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Sample records for heated circular cylinder

  1. Convective heat transfer from circular cylinders located within perforated cylindrical shrouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daryabeigi, K.; Ash, R. L.

    1986-01-01

    The influence of perforated cylindrical shrouds on the convective heat transfer to circular cylinders in transverse flow has been studied experimentally. Geometries studied were similar to those used in industrial platinum resistance thermometers. The influence of Reynolds number, ventilation factor (ratio of the open area to the total surface area of shroud), radius ratio (ratio of shroud's inside radius to bare cylinder's radius), and shroud orientation with respect to flow were studied. The experiments showed that perforated shrouds with ventilation factors in the range 0.1 to 0.4 and radius ratios in the range 1.1 to 2.1 could enhance the convective heat transfer to bare cylinders up to 50%. The maximum enhancement occurred for a radius ratio of 1.4 and ventilation factors between 0.2 and 0.3. It was found that shroud orientation influenced the heat transfer, with maximum heat transfer generally occurring when the shroud's holes were centered on either side of the stagnation line. However, the hole orientation effect is of second order compared to the influence of ventilation factor and radius ratio.

  2. Application of turbulence modeling to predict surface heat transfer in stagnation flow region of circular cylinder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Chi R.; Yeh, Frederick C.

    1987-01-01

    A theoretical analysis and numerical calculations for the turbulent flow field and for the effect of free-stream turbulence on the surface heat transfer rate of a stagnation flow are presented. The emphasis is on the modeling of turbulence and its augmentation of surface heat transfer rate. The flow field considered is the region near the forward stagnation point of a circular cylinder in a uniform turbulent mean flow. The free stream is steady and incompressible with a Reynolds number of the order of 10 to the 5th power and turbulence intensity of less than 5 percent. For this analysis, the flow field is divided into three regions: (1) a uniform free-stream region where the turbulence is homogeneous and isotropic; (2) an external viscid flow region where the turbulence is distorted by the variation of the mean flow velocity; and, (3) an anisotropic turbulent boundary layer region over the cylinder surface. The turbulence modeling techniques used are the kappa-epsilon two-equation model in the external flow region and the time-averaged turbulence transport equation in the boundary layer region. The turbulence double correlations, the mean velocity, and the mean temperature within the boundary layer are solved numerically from the transport equations. The surface heat transfer rate is calculated as functions of the free-stream turbulence longitudinal microlength scale, the turbulence intensity, and the Reynolds number.

  3. Influence of ventilated shrouds on the convective heat transfer to a circular cylinder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daryabeigi, Kamran; Ash, Robert L.; Dillon-Townes, Lawrence A.

    1987-01-01

    Convective heat transfer to shrouded cylinders in transverse flow has been studied over the Reynolds number range 2000-20,000. The influence of shroud ventilation, relative shroud diameters, and orientation of the ventilation holes was studied. In some cases, average inner-cylinder Nusselt numbers were found to exceed the comparable bare-cylinder values by as much as 50 percent. Cylinder heat convection was influenced more by the degree of ventilation and shroud diameter than by hole orientation. An equivalent inner bare cylinder diameter, based on degree of shroud ventilation and shroud diameter, was developed which can be useful in shroud design studies.

  4. Digital particle image velocimetry/thermometry and application to the wake of a heated circular cylinder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, H. G.; Dabiri, D.; Gharib, M.

    Digital particle image velocimetry/thermometry (DPIV/T) is a technique whereby the velocity and temperature fields are obtained using thermochromic liquid crystal (TLC) seeding particles in water. In this paper, the uncertainty levels associated with temperature and velocity measurements using DPIV/T are studied. The study shows that large uncertainties are encountered when the temperature is measured from individual TLC particles. Therefore, an averaging procedure is presented which can reduce the temperature uncertainties. The uncertainty is reduced by computing the average temperature of the particles within the common specified sampling window used for standard DPIV. Using this procedure, the velocity and temperature distributions of an unsteady wake behind a heated circular cylinder are measured experimentally at Re=610. The instantaneous DPIV/T measurements are shown to be useful for computing statistical flow quantities, such as mean and velocity-temperature correlations.

  5. Turbulence and surface heat transfer near the stagnation point of a circular cylinder in turbulent flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, C. R.

    1983-01-01

    A turbulent boundary layer flow analysis of the momentum and thermal flow fields near the forward stagnation point due to a circular cylinder in turbulent cross flow is presented. Turbulence modeling length scale, anisotropic turbulence initial profiles and boundary conditions were identified as functions of the cross flow turbulence intensity and the boundary layer flow far field velocity. These parameters were used in a numerical computational procedure to calculate the mean velocity, mean temperature, and turbulence double correlation profiles within the flow field. The effects of the cross flow turbulence on the stagnation region momentum and thermal flow fields were investigated. This analysis predicted the existing measurements of the stagnation region mean velocity and surface heat transfer rate with cross flow Reynolds number and turbulence intensity less than 250,000 and 0.05, respectively.

  6. Effect of a rotor wake on heat transfer from a circular cylinder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simoneau, R. J.; Morehouse, K. A.; Vanfossen, G. J.; Behning, F. P.

    1984-08-01

    The effect of a rotor wake on heat transfer to a downstream stator was investigated. The rotor was modeled with a spoked wheel of 24 circular pins 1.59 mm in diameter. One of the stator pins was electrically heated in the midspan region and circumferentially averaged heat transfer coefficients were obtained. The experiment was run in an annular flow wind tunnel using air at ambient temperature and pressure. Reynolds numbers based on stator cylinder diameter ranged from .001 to .00001. Rotor blade passing frequencies ranged from zero to 2500 Hz. Stationary grids were used to vary the rotor inlet turbulence from one to four percent. The rotor-stator spacings were one and two stator pin diameters. In addition to the heat transfer coefficients, turbulence spectra and ensemble averaged wake profiles were measured. At the higher Reynolds numbers, which is the primary range of interest for turbulent heat transfer, the rotor wakes increased Nusselt number from 10 to 45 percent depending on conditions. At lower Reynolds numbers the effect was as much as a factor of two.

  7. Simulating transitional flow and heat transfer over the flat plate and circular cylinder using a K-epsilon turbulence model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sullivan, T. J.; Ibrahim, M.

    1989-01-01

    A boundary layer computer code, called TEXSTAN, has been used to simulate external, transitional, fluid flow and heat transfer over the flat plate and circular cylinder. Turbulence modeling was accomplished by using a low-Reynolds number K-epsilon turbulence model. The study was made for free-stream turbulence intensities less than 15 percent. The comparison of the flat plate heat transfer predictions to experimental data showed good agreement, for the location of transition as well as in the heat transfer coefficient. The typical discrepancy in predicting the heat transfer coefficient was less than 5 percent of the measured value.

  8. Heat Transfer and Pressure Drop Data for Circular Cylinders in Ducts and Various Arrangements

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1951-09-01

    cities - and Constant Spacing iii Scinch, Duct - ~-^ - - -r =• -~ - -- - - - - 37;, Single, Cylinder’ and Three- Cylinders in line" with Yard...heating coils surrounded by .a 3/Scinch thicis shell of ^anslte, .an asbest -cs-cemens material; oo’CiSlstljig of 35 per cent Portland cement .and lä per...gradients did, not permit very accurate de-* teraiinationä--&t low flois veio- cities because of ihseösitivity af She fee generalization of the, pressure

  9. Molecular tagging velocimetry and thermometry and its application to the wake of a heated circular cylinder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Hui; Koochesfahani, Manoochehr M.

    2006-06-01

    instrumentation and experimental set-up. The implementation and application of the new technique are demonstrated by conducting simultaneous velocity and temperature measurements in the wake region of a heated circular cylinder at a Richardson number of 0.36, a value large enough for the buoyancy effects to potentially influence the flow.

  10. Tests on Stiffened Circular Cylinders

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holt, Marshall

    1941-01-01

    Compressive tests were made of two series of stiffened circular cylindrical shells under axial load. All the shells were 16 inches in diameter by 24 inches in length and were made of aluminum-alloy sheet curved to the proper radius and welded with one longitudinal weld. The ratios of diameter to thickness of shell wall in the two series of specimens were 258 and 572. Strains were measured with Huggenberger tensometers at a number of gage lines on the stiffeners and shell. The results of these tests indicate that a spacing of circumferential stiffeners equal to 0.67 times the radius is too great to strengthen the shell wall appreciably. The results are not inclusive enough to show the optimum in stiffeners. Plain cylinders without stiffeners developed ultimate strengths approximately half as great as the buckling strengths computed by the equation resulting from the classical theory and slightly greater than those computed by Donnell's large deflection theory.

  11. Numerical investigation of mixed convection heat transfer from two isothermal circular cylinders in tandem arrangement: buoyancy, spacing ratio, and confinement effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salcedo, Erick; Cajas, Juan C.; Treviño, César; Martínez-Suástegui, Lorenzo

    2017-04-01

    This paper presents a two-dimensional numerical study for mixed convection in a laminar cross-flow with a pair of stationary equal-sized isothermal cylinders in tandem arrangement confined in a channel. The governing equations are solved using the control volume method on a nonuniform orthogonal Cartesian grid, and the immersed boundary method is employed to identify the cylinders placed in the flow field. The numerical scheme is first validated against standard cases of symmetrically confined isothermal circular cylinders in plane channels, and grid convergence tests were also examined. The objective of the present study was to investigate the influence of buoyancy and the blockage ratio constraint on the flow and heat transfer characteristics of the immersed cylinder array. Using a fixed Reynolds number based on cylinder diameter of ReD = 200, a fixed value of the Prandtl number of Pr = 7, and a blockage ratio of D/H = 0.2, all possible flow regimes are considered by setting the longitudinal spacing ratio (σ = L/D) between the cylinder axes to 2, 3, and 5 for values of the buoyancy parameter (Richardson number) in the range -1≤ Ri≤ 4. The interference effects and complex flow features are presented in the form of mean and instantaneous velocity, vorticity, and temperature distributions. The results demonstrate how the buoyancy, spacing ratio, and wall confinement affect the wake structure and vortex dynamics. In addition, local and average heat transfer characteristics of both cylinders are comprehensively presented for a wide range in the parametric space.

  12. Numerical investigation of mixed convection heat transfer from two isothermal circular cylinders in tandem arrangement: buoyancy, spacing ratio, and confinement effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salcedo, Erick; Cajas, Juan C.; Treviño, César; Martínez-Suástegui, Lorenzo

    2016-11-01

    This paper presents a two-dimensional numerical study for mixed convection in a laminar cross-flow with a pair of stationary equal-sized isothermal cylinders in tandem arrangement confined in a channel. The governing equations are solved using the control volume method on a nonuniform orthogonal Cartesian grid, and the immersed boundary method is employed to identify the cylinders placed in the flow field. The numerical scheme is first validated against standard cases of symmetrically confined isothermal circular cylinders in plane channels, and grid convergence tests were also examined. The objective of the present study was to investigate the influence of buoyancy and the blockage ratio constraint on the flow and heat transfer characteristics of the immersed cylinder array. Using a fixed Reynolds number based on cylinder diameter of ReD = 200 , a fixed value of the Prandtl number of Pr = 7 , and a blockage ratio of D/H = 0.2 , all possible flow regimes are considered by setting the longitudinal spacing ratio (σ = L/D ) between the cylinder axes to 2, 3, and 5 for values of the buoyancy parameter (Richardson number) in the range -1≤ Ri≤ 4 . The interference effects and complex flow features are presented in the form of mean and instantaneous velocity, vorticity, and temperature distributions. The results demonstrate how the buoyancy, spacing ratio, and wall confinement affect the wake structure and vortex dynamics. In addition, local and average heat transfer characteristics of both cylinders are comprehensively presented for a wide range in the parametric space.

  13. Vortex motion behind a circular cylinder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Foeppl, L.

    1983-01-01

    Vortex motion behind a circular cylinder moving through water is discussed. It is shown that a pair of vortices form behind a moving cylinder and that their centers will move along a predictable curve. This curve represents an equilibrium condition which, however, is subject to perturbation. The stability of the vortex pair is investigated. Movement of the vortex pair away from the cylinder is calculated as an explanation of the resistance of the cylinder. Finally, the principles elaborated are applied to the flow around a flat plate.

  14. Effect of a rotor wake on the local heat transfer on the forward half of a circular cylinder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morehouse, Kim A.; Simoneau, Robert J.

    Turbine rotor-stator wake dynamics was simulated by a spoked wheel rotating in annular flow, generating rotor wakes. Spanwise averaged circumferentially local heat transfer in the circular cylindrical leading edge region of a turbine airfoil was obtained. Reynolds numbers ranged from 35,000 to 175,000. Strouhal numbers ranged from 0.63 to 2.50. Wakes were generated by 2 sets of circular cylindrical bars, 1.59 and 3.18 mm in diameter. The rotor could be rotated either clockwise or counterclockwise. Grid turbulence was introduced upstream yielding freestream turbulence of 1.0 to 2.5 percent at the stator. Data represented an extensive body of local heat transfer coefficients, which can be used to model the leading edge region of a turbine airfoil. In the presence of rotor wakes, an asymmetry from the leeward to windward side was noted. Windward side levels were 30 to 40 percent higher than the corresonding leeward side.

  15. Investigation of the effects of pressure gradient, temperature and wall temperature ratio on the stagnation point heat transfer for circular cylinders and gas turbine vanes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nagamatsu, H. T.; Duffy, R. E.

    1984-01-01

    Low and high pressure shock tubes were designed and constructed for the purpose of obtaining heat transfer data over a temperature range of 390 to 2500 K, pressures of 0.3 to 42 atm, and Mach numbers of 0.15 to 1.5 with and without pressure gradient. A square test section with adjustable top and bottom walls was constructed to produce the favorable and adverse pressure gradient over the flat plate with heat gages. A water cooled gas turbine nozzle cascade which is attached to the high pressure shock tube was obtained to measuse the heat flux over pressure and suction surfaces. Thin-film platinum heat gages with a response time of a few microseconds were developed and used to measure the heat flux for laminar, transition, and turbulent boundary layers. The laminar boundary heat flux on the shock tube wall agreed with Mirel's flat plate theory. Stagnation point heat transfer for circular cylinders at low temperature compared with the theoretical prediction, but for a gas temperature of 922 K the heat fluxes were higher than the predicted values. Preliminary flat plate heat transfer data were measured for laminar, transition, and turbulent boundary layers with and without pressure gradients for free-stream temperatures of 350 to 2575 K and flow Mach numbers of 0.11 to 1.9. The experimental heat flux data were correlated with the laminar and turbulent theories and the agreement was good at low temperatures which was not the case for higher temperatures.

  16. Mixed convection flow over a horizontal circular cylinder with constant heat flux embedded in a porous medium filled by a nanofluid: Buongiorno-Darcy model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tham, Leony; Nazar, Roslinda; Pop, Ioan

    2016-09-01

    The steady laminar mixed convection boundary layer flow from a horizontal circular cylinder in a nanofluid embedded in a porous medium, which is maintained at a constant surface heat flux, has been studied by using the Buongiorno-Darcy nanofluid model for both cases of a heated and cooled cylinder. The resulting system of nonlinear partial differential equations is solved numerically using an implicit finite-difference scheme known as the Keller box method. The solutions for the flow and heat transfer characteristics are evaluated numerically and studied for various values of the governing parameters, namely the Lewis number, Brownian number, mixed convection parameter, buoyancy ratio parameter and thermophoresis parameter. It is also found that the boundary layer separation occurs at the opposing fluid flow, that is when the mixed convection parameter is negative. It is also observed that increasing the mixed convection parameter delays the boundary layer separation and the separation can be completely suppressed for sufficiently large values of the mixed convection parameter. The Brownian and buoyancy ratio parameters appear to affect the fluid flow and heat transfer profiles.

  17. Stability analysis of cylinders with circular cutouts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Almroth, B. O.; Brogan, F. A.; Marlowe, M. B.

    1973-01-01

    The stability of axially compressed cylinders with circular cutouts is analyzed numerically. An extension of the finite-difference method is used which removes the requirement that displacement components be defined in the directions of the grid lines. The results of this nonlinear analysis are found to be in good agreement with earlier experimental results.

  18. Bilateral symmetry breaking in nonlinear circular cylinders.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Lijun; Lu, Ya Yan

    2014-12-01

    Symmetry breaking is a common phenomenon in nonlinear systems, it refers to the existence of solutions that do not preserve the original symmetries of the underlying system. In nonlinear optics, symmetry breaking has been previously investigated in a number of systems, usually based on simplified model equations or temporal coupled mode theories. In this paper, we analyze the scattering of an incident plane wave by one or two circular cylinders with a Kerr nonlinearity, and show the existence of solutions that break a lateral reflection symmetry. Although symmetry breaking is a known phenomenon in nonlinear optics, it is the first time that this phenomenon was rigorously studied in simple systems with one or two circular cylinders.

  19. Laminar flow past a rotating circular cylinder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Sangmo; Choi, Haecheon; Lee, Sangsan

    1999-11-01

    The present study numerically investigates two-dimensional laminar flow past a circular cylinder rotating with a constant angular velocity, for the purpose of controlling vortex shedding and understanding the underlying flow mechanism. Numerical simulations are performed for flows with Re=60, 100, and 160 in the range of 0⩽α⩽2.5, where α is the circumferential speed at the cylinder surface normalized by the free-stream velocity. Results show that the rotation of a cylinder can suppress vortex shedding effectively. Vortex shedding exists at low rotational speeds and completely disappears at α>αL, where αL is the critical rotational speed which shows a logarithmic dependence on Re. The Strouhal number remains nearly constant regardless of α while vortex shedding exists. With increasing α, the mean lift increases linearly and the mean drag decreases, which differ significantly from those predicted by the potential flow theory. On the other hand, the amplitude of lift fluctuation stays nearly constant with increasing α (<αL), while that of drag fluctuation increases. Further studies from the instantaneous flow fields demonstrate again that the rotation of a cylinder makes a substantial effect on the flow pattern.

  20. Steady viscous flow past a circular cylinder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fornberg, B.

    1984-01-01

    Viscous flow past a circular cylinder becomes unstable around Reynolds number Re = 40. With a numerical technique based on Newton's method and made possible by the use of a supercomputer, steady (but unstable) solutions have been calculated up to Re = 400. It is found that the wake continues to grow in length approximately linearly with Re. However, in conflict with available asymptotic predictions, the width starts to increase very rapidly around Re = 300. All numerical calculations have been performed on the CDC CYBER 205 at the CDC Service Center in Arden Hills, Minnesota.

  1. Failure of Non-Circular Composite Cylinders

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hyer, M. W.

    2004-01-01

    In this study, a progressive failure analysis is used to investigate leakage in internally pressurized non-circular composite cylinders. This type of approach accounts for the localized loss of stiffness when material failure occurs at some location in a structure by degrading the local material elastic properties by a certain factor. The manner in which this degradation of material properties takes place depends on the failure modes, which are determined by the application of a failure criterion. The finite-element code STAGS, which has the capability to perform progressive failure analysis using different degradation schemes and failure criteria, is utilized to analyze laboratory scale, graphite-epoxy, elliptical cylinders with quasi-isotropic, circumferentially-stiff, and axially-stiff material orthotropies. The results are divided into two parts. The first part shows that leakage, which is assumed to develop if there is material failure in every layer at some axial and circumferential location within the cylinder, does not occur without failure of fibers. Moreover before fibers begin to fail, only matrix tensile failures, or matrix cracking, takes place, and at least one layer in all three cylinders studied remain uncracked, preventing the formation of a leakage path. That determination is corroborated by the use of different degradation schemes and various failure criteria. Among the degradation schemes investigated are the degradation of different engineering properties, the use of various degradation factors, the recursive or non-recursive degradation of the engineering properties, and the degradation of material properties using different computational approaches. The failure criteria used in the analysis include the noninteractive maximum stress criterion and the interactive Hashin and Tsai-Wu criteria. The second part of the results shows that leakage occurs due to a combination of matrix tensile and compressive, fiber tensile and compressive, and inplane

  2. Bubbly flows around a two-dimensional circular cylinder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jubeom; Park, Hyungmin

    2016-11-01

    Two-phase cross flows around a bluff body occur in many thermal-fluid systems like steam generators, heat exchangers and nuclear reactors. However, our current knowledge on the interactions among bubbles, bubble-induced flows and the bluff body are limited. In the present study, the gas-liquid bubbly flows around a solid circular cylinder are experimentally investigated while varying the mean void fraction from 5 to 27%. The surrounding liquid (water) is initially static and the liquid flow is only induced by the air bubbles. For the measurements, we use the high-speed two-phase particle image velocimetry techniques. First, depending on the mean void fraction, two regimes are classified with different preferential concentration of bubbles in the cylinder wake, which are explained in terms of hydrodynamic force balances acting on rising bubbles. Second, the differences between the two-phase and single-phase flows (while matching their Reynolds numbers) around a circular cylinder will be discussed in relation to effects of bubble dynamics and the bubble-induced turbulence on the cylinder wake. Supported by a Grant (MPSS-CG-2016-02) through the Disaster and Safety Management Institute funded by Ministry of Public Safety and Security of Korean government.

  3. Torsion Tests of Stiffened Circular Cylinders

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, R L; Wescoat, C

    1944-01-01

    The design of curved sheet panels to resist shear involves a consideration of several factors: the buckling resistance of the sheet, the stress at which buckling becomes permanent, and the strength which may be developed beyond the buckling limit by tension-field action. Although some experimental as well as theoretical work has been done on the buckling and tension-field phases of this problem, neither of these types of action appears to be very well understood. The problem is of sufficient importance from the standpoint of aircraft design, it is believed, to warrant further experimental investigation. This report presents the results of the first series of torsion tests of stiffened circular cylinders to be completed in connection with this study at Aluminum Research Laboratories. (author)

  4. Experimental free convection heat transfer from inclined square cylinders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ali, Mohamed

    2016-10-01

    Natural convection from axisymmetric objects such as vertical or horizontal cylinders and spheres are two dimensional. However, for inclined circular or noncircular cylinders the flow and heat transfer is three dimensional and hence more complex and needs more attention. This study investigates the steady state mechanism of natural convection from inclined square cylinders in air. Five different cylinders of 1 m length, 8 × 8, 7 × 7, 6 × 6, 4 × 4 and 2.5 × 2.5 cm2 cross sections are used. The cylinders are heated using inserted heating element of 6 mm in diameter. Self-adhesive thermocouples are used at the upper, bottom and at one side of the cylinders for temperature measurement. Three inclination angles to the horizontal 30, 45 and 60o are used for each cylinder with uniform heat flux boundary conditions. For each cylinder, about ten heat fluxes are used to generate the heat transfer data. Local and average heat transfer coefficient is determined for each cylinder at each inclination angle for each uniform heat flux. Laminar and transition to turbulent regimes are obtained and characterized. Local critical axial distance where heat transfer coefficient changes the mode is obtained for each heat flux. Local and averaged Nusselt numbers are correlated with the modified Rayleigh numbers for all angles.

  5. Fluid forces on two circular cylinders in crossflow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jendrzejczyk, J. A.; Chen, S. S.

    1986-07-01

    Fluid excitation forces are measured in a water loop for two circular cylinders arranged in tandem and normal to flow. The Strouhal number and fluctuating drag and lift coefficients for both cylinders are presented for various spacings and incoming flow conditions. The results show the effects of Reynolds number, pitch ratio, and upstream turbulence on the fluid excitation forces.

  6. Nonlinear standing waves on a periodic array of circular cylinders.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Lijun; Lu, Ya Yan

    2015-08-10

    A periodic array of parallel and infinitely long dielectric circular cylinders surrounded by air can be regarded as a simple two-dimensional periodic waveguide. For linear cylinders, guided modes exist continuously below the lightline in various frequency intervals, but standing waves, which are special guided modes with a zero Bloch wavenumber, could exist above the lightline at a discrete set of frequencies. In this paper, we consider a periodic array of nonlinear circular cylinders with a Kerr nonlinearity, and show numerically that nonlinear standing waves exist continuously with the frequency and their amplitudes depend on the frequency. The amplitude-frequency relations are further investigated in a perturbation analysis.

  7. Analysis of aerodynamic noise generated from inclined circular cylinder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haramoto, Yasutake; Yasuda, Shouji; Matsuzaki, Kazuyoshi; Munekata, Mizue; Ohba, Hideki

    2000-06-01

    Making clear the generation mechanism of fluid dynamic noise is essential to reduce noise deriving from turbomachinery. The analysis of the aerodynamic noise generated from circular cylinder is carried out numerically and experimentally in a low noise wind tunnel. In this study, aerodynamic sound radiated from a circular cylinder in uniform flow is predicted numerically by the following two step method. First, the three-dimensional unsteady incompressible Navier-Stokes equation is solved using the high order accurate upwind scheme. Next, the sound pressure level at the observed point is calculated from the fluctuating surface pressure on the cylinder, based on modified Lighthill-Curl’s equation. It is worth to note that the noise generated from the model is reduced rapidly when it is inclined against the mean flow. In other words, the peak level of the radiated noise decreases rapidly with inclination of the circular cylinder. The simulated SPL for the inclined circular cylinder is compared with the measured value, and good agreement is obtained for the peak spectrum frequency of the sound pressure level and tendency of noise reduction. So we expect that the change of flow structures makes reduction of the aerodynamic noise from the inclined models.

  8. Flow Interference between a Circular (Upstream) and a Square Cylinder: Flow Pattern Identification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohan, Jayalakshmi; R, Ajith Kumar; Kumar, Nithin S.

    2014-11-01

    In this paper, flow interference between an upstream circular cylinder and a square cylinder of equal size is studied in tandem arrangement. The main objective of this invesigation is to identify the possible flow patterns at different spacing ratios, L/B where L is the centre-to-centre distance between the cylinders and B is the characteristic dimension of the bodies. All the experiments are conducted in a water channel and the test Reynolds number is 2100 (based on B). L/B is varied from 1.0 to 5.0. The flow visualization experiments are videographed and then analyzed frame-by-frame to capture the finer details of the flow patterns. Flow over single square and circular cylinders is analyzed first. Then, flow interference between two circular cylinders is investigated. Subsequently, flow over a circular-square configuration is investigated. No such studies are reported so far. Different flow patterns are observed for the circular-square configuration. Additionally, the time of persistence of each flow pattern have been recorded over a sufficiently long period of time to see the most dominant flow pattern. The schedule of occurrence of flow patterns have also been studied during this investigation. This study is very much relevant in the context of possible interference effects occuring in engineering structures such as buildings, heat exchanger tubes etc.

  9. Flow over an inline oscillating circular cylinder in the wake of a stationary circular cylinder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yang; Zhu, Keqiang

    2017-02-01

    Flow interference between an upstream stationary cylinder and an inline oscillating cylinder is studied with the lattice Boltzmann method. With a fixed Reynolds number Re = 100 and pitch ratio L/D = 4, the effects of oscillation amplitude A/D = [0.25, 1] and frequency f e/f s = [0.5, 2] are investigated. The wake response state is categorized into lock-in and non-lock-in. The lock-in zone in the bifurcation diagram of amplitude versus frequency is discontinuous. Response states of upstream and downstream wakes are similar under the conditions of small amplitude or low frequency. However, with large oscillating parameters, the two wakes are prone to be in different states as the flow field becomes irregular. Two distinct flow regimes have been identified, i.e., single-cylinder and two-cylinder shedding regimes. The presence of single-cylinder shedding regime is attributed to the low shedding frequency of the downstream cylinder at large amplitude. Hydrodynamic forces of the oscillating tandem system are discussed. The results reveal that forces on the two cylinders behave differently and that the absence of vortices in the gap flow significantly reduces the forces exerting on the tandem system.

  10. Scattering of light by polydisperse, randomly oriented, finite circular cylinders.

    PubMed

    Mishchenko, M I; Travis, L D; Macke, A

    1996-08-20

    We use the T-matrix method, as described by Mishchenko [Appl. Opt. 32, 4652 (1993)], to compute rigorously light scattering by finite circular cylinders in random orientation. First we discuss numerical aspects of T -matrix computations specific for finite cylinders and present results of benchmark computations for a simple cylinder model. Then we report results of extensive computations for polydisperse, randomly oriented cylinders with a refractive index of 1.53 + 0.008i, diameter-to-length ratios of 1/2, 1/1.4, 1, 1.4, and 2, and effective size parameters ranging from 0 to 25. These computations parallel our recent study of light scattering by polydisperse, randomly oriented spheroids and are used to compare scattering properties of the two classes of simple convex particles. Despite the significant difference in shape between the two particle types (entirely smooth surface for spheroids and sharp rectangular edges for cylinders), the comparison shows rather small differences in the integral photometric characteristics (total optical cross sections, single-scattering albedo, and asymmetry parameter of the phase function) and the phase function. The general patterns of the other elements of the scattering matrix for cylinders and aspect-ratio-equivalent spheroids are also qualitatively similar, although noticeable quantitative differences can be found in some particular cases. In general, cylinders demonstrate much less shape dependence of the elements of the scattering matrix than do spheroids. Our computations show that, like spheroids and bispheres, cylinders with surface-equivalent radii smaller than a wavelength can strongly depolarize backscattered light, thus suggesting that backscattering depolarization for nonspherical particles cannot be universally explained by using only geometric-optics considerations.

  11. Optimal control of circular cylinder wakes using long control horizons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flinois, Thibault L. B.; Colonius, Tim

    2015-08-01

    The classical problem of suppressing vortex shedding in the wake of a circular cylinder by using body rotation is revisited in an adjoint-based optimal control framework. The cylinder's unsteady and fully unconstrained rotation rate is optimized at Reynolds numbers between 75 and 200 and over horizons that are longer than in previous studies, where they are typically of the order of a vortex shedding period or shorter. In the best configuration, the drag is reduced by 19%, the vortex shedding is effectively suppressed, and this low drag state is maintained with minimal cylinder rotation after transients. Unlike open-loop control, the optimal control is shown to maintain a specific phase relationship between the actuation and the shedding in order to stabilize the wake. A comparison is also given between the performance of optimizations for different Reynolds numbers, cost functions, and horizon lengths. It is shown that the long horizons used are necessary in order to stabilize the vortex shedding efficiently.

  12. Sensitivity analysis of small circular cylinders as wake control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meneghini, Julio; Patino, Gustavo; Gioria, Rafael

    2016-11-01

    We apply a sensitivity analysis to a steady external force regarding control vortex shedding from a circular cylinder using active and passive small control cylinders. We evaluate the changes on the flow produced by the device on the flow near the primary instability, transition to wake. We numerically predict by means of sensitivity analysis the effective regions to place the control devices. The quantitative effect of the hydrodynamic forces produced by the control devices is also obtained by a sensitivity analysis supporting the prediction of minimum rotation rate. These results are extrapolated for higher Reynolds. Also, the analysis provided the positions of combined passive control cylinders that suppress the wake. The latter shows that these particular positions for the devices are adequate to suppress the wake unsteadiness. In both cases the results agree very well with experimental cases of control devices previously published.

