factor‐1. By performing absolute quantification of chaperones under heat stress for the first time, we were able to evaluate the individual protein‐level response. Furthermore, this SRM data was used to calibrate label‐free quantification values for the proteome in absolute terms, thus improving relative quantification between the two conditions. This study significantly enhances the largely transcriptomic data available in the field and illustrates a more nuanced response at the protein level. PMID:27252046

  8. On the path to the heat shock response: destabilization and formation of partially folded protein intermediates, a consequence of protein thiol modification.

    PubMed

    Freeman, M L; Borrelli, M J; Meredith, M J; Lepock, J R

    1999-03-01

    This review discusses the initial events that occur during oxidative stress that induce the synthesis of heat shock proteins. The focus is on non-native oxidation or modification of protein thiols and the destablization that can result. Proteins that contain non-native modified thiols can become destablized such that they unfold into molten globule-like intermediates at or below 37 degrees C, relieving Hsf-1 negative regulation, and inducing Hsp transcription.

  9. EFFECT OF EXPOSURE PROTOCOL AND HEAT SHOCK PROTEIN EXPRESSION ON ARSENITE INDUCED GENOTOXICITY IN MCF-7 BREAST CANCER CELLS

    EPA Science Inventory


    Effect of exposure protocol and heat shock protein expression on arsenite induced genotoxicity in MCF-7 breast cancer cells

    The genotoxic effects of arsenic (As) are well accepted, yet its mechanism of action is not clearly defined. Heat-shock proteins (HSPs) protect...

  10. Antibodies to two major chicken heat shock proteins cross-react with similar proteins in widely divergent species.

    PubMed Central

    Kelley, P M; Schlesinger, M J

    1982-01-01

    Three of the proteins induced by heat shock of chicken embryo fibroblasts have been purified, and rabbit antibodies have been raised against them. These antibodies have been used in radioimmune precipitation reactions and in a solid-phase immune assay to detect antigenic material in non-heat-shocked chicken tissues and in extracts of widely different species ranging from yeast to mammalian tissue culture cells and human erythrocyte ghosts. Antibodies to two of the major chicken heat shock proteins, chsp89 and chsp70, cross-reacted with proteins of similar molecular weights in normal embryonic and adult chicken tissues and in extracts from widely different organisms. These data provide further evidence for the university of the heat shock response and conservation of proteins induced by this type of stress. Images PMID:7110134

  11. CHEMOSENSITIZATION BY A NON-APOPTOGENIC HEAT SHOCK PROTEIN 70-BINDING APOPTOSIS INDUCING FACTOR MUTANT

    EPA Science Inventory

    Chemosensitization by a non-apoptogenic heat shock protein 70-binding apoptosis inducing factor mutant

    Abstract
    HSP70 inhibits apoptosis by neutralizing the caspase activator Apaf-1 and by interacting with apoptosis inducing factor (AIF), a mitochondrial flavoprotein wh...

  12. Upregulation of Heat Shock Proteins is Essential for Cold Survival during Insect Diapause

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Diapause, the dormancy common to overwintering insects, evokes a unique pattern of gene expression. In the flesh fly most, but not all, of the fly’s heat shock proteins (Hsps) are upregulated. The diapause upregulated Hsps include two members of the Hsp70 family, one member of the Hsp60 family (TC...

  13. Heat shock proteins as a target for phylogenetic analysis of Homalodisca vitripennis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Production of genomic data from the glassy-winged sharpshooter has identified a set of heat shock proteins which may be used to further the understanding of leafhopper biology and genetics. The glassy-winged sharpshooter, GWSS, Homalodisca vitripennis (Germar)(Hemiptera: Cicadellidae), is the major ...

  14. Phylogenetic analysis of heat shock proteins in Glassy-winged sharpshooter

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Four heat shock protein transcripts were produced from the glassy-winged sharpshooter Homalodisca vitripennis (Germar) (Hemiptera: Cicadellidae) which is the major vector of Xylella fastidiosa, the causal agent of Pierce’s disease of grapes. As genomic information has continued to be produced resea...

  15. Calving traits of crossbred Brahman Cows are Associated with Heat Shock Protein 70 Genetic Polymorphisms

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Objectives were to: 1) identify single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) located in the promoter region of the bovine heat shock protein 70 gene, and 2) evaluate associations between Hsp70 SNP and calving rates of Brahman-influenced cows. Specific primers were designed for PCR amplification of a 539 b...

  16. THE EFFECTS OF HEAT SHOCK PROTEIN 70 (HSP70) AND EXPOSURE PROTOCOL ON ARSENITE INDUCED GENOTOXICITY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Effects of Heat Shock Protein 70 (Hsp70) and Exposure Protocol on Arsenite Induced Genotoxicity

    Barnes, J.A.1,2, Collins, B.W.2, Dix, D.J.3 and Allen J.W2.
    1National Research Council, 2Environmental Carcinogenesis Division, 3Reproductive Toxicology Division, Office...

  17. Possible involvement of phosphorylated heat-shock factor-1 in changes in heat shock protein 72 induction in the failing rat heart following myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Marunouchi, Tetsuro; Murata, Mao; Takagi, Norio; Tanonaka, Kouichi

    2013-01-01

    It is supposed that an increase in the level of heat shock protein 72 (HSP72) in the failing heart would be beneficial for reducing the myocardial damage. However, the induction of HSP72 after an exposure to heat shock is blunted in the failing rat heart following myocardial infarction. In this study, to clarify the possible mechanisms underlying this reduction in the ability for HSP72 induction in the failing heart, the possible involvement of heat-shock factor-1 (HSF1), an HSP transcription factor, in this reduction was examined. When hemodynamic parameters of rats with myocardial infarction 8 weeks after coronary artery ligation were measured, the animals showed the signs of chronic heart failure. The HSF1 content was increased in the viable myocardium in the failing heart. The ability to induce cardiac HSP72 was reduced after an exposure to hyperthermia. The level of HSF1 in the cytosolic fraction from the failing heart with or without exposure to hyperthermia was increased, whereas that of HSF1 in the nuclear fraction was reduced. In the failing heart, the level of HSF1 on its serine 303 (Ser303) residue, which phosphorylation represses HSF1, was increased. These findings suggest that HSF1 translocation from the cytosol into the nucleus was attenuated after an exposure to hyperthermia and that an increase in the phosphorylation of HSF1 Ser303 was involved in the impairment of heat shock-induced HSP72 induction in the failing heart following myocardial infarction.

  18. Induction of a chicken small heat shock (stress) protein: evidence of multilevel posttranscriptional regulation.

    PubMed Central

    Edington, B V; Hightower, L E

    1990-01-01

    A novel form of regulation of expression of a vertebrate heat shock gene is described. A cDNA clone encoding human Hsp27 was shown to specifically recognize chicken Hsp23 RNA by Northern (RNA) blot analysis and hybrid-select translation. This probe was then used to measure chicken hsp23 gene activity in control and heat-stressed cells. The hsp23 gene(s) was transcriptionally active in non-heat-stressed cells, and its rate of transcription did not increase significantly upon heat shock. Cytoplasmic Hsp23 mRNA, which was metabolically very stable in nonstressed cells, underwent a fourfold increase in amount after a 1-h heat shock, resulting in a twofold increase in Hsp23 mRNA in polysomes. Hsp23 mRNA was relatively abundant and translationally active even in non-heat-shocked cells. Taken together, these data implicated posttranscriptional nuclear events as an important control point for induction of Hsp23 RNA transcripts. The protein half-life of Hsp23 increased from approximately 2 h in control cultures to 13 h in heat-shocked cells, revealing a second major control point. Hsp23 which was synthesized prior to heat shock also increased in stability and contributed to the overall accumulation of Hsp23 in heat-shocked cells. Cycloheximide had no effect on this change in Hsp23 half-life, while dactinomycin blocked the stabilization of Hsp23, suggesting a need for newly synthesized RNA. These data indicated that stabilization of Hsp23 protein and posttranscriptional nuclear events resulting in increased production of Hsp23 mRNA were primarily responsible for a 13-fold increase in the accumulation of newly synthesized Hsp23 after 1 h of heat shock. The regulation of the hsp23 gene is discussed in comparison with several other posttranscriptionally regulated genes, including the proto-oncogene c-fos, the developmentally regulated chicken delta-crystallin gene, and regulation of cellular gene expression by the proto-oncogene c-myc. Images PMID:2388629

  19. Response to heat shock of different sea urchin species.

    PubMed

    Roccheri, M C; Sconzo, G; La Rosa, M; Oliva, D; Abrignani, A; Giudice, G

    1986-03-01

    It is demonstrated that sea urchin embryos of the species Sphaerechinus granularis are able to respond to heat shock by producing heat shock proteins at the same stage as embryos of Paracentrotus lividus, i.e. after hatching. Arbacia lixula embryos are able to synthesize heat shock proteins already at the stage of 64-128 blastomeres. Embryonic survival is observed if the embryos are heated at the stages at which they can synthesize the heat shock proteins. The inhibition of the bulk protein synthesis after heating at 31 degrees C is never less than 50%.

  20. Axonal maintenance, glia, exosomes, and heat shock proteins

    PubMed Central

    Tytell, Michael; Lasek, Raymond J.; Gainer, Harold

    2016-01-01

    Of all cellular specializations, the axon is especially distinctive because it is a narrow cylinder of specialized cytoplasm called axoplasm with a length that may be orders of magnitude greater than the diameter of the cell body from which it originates. Thus, the volume of axoplasm can be much greater than the cytoplasm in the cell body. This fact raises a logistical problem with regard to axonal maintenance. Many of the components of axoplasm, such as soluble proteins and cytoskeleton, are slowly transported, taking weeks to months to travel the length of axons longer than a few millimeters after being synthesized in the cell body. Furthermore, this slow rate of supply suggests that the axon itself might not have the capacity to respond fast enough to compensate for damage to transported macromolecules. Such damage is likely in view of the mechanical fragility of an axon, especially those innervating the limbs, as rapid limb motion with high impact, like running, subjects the axons in the limbs to considerable mechanical force. Some researchers have suggested that local, intra-axonal protein synthesis is the answer to this problem. However, the translational state of axonal RNAs remains controversial. We suggest that glial cells, which envelop all axons, whether myelinated or not, are the local sources of replacement and repair macromolecules for long axons. The plausibility of this hypothesis is reinforced by reviewing several decades of work on glia-axon macromolecular transfer, together with recent investigations of exosomes and other extracellular vesicles, as vehicles for the transmission of membrane and cytoplasmic components from one cell to another. PMID:26962444

  1. Induction of heat shock protein 72 in C6 glioma cells by methyl jasmonate through ROS-dependent heat shock factor 1 activation.

    PubMed

    Oh, Su Young; Kim, Ji Hye; Park, Min Jung; Kim, Sun Mi; Yoon, Chang Shin; Joo, Young Mi; Park, Jang Su; Han, Song Iy; Park, Hye Gyeong; Kang, Ho Sung

    2005-11-01

    Salicylate and jasmonates are two different types of plant hormone that play critical roles in plant defense responses against insect herbivores and microbial pathogens, through activating defense genes. These two natural products have been shown to have similar activities in animal cells: the compounds are able to induce cell cycle arrest or apoptosis in a variety of human cancer cells including those of colon, prostate, breast, and leukemia, suggesting the chemicals may potentially be a novel class of anti-cancer drugs. Since sodium salicylate can induce the heat shock response in animals, we examined the effects of jasmonates on the heat shock response in C6 glioma cells. Here, we show that brief exposure to methyl jasmonate (MeJA), but not to jasmonic acid, induces heat shock protein 72 (HSP72), but not HSP73 and HSP90, via heat shock factor I (HSF1) activation in C6 glioma cells without affecting cell viability. Intracellular H2O2 and O2-, and mitochondrial ROS were prominently increased in response to 5 mM MeJA in C6 cells. MeJA-induced HSP72 expression, HSF1 DNA binding, and human HSP70 promoter-driven CAT activity were prevented by N-acetyl-L-cysteine (a general antioxidant), catalase (a specific antioxidant for H2O2), and sodium formate (an inhibitor of OH.), but not by Rac1 dominant negative mutant Rac1N17 and diphenyleneiodonium (a NADPH oxidase inhibitor), indicating that MeJA induces HSP72 expression though HSF1 that is activated via Rac1-NADPH oxidase-independent ROS production pathway. These results suggest that the plant stress hormones share the ability to induce heat shock response in animal cells.

  2. Heat-shock protein 70 (Hsp70) expression in four limpets of the genus Lottia: interspecific variation in constitutive and inducible synthesis correlates with in situ exposure to heat stress.

    PubMed

    Dong, Yunwei; Miller, Luke P; Sanders, Jon G; Somero, George N

    2008-10-01

    Limpets of the genus Lottia occupy a broad vertical distribution on wave-exposed rocky shores, a range that encompasses gradients in the frequency and severity of thermal and desiccation stress brought on by aerial emersion. Using western blot analysis of levels of heat-shock protein 70 (Hsp70), we examined the heat-shock responses of four Lottia congeners: Lottia scabra and L. austrodigitalis, which occur in the high-intertidal zone, and L. pelta and L. scutum, which are restricted to the low- and mid-intertidal zones. Our results suggest distinct strategies of Hsp70 expression in limpets occupying different heights and orientations in the rocky intertidal zone. In freshly field-collected animals and in specimens acclimated at ambient temperature ( approximately 14 degrees C) for 14 days, the two high-intertidal species had higher constitutive levels of Hsp70 than the low- and mid-intertidal species. During aerial exposure to high temperatures, the two low-shore species and L. austrodigitalis exhibited an onset of Hsp70 expression at 28 degrees C; no induction of Hsp70 occurred in L. scabra. Our findings suggest that high-intertidal congeners of Lottia employ a "preparative defense" strategy involving maintenance of high constitutive levels of Hsp70 in their cells as a mechanism for protection against periods of extreme and unpredictable heat stress.

  3. Recruitment of phosphorylated small heat shock protein Hsp27 to nuclear speckles without stress

    SciTech Connect

    Bryantsev, A.L.; Chechenova, M.B.; Shelden, E.A. . E-mail: eshelden@wsu.edu

    2007-01-01

    During stress, the mammalian small heat shock protein Hsp27 enters cell nuclei. The present study examines the requirements for entry of Hsp27 into nuclei of normal rat kidney (NRK) renal epithelial cells, and for its interactions with specific nuclear structures. We find that phosphorylation of Hsp27 is necessary for the efficient entry into nuclei during heat shock but not sufficient for efficient nuclear entry under control conditions. We further report that Hsp27 is recruited to an RNAse sensitive fraction of SC35 positive nuclear speckles, but not other intranuclear structures, in response to heat shock. Intriguingly, Hsp27 phosphorylation, in the absence of stress, is sufficient for recruitment to speckles found in post-anaphase stage mitotic cells. Additionally, pseudophosphorylated Hsp27 fused to a nuclear localization peptide (NLS) is recruited to nuclear speckles in unstressed interphase cells, but wildtype and nonphosphorylatable Hsp27 NLS fusion proteins are not. The expression of NLS-Hsp27 mutants does not enhance colony forming abilities of cells subjected to severe heat shock, but does regulate nuclear speckle morphology. These data demonstrate that phosphorylation, but not stress, mediates Hsp27 recruitment to an RNAse soluble fraction of nuclear speckles and support a site-specific role for Hsp27 within the nucleus.

  4. Functional differentiation of small heat shock proteins in diapause-destined Artemia embryos.

    PubMed

    King, Allison M; Toxopeus, Jantina; MacRae, Thomas H

    2013-10-01

    Encysted embryos of Artemia franciscana cease development and enter diapause, a state of metabolic suppression and enhanced stress tolerance. The development of diapause-destined Artemia embryos is characterized by the coordinated synthesis of the small heat shock proteins (sHsps) p26, ArHsp21 and ArHsp22, with the latter being stress inducible in adults. The amounts of sHsp mRNA and protein varied in Artemia cysts, suggesting transcriptional and translational regulation. By contrast to p26, knockdown of ArHsp21 by RNA interference had no effect on embryo development. ArHsp21 provided limited protection against stressors such as desiccation and freezing but not heat. ArHsp21 may have a non-essential or unidentified role in cysts. Injection of Artemia adults with amounts of ArHsp22 double-stranded RNA less than those used for other sHsps killed females and males, curtailing the analysis of ArHsp22 function in developing embryos and cysts. The results indicate that diapause-destined Artemia embryos synthesize varying amounts of sHsps as a result of differential gene expression and mRNA translation and also suggest that these sHsps have distinctive functions.

  5. Small Heat Shock Protein Responses Differ between Chaparral Shrubs from Contrasting Microclimates

    DOE PAGES

    Knight, Charles A.

    2010-01-01

    Smore » mall heat shock protein (sHsp) responses were studied for two evergreen perennial shrubs in the northern California chaparral; one common on warm, south-facing slopes ( Ceanothus cuneatus ), and the other on cooler, north-facing slopes ( Prunus ilicifolia ).mall Hsp expression was induced experimentally for field collected leaves. Leaf collections were made where the species co-occur.mall Hsp expression was quantified using two antibodies, one specific to a chloroplast 22 kD sHsp and another that detects a broad range of sHsps. Differences between chloroplast sHsp accumulation, which protects thermally labile proteins in PSII, and the general sHsp response were examined. The species from the cooler microclimate, Prunus , had a lower induction temperature and accumulated greater levels of sHsps at low temperatures. Both Prunus and Ceanothus reached peak sHsp expression at 42 ∘ C . The species from the warmer microclimate, Ceanothus , had greater sHsp expression at higher temperatures. Chloroplast sHsp expression generally tracked sHsp expression in Ceanothus , but in Prunus general Hsps were elevated before chloroplast sHsps. Variation between species for sHsp expression (induction temperatures, accumulation levels, and the duration of expression) coupled with the costs of Hsp synthesis, may contribute to differences in the abundance and distribution of plants across environmental gradients.« less

  6. Nitric oxide induces heat-shock protein 70 expression in vascular smooth muscle cells via activation of heat shock factor 1.

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Q; Hu, Y; Kleindienst, R; Wick, G

    1997-01-01

    Current data suggest that nitric oxide (NO) is a double-edged sword that could result in relaxation and/or cytotoxicity of vascular smooth muscle cells (SMCs) via cGMP- dependent or -independent signal pathways. Stress or heat shock proteins (hsps) have been shown to be augmented in arterial SMCs during acute hypertension and atherosclerosis, both conditions that are believed to correlate with disturbed NO production. In the present study, we demonstrate that NO generated from sodium nitroprusside (SNP), S-nitroso-N-acetylpenicillamine, and spermine/nitric oxide complex leads to hsp70 induction in cultured SMCs. Western blot analysis demonstrated that hsp70 protein expression peaked between 6 and 12 h after treatment with SNP, and elevated protein levels were preceded by induction of hsp70 mRNA within 3 h. Induction of hsp70 mRNA was associated with the activation of heat shock transcription factor 1 (HSF1), suggesting that the response was regulated at the transcriptional level. HSF1 activation was completely blocked by hemoglobin, dithiothreitol, and cycloheximide, suggesting that the protein damage and nascent polypeptide formation induced by NO may initiate this activation. Furthermore, SMCs pretreated with heat shock (42 degrees C) for 30 min were significantly protected from death induced by NO. Thus, we provide evidence that NO induces hsp70 expression in SMCs via HSF1 activation. Induction of hsp70 could be important in protecting SMCs from injury resulting from NO stimulation. PMID:9276725

  7. Role of Heat-Shock Proteins in Cellular Function and in the Biology of Fungi

    PubMed Central

    Tiwari, Shraddha; Thakur, Raman; Shankar, Jata

    2015-01-01

    Stress (biotic or abiotic) is an unfavourable condition for an organism including fungus. To overcome stress, organism expresses heat-shock proteins (Hsps) or chaperons to perform biological function. Hsps are involved in various routine biological processes such as transcription, translation and posttranslational modifications, protein folding, and aggregation and disaggregation of proteins. Thus, it is important to understand holistic role of Hsps in response to stress and other biological conditions in fungi. Hsp104, Hsp70, and Hsp40 are found predominant in replication and Hsp90 is found in transcriptional and posttranscriptional process. Hsp90 and Hsp70 in combination or alone play a major role in morphogenesis and dimorphism. Heat stress in fungi expresses Hsp60, Hsp90, Hsp104, Hsp30, and Hsp10 proteins, whereas expression of Hsp12 protein was observed in response to cold stress. Hsp30, Hsp70, and Hsp90 proteins showed expression in response to pH stress. Osmotic stress is controlled by small heat-shock proteins and Hsp60. Expression of Hsp104 is observed under high pressure conditions. Out of these heat-shock proteins, Hsp90 has been predicted as a potential antifungal target due to its role in morphogenesis. Thus, current review focuses on role of Hsps in fungi during morphogenesis and various stress conditions (temperature, pH, and osmotic pressure) and in antifungal drug tolerance. PMID:26881084

  8. Decrease in Penicillin Susceptibility Due to Heat Shock Protein ClpL in Streptococcus pneumoniae▿†

    PubMed Central

    Tran, Thao Dang-Hien; Kwon, Hyog-Young; Kim, Eun-Hye; Kim, Ki-Woo; Briles, David E.; Pyo, Suhkneung; Rhee, Dong-Kwon

    2011-01-01

    Antibiotic resistance and tolerance are increasing threats to global health as antibiotic-resistant bacteria can cause severe morbidity and mortality and can increase treatment cost 10-fold. Although several genes contributing to antibiotic tolerance among pneumococci have been identified, we report here that ClpL, a major heat shock protein, could modulate cell wall biosynthetic enzymes and lead to decreased penicillin susceptibility. On capsular type 1, 2, and 19 genetic backgrounds, mutants lacking ClpL were more susceptible to penicillin and had thinner cell walls than the parental strains, whereas a ClpL-overexpressing strain showed a higher resistance to penicillin and a thicker cell wall. Although exposure of Streptococcus pneumoniae D39 to penicillin inhibited expression of the major cell wall synthesis gene pbp2x, heat shock induced a ClpL-dependent increase in the mRNA levels and protein synthesized by pbp2x. Inducible ClpL expression correlated with PBP2x expression and penicillin susceptibility. Fractionation and electron micrograph data revealed that ClpL induced by heat shock is localized at the cell wall, and the ΔclpL showed significantly reduced net translocation of PBP2x into the cell wall. Moreover, coimmunoprecipitation with either ClpL or PBP2x antibody followed by reprobing with ClpL or PBP2x antibody showed an interaction between ClpL and PBP2x after heat stress. This interaction was confirmed by His tag pulldown assay with either ClpLHis6 or PBP2xHis6. Thus, ClpL stabilized pbp2x expression, interacted with PBP2x, and facilitated translocation of PBP2x, a key protein of cell wall synthesis process, contributing to the decrease of antibiotic susceptibility in S. pneumoniae. PMID:21422206

  9. Characterization of high-molecular-mass heat shock proteins and 42 degrees C-specific heat shock proteins of murine cells.

    PubMed

    Hatayama, T; Yasuda, K; Nishiyama, E

    1994-10-14

    There are two isoforms of high-molecular-mass heat shock protein (HMM-HSP), hsp105A and hsp105B, in murine FM3A cells. To characterize the HMM-HSPs, we here purified hsp105A and hsp105B, as well as 42 degrees C-specific HSPs that are specifically induced by continuous heating at 42 degrees C, from the cytoplasmic extracts of the FM3A cells heat-shocked at 42 degrees C for 8 h. Digestion of the hsp105A, hsp105B, and 42 degrees C-specific HSPs with lysyl endopeptidase generated 17,000-Da polypeptide fragments in common, and the N-terminal amino acid sequences of the fragments revealed a homology with those of the adenosine binding domain of hsp70 family proteins and actin. Thus, the two isoforms of hsp105 and the 42 degrees C-specific HSPs seemed to be very similar proteins having a ATP binding domain in common, and these HSPs may constitute a HMM-HSP family in murine cells.

  10. Discovery of Benzisoxazoles as Potent Inhibitors of Chaperone Heat Shock Protein 90

    SciTech Connect

    Gopalsamy, Ariamala; Shi, Mengxiao; Golas, Jennifer; Vogan, Erik; Jacob, Jaison; Johnson, Mark; Lee, Frederick; Nilakantan, Ramaswamy; Petersen, Roseann; Svenson, Kristin; Chopra, Rajiv; Tam, May S.; Wen, Yingxia; Ellingboe, John; Arndt, Kim; Boschelli, Frank

    2008-08-11

    Heat shock protein 90 (Hsp90) is a molecular chaperone that is responsible for activating many signaling proteins and is a promising target in tumor biology. We have identified small-molecule benzisoxazole derivatives as Hsp90 inhibitors. Crystallographic studies show that these compounds bind in the ATP binding pocket interacting with the Asp93. Structure based optimization led to the identification of potent analogues, such as 13, with good biochemical profiles.

  11. Blood heat shock proteins evoked by some Salmonella strains infection in ducks.

    PubMed

    Osman, Kamelia; Ibrahim, Ihab; Yousef, Ashgan; Nabil, Tanios; Nayerah, Alatfeehy

    2012-05-01

    Bacterial heat-shock response is a global regulatory system required for effective adaptation to changes (stress) in the environment. An in vitro study was conducted to investigate the impact of a sublethal temperature (42°C) on heat shock protein (HSP) expression in 6 Salmonella strains (Salmonella Enteritidis, S. Typhimurium, S. Virchow, S. Shubra, S. Haifa and S. Eingedi). The 6 Salmonella strains were isolated from the tissues of ducklings that had died from avian salmonellosis. To determine the induction of HSP in the 6 Salmonella strains, they were exposed to the selected temperature level for 24 h and further kept for 48 h at culturing condition of 42°C. Growth under a sublethal temperature of 42°C increased the expression of several proteins of Salmonella, including a 63 kDa protein in addition to the generation and/or overexpression of 143 proteins which were specific to heat shock, concurrent to this acquired thermotolerance. The 6 Salmonella strains responded to 24 h of thermal stress at an elevated temperature 42°C by synthesizing different heat shock proteins (HSP) with molecular weights ranging between 13.62 and 96.61 kDa. At 48 h, the 6 Salmonella strains synthesized different HSPs with molecular weights ranging between 14.53 and 103.43 kDa. It follows that salmonellae would produce HSPs during the course of the infectious process. Salmonellosis produced several proteins after 24 and 48 h of infection. Seven of these proteins (100, 80, 60, 40, 30, 20 and 10 kDa) were recognized in the serum obtained from the ducklings infected with S. Enteritidis, S. Typhimurium, S. Virchow, S. Shubra, S. Haifa and S. Eingedi after 24 h of infection. After 48 h, the 1-7 kDa HSP became more evident and indicated their de novo generation.

  12. Digital-analog hybrid control model for eukaryotic heat shock response illustrating the dynamics of heat shock protein 70 on exposure to thermal stress.

    PubMed

    Dwivedi, Anjana; Karan, Bhuwan Mohan; Das, Barda Nand; Sinha, Rakesh Kumar

    2008-04-01

    We are introducing in this paper a digital-analog hybrid model approach for the study of a complete gene regulatory network; the heat shock response (HSR) network of eukaryotes. HSR is a crucial and widely studied cellular phenomenon occurring due to various stresses on the cell, and is characterised by the induction of heat shock genes resulting in the production of heat shock proteins (HSPs) which restores cellular homeostasis by maintaining protein integrity. We are proposing a model which incorporates simple digital and analog components which mimic the functioning of biological molecules involved in HSR and model their dynamics and behaviour. The simulation result of the circuit for the production of HSP70 has been found to be consistent with published experimental results. The qualitative behaviour of the HSR is expressed through a truth table. Through this novel approach, the authors have tried to develop a level of understanding of the interactions of the parts of the HSR system and of this system as a whole.

  13. Heat shock protein inhibitors, 17-DMAG and KNK437, enhance arsenic trioxide-induced mitotic apoptosis

    SciTech Connect

    Wu Yichen; Yen Wenyen; Lee, T.-C. Yih, L.-H.

    2009-04-15

    Arsenic trioxide (ATO) has recently emerged as a promising therapeutic agent in leukemia because of its ability to induce apoptosis. However, there is no sufficient evidence to support its therapeutic use for other types of cancers. In this study, we investigated if, and how, 17-dimethylaminoethylamino-17-demethoxy-geldanamycin (17-DMAG), an antagonist of heat shock protein 90 (HSP90), and KNK437, a HSP synthesis inhibitor, potentiated the cytotoxic effect of ATO. Our results showed that cotreatment with ATO and either 17-DMAG or KNK437 significantly increased ATO-induced cell death and apoptosis. siRNA-mediated attenuation of the expression of the inducible isoform of HSP70 (HSP70i) or HSP90{alpha}/{beta} also enhanced ATO-induced apoptosis. In addition, cotreatment with ATO and 17-DMAG or KNK437 significantly increased ATO-induced mitotic arrest and ATO-induced BUBR1 phosphorylation and PDS1 accumulation. Cotreatment also significantly increased the percentage of mitotic cells with abnormal mitotic spindles and promoted metaphase arrest as compared to ATO treatment alone. These results indicated that 17-DMAG or KNK437 may enhance ATO cytotoxicity by potentiating mitotic arrest and mitotic apoptosis possibly through increased activation of the spindle checkpoint.

  14. Heat shock proteins in relation to heat stress tolerance of creeping bentgrass at different N levels.

    PubMed

    Wang, Kehua; Zhang, Xunzhong; Goatley, Mike; Ervin, Erik

    2014-01-01

    Heat stress is a primary factor causing summer bentgrass decline. Changes in gene expression at the transcriptional and/or translational level are thought to be a fundamental mechanism in plant response to environmental stresses. Heat stress redirects protein synthesis in higher plants and results in stress protein synthesis, particularly heat shock proteins (HSPs). The goal of this work was to analyze the expression pattern of major HSPs in creeping bentgrass (Agrostis stolonifera L.) during different heat stress periods and to study the influence of nitrogen (N) on the HSP expression patterns. A growth chamber study on 'Penn-A4' creeping bentgrass subjected to 38/28°C day/night for 50 days, was conducted with four nitrate rates (no N-0, low N-2.5, medium N-7.5, and high N-12.5 kg N ha-1) applied biweekly. Visual turfgrass quality (TQ), normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI), photochemical efficiency of photosystem II (Fv/Fm), shoot electrolyte leakage (ShEL), and root viability (RV) were monitored, along with the expression pattern of HSPs. There was no difference in measured parameters between treatments until week seven, except TQ at week five. At week seven, grass at medium N had better TQ, NDVI, and Fv/Fm accompanied by lower ShEL and higher RV, suggesting a major role in improved heat tolerance. All the investigated HSPs (HSP101, HSP90, HSP70, and sHSPs) were up-regulated by heat stress. Their expression patterns indicated cooperation between different HSPs and their roles in bentgrass thermotolerance. In addition, their production seems to be resource dependent. This study could further improve our understanding about how different N levels affect bentgrass thermotolerance.

  15. Heat shock induces barotolerance in Listeria monocytogenes.

    PubMed

    Hayman, Melinda M; Anantheswaran, Ramaswamy C; Knabel, Stephen J

    2008-02-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of heat shock on the resistance of Listeria monocytogenes to high pressure processing (HPP). L. monocytogenes ATCC 19115 was grown to stationary phase at 15 degrees C and inoculated into whole ultrahigh-temperature milk at approximately 10(7) CFU/ml. Milk samples (5 ml) were placed into plastic transfer pipettes, which were heat sealed and then heated in a water bath at 48 degrees C for 10 min. Immediately after heat shock, the milk was cooled in water (20 degrees C) for 25 min and then placed on ice. The samples were high pressure processed at ambient temperature (approximately 23 degrees C) at 400 MPa for various times up to 150 s. Following HPP, the samples were spread plated on tryptic soy agar supplemented with yeast extract. Heat shock significantly increased the D400 MPa-value of L. monocytogenes from 35 s in non-heat-shocked cells to 127 s in heat-shocked cells (P < 0.05). Addition of chloramphenicol before heat shock eliminated the protective effect of heat shock (P < 0.05). Heat shock for 5, 10, 15, or 30 min at 48 degrees C resulted in maximal barotolerance (P < 0.05); increasing the time to 60 min significantly decreased survival compared with that at 5, 10, 15, or 30 min (P < 0.05). These results indicate that prior heat shock significantly increases the barotolerance of L. monocytogenes and that de novo protein synthesis during heat shock is required for this enhanced barotolerance.

  16. FTSJ2, a Heat Shock-Inducible Mitochondrial Protein, Suppresses Cell Invasion and Migration

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Ken-Yo; Liu, Fang-Chueh; Chong, Kowit-Yu; Cheng, Winston T. K.; Chen, Chuan-Mu

    2014-01-01

    Ribosomal RNA large subunit methyltransferase J (RrmJ), an Escherichia coli heat shock protein, is responsible for 2′-O-ribose methylation in 23S rRNA. In mammals, three close homologs of RrmJ have been identified and have been designated as FTSJ1, FTSJ2 and FTSJ3; however, little is known about these genes. In this study, we characterized the mammalian FTSJ2, which was the most related protein to RrmJ in a phylogenetic analysis that had similar amino acid sequence features and tertiary protein structures of RrmJ. FTSJ2 was first identified in this study as a nucleus encoded mitochondrial protein that preserves the heat shock protein character in mammals in which the mRNA expressions was increased in porcine lung tissues and A549 cells after heat shock treatment. In addition, a recent study in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) suggested that the FTSJ2 gene is located in a novel oncogenic locus. However, our results demonstrate that the expression of FTSJ2 mRNA was decreased in the more invasive subline (CL1-5) of the lung adenocarcinoma cells (CL1) compared with the less invasive subline (CL1-0), and overexpression of FTSJ2 resulted in the inhibition of cell invasion and migration in the rhabdomyosarcoma cell (TE671). In conclusion, our findings indicate that mammalian FTSJ2 is a mitochondrial ortholog of E. coli RrmJ and conserves the heat shock protein properties. Moreover, FTSJ2 possesses suppressive effects on the invasion and migration of cancer cells. PMID:24595062

  17. Arginine methylation in yeast proteins during stationary-phase growth and heat shock.

    PubMed

    Lakowski, Ted M; Pak, Magnolia L; Szeitz, András; Thomas, Dylan; Vhuiyan, Mynol I; Clement, Bernd; Frankel, Adam

    2015-12-01

    Arginine methyltransferases (RMTs) catalyze the methylation of arginine residues on proteins. We examined the effects of log-phase growth, stationary-phase growth, and heat shock on the formation of methylarginines on yeast proteins to determine if the conditions favor a particular type of methylation. Utilizing linear ion trap mass spectrometry, we identify methylarginines in wild-type and RMT deletion yeast strains using secondary product ion scans (MS(3)), and quantify the methylarginines using multiple reaction monitoring (MRM). Employing MS(3) and isotopic incorporation, we demonstrate for the first time that Nη1, Nη2-dimethylarginine (sDMA) is present on yeast proteins, and make a detailed structural determination of the fragment ions from the spectra. Nη-monomethylarginine (ηMMA), Nδ-monomethylarginine (δMMA), Nη1, Nη1-dimethylarginine (aDMA), and sDMA were detected in RMT deletion yeast using MS(3) and MRM with and without isotopic incorporation, suggesting that additional RMT enzymes remain to be discovered in yeast. The concentrations of ηMMA and δMMA decreased by half during heat shock and stationary phase compared to log-phase growth of wild-type yeast, whereas sDMA increased by as much as sevenfold and aDMA decreased by 11-fold. Therefore, upon entering stressful conditions like heat shock or stationary-phase growth, there is a net increase in sDMA and decreases in aDMA, ηMMA, and δMMA on yeast proteins.

  18. Low-molecular-weight heat shock proteins in a desert fish (Poeciliopsis lucida): homologs of human Hsp27 and Xenopus Hsp30.

    PubMed

    Norris, C E; Brown, M A; Hickey, E; Weber, L A; Hightower, L E

    1997-10-01

    The heat shock response of a fish which inhabits a highly stressful environment (Poeciliopsis lucida, a minnow from river systems of the Sonoran desert in northwestern Mexico) was investigated. Cells derived from this fish exhibited a typical heat shock response when exposed to elevated temperature, synthesizing high levels of 90 kDa, 70 kDa, and 30 kDa heat shock proteins (Hsp90, Hsp70, and Hsp30), as well as lower amounts of other heat shock proteins. Additional small heat shock proteins (sHSPs), including Hsp27, were induced after a prolonged heat shock at a time when synthesis of Hsp70 and Hsp30 was decreasing. Characterization of cDNA clones for hsp27 and hsp30 revealed that both are members of the alpha-crystallin/sHSP superfamily but belong to separate lineages within this gene family. The multiple isoforms of P. lucida Hsp30 appear to be members of a multigene family and are most closely related to salmon and Xenopus Hsp30s. In contrast, Hsp27 is highly similar to mammalian and avian sHSPs; it was synthesized as three isoforms which represented differentially phosphorylated forms of a single polypeptide. In Poeciliopsis, the various sHSPs may each perform a subset of the roles attributed to mammalian sHSPs. The conservation of phosphorylation sites in Hsp27 may indicate an involvement in signal transduction to the actin cytoskeleton. The hsp30 genes appear to have diverged more rapidly than the corresponding hsp27 genes; the various members of the Hsp30 family may function as molecular chaperones and, in this role, may be less evolutionarily constrained. Finally, the presence of these two classes of sHSP in a single taxon indicates that these two lineages arose by gene duplication early in the evolution of vertebrates and raises questions about the fate of homologs of Hsp30 in mammals and of Hsp27 in Xenopus.

  19. Heat shock protein response in phosphorus-deficient heat-stressed broiler chickens.

    PubMed

    Edens, F W; Hill, C H; Wang, S

    1992-12-01

    1. During acute in vivo heat stress, a normal heat shock protein (HSP) response was not inducible in chickens deficient in inorganic phosphorus (P(i)-deficient). 2. Small quantities of HSP 70 and HSP 90 were induced, but little or no HSP 23 was induced in P(i)-deficient chickens compared to P(i)-adequate chickens. 3. Increased susceptibility of P(i)-deficient chickens to acute heat stress was attributed to their inability to produce an adequate HSP response.

  20. Exercise training-induced gender-specific heat shock protein adaptations in human skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Morton, James P; Holloway, Kathryn; Woods, Paul; Cable, Nigel T; Burniston, Jatin; Evans, Louise; Kayani, Anna C; McArdle, Anne

    2009-02-01

    This study investigates the effects of short-term endurance training on heat shock protein (HSP) adaptations of male and female human skeletal muscle. The data demonstrate that females did not respond to continuous or interval training in terms of increasing HSP content of the vastus lateralis muscle. In contrast, males displayed HSP adaptations to both training interventions. These data provide a platform for future human studies to examine a potential gender-specific stress response to exercise.

  1. Altered phosphorylation of. tau. protein in heat-shocked rats and patients with Alzheimer disease

    SciTech Connect

    Papasozomenos, S.C.; Yuan Su Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX )

    1991-05-15

    Six hours after heat shocking 2- to 3-month-old male and female Sprague-Dawley rats at 42C for 15 min, the authors analyzed {tau} protein immunoreactivity in SDS extracts of cerebrums and peripheral nerves by using immunoblot analysis and immunohistochemistry with the anti-{tau} monoclonal antibody Tau-1, which recognizes a phosphate-dependent nonphosphorylated epitope, and with {sup 125}I-labeled protein A. In the cerebal extracts, the authors found altered phosphorylation of {tau} in heat-shocked females, characterized by a marked reduction in the amount of nonphosphorylated {tau}, a doubling of the ratio of total (phosphorylated plus nonphosphorylated) {tau} to nonphosphorylated {tau}, and the appearance of the slowest moving phosphorylated {tau} polypeptide (68 kDa). Similar, but milder, changes were observed in male rats. Quantitative immunoblot analysis of cortex and the underlying white matter with Tau-1 and {sup 125}I-labeled protein A showed that the amount of phosphorylated {tau} progressively increased in the Alzheimer disease-affected cerebral cortex, while concurrently a proportionally lesser amount of {tau} entered the white matter axons. The similar findings for the rat heat-shock model and Alzheimer disease suggest that life stressors may play a role in the etiopathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease.

  2. Neurotoxicity induced by arsenic in Gallus Gallus: Regulation of oxidative stress and heat shock protein response.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Panpan; Guo, Ying; Zhang, Wen; Chai, Hongliang; Xing, Houjuan; Xing, Mingwei

    2017-01-01

    Arsenic, a naturally occurring heavy metal pollutant, is one of the functioning risk factors for neurological toxicity in humans. However, little is known about the effects of arsenic on the nervous system of Gallus Gallus. To investigate whether arsenic induce neurotoxicity and influence the oxidative stress and heat shock proteins (Hsps) response in chickens, seventy-two 1-day-old male Hy-line chickens were treated with different doses of arsenic trioxide (As2O3). The histological changes, antioxidant enzyme activity, and the expressions of Hsps were detected. Results showed slightly histology changes were obvious in the brain tissues exposure to arsenic. The activities of Glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px) and catalase (CAT) were decreased compared to the control, whereas the malondialdehyde (MDA) content was increased gradually along with increase in diet-arsenic. The mRNA levels of Hsps and protein expressions of Hsp60 and Hsp70 were up-regulated. These results suggested that sub-chronic exposure to arsenic induced neurotoxicity in chickens. Arsenic exposure disturbed the balance of oxidants and antioxidants. Increased heat shock response tried to protect chicken brain tissues from tissues damage caused by oxidative stress. The mechanisms of neurotoxicity induced by arsenic include oxidative stress and heat shock protein response in chicken brain tissues.

  3. Heat shock in Escherichia coli alters the protein-binding properties of the chaperonin groEL by inducing its phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Sherman MYu; Goldberg, A L

    1992-05-14

    When bacterial or eukaryotic cells are exposed to high temperatures or other harsh conditions, they respond by synthesis of a specific set of heat-shock proteins. Certain heat-shock proteins such as groEL, called 'chaperonins', can prevent misfolding and promote the refolding and proper assembly of unfolded polypeptides generated under harmful conditions. We report here a new aspect of the heat-shock response in Escherichia coli: at high temperatures a fraction of groEL becomes modified covalently, altering its interaction with unfolded proteins. The heat-modified form can be eluted with ATP from an unfolded protein more easily than normal groEL. The critical heat-induced modification seems to be phosphorylation, which is reversed on return to low temperature. Treatment of the modified groEL with phosphatases caused its apparent size, charge and binding properties to resemble those of the unmodified form. Thus during heat shock some groEL is reversibly phosphorylated, which allows its ATP-dependent release from protein substrates in the absence of its usual cofactor (groES), and probably promotes the repair of damaged polypeptides.

  4. Erythrocyte heat shock protein responses to chronic (in vivo) and acute (in vitro) temperature challenge in diploid and triploid salmonids.

    PubMed

    Saranyan, Pillai V; Ross, Neil W; Benfey, Tillmann J

    2017-04-01

    This research investigated how ploidy level (diploid versus triploid) affects the heat shock protein (HSP) response in erythrocytes under different thermal stress regimes, both in vivo and in vitro, in Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar) and brook charr (Salvelinus fontinalis) in order to address the question of why triploids typically have reduced thermal tolerance. A preliminary study confirmed that identical volumes of diploid and triploid erythrocytes (which equates to a smaller number of larger cells for triploids compared to diploids) did not differ in total protein synthesis rates. After chronic (100d) acclimation of fish to 5, 15 and 25°C, triploid erythrocytes had lower HSP70, HSP90, heat shock factor 1 (HSF1) and ubiquitin (free and total) levels than diploids in both species. Furthermore, Atlantic salmon erythrocytes showed significantly higher protein breakdown (based on conjugated ubiquitin levels) in triploids than diploids after acute heat stress in vitro, but no significant difference was detected between ploidies after acute cold stress. These results indicate that: 1) triploid erythrocytes synthesize more total protein per cell than diploids as a result of increased cell size; 2) triploids have sufficient total HSP levels for survival under low stress conditions; and 3) the lower basal titres of HSPs in triploids may be a handicap when combating acute stress. Taken together, this suggests that triploids are limited in their ability to withstand thermal stress because of a reduced ability to maintain proteostasis under stressful conditions.

  5. Nuclear p26, a small heat shock/alpha-crystallin protein, and its relationship to stress resistance in Artemia franciscana embryos.

    PubMed

    Willsie, J K; Clegg, J S

    2001-07-01

    The role of the small heat shock/alpha-crystallin protein, p26, in transcription in Artemia franciscana embryos was examined using isolated nuclei, containing either control or elevated levels of p26, in transcription run-on assays. Heat shock or anoxia in vivo and acid pH in vitro were used to transfer p26 into nuclei. The results suggest that parameters other than, or in addition to, p26 are responsible for the reduced transcription rates observed and that decreases in pHi are involved. In vivo experiments indicate that RNA synthesis and, to a lesser extent, protein synthesis are downregulated in intact embryos recovering from heat shock and that the precursor pool is not limiting. Confocal microscopy confirmed that p26 moves into nuclei in response to heat shock and anoxia in vivo, and to low pH in vitro, and indicated that the nuclear distribution of p26 is similar under all three conditions. We present evidence that unstressed (control) embryos containing p26 in all their nuclei will not hatch, even under permissive conditions, and propose that they are unable to terminate diapause. Potential nuclear targets of p26 chaperone activity are discussed.

  6. Over-expression of mitochondrial heat shock protein 70 suppresses programmed cell death in rice.

    PubMed

    Qi, Yaocheng; Wang, Hongjuan; Zou, Yu; Liu, Cheng; Liu, Yanqi; Wang, Ying; Zhang, Wei

    2011-01-03

    In this study, we identified and functionally characterized the mitochondrial heat shock protein 70 (mtHsp70). Over-expression of mtHsp70 suppressed heat- and H(2)O(2)-induced programmed cell death (PCD) in rice protoplasts, as reflected by higher cell viability, decreased DNA laddering and chromatin condensation. Mitochondrial membrane potential (Δψ(m)) after heat shock was destroyed gradually in protoplasts, but mtHsp70 over-expression showed higher Δψ(m) relative to the vector control cells, and partially inhibited cytochrome c release from mitochondria to cytosol. Heat treatment also significantly increased reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation, a phenomenon not observed in protoplasts over-expressing mtHsp70. Together, these results suggest that mtHsp70 may suppress PCD in rice protoplasts by maintaining mitochondrial Δψ(m) and inhibiting the amplification of ROS.

  7. Isolation and functional analysis of chicken 90-kDa heat shock protein gene promoter.

    PubMed Central

    Vourc'h, C; Binart, N; Chambraud, B; David, J P; Jérôme, V; Baulieu, E E; Catelli, M G

    1989-01-01

    We report the nucleotide sequence of a 2652 bp derived from a chicken 90-kDa heat shock protein (hsp 90) genomic clone. This fragment contains 890 bp of the 5' flanking region and 1762 bp of structural gene sequence encoding the first 85 amino acids of the protein. The start site of transcription was determined by primer extension and RNase mapping. Two introns have been identified. The first intron presents two features in common with the unique intron of the hsp 83 of drosophila: its location just before the ATG initiation codon and its length of approximately 1.3 Kb. The 5' flanking region contains a TATAA element, a CCAAT box and several putative cis-regulatory elements that might account for the basal level of expression and developmental regulation of the gene. Functional analyses show that hsp 90 gene expression is constitutive and heat inducible and that a full heat shock response requires the cooperativity of two distinct blocks of overlapping heat shock response elements. Images PMID:2762125

  8. Heat Shock Factor 1 Is a Substrate for p38 Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinases

    PubMed Central

    Dayalan Naidu, Sharadha; Sutherland, Calum; Zhang, Ying; Risco, Ana; de la Vega, Laureano; Caunt, Christopher J.; Hastie, C. James; Lamont, Douglas J.; Torrente, Laura; Chowdhry, Sudhir; Benjamin, Ivor J.; Keyse, Stephen M.; Cuenda, Ana

    2016-01-01

    Heat shock factor 1 (HSF1) monitors the structural integrity of the proteome. Phosphorylation at S326 is a hallmark for HSF1 activation, but the identity of the kinase(s) phosphorylating this site has remained elusive. We show here that the dietary agent phenethyl isothiocyanate (PEITC) inhibits heat shock protein 90 (Hsp90), the main negative regulator of HSF1; activates p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK); and increases S326 phosphorylation, trimerization, and nuclear translocation of HSF1, and the transcription of a luciferase reporter, as well as the endogenous prototypic HSF1 target Hsp70. In vitro, all members of the p38 MAPK family rapidly and stoichiometrically catalyze the S326 phosphorylation. The use of stable knockdown cell lines and inhibitors indicated that among the p38 MAPKs, p38γ is the principal isoform responsible for the phosphorylation of HSF1 at S326 in cells. A protease-mass spectrometry approach confirmed S326 phosphorylation and unexpectedly revealed that p38 MAPK also catalyzes the phosphorylation of HSF1 at S303/307, previously known repressive posttranslational modifications. Thus, we have identified p38 MAPKs as highly efficient catalysts for the phosphorylation of HSF1. Furthermore, our findings suggest that the magnitude and persistence of activation of p38 MAPK are important determinants of the extent and duration of the heat shock response. PMID:27354066

  9. Small Heat Shock Proteins Are Novel Common Determinants of Alcohol and Nicotine Sensitivity in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Johnson, James R; Rajamanoharan, Dayani; McCue, Hannah V; Rankin, Kim; Barclay, Jeff W

    2016-03-01

    Addiction to drugs is strongly determined by multiple genetic factors. Alcohol and nicotine produce distinct pharmacological effects within the nervous system through discrete molecular targets; yet, data from family and twin analyses support the existence of common genetic factors for addiction in general. The mechanisms underlying addiction, however, are poorly described and common genetic factors for alcohol and nicotine remain unidentified. We investigated the role that the heat shock transcription factor, HSF-1, and its downstream effectors played as common genetic modulators of sensitivity to addictive substances. Using Caenorhabditis elegans, an exemplary model organism with substance dose-dependent responses similar to mammals, we demonstrate that HSF-1 altered sensitivity to both alcohol and nicotine. Using a combination of a targeted RNAi screen of downstream factors and transgenic approaches we identified that these effects were contingent upon the constitutive neuronal expression of HSP-16.48, a small heat shock protein (HSP) homolog of human α-crystallin. Furthermore we demonstrated that the function of HSP-16.48 in drug sensitivity surprisingly was independent of chaperone activity during the heat shock stress response. Instead we identified a distinct domain within the N-terminal region of the HSP-16.48 protein that specified its function in comparison to related small HSPs. Our findings establish and characterize a novel genetic determinant underlying sensitivity to diverse addictive substances.

  10. Significance of heat shock proteins in the skin upon UV exposure.

    PubMed

    Jonak, Constanze; Klosner, Gabriele; Trautinger, Franz

    2009-01-01

    The expression of heat shock proteins (Hsp) expression is induced in all cells by exposure to heat and other environmental stress and Hsp can protect cells from damage through further exposure. Hsp are highly conserved and it is likely that they are essential for survival in a potentially harmful environment. Most Hsp are molecular chaperones sensing unfolded proteins and mediating their re-folding, transport, and interaction. In human epidermis Hsp are associated with differentiation, photoprotection, and skin disease. Recent research has mainly focused on the 27kD and 72kD Hsp that are constitutively expressed in keratinocytes. Cell death induced by ultraviolet radiation (UV) can be inhibited by previous heat shock and UV itself can induce Hsp experimentally. Regulation of Hsp can be pharmacologically modified and topical and systemic inducers and inhibitors of Hsp expression are under development. Whether phototherapy exerts its clinical efficacy by modulation of Hsp has not been sufficiently studied. The UV-wavelength ranges, -intensities and -doses that are required to interfere with the heat shock response in the skin still remain to be elucidated.

  11. Assembly of lipopolysaccharide in Escherichia coli requires the essential LapB heat shock protein.

    PubMed

    Klein, Gracjana; Kobylak, Natalia; Lindner, Buko; Stupak, Anna; Raina, Satish

    2014-05-23

    Here, we describe two new heat shock proteins involved in the assembly of LPS in Escherichia coli, LapA and LapB (lipopolysaccharide assembly protein A and B). lapB mutants were identified based on an increased envelope stress response. Envelope stress-responsive pathways control key steps in LPS biogenesis and respond to defects in the LPS assembly. Accordingly, the LPS content in ΔlapB or Δ(lapA lapB) mutants was elevated, with an enrichment of LPS derivatives with truncations in the core region, some of which were pentaacylated and exhibited carbon chain polymorphism. Further, the levels of LpxC, the enzyme that catalyzes the first committed step of lipid A synthesis, were highly elevated in the Δ(lapA lapB) mutant. Δ(lapA lapB) mutant accumulated extragenic suppressors that mapped either to lpxC, waaC, and gmhA, or to the waaQ operon (LPS biosynthesis) and lpp (Braun's lipoprotein). Increased synthesis of either FabZ (3-R-hydroxymyristoyl acyl carrier protein dehydratase), slrA (novel RpoE-regulated non-coding sRNA), lipoprotein YceK, toxin HicA, or MurA (UDP-N-acetylglucosamine 1-carboxyvinyltransferase) suppressed some of the Δ(lapA lapB) defects. LapB contains six tetratricopeptide repeats and, at the C-terminal end, a rubredoxin-like domain that was found to be essential for its activity. In pull-down experiments, LapA and LapB co-purified with LPS, Lpt proteins, FtsH (protease), DnaK, and DnaJ (chaperones). A specific interaction was also observed between WaaC and LapB. Our data suggest that LapB coordinates assembly of proteins involved in LPS synthesis at the plasma membrane and regulates turnover of LpxC, thereby ensuring balanced biosynthesis of LPS and phospholipids consistent with its essentiality.

  12. Heat shock protein concentration and clarity of porcine lenses incubated at elevated temperatures

    PubMed Central

    Dzialoszynski, T. M.; Milne, K.J.; Trevithick, J.R.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To quantify the concentration of heat shock proteins in lenses in lens organ culture at elevated temperatures, and to examine the relation between elevated temperature and lens clarity. Methods Pig lenses obtained from a local abattoir were dissected aseptically and incubated in medium M199 without serum for 4 days to stabilize, and lenses with protein leakage of less than 10 mg/l were obtained for heat shock exposure. Heat shock was performed by incubation for 1 h in M199 without serum at various temperatures ranging from 37 °C to 55 °C. After incubation for 24 h, cataract blurring of the images was assessed using Scantox™ and Scion Image analysis of the lens photographs. Lens homogenates were subsequently analyzed for Hsp70 and Hsp27 with western blotting. Results The degree of cataract blurring of the images increased with increasing temperature, but the two functional measures provided different results. Focal length inconsistency, as assessed with the back vertex distance standard error of the mean (BVD SEM; the variability in focal lengths measured at 20 equally spaced locations across the lens, Scantox™), increased nearly linearly with the heat treatment temperature. In contrast, decreased clarity, evident by a fuzzy image with lower contrast, was not markedly altered as the temperature rose until a threshold of approximately 47.5 °C. The inducible isoform of the Hsp70 family (Hsp70) of heat shock proteins was increased at all temperatures above the control except those above 50 °C. Changes in Hsp27 were less clear as the protein content increased only at the incubation temperatures of 39 °C and 48.5 °C. Conclusions The porcine lens demonstrates subtle changes in the variability of the focal length, and the variability increases as the incubation temperature rises. In contrast, lens clarity is relatively stable at temperatures up to 47.5 °C, above which dramatic changes, indicative of the formation of cataracts, occur. The lens content

  13. Heat Shock Protein 90 Inhibition in Cancer Drug Discovery: From Chemistry to Futural Clinical Applications.

    PubMed

    Özgür, Aykut; Tutar, Yusuf

    2016-01-01

    Heat shock protein 90 (Hsp90) is an important member of the chaperone protein family and it is involved in stabilization, regulation, and maintenance of oncogenic client proteins with co-chaperones. Cochaperones regulate the ATPase activity of Hsp90 and its interactions with oncogenic client proteins. Therefore, Hsp90 and its co-chaperones have become significant therapeutic targets for cancer treatment. Many chemical compounds have been evaluated for Hsp90 inhibition as well as significant results were obtained in clinical trials. In this paper, we emphasize on the key roles of Hsp90 and its co-chaperones in tumorigenesis and overview therapeutic strategies of Hsp90 inhibition in oncology.

