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Sample records for heat-shock protein synthesis

  1. Heat shock in cultured neurons and astrocytes: correlation of ultrastructure and heat shock protein synthesis.

    PubMed

    Nishimura, R N; Dwyer, B E; Vinters, H V; De Vellis, J; Cole, R

    1991-04-01

    Cultured cerebral cortical neurons and astrocytes were compared after a brief shock. Morphological findings were correlated with the synthesis of the 68 kD heat shock protein (HSP68). Heat shocked neurons demonstrated many severe morphological changes after exposure to temperatures of 43 degrees C for 15 min and 45 degrees C for 10 min. Nuclear membrane 'blebbing' with lysis of the membrane, chromatin clumping, and disappearance of the nucleolus were prominent after both conditions. Lysis of the cell membrane was noted in severely injured neurons; this was more prominent at the higher temperature. In addition, alterations to polyribosomes, Golgi apparatus, rough endoplasmic reticulum and mitochondria were noted in the cytoplasm of neurons after heat shock. In contrast, no significant changes were noted in either the nucleus or cytoplasm of heat shocked astrocytes. The severity of morphological changes in neurons directly correlated with the low level of induction of HSP68 in neurons. Neurons synthesized much less 68 kD heat shock protein than similarly heat shocked astrocytes. We conclude that cultured cerebral cortical neurons are more susceptible to injury after heat shock than heat resistant astrocytes and that one possible mechanism of injury is failure to synthesize adequate amounts of HSP68 after injury.

  2. Regulation of heat-shock protein synthesis in chicken muscle culture during recovery from heat shock.

    PubMed

    Bag, J

    1983-10-03

    Exposure of chick myotube cultures to a temperature (45 degrees C) higher than their normal growing temperature (37 degrees C) caused extensive synthesis of three major polypeptides of Mr = 25 000, 65 000 and 81 000 referred to as 'heat-shock polypeptides' (hsps). When these cells were allowed to recover from heat-shock treatment at 37 degrees C for 6-8 h, the rate of accumulation of isotope into the 65 000-Mr and 81 000-Mr hsps declined to levels comparable to those in control cultures maintained at 37 degrees C. However, incorporation of isotope in the 25 000-Mr hsp continued at an elevated rate for a longer period than the 65 000-Mr and 81 000-Mr hsps. When heat-shocked cells were allowed to recover at 37 degrees C in the presence of actinomycin D to block new mRNA synthesis, the hsp synthesis as measured by the incorporation of radioactive isotope in these polypeptides continued at levels comparable to those in heat-shocked cells prior to recovery. The block of recovery by actinomycin D was due to the presence of a greater amount of functional hsp mRNAs in the polysomes as compared to untreated controls. The role of competition between the mRNAs for hsps and normal cellular proteins for the translation machinery in regulating protein synthesis during the recovery from heat shock has been discussed.

  3. Synthesis of the low molecular weight heat shock proteins in plants

    SciTech Connect

    Mansfield, M.A.; Key, J.L. )

    1987-08-01

    Heat shock of living tissue induces the synthesis of a unique group of proteins, the heat shock proteins. In plants, the major group of heat shock proteins has a molecular mass of 15 to 25 kilodaltons. Accumulation to these proteins to stainable levels has been reported in only a few species. To examine accumulation of the low molecular weight heat shock proteins in a broader range of species, two-dimensional electrophoresis was used to resolve total protein from the following species: soybean (Glycine max L. Merr., var Wayne), pea (Pisum sativum L., var Early Alaska), sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.), wheat (Triticum asetivum L.), rice (Oryza sativa L., cv IR-36), maize (Zea mays L.), pearl millet (Pennisetum americanum L. Leeke, line 23DB), and Panicum miliaceum L. When identified by both silver staining and incorporation of radiolabel, a diverse array of low molecular weight heat shock proteins was synthesized in each of these species. These proteins accumulated to significant levels after three hours of heat shock but exhibited considerable heterogeneity in isoelectric point, molecular weight, stainability, and radiolabel incorporation. Although most appeared to be synthesized only during heat shock, some were detectable at low levels in control tissue. Compared to the monocots, a higher proportion of low molecular weight heat shock proteins was detectable in control tissues from dicots.

  4. Pharmacological induction of heat shock protein 68 synthesis in cultured rat astrocytes.

    PubMed

    Nishimura, R N; Dwyer, B E

    1995-12-15

    The induction of the highly inducible 70-kDa heat shock protein (HSP 70) is associated with thermotolerance and survival from many other types of stress. This investigation studied the pharmacological induction of HSP 68 (HSP 68 is the rat homolog of human HSP 70) by 1,10-phenanthroline in cultured rat astrocytes under conditions that activated heat shock transcription factor-1 without inducing HSP 68 synthesis. Two conditions that activate heat shock transcription factor-1 and promote its binding to the heat shock element without subsequent transcription of HSP 68 mRNA, intracellular acidosis and exposure to salicylate, showed synthesis of HSP 68 when 1,10-phenanthroline was added to culture medium after the activation of heat shock transcription factor-1. 1,10-phenanthroline mimicked heat shock by inducing HSP 68 mRNA and protein under both conditions. 1,10-phenanthroline added alone to culture medium did not induce the synthesis of HSP 68 or activate heat shock transcription factor-1. These findings strongly suggest a multistep activation for HSP 68 synthesis and also demonstrate that the synthesis of HSP 68 can be pharmacologically regulated.

  5. Effects of cycloheximide on thermotolerance expression, heat shock protein synthesis, and heat shock protein mRNA accumulation in rat fibroblasts.

    PubMed Central

    Widelitz, R B; Magun, B E; Gerner, E W

    1986-01-01

    A single hyperthermic exposure can render cells transiently resistant to subsequent high temperature stresses. Treatment of rat embryonic fibroblasts with cycloheximide for 6 h after a 20-min interval at 45 degrees C inhibits protein synthesis, including heat shock protein (hsp) synthesis, and results in an accumulation of hsp 70 mRNA, but has no effect on subsequent survival responses to 45 degrees C hyperthermia. hsp 70 mRNA levels decreased within 1 h after removal of cycloheximide but then appeared to stabilize during the next 2 h (3 h after drug removal and 9 h after heat shock). hsp 70 mRNA accumulation could be further increased by a second heat shock at 45 degrees C for 20 min 6 h after the first hyperthermic exposure in cycloheximide-treated cells. Both normal protein and hsp synthesis appeared increased during the 6-h interval after hyperthermia in cultures which received two exposures to 45 degrees C for 20 min compared with those which received only one treatment. No increased hsp synthesis was observed in cultures treated with cycloheximide, even though hsp 70 mRNA levels appeared elevated. These data indicate that, although heat shock induces the accumulation of hsp 70 mRNA in both normal and thermotolerant cells, neither general protein synthesis nor hsp synthesis is required during the interval between two hyperthermic stresses for Rat-1 cells to express either thermotolerance (survival resistance) or resistance to heat shock-induced inhibition of protein synthesis. Images PMID:3785158

  6. Synthesis of calmodulin-binding proteins during heat shock in tobacco cells

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, Yingtang; Harrington, M. )

    1990-05-01

    Heat shock treatment induces the synthesis of heat shock proteins (HSPs), but little is known about the functions of these proteins in the heat shock response. Here we report isolation and analysis of heat-shock induced or enhanced calmodulin-binding proteins (CaMBPs) from cultured tobacco cells (Nicotiana tabacum cv. Wisconsin-38) using CaM-sepharose affinity chromatography. Analyses of {sup 35}S-methionine-labeled proteins by SDS-PAGE indicate that at least 12 HSP bands with apparent molecular weights ranging from 105 to 17 kD exhibit Ca{sup 2+}-dependent binding to CaM sepharose even in the presence of 0.3M NaCl. Thee proteins do not bind to sepharose 4B suggesting a specific interaction with CaM. Gel overlay analysis of HSPs binding to CaM-sepharose indicates that not all of these peptides bind to {sup 125}I-CaM in this assay. This may be due to the structural modification of {sup 125}I-CaM, the resolution of the assay, or the small amount of the CaMBPs synthesized during heat shock. An alternative approach is being employed using {sup 35}S-labeled CaM made from a synthetic CaM gene (VUC-1) to confirm the CaMBP/HSP by overlay analysis and to screen a heat shock cDNA expression library.

  7. Induction of heat-shock protein synthesis in chondrocytes at physiological temperatures.

    PubMed

    Madreperla, S A; Louwerenburg, B; Mann, R W; Towle, C A; Mankin, H J; Treadwell, B V

    1985-01-01

    Induction of heat-shock protein (HSP) synthesis is demonstrated in cultured calf-chondrocytes at temperatures shown to occur in normal human cartilage during experiments subjecting intact cadaverous hip joints to the parameters of level walking. A 70,000 MW heat-shock protein (HSP-70) is synthesized by chondrocytes at temperatures above 39 degrees C, while induction of synthesis of a 110,000 MW HSP only occurs at temperatures of 45 degrees C or greater. These differences in critical temperatures for induction, and data showing differences in kinetics of induction and repression of synthesis, suggest that there are differences in the mechanism of induction of the two HSPs. The duration of HSP synthesis and inhibition of synthesis of normal cellular proteins is directly proportional to the duration and magnitude of the temperature rise. Possible relationships between these new findings and the initiation and progression of degenerative joint disease are discussed.

  8. Modulation of heat shock protein 90 affects TGF-β-induced collagen synthesis in human dermal fibroblast cells.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sae Bin; Lim, A-Ram; Rah, Dong Kyun; Kim, Kyung Soo; Min, Hyun Jin

    2016-12-01

    Heat shock protein 90 is a chaperone molecule that aids in proper folding of target proteins. Recently, heat shock protein 90 was found to play a role in would healing through regulation of fibroblast functions. The aim of the present study was to investigate the role of heat shock protein 90 in collagen synthesis in human dermal fibroblasts. The effects of transforming growth factor-β, 17-N-allylamino-17-demethoxygeldanamycin, and transfection of heat shock protein 90 were evaluated by real-time PCR, western blot, and immunofluorescence assays. The Smad 2/3 and Akt pathways were evaluated to identify the signaling pathways involved in collagen synthesis. Heat shock protein 90 and collagen levels were compared in keloid and control tissues by immunohistochemical analysis. The expression of collagen was significantly increased after treatment with transforming growth factor-β, while 17-N-allylamino-17-demethoxygeldanamycin inhibited transforming growth factor-β-induced collagen synthesis. Overexpression of heat shock protein 90 itself with or without transforming growth factor-β increased collagen synthesis. These effects were dependent on Smad 2/3 pathway signaling. Finally, expression of heat shock protein 90 was increased in keloid tissue compared with control tissues. Taken together, these results demonstrate that modulation of heat shock protein 90 influences transforming growth factor-β-induced collagen synthesis via regulation of Smad 2/3 phosphorylation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Heat shock protein synthesis and trehalose accumulation are not required for induced thermotolerance in depressed Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Gross, C; Watson, K

    1996-03-27

    Intrinsic and heat shock induced thermotolerance of Saccharomyces cerevisiae was investigated in cells grown on glucose and acetate supplemented media. Heat shocked cells (37 degrees C/30 min), in either medium, exhibited induced synthesis of heat shock proteins (hsp) and trehalose. In all cases, with the notable exception of repressed cells of a relatively thermosensitive strain, heat shock acquisition of thermotolerance also occurred in the absence of protein synthesis and coincident decrease in trehalose accumulation. Results indicted that the marked increase in thermotolerance exhibited by non-fermenting (acetate) cells compared with fermenting (glucose) cells was not closely correlated with levels of hsp or trehalose. It was concluded that mechanisms for intrinsic and induced thermotolerance appear to be different and that growth on acetate endows cells with a biochemical predisposition, other than hsp or trehalose, that confers intrinsic tolerance, a factor which may be subject to heat induced modification.

  10. The heat shock protein 60 promotes progesterone synthesis in mitochondria of JEG-3 cells.

    PubMed

    Monreal-Flores, Jessica; Espinosa-García, María Teresa; García-Regalado, Alejandro; Arechavaleta-Velasco, Fabian; Martínez, Federico

    2017-06-01

    Progesterone synthesis in human placenta is essential to maintain pregnancy. The limiting step in placental progesterone synthesis is cholesterol transport from the cytoplasm to the inner mitochondrial membrane. Multiple proteins located in mitochondrial contact sites seem to play a key role in this process. Previously, our group identified the heat shock protein 60 (HSP60) as part of mitochondrial contact sites in human placenta, suggesting its participation in progesterone synthesis. Here, we examined the role of HSP60 in progesterone synthesis. Our results show that over-expression of HSP60 in human placental choriocarcinoma cells (JEG-3) and human embryonic kidney 293 cells (HEK293) promotes progesterone synthesis. Furthermore, incubation of the HSP60 recombinant protein with intact isolated mitochondria from JEG-3 cells also promotes progesterone synthesis in a dose-related fashion. We also show that HSP60 interacts with STARD3 and P450scc proteins from mitochondrial membrane contact sites. Finally, we show that the HSP60 recombinant protein binds cholesterol. Ours results demonstrate that HSP60 participates in mitochondrial progesterone synthesis. These findings provide novel insights into progesterone synthesis in the human placenta and its role in maintaining pregnancy. Copyright © 2017 Society for Biology of Reproduction & the Institute of Animal Reproduction and Food Research of Polish Academy of Sciences in Olsztyn. Published by Elsevier Urban & Partner Sp. z o.o. All rights reserved.

  11. Differentiation-specific decrease in heat shock protein synthesis in 3T3-L1 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Sorhage, F.; Kim, J.; Liu, A.Y.C.; Chen, K.Y.

    1986-05-01

    The regulation of synthesis of heat shock proteins (HSPs) in 3T3-L1 preadipocytes (fibroblasts) and adipocytes was examined using the techniques of pulse labeling with (/sup 35/S)methionine followed by analysis of the pattern and amount of radioactivity incorporated by SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and autoradiography. Exposure of the 3T3-L1 preadipocyte cultures either to elevated temperature (42..mu..C) or to the amino acid analogue canavanine (400 ..mu..g/ml), markedly induced the synthesis of six major HSPs with apparent molecular weights of 105,000, 89,000, 74,000, 72,000, 50,000, and 42,000. The time course of induction of the HSPs by canavanine was significantly delayed as compared to that of heat shock; maximal increase in synthesis of the HSPs was observed at 3-7 hrs after incubation at 42..mu..c and at 22-24 hrs after incubation with 400 ..mu..g/ml canavanine. The magnitude of induction of HSP in the differentiated adipocytes was significantly reduced as compared to that of the undifferentiated fibroblast cells. The reduced expression of HSPs in 3T3-L1 adipocytes appears to be related to the terminal adipogenic differentiation process. The phenomenon was not observed in the control 3T3-C2 cells nor in a transformed variant of the 3T3-L1 cells.

  12. Heat shock protein synthesis and thermotolerance in Cataglyphis, an ant from the Sahara desert.

    PubMed

    Gehring, W J; Wehner, R

    1995-03-28

    The ant Cataglyphis lives in the Sahara desert and is one of the most thermotolerant land animals known. It forages at body temperatures above 50 degrees C, and the critical thermal maxima are at 53.6 +/- 0.8 degrees C for Cataglyphis bombycina and 55.1 +/- 1.1 degrees C for Cataglyphis bicolor. The synthesis and accumulation of heat shock proteins (HSPs) were analyzed in Cataglyphis and compared to Formica, an ant living in more moderate climates, and to two Drosophila species. In Cataglyphis, protein synthesis continues at temperatures up to 45 degrees C as compared to 39 degrees C for Formica and Drosophila. The two Drosophila species, Drosophila melanogaster and Drosophila ambigua, differ with respect to their maximal induction of HSP synthesis and accumulation by 3-4 degrees C. In contrast, the two ant species accumulate HSPs prior to their exposure to heat, and in Cataglyphis the temperature of maximal HSP induction by de novo protein synthesis is only 2 degrees C higher than in Formica. These findings are interpreted as preadaption of the ants prior to exposure to high temperatures.

  13. Heat shock protein synthesis and thermotolerance in Cataglyphis, an ant from the Sahara desert.

    PubMed Central

    Gehring, W J; Wehner, R

    1995-01-01

    The ant Cataglyphis lives in the Sahara desert and is one of the most thermotolerant land animals known. It forages at body temperatures above 50 degrees C, and the critical thermal maxima are at 53.6 +/- 0.8 degrees C for Cataglyphis bombycina and 55.1 +/- 1.1 degrees C for Cataglyphis bicolor. The synthesis and accumulation of heat shock proteins (HSPs) were analyzed in Cataglyphis and compared to Formica, an ant living in more moderate climates, and to two Drosophila species. In Cataglyphis, protein synthesis continues at temperatures up to 45 degrees C as compared to 39 degrees C for Formica and Drosophila. The two Drosophila species, Drosophila melanogaster and Drosophila ambigua, differ with respect to their maximal induction of HSP synthesis and accumulation by 3-4 degrees C. In contrast, the two ant species accumulate HSPs prior to their exposure to heat, and in Cataglyphis the temperature of maximal HSP induction by de novo protein synthesis is only 2 degrees C higher than in Formica. These findings are interpreted as preadaption of the ants prior to exposure to high temperatures. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 PMID:7708762

  14. Influence of temperature stress on in vitro fertilization and heat shock protein synthesis in maize (Zea mays L. ) reproductive tissues

    SciTech Connect

    Dupuis, I.; Dumas, C. )

    1990-10-01

    This study was conducted to investigate the response of maize (Zea mays) male and female mature reproductive tissues to temperature stress. We have tested the fertilization abilities of the stressed spikelets and pollen using in vitro pollination-fertilization to determine their respective tolerance to stress. The synthesis of heat shock proteins (HSPs) was also analyzed in male and female tissues using electrophoresis of {sup 35}S-labeled proteins and fluorography, to establish a relationship between the physiological and molecular responses. Pollen, spikelets, and pollinated spikelets were exposed to selected temperatures (4, 28, 32, 36, or 40{degree}C) and tested using an in vitro fertilization system. The fertilization rate is highly reduced when pollinated spikelets are exposed to temperatures over 36{degree}C. When pollen and spikelets are exposed separately to temperature stress, the female tissues appear resistant to 4 hours of cold stress (4{degree}C) or heat stress (40{degree}C). Under heat shock conditions, the synthesis of a typical set of HSPs is induced in the female tissues. In contrast, the mature pollen is sensitive to heat stress and is responsible for the failure of fertilization at high temperatures. At the molecular level, no heat shock response is detected in the mature pollen.

  15. The effect of age on the synthesis of two heat shock proteins in the hsp70 family.

    PubMed

    Wu, B; Gu, M J; Heydari, A R; Richardson, A

    1993-03-01

    Hepatocytes isolated from male F344 rats were exposed to elevated temperatures (40 degrees C to 45 degrees C), and the incorporation of [35S]-L-methionine into proteins was measured from fluorograms of two-dimensional polyacrylamide gels. The synthesis of two proteins was induced by temperatures of 40 degrees C to 42.5 degrees C; however, 45 degrees C inhibited the synthesis of all proteins. Based on their apparent molecular weights and pI values and their recognition by a monoclonal antibody to the HSP70 gene family, the two proteins induced by hyperthermia were found to be the highly heat-inducible hsp70 and the constitutive hsc70. Because a heat shock of 42.5 degrees C for 30 minutes had very little effect on cell viability and induced the synthesis of hsp70 and hsc70, this heat shock was used to study the effect of age on the ability of hepatocytes to respond to the stress of hyperthermia. Neither hepatocytes isolated from young adult (5-7 months) nor old (25-27 months) rats synthesized detectable amounts of hsp70 when incubated at 37 degrees C. However, heat shock induced the synthesis of both hsp70 and hsc70 in hepatocytes isolated from young adult and old rats. The induction of hsp70 synthesis was significantly lower (37%) for hepatocytes isolated from old rats compared to hepatocytes isolated from young adult rats. However, neither the basal level nor the induced level of hsc70 synthesis changed significantly with age. Thus, aging resulted in a decrease in the ability of hepatocytes to synthesize hsp70 in response to hyperthermia; this effect, however, was specific for hsp70.

  16. Carnitine promotes heat shock protein synthesis in adriamycin-induced cardiomyopathy in a neonatal rat experimental model.

    PubMed

    Strauss, M; Anselmi, G; Hermoso, T; Tejero, F

    1998-11-01

    In order to evaluate carnitine protective strategy and its relationship with heat shock protein induction, female Sprague-Dawley neonatal rats, body weight 40 g, were randomized into four groups: control, adriamycin, carnitine and carnitine-adriamycin. Adriamycin was injected i.v. at a dose of 27 mg/kg (0.1 ml). Carnitine was administered i.v. (20 mg/0.1 ml) before each subdose of adriamycin and then per os (180 mg/kg) daily for 12 weeks. Body weight was recorded weekly. Ventricular wall thickness and cellular damage percentage were morphometrically and ultrastructurally determined, respectively. The determinations were realized monthly until the third month after treatment. The heat shock protein 25 content in the supernatant of the homogenized heart tissue was determined by Western blot analysis. Eight and 12 weeks after treatment, body weight and ventricular wall thickness decreased much more in adriamycin groups than in control and carnitine ones. At the same time, electron microscopic analysis of adriamycin left ventricular wall samples showed loss of myofibrils, swollen mitochondria and vacuoles. Carnitine-adriamycin treated rats resemble control groups more than adriamycin treated samples. Moreover, de-novo synthesis of heat shock protein was three times more induced in carnitine-adriamycin rats than in adriamycin ones. Carnitine may enhance the cell-protecting mechanism based on an induction of shock protein, and this first cellular response could reduce the severity of late adriamycin-cardiomiopathy.

  17. Heat shock protein synthesis is induced by diethyl phthalate but not by di(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate in radish (Raphanus sativus).

    PubMed

    Saarma, Kaari; Tarkka, Mika T; Itävaara, Merja; Fagerstedt, Kurt V

    2003-09-01

    The toxicity and effects on protein synthesis of the phthalate esters diethyl phthalate (DEP) and di(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate (DEHP) was studied in radish seedings (Raphanus sativus cv. Kööpenhaminan tori). Phthalate esters are a class of commercially important compounds used mainly as plasticizers in high molecular-weight polymers such as many plastics. They can enter soil through various routes and can affect plant growth and development. First the effect of DEP and DEHP on the growth of radish seedings was determined in an aqueous medium. It was found that DEP, but not DEHP, caused retardation of growth in radish. A further investigation on protein synthesis during DEP-stress was executed by in vivo protein labeling combined with two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2D-PAGE). For comparisons with known stress-induced proteins a similar experiment was done with heat shock, and the induced heat shock proteins (HSPs) were compared with those of DEP-stress. The results showed that certain HSPs can be used as an indicator of DEP-stress, although the synthesis of most HSPs was not affected by DEP. DEP also elicited the synthesis of numerous proteins found only in DEP-treated roots. The toxic effect of phthalate esters and the roles of the induced proteins are discussed.

  18. Posttranscriptional regulation of hsp70 expression in human cells: effects of heat shock, inhibition of protein synthesis, and adenovirus infection on translation and mRNA stability.

    PubMed Central

    Theodorakis, N G; Morimoto, R I

    1987-01-01

    We have examined the posttranscriptional regulation of hsp70 gene expression in two human cell lines, HeLa and 293 cells, which constitutively express high levels of HSP70. HSP70 mRNA translates with high efficiency in both control and heat-shocked cells. Therefore, heat shock is not required for the efficient translation of HSP70 mRNA. Rather, the main effect of heat shock on translation is to suppress the translatability of non-heat shock mRNAs. Heat shock, however, has a marked effect on the stability of HSP70 mRNA; in non-heat-shocked cells the half-life of HSP70 mRNA is approximately 50 min, and its stability increases at least 10-fold upon heat shock. Moreover, HSP70 mRNA is more stable in cells treated with protein synthesis inhibitors, suggesting that a heat shock-sensitive labile protein regulates its turnover. An additional effect on posttranscriptional regulation of hsp70 expression can be found in adenovirus-infected cells, in which HSP70 mRNA levels decline precipititously late during infection although hsp70 transcription continues unabated. Images PMID:3437893

  19. Heat shock proteins in cancer.

    PubMed

    Sherman, Michael; Multhoff, Gabriele

    2007-10-01

    Heat shock proteins (Hsps) are highly conserved and inhabit nearly all subcellular locations where they perform a variety of chaperoning functions including folding and unfolding of nascent polypeptides, proteins, transport of proteins, and support of antigen presentation processes. Apart from their intracellular location Hsps with a molecular weight of 70 kDa (Hsp70) also have been found on the plasma membrane of malignantly transformed cells, on virally/bacterial infected cells and in the extracellular space. Depending on their intra- and extracellular location Hsps exert either protection against environmental stress or act as potent stimulators of the immune response. In this review we address the dual function of intracellular and extracellular located small Hsps and members of the Hsp70 family and its immunological consequences for cancer immunity.

  20. Heat Shock Proteins and Diabetes.

    PubMed

    Zilaee, Marzie; Shirali, Saeed

    2016-12-01

    Diabetes is a chronic disease, and its prevalence continues to rise and can increase the risk for the progression of microvascular (such as nephropathy, retinopathy and neuropathy) and also macrovascular complications. Diabetes is a condition in which the oxidative stress and inflammation rise. Heat shock proteins (HSPs) are a highly conserved family of proteins that are expressed by all cells exposed to environmental stress, and they have diverse functions. In patients with diabetes, the expression and levels of HSPs decrease, but these chaperones can aid in improving some complications of diabetes, such as oxidative stress and inflammation. (The suppression of some HSPs is associated with a generalized increase in tissue inflammation.) In this review, we summarize the current understanding of HSPs in diabetes as well as their complications, and we also highlight their potential role as therapeutic targets in diabetes. Copyright © 2016 Canadian Diabetes Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Heat Shock Proteins: Mediators of Atherosclerotic Development.

    PubMed

    Deniset, Justin F; Pierce, Grant N

    2015-01-01

    Heat shock proteins play important housekeeping roles in a variety of cells within the body during normal control conditions. The many different functions for heat shock proteins in the cell depend upon the specific heat shock protein involved. Each protein is nominally differentiated based upon its molecular size. However, in addition to their role in normal cell function, heat shock proteins may play an even more important role as pro-survival proteins conserved through evolution to protect the cell from a variety of stresses. The ability of a cell to withstand these environmental stresses is critical to its capacity to adapt and remain viable. Loss of this ability may lead to pathological states. Abnormal localization, structure or function of the heat shock proteins has been associated with many pathologies, including those involving heart disease. Heat shock proteins like HSP60 and HSP70 in particular have been identified as playing important roles in inflammation and immune reactions. Inflammation has been identified recently as an important pathological risk factor for heart disease. It is perhaps not surprising therefore, that heat shock protein family has been increasingly identified as an important intracellular pathway associated with inflammatory-mediated heart conditions including atherosclerosis. This paper reviews the evidence in support of a role for heat shock proteins in cardiovascular disease and the potential to target these proteins to alter the progression of atherosclerotic disease.

  2. [Changes in heat shock protein synthesis and thermotolerance of Arabidopsis thaliana seedlings as a result of inhibition of Hsp90 by geldanamycin].

    PubMed

    Kozeko, L G

    2014-01-01

    The influence of geldanamycin (GA), which is a specific inhibitor of heat shock protein Hsp90 activities, on synthesis of Hsp70 and Hsp90 and thermotolerance of Arabidopsis thaliana seedlings has been studied. Incubation of seedlings with GA was shown to induce synthesis of these stress proteins under normal conditions. Treatment of seeds with the Hsp90 inhibitor resulted in the elevated constitutive levels of Hsp70 and Hsp90 in seedlings as well as increased induction of their synthesis under heat shock, at that the effect of GA increased with its concentration. These up-regulation of Hsp promoted thermotolerance of seedlings. The obtained results are considered as evidence for autoregulation of heat shock protein synthesis and regulation of plant tolerance by Hsp90.

  3. Synthesis of 19-substituted geldanamycins with altered conformations and their binding to heat shock protein Hsp90

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kitson, Russell R. A.; Chang, Chuan-Hsin; Xiong, Rui; Williams, Huw E. L.; Davis, Adrienne L.; Lewis, William; Dehn, Donna L.; Siegel, David; Roe, S. Mark; Prodromou, Chrisostomos; Ross, David; Moody, Christopher J.

    2013-04-01

    The benzoquinone ansamycin geldanamycin and its derivatives are inhibitors of heat shock protein Hsp90, an emerging target for novel therapeutic agents both in cancer and in neurodegeneration. However, the toxicity of these compounds to normal cells has been ascribed to reaction with thiol nucleophiles at the quinone 19-position. We reasoned that blocking this position would ameliorate toxicity, and that it might also enforce a favourable conformational switch of the trans-amide group into the cis-form required for protein binding. Here, we report an efficient synthesis of such 19-substituted compounds and realization of our hypotheses. Protein crystallography established that the new compounds bind to Hsp90 with, as expected, a cis-amide conformation. Studies on Hsp90 inhibition in cells demonstrated the molecular signature of Hsp90 inhibitors: decreases in client proteins with compensatory increases in other heat shock proteins in both human breast cancer and dopaminergic neural cells, demonstrating their potential for use in the therapy of cancer or neurodegenerative diseases.

  4. Synthesis of 19-substituted geldanamycins with altered conformations and their binding to heat shock protein Hsp90

    PubMed Central

    Kitson, Russell R. A.; Chang, Chuan-Hsin; Xiong, Rui; Williams, Huw E. L.; Davis, Adrienne L.; Lewis, William; Dehn, Donna L.; Siegel, David; Roe, S. Mark; Prodromou, Chrisostomos; Ross, David; Moody, Christopher J.

    2013-01-01

    The benzoquinone ansamycin geldanamycin and its derivatives are inhibitors of heat shock protein Hsp90, an emerging target for novel therapeutic agents both in cancer and in neurodegeneration. However, toxicity of these compounds to normal cells has been ascribed to reaction with thiol nucleophiles at the quinone 19-position. We reasoned that blocking this position would ameliorate toxicity, and that it might also enforce a favourable conformational switch of the trans-amide group into the cis-form required for protein binding. We report here an efficient synthesis of such 19-substituted compounds and realization of our hypotheses. Protein crystallography established that the new compounds bind to Hsp90 with, as expected, a cis-amide conformation. Studies on Hsp90 inhibition in cells demonstrated the molecular signature of Hsp90 inhibitors: decreases in client proteins with compensatory increases in other heat shock proteins in both human breast cancer and dopaminergic neural cells, demonstrating their potential for use in the therapy of cancer or neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:23511419

  5. Massive heat-shock polypeptide synthesis in late chicken embryos: convenient system for study of protein synthesis in highly differentiated organisms.

    PubMed Central

    Voellmy, R; Bromley, P A

    1982-01-01

    In cultured eucaryotic cells, heat treatments specifically induced the rapid synthesis of the so-called heat-shock polypeptides. To ascertain the physiological importance of this phenomenon for highly differentiated organisms, we attempted to determine whether the heat-shock response occurs in a living endothermic organism at extreme temperatures, and if so, whether the response is organ specific. We developed a procedure to label proteins efficiently in 5- to 18-day-old chicken embryos. Heat-shock polypeptides of identical sizes of 85,000, 70,000, and 25,000 daltons were synthesized predominantly in chicken embryo fibroblasts and in many different organs of 18-day-old embryos at 42.5 to 44 degrees C. Images PMID:7110137

  6. Stimulation of glycogen synthesis by heat shock in L6 skeletal-muscle cells: regulatory role of site-specific phosphorylation of glycogen-associated protein phosphatase 1.

    PubMed Central

    Moon, Byoung; Duddy, Noreen; Ragolia, Louis; Begum, Najma

    2003-01-01

    Recent evidence suggests that glycogen-associated protein phosphatase 1 (PP-1(G)) is essential for basal and exercise-induced glycogen synthesis, which is mediated in part by dephosphorylation and activation of glycogen synthase (GS). In the present study, we examined the potential role of site-specific phosphorylation of PP-1(G) in heat-shock-induced glycogen synthesis. L6 rat skeletal-muscle cells were stably transfected with wild-type PP-1(G) or with PP-1(G) mutants in which site-1 (S1) Ser(48) and site-2 (S2) Ser(67) residues were substituted with Ala. Cells expressing wild-type and PP-1(G) mutants, S1, S2 and S1/S2, were examined for potential alterations in glycogen synthesis after a 60 min heat shock at 45 degrees C, followed by analysis of [(14)C]glucose incorporation into glycogen at 37 degrees C. PP-1(G) S1 mutation caused a 90% increase in glycogen synthesis on heat-shock treatment, whereas the PP-1(G) S2 mutant was not sensitive to heat stress. The S1/S2 double mutant was comparable with wild-type, which showed a 30% increase over basal. Heat-shock-induced glycogen synthesis was accompanied by increased PP-1 and GS activities. The highest activation was observed in S1 mutant. Heat shock also resulted in a rapid and sustained Akt/ glycogen synthase kinase 3 beta (GSK-3 beta) phosphorylation. Wortmannin blocked heat-shock-induced Akt/GSK-3 beta phosphorylation, prevented 2-deoxyglucose uptake and abolished the heat-shock-induced glycogen synthesis. Muscle glycogen levels regulate GS activity and glycogen synthesis and were found to be markedly depleted in S1 mutant on heat-shock treatment, suggesting that PP-1(G) S1 Ser phosphorylation may inhibit glycogen degradation during thermal stimulation, as S1 mutation resulted in excessive glycogen synthesis on heat-shock treatment. In contrast, PP-1(G) S2 Ser phosphorylation may promote glycogen breakdown under stressful conditions. Heat-shock-induced glycogenesis appears to be mediated via phosphoinositide 3

  7. A functional heat shock protein 90 chaperone is essential for efficient flock house virus RNA polymerase synthesis in Drosophila cells.

    PubMed

    Castorena, Kathryn M; Weeks, Spencer A; Stapleford, Kenneth A; Cadwallader, Amy M; Miller, David J

    2007-08-01

    The molecular chaperone heat shock protein 90 (Hsp90) is involved in multiple cellular processes including protein maturation, complex assembly and disassembly, and intracellular transport. We have recently shown that a disruption of Hsp90 activity in cultured Drosophila melanogaster cells suppresses Flock House virus (FHV) replication and the accumulation of protein A, the FHV RNA-dependent RNA polymerase. In the present study, we investigated whether the defect in FHV RNA polymerase accumulation induced by Hsp90 suppression was secondary to an effect on protein A synthesis, degradation, or intracellular membrane association. Treatment with the Hsp90-specific inhibitor geldanamycin selectively reduced FHV RNA polymerase synthesis by 80% in Drosophila S2 cells stably transfected with an inducible protein A expression plasmid. The suppressive effect of geldanamycin on protein A synthesis was not attenuated by proteasome inhibition, nor was it sensitive to changes in either the mRNA untranslated regions or protein A intracellular membrane localization. Furthermore, geldanamycin did not promote premature protein A degradation, nor did it alter the extremely rapid kinetics of protein A membrane association. These results identify a novel role for Hsp90 in facilitating viral RNA polymerase synthesis in Drosophila cells and suggest that FHV subverts normal cellular pathways to assemble functional replication complexes.

  8. Heat shock protein produced by Helicobacter pylori.

    PubMed

    Yokota, K; Hirai, Y; Haque, M; Hayashi, S; Isogai, H; Sugiyama, T; Nagamachi, E; Tsukada, Y; Fujii, N; Oguma, K

    1994-01-01

    The cells of Helicobacter pylori were suspended in the medium containing 35S-methionine. After a heat shock of the cells at 42 C for 5, 10, and 30 min, the production of proteins was analyzed by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and autoradiography. Out of many proteins produced by the cells, only 66 kDa protein production was dramatically increased by heat treatment. The N-terminal amino acid sequence of 66 kDa protein was quite similar to that of 62 kDa and 54 kDa proteins previously suggested as heat shock protein (HSP) of H. pylori based on the reaction with polyclonal and monoclonal antibodies against HSP 60 family proteins produced by other bacteria. Therefore, it was concluded that H. pylori produces the 66 kDa protein as its major heat shock protein which belongs to HSP 60 family.

  9. Heat shock proteins in multiple myeloma

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Lei; Fok, Jacqueline H.L.; Davies, Faith E.

    2014-01-01

    Heat shock proteins are molecular chaperones with a central role in protein folding and cellular protein homeostasis. They also play major roles in the development of cancer and in recent years have emerged as promising therapeutic targets. In this review, we discuss the known molecular mechanisms of various heat shock protein families and their involvement in cancer and in particular, multiple myeloma. In addition, we address the current progress and challenges in pharmacologically targeting these proteins as anti-cancer therapeutic strategies PMID:24675290

  10. Heat shock proteins in porcine ovary: synthesis, accumulation and regulation by stress and hormones.

    PubMed

    Sirotkin, Alexander V; Bauer, Miroslav

    2011-07-01

    The present studies aimed to understand the interrelationships between stress, hormones and heat shock proteins (HSPs) in the ovary. We examined (1) whether HSP70.2, HSP72 and HSP105/110 can be produced and accumulated in porcine ovarian tissue, (2) whether these HSPs could be indicators of stress, i.e. whether two kinds of stress (high temperatures and malnutrition/serum deprivation) can affect them, and (3) whether some hormonal regulators of ovarian functions (insulin-like growth factor (IGF)-I, leptin and follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH)) can affect these HSPs and response of ovaries to HSP-related stress. We analysed the expression of HSP70.2, HSP72 and HSP105/110 mRNA (by using real-time reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction) in porcine ovarian granulosa cells, as well as the accumulation of HSP70 protein (by using sodium dodecyl sulphate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis-Western) in either whole ovarian follicles and granulose cells cultured at normal (37.5°C) or high (41.5°C) temperature, with and without serum and with and without IGF-I, leptin and FSH. Expression of mRNA for HSP70.2, HSP72 and HSP105/110 in ovarian granulosa cells and accumulation of HSP70 protein in whole ovarian follicles and granulosa cells were demonstrated. In all the groups, addition of either IGF-I, leptin and FSH reduced the expression of HSP70.2, HSP72 and HSP105/110 mRNA. Both high temperature, serum deprivation and their combination resulted in increase in mRNAs for all three analysed HSPs. Additions of either IGF-I, leptin and FSH prevented the stimulatory effect of both high temperature and serum deprivation on the transcription of HSP70.2, HSP72 and HSP105/110. In contrast, high temperature reduced accumulation of peptide HSP70 in both ovarian follicles and granulosa cell. Serum deprivation promoted accumulation of HSP70 in granulosa cells, but not in ovarian follicles. Addition of IGF-I, leptin and FSH was able to alter accumulation of HSP70 in both follicles

  11. Induction of heat shock proteins may combat insulin resistance.

    PubMed

    McCarty, Mark F

    2006-01-01

    The molecular mechanism responsible for obesity-associated insulin resistance has been partially clarified: increased fatty acid levels in muscle fibers promote diacylglycerol synthesis, which activates certain isoforms of protein kinase C (PKC). This in turn triggers a kinase cascade which activates both IkappaB kinase-beta (IKK-beta) and c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK), each of which can phosphorylate a key serine residue in IRS-1, rendering it a poor substrate for the activated insulin receptor. Heat shock proteins Hsp27 and Hsp72 have the potential to prevent the activation of IKK-beta and JNK, respectively; this suggests that induction of heat shock proteins may blunt the adverse impact of fat overexposure on insulin function. Indeed, bimoclomol--a heat shock protein co-inducer being developed for treatment of diabetic neuropathy--and lipoic acid--suspected to be a heat shock protein inducer--have each demonstrated favorable effects on the insulin sensitivity of obese rodents, and parenteral lipoic acid is reported to improve the insulin sensitivity of type 2 diabetics. Moreover, there is reason to believe that heat shock protein induction may have a favorable impact on the microvascular complications of diabetes, and on the increased risk for macrovascular disease associated with diabetes and insulin resistance syndrome. Heat shock protein induction may also have potential for preventing or treating neurodegenerative disorders, controlling inflammation, and possibly even slowing the aging process. The possible complementarity of bimoclomol and lipoic acid for heat shock protein induction should be assessed, and further efforts to identify well-tolerated agents active in this regard are warranted.

  12. Investigation of the function of the heat shock proteins in Drosophila melanogaster tissue culture cells.

    PubMed

    Arrigo, A P

    1980-01-01

    The effect of inhibitors of protein synthesis on RNA synthesis was investigated before and during heat shock. The results indicate that proteins specifically made following heat shock might be required for the resumption, after heat shock, of the synthesis of the RNA normally made at 25 degrees C. It has previously been shown that the heat shock proteins, with the exception of hsp 84 are found in the nucleus bound to chromatin at 37 degrees C, and that they move to the cytoplasm on further incubation of the cells at 25 degrees C (Arrigo et al., 1980). Taken together, these results suggest that some protein(s) synthesized during heat shock may be involved in the regulation of RNA synthesis. However evidence is presented showing that the newly synthesized proteins at 37 degrees are not involved in repressing the transcription of most of the genes active before the heat shock.

  13. [Heat shock proteins and their characteristics].

    PubMed

    Dzaman-Serafin, Sylwia; Telatyńska-Mieszek, Bogumiła; Ciechanowski, Kazimierz

    2005-08-01

    The main adaptable response to increased temperature is heat shock response resulting in induction of proteins called heat shock proteins (HSP). They are present in all cells under proper growth conditions and they create 5-10% of the whole protein contents. HSP were divided into five basic groups according to their approximate molecular mass, expressed in kDa and called respectively: HSP 100, HSP 90, HSP 70, HSP 60 and small HSP. Heat shock proteins can act like antigens in many infectious diseases. Immunological response against proteins from HSP 60, HSP 70 and HSP 90 families was observed in diseases caused by bacterial and protozoan pathogens. It is known that ischemia and reperfusion activate HSP genes transcription in heart cells of various experimental animals. Human and Chlamydia pneumoniae HSP 60 were found in patients with stable coronary disease. Hence many researchers connect the increase of ischaemia with the passed infection caused by Chlamydia pneumoniae, which can influence the origin or development of atheromatous plaque in the vascular wall. HSPs play an important role in hyperthermic therapy commonly used together with irradiation. Moreover, works on the possibility of HSP application to delay of disease process in neurodegenerative diseases, such as Parkinson or Alzheimer diseases are conducted. The paper presents characteristics of heat shock proteins, role in the state of health and disease and possibilities of their usage in monitoring and/or treatment of diseases, e.g. cancers.

  14. High hydrostatic pressure induces synthesis of heat-shock proteins and trehalose-6-phosphate synthase in Anastrepha ludens larvae.

    PubMed

    Vargas-Ortiz, Manuel A; Quintana-Castro, Rodolfo; Oliart-Ros, Rosa M; De la Cruz-Medina, Javier; Ramírez de León, José A; Garcia, Hugo S

    2013-04-01

    The Mexican fruit fly (Anastrepha ludens) is responsible for losses of up to 25% of crops such as mango and citrus fruits in Central America and México. The larval life cycle of A. ludens comprises three stages with a duration ranging from 3 to 8 days. Because of the damage caused by A. ludens, several methods of control have been studied and implemented. High hydrostatic pressures (HHP) are currently applied to foods and it is now proposed to be employed to inactivate eggs and larvae of A. ludens. Originally HHP was designed to inactivate microorganisms, since it exerts marked effects on cell morphology, and can affect enzymatic reactions and genetic mechanisms of microbial cells, with no major changes altering the sensory or nutritional quality of the foodstuff. In this study, A. ludens in two larval stages (5- and 8-day-old) were subjected to HHP treatments. The biochemical response of the larvae of A. ludens was dependent on their stage of development. The third larval stage (L3) developed a better protection mechanism based on the synthesis of stress proteins or heat-shock proteins (HSPs) and the enzyme trehalose-6-phosphate synthase, which are linked and possibly act together to achieve greater survivability to stress caused by hydrostatic pressure.

  15. Human cyclophilin 40 is a heat shock protein that exhibits altered intracellular localization following heat shock

    PubMed Central

    Mark, Peter J.; Ward, Bryan K.; Kumar, Premlata; Lahooti, Hooshang; Minchin, Rodney F.; Ratajczak, Thomas

    2001-01-01

    The unactivated steroid receptors are chaperoned into a conformation that is optimal for binding hormone by a number of heat shock proteins, including Hsp90, Hsp70, Hsp40, and the immunophilin, FKBP52 (Hsp56). Together with its partner cochaperones, cyclophilin 40 (CyP40) and FKBP51, FKBP52 belongs to a distinct group of structurally related immunophilins that modulate steroid receptor function through their association with Hsp90. Due to the structural similarity between the component immunophilins, FKBP52 and cyclophilin 40, we decided to investigate whether CyP40 is also a heat shock protein. Exposure of MCF-7 breast cancer cells to elevated temperatures (42°C for 3 hours) resulted in a 75-fold increase in CyP40 mRNA levels, but no corresponding increase in CyP40 protein expression, even after 7 hours of heat stress. The use of cycloheximide to inhibit protein synthesis revealed that in comparison to MCF-7 cells cultured at 37°C, those exposed to heat stress (42°C for 3 hours) displayed an elevated rate of degradation of both CyP40 and FKBP52 proteins. Concomitantly, the half-life of the CyP40 protein was reduced from more than 24 hours to just over 8 hours following heat shock. As no alteration in CyP40 protein levels occurred in cells exposed to heat shock, an elevated rate of degradation would imply that CyP40 protein was synthesized at an increased rate, hence the designation of human CyP40 as a heat shock protein. Application of heat stress elicited a marked redistribution of CyP40 protein in MCF-7 cells from a predominantly nucleolar localization, with some nuclear and cytoplasmic staining, to a pattern characterized by a pronounced nuclear accumulation of CyP40, with no distinguishable nucleolar staining. This increase in nuclear CyP40 possibly resulted from a redistribution of cytoplasmic and nucleolar CyP40, as no net increase in CyP40 expression levels occurred in response to stress. Exposure of MCF-7 cells to actinomycin D for 4 hours resulted in

  16. Heat-shock proteins and atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, M Branco; Carlos, A G Palma

    2002-06-01

    In this review the authors focus on the possible role of heat-shock proteins (hsp) in the immune pathogenesis of the atherosclerotic process. The authors discuss evidence showing increased expression of these proteins in the vascular wall of stressed and atherosclerotic vessels and the immune mechanisms which could justify some of the inflammatory aspects that are now currently recognized in atherosclerosis, namely some of the possible hsp immune activating properties and also the possibility of hsp representing an innocent auto-antigen which could be the unwanted target of an immune response, initially directed against microbial heat-shock proteins. Epidemiological evidence linking atherosclerosis and cardiovascular diseases to soluble hsp levels as well as the intensity of anti-hsp immune response is also reviewed.

  17. Influence of Temperature Stress on in Vitro Fertilization and Heat Shock Protein Synthesis in Maize (Zea mays L.) Reproductive Tissues 1

    PubMed Central

    Dupuis, Isabelle; Dumas, Christian

    1990-01-01

    This study was conducted to investigate the response of maize (Zea mays) male and female mature reproductive tissues to temperature stress. We have tested the fertilization abilities of the stressed spikelets and pollen using in vitro pollination-fertilization to determine their respective tolerance to stress. The synthesis of heat shock proteins (HSPs) was also analyzed in male and female tissues using electrophoresis of 35S-labeled proteins and fluorography, to establish a relationship between the physiological and molecular responses. Pollen, spikelets, and pollinated spikelets were exposed to selected temperatures (4, 28, 32, 36, or 40°C) and tested using an in vitro fertilization system. The fertilization rate is highly reduced when pollinated spikelets are exposed to temperatures over 36°C. When pollen and spikelets are exposed separately to temperature stress, the female tissues appear resistant to 4 hours of cold stress (4°C) or heat stress (40°C). Under heat shock conditions, the synthesis of a typical set of HSPs is induced in the female tissues. In contrast, the mature pollen is sensitive to heat stress and is responsible for the failure of fertilization at high temperatures. At the molecular level, no heat shock response is detected in the mature pollen. Images Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 PMID:16667763

  18. Synthesis of macrolactam analogues of radicicol and their binding to heat shock protein Hsp90.

    PubMed

    Dutton, Bridie L; Kitson, Russell R A; Parry-Morris, Sarah; Roe, S Mark; Prodromou, Chrisostomos; Moody, Christopher J

    2014-02-28

    A series of macrolactam analogues of the naturally occurring resorcylic acid lactone radicicol have been synthesised from methyl orsellinate in 7 steps, involving chlorination, protection of the two phenolic groups, and hydrolysis to the benzoic acid. Formation of the dianion and quenching with a Weinreb amide results in acylation of the toluene methyl group that is followed by amide formation and ring closing metathesis to form the macrocyclic lactam. Final deprotection of the phenolic groups gives the desired macrolactams whose binding to the N-terminal domain of yeast Hsp90 was studied by isothermal titration calorimetry and protein X-ray crystallography.

  19. Regulation of protein turnover by heat shock proteins.

    PubMed

    Bozaykut, Perinur; Ozer, Nesrin Kartal; Karademir, Betul

    2014-12-01

    Protein turnover reflects the balance between synthesis and degradation of proteins, and it is a crucial process for the maintenance of the cellular protein pool. The folding of proteins, refolding of misfolded proteins, and also degradation of misfolded and damaged proteins are involved in the protein quality control (PQC) system. Correct protein folding and degradation are controlled by many different factors, one of the most important of which is the heat shock protein family. Heat shock proteins (HSPs) are in the class of molecular chaperones, which may prevent the inappropriate interaction of proteins and induce correct folding. On the other hand, these proteins play significant roles in the degradation pathways, including endoplasmic reticulum-associated degradation (ERAD), the ubiquitin-proteasome system, and autophagy. This review focuses on the emerging role of HSPs in the regulation of protein turnover; the effects of HSPs on the degradation machineries ERAD, autophagy, and proteasome; as well as the role of posttranslational modifications in the PQC system. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Synthesis and biological effect of chrom-4-one derivatives as functional inhibitors of heat shock protein 27.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Soo-Yeon; Kwak, Soo Yeon; Kwon, Youngjoo; Lee, Yun-Sil; Na, Younghwa

    2017-10-20

    Heat Shock Protein 27 (HSP27) is a member of small heat shock proteins with a highly-conserved α-crystalline domain. It inhibits aggregation of damaged proteins through a complex structural systems of phosphorylation-dependent oligomerization and self-assembly. It has been demonstrated that HSP27 is involved in a variety of pathophysiological pathways with negative or positive protective activities. In this study, we synthesized six chromone analogs possessing thiiran-2-ylmethoxy or oxyran-2-ylmethoxy substituents and evaluated their biological activities against HSP27 protein. Compounds YK598-2, J4 and J2 induced significant abnormal HSP27 dimer formation in NCI-H460, a human lung cancer cell line. In synergistic anticancer activity test, the compounds effectively producing abnormal HSP27 cross-linking remarkably enhanced the antiproliferative activity of 17-AAG, a HSP90 inhibitor. Target specificity test using the HSP27-silenced cells (shHSP27) showed that compounds YK598-2, J4, and J2 significantly lost their cross-linking activity only under conditions when HSP27 was deprived of. In the evaluation of cancer cell sensitization with cisplatin, cisplatin-induced lung cancer cell growth inhibition was sensitized with statistical significance by J4 and J2 as compared to compound alone treatment. These results suggest that abnormal HSP27 dimerization can be an efficient control point for cancer cell proliferation and chromone compounds might have potential as anticancer agents that modulate abnormal HSP27 dimerization. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  1. Genetic regulation during heat shock and function of heat-shock proteins: a review.

    PubMed

    Tanguay, R M

    1983-06-01

    The induction by thermal stress of certain specific genes (heat-shock genes) first described in Drosophila has recently been observed in a wide variety of unicellular and multicellular organisms, emphasizing the basic importance of this ubiquitous response. Recent data dealing with the molecular mechanisms involved in the intensive transcriptional and posttranscriptional regulation during heat shock is reviewed with emphasis on the induction of the response and the putative function of the heat-shock proteins. A model showing the various interactions of cellular regulatory mechanisms operating in the heat-shocked cell is presented. While the list of agents or treatments inducing heat-shock proteins (hsp's) in various organisms is increasing, the identification of a hypothetical common inducing factor is elusive. The recently described reorganization of some cytoskeletal elements upon heat shock is discussed both in terms of its potential involvement in transcriptional and (or) translational regulation and of its putative relation with the cellular localization of the hsp's. Studies on the cellular localization of hsp's in various organisms do not show a clear uniform pattern which could help in elucidating the function of hsp's. On the other hand, studies on the thermal resistance of various cells types show a strong correlation between the induction of hsp's and the development of transitory thermotolerance. Such a protective function for hsp's can probably be extended to other types of cellular aggression.

  2. Heat shock proteins and Drosophila aging.

    PubMed

    Tower, John

    2011-05-01

    Since their discovery in Drosophila, the heat shock proteins (Hsps) have been shown to regulate both stress resistance and life-span. Aging is characterized by increased oxidative stress and the accumulation of abnormal (malfolded) proteins, and these stresses induce Hsp gene expression through the transcription factor HSF. In addition, a subset of Hsps is induced by oxidative stress through the JNK signaling pathway and the transcription factor Foxo. The Hsps counteract the toxicity of abnormal proteins by facilitating protein refolding and turnover, and through other mechanisms including inhibition of apoptosis. The Hsps are up-regulated in tissue-specific patterns during aging, and their expression correlates with, and sometimes predicts, life span, making them ideal biomarkers of aging. The tools available for experimentally manipulating gene function and assaying healthspan in Drosophila provides an unparalleled opportunity to further study the role of Hsps in aging.

  3. Heat shock proteins and Drosophila aging

    PubMed Central

    Tower, John

    2010-01-01

    Since their discovery in Drosophila, the heat shock proteins (Hsps) have been shown to regulate both stress resistance and life span. Aging is characterized by increased oxidative stress and the accumulation of abnormal (malfolded) proteins, and these stresses induce Hsp gene expression through the transcription factor HSF. In addition, a subset of Hsps is induced by oxidative stress through the JNK signaling pathway and the transcription factor Foxo. The Hsps counteract the toxicity of abnormal proteins by facilitating protein refolding and turnover, and through other mechanisms including inhibition of apoptosis. The Hsps are up-regulated in tissue-specific patterns during aging, and their expression correlates with, and sometimes predicts, life span, making them ideal biomarkers of aging. The tools available for experimentally manipulating gene function and assaying healthspan in Drosophila provides an unparalleled opportunity to further study the role of Hsps in aging. PMID:20840862

  4. Mobile phones, heat shock proteins and cancer.

    PubMed

    French, P W; Penny, R; Laurence, J A; McKenzie, D R

    2001-06-01

    There are several reports which indicate that electromagnetic radiation (such as from mobile phones) at non-thermal levels may elicit a biological effect in target cells or tissues. Whether or not these biological effects lead to adverse health effects, including cancer, is unclear. To date there is limited scientific evidence of health issues, and no mechanism by which mobile phone radiation could influence cancer development. In this paper, we develop a theoretical mechanism by which radiofrequency radiation from mobile phones could induce cancer, via the chronic activation of the heat shock response. Upregulation of heat shock proteins (Hsps) is a normal defence response to a cellular stress. However, chronic expression of Hsps is known to induce or promote oncogenesis, metastasis and/or resistance to anticancer drugs. We propose that repeated exposure to mobile phone radiation acts as a repetitive stress leading to continuous expression of Hsps in exposed cells and tissues, which in turn affects their normal regulation, and cancer results. This hypothesis provides the possibility of a direct association between mobile phone use and cancer, and thus provides an important focus for future experimentation.

  5. Regulation of apoptosis by heat shock proteins.

    PubMed

    Kennedy, Donna; Jäger, Richard; Mosser, Dick D; Samali, Afshin

    2014-05-01

    Thermotolerance, the acquired resistance of cells to stress, is a well-established phenomenon. Studies of the key mediators of this response, the heat shock proteins (HSPs), have led to the discovery of the important roles played by these proteins in the regulation of apoptotic cell death. Apoptosis is critical for normal tissue homeostasis and is involved in diverse processes including development and immune clearance. Apoptosis is tightly regulated by both proapoptotic and antiapoptotic factors, and dysregulation of apoptosis plays a significant role in the pathophysiology of many diseases. In the recent years, HSPs have been identified as key determinants of cell survival, which can modulate apoptosis by directly interacting with components of the apoptotic machinery. Therefore, manipulation of the HSPs could represent a viable strategy for the treatment of diseases. Here, we review the current knowledge with regard to the mechanisms of HSP-mediated regulation of apoptosis. © 2014 International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology.

  6. [Alterations in heat shock protein 70 kDa levels in human neutrophils under the heat shock conditions].

    PubMed

    Boĭko, A A; Vetchinin, S S; Sapozhnikov, A M; Kovalenko, E I

    2014-01-01

    Intracellular content of heat shock proteins of 70 kDa family (HSP70) possessing chaperone and cytoprotective functions depends on specialization and functional activity of the cells. The aim of this study was to analyze the dynamics of constitutive and inducible HSP70 levels evoked by heat shock in human neutrophils, the short-lived fraction of white blood cells providing non-specific defense against bacterial pathogens. Biphasic dynamics of the intracellular HSP70 level with an increase and following decrease in 15-30 min after the heat shock was revealed by flow cytometry. This dynamics was similar for constitutive and inducible forms of HSP70. Pre-incubation of neutrophils with cycloheximide, the inhibitor of protein synthesis, did not change the intracellular HSP70 dynamics registered by flow cytometry indicating that the increased HSP70 level detected immediately after the heat shock was not mediated by de novo protein synthesis. It was confirmed by Western blotting analysis of HSP70 intracellular content. It was suggested that the elevated HSP70 level was related to conformational HSP70 molecule changes and to increased availability of HSP70 epitopes for antibody binding. Using a panel of antibodies specific to the N-terminal ATP-binding or C-terminal substrate-binding domains of HSP70 it has been demonstrated by cell immunofluorescence and flow cytometry methods that the heat shock-associated increase of the intracellular HSP70 level was mediated by HSP70 interaction with antibodies recognizing HSP70 substrate-binding domain. It was demonstrated that the decrease of intracellular HSP70 level after heat treatment could be connected with a release of both inducible and constitutive HSP70 into extracellular space. Our data suggest that stress-induced release of HSP70 from neutrophils is regulated by ABC-transporters.

  7. Altered expression and phosphorylation of amyloid precursor protein in heat shocked neuronal PC12 cells.

    PubMed

    Johnson, G; Refolo, L M; Merril, C R; Wallace, W

    1993-07-01

    The pathology of the Alzheimer's disease (AD) brain, including amyloid plaques, neurofibrillary tangles and neuronal degeneration, indicates that neurons affected by AD exist under conditions of stress. In fact, the brains of AD patients undergo many changes classically associated with the heat shock response, which is one form of a stress response. These changes include reduced protein synthesis, disrupted cytoskeleton, increased number of proteins associated with ubiquitin, and the induction of heat shock proteins. To investigate the response of neurons to stress, we examined neuronal PC12 cells incubated at either 37 degrees C (control cells) or 45 degrees C (heat-shocked cells). After a 30 min exposure at 45 degrees C, the heat-shocked cells exhibited several features characteristic of the classical heat shock response including a 45% reduction in total protein synthesis, the induction of heat shock protein 72, and an increased phosphorylation of the protein synthesis initiation factor eIF-2 alpha. We used this cellular model system to study the neuronal response to stress specifically focusing on protein synthesis elongation factor 2 (EF-2) and the Alzheimer's amyloid precursor protein (APP), the precursor form of beta-amyloid peptide. Hyperphosphorylation of EF-2 has been observed in the neocortex and hippocampus of AD brain. However, in our system, we find no hyperphosphorylation of EF-2 in response to heat shock. Heat-shocked neuronal PC12 cells exhibited two additional APP-like polypeptides not present in controls. We also found a significant decrease in the phosphorylation state of APP in response to heat shock.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  8. Synthesis and biological evaluation of C-ring truncated deguelin derivatives as heat shock protein 90 (HSP90) inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ho Shin; Hong, Mannkyu; Ann, Jihyae; Yoon, Suyoung; Nguyen, Cong-Truong; Lee, Su-Chan; Lee, Ho-Young; Suh, Young-Ger; Seo, Ji Hae; Choi, Hoon; Kim, Jun Yong; Kim, Kyu-Won; Kim, Joohwan; Kim, Young-Myeong; Park, So-Jung; Park, Hyun-Ju; Lee, Jeewoo

    2016-11-15

    Based on the lead compound L-80 (compound 2), a potent heat shock protein 90 (HSP90) inhibitor, a series of C-ring truncated deguelin analogs were designed, synthesized and evaluated for Hypoxia Inducible Factor-1α (HIF-1α) inhibition as a primary screening method. Their structure-activity relationship was investigated in a systematic manner by varying the A/B ring, linker and D/E ring, respectively. Among the synthesized inhibitors, compound 5 exhibited potent HIF-1α inhibition in a dose-dependent manner and significant antitumor activity in human non-small cell lung carcinoma (H1299), with better activities than L-80. It also inhibited in vitro hypoxia-mediated angiogenic processes in human retinal microvascular endothelial cells (HRMEC). The docking study of 5 showed a similar binding mode as L-80: it occupied the C-terminal ATP-binding pocket of HSP90, indicating that the anticancer and antiangiogenic activities of 5 were derived from HIF-1α destabilization by inhibiting the C-terminal ATP-binding site of hHSP90. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Characterization of the major 68 kDa heat shock protein in a rat transformed astroglial cell line.

    PubMed

    Nishimura, R N; Dwyer, B E; de Vellis, J; Clegg, K B

    1992-01-01

    The heat shock response in a transformed astrocyte line was compared with nontransformed astrocytes. The synthesis of HSP 68, the major inducible heat shock protein (HSP 68) was induced by a non-lethal 45 degrees C, 10 min heat shock. Although the incorporation of [35S]methionine into HSP 68 suggested that similar amounts of protein were being synthesized after heat shock, Western immunoblotting demonstrated striking differences in the HSP immunostaining between the two cell types. By one- and 'two-dimensional gel electrophoresis the major 68 kDa heat shock protein (HSP 68) was similar in both cell types. However, HSP 68 from heat shocked, transformed astrocytes did not immunostain with the monoclonal antibody, C-92, which is specific for the major inducible heat shock protein of HeLa cells. In contrast HSP 68 from heat shocked, nontransformed astrocytes immunostained quite well. A polyclonal antibody raised against the inducible 72 kDa heat shock protein of HeLa cells immunostained the HSP 68 from both astrocytes and transformed astrocytes. Analysis of the mRNA from the two cell types after heat shock revealed two bands of approximately 2.5 and 2.8 kb in astrocytes but only a single 2.5 kb band in the heat shocked transformed astroglia. These results suggest that structural differences in the HSP 68 may be present in the transformed astrocytes compared to the normal astrocytes.

  10. Induction of heat shock proteins in response to primary alcohols in Acinetobacter calcoaceticus.

    PubMed

    Benndorf, D; Loffhagen, N; Babel, W

    1999-01-01

    Cells of Acinetobacter calcoaceticus 69-V, a species able to metabolize a range of aliphatic hydrocarbons and alcohols, were confronted with ethanol, butanol, hexanol or heat shock during growth on acetate as sole source of carbon and energy. The primary alcohols and the heat shock led to the synthesis of new proteins or amplified expression of specific, common and general proteins, which were detected by silver staining after two-dimensional gel electrophoresis. Some of the alcohol-inducible proteins were identified as heat shock proteins by comparing protein patterns of alcohol-shocked cells with those of heat-shocked cells, and by N-terminal amino acid sequencing. DnaK was found to be amplified after all treatments, but GroEI only after heat shock and ethanol treatment. The N-terminal amino acid sequence of the protein, which was considerably amplified after alcohol treatment and heat shock, shows homology to HtpG (high temperature protein G). Some of the heat shock proteins induced by ethanol differ from those induced by butanol and hexanol, suggesting there are at least two different signals for the induction of some heat shock proteins by primary alcohols. This could be due to the different localization of ethanol, butanol and hexanol in the membrane, or because higher cytoplasmic concentrations of ethanol than of butanol or hexanol were applied in these tests in order to keep concentrations of the alcohols in the membrane roughly similar. Besides heat shock proteins, a group of proteins were observed which were only induced by butanol and hexanol, possibly indicating the existence of a further defense mechanism against high concentrations of hydrophobic substrates preventing protein denaturation and membrane damage.

  11. Heat shock-induced HIKESHI protects cell viability via nuclear translocation of heat shock protein 70.

    PubMed

    Yanoma, Toru; Ogata, Kyoichi; Yokobori, Takehiko; Ide, Munenori; Mochiki, Erito; Toyomasu, Yoshitaka; Yanai, Mitsuhiro; Kogure, Norimichi; Kimura, Akiharu; Suzuki, Masaki; Nakazawa, Nobuhiro; Bai, Tuya; Oyama, Tetsunari; Asao, Takayuki; Shirabe, Ken; Kuwano, Hiroyuki

    2017-09-01

    Heat shock proteins (HSPs), particularly HSP70, help restore normal cellular function following damage caused by stressors. HSP expression in tumor tissues indicates cancer progression, and while the development of HSP inhibitors is progressing, these substances are not widely used to treat cancer. HIKESHI (C11orf73) does not control the intracellular movement of HSP70 at normal temperatures; however, it does regulate the function and movements of HSP70 during heat shock. In this study, we examined the intracellular movement of HSP70 during heat shock to investigate the significance of HIKESHI expression in gastric cancer (GC) and determine if HIKESHI inhibition has cytotoxic effects. We examined HIKESHI using GC cell lines and immunostaining in 207 GC tissue samples. HIKESHI expression in GC tissues was associated with the progression of lymphatic invasion. Suppressing HIKESHI using siRNA did not affect cell viability at normal temperatures. However, suppressing HIKESHI during heat shock inhibited HSP70 nuclear transport and suppressed cell viability. Our results suggest that HIKESHI is a marker of cancer progression and that the combination of HIKESHI inhibition and hyperthermia is a therapeutic tool for refractory GC.

  12. The effect of heat stress on gene expression and synthesis of heat-shock and milk proteins in bovine mammary epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Hu, Han; Zhang, Yangdong; Zheng, Nan; Cheng, Jianbo; Wang, Jiaqi

    2016-01-01

    In this study, bovine mammary epithelial cells were used to study stress responses after cells were exposed to 42°C for 0.5, 1, 3, 5, 8 or 12 h, and 38°C as control. The transcription of the genes (HSP27, HSP70 and HSP90) of heat shock protein (Hsp) was significantly enhanced under heat stress (HS). The peak transcription of HSP70 was 14 times the control at 1 h. Expression of proteins Hsp27 and Hsp70 was gradually increased under HS, with rapid deposition of Hsp70 in epithelial cells. The major milk protein genes of β-casein (CSN2) and butyrophilin (BTN1A1) were down-regulated and the synthesis of total caseins was decreased. After the cells were under HS (42°C) for 1 or 5 h, the cells were cultured at 38°C for 1, 6, 12 or 24 h for recovery. When the cells were cultured at 38°C for 24 h after HS for 1 h, the transcription of HSP70, HSP90, CSN2 and BTN reached normal levels. Our results suggest that HS initiated Hsp synthesis and decreased the milk protein synthesis. Hsp70 is extremely sensitive to HS and mainly responsible for mammary cell protection from HS. © 2015 Japanese Society of Animal Science.

  13. Arsenic trioxide induces de novo protein synthesis of annexin-1 in neutrophils: association with a heat shock-like response and not apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Binet, François; Chiasson, Sonia; Girard, Denis

    2008-02-01

    We recently demonstrated that arsenic trioxide (ATO) induced apoptosis in human neutrophils and increased de novo protein synthesis. Here, we identified one of these newly synthesized proteins as annexin-1 (AnxA1), a protein recently found to be proapoptotic in neutrophils when added exogenously. AnxA1 was detected at the cell membrane of ATO-induced neutrophils as well as in the supernatants. Using neutrophils harvested from AnxA1 knockout mice, we found that the proapoptotic activity of ATO was similar in neutrophils, regardless of AnxA1 levels. A second protein was identified as heat shock protein (Hsp) 89alpha. Because ATO is known to induce a HS-like response in a variety of cells, we investigated its ability to induce gene expression of Hsp in neutrophils and found that ATO increases HSP90AA1, HSPA1 and HSPB1 mRNA in these cells. We conclude that ATO-induced neutrophil apoptosis by an AnxA1-independent mechanism. Our data provide the first evidence that ATO induces a stress response in human neutrophils and that de novo synthesis of AnxA1 is related to this event rather than to the proapoptotic activity of ATO.

  14. Potent triazolothione inhibitor of heat-shock protein-90.

    PubMed

    Feldman, Richard I; Mintzer, Bob; Zhu, Daguang; Wu, James M; Biroc, Sandra L; Yuan, Shendong; Emayan, Kumar; Chang, Zheng; Chen, Deborah; Arnaiz, Damian O; Bryant, Judi; Ge, Xue Snow; Whitlow, Marc; Adler, Marc; Polokoff, Mark A; Li, Wei-Wei; Ferrer, Mike; Sato, Takashi; Gu, Jian-Ming; Shen, Jun; Tseng, Jih-Lie; Dinter, Harald; Buckman, Brad

    2009-07-01

    Heat-shock protein-90 is an attractive target for anticancer drugs, as heat-shock protein-90 blockers such as the ansamycin 17-(allylamino)-17-demethoxygeldanamycin greatly reduce the expression of many signaling molecules that are disregulated in cancer cells and are key drivers of tumor growth and metastasis. While 17-(allylamino)-17-demethoxygeldanamycin has shown promise in clinical trials, this compound class has significant template-related drawbacks. In this paper, we describe a new, potent non-ansamycin small-molecule inhibitor of heat-shock protein-90, BX-2819, containing resorcinol and triazolothione rings. Structural studies demonstrate binding of BX-2819 to the ADP/ATP-binding pocket of heat-shock protein-90. The compound blocked expression of heat-shock protein-90 client proteins in cancer cell lines and inhibited cell growth with a potency similar to 17-(allylamino)-17-demethoxygeldanamycin. In a panel of four cancer cell lines, BX-2819 blocked growth with an average IC(50) value of 32 nM (range of 7-72 nM). Efficacy studies demonstrated that treatment with BX-2819 significantly inhibited the growth of NCI-N87 and HT-29 tumors in nude mice, consistent with pharmacodynamic studies showing inhibition of heat-shock protein-90 client protein expression in tumors for greater than 16 h after dosing. These data support further studies to assess the potential of BX-2819 and related analogs for the treatment of cancer.

  15. Heat shock protein induction in rat pancreatic islets by recombinant human interleukin 1 beta.

    PubMed

    Helqvist, S; Polla, B S; Johannesen, J; Nerup, J

    1991-03-01

    Interleukin 1 beta, potentiated by tumour necrosis factor alpha, is cytotoxic to pancreatic Beta cells in vitro. We have hypothesized that interleukin 1 beta induces oxygen free radicals in Beta cells. Since cytotoxicity induced by free radicals and by heat may activate the same cellular repair mechanism (the heat shock response), the aim of this study was to investigate the pattern of protein synthesis in isolated islets after exposure to interleukin 1 beta (150 pg/ml, 24 h), tumour necrosis factor alpha (50 ng/ml, 24 h) heat shock (43 degrees C, 30 min) and H2O2 (0.1 mmol/l, 20 min). By polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, autoradiography, Western-blot analysis and partial peptide mapping of 35S-methionine labelled islets, interleukin 1 beta was found to induce a 73 kilodalton protein belonging to the heat shock protein family heat shock protein 70, a heat shock protein 90, and haem oxygenase. A minor induction of heat shock protein 73 and haem oxygenase was seen after H2O2. Interleukin 1 beta did not induce heat shock proteins in rat thyroid cells, rat mesangial cells or in human monocytes. Tumour necrosis factor alpha did not induce selective protein synthesis. Pre-exposure of islets to heat, tumour necrosis factor alpha, or H2O2 did not prevent the impairment of glucose-stimulated insulin release seen after 24 h of interleukin 1 beta exposure. The data are compatible with free radical induction by interleukin 1 beta. However, the heat shock response is not specific for oxidative injury, and previous studies have shown discrepant effects as to a protective effect of free radical scavengers against interleukin 1 beta-mediated beta-cytotoxicity.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  16. Aging results in an unusual expression of Drosophila heat shock proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Fleming, J.E.; Walton, J.K.; Dubitsky, R.; Bensch, K.G. )

    1988-06-01

    The authors used high-resolution two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis to evaluate the effect of aging on the heat shock response in Drosophila melanogaster. Although the aging process is not well understood at the molecular level, recent observations suggest that quantitative changes in gene expression occur as these fruit flies approach senescence. Such genetic alterations are in accord with our present data, which clearly show marked differences in the synthesis of heat shock proteins between young and old fruit flies. In 10-day-old flies, a heat shock of 20 min results in the expression of 14 new proteins as detectable by two-dimensional electrophoresis of ({sup 35}S)methionine-labeled polypeptides, whereas identical treatment of 45-day-old flies leads to the expression of at least 50 new or highly up-regulated proteins. In addition, there is also a concomitant increase in the rate of synthesis of a number of the normal proteins in the older animals. Microdensitometric determinations of the low molecular weight heat shock polypeptides on autoradiographs of five age groups revealed that their maximum expression occurs at 47 days for a population of flies with a mean life span of 33.7 days. Moreover, a heat shock effect similar to that observed in senescent flies occurs in young flies fed canavanine, an arginine analogue, before heat shock.