  13. Patterns of vortex shedding from an oscillating circular cylinder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, Keun-Shik; Sa, Jong-Youb

    1990-01-01

    Vortex shedding from an oscillating circular cylinder was numerically investigated at Re = 100 with the Navier-Stokes equations and the new boundary conditions. The detailed shedding patterns are characterized by means of streakline plotting and lift-coefficient curves. A parameter map is presented which distinguishes the synchronized shedding from the asynchronous and the double vortices shedding from the single vortex shedding. The computational result is in good agreement with earlier experimental results.

  14. Mechanism of Secondary Instability of Flow around a Circular Cylinder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dou, Hua-Shu; Ben, An-Qing; Fluid Mechanics Research Team Team

    2016-11-01

    Flow around a circular cylinder in infinite domain is simulated with large eddy simulation at Re =200, and the mechanism of the origin of secondary vortex street is analyzed. The simulation results show that the vortex street generated in the cylinder near wake disappears as the flow moving downstream. Secondary instability occurs in far wake of the cylinder after the primary vortex street dying away. The processes of first instability and secondary instability in the cylinder wake are recorded in the simulation. The instability of the entire flow field is studied with the energy gradient theory. It is found that it is the high value of the energy gradient function generated by the zero velocity gradients that leads to the instability. As the vortex developing at rear of the cylinder, the value of the energy gradient function becomes low downstream, which leads to the vortex dying away. At further downstream, the value of the energy gradient function is enlarged again because of the role of perturbation, which leads to the secondary instability. It can be concluded that the interaction of the variation of the value of the energy gradient function and the perturbation leads to the occurrence of secondary instability.

  15. Heat transfer in geometrically similar cylinders

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Riekert, P; Held, A

    1941-01-01

    The power and heat-stress conditions of geometrically similar engines are discussed. The advantages accruing from smaller cylinder dimensions are higher specific horsepower, lower weight per horsepower, lower piston temperature, and less frontal area, with reduced detonation tendency.

  16. Optimization of Feedback Control of Flow over a Circular Cylinder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Son, Donggun; Kim, Euiyoung; Choi, Haecheon

    2012-11-01

    We perform a feedback gain optimization of the proportional-integral-differential (PID) control for flow over a circular cylinder at Re = 60 and 100. We measure the transverse velocity at a centerline location in the wake as a sensing variable and provide blowing and suction at the upper and lower slots on the cylinder surface as an actuation. The cost function to minimize is defined as the mean square of the sensing variable, and the PID control gains are optimized by iterative feedback tuning method which is a typical model free gain optimization method. In this method, the control gains are iteratively updated by the gradient of cost function until the control system satisfies a certain stopping criteria. The PID control with optimal control gains successfully reduces the velocity fluctuations at the sensing location and attenuates (or annihilates) vortex shedding in the wake, resulting in the reduction in the mean drag and lift fluctuations. Supported by the NRF Program (2011-0028032).

  17. Spanwise plumes in wakes behind heated cylinder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, S. Ajith; Lal, S. Anil; Sameen, A.

    2013-11-01

    3D wake transition in flow past cylinder is interesting theoretically and industrially. A three dimensional Finite volume computation has been performed on an incompressible flow past heated cylinder to understand the wake behavior behind the cylinder, under the Boussinesq assumption. We study the heat transfer characteristics and the coherent structures behind the cylinder at different Prandtl numbers. In forced convection, the 3D transition occurs above Reynolds number, Re = 180-190 (Re is based on the cylinder diameter). However, the present 3D computational analyses show that in mixed convection, the so called ``mode-E'' instability (3D transition of wake behind the cylinder caused by the heating of the cylinder) happens at a much lower Reynolds number. The co-existence of mushroom like coherent structures called the plumes along with the shed vortices is observed for a range of heating conditions. These plumes originates from the core of the upper vortex rows at a definite span wise wavelengths. The dependence of Prandtl number on the span wise wavenumber of these plumes is also analyzed.

  18. Stress analysis of circular semimonocoque cylinders with cutouts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccomb, Harvey G , Jr

    1955-01-01

    A method is presented for analyzing the stresses about cutouts in circular semimonocoque cylinders with flexible rings. The method involves the use of so-called perturbation stress distributions which are superposed on the stress distribution that would exist in the structure with no cutout in such a way as to give the effects of a cutout. The method can be used for any loading case for which the structure without the cutout can be analyzed and is sufficiently versatile to account for stringer and shear reinforcement about the cutout.

  19. Effect of location in an array on heat transfer to a cylinder in crossflow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simoneau, R. J.; Vanfossen, G. J., Jr.

    1982-01-01

    An experiment was conducted to measure the heat transfer from a heated cylinder in crossflow in an array of circular cylinders. All cylinders had a length-to-diameter ratio of 3.0. Both in-line and staggered array patterns were studied. The cylinders were spaced 2.67 diameters apart center-to-center in both the axial and transverse directions to the flow. The row containing the heated cylinder remained in a fixed position in the channel and the relative location of this row within the array was changed by adding up to five upstream rows. The working fluid was nitrogen gas at pressures from 100 to 600 kPa. The Reynolds number ranged based on cylinder diameter and average unobstructed channel velocity was from 5,000 to 125,000. Turbulence intensity: profiles were measured for each case at a point one half space upstream of the row containing the heated cylinder. The basis of comparison for all the heat transfer data was the single row with the heated cylinder. For the in-line cases the addition of a single row of cylinders upstream of the row containing the heated cylinder increased the heat transfer by an average of 50 percent above the base case. Adding up to five more rows caused no increase or decrease in heat transfer. Adding rows in the staggered array cases resulted in average increases in heat transfer of 21, 64, 58, 46, and 46 percent for one to five upstream rows, respectively.

  20. Scattering of antiplane shear waves by layered circular elastic cylinder.

    PubMed

    Cai, Liang-Wu

    2004-02-01

    An exact analytical solution for the scattering of antiplane elastic waves by a layered elastic circular cylinder is obtained. The solution and its degenerate cases are compared with other simpler models of circular cylindrical scatterers. The effects of the geometrical and physical properties of the interphase are studied. Numerical results confirm the existence of a resonance mode in which the scatterer's core undergoes a rigid-body motion when the outer layer of the scatterer is very compliant. This resonance mode has been attributed [Liu et al., Science 289, 1734 (2000)] to a new mechanism for the band gap formed in the extremely low frequency range for phononic crystals made of layered spherical scatterers. Numerical results also show the existence of a similar resonance mode when the outer layer of the scatterer has very high mass density.

  1. Pulsatile flow and mass transport past a circular cylinder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zierenberg, Jennifer R.; Fujioka, Hideki; Suresh, Vinod; Bartlett, Robert H.; Hirschl, Ronald B.; Grotberg, James B.

    2006-01-01

    The mass transport of a pulsatile free-stream flow past a single circular cylinder is investigated as a building block for an artificial lung device. The free stream far from the cylinder is represented by a time-periodic (sinusoidal) component superimposed on a steady velocity. The dimensionless parameters of interest are the steady Reynolds number (Re), Womersley parameter (α), sinusoidal amplitude (A), and the Schmidt number (Sc). The ranges investigated in this study are 5⩽Re⩽40, 0.25⩽α⩽4, 0.25⩽A⩽0.75, and Sc =1000. A pair of vortices downstream of the cylinder is observed in almost all cases investigated. These vortices oscillate in size and strength as α and A are varied. For α <αc, where αc=0.005A-1.13Re1.33, the vortex is always attached to the cylinder (persistent); while for α >αc, the vortex is attached to the cylinder only during part of a time cycle (intermittent). The time-averaged Sherwood number, Sh̿, is found to be largely influenced by the steady Reynolds number, increasing approximately as Re1/2. For α =0.25, Sh̿ is less than the steady (α =0, A =0) value and decreases with increasing A. For α =2 and α =4, Sh̿ is greater than the steady value and increases with increasing A. These qualitatively opposite effects of pulsatility are discussed in terms of quasisteady versus unsteady transport. The maximum increase over steady transport due to pulsatility varies between 14.4% and 20.9% for Re =10-40, α =4, and A =0.75.

  2. Water-tunnel study of transition flow around circular cylinders

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Almosnino, D.; Mcalister, K. W.

    1984-01-01

    The recently reported phenomenon of asymmetric flow separation from a circular cylinder in the critical Reynolds number regime has been confirmed in a water-tunnel experiment. For the first time, an attempt was made to visualize the wake of the cylinder during the transition from subcritical to critical flow and to correlate the visualizations with lift and drag measurements. The occurrence of a dominant asymmetric-flow state was quite repeatable, both when increasing and decreasing the Reynolds number, resulting in a mean lift coefficient of C sub L approx 1.2 and a shift in the angle of the wake by about 12 deg. A distinctive step change in the drag and shedding frequency was also found to occur. A hysteresis was confirmed to exist in this region as the Reynolds number was cycled over the transition range. Both boundaries of the asymmetry appear to be supercritical bifurcations in the flow. The asymmetry was normally steady in the mean; however, there were instances when the direction of the asymmetry reversed and remained so for the duration of the Reynolds number sweep through this transition region. A second asymmetry was observed at a higher Reynolds number; however, the mean lift coefficient was much lower, and the direction of the asymmetry was not observed to reverse. Introducing a small local disturbance into the boundary layer was found to prevent the critical asymmetry from developing along the entire span of the cylinder.

  3. Diffraction of dust acoustic waves by a circular cylinder

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, S.-H.; Heinrich, J. R.; Merlino, R. L.

    2008-09-15

    The diffraction of dust acoustic (DA) waves around a long dielectric rod is observed using video imaging methods. The DA waves are spontaneously excited in a dusty plasma produced in a direct current glow discharge plasma. The rod acquires a negative charge that produces a coaxial dust void around it. The diameter of the void is the effective size of the 'obstacle' encountered by the waves. The wavelength of the DA waves is approximately the size of the void. The observations are considered in relation to the classical problem of the diffraction of sound waves from a circular cylinder, a problem first analyzed by Lord Rayleigh [Theory of Sound, 2nd ed. (MacMillan, London, 1896)].

  4. Circular cylinders with soft porous cover for flow noise reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geyer, Thomas F.; Sarradj, Ennes

    2016-03-01

    The use of porous materials is one of several approaches to passively control or minimize the generation of flow noise. In order to investigate the possible reduction of noise from struts and other protruding parts (for example components of the landing gear or pantographs), acoustic measurements were taken in a small aeroacoustic wind tunnel on a set of circular cylinders with a soft porous cover. The aim of this study was to identify those materials that result in the best noise reduction, which refers to both tonal noise and broadband noise. The porous covers were characterized by their air flow resistivity, a parameter describing the permeability of an open-porous material. The results show that materials with low air flow resistivities lead to a noticeable flow noise reduction. Thereby, the main effect of the porous cylinder covers is that the spectral peak of the aeolian tone due to vortex shedding appears much narrower, but is not suppressed completely. Based on the measurement results, a basic model for the estimation of the total peak level of the aeolian tone was derived. In addition to the minimization of the vortex shedding noise, a reduction of broadband noise can be observed, especially at higher Reynolds numbers. The noise reduction increases with decreasing air flow resistivity of the porous covers, which means that materials that are highly permeable to air result in the best noise reduction.

  5. Mass transfer from a circular cylinder: Effects of flow unsteadiness and ""slight" nonuniformities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marziale, M. L.

    The effect of periodic variations in the angle of the flow incident to a turbine blade on its leading edge heat load was investigated measuring a circular cylinder oscillating rotationally in a uniform steady flow A stationary cylinder was used and the transfer rate was measured for Re = 75,000 to 110,000 and turbulence levels from .34% to 4.9%. The accuracy and repeatability of the developed mass transfer technique is about + or - 2%, a large improvement over similar methods. Identical flow conditions were used when the cylinder was oscillated. A Strouhal number range from .0071 to .1406 was covered. Comparisons of the unsteady results indicate that the magnitude of the effect of oscillation is small and dependent on the incident turbulence conditions. Experiments were conducted in which a small amplitude periodic perturbation was superimposed on the mean flow by a woven wire grid. Spanwise traverses of the mean velocity and turbulence quantities and spanwise and circumferential traverses of the mass transfer rate on the cylinder were made. Although the perturbation was measured to be only .25% of the mean velocity and was buried in the stream's turbulence, disproportionately larger 15% variations in the spanwise transfer rate were observed.

  6. Mass transfer from a circular cylinder: Effects of flow unsteadiness and slight nonuniformities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marziale, M. L.; Mayle, R. E.

    1984-01-01

    Experiments were performed to determine the effect of periodic variations in the angle of the flow incident to a turbine blade on its leading edge heat load. To model this situation, measurements were made on a circular cylinder oscillating rotationally in a uniform steady flow. A naphthalene mass transfer technique was developed and used in the experiments and heat transfer rates are inferred from the results. The investigation consisted of two parts. In the first, a stationary cylinder was used and the transfer rate was measured for Re = 75,000 to 110,000 and turbulence levels from .34 percent to 4.9 percent. Comparisons with both theory and the results of others demonstrate that the accuracy and repeatability of the developed mass transfer technique is about + or - 2 percent, a large improvement over similar methods. In the second part identical flow conditions were used but the cylinder was oscillated. A Strouhal number range from .0071 to .1406 was covered. Comparisons of the unsteady and steady results indicate that the magnitude of the effect of oscillation is small and dependent on the incident turbulence conditions.

  7. Mass transfer from a circular cylinder: Effects of flow unsteadiness and slight nonuniformities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marziale, M. L.; Mayle, R. E.

    1984-09-01

    Experiments were performed to determine the effect of periodic variations in the angle of the flow incident to a turbine blade on its leading edge heat load. To model this situation, measurements were made on a circular cylinder oscillating rotationally in a uniform steady flow. A naphthalene mass transfer technique was developed and used in the experiments and heat transfer rates are inferred from the results. The investigation consisted of two parts. In the first, a stationary cylinder was used and the transfer rate was measured for Re = 75,000 to 110,000 and turbulence levels from .34 percent to 4.9 percent. Comparisons with both theory and the results of others demonstrate that the accuracy and repeatability of the developed mass transfer technique is about + or - 2 percent, a large improvement over similar methods. In the second part identical flow conditions were used but the cylinder was oscillated. A Strouhal number range from .0071 to .1406 was covered. Comparisons of the unsteady and steady results indicate that the magnitude of the effect of oscillation is small and dependent on the incident turbulence conditions.

  8. Transient wall-jet flowing over a circular cylinder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Danon, Ron; Gregory, James W.; Greenblatt, David

    2016-09-01

    The transient flow of a two-dimensional wall-jet over a circular cylinder, following rapid initiation and termination, was investigated experimentally. Unsteady surface pressures and unsteady pressure-sensitive paint were used to gain a basic understanding of the flow physics. Jet initiation produced a starting vortex, upstream of which the Coandă flow developed, producing a large low-pressure peak. Immediately following jet termination, the pressure increased over the first quarter of the circumference, while the downstream separation region remained virtually unaffected. Simplifying analyses and dimensional arguments were used to show that the timescales characterizing the transient development of the integrated loads depend only on the square of the slot height and the kinematic viscosity and are thus independent of the jet velocity. Following jet initiation, the resulting loads varied according to a linear transient model, while small nonlinearities were observed following jet termination. Unsteady pressure-sensitive paint showed that the starting jet emerges from the slot in a two-dimensional manner and that streamwise streaks, identified as Görtler vortices, form well before the flow reaches steady state. During termination, the streamwise structures dissipate downstream initially, with the dissipation propagating upstream.

  9. Standing Torsional Waves in Fluid-Saturated Porous Circular Cylinder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solorza, S.; Sahay, P. N.

    2002-12-01

    For dynamic measurement of elastic constants of a porous material saturated with viscous fluid when resonance-bar technique is applied, one also observes attenuation of the wave field. The current practice is to interpret it in terms of solid-viscosity by assuming a viscoelastic rheology for porous material. The likely mechanisms of attenuation in a fluid saturated porous material are: 1) motion of the fluid with respect to the solid frame and 2) viscous loss within the pore fluid. Therefore, it is appropriate to assume a poroelastic rheology and link the observed attenuation value to fluid properties and permeability. In the framework of poroelastic theory, the explicit formula linking attenuation to the properties of solid and fluid constituents and permeability are not worked out yet. In order to established such a link one has to workout solutions of appropriate boundary value problems in such a framework. Here, we have carried out the solution of boundary value problem associated with torsional oscillation of a finite poroelastic circular cylinder, casted in the framework of volume-averaged theory of poroelasticity. Analysing this solution by a perturbative approach we are able to develop explicit expressions for resonance frequency and attenuation for this mode of vibration. It shows how the attenuation is controlled by the permeability and the fluid properties, and how the resonance frequency drops over its value for the dry porous frame due to the effect of the fluid-mass.

  10. Velocity Measurements of Turbulent Wake Flow Over a Circular Cylinder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shih, Chang-Lung; Chen, Wei-Cheng; Chang, Keh-Chin; Wang, Muh-Rong

    2016-06-01

    There are two general concerns in the velocity measurements of turbulence. One is the temporal characteristics which governs the turbulent mixing process. Turbulence is rotational and is characterized by high levels of fluctuating vorticity. In order to obtain the information of vorticity dynamics, the spatial characteristics is the other concern. These varying needs can be satisfied by using a variety of diagnostic techniques such as invasive physical probes and non-invasive optical instruments. Probe techniques for the turbulent measurements are inherently simple and less expensive than optical methods. However, the presence of a physical probe may alter the flow field, and velocity measurements usually become questionable when probing recirculation zones. The non-invasive optical methods are mostly made of the foreign particles (or seeding) instead of the fluid flow and are, thus, of indirect method. The difference between the velocities of fluid and foreign particles is always an issue to be discussed particularly in the measurements of complicated turbulent flows. Velocity measurements of the turbulent wake flow over a circular cylinder will be made by using two invasive instruments, namely, a cross-type hot-wire anemometry (HWA) and a split-fiber hot-film anemometry (HFA), and a non-invasive optical instrument, namely, particle image velocimetry (PIV) in this study. Comparison results show that all three employed diagnostic techniques yield similar measurements in the mean velocity while somewhat deviated results in the root-mean-squared velocity, particularly for the PIV measurements. It is demonstrated that HFA possesses more capability than HWA in the flow measurements of wake flow. Wake width is determined in terms of either the flatness factor or shear-induced vorticity. It is demonstrated that flow data obtained with the three employed diagnostic techniques are capable of yielding accurate determination of wake width.

  11. Poiseuille flow-induced vibrations of two tandem circular cylinders with different mass ratios

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Ren-Jie; Lin, Jian-Zhong

    2016-06-01

    Flow-induced vibrations of two tandem circular cylinders with different mass ratios confined between two parallel walls are numerically studied via a lattice Boltzmann method. With fixed Reynolds number Re = 100 and blockage ratio β = 1/4, the effects of mass ratio m* = [0.0625, 16] and streamwise separation between two cylinders S/D = [1.125, 10] on the cylinder motions and vortex wake modes are investigated. A variety of distinct cylinder motion regimes involving the symmetric periodic vibration, biased quasi-periodic vibration, beating vibration, and steady regimes, with the corresponding wake structures, e.g., two rows of alternately rotating vortices, a single row of same-sign vortices, and steady wake, are observed. For each current case, the cylinder motion type is exclusive and in the binary oscillation regime, both cylinders always vibrate at a common primary frequency. The lighter cylinder usually oscillates at a larger amplitude than the heavier one, while the heavier cylinder undergoes larger lift force than the lighter one. The lift force and cylinder displacement always behave as an out-of-phase state. In the gap-interference region, large-amplitude oscillations could be produced extensively and in the wake-interference region, the cylinder motions and fluid flows are mainly dependent on the upstream cylinder. When the separation is large enough, both cylinders behave as two isolated ones. The mechanisms for the excitations of cylinder vibrations have also been analysed.

  12. Heat transfer measurements for Stirling machine cylinders

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kornhauser, Alan A.; Kafka, B. C.; Finkbeiner, D. L.; Cantelmi, F. C.

    1994-01-01

    The primary purpose of this study was to measure the effects of inflow-produced heat turbulence on heat transfer in Stirling machine cylinders. A secondary purpose was to provide new experimental information on heat transfer in gas springs without inflow. The apparatus for the experiment consisted of a varying-volume piston-cylinder space connected to a fixed volume space by an orifice. The orifice size could be varied to adjust the level of inflow-produced turbulence, or the orifice plate could be removed completely so as to merge the two spaces into a single gas spring space. Speed, cycle mean pressure, overall volume ratio, and varying volume space clearance ratio could also be adjusted. Volume, pressure in both spaces, and local heat flux at two locations were measured. The pressure and volume measurements were used to calculate area averaged heat flux, heat transfer hysteresis loss, and other heat transfer-related effects. Experiments in the one space arrangement extended the range of previous gas spring tests to lower volume ratio and higher nondimensional speed. The tests corroborated previous results and showed that analytic models for heat transfer and loss based on volume ratio approaching 1 were valid for volume ratios ranging from 1 to 2, a range covering most gas springs in Stirling machines. Data from experiments in the two space arrangement were first analyzed based on lumping the two spaces together and examining total loss and averaged heat transfer as a function of overall nondimensional parameter. Heat transfer and loss were found to be significantly increased by inflow-produced turbulence. These increases could be modeled by appropriate adjustment of empirical coefficients in an existing semi-analytic model. An attempt was made to use an inverse, parameter optimization procedure to find the heat transfer in each of the two spaces. This procedure was successful in retrieving this information from simulated pressure-volume data with artificially

  13. Aerodynamic modification to a circular cylinder to enhance the piezoelectric wind energy harvesting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Gang; Tse, K. T.; Kwok, K. C. S.; Song, Jie; Lyu, Yuan

    2016-11-01

    This study aims to expand the aeroelastic unstable range of a circular cylinder for improving the efficiency of a vortex-induced vibration (VIV)-based wind energy harvester. The kinetic energy of the harvester is provided by flow-induced vibration of a circular cylinder. Two small-diameter cylindrical rods were attached on two sides of the circular cylinder parallel to the cylinder axis and symmetrical to the stagnation line at a series of circumferential locations. This was inspired by rain-wind-induced vibrations of stay-cables of cable-stayed bridges. It was found that attaching two small-diameter cylindrical rods at the circumferential location θ = 60° significantly expands the aeroelastic unstable range for the circular cylinder. The wind energy harvester with this configuration harnesses the wind energy beyond the VIV onset wind speed and is sustained over the range of wind speed. Therefore, this configuration possesses a dramatic superiority over a plain circular cylinder as the kinetic source of a wind energy harvester.

  14. The three-dimensional flow past a rapidly rotating circular cylinder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Denier, James P.; Duck, Peter W.

    1993-01-01

    The high Reynolds number (Re) flow past a rapidly rotating circular cylinder is investigated. The rotation rate of the cylinder is allowed to vary (slightly) along the axis of the cylinder, thereby provoking three-dimensional flow disturbances, which are shown to involve relatively massive (O(Re)) velocity perturbations to the flow away from the cylinder surface. Additionally, three integral conditions, analogous to the single condition determined in two dimensions by Batchelor, are derived, based on the condition of periodicity in the azimuthal direction.

  15. Mixed convection heat transfer to and from a horizontal cylinder in cross-flow with heating from below.

    SciTech Connect

    Greif, Ralph; Evans, Gregory Herbert; Kearney, Sean Patrick; Laskowski, Gregory Michael

    2006-02-01

    Heat transfer to and from a circular cylinder in a cross-flow of water at low Reynolds number was studied both experimentally and numerically. The experiments were carried out in a high aspect ratio water channel. The test section inflow temperature and velocity, channel lower surface temperature and cylinder surface temperature were controlled to yield either laminar or turbulent flow for a desired Richardson number. When the lower surface was unheated, the temperatures of the lower surface and water upstream of the cylinder were maintained approximately equal and the flow was laminar. When the lower surface was heated, turbulence intensities as high as 20% were measured several cylinder diameters upstream of the cylinder due to turbulent thermal plumes produced by heating the lower surface. Variable property, two-dimensional simulations were undertaken using a variant of the u{sup 2}-f turbulence model with buoyancy production of turbulence accounted for by a simple gradient diffusion model. Predicted and measured heat flux distributions around the cylinder are compared for values of the Richardson number, Gr{sub d}/Re{sub d}{sup 2} from 0.3 to 9.3. For laminar flow, the predicted and measured heat flux results agreed to within the experimental uncertainty. When the lower surface was heated, and the flow was turbulent, there was qualitative agreement between predicted and measured heat flux distributions around the cylinder. However the predicted spatially averaged Nusselt number was from 37% to 53% larger than the measured spatially averaged Nusselt number. Additionally, spatially averaged Nusselt numbers are compared to correlations in the literature for mixed convection heat transfer to/from cylinders in cross-flow. The results presented here are larger than the correlation values. This is believed to be due to the effects of buoyancy-induced turbulence resulting from heating the lower surface and the proximity of the cylinder to that surface.

  16. Slow motion of a circular cylinder in a plane Poiseuille flow in a microchannel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeong, Jae-Tack; Jang, Chul-Soo

    2014-12-01

    The slow motion of a circular cylinder in a plane Poiseuille flow in a microchannel is analyzed for a wide range of cylinder radii and positions across the channel. The cylinder translates parallel to the channel walls and rotates about its axis. The Stokes approximation is used and the problem is solved analytically using the Papkovich-Fadle eigenfunction expansion and the least-squares method. The stream function and the pressure distribution of the flow field are obtained as results. The force and moment exerted on the cylinder, and the pressure change far from the cylinder, are calculated and shown as functions of the size and location of the cylinder. The results confirm some reciprocal relations exactly. In particular, the translational and rotational velocities of the drifting cylinder in the existing Poiseuille flow are determined. The induced pressure change, when the cylinder drifts in the Poiseuille flow, is also calculated. Some typical streamline patterns, depending on the size and location of the cylinder, are shown and discussed. When the cylinder translates and/or rotates in the channel blocked at infinity, a series of Moffatt eddies appears far from the cylinder in the channel, as expected.

  17. Correlations of velocity and temperature fluctuations in the stagnation-point flow of circular cylinder in turbulent flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, C. R.

    1988-01-01

    The present analyses of boundary layer flow and turbulence transport attempt to characterize the influence of freestream turbulence on the surface heat-transfer rate and stagnation point region skin friction of a circular cross-section cylinder in turbulent flow. The Reynolds stress-transport equations and k-epsilon two-equation turbulence modeling are used, yielding time-averaged turbulence double-correlations, mean-flow properties, surface heat-transfer rate, and skin-friction with freestream isotropic turbulence. A comparison of analytical results with experimental data indicates that large Reynolds normal stresses are induced at the boundary layer edge by the kinetic energy of the turbulence.

  18. Computational Unsteady Flow Dynamics: Oscillating Flow About a Circular Cylinder

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-12-01

    that the calculations can be carried out only for short times (less than two cycles of flow oscillation) with a non-super computer. Murashige , Hinatsu...Flow Round a Circu- lar Cylinder," Computers &Fluids, Vol. 12, No. 4, pp. 255-280. 6. Murashige , S., Hinatsu, M., and Kinoshita, T, 1989, "Direct

  19. Flow Interference between a Square (Upstream) and a Circular Cylinder: Flow Pattern Identification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Nithin S.; R, Ajith Kumar; Mohan, Jayalakshmi

    2014-11-01

    In this paper, flow interference between an upstream square cylinder and a circular cylinder of equal size is studied in tandem arrangement. The main objective of this invesigation is to identify the possible flow patterns at different spacing ratios, L/B where L is the centre-to-centre distance between the cylinders and B is the characteristic dimension of the bodies. All the experiments are conducted in a water channel and the test Reynolds number is 2100 (based on B). L/B is varied from 1.0 to 5.0. The flow visualization experiments are videographed and then analyzed frame-by-frame to capture the finer details of the flow patterns. Flow over single square and circular cylinders is analyzed first. Then, flow interference between two square cylinders is investigated. Subsequently, flow over a square-circular configuration is investigated. No such systematic studies are reported so far. Different flow patterns are observed for the square-circular configuration. Additionally, the time of persistence of each flow pattern have been recorded over a sufficiently long period of time to see the most dominant flow pattern. The schedule of occurrence of flow patterns have also been studied during this investigation. This study bears considerable practical relevance in the context of possible interference effects occurring in engineering structures such as buildings, bridges etc.

  20. Energetically efficient proportional-integral-differential (PID) control of wake vortices behind a circular cylinder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, Pramode K.; Mathew, Sam; Shaiju, A. J.; Patnaik, B. S. V.

    2016-02-01

    The control of vortex shedding behind a circular cylinder is a precursor to a wide range of external shear flow problems in engineering, in particular the flow-induced vibrations. In the present study, numerical simulation of an energetically efficient active flow control strategy is proposed, for the control of wake vortices behind a circular cylinder at a low Reynolds number of 100. The fluid is assumed to be incompressible and Newtonian with negligible variation in properties. Reflectionally symmetric controllers are designed such that, they are located on a small sector of the cylinder over which, tangential sliding mode control is imparted. In the field of modern controls, proportional (P), integral (I) and differential (D) control strategies and their numerous combinations are extremely popular in industrial practice. To impart suitable control actuation, the vertically varying lift force on the circular cylinder, is synthesised for the construction of an error term. Four different types of controllers considered in the present study are, P, I, PI and PID. These controllers are evaluated for their energetic efficiency and performance. A linear quadratic optimal control problem is formulated, to minimise the cost functional. By performing detailed simulations, it was observed that, the system is energetically efficient, even when the twin eddies are still persisting behind the circular cylinder. To assess the adaptability of the controllers, the actuators were switched on and off to study their dynamic response.

  1. Investigation of drag reduction through a flapping mechanism on circular cylinder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asif, Md. Asafuddoula; Gupta, Avijit Das; Rana, M. D. Juwel; Ahmed, Dewan Hasan

    2016-07-01

    During flapping wing, a bird develops sufficient lift force as well as counteracts drag and increases its speed through different orientations of feathers on the flapping wings. Differently oriented feathers play a significant role in drag reduction during flying of a bird. With an objective to investigate the effect of installation of such flapping mechanism as a mean of drag reduction in case of flow over circular cylinder, this concept has been implemented through installation of continuous and mini flaps, made of MS sheet metal, where flaps are oriented at different angles as like feathers of flapping wings. The experiments are carried out in a subsonic wind tunnel. After validation and comparison with conventional result of drag analysis of a single cylinder, effects of flapping with Reynolds number variation, implementation of different orientations of mini flaps and variation of different interspacing distance between mini flaps are studied to find the most effective angle of attack of drag reduction on the body of circular cylinder. This research show that, installation of continuous flap reduces value of drag co-efficient, CD up to 66%, where as mini flaps are found more effective by reducing it up to 73%. Mini flaps of L/s=6.25, all angled at 30O, at the 30O angular position on the body of circular cylinder has been found the most effective angle of attack for drag reduction in case of flow over circular cylinder.

  2. Pressure Distribution at Subsonic Speeds over the Forepart of Two Blunt Circular Cylinders

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lockwood, V. E.