  14. Specific protein homeostatic functions of small heat-shock proteins increase lifespan.

    PubMed

    Vos, Michel J; Carra, Serena; Kanon, Bart; Bosveld, Floris; Klauke, Karin; Sibon, Ody C M; Kampinga, Harm H

    2016-04-01

    During aging, oxidized, misfolded, and aggregated proteins accumulate in cells, while the capacity to deal with protein damage declines severely. To cope with the toxicity of damaged proteins, cells rely on protein quality control networks, in particular proteins belonging to the family of heat-shock proteins (HSPs). As safeguards of the cellular proteome, HSPs assist in protein folding and prevent accumulation of damaged, misfolded proteins. Here, we compared the capacity of all Drosophila melanogaster small HSP family members for their ability to assist in refolding stress-denatured substrates and/or to prevent aggregation of disease-associated misfolded proteins. We identified CG14207 as a novel and potent small HSP member that exclusively assisted in HSP70-dependent refolding of stress-denatured proteins. Furthermore, we report that HSP67BC, which has no role in protein refolding, was the most effective small HSP preventing toxic protein aggregation in an HSP70-independent manner. Importantly, overexpression of both CG14207 and HSP67BC in Drosophila leads to a mild increase in lifespan, demonstrating that increased levels of functionally diverse small HSPs can promote longevity in vivo.

  15. Relationship between heat shock protein 70 expression and life span in Daphnia.

    PubMed

    Schumpert, Charles; Handy, Indhira; Dudycha, Jeffry L; Patel, Rekha C

    2014-07-01

    The longevity of an organism is directly related to its ability to effectively cope with cellular stress. Heat shock response (HSR) protects the cells against accumulation of damaged proteins after exposure to elevated temperatures and also in aging cells. To understand the role of Hsp70 in regulating life span of Daphnia, we examined the expression of Hsp70 in two ecotypes that exhibit strikingly different life spans. Daphnia pulicaria, the long lived ecotype, showed a robust Hsp70 induction as compared to the shorter lived Daphnia pulex. Interestingly, the short-lived D. pulex isolates showed no induction of Hsp70 at the mid point in their life span. In contrast to this, the long-lived D. pulicaria continued to induce Hsp70 expression at an equivalent age. We further show that the Hsp70 expression was induced at transcriptional level in response to heat shock. The transcription factor responsible for Hsp70 induction, heat shock factor-1 (HSF-1), although present in aged organisms did not exhibit DNA-binding capability. Thus, the decline of Hsp70 induction in old organisms could be attributed to a decline in HSF-1's DNA-binding activity. These results for the first time, present a molecular analysis of the relationship between HSR and life span in Daphnia.

  16. Chloroplast small heat shock proteins: Evidence for atypical evolution of an organelle-localized protein

    PubMed Central

    Waters, Elizabeth R.; Vierling, Elizabeth

    1999-01-01

    Knowledge of the origin and evolution of gene families is critical to our understanding of the evolution of protein function. To gain a detailed understanding of the evolution of the small heat shock proteins (sHSPs) in plants, we have examined the evolutionary history of the chloroplast (CP)-localized sHSPs. Previously, these nuclear-encoded CP proteins had been identified only from angiosperms. This study reveals the presence of the CP sHSPs in a moss, Funaria hygrometrica. Two clones for CP sHSPs were isolated from a F. hygrometrica heat shock cDNA library that represent two distinct CP sHSP genes. Our analysis of the CP sHSPs reveals unexpected evolutionary relationships and patterns of sequence conservation. Phylogenetic analysis of the CP sHSPs with other plant CP sHSPs and eukaryotic, archaeal, and bacterial sHSPs shows that the CP sHSPs are not closely related to the cyanobacterial sHSPs. Thus, they most likely evolved via gene duplication from a nuclear-encoded cytosolic sHSP and not via gene transfer from the CP endosymbiont. Previous sequence analysis had shown that all angiosperm CP sHSPs possess a methionine-rich region in the N-terminal domain. The primary sequence of this region is not highly conserved in the F. hygrometrica CP sHSPs. This lack of sequence conservation indicates that sometime in land plant evolution, after the divergence of mosses from the common ancestor of angiosperms but before the monocot–dicot divergence, there was a change in the selective constraints acting on the CP sHSPs. PMID:10588716

  17. Protein kinase Cmu plays an essential role in hypertonicity-induced heat shock protein 70 expression.

    PubMed

    Lim, Yun Sook; Lee, Jae Seon; Huang, Tai Qin; Seo, Jeong Sun

    2008-12-31

    Heat shock protein 70 (HSP70), which evidences important functions as a molecular chaperone and anti-apoptotic molecule, is substantially induced in cells exposed to a variety of stresses, including hypertonic stress, heavy metals, heat shock, and oxidative stress, and prevents cellular damage under these conditions. However, the molecular mechanism underlying the induction of HSP70 in response to hypertonicity has been characterized to a far lesser extent. In this study, we have investigated the cellular signaling pathway of HSP70 induction under hypertonic conditions. Initially, we applied a variety of kinase inhibitors to NIH3T3 cells that had been exposed to hypertonicity. The induction of HSP70 was suppressed specifically by treatment with protein kinase C (PKC) inhibitors (Gö6976 and GF109203X). As hypertonicity dramatically increased the phosphorylation of PKCmu, we then evaluated the role of PKCmu in hypertonicity-induced HSP70 expression and cell viability. The depletion of PKCmu with siRNA or the inhibition of PKCmu activity with inhibitors resulted in a reduction in HSP70 induction and cell viability. Tonicity-responsive enhancer binding protein (TonEBP), a transcription factor for hypertonicity-induced HSP70 expression, was translocated rapidly into the nucleus and was modified gradually in the nucleus under hypertonic conditions. When we administered treatment with PKC inhibitors, the mobility shift of TonEBP was affected in the nucleus. However, PKCmu evidenced no subcellular co-localization with TonEBP during hypertonic exposure. From our results, we have concluded that PKCmu performs a critical function in hypertonicity-induced HSP70 induction, and finally cellular protection, via the indirect regulation of TonEBP modification.

  18. [The role of heat shock proteins HSP90 in the response of immune cells to centimeter microwaves].

    PubMed

    Glushkova, O V; Novoselova, E G; Khrenov, M O; Novoselova, T V; Cherenkov, D A; Lunin, S M; Fesenko, E E

    2008-01-01

    The effects of low-level electromagnetic waves (8.15-18 GHz, 1 microW/cm2, 1 h) on the production of heat shock proteins, several cytokines, and nitric oxide in isolated mouse macrophages and lymphocytes were examined both under normal conditions and after the treatment of the cells with geldanamycin (GA), a depressor of activity of the heat shock protein 90 (Hsp90). The irradiation of cells without GA induced the production of Hsp70, nitric oxide (NO), interleukin-1beta (IL-1beta), interleukin-10 (IL-10), and the tumor necrosis factor -alpha (TNF-alpha). No changes in the production of Hsp90 in irradiated cells were observed, but intracellular locations of Hsp25 and Hsp70 altered. The preliminary treatment of cells with GA did not remove the effects of microwaves: in these conditions, the synthesis of all cytokines tested, nitric oxide, as well as total and membrane amount of Hsp70, and the amount of Hsp25 in the cytoplasm and cytoskeleton increased. Moreover, the exposure of cells incubated with GA resulted in the reduction of Hsp90-alpha production.

  19. Crotonaldehyde induces heat shock protein 72 expression that mediates anti-apoptotic effects in human endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Ryu, Dong Sun; Yang, Hana; Lee, Seung Eun; Park, Cheung-Seog; Jin, Young-Ho; Park, Yong Seek

    2013-11-25

    Crotonaldehyde is a highly reactive aldehyde and a common environmental pollutant. It occurs in cigarette smoke and automobile exhaust, and is also endogenously generated by lipid peroxidation. Reactive aldehydes, such as crotonaldehyde, are considered to be important mediators of cell damage. Since endothelial apoptosis is considered to be the first step in the pathogenesis of cardiovascular disease, there have been many efforts to protect endothelial cell from oxidative stress. Heat shock protein 72 (HSP72) is a representative stress-inducible HSP70 family protein, and its synthesis is increased in response to multiple stressors. In the present study, we investigated the effect of crotonaldehyde on the up-regulation of HSP72 in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs). Crotonaldehyde treatment caused nuclear accumulation of the heat shock transcription factor 1 (HSF1), leading to the induction of HSP72. Inhibition of the c-Jun N-terminal kinases (JNK) signaling pathways, reduction of intracellular calcium level and blocking of reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation resulted in significant blockage of crotonaldehyde-mediated HSP72 induction. In addition, HSP72 silencing by siRNA or calcium chelating by BAPTA/AM resulted in an obvious increase in the rate of apoptosis in crotonaldehyde-stimulated HUVECs. In summary, our data demonstrated that crotonaldehyde-induced HSP72 expression in HUVECs is mediated by the JNK-HSF1 pathway, and involves calcium ions and ROS, which is an adaptive response to oxidative stress caused by crotonaldehyde.

  20. Hierarchical functional specificity of cytosolic heat shock protein 70 (Hsp70) nucleotide exchange factors in yeast.

    PubMed

    Abrams, Jennifer L; Verghese, Jacob; Gibney, Patrick A; Morano, Kevin A

    2014-05-09

    Heat shock protein 70 (Hsp70) molecular chaperones play critical roles in protein homeostasis. In the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, cytosolic Hsp70 interacts with up to three types of nucleotide exchange factors (NEFs) homologous to human counterparts: Sse1/Sse2 (Heat shock protein 110 (Hsp110)), Fes1 (HspBP1), and Snl1 (Bag-1). All three NEFs stimulate ADP release; however, it is unclear why multiple distinct families have been maintained throughout eukaryotic evolution. In this study we investigate NEF roles in Hsp70 cell biology using an isogenic combinatorial collection of NEF deletion mutants. Utilizing well characterized model substrates, we find that Sse1 participates in most Hsp70-mediated processes and is of particular importance in protein biogenesis and degradation, whereas Fes1 contributes to a minimal extent. Surprisingly, disaggregation and resolubilization of thermally denatured firefly luciferase occurred independently of NEF activity. Simultaneous deletion of SSE1 and FES1 resulted in constitutive activation of heat shock protein expression mediated by the transcription factor Hsf1, suggesting that these two factors are important for modulating stress response. Fes1 was found to interact in vivo preferentially with the Ssa family of cytosolic Hsp70 and not the co-translational Ssb homolog, consistent with the lack of cold sensitivity and protein biogenesis phenotypes for fes1Δ cells. No significant consequence could be attributed to deletion of the minor Hsp110 SSE2 or the Bag homolog SNL1. Together, these lines of investigation provide a comparative analysis of NEF function in yeast that implies Hsp110 is the principal NEF for cytosolic Hsp70, making it an ideal candidate for therapeutic intervention in human protein folding disorders.

  1. Reactive oxygen species promote heat shock protein 90-mediated HBV capsid assembly

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Yoon Sik Seo, Hyun Wook Jung, Guhung

    2015-02-13

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection induces reactive oxygen species (ROS) production and has been associated with the development of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). ROS are also an important factor in HCC because the accumulated ROS leads to abnormal cell proliferation and chromosome mutation. In oxidative stress, heat shock protein 90 (Hsp90) and glutathione (GSH) function as part of the defense mechanism. Hsp90 prevents cellular component from oxidative stress, and GSH acts as antioxidants scavenging ROS in the cell. However, it is not known whether molecules regulated by oxidative stress are involved in HBV capsid assembly. Based on the previous study that Hsp90 facilitates HBV capsid assembly, which is an important step for the packing of viral particles, here, we show that ROS enrich Hsp90-driven HBV capsid formation. In cell-free system, HBV capsid assembly was facilitated by ROS with Hsp90, whereas it was decreased without Hsp90. In addition, GSH inhibited the function of Hsp90 to decrease HBV capsid assembly. Consistent with the result of cell-free system, ROS and buthionine sulfoximine (BS), an inhibitor of GSH synthesis, increased HBV capsid formation in HepG2.2.15 cells. Thus, our study uncovers the interplay between ROS and Hsp90 during HBV capsid assembly. - Highlights: • We examined H{sub 2}O{sub 2} and GSH modulate HBV capsid assembly. • H{sub 2}O{sub 2} facilitates HBV capsid assembly in the presence of Hsp90. • GSH inhibits function of Hsp90 in facilitating HBV capsid assembly. • H{sub 2}O{sub 2} and GSH induce conformation change of Hsp90.

  2. Protein carbonylation and heat shock proteins in human skeletal muscle: relationships to age and sarcopenia.

    PubMed

    Beltran Valls, Maria R; Wilkinson, Daniel J; Narici, Marco V; Smith, Kenneth; Phillips, Bethan E; Caporossi, Daniela; Atherton, Philip J

    2015-02-01

    Aging is associated with a gradual loss of muscle mass termed sarcopenia, which has significant impact on quality-of-life. Because oxidative stress is proposed to negatively impact upon musculoskeletal aging, we investigated links between human aging and markers of oxidative stress, and relationships to muscle mass and strength in young and old nonsarcopenic and sarcopenic adults. Sixteen young and 16 old males (further subdivided into "old" and "old sarcopenic") were studied. The abundance of protein carbonyl adducts within skeletal muscle sarcoplasmic, myofibrillar, and mitochondrial protein subfractions from musculus vastus lateralis biopsies were determined using Oxyblot immunoblotting techniques. In addition, concentrations of recognized cytoprotective proteins (eg, heat shock proteins [HSP], αβ-crystallin) were also assayed. Aging was associated with increased mitochondrial (but not myofibrillar or sarcoplasmic) protein carbonyl adducts, independently of (stage-I) sarcopenia. Correlation analyses of all subjects revealed that mitochondrial protein carbonyl abundance negatively correlated with muscle strength ([1-repetition maximum], p = .02, r (2) = -.16), but not muscle mass (p = .13, r (2) = -.08). Abundance of cytoprotective proteins, including various HSPs (HSP 27 and 70), were unaffected by aging/sarcopenia. To conclude, these data reveal that mitochondrial protein carbonylation increases moderately with age, and that this increase may impact upon skeletal muscle function, but is not a hallmark of (stage-I) sarcopenia, per se.

  3. Antibodies against 70-kD heat shock cognate protein inhibit mediated nuclear import of karyophilic proteins

    PubMed Central

    1992-01-01

    Previously, we found that anti-DDDED antibodies strongly inhibited in vivo nuclear transport of nuclear proteins and that these antibodies recognized a protein of 69 kD (p69) from rat liver nuclear envelopes that showed specific binding activities to the nuclear location sequences (NLSs) of nucleoplasmin and SV-40 large T-antigen. Here we identified this protein as the 70-kD heat shock cognate protein (hsc70) based on its mass, isoelectric point, cellular localization, and partial amino acid sequences. Competition studies indicated that the recombinant hsc70 expressed in Escherichia coli binds to transport competent SV-40 T-antigen NLS more strongly than to the point mutated transport incompetent mutant NLS. To investigate the possible involvement of hsc70 in nuclear transport, we examined the effect of anti-hsc70 rabbit antibodies on the nuclear accumulation of karyophilic proteins. When injected into the cytoplasm of tissue culture cells, anti-hsc70 strongly inhibited the nuclear import of nucleoplasmin, SV- 40 T-antigen NLS bearing BSA and histone H1. In contrast, anti-hsc70 IgG did not prevent the diffusion of lysozyme or 17.4-kD FITC-dextran into the nuclei. After injection of these antibodies, cells continued RNA synthesis and were viable. These results indicate that hsc70 interacts with NLS-containing proteins in the cytoplasm before their nuclear import. PMID:1332978

  4. Synthesis and initial evaluation of YM-08, a blood-brain barrier permeable derivative of the heat shock protein 70 (Hsp70) inhibitor MKT-077, which reduces tau levels.

    PubMed

    Miyata, Yoshinari; Li, Xiaokai; Lee, Hsiu-Fang; Jinwal, Umesh K; Srinivasan, Sharan R; Seguin, Sandlin P; Young, Zapporah T; Brodsky, Jeffrey L; Dickey, Chad A; Sun, Duxin; Gestwicki, Jason E

    2013-06-19

    The molecular chaperone, heat shock protein 70 (Hsp70), is an emerging drug target for treating neurodegenerative tauopathies. We recently found that one promising Hsp70 inhibitor, MKT-077, reduces tau levels in cellular models. However, MKT-077 does not penetrate the blood-brain barrier (BBB), limiting its use as either a clinical candidate or probe for exploring Hsp70 as a drug target in the central nervous system (CNS). We hypothesized that replacing the cationic pyridinium moiety in MKT-077 with a neutral pyridine might improve its clogP and enhance its BBB penetrance. To test this idea, we designed and synthesized YM-08, a neutral analogue of MKT-077. Like the parent compound, YM-08 bound to Hsp70 in vitro and reduced phosphorylated tau levels in cultured brain slices. Pharmacokinetic evaluation in CD1 mice showed that YM-08 crossed the BBB and maintained a brain/plasma (B/P) value of ∼0.25 for at least 18 h. Together, these studies suggest that YM-08 is a promising scaffold for the development of Hsp70 inhibitors suitable for use in the CNS.

  5. Small heat shock proteins protect against {alpha}-synuclein-induced toxicity and aggregation

    SciTech Connect

    Outeiro, Tiago Fleming; Klucken, Jochen; Strathearn, Katherine E.; Liu Fang; Nguyen, Paul; Rochet, Jean-Christophe; Hyman, Bradley T.; McLean, Pamela J. . E-mail: touteiro@partners.org

    2006-12-22

    Protein misfolding and inclusion formation are common events in neurodegenerative diseases, such as Parkinson's disease (PD), Alzheimer's disease (AD) or Huntington's disease (HD). {alpha}-Synuclein (aSyn) is the main protein component of inclusions called Lewy bodies (LB) which are pathognomic of PD, Dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB), and other diseases collectively known as LB diseases. Heat shock proteins (HSPs) are one class of the cellular quality control system that mediate protein folding, remodeling, and even disaggregation. Here, we investigated the role of the small heat shock proteins Hsp27 and {alpha}B-crystallin, in LB diseases. We demonstrate, via quantitative PCR, that Hsp27 messenger RNA levels are {approx}2-3-fold higher in DLB cases compared to control. We also show a corresponding increase in Hsp27 protein levels. Furthermore, we found that Hsp27 reduces aSyn-induced toxicity by {approx}80% in a culture model while {alpha}B-crystallin reduces toxicity by {approx}20%. In addition, intracellular inclusions were immunopositive for endogenous Hsp27, and overexpression of this protein reduced aSyn aggregation in a cell culture model.

  6. Cadmium alters the expression of small heat shock protein genes in the aquatic midge Chironomus riparius.

    PubMed

    Martín-Folgar, Raquel; Martínez-Guitarte, José-Luis

    2017-02-01

    Cadmium (Cd) is a widespread and highly toxic heavy metal of particular ecotoxicological relevance for aquatic ecosystems. It occurs naturally in the environment but is also an industrial pollutant with extensively researched carcinogenic potentials. Heat shock proteins (HSPs) are chaperones that play an important role in maintaining protein homeostasis under stress conditions. Small heat shock proteins (sHSPs) comprise the most diverse group of the HSPs family. They are expressed both constitutively and by stress-induction. The midge Chironomus riparius is widely used as a test species in aquatic toxicology. In the present study, Reverse Transcription Polymerase Chain Reaction (RT-PCR) was used to evaluate the effects of acute Cd exposure to the expression profile of seven shsp genes (hsp17, hsp21, hsp22, hsp23, hsp24, hsp27, and hsp34) in C. riparius larvae. Results show a specific pattern of response with a rapid response by hsp27, which was downregulated at 2-6 h, while the rest of the shsp genes remained unaltered except for hsp17 at 2 h, which was upregulated. However, at 24 h of exposure are observed high levels of hsp23, hsp24, hsp27, and hsp34 transcription while hsp22 mRNA levels were downregulated and hsp17 and hsp21 remained unaltered. These changes in gene expression suggest a functional diversity between the sHSPs in the cellular response to heavy metal stress. The differential pattern in comparison with heat shock supports a specific profile depending on the stress supporting the use of shsp genes as suitable biomarkers for ecotoxicological studies on aquatic systems.

  7. A First Line of Stress Defense: Small Heat Shock Proteins and their function in protein homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Haslbeck, Martin; Vierling, Elizabeth

    2015-01-01

    Small heat shock proteins (sHsps) are virtually ubiquitous molecular chaperones that can prevent the irreversible aggregation of denaturing proteins. To maintain protein homeostasis, sHsps complex with a variety of nonnative proteins in an ATP-independent manner and, in the context of the stress response, form a first line of defense against protein aggregation. In vertebrates they act to maintain the clarity of the eye lens, and in humans sHsp mutations are linked to myopathies and neuropathies. Although found in all domains of life, sHsps are quite diverse and have evolved independently in metazoans, plants and fungi. sHsp monomers range in size from approximately 12 to 42 kDa and are defined by a conserved β-sandwich α-crystallin domain, flanked by variable N- and C-terminal sequences. Most sHsps form large oligomeric ensembles with a broad distribution of different, sphere- or barrel like oligomers, with the size and structure of the oligomers dictated by features of the N- and C-termini. The activity of sHsps is regulated by mechanisms that change the equilibrium distribution in tertiary features and/or quaternary structure of the sHsp ensembles. Cooperation and/or coassembly between different sHsps in the same cellular compartment adds an underexplored level of complexity to sHsp structure and function. PMID:25681016

  8. A first line of stress defense: small heat shock proteins and their function in protein homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Haslbeck, Martin; Vierling, Elizabeth

    2015-04-10

    Small heat shock proteins (sHsps) are virtually ubiquitous molecular chaperones that can prevent the irreversible aggregation of denaturing proteins. sHsps complex with a variety of non-native proteins in an ATP-independent manner and, in the context of the stress response, form a first line of defense against protein aggregation in order to maintain protein homeostasis. In vertebrates, they act to maintain the clarity of the eye lens, and in humans, sHsp mutations are linked to myopathies and neuropathies. Although found in all domains of life, sHsps are quite diverse and have evolved independently in metazoans, plants and fungi. sHsp monomers range in size from approximately 12 to 42kDa and are defined by a conserved β-sandwich α-crystallin domain, flanked by variable N- and C-terminal sequences. Most sHsps form large oligomeric ensembles with a broad distribution of different, sphere- or barrel-like oligomers, with the size and structure of the oligomers dictated by features of the N- and C-termini. The activity of sHsps is regulated by mechanisms that change the equilibrium distribution in tertiary features and/or quaternary structure of the sHsp ensembles. Cooperation and/or co-assembly between different sHsps in the same cellular compartment add an underexplored level of complexity to sHsp structure and function.

  9. Functions of heat shock proteins in pathways of the innate and adaptive immune system.

    PubMed

    Binder, Robert Julian

    2014-12-15

    For more than 50 years, heat shock proteins (HSPs) have been studied for their role in protecting cells from elevated temperature and other forms of stress. More recently, several roles have been ascribed to HSPs in the immune system. These include intracellular roles in Ag presentation and expression of innate receptors, as well as extracellular roles in tumor immunosurveillance and autoimmunity. Exogenously administered HSPs can elicit a variety of immune responses that have been used in immunotherapy of cancer, infectious diseases, and autoimmune disease.

  10. Major heat shock protein Hsp72 controls oncogene-induced senescence.

    PubMed

    Sherman, Michael

    2010-06-01

    Various heat shock proteins, including Hsp72, are strongly upregulated in cancers, but their significance for tumor emergence and growth is poorly understood. Here we review recent data from several labs to indicate that Hsps, including Hsp72, are critical for growth of transformed but not normal cells. By manipulating expression and activity of Hsp72 and several oncogenes, it was shown that Hsp72 suppresses oncogene-induced senescence, thus allowing proliferation of cancer cells. Importantly, Hsp72 is able to suppress both p53-dependent and p53-independent senescence pathways. We propose that targeting Hsp72 may be a promising approach toward development of novel cancer therapies.

  11. Role of TRP channels in the induction of heat shock proteins (Hsps) by heating skin

    PubMed Central

    Hsu, Wen-Li; Yoshioka, Tohru

    2015-01-01

    Transient receptor potential (TRP) channels in skin are crucial for achieving temperature sensitivity to maintain internal temperature balance and thermal homeostasis, as well as to protect skin cells from environmental stresses such as infrared (IR) or near-infrared (NIR) radiation via heat shock protein (Hsp) production. However, the mechanisms by which IR and NIR activate TRP channels and produce Hsps intracellularly have been independently reported. In this review, we discuss the relationship between TRP channel activation and Hsp production, and introduce the roles of several skin TRP channels in the regulation of HSP production by IR and NIR exposure. PMID:27493511

  12. Role of TRP channels in the induction of heat shock proteins (Hsps) by heating skin.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Wen-Li; Yoshioka, Tohru

    2015-01-01

    Transient receptor potential (TRP) channels in skin are crucial for achieving temperature sensitivity to maintain internal temperature balance and thermal homeostasis, as well as to protect skin cells from environmental stresses such as infrared (IR) or near-infrared (NIR) radiation via heat shock protein (Hsp) production. However, the mechanisms by which IR and NIR activate TRP channels and produce Hsps intracellularly have been independently reported. In this review, we discuss the relationship between TRP channel activation and Hsp production, and introduce the roles of several skin TRP channels in the regulation of HSP production by IR and NIR exposure.

  13. Chronic SIV and Morphine treatment increases heat shock protein 5 expression at the synapse

    PubMed Central

    Pendyala, Gurudutt; Periyasamy, Palsamy; Callen, Shannon; Fox, Howard S.; Lisco, Steven J.; Buch, Shilpa J.

    2015-01-01

    The abuse of opiates such as morphine in synergy with HIV infection accelerates neurocognitive impairments and neuropathology in the CNS of HIV infected subjects, collectively referred to as HAND. To identify potential pathogenic markers associated with HIV and morphine in perturbing the synaptic architecture, we performed quantitative mass spectrometry proteomics on purified synaptosomes isolated from the caudate of two groups of rhesus macaques chronically infected with SIV differing by one regimen- morphine treatment. The up regulation of heat shock 70 kDa protein 5 in the SIV+morphine group points to increased cellular stress during SIV/Morphine interaction thus leading to CNS dysfunction. PMID:26037114

  14. Chronic SIV and morphine treatment increases heat shock protein 5 expression at the synapse.

    PubMed

    Pendyala, Gurudutt; Periyasamy, Palsamy; Callen, Shannon; Fox, Howard S; Lisco, Steven J; Buch, Shilpa J

    2015-10-01

    The abuse of opiates such as morphine in synergy with HIV infection accelerates neurocognitive impairments and neuropathology in the CNS of HIV-infected subjects, collectively referred to as HAND. To identify potential pathogenic markers associated with HIV and morphine in perturbing the synaptic architecture, we performed quantitative mass spectrometry proteomics on purified synaptosomes isolated from the caudate of two groups of rhesus macaques chronically infected with SIV differing by one regimen-morphine treatment. The upregulation of heat shock 70-kDa protein 5 in the SIV + morphine group points to increased cellular stress during SIV/morphine interaction thus leading to CNS dysfunction.

  15. Heat Shock Protein translocation induced by membrane fluidization increases tumor-cell sensitivity to chemotherapeutic drugs.

    PubMed

    Dempsey, Nina C; Ireland, H Elyse; Smith, Carly M; Hoyle, Christine F; Williams, John H H

    2010-10-28

    Treatment of chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) remains a challenge due to the frequency of drug resistance amongst patients. Improving the delivery of chemotherapeutic agents while reducing the expression of anti-apoptotic Heat Shock Proteins (HSPs) within the cancer cells may facilitate in overcoming this drug resistance. We demonstrate for the first time that sub-lethal doses of chemotherapeutic agents can be combined with membrane fluidizing treatments to produce a significant increase in drug efficacy and apoptosis in vitro. We show that fluidizers result in a transient decrease in intracellular HSPs, resulting in increased tumor-cell sensitivity and a membrane-associated induction of HSP gene expression.

  16. Heat shock protein 10 (Hsp10) in immune-related diseases: one coin, two sides

    PubMed Central

    Jia, Haibo; Halilou, Amadou I.; Hu, Liang; Cai, Wenqian; Liu, Jing; Huang, Bo

    2011-01-01

    Heat shock protein 10 (Hsp10) in eukaryotes, originally identified as a mitochondrial chaperone, now is also known to be present in cytosol, cell surface, extracellular space and peripheral blood. Functionally besides participating in mitochondrial protein folding in association with Hsp60, Hsp10 appears to be related to pregnancy, cancer and autoimmune inhibition. Hsp10 can be released to peripheral blood at very early time point of pregnancy and given another name called early pregnancy factor (EPF), which seems to play a critical role in developing a pregnant niche. In malignant disorders, Hsp10 is usually abnormally expressed in the cytosol of malignant cells and further released to extracellular space, resulting in tumor-promoting effect from various aspects. Furthermore, distinct from other heat shock protein members, whose soluble form is recognized as danger signal by immune cells and triggers immune responses, Hsp10 after release, however, is designed to be an inhibitory signal by limiting immune response. This review discusses how Hsp10 participates in various physiological and pathological processes from basic protein molecule folding to pregnancy, cancer and autoimmune diseases, and emphasizes how important the location is for the function exertion of a molecule. PMID:21969171

  17. Heat shock proteins (Hsp70) and water content in the estivating Mediterranean Grunt Snail (Cantareus apertus).

    PubMed

    Reuner, Andy; Brümmer, Franz; Schill, Ralph O

    2008-09-01

    Pulmonate land snails often are able to estivate to survive dry hot seasons were water and food are scarce. The aperture of the shell is closed with an epiphragm, and metabolism is depressed to approximately one fourth of basal metabolism. We investigated a molecular aspect of estivation focussing on the heat shock protein 70 (Hsp70) stress response during estivation in the Mediterranean Grunt Snail Cantareus apertus. Sequences of a new inducible hsp70 and of actin are presented and expression of the hsp70 gene as well as Hsp70 protein content was measured in estivating animals. Both Hsp70 protein and mRNA do not show a significant change from the control, although there is a trend that hsp70 mRNA is less abundant in estivating specimens. After heat shock, the expression of hsp70 increased and a higher Hsp70 protein content was detected. Water relations were also investigated. After a period of 6 months in the dormant state, the snails contained 14% less water than active ones, implying a constricted protection against desiccation, compared to the desert snail Sphincterochila zonata, and a Mediterranean-type water economy.

  18. Silver nanoparticles induced heat shock protein 70, oxidative stress and apoptosis in Drosophila melanogaster

    SciTech Connect

    Ahamed, Maqusood; Posgai, Ryan; Gorey, Timothy J.; Nielsen, Mark; Hussain, Saber M.; Rowe, John J.

    2010-02-01

    Due to the intensive commercial application of silver nanoparticles (Ag NPs), risk assessment of this nanoparticle is of great importance. Our previous in vitro study demonstrated that Ag NPs caused DNA damage and apoptosis in mouse embryonic stem cells and fibroblasts. However, toxicity of Ag NPs in vivo is largely lacking. This study was undertaken to examine the toxic effects of well-characterized polysaccharide coated 10 nm Ag NPs on heat shock stress, oxidative stress, DNA damage and apoptosis in Drosophila melanogaster. Third instar larvae of D. melanogaster were fed a diet of standard cornmeal media mixed with Ag NPs at the concentrations of 50 and 100 mug/ml for 24 and 48 h. Ag NPs up-regulated the expression of heat shock protein 70 and induced oxidative stress in D. melanogaster. Malondialdehyde level, an end product of lipid peroxidation was significantly higher while antioxidant glutathione content was significantly lower in Ag NPs exposed organisms. Activities of antioxidant enzyme superoxide dismutase and catalase were also significantly higher in the organisms exposed to Ag NPs. Furthermore, Ag NPs up-regulated the cell cycle checkpoint p53 and cell signaling protein p38 that are involved in the DNA damage repair pathway. Moreover, activities of caspase-3 and caspase-9, markers of apoptosis were significantly higher in Ag NPs exposed organisms. The results indicate that Ag NPs in D. melanogaster induce heat shock stress, oxidative stress, DNA damage and apoptosis. This study suggests that the organism is stressed and thus warrants more careful assessment of Ag NPs using in vivo models to determine if chronic exposure presents developmental and reproductive toxicity.

  19. Heat shock protein expression as guidance for the therapeutic window of retinal laser therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jenny; Huie, Philip; Dalal, Roopa; Lee, Seungjun; Tan, Gavin; Lee, Daeyoung; Lavinksy, Daniel; Palanker, Daniel

    2016-03-01

    Unlike conventional photocoagulation, non-damaging retinal laser therapy (NRT) limits laser-induced heating to stay below the retinal damage threshold and therefore requires careful dosimetry. Without the adverse effects associated with photocoagulation, NRT can be applied to critical areas of the retina and repeatedly to manage chronic disorders. Although the clinical benefits of NRT have been demonstrated, the mechanism of therapeutic effect and width of the therapeutic window below damage threshold are not well understood. Here, we measure activation of heat shock response via laser-induced hyperthermia as one indication of cellular response. A 577 nm laser is used with the Endpoint Management (EpM) user interface, a titration algorithm, to set experimental pulse energies relative to a barely visible titration lesion. Live/dead staining and histology show that the retinal damage threshold in rabbits is at 40% of titration energy on EpM scale. Heat shock protein 70 (HSP70) expression in the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) was detected by whole-mount immunohistochemistry after different levels of laser treatment. We show HSP70 expression in the RPE beginning at 25% of titration energy indicating that there is a window for NRT between 25% and 40% with activation of the heat shock protein expression in response to hyperthermia. HSP70 expression is also seen at the perimeter of damaging lesions, as expected based on a computational model of laser heating. Expression area for each pulse energy setting varied between laser spots due to pigmentation changes, indicating the relatively narrow window of non-damaging activation and highlighting the importance of proper titration.

  20. Heat shock protein 70 gene family in the Glanville fritillary butterfly and their response to thermal stress.

    PubMed

    Luo, Shiqi; Ahola, Virpi; Shu, Chang; Xu, Chongren; Wang, Rongjiang

    2015-02-10

    Temperature variation in the environment is a great challenge to organisms. Induction of heat shock protein 70 (HSP70) is a common genetic mechanism to cope with thermal stress. The Glanville fritillary butterfly (Melitaea cinxia) is a model species in population and evolutionary biology, and its behavior and life history are greatly influenced by ambient temperature. We cloned and sequenced the full coding sequences of seven hsp70 genes from the Glanville fritillary. Of those genes, McHsc70-1 and McHsc70-2 were identified as heat shock cognate 70 (hsc70), of which the latter located in endoplasmic reticulum. We analyzed the expression patterns of different hsp70s under various thermal stresses using quantitative PCR. Heat shock at 40°C for 2h induced high expression of McHsp70-1, McHsp70-2 and McHsc70-2. Only McHsc70-2 had a small increase after cold shock at 0°C for 2h. Acclimation at 35°C for three days before heat shock reduced expression of McHsp70 after heat shock. The maximum mRNA level of McHsp70s was reached in the first 2h after the heat shock. This study uncovers the complexity of the hsp70 system, and provides the valuable information for further temperature-related research in the Glanville fritillary butterfly.

  1. A cellular protein that associates with the transforming protein of Rous sarcoma virus is also a heat-shock protein.

    PubMed Central

    Oppermann, H; Levinson, W; Bishop, J M

    1981-01-01

    A single viral protein (pp60src) mediates neoplastic transformation of cells infected with Rous sarcoma virus. Immunoprecipitation of pp60src has revealed two cellular proteins (Mr 50,000 and 89,000) that appear to associate with pp60src in a specific manner. Neither of the cellular proteins has been well characterized, but it is thought that both may participate in the function of pp60src. Treatment of avian cells with unphysiological temperature or certain chemical agents amplifies the production of several proteins in the manner of the "heat shock" response earlier described for Drosophila. We report here that one of these proteins, with a molecular weight of 89,000 is identical to the 89-kilodalton protein found associated with pp60src. The 89-kilodalton protein is a major constituent of both uninfected and infected cells, even in the absence of inducing agents, but only a small fraction of this protein appears to associate with pp60src in cells transformed by Rous sarcoma virus. The complex containing pp60src and the 89-kilodalton protein can be precipitated by an immune reaction involving pp60src alone. The complexed form of the 89-kilodalton protein did not react directly with antibodies but regained its reactivity subsequent to release from the complex. We conclude that the 89-kilodalton protein is bound to pp60src in a relatively stable complex. We suggest that the 89-kilodalton protein may have overlapping roles in viral oncogenesis and the heat shock response, and that evidence on the function of the protein in either setting may illuminate its function in the other. In addition, it may prove profitable to search for other overlaps between the cellular response to heat shock and the neoplastic transformation of cells by pp60src. Images PMID:6262754

  2. Binding of natural and synthetic inhibitors to human heat shock protein 90 and their clinical application.

    PubMed

    Petrikaitė, Vilma; Matulis, Daumantas

    2011-01-01

    This review describes the recent progress in the field of heat shock protein 90 (Hsp90) inhibitor design. Hsp90 is a heat shock protein with a molecular weight of approximately 90 kDa. Hsp90 is considered a good anticancer target because its inhibition leads to inactivation of its numerous client proteins participating in various signaling and other processes involved in cancer progression. Numerous Hsp90 inhibitors-leads currently tested in clinical trials are presented in this review. Furthermore, this review emphasizes the application of biophysical binding assays in the development of Hsp90 inhibitors. The binding of designed lead compounds to various Hsp90 constructs is measured by isothermal titration calorimetry and thermal shift assay. These assays provide a detailed energetic insight of the binding reaction, including the enthalpy, entropy, heat capacity, and the Gibbs free energy. A detailed description of the binding energetics helps to extend our knowledge of structure-activity relationships in the design of more potent inhibitors. The most active compounds are then tested for their absorption, distribution, metabolism, elimination, toxicity, and activity against cancer cell lines.

  3. Heat shock protein gene expression and function in amphibian model systems.

    PubMed

    Heikkila, John J

    2010-05-01

    Heat shock proteins (HSPs) are molecular chaperones that are involved in protein folding and translocation. During heat shock, both constitutive and stress-inducible HSPs bind to and inhibit irreversible aggregation of denatured protein and facilitate their refolding once normal cellular conditions are re-established. Recent interest in HSPs has been propelled by their association with various human diseases. Amphibian model systems, as shown in this review, have had a significant impact on our understanding of hsp gene expression and function. Some amphibian hsp genes are expressed constitutively during oogenesis and embryogenesis, while others are developmentally regulated and enriched in selected tissues in a stress-inducible fashion. For example, while hsp70 genes are heat-inducible after the midblastula stage, hsp30 genes are not inducible until late neurula/early tailbud. This particular phenomenon is likely controlled by chromatin structure. Also, hsp genes are expressed during regeneration, primarily in response to wounding-associated trauma. The availability of amphibian cultured cells has enabled the analysis of hsp gene expression induced by different stresses (e.g. cadmium, arsenite, proteasome inhibitors etc.), HSP intracellular localization, and their involvement in stress resistance. Furthermore, hyperthermia treatment of adult amphibians reveals that certain tissues were more sensitive than others in terms of hsp gene expression. Finally, this review details the evidence available for the role of amphibian small HSPs as molecular chaperones.

  4. Detection of heat shock protein 70 in choroidal neovascular membranes secondary to age related macular degeneration

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Heat shock proteins are acute phase proteins that are upregulated in inflammation or following thermal stress. We analyzed the presence of the heat shock protein 70 (Hsp 70) in choroidal neovascular (CNV) membranes secondary to AMD after treatment with verteporphin photodynamic therapy (PDT) or transpupillary thermo therapy (TTT) to determine whether treatment correlated with the presence of Hsp70. Results CNV membranes were removed by pars plana vitrectomy (ppV) and subretinal extraction. The membranes were analysed by light microscopy and the presence of Hsp 70 was examined using histochemistry. HeLa Cells served as controls. Of the 14 membranes analysed 11 were Hsp70 positive and 3 negative. In the no pre-treatment group of 8 membranes 6 were Hsp70 positive and 2 negative; in the PTD group all 4 membranes were positive and in the TTT group 1 membrane was positive and 1 membrane was negative for Hsp70. Conclusion Hsp70 is present in the most CNV membranes secondary to AMD. Pre-treatment of the membrane with PTD or TTT does not appear to influence the expression of Hsp70. PMID:21477309

  5. Escherichia coli Heat Shock Protein DnaK: Production and Consequences in Terms of Monitoring Cooking

    PubMed Central

    Seyer, Karine; Lessard, Martin; Piette, Gabriel; Lacroix, Monique; Saucier, Linda

    2003-01-01

    Through use of commercially available DnaK proteins and anti-DnaK monoclonal antibodies, a competitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay was developed to quantify this heat shock protein in Escherichia coli ATCC 25922 subjected to various heating regimens. For a given process lethality (F7010 of 1, 3, and 5 min), the intracellular concentration of DnaK in E. coli varied with the heating temperature (50 or 55°C). In fact, the highest DnaK concentrations were found after treatments at the lower temperature (50°C) applied for a longer time. Residual DnaK after heating was found to be necessary for cell recovery, and additional DnaK was produced during the recovery process. Overall, higher intracellular concentrations of DnaK tended to enhance cell resistance to a subsequent lethal stress. Indeed, E. coli cells that had undergone a sublethal heat shock (105 min at 55°C, F7010 = 3 min) accompanied by a 12-h recovery (containing 76,786 ± 25,230 molecules/cell) resisted better than exponentially growing cells (38,500 ± 6,056 molecules/cell) when later heated to 60°C for 50 min (F7010 = 5 min). Results reported here suggest that using stress protein to determine cell adaptation and survival, rather than cell counts alone, may lead to more efficient heat treatment. PMID:12788720

  6. Proteome stability, heat hardening, and heat-shock protein expression profiles in Cataglyphis desert ants.

    PubMed

    Willot, Quentin; Gueydan, Cyril; Aron, Serge

    2017-02-23

    In ectotherms, high temperatures impose physical limits, impeding activity. Exposure to high heat levels causes various deleterious and lethal effects, including protein misfolding and denaturation. Thermophilic ectotherms have thus evolved various ways to increase macromolecular stability and cope with elevated body temperatures; these include the high constitutive expression of molecular chaperones. In this work, we investigated the effect of moderate to severe heat shock (37°C-45°C) on survival, heat hardening, protein damage, and the expression of five heat-tolerance related genes (hsc70-4 h1, hsc70-4 h2, hsp83, hsc70-5, and hsf1) in two rather closely related Cataglyphis ants that occur in distinct habitats. Our results show that the highly thermophilic Sahara ant Cataglyphis bombycina constitutively expresses HSC70 at higher levels, but has lower induced expression of heat-tolerance related genes in response to heat shock, as compared to the more mesophilic C. mauritanica found in the Atlas Mountains. As a result, C. bombycina demonstrates increased protein stability when exposed to acute heat stress but is less prone to acquiring induced thermotolerance via heat hardening. These results provide further insight into the evolutionary plasticity of the hsps gene expression system and subsequent physiological adaptations in thermophilous desert insects to adapt to harsh environmental conditions.

  7. Heat shock protein defenses in the neocortex and allocortex of the telencephalon.

    PubMed

    Posimo, Jessica M; Weilnau, Justin N; Gleixner, Amanda M; Broeren, Matthew T; Weiland, Nicole L; Brodsky, Jeffrey L; Wipf, Peter; Leak, Rehana K

    2015-05-01

    The telencephalic allocortex develops protein inclusions before the neocortex in many age-related proteinopathies. One major defense mechanism against proteinopathic stress is the heat shock protein (Hsp) network. We therefore contrasted Hsp defenses in stressed primary neocortical and allocortical cells. Neocortical neurons were more resistant to the proteasome inhibitor MG132 than neurons from 3 allocortical subregions: entorhinal cortex, piriform cortex, and hippocampus. However, allocortical neurons exhibited higher MG132-induced increases in Hsp70 and heat shock cognate 70 (Hsc70). MG132-treated allocortical neurons also exhibited greater levels of protein ubiquitination. Inhibition of Hsp70/Hsc70 activity synergistically exacerbated MG132 toxicity in allocortical neurons more than neocortical neurons, suggesting that the allocortex is more reliant on these Hsp defenses. In contrast, astrocytes harvested from the neocortex or allocortex did not differ in their response to Hsp70/Hsc70 inhibition. Consistent with the idea that chaperones are maximally engaged in allocortical neurons, an increase in Hsp70/Hsc70 activity was protective only in neocortical neurons. Finally, the levels of select Hsps were altered in the neocortex and allocortex in vivo with aging.

  8. Extracellular Release and Signaling by Heat Shock Protein 27: Role in Modifying Vascular Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Batulan, Zarah; Pulakazhi Venu, Vivek Krishna; Li, Yumei; Koumbadinga, Geremy; Alvarez-Olmedo, Daiana Gisela; Shi, Chunhua; O’Brien, Edward R.

    2016-01-01

    Heat shock protein 27 (HSP27) is traditionally viewed as an intracellular chaperone protein with anti-apoptotic properties. However, recent data indicate that a number of heat shock proteins, including HSP27, are also found in the extracellular space where they may signal via membrane receptors to alter gene transcription and cellular function. Therefore, there is increasing interest in better understanding how HSP27 is released from cells, its levels and composition in the extracellular space, and the cognate cell membrane receptors involved in effecting cell signaling. In this paper, the knowledge to date, as well as some emerging paradigms about the extracellular function of HSP27 is presented. Of particular interest is the role of HSP27 in attenuating atherogenesis by modifying lipid uptake and inflammation in the plaque. Moreover, the abundance of HSP27 in serum is an emerging new biomarker for ischemic events. Finally, HSP27 replacement therapy may represent a novel therapeutic opportunity for chronic inflammatory disorders, such as atherosclerosis. PMID:27507972

  9. Extracellular heat shock protein 70 has novel functional effects on sea urchin eggs and coelomocytes.

    PubMed

    Browne, Carole L; Swan, Justin B; Rankin, Ellen E; Calvert, Hayes; Griffiths, Shylise; Tytell, Michael

    2007-04-01

    Numerous reports document that the 70 kDa heat shock proteins are not only intracellular proteins but are also present in blood and other extracellular compartments. How they affect cell function from the extracellular space remains unclear. Using two well-characterized cell types from the sea urchin, we show that extracellular mixtures of the constitutive and inducible forms of the 70 kDa heat shock proteins (Hsc70 and Hsp70, respectively) have dramatic effects on initiation of cell division in fertilized eggs and on the clotting reaction of hypotonically stressed coelomocytes. In suspensions of fertilized eggs to which Hsc70 or a 2:3 mixture of Hsc and Hsp70 was added, progression to the first mitotic division was accelerated. Evidence is provided that the extracellular Hsc70 passes into the egg cells in an unconventional manner, being distributed through the cytoplasm, and that it may alter the intracellular signaling cascade initiated by sperm penetration. In coelomocytes that were stimulated by hypotonic shock to mimic injury, the spreading reaction of the clotting response was significantly inhibited when either Hsp70 or Hsc70 was in the medium. These results suggest that the presence of Hsc and/or Hsp70 in the extracellular fluid may promote mitosis of dividing cells and suppress the reactivity of immune system cells.

  10. Regulation of G protein signaling by the 70kDa heat shock protein.

    PubMed

    Lim, William K; Kanelakis, Kimon C; Neubig, Richard R

    2013-02-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) transduce extracellular signals to the interior of the cell by activating membrane-bound guanine nucleotide-binding regulatory proteins (G proteins). An increasing number of proteins have been reported to bind to and regulate GPCRs. We report a novel regulation of the alpha(2A) adrenergic receptor (α(2A)-R) by the ubiquitous stress-inducible 70kDa heat shock protein, hsp70. Hsp70, but not hsp90, attenuated G protein-dependent high affinity agonist binding to the α(2A)-R in Sf9 membranes. Antagonist binding was unchanged, suggesting that hsp70 uncouples G proteins from the receptor. As hsp70 did not bind G proteins but complexed with the α(2A)-R in intact cells, a direct interaction with the receptor seems likely. In the presence of hsp70, α(2A)-R-catalyzed [(35)S]GTPγS binding was reduced by approximately 70%. In contrast, approximately 50-fold higher concentrations of hsp70 were required to reduce agonist binding to the stress-inducible 5-hydroxytryptamine(1A) receptor (5-HT(1A)-R). In heat-stressed CHO cells, the α(2A)-R was significantly uncoupled from G proteins, coincident with an increased localization of hsp70 at the membrane. The contrasting effect of hsp70 on the α(2A)-R compared to the 5-HT(1A)-R suggests that during stress, upregulation of hsp70 may attenuate signaling from specific GPCRs as part of the stress response to foster survival.

  11. Selective release from cultured mammalian cells of heat-shock (stress) proteins that resemble glia-axon transfer proteins.

    PubMed

    Hightower, L E; Guidon, P T

    1989-02-01

    Cultured rat embryo cells were stimulated to rapidly release a small group of proteins that included several heat-shock proteins (hsp110, hsp71, hscp73) and nonmuscle actin. The extracellular proteins were analyzed by two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Heat-shocked cells released the same set of proteins as control cells with the addition of the stress-inducible hsp110 and hsp71. Release of these proteins was not blocked by either monensin or colchicine, inhibitors of the common secretory pathway. A small amount of the glucose-regulated protein grp78 was externalized by this pathway. The extracellular accumulation of these proteins was inhibited after they were synthesized in the presence of the lysine analogue aminoethyl cysteine. It is likely that the analogue-substituted proteins were misfolded and could not be released from cells, supporting our conclusion that a selective release mechanism is involved. Remarkably, actin and the squid heat-shock proteins homologous to rat hsp71 and hsp110 are also among a select group of proteins transferred from glial cells to the squid giant axon, where they have been implicated in neuronal stress responses (Tytell et al.: Brain Res., 363:161-164, 1986). Based in part on the similarities between these two sets of proteins, we hypothesized that these proteins were released from labile cortical regions of animal cells in response to perturbations of homeostasis in cells as evolutionarily distinct as cultured rat embryo cells and squid glial cells.

  12. Size dependent classification of heat shock proteins: a mini-review

    PubMed Central

    Jee, Hyunseok

    2016-01-01

    Molecular chaperones are ubiquitous and abundant within cellular environments, functioning as a defense mechanism against outer environment. The range of molecular chaperones varies from 10 to over 100 kDa. Depending on the size, the specific locations and physiological roles of molecular chaperones vary within the cell. Multifunctionality of heat shock proteins (HSPs) expressed via various cyto-stress including heat shock have been spotlighted as a reliable prognostic target biomarker for therapeutic purpose in neuromuscular disease or cancer related studies. HSP also plays a critical role in the maintenance of proteins and cellular homeostasis in exercise-induced adaptation. Such various functions of HSPs give scientists insights into intracellular protective mechanisms in the living body thus HSPs can be target molecules to know the defense mechanism in cellular environment. Based on experimental results regarding small to large scaled HSPs, this review aims to provide updated important information regarding the modality of responses of intracellular HSPs towards extracellular stimulations. Further, the expressive mechanisms of HSPs data from tremendous in vivo and in vitro studies underlying the enhancement of the functionality of living body will be discussed. PMID:27656620

  13. Small Heat Shock Protein αA-Crystallin Prevents Photoreceptor Degeneration in Experimental Autoimmune Uveitis

    PubMed Central

    Rao, Narsing A.; Saraswathy, Sindhu; Pararajasegaram, Geeta; Bhat, Suraj P.

    2012-01-01

    The small heat shock protein, αA-crystallin null (αA−/−) mice are known to be more prone to retinal degeneration than the wild type mice in Experimental Autoimmune Uveoretinitis (EAU). In this report we demonstrate that intravenous administration of αA preserves retinal architecture and prevents photoreceptor damage in EAU. Interestingly, only αA and not αB-crystallin (αB), a closely related small heat shock protein works, pointing to molecular specificity in the observed retinal protection. The possible involvement of αA in retinal protection through immune modulation is corroborated by adaptive transfer experiments, (employing αA−/− and wild type mice with EAU as donors and Rag2−/− as the recipient mice), which indicate that αA protects against the autoimmune challenge by modulating the systemic B and T cell immunity. We show that αA administration causes marked reduction in Th1 cytokines (TNF-α, IL-12 and IFN-γ), both in the retina and in the spleen; notably, IL-17 was only reduced in the retina suggesting local intervention. Importantly, expression of Toll-like receptors and their associated adaptors is also inhibited suggesting that αA protection, against photoreceptor loss in EAU, is associated with systemic suppression of both the adaptive and innate immune responses. PMID:22479415

  14. A heat-shock protein axis regulates VEGFR2 proteolysis, blood vessel development and repair.

    PubMed

    Bruns, Alexander F; Yuldasheva, Nadira; Latham, Antony M; Bao, Leyuan; Pellet-Many, Caroline; Frankel, Paul; Stephen, Sam L; Howell, Gareth J; Wheatcroft, Stephen B; Kearney, Mark T; Zachary, Ian C; Ponnambalam, Sreenivasan

    2012-01-01

    Vascular endothelial growth factor A (VEGF-A) binds to the VEGFR2 receptor tyrosine kinase, regulating endothelial function, vascular physiology and angiogenesis. However, the mechanism underlying VEGFR2 turnover and degradation in this response is unclear. Here, we tested a role for heat-shock proteins in regulating the presentation of VEGFR2 to a degradative pathway. Pharmacological inhibition of HSP90 stimulated VEGFR2 degradation in primary endothelial cells and blocked VEGF-A-stimulated intracellular signaling via VEGFR2. HSP90 inhibition stimulated the formation of a VEGFR2-HSP70 complex. Clathrin-mediated VEGFR2 endocytosis is required for this HSP-linked degradative pathway for targeting VEGFR2 to the endosome-lysosome system. HSP90 perturbation selectively inhibited VEGF-A-stimulated human endothelial cell migration in vitro. A mouse femoral artery model showed that HSP90 inhibition also blocked blood vessel repair in vivo consistent with decreased endothelial regeneration. Depletion of either HSP70 or HSP90 caused defects in blood vessel formation in a transgenic zebrafish model. We conclude that perturbation of the HSP70-HSP90 heat-shock protein axis stimulates degradation of endothelial VEGFR2 and modulates VEGF-A-stimulated intracellular signaling, endothelial cell migration, blood vessel development and repair.