  17. Long-Lived and Short-Lived Heat-Shock Proteins in Tobacco Mesophyll Protoplasts

    PubMed Central

    Meyer, Yves; Chartier, Yvette

    1983-01-01

    We have studied modifications in the pattern of proteins synthesized by tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum var Maryland) mesophyll protoplasts when they are transferred from 25°C to 40°C. The synthesis of one group of proteins is practically unaffected by the heat shock. On the other hand, the synthesis of most other 25°C proteins is greatly reduced, while specific heat-shock proteins appear: 17 stable, neutral, major proteins, which are synthesized throughout the culture period at the higher temperature and which correspond to those observed in other organisms, and two basic proteins with a short lifetime and which are synthesized only during the first 2 hours of heat shock. We suggest that these latter proteins are regulatory peptides which intervene in the inhibition of 25°C syntheses. Images Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 Fig. 6 Fig. 7 PMID:16662973

  18. Heat shock proteins and heat shock factor 1 in carcinogenesis and tumor development: an update

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Heat shock proteins (HSP) are a subset of the molecular chaperones, best known for their rapid and abundant induction by stress. HSP genes are activated at the transcriptional level by heat shock transcription factor 1 (HSF1). During the progression of many types of cancer, this heat shock transcriptional regulon becomes co-opted by mechanisms that are currently unclear, although evidently triggered in the emerging tumor cell. Concerted activation of HSF1 and the accumulation of HSPs then participates in many of the traits that permit the malignant phenotype. Thus cancers of many histologies exhibit activated HSF1 and increased HSP levels that may help to deter tumor suppression and evade therapy in the clinic. We review here the extensive work that has been carried out and is still in progress aimed at: (1) understanding the oncogenic mechanisms by which HSP genes are switched on, (2) determining the roles of HSF1 / HSP in malignant transformation and, (3) discovering approaches to therapy based on disrupting the influence of the HSF1 controlled transcriptome in cancer. PMID:22885793

  19. Heat shock proteins and heat shock factor 1 in carcinogenesis and tumor development: an update.

    PubMed

    Ciocca, Daniel R; Arrigo, Andre Patrick; Calderwood, Stuart K

    2013-01-01

    Heat shock proteins (HSP) are a subset of the molecular chaperones, best known for their rapid and abundant induction by stress. HSP genes are activated at the transcriptional level by heat shock transcription factor 1 (HSF1). During the progression of many types of cancer, this heat shock transcriptional regulon becomes co-opted by mechanisms that are currently unclear, although evidently triggered in the emerging tumor cell. Concerted activation of HSF1 and the accumulation of HSPs then participate in many of the traits that permit the malignant phenotype. Thus, cancers of many histologies exhibit activated HSF1 and increased HSP levels that may help to deter tumor suppression and evade therapy in the clinic. We review here the extensive work that has been carried out and is still in progress aimed at (1) understanding the oncogenic mechanisms by which HSP genes are switched on, (2) determining the roles of HSF1/HSP in malignant transformation and (3) discovering approaches to therapy based on disrupting the influence of the HSF1-controlled transcriptome in cancer.

  20. Synthesis of Reblastatin, Autolytimycin, Non-Benzoquinone Analogs: Potent Inhibitors of Heat Shock Protein 90 (Hsp90)

    PubMed Central

    Wrona, Iwona E.; Gozman, Alexander; Taldone, Tony; Chiosis, Gabriela; Panek, James S.

    2010-01-01

    A full account of an asymmetric synthesis of reblastatin (1), the first total synthesis of autolytimycin (2) and related structural compounds is described. The syntheses expand the utility of a highly regio-and diastereoselective hydrometalation aldehyde addition sequence to assemble the fully functionalized ansa chain of the natural products. Also documented is an intramolecular copper-mediated amidation reaction to close the 19-membered macrolactams. The amidation reaction was also employed for the generation of structural derivatives (6–9) of phenolic ansamycins. Ansamycin natural products and selected structural analogs were evaluated in a competitive binding assay to breast cancer cell lysate and a cytotoxicity assay. Both reblastatin (1) and autolytimycin (2) were shown to bind the Hsp90 protein with enhanced binding activity (~25 nM) than 17-allylamino-17-demethoxygeldanamycin (17-AAG, 4), a geldanamycin (3) derivative currently under evaluation for treatment of cancer (~100 nM). PMID:20392070

  1. Multiple oligomeric structures of a bacterial small heat shock protein

    PubMed Central

    Mani, Nandini; Bhandari, Spraha; Moreno, Rodolfo; Hu, Liya; Prasad, B. V. Venkataram; Suguna, Kaza

    2016-01-01

    Small heat shock proteins are ubiquitous molecular chaperones that form the first line of defence against the detrimental effects of cellular stress. Under conditions of stress they undergo drastic conformational rearrangements in order to bind to misfolded substrate proteins and prevent cellular protein aggregation. Owing to the dynamic nature of small heat shock protein oligomers, elucidating the structural basis of chaperone action and oligomerization still remains a challenge. In order to understand the organization of sHSP oligomers, we have determined crystal structures of a small heat shock protein from Salmonella typhimurium in a dimeric form and two higher oligomeric forms: an 18-mer and a 24-mer. Though the core dimer structure is conserved in all the forms, structural heterogeneity arises due to variation in the terminal regions. PMID:27053150

  2. Heat shock proteins, end effectors of myocardium ischemic preconditioning?

    PubMed Central

    Guisasola, María Concepcion; Desco, Maria del Mar; Gonzalez, Fernanda Silvana; Asensio, Fernando; Dulin, Elena; Suarez, Antonio; Garcia Barreno, Pedro

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate (1) whether ischemia-reperfusion increased the content of heat shock protein 72 (Hsp72) transcripts and (2) whether myocardial content of Hsp72 is increased by ischemic preconditioning so that they can be considered as end effectors of preconditioning. Twelve male minipigs (8 protocol, 4 sham) were used, with the following ischemic preconditioning protocol: 3 ischemia and reperfusion 5-minute alternative cycles and last reperfusion cycle of 3 hours. Initial and final transmural biopsies (both in healthy and ischemic areas) were taken in all animals. Heat shock protein 72 messenger ribonucleic acid (mRNA) expression was measured by a semiquantitative reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) method using complementary DNA normalized against the housekeeping gene cyclophilin. The identification of heat shock protein 72 was performed by immunoblot. In our “classic” preconditioning model, we found no changes in mRNA hsp72 levels or heat shock protein 72 content in the myocardium after 3 hours of reperfusion. Our experimental model is valid and the experimental techniques are appropriate, but the induction of heat shock proteins 72 as end effectors of cardioprotection in ischemic preconditioning does not occur in the first hours after ischemia, but probably at least 24 hours after it, in the so-called “second protection window.” PMID:17009598

  3. Barcoding heat shock proteins to human diseases: looking beyond the heat shock response

    PubMed Central

    Kakkar, Vaishali; Meister-Broekema, Melanie; Minoia, Melania; Carra, Serena; Kampinga, Harm H.

    2014-01-01

    There are numerous human diseases that are associated with protein misfolding and the formation of toxic protein aggregates. Activating the heat shock response (HSR) – and thus generally restoring the disturbed protein homeostasis associated with such diseases – has often been suggested as a therapeutic strategy. However, most data on activating the HSR or its downstream targets in mouse models of diseases associated with aggregate formation have been rather disappointing. The human chaperonome consists of many more heat shock proteins (HSPs) that are not regulated by the HSR, however, and researchers are now focusing on these as potential therapeutic targets. In this Review, we summarize the existing literature on a set of aggregation diseases and propose that each of them can be characterized or ‘barcoded’ by a different set of HSPs that can rescue specific types of aggregation. Some of these ‘non-canonical’ HSPs have demonstrated effectiveness in vivo, in mouse models of protein-aggregation disease. Interestingly, several of these HSPs also cause diseases when mutated – so-called chaperonopathies – which are also discussed in this Review. PMID:24719117

  4. Exposure of gnotobiotic Artemia franciscana larvae to abiotic stress promotes heat shock protein 70 synthesis and enhances resistance to pathogenic Vibrio campbellii

    PubMed Central

    Pineda, Carlos; MacRae, Thomas H.; Sorgeloos, Patrick; Bossier, Peter

    2008-01-01

    Larvae of the brine shrimp Artemia franciscana serve as important feed in fish and shellfish larviculture; however, they are subject to bacterial diseases that devastate entire populations and consequently hinder their use in aquaculture. Exposure to abiotic stress was shown previously to shield Artemia larvae against infection by pathogenic Vibrio, with the results suggesting a mechanistic role for heat shock protein 70. In the current report, combined hypothermic/hyperthermic shock followed by recovery at ambient temperature induced Hsp70 synthesis in Artemia larvae. Thermotolerance was also increased as was protection against infection by Vibrio campbellii, the latter indicated by reduced mortality and lower bacterial load in challenge tests. Resistance to Vibrio improved in the face of declining body mass as demonstrated by measurement of ash-free dry weight. Hypothermic stress only and acute osmotic insult did not promote Hsp70 expression and thermotolerance in Artemia larvae nor was resistance to Vibrio challenge augmented. The data support a causal link between Hsp70 accumulation induced by abiotic stress and enhanced resistance to infection by V. campbellii, perhaps via stimulation of the Artemia immune system. This possibility is now under investigation, and the work may reveal fundamental properties of crustacean immunity. Additionally, the findings are important in aquaculture where development of procedures to prevent bacterial infection of feed stock such as Artemia larvae is a priority. PMID:18347942

  5. Synergistic Effects of Toxic Elements on Heat Shock Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Mahmood, Khalid; Mahmood, Qaisar; Irshad, Muhammad; Hussain, Jamshaid

    2014-01-01

    Heat shock proteins show remarkable variations in their expression levels under a variety of toxic conditions. A research span expanded over five decades has revealed their molecular characterization, gene regulation, expression patterns, vast similarity in diverse groups, and broad range of functional capabilities. Their functions include protection and tolerance against cytotoxic conditions through their molecular chaperoning activity, maintaining cytoskeleton stability, and assisting in cell signaling. However, their role as biomarkers for monitoring the environmental risk assessment is controversial due to a number of conflicting, validating, and nonvalidating reports. The current knowledge regarding the interpretation of HSPs expression levels has been discussed in the present review. The candidature of heat shock proteins as biomarkers of toxicity is thus far unreliable due to synergistic effects of toxicants and other environmental factors. The adoption of heat shock proteins as “suit of biomarkers in a set of organisms” requires further investigation. PMID:25136596

  6. Heat Shock Proteins in Tendinopathy: Novel Molecular Regulators

    PubMed Central

    Millar, Neal L.; Murrell, George A. C.

    2012-01-01

    Tendon disorders—tendinopathies—are the primary reason for musculoskeletal consultation in primary care and account for up to 30% of rheumatological consultations. Whilst the molecular pathophysiology of tendinopathy remains difficult to interpret the disease process involving repetitive stress, and cellular load provides important mechanistic insight into the area of heat shock proteins which spans many disease processes in the autoimmune community. Heat shock proteins, also called damage-associated molecular patterns (DAMPs), are rapidly released following nonprogrammed cell death, are key effectors of the innate immune system, and critically restore homeostasis by promoting the reconstruction of the effected tissue. Our investigations have highlighted a key role for HSPs in tendion disease which may ultimately affect tissue rescue mechanisms in tendon pathology. This paper aims to provide an overview of the biology of heat shock proteins in soft tissue and how these mediators may be important regulators of inflammatory mediators and matrix regulation in tendinopathy. PMID:23258952

  7. Synergistic effects of toxic elements on heat shock proteins.

    PubMed

    Mahmood, Khalid; Jadoon, Saima; Mahmood, Qaisar; Irshad, Muhammad; Hussain, Jamshaid

    2014-01-01

    Heat shock proteins show remarkable variations in their expression levels under a variety of toxic conditions. A research span expanded over five decades has revealed their molecular characterization, gene regulation, expression patterns, vast similarity in diverse groups, and broad range of functional capabilities. Their functions include protection and tolerance against cytotoxic conditions through their molecular chaperoning activity, maintaining cytoskeleton stability, and assisting in cell signaling. However, their role as biomarkers for monitoring the environmental risk assessment is controversial due to a number of conflicting, validating, and nonvalidating reports. The current knowledge regarding the interpretation of HSPs expression levels has been discussed in the present review. The candidature of heat shock proteins as biomarkers of toxicity is thus far unreliable due to synergistic effects of toxicants and other environmental factors. The adoption of heat shock proteins as "suit of biomarkers in a set of organisms" requires further investigation.

  8. Heat Shock Protein (HSP) Drug Discovery and Development: Targeting Heat Shock Proteins in Disease

    PubMed Central

    Shrestha, Liza; Bolaender, Alexander; Patel, Hardik J.; Taldone, Tony

    2016-01-01

    Heat shock proteins (HSPs) present as a double edged sword. While they play an important role in maintaining protein homeostasis in a normal cell, cancer cells have evolved to co-opt HSP function to promote their own survival. As a result, HSPs such as HSP90 have attracted a great deal of interest as a potential anticancer target. These efforts have resulted in over 20 distinct compounds entering clinical evaluation for the treatment of cancer. However, despite the potent anticancer activity demonstrated in preclinical models, to date no HSP90 inhibitor has obtained regulatory approval. In this review we discuss the unique challenges faced in targeting HSPs that have likely contributed to their lack of progress in the clinic and suggest ways to overcome these so that the enormous potential of these compounds to benefit patients can finally be realized. We also provide a guideline for the future development of HSP-targeted agents based on the many lessons learned during the last two decades in developing HSP90 inhibitors. PMID:27072696

  9. Heat shock proteins and protection against ischemic injury.

    PubMed Central

    Dillmann, W H

    1999-01-01

    Heat shock proteins present a complex family of proteins exerting chaperone-like activities that are classified according to their molecular weight. We especially explored protective functions of inducible heat shock protein 70, the mitochondrial heat shock protein 60 and 10, and the small heat shock proteins HSP27 and alphaB-crystallin against ischemic, reoxygenation-mediated injury using transgenic animals and hearts under in vivo conditions and in isolated cardiac myocyte-derived cells using adenoviral vectors. We noted with great interest that differential protective effects are exerted by specific hsps. For example, alpha-B-crystallin and constitutive hsp70 markedly protect microtubular structure in cardiac myocytes from ischemia-induced injury. Inducible hsp70, hsp60 and hsp10 when coexpressed, and hsp27 and alphaB-crystallin have an overall protective effect against ischemic injury as determined by the release of enzymes like creatine kinase and LDH. We did not note inflammatory or immune responses elicited by the expression of hsps in transgenic animals and cardiac myocytes. The specific cell types in which hsps are expressed may contribute to the protective effect of hsps versus their inflammatory and immunogenic effects when expressed in other cell types. PMID:10231010

  10. Decreased levels of heat shock proteins in gut epithelial cells after exposure to plant lectins

    PubMed Central

    Ovelgonne, J; Koninkx, J; Pusztai, A; Bardocz, S; Kok, W; Ewen, S; Hendriks, H; van Dijk, J E

    2000-01-01

    BACKGROUND—The enterocytes of the intestinal epithelium are regularly exposed to potentially harmful substances of dietary origin, such as lectins. Expression of heat shock proteins (HSPs) by this epithelium may be part of a protective mechanism developed by intestinal epithelial cells to deal with noxious components in the intestinal lumen.
AIM—To investigate if the lectins PHA, a lectin from kidney beans (Phaseolus vulgaris) and WGA, a lectin from wheat germ (Triticum aestivum) could modify the heat shock response in gut epithelial cells and to establish the extent of this effect.
METHODS—Jejunal tissue sections from PHA and WGA fed rats were screened for expression of HSP70, HSP72, and HSP90 using monoclonal antibodies. Differentiated Caco-2 cells, the in vitro counterpart of villus enterocytes, were exposed to 100 µg/ml of PHA-E4 or WGA for 48 hours and investigated for changes in DNA and protein synthesis by double labelling with [2-14C]thymidine and L-[methyl-3H]methionine. The relative concentrations of HSP60, HSP70, HSP72, and HSP90 and binding protein (BiP) in these cells exposed to lectins were analysed by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and immunoblotting. To establish if lectin exposed differentiated Caco-2 cells were still capable of producing a heat shock response, these cells received a heat shock (40°C, 41°C, and 42°C) for one hour and were allowed to recover for six hours at 37°C. During heat shock and recovery periods, lectin exposure was continued.
RESULTS—Constitutive levels of HSPs were measured in the intestinal cells of lactalbumin fed (control) rats, as may be expected from the function of this tissue. However, in PHA and WGA fed rats a marked decline in the binding of antibodies against several HSPs to the intestinal epithelium was found. These results were confirmed by in vitro experiments using differentiated Caco-2 cells exposed to PHA-E4 and WGA. However, after exposure to lectins, these cells were still capable

  11. Small heat shock proteins and protein-misfolding diseases.

    PubMed

    Laskowska, Ewa; Matuszewska, Ewelina; Kuczyńska-Wiśnik, Dorota

    2010-02-01

    Small heat shock proteins (sHsps) are molecular chaperones ubiquitously distributed in numerous species, from bacteria to humans. A conserved C-terminal "alpha-crystallin" domain organized in a beta-sheet sandwich and oligomeric structure are common features of sHsps. sHsps protect cells against many kinds of stresses including heat shock, oxidative and osmotic stress. sHsps recognize unfolded proteins, prevent their irreversible aggregation and facilitate refolding of bound substrates in cooperation with ATP-dependent molecular chaperones (Hsp70/Hsp40). Mammalian sHsps (HSPBs) are multifunctional proteins involved in many cellular processes including those which are not directly related to protein folding and aggregation. HSPBs participate in cell development and cancerogenesis, regulate apoptosis and control cytoskeletal architecture. Recent data revealed that HSPBs also play an important role in membrane stabilization. Mutation in HSPB genes have been identified, which are responsible for the development of cataract, desmin related myopathy and neuropathies. HSPBs are often found as components of protein aggregates associated with protein-misfolding disorders, such as Parkinson's, Alzheimer's, Alexander's and prion diseases. It is supposed that the presence of HSPBs in intra- or extracellular protein deposits is a consequence of the chaperone activity of HSPBs, however more studies are needed to reveal the exact function of HSPBs during the formation (or removal) of disease-related aggregates.

  12. Thermotolerance and Human Performance: Role of Heat Shock Proteins

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-10-01

    and provide a mechanistic basis for the requirement of HSF1 in the regulation of life span and establish a role for SIRT1 in protein homeostasis and...Stress-Inducible Regulation of Heat Shock Factor 1 by the Deacetylase SIRT1 . Science. 2009; 323: 1063-1066. Wilson N, Gisolfi C, Farber J, Hinrichs D

  13. Expression of heat shock protein genes in insect stress responses

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The heat shock proteins (HSPs) that are abundantly expressed in insects are important modulators of insect survival. Expression of HSP genes in insects is not only developmentally regulated, but also induced by various stressors in order to confer protection against such stressors. The expression o...

  14. Heat-shock protein ClpL/HSP100 increases penicillin tolerance in Streptococcus pneumoniae.

    PubMed

    Tran, Thao Dang-Hien; Kwon, Hyog-Young; Kim, Eun-Hye; Kim, Ki-Woo; Briles, David E; Pyo, Suhkneung; Rhee, Dong-Kwon

    2011-01-01

    Penicillin resistance and tolerance has been an increasing threat to the treatment of pneumococcal pneumoniae. However, no penicillin tolerance-related genes have been claimed. Here we show that a major heat shock protein ClpL/HSP100 could modulate the expression of a cell wall synthesis enzyme PBP2x, and subsequently increase cell wall thickness and penicillin tolerance in Streptococus pneumoniae.

  15. Molecular cloning, phylogenetic analysis and heat shock response of Babesia gibsoni heat shock protein 90

    PubMed Central

    YAMASAKI, Masahiro; TSUBOI, Yoshihiro; TANIYAMA, Yusuke; UCHIDA, Naohiro; SATO, Reeko; NAKAMURA, Kensuke; OHTA, Hiroshi; TAKIGUCHI, Mitsuyoshi

    2016-01-01

    The Babesia gibsoni heat shock protein 90 (BgHSP90) gene was cloned and sequenced. The length of the gene was 2,610 bp with two introns. This gene was amplified from cDNA corresponding to full length coding sequence (CDS) with an open reading frame of 2,148 bp. A phylogenetic analysis of the CDS of HSP90 gene showed that B. gibsoni was most closely related to B. bovis and Babesia sp. BQ1/Lintan and lies within a phylogenetic cluster of protozoa. Moreover, mRNA transcription profile for BgHSP90 exposed to high temperature were examined by quantitative real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. BgHSP90 levels were elevated when the parasites were incubated at 43°C for 1 hr. PMID:27149891

  16. Heat shock inhibits. alpha. -amylase synthesis in barley aleurone without inhibiting the activity of endoplasmic reticulum marker enzymes

    SciTech Connect

    Sticher, L.; Biswas, A.K.; Bush, D.S.; Jones, R.L. )

    1990-02-01

    The effects of heat shock on the synthesis of {alpha}-amylase and on the membranes of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) of barley (Hordeum vulgare) aleurone were studied. Heat shock, imposed by raising the temperature of incubation from 25{degree}C to 40{degree}C for 3 hours, inhibits the accumulation of {alpha}-amylase and other proteins in the incubation medium of barley aleurone layers treated with gibberellic acid and Ca{sup 2+}. When ER is isolated from heat-shocked aleurone layers, less newly synthesized {alpha}-amylase is found associated with this membrane system. ER membranes, as indicated by the activities of NADH cytochrome c reductase and ATP-dependent Ca{sup 2+} transport, are not destroyed by heat stress, however. Although heat shock did not reduce the activity of ER membrane marker enzymes, it altered the buoyant density of these membranes. Whereas ER from control tissue showed a peak of marker enzyme activity at 27% to 28% sucrose (1.113-1.120 grams per cubic centimeter), ER from heat-shocked tissue peaked at 30% to 32% sucrose (1.127-1.137 grams per cubic centimeter). The synthesis of a group of proteins designated as heat-shock proteins (HSPs) was stimulated by heat shock. These HSPs were localized to different compartments of the aleurone cell. Several proteins ranging from 15 to 30 kilodaltons were found in the ER and the mitochondrial/plasma membrane fractions of heat-shocked cells, but none of the HSPs accumulated in the incubation medium of heat-shocked aleurone layers.

  17. The role of heat shock proteins in kidney disease

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Heat Shock Proteins (HSP) belong to the family of intracellular proteins that are constitutively expressed and are upregulated by various stressors including heat, oxidative and chemical stress. HSP helps in reparative processes, including the refolding of damaged proteins and the removal of irreparably damaged proteins that would initiate cellular death or apoptosis. A growing body of evidence has expanded the role of HSP and defined their role in diseases such as neurodegenerative disorders, cancer, ischemic heart disease and kidney diseases. The protective role of HSP in ischemic renal injury has been described and HSP impairment has been noted in other forms of kidney injuries including post-transplant situation. Further research into the role of HSP in prevention of kidney injury is crucial if translation from the laboratory to patient bedside has to occur. This article aims to be a review of heat shock protein, and its relevance to kidney diseases. PMID:28191532

  18. Hydrogen peroxide-inducible proteins in Salmonella typhimurium overlap with heat shock and other stress proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Morgan, R W; Christman, M F; Jacobson, F S; Storz, G; Ames, B N

    1986-01-01

    Hydrogen peroxide treatment induces the synthesis of 30 proteins in Salmonella typhimurium. Five of these proteins are also induced by heat shock, including the highly conserved DnaK protein. The induction of one of these five proteins by heat shock is dependent on oxyR, a positive regulator of hydrogen peroxide-inducible genes, while the induction of the other four by heat shock is oxyR independent. Five of the 30 hydrogen peroxide-inducible proteins have been identified, and their structural genes have been mapped. Other stresses such as nalidixic acid, ethanol, or cumene hydroperoxide treatment also induce subsets of the 30 hydrogen peroxide-inducible proteins as well as additional proteins. Hydrogen peroxide-inducible proteins are shown to be largely different from those proteins induced by aerobiosis. In addition, the expression of the katG (catalase) gene is shown to be regulated by oxyR at the level of mRNA. Images PMID:3534881

  19. A novel 29-kDa chicken heat shock protein.

    PubMed

    Einat, M F; Haberfeld, A; Shamay, A; Horev, G; Hurwitz, S; Yahav, S

    1996-12-01

    The family of small heat shock proteins is the more variable among the highly conserved superfamily of heat shock proteins (HSP). Using a metabolic labeling procedure with tissue explants, we have detected in chickens a new member of the small HSP family with an apparent molecular weight of 29-kDa. This protein was induced in broiler chickens' heart muscle and lungs following an in vivo heat stress. The 29-kDa band appears after 3 h of heat stress, much later than the induction of HSP 90, HSP 70, and HSP 27. The late onset of induction suggests that HSP 29 plays a more specific role of a "second stage defense protein".

  20. Inhibition of Heat Shock Protein 90 Prevents HIV Rebound.

    PubMed

    Joshi, Pheroze; Maidji, Ekaterina; Stoddart, Cheryl A

    2016-05-06

    HIV evades eradication because transcriptionally dormant proviral genomes persist in long-lived reservoirs of resting CD4(+) T cells and myeloid cells, which are the source of viral rebound after cessation of antiretroviral therapy. Dormant HIV genomes readily produce infectious virus upon cellular activation because host transcription factors activated specifically by cell stress and heat shock mediate full-length HIV transcription. The molecular chaperone heat shock protein 90 (Hsp90) is overexpressed during heat shock and activates inducible cellular transcription factors. Here we show that heat shock accelerates HIV transcription through induction of Hsp90 activity, which activates essential HIV-specific cellular transcription factors (NF-κB, NFAT, and STAT5), and that inhibition of Hsp90 greatly reduces gene expression mediated by these factors. More importantly, we show that Hsp90 controls virus transcription in vivo by specific Hsp90 inhibitors in clinical development, tanespimycin (17-(allylamino)-17-demethoxygeldanamycin) and AUY922, which durably prevented viral rebound in HIV-infected humanized NOD scid IL-2Rγ(-/-) bone marrow-liver-thymus mice up to 11 weeks after treatment cessation. Despite the absence of rebound viremia, we were able to recover infectious HIV from PBMC with heat shock. Replication-competent virus was detected in spleen cells from these nonviremic Hsp90 inhibitor-treated mice, indicating the presence of a tissue reservoir of persistent infection. Our novel findings provide in vivo evidence that inhibition of Hsp90 activity prevents HIV gene expression in replication-competent cellular reservoirs that would typically cause rebound in plasma viremia after antiretroviral therapy cessation. Alternating or supplementing Hsp90 inhibitors with current antiretroviral therapy regimens could conceivably suppress rebound viremia from persistent HIV reservoirs. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  1. Detection of secreted and temporarily inducible heat shock responsive proteins in mouse testicular tissue.

    PubMed

    Lemaire, L; Heinlein, U A

    1991-01-01

    Temperature-induced effects on the synthesis of murine testicular proteins were investigated by one- and two-dimensional SDS polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Newly synthesized proteins were monitored by incorporation of 35S-methionine and autoradiography. Three heat shock responsive proteins, which are differently affected by elevated temperatures, are described. These proteins represent special examples for how testicular cells respond to environmental stress. One of these proteins, HSl36, is synthesized and secreted at 38 degrees C, whereas at lower, scrotal temperatures it is not detectable. HSlD74 protein is synthesized at elevated temperatures, but only in prepuberal testis, not in adult. Synthesis of the third example, HSR28, is decreased within the seminiferous tubules, but only in those regions which bear cell associations of the elongation stage. These results indicate that the use of DNA probes of the 'heat shock'-gene family might not be sufficient to describe the molecular reasons for impaired spermatogenesis following hyperthermia.

  2. Fused imidazoles as potential chemical scaffolds for inhibition of heat shock protein 70 and induction of apoptosis. Synthesis and biological evaluation of phenanthro[9,10-d]imidazoles and imidazo[4,5-f][1,10]phenanthrolines.

    PubMed

    Patel, Alpa; Sharp, Swee Y; Hall, Katelan; Lewis, William; Stevens, Malcolm F G; Workman, Paul; Moody, Christopher J

    2016-04-28

    The imidazole ring is widespread in biologically active compounds, and hence imidazole-containing scaffolds are useful starting points for drug discovery programmes. We report the synthesis of a series of novel imidazole-containing compounds fused with either phenanthrene or phenanthroline, which show enhanced growth inhibitory potency against human colon, breast and melanoma cancer cell lines, as well as evidence of inhibition of the molecular chaperone heat shock protein 70 (Hsp70) pathway in cells, as shown by depletion of downstream oncogenic client proteins of the Hsp90 chaperone pathway, and induction of apoptosis.

  3. Heat-shock treatment-mediated increase in transduction by recombinant adeno-associated virus 2 vectors is independent of the cellular heat-shock protein 90.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Li; Qing, Keyun; Si, Yue; Chen, Linyuan; Tan, Mengqun; Srivastava, Arun

    2004-03-26

    Recombinant adeno-associated virus 2 (AAV) vectors transduction efficiency varies greatly in different cell types. We have described that a cellular protein, FKBP52, in its phosphorylated form interacts with the D-sequence in the viral inverted terminal repeat, inhibits viral second strand DNA synthesis, and limits transgene expression. Here we investigated the role of cellular heat-shock protein 90 (HSP90) in AAV transduction because FKBP52 forms a complex with HSP90, and because heat-shock treatment augments AAV transduction efficiency. Heat-shock treatment of HeLa cells resulted in tyrosine dephosphorylation of FKBP52, led to stabilization of the FKBP52-HSP90 complex, and resulted in approximately 6-fold increase in AAV transduction. However, when HeLa cells were pre-treated with tyrphostin 23, a specific inhibitor of cellular epidermal growth factor receptor tyrosine kinase, which phosphorylates FKBP52 at tyrosine residues, heat-shock treatment resulted in a further 18-fold increase in AAV transduction. HSP90 was shown to be a part of the FKBP52-AAV D-sequence complex, but HSP90 by itself did not bind to the D-sequence. Geldanamycin treatment, which disrupts the HSP90-FKBP52 complex, resulted in >22-fold increase in AAV transduction in heat-shock-treated cells compared with heat shock alone. Deliberate overexpression of the human HSP90 gene resulted in a significant decrease in AAV-mediated transduction in tyrphostin 23-treated cells, whereas down-modulation of HSP90 levels led to a decrease in HSP90-FKBP52-AAV D-sequence complex formation, resulting in a significant increase in AAV transduction following pre-treatment with tyrphostin 23. These studies suggest that the observed increase in AAV transduction efficiency following heat-shock treatment is unlikely to be mediated by HSP90 alone and that increased levels of HSP90, in the absence of heat shock, facilitate binding of FKBP52 to the AAV D-sequence, thereby leading to inhibition of AAV-mediated transgene

  4. The dynamic state of heat shock proteins in chicken embryo fibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    1986-01-01

    Subcellular fractionation and immunofluorescence microscopy have been used to study the intracellular distributions of the major heat shock proteins, hsp 89, hsp 70, and hsp 24, in chicken embryo fibroblasts stressed by heat shock, allowed to recover and then restressed. Hsp 89 was localized primarily to the cytoplasm except during the restress when a portion of this protein concentrated in the nuclear region. Under all conditions, hsp 89 was readily extracted from cells by detergent. During stress and restress, significant amounts of hsp 70 moved to the nucleus and became resistant to detergent extraction. Some of this hsp 70 was released from the insoluble form in an ATP-dependent reaction. Hsp 24 was confined to the cytoplasm and, during restress, aggregated to detergent-insoluble perinuclear phase-dense granules. These granules dissociated during recovery and hsp 24 could be solubilized by detergent. The nuclear hsps reappeared in the cytoplasm in cells allowed to recover at normal temperatures. Sodium arsenite also induces hsps and their distributions were similar to that observed after a heat shock, except for hsp 89, which remained cytoplasmic. We also examined by immunofluorescence the cytoskeletal systems of chicken embryo fibroblasts subjected to heat shock and found no gross morphological changes in cytoplasmic microfilaments or microtubules. However, the intermediate filament network was very sensitive and collapsed around the nucleus very shortly after a heat shock. The normal intermediate filament morphology reformed when cells were allowed to recover from the stress. Inclusion of actinomycin D during the heat shock--a condition that prevents synthesis of the hsps--did not affect the intermediate filament collapse, but recovery of the normal morphology did not occur. We suggest that an hsp(s) may aid in the formation of the intermediate filament network after stress. PMID:3533955

  5. Transgenic mice expressing the human heat shock protein 70 have improved post-ischemic myocardial recovery.

    PubMed Central

    Plumier, J C; Ross, B M; Currie, R W; Angelidis, C E; Kazlaris, H; Kollias, G; Pagoulatos, G N

    1995-01-01

    Heat shock treatment induces expression of several heat shock proteins and subsequent post-ischemic myocardial protection. Correlations exist between the degree of stress used to induce the heat shock proteins, the amount of the inducible heat shock protein 70 (HSP70) and the level of myocardial protection. The inducible HSP70 has also been shown to be protective in transfected myogenic cells. Here we examined the role of human inducible HSP70 in transgenic mouse hearts. Overexpression of the human HSP70 does not appear to affect normal protein synthesis or the stress response in transgenic mice compared with nontransgenic mice. After 30 min of ischemia, upon reperfusion, transgenic hearts versus nontransgenic hearts showed significantly improved recovery of contractile force (0.35 +/- 0.08 versus 0.16 +/- 0.05 g, respectively, P < 0.05), rate of contraction, and rate of relaxation. Creatine kinase, an indicator of cellular injury, was released at a high level (67.7 +/- 23.0 U/ml) upon reperfusion from nontransgenic hearts, but not transgenic hearts (1.6 +/- 0.8 U/ml). We conclude that high level constitutive expression of the human inducible HSP70 plays a direct role in the protection of the myocardium from ischemia and reperfusion injury. Images PMID:7706492

  6. Microinjection of ubiquitin: changes in protein degradation in HeLa cells subjected to heat-shock

    SciTech Connect

    Carlson, N.; Rogers, S.; Rechsteiner, M.

    1987-03-01

    Ubiquitin was radiolabeled by reaction with /sup 125/I-Bolton-Hunter reagent and introduced into HeLa cells using erythrocyte-mediated microinjection. The injected cells were then incubated at 45 degrees C for 5 min (reversible heat-shock) or for 30 min (lethal heat-shock). After either treatment, there were dramatic changes in the levels of ubiquitin conjugates. Under normal culture conditions, approximately 10% of the injected ubiquitin is linked to histones, 40% is found in conjugates with molecular weights greater than 25,000, and the rest is unconjugated. After heat-shock, the free ubiquitin pool and the level of histone-ubiquitin conjugates decreased rapidly, and high molecular weight conjugates predominated. Formation of large conjugates did not require protein synthesis; when analyzed by two-dimensional electrophoresis, the major conjugates did not co-migrate with heat-shock proteins before or after thermal stress. Concomitant with the loss of free ubiquitin, the degradation of endogenous proteins, injected hemoglobin, BSA, and ubiquitin was reduced in heat-shocked HeLa cells. After reversible heat-shock, the decrease in proteolysis was small, and both the rate of proteolysis and the size of the free ubiquitin pool returned to control levels upon incubation at 37 degrees C. In contrast, neither proteolysis nor free ubiquitin pools returned to control levels after lethal heat-shock. However, lethally heat-shocked cells degraded denatured hemoglobin more rapidly than native hemoglobin and ubiquitin-globin conjugates formed within them. Therefore, stabilization of proteins after heat-shock cannot be due to the loss of ubiquitin conjugation or inability to degrade proteins that form conjugates with ubiquitin.

  7. Microinjection of ubiquitin: changes in protein degradation in HeLa cells subjected to heat-shock.

    PubMed

    Carlson, N; Rogers, S; Rechsteiner, M

    1987-03-01

    Ubiquitin was radiolabeled by reaction with 125I-Bolton-Hunter reagent and introduced into HeLa cells using erythrocyte-mediated microinjection. The injected cells were then incubated at 45 degrees C for 5 min (reversible heat-shock) or for 30 min (lethal heat-shock). After either treatment, there were dramatic changes in the levels of ubiquitin conjugates. Under normal culture conditions, approximately 10% of the injected ubiquitin is linked to histones, 40% is found in conjugates with molecular weights greater than 25,000, and the rest is unconjugated. After heat-shock, the free ubiquitin pool and the level of histone-ubiquitin conjugates decreased rapidly, and high molecular weight conjugates predominated. Formation of large conjugates did not require protein synthesis; when analyzed by two-dimensional electrophoresis, the major conjugates did not co-migrate with heat-shock proteins before or after thermal stress. Concomitant with the loss of free ubiquitin, the degradation of endogenous proteins, injected hemoglobin, BSA, and ubiquitin was reduced in heat-shocked HeLa cells. After reversible heat-shock, the decrease in proteolysis was small, and both the rate of proteolysis and the size of the free ubiquitin pool returned to control levels upon incubation at 37 degrees C. In contrast, neither proteolysis nor free ubiquitin pools returned to control levels after lethal heat-shock. However, lethally heat-shocked cells degraded denatured hemoglobin more rapidly than native hemoglobin and ubiquitin-globin conjugates formed within them. Therefore, stabilization of proteins after heat-shock cannot be due to the loss of ubiquitin conjugation or inability to degrade proteins that form conjugates with ubiquitin.

  8. Heat shock protein coinducers with no effect on protein denaturation specifically modulate the membrane lipid phase

    PubMed Central

    Török, Zsolt; Tsvetkova, Nelly M.; Balogh, Gábor; Horváth, Ibolya; Nagy, Enikő; Pénzes, Zoltán; Hargitai, Judit; Bensaude, Olivier; Csermely, Péter; Crowe, John H.; Maresca, Bruno; Vígh, László

    2003-01-01

    The hydroxylamine derivative bimoclomol (BM) has been shown to activate natural cytoprotective homeostatic responses by enhancing the capability of cells to cope with various pathophysiological conditions. It exerts its effect in synergy with low levels of stress to induce the synthesis of members of major stress protein families. We show here that the presence of BM does not influence protein denaturation in the cells. BM and its derivatives selectively interact with acidic lipids and modulate their thermal and dynamic properties. BM acts as a membrane fluidizer at normal temperature, but it is a highly efficient membrane stabilizer, inhibiting the bilayer–nonbilayer phase transitions during severe heat shock. We suggest that BM and the related compounds modify those domains of membrane lipids where the thermally or chemically induced perturbation of lipid phase is sensed and transduced into a cellular signal, leading to enhanced activation of heat shock genes. BM may be a prototype for clinically safe membrane-interacting drug candidates that rebalance the level and composition of heat shock proteins. PMID:12615993

  9. Characterization of two heat shock proteins (Hsp70/Hsc70) from grass carp (Ctenopharyngodon idella): evidence for their differential gene expression, protein synthesis and secretion in LPS-challenged peripheral blood lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Anying; Zhou, Xiaofei; Wang, Xinyan; Zhou, Hong

    2011-06-01

    Two cDNAs, encoding the stress-inducible 70-kDa heat shock protein (Hsp70) and the constitutively expressed 70-kDa heat shock cognate protein (Hsc70), were isolated from grass carp. The Hsp70 and Hsc70 cDNAs were 2250 bp and 2449 bp in length and contained 1932 bp and 1953 bp open reading frames, respectively. Tissue distribution results showed that Hsp70/Hsc70 was highly expressed in gill, kidney, head kidney and peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBLs). Using grass carp PBLs as a cell model, effects of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) on the mRNA and protein levels of Hsp70/Hsc70 were examined. In this case, LPS increased the mRNA expression of Hsp70 in a time- and dose-dependent manner, but had no effect on Hsc70 mRNA expression. In agreement with this, LPS elevated the intracellular Hsp70 markedly, but not the Hsc70 protein levels in parallel experiments. Furthermore, Hsp70 protein was also detected in culture medium. Moreover, inhibition of LPS on Hsp70 release in a time-dependent manner was observed, indicating that there may be a dynamic balance between Hsp70 stores and Hsp70 release in grass carp PBLs following exposure to LPS. Taken together, these results not only shed new insights into the different regulations of LPS on Hsp70/Hsc70 gene expression, protein synthesis and release, but also provide a basis for further study on the functional role of Hsp70 in fish immune response.

  10. Heat shock proteins: applications in health and disease.

    PubMed

    Jindal, S

    1996-01-01

    Heat shock proteins (hsps) assist the assembly, folding and translocation of other proteins, and apparently have a role in protecting cells against injuries and other types of stress. In addition, hsps are frequently recognized by the immune system as predominant antigens during infections and during the progression of certain autoimmune diseases and, thus, might provide a novel route for the development of immunotherapeutics. This review focuses on applications for hsps in health and disease, and discusses the pros and cons of considering them as targets for the development of therapeutics/pharmaceuticals.

  11. Heat shock proteins and their association with major pediatric malignancies.

    PubMed

    Skora, Dorota; Gorska, Magdalena

    2016-01-01

    Heat shock proteins belong to a group of molecular chaperones responsible for the regulation of many intracellular processes. HSPs play a pivotal role in the survival of cells under stressful conditions. Over-expression of these proteins have been found in both healthy and a great number of cancer cells. HSPs may be involved in numerous carcinogenic and chemoresistant processes. Due to that fact, they may be referred to as diagnostic biomarkers of oncogenesis and potential targets for anticancer drugs. Thus, we decided to review the involvement of major HSPs in the most malignant childhood cancers.

  12. Heat Shock Proteins in Association with Heat Tolerance in Grasses

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Yan; Zhan, Chenyang; Huang, Bingru

    2011-01-01

    The grass family Poaceae includes annual species cultivated as major grain crops and perennial species cultivated as forage or turf grasses. Heat stress is a primary factor limiting growth and productivity of cool-season grass species and is becoming a more significant problem in the context of global warming. Plants have developed various mechanisms in heat-stress adaptation, including changes in protein metabolism such as the induction of heat shock proteins (HSPs). This paper summarizes the structure and function of major HSPs, recent research progress on the association of HSPs with grass tolerance to heat stress, and incorporation of HSPs in heat-tolerant grass breeding. PMID:22084689

  13. Protein disorder reduced in Saccharomyces cerevisiae to survive heat shock

    PubMed Central

    Vicedo, Esmeralda; Gasik, Zofia; Dong, Yu-An; Goldberg, Tatyana; Rost, Burkhard

    2015-01-01

    Recent experiments established that a culture of Saccharomyces cerevisiae (baker’s yeast) survives sudden high temperatures by specifically duplicating the entire chromosome III and two chromosomal fragments (from IV and XII). Heat shock proteins (HSPs) are not significantly over-abundant in the duplication. In contrast, we suggest a simple algorithm to “ postdict ” the experimental results: Find a small enough chromosome with minimal protein disorder and duplicate this region. This algorithm largely explains all observed duplications. In particular, all regions duplicated in the experiment reduced the overall content of protein disorder. The differential analysis of the functional makeup of the duplication remained inconclusive. Gene Ontology (GO) enrichment suggested over-representation in processes related to reproduction and nutrient uptake. Analyzing the protein-protein interaction network (PPI) revealed that few network-central proteins were duplicated. The predictive hypothesis hinges upon the concept of reducing proteins with long regions of disorder in order to become less sensitive to heat shock attack. PMID:26673203

  14. Inhibition of Heat Shock Induction of Heat Shock Protein 70 and Enhancement of Heat Shock Protein 27 Phosphorylation by Quercetin Derivatives

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Rongsheng E.; Kao, Jeffrey L.-F.; Hilliard, Carolyn A.; Pandita, Raj K.; Roti, Joseph L. Roti; Hunt, Clayton R.; Taylor, John-Stephen

    2009-01-01

    Inhibitors of heat-induced heat shock protein 70 (HSP70)a expression have the potential to enhance the therapeutic effectiveness of heat induced radiosensitization of tumors. Among known small molecule inhibitors, quercetin has the advantage of being easily modified for structure-activity studies. Herein, we report the ability of five mono-methyl and five carbomethoxymethyl derivatives of quercetin to inhibit heat-induced HSP70 expression and enhance HSP27 phosphorylation in human cells. While quercetin and several derivatives inhibit HSP70 induction and enhance HSP27 phosphorylation at Ser78, other analogs selectively inhibit HSP70 induction without enhancing HSP27 phosphorylation that would otherwise aid in cell survival. We also show that good inhibitors of HSP70 induction are also good inhibitors of both CK2 and CamKII, kinases that are known to activate HSP70 expression by phosphorylation of heat shock transcription factor 1. Derivatives that show poor inhibition of either or both kinases are not good inhibitors of HSP70 induction, suggesting that quercetin’s effectiveness is due to its ability to inhibit both kinases. PMID:19296652

  15. Expression of heat shock protein 70 is altered by age and diet at the level of transcription.

    PubMed Central

    Heydari, A R; Wu, B; Takahashi, R; Strong, R; Richardson, A

    1993-01-01

    Because heat shock proteins have been shown to play a critical role in protecting cells from hyperthermia and other types of physiological stresses, it was of interest to determine what effect age and caloric restriction have on the ability of cells to regulate the expression of heat shock protein 70 (hsp70), the most prominent and most evolutionarily conserved of the heat shock proteins. Caloric restriction is the only experimental manipulation known to retard aging and increase survival of mammals. The ability of hepatocytes isolated from young/adult (4- to 7-month-old) and old (22- to 28-month-old) male Fischer F344 rats fed ad libitum or a caloric restriction diet (60% of the content of the ad libitum diet) to express hsp70 was determined after a mild heat shock (42.5 degrees C for 30 min). We found that the induction of hsp70 synthesis and mRNA levels by heat shock was 40 to 50% lower in hepatocytes isolated from old rats than in hepatocytes isolated from young rats. Using in situ hybridization, we found that essentially all hepatocytes from the young/adult and old rats expressed hsp70 in response to heat shock; therefore, the age-related decrease in the induction of hsp70 expression was not due to an age-related accumulation of cells that do not respond to heat shock. Measurements of hsp70 mRNA stability and hsp70 transcription demonstrated that the age-related decline in hsp70 expression arose from a decline in hsp70 transcription. Interestingly, the age-related decline in the induction of hsp70 expression was reversed by caloric restriction; e.g., the induction of hsp70 synthesis, mRNA levels, and nuclear transcription were significantly higher in hepatocytes isolated from old rats fed the caloric restricted diet than in hepatocytes isolated from old rats fed ad libitum. The levels of the heat shock transcription factor in nuclear extracts isolated from heat-shocked hepatocytes were measured in a gel shift assay. Binding of the heat shock transcription

  16. Modification of tooth development by heat shock protein 60.

    PubMed

    Papp, Tamas; Polyak, Angela; Papp, Krisztina; Meszar, Zoltan; Zakany, Roza; Meszar-Katona, Eva; Tünde, Palne Terdik; Ham, Chang Hwa; Felszeghy, Szabolcs

    2016-03-30

    Although several heat shock proteins have been investigated in relation to tooth development, no available information is available about the spatial and temporal expression pattern of heat shock protein 60 (Hsp 60). To characterize Hsp 60 expression in the structures of the developing tooth germ, we used Western blotting, immunohistochemistry and in situ hybridization. Hsp 60 was present in high amounts in the inner and outer enamel epithelia, enamel knot (EK) and stratum intermedium (SI). Hsp 60 also appeared in odontoblasts beginning in the bell stage. To obtain data on the possible effect of Hsp 60 on isolated lower incisors from mice, we performed in vitro culturing. To investigate the effect of exogenous Hsp 60 on the cell cycle during culturing, we used the 5-bromo-2-deoxyuridine (BrdU) incorporation test on dental cells. Exogenously administered Hsp 60 caused bluntness at the apical part of the 16.5-day-old tooth germs, but it did not influence the proliferation rate of dental cells. We identified the expression of Hsp 60 in the developing tooth germ, which was present in high concentrations in the inner and outer enamel epithelia, EK, SI and odontoblasts. High concentration of exogenous Hsp 60 can cause abnormal morphology of the tooth germ, but it did not influence the proliferation rate of the dental cells. Our results suggest that increased levels of Hsp 60 may cause abnormalities in the morphological development of the tooth germ and support the data on the significance of Hsp during the developmental processes.

  17. Heat shock protein 90 from neglected protozoan parasites.

    PubMed

    Roy, Nainita; Nageshan, Rishi Kumar; Ranade, Shatakshi; Tatu, Utpal

    2012-03-01

    Significant advances have been made in our understanding of heat shock protein 90 (Hsp90) in terms of its structure, biochemical characteristics, post-translational modifications, interactomes, regulation and functions. In addition to yeast as a model several new systems have now been examined including flies, worms, plants as well as mammalian cells. This review discusses themes emerging out of studies reported on Hsp90 from infectious disease causing protozoa. A common theme of sensing and responding to host cell microenvironment emerges out of analysis of Hsp90 in Malaria, Trypanosmiasis as well as Leishmaniasis. In addition to their functional roles, the potential of Hsp90 from these infectious disease causing organisms to serve as drug targets and the current status of this drug development endeavor are discussed. Finally, a unique and the only known example of a split Hsp90 gene from another disease causing protozoan Giardia lamblia and its evolutionary significance are discussed. Clearly studies on Hsp90 from protozoan parasites promise to reveal important new paradigms in Hsp90 biology while exploring its potential as an anti-infective drug target. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Heat Shock Protein 90 (HSP90). Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. A heat shock protein localized to chloroplasts is a member of a eukaryotic superfamily of heat shock proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Vierling, E; Nagao, R T; DeRocher, A E; Harris, L M

    1988-01-01

    We have isolated cDNA clones from soybean and pea that specify nuclear-encoded heat shock proteins (HSPs) which localize to chloroplasts. The mRNAs for these HSPs are undetectable at control temperatures, but increase approximately 150-fold during a 2-h heat shock. Hybridization-selection followed by in vitro translation demonstrates that these HSPs are synthesized as precursor proteins which are processed by the removal of 5-6.5 kd during import into isolated chloroplasts. The nucleotide sequence of the cDNAs shows the derived amino acid sequences of the mature pea and soybean proteins are 79% identical. While the predicted transit peptide encoded by the pea cDNA has some characteristics typical of transit sequences, including high Ser content, multiple basic residues and no acidic residues, it lacks two domains proposed to be important for import and maturation of other chloroplast proteins. The carboxy-terminal region of the chloroplast HSP has significant homology to cytoplasmic HSPs from soybean and other eukaryotes. We hypothesize that the chloroplast HSP shares a common structural and functional domain with low mol. wt HSPs which localize to other parts of the cell, and may have evolved from a nuclear gene. Images PMID:3396532

  19. Heat-shock protein 70 binds microtubules and interacts with kinesin in tobacco pollen tubes.

    PubMed

    Parrotta, Luigi; Cresti, Mauro; Cai, Giampiero

    2013-09-01

    The heat-shock proteins of 70 kDa are a family of ubiquitously expressed proteins important for protein folding. Heat-shock protein 70 assists other nascent proteins to achieve the spatial structure and ultimately helps the cell to protect against stress factors, such as heat. These proteins are localized in different cellular compartments and are associated with the cytoskeleton. We identified a heat-shock protein 70 isoform in the pollen tube of tobacco that binds to microtubules in an ATP-dependent manner. The heat-shock protein 70 was identified as part of the so-called ATP-MAP (ATP-dependent microtubule-associated protein) fraction, which also includes the 90-kDa kinesin, a mitochondria-associated motor protein. The identity of heat-shock protein 70 was validated by immunological assays and mass spectrometry. Sequence analysis showed that this heat-shock protein 70 is more similar to specific heat-shock proteins of Arabidopsis than to corresponding proteins of tobacco. Two-dimensional electrophoresis indicated that this heat-shock protein 70 isoform only is part of the ATP-MAP fraction and that is associated with the mitochondria of pollen tubes. Sedimentation assays showed that the binding of heat-shock protein 70 to microtubules is not affected by AMPPNP but it increases in the presence of the 90-kDa kinesin. Binding of heat-shock protein 70 to microtubules occurs only partially in the presence of ATP but it does not occur if, in addition to ATP, the 90-kDa kinesin is also present. Data suggest that the binding (but not the release) of heat-shock protein 70 to microtubules is facilitated by the 90-kDa kinesin. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Targeted heat shock protein 72 for pulmonary cytoprotection.

    PubMed

    Parseghian, Missag H; Hobson, Stephen T; Richieri, Richard A

    2016-06-01

    Heat shock protein 72 (HSP72) is perhaps the most important member of the HSP70 family of proteins, given that it is induced in a wide variety of tissues and cells to combat stress, particularly oxidative stress. Here, we review independent observations of the critical role this protein plays as a pulmonary cytoprotectant and discuss the merits of developing HSP72 as a therapeutic for rapid delivery to cells and tissues after a traumatic event. We also discuss the fusion of HSP72 to a cell-penetrating single-chain Fv antibody fragment derived from mAb 3E10, referred to as Fv-HSP70. This fusion construct has been validated in vivo in a cerebral infarction model and is currently in testing as a clinical therapeutic to treat ischemic events and as a fieldable medical countermeasure to treat inhalation of toxicants caused by terrorist actions or industrial accidents.

  1. Heat shock proteins and DNA repair mechanisms: an updated overview.

    PubMed

    Sottile, Mayra L; Nadin, Silvina B

    2017-09-26

    Heat shock proteins (HSPs), also known as molecular chaperones, participate in important cellular processes, such as protein aggregation, disaggregation, folding, and unfolding. HSPs have cytoprotective functions that are commonly explained by their antiapoptotic role. Their involvement in anticancer drug resistance has been the focus of intense research efforts, and the relationship between HSP induction and DNA repair mechanisms has been in the spotlight during the past decades. Because DNA is permanently subject to damage, many DNA repair pathways are involved in the recognition and removal of a diverse array of DNA lesions. Hence, DNA repair mechanisms are key to maintain genome stability. In addition, the interactome network of HSPs with DNA repair proteins has become an exciting research field and so their use as emerging targets for cancer therapy. This article provides a historical overview of the participation of HSPs in DNA repair mechanisms as part of their molecular chaperone capabilities.

  2. Heat-shock protein 27 (Hsp27) as a target of methylglyoxal in gastrointestinal cancer.

    PubMed

    Oya-Ito, Tomoko; Naito, Yuji; Takagi, Tomohisa; Handa, Osamu; Matsui, Hirofumi; Yamada, Masaki; Shima, Keisuke; Yoshikawa, Toshikazu

    2011-07-01

    The molecular mechanisms underlying the posttranslational modification of proteins in gastrointestinal cancer are still unknown. Here, we investigated the role of methylglyoxal modifications in gastrointestinal tumors. Methylglyoxal is a reactive dicarbonyl compound produced from cellular glycolytic intermediates that reacts non-enzymatically with proteins. By using a monoclonal antibody to methylglyoxal-modified proteins, we found that murine heat-shock protein 25 and human heat-shock protein 27 were the major adducted proteins in rat gastric carcinoma mucosal cell line and human colon cancer cell line, respectively. Furthermore, we found that heat-shock protein 27 was modified by methylglyoxal in ascending colon and rectum of patients with cancer. However, methylglyoxal-modified heat-shock protein 25/heat-shock protein 27 was not detected in non cancerous cell lines or in normal subject. Matrix-associated laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry/mass spectrometry analysis of peptide fragments identified Arg-75, Arg-79, Arg-89, Arg-94, Arg-127, Arg-136, Arg-140, Arg-188, and Lys-123 as methylglyoxal modification sites in heat-shock protein 27 and in phosphorylated heat-shock protein 27. The transfer of methylglyoxal-modified heat-shock protein 27 into rat intestinal epithelial cell line RIE was even more effective in preventing apoptotic cell death than that of native control heat-shock protein 27. Furthermore, methylglyoxal modification of heat-shock protein 27 protected the cells against both the hydrogen peroxide- and cytochrome c-mediated caspase activation, and the hydrogen peroxide-induced production of intracellular reactive oxygen species. The levels of lactate converted from methylglyoxal were increased in carcinoma mucosal cell lines. Our results suggest that posttranslational modification of heat-shock protein 27 by methylglyoxal may have important implications for epithelial cell injury in gastrointestinal cancer.

  3. [The role of heat shock protein (HSP) in SIRS].

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Toru; Morita, Kiyoshi

    2004-12-01

    Despite recent progress in critical care, sepsis remains a serious problem with high rate of mortality. Although the pathophysiology of sepsis has not been fully elucidated, oxidative stress associated with excessive systemic inflammation plays an important role in its pathogenesis. Oxidative stress conditions principally involving transcriptional activation of genes encoding proteins that participate in the defense against oxidative tissue injuries. One of them is heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1), the rate-limiting enzyme in heme catabolism, as well as the 32 kDa heat shock protein. HO-1 induction has been shown to confer protection, while its abrogation accelerates oxidative tissue injuries. In this review, recent findings concerning the role of HO-1 as a protective response against oxidative stress conditions in sepsis are summarized.

  4. Heat Shock Protein 70: Roles in Multiple Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Mansilla, María José; Montalban, Xavier; Espejo, Carmen

    2012-01-01

    Heat shock proteins (HSP) have long been considered intracellular chaperones that possess housekeeping and cytoprotective functions. Consequently, HSP overexpression was proposed as a potential therapy for neurodegenerative diseases characterized by the accumulation or aggregation of abnormal proteins. Recently, the discovery that cells release HSP with the capacity to trigger proinflammatory as well as immunoregulatory responses has focused attention on investigating the role of HSP in chronic inflammatory autoimmune diseases such as multiple sclerosis (MS). To date, the most relevant HSP is the inducible Hsp70, which exhibits both cytoprotectant and immunoregulatory functions. Several studies have presented contradictory evidence concerning the involvement of Hsp70 in MS or experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), the MS animal model. In this review, we dissect the functions of Hsp70 and discuss the controversial data concerning the role of Hsp70 in MS and EAE. PMID:22669475

  5. Optimization of Salmonella enteritidis recombinant heat shock protein 60 production.

    PubMed

    Rainczak, K; Bajzert, J; Galli, J; Selera, A; Wieliczko, A; Borkowski, J; Stefaniak, T

    2011-01-01

    The aim of the study was to optimize conditions for producing Salmonella Enteritidis recombinant heat shock protein 60 (rHsp60). Seven Escherichia coli host strains (Rosetta, Turner, C41, C43, Origami, BL21pLys, Rosetta pLys) were transformed by a recombinant plasmid containing Hsp60 gene from Salmonella Enteritidis, and then cultured and induced by isopropyl-beta-D-thiogalactopyranoside (IPTG). The highest S. Enteritidis rHsp60 yield was obtained using E. coli strain C41. Induction of this strain using IPTG allowed the yield 400 microg of S. Enteritidis Hsp60 protein/2L of culture, but by autoinduction the yield exceeded 800 microg/2L.

  6. Heat shock proteins (HSP): dermatological implications and perspectives.

    PubMed

    Vidal Magalhães, Wagner; Gouveia Nogueira, Marcelo Fábio; Kaneko, Telma Mary

    2012-01-01

    In recent years, several studies have demonstrated the protective effect of Heat Shock Proteins (HSP) on different organs and tissues under stressful conditions. However, most research explores the performance of those molecular chaperones during immune responses or pathological conditions like cancer, whereas the number of studies related to the performance of HSPs in the skin during diverse natural or physiopathological conditions is very low. Therefore, the aim of this article was to summarize the main concepts concerning the expression and performance of HSPs, from analysis of current medicine and cosmetics publications, as well as exploring the importance of these proteins in the dermatological area in physiological events such as cutaneous aging, skin cancer and wound healing and to present final considerations related to biotechnology performance in this area.

  7. The interactive association between heat shock factor 1 and heat shock proteins in primary myocardial cells subjected to heat stress.

    PubMed

    Tang, Shu; Chen, Hongbo; Cheng, Yanfen; Nasir, Mohammad Abdel; Kemper, Nicole; Bao, Endong

    2016-01-01

    Heat shock factor 1 (HSF1) is a heat shock transcription factor that rapidly induces heat shock gene transcription following thermal stress. In this study, we subjected primary neonatal rat myocardial cells to heat stress in vitro to create a model system for investigating the trends in expression and association between various heat shock proteins (HSPs) and HSF1 under adverse environmental conditions. After the cells were subjected to heat stress at 42˚C for different periods of time, HSP and HSF1 mRNA and protein levels were detected by qPCR and western blot analysis in the heat-stressed cells. The HSF1 expression levels significantly increased in the cells following 120 min of exposure to heat stess compared to the levels observed at the beginning of heat stress exposure. HSP90 followed a similar trend in expression to HSF1, whereas HSP70 followed an opposite trend. However, no significant changes were observed in the crystallin, alpha B (CRYAB, also known as HSP beta-5) expression levels during the 480‑min period of exposure to heat stress. The interaction between the HSPs and HSF1 was analyzed by STRING 9.1, and it was found that HSF1 interacted with HSP90 and HSP70, and that it did not play a role in regulating CRYAB expression. Based on our findings, HSP70 may suppress HSF1 in rat myocardial cells under conditions of heat stress. Furthermore, our data demonstrate that HSF1 is not the key factor for all HSPs, and this was particularly the case for CRYAB.

  8. The interactive association between heat shock factor 1 and heat shock proteins in primary myocardial cells subjected to heat stress

    PubMed Central

    TANG, SHU; CHEN, HONGBO; CHENG, YANFEN; NASIR, MOHAMMAD ABDEL; KEMPER, NICOLE; BAO, ENDONG

    2016-01-01

    Heat shock factor 1 (HSF1) is a heat shock transcription factor that rapidly induces heat shock gene transcription following thermal stress. In this study, we subjected primary neonatal rat myocardial cells to heat stress in vitro to create a model system for investigating the trends in expression and association between various heat shock proteins (HSPs) and HSF1 under adverse environmental conditions. After the cells were subjected to heat stress at 42°C for different periods of time, HSP and HSF1 mRNA and protein levels were detected by qPCR and western blot analysis in the heat-stressed cells. The HSF1 expression levels significantly increased in the cells following 120 min of exposure to heat stess compared to the levels observed at the beginning of heat stress exposure. HSP90 followed a similar trend in expression to HSF1, whereas HSP70 followed an opposite trend. However, no significant changes were observed in the crystallin, alpha B (CRYAB, also known as HSP beta-5) expression levels during the 480-min period of exposure to heat stress. The interaction between the HSPs and HSF1 was analyzed by STRING 9.1, and it was found that HSF1 interacted with HSP90 and HSP70, and that it did not play a role in regulating CRYAB expression. Based on our findings, HSP70 may suppress HSF1 in rat myocardial cells under conditions of heat stress. Furthermore, our data demonstrate that HSF1 is not the key factor for all HSPs, and this was particularly the case for CRYAB. PMID:26719858

  9. Induction of apoptosis by phenylisocyanate derivative of quercetin: involvement of heat shock protein.

    PubMed

    Ye, Bin; Yang, Jin-Liang; Chen, Li-Juan; Wu, Xian-Xue; Yang, Han-Shuo; Zhao, Ju-Mei; Yuan, Zhi-Ping; Li, Jiong; Wen, Yan-Jun; Mao, Yong-Qiu; Lei, Song; Kan, Bing; Fan, Lin-Yu; Yao, Wen-Xiu; Wang, Rui; Wang, Guo-Qing; Du, Xiao-Bo; Liu, Huan-Yi; Wu, Hong-Bing; Xu, Jian-Rong; Li, Hong-Xia; Zhang, Wei; Zhao, Xia; Wei, Yu-Quan; Cheng, Li

    2007-11-01

    Quercetin, a widely distributed bioflavonoid, inhibits the growth of various tumor cells. The present study was designed to investigate whether a novel quercetin derivative [phenylisocyanate of quercetin (PHICNQ)] exerts antitumor activity against K562 and CT26 tumor cell lines by inducing apoptosis, and to examine the possible mechanism in the phenomenon. The cell proliferation assay of K562 and CT26 tumor cells was determined by the trypan blue dye exclusion test. Apoptosis of PHICNQ-treated cells was determined by morphological analysis, agarose gel DNA electrophoresis and quantitated by flow cytometry after staining with propidium iodide. Cell cycle was evaluated by flow cytometry. The expression of heat shock protein 70 was checked by Western blot analysis. Our results showed that PHICNQ inhibited the proliferation of K562 and CT26 cells in a dose-dependent and time-dependent manner. PHICNQ was 308- and 73-fold more active on CT26 and K562 cells than quercetin, respectively. In addition to this cytostatic effect, treatment of K562 and CT26 tumor cells with PHICNQ induced apoptosis. PHICNQ treatment downregulated the expression of heat shock protein 70 more dramatically than quercetin treatment. These results suggest that PHICNQ is a more powerful antiproliferative derivative than quercetin, with cytostatic and apoptotic effects on K562 and CT26 tumor cells. PHICNQ may trigger apoptosis in tumor cells through inhibition of heat shock protein 70 synthesis and expression.

  10. Small Heat Shock Proteins Can Release Light Dependence of Tobacco Seed during Germination1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Koo, Hyun Jo; Park, Soo Min; Kim, Keun Pill; Suh, Mi Chung; Lee, Mi Ok; Lee, Seong-Kon; Xinli, Xia

    2015-01-01

    Small heat shock proteins (sHSPs) function as ATP-independent molecular chaperones, and although the production and function of sHSPs have often been described under heat stress, the expression and function of sHSPs in fundamental developmental processes, such as pollen and seed development, have also been confirmed. Seed germination involves the breaking of dormancy and the resumption of embryo growth that accompany global changes in transcription, translation, and metabolism. In many plants, germination is triggered simply by imbibition of water; however, different seeds require different conditions in addition to water. For small-seeded plants, like Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), lettuce (Lactuca sativa), tomato (Solanum lycopersicum), and tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum), light is an important regulator of seed germination. The facts that sHSPs accumulate during seed development, sHSPs interact with various client proteins, and seed germination accompanies synthesis and/or activation of diverse proteins led us to investigate the role of sHSPs in seed germination, especially in the context of light dependence. In this study, we have built transgenic tobacco plants that ectopically express sHSP, and the effect was germination of the seeds in the dark. Administering heat shock to the seeds also resulted in the alleviation of light dependence during seed germination. Subcellular localization of ectopically expressed sHSP was mainly observed in the cytoplasm, whereas heat shock-induced sHSPs were transported to the nucleus. We hypothesize that ectopically expressed sHSPs in the cytoplasm led the status of cytoplasmic proteins involved in seed germination to function during germination without additional stimulus and that heat shock can be another signal that induces seed germination. PMID:25604531

  11. Small heat shock proteins can release light dependence of tobacco seed during germination.

    PubMed

    Koo, Hyun Jo; Park, Soo Min; Kim, Keun Pill; Suh, Mi Chung; Lee, Mi Ok; Lee, Seong-Kon; Xinli, Xia; Hong, Choo Bong

    2015-03-01

    Small heat shock proteins (sHSPs) function as ATP-independent molecular chaperones, and although the production and function of sHSPs have often been described under heat stress, the expression and function of sHSPs in fundamental developmental processes, such as pollen and seed development, have also been confirmed. Seed germination involves the breaking of dormancy and the resumption of embryo growth that accompany global changes in transcription, translation, and metabolism. In many plants, germination is triggered simply by imbibition of water; however, different seeds require different conditions in addition to water. For small-seeded plants, like Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), lettuce (Lactuca sativa), tomato (Solanum lycopersicum), and tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum), light is an important regulator of seed germination. The facts that sHSPs accumulate during seed development, sHSPs interact with various client proteins, and seed germination accompanies synthesis and/or activation of diverse proteins led us to investigate the role of sHSPs in seed germination, especially in the context of light dependence. In this study, we have built transgenic tobacco plants that ectopically express sHSP, and the effect was germination of the seeds in the dark. Administering heat shock to the seeds also resulted in the alleviation of light dependence during seed germination. Subcellular localization of ectopically expressed sHSP was mainly observed in the cytoplasm, whereas heat shock-induced sHSPs were transported to the nucleus. We hypothesize that ectopically expressed sHSPs in the cytoplasm led the status of cytoplasmic proteins involved in seed germination to function during germination without additional stimulus and that heat shock can be another signal that induces seed germination.

  12. Pentylenetetrazol-kindling in mice overexpressing heat shock protein 70.

    PubMed

    Ammon-Treiber, Susanne; Grecksch, Gisela; Angelidis, Charalampos; Vezyraki, Patra; Höllt, Volker; Becker, Axel

    2007-04-01

    Kindling induced by the convulsant pentylenetetrazol (PTZ) is an accepted model of primary generalized epilepsy. Because seizures represent a strong distressing stimulus, stress-induced proteins such as heat shock proteins might counteract the pathology of increased neuronal excitation. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to determine whether PTZ kindling outcome parameters are influenced by heat shock protein 70 (Hsp70) overexpression in Hsp70 transgenic mice as compared to the respective wild-type mice. Kindling was performed by nine intraperitoneal injections of PTZ (ED(16) for induction of clonic-tonic seizures, every 48 h); control animals received saline instead of PTZ. Seven days after the final injection, all mice received a PTZ challenge dose. Outcome parameters included evaluation of seizure stages and overall survival rates. In addition, histopathological findings such as cell number in hippocampal subfields CA1 and CA3 were determined. The onset of the highest convulsion stage was delayed in Hsp70 transgenic mice as compared to wild-type mice, and overall survival during kindling was improved in Hsp70 transgenic mice as compared to wild-type mice. In addition, a challenge dose after termination of kindling produced less severe seizures in Hsp70 transgenic mice than in wild-type mice. PTZ kindling did not result in significant subsequent neuronal cell loss in CA1 or CA3 neither in wild-type mice nor in the Hsp70 transgenic mice. The results of the present experiments clearly demonstrate that overexpression of Hsp70 exerts protective effects regarding seizure severity and overall survival during PTZ kindling. In addition, the decreased seizure severity in Hsp70 transgenic mice after a challenge dose suggests an interference of Hsp70 with the developmental component of kindling.