    1975-01-01

    A wind tunnel investigation was made at subsonic speeds to determine the pressure distribution over the forward part of a circular cylinder. The cylinder was equipped with interchangeable faces, one having a flat face and one having a dome shaped face. The investigation was made over angle of attack range from -1 deg to 26 deg and a Mach number range from 0.30 to 0.89. Pressure coefficients are presented in tabular form and plotted data are presented for some selected angles of attack about the surface of the cylinder.

  3. Subcritical flow past a circular cylinder surrounded by a porous layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sobera, M. P.; Kleijn, C. R.; Van den Akker, H. E. A.

    2006-03-01

    A study of the flow at subcritical Re =3900 around a circular cylinder, surrounded at some fixed small distance by a porous layer with a hydraulic resistance typical for that of textile materials, has been performed by means of direct numerical simulations. The flow in the space between the porous layer and the solid cylinder was found to be laminar and periodic, with a frequency locked to that of the vortex shedding in the wake behind the cylinder. Time averaged flow velocities underneath the porous material were in good agreement with experimental data from laser Doppler anemometry.

  4. The Twisting of Thin-walled, Stiffened Circular Cylinders

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schapitz, E

    1938-01-01

    On the basis of the present investigation of the twisting of thin-walled, stiffened cylinders the following conclusions can be reached: 1) there is as yet no generally applicable formula for the buckling moment of the skin; 2) the mathematical treatment of the condition of the shell after buckling of the skin is based on the tension-field theory, wherein the strain condition is considered homogenous.

  5. Influence of hydrodynamic slip on convective transport in flow past a circular cylinder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rehman, Nidhil M. A.; Kumar, Anuj; Shukla, Ratnesh K.

    2017-02-01

    The presence of a finite tangential velocity on a hydrodynamically slipping surface is known to reduce vorticity production in bluff body flows substantially while at the same time enhancing its convection downstream and into the wake. Here, we investigate the effect of hydrodynamic slippage on the convective heat transfer (scalar transport) from a heated isothermal circular cylinder placed in a uniform cross-flow of an incompressible fluid through analytical and simulation techniques. At low Reynolds (Re≪ 1 ) and high Péclet (Pe≫ 1 ) numbers, our theoretical analysis based on Oseen and thermal boundary layer equations allows for an explicit determination of the dependence of the thermal transport on the non-dimensional slip length l_s . In this case, the surface-averaged Nusselt number, Nu transitions gradually between the asymptotic limits of Nu ˜ Pe^{1/3} and Nu ˜ Pe^{1/2} for no-slip (l_s → 0 ) and shear-free (l_s → ∞) boundaries, respectively. Boundary layer analysis also shows that the scaling Nu ˜ Pe^{1/2} holds for a shear-free cylinder surface in the asymptotic limit of Re≫ 1 so that the corresponding heat transfer rate becomes independent of the fluid viscosity. At finite Re, results from our two-dimensional simulations confirm the scaling Nu ˜ Pe^{1/2} for a shear-free boundary over the range 0.1 ≤ Re≤ 10^3 and 0.1≤ Pr≤ 10 . A gradual transition from the lower asymptotic limit corresponding to a no-slip surface, to the upper limit for a shear-free boundary, with l_s , is observed in both the maximum slip velocity and the Nu. The local time-averaged Nusselt number Nu_{θ } for a shear-free surface exceeds the one for a no-slip surface all along the cylinder boundary except over the downstream portion where unsteady separation and flow reversal lead to an appreciable rise in the local heat transfer rates, especially at high Re and Pr. At a Reynolds number of 10^3 , the formation of secondary recirculating eddy pairs results in

  6. Numerical simulation of circular cylinders in free-fall

    SciTech Connect

    Romero-Gomez, Pedro; Richmond, Marshall C.

    2016-02-01

    In this work, we combined the use of (i) overset meshes, (ii) a 6 degree-of-freedom (6- DOF) motion solver, and (iii) an eddy-resolving flow simulation approach to resolve the drag and secondary movement of large-sized cylinders settling in a quiescent fluid at moderate terminal Reynolds numbers (1,500 < Re < 28,000). These three strategies were implemented in a series of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) solutions to describe the fluid-structure interactions and the resulting effects on the cylinder motion. Using the drag coefficient, oscillation period, and maximum angular displacement as baselines, the findings show good agreement between the present CFD results and corresponding data of published laboratory experiments. We discussed the computational expense incurred in using the present modeling approach. We also conducted a preceding simulation of flow past a fixed cylinder at Re = 3,900, which tested the influence of the turbulence approach (time-averaging vs eddy-resolving) and the meshing strategy (continuous vs. overset) on the numerical results. The outputs indicated a strong effect of the former and an insignificant influence of the latter. The long-term motivation for the present study is the need to understand the motion of an autonomous sensor of cylindrical shape used to measure the hydraulic conditions occurring in operating hydropower turbines.

  7. Lock-in in forced vibration of a circular cylinder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Samvit; Navrose, Mittal, Sanjay

    2016-11-01

    The phenomenon of lock-in/synchronization in uniform flow past an oscillating cylinder is investigated via a stabilized finite element method at Re = 100. Computations are carried out for various amplitudes and frequencies of cylinder oscillation to accurately obtain the boundary of the lock-in regime. Results from earlier studies show a significant scatter in the lock-in boundary. The scatter might be an outcome of the difference in data collection or the use of a different criterion for identifying lock-in. A new criterion for lock-in is proposed, wherein the following two conditions are to be satisfied. (i) The most dominant frequency in the power spectrum of lift coefficient matches the frequency of cylinder oscillation (fy) and (ii) other peaks in the power spectrum, if any, are present only at super-harmonics of fy. Utilizing this criterion, three flow regimes are identified on the frequency-amplitude plane: lock-in, transition, and no lock-in. The behaviour of the wake is also investigated by examining the power spectra of the velocity traces at various locations downstream of the cylinder. Wake-lock-in is observed during lock-in. A wake-transition regime is identified wherein the near wake, up to a certain streamwise location, is in a lock-in state while the downstream region is in a desynchronized state. For a fixed fy, the location beyond which the wake is desynchronized moves downstream as the amplitude of oscillation is increased. The proposed criterion for lock-in addresses the wide scatter in the boundary of the lock-in regime among earlier studies. Energy transfer from the fluid to the structure, per cycle of cylinder oscillation, is computed from the data for forced vibration. The data is utilized to generate iso-energy transfer contours in the frequency-amplitude plane. The free vibration response with zero structural damping is found to be in very good agreement with the contour corresponding to zero energy transfer.

  8. Experimental study of noise emitted by circular cylinders with large roughness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alomar, Antoni; Angland, David; Zhang, Xin; Molin, Nicolas

    2014-12-01

    The aerodynamic noise generated by high Reynolds number flow around a bluff body with large surface roughness was investigated. This is a relevant problem in many applications, in particular aircraft landing gear noise. A circular cylinder in cross-flow and a zero-pressure-gradient turbulent boundary layer with various types of roughness was tested in a series of wind tunnel experiments. It has been shown that distributed roughness covering a circular cylinder affects the spectra over the entire frequency range. Roughness noise is dominant at high frequencies, and the peak frequency is well described by Howe's roughness noise model when scaled with the maximum outer velocity. There are differences between hemispherical and cylindrical roughness elements for both the circular cylinder and the zero-pressure-gradient turbulent boundary layer cases, indicating a dependence on roughness shape, not described by the considered roughness noise models. Cylindrical roughness generates higher noise levels at the highest frequencies, especially for the zero-pressure-gradient turbulent boundary layer case. Cable-type roughness aligned with the mean flow does not generate roughness noise, and its spectrum has been found to collapse with the smooth cylinder at medium and high frequencies. At low and medium frequencies the noise spectra have the same features as the smooth cylinder, but with higher shedding peak levels and fall-off levels, despite the decrease in spanwise correlation length. Roughness induces early separation, and thus a shift of the spectra to lower frequencies.

  9. On the circulatory subsonic flow of a compressible fluid past a circular cylinder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bers, Lipman

    1945-01-01

    The circulatory subsonic flow around an infinite circular cylinder is computed using the linearized pressure-volume relation, by a method developed in a previous report. Formulas and graphs are given for the velocity and pressure distributions, the circulation, the lift, and the dependence of the critical Mach number upon the position of the stagnation point.

  10. Experimental study on the wake behind tapered circular cylinders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Visscher, Jan; Pettersen, Bjørnar; Andersson, Helge I.

    2011-11-01

    The flow around tapered cylinders can act as basic models for numerous bluff body flows with a spanwise variation of either the body shape or the inflow conditions. The well-known vortex street is influenced by strong three-dimensional effects from the spanwise variation of the shedding frequency, namely oblique vortex shedding and vortex dislocations. Stereo-PIV was chosen to study these phenomena, since it allows analyzing planes with the full three-component, instantaneous velocity fields and local, time-dependent variations in the same setting. Hence, detailed aspects of the vortex dislocation phenomenon are presented. Single vortex dislocation events are presented through the local variation of the three measured velocity components u, v and w. Longer time-series reveal both period and location of these dislocation events, as well as quantity and sizes of the cells of constant shedding velocity in between them. The influence of the Reynolds number and the cylinder aspect ratio on the vortex cells could be shown. The analysis of the vortex shedding behavior shows good agreement with previously published results. At the same time, the applied PIV technique provides more spatial information than point-based measurements and offers insight into a Reynolds number range that is currently out of reach of Direct Numerical Simulations.

  11. The flow around circular cylinders partially coated with porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruck, Bodo; Klausmann, Katharina; Wacker, Tobias

    2012-05-01

    There are indications that the flow resistance of bodies can be reduced by a porous coating or porous sheath. A few numerical investigations exists in this field, however, experimental evidence is lacking. In order to investigate this phenomenon, the drag resistance of cylinders with porous coating has been investigated qualitatively and quantitatively in wind tunnel experiments. The Reynolds number was systematically varied in the range from 104 to 1.3*105. The results show that the boundary layer over the porous surface is turbulent right from the beginning and thickens faster because of the possible vertical momentum exchange at the interface. The region of flow detachment is widened resulting in a broader area with almost vanishing low flow velocities. All in all, the measurements show that a full porous coating of the cylinders increase the flow resistance. However, the measurements show that a partial coating only on the leeward side can decrease the flow resistance of the body. This effect seems due to the fact that the recirculating velocity and the underpressure in the wake is reduced significantly through a leeward porous coating. Thus, combining a smooth non-permeable windward side with a porous-coated leeward side can lead to a reduction of the body's flow resistance. These findings can be applied advantageously in many technical areas, such as energy saving of moving bodies (cars/trains/planes) or in reducing fluid loads on submersed bodies.

  12. An Experiment in Heat Conduction Using Hollow Cylinders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ortuno, M.; Marquez, A.; Gallego, S.; Neipp, C.; Belendez, A.

    2011-01-01

    An experimental apparatus was designed and built to allow students to carry out heat conduction experiments in hollow cylinders made of different materials, as well as to determine the thermal conductivity of these materials. The evolution of the temperature difference between the inner and outer walls of the cylinder as a function of time is…

  13. Investigation of the flow between a pair of circular cylinders in the flopping regime

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, H. J.; Durbin, P. A.

    1988-01-01

    The wakes of a pair of circular cylinders are grossly unsteady when the cylinders are separated in a direction normal to the approaching flow by less than one cylinder diameter. The wakes flop randomly between two asymmetric states. The time-scale for the flopping is several orders of magnitude longer than the timescale of vortex shedding, and also several orders of magnitude longer than the timescale for instability of the separating shear layers. When a splitter plate is positioned suitably on the centerline of the cylinders, the flopping can be stopped and the flow made to assume either of the asymmetric states, or a symmetric steady state. For a range of plate positions a new, periodic oscillation occurs. Acoustic excitation can also destroy the flopping mean flow, replacing it by a symmetric flow.

  14. Radiation by cavity-backed antennas on a circular cylinder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kempel, Leo C.; Volakis, John L.; Sliva, Randy

    1994-01-01

    Conformal antenna arrays are popular antennas for aircraft, spacecraft and land vehicle platforms due to their inherent low weight, cost and drag properties. However, to date there has been a dearth of rigorous analytical or numerical solutions to aid the designer. In fact, it has been common practice to use limited measurements and planar approximations in designing such non-planar antennas. The finite element-boundary integral method is extended to radiation by cavity-backed structures in an infinite, metallic cylinder. The formulation is used to investigate the effect of cavity size on the radiation pattern for typical circumferentially and axially polarized patch antennas. Curvature effect on the gain, pattern shape, and input impedance is also studied. Finally, the accuracy of the FE-BI approach for a microstrip patch array is demonstrated.

  15. An Experimental Study of Jet Impingement on a Circular Cylinder.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-08-01

    4, pp. 72--676. 22. Beltaos , S ., and Rajaratnam, N., "Impinging Circular Turbulent Jets," Proceedings of the ASCE Journal of Hydralics Division, Vol...11. CONTRACT OR GRANT NUMBER( s ) 00 Dennis W. Potts ID WI) :-wiFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME AND ADDRESS 10. PROGRAM ELEMENT. PROJECT. TASK - ANT STUDENT...necessary and identify by block niber) 70.1. AB6S M’AGC - Contlnu* on reverie side If necessary end vdentify by block number) S ATTACH ED [))"~- 1473

  16. Numerical investigations of lift suppression by feedback rotary oscillation of circular cylinder at low Reynolds number

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Lin; Qin, Jian-Min; Teng, Bin; Li, Yu-Cheng

    2011-03-01

    This article describes a strategy of active flow control for lift force reduction of circular cylinder subjected to uniform flow at low Reynolds numbers. The flow control is realized by rotationally oscillating the circular cylinder about its axis with ω(t )=-λCL(t), where ω(t ) is the dimensionless angular speed of rotation cylinder, λ is the control parameter and CL(t) is the feedback signal of lift coefficient. The study focuses on seeking optimum λ for the low Reynolds numbers of 60, 80, 100, 150, and 200. The effectiveness of the proposed flow control in suppressing lift force is examined comprehensively by a numerical model based on the finite element solution of two-dimensional Navier-Stokes equations. The dependence of lift reduction on the control parameter λ is investigated. The threshold of λ, denoted by λc, is identified for the Reynolds numbers considered in this work. The numerical results show that the present active rotary oscillation of circular cylinder is able to reduce the amplitude of lift force significantly as long as λ ≤λc, at least 50% for the laminar flow regime. Meanwhile, the present active flow control does not result in the undesirable increase in the drag force. The Strouhal number is observed to decrease slightly with the increase of λ. As for a specific Reynolds number, the larger λ gives rise to the larger amount of lift reduction. The lift reduction reaches the maximum at λ =λc. The mechanism behind the present lift reduction method is revealed by comparing the flow patterns and pressure distributions near the active rotationally oscillating circular cylinder and the stationary circular cylinder. It is found that the critical value λc generally increases with Reynolds number. Two types of lift shift are observed in the numerical results for the cases with λ >λc. The first is characterized by the regular fluctuation of lift coefficient but with nonzero mean value, while the second is associated with the

  17. On the low-Reynolds-number flow about two rotating circular cylinders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ueda, Y.; Sellier, A.; Kida, T.; Nakanishi, M.

    2003-11-01

    The viscous and steady flow about two distinct parallel infinite rotating circular cylinders is theoretically investigated. Because any inner steady Stokes flow is not quiescent far from the cylinders, a strictly steady analysis requires matching an inner steady Stokes approximation with an outer solution of the steady Navier Stokes equations. However, except for the case of identical cylinders of equal angular velocities, it is impossible to determine this outer solution. In the same spirit as Nakanishi et al. (1997) and Ueda et al. (2001), the present work therefore first addresses the unsteady viscous flow induced by cylinders impulsively set into both steady rotation and translation {bm W}. Using integral representations of the stream function and the vorticity, the resulting long-time flow is approximated in the limit of large viscosity. Letting time tend to infinity for {bm W} non-zero extends Lee & Leal (1986) and agrees with Watson (1996), whereas the required steady flow is obtained by making {bm W} vanish before letting time go to infinity. At the obtained leading-order approximation, the ‘lift’ and ‘drag’ forces on each cylinder (parallel and normal to the line of centres) are respectively zero and independent of the Reynolds number. The drag experienced by each body is plotted versus the gap between the cylinders for several values of the rotation, both for identical and non-identical cylinders.

  18. A circular cylinder undergoing large-amplitude transverse oscillations in a slow uniform cross flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lam, K. M.; Liu, P.

    2013-05-01

    This study explores the vortex patterns formed by a circular cylinder undergoing lateral cylinder oscillations with large amplitudes and in the presence of a slow uniform cross flow. It is an extension of our previous study (Lam et al., 2010b) in which formation of the 2S, 2P and P+S vortex modes were discussed from the viewpoint of interaction of a uniform cross-flow with the vortex street patterns of a cylinder oscillating in an otherwise quiescent fluid at Keulegan-Carpenter numbers up to KC=8.9. The present paper reports three additional experimental sets in which the amplitudes of cylinder oscillations have even larger values, at A/D>2.5, and lie beyond the vortex mode map usually quoted from Williamson and Roshko (1988). It is found that the slow uniform cross-flow at λ/D≈3 and Reynolds number based on cross-flow velocity at 232 acts to convect the corresponding vortex patterns in the absence of cross-flow downstream across the line of cylinder oscillation. Vortex-vortex interaction and vortex-cylinder interaction are observed to affect the subsequent development of vortices. The P+S vortex mode is found to occur up to KC=16. At KC between 16 and 24, a new vortex mode is observed in which only one vortex pair can be convected downstream every cylinder oscillation cycle. Another new vortex mode with two vortex pairs and two stationary vortices are found at KC>24.

  19. Measurement of convective heat transfer to solid cylinders inside ventilated shrouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daryabeigi, K.; Germain, E. F.; Ash, R. L.

    1984-01-01

    The influence of ventilated cylindrical shrouds on the convective heat transfer to circular cylinders has been studied experimentally. Geometries studied were similar to those used in commercially available platinum resistance thermometers. Experiments showed that thermal response (convection) was enhanced when the shroud ventilation factor was approximately 20 percent (80 percent solid), and that maximum enhancement occurred when the ventilation holes were located symmetrically on either side of the stagnation lines.

  20. Heat-transfer processes in air-cooled engine cylinders

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pinkel, Benjamin

    1938-01-01

    From a consideration of heat-transfer theory, semi-empirical expressions are set up for the transfer of heat from the combustion gases to the cylinder of an air-cooled engine and from the cylinder to the cooling air. Simple equations for the average head and barrel temperatures as functions of the important engine and cooling variables are obtained from these expressions. The expressions involve a few empirical constants, which may be readily determined from engine tests. Numerical values for these constants were obtained from single-cylinder engine tests for cylinders of the Pratt & Whitney 1535 and 1340-h engines. The equations provide a means of calculating the effect of the various engine and cooling variables on the cylinder temperatures and also of correlating the results of engine cooling tests. An example is given of the application of the equations to the correlation of cooling-test data obtained in flight.

  1. Accelerated micropolar fluid-flow past an uniformly rotating circular cylinder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siddiqui, Abuzar Abid

    2016-10-01

    In this paper, we formulated the non-steady flow due to the uniformly accelerated and rotating circular cylinder from rest in a stationary, viscous, incompressible and micropolar fluid. This flow problem is examined numerically by adopting a special scheme comprising the Adams-Bashforth Temporal Fourier Series method and the Runge-Kutta Temporal Special Finite-Difference method. This numerical scheme transforms the governing equation into a system of finite-difference equations. This system was further solved numerically by point successive-over-relaxation method. These results were also further extrapolated by the Richardson extrapolation method. This scheme is valid for all values of the flow and fluid-parameters and for all time. Moreover the boundary conditions of the vorticity and the spin at points far from the cylinder are being imposed and encountered too. The results are compared with existing results (for non-rotating circular cylinder in Newtonian fluids). The comparison is good. The enhancement of lift and reduction in drag is observed if the micropolarity effects are intensified. Same is happened if the rotation of a cylinder increases. Furthermore, the vortex-pair in the wake is delayed to successively higher times as rotation parameter increases. In addition, the rotation helps not only in dissolving vortices adjacent to the cylinder and adverse pressure region but also in dissolving the boundary layer separation. Furthermore, the rotation reduces the micropolar spin boundary layer.

  2. Self-propelled flexible fin in the wake of a circular cylinder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Sung Goon; Kim, Boyoung; Sung, Hyung Jin

    2016-11-01

    The behavior of a self-propelled flexible fin behind a circular cylinder in a uniform flow was explored using the immersed boundary method. The transverse heaving motion of the leading edge of the fin was prescribed, whereas the lateral behavior was spontaneously determined by the hydrodynamic interactions between the fin and the fluid environment. Three different behaviors were observed: propulsion upstream, drift downstream, and holding stationary at an equilibrium position. In a uniform flow, the fin could not overcome the positive net drag, and it drifted downstream. By contrast, a fin in the wake of a cylinder was propelled toward the circular cylinder during the heaving motion. The trailing edge of the fin passively fluttered along the oncoming vortices, thereby propelling the fin upstream. During the upstream propulsion behavior, the fin was propelled through the vortex cores. The fin was observed to remain stationary at a heaving frequency equal to the vortex shedding frequency, and a slaloming behavior was observed between the oncoming vortical structures. The fin was not propelled toward the cylinder during the slaloming behavior; rather, it lingered at a certain streamwise distance from the cylinder. Several equilibrium positions were dynamically determined from the interaction between the fin and the vortical fluid environment. The equilibrium position depended on the initial longitudinal position and the phase of the fin heaving motion with respect to the phase of the vortex shedding. The power input required to drive the heaving motion was reduced during the slaloming behavior.

  3. Vortex shedding and galloping of open semi-circular and parabolic cylinders in cross-flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weaver, D. S.; Veljkovic, I.

    2005-11-01

    An experimental wind-tunnel study was undertaken to investigate the flow-induced vibration behaviour of open semi-circular and parabolic cylinders in cross-flow. The motivation for the research was to investigate the cause of the fatigue failures of a number of parabolic section rotary mixing blades in a large mixing vessel. Results are presented for force coefficients as a function of angle of incidence of the flow, Strouhal number and amplitude response. It is shown that the parabolic cylinder is subject to large amplitude vortex shedding resonance and, when the elastic axis is sufficiently downstream of the section's centre of gravity, galloping instability.

  4. UF{sub 6} pressure excursions during cylinder heating

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, P.G.

    1991-12-31

    As liquid UF{sub 6} inside a cylinder changes from a liquid to a solid, it forms a porous solid which occupies approximately the same volume as that of the liquid before cooling. Simultaneously as the liquid cools, UF{sub 6} vapor in the cylinder ullage above the liquid desublimes on the upper region of the inner cylinder wall. This solid is a dense, glass-like material which can accumulate to a significant thickness. The thickness of the solid coating on the upper cylinder wall and directly behind the cylinder valve area will vary depending on the conditions during the cooling stage. The amount of time lapsed between UF{sub 6} solidification and UF{sub 6} liquefaction can also affect the UF{sub 6} coating. This is due to the daily ambient heat cycle causing the coating to sublime from the cylinder wall to cooler areas, thus decreasing the thickness. Structural weakening of the dense UF{sub 6} layer also occurs due to cylinder transport vibration and thermal expansion. During cylinder heating, the UF{sub 6} nearest the cylinder wall will liquefy first. As the solid coating behind the cylinder valve begins to liquefy, it results in increased pressure depending upon the available volume for expansion. At the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP) during the liquefaction of the UF{sub 6} in cylinders in the UF{sub 6} feed and sampling autoclaves, this pressure increase has resulted in the activation of the systems rupture discs which are rated at 100 pounds per square inch differential.

  5. Application of wave mechanics theory to fluid dynamics problems: Boundary layer on a circular cylinder including turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krzywoblocki, M. Z. V.

    1974-01-01

    The application of the elements of quantum (wave) mechanics to some special problems in the field of macroscopic fluid dynamics is discussed. Emphasis is placed on the flow of a viscous, incompressible fluid around a circular cylinder. The following subjects are considered: (1) the flow of a nonviscous fluid around a circular cylinder, (2) the restrictions imposed the stream function by the number of dimensions of space, and (3) the flow past three dimensional bodies in a viscous fluid, particularly past a circular cylinder in the symmetrical case.

  6. Examination of hydrodynamic force acting on a circular cylinder in vortex-induced vibrations in synchronization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Linwei; Chan, Eng-Soon; Sun, Zhilin

    2017-04-01

    An immersed boundary method is employed to simulate vortex-induced vibrations (VIV) of a circular cylinder in two dimensions. The Reynolds number is 150, and the cylinder mass ratios of 2 and 10 are considered. The synchronization regions for these two mass ratios are determined by the simulations. It is found that the cycle-averaged added mass is about zero at the reduced velocity of 6.1. The instantaneous frequency, which is obtained by Hilbert transformation of the cylinder oscillating displacement, exhibits an important feature whereby the cylinder oscillation in the VIV synchronization region is modulated with a frequency twice the displacement prevailing frequency. The cylinder displacement could still be well approximated by a sine function with a constant frequency and amplitude. However, the lift force acting on the cylinder cannot be estimated in the same manner. In fact, both the lift force amplitude and frequency are modulated. The suggested expression provides a better approximation of the lift force. Moreover, it reveals that the presence of the higher harmonics in the lift force is the result of the amplitude and frequency modulation.

  7. Spatially distributed control for optimal drag reduction of the flow past a circular cylinder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poncet, Philippe; Hildebrand, Roland; Cottet, Georges-Henri; Koumoutsakos, Petros

    We report high drag reduction in direct numerical simulations of controlled flows past circular cylinders at Reynolds numbers of 300 and 1000. The flow is controlled by the azimuthal component of the tangential velocity of the cylinder surface. Starting from a spanwise-uniform velocity profile that leads to high drag reduction, the optimization procedure identifies, for the same energy input, spanwise-varying velocity profiles that lead to higher drag reduction. The three-dimensional variations of the velocity field, corresponding to modes A and B of three-dimensional wake instabilities, are largely responsible for this drag reduction. The spanwise wall velocity variations introduce streamwise vortex braids in the wake that are responsible for reducing the drag induced by the primary spanwise vortices shed by the cylinder. The results demonstrate that extending two-dimensional controllers to three-dimensional flows is not optimal as three-dimensional control strategies can lead efficiently to higher drag reduction.

  8. Bending Tests of Circular Cylinders of Corrugated Aluminum-alloy Sheet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buckwalter, John C; Reed, Warren D; Niles, Alfred S

    1937-01-01

    Bending tests were made of two circular cylinders of corrugated aluminum-alloy sheet. In each test failure occurred by bending of the corrugations in a plane normal to the skin. It was found, after analysis of the effect of short end bays, that the computed stress on the extreme fiber of a corrugated cylinder is in excess of that for a flat panel of the same basic pattern and panel length tested as a pin-ended column. It is concluded that this increased strength was due to the effects of curvature of the pitch line. It is also concluded from the tests that light bulkheads closely spaced strengthen corrugated cylinders very materially.

  9. Buckling Analysis for Stiffened Anisotropic Circular Cylinders Based on Sanders Nonlinear Shell Theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nemeth, Michael P.

    2014-01-01

    Nonlinear and bifurcation buckling equations for elastic, stiffened, geometrically perfect, right-circular cylindrical, anisotropic shells subjected to combined loads are presented that are based on Sanders' shell theory. Based on these equations, a three-parameter approximate Rayleigh-Ritz solution and a classical solution to the buckling problem are presented for cylinders with simply supported edges. Extensive comparisons of results obtained from these solutions with published results are also presented for a wide range of cylinder constructions. These comparisons include laminated-composite cylinders with a wide variety of shell-wall orthotropies and anisotropies. Numerous results are also given that show the discrepancies between the results obtained by using Donnell's equations and variants of Sanders' equations. For some cases, nondimensional parameters are identified and "master" curves are presented that facilitate the concise representation of results.

  10. Wave multiple scattering by a finite number of unclosed circular cylinders

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Veliyev, E. I.; Veremey, V. V.

    1984-01-01

    The boundary value problem of plane H-polarized electromagnetic wave multiple scattering by a finite number of unclosed circular cylinders is solved. The solution is obtained by two different methods: the method of successive scattering and the method of partial matrix inversion for simultaneous dual equations. The advantages of the successive scattering method are shown. Computer calculations of the suface currents and the total cross section are presented for the structure of two screens.

  11. Vortex-induced vibrations of a neutrally buoyant circular cylinder near a plane wall

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, X. K.; Hao, Z.; Tan, S. K.

    2013-05-01

    This paper presents an experimental study of the motions, drag force and vortex shedding patterns of an elastically mounted circular cylinder, which is held at various heights above a plane wall and is subject to vortex-induced vibration (VIV) in the transverse direction. The cylinder is neutrally buoyant with a mass ratio m=1.0 and has a low damping ratio ζ=0.0173. Effects of the gap ratio (S/D) ranged from 0.05 to 2.5 and the free-stream velocity (U) ranged from 0.15 to 0.65m/s (corresponding to 3000≤Re≤13 000, and 1.53≤U≤6.62) are examined. The flow around the cylinder has been measured using particle image velocimetry (PIV), in conjunction with direct measurements of the dynamic drag force on the cylinder using a piezoelectric load cell. Results of the vibrating cylinder under unbounded (or free-standing) condition, as well as those of a near-wall stationary cylinder at the same gap ratios, are also provided. For the free-standing cylinder, the transition from the initial branch to the upper branch is characterized by a switch of vortex pattern from the classical 2S mode to the newly-discovered 2PO mode by Morse and Williamson (2009). The nearby wall not only affects the amplitude and frequency of vibration, but also leads to non-linearities in the cylinder response as evidenced by the presence of super-harmonics in the drag force spectrum. In contrast to the case of a stationary cylinder that vortex shedding is suppressed below a critical gap ratio (S/D≈0.3), the elastically mounted cylinder always vibrates even at the smallest gap ratio S/D=0.05. Due to the proximity of the plane wall, the vortices shed from the vibrating cylinder that would otherwise be in a double-sided vortex street pattern (either 2S or 2PO mode) under free-standing condition are arranged into a single-sided pattern.

  12. Shock interference studies on a circular cylinder at Mach 16

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prabhu, Ramadas K.; Thareja, Rajiv R.; Stewart, James R.

    1990-01-01

    This paper presents the results of a computational study on the shock interference problems on a cylindrical body typical of an engine inlet cowl leading edge at a nominal Mach number of 16. The two-dimensional Navier-Stokes equations are solved assuming the flow to be in chemical and thermal equilibrium and using a finite element method. The algorithm employs a cell-centered fully implicit upwind scheme. Adaptively generated unstructured meshes of triangles and quadrilaterals are employed. Under certain conditions the finite element code resulted in oscillatory solutions for shock interference at Mach 16. Some of the causes of the unsteady behavior are identified, and to the extent possible, such situations are avoided in the present application. Two shock interference conditions involving a Type IV (supersonic jet) and a Type III (attaching shear layer) are solved. The results are compared with available experimental data and reasonable agreement is observed. A semi-empirical method is also used to estimate the maximum surface heat flux and static pressure.