  15. Suppression of Expression of Heat Shock Protein 70 by Gefitinib and Its Contribution to Pulmonary Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Namba, Takushi; Tanaka, Ken-Ichiro; Hoshino, Tatsuya; Azuma, Arata; Mizushima, Tohru

    2011-01-01

    Drug-induced interstitial lung disease (ILD), particularly pulmonary fibrosis, is of serious clinical concern. Gefitinib, a tyrosine kinase inhibitor of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), is beneficial as a drug for treating non-small cell lung cancer; however, this drug induces ILD and the molecular mechanisms underpinning this condition remain unclear. We recently reported that expression of heat shock protein 70 (HSP70) protects against bleomycin-induced pulmonary fibrosis, an animal model of pulmonary fibrosis. In this study, we have examined the effects of drugs known to induce ILD clinically on the expression of HSP70 in cultured lung epithelial cells and have found that gefitinib has a suppressive effect. Results of a luciferase reporter assay, pulse-labelling analysis of protein and experiments using an inhibitor of translation or transcription suggest that gefitinib suppresses the expression of HSP70 at the level of translation. Furthermore, the results of experiments with siRNA for Dicer1, an enzyme responsible for synthesis of microRNA, and real-time RT-PCR analysis suggest that some microRNAs are involved in the gefitinib-induced translational inhibition of HSP70. Mutations in the EGFR affect the concentration of gefitinib required for suppressing the expression of HSP70. These results suggest that gefitinib suppresses the translation of HSP70 through an EGFR- and microRNA-mediated mechanism. In vivo, while oral administration of gefitinib suppressed the pulmonary expression of HSP70 and exacerbated bleomycin-induced pulmonary fibrosis in wild-type mice, these effects were not as distinct in transgenic mice expressing HSP70. Furthermore, oral co-administration of geranylgeranylacetone (GGA), an inducer of HSP70, suppressed gefitinib-induced exacerbation of bleomycin-induced pulmonary fibrosis. Taken together, these findings suggest that gefitinib-induced exacerbation of bleomycin-induced pulmonary fibrosis is mediated by suppression of

  16. Modulation of heat-shock protein 27 (Hsp27) anti-apoptotic activity by methylglyoxal modification.

    PubMed

    Sakamoto, Hiroshi; Mashima, Tetsuo; Yamamoto, Kazuo; Tsuruo, Takashi

    2002-11-29

    Methylglyoxal (MG) is one of the side-products in glycolysis, and it reacts with proteins under physiological conditions. Here, we identified heat-shock protein 27 (Hsp27) as a major MG-modified protein in cells. MG modification of Hsp27 selectively occurs at Arg-188 to form argpyrimidine, and mutation in the residue represses the formation of a large oligomer. This modification process is essential to its repressing activity for cytochrome c-mediated caspase activation. Inhibition of MG modification of Hsp27 causes sensitization of the cells to anti-tumor drug-induced apoptosis. Thus, MG is a novel modulator of cell survival by directly incorporating with the specific protein residue.

  17. Concomitant changes in high temperature tolerance and heat-shock proteins in desert succulents.

    PubMed

    Kee, S C; Nobel, P S

    1986-02-01

    Raising the day/night air temperatures from 30 degrees C/20 degrees C to 50 degrees C/40 degrees C increases the high temperature tolerated by Agave deserti, Carnegiea gigantea, and Ferocactus acanthodes by 6 degrees C to 8 degrees C; the increase is about half completed in 3 days and fully completed in 10 days. A 25 to 27 kilodalton protein concomitantly accumulates for all three desert succulents upon transfer to 50 degrees C/40 degrees C, while accumulation of other heat "heat-shock" proteins is species specific. Some of the induced proteins are more abundant at 3 days, while others (including the 25-27 kilodalton protein) remain after completion of high temperature acclimation.

  18. Targeting Allosteric Control Mechanisms in Heat Shock Protein 70 (Hsp70).

    PubMed

    Li, Xiaokai; Shao, Hao; Taylor, Isabelle R; Gestwicki, Jason E

    2016-01-01

    Heat shock protein 70 (Hsp70) is a molecular chaperone that plays critical roles in protein homeostasis. Hsp70's chaperone activity is coordinated by intra-molecular interactions between its two domains, as well as inter-molecular interactions between Hsp70 and its co-chaperones. Each of these contacts represents a potential opportunity for the development of chemical inhibitors. To illustrate this concept, we review three classes of recently identified molecules that bind distinct pockets on Hsp70. Although all three compounds share the ability to interrupt core biochemical functions of Hsp70, they stabilize different conformers. Accordingly, each compound appears to interrupt a specific subset of inter- and intra-molecular interactions. Thus, an accurate definition of an Hsp70 inhibitor may require a particularly detailed understanding of the molecule's binding site and its effects on protein-protein interactions.

  19. Heavy metals chromium and neodymium reduced phosphorylation level of heat shock protein 27 in human keratinocytes.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qihao; Zhang, Lei; Xiao, Xue; Su, Zhijian; Zou, Ping; Hu, Hao; Huang, Yadong; He, Qing-Yu

    2010-06-01

    Heavy metals may exert their acute and chronic effects on the human skin through stress signals. In the present study, 2DE-based proteomics was used to analyze the protein expression in human keratinocytes exposed to heavy metals, chromium and neodymium, and 10 proteins with altered expression were identified. Among these proteins, small heat shock protein 27 (HSP27) was up-regulated significantly and the up-regulation was validated by Western blot and immunofluorescence. In addition, the mRNA expression level of HSP27 markedly increased as detected by quantitative PCR. More interestingly, the ratio of phosphorylated HSP27 and total HSP27 significantly decreased in keratinocytes treated with the heavy metals. These findings suggested that heavy metals reduced the phosphorylation level of HSP27, and that the ratio of p-HSP27 and HSP27 may represent a potential marker or additional endpoint for the hazard assessment of skin irritation caused by chemical products.

  20. Up-regulation of inducible heat shock protein-70 expression in multiple sclerosis patients.

    PubMed

    Mansilla, María José; Comabella, Manuel; Río, Jordi; Castilló, Joaquín; Castillo, Mireia; Martin, Roland; Montalban, Xavier; Espejo, Carmen

    2014-03-01

    Inducible heat shock protein (HSP)70 (HSP70-1A and HSP70-1B proteins) is a chaperone responsible for assisting proper protein folding. Following stress conditions, HSP70 is highly up-regulated to mediate cytoprotective functions. In addition, HSP70 is able to trigger innate and adaptive immune responses that promote the immune recognition of antigens and to act as a cytokine when it is released. The data in the literature are controversial with regard to expression studies in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs). In the present study, we aimed to examine if alterations of HSP70-1A/B expression are involved in the autoimmune pathogenesis of multiple sclerosis (MS). We determined both mRNA and protein expression in PBMCs of MS patients and healthy donors (HDs). We found a baseline increased expression of the HSPA1A gene in PBMCs from MS patients compared with HDs. Gene expression findings were associated with an increased protein expression of HSP70-1A/B in T lymphocytes (CD4+ and CD8+) and monocytes from MS patients under basal conditions that may reflect the immunological activation occurring in MS patients. We also provided evidence that heat shock (HS) stimulus induced HSP70-1A/B protein expression in HDs and MS patients, and that HS-induced HSP70-1A/B protein expression in monocytes correlated with the number of T2 lesions at baseline in MS patients. However, after lipopolysaccharide inflammatory stimulus, monocytes from MS patients failed to induce HSP70-1A/B protein expression. Our data hint at altered immune responses in MS and may indicate either a state of chronic stress or increased vulnerability to physiological immune responses in MS patients.

  1. Heat shock protein 70 down-regulates the production of toll-like receptor-induced pro-inflammatory cytokines by a heat shock factor-1/constitutive heat shock element-binding factor-dependent mechanism

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Heat shock protein 70 (Hsp70) is an intracellular chaperone protein with regulatory and cytoprotective functions. Hsp70 can also be found in the extracellular milieu, as a result of active secretion or passive release from damaged cells. The role of extracellular Hsp70 is not fully understood. Some studies report that it activates monocytes, macrophages and dendritic cells through innate immune receptors (such as Toll-like receptors, TLRs), while others report that Hsp70 is a negative regulator of the inflammatory response. In order to address this apparent inconsistency, in this study we evaluated the response of human monocytes to a highly purified recombinant Hsp70. Methods Human peripheral blood monocytes were stimulated with Hsp70, alone or in combination with TLR agonists. Cytokines were quantified in culture supernatants, their mRNAs were measured by RT-PCR, and the binding of transcription factors was evaluated by electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA). Kruskal-Wallis test or one-way or two-way ANOVA were used to analyze the data. Results The addition of Hsp70 to TLR-activated monocytes down-regulated TNF-α as well as IL-6 levels. This effect was independent of a physical interaction between Hsp70 and TLR agonists; instead it resulted of changes at the TNF-α gene expression level. The decrease in TNF-α expression correlated with the binding of HSF-1 (heat shock transcription factor 1, a transcription factor activated in response to Hsp70) and CHBF (constitutive HSE-binding factor) to the TNF-α gene promoter. Conclusion Extracellular Hsp70 negatively regulates the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines of monocytes exposed to TLR agonists and contributes to dampen the inflammatory response. PMID:25053922

  2. A novel protein quality control mechanism contributes to heat shock resistance of worldwide-distributed Pseudomonas aeruginosa clone C strains.

    PubMed

    Lee, Changhan; Wigren, Edvard; Trček, Janja; Peters, Verena; Kim, Jihong; Hasni, Muhammad Sharif; Nimtz, Manfred; Lindqvist, Ylva; Park, Chankyu; Curth, Ute; Lünsdorf, Heinrich; Römling, Ute

    2015-11-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a highly successful nosocomial pathogen capable of causing a wide variety of infections with clone C strains most prevalent worldwide. In this study, we initially characterize a molecular mechanism of survival unique to clone C strains. We identified a P. aeruginosa clone C-specific genomic island (PACGI-1) that contains the highly expressed small heat shock protein sHsp20c, the founding member of a novel subclass of class B bacterial small heat shock proteins. sHsp20c and adjacent gene products are involved in resistance against heat shock. Heat stable sHsp20c is unconventionally expressed in stationary phase in a wide temperature range from 20 to 42°C. Purified sHsp20c has characteristic features of small heat shock protein class B as it is monodisperse, forms sphere-like 24-meric oligomers and exhibits significant chaperone activity. As the P. aeruginosa clone C population is significantly more heat shock resistant than genetically unrelated P. aeruginosa strains without sHsp20c, the horizontally acquired shsp20c operon might contribute to the survival of worldwide-distributed clone C strains.

  3. Differential expression patterns among heat-shock protein genes and thermal responses in the whitefly Bemisia tabaci (MEAM 1).

    PubMed

    Díaz, Fernando; Orobio, Rony F; Chavarriaga, Paul; Toro-Perea, Nelson

    2015-08-01

    There is convincing evidence that heat-shock proteins (HSP) are upregulated by stress conditions in insects; however, the relative contribution of each HSP gene to the heat-shock response remains unclear. Here we considered the whitefly Bemisia tabaci (MEAM 1), a phloem feeder and invasive species whose molecular stress response is an important mechanism for overcoming heat stress. We assessed the expression of the hsp23, 40, 70 and 90 genes at the mRNA level when submitted to heat shocks of 40 and 44°C/1h (control at 25°C). For this, we evaluated a set of available and suitable reference genes in order to perform data normalization using the real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) technique, and then confirmed the production of HSP70 protein based on Western blot. Results were compared with the hardening capacity of B. tabaci, measured by fitness components as a response to heat shocks, using 40°C as the induction temperature. Three of the four genes (hsp23, 70 and 90) were upregulated by heat stress at mRNA, showing differential expression patterns. Hsp70 expression was confirmed at the protein level. Hardening significantly increased fitness following heat stress, suggesting that HSPs may contribute to hardening capacity in B. tabaci. Potential role of each gene in the heat-shock response for whiteflies is discussed.

  4. Small heat-shock proteins protect from heat-stroke-associated neurodegeneration.

    PubMed

    Kourtis, Nikos; Nikoletopoulou, Vassiliki; Tavernarakis, Nektarios

    2012-10-11

    Heat stroke is a life-threatening condition, characterized by catastrophic collapse of thermoregulation and extreme hyperthermia. In recent years, intensification of heat waves has caused a surge of heat-stroke fatalities. The mechanisms underlying heat-related pathology are poorly understood. Here we show that heat stroke triggers pervasive necrotic cell death and neurodegeneration in Caenorhabditis elegans. Preconditioning of animals at a mildly elevated temperature strongly protects from heat-induced necrosis. The heat-shock transcription factor HSF-1 and the small heat-shock protein HSP-16.1 mediate cytoprotection by preconditioning. HSP-16.1 localizes to the Golgi, where it functions with the Ca(2+)- and Mn(2+)-transporting ATPase PMR-1 to maintain Ca(2+) homeostasis under heat stroke. Preconditioning also suppresses cell death inflicted by diverse insults, and protects mammalian neurons from heat cytotoxicity. These findings reveal an evolutionarily conserved mechanism that defends against diverse necrotic stimuli, and may be relevant to heat stroke and other pathological conditions involving necrosis in humans.

  5. Purinergic Receptor Antagonists Inhibit Odorant-Induced Heat Shock Protein 25 Induction in Mouse Olfactory Epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Hegg, Colleen C.; Lucero, Mary T.

    2010-01-01

    Heat shock proteins (HSPs) accumulate in cells exposed to a variety of physiological and environmental factors, such as heat shock, oxidative stress, toxicants, and odorants. Ischemic, stressed, and injured cells release ATP in large amounts. Our hypothesis is that noxious stimulation (in this case, strong odorant) evokes the release of ATP in the olfactory epithelium (OE). Extracellular ATP, a signal of cellular stress, induces the expression of HSPs via purinergic receptors. In the present study, in vivo odorant exposure (heptanal or r-carvone) led to a selective induction of HSP25 in glia-like sustentacular cells in the Swiss Webster mouse OE, as previously shown in rats (Carr et al., 2001). Furthermore, in vitro and in vivo administration of purinergic receptor antagonists suramin and pyridoxalphosphate-6-azophenyl-2′,4′-disulfonic acid (PPADS) blocked the expression of HSP25 immunoreactivity in sustentacular cells. ATP released by acutely injured cells could act as an early signal of cell and tissue damage, causing HSP expression and initiating a stress signaling cascade to protect against further damage. Sustentacular cells have a high capacity to detoxify xenobiotics and thereby protect the olfactory epithelium from airborne pollutants. Thus, the robust, rapid induction of HSPs in sustentacular cells may help maintain the integrity of the OE during exposure to toxicants. PMID:16206165

  6. Heat shock protein 90 genes of two species of poultry Eimeria: expression and evolutionary analysis.

    PubMed

    Miska, K B; Fetterer, R H; Min, W; Lillehoj, H S

    2005-04-01

    Heat shock protein 90 (Hsp90) is 1 of the most abundant and evolutionarily conserved proteins. In most species, Hsp90 is essential for proper cell function. In this study, we present the molecular analysis of Hsp90 from Eimeria species, the causative agents of avian coccidiosis. The full-length Eimeria acervulina Hsp90 complementary DNA was isolated from intestinal intraepithelial lymphocytes of Eimeria-infected chickens. From evolutionary analysis and sequence identity, it is likely that Eimeria Hsp90 sequences described thus far encode the cytosolic versions of the protein. Although at the nucleotide and amino acid levels Eimeria tenella and E. acervulina Hsp90 are highly similar, their expression profiles differ considerably. Although E. tenella transcripts were detected in all developmental stages tested, E. acervulina transcripts were not found in oocysts undergoing sporulation or in fully sporulated oocysts, suggesting that messenger RNA expression may be regulated quite differently between Eimeria species.

  7. Thermally induced structural changes of intrinsically disordered small heat shock protein Hsp22.

    PubMed

    Kazakov, Alexey S; Markov, Denis I; Gusev, Nikolai B; Levitsky, Dmitrii I

    2009-12-01

    We applied different methods (differential scanning calorimetry, circular dichroism, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, and intrinsic fluorescence) to investigate the thermal-induced changes in the structure of small heat shock protein Hsp22. It has been shown that this protein undergoes thermal-induced unfolding that occurs within a very broad temperature range (from 27 degrees C to 80 degrees C and above), and this is accompanied by complete disappearance of alpha-helices, significant decrease in beta-sheets content, and by pronounced changes in the intrinsic fluorescence. The results confirm predictions that Hsp22 belongs to the family of intrinsically disordered proteins (IDP) with certain parts of its molecule (presumably, in the alpha-crystallin domain) retaining folded structure and undergoing reversible thermal unfolding. The results are also discussed in terms of downhill folding scenario.

  8. Heat-shock protein dysregulation is associated with functional and pathological TDP-43 aggregation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Hsiang-Yu; Hou, Shin-Chen; Way, Tzong-Der; Wong, Chi-Huey; Wang, I.-Fan

    2013-11-01

    Conformational disorders are involved in various neurodegenerative diseases. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are the major contributors to neurodegenerative disease; however, ROS that affect the structural changes in misfolded disease proteins have yet to be well characterized. Here we demonstrate that the intrinsic propensity of TDP-43 to aggregate drives the assembly of TDP-43-positive stress granules and soluble toxic TDP-43 oligomers in response to a ROS insult via a disulfide crosslinking-independent mechanism. Notably, ROS-induced TDP-43 protein assembly correlates with the dynamics of certain TDP-43-associated chaperones. The heat-shock protein (HSP)-90 inhibitor 17-AAG prevents ROS-induced TDP-43 aggregation, alters the type of TDP-43 multimers and reduces the severity of pathological TDP-43 inclusions. In summary, our study suggests that a common mechanism could be involved in the pathogenesis of conformational diseases that result from HSP dysregulation.

  9. Developmentally and stress-induced small heat shock proteins in cork oak somatic embryos.

    PubMed

    Puigderrajols, Pere; Jofré, Anna; Mir, Gisela; Pla, Maria; Verdaguer, Dolors; Huguet, Gemma; Molinas, Marisa

    2002-06-01

    The timing and tissue localization of small heat shock proteins (sHSPs) during cork oak somatic embryo development was investigated under normal growing culture conditions and in response to stress. Western blot analyses using polyclonal antibodies raised against cork oak recombinant HSP17 showed a transient accumulation of class I sHSPs during somatic embryo maturation and germination. Moreover, the amount of protein increased at all stages of embryo development in response to exogenous stress. The developmentally accumulated proteins localized to early differentiating, but not the highly dividing, regions of the root and shoot apical meristems. By contrast, these highly dividing regions were strongly immunostained after heat stress. Findings support the hypothesis of a distinct control for developmentally and stress-induced accumulation of class I sHSPs. The possible role of sHSPs is discussed in relation to their tissue specific localization.

  10. The 70 kDa heat shock protein suppresses matrix metalloproteinases in astrocytes.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jong Eun; Kim, Yeun Jung; Kim, Jong Youl; Lee, Won Taek; Yenari, Midori A; Giffard, Rona G

    2004-03-01

    The 70 kDa heat shock protein (Hsp70) is synthesized in response to a variety of stresses, including ischemia, and is thought to act as a molecular chaperone to prevent protein denaturation and facilitate protein folding. Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), a family of serine proteases, are also upregulated by ischemia and are thought to promote cell death and tissue injury. We examined the influence of Hsp70 on expression and activity of MMPs. Astrocyte cultures were prepared from neonatal mice and transfected with retroviral vectors containing hsp70 or lacZ or mock infected, then exposed to oxygen-glucose deprivation followed by reperfusion. Zymograms and Western blots showed that Hsp70 over-expression suppressed MMP-2 and MMP-9. These findings suggest that Hsp70 may protect by regulating MMPs.

  11. Heat shock protein 70-dependent protective effect of polaprezinc on acetylsalicylic acid-induced apoptosis of rat intestinal epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Qin, Ying; Naito, Yuji; Handa, Osamu; Hayashi, Natsuko; Kuki, Aiko; Mizushima, Katsura; Omatsu, Tatsushi; Tanimura, Yuko; Morita, Mayuko; Adachi, Satoko; Fukui, Akifumi; Hirata, Ikuhiro; Kishimoto, Etsuko; Nishikawa, Taichiro; Uchiyama, Kazuhiko; Ishikawa, Takeshi; Takagi, Tomohisa; Yagi, Nobuaki; Kokura, Satoshi; Yoshikawa, Toshikazu

    2011-11-01

    Protection of the small intestine from mucosal injury induced by nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs including acetylsalicylic acid is a critical issue in the field of gastroenterology. Polaprezinc an anti-ulcer drug, consisting of zinc and L-carnosine, provides gastric mucosal protection against various irritants. In this study, we investigated the protective effect of polaprezinc on acetylsalicylic acid-induced apoptosis of the RIE1 rat intestinal epithelial cell line. Confluent rat intestinal epithelial cells were incubated with 70 µM polaprezinc for 24 h, and then stimulated with or without 15 mM acetylsalicylic acid for a further 15 h. Subsequent cellular viability was quantified by fluorometric assay based on cell lysis and staining. Acetylsalicylic acid-induced cell death was also qualified by fluorescent microscopy of Hoechst33342 and propidium iodide. Heat shock proteins 70 protein expression after adding polaprezinc or acetylsalicylic acid was assessed by western blotting. To investigate the role of Heat shock protein 70, Heat shock protein 70-specific small interfering RNA was applied. Cell viability was quantified by fluorometric assay based on cell lysis and staining and apoptosis was analyzed by fluorescence-activated cell sorting. We found that acetylsalicylic acid significantly induced apoptosis of rat intestinal epithelial cells in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Polaprezinc significantly suppressed acetylsalicylic acid-induced apoptosis of rat intestinal epithelial cells at its late phase. At the same time, polaprezinc increased Heat shock protein 70 expressions of rat intestinal epithelial cells in a time-dependent manner. However, in Heat shock protein 70-silenced rat intestinal epithelial cells, polaprezinc could not suppress acetylsalicylic acid -induced apoptosis at its late phase. We conclude that polaprezinc-increased Heat shock protein 70 expression might be an important mechanism by which polaprezinc suppresses acetylsalicylic

  12. Heat Shock Protein 90 Has Roles in Intracellular Calcium Homeostasis, Protein Tyrosine Phosphorylation Regulation, and Progesterone-Responsive Sperm Function in Human Sperm

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Aijun; Jiang, Youfang; Xie, Haifeng; Shi, Qixian; Zhang, Songying; Ni, Ya

    2014-01-01

    Heat shock protein 90 plays critical roles in client protein maturation, signal transduction, protein folding and degradation, and morphological evolution; however, its function in human sperm is not fully understood. Therefore, our objective in this study was to elucidate the mechanism by which heat shock protein 90 exerts its effects on human sperm function. By performing indirect immunofluorescence staining, we found that heat shock protein 90 was localized primarily in the neck, midpiece, and tail regions of human sperm, and that its expression increased with increasing incubation time under capacitation conditions. Geldanamycin, a specific inhibitor of heat shock protein 90, was shown to inhibit this increase in heat shock protein 90 expression in western blotting analyses. Using a multifunctional microplate reader to examine Fluo-3 AM-loaded sperm, we observed for the first time that inhibition of heat shock protein 90 by using geldanamycin significantly decreased intracellular calcium concentrations during capacitation. Moreover, western blot analysis showed that geldanamycin enhanced tyrosine phosphorylation of several proteins, including heat shock protein 90, in a dose-dependent manner. The effects of geldanamycin on human sperm function in the absence or presence of progesterone was evaluated by performing chlortetracycline staining and by using a computer-assisted sperm analyzer. We found that geldanamycin alone did not affect sperm capacitation, hyperactivation, and motility, but did so in the presence of progesterone. Taken together, these data suggest that heat shock protein 90, which increases in expression in human sperm during capacitation, has roles in intracellular calcium homeostasis, protein tyrosine phosphorylation regulation, and progesterone-stimulated sperm function. In this study, we provide new insights into the roles of heat shock protein 90 in sperm function. PMID:25541943

  13. Mycobacterium tuberculosis heat shock proteins use diverse Toll-like receptor pathways to activate pro-inflammatory signals.

    PubMed

    Bulut, Yonca; Michelsen, Kathrin S; Hayrapetian, Linda; Naiki, Yoshikazu; Spallek, Ralf; Singh, Mahavir; Arditi, Moshe

    2005-06-03

    Although the Toll-like receptors used by Mycobacterium tuberculosis membrane and secreted factors are known, the pathways activated by M. tuberculosis heat shock proteins are not. An efficient immune response against the intracellular pathogen M. tuberculosis is critically dependent on rapid detection of the invading pathogen by the innate immune system and coordinated activation of the adaptive immune response. Macrophage phagocytosis of M. tuberculosis is accompanied by activation of the transcription factor NF-kappaB and secretion of inflammatory mediators that play an important role in granuloma formation and immune protection during M. tuberculosis infection. The interaction between M. tuberculosis and the various Toll-like receptors is complex, and it appears that distinct mycobacterial components may interact with different members of the Toll-like receptor family. Here we show that recombinant, purified, mycobacterial heat shock proteins 65 and 70 induce NF-kappaB activity in a dose-dependent manner in human endothelial cells. Furthermore, we show that whereas mycobacterial heat shock protein 65 signals exclusively through Toll-like receptor 4, heat shock protein 70 also signals through Toll-like receptor 2. Mycobacterial heat shock protein 65-induced NF-kappaB activation was MyD88-, TIRAP-, TRIF-, and TRAM-dependent and required the presence of MD-2. A better understanding of the recognition of mycobacterial heat shock proteins and their role in the host immune response to the pathogen may open the way to a better understanding of the immunological processes induced by this important human pathogen and the host-pathogen interactions and may help in the rational design of more effective vaccines or vaccine adjuvants.

  14. Balloon angioplasty induces heat shock protein 70 in human blood vessels.

    PubMed

    Kirby, L B; Mondy, J S; Brophy, C M

    1999-09-01

    Balloon angioplasty produces a mechanically induced injury to the blood vessel wall. Heat shock protein 70 (HSP70) is a molecular chaperone whose expression can be induced by chemical or thermal stress. Thus, we hypothesized that the mechanical injury associated with balloon angioplasty would lead to increases in the expression of HSP70 in vascular smooth muscle. Segments of popliteal and trifurcation vessels from above-the-knee amputations were subject to transluminal balloon angioplasty, excised, and placed in organ cultures. Neighboring vessel that was not subjected to balloon angioplasty served as controls. Some vessels were treated with sodium arsenite (positive control, known to induce HSP70 expression). The vessels were homogenized and the proteins were separated by gel electrophoresis and transferred to Immobilon. Western blots with an antibody specific for the inducible form of HSP70 were analyzed by densitometry. Our results showed that HSP70 expression can be induced by the mechanical injury associated with balloon angioplasty in human atherosclerotic vessels.

  15. Specific Genetic Immunotherapy Induced by Recombinant Vaccine Alpha-Fetoprotein-Heat Shock Protein 70 Complex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xiaoping; Lin, Huanping; Wang, Qiaoxia

    Purposes: To construct a recombinant vaccine alpha-fetoprotein (AFP)-heat shock protein (HSP70) complex, and study its ability to induce specific CTL response and its protective effect against AFP-producing tumor. Material/Methods: A recombinant vaccine was constructed by conjugating mouse alpha-fetoprotein to heat shock protein 70. By way of intracutaneous injection, mice were primed and boosted with recombinant vaccine mAFP/HSP70, whereas single mAFP or HSP70 injection as controls. The ELISPOT and ELISA were used to measure the frequency of cells producing the cytokine IFN-γ in splenocytes and the level of anti-AFP antibody of serum from immunized mice respectively. In vivo tumor challenge were carried out to assess the immune effect of the recombinant vaccine. Results: By recombinant mAFP/HSP70 vaccine immunization, the results of ELISPOT and ELISA showed that the number of splenic cells producing IFN-γ and the level of anti-AFP antibody of serum were significantly higher in mAFP/HSP70 group than those in mAFP and HSP70 groups (108.50±11.70 IFN-γ spots/106 cells vs 41.60±10.40 IFN-γ spots/106 cells, 7.32±3.14 IFN-γ spots/106 cells, P<0.01; 156.32±10.42 μg/mL vs 66.52±7.35 μg/mL, 5.73±2.89 μg/mL, P<0.01). The tumor volume in mAFP/HSP70 group was significantly smaller than that in mAFP and HSP70 groups (42.44±7.14 mm3 vs 392.23±12.46 mm3, 838.63±13.84 mm3, P<0.01). Conclusions: The study further confirmed the function of heat shock protein 70's immune adjuvant. Sequential immunization with recombinant mAFP/HSP70 vaccine could generate effective antitumor immunity on AFP-producing tumor. The recombined mAFP/HSP70 vaccine may be suitable for serving as an immunotherapy for hepatocellular carcinoma.

  16. Transcript analysis and expression profiling of three heat shock protein 70 genes in the ectoparasitoid Habrobracon hebetor (Hymenoptera: Braconidae)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Heat shock proteins (HSPs) are known as chaperones that help with folding of other proteins when cells are under environmental stresses. The upregulation of HSPs is essential for cold survival during insect diapause. The ectoparasitoid Habrobracon hebetor, a potential biological control agent, can e...

  17. Effects of Heat Shock Protein-70 Gene and Forage System on Milk Yield and Composition of Beef Cattle

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Genomic DNA from 117 Angus, Brahman, and reciprocal-cross cows was used to determine the influence of heat shock protein 70 haplotype and forage type [endophyte-infected tall fescue (Neotyphodium coenophialum; E+) or common bermudagrass (Cynododactylon; BG)] on milk yield and composition (protein, f...

  18. Repression of hsp70 heat shock gene transcription by the suppressor of hairy-wing protein of Drosophila melanogaster

    SciTech Connect

    Holdridge, C.; Dorsett, D. )

    1991-04-01

    The suppressor of hairy-wing [su(Hw)] locus of Drosophila melanogaster encodes a zinc finger protein that binds a repeated motif in the gypsy retroposon. Mutations of su(Hw) suppress the phenotypes associated with mutations caused by gypsy insertions. To examine the mechanisms by which su(Hw) alters gene expression, a fragment of gypsy containing multiple su(Hw) protein-binding sites was inserted into various locations in the well-characterized Drosophila hsp70 heat shock gene promoter. The authors found no evidence for activation of basal hsp70 transcription by su(Hw) protein in cultured Drosophila cells but observed that it can repress heat shock-induced transcription. Repression occurred only when su(Hw) protein-binding sites were positioned between binding sites for proteins required for heat shock transcription. They propose that su(Hw) protein interferes nonspecifically with protein-protein interactions required for heat shock transcription, perhaps sterically, or by altering the ability of DNA to bend or twist.

  19. ELEVATED LEVELS OF INDUCIBLE HEAT SHOCK PROTEIN (HSP70-1) PROTECT MCF-7 CELLS FROM ARSENITE TOXICITY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Heat shock proteins (HSPs) belong to the highly conserved family of stress proteins and are induced following exposure to arsenic. Elevated HSPs protect against cellular damage from heat but it is unclear whether HSP induction alters the damaging effects of environmental chemical...

  20. INDUCIBLE HEAT SHOCK PROTEIN (HSP70-1) PROTECTS MCF-7 CELLS FROM THE CYTOTOXIC AND GENOTOXIC EFFECTS OF ARSENITE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Heat shock proteins (HSPs) belong to the highly conserved family of stress proteins and are induced following exposure to arsenic. Elevated HSPs protect against cellular damage from heat but it is unclear wether HSP induction alters the damaging effects of environmental chemical ...

  1. The L-type cyclin CYL-1 and the heat-shock-factor HSF-1 are required for heat-shock-induced protein expression in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Hajdu-Cronin, Yvonne M; Chen, Wen J; Sternberg, Paul W

    2004-12-01

    In a screen for suppressors of activated GOA-1 (Galpha(o)) under the control of the hsp-16.2 heat-shock promoter, we identified three genetic loci that affected heat-shock-induced GOA-1 expression. The cyl-1 mutants are essentially wild type in appearance, while hsf-1 and sup-45 mutants have egg-laying defects. The hsf-1 mutation also causes a temperature-sensitive developmental arrest, and hsf-1 mutants have decreased life span. Western analysis indicated that mutations in all three loci suppressed the activated GOA-1 transgene by decreasing its expression. Heat-shock-induced expression of hsp-16.2 mRNA was reduced in cyl-1 mutants and virtually eliminated in hsf-1 and sup-45 mutants, as compared to wild-type expression. The mutations could also suppress other transgenes under heat-shock control. cyl-1 and sup-45, but not hsf-1, mutations suppressed a defect caused by a transgene not under heat-shock control, suggesting a role in general transcription or a post-transcriptional aspect of gene expression. hsf-1 encodes the C. elegans homolog of the human heat-shock factor HSF1, and cyl-1 encodes a cyclin most similar to cyclin L. We believe HSF-1 acts in heat-shock-inducible transcription and CYL-1 acts more generally in gene expression.

  2. Temperature dependent N-glycosylation of plasma membrane heat shock protein Hsp30p in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Kamo, Ken'ichi; Takabatake, Akiko; Inoue, Yoshiharu; Izawa, Shingo

    2012-03-30

    The HSP30 gene of the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae encodes a seven-transmembrane heat shock protein expressed in response to various types of stress including heat shock. Although Hsp30p contains a potential N-glycosylation consensus sequence (Asn(2)-Asp(3)-Thr(4)), whether it is actually N-glycosylated has not been verified. Here we demonstrate that N-glycosylation is induced at Asn(2) of Hsp30p by severe heat shock, ethanol stress, and acetic acid stress. Mild heat shock and glucose depletion induced the expression but not N-glycosylation of Hsp30p, indicating the N-glycosylation to be dependent on temperature and environmental conditions. N-glycosylation did not affect on the intracellular localization of Hsp30p but its physiological role under severe heat shock conditions. Since limited information is available on stress-responsive or condition-induced N-glycosylation, our findings provide new insight into the regulation of cellular stress response in yeast.

  3. The stress protein heat shock cognate 70 (Hsc70) inhibits the Transient Receptor Potential Vanilloid type 1 (TRPV1) channel

    PubMed Central

    Iftinca, Mircea; Flynn, Robyn; Basso, Lilian; Melo, Helvira; Aboushousha, Reem; Taylor, Lauren

    2016-01-01

    Background Specialized cellular defense mechanisms prevent damage from chemical, biological, and physical hazards. The heat shock proteins have been recognized as key chaperones that maintain cell survival against a variety of exogenous and endogenous stress signals including noxious temperature. However, the role of heat shock proteins in nociception remains poorly understood. We carried out an expression analysis of the constitutively expressed 70 kDa heat-shock cognate protein, a member of the stress-induced HSP70 family in lumbar dorsal root ganglia from a mouse model of Complete Freund’s Adjuvant-induced chronic inflammatory pain. We used immunolabeling of dorsal root ganglion neurons, behavioral analysis and patch clamp electrophysiology in both dorsal root ganglion neurons and HEK cells transfected with Hsc70 and Transient Receptor Potential Channels to examine their functional interaction in heat shock stress condition. Results We report an increase in protein levels of Hsc70 in mouse dorsal root ganglia, 3 days post Complete Freund’s Adjuvant injection in the hind paw. Immunostaining of Hsc70 was observed in most of the dorsal root ganglion neurons, including the small size nociceptors immunoreactive to the TRPV1 channel. Standard whole-cell patch-clamp technique was used to record Transient Receptor Potential Vanilloid type 1 current after exposure to heat shock. We found that capsaicin-evoked currents are inhibited by heat shock in dorsal root ganglion neurons and transfected HEK cells expressing Hsc70 and TRPV1. Blocking Hsc70 with matrine or spergualin compounds prevented heat shock-induced inhibition of the channel. We also found that, in contrast to TRPV1, both the cold sensor channels TRPA1 and TRPM8 were unresponsive to heat shock stress. Finally, we show that inhibition of TRPV1 depends on the ATPase activity of Hsc70 and involves the rho-associated protein kinase. Conclusions Our work identified Hsc70 and its ATPase activity as a central

  4. Chalcones from Angelica keiskei: Evaluation of Their Heat Shock Protein Inducing Activities.

    PubMed

    Kil, Yun-Seo; Choi, Seul-Ki; Lee, Yun-Sil; Jafari, Mahtab; Seo, Eun-Kyoung

    2015-10-23

    Five new chalcones, 4,2',4'-trihydroxy-3'-[(2E,5E)-7-methoxy-3,7-dimethyl-2,5-octadienyl]chalcone (1), (±)-4,2',4'-trihydroxy-3'-[(2E)-6-hydroxy-7-methoxy-3,7-dimethyl-2-octenyl]chalcone (2), 4,2',4'-trihydroxy-3'-[(2E)-3-methyl-5-(1,3-dioxolan-2-yl)-2-pentenyl]chalcone (3), 2',3'-furano-4-hydroxy-4'-methoxychalcone (4), and (±)-4-hydroxy-2',3'-(2,3-dihydro-2-methoxyfurano)-4'-methoxychalcone (5), were isolated from the aerial parts of Angelica keiskei Koidzumi together with eight known chalcones, 6-13, which were identified as (±)-4,2',4'-trihydroxy-3'-[(6E)-2-hydroxy-7-methyl-3-methylene-6-octenyl]chalcone (6), xanthoangelol (7), xanthoangelol F (8), xanthoangelol G (9), 4-hydroxyderricin (10), xanthoangelol D (11), xanthoangelol E (12), and xanthoangelol H (13), respectively. Chalcones 1-13 were evaluated for their promoter activity on heat shock protein 25 (hsp25, murine form of human hsp27). Compounds 1 and 6 activated the hsp25 promoter by 21.9- and 29.2-fold of untreated control at 10 μM, respectively. Further protein expression patterns of heat shock factor 1 (HSF1), HSP70, and HSP27 by 1 and 6 were examined. Compound 6 increased the expression of HSF1, HSP70, and HSP27 by 4.3-, 1.5-, and 4.6-fold of untreated control, respectively, without any significant cellular cytotoxicities, whereas 1 did not induce any expression of these proteins. As a result, 6 seems to be a prospective HSP inducer.

  5. Increased expression of heat shock protein 65 coincides with a population of infiltrating T lymphocytes in atherosclerotic lesions of rabbits specifically responding to heat shock protein 65.

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Q; Kleindienst, R; Waitz, W; Dietrich, H; Wick, G

    1993-01-01

    We have shown previously that atherosclerotic lesions can be induced in normocholesterolemic rabbits by immunization with mycobacterial heat shock protein 65 (hsp65), which has a high degree of sequence homology with mammalian hsp60. To investigate a possible relationship between hsp60 expression and the antigenic specificities of infiltrating T cells in the lesion, 38 New Zealand White rabbits were treated either by immunization with recombinant mycobacterial hsp65 or by administration of a 0.2% cholesterol diet. Atherosclerotic lesions were observed after 16 wk, particularly in the aortic arch and arterial bifurcations of rabbits immunized with hsp65 or fed with a cholesterol-rich diet. Hsp65 staining of aortas showed a heterogeneous distribution, and significantly increased staining intensity in atherosclerotic lesions compared to aortic media or adventitia. This abundantly expressed hsp65 was observed in atherosclerotic lesions induced by hsp65 immunization as well as those induced by cholesterol-rich diet alone. Interestingly, a population of the T lymphocytes isolated from all forms of atherosclerotic lesions specifically responded to hsp65 in vitro. IL-2-expanded T cell lines derived from atherosclerotic lesions showed a significantly higher hsp65 reactivity than those developed from peripheral blood of the same donor. Furthermore, levels of circulating antibodies and numbers of spleen cells specifically reacting against hsp65 were elevated in all experimental animals. Flow cytometric analysis of spleen cells showed elevated immune response-associated antigen expression in treated animals. In conclusion, increased hsp65 expression in intimal cells and the presence of hsp65-specific T cells in blood and in atherosclerotic lesions may be important in initiating the development of atherosclerosis and perpetuating the lesions. Images PMID:8514876

  6. Tandem Duplication Events in the Expansion of the Small Heat Shock Protein Gene Family in Solanum lycopersicum (cv. Heinz 1706).

    PubMed

    Krsticevic, Flavia J; Arce, Débora P; Ezpeleta, Joaquín; Tapia, Elizabeth

    2016-10-13

    In plants, fruit maturation and oxidative stress can induce small heat shock protein (sHSP) synthesis to maintain cellular homeostasis. Although the tomato reference genome was published in 2012, the actual number and functionality of sHSP genes remain unknown. Using a transcriptomic (RNA-seq) and evolutionary genomic approach, putative sHSP genes in the Solanum lycopersicum (cv. Heinz 1706) genome were investigated. A sHSP gene family of 33 members was established. Remarkably, roughly half of the members of this family can be explained by nine independent tandem duplication events that determined, evolutionarily, their functional fates. Within a mitochondrial class subfamily, only one duplicated member, Solyc08g078700, retained its ancestral chaperone function, while the others, Solyc08g078710 and Solyc08g078720, likely degenerated under neutrality and lack ancestral chaperone function. Functional conservation occurred within a cytosolic class I subfamily, whose four members, Solyc06g076570, Solyc06g076560, Solyc06g076540, and Solyc06g076520, support ∼57% of the total sHSP RNAm in the red ripe fruit. Subfunctionalization occurred within a new subfamily, whose two members, Solyc04g082720 and Solyc04g082740, show heterogeneous differential expression profiles during fruit ripening. These findings, involving the birth/death of some genes or the preferential/plastic expression of some others during fruit ripening, highlight the importance of tandem duplication events in the expansion of the sHSP gene family in the tomato genome. Despite its evolutionary diversity, the sHSP gene family in the tomato genome seems to be endowed with a core set of four homeostasis genes: Solyc05g014280, Solyc03g082420, Solyc11g020330, and Solyc06g076560, which appear to provide a baseline protection during both fruit ripening and heat shock stress in different tomato tissues.

  7. Tandem Duplication Events in the Expansion of the Small Heat Shock Protein Gene Family in Solanum lycopersicum (cv. Heinz 1706)

    PubMed Central

    Krsticevic, Flavia J.; Arce, Débora P.; Ezpeleta, Joaquín; Tapia, Elizabeth

    2016-01-01

    In plants, fruit maturation and oxidative stress can induce small heat shock protein (sHSP) synthesis to maintain cellular homeostasis. Although the tomato reference genome was published in 2012, the actual number and functionality of sHSP genes remain unknown. Using a transcriptomic (RNA-seq) and evolutionary genomic approach, putative sHSP genes in the Solanum lycopersicum (cv. Heinz 1706) genome were investigated. A sHSP gene family of 33 members was established. Remarkably, roughly half of the members of this family can be explained by nine independent tandem duplication events that determined, evolutionarily, their functional fates. Within a mitochondrial class subfamily, only one duplicated member, Solyc08g078700, retained its ancestral chaperone function, while the others, Solyc08g078710 and Solyc08g078720, likely degenerated under neutrality and lack ancestral chaperone function. Functional conservation occurred within a cytosolic class I subfamily, whose four members, Solyc06g076570, Solyc06g076560, Solyc06g076540, and Solyc06g076520, support ∼57% of the total sHSP RNAm in the red ripe fruit. Subfunctionalization occurred within a new subfamily, whose two members, Solyc04g082720 and Solyc04g082740, show heterogeneous differential expression profiles during fruit ripening. These findings, involving the birth/death of some genes or the preferential/plastic expression of some others during fruit ripening, highlight the importance of tandem duplication events in the expansion of the sHSP gene family in the tomato genome. Despite its evolutionary diversity, the sHSP gene family in the tomato genome seems to be endowed with a core set of four homeostasis genes: Solyc05g014280, Solyc03g082420, Solyc11g020330, and Solyc06g076560, which appear to provide a baseline protection during both fruit ripening and heat shock stress in different tomato tissues. PMID:27565886

  8. Molecular docking and pharmacophore studies of heterocyclic compounds as Heat shock protein 90 (Hsp90) Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Baby, Suby T; Sharma, Shailendra; Enaganti, Sreenivas; Cherian, P. Roby

    2016-01-01

    Heat Shock Protein 90 was a key molecular chaperone involved in the proteome stability maintenance and its interference in many signaling networks associated with cancer progression, makes it of an important target for cancer therapeutics. The present study aimed to identify potential lead molecule among the selected heterocyclic compounds against Human Hsp90 (PDB: 1YET) through docking using GOLD 3.1 and pharmacophore studies using Discovery studio 2.1. On the basis of the GOLD Fitness scores, the compounds Q1G and T21 showed better binding affinity. Further the analyzed structure pharmacophore results are in consistence with the docking results indicating that both these compounds show antagonistic activity towards HSP90 respectively.

  9. Emotional and learning behaviour in mice overexpressing heat shock protein 70.

    PubMed

    Ammon-Treiber, Susanne; Grecksch, Gisela; Angelidis, Charalampos; Vezyraki, Patra; Höllt, Volker; Becker, Axel

    2008-09-01

    The effects of inducible heat shock protein 70 (HSP70) on emotional and learning behaviour as well as hippocampal long-term potentiation was investigated in transgenic HSP70 overexpressing mice. In active two-way avoidance learning (shuttle box) as well as spatial 8-arm radial maze learning, the HSP70 overexpressing mice showed diminished learning performance. In several tests there was no indication of differences in anxiety behaviour between transgenic mice and wild-type mice. This suggests that impairment in learning behaviour is unrelated to the learning task and motivational aspects of behaviour. To investigate the neurophysiological correlate of learning, long-term potentiation experiments were performed. In transversal hippocampal slices, an enhanced amplitude of the population spike was found in HSP70 overexpressing mice. It was hypothesised that enhanced potentiation in conjunction with potentiation effects due to learning led to learning impairment.

  10. Increased light intensity induces heat shock protein Hsp60 in coral species.

    PubMed

    Chow, Ari M; Ferrier-Pagès, Christine; Khalouei, Sam; Reynaud, Stéphanie; Brown, Ian R

    2009-09-01

    The effect of increased light intensity and heat stress on heat shock protein Hsp60 was examined in two coral species using a branched coral and a laminar coral, selected for their different resistance to environmental perturbation. Transient Hsp60 induction was observed in the laminar coral following either light or thermal stress. Sustained induction was observed when these stresses were combined. The branched coral exhibited comparatively weak transient Hsp60 induction after heat stress and no detectable induction following light stress, consistent with its susceptibility to bleaching in native environments compared to the laminar coral. Our observations also demonstrate that increased light intensity and heat stress exhibited a greater negative impact on the photosynthetic capacity of environmentally sensitive branched coral than the more resistant laminar coral. This supports a correlation between stress induction of Hsp60 and (a) ability to counter perturbation of photosynthetic capacity by light and heat stress and (b) resistance to environmentally induced coral bleaching.

  11. AuNPs modified, disposable, ITO based biosensor: Early diagnosis of heat shock protein 70.

    PubMed

    Sonuç Karaboğa, Münteha Nur; Şimşek, Çiğdem Sayıklı; Sezgintürk, Mustafa Kemal

    2016-10-15

    This paper describes a novel, simple, and disposable immunosensor based on indium-tin oxide (ITO) sheets modified with gold nanoparticles to sensitively analyze heat shock protein 70 (HSP70), a potential biomarker that could be evaluated in diagnosis of some carcinomas. Disposable ITO coated Polyethylene terephthalate (PET) electrodes were used and modified with gold nanoparticles in order to construct the biosensors. Optimization and characterization steps were analyzed by electrochemical techniques such as electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) and cyclic voltammetry (CV). Surface morphology of the biosensor was also identified by electrochemical methods, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and atomic force microscopy (AFM). To interpret binding characterization of HSP70 to anti-HSP70 single frequency impedance method was successfully operated. Moreover, the proposed HSP70 immunosensor acquired good stability, repeatability, and reproducibility. Ultimately, proposed biosensor was introduced to real human serum samples to determine HSP70 sensitively and accurately.

  12. Proposal of Dual Inhibitor Targeting ATPase Domains of Topoisomerase II and Heat Shock Protein 90

    PubMed Central

    Jun, Kyu-Yeon; Kwon, Youngjoo

    2016-01-01

    There is a conserved ATPase domain in topoisomerase II (topo II) and heat shock protein 90 (Hsp90) which belong to the GHKL (gyrase, Hsp90, histidine kinase, and MutL) family. The inhibitors that target each of topo II and Hsp90 are intensively studied as anti-cancer drugs since they play very important roles in cell proliferation and survival. Therefore the development of dual targeting anti-cancer drugs for topo II and Hsp90 is suggested to be a promising area. The topo II and Hsp90 inhibitors, known to bind to their ATP binding site, were searched. All the inhibitors investigated were docked to both topo II and Hsp90. Four candidate compounds as possible dual inhibitors were selected by analyzing the molecular docking study. The pharmacophore model of dual inhibitors for topo II and Hsp90 were generated and the design of novel dual inhibitor was proposed. PMID:27582553

  13. Modulation of heat shock protein response in SH-SY5Y by mobile phone microwaves

    PubMed Central

    Calabrò, Emanuele; Condello, Salvatore; Currò, Monica; Ferlazzo, Nadia; Caccamo, Daniela; Magazù, Salvatore; Ientile, Riccardo

    2012-01-01

    AIM: To investigate putative biological damage caused by GSM mobile phone frequencies by assessing electromagnetic fields during mobile phone working. METHODS: Neuron-like cells, obtained by retinoic-acid-induced differentiation of human neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cells, were exposed for 2 h and 4 h to microwaves at 1800 MHz frequency bands. RESULTS: Cell stress response was evaluated by MTT assay as well as changes in the heat shock protein expression (Hsp20, Hsp27 and Hsp70) and caspase-3 activity levels, as biomarkers of apoptotic pathway. Under our experimental conditions, neither cell viability nor Hsp27 expression nor caspase-3 activity was significantly changed. Interestingly, a significant decrease in Hsp20 expression was observed at both times of exposure, whereas Hsp70 levels were significantly increased only after 4 h exposure. CONCLUSION: The modulation of the expression of Hsps in neuronal cells can be an early response to radiofrequency microwaves. PMID:22371824

  14. Crystal Structure of an Activated Variant of Small Heat Shock Protein Hsp16.5

    SciTech Connect

    Mchaourab, Hassane S.; Lin, Yi-Lun; Spiller, Benjamin W.

    2013-04-17

    How does the sequence of a single small heat shock protein (sHSP) assemble into oligomers of different sizes? To gain insight into the underlying structural mechanism, we determined the crystal structure of an engineered variant of Methanocaldococcus jannaschii Hsp16.5 wherein a 14 amino acid peptide from human heat shock protein 27 (Hsp27) was inserted at the junction of the N-terminal region and the {alpha}-crystallin domain. In response to this insertion, the oligomer shell expands from 24 to 48 subunits while maintaining octahedral symmetry. Oligomer rearrangement does not alter the fold of the conserved {alpha}-crystallin domain nor does it disturb the interface holding the dimeric building block together. Rather, the flexible C-terminal tail of Hsp16.5 changes its orientation relative to the {alpha}-crystallin domain which enables alternative packing of dimers. This change in orientation preserves a peptide-in-groove interaction of the C-terminal tail with an adjacent {beta}-sandwich, thereby holding the assembly together. The interior of the expanded oligomer, where substrates presumably bind, retains its predominantly nonpolar character relative to the outside surface. New large windows in the outer shell provide increased access to these substrate-binding regions, thus accounting for the higher affinity of this variant to substrates. Oligomer polydispersity regulates sHSPs chaperone activity in vitro and has been implicated in their physiological roles. The structural mechanism of Hsp16.5 oligomer flexibility revealed here, which is likely to be highly conserved across the sHSP superfamily, explains the relationship between oligomer expansion observed in disease-linked mutants and changes in chaperone activity.

  15. Molecular cloning, characterization and functional analysis of a heat shock protein 70 gene in Cyclina sinensis.

    PubMed

    Ren, Yipeng; Pan, Heting; Yang, Ying; Pan, Baoping; Bu, Wenjun

    2016-11-01

    Heat shock protein 70 (HSP70) is an important member of the heat shock protein superfamily and is involved in protecting organisms against various stressors. In the present study, we used RACE to clone a full-length Cyclina sinensis HSP70 cDNA termed CsHSP70. The full length of the CsHSP70 cDNA was 2308 bp, with a 5' untranslated region (UTR) of 42 bp, a 3' UTR of 268 bp, and an open reading frame (ORF) of 1998 bp encoding a polypeptide of 655 amino acids with an estimated molecular mass of 72.75 kDa and an estimated isoelectric point of 5.48. Quantitative real-time PCR was employed to analyze the tissue distribution and temporal expression of the CsHSP70 gene after bacterial challenge and cadmium (Cd) exposure. The CsHSP70 mRNA transcript was expressed ubiquitously in five examined tissues, with the highest expression in hemocytes (P < 0.05) and with the lowest expression in the hepatopancreas. Furthermore, the expression level of CsHSP70 in hemocytes at 3 h after Vibrio anguillarum challenge was extremely significantly up-regulated (P < 0.01). Moreover, the CsHSP70 transcript was up-regulated significantly following exposure to a safe Cd concentration (0.1 mg/L). Finally, after the CsHSP70 gene was silenced by RNA interference, the expression of the CsTLR13 and CsMyD88 genes were extremely significantly decreased (P < 0.01). The results indicated that CsHSP70 could play an important role in mediating the environmental stress and immune responses, and regulating TLR signaling pathway in C. sinensis.

  16. Expression of heat shock protein 72 in atrophied rat skeletal muscles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oishi, Y.; Ishihara, A.; Talmadge, R. J.; Ohira, Y.; Taniguchi, K.; Matsumoto, H.; Roy, R. R.; Edgerton, V. R.

    2001-01-01

    Changes in the expression of heat shock protein 72 (HSP72) in response to atrophic-inducing perturbations of muscle involving chronic mechanical unloading and denervation were determined. Adult male Wistar rats were assigned randomly to a sedentary cage control (CON), hind limb unloading (HU, via tail suspension), HU plus tenotomy (HU + TEN), HU plus denervation (HU + DEN), or HU + TEN + DEN group. Tenotomy and DEN involved cutting the Achilles tendon and removing a segment of the sciatic nerve, respectively. After 5 days, HSP72 levels in the soleus of the HU + DEN and HU + TEN + DEN groups were 42 (P < 0.05) and 53% (P < 0.01) less than CON, respectively. Soleus weight decreased in both groups. Heat shock protein 72 levels in the plantaris of the HU + TEN, HU + DEN, and HU + TEN + DEN groups were 31, 25, and 30% lower than CON, respectively (P < 0.05). Plantaris weight decreased in the HU + DEN and HU + TEN + DEN, but not in the HU + TEN group. Hind limb unloading alone had little effect on the HSP72 level in either muscle. Reduced levels of HSP72 were associated with a decreased soleus (r=0.62, P < 0.01) and plantaris (r=0.78, P < 0.001) weight. These results indicate that the levels of HSP72 in both a slow and a fast rat plantarflexor are responsive to a chronic decrease in the levels of loading and/or activation and suggest that the neuromuscular activity level and the presence of innervation of a muscle are important factors that induce HSP72 expression.