  13. A Chrysanthemum Heat Shock Protein Confers Tolerance to Abiotic Stress

    PubMed Central

    Song, Aiping; Zhu, Xirong; Chen, Fadi; Gao, Haishun; Jiang, Jiafu; Chen, Sumei

    2014-01-01

    Heat shock proteins are associated with protection against various abiotic stresses. Here, the isolation of a chrysanthemum cDNA belonging to the HSP70 family is reported. The cDNA, designated CgHSP70, encodes a 647-residue polypeptide, of estimated molecular mass 70.90 kDa and pI 5.12. A sub-cellular localization assay indicated that the cDNA product is deposited in the cytoplasm and nucleus. The performance of Arabidopsis thaliana plants constitutively expressing CgHSP70 demonstrated that the gene enhances tolerance to heat, drought and salinity. When CgHSP70 was stably over-expressed in chrysanthemum, the plants showed an increased peroxidase (POD) activity, higher proline content and inhibited malondialdehyde (MDA) content. After heat stress, drought or salinity the transgenic plants were better able to recover, demonstrating CgHSP70 positive effect. PMID:24663057

  14. Heat Shock Protein 90 regulates encystation in Entamoeba

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Meetali; Sharma, Shalini; Bhattacharya, Alok; Tatu, Utpal

    2015-01-01

    Enteric protozoan Entamoeba histolytica is a major cause of debilitating diarrheal infection worldwide with high morbidity and mortality. Even though the clinical burden of this parasite is very high, this infection is categorized as a neglected disease. Parasite is transmitted through feco-oral route and exhibit two distinct stages namely – trophozoites and cysts. Mechanism and regulation of encystation is not clearly understood. Previous studies have established the role of Heat shock protein 90 (Hsp90) in regulating stage transition in various protozoan parasites like Giardia, Plasmodium, Leishmania, and Toxoplasma. Our study for the first time reports that Hsp90 plays a crucial role in life cycle of Entamoeba as well. We identify Hsp90 to be a negative regulator of encystation in Entamoeba. We also show that Hsp90 inhibition interferes with the process of phagocytosis in Entamoeba. Overall, we show that Hsp90 plays an important role in virulence and transmission of Entamoeba. PMID:26528271

  15. Heat Shock Protein 90 regulates encystation in Entamoeba.

    PubMed

    Singh, Meetali; Sharma, Shalini; Bhattacharya, Alok; Tatu, Utpal

    2015-01-01

    Enteric protozoan Entamoeba histolytica is a major cause of debilitating diarrheal infection worldwide with high morbidity and mortality. Even though the clinical burden of this parasite is very high, this infection is categorized as a neglected disease. Parasite is transmitted through feco-oral route and exhibit two distinct stages namely - trophozoites and cysts. Mechanism and regulation of encystation is not clearly understood. Previous studies have established the role of Heat shock protein 90 (Hsp90) in regulating stage transition in various protozoan parasites like Giardia, Plasmodium, Leishmania, and Toxoplasma. Our study for the first time reports that Hsp90 plays a crucial role in life cycle of Entamoeba as well. We identify Hsp90 to be a negative regulator of encystation in Entamoeba. We also show that Hsp90 inhibition interferes with the process of phagocytosis in Entamoeba. Overall, we show that Hsp90 plays an important role in virulence and transmission of Entamoeba.

  16. Immunity to heat shock proteins and arthritic disorders.

    PubMed Central

    van Eden, W

    1999-01-01

    Adjuvant arthritis (AA) is a frequently used model of experimental arthritis. Because of its histopathology, which is reminiscent of rheumatoid arthritis in humans, AA is used as a model for the development of novel anti-inflammatory drugs. Recently, it has become evident that AA is a typical T-cell-mediated autoimmune condition. Therefore, novel immunotherapies targeted to T cells can be developed in this model. Analysis of responding T cells in AA have now led to the definition of various antigens with potential relevance to arthritis, including human arthritic conditions. One such antigen defined in AA is the 60kD heat shock protein. Both T-cell vaccination approaches and active antigen immunizations and antigen toleration approaches have turned out to be effective in suppressing AA. PMID:10231009

  17. Modification of tooth development by heat shock protein 60

    PubMed Central

    Papp, Tamas; Polyak, Angela; Papp, Krisztina; Meszar, Zoltan; Zakany, Roza; Meszar-Katona, Eva; Tünde, Palne Terdik; Ham, Chang Hwa; Felszeghy, Szabolcs

    2016-01-01

    Although several heat shock proteins have been investigated in relation to tooth development, no available information is available about the spatial and temporal expression pattern of heat shock protein 60 (Hsp 60). To characterize Hsp 60 expression in the structures of the developing tooth germ, we used Western blotting, immunohistochemistry and in situ hybridization. Hsp 60 was present in high amounts in the inner and outer enamel epithelia, enamel knot (EK) and stratum intermedium (SI). Hsp 60 also appeared in odontoblasts beginning in the bell stage. To obtain data on the possible effect of Hsp 60 on isolated lower incisors from mice, we performed in vitro culturing. To investigate the effect of exogenous Hsp 60 on the cell cycle during culturing, we used the 5-bromo-2-deoxyuridine (BrdU) incorporation test on dental cells. Exogenously administered Hsp 60 caused bluntness at the apical part of the 16.5-day-old tooth germs, but it did not influence the proliferation rate of dental cells. We identified the expression of Hsp 60 in the developing tooth germ, which was present in high concentrations in the inner and outer enamel epithelia, EK, SI and odontoblasts. High concentration of exogenous Hsp 60 can cause abnormal morphology of the tooth germ, but it did not influence the proliferation rate of the dental cells. Our results suggest that increased levels of Hsp 60 may cause abnormalities in the morphological development of the tooth germ and support the data on the significance of Hsp during the developmental processes. PMID:27025262

  18. Differential expression of proteins in Listeria monocytogenes under thermotolerance-inducing, heat shock, and prolonged heat shock conditions.

    PubMed

    Agoston, Réka; Soni, Kamlesh; Jesudhasan, Palmy R; Russell, William K; Mohácsi-Farkas, Csilla; Pillai, Suresh D

    2009-11-01

    Listeria monocytogenes is a foodborne pathogen capable of employing stress adaptive responses to evade a variety of stressors including temperature stress. We employed two-dimensional gel electrophoresis coupled with matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization-time of flight analysis to study the differential expression of L. monocytogenes (ATCC 43256) soluble proteins at heat shock (60 degrees C) conditions, prolonged heat shock (60 degrees C for 9 minutes) conditions, and thermotolerance-inducing (48 degrees C for 30 minutes followed by 60 degrees C for 9 minutes) conditions. We compared the proteome of L. monocytogenes under these conditions to the proteome at 37 degrees C. Eighteen proteins were differentially expressed at 60 degrees C (6 up-regulated and 12 down-regulated), 21 proteins were differentially expressed (12 up-regulated and 9 down-regulated) when the cells were exposed to 60 degrees C for 9 minutes, and 20 proteins were differentially expressed (10 up-regulated and 10 down-regulated) when cells were initially exposed to 48 degrees C for 30 minutes before 60 degrees C for 9 minutes. There was one unidentifiable protein with observed molecular weight of 50 kDa which was differentially expressed across the three temperature treatments. Thermotolerance-inducing conditions caused the up-regulation of a protein by as much as 12-fold. DnaN, a previously identified stress protein, was up-regulated almost threefold at 60 degrees C. TcsA, a lipoprotein (CD4 T cell-stimulating antigen), and Gap (glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate-dehydrogenase) were selectively expressed under prolonged heat shock conditions suggesting their potential as candidate marker proteins targets for identifying temperature-stressed L. monocytogenes cells.

  19. Characterization of the 70,000 dalton heat shock proteins of Euglena gracilis

    SciTech Connect

    Leustek, T.; Amir-Shapira, D.; Dalie, B.; Weissbach, H.; Brot, N. ); Welch, W. )

    1989-04-01

    The heat shock response of Euglena gracilis was studied and the proteins synthesized were identified. Cells were pulse-labeled with ({sup 35}S) sulfate at 21{degrees}C or 36{degrees}C and the proteins synthesized were analyzed by acrylamide gel analysis. The rate of synthesis of at least 4 major and 6 minor polypeptides, ranging from 25 Kd to 116 Kd increased in both light and dark grown cultures. Two polypeptides, 68 Kd and 69 Kd, were found to cross-react by immunoblot analysis with monoclonal antibodies raised against human 72 and 73 Kd heat shock proteins. Both the 68 Kd and 69 Kd proteins were expressed at 21{degrees}C; however, the synthesis of only the 68 Kd protein increased at 36{degrees}C. The 68 Kd heat inducible protein was present in the cytoplasm and nucleus, but not the chloroplast, in cells grown at 21{degrees}C or exposed to 36{degrees}C. Both 68 Kd and 69 Kd proteins copurified during ATP-agarose affinity chromatography. Preliminary evidence indicates that the 68 Kd protein is phosphorylated in the presence of Ca{sup ++} and these proteins exhibit ATPase activity.

  20. HSF transcription factor family, heat shock response, and protein intrinsic disorder.

    PubMed

    Westerheide, Sandy D; Raynes, Rachel; Powell, Chase; Xue, Bin; Uversky, Vladimir N

    2012-02-01

    Intrinsically disordered proteins are highly abundant in all kingdoms of life, and several protein functional classes, such as transcription factors, transcriptional regulators, hub and scaffold proteins, signaling proteins, and chaperones are especially enriched in intrinsic disorder. One of the unique cellular reactions to protein damaging stress is the so-called heat shock response that results in the upregulation of heat shock proteins including molecular chaperones. This molecular protective mechanism is conserved from prokaryotes to eukaryotes and allows an organism to respond to various proteotoxic stressors, such as heat shock, oxidative stress, exposure to heavy metals, and drugs. The heat shock response- related proteins can be expressed during normal conditions (e.g., during the cell growth and development) or can be induced by various pathological conditions, such as infection, inflammation, and protein conformation diseases. The initiation of the heat shock response is manifested by the activation of the heat shock transcription factors HSF 1, part of a family of related HSF transcription factors. This review analyzes the abundance and functional roles of intrinsic disorder in various heat shock transcription factors and clearly shows that the heat shock response requires HSF flexibility to be more efficient. © 2012 Bentham Science Publishers

  1. Associations between heat shock protein 70 genetic polymorphisms and calving traits in crossbred Brahman cows

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Stressors such as heat, cold, toxins, and oxygen deprivation are known to induce heat shock proteins. Genetic polymorphisms associated with heat shock protein genes have been associated with decreased male and female fertility. Our objectives were to 1) confirm single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) ...

  2. NF-κB signaling pathway is inhibited by heat shock independently of active transcription factor HSF1 and increased levels of inducible heat shock proteins.

    PubMed

    Janus, Patryk; Pakuła-Cis, Małgorzata; Kalinowska-Herok, Magdalena; Kashchak, Natalia; Szołtysek, Katarzyna; Pigłowski, Wojciech; Widlak, Wieslawa; Kimmel, Marek; Widlak, Piotr

    2011-12-01

    NF-κB transcription factor regulates numerous genes important for inflammation, immune responses and cell survival. HSF1 is the primary transcription factor activated under stress conditions that is responsible for induction of genes encoding heat shock proteins. Previous studies have shown that the NF-κB activation pathway is blocked by heat shock possibly involving heat shock proteins. Here, we investigate whether active HSF1 inhibited this pathway in the absence of stress conditions. Activation of the NF-κB pathway and expression of NF-κB-dependent genes were analyzed in TNFα-stimulated U-2 OS human osteosarcoma cells that were either heat-shocked or engineered to express a constitutively active form of HSF1 in the absence of heat shock. As expected, heat shock resulted in a general blockade in the degradation of the IκBα inhibitor, nuclear translocation of NF-κB and expression of NF-κB-dependent target genes. In marked contrast, the presence of constitutively active HSF1 did not block TNFα-induced activation of the NF-κB pathway or expression of a set of the NF-κB-dependent genes. We conclude that in the absence of heat shock, the NF-κB activation pathway is inhibited by neither active HSF1 transcription factor nor by increased levels of HSF1-induced heat shock proteins.

  3. The hexameric structures of human heat shock protein 90.

    PubMed

    Lee, Cheng-Chung; Lin, Ta-Wei; Ko, Tzu-Ping; Wang, Andrew H-J

    2011-01-01

    The human 90-kDa heat shock protein (HSP90) functions as a dimeric molecular chaperone. HSP90 identified on the cell surface has been found to play a crucial role in cancer invasion and metastasis, and has become a validated anti-cancer target for drug development. It has been shown to self-assemble into oligomers upon heat shock or divalent cations treatment, but the functional role of the oligomeric states in the chaperone cycle is not fully understood. Here we report the crystal structure of a truncated HSP90 that contains the middle segment and the carboxy-terminal domain, termed MC-HSP90. The structure reveals an architecture with triangular bipyramid geometry, in which the building block of the hexameric assembly is a dimer. In solution, MC-HSP90 exists in three major oligomer states, namely dimer, tetramer and hexamer, which were elucidated by size exclusion chromatography and analytical ultracentrifugation. The newly discovered HSP90 isoform HSP90N that lacks the N-terminal ATPase domain also exhibited similar oligomerization states as did MC-HSP90. While lacking the ATPase domain, both MC-HSP90 and HSP90N can self-assemble into a hexameric structure, spontaneously. The crystal structure of MC-HSP90 reveals that, in addition to the C-terminal dimerization domain, the residue W320 in the M domain plays a critical role in its oligomerization. This study not only demonstrates how the human MC-HSP90 forms a hexamer, but also justifies the similar formation of HSP90N by using 3D modeling analysis.

  4. Exercise-induced ROS in heat shock proteins response.

    PubMed

    Dimauro, Ivan; Mercatelli, Neri; Caporossi, Daniela

    2016-09-01

    Cells have evolved multiple and sophisticated stress response mechanisms aiming to prevent macromolecular (including proteins, lipids, and nucleic acids) damage and to maintain or re-establish cellular homeostasis. Heat shock proteins (HSPs) are among the most highly conserved, ubiquitous, and abundant proteins in all organisms. Originally discovered more than 50 years ago through heat shock stress, they display multiple, remarkable roles inside and outside cells under a variety of stresses, including also oxidative stress and radiation, recognizing unfolded or misfolded proteins and facilitating their restructuring. Exercise consists in a combination of physiological stresses, such as metabolic disturbances, changes in circulating levels of hormones, increased temperature, induction of mild to severe inflammatory state, increased production of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (ROS and RNS). As a consequence, exercise is one of the main stimuli associated with a robust increase in different HSPs in several tissues, which appears to be also fundamental in facilitating the cellular remodeling processes related to the training regime. Among all factors involved in the exercise-related modulation of HSPs level, the ROS production in the contracting muscle or in other tissues represents one of the most attracting, but still under discussion, mechanism. Following exhaustive or damaging muscle exercise, major oxidative damage to proteins and lipids is likely involved in HSP expression, together with mechanically induced damage to muscle proteins and the inflammatory response occurring several days into the recovery period. Instead, the transient and reversible oxidation of proteins by physiological concentrations of ROS seems to be involved in the activation of stress response following non-damaging muscle exercise. This review aims to provide a critical update on the role of HSPs response in exercise-induced adaptation or damage in humans, focusing on experimental

  5. Heat Shock Proteins: Cellular and molecular mechanisms in the CNS

    PubMed Central

    Stetler, R. Anne; Gan, Yu; Zhang, Wenting; Liou, Anthony K.; Gao, Yanqin; Cao, Guodong; Chen, Jun

    2010-01-01

    Emerging evidence describe heat shock proteins (HSPs) as critical regulators in normal neural physiological function as well as in cell stress responses. The functions of HSPs represent an enormous and diverse range of cellular activities, far beyond the originally identified role in protein folding and chaperoning. Now understood to be involved in processes such as synaptic transmission, autophagy, ER stress response, protein kinase and cell death signaling as well as protein chaperone and folding, manipulation of HSPs have robust effects on the fate of cells in neurological injury and disease states. The ongoing exploration of multiple HSP superfamilies has underscored the pluripotent nature of HSPs in the cellular context, and demanded the recent restructuring of the nomenclature referring to these families to reflect a re-organization based on structure and function. In keeping with this re-organization, we have first discussed the HSP superfamilies in terms of protein structure, regulation and expression and distribution in the brain. We then explore major cellular functions of HSPs that are relevant to neural physiological states, and from there discuss known and proposed HSP impact on major neurological disease states. This review article presents a three-part discussion on the array of HSPs families relevant to neuronal tissue, their cellular functions, and the exploration of therapeutic targets of these proteins in the context of neurological diseases. PMID:20685377

  6. Plasmodium falciparum heat shock protein 70 lacks immune modulatory activity.

    PubMed

    Pooe, Ofentse Jacob; Köllisch, Gabriele; Heine, Holger; Shonhai, Addmore

    2017-02-14

    Heat shock protein 70 (Hsp70) family are conserved molecules that constitute a major part of the cell's protein folding machinery. The role of Hsp70s of parasitic origin in host cell immune modulation has remained contentious. This is largely due to the fact that several studies implicating Hsp70 in immune modulation rely on the use of recombinant protein derived from bacteria which is often fraught contamination. Thus, in the current study, we expressed recombinant Plasmodium falciparum Hsp70 (PfHsp70) using in three bacterial expression hosts: E. coli XL1 Blue, E. coli ClearColi BL21 and Brevibacillus choshinensis, respectively. We further investigated the immunostimulatory capability of the protein by assessing cytokine production by murine immune cells cultured in the presence of the protein. Recombinant PfHsp70 obtained from E. coli XL1 Blue expression host induced IL6 and IL8 cytokines. On the other hand, PfHsp70 produced in E. coli ClearColi and B. choshinensis expression systems was associated with no detectable traces of LPS and exhibited no immunomodulatory activity. Our findings suggest that PfHsp70 does not possess immunomodulatory function. Furthermore, our study suggests that E. coli ClearColi and B. choshinensis are versatile for the production of recombinant protein for use in immunomodulatory studies.

  7. Riboflavin protects mice against liposaccharide-induced shock through expression of heat shock protein 25

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Riboflavin (vitamin B2) is a water-soluble vitamin essential for normal cellular functions, growth and development. The study was aimed at investigating the effects of vitamin B2 on the survival rate, and expressions of tissue heat shock protein 25 (HSP25) and heat shock factor 1 (HSF1) in mice und...

  8. The expression and induction of heat shock proteins in molluscs.

    PubMed

    Liu, Dongwu; Chen, Zhiwei

    2013-05-01

    Living cells respond to stress stimuli by triggering rapid changes in the protein profiles, and the induction of heat shock proteins (HSPs) plays an important part in this process. HSPs, mainly acting as molecular chaperones, are constitutively expressed in cells and involved in protein folding, assembly, degradation, and intracellular localization. The overexpression of HSPs represents a ubiquitous molecular mechanism to cope with stress. Compared to vertebrates, molluscs have a biphasic life cycle where pelagic larvae go through settlement and metamorphosis. HSPs may play an important role in the survival strategy of molluscs during the biphasic life stages. Since aquatic environments are highly dynamic, molluscs may be subject to a variety of sources of stress and HSPs might play a more important role in the adaptation of these animals. Moreover, the mechanisms of stress tolerance in molluscs can offer fundamental insights into the adaptation of organisms for a wide range of environmental challenges. The cDNA of HSPs has been cloned from some molluscs, and HSPs can be induced by heat stress, hypoxia, heavy metal contamination, and aestivation, etc. The expression of HSPs was detected in the neuroendocrine system, mollusc development, and reproductive process. Furthermore, the induction of HSPs is related with the phosphorylation of stress-activated p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (p38 MAPK) and cJun-N-terminal kinases (JNKs) in molluscs.

  9. Involvement of heat shock proteins in gluten-sensitive enteropathy.

    PubMed

    Sziksz, Erna; Pap, Domonkos; Veres, Gábor; Fekete, Andrea; Tulassay, Tivadar; Vannay, Ádám

    2014-06-07

    Gluten-sensitive enteropathy, also known as coeliac disease (CD), is an autoimmune disorder occurring in genetically susceptible individuals that damages the small intestine and interferes with the absorption of other nutrients. As it is triggered by dietary gluten and related prolamins present in wheat, rye and barley, the accepted treatment for CD is a strict gluten-free diet. However, a complete exclusion of gluten-containing cereals from the diet is often difficult, and new therapeutic strategies are urgently needed. A class of proteins that have already emerged as drug targets for other autoimmune diseases are the heat shock proteins (HSPs), which are highly conserved stress-induced chaperones that protect cells against harmful extracellular factors. HSPs are expressed in several tissues, including the gastrointestinal tract, and their levels are significantly increased under stress circumstances. HSPs exert immunomodulatory effects, and also play a crucial role in the maintenance of epithelial cell structure and function, as they are responsible for adequate protein folding, influence the degradation of proteins and cell repair processes after damage, and modulate cell signalling, cell proliferation and apoptosis. The present review discusses the involvement of HSPs in the pathophysiology of CD. Furthermore, HSPs may represent a useful therapeutic target for the treatment of CD due to the cytoprotective, immunomodulatory, and anti-apoptotic effects in the intestinal mucosal barrier.

  10. Heat-shock response in cultured chick embryo chondrocytes. Osteonectin is a secreted heat-shock protein.

    PubMed

    Neri, M; Descalzi-Cancedda, F; Cancedda, R

    1992-04-15

    We investigated the induction of specific protein expression by heat shock in dedifferentiated and hypertrophic chick embryo chondrocytes in a culture system that allows 'in vitro' differentiation of cartilage cells [Castagnola, P., Moro, G., Descalzi-Cancedda, F. and Cancedda, R. (1986) J. Cell. Biol. 102, 2310-2317]. As control, we used cultures of embryonic fibroblasts from the whole body and from the skin. In the cell lysates of all cultures we identified four major heat-shock proteins (HSP), with a molecular size corresponding to HSP families previously described (HSP 90, HSP 70, HSP 47 and HSP 26). Some of these proteins were constantly induced when the temperature was raised, others were expressed in a more variable manner. Differences also existed in the relative amount of the HSP synthesized by the four cultures. When we specifically investigated HSP species released into the culture medium, we observed a 43-45 kDa protein constantly expressed and secreted in large amount by the cells. On the basis of its biochemical characteristic and its precipitation by specific antibodies, this protein has been identified as osteonectin (SPARC, BM-40).

  11. Report on the VIIth International Symposium on Heat Shock Proteins in Biology & Medicine.

    PubMed

    Calderwood, Stuart K; Hightower, Lawrence E

    2015-03-01

    This seventh symposium in a series on heat shock proteins in biology and medicine was held November 1-5, 2014, at the Hilton Hotel in Old Town Alexandria, Virginia. Approximately 70 participants including principal investigators, postdoctoral fellows, and graduate students were in attendance. The major themes were: new properties of heat shock proteins (HSPs) and heat shock factor (HSF) and role in the etiology of cancer, molecular chaperones in aging, extracellular HSPs in inflammation and immunity, role of heat shock and the heat shock response in immunity and cancer, protein aggregation disorders and HSP expression, and Hsp70 in blood cell differentiation. The next meeting is planned for the fall of 2016 in the same venue.

  12. EXTRACELLULAR HEAT SHOCK PROTEINS: A NEW LOCATION, A NEW FUNCTION

    PubMed Central

    De Maio, Antonio; Vazquez, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    The expression of heat shock proteins (hsp) is a basic and well conserved cellular response to an array of stresses. These proteins are involved in the repair of cellular damage induced by the stress, which is necessary for the salutary resolution from the insult. Moreover, they confer protection from subsequent insults, which has been coined stress tolerance. Since these proteins are expressed in subcellular compartments, it was thought that their function during stress conditions was circumscribed to the intracellular environment. However, it is now well established that hsp can also be present outside cells where they appear to display a function different than the well understood chaperone role. Extracellular hsp act as alert stress signals priming other cells, particularly of the immune system, to avoid the propagation of the insult and favor resolution. Since the majority of hsp do not possess a secretory peptide signal, they are likely be exported by a non-classical secretory pathway. Different mechanisms have been proposed to explain the export of hsp, including translocation across the plasma membrane and release associated with lipid vesicles, as well as the passive release after cell death by necrosis. Extracellular hsp appear in various flavors, including membrane-bound and membrane-free forms. All of these variants of extracellular hsp suggest that their interactions with cells may be quite diverse, both in target cell types and the activation signaling pathways. This review addresses some of our current knowledge about the release and relevance of extracellular hsp. PMID:23807250

  13. Heat shock factor 2 is associated with the occurrence of lung cancer by enhancing the expression of heat shock proteins

    PubMed Central

    Zhong, Yun-Hua; Cheng, Hong-Zhong; Peng, Hao; Tang, Shi-Cong; Wang, Ping

    2016-01-01

    Cancer is the leading cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide, particularly lung cancer. Heat shock proteins and their upstream heat shock factors are involved in the occurrence of cancer and have been widely researched. However, the role of heat shock factor 2 (HSF2) in lung cancer remains unclear. In the present study, expression levels of HSF2 in lung cancer tissues from 50 lung cancer patients were detected by reverse transcription quantitative polymerase chain reaction, and 76% (38/50) were upregulated compared with the matched normal tissues. This suggested possible involvement of HSF2 in lung cancer. To additionally investigate the role of HSF2 in lung cancer occurrence, a plasmid encoding HSF2 was constructed. HSF2 was over expressed in normal lung epithelial BEAS-2B cells and lung cancer A549 cells. The results showed that HSF2 overexpression promoted cell proliferation and cell migration in BEAS-2B and A549 cells. Additional experiments showed that the HSF2-induced cell proliferation and cell migration were dependent on induction of HSPs, particularly HSP27 and HSP90, as co-transfection of HSP27 small interfering RNA (siRNA) or HSP90 siRNA attenuated HSF2-induced cell growth and migration. In conclusion, the present study showed that HSF2 is aberrantly expressed in lung cancer, and it may be an upstream regulator of HSPs, which may strongly affect cell growth and cell migration. Additional studies are required to explain the detailed mechanism between lung cancer, HSF2, HSPs and other possible signaling pathways. PMID:28101237

  14. A nuclear protein associated with lethal heat shock of HL-60 cells.

    PubMed

    Pipkin, J L; Hinson, W G; Lyn-Cook, L E; Burns, E R; Sheehan, D; Casciano, D A

    1992-09-01

    The responses to stress in living cells are well known. Thermal stress causes decreased protein synthesis as well as rapid induction of heat shock proteins (hsps), or alternately termed stress proteins (sps). The exposure of cultured promyelocytic leukemia cells (HL-60) to a 45 degrees C lethal heat shock for 1 h elicited synthesis and phosphorylation of a polypeptide M(r) 48,000 and pI 7.5 (p 48) as visualized by two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel ultra-microelectrophoresis. p 48, which was not observed at sublethal temperatures (39 and 41 degrees C), was synthesized during all phases of the cell cycle but was phosphorylated only in G0 + G1 and S-phases. The appearance of p 48 was marked by a concomitant and reciprocal reduction in hsps or sps 70 and 90. Distinct protease V8 fragment maps of p 48, hsps 70 and 90 in conjunction with immunochemical determination indicated vast differences in their primary structures. These facts suggest that p 48 was not formed from coalesced breakdown products of hsps 70 or 90. Western blotting showed that p 48 possessed the same immunochemical determinants as two other proteins with the same molecular mass but different isoelectric points. In an association assay, p 48 was shown to bind with actins and hsp 90 from HL-60 nuclei.

  15. Heat Shock Proteins in Dermatophytes: Current Advances and Perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Martinez-Rossi, Nilce M.; Jacob, Tiago R.; Sanches, Pablo R.; Peres, Nalu T.A.; Lang, Elza A.S.; Martins, Maíra P.; Rossi, Antonio

    2016-01-01

    Heat shock proteins (HSPs) are proteins whose transcription responds rapidly to temperature shifts. They constitute a family of molecular chaperones, involved in the proper folding and stabilisation of proteins under physiological and adverse conditions. HSPs also assist in the protection and recovery of cells exposed to a variety of stressful conditions, including heat. The role of HSPs extends beyond chaperoning proteins, as they also participate in diverse cellular functions, such as the assembly of macromolecular complexes, protein transport and sorting, dissociation of denatured protein aggregates, cell cycle control, and programmed cell death. They are also important antigens from a variety of pathogens, are able to stimulate innate immune cells, and are implicated in acquired immunity. In fungi, HSPs have been implicated in virulence, dimorphic transition, and drug resistance. Some HSPs are potential targets for therapeutic strategies. In this review, we discuss the current understanding of HSPs in dermatophytes, which are a group of keratinophilic fungi responsible for superficial mycoses in humans and animals. Computational analyses were performed to characterise the group of proteins in these dermatophytes, as well as to assess their conservation and to identify DNA-binding domains (5′-nGAAn-3′) in the promoter regions of the hsp genes. In addition, the quantification of the transcript levels of few genes in a pacC background helped in the development of an extended model for the regulation of the expression of the hsp genes, which supports the participation of the pH-responsive transcriptional regulator PacC in this process. PMID:27226766

  16. Decrease in penicillin susceptibility due to heat shock protein ClpL in Streptococcus pneumoniae.

    PubMed

    Tran, Thao Dang-Hien; Kwon, Hyog-Young; Kim, Eun-Hye; Kim, Ki-Woo; Briles, David E; Pyo, Suhkneung; Rhee, Dong-Kwon

    2011-06-01

    Antibiotic resistance and tolerance are increasing threats to global health as antibiotic-resistant bacteria can cause severe morbidity and mortality and can increase treatment cost 10-fold. Although several genes contributing to antibiotic tolerance among pneumococci have been identified, we report here that ClpL, a major heat shock protein, could modulate cell wall biosynthetic enzymes and lead to decreased penicillin susceptibility. On capsular type 1, 2, and 19 genetic backgrounds, mutants lacking ClpL were more susceptible to penicillin and had thinner cell walls than the parental strains, whereas a ClpL-overexpressing strain showed a higher resistance to penicillin and a thicker cell wall. Although exposure of Streptococcus pneumoniae D39 to penicillin inhibited expression of the major cell wall synthesis gene pbp2x, heat shock induced a ClpL-dependent increase in the mRNA levels and protein synthesized by pbp2x. Inducible ClpL expression correlated with PBP2x expression and penicillin susceptibility. Fractionation and electron micrograph data revealed that ClpL induced by heat shock is localized at the cell wall, and the ΔclpL showed significantly reduced net translocation of PBP2x into the cell wall. Moreover, coimmunoprecipitation with either ClpL or PBP2x antibody followed by reprobing with ClpL or PBP2x antibody showed an interaction between ClpL and PBP2x after heat stress. This interaction was confirmed by His tag pulldown assay with either ClpLHis₆ or PBP2xHis₆. Thus, ClpL stabilized pbp2x expression, interacted with PBP2x, and facilitated translocation of PBP2x, a key protein of cell wall synthesis process, contributing to the decrease of antibiotic susceptibility in S. pneumoniae.

  17. Increased heat shock protein expression after stress in Japanese quail.

    PubMed

    Hoekstra, K A; Iwama, G K; Nichols, C R; Godin, D V; Cheng, K M

    1998-12-01

    Heat shock proteins (HSPs) have been shown to provide information on the biological impact of environmental stress to organisms, yet none have investigated the HSP response to stress in birds. Japanese quail were exposed to seven different stressors (mild restraint, loud noise, inescapable irritation, cold temperature, isolation in darkness, and two stressful social situations) and expression of HSP30, 60, 70, and 90 in heart, liver, lung, kidney and gonads was examined. Tonic Immobility (TI) tests were also conducted to assess whether the stressors increased fear response. Increased expression of HSP70 was found in the myocardial tissue of birds exposed to loud noise, inescapable irritation, cold temperature, and isolation in darkness. Increased expression of other HSPs was not apparent in the heart or any of the other all tissues examined. Longer TI was observed only in birds exposed to the noise stress. Evidence is presented that a fairly wide range of stressors caused increased expression of HSP70 in the Japanese quail myocardial tissue and that HSPs may provide useful biomarkers for the study of environmental stress in birds.

  18. The Role of Heat Shock Proteins in Antigen Cross Presentation

    PubMed Central

    Murshid, Ayesha; Gong, Jianlin; Calderwood, Stuart K.

    2012-01-01

    Heat shock proteins (HSPs) are molecular chaperones that bind tumor antigens and mediate their uptake into antigen presenting cells. HSP–antigen complexes are then directed toward either the MHC class I pathway through antigen cross presentation or the conventional class II pathway, leading to activation of T cell subsets. Uptake of HSP-chaperoned polypeptides can involve both receptor-mediated and receptor-independent routes, and mechanisms of antigen sorting between the Class I and II pathways after uptake are currently under investigation. The processes involved in internalization of HSP–antigen complexes differ somewhat from the mechanisms previously determined for (unchaperoned) particulate and free soluble antigens. A number of studies show that HSP-facilitated antigen cross presentation requires uptake of the complexes by scavenger receptors (SR) followed by processing in the proteasome, and loading onto MHC class I molecules. In this review we have examined the roles of HSPs and SR in antigen uptake, sorting, processing, cell signaling, and activation of innate and adaptive immunity. PMID:22566944

  19. Heat shock protein expression enhances heat tolerance of reptile embryos

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Jing; Zhang, Wen; Dang, Wei; Mou, Yi; Gao, Yuan; Sun, Bao-Jun; Du, Wei-Guo

    2014-01-01

    The role of heat shock proteins (HSPs) in heat tolerance has been demonstrated in cultured cells and animal tissues, but rarely in whole organisms because of methodological difficulties associated with gene manipulation. By comparing HSP70 expression patterns among representative species of reptiles and birds, and by determining the effect of HSP70 overexpression on embryonic development and hatchling traits, we have identified the role of HSP70 in the heat tolerance of amniote embryos. Consistent with their thermal environment, and high incubation temperatures and heat tolerance, the embryos of birds have higher onset and maximum temperatures for induced HSP70 than do reptiles, and turtles have higher onset and maximum temperatures than do lizards. Interestingly, the trade-off between benefits and costs of HSP70 overexpression occurred between life-history stages: when turtle embryos developed at extreme high temperatures, HSP70 overexpression generated benefits by enhancing embryo heat tolerance and hatching success, but subsequently imposed costs by decreasing heat tolerance of surviving hatchlings. Taken together, the correlative and causal links between HSP70 and heat tolerance provide, to our knowledge, the first unequivocal evidence that HSP70 promotes thermal tolerance of embryos in oviparous amniotes. PMID:25080340

  20. The role of small heat shock proteins in parasites.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Morales, Deyanira; Espinoza, Bertha

    2015-09-01

    The natural life cycle of many protozoan and helminth parasites involves exposure to several hostile environmental conditions. Under these circumstances, the parasites arouse a cellular stress response that involves the expression of heat shock proteins (HSPs). Small HSPs (sHSPs) constitute one of the main families of HSPs. The sHSPs are very divergent at the sequence level, but their secondary and tertiary structures are conserved and some of its members are related to α-crystallin from vertebrates. They are involved in a variety of cellular processes. As other HSPs, the sHSPs act as molecular chaperones; however, they have shown other activities apparently not related to chaperone action. In this review, the diverse activities of sHSPs in the major genera of protozoan and helminth parasites are described. These include stress response, development, and immune response, among others. In addition, an analysis comparing the sequences of sHSPs from some parasites using a distance analysis is presented. Because many parasites face hostile conditions through its life cycles the study of HSPs, including sHSPs, is fundamental.

  1. Heat shock proteins: a therapeutic target worth to consider

    PubMed Central

    Dubey, Amita; Prajapati, K. S.; Swamy, Madhu; Pachauri, V.

    2015-01-01

    Heat shock proteins (HSPs) are the molecular chaperones, that are not only expressed during the normal growth process of cell cycle consecutively, but also get induced in cells during various stress conditions produced by cellular insult, environmental changes, temperature, infections, tumors etc. According to their molecular weight and functions, HSPs are divided into five major families. HSP90, HSP70, HSP60 and HSP100 are the most studied members of the family. Experimental studies have proved that overexpression and/or inhibition of HSPs play an important role in maintaining the tolerance and cell viability under above-described stress conditions. HSP90 is found to be a promising the candidate for the diagnosis, prognosis and treatment of cancer. Similarly, HSP70, HSP60 and small HSPs experimentally and clinically have potential for the treatment of neurodegenerative disease, ischemia, cell death, autoimmunity, graft rejection, etc. In a way, exploring, the cytoprotective and immunoregulatory role of HSPs can open a new avenue for the drug discovery and treatment of critical diseases. PMID:27046995

  2. The bromodomain protein BRD4 regulates splicing during heat shock

    PubMed Central

    Hussong, Michelle; Kaehler, Christian; Kerick, Martin; Grimm, Christina; Franz, Alexandra; Timmermann, Bernd; Welzel, Franziska; Isensee, Jörg; Hucho, Tim; Krobitsch, Sylvia; Schweiger, Michal R.

    2017-01-01

    The cellular response to heat stress is an ancient and evolutionarily highly conserved defence mechanism characterised by the transcriptional up-regulation of cyto-protective genes and a partial inhibition of splicing. These features closely resemble the proteotoxic stress response during tumor development. The bromodomain protein BRD4 has been identified as an integral member of the oxidative stress as well as of the inflammatory response, mainly due to its role in the transcriptional regulation process. In addition, there are also several lines of evidence implicating BRD4 in the splicing process. Using RNA-sequencing we found a significant increase in splicing inhibition, in particular intron retentions (IR), following heat treatment in BRD4-depleted cells. This leads to a decrease of mRNA abundancy of the affected transcripts, most likely due to premature termination codons. Subsequent experiments revealed that BRD4 interacts with the heat shock factor 1 (HSF1) such that under heat stress BRD4 is recruited to nuclear stress bodies and non-coding SatIII RNA transcripts are up-regulated. These findings implicate BRD4 as an important regulator of splicing during heat stress. Our data which links BRD4 to the stress induced splicing process may provide novel mechanisms of BRD4 inhibitors in regard to anti-cancer therapies. PMID:27536004

  3. Heat shock protein expression enhances heat tolerance of reptile embryos.

    PubMed

    Gao, Jing; Zhang, Wen; Dang, Wei; Mou, Yi; Gao, Yuan; Sun, Bao-Jun; Du, Wei-Guo

    2014-09-22

    The role of heat shock proteins (HSPs) in heat tolerance has been demonstrated in cultured cells and animal tissues, but rarely in whole organisms because of methodological difficulties associated with gene manipulation. By comparing HSP70 expression patterns among representative species of reptiles and birds, and by determining the effect of HSP70 overexpression on embryonic development and hatchling traits, we have identified the role of HSP70 in the heat tolerance of amniote embryos. Consistent with their thermal environment, and high incubation temperatures and heat tolerance, the embryos of birds have higher onset and maximum temperatures for induced HSP70 than do reptiles, and turtles have higher onset and maximum temperatures than do lizards. Interestingly, the trade-off between benefits and costs of HSP70 overexpression occurred between life-history stages: when turtle embryos developed at extreme high temperatures, HSP70 overexpression generated benefits by enhancing embryo heat tolerance and hatching success, but subsequently imposed costs by decreasing heat tolerance of surviving hatchlings. Taken together, the correlative and causal links between HSP70 and heat tolerance provide, to our knowledge, the first unequivocal evidence that HSP70 promotes thermal tolerance of embryos in oviparous amniotes.

  4. Recent Patents on Heat Shock Proteins Targeting Antibodies.

    PubMed

    Fernandes, Joao C; Alves, Pedro

    2017-01-01

    Heat shock proteins (Hsp) are major chaperone molecules that have recently emerged as cancer therapeutic targets owing to their involvement in tumor cell proliferation, differentiation, invasion and metastasis. High levels of extracellular Hsp90 and Hsp70 have been closely associated with a wide range of human cancers. Accumulating evidence suggests that the pharmacological inhibition of these molecules can play a pivotal role in non-surgical cancer treatment. Efforts have been taken to develop monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) and antibody fragments targeting extracellular Hsp90 and Hsp70, alone or conjugated with standard anticancer agents, to control several types of cancer, such as breast, colon, prostate or melanoma. To provide an overview on the development of monoclonal antibodies and antibody fragments with capacity to bind Hsp90 and Hsp70, aiming at being used for cancer treatment. A systematic review was performed using European Patent Office and Google patents databases. Based on the available literature and patents, we report the potential anticancer strategies based on these biological molecules. Supported by the recent developments in this field, Hsp targeting antibodies therapy may emerge for clinical use in the future for cancer patients, namely as antibody-drug conjugates combining the specificity of these antibodies with the potency of cytotoxic drugs. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  5. The role of heat shock protein 90 in the regulation of tumor cell apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Kaigorodova, E V; Ryazantseva, N V; Novitskii, V V; Belkina, M V; Maroshkina, A N

    2011-02-01

    Programmed death of Jurkat tumor cells was studied under conditions of culturing with 17-AAG selective inhibitor of heat shock protein with a molecular weight of 90 kDa and etoposide. Apoptosis realization was evaluated by fluorescent microscopy with FITC-labeled annexin V and propidium iodide. Activity of caspase-3 was evaluated spectrophotometrically. Inhibition of heat shock protein with a molecular weight of 90 kDa activated the apoptotic program in Jurkat tumor cells and etoposide-induced apoptosis. The heat shock protein with a molecular weight of 90 kDa acted as apoptosis inhibitor in tumor cells.

  6. Induction of heat-shock response and alterations of protein phosphorylation by a novel topoisomerase II inhibitor, withangulatin A, in 9L rat brain tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Lee, W C; Lin, K Y; Chen, C M; Chen, Z T; Liu, H J; Lai, Y K

    1991-10-01

    Withangulatin A is a newly identified in vitro topoisomerase II inhibitor isolated from the Chinese antitumor herb Physalis angulata. In vivo, it was found to be cytotoxic, capable of suppressing general protein synthesis and of inducing the synthesis of a small set of proteins including those generated by heat-shock treatment. The 70 kDa protein generated by withangulatin A was unequivocally identified as the heat-shock protein 70 (HSP70) since both proteins migrated to the same position on two-dimensional polyacrylamide gels, could be recognized by a monoclonal antibody to human HSP70, and exhibited identical peptide maps. The induction of protein synthesis by withangulatin A was regulated at the transcriptional level since it was aborted in cells pre-treated with actinomycin D. However, the initiation of this process did not require de novo protein synthesis since it was not affected by cycloheximide. Other cellular effect of withangulatin A was alterations of protein phosphorylation including an enhancement of phosphorylation of a 65 kDa protein which was also detected in the heat-shocked cells. Moreover, this process was observed within 7.5 min after the initial heat treatment which is much faster than the onset of HSP synthesis. Therefore, increased phosphorylation of the 65 kDa protein may represent one of the earliest signals generated by both heat-shock and withangluatin A and may be involved in the upstream regulation of heat-shock response in cells.

  7. KPNA3-knockdown eliminates the second heat shock protein peak associated with the heat shock response of male silkworm pupae (Bombyx mori) by reducing heat shock factor transport into the nucleus.

    PubMed

    Li, Jun; Wei, Guoqing; Wang, Lei; Qian, Cen; Li, Kedong; Zhang, Congfen; Dai, Lishang; Sun, Yu; Liu, Dongran; Zhu, Baojian; Liu, Chaoliang

    2016-01-10

    In this study, we investigated the role of karyopherin alpha 3 in the heat shock response in male silkworm pupae. Karyopherin alpha recognizes the classical nuclear location sequence on proteins and transports them into the nucleus by forming a trimetric complex with karyopherin beta. Three predicted karyopherin alphas (KPNA1, KPNA2 and KPNA3) have been identified from the silkworm Bombyx mori. Pull-down assay result showed that KPNA3 can pull down heat shock transcription factor (HSF) from proteins extracted from tissues using non-denature lysis buffer. After 45 °C heat shock on male B. mori pupae for 30 min, we identified two heat shock protein (HSP) mRNA expression peaks correlating with HSP19.9, HSP20.4 and HSP25.4 at 4 h (peak 1) and 24 h (peak 2). The second peak was eliminated after knockdown of KPNA3. Similar results were obtained following knockdown of HSF, which is the trans-activating factor of heat shock. However, KPNA3 knockdown was not accompanied by the decreased HSF protein levels at 24 h after heat shock which were observed following HSF knockdown. We also expressed recombinant protein GST-KPNA3 and His-HSF in Escherichia coli to perform GST pull-down assay and the result confirmed the interaction between KPNA3 and HSF. We concluded that KPNA3 knockdown eliminates the second heat shock protein peak in the heat shock response of male silkworm pupae by reducing HSF transport into the nucleus. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Heat Shock Protein 27 Mediated Signaling in Viral Infection

    PubMed Central

    Rajaiya, Jaya; Yousuf, Mohammad A.; Singh, Gurdeep; Stanish, Heather; Chodosh, James

    2013-01-01

    Heat shock proteins (HSPs) play a critical role in many intracellular processes, including apoptosis and delivery of other proteins to intracellular compartments. Small HSPs have been shown previously to participate in many cellular functions, including IL-8 induction. Human adenovirus infection activates intracellular signaling, involving particularly the c-Src and mitogen-activated protein kinases [Natarajan, K., et al. (2003) J. Immunol. 170, 6234–6243]. HSP27 and MK2 are also phosphorylated, and c-Src, and its downstream targets, p38, ERK1/2, and c-Jun-terminal kinase (JNK), differentially mediate IL-8 and MCP-1 expression. Specifically, activation and translocation of transcription factor NFκB-p65 occurs in a p38-dependent fashion [Rajaiya, J., et al. (2009) Mol. Vision 15, 2879–2889]. Herein, we report a novel role for HSP27 in an association of p38 with NFκB-p65. Immunoprecipitation assays of virus-infected but not mock-infected cells revealed a signaling complex including p38 and NFκB-p65. Transfection with HSP27 short interfering RNA (siRNA) but not scrambled RNA disrupted this association and reduced the level of IL-8 expression. Transfection with HSP27 siRNA also reduced the level of nuclear localization of NFκB-p65 and p38. By use of tagged p38 mutants, we found that amino acids 279–347 of p38 are necessary for the association of p38 with NFκB-p65. These studies strongly suggest that HSP27, p38, and NFκB-p65 form a signalosome in virus-infected cells and influence downstream expression of pro-inflammatory mediators. PMID:22734719

  9. Examination of KNK437- and quercetin-mediated inhibition of heat shock-induced heat shock protein gene expression in Xenopus laevis cultured cells.

    PubMed

    Manwell, Laurie A; Heikkila, John J

    2007-11-01

    We examined the effect of quercetin (3,3',4',5,7-pentahydroxyflavon) and KNK437 (N-formyl-3,4-methylenedioxy-benzylidene-gamma-butyrolactam), a benzylidene lactam compound, on heat-induced heat shock protein (hsp) gene expression in Xenopus laevis A6 kidney epithelial cells. In previous studies, both quercetin and KNK437 inhibited heat shock factor activity resulting in a repression of hsp mRNA and protein accumulation in human cultured cells. In this first study of the effect of these hsp gene expression inhibitors in a non-mammalian cell line, we report that both quercetin and KNK437 reduced the heat shock-induced accumulation of hsp30, hsp47 and hsp70 mRNA in X. laevis cultured cells. However, these inhibitors had no effect on the relative level of a non-heat shock protein mRNA, ef1alpha, in either control or heat shocked cells. Western blot and immunocytochemical analyses revealed that quercetin partially inhibited HSP30 protein accumulation. In contrast, HSP30 protein was not detectable in KNK437-treated cells. Finally, treatment of A6 cells with KNK437 inhibited the heat shock-induced acquisition of thermotolerance, as determined by preservation of actin filaments and cellular morphology using immunocytochemistry and laser scanning confocal microscopy.

  10. 4-Hydroxynonenal induces a DNA-binding protein similar to the heat-shock factor.

    PubMed Central

    Cajone, F; Salina, M; Benelli-Zazzera, A

    1989-01-01

    By using a gel mobility assay, we have shown that treatment of HeLa cells with 4-hydroxynonenal, a major product of the peroxidation of membrane lipids and an inducer of heat-shock proteins, has the same effect as heat shock in causing the appearance of a protein which binds to the sequence of DNA specific for the induction of heat-shock genes. Lipoperoxidation and heat exposure seem to share a common mechanism of specific gene activation. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 2. PMID:2590181

  11. Molecular identification and expression of heat shock cognate 70 (hsc70) and heat shock protein 70 (hsp70) genes in the Pacific oyster Crassostrea gigas

    PubMed Central

    Boutet, Isabelle; Tanguy, Arnaud; Rousseau, Sabrina; Auffret, Michel; Moraga, Dario

    2003-01-01

    The 70-kDa heat shock protein (Hsp) family is composed of both environmentally inducible (Hsp) and constitutively expressed (Hsc) family members. We sequenced 2 genes encoding an Hsp70 and an Hsc70 in the Pacific oyster Crassostrea gigas. The Cghsc70 gene contained introns, whereas the Cghsp70 gene did not. Moreover, the corresponding amino acid sequences of the 2 genes presented all the characteristic motifs of the Hsp70 family. We also investigated the expression of Hsp70 in tissues of oysters experimentally exposed to metal. A recombinant Hsc72 was used as an antigen to produce a polyclonal antibody to quantify soluble Hsp70 by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay in protein samples extracted from oysters. Our results showed that metals (copper and cadmium) induced a decrease in cytosolic Hsp70 level in gills and digestive gland of oysters experimentally exposed to metal. These data suggest that metals may inhibit stress protein synthesis. PMID:12820657

  12. Heat-shock protein expression in canine corneal wound healing.

    PubMed

    Peterson, Cornelia W M; Carter, Renee T; Bentley, Ellison; Murphy, Christopher J; Chandler, Heather L

    2016-05-01

    Heat-shock proteins, particularly the 70-kDa member (Hsp70), have been implicated in facilitating wound healing in multiple tissues. Expression and localization of three HSPs were assessed in normal and wounded canine corneas to elucidate a role in epithelial healing. Paraffin-embedded normal corneas, acute and repeatedly abraded corneas, and keratectomies of spontaneous chronic corneal epithelial defects (SCCEDs) were subjected to routine immunohistochemistry for Hsp27, 47, and 70 expression. Ex vivo corneal defects were created and treated with anti-HSPs or IgG controls, and wound healing was monitored. Primary cultures of canine corneal stromal fibroblasts and corneal epithelial cells were treated with exogenous Hsp70, and an artificial wound was created in vitro to monitor restoration of the monolayer. Normal canine corneas exhibited constitutive expression of all HSPs evaluated. Inducible expression was demonstrated in acutely wounded tissues, and expression in the chronically abraded corneas was relocalized. All HSP expression was below the limits of detection in the epithelium of SCCED samples. Inhibition of HSPs in culture resulted in delayed wound healing when compared to controls. Hsp70-treated fibroblasts demonstrated significantly (P < 0.001) increased migration and proliferation compared to the vehicle control; however, there was no significant effect of exogenous Hsp70 on corneal epithelial cells. These findings suggest that HSPs are induced in the normal canine cornea during re-epithelialization. Hsp70 expression is likely important for inducing the cytoarchitectural remodeling, migration, and proliferation necessary early in the canine corneal healing response, and suppressed expression may contribute to the pathophysiology of nonhealing defects. © 2015 American College of Veterinary Ophthalmologists.

  13. Circulating Heat Shock Protein 70 in Health, Aging and Disease

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Heat shock proteins (Hsp) are ubiquitously synthesised in virtually all species and it is hypothesised that they might have beneficial health effects. Recent studies have identified circulating Hsp as an important mediator in inflammation - the effects of low-grade inflammation in the aging process are overwhelming. While much is known about intracellular Hsp70, scant data exist on circulating Hsp70 in the aging context. Therefore, the objectives of this study were to investigate the effect of age and disease on circulating Hsp70 and, in particular, to evaluate the association between circulating Hsp70 and inflammatory parameters. Results Serum Hsp70, Interleukin (IL) -10, IL-6 and Tumor Necrosis Factor (TNF) alpha concentrations were determined in 90 hospitalised geriatric patients (aged 83 ± 6 years) and in 200 community-dwelling control subjects (100 elderly, aged 74 ± 5 years, and 100 young, aged 23 ± 3 years). In the community-dwelling elderly, serum Hsp70 and IL-10 concentrations were significantly lower and IL-6 was significantly higher when compared to healthy young control subjects. Elderly patients presenting inflammation (CRP serum levels ≥5 mg/L) showed significantly (p = 0.007) higher Hsp70 values; and Hsp70 correlated positively (p < 0.001) with IL-6 and CRP, but not with TNF-alpha or IL-10. A significant association was also noted between Hsp70 levels and the degree of dependency and cognitive decline in geriatric patients. Conclusions The present data provide new evidence that serum concentration of Hsp70 decreases with age in a normal population. Our study also shows that higher levels of Hsp70 are associated with inflammation and frailty in elderly patients. PMID:21443787

  14. Neurite outgrowth of NG108-15 cells induced by heat shock protein 90 inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Jin, Erika; Sano, Mamoru

    2008-12-01

    We previously reported that radicicol (Rad) and geldanamycin (Geld), heat shock protein 90 (Hsp90) inhibitors, potentiate neurite growth of cultured sensory neurons from chick embryo. We now show that the antibiotics induce neurite growth in NG108-15 cells. Treatment of the cells with these drugs caused transient decrease in protein levels of Raf1, ERK1/2, phosphorylated ERK1/2, Akt1, and CDK4. The neurite growth of NG108-15 induced by the inhibitors was blocked by actynomycin D, but the neurite growth stimulated by dbcAMP in the cells was not affected. The neurite growth could be due to a change in the synthesis of some specific protein(s) and is speculated to be due to the transient downregulation of particular-signaling molecules stabilized by Hsp90.

  15. BH3-only protein BIM mediates heat shock-induced apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Mahajan, Indra M; Chen, Miao-Der; Muro, Israel; Robertson, John D; Wright, Casey W; Bratton, Shawn B

    2014-01-01

    Acute heat shock can induce apoptosis through a canonical pathway involving the upstream activation of caspase-2, followed by BID cleavage and stimulation of the intrinsic pathway. Herein, we report that the BH3-only protein BIM, rather than BID, is essential to heat shock-induced cell death. We observed that BIM-deficient cells were highly resistant to heat shock, exhibiting short and long-term survival equivalent to Bax(-/-)Bak(-/-) cells and better than either Bid(-/-) or dominant-negative caspase-9-expressing cells. Only Bim(-/-) and Bax(-/-)Bak(-/-) cells exhibited resistance to mitochondrial outer membrane permeabilization and loss of mitochondrial inner membrane potential. Moreover, while dimerized caspase-2 failed to induce apoptosis in Bid(-/-) cells, it readily did so in Bim(-/-) cells, implying that caspase-2 kills exclusively through BID, not BIM. Finally, BIM reportedly associates with MCL-1 following heat shock, and Mcl-1(-/-) cells were indeed sensitized to heat shock-induced apoptosis. However, pharmacological inhibition of BCL-2 and BCL-X(L) with ABT-737 also sensitized cells to heat shock, most likely through liberation of BIM. Thus, BIM mediates heat shock-induced apoptosis through a BAX/BAK-dependent pathway that is antagonized by antiapoptotic BCL-2 family members.

  16. BH3-Only Protein BIM Mediates Heat Shock-Induced Apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Mahajan, Indra M.; Chen, Miao-Der; Muro, Israel; Robertson, John D.; Wright, Casey W.; Bratton, Shawn B.

    2014-01-01

    Acute heat shock can induce apoptosis through a canonical pathway involving the upstream activation of caspase-2, followed by BID cleavage and stimulation of the intrinsic pathway. Herein, we report that the BH3-only protein BIM, rather than BID, is essential to heat shock-induced cell death. We observed that BIM-deficient cells were highly resistant to heat shock, exhibiting short and long-term survival equivalent to Bax−/−Bak−/− cells and better than either Bid−/− or dominant-negative caspase-9-expressing cells. Only Bim−/− and Bax−/−Bak−/− cells exhibited resistance to mitochondrial outer membrane permeabilization and loss of mitochondrial inner membrane potential. Moreover, while dimerized caspase-2 failed to induce apoptosis in Bid−/− cells, it readily did so in Bim−/− cells, implying that caspase-2 kills exclusively through BID, not BIM. Finally, BIM reportedly associates with MCL-1 following heat shock, and Mcl-1−/− cells were indeed sensitized to heat shock-induced apoptosis. However, pharmacological inhibition of BCL-2 and BCL-XL with ABT-737 also sensitized cells to heat shock, most likely through liberation of BIM. Thus, BIM mediates heat shock-induced apoptosis through a BAX/BAK-dependent pathway that is antagonized by antiapoptotic BCL-2 family members. PMID:24427286

  17. Role of Heat Shock Protein 70 in Innate Alloimmunity

    PubMed Central

    Land, Walter G.

    2012-01-01

    This article briefly describes our own experience with the proven demonstration of heat shock protein 70 (HSP70) in reperfused renal allografts from brain-dead donors and reflects about its potential role as a typical damage-associated molecular pattern (DAMP) in the setting of innate alloimmunity. In fact, our group was able to demonstrate a dramatic up-regulation of HSP70 expression after postischemic reperfusion of renal allografts. Of note, up-regulation of this stress protein expression, although to a lesser extent, was already observed after cold storage of the organ indicating that this molecule is already induced in the stressed organism of a brain-dead donor. However, whether or not the dramatic up-regulation of HSP70 expression contributes to mounting an innate alloimmune response cannot be judged in view of these clinical findings. Nevertheless, HSP70, since generated in association with postischemic reperfusion-induced allograft injury, can be called a typical DAMP – as can every molecule be termed a DAMP that is generated in association with any stressful tissue injury regardless of its final positive or negative regulatory function within the innate immune response elicited by it. In fact, as we discuss in this article, the context-dependent, even contradistinctive activities of HSP70 reflect the biological phenomenon that, throughout evolution, mammals have developed an elaborate network of positive and negative regulatory mechanisms, which provide balance between defensive and protective measures against unwarranted destruction of the host. In this sense, up-regulated expression of HSP70 in an injured allograft might reflect a pure protective response against the severe oxidative injury of a reperfused donor organ. On the other hand, up-regulated expression of this stress protein in an injured allograft might reflect a (futile) attempt of the innate immune system to restore homeostasis with the aim to eliminate the “unwanted foreign allograft

  18. Role of the heat shock response in stability of mRNA in Escherichia coli K-12.

    PubMed Central

    Henry, M D; Yancey, S D; Kushner, S R

    1992-01-01

    The heat shock response in Escherichia coli involves extensive induction of the heat shock proteins, with the concomitant suppression of the synthesis of the non-heat shock proteins. While the induction of the heat shock proteins has been shown to occur primarily at the transcriptional level, the suppression of non-heat shock proteins is poorly understood. We have investigated the possibility that an increased decay of non-heat shock mRNAs is a means of decreasing the synthesis of non-heat shock proteins during the heat shock response. Heat shock response-defective strains were compared with wild-type controls by several criteria to evaluate both mRNA stability and the induction of enzymes known to be involved in mRNA turnover. Our results indicate that increased mRNA decay is not a mechanism used to regulate the synthesis of non-heat shock proteins. PMID:1732210

  19. Immediate induction of heat shock proteins is not protective against cryopreservation in normal human fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Park, S J; Choi, H R; Nam, K M; Na, J I; Huh, C H; Park, K C

    2013-01-01

    Heat shock proteins (HSPs) were first identified as proteins whose synthesis was enhanced by stresses, such as increased temperature. HSPs can protect cells from various cytotoxic factors by stabilizing proteins. Thus, it could be hypothesized that heat induced HSPs can provide protective effects against cryopreservation-induced cell death. The aim of this study was to determine whether induction of HSPs can increase the cell viability of normal human fibroblasts after cryopreservation. Cytotoxic effects of heat treatment were tested and the induction of HSPs was assessed by examining time-dependent HSP expression. A cell counting method using fluorescence microscopy was used to determine the viability of cells. In addition, the effects of geranylgeranylacetone were evaluated in terms of HSP expression and cytoskeleton changes. The results of this study showed that immediate induction of HSPs does not protect normal human fibroblasts against cryopreservation-induced cell death possibly by inducing cytoskeleton changes.

  20. Ventilation during cardiopulmonary bypass: impact on heat shock protein release.

    PubMed

    Beer, L; Szerafin, T; Mitterbauer, A; Kasiri, M M; Debreceni T Palotás, L; Dworschak, M; Roth, G A; Ankersmit, H J

    2014-12-01

    Cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB), utilized in on-pump coronary artery bypass graft procedures (CABG) induces generalized immune suppression, release of heat shock proteins (HSP), inflammatory markers and apoptosis-specific proteins. We hypothesized that continued mechanical ventilation during cardiopulmonary bypass attenuates immune response and HSP liberation. Thirty patients undergoing conventional coronary artery bypass graft (CABG) operation were randomized into a ventilated on CPB (VG; N.=15) and a non-ventilated CPB group (NVG; N.=15). Blood samples were drawn at the beginning and end of surgery, as well as on the five consecutive postoperative days (POD). Molecular markers were measured by ELISA. Data are given as mean ± (SD). Mann-Whitney-U-test was used for statistical analysis. Serum concentrations of HSP70 were significantly lower in VG compared to NVG on POD-1 (VG: 1629±608 vs. NVG: 5203±2128.6 pg/mL, P<0.001). HSP27 and HSP60 depicted a minor increase in both study groups at the end of surgery without any intergroup differences (HSP27: VG 6207.9±1252.5 vs. NVG 7424.1±2632.5; HSP60: VG 1046.2±478.8 vs. NVG 1223.5±510.1). IL-8 and CK-18 M30 evidenced the highest serum concentrations at the end of surgery (IL-8: VG 119.5±77.9 vs. NVG 148.0±184.55; CK-18 M30: VG 62.1±39.2 vs. NVG 67.5±33.9) with no differences between groups. Decreased ICAM-1 serum concentrations were detected postoperatively, however ICAM-1 concentrations on POD-1 to POD-5 showed slightly elevated concentrations in both study groups with no intergroup differences. Significantly less HSP70 was detectable in patients receiving uninterrupted mechanical lung ventilation on CPB, indicating either different inflammatory response, cellular stress or cell damage between the ventilated and non-ventilated group. These data suggest that continued mechanical ventilation has a modulatory effect on the immune response in patients after CABG surgery.

  1. The Stress Granule RNA-Binding Protein TIAR-1 Protects Female Germ Cells from Heat Shock in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Huelgas-Morales, Gabriela; Silva-García, Carlos Giovanni; Salinas, Laura S; Greenstein, David; Navarro, Rosa E

    2016-04-07

    In response to stressful conditions, eukaryotic cells launch an arsenal of regulatory programs to protect the proteome. One major protective response involves the arrest of protein translation and the formation of stress granules, cytoplasmic ribonucleoprotein complexes containing the conserved RNA-binding proteins TIA-1 and TIAR. The stress granule response is thought to preserve mRNA for translation when conditions improve. For cells of the germline-the immortal cell lineage required for sexual reproduction-protection from stress is critically important for perpetuation of the species, yet how stress granule regulatory mechanisms are deployed in animal reproduction is incompletely understood. Here, we show that the stress granule protein TIAR-1 protects the Caenorhabditis elegans germline from the adverse effects of heat shock. Animals containing strong loss-of-function mutations in tiar-1 exhibit significantly reduced fertility compared to the wild type following heat shock. Analysis of a heat-shock protein promoter indicates that tiar-1 mutants display an impaired heat-shock response. We observed that TIAR-1 was associated with granules in the gonad core and oocytes during several stressful conditions. Both gonad core and oocyte granules are dynamic structures that depend on translation; protein synthesis inhibitors altered their formation. Nonetheless, tiar-1 was required for the formation of gonad core granules only. Interestingly, the gonad core granules did not seem to be needed for the germ cells to develop viable embryos after heat shock. This suggests that TIAR-1 is able to protect the germline from heat stress independently of these structures.

  2. The Stress Granule RNA-Binding Protein TIAR-1 Protects Female Germ Cells from Heat Shock in Caenorhabditis elegans

    PubMed Central

    Huelgas-Morales, Gabriela; Silva-García, Carlos Giovanni; Salinas, Laura S.; Greenstein, David; Navarro, Rosa E.

    2016-01-01

    In response to stressful conditions, eukaryotic cells launch an arsenal of regulatory programs to protect the proteome. One major protective response involves the arrest of protein translation and the formation of stress granules, cytoplasmic ribonucleoprotein complexes containing the conserved RNA-binding proteins TIA-1 and TIAR. The stress granule response is thought to preserve mRNA for translation when conditions improve. For cells of the germline—the immortal cell lineage required for sexual reproduction—protection from stress is critically important for perpetuation of the species, yet how stress granule regulatory mechanisms are deployed in animal reproduction is incompletely understood. Here, we show that the stress granule protein TIAR-1 protects the Caenorhabditis elegans germline from the adverse effects of heat shock. Animals containing strong loss-of-function mutations in tiar-1 exhibit significantly reduced fertility compared to the wild type following heat shock. Analysis of a heat-shock protein promoter indicates that tiar-1 mutants display an impaired heat-shock response. We observed that TIAR-1 was associated with granules in the gonad core and oocytes during several stressful conditions. Both gonad core and oocyte granules are dynamic structures that depend on translation; protein synthesis inhibitors altered their formation. Nonetheless, tiar-1 was required for the formation of gonad core granules only. Interestingly, the gonad core granules did not seem to be needed for the germ cells to develop viable embryos after heat shock. This suggests that TIAR-1 is able to protect the germline from heat stress independently of these structures. PMID:26865701

  3. Heat Shock Protein 90 Ensures Efficient Mumps Virus Replication by Assisting with Viral Polymerase Complex Formation.

    PubMed

    Katoh, Hiroshi; Kubota, Toru; Nakatsu, Yuichiro; Tahara, Maino; Kidokoro, Minoru; Takeda, Makoto

    2017-03-15

    Paramyxoviral RNAs are synthesized by a viral RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp) consisting of the large (L) protein and its cofactor phosphoprotein (P protein). The L protein is a multifunctional protein that catalyzes RNA synthesis, mRNA capping, and mRNA polyadenylation. Growing evidence shows that the stability of several paramyxovirus L proteins is regulated by heat shock protein 90 (Hsp90). In this study, we demonstrated that Hsp90 activity was important for mumps virus (MuV) replication. The Hsp90 activity was required for L-protein stability and activity because an Hsp90-specific inhibitor, 17-allylamino-17-demethoxygeldanamycin (17-AAG), destabilized the MuV L protein and suppressed viral RNA synthesis. However, once the L protein formed a mature polymerase complex with the P protein, Hsp90 activity was no longer required for the stability and activity of the L protein. When the Hsp90 activity was inhibited, the MuV L protein was degraded through the CHIP (C terminus of Hsp70-interacting protein)-mediated proteasomal pathway. High concentrations of 17-AAG showed strong cytotoxicity to certain cell types, but combined use of an Hsp70 inhibitor, VER155008, potentiated degradation of the L protein, allowing a sufficient reduction of 17-AAG concentration to block MuV replication with minimum cytotoxicity. Regulation of the L protein by Hsp90 and Hsp70 chaperones was also demonstrated for another paramyxovirus, the measles virus. Collectively, our data show that the Hsp90/Hsp70 chaperone machinery assists in the maturation of the paramyxovirus L protein and thereby in the formation of a mature RdRp complex and efficient viral replication.IMPORTANCE Heat shock protein 90 (Hsp90) is nearly universally required for viral protein homeostasis. Here, we report that Hsp90 activity is required for efficient propagation of mumps virus (MuV). Hsp90 functions in the maintenance of the catalytic subunit of viral polymerase, the large (L) protein, prior to formation of a

  4. Hsp56: a novel heat shock protein associated with untransformed steroid receptor complexes.

    PubMed

    Sanchez, E R

    1990-12-25

    The recently-described p59 protein has been shown to be associated with untransformed steroid receptors present in rabbit uterus and rat liver cytosols (Tai, P. K., Maeda, Y., Nakao, K., Wakim, N. G., Duhring, J. L., and Faber, L. E. (1986) Biochemistry 25, 5269-5275; Renoir, J.-M., Radanyi, C., Faber, L. E., and Baulieu, E.-E. (1990) J. Biol. Chem. 265, 10740-10745), while a smaller version of this protein (p56) interacts with glucocorticoid receptors in human IM-9 cell cytosols (Sanchez, E. R., Faber, L. E., Henzel, W. J., and Pratt, W. B. (1990) Biochemistry 29, 5145-5152). In addition to interacting with glucocorticoid receptors, the p56 protein of IM-9 cell cytosol is also found as part of a large heteromeric complex that contains both the 70-kDa and 90-kDa heat shock proteins (hsp70 and hsp90, respectively). Given this association of p56 with the two major stress proteins, I have speculated that p56 may itself be a heat shock protein. In this paper, the effect of heat stress on the rate of synthesis of p56 is determined. Intact IM-9 cells were exposed to 37 or 43 degrees C for 4 h, followed by pulse-labeling with [35S]methionine. Analysis of whole cytosolic extracts by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and autoradiography reveal an increased rate of radiolabeling for hsp70, hsp90, hsp100, ad hsp110, but no heat-inducible protein of smaller relative molecular mass is detected. However, immune-purification of p56 from normal and heat-stressed cytosols with the EC1 monoclonal antibody results in the presence of a 56-kDa protein that exhibits an increased rate of synthesis in response to heat stress. The results of two-dimensional gel Western blots employing the EC1 antibody demonstrate that this heat-inducible protein is indeed the EC1-reactive p56 protein and that the induction effect is not due to unequal yields of p56 during immune-purification. Heat stress has no effect on the composition of the p56.hsp.70.hsp90 complex, except that

  5. Heat shock protein 70 and anti–heat shock protein 70 antibodies in nasal secretions of patients with chronic rhinosinusitis

    PubMed Central

    Tsybikov, Namjil N.; Egorova, Elena V.; Kuznik, Boris I.; Fefelova, Elena V.

    2016-01-01

    Background: The issue of heat shock protein (HSP) 70 and anti-HSP70 antibodies in chronic rhinosinusitis (CRS) has never been explored. Objective: To determine the nasal secretion (NS) levels of HSP70 and anti-HSP70 antibodies in patients with CRS with nasal polyps (CRSwNP) and patients with CRS without nasal polyps (CRSsNP), and to evaluate their associations with CRS clinical severity and correlation with NS interleukin (IL), IL-5 and interferon λ. Methods: CRS severity was determined by Lund-Mackay scores. Levels of immunoglobulin E (IgE), IL-4, IL-5, interferon λ, HSP70, and anti-HSP70 antibody levels in NS were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Results: Forty-six patients with CRSsNP (25 women [54.3%] and 21 men [45.7%], mean [standard deviation {SD}]) age, 34.1 ± 12.3 years; 54 patients with CRSwNP (24 women [44.4%] and 30 men [55.6%], mean [SD] age, 37.9 ± 17.5 years). A group of 40 healthy subjects served as controls. Compared with the controls (with a mean [SD] NS HSP70 level of 0.05 ± 0.03 μg/mL), mean [SD] NS HSP70 levels in both the CRSsNP group (0.16 ± 0.07 μg/mL) and CRSwNP group (0.21 ± 0.10 μg/mL) were increased (p < 0.001). Similarly, the mean (SD) NS anti-HSP70 antibody levels were significantly higher in patients with CRSwNP (0.25 ± 0.09 optical density value [ODV]) compared with CRSsNP (0.13 ± 0.04 ODV) (p < 0.001) and healthy controls (0.14 ± 0.02 ODV) (p < 0.001). NS HSP70 in subjects with CRSwNP showed a significant positive correlation with the Lund-Mackay score (r = 0.31; p < 0.05). NS levels of either HSP70 or anti-HSP70 antibodies were strongly correlated with NS IL-4 in the CRSwNP group (r = 0.62, p < 0.001; and r = 0.69, p < 0.001, respectively). Conclusion: NS concentrations of HSP70 and secretory IgA anti HSP70 antibodies are increased in CRSwNP (but not in CRSsNP) and correlate positively with the Lund-Mackay score, NS IL-4, and NS IL-5. PMID:27103555

  6. Clinical, Prognostic and Therapeutic Significance of Heat Shock Proteins in Cancer.

    PubMed

    Saini, Jasleen; Sharma, Pushpender K

    2017-08-23

    Heat shock proteins (HSPs) constitute a group of proteins that play crucial role in process of proteins folding. HSPs are also known to modulate number of key apoptotic factors. High expression of these proteins is reported in array of cancers, such as breast, prostate, colorectal, lung, ovarian, gastric, oral and esophageal cancer. Ample amount of investigations carried out on variety of cancers suggests HSPs as a promising hallmark in cancers. Their expression profile in several tumors elucidates that they help in proliferation, invasion, metastasis and death of cancerous cells. Detection of the levels of heat shock proteins and their specific antibodies in the sera of diseased individuals can play an important role in cancer diagnosis. This review will present and summarize latest research being carried out on heat shock proteins. It will also highlight the clinical and prognostic features of HSP27, HSP60, HSP70, HSP90 and HSP110, and will further shed light into future implications of these HSPs in diagnosis and prognosis of cancer. Furthermore, role of heat shock proteins as a therapeutic target in cancer will be discussed. In addition, the review article will further shed light into different studies, where HSPs have been targeted for its therapeutic potential. In summary, multiple experimental investigations have successful in suggesting the role of heat shock protein as a clinical biomarker and therapeutic target in cancer. HSPs are associated with number of cancer hallmarks such as cell proliferation, invasion, and metastasis. Inhibition of HSPs has resulted in successful therapeutic outcome in cancer. It has served as a novel anti-cancer therapy for the treatment of several cancer forms. However, more experimental studies are required to elucidate the reliability and efficacy of heat shock proteins in combination with other conventional markers for cancer diagnosis and prognosis. Novel and effective interventions through HSP inhibition are expected to

  7. Characterization of a novel heat shock protein (Hsp22.5) involved in the pathogenesis of Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Abomoelak, Bassam; Marcus, Sarah A; Ward, Sarah K; Karakousis, Petros C; Steinberg, Howard; Talaat, Adel M

    2011-07-01

    Tuberculosis is a worldwide health problem, given that one-third of the world's population is currently infected with Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Understanding the regulation of virulence on the molecular level will provide a better understanding of how M. tuberculosis can establish chronic infection. Using in vivo microarray analysis (IVMA), we previously identified a group of genes that are activated in BALB/c mouse lungs compared to in vitro cultures, including the rv0990c gene. Our analysis indicated that this gene is a member of the heat shock regulon and was activated under other stress conditions, including survival in macrophages or during the late phase of chronic tuberculosis in the murine lungs. Deletion of rv0990c from the genome of M. tuberculosis strain H37Rv affected the transcriptional profiles of many genes (n = 382) and operons involved in mycobacterial survival, including the dormancy regulon, ATP synthesis, respiration, protein synthesis, and lipid metabolism. Comparison of the proteomes of the mutant to those of the wild-type strain further confirmed the differential expression of 15 proteins, especially those involved in the heat shock response (e.g., DnaK and GrpE). Finally, the rv0990c mutant strain showed survival equivalent to that of the isogenic wild-type strain during active tuberculosis in guinea pigs, despite showing significant attenuation in BALB/c mice during the chronic phase of the disease. Overall, we suggest that rv0990c encodes a heat shock protein that plays an important role in mycobacterial virulence. Hence, we renamed rv0990c heat shock protein 22.5 (hsp22.5), reflecting its molecular mass.