  13. Flow visualization of the vortex shedding from an in-line oscillating circular cylinder with splitter plate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yokoi, Yoshifumi

    2016-06-01

    In order to investigate the generating mechanism of the Karman vortex, the flow visualization experiment of the around of a circular cylinder with splitter plate was performed. Six kinds of circular cylinders with splitter plate were prepared. The main flow velocity was set as 0.04 m.s-1 (corresponding Reynolds number is 560), the oscillating amplitude ratio and the oscillation frequency ratio were varied about each circular cylinder with splitter plate, and the visualization experiment was performed. The dye oozing streak method was used as the technique of visualization. As a result, ten kinds of typical flow patterns of the oscillating circular cylinder with splitter plate were obtained. It was a simultaneous vortex shedding type lock-in in most cases of carrying out a lock-in. In order to discharge vortices alternately, it was found that the information on the mutual vortex flow of a wake is required.

  14. Reliability Analysis and Reliability-Based Design Optimization of Circular Composite Cylinders Under Axial Compression

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rais-Rohani, Masoud

    2001-01-01

    This report describes the preliminary results of an investigation on component reliability analysis and reliability-based design optimization of thin-walled circular composite cylinders with average diameter and average length of 15 inches. Structural reliability is based on axial buckling strength of the cylinder. Both Monte Carlo simulation and First Order Reliability Method are considered for reliability analysis with the latter incorporated into the reliability-based structural optimization problem. To improve the efficiency of reliability sensitivity analysis and design optimization solution, the buckling strength of the cylinder is estimated using a second-order response surface model. The sensitivity of the reliability index with respect to the mean and standard deviation of each random variable is calculated and compared. The reliability index is found to be extremely sensitive to the applied load and elastic modulus of the material in the fiber direction. The cylinder diameter was found to have the third highest impact on the reliability index. Also the uncertainty in the applied load, captured by examining different values for its coefficient of variation, is found to have a large influence on cylinder reliability. The optimization problem for minimum weight is solved subject to a design constraint on element reliability index. The methodology, solution procedure and optimization results are included in this report.

  15. Sting-free measurements on a magnetically supported right circular cylinder aligned with the free stream

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Higuchi, Hiroshi; Sawada, Hideo; Kato, Hiroyuki

    The flow over cylinders of varying fineness ratio (length to diameter) aligned with the free stream was examined using a magnetic suspension and balance system in order to avoid model support interference. The drag coefficient variation of a right circular cylinder was obtained for a wide range of fineness ratios. Particle image velocimetry (PIV) was used to examine the flow field, particularly the behaviour of the leading-edge separation shear layer and its effect on the wake. Reynolds numbers based on the cylinder diameter ranged from 5105, while the major portion of the experiment was conducted at ReD=1.0×105. For moderately large fineness ratio, the shear layer reattaches with subsequent growth of the boundary layer, whereas over shorter cylinders, the shear layer remains detached. Differences in the wake recirculation region and the immediate wake patterns are clarified in terms of both the mean velocity and turbulent flow fields, including longitudinal vortical structures in the cross-flow plane of the wake. The minimum drag corresponded to the fineness ratio for which the separated shear layer reattached at the trailing edge of the cylinder. The base pressure was obtained with a telemetry technique. Pressure fields and aerodynamic force fluctuations are also discussed.

  16. Far-field condition of vortex methods on an impulsively started two-dimensional circular cylinder with rotation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kida, Teruhiko; Nagata, Toshimi; Nakajima, Tomoya

    1994-08-01

    The far-field condition in the problem of the steady two-dimensional flow past a rotating circular cylinder is well known, but this condition is not clear in the problem of the two-dimensional unsteady flow past a rotating circular cylinder which is impulsively started. In the latter problem, the circulation around a contour of sufficient large radius surrounding the cylinder is dependent on initial conditions: (1) The circular cylinder is impulsively started with rotation from rest and (2) the rotating cylinder is impulsively started. The hybrid vortex method combined with a panel method is used for the flow of a slightly viscous, incompressible fluid around the rotating circular cylinder in the two initial conditions mentioned above. The numerical accuracy of this hybrid method is tested on the flow around an impulsively started cylinder without rotation. The detailed results of the flow around the rotating cylinder with a constant clockwise angular velocity show: (1) The initial shedding vortex is anticlockwise in the former initial case, but it is clockwise in the latter initial case. (2) The growth of the wake depends on the initial condition. (3) The time history of the aerodynamic force is dependent on the initial condition at the early stages of the development but it is almost independent of the initial condition after the early stages.

  17. Energetically efficient Proportional-Integral control of flow past a circular cylinder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kesavadas, Pramode; Anand, Vijay; Patnaik, B. S. V.; Shaiju, A. J.

    2015-11-01

    In this numerical study, we present an energetically efficient Proportional (P) and Integral (I) control strategy for the cessation of vortex shedding behind a circular cylinder. Reflectionally symmetric controllers are designed such that, they are located on a small sector of the cylinder over which, tangential sliding mode control is imparted. Energetically efficient optimal parameters for the P, I and PI controls have been numerically assessed. An estimation of the time-averaged kinetic energy of different flow regimes using Proper Orthogonal Decomposition (POD) is also carried out. These values are obtained with and without the optimal controllers. The Navier-Stokes equations along with an evolution equation for the PI controller, is numerically solved using finite volume method. The optimization procedure is formulated as a standard Linear Quadratic (LQ) problem and the time-averaged kinetic energy is obtained by summation of POD eigenvalues. The energetic efficiency for the, I controller was observed to be superior compared to the other two classes of controllers. By performing detailed fluid flow simulations, it was observed that, the system is energetically efficient, even when the twin eddies are still persisting behind the circular cylinder. The first author wishes to acknowledge the Ministry of Human Resource Development, Govt. of India.

  18. Extinction efficiencies from DDA calculations solved for finite circular cylinders and disks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Withrow, J. R.; Cox, S. K.

    1993-01-01

    One of the most commonly noted uncertainties with respect to the modeling of cirrus clouds and their effect upon the planetary radiation balance is the disputed validity of the use of Mie scattering results as an approximation to the scattering results of the hexagonal plates and columns found in cirrus clouds. This approximation has historically been a kind of default, a result of the lack of an appropriate analytical solution of Maxwell's equations to particles other than infinite cylinders and spheroids. Recently, however, the use of such approximate techniques as the Discrete Dipole Approximation has made scattering solutions on such particles a computationally intensive but feasible possibility. In this study, the Discrete Dipole Approximation (DDA) developed by Flatau (1992) is used to find such solutions for homogeneous, circular cylinders and disks. This can serve to not only assess the validity of the current radiative transfer schemes which are available for the study of cirrus but also to extend the current approximation of equivalent spheres to an approximation of second order, homogeneous finite circular cylinders and disks. The results will be presented in the form of a single variable, the extinction efficiency.

  19. Relating surface pressure to Lagrangian wake topology around a circular cylinder in cross flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rockwood, Matthew; Green, Melissa

    2016-11-01

    The tracks of Lagrangian saddles, identified as non-parallel intersections of positive and negative-time finite-time Lyapunov exponent (FTLE) ridges, have been shown to indicate the timing of von Karman vortex shedding in the wake of bluff bodies. The saddles are difficult to track in real-time, however, since future flow field data is needed for the computation of the FTLE fields. In order to detect the topological changes without direct access to the FTLE, the saddle dynamics are correlated to measurable surface quantities on a circular cylinder in cross flow. The Lagrangian saddle found upstream of a forming and subsequently shedding vortex has been shown to accelerate away from the cylinder surface as the vortex sheds. In previous numerical results at Re = 150 , this acceleration coincides with the peak in lift force over the cylinder, and also with a minimum in the static pressure at a location slightly upstream of the mean separation location. In the current work, this result is compared with experimental data at Re = O (10 , 000) . Successful validation would provide a strategy for locating sensitive regions on the cylinder surface where vortex shedding could be detected using simple pressure transducers. This work was supported by the Air Force Office of Scientific Research under AFOSR Award No. FA9550-14-1-0210.

  20. Light extinction and absorption by arbitrarily oriented finite circular cylinders by use of geometrical path statistics of rays.

    PubMed

    Xu, Min

    2003-11-20

    From the geometrical path statistics of rays in an anomalous-diffraction theory (ADT) [Opt. Lett. 28, 179 (2003)] closed-form expressions for the geometrical path distribution of rays and analytical formulas for the optical efficiencies of finite circular cylinders oriented in an arbitrary direction with respect to the incident light are derived. The characteristics of the shapes of the cylinders produce unique features in the geometrical path distributions of the cylinders compared with spheroids. Gaussian ray approximations, which depend only on the mean and the mean-squared geometrical paths of rays, of the optical efficiencies of finite circular cylinders and spheroids are compared with the exact optical efficiencies in ADT. The influence of the difference in shape between cylinders and spheroids on the optical efficiencies in ADT is illustrated by their respective geometrical path distributions of rays.

  1. A numerical study of shock wave diffraction by a circular cylinder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, J.-Y.; Liu, Y.; Lomax, H.

    1986-01-01

    The nonstationary shock wave diffraction patterns generated by a blast wave impinging on a circular cylinder are numerically simulated using a second-order hybrid upwind method for solving the two-dimensional inviscid compressible Euler equations of gasdynamics. The complete diffraction patterns, including the transition from regular to Mach reflection, trajectory of the Mach triple point and the complex shock-on-shock interaction at the wake region resulting from the Mach shocks collision behind the cylinder are reported in detail. Pressure-time history and various contour plots are also included. Comparison between the work of Bryson and Gross (1961) which included both experimental schlieren pictures and theoretical calculations using Whitham's ray-shock theory and results of the present finite difference computation indicate good agreement in every aspect except for some nonideal gas and viscous effects which are not accounted for by the Euler equations.

  2. Reynolds and froude number effect on the flow past an interface-piercing circular cylinder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koo, Bonguk; Yang, Jianming; Yeon, Seong Mo; Stern, Frederick

    2014-09-01

    The two-phase turbulent flow past an interface-piercing circular cylinder is studied using a high-fidelity orthogonal curvilinear grid solver with a Lagrangian dynamic subgrid-scale model for large-eddy simulation and a coupled level set and volume of fluid method for air-water interface tracking. The simulations cover the sub-critical and critical and post critical regimes of the Reynolds and sub and super-critical Froude numbers in order to investigate the effect of both dimensionless parameters on the flow. Significant changes in flow features near the air-water interface were observed as the Reynolds number was increased from the sub-critical to the critical regime. The interface makes the separation point near the interface much delayed for all Reynolds numbers. The separation region at intermediate depths is remarkably reduced for the critical Reynolds number regime. The deep flow resembles the single-phase turbulent flow past a circular cylinder, but includes the effect of the free-surface and the limited span length for sub-critical Reynolds numbers. At different Froude numbers, the air-water interface exhibits significantly changed structures, including breaking bow waves with splashes and bubbles at high Froude numbers. Instantaneous and mean flow features such as interface structures, vortex shedding, Reynolds stresses, and vorticity transport are also analyzed. The results are compared with reference experimental data available in the literature. The deep flow is also compared with the single-phase turbulent flow past a circular cylinder in the similar ranges of Reynolds numbers. Discussion is provided concerning the limitations of the current simulations and available experimental data along with future research

  3. Flow Past a Circular Cylinder with a Permeable Wake Splitter Plate

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-08-01

    10/1/9 2 T09/30/93 1993 August 1 227 p 16. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTATION Ph. D. thesis 17. COSATI CODES 18. SUBJECT TERMS (Contiue on reverse if necenarv and...wake is investigated. Flow Past a Circular Cylinder with a Permeable Wake Splitter Plate Thesis by Gregory Scott Cardell In Partial Fulfillment of the...Cardell, for their support and their belief in me. This thesis is much improved by the comments and suggestions provided by Cathleen Jones who, in a truly

  4. Stabilization of vortices in the wake of a circular cylinder using harmonic forcing.

    PubMed

    Chamoun, Georges C; Schilder, Frank; Brøns, Morten

    2011-06-01

    We explore whether vortex flows in the wake of a fixed circular cylinder can be stabilized using harmonic forcing. We use Föppl's point vortex model augmented with a harmonic point source-sink mechanism which preserves conservation of mass and leaves the system Hamiltonian. We discover a region of Lyapunov-stable vortex motion for an appropriate selection of parameters. We identify four unique parameters that affect the stability of the vortices: the uniform flow velocity, vortex equilibrium positions, forcing amplitude, and forcing frequency. We assess the robustness of the controller using a Poincaré section.

  5. Correlations of velocity and temperature fluctuations in the stagnation-point flow of circular cylinder in turbulent flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Chi R.

    1988-01-01

    Boundary layer flow and turbulence transport analyses to study the influence of the free-stream turbulence on the surface heat transfer rate and the skin friction around the stagnation point of a circular cylinder in a turbulent flow are presented. The analyses are formulated with the turbulent boundary layer equations, the Reynolds stress transport equations and the k - epsilon two-equation turbulence modeling. The analyses are used to calculate the time-averaged turbulence double correlations, the mean flow properties, the surface heat transfer rate and the skin friction with an isotropic turbulence in the freestream. The analytical results are described and compared with the existing experimental measurements. Depending on the free-stream turbulence properties, the turbulence kinetic energy can increase or decrease as the flow moves toward the surface. However, the turbulence kinetic energy induces large Reynolds normal stresses at the boundary layer edge. The Reynolds normal stresses change the boundary layer profiles of the time-averaged double correlations of the velocity and temperature fluctuations, the surface heat transfer rate and the skin friction. The free-stream turbulence dissipation rate can affect the stagnation-point heat transfer rate but the influence of the free-stream temperature fluctuation on the heat transfer rate is insignificant.

  6. Mechanism of tonal noise generation from circular cylinder with spiral fin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamashita, Ryo; Hayashi, Hidechito; Okumura, Tetsuya; Hamakawa, Hiromitsu

    2014-12-01

    The pitch of the spiral finned tube influences seriously to the acoustic resonance in the heat exchanger. In this research, the flow characteristics in relating to the aeolian tone from the finned cylinder are studied by the numerical simulation. It is observed that the tonal noise generated from the finned tube at two pitch spaces. The ratio of the fin pitch to the cylinder diameter is changed at 0.11 and 0.27. The tone level increases and the frequency decreases with the pitch shorter. The separation flow from the cylinder generates the span-wise vortices, Karman vortices, and the separation flow from the fin generates the stream-wise vortices. When the fin pitch ratio is small, the stream-wise vortices line up to span-wise and become weak rapidly. Only the Karman vortices are remained and integrate in span. So the Karman vortex became large. This causes the low frequency and the large aeolian tone.

  7. An experimental investigation of jet plume simulation with solid circular cylinders

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reubush, D. E.

    1974-01-01

    An investigation has been conducted in the Langley 16-foot transonic tunnel to determine the effectiveness of utilizing solid circular cylinders to simulate the jet exhaust plume for a series of four isolated circular arc afterbodies with little or no flow separation. This investigation was conducted at Mach numbers from 0.40 to 1.30 at 0 deg angle of attack. Plume simulators with simulator diameter to nozzle exit diameter ratios of 0.82, 0.88, 0.98, and 1.00 were investigated with one of the four configurations while the 0.82 and 1.00 simulators were investigated with the other three. Reynolds number based on maximum model diameter varied from approximately 1.50 to 2.14 million.

  8. Control of vortex shedding on a circular cylinder using self-adaptive hairy-flaps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kunze, Sebastian; Brücker, Christoph

    2012-01-01

    Experiments on separation control using flexible self-adaptive hairy-flaps are presented herein. The wake-flow behind a circular cylinder is investigated without and with flexible hairy-flaps at the aft-part of the cylinder. Flow dynamics and hair motion were measured by particle image velocimetry and image processing in a range of Reynolds number 5000cylinder wake axis. Thus, the wake-deficit is largely reduced. Furthermore, flow fluctuations are considerably reduced about 42% in streamwise and 35% in transversal direction compared to the reference case without hairy-flaps, too. The condition for this mode change is the lock-in of the vortex shedding with a traveling wave running through the flexible hair bundles in transversal direction at the aft-part of the cylinder. As a consequence, the vortex shedding frequency is increased, the length of the separation bubble is decreased and drag force is decreased, too. The lock-in appears as a jump-like change of the shedding frequency and a jump in the Strouhal-Reynolds number diagram. However, when the characteristic length for the normalized frequency is chosen as the length of the separation bubble instead of the cylinder diameter, the Str-Re dependence is regular again. This hints on the relevance of the resonator model as proposed by Sigurdson and Roshko (1988) [16] on vortex shedding mechanism when boundary conditions are changed such as in our case, where the hairy-flap bundle imposes a flexible wall with visco-elastic coupling in transversal direction.

  9. Flow around circular cylinder oscillating at low Keulegan-Carpenter number

    SciTech Connect

    Sunahara, Shunji; Kinoshita, Takeshi

    1994-12-31

    This paper shows experimental results of hydrodynamic forces acting on a vertical circular cylinder oscillating sinusoidally at low frequencies in the still water and results of the flow visualization, to examine the flow around a circular cylinder, particularly the lift forces at low Keulegan-Carpenter number Kc. The instability of streaked flow of which section is mushroom shape is observed by flow visualization, and the flows are asymmetrical in some cases. The asymmetrical streaked flow may have a close relationship to the lift force at low Kc, Kc {le} 4 or 5. Asymmetrical mushroom vortex ring is visible for Kc {le} 1. The mushroom vortex ring is symmetrical, or the streaks of the rings arrange themselves alternately for 1 {le} Kc {le} 1.5. A clear ring of mushroom vortices is not formed due to diffusion of dye sheets, though a flow streaked with mushroom vortices is visible for 1.5 {le} Kc {le} 2.5 and for Kc {ge} 2.5 the flow is almost turbulent.

  10. The velocity and vorticity fields of the turbulent near wake of a circular cylinder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wallace, James; Ong, Lawrence; Moin, Parviz

    1995-01-01

    The purpose of this research is to provide a detailed experimental database of velocity and vorticity statistics in the very near wake (x/d less than 10) of a circular cylinder at Reynolds number of 3900. This study has determined that estimations of the streamwise velocity component in flow fields with large nonzero cross-stream components are not accurate. Similarly, X-wire measurements of the u and v velocity components in flows containing large w are also subject to the errors due to binormal cooling. Using the look-up table (LUT) technique, and by calibrating the X-wire probe used here to include the range of expected angles of attack (+/- 40 deg), accurate X-wire measurements of instantaneous u and v velocity components in the very near wake region of a circular cylinder has been accomplished. The approximate two-dimensionality of the present flow field was verified with four-wire probe measurements, and to some extent the spanwise correlation measurements with the multisensor rake. Hence, binormal cooling errors in the present X-wire measurements are small.

  11. An Experimental Investigation of Some Three-Dimensional Effects of Stationary Circular Cylinders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weiss, Lesley G.; Szewczyk, Albin A.

    1999-11-01

    Some effects of three-dimensionality on the near wake of a circular cylinder were investigated in the subcritical Reynolds number range. The three-dimensional effects were imposed by a linear shear approach flow and taper in the cylinder. A rake of 16 hot-wires was placed in the near wake in order to investigate the effects of three-dimensionality on the vortex shedding along the span. Results of the present investigation indicate that the three-dimensionality triggers the formation of constant frequency cells. The number and size of the cells are dependent on the combination of nonuniformity in the flow and cylinder. When based on midspan values of diameter and velocity the Strouhal number remains constant within each cell and is centered around the two-dimensional Strouhal number. If the Strouhal number is based on local values it tends to vary linearly within each cell and jump between cell boundaries. A pseudo-visualization technique using time series data is used to show the splitting of vortex cells of different frequency.

  12. Adaptive individual-cylinder thermal state control using intake air heating for a GDCI engine

    DOEpatents

    Roth, Gregory T.; Sellnau, Mark C.

    2016-08-09

    A system for a multi-cylinder compression ignition engine includes a plurality of heaters, at least one heater per cylinder, with each heater configured to heat air introduced into a cylinder. Independent control of the heaters is provided on a cylinder-by-cylinder basis. A combustion parameter is determined for combustion in each cylinder of the engine, and control of the heater for that cylinder is based on the value of the combustion parameter for combustion in that cylinder. A method for influencing combustion in a multi-cylinder compression ignition engine, including determining a combustion parameter for combustion taking place in a cylinder of the engine and controlling a heater configured to heat air introduced into that cylinder, is also provided.

  13. Asymmetric turbulent boundary layers along long thin circular cylinders at low-Re

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jordan, Stephen A.

    2015-09-01

    Notable deviations of the asymmetric turbulent boundary layer (TBL) statistics from their axisymmetric counterpart along long thin circular cylinders are vitally important to the naval and oceanographic jurisdictions. Although the available experimental evidence backs their concern, the realm of parametric variability (both geometric and kinematic) is extremely limited to draw solid conclusions. We know that only small misalignments which quantify less than one degree of incidence between the freestream and the straight cylinder axis can substantially alter the boundary layer thicknesses, mean axial velocity, and Reynolds stresses. But the statistical database is plainly inadequate to justify modifying the design tools that were founded solely for axisymmetric flow conditions. Herein, we begin rectifying this drawback by numerical means. The investigation centers on low turbulent Reynolds numbers (500 ≤ Rea ≤ 2500) and small angles-of-incidence (0° < α < 9°) to validate and complement the lions-share of the present database (Rea = aUo/ν, where a, Uo, and ν are the cylinder radius, freestream velocity, and kinematic viscosity, respectively). In particular, we numerically resolved the statistical responses of the TBL, mean axial velocity, Reynolds stresses, and skin friction under angles-of-incidence up to the earliest signs of Strouhal-type shedding. Clearly, the first prominent response was the thinning and thickening of the TBL along the respective windward and leeward sides to only a minor misalignment. Tilting the straight cylinder to slightly higher yaw angles transformed the TBL to a transitional boundary layer along the windward side for all simulated Reynolds numbers. For yaw angles α > 2°, all turbulent statistics of the asymmetric boundary layer were measurably dissimilar to those of the axisymmetric state.

  14. In-cylinder tumble flows and performance of a motorcycle engine with circular and elliptic intake ports

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, R. F.; Lin, K. H.; Yeh, C.-N.; Lan, J.

    2009-01-01

    The temporal and spatial evolution processes of the flows in the cylinder of a four-valve, four-stroke, single cylinder, reciprocating motorcycle engine installed with the elliptic and circular intake ports were experimentally studied by using the particle image velocimetry (PIV). The engine was modified to fit the requirements of PIV measurement. The velocity fields measured by the PIV were analyzed and quantitatively presented as the tumble ratio and turbulence intensity. In the symmetry plane, both the circular and elliptic intake ports could initiate a vortex around the central region during the intake stroke. During the compression stroke, the central vortex created in the cylinder of the engine with the circular intake port disappeared, while that in the engine cylinder with the elliptic intake port further developed into the tumble motion. In the offset plane, weak vortical structures were initiated by the bluff-body effect of the intake valves during the intake stroke. The vortical structures induced by the elliptic intake port were more coherent than those generated by the circular intake port; besides, this feature extends to the compression stroke. The cycle-averaged tumble ratio and the turbulence intensity of the engine with the elliptic intake port were dramatically larger than those of the engine with the circular intake port. The measured engine performance was improved a lot by installing the elliptic intake port. The correlation between the flow features and the enhancement of the engine performance were argued and discussed.

  15. On the symmetrical potential flow of compressible fluid past a circular cylinder in the tunnel in the subcritical zone

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lamla, Ernst

    1942-01-01

    The two-dimensional symmetrical potential flow of compressible fluid past a circular cylinder placed in the center line of a straight tunnel is analyzed in second approximation according to the Jansen-Rayleigh method. The departure of the profile from the exact circular shape can be kept to the same magnitude as for the incompressible flow. The velocities in the narrowest section of the tunnel wall and at the profile edge are discussed in detail.

  16. The influence of higher harmonic flow forces on the response of a curved circular cylinder undergoing vortex-induced vibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seyed-Aghazadeh, Banafsheh; Budz, Collin; Modarres-Sadeghi, Yahya

    2015-09-01

    Vortex-induced vibration (VIV) of a curved circular cylinder (a quarter of a ring, with no extension added to either end) free to oscillate in the crossflow direction was studied experimentally. Both the concave and the convex orientations (with respect to the oncoming flow direction) were considered. As expected, the amplitude of oscillations in both configurations was decreased compared to a vertical cylinder with the same mass ratio. Flow visualizations showed that the vortices were shed in parallel to the curved cylinder, when the cylinder was free to oscillate. The sudden jump in the phase difference between the flow forces and the cylinder displacement observed in the VIV of vertical cylinders was not observed in the curved cylinders. Higher harmonic force components at frequencies twice and three times the frequency of oscillations were observed in flow forces acting on the vertical cylinder, as well as the curved cylinder. Asymmetry in the wake was responsible for the 2nd harmonic force component and the relative velocity of the structure with respect to the oncoming flow was responsible for the 3rd harmonic force component. The lock-in occurred over the same range of reduced velocities for the curved cylinder in the convex orientation as for a vertical cylinder, but it was extended to higher reduced velocities for a curved cylinder in the concave orientation. Higher harmonic force components were found to be responsible for the extended lock-in range in the concave orientation. Within this range, the higher harmonic forces were even larger than the first harmonic force and the structure was being excited mainly by these higher harmonic forces.

  17. A visual investigation of turbulence in stagnation flow about a circular cylinder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sadeh, W. Z.; Brauer, H. J.

    1978-01-01

    A visual investigation of turbulence in stagnation flow around a circular cylinder was carried out in order to gain a physical insight into the model advocated by the corticity-amplification theory. Motion pictures were taken from three different viewpoints, and a frame by frame examination of selected movie strips was conducted. Qualitative and quantitative analyses of the flow events focused on tracing the temporal and spatial evolution of a cross-vortex tube outlined by the entrained smoke filaments. The visualization supplied evidence verifying: (1) the selective stretching of cross-vortex tubes which is responsible for the amplification of cross vorticity and, hence, of streamwise turbulence; (2) the streamwise tilting of stretched cross-vortex tubes; (3) the existence of a coherent array of vortices near the stagnation zone; (4) the interaction of the amplified vorticity with the body laminar boundary layer; and, (5) the growth of a turbulent boundary layer.

  18. Numerical studies of flow over a circular cylinder at ReD=3900

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kravchenko, Arthur G.; Moin, Parviz

    2000-02-01

    Flow over a circular cylinder at Reynolds number 3900 is studied numerically using the technique of large eddy simulation. The computations are carried out with a high-order accurate numerical method based on B-splines and compared with previous upwind-biased and central finite-difference simulations and with the existing experimental data. In the very near wake, all three simulations are in agreement with each other. Farther downstream, the results of the B-spline computations are in better agreement with the hot-wire experiment of Ong and Wallace [Exp. Fluids 20, 441-453 (1996)] than those obtained in the finite-difference simulations. In particular, the power spectra of velocity fluctuations are in excellent agreement with the experimental data. The impact of numerical resolution on the shear layer transition is investigated.

  19. a Novel Flexible Forcing Hybrid Ib-Lbm Scheme to Simulate Flow Past Circular Cylinder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dash, Sunil Manohar; Lee, Thong-See; Huang, Haibo

    2014-01-01

    A novel flexible forcing immersed boundary and lattice Boltzmann method (IB-LBM) is introduced in this paper. In the conventional IB-LBM scheme, explicit calculation of the force density term may not guarantee exact satisfaction of the no-slip boundary condition. This produces unphysical streamline penetration into the solid object. In this study, an implicit approach is followed where the force density is obtained from the unknown velocity correction with a unique single Lagrangian velocity correction term and flexible number of forcing steps. The proposed algorithm is computationally efficient and easy for new code development. Also the algorithm is found advantageous for unsteady flow case where no-slip condition is accurately satisfied. Flow past circular cylinder is studied for both steady and unsteady flow cases to validate the proposed scheme.

  20. Control of flow around a circular cylinder wrapped with a porous layer by magnetohydrodynamic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bovand, M.; Rashidi, S.; Esfahani, J. A.; Saha, S. C.; Gu, Y. T.; Dehesht, M.

    2016-03-01

    The present study focuses on the analysis of two-dimensional Magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) flow past a circular cylinder wrapped with a porous layer in different laminar flow regimes. The Darcy-Brinkman-Forchheimer model has been used for simulating flow in porous medium using finite volume based software, Fluent 6.3. In order to analyze the MHD flow, the mean and instantaneous drag and lift coefficients and stream patterns are computed to elucidate the role of Stuart number, N and Darcy number, Da. It is revealed that the magnetic fields are capable to stabilize flow and suppress the vortex shedding of vortices. The N-Re plane shows the curves for separating steady and periodic flow regimes, Ncr and disappearing of vortex, Ndiss. For validate the solution, the obtained CD and St are compared with available results of literature.

  1. Force measurements on a circular cylinder in a Cryogenic Ludwieg-Tube using piezoelectric transducers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schewe, Günter; Steinhoff, Christian

    2007-03-01

    Force and pressure measurements were performed in a high Reynolds number facility, i.e. the Cryogenic Ludwieg-Tube (KRG). The balance based on multicomponent piezoelectric force transducers was applied totally in the cryogenic environment. The behaviour of the balance was tested ranging from ambient down to cryogenic conditions. As test cases, the flow around a circular cylinder was investigated at a sub- and supercritical Mach number. The highest possible Reynolds number in most nearly incompressible flow (Re = 5.8 × 106) was achieved at the temperature of T = -150°C, the highest pressure possible, p 0 = 10 bar, and the lowest attainable Mach number of Ma = 0.28. The results show that, in spite of the pulse operating mode of the tunnel, the steady and unsteady processes can be measured very well by means of a piezoelectric balance.

  2. The inviscid axisymmetric stability of the supersonic flow along a circular cylinder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duck, Peter W.

    1989-01-01

    The supersonic flow past a thin straight circular cylinder is investigated. The associated boundary layer flow (i.e., the velocity and temperature field) is computed; the asymptotic, far downstream solution is obtained, and compared with the full numerical results. The inviscid, linear, axisymmetric (temporal) stability of this boundary layer is also studied. A so called doubly generalized inflexion condition is derived, which is a condition for the existence of so called subsonic neutral modes. The eigenvalue problem (for the complex wavespeed) is computed for two freestream Mach numbers (2.8 and 3.8), and this reveals that curvature has a profound effect on the stability of the flow. The first unstable inviscid mode is seen to rapidly disappear as curvature is introduced, while the second (and generally the most important) mode suffers a substantially reduced amplification rate.

  3. The inviscid axisymmetric stability of the supersonic flow along a circular cylinder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duck, Peter W.

    1990-01-01

    The supersonic flow past a thin straight circular cylinder is investigated. The associated boundary-layer flow (i.e. the velocity and temperature field) is computed; the asymptotic, far downstream solution is obtained, and compared with the full numerical results. The inviscid, linear, axisymmetric (temporal) stability of this boundary layer is also studied. A so-called 'doubly generalized' inflexion condition is derived, which is a condition for the existence of so-called 'subsonic' neutral modes. The eigenvalue problem (for the complex wavespeed) is computed for two free-stream Mach numbers (2.8 and 3.8), and this reveals that curvature has a profound effect on the stability of the flow. The first unstable inviscid mode is seen to disappear rapidly as curvature is introduced, while the second (and generally the most important) mode suffers a substantially reduced amplification rate.