  17. Heat shock treatment protects osmotic stress–induced dysfunction of the blood-brain barrier through preservation of tight junction proteins

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Tzong-Shi; Chen, Hsiang-Wen; Huang, Maw-Hsiung; Wang, Shu-Jung; Yang, Rei-Cheng

    2004-01-01

    The blood-brain barrier (BBB) is a specialized structure in the central nervous system (CNS), which participates in maintenance of a state of cerebrospinal fluid homeostasis. The endothelial cells of the cerebral capillaries and the tight junctions between them form the basis of the BBB. Research has shown that destruction of the BBB is associated with diseases of the CNS. However, there is little research on how the BBB might be protected. In this study, we used a high osmotic solution (1.6 M d-mannitol) to open the BBB of rats and Evans blue dye as a macromolecular marker. The effect of heat shock treatment was evaluated. The results show that increased synthesis of heat shock protein 72 (Hsp72) was induced in the heated group only. BBB permeability was significantly less in the heat shock–treated group after hyperosmotic shock. The major tight junction proteins, occludin and zonula occludens (ZO)-1, were significantly decreased after d-mannitol treatment in the nonheated group, whereas they were preserved in the heated group. The coimmunoprecipitation studies demonstrated that Hsp72 could be detected in the precipitates of brain extract interacting with anti–ZO-1 antibodies as well as those interacting with anti–occludin antibodies in the heated group. We conclude that the integrity of tight junctions could be maintained by previous heat shock treatment, which might be associated with the increased production of Hsp72. PMID:15633295

  18. The expression and function of hsp30-like small heat shock protein genes in amphibians, birds, fish, and reptiles.

    PubMed

    Heikkila, John J

    2017-01-01

    Small heat shock proteins (sHSPs) are a superfamily of molecular chaperones with important roles in protein homeostasis and other cellular functions. Amphibians, reptiles, fish and birds have a shsp gene called hsp30, which was also referred to as hspb11 or hsp25 in some fish and bird species. Hsp30 genes, which are not found in mammals, are transcribed in response to heat shock or other stresses by means of the heat shock factor that is activated in response to an accumulation of unfolded protein. Amino acid sequence analysis revealed that representative HSP30s from different classes of non-mammalian vertebrates were distinct from other sHSPs including HSPB1/HSP27. Studies with amphibian and fish recombinant HSP30 determined that they were molecular chaperones since they inhibited heat- or chemically-induced aggregation of unfolded protein. During non-mammalian vertebrate development, hsp30 genes were differentially expressed in selected tissues. Also, heat shock-induced stage-specific expression of hsp30 genes in frog embryos was regulated at the level of chromatin structure. In adults and/or tissue culture cells, hsp30 gene expression was induced by heat shock, arsenite, cadmium or proteasomal inhibitors, all of which enhanced the production of unfolded/damaged protein. Finally, immunocytochemical analysis of frog and chicken tissue culture cells revealed that proteotoxic stress-induced HSP30 accumulation co-localized with aggresome-like inclusion bodies. The congregation of damaged protein in aggresomes minimizes the toxic effect of aggregated protein dispersed throughout the cell. The current availability of probes to detect the presence of hsp30 mRNA or encoded protein has resulted in the increased use of hsp30 gene expression as a marker of proteotoxic stress in non-mammalian vertebrates.

  19. Oral glutamine enhances heat shock protein expression and improves survival following hyperthermia.

    PubMed

    Singleton, Kristen D; Wischmeyer, Paul E

    2006-03-01

    No pharmacologic agent has shown benefit in treating heatstroke. Previous data indicate that enhanced heat shock protein 70 (HSP-70) expression can improve survival postexperimental heatstroke. Glutamine (GLN) can enhance HSP-70 expression in other injury models. This study assessed if orally administered GLN could enhance tissue HSP expression and could improve survival following whole body hyperthermia. Intestinal permeability and plasma endotoxin were assayed to determine if enhanced HSP expression correlated with improved organ function. GLN (0.65 g/kg) or an iso-nitrogenous control (Travasol; T) was given to rats via gavage twice daily for 5 days pre-heatstroke. Hyperthermia was performed in anesthetized rats by heating animals to 42 degrees C (rectal temperature) for 30 min. HSP-70 analyzed via Western blot. Gut permeability was measured 6 and 24 h post-hyperthermia. Plasma endotoxin was measured 24 h post-hyperthermia. Survival was analyzed for 5 days post-hyperthermia. GLN administration enhanced gut and lung HSP-70 post-hyperthermia. GLN administration led to significantly enhanced gut heat shock factor 1 (HSF-1) activation before heatstroke and at 1 h postheat stress. GLN decreased gut permeability at 6 and 24 h post-hyperthermia versus T. Plasma endotoxin also decreased in GLN-treated rats 24 h post-hyperthermia. Oral GLN therapy significantly improved survival (P < 0.05). Our results indicate that oral GLN can enhance tissue HSP-70 and HSF-1 activation post-hyperthermia. These results also indicate that enhanced HSP-70 may have functional significance as GLN-treated animals had decreased gut permeability, plasma endotoxin, and improve survival following lethal hyperthermia. Enhanced expression of HSP-70 may be an important mechanism leading to enhanced survival via GLN. These data indicate that oral GLN may useful in prevention of mortality from heatstroke in at risk populations.

  20. Heat shock protein 70 regulates Tcl1 expression in leukemia and lymphomas.

    PubMed

    Gaudio, Eugenio; Paduano, Francesco; Ngankeu, Apollinaire; Lovat, Francesca; Fabbri, Muller; Sun, Hui-Lung; Gasparini, Pierluigi; Efanov, Alexey; Peng, Yong; Zanesi, Nicola; Shuaib, Mohammed A; Rassenti, Laura Z; Kipps, Thomas J; Li, Chenglong; Aqeilan, Rami I; Lesinski, Gregory B; Trapasso, Francesco; Croce, Carlo M

    2013-01-10

    T-cell leukemia/lymphoma 1 (TCL1) is an oncogene overexpressed in T-cell prolymphocytic leukemia and in B-cell malignancies including B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia and lymphomas. To date, only a limited number of Tcl1-interacting proteins that regulate its oncogenic function have been identified. Prior studies used a proteomic approach to identify a novel interaction between Tcl1 with Ataxia Telangiectasia Mutated. The association of Tcl1 and Ataxia Telangiectasia Mutated leads to activation of the NF-κB pathway. Here, we demonstrate that Tcl1 also interacts with heat shock protein (Hsp) 70. The Tcl1-Hsp70 complex was validated by coimmunoprecipitation experiments. In addition, we report that Hsp70, a protein that plays a critical role in the folding and maturation of several oncogenic proteins, associates with Tcl1 protein and stabilizes its expression. The inhibition of the ATPase activity of Hsp70 results in ubiquitination and proteasome-dependent degradation of Tcl1. The inhibition of Hsp70 significantly reduced the growth of lymphoma xenografts in vivo and down-regulated the expression of Tcl1 protein. Our findings reveal a functional interaction between Tcl1 and Hsp70 and identify Tcl1 as a novel Hsp70 client protein. These findings suggest that inhibition of Hsp70 may represent an alternative effective therapy for chronic lymphocytic leukemia and lymphomas via its ability to inhibit the oncogenic functions of Tcl1.

  1. Heat shock protein 70 regulates Tcl1 expression in leukemia and lymphomas

    PubMed Central

    Gaudio, Eugenio; Paduano, Francesco; Ngankeu, Apollinaire; Lovat, Francesca; Fabbri, Muller; Sun, Hui-Lung; Gasparini, Pierluigi; Efanov, Alexey; Peng, Yong; Zanesi, Nicola; Shuaib, Mohammed A.; Rassenti, Laura Z.; Kipps, Thomas J.; Li, Chenglong; Aqeilan, Rami I.; Lesinski, Gregory B.; Trapasso, Francesco

    2013-01-01

    T-cell leukemia/lymphoma 1 (TCL1) is an oncogene overexpressed in T-cell prolymphocytic leukemia and in B-cell malignancies including B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia and lymphomas. To date, only a limited number of Tcl1-interacting proteins that regulate its oncogenic function have been identified. Prior studies used a proteomic approach to identify a novel interaction between Tcl1 with Ataxia Telangiectasia Mutated. The association of Tcl1 and Ataxia Telangiectasia Mutated leads to activation of the NF-κB pathway. Here, we demonstrate that Tcl1 also interacts with heat shock protein (Hsp) 70. The Tcl1-Hsp70 complex was validated by coimmunoprecipitation experiments. In addition, we report that Hsp70, a protein that plays a critical role in the folding and maturation of several oncogenic proteins, associates with Tcl1 protein and stabilizes its expression. The inhibition of the ATPase activity of Hsp70 results in ubiquitination and proteasome-dependent degradation of Tcl1. The inhibition of Hsp70 significantly reduced the growth of lymphoma xenografts in vivo and down-regulated the expression of Tcl1 protein. Our findings reveal a functional interaction between Tcl1 and Hsp70 and identify Tcl1 as a novel Hsp70 client protein. These findings suggest that inhibition of Hsp70 may represent an alternative effective therapy for chronic lymphocytic leukemia and lymphomas via its ability to inhibit the oncogenic functions of Tcl1. PMID:23160471

  2. Mapping the Interactome of a Major Mammalian Endoplasmic Reticulum Heat Shock Protein 90

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Feng; Mohammad Rachidi, Saleh; Lundgren, Debbie; Han, David; Huang, Xiu; Zhao, Hongyu; Kimura, Yayoi; Hirano, Hisashi; Ohara, Osamu; Udono, Heichiiro; Meng, Songdong; Liu, Bei; Li, Zihai

    2017-01-01

    Up to 10% of cytosolic proteins are dependent on the mammalian heat shock protein 90 (HSP90) for folding. However, the interactors of its endoplasmic reticulum (ER) paralogue (gp96, Grp94 and HSP90b1) has not been systematically identified. By combining genetic and biochemical approaches, we have comprehensively mapped the interactome of gp96 in macrophages and B cells. A total of 511 proteins were reduced in gp96 knockdown cells, compared to levels observed in wild type cells. By immunoprecipitation, we found that 201 proteins associated with gp96. Gene Ontology analysis indicated that these proteins are involved in metabolism, transport, translation, protein folding, development, localization, response to stress and cellular component biogenesis. While known gp96 clients such as integrins, Toll-like receptors (TLRs) and Wnt co-receptor LRP6, were confirmed, cell surface HSP receptor CD91, TLR4 pathway protein CD180, WDR1, GANAB and CAPZB were identified as potentially novel substrates of gp96. Taken together, our study establishes gp96 as a critical chaperone to integrate innate immunity, Wnt signaling and organ development. PMID:28056051

  3. Isolation and characterization of Heat Shock Protein 100-Batu1 from Toxoplasma gondii RH strain.

    PubMed

    Coşkun, Kübra Açıkalın; Tutar, Yusuf

    2015-06-01

    Toxoplasma gondii is an intracellular parasitic protozoon which infects human and most warm-blooded animals. Almost one-third of the world's population is affected by life-threatening infection of T. gondii tachyzoites form. Slow growing, transmissible and encysted bradyzoites forms are composed after tachyzoites stage. Cellular and environmental stresses induce conversion of tachyzoites from bradyzoites and this condition is associated with Heat Shock Protein (Hsps) family. Hsp100 is a member of this protein family, and coordinates to disassemble protein aggregates with Hsp70 and Hsp40 in an ATP dependent manner. Several proteins are involved during this stage differentiation and Hsp100 may help them to be in their native soluble form to perform their function as observed in other organisms. For this purpose, Hsp100-Batu1 was isolated from T. gondii RH strain to characterize its biochemical properties in this current study. Hsp100 proteins play a role in survival and virulence of pathogens as shown in the literature. Therefore, manipulation of protein-protein interaction may perturb T. gondii infection and impair conversion to tachyzoites by inhibiting Hsp100 function. Therefore, results of this work present a potential route for vaccination or immunotherapy.

  4. TARGETED DELETION OF INDUCIBLE HEAT SHOCK PROTEIN 70 ABROGATES THE LATE INFARCT-SPARING EFFECT OF MYOCARDIAL ISCHEMIC PRECONDITIONING

    EPA Science Inventory

    Abstract submitted for 82nd annual meeting of the American Association for Thoracic Surgery, May 4-8, 2002 in Washington D.C.

    Targeted Deletion of Inducible Heat Shock Protein 70 Abrogates the Late Infarct-Sparing Effect of Myocardial Ischemic Preconditioning

    Craig...

  5. Characterization of three transcripts encoding small heat shock proteins expressed in the codling moth, Cydia pomonella (Lepidoptera: Tortricidae)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Codling moth is a major pest of apples and pears worldwide. Increasing knowledge of how this insect responds to environmental stress will improve field and postharvest control measures used against it. The small heat shock proteins (sHsps) play a major role in cellular responses to environmental st...

  6. PUTATIVE CREATINE KINASE M-ISOFORM IN HUMAN SPERM IS IDENTIFIED AS THE 70-KILODALTON HEAT SHOCK PROTEIN HSPA2

    EPA Science Inventory

    THE PUTATIVE CREATINE KINASE M-ISOFORM IN HUMAN SPERM
    IS IDENTIFIED AS THE 70 kDa HEAT SHOCK PROTEIN HSPA2

    * Gabor Huszar1, Kathryn Stone2, David Dix3 and Lynne Vigue1
    1The Sperm Physiology Laboratory, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, 2 W.M. Keck Foundatio...

  7. Wheat Mds-1 encodes a heat-shock protein and governs susceptibility towards the Hessian fly gall midge

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Plant pests including insects must manipulate plants in order to utilize the nutrition and environment of the host. Here, we show that the heat-shock protein gene Mayetiola destructor susceptibility gene-1 (Mds-1) is a major susceptibility gene in wheat that allows the gall midge M. destructor, com...

  8. Transcriptional profiles of human epithelial cells in response to heat: computational evidence for novel heat shock proteins.

    PubMed

    Laramie, Jason M; Chung, T Philip; Brownstein, Buddy; Stormo, Gary D; Cobb, J Perren

    2008-05-01

    We hypothesized that broad-scale expression profiling would provide insight into the regulatory pathways that control gene expression in response to stress and potentially identify novel heat-responsive genes. HEp2 cells, a human malignant epithelial cell line, were heated at 37 degrees C to 43 degrees C for 60 min to gauge the heat shock response, using as a proxy inducible Hsp70 quantified by Western blot analysis. Based on these results, microarray experiments were conducted at 37 degrees C, 40 degrees C, 41 degrees C, 42 degrees C, and 43 degrees C. Using linear modeling, we compared the sets of microarrays at 40 degrees C, 41 degrees C, 42 degrees C, and 43 degrees C with the 37 degrees C baseline temperature and took the union of the genes exhibiting differential gene expression signal to create two sets of "heat shock response" genes, each set reflecting either increased or decreased RNA abundance. Leveraging human and mouse orthologous alignments, we used the two lists of coexpressed genes to predict transcription factor binding sites in silico, including those for heat shock factor (HSF) 1 and HSF2 transcription factors. We discovered HSF1 and HSF2 binding sites in 15 genes not previously associated with the heat shock response. We conclude that microarray experiments coupled with upstream promoter analysis can be used to identify novel genes that respond to heat shock. Additional experiments are required to validate these putative heat shock proteins and facilitate a deeper understanding of the mechanisms involved during the stress response.

  9. Heat Shock Partially Dissociates the Overlapping Modules of the Yeast Protein-Protein Interaction Network: A Systems Level Model of Adaptation

    PubMed Central

    Mihalik, Ágoston; Csermely, Peter

    2011-01-01

    Network analysis became a powerful tool giving new insights to the understanding of cellular behavior. Heat shock, the archetype of stress responses, is a well-characterized and simple model of cellular dynamics. S. cerevisiae is an appropriate model organism, since both its protein-protein interaction network (interactome) and stress response at the gene expression level have been well characterized. However, the analysis of the reorganization of the yeast interactome during stress has not been investigated yet. We calculated the changes of the interaction-weights of the yeast interactome from the changes of mRNA expression levels upon heat shock. The major finding of our study is that heat shock induced a significant decrease in both the overlaps and connections of yeast interactome modules. In agreement with this the weighted diameter of the yeast interactome had a 4.9-fold increase in heat shock. Several key proteins of the heat shock response became centers of heat shock-induced local communities, as well as bridges providing a residual connection of modules after heat shock. The observed changes resemble to a ‘stratus-cumulus’ type transition of the interactome structure, since the unstressed yeast interactome had a globally connected organization, similar to that of stratus clouds, whereas the heat shocked interactome had a multifocal organization, similar to that of cumulus clouds. Our results showed that heat shock induces a partial disintegration of the global organization of the yeast interactome. This change may be rather general occurring in many types of stresses. Moreover, other complex systems, such as single proteins, social networks and ecosystems may also decrease their inter-modular links, thus develop more compact modules, and display a partial disintegration of their global structure in the initial phase of crisis. Thus, our work may provide a model of a general, system-level adaptation mechanism to environmental changes. PMID:22022244

  10. Sulphoraphane, a naturally occurring isothiocyanate induces apoptosis in breast cancer cells by targeting heat shock proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Sarkar, Ruma; Mukherjee, Sutapa; Biswas, Jaydip; Roy, Madhumita

    2012-10-12

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer HSPs (27, 70 and 90) and HSF1 are overexpressed in MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Sulphoraphane, a natural isothiocyanate inhibited HSPs and HSF1 expressions. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Inhibition of HSPs and HSF1 lead to regulation of apoptotic proteins. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Alteration of apoptotic proteins activate of caspases particularly caspase 3 and 9 leading to induction of apoptosis. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Alteration of apoptotic proteins induce caspases leading to induction of apoptosis. -- Abstract: Heat shock proteins (HSPs) are involved in protein folding, aggregation, transport and/or stabilization by acting as a molecular chaperone, leading to inhibition of apoptosis by both caspase dependent and/or independent pathways. HSPs are overexpressed in a wide range of human cancers and are implicated in tumor cell proliferation, differentiation, invasion and metastasis. HSPs particularly 27, 70, 90 and the transcription factor heat shock factor1 (HSF1) play key roles in the etiology of breast cancer and can be considered as potential therapeutic target. The present study was designed to investigate the role of sulphoraphane, a natural isothiocyanate on HSPs (27, 70, 90) and HSF1 in two different breast cancer cell lines MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 cells expressing wild type and mutated p53 respectively, vis-a-vis in normal breast epithelial cell line MCF-12F. It was furthermore investigated whether modulation of HSPs and HSF1 could induce apoptosis in these cells by altering the expressions of p53, p21 and some apoptotic proteins like Bcl-2, Bax, Bid, Bad, Apaf-1 and AIF. Sulphoraphane was found to down-regulate the expressions of HSP70, 90 and HSF1, though the effect on HSP27 was not pronounced. Consequences of HSP inhibition was upregulation of p21 irrespective of p53 status. Bax, Bad, Apaf-1, AIF were upregulated followed by down-regulation of Bcl-2 and this effect was prominent

  11. Heat shock protein-90-beta facilitates enterovirus 71 viral particles assembly.

    PubMed

    Wang, Robert Y L; Kuo, Rei-Lin; Ma, Wei-Chieh; Huang, Hsing-I; Yu, Jau-Song; Yen, Sih-Min; Huang, Chi-Ruei; Shih, Shin-Ru

    2013-09-01

    Molecular chaperones are reported to be crucial for virus propagation, but are not yet addressed in Human Enterovirus 71 (EV71). Here we describe the specific association of heat shock protein-90-beta (Hsp90β), but not alpha form (Hsp90α), with EV71 viral particles by the co-purification with virions using sucrose density gradient ultracentrifugation, and by the colocalization with viral particles, as assessed by immunogold electron microscopy. The reduction of the Hsp90β protein using RNA interference decreased the correct assembly of viral particles, without affecting EV71 replication levels. Tracking ectopically expressed Hsp90β protein associated with EV71 virions revealed that Hsp90β protein was transmitted to new host cells through its direct association with infectious viral particles. Our findings suggest a new antiviral strategy in which extracellular Hsp90β protein is targeted to decrease the infectivity of EV71 and other enteroviruses, without affecting the broader functions of this constitutively expressed molecular chaperone.

  12. Unfolding the Role of Large Heat Shock Proteins: New Insights and Therapeutic Implications

    PubMed Central

    Zuo, Daming; Subjeck, John; Wang, Xiang-Yang

    2016-01-01

    Heat shock proteins (HSPs) of eukaryotes are evolutionarily conserved molecules present in all the major intracellular organelles. They mainly function as molecular chaperones and participate in maintenance of protein homeostasis in physiological state and under stressful conditions. Despite their relative abundance, the large HSPs, i.e., Hsp110 and glucose-regulated protein 170 (Grp170), have received less attention compared to other conventional HSPs. These proteins are distantly related to the Hsp70 and belong to Hsp70 superfamily. Increased sizes of Hsp110 and Grp170, due to the presence of a loop structure, result in their exceptional capability in binding to polypeptide substrates or non-protein ligands, such as pathogen-associated molecules. These interactions that occur in the extracellular environment during tissue injury or microbial infection may lead to amplification of an immune response engaging both innate and adaptive immune components. Here, we review the current advances in understanding these large HSPs as molecular chaperones in proteostasis control and immune modulation as well as their therapeutic implications in treatment of cancer and neurodegeneration. Given their unique immunoregulatory activities, we also discuss the emerging evidence of their potential involvement in inflammatory and immune-related diseases. PMID:26973652

  13. Disruption of the glucocorticoid receptor assembly with heat shock protein 90 by a peptidic antiglucocorticoid.

    PubMed

    Dao-Phan, H P; Formstecher, P; Lefebvre, P

    1997-06-01

    Association of glucocorticoid (GR) and progesterone (PR) receptors with a set of molecular chaperones, including the 90-kDa heat shock protein (hsp90), is a dynamic process required for proper folding and maintaining these nuclear receptors under a transcriptionally inactive, ligand-responsive state. Mutational studies of the chicken hsp90 complementary DNA suggested that three regions of this protein (A, B, and Z) interact with the hormone-binding domain of GR, whereas region A is dispensable for hsp90 binding to PR. We found that this 69-amino acid region can be narrowed down to a 35-mer alpha-helical, acidic peptide, which is by itself able to inhibit hsp90 association to GR translated in vitro. The hsp90-free GR did not bind ligand, but was devoid of any specific DNA-binding activity, and higher peptide concentrations specifically inhibited the binding of activated GR to DNA. When overexpressed in cultured cells, this peptide acted as an antiglucocorticoid and inhibited the antiactivating protein-1 activity and the ligand-dependent nuclear transfer of GR. None of these effects, either in vivo and in vitro, was observed for PR. The region from residue 232 to residue 265 of hsp90 is, therefore, a domain critical for its association to GR, an association that is a prerequisite for receptor transcriptional activity. More importantly, these results demonstrate that targeting specific protein/protein interaction interfaces is a powerful means to specifically modulate nuclear receptor signaling pathways in a ligand-independent manner.

  14. Heat Shock Proteins: Old and Novel Roles in Neurodegenerative Diseases in the Central Nervous System.

    PubMed

    van Noort, Johannes M; Bugiani, Marianna; Amor, Sandra

    2016-10-31

    Heat shock proteins (HSPs) are families of molecular chaperones that play important homeostatic functions in the central nervous system (CNS) by preventing protein misfolding, promoting degradation of improperly folded proteins, and protecting against apoptosis and inflammatory damage especially during hyperthermia, hypoxia, or oxidative stress. Under stress conditions, HSPs are upregulated to protect cells from damage that accumulates during ageing as well as pathological conditions. An important, yet frequently overlooked function of some HSPs is their ability to function as extracellular messengers (also termed chaperokines) that modulate immune responses within the CNS. Given the strong association between protein aggregation, innate immune cell activation and neurodegeneration, the expression and roles of HSPs in the CNS is attracting attention in many neurodegenerative disorders including inflammatory diseases such as multiple sclerosis, protein folding diseases such as Alzheimer's disease and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, and genetic white matter diseases. This is especially so since several studies show that HSPs act therapeutically by modulating innate immune activation and may thus serve as neuroprotective agents. Here we review the evidence linking HSPs with neurodegenerative disorders in humans and the experimental animal models of these disorders. We discuss the mechanisms by which HSP protect cells, and how the knowledge of their endogenous functions can be exploited to treat disorders of the CNS.

  15. Malaria heat shock proteins: drug targets that chaperone other drug targets.

    PubMed

    Pesce, E-R; Cockburn, I L; Goble, J L; Stephens, L L; Blatch, G L

    2010-06-01

    Ongoing research into the chaperone systems of malaria parasites, and particularly of Plasmodium falciparum, suggests that heat shock proteins (Hsps) could potentially be an excellent class of drug targets. The P. falciparum genome encodes a vast range and large number of chaperones, including 43 Hsp40, six Hsp70, and three Hsp90 proteins (PfHsp40s, PfHsp70s and PfHsp90s), which are involved in a number of fundamental cellular processes including protein folding and assembly, protein translocation, signal transduction and the cellular stress response. Despite the fact that Hsps are relatively conserved across different species, PfHsps do exhibit a considerable number of unique structural and functional features. One PfHsp90 is thought to be sufficiently different to human Hsp90 to allow for selective targeting. PfHsp70s could potentially be used as drug targets in two ways: either by the specific inhibition of Hsp70s by small molecule modulators, as well as disruption of the interactions between Hsp70s and co-chaperones such as the Hsp70/Hsp90 organising protein (Hop) and Hsp40s. Of the many PfHsp40s present on the parasite, there are certain unique or essential members which are considered to have good potential as drug targets. This review critically evaluates the potential of Hsps as malaria drug targets, as well as the use of chaperones as aids in the heterologous expression of other potential malarial drug targets.

  16. Heat shock protein-90-beta facilitates enterovirus 71 viral particles assembly

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Robert Y.L.; Kuo, Rei-Lin; Ma, Wei-Chieh; Huang, Hsing-I; Yu, Jau-Song; Yen, Sih-Min; Huang, Chi-Ruei; Shih, Shin-Ru

    2013-09-01

    Molecular chaperones are reported to be crucial for virus propagation, but are not yet addressed in Human Enterovirus 71 (EV71). Here we describe the specific association of heat shock protein-90-beta (Hsp90β), but not alpha form (Hsp90α), with EV71 viral particles by the co-purification with virions using sucrose density gradient ultracentrifugation, and by the colocalization with viral particles, as assessed by immunogold electron microscopy. The reduction of the Hsp90β protein using RNA interference decreased the correct assembly of viral particles, without affecting EV71 replication levels. Tracking ectopically expressed Hsp90β protein associated with EV71 virions revealed that Hsp90β protein was transmitted to new host cells through its direct association with infectious viral particles. Our findings suggest a new antiviral strategy in which extracellular Hsp90β protein is targeted to decrease the infectivity of EV71 and other enteroviruses, without affecting the broader functions of this constitutively expressed molecular chaperone. - Highlights: • Hsp90β is associated with EV71 virion and is secreted with the release virus. • Hsp90β effects on the correct assembly of viral particles. • Viral titer of cultured medium was reduced in the presence of geldanamycin. • Viral titer was also reduced when Hsp90β was suppressed by siRNA treatment. • The extracellular Hsp90β was also observed in other RNA viruses-infected cells.

  17. Diet and the anti-inflammatory effect of heat shock proteins.

    PubMed

    van Eden, Willem

    2015-01-01

    Stress proteins or heat shock proteins (HSPs) have a critical role in gut health and immune regulation. They have a functional significance as molecular chaperones for cell skeleton proteins and intercellular tight junction proteins. Herewith HSPs ensure gut epithelium integrity and effective intestinal barrier function. In addition, stress protein molecules such as HSP70 are a target for anti-inflammatory regulatory T cells (Tregs). Inflamed sites in the body feature inflammatory-stress induced enhanced levels of HSPs, which enable the immune system to target Tregs selectively to sites of inflammation. We have shown in experimental models of inflammatory diseases that both microbial HSP and endogenous (self) HSP molecules are capable of inducing the expansion of disease suppressive Tregs. Since the gut associated lymphoid tissue (GALT) is well poised towards the induction of regulation and tolerance, we set out to promote HSP expression and induction of Tregs in the gut lymphoid tissues by the oral administration of HSP co-inducing compounds. For the identification, selection and characterization of such compounds we have developed assay systems, such as reporter cell-lines, HSP specific T cell hybridomas and a transgenic mouse model (expression a HSP specific T cell receptor). The introduction of HSP coinducers into the diet constitutes a novel food based preventive or possibly even therapeutic approach in inflammatory diseases.

  18. Continuous up-regulation of heat shock proteins in larvae, but not adults, of a polar insect.

    PubMed

    Rinehart, Joseph P; Hayward, Scott A L; Elnitsky, Michael A; Sandro, Luke H; Lee, Richard E; Denlinger, David L

    2006-09-19

    Antarctica's terrestrial environment is a challenge to which very few animals have adapted. The largest, free-living animal to inhabit the continent year-round is a flightless midge, Belgica antarctica. Larval midges survive the lengthy austral winter encased in ice, and when the ice melts in summer, the larvae complete their 2-yr life cycle, and the wingless adults form mating aggregations while subjected to surprisingly high substrate temperatures. Here we report a dichotomy in survival strategies exploited by this insect at different stages of its life cycle. Larvae constitutively up-regulate their heat shock proteins (small hsp, hsp70, and hsp90) and maintain a high inherent tolerance to temperature stress. High or low temperature exposure does not further up-regulate these genes nor does it further enhance thermotolerance. Such "preemptive" synthesis of hsps is sufficient to prevent irreversible protein aggregation in response to a variety of common environmental stresses. Conversely, adults exhibit no constitutive up-regulation of their hsps and have a lower intrinsic tolerance to high temperatures, but their hsps can be thermally activated, resulting in enhanced thermotolerance. Thus, the midge larvae, but not the adults, have adopted the unusual strategy of expressing hsps continuously, possibly to facilitate proper protein folding in a cold habitat that is more thermally stable than that of the adults but a habitat subjected frequently to freeze-thaw episodes and bouts of pH, anoxic, and osmotic stress.

  19. Heat shock proteins and exercise adaptations. Our knowledge thus far and the road still ahead.

    PubMed

    Henstridge, Darren C; Febbraio, Mark A; Hargreaves, Mark

    2016-03-15

    By its very nature, exercise exerts a challenge to the body's cellular homeostatic mechanisms. This homeostatic challenge affects not only the contracting skeletal muscle but also a number of other organs and results over time in exercise-induced adaptations. Thus it is no surprise that heat shock proteins (HSPs), a group of ancient and highly conserved cytoprotective proteins critical in the maintenance of protein and cellular homeostasis, have been implicated in exercise/activity-induced adaptations. It has become evident that HSPs such as HSP72 are induced or activated with acute exercise or after chronic exercise training regimens. These observations have given scientists an insight into the protective mechanisms of these proteins and provided an opportunity to exploit their protective role to improve health and physical performance. Although our knowledge in this area of physiology has improved dramatically, many questions still remain unanswered. Further understanding of the role of HSPs in exercise physiology may prove beneficial for therapeutic targeting in diseased patient cohorts, exercise prescription for disease prevention, and training strategies for elite athletes.

  20. Structural and functional homology between periplasmic bacterial molecular chaperones and small heat shock proteins.

    PubMed

    Zav'yalov, V P; Zav'yalova, G A; Denesyuk, A I; Gaestel, M; Korpela, T

    1995-07-01

    The periplasmic Yersinia pestis molecular chaperone Caf1M belongs to a superfamily of bacterial proteins for one of which (PapD protein of Escherichia coli) the immunoglobulin-like fold was solved by X-ray analysis. The N-terminal domain of Caf1M was found to share a 20% amino acid sequence identity with an inclusion body-associated protein IbpB of Escherichia coli. One of the regions that was compared, was 32 amino acids long, and displayed more than 40% identity, probability of random coincidence was 1.2 x 10(-4). IbpB is involved in a superfamily of small heat shock proteins which fulfil the function of molecular chaperone. On the basis of the revealed homology, an immunoglobulin-like one-domain model of IbpB three-dimensional structure was designed which could be a prototype conformation of sHsp's. The structure suggested is in good agreement with the known experimental data obtained for different members of sHsp's superfamily.

  1. Four Members of Heat Shock Protein 70 Family in Korean Rose Bitterling (Rhodeus uyekii)

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jung Hyun; Dong, Chun Mae; Kim, Julan; An, Cheul Min; Baek, Hae Ja; Kong, Hee Jeong

    2015-01-01

    Heat shock protein (HSP) 70, the highly conserved stress protein families, plays important roles in protecting cells against heat and other stresses in most animal species. In the present study, we identified and characterized four Hsp70 (RuHSP4, RuHSC70, RuHSP12A, RuGRP78) family proteins based on the expressed sequence tag (EST) analysis of the Korean rose bitterling R. uyekii cDNA library. The deduced RuHSP70 family has high amino acid identities of 72-99% with those of other species. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that RuHsp70 family clustered with fish groups (HSP4, HSC70, HSP12A, GRP78) proteins. Quantitative RT-PCR analysis showed the specific expression patterns of RuHsp70 family members in the early developmental stages and several tissues in Korean rose bitterling. The expression of 4 groups of Hsp70 family was detected in all tested tissue. Particularly, Hsp70 family of Korean rose bitterling is highly expressed in hepatopancreas and sexual gonad (testis and ovary). The expression of Hsp70 family was differentially regulated in accordance with early development stage of Rhodeus uyekii. PMID:27004270

  2. Priming the prophenoloxidase system of Artemia franciscana by heat shock proteins protects against Vibrio campbellii challenge.

    PubMed

    Baruah, Kartik; Ranjan, Jayant; Sorgeloos, Patrick; Macrae, Thomas H; Bossier, Peter

    2011-07-01

    Like other invertebrates, the brine shrimp Artemia franciscana relies solely on innate immunity, which by definition lacks adaptive characteristics, to combat against invading pathogens. One of the innate mechanisms is melanisation of bacteria mediated by the activation of the prophenoloxidase (proPO) system. The 70 kDa heat shock proteins (Hsp70) derived from either prokaryote (Escherichia coli) or eukaryote (Artemia), well conserved and immune-dominant molecules, protect Artemia against Vibrio campbellii. However, the molecular mechanisms by which these proteins protect Artemia against Vibrio campbellii infection are unknown. Here we demonstrated that feeding gnotobiotically grown Artemia with either Artemia Hsp70 or the E. coli Hsp70 equivalent DnaK, each overproduced in E. coli, followed by V. campbellii challenge enhanced the proPO system, at both mRNA and protein activity levels. Additionally, the Artemia fed with these proteins survived well in a Vibrio challenge assay. These results indicated that Hsp70s derived from either prokaryotic or eukaryotic sources generate protective immunity in the crustacean Artemia against V. campbellii infection by priming the proPO system. This is apparently the first in vivo report on priming activity of Hsp70 in an invertebrate.

  3. Heat shock protein 90 as a drug target: some like it hot.

    PubMed

    Banerji, Udai

    2009-01-01

    Heat shock protein 90 (HSP90) is a ubiquitously expressed chaperone that is involved in the posttranslational folding and stability of proteins. Inhibition at the NH(2)-terminal ATP-binding site leads to the degradation of client proteins by the ubiquitin proteasome pathway. Inhibition of HSP90 leads to the degradation of known oncogenes, such as ERB-B2, BRAF, and BCR-ABL, leading to the combinatorial blockade of multiple signal transduction pathways, such as the RAS-RAF-mitogen-activated protein/extracellular signal-regulated kinase kinase-extracellular signal-regulated kinase and phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase pathways. Multiple structurally diverse HSP90 inhibitors are undergoing early clinical evaluation. The clinical focus of these drugs should be solid tumors, such as breast, prostate, and lung cancers, along with malignant melanoma, in addition to hematologic malignancies, such as chronic myeloid leukemia and multiple myeloma. HSP90 inhibitors can be used as single agents or in combination with other targeted treatments or conventional forms of treatment such as chemotherapy and radiotherapy. Clinical trials evaluating efficacy of these agents should include innovative designs to capture cytostasis evidenced by clinical nonprogression and enrichment of patient populations by molecular characterization. The results of clinical trials evaluating the efficacy of drugs targeting this exciting target are awaited.

  4. Heat shock (stress response) proteins and renal ischemia/reperfusion injury.

    PubMed

    Kelly, Katherine J

    2005-01-01

    Acute renal failure occurs frequently, may be increasing, carries an unacceptably high mortality, yet there is no specific treatment. The induction of stress response (heat shock) proteins (HSPs) is a highly conserved response that protects many cell types from diverse physiological and environmental stressors. HSP families of different sizes function as molecular chaperones that facilitate the folding of enzymes and other proteins into functional conformations. After injury, HSPs are believed to facilitate the restoration of normal function by assisting in the refolding of denatured proteins and degradation of irreparably damaged proteins and toxic metabolites, limitation of aggregation of damaged peptides and aiding appropriate folding of newly synthesized essential polypeptides. HSPs may also regulate apoptosis and immune functions. We have demonstrated protection from the functional deficits and histological evidence of experimental ischemic renal injury with heat stress 6 but not 48 h prior to ischemia. Limitation of the induction of HSPs (either with a short period of hyperthermia or pharmacologically) attenuated the protection observed. Other investigators have demonstrated a correlation between the levels of HSP25 and renal ischemic preconditioning in the mouse. Several pharmacological agents have been shown to increase HSP expression. Enhancement of these endogenous protective mechanisms has potential benefit in human disease.

  5. Disruption of the three cytoskeletal networks in mammalian cells does not affect transcription, translation, or protein translocation changes induced by heat shock.

    PubMed Central

    Welch, W J; Feramisco, J R

    1985-01-01

    Mammalian cells show a complex series of transcriptional and translational switching events in response to heat shock treatment which ultimately lead to the production and accumulation of a small number of proteins, the so-called heat shock (or stress) proteins. We investigated the heat shock response in both qualitative and quantitative ways in cells that were pretreated with drugs that specifically disrupt one or more of the three major cytoskeletal networks. (These drugs alone, cytochalasin E and colcemid, do not result in induction of the heat shock response.) Our results indicated that disruption of the actin microfilaments, the vimentin-containing intermediate filaments, or the microtubules in living cells does not hinder the ability of the cell to undergo an apparently normal heat shock response. Even when all three networks were simultaneously disrupted (resulting in a loose, baglike appearance of the cells), the cells still underwent a complete heat shock response as assayed by the appearance of the heat shock proteins. In addition, the major induced 72-kilodalton heat shock protein was efficiently translocated from the cytoplasm into its proper location in the nucleus and nucleolus irrespective of the condition of the three cytoskeletal elements. Images PMID:4040602

  6. Anopheles gambiae heat shock protein cognate 70B impedes o'nyong-nyong virus replication

    PubMed Central

    Sim, Cheolho; Hong, Young S; Tsetsarkin, Konstantin A; Vanlandingham, Dana L; Higgs, Stephen; Collins, Frank H

    2007-01-01

    Background Phylogenetic and functional analysis was conducted on an Anopheles gambiae gene, ENSANGG00000017398. Based on phylogenetic analysis, this gene belongs to the same lineage as Heat shock protein cognate 70-4 (Hsc70-4) in Drosophila. Accordingly, we propose to name this gene Heat shock protein cognate 70B (HSC70B). We previously reported that expression of HSC70B and other genes including elongation factor-1α (EF-1α) and the agglutinin attachment subunit (agglutinin) were up-regulated in o'nyong-nyong virus (ONNV)-infected female An. gambiae. Double-stranded RNA interferences have been applied to further investigate HSC70B, EF-1α and the agglutinin functions in ONNV replication in An. gambiae. Results Among these three RNAi silenced genes, only dsRNAs of HSC70B (dsHSC70B) promoted ONNV replication in adult An. gambiae compared to the control mosquitoes that were co-injected with ONNV and dsRNA of β-galactosidase (dsβ-gal). ONNV titers from mosquitoes co-injected with dsHSC70B were about 9-fold higher at 6 days post-injection (d.p.i.) as compared to the control mosquitoes. By using ONNV tagged with enhanced green fluorescent protein (ONNV-eGFP), co-injection of ONNV-eGFP with dsHSC70B also showed approximately 2 ~ 3-fold higher GFP expression rates than the controls in the head, thorax, and abdomen of the mosquito. Furthermore, co-injection of ONNV with dsHSC70B significantly reduced the lifespan of adult mosquitoes as compared with the control, co-injection of ONNV with dsβ-gal treated mosquitoes. Conclusion These results indicate that HSC70B plays important roles in homeostasis and suppression of ONNV replication in the vector, An. gambiae. Biological implications of these findings are that while mosquitoes allow ONNV to replicate in them, they also check viral titers so that ONNV infection will result in no harmful effect on mosquitoes. Therefore, mosquitoes can function as vectors of ONNV transmission to humans while ONNV infection in An. gambiae

  7. Role of the Cytosolic Heat Shock Protein 70 Ssa5 in the Ciliate Protozoan Tetrahymena thermophila.

    PubMed

    Fukuda, Yasuhiro; Akematsu, Takahiko; Attiq, Rizwan; Tada, Chika; Nakai, Yutaka; Pearlman, Ronald E

    2015-01-01

    Heat shock protein 70 (Hsp70) is a member of a family of conserved chaperone proteins whose function is well investigated in many model organisms. Here we focus on an Hsp70 called Ssa5 in the ciliate protozoan Tetrahymena thermophila, and reveal that its translation is heat inducible as for general Hsps. Moreover, the protein is abundantly expressed in the cytoplasm during sexual reproduction (conjugation) as well as in response to heat-stress. Knocking out of SSA5 (ΔSSA5) does not affect the survival of the cell under heat-stress, likely due to other Hsp70 paralogs compensating for the defect. During conjugation, ΔSSA5 leads to a fertilization defect in which the two pronuclei are in close proximity but never fuse. The unfertilized pronuclei differentiate, resulting in a heterokaryon with developed haploid germline and somatic nuclei. In addition, degeneration of the parental somatic nucleus is not affected. These results suggest a specific involvement of Ssa5 in pronuclear fusion and fertilization.

  8. Heat shock proteins (HSPs) in the homeostasis of regulatory T cells (Tregs)

    PubMed Central

    Marek-Trzonkowska, Natalia; Trzonkowski, Piotr; Siebert, Janusz

    2016-01-01

    Heat shock proteins (HSPs) belong to the family of conservative polypeptides with a high homology of the primary structure. The uniqueness of this family lies in their ability to interact with a large number of different proteins and provide protection from cellular and environmental stress factors as molecular chaperones to keep protein homeostasis. While intracellular HSPs play a mainly protective role, extracellular or membrane-bound HSPs mediate immunological functions and immunomodulatory activity. In immune system are subsets of cells including regulatory T cells (Tregs) with suppressive functions. HSPs are implicated in the function of innate and adaptive immune systems, stimulate T lymphocyte proliferation and immunomodulatory functions, increase the effectiveness of cross-presentation of antigens, and induce the secretion of cytokines. HSPs are also important in the induction, proliferation, suppressive function, and cytokine production of Tregs, which are a subset of CD4+ T cells maintaining peripheral tolerance. Together HSPs and Tregs are potential tools for future clinical interventions in autoimmune disease. PMID:27833451

  9. A novel DNA replication origin identified in the human heat shock protein 70 gene promoter.

    PubMed Central

    Taira, T; Iguchi-Ariga, S M; Ariga, H

    1994-01-01

    A general and sensitive method for the mapping of initiation sites of DNA replication in vivo, developed by Vassilev and Johnson, has revealed replication origins in the region of simian virus 40 ori, in the regions upstream from the human c-myc gene and downstream from the Chinese hamster dihydrofolate reductase gene, and in the enhancer region of the mouse immunoglobulin heavy-chain gene. Here we report that the region containing the promoter of the human heat shock protein 70 (hsp70) gene was identified as a DNA replication origin in HeLa cells by this method. Several segments of the region were cloned into pUC19 and examined for autonomously replicating sequence (ARS) activity. The plasmids carrying the segments replicated episomally and semiconservatively when transfected into HeLa cells. The segments of ARS activity contained the sequences previously identified as binding sequences for a c-myc protein complex (T. Taira, Y. Negishi, F. Kihara, S. M. M. Iguchi-Ariga, and H. Ariga, Biochem. Biophys. Acta 1130:166-174, 1992). Mutations introduced within the c-myc protein complex binding sequences abolished the ARS activity. Moreover, the ARS plasmids stably replicated at episomal state for a long time in established cell lines. The results suggest that the promoter region of the human hsp70 gene plays a role in DNA replication as well as in transcription. Images PMID:8065368

  10. Enhanced salt tolerance in tomato plants constitutively expressing heat-shock protein in the endoplasmic reticulum.

    PubMed

    Fu, C; Liu, X X; Yang, W W; Zhao, C M; Liu, J

    2016-07-14

    The accumulation of unfolded or misfolded proteins in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) causes ER stress and activates the unfolded protein response (UPR) signaling pathway. The UPR signaling pathway is associated with plant responses to adverse environmental conditions. Thus, changes in the UPR signaling pathway might affect plant abiotic tolerance. Here, the role of ER small heat-shock protein (ER-sHSP) in improving plant resistance to salt stress was explored. Under salt stress conditions, ER-sHSP transgenic plants were found to have more vigorous roots, maintain a higher relative water content, absorb less Na(+), accumulate more osmolytes and Ca(2+), and sustain less damage to the photosystem, compared to wild-type non-transgenic plants. Furthermore, we found that the constitutive expression of ER-sHSP under salt stress depressed the expression of other ER molecular chaperones. These results indicate that the constitutive expression of ER-sHSP enhanced salinity tolerance of tomato plants significantly, and alleviated the ER stress caused by the salt stress in plant cells.

  11. Inhibiting Heat Shock Proteins Can Potentiate the Cytotoxic Effect of Cannabidiol in Human Glioma Cells.

    PubMed

    Scott, Katherine A; Dennis, Jayne L; Dalgleish, Angus G; Liu, Wai M

    2015-11-01

    Cannabinoids possess a number of characteristics that make them putative anticancer drugs, and their value as such is currently being explored in a number of clinical studies. To further understand the roles that cannabinoids may have, we performed gene expression profiling in glioma cell lines cultured with cannabidiol (CBD) and/or Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), and pursued targets identified by this screening. Results showed that a large number of genes belonging to the heat shock protein (HSP) super-family were up-regulated following treatment, specifically with CBD. Increases were observed both at the gene and protein levels and arose as a consequence of increased generation of ROS by CBD, and correlated with an increase in a number of HSP client proteins. Furthermore, increases impeded the cytotoxic effect of CBD; an effect that was improved by co-culture with pharmacalogical inhibitors of HSPs. Similarly, culturing glioma cells with CBD and HSP inhibitors increased radiosensitivity when compared to CBD-alone. Taken together, these data indicate that the cytotoxic effects of CBD can be diminished by HSPs that indirectly rise as a result of CBD use, and that the inclusion of HSP inhibitors in CBD treatment regimens can enhance the overall effect.

  12. Characterization of heat-shock proteins in Escherichia coli strains under thermal stress in vitro.

    PubMed

    Urban-Chmiel, Renata; Dec, Marta; Puchalski, Andrzej; Wernicki, Andrzej

    2013-12-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of heat stress in in vitro conditions on the induction of heat-shock protein (Hsp)70 by Escherichia coli cells, and to determine the localization of Hsps in cell fractions. The material consisted of wild strains of E. coli isolated from the digestive tract of calves, suspended in an exponential-phase culture and subjected to 41.5 °C for 2 h. Individual fractions were analysed by SDS-PAGE and two-dimensional electrophoresis. Western blotting with mouse anti-Hsp70 and anti-Hsp60 mAbs was used to identify the proteins. Electrophoretic analysis of the heat-treated cells detected Hsp70 in all three fractions, cytoplasmic, periplasmic and membrane, which was confirmed by Western blotting. The proteins obtained had diverse localizations in the pH gradient in two-dimensional electrophoresis, which may indicate changes in their conformation and physical properties leading to stabilization and protection of intracellular structures in stress conditions. The presence of these Hsps in different cell fractions indicates a very strong protective adaptation in the bacteria in unfavourable conditions, which is critical for the organism infected by them.

  13. Differential expression of heat shock protein 90 isoforms in small cell lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Ji Hyun; Kang, Kyung Woo; Kim, Jeong-Eun; Hwang, Sang Won; Park, Jae Hong; Kim, Seok-Hyun; Ji, Jun Ho; Kim, Tae Gyu; Nam, Hyun-Yeol; Roh, Mee Sook; Lee, Eun Hee; Park, Moon-il; Kim, Mee-Seon; Lee, Hyoun Wook

    2015-01-01

    Heat shock protein 90 (HSP90), a molecular chaperone, plays important roles in cellular protection against various stressful stimuli and in the regulation of cellular growth and apoptosis. HSP90 has 4 different types of human isoforms; HSP90α, HSP90β, glucose related protein 94 (GRP94) and tumor necrosis factor (TNF) receptor-associated protein 1 (TRAP1). We assessed the differential expression of these HSP90 isoforms in small-cell lung cancer (SCLC) and the correlation of their expression levels with clinicopathological factors and patient survival rates. This study included 117 SCLCs, comprised of 108 primary and 9 metastatic tumor tissues. We performed immunohistochemical staining for HSP90α, HSP90β, GRP94 and TRAP1 in 117 tumors and found that HSP90α and HSP90β were positive in 11 (9%) and 61 tumors (52%), respectively, most of which showed weak expression, whereas GRP94 and TRAP1 were positive in 115 (98%) and 117 tumors (100%), respectively, the majority of which showed moderate or strong expression. None of the HSP90 isoforms showed significant associations with clinicopathological factors or survival status in patients with SCLC. Our results indicate that GRP94 and TRAP1 might contribute more to the carcinogenesis or biology of SCLC than HSP90α and HSP90β, and that isoform selectivity should be considered when HSP90 inhibitors are studied or utilized for the treatment of SCLC. PMID:26464709

  14. Altered expression of glomerular heat shock protein 27 in experimental nephrotic syndrome.

    PubMed Central

    Smoyer, W E; Gupta, A; Mundel, P; Ballew, J D; Welsh, M J

    1996-01-01

    Although nephrotic syndrome is a very common kidney disease, little is known about the molecular changes occurring within glomerular capillary loops during development of disease. The characteristic histologic change is retraction (effacement) of the distal "foot" processes of glomerular epithelial cells (GEC) which surround the capillary loops. The GEC foot processes are an essential part of the kidney's filtration barrier, and their structure is regulated primarily by actin microfilaments, cytoskeletal proteins present in high concentrations in foot processes. Actin polymerization has been reported to be regulated via phosphorylation of the low molecular weight heat shock protein, hsp27. We localized hsp27 within normal rat GECs using immunofluorescence and immunoelectron microscopy. Induction of nephrotic syndrome and GEC foot process effacement using the puromycin aminonucleoside rat model resulted in significant increases in: (a) renal cortical hsp27 mRNA expression (826 +/- 233%, x +/- SEM, P < 0.01 vs. control); (b) glomerular hsp27 protein expression (87 +/- 2%, P < 0.001 vs. control); and (c) glomerular hsp27 phosphorylation (101 +/- 32%, P < 0.05 vs. control). These findings support the hypothesis that hsp27, by regulating GEC foot process actin polymerization, may be important in maintaining normal foot process structure, and regulating pathophysiologic GEC cytoskeletal changes during development of nephrotic syndrome. PMID:8675679

  15. Pharmacological Tuning of Heat Shock Protein 70 Modulates Polyglutamine Toxicity and Aggregation

    PubMed Central

    Chafekar, Sidhartha M.; Wisén, Susanne; Thompson, Andrea D.; Echeverria, AnaLisa; Walter, Gladis M.; Evans, Christopher G.; Makley, Leah N.; Gestwicki, Jason E.; Duennwald, Martin L.

    2012-01-01

    Nine neurodegenerative disorders are caused by the abnormal expansion of polyglutamine (polyQ) regions within distinct proteins. Genetic and biochemical evidence has documented that the molecular chaperone, heat shock protein 70 (Hsp70), modulates polyQ toxicity and aggregation, yet it remains unclear how Hsp70 might be used as a potential target in polyQ-related diseases. We have utilized a pair of membrane-permeable compounds that tune the activity of Hsp70 by either stimulating or by inhibiting its ATPase functions. Using these two pharmacological agents in both yeast and PC12 cell models of polyQ aggregation and toxicity, we were surprised to find that stimulating Hsp70 solubilized polyQ conformers and simultaneously exacerbated polyQ-mediated toxicity. By contrast, inhibiting Hsp70’s ATPase activity protected against polyQ toxicity and promoted aggregation. These findings clarify Hsp70’s role as a possible drug target in polyQ disorders and suggest that Hsp70 uses ATP hydrolysis to help partition polyQ proteins into structures with varying levels of proteotoxicity. Our results thus support an emerging concept in which certain kinds of polyQ aggregates may be protective, while more soluble polyQ species are toxic. PMID:22709427

  16. Arsenic induces VL30 retrotransposition: the involvement of oxidative stress and heat-shock protein 70.

    PubMed

    Markopoulos, Georgios; Noutsopoulos, Dimitrios; Mantziou, Stefania; Vartholomatos, Georgios; Monokrousos, Nikolaos; Angelidis, Charalampos; Tzavaras, Theodore

    2013-08-01

    Arsenic is an environmental contaminant with known cytotoxic and carcinogenic properties, but the cellular mechanisms of its action are not fully known. As retrotransposition consists a potent mutagenic factor affecting genome stability, we investigated the effect of arsenic on retrotransposition of an enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP)-tagged nonautonomous long terminal repeat (LTR)-retrotransposon viral-like 30 (VL30) in a mouse NIH3T3 cell culture-retrotransposition assay. Flow cytometry analysis of assay cells treated with 2.5-20μM sodium arsenite revealed induction of retrotransposition events in a dose- and time-dependent manner, which was further confirmed as genomic integrations by PCR analysis and appearance of EGFP-positive cells by UV microscopy. Specifically, 20μM sodium arsenite strongly induced the VL30 retrotransposition frequency, which was ~90,000-fold higher than the natural one and also VL30 RNA expression was ~6.6-fold. Inhibition of the activity of endogenous reverse transcriptases by efavirenz at 15μM or nevirapine at 375μM suppressed the arsenite-induced VL30 retrotransposition by 71.16 or 79.88%, respectively. In addition, the antioxidant N-acetyl-cysteine reduced the level of arsenite-induced retrotransposition, which correlated with the rescue of arsenite-induced G2/M cell cycle arrest and cell toxicity. Treatment of assay cells ectopically overexpressing the human heat-shock protein 70 (Hsp70) with 15μM sodium arsenite resulted in an additional ~4.5-fold induction of retrotransposition compared with normal assay cells, whereas treatment with 20μM produced a massive cell death. Our results show for the first time that arsenic both as an oxidative and heat-shock mimicking agent is a potent inducer of VL30 retrotransposition in mouse cells. The impact of arsenic-induced retrotransposition, as a cellular response, on contribution to or explanation of the arsenic-associated toxicity and carcinogenicity is discussed.