  8. Heat shock proteins as key biological targets of the marine natural cyclopeptide perthamide C.

    PubMed

    Margarucci, Luigi; Monti, Maria Chiara; Mencarelli, Andrea; Cassiano, Chiara; Fiorucci, Stefano; Riccio, Raffaele; Zampella, Angela; Casapullo, Agostino

    2012-04-01

    Linking bioactive compounds to their cellular targets is a central challenge in chemical biology. Herein we report the mode of action of perthamide C, a natural cyclopeptide isolated from the marine sponge Theonella swinhoei. Through an emerging mass spectrometry-based chemical proteomics approach, Heat Shock Protein 90 and Glucose Regulated Protein 94 were identified as key targets of perthamide C and this evidence has been validated using surface plasmon resonance. The ability of perthamide C to influence heat shock protein-mediated cell apoptosis revealed that this marine metabolite could be a good candidate for the development of a lead compound with therapeutic applications based on apoptosis modulation.

  9. Heat Shock Proteins 70kDa, Eosinophil Cationic Protein, and Nitric Oxide During Chronic Superficial Keratitis in Dogs.

    PubMed

    Urban-Chmiel, Renata; Balicki, Ireneusz; Wernicki, Andrzej

    2017-03-01

    The objective of the study is to determine the levels of eosinophil cationic protein (ECP), heat shock proteins 70, and nitric oxide ions measured as nitrite ions (Griess reaction) in dogs with chronic superficial keratitis (CSK). The study was conducted on 24 dogs with CSK. Blood sera from the animals were tested for concentrations of heat shock proteins 70, ECP, and nitrite ions before treatment and again 5 weeks and 6 months after treatment. Dogs with CSK were treated for 6 months with various regimes involving the use of ophthalmic drops containing dexamethasone, dimethyl sulfoxide, and cyclosporine. The control group consisted of 16 clinically healthy German Shepherds. The results obtained indicated a significant (P ≤ 0.05) elevation in the concentrations of heat shock proteins 70 and nitrite ions in dogs with CSK in comparison to healthy dogs and dogs after 5 weeks of therapy. After 6 months of treatment, concentrations of heat shock proteins 70, ECP, and nitrite ions had fallen below pretreatment values. Significant correlations were found between concentrations of heat shock proteins 70, ECP, and nitrite ions in healthy animals and animals with CSK. The elevated concentrations of heat shock proteins 70, ECP, and nitrite ions in dogs with CSK may indicate that the disease was both localized and systemic. The significant correlation between levels of heat shock proteins 70 and nitrite ions suggests that these parameters may be used as indirect indicators of CSK. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Heat Shock Protein Induction in Human Cells by CO2 Laser Irradiation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-06-14

    Boorstein W. A review of the role of 70 kD heat shock proteins in protein translocation across membranes. Antonie Van Leeuwenhoek 1990:58:137-46. 32...1991;65:363-366. 55. Young DB. Stress proteins and the immune response. Antonie Van Leeuwenhoek 1990;58:203-208. 56. Craig EA, Kramer J, Kosic-Smithers

  11. Cardioprotective effects of 70-kDa heat shock protein in transgenic mice.

    PubMed Central

    Radford, N B; Fina, M; Benjamin, I J; Moreadith, R W; Graves, K H; Zhao, P; Gavva, S; Wiethoff, A; Sherry, A D; Malloy, C R; Williams, R S

    1996-01-01

    Heat shock proteins are proposed to limit injury resulting from diverse environmental stresses, but direct metabolic evidence for such a cytoprotective function in vertebrates has been largely limited to studies of cultured cells. We generated lines of transgenic mice to express human 70-kDa heat shock protein constitutively in the myocardium. Hearts isolated from these animals demonstrated enhanced recovery of high energy phosphate stores and correction of metabolic acidosis following brief periods of global ischemia sufficient to induce sustained abnormalities of these variables in hearts from nontransgenic littermates. These data demonstrate a direct cardioprotective effect of 70-kDa heat shock protein to enhance postischemic recovery of the intact heart. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 3 PMID:8637874

  12. Small heat shock proteins in redox metabolism: implications for cardiovascular diseases.

    PubMed

    Christians, Elisabeth S; Ishiwata, Takahiro; Benjamin, Ivor J

    2012-10-01

    A timely review series on small heat shock proteins has to appropriately examine their fundamental properties and implications in the cardiovascular system since several members of this chaperone family exhibit robust expression in the myocardium and blood vessels. Due to energetic and metabolic demands, the cardiovascular system maintains a high mitochondrial activity but irreversible oxidative damage might ensue from increased production of reactive oxygen species. How equilibrium between their production and scavenging is achieved becomes paramount for physiological maintenance. For example, heat shock protein B1 (HSPB1) is implicated in maintaining this equilibrium or redox homeostasis by upholding the level of glutathione, a major redox mediator. Studies of gain or loss of function achieved by genetic manipulations have been highly informative for understanding the roles of those proteins. For example, genetic deficiency of several small heat shock proteins such as HSPB5 and HSPB2 is well-tolerated in heart cells whereas a single missense mutation causes human pathology. Such evidence highlights both the profound genetic redundancy observed among the multigene family of small heat shock proteins while underscoring the role proteotoxicity plays in driving disease pathogenesis. We will discuss the available data on small heat shock proteins in the cardiovascular system, redox metabolism and human diseases. From the medical perspective, we envision that such emerging knowledge of the multiple roles small heat shock proteins exert in the cardiovascular system will undoubtedly open new avenues for their identification and possible therapeutic targeting in humans. This article is part of a Directed Issue entitled: Small HSPs in physiology and pathology. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. A review of acquired thermotolerance, heat shock proteins, and molecular chaperones in archaea

    SciTech Connect

    Trent, J.D.

    1996-05-01

    Acquired thermotolerance, the associated synthesis of heat-shock proteins (HSPs) under stress conditions, and the role of HSPs as molecular chaperones under normal growth conditions have been studied extensively in eukaryotes and bacteria, whereas research in these areas in archaea is only beginning. All organisms have evolved a variety of strategies for coping with high-temperature stress, and among these strategies is the increased synthesis of HSPs. The facts that both high temperatures and chemical stresses induce the HSPs and that some of the HSPs recognize and bind to unfolded proteins in vitro have led to the theory that the function of HSPs is to prevent protein aggregation in vivo. The facts that some HSPs are abundant under normal growth conditions and that they assist in protein folding in vitro have led to the theory that they assist protein folding in vivo; in this role, they are referred to as molecular chaperones. The limited research on acquired thermotolerance, HSPs, and molecular chaperones in archaea, particularly the hyperthermophilic archaea, suggests that these extremophiles provide a new perspective in these areas of research, both because they are members of a separate phylogenetic domain and because they have evolved to live under extreme conditions.

  14. Two RpoH homologs responsible for the expression of heat shock protein genes in Sinorhizobium meliloti.

    PubMed

    Ono, Y; Mitsui, H; Sato, T; Minamisawa, K

    2001-02-01

    We identified two rpoH-related genes encoding sigma32-like proteins from Sinorhizobium meliloti, a nitrogen-fixing root-nodule symbiont of alfalfa. The genes, rpoH1 and rpoH2, are functionally similar to rpoH of Escherichia coli because they partially complemented an E. coli rpoH null mutant. We obtained evidence indicating that these genes are involved in the heat shock response in S. meliloti. Following an increase in temperature, synthesis of several putative heat shock proteins (Hsps) was induced in cultures of wild-type cells: the most prominent were 66- and 60-kDa proteins, both of which are suggested to represent GroEL species. The other Hsps could divided into two groups based on differences in synthesis kinetics: synthesis of the first group peaked 5-10 min, and expression of the other group 30 min, after temperature upshift. In the rpoH1 mutant, inducible synthesis of the former group was markedly reduced, whereas that of the latter group was not affected. Synthesis of both the 66- and 60-kDa proteins was partially reduced. While no appreciable effect was observed in the rpoH2 single mutant, the rpoH2 mutation had a synergistic effect on the 60-kDa protein in the rpoH1- background. The results indicate that two distinct mechanisms are involved in the heat shock response of S. meliloti: one requires the rpoH1 function, while rpoH2 can substitute in part for the rpoH1 function. Moreover, the rpoH1 mutant and rpoH1 rpoH2 double mutant exhibited Nod+ Fix- and Nod- phenotypes, respectively, on alfalfa.

  15. Biology of the Heat Shock Response and Protein Chaperones: Budding Yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) as a Model System

    PubMed Central

    Verghese, Jacob; Abrams, Jennifer; Wang, Yanyu

    2012-01-01

    Summary: The eukaryotic heat shock response is an ancient and highly conserved transcriptional program that results in the immediate synthesis of a battery of cytoprotective genes in the presence of thermal and other environmental stresses. Many of these genes encode molecular chaperones, powerful protein remodelers with the capacity to shield, fold, or unfold substrates in a context-dependent manner. The budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae continues to be an invaluable model for driving the discovery of regulatory features of this fundamental stress response. In addition, budding yeast has been an outstanding model system to elucidate the cell biology of protein chaperones and their organization into functional networks. In this review, we evaluate our understanding of the multifaceted response to heat shock. In addition, the chaperone complement of the cytosol is compared to those of mitochondria and the endoplasmic reticulum, organelles with their own unique protein homeostasis milieus. Finally, we examine recent advances in the understanding of the roles of protein chaperones and the heat shock response in pathogenic fungi, which is being accelerated by the wealth of information gained for budding yeast. PMID:22688810

  16. Heat shock protein 72 (Hsp72) improves long term recovery after focal cerebral ischemia in mice.

    PubMed

    Xu, Lijun; Xiong, Xiaoxing; Ouyang, Yibing; Barreto, George; Giffard, Rona

    2011-01-25

    Many brain protective strategies have been tested over short survival intervals, but few have been examined for long term benefit. The inducible member of the Heat shock protein 70 (Hsp70) family, Heat shock protein 72 (Hsp72), has been widely found to reduce ischemic injury. Here we assessed outcome in Hsp72 transgenic overexpressing mice and wild type littermates for one month following transient focal ischemia. Hsp72 reduced infarct area lost and improved behavioral outcome on rotarod and foot fault at one month. Thus protection by Hsp72 overexpression is long lasting, and includes improved recovery of motor function over one month.

  17. Stress- and mitogen-induced phosphorylation of the small heat shock protein Hsp25 by MAPKAP kinase 2 is not essential for chaperone properties and cellular thermoresistance.

    PubMed Central

    Knauf, U; Jakob, U; Engel, K; Buchner, J; Gaestel, M

    1994-01-01

    Small heat shock proteins (sHsps) show a very rapid stress- and mitogen-dependent phosphorylation by MAPKAP kinase 2. Based on this observation, phosphorylation of sHsps was thought to play a key role in mediating thermoresistance immediately after heat shock, before the increased synthesis of heat shock proteins becomes relevant. We have analysed the phosphorylation dependence of the chaperone and thermoresistance-mediating properties of the small heat shock protein Hsp25. Surprisingly, overexpression of Hsp25 mutants, which are not phosphorylated in the transfected cells, confers the same thermoresistant phenotype as overexpression of wild type Hsp25, which is either mono- or bis-phosphorylated at serine residues 15 and 86 within the cells. Furthermore, in vitro phosphorylated Hsp25 shows the same oligomerization properties and the same chaperone activity as the nonphosphorylated protein. No differences between phosphorylated and nonphosphorylated Hsp25 are detected in preventing thermal aggregation of unfolding proteins and assisting refolding of denatured proteins. The results suggest that chaperone properties of the small heat shock proteins contribute to the increased cellular thermoresistance in a phosphorylation-independent manner. Images PMID:7905823

  18. Phylogenetic analysis of heat shock proteins in Glassy-winged sharpshooter (Homalodisca vitripennis)

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Heat shock proteins were identified in the glassy-winged sharpshooter, GWSS, Homalodisca vitripennis. The overall importance and function of HSPs lie in their ability to maintain protein integrity and activity during stressful conditions, such as extreme heat, cold, drought, or other stresses. The G...

  19. Baculovirus replication induces the expression of heat shock proteins in vivo and in vitro

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    A recent handful of studies have linked baculovirus infection with the induction of heat shock proteins, a highly conserved family of cytoprotective proteins. Here, we demonstrate baculovirus-stimulated upregulation of hsp70 transcription in the natural host, Helicoverpa zea. Larvae lethally infec...

  20. Human immune response directed against Plasmodium falciparum heat shock-related proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, N; Zhao, Y; Graves, P; Perez Folgar, J; Maloy, L; Zheng, H

    1990-01-01

    Heat shock-related stress proteins present in all eucaryotes and procaryotes have been shown to be immune targets in a broad range of infections. We have analyzed sera from people exposed primarily to Plasmodium falciparum for specific antibodies against two heat shock-related proteins (proteins similar to the heat shock protein with a molecular weight of 75,000 [Pfhsp] and a glucose-regulated protein with a molecular weight of 72,000 [Pfgrp]). In an immunoprecipitation analysis with metabolically labeled parasites and synthetic peptides in an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, specific antibodies against Pfhsp and Pfgrp were detected in the sera of these individuals. Sera from people exposed to a different human malarial parasite, Plasmodium vivax, did not react with the peptides in an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Southern blot analysis with DNA isolated from P. falciparum from different geographical locations showed a conservation of genes for these stress proteins; thus, they are likely to be immune targets in various endemic areas. Lymphocytes from two tested immune donors responded in proliferation assays to purified Pfhsp and Pfgrp and purified recombinant proteins. However, a similar response was also seen in lymphocytes from nonimmune individuals and has raised questions pertaining to a generalized responsiveness of lymphocytes to some common determinants present in heat shock-related proteins in various pathogens. Images PMID:1691147

  1. Retaspimycin hydrochloride (IPI-504): a novel heat shock protein inhibitor as an anticancer agent.

    PubMed

    Hanson, Britt Erika; Vesole, David H

    2009-09-01

    Heat shock proteins are vital to cell survival under conditions of stress. They bind client proteins to assist in protein stabilization, translocation of polypeptides across cell membranes and recovery of proteins from aggregates. Heat shock protein inhibitors are a diverse group of novel agents that have been demonstrated to have pro-apoptotic effects on malignant cells through inhibition of ATP binding on the ATP/ADP-binding pocket of the heat shock protein. Initial development of heat shock protein 90 inhibitors, geldanamycin and 17-AAG, were limited by hepatotoxicity and the need for solvent carrying agents. In contrast, retaspimycin, or IPI-504, a derivative of geldanamycin and 17-AAG, is highly soluble in water and generally well tolerated. In Phase I/II trials, retaspimycin has shown activity in NSCLC and gastrointestinal stromal tumor. The most promising activity was observed in gastrointestinal stromal tumors. Phase I/II trials are currently underway to evaluate the dosing schedules and activity of IPI-504 in breast cancer. Given the in vitro activity in diffuse large B-cell lymphoma, mantle cell lymphoma, melanoma, leukemia and pancreatic cancer, current and future trials are of clinical interest. This article reviews IPI-504 and its utility in a wide variety of cancer phenotypes.

  2. Absolute protein quantification of the yeast chaperome under conditions of heat shock.

    PubMed

    Mackenzie, Rebecca J; Lawless, Craig; Holman, Stephen W; Lanthaler, Karin; Beynon, Robert J; Grant, Chris M; Hubbard, Simon J; Eyers, Claire E

    2016-08-01

    Chaperones are fundamental to regulating the heat shock response, mediating protein recovery from thermal-induced misfolding and aggregation. Using the QconCAT strategy and selected reaction monitoring (SRM) for absolute protein quantification, we have determined copy per cell values for 49 key chaperones in Saccharomyces cerevisiae under conditions of normal growth and heat shock. This work extends a previous chemostat quantification study by including up to five Q-peptides per protein to improve confidence in protein quantification. In contrast to the global proteome profile of S. cerevisiae in response to heat shock, which remains largely unchanged as determined by label-free quantification, many of the chaperones are upregulated with an average two-fold increase in protein abundance. Interestingly, eight of the significantly upregulated chaperones are direct gene targets of heat shock transcription factor-1. By performing absolute quantification of chaperones under heat stress for the first time, we were able to evaluate the individual protein-level response. Furthermore, this SRM data was used to calibrate label-free quantification values for the proteome in absolute terms, thus improving relative quantification between the two conditions. This study significantly enhances the largely transcriptomic data available in the field and illustrates a more nuanced response at the protein level. © 2016 The Authors. Proteomics Published by Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  3. Design, synthesis and pharmacological evaluation of 4,5-diarylisoxazols bearing amino acid residues within the 3-amido motif as potent heat shock protein 90 (Hsp90) inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chi; Wang, Xin; Liu, Hongchun; Zhang, Minmin; Geng, Meiyu; Sun, Liping; Shen, Aijun; Zhang, Ao

    2017-01-05

    A structure-based medicinal chemistry optimization was conducted on the clinical Hsp90 inhibitor diarylisoxazole 3. Several series of new compounds were designed and synthesized by incorporating diversified amino acid derivatives with various lengths to the 3-amido motif of the isoxazole scaffold. Compound 14j was identified to have high Hsp90 binding potency (14 nM) and antiproliferative activity against H3122 human lung cancer and BT-474 breast cancer cells. Treatment of 14j with H3122 cell led to degradation of client protein ALK, reduction of downstream phosphorylation of AKT and ERK, and up-regulation of Hsp70. Molecular docking suggested that the terminal valine moiety and the ethyleneglycol linker in compound 14j formed additional apolar and polar interaction network with a number of amino acid residues. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  4. Genes for Drosophila small heat shock proteins are regulated differently by ecdysterone

    SciTech Connect

    Amin, J.; Voellmy, R. ); Mestril, R. )

    1991-12-01

    Genes for small heat shock proteins (hsp27 to hsp22) are activated in late third-instar larvae of Drosophila melanogaster in the absence of heat stress. This regulation has been stimulated in cultured Drosophila cells in which the genes are activated by the addition of ecdysterone. Sequence elements (HERE) involved in ecdysterone regulation of the hsp27 and hsp23 genes have been defined by transfection studies and have recently been identified as binding sites for ecdysterone receptor. The authors report here that the shp27 and hsp23 genes are regulated differently by ecdysterone. The hsp27 gene is activated rapidly by ecdysterone, even in the absence of protein synthesis. In contrast, high-level expression of the hsp23 gene begins only after a lag of about 6 h, is dependent on the continuous presence of ecdysterone, and is sensitive to low concentrations of protein synthesis inhibitors. Transfection experiments with reported constructs show that this difference in regulation is at the transcriptional level. Synthetic hsp27 or hsp23 HERE sequences confer hsp27- or hsp23-type ecdysterone regulation on a basal promoter. These findings indicate that the hsp27 gene is primary, and the hsp23 gene is mainly a secondary, hormone-responsive gene. Ecdysterone receptor is implied to play a role in the regulation of both genes.

  5. Enhancement of presynaptic performance in transgenic Drosophila overexpressing heat shock protein Hsp70.

    PubMed

    Karunanithi, Shanker; Barclay, Jeffrey W; Brown, Ian R; Robertson, R Meldrum; Atwood, Harold L

    2002-04-01

    Prior heat shock confers protection to Drosophila synapses during subsequent heat stress by stabilizing quantal size and reducing the decline of quantal emission at individual synaptic boutons. The major heat shock protein Hsp70, which is strongly induced by high temperatures in Drosophila, may be responsible for this synaptic protection. To test this hypothesis, we investigated synaptic protection and stabilization at larval neuromuscular junctions of transgenic Drosophila which produce more than the normal amount of Hsp70 in response to heat shock. Overexpression of Hsp70 coincides with enhanced protection of presynaptic performance, assayed by measuring mean quantal content and percentage success of transmission. Quantal size was not selectively altered, indicating no effects of overexpression on postsynaptic performance. Thus, presynaptic mechanisms can be protected by manipulating levels of Hsp70, which would provide stability to neural circuits otherwise susceptible to heat stress. Copyright 2002 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  6. BAG3 Is a Modular, Scaffolding Protein that physically Links Heat Shock Protein 70 (Hsp70) to the Small Heat Shock Proteins.

    PubMed

    Rauch, Jennifer N; Tse, Eric; Freilich, Rebecca; Mok, Sue-Ann; Makley, Leah N; Southworth, Daniel R; Gestwicki, Jason E

    2017-01-06

    Small heat shock proteins (sHsps) are a family of ATP-independent molecular chaperones that are important for binding and stabilizing unfolded proteins. In this task, the sHsps have been proposed to coordinate with ATP-dependent chaperones, including heat shock protein 70 (Hsp70). However, it is not yet clear how these two important components of the chaperone network are linked. We report that the Hsp70 co-chaperone, BAG3, is a modular, scaffolding factor to bring together sHsps and Hsp70s. Using domain deletions and point mutations, we found that BAG3 uses both of its IPV motifs to interact with sHsps, including Hsp27 (HspB1), αB-crystallin (HspB5), Hsp22 (HspB8), and Hsp20 (HspB6). BAG3 does not appear to be a passive scaffolding factor; rather, its binding promoted de-oligomerization of Hsp27, likely by competing for the self-interactions that normally stabilize large oligomers. BAG3 bound to Hsp70 at the same time as Hsp22, Hsp27, or αB-crystallin, suggesting that it might physically bring the chaperone families together into a complex. Indeed, addition of BAG3 coordinated the ability of Hsp22 and Hsp70 to refold denatured luciferase in vitro. Together, these results suggest that BAG3 physically and functionally links Hsp70 and sHsps.

  7. Absolute protein quantification of the yeast chaperome under conditions of heat shock

    PubMed Central

    Mackenzie, Rebecca J.; Lawless, Craig; Holman, Stephen W.; Lanthaler, Karin; Beynon, Robert J.; Grant, Chris M.; Hubbard, Simon J.

    2016-01-01

    Chaperones are fundamental to regulating the heat shock response, mediating protein recovery from thermal‐induced misfolding and aggregation. Using the QconCAT strategy and selected reaction monitoring (SRM) for absolute protein quantification, we have determined copy per cell values for 49 key chaperones in Saccharomyces cerevisiae under conditions of normal growth and heat shock. This work extends a previous chemostat quantification study by including up to five Q‐peptides per protein to improve confidence in protein quantification. In contrast to the global proteome profile of S. cerevisiae in response to heat shock, which remains largely unchanged as determined by label‐free quantification, many of the chaperones are upregulated with an average two‐fold increase in protein abundance. Interestingly, eight of the significantly upregulated chaperones are direct gene targets of heat shock transcription factor‐1. By performing absolute quantification of chaperones under heat stress for the first time, we were able to evaluate the individual protein‐level response. Furthermore, this SRM data was used to calibrate label‐free quantification values for the proteome in absolute terms, thus improving relative quantification between the two conditions. This study significantly enhances the largely transcriptomic data available in the field and illustrates a more nuanced response at the protein level. PMID:27252046

  8. Induction of 70-kD heat shock protein in scleractinian corals by elevated temperature: significance for coral bleaching.

    PubMed

    Hayes, R L; King, C M

    1995-03-01

    In this study, the induction of the 70-kD family of heat shock proteins (hsp70) has been examined in stony coral tissues. In these experiments, the only difference from control conditions has been exposure to a temperature approximating that at which field bleaching in the Caribbean is known to occur, approximately 30 degrees C or 1 degree-2 degrees C above long-term average seasonal maximum temperatures. A constitutive hsp70 has been identified both in the zooxanthellate (hermatypic) coral, Montastrea annularis, and in two corals lacking symbiotic algae, Tubastrea cocchinea and Astrangia danae (Cnidaria, Anthozoa, Scleractinia). Western blots of experimental tissues fractionated by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis indicate that the initial induction of hsp70 occurs rapidly, within one hour of transfer to water of elevated temperature. Thereafter, the level of hsp70 decreases within 12-24 hours to approximately the constitutive level. In field-bleached specimens of M. annularis, hsp70 is not detected. Since this coral tissue, once bleached to whiteness, contains no 70-kD heat shock protein, we conclude that the process of coral bleaching might include, among other metabolic alterations, a failed heat shock response. In addition to being compromised in other normal functions, the bleached coral would lose the capacity to protect itself against environmental stress. The eventual loss of algae by bleached coral is likely to be consequent to several metabolic changes in the coral tissue. However, the uncoupling of that symbiotic relation is not concomitant with the initial stress response of heat shock protein synthesis.

  9. On the path to the heat shock response: destabilization and formation of partially folded protein intermediates, a consequence of protein thiol modification.

    PubMed

    Freeman, M L; Borrelli, M J; Meredith, M J; Lepock, J R

    1999-03-01

    This review discusses the initial events that occur during oxidative stress that induce the synthesis of heat shock proteins. The focus is on non-native oxidation or modification of protein thiols and the destablization that can result. Proteins that contain non-native modified thiols can become destablized such that they unfold into molten globule-like intermediates at or below 37 degrees C, relieving Hsf-1 negative regulation, and inducing Hsp transcription.

  10. The declined phosphorylation of Heat shock protein 27 in rat cardiac muscle after hindlimb unloading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Ming; Jiang, Shizhong; Li, Zhili; Yuan, Min; Ting, Li; Ying, Zhang; Wang, Desheng

    2009-07-01

    Hindlimb unloading can induce the cardiac atrophy and diminished cardiac function, however, the mechanisms responsible for which remain elusive. The chronic volume unloading of heart, which decreases the local mechanical stress, may lead to cardiac atrophy after hindlimb unloading. Many studies showed that integrin signaling, p38 MAPK, Heat shock protein 27 and cytoskeleton involved in the hypertrophic growth induced by mechanical stress. However, the mechanisms responsible for cardiac atrophy after hindlimb unloading are still unclear. In this study, we used the tail-suspended, hindlimb unloading rat model to simulate the effects of microgravity. Western blot analysis was used to detect the protein expression of Heat shock protein 27, focal adhesion kinase, p38 MAPK and their phosphorylation levels in rat cardiac muscle after 14d hindlimb unloading. The results showed that the phosphorylation levels of both Heat shock protein 27 and p38 MAPK were decreased significantly in rat cardiac muscle after hindlimb unloading. However, the phosphorylation level of focal adhesion kinase was not decreased significantly. The results suggested that Heat shock protein 27, the downstream of p38 MAPK, might play a critical role in the cardiac atrophy in response to simulated microgravity induced by hindlimb unloading.

  11. EFFECT OF EXPOSURE PROTOCOL AND HEAT SHOCK PROTEIN EXPRESSION ON ARSENITE INDUCED GENOTOXICITY IN MCF-7 BREAST CANCER CELLS

    EPA Science Inventory


    Effect of exposure protocol and heat shock protein expression on arsenite induced genotoxicity in MCF-7 breast cancer cells

    The genotoxic effects of arsenic (As) are well accepted, yet its mechanism of action is not clearly defined. Heat-shock proteins (HSPs) protect...

  12. EFFECT OF EXPOSURE PROTOCOL AND HEAT SHOCK PROTEIN EXPRESSION ON ARSENITE INDUCED GENOTOXICITY IN MCF-7 BREAST CANCER CELLS

    EPA Science Inventory


    Effect of exposure protocol and heat shock protein expression on arsenite induced genotoxicity in MCF-7 breast cancer cells

    The genotoxic effects of arsenic (As) are well accepted, yet its mechanism of action is not clearly defined. Heat-shock proteins (HSPs) protect...

  13. Antibodies to two major chicken heat shock proteins cross-react with similar proteins in widely divergent species.

    PubMed Central

    Kelley, P M; Schlesinger, M J

    1982-01-01

    Three of the proteins induced by heat shock of chicken embryo fibroblasts have been purified, and rabbit antibodies have been raised against them. These antibodies have been used in radioimmune precipitation reactions and in a solid-phase immune assay to detect antigenic material in non-heat-shocked chicken tissues and in extracts of widely different species ranging from yeast to mammalian tissue culture cells and human erythrocyte ghosts. Antibodies to two of the major chicken heat shock proteins, chsp89 and chsp70, cross-reacted with proteins of similar molecular weights in normal embryonic and adult chicken tissues and in extracts from widely different organisms. These data provide further evidence for the university of the heat shock response and conservation of proteins induced by this type of stress. Images PMID:7110134

  14. Altered expression of heat shock proteins in embryonal carcinoma and mouse early embryonic cells.

    PubMed

    Morange, M; Diu, A; Bensaude, O; Babinet, C

    1984-04-01

    In a previous paper, we have shown that in the absence of stress, mouse embryonal carcinoma cells, like mouse early embryo multipotent cells, synthesize high levels of 89- and 70-kilodalton heat shock proteins (HSP)(O. Bensaude and M. Morange, EMBO J. 2:173-177, 1983). We report here the pattern of proteins synthesized after a short period of hyperthermia in various mouse embryonal carcinoma cell lines and early mouse embryo cells. Among the various cell lines tested, two of them, PCC4-Aza R1 and PCC7-S-1009, showed an unusual response in that stimulation of HSP synthesis was not observed in these cells after hyperthermia. However, inducibility of 68- and 105-kilodalton HSP can be restored in PCC7-S-1009 cells after in vitro differentiation triggered by retinoic acid. Similarly, in the early mouse embryo, hyperthermia does not induce the synthesis of nonconstitutive HSP at the eight-cell stage, but induction of the 68-kilodalton HSP does occur at the blastocyst stage. Such a transition in the expression of HSP has already been described for Drosophila melanogaster and sea urchin embryos and recently for mouse embryos. It may be a general property of early embryonic cells.

  15. Altered expression of heat shock proteins in embryonal carcinoma and mouse early embryonic cells.

    PubMed Central

    Morange, M; Diu, A; Bensaude, O; Babinet, C

    1984-01-01

    In a previous paper, we have shown that in the absence of stress, mouse embryonal carcinoma cells, like mouse early embryo multipotent cells, synthesize high levels of 89- and 70-kilodalton heat shock proteins (HSP)(O. Bensaude and M. Morange, EMBO J. 2:173-177, 1983). We report here the pattern of proteins synthesized after a short period of hyperthermia in various mouse embryonal carcinoma cell lines and early mouse embryo cells. Among the various cell lines tested, two of them, PCC4-Aza R1 and PCC7-S-1009, showed an unusual response in that stimulation of HSP synthesis was not observed in these cells after hyperthermia. However, inducibility of 68- and 105-kilodalton HSP can be restored in PCC7-S-1009 cells after in vitro differentiation triggered by retinoic acid. Similarly, in the early mouse embryo, hyperthermia does not induce the synthesis of nonconstitutive HSP at the eight-cell stage, but induction of the 68-kilodalton HSP does occur at the blastocyst stage. Such a transition in the expression of HSP has already been described for Drosophila melanogaster and sea urchin embryos and recently for mouse embryos. It may be a general property of early embryonic cells. Images PMID:6546970

  16. Upregulation of Heat Shock Proteins is Essential for Cold Survival during Insect Diapause

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Diapause, the dormancy common to overwintering insects, evokes a unique pattern of gene expression. In the flesh fly most, but not all, of the fly’s heat shock proteins (Hsps) are upregulated. The diapause upregulated Hsps include two members of the Hsp70 family, one member of the Hsp60 family (TC...

  17. Calving traits of crossbred Brahman Cows are Associated with Heat Shock Protein 70 Genetic Polymorphisms

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Objectives were to: 1) identify single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) located in the promoter region of the bovine heat shock protein 70 gene, and 2) evaluate associations between Hsp70 SNP and calving rates of Brahman-influenced cows. Specific primers were designed for PCR amplification of a 539 b...

  18. Associations among heat shock protein 70 genotype, forage system, and horn fly infestation of beef cattle

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Horn fly infestations on beef cattle results in decreased productivity and challenges enterprise sustainability. Objective of this experiment was to determine the relationships among, cattle breed, heat shock protein 70 (Hsp70) genotype, and horn fly density. Angus (n = 20), Brahman (n = 17), and ...

  19. THE EFFECTS OF HEAT SHOCK PROTEIN 70 (HSP70) AND EXPOSURE PROTOCOL ON ARSENITE INDUCED GENOTOXICITY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Effects of Heat Shock Protein 70 (Hsp70) and Exposure Protocol on Arsenite Induced Genotoxicity

    Barnes, J.A.1,2, Collins, B.W.2, Dix, D.J.3 and Allen J.W2.
    1National Research Council, 2Environmental Carcinogenesis Division, 3Reproductive Toxicology Division, Office...

  20. Phylogenetic analysis of heat shock proteins in Glassy-winged sharpshooter

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Four heat shock protein transcripts were produced from the glassy-winged sharpshooter Homalodisca vitripennis (Germar) (Hemiptera: Cicadellidae) which is the major vector of Xylella fastidiosa, the causal agent of Pierce’s disease of grapes. As genomic information has continued to be produced resea...

  1. Heat shock proteins as a target for phylogenetic analysis of Homalodisca vitripennis

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Production of genomic data from the glassy-winged sharpshooter has identified a set of heat shock proteins which may be used to further the understanding of leafhopper biology and genetics. The glassy-winged sharpshooter, GWSS, Homalodisca vitripennis (Germar)(Hemiptera: Cicadellidae), is the major ...

  2. Influence of the real and simulated microgravity on gene expression of heat-shock proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozeko, L. Ye.

    The possibility of heat-shock proteins' (HSP) participation in adaptation of living systems to microgravity is considered. The published information on HSP gene expression in cells under real and simulated microgravity is analysed. The necessity of detailed investigation on this problem is supposed.

  3. CHEMOSENSITIZATION BY A NON-APOPTOGENIC HEAT SHOCK PROTEIN 70-BINDING APOPTOSIS INDUCING FACTOR MUTANT

    EPA Science Inventory

    Chemosensitization by a non-apoptogenic heat shock protein 70-binding apoptosis inducing factor mutant

    Abstract
    HSP70 inhibits apoptosis by neutralizing the caspase activator Apaf-1 and by interacting with apoptosis inducing factor (AIF), a mitochondrial flavoprotein wh...

  4. CHEMOSENSITIZATION BY A NON-APOPTOGENIC HEAT SHOCK PROTEIN 70-BINDING APOPTOSIS INDUCING FACTOR MUTANT

    EPA Science Inventory

    Chemosensitization by a non-apoptogenic heat shock protein 70-binding apoptosis inducing factor mutant

    Abstract
    HSP70 inhibits apoptosis by neutralizing the caspase activator Apaf-1 and by interacting with apoptosis inducing factor (AIF), a mitochondrial flavoprotein wh...

  5. THE EFFECTS OF HEAT SHOCK PROTEIN 70 (HSP70) AND EXPOSURE PROTOCOL ON ARSENITE INDUCED GENOTOXICITY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Effects of Heat Shock Protein 70 (Hsp70) and Exposure Protocol on Arsenite Induced Genotoxicity

    Barnes, J.A.1,2, Collins, B.W.2, Dix, D.J.3 and Allen J.W2.
    1National Research Council, 2Environmental Carcinogenesis Division, 3Reproductive Toxicology Division, Office...

  6. Urinary heat shock protein 72 as a biomarker of acute kidney injury in dogs.

    PubMed

    Bruchim, Yaron; Avital, Yochai; Horowitz, Michal; Mazaki-Tovi, Michal; Aroch, Itamar; Segev, Gilad

    2017-07-01

    Early recognition of acute kidney injury (AKI) is important, as therapy is potentially more efficacious if instituted early in the course of disease. Urinary heat shock protein-72 to urinary creatinine ratio (uHSP72/uCr) was assessed as a diagnostic and prognostic marker in AKI in dogs. Fifty-three dogs were enrolled in five groups: healthy controls (n=11), urinary tract infection (n=10), chronic kidney disease (CKD; n=11), AKI (n=13), and acute decompensating CKD (n=8). Urinary heat shock protein-72 to urinary creatinine ratio was highest in the AKI group (P<0.001 when compared to the control and urinary tract infection groups, individually; P>0.05 compared to each of the other two groups). The area under the curve (AUC) for the receiver operator characteristic (ROC) analysis of uHSP72/uCr to predict AKI, compared to the control group, was 0.97. A cutoff value of 0.20ng/mg corresponded to sensitivity and specificity of 100% and 82%, respectively. Urinary heat shock protein-72 to urinary creatinine ratio was significantly lower in dogs categorized as survivors vs. non-survivors of AKI; ROC AUC, 0.91 (95% confidence intervals, 0.74-1.0). Urinary heat shock protein-72 to urinary creatinine ratio is a potentially useful diagnostic and prognostic biomarker of AKI in dogs. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Heat shock proteins are important mediators of skeletal muscle insulin sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Geiger, Paige C; Gupte, Anisha A

    2011-01-01

    Endogenous heat shock proteins (HSP) are decreased in disease states associated with insulin resistance and aging. Induction of HSPs has been shown to decrease oxidative stress, inhibit inflammatory pathways, and enhance metabolic characteristics in skeletal muscle. As such, HSPs have the potential to function as an important defense system against the development of insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes.

  8. Induction of a chicken small heat shock (stress) protein: evidence of multilevel posttranscriptional regulation.

    PubMed Central

    Edington, B V; Hightower, L E

    1990-01-01

    A novel form of regulation of expression of a vertebrate heat shock gene is described. A cDNA clone encoding human Hsp27 was shown to specifically recognize chicken Hsp23 RNA by Northern (RNA) blot analysis and hybrid-select translation. This probe was then used to measure chicken hsp23 gene activity in control and heat-stressed cells. The hsp23 gene(s) was transcriptionally active in non-heat-stressed cells, and its rate of transcription did not increase significantly upon heat shock. Cytoplasmic Hsp23 mRNA, which was metabolically very stable in nonstressed cells, underwent a fourfold increase in amount after a 1-h heat shock, resulting in a twofold increase in Hsp23 mRNA in polysomes. Hsp23 mRNA was relatively abundant and translationally active even in non-heat-shocked cells. Taken together, these data implicated posttranscriptional nuclear events as an important control point for induction of Hsp23 RNA transcripts. The protein half-life of Hsp23 increased from approximately 2 h in control cultures to 13 h in heat-shocked cells, revealing a second major control point. Hsp23 which was synthesized prior to heat shock also increased in stability and contributed to the overall accumulation of Hsp23 in heat-shocked cells. Cycloheximide had no effect on this change in Hsp23 half-life, while dactinomycin blocked the stabilization of Hsp23, suggesting a need for newly synthesized RNA. These data indicated that stabilization of Hsp23 protein and posttranscriptional nuclear events resulting in increased production of Hsp23 mRNA were primarily responsible for a 13-fold increase in the accumulation of newly synthesized Hsp23 after 1 h of heat shock. The regulation of the hsp23 gene is discussed in comparison with several other posttranscriptionally regulated genes, including the proto-oncogene c-fos, the developmentally regulated chicken delta-crystallin gene, and regulation of cellular gene expression by the proto-oncogene c-myc. Images PMID:2388629

  9. Response to heat shock of different sea urchin species.

    PubMed

    Roccheri, M C; Sconzo, G; La Rosa, M; Oliva, D; Abrignani, A; Giudice, G

    1986-03-01

    It is demonstrated that sea urchin embryos of the species Sphaerechinus granularis are able to respond to heat shock by producing heat shock proteins at the same stage as embryos of Paracentrotus lividus, i.e. after hatching. Arbacia lixula embryos are able to synthesize heat shock proteins already at the stage of 64-128 blastomeres. Embryonic survival is observed if the embryos are heated at the stages at which they can synthesize the heat shock proteins. The inhibition of the bulk protein synthesis after heating at 31 degrees C is never less than 50%.

  10. Small Molecule Inhibitors to Disrupt Protein-protein Interactions of Heat Shock Protein 90 Chaperone Machinery.

    PubMed

    Seo, Young Ho

    2015-03-01

    Heat shock protein 90 (Hsp90) is an adenosine triphosphate dependent molecular chaperone in eukaryotic cells that regulates the activation and maintenance of numerous regulatory and signaling proteins including epidermal growth factor receptor, human epidermal growth factor receptor 2, mesenchymal-epithelial transition factor, cyclin-dependent kinase-4, protein kinase B, hypoxia-inducible factor 1α, and matrix metalloproteinase-2. Since many of Hsp90 clients are oncogenic proteins, Hsp90 has become an attractive therapeutic target for treatment of cancer. To discover small molecule inhibitors targeting Hsp90 chaperone machinery, several strategies have been employed, which results in three classes of inhibitors such as N-terminal inhibitors, C-terminal inhibitors, and inhibitors disrupting protein-protein interactions of Hsp90 chaperone machinery. Developing small molecule inhibitors that modulate protein-protein interactions of Hsp90 is a challenging task, although it offers many alternative opportunities for therapeutic intervention. The lack of well-defined binding pocket and starting points for drug design challenges medicinal chemists to discover small molecule inhibitors disrupting protein-protein interactions of Hsp90. The present review will focus on the current studies on small molecule inhibitors disrupting protein-protein interactions of Hsp90 chaperone machinery, provide biological background on the structure, function and mechanism of Hsp90's protein-protein interactions, and discuss the challenges and promise of its small molecule modulations.

  11. Induction of heat shock protein 72 in C6 glioma cells by methyl jasmonate through ROS-dependent heat shock factor 1 activation.

    PubMed

    Oh, Su Young; Kim, Ji Hye; Park, Min Jung; Kim, Sun Mi; Yoon, Chang Shin; Joo, Young Mi; Park, Jang Su; Han, Song Iy; Park, Hye Gyeong; Kang, Ho Sung

    2005-11-01

    Salicylate and jasmonates are two different types of plant hormone that play critical roles in plant defense responses against insect herbivores and microbial pathogens, through activating defense genes. These two natural products have been shown to have similar activities in animal cells: the compounds are able to induce cell cycle arrest or apoptosis in a variety of human cancer cells including those of colon, prostate, breast, and leukemia, suggesting the chemicals may potentially be a novel class of anti-cancer drugs. Since sodium salicylate can induce the heat shock response in animals, we examined the effects of jasmonates on the heat shock response in C6 glioma cells. Here, we show that brief exposure to methyl jasmonate (MeJA), but not to jasmonic acid, induces heat shock protein 72 (HSP72), but not HSP73 and HSP90, via heat shock factor I (HSF1) activation in C6 glioma cells without affecting cell viability. Intracellular H2O2 and O2-, and mitochondrial ROS were prominently increased in response to 5 mM MeJA in C6 cells. MeJA-induced HSP72 expression, HSF1 DNA binding, and human HSP70 promoter-driven CAT activity were prevented by N-acetyl-L-cysteine (a general antioxidant), catalase (a specific antioxidant for H2O2), and sodium formate (an inhibitor of OH.), but not by Rac1 dominant negative mutant Rac1N17 and diphenyleneiodonium (a NADPH oxidase inhibitor), indicating that MeJA induces HSP72 expression though HSF1 that is activated via Rac1-NADPH oxidase-independent ROS production pathway. These results suggest that the plant stress hormones share the ability to induce heat shock response in animal cells.

  12. Heat-shock protein 70 (Hsp70) expression in four limpets of the genus Lottia: interspecific variation in constitutive and inducible synthesis correlates with in situ exposure to heat stress.

    PubMed

    Dong, Yunwei; Miller, Luke P; Sanders, Jon G; Somero, George N

    2008-10-01

    Limpets of the genus Lottia occupy a broad vertical distribution on wave-exposed rocky shores, a range that encompasses gradients in the frequency and severity of thermal and desiccation stress brought on by aerial emersion. Using western blot analysis of levels of heat-shock protein 70 (Hsp70), we examined the heat-shock responses of four Lottia congeners: Lottia scabra and L. austrodigitalis, which occur in the high-intertidal zone, and L. pelta and L. scutum, which are restricted to the low- and mid-intertidal zones. Our results suggest distinct strategies of Hsp70 expression in limpets occupying different heights and orientations in the rocky intertidal zone. In freshly field-collected animals and in specimens acclimated at ambient temperature ( approximately 14 degrees C) for 14 days, the two high-intertidal species had higher constitutive levels of Hsp70 than the low- and mid-intertidal species. During aerial exposure to high temperatures, the two low-shore species and L. austrodigitalis exhibited an onset of Hsp70 expression at 28 degrees C; no induction of Hsp70 occurred in L. scabra. Our findings suggest that high-intertidal congeners of Lottia employ a "preparative defense" strategy involving maintenance of high constitutive levels of Hsp70 in their cells as a mechanism for protection against periods of extreme and unpredictable heat stress.

  13. Axonal maintenance, glia, exosomes, and heat shock proteins

    PubMed Central

    Tytell, Michael; Lasek, Raymond J.; Gainer, Harold

    2016-01-01

    Of all cellular specializations, the axon is especially distinctive because it is a narrow cylinder of specialized cytoplasm called axoplasm with a length that may be orders of magnitude greater than the diameter of the cell body from which it originates. Thus, the volume of axoplasm can be much greater than the cytoplasm in the cell body. This fact raises a logistical problem with regard to axonal maintenance. Many of the components of axoplasm, such as soluble proteins and cytoskeleton, are slowly transported, taking weeks to months to travel the length of axons longer than a few millimeters after being synthesized in the cell body. Furthermore, this slow rate of supply suggests that the axon itself might not have the capacity to respond fast enough to compensate for damage to transported macromolecules. Such damage is likely in view of the mechanical fragility of an axon, especially those innervating the limbs, as rapid limb motion with high impact, like running, subjects the axons in the limbs to considerable mechanical force. Some researchers have suggested that local, intra-axonal protein synthesis is the answer to this problem. However, the translational state of axonal RNAs remains controversial. We suggest that glial cells, which envelop all axons, whether myelinated or not, are the local sources of replacement and repair macromolecules for long axons. The plausibility of this hypothesis is reinforced by reviewing several decades of work on glia-axon macromolecular transfer, together with recent investigations of exosomes and other extracellular vesicles, as vehicles for the transmission of membrane and cytoplasmic components from one cell to another. PMID:26962444

  14. Recruitment of phosphorylated small heat shock protein Hsp27 to nuclear speckles without stress

    SciTech Connect

    Bryantsev, A.L.; Chechenova, M.B.; Shelden, E.A. . E-mail: eshelden@wsu.edu

    2007-01-01

    During stress, the mammalian small heat shock protein Hsp27 enters cell nuclei. The present study examines the requirements for entry of Hsp27 into nuclei of normal rat kidney (NRK) renal epithelial cells, and for its interactions with specific nuclear structures. We find that phosphorylation of Hsp27 is necessary for the efficient entry into nuclei during heat shock but not sufficient for efficient nuclear entry under control conditions. We further report that Hsp27 is recruited to an RNAse sensitive fraction of SC35 positive nuclear speckles, but not other intranuclear structures, in response to heat shock. Intriguingly, Hsp27 phosphorylation, in the absence of stress, is sufficient for recruitment to speckles found in post-anaphase stage mitotic cells. Additionally, pseudophosphorylated Hsp27 fused to a nuclear localization peptide (NLS) is recruited to nuclear speckles in unstressed interphase cells, but wildtype and nonphosphorylatable Hsp27 NLS fusion proteins are not. The expression of NLS-Hsp27 mutants does not enhance colony forming abilities of cells subjected to severe heat shock, but does regulate nuclear speckle morphology. These data demonstrate that phosphorylation, but not stress, mediates Hsp27 recruitment to an RNAse soluble fraction of nuclear speckles and support a site-specific role for Hsp27 within the nucleus.

  15. Specific Binding of Tetratricopeptide Repeat Proteins to Heat Shock Protein 70 (Hsp70) and Heat Shock Protein 90 (Hsp90) Is Regulated by Affinity and Phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Assimon, Victoria A; Southworth, Daniel R; Gestwicki, Jason E

    2015-12-08

    Heat shock protein 70 (Hsp70) and heat shock protein 90 (Hsp90) require the help of tetratricopeptide repeat (TPR) domain-containing cochaperones for many of their functions. Each monomer of Hsp70 or Hsp90 can interact with only a single TPR cochaperone at a time, and each member of the TPR cochaperone family brings distinct functions to the complex. Thus, competition for TPR binding sites on Hsp70 and Hsp90 appears to shape chaperone activity. Recent structural and biophysical efforts have improved our understanding of chaperone-TPR contacts, focusing on the C-terminal EEVD motif that is present in both chaperones. To better understand these important protein-protein interactions on a wider scale, we measured the affinity of five TPR cochaperones, CHIP, Hop, DnaJC7, FKBP51, and FKBP52, for the C-termini of four members of the chaperone family, Hsc70, Hsp72, Hsp90α, and Hsp90β, in vitro. These studies identified some surprising selectivity among the chaperone-TPR pairs, including the selective binding of FKBP51/52 to Hsp90α/β. These results also revealed that other TPR cochaperones are only able to weakly discriminate between the chaperones or between their paralogs. We also explored whether mimicking phosphorylation of serine and threonine residues near the EEVD motif might impact affinity and found that pseudophosphorylation had selective effects on binding to CHIP but not other cochaperones. Together, these findings suggest that both intrinsic affinity and post-translational modifications tune the interactions between the Hsp70 and Hsp90 proteins and the TPR cochaperones.

  16. Nitric oxide induces heat-shock protein 70 expression in vascular smooth muscle cells via activation of heat shock factor 1.

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Q; Hu, Y; Kleindienst, R; Wick, G

    1997-01-01

    Current data suggest that nitric oxide (NO) is a double-edged sword that could result in relaxation and/or cytotoxicity of vascular smooth muscle cells (SMCs) via cGMP- dependent or -independent signal pathways. Stress or heat shock proteins (hsps) have been shown to be augmented in arterial SMCs during acute hypertension and atherosclerosis, both conditions that are believed to correlate with disturbed NO production. In the present study, we demonstrate that NO generated from sodium nitroprusside (SNP), S-nitroso-N-acetylpenicillamine, and spermine/nitric oxide complex leads to hsp70 induction in cultured SMCs. Western blot analysis demonstrated that hsp70 protein expression peaked between 6 and 12 h after treatment with SNP, and elevated protein levels were preceded by induction of hsp70 mRNA within 3 h. Induction of hsp70 mRNA was associated with the activation of heat shock transcription factor 1 (HSF1), suggesting that the response was regulated at the transcriptional level. HSF1 activation was completely blocked by hemoglobin, dithiothreitol, and cycloheximide, suggesting that the protein damage and nascent polypeptide formation induced by NO may initiate this activation. Furthermore, SMCs pretreated with heat shock (42 degrees C) for 30 min were significantly protected from death induced by NO. Thus, we provide evidence that NO induces hsp70 expression in SMCs via HSF1 activation. Induction of hsp70 could be important in protecting SMCs from injury resulting from NO stimulation. PMID:9276725

  17. Functional differentiation of small heat shock proteins in diapause-destined Artemia embryos.

    PubMed

    King, Allison M; Toxopeus, Jantina; MacRae, Thomas H

    2013-10-01

    Encysted embryos of Artemia franciscana cease development and enter diapause, a state of metabolic suppression and enhanced stress tolerance. The development of diapause-destined Artemia embryos is characterized by the coordinated synthesis of the small heat shock proteins (sHsps) p26, ArHsp21 and ArHsp22, with the latter being stress inducible in adults. The amounts of sHsp mRNA and protein varied in Artemia cysts, suggesting transcriptional and translational regulation. By contrast to p26, knockdown of ArHsp21 by RNA interference had no effect on embryo development. ArHsp21 provided limited protection against stressors such as desiccation and freezing but not heat. ArHsp21 may have a non-essential or unidentified role in cysts. Injection of Artemia adults with amounts of ArHsp22 double-stranded RNA less than those used for other sHsps killed females and males, curtailing the analysis of ArHsp22 function in developing embryos and cysts. The results indicate that diapause-destined Artemia embryos synthesize varying amounts of sHsps as a result of differential gene expression and mRNA translation and also suggest that these sHsps have distinctive functions. © 2013 FEBS.

  18. Small Heat Shock Protein Responses Differ between Chaparral Shrubs from Contrasting Microclimates

    DOE PAGES

    Knight, Charles A.

    2010-01-01

    Smore » mall heat shock protein (sHsp) responses were studied for two evergreen perennial shrubs in the northern California chaparral; one common on warm, south-facing slopes ( Ceanothus cuneatus ), and the other on cooler, north-facing slopes ( Prunus ilicifolia ).mall Hsp expression was induced experimentally for field collected leaves. Leaf collections were made where the species co-occur.mall Hsp expression was quantified using two antibodies, one specific to a chloroplast 22 kD sHsp and another that detects a broad range of sHsps. Differences between chloroplast sHsp accumulation, which protects thermally labile proteins in PSII, and the general sHsp response were examined. The species from the cooler microclimate, Prunus , had a lower induction temperature and accumulated greater levels of sHsps at low temperatures. Both Prunus and Ceanothus reached peak sHsp expression at 42 ∘ C . The species from the warmer microclimate, Ceanothus , had greater sHsp expression at higher temperatures. Chloroplast sHsp expression generally tracked sHsp expression in Ceanothus , but in Prunus general Hsps were elevated before chloroplast sHsps. Variation between species for sHsp expression (induction temperatures, accumulation levels, and the duration of expression) coupled with the costs of Hsp synthesis, may contribute to differences in the abundance and distribution of plants across environmental gradients.« less

  19. The heat shock protein HSP70 and heat shock cognate protein HSC70 contribute to antimony tolerance in the protozoan parasite Leishmania

    PubMed Central

    Brochu, Christian; Haimeur, Anass; Ouellette, Marc

    2004-01-01

    Antimony-containing drugs are still the drugs of choice in the treatment of infections caused by the parasite Leishmania. Resistance to antimony is now common in some parts of the world, and several mechanisms of resistance have been described. By transfecting cosmid banks and selecting with potassium antimonyl tartrate (SbIII), we have isolated a cosmid associated with resistance. This cosmid contains 2 copies of the heat shock protein 70 (HSP70) and 1 copy of the heat shock cognate protein 70 (HSC70). Several data linked HSP70 to antimony response and resistance. First, several Leishmania species, both as promastigotes and amastigotes, increased the expression of their HSP70 proteins when grown in the presence of 1 or 2 times the Effect Concentration 50% of SbIII. In several mutants selected for resistance to either SbIII or to the related metal arsenite, the HSP70 proteins were found to be overexpressed. This increase was also observed in revertant cells grown for several passages in the absence of SbIII, suggesting that this increased production of HSP70 is stable. Transfection of HSP70 or HSC70 in Leishmania cells does not confer resistance directly, though these transfectants were better able to tolerate a shock with SbIII. Our results are consistent with HSP70 and HSC70 being a first line of defense against SbIII until more specific and efficient resistance mechanisms take over. PMID:15544167

  20. Role of Heat-Shock Proteins in Cellular Function and in the Biology of Fungi

    PubMed Central

    Tiwari, Shraddha; Thakur, Raman; Shankar, Jata

    2015-01-01

    Stress (biotic or abiotic) is an unfavourable condition for an organism including fungus. To overcome stress, organism expresses heat-shock proteins (Hsps) or chaperons to perform biological function. Hsps are involved in various routine biological processes such as transcription, translation and posttranslational modifications, protein folding, and aggregation and disaggregation of proteins. Thus, it is important to understand holistic role of Hsps in response to stress and other biological conditions in fungi. Hsp104, Hsp70, and Hsp40 are found predominant in replication and Hsp90 is found in transcriptional and posttranscriptional process. Hsp90 and Hsp70 in combination or alone play a major role in morphogenesis and dimorphism. Heat stress in fungi expresses Hsp60, Hsp90, Hsp104, Hsp30, and Hsp10 proteins, whereas expression of Hsp12 protein was observed in response to cold stress. Hsp30, Hsp70, and Hsp90 proteins showed expression in response to pH stress. Osmotic stress is controlled by small heat-shock proteins and Hsp60. Expression of Hsp104 is observed under high pressure conditions. Out of these heat-shock proteins, Hsp90 has been predicted as a potential antifungal target due to its role in morphogenesis. Thus, current review focuses on role of Hsps in fungi during morphogenesis and various stress conditions (temperature, pH, and osmotic pressure) and in antifungal drug tolerance. PMID:26881084

  1. Decrease in Penicillin Susceptibility Due to Heat Shock Protein ClpL in Streptococcus pneumoniae▿†

    PubMed Central

    Tran, Thao Dang-Hien; Kwon, Hyog-Young; Kim, Eun-Hye; Kim, Ki-Woo; Briles, David E.; Pyo, Suhkneung; Rhee, Dong-Kwon

    2011-01-01

    Antibiotic resistance and tolerance are increasing threats to global health as antibiotic-resistant bacteria can cause severe morbidity and mortality and can increase treatment cost 10-fold. Although several genes contributing to antibiotic tolerance among pneumococci have been identified, we report here that ClpL, a major heat shock protein, could modulate cell wall biosynthetic enzymes and lead to decreased penicillin susceptibility. On capsular type 1, 2, and 19 genetic backgrounds, mutants lacking ClpL were more susceptible to penicillin and had thinner cell walls than the parental strains, whereas a ClpL-overexpressing strain showed a higher resistance to penicillin and a thicker cell wall. Although exposure of Streptococcus pneumoniae D39 to penicillin inhibited expression of the major cell wall synthesis gene pbp2x, heat shock induced a ClpL-dependent increase in the mRNA levels and protein synthesized by pbp2x. Inducible ClpL expression correlated with PBP2x expression and penicillin susceptibility. Fractionation and electron micrograph data revealed that ClpL induced by heat shock is localized at the cell wall, and the ΔclpL showed significantly reduced net translocation of PBP2x into the cell wall. Moreover, coimmunoprecipitation with either ClpL or PBP2x antibody followed by reprobing with ClpL or PBP2x antibody showed an interaction between ClpL and PBP2x after heat stress. This interaction was confirmed by His tag pulldown assay with either ClpLHis6 or PBP2xHis6. Thus, ClpL stabilized pbp2x expression, interacted with PBP2x, and facilitated translocation of PBP2x, a key protein of cell wall synthesis process, contributing to the decrease of antibiotic susceptibility in S. pneumoniae. PMID:21422206

  2. Golgi fragmentation induced by heat shock or inhibition of heat shock proteins is mediated by non-muscle myosin IIA via its interaction with glycosyltransferases.

    PubMed

    Petrosyan, Armen; Cheng, Pi-Wan

    2014-03-01

    The Golgi apparatus is a highly dynamic organelle which frequently undergoes morphological changes in certain normal physiological processes or in response to stress. The mechanisms are largely not known. We have found that heat shock of Panc1 cells expressing core 2 N-acetylglucosaminyltransferase-M (Panc1-C2GnT-M) induces Golgi disorganization by increasing non-muscle myosin IIA (NMIIA)-C2GnT-M complexes and polyubiquitination and proteasomal degradation of C2GnT-M. These effects are prevented by inhibition or knockdown of NMIIA. Also, the speed of Golgi fragmentation induced by heat shock is found to be positively correlated with the levels of C2GnT-M in the Golgi. The results are reproduced in LNCaP cells expressing high levels of two endogenous glycosyltransferases-core 2 N-acetylglucosaminyltransferase-L:1 and β-galactoside:α2-3 sialyltransferase 1. Further, during recovery after heat shock, Golgi reassembly as monitored by a Golgi matrix protein giantin precedes the return of C2GnT-M to the Golgi. The results are consistent with the roles of giantin as a building block of the Golgi architecture and a docking site for transport vesicles carrying glycosyltransferases. In addition, inhibition/depletion of HSP70 or HSP90 in Panc1-C2GnT-M cells also causes an increase of NMIIA-C2GnT-M complexes and NMIIA-mediated Golgi fragmentation but results in accumulation or degradation of C2GnT-M, respectively. These results can be explained by the known functions of these two HSP: participation of HSP90 in protein folding and HSP70 in protein folding and degradation. We conclude that NMIIA is the master regulator of Golgi fragmentation induced by heat shock or inhibition/depletion of HSP70/90.

  3. Characterization of high-molecular-mass heat shock proteins and 42 degrees C-specific heat shock proteins of murine cells.

    PubMed

    Hatayama, T; Yasuda, K; Nishiyama, E

    1994-10-14

    There are two isoforms of high-molecular-mass heat shock protein (HMM-HSP), hsp105A and hsp105B, in murine FM3A cells. To characterize the HMM-HSPs, we here purified hsp105A and hsp105B, as well as 42 degrees C-specific HSPs that are specifically induced by continuous heating at 42 degrees C, from the cytoplasmic extracts of the FM3A cells heat-shocked at 42 degrees C for 8 h. Digestion of the hsp105A, hsp105B, and 42 degrees C-specific HSPs with lysyl endopeptidase generated 17,000-Da polypeptide fragments in common, and the N-terminal amino acid sequences of the fragments revealed a homology with those of the adenosine binding domain of hsp70 family proteins and actin. Thus, the two isoforms of hsp105 and the 42 degrees C-specific HSPs seemed to be very similar proteins having a ATP binding domain in common, and these HSPs may constitute a HMM-HSP family in murine cells.

  4. Discovery of Benzisoxazoles as Potent Inhibitors of Chaperone Heat Shock Protein 90

    SciTech Connect

    Gopalsamy, Ariamala; Shi, Mengxiao; Golas, Jennifer; Vogan, Erik; Jacob, Jaison; Johnson, Mark; Lee, Frederick; Nilakantan, Ramaswamy; Petersen, Roseann; Svenson, Kristin; Chopra, Rajiv; Tam, May S.; Wen, Yingxia; Ellingboe, John; Arndt, Kim; Boschelli, Frank

    2008-08-11

    Heat shock protein 90 (Hsp90) is a molecular chaperone that is responsible for activating many signaling proteins and is a promising target in tumor biology. We have identified small-molecule benzisoxazole derivatives as Hsp90 inhibitors. Crystallographic studies show that these compounds bind in the ATP binding pocket interacting with the Asp93. Structure based optimization led to the identification of potent analogues, such as 13, with good biochemical profiles.

  5. Heat shock induces barotolerance in Listeria monocytogenes.

    PubMed

    Hayman, Melinda M; Anantheswaran, Ramaswamy C; Knabel, Stephen J

    2008-02-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of heat shock on the resistance of Listeria monocytogenes to high pressure processing (HPP). L. monocytogenes ATCC 19115 was grown to stationary phase at 15 degrees C and inoculated into whole ultrahigh-temperature milk at approximately 10(7) CFU/ml. Milk samples (5 ml) were placed into plastic transfer pipettes, which were heat sealed and then heated in a water bath at 48 degrees C for 10 min. Immediately after heat shock, the milk was cooled in water (20 degrees C) for 25 min and then placed on ice. The samples were high pressure processed at ambient temperature (approximately 23 degrees C) at 400 MPa for various times up to 150 s. Following HPP, the samples were spread plated on tryptic soy agar supplemented with yeast extract. Heat shock significantly increased the D400 MPa-value of L. monocytogenes from 35 s in non-heat-shocked cells to 127 s in heat-shocked cells (P < 0.05). Addition of chloramphenicol before heat shock eliminated the protective effect of heat shock (P < 0.05). Heat shock for 5, 10, 15, or 30 min at 48 degrees C resulted in maximal barotolerance (P < 0.05); increasing the time to 60 min significantly decreased survival compared with that at 5, 10, 15, or 30 min (P < 0.05). These results indicate that prior heat shock significantly increases the barotolerance of L. monocytogenes and that de novo protein synthesis during heat shock is required for this enhanced barotolerance.

  6. Digital-analog hybrid control model for eukaryotic heat shock response illustrating the dynamics of heat shock protein 70 on exposure to thermal stress.

    PubMed

    Dwivedi, Anjana; Karan, Bhuwan Mohan; Das, Barda Nand; Sinha, Rakesh Kumar

    2008-04-01

    We are introducing in this paper a digital-analog hybrid model approach for the study of a complete gene regulatory network; the heat shock response (HSR) network of eukaryotes. HSR is a crucial and widely studied cellular phenomenon occurring due to various stresses on the cell, and is characterised by the induction of heat shock genes resulting in the production of heat shock proteins (HSPs) which restores cellular homeostasis by maintaining protein integrity. We are proposing a model which incorporates simple digital and analog components which mimic the functioning of biological molecules involved in HSR and model their dynamics and behaviour. The simulation result of the circuit for the production of HSP70 has been found to be consistent with published experimental results. The qualitative behaviour of the HSR is expressed through a truth table. Through this novel approach, the authors have tried to develop a level of understanding of the interactions of the parts of the HSR system and of this system as a whole.

  7. Expression of Heat Shock and Other Stress Response Proteins in Ticks and Cultured Tick Cells in Response to Anaplasma spp. Infection and Heat Shock

    PubMed Central

    Villar, Margarita; Ayllón, Nieves; Busby, Ann T.; Galindo, Ruth C.; Blouin, Edmour F.; Kocan, Katherine M.; Bonzón-Kulichenko, Elena; Zivkovic, Zorica; Almazán, Consuelo; Torina, Alessandra; Vázquez, Jesús; de la Fuente, José

    2010-01-01

    Ticks are ectoparasites of animals and humans that serve as vectors of Anaplasma and other pathogens that affect humans and animals worldwide. Ticks and the pathogens that they transmit have coevolved molecular interactions involving genetic traits of both the tick and the pathogen that mediate their development and survival. In this paper, the expression of heat shock proteins (HSPs) and other stress response proteins (SRPs) was characterized in ticks and cultured tick cells by proteomics and transcriptomics analyses in response to Anaplasma spp. infection and heat shock. The results of these studies demonstrated that the stress response was activated in ticks and cultured tick cells after Anaplasma spp. infection and heat shock. However, in the natural vector-pathogen relationship, HSPs and other SRPs were not strongly activated, which likely resulted from tick-pathogen coevolution. These results also demonstrated pathogen- and tick-specific differences in the expression of HSPs and other SRPs in ticks and cultured tick cells infected with Anaplasma spp. and suggested the existence of post-transcriptional mechanisms induced by Anaplasma spp. to control tick response to infection. These results illustrated the complexity of the stress response in ticks and suggested a function for the HSPs and other SRPs during Anaplasma spp. infection. PMID:22084679

  8. Involvement of heat shock proteins on Mn-induced toxicity in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Avila, Daiana Silva; Benedetto, Alexandre; Au, Catherine; Bornhorst, Julia; Aschner, Michael

    2016-11-02

    All living cells display a rapid molecular response to adverse environmental conditions, and the heat shock protein family reflects one such example. Hence, failing to activate heat shock proteins can impair the cellular response. In the present study, we evaluated whether the loss of different isoforms of heat shock protein (hsp) genes in Caenorhabditis elegans would affect their vulnerability to Manganese (Mn) toxicity. We exposed wild type and selected hsp mutant worms to Mn (30 min) and next evaluated further the most susceptible strains. We analyzed survival, protein carbonylation (as a marker of oxidative stress) and Parkinson's disease related gene expression immediately after Mn exposure. Lastly, we observed dopaminergic neurons in wild type worms and in hsp-70 mutants following Mn treatment. Analysis of the data was performed by one-way or two way ANOVA, depending on the case, followed by post-hoc Bonferroni test if the overall p value was less than 0.05. We verified that the loss of hsp-70, hsp-3 and chn-1 increased the vulnerability to Mn, as exposed mutant worms showed lower survival rate and increased protein oxidation. The importance of hsp-70 against Mn toxicity was then corroborated in dopaminergic neurons, where Mn neurotoxicity was aggravated. The lack of hsp-70 also blocked the transcriptional upregulation of pink1, a gene that has been linked to Parkinson's disease. Taken together, our data suggest that Mn exposure modulates heat shock protein expression, particularly HSP-70, in C. elegans. Furthermore, loss of hsp-70 increases protein oxidation and dopaminergic neuronal degeneration following manganese exposure, which is associated with the inhibition of pink1 increased expression, thus potentially exacerbating the vulnerability to this metal.

  9. Structure and function of small heat shock/alpha-crystallin proteins: established concepts and emerging ideas.

    PubMed

    MacRae, T H

    2000-06-01

    Small heat shock/alpha-crystallin proteins are defined by conserved sequence of approximately 90 amino acid residues, termed the alpha-crystallin domain, which is bounded by variable amino- and carboxy-terminal extensions. These proteins form oligomers, most of uncertain quaternary structure, and oligomerization is prerequisite to their function as molecular chaperones. Sequence modelling and physical analyses show that the secondary structure of small heat shock/alpha-crystallin proteins is predominately beta-pleated sheet. Crystallography, site-directed spin-labelling and yeast two-hybrid selection demonstrate regions of secondary structure within the alpha-crystallin domain that interact during oligomer assembly, a process also dependent on the amino terminus. Oligomers are dynamic, exhibiting subunit exchange and organizational plasticity, perhaps leading to functional diversity. Exposure of hydrophobic residues by structural modification facilitates chaperoning where denaturing proteins in the molten globule state associate with oligomers. The flexible carboxy-terminal extension contributes to chaperone activity by enhancing the solubility of small heat shock/alpha-crystallin proteins. Site-directed mutagenesis has yielded proteins where the effect of the change on structure and function depends upon the residue modified, the organism under study and the analytical techniques used. Most revealing, substitution of a conserved arginine residue within the alpha-crystallin domain has a major impact on quaternary structure and chaperone action probably through realignment of beta-sheets. These mutations are linked to inherited diseases. Oligomer size is regulated by a stress-responsive cascade including MAPKAP kinase 2/3 and p38. Phosphorylation of small heat shock/alpha-crystallin proteins has important consequences within stressed cells, especially for microfilaments.

  10. Blood heat shock proteins evoked by some Salmonella strains infection in ducks.

    PubMed

    Osman, Kamelia; Ibrahim, Ihab; Yousef, Ashgan; Nabil, Tanios; Nayerah, Alatfeehy

    2012-05-01

    Bacterial heat-shock response is a global regulatory system required for effective adaptation to changes (stress) in the environment. An in vitro study was conducted to investigate the impact of a sublethal temperature (42°C) on heat shock protein (HSP) expression in 6 Salmonella strains (Salmonella Enteritidis, S. Typhimurium, S. Virchow, S. Shubra, S. Haifa and S. Eingedi). The 6 Salmonella strains were isolated from the tissues of ducklings that had died from avian salmonellosis. To determine the induction of HSP in the 6 Salmonella strains, they were exposed to the selected temperature level for 24 h and further kept for 48 h at culturing condition of 42°C. Growth under a sublethal temperature of 42°C increased the expression of several proteins of Salmonella, including a 63 kDa protein in addition to the generation and/or overexpression of 143 proteins which were specific to heat shock, concurrent to this acquired thermotolerance. The 6 Salmonella strains responded to 24 h of thermal stress at an elevated temperature 42°C by synthesizing different heat shock proteins (HSP) with molecular weights ranging between 13.62 and 96.61 kDa. At 48 h, the 6 Salmonella strains synthesized different HSPs with molecular weights ranging between 14.53 and 103.43 kDa. It follows that salmonellae would produce HSPs during the course of the infectious process. Salmonellosis produced several proteins after 24 and 48 h of infection. Seven of these proteins (100, 80, 60, 40, 30, 20 and 10 kDa) were recognized in the serum obtained from the ducklings infected with S. Enteritidis, S. Typhimurium, S. Virchow, S. Shubra, S. Haifa and S. Eingedi after 24 h of infection. After 48 h, the 1-7 kDa HSP became more evident and indicated their de novo generation.