  4. Study of Cavitation in Wakes of Circular Cylinders and Symmetric Wedges Using X-ray Densitometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koot, Joachim; Wu, Juliana; Ganesh, Harish; Ceccio, Steven

    2016-11-01

    Cavitation in wakes behind canonical objects can exhibit variation in Strouhal number with a reduction in cavitation number. Circular cylinders of two diameters and symmetric wedges with a wedge angle of 15, 30, and 60 degrees are used to study cavitation in their wakes using X-ray densitometry. Using high speed video and X-ray densitometry, the nature of cavitation is studied in near-wake and a part of the far-wake region. In addition, acoustic measurements are also carried out to understand the spectral content of such wake cavities. Based on void fraction flow field and high-speed video measurements, the effect of cavitation on the Kármán vortex street spacing in the far wake region is studied. The results are the interpreted to explain the physical mechanisms responsible for the observed change in Strouhal number. Office of Naval Research.

  5. Wall-resolved large-eddy simulation of flow past a circular cylinder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, W.; Pullin, D. I.; Samtaney, R.

    2016-11-01

    Wall-resolved large-eddy simulations (LES) about a smooth-walled circular cylinder are described over a range of Reynolds number from ReD = 3 . 9 ×103 (subcritical) to above the drag crisis, ReD = 8 . 5 ×105 (supercritical), where D is the cylinder diameter. The span-wise domain is 3 D for ReD <=105 and D otherwise. The numerical method is a fourth-order finite-difference discretization on a standard curvilinear O-grid. The stretched-vortex sub-grid scale model is used in the whole domain, including regions of large-scale separated flow. For ReD <=105 , calculations of the skin-friction coefficient versus polar angle θ along the cylinder surface and its dependence on ReD are well captured in comparison with experimental data. Proper separation behavior is observed. For high ReD , a fine mesh 8192 × 1024 × 256 is used. It is found that a blowing/suction-type perturbation of the wall-normal velocity along a span-wise strip, with angular position at θ = 50 -60o , is then required in order to produce flow separation in accordance with experiment at Reynolds numbers in the drag-crisis regime. Results presented will focus on the skin-friction behavior and details of flow separation. Supported partially by KAUST OCRF Award No. URF/1/1394-01 and partially by NSF award CBET 1235605. The Cray XC40, Shaheen, at KAUST was utilized for all simulations.

  6. Secondary vortex street in the wake of two tandem circular cylinders at low Reynolds number.

    PubMed

    Wang, Si-ying; Tian, Fang-bao; Jia, Lai-bing; Lu, Xi-yun; Yin, Xie-zhen

    2010-03-01

    The experiments on two tandem circular cylinders were conducted in a horizontal soap film tunnel for the Reynolds number Re=60 , 80, and 100 and the nondimensional center-to-center spacing Gamma ranging in 1 approximately 12. The flow patterns were recorded by a high-speed camera and the vortex shedding frequency was obtained by a spatiotemporal evolution method. The secondary vortex formation (SVF) mode characterized by the formation of a secondary vortex street in the wake of the downstream cylinder was found at large gamma. Moreover, some typical modes predicted by previous investigations, including the single bluff-body, shear layer reattachment, and synchronization of vortex shedding modes, were also revisited in our experiments. Further, numerical simulations were carried out using a space-time finite-element method and the results confirmed the existence of the SVF mode. The mechanism of SVF mode was analyzed in terms of the numerical results. The dependence of the Strouhal number Sr on Gamma was given and the flow characteristics relevant to the critical spacing values and the hysteretic mode transitions were investigated.

  7. Numerical investigation of flow-induced rotary oscillation of circular cylinder with rigid splitter plate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Lin; Guo, Xiao-ling; Tang, Guo-qiang; Liu, Ming-ming; Chen, Chuan-qi; Xie, Zhi-hua

    2016-09-01

    Numerical results of fluid flow over a rotationally oscillating circular cylinder with splitter plate are presented here. Different from the previous examinations with freely rotatable assembly, the fluid and structure interactions are treated as a coupled dynamic system by fully considering the structural inertia, stiffness, and damping. The hydrodynamic characteristics are examined in terms of reduced velocity Ur at a relatively low Reynolds number Re = 100 for different plate lengths of L/D = 0.5, 1.0, and 1.5, where Ur = U/(Dfn), Re = UD/υ and fn = (κ/J)0.5/2π with U the free stream velocity, D the diameter of the circular cylinder, υ the fluid kinematic viscosity, fn the natural frequency, J the inertial moment, κ the torsional stiffness, and L the plate length. Contrast to the freely rotating cylinder/plate body, that is, in the limit of κ → 0 or Ur →∞, remarkable rotary oscillation is observed at relatively low reduced velocities. For the typical case with L/D = 1.0, the maximum amplitude may reach five times that at the highest reduced velocity of Ur = 15.0 considered in this work. At the critical reduced velocity Ur = 4.2, notable hydrodynamic jumps are identified for the rotation amplitude, response frequency, mean drag coefficient, lift amplitude, and vortex shedding frequency. Moreover, the phase angle between the fluid moment and rotary oscillation abruptly changes from 0 to π at Ur = 6.5. Due to the combined effect of fluid moment, rotation response, and phase difference, the natural frequency of the rotating body varies in flow, leading to a wide regime of lock-in/synchronization (Ur ≥4.2, for L/D = 1.0). The phenomenon of rotation bifurcation, i.e., the equilibrium position of the rotary oscillation deflects to a position which is not parallel to the free stream, is found to only occur at higher reduced velocities. The longer splitter plate has the lower critical reduced velocity. The occurrence of bifurcation is attributed to the

  8. Heat Transfer Over the Circumference of a Heated Cylinder in Transverse Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmidt, Ernst; Wenner, Karl

    1943-01-01

    A method for recording the local heat-transfer coefficients on bodies in flow was developed. The cylinder surface was kept at constant temperature by the condensation of vapor except for a narrow strip which is heated separately to the same temperature by electricity. The heat-transfer coefficient at each point was determined from the electric heat output and the temperature increase. The distribution of the heat transfer along the circumference of cylinders was recorded over a range of Reynolds numbers of from 5000 to 426,000. The pressure distribution was measured at the same time. At Reynolds numbers up to around 100,000 high maximums of the heat transfer occurred in the forward stagnation point at and on the rear side at 180C, while at around 80 the heat-transfer coefficient on both sides of the cylinder behind the forward stagnation point manifested distinct minimums. Two other maximums occurred at around 115 C behind the forward stagnation point between 170,000 and 426,000. At 426,000 the heat transfer at the location of those maximums was almost twice as great as in the forward stagnation point, and the rear half of the cylinder diffused about 60 percent of the entire heat, The tests are compared with the results of other experimental and theoretical investigations.

  9. Computation of Far-Field Noise from Vortex Shedding Behind a Circular Cylinder at Low Reynolds Numbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, H.; You, D.; Choi, M.-R.; Kang, S.-H.

    1996-11-01

    Laminar vortex sheddings behind a circular cylinder with and without splitter plates attached to the cylinder at low Reynolds numbers are simulated by solving the unsteady incompressible Navier-Stokes equations. The Strouhal number, lift and drag rapidly change with the length of the splitter plate. Far-field noise from the vortex shedding behind the cylinder is computed using the Curle's formulation of the Lighthill acoustic analogy. The acoustic source functions are obtained from the computed near-field velocity and pressure. Numerical results show that the volume quadrupole noise is small at a low Mach number, compared to the surface dipole noise from the cylinder. Variations of the far-field noise characteristics with respect to the splitter plate are being investigated and will be shown in the final presentation. ^* Supported by KOSEF under Contract No. 961-1009-075-2

  10. Investigation of flow characteristics effects on heat transfer in water-cooled cylinder heads

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hassan, M. A. M.; Abd El-Hameed, H. M.; Mahmoud, Osama E.

    2016-08-01

    An experimental and theoretical study has been performed to investigate the effect of flow characteristics on heat-transfer in water impingement-cooled cylinder heads. Numerous investigations have been made using a three-dimensional model, which is designed and solved by FLUENT software using both realizable k-ɛ turbulent and heat transfer models. The simulation investigates a fully developed turbulent-water flow in asymmetric heated circular passage cooled by parallel flow or impingement of circular submerged confined liquid jet. The following parameters were investigated for both parallel flow and jet impingement flow: flow velocities (1, 2 and 3 m/s), bulk fluid temperatures (50, 70 and 90 °C), main duct diameters (6, 8, 10 and 12 mm). While the following parameters were investigated for jet impingement flow, jet diameter ratio (0.6, 0.8 and 1) and jet inclination angles as measured from horizontal (45°, 60° and 90°). Experimental results were used to verify the theoretical model. Results indicate that, the normal jet (90°) gives the maximum cooling effect in comparison to other angles while the maximum heat transfer coefficient is found at jet interface position.

  11. Turbulent fluid-structure interaction of water-entry/exit of a rotating circular cylinder using SPH method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghazanfarian, Jafar; Saghatchi, Roozbeh; Gorji-Bandpy, Mofid

    2015-12-01

    This paper studies the two-dimensional (2D) water-entry and exit of a rotating circular cylinder using the Sub-Particle Scale (SPS) turbulence model of a Lagrangian particle-based Smoothed-Particle Hydrodynamics (SPH) method. The full Navier-Stokes (NS) equations along with the continuity have been solved as the governing equations of the problem. The accuracy of the numerical code is verified using the case of water-entry and exit of a nonrotating circular cylinder. The numerical simulations of water-entry and exit of the rotating circular cylinder are performed at Froude numbers of 2, 5, 8, and specific gravities of 0.25, 0.5, 0.75, 1, 1.75, rotating at the dimensionless rates of 0, 0.25, 0.5, 0.75. The effect of governing parameters and vortex shedding behind the cylinder on the trajectory curves, velocity components in the flow field, and the deformation of free surface for both cases have been investigated in detail. It is seen that the rotation has a great effect on the curvature of the trajectory path and velocity components in water-entry and exit cases due to the interaction of imposed lift and drag forces with the inertia force.

  12. Phenomenology of a flow around a circular cylinder at sub-critical and critical Reynolds numbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capone, Alessandro; Klein, Christian; Di Felice, Fabio; Miozzi, Massimo

    2016-07-01

    In this work, the flow around a circular cylinder is investigated at Reynolds numbers ranging from 79 000 up to 238 000 by means of a combined acquisition system based on Temperature Sensitive Paint (TSP) and particle velocimetry. The proposed setup allows simultaneous and time-resolved measurement of absolute temperature and relative skin friction fields onto the cylinder surface and near-wake velocity field. Combination of time-resolved surface measurements and planar near-field velocity data allows the investigation of the profound modifications undergone by the wall shear stress topology and its connections to the near-field structure as the flow regime travels from the sub-critical to the critical regime. Laminar boundary-layer separation, transition, and re-attachment are analyzed in the light of temperature, relative skin friction maps, and Reynolds stress fields bringing about a new perspective on the relationship between boundary layer development and shear layer evolution. The fast-responding TSP employed allows high acquisition frequency and calculation of power spectral density from surface data. Correlation maps of surface and near-wake data provide insight into the relationship between boundary-layer evolution and vortex shedding. We find that as the Reynolds number approaches the critical state, the separation line oscillations feature an increasingly weaker spectrum peak compared to the near-wake velocity spectrum. In the critical regime, separation line oscillations are strongly reduced and the correlation to the local vorticity undergoes an overall decrease giving evidence of modifications in the vortex shedding mechanism.

  13. Suppression of vortex-induced vibration of a circular cylinder using thermal effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wan, Hui; Patnaik, Soumya S.

    2016-12-01

    Transverse vortex-induced vibration (VIV) of a cylinder with various body-to-fluid density ratio and stiffness is studied. The cylinder is elastically mounted and heated, and the flow direction is aligned with the direction of the thermal induced buoyancy force. Amplitude of VIV can be reduced as the thermal control parameter Richardson number (Ri) increases, or even be fully suppressed when Ri is above a critical value. This critical Richardson number depends on both body-to-fluid density and structural stiffness. A higher critical Richardson is required to fully suppress the VIV of a structure with smaller density ratio. With the same density or mass, a structure with intermediate stiffness vibrating in lock-in regime needs higher critical Ri to suppress VIV than either rigid or flexible structures. Drag experienced by the body is also studied. It is found that for a flexible body, drag gradually increases with the Richardson number. For a body with intermediate stiffness, both drag and amplitude of VIV can be reduced until the Richardson number reaches the critical value, after which drag builds up if the Richardson number is further increased. A drag reduction of 30%-40% can be obtained at the critical Richardson number.

  14. Computational study of vortex-induced vibration of a sprung rigid circular cylinder with a strongly nonlinear internal attachment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tumkur, Ravi Kumar R.; Calderer, Ramon; Masud, Arif; Pearlstein, Arne J.; Bergman, Lawrence A.; Vakakis, Alexander F.

    2013-07-01

    For a Reynolds number (Re) based on cylinder diameter of 100, and a ratio of cylinder density to fluid density of 10, we investigate the effect of a strongly nonlinear internal attachment on the vortex-induced vibration (VIV) of a rigid circular cylinder restrained by a linear spring, and constrained to move perpendicularly to the mean flow. The variational multiscale residual-based stabilized finite-element method used to compute approximate solutions of the incompressible Navier-Stokes equations about the moving cylinder is coupled to a simple model of a "nonlinear energy sink" (NES), an essentially nonlinear oscillator consisting of a mass, a linear damper, and a strongly nonlinear spring. The NES promotes nearly one-way transfer of energy to itself from the primary structure (the cylinder), resulting in reduction of the amplitude of the limit-cycle oscillation by as much as 75%, depending on the parameters characterizing the NES. Various mechanisms of nonlinear interaction of the NES with the cylinder undergoing VIV are discussed. Although no optimization of the NES is performed in this work, we demonstrate capacity for passive suppression of VIV and compare the performance of the NES to the tuned linear absorber of equal mass.

  15. Interaction of torsional and longitudinal guided waves in weakly nonlinear circular cylinders.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yang; Khajeh, Ehsan; Lissenden, Cliff J; Rose, Joseph L

    2013-05-01

    The nonlinear forcing terms for the wave equation in general curvilinear coordinates are derived based on an isotropic homogeneous weakly nonlinear elastic material. The expressions for the nonlinear part of the first Piola-Kirchhoff stress are specialized for axisymmetric torsional and longitudinal fundamental waves in a circular cylinder. The matrix characteristics of the nonlinear forcing terms and secondary mode wave structures are manipulated to analyze the higher harmonic generation due to the guided wave mode self-interactions and mutual interactions. It is proved that both torsional and longitudinal secondary wave fields can be cumulative by a specific type of guided wave mode interactions. A method for the selection of preferred fundamental excitations that generate strong cumulative higher harmonics is formulated, and described in detail for second harmonic generation. Nonlinear finite element simulations demonstrate second harmonic generation by T(0,3) and L(0,4) modes at the internal resonance points. A linear increase of the normalized modal amplitude ratio A2/A1(2) over the propagation distance is observed for both cases, which indicates that mode L(0,5) is effectively generated as a cumulative second harmonic. Counter numerical examples demonstrate that synchronism and sufficient power flux from the fundamental mode to the secondary mode must occur for the secondary wave field to be strongly cumulative.

  16. Growth and densification of frost around a circular cylinder under humid air on cross flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madrid, Victor; Sanchez, Fausto; Martinez, Simon; Morales, Arturo

    2015-03-01

    Formation, growth and densification of frost around a circular cylinder under humid air on cross flow at different Reynolds numbers has been numerically studied using the finite volume method. The frost formation phenomenon takes place when humidity goes through a desublimation phase change at a temperature lower than its solidification point. Continuity, momentum, energy and mass transport equations have been solved for a whole domain including both phases, gas and solid, and the two components in the gas phase, i.e. dry air and humidity. The mass of water that goes from the gas to the solid phase is used as a source term in the mass conservation equation for solid phase and as a sink for the gas phase, affecting source terms in all the other conservation equations (energy and momentum) also. A volume of fraction conservation equation for solid phase is used to obtain local fractions of ice droplets, considering formally as frost those fraction values greater than a critical value. Once those local fractions are known, local frost properties such as density and thermal conductivity can be calculated as functions of the phase fraction allowing to compute the evolution of growth and local properties of frost. Authors aknowledge financial support from CONACYT through Project 221993.

  17. Turbulence effect on crossflow around a circular cylinder at subcritical Reynolds numbers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sadeh, W. Z.; Saharon, D. B.

    1982-01-01

    An investigation of the effect of freestream turbulence on the flow around a smooth circular cylinder at subcritical Reynolds numbers from 5.2 x 10 to the 4th power to 2.09 x 10 to the 5th power was conducted. Measurements show that the interaction of incident turbulence with the initial laminar boundary layer: (1) modifies the characteristics of the mean surface pressure distribution; (2) induces an aft shift in the separation point ranging from 5 to 50 beyond the laminar separation angle of 80 degrees; and, (3) reduces the mean drag coefficient to values between 97 and 46% of its nearly constant laminar counterpart. The extent of these changes depends on the particular Reynolds number background turbulence combination. These results demonstrate that a boundary-layer flow similar to that found in critical, supercritical and/or transcritical flow regimes is induced by turbulence at subcritical Reynolds numbers and, hence, the effect of turbulence is equivalent to an effective increase in the Reynolds number. The change in the nature and properties of the boundary layer in the subcritical regime, consequent upon the penetration of turbulence into it, is in agreement with the model proposed by the vorticity-amplification theory.

  18. Acoustic scattering by circular cylinders of various aspect ratios. [pressure gradient microphones

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maciulaitis, A.

    1979-01-01

    The effects of acoustic scattering on the useful frequency range of pressure gradient microphones were investigated experimentally between ka values of 0.407 and 4.232 using two circular cylindrical models (L/D = 0.5 and 0.25) having a 25 cm outside diameter. Small condenser microphones, attached to preamplifiers by flexible connectors, were installed from inside the cylindrical bodies, and flush mounted on the exterior surface of the cylinders. A 38 cm diameter woofer in a large speaker enclosure was used as the sound source. Surface pressure augmentation and phase differences were computed from measured data for various sound wave incidence angles. Results are graphically compared with theoretical predictions supplied by NASA for ka = 0.407, 2.288, and 4.232. All other results are tabulated in the appendices. With minor exceptions, the experimentally determined pressure augmentations agreed within 0.75 dB with theoretical predictions. The agreement for relative phase angles was within 5 percent without any exceptions. Scattering parameter variations with ka and L/D ratio, as computed from experimental data, are also presented.

  19. A theoretical approximation of the shock standoff distance for supersonic flows around a circular cylinder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinclair, J.; Cui, X.

    2017-02-01

    Many previous studies have addressed the problem of theoretically approximating the shock standoff distance; however, limitations to these methods fail to produce excellent results across the entire range of Mach numbers. This paper proposes an alternative approach for approximating the shock standoff distance for supersonic flows around a circular cylinder. It follows the philosophy that the "modified Newtonian impact theory" can be used to calculate the size of the sonic zone bounded between the bow shock and the fore part of the body and that the variation of the said zone is related to the standoff distance as a function of the upstream Mach number. Consequently, a reduction rate parameter for the after-shock subsonic region and a reduction rate parameter for the shock standoff distance are introduced to formulate such a relation, yielding a new expression for the shock standoff distance given in Equation (32). It is directly determined by the upstream Mach number and the location of the sonic point at the body surface. The shock standoff distance found by this relation is compared with the numerical solutions obtained by solving the two-dimensional inviscid Euler equations, and with previous experimental results for Mach numbers from 1.35 to 6, and excellent and consistent agreement is achieved across this range of Mach numbers.

  20. Electron bounce resonance heating in a bumpy cylinder

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, G.L.

    1984-10-01

    In bumpy cylinder geometry, the electrons are classified into trapped and passing particles. The interaction between a wave near the electron bounce frequency and the electrons is studied both numerically and analytically for the appropriate parameters of ELMO Bumpy Torus-Scale (EBT-S). It is shown that coupling of the waves to the electron bounce motion parallel to the magnetic field can lead to heating of those electrons near the passing/trapped boundary in velocity space. The stochastic threshold condition is eE/sub 0/k/sub 0//m..omega../sub b//sup 2/ approx. = 0.1. For this mechanism, it is found that the wave energy density required to induce stochastic heating in EBT by rf (in the frequency range of ion cyclotron resonance heating (ICRH)) is about an order of magnitude more than that estimated on the basis of cold plasma wave theory. It is hypothesized that this discrepancy would disappear when the thermal correction to the wave propagation and the effects of collisions and toroidicity are included. We also suggest that the bounce resonance can enhance the electron cyclotron resonance heating (ECRH) efficiency in an EBT-like heating scheme.

  1. Heat Transfer from a Horizontal Cylinder Rotating in Oil

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seban, R. A.; Johnson, H. A.

    1959-01-01

    Measurements of the heat transfer from a horizontal cylinder rotating about its axis have been made with oil as the surrounding fluid to provide an addition to the heat-transfer results for this system heretofore available only for air. The results embrace a Prandtl number range from about 130 to 660, with Reynolds numbers up to 3 x 10(exp 4), and show an increasing dependence of free-convection heat transfer on rotation as the Prandtl number is increased by reducing the oil temperature. Some correlation of this effect, which agrees with the prior results for air, has been achieved. At higher rotative speeds the flow becomes turbulent, the free- convection effect vanishes, and the results with oil can be correlated generally with those for air and with mass-transfer results for even higher Prandtl numbers. For this system, however, the analogy calculations which have successfully related the heat transfer to the friction for pipe flows at high Prandtl numbers fail.

  2. Simulation of infrared scattering from ice aggregates by use of a size-shape distribution of circular ice cylinders.

    PubMed

    Baran, Anthony J

    2003-05-20

    The scalar optical properties (extinction coefficient, mass extinction coefficient, single-scattering albedo, and asymmetry parameter) of a distribution of randomly oriented ice aggregates are simulated generally to well within 4% accuracy by use of a size-shape distribution of randomly oriented circular ice cylinders at wavelengths in the terrestrial window region. The single-scattering properties of the ice aggregates are calculated over the whole size distribution function by the finite-difference time-domain and improved geometric optics methods. The single-scattering properties of the size-shape distribution of circular ice cylinders are calculated by the T-matrix method supplemented by scattering solutions obtained from complex-angular-momentum theory. Moreover, radiative-transfer studies demonstrate that the maximum error in brightness temperature space when the size-shape distribution of circular ice cylinders is used to represent scattering from ice aggregates is only approximately 0.4 K The methodology presented should find wide applicability in remote sensing of ice cloud and parameterization of cirrus cloud scalar optical properties in climate models.

  3. Natural convection heat transfer on two horizontal cylinders in liquid sodium

    SciTech Connect

    Hata, K.; Shiotsu, M.; Takeuchi, Y.

    1995-09-01

    Natural convection heat transfer on two horizontal 7.6 mm diameter test cylinders assembled with the ratio of the distance between each cylinder axis to the cylinder diameter, S/D, of 2 in liquid sodium was studied experimentally and theoretically. The heat transfer coefficients on the cylinder surface due to the same heat inputs ranging from 1.0 X 10{sup 7} to 1.0 x 10{sup 9} W/m{sup 3} were obtained experimentally for various setting angeles, {gamma}, between vertical direction and the plane including both of these cylinder axis over the range of zero to 90{degrees}. Theoretical equations for laminar natural convection heat transfer from the two horizontal cylinders were numerically solved for the same conditions as the experimental ones considering the temperature dependence of thermophysical properties concerned. The average Nusselt numbers, Nu, values on the Nu versus modified Rayleigh number, R{sub f}, graph. The experimental values of Nu for the upper cylinder are about 20% lower than those for the lower cylinder at {gamma} = 0{degrees} for the range of R{sub f} tested here. The value of Nu for the upper cylinder becomes higher and approaches that for the lower cylinder with the increase in {gamma} over range of 0 to 90{degrees}. The values of Nu for the lower cylinder at each {gamma} are almost in agreement with those for a single cylinder. The theoretical values of Nu on two cylinders except those for R{sub f}<4 at {gamma} = 0{degrees} are in agreement with the experimental data at each {gamma} with the deviations less than 15%. Correlations for Nu on the upper and lower cylinders were obtained as functions of S/D and {gamma} based n the theoretical solutions for the S/D ranged over 1.5 to 4.0.

  4. Turbulent boundary layers along straight and curved long thin circular cylinders at low angles-of-incidence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jordan, Stephen A.

    2016-05-01

    Long thin circular cylinders commonly serve as towed sonar tracking devices, where the radius-of-curvature along the longitudinal axis is quite low [ρr = O(10-4)]. Because no understanding presently exists about the direct impact of longitudinal curvature on the turbulent statistics, the long cylinder is simply viewed as a chain of straight segments at various (increasing then decreasing) small inclinations to the freestream direction. Realistically, even our statistical evidence along straight thin cylinders at low incidence angles is inadequate to build solid evidence towards forming reliable empirical models. In the present study, we address these shortcomings by executing Large-Eddy Simulations (LESs) of straight and longitudinally curved thin cylinders at low to moderate turbulent radius-based Reynolds numbers (500 ≤ Rea ≤ 3500) and small angles-of-incidence (α = 0° → 9°). Coupled with the previous experimental measurements and numerical results, the new expanded database (311 ≤ Rea ≤ 56 500) delivered sufficient means to propose power-law expressions for the longitudinal evolution of the skin friction, normal drag, and turbulent boundary layer (TBL) length scales. Surprisingly, the LES computations of the curved cylinders at analogous geometric and kinematic conditions as the straight cylinder showed similar character in terms of the longitudinal skin friction. Beyond incidence 1°-3° (upper end corresponds to the highest simulated Rea), the skin friction was directly proportional to the yaw angle and monotonically shifted downward with higher Rea. Conversely, the flow structure, normal drag, TBL length scales, Reynolds stresses, and the separation state of the transverse shear layers towards regular vortex shedding for the curved cylinder were highly dissimilar than the straight one at equivalent incidence angles.

  5. Flow control around a circular cylinder using pulsed dielectric barrier discharge surface plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Jukes, Timothy N.; Choi, Kwing-So

    2009-08-15

    Dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) plasma actuators have been used to control the flow around a circular cylinder at Re=15 000, where the near-wake structure was studied using time-resolved particle image velocimetry with simultaneous measurements of the dynamic lift and drag forces. It was shown that the vortex shedding was suppressed when the surface plasma placed near the natural separation point was activated in a pulsed mode at nondimensional frequency, f{sub p}{sup +}, above 0.6 with a force coefficient, C{sub p}, greater than 0.05%. Plasma actuator performance on flow control was summarized by mapping the changes in drag and lift fluctuations as a function of the forcing frequency and the force coefficient. They showed that more than 70% reduction in lift fluctuations was obtained with up to 32% drag reduction at f{sub p}{sup +}=2.0 and C{sub p}=0.32%. Here, narrowing of the wake was observed as the plasma promoted shear-layer roll-ups at the forcing frequency. This, however, did not affect the shear layer on the opposite side of the wake. At nondimensional forcing frequencies less than 0.6, the vortex shedding locked onto a multiple of the plasma frequency to amplify the wake oscillations. This caused more than 85% increase in lift fluctuations with 8% drag increase at f{sub p}{sup +}=0.2 and C{sub p}=0.01%. The efficiency of flow control using DBD plasma was found to be 1%-2% for drag reduction while around 6% for drag increase.

  6. Interaction theory of hypersonic laminar near-wake flow behind an adiabatic circular cylinder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hinman, W. Schuyler; Johansen, C. T.

    2016-11-01

    The separation and shock wave formation on the aft-body of a hypersonic adiabatic circular cylinder were studied numerically using the open source software OpenFOAM. The simulations of laminar flow were performed over a range of Reynolds numbers (8× 10^3 < Re < 8× 10^4) at a free-stream Mach number of 5.9. Off-body viscous forces were isolated by controlling the wall boundary condition. It was observed that the off-body viscous forces play a dominant role compared to the boundary layer in displacement of the interaction onset in response to a change in Reynolds number. A modified free-interaction equation and correlation parameter has been presented which accounts for wall curvature effects on the interaction. The free-interaction equation was manipulated to isolate the contribution of the viscous-inviscid interaction to the overall pressure rise and shock formation. Using these equations coupled with high-quality simulation data, the underlying mechanisms resulting in Reynolds number dependence of the lip-shock formation were investigated. A constant value for the interaction parameter representing the part of the pressure rise due to viscous-inviscid interaction has been observed at separation over a wide range of Reynolds numbers. The effect of curvature has been shown to be the primary contributor to the Reynolds number dependence of the free-interaction mechanism at separation. The observations in this work have been discussed here to create a thorough analysis of the Reynolds number-dependent nature of the lip-shock.

  7. Control of flow around a circular cylinder for minimizing energy dissipation.

    PubMed

    Naito, Hiroshi; Fukagata, Koji

    2014-11-01

    Control of flow around a circular cylinder is studied numerically aiming at minimization of the energy dissipation. First, we derive a mathematical relationship (i.e., identity) between the energy dissipation in an infinitely large volume and the surface quantities, so that the cost function can be expressed by the surface quantities only. Subsequently a control law to minimize the energy dissipation is derived by using the suboptimal control procedure [J. Fluid Mech. 401, 123 (1999)JFLSA70022-112010.1017/S002211209900659X]. The performance of the present suboptimal control law is evaluated by a parametric study by varying the value of the arbitrary parameter contained. Two Reynolds numbers, Re=100 and 1000, are investigated by two-dimensional simulations. Although no improvement is obtained at Re=100, the present suboptimal control shows better results at Re=1000 than the suboptimal controls previously proposed. With the present suboptimal control, the dissipation and the drag are reduced by 58% and 44% as compared to the uncontrolled case, respectively. The suction around the front stagnation point and the blowing in the rear half are found to be weakened as compared to those in the previous suboptimal control targeting at pressure drag reduction. A predetermined control based on the control input profile obtained by the suboptimal control is also performed. The energy dissipation and the drag are found to be reduced as much as those in the present suboptimal control. It is also found that the present suboptimal and predetermined controls have better energy efficiencies than the suboptimal control previously proposed. Investigation at different control amplitudes reveals an advantage of the present control at higher amplitude. Toward its practical implementation, a localized version of the predetermined control is also examined, and it is found to work as effectively as the continuous case. Finally, the present predetermined control is confirmed to work well in a

  8. Forced Convection Heat Transfer in Circular Pipes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tosun, Ismail

    2007-01-01

    One of the pitfalls of engineering education is to lose the physical insight of the problem while tackling the mathematical part. Forced convection heat transfer (the Graetz-Nusselt problem) certainly falls into this category. The equation of energy together with the equation of motion leads to a partial differential equation subject to various…

  9. Modeling of Reduction in the Drag and of Cessation of the Action of an Alternating Transverse Force on a Circular Cylinder due to the Throttling Effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isaev, S. A.; Sudakov, A. G.; Zhukova, Yu. V.; Usachovd, A. E.