  17. Ischemic postconditioning prevents renal ischemia reperfusion injury through the induction of heat shock proteins in rats.

    PubMed

    Guo, Qiongmei; Du, Xuefang; Zhao, Yanli; Zhang, Dong; Yue, Lihui; Wang, Zhenxian

    2014-12-01

    Ischemic postconditioning (IPo) attenuates ischemia‑reperfusion injuries (IRI) in various organs, of both animals and humans. This study tested the hypothesis that IPo attenuates renal IRI through the upregulation of heat shock protein (HSP)70, HSP27 and heme oxygenase‑1 (HO‑1, also known as HSP 32) expression. Adult Sprague Dawley rats were subjected to bilateral renal ischemia for 45 min followed by reperfusion for up to 48 h. One group of rats received IPo prior to restoring full perfusion. Another group was administered 100 mg/kg HSP inhibitor quercetin, injected intraperitoneally 1 h prior to ischemia. Control rats received sham operations. Renal IR resulted in severe morphological and pathological changes, with increased serum creatinine and blood urea nitrogen concentrations. IR resulted in increased inflammation by inducing plasma tumor necrosis factor‑α and renal nuclear factor kappa‑light‑chain‑enhancer of activated B cells expression. IR also increased lipid peroxidation, as indicated by elevated malondialdehyde content, reduced superoxide dismutase activity and increased renal apoptosis. Renal HSP70, HSP27 and HO‑1 mRNA and protein levels were increased by IR and further elevated by IPo. IPo attenuated these changes observed in pathology, lipid peroxidation, apoptosis and inflammation. Quercetin treatment abolished all the protective effects of IPo. In conclusion, this study showed that IPo can attenuate lipid peroxidation, apoptosis and inflammation as well as renal IRI by upregulating the expression of HSP70, HSP27 and HO‑1.

  18. The heat shock protein 70 cochaperone hip enhances functional maturation of glucocorticoid receptor.

    PubMed

    Nelson, Gregory M; Prapapanich, Viravan; Carrigan, Patricia E; Roberts, Patricia J; Riggs, Daniel L; Smith, David F

    2004-07-01

    Multiple molecular chaperones interact with steroid receptors to promote functional maturation and stability of receptor complexes. The heat shock protein (Hsp)70 cochaperone Hip has been identified in conjunction with Hsp70, Hsp90, and the Hsp70/Hsp90 cochaperone Hop/Sti1p in receptor complexes during an intermediate stage of receptor assembly, but a functional requirement for Hip in the receptor assembly process has not been established. Because the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae contains orthologs for most of the receptor-associated chaperones yet lacks an orthologous Hip gene, we exploited the well-established yeast model for steroid receptor function to ask whether Hip can alter steroid receptor function in vivo. Introducing human Hip into yeast enhances hormone-dependent activation of a reporter gene by glucocorticoid receptor (GR). Because Hip does not similarly enhance signaling by mineralocorticoid, progesterone, or estrogen receptors, a general effect on transcription can be excluded. Instead, Hip promotes functional maturation of GR without increasing steady-state levels of GR protein. Unexpectedly, Hip binding to Hsp70 is not critical for boosting GR responsiveness to hormone. In conclusion, Hip functions by a previously unrecognized mechanism to promote the efficiency of GR maturation in cells.

  19. Chaperone Activity of Small Heat Shock Proteins Underlies Therapeutic Efficacy in Experimental Autoimmune Encephalomyelitis*

    PubMed Central

    Kurnellas, Michael P.; Brownell, Sara E.; Su, Leon; Malkovskiy, Andrey V.; Rajadas, Jayakumar; Dolganov, Gregory; Chopra, Sidharth; Schoolnik, Gary K.; Sobel, Raymond A.; Webster, Jonathan; Ousman, Shalina S.; Becker, Rachel A.; Steinman, Lawrence; Rothbard, Jonathan B.

    2012-01-01

    To determine whether the therapeutic activity of αB crystallin, small heat shock protein B5 (HspB5), was shared with other human sHsps, a set of seven human family members, a mutant of HspB5 G120 known to exhibit reduced chaperone activity, and a mycobacterial sHsp were expressed and purified from bacteria. Each of the recombinant proteins was shown to be a functional chaperone, capable of inhibiting aggregation of denatured insulin with varying efficiency. When injected into mice at the peak of disease, they were all effective in reducing the paralysis in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis. Additional structure activity correlations between chaperone activity and therapeutic function were established when linear regions within HspB5 were examined. A single region, corresponding to residues 73–92 of HspB5, forms amyloid fibrils, exhibited chaperone activity, and was an effective therapeutic for encephalomyelitis. The linkage of the three activities was further established by demonstrating individual substitutions of critical hydrophobic amino acids in the peptide resulted in the loss of all of the functions. PMID:22955287

  20. Effects of avermectin on heat shock proteins expression and histopathology in spleen tissues of pigeon.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ci; Wang, Xian-Song; Xu, Zhe; Li, Ming; Zhang, Zi-Wei; Min, Ya-Hong; Khoso, Pervez Ahmed; Li, Shu

    2014-12-05

    Avermectin (AVM) is the active component of some insecticidal and nematicidal product used in agriculture and veterinary medicine for the prevention of parasitic diseases. Residues of AVM in environment have toxic effects on non-target aquatic and terrestrial organisms. Heat shock proteins (Hsps) are commonly used by environmental toxicologists as biochemical markers of exposure to various chemical and other stressors. The objective of this study was to investigate whether sub-chronic AVM exposure would alter the levels of stress proteins, Hsps in the pigeon spleen after 30, 60 and 90days. Our results showed that Hsp60, Hsp70 and Hsp90, and their corresponding messenger RNA (mRNA) transcriptions (as well as Hsp30) significantly elevated, meanwhile, obviously histopathological changes were not observed in pigeons spleens after early AVM exposure. Then the expression of Hsps relatively decreased and obvious histopathological damages occurred in the spleen tissues with continued AVM exposure. So we suggest that the elevations of Hsps can be as a part of protective mechanism to reduce cellular damage, and important markers to help assess the toxicity induced by AVM. The reduction of Hsps in spleen implies that the tissues are damaged by long-term and excessive AVM exposure. Thus, the information presented in this study is believed to be helpful in supplementing data for further AVM toxicity study.

  1. Aberrant Expression and Secretion of Heat Shock Protein 90 in Patients with Bullous Pemphigoid

    PubMed Central

    Tukaj, Stefan; Kleszczyński, Konrad; Vafia, Katerina; Groth, Stephanie; Meyersburg, Damian; Trzonkowski, Piotr; Ludwig, Ralf J.; Zillikens, Detlef; Schmidt, Enno; Fischer, Tobias W.; Kasperkiewicz, Michael

    2013-01-01

    The cell stress chaperone heat shock protein 90 (Hsp90) has been implicated in inflammatory responses and its inhibition has proven successful in different mouse models of autoimmune diseases, including epidermolysis bullosa acquisita. Here, we investigated expression levels and secretory responses of Hsp90 in patients with bullous pemphigoid (BP), the most common subepidermal autoimmune blistering skin disease. In comparison to healthy controls, the following observations were made: (i) Hsp90 was highly expressed in the skin of BP patients, whereas its serum levels were decreased and inversely associated with IgG autoantibody levels against the NC16A immunodominant region of the BP180 autoantigen, (ii) in contrast, neither aberrant levels of circulating Hsp90 nor any correlation of this protein with serum autoantibodies was found in a control cohort of autoimmune bullous disease patients with pemphigus vulgaris, (iii) Hsp90 was highly expressed in and restrictedly released from peripheral blood mononuclear cells of BP patients, and (iv) Hsp90 was potently induced in and restrictedly secreted from human keratinocyte (HaCaT) cells by BP serum and isolated anti-BP180 NC16A IgG autoantibodies, respectively. Our results reveal an upregulated Hsp90 expression at the site of inflammation and an autoantibody-mediated dysregulation of the intracellular and extracellular distribution of this chaperone in BP patients. These findings suggest that Hsp90 may play a pathophysiological role and represent a novel potential treatment target in BP. PMID:23936217

  2. Protective effect of post-ischaemic viral delivery of heat shock proteins in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Badin, Romina A; Modo, Michael; Cheetham, Mike; Thomas, David L; Gadian, David G; Latchman, David S; Lythgoe, Mark F

    2009-01-01

    Heat shock proteins (HSPs) function as molecular chaperones involved in protein folding, transport and degradation and, in addition, they can promote cell survival both in vitro and in vivo after a range of stresses. Although some in vivo studies have suggested that HSP27 and HSP70 can be neuroprotective, current evidence is limited, particularly when HSPs have been delivered after an insult. The effect of overexpressing HSPs after transient occlusion of the middle cerebral artery in rats was investigated by delivering an attenuated herpes simplex viral vector (HSV-1) engineered to express HSP27 or HSP70 30 mins after tissue reperfusion. Magnetic resonance imaging scans were used to determine lesion size and cerebral blood flow at six different time points up to 1 month after stroke. Animals underwent two sensorimotor tests at the same time points to assess the relationship between lesion size and function. Results indicate that post-ischaemic viral delivery of HSP27, but not of HSP70, caused a statistically significant reduction in lesion size and induced a significant behavioural improvement compared with controls. This is the first evidence of effective post-ischaemic gene therapy with a viral vector expressing HSP27 in an experimental model of stroke. PMID:18781161

  3. Optimization of a localized surface plasmon resonance biosensor for heat shock protein 70

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Denomme, R. C.; Young, Z.; Brock, L.; Nieva, P. M.; Vijayan, M. M.

    2012-03-01

    Localized surface plasmon resonance, a property characteristic of metal nanoparticles, is a promising technique for the development of low cost, rapid, and portable biosensors for a variety of medical diagnostic applications. In order to meet the demanding detection limits required for many such applications, performance improvements are required. Designing nanoparticle structures to maximize refractive index sensitivity and optimize the electromagnetic field decay length is one approach to achieving better performance. However, experimentally finding the optimal nanoparticle structure, as has been done in the past, is time consuming and costly, and needs to be done for each biomolecule of interest. Instead, simulations can be used to find the optimal nanoparticle design prior to fabrication. In this paper, we present a numerical modeling technique that allows the design of optimal nanoparticles for LSPR biosensors, and report on the effect of the size and shape of gold nanoparticles on the sensitivity and decay length. The results are used to determine the optimal nanoparticle geometry for an LSPR immunosensor for heat shock protein 70, an important protein with applications in medical and wildlife diagnostics. Our simulations show an improvement of 373% in sensor response when using the optimal configuration, showcasing the significant advantages of proper nanoparticle design.

  4. Analysis and phylogeny of small heat shock proteins from marine viruses and their cyanobacteria host.

    PubMed

    Maaroufi, Halim; Tanguay, Robert M

    2013-01-01

    Small heat shock proteins (sHSPs) are oligomeric stress proteins characterized by an α-crystallin domain (ACD) surrounded by a N-terminal arm and C-terminal extension. Publications on sHSPs have reported that they exist in prokaryotes and eukaryotes but, to our knowledge, not in viruses. Here we show that sHSPs are present in some cyanophages that infect the marine unicellular cyanobacteria, Synechococcus and Prochlorococcus. These phage sHSPs contain a conserved ACD flanked by a relatively conserved N-terminal arm and a short C-terminal extension with or without the conserved C-terminal anchoring module (CAM) L-X-I/V, suggested to be implicated in the oligomerization. In addition, cyanophage sHSPs have the signature pattern, P-P-[YF]-N-[ILV]-[IV]-x(9)-[EQ], in the predicted β2 and β3 strands of the ACD. Phylogenetically, cyanophage sHSPs form a monophyletic clade closer to bacterial class A sHSPs than to cyanobacterial sHSPs. Furthermore, three sHSPs from their cellular host, Synechococcus, are phylogenetically close to plants sHSPs. Implications of evolutionary relationships between the sHSPs of cyanophages, bacterial class A, cyanobacteria, and plants are discussed.

  5. Spotlight on the microbes that produce heat shock protein 90-targeting antibiotics

    PubMed Central

    Piper, Peter W.; Millson, Stefan H.

    2012-01-01

    Heat shock protein 90 (Hsp90) is a promising cancer drug target as a molecular chaperone critical for stabilization and activation of several of the oncoproteins that drive cancer progression. Its actions depend upon its essential ATPase, an activity fortuitously inhibited with a very high degree of selectivity by natural antibiotics: notably the actinomycete-derived benzoquinone ansamycins (e.g. geldanamycin) and certain fungal-derived resorcyclic acid lactones (e.g. radicicol). The molecular interactions made by these antibiotics when bound within the ADP/ATP-binding site of Hsp90 have served as templates for the development of several synthetic Hsp90 inhibitor drugs. Much attention now focuses on the clinical trials of these drugs. However, because microbes have evolved antibiotics to target Hsp90, it is probable that they often exploit Hsp90 inhibition when interacting with each other and with plants. Fungi known to produce Hsp90 inhibitors include mycoparasitic, as well as plant-pathogenic, endophytic and mycorrhizal species. The Hsp90 chaperone may, therefore, be a prominent target in establishing a number of mycoparasitic (interfungal), fungal pathogen–plant and symbiotic fungus–plant relationships. Furthermore the Hsp90 family proteins of the microbes that produce Hsp90 inhibitor antibiotics are able to reveal how drug resistance can arise by amino acid changes in the highly conserved ADP/ATP-binding site of Hsp90. PMID:23271830

  6. Caffeine Induces the Stress Response and Up-Regulates Heat Shock Proteins in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Al-Amin, Mohammad; Kawasaki, Ichiro; Gong, Joomi; Shim, Yhong-Hee

    2016-02-01

    Caffeine has both positive and negative effects on physiological functions in a dose-dependent manner. C. elegans has been used as an animal model to investigate the effects of caffeine on development. Caffeine treatment at a high dose (30 mM) showed detrimental effects and caused early larval arrest. We performed a comparative proteomic analysis to investigate the mode of action of high-dose caffeine treatment in C. elegans and found that the stress response proteins, heat shock protein (HSP)-4 (endoplasmic reticulum [ER] chaperone), HSP-6 (mitochondrial chaperone), and HSP-16 (cytosolic chaperone), were induced and their expression was regulated at the transcriptional level. These findings suggest that high-dose caffeine intake causes a strong stress response and activates all three stress-response pathways in the worms, including the ER-, mitochondrial-, and cytosolic pathways. RNA interference of each hsp gene or in triple combination retarded growth. In addition, caffeine treatment stimulated a food-avoidance behavior (aversion phenotype), which was enhanced by RNAi depletion of the hsp-4 gene. Therefore, up-regulation of hsp genes after caffeine treatment appeared to be the major responses to alleviate stress and protect against developmental arrest.

  7. A potential role for Helicobacter pylori heat shock protein 60 in gastric tumorigenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Chen-Si; He, Pei-Juin; Tsai, Nu-Man; Li, Chi-Han; Yang, Shang-Chih; Hsu, Wei-Tung; Wu, Ming-Shiang; Wu, Chang-Jer; Cheng, Tain-Lu; Liao, Kuang-Wen

    2010-02-05

    Helicobacter pylori has been found to promote the malignant process leading to gastric cancer. Heat shock protein 60 of H. pylori (HpHSP60) was previously been identified as a potent immunogene. This study investigates the role of HpHSP60 in gastric cancer carcinogenesis. The effect of HpHSP60 on cell proliferation, anti-death activity, angiogenesis and cell migration were explored. The results showed that HpHSP60 enhanced migration by gastric cancer cells and promoted tube formation by umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs); however, HpHSP60 did not increase cell proliferation nor was this protein able to rescue gastric cancer cells from death. Moreover, the results also indicated HpHSP60 had different effects on AGS gastric cancer cells or THP-1 monocytic cells in terms of their expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines, which are known to be important to cancer development. We propose that HpHSP60 may trigger the initiation of carcinogenesis by inducing pro-inflammatory cytokine release and by promoting angiogenesis and metastasis. Thus, this extracellular pathogen-derived HSP60 is potentially a vigorous virulence factor that can act as a carcinogen during gastric tumorigenesis.

  8. Heat shock protein 90{beta}: A novel mediator of vitamin D action

    SciTech Connect

    Angelo, Giana Lamon-Fava, Stefania; Sonna, Larry A.

    2008-03-14

    We investigated the role of Heat shock protein 90 (Hsp90) in vitamin D action in Caco-2 cells using geldanamycin (GA) to block Hsp90 function and RNA interference to reduce Hsp90{beta} expression. When cells were exposed to GA, vitamin D-mediated gene expression and transcriptional activity were inhibited by 69% and 54%, respectively. Gel shift analysis indicated that GA reduced vitamin D-mediated DNA binding activity of the vitamin D receptor (VDR). We tested the specific role of Hsp90{beta} by knocking down its expression with stably expressed short hairpin RNA. Vitamin D-induced gene expression and transcriptional activity were reduced by 90% and 80%, respectively, in Hsp90{beta}-deficient cells. Nuclear protein for VDR and RXR{alpha}, its heterodimer partner, were not reduced in Hsp90{beta}-deficient cells. These findings indicate that Hsp90{beta} is needed for optimal vitamin D responsiveness in the enterocyte and demonstrate a specific role for Hsp90{beta} in VDR signaling.

  9. Inhibition of heat shock protein 90 improves pulmonary arteriole remodeling in pulmonary arterial hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Zhi-Min; Liu, Su-Xuan; Zhang, Guan-Xin; Yang, Fan; Wang, Yang; Wu, Feng; Zhao, Xian-Xian; Xu, Zhi-Yun

    2016-01-01

    While the molecular chaperone heat shock protein 90 (HSP90) is involved in a multitude of physiological and pathological processes, its role relating to pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) remains unclear. In the present study, we investigated the effect in which HSP90 improves pulmonary arteriole remodeling, and explored the therapeutic utility of targeting HSP90 as therapeutic drug for PAH. By Elisa and immunohistochemistry, HSP90 was found to be increased in both plasma and membrane walls of pulmonary arterioles from PAH patients. Moreover, plasma HSP90 levels positively correlated with mean pulmonary arterial pressure and C-reactive protein. In a monocrotaline-induced rat model of PH, we found that 17-AAG, a HSP90-inhibitor, alleviated the progress of PH, demonstrated by lower pulmonary arterial pressure and absence of right ventricular hypertrophy. Immunohistochemical staining demonstrated that 17-AAG improved pulmonary arteriole remodeling on the basis of reduced wall thickness and wall area. The inflammatory response attributed to PH could be attenuated by 17-AAG through reduction of NF-κB signaling. Moreover, 17-AAG was found to suppress PDGF-stimulated proliferation and migration of pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells (PASMCs) through induction of cell cycle arrest in the G1 phase. In conclusion, HSP90 inhibitor 17-AAG could improve pulmonary arteriole remodeling via inhibiting the excessive proliferation of PASMCs, and inhibition of HSP90 may represent a therapeutic avenue for the treatment of PAH. PMID:27472464

  10. Association of serum antibodies to heat-shock protein 65 with carotid atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Xu, Q; Willeit, J; Marosi, M; Kleindienst, R; Oberhollenzer, F; Kiechl, S; Stulnig, T; Luef, G; Wick, G

    1993-01-30

    Arteriosclerotic lesions can be induced in normocholesterolaemic rabbits by immunisation with heat-shock protein (hsp) 65, a stress protein expressed in high concentrations in human atherosclerotic lesions. If an immune reaction to hsp65 also plays a part in human atherogenesis, it should be possible to detect anti-hsp65 antibodies in patients with atherosclerotic lesions. To study the possible relation between immune reaction to hsp65 and atherosclerosis, 867 normal inhabitants of South Tyrol, aged 40-79 years, were selected randomly for determination of serum antibodies against hsp65, simultaneous sonographic assessment of carotid atherosclerotic lesions, and evaluation of established risk factors--ie, blood cholesterol, hypertension, smoking, diabetes mellitus, and obesity. Autoantibodies to nuclear antigens, thyroid antigens, and rheumatoid factors were also measured. Serum anti-hsp65 antibodies were significantly (p < 0.05) increased in subjects aged 60-79 years with carotid atherosclerosis compared with those without lesions, and increased antibody concentration was independent of age, sex, and other established risk factors. On the other hand, the incidence and titres of autoantibodies did not correlate with carotid atherosclerotic lesions. Our data provide the first evidence of a strong correlation between anti-hsp65 antibodies and carotid atherosclerosis, suggesting that hsp65 might be involved in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis.

  11. Feeding truncated heat shock protein 70s protect Artemia franciscana against virulent Vibrio campbellii challenge.

    PubMed

    Baruah, Kartik; Norouzitallab, Parisa; Shihao, Li; Sorgeloos, Patrick; Bossier, Peter

    2013-01-01

    The 70 kDa heat shock proteins (Hsp70s) are highly conserved in evolution, leading to striking similarities in structure and composition between eukaryotic Hsp70s and their homologs in prokaryotes. The eukaryotic Hsp70 like the DnaK (Escherichia coli equivalent Hsp70) protein, consist of three functionally distinct domains: an N-terminal 44-kDa ATPase portion, an 18-kDa peptide-binding domain and a C-terminal 10-kDa fragment. Previously, the amino acid sequence of eukaryotic (the brine shrimp Artemia franciscana) Hsp70 and DnaK proteins were shown to share a high degree of homology, particularly in the peptide-binding domain (59.6%, the putative innate immunity-activating portion) compared to the N-terminal ATPase (48.8%) and the C-terminal lid domains (19.4%). Next to this remarkable conservation, these proteins have been shown to generate protective immunity in Artemia against pathogenic Vibrio campbellii. This study, aimed to unravel the Vibrio-protective domain of Hsp70s in vivo, demonstrated that gnotobiotically cultured Artemia fed with recombinant C-terminal fragment (containing the conserved peptide binding domain) of Artemia Hsp70 or DnaK protein were well protected against subsequent Vibrio challenge. In addition, the prophenoloxidase (proPO) system, at both mRNA and protein activity levels, was also markedly induced by these truncated proteins, suggesting epitope(s) responsible for priming the proPO system and presumably other immune-related genes, consequently boosting Artemia survival upon challenge with V. campbellii, might be located within this conserved region of the peptide binding domain.

  12. A small heat-shock protein (Hsp20) regulated by RpoS is essential for cyst desiccation resistance in Azotobacter vinelandii.

    PubMed

    Cocotl-Yañez, Miguel; Moreno, Soledad; Encarnación, Sergio; López-Pliego, Liliana; Castañeda, Miguel; Espín, Guadalupe

    2014-03-01

    In Azotobacter vinelandii, a cyst-forming bacterium, the alternative sigma factor RpoS is essential to the formation of cysts resistant to desiccation and to synthesis of the cyst-specific lipids, alkylresorcinols. In this study, we carried out a proteome analysis of vegetative cells and cysts of A. vinelandii strain AEIV and its rpoS mutant derivative AErpoS. This analysis allowed us to identify a small heat-shock protein, Hsp20, as one of the most abundant proteins of cysts regulated by RpoS. Inactivation of hsp20 did not affect the synthesis of alkylresorcinols or the formation of cysts with WT morphology; however, the cysts formed by the hsp20 mutant strain were unable to resist desiccation. We also demonstrated that expression of hsp20 from an RpoS-independent promoter in the AErpoS mutant strain is not enough to restore the phenotype of resistance to desiccation. These results indicate that Hsp20 is essential for the resistance to desiccation of A. vinelandii cysts, probably by preventing the aggregation of proteins caused by the lack of water. To our knowledge, this is the first report of a small heat-shock protein that is essential for desiccation resistance in bacteria.

  13. Distribution of Mayaro virus RNA in polysomes during heat shock.

    PubMed

    Rosas, S L; Herculano, S; Carvalho, M da G

    1997-05-01

    Mayaro virus (alphavirus) infection of Aedes albopictus cells results in inhibition of cell protein synthesis and viral proteins are preferably synthesized. When infected cells are heat shocked, however, there is also an inhibition of viral protein synthesis, and there is preferential synthesis of heat shock proteins. Based on these observations, the distribution of Mayaro viral RNA in polysomes and the association of p34 (capsid protein) with ribosomal fractions of the cells under such conditions have been analyzed. During infection, the viral RNA is mainly observed in light polysomes (60% of total viral RNA in the cell) and also in heavy polysomes (13%). However, when infected cells are heat-shocked, the viral RNA is strongly mobilized from heavy polysomes to the light polysomes fraction and an enrichment in the unbound fraction can be noticed. The amount of p34 associated with the ribosomal fraction was also shown to be decreased in the heat shocked cells. These data lead to the suggestion that two mechanisms could be involved in the inhibition of Mayaro virus protein synthesis in response to heat shock: (1) mobilization of Mayaro virus RNA from heavy to light polysomes; (2) a decrease in the amount of the p34 within the ribosomal fraction.

  14. Cloning and characterization of carboxyl terminus of heat shock cognate 70-interacting protein gene from the silkworm, Bombyx mori.

    PubMed

    Ohsawa, Takeshi; Fujimoto, Shota; Tsunakawa, Akane; Shibano, Yuka; Kawasaki, Hideki; Iwanaga, Masashi

    2016-11-01

    Carboxyl terminus of heat shock cognate 70-interacting protein (CHIP) is an evolutionarily conserved E3 ubiquitin ligase across different eukaryotic species and is known to play a key role in protein quality control. CHIP has two distinct functional domains, an N-terminal tetratricopeptide repeat (TPR) and a C-terminal U-box domain, which are required for the ubiquitination of numerous labile client proteins that are chaperoned by heat shock proteins (HSPs) and heat shock cognate proteins (HSCs). During our screen for CHIP-like proteins in the Bombyx mori databases, we found a novel silkworm gene, Bombyx mori CHIP. Phylogenetic analysis showed that BmCHIP belongs to Lepidopteran lineages. Quantitative reverse transcription-PCR analysis indicated that BmCHIP was relatively highly expressed in the gonad and fat body. A pull-down experiment and auto-ubiquitination assay showed that BmCHIP interacted with BmHSC70 and had E3 ligase activity. Additionally, immunohistochemical analysis revealed that BmCHIP was partially co-localized with ubiquitin in BmN4 cells. These data support that BmCHIP plays an important role in the ubiquitin proteasome system as an E3 ubiquitin ligase in B. mori.

  15. Characterization and temperature-dependent quantification of heat shock protein 60 of the immunogenic fungus Alternaria alternata.

    PubMed

    Buzina, Walter; Raggam, Renhard B; Paulitsch, Astrid; Heiling, Bettina; Marth, Egon

    2008-09-01

    Heat shock proteins or chaperones are found in mitochondrial and cytosolic compartments of cells. They are responsible for the correct folding of proteins and are up-regulated in reaction to various stressors. In addition, when released or presented on the surface of cells, they may play an important role in inflammatory and immunomodulating processes. To identify and characterize hsp60 in the common environmental mold Alternaria alternata, the fungus was cultivated and incubated at different temperatures to induce a possible heat shock response. Fully automated RNA extraction was followed by quantitative real-time RT-PCR targeting A. alternata specific Hsp60 mRNA and subsequent sequencing of the amplicon. While Hsp60 mRNA was constitutively expressed in all samples tested, a temperature-dependent expression of Hsp60 mRNA was observed. Sequencing revealed an identity of more than 85% to other fungal hsp60, indicating the existence of this protein in A. alternata.

  16. Enzyme-treated asparagus extract promotes expression of heat shock protein and exerts antistress effects.

    PubMed

    Ito, Tomohiro; Maeda, Takahiro; Goto, Kazunori; Miura, Takehito; Wakame, Koji; Nishioka, Hiroshi; Sato, Atsuya

    2014-03-01

    A novel enzyme-treated asparagus extract (ETAS) has been developed as a functional material produced from asparagus stem. Studies were conducted to determine the effect of ETAS on heat shock protein 70 (HSP70) expression and alleviation of stress. HeLa cells were treated with ETAS, and HSP70 mRNA and protein levels were measured using a reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) assay and an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), respectively. ETAS showed significant increases in HSP70 mRNA at more than 0.125 mg/mL and the protein at more than 1.0 mg/mL. The antistress effect was evaluated in a murine sleep-deprivation model. A sleep-deprivation stress load resulted in elevation of blood corticosterone and lipid peroxide concentrations, while supplementation with ETAS at 200 and 1000 mg/kg body weight was associated with significantly reduced levels of both stress markers, which were in the normal range. The HSP70 protein expression level in mice subjected to sleep-deprivation stress and supplemented with ETAS was significantly enhanced in stomach, liver, and kidney, compared to ETAS-untreated mice. A preliminary and small-sized human study was conducted among healthy volunteers consuming up to 150 mg/d of ETAS daily for 7 d. The mRNA expression of HSP70 in peripheral leukocytes was significantly elevated at intakes of 100 or 150 mg/d, compared to their baseline levels. Since HSP70 is known to be a stress-related protein and its induction leads to cytoprotection, the present results suggest that ETAS might exert antistress effects under stressful conditions, resulting from enhancement of HSP70 expression.

  17. Preclinical antitumor activity of SST0116CL1: a novel heat shock protein 90 inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Vesci, Loredana; Milazzo, Ferdinando Maria; Carollo, Valeria; Pace, Silvia; Giannini, Giuseppe

    2014-10-01

    4-Amino substituted resorcino-isoxazole (SST0116CL1) (property of Sigma-Tau Research Switzerland S.A.) is a potent, second generation, small-molecule heat shock protein 90 inhibitor (Hsp90i). SST0116CL1 binds to the ATP binding pocket of Hsp90, and interferes with Hsp90 chaperone function thus resulting in client protein degradation and tumor growth inhibition. The aim of the study was to assess SST0116CL1 in various solid and haematological tumors. The antitumor properties of SST0116CL1 were assessed using in vitro cell proliferation and client protein degradation assays and in vivo different tumor xenograft models. Pharmacokinetic (PK) data were also generated in tumor-bearing mice to gain an understanding of optimal dosing schedules and regimens. SST0116CL1 was shown to inhibit recombinant Hsp90α and to induce the destabilization of different client proteins, often overexpressed and constitutively activated in different types of hematological or solid human tumors. In preclinical in vivo studies, it was revealed to induce antitumor effects in murine models of leukemia and of gastric and ovarian carcinoma. A modulation of PD biomarkers in terms of downregulation of Hsp90 client proteins in tumor-bearing mice was found. SST0116CL1 is a new clinical candidate for cancer therapy. The antitumor property of SST0116CL1, likely due to direct inhibition of the Hsp90 enzymatic activity, may prove to be a critical attribute as the compound enters phase I clinical trials.

  18. Analogs of the Allosteric Heat Shock Protein 70 (Hsp70) Inhibitor, MKT-077, as Anti-Cancer Agents.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiaokai; Srinivasan, Sharan R; Connarn, Jamie; Ahmad, Atta; Young, Zapporah T; Kabza, Adam M; Zuiderweg, Erik R P; Sun, Duxin; Gestwicki, Jason E

    2013-11-14

    The rhodacyanine, MKT-077, has anti-proliferative activity against cancer cell lines through its ability to inhibit members of the heat shock protein 70 (Hsp70) family of molecular chaperones. However, MKT-077 is rapidly metabolized, which limits its use as either a chemical probe or potential therapeutic. We report the synthesis and characterization of MKT-077 analogs designed for greater stability. The most potent molecules, such as 30 (JG-98), were at least 3-fold more active than MKT-077 against the breast cancer cell lines MDA-MB-231 and MCF-7 (EC50 values of 0.4 ± 0.03 μM and 0.7 ± 0.2 μM, respectively). The analogs modestly destabilized the chaperone "clients", Akt1 and Raf1, and induced apoptosis in these cells. Further, the microsomal half-life of JG-98 was improved at least 7-fold (t1/2 = 37 min) compared to MKT-077 (t1/2 < 5 min). Finally, NMR titration experiments suggested that these analogs bind an allosteric site that is known to accommodate MKT-077. These studies advance MKT-077 analogs as chemical probes for studying Hsp70's roles in cancer.

  19. Ischemic preconditioning inhibits development of edematous cerulein-induced pancreatitis: Involvement of cyclooxygenases and heat shock protein 70

    PubMed Central

    Warzecha, Zygmunt; Dembinski, Artur; Ceranowicz, Piotr; Konturek, Stanislaw J; Dembinski, Marcin; Pawlik, Wieslaw W; Tomaszewska, Romana; Stachura, Jerzy; Kusnierz-Cabala, Beata; Naskalski, Jerzy W; Konturek, Peter C

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To determine whether ischemic preconditioning (IP) affects the development of edematous cerulein-induced pancreatitis and to assess the role of cyclooxygenase-1 (COX-1), COX-2, and heat shock protein 70 (HSP 70) in this process. METHODS: In male Wistar rats, IP was performed by clamping of celiac artery (twice for 5 min at 5-min intervals). Thirty minutes after IP or sham operation, acute pancreatitis was induced by cerulein. Activity of COX-1 or COX-2 was inhibited by resveratrol or rofecoxib, respectively (10 mg/kg). RESULTS: IP significantly reduced pancreatic damage in cerulein-induced pancreatitis as demonstrated by the improvement of pancreas histology, reduction in serum lipase and poly-C ribonuclease activity, and serum concentration of pro-inflammatory interleukin (IL)-1β. Also, IP attenuated the pancreatitis-evoked fall in pancreatic blood flow and pancreatic DNA synthesis. Serum level of anti-inflammatory IL-10 was not affected by IP. Cerulein-induced pancreatitis and IP increased the content of HSP 70 in the pancreas. Maximal increase in HSP 70 was observed when IP was combined with cerulein-induced pancreatitis. Inhibition of COXs, especially COX-2, reduced the protective effect of IP in edematous pancreatitis. CONCLUSION: Our results indicate that IP reduces pancreatic damage in cerulein-induced pancreatitis and this effect, at least in part, depends on the activity of COXs and pancreatic production of HSP 70. PMID:16273606

  20. Detrimental Effect of Fungal 60-kDa Heat Shock Protein on Experimental Paracoccidioides brasiliensis Infection

    PubMed Central

    Fernandes, Fabrício Freitas; de Oliveira, Leandro Licursi; Landgraf, Taise Natali; Peron, Gabriela; Costa, Marcelo Vieira; Coelho-Castelo, Arlete A. M.; Bonato, Vânia L. D.; Roque-Barreira, Maria-Cristina; Panunto-Castelo, Ademilson

    2016-01-01

    The genus Paracoccidioides comprises species of dimorphic fungi that cause paracoccidioidomycosis (PCM), a systemic disease prevalent in Latin America. Here, we investigated whether administration of native 60-kDa heat shock protein of P. brasiliensis (nPbHsp60) or its recombinant counterpart (rPbHsp60) affected the course of experimental PCM. Mice were subcutaneously injected with nPbHsp60 or rPbHsp60 emulsified in complete’s Freund Adjuvant (CFA) at three weeks after intravenous injection of P. brasiliensis yeasts. Infected control mice were injected with CFA or isotonic saline solution alone. Thirty days after the nPbHsp60 or rPbHsp60 administration, mice showed remarkably increased fungal load, tissue inflammation, and granulomas in the lungs, liver, and spleen compared with control mice. Further, rPbHsp60 treatment (i) decreased the known protective effect of CFA against PCM and (ii) increased the concentrations of IL-17, TNF-α, IL-12, IFN-γ, IL-4, IL-10, and TGF-β in the lungs. Together, our results indicated that PbHsp60 induced a harmful immune response, exacerbated inflammation, and promoted fungal dissemination. Therefore, we propose that PbHsp60 contributes to the fungal pathogenesis. PMID:27598463

  1. Heat shock protein Hsp72 plays an essential role in Her2-induced mammary tumorigenesis.

    PubMed

    Meng, L; Hunt, C; Yaglom, J A; Gabai, V L; Sherman, M Y

    2011-06-23

    The major heat shock protein Hsp72 is expressed at elevated levels in many human cancers and its expression correlates with tumor progression. Here, we investigated the role of Hsp72 in Her2 oncogene-induced neoplastic transformation and tumorigenesis. Expression of Her2 in untransformed MCF10A mammary epithelial cells caused transformation, as judged by foci formation in culture and tumorigenesis in xenografts. However, expression of Her2 in Hsp72-depleted cells failed to induce transformation. The anti-tumorigenic effects of Hsp72 downregulation were associated with cellular senescence because of accumulation of p21 and depletion of survivin. Accordingly, either knockdown of p21 or expression of survivin reversed this senescence process. Further, we developed an animal model of Hsp72-dependent breast cancer associated with expression of Her2. Knockout (KO) of Hsp72 almost completely suppressed tumorigenesis in the MMTVneu breast cancer mouse model. In young Hsp72 KO mice, expression of Her2 instead of mammary tissue hyperplasia led to suppression of duct development and blocked alveolar budding. These effects were due to massive cell senescence in mammary tissue, which was associated with upregulation of p21 and downregulation of survivin. Therefore, Hsp72 has an essential role in Her2-induced tumorigenesis by regulating oncogene-induced senescence pathways.

  2. Heat shock protein 70 acts as a potential biomarker for early diagnosis of heart failure.

    PubMed

    Li, Zongshi; Song, Yao; Xing, Rui; Yu, Haiyi; Zhang, Youyi; Li, Zijian; Gao, Wei

    2013-01-01

    Early identification for heart failure (HF) may be useful for disease modifying treatment in order to reduce heart disease progression or even to reverse it. In our previous studies, we have revealed a group of heat shock proteins (HSPs) which might be related to neonatal rat cardiomyocyte hypertrophy by proteomic approach. Here, we confirm that HSPs, including HSP27 and HSP70, altered in the early stage of cardiac remodeling in vivo animal model. Furthermore, plasma concentrations of those HSPs and their potential screening value were evaluated at different stages in 222 patient subjects. Plasma HSP27, HSP70 and HSP90 were measured using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Results indicate that HSP70 was positively correlated to the severity (progression) of HF (r = 0.456, p<0.001). The area under the rate of change (ROC) curve was 0.601 (p = 0.017) in patients with stage B HF and 0.835 (p<0.001) in those with stage C HF. However, HSP27 and HSP90 did not display significant changes in any stage of HF in this study. Taken together, plasma concentrations of HSP70 elevated with the progression of HF and might act as a potential screening biomarker for early diagnosis of HF.

  3. Gut epithelial inducible heat-shock proteins and their modulation by diet and the microbiota

    PubMed Central

    Arnal, Marie-Edith

    2016-01-01

    The epidemic of metabolic diseases has raised questions about the interplay between the human diet and the gut and its microbiota. The gut has two vital roles: nutrient absorption and intestinal barrier function. Gut barrier defects are involved in many diseases. Excess energy intake disturbs the gut microbiota and favors body entry of microbial compounds that stimulate chronic metabolic inflammation. In this context, the natural defense mechanisms of gut epithelial cells and the potential to boost them nutritionally warrant further study. One such important defense system is the activation of inducible heat-shock proteins (iHSPs) which protect the gut epithelium against oxidative stress and inflammation. Importantly, various microbial components can induce the expression of iHSPs. This review examines gut epithelial iHSPs as the main targets of microbial signals and nutrients and presents data on diseases involving disturbances of gut epithelial iHSPs. In addition, a broad literature analysis of dietary modulation of gut epithelial iHSPs is provided. Future research aims should include the identification of gut microbes that can optimize gut-protective iHSPs and the evaluation of iHSP-mediated health benefits of nutrients and food components. PMID:26883882

  4. The Protective and Therapeutic Function of Small Heat Shock Proteins in Neurological Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Brownell, Sara E.; Becker, Rachel A.; Steinman, Lawrence

    2012-01-01

    Historically, small heat shock proteins (sHSPs) have been extensively studied in the context of being intracellular molecular chaperones. However, recent studies looking at the role of sHSPs in neurological diseases have demonstrated a near universal upregulation of certain sHSPs in damaged and diseased brains. Initially, it was thought that sHSPs are pathological in these disease states because they are found in the areas of damage. However, transgenic overexpression and exogenous administration of sHSPs in various experimental disease paradigms have shown just the contrary – that sHSPs are protective, not pathological. This review examines sHSPs in neurological diseases and highlights the potential for using these neuroprotective sHSPs as novel therapeutics. It first addresses the endogenous expression of sHSPs in a variety of neurological disorders. Although many studies have examined the expression of sHSPs in neurological diseases, there are no review articles summarizing these data. Furthermore, it focuses on recent studies that have investigated the therapeutic potential of sHSPs for neurological diseases. Finally, it will explain what we think is the function of endogenous sHSPs in neurological diseases. PMID:22566955

  5. Combined heat shock protein 90 and ribosomal RNA sequence phylogeny supports multiple replacements of dinoflagellate plastids.

    PubMed

    Shalchian-Tabrizi, Kamran; Minge, Marianne A; Cavalier-Smith, Tom; Nedreklepp, Joachim M; Klaveness, Dag; Jakobsen, Kjetill S

    2006-01-01

    Dinoflagellates harbour diverse plastids obtained from several algal groups, including haptophytes, diatoms, cryptophytes, and prasinophytes. Their major plastid type with the accessory pigment peridinin is found in the vast majority of photosynthetic species. Some species of dinoflagellates have other aberrantly pigmented plastids. We sequenced the nuclear small subunit (SSU) ribosomal RNA (rRNA) gene of the "green" dinoflagellate Gymnodinium chlorophorum and show that it is sister to Lepidodinium viride, indicating that their common ancestor obtained the prasinophyte (or other green alga) plastid in one event. As the placement of dinoflagellate species that acquired green algal or haptophyte plastids is unclear from small and large subunit (LSU) rRNA trees, we tested the usefulness of the heat shock protein (Hsp) 90 gene for dinoflagellate phylogeny by sequencing it from four species with aberrant plastids (G. chlorophorum, Karlodinium micrum, Karenia brevis, and Karenia mikimotoi) plus Alexandrium tamarense, and constructing phylogenetic trees for Hsp90 and rRNAs, separately and together. Analyses of the Hsp90 and concatenated data suggest an ancestral origin of the peridinin-containing plastid, and two independent replacements of the peridinin plastid soon after the early radiation of the dinoflagellates. Thus, the Hsp90 gene seems to be a promising phylogenetic marker for dinoflagellate phylogeny.

  6. The effect of the hyperbaric environment on heat shock protein 72 expression in vivo.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Lee; Midgley, Adrian W; Sandstrom, Marie E; Chrismas, Bryna; McNaughton, Lars R

    2012-04-01

    Heat shock protein 72 (HSP72) is expressed in response to stress and has been demonstrated to follow a diurnal expression pattern within monocytes and is sensitive to changes in core temperature. Numerous studies have shown changes in HSP72 expression within cell lines exposed to hyperbaric conditions. No studies have investigated changes in HSP72 expression in vivo. Six males participated in the study and were exposed to hyperbaric air and hyperbaric oxygen a week apart. Monocyte HSP72 was analyzed by flow cytometry at 09:00, 13:00, 17:00, 21:00 with hyperbaric oxygen or hyperbaric air breathing commencing at 15:00 for 78 min at a pressure of 2.8 ATA. HSP72 under normoxia followed the established trend; however, following the hyperbaric air or oxygen exposure a reduction in detectable HSP72 was observed at 17:00 and 21:00. No changes in core temperature were observed between 13:00 and 21:00 for any condition. The data show that HSP72 expression is impaired following hyperbaric air (HA) exposure, when compared with control or hyperbaric oxygen (HO) exposure.

  7. Arthritis protective regulatory potential of self–heat shock protein cross-reactive T cells

    PubMed Central

    van Eden, Willem; Wendling, Uwe; Paul, Liesbeth; Prakken, Berent; van Kooten, Peter; van der Zee, Ruurd

    2000-01-01

    Immunization with heat shock proteins has protective effects in models of induced arthritis. Analysis has shown a reduced synovial inflammation in such protected animals. Adoptive transfer and immunization with selected T cell epitopes (synthetic peptides) have indicated the protection to be mediated by T cells directed to conserved hsp epitopes. This was shown first for mycobacterial hsp60 and later for mycobacterial hsp70. Fine specificity analysis showed that such T cells were cross-reactive with the homologous self hsp. Therefore protection by microbial hsp reactive T cells can be by cross-recognition of self hsp overexpressed in the inflamed tissue. Preimmunization with hsp leads to a relative expansion of such self hsp cross-responsive T cells. The regulatory nature of such T cells may originate from mucosal tolerance maintained by commensal flora derived hsp or from partial activation through recognition of self hsp as a partial agonist (Altered Peptide Ligand) or in the absence of proper costimulation. Recently, we reported the selective upregulation of B7.2 on microbial hsp60 specific T cells in response to self hsp60. Through a preferred interaction with CTLA-4 on proinflammatory T cells this may constitute an effector mechanism of regulation. Also, regulatory T cells produced IL10. PMID:11189451

  8. The involvement of heat-shock proteins in the pathogenesis of autoimmune arthritis: a critical appraisal

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Min-Nung; Yu, Hua; Moudgil, Kamal D.

    2012-01-01

    Objectives To review the literature on the role of heat-shock proteins (HSPs) in the pathogenesis of autoimmune arthritis in animal models ans patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Methods The published literature in Medline (PubMed), including our published work on the cell-mediated as well as humoral immune response to various HSPs was reviewed. Studies in both the pre-clinical animal models of arthritis as well as RA were examined critically and the data presented. Results In experimental arthritis, disease induction by different arthritogenic stimuli, including an adjuvant, led to immune response to mycobacterial HSP65 (BHSP65). However, attempts to induce arthritis by a purified HSP have not met with success. There are several reports of a significant immune response to HSP65 in RA patients. But, the issue of cause and effect is difficult to address. Nevertheless, several studies in animal models and a couple of clinical trials in RA patients have shown the beneficial effect of HSPs against autoimmune arthritis. Conclusions There is a clear association between immune response to HSPs, particularly HSP65, and the initiation and propagation of autoimmune arthritis in experimental models. The correlation is relatively less convincing in RA patients. In both cases, the ability of HSPs to modulate arthritis offers support, albeit an indirect one, for the involvement of these antigens in the disease process. PMID:19969325

  9. A novel method to identify and characterise peptide mimotopes of heat shock protein 70-associated antigens.

    PubMed

    Arnaiz, Blanca; Madrigal-Estebas, Laura; Todryk, Stephen; James, Tharappel C; Doherty, Derek G; Bond, Ursula

    2006-04-08

    The heat shock protein, Hsp70, has been shown to play an important role in tumour immunity. Vaccination with Hsp70-peptide complexes (Hsp70-PCs), isolated from autologous tumour cells, can induce protective immune responses. We have developed a novel method to identify synthetic mimic peptides of Hsp70-PCs and to test their ability to activate T-cells. Peptides (referred to as "recognisers") that bind to Hsp70-PCs from the human breast carcinoma cell line, MDA-MB-231, were identified by bio-panning a random peptide M13 phage display library. Synthetic recogniser peptides were subsequently used as bait in a reverse bio-panning experiment to identify potential Hsp70-PC mimic peptides. The ability of the recogniser and mimic peptides to prime human lymphocyte responses against tumour cell antigens was tested by stimulating lymphocytes with autologous peptide-loaded monocyte-derived dendritic cells (DCs). Priming and subsequent stimulation with either the recogniser or mimic peptide resulted in interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma) secretion by the lymphocytes. Furthermore, DCs loaded with Hsp70, Hsp70-PC or the recogniser or the mimic peptide primed the lymphocytes to respond to soluble extracts from breast cells. These results highlight the potential application of synthetic peptide-mimics of Hsp70-PCs, as modulators of the immune response against tumours.

  10. Inflammatory stress of pancreatic beta cells drives release of extracellular heat shock protein 90α.

    PubMed

    Ocaña, Gail J; Pérez, Liliana; Guindon, Lynette; Deffit, Sarah N; Evans-Molina, Carmella; Thurmond, Debbie C; Blum, Janice S

    2017-02-11

    A major obstacle in predicting and preventing the development of autoimmune type 1 diabetes (T1D) in at-risk individuals is the lack of well-established early biomarkers indicative of ongoing beta cell stress during the pre-clinical phase of disease. Recently, serum levels of the alpha cytoplasmic isoform of heat shock protein (HSP) 90 were shown to be elevated in individuals with new-onset T1D. We therefore hypothesized HSP90α could be released from beta cells in response to cellular stress and inflammation associated with the earliest stages of T1D. Here, human beta cell lines and cadaveric islets released HSP90α in response to stress induced by treatment with a combination of pro-inflammatory cytokines including IL-1β, TNF-α, and IFN-γ. Mechanistically, HSP90α release was found to be driven by cytokine-induced endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress mediated by c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK), a pathway that can eventually lead to beta cell apoptosis. Cytokine-induced beta cell HSP90α release and JNK activation were significantly reduced by pre-treating cells with the ER stress-mitigating chemical chaperone tauroursodeoxycholic acid (TUDCA). HSP90α release by cells may thus be a sensitive indicator of stress during inflammation and a useful tool in assessing therapeutic mitigation of cytokine-induced cell damage linked to autoimmunity. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  11. Heat shock protein 90 as a potential drug target against surra.

    PubMed

    Rochani, Ankit K; Mithra, Chandan; Singh, Meetali; Tatu, Utpal

    2014-08-01

    Trypanosomiasis is caused by Trypanosoma species which affect both human and animal populations and pose a major threat to developing countries. The incidence of animal trypanosomiasis is on the rise. Surra is a type of animal trypanosomiasis, caused by Trypanosoma evansi, and has been included in priority list B of significant diseases by the World Organization of Animal Health (OIE). Control of surra has been a challenge due to the lack of effective drugs and vaccines and emergence of resistance towards existing drugs. Our laboratory has previously implicated Heat shock protein 90 (Hsp90) from protozoan parasites as a potential drug target and successfully demonstrated efficacy of an Hsp90 inhibitor in cell culture as well as a pre-clinical mouse model of trypanosomiasis. This article explores the role of Hsp90 in the Trypanosoma life cycle and its potential as a drug target. It appears plausible that the repertoire of Hsp90 inhibitors available in academia and industry may have value for treatment of surra and other animal trypanosomiasis.

  12. Expression of Low Molecular Weight Heat-Shock Proteins under Field Conditions.

    PubMed Central

    Hernandez, L. D.; Vierling, E.

    1993-01-01

    Heat-shock proteins (HSPs) are known to be expressed in plants experiencing high-temperature stress. We have examined the expression of class I cytoplasmic low molecular weight (LMW) HSPs and find that these HSPs also frequently accumulate in seeds, seed pods, and flowers during a normal growing season. We first examined the expression of class I cytoplasmic LMW HSPs by western blot analysis in a range of seed samples from both commercially grown and wild legumes. LMW HSPs were present in all seed samples, indicating that these HSPs are regularly expressed in these tissues. To examine more specifically conditions under which LMW HSPs were produced during an average growing season, additional studies of Medicago sativa were carried out during the fall season in Tucson, AZ. Plants were irrigated to avoid conditions of water stress, and canopy temperature was monitored throughout the study period. LMW HSP expression in leaves, flowers, and developing seed pods was analyzed by western blotting. Results show that in the field HSPs are frequently produced in flowers and seed pods, even in plants that show no HSP expression in leaves. Parallel greenhouse studies indicate that HSP expression in seeds is in part developmentally regulated. In total our data suggest a more widespread occurrence of HSPs in optimal growth environments and emphasize their potential role during reproduction. PMID:12231775

  13. Experimental pneumococcal meningitis causes central nervous system pathology without inducing the 72-kd heat shock protein.

    PubMed Central

    Täuber, M. G.; Kennedy, S. L.; Tureen, J. H.; Lowenstein, D. H.

    1992-01-01

    We examined whether experimental pneumococcal meningitis induced the 72-kd heat shock protein (HSP72), a sensitive marker of neuronal stress in other models of central nervous system (CNS) injury. Brain injury was characterized by vasculitis, cerebritis, and abscess formation in the cortex of infected animals. The extent of these changes correlated with the size of the inoculum (P less than 0.003) and with pathophysiologic parameters of disease severity, i.e., cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) lactate (r = 0.61, P less than 0.0001) and CSF glucose concentrations (r = -0.55, P less than 0.0001). Despite the presence of numerous cortical regions having morphologic evidence of injury, HSP72 was not detected in most animals. When present, only rare neurons were HSP72 positive. Western blot analysis of brain samples confirmed the paucity of HSP72 induction. The lack of neuronal HSP72 expression in this model suggests that at least some of the events leading to neuronal injury in meningitis are unique, when compared with CNS diseases associated with HSP72 induction. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:1632471

  14. Phylogenetic analysis of the Trypanosoma genus based on the heat-shock protein 70 gene.

    PubMed

    Fraga, Jorge; Fernández-Calienes, Aymé; Montalvo, Ana Margarita; Maes, Ilse; Deborggraeve, Stijn; Büscher, Philippe; Dujardin, Jean-Claude; Van der Auwera, Gert

    2016-09-01

    Trypanosome evolution was so far essentially studied on the basis of phylogenetic analyses of small subunit ribosomal RNA (SSU-rRNA) and glycosomal glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (gGAPDH) genes. We used for the first time the 70kDa heat-shock protein gene (hsp70) to investigate the phylogenetic relationships among 11 Trypanosoma species on the basis of 1380 nucleotides from 76 sequences corresponding to 65 strains. We also constructed a phylogeny based on combined datasets of SSU-rDNA, gGAPDH and hsp70 sequences. The obtained clusters can be correlated with the sections and subgenus classifications of mammal-infecting trypanosomes except for Trypanosoma theileri and Trypanosoma rangeli. Our analysis supports the classification of Trypanosoma species into clades rather than in sections and subgenera, some of which being polyphyletic. Nine clades were recognized: Trypanosoma carassi, Trypanosoma congolense, Trypanosoma cruzi, Trypanosoma grayi, Trypanosoma lewisi, T. rangeli, T. theileri, Trypanosoma vivax and Trypanozoon. These results are consistent with existing knowledge of the genus' phylogeny. Within the T. cruzi clade, three groups of T. cruzi discrete typing units could be clearly distinguished, corresponding to TcI, TcIII, and TcII+V+VI, while support for TcIV was lacking. Phylogenetic analyses based on hsp70 demonstrated that this molecular marker can be applied for discriminating most of the Trypanosoma species and clades.

  15. Gut epithelial inducible heat-shock proteins and their modulation by diet and the microbiota.

    PubMed

    Arnal, Marie-Edith; Lallès, Jean-Paul

    2016-03-01

    The epidemic of metabolic diseases has raised questions about the interplay between the human diet and the gut and its microbiota. The gut has two vital roles: nutrient absorption and intestinal barrier function. Gut barrier defects are involved in many diseases. Excess energy intake disturbs the gut microbiota and favors body entry of microbial compounds that stimulate chronic metabolic inflammation. In this context, the natural defense mechanisms of gut epithelial cells and the potential to boost them nutritionally warrant further study. One such important defense system is the activation of inducible heat-shock proteins (iHSPs) which protect the gut epithelium against oxidative stress and inflammation. Importantly, various microbial components can induce the expression of iHSPs. This review examines gut epithelial iHSPs as the main targets of microbial signals and nutrients and presents data on diseases involving disturbances of gut epithelial iHSPs. In addition, a broad literature analysis of dietary modulation of gut epithelial iHSPs is provided. Future research aims should include the identification of gut microbes that can optimize gut-protective iHSPs and the evaluation of iHSP-mediated health benefits of nutrients and food components.