  11. Heat shock protein inhibitors, 17-DMAG and KNK437, enhance arsenic trioxide-induced mitotic apoptosis

    SciTech Connect

    Wu Yichen; Yen Wenyen; Lee, T.-C. Yih, L.-H.

    2009-04-15

    Arsenic trioxide (ATO) has recently emerged as a promising therapeutic agent in leukemia because of its ability to induce apoptosis. However, there is no sufficient evidence to support its therapeutic use for other types of cancers. In this study, we investigated if, and how, 17-dimethylaminoethylamino-17-demethoxy-geldanamycin (17-DMAG), an antagonist of heat shock protein 90 (HSP90), and KNK437, a HSP synthesis inhibitor, potentiated the cytotoxic effect of ATO. Our results showed that cotreatment with ATO and either 17-DMAG or KNK437 significantly increased ATO-induced cell death and apoptosis. siRNA-mediated attenuation of the expression of the inducible isoform of HSP70 (HSP70i) or HSP90{alpha}/{beta} also enhanced ATO-induced apoptosis. In addition, cotreatment with ATO and 17-DMAG or KNK437 significantly increased ATO-induced mitotic arrest and ATO-induced BUBR1 phosphorylation and PDS1 accumulation. Cotreatment also significantly increased the percentage of mitotic cells with abnormal mitotic spindles and promoted metaphase arrest as compared to ATO treatment alone. These results indicated that 17-DMAG or KNK437 may enhance ATO cytotoxicity by potentiating mitotic arrest and mitotic apoptosis possibly through increased activation of the spindle checkpoint.

  12. Protective effects of heat shock protein70 induced by geranylgeranylacetone in atrophic gastritis in rats.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wei-li; Chen, Shu-jie; Chen, Yan; Sun, Lei-min; Zhang, Wei; Zeng, Ya-min; Zhou, Tian-hua; Si, Jian-min

    2007-07-01

    To investigate the effect of geranylgeranylacetone (GGA) on the progression of atrophic gastritis in rats and its potential mechanism. Atrophic gastritis was induced in Sprague-Dawley rats with 0.1% ammonia solution, 60% ethanol, and 20 mmol/L deoxycholic acid for 24 weeks. Accompanied by the induction of atrophic gastritis, 200 mg/kg GGA was administered by oral gavage for 8 weeks (weeks 17-24). The histological changes in gastric mucosa were quantitated by the index of inflammation, the gastric mucosal thickness, and the amount of glands of 1 mm horizontal length in antrum. Endogenous heat shock protein (HSP)70 levels and distribution were determined by immunoblotting and immunohistochemistry in gastric mucosa. GGA alleviated the pathological progression of atrophic gastritis with inflammation relief (inflammation index: 1.40 in the GGA group and 1.65 in the atrophic gastritis group) and glandular restoration (mucosal thickness and quantity of glands: 194.3 microm and 38.7 mm in the GGA group; 123.3 microm and 32.7 mm in the atrophic gastritis group; P<0.05). GGA significantly induced HSP70 synthesis (P<0.05). Moreover, quercetin, an inhibitor of HSP70 expression, aggravated the infiltration of inflammatory cells and glandular loss in the antrum. GGA prevented the progression of atrophic gastritis in rats via the induction of HSP70 expression.

  13. Heat shock proteins in relation to heat stress tolerance of creeping bentgrass at different N levels.

    PubMed

    Wang, Kehua; Zhang, Xunzhong; Goatley, Mike; Ervin, Erik

    2014-01-01

    Heat stress is a primary factor causing summer bentgrass decline. Changes in gene expression at the transcriptional and/or translational level are thought to be a fundamental mechanism in plant response to environmental stresses. Heat stress redirects protein synthesis in higher plants and results in stress protein synthesis, particularly heat shock proteins (HSPs). The goal of this work was to analyze the expression pattern of major HSPs in creeping bentgrass (Agrostis stolonifera L.) during different heat stress periods and to study the influence of nitrogen (N) on the HSP expression patterns. A growth chamber study on 'Penn-A4' creeping bentgrass subjected to 38/28°C day/night for 50 days, was conducted with four nitrate rates (no N-0, low N-2.5, medium N-7.5, and high N-12.5 kg N ha-1) applied biweekly. Visual turfgrass quality (TQ), normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI), photochemical efficiency of photosystem II (Fv/Fm), shoot electrolyte leakage (ShEL), and root viability (RV) were monitored, along with the expression pattern of HSPs. There was no difference in measured parameters between treatments until week seven, except TQ at week five. At week seven, grass at medium N had better TQ, NDVI, and Fv/Fm accompanied by lower ShEL and higher RV, suggesting a major role in improved heat tolerance. All the investigated HSPs (HSP101, HSP90, HSP70, and sHSPs) were up-regulated by heat stress. Their expression patterns indicated cooperation between different HSPs and their roles in bentgrass thermotolerance. In addition, their production seems to be resource dependent. This study could further improve our understanding about how different N levels affect bentgrass thermotolerance.

  14. Heat Shock Proteins in Relation to Heat Stress Tolerance of Creeping Bentgrass at Different N Levels

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Kehua; Zhang, Xunzhong; Goatley, Mike; Ervin, Erik

    2014-01-01

    Heat stress is a primary factor causing summer bentgrass decline. Changes in gene expression at the transcriptional and/or translational level are thought to be a fundamental mechanism in plant response to environmental stresses. Heat stress redirects protein synthesis in higher plants and results in stress protein synthesis, particularly heat shock proteins (HSPs). The goal of this work was to analyze the expression pattern of major HSPs in creeping bentgrass (Agrostis stolonifera L.) during different heat stress periods and to study the influence of nitrogen (N) on the HSP expression patterns. A growth chamber study on ‘Penn-A4’ creeping bentgrass subjected to 38/28°C day/night for 50 days, was conducted with four nitrate rates (no N-0, low N-2.5, medium N-7.5, and high N-12.5 kg N ha−1) applied biweekly. Visual turfgrass quality (TQ), normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI), photochemical efficiency of photosystem II (Fv/Fm), shoot electrolyte leakage (ShEL), and root viability (RV) were monitored, along with the expression pattern of HSPs. There was no difference in measured parameters between treatments until week seven, except TQ at week five. At week seven, grass at medium N had better TQ, NDVI, and Fv/Fm accompanied by lower ShEL and higher RV, suggesting a major role in improved heat tolerance. All the investigated HSPs (HSP101, HSP90, HSP70, and sHSPs) were up-regulated by heat stress. Their expression patterns indicated cooperation between different HSPs and their roles in bentgrass thermotolerance. In addition, their production seems to be resource dependent. This study could further improve our understanding about how different N levels affect bentgrass thermotolerance. PMID:25050702

  15. FTSJ2, a Heat Shock-Inducible Mitochondrial Protein, Suppresses Cell Invasion and Migration

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Ken-Yo; Liu, Fang-Chueh; Chong, Kowit-Yu; Cheng, Winston T. K.; Chen, Chuan-Mu

    2014-01-01

    Ribosomal RNA large subunit methyltransferase J (RrmJ), an Escherichia coli heat shock protein, is responsible for 2′-O-ribose methylation in 23S rRNA. In mammals, three close homologs of RrmJ have been identified and have been designated as FTSJ1, FTSJ2 and FTSJ3; however, little is known about these genes. In this study, we characterized the mammalian FTSJ2, which was the most related protein to RrmJ in a phylogenetic analysis that had similar amino acid sequence features and tertiary protein structures of RrmJ. FTSJ2 was first identified in this study as a nucleus encoded mitochondrial protein that preserves the heat shock protein character in mammals in which the mRNA expressions was increased in porcine lung tissues and A549 cells after heat shock treatment. In addition, a recent study in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) suggested that the FTSJ2 gene is located in a novel oncogenic locus. However, our results demonstrate that the expression of FTSJ2 mRNA was decreased in the more invasive subline (CL1-5) of the lung adenocarcinoma cells (CL1) compared with the less invasive subline (CL1-0), and overexpression of FTSJ2 resulted in the inhibition of cell invasion and migration in the rhabdomyosarcoma cell (TE671). In conclusion, our findings indicate that mammalian FTSJ2 is a mitochondrial ortholog of E. coli RrmJ and conserves the heat shock protein properties. Moreover, FTSJ2 possesses suppressive effects on the invasion and migration of cancer cells. PMID:24595062

  16. Heat Shock Proteins: Intestinal Gatekeepers that Are Influenced by Dietary Components and the Gut Microbiota

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Haoyu; Dicksved, Johan; Lundh, Torbjörn; Lindberg, Jan Erik

    2014-01-01

    Trillions of microorganisms that inhabit the intestinal tract form a diverse and intricate ecosystem with a deeply embedded symbiotic relationship with their hosts. As more detailed information on gut microbiota complexity and functional diversity accumulates, we are learning more about how diet-microbiota interactions can influence the immune system within and outside the gut and host health in general. Heat shock proteins are a set of highly conserved proteins that are present in all types of cells, from microbes to mammals. These proteins carry out crucial intracellular housekeeping functions and unexpected extracellular immuno-regulatory features in order to maintain the mucosal barrier integrity and gut homeostasis. It is becoming evident that the enteric microbiota is one of the major determinants of heat shock protein production in intestinal epithelial cells. This review will focus on the interactions between diet, gut microbiota and their role for regulating heat shock protein production and, furthermore, how these interactions influence the immune system and the integrity of the mucosal barrier. PMID:25437614

  17. Relative induction of heat shock protein in coronary endothelial cells and cardiomyocytes: implications for myocardial protection.

    PubMed

    Amrani, M; Latif, N; Morrison, K; Gray, C C; Jayakumar, J; Corbett, J; Goodwin, A T; Dunn, M J; Yacoub, M H

    1998-01-01

    Induction of the 70 kd heat shock protein in the heart is known to exert a protective effect against postischemic mechanical and endothelial dysfunction. However, the exact site of induction and the mechanisms involved remain unknown. The aim of this study was to investigate the relative capacity of endothelial and myocardial cells to express the 70 kd heat shock protein in response to heat stress, as well as their significance. (1) Postischemic recovery of cardiac mechanical and endothelial function was studied in isolated rat hearts with and without endothelial denudation with saponin. (2) Semiquantitative determination of induction of 70 kd heat shock protein by Western immunoblotting was performed in the whole cardiac homogenate, in isolated cardiac myocytes, and in coronary endothelial cells. (3) Immunocytochemistry was used to visualize the distribution of induction of 70 kd heat shock protein in both cell types. Postischemic recovery (percent preischemic value +/- standard error of the mean) of cardiac output in hearts from heat-stressed animals was significantly improved (66.7 +/- 6.9 vs 44.5 +/- 4.5 in the control group, p < 0.01). In heat-stressed hearts treated with saponin no improvement in the recovery of cardiac output was noted (44.7 +/- 6.9 in heat-stressed hearts vs 38.0 +/- 4.0 in heat-stressed, saponin-treated hearts, p = not significant). Endothelial function (as assessed by the vasodilatory response to the endothelium-dependent vasodilator 5-hydroxytryptamine) improved from 31.0 +/- 5.2 in the control group to 65.8 +/- 7.1 in heat-stressed hearts (p < 0.02 vs control) and dropped to -1.9 +/- 3.8 in heat-stressed hearts treated with saponin. Immunocytochemistry showed that only sections of hearts from heat-treated rats showed a strong specific reaction with heat shock protein antibody. The positive staining was seen in endothelial cells. Induction of 70 kd heat shock protein content in the whole cardiac homogenate from heat-stressed rats as

  18. Arginine methylation in yeast proteins during stationary-phase growth and heat shock.

    PubMed

    Lakowski, Ted M; Pak, Magnolia L; Szeitz, András; Thomas, Dylan; Vhuiyan, Mynol I; Clement, Bernd; Frankel, Adam

    2015-12-01

    Arginine methyltransferases (RMTs) catalyze the methylation of arginine residues on proteins. We examined the effects of log-phase growth, stationary-phase growth, and heat shock on the formation of methylarginines on yeast proteins to determine if the conditions favor a particular type of methylation. Utilizing linear ion trap mass spectrometry, we identify methylarginines in wild-type and RMT deletion yeast strains using secondary product ion scans (MS(3)), and quantify the methylarginines using multiple reaction monitoring (MRM). Employing MS(3) and isotopic incorporation, we demonstrate for the first time that Nη1, Nη2-dimethylarginine (sDMA) is present on yeast proteins, and make a detailed structural determination of the fragment ions from the spectra. Nη-monomethylarginine (ηMMA), Nδ-monomethylarginine (δMMA), Nη1, Nη1-dimethylarginine (aDMA), and sDMA were detected in RMT deletion yeast using MS(3) and MRM with and without isotopic incorporation, suggesting that additional RMT enzymes remain to be discovered in yeast. The concentrations of ηMMA and δMMA decreased by half during heat shock and stationary phase compared to log-phase growth of wild-type yeast, whereas sDMA increased by as much as sevenfold and aDMA decreased by 11-fold. Therefore, upon entering stressful conditions like heat shock or stationary-phase growth, there is a net increase in sDMA and decreases in aDMA, ηMMA, and δMMA on yeast proteins.

  19. Huntingtin interacting protein HYPK is a negative regulator of heat shock response and is downregulated in models of Huntington's Disease.

    PubMed

    Das, Srijit; Bhattacharyya, Nitai Pada

    2016-05-01

    Huntingtin interacting protein HYPK (Huntingtin Yeast Partner K) is an intrinsically unstructured protein having chaperone-like activity and can suppress mutant huntingtin aggregates and toxicity in cell model of Huntington's Disease (HD). Heat shock response is an adaptive mechanism of cells characterized by upregulation of heat shock proteins by heat-induced activation of heat shock factor 1 (HSF1). The trans-activation ability of HSF1 is arrested upon restoration of proteostasis. We earlier identified HYPK as a heat-inducible protein and transcriptional target of HSF1. Here we show that HYPK can act as negative regulator of heat shock response by repressing transcriptional activity of HSF1. As part of its role as a repressor of heat shock response, HYPK can also inhibit HSF1-dependent trans-activation of its own promoter. HYPK is downregulated in cell and animal model of HD. We further show that transcriptional downregulation of HYPK in HD cell model is a consequence of reduced occupancy of HSF1 in HYPK promoter. Moreover, presence of mutant huntingtin inhibits effective induction of HYPK in response to heat shock. Taken together, our findings reveal that HYPK can suppress heat shock response via an autoregulatory loop and downregulation of HYPK in HD is caused by impaired transcriptional activity of HSF1 in presence of mutant huntingtin. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Low-molecular-weight heat shock proteins in a desert fish (Poeciliopsis lucida): homologs of human Hsp27 and Xenopus Hsp30.

    PubMed

    Norris, C E; Brown, M A; Hickey, E; Weber, L A; Hightower, L E

    1997-10-01

    The heat shock response of a fish which inhabits a highly stressful environment (Poeciliopsis lucida, a minnow from river systems of the Sonoran desert in northwestern Mexico) was investigated. Cells derived from this fish exhibited a typical heat shock response when exposed to elevated temperature, synthesizing high levels of 90 kDa, 70 kDa, and 30 kDa heat shock proteins (Hsp90, Hsp70, and Hsp30), as well as lower amounts of other heat shock proteins. Additional small heat shock proteins (sHSPs), including Hsp27, were induced after a prolonged heat shock at a time when synthesis of Hsp70 and Hsp30 was decreasing. Characterization of cDNA clones for hsp27 and hsp30 revealed that both are members of the alpha-crystallin/sHSP superfamily but belong to separate lineages within this gene family. The multiple isoforms of P. lucida Hsp30 appear to be members of a multigene family and are most closely related to salmon and Xenopus Hsp30s. In contrast, Hsp27 is highly similar to mammalian and avian sHSPs; it was synthesized as three isoforms which represented differentially phosphorylated forms of a single polypeptide. In Poeciliopsis, the various sHSPs may each perform a subset of the roles attributed to mammalian sHSPs. The conservation of phosphorylation sites in Hsp27 may indicate an involvement in signal transduction to the actin cytoskeleton. The hsp30 genes appear to have diverged more rapidly than the corresponding hsp27 genes; the various members of the Hsp30 family may function as molecular chaperones and, in this role, may be less evolutionarily constrained. Finally, the presence of these two classes of sHSP in a single taxon indicates that these two lineages arose by gene duplication early in the evolution of vertebrates and raises questions about the fate of homologs of Hsp30 in mammals and of Hsp27 in Xenopus.

  1. Heat Stress in Rat Adriamycin Cardiomyopathy: Heat Shock Protein 25 and Myosin Accumulation

    PubMed Central

    Rada, Alegna; Tejero, Félix; Hermoso, Tomás

    2010-01-01

    In order to evaluate the effects of hyperthermia on adriamycin cardiomyopathy and its relationship with heat shock protein induction and myosin accumulation, female Sprague-Dawley rats (21–24 days) were randomized into four groups: the control, adriamycin, temperature and temperature-adriamycin groups. Adriamycin was injected i.v. at a dose of 27 mg/Kg (0.1 ml). The rats were exposed to a temperature of 45ºC for 35 min, followed by a recovery (1 h) at room temperature prior to adriamycin treatment. Body weight was recorded weekly. The thickness of the ventricular wall and percentage of cellular damage were biometrically and ultrastructurally evaluated, respectively. Heat shock protein 25 and myosin accumulation were determined through Western blot analysis. The determinations were carried out monthly until the third month after treatment. At eight and twelve weeks after treatment, the thickness of the ventricular wall seemed to decrease in the adriamycin-treated rats in relation to the other groups. An electron microscopic analysis of the adriamycin group’s left ventricular wall samples, showed more sarcomeric changes and loss of myofibrils than the control, temperature and temperature-adriamycin groups. At 24 hours after treatment with adriamycin, higher levels of heat shock protein 25 and myosin were observed (week 0) in the temperature-adriamycin group than in the control and adriamycin groups (4, 8 and 12 weeks). Hyperthermia was confirmed by a multivariate approach to induce heat shock protein 25 and myosin, which would strengthen cardiac-sarcomeric myosin arrangement. PMID:22272033

  2. Exercise training-induced gender-specific heat shock protein adaptations in human skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Morton, James P; Holloway, Kathryn; Woods, Paul; Cable, Nigel T; Burniston, Jatin; Evans, Louise; Kayani, Anna C; McArdle, Anne

    2009-02-01

    This study investigates the effects of short-term endurance training on heat shock protein (HSP) adaptations of male and female human skeletal muscle. The data demonstrate that females did not respond to continuous or interval training in terms of increasing HSP content of the vastus lateralis muscle. In contrast, males displayed HSP adaptations to both training interventions. These data provide a platform for future human studies to examine a potential gender-specific stress response to exercise.

  3. Heat Shock Protein-70 Inducers and iNOS Inhibitors as Therapeutics to Ameliorate Hemorrhagic Shock

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-09-01

    RTO-MP-HFM-109 P28 - 1 Heat Shock Protein-70 Inducers and iNOS Inhibitors as Therapeutics to Ameliorate Hemorrhagic Shock Juliann G. Kiang...mechanisms are still not fully understood, it has been shown that nitric oxide (NO) overproduction and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS...tissues and leukotriene B4 (LTB4) generation increases. In a hemorrhage/resuscitation- induced injury model, iNOS, cyclooxygenase-2, and CD14 are all

  4. Thermally induced apoptosis, necrosis, and heat shock protein expression in 3D culture.

    PubMed

    Song, Alfred S; Najjar, Amer M; Diller, Kenneth R

    2014-07-01

    This study was conducted to compare the heat shock responses of cells grown in 2D and 3D culture environments as indicated by the level of heat shock protein 70 expression and the incidence of apoptosis and necrosis of prostate cancer cell lines in response to graded hyperthermia. PC3 cells were stably transduced with a dual reporter system composed of two tandem expression cassettes-a conditional heat shock protein promoter driving the expression of green fluorescent protein (HSPp-GFP) and a cytomegalovirus (CMV) promoter controlling the constitutive expression of a "beacon" red fluorescent protein (CMVp-RFP). Two-dimensional and three-dimensional cultures of PC3 prostate cancer cells were grown in 96-well plates for evaluation of their time-dependent response to supraphysiological temperature. To induce controlled hyperthermia, culture plates were placed on a flat copper surface of a circulating water manifold that maintained the specimens within ±0.1°C of a target temperature. Hyperthermia protocols included various combinations of temperature, ranging from 37°C to 57°C, and exposure times of up to 2 h. The majority of protocols were focused on temperature and time permutations, where the response gradient was greatest. Post-treatment analysis by flow cytometry analysis was used to measure the incidences of apoptosis (annexin V-FITC stain), necrosis (propidium iodide (PI) stain), and HSP70 transcription (GFP expression). Cells grown in 3D compared with 2D culture showed reduced incidence of apoptosis and necrosis and a higher level of HSP70 expression in response to heat shock at the temperatures tested. Cells responded differently to hyperthermia when grown in 2D and 3D cultures. Three-dimensional culture appears to enhance survival plausibly by activating protective processes related to enhanced-HSP70 expression. These differences highlight the importance of selecting physiologically relevant 3D models in assessing cellular responses to hyperthermia in

  5. Heat shock protein response in phosphorus-deficient heat-stressed broiler chickens.

    PubMed

    Edens, F W; Hill, C H; Wang, S

    1992-12-01

    1. During acute in vivo heat stress, a normal heat shock protein (HSP) response was not inducible in chickens deficient in inorganic phosphorus (P(i)-deficient). 2. Small quantities of HSP 70 and HSP 90 were induced, but little or no HSP 23 was induced in P(i)-deficient chickens compared to P(i)-adequate chickens. 3. Increased susceptibility of P(i)-deficient chickens to acute heat stress was attributed to their inability to produce an adequate HSP response.

  6. Heat Shock Protein 70s as Potential Molecular Targets for Colon Cancer Therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Black, Jennifer D; Rezvani, Khosrow

    2016-01-01

    Targeted drugs modulate selective pathways activated or repressed only in cancer cells, resulting in a higher response to chemotherapy with less severe side effects. The use of a selected member of the heat shock protein 70 family (HSP70) as an effective therapeutic target in the treatment of colorectal cancer (CRC) will be the focus of this review. We generated two main questions for this study: 1) What are the current and potential future molecular therapies in CRC? 2) Can selective members of the HSP70 family advance drug design and drug discovery for treatment of CRC patients? We discuss related articles based on their significance and translational contributions to the existing literature. The first part of this review discusses molecularly targeted agents that are currently used successfully in the clinic for the treatment of patients with CRC and highlights several novel targeted agents that are being investigated in ongoing trials. The second part of this review focuses on the unique tumorigenic functions of heat shock proteins, particularly mortalin-2, an essential heat shock protein for mitochondrial biogenesis in normal cells and a dominant oncoprotein in colon cancer cells. Basic and clinical studies have justified mortalin-2 as a potential molecular target, and its inhibition could dramatically improve patients' responses to standard chemotherapies. Further understanding of the contributions of HSP70 family members to CRC at the molecular level, combined with translation of new concepts into effective targeted therapies, are anticipated to improve clinical outcomes and increase the therapeutic synergy with combination treatment with cytotoxic agents.

  7. Neurotoxicity induced by arsenic in Gallus Gallus: Regulation of oxidative stress and heat shock protein response.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Panpan; Guo, Ying; Zhang, Wen; Chai, Hongliang; Xing, Houjuan; Xing, Mingwei

    2017-01-01

    Arsenic, a naturally occurring heavy metal pollutant, is one of the functioning risk factors for neurological toxicity in humans. However, little is known about the effects of arsenic on the nervous system of Gallus Gallus. To investigate whether arsenic induce neurotoxicity and influence the oxidative stress and heat shock proteins (Hsps) response in chickens, seventy-two 1-day-old male Hy-line chickens were treated with different doses of arsenic trioxide (As2O3). The histological changes, antioxidant enzyme activity, and the expressions of Hsps were detected. Results showed slightly histology changes were obvious in the brain tissues exposure to arsenic. The activities of Glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px) and catalase (CAT) were decreased compared to the control, whereas the malondialdehyde (MDA) content was increased gradually along with increase in diet-arsenic. The mRNA levels of Hsps and protein expressions of Hsp60 and Hsp70 were up-regulated. These results suggested that sub-chronic exposure to arsenic induced neurotoxicity in chickens. Arsenic exposure disturbed the balance of oxidants and antioxidants. Increased heat shock response tried to protect chicken brain tissues from tissues damage caused by oxidative stress. The mechanisms of neurotoxicity induced by arsenic include oxidative stress and heat shock protein response in chicken brain tissues. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Altered phosphorylation of. tau. protein in heat-shocked rats and patients with Alzheimer disease

    SciTech Connect

    Papasozomenos, S.C.; Yuan Su Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX )

    1991-05-15

    Six hours after heat shocking 2- to 3-month-old male and female Sprague-Dawley rats at 42C for 15 min, the authors analyzed {tau} protein immunoreactivity in SDS extracts of cerebrums and peripheral nerves by using immunoblot analysis and immunohistochemistry with the anti-{tau} monoclonal antibody Tau-1, which recognizes a phosphate-dependent nonphosphorylated epitope, and with {sup 125}I-labeled protein A. In the cerebal extracts, the authors found altered phosphorylation of {tau} in heat-shocked females, characterized by a marked reduction in the amount of nonphosphorylated {tau}, a doubling of the ratio of total (phosphorylated plus nonphosphorylated) {tau} to nonphosphorylated {tau}, and the appearance of the slowest moving phosphorylated {tau} polypeptide (68 kDa). Similar, but milder, changes were observed in male rats. Quantitative immunoblot analysis of cortex and the underlying white matter with Tau-1 and {sup 125}I-labeled protein A showed that the amount of phosphorylated {tau} progressively increased in the Alzheimer disease-affected cerebral cortex, while concurrently a proportionally lesser amount of {tau} entered the white matter axons. The similar findings for the rat heat-shock model and Alzheimer disease suggest that life stressors may play a role in the etiopathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease.

  9. Heat shock in Escherichia coli alters the protein-binding properties of the chaperonin groEL by inducing its phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Sherman MYu; Goldberg, A L

    1992-05-14

    When bacterial or eukaryotic cells are exposed to high temperatures or other harsh conditions, they respond by synthesis of a specific set of heat-shock proteins. Certain heat-shock proteins such as groEL, called 'chaperonins', can prevent misfolding and promote the refolding and proper assembly of unfolded polypeptides generated under harmful conditions. We report here a new aspect of the heat-shock response in Escherichia coli: at high temperatures a fraction of groEL becomes modified covalently, altering its interaction with unfolded proteins. The heat-modified form can be eluted with ATP from an unfolded protein more easily than normal groEL. The critical heat-induced modification seems to be phosphorylation, which is reversed on return to low temperature. Treatment of the modified groEL with phosphatases caused its apparent size, charge and binding properties to resemble those of the unmodified form. Thus during heat shock some groEL is reversibly phosphorylated, which allows its ATP-dependent release from protein substrates in the absence of its usual cofactor (groES), and probably promotes the repair of damaged polypeptides.

  10. Erythrocyte heat shock protein responses to chronic (in vivo) and acute (in vitro) temperature challenge in diploid and triploid salmonids.

    PubMed

    Saranyan, Pillai V; Ross, Neil W; Benfey, Tillmann J

    2017-04-01

    This research investigated how ploidy level (diploid versus triploid) affects the heat shock protein (HSP) response in erythrocytes under different thermal stress regimes, both in vivo and in vitro, in Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar) and brook charr (Salvelinus fontinalis) in order to address the question of why triploids typically have reduced thermal tolerance. A preliminary study confirmed that identical volumes of diploid and triploid erythrocytes (which equates to a smaller number of larger cells for triploids compared to diploids) did not differ in total protein synthesis rates. After chronic (100d) acclimation of fish to 5, 15 and 25°C, triploid erythrocytes had lower HSP70, HSP90, heat shock factor 1 (HSF1) and ubiquitin (free and total) levels than diploids in both species. Furthermore, Atlantic salmon erythrocytes showed significantly higher protein breakdown (based on conjugated ubiquitin levels) in triploids than diploids after acute heat stress in vitro, but no significant difference was detected between ploidies after acute cold stress. These results indicate that: 1) triploid erythrocytes synthesize more total protein per cell than diploids as a result of increased cell size; 2) triploids have sufficient total HSP levels for survival under low stress conditions; and 3) the lower basal titres of HSPs in triploids may be a handicap when combating acute stress. Taken together, this suggests that triploids are limited in their ability to withstand thermal stress because of a reduced ability to maintain proteostasis under stressful conditions.

  11. Nuclear p26, a small heat shock/alpha-crystallin protein, and its relationship to stress resistance in Artemia franciscana embryos.

    PubMed

    Willsie, J K; Clegg, J S

    2001-07-01

    The role of the small heat shock/alpha-crystallin protein, p26, in transcription in Artemia franciscana embryos was examined using isolated nuclei, containing either control or elevated levels of p26, in transcription run-on assays. Heat shock or anoxia in vivo and acid pH in vitro were used to transfer p26 into nuclei. The results suggest that parameters other than, or in addition to, p26 are responsible for the reduced transcription rates observed and that decreases in pHi are involved. In vivo experiments indicate that RNA synthesis and, to a lesser extent, protein synthesis are downregulated in intact embryos recovering from heat shock and that the precursor pool is not limiting. Confocal microscopy confirmed that p26 moves into nuclei in response to heat shock and anoxia in vivo, and to low pH in vitro, and indicated that the nuclear distribution of p26 is similar under all three conditions. We present evidence that unstressed (control) embryos containing p26 in all their nuclei will not hatch, even under permissive conditions, and propose that they are unable to terminate diapause. Potential nuclear targets of p26 chaperone activity are discussed.

  12. Heat shock protein 90 inhibitors repurposed against Entamoeba histolytica

    PubMed Central

    Shahinas, Dea; Debnath, Anjan; Benedict, Christan; McKerrow, James H.; Pillai, Dylan R.

    2015-01-01

    Hsp90 is an essential chaperone responsible for trafficking a vast array of client proteins, which are substrates that Hsp90 regulates in eukaryotic cells under stress conditions. The ATP-binding N-terminal domain of Hsp90 (also known as a GHKL type ATPase domain) can serve as a specific drug target, because sufficient structural diversity in the ATP-binding pocket of Hsp90 allows for ortholog selectivity of Hsp90 inhibitors. The primary objective of this study is to identify inhibitors specific for the ATP-binding domain of Entamoeba histolytica Hsp90 (EhHsp90). An additional aim, using a combination of site-directed mutagenesis and a protein in vitro assay, is to show that the antiparasitic activity of Hsp90 inhibitors is dependent on specific residues within the ATP-binding domain. Here, we tested the activity of 43 inhibitors of Hsp90 that we previously identified using a high-throughput screen. Of the 43 compounds tested, 19 competed for binding of the EhHsp90 ATP-binding domain. Five out of the 19 EhHsp90 protein hits demonstrated activity against E. histolytica in vitro culture: rifabutin, rutilantin, cetylpyridinium chloride, pararosaniline pamoate and gentian violet. These five top E. histolytica Hsp90 inhibitors showed 30–100% inhibition of E. histolytica in culture in the micromolar range. These data suggest that E. histolytica-specific Hsp90 inhibitors are possible to identify and provide important lead compounds for the development of novel antiamebic drugs. PMID:26029171

  13. Heat shock proteins and their immunomodulatory role in inflammatory arthritis.

    PubMed

    Spierings, Julia; van Eden, Willem

    2017-02-01

    Autoimmune diseases, including inflammatory arthritis, are characterized by a loss of self-tolerance, leading to an excessive immune responses and subsequent ongoing inflammation. Current therapies are focused on dampening this inflammation, but a permanent state of tolerance is seldom achieved. Therefore, novel therapies that restore and maintain tolerance are needed. Tregs could be a potential target to achieve permanent immunotolerance. Activation of Tregs can be accomplished when they recognize and bind their specific antigens. HSPs are proteins present in all cells and are upregulated during inflammation. These proteins are immunogenic and can be recognized by Tregs. Several studies in animal models and in human clinical trials have shown the immunoregulatory effects of HSPs and their protective effects in inflammatory arthritis. In this review, an overview is presented of the immunomodulatory effects of several members of the HSP family in general and in inflammatory arthritis. These effects can be attributed to the activation of Tregs through cellular interactions within the immune system. The effect of HSP-specific therapies in patients with inflammatory arthritis should be explored further, especially with regard to long-term efficacy and safety and their use in combination with current therapeutic approaches. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Society for Rheumatology. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  14. Small Heat Shock Proteins Are Novel Common Determinants of Alcohol and Nicotine Sensitivity in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Johnson, James R; Rajamanoharan, Dayani; McCue, Hannah V; Rankin, Kim; Barclay, Jeff W

    2016-03-01

    Addiction to drugs is strongly determined by multiple genetic factors. Alcohol and nicotine produce distinct pharmacological effects within the nervous system through discrete molecular targets; yet, data from family and twin analyses support the existence of common genetic factors for addiction in general. The mechanisms underlying addiction, however, are poorly described and common genetic factors for alcohol and nicotine remain unidentified. We investigated the role that the heat shock transcription factor, HSF-1, and its downstream effectors played as common genetic modulators of sensitivity to addictive substances. Using Caenorhabditis elegans, an exemplary model organism with substance dose-dependent responses similar to mammals, we demonstrate that HSF-1 altered sensitivity to both alcohol and nicotine. Using a combination of a targeted RNAi screen of downstream factors and transgenic approaches we identified that these effects were contingent upon the constitutive neuronal expression of HSP-16.48, a small heat shock protein (HSP) homolog of human α-crystallin. Furthermore we demonstrated that the function of HSP-16.48 in drug sensitivity surprisingly was independent of chaperone activity during the heat shock stress response. Instead we identified a distinct domain within the N-terminal region of the HSP-16.48 protein that specified its function in comparison to related small HSPs. Our findings establish and characterize a novel genetic determinant underlying sensitivity to diverse addictive substances.

  15. Isolation and functional analysis of chicken 90-kDa heat shock protein gene promoter.

    PubMed Central

    Vourc'h, C; Binart, N; Chambraud, B; David, J P; Jérôme, V; Baulieu, E E; Catelli, M G

    1989-01-01

    We report the nucleotide sequence of a 2652 bp derived from a chicken 90-kDa heat shock protein (hsp 90) genomic clone. This fragment contains 890 bp of the 5' flanking region and 1762 bp of structural gene sequence encoding the first 85 amino acids of the protein. The start site of transcription was determined by primer extension and RNase mapping. Two introns have been identified. The first intron presents two features in common with the unique intron of the hsp 83 of drosophila: its location just before the ATG initiation codon and its length of approximately 1.3 Kb. The 5' flanking region contains a TATAA element, a CCAAT box and several putative cis-regulatory elements that might account for the basal level of expression and developmental regulation of the gene. Functional analyses show that hsp 90 gene expression is constitutive and heat inducible and that a full heat shock response requires the cooperativity of two distinct blocks of overlapping heat shock response elements. Images PMID:2762125

  16. Heat Shock Factor 1 Is a Substrate for p38 Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinases

    PubMed Central

    Dayalan Naidu, Sharadha; Sutherland, Calum; Zhang, Ying; Risco, Ana; de la Vega, Laureano; Caunt, Christopher J.; Hastie, C. James; Lamont, Douglas J.; Torrente, Laura; Chowdhry, Sudhir; Benjamin, Ivor J.; Keyse, Stephen M.; Cuenda, Ana

    2016-01-01

    Heat shock factor 1 (HSF1) monitors the structural integrity of the proteome. Phosphorylation at S326 is a hallmark for HSF1 activation, but the identity of the kinase(s) phosphorylating this site has remained elusive. We show here that the dietary agent phenethyl isothiocyanate (PEITC) inhibits heat shock protein 90 (Hsp90), the main negative regulator of HSF1; activates p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK); and increases S326 phosphorylation, trimerization, and nuclear translocation of HSF1, and the transcription of a luciferase reporter, as well as the endogenous prototypic HSF1 target Hsp70. In vitro, all members of the p38 MAPK family rapidly and stoichiometrically catalyze the S326 phosphorylation. The use of stable knockdown cell lines and inhibitors indicated that among the p38 MAPKs, p38γ is the principal isoform responsible for the phosphorylation of HSF1 at S326 in cells. A protease-mass spectrometry approach confirmed S326 phosphorylation and unexpectedly revealed that p38 MAPK also catalyzes the phosphorylation of HSF1 at S303/307, previously known repressive posttranslational modifications. Thus, we have identified p38 MAPKs as highly efficient catalysts for the phosphorylation of HSF1. Furthermore, our findings suggest that the magnitude and persistence of activation of p38 MAPK are important determinants of the extent and duration of the heat shock response. PMID:27354066

  17. Significance of heat shock proteins in the skin upon UV exposure.

    PubMed

    Jonak, Constanze; Klosner, Gabriele; Trautinger, Franz

    2009-01-01

    The expression of heat shock proteins (Hsp) expression is induced in all cells by exposure to heat and other environmental stress and Hsp can protect cells from damage through further exposure. Hsp are highly conserved and it is likely that they are essential for survival in a potentially harmful environment. Most Hsp are molecular chaperones sensing unfolded proteins and mediating their re-folding, transport, and interaction. In human epidermis Hsp are associated with differentiation, photoprotection, and skin disease. Recent research has mainly focused on the 27kD and 72kD Hsp that are constitutively expressed in keratinocytes. Cell death induced by ultraviolet radiation (UV) can be inhibited by previous heat shock and UV itself can induce Hsp experimentally. Regulation of Hsp can be pharmacologically modified and topical and systemic inducers and inhibitors of Hsp expression are under development. Whether phototherapy exerts its clinical efficacy by modulation of Hsp has not been sufficiently studied. The UV-wavelength ranges, -intensities and -doses that are required to interfere with the heat shock response in the skin still remain to be elucidated.

  18. Identification and characterization of Theileria annulata heat-shock protein 90 (HSP90) isoforms.

    PubMed

    Mohammed, S B; Bakheit, M A; Ernst, M; Ahmed, J S; Seitzer, U

    2013-11-01

    Heat-shock proteins (HSPs) refer to a group of proteins whose synthesis is enhanced upon sudden increase in temperature or exposure to a variety of other stressors. In this study, Theileria annulata (T. annulata) HSP90 was identified and characterized as a first step to understand the function of this molecule in T. annulata-infected cells. Our results indicated the existence in the genome of T. annulata of two HSP90 genes: one located in chromosome one (TaHSP90-Chr1) and the other in chromosome four (TaHSP90-Chr4). The amino acid alignment between the two isoforms has shown identity and similarity values of 23.52% and 30.26%, respectively. Theileria annulata recombinant HSP90 proteins were expressed using a bacterial expression system and could be recognized in Western blots by rabbit anti-serum raised against an antigenic peptide derived from a unique sequence of TaHSP90-Chr1. On the other hand, bovine HSP90 was detected in T. annulata-infected cells using Western blot and immunocytostaining. To demonstrate the effect of the inhibition of HSP90 on the survival of T. annulata-infected cells, Geldanamycin (GA), a specific inhibitor for HSP90, was used. Upon GA treatment, p53 was observed to translocate into the host cell nucleus, a phenomenon that occurs in cells undergoing apoptosis. Using flowcytometry, a significant increase (P = 0.028) in cell death (%) was observed in T. annulata-infected cells treated with two different GA concentrations, 0.5 and 1 μm, and incubated for 24, 48 and 72 h. © 2013 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  19. Nicotinamide Mononucleotide Adenylyltransferase Is a Stress Response Protein Regulated by the Heat Shock Factor/Hypoxia-inducible Factor 1α Pathway*

    PubMed Central

    Ali, Yousuf O.; McCormack, Ryan; Darr, Andrew; Zhai, R. Grace

    2011-01-01

    Stress responses are cellular processes essential for maintenance of cellular integrity and defense against environmental and intracellular insults. Neurodegenerative conditions are linked with inadequate stress responses. Several stress-responsive genes encoding neuroprotective proteins have been identified, and among them, the heat shock proteins comprise an important group of molecular chaperones that have neuroprotective functions. However, evidence for other critical stress-responsive genes is lacking. Recent studies on the NAD synthesis enzyme nicotinamide mononucleotide adenylyltransferase (NMNAT) have uncovered a novel neuronal maintenance and protective function against activity-, injury-, or misfolded protein-induced degeneration in Drosophila and in mammalian neurons. Here, we show that NMNAT is also a novel stress response protein required for thermotolerance and mitigation of oxidative stress-induced shortened lifespan. NMNAT is transcriptionally regulated during various stress conditions including heat shock and hypoxia through heat shock factor (HSF) and hypoxia-inducible factor 1α in vivo. HSF binds to nmnat promoter and induces NMNAT expression under heat shock. In contrast, under hypoxia, HIF1α up-regulates NMNAT indirectly through the induction of HSF. Our studies provide an in vivo mechanism for transcriptional regulation of NMNAT under stress and establish an essential role for this neuroprotective factor in cellular stress response. PMID:21478149

  20. Assembly of lipopolysaccharide in Escherichia coli requires the essential LapB heat shock protein.

    PubMed

    Klein, Gracjana; Kobylak, Natalia; Lindner, Buko; Stupak, Anna; Raina, Satish

    2014-05-23

    Here, we describe two new heat shock proteins involved in the assembly of LPS in Escherichia coli, LapA and LapB (lipopolysaccharide assembly protein A and B). lapB mutants were identified based on an increased envelope stress response. Envelope stress-responsive pathways control key steps in LPS biogenesis and respond to defects in the LPS assembly. Accordingly, the LPS content in ΔlapB or Δ(lapA lapB) mutants was elevated, with an enrichment of LPS derivatives with truncations in the core region, some of which were pentaacylated and exhibited carbon chain polymorphism. Further, the levels of LpxC, the enzyme that catalyzes the first committed step of lipid A synthesis, were highly elevated in the Δ(lapA lapB) mutant. Δ(lapA lapB) mutant accumulated extragenic suppressors that mapped either to lpxC, waaC, and gmhA, or to the waaQ operon (LPS biosynthesis) and lpp (Braun's lipoprotein). Increased synthesis of either FabZ (3-R-hydroxymyristoyl acyl carrier protein dehydratase), slrA (novel RpoE-regulated non-coding sRNA), lipoprotein YceK, toxin HicA, or MurA (UDP-N-acetylglucosamine 1-carboxyvinyltransferase) suppressed some of the Δ(lapA lapB) defects. LapB contains six tetratricopeptide repeats and, at the C-terminal end, a rubredoxin-like domain that was found to be essential for its activity. In pull-down experiments, LapA and LapB co-purified with LPS, Lpt proteins, FtsH (protease), DnaK, and DnaJ (chaperones). A specific interaction was also observed between WaaC and LapB. Our data suggest that LapB coordinates assembly of proteins involved in LPS synthesis at the plasma membrane and regulates turnover of LpxC, thereby ensuring balanced biosynthesis of LPS and phospholipids consistent with its essentiality. © 2014 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  1. Heat shock protein concentration and clarity of porcine lenses incubated at elevated temperatures

    PubMed Central

    Dzialoszynski, T. M.; Milne, K.J.; Trevithick, J.R.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To quantify the concentration of heat shock proteins in lenses in lens organ culture at elevated temperatures, and to examine the relation between elevated temperature and lens clarity. Methods Pig lenses obtained from a local abattoir were dissected aseptically and incubated in medium M199 without serum for 4 days to stabilize, and lenses with protein leakage of less than 10 mg/l were obtained for heat shock exposure. Heat shock was performed by incubation for 1 h in M199 without serum at various temperatures ranging from 37 °C to 55 °C. After incubation for 24 h, cataract blurring of the images was assessed using Scantox™ and Scion Image analysis of the lens photographs. Lens homogenates were subsequently analyzed for Hsp70 and Hsp27 with western blotting. Results The degree of cataract blurring of the images increased with increasing temperature, but the two functional measures provided different results. Focal length inconsistency, as assessed with the back vertex distance standard error of the mean (BVD SEM; the variability in focal lengths measured at 20 equally spaced locations across the lens, Scantox™), increased nearly linearly with the heat treatment temperature. In contrast, decreased clarity, evident by a fuzzy image with lower contrast, was not markedly altered as the temperature rose until a threshold of approximately 47.5 °C. The inducible isoform of the Hsp70 family (Hsp70) of heat shock proteins was increased at all temperatures above the control except those above 50 °C. Changes in Hsp27 were less clear as the protein content increased only at the incubation temperatures of 39 °C and 48.5 °C. Conclusions The porcine lens demonstrates subtle changes in the variability of the focal length, and the variability increases as the incubation temperature rises. In contrast, lens clarity is relatively stable at temperatures up to 47.5 °C, above which dramatic changes, indicative of the formation of cataracts, occur. The lens content

  2. Heat Shock Protein 90 Inhibition in Cancer Drug Discovery: From Chemistry to Futural Clinical Applications.

    PubMed

    Özgür, Aykut; Tutar, Yusuf

    2016-01-01

    Heat shock protein 90 (Hsp90) is an important member of the chaperone protein family and it is involved in stabilization, regulation, and maintenance of oncogenic client proteins with co-chaperones. Cochaperones regulate the ATPase activity of Hsp90 and its interactions with oncogenic client proteins. Therefore, Hsp90 and its co-chaperones have become significant therapeutic targets for cancer treatment. Many chemical compounds have been evaluated for Hsp90 inhibition as well as significant results were obtained in clinical trials. In this paper, we emphasize on the key roles of Hsp90 and its co-chaperones in tumorigenesis and overview therapeutic strategies of Hsp90 inhibition in oncology.

  3. Redox regulation of heat shock protein expression in aging and neurodegenerative disorders associated with oxidative stress: a nutritional approach.

    PubMed

    Calabrese, V; Scapagnini, G; Colombrita, C; Ravagna, A; Pennisi, G; Giuffrida Stella, A M; Galli, F; Butterfield, D A

    2003-12-01

    Oxidative stress has been implicated in mechanisms leading to neuronal cell injury in various pathological states of the brain. Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a progressive disorder with cognitive and memory decline, speech loss, personality changes and synapse loss. Many approaches have been undertaken to understand AD, but the heterogeneity of the etiologic factors makes it difficult to define the clinically most important factor determining the onset and progression of the disease. However, increasing evidence indicates that factors such as oxidative stress and disturbed protein metabolism and their interaction in a vicious cycle are central to AD pathogenesis. Brains of AD patients undergo many changes, such as disruption of protein synthesis and degradation, classically associated with the heat shock response, which is one form of stress response. Heat shock proteins are proteins serving as molecular chaperones involved in the protection of cells from various forms of stress.Recently, the involvement of the heme oxygenase (HO) pathway in anti-degenerative mechanisms operating in AD has received considerable attention, as it has been demonstrated that the expression of HO is closely related to that of amyloid precursor protein (APP). HO induction occurs together with the induction of other HSPs during various physiopathological conditions. The vasoactive molecule carbon monoxide and the potent antioxidant bilirubin, products of HO-catalyzed reaction, represent a protective system potentially active against brain oxidative injury. Given the broad cytoprotective properties of the heat shock response there is now strong interest in discovering and developing pharmacological agents capable of inducing the heat shock response. Increasing interest has been focused on identifying dietary compounds that can inhibit, retard or reverse the multi-stage pathophysiological events underlying AD pathology. Alzheimer's disease, in fact, involves a chronic inflammatory response

  4. Relationship between heat shock protein 70 expression and life span in Daphnia

    PubMed Central

    Schumpert, Charles; Handy, Indhira; Dudycha, Jeffry L.; Patel, Rekha C.

    2014-01-01

    The longevity of an organism is directly related to its ability to effectively cope with cellular stress. Heat shock response (HSR) protects the cells against accumulation of damaged proteins after exposure to elevated temperatures and also in ageing cells. To understand the role of Hsp70 in regulating life span of Daphnia, we examined the expression of Hsp70 in two ecotypes that exhibit strikingly different life spans. D. pulicaria, the long lived ecotype, showed a robust Hsp70 induction as compared to the shorter lived D. pulex. Interestingly, the short-lived D. pulex isolates showed no induction of Hsp70 at the mid point in their life span. In contrast to this, the long-lived D. pulicaria continued to induce Hsp70 expression at an equivalent age. We further show that the Hsp70 expression was induced at transcriptional level in response to heat shock. The transcription factor responsible for Hsp70 induction, heat shock factor-1 (HSF-1), although present in aged organisms did not exhibit DNA-binding capability. Thus, the decline of Hsp70 induction in old organisms could be attributed to a decline in HSF-1’s DNA-binding activity. These results for the first time, present a molecular analysis of the relationship between HSR and life span in Daphnia. PMID:24814302

  5. Relationship between heat shock protein 70 expression and life span in Daphnia.

    PubMed

    Schumpert, Charles; Handy, Indhira; Dudycha, Jeffry L; Patel, Rekha C

    2014-07-01

    The longevity of an organism is directly related to its ability to effectively cope with cellular stress. Heat shock response (HSR) protects the cells against accumulation of damaged proteins after exposure to elevated temperatures and also in aging cells. To understand the role of Hsp70 in regulating life span of Daphnia, we examined the expression of Hsp70 in two ecotypes that exhibit strikingly different life spans. Daphnia pulicaria, the long lived ecotype, showed a robust Hsp70 induction as compared to the shorter lived Daphnia pulex. Interestingly, the short-lived D. pulex isolates showed no induction of Hsp70 at the mid point in their life span. In contrast to this, the long-lived D. pulicaria continued to induce Hsp70 expression at an equivalent age. We further show that the Hsp70 expression was induced at transcriptional level in response to heat shock. The transcription factor responsible for Hsp70 induction, heat shock factor-1 (HSF-1), although present in aged organisms did not exhibit DNA-binding capability. Thus, the decline of Hsp70 induction in old organisms could be attributed to a decline in HSF-1's DNA-binding activity. These results for the first time, present a molecular analysis of the relationship between HSR and life span in Daphnia. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Specific protein homeostatic functions of small heat-shock proteins increase lifespan.

    PubMed

    Vos, Michel J; Carra, Serena; Kanon, Bart; Bosveld, Floris; Klauke, Karin; Sibon, Ody C M; Kampinga, Harm H

    2016-04-01

    During aging, oxidized, misfolded, and aggregated proteins accumulate in cells, while the capacity to deal with protein damage declines severely. To cope with the toxicity of damaged proteins, cells rely on protein quality control networks, in particular proteins belonging to the family of heat-shock proteins (HSPs). As safeguards of the cellular proteome, HSPs assist in protein folding and prevent accumulation of damaged, misfolded proteins. Here, we compared the capacity of all Drosophila melanogaster small HSP family members for their ability to assist in refolding stress-denatured substrates and/or to prevent aggregation of disease-associated misfolded proteins. We identified CG14207 as a novel and potent small HSP member that exclusively assisted in HSP70-dependent refolding of stress-denatured proteins. Furthermore, we report that HSP67BC, which has no role in protein refolding, was the most effective small HSP preventing toxic protein aggregation in an HSP70-independent manner. Importantly, overexpression of both CG14207 and HSP67BC in Drosophila leads to a mild increase in lifespan, demonstrating that increased levels of functionally diverse small HSPs can promote longevity in vivo.

  7. Prostaglandin E synthase interacts with inducible heat shock protein 70 after heat stress in bovine primary dermal fibroblast cells.

    PubMed

    Richter, Constanze; Viergutz, Torsten; Schwerin, Manfred; Weitzel, Joachim M

    2015-01-01

    Exposure to heat stress in dairy cows leads to undesired side effects that are reflected by complex alterations in endocrine parameters, such as reduced progesterone, estradiol, and thyroid hormone concentrations. These endocrine maladaptation leads to failure to resume cyclicity, a poor uterine environment and inappropriate immune responses in postpartum dairy cows. Prostaglandins (PG's) are lipid mediators, which serve as signal molecules in response to various external stimuli as well as to cell-specific internal signal molecules. A central role in PG synthesis plays prostaglandin E synthase (PGES) that catalyzes the isomerization of PGH2 to PGE2 .The present study was conducted to investigate heat stress associated PGES expression. Expression of PGES and inducible heat shock protein 70 (HSP70), as a putative chaperonic protein, was studied in bovine primary fibroblasts under different heat shock conditions. Bovine primary fibroblasts produce PGE2 at homoiothermical norm temperature (38.5°C in bovine), but reduce PGE2 production rates under extreme heat stress (at 45°C for 6 h). By contrast, PGE2 production rates are maintained after a milder heat stress (at 41.5°C for 6 h). PGE2 synthesis is abolished by application of cyclooxygenase inhibitor indomethacin, indicating de novo synthesis. Heat stress increases HSP70 but not PGES protein concentrations. HSP70 physically interacts with PGES and the PGES-HSP70 complex did not dissociate upon heat stress at 45°C even after returning the cells to 37°C. The PGE2 production negatively correlates with the portion of PGES-HSP70 complex. These results suggest a protein interaction between HSP70 and PGES in dermal fibroblast cells. Blockage of PGES protein by HSP70 seems to interfere with the regulatory processes essential for cellular adaptive protection. © 2014 International Society for Advancement of Cytometry. © 2014 International Society for Advancement of Cytometry.

  8. Protein kinase Cmu plays an essential role in hypertonicity-induced heat shock protein 70 expression.

    PubMed

    Lim, Yun Sook; Lee, Jae Seon; Huang, Tai Qin; Seo, Jeong Sun

    2008-12-31

    Heat shock protein 70 (HSP70), which evidences important functions as a molecular chaperone and anti-apoptotic molecule, is substantially induced in cells exposed to a variety of stresses, including hypertonic stress, heavy metals, heat shock, and oxidative stress, and prevents cellular damage under these conditions. However, the molecular mechanism underlying the induction of HSP70 in response to hypertonicity has been characterized to a far lesser extent. In this study, we have investigated the cellular signaling pathway of HSP70 induction under hypertonic conditions. Initially, we applied a variety of kinase inhibitors to NIH3T3 cells that had been exposed to hypertonicity. The induction of HSP70 was suppressed specifically by treatment with protein kinase C (PKC) inhibitors (Gö6976 and GF109203X). As hypertonicity dramatically increased the phosphorylation of PKCmu, we then evaluated the role of PKCmu in hypertonicity-induced HSP70 expression and cell viability. The depletion of PKCmu with siRNA or the inhibition of PKCmu activity with inhibitors resulted in a reduction in HSP70 induction and cell viability. Tonicity-responsive enhancer binding protein (TonEBP), a transcription factor for hypertonicity-induced HSP70 expression, was translocated rapidly into the nucleus and was modified gradually in the nucleus under hypertonic conditions. When we administered treatment with PKC inhibitors, the mobility shift of TonEBP was affected in the nucleus. However, PKCmu evidenced no subcellular co-localization with TonEBP during hypertonic exposure. From our results, we have concluded that PKCmu performs a critical function in hypertonicity-induced HSP70 induction, and finally cellular protection, via the indirect regulation of TonEBP modification.

  9. Chloroplast small heat shock proteins: Evidence for atypical evolution of an organelle-localized protein

    PubMed Central

    Waters, Elizabeth R.; Vierling, Elizabeth

    1999-01-01

    Knowledge of the origin and evolution of gene families is critical to our understanding of the evolution of protein function. To gain a detailed understanding of the evolution of the small heat shock proteins (sHSPs) in plants, we have examined the evolutionary history of the chloroplast (CP)-localized sHSPs. Previously, these nuclear-encoded CP proteins had been identified only from angiosperms. This study reveals the presence of the CP sHSPs in a moss, Funaria hygrometrica. Two clones for CP sHSPs were isolated from a F. hygrometrica heat shock cDNA library that represent two distinct CP sHSP genes. Our analysis of the CP sHSPs reveals unexpected evolutionary relationships and patterns of sequence conservation. Phylogenetic analysis of the CP sHSPs with other plant CP sHSPs and eukaryotic, archaeal, and bacterial sHSPs shows that the CP sHSPs are not closely related to the cyanobacterial sHSPs. Thus, they most likely evolved via gene duplication from a nuclear-encoded cytosolic sHSP and not via gene transfer from the CP endosymbiont. Previous sequence analysis had shown that all angiosperm CP sHSPs possess a methionine-rich region in the N-terminal domain. The primary sequence of this region is not highly conserved in the F. hygrometrica CP sHSPs. This lack of sequence conservation indicates that sometime in land plant evolution, after the divergence of mosses from the common ancestor of angiosperms but before the monocot–dicot divergence, there was a change in the selective constraints acting on the CP sHSPs. PMID:10588716

  10. Upregulation of heat-shock proteins in larvae, but not adults, of the flesh fly during hot summer days.

    PubMed

    Harada, Eri; Goto, Shin G

    2017-06-08

    Heat-shock proteins (HSPs) are highly expressed when organisms are exposed to thermal stresses. The HSPs are considered to play significant roles in thermal adaptation because they function as molecular chaperones facilitating proper protein synthesis. The expression of HSPs under field conditions, however, has not been evaluated much, and their importance, based on the ecological contexts in nature, is still unclear. We investigated this aspect in the larvae and adults of the flesh fly, Sarcophaga similis. These larvae spend their larval life in the carrion or faeces of vertebrates; therefore, they are less mobile and are occasionally exposed to high temperature. In contrast, the adults of this species can fly and, therefore, they are highly mobile. Massive transcription of Hsps was detected both in the larvae and adults in a laboratory heat-shock experiment. The larvae in the field showed no or less Hsp production on thermally mild days, whereas considerable upregulation of Hsp expression was detected on days with high temperature. The adults can also be exposed to thermal stress as high as 40 °C or higher in the field. However, most of the flies showed no or less Hsp expression. The observations in the experimental cage under field conditions revealed behavioural thermoregulation of adults through microhabitat selection. The present study demonstrates ontogenetic alteration of the strategy to overcome thermal stress in an insect; in the field, less mobile larvae use physiological protection against heat (HSP production), whereas highly mobile adults avoid the stress behaviourally (through microhabitat selection).

  11. [The role of heat shock proteins HSP90 in the response of immune cells to centimeter microwaves].

    PubMed

    Glushkova, O V; Novoselova, E G; Khrenov, M O; Novoselova, T V; Cherenkov, D A; Lunin, S M; Fesenko, E E

    2008-01-01

    The effects of low-level electromagnetic waves (8.15-18 GHz, 1 microW/cm2, 1 h) on the production of heat shock proteins, several cytokines, and nitric oxide in isolated mouse macrophages and lymphocytes were examined both under normal conditions and after the treatment of the cells with geldanamycin (GA), a depressor of activity of the heat shock protein 90 (Hsp90). The irradiation of cells without GA induced the production of Hsp70, nitric oxide (NO), interleukin-1beta (IL-1beta), interleukin-10 (IL-10), and the tumor necrosis factor -alpha (TNF-alpha). No changes in the production of Hsp90 in irradiated cells were observed, but intracellular locations of Hsp25 and Hsp70 altered. The preliminary treatment of cells with GA did not remove the effects of microwaves: in these conditions, the synthesis of all cytokines tested, nitric oxide, as well as total and membrane amount of Hsp70, and the amount of Hsp25 in the cytoplasm and cytoskeleton increased. Moreover, the exposure of cells incubated with GA resulted in the reduction of Hsp90-alpha production.

  12. Crotonaldehyde induces heat shock protein 72 expression that mediates anti-apoptotic effects in human endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Ryu, Dong Sun; Yang, Hana; Lee, Seung Eun; Park, Cheung-Seog; Jin, Young-Ho; Park, Yong Seek

    2013-11-25

    Crotonaldehyde is a highly reactive aldehyde and a common environmental pollutant. It occurs in cigarette smoke and automobile exhaust, and is also endogenously generated by lipid peroxidation. Reactive aldehydes, such as crotonaldehyde, are considered to be important mediators of cell damage. Since endothelial apoptosis is considered to be the first step in the pathogenesis of cardiovascular disease, there have been many efforts to protect endothelial cell from oxidative stress. Heat shock protein 72 (HSP72) is a representative stress-inducible HSP70 family protein, and its synthesis is increased in response to multiple stressors. In the present study, we investigated the effect of crotonaldehyde on the up-regulation of HSP72 in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs). Crotonaldehyde treatment caused nuclear accumulation of the heat shock transcription factor 1 (HSF1), leading to the induction of HSP72. Inhibition of the c-Jun N-terminal kinases (JNK) signaling pathways, reduction of intracellular calcium level and blocking of reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation resulted in significant blockage of crotonaldehyde-mediated HSP72 induction. In addition, HSP72 silencing by siRNA or calcium chelating by BAPTA/AM resulted in an obvious increase in the rate of apoptosis in crotonaldehyde-stimulated HUVECs. In summary, our data demonstrated that crotonaldehyde-induced HSP72 expression in HUVECs is mediated by the JNK-HSF1 pathway, and involves calcium ions and ROS, which is an adaptive response to oxidative stress caused by crotonaldehyde.

  13. Hierarchical functional specificity of cytosolic heat shock protein 70 (Hsp70) nucleotide exchange factors in yeast.

    PubMed

    Abrams, Jennifer L; Verghese, Jacob; Gibney, Patrick A; Morano, Kevin A

    2014-05-09

    Heat shock protein 70 (Hsp70) molecular chaperones play critical roles in protein homeostasis. In the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, cytosolic Hsp70 interacts with up to three types of nucleotide exchange factors (NEFs) homologous to human counterparts: Sse1/Sse2 (Heat shock protein 110 (Hsp110)), Fes1 (HspBP1), and Snl1 (Bag-1). All three NEFs stimulate ADP release; however, it is unclear why multiple distinct families have been maintained throughout eukaryotic evolution. In this study we investigate NEF roles in Hsp70 cell biology using an isogenic combinatorial collection of NEF deletion mutants. Utilizing well characterized model substrates, we find that Sse1 participates in most Hsp70-mediated processes and is of particular importance in protein biogenesis and degradation, whereas Fes1 contributes to a minimal extent. Surprisingly, disaggregation and resolubilization of thermally denatured firefly luciferase occurred independently of NEF activity. Simultaneous deletion of SSE1 and FES1 resulted in constitutive activation of heat shock protein expression mediated by the transcription factor Hsf1, suggesting that these two factors are important for modulating stress response. Fes1 was found to interact in vivo preferentially with the Ssa family of cytosolic Hsp70 and not the co-translational Ssb homolog, consistent with the lack of cold sensitivity and protein biogenesis phenotypes for fes1Δ cells. No significant consequence could be attributed to deletion of the minor Hsp110 SSE2 or the Bag homolog SNL1. Together, these lines of investigation provide a comparative analysis of NEF function in yeast that implies Hsp110 is the principal NEF for cytosolic Hsp70, making it an ideal candidate for therapeutic intervention in human protein folding disorders.

  14. Synthesis and initial evaluation of YM-08, a blood-brain barrier permeable derivative of the heat shock protein 70 (Hsp70) inhibitor MKT-077, which reduces tau levels.

    PubMed

    Miyata, Yoshinari; Li, Xiaokai; Lee, Hsiu-Fang; Jinwal, Umesh K; Srinivasan, Sharan R; Seguin, Sandlin P; Young, Zapporah T; Brodsky, Jeffrey L; Dickey, Chad A; Sun, Duxin; Gestwicki, Jason E

    2013-06-19

    The molecular chaperone, heat shock protein 70 (Hsp70), is an emerging drug target for treating neurodegenerative tauopathies. We recently found that one promising Hsp70 inhibitor, MKT-077, reduces tau levels in cellular models. However, MKT-077 does not penetrate the blood-brain barrier (BBB), limiting its use as either a clinical candidate or probe for exploring Hsp70 as a drug target in the central nervous system (CNS). We hypothesized that replacing the cationic pyridinium moiety in MKT-077 with a neutral pyridine might improve its clogP and enhance its BBB penetrance. To test this idea, we designed and synthesized YM-08, a neutral analogue of MKT-077. Like the parent compound, YM-08 bound to Hsp70 in vitro and reduced phosphorylated tau levels in cultured brain slices. Pharmacokinetic evaluation in CD1 mice showed that YM-08 crossed the BBB and maintained a brain/plasma (B/P) value of ∼0.25 for at least 18 h. Together, these studies suggest that YM-08 is a promising scaffold for the development of Hsp70 inhibitors suitable for use in the CNS.

  15. Heat shock protein 90 (Hsp90) inhibition targets canonical TGF-β signalling to prevent fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Tomcik, Michal; Zerr, Pawel; Pitkowski, Jana; Palumbo-Zerr, Katrin; Avouac, Jérôme; Distler, Oliver; Becvar, Radim; Senolt, Ladislav; Schett, Georg; Distler, Jörg H

    2014-06-01

    Targeted therapies for systemic sclerosis (SSc) and other fibrotic diseases are not yet available. We evaluated the efficacy of heat shock protein 90 (Hsp90) inhibition as a novel approach to inhibition of aberrant transforming growth factor (TGF)-β signalling and for the treatment of fibrosis in preclinical models of SSc. Expression of Hsp90 was quantified by quantitative PCR, western blot and immunohistochemistry. The effects of Hsp90 inhibition were analysed in cultured fibroblasts, in bleomycin-induced dermal fibrosis, in tight-skin (Tsk-1) mice and in mice overexpressing a constitutively active TGF-β receptor I (TβRI). Expression of Hsp90β was increased in SSc skin and in murine models of SSc in a TGF-β-dependent manner. Inhibition of Hsp90 by 17-dimethylaminoethylamino-17-demethoxy-geldanamycin (17-DMAG) inhibited canonical TGF-β signalling and completely prevented the stimulatory effects of TGF-β on collagen synthesis and myofibroblast differentiation. Treatment with 17-DMAG decreased the activation of canonical TGF-β signalling in murine models of SSc and exerted potent antifibrotic effects in bleomycin-induced dermal fibrosis, in Tsk-1 mice and in mice overexpressing a constitutively active TβRI. Dermal thickness, number of myofibroblasts and hydroxyproline content were all significantly reduced on treatment with 17-DMAG. No toxic effects were observed with 17-DMAG at antifibrotic doses. Hsp90 is upregulated in SSc and is critical for TGF-β signalling. Pharmacological inhibition of Hsp90 effectively blocks the profibrotic effects of TGF-β in cultured fibroblasts and in different preclinical models of SSc. These results have translational implications, as several Hsp90 inhibitors are in clinical trials for other indications.

  16. Reactive oxygen species promote heat shock protein 90-mediated HBV capsid assembly

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Yoon Sik Seo, Hyun Wook Jung, Guhung

    2015-02-13

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection induces reactive oxygen species (ROS) production and has been associated with the development of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). ROS are also an important factor in HCC because the accumulated ROS leads to abnormal cell proliferation and chromosome mutation. In oxidative stress, heat shock protein 90 (Hsp90) and glutathione (GSH) function as part of the defense mechanism. Hsp90 prevents cellular component from oxidative stress, and GSH acts as antioxidants scavenging ROS in the cell. However, it is not known whether molecules regulated by oxidative stress are involved in HBV capsid assembly. Based on the previous study that Hsp90 facilitates HBV capsid assembly, which is an important step for the packing of viral particles, here, we show that ROS enrich Hsp90-driven HBV capsid formation. In cell-free system, HBV capsid assembly was facilitated by ROS with Hsp90, whereas it was decreased without Hsp90. In addition, GSH inhibited the function of Hsp90 to decrease HBV capsid assembly. Consistent with the result of cell-free system, ROS and buthionine sulfoximine (BS), an inhibitor of GSH synthesis, increased HBV capsid formation in HepG2.2.15 cells. Thus, our study uncovers the interplay between ROS and Hsp90 during HBV capsid assembly. - Highlights: • We examined H{sub 2}O{sub 2} and GSH modulate HBV capsid assembly. • H{sub 2}O{sub 2} facilitates HBV capsid assembly in the presence of Hsp90. • GSH inhibits function of Hsp90 in facilitating HBV capsid assembly. • H{sub 2}O{sub 2} and GSH induce conformation change of Hsp90.

  17. Protein carbonylation and heat shock proteins in human skeletal muscle: relationships to age and sarcopenia.

    PubMed

    Beltran Valls, Maria R; Wilkinson, Daniel J; Narici, Marco V; Smith, Kenneth; Phillips, Bethan E; Caporossi, Daniela; Atherton, Philip J

    2015-02-01

    Aging is associated with a gradual loss of muscle mass termed sarcopenia, which has significant impact on quality-of-life. Because oxidative stress is proposed to negatively impact upon musculoskeletal aging, we investigated links between human aging and markers of oxidative stress, and relationships to muscle mass and strength in young and old nonsarcopenic and sarcopenic adults. Sixteen young and 16 old males (further subdivided into "old" and "old sarcopenic") were studied. The abundance of protein carbonyl adducts within skeletal muscle sarcoplasmic, myofibrillar, and mitochondrial protein subfractions from musculus vastus lateralis biopsies were determined using Oxyblot immunoblotting techniques. In addition, concentrations of recognized cytoprotective proteins (eg, heat shock proteins [HSP], αβ-crystallin) were also assayed. Aging was associated with increased mitochondrial (but not myofibrillar or sarcoplasmic) protein carbonyl adducts, independently of (stage-I) sarcopenia. Correlation analyses of all subjects revealed that mitochondrial protein carbonyl abundance negatively correlated with muscle strength ([1-repetition maximum], p = .02, r (2) = -.16), but not muscle mass (p = .13, r (2) = -.08). Abundance of cytoprotective proteins, including various HSPs (HSP 27 and 70), were unaffected by aging/sarcopenia. To conclude, these data reveal that mitochondrial protein carbonylation increases moderately with age, and that this increase may impact upon skeletal muscle function, but is not a hallmark of (stage-I) sarcopenia, per se. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Gerontological Society of America.

  18. Protein Carbonylation and Heat Shock Proteins in Human Skeletal Muscle: Relationships to Age and Sarcopenia

    PubMed Central

    Beltran Valls, Maria R.; Wilkinson, Daniel J.; Narici, Marco V.; Smith, Kenneth; Phillips, Bethan E.; Caporossi, Daniela

    2015-01-01

    Aging is associated with a gradual loss of muscle mass termed sarcopenia, which has significant impact on quality-of-life. Because oxidative stress is proposed to negatively impact upon musculoskeletal aging, we investigated links between human aging and markers of oxidative stress, and relationships to muscle mass and strength in young and old nonsarcopenic and sarcopenic adults. Sixteen young and 16 old males (further subdivided into “old” and “old sarcopenic”) were studied. The abundance of protein carbonyl adducts within skeletal muscle sarcoplasmic, myofibrillar, and mitochondrial protein subfractions from musculus vastus lateralis biopsies were determined using Oxyblot immunoblotting techniques. In addition, concentrations of recognized cytoprotective proteins (eg, heat shock proteins [HSP], αβ-crystallin) were also assayed. Aging was associated with increased mitochondrial (but not myofibrillar or sarcoplasmic) protein carbonyl adducts, independently of (stage-I) sarcopenia. Correlation analyses of all subjects revealed that mitochondrial protein carbonyl abundance negatively correlated with muscle strength ([1-repetition maximum], p = .02, r 2 = −.16), but not muscle mass (p = .13, r 2 = −.08). Abundance of cytoprotective proteins, including various HSPs (HSP 27 and 70), were unaffected by aging/sarcopenia. To conclude, these data reveal that mitochondrial protein carbonylation increases moderately with age, and that this increase may impact upon skeletal muscle function, but is not a hallmark of (stage-I) sarcopenia, per se. PMID:24621945

  19. Role of heat shock proteins in oxygen radical-induced gastric apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Leung, Anna M; Redlak, Maria J; Miller, Thomas A

    2015-01-01

    The generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and their resultant oxidative damage is a common pathway for gastric mucosal injury. Developing strategies to protect the gastric epithelium against oxygen free radical damage is of profound pathophysiological interest. We have previously shown caspase-mediated apoptosis as a major cause of ROS-induced cell death in gastric mucosa. Because heat shock proteins (Hsps) confer protection against many cytotoxic agents, this study was undertaken to determine whether modulation of Hsps was protective against oxidative damage. AGS cells (human gastric mucosal cell line) received either no pretreatment, heat shock pretreatment (1 h at 42 ± 1°C), or pretreatment with an Hsp modulating drug (geldanamycin or quercetin). Cells were then exposed to hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), a representative ROS (1 mM, a physiologically relevant concentration), for 24 h. Caspase-3 activation and Poly ADP Ribose Polymerase (PARP) inactivation, as well as DNA-histone complex formation were used as measures of apoptosis. Inducible Hsps (Hsp70 and Hsp90) were detected using Western blot analysis. Results showed heat shock pretreatment induced increased expression of Hsp70 without change in Hsp90. In response to H2O2 exposure alone, there was significant increase in DNA-histone complex formation as well as caspase-3 activation and PARP cleavage in gastric epithelium. Heat shock pretreatment resulted in statistically significant prevention in these measures of apoptosis. Geldanamycin increased Hsp70, but elicited cleavage of Hsp90 and subsequently resulted in an increase in H2O2-induced apoptosis. Quercetin decreased Hsp70 and resulted again in increased H2O2-induced apoptosis. These findings indicate that heat shock pretreatment protects gastric mucosal cells against H2O2-induced apoptosis and that Hsp70 and Hsp90 may play key roles in this process. These results further suggest that perturbations in Hsp metabolism may induce mucosal injury in

  20. Silkworm Thermal Biology: A Review of Heat Shock Response, Heat Shock Proteins and Heat Acclimation in the Domesticated Silkworm, Bombyx mori

    PubMed Central

    Manjunatha, H. B.; Rajesh, R. K.; Aparna, H. S.