    2014-07-01

    An analysis of the physical processes in unsteady fl ow past a circular cylinder surrounded by a sheath with ports for bleeding of the medium has been made by a factorized fi nite-volume method on the basis of numerical solution of Navier-Stokes equations closed with the Menter sheer-stress-transfer model. It has been shown that such arrangement of a circular cylinder ensures stabilization of the wake of the cylinder, and also the reduction in its drag and cessation of the action of an alternating transverse force at Reynolds numbers higher than 105.

  10. X-ray densitometry based void fraction flow field measurements of cavitating flow in the wake of a circular cylinder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Tiezhi; Ganesh, Harish; Ceccio, Steven

    2015-11-01

    At sufficiently low cavitation number, the wake vortices behind bluff objects will cavitate. The presence of developed cavitation can alter the underlying vortical flow. In this study, cavitation dynamics in the wake of a circular cylinder is examined in order to determine the relationship between the void fraction in the cavity wake and the resulting modification to the flow compared to the non-cavitating flow. Cavitation in the wake of a cylinder is investigated using high-speed video cameras and cinematographic X-ray densitometry. Using synchronized top and side views from high-speed video cameras, the morphology and extent of the cavities forming on the wake of the circular cylinder is studied for a range of cavitation numbers, at a Reynolds number of 1x10-5, which lies at the transition region between sub-critical to critical regime of wake transitions. The time resolved and mean X-ray densitometry based void fraction of the spanwise and plan view averaged flow field will be related to the vortex dynamics in an attempt to understand the role of vapor production in the observed dynamics.

  11. Scattering from the Finite-Length, Dielectric Circular Cylinder: Part I - Derivation of an Analytical Solution

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-07-01

    the direct response and the single and double ground bounce contributions. An arbitrarily oriented cylinder is treated by augmenting the solution with...response and the single and double ground bounce contributions. An arbitrarily oriented cylinder is treated by augmenting the solution with

  12. Frequency lock-in and phase synchronization of vortex shedding behind circular cylinder due to surface waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gunnoo, Hans; Abcha, Nizar; Ezersky, Alexander

    2016-02-01

    The influence of harmonic surface wave on non-regular Karman Vortex Street is investigated. In our experiments, Karman Street arises behind a vertical circular cylinder in a water flow and harmonic surface waves propagating upstream. It is found that surface waves can modify regimes of shedding in Karman Street: frequency lock-in and synchronization of vortex shedding can arise. Intensive surface waves can excite symmetric vortex street instead of chess-like street, and completely suppress shedding behind the cylinder. It is shown experimentally that such effects occur if frequency of harmonic surface wave is approximately twice higher than the frequency of vortex shedding. Region of frequency lock-in is found on the plane amplitude-frequency of surface wave.

  13. Evaluation of a Second-Order Accurate Navier-Stokes Code for Detached Eddy Simulation Past a Circular Cylinder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vatsa, Veer N.; Singer, Bart A.

    2003-01-01

    We evaluate the applicability of a production computational fluid dynamics code for conducting detached eddy simulation for unsteady flows. A second-order accurate Navier-Stokes code developed at NASA Langley Research Center, known as TLNS3D, is used for these simulations. We focus our attention on high Reynolds number flow (Re = 5 x 10(sup 4) - 1.4 x 10(sup 5)) past a circular cylinder to simulate flows with large-scale separations. We consider two types of flow situations: one in which the flow at the separation point is laminar, and the other in which the flow is already turbulent when it detaches from the surface of the cylinder. Solutions are presented for two- and three-dimensional calculations using both the unsteady Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes paradigm and the detached eddy simulation treatment. All calculations use the standard Spalart-Allmaras turbulence model as the base model.

  14. Large-eddy simulation of circular cylinder flow at subcritical Reynolds number: Turbulent wake and sound radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Li; Zhang, Xing; He, Guowei

    2016-02-01

    The flows past a circular cylinder at Reynolds number 3900 are simulated using large-eddy simulation (LES) and the far-field sound is calculated from the LES results. A low dissipation energy-conserving finite volume scheme is used to discretize the incompressible Navier-Stokes equations. The dynamic global coefficient version of the Vreman's subgrid scale (SGS) model is used to compute the sub-grid stresses. Curle's integral of Lighthill's acoustic analogy is used to extract the sound radiated from the cylinder. The profiles of mean velocity and turbulent fluctuations obtained are consistent with the previous experimental and computational results. The sound radiation at far field exhibits the characteristic of a dipole and directivity. The sound spectra display the -5/3 power law. It is shown that Vreman's SGS model in company with dynamic procedure is suitable for LES of turbulence generated noise.

  15. Vortex-Induced Vibration of a Circular Cylinder Fitted with a Single Spanwise Tripwire

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaziri, Ehsan; Ekmekci, Alis

    2016-11-01

    A spanwise tripwire can be used to alter the coherence and strength of the vortex shedding from cylindrical structures. While this has been well-documented for cylinders in stationary state, there exists a lack of understanding regarding the control induced by spanwise tripwires for cylinders undergoing vortex-induced vibration (VIV). The current experimental research investigates the consequences of spanwise tripping on VIV of a cylinder. Experiments are conducted in a recirculating water tunnel at a Reynolds number of 10,000. The test setup allows the rigid test cylinder to have one-degree-of-freedom vibration in the cross-flow direction as a result of fluid forcing. To measure the cylinder motion, a high-resolution laser displacement sensor is used. The tripwire diameter to cylinder diameter ratio is fixed at 6.1%. Various angular positions of tripwire are studied ranging from 40 to 90 degrees. It is shown that the tripwire location controls the pattern, amplitude, frequency, and mid-position of oscillations significantly. Different oscillation modes are classified based on the observed oscillation pattern, amplitude and frequency. Oscillation amplitude can be reduced by 61% with respect to the amplitude of a clean cylinder undergoing VIV under the same flow condition.

  16. Natural convection heat transfer from horizontal concentric and eccentric cylinder systems cooling in the ambient air and determination of inner cylinder location

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atayılmaz, Ş. Özgür; Demir, Hakan; Sevindir, Mustafa Kemal; Ağra, Özden; Teke, İsmail; Dalkılıç, Ahmet Selim

    2017-03-01

    Heat transfer characteristics of horizontal copper concentric cylinders in the case of natural convection was investigated numerically and experimentally. While the inner cylinder had an electric heater to keep it at a constant temperature, annulus was filled with water. There were two different test sections as bare and concentric cylinder systems located in different ambient temperatures in a conditioned room for the comparison of the results. Comparison of average Nusselt numbers for the air side of the concentric cylinder system and the effective thermal conductivity of the annulus were calculated with both experimental data, numerical results and a well-known correlation. Annulus and the air side isotherms and streamlines are shown for RaL = 9 × 105-5 × 106 and Ra = 2 × 105-7 × 105 respectively. Additionally, a numerical study was conducted by forming eccentric cylinder systems to determine the optimum location of inner cylinder to maximize the heat transfer rate. Comparison of heat transfer rates from bare and concentric horizontal cylinders were done under steady state conditions. Heat transfer enhancement, the effect of the decrease in condensing temperature of the inner cylinder surface on COP of an ideal Carnot refrigeration cycle and rise in COP were determined in the study. Also the optimum location of inner cylinder to maximize the heat transfer rate was determined as at the bottom quadrant of outer cylinder.

  17. The Effect of Baffles on the Temperature Distribution and Heat-transfer Coefficients of Finned Cylinders

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schey, Oscar W; Rollin, Vern G

    1936-01-01

    This report presents the results of an investigation to determine the effect of baffles on the temperature distribution and the heat-transfer coefficient of finned cylinders. The tests were conducted in a 30-inch wind tunnel on electrically heated cylinders with fins of 0.25 and 0.31 inch pitch. The results of these tests showed that the use of integral baffles gave a reduction of 31.9 percent in the rear wall temperatures and an increase of 54.2 percent in the heat transfer coefficient as compared with a cylinder without baffles.

  18. Microwave heating and joining of ceramic cylinders: A mathematical model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Booty, Michael R.; Kriegsmann, Gregory A.

    1994-01-01

    A thin cylindrical ceramic sample is placed in a single mode microwave applicator in such a way that the electric field strength is allowed to vary along its axis. The sample can either be a single rod or two rods butted together. We present a simple mathematical model which describes the microwave heating process. It is built on the assumption that the Biot number of the material is small, and that the electric field is known and uniform throughout the cylinder's cross-section. The model takes the form of a nonlinear parabolic equation of reaction-diffusion type, with a spatially varying reaction term that corresponds to the spatial variation of the electromagnetic field strength in the waveguide. The equation is analyzed and a solution is found which develops a hot spot near the center of the cylindrical sample and which then propagates outwards until it stabilizes. The propagation and stabilization phenomenon concentrates the microwave energy in a localized region about the center where elevated temperatures may be desirable.

  19. Aerodynamic Characteristics of a Circular Cylinder at Mach Number 6.86 and Angles of Attack up to 90 Degrees

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Penland, Jim A

    1957-01-01

    Pressure-distribution and force tests of a circular cylinder have been made in the Langley 11-inch hypersonic tunnel at a Mach number of 6.88, a Reynolds number of 129,000, and angles of attack up to 90 degrees. The results are compared with the hypersonic approximation of Grimminger, Williams, and Young and a simple modification of the Newtonian flow theory. An evaluation of the crossflow theory is made through comparison of present results with available crossflow Mach number drag coefficients.

  20. Control of flow past a circular cylinder via a spanwise surface wire: effect of the wire scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ekmekci, Alis; Rockwell, Donald

    2011-09-01

    Flow phenomena induced by a single spanwise wire on the surface of a circular cylinder are investigated via a cinema technique of particle image velocimetry (PIV). The primary aim of this investigation is to assess the effect of the wire scale. To this end, consideration is given to wires with different diameters that are 0.5, 1.2, and 2.9% of the cylinder diameter. The Reynolds number has a subcritical value of 10,000. Compared to the thickness of the unperturbed boundary layer developing around the cylinder between 5° and 75° from the forward stagnation point, the former two wires have smaller scales and the latter has a larger scale. Two angular locations of the wire, defined with respect to the forward stagnation point of the cylinder, are found to be critical. When the wire is located at these critical angles, either the most significant extension or the contraction of the time-mean separation bubble occurs in the near wake. These critical angles depend on the wire scale: the smaller the wire, the larger the critical angle. The small-scale and large-scale wires that have diameters of 1.2 and 2.9% of the cylinder diameter induce bistable shear-layer oscillations between different separation modes when placed at their respective critical angles corresponding to maximum extension of the near-wake bubble. These oscillations have irregular time intervals that are much longer than the time scale associated with the classical Kármán instability. Moreover, the large-scale wire can either significantly attenuate or intensify the Kármán mode of vortex shedding at the critical states; in contrast, the small-scale wires do not notably alter the strength of the Kármán instability.

  1. Transition to Taylor vortex flow between combinations of circular and conical cylinders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lalaoua, Adel

    2017-01-01

    The stability and flow transitions in the annular gap between two coaxial rotating bodies, termed Taylor-Couette flow, presents a great importance in the field of fluid dynamics. In this paper, the fluid motion in an annulus between cylinder-cone combinations is investigated numerically using CFD simulations for a three dimensional viscous and incompressible flow. The transitional phenomena occurring in this flow are discussed under the effect of opening angles of the outer cylinder. The main goal it is to show how operates the change in the structure of the movement when changing the geometry of the flow through angular deviation, i.e., from coaxial rotating cylinders to an inner cylinder rotating in a conical container. Particular attention is given to the transitional regime and the onset of Taylor vortices when the outer cylinder is replaced with a cone. The numerical calculations are carried out over a range of apex angle α from 0 (classical case) up to 12°. The critical Taylor number, Tac1, characterizing the occurrence of Taylor vortices in the flow, decreases drastically: the first instability mode of transition changes from Tac1 = 41.6, corresponding to the classical case to Tac1 = 20.3 when the apex angle reaches 12°. The velocity distribution and the wavelengths are also presented. It is established that the number of vortices occurring in the gap between rotating cylinder in a cone is inversely proportional to the apex angles.

  2. Natural convection heat transfer for a staggered array of heated, horizontal cylinders within a rectangular enclosure

    SciTech Connect

    Triplett, C.E.

    1996-12-01

    This thesis presents the results of an experimental investigation of natural convection heat transfer in a staggered array of heated cylinders, oriented horizontally within a rectangular enclosure. The main purpose of this research was to extend the knowledge of heat transfer within enclosed bundles of spent nuclear fuel rods sealed within a shipping or storage container. This research extends Canaan`s investigation of an aligned array of heated cylinders that thermally simulated a boiling water reactor (BWR) spent fuel assembly sealed within a shipping or storage cask. The results are presented in terms of piecewise Nusselt-Rayleigh number correlations of the form Nu = C(Ra){sup n}, where C and n are constants. Correlations are presented both for individual rods within the array and for the array as a whole. The correlations are based only on the convective component of the heat transfer. The radiative component was calculated with a finite-element code that used measured surface temperatures, rod array geometry, and measured surface emissivities as inputs. The correlation results are compared to Canaan`s aligned array results and to other studies of natural convection in horizontal tube arrays.

  3. Optimal Design of General Stiffened Composite Circular Cylinders for Global Buckling with Strength Constraints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jaunky, N.; Ambur, D. R.; Knight, N. F., Jr.

    1998-01-01

    A design strategy for optimal design of composite grid-stiffened cylinders subjected to global and local buckling constraints and strength constraints was developed using a discrete optimizer based on a genetic algorithm. An improved smeared stiffener theory was used for the global analysis. Local buckling of skin segments were assessed using a Rayleigh-Ritz method that accounts for material anisotropy. The local buckling of stiffener segments were also assessed. Constraints on the axial membrane strain in the skin and stiffener segments were imposed to include strength criteria in the grid-stiffened cylinder design. Design variables used in this study were the axial and transverse stiffener spacings, stiffener height and thickness, skin laminate stacking sequence and stiffening configuration, where stiffening configuration is a design variable that indicates the combination of axial, transverse and diagonal stiffener in the grid-stiffened cylinder. The design optimization process was adapted to identify the best suited stiffening configurations and stiffener spacings for grid-stiffened composite cylinder with the length and radius of the cylinder, the design in-plane loads and material properties as inputs. The effect of having axial membrane strain constraints in the skin and stiffener segments in the optimization process is also studied for selected stiffening configurations.

  4. Optimal Design of General Stiffened Composite Circular Cylinders for Global Buckling with Strength Constraints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jaunky, Navin; Knight, Norman F., Jr.; Ambur, Damodar R.

    1998-01-01

    A design strategy for optimal design of composite grid-stiffened cylinders subjected to global and local buckling constraints and, strength constraints is developed using a discrete optimizer based on a genetic algorithm. An improved smeared stiffener theory is used for the global analysis. Local buckling of skin segments are assessed using a Rayleigh-Ritz method that accounts for material anisotropy. The local buckling of stiffener segments are also assessed. Constraints on the axial membrane strain in the skin and stiffener segments are imposed to include strength criteria in the grid-stiffened cylinder design. Design variables used in this study are the axial and transverse stiffener spacings, stiffener height and thickness, skin laminate stacking sequence, and stiffening configuration, where herein stiffening configuration is a design variable that indicates the combination of axial, transverse, and diagonal stiffener in the grid-stiffened cylinder. The design optimization process is adapted to identify the best suited stiffening configurations and stiffener spacings for grid-stiffened composite cylinder with the length and radius of the cylinder, the design in-plane loads, and material properties as inputs. The effect of having axial membrane strain constraints in the skin and stiffener segments in the optimization process is also studied for selected stiffening configuration.

  5. Dynamics of Plug Formation in a Circular Cylinder Under Low Bond Number Conditions: Experiment and Simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hallaby, Ghazi; Kizito, John P.

    2016-08-01

    The goal of the current study is to investigate the dynamics of two phase interface under a low Bond number condition. Silicone oil is injected into a cylinder under a Bond number of about 0.47 via a side tube forming a T-junction with the former. The time evolution of the interface of silicon oil in a cylinder is captured using a high speed camera. The volume at which the plug is formed is then determined using an image processing tool to analyze the captured images. A numerical simulation is carried out where fluid is injected into a cylinder, under a less than unity Bond number condition, via a side tube. Numerical and experimental results are then compared.

  6. Influence of thermal boundary conditions on heat transfer from a cylinder in cross flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Papell, S. S.

    1981-01-01

    Local heat transfer data over the leading surface of a cylinder in crossflow were obtained for a Reynolds number range of 50,000. The cylinder was operated at both uniform-wall-temperature and uniform-heat-flux thermal ance of 80 deg from the front stagnation point, the uniform-wall-temperature heat transfer coefficients were as much as 66 percent lower than the uniform-heat-flux data. Between the stagnation point and 60 deg around the cylinder, there were no significant differences in the data. This region of the cylinder is within the cylindrical curvature region of the front end of a real turbine so it was concluded that either thermal boundary condition could be used to model turbine flow over that region of the blade. Results of evaluating the exponent x in the fundamental relationship Nu=f(Re) sup x, which is used in data correlation show the exponent varies as a function of local position on the cylinder even in the laminar flow region. The value of x increases linearly from 0.50 at the stagnation point to 0.59 at 60 deg around the cylinder. This linear trend continued into the separation region at 80 deg for the uniform-wall-temperature data, but x increased markedly in the separation region for the uniform-heat-flux data.

  7. Transition to Turbulence in the Separated Shear Layers of Yawed Circular Cylinders

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-04-15

    where her hot - wire anemometer measurements found their streamwise appearance (after separation) to be inversely proportional to the cylinder Reynolds...Smith (1986) conducted hot - wire anemometer measurements where they reported expo- nents b = 0.87 and b = 0.773, respectively, for the Bloor power- law...measured when using anemometry . Prasad and Wil- liamson (1996) compiled their anemometer measurements along with those of Bloor as well as Wei and

  8. Vibrations of a circular cylinder submerged in a fluid with a non-homogeneous upper boundary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sturova, I. V.

    2014-05-01

    Results of solving a linear problem on steady vibrations of a horizontal cylinder submerged in a fluid, whose upper boundary is partially closed by a solid lid, whereas the rest of the surface is free, are presented. Multipole and eigenfunction expansion methods are used. Reciprocity relations are derived. Added-mass and damping coefficients and the wave amplitudes on the free surface of the fluid are calculated.

  9. The Flow Field Downstream of a Dynamic Low Aspect Ratio Circular Cylinder: A Parametric Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gildersleeve, Samantha; Dan, Clingman; Amitay, Michael

    2015-11-01

    Flow past a static, low aspect ratio cylinder (pin) has shown the formation of vortical structures, namely the horseshoe and arch-type vortex. These vortical structures may have substantial effects in controlling flow separation over airfoils. In the present experiments, the flow field associated with a low aspect ratio cylinder as it interacts with a laminar boundary layer under static and dynamic conditions was investigated through a parametric study over a flat plate. As a result of the pin being actuated in the wall-normal direction, the structures formed in the wake of the pin were seen to be a strong function of actuation amplitude, driving frequency, and aspect ratio of the cylinder. The study was conducted at a Reynolds number of 1875, based on the local boundary layer thickness, with a free stream velocity of 10 m/s. SPIV data were collected for two aspect ratios of 0.75 and 1.125, actuation amplitudes of 6.7% and 16.7%, and driving frequencies of 175 Hz and 350 Hz. Results indicate that the presence and interactions between vortical structures are altered in comparison to the static case and suggest increased large-scale mixing when the pin is driven at the shedding frequency (350 Hz). Supported by the Boeing Company.

  10. A different approach on the onset of separation in the flow around a circular cylinder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malamataris, Nikolaos; Sarris, I.; Pazis, D.; Liakos, A.

    2016-11-01

    The onset of separation in the flow around a cylinder is revisited with new insight. The goal of the research is to compute the smallest Reynolds number where the separation actual occurs rather than computing small eddies and extrapolating to the value of the Reynolds number where separation may occur. To this purpose, an accurate home made code is designed with Galerkin finite elements. The computational domain is chosen as the laboratory experiments by Taneda. It is found that in all six different choices of Taneda's diameters of the cylinders he used, separation is not observed for Re < 6 . 1 . Actually, separation is computed in all of his six cases for Re = 6 . 14 . Images of this smallest eddy are shown for the first time where all characteristics of eddies are recognisable (vortex centre, separation length etc). The vorticity of the flow is computed along the cylinder surface and it is shown that, at separation, vorticity changes sign. Byproducts of this research is the computation of the drag coefficient for Reynolds numbers starting from 1 .10-5 up to 40. In addition, the separation angle (point where vorticity changes sign) is computed for 6 . 14 <= Re <= 40 . This research aims to be the most thorough work done on that subject so far.

  11. Turbulent Natural Convection in a Square Cavity with a Circular Cylinder

    DOE PAGES

    Aithal, S. M.

    2016-07-19

    In this paper, numerical simulations of high Rayleigh number flows (108-1010) were conducted to investigate the turbulent fluid flow and thermal characteristics of natural convection induced by a centrally placed hot cylinder in a cold square enclosure. The effect of the aspect ratio (radius of the cylinder to the side of the cavity) was investigated for three values (0.1, 0.2, and 0.3) for each Rayleigh number. Effects of turbulence induced by the high Rayleigh number (>107) were computed by using the unsteady k-ω model. A spectral-element method with high polynomial order (high resolution) was used to solve the system ofmore » unsteady time-averaged equations of continuity, momentum, and energy, along with the turbulence equations. Detailed comparison with other numerical work is presented. Contours of velocity, temperature, and turbulence quantities are presented for various high Rayleigh numbers. Also presented is the influence of the Rayleigh number on the local Nusselt number on the centrally placed hot cylinder and the cold enclosure walls. Time-marching results show that the steady-state solutions can be obtained even for high Rayleigh numbers considered in this study. The results also show that the average and peak Nusselt numbers roughly double for each order of magnitude increase of the Rayleigh number for all radii considered. Finally, a correlation for the average Nusselt number as a function of Rayleigh number and aspect ratio is also presented.« less

  12. Turbulent Natural Convection in a Square Cavity with a Circular Cylinder

    SciTech Connect

    Aithal, S. M.

    2016-07-19

    In this paper, numerical simulations of high Rayleigh number flows (108-1010) were conducted to investigate the turbulent fluid flow and thermal characteristics of natural convection induced by a centrally placed hot cylinder in a cold square enclosure. The effect of the aspect ratio (radius of the cylinder to the side of the cavity) was investigated for three values (0.1, 0.2, and 0.3) for each Rayleigh number. Effects of turbulence induced by the high Rayleigh number (>107) were computed by using the unsteady k-ω model. A spectral-element method with high polynomial order (high resolution) was used to solve the system of unsteady time-averaged equations of continuity, momentum, and energy, along with the turbulence equations. Detailed comparison with other numerical work is presented. Contours of velocity, temperature, and turbulence quantities are presented for various high Rayleigh numbers. Also presented is the influence of the Rayleigh number on the local Nusselt number on the centrally placed hot cylinder and the cold enclosure walls. Time-marching results show that the steady-state solutions can be obtained even for high Rayleigh numbers considered in this study. The results also show that the average and peak Nusselt numbers roughly double for each order of magnitude increase of the Rayleigh number for all radii considered. Finally, a correlation for the average Nusselt number as a function of Rayleigh number and aspect ratio is also presented.

  13. Computation of Flow in a Circular Cylinder Driven by Coaxial Screw Rotation and an Opposing Pressure Gradient.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cotrell, David L.; Pearlstein, Arne J.

    2000-11-01

    We report computations of the velocity field for flows driven by rotation of a screw in a circular cylinder with an applied opposing pressure gradient. Use of a helical coordinate system in a frame rotating with the screw reduces the flow calculation to a steady one, which is taken to be fully-developed in the helical direction. The full incompressible Navier-Stokes equations in primitive-variables form are solved numerically using a finite-element method employing quadrilateral elements with quadratic velocity and linear pressure interpolation. A consistent penalty method is used to satisfy incompressibility. The screw cross-section is rectangular. The effect of screw clearance and other geometric parameters on the velocity field will be discussed for low and intermediate Reynolds numbers and compared to the Stokes flow case.

  14. Scattering by simple and nonsimple shapes by the combined method of ray tracing and diffraction: application to circular cylinders.

    PubMed

    Chen, B; Stamnes, J J

    1998-04-10

    The combined method of ray tracing and diffraction (CMRD) is an efficient and accurate technique for computing the scattered field in focal regions of optical systems. Here we extend the CMRD concept so it can be used to compute fields scattered by objects of simple as well as nonsimple shapes. To that end we replace the scattering object by an equivalent, planar phase object; use ray tracing to determine its location, aperture area, amplitude distribution, and phase distribution; and use standard Kirchhoff diffraction theory to compute the field scattered by the equivalent phase object. To illustrate the practical use of the CMRD we apply it to a two-dimensional problem in which a plane or cylindrical wave is normally incident upon a circular cylinder. For this application we determine the range of validity of the CMRD by comparing its results for the scattered field with those obtained by use of an exact eigenfunction expansion.

  15. Unsteady flow field, lift and drag measurements of impulsively started elliptic cylinder and circular-arc airfoil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Izumi, K.; Kuwahara, K.

    1983-07-01

    Developments of flow fields around and forces acting on an elliptic cylinder and a circular-arc airfoil with high angle of attack after impulsive start were experimentally investigated using a water tank. Special attention is called to elucidate the correlation between the unsteady forces acting on the body and the corresponding flow patterns. Except the initial instant, the peaks of the lift are observed when the large, separated vortex from the leading edge is traped on the leeward surface of the body, while the troughs of it coincide to the period when these vortex is shed from the trailing edge. The variations of the drag are found to be very small compared with those of the lift. These results are succesfully compared with the corresponding computation by discrete-vortex approximation.

  16. Investigation on heat transfer between two coaxial cylinders for measurement of thermal accommodation coefficient

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamaguchi, Hiroki; Kanazawa, Kazuaki; Matsuda, Yu; Niimi, Tomohide; Polikarpov, Alexey; Graur, Irina

    2012-06-01

    The heat flux between two coaxial cylinders was measured in the range from the free molecular to the early transitional flow regimes for extraction of the thermal accommodation coefficient using an approximate relation on the pressure dependence of the heat flux. The experimental coaxial cylinders' geometry has been traditionally implemented for the measurement of the thermal accommodation coefficient using the low-pressure method; however, the actual experimental setup was characterized by large temperature difference and large cylinders' radius ratio. Compared to the original low-pressure method, much higher pressure range was applied. In order to verify assumptions in the accommodation coefficient extraction, the heat flux under measurement conditions was simulated numerically by the nonlinear S-model kinetic equation. Very good agreement was found between the measured and the simulated heat flux. The proposed procedure of the thermal accommodation coefficient extraction was discussed in detail and verified. The temperature dependence of the thermal accommodation coefficient was also found.

  17. Measurement of convective heat transfer coefficient for a horizontal cylinder rotating in quiescent air

    SciTech Connect

    Oezerdem, B.

    2000-04-01

    Heat transfer from a rotating cylinder is one of the problems, which is drawing attention due to its wide range of engineering applications. The present paper deals with convective heat transfer from a horizontal cylinder rotating in quiescent air, experimentally. The average convective heat transfer coefficients have been measured by using radiation pyrometer, which offers a new method. According to the experimental results, a correlation in terms of the average Nusselt number and rotating Reynolds number has been established. The average Nusselt number increased with an increase in the rotating speed. Comparison of the results, with previous studies, have been showed a good agreement with each other.

  18. One- versus two-degree-of-freedom vortex-induced vibrations of a circular cylinder at Re=3900

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gsell, Simon; Bourguet, Rémi; Braza, Marianna

    2015-11-01

    The response of an elastically-mounted circular cylinder, immersed in a current and free to move either in the streamwise or cross-flow direction, or in both directions, is predicted by means of direct numerical simulation. The Reynolds number based on the inflow velocity and the cylinder diameter is kept equal to 3900. Each configuration is studied over a range of the reduced velocity (inverse of the oscillator natural frequency) encompassing the entire region of lock-in, i.e. where body motion and flow unsteadiness are synchronized. The impact of an additional degree of freedom on the body response and fluid loading is analyzed. Particular attention is paid to the synchronization between the streamwise and cross-flow oscillations, their frequency ratio and phase difference, and to the frequency content of the fluid forces, including the occurrence of large higher harmonic contributions. The reciprocal influence of flow patterns and body motion is investigated on the basis of three-dimensional visualizations of the wake; the formation and modulation of the shear layer vortices is explored in this context.

  19. Development of the wake behind a circular cylinder impulsively started into rotatory and rectilinear motion: Intermediate rotation rates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Yen-Ming; Ou, Yuh-Roung; Pearlstein, Arne J.

    1991-01-01

    The temporal development of two-dimensional viscous incompressible flow generated by a circular cylinder started impulsively into steady rotatory and rectilinear motion is studied by integration of a velocity/vorticity formulation of the governing equations, using an explicit finite-difference/pseudo-spectral technique and an implementation of the Biot-Savart law. Results are presented for a Reynolds number of 200 (based on the cylinder diameter 2a and the magnitude U of the rectilinear velocity) for several values of the angular/rectilinear speed ratio alpha = (omega x a)/U (where omega is the angular speed) up to 3.25. Several aspects of the kinematics and dynamics of the flow not considered earlier are discussed. For higher values of alpha, the results indicate that for Re = 200, vortex shedding does indeed occur for alpha = 3.25. The shedding process is; however, very different from that which gives rise to the usual Karman vortex street for alpha = 0. In particular, consecutive vortices shed by the body can be shed from the same side and be of the same sense, in contrast to the nonrotating case, in which mirror-image vortices of opposite sense are shed alternately on opposite sides of the body. The implications of the results are discussed in relation to the possibility of suppressing vortex shedding by open or closed-loop control of the rotation rate.

  20. Algebraic Approximations to Extinction from Randomly Oriented Circular and Elliptical Cylinders

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1995-06-01

    cylinders, l¢1x = 2Im -1lx << 1. This occurs since what we have been calling an edge effect is in fact the field distortion around the boundaries of the...is high enough for the particle to be reflective. The overestimate of Qe:ct for x < 3 is due to a breakdown of our model of the edge effect . All our...the combined approaches of anomalous diffraction and edge effect terms in modelling the extinction from smooth convex bodies. This is a positive

  1. Effects of confining walls on heat transfer from a vertical array of isothermal horizontal elliptic cylinders

    SciTech Connect

    Yousefi, T.; Paknezhad, M.; Ashjaee, M.; Yazdani, S.