  16. Molecular cloning and characterization of heat shock protein 70 from Trichinella spiralis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shaohua; Zhu, Xinping; Yang, Yaping; Yang, Jing; Gu, Yuan; Wei, Junfei; Hao, Ran; Boireau, P; Cui, Shijuan

    2009-04-01

    A cDNA encoding heat shock protein 70 of Trichinella spiralis (Ts-Hsp70) was identified by immunoscreening the adult T. spiralis cDNA library with rabbit antisera against T. spiralis adult extracts. The open reading frame of Ts-Hsp70 cDNA encoded a 623-amino acid peptide with a predicted molecular weight of 68.7kDa, which shares a high degree of sequence conservation with HSP70s from other parasites. Recombinant Ts-Hsp70 was expressed in Escherichia coli and purified with nickel column chromatography. Western blot analysis showed that recombinant Ts-Hsp70 could be recognized not only by trichinellosis patient sera, but also by T. spiralis-infected sera from rabbits, swine, and mice. Mice vaccinated with recombinant Ts-Hsp70 formulated with Freund's adjuvant exhibited strong humoral immune responses indicated by high titer of IgG antibody and significant muscle larval reduction (37%) after being challenged with T. spiralis larvae. The present results indicate that Ts-Hsp70 is a possible candidate vaccine against T. spiralis infection.

  17. Targeting Heat Shock Proteins Mitigates Ventilator Induced Diaphragm Muscle Dysfunction in an Age-Dependent Manner

    PubMed Central

    Ogilvie, Hannah; Cacciani, Nicola; Akkad, Hazem; Larsson, Lars

    2016-01-01

    Intensive care unit (ICU) patients are often overtly subjected to mechanical ventilation and immobilization, which leads to impaired limb and respiratory muscle function. The latter, termed ventilator-induced diaphragm dysfunction (VIDD) has recently been related to compromised heat shock protein (Hsp) activation. The administration of a pharmacological drug BGP-15 acting as a Hsp chaperone co-inducer has been found to partially alleviate VIDD in young rats. Considering that the mean age in the ICU is increasing, we aimed to explore whether the beneficial functional effects are also present in old rats. For that, we exposed young (7–8 months) and old (28–32 months) rats to 5-day controlled mechanical ventilation and immobilization with or without systemic BGP-15 administration. We then dissected diaphragm muscles, membrane–permeabilized bundles and evaluated the contractile function at single fiber level. Results confirmed that administration of BGP-15 restored the force-generating capacity of isolated muscle cells from young rats in conjunction with an increased expression of Hsp72. On the other hand, our results highlighted that old rats did not positively respond to the BGP-15 treatment. Therefore, it is of crucial importance to comprehend in more depth the effect of VIDD on diaphragm function and ascertain any further age-related differences. PMID:27729867

  18. Human myocytes are protected from titin aggregation-induced stiffening by small heat shock proteins

    PubMed Central

    Kötter, Sebastian; Unger, Andreas; Hamdani, Nazha; Lang, Patrick; Vorgerd, Matthias; Nagel-Steger, Luitgard

    2014-01-01

    In myocytes, small heat shock proteins (sHSPs) are preferentially translocated under stress to the sarcomeres. The functional implications of this translocation are poorly understood. We show here that HSP27 and αB-crystallin associated with immunoglobulin-like (Ig) domain-containing regions, but not the disordered PEVK domain (titin region rich in proline, glutamate, valine, and lysine), of the titin springs. In sarcomeres, sHSP binding to titin was actin filament independent and promoted by factors that increased titin Ig unfolding, including sarcomere stretch and the expression of stiff titin isoforms. Titin spring elements behaved predominantly as monomers in vitro. However, unfolded Ig segments aggregated, preferentially under acidic conditions, and αB-crystallin prevented this aggregation. Disordered regions did not aggregate. Promoting titin Ig unfolding in cardiomyocytes caused elevated stiffness under acidic stress, but HSP27 or αB-crystallin suppressed this stiffening. In diseased human muscle and heart, both sHSPs associated with the titin springs, in contrast to the cytosolic/Z-disk localization seen in healthy muscle/heart. We conclude that aggregation of unfolded titin Ig domains stiffens myocytes and that sHSPs translocate to these domains to prevent this aggregation. PMID:24421331

  19. Heat shock proteins and survival strategies in congeneric land snails (Sphincterochila) from different habitats.

    PubMed

    Mizrahi, Tal; Heller, Joseph; Goldenberg, Shoshana; Arad, Zeev

    2012-09-01

    Polmunate land snails are subject to stress conditions in their terrestrial habitat, and depend on a range of behavioural, physiological and biochemical adaptations for coping with problems of maintaining water, ionic and thermal balance. The involvement of the heat shock protein (HSP) machinery in land snails was demonstrated following short-term experimental aestivation and heat stress, suggesting that land snails use HSPs as part of their survival strategy. As climatic variation was found to be associated with HSP expression, we tested whether adaptation of land snails to different habitats affects HSP expression in two closely related Sphincterochila snail species, a desert species Sphincterochila zonata and a Mediterranean-type species Sphincterochila cariosa. Our study suggests that Sphincterochila species use HSPs as part of their survival strategy following desiccation and heat stress, and as part of the natural annual cycle of activity and aestivation. Our studies also indicate that adaptation to different habitats results in the development of distinct strategies of HSP expression in response to stress, namely the reduced expression of HSPs in the desert-inhabiting species. We suggest that these different strategies reflect the difference in heat and aridity encountered in the natural habitats, and that the desert species S. zonata relies on mechanisms and adaptations other than HSP induction thus avoiding the fitness consequences of continuous HSP upregulation.

  20. Epitopes of Microbial and Human Heat Shock Protein 60 and Their Recognition in Myalgic Encephalomyelitis

    PubMed Central

    Elfaitouri, Amal; Herrmann, Björn; Bölin-Wiener, Agnes; Wang, Yilin; Gottfries, Carl-Gerhard; Zachrisson, Olof; Pipkorn, Rϋdiger; Rönnblom, Lars; Blomberg, Jonas

    2013-01-01

    Myalgic encephalomyelitis (ME, also called Chronic Fatigue Syndrome), a common disease with chronic fatigability, cognitive dysfunction and myalgia of unknown etiology, often starts with an infection. The chaperonin human heat shock protein 60 (HSP60) occurs in mitochondria and in bacteria, is highly conserved, antigenic and a major autoantigen. The anti-HSP60 humoral (IgG and IgM) immune response was studied in 69 ME patients and 76 blood donors (BD) (the Training set) with recombinant human and E coli HSP60, and 136 30-mer overlapping and targeted peptides from HSP60 of humans, Chlamydia, Mycoplasma and 26 other species in a multiplex suspension array. Peptides from HSP60 helix I had a chaperonin-like activity, but these and other HSP60 peptides also bound IgG and IgM with an ME preference, theoretically indicating a competition between HSP60 function and antibody binding. A HSP60-based panel of 25 antigens was selected. When evaluated with 61 other ME and 399 non-ME samples (331 BD, 20 Multiple Sclerosis and 48 Systemic Lupus Erythematosus patients), a peptide from Chlamydia pneumoniae HSP60 detected IgM in 15 of 61 (24%) of ME, and in 1 of 399 non-ME at a high cutoff (p<0.0001). IgM to specific cross-reactive epitopes of human and microbial HSP60 occurs in a subset of ME, compatible with infection-induced autoimmunity. PMID:24312270

  1. Immunological enhancement action of endotoxin-free tilapia heat shock protein 70 against Streptococcus iniae.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ming; Wang, Rui; Li, Liping; Liang, Wanwen; Wang, Qiuhua; Huang, Ting; Li, Chao; Li, Jian; Gan, Xi; Lei, Aiying; Huang, Weiyi; Luo, Honglin

    2014-07-01

    The immunological effects of heat shock proteins (HSPs) had been found in humans and mice, but scarce data of endotoxin-free Hsp70 were reported in tilapia. In the current study, we reported that tHsp70 alone and antigen-tHsp70 compound increased the proliferations of lymphocytes and macrophages, significantly increased the NO release and phagocytotic ability of macrophages (p<0.05), and enhanced the levels of immune-related genes in lymphocytes and macrophages in a dose- and/or time-dependent manner. On the other hand, tHsp70 not only helped to reduce the proliferation inhibitions induced by the ECP treatment, but also assisted antigens to enhance the vaccine-induced protection against Streptococcus iniae (p<0.05). We described, for the first time, a critical role of endotoxin-free tHsp70 on activation of tilapia lymphocytes and macrophages post S. iniae exposure and its up-regulation effects on vaccine-induced protection. Our research highlights the immunological enhancement action of Hsp70 in teleost immunity.

  2. Immunohistochemical localization of heat shock protein 70 in the human medulla oblongata in forensic autopsies.

    PubMed

    Nogami, M; Takatsu, A; Endo, N; Ishiyama, I

    1999-12-01

    Heat shock protein 70 (hsp70) can be induced under various stresses in experimental animals. We investigated hsp70 immunoreactivity in the human medulla oblongata in forensic autopsies. Hsp70 immunoreactivity was observed in the cytoplasm of some neurons in the hypoglossal nucleus (XII), the dorsal motor nucleus of the vagal nerve (X), the lateral cuneate nucleus (Cun), and the inferior olive (Oli). Neurons with positive hsp70 immunoreactivity were statistically significantly fewer in the Oli than in the XII, X, and Cun. There was no statistically significant correlation between the AMI (the antemortem interval between the onset of injury and death) or PMI (the postmortem interval between death and autopsy), and the percentage of positive cytoplasmic hsp70 immunoreactivity in any of the nuclei studied. Age had a statistically significant negative correlation with the percentage of positive hsp70 immunoreactivity in the Oli. The percentages of positive hsp70 immunoreactivity in the XII and Cun were statistically significantly lower in burn cases than in other cases. Therefore, the induction of hsp70 immunoreactivity in the medulla oblongata may not reflect the duration of stress in the AMI, but may reflect the regional (nuclei) and conditional (burns) differences in autopsy specimens.

  3. Thermal preconditioning and heat-shock protein 72 preserve synaptic transmission during thermal stress.

    PubMed

    Kelty, Jonathan D; Noseworthy, Peter A; Feder, Martin E; Robertson, R Meldrum; Ramirez, Jan-Marino

    2002-01-01

    As with other tissues, exposing the mammalian CNS to nonlethal heat stress (i.e., thermal preconditioning) increases levels of heat-shock proteins (Hsps) such as Hsp70 and enhances the viability of neurons under subsequent stress. Using a medullary slice preparation from a neonatal mouse, including the site of the neural network that generates respiratory rhythm (the pre-Bötzinger complex), we show that thermal preconditioning has an additional fundamental effect, protection of synaptic function. Relative to 30 degrees C baseline, initial thermal stress (40 degrees C) greatly increased the frequency of synaptic currents recorded without pharmacological manipulation by approximately 17-fold (p < 0.01) and of miniature postsynaptic currents (mPSCs) elicited by GABA (20-fold) glutamate (10-fold), and glycine (36-fold). Thermal preconditioning (15 min at 40 degrees C) eliminated the increase in frequency of overall synaptic transmission during acute thermal stress and greatly attenuated the frequency increases of GABAergic, glutamatergic, and glycinergic mPSCs (for each, p < 0.05). Moreover, without thermal preconditioning, incubation of slices in solution containing inducible Hsp70 (Hsp72) mimicked the effect of thermal preconditioning on the stress-induced release of neurotransmitter. That preconditioning and exogenous Hsp72 can affect and preserve normal physiological function has important therapeutic implications.

  4. Heat shock proteins and chronic fatigue in primary Sjögren's syndrome.

    PubMed

    Bårdsen, Kjetil; Nilsen, Mari Mæland; Kvaløy, Jan Terje; Norheim, Katrine Brække; Jonsson, Grete; Omdal, Roald

    2016-04-01

    Fatigue occurs frequently in patients with cancer, neurological diseases and chronic inflammatory diseases, but the biological mechanisms that lead to and regulate fatigue are largely unknown. When the innate immune system is activated, heat shock proteins (HSPs) are produced to protect cells. Some extracellular HSPs appear to recognize cellular targets in the brain, and we hypothesize that fatigue may be generated by specific HSPs signalling through neuronal or glial cells in the central nervous system. From a cohort of patients with primary Sjögren's syndrome, 20 patients with high and 20 patients with low fatigue were selected. Fatigue was evaluated with a fatigue visual analogue scale. Plasma concentrations of HSP32, HSP60, HSP72 and HSP90α were measured and analysed to determine if there were associations with the level of fatigue. Plasma concentrations of HSP90α were significantly higher in patients with high fatigue compared with those with low fatigue, and there was a tendency to higher concentrations of HSP72 in patients with high fatigue compared with patients with low fatigue. There were no differences in concentrations of HSP32 and HSP60 between the high- and low-fatigue groups. Thus, extracellular HSPs, particularly HSP90α, may signal fatigue in chronic inflammation. This supports the hypothesis that fatigue is generated by cellular defence mechanisms.

  5. Heat shock-induced accumulation of 70-kDa stress protein (HSP70) can protect ATP-depleted tumor cells from necrosis.

    PubMed

    Kabakov, A E; Gabai, V L

    1995-03-01

    The phenomenon of cell resistance to prolonged energy deprivation after mild thermal stress was studied in vitro. Murine P3O1 myeloma and Ehrlich ascites carcinoma cells were treated with rotenone (an inhibitor of respiration) in glucose-free medium to block ATP generation. ATP rapidly decreased in these cells to 3-6% of the initial level that resulted in powerful aggregation of cytoskeletal proteins, blebbing, and necrotic death of 60-70% cells within 2 h. Prior heat shock (43 degrees C for 10 min) with a subsequent 3-h recovery in a rich medium considerably suppressed the rotenone-induced actin aggregation and rate of necrosis in the energy-deprived cells without effecting the ATP drop in them. Using [14C]leucine labeling, gel electrophoresis, and fluorography, stimulation of the heat-shock protein (HSP) synthesis and total suppression of any other translation were revealed in the cells during recovery after the heat pretreatment. Significantly elevated levels of HSP70 but not HSP90 and HSP27 were found by means of immunoblotting in both cell cultures rendered resistant to necrosis under ATP-depleting conditions. Inhibition of the thermo-induced HSP synthesis by cycloheximide fully prevented development of the tolerance to energy deprivation. A novel function of HSP70 consisting of protection of ATP-deprived cells from "lethal" aggregation of cytoskeletal proteins is suggested.

  6. Translational control in the stress adaptive response of cancer cells: a novel role for the heat shock protein TRAP1

    PubMed Central

    Matassa, D S; Amoroso, M R; Agliarulo, I; Maddalena, F; Sisinni, L; Paladino, S; Romano, S; Romano, M F; Sagar, V; Loreni, F; Landriscina, M; Esposito, F

    2013-01-01

    TNF receptor-associated protein 1 (TRAP1), the main mitochondrial member of the heat shock protein (HSP) 90 family, is induced in most tumor types and is involved in the regulation of proteostasis in the mitochondria of tumor cells through the control of folding and stability of selective proteins, such as Cyclophilin D and Sorcin. Notably, we have recently demonstrated that TRAP1 also interacts with the regulatory protein particle TBP7 in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), where it is involved in a further extra-mitochondrial quality control of nuclear-encoded mitochondrial proteins through the regulation of their ubiquitination/degradation. Here we show that TRAP1 is involved in the translational control of cancer cells through an attenuation of global protein synthesis, as evidenced by an inverse correlation between TRAP1 expression and ubiquitination/degradation of nascent stress-protective client proteins. This study demonstrates for the first time that TRAP1 is associated with ribosomes and with several translation factors in colon carcinoma cells and, remarkably, is found co-upregulated with some components of the translational apparatus (eIF4A, eIF4E, eEF1A and eEF1G) in human colorectal cancers, with potential new opportunities for therapeutic intervention in humans. Moreover, TRAP1 regulates the rate of protein synthesis through the eIF2α pathway either under basal conditions or under stress, favoring the activation of GCN2 and PERK kinases, with consequent phosphorylation of eIF2α and attenuation of cap-dependent translation. This enhances the synthesis of selective stress-responsive proteins, such as the transcription factor ATF4 and its downstream effectors BiP/Grp78, and the cystine antiporter system xCT, thereby providing protection against ER stress, oxidative damage and nutrient deprivation. Accordingly, TRAP1 silencing sensitizes cells to apoptosis induced by novel antitumoral drugs that inhibit cap-dependent translation, such as ribavirin or 4EGI

  7. Heat shock 70 kDa protein cognate 5 involved in WSSV toleration of Litopenaeus vannamei.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Kai; Yuan, Feng-Hua; He, Hong-Hui; Bi, Hai-Tao; Weng, Shao-Ping; He, Jian-Guo; Chen, Yi-Hong

    2017-02-11

    The expression levels of 97 unigenes encoding heat shock proteins of Litopenaeus vannamei was scanned, and ten of them were significantly induced by white spot syndrome virus (WSSV). Among these genes, heat shock 70 kDa protein cognate 5 (LvHSC70-5) was upregulated to the highest extent and subjected to further studies. Subcellular localization assay revealed that LvHSC70-5 was located in the mitochondria. Aside from WSSV infection, unfolded protein response activation and thermal stress could also upregulate LvHSC70-5. Results of reporter gene assay demonstrated that promoter of LvHSC70-5 was activated by L. vannamei heat shock factor protein 1, activating transcription factor 4 and thermal stress. A decrease in the expression of LvHSC70-5 could reduce the aggregation of proteins in hemocytes and the cumulative mortality of WSSV-infected L. vannamei. LvHSC70-5 in L. vannamei hemocytes was upregulated by mild thermal stress. In addition, mild thermal stress, decreased the copy number of WSSV in shrimp muscle and the cumulative mortality of WSSV-infected L. vannamei. Therefore, collecting results suggested that LvHSC70-5 should be involved in WSSV toleration of shrimp L. vannamei.

  8. Hypothermia decreased the expression of heat shock proteins in neonatal rat model of hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Lee, Byong Sop; Jung, Euiseok; Lee, Yeonjoo; Chung, Sung-Hoon

    2017-03-11

    Hypothermia (HT) is a well-established neuroprotective strategy against neonatal hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy (HIE). The overexpression of heat shock proteins (HSP) has been shown to provide neuroprotection in animal models of stroke. We aimed to investigate the effect of HT on HSP70 and HSP27 expression in a neonatal rat model of HIE. Seven-day-old rat pups were exposed to hypoxia for 90 min to establish the Rice-Vannucci model and were assigned to the following four groups: hypoxic injury (HI)-normothermia (NT, 36 °C), HI-HT (30 °C), sham-NT, and sham-HT. After temperature intervention for 24 h, the mRNA and protein expression of HSP70 and HSP27 were measured. The association between HSP expression and brain injury severity was also evaluated. The brain infarct size was significantly smaller in the HI-HT group than in the HI-NT group. The mRNA and protein expression of both HSPs were significantly greater in the two HI groups, compared to those in the two sham groups. Moreover, among the rat pups subjected to HI, HT significantly reduced the mRNA and protein expression of both HSPs. The mRNA expression level of the HSPs was proportional to the brain injury severity. Post-ischemic HT, i.e., a cold shock attenuated the expression of HSP70 and HSP27 in a neonatal rat model of HIE. Our study suggests that neither HSP70 nor HSP27 expression is involved in the neuroprotective mechanism through which prolonged HT protects against neonatal HIE.

  9. Evaluation of heat shock protein (HSP-60) induction on accumulation of carbohydrate in Isochrysis galbana

    SciTech Connect

    Olsen, H.; Wolfe, M.; Tell, J.; Tjeerdema, R.

    1995-12-31

    Primary levels of the marine food chain may play an important role in the fate of petroleum hydrocarbons in both chemically dispersed and un-dispersed oil spills. HSP-60 proteins, members of the chaperonin family of stress proteins, are induced in response to a wide variety of environmental agents, including UV light, heavy metals, and xenobiotics. Increased production and storage of carbohydrate in I. galbana has been associated with aging and stress. Thus, HSP-60 and carbohydrate storage were selected as sublethal endpoints of exposure to the primary producer, I. galbana, a golden brown, unicellular algae, and a significant component of the marine phytoplankton community. The authors have found that I. galbana cultures exposed to water-accommodated fractions (WAF) of Prudhoe Bay Crude Oil (PBCO), and PBCO/dispersant preparations efficiently induce HSP-60. Studies indicated that WAF produced a dose-related response in I. galbana, which increased as a function of time. Dispersant alone showed the greatest induction, while combined WAF-dispersant showed less induction, suggesting a possible competition between crude oil and algae for dispersant interaction. In addition, they have demonstrated that I. galbana accumulates carbohydrates in response to exposure to WAF and PBCO/dispersant preparations and therefore represents another index of stress in this organism. They were interested in determining if induction of stress proteins and HSP60 in particular represented an adaptive-mechanism, allowing this algae to better cope with exposure to petroleum hydrocarbons released in the marine environment during an oil spill. In an effort to determine if stress protein induction serves as a protective adaptive response to exposure to petroleum hydrocarbons they examined the effect of heat shock induction on the accumulation of carbohydrates by these organisms in response to exposure to WAF and dispersed oil preparations.

  10. Mice overexpressing 70-kDa heat shock protein show increased resistance to malonate and 3-nitropropionic acid.

    PubMed

    Dedeoglu, Alpaslan; Ferrante, Robert J; Andreassen, Ole A; Dillmann, Wolfgang H; Beal, M Flint

    2002-07-01

    Heat shock proteins (HSPs) are induced in response to oxidative stress, hypoxia-ischemia, and neuronal injury and play a protective role. Malonate and 3-nitropropionic acid (3-NP) are well-characterized animal models of Huntington's Disease (HD). They inhibit succinate dehydrogenase, inducing mitochondrial dysfunction, which triggers the generation of superoxide radicals, secondary excitotoxicity, and apoptosis. In this study, we examined whether the 70-kDa heat shock protein (HSP-70) is protective against neurotoxicity induced by malonate and 3-NP. Homozygous and heterozygous HSP-70 overexpressing mice (HSP-70+/+, HSP-70+/-) and wild-type controls received 3-NP or malonate and striatal lesion sizes were evaluated by stereology. Compared to HSP-70+/+ and HSP-70+/-, wild-type controls showed significantly larger striatal lesions following 3-NP or malonate injections. These findings support the idea that HSP-70 has a neuroprotective role that may be useful in the treatment of neurodegenerative diseases.

  11. The impact of heat shock protein 70 gene variations on clinical presentation and outcome in schizophrenic inpatients.

    PubMed

    Pae, Chi-Un; Drago, Antonio; Kim, Jung-Jin; Mandelli, Laura; De Ronchi, Diana; Serretti, Alessandro

    2009-01-01

    We previously investigated a group of single-nucleotide polymorphisms of a set of genes coding for heat shock proteins (HSPA1A, HSPA1B and HSPA1L) and found a significant association between one HSPA1B variation and schizophrenia (SZ). We now report an association between a set of variations (rs2227956, rs2075799, rs1043618, rs562047 and rs539689) within the same genes and a larger sample of schizophrenic inpatients. A single variation, rs539689 (HSPA1B), was found to be marginally associated with Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale (PANSS) positive scores at discharge, and haplotype analysis revealed a significant association between improvement in PANSS scores with both A-C-G-G and A-C-G-G haplotypes. These findings further support a role of heat shock proteins in the pathophysiology of SZ.

  12. Cloning and expression analysis of four heat shock protein genes in Ericerus pela (Homoptera: Coccidae).

    PubMed

    Liu, Wei-Wei; Yang, Pu; Chen, Xiao-Ming; Xu, Dong-Li; Hu, Yan-Hong

    2014-01-01

    To explore the function of small heat shock protein genes (shsps) and hsp70 in Ericerus pela, we cloned the full-length cDNA sequences of hsp21.5, hsp21.7, hsp70, and hsc70 and the genomic sequence of hsc70. Open reading frames of the four hsps were 570, 564, 1,908, and 1,962 base pairs (bp), respectively, which encode proteins with calculated molecular mass of 21.5, 21.7, 69.8, and 71.6 kDa. Amino acid sequence analysis revealed the presence of the conserved Hsp motifs in all four proteins. The genomic DNA of hsc70 had four introns. ep-hsp21.5 was orthologous and ep-hsp21.7 was species specific. Expression of all four transcripts during heat or cold stress and development was examined by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction. All four hsps were upregulated during heat or cold stress in female adults, indicating a correlation between the four hsps and heat or cold-stress tolerance in female adults. ep-hsp21.7 and ep-hsp70 were upregulated during heat stress in male larvae, implying a correlation between the two hsps and heat-stress tolerance in male larvae. The four ep-hsps were also upregulated during the developmental process in males, and ep-hsp21.5, ep-hsp70, and ep-hsc70 were upregulated in females, which indicates their possible role in the developmental regulation of E. pela.

  13. Protein expression following heat shock in the nervous system of Locusta migratoria.

    PubMed

    Dehghani, Mehrnoush; Xiao, Chengfeng; Money, Tomas G A; Shoemaker, Kelly L; Robertson, R Meldrum

    2011-11-01

    There is a thermal range for the operation of neural circuits beyond which nervous system function is compromised. Locusta migratoria is native to the semiarid regions of the world and provides an excellent model for studying neural phenomena. In this organism previous exposure to sublethal high temperatures (heat shock, HS) can protect neuronal function against future hyperthermia but, unlike many organisms, the profound physiological adaptations are not accompanied by a robust increase of Hsp70 transcript or protein in the nervous system. We compared Hsp70 increase following HS in the tissues of isolated and gregarious locusts to investigate the effect of population density. We also localized Hsp70 in the metathoracic ganglion (MTG) of gregarious locusts to determine if HS affects Hsp70 in specific cell types that could be masked in whole ganglion assays. Our study indicated no evidence of a consistent change in Hsp70 level in the MTG of isolated locusts following HS. Also, Hsp70 was mainly localized in perineurium, neural membranes and glia and prior HS had no effect on its density or distribution. Finally, we applied 2-D gels to study the proteomic profile of MTG in gregarious locusts following HS; although these experiments showed some changes in the level of ATP-synthase β isoforms, the overall amount of this protein was found unchanged following HS. We conclude that the constitutive level of Hsps in the tissues of locusts is high. Also the thermoprotective effect of HS on the nervous system might be mediated by post-translational modifications or protein trafficking.

  14. Implication of Bemisia tabaci heat shock protein 70 in Begomovirus-whitefly interactions.

    PubMed

    Götz, Monika; Popovski, Smadar; Kollenberg, Mario; Gorovits, Rena; Brown, Judith K; Cicero, Joseph M; Czosnek, Henryk; Winter, Stephan; Ghanim, Murad

    2012-12-01

    The whitefly Bemisia tabaci (Gennadius) is a major cosmopolitan pest capable of feeding on hundreds of plant species and transmits several major plant viruses. The most important and widespread viruses vectored by B. tabaci are in the genus Begomovirus, an unusual group of plant viruses owing to their small, single-stranded DNA genome and geminate particle morphology. B. tabaci transmits begomoviruses in a persistent circulative nonpropagative manner. Evidence suggests that the whitefly vector encounters deleterious effects following Tomato yellow leaf curl virus (TYLCV) ingestion and retention. However, little is known about the molecular and cellular basis underlying these coevolved begomovirus-whitefly interactions. To elucidate these interactions, we undertook a study using B. tabaci microarrays to specifically describe the responses of the transcriptomes of whole insects and dissected midguts following TYLCV acquisition and retention. Microarray, real-time PCR, and Western blot analyses indicated that B. tabaci heat shock protein 70 (HSP70) specifically responded to the presence of the monopartite TYLCV and the bipartite Squash leaf curl virus. Immunocapture PCR, protein coimmunoprecipitation, and virus overlay protein binding assays showed in vitro interaction between TYLCV and HSP70. Fluorescence in situ hybridization and immunolocalization showed colocalization of TYLCV and the bipartite Watermelon chlorotic stunt virus virions and HSP70 within midgut epithelial cells. Finally, membrane feeding of whiteflies with anti-HSP70 antibodies and TYLCV virions showed an increase in TYLCV transmission, suggesting an inhibitory role for HSP70 in virus transmission, a role that might be related to protection against begomoviruses while translocating in the whitefly.

  15. Immunolocalization of heat shock protein 27 in developing jaw bones and tooth germs of human fetuses.

    PubMed

    Leonardi, R; Barbato, E; Paganelli, C; Lo Muzio, L

    2004-12-01

    27 kDa Heat shock protein (Hsp27), which is also identified as p29 estrogen-receptor associated protein, plays a crucial role in specific growth stages. It also seems to be involved in the balance between differentiation and apoptosis. To determine whether Hsp27 is involved during craniofacial development and odontogenesis, its expression was studied through immunohistochemistry of developing jaw bone as well as the odontogenesis of heads from human fetuses. Formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded specimens of 7 human fetuses (3 female, 4 male), obtained from miscarriages occurring between the 9th and 16th weeks of pregnancy, were examined by using a monoclonal antibody against Hsp27. Staining intensity (weak, +; moderate, ++; strong, +++) was evaluated semiquantitatively. The sample slice was cut through a coronal plane, which included eyes, nasal cavities, tongue, and primitive dental lamina with tooth germs. A transient and spatially restricted expression of Hsp27 in developing human jaw bones and teeth was observed. Osteoblasts around the uncalcified bone matrix showed Hsp27 immunoreaction products (+++), whereas osteocytes were not immunolabeled. In mandibular condyle, immunolabeling was restricted to hypertrophic chondrocytes (++). In developing tooth germs, Hsp27 immunostaining was detected throughout the bud (+++). At the early cap stage, a strong immunolabeling for Hsp27 was seen in the dental lamina (+++), and a moderate staining was seen in the outer dental epithelium (++). At the late cap stage, Hsp27 expression was detected in the outer dental epithelium (++) as well as in the cells of the future stellate reticulum (++). The spatiotemporal-restricted expression of Hsp27 in craniofacial bones during development suggests that this protein could be involved in the balance between differentiation and apoptosis, by modulating the viability of osteoblasts and chondrocytes. The specific regional and temporal expression patterns of Hsp27 during tooth development

  16. Human mutation in the anti-apoptotic heat shock protein 20 abrogates its cardioprotective effects.

    PubMed

    Nicolaou, Persoulla; Knöll, Ralph; Haghighi, Kobra; Fan, Guo-Chang; Dorn, Gerald W; Hasenfub, Gerd; Kranias, Evangelia G

    2008-11-28

    The small heat shock protein Hsp20 protects cardiomyocytes against apoptosis, and phosphorylation at its Ser16 site enhances its cardioprotection. To determine whether genetic variants exist in human Hsp20, which may modify these beneficial effects, we sequenced the coding region of the Hsp20 gene in 1347 patients suffering from dilated cardiomyopathy and 744 subjects with no heart disease. We identified a C59T substitution in the human Hsp20 gene in one patient and three individuals without heart disease. All subjects were heterozygous for this mutation, which changes a fully conserved proline residue into leucine at position 20 (P20L), resulting in secondary structural alterations. To examine the potential functional significance of the P20L-Hsp20 human variant, adult rat cardiomyocytes were infected with Ad.GFP (where Ad is adenovirus and GFP is green fluorescent protein), Ad.WT-Hsp20 (where WT is wild-type), and Ad.P20L-Hsp20 and subjected to simulated ischemia/reperfusion injury. Expression of WT-Hsp20 resulted in significant attenuation of apoptosis compared with the GFP control. However, the P20L-Hsp20 mutant showed no protection against apoptosis, assessed by Hoechst staining and DNA fragmentation. The loss of cardioprotection by the mutant Hsp20 was associated with its diminished phosphorylation at Ser16 compared with WT-Hsp20. Furthermore, maximal stimulation of cardiomyocytes with isoproterenol or protein kinase A-mediated phosphorylation in vitro confirmed the impaired ability of the mutant Hsp20 to become phosphorylated at Ser16. In conclusion, we have identified a P20L substitution in human Hsp20, which is associated with diminished phosphorylation at Ser16 and complete abrogation of the Hsp20 cardioprotective effects which may adversely affect the ability of human carriers to cope with cellular stress.

  17. Heat shock protein 90: role in enterovirus 71 entry and assembly and potential target for therapy.

    PubMed

    Tsou, Yueh-Liang; Lin, Yi-Wen; Chang, Hsuen-Wen; Lin, Hsiang-Yin; Shao, Hsiao-Yun; Yu, Shu-Ling; Liu, Chia-Chyi; Chitra, Ebenezer; Sia, Charles; Chow, Yen-Hung

    2013-01-01

    Although several factors participating in enterovirus 71 (EV71) entry and replication had been reported, the precise mechanisms associated with these events are far from clear. In the present study, we showed that heat shock protein 90 (HSP90) is a key element associated with EV71 entry and replication in a human rhabdomyosarcoma of RD cells. Inhibition of HSP90 by pretreating host cells with HSP90β siRNA or blocking HSP90 with a HSP90-specific antibody or geldanamycin (GA), a specific inhibitor of HSP90, as well as recombinant HSP90β resulted in inhibiting viral entry and subsequent viral replication. Co-immunprecipitation of EV71 with recombinant HSP90β and colocalization of EV71-HSP90 in the cells demonstrated that HSP90 was physically associated with EV71 particles. HSP90 seems to mediate EV71 replication by preventing proteosomal degradation of the newly synthesized capsid proteins, but does not facilitate viral gene expression at transcriptional level. This was evident by post-treatment of host cells with GA, which did not affect the expression of viral transcripts but accelerated the degradation of viral capsid proteins and interfered with the formation of assembled virions. In vivo studies were carried out using human SCARB2-transgenic mice to evaluate the protection conferred by HSP90 inhibitor, 17-allyamino-17-demethoxygeldanamycin (17-AAG), an analog of geldanamycin, that elicited similar activity but with less toxicity. The results showed that the administration of 17-AAG twice conferred the resistance to hSCARB2 mice challenged with C2, C4, and B4 genotypes of EV71. Our data supports HSP90 plays an important role in EV71 infection. Targeting of HSP90 with clinically available drugs might provide a feasible therapeutic approach to treat EV71 infection.

  18. Heat shock protein (Hsp70) induced by a mild heat shock slightly moderates plasma osmolarity increases upon salinity transfer in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss).

    PubMed

    Niu, C J; Rummer, J L; Brauner, C J; Schulte, P M

    2008-11-01

    We have investigated whether mild heat shock, and resulting Hsp70 expression, can confer cross-protection against the stress associated with transfer from freshwater (FW) to seawater (SW) in juvenile rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss). In experimental Series I, juvenile trout reared in FW were transferred from 13.5 degrees C to 25.5 degrees C in FW, held for 2 h, returned to 13.5 degrees C for 12 h, and then transferred to 32 ppt SW at 13.5 degrees C. Branchial Hsp70 increased approximately 10-fold in the heat-shocked fish relative to the control by the end of recovery and remained high 2, 8, and 24 h post-salinity transfer. However, no clear differences could be detected in blood parameters (blood hemoglobin, hematocrit, MCHC, plasma Na(+) and plasma osmolarity) or muscle water content between heat-shocked and sham-shocked fish in SW at any sampling interval (0, 2, 8, 24, 48, 120, 240 and 360 h post-SW transfer). In experimental Series II, trout acclimated to 8 degrees C were heat-shocked at 22 degrees C for 2 h, allowed to recover 18 h, and exposed to a more severe salinity transfer (either 36 or 45 ppt) than in Series I. Branchial Hsp70 levels increased approximately 6-fold in heat-shocked fish, but had declined to baseline after 120 h in SW. Plasma osmolarity and chloride increased in both groups upon transfer to 36 ppt; however, the increase was significantly less in heat-shocked fish when compared to the increase observed in sham-shocked fish at 24 h. No significant differences could be detected in branchial Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase activity or Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase alpha1a and alpha1b mRNA expression between the two groups. Our data indicate that a mild temperature shock has only modest effects on the ability of rainbow trout to resist osmotic stress during FW to SW transfer.

  19. Heat shock protein 70 and glycoprotein 96 are differentially expressed on the surface of malignant and nonmalignant breast cells.

    PubMed

    Melendez, Karla; Wallen, Erik S; Edwards, Bruce S; Mobarak, Charlotte D; Bear, David G; Moseley, Pope L

    2006-01-01

    Heat shock proteins (HSPs), which are important for a number of different intracellular functions, are occasionally found on the surface of cells. The function of heat shock protein on the cell surface is not understood, although it has been shown to be greater in some tumor cells and some virally infected cells. Surface expression of both glycoprotein 96 (gp96) and Hsp70 occurs on tumor cells, and this expression correlates with natural killer cell killing of the cells. We examined the surface expression of gp96 and Hsp70 on human breast cell lines MCF7, MCF10A, AU565, and HS578, and in primary human mammary epithelial cells by immunofluorescence microscopy and flow cytometry. The nonmalignant cell lines HS578, MCF10A, and HMEC showed no surface expression of gp96, whereas malignant cell lines MCF7 and AU565 were positive for gp96 surface expression. All of the breast cell lines examined showed Hsp70 surface expression. These results also confirm previous studies, demonstrating that Hsp70 is on the plasma membrane of tumor cell lines. Given the involvement of heat shock proteins, gp96 and Hsp70, in innate and adaptive immunity, these observations may be important in the immune response to tumor cells.

  20. Small heat shock proteins and the postharvest chilling tolerance of tomato fruit.

    PubMed

    Ré, Martín D; Gonzalez, Carla; Escobar, Mariela R; Sossi, María Laura; Valle, Estela M; Boggio, Silvana B

    2017-02-01

    Plants have the largest number of small heat shock proteins (sHsps) (15-42 kDa) among eukaryotes, but little is known about their function in vivo. They accumulate in response to different stresses, and specific sHsps are also expressed during developmental processes such as seed development, germination, and ripening. The presence of organelle-specific sHsps appears to be unique to plants. The sHsps expression is regulated by heat stress transcription factors (Hsfs). In this work, it was explored the role of sHsps in the chilling injury of tomato fruit. The level of transcripts and proteins of cytoplasmic and organellar sHsps was monitored in fruit during ripening and after cold storage (4 weeks at 4°C). Expression of HsfA1, HsfA2, HsfA3, and HsfB1 was also examined. Two cultivars of tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) contrasting in chilling tolerance were assayed: Micro-Tom (chilling-tolerant) and Minitomato (chilling-sensitive). Results showed that sHsps were induced during ripening in fruit from both cultivars. However, sHsps were induced in Micro-Tom fruit but not in Minitomato fruit after storage at a low temperature. In particular, sHsp 17.4-CII and sHsp23.8-M transcripts strongly accumulated in Micro-Tom fruit and HsfA3 transcript diminished after cold storage. These data suggest that sHsps may be involved in the protection mechanisms against chilling stress and substantiate the hypothesis that sHsps may participate in the mechanism of tomato genotype chilling tolerance.

  1. Plasma heat shock protein 72 as a biomarker of sarcopenia in elderly people.

    PubMed

    Ogawa, Kishiko; Kim, Hun-Kyung; Shimizu, Takahiko; Abe, Sigeaki; Shiga, Yumi; Calderwood, Stuart K

    2012-05-01

    Sarcopenia is a geriatric syndrome in which there is a decrease of muscle mass and strength with aging. In age-related loss of muscle strength, there are numerous observations supporting the assertion that neural factors mediate muscle strength. A possible contributing cause may be that aging changes systemic extracellular heat shock protein (eHsp)72 activity. The present study was designed to assess the plasma levels of eHsp72 in elderly people and to investigate its potential interaction with components of sarcopenia. A total of 665 men and women participated in an official medical health examination and an integrated health examination, including psychological and physical fitness tests. Blood samples were assayed for levels of plasma Hsp72, serum C-reactive protein, interleukin 6, tumor necrosis factor α, and regular biomedical parameters. We found that higher Hsp72 in plasma is associated with lower muscle mass, weaker grip strength, and slower walking speed, and may be a potential biomarker of sarcopenia in elderly people. This finding was supported by other results in the present study: (1) older age and shrinking body and lower hemoglobin levels, all of which characterize sarcopenia, were related to higher eHsp72 tertiles and (2) the ORs of the highest tertile of eHsp72 for the lowest tertiles of muscle mass, grip strength, and walking speed were 2.7, 2.6, and 1.8, respectively. These ORs were independent of age, sex, and the incidence of related diseases. Our results would reveal that eHsp72 in plasma is linked to sarcopenia factors and is a potential biomarker or predictor of sarcopenia.

  2. Serum heat shock protein 60 in acute heart failure: a new biomarker?

    PubMed

    Bonanad, Clara; Núñez, Julio; Sanchis, Juan; Bodi, Vicente; Chaustre, Fabian; Chillet, Marifina; Miñana, Gema; Forteza, Maria José; Palau, Patricia; Núñez, Eduardo; Navarro, David; Llàcer, Angel; Chorro, Francisco J

    2013-01-01

    Heat shock protein 60 (HSP60) is a mitochondrial protein constitutively expressed in the majority of cells, and its expression is up-regulated by a variety of stressors. In heart failure, HSP60 is released from cardiomyocytes. The authors speculate that increased serum HSP60 (sHSP60) may be related to the severity of heart failure. This investigation sought to assess the association between sHSP60 and the composite end point of death/readmission in patients with acute heart failure (AHF). A total of 132 consecutive patients were admitted for AHF. The independent association between sHSP60 and the end point was assessed with Cox regression. During a median follow-up of 7 months (interquartile range, 3-14), 35 (26.5%) deaths, 40 (30.3%) readmissions, and 65 (49.2%) deaths/readmission were identified. Patients who exhibited the outcome showed higher median sHSP60 values (6.15 ng/mL [8.49] vs 4.71 ng/mL [7.55] P=.010). A monotonic increase in the incidence of the composite end point was observed when moving from lower to higher tertile (4.74, 4.76, and 6.98 per 10 patients-years of follow-up, P for trend <.001). After adjusting for established risk factors, only patients in the upper tertile showed an increased risk of death/readmission (hazard ratio, 2.63; 95% confidence interval, 1.29-5.37; P=.008). In patients with AHF, high sHSP60 was related to a higher risk for subsequent death/readmission for AHF.

  3. Separation of an associated 90K heat shock protein from the glucocorticoid receptor complex

    SciTech Connect

    Miller-Diener, A.; Kirsch, T.; Grove, B.; Robertson, N.; Litwack, G.

    1986-05-01

    A 90K heat shock protein(HSP), observed to copurify with the glucocorticoid receptor(GR), can be separated from the complex by 2 methods, allowing investigation of the role of HSP on kinase activity that was previously reported to be inherent to purified activated GR. Na/sub 2/MoO/sub 4/ stabilized unactivated rat hepatic GR complexes have been purified to >10,000-fold using a purification scheme that involves batchwise treatment of cytosol with phosphocellulose/DNAcellulose, elution from an affinity resin, gel filtration and ion exchange chromatography. Samples were subjected to 10-20% gradient SDS-PAGE. Proteins were transferred to nitrocellulose and blotted against monoclonal antibodies to GR(3A6), HSP or nonspecific IgM/G. Immunoblots indicated that HSP was separated from unactivated GR complexes at the affinity step prior to elution of GR with active steroid. GR eluted from the resin with /sup 3/H Triamcinolone acetonide or /sup 3/H Dexamethasone mesylate had an apparent M/sub r/ = 94-96,000 for the steroid binding subunit and is recognized by 3A6. Purification of GR minus the affinity step resulted in copurification of HSP throughout the procedure. However, after Sephadex G75 filtration and subsequent incubation at 25/sup 0/C, 30 min., HSP was separated from activated (DNA binding) GR on DEAE cellulose-52. HSP did not enhance or inhibit /sup 32/P incorporation of the 94K steroid binding subunit nor did it affect phosphorylation of histones by GR.

  4. Role of the human heat shock protein hsp70 in protection against stress-induced apoptosis.

    PubMed Central

    Mosser, D D; Caron, A W; Bourget, L; Denis-Larose, C; Massie, B

    1997-01-01

    Resistance to stress-induced apoptosis was examined in cells in which the expression of hsp70 was either constitutively elevated or inducible by a tetracycline-regulated transactivator. Heat-induced apoptosis was blocked in hsp70-expressing cells, and this was associated with reduced cleavage of the common death substrate protein poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP). Heat-induced cell death was correlated with the activation of the stress-activated protein kinase SAPK/JNK (c-Jun N-terminal kinase). Activation of SAPK/JNK was strongly inhibited in cells in which hsp70 was induced to a high level, indicating that hsp70 is able to block apoptosis by inhibiting signaling events upstream of SAPK/JNK activation. In contrast, SAPK/JNK activation was not inhibited by heat shock in cells with constitutively elevated levels of hsp70. Cells that constitutively overexpress hsp70 resist apoptosis induced by ceramide, a lipid signaling molecule that is generated by apoptosis-inducing treatments and is linked to SAPK/JNK activation. Similar to heat stress, resistance to ceramide-induced apoptosis occurs in spite of strong SAPK/JNK activation. Therefore, hsp70 is also able to inhibit apoptosis at some point downstream of SAPK/JNK activation. Since PARP cleavage is prevented in both cell lines, these results suggest that hsp70 is able to prevent the effector steps of apoptotic cell death. Processing of the CED-3-related protease caspase-3 (CPP32/Yama/apopain) is inhibited in hsp70-expressing cells; however, the activity of the mature enzyme is not affected by hsp70 in vitro. Caspase processing may represent a critical heat-sensitive target leading to cell death that is inhibited by the chaperoning function of hsp70. The inhibition of SAPK/JNK signaling and apoptotic protease effector steps by hsp70 likely contributes to the resistance to stress-induced apoptosis seen in transiently induced thermotolerance. PMID:9271409

  5. MIPS: a calmodulin-binding protein of Gracilaria lemaneiformis under heat shock.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xuan; Zhou, Huiyue; Zang, Xiaonan; Gong, Le; Sun, Hengyi; Zhang, Xuecheng

    2014-08-01

    To study the Ca(2+)/Calmodulin (CaM) signal transduction pathway of Gracilaria lemaneiformis under heat stress, myo-inositol-1-phosphate synthase (MIPS), a calmodulin-binding protein, was isolated using the yeast two-hybrid system. cDNA and DNA sequences of mips were cloned from G. lemaneiformis by using 5'RACE and genome walking procedures. The MIPS DNA sequence was 2,067 nucleotides long, containing an open reading frame (ORF) of 1,623 nucleotides with no intron. The mips ORF was predicted to encode 540 amino acids, which included the conserved MIPS domain and was 61-67 % similar to that of other species. After analyzing the amino acid sequence of MIPS, the CaM-Binding Domain (CaMBD) was inferred to be at a site spanning from amino acid 212 to amino acid 236. The yeast two-hybrid results proved that MIPS can interact with CaM and that MIPS is a type of calmodulin-binding protein. Next, the expression of CaM and MIPS in wild-type G. lemaneiformis and a heat-tolerant G. lemaneiformis cultivar, "981," were analyzed using real-time PCR under a heat shock of 32 °C. The expression level displayed a cyclical upward trend. Compared with wild type, the CaM expression levels of cultivar 981 were higher, which might directly relate to its resistance to high temperatures. This paper indicates that MIPS and CaM may play important roles in the high-temperature resistance of G. lemaneiformis.

  6. A stromal heat shock protein 70 system functions in protein import into chloroplasts in the moss Physcomitrella patens.

    PubMed

    Shi, Lan-Xin; Theg, Steven M

    2010-01-01

    Heat shock protein 70s (Hsp70s) are encoded by a multigene family and are located in different cellular compartments. They have broad-ranging functions, including involvement in protein trafficking, prevention of protein aggregation, and assistance in protein folding. Hsp70s work together with their cochaperones, J domain proteins and nucleotide exchange factors (e.g., GrpEs), in a functional cycle of substrate binding and release accompanied by ATP hydrolysis. We have taken advantage of the gene targeting capability of the moss Physcomitrella patens to investigate the functions of chloroplast Hsp70s. We identified four Hsp70 genes and two GrpE cochaperone homolog genes (CGE) in moss that encode chloroplast proteins. Disruption of one of the Hsp70 genes, that for Hsp70-2, caused lethality, and protein import into heat-shocked chloroplasts isolated from temperature-sensitive hsp70-2 mutants was appreciably impaired. Whereas the double cge null mutant was not viable, we recovered a cge1 null/cge2 knock down mutant in which Hsp70-2 was upregulated. Chloroplasts isolated from this mutant demonstrated a defect in protein import. In addition, two different precursors staged as early import intermediates could be immunoprecipitated with an Hsp70-2-specific antibody. This immunoprecipitate also contained Hsp93 and Tic40, indicating that it represents a precursor still in the Toc/Tic translocon. Together, these data indicate that a stromal Hsp70 system plays a crucial role in protein import into chloroplasts.

  7. The intertidal copepod Tigriopus japonicus small heat shock protein 20 gene (Hsp20) enhances thermotolerance of transformed Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Seo, Jung Soo; Lee, Young-Mi; Park, Heum Gi; Lee, Jae-Seong

    2006-02-17

    To understand the role of the Tigriopus japonicus Hsp20 gene, we isolated this gene from a whole body cDNA library and found two heat shock factor elements at the 5'-UTR. The transformed bacteria containing Tigriopus Hsp20 showed thermotolerance against heat shock (54 degrees C) with different ranges of time. The Tigriopus Hsp20 gene is comprised of 174 amino acid residues and shows similarity to Caenorhabditis elegans (27% identity), silkworm (24.1% identity), moth (24.1% identity), Mexican tetra (19.5% identity), zebrafish (19.5% identity), and spiny dogfish (17.2% identity) genes, but shows more similarity in the C-terminal region that contains an alpha-crystallin domain. Protein motifs such as an N-glycosylation site (67-70 NKSE) and a casein kinase II phosphorylation site were found in Tigriopus Hsp20. The genomic structure of the Tigriopus Hsp20 gene did not contain introns. To characterize the biochemical characteristics of the Tigriopus Hsp20 protein, we expressed Tigriopus Hsp20 in Escherichia coli and purified the soluble protein via 6x His-tag chromatography. To analyze the gene expression of Tigriopus Hsp20 against environmental stresses (e.g., water temperature and salinity), we performed a semi-quantitative reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). On exposure to different salinities, significant change in the expression of Tigriopus Hsp20 was not observed. However, upon heat shock (30 degrees C), Tigriopus Hsp20 expression was significantly increased, but in the case of cold shock (4 or 10 degrees C), expression was likely downregulated. These findings provide a better understanding of cellular protection mechanisms against environmental stress such as heat shock.

  8. Radio frequency induced hyperthermia mediated by dextran stabilized LSMO nanoparticles: in vitro evaluation of heat shock protein response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhayani, K. R.; Rajwade, J. M.; Paknikar, K. M.

    2013-01-01

    Dextran stabilized La0.7Sr0.3MnO3 (Dex-LSMO) is an alternative cancer hyperthermia agent holding considerable promise. Here, we have carried out a comparative study on radio frequency (˜264 kHz) induced Dex-LSMO mediated heating and extraneous heating (mimicking generalized hyperthermia) in terms of changes in the morphology, proliferation pattern and induction of heat shock proteins in a human melanoma cell line (A375). Our results clearly show that the cellular effects seen with extraneous heating (60 min at 43 °C) could be reproduced by just six minutes of radio frequency induced Dex-LSMO mediated heating. More importantly, the observed enhanced levels of HSP 70 and 90 (molecular markers of heat shock that trigger favorable immunological reactions) seen with Dex-LSMO mediated heating were comparable to extraneous heating. These results suggest the possible utility of Dex-LSMO as a cancer hyperthermia agent.

  9. Heat shock protein 22 (HSPB8) limits TGF-β-stimulated migration of osteoblasts.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Naohiro; Tokuda, Haruhiko; Kuroyanagi, Gen; Kainuma, Shingo; Matsushima-Nishiwaki, Rie; Fujita, Kazuhiko; Kozawa, Osamu; Otsuka, Takanobu

    2016-11-15

    Heat shock proteins (HSPs) are induced in response to various physiological and environmental conditions such as chemical and heat stress, and recognized to function as molecular chaperones. HSP22 (HSPB8), a low-molecular weight HSP, is ubiquitously expressed in many cell types. However, the precise role of HSP22 in bone metabolism remains to be clarified. In the present study, we investigated whether HSP22 is implicated in the transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β)-stimulated migration of osteoblast-like MC3T3-E1 cells. Although protein levels of HSP22 were clearly detected in unstimulated MC3T3-E1 cells, TGF-β failed to induce the protein levels. The TGF-β-stimulated migration was significantly up-regulated by knockdown of HSP22 expression. The cell migration stimulated by platelet-derived growth factor-BB was also enhanced by HSP22 knockdown. SB203580, an inhibitor of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase, PD98059, an inhibitor of MEK1/2, or SP600125, an inhibitor of stress-activated protein kinase/c-Jun N-terminal kinase had no effects on the TGF-β-induced migration. SIS3, a specific inhibitor of TGF-β-dependent Smad3 phosphorylation, significantly reduced the migration with or without TGF-β stimulation. Smad2, Smad3, Smad4 or Smad7 was not coimmunoprecipitated with HSP22. On the other hand, the TGF-β-induced Smad2 phosphorylation was enhanced by HSP22 down-regulation. The protein levels of TGF-β type II receptor (TGF-β RII) but not TGF-β type I receptor (TGF-β RI) was significantly up-regulated in HSP22 knockdown cells compared with those in the control cells. However, the levels of TGF-β RII mRNA in HSP22 knockdown cells were little different from those of the control cells. Neither TGF-β RI nor TGF-β RII was coimmunoprecipitated with HSP22. SIS3 reduced the amplification by HSP22 knockdown of the TGF-β-stimulated cell migration almost to the basal level. Our results strongly suggest that HSP22 functions as a negative regulator in the TGF

  10. Cucumber Necrosis Virus Recruits Cellular Heat Shock Protein 70 Homologs at Several Stages of Infection

    PubMed Central

    Alam, Syed Benazir

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT RNA viruses often depend on host factors for multiplication inside cells due to the constraints of their small genome size and limited coding capacity. One such factor that has been exploited by several plant and animal viruses is heat shock protein 70 (HSP70) family homologs which have been shown to play roles for different viruses in viral RNA replication, viral assembly, disassembly, and cell-to-cell movement. Using next generation sequence analysis, we reveal that several isoforms of Hsp70 and Hsc70 transcripts are induced to very high levels during cucumber necrosis virus (CNV) infection of Nicotiana benthamiana and that HSP70 proteins are also induced by at least 10-fold. We show that HSP70 family protein homologs are co-opted by CNV at several stages of infection. We have found that overexpression of Hsp70 or Hsc70 leads to enhanced CNV genomic RNA, coat protein (CP), and virion accumulation, whereas downregulation leads to a corresponding decrease. Hsc70-2 was found to increase solubility of CNV CP in vitro and to increase accumulation of CNV CP independently of viral RNA replication during coagroinfiltration in N. benthamiana. In addition, virus particle assembly into virus-like particles in CP agroinfiltrated plants was increased in the presence of Hsc70-2. HSP70 was found to increase the targeting of CNV CP to chloroplasts during infection, reinforcing the role of HSP70 in chloroplast targeting of host proteins. Hence, our findings have led to the discovery of a highly induced host factor that has been co-opted to play multiple roles during several stages of the CNV infection cycle. IMPORTANCE Because of the small size of its RNA genome, CNV is dependent on interaction with host cellular components to successfully complete its multiplication cycle. We have found that CNV induces HSP70 family homologs to a high level during infection, possibly as a result of the host response to the high levels of CNV proteins that accumulate during infection

  11. The 73 kilodalton heat shock cognate protein purified from rat brain contains nonesterified palmitic and stearic acids.