    2010-01-01

    Heat shock proteins (HSPs) are known to play ecological and evolutionary roles in this postgenomic era. Recent research suggests that HSPs are implicated in cardiovascular biology and disease development, proliferation and regulation of cancer cells, cell death via apoptosis, and several other key cellular functions. These activities have generated great interest amongst cell and molecular biologists, and these biologists are keen to unravel other hitherto unknown potential functions of this group of proteins. Consequently, the biological significance of HSPs has led to cloning and characterization of genes encoding HSPs in many organisms including the silkworm, Bombyx mori L. (Lepidoptera: Bombycidae). However, most of the past investigations in B. mori were confined to expression of HSPs in tissues and cell lines, whereas information on their specific functional roles in biological, physiological, and molecular processes is scarce. Naturally occurring or domesticated polyvoltines (known to be the tropical race) are more resistant to high temperatures and diseases than bi- or univoltines (temperate races). The mechanism of ecological or evolutionary modification of HSPs during the course of domestication of B. mori - particularly in relation to thermotolerance in geographically distinct races/strains - is still unclear. In addition, the heat shock response, thermal acclimation, and hardening have not been studied extensively in B. mori compared to other organisms. Towards this, recent investigations on differential expression of HSPs at various stages of development, considering the concept of the whole organism, open ample scope to evaluate their biological and commercial importance in B. mori which has not been addressed in any of the representative organisms studied so far. Comparatively, heat shock response among different silkworm races/strains of poly-, bi-, and univoltines varies significantly and thermotolerance increases as the larval development proceeds

  1. Antibodies against 70-kD heat shock cognate protein inhibit mediated nuclear import of karyophilic proteins

    PubMed Central

    1992-01-01

    Previously, we found that anti-DDDED antibodies strongly inhibited in vivo nuclear transport of nuclear proteins and that these antibodies recognized a protein of 69 kD (p69) from rat liver nuclear envelopes that showed specific binding activities to the nuclear location sequences (NLSs) of nucleoplasmin and SV-40 large T-antigen. Here we identified this protein as the 70-kD heat shock cognate protein (hsc70) based on its mass, isoelectric point, cellular localization, and partial amino acid sequences. Competition studies indicated that the recombinant hsc70 expressed in Escherichia coli binds to transport competent SV-40 T-antigen NLS more strongly than to the point mutated transport incompetent mutant NLS. To investigate the possible involvement of hsc70 in nuclear transport, we examined the effect of anti-hsc70 rabbit antibodies on the nuclear accumulation of karyophilic proteins. When injected into the cytoplasm of tissue culture cells, anti-hsc70 strongly inhibited the nuclear import of nucleoplasmin, SV- 40 T-antigen NLS bearing BSA and histone H1. In contrast, anti-hsc70 IgG did not prevent the diffusion of lysozyme or 17.4-kD FITC-dextran into the nuclei. After injection of these antibodies, cells continued RNA synthesis and were viable. These results indicate that hsc70 interacts with NLS-containing proteins in the cytoplasm before their nuclear import. PMID:1332978

  2. Small heat shock proteins protect against {alpha}-synuclein-induced toxicity and aggregation

    SciTech Connect

    Outeiro, Tiago Fleming; Klucken, Jochen; Strathearn, Katherine E.; Liu Fang; Nguyen, Paul; Rochet, Jean-Christophe; Hyman, Bradley T.; McLean, Pamela J. . E-mail: touteiro@partners.org

    2006-12-22

    Protein misfolding and inclusion formation are common events in neurodegenerative diseases, such as Parkinson's disease (PD), Alzheimer's disease (AD) or Huntington's disease (HD). {alpha}-Synuclein (aSyn) is the main protein component of inclusions called Lewy bodies (LB) which are pathognomic of PD, Dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB), and other diseases collectively known as LB diseases. Heat shock proteins (HSPs) are one class of the cellular quality control system that mediate protein folding, remodeling, and even disaggregation. Here, we investigated the role of the small heat shock proteins Hsp27 and {alpha}B-crystallin, in LB diseases. We demonstrate, via quantitative PCR, that Hsp27 messenger RNA levels are {approx}2-3-fold higher in DLB cases compared to control. We also show a corresponding increase in Hsp27 protein levels. Furthermore, we found that Hsp27 reduces aSyn-induced toxicity by {approx}80% in a culture model while {alpha}B-crystallin reduces toxicity by {approx}20%. In addition, intracellular inclusions were immunopositive for endogenous Hsp27, and overexpression of this protein reduced aSyn aggregation in a cell culture model.

  3. Specific binding of tetratricopeptide repeat (TPR) proteins to heat shock protein 70 (Hsp70) and heat shock protein 90 (Hsp90) is regulated by affinity and phosphorylation

    PubMed Central

    Assimon, Victoria A.; Southworth, Daniel R.; Gestwicki, Jason E.

    2016-01-01

    The heat shock proteins Hsp70 and Hsp90 require the help of tetratricopeptide repeat (TPR) domain-containing co-chaperones for many of their functions. Each monomer of Hsp70 or Hsp90 can only interact with a single TPR co-chaperone at a time and each member of the TPR co-chaperone family brings distinct functions into the complex. Thus, competition for TPR binding sites on Hsp70 and Hsp90 appears to shape chaperone activity. Recent structural and biophysical efforts have improved our understanding of chaperone-TPR contacts, focusing on the C-terminal EEVD motif that is present in both chaperones. To better understand these important protein-protein interactions on a wider scale, we measured the affinity of five TPR co-chaperones, CHIP, Hop, DnaJC7, FKBP51, and FKBP52, for the C-termini of four members of the chaperone family, Hsc70, Hsp72, Hsp90α, and Hsp90β, in vitro. These studies identified some surprising selectivity amongst the chaperone-TPR pairs, including the selective binding of FKBP51/52 to Hsp90α/β. These results also revealed that other TPR co-chaperones are only able to weakly discriminate between the chaperones or between their paralogs. We also explored whether mimicking phosphorylation of serine and threonine residues near the EEVD motif might impact affinity and found that pseudophosphorylation had selective effects on binding to CHIP but not other co-chaperones. Together, these findings suggest that both intrinsic affinity and post-translational modifications tune the interactions between Hsp70/90 and the TPR co-chaperones. PMID:26565746

  4. Heat-shock protein 70 expression in shrimp Fenneropenaeus chinensis during thermal and immune-challenged stress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Zhenyu; Jiao, Chuanzhen; Xiang, Jianhai

    2004-12-01

    Using western immunoblotting we obtained heat-shock protein 70 (HSP70) induction data and distribution in different tissues from shrimp Fenneropenaeus chinensis during thermal and immune-challenged stresses. This is probably the first report of the effects of various stressors on the expression of HSP70 in shrimp. HSP70 was prominently induced in hepatopancreas and gills, but not in muscle, eyestalk and hemolymph, when the shrimp were exposed to heat shock and Vibrio anguillavium-challenged stresses. Cold shock and WSSV treatment had no significant effects on the levels of HSP70 expression in all tissues examined. HSP70 induction was greatest after 2 h exposure to heat shock stress, which was elevated after acute heat shock exposure of 10°C above ambient temperature.

  5. Identification of two calcineurin B-binding proteins: tubulin and heat shock protein 60.

    PubMed

    Li, Wei; Handschumacher, Robert E

    2002-09-23

    Calcineurin (CaN) is a Ca++/calmodulin-dependent protein phosphatase with two subunits: a catalytic subunit (CaNA) and a regulatory subunit (CaNB). With four Ca(++)-binding sites and a sequence homology to calmodulin, CaNB has been defined as the regulatory subunit for CaNA. However, we have shown that mitochondrial expression of CaNB far exceeds that of CaNA. To investigate the role of this excess CaNB, we have generated glutathione-S-transferase-CaNB (GST-CaNB) fusion protein and demonstrated that the fusion protein predominantly bound to alpha-tubulin, a 57 kDa protein in bovine brain extracts, and heat shock protein 60 (Hsp60) in bovine kidney extracts. Their Ca(++)-dependent interactions with CaNB were verified by immunoprecipitation. The binding of CaNB could be demonstrated with purified alpha/beta tubulins and Hsp60, but not GroEL, a bacterial Hsp60 analog. The interaction of CaNB and Hsp60 was not disrupted by the incubation with Hsp10, ATP and Mg++, suggesting that CaNB was not associated with Hsp60 as a misfolded substrate, and may serve as a regulatory protein. Thus, CaNB may play other regulatory roles in Ca(++)-dependent events in addition to its interaction with CaNA, and may be important for Ca(++)-dependent processes in mitochondria.

  6. Interaction of small heat shock proteins with light component of neurofilaments (NFL).

    PubMed

    Nefedova, Victoria V; Sudnitsyna, Maria V; Gusev, Nikolai B

    2017-07-01

    The interaction of human small heat shock protein HspB1, its point mutants associated with distal hereditary motor neuropathy, and three other small heat shock proteins (HspB5, HspB6, HspB8) with the light component of neurofilaments (NFL) was analyzed by differential centrifugation, analytical ultracentrifugation, and fluorescent spectroscopy. The wild-type HspB1 decreased the quantity of NFL in pellets obtained after low- and high-speed centrifugation and increased the quantity of NFL remaining in the supernatant after high-speed centrifugation. Part of HspB1 was detected in the pellet of NFL after high-speed centrifugation, and at saturation, 1 mol of HspB1 monomer was bound per 2 mol of NFL. Point mutants of HspB1 associated with distal hereditary motor neuropathy (G84R, L99M, R140G, K141Q, and P182S) were almost as effective as the wild-type HspB1 in modulation of NFL assembly. At low ionic strength, HspB1 weakly interacted with NFL tetramers, and this interaction was increased upon salt-induced polymerization of NFL. HspB1 and HspB5 (αB-crystallin) decreased the rate of NFL polymerization measured by fluorescent spectroscopy. HspB6 (Hsp20) and HspB8 (Hsp22) were less effective than HspB1 (or HspB5) in modulation of NFL assembly. The data presented indicate that the small heat shock proteins affect NFL transition from tetramers to filaments, hydrodynamic properties of filaments, and their bundling and therefore probably modulate the formation of intermediate filament networks in neurons.

  7. Cadmium alters the expression of small heat shock protein genes in the aquatic midge Chironomus riparius.

    PubMed

    Martín-Folgar, Raquel; Martínez-Guitarte, José-Luis

    2017-02-01

    Cadmium (Cd) is a widespread and highly toxic heavy metal of particular ecotoxicological relevance for aquatic ecosystems. It occurs naturally in the environment but is also an industrial pollutant with extensively researched carcinogenic potentials. Heat shock proteins (HSPs) are chaperones that play an important role in maintaining protein homeostasis under stress conditions. Small heat shock proteins (sHSPs) comprise the most diverse group of the HSPs family. They are expressed both constitutively and by stress-induction. The midge Chironomus riparius is widely used as a test species in aquatic toxicology. In the present study, Reverse Transcription Polymerase Chain Reaction (RT-PCR) was used to evaluate the effects of acute Cd exposure to the expression profile of seven shsp genes (hsp17, hsp21, hsp22, hsp23, hsp24, hsp27, and hsp34) in C. riparius larvae. Results show a specific pattern of response with a rapid response by hsp27, which was downregulated at 2-6 h, while the rest of the shsp genes remained unaltered except for hsp17 at 2 h, which was upregulated. However, at 24 h of exposure are observed high levels of hsp23, hsp24, hsp27, and hsp34 transcription while hsp22 mRNA levels were downregulated and hsp17 and hsp21 remained unaltered. These changes in gene expression suggest a functional diversity between the sHSPs in the cellular response to heavy metal stress. The differential pattern in comparison with heat shock supports a specific profile depending on the stress supporting the use of shsp genes as suitable biomarkers for ecotoxicological studies on aquatic systems.

  8. A First Line of Stress Defense: Small Heat Shock Proteins and their function in protein homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Haslbeck, Martin; Vierling, Elizabeth

    2015-01-01

    Small heat shock proteins (sHsps) are virtually ubiquitous molecular chaperones that can prevent the irreversible aggregation of denaturing proteins. To maintain protein homeostasis, sHsps complex with a variety of nonnative proteins in an ATP-independent manner and, in the context of the stress response, form a first line of defense against protein aggregation. In vertebrates they act to maintain the clarity of the eye lens, and in humans sHsp mutations are linked to myopathies and neuropathies. Although found in all domains of life, sHsps are quite diverse and have evolved independently in metazoans, plants and fungi. sHsp monomers range in size from approximately 12 to 42 kDa and are defined by a conserved β-sandwich α-crystallin domain, flanked by variable N- and C-terminal sequences. Most sHsps form large oligomeric ensembles with a broad distribution of different, sphere- or barrel like oligomers, with the size and structure of the oligomers dictated by features of the N- and C-termini. The activity of sHsps is regulated by mechanisms that change the equilibrium distribution in tertiary features and/or quaternary structure of the sHsp ensembles. Cooperation and/or coassembly between different sHsps in the same cellular compartment adds an underexplored level of complexity to sHsp structure and function. PMID:25681016

  9. A first line of stress defense: small heat shock proteins and their function in protein homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Haslbeck, Martin; Vierling, Elizabeth

    2015-04-10

    Small heat shock proteins (sHsps) are virtually ubiquitous molecular chaperones that can prevent the irreversible aggregation of denaturing proteins. sHsps complex with a variety of non-native proteins in an ATP-independent manner and, in the context of the stress response, form a first line of defense against protein aggregation in order to maintain protein homeostasis. In vertebrates, they act to maintain the clarity of the eye lens, and in humans, sHsp mutations are linked to myopathies and neuropathies. Although found in all domains of life, sHsps are quite diverse and have evolved independently in metazoans, plants and fungi. sHsp monomers range in size from approximately 12 to 42kDa and are defined by a conserved β-sandwich α-crystallin domain, flanked by variable N- and C-terminal sequences. Most sHsps form large oligomeric ensembles with a broad distribution of different, sphere- or barrel-like oligomers, with the size and structure of the oligomers dictated by features of the N- and C-termini. The activity of sHsps is regulated by mechanisms that change the equilibrium distribution in tertiary features and/or quaternary structure of the sHsp ensembles. Cooperation and/or co-assembly between different sHsps in the same cellular compartment add an underexplored level of complexity to sHsp structure and function. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Role of TRP channels in the induction of heat shock proteins (Hsps) by heating skin

    PubMed Central

    Hsu, Wen-Li; Yoshioka, Tohru

    2015-01-01

    Transient receptor potential (TRP) channels in skin are crucial for achieving temperature sensitivity to maintain internal temperature balance and thermal homeostasis, as well as to protect skin cells from environmental stresses such as infrared (IR) or near-infrared (NIR) radiation via heat shock protein (Hsp) production. However, the mechanisms by which IR and NIR activate TRP channels and produce Hsps intracellularly have been independently reported. In this review, we discuss the relationship between TRP channel activation and Hsp production, and introduce the roles of several skin TRP channels in the regulation of HSP production by IR and NIR exposure. PMID:27493511

  11. Functions of heat shock proteins in pathways of the innate and adaptive immune system.

    PubMed

    Binder, Robert Julian

    2014-12-15

    For more than 50 years, heat shock proteins (HSPs) have been studied for their role in protecting cells from elevated temperature and other forms of stress. More recently, several roles have been ascribed to HSPs in the immune system. These include intracellular roles in Ag presentation and expression of innate receptors, as well as extracellular roles in tumor immunosurveillance and autoimmunity. Exogenously administered HSPs can elicit a variety of immune responses that have been used in immunotherapy of cancer, infectious diseases, and autoimmune disease.

  12. Chronic SIV and Morphine treatment increases heat shock protein 5 expression at the synapse

    PubMed Central

    Pendyala, Gurudutt; Periyasamy, Palsamy; Callen, Shannon; Fox, Howard S.; Lisco, Steven J.; Buch, Shilpa J.

    2015-01-01

    The abuse of opiates such as morphine in synergy with HIV infection accelerates neurocognitive impairments and neuropathology in the CNS of HIV infected subjects, collectively referred to as HAND. To identify potential pathogenic markers associated with HIV and morphine in perturbing the synaptic architecture, we performed quantitative mass spectrometry proteomics on purified synaptosomes isolated from the caudate of two groups of rhesus macaques chronically infected with SIV differing by one regimen- morphine treatment. The up regulation of heat shock 70 kDa protein 5 in the SIV+morphine group points to increased cellular stress during SIV/Morphine interaction thus leading to CNS dysfunction. PMID:26037114

  13. Heat Shock Protein translocation induced by membrane fluidization increases tumor-cell sensitivity to chemotherapeutic drugs.

    PubMed

    Dempsey, Nina C; Ireland, H Elyse; Smith, Carly M; Hoyle, Christine F; Williams, John H H

    2010-10-28

    Treatment of chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) remains a challenge due to the frequency of drug resistance amongst patients. Improving the delivery of chemotherapeutic agents while reducing the expression of anti-apoptotic Heat Shock Proteins (HSPs) within the cancer cells may facilitate in overcoming this drug resistance. We demonstrate for the first time that sub-lethal doses of chemotherapeutic agents can be combined with membrane fluidizing treatments to produce a significant increase in drug efficacy and apoptosis in vitro. We show that fluidizers result in a transient decrease in intracellular HSPs, resulting in increased tumor-cell sensitivity and a membrane-associated induction of HSP gene expression.

  14. Chronic SIV and morphine treatment increases heat shock protein 5 expression at the synapse.

    PubMed

    Pendyala, Gurudutt; Periyasamy, Palsamy; Callen, Shannon; Fox, Howard S; Lisco, Steven J; Buch, Shilpa J

    2015-10-01

    The abuse of opiates such as morphine in synergy with HIV infection accelerates neurocognitive impairments and neuropathology in the CNS of HIV-infected subjects, collectively referred to as HAND. To identify potential pathogenic markers associated with HIV and morphine in perturbing the synaptic architecture, we performed quantitative mass spectrometry proteomics on purified synaptosomes isolated from the caudate of two groups of rhesus macaques chronically infected with SIV differing by one regimen-morphine treatment. The upregulation of heat shock 70-kDa protein 5 in the SIV + morphine group points to increased cellular stress during SIV/morphine interaction thus leading to CNS dysfunction.

  15. Major heat shock protein Hsp72 controls oncogene-induced senescence.

    PubMed

    Sherman, Michael

    2010-06-01

    Various heat shock proteins, including Hsp72, are strongly upregulated in cancers, but their significance for tumor emergence and growth is poorly understood. Here we review recent data from several labs to indicate that Hsps, including Hsp72, are critical for growth of transformed but not normal cells. By manipulating expression and activity of Hsp72 and several oncogenes, it was shown that Hsp72 suppresses oncogene-induced senescence, thus allowing proliferation of cancer cells. Importantly, Hsp72 is able to suppress both p53-dependent and p53-independent senescence pathways. We propose that targeting Hsp72 may be a promising approach toward development of novel cancer therapies.

  16. Role of TRP channels in the induction of heat shock proteins (Hsps) by heating skin.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Wen-Li; Yoshioka, Tohru

    2015-01-01

    Transient receptor potential (TRP) channels in skin are crucial for achieving temperature sensitivity to maintain internal temperature balance and thermal homeostasis, as well as to protect skin cells from environmental stresses such as infrared (IR) or near-infrared (NIR) radiation via heat shock protein (Hsp) production. However, the mechanisms by which IR and NIR activate TRP channels and produce Hsps intracellularly have been independently reported. In this review, we discuss the relationship between TRP channel activation and Hsp production, and introduce the roles of several skin TRP channels in the regulation of HSP production by IR and NIR exposure.

  17. Sickle cell vaso-occlusive crisis induces the release of circulating serum heat shock protein-70.

    PubMed

    Adewoye, Adeboye H; Klings, Elizabeth S; Farber, Harrison W; Palaima, Elizabeth; Bausero, Maria A; McMahon, Lillian; Odhiambo, Adam; Surinder, Safaya; Yoder, Mark; Steinberg, Martin H; Asea, Alexzander

    2005-03-01

    Inflammation may play an important role in the pathophysiology of sickle cell disease (SCD), and recent studies have identified the 70-kDa heat shock protein (Hsp70) as an important mediator of inflammatory responses. Here we demonstrate a significant increase in circulating serum Hsp70 level in SCD during vaso-occlusive crisis (VOC) as compared with baseline steady-state levels (P <0.05) and a significant increase in Hsp70 levels in SCD at baseline compared with normal controls (P <0.05). Taken together, these results indicate that circulating serum Hsp70 might be a marker for VOC in SCD.

  18. Sickle Cell Vaso-occlusive Crisis Induces the Release of Circulating Serum Heat Shock Protein-70

    PubMed Central

    Adewoye, Adeboye H.; Klings, Elizabeth S.; Farber, Harrison W.; Palaima, Elizabeth; Bausero, Maria A.; McMahon, Lillian; Odhiambo, Adam; Surinder, Safaya; Yoder, Mark; Steinberg, Martin H.; Asea, Alexzander

    2006-01-01

    Inflammation may play an important role in the pathophysiology of sickle cell disease (SCD), and recent studies have identified the 70-kDa heat shock protein (Hsp70) as an important mediator of inflammatory responses. Here we demonstrate a significant increase in circulating serum Hsp70 level in SCD during vaso-occlusive crisis (VOC) as compared with baseline steady-state levels (P < 0.05) and a significant increase in Hsp70 levels in SCD at baseline compared with normal controls (P < 0.05). Taken together, these results indicate that circulating serum Hsp70 might be a marker for VOC in SCD. PMID:15726596

  19. [Role and mechanism of heat shock protein 70 in airway hypersecretion].

    PubMed

    Zhou, Zhiyu; Zhang, Ting; Zhou, Xiangdong; Li, Qi; Liu, Chunyi

    2015-03-03

    To explore the role and mechanism of heat shock protein 70 (HSP70) in airway hypersecretion. After a stimulation of 8% cigarette smoke extract (CSE), airway cells A549 were treated with HSP70 antibody and c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) specific inhibitor SP600125 respectively. And the cells were divided into 4 groups of blank contrast (serum-free medium), CSE stimulation (8% CSE for 24 h), HSP70 antibody (30-min pre-treatment of HSP70 antibody and culturing in 8% CSE for 24 h) and SP600125 (30-min pre-treatment of SP600125 30 µmol/L and culturing in 8% CSE for 24 h). The relative expression levels of MUC5AC protein in various groups were determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). And the relative transcription level of MUC5AC mRNA was detected by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (PCR) while the synthesized levels of HS70 as well as the phosphorylation levels of JNK and activated protein-1 (mostly c-Jun) were measured by Western blot. As compared with those in blank contrast group (0.26 ± 0.10, 0.28 ± 0.06, 0.30 ± 0.05, 0.30 ± 0.08, 0.36 ± 0.08), HSP70 antibody group (0.30 ± 0.12, 0.29 ± 0.09, 0.34 ± 0.06, 0.47 ± 0.19, 0.39 ± 0.13) and SP600125 group (0.38 ± 0.06, 0.31 ± 0.14, 0.39 ± 0.04, 0.44 ± 0.12, 0.48 ± 0.11), the relative expression levels of MUC5AC protein and mRNA, phosphorylation JNK (p-JNK), c-Jun and p-c-Jun (0.52 ± 0.07, 0.64 ± 0.11, 0.73 ± 0.06, 0.67 ± 0.10, 0.67 ± 0.09) significantly increased in CSE stimulation group (all P < 0.05). And the synthesis levels of HSP70 (0.75 ± 0.09) in CSE stimulation group increased than blank contrast group (0.29 ± 0.03) and HSP70 antibody group (0.40 ± 0.11) (all P < 0.05). HSP70 may enhance the expression of MUC5AC in bronchial epithelial A549 cells via a signaling pathway of JNK/AP-1..

  20. Silver nanoparticles induced heat shock protein 70, oxidative stress and apoptosis in Drosophila melanogaster

    SciTech Connect

    Ahamed, Maqusood; Posgai, Ryan; Gorey, Timothy J.; Nielsen, Mark; Hussain, Saber M.; Rowe, John J.

    2010-02-01

    Due to the intensive commercial application of silver nanoparticles (Ag NPs), risk assessment of this nanoparticle is of great importance. Our previous in vitro study demonstrated that Ag NPs caused DNA damage and apoptosis in mouse embryonic stem cells and fibroblasts. However, toxicity of Ag NPs in vivo is largely lacking. This study was undertaken to examine the toxic effects of well-characterized polysaccharide coated 10 nm Ag NPs on heat shock stress, oxidative stress, DNA damage and apoptosis in Drosophila melanogaster. Third instar larvae of D. melanogaster were fed a diet of standard cornmeal media mixed with Ag NPs at the concentrations of 50 and 100 mug/ml for 24 and 48 h. Ag NPs up-regulated the expression of heat shock protein 70 and induced oxidative stress in D. melanogaster. Malondialdehyde level, an end product of lipid peroxidation was significantly higher while antioxidant glutathione content was significantly lower in Ag NPs exposed organisms. Activities of antioxidant enzyme superoxide dismutase and catalase were also significantly higher in the organisms exposed to Ag NPs. Furthermore, Ag NPs up-regulated the cell cycle checkpoint p53 and cell signaling protein p38 that are involved in the DNA damage repair pathway. Moreover, activities of caspase-3 and caspase-9, markers of apoptosis were significantly higher in Ag NPs exposed organisms. The results indicate that Ag NPs in D. melanogaster induce heat shock stress, oxidative stress, DNA damage and apoptosis. This study suggests that the organism is stressed and thus warrants more careful assessment of Ag NPs using in vivo models to determine if chronic exposure presents developmental and reproductive toxicity.

  1. Heat shock protein expression as guidance for the therapeutic window of retinal laser therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jenny; Huie, Philip; Dalal, Roopa; Lee, Seungjun; Tan, Gavin; Lee, Daeyoung; Lavinksy, Daniel; Palanker, Daniel

    2016-03-01

    Unlike conventional photocoagulation, non-damaging retinal laser therapy (NRT) limits laser-induced heating to stay below the retinal damage threshold and therefore requires careful dosimetry. Without the adverse effects associated with photocoagulation, NRT can be applied to critical areas of the retina and repeatedly to manage chronic disorders. Although the clinical benefits of NRT have been demonstrated, the mechanism of therapeutic effect and width of the therapeutic window below damage threshold are not well understood. Here, we measure activation of heat shock response via laser-induced hyperthermia as one indication of cellular response. A 577 nm laser is used with the Endpoint Management (EpM) user interface, a titration algorithm, to set experimental pulse energies relative to a barely visible titration lesion. Live/dead staining and histology show that the retinal damage threshold in rabbits is at 40% of titration energy on EpM scale. Heat shock protein 70 (HSP70) expression in the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) was detected by whole-mount immunohistochemistry after different levels of laser treatment. We show HSP70 expression in the RPE beginning at 25% of titration energy indicating that there is a window for NRT between 25% and 40% with activation of the heat shock protein expression in response to hyperthermia. HSP70 expression is also seen at the perimeter of damaging lesions, as expected based on a computational model of laser heating. Expression area for each pulse energy setting varied between laser spots due to pigmentation changes, indicating the relatively narrow window of non-damaging activation and highlighting the importance of proper titration.

  2. Heat shock protein 10 (Hsp10) in immune-related diseases: one coin, two sides

    PubMed Central

    Jia, Haibo; Halilou, Amadou I.; Hu, Liang; Cai, Wenqian; Liu, Jing; Huang, Bo

    2011-01-01

    Heat shock protein 10 (Hsp10) in eukaryotes, originally identified as a mitochondrial chaperone, now is also known to be present in cytosol, cell surface, extracellular space and peripheral blood. Functionally besides participating in mitochondrial protein folding in association with Hsp60, Hsp10 appears to be related to pregnancy, cancer and autoimmune inhibition. Hsp10 can be released to peripheral blood at very early time point of pregnancy and given another name called early pregnancy factor (EPF), which seems to play a critical role in developing a pregnant niche. In malignant disorders, Hsp10 is usually abnormally expressed in the cytosol of malignant cells and further released to extracellular space, resulting in tumor-promoting effect from various aspects. Furthermore, distinct from other heat shock protein members, whose soluble form is recognized as danger signal by immune cells and triggers immune responses, Hsp10 after release, however, is designed to be an inhibitory signal by limiting immune response. This review discusses how Hsp10 participates in various physiological and pathological processes from basic protein molecule folding to pregnancy, cancer and autoimmune diseases, and emphasizes how important the location is for the function exertion of a molecule. PMID:21969171

  3. Small heat shock protein message in etiolated Pea seedlings under altered gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Talalaiev, O.

    Plants are subjected to various environmental changes during their life cycle To protect themselves against unfavorable influences plant cells synthesize several classes of small heat shock proteins sHsp ranging in size from 15 to 30 kDa This proteins are able to enhance the refolding of chemically denatured proteins in an ATP-independent manner in other words they can function as molecular chaperones The potential contribution of effects of space flight at the plant cellular and gene regulation level has not been characterized yet The object of our study is sHsp gene expression in etiolated Pisum sativum seedlings exposed to altered gravity and environmental conditions We designed primers to detect message for two inducible forms of the cytosolic small heat shock proteins sHsp 17 7 and sHsp 18 1 Applying the RT- PCR we explore sHsps mRNA in pea seedling cells subjected to two types of altered gravity achieved by centrifugation from 3 to 8g by clinorotation 2 rpm and temperature elevation 42oC Temperature elevation as the positive control significantly increased PsHspl7 7 PsHspl8 1 expression We investigate the expression of actin it was constant and comparable for unstressed controls for all variants Results are under discussion

  4. Not changes in membrane fluidity but proteotoxic stress triggers heat shock protein expression in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    PubMed

    Rütgers, Mark; Muranaka, Ligia Segatto; Schulz-Raffelt, Miriam; Thoms, Sylvia; Schurig, Juliane; Willmund, Felix; Schroda, Michael

    2017-09-06

    A conserved reaction of all organisms exposed to heat stress is an increased expression of heat shock proteins (HSPs). Several studies have proposed that HSP expression in heat-stressed plant cells is triggered by an increased fluidity of the plasma membrane. Among the main lines of evidence in support of this model are (i) the degree of membrane lipid saturation was higher in cells grown at elevated temperatures and correlated with a lower amplitude of HSP expression upon a temperature upshift; (ii) membrane fluidizers induce HSP expression at physiological temperatures; (iii) membrane rigidifier dimethylsulfoxide dampens heat-induced HSP expression. Here we tested whether this holds also for Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. We show that heat-induced HSP expression in cells grown at elevated temperatures was reduced because they already contained elevated levels of cytosolic HSP70A/90A that apparently act as negative regulators of heat shock factor 1. We find that membrane rigidifier dimethylsulfoxide impaired translation under heat stress conditions and that membrane fluidizer benzyl alcohol induced HSP expression, but also caused protein aggregation. These findings support the classical model for the cytosolic unfolded protein response, according to which HSP expression is induced by the accumulation of unfolded proteins. Hence, the membrane fluidity model should be reconsidered. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  5. Heat shock proteins (Hsp70) and water content in the estivating Mediterranean Grunt Snail (Cantareus apertus).

    PubMed

    Reuner, Andy; Brümmer, Franz; Schill, Ralph O

    2008-09-01

    Pulmonate land snails often are able to estivate to survive dry hot seasons were water and food are scarce. The aperture of the shell is closed with an epiphragm, and metabolism is depressed to approximately one fourth of basal metabolism. We investigated a molecular aspect of estivation focussing on the heat shock protein 70 (Hsp70) stress response during estivation in the Mediterranean Grunt Snail Cantareus apertus. Sequences of a new inducible hsp70 and of actin are presented and expression of the hsp70 gene as well as Hsp70 protein content was measured in estivating animals. Both Hsp70 protein and mRNA do not show a significant change from the control, although there is a trend that hsp70 mRNA is less abundant in estivating specimens. After heat shock, the expression of hsp70 increased and a higher Hsp70 protein content was detected. Water relations were also investigated. After a period of 6 months in the dormant state, the snails contained 14% less water than active ones, implying a constricted protection against desiccation, compared to the desert snail Sphincterochila zonata, and a Mediterranean-type water economy.

  6. Heat shock protein 70 gene family in the Glanville fritillary butterfly and their response to thermal stress.

    PubMed

    Luo, Shiqi; Ahola, Virpi; Shu, Chang; Xu, Chongren; Wang, Rongjiang

    2015-02-10

    Temperature variation in the environment is a great challenge to organisms. Induction of heat shock protein 70 (HSP70) is a common genetic mechanism to cope with thermal stress. The Glanville fritillary butterfly (Melitaea cinxia) is a model species in population and evolutionary biology, and its behavior and life history are greatly influenced by ambient temperature. We cloned and sequenced the full coding sequences of seven hsp70 genes from the Glanville fritillary. Of those genes, McHsc70-1 and McHsc70-2 were identified as heat shock cognate 70 (hsc70), of which the latter located in endoplasmic reticulum. We analyzed the expression patterns of different hsp70s under various thermal stresses using quantitative PCR. Heat shock at 40°C for 2h induced high expression of McHsp70-1, McHsp70-2 and McHsc70-2. Only McHsc70-2 had a small increase after cold shock at 0°C for 2h. Acclimation at 35°C for three days before heat shock reduced expression of McHsp70 after heat shock. The maximum mRNA level of McHsp70s was reached in the first 2h after the heat shock. This study uncovers the complexity of the hsp70 system, and provides the valuable information for further temperature-related research in the Glanville fritillary butterfly.

  7. Screening Molecular Chaperones Similar to Small Heat Shock Proteins in Schizosaccharomyces pombe

    PubMed Central

    Han, Jiyoung; Kim, Kanghwa

    2015-01-01

    To screen molecular chaperones similar to small heat shock proteins (sHsps), but without α-crystalline domain, heat-stable proteins from Schizosaccharomyces pombe were analyzed by 2-dimensional electrophoresis and matrix assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry. Sixteen proteins were identified, and four recombinant proteins, including cofilin, NTF2, pyridoxin biosynthesis protein (Snz1) and Wos2 that has an α-crystalline domain, were purified. Among these proteins, only Snz1 showed the anti-aggregation activity against thermal denaturation of citrate synthase. However, pre-heating of NTF2 and Wos2 at 70℃ for 30 min, efficiently prevented thermal aggregation of citrate synthase. These results indicate that Snz1 and NTF2 possess molecular chaperone activity similar to sHsps, even though there is no α-crystalline domain in their sequences. PMID:26539043

  8. A cellular protein that associates with the transforming protein of Rous sarcoma virus is also a heat-shock protein.

    PubMed Central

    Oppermann, H; Levinson, W; Bishop, J M

    1981-01-01

    A single viral protein (pp60src) mediates neoplastic transformation of cells infected with Rous sarcoma virus. Immunoprecipitation of pp60src has revealed two cellular proteins (Mr 50,000 and 89,000) that appear to associate with pp60src in a specific manner. Neither of the cellular proteins has been well characterized, but it is thought that both may participate in the function of pp60src. Treatment of avian cells with unphysiological temperature or certain chemical agents amplifies the production of several proteins in the manner of the "heat shock" response earlier described for Drosophila. We report here that one of these proteins, with a molecular weight of 89,000 is identical to the 89-kilodalton protein found associated with pp60src. The 89-kilodalton protein is a major constituent of both uninfected and infected cells, even in the absence of inducing agents, but only a small fraction of this protein appears to associate with pp60src in cells transformed by Rous sarcoma virus. The complex containing pp60src and the 89-kilodalton protein can be precipitated by an immune reaction involving pp60src alone. The complexed form of the 89-kilodalton protein did not react directly with antibodies but regained its reactivity subsequent to release from the complex. We conclude that the 89-kilodalton protein is bound to pp60src in a relatively stable complex. We suggest that the 89-kilodalton protein may have overlapping roles in viral oncogenesis and the heat shock response, and that evidence on the function of the protein in either setting may illuminate its function in the other. In addition, it may prove profitable to search for other overlaps between the cellular response to heat shock and the neoplastic transformation of cells by pp60src. Images PMID:6262754

  9. Heat shock protein defenses in the neocortex and allocortex of the telencephalon.

    PubMed

    Posimo, Jessica M; Weilnau, Justin N; Gleixner, Amanda M; Broeren, Matthew T; Weiland, Nicole L; Brodsky, Jeffrey L; Wipf, Peter; Leak, Rehana K

    2015-05-01

    The telencephalic allocortex develops protein inclusions before the neocortex in many age-related proteinopathies. One major defense mechanism against proteinopathic stress is the heat shock protein (Hsp) network. We therefore contrasted Hsp defenses in stressed primary neocortical and allocortical cells. Neocortical neurons were more resistant to the proteasome inhibitor MG132 than neurons from 3 allocortical subregions: entorhinal cortex, piriform cortex, and hippocampus. However, allocortical neurons exhibited higher MG132-induced increases in Hsp70 and heat shock cognate 70 (Hsc70). MG132-treated allocortical neurons also exhibited greater levels of protein ubiquitination. Inhibition of Hsp70/Hsc70 activity synergistically exacerbated MG132 toxicity in allocortical neurons more than neocortical neurons, suggesting that the allocortex is more reliant on these Hsp defenses. In contrast, astrocytes harvested from the neocortex or allocortex did not differ in their response to Hsp70/Hsc70 inhibition. Consistent with the idea that chaperones are maximally engaged in allocortical neurons, an increase in Hsp70/Hsc70 activity was protective only in neocortical neurons. Finally, the levels of select Hsps were altered in the neocortex and allocortex in vivo with aging.

  10. Proteome stability, heat hardening, and heat-shock protein expression profiles in Cataglyphis desert ants.

    PubMed

    Willot, Quentin; Gueydan, Cyril; Aron, Serge

    2017-02-23

    In ectotherms, high temperatures impose physical limits, impeding activity. Exposure to high heat levels causes various deleterious and lethal effects, including protein misfolding and denaturation. Thermophilic ectotherms have thus evolved various ways to increase macromolecular stability and cope with elevated body temperatures; these include the high constitutive expression of molecular chaperones. In this work, we investigated the effect of moderate to severe heat shock (37°C-45°C) on survival, heat hardening, protein damage, and the expression of five heat-tolerance related genes (hsc70-4 h1, hsc70-4 h2, hsp83, hsc70-5, and hsf1) in two rather closely related Cataglyphis ants that occur in distinct habitats. Our results show that the highly thermophilic Sahara ant Cataglyphis bombycina constitutively expresses HSC70 at higher levels, but has lower induced expression of heat-tolerance related genes in response to heat shock, as compared to the more mesophilic C. mauritanica found in the Atlas Mountains. As a result, C. bombycina demonstrates increased protein stability when exposed to acute heat stress but is less prone to acquiring induced thermotolerance via heat hardening. These results provide further insight into the evolutionary plasticity of the hsps gene expression system and subsequent physiological adaptations in thermophilous desert insects to adapt to harsh environmental conditions.

  11. Binding of natural and synthetic inhibitors to human heat shock protein 90 and their clinical application.

    PubMed

    Petrikaitė, Vilma; Matulis, Daumantas

    2011-01-01

    This review describes the recent progress in the field of heat shock protein 90 (Hsp90) inhibitor design. Hsp90 is a heat shock protein with a molecular weight of approximately 90 kDa. Hsp90 is considered a good anticancer target because its inhibition leads to inactivation of its numerous client proteins participating in various signaling and other processes involved in cancer progression. Numerous Hsp90 inhibitors-leads currently tested in clinical trials are presented in this review. Furthermore, this review emphasizes the application of biophysical binding assays in the development of Hsp90 inhibitors. The binding of designed lead compounds to various Hsp90 constructs is measured by isothermal titration calorimetry and thermal shift assay. These assays provide a detailed energetic insight of the binding reaction, including the enthalpy, entropy, heat capacity, and the Gibbs free energy. A detailed description of the binding energetics helps to extend our knowledge of structure-activity relationships in the design of more potent inhibitors. The most active compounds are then tested for their absorption, distribution, metabolism, elimination, toxicity, and activity against cancer cell lines.

  12. Heat shock protein gene expression and function in amphibian model systems.

    PubMed

    Heikkila, John J

    2010-05-01

    Heat shock proteins (HSPs) are molecular chaperones that are involved in protein folding and translocation. During heat shock, both constitutive and stress-inducible HSPs bind to and inhibit irreversible aggregation of denatured protein and facilitate their refolding once normal cellular conditions are re-established. Recent interest in HSPs has been propelled by their association with various human diseases. Amphibian model systems, as shown in this review, have had a significant impact on our understanding of hsp gene expression and function. Some amphibian hsp genes are expressed constitutively during oogenesis and embryogenesis, while others are developmentally regulated and enriched in selected tissues in a stress-inducible fashion. For example, while hsp70 genes are heat-inducible after the midblastula stage, hsp30 genes are not inducible until late neurula/early tailbud. This particular phenomenon is likely controlled by chromatin structure. Also, hsp genes are expressed during regeneration, primarily in response to wounding-associated trauma. The availability of amphibian cultured cells has enabled the analysis of hsp gene expression induced by different stresses (e.g. cadmium, arsenite, proteasome inhibitors etc.), HSP intracellular localization, and their involvement in stress resistance. Furthermore, hyperthermia treatment of adult amphibians reveals that certain tissues were more sensitive than others in terms of hsp gene expression. Finally, this review details the evidence available for the role of amphibian small HSPs as molecular chaperones.

  13. Escherichia coli Heat Shock Protein DnaK: Production and Consequences in Terms of Monitoring Cooking

    PubMed Central

    Seyer, Karine; Lessard, Martin; Piette, Gabriel; Lacroix, Monique; Saucier, Linda

    2003-01-01

    Through use of commercially available DnaK proteins and anti-DnaK monoclonal antibodies, a competitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay was developed to quantify this heat shock protein in Escherichia coli ATCC 25922 subjected to various heating regimens. For a given process lethality (F7010 of 1, 3, and 5 min), the intracellular concentration of DnaK in E. coli varied with the heating temperature (50 or 55°C). In fact, the highest DnaK concentrations were found after treatments at the lower temperature (50°C) applied for a longer time. Residual DnaK after heating was found to be necessary for cell recovery, and additional DnaK was produced during the recovery process. Overall, higher intracellular concentrations of DnaK tended to enhance cell resistance to a subsequent lethal stress. Indeed, E. coli cells that had undergone a sublethal heat shock (105 min at 55°C, F7010 = 3 min) accompanied by a 12-h recovery (containing 76,786 ± 25,230 molecules/cell) resisted better than exponentially growing cells (38,500 ± 6,056 molecules/cell) when later heated to 60°C for 50 min (F7010 = 5 min). Results reported here suggest that using stress protein to determine cell adaptation and survival, rather than cell counts alone, may lead to more efficient heat treatment. PMID:12788720

  14. Heat shock protein antagonists in early stage clinical trials for NSCLC.

    PubMed

    Hendriks, Lizza E L; Dingemans, Anne-Marie C

    2017-05-01

    Cancer cells have a higher need of chaperones than normal cells to prevent the toxic effects of intracellular protein misfolding and aggregation. Heat shock proteins (Hsps) belong to these chaperones; they are classified into families according to molecular size. Hsps are upregulated in many cancers and inhibition can inhibit tumor growth by destabilizing proteins necessary for tumor survival. In non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), there are three different Hsp antagonist classes that are in (early) clinical trials: Hsp90, Hsp70 and Hsp27 inhibitors. Areas covered: The rationale to use Hsp inhibitors in NSCLC will be summarized and phase I-III trials will be reviewed. Expert opinion: Several Hsp90 inhibitors have been tested in phase I-III trials, until now none was positive in unselected NSCLC; therefore development of AUY922, ganetespib and retaspimycin was halted. Results seem more promising in molecularly selected patients, especially in ALK-rearranged NSCLC. Hsp27 is overexpressed in squamous NSCLC and is a mechanism of chemotherapy resistance. The Hsp27 inhibitor apatorsen is now tested in squamous NSCLC. No phase II/III data are known for Hsp70 inhibitors. Combination of Hsp inhibitors with heat shock transcription factor 1 inhibitors or focal adhesion kinase inhibitors might be of interest for future trials.

  15. Detection of heat shock protein 70 in choroidal neovascular membranes secondary to age related macular degeneration

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Heat shock proteins are acute phase proteins that are upregulated in inflammation or following thermal stress. We analyzed the presence of the heat shock protein 70 (Hsp 70) in choroidal neovascular (CNV) membranes secondary to AMD after treatment with verteporphin photodynamic therapy (PDT) or transpupillary thermo therapy (TTT) to determine whether treatment correlated with the presence of Hsp70. Results CNV membranes were removed by pars plana vitrectomy (ppV) and subretinal extraction. The membranes were analysed by light microscopy and the presence of Hsp 70 was examined using histochemistry. HeLa Cells served as controls. Of the 14 membranes analysed 11 were Hsp70 positive and 3 negative. In the no pre-treatment group of 8 membranes 6 were Hsp70 positive and 2 negative; in the PTD group all 4 membranes were positive and in the TTT group 1 membrane was positive and 1 membrane was negative for Hsp70. Conclusion Hsp70 is present in the most CNV membranes secondary to AMD. Pre-treatment of the membrane with PTD or TTT does not appear to influence the expression of Hsp70. PMID:21477309

  16. Extracellular Release and Signaling by Heat Shock Protein 27: Role in Modifying Vascular Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Batulan, Zarah; Pulakazhi Venu, Vivek Krishna; Li, Yumei; Koumbadinga, Geremy; Alvarez-Olmedo, Daiana Gisela; Shi, Chunhua; O’Brien, Edward R.

    2016-01-01

    Heat shock protein 27 (HSP27) is traditionally viewed as an intracellular chaperone protein with anti-apoptotic properties. However, recent data indicate that a number of heat shock proteins, including HSP27, are also found in the extracellular space where they may signal via membrane receptors to alter gene transcription and cellular function. Therefore, there is increasing interest in better understanding how HSP27 is released from cells, its levels and composition in the extracellular space, and the cognate cell membrane receptors involved in effecting cell signaling. In this paper, the knowledge to date, as well as some emerging paradigms about the extracellular function of HSP27 is presented. Of particular interest is the role of HSP27 in attenuating atherogenesis by modifying lipid uptake and inflammation in the plaque. Moreover, the abundance of HSP27 in serum is an emerging new biomarker for ischemic events. Finally, HSP27 replacement therapy may represent a novel therapeutic opportunity for chronic inflammatory disorders, such as atherosclerosis. PMID:27507972

  17. Extracellular heat shock protein 70 has novel functional effects on sea urchin eggs and coelomocytes.

    PubMed

    Browne, Carole L; Swan, Justin B; Rankin, Ellen E; Calvert, Hayes; Griffiths, Shylise; Tytell, Michael

    2007-04-01

    Numerous reports document that the 70 kDa heat shock proteins are not only intracellular proteins but are also present in blood and other extracellular compartments. How they affect cell function from the extracellular space remains unclear. Using two well-characterized cell types from the sea urchin, we show that extracellular mixtures of the constitutive and inducible forms of the 70 kDa heat shock proteins (Hsc70 and Hsp70, respectively) have dramatic effects on initiation of cell division in fertilized eggs and on the clotting reaction of hypotonically stressed coelomocytes. In suspensions of fertilized eggs to which Hsc70 or a 2:3 mixture of Hsc and Hsp70 was added, progression to the first mitotic division was accelerated. Evidence is provided that the extracellular Hsc70 passes into the egg cells in an unconventional manner, being distributed through the cytoplasm, and that it may alter the intracellular signaling cascade initiated by sperm penetration. In coelomocytes that were stimulated by hypotonic shock to mimic injury, the spreading reaction of the clotting response was significantly inhibited when either Hsp70 or Hsc70 was in the medium. These results suggest that the presence of Hsc and/or Hsp70 in the extracellular fluid may promote mitosis of dividing cells and suppress the reactivity of immune system cells.

  18. Selective release from cultured mammalian cells of heat-shock (stress) proteins that resemble glia-axon transfer proteins.

    PubMed

    Hightower, L E; Guidon, P T

    1989-02-01

    Cultured rat embryo cells were stimulated to rapidly release a small group of proteins that included several heat-shock proteins (hsp110, hsp71, hscp73) and nonmuscle actin. The extracellular proteins were analyzed by two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Heat-shocked cells released the same set of proteins as control cells with the addition of the stress-inducible hsp110 and hsp71. Release of these proteins was not blocked by either monensin or colchicine, inhibitors of the common secretory pathway. A small amount of the glucose-regulated protein grp78 was externalized by this pathway. The extracellular accumulation of these proteins was inhibited after they were synthesized in the presence of the lysine analogue aminoethyl cysteine. It is likely that the analogue-substituted proteins were misfolded and could not be released from cells, supporting our conclusion that a selective release mechanism is involved. Remarkably, actin and the squid heat-shock proteins homologous to rat hsp71 and hsp110 are also among a select group of proteins transferred from glial cells to the squid giant axon, where they have been implicated in neuronal stress responses (Tytell et al.: Brain Res., 363:161-164, 1986). Based in part on the similarities between these two sets of proteins, we hypothesized that these proteins were released from labile cortical regions of animal cells in response to perturbations of homeostasis in cells as evolutionarily distinct as cultured rat embryo cells and squid glial cells.

  19. Regulation of G protein signaling by the 70kDa heat shock protein.

    PubMed

    Lim, William K; Kanelakis, Kimon C; Neubig, Richard R

    2013-02-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) transduce extracellular signals to the interior of the cell by activating membrane-bound guanine nucleotide-binding regulatory proteins (G proteins). An increasing number of proteins have been reported to bind to and regulate GPCRs. We report a novel regulation of the alpha(2A) adrenergic receptor (α(2A)-R) by the ubiquitous stress-inducible 70kDa heat shock protein, hsp70. Hsp70, but not hsp90, attenuated G protein-dependent high affinity agonist binding to the α(2A)-R in Sf9 membranes. Antagonist binding was unchanged, suggesting that hsp70 uncouples G proteins from the receptor. As hsp70 did not bind G proteins but complexed with the α(2A)-R in intact cells, a direct interaction with the receptor seems likely. In the presence of hsp70, α(2A)-R-catalyzed [(35)S]GTPγS binding was reduced by approximately 70%. In contrast, approximately 50-fold higher concentrations of hsp70 were required to reduce agonist binding to the stress-inducible 5-hydroxytryptamine(1A) receptor (5-HT(1A)-R). In heat-stressed CHO cells, the α(2A)-R was significantly uncoupled from G proteins, coincident with an increased localization of hsp70 at the membrane. The contrasting effect of hsp70 on the α(2A)-R compared to the 5-HT(1A)-R suggests that during stress, upregulation of hsp70 may attenuate signaling from specific GPCRs as part of the stress response to foster survival.

  20. Exploiting the diversity of the heat-shock protein family for primary and secondary tauopathy therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Abisambra, Jose F; Jinwal, Umesh K; Jones, Jeffrey R; Blair, Laura J; Koren, John; Dickey, Chad A

    2011-12-01

    The heat shock protein (Hsp) family is an evolutionarily conserved system that is charged with preventing unfolded or misfolded proteins in the cell from aggregating. In Alzheimer's disease, extracellular accumulation of the amyloid β peptide (Aβ) and intracellular aggregation of the microtubule associated protein tau may result from mechanisms involving chaperone proteins like the Hsps. Due to the ability of Hsps to regulate aberrantly accumulating proteins like Aβ and tau, therapeutic strategies are emerging that target this family of chaperones to modulate their pathobiology. This article focuses on the use of Hsp-based therapeutics for treating primary and secondary tauopathies like Alzheimer's disease. It will particularly focus on the pharmacological targeting of the Hsp70/90 system and the value of manipulating Hsp27 for treating Alzheimer's disease.

  1. Perforin is required for innate and adaptive immunity induced by heat shock protein gp96.

    PubMed

    Strbo, Natasa; Oizumi, Satoshi; Sotosek-Tokmadzic, Vlatka; Podack, Eckhard R

    2003-03-01

    Tumor-secreted gp96-Ig is highly immunogenic and triggers CD8 T cell-mediated tumor rejection. In vivo secreted gp96-Ig and gp96-myc cause NK activation and clonal expansion of specific CD8(+) CTL in wild-type and in Fas-ligand-deficient (gld) mice but not in perforin- (PKO) or IFN-gamma-deficient (GKO) mice. Transfer of perforin-competent NK cells restores the ability of PKO mice to clonally expand CD8 CTL in response to gp96-Ig. The data demonstrate an essential role for perforin-mediated functions in the activation of innate and adaptive immunity by heat shock protein gp96-peptide complexes. Crosspresentation of antigens by heat shock proteins seems to require a perforin-dependent positive feedback loop between NK and DC for both sustained NK activation and clonal CTL expansion. The studies also explain how depressed NK activity in patients with tumors or after viral infections could diminish CTL responses.

  2. Heat shock protein (HSP70) RNA expression differs among rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) clonal lines.

    PubMed

    Heredia-Middleton, Pilar; Brunelli, Joseph; Drew, Robert E; Thorgaard, Gary H

    2008-04-01

    Heat shock protein 70 (HSP70, 70 kDa) is the most commonly expressed protein in response to thermal stress. The extent of its expression is associated with differences in environmental temperatures. We investigated the heat shock response in red blood cells collected from one-year-old rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss). Three different clonal lines of rainbow trout (Arlee, OSU and Whale Rock) were utilized, originating from habitats that likely experienced different thermal profile. The relative expression of HSP70 from blood cells treated at 13 degrees C, 16 degrees C, 18 degrees C, 20 degrees C, 22 degrees C, and 24 degrees C was quantified using real-time PCR. The use of red blood cells allows for the control and replication of HSP70 expression patterns. Relative expression of HSP70 differed significantly among the three clonal lines. The Arlee line had the lowest HSP70 response of the three clonal lines at any temperature; indicating a heritable difference. Maximum expression of HSP70 occurred at 22 degrees C in the OSU line and at 24 degrees C in the Whale Rock line. The discovery of variation in HSP70 expression among the clonal lines indicates that future studies to map the genetic control of HSP70 expression differences are possible.

  3. Small Heat Shock Protein αA-Crystallin Prevents Photoreceptor Degeneration in Experimental Autoimmune Uveitis

    PubMed Central

    Rao, Narsing A.; Saraswathy, Sindhu; Pararajasegaram, Geeta; Bhat, Suraj P.

    2012-01-01

    The small heat shock protein, αA-crystallin null (αA−/−) mice are known to be more prone to retinal degeneration than the wild type mice in Experimental Autoimmune Uveoretinitis (EAU). In this report we demonstrate that intravenous administration of αA preserves retinal architecture and prevents photoreceptor damage in EAU. Interestingly, only αA and not αB-crystallin (αB), a closely related small heat shock protein works, pointing to molecular specificity in the observed retinal protection. The possible involvement of αA in retinal protection through immune modulation is corroborated by adaptive transfer experiments, (employing αA−/− and wild type mice with EAU as donors and Rag2−/− as the recipient mice), which indicate that αA protects against the autoimmune challenge by modulating the systemic B and T cell immunity. We show that αA administration causes marked reduction in Th1 cytokines (TNF-α, IL-12 and IFN-γ), both in the retina and in the spleen; notably, IL-17 was only reduced in the retina suggesting local intervention. Importantly, expression of Toll-like receptors and their associated adaptors is also inhibited suggesting that αA protection, against photoreceptor loss in EAU, is associated with systemic suppression of both the adaptive and innate immune responses. PMID:22479415

  4. A heat-shock protein axis regulates VEGFR2 proteolysis, blood vessel development and repair.

    PubMed

    Bruns, Alexander F; Yuldasheva, Nadira; Latham, Antony M; Bao, Leyuan; Pellet-Many, Caroline; Frankel, Paul; Stephen, Sam L; Howell, Gareth J; Wheatcroft, Stephen B; Kearney, Mark T; Zachary, Ian C; Ponnambalam, Sreenivasan

    2012-01-01

    Vascular endothelial growth factor A (VEGF-A) binds to the VEGFR2 receptor tyrosine kinase, regulating endothelial function, vascular physiology and angiogenesis. However, the mechanism underlying VEGFR2 turnover and degradation in this response is unclear. Here, we tested a role for heat-shock proteins in regulating the presentation of VEGFR2 to a degradative pathway. Pharmacological inhibition of HSP90 stimulated VEGFR2 degradation in primary endothelial cells and blocked VEGF-A-stimulated intracellular signaling via VEGFR2. HSP90 inhibition stimulated the formation of a VEGFR2-HSP70 complex. Clathrin-mediated VEGFR2 endocytosis is required for this HSP-linked degradative pathway for targeting VEGFR2 to the endosome-lysosome system. HSP90 perturbation selectively inhibited VEGF-A-stimulated human endothelial cell migration in vitro. A mouse femoral artery model showed that HSP90 inhibition also blocked blood vessel repair in vivo consistent with decreased endothelial regeneration. Depletion of either HSP70 or HSP90 caused defects in blood vessel formation in a transgenic zebrafish model. We conclude that perturbation of the HSP70-HSP90 heat-shock protein axis stimulates degradation of endothelial VEGFR2 and modulates VEGF-A-stimulated intracellular signaling, endothelial cell migration, blood vessel development and repair.

  5. Size dependent classification of heat shock proteins: a mini-review

    PubMed Central

    Jee, Hyunseok

    2016-01-01

    Molecular chaperones are ubiquitous and abundant within cellular environments, functioning as a defense mechanism against outer environment. The range of molecular chaperones varies from 10 to over 100 kDa. Depending on the size, the specific locations and physiological roles of molecular chaperones vary within the cell. Multifunctionality of heat shock proteins (HSPs) expressed via various cyto-stress including heat shock have been spotlighted as a reliable prognostic target biomarker for therapeutic purpose in neuromuscular disease or cancer related studies. HSP also plays a critical role in the maintenance of proteins and cellular homeostasis in exercise-induced adaptation. Such various functions of HSPs give scientists insights into intracellular protective mechanisms in the living body thus HSPs can be target molecules to know the defense mechanism in cellular environment. Based on experimental results regarding small to large scaled HSPs, this review aims to provide updated important information regarding the modality of responses of intracellular HSPs towards extracellular stimulations. Further, the expressive mechanisms of HSPs data from tremendous in vivo and in vitro studies underlying the enhancement of the functionality of living body will be discussed. PMID:27656620

  6. The heat-shock protein/chaperone network and multiple stress resistance.

    PubMed

    Jacob, Pierre; Hirt, Heribert; Bendahmane, Abdelhafid

    2017-04-01

    Crop yield has been greatly enhanced during the last century. However, most elite cultivars are adapted to temperate climates and are not well suited to more stressful conditions. In the context of climate change, stress resistance is a major concern. To overcome these difficulties, scientists may help breeders by providing genetic markers associated with stress resistance. However, multistress resistance cannot be obtained from the simple addition of single stress resistance traits. In the field, stresses are unpredictable and several may occur at once. Consequently, the use of single stress resistance traits is often inadequate. Although it has been historically linked with the heat stress response, the heat-shock protein (HSP)/chaperone network is a major component of multiple stress responses. Among the HSP/chaperone 'client proteins', many are primary metabolism enzymes and signal transduction components with essential roles for the proper functioning of a cell. HSPs/chaperones are controlled by the action of diverse heat-shock factors, which are recruited under stress conditions. In this review, we give an overview of the regulation of the HSP/chaperone network with a focus on Arabidopsis thaliana. We illustrate the role of HSPs/chaperones in regulating diverse signalling pathways and discuss several basic principles that should be considered for engineering multiple stress resistance in crops through the HSP/chaperone network. © 2016 The Authors. Plant Biotechnology Journal published by Society for Experimental Biology and The Association of Applied Biologists and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Levels of Antibodies against Human Heat Shock Protein (HSP) 60 in Patients with Glaucoma in Poland

    PubMed Central

    Grabska-Liberek, Iwona; Skonieczna, Katarzyna; Olesińska, Marzena; Terelak-Borys, Barbara; Kocięcki, Jarosandlstrokaw; Sikora, Mariusz; Jamrozy-Witkowska, Agnieszka; Tesla, Piotr; Czarnocka, Barbara

    2015-01-01

    Background Although elevated intraocular pressure is a major risk factor for the development of glaucoma, there is increasing evidence that the immune system may be involved in the development of normal-tension glaucoma (NTG). The aim of this study was to determine if NTG is associated with elevated levels of antibodies against human heat shock protein (HSP) 60. Material/Methods The study was conducted in 139 subjects (35 subjects with NTG [Group 1], 34 subjects with primary open-angle glaucoma/POAG/[Group 2], 24 subjects with autoimmune rheumatic diseases [Group 3], and 36 healthy controls [Group 4]). All subjects had complete ophthalmologic examination (visual acuity, slit-lamp examination, tonometry, gonioscopy; visual-field examination, and optical coherence tomography/OCT/of the optic nerve head and the macula). Blood samples were collected for the measurements of serum levels of antibodies against human HSP60. Results The subjects with rheumatic diseases had the highest median serum level of antibodies against HSP60 – 20.49 ng/mL. The values in the subjects with NTG, POAG, and in controls were 18.79 ng/mL, 18.61 ng/mL and 17.61 ng/mL, respectively (p=0.96). Conclusions This study does not confirm the hypothesis that normal-tension glaucoma is associated with elevated blood levels of antibodies against human heat shock protein (HSP) 60. PMID:25786333

  8. Emerging Role of Nitric Oxide and Heat Shock Proteins in Insulin Resistance.

    PubMed

    Molina, Marisa Nile; Ferder, León; Manucha, Walter

    2016-01-01

    Insulin resistance (IR) is present in pathologies such as diabetes, obesity, metabolic syndrome, impaired glucose tolerance, hypertension, inflammation, cardiac disease, and dyslipidemias. Population studies show that IR is multifactorial and has genetic components, such as defects in the insulin-signaling pathway (as serine phosphorylation on insulin substrate or decreased activation of signaling molecules) and RAS/MAPK-dependent pathways. IR is connected to mitochondrial dysfunction, overproduction of oxidants, accumulation of fat, and an over-activation of the renin-angiotensin system linked to the NADPH oxidase activity. In addition, nitric oxide (NO), synthesized by nitric oxide synthases (endothelial and inducible), is also associated with IR when both impaired release and reduced bioavailability of all which lead to inflammation and hypertension. However, increased NO may promote vasculoprotection. Moreover, reduced NO release induces heat shock protein 70 kDa (HSP70) expression in IR and diabetes, mediating beneficial effects against oxidative stress injury, inflammation and apoptosis. HSP70 may be used as biomarker of the chronicity of diabetes. Hsp72 (inducible protein) is linked to vascular complications with a high-fat diet by blocking inflammation signaling (cytoprotective and anti-cytotoxicity intracellular role). Elucidating the IR signaling pathways and the roles of NO and HSPs is relevant to the application of new treatments, such as heat shock and thermal therapy, nitrosylated drugs, chemical chaperones or exercise training.

  9. Heat shock proteins and heat therapy for type 2 diabetes: pros and cons.

    PubMed

    Krause, Mauricio; Ludwig, Mirna Stela; Heck, Thiago Gomes; Takahashi, Hilton Kenji

    2015-07-01

    Heat therapy, such as sauna and hot tub, has become an increasingly regular therapeutical practice around the world since several studies have shown benefits of heat therapy in metabolic and cardiovascular diseases. The use of heat therapy in people with type 2 diabetes mellitus revealed a striking reduction of 1% unit in the glycated hemoglobin, suggesting this therapy for the treatment of diabetes. Herein, we shall discuss the use of heat therapy and the mechanisms involved, and suggest a provisional guide for the use of heat therapy in obesity and diabetes. Human studies indicate that heat therapy reduces fasting glycemia, glycated hemoglobin, body weight, and adiposity. Animal studies have indicated that nitric oxide and the increase in heat shock protein 70 expression is involved in the improvements induced by heat therapy on insulin sensitivity, adiposity, inflammation, and vasomotricity. Heat therapy is a promising and inexpensive tool for the treatment of obesity and diabetes. We proposed that transient increments in nitric oxide and heat shock protein 70 levels may explain the benefits of heat therapy. We suggest that heat therapy (sauna: 80-100°C; hot tub: at 40°C) for 15 min, three times a week, for 3 months, is a safe method to test its efficiency.

  10. Small Heat Shock Proteins Potentiate Amyloid Dissolution by Protein Disaggregases from Yeast and Humans

    PubMed Central

    Duennwald, Martin L.; Echeverria, AnaLisa; Shorter, James

    2012-01-01

    How small heat shock proteins (sHsps) might empower proteostasis networks to control beneficial prions or disassemble pathological amyloid is unknown. Here, we establish that yeast sHsps, Hsp26 and Hsp42, inhibit prionogenesis by the [PSI +] prion protein, Sup35, via distinct and synergistic mechanisms. Hsp42 prevents conformational rearrangements within molten oligomers that enable de novo prionogenesis and collaborates with Hsp70 to attenuate self-templating. By contrast, Hsp26 inhibits self-templating upon binding assembled prions. sHsp binding destabilizes Sup35 prions and promotes their disaggregation by Hsp104, Hsp70, and Hsp40. In yeast, Hsp26 or Hsp42 overexpression prevents [PSI+] induction, cures [PSI+], and potentiates [PSI+]-curing by Hsp104 overexpression. In vitro, sHsps enhance Hsp104-catalyzed disaggregation of pathological amyloid forms of α-synuclein and polyglutamine. Unexpectedly, in the absence of Hsp104, sHsps promote an unprecedented, gradual depolymerization of Sup35 prions by Hsp110, Hsp70, and Hsp40. This unanticipated amyloid-depolymerase activity is conserved from yeast to humans, which lack Hsp104 orthologues. A human sHsp, HspB5, stimulates depolymerization of α-synuclein amyloid by human Hsp110, Hsp70, and Hsp40. Thus, we elucidate a heretofore-unrecognized human amyloid-depolymerase system that could have applications in various neurodegenerative disorders. PMID:22723742

  11. Suppression of Expression of Heat Shock Protein 70 by Gefitinib and Its Contribution to Pulmonary Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Namba, Takushi; Tanaka, Ken-Ichiro; Hoshino, Tatsuya; Azuma, Arata; Mizushima, Tohru

    2011-01-01

    Drug-induced interstitial lung disease (ILD), particularly pulmonary fibrosis, is of serious clinical concern. Gefitinib, a tyrosine kinase inhibitor of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), is beneficial as a drug for treating non-small cell lung cancer; however, this drug induces ILD and the molecular mechanisms underpinning this condition remain unclear. We recently reported that expression of heat shock protein 70 (HSP70) protects against bleomycin-induced pulmonary fibrosis, an animal model of pulmonary fibrosis. In this study, we have examined the effects of drugs known to induce ILD clinically on the expression of HSP70 in cultured lung epithelial cells and have found that gefitinib has a suppressive effect. Results of a luciferase reporter assay, pulse-labelling analysis of protein and experiments using an inhibitor of translation or transcription suggest that gefitinib suppresses the expression of HSP70 at the level of translation. Furthermore, the results of experiments with siRNA for Dicer1, an enzyme responsible for synthesis of microRNA, and real-time RT-PCR analysis suggest that some microRNAs are involved in the gefitinib-induced translational inhibition of HSP70. Mutations in the EGFR affect the concentration of gefitinib required for suppressing the expression of HSP70. These results suggest that gefitinib suppresses the translation of HSP70 through an EGFR- and microRNA-mediated mechanism. In vivo, while oral administration of gefitinib suppressed the pulmonary expression of HSP70 and exacerbated bleomycin-induced pulmonary fibrosis in wild-type mice, these effects were not as distinct in transgenic mice expressing HSP70. Furthermore, oral co-administration of geranylgeranylacetone (GGA), an inducer of HSP70, suppressed gefitinib-induced exacerbation of bleomycin-induced pulmonary fibrosis. Taken together, these findings suggest that gefitinib-induced exacerbation of bleomycin-induced pulmonary fibrosis is mediated by suppression of

  12. Heavy metals chromium and neodymium reduced phosphorylation level of heat shock protein 27 in human keratinocytes.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qihao; Zhang, Lei; Xiao, Xue; Su, Zhijian; Zou, Ping; Hu, Hao; Huang, Yadong; He, Qing-Yu

    2010-06-01

    Heavy metals may exert their acute and chronic effects on the human skin through stress signals. In the present study, 2DE-based proteomics was used to analyze the protein expression in human keratinocytes exposed to heavy metals, chromium and neodymium, and 10 proteins with altered expression were identified. Among these proteins, small heat shock protein 27 (HSP27) was up-regulated significantly and the up-regulation was validated by Western blot and immunofluorescence. In addition, the mRNA expression level of HSP27 markedly increased as detected by quantitative PCR. More interestingly, the ratio of phosphorylated HSP27 and total HSP27 significantly decreased in keratinocytes treated with the heavy metals. These findings suggested that heavy metals reduced the phosphorylation level of HSP27, and that the ratio of p-HSP27 and HSP27 may represent a potential marker or additional endpoint for the hazard assessment of skin irritation caused by chemical products.

  13. Modulation of heat-shock protein 27 (Hsp27) anti-apoptotic activity by methylglyoxal modification.

    PubMed

    Sakamoto, Hiroshi; Mashima, Tetsuo; Yamamoto, Kazuo; Tsuruo, Takashi

    2002-11-29

    Methylglyoxal (MG) is one of the side-products in glycolysis, and it reacts with proteins under physiological conditions. Here, we identified heat-shock protein 27 (Hsp27) as a major MG-modified protein in cells. MG modification of Hsp27 selectively occurs at Arg-188 to form argpyrimidine, and mutation in the residue represses the formation of a large oligomer. This modification process is essential to its repressing activity for cytochrome c-mediated caspase activation. Inhibition of MG modification of Hsp27 causes sensitization of the cells to anti-tumor drug-induced apoptosis. Thus, MG is a novel modulator of cell survival by directly incorporating with the specific protein residue.

  14. Concomitant changes in high temperature tolerance and heat-shock proteins in desert succulents.

    PubMed

    Kee, S C; Nobel, P S

    1986-02-01

    Raising the day/night air temperatures from 30 degrees C/20 degrees C to 50 degrees C/40 degrees C increases the high temperature tolerated by Agave deserti, Carnegiea gigantea, and Ferocactus acanthodes by 6 degrees C to 8 degrees C; the increase is about half completed in 3 days and fully completed in 10 days. A 25 to 27 kilodalton protein concomitantly accumulates for all three desert succulents upon transfer to 50 degrees C/40 degrees C, while accumulation of other heat "heat-shock" proteins is species specific. Some of the induced proteins are more abundant at 3 days, while others (including the 25-27 kilodalton protein) remain after completion of high temperature acclimation.

  15. Expression of small heat shock proteins from pea seedlings under gravity altered conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Talalaev, Alexandr S.

    2005-08-01

    A goal of our study was to evaluate the stress gene expression in Pisum sativum seedlings exposed to altered gravity and temperature elevation. We investigate message for the two inducible forms of the cytosolic small heat shock proteins (sHsp), sHsp 17.7 and sHsp 18.1. Both proteins are able to enhance the refolding of chemically denatured proteins in an ATP- independent manner, in other words they can function as molecular chaperones. We studied sHsps expression in pea seedlings cells by Western blotting. Temperature elevation, as the positive control, significantly increased PsHsp 17.7 and PsHsp 18.1 expression. Expression of the housekeeping protein, actin was constant and comparable to unstressed controls for all treatments. We concluded that gravitational perturbations incurred by clinorotation did not change sHsp genes expression.