    2009-09-15

    Steady state two-dimensional natural convection heat transfer from the vertical array of five horizontal isothermal elliptic cylinders with vertical major axis which confined between two adiabatic walls has been studied experimentally. Experiments were carried out using a Mach-Zehnder interferometer. The Rayleigh number based on cylinder major axis was in the range 10{sup 3}{<=}Ra{<=}2.5 x 10{sup 3}, and dimensionless wall spacing 1.5{<=} t/b{<=}9 and infinity. The effect of wall spacing and Rayleigh number on the heat transfer from the individual cylinder and the array were investigated. Experiments are performed for ratio wall spacing to major diameter t/b = 1.5, 2, 2.5, 3, 3.5, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9 and infinity. A correlation based on the experimental data for the average Nusselt number of the array as a function of Ra and t/b is presented in the aforementioned ranges. A relation has been derived for optimum wall spacing at which the Nusselt number of the array attains its maximum value. At optimum wall spacing, approximately 10% increase in the heat transfer from the confined array of elliptic cylinders has been observed as compared to the unconfined case. Also, a heat transfer correlation has been proposed for a single elliptic cylinder with vertical major axis and has been compared with earlier works. (author)

  2. Test Method Designed to Evaluate Cylinder Liner-Piston Ring Coatings for Advanced Heat Engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Radil, Kevin C.

    1997-01-01

    Research on advanced heat engine concepts, such as the low-heat-rejection engine, have shown the potential for increased thermal efficiency, reduced emissions, lighter weight, simpler design, and longer life in comparison to current diesel engine designs. A major obstacle in the development of a functional advanced heat engine is overcoming the problems caused by the high combustion temperatures at the piston ring/cylinder liner interface, specifically at top ring reversal (TRR). Therefore, advanced cylinder liner and piston ring materials are needed that can survive under these extreme conditions. To address this need, researchers at the NASA Lewis Research Center have designed a tribological test method to help evaluate candidate piston ring and cylinder liner materials for advanced diesel engines.

  3. Effect of finite length on forced convection heat transfer from cylinders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quarmby, A.; Al-Fakhri, A. A. M.

    1980-04-01

    Forced convection heat transfer from single cylinders of finite length is investigated experimentally with particular reference to the effect of aspect (length/diameter) ratio of the cylinder. It is found that for aspect ratios greater than 4 there is little further effect as aspect ratio increases to infinity. The disagreement between the correlations proposed by Zukauskas (1972) and Morgan (1975) is considered and resolved in favor of the Zukauskas correlation. A correlation is proposed for heat transfer from cylinders of low aspect ratio which in the limit agrees with the correlation for large aspect ratios and with the generally accepted correlation for turbulent heat transfer from isothermal flat plates for small aspect ratios.

  4. Development of Advanced In-Cylinder Components and Tribological Systems for Low Heat Rejection Diesel Engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yonushonis, T. M.; Wiczynski, P. D.; Myers, M. R.; Anderson, D. D.; McDonald, A. C.; Weber, H. G.; Richardson, D. E.; Stafford, R. J.; Naylor, M. G.

    1999-01-01

    In-cylinder components and tribological system concepts were designed, fabricated and tested at conditions anticipated for a 55% thermal efficiency heavy duty diesel engine for the year 2000 and beyond. A Cummins L10 single cylinder research engine was used to evaluate a spherical joint piston and connecting rod with 19.3 MPa (2800 psi) peak cylinder pressure capability, a thermal fatigue resistant insulated cylinder head, radial combustion seal cylinder liners, a highly compliant steel top compression ring, a variable geometry turbocharger, and a microwave heated particulate trap. Components successfully demonstrated in the final test included spherical joint connecting rod with a fiber reinforced piston, high conformability steel top rings with wear resistant coatings, ceramic exhaust ports with strategic oil cooling and radial combustion seal cylinder liner with cooling jacket transfer fins. A Cummins 6B diesel was used to develop the analytical methods, materials, manufacturing technology and engine components for lighter weight diesel engines without sacrificing performance or durability. A 6B diesel engine was built and tested to calibrate analytical models for the aluminum cylinder head and aluminum block.

  5. Stability of flow of a thermoviscoelastic fluid between rotating coaxial circular cylinders

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ghandour, N. N.; Narasimhan, M. N. L.

    1976-01-01

    The stability problem of thermoviscoelastic fluid flow between rotating coaxial cylinders is investigated using nonlinear thermoviscoelastic constitutive equations due to Eringen and Koh. The velocity field is found to be identical with that of the classical viscous case and the case of the viscoelastic fluid, but the temperature and pressure fields are found to be different. By imposing some physically reasonable mechanical and geometrical restrictions on the flow, and by a suitable mathematical analysis, the problem is reduced to a characteristic value problem. The resulting problem is solved and stability criteria are obtained in terms of critical Taylor numbers. In general, it is found that thermoviscoelastic fluids are more stable than classical viscous fluids and viscoinelastic fluids under similar conditions.

  6. A finite element-boundary integral method for conformal antenna arrays on a circular cylinder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kempel, Leo C.; Volakis, John L.; Woo, Alex C.; Yu, C. Long

    1992-01-01

    Conformal antenna arrays offer many cost and weight advantages over conventional antenna systems. In the past, antenna designers have had to resort to expensive measurements in order to develop a conformal array design. This is due to the lack of rigorous mathematical models for conformal antenna arrays, and as a result the design of conformal arrays is primarily based on planar antenna design concepts. Recently, we have found the finite element-boundary integral method to be very successful in modeling large planar arrays of arbitrary composition in a metallic plane. Herewith we shall extend this formulation for conformal arrays on large metallic cylinders. In this we develop the mathematical formulation. In particular we discuss the finite element equations, the shape elements, and the boundary integral evaluation, and it is shown how this formulation can be applied with minimal computation and memory requirements. The implementation shall be discussed in a later report.

  7. A finite element-boundary integral method for cavities in a circular cylinder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kempel, Leo C.; Volakis, John L.

    1992-01-01

    Conformal antenna arrays offer many cost and weight advantages over conventional antenna systems. However, due to a lack of rigorous mathematical models for conformal antenna arrays, antenna designers resort to measurement and planar antenna concepts for designing non-planar conformal antennas. Recently, we have found the finite element-boundary integral method to be very successful in modeling large planar arrays of arbitrary composition in a metallic plane. We extend this formulation to conformal arrays on large metallic cylinders. In this report, we develop the mathematical formulation. In particular, we discuss the shape functions, the resulting finite elements and the boundary integral equations, and the solution of the conformal finite element-boundary integral system. Some validation results are presented and we further show how this formulation can be applied with minimal computational and memory resources.

  8. Radiation and scattering by cavity-backed antennas on a circular cylinder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kempel, Leo C.; Volakis, John L.

    1993-01-01

    Conformal arrays are popular antennas for aircraft and missile platforms due to their inherent low weight and drag properties. However, to date there has been a dearth of rigorous analytical or numerical solutions to aid the designer. In fact, it has been common practice to use limited measurements and planar approximations in designing such non-planar antennas. The finite element-boundary integral method is extended to scattering and radiation by cavity-backed structures in an infinite, metallic cylinder. In particular, the formulation specifics such as weight functions, dyadic Green's function, implementation details, and particular difficulties inherent to cylindrical structures are discussed. Special care is taken to ensure that the resulting computer program has low memory demand and minimal computational requirements. Both scattering and radiation parameters are computed and validated as much as possible.

  9. Buckling of steel cylinders containing circular cutouts reinforced according to the area-replacement method

    SciTech Connect

    Dove, R.C.; Bennett, J.G.; Butler, T.A.

    1982-01-01

    The effect of the use of the area replacement method (ARM) for reinforcing circular penetrations in cylindrical steel shells has been studied both experimentally and analyticaly. How this type of reinforcement affects the buckling strength of a shell subjected to uniform axial compression is the specific area of investigation. In shells that are of such a quality that the penetration reduces the buckling strength, the use of the ARM will increase the bucking strength of the shell. In any case, the conservative knockdown factors suggested for buckling design by the American Society of Mechanical Engineer's (ASME) Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code should ensure an adequate margin to failure under this loading condition.

  10. Flow of Supercritical Hydrogen in a Uniformly Heated Circular Tube

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Youn, B.; Mills, A. F.

    1993-01-01

    Turbulent flow of supercritical hydrogen through a uniformly heated circular tube has been investigated using numerical methods, for the range of 4 x 10(exp 5) less than Re less than 3 x 10(exp 6), 5 less than or equal to q(sub W) less than or equal to 10 MW/sq m, 30 less than or equal to T(sub in) less than or equal to 90 K, and 5 less than or equal to P(sub in) less than or equal to 15 MPa. The purpose is to validate a turbulence model and calculation method for the design of active cooling systems of hydrogen-fueled hypersonic aircraft, where the hydrogen fuel a used as coolant. The PHOENICS software package was used for the computations, which required special provision for evaluation of the thermophysical properties of the supercritical hydrogen, and a low Reynolds number form of the k-epsilon turbulence model. Pressure drop and heat transfer data were compared with experiment and existing correlations and good agreement was demonstrated. For the pressure range considered here a "thermal spike" was observed and shown to be due to the secondary peak in specific heat, rather than the primary peak.

  11. Convective heat transfer by impingement of circular liquid jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, X.; Lienhard, J. H. V.; Lombara, J. S.

    1991-08-01

    The impingement of circular, liquid jets provides a convenient method of cooling surfaces. Here, jet impingement cooling of uniformly heated surfaces is investigated analytically and experimentally for stable, unsubmerged, uniform velocity laminar jets in the absence of phase change. Analytical and numerical predictions are developed for a laminar radial film flow. Experiments using undisturbed laminar jets were performed to determine local Nusselt numbers from the stagnation point to radii of up to 40 diameters. Turbulent transition in the film flow is observed experimentally at a certain radius. Beyond this transition radius, a separate turbulent analysis is constructed. Integral method results are compared to numberical results, and Prandtl number effects are investigated. The predictions are found to agree well with the measurements for both laminar and turbulent flow. Predictive formulas are recommended for the entire range of radii.

  12. Convective heat transfer by impingement of circular liquid jets

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, X.; Lienhard, J.H. V; Lombara, J.S. )

    1991-08-01

    The impingement of circular, liquid jets provides a convenient method of cooling surfaces. Here, jet impingement cooling of uniformly heated surfaces is investigated analytically and experimentally for stable, unsubmerged, uniform velocity laminar jets in the absence of phase change. Analytical and numerical predictions are developed for a laminar radial film flow. Experiments using undisturbed laminar jets were performed to determine local Nusselt numbers from the stagnation point to radii of up to 40 diameters. Turbulent transition in the film flow is observed experimentally at a certain radius. Beyond this transition radius, a separate turbulent analysis is constructed. Integral method results are compared to numerical results, and Prandtl number effects are investigated. The predictions are found to agree well with the measurements for both laminar and turbulent flow. Predictive formulae are recommended for the entire range of radii.

  13. Conductive sublayer of turbulent heat transfer for heating of water in a circular tube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hata, K.; Fukuda, K.; Masuzaki, S.

    2017-03-01

    The steady-state and transient turbulent heat transfer coefficients in circular platinum (Pt) test tubes (inner diameters: 3 and 6 mm; heated lengths: 66.5 and 100 mm and 69.6 mm, respectively) were systematically measured using an experimental water loop for a wide range of flow velocities, inlet liquid temperatures, Prandtl numbers, inlet pressures, and exponentially increasing heat inputs (Q 0 exp(t/τ), τ: exponential period). The Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes equations and the k-ɛ turbulence model for unsteady turbulent heat transfer in circular test sections were numerically solved for heating of water with heated sections of diameter 3 and 6 mm and length 67 and 100 mm and 70 mm, respectively, by using computational fluid dynamics code under the same conditions as those in the experiment and with temperature-dependent thermophysical fluid properties. The thickness of the conductive sublayer, δ CSL,st and δ CSL [=(Δr) out /2], and the nondimensional thickness of the conductive sublayer, (y {/CSL,st +}) TEM [=(f F /2)0.5 ρ l u δ CSL,st /μ l ] and (y {/CSL +}) TEM [=(f F /2)0.5 ρ l u δ CSL /μ l ], for steady-state and transient turbulent heat transfer at various heated length-to-inner diameter ratios, inlet liquid temperatures, and exponential periods were measured on the basis of the numerical solutions. The correlations of the thickness of the conductive sublayer, δ CSL,st , and nondimensional thickness of the conductive sublayer, (y {/CSL,st +}) TEM , for steady-state turbulent heat transfer and those of the thickness of the conductive sublayer, δ CSL , and nondimensional thickness of the conductive sublayer, (y {/CSL +}) TEM , for transient turbulent heat transfer in a circular tube were derived.

  14. Active control of vortex-induced vibrations of a circular cylinder using windward-suction- leeward-blowing actuation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Chenglei; Tang, Hui; Yu, Simon C. M.; Duan, Fei

    2016-05-01

    This paper studies the control of two-dimensional vortex-induced vibrations (VIVs) of a single circular cylinder at a Reynolds number of 100 using a novel windward-suction-leeward-blowing (WSLB) concept. A lattice Boltzmann method based numerical framework is adopted for this study. Both open-loop and closed-loop controls are implemented. In the open-loop control, three types of actuation arrangements, including the pure suction on the windward side of the cylinder, the pure blowing on the leeward side, and the general WSLB on both sides, are implemented and compared. It is found that the general WSLB is the most effective, whereas the pure suction is the least effective. In the closed-loop control, the proportional (P), integral (I), and proportional-integral (PI) control schemes are applied to adjust the WSLB velocities according to the flow information obtained from a sensor. The effects of four key control parameters including the proportional gain constant, the integral gain constant, the length of data history used for the feedback, and the location of the sensor are investigated. It is found that the use of only P control fails to completely suppress the VIV, the use of only I control can achieve the complete suppression, and the PI control performs the best in terms of both the control effectiveness and efficiency. In the PI control, there exists an optimal length of data history for the feedback, at which the VIV control is the most efficient. There also exist the minimum required WSLB velocities for the VIV suppression, independent of the control schemes. Moreover, it is found that the VIV control is independent of the sensor location.

  15. Numerical investigation of flow and scour around a vertical circular cylinder

    PubMed Central

    Baykal, C.; Sumer, B. M.; Fuhrman, D. R.; Jacobsen, N. G.; Fredsøe, J.

    2015-01-01

    Flow and scour around a vertical cylinder exposed to current are investigated by using a three-dimensional numerical model based on incompressible Reynolds-averaged Navier–Stokes equations. The model incorporates (i) k-ω turbulence closure, (ii) vortex-shedding processes, (iii) sediment transport (both bed and suspended load), as well as (iv) bed morphology. The influence of vortex shedding and suspended load on the scour are specifically investigated. For the selected geometry and flow conditions, it is found that the equilibrium scour depth is decreased by 50% when the suspended sediment transport is not accounted for. Alternatively, the effects of vortex shedding are found to be limited to the very early stage of the scour process. Flow features such as the horseshoe vortex, as well as lee-wake vortices, including their vertical frequency variation, are discussed. Large-scale counter-rotating streamwise phase-averaged vortices in the lee wake are likewise demonstrated via numerical flow visualization. These features are linked to scour around a vertical pile in a steady current. PMID:25512595

  16. Numerical investigation of two-degree-of-freedom vortex-induced vibration of a circular cylinder in oscillatory flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Ming

    2013-05-01

    Two-degree-of-freedom (2dof) vortex-induced vibration (VIV) of a circular cylinder in oscillatory flow is investigated numerically. The direction of the oscillatory flow is perpendicular to the spanwise direction of the circular cylinder. Simulations are carried out for the Keulegan-Carpenter (KC) numbers of 10, 20 and 40 and the Reynolds numbers ranging from 308 to 9240. The ratio of the Reynolds number to the reduced velocity is 308. At KC=10, the amplitude of the primary frequency component is much larger than those of other frequency components. Most vibrations for KC=20 and 40 have multiple frequencies. The primary frequency of the response in the cross-flow direction decreases with the increasing reduced velocity, except when the reduced velocity is very small. Because the calculated primary frequencies of the response in the cross-flow direction are multiple of the oscillatory flow frequency in most of the calculated cases, the responses are classified into single-frequency mode, double-frequency mode, triple frequency mode, etc. If the reduced velocity is in the range where the VIV is transiting from one mode to another, the vibration is very irregular.For each KC number the range of the reduced velocity can be divided into a cross-flow-in-phase regime (low Vr), where the response and the hydrodynamic force in the cross-flow direction synchronize, and a cross-flow-anti-phase regime (high Vr), where the response and the hydrodynamic force in the cross-flow direction are in anti-phase with each other. The boundary values of Vr between the cross-flow-in-phase and the cross-flow-anti-phase regimes are 7, 9 and 11 for KC=10, 20 and 40, respectively. For KC=20, another cross-flow-anti-phase regime is found between 15≤Vr≤19. Similarly the in-line-in-phase and the in-line-anti-phase regimes are also identified for the response in the in-line direction. It is found that the boundary value of Vr between the in-line-in-phase and the in-line-anti-phase regimes is

  17. Heat Transfer from Finned Metal Cylinders in an Air Stream

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Biermann, Arnold, E; Pinkel, Benjamin

    1935-01-01

    This report presents the results of tests made to supply design information for the construction of metal fins for the cooling of heated cylindrical surfaces by an air stream. A method is given for determining fin dimensions for a maximum heat transfer with the expenditure of a given amount of material for a variety of conditions of air flow and metals.

  18. Heat transfer from cylinders in subsonic slip flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nagabushana, K. A.; Stainback, P. C.

    1992-01-01

    The heat transfer in heated wires was measured using a constant temperature anemometer over a Mach number range from 0.05 to 0.4 and pressures from 0.5 to 8.0 atmospheres. The total temperature ranged from 80 to 120 F and the wire diameters were 0.00015, 0.00032, and 0.00050 inch. The heat transfer data is presented in the form of a corrected Nusselt number. Based on suggested criteria, much of the data was obtained in the slip flow regime. Therefore, the data is compared with data having comparable flow conditions. The possible application of the heat transfer data to hot wire anemometry is discussed. To this end, the sensitivity of the wires to velocity, density, and total temperature is computed and compared using two different types of correlations.

  19. Particle image velocimetry analysis of the flow around circular cylinder induced by arc discharge rotating in magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Munhoz, D. S.; Bityurin, V. A.; Klimov, A. I.; Moralev, I. A.

    2016-11-01

    An experimental study of the flow around a circular cylinder model with magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) actuator was carried out in subsonic wind tunnels (M < 0.2). Combined (high frequency and pulsed-periodic) electrical discharge was used in this MHD actuator. This intense pulsed-periodic discharge had the following characteristics: voltage amplitude up to 15 kV, current amplitude up to 16 A and frequency up to 1 kHz. Permanent magnets with an induction of B = 0.1 T on the model surface were placed inside the cylindrical model. Annular electrodes were situated on the surface of the cylindrical model. The Lorentz force causes the rotation of the electric arc on the model surface. In turn, the movement of the arc discharge induces the rotation of the gas near the surface of the model. In this experiment were carried out the measurement of the flow velocity profile near the surface of the model on the following operational modes: with plasma and without plasma. A parametric study of the aerodynamic performance of the model was fulfilled with respect to the discharge parameters and the flow velocity. To measure the velocity profile was used particle image velocimetry method.

  20. Numerical Solution of the Flow of a Perfect Gas Over A Circular Cylinder at Infinite Mach Number

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamaker, Frank M.

    1959-01-01

    A solution for the two-dimensional flow of an inviscid perfect gas over a circular cylinder at infinite Mach number is obtained by numerical methods of analysis. Nonisentropic conditions of curved shock waves and vorticity are included in the solution. The analysis is divided into two distinct regions, the subsonic region which is analyzed by the relaxation method of Southwell and the supersonic region which was treated by the method of characteristics. Both these methods of analysis are inapplicable on the sonic line which is therefore considered separately. The shapes of the sonic line and the shock wave are obtained by iteration techniques. The striking result of the solution is the strong curvature of the sonic line and of the other lines of constant Mach number. Because of this the influence of the supersonic flow on the sonic line is negligible. On comparison with Newtonian flow methods, it is found that the approximate methods show a larger variation of surface pressure than is given by the present solution.

  1. Development of a UF{sub 6} cylinder transient heat transfer/stress analysis model

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, W.R.

    1991-12-31

    A heat transfer/stress analysis model is being developed to simulate the heating to a point of rupture of a cylinder containing UF{sub 6} when it is exposed to a fire. The assumptions underlying the heat transfer portion of the model, which has been the focus of work to date, will be discussed. A key aspect of this model is a lumped parameter approach to modeling heat transfer. Preliminary results and future efforts to develop an integrated thermal/stress model will be outlined.

  2. Multiple buoyancy driven flows in a vertical cylinder heated from below

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yamaguchi, Y.; Chang, C. J.; Brown, R. A.

    1983-01-01

    The structure of axisymmetric buoyancy-driven convection in a vertical cylinder heated from below is probed by finite element solution of the Boussinesq equations coupled with computed-implemented perturbation techniques for detecting and tracking multiple flows and for determining flow stability. Results are reported for fluids with Prandtl number of one and for cylinders with aspect ratio (Lambda) (defined as the height to radius of the cylinder) between 0.5 and 2.25. Extensive calculations of the neutral stability curve for the static solution and of the nonlinear motions along the bifurcating flow families show a continuous evolution of the primary cellular motion from a single toroidal cell to two and three cells nested radially in the cylinder, instead of the sharp transitions found for a cylinder with shear-free sidewalls. The smooth transitions in flow structure with Rayleigh number and lambda are explained by nonlinear connectivity between the first two bifurcating flow families formed either by a secondary bifurcation point for Lambda or = Lambda * approximately 0.80 or by a limit point for Lambda Lambda *. The transition between these two modes may be described by the theory of multiple limit point bifurcation.

  3. Newtonian heating effect in nanofluid flow by a permeable cylinder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayat, T.; Khan, M. Ijaz; Waqas, M.; Alsaedi, A.

    Here characteristics of Newtonian heating in permeable stretched flow of viscous nanomaterial are investigated. Adopted nanomaterial model incorporates the phenomena of Brownian motion and thermophoresis. Concept of boundary layer is employed for the formulation procedure. Convergent homotopic solutions are established for the nonlinear systems. Velocity, thermal and nanoparticles fields for nonlinear boundary value problems are computed and discussed. The velocity, temperature and concentration gradients are also evaluated. It is noticed that impacts of curvature and suction/injection parameters on skin friction coefficient are qualitatively similar. Moreover temperature distribution enhances for larger thermophoresis and Brownian motion parameters.

  4. Effect of Groundboard Height on the Aerodynamic Characteristics of a Lifting Circular Cylinder Using Tangential Blowing from Surface Slots for Lift Generation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lockwood, Vernard E.

    1961-01-01

    A wind-tunnel investigation has been made to determine the ground effect on the aerodynamic characteristics of a lifting circular cylinder using tangential blowing from surface slots to generate high lift coefficients. The tests were made on a semispan model having a length 4 times the cylinder diameter and an end plate of 2.5 diameters. The tests were made at low speeds at a Reynolds number of approximately 290,000, over a range of momentum coefficients from 0.14 to 4.60, and over a range of groundboard heights from 1.5 to 10 cylinder diameters. The investigation showed an earlier stall angle and a large loss of lift coefficient as the groundboard was brought close to the cylinder when large lift coefficients were being generated. For example, at a momentum coefficient of 4.60 the maximum lift coefficient was reduced from a value of 20.3 at a groundboard height of 10 cylinder diameters to a value of 8.7 at a groundboard height of 1.5 cylinder diameters. In contrast to this there was little effect on the lift characteristics of changes in groundboard height when lift coefficients of about 4.5 were being generated. At a height of 1.5 cylinder diameters the drag coefficients generally increased rapidly when the slot position angle for maximum lift was exceeded. Slightly below the slot position angle for maximum lift, the groundboard had a beneficial effect, that is, the drag for a given lift was less near the groundboard than away from the groundboard. The variation of maximum circulation lift coefficient (maximum lift coefficient minus momentum coefficient) obtained in this investigation is in general agreement with a theory developed for a jet-flap wing which assumes that the loss in circulation is the result of blockage of the main stream beneath the wing.

  5. Nonlinear radiative heat transfer to stagnation-point flow of Sisko fluid past a stretching cylinder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khan, Masood; Malik, Rabia; Hussain, M.

    2016-05-01

    In the present paper, we endeavor to perform a numerical analysis in connection with the nonlinear radiative stagnation-point flow and heat transfer to Sisko fluid past a stretching cylinder in the presence of convective boundary conditions. The influence of thermal radiation using nonlinear Rosseland approximation is explored. The numerical solutions of transformed governing equations are calculated through forth order Runge-Kutta method using shooting technique. With the help of graphs and tables, the influence of non-dimensional parameters on velocity and temperature along with the local skin friction and Nusselt number is discussed. The results reveal that the temperature increases however, heat transfer from the surface of cylinder decreases with the increasing values of thermal radiation and temperature ratio parameters. Moreover, the authenticity of numerical solutions is validated by finding their good agreement with the HAM solutions.

  6. Heat transfer in thin, compact heat exchangers with circular, rectangular, or pin-fin flow passages

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Olson, D. A.

    1992-01-01

    Heat transfer and pressure drop have been measured of three thin, compact heat exchangers in helium gas at 3.5 MPa and higher, with Reynolds numbers of 450 to 36,000. The flow geometries for the three heat exchanger specimens were: circular tube, rectangular channel, and staggered pin fin with tapered pins. The specimens were heated radiatively at heat fluxes up to 77 W/sq cm. Correlations were developed for the isothermal friction factor as a function of Reynolds number, and for the Nusselt number as a function of Reynolds number and the ratio of wall temperature to fluid temperature. The specimen with the pin fin internal geometry had significantly better heat transfer than the other specimens, but it also had higher pressure drop. For certain conditions of helium flow and heating, the temperature more than doubled from the inlet to the outlet of the specimens, producing large changes in gas velocity, density, viscosity, and thermal conductivity. These changes in properties did not affect the correlations for friction factor and Nusselt number in turbulent flow.

  7. Inverse Analysis of Heat Conduction in Hollow Cylinders with Asymmetric Source Distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lambrakos, Samuel G.; Michopoulos, John G.; Jones, Harry N.; Boyer, Craig N.

    2008-10-01

    This paper presents an application of inverse analysis for determining both the temperature field histories and corresponding heat source distributions in hollow cylinders. The primary goal, however, is the development of an inversion infrastructure in a manner that allows taking advantage of all aspects related to its utility, including sensitivity analysis. The conditions generating heat sources are those resulting from intense pulsed-current electrical contact experiments. Under these conditions intense heat currents are generated due to the Joule conversion of the electric conduction currents. Asymmetry of the heat source is induced from the localized melting due to arc-enhanced electric conduction. Experimentally acquired temperature histories and melting domain boundary data are utilized to setup an inverse model of the heat conduction problem. This permits the construction of an estimate not only of the temperature field histories throughout the computational domain but also of an evaluation of the effective thermal diffusivity of the material involved.

  8. Effects of Prandtl number on the laminar cross flow past a heated cylinder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ajith Kumar, S.; Mathur, Manikandan; Sameen, A.; Anil Lal, S.

    2016-11-01

    Flow past a heated cylinder at constant surface temperature is computationally simulated and analyzed in the laminar regime at moderate buoyancy. The parameters governing the flow dynamics are the Reynolds number, Re, the Richardson number, Ri, and the Prandtl number, Pr. We perform our computations in the range 10 ≤ Re ≤ 35, for which the flow past an unheated cylinder results in a steady separation bubble, and vary the other two parameters in the range 0 ≤ Ri ≤ 2, 0.25 ≤ Pr ≤ 100. The heat transfer from the entire cylinder surface, quantified by the average Nusselt number Nuavg, is shown to obey Nuavg = 0.7435Re0.44Pr0.346 in the mixed convection regime we investigate. For a fixed Re and Pr, the flow downstream of the cylinder becomes asymmetric as Ri is increased from zero, followed by a complete disappearance of the vortices in the recirculation bubble beyond a threshold value of Ri. For a fixed Re and Ri, the vortices in the recirculation bubble are again observed to disappear beyond a threshold Pr, but with the reappearance of both the vortices above a larger threshold of Pr. In the limit of large Pr, the time-averaged flow outside the thermal boundary layer but within the near-wake region regains symmetry about the centerline and ultimately converges to a flow field similar to that of Ri = 0; in the far-wake region, however, we observe asymmetric vortex shedding for moderate Pr. The thermal plume structure in the cylinder wake is then discussed, and the plume generation is identified at points on the cylinder where the Nusselt number is a local minimum. The difference between the plume generation and the flow separation locations on the cylinder is shown to converge to zero in the limit of large Pr. We conclude by plotting the lift and drag coefficients as a function of Ri and Pr, observing that CD decreases with Ri for Pr < Prt (and vice versa for Pr > Prt), where Prt ≈ 7.5.

  9. Heat transfer to small horizontal cylinders immersed in a fluidized bed

    SciTech Connect

    Friedman, J.; Koundakjian, P.; Naylor, D.; Rosero, D.

    2006-10-15

    Heat transfer to horizontal cylinders immersed in fluidized beds has been extensively studied, but mainly in the context of heat transfer to boiler tubes in coal-fired beds. As a result, most correlations in the literature have been derived for cylinders of 25-50 mm diameter in vigorously fluidizing beds. In recent years, fluidized bed heat treating furnaces fired by natural gas have become increasingly popular, particularly in the steel wire manufacturing industry. These fluidized beds typically operate at relatively low fluidizing rates and with small diameter wires (1-6 mm). Nusselt number correlations developed based on boiler tube studies do not extrapolate down to these small size ranges and low fluidizing rates. In order to obtain reliable Nusselt number data for these size ranges, an experimental investigation has been undertaken using two heat treating fluidized beds; one a pilot-scale industrial unit and the other a lab-scale (300 mm diameter) unit. Heat transfer measurements were obtained using resistively heated cylindrical samples ranging from 1.3 to 9.5 mm in diameter at fluidizing rates ranging from approximately 0.5 x G{sub mf} (packed bed condition) to over 10 x G{sub mf} using aluminum oxide sand particles ranging from d{sub p}=145-330 {mu}m (50-90 grit). It has been found that for all cylinder sizes tested, the Nusselt number reaches a maximum near 2 x G{sub mf}, then remains relatively steady ({+-}5-10%) to the maximum fluidizing rate tested, typically 8-12xG{sub mf}. A correlation for maximum Nusselt number is developed.

  10. Influence of flexible fins on vortex-induced load over a circular cylinder at low Reynolds number

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaiman, Rajeev K.; Gurugubelli, Pardha S.

    2016-11-01

    Rigid fins/fairings are known to reduce the vortex induced periodic forces exerting on a cylinder by extending the shear layers interaction further downstream to avoid alternate oppositely-signed shed vortices in the afterbody region. In this work, we present a numerical analysis on the effect of flexible fins with their leading edges fixed tangentially to the cylinder and the trailing edges are free to flap in the wake of two-dimensional (2D) cylinder. Two-dimensional simulations are carried out with varying non-dimensional flexural rigidity, KB ∈ [0.01, 1] at a fixed a non-dimensional mass ratio, m* = 0 . 1 and Reynolds number, Re = 100, defined based on the cylinder diameter. We investigate the role of flexibility in altering the wake flow and load generation over the cylinder body. As the KB is reduced, there exists a critical KB below which the flexible fins lose their stability to perform flapping and the drag acting on combined cylinder flexible fins begins to increase. However surprisingly, we observe that due to the flexible fin flapping the periodic lift forces acting on the cylinder drops significantly. We show that we can achieve an approx. 62.5% decrease in the nett periodic lift forces when compared to the bare cylinder.