    PubMed

    Guidon, P T; Hightower, L E

    1986-08-01

    A protein related to the 71 kilodalton inducible rat heat shock protein was purified to electrophoretic homogeneity in milligram amounts from brain tissue of nonheat-stressed rats. The protein has been designated as a stress cognate protein based on previous studies and data presented herein that this protein cross-reacted with a monoclonal antibody originally raised against the Drosophila 70 kilodalton heat shock protein. The purified protein had an apparent molecular mass of 73 kilodaltons when analyzed by sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and an apparent mass of 150 kilodaltons as determined by nondissociative gel chromatography, suggesting that the purified protein is a homodimer. The purified protein had isoelectric points of 5.0 under nondissociative conditions and 5.6 when exposed to protein denaturants, suggesting loss of bound anionic molecules and/or net exposure of basic residues upon denaturation. Chloroform/methanol extraction of the purified protein and subsequent analyses by thin layer and gas-liquid chromatography resulted in the identification of palmitic and stearic acids noncovalently bound to the protein. Approximately four molecules of fatty acids were bound per dimer with palmitic and stearic acids present in a one-to-one ratio. The purified protein did not bind exogenously added radioactive palmitate, indicating that the fatty acid-binding sites of the cognate protein were fully occupied and that the associated fatty acids were too tightly bound to exchange readily. The possible significance of the fatty acids associated with the 73 kilodalton stress cognate protein is discussed.

  12. The 14-3-3 protein forms a molecular complex with heat shock protein Hsp60 and cellular prion protein.

    PubMed

    Satoh, Jun-ichi; Onoue, Hiroyuki; Arima, Kunimasa; Yamamura, Takashi

    2005-10-01

    The 14-3-3 protein family consists of acidic 30-kDa proteins composed of 7 isoforms expressed abundantly in neurons and glial cells of the central nervous system (CNS). The 14-3-3 protein identified in the cerebrospinal fluid provides a surrogate marker for premortem diagnosis of Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease, although an active involvement of 14-3-3 in the pathogenesis of prion diseases remains unknown. By protein overlay and mass spectrometric analysis of protein extract of NTera2-derived differentiated neurons, we identified heat shock protein Hsp60 as a 14-3-3-interacting protein. The 14-3-3zeta and gamma isoforms interacted with Hsp60, suggesting that the interaction is not isoform-specific. Furthermore, the interaction was identified in SK-N-SH neuroblastoma, U-373MG astrocytoma, and HeLa cervical carcinoma cells. The cellular prion protein (PrPC) along with Hsp60 was coimmunoprecipitated with 14-3-3 in the human brain protein extract. By protein overlay, 14-3-3 interacted with both recombinant human Hsp60 and PrPC produced by Escherichia coli, indicating that the molecular interaction is phosphorylation-independent. The 14-3-3-binding domain was located in the N-terminal half (NTF) of Hsp60 spanning amino acid residues 27-287 and the NTF of PrPC spanning amino acid residues 23-137. By immunostaining, the 14-3-3 protein Hsp60 and PrPC were colocalized chiefly in the mitochondria of human neuronal progenitor cells in culture, and were coexpressed most prominently in neurons and reactive astrocytes in the human brain. These observations indicate that the 14-3-3 protein forms a molecular complex with Hsp60 and PrPC in the human CNS under physiological conditions and suggest that this complex might become disintegrated in the pathologic process of prion diseases.

  13. Extracellular heat shock protein 90 binding to TGFβ receptor I participates in TGFβ-mediated collagen production in myocardial fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    García, Raquel; Merino, David; Gómez, Jenny M; Nistal, J Francisco; Hurlé, María A; Cortajarena, Aitziber L; Villar, Ana V

    2016-10-01

    The pathological remodeling heart shows an increase in left ventricular mass and an excess of extracellular matrix deposition that can over time cause heart failure. Transforming growth factor β (TGFβ) is the main cytokine controlling this process. The molecular chaperone heat shock protein 90 (Hsp90) has been shown to play a critical role in TGFβ signaling by stabilizing the TGFβ signaling cascade. We detected extracellular Hsp90 in complex with TGFβ receptor I (TGFβRI) in fibroblasts and determined a close proximity between both proteins suggesting a potential physical interaction between the two at the plasma membrane. This was supported by in silico studies predicting Hsp90 dimers and TGFβRI extracellular domain interaction. Both, Hsp90aa1 and Hsp90ab1 isoforms participate in TGFβRI complex. Extracellular Hsp90 inhibition lessened the yield of collagen production as well as the canonical TGFβ signaling cascade, and collagen protein synthesis was drastically reduced in Hsp90aa1 KO mice. These observations together with the significant increase in activity of Hsp90 at the plasma membrane pointed to a functional cooperative partnership between Hsp90 and TGFβRI in the fibrotic process. We propose that a surface population of Hsp90 extracellularly binds TGFβRI and this complex behaves as an active participant in collagen production in TGFβ-activated fibroblasts. We also offer an in vivo insight into the role of Hsp90 and its isoforms during cardiac remodeling in murine aortic banding model suffering from pathological cardiac remodeling and detect circulating Hsp90 overexpressed in remodeling mice.

  14. The heat shock factor HSF1 juggles protein quality control and metabolic regulation.

    PubMed

    Cantó, Carles

    2017-03-06

    Transcriptional regulators often act as central hubs to integrate multiple nutrient and stress signals. In this issue, Qiao et al. (2017. J. Cell Biol. https://doi.org/10.1083/jcb.201607091) demonstrate how heat shock factor 1 (HSF1) uncouples metabolic control from proteostatic regulation and unveils HSF1 as a critical transcriptional regulator of NAD(+) metabolism.

  15. Implication of reactive oxygen species, ERK1/2, and p38MAPK in sodium salicylate-induced heat shock protein 72 expression in C6 glioma cells.

    PubMed

    Seo, Myoung Suk; Oh, Su Young; Park, Min Jung; Kim, Sun Mi; Kim, Min Young; Han, Song Iy; Park, Hye Gyeong; Kang, Ho Sung

    2005-11-01

    Sodium salicylate, one of anti-inflammatory agents, is known to partially induce the heat shock response: it stimulates the DNA-binding of heat shock factor 1 (HSF1) without inducing heat shock gene expression. Here we show that when C6 glioma cells are recovered from sodium salicylate treatment, they highly induce heat shock protein 72 (HSP72), but not HSP73 and HSP90, demonstrating that salicylate-induced inert HSF1 can be fully activated into a transcriptionally competent form by sodium salicylate recovery (SR)-specific mechanism. Fluorescent analysis using 2',7'-dichlorodihydrofluorescein diacetate revealed that sodium salicylate enhanced reactive oxygen species (ROS) production. N-acetyl-L-cysteine (NAC, a ROS scavenger) completely suppressed SR-induced HSP72 synthesis and HSP72 promoter-driven CAT reporter gene transcription as well as salicylate-induced HSF1-DNA binding, indicating a critical role(s) of ROS in the SR-induced HSP72 gene regulation. We also show that treatment of C6 cells with sodium salicylate activated p38MAPK and inactivated ERK1/2 in a ROS-independent manner and activities of these protein kinases returned during recovery period to the control level. Inhibiting p38MAPK and ERK1/2 with the p38MAPK inhibitors (SB203580 and SB202190) and the MEK1/2 inhibitor (PD98059 and U0126) or with expression of dominant negative p38MAPK and ERK1/2 abolished SR-induced HSP72 synthesis and HSP70 promoter-driven CAT activity. However, sodium salicylate-induced HSF1-DNA binding was not affected by the p38MAPK inhibitor or the MEK1/2 inhibitor. These findings suggest that sodium salicylate partially activates HSF1 via ROS production and p38MAPK activation and the salicylate-induced inert HSF1 can be fully activated into a transcriptionally competent form by the ERK1/2 signaling pathways that are activated independently of ROS during SR.

  16. Induction of heat shock proteins DnaK, GroEL, and GroES by salt stress in Lactococcus lactis.

    PubMed Central

    Kilstrup, M; Jacobsen, S; Hammer, K; Vogensen, F K

    1997-01-01

    The bacterium Lactococcus lactis has become a model organism in studies of growth physiology and membrane transport, as a result of its simple fermentative metabolism. It is also used as a model for studying the importance of specific genes and functions during life in excess nutrients, by comparison of prototrophic wild-type strains and auxotrophic domesticated (dairy) strains. In a study of the capacity of domesticated strains to perform directed responses toward various stress conditions, we have analyzed the heat and salt stress response in the established L. lactis subsp. cremoris laboratory strain MG1363, which was originally derived from a dairy strain. After two-dimensional separation of proteins, the DnaK, GroEL, and GroES heat shock proteins, the HrcA (Orf1) heat shock repressor, and the glycolytic enzymes pyruvate kinase, glyceral-dehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase, and phosphoglycerate kinase were identified by a combination of Western blotting and direct N-terminal amino acid sequencing of proteins from the gels. Of 400 to 500 visible proteins, 17 were induced more than twofold during heat stress. Two classes of heat stress proteins were identified from their temporal induction pattern. The fast-induced proteins (including DnaK) showed an abruptly increased rate of synthesis during the first 10 min, declining to intermediate levels after 15 min. GroEL and GroES, which also belong to this group, maintained a high rate of synthesis after 15 min. The class of slowly induced proteins exhibited a gradual increase in the rate of synthesis after the onset of stress. Unlike other organisms, all salt stress-induced proteins in L. lactis were also subjected to heat stress induction. DnaK, GroEL, and GroES showed similar temporal patterns of induction during salt stress, resembling the timing during heat stress although at a lower induction level. These data indicate an overlap between the heat shock and salt stress responses in L. lactis. PMID:9143115

  17. Prevention of UVB Radiation-induced Epidermal Damage by Expression of Heat Shock Protein 70*

    PubMed Central

    Matsuda, Minoru; Hoshino, Tatsuya; Yamashita, Yasuhiro; Tanaka, Ken-ichiro; Maji, Daisuke; Sato, Keizo; Adachi, Hiroaki; Sobue, Gen; Ihn, Hironobu; Funasaka, Yoko; Mizushima, Tohru

    2010-01-01

    Irradiation with UV light, especially UVB, causes epidermal damage via the induction of apoptosis, inflammatory responses, and DNA damage. Various stressors, including UV light, induce heat shock proteins (HSPs) and the induction, particularly that of HSP70, provides cellular resistance to such stressors. The anti-inflammatory activity of HSP70, such as its inhibition of nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB), was recently revealed. These in vitro results suggest that HSP70 protects against UVB-induced epidermal damage. Here we tested this idea by using transgenic mice expressing HSP70 and cultured keratinocytes. Irradiation of wild-type mice with UVB caused epidermal damage such as induction of apoptosis, which was suppressed in transgenic mice expressing HSP70. UVB-induced apoptosis in cultured keratinocytes was suppressed by overexpression of HSP70. Irradiation of wild-type mice with UVB decreased the cutaneous level of IκB-α (an inhibitor of NF-κB) and increased the infiltration of leukocytes and levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines and chemokines in the epidermis. These inflammatory responses were suppressed in transgenic mice expressing HSP70. In vitro, the overexpression of HSP70 suppressed the expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines and chemokines and increased the level of IκB-α in keratinocytes irradiated with UVB. UVB induced an increase in cutaneous levels of cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers and 8-hydroxy-2′-deoxyguanosine, both of which were suppressed in transgenic mice expressing HSP70. This study provides genetic evidence that HSP70 protects the epidermis from UVB-induced radiation damage. The findings here also suggest that the protective action of HSP70 is mediated by anti-apoptotic, anti-inflammatory, and anti-DNA damage effects. PMID:20018843

  18. Plasma Membrane Expression of Heat Shock Protein 60 In Vivo in Response to Infection

    PubMed Central

    Belles, Cindy; Kuhl, Alicia; Nosheny, Rachel; Carding, Simon R.

    1999-01-01

    Heat shock protein 60 (hsp60) is constitutively expressed in the mitochondria of eukaryotic cells. However, it has been identified in other subcellular compartments in several disease states and in transformed cells, and it is an immunogenic molecule in various infectious and autoimmune diseases. To better understand the factors that influence expression of hsp60 in normal cells in vivo, we analyzed its cellular and subcellular distribution in mice infected with the intracellular bacterium Listeria monocytogenes. Western blotting of subcellular fractionated spleen cells showed that although endogenous hsp60 was restricted to the mitochondria in noninfected animals, it was associated with the plasma membrane as a result of infection. The low levels of plasma membrane-associated hsp60 seen in the livers in noninfected animals subsequently increased during infection. Plasma membrane hsp60 expression did not correlate with bacterial growth, being most evident during or after bacterial clearance and persisting at 3 weeks postinfection. Using flow cytometry, we determined that Mac-1+, T-cell receptor γδ+, and B220+ cells represented the major Hsp60+ populations in spleens of infected mice. By contrast, B220+ cells were the predominant hsp60+ population in livers of infected mice. Of the immune cells analyzed, the kinetic profile of the γδ T-cell response most closely matched that of hsp60 expression in both the spleen and liver. Collectively, these findings show that during infection hsp60 can be localized to the plasma membrane of viable cells, particularly antigen-presenting cells, providing a means by which hsp60-reactive lymphocytes seen in various infectious disease and autoimmune disorders may be generated and maintained. PMID:10417191

  19. Plasmodium falciparum signal peptide peptidase cleaves malaria heat shock protein 101 (HSP101). Implications for gametocytogenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Baldwin, Michael; Russo, Crystal; Li, Xuerong; Chishti, Athar H.

    2014-08-08

    Highlights: • PfSPP is an ER resident protease. • PfSPP is expressed both as a monomer and dimer. • The signal peptide of HSP101 is the first known substrate of PfSPP. • Reduced PfSPP activity may significantly affect ER homeostasis. - Abstract: Previously we described the identification of a Plasmodium falciparum signal peptide peptidase (PfSPP) functioning at the blood stage of malaria infection. Our studies also demonstrated that mammalian SPP inhibitors prevent malaria parasite growth at the late-ring/early trophozoite stage of intra-erythrocytic development. Consistent with its role in development, we tested the hypothesis that PfSPP functions at the endoplasmic reticulum of P.falciparum where it cleaves membrane-bound signal peptides generated following the enzyme activity of signal peptidase. The localization of PfSPP to the endoplasmic reticulum was confirmed by immunofluorescence microscopy and immunogold electron microscopy. Biochemical analysis indicated the existence of monomer and dimer forms of PfSPP in the parasite lysate. A comprehensive bioinformatics screen identified several candidate PfSPP substrates in the parasite genome. Using an established transfection based in vivo luminescence assay, malaria heat shock protein 101 (HSP101) was identified as a substrate of PfSPP, and partial inhibition of PfSPP correlated with the emergence of gametocytes. This finding unveils the first known substrate of PfSPP, and provides new perspectives for the function of intra-membrane proteolysis at the erythrocyte stage of malaria parasite life cycle.

  20. Heat Shock Protein-70 Expression in Vitiligo and its Relation to the Disease Activity

    PubMed Central

    Doss, Reham William; El-Rifaie, Abdel-Aziz A; Abdel-Wahab, Amr M; Gohary, Yasser M; Rashed, Laila A

    2016-01-01

    Background: Vitiligo is a progressive depigmenting disorder characterized by the loss of functional melanocytes from the epidermis. The etiopathogenesis of vitiligo is still unclear. Heat shock proteins (HSPs) are prime candidates to connect stress to the skin. HSPs were found to be implicated in autoimmune diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis and other skin disorders as psoriasis. Aim and Objectives: The aim of this study was to map the level of HSP-70 in vitiligo lesions to declare its role in the pathogenesis and activity of vitiligo. Materials and Methods: The study included thirty patients with vitiligo and 30 age- and sex-matched healthy controls. Vitiligo patients were divided as regards to the disease activity into highly active, moderately active, and inactive vitiligo groups. Skin biopsies were taken from the lesional and nonlesional skin of patients and from the normal skin of the controls. HSP-70 messenger RNA (mRNA) expression was estimated using quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction. Results: Our analysis revealed a significantly higher expression of HSP-70 mRNA in lesional skin biopsies from vitiligo patients compared to nonlesional skin biopsies from vitiligo patients (P < 0.001) and compared to skin biopsies from healthy controls (P < 0.001). The level of HSP-70 was not found to be correlated with age, sex, or disease duration. The expression of HSP-70 was correlated with the disease activity and patients with active vitiligo showed higher mean HSP-70 level compared to those with inactive disease. Conclusions: HSP-70 plays a role in the pathogenesis of vitiligo and may enhance the immune response in active disease. PMID:27512186

  1. A small heat shock protein (sHSP) from Sinonovacula constricta against heavy metals stresses.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Anguo; Lu, Yali; Li, Chenghua; Zhang, Peng; Su, Xiurong; Li, Ye; Wang, Chunlin; Li, Taiwu

    2013-06-01

    Small heat shock proteins (sHSPs) are ATP-independent molecular chaperones and involved into many physiological and stress processes. In the present study, the full-length cDNA of sHSP was cloned from razor clam Sinonovacula constricta (denoted as ScsHSP) through cDNA library and PCR approaches. Some feature motifs like the typical α-crystalline domain with six beta strands, three susceptible phosphorylation serines (S(15), S(78), and S(82)) were conserved in the deduce amino acid of ScsHSP. Tissue distribution analysis of the ScsHSP revealed that the mRNA transcripts of ScsHSP were constitutively expressed in all examined tissues with the highest expressions in the haemocytes. The temporal expression of ScsHSP in gill and haemocytes after PbCl2 and CdCl2 exposure were recorded by qPCR. The suppressed expression patterns were detected in CdCl2 stress at both tissues, and the minimum expression were detected at 36 h with 0.58-fold decrease in haemocytes and 0.30-fold in gill compared to each control group. During the PbCl2 exposure experiment, the expression level of ScsHSP increased significantly with larger amplitude in haemocytes. As time progressed, the mRNA transcripts of ScsHSP recovered almost to the original level at 36 h. All our results indicated that ScsHSP was involved into mediating environmental pollutants exposure and considered to be a promising candidate bio-mark for heavy metals monitoring.

  2. Heat shock proteins expression in canine intracutaneous cornifying epithelioma and squamous cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Romanucci, Mariarita; Bongiovanni, Laura; Marruchella, Giuseppe; Marà, Marino; di Guardo, Giovanni; Preziosi, Rosario; della Salda, Leonardo

    2005-04-01

    Heat shock proteins (HSPs) are strongly implicated in the control of cell growth, differentiation and biological behaviour of many human cutaneous neoplasms. To our knowledge, no data have been published in the veterinary literature concerning either normal or neoplastic skin. In this study, the immunohistochemical expression of Hsp27, Hsp72 and Hsp73 was evaluated in normal canine skin, 14 intracutaneous cornifying epitheliomas (ICE), 10 well-differentiated and 5 moderately differentiated squamous cell carcinomas (SCC). Expression was correlated with the histological degree of keratinocyte differentiation and proliferation, and investigated as to its usefulness in the differential diagnosis of these canine tumours. In normal epidermis, Hsp27 exhibited cytoplasmic labelling in the spinous and granular layers, whereas in neoplastic tissues it was detected particularly in those areas showing squamous differentiation. Hsp72 immunoreactivity was more intense in ICE and well-differentiated SCC than in normal skin; however, reduced immunolabelling was observed in moderately differentiated SCC. Unlike Hsp72, Hsp73 showed less intense labelling in ICE and well-differentiated SCC than in normal epithelium and an increased positivity in moderately differentiated SCC. These results indicate that HSP immunoreactivity differs between normal and neoplastic canine skin. Hsp27 expression seems to correlate directly with cellular differentiation; by contrast, the involvement of Hsp72/73 in proliferation and differentiation of tumour cells remains controversial. The pattern and intensity of immunolabelling of each investigated HSP did not show, however, significant differences between ICE and SCC; therefore, they do not seem to be useful in the differential diagnosis of these two canine tumours.

  3. Serial Changes of Heat Shock Protein 70 and Interleukin-8 in Burn Blister Fluid

    PubMed Central

    Yoo, Kicheol; Suh, Kang Yeol; Choi, Gi Hun; Seo, Dong Kook; Kym, Dohern; Yoon, Hyeon; Cho, Yong Se

    2017-01-01

    Background It has been reported that heat shock protein 70 (HSP70) and interleukin-8 (IL-8) play an important role in cells during the wound healing process. However, there has been no report on the effect of HSP70 and IL-8 on the blisters of burn patients. Objective This study aimed to evaluate the serial quantitative changes of HSP70 and IL-8 in burn blisters. Methods Twenty-five burn patients were included, for a total of 36 cases: twenty cases on the first day, six cases on the second, five cases on the third, three cases on the fourth, and two cases on the fifth. A correlation analysis was performed to determine the relationship between the concentration of HSP70 and IL-8 and the length of the treatment period. Results The HSP70 concentration was the highest on the first day, after which it decreased down to near zero. Most HSP70 was generated during the first 12 hours after the burn accident. There was no correlation between the concentration of HSP70 on the first day and the length of the treatment period. No measurable concentration of IL-8 was detected before 5 hours, but the concentration started to increase after 11 hours. The peak value was measured on the fourth day. Conclusion While HSP70 increased in the first few hours and decreased afterwards, IL-8 was produced after 11 hours and increased afterward in burn blister fluid. These findings provide new evidence on serial changes of inflammatory mediators in burn blister fluid.

  4. Expression of Antioxidant Molecules and Heat Shock Protein 27 in Thyroid Tumors.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shanshan; Yang, Shucui; Vlantis, Alexander C; Liu, Shirley Y W; Ng, Enders K W; Chan, Amy B W; Wu, Juekun; Du, Jing; Wei, Wei; Liu, Xiaoling; Liu, Zhimin; Ng, Siu Kwan; van Hasselt, C Andrew; Tong, Michael C F; Chen, George G

    2016-11-01

    Oxidative stress-induced DNA damage is a known causing factor for many types of tumors, but information on the role of oxidants and antioxidants in thyroid tumors is limited. The aim of this study was to determine antioxidant levels in thyroid tumors. In this study, tumor and its matched non-tumor thyroid tissue samples were obtained from 53 patients with thyroid tumors. The levels of manganese superoxide dismutase (MnSOD), thioredoxin reductase 2 (TXNRD2), glutathione (GSH), glutathione peroxidase (Gpx), catalase (CAT), and 27 kd heat-shock protein (hsp27) were determined in both thyroid tissue samples and cultured thyroid cells by immunohistochemical staining and western blot. Hydrogen peroxide (H2 O2 ) was used to generate oxidant stress in the cell culture experiments. We found that the levels of MnSOD, TXNRD2, GSH, Gpx, and Hsp27 were increased in both malignant and benign tumors, while the level of CAT was decreased. To verify the results of the tissue study, we treated cultured thyroid cells with H2 O2 and found the same pattern of antioxidant changes. Hsp27 was also increased after H2 O2 treatment. The expression of hsp27 was upregulated by 8.24-, 6.96-, and 3.09-fold in thyroid cancer, follicular adenoma, multinodular goiter, respectively. Collectively, our study demonstrated that the levels of hsp27 together with MnSOD, TXNRD2, GSH, and Gpx were significantly upregulated by H2 O2 in thyroid tumors. The increase of these antioxidants is observed in both malignant and benign tumors, particularly in the former. The upregulation of antioxidants is likely a protective mechanism of tumor cells to maintain their survival and growth. J. Cell. Biochem. 117: 2473-2481, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. HEAT SHOCK PROTEIN 27 RESPONSE TO WRESTLING TRAINING IN RELATION TO THE MUSCLE DAMAGE AND INFLAMMATION.

    PubMed

    Zembron-Lacny, Agnieszka; Ziemann, Ewa; Zurek, Piotr; Hübner-Wozniak, Elzbieta

    2015-10-06

    One of the unique features of an exercise is that it leads to a simultaneous increase of antagonistic mediators. On the one hand, exercise elevates catabolic pro-inflammatory cytokines. On the other hand, exercise stimulates anabolic components such as heat shock proteins (HSPs) which protect against stressors. Therefore, the study was designed to evaluate the blood level of HSP27, and its relationship with muscle damage and inflammatory mediators in elite Greco-Roman wrestlers during training periods differed in type and intensity exercise.Ten male wrestlers (21.2 ± 2.1 yr), were observed during the conditioning camps at pre-season (January), at the beginning of tournament season (April), and during tournament season (June). Twelve healthy and untrained men (19.2 ± 0.4 yr) was considered a reference group.The serum levels of inflammatory mediators and HSP27 in wrestlers were significantly different from non-athletes. In wrestlers, reactive oxygen and nitrogen species H2O2, NO and 3-Nitro, cytokines IL-1β and TNFα as well as HSP27 reached the highest levels at pre-season (January) or tournament season (June) when the special training predominated (>30% training load) over directed training (approx. 10% training load). CK activity also demonstrated the highest level during the same training periods (January 2315 ± 806 IU/L; June 3139 ± 975 IU/L). The regression analysis revealed the relationship of HSP27 level with muscle damage (rs=-0.613, P<0.001), and also with inflammatory mediators. The results of this study show that wrestling training modulates HSP27 level which is significantly related with skeletal muscle damage and inflammatory response, and suggest that measure of HSP27 level can be useful diagnostic tool in biochemical assessment of athletes to increase their performance.

  6. Molecular importance of prawn large heat shock proteins 60, 70 and 90.

    PubMed

    Chaurasia, Mukesh Kumar; Nizam, Faizal; Ravichandran, Gayathri; Arasu, Mariadhas Valan; Al-Dhabi, Naif Abdullah; Arshad, Aziz; Elumalai, Preetham; Arockiaraj, Jesu

    2016-01-01

    Considering the importance of heat shock proteins (HSPs) in the innate immune system of prawn, a comparative molecular approach was proposed to study the crustacean large HSPs 60, 70 and 90. Three different large HSPs were identified from freshwater prawn Macrobrachium rosenbergii (Mr) cDNA library during screening. The structural and functional characteristic features of HSPs were studied using various bioinformatics tools. Also, their gene expression and mRNA regulation upon various pathogenic infections was studied by relative quantification using 2(-ΔΔCT) method. MrHSP60 contains a long chaperonin 60 domain at 46-547 which carries a chaperonin 60 signature motif between 427 and 438, whereas MrHSP70 contains a long HSP70 domain at 21-624 and MrHSP90 carries a HSP90 domain at 188-719. The two dimensional analysis showed that MrHSP60 contains more amino acids (52%) in helices, whereas MrHSP70 (40.6%) and MrHSP90 (51.8%) carried more residues in coils. Gene expression results showed significant (P < 0.05) expression of MrHSP60, 70 and 90 in haemocyte, gill and hepatopancreas, respectively. Further, the expression level was up-regulated upon bacterial (Aeromonas hydrophilla and Vibrio harveyi) and viral [white spot syndrome virus (WSSV) and M. rosenbergii nodo virus (MrNV)] infections during various time periods. The gene expression results exhibited the potential involvement of these three HSPs in the immune system of prawn. The study indicated the potentiality of these molecules, thereby protecting cells against pathogens as well as severe cellular and environmental stresses in crustaceans.

  7. Assessment of heat shock proteins and endothelial dysfunction in acute pulmonary embolism.

    PubMed

    İn, Erdal; Deveci, Figen; Kaman, Dilara

    2016-06-01

    We determined the levels of some heat shock proteins (HSP27, HSP70, and HSP90), L-arginine, asymmetric dimethylarginine (ADMA), and symmetric dimethylarginine (SDMA) levels in patients with acute pulmonary embolism. The present case-control study comprised a healthy control group (n = 57) and patients with acute pulmonary embolism (n = 84). HSPs, L-arginine, ADMA, and SDMA levels were measured in all of the cases. The mean age of the control group was 56.72 ± 8.44 years, and the mean age of the patients with acute pulmonary embolism was 60.20 ± 16.56 years (P = 0.104). Compared with controls, patients with acute pulmonary embolism had significantly higher mean serum HSP27, HSP90, and ADMA levels, whereas the mean serum L-arginine and SDMA levels were lower (P < 0.001, for all parameters). In patients with acute pulmonary embolism serum HSP27, HSP70, and ADMA levels were negatively correlated with partial pressures of arterial oxygen levels (r = -0.281, P = 0.01; r = -0.263, P = 0.016; and r = -0.275, P = 0.011, respectively) and arterial oxygen saturation (r = -0.225, P = 0.039; r = -0.400, P < 0.001; r = -0.299, P = 0.006, respectively). The findings of the present study demonstrated that oxidative stress and endothelial damage increase in acute pulmonary embolism.

  8. Heat shock protein expression in relation to reproductive cycle in land snails: Implications for survival.

    PubMed

    Mizrahi, Tal; Heller, Joseph; Goldenberg, Shoshana; Arad, Zeev

    2011-10-01

    Land snails are subject to daily and seasonal variations in temperature and in water availability and use heat shock proteins (HSPs) as part of their survival strategy. We tested whether the reproductive cycle of land snails affects the endogenous levels of HSPs, and their involvement in the reproductive process. We examined HSP levels in the foot tissue of two Sphincterochila species, S. cariosa and S. zonata, before and after laying eggs, and analyzed the albumen gland (reproductive organ) of both species and eggs of S. cariosa for the presence and quantity of various HSPs. Our study shows reduction in the expression level of Hsp70 isoforms and Hsp90 in S. zonata foot and of Hsp74 in S. cariosa foot during the period preceding egg laying compared to the post-reproductive stage. Hsp70 isoforms and Hsp25 were highly expressed in both large albumen glands and in freshly laid eggs of S. cariosa, whereas large albumen glands of S. zonata expressed mainly Hsp70 isoforms. We conclude that a trade-off between survival and fertility is responsible for the expression level of HSPs in the foot tissue of Sphincterochila snails. Our study shows that HSPs are involved in the reproductive process. We propose that parental provision of HSPs may be part of a "be prepared" strategy of Sphincterochila snails, and that HSPs may play important roles in the survival strategy of land snails during the early life stages. Our observations also highlight the importance of the reproductive status in study of whole organisms, especially when assessing the HSP response to stress.

  9. Expression of heat shock protein 27 and alpha-crystallins in human retinoblastoma after chemoreduction

    PubMed Central

    Kase, S; Parikh, J G; Rao, N A

    2010-01-01

    Aim Small heat shock proteins (sHSP) play an important role in the resistance to anticancer drugs. We examined the expression of the sHSP family, HSP27 and α-crystallins, in human retinoblastoma with and without preoperative chemotherapy. Methods Eighteen enucleated eyes from patients with retinoblastoma were used. Six patients had undergone chemotherapy before enucleation. Formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissue sections were processed for H&E staining and examined by immunohistochemistry using anti-HSP27 and α-crystallins antibodies. Results Eleven of 12 cases with no history of preoperative chemotherapy showed weakly positive or negative staining for HSP27, whereas six and five cases were strongly positive for αA and αB-crystallin, respectively. In the six cases with a history of chemotherapy, several viable retinoblastoma cells remained. Immunoreactivity for HSP27 and αB-crystallin was strongly detected in the cytoplasm of viable retinoblastoma cells, while αA-crystallin immunoreactivity was less marked. Immunoreactivity for HSP27 was significantly higher in retinoblastoma cases with preoperative chemotherapy than in those without chemotherapy (p<0.0001). In contrast, immunoreactivity for αA-crystallin was significantly lower in cases with chemotherapy than in cases without chemotherapy (p<0.01). Conclusions HSP27 and αB-crystallin, but not αA-crystallin, were highly expressed in viable tumour cells after chemotherapy, suggesting that HSP27 and αB-crystallin may protect tumour cells from apoptotic signals produced by anticancer drugs in retinoblastoma. PMID:18812387

  10. Heat shock protein 60 in rostral ventrolateral medulla reduces cardiovascular fatality during endotoxaemia in the rat.

    PubMed

    Chang, Alice Y W; Chan, Julie Y H; Chou, Jimmy L J; Li, Faith C H; Dai, Kuang-Yu; Chan, Samuel H H

    2006-07-15

    The rostral ventrolateral medulla (RVLM) is the origin of a 'life-and-death' signal that reflects central cardiovascular regulatory failure during brain stem death. Using an experimental endotoxaemia model, we evaluated the hypothesis that the 60 kDa heat shock protein 60 (HSP60) reduces cardiovascular fatality during brain stem death via an anti-apoptotic action in the RVLM. In Sprague-Dawley rats maintained under propofol anaesthesia, proteomic or Western blot analysis revealed a progressive augmentation of HSP60 expression in the RVLM after intravenous administration of Escherichia coli lipopolysaccharide (30 mg kg(-1)). Pretreatment with a microinjection of actinomycin D or cycloheximide into bilateral RVLM significantly blunted this HSP60 increase, whereas real-time PCR showed progressive augmentation of hsp60 mRNA. Intriguingly, superimposed on the augmented expression was a progressive decline in mitochondrial, or elevation in cytosolic, HSP60 in ventrolateral medulla. Loss-of-function manipulations in the RVLM using anti-HSP60 antiserum or antisense hsp60 oligonucleotide exacerbated mortality by potentiating the cardiovascular depression during experimental endotoxaemia, alongside intensified nucleosomal DNA fragmentation, elevated cytoplasmic histone-associated DNA fragments or augmented cytochromec-caspase-3 cascade of apoptotic signalling in the RVLM. Immunoprecipitation coupled with immunoblot analysis further revealed a progressive increase in the complex formed between HSP60 and mitochondrial or cytosolic Bax or mitochondrial Bcl-2 during endotoxaemia, alongside a dissociation of the cytosolic HSP60-Bcl-2 complex. We conclude that HSP60 redistributed from mitochondrion to cytosol in the RVLM confers neuroprotection against fatal cardiovascular depression during endotoxaemia via reduced activation of the cytochrome c-caspase-3 cascade of apoptotic signalling through enhanced interactions with mitochondrial or cytosolic Bax or Bcl-2.

  11. Developmental immunolocalization of heat shock protein 70 (HSP70) in epithelial cell of rat kidney.

    PubMed

    Kang, S-S; Song, J-H; Lee, M-Y; Kang, Y-H; Lim, S S; Ryu, S-Y; Jung, J-Y

    2011-11-01

    During renal development the cells in the medulla are exposed to elevated and variable interstitial osmolality. Heat shock protein 70 (HSP70) is a major molecular chaperone and plays an important role in the protection of cells in the renal medulla from high osmolality. The purpose of this study was to establish the time of immunolocalization and distribution of HSP70 in developing and adult rat kidney. In addition, changes in HSP70 immunolocalization following the infusion of furosemide were investigated. In adult animals, the HSP70 was expressed in the medullary thin ascending limb of Henle's loop (ATL) and inner medullary collecting duct (IMCD). In developing kidney, HSP70 immunoreactivity was first detected in the IMCD of the papillary tip on postnatal day 1. From four to 14 days of age, HSP70 was detected in the ATL after transformation from thick ascending limb, beginning at the papillary tip and ascending to the border between the outer and inner medulla. The immunolocalization of HSP70 in both the ATL and IMCD gradually increased during two weeks. The gradual increase in HSP70 was associated with an increase in its mRNA abundance. However, furosemide infusion resulted in significantly reduced HSP70 immunolocalization in the IMCD and ATL. These data demonstrated that the expression of HSP70 was closely correlated with changes in interstitial osmolality during the development of the kidney. We suggest that HSP70 protects ATL and IMCD cells in the inner medulla from the stress of high osmolality and may be involved in the transformation of the ATL of the long loop of Henle during renal development.

  12. Heat shock proteins: in vivo heat treatments reveal adipose tissue depot-specific effects.

    PubMed

    Rogers, Robert S; Beaudoin, Marie-Soleil; Wheatley, Joshua L; Wright, David C; Geiger, Paige C

    2015-01-01

    Heat treatments (HT) and the induction of heat shock proteins (HSPs) improve whole body and skeletal muscle insulin sensitivity while decreasing white adipose tissue (WAT) mass. However, HSPs in WAT have been understudied. The purpose of the present study was to examine patterns of HSP expression in WAT depots, and to examine the effects of a single in vivo HT on WAT metabolism. Male Wistar rats received HT (41°C, 20 min) or sham treatment (37°C), and 24 h later subcutaneous, epididymal, and retroperitoneal WAT depots (SCAT, eWAT, and rpWAT, respectively) were removed for ex vivo experiments and Western blotting. SCAT, eWAT, and rpWAT from a subset of rats were also cultured separately and received a single in vitro HT or sham treatment. HSP72 and HSP25 expression was greatest in more metabolically active WAT depots (i.e., eWAT and rpWAT) compared with the SCAT. Following HT, HSP72 increased in all depots with the greatest induction occurring in the SCAT. In addition, HSP25 increased in the rpWAT and eWAT, while HSP60 increased in the rpWAT only in vivo. Free fatty acid (FFA) release from WAT explants was increased following HT in the rpWAT only, and fatty acid reesterification was decreased in the rpWAT but increased in the SCAT following HT. HT increased insulin responsiveness in eWAT, but not in SCAT or rpWAT. Differences in HSP expression and induction patterns following HT further support the growing body of literature differentiating distinct WAT depots in health and disease.

  13. Phylogenetic analysis of eukaryotes using heat-shock protein Hsp90.

    PubMed

    Stechmann, Alexandra; Cavalier-Smith, Thomas

    2003-10-01

    Most eukaryote molecular phylogenies have been based on small-subunit ribosomal RNA as its database includes the most species, but serious problems have been encountered that can make these trees misleading. More recent studies using concatenated protein sequences have increased the data per organism, reducing misleading signals from a single sequence, but taxon sampling is limited. To increase the database of protein-coding genes we sequenced the cytosolic form of heat-shock protein Hsp90 from a broad variety of previously unsampled eukaryote groups: protozoan flagellates (phyla Choanozoa, Apusozoa, Cercozoa) and all three groups of chromists (Cryptophyta, Heterokonta, Haptophyta). Gamma-corrected distance trees robustly show three groups: bacterial sequences are sister to all eukaryote sequences, which are cleanly subdivided into the cytosolic sequences and a clade comprising the chloroplast and endoplasmic reticulum (ER) Hsp90 sequences. The eukaryote cytosolic sequences comprise a robust opisthokont clade (animals/Choanozoa/fungi), a bikont clade, and an amoebozoan branch. However their topology is not robust. When the cytosolic sequences are rooted using only the ER/ chloroplast clade as outgroup the amoebozoan Dictyostelium is sister to the opisthokonts forming a unikont clade in the distance tree. Congruence of this tree with that for concatenated mitochondrial proteins suggests that the root of the eukaryote tree is between unikonts and bikonts. Gamma-corrected maximum likelihood analyses of cytosolic sequences alone (519 unambiguously aligned amino acid positions) show bikonts as a clade, as do least-squares distance trees, but with other distance methods and parsimony the sole amoebozoan species branches weakly within bikonts. Choanozoa are clearly sisters to animals. Some major bikont groups (e.g. green plants, alveolates, Euglenozoa) are consistently recovered, but others (e.g. discicristates, chromalveolates) appear only in some trees; the backbone of

  14. Diversity of cytosolic HSP70 Heat Shock Protein from decapods and their phylogenetic placement within Arthropoda.

    PubMed

    Baringou, Stephane; Rouault, Jacques-Deric; Koken, Marcel; Hardivillier, Yann; Hurtado, Luis; Leignel, Vincent

    2016-10-10

    The 70kDa heat shock proteins (HSP70) are considered the most conserved members of the HSP family. These proteins are primordial to the cell, because of their implications in many cellular pathways (e. g., development, immunity) and also because they minimize the effects of multiple stresses (e. g., temperature, pollutants, salinity, radiations). In the cytosol, two ubiquitous HSP70s with either a constitutive (HSC70) or an inducible (HSP70) expression pattern are found in all metazoan species, encoded by 5 or 6 genes (Drosophila melanogaster or yeast and human respectively). The cytosolic HSP70 protein family is considered a major actor in environmental adaptation, and widely used in ecology as an important biomarker of environmental stress. Nevertheless, the diversity of cytosolic HSP70 remains unclear amongst the Athropoda phylum, especially within decapods. Using 122 new and 311 available sequences, we carried out analyses of the overall cytosolic HSP70 diversity in arthropods (with a focus on decapods) and inferred molecular phylogenies. Overall structural and phylogenetic analyses showed a surprisingly high diversity in cytosolic HSP70 and revealed the existence of several unrecognised groups. All crustacean HSP70 sequences present signature motifs and molecular weights characteristic of non-organellar HSP70, with multiple specific substitutions in the protein sequence. The cytosolic HSP70 family in arthropods appears to be constituted of at least three distinct groups (annotated as A, B and C), which comprise several subdivisions, including both constitutive and inducible forms. Group A is constituted by several classes of Arthropods, while group B and C seem to be specific to Malacostraca and Hexapoda/Chelicerata, respectively. The HSP70 organization appeared much more complex than previously suggested, and far beyond a simple differentiation according to their expression pattern (HSC70 versus HSP70). This study proposes a new classification of cytosolic

  15. Potential role of heat shock proteins in neural differentiation of murine embryonal carcinoma stem cells (P19).

    PubMed

    Afzal, Elahe; Ebrahimi, Marzieh; Najafi, S Mahmoud Arab; Daryadel, Arezoo; Baharvand, Hossein

    2011-07-01

    HSPs (heat shock proteins) have been recognized to maintain cellular homoeostasis during changes in microenvironment. The present study aimed to investigate the HSPs expression pattern in hierarchical neural differentiation stages from mouse embryonal carcinoma stem cells (P19) and its role in heat stressed exposed cells. For induction of HSPs, cells were heated at 42°C for 30 min and recovered at 37°C in different time points. For neural differentiation, EBs (embryoid bodies) were formed by plating P19 cells in bacterial dishes in the presence of 1 mM RA (retinoic acid) and 5% FBS (fetal bovine serum). Then, on the sixth day, EBs were trypsinized and plated in differentiation medium containing neurobasal medium, B27, N2 and 5% FBS and for an extra 4 days. The expression of HSPs and neural cell markers were evaluated by Western blot, flow cytometry and immunocytochemistry in different stages. Our results indicate that HSC (heat shock constant)70 and HSP60 expressions decreased following RA treatment, EB formation and in mature neural cells derived from heat-stressed single cells and not heat-treated EBs. While the level of HSP90 increased six times following maturation process, HSP25 was expressed constantly during neural differentiation; however, its level was enhanced with heat stress. Accordingly, heat shock 12 h before the initiation of differentiation did not affect the expression of neuroectodermal and neural markers, nestin and β-tubulin III, respectively. However, both markers increased when heat shock was induced after treatment and when EBs were formed. In conclusion, our results raise the possibility that HSPs could regulate cell differentiation and proliferation under both physiological and pathological conditions.

  16. Heat shock proteins reduce toxicity of 1-methyl-4-phenylpyridinium ion in SK-N-SH cells.

    PubMed

    Fan, Guo-Hua; Qi, Chen; Chen, Sheng-Di

    2005-11-15

    The pathology of Parkinson's disease (PD) is characterized by the progressive loss of dopaminergic (DA) neurons in the substantia nigra. However, the pathogenesis of PD remains unclear. Heat shock proteins (HSPs) have many functions, including inhibition of apoptosis and necrosis, protection from oxidative stress, and maintenance of the mitochondrial membrane potential, that are related to neurodegenerative diseases. 1-Methyl-4-phenylpyridinium ion (MPP(+)) is a neurotoxin that selectively inhibits the mitochondrial functions of DA neurons in the substantia nigra. MPP(+) administration is accepted as a model for PD. In the present study, we found that MPP(+) induced a concentration- and time-dependent decrease in cell viability. Lower concentrations of MPP(+) induced mainly early apoptosis, and, as the concentration increased, the number of late apoptotic and necrotic cells significantly increased. However, treated by heat shock preconditioning or transfection with HDJ-1, a homologue of human Hsp40, cells showed marked improvement in viability after exposure to the same concentrations of MPP(+). Compared with heat shock, HDJ-1 appeared to improve cell viability obviously. Similarly, HDJ-1 elicited significantly stronger protective effects against apoptosis and necrosis. In addition, HDJ-1 transfection maintained more injured cells in early apoptotic stages and inhibited the occurrence of late apoptotic/necrotic events. Heat shock and HDJ-1 both ameliorated MPP(+)-induced cytotoxicity by maintaining the mitochondrial membrane potential and reducing reactive oxygen species (ROS). Therefore, the effects of HSPs, such as reducing apoptosis and necrosis, preserving mitochondrial functions and decreasing oxidative stress, may bring a novel approach for PD therapy.

  17. Regulation of heat shock protein message in Jurkat cells cultured under serum-starved and gravity-altered conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewis, M. L.; Hughes-Fulford, M.

    2000-01-01

    Although our understanding of effects of space flight on human physiology has advanced significantly over the past four decades, the potential contribution of stress at the cellular and gene regulation level is not characterized. The objective of this ground-based study was to evaluate stress gene regulation in cells exposed to altered gravity and environmentally suboptimal conditions. We designed primers to detect message for both the constitutive and inducible forms of the heat shock protein, HSP-70. Applying the reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), we probed for HSP-70 message in human acute T-cell leukemia cells, Jurkat, subjected to three types of environmental stressors: (1) altered gravity achieved by centrifugation (hypergravity) and randomization of the gravity vector in rotating bioreactors, (2) serum starvation by culture in medium containing 0.05% serum, and (3) temperature elevation (42 degrees C). Temperature elevation, as the positive control, significantly increased HSP-70 message, while centrifugation and culture in rotating bioreactors did not upregulate heat shock gene expression. We found a fourfold increase in heat shock message in serum-starved cells. Message for the housekeeping genes, actin and cyclophilin, were constant and comparable to unstressed controls for all treatments. We conclude that gravitational perturbations incurred by centrifugal forces, exceeding those characteristic of a Space Shuttle launch (3g), and culture in rotating bioreactors do not upregulate HSP-70 gene expression. In addition, we found RT-PCR useful for evaluating stress in cultured cells. Copyright 2000 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  18. Isolation and characterization of the main small heat shock proteins induced in tomato pericarp by thermal treatment.

    PubMed

    Polenta, Gustavo A; Calvete, Juan J; González, Claudia B

    2007-12-01

    In recent years, heat treatment has been used to prevent the development of chilling injury in fruits and vegetables. The acquired tolerance to chilling seen in treated fruit is related to the accumulation of heat shock proteins (HSPs). The positive effect of heat treatment has generally been verified for only a narrow range of treatment intensities and more reliable methods of determining optimal conditions are therefore needed. In this regard, quantitation of HSPs would seem to be an interesting tool for monitoring purposes. As a step toward the development of analytical methodology, the objective of this study was the isolation and characterization of relevant HSPs from plant tissues. Tomato fruits were exposed to a temperature of 38 degrees C for 0, 3, 20 and 27 h, and protein extracts from pericarp were analysed using SDS/PAGE. Analysis revealed the appearance of an intense 21 kDa protein band in treated samples. IEF of this band showed the presence of four major proteins (HSPC1, HSPC2, HSPC3 and HSPC4) with similar pI values. A monospecific polyclonal antiserum was raised in rabbits against purified HSPC1 protein, which cross-reacted with other small heat shock proteins. The major proteins were characterized by MS/MS analysis of tryptic peptides, all having blocked N-termini. The antiserum obtained proved suitable for detecting increased amounts of small heat shock proteins in tomatoes and grapefruits subjected to heat treatment for 24 and 48 h; these treatments were successful in preventing the development of chilling injury symptoms during cold storage. Our data are valuable for the future development of analytical methods to evaluate the optimal protection induced by heat treatment in different fruits.

  19. Patients with Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis with Antibodies to Heat Shock Protein 70 Have Poor Prognoses

    PubMed Central

    Kahloon, Rehan A.; Xue, Jianmin; Bhargava, Arpit; Csizmadia, Eva; Otterbein, Leo; Kass, Daniel J.; Bon, Jessica; Soejima, Makoto; Levesque, Marc C.; Lindell, Kathleen O.; Gibson, Kevin F.; Kaminski, Naftali; Banga, Gunjan; Oddis, Chester V.; Pilewski, Joseph M.; Sciurba, Frank C.; Donahoe, Michael; Zhang, Yingze

    2013-01-01

    Rationale: Diverse autoantibodies are present in most patients with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF). We hypothesized that specific autoantibodies may associate with IPF manifestations. Objectives: To identify clinically relevant, antigen-specific immune responses in patients with IPF. Methods: Autoantibodies were detected by immunoblots and ELISA. Intrapulmonary immune processes were evaluated by immunohistochemistry. Anti–heat shock protein 70 (HSP70) IgG was isolated from plasma by immunoaffinity. Flow cytometry was used for leukocyte functional studies. Measurements and Main Results: HSP70 was identified as a potential IPF autoantigen in discovery assays. Anti-HSP70 IgG autoantibodies were detected by immunoblots in 3% of 60 control subjects versus 25% of a cross-sectional IPF cohort (n = 122) (P = 0.0004), one-half the patients with IPF who died (P = 0.008), and 70% of those with acute exacerbations (P = 0.0005). Anti-HSP70 autoantibodies in patients with IPF were significantly associated with HLA allele biases, greater subsequent FVC reductions (P = 0.0004), and lesser 1-year survival (40 ± 10% vs. 80 ± 5%; hazard ratio = 4.2; 95% confidence interval, 2.0–8.6; P < 0.0001). HSP70 protein, antigen–antibody complexes, and complement were prevalent in IPF lungs. HSP70 protein was an autoantigen for IPF CD4 T cells, inducing lymphocyte proliferation (P = 0.004) and IL-4 production (P = 0.01). IPF anti-HSP70 autoantibodies activated monocytes (P = 0.009) and increased monocyte IL-8 production (P = 0.049). ELISA confirmed the association between anti-HSP70 autoreactivity and IPF outcome. Anti-HSP70 autoantibodies were also found in patients with other interstitial lung diseases but were not associated with their clinical progression. Conclusions: Patients with IPF with anti-HSP70 autoantibodies have more near-term lung function deterioration and mortality. These findings suggest antigen-specific immunoassays could provide useful clinical information in

  20. Targeting heat-shock protein 90 with ganetespib for molecularly targeted therapy of gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    Liu, H; Lu, J; Hua, Y; Zhang, P; Liang, Z; Ruan, L; Lian, C; Shi, H; Chen, K; Tu, Z

    2015-01-01

    Gastric cancer (GC) remains the fifth most common cancer worldwide. Heat-shock protein 90 (HSP90) has become an attractive therapeutic target in treating cancers, because of its abnormally high expression in cancers. Several successful cases of HSP90 inhibitors capable of inhibiting GC inspired us to try ganetespib, a clinically promising and actively investigated second-generation HSP90 inhibitor in GC treatment. In our study, we show that ganetespib markedly reduced the growth of MGC-803 and also significantly inhibited the growth of SGC-7901 and MKN-28 in a dose-dependent manner. It induced G2/M cell-cycle arrest and apoptosis in all three cell lines, together with the related markers affected significantly. Mechanistically, ganetespib caused pronounced decrease of expression of classic HSP90 client proteins. Specifically, it greatly affected epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) signaling cascades by markedly decreasing the levels of total EGFR and EGFR on cell membranes. EGFR knockdown also induced cell-cycle arrest and apoptosis accompanied with a decrease of several EGFR downstream proteins. These results strongly support that EGFR signaling greatly contributes to the ganetespib inhibitory effects. Besides, we found that the responses of GC cell lines to ganetespib correlated well with their EGFR expression levels: MGC-803, as well as AGS and BGC-803, with higher EGFR expression responded to ganetespib better, whereas SGC-7901 and MKN-28 with lower EGFR levels were much less sensitive to ganetespib. Although SGC-7901 and MKN-28 were not very sensitive to ganetespib, ganetespib worked synergistically with radiation and cisplatin in killing them. Importantly, ganetespib significantly inhibited the growth of xenograft tumors in vivo as a single agent or in combination with cisplatin. Results of hematoxylin/eosin staining, TUNEL (terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick-end labeling) assays, and immunohistochemistry staining of phosphorylated cyclin

  1. Heat Shock Protein Alteration in the Gastrointestinal Tract Tissues of Chickens Exposed to Arsenic Trioxide.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Panpan; Zhang, Kexin; Guo, Guangyang; Sun, Xiao; Chai, Hongliang; Zhang, Wen; Xing, Mingwei

    2016-03-01

    Arsenic (As) is widely distributed in our living environment and is useful for industry, agriculture, medical treatment, and other fields. Arsenic trioxide (As2O3) is an existing form of As. Exposure to As2O3 has a toxic effect on humans and animals. It not only leads to skin cancer, peripheral vascular disease, hyperkeratosis, etc. but also interferes with the functioning of the gastrointestinal tract. The gastrointestinal tract is an important organ for animals to transform the food they eat into the nutrients their body needs for maintenance and growth. Heat shock proteins (Hsps) exist in the non-stress normal cells and their expression increases under stimuli. Therefore, we wonder whether the "stimulus" of As2O3 could change the messenger RNA (mRNA) abundance and expression level of Hsps in the gastrointestinal tract of birds. To investigate the relation between arseniasis and Hsp alterations in the chicken's gastrointestinal tract induced by an As2O3-supplemented diet, we selected 72 one-day-old male Hy-line chickens and randomly divided them into four groups. They were fed either a commercial diet or an As2O3-supplemented diet containing 7.5, 15, and 30 mg/kg As2O3. The experiment lasted for 90 days, and gastrointestinal tract tissue samples (gizzard, glandular stomach, duodenum, jejunum, ileum, cecum, and rectum) were collected at 30, 60, and 90 days. The mRNA contents of Hsps (including Hsp27, Hsp40, Hsp60, Hsp70, and Hsp90) were examined by real-time PCR (RT-PCR). The correlation between As2O3 and Hsp genes was assessed. In addition, the protein expression levels of Hsp60 and Hsp70 in the gastrointestinal tract tissue samples were measured by western blot. The results indicated that the mRNA expression levels and the Hsp expression levels in the gastrointestinal tract tissues of chickens with As2O3 supplementation increased at different time points in a dose-dependent manner (p < 0.05 or p < 0.01). These data suggested that arseniasis influenced the

  2. Effects of heat shock protein 90 expression on pectoralis major oxidation in broilers exposed to acute heat stress.

    PubMed

    Hao, Y; Gu, X H

    2014-11-01

    This study was conducted to determine the effects of heat shock protein 90 (HSP90) expression on pH, lipid peroxidation, heat shock protein 70 (HSP70), and glucocorticoid receptor (GR) expression of pectoralis major in broilers exposed to acute heat stress. In total, 90 male broilers were randomly allocated to 3 groups: control (CON), heat stress (HS), or geldanamycin treatment (GA). On d 41, the broilers in the GA group were injected intraperitoneally with GA (5 μg/kg of BW), and the broilers in the CON and HS groups were injected intraperitoneally with saline. Twenty-four hours later, the broilers in the CON group were moved to environmental chambers controlled at 22°C for 2 h, and the broilers in the HS and GA groups were moved to environmental chambers controlled at 40°C for 2 h. The pH values of the pectoralis major after 30 min and 24 h of chilling after slaughter of HS and GA broilers were significantly lower (P < 0.01) than those of the CON broilers. Heat stress caused significant increases in sera corticosterone and lactic dehydrogenase, the activity of malondialdehyde and superoxide dismutase, the expression of HSP90 and HSP70, and nuclear expression of GR protein in the pectoralis major (P < 0.05). Heat stress induced a significant decrease in GR protein expression in the cytoplasm and GR mRNA expression. Furthermore, the low expression of HSP90 significantly increased levels of lactic dehydrogenase and malondialdehyde and GR protein expression in the cytoplasm under heat stress (P < 0.01), and significantly decreased nuclear GR protein expression (P < 0.01). Heat shock protein 90 was positively correlated with corticosterone and superoxide dismutase activities (P < 0.01), and HSP90 mRNA was negatively correlated with pH after chilling for 24 h. The results demonstrated that HSP90 plays a pivotal role in protecting cells from oxidation.