  16. Targeting Allosteric Control Mechanisms in Heat Shock Protein 70 (Hsp70).

    PubMed

    Li, Xiaokai; Shao, Hao; Taylor, Isabelle R; Gestwicki, Jason E

    2016-01-01

    Heat shock protein 70 (Hsp70) is a molecular chaperone that plays critical roles in protein homeostasis. Hsp70's chaperone activity is coordinated by intra-molecular interactions between its two domains, as well as inter-molecular interactions between Hsp70 and its co-chaperones. Each of these contacts represents a potential opportunity for the development of chemical inhibitors. To illustrate this concept, we review three classes of recently identified molecules that bind distinct pockets on Hsp70. Although all three compounds share the ability to interrupt core biochemical functions of Hsp70, they stabilize different conformers. Accordingly, each compound appears to interrupt a specific subset of inter- and intra-molecular interactions. Thus, an accurate definition of an Hsp70 inhibitor may require a particularly detailed understanding of the molecule's binding site and its effects on protein-protein interactions.

  17. Up-regulation of inducible heat shock protein-70 expression in multiple sclerosis patients.

    PubMed

    Mansilla, María José; Comabella, Manuel; Río, Jordi; Castilló, Joaquín; Castillo, Mireia; Martin, Roland; Montalban, Xavier; Espejo, Carmen

    2014-03-01

    Inducible heat shock protein (HSP)70 (HSP70-1A and HSP70-1B proteins) is a chaperone responsible for assisting proper protein folding. Following stress conditions, HSP70 is highly up-regulated to mediate cytoprotective functions. In addition, HSP70 is able to trigger innate and adaptive immune responses that promote the immune recognition of antigens and to act as a cytokine when it is released. The data in the literature are controversial with regard to expression studies in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs). In the present study, we aimed to examine if alterations of HSP70-1A/B expression are involved in the autoimmune pathogenesis of multiple sclerosis (MS). We determined both mRNA and protein expression in PBMCs of MS patients and healthy donors (HDs). We found a baseline increased expression of the HSPA1A gene in PBMCs from MS patients compared with HDs. Gene expression findings were associated with an increased protein expression of HSP70-1A/B in T lymphocytes (CD4+ and CD8+) and monocytes from MS patients under basal conditions that may reflect the immunological activation occurring in MS patients. We also provided evidence that heat shock (HS) stimulus induced HSP70-1A/B protein expression in HDs and MS patients, and that HS-induced HSP70-1A/B protein expression in monocytes correlated with the number of T2 lesions at baseline in MS patients. However, after lipopolysaccharide inflammatory stimulus, monocytes from MS patients failed to induce HSP70-1A/B protein expression. Our data hint at altered immune responses in MS and may indicate either a state of chronic stress or increased vulnerability to physiological immune responses in MS patients.

  18. Heat shock protein 70 down-regulates the production of toll-like receptor-induced pro-inflammatory cytokines by a heat shock factor-1/constitutive heat shock element-binding factor-dependent mechanism.

    PubMed

    Ferat-Osorio, Eduardo; Sánchez-Anaya, Aldair; Gutiérrez-Mendoza, Mireille; Boscó-Gárate, Ilka; Wong-Baeza, Isabel; Pastelin-Palacios, Rodolfo; Pedraza-Alva, Gustavo; Bonifaz, Laura C; Cortés-Reynosa, Pedro; Pérez-Salazar, Eduardo; Arriaga-Pizano, Lourdes; López-Macías, Constantino; Rosenstein, Yvonne; Isibasi, Armando

    2014-01-01

    Heat shock protein 70 (Hsp70) is an intracellular chaperone protein with regulatory and cytoprotective functions. Hsp70 can also be found in the extracellular milieu, as a result of active secretion or passive release from damaged cells. The role of extracellular Hsp70 is not fully understood. Some studies report that it activates monocytes, macrophages and dendritic cells through innate immune receptors (such as Toll-like receptors, TLRs), while others report that Hsp70 is a negative regulator of the inflammatory response. In order to address this apparent inconsistency, in this study we evaluated the response of human monocytes to a highly purified recombinant Hsp70. Human peripheral blood monocytes were stimulated with Hsp70, alone or in combination with TLR agonists. Cytokines were quantified in culture supernatants, their mRNAs were measured by RT-PCR, and the binding of transcription factors was evaluated by electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA). Kruskal-Wallis test or one-way or two-way ANOVA were used to analyze the data. The addition of Hsp70 to TLR-activated monocytes down-regulated TNF-α as well as IL-6 levels. This effect was independent of a physical interaction between Hsp70 and TLR agonists; instead it resulted of changes at the TNF-α gene expression level. The decrease in TNF-α expression correlated with the binding of HSF-1 (heat shock transcription factor 1, a transcription factor activated in response to Hsp70) and CHBF (constitutive HSE-binding factor) to the TNF-α gene promoter. Extracellular Hsp70 negatively regulates the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines of monocytes exposed to TLR agonists and contributes to dampen the inflammatory response.

  19. Heat shock protein 70 down-regulates the production of toll-like receptor-induced pro-inflammatory cytokines by a heat shock factor-1/constitutive heat shock element-binding factor-dependent mechanism

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Heat shock protein 70 (Hsp70) is an intracellular chaperone protein with regulatory and cytoprotective functions. Hsp70 can also be found in the extracellular milieu, as a result of active secretion or passive release from damaged cells. The role of extracellular Hsp70 is not fully understood. Some studies report that it activates monocytes, macrophages and dendritic cells through innate immune receptors (such as Toll-like receptors, TLRs), while others report that Hsp70 is a negative regulator of the inflammatory response. In order to address this apparent inconsistency, in this study we evaluated the response of human monocytes to a highly purified recombinant Hsp70. Methods Human peripheral blood monocytes were stimulated with Hsp70, alone or in combination with TLR agonists. Cytokines were quantified in culture supernatants, their mRNAs were measured by RT-PCR, and the binding of transcription factors was evaluated by electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA). Kruskal-Wallis test or one-way or two-way ANOVA were used to analyze the data. Results The addition of Hsp70 to TLR-activated monocytes down-regulated TNF-α as well as IL-6 levels. This effect was independent of a physical interaction between Hsp70 and TLR agonists; instead it resulted of changes at the TNF-α gene expression level. The decrease in TNF-α expression correlated with the binding of HSF-1 (heat shock transcription factor 1, a transcription factor activated in response to Hsp70) and CHBF (constitutive HSE-binding factor) to the TNF-α gene promoter. Conclusion Extracellular Hsp70 negatively regulates the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines of monocytes exposed to TLR agonists and contributes to dampen the inflammatory response. PMID:25053922

  20. A novel protein quality control mechanism contributes to heat shock resistance of worldwide-distributed Pseudomonas aeruginosa clone C strains.

    PubMed

    Lee, Changhan; Wigren, Edvard; Trček, Janja; Peters, Verena; Kim, Jihong; Hasni, Muhammad Sharif; Nimtz, Manfred; Lindqvist, Ylva; Park, Chankyu; Curth, Ute; Lünsdorf, Heinrich; Römling, Ute

    2015-11-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a highly successful nosocomial pathogen capable of causing a wide variety of infections with clone C strains most prevalent worldwide. In this study, we initially characterize a molecular mechanism of survival unique to clone C strains. We identified a P. aeruginosa clone C-specific genomic island (PACGI-1) that contains the highly expressed small heat shock protein sHsp20c, the founding member of a novel subclass of class B bacterial small heat shock proteins. sHsp20c and adjacent gene products are involved in resistance against heat shock. Heat stable sHsp20c is unconventionally expressed in stationary phase in a wide temperature range from 20 to 42°C. Purified sHsp20c has characteristic features of small heat shock protein class B as it is monodisperse, forms sphere-like 24-meric oligomers and exhibits significant chaperone activity. As the P. aeruginosa clone C population is significantly more heat shock resistant than genetically unrelated P. aeruginosa strains without sHsp20c, the horizontally acquired shsp20c operon might contribute to the survival of worldwide-distributed clone C strains. © 2015 Society for Applied Microbiology and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Differential expression patterns among heat-shock protein genes and thermal responses in the whitefly Bemisia tabaci (MEAM 1).

    PubMed

    Díaz, Fernando; Orobio, Rony F; Chavarriaga, Paul; Toro-Perea, Nelson

    2015-08-01

    There is convincing evidence that heat-shock proteins (HSP) are upregulated by stress conditions in insects; however, the relative contribution of each HSP gene to the heat-shock response remains unclear. Here we considered the whitefly Bemisia tabaci (MEAM 1), a phloem feeder and invasive species whose molecular stress response is an important mechanism for overcoming heat stress. We assessed the expression of the hsp23, 40, 70 and 90 genes at the mRNA level when submitted to heat shocks of 40 and 44°C/1h (control at 25°C). For this, we evaluated a set of available and suitable reference genes in order to perform data normalization using the real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) technique, and then confirmed the production of HSP70 protein based on Western blot. Results were compared with the hardening capacity of B. tabaci, measured by fitness components as a response to heat shocks, using 40°C as the induction temperature. Three of the four genes (hsp23, 70 and 90) were upregulated by heat stress at mRNA, showing differential expression patterns. Hsp70 expression was confirmed at the protein level. Hardening significantly increased fitness following heat stress, suggesting that HSPs may contribute to hardening capacity in B. tabaci. Potential role of each gene in the heat-shock response for whiteflies is discussed. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Detection of anti-Babesia gibsoni heat shock protein 70 antibody and anti-canine heat shock protein 70 antibody in sera from Babesia gibsoni-infected dogs.

    PubMed

    Yamasaki, Masahiro; Ishida, Mikiko; Nakamura, Kensuke; Sasaki, Noboru; Murakami, Masahiro; Kumara, Wickramasekara Rajapakshage Bandula; Tamura, Yu; Lim, Sue Yee; Ohta, Hiroshi; Takiguchi, Mitsuyoshi

    2011-08-25

    Antibodies that recognized either Babesia gibsoni or canine red blood cell (RBC) 70-kilodalton (kDa) protein were detected in serum from acutely and chronically B. gibsoni-infected. In those sera, antibodies that reacted with recombinant B. gibsoni and canine heat shock protein 70 (rBgHsp70 and rcHsp70) were detected; therefore, B. gibsoni and canine RBC 70-kDa proteins seemed to be BgHsp70 and cHsp70, respectively. In infected dogs, the amounts of these antibodies increased after infection. Interestingly, polyclonal antibody raised against rBgHsp70 in two rabbits reacted not only with rBgHsp70 but also with rcHsp70 and native cHsp70 from canine RBCs. Because BgHsp70 showed high homology with cHsp70 (70.8%), anti-rBgHsp70 antibody might cross-react with cHsp70. Additionally, the localizations of both BgHsp70 and cHsp70 were observed by indirect fluorescence assay. As a result, cHsp70 was not found on the membrane surface of erythrocytes, suggesting that erythrocytes would not be targets of anti-cHsp70 antibody. Meanwhile, only exoerythrocytic parasites were stained by anti-rBgHsp70 antibody. This result showed that BgHsp70 would be expressed on the surface of parasites during the exoerythrocytic stage. These results indicated that BgHsp70 was a highly immunogenic protein in canine B. gibsoni infection, and that exoerythrocytic parasites might be targets of anti-BgHsp70 antibody. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Small heat-shock proteins protect from heat-stroke-associated neurodegeneration.

    PubMed

    Kourtis, Nikos; Nikoletopoulou, Vassiliki; Tavernarakis, Nektarios

    2012-10-11

    Heat stroke is a life-threatening condition, characterized by catastrophic collapse of thermoregulation and extreme hyperthermia. In recent years, intensification of heat waves has caused a surge of heat-stroke fatalities. The mechanisms underlying heat-related pathology are poorly understood. Here we show that heat stroke triggers pervasive necrotic cell death and neurodegeneration in Caenorhabditis elegans. Preconditioning of animals at a mildly elevated temperature strongly protects from heat-induced necrosis. The heat-shock transcription factor HSF-1 and the small heat-shock protein HSP-16.1 mediate cytoprotection by preconditioning. HSP-16.1 localizes to the Golgi, where it functions with the Ca(2+)- and Mn(2+)-transporting ATPase PMR-1 to maintain Ca(2+) homeostasis under heat stroke. Preconditioning also suppresses cell death inflicted by diverse insults, and protects mammalian neurons from heat cytotoxicity. These findings reveal an evolutionarily conserved mechanism that defends against diverse necrotic stimuli, and may be relevant to heat stroke and other pathological conditions involving necrosis in humans.

  4. Small heat-shock protein Hsp12 contributes to yeast tolerance to freezing stress.

    PubMed

    Pacheco, A; Pereira, C; Almeida, M J; Sousa, M J

    2009-06-01

    The HSP12 gene encodes one of the two major small heat-shock proteins of Saccharomyces cerevisiae and is induced under different conditions, such as low and high temperatures, osmotic or oxidative stress and high sugar or ethanol concentrations. However, few studies could demonstrate any correlation between HSP12 deletion or overexpression and a phenotype of sensitivity/resistance, making it difficult to attribute a role for Hsp12p under several of these stress conditions. We investigated the possible role of Hsp12p in yeast freezing tolerance. Contrary to what would be expected, the hsp12 null mutant when subjected to prolonged storage at -20 degrees C showed an increased resistance to freezing when compared with the isogenic wild-type strain. Because the mutant strain displayed a higher intracellular trehalose concentration than the wild-type, which could mask the effect of manipulating HSP12, we overexpressed the HSP12 gene in a trehalose-6-phosphate synthase (TPS1) null mutant. The tps1Delta strain overexpressing HSP12 showed an increase in resistance to freezing storage, indicating that Hsp12p plays a role in freezing tolerance in a way that seems to be interchangeable with trehalose. In addition, we show that overexpression of HSP12 in this tps1Delta strain also increased resistance to heat shock and that absence of HSP12 compromises the ability of yeast cells to accumulate high levels of trehalose in response to a mild heat stress.

  5. Purinergic Receptor Antagonists Inhibit Odorant-Induced Heat Shock Protein 25 Induction in Mouse Olfactory Epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Hegg, Colleen C.; Lucero, Mary T.

    2010-01-01

    Heat shock proteins (HSPs) accumulate in cells exposed to a variety of physiological and environmental factors, such as heat shock, oxidative stress, toxicants, and odorants. Ischemic, stressed, and injured cells release ATP in large amounts. Our hypothesis is that noxious stimulation (in this case, strong odorant) evokes the release of ATP in the olfactory epithelium (OE). Extracellular ATP, a signal of cellular stress, induces the expression of HSPs via purinergic receptors. In the present study, in vivo odorant exposure (heptanal or r-carvone) led to a selective induction of HSP25 in glia-like sustentacular cells in the Swiss Webster mouse OE, as previously shown in rats (Carr et al., 2001). Furthermore, in vitro and in vivo administration of purinergic receptor antagonists suramin and pyridoxalphosphate-6-azophenyl-2′,4′-disulfonic acid (PPADS) blocked the expression of HSP25 immunoreactivity in sustentacular cells. ATP released by acutely injured cells could act as an early signal of cell and tissue damage, causing HSP expression and initiating a stress signaling cascade to protect against further damage. Sustentacular cells have a high capacity to detoxify xenobiotics and thereby protect the olfactory epithelium from airborne pollutants. Thus, the robust, rapid induction of HSPs in sustentacular cells may help maintain the integrity of the OE during exposure to toxicants. PMID:16206165

  6. Inhibition of heat shock protein response enhances PS-341-mediated glioma cell death.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yaohua; Zheng, Tianhu; Zhao, Shiguang; Liu, Huailei; Han, Dayong; Zhen, Yunbo; Xu, Dongxiao; Wang, Yu; Yang, Hongyu; Zhang, Guang; Wang, Chunlei; Wu, Jianing; Ye, Yuanzhu

    2012-07-01

    Previous study indicated that PS-341 induces cell death via JNK pathway in vitro in glioma. However, suppressing proteasome complex by PS-341 may induce expression of heat shock proteins (HSPs), which confer potential protection against cellular stress. In this study, we explored whether induction of HSPs could impair PS-341-induced cell death and whether inhibition of HSPs could enhance cell damage induced by PS-341 in glioma cells. HSP expression in glioma cells was modulated by HSP inhibitor, sublethal heat, or knockdown of heat shock factor1 (HSF1), then PS-341-induced cell damage was examined by different methods. Similar experiments were also performed in HSF1+/+ and HSF1-/- cells. HSP70 expression and HSF1 nuclear localization were compared between glioma and normal brain tissues. HSP level was upregulated mediated by HSF1 when glioma cells were treated with PS-341. PS-341-mediated cell damage could be significantly augmented by HSP inhibition. Furthermore, HSP70 expression and HSF1 nuclear localization were much more abundant in gliomas than in normal brain tissues. Our results demonstrated that HSP70 impaired cell death induced by PS-341 in glioma cells. Administration of PS-341 in combination with either HSP70 inhibitor or HSF1 knockdown may act as a new approach to treatment of glioma.

  7. Over-expression of mitochondrial heat shock protein 70 suppresses programmed cell death in rice.

    PubMed

    Qi, Yaocheng; Wang, Hongjuan; Zou, Yu; Liu, Cheng; Liu, Yanqi; Wang, Ying; Zhang, Wei

    2011-01-03

    In this study, we identified and functionally characterized the mitochondrial heat shock protein 70 (mtHsp70). Over-expression of mtHsp70 suppressed heat- and H(2)O(2)-induced programmed cell death (PCD) in rice protoplasts, as reflected by higher cell viability, decreased DNA laddering and chromatin condensation. Mitochondrial membrane potential (Δψ(m)) after heat shock was destroyed gradually in protoplasts, but mtHsp70 over-expression showed higher Δψ(m) relative to the vector control cells, and partially inhibited cytochrome c release from mitochondria to cytosol. Heat treatment also significantly increased reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation, a phenomenon not observed in protoplasts over-expressing mtHsp70. Together, these results suggest that mtHsp70 may suppress PCD in rice protoplasts by maintaining mitochondrial Δψ(m) and inhibiting the amplification of ROS. Copyright © 2010 Federation of European Biochemical Societies. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. The 75-kilodalton protein of Chlamydia trachomatis: a member of the heat shock protein 70 family?

    PubMed Central

    Danilition, S L; Maclean, I W; Peeling, R; Winston, S; Brunham, R C

    1990-01-01

    The gene encoding a 75-kilodalton (kDa) protein of Chlamydia trachomatis was cloned, expressed, and sequenced. Genomic libraries from C. trachomatis serovar D DNA were constructed in vectors pUC18 and lambda gt11 and were screened with a panel of monoclonal antibodies against C. trachomatis antigens. The only recombinants identified were those that reacted with antibody UM-13, which has specificity for a genus-specific epitope on the 75-kDa protein. The gene was localized to a 2.9-kilobase DNA fragment and sequenced. The gene consists of a long open reading frame of 1,956 nucleotides, which translates into 652 amino acids totalling 70,558 daltons in mass. Putative promoter elements and a ribosome binding site were identified within 5'-flanking sequences, and a typical rho-independent terminator was identified within 3'-flanking sequences. Screening of the GenBank nucleic acid sequence data bank revealed extensive similarity between the chlamydial 75-kDa gene and the heat shock protein 70 (hsp70) family or proteins. In particular, 71 and 69% amino acid sequence similarities were identified with hsp70 of Escherichia coli and Bacillus megaterium, respectively. Polyclonal antibodies were produced to the recombinant antigen in rabbits and detected epitopes on elementary bodies in enzyme-linked immunosorbent and indirect microimmunofluorescence assays. Antibodies reacted with an antigen of identical molecular mass in L2 and C serovars in an immunoblot assay and neutralized these serovars in cell culture. The 75-kDa protein appears to be a chlamydial homolog of hsp70, is immunoaccessible on native elementary bodies, and is a target for neutralization. Images PMID:2294048

  9. CHIP Knockdown Reduced Heat Shock Response and Protein Quality Control Capacity in Lens Epithelial Cells.

    PubMed

    Zhang, W; Liu, Z; Bao, X; Qin, Y; Taylor, A; Shang, F; Wu, M

    2015-01-01

    Protein quality control (PQC) systems, including molecular chaperones and ubiquitin-proteasome pathway (UPP), plays an important role in maintaining intracellular protein homeostasis. Carboxyl terminus of Hsc70- interacting protein (CHIP) links the chaperone and UPPs, thus contributing to the repair or removal of damaged proteins. Over-expression of CHIP had previously been used to protect cells from environmental stress. In order to gain a more physiologic mechanism of the advantage conferred by CHIP, we induced a CHIP knockdown and monitored the ability of cells to cope with environmental stress. To knockdown CHIP, the human lens epithelial cell line HLE B3 was transfected with lentiviral particles that encode a CHIP short hairpin RNA (shRNA) or negative control lentiviral particles. Stable CHIP-knock down cells (KD) and negative control cells (NC) were selected with puromycin. After exposure to heat shock stress, there was no change observed in the expression of Hsp90. In contrast, Hsp70 levels increased significantly in NC cells but less so in KD cells. Hsp27 levels also increased after heat shock, but only in NC cells. Protein ubiquitination was reduced when CHIP was knocked down. CHIP knockdown reduced the ability to clear aggregation proteins. When same levels of aggregation-prone RFP-mutant crystallin fusion protein, RFP/V76D-γD, was expressed, there was ~9- fold more aggregates in KD cells as compared to that observed in NC cells. Furthermore, KD cells were more sensitive to toxicity of amino acid analog canavanine as compared to NC cells. Together, these data indicate that CHIP is required for PQC and that CHIP knockdown diminished cellular PQC capacity in lens cells.

  10. Small Heat Shock Protein Hsp27 Is Required for Proper Heart Tube Formation

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Daniel D.; Christine, Kathleen S.; Showell, Christopher; Conlon, Frank L.

    2009-01-01

    Summary The small heat shock protein Hsp27 has been shown to be involved in a diverse array of cellular processes, including cellular stress response, protein chaperone activity, regulation of cellular glutathione levels, apoptotic signaling, and regulation of actin polymerization and stability. Furthermore, mutation within Hsp27 has been associated with the human congenital neuropathy Charcot-Marie Tooth (CMT) disease. Hsp27 is known to be expressed in developing embryonic tissues; however, little has been done to determine the endogenous requirement for Hsp27 in developing embryos. In this study, we show that depletion of XHSP27 protein results in a failure of cardiac progenitor fusion resulting in cardia bifida. Furthermore, we demonstrate a concomitant disorganization of actin filament organization and defects in myofibril assembly. Moreover, these defects are not associated with alterations in specification or differentiation. We have thus demonstrated a critical requirement for XHSP27 in developing cardiac and skeletal muscle tissues. PMID:17987658

  11. Heat-shock protein dysregulation is associated with functional and pathological TDP-43 aggregation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Hsiang-Yu; Hou, Shin-Chen; Way, Tzong-Der; Wong, Chi-Huey; Wang, I.-Fan

    2013-11-01

    Conformational disorders are involved in various neurodegenerative diseases. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are the major contributors to neurodegenerative disease; however, ROS that affect the structural changes in misfolded disease proteins have yet to be well characterized. Here we demonstrate that the intrinsic propensity of TDP-43 to aggregate drives the assembly of TDP-43-positive stress granules and soluble toxic TDP-43 oligomers in response to a ROS insult via a disulfide crosslinking-independent mechanism. Notably, ROS-induced TDP-43 protein assembly correlates with the dynamics of certain TDP-43-associated chaperones. The heat-shock protein (HSP)-90 inhibitor 17-AAG prevents ROS-induced TDP-43 aggregation, alters the type of TDP-43 multimers and reduces the severity of pathological TDP-43 inclusions. In summary, our study suggests that a common mechanism could be involved in the pathogenesis of conformational diseases that result from HSP dysregulation.

  12. Developmentally and stress-induced small heat shock proteins in cork oak somatic embryos.

    PubMed

    Puigderrajols, Pere; Jofré, Anna; Mir, Gisela; Pla, Maria; Verdaguer, Dolors; Huguet, Gemma; Molinas, Marisa

    2002-06-01

    The timing and tissue localization of small heat shock proteins (sHSPs) during cork oak somatic embryo development was investigated under normal growing culture conditions and in response to stress. Western blot analyses using polyclonal antibodies raised against cork oak recombinant HSP17 showed a transient accumulation of class I sHSPs during somatic embryo maturation and germination. Moreover, the amount of protein increased at all stages of embryo development in response to exogenous stress. The developmentally accumulated proteins localized to early differentiating, but not the highly dividing, regions of the root and shoot apical meristems. By contrast, these highly dividing regions were strongly immunostained after heat stress. Findings support the hypothesis of a distinct control for developmentally and stress-induced accumulation of class I sHSPs. The possible role of sHSPs is discussed in relation to their tissue specific localization.

  13. Thermally induced structural changes of intrinsically disordered small heat shock protein Hsp22.

    PubMed

    Kazakov, Alexey S; Markov, Denis I; Gusev, Nikolai B; Levitsky, Dmitrii I

    2009-12-01

    We applied different methods (differential scanning calorimetry, circular dichroism, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, and intrinsic fluorescence) to investigate the thermal-induced changes in the structure of small heat shock protein Hsp22. It has been shown that this protein undergoes thermal-induced unfolding that occurs within a very broad temperature range (from 27 degrees C to 80 degrees C and above), and this is accompanied by complete disappearance of alpha-helices, significant decrease in beta-sheets content, and by pronounced changes in the intrinsic fluorescence. The results confirm predictions that Hsp22 belongs to the family of intrinsically disordered proteins (IDP) with certain parts of its molecule (presumably, in the alpha-crystallin domain) retaining folded structure and undergoing reversible thermal unfolding. The results are also discussed in terms of downhill folding scenario.

  14. Small heat shock protein Hsp27 is required for proper heart tube formation.

    PubMed

    Brown, Daniel D; Christine, Kathleen S; Showell, Christopher; Conlon, Frank L

    2007-11-01

    The small heat shock protein Hsp27 has been shown to be involved in a diverse array of cellular processes, including cellular stress response, protein chaperone activity, regulation of cellular glutathione levels, apoptotic signaling, and regulation of actin polymerization and stability. Furthermore, mutation within Hsp27 has been associated with the human congenital neuropathy Charcot-Marie Tooth (CMT) disease. Hsp27 is known to be expressed in developing embryonic tissues; however, little has been done to determine the endogenous requirement for Hsp27 in developing embryos. In this study, we show that depletion of XHSP27 protein results in a failure of cardiac progenitor fusion resulting in cardia bifida. Furthermore, we demonstrate a concomitant disorganization of actin filament organization and defects in myofibril assembly. Moreover, these defects are not associated with alterations in specification or differentiation. We have thus demonstrated a critical requirement for XHSP27 in developing cardiac and skeletal muscle tissues. (c) 2007 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  15. Heat shock protein 90 genes of two species of poultry Eimeria: expression and evolutionary analysis.

    PubMed

    Miska, K B; Fetterer, R H; Min, W; Lillehoj, H S

    2005-04-01

    Heat shock protein 90 (Hsp90) is 1 of the most abundant and evolutionarily conserved proteins. In most species, Hsp90 is essential for proper cell function. In this study, we present the molecular analysis of Hsp90 from Eimeria species, the causative agents of avian coccidiosis. The full-length Eimeria acervulina Hsp90 complementary DNA was isolated from intestinal intraepithelial lymphocytes of Eimeria-infected chickens. From evolutionary analysis and sequence identity, it is likely that Eimeria Hsp90 sequences described thus far encode the cytosolic versions of the protein. Although at the nucleotide and amino acid levels Eimeria tenella and E. acervulina Hsp90 are highly similar, their expression profiles differ considerably. Although E. tenella transcripts were detected in all developmental stages tested, E. acervulina transcripts were not found in oocysts undergoing sporulation or in fully sporulated oocysts, suggesting that messenger RNA expression may be regulated quite differently between Eimeria species.

  16. The 70 kDa heat shock protein suppresses matrix metalloproteinases in astrocytes.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jong Eun; Kim, Yeun Jung; Kim, Jong Youl; Lee, Won Taek; Yenari, Midori A; Giffard, Rona G

    2004-03-01

    The 70 kDa heat shock protein (Hsp70) is synthesized in response to a variety of stresses, including ischemia, and is thought to act as a molecular chaperone to prevent protein denaturation and facilitate protein folding. Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), a family of serine proteases, are also upregulated by ischemia and are thought to promote cell death and tissue injury. We examined the influence of Hsp70 on expression and activity of MMPs. Astrocyte cultures were prepared from neonatal mice and transfected with retroviral vectors containing hsp70 or lacZ or mock infected, then exposed to oxygen-glucose deprivation followed by reperfusion. Zymograms and Western blots showed that Hsp70 over-expression suppressed MMP-2 and MMP-9. These findings suggest that Hsp70 may protect by regulating MMPs.

  17. Heat shock protein 70-dependent protective effect of polaprezinc on acetylsalicylic acid-induced apoptosis of rat intestinal epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Qin, Ying; Naito, Yuji; Handa, Osamu; Hayashi, Natsuko; Kuki, Aiko; Mizushima, Katsura; Omatsu, Tatsushi; Tanimura, Yuko; Morita, Mayuko; Adachi, Satoko; Fukui, Akifumi; Hirata, Ikuhiro; Kishimoto, Etsuko; Nishikawa, Taichiro; Uchiyama, Kazuhiko; Ishikawa, Takeshi; Takagi, Tomohisa; Yagi, Nobuaki; Kokura, Satoshi; Yoshikawa, Toshikazu

    2011-11-01

    Protection of the small intestine from mucosal injury induced by nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs including acetylsalicylic acid is a critical issue in the field of gastroenterology. Polaprezinc an anti-ulcer drug, consisting of zinc and L-carnosine, provides gastric mucosal protection against various irritants. In this study, we investigated the protective effect of polaprezinc on acetylsalicylic acid-induced apoptosis of the RIE1 rat intestinal epithelial cell line. Confluent rat intestinal epithelial cells were incubated with 70 µM polaprezinc for 24 h, and then stimulated with or without 15 mM acetylsalicylic acid for a further 15 h. Subsequent cellular viability was quantified by fluorometric assay based on cell lysis and staining. Acetylsalicylic acid-induced cell death was also qualified by fluorescent microscopy of Hoechst33342 and propidium iodide. Heat shock proteins 70 protein expression after adding polaprezinc or acetylsalicylic acid was assessed by western blotting. To investigate the role of Heat shock protein 70, Heat shock protein 70-specific small interfering RNA was applied. Cell viability was quantified by fluorometric assay based on cell lysis and staining and apoptosis was analyzed by fluorescence-activated cell sorting. We found that acetylsalicylic acid significantly induced apoptosis of rat intestinal epithelial cells in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Polaprezinc significantly suppressed acetylsalicylic acid-induced apoptosis of rat intestinal epithelial cells at its late phase. At the same time, polaprezinc increased Heat shock protein 70 expressions of rat intestinal epithelial cells in a time-dependent manner. However, in Heat shock protein 70-silenced rat intestinal epithelial cells, polaprezinc could not suppress acetylsalicylic acid -induced apoptosis at its late phase. We conclude that polaprezinc-increased Heat shock protein 70 expression might be an important mechanism by which polaprezinc suppresses acetylsalicylic

  18. Heat shock proteins HSP70 and MRJ cooperatively regulate cell adhesion and migration through urokinase receptor.

    PubMed

    Lin, Yuli; Peng, Nana; Zhuang, Hongqin; Zhang, Di; Wang, Yao; Hua, Zi-Chun

    2014-08-30

    The urokinase-type plasminogen activator receptor (uPAR) is an important regulator of ECM proteolysis, cell-ECM interactions and cell signaling. uPAR and heat shock proteins HSP70 and MRJ (DNAJB6) have been implicated in tumor growth and metastasis. We have reported recently that MRJ (DNAJB6, a heat shock protein) can interact with uPAR and enhance cell adhesion. Here, we identified another heat shock protein HSP70 as a novel uPAR-interacting protein. We performed co-immunoprecipitation in human embryonic kidney (HEK) 293 and colon cancer HCT116 cells as well as immunofluorence assays in HEK293 cells stably transfected with uPAR to investigate the association of suPAR with HSP70/MRJ. To understand the biological functions of the triple complex of suPAR/HSP70/MRJ, we determined whether HSP70 and/or MRJ regulated uPAR-mediated cell invasion, migration, adhesion to vitronectin and MAPK pathway in two pair of human tumor cells (uPAR negative HEK293 cells vs HEK293 cells stably transfected with uPAR and HCT116 cells stably transfected with antisense-uPAR vs HCT116 mock cells transfected with vector only) using transwell assay, wound healing assay, quantitative RT-PCR analyzing mmp2 and mmp9 transcription levels, cell adhesion assay and Western blotting assay. HSP70 and MRJ formed a triple complex with uPAR and over-expression of MRJ enhanced the interaction between HSP70 and uPAR, while knockdown of MRJ decreased soluble uPAR in HCT116 cells (P < 0.05) and reduced the formation of the triple complex, suggesting that MRJ may act as an uPAR-specific adaptor protein to link uPAR to HSP70. Further experiments showed that knockdown of HSP70 and/or MRJ by siRNA inhibited uPAR-mediated cell adhesion to vitronectin as well as suppressed cell invasion and migration. Knockdown of HSP70 and/or MRJ inhibited expression of invasion related genes mmp2 and mmp9. Finally, HSP70 and/or MRJ up-regulated phosphorylation levels of ERK1/2 and FAK suggesting MAPK pathway was involved

  19. Heat Shock Protein 90 Has Roles in Intracellular Calcium Homeostasis, Protein Tyrosine Phosphorylation Regulation, and Progesterone-Responsive Sperm Function in Human Sperm

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Aijun; Jiang, Youfang; Xie, Haifeng; Shi, Qixian; Zhang, Songying; Ni, Ya

    2014-01-01

    Heat shock protein 90 plays critical roles in client protein maturation, signal transduction, protein folding and degradation, and morphological evolution; however, its function in human sperm is not fully understood. Therefore, our objective in this study was to elucidate the mechanism by which heat shock protein 90 exerts its effects on human sperm function. By performing indirect immunofluorescence staining, we found that heat shock protein 90 was localized primarily in the neck, midpiece, and tail regions of human sperm, and that its expression increased with increasing incubation time under capacitation conditions. Geldanamycin, a specific inhibitor of heat shock protein 90, was shown to inhibit this increase in heat shock protein 90 expression in western blotting analyses. Using a multifunctional microplate reader to examine Fluo-3 AM-loaded sperm, we observed for the first time that inhibition of heat shock protein 90 by using geldanamycin significantly decreased intracellular calcium concentrations during capacitation. Moreover, western blot analysis showed that geldanamycin enhanced tyrosine phosphorylation of several proteins, including heat shock protein 90, in a dose-dependent manner. The effects of geldanamycin on human sperm function in the absence or presence of progesterone was evaluated by performing chlortetracycline staining and by using a computer-assisted sperm analyzer. We found that geldanamycin alone did not affect sperm capacitation, hyperactivation, and motility, but did so in the presence of progesterone. Taken together, these data suggest that heat shock protein 90, which increases in expression in human sperm during capacitation, has roles in intracellular calcium homeostasis, protein tyrosine phosphorylation regulation, and progesterone-stimulated sperm function. In this study, we provide new insights into the roles of heat shock protein 90 in sperm function. PMID:25541943

  20. Mycobacterium tuberculosis heat shock proteins use diverse Toll-like receptor pathways to activate pro-inflammatory signals.

    PubMed

    Bulut, Yonca; Michelsen, Kathrin S; Hayrapetian, Linda; Naiki, Yoshikazu; Spallek, Ralf; Singh, Mahavir; Arditi, Moshe

    2005-06-03

    Although the Toll-like receptors used by Mycobacterium tuberculosis membrane and secreted factors are known, the pathways activated by M. tuberculosis heat shock proteins are not. An efficient immune response against the intracellular pathogen M. tuberculosis is critically dependent on rapid detection of the invading pathogen by the innate immune system and coordinated activation of the adaptive immune response. Macrophage phagocytosis of M. tuberculosis is accompanied by activation of the transcription factor NF-kappaB and secretion of inflammatory mediators that play an important role in granuloma formation and immune protection during M. tuberculosis infection. The interaction between M. tuberculosis and the various Toll-like receptors is complex, and it appears that distinct mycobacterial components may interact with different members of the Toll-like receptor family. Here we show that recombinant, purified, mycobacterial heat shock proteins 65 and 70 induce NF-kappaB activity in a dose-dependent manner in human endothelial cells. Furthermore, we show that whereas mycobacterial heat shock protein 65 signals exclusively through Toll-like receptor 4, heat shock protein 70 also signals through Toll-like receptor 2. Mycobacterial heat shock protein 65-induced NF-kappaB activation was MyD88-, TIRAP-, TRIF-, and TRAM-dependent and required the presence of MD-2. A better understanding of the recognition of mycobacterial heat shock proteins and their role in the host immune response to the pathogen may open the way to a better understanding of the immunological processes induced by this important human pathogen and the host-pathogen interactions and may help in the rational design of more effective vaccines or vaccine adjuvants.

  1. Endogenous epitope tagging of heat shock protein 70 isoform Hsc70 using CRISPR/Cas9.

    PubMed

    Nitika; Truman, Andrew W

    2017-09-24

    Heat shock protein 70 (Hsp70) is an evolutionarily well-conserved molecular chaperone involved in several cellular processes such as folding of proteins, modulating protein-protein interactions, and transport of proteins across the membrane. Binding partners of Hsp70 (known as "clients") are identified on an individual basis as researchers discover their particular protein of interest binds to Hsp70. A full complement of Hsp70 interactors under multiple stress conditions remains to be determined. A promising approach to characterizing the Hsp70 "interactome" is the use of protein epitope tagging and then affinity purification followed by mass spectrometry (AP-MS/MS). AP-MS analysis is a widely used method to decipher protein-protein interaction networks and identifying protein functions. Conventionally, the proteins are overexpressed ectopically which interferes with protein complex stoichiometry, skewing AP-MS/MS data. In an attempt to solve this issue, we used CRISPR/Cas9-mediated gene editing to integrate a tandem-affinity (TAP) epitope tag into the genomic locus of HSC70. This system offers several benefits over existing expression systems including native expression, no requirement for selection, and homogeneity between cells. This cell line, freely available to chaperone researchers, will aid in small and large-scale protein interaction studies as well as the study of biochemical activities and structure-function relationships of the Hsc70 protein.

  2. Crystal structure of a small heat-shock protein from Xylella fastidiosa reveals a distinct high-order structure.

    PubMed

    Fonseca, Emanuella Maria Barreto; Scorsato, Valéria; Dos Santos, Marcelo Leite; Júnior, Atilio Tomazini; Tada, Susely Ferraz Siqueira; Dos Santos, Clelton Aparecido; de Toledo, Marcelo Augusto Szymanski; de Souza, Anete Pereira; Polikarpov, Igor; Aparicio, Ricardo

    2017-04-01

    Citrus variegated chlorosis is a disease that attacks economically important citrus plantations and is caused by the plant-pathogenic bacterium Xylella fastidiosa. In this work, the structure of a small heat-shock protein from X. fastidiosa (XfsHSP17.9) is reported. The high-order structures of small heat-shock proteins from other organisms are arranged in the forms of double-disc, hollow-sphere or spherical assemblies. Unexpectedly, the structure reported here reveals a high-order architecture forming a nearly square cavity.

  3. Heat shock protein 60 regulation of the mitochondrial permeability transition pore in tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Jagadish C; Siegelin, Markus D; Dohi, Takehiko; Altieri, Dario C

    2010-11-15

    Mitochondrial apoptosis plays a critical role in tumor maintenance and dictates the response to therapy in vivo; however, the regulators of this process are still largely elusive. Here, we show that the molecular chaperone heat shock protein 60 (Hsp60) directly associates with cyclophilin D (CypD), a component of the mitochondrial permeability transition pore. This interaction occurs in a multichaperone complex comprising Hsp60, Hsp90, and tumor necrosis factor receptor-associated protein-1, selectively assembled in tumor but not in normal mitochondria. Genetic targeting of Hsp60 by siRNA triggers CypD-dependent mitochondrial permeability transition, caspase-dependent apoptosis, and suppression of intracranial glioblastoma growth in vivo. Therefore, Hsp60 is a novel regulator of mitochondrial permeability transition, contributing to a cytoprotective chaperone network that antagonizes CypD-dependent cell death in tumors. Copyright © 2010 AACR.

  4. Balloon angioplasty induces heat shock protein 70 in human blood vessels.

    PubMed

    Kirby, L B; Mondy, J S; Brophy, C M

    1999-09-01

    Balloon angioplasty produces a mechanically induced injury to the blood vessel wall. Heat shock protein 70 (HSP70) is a molecular chaperone whose expression can be induced by chemical or thermal stress. Thus, we hypothesized that the mechanical injury associated with balloon angioplasty would lead to increases in the expression of HSP70 in vascular smooth muscle. Segments of popliteal and trifurcation vessels from above-the-knee amputations were subject to transluminal balloon angioplasty, excised, and placed in organ cultures. Neighboring vessel that was not subjected to balloon angioplasty served as controls. Some vessels were treated with sodium arsenite (positive control, known to induce HSP70 expression). The vessels were homogenized and the proteins were separated by gel electrophoresis and transferred to Immobilon. Western blots with an antibody specific for the inducible form of HSP70 were analyzed by densitometry. Our results showed that HSP70 expression can be induced by the mechanical injury associated with balloon angioplasty in human atherosclerotic vessels.

  5. Specific Genetic Immunotherapy Induced by Recombinant Vaccine Alpha-Fetoprotein-Heat Shock Protein 70 Complex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xiaoping; Lin, Huanping; Wang, Qiaoxia

    Purposes: To construct a recombinant vaccine alpha-fetoprotein (AFP)-heat shock protein (HSP70) complex, and study its ability to induce specific CTL response and its protective effect against AFP-producing tumor. Material/Methods: A recombinant vaccine was constructed by conjugating mouse alpha-fetoprotein to heat shock protein 70. By way of intracutaneous injection, mice were primed and boosted with recombinant vaccine mAFP/HSP70, whereas single mAFP or HSP70 injection as controls. The ELISPOT and ELISA were used to measure the frequency of cells producing the cytokine IFN-γ in splenocytes and the level of anti-AFP antibody of serum from immunized mice respectively. In vivo tumor challenge were carried out to assess the immune effect of the recombinant vaccine. Results: By recombinant mAFP/HSP70 vaccine immunization, the results of ELISPOT and ELISA showed that the number of splenic cells producing IFN-γ and the level of anti-AFP antibody of serum were significantly higher in mAFP/HSP70 group than those in mAFP and HSP70 groups (108.50±11.70 IFN-γ spots/106 cells vs 41.60±10.40 IFN-γ spots/106 cells, 7.32±3.14 IFN-γ spots/106 cells, P<0.01; 156.32±10.42 μg/mL vs 66.52±7.35 μg/mL, 5.73±2.89 μg/mL, P<0.01). The tumor volume in mAFP/HSP70 group was significantly smaller than that in mAFP and HSP70 groups (42.44±7.14 mm3 vs 392.23±12.46 mm3, 838.63±13.84 mm3, P<0.01). Conclusions: The study further confirmed the function of heat shock protein 70's immune adjuvant. Sequential immunization with recombinant mAFP/HSP70 vaccine could generate effective antitumor immunity on AFP-producing tumor. The recombined mAFP/HSP70 vaccine may be suitable for serving as an immunotherapy for hepatocellular carcinoma.

  6. Chaperone activity of human small heat shock protein-GST fusion proteins.

    PubMed

    Arbach, Hannah; Butler, Caley; McMenimen, Kathryn A

    2017-07-01

    Small heat shock proteins (sHsps) are a ubiquitous part of the machinery that maintains cellular protein homeostasis by acting as molecular chaperones. sHsps bind to and prevent the aggregation of partially folded substrate proteins in an ATP-independent manner. sHsps are dynamic, forming an ensemble of structures from dimers to large oligomers through concentration-dependent equilibrium dissociation. Based on structural studies and mutagenesis experiments, it is proposed that the dimer is the smallest active chaperone unit, while larger oligomers may act as storage depots for sHsps or play additional roles in chaperone function. The complexity and dynamic nature of their structural organization has made elucidation of their chaperone function challenging. HspB1 and HspB5 are two canonical human sHsps that vary in sequence and are expressed in a wide variety of tissues. In order to determine the role of the dimer in chaperone activity, glutathione-S-transferase (GST) was genetically linked as a fusion protein to the N-terminus regions of both HspB1 and HspB5 (also known as Hsp27 and αB-crystallin, respectively) proteins in order to constrain oligomer formation of HspB1 and HspB5, by using GST, since it readily forms a dimeric structure. We monitored the chaperone activity of these fusion proteins, which suggest they primarily form dimers and monomers and function as active molecular chaperones. Furthermore, the two different fusion proteins exhibit different chaperone activity for two model substrate proteins, citrate synthase (CS) and malate dehydrogenase (MDH). GST-HspB1 prevents more aggregation of MDH compared to GST-HspB5 and wild type HspB1. However, when CS is the substrate, both GST-HspB1 and GST-HspB5 are equally effective chaperones. Furthermore, wild type proteins do not display equal activity toward the substrates, suggesting that each sHsp exhibits different substrate specificity. Thus, substrate specificity, as described here for full-length GST

  7. The L-type cyclin CYL-1 and the heat-shock-factor HSF-1 are required for heat-shock-induced protein expression in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Hajdu-Cronin, Yvonne M; Chen, Wen J; Sternberg, Paul W

    2004-12-01

    In a screen for suppressors of activated GOA-1 (Galpha(o)) under the control of the hsp-16.2 heat-shock promoter, we identified three genetic loci that affected heat-shock-induced GOA-1 expression. The cyl-1 mutants are essentially wild type in appearance, while hsf-1 and sup-45 mutants have egg-laying defects. The hsf-1 mutation also causes a temperature-sensitive developmental arrest, and hsf-1 mutants have decreased life span. Western analysis indicated that mutations in all three loci suppressed the activated GOA-1 transgene by decreasing its expression. Heat-shock-induced expression of hsp-16.2 mRNA was reduced in cyl-1 mutants and virtually eliminated in hsf-1 and sup-45 mutants, as compared to wild-type expression. The mutations could also suppress other transgenes under heat-shock control. cyl-1 and sup-45, but not hsf-1, mutations suppressed a defect caused by a transgene not under heat-shock control, suggesting a role in general transcription or a post-transcriptional aspect of gene expression. hsf-1 encodes the C. elegans homolog of the human heat-shock factor HSF1, and cyl-1 encodes a cyclin most similar to cyclin L. We believe HSF-1 acts in heat-shock-inducible transcription and CYL-1 acts more generally in gene expression.

  8. Heat Shock Proteins in Brain: Role of Hsp70, Hsp 27 and HO-1 (Hsp32) and Their Therapeutic Potential

    PubMed Central

    Sharp, Frank R; Zhan, Xinhua; Liu, DaZhi

    2013-01-01

    Heat shock proteins are induced by heat shock via HSF proteins binding to heat shock elements in their promoters. Hsp70 is massively induced in response to misfolded proteins following cerebral ischemia in all cell types, but is induced mainly in neurons in the ischemic penumbra. Over expression of Hsp70 via transgenes and viruses or systemic administration of Hsp70 fusion proteins that allow it to cross the blood brain barrier protect brain against ischemia in most reported studies. Hsp27 can exist as unphosphorylated large oligomers that prevent misfolded protein aggregates and improve cell survival. P-Hsp27 small oligomers bind specific protein targets to improve survival. In brain Protein Kinase D phosphorylates Hsp27 following ischemia which then binds ASK1 to prevent MKK4/7, JNK, Jun induced apoptosis and decrease infarct volumes following focal cerebral ischemia. Heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) metabolizes heme to carbon monoxide, ferrous ion and biliverdin. CO activates cGMP to promote vasodilation, and biliverdin is converted to bilirubin which can serve as an anti-oxidant both of which may contribute to the reported protective role of HO-1 in cerebral ischemia and subarachnoid hemorrhage. However, ferrous ion can react with hydrogen peroxide to produce pro-oxidant hydroxyl radicals which may explain the harmful role of HO-1 in intracerebral hemorrhage. Heat shock proteins as a class have great potential as treatments for cerebrovascular disease and have yet to be tested in the clinic. PMID:24323422

  9. Transcript analysis and expression profiling of three heat shock protein 70 genes in the ectoparasitoid Habrobracon hebetor (Hymenoptera: Braconidae)

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Heat shock proteins (HSPs) are known as chaperones that help with folding of other proteins when cells are under environmental stresses. The upregulation of HSPs is essential for cold survival during insect diapause. The ectoparasitoid Habrobracon hebetor, a potential biological control agent, can e...

  10. Effects of Heat Shock Protein-70 Gene and Forage System on Milk Yield and Composition of Beef Cattle

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Genomic DNA from 117 Angus, Brahman, and reciprocal-cross cows was used to determine the influence of heat shock protein 70 haplotype and forage type [endophyte-infected tall fescue (Neotyphodium coenophialum; E+) or common bermudagrass (Cynododactylon; BG)] on milk yield and composition (protein, f...

  11. INDUCIBLE HEAT SHOCK PROTEIN (HSP70-1) PROTECTS MCF-7 CELLS FROM THE CYTOTOXIC AND GENOTOXIC EFFECTS OF ARSENITE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Heat shock proteins (HSPs) belong to the highly conserved family of stress proteins and are induced following exposure to arsenic. Elevated HSPs protect against cellular damage from heat but it is unclear wether HSP induction alters the damaging effects of environmental chemical ...

  12. Repression of hsp70 heat shock gene transcription by the suppressor of hairy-wing protein of Drosophila melanogaster

    SciTech Connect

    Holdridge, C.; Dorsett, D. )

    1991-04-01

    The suppressor of hairy-wing [su(Hw)] locus of Drosophila melanogaster encodes a zinc finger protein that binds a repeated motif in the gypsy retroposon. Mutations of su(Hw) suppress the phenotypes associated with mutations caused by gypsy insertions. To examine the mechanisms by which su(Hw) alters gene expression, a fragment of gypsy containing multiple su(Hw) protein-binding sites was inserted into various locations in the well-characterized Drosophila hsp70 heat shock gene promoter. The authors found no evidence for activation of basal hsp70 transcription by su(Hw) protein in cultured Drosophila cells but observed that it can repress heat shock-induced transcription. Repression occurred only when su(Hw) protein-binding sites were positioned between binding sites for proteins required for heat shock transcription. They propose that su(Hw) protein interferes nonspecifically with protein-protein interactions required for heat shock transcription, perhaps sterically, or by altering the ability of DNA to bend or twist.

  13. ELEVATED LEVELS OF INDUCIBLE HEAT SHOCK PROTEIN (HSP70-1) PROTECT MCF-7 CELLS FROM ARSENITE TOXICITY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Heat shock proteins (HSPs) belong to the highly conserved family of stress proteins and are induced following exposure to arsenic. Elevated HSPs protect against cellular damage from heat but it is unclear whether HSP induction alters the damaging effects of environmental chemical...

  14. INDUCIBLE HEAT SHOCK PROTEIN (HSP70-1) PROTECTS MCF-7 CELLS FROM THE CYTOTOXIC AND GENOTOXIC EFFECTS OF ARSENITE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Heat shock proteins (HSPs) belong to the highly conserved family of stress proteins and are induced following exposure to arsenic. Elevated HSPs protect against cellular damage from heat but it is unclear wether HSP induction alters the damaging effects of environmental chemical ...

  15. ELEVATED LEVELS OF INDUCIBLE HEAT SHOCK PROTEIN (HSP70-1) PROTECT MCF-7 CELLS FROM ARSENITE TOXICITY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Heat shock proteins (HSPs) belong to the highly conserved family of stress proteins and are induced following exposure to arsenic. Elevated HSPs protect against cellular damage from heat but it is unclear whether HSP induction alters the damaging effects of environmental chemical...

  16. Temperature dependent N-glycosylation of plasma membrane heat shock protein Hsp30p in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Kamo, Ken'ichi; Takabatake, Akiko; Inoue, Yoshiharu; Izawa, Shingo

    2012-03-30

    The HSP30 gene of the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae encodes a seven-transmembrane heat shock protein expressed in response to various types of stress including heat shock. Although Hsp30p contains a potential N-glycosylation consensus sequence (Asn(2)-Asp(3)-Thr(4)), whether it is actually N-glycosylated has not been verified. Here we demonstrate that N-glycosylation is induced at Asn(2) of Hsp30p by severe heat shock, ethanol stress, and acetic acid stress. Mild heat shock and glucose depletion induced the expression but not N-glycosylation of Hsp30p, indicating the N-glycosylation to be dependent on temperature and environmental conditions. N-glycosylation did not affect on the intracellular localization of Hsp30p but its physiological role under severe heat shock conditions. Since limited information is available on stress-responsive or condition-induced N-glycosylation, our findings provide new insight into the regulation of cellular stress response in yeast. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. The stress protein heat shock cognate 70 (Hsc70) inhibits the Transient Receptor Potential Vanilloid type 1 (TRPV1) channel

    PubMed Central

    Iftinca, Mircea; Flynn, Robyn; Basso, Lilian; Melo, Helvira; Aboushousha, Reem; Taylor, Lauren

    2016-01-01

    Background Specialized cellular defense mechanisms prevent damage from chemical, biological, and physical hazards. The heat shock proteins have been recognized as key chaperones that maintain cell survival against a variety of exogenous and endogenous stress signals including noxious temperature. However, the role of heat shock proteins in nociception remains poorly understood. We carried out an expression analysis of the constitutively expressed 70 kDa heat-shock cognate protein, a member of the stress-induced HSP70 family in lumbar dorsal root ganglia from a mouse model of Complete Freund’s Adjuvant-induced chronic inflammatory pain. We used immunolabeling of dorsal root ganglion neurons, behavioral analysis and patch clamp electrophysiology in both dorsal root ganglion neurons and HEK cells transfected with Hsc70 and Transient Receptor Potential Channels to examine their functional interaction in heat shock stress condition. Results We report an increase in protein levels of Hsc70 in mouse dorsal root ganglia, 3 days post Complete Freund’s Adjuvant injection in the hind paw. Immunostaining of Hsc70 was observed in most of the dorsal root ganglion neurons, including the small size nociceptors immunoreactive to the TRPV1 channel. Standard whole-cell patch-clamp technique was used to record Transient Receptor Potential Vanilloid type 1 current after exposure to heat shock. We found that capsaicin-evoked currents are inhibited by heat shock in dorsal root ganglion neurons and transfected HEK cells expressing Hsc70 and TRPV1. Blocking Hsc70 with matrine or spergualin compounds prevented heat shock-induced inhibition of the channel. We also found that, in contrast to TRPV1, both the cold sensor channels TRPA1 and TRPM8 were unresponsive to heat shock stress. Finally, we show that inhibition of TRPV1 depends on the ATPase activity of Hsc70 and involves the rho-associated protein kinase. Conclusions Our work identified Hsc70 and its ATPase activity as a central

  18. Osmotic stress stimulates phosphorylation and cellular expression of heat shock proteins in rhesus macaque sperm.

    PubMed

    Cole, Julie A; Meyers, Stuart A

    2011-01-01

    The cryosurvival of sperm requires cell signaling mechanisms to adapt to anisotonic conditions during the freezing and thawing process. Chaperone proteins heat shock protein 70 (HSP 70) and heat shock protein 90 (HSP 90; recently renamed HSPA and HSPC, respectively) facilitate some of these cell signaling events in somatic cells. Sperm were evaluated for their cellular expression and levels of phosphorylation of both HSP 70 and HSP 90 under anisotonic conditions as a potential model for cell signaling during the cryopreservation of macaque spermatozoa. In order to monitor the level of stress, the motility and viability parameters were evaluated at various time points. Cells were then either prepared for phosphoprotein enrichment or indirect immunocytochemistry. As controls, the phosphoserine, phosphothreonine, and phosphotyrosine levels were measured under capacitation and cryopreservation conditions and were compared with the phosphoprotein levels expressed under osmotic conditions. As expected, there was an increase in the level of tyrosine phosphorylation under capacitation and cryopreservation conditions. There was also a significant increase in the level of all phosphoproteins under hyperosmotic conditions. There was no change in the level of expression of HSP 70 or 90 under osmotic stress conditions as measured by Western blot. The enrichment of phosphoproteins followed by Western immunoblotting revealed an increase in the phosphorylation of HSP 70 but not HSP 90 under osmotic stress conditions. Indirect immunofluorescence localized HSP 70 to the postacrosomal region of sperm, and the level of membrane expression of HSP 70 was significantly affected by anisotonic conditions, as measured by flow cytometry. Taken together, these results suggest a differential role for HSP 70 and HSP 90 during osmotic stress conditions in rhesus macaque sperm.

  19. Chalcones from Angelica keiskei: Evaluation of Their Heat Shock Protein Inducing Activities.

    PubMed

    Kil, Yun-Seo; Choi, Seul-Ki; Lee, Yun-Sil; Jafari, Mahtab; Seo, Eun-Kyoung

    2015-10-23

    Five new chalcones, 4,2',4'-trihydroxy-3'-[(2E,5E)-7-methoxy-3,7-dimethyl-2,5-octadienyl]chalcone (1), (±)-4,2',4'-trihydroxy-3'-[(2E)-6-hydroxy-7-methoxy-3,7-dimethyl-2-octenyl]chalcone (2), 4,2',4'-trihydroxy-3'-[(2E)-3-methyl-5-(1,3-dioxolan-2-yl)-2-pentenyl]chalcone (3), 2',3'-furano-4-hydroxy-4'-methoxychalcone (4), and (±)-4-hydroxy-2',3'-(2,3-dihydro-2-methoxyfurano)-4'-methoxychalcone (5), were isolated from the aerial parts of Angelica keiskei Koidzumi together with eight known chalcones, 6-13, which were identified as (±)-4,2',4'-trihydroxy-3'-[(6E)-2-hydroxy-7-methyl-3-methylene-6-octenyl]chalcone (6), xanthoangelol (7), xanthoangelol F (8), xanthoangelol G (9), 4-hydroxyderricin (10), xanthoangelol D (11), xanthoangelol E (12), and xanthoangelol H (13), respectively. Chalcones 1-13 were evaluated for their promoter activity on heat shock protein 25 (hsp25, murine form of human hsp27). Compounds 1 and 6 activated the hsp25 promoter by 21.9- and 29.2-fold of untreated control at 10 μM, respectively. Further protein expression patterns of heat shock factor 1 (HSF1), HSP70, and HSP27 by 1 and 6 were examined. Compound 6 increased the expression of HSF1, HSP70, and HSP27 by 4.3-, 1.5-, and 4.6-fold of untreated control, respectively, without any significant cellular cytotoxicities, whereas 1 did not induce any expression of these proteins. As a result, 6 seems to be a prospective HSP inducer.

  20. Increased expression of heat shock protein 65 coincides with a population of infiltrating T lymphocytes in atherosclerotic lesions of rabbits specifically responding to heat shock protein 65.

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Q; Kleindienst, R; Waitz, W; Dietrich, H; Wick, G

    1993-01-01

    We have shown previously that atherosclerotic lesions can be induced in normocholesterolemic rabbits by immunization with mycobacterial heat shock protein 65 (hsp65), which has a high degree of sequence homology with mammalian hsp60. To investigate a possible relationship between hsp60 expression and the antigenic specificities of infiltrating T cells in the lesion, 38 New Zealand White rabbits were treated either by immunization with recombinant mycobacterial hsp65 or by administration of a 0.2% cholesterol diet. Atherosclerotic lesions were observed after 16 wk, particularly in the aortic arch and arterial bifurcations of rabbits immunized with hsp65 or fed with a cholesterol-rich diet. Hsp65 staining of aortas showed a heterogeneous distribution, and significantly increased staining intensity in atherosclerotic lesions compared to aortic media or adventitia. This abundantly expressed hsp65 was observed in atherosclerotic lesions induced by hsp65 immunization as well as those induced by cholesterol-rich diet alone. Interestingly, a population of the T lymphocytes isolated from all forms of atherosclerotic lesions specifically responded to hsp65 in vitro. IL-2-expanded T cell lines derived from atherosclerotic lesions showed a significantly higher hsp65 reactivity than those developed from peripheral blood of the same donor. Furthermore, levels of circulating antibodies and numbers of spleen cells specifically reacting against hsp65 were elevated in all experimental animals. Flow cytometric analysis of spleen cells showed elevated immune response-associated antigen expression in treated animals. In conclusion, increased hsp65 expression in intimal cells and the presence of hsp65-specific T cells in blood and in atherosclerotic lesions may be important in initiating the development of atherosclerosis and perpetuating the lesions. Images PMID:8514876

  1. Tandem Duplication Events in the Expansion of the Small Heat Shock Protein Gene Family in Solanum lycopersicum (cv. Heinz 1706).

    PubMed

    Krsticevic, Flavia J; Arce, Débora P; Ezpeleta, Joaquín; Tapia, Elizabeth

    2016-10-13

    In plants, fruit maturation and oxidative stress can induce small heat shock protein (sHSP) synthesis to maintain cellular homeostasis. Although the tomato reference genome was published in 2012, the actual number and functionality of sHSP genes remain unknown. Using a transcriptomic (RNA-seq) and evolutionary genomic approach, putative sHSP genes in the Solanum lycopersicum (cv. Heinz 1706) genome were investigated. A sHSP gene family of 33 members was established. Remarkably, roughly half of the members of this family can be explained by nine independent tandem duplication events that determined, evolutionarily, their functional fates. Within a mitochondrial class subfamily, only one duplicated member, Solyc08g078700, retained its ancestral chaperone function, while the others, Solyc08g078710 and Solyc08g078720, likely degenerated under neutrality and lack ancestral chaperone function. Functional conservation occurred within a cytosolic class I subfamily, whose four members, Solyc06g076570, Solyc06g076560, Solyc06g076540, and Solyc06g076520, support ∼57% of the total sHSP RNAm in the red ripe fruit. Subfunctionalization occurred within a new subfamily, whose two members, Solyc04g082720 and Solyc04g082740, show heterogeneous differential expression profiles during fruit ripening. These findings, involving the birth/death of some genes or the preferential/plastic expression of some others during fruit ripening, highlight the importance of tandem duplication events in the expansion of the sHSP gene family in the tomato genome. Despite its evolutionary diversity, the sHSP gene family in the tomato genome seems to be endowed with a core set of four homeostasis genes: Solyc05g014280, Solyc03g082420, Solyc11g020330, and Solyc06g076560, which appear to provide a baseline protection during both fruit ripening and heat shock stress in different tomato tissues.

  2. Tandem Duplication Events in the Expansion of the Small Heat Shock Protein Gene Family in Solanum lycopersicum (cv. Heinz 1706)

    PubMed Central

    Krsticevic, Flavia J.; Arce, Débora P.; Ezpeleta, Joaquín; Tapia, Elizabeth

    2016-01-01

    In plants, fruit maturation and oxidative stress can induce small heat shock protein (sHSP) synthesis to maintain cellular homeostasis. Although the tomato reference genome was published in 2012, the actual number and functionality of sHSP genes remain unknown. Using a transcriptomic (RNA-seq) and evolutionary genomic approach, putative sHSP genes in the Solanum lycopersicum (cv. Heinz 1706) genome were investigated. A sHSP gene family of 33 members was established. Remarkably, roughly half of the members of this family can be explained by nine independent tandem duplication events that determined, evolutionarily, their functional fates. Within a mitochondrial class subfamily, only one duplicated member, Solyc08g078700, retained its ancestral chaperone function, while the others, Solyc08g078710 and Solyc08g078720, likely degenerated under neutrality and lack ancestral chaperone function. Functional conservation occurred within a cytosolic class I subfamily, whose four members, Solyc06g076570, Solyc06g076560, Solyc06g076540, and Solyc06g076520, support ∼57% of the total sHSP RNAm in the red ripe fruit. Subfunctionalization occurred within a new subfamily, whose two members, Solyc04g082720 and Solyc04g082740, show heterogeneous differential expression profiles during fruit ripening. These findings, involving the birth/death of some genes or the preferential/plastic expression of some others during fruit ripening, highlight the importance of tandem duplication events in the expansion of the sHSP gene family in the tomato genome. Despite its evolutionary diversity, the sHSP gene family in the tomato genome seems to be endowed with a core set of four homeostasis genes: Solyc05g014280, Solyc03g082420, Solyc11g020330, and Solyc06g076560, which appear to provide a baseline protection during both fruit ripening and heat shock stress in different tomato tissues. PMID:27565886

  3. Genome-wide survey of heat shock factors and heat shock protein 70s and their regulatory network under abiotic stresses in Brachypodium distachyon.

    PubMed

    Wen, Feng; Wu, Xiaozhu; Li, Tongjian; Jia, Mingliang; Liu, Xinshen; Li, Peng; Zhou, Xiaojian; Ji, Xinxin; Yue, Xiaomin

    2017-01-01

    The heat shock protein 70s (Hsp70s) and heat shock factors (Hsfs) play key roles in protecting plant cells or tissues from various abiotic stresses. Brachypodium distachyon, recently developed an excellent model organism for functional genomics research, is related to the major cereal grain species. Although B. distachyon genome has been fully sequenced, the information of Hsf and Hsp70 genes and especially the regulatory network between Hsfs and Hsp70s remains incomplete. Here, a total of 24 BdHsfs and 29 BdHsp70s were identified in the genome by bioinformatics analysis and the regulatory network between Hsfs and Hsp70s were performed in this study. Based on highly conserved domain and motif analysis, BdHsfs were grouped into three classes, and BdHsp70s divided into six groups, respectively. Most of Hsf proteins contain five conserved domains: DBD, HR-A/B region, NLS and NES motifs and AHA domain, while Hsp70 proteins have three conserved domains: N-terminal nucleotide binding domain, peptide binding domain and a variable C-terminal lid region. Expression data revealed a large number of BdHsfs and BdHsp70s were induced by HS challenge, and a previous heat acclimation could induce the acquired thermotolerance to help seedling suffer the severe HS challenge, suggesting that the BdHsfs and BdHsp70s played a role in alleviating the damage by HS. The comparison revealed that, most BdHsfs and BdHsp70s genes responded to multiple abiotic stresses in an overlapping relationship, while some of them were stress specific response genes. Moreover, co-expression relationships and predicted protein-protein interaction network implied that class A and B Hsfs played as activator and repressors, respectively, suggesting that BdHsp70s might be regulated by both the activation and the repression mechanisms under stress condition. Our genomics analysis of BdHsfs and BdHsp70s provides important evolutionary and functional characterization for further investigation of the accurate

  4. AuNPs modified, disposable, ITO based biosensor: Early diagnosis of heat shock protein 70.

    PubMed

    Sonuç Karaboğa, Münteha Nur; Şimşek, Çiğdem Sayıklı; Sezgintürk, Mustafa Kemal

    2016-10-15

    This paper describes a novel, simple, and disposable immunosensor based on indium-tin oxide (ITO) sheets modified with gold nanoparticles to sensitively analyze heat shock protein 70 (HSP70), a potential biomarker that could be evaluated in diagnosis of some carcinomas. Disposable ITO coated Polyethylene terephthalate (PET) electrodes were used and modified with gold nanoparticles in order to construct the biosensors. Optimization and characterization steps were analyzed by electrochemical techniques such as electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) and cyclic voltammetry (CV). Surface morphology of the biosensor was also identified by electrochemical methods, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and atomic force microscopy (AFM). To interpret binding characterization of HSP70 to anti-HSP70 single frequency impedance method was successfully operated. Moreover, the proposed HSP70 immunosensor acquired good stability, repeatability, and reproducibility. Ultimately, proposed biosensor was introduced to real human serum samples to determine HSP70 sensitively and accurately. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Modulation of heat shock protein response in SH-SY5Y by mobile phone microwaves

    PubMed Central

    Calabrò, Emanuele; Condello, Salvatore; Currò, Monica; Ferlazzo, Nadia; Caccamo, Daniela; Magazù, Salvatore; Ientile, Riccardo

    2012-01-01

    AIM: To investigate putative biological damage caused by GSM mobile phone frequencies by assessing electromagnetic fields during mobile phone working. METHODS: Neuron-like cells, obtained by retinoic-acid-induced differentiation of human neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cells, were exposed for 2 h and 4 h to microwaves at 1800 MHz frequency bands. RESULTS: Cell stress response was evaluated by MTT assay as well as changes in the heat shock protein expression (Hsp20, Hsp27 and Hsp70) and caspase-3 activity levels, as biomarkers of apoptotic pathway. Under our experimental conditions, neither cell viability nor Hsp27 expression nor caspase-3 activity was significantly changed. Interestingly, a significant decrease in Hsp20 expression was observed at both times of exposure, whereas Hsp70 levels were significantly increased only after 4 h exposure. CONCLUSION: The modulation of the expression of Hsps in neuronal cells can be an early response to radiofrequency microwaves. PMID:22371824

  6. Targeting heat shock protein 90 for the treatment of malignant pheochromocytoma.

    PubMed

    Giubellino, Alessio; Sourbier, Carole; Lee, Min-Jung; Scroggins, Brad; Bullova, Petra; Landau, Michael; Ying, Weiwen; Neckers, Len; Trepel, Jane B; Pacak, Karel

    2013-01-01

    Metastatic pheochromocytoma represents one of the major clinical challenges in the field of neuroendocrine oncology. Recent molecular characterization of pheochromocytoma suggests new treatment options with targeted therapies. In this study we investigated the 90 kDa heat shock protein (Hsp90) as a potential therapeutic target for advanced pheochromocytoma. Both the first generation, natural product Hsp90 inhibitor 17-allylamino-17-demethoxygeldanamycin (17-AAG, tanespimycin), and the second-generation synthetic Hsp90 inhibitor STA-9090 (ganetespib) demonstrated potent inhibition of proliferation and migration of pheochromocytoma cell lines and induced degradation of key Hsp90 clients. Furthermore, ganetespib induced dose-dependent cytotoxicity in primary pheochromocytoma cells. Using metastatic models of pheochromocytoma, we demonstrate the efficacy of 17-AAG and ganetespib in reducing metastatic burden and increasing survival. Levels of Hsp70 in plasma from the xenograft studies served as a proximal biomarker of drug treatment. Our study suggests that targeting Hsp90 may benefit patients with advanced pheochromocytoma.

  7. A novel mechanism for small heat shock proteins to function as molecular chaperones.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Kaiming; Ezemaduka, Anastasia N; Wang, Zhao; Hu, Hongli; Shi, Xiaodong; Liu, Chuang; Lu, Xinping; Fu, Xinmiao; Chang, Zengyi; Yin, Chang-Cheng

    2015-03-06

    Small heat shock proteins (sHSPs) are molecular chaperones ubiquitously present in all forms of life, but their function mechanisms remain controversial. Here we show by cryo-electron microscopy and single particle 3D reconstruction that, at the low temperatures (4-25°C), CeHSP17 (a sHSP from Caenorhabditis elegans) exists as a 24-subunit spherical oligomer with tetrahedral symmetry. Our studies demonstrate that CeHSP17 forms large sheet-like super-molecular assemblies (SMAs) at the high temperatures (45-60°C), and such SMAs are apparently the form that exhibits chaperone-like activity. Our findings suggest a novel molecular mechanism for sHSPs to function as molecular chaperones.

  8. Targeting Heat Shock Protein 90 for the Treatment of Malignant Pheochromocytoma

    PubMed Central

    Giubellino, Alessio; Sourbier, Carole; Lee, Min-Jung; Scroggins, Brad; Bullova, Petra; Landau, Michael; Ying, Weiwen; Neckers, Len

    2013-01-01

    Metastatic pheochromocytoma represents one of the major clinical challenges in the field of neuroendocrine oncology. Recent molecular characterization of pheochromocytoma suggests new treatment options with targeted therapies. In this study we investigated the 90 kDa heat shock protein (Hsp90) as a potential therapeutic target for advanced pheochromocytoma. Both the first generation, natural product Hsp90 inhibitor 17-allylamino-17-demethoxygeldanamycin (17-AAG, tanespimycin), and the second-generation synthetic Hsp90 inhibitor STA-9090 (ganetespib) demonstrated potent inhibition of proliferation and migration of pheochromocytoma cell lines and induced degradation of key Hsp90 clients. Furthermore, ganetespib induced dose-dependent cytotoxicity in primary pheochromocytoma cells. Using metastatic models of pheochromocytoma, we demonstrate the efficacy of 17-AAG and ganetespib in reducing metastatic burden and increasing survival. Levels of Hsp70 in plasma from the xenograft studies served as a proximal biomarker of drug treatment. Our study suggests that targeting Hsp90 may benefit patients with advanced pheochromocytoma. PMID:23457505

  9. Emotional and learning behaviour in mice overexpressing heat shock protein 70.

    PubMed

    Ammon-Treiber, Susanne; Grecksch, Gisela; Angelidis, Charalampos; Vezyraki, Patra; Höllt, Volker; Becker, Axel

    2008-09-01

    The effects of inducible heat shock protein 70 (HSP70) on emotional and learning behaviour as well as hippocampal long-term potentiation was investigated in transgenic HSP70 overexpressing mice. In active two-way avoidance learning (shuttle box) as well as spatial 8-arm radial maze learning, the HSP70 overexpressing mice showed diminished learning performance. In several tests there was no indication of differences in anxiety behaviour between transgenic mice and wild-type mice. This suggests that impairment in learning behaviour is unrelated to the learning task and motivational aspects of behaviour. To investigate the neurophysiological correlate of learning, long-term potentiation experiments were performed. In transversal hippocampal slices, an enhanced amplitude of the population spike was found in HSP70 overexpressing mice. It was hypothesised that enhanced potentiation in conjunction with potentiation effects due to learning led to learning impairment.

  10. Proposal of Dual Inhibitor Targeting ATPase Domains of Topoisomerase II and Heat Shock Protein 90

    PubMed Central

    Jun, Kyu-Yeon; Kwon, Youngjoo

    2016-01-01

    There is a conserved ATPase domain in topoisomerase II (topo II) and heat shock protein 90 (Hsp90) which belong to the GHKL (gyrase, Hsp90, histidine kinase, and MutL) family. The inhibitors that target each of topo II and Hsp90 are intensively studied as anti-cancer drugs since they play very important roles in cell proliferation and survival. Therefore the development of dual targeting anti-cancer drugs for topo II and Hsp90 is suggested to be a promising area. The topo II and Hsp90 inhibitors, known to bind to their ATP binding site, were searched. All the inhibitors investigated were docked to both topo II and Hsp90. Four candidate compounds as possible dual inhibitors were selected by analyzing the molecular docking study. The pharmacophore model of dual inhibitors for topo II and Hsp90 were generated and the design of novel dual inhibitor was proposed. PMID:27582553

  11. Fragment screening using capillary electrophoresis (CEfrag) for hit identification of heat shock protein 90 ATPase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Austin, Carol; Pettit, Simon N; Magnolo, Sharon K; Sanvoisin, Jonathan; Chen, Wenjie; Wood, Stephen P; Freeman, Lauren D; Pengelly, Reuben J; Hughes, Dallas E

    2012-08-01

    CEfrag is a new fragment screening technology based on affinity capillary electrophoresis (ACE). Here we report on the development of a mobility shift competition assay using full-length human heat shock protein 90α (Hsp90α), radicicol as the competitor probe ligand, and successful screening of the Selcia fragment library. The CEfrag assay was able to detect weaker affinity (IC(50) >500 µM) fragments than were detected by a fluorescence polarization competition assay using FITC-labeled geldanamycin. The binding site of selected fragments was determined by co-crystallization with recombinant Hsp90α N-terminal domain and X-ray analysis. The results of this study confirm that CEfrag is a sensitive microscale technique enabling detection of fragments binding to the biological target in near-physiological solution.

  12. Increased light intensity induces heat shock protein Hsp60 in coral species.

    PubMed

    Chow, Ari M; Ferrier-Pagès, Christine; Khalouei, Sam; Reynaud, Stéphanie; Brown, Ian R

    2009-09-01

    The effect of increased light intensity and heat stress on heat shock protein Hsp60 was examined in two coral species using a branched coral and a laminar coral, selected for their different resistance to environmental perturbation. Transient Hsp60 induction was observed in the laminar coral following either light or thermal stress. Sustained induction was observed when these stresses were combined. The branched coral exhibited comparatively weak transient Hsp60 induction after heat stress and no detectable induction following light stress, consistent with its susceptibility to bleaching in native environments compared to the laminar coral. Our observations also demonstrate that increased light intensity and heat stress exhibited a greater negative impact on the photosynthetic capacity of environmentally sensitive branched coral than the more resistant laminar coral. This supports a correlation between stress induction of Hsp60 and (a) ability to counter perturbation of photosynthetic capacity by light and heat stress and (b) resistance to environmentally induced coral bleaching.

  13. Expression of heat shock protein 72 in atrophied rat skeletal muscles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oishi, Y.; Ishihara, A.; Talmadge, R. J.; Ohira, Y.; Taniguchi, K.; Matsumoto, H.; Roy, R. R.; Edgerton, V. R.

    2001-01-01

    Changes in the expression of heat shock protein 72 (HSP72) in response to atrophic-inducing perturbations of muscle involving chronic mechanical unloading and denervation were determined. Adult male Wistar rats were assigned randomly to a sedentary cage control (CON), hind limb unloading (HU, via tail suspension), HU plus tenotomy (HU + TEN), HU plus denervation (HU + DEN), or HU + TEN + DEN group. Tenotomy and DEN involved cutting the Achilles tendon and removing a segment of the sciatic nerve, respectively. After 5 days, HSP72 levels in the soleus of the HU + DEN and HU + TEN + DEN groups were 42 (P < 0.05) and 53% (P < 0.01) less than CON, respectively. Soleus weight decreased in both groups. Heat shock protein 72 levels in the plantaris of the HU + TEN, HU + DEN, and HU + TEN + DEN groups were 31, 25, and 30% lower than CON, respectively (P < 0.05). Plantaris weight decreased in the HU + DEN and HU + TEN + DEN, but not in the HU + TEN group. Hind limb unloading alone had little effect on the HSP72 level in either muscle. Reduced levels of HSP72 were associated with a decreased soleus (r=0.62, P < 0.01) and plantaris (r=0.78, P < 0.001) weight. These results indicate that the levels of HSP72 in both a slow and a fast rat plantarflexor are responsive to a chronic decrease in the levels of loading and/or activation and suggest that the neuromuscular activity level and the presence of innervation of a muscle are important factors that induce HSP72 expression.

  14. Crystal Structure of an Activated Variant of Small Heat Shock Protein Hsp16.5

    SciTech Connect

    Mchaourab, Hassane S.; Lin, Yi-Lun; Spiller, Benjamin W.

    2013-04-17

    How does the sequence of a single small heat shock protein (sHSP) assemble into oligomers of different sizes? To gain insight into the underlying structural mechanism, we determined the crystal structure of an engineered variant of Methanocaldococcus jannaschii Hsp16.5 wherein a 14 amino acid peptide from human heat shock protein 27 (Hsp27) was inserted at the junction of the N-terminal region and the {alpha}-crystallin domain. In response to this insertion, the oligomer shell expands from 24 to 48 subunits while maintaining octahedral symmetry. Oligomer rearrangement does not alter the fold of the conserved {alpha}-crystallin domain nor does it disturb the interface holding the dimeric building block together. Rather, the flexible C-terminal tail of Hsp16.5 changes its orientation relative to the {alpha}-crystallin domain which enables alternative packing of dimers. This change in orientation preserves a peptide-in-groove interaction of the C-terminal tail with an adjacent {beta}-sandwich, thereby holding the assembly together. The interior of the expanded oligomer, where substrates presumably bind, retains its predominantly nonpolar character relative to the outside surface. New large windows in the outer shell provide increased access to these substrate-binding regions, thus accounting for the higher affinity of this variant to substrates. Oligomer polydispersity regulates sHSPs chaperone activity in vitro and has been implicated in their physiological roles. The structural mechanism of Hsp16.5 oligomer flexibility revealed here, which is likely to be highly conserved across the sHSP superfamily, explains the relationship between oligomer expansion observed in disease-linked mutants and changes in chaperone activity.

  15. Crystal structure of an activated variant of small heat shock protein Hsp16.5.

    PubMed

    McHaourab, Hassane S; Lin, Yi-Lun; Spiller, Benjamin W

    2012-06-26

    How does the sequence of a single small heat shock protein (sHSP) assemble into oligomers of different sizes? To gain insight into the underlying structural mechanism, we determined the crystal structure of an engineered variant of Methanocaldococcus jannaschii Hsp16.5 wherein a 14 amino acid peptide from human heat shock protein 27 (Hsp27) was inserted at the junction of the N-terminal region and the α-crystallin domain. In response to this insertion, the oligomer shell expands from 24 to 48 subunits while maintaining octahedral symmetry. Oligomer rearrangement does not alter the fold of the conserved α-crystallin domain nor does it disturb the interface holding the dimeric building block together. Rather, the flexible C-terminal tail of Hsp16.5 changes its orientation relative to the α-crystallin domain which enables alternative packing of dimers. This change in orientation preserves a peptide-in-groove interaction of the C-terminal tail with an adjacent β-sandwich, thereby holding the assembly together. The interior of the expanded oligomer, where substrates presumably bind, retains its predominantly nonpolar character relative to the outside surface. New large windows in the outer shell provide increased access to these substrate-binding regions, thus accounting for the higher affinity of this variant to substrates. Oligomer polydispersity regulates sHSPs chaperone activity in vitro and has been implicated in their physiological roles. The structural mechanism of Hsp16.5 oligomer flexibility revealed here, which is likely to be highly conserved across the sHSP superfamily, explains the relationship between oligomer expansion observed in disease-linked mutants and changes in chaperone activity.

  16. Using the Heat-Shock Response to Discover Anticancer Compounds that Target Protein Homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Santagata, Sandro; Xu, Ya-ming; Wijeratne, E. M. Kithsiri; Kontnik, Renee; Rooney, Christine; Perley, Casey C; Kwon, Hyoungtae; Clardy, Jon; Kesari, Santosh; Whitesel, Luke; Lindquist, Susan; Gunatilaka, A.A. Leslie

    2011-01-01

    Unlike normal tissues, cancers experience profound alterations in protein homeostasis. Powerful innate adaptive mechanisms, especially the transcriptional response regulated by Heat Shock Factor 1 (HSF1), are activated in cancers to enable survival under these stressful conditions. Natural products that further tax these stress responses can overwhelm the ability to cope and could provide leads for the development of new, broadly effective anticancer drugs. To identify compounds that drive the HSF1-dependent stress response, we evaluated over 80,000 natural and synthetic compounds as well as partially purified natural product extracts using a reporter cell line optimized for high-throughput screening. Surprisingly, many of the strongly active compounds identified were natural products representing five diverse chemical classes (limonoids, curvularins, withanolides, celastraloids and colletofragarones). All of these compounds share the same chemical motif, an α,β-unsaturated carbonyl functionality, with strong potential for thiol-reactivity. Despite the lack of a priori mechanistic requirements in our primary phenotypic screen, this motif was found to be necessary albeit not sufficient, for both heat-shock activation and inhibition of glioma tumor cell growth. Within the withanolide class, a promising therapeutic index for the compound withaferin A was demonstrated in vivo using a stringent orthotopic human glioma xenograft model in mice. Our findings reveal that diverse organisms elaborate structurally complex thiol-reactive metabolites that act on the stress responses of heterologous organisms including humans. From a chemical biology perspective, they define a robust approach for discovering candidate compounds that target the malignant phenotype by disrupting protein homeostasis. PMID:22050377

  17. Expression of heat shock protein 72 in atrophied rat skeletal muscles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oishi, Y.; Ishihara, A.; Talmadge, R. J.; Ohira, Y.; Taniguchi, K.; Matsumoto, H.; Roy, R. R.; Edgerton, V. R.

    2001-01-01

    Changes in the expression of heat shock protein 72 (HSP72) in response to atrophic-inducing perturbations of muscle involving chronic mechanical unloading and denervation were determined. Adult male Wistar rats were assigned randomly to a sedentary cage control (CON), hind limb unloading (HU, via tail suspension), HU plus tenotomy (HU + TEN), HU plus denervation (HU + DEN), or HU + TEN + DEN group. Tenotomy and DEN involved cutting the Achilles tendon and removing a segment of the sciatic nerve, respectively. After 5 days, HSP72 levels in the soleus of the HU + DEN and HU + TEN + DEN groups were 42 (P < 0.05) and 53% (P < 0.01) less than CON, respectively. Soleus weight decreased in both groups. Heat shock protein 72 levels in the plantaris of the HU + TEN, HU + DEN, and HU + TEN + DEN groups were 31, 25, and 30% lower than CON, respectively (P < 0.05). Plantaris weight decreased in the HU + DEN and HU + TEN + DEN, but not in the HU + TEN group. Hind limb unloading alone had little effect on the HSP72 level in either muscle. Reduced levels of HSP72 were associated with a decreased soleus (r=0.62, P < 0.01) and plantaris (r=0.78, P < 0.001) weight. These results indicate that the levels of HSP72 in both a slow and a fast rat plantarflexor are responsive to a chronic decrease in the levels of loading and/or activation and suggest that the neuromuscular activity level and the presence of innervation of a muscle are important factors that induce HSP72 expression.

  18. Molecular cloning, characterization and functional analysis of a heat shock protein 70 gene in Cyclina sinensis.

    PubMed

    Ren, Yipeng; Pan, Heting; Yang, Ying; Pan, Baoping; Bu, Wenjun

    2016-11-01

    Heat shock protein 70 (HSP70) is an important member of the heat shock protein superfamily and is involved in protecting organisms against various stressors. In the present study, we used RACE to clone a full-length Cyclina sinensis HSP70 cDNA termed CsHSP70. The full length of the CsHSP70 cDNA was 2308 bp, with a 5' untranslated region (UTR) of 42 bp, a 3' UTR of 268 bp, and an open reading frame (ORF) of 1998 bp encoding a polypeptide of 655 amino acids with an estimated molecular mass of 72.75 kDa and an estimated isoelectric point of 5.48. Quantitative real-time PCR was employed to analyze the tissue distribution and temporal expression of the CsHSP70 gene after bacterial challenge and cadmium (Cd) exposure. The CsHSP70 mRNA transcript was expressed ubiquitously in five examined tissues, with the highest expression in hemocytes (P < 0.05) and with the lowest expression in the hepatopancreas. Furthermore, the expression level of CsHSP70 in hemocytes at 3 h after Vibrio anguillarum challenge was extremely significantly up-regulated (P < 0.01). Moreover, the CsHSP70 transcript was up-regulated significantly following exposure to a safe Cd concentration (0.1 mg/L). Finally, after the CsHSP70 gene was silenced by RNA interference, the expression of the CsTLR13 and CsMyD88 genes were extremely significantly decreased (P < 0.01). The results indicated that CsHSP70 could play an important role in mediating the environmental stress and immune responses, and regulating TLR signaling pathway in C. sinensis.

  19. Heat shock treatment protects osmotic stress–induced dysfunction of the blood-brain barrier through preservation of tight junction proteins

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Tzong-Shi; Chen, Hsiang-Wen; Huang, Maw-Hsiung; Wang, Shu-Jung; Yang, Rei-Cheng

    2004-01-01

    The blood-brain barrier (BBB) is a specialized structure in the central nervous system (CNS), which participates in maintenance of a state of cerebrospinal fluid homeostasis. The endothelial cells of the cerebral capillaries and the tight junctions between them form the basis of the BBB. Research has shown that destruction of the BBB is associated with diseases of the CNS. However, there is little research on how the BBB might be protected. In this study, we used a high osmotic solution (1.6 M d-mannitol) to open the BBB of rats and Evans blue dye as a macromolecular marker. The effect of heat shock treatment was evaluated. The results show that increased synthesis of heat shock protein 72 (Hsp72) was induced in the heated group only. BBB permeability was significantly less in the heat shock–treated group after hyperosmotic shock. The major tight junction proteins, occludin and zonula occludens (ZO)-1, were significantly decreased after d-mannitol treatment in the nonheated group, whereas they were preserved in the heated group. The coimmunoprecipitation studies demonstrated that Hsp72 could be detected in the precipitates of brain extract interacting with anti–ZO-1 antibodies as well as those interacting with anti–occludin antibodies in the heated group. We conclude that the integrity of tight junctions could be maintained by previous heat shock treatment, which might be associated with the increased production of Hsp72. PMID:15633295

  20. In vivo phosphorus-31 nuclear magnetic resonance reveals lowered ATP during heat shock of Tetrahymena

    SciTech Connect

    Findly, R.C.; Gillies, R.J.; Shulman, R.G.

    1983-03-11

    Cells synthesize a characteristic set of proteins--heat shock proteins--in response to a rapid temperature jump or certain other stress treatments. The technique of phosphorus-31 nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy was used to examine in vivo the effects of temperature jump on two species of Tetrahymena that initiate the heat shock response at different temperatures. An immediate 50 percent decrease in cellular adenosine triphosphate was observed when either species was jumped to a temperature that strongly induces synthesis of heat shock proteins. This new adenosine triphosphate concentration was maintained at the heat shock temperature.

  1. The expression and function of hsp30-like small heat shock protein genes in amphibians, birds, fish, and reptiles.

    PubMed

    Heikkila, John J

    2017-01-01

    Small heat shock proteins (sHSPs) are a superfamily of molecular chaperones with important roles in protein homeostasis and other cellular functions. Amphibians, reptiles, fish and birds have a shsp gene called hsp30, which was also referred to as hspb11 or hsp25 in some fish and bird species. Hsp30 genes, which are not found in mammals, are transcribed in response to heat shock or other stresses by means of the heat shock factor that is activated in response to an accumulation of unfolded protein. Amino acid sequence analysis revealed that representative HSP30s from different classes of non-mammalian vertebrates were distinct from other sHSPs including HSPB1/HSP27. Studies with amphibian and fish recombinant HSP30 determined that they were molecular chaperones since they inhibited heat- or chemically-induced aggregation of unfolded protein. During non-mammalian vertebrate development, hsp30 genes were differentially expressed in selected tissues. Also, heat shock-induced stage-specific expression of hsp30 genes in frog embryos was regulated at the level of chromatin structure. In adults and/or tissue culture cells, hsp30 gene expression was induced by heat shock, arsenite, cadmium or proteasomal inhibitors, all of which enhanced the production of unfolded/damaged protein. Finally, immunocytochemical analysis of frog and chicken tissue culture cells revealed that proteotoxic stress-induced HSP30 accumulation co-localized with aggresome-like inclusion bodies. The congregation of damaged protein in aggresomes minimizes the toxic effect of aggregated protein dispersed throughout the cell. The current availability of probes to detect the presence of hsp30 mRNA or encoded protein has resulted in the increased use of hsp30 gene expression as a marker of proteotoxic stress in non-mammalian vertebrates. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Oral glutamine enhances heat shock protein expression and improves survival following hyperthermia.

    PubMed

    Singleton, Kristen D; Wischmeyer, Paul E

    2006-03-01

    No pharmacologic agent has shown benefit in treating heatstroke. Previous data indicate that enhanced heat shock protein 70 (HSP-70) expression can improve survival postexperimental heatstroke. Glutamine (GLN) can enhance HSP-70 expression in other injury models. This study assessed if orally administered GLN could enhance tissue HSP expression and could improve survival following whole body hyperthermia. Intestinal permeability and plasma endotoxin were assayed to determine if enhanced HSP expression correlated with improved organ function. GLN (0.65 g/kg) or an iso-nitrogenous control (Travasol; T) was given to rats via gavage twice daily for 5 days pre-heatstroke. Hyperthermia was performed in anesthetized rats by heating animals to 42 degrees C (rectal temperature) for 30 min. HSP-70 analyzed via Western blot. Gut permeability was measured 6 and 24 h post-hyperthermia. Plasma endotoxin was measured 24 h post-hyperthermia. Survival was analyzed for 5 days post-hyperthermia. GLN administration enhanced gut and lung HSP-70 post-hyperthermia. GLN administration led to significantly enhanced gut heat shock factor 1 (HSF-1) activation before heatstroke and at 1 h postheat stress. GLN decreased gut permeability at 6 and 24 h post-hyperthermia versus T. Plasma endotoxin also decreased in GLN-treated rats 24 h post-hyperthermia. Oral GLN therapy significantly improved survival (P < 0.05). Our results indicate that oral GLN can enhance tissue HSP-70 and HSF-1 activation post-hyperthermia. These results also indicate that enhanced HSP-70 may have functional significance as GLN-treated animals had decreased gut permeability, plasma endotoxin, and improve survival following lethal hyperthermia. Enhanced expression of HSP-70 may be an important mechanism leading to enhanced survival via GLN. These data indicate that oral GLN may useful in prevention of mortality from heatstroke in at risk populations.

  3. TARGETED DELETION OF INDUCIBLE HEAT SHOCK PROTEIN 70 ABROGATES THE LATE INFARCT-SPARING EFFECT OF MYOCARDIAL ISCHEMIC PRECONDITIONING

    EPA Science Inventory

    Abstract submitted for 82nd annual meeting of the American Association for Thoracic Surgery, May 4-8, 2002 in Washington D.C.

    Targeted Deletion of Inducible Heat Shock Protein 70 Abrogates the Late Infarct-Sparing Effect of Myocardial Ischemic Preconditioning

    Craig...

  4. PUTATIVE CREATINE KINASE M-ISOFORM IN HUMAN SPERM IS IDENTIFIED AS THE 70-KILODALTON HEAT SHOCK PROTEIN HSPA2

    EPA Science Inventory

    THE PUTATIVE CREATINE KINASE M-ISOFORM IN HUMAN SPERM
    IS IDENTIFIED AS THE 70 kDa HEAT SHOCK PROTEIN HSPA2

    * Gabor Huszar1, Kathryn Stone2, David Dix3 and Lynne Vigue1
    1The Sperm Physiology Laboratory, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, 2 W.M. Keck Foundatio...

  5. Characterization of three transcripts encoding small heat shock proteins expressed in the codling moth, Cydia pomonella (Lepidoptera: Tortricidae)

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Codling moth is a major pest of apples and pears worldwide. Increasing knowledge of how this insect responds to environmental stress will improve field and postharvest control measures used against it. The small heat shock proteins (sHsps) play a major role in cellular responses to environmental st...

  6. Induction of DnaK and GroEL heat shock proteins by fluoroquinolones in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Mizushima, T; Matsuo, M; Sekimizu, K

    1997-01-01

    Various fluoroquinolones (norfloxacin, enoxacin, ofloxacin, levofloxacin, and sparfloxacin) induce DnaK and GroEL heat shock proteins in Escherichia coli. The induction is transient, consistent with the kinetics of cellular DNA relaxation. The concentrations of fluoroquinolones required for induction are similar to those required for DNA relaxation and much higher than those required for cell death. PMID:8980780

  7. TARGETED DELETION OF INDUCIBLE HEAT SHOCK PROTEIN 70 ABROGATES THE LATE INFARCT-SPARING EFFECT OF MYOCARDIAL ISCHEMIC PRECONDITIONING

    EPA Science Inventory

    Abstract submitted for 82nd annual meeting of the American Association for Thoracic Surgery, May 4-8, 2002 in Washington D.C.

    Targeted Deletion of Inducible Heat Shock Protein 70 Abrogates the Late Infarct-Sparing Effect of Myocardial Ischemic Preconditioning

    Craig...

  8. Wheat Mds-1 encodes a heat-shock protein and governs susceptibility towards the Hessian fly gall midge

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Plant pests including insects must manipulate plants in order to utilize the nutrition and environment of the host. Here, we show that the heat-shock protein gene Mayetiola destructor susceptibility gene-1 (Mds-1) is a major susceptibility gene in wheat that allows the gall midge M. destructor, com...

  9. PUTATIVE CREATINE KINASE M-ISOFORM IN HUMAN SPERM IS IDENTIFIED AS THE 70-KILODALTON HEAT SHOCK PROTEIN HSPA2

    EPA Science Inventory

    THE PUTATIVE CREATINE KINASE M-ISOFORM IN HUMAN SPERM
    IS IDENTIFIED AS THE 70 kDa HEAT SHOCK PROTEIN HSPA2

    * Gabor Huszar1, Kathryn Stone2, David Dix3 and Lynne Vigue1
    1The Sperm Physiology Laboratory, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, 2 W.M. Keck Foundatio...

  10. Identification of a small heat-shock protein associated with a ras-mediated signaling pathway in ectomycorrhizal symbiosis

    Treesearch

    Shiv Hiremath; Kirsten Lehtoma; Gopi K. Podila

    2009-01-01

    Initiation, development, and establishment of a functional ectomycorrhiza involve a series of biochemical events mediated by a number of genes from the fungus as well as the host plant. We have identified a heat shock protein gene from Laccaria bicolor (Lbhsp) that appears to play a role in these events. The size and...

  11. Isolation and characterization of Heat Shock Protein 100-Batu1 from Toxoplasma gondii RH strain.

    PubMed

    Coşkun, Kübra Açıkalın; Tutar, Yusuf

    2015-06-01

    Toxoplasma gondii is an intracellular parasitic protozoon which infects human and most warm-blooded animals. Almost one-third of the world's population is affected by life-threatening infection of T. gondii tachyzoites form. Slow growing, transmissible and encysted bradyzoites forms are composed after tachyzoites stage. Cellular and environmental stresses induce conversion of tachyzoites from bradyzoites and this condition is associated with Heat Shock Protein (Hsps) family. Hsp100 is a member of this protein family, and coordinates to disassemble protein aggregates with Hsp70 and Hsp40 in an ATP dependent manner. Several proteins are involved during this stage differentiation and Hsp100 may help them to be in their native soluble form to perform their function as observed in other organisms. For this purpose, Hsp100-Batu1 was isolated from T. gondii RH strain to characterize its biochemical properties in this current study. Hsp100 proteins play a role in survival and virulence of pathogens as shown in the literature. Therefore, manipulation of protein-protein interaction may perturb T. gondii infection and impair conversion to tachyzoites by inhibiting Hsp100 function. Therefore, results of this work present a potential route for vaccination or immunotherapy.

  12. Mapping the Interactome of a Major Mammalian Endoplasmic Reticulum Heat Shock Protein 90

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Feng; Mohammad Rachidi, Saleh; Lundgren, Debbie; Han, David; Huang, Xiu; Zhao, Hongyu; Kimura, Yayoi; Hirano, Hisashi; Ohara, Osamu; Udono, Heichiiro; Meng, Songdong; Liu, Bei; Li, Zihai

    2017-01-01

    Up to 10% of cytosolic proteins are dependent on the mammalian heat shock protein 90 (HSP90) for folding. However, the interactors of its endoplasmic reticulum (ER) paralogue (gp96, Grp94 and HSP90b1) has not been systematically identified. By combining genetic and biochemical approaches, we have comprehensively mapped the interactome of gp96 in macrophages and B cells. A total of 511 proteins were reduced in gp96 knockdown cells, compared to levels observed in wild type cells. By immunoprecipitation, we found that 201 proteins associated with gp96. Gene Ontology analysis indicated that these proteins are involved in metabolism, transport, translation, protein folding, development, localization, response to stress and cellular component biogenesis. While known gp96 clients such as integrins, Toll-like receptors (TLRs) and Wnt co-receptor LRP6, were confirmed, cell surface HSP receptor CD91, TLR4 pathway protein CD180, WDR1, GANAB and CAPZB were identified as potentially novel substrates of gp96. Taken together, our study establishes gp96 as a critical chaperone to integrate innate immunity, Wnt signaling and organ development. PMID:28056051

  13. Heat shock protein 70 regulates Tcl1 expression in leukemia and lymphomas.

    PubMed

    Gaudio, Eugenio; Paduano, Francesco; Ngankeu, Apollinaire; Lovat, Francesca; Fabbri, Muller; Sun, Hui-Lung; Gasparini, Pierluigi; Efanov, Alexey; Peng, Yong; Zanesi, Nicola; Shuaib, Mohammed A; Rassenti, Laura Z; Kipps, Thomas J; Li, Chenglong; Aqeilan, Rami I; Lesinski, Gregory B; Trapasso, Francesco; Croce, Carlo M

    2013-01-10

    T-cell leukemia/lymphoma 1 (TCL1) is an oncogene overexpressed in T-cell prolymphocytic leukemia and in B-cell malignancies including B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia and lymphomas. To date, only a limited number of Tcl1-interacting proteins that regulate its oncogenic function have been identified. Prior studies used a proteomic approach to identify a novel interaction between Tcl1 with Ataxia Telangiectasia Mutated. The association of Tcl1 and Ataxia Telangiectasia Mutated leads to activation of the NF-κB pathway. Here, we demonstrate that Tcl1 also interacts with heat shock protein (Hsp) 70. The Tcl1-Hsp70 complex was validated by coimmunoprecipitation experiments. In addition, we report that Hsp70, a protein that plays a critical role in the folding and maturation of several oncogenic proteins, associates with Tcl1 protein and stabilizes its expression. The inhibition of the ATPase activity of Hsp70 results in ubiquitination and proteasome-dependent degradation of Tcl1. The inhibition of Hsp70 significantly reduced the growth of lymphoma xenografts in vivo and down-regulated the expression of Tcl1 protein. Our findings reveal a functional interaction between Tcl1 and Hsp70 and identify Tcl1 as a novel Hsp70 client protein. These findings suggest that inhibition of Hsp70 may represent an alternative effective therapy for chronic lymphocytic leukemia and lymphomas via its ability to inhibit the oncogenic functions of Tcl1.

  14. Heat shock protein 70 regulates Tcl1 expression in leukemia and lymphomas

    PubMed Central

    Gaudio, Eugenio; Paduano, Francesco; Ngankeu, Apollinaire; Lovat, Francesca; Fabbri, Muller; Sun, Hui-Lung; Gasparini, Pierluigi; Efanov, Alexey; Peng, Yong; Zanesi, Nicola; Shuaib, Mohammed A.; Rassenti, Laura Z.; Kipps, Thomas J.; Li, Chenglong; Aqeilan, Rami I.; Lesinski, Gregory B.; Trapasso, Francesco

    2013-01-01

    T-cell leukemia/lymphoma 1 (TCL1) is an oncogene overexpressed in T-cell prolymphocytic leukemia and in B-cell malignancies including B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia and lymphomas. To date, only a limited number of Tcl1-interacting proteins that regulate its oncogenic function have been identified. Prior studies used a proteomic approach to identify a novel interaction between Tcl1 with Ataxia Telangiectasia Mutated. The association of Tcl1 and Ataxia Telangiectasia Mutated leads to activation of the NF-κB pathway. Here, we demonstrate that Tcl1 also interacts with heat shock protein (Hsp) 70. The Tcl1-Hsp70 complex was validated by coimmunoprecipitation experiments. In addition, we report that Hsp70, a protein that plays a critical role in the folding and maturation of several oncogenic proteins, associates with Tcl1 protein and stabilizes its expression. The inhibition of the ATPase activity of Hsp70 results in ubiquitination and proteasome-dependent degradation of Tcl1. The inhibition of Hsp70 significantly reduced the growth of lymphoma xenografts in vivo and down-regulated the expression of Tcl1 protein. Our findings reveal a functional interaction between Tcl1 and Hsp70 and identify Tcl1 as a novel Hsp70 client protein. These findings suggest that inhibition of Hsp70 may represent an alternative effective therapy for chronic lymphocytic leukemia and lymphomas via its ability to inhibit the oncogenic functions of Tcl1. PMID:23160471

  15. Transcriptional profiles of human epithelial cells in response to heat: computational evidence for novel heat shock proteins.

    PubMed

    Laramie, Jason M; Chung, T Philip; Brownstein, Buddy; Stormo, Gary D; Cobb, J Perren

    2008-05-01

    We hypothesized that broad-scale expression profiling would provide insight into the regulatory pathways that control gene expression in response to stress and potentially identify novel heat-responsive genes. HEp2 cells, a human malignant epithelial cell line, were heated at 37 degrees C to 43 degrees C for 60 min to gauge the heat shock response, using as a proxy inducible Hsp70 quantified by Western blot analysis. Based on these results, microarray experiments were conducted at 37 degrees C, 40 degrees C, 41 degrees C, 42 degrees C, and 43 degrees C. Using linear modeling, we compared the sets of microarrays at 40 degrees C, 41 degrees C, 42 degrees C, and 43 degrees C with the 37 degrees C baseline temperature and took the union of the genes exhibiting differential gene expression signal to create two sets of "heat shock response" genes, each set reflecting either increased or decreased RNA abundance. Leveraging human and mouse orthologous alignments, we used the two lists of coexpressed genes to predict transcription factor binding sites in silico, including those for heat shock factor (HSF) 1 and HSF2 transcription factors. We discovered HSF1 and HSF2 binding sites in 15 genes not previously associated with the heat shock response. We conclude that microarray experiments coupled with upstream promoter analysis can be used to identify novel genes that respond to heat shock. Additional experiments are required to validate these putative heat shock proteins and facilitate a deeper understanding of the mechanisms involved during the stress response.

  16. Heat Shock Partially Dissociates the Overlapping Modules of the Yeast Protein-Protein Interaction Network: A Systems Level Model of Adaptation

    PubMed Central

    Mihalik, Ágoston; Csermely, Peter

    2011-01-01

    Network analysis became a powerful tool giving new insights to the understanding of cellular behavior. Heat shock, the archetype of stress responses, is a well-characterized and simple model of cellular dynamics. S. cerevisiae is an appropriate model organism, since both its protein-protein interaction network (interactome) and stress response at the gene expression level have been well characterized. However, the analysis of the reorganization of the yeast interactome during stress has not been investigated yet. We calculated the changes of the interaction-weights of the yeast interactome from the changes of mRNA expression levels upon heat shock. The major finding of our study is that heat shock induced a significant decrease in both the overlaps and connections of yeast interactome modules. In agreement with this the weighted diameter of the yeast interactome had a 4.9-fold increase in heat shock. Several key proteins of the heat shock response became centers of heat shock-induced local communities, as well as bridges providing a residual connection of modules after heat shock. The observed changes resemble to a ‘stratus-cumulus’ type transition of the interactome structure, since the unstressed yeast interactome had a globally connected organization, similar to that of stratus clouds, whereas the heat shocked interactome had a multifocal organization, similar to that of cumulus clouds. Our results showed that heat shock induces a partial disintegration of the global organization of the yeast interactome. This change may be rather general occurring in many types of stresses. Moreover, other complex systems, such as single proteins, social networks and ecosystems may also decrease their inter-modular links, thus develop more compact modules, and display a partial disintegration of their global structure in the initial phase of crisis. Thus, our work may provide a model of a general, system-level adaptation mechanism to environmental changes. PMID:22022244

  17. [The heat shock protein 90 inhibitor induces apoptosis and differentiation of Kasumi-1 and its mechanisms].

    PubMed

    Yu, Wen-juan; Rao, Qing; Wang, Min; Tian, Zheng; Liu, Xiang-rong; Lin, Dong; Wang, Jian-xiang

    2005-12-01

    To explore the effect of 17-allylamide-17-demethoxygeldanamycin (17AAG), a heat shock protein 90 (HSP90) inhibitor, on the growth, differentiation and apoptosis of leukemic Kasumi-1 cells. Kasumi-1 cells were treated with 17AAG at different concentrations in suspension culture. Cell proliferation was analysed by MTT assay, expression of myeloid-specific differentiation antigen and cell cycle by flow cytometry, cell apoptosis by annexin V staining, agarose gel electrophoresis and flow cytometry. KIT protein was analysed by Western blot and c-kit mRNA by RT-PCR. 17AAG treatment caused a dose-dependent inhibition of the cell proliferation with the IC(50) of 0.62 micromol/L. A dose-dependent increase in early apoptosis occurred at 24 hours treatment and in late apoptosis at 48 hours treatment. 17AAG induced a time- and dose-dependent increase in expression of myeloid cell surface protein CD11b and CD15, a progressive decline in S-phase cell fraction and an increase in G(0)/G(1) cells. When Kasumi-1 cells were incubated with 1 micromol/L of 17AAG, KIT protein began to decrease at 2 hours and KIT protein could hardly be detected at 20 hours, but c-kit mRNA was not decreased. 17AAG treatment of Kasumi-1 cells could lower KIT protein expression, inhibit cell proliferation, induce cell partial differentiation, apoptosis and accumulation in G(0)/G(1) phase.

  18. Members of the heat-shock protein 70 family promote cancer cell growth by distinct mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Rohde, Mikkel; Daugaard, Mads; Jensen, Mette Hartvig; Helin, Kristian; Nylandsted, Jesper; Jäättelä, Marja

    2005-01-01

    Whereas the stress-inducible heat-shock protein 70 (Hsp70) has gained plenty of attention as a putative target for tumor therapy, little is known about the role of other Hsp70 proteins in cancer. Here we present the first thorough analysis of the expression and function of the cytosolic Hsp70 proteins in human cancer cells and identify Hsp70-2, a protein essential for spermatogenesis, as an important regulator of cancer cell growth. Targeted knock-down of the individual family members by RNA interference revealed that both Hsp70 and Hsp70-2 were required for cancer cell growth, whereas the survival of tumorigenic as well as nontumorigenic cells depended on Hsc70. Cancer cells depleted for Hsp70 and Hsp70-2 displayed strikingly different morphologies (detached and round vs. flat senescent-like), cell cycle distributions (G2/M vs. G1 arrest) and gene expression profiles. Only Hsp70-2 depletion induced the expression of macrophage inhibitory cytokine-1 that was identified as a target of P53 tumor-suppressor protein and a mediator of the G1 arrest and the senescent phenotype. Importantly, concomitant depletion of Hsp70 and Hsp70-2 had a synergistic antiproliferative effect on cancer cells. Thus, highly homologous Hsp70 proteins bring about nonoverlapping functions essential for cell growth and survival. PMID:15741319

  19. Heat shock protein-based therapeutic strategies against human immunodeficiency virus type 1 infection.

    PubMed Central

    Brenner, B G; Wainberg, M A

    1999-01-01

    Heat shock proteins (hsps) and cyclophilins (CypA) are intracellular chaperone molecules that facilitate protein folding and assembly. These proteins are selectively expressed in cells following exposure to a range of stress stimuli, including viral infection. Hsp species are highly immunogenic, eliciting humoral, cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL), and natural killer (NK) cell responses against viruses, tumours, and infectious diseases. This review discusses the roles of stress proteins in immunity and viral life cycles, vis-à-vis the development of Hsp-based therapeutic strategies against human immunodeficiency virus type-1 (HIV-1) infection. Cumulative findings are cited implicating the requirement of CypA in HIV-1 replication and formation of infectious virions. Studies by our group show the upregulated expression of hsp27 and hsp70 during single-cycle HIV infections. These species redistribute to the cell surface following HIV-infection and heat stress, serving as targets for NK and antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity. Co-immunoprecipitation and Western blot studies show that hsp27, hsp70, and hsp78 complex with HIV-1 viral proteins intracellularly. Hsp70, hsp56, and CypA are assembled into HIV-1 virions. The ability of hsps to interact with HIV-1 viral proteins, combined with their inherent adjuvant and immunogenic properties, indicates that hsps may serve as vehicles for antigen delivery and the design of vaccines against acquired immunodeficiency syndrome. PMID:10231014

  20. Sulphoraphane, a naturally occurring isothiocyanate induces apoptosis in breast cancer cells by targeting heat shock proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Sarkar, Ruma; Mukherjee, Sutapa; Biswas, Jaydip; Roy, Madhumita

    2012-10-12

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer HSPs (27, 70 and 90) and HSF1 are overexpressed in MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Sulphoraphane, a natural isothiocyanate inhibited HSPs and HSF1 expressions. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Inhibition of HSPs and HSF1 lead to regulation of apoptotic proteins. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Alteration of apoptotic proteins activate of caspases particularly caspase 3 and 9 leading to induction of apoptosis. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Alteration of apoptotic proteins induce caspases leading to induction of apoptosis. -- Abstract: Heat shock proteins (HSPs) are involved in protein folding, aggregation, transport and/or stabilization by acting as a molecular chaperone, leading to inhibition of apoptosis by both caspase dependent and/or independent pathways. HSPs are overexpressed in a wide range of human cancers and are implicated in tumor cell proliferation, differentiation, invasion and metastasis. HSPs particularly 27, 70, 90 and the transcription factor heat shock factor1 (HSF1) play key roles in the etiology of breast cancer and can be considered as potential therapeutic target. The present study was designed to investigate the role of sulphoraphane, a natural isothiocyanate on HSPs (27, 70, 90) and HSF1 in two different breast cancer cell lines MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 cells expressing wild type and mutated p53 respectively, vis-a-vis in normal breast epithelial cell line MCF-12F. It was furthermore investigated whether modulation of HSPs and HSF1 could induce apoptosis in these cells by altering the expressions of p53, p21 and some apoptotic proteins like Bcl-2, Bax, Bid, Bad, Apaf-1 and AIF. Sulphoraphane was found to down-regulate the expressions of HSP70, 90 and HSF1, though the effect on HSP27 was not pronounced. Consequences of HSP inhibition was upregulation of p21 irrespective of p53 status. Bax, Bad, Apaf-1, AIF were upregulated followed by down-regulation of Bcl-2 and this effect was prominent

  1. Molecular characterization and expression analysis of a heat shock protein 90 gene from disk abalone (Haliotis discus).

    PubMed

    Wang, Ning; Whang, Ilson; Lee, Jae-Seong; Lee, Jehee

    2011-06-01

    Heat shock protein 90s (hsp90s) are chaperones that contribute to the proper folding of cellular proteins and help animals cope with the cellular protein damages in stress conditions. In this study, an hsp90 gene was isolated from disc abalone (Haliotis discus). The complete nucleotide sequence of the hsp90 gene contains an open reading frame of 2,184 base pairs, encoding an 84 kDa protein. Disk abalone hsp90 shares high sequence similarity with other hsp90 family proteins. Although the phylogenetic analysis did not classify it into the hsp90α group, the inductivity of this gene was confirmed by heat shock and lipopolysaccharide (LPS) challenge test. Disk abalone hsp90 gene displayed a rapid and reversible induction response to both an exposure of typical heat shock and the LPS challenge. Once given the sublethal heat shock treatment, the transcription of disk abalone hsp90 gene was significantly up-regulated. With a recovery of 12 h, the transcription of disk abalone hsp90 gene gradually attenuated to the control level. These observations reflected the feedback regulation of abalone heat shock responses faithfully. In response to LPS challenge, the transcription of disk abalone hsp90 gene was significantly increased within 2 h and it approached maximum induction at 4 h later and recovered finally the reference level in 24 h. Take all together, the cloning and expression analysis of disk abalone hsp90 gene provided useful molecular information of abalone responses in stress conditions and potential ways to monitor the chronic stressors in abalone culture environments and diagnose the animal health status.

  2. Plasma antibodies to heat shock protein 60 and heat shock protein 70 are associated with increased risk of electrocardiograph abnormalities in automobile workers exposed to noise

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Jing; Yang, Miao; Yao, Huiling; Zheng, Jianru; Yang, Qiaoling; Chen, Sheng; Wei, Qingyi; Tanguay, Robert M.; Wu, Tangchun

    2005-01-01

    In the living and working environment, stressful factors, such as noise, can cause health problems including cardiovascular diseases and noise-induced hearing loss. Some heat shock proteins (Hsps) play an important role in protecting cardiac cells against ischemic injury, and antibodies against these Hsps are associated with the development and prognosis of atherogenesis, coronary heart disease, and hypertension. Whether the presence of such antibodies is associated with abnormal electrocardiography (ECG) in stressed autoworkers exposed to chronic noise is presently unknown. Therefore, we investigated the association between the levels of plasma anti-Hsp60 and anti-Hsp70 with electrocardiograph abnormality in 396 autoworkers exposed to different noise levels by using Western blot, ECG, and multivariate logistic regression analysis. The results showed that the increase in levels of anti-Hsp70 was associated with a higher risk of ECG abnormalities characteristic of chronic myocardial ischemia (P < 0.05), conductive abnormality (P < 0.01), or heart displacement (P < 0.05); in contrast, elevated anti-Hsp60 was related to ECG abnormalities characteristic of sinus arrhythmia, chronic myocardial ischemia, and ectopic rhythm (P < 0.01 for all). Overall, high levels of both anti-Hsp70 and anti-Hsp60 were associated with significantly increased risk of ECG abnormalities (odds ratio [OR] = 1.73 and 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.04–2.86 for anti-Hsp70 and OR = 1.36 and 95% CI = 1.07– 1.72 for anti-Hsp60) with and without adjustment for cumulative noise exposure (OR = 1.96 and 95% CI = 1.20–3.21 for anti-Hsp70 and OR = 3.93 and 95% CI = 1.72–8.92 for anti-Hsp60). These findings suggest that the production of both anti-Hsp70 and anti-Hsp60 may be independent risk factors for the development and progression of abnormal ECG and therefore possibly cardiovascular diseases in autoworkers exposed to occupational noise. PMID:16038409

  3. Heat shock protein-90-beta facilitates enterovirus 71 viral particles assembly

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Robert Y.L.; Kuo, Rei-Lin; Ma, Wei-Chieh; Huang, Hsing-I; Yu, Jau-Song; Yen, Sih-Min; Huang, Chi-Ruei; Shih, Shin-Ru

    2013-09-01

    Molecular chaperones are reported to be crucial for virus propagation, but are not yet addressed in Human Enterovirus 71 (EV71). Here we describe the specific association of heat shock protein-90-beta (Hsp90β), but not alpha form (Hsp90α), with EV71 viral particles by the co-purification with virions using sucrose density gradient ultracentrifugation, and by the colocalization with viral particles, as assessed by immunogold electron microscopy. The reduction of the Hsp90β protein using RNA interference decreased the correct assembly of viral particles, without affecting EV71 replication levels. Tracking ectopically expressed Hsp90β protein associated with EV71 virions revealed that Hsp90β protein was transmitted to new host cells through its direct association with infectious viral particles. Our findings suggest a new antiviral strategy in which extracellular Hsp90β protein is targeted to decrease the infectivity of EV71 and other enteroviruses, without affecting the broader functions of this constitutively expressed molecular chaperone. - Highlights: • Hsp90β is associated with EV71 virion and is secreted with the release virus. • Hsp90β effects on the correct assembly of viral particles. • Viral titer of cultured medium was reduced in the presence of geldanamycin. • Viral titer was also reduced when Hsp90β was suppressed by siRNA treatment. • The extracellular Hsp90β was also observed in other RNA viruses-infected cells.

  4. Unfolding the Role of Large Heat Shock Proteins: New Insights and Therapeutic Implications

    PubMed Central

    Zuo, Daming; Subjeck, John; Wang, Xiang-Yang

    2016-01-01

    Heat shock proteins (HSPs) of eukaryotes are evolutionarily conserved molecules present in all the major intracellular organelles. They mainly function as molecular chaperones and participate in maintenance of protein homeostasis in physiological state and under stressful conditions. Despite their relative abundance, the large HSPs, i.e., Hsp110 and glucose-regulated protein 170 (Grp170), have received less attention compared to other conventional HSPs. These proteins are distantly related to the Hsp70 and belong to Hsp70 superfamily. Increased sizes of Hsp110 and Grp170, due to the presence of a loop structure, result in their exceptional capability in binding to polypeptide substrates or non-protein ligands, such as pathogen-associated molecules. These interactions that occur in the extracellular environment during tissue injury or microbial infection may lead to amplification of an immune response engaging both innate and adaptive immune components. Here, we review the current advances in understanding these large HSPs as molecular chaperones in proteostasis control and immune modulation as well as their therapeutic implications in treatment of cancer and neurodegeneration. Given their unique immunoregulatory activities, we also discuss the emerging evidence of their potential involvement in inflammatory and immune-related diseases. PMID:26973652

  5. Disruption of the glucocorticoid receptor assembly with heat shock protein 90 by a peptidic antiglucocorticoid.

    PubMed

    Dao-Phan, H P; Formstecher, P; Lefebvre, P

    1997-06-01

    Association of glucocorticoid (GR) and progesterone (PR) receptors with a set of molecular chaperones, including the 90-kDa heat shock protein (hsp90), is a dynamic process required for proper folding and maintaining these nuclear receptors under a transcriptionally inactive, ligand-responsive state. Mutational studies of the chicken hsp90 complementary DNA suggested that three regions of this protein (A, B, and Z) interact with the hormone-binding domain of GR, whereas region A is dispensable for hsp90 binding to PR. We found that this 69-amino acid region can be narrowed down to a 35-mer alpha-helical, acidic peptide, which is by itself able to inhibit hsp90 association to GR translated in vitro. The hsp90-free GR did not bind ligand, but was devoid of any specific DNA-binding activity, and higher peptide concentrations specifically inhibited the binding of activated GR to DNA. When overexpressed in cultured cells, this peptide acted as an antiglucocorticoid and inhibited the antiactivating protein-1 activity and the ligand-dependent nuclear transfer of GR. None of these effects, either in vivo and in vitro, was observed for PR. The region from residue 232 to residue 265 of hsp90 is, therefore, a domain critical for its association to GR, an association that is a prerequisite for receptor transcriptional activity. More importantly, these results demonstrate that targeting specific protein/protein interaction interfaces is a powerful means to specifically modulate nuclear receptor signaling pathways in a ligand-independent manner.

  6. Malaria heat shock proteins: drug targets that chaperone other drug targets.

    PubMed

    Pesce, E-R; Cockburn, I L; Goble, J L; Stephens, L L; Blatch, G L

    2010-06-01

    Ongoing research into the chaperone systems of malaria parasites, and particularly of Plasmodium falciparum, suggests that heat shock proteins (Hsps) could potentially be an excellent class of drug targets. The P. falciparum genome encodes a vast range and large number of chaperones, including 43 Hsp40, six Hsp70, and three Hsp90 proteins (PfHsp40s, PfHsp70s and PfHsp90s), which are involved in a number of fundamental cellular processes including protein folding and assembly, protein translocation, signal transduction and the cellular stress response. Despite the fact that Hsps are relatively conserved across different species, PfHsps do exhibit a considerable number of unique structural and functional features. One PfHsp90 is thought to be sufficiently different to human Hsp90 to allow for selective targeting. PfHsp70s could potentially be used as drug targets in two ways: either by the specific inhibition of Hsp70s by small molecule modulators, as well as disruption of the interactions between Hsp70s and co-chaperones such as the Hsp70/Hsp90 organising protein (Hop) and Hsp40s. Of the many PfHsp40s present on the parasite, there are certain unique or essential members which are considered to have good potential as drug targets. This review critically evaluates the potential of Hsps as malaria drug targets, as well as the use of chaperones as aids in the heterologous expression of other potential malarial drug targets.

  7. Heat shock protein-90-beta facilitates enterovirus 71 viral particles assembly.

    PubMed

    Wang, Robert Y L; Kuo, Rei-Lin; Ma, Wei-Chieh; Huang, Hsing-I; Yu, Jau-Song; Yen, Sih-Min; Huang, Chi-Ruei; Shih, Shin-Ru

    2013-09-01

    Molecular chaperones are reported to be crucial for virus propagation, but are not yet addressed in Human Enterovirus 71 (EV71). Here we describe the specific association of heat shock protein-90-beta (Hsp90β), but not alpha form (Hsp90α), with EV71 viral particles by the co-purification with virions using sucrose density gradient ultracentrifugation, and by the colocalization with viral particles, as assessed by immunogold electron microscopy. The reduction of the Hsp90β protein using RNA interference decreased the correct assembly of viral particles, without affecting EV71 replication levels. Tracking ectopically expressed Hsp90β protein associated with EV71 virions revealed that Hsp90β protein was transmitted to new host cells through its direct association with infectious viral particles. Our findings suggest a new antiviral strategy in which extracellular Hsp90β protein is targeted to decrease the infectivity of EV71 and other enteroviruses, without affecting the broader functions of this constitutively expressed molecular chaperone.

  8. Diet and the anti-inflammatory effect of heat shock proteins.

    PubMed

    van Eden, Willem

    2015-01-01

    Stress proteins or heat shock proteins (HSPs) have a critical role in gut health and immune regulation. They have a functional significance as molecular chaperones for cell skeleton proteins and intercellular tight junction proteins. Herewith HSPs ensure gut epithelium integrity and effective intestinal barrier function. In addition, stress protein molecules such as HSP70 are a target for anti-inflammatory regulatory T cells (Tregs). Inflamed sites in the body feature inflammatory-stress induced enhanced levels of HSPs, which enable the immune system to target Tregs selectively to sites of inflammation. We have shown in experimental models of inflammatory diseases that both microbial HSP and endogenous (self) HSP molecules are capable of inducing the expansion of disease suppressive Tregs. Since the gut associated lymphoid tissue (GALT) is well poised towards the induction of regulation and tolerance, we set out to promote HSP expression and induction of Tregs in the gut lymphoid tissues by the oral administration of HSP co-inducing compounds. For the identification, selection and characterization of such compounds we have developed assay systems, such as reporter cell-lines, HSP specific T cell hybridomas and a transgenic mouse model (expression a HSP specific T cell receptor). The introduction of HSP coinducers into the diet constitutes a novel food based preventive or possibly even therapeutic approach in inflammatory diseases.

  9. Heat Shock Proteins: Old and Novel Roles in Neurodegenerative Diseases in the Central Nervous System.

    PubMed

    van Noort, Johannes M; Bugiani, Marianna; Amor, Sandra

    2017-01-01

    Heat shock proteins (HSPs) are families of molecular chaperones that play important homeostatic functions in the central nervous system (CNS) by preventing protein misfolding, promoting degradation of improperly folded proteins, and protecting against apoptosis and inflammatory damage especially during hyperthermia, hypoxia, or oxidative stress. Under stress conditions, HSPs are upregulated to protect cells from damage that accumulates during ageing as well as pathological conditions. An important, yet frequently overlooked function of some HSPs is their ability to function as extracellular messengers (also termed chaperokines) that modulate immune responses within the CNS. Given the strong association between protein aggregation, innate immune cell activation and neurodegeneration, the expression and roles of HSPs in the CNS is attracting attention in many neurodegenerative disorders including inflammatory diseases such as multiple sclerosis, protein folding diseases such as Alzheimer's disease and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, and genetic white matter diseases. This is especially so since several studies show that HSPs act therapeutically by modulating innate immune activation and may thus serve as neuroprotective agents. Here we review the evidence linking HSPs with neurodegenerative disorders in humans and the experimental animal models of these disorders. We discuss the mechanisms by which HSPs protect cells, and how the knowledge of their endogenous functions can be exploited to treat disorders of the CNS. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  10. Heat shock protein 27 (HSPB1) suppresses the PDGF-BB-induced migration of osteoblasts.

    PubMed

    Kainuma, Shingo; Tokuda, Haruhiko; Yamamoto, Naohiro; Kuroyanagi, Gen; Fujita, Kazuhiko; Kawabata, Tetsu; Sakai, Go; Matsushima-Nishiwaki, Rie; Kozawa, Osamu; Otsuka, Takanobu

    2017-10-01

    Heat shock protein 27 (HSP27/HSPB1), one of the small heat shock proteins, is constitutively expressed in various tissues. HSP27 and its phosphorylation state participate in the regulation of multiple physiological and pathophysiological cell functions. However, the exact roles of HSP27 in osteoblasts remain unclear. In the present study, we investigated the role of HSP27 in the platelet-derived growth factor‑BB (PDGF‑BB)‑stimulated migration of osteoblast-like MC3T3-E1 cells. PDGF-BB by itself barely upregulated the expression of HSP27 protein, but stimulated the phosphorylation of HSP27 in these cells. The PDGF-BB‑induced cell migration was significantly downregulated by HSP27 overexpression. The PDGF-BB-induced migrated cell numbers of the wild‑type HSP27-overexpressing cells and the phospho‑mimic HSP27-overexpressing (3D) cells were less than those of the unphosphorylatable HSP27-overexpressing (3A) cells. PD98059, an inhibitor of MEK1/2, SB203580, an inhibitor of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase, and SP600125, an inhibitor of stress-activated protein kinase/c-Jun N-terminal kinase (SAPK/JNK) reduced the PDGF-BB-induced migration of these cells, whereas Akt inhibitor or rapamycin, an inhibitor of upstream kinase of p70 S6 kinase (mTOR), barely affected the migration. However, the PDGF-BB-induced phosphorylation of p44/p42 MAPΚ, p38 MAPK and SAPK/JNK was not affected by HSP27 overexpression. There were no significant differences in the phosphorylation of p44/p42 MAPΚ, p38 MAP kinase or SAPK/JNK between the 3D cells and the 3A cells. These results strongly suggest that HSP27 functions as a negative regulator in the PDGF-BB-stimulated migration of osteoblasts, and the suppressive effect is amplified by the phosphorylation state of HSP27.

  11. Continuous up-regulation of heat shock proteins in larvae, but not adults, of a polar insect.

    PubMed

    Rinehart, Joseph P; Hayward, Scott A L; Elnitsky, Michael A; Sandro, Luke H; Lee, Richard E; Denlinger, David L

    2006-09-19

    Antarctica's terrestrial environment is a challenge to which very few animals have adapted. The largest, free-living animal to inhabit the continent year-round is a flightless midge, Belgica antarctica. Larval midges survive the lengthy austral winter encased in ice, and when the ice melts in summer, the larvae complete their 2-yr life cycle, and the wingless adults form mating aggregations while subjected to surprisingly high substrate temperatures. Here we report a dichotomy in survival strategies exploited by this insect at different stages of its life cycle. Larvae constitutively up-regulate their heat shock proteins (small hsp, hsp70, and hsp90) and maintain a high inherent tolerance to temperature stress. High or low temperature exposure does not further up-regulate these genes nor does it further enhance thermotolerance. Such "preemptive" synthesis of hsps is sufficient to prevent irreversible protein aggregation in response to a variety of common environmental stresses. Conversely, adults exhibit no constitutive up-regulation of their hsps and have a lower intrinsic tolerance to high temperatures, but their hsps can be thermally activated, resulting in enhanced thermotolerance. Thus, the midge larvae, but not the adults, have adopted the unusual strategy of expressing hsps continuously, possibly to facilitate proper protein folding in a cold habitat that is more thermally stable than that of the adults but a habitat subjected frequently to freeze-thaw episodes and bouts of pH, anoxic, and osmotic stress.

  12. Altered expression of a heat shock protein in the mammalian nervous system in the presence of agents which affect microtubule stability.

    PubMed

    Clark, B D; Brown, I R

    1987-09-01

    In vitro incubation of the isolated rabbit retina at elevated temperature results in the synthesis of a heat shock protein of M.W. 74,000 (hsp74). Recently we have demonstrated that this protein is associated with preparations of purified retinal microtubules and intermediate filaments. In order to examine the possibility that hsp74 synthesis is related to cytoskeletal stability, the effects of agents known to specifically affect microtubules were examined using an in vitro retinal system. Taxol, an antimitotic agent which stabilizes microtubules, was found to reduce the level of hsp74 synthesized in response to elevated temperature. Colchicine, a potent microtubule de-stabilizing agent, did not induce hsp74 synthesis in the absence of elevated temperature, however, under heat shock conditions, hsp74 synthesis was elevated in the presence of colchicine. Kinetics of microtubule assembly were similar in preparations isolated from cerebral hemispheres of control and hyperthermic animals however, microtubules from the latter were altered in appearance and exhibited a higher degree of crosslinking.

  13. Cloning of the heat shock protein 90 and 70 genes from the beet armyworm, Spodoptera exigua, and expression characteristics in relation to thermal stress and development

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Two full-length complementary DNAs (cDNAs) of heat shock protein (HSP) genes (Se-hsp90 and Se-hsp70) were cloned from the beet armyworm, Spodoptera exigua, and their expression was investigated in relation to cold shock, heat shock, and development. The open reading frames of Se-hsp90 and Sehsp70 ar...

  14. Disruption of the three cytoskeletal networks in mammalian cells does not affect transcription, translation, or protein translocation changes induced by heat shock.

    PubMed Central

    Welch, W J; Feramisco, J R

    1985-01-01

    Mammalian cells show a complex series of transcriptional and translational switching events in response to heat shock treatment which ultimately lead to the production and accumulation of a small number of proteins, the so-called heat shock (or stress) proteins. We investigated the heat shock response in both qualitative and quantitative ways in cells that were pretreated with drugs that specifically disrupt one or more of the three major cytoskeletal networks. (These drugs alone, cytochalasin E and colcemid, do not result in induction of the heat shock response.) Our results indicated that disruption of the actin microfilaments, the vimentin-containing intermediate filaments, or the microtubules in living cells does not hinder the ability of the cell to undergo an apparently normal heat shock response. Even when all three networks were simultaneously disrupted (resulting in a loose, baglike appearance of the cells), the cells still underwent a complete heat shock response as assayed by the appearance of the heat shock proteins. In addition, the major induced 72-kilodalton heat shock protein was efficiently translocated from the cytoplasm into its proper location in the nucleus and nucleolus irrespective of the condition of the three cytoskeletal elements. Images PMID:4040602

  15. Priming the prophenoloxidase system of Artemia franciscana by heat shock proteins protects against Vibrio campbellii challenge.

    PubMed

    Baruah, Kartik; Ranjan, Jayant; Sorgeloos, Patrick; Macrae, Thomas H; Bossier, Peter

    2011-07-01

    Like other invertebrates, the brine shrimp Artemia franciscana relies solely on innate immunity, which by definition lacks adaptive characteristics, to combat against invading pathogens. One of the innate mechanisms is melanisation of bacteria mediated by the activation of the prophenoloxidase (proPO) system. The 70 kDa heat shock proteins (Hsp70) derived from either prokaryote (Escherichia coli) or eukaryote (Artemia), well conserved and immune-dominant molecules, protect Artemia against Vibrio campbellii. However, the molecular mechanisms by which these proteins protect Artemia against Vibrio campbellii infection are unknown. Here we demonstrated that feeding gnotobiotically grown Artemia with either Artemia Hsp70 or the E. coli Hsp70 equivalent DnaK, each overproduced in E. coli, followed by V. campbellii challenge enhanced the proPO system, at both mRNA and protein activity levels. Additionally, the Artemia fed with these proteins survived well in a Vibrio challenge assay. These results indicated that Hsp70s derived from either prokaryotic or eukaryotic sources generate protective immunity in the crustacean Artemia against V. campbellii infection by priming the proPO system. This is apparently the first in vivo report on priming activity of Hsp70 in an invertebrate. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Pathology-Dependent Effects Linked to Small Heat Shock Proteins Expression: An Update

    PubMed Central

    Arrigo, A.-P.

    2012-01-01

    Small heat shock proteins (small Hsps) are stress-induced molecular chaperones that act as holdases towards polypeptides that have lost their folding in stress conditions or consequently of mutations in their coding sequence. A cellular protection against the deleterious effects mediated by damaged proteins is thus provided to cells. These chaperones are also highly expressed in response to protein conformational and inflammatory diseases and cancer pathologies. Through specific and reversible modifications in their phospho-oligomeric organization, small Hsps can chaperone appropriate client proteins in order to provide cells with resistance to different types of injuries or pathological conditions. By helping cells to better cope with their pathological status, their expression can be either beneficial, such as in diseases characterized by pathological cell degeneration, or deleterious when they are required for tumor cell survival. Moreover, small Hsps are actively released by cells and can act as immunogenic molecules that have dual effects depending on the pathology. The cellular consequences linked to their expression levels and relationships with other Hsps as well as therapeutic strategies are discussed in view of their dynamic structural organization required to interact with specific client polypeptides. PMID:24278676

  17. Targeting the molecular chaperone heat shock protein 90 (HSP90): lessons learned and future directions.

    PubMed

    Hong, David S; Banerji, Udai; Tavana, Bahareh; George, Goldy C; Aaron, Joann; Kurzrock, Razelle

    2013-06-01

    Due to the critical role of heat shock protein 90 (HSP90) in regulating the stability, activity and intracellular sorting of its client proteins involved in multiple oncogenic processes, HSP90 inhibitors are promising therapeutic agents for cancer treatment. In cancer cells, HSP90 client proteins play a major role in oncogenic signal transduction (i.e., mutant epidermal growth factor receptor), angiogenesis (i.e., vascular endothelial growth factor), anti-apoptosis (i.e., AKT), and metastasis (i.e., matrix metalloproteinase 2 and CD91), processes central to maintaining the cancer phenotype. Thus, HSP90 has emerged as a viable target for antitumor drug development, and several HSP90 inhibitors have transitioned to clinical trials. HSP90 inhibitors include geldanamycin and its derivatives (i.e., tanespimycin, alvespimycin, IPI-504), synthetic and small molecule inhibitors (i.e., AUY922, AT13387, STA9090, MPC3100), other inhibitors of HSP90 and its isoforms (i.e., shepherdin and 5'-N-ethylcarboxamideadenosine). With more than 200 "client" proteins, many of them meta-stable and oncogenic, HSP90 inhibition can affect an array of tumors. Here we review the molecular structure of HSP90, structural features of HSP90 inhibition, pharmacodynamic effects and tumor responses in clinical trials of HSP90 inhibitors. We also discuss lessons learned from completed clinical trials of HSP90 inhibitors, and future directions for these promising therapeutic agents. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Heat shock (stress response) proteins and renal ischemia/reperfusion injury.

    PubMed

    Kelly, Katherine J

    2005-01-01

    Acute renal failure occurs frequently, may be increasing, carries an unacceptably high mortality, yet there is no specific treatment. The induction of stress response (heat shock) proteins (HSPs) is a highly conserved response that protects many cell types from diverse physiological and environmental stressors. HSP families of different sizes function as molecular chaperones that facilitate the folding of enzymes and other proteins into functional conformations. After injury, HSPs are believed to facilitate the restoration of normal function by assisting in the refolding of denatured proteins and degradation of irreparably damaged proteins and toxic metabolites, limitation of aggregation of damaged peptides and aiding appropriate folding of newly synthesized essential polypeptides. HSPs may also regulate apoptosis and immune functions. We have demonstrated protection from the functional deficits and histological evidence of experimental ischemic renal injury with heat stress 6 but not 48 h prior to ischemia. Limitation of the induction of HSPs (either with a short period of hyperthermia or pharmacologically) attenuated the protection observed. Other investigators have demonstrated a correlation between the levels of HSP25 and renal ischemic preconditioning in the mouse. Several pharmacological agents have been shown to increase HSP expression. Enhancement of these endogenous protective mechanisms has potential benefit in human disease.

  19. Structural and functional homology between periplasmic bacterial molecular chaperones and small heat shock proteins.

    PubMed

    Zav'yalov, V P; Zav'yalova, G A; Denesyuk, A I; Gaestel, M; Korpela, T

    1995-07-01

    The periplasmic Yersinia pestis molecular chaperone Caf1M belongs to a superfamily of bacterial proteins for one of which (PapD protein of Escherichia coli) the immunoglobulin-like fold was solved by X-ray analysis. The N-terminal domain of Caf1M was found to share a 20% amino acid sequence identity with an inclusion body-associated protein IbpB of Escherichia coli. One of the regions that was compared, was 32 amino acids long, and displayed more than 40% identity, probability of random coincidence was 1.2 x 10(-4). IbpB is involved in a superfamily of small heat shock proteins which fulfil the function of molecular chaperone. On the basis of the revealed homology, an immunoglobulin-like one-domain model of IbpB three-dimensional structure was designed which could be a prototype conformation of sHsp's. The structure suggested is in good agreement with the known experimental data obtained for different members of sHsp's superfamily.

  20. Heat shock proteins and exercise adaptations. Our knowledge thus far and the road still ahead.

    PubMed

    Henstridge, Darren C; Febbraio, Mark A; Hargreaves, Mark

    2016-03-15

    By its very nature, exercise exerts a challenge to the body's cellular homeostatic mechanisms. This homeostatic challenge affects not only the contracting skeletal muscle but also a number of other organs and results over time in exercise-induced adaptations. Thus it is no surprise that heat shock proteins (HSPs), a group of ancient and highly conserved cytoprotective proteins critical in the maintenance of protein and cellular homeostasis, have been implicated in exercise/activity-induced adaptations. It has become evident that HSPs such as HSP72 are induced or activated with acute exercise or after chronic exercise training regimens. These observations have given scientists an insight into the protective mechanisms of these proteins and provided an opportunity to exploit their protective role to improve health and physical performance. Although our knowledge in this area of physiology has improved dramatically, many questions still remain unanswered. Further understanding of the role of HSPs in exercise physiology may prove beneficial for therapeutic targeting in diseased patient cohorts, exercise prescription for disease prevention, and training strategies for elite athletes.

  1. Four Members of Heat Shock Protein 70 Family in Korean Rose Bitterling (Rhodeus uyekii)

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jung Hyun; Dong, Chun Mae; Kim, Julan; An, Cheul Min; Baek, Hae Ja; Kong, Hee Jeong

    2015-01-01

    Heat shock protein (HSP) 70, the highly conserved stress protein families, plays important roles in protecting cells against heat and other stresses in most animal species. In the present study, we identified and characterized four Hsp70 (RuHSP4, RuHSC70, RuHSP12A, RuGRP78) family proteins based on the expressed sequence tag (EST) analysis of the Korean rose bitterling R. uyekii cDNA library. The deduced RuHSP70 family has high amino acid identities of 72-99% with those of other species. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that RuHsp70 family clustered with fish groups (HSP4, HSC70, HSP12A, GRP78) proteins. Quantitative RT-PCR analysis showed the specific expression patterns of RuHsp70 family members in the early developmental stages and several tissues in Korean rose bitterling. The expression of 4 groups of Hsp70 family was detected in all tested tissue. Particularly, Hsp70 family of Korean rose bitterling is highly expressed in hepatopancreas and sexual gonad (testis and ovary). The expression of Hsp70 family was differentially regulated in accordance with early development stage of Rhodeus uyekii. PMID:27004270

  2. Pharmacological induction of heat-shock proteins alleviates polyglutamine-mediated motor neuron disease

    PubMed Central

    Katsuno, Masahisa; Sang, Chen; Adachi, Hiroaki; Minamiyama, Makoto; Waza, Masahiro; Tanaka, Fumiaki; Doyu, Manabu; Sobue, Gen

    2005-01-01

    Spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy (SBMA) is an adult-onset motor neuron disease caused by the expansion of a trinucleotide CAG repeat encoding the polyglutamine tract in the first exon of the androgen receptor gene (AR). The pathogenic, polyglutamine-expanded AR protein accumulates in the cell nucleus in a ligand-dependent manner and inhibits transcription by interfering with transcriptional factors and coactivators. Heat-shock proteins (HSPs) are stress-induced chaperones that facilitate the refolding and, thus, the degradation of abnormal proteins. Geranylgeranylacetone (GGA), a nontoxic antiulcer drug, has been shown to potently induce HSP expression in various tissues, including the central nervous system. In a cell model of SBMA, GGA increased the levels of Hsp70, Hsp90, and Hsp105 and inhibited cell death and the accumulation of pathogenic AR. Oral administration of GGA also up-regulated the expression of HSPs in the central nervous system of SBMA-transgenic mice and suppressed nuclear accumulation of the pathogenic AR protein, resulting in amelioration of polyglutamine-dependent neuromuscular phenotypes. These observations suggest that, although a high dose appears to be needed for clinical effects, oral GGA administration is a safe and promising therapeutic candidate for polyglutamine-mediated neurodegenerative diseases, including SBMA. PMID:16260738

  3. Expression of heat shock protein 90 in the kidneys of diabetic db/db mice.

    PubMed

    Kim, Y S; Sohn, E; Jung, D H; Lee, Y M; Kim, C S; Kim, J; Kim, J S

    2014-01-01

    To identify novel genes regulated in diabetic nephropathy. Total RNA from the renal cortex of db/+ and db/db mice was isolated and DNA microarrays specific for diabetes signaling pathways were used for expression profiling. Expression of mRNA and protein was determined by RT-PCR and western blotting. The terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated biotinylated UTP nick-end labeling (TUNEL) assay and immunohistochemical staining were assessed in renal cortex of db/db mice. Microarray data revealed that 7 genes show up- or down-regulated pattern and diabetic mice specifically decreased heat shock protein (Hsp) 90α expression of genes compared to control mice (diabetic mice 0.68 vs. control mice 1 relative density). Expression of Hsp90α mRNA and Hsp90 protein was significantly decreased in the renal cortex of diabetic mice. However, Hsp70 mRNA and protein expression was not changed. Apoptosis was increased in glomeruli of diabetic mice due to increased expression of cleaved caspase-3 and Bax. Our results suggest that Hsp 90 expression was decreased in diabetic glomeruli and decreased Hsp90 expression may mediate podocyte apoptosis in type 2 diabetic kidneys.

  4. Heat shock protein 90 as a drug target: some like it hot.

    PubMed

    Banerji, Udai

    2009-01-01

    Heat shock protein 90 (HSP90) is a ubiquitously expressed chaperone that is