  3. Expression of the 60 kDa and 71 kDa heat shock proteins and presence of antibodies against the 71 kDa heat shock protein in pediatric patients with immune thrombocytopenic purpura

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Chengfeng; Chen, Sheng; Yuan, Mingchun; Ding, Fuyue; Yang, Dongliang; Wang, Ruibo; Li, Jianxin; Tanguay, Robert M; Wu, Tangchun

    2004-01-01

    Background Immune thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP) is an autoimmune disease characterized by platelet destruction resulting from autoantibodies against platelet proteins, particularly platelet glycoprotein IIb/IIIa. Heat shock proteins (Hsp) have been shown to be major antigenic determinants in some autoimmune diseases. Antibodies to Hsps have also been reported to be associated with a number of pathological states. Methods Using western blot, we measured the levels of the 60 kDa heat shock protein (Hsp60) and of the inducible 71 kDa member of the Hsp70 family (Hsp71) in lymphocytes and the presence of antibodies against these hsps in plasma of 29 pediatric patients with ITP before the treatment and in 6 other patients before and after treatment. Results Interestingly only one out of 29 patients showed detectable Hsp60 in lymphocytes while this heat shock protein was detected in the 30 control children. Hsp71 levels were slightly lower in lymphocytes of patients with ITP than in controls (1567.8 ± 753.2 via 1763.2 ± 641.8 integrated optical density (IOD) units). There was a small increase of Hsp71 after recovery from ITP. The titers of plasma antibodies against Hsp60 and Hsp71 were also examined. Antibodies against Hsp71 were more common in ITP patients (15/29) than in control children (5/30). The titer of anti-Hsp71 was also higher in children patients with ITP. The prevalence of ITP children with antibodies against Hsp71 (51.7%) was as high as those with antibodies against platelet membrane glycoproteins (58.3%). Conclusions In summary, pediatric patients with ITP showed no detectable expression of Hsp60 in lymphocytes and a high prevalence of antibody against Hsp71 in plasma. These changes add to our understanding of the pathogenesis of ITP and may be important for the diagnosis, prognosis and treatment of ITP. PMID:15070425

  4. Differential heat shock tolerance and expression of heat-inducible proteins in two stored-product psocids.

    PubMed

    Guedes, R N C; Zhu, K Y; Opit, G P; Throne, J E

    2008-12-01

    The recent recognition of psocids as a major concern in stored products and also the reemergence of heat treatment as a control tactic of stored-product insects led to the present investigation. The objectives of this study were to determine whether there are differences in heat shock tolerance of two species of stored-product psocids--Lepinotus reticulatus Enderlein (Trogiidae) and Liposcelis entomophila (Enderlein) (Liposcelididae)--and to determine whether heat shock proteins (HSPs) underlay such tolerance. Time-response bioassays were therefore carried out at increasing temperatures for both psocids. The lethal time (LT)50 and LT95 estimates were correlated with the expression of heat shock proteins after exposure at the same range of temperatures for 30 min. The expression of HSP was determined through Western blot analyses using HSP 70 antibody. Liposcelis entomophila was more than two-fold more tolerant than L. reticulatus for nearly all of the range of temperatures (> or = 40.0 degrees C). Expression of HSP 70 was not observed for either of the psocid species, but the expression of two low-molecular-mass heat-inducible proteins (HIPs; 23 and 27 kDa) was observed in L. entomophila. The expression of these small proteins was induced by exposure to higher temperatures, and the trend was particularly strong for HIP 27. In contrast, no expression of small heat-inducible proteins was detected in L. reticulatus, reflecting its higher susceptibility to heat treatments. The relatively high heat tolerance of L. entomophila might help explain its more common occurrence in grain stored in warmer regions of the world.

  5. A novel G1-specific enhancer identified in the human heat shock protein 70 gene.

    PubMed Central

    Taira, T; Narita, T; Iguchi-Ariga, S M; Ariga, H

    1997-01-01

    Expression of the human heat shock protein 70 gene (hsp70) is induced by various kinds of stress and by oncogenes. In the absence of stress, hsp70 is mainly expressed in the G1and S phases of the cell cycle, but the elements contributing to cell cycle-dependent expression from the hsp70 promoter remain elusive. We have previously reported that two elements, named HSP-MYCA and HSP-MYCB, located approximately 200 bp upstream (-200) from the transcription start site (+1) of human hsp70, are important for initiation of DNA replication at the hsp70 locus. In this report we examine the effect of these two elements on transcriptional activity from the hsp70 promoter, especially in terms of cell cycle-dependent expression. Various segments of the hsp70 promoter region (up to -300) were linked to the luciferase gene and the constructs were transfected into mouse L cells to examine their transcriptional activity. A strong enhancer activity was defined in the HSP-MYCB element, but not in HSP-MYCA. Mutations introduced within HSP-MYCB abolished the transcriptional activation. In synchronized cells, pHB-Luc (a luciferase construct containing approximately 2.4 kb of the hsp70 promoter region) as well as endogenous hsp70 showed two peaks of expression; one in G1 and the other in the S phase. Site-directed mutagenesis of HSP-MYCB in pHB-Luc abolished the expression peak in G1, but not that in the S phase. To test promoter specificity, wild-type and mutant HSP-MYCB elements were then linked to the luciferase gene in combination with the hsp70 , the cyclin A or the PCNA promoter. Both in transient experiments and established cell lines, a strong peak of expression in mid-G1phase was observed with all the constructs containing wild-type HSP-MYCB, but not with the constructs containing the mutant sequence. These results suggest that the HSP-MYCB sequence is a G1-specific enhancer and is responsible for cell cycle-dependent expression of hsp70. PMID:9115365

  6. Dinoflagellate Phylogeny as Inferred from Heat Shock Protein 90 and Ribosomal Gene Sequences

    PubMed Central

    Hoppenrath, Mona; Leander, Brian S.

    2010-01-01

    Background Interrelationships among dinoflagellates in molecular phylogenies are largely unresolved, especially in the deepest branches. Ribosomal DNA (rDNA) sequences provide phylogenetic signals only at the tips of the dinoflagellate tree. Two reasons for the poor resolution of deep dinoflagellate relationships using rDNA sequences are (1) most sites are relatively conserved and (2) there are different evolutionary rates among sites in different lineages. Therefore, alternative molecular markers are required to address the deeper phylogenetic relationships among dinoflagellates. Preliminary evidence indicates that the heat shock protein 90 gene (Hsp90) will provide an informative marker, mainly because this gene is relatively long and appears to have relatively uniform rates of evolution in different lineages. Methodology/Principal Findings We more than doubled the previous dataset of Hsp90 sequences from dinoflagellates by generating additional sequences from 17 different species, representing seven different orders. In order to concatenate the Hsp90 data with rDNA sequences, we supplemented the Hsp90 sequences with three new SSU rDNA sequences and five new LSU rDNA sequences. The new Hsp90 sequences were generated, in part, from four additional heterotrophic dinoflagellates and the type species for six different genera. Molecular phylogenetic analyses resulted in a paraphyletic assemblage near the base of the dinoflagellate tree consisting of only athecate species. However, Noctiluca was never part of this assemblage and branched in a position that was nested within other lineages of dinokaryotes. The phylogenetic trees inferred from Hsp90 sequences were consistent with trees inferred from rDNA sequences in that the backbone of the dinoflagellate clade was largely unresolved. Conclusions/Significance The sequence conservation in both Hsp90 and rDNA sequences and the poor resolution of the deepest nodes suggests that dinoflagellates reflect an explosive

  7. C-Terminus of Heat Shock Cognate 70 Interacting Protein Increases Following Stroke and Impairs Survival Against Acute Oxidative Stress

    PubMed Central

    Stankowski, Jeannette N.; Zeiger, Stephanie L.H.; Cohen, Evan L.; DeFranco, Donald B.; Cai, Jiyang

    2011-01-01

    Abstract The decision to remove or refold oxidized, denatured, or misfolded proteins by heat shock protein 70 and its binding partners is critical to determine cell fate under pathophysiological conditions. Overexpression of the ubiquitin ligase C-terminus of HSC70 interacting protein (CHIP) can compensate for failure of other ubiquitin ligases and enhance protein turnover and survival under chronic neurological stress. The ability of CHIP to alter cell fate after acute neurological injury has not been assessed. Using postmortem human tissue samples, we provide the first evidence that cortical CHIP expression is increased after ischemic stroke. Oxygen glucose deprivation in vitro led to rapid protein oxidation, antioxidant depletion, proteasome dysfunction, and a significant increase in CHIP expression. To determine if CHIP upregulation enhances neural survival, we overexpressed CHIP in vitro and evaluated cell fate 24 h after acute oxidative stress. Surprisingly, CHIP overexpressing cells fared worse against oxidative injury, accumulated more ubiquitinated and oxidized proteins, and experienced decreased proteasome activity. Conversely, using small interfering RNA to decrease CHIP expression in primary neuronal cultures improved survival after oxidative stress, suggesting that increases in CHIP observed after stroke like injuries are likely correlated with diminished survival and may negatively impact the neuroprotective potential of heat shock protein 70. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 14, 1787–1801. PMID:20677910

  8. Design of heat shock-resistant surfaces to prevent protein aggregation: Enhanced chaperone activity of immobilized α-Crystallin.

    PubMed

    Ray, Namrata; Roy, Sarita; Singha, Santiswarup; Chandra, Bappaditya; Dasgupta, Anjan Kr; Sarkar, Amitabha

    2014-05-21

    α-Crystallin is a multimeric protein belonging to the family of small heat shock proteins, which function as molecular chaperones by resisting heat and oxidative stress induced aggregation of other proteins. We immobilized α-Crystallin on a self-assembled monolayer on glass surface and studied its activity in terms of the prevention of aggregation of aldolase. We discovered that playing with grafted protein density led to interesting variations in the chaperone activity of immobilized α-Crystallin. This result is in accordance with the hypothesis that dynamicity of subunits plays a vital role in the functioning of α-Crystallin and might be able to throw light on the structure-activity relationship. We showed that the chaperone activity of a certain number of immobilized α-Crystallins was superior compared to a solution containing an equivalent number of the protein and 10 times the number of the protein at temperatures >60 °C. The α-Crystallin grafted surfaces retained activity on reuse. This could also lead to the design of potent heat-shock resistant surfaces that can find wide applications in storage and shipping of protein based biopharmaceuticals.

  9. The 70 kDa Heat Shock Protein Assists during the Repair of Chilling Injury in the Insect, Pyrrhocoris apterus

    PubMed Central

    Koštál, Vladimír; Tollarová-Borovanská, Michaela

    2009-01-01

    Background The Pyrrhocoris apterus (Insecta: Heteroptera) adults attain high levels of cold tolerance during their overwintering diapause. Non-diapause reproducing adults, however, lack the capacity to express a whole array of cold-tolerance adaptations and show relatively low survival when exposed to sub-zero temperatures. We assessed the competence of non-diapause males of P. apterus for responding to heat- and cold-stresses by up-regulation of 70 kDa heat shock proteins (Hsps) and the role of Hsps during repair of heat- and cold-induced injury. Principal Findings The fragments of P. apterus homologues of Hsp70 inducible (PaHsp70) and cognate forms (PaHsc70) were cloned and sequenced. The abundance of mRNA transcripts for the inducible form (qPCR) and corresponding protein (Western blotting) were significantly up-regulated in response to high and low temperature stimuli. In the cognate form, mRNA was slightly up-regulated in response to both stressors but very low or no up-regulation of protein was apparent after heat- or cold-stress, respectively. Injection of 695 bp-long Pahsp70 dsRNA (RNAi) caused drastic suppression of the heat- and cold-stress-induced Pahsp70 mRNA response and the up-regulation of corresponding protein was practically eliminated. Our RNAi predictably prevented recovery from heat shock and, in addition, negatively influenced repair of chilling injuries caused by cold stress. Cold tolerance increased when the insects were first exposed to a mild heat shock, in order to trigger the up-regulation of PaHsp70, and subsequently exposed to cold stress. Conclusion Our results suggest that accumulation of PaHsp70 belongs to a complex cold tolerance adaptation in the insect Pyrrhocoris apterus. PMID:19229329

  10. Time-resolved FT-IR microspectroscopy of protein aggregation induced by heat-shock in live cells.

    PubMed

    Mitri, Elisa; Kenig, Saša; Coceano, Giovanna; Bedolla, Diana E; Tormen, Massimo; Grenci, Gianluca; Vaccari, Lisa

    2015-04-07

    Maintaining the correct folding of cellular proteins is essential for preserving cellular homeostasis. Protein dishomeostasis, aberrant protein folding, and protein aggregation are indeed involved in several diseases including cancer, aging-associated, and neurodegenerative disorders. Accumulation of protein aggregates can also be induced from a variety of stressful conditions, such as temperature increase or oxidative stress. In this work, we monitored by Fourier transform-infrared (FT-IR) microspectroscopy the response of live breast cancer MCF-7 and mammary breast adenocarcinoma MDA-MB 231 cell lines to severe heat-shock (HS), caused by the rise of the cellular medium temperature from 37 ± 0.5 °C to 42 ± 0.5 °C. Through the study of the time-evolution of the second derivatives of the spectra and by the 2D correlation analysis of FT-IR absorbance data, we were able to identify a common sudden heat-shock response (HSR) among the two cell lines. The hyperfluidization of mammalian cell membranes, the transient increment of the signal lipids, as well as the alteration of proteome profile were all monitored within the first 40 min of stress application, while the persistent intracellular accumulation of extended β-folded protein aggregates was detected after 40 min up to 2 h. As a whole, this paper offers a further prove of the diagnostic capabilities of FT-IR microspectroscopy for monitoring in real-time the biochemical rearrangements undergone by live cells upon external stimulation.

  11. Overexpression of a heat shock protein (ThHSP18.3) from Tamarix hispida confers stress tolerance to yeast.

    PubMed

    Gao, Caiqiu; Jiang, Bo; Wang, Yucheng; Liu, Guifeng; Yang, Chuanping

    2012-04-01

    It is well known that plant heat shock proteins (HSPs) play important roles both in response to adverse environmental conditions and in various developmental processes. However, among plant HSPs, the functions of tree plant HSPs are poorly characterized. To improve our understanding of tree HSPs, we cloned and characterized an HSP gene (ThHSP18.3) from Tamarix hispida. Sequence alignment reveals that ThHSP18.3 belongs to the class I small heat shock protein family. A transient expression assay showed that ThHSP18.3 protein was targeted to the cell nucleus. Treatment of Tamarix hispida with cold and heat shock highly induced ThHSP18.3 expression in all studied leaves, roots and stems, whereas, treatment of T. hispida with NaCl, NaHCO(3), and PEG induced ThHSP18.3 expression in leaves and decreased its expression in roots and stems. Further, to study the role of ThHSP18.3 in stress tolerance under different stress conditions, we cloned ThHSP18.3 into the pYES2 vector, transformed and expressed the vector in yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Yeast cells transformed with an empty pYES2 vector were employed as a control. Compared to the control, yeast cells expressing ThHSP18.3 showed greater tolerance to salt, drought, heavy metals, and both low and high temperatures, indicating that ThHSP18.3 confers tolerance to these stress conditions. These results suggested that ThHSP18.3 is involved in tolerance to a variety of stress conditions in T. hispida.

  12. Dynamic behavior of small heat shock protein inhibition on amyloid fibrillization of a small peptide (SSTSAA) from RNase A

    SciTech Connect

    Xi, Dong; Dong, Xiao; Deng, Wei; Lai, Luhua

    2011-12-09

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Mechanism of small heat shock protein inhibition on fibril formation was studied. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Peptide SSTSAA with modified ends was used for amyloid fibril formation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer FRET signal was followed during the fibril formation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Mj HSP16.5 inhibits fibril formation when introduced in the lag phase. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Mj HSP16.5 slows down fibril formation when introduced after the lag phase. -- Abstract: Small heat shock proteins, a class of molecular chaperones, are reported to inhibit amyloid fibril formation in vitro, while the mechanism of inhibition remains unknown. In the present study, we investigated the mechanism by which Mj HSP16.5 inhibits amyloid fibril formation of a small peptide (SSTSAA) from RNase A. A model peptide (dansyl-SSTSAA-W) was designed by introducing a pair of fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) probes into the peptide, allowing for the monitoring of fibril formation by this experimental model. Mj HSP16.5 completely inhibited fibril formation of the model peptide at a molar ratio of 1:120. The dynamic process of fibril formation, revealed by FRET, circular dichroism, and electron microscopy, showed a lag phase of about 2 h followed by a fast growth period. The effect of Mj HSP16.5 on amyloid fibril formation was investigated by adding it into the incubation solution during different growth phases. Adding Mj HSP16.5 to the incubating peptide before or during the lag phase completely inhibited fibril formation. However, introducing Mj HSP16.5 after the lag phase only slowed down the fibril formation process by adhering to the already formed fibrils. These findings provide insight into the inhibitory roles of small heat shock proteins on amyloid fibril formation at the molecular level.

  13. Heteromeric complexes of heat shock protein 70 (HSP70) family members, including Hsp70B′, in differentiated human neuronal cells

    PubMed Central

    Chow, Ari M.; Mok, Philip; Xiao, Dawn; Khalouei, Sam

    2010-01-01

    Human neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer’s disease, Parkinson’s disease, and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis have been termed “protein misfolding disorders.” Upregulation of heat shock proteins that target misfolded aggregation-prone proteins has been proposed as a potential therapeutic strategy to counter neurodegenerative disorders. The heat shock protein 70 (HSP70) family is well characterized for its cytoprotective effects against cell death and has been implicated in neuroprotection by overexpression studies. HSP70 family members exhibit sequence and structural conservation. The significance of the multiplicity of HSP70 proteins is unknown. In this study, coimmunoprecipitation was employed to determine if association of HSP70 family members occurs, including Hsp70B′ which is present in the human genome but not in mouse and rat. Heteromeric complexes of Hsp70B′, Hsp70, and Hsc70 were detected in differentiated human SH-SY5Y neuronal cells. Hsp70B′ also formed complexes with Hsp40 suggesting a common co-chaperone for HSP70 family members. PMID:20084477

  14. BIIB021, an orally available, fully synthetic small-molecule inhibitor of the heat shock protein Hsp90.

    PubMed

    Lundgren, Karen; Zhang, Hong; Brekken, John; Huser, Nanni; Powell, Rachel E; Timple, Noel; Busch, David J; Neely, Laura; Sensintaffar, John L; Yang, Yong-ching; McKenzie, Andres; Friedman, Jessica; Scannevin, Robert; Kamal, Adeela; Hong, Kevin; Kasibhatla, Srinivas R; Boehm, Marcus F; Burrows, Francis J

    2009-04-01

    Inhibition of heat shock protein 90 (Hsp90) results in the degradation of oncoproteins that drive malignant progression, inducing cell death, making Hsp90 a target of substantial interest for cancer therapy. BIIB021 is a novel, fully synthetic inhibitor of Hsp90 that binds competitively with geldanamycin in the ATP-binding pocket of Hsp90. In tumor cells, BIIB021 induced the degradation of Hsp90 client proteins including HER-2, AKT, and Raf-1 and up-regulated expression of the heat shock proteins Hsp70 and Hsp27. BIIB021 treatment resulted in growth inhibition and cell death in cell lines from a variety of tumor types at nanomolar concentrations. Oral administration of BIIB021 led to the degradation of Hsp90 client proteins measured in tumor tissue and resulted in the inhibition of tumor growth in several human tumor xenograft models. Studies to investigate the antitumor effects of BIIB021 showed activity on both daily and intermittent dosing schedules, providing dose schedule flexibility for clinical studies. Assays measuring the HER-2 protein in tumor tissue and the HER-2 extracellular domain in plasma were used to show interdiction of the Hsp90 pathway and utility as potential biomarkers in clinical trials for BIIB021. Together, these data show that BIIB021 is a promising new oral inhibitor of Hsp90 with antitumor activity in preclinical models.

  15. A Broad Set of Different Llama Antibodies Specific for a 16 kDa Heat Shock Protein of Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Trilling, Anke K.; de Ronde, Hans; Noteboom, Linda; van Houwelingen, Adèle; Roelse, Margriet; Srivastava, Saurabh K.; Haasnoot, Willem; Jongsma, Maarten A.; Kolk, Arend; Zuilhof, Han; Beekwilder, Jules

    2011-01-01

    Background Recombinant antibodies are powerful tools in engineering of novel diagnostics. Due to the small size and stable nature of llama antibody domains selected antibodies can serve as a detection reagent in multiplexed and sensitive assays for M. tuberculosis. Methodology/Principal Findings Antibodies for Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M. tb) recognition were raised in Alpaca, and, by phage display, recombinant variable domains of heavy-chain antibodies (VHH) binding to M. tuberculosis antigens were isolated. Two phage display selection strategies were followed: one direct selection using semi-purified protein antigen, and a depletion strategy with lysates, aiming to avoid cross-reaction to other mycobacteria. Both panning methods selected a set of binders with widely differing complementarity determining regions. Selected recombinant VHHs were produced in E. coli and shown to bind immobilized lysate in direct Enzymelinked Immunosorbent Assay (ELISA) tests and soluble antigen by surface plasmon resonance (SPR) analysis. All tested VHHs were specific for tuberculosis-causing mycobacteria (M. tuberculosis, M. bovis) and exclusively recognized an immunodominant 16 kDa heat shock protein (hsp). The highest affinity VHH had a dissociation constant (KD) of 4×10−10 M. Conclusions/Significance A broad set of different llama antibodies specific for 16 kDa heat shock protein of M. tuberculosis is available. This protein is highly stable and abundant in M. tuberculosis. The VHH that detect this protein are applied in a robust SPR sensor for identification of tuberculosis-causing mycobacteria. PMID:22046343

  16. Expression of heat-shock protein 70 (Hsp70) in the respiratory tract and lungs of fire victims.

    PubMed

    Marschall, S; Rothschild, M A; Bohnert, M

    2006-11-01

    Immunohistochemical investigation of the respiratory tract and lungs of 63 fire victims revealed a statistically significant enhanced expression of heat-shock protein 70 (Hsp70) in the epiglottis, the trachea, and the main and the peripheral bronchi compared with a control group. In the fire victims, a strong expression of Hsp70 was discernible not only particularly in the vessels but also in seromucous secretory cells, ciliated epithelial cells, smooth muscle cells, and alveolar cells. The results suggest a vital or supravital reaction due to the inhalation of hot fire fumes.

  17. HEAT SHOCK FACTOR 1-MEDIATED THERMOTOLERANCE PREVENTS CELL DEATH AND RESULTS IN G2/M CELL CYCLE ARREST

    EPA Science Inventory

    Mammalian cells respond to stress by activating heat shock transcription factors (e.g., HSF1) that regulate increased synthesis of heat shock proteins (HSPs). HSPs mediate protection from deleterious effects of stress by preventing permanent disruption of normal cellular mitosis...

  18. Expression and interaction of small heat shock proteins (sHsps) in rice in response to heat stress.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xinhai; Lin, Shoukai; Liu, Qiulin; Huang, Jian; Zhang, Wenfeng; Lin, Jun; Wang, Yongfei; Ke, Yuqin; He, Huaqin

    2014-04-01

    The inherent immobility of rice (Oryza sativa L.) limited their abilities to avoid heat stress and required them to contend with heat stress through innate defense abilities in which heat shock proteins played important roles. In this study, Hsp26.7, Hsp23.2, Hsp17.9A, Hsp17.4 and Hsp16.9A were up-regulated in Nipponbare during seedling and anthesis stages in response to heat stress. Subsequently, the expressing levels of these five sHsps in the heat-tolerant rice cultivar, Co39, were all significantly higher than that in the heat-susceptible rice cultivar, Azucena. This indicated that the expressive level of these five sHsps was positively related to the ability of rice plants to avoid heat stress. Thus, the expression level of these five sHsps can be regarded as bio-markers for screening rice cultivars with different abilities to avoid heat stress. Hsp18.1, Hsp17.9A, Hsp17.7 and Hsp16.9A, in the three rice cultivars under heat stress were found to be involved in one protein complex by Native-PAGE, and the interactions of Hsp18.1 and Hsp 17.7, Hsp18.1 and Hsp 17.9A, and Hsp17.7 and Hsp16.9A were further validated by yeast 2-hybridization. Pull down assay also confirmed the interaction between Hsp17.7 and Hsp16.9A in rice under heat stress. In conclusion, the up-regulation of the 5 sHsps is a key step for rice to tolerate heat stress, after that some sHsps assembled into a large hetero-oligomeric complex. In addition, through protein-protein interaction, Hsp101 regulated thiamine biosynthesis, and Hsp82 homology affected nitrogen metabolism, while Hsp81-1 were involved in the maintenance of sugar or starch synthesis in rice plants under heat stress. These results provide new insight into the regulatory mechanism of sHsps in rice.

  19. Phosphorylation of Heat Shock Protein 27 is Increased by Cast Immobilization and by Serum-free Starvation in Skeletal Muscles

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Mee-Young; Lee, Jeong-Uk; Kim, Ju-Hyun; Lee, Lim-Kyu; Park, Byoung-Sun; Yang, Seung-Min; Jeon, Hye-Joo; Lee, Won-Deok; Noh, Ji-Woong; Kwak, Taek-Yong; Jang, Sung-Ho; Lee, Tae-Hyun; Kim, Ju-Young; Kim, Bokyung; Kim, Junghwan

    2014-01-01

    [Purpose] Cast immobilization- and cell starvation-induced loss of muscle mass are closely associated with a dramatic reduction in the structural muscle proteins. Heat shock proteins are molecular chaperones that are constitutively expressed in several eukaryotic cells and have been shown to protect against various stressors. However, the changes in the phosphorylation of atrophy-related heat shock protein 27 (HSP27) are still poorly understood in skeletal muscles. In this study, we examine whether or not phosphorylation of HSP27 is changed in the skeletal muscles after cast immobilization and serum-free starvation with low glucose in a time-dependent manner. [Methods] We undertook a HSP27 expression and high-resolution differential proteomic analysis in skeletal muscles. Furthermore, we used western blotting to examine protein expression and phosphorylation of HSP27 in atrophied gastrocnemius muscle strips and L6 myoblasts. [Results] Cast immobilization and starvation significantly upregulated the phosphorylation of HSP27 in a time-dependent manner, respectively. [Conclusion] Our results suggest that cast immobilization- and serum-free starvation-induced atrophy may be in part related to changes in the phosphorylation of HSP27 in rat skeletal muscles. PMID:25540511

  20. In situ detection of a heat-shock regulatory element binding protein using a soluble synthetic enhancer sequence.

    PubMed Central

    Harel-Bellan, A; Brini, A T; Ferris, D K; Robin, P; Farrar, W L

    1989-01-01

    In various studies, enhancer binding proteins have been successfully absorbed out by competing sequences inserted into plasmids, resulting in the inhibition of the plasmid expression. Theoretically, such a result could be achieved using synthetic enhancer sequences not inserted into plasmids. In this study, a double stranded DNA sequence corresponding to the human heat shock regulatory element was chemically synthesized. By in vitro retardation assays, the synthetic sequence was shown to bind specifically a protein in extracts from the human T cell line Jurkat. When the synthetic enhancer was electroporated into Jurkat cells, not only the enhancer was shown to remain undegraded into the cells for up to 2 days, but also it was shown to bind intracellularly a protein. The binding was specific and was modulated upon heat shock. Furthermore, the binding protein was shown to be of the expected molecular weight by UV crosslinking. However, when the synthetic enhancer element was co-electroporated with an HSP 70-CAT reporter construct, the expression of the reporter plasmid was consistently enhanced in the presence of the exogenous synthetic enhancer. Images PMID:2740211

  1. Heat shock proteins 27 and 70 contribute to the protection of Schisandrin B against d-galactosamine-induced liver injury in mice.

    PubMed

    Gao, Zhiying; Zhang, Jishun; Li, Libo; Shen, Longqing; Li, Qingyi; Zou, Yu; Du, Xiaohui; Zhao, Zhibo

    2016-04-01

    Schisandrin B is a hepatoprotective component isolated from a traditional Chinese herb, Schisandra chinensis (Turcz.) Baill. This study determined the effect of Schisandrin B on d-galactosamine -induced liver injury and the role of heat shock proteins 27 and 70 against liver injury in mice. Acute liver injury was induced by intraperitoneal injection of d-galactosamine to mice, and Schisandrin B was given orally. The protein and gene expression of heat shock proteins 27 and 70 were detected by western blot and real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction, respectively. Liver tissues were subjected to histological evaluation, and the activities of alanine aminotransferase and aspartate aminotransferase in the serum were measured. Pretreatment of Schisandrin B significantly attenuated d-galactosamine-induced liver injury in mice. This result was evidenced by improved alteration of histopathological hepatic necrosis and reduced alanine aminotransferase and aspartate aminotransferase activities in the serum. The hepatoprotective effect was accompanied with overexpression of heat shock proteins 27 and 70 both at the protein and mRNA levels. However, the aforementioned actions of Schisandrin B were all markedly suppressed by the heat shock protein inhibitor quercetin. Heat shock proteins 27 and 70 were involved in the protective effect of Schisandrin B against d-galactosamine-induced liver injury in mice.

  2. Virus Induction of Heat Shock Protein 70 Reflects a General Response to Protein Accumulation in the Plant Cytosol1

    PubMed Central

    Aparicio, Frederic; Thomas, Carole L.; Lederer, Carsten; Niu, Yan; Wang, Daowen; Maule, Andrew J.

    2005-01-01

    Different cytoplasmically replicating RNA viruses were shown to induce a specific subset of heat-inducible heat shock protein 70 (HSP70) genes in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). To identify the inducing principle, a promoter∷reporter system was developed for the facile analysis of differentially responding Arabidopsis HSP70 genes, by infiltration into Nicotiana benthamiana leaves. Through transient expression of individual viral cistrons or through deletion analysis of a viral replicon, we were unable to identify a unique inducer of HSP70. However, there was a positive correlation between the translatability of the test construct and the differential induction of HSP70. Since these data implied a lack of specificity in the induction process, we also expressed a random series of cytosolically targeted Arabidopsis genes and showed that these also differentially induced HSP70. Through a comparison of different promoter∷reporter constructs and through measurements of the steady-state levels of the individual proteins, it appeared that the HSP70 response reflected the ability of the cytosol to sense individual properties of particular proteins when expressed at high levels. This phenomenon is reminiscent of the unfolded protein response observed when the induced accumulation of proteins in the endoplasmic reticulum also induces a specific suite of chaperones. PMID:15805473

  3. Prediction of intrinsically disordered regions in proteins using signal processing methods: application to heat-shock proteins.

    PubMed

    Vojisavljevic, Vuk; Pirogova, Elena

    2016-12-01

    Heat-shock protein (HSP)-based immunotherapy is believed to be a promising area of development for cancer treatment as such therapy is characterized by a unique approach to every tumour. It was shown that by inhibition of HSPs it is possible to induce apoptotic cell death in cancer cells. Interestingly, there are a great number of disordered regions in proteins associated with cancer, cardiovascular and neurodegenerative diseases, signalling, and diabetes. HSPs and some specific enzymes were shown to have these disordered regions in their primary structures. The experimental studies of HSPs confirmed that their intrinsically disordered (ID) regions are of functional importance. These ID regions play crucial roles in regulating the specificity of interactions between dimer complexes and their interacting partners. Because HSPs are overexpressed in cancer, predicting the locations of ID regions and binding sites in these proteins will be important for developing novel cancer therapeutics. In our previous studies, signal processing methods have been successfully used for protein structure-function analysis (i.e. for determining functionally important amino acids and the locations of protein active sites). In this paper, we present and discuss a novel approach for predicting the locations of ID regions in the selected cancer-related HSPs.

  4. Expression and purification of recombinant proteins based on human prostate stem cell antigen and heat shock protein-70

    PubMed Central

    DONG, LEI; ZHANG, XIAOPENG; YU, CHANGMING; REN, JUN; HOU, LIHUA; FU, LING; YI, SHAOQIONG; CHEN, WEI

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to express and purify recombinant proteins based on human prostate stem cell antigen (PSCA) and heat shock protein-70 (HSP70). The PSCA gene and various structural domains of HSP70 were amplified by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) with the respective primers. Then, the PSCA was cloned into the prokaryotic expression vector pET21a(+) with the amino-terminus, carboxyl-terminus and overall length of HSP70, by enzyme digestion to construct the recombinant plasmids pET21-PSCA-HSPN, pET21-PSCA-HSPC and pET21-PSCA-HSP, respectively. After being expressed in Escherichia coli (E. coli) by isopropyl β-D-1-thiogalactopyranoside (IPTG) induction, recombinant fusion proteins were purified. Western blotting was performed to confirm the expression of the recombinant proteins. The results revealed that recombinant plasmids were successfully constructed. The PSCA-HSPC and PSCA-HSP expressed in E. coli existed in soluble form, as confirmed by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE). The purity of the recombinant proteins PSCA-HSPC and PSCA-HSP reached >95% following purification with the nickel-nitrilotriacetic acid (Ni-NTA) resin, Phenyl-Sepharose Fast Flow and Superdex 75, which lays a foundation for the development of vaccines for prostate cancer. PMID:23596484

  5. 90-Kilodalton Heat Shock Protein, Hsp90, as a Target for Genotyping Cryptosporidium spp. Known To Infect Humans ▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Yaoyu; Dearen, Theresa; Cama, Vitaliano; Xiao, Lihua

    2009-01-01

    Small-subunit (SSU) rRNA-based methods have been commonly used in the differentiation of Cryptosporidium species or genotypes. In order to develop a new tool for confirming the genotypes of Cryptosporidium species, parts of the 90-kDa heat shock protein (Hsp90) genes of seven Cryptosporidium species and genotypes known to infect humans (C. hominis, C. parvum, C. meleagridis, C. canis, C. muris, C. suis, and the cervine genotype), together with one from cattle (C. andersoni), were sequenced and analyzed. With the exception of C. felis from cats and C. baileyi from birds, the Hsp90 genes of all tested Cryptosporidium species were amplified. Phylogenetic analysis of the hsp90 sequences from all these species is congruent with previous studies in which the SSU rRNA, 70-kDa heat shock protein, oocyst wall protein, and actin genes were analyzed and showed that gastric and intestinal parasites segregate into two distinct clades. In this study, the secondary products of hsp90 produced after PCR-restriction fragment length digestion with StyI and HphI or with BbsI showed that parasites within the intestinal or gastric clade could be differentiated from each other. These data confirm the utility of the Hsp90 gene as a sensitive, specific, and robust molecular tool for differentiating species and/or genotypes of Cryptosporidium in clinical specimens. PMID:19168758

  6. The induction levels of heat shock protein 70 differentiate the vulnerabilities to mutant huntingtin among neuronal subtypes.

    PubMed

    Tagawa, Kazuhiko; Marubuchi, Shigeki; Qi, Mei-Ling; Enokido, Yasushi; Tamura, Takuya; Inagaki, Reina; Murata, Miho; Kanazawa, Ichiro; Wanker, Erich E; Okazawa, Hitoshi

    2007-01-24

    The reason why vulnerabilities to mutant polyglutamine (polyQ) proteins are different among neuronal subtypes is mostly unknown. In this study, we compared the gene expression profiles of three types of primary neurons expressing huntingtin (htt) or ataxin-1. We found that heat shock protein 70 (hsp70), a well known chaperone molecule protecting neurons in the polyQ pathology, was dramatically upregulated only by mutant htt and selectively in the granule cells of the cerebellum. Granule cells, which are insensitive to degeneration in the human Huntington's disease (HD) pathology, lost their resistance by suppressing hsp70 with siRNA, whereas cortical neurons, affected in human HD, gained resistance by overexpressing hsp70. This indicates that induction levels of hsp70 are a critical factor for determining vulnerabilities to mutant htt among neuronal subtypes. CAT (chloramphenicol acetyltransferase) assays showed that CBF (CCAAT box binding factor, CCAAT/enhancer binding protein zeta) activated, but p53 repressed transcription of the hsp70 gene in granule cells. Basal and mutant htt-induced expression levels of p53 were remarkably lower in granule cells than in cortical neurons, suggesting that different magnitudes of p53 are linked to distinct induction levels of hsp70. Surprisingly, however, heat shock factor 1 was not activated in granule cells by mutant htt. Collectively, different levels of hsp70 among neuronal subtypes might be involved in selective neuronal death in the HD pathology.

  7. Effects of GH, prolactin and cortisol on hepatic heat shock protein 70 expression in a marine teleost Sparus sarba.

    PubMed

    Deane, E E; Kelly, S P; Lo, C K; Woo, N Y

    1999-06-01

    Heat shock protein 70 (HSP70) expression was assessed in hepatic tissue of a marine teleost Sparus sarba after exogenous hormone administration. Using a PCR-amplified, homologous HSP70 cDNA clone, as a probe in Northern analysis, we detected a 2.3 kb transcript which was elevated after exposure to a temperature 7 degrees C above the ambient. For our studies on hormonal effects on HSP70 expression, groups of fish were administered recombinant bream GH (rbGH), ovine prolactin (oPRL) or cortisol daily over a 7-day period. Quantification of hepatic HSP70 transcript revealed that the administration of GH and PRL significantly reduced HSP70 mRNA abundance by 42% and 54% from saline-injected fish respectively. Also hepatic HSP70 levels were reduced by 76% and 64% as determined by immunoblotting after rbGH and oPRL treatment respectively. The administration of exogenous cortisol did not alter hepatic HSP70 mRNA or protein levels in S. sarba. The results obtained in this study are the first evidence for hormonal modulation of heat shock protein expression in fish. The significance of these results is discussed within the context of current knowledge on the roles of these hormones in teleostean stress response.

  8. Stress Responses of Small Heat Shock Protein Genes in Lepidoptera Point to Limited Conservation of Function across Phylogeny

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Bo; Zheng, Jincheng; Peng, Yu; Liu, Xiaoxia; Hoffmann, Ary A.; Ma, Chun-Sen

    2015-01-01

    The small heat shock protein (sHsp) family is thought to play an important role in protein refolding and signal transduction, and thereby protect organisms from stress. However little is known about sHsp function and conservation across phylogenies. In the current study, we provide a comprehensive assessment of small Hsp genes and their stress responses in the oriental fruit moth (OFM), Grapholita molesta. Fourteen small heat shock proteins of OFM clustered with related Hsps in other Lepidoptera despite a high level of variability among them, and in contrast to the highly conserved Hsp11.1. The only known lepidopteran sHsp ortholog (Hsp21.3) was consistently unaffected under thermal stress in Lepidoptera where it has been characterized. However the phylogenetic position of the sHsps within the Lepidoptera was not associated with conservation of induction patterns under thermal extremes or diapause. These findings suggest that the sHsps have evolved rapidly to develop new functions within the Lepidoptera. PMID:26196395

  9. Temporal patterns of cardiac performance and genes encoding heat shock proteins and metabolic sensors of an intertidal limpet Cellana toreuma during sublethal heat stress.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shu; Han, Guo-dong; Dong, Yun-wei

    2014-04-01

    Intertidal invertebrates develop effective physiological adaptations to cope with the rapidly changing thermal environment in the intertidal zone. In the present study, the temporal patterns of heart rate, protein carbonyl groups, and genes encoding heat shock proteins (hsp70 and hsp90) and metabolic sensors (ampkα, ampkβ and sirt1) were measured to study the effect of sublethal heat stress on the cardiac function, oxidative stress, heat shock response and cellular metabolism of an intertidal limpet Cellana toreuma. All the physiological parameters are sensitive to temperature and duration of heat stress. Spearman correlation analysis revealed that the correlations between heart rate and levels of heat shock proteins mRNA and metabolic sensors mRNA were statistically significant. These results further suggest that cardiac function plays crucial roles in cellular energy metabolism and heat shock responses. The significant increase of protein carbonyl groups at 34°C after 4h exposure indicated that the failure of cardiac function and the increase of anaerobic metabolism partly leads to the increase of protein carbonyl groups. Generally, the physiological responses to heat stress are sensitive to temperature and are energy-consumptive, as indicated by the upregulation of metabolic sensors mRNA. However, the upregulation of heat shock proteins and metabolic sensors at the post-transcriptional level and related functions need to be confirmed in further experiments.

  10. Small heat shock proteins sequester misfolding proteins in near-native conformation for cellular protection and efficient refolding

    PubMed Central

    Ungelenk, Sophia; Moayed, Fatemeh; Ho, Chi-Ting; Grousl, Tomas; Scharf, Annette; Mashaghi, Alireza; Tans, Sander; Mayer, Matthias P.; Mogk, Axel; Bukau, Bernd

    2016-01-01

    Small heat shock proteins (sHsp) constitute an evolutionary conserved yet diverse family of chaperones acting as first line of defence against proteotoxic stress. sHsps coaggregate with misfolded proteins but the molecular basis and functional implications of these interactions, as well as potential sHsp specific differences, are poorly explored. In a comparative analysis of the two yeast sHsps, Hsp26 and Hsp42, we show in vitro that model substrates retain near-native state and are kept physically separated when complexed with either sHsp, while being completely unfolded when aggregated without sHsps. Hsp42 acts as aggregase to promote protein aggregation and specifically ensures cellular fitness during heat stress. Hsp26 in contrast lacks aggregase function but is superior in facilitating Hsp70/Hsp100-dependent post-stress refolding. Our findings indicate the sHsps of a cell functionally diversify in stress defence, but share the working principle to promote sequestration of misfolding proteins for storage in native-like conformation. PMID:27901028

  11. Caenorhabditis elegans HSF-1 is an essential nuclear protein that forms stress granule-like structures following heat shock.

    PubMed

    Morton, Elizabeth A; Lamitina, Todd

    2013-02-01

    The heat shock transcription factor (HSF) is a conserved regulator of heat shock-inducible gene expression. Organismal roles for HSF in physiological processes such as development, aging, and immunity have been defined largely through studies of the single Caenorhabditis elegans HSF homolog, hsf-1. However, the molecular and cell biological properties of hsf-1 in C. elegans are incompletely understood. We generated animals expressing physiological levels of an HSF-1::GFP fusion protein and examined its function, localization, and regulation in vivo. HSF-1::GFP was functional, as measured by its ability to rescue phenotypes associated with two hsf-1 mutant alleles. Rescue of hsf-1 development phenotypes was abolished in a DNA-binding-deficient mutant, demonstrating that the transcriptional targets of hsf-1 are critical to its function even in the absence of stress. Under nonstress conditions, HSF-1::GFP was found primarily in the nucleus. Following heat shock, HSF-1::GFP rapidly and reversibly redistributed into dynamic, subnuclear structures that share many properties with human nuclear stress granules, including colocalization with markers of active transcription. Rapid formation of HSF-1 stress granules required HSF-1 DNA-binding activity, and the threshold for stress granule formation was altered by growth temperature. HSF-1 stress granule formation was not induced by inhibition of IGF signaling, a pathway previously suggested to function upstream of hsf-1. Our findings suggest that development, stress, and aging pathways may regulate HSF-1 function in distinct ways, and that HSF-1 nuclear stress granule formation is an evolutionarily conserved aspect of HSF-1 regulation in vivo.

  12. cAMP and cAMP-dependent protein kinase regulate the human heat shock protein 70 gene promoter activity.

    PubMed

    Choi, H S; Li, B; Lin, Z; Huang, E; Liu, A Y

    1991-06-25

    The theme of this study is an evaluation of the involvement of cAMP and cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA) in the regulation of the human heat shock protein (hsp) 70 gene promoter. Expression of a highly specific protein inhibitor of PKA (pRSVPKI) inhibited the basal as well as heat- and cadmium-induced expression of the cotransfected pHBCAT, a human hsp 70 promoter-driven reporter gene; this inhibition was dependent on the amount of pRSVPKI used. The effect of an expression vector of the RI regulatory subunit of PKA, pMTREV, was similar to that of pRSVPKI; pMTREV inhibited both the basal as well as the heat-induced expression of pHBCAT. The specificity of effects of these expression vectors was demonstrated by the lack of effect of a mutant PKI gene and by the unaffected expression of a reference gene (pRSV beta gal) under these conditions. Analysis of the effects of dibutyryl cAMP (1 mM), forskolin (10 microM), and 8-Br-cAMP (1 mM) on the transient expression of pHBCAT showed that these cAMP-elevating agents stimulated the hsp 70 promoter activity, whereas cAMP (1 mM) was without effect. Chloramphenicol acetyltransferase gene constructs with truncated or mutated hsp 70 promoter were used to define the cis-acting DNA element(s) that confer this cAMP stimulation; the heat induced (42 degrees C) expression was used as a control. Mutation of the adenovirus transcription factor element (pLSN-40/-26) greatly reduced the basal level of expression; forskolin had little or no effect on this adenovirus transcription factor-minus promoter, although the promoter activity was very heat inducible. The absence of a functional heat shock consensus element (HSE) in the construct pLSPNWT rendered the promoter heat insensitive; this construct was forskolin responsive although the magnitude of this stimulation was reduced when compared with that of a control construct with HSE. These results were corroborated by studies using consensus sequence of ATF (ATFE) and HSE as competitors

  13. Laser‐Triggered Small Interfering RNA Releasing Gold Nanoshells against Heat Shock Protein for Sensitized Photothermal Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhaohui; Li, Siwen; Zhang, Min; Ma, Yi; Liu, Yuxi; Gao, Weidong; Zhang, Jiaqi

    2016-01-01

    The resistance of cancer cells to photothermal therapy is closely related to the overexpression of heat shock proteins (HSPs), which are abnormally upregulated when cells are under lethal stresses. Common strategies that use small molecule inhibitors against HSPs to enhance hyperthermia effect lack spatial and temporal control of drug release, leading to unavoidable systemic toxicity. Herein, a versatile photothermal platform is developed which is composed of a hollow gold nanoshell core densely packed with small interfering RNAs against heat shock protein 70 (Hsp70). Upon near infrared light irradiation, the small interfering RNAs can detach from gold surface specifically and escape from endosomes for Hsp70 silencing. Meanwhile, the temperature increases for hyperthermia therapy due to the high photothermal efficiency of the nanoshells. Efficient downregulation of Hsp70 after light activation is achieved in vitro and in vivo. Ultimately, the light‐controlled dual functional nanosystem, with the effects of Hsp70 silencing and temperature elevation, results in sensitized photothermal therapy in nude mice model under mild temperature. This strategy smartly combines the localized photothermal therapy with controlled Hsp70 silencing, and has great potential for clinical translation with a simple and easily controlled structure. PMID:28251053

  14. Assessment of heat shock protein 70 induction by heat in alfalfa varieties and constitutive overexpression in transgenic plants.

    PubMed

    Ferradini, Nicoletta; Iannacone, Rina; Capomaccio, Stefano; Metelli, Alessandra; Armentano, Nadia; Semeraro, Lucia; Cellini, Francesco; Veronesi, Fabio; Rosellini, Daniele

    2015-01-01

    Heat shock proteins (HSPs) are molecular chaperones involved in many cellular functions. It has been shown that mammalian cytosolic HSP70 binds antigenic peptides mediating the activation of the immune system, and that it plays a determining role in tumour immunogenicity. This suggests that HSP70 may be used for the production of conjugated vaccines. Human and plant HSPs share high sequence similarity and some important biological functions in vitro. In addition, plant HSPs have no endotoxic side effects. Extraction of HSP70 from plants for use as vaccine adjuvant requires enhancing its concentration in plant tissues. In this work, we explored the possibility to produce HSP70 in both transgenic and non-transgenic plants, using alfalfa as a model species. First, a transcriptional analysis of a constitutive and an inducible HSP70 genes was conducted in Arabidopsis thaliana. Then the coding sequence of the inducible form was cloned and introduced into alfalfa by Agrobacterium-mediated transformation, and the accumulation of the protein in leaf tissue of transgenic plants was demonstrated. We also tested diverse alfalfa varieties for heat-inducible expression of endogenous HSP70, revealing variety-specific responses to heat shock.

  15. Laser-Triggered Small Interfering RNA Releasing Gold Nanoshells against Heat Shock Protein for Sensitized Photothermal Therapy.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhaohui; Li, Siwen; Zhang, Min; Ma, Yi; Liu, Yuxi; Gao, Weidong; Zhang, Jiaqi; Gu, Yueqing

    2017-02-01

    The resistance of cancer cells to photothermal therapy is closely related to the overexpression of heat shock proteins (HSPs), which are abnormally upregulated when cells are under lethal stresses. Common strategies that use small molecule inhibitors against HSPs to enhance hyperthermia effect lack spatial and temporal control of drug release, leading to unavoidable systemic toxicity. Herein, a versatile photothermal platform is developed which is composed of a hollow gold nanoshell core densely packed with small interfering RNAs against heat shock protein 70 (Hsp70). Upon near infrared light irradiation, the small interfering RNAs can detach from gold surface specifically and escape from endosomes for Hsp70 silencing. Meanwhile, the temperature increases for hyperthermia therapy due to the high photothermal efficiency of the nanoshells. Efficient downregulation of Hsp70 after light activation is achieved in vitro and in vivo. Ultimately, the light-controlled dual functional nanosystem, with the effects of Hsp70 silencing and temperature elevation, results in sensitized photothermal therapy in nude mice model under mild temperature. This strategy smartly combines the localized photothermal therapy with controlled Hsp70 silencing, and has great potential for clinical translation with a simple and easily controlled structure.

  16. Heat Shock Protein Augmentation of Angelica gigas Nakai Root Hot Water Extract on Adipogenic Differentiation in Murine 3T3-L1 Preadipocytes.

    PubMed

    Lumbera, Wenchie Marie L; Dela Cruz, Joseph; Yang, Seung-Hak; Hwang, Seong Gu

    2016-03-01

    There is a high association of heat shock on the alteration of energy and lipid metabolism. The alterations associated with thermal stress are composed of gene expression changes and adaptation through biochemical responses. Previous study showed that Angelica gigas Nakai (AGN) root extract promoted adipogenic differentiation in murine 3T3-L1 preadipocytes under the normal temperature condition. However, its effect in heat shocked 3T3-L1 cells has not been established. In this study, we investigated the effect of AGN root hot water extract in the adipogenic differentiation of murine 3T3-L1 preadipocytes following heat shock and its possible mechanism of action. Thermal stress procedure was executed within the same stage of preadipocyte confluence (G0) through incubation at 42°C for one hour and then allowed to recover at normal incubation temperature of 37°C for another hour before AGN treatment for both cell viability assay and Oil Red O. Cell viability assay showed that AGN was able to dose dependently (0 to 400 μg/mL) increase cell proliferation under normal incubation temperature and also was able to prevent cytotoxicity due to heat shock accompanied by cell proliferation. Confluent preadipocytes were subjected into heat shock procedure, recovery and then AGN treatment prior to stimulation with the differentiation solution. Heat shocked preadipocytes exhibited reduced differentiation as supported by decreased amount of lipid accumulation in Oil Red O staining and triglyceride measurement. However, those heat shocked preadipocytes that then were given AGN extract showed a dose dependent increase in lipid accumulation as shown by both evaluation procedures. In line with these results, real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and Western blot analysis showed that AGN increased adipogenic differentiation by upregulating heat shock protection related genes and proteins together with the adipogenic markers. These findings imply the potential of AGN in heat

  17. Heat Shock Protein 70 Regulates Degradation of the Mumps Virus Phosphoprotein via the Ubiquitin-Proteasome Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Kubota, Toru; Kita, Shunsuke; Nakatsu, Yuichiro; Aoki, Natsuko; Mori, Yoshio; Maenaka, Katsumi; Takeda, Makoto; Kidokoro, Minoru

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Mumps virus (MuV) infection induces formation of cytoplasmic inclusion bodies (IBs). Growing evidence indicates that IBs are the sites where RNA viruses synthesize their viral RNA. However, in the case of MuV infection, little is known about the viral and cellular compositions and biological functions of the IBs. In this study, pulldown purification and N-terminal amino acid sequencing revealed that stress-inducible heat shock protein 70 (Hsp72) was a binding partner of MuV phosphoprotein (P protein), which was an essential component of the IB formation. Immunofluorescence and immunoblotting analyses revealed that Hsp72 was colocalized with the P protein in the IBs, and its expression was increased during MuV infection. Knockdown of Hsp72 using small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) had little, if any, effect on viral propagation in cultured cells. Knockdown of Hsp72 caused accumulation of ubiquitinated P protein and delayed P protein degradation. These results show that Hsp72 is recruited to IBs and regulates the degradation of MuV P protein through the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway. IMPORTANCE Formation of cytoplasmic inclusion bodies (IBs) is a common characteristic feature in mononegavirus infections. IBs are considered to be the sites of viral RNA replication and transcription. However, there have been few studies focused on host factors recruited to the IBs and their biological functions. Here, we identified stress-inducible heat shock protein 70 (Hsp72) as the first cellular partner of mumps virus (MuV) phosphoprotein (P protein), which is an essential component of the IBs and is involved in viral RNA replication/transcription. We found that the Hsp72 mobilized to the IBs promoted degradation of the MuV P protein through the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway. Our data provide new insight into the role played by IBs in mononegavirus infection. PMID:25552722

  18. Heat shock proteins as gatekeepers of proteolytic pathways-Implications for age-related macular degeneration (AMD).

    PubMed

    Kaarniranta, Kai; Salminen, Antero; Eskelinen, Eeva-Liisa; Kopitz, Jürgen

    2009-04-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is the major diagnosis for severe and irreversible central loss of vision in elderly people in the developed countries. The loss of vision involves primarily a progressive degeneration and cell death of postmitotic retinal pigment