  11. Compact Analytic Expression for the Electric Field of a 2DElliptical Charge Distribution Inside a Perfectly Conducting CircularCylinder

    SciTech Connect

    Furman, M.A.

    2007-05-29

    By combining the method of images with calculus of complex variables, we provide a simple expression for the electric field of a two-dimensional (2D) static elliptical charge distribution inside a perfectly conducting cylinder. The charge distribution need not be concentric with the cylinder.

  12. Some Investigations of the General Instability of Stiffened Metal Cylinders IV : Continuation of Tests of Sheet-covered Specimens and Studies of the Buckling Phenomena of Unstiffened Circular Cylinders

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1943-01-01

    This is the fourth of a series of reports covering an investigation of the general instability problem by the California Institute of Technology. The first five reports of this series cover investigations of the general instability problem under the loading conditions of pure bending and were prepared under the sponsorship of the Civil Aeronautics Administration. The succeeding reports of this series cover the work done on other loading conditions under the sponsorship of the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics. This report is to deal primarily with the continuation of tests of sheet-covered specimens and studies of the buckling phenomena of unstiffened circular cylinders.

  13. Test of the FDTD accuracy in the analysis of the scattering resonances associated with high-Q whispering-gallery modes of a circular cylinder.

    PubMed

    Boriskin, Artem V; Boriskina, Svetlana V; Rolland, Anthony; Sauleau, Ronan; Nosich, Alexander I

    2008-05-01

    Our objective is the assessment of the accuracy of a conventional finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) code in the computation of the near- and far-field scattering characteristics of a circular dielectric cylinder. We excite the cylinder with an electric or magnetic line current and demonstrate the failure of the two-dimensional FDTD algorithm to accurately characterize the emission rate and the field patterns near high-Q whispering-gallery-mode resonances. This is proven by comparison with the exact series solutions. The computational errors in the emission rate are then studied at the resonances still detectable with FDTD, i.e., having Q-factors up to 10(3).

  14. Non-Newtonian unconfined flow and heat transfer over a heated cylinder using the direct-forcing immersed boundary-thermal lattice Boltzmann method.

    PubMed

    Amiri Delouei, A; Nazari, M; Kayhani, M H; Succi, S

    2014-05-01

    In this study, the immersed boundary-thermal lattice Boltzmann method has been used to simulate non-Newtonian fluid flow over a heated circular cylinder. The direct-forcing algorithm has been employed to couple the off-lattice obstacles and on-lattice fluid nodes. To investigate the effect of boundary sharpness, two different diffuse interface schemes are considered to interpolate the velocity and temperature between the boundary and computational grid points. The lattice Boltzmann equation with split-forcing term is applied to consider the effects of the discrete lattice and the body force to the momentum flux, simultaneously. A method for calculating the Nusselt number based on diffuse interface schemes is developed. The rheological and thermal properties of non-Newtonian fluids are investigated under the different power-law indices and Reynolds numbers. The effect of numerical parameters on the accuracy of the proposed method has been investigated in detail. Results show that the rheological and thermal properties of non-Newtonian fluids in the presence of a heated immersed body can be suitably captured using the immersed boundary thermal lattice Boltzmann method.

  15. Effects of Lewis number on coupled heat and mass transfer in a circular tube subjected to external convective heating.

    PubMed

    Jiao, Anjun; Zhang, Yuwen; Ma, Hongbin; Critser, John

    2009-03-01

    Heat and mass transfer in a circular tube subject to the boundary condition of the third kind is investigated. The closed form of temperature and concentration distributions, the local Nusselt number based on the total external heat transfer and convective heat transfer inside the tube, as well as the Sherwood number were obtained. The effects of Lewis number and Biot number on heat and mass transfer were investigated.

  16. Circular Dichroism Method for Heat Capacity Determination of Proteins

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Cecil L.; Bailey, Chris; Bheemarti, Kiran Kumar

    2006-01-01

    Circular dichroism spectroscopy was used to measure the thermal unfolding of bovine pancreatic ribonuclease A (RNase A) with various concentrations of guanidine hydrochloride (GuHCl). A red shift in transition midpoint temperatures, T[subscript m], occurred with increasing concentration of the strong protein denaturant. van Hoff enthalpy changes,…

  17. MHD boundary layer slip flow and heat transfer of ferrofluid along a stretching cylinder with prescribed heat flux.

    PubMed

    Qasim, Muhammad; Khan, Zafar Hayat; Khan, Waqar Ahmad; Ali Shah, Inayat

    2014-01-01

    This study investigates the magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) flow of ferrofluid along a stretching cylinder. The velocity slip and prescribed surface heat flux boundary conditions are employed on the cylinder surface. Water as conventional base fluid containing nanoparticles of magnetite (Fe3O4) is used. Comparison between magnetic (Fe3O4) and non-magnetic (Al2O3) nanoparticles is also made. The governing non-linear partial differential equations are reduced to non-linear ordinary differential equations and then solved numerically using shooting method. Present results are compared with the available data in the limiting cases. The present results are found to be in an excellent agreement. It is observed that with an increase in the magnetic field strength, the percent difference in the heat transfer rate of magnetic nanoparticles with Al2O3 decreases. Surface shear stress and the heat transfer rate at the surface increase as the curvature parameter increases, i.e curvature helps to enhance the heat transfer.

  18. Effects of prescribed heat flux and transpiration on MHD axisymmetric flow impinging on stretching cylinder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mabood, Fazle; Lorenzini, Giulio; Pochai, Nopparat; Ibrahim, Sheikh Muhammad

    2016-11-01

    A numerical treatment for axisymmetric flow and heat transfer due to a stretching cylinder under the influence of a uniform magnetic field and prescribed surface heat flux is presented. Numerical results are obtained for dimensionless velocity, temperature, skin friction coefficient and Nusselt number for several values of the suction/injection, magnetic and curvature parameters as well as the Prandtl number. The present study reveals that the controlling parameters have strong effects on the physical quantities of interest. It is seen that the magnetic field enhances the dimensionless temperature inside the thermal boundary layer, whereas it reduces the dimensionless velocity inside the hydrodynamic boundary layer. Heat transfer rate reduces, while the skin friction coefficient increases with magnetic field.

  19. Measurement of temperature gradient in a heated liquid cylinder using rainbow refractometry assisted with infrared thermometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Feihu; Xu, Chuanlong; Wang, Shimin; Li, Zhenfeng

    2016-12-01

    In a heated liquid cylinder, a temperature gradient exists between the hotter surface and the colder core. Measurement of the temperature gradient is very important for the in-depth investigation into the mechanism and optimized control of the heat transfer process. Rainbow refractometry has been attempted to achieve the measurement since several years ago. Yet there is no effective inversion algorithm without predicting refractive index profiles based on experience. In the paper, an improved rainbow refractometry assisted with infrared thermometry was proposed to measure the diameter and the inside temperature gradient of a heated liquid cylinder. The inversion algorithm was designed based on the nonlinear least square method and an optimization process. To evaluate the feasibility of the proposed method, numerical simulations and experiments were carried out. The results of the numerical simulation showed that the relative error of the inversion diameter was about 1%, and the error of the refractive index was less than 6×10-4 at all the radial locations. In the experimental research, t rainbows reconstructed with the reversion parameters were all similar to the corresponding captured ones.

  20. Heat Dissipation from a Finned Cylinder at Different Fin-Plane/Air-stream Angles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schey, Oscar W; Biermann, Arnold E

    1932-01-01

    This report gives the results of an experimental determination of the temperature distribution in and the heat dissipation from a cylindrical finned surface for various fin-plane/air-stream angles. A steel cylinder 4.5 inches in diameter having slightly tapered fins of 0.30-inch pitch and 0.6 -inch width was equipped with an electrical heating unit furnishing 13 to 248 B.T.U. per hour per square inch of inside wall area. Air at speeds form 30 to 150 miles per hour was directed at seven different angles from 0 degrees to 90 degrees with respect to the fin planes. The tests show the best angle for cooling at all air speeds to be about 45 degrees. With the same temperature for the two conditions and with an air speed of 76 miles per hour, the heat input to the cylinder can be increased 50 percent at 45 degrees fin-plane/air-stream angle over that at 0 degrees.

  1. The exterior unsteady viscous flow and heat transfer due to a porous expanding or contracting cylinder.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chao; Si, Xinhui; Shen, Yanan; Zheng, Liancun; Lin, Ping

    2015-01-01

    Since the vessels in the biological tissues are characterized by low seepage Reynolds numbers and contracting or expanding walls, more attention is paid on the viscous flow outside the porous pipe with small expansion or contraction. This paper presents a numerical solution of the flow and heat transfer outside an expanding or contracting porous cylinder. The coupled nonlinear similarity equations are solved by Bvp4c, which is a collocation method with MATLAB. The effects of the different physical parameters, namely the permeability Reynolds number,the expansion ratio and the Prandtl number, on the velocity and temperature distribution are obtained and the results are shown graphically.

  2. MHD stagnation point flow over a stretching cylinder with variable thermal conductivity and joule heating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jahan, Shah; Sakidin, Hamzah; Nazar, Roslinda Mohd

    2016-11-01

    The behavior of magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) flow of viscous fluid near the stagnation point over a stretching cylinder with variable thermal conductivity is analyzed. Thermal conductivity is assumed to be linearly related with temperature. The joule heating effects due to magnetic field is also encountered here. Analytical solutions are developed for both momentum and energy equations by using the homotopy analysis method (HAM). The variations of different parameters on the velocity and temperature distributions along with the skin friction coefficient and local Nusselt number are displayed graphically. Numerical values for the skin friction coefficient are calculated and discussed

  3. A new hydrodynamic prediction of the peak heat flux from horizontal cylinders in low speed upflow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ungar, E. K.; Eichhorn, R.

    1988-01-01

    Flow-boiling data have been obtained for horizontal cylinders in saturated acetone, isopropanol, and water, yielding heat flux vs. wall superheat boiling curves for the organic liquids. A region of low speed upflow is identified in which long cylindrical bubbles break off from the wake with regular frequency. The Strouhal number of bubble breakoff is a function only of the Froude number in any liquid, and the effective wake thickness in all liquids is a function of the density ratio and the Froude number. A low speed flow boiling burnout prediction procedure is presented which yields accurate results in widely dissimilar liquids.

  4. Browns Ferry waste heat greenhouse. Progress report. Circular Z-117

    SciTech Connect

    Burns, E.R.; Carter, J.; Pile, R.S.; Roetheli, J.C.

    1980-08-01

    A 25,000-ft/sup 2/ experimental greenhouse at Browns Ferry Nuclear Plant was divided into three sections to compare two heat exchange systems using waste heat in condenser cooling water (CCW) with a conventionally heated zone. A 125-hp pump at each of the three power plant units provides a 3000 gal/min pumping capacity for the CCW which is pumped about 2000 ft through a 12-in. pipe to the greenhouse. Construction was completed in November 1978; initial engineering tests were not conducted on system performance until January 1979; and the first tomato crop was planted January 10, 1979. Harvest was completed in July 1979; and cucumbers, chrysanthemums, poinsettias, and gloxinias were grown during the following summer and fall. Low winter greenhouse temperatures reduced the yield and quality of tomatoes in the two waste heat sections which averaged 13.0 lbs/plant. The conventionally heated zone produced 15.4 lbs/plant. In January and February, temperatures of the CCW were sometimes as low as 52/sup 0/F, or 18/sup 0/F below the predicted 70/sup 0/F which was the minimum simulated CCW temperature used to develop the pilot greenhouse heating system at Muscle Shoals. The two heat exchange systems using CCW performed near design expectations - keeping the greenhouse air temperature within 10/sup 0/ to 12/sup 0/F of the incoming water temperature. Summer and fall production of cucumbers and ornamental crops was successful in all three sections, which were conventionally cooled. Production budgets indicated a greater potential for ornamental production than vegetable production in waste heat greenhouses. Economic studies showed that heat exchange systems using waste heat from CCW will require higher capital investment and greater electrical consumption than a conventionally heated greenhouse. However, depending upon the costs charged for CCW, the waste heat systems may show potential economic advantages as a result of reduced heating costs.

  5. The Effect of Internal Pressure on the Buckling Stress of Thin-Walled Circular Cylinders Under Torsion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crate, Harold; Batdorf, S B; Baab, George W

    1944-01-01

    The results of a series of tests to determine the effect of internal pressure on the buckling load of a thin cylinder under an applied torque indicated that internal pressure raises the shear buckling stress. The experimental results were analyzed with the aid of previously developed theory and a simple interaction formula was derived. (author)

  6. Calculation of the electric potential and the Lorentz force in a transverse flow past a circular cylinder in a nonuniform magnetic field for various configurations of a locally ionized region at the cylinder surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheikin, E. G.; Cheng, Wei Yang

    2013-12-01

    We obtain a solution to the equation for the electric potential in a locally ionized transverse magnetohydrodynamic flow past a circular cylinder in a nonuniform magnetic field produced by a linear conductor for various configurations of the ionization region. Analytical formulas are derived for the volume density of the Lorentz force acting on the flow in a locally ionized region. The effect of the Hall parameter and of the configuration of the region of the magnetohydrodynamic interaction on the Lorentz force is analyzed. It is shown that an increase in the Hall parameter leads to a decrease in the Lorentz force acting on the flow, and a change in the configuration of the locally ionized region makes it possible to suppress the effect of the Hall parameter on the Lorentz force.

  7. EXACT SOLUTION OF HEAT CONDUCTION IN A TWO-DOMAIN COMPOSITE CYLINDER WITH AN ORTHOTROPIC OUTER LAYER.

    SciTech Connect

    C. AVILES-RAMOS; C. RUDY

    2000-11-01

    The transient exact solution of heat conduction in a two-domain composite cylinder is developed using the separation of variables technique. The inner cylinder is isotropic and the outer cylindrical layer is orthotropic. Temperature solutions are obtained for boundary conditions of the first and second kinds at the outer surface of the orthotropic layer. These solutions are applied to heat flow calorimeters modeling assuming that there is heat generation due to nuclear reactions in the inner cylinder. Heat flow calorimeter simulations are carried out assuming that the inner cylinder is filled with plutonium oxide powder. The first objective in these simulations is to predict the onset of thermal equilibrium of the calorimeter with its environment. Two types of boundary conditions at the outer surface of the orthotropic layer are used to predict thermal equilibrium. The procedure developed to carry out these simulations can be used as a guideline for the design of calorimeters. Another important application of these solutions is on the estimation of thermophysical properties of orthotropic cylinders. The thermal conductivities in the vertical, radial and circumferential directions of the orthotropic outer layer can be estimated using this exact solution and experimental data. Simultaneous estimation of the volumetric heat capacity and thermal conductivities is also possible. Furthermore, this solution has potential applications to the solution of the inverse heat conduction problem in this cylindrical geometry. An interesting feature of the construction of this solution is that two different sets of eigenfunctions need to be considered in the eigenfunction expansion. These eigenfunctions sets depend on the relative values of the thermal diffusivity of the inner cylinder and the thermal diffusivity in the vertical direction of the outer cylindrical layer.

  8. Stability analysis of the rimming flow inside a uniformly heated rotating horizontal cylinder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumawat, Tara Chand; Tiwari, Naveen

    2017-03-01

    The stability analysis is presented for a thin viscous liquid film flowing inside a uniformly heated horizontal cylinder that is rotating about its axis. The free surface evolution equation for the liquid-gas interface is obtained by simplifying the Navier-Stokes and energy equations within the lubrication approximation. Various dimensionless numbers are obtained that quantify the effect of gravity, viscous drag, inertia, surface tension, and thermocapillary stress. The film thickness evolution equation is solved numerically to obtain two-dimensional, steady state solutions neglecting axial variations. A liquid pool forms at the bottom of the cylinder when gravity dominates other forces. This liquid pool is shifted in the direction of rotation when inertia or viscous drag is increased. Small axial perturbations are then imposed to the steady solutions to study their stability behavior. It is found that the inertia and capillary pressure destabilize whereas the gravity and thermocapillary stress stabilize the rimming flow. The influence of Marangoni number is reported by computing the stable and unstable parametric regions. Thicker films are shown to be more susceptible to become unstable.

  9. Experimental Investigation of Coolant Boiling in a Half-Heated Circular Tube - Final CRADA Report

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, Wenhua; Singh, Dileep; France, David M.

    2016-11-01

    Coolant subcooled boiling in the cylinder head regions of heavy-duty vehicle engines is unavoidable at high thermal loads due to high metal temperatures. However, theoretical, numerical, and experimental studies of coolant subcooled flow boiling under these specific application conditions are generally lacking in the engineering literature. The objective of this project was to provide such much-needed information, including the coolant subcooled flow boiling characteristics and the corresponding heat transfer coefficients, through experimental investigations.

  10. User manual for EXCALIBUR: A FE-BI numerical laboratory for cavity-backed antennas in a circular cylinder, version 1.2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kempel, Leo C.

    1994-01-01

    The Finite Element-Boundary Integral (FE-BI) technique was used to analyze the scattering and radiation properties of cavity-backed patch antennas recessed in a metallic groundplane. A program, CAVITY3D, was written and found to yield accurate results for large arrays without the usual high memory and computational demand associated with competing formulations. Recently, the FE-BI approach was extended to cavity-backed antennas recessed in an infinite, metallic circular cylinder. EXCALIBUR is a computer program written in the Radiation Laboratory of the University of Michigan which implements this formulation. This user manual gives a brief introduction to EXCALIBUR and some hints as to its proper use. As with all computational electromagnetics programs (especially finite element programs), skilled use and best performance are only obtained through experience. However, several important aspects of the program such as portability, geometry generation, interpretation of results, and custom modification are addressed.

  11. Pressure losses and heat transfer in non-circular channels with hydraulically smooth walls

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Malak, J.

    1982-01-01

    The influence of channel geometry on pressure losses and heat transfer in noncircular channels with hydraulically smooth walls was studied. As a basic assumption for the description of this influence, integral geometrical criteria, selected according to experimental experience, were introduced. Using these geometrical criteria, a large set of experimental data for pressure losses and heat transfer in circular and annular channels with longitudinal fins was evaluated. In this way it as empirically proved that the criteria described channel geometry fairly well.

  12. Development of advanced high temperature in-cylinder components and tribological systems for low heat rejection diesel engines, phase 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kroeger, C. A.; Larson, H. J.

    1992-01-01

    Analysis and concept design work completed in Phase 1 have identified a low heat rejection engine configuration with the potential to meet the Heavy Duty Transport Technology program specific fuel consumption goal of 152 g/kW-hr. The proposed engine configuration incorporates low heat rejection, in-cylinder components designed for operation at 24 MPa peak cylinder pressure. Water cooling is eliminated by selective oil cooling of the components. A high temperature lubricant will be required due to increased in-cylinder operating temperatures. A two-stage turbocharger air system with intercooling and aftercooling was selected to meet engine boost and BMEP requirements. A turbocompound turbine stage is incorporated for exhaust energy recovery. The concept engine cost was estimated to be 43 percent higher compared to a Caterpillar 3176 engine. The higher initial engine cost is predicted to be offset by reduced operating costs due the lower fuel consumption.

  13. Average heat-transfer characteristics of a row of circular air jets impinging on a concave surface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Livingood, J. N. B.; Gauntner, J. W.

    1972-01-01

    A study of the average heat-transfer characteristics of air jets impinging on the concave side of a right-circular semicylinder is reported. Results from existing correlating are compared with each other and with experimental heat-transfer data for a row of circular jets. Two correlations available in the literature are recommended for use in designing cooled turbine vanes and blades.

  14. Aerodynamic Characteristics of a Circular Cylinder at Mach Number of 6.86 and Angles of Attack up to 90 Degrees

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Penland, Jim A

    1954-01-01

    Pressure-distribution and force tests of a circular cylinder have been made in the Langley 11-inch hypersonic tunnel at a Mach number of 6.86, a Reynolds number of 129,000 based on diameter, and angles of attack up to 90 degrees. The results are compared with the hypersonic approximation of Grimminger, Williams, and Young and with a simple modification of the Newtonian flow theory. The comparison of experimental results shows that either theory gives adequate general aerodynamic characteristics but that the modified Newtonian theory gives a more accurate prediction of the pressure distribution. The calculated crossflow drag coefficients plotted as a function of crossflow Mach number were found to be in reasonable agreement with similar results obtained from other investigations at lower supersonic Mach numbers. Comparison of the results of this investigation with data obtained at a lower Mach number indicates that the drag coefficient of a cylinder normal to the flow is relatively constant for Mach numbers above about 4.

  15. Numerical Study of Flow Past a Circular Cylinder Using RANS, Hybrid RANS/LES and PANS Formulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elmiligui, Alaa A.; Abdol-Hamid, Khaled S.; Massey, Steven J.; Pao, S. Paul

    2004-01-01

    Two multiscale type turbulence models are implemented in the PAB3D solver. The models are based on modifying the Reynolds Averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) equations. The first scheme is a hybrid RANS/LES model utilizing the two-equation (k(sub epsilon)) model with a RANS/LES transition function dependent on grid spacing and the computed turbulence length scale. The second scheme is a modified version of the partially averaged Navier-Stokes (PANS) model, where the unresolved kinetic energy parameter (f(sub k)) is allowed to vary as a function of grid spacing and the turbulence length scale. Solutions from these models are compared to RANS results and experimental data for a stationary and rotating cylinder. The parameter f(sub k) varies between zero and one and has the characteristic to be equal to one in the viscous sub layer, and when the RANS turbulent viscosity becomes smaller than the LES viscosity. The formulation, usage methodology, and validation example are presented to demonstrate the enhancement of PAB3D's time-accurate and turbulence modeling capabilities. The models are compared to RANS results and experimental data for turbulent separated flows (TS) and laminar separated flows (LS) around stationary and rotating cylinders. For a stationary cylinder, the TS case is accurately simulated using the general two-equation k(sub epsilon) turbulence model (eddy-viscosity model). PAB3D accurately predicts the drag coefficient (CD), lift coefficient (CL) and the Strouhal number (St). The LS case was a challenge for the RANS computation with an eddy-viscosity turbulence model. The RANS/LES and PANS performed well and showed marked improvements over the RANS solution. The modified PANS model was the most accurate. For the rotating cylinder, the spin ratio varied from zero to one, and the PANS results were in good agreement with published experimental data. RANS/LES and PANS capture both temporal and spatial fluctuations and produce large-scale structures that do not

  16. Effect of adiabatic wall on the natural convection heat transfer from a wavy surface created by attached horizontal cylinders

    SciTech Connect

    Harsini, I.; Ashjaee, M.

    2010-09-15

    The effect of a vertical adiabatic wall on the natural convection heat transfer from vertical array of attached cylinders, which can be considered as wavy surface, was investigated experimentally and numerically. The experiments were carried out using Mach-Zehnder interferometer and the commercial FLUENT code was used for numerical study. This paper focuses on the effect of wall-wavy surface spacing and Rayleigh number variation on the local and average free convection heat transfer coefficients from the each cylinder and the wavy surface. Rayleigh number ranges from 2400 to 10,000 and from 300,000 to 1,250,000 based on cylinder diameter and wavy surface height respectively. The local and average Nusselt numbers were determined for the different Rayleigh numbers, and the ratio of wall- wavy surface spacing to cylinder diameter 0.75, 1, 1.5, 2, 3, 4, 5, and {infinity}. Results are indicated with a single correlation which gives the average Nusselt number as a function of the ratio of the wall-wavy surface spacing to cylinder diameter and the Rayleigh numbers. There is an optimum distance between the wall and wavy surface in which the Nusselt number attain its maximum value. This optimum distance depends on the Rayleigh number. (author)

  17. Stagnation point flow and heat transfer behavior of Cu-water nanofluid towards horizontal and exponentially stretching/shrinking cylinders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sulochana, C.; Sandeep, N.

    2016-03-01

    In this study we analyzed the stagnation point flow and heat transfer behavior of Cu-water nanofluid towards horizontal and exponentially permeable stretching/shrinking cylinders in presence of suction/injection, heat source and shape of nanoparticles. The governing boundary layer equations are transformed to nonlinear ordinary differential equations using similarity transformation which are then solved numerically using bvp4c Matlab package. The influence of non-dimensional governing parameters on the flow field and heat transfer characteristics are discussed and presented through graphs and tables. The study indicates that the solutions for the horizontal and exponential cylinders are non-unique and shape of nanoparticles also influences the rate of heat transfer. Comparisons of the present results with existed studies are presented. Present study has an excellent agreement with the existed studies under some special conditions.

  18. Heat transfer and pressure distributions on hemisphere-cylinders in methane-air combustion products at Mach 7

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weinstein, I.

    1973-01-01

    Heat-transfer and pressure distributions were measured over the surfaces of three hemisphere-cylinder models tested at a nominal Mach number of 7 in the Langley 8-foot high-temperature structures tunnel which uses methane-air products of combustion as a test medium. The results showed that the heat-transfer and pressure distributions over the surface of the models were in good agreement with experimental data obtained in air and also with theoretical predictions.

  19. Fatigue Performance of Fluidized Bed Heat Treated 319 Alloy Diesel Cylinder Heads

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaudhury, Sujoy K.; Apelian, Diran; Meyer, Philippe; Massinon, Denis; Morichon, Julien

    2015-07-01

    Effects of various heat treatment tempers on fatigue performance of 319 alloy diesel cylinder heads were investigated. Castings were heat treated to T5, T6, and T7 tempers. Castings were solution heat treated and quenched using fluidized beds and aged using both conventional air convective furnace and fluidized bed for T6 and T7 tempers; while they were aged after casting for T5 temper using conventional furnace. Fatigue tests were performed at 373 K (100 °C) and stress ratio equal to -1. Results show that heat treatment has significant effect on the fatigue behavior of 319 alloy. The fatigue strength of T6 tempered 319 alloy is greater than T5 and T7 treatments. Weibull analysis shows that the Weibull modulus and characteristic fatigue life of castings treated (using conventional forced air circulation electrical resistance furnace) to T6 and T7 tempers are greater than T5 temper. This implies that castings treated to T6 and T7 tempers have greater reliability vis-à-vis T5 temper. Fractographic analyses reveal three distinct regions. These are: (I) crack initiation region from the surface, (II) crack propagation region, and (III) catastrophic or monotonic failure region. The relative size of the crack propagation region in T6 and T7 treated samples is greater than T5 treated samples. In general, the monotonic failure region shows typical dimple morphology, which implies significant plastic deformation prior to failure. Dimples on the fractured surface of T5 treated alloy are relatively more faceted than those treated to T6 and T7 tempers. This implies that the 319 alloy treated to T6 and T7 tempers underwent higher degree of plasticity prior to failure than that in the T5 condition.

  20. Microstructure and Mechanical Properties of Heat-Treated B319 Alloy Diesel Cylinder Heads

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaudhury, S. K.; Apelian, D.; Meyer, P.; Massinon, D.; Morichon, J.

    2015-07-01

    Microstructure and mechanical properties of B319 alloy diesel cylinder heads were investigated in this study. Cylinder heads were heat treated to T5, T6, and T7 tempers using fluidized bed technology. Three different fluidized beds were used, each to solutionize, quench, and age the castings. For comparative purposes, castings were also aged using conventional forced-air circulation electric-resistance furnace. Effects of processing parameters such as temperature, time, and heating rate on microstructural evolution and mechanical properties namely tensile properties and hardness of B319 alloy castings were studied. The number density and size range of precipitates were measured. Results show that the T5 temper has no effect on eutectic phases such as Si- and Fe-rich intermetallic, and Al2Cu. On contrary, both T6 and T7 tempers result in spherodization of the eutectic Si and partial dissolution of the Al2Cu phase. Prolonged solution heat treatment for 8 hours in fluidized bed results in limited dissolution of the secondary eutectic Al2Cu phase. Aging (T6, T7, and T5) results in precipitation of Al5Cu2Mg8Si6 and Al2Cu phases in B319 alloy. The number density of precipitates in T6 temper is greater than in T7 and T5 tempers. The number density of precipitates is also affected by the duration of solution heat treatment. In general, long solution heat treatment (8 hours) results in greater precipitate density than short solution treatment (2 hours). The distribution of precipitates is inhomogeneous and varied across the dendritic structure. In general, precipitation rate of Al5Cu2Mg8Si6 phase is greater near the periphery of the dendrite as compared to the center. This is because Al5Cu2Mg8Si6 nucleates on Si particle, grain boundaries, and triple junction between recrystallized Al grains and Si particles. Similarly, heterogeneous sites such as grain boundaries and Al/Si interface also act as nucleating sites for the precipitation of Al2Cu phase. In general, the

  1. LES of fluid and heat flow over a wall-bounded short cylinder at different inflow conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borello, D.; Hanjalić, K.

    2011-12-01

    We report on LES studies of flow patterns, vortical structures and heat transfer in flows over a short single cylinder of diameter D placed in a plane channel of height h = 0.4D in which the bottom wall is heated. The Reynolds number of 6150, based on D, corresponds to the water experiments reported by Sahin et al. (2008). For the basic computational domain of 24×14×0.4D three different inflow conditions have been considered: a non-turbulent flow with a uniform initial velocity developing along the channel (NT), a fully developed channel flows (FD) (generated a priori) and periodic conditions (PC). The latter boundary conditions have also been considered for two shorter domain lengths of 6D and 3D corresponding to a cylinder in a compact matrix. For the long domain, despite the length of the channel of 9.5 D before (and after) the cylinder, the inlet conditions show strong effects on the formation and evolution of the multiple vortex systems both in front and behind the cylinder, influencing significantly also friction and heat transfer. Simulations show some agreement with experimental data though the comparison is impaired by the uncertainty in the experimental inflow conditions. For the shortest cylinder spacing the wake never closes and the flow shows enhanced unsteadiness and turbulence level. Interestingly, the comparison for the same short domain (3Dx3D) using the mean temperature at the inflow to this domain as a reference shows the lowest average base-wall Nusselt number in the PC 3D case that corresponds to compact heat exchangers.

  2. Buoyancy and blockage effects on transient laminar opposing mixed convection heat transfer from two horizontal confined isothermal cylinder in tandem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martínez-Suástegui, Lorenzo; Salcedo, Erick; Cajas, Juan; Treviño, César

    2015-11-01

    Transient mixed convection in a laminar cross-flow from two isothermal cylinders in tandem arrangement confined inside a vertical channel is studied numerically using the vorticity-stream function formulation of the unsteady two-dimensional Navier-Stokes and energy equations. Numerical experiments are performed for a Reynolds number based on cylinder diameter of Re = 200, Prandtl number of Pr = 7, blockage ratio of D/H = 0.2, a pitch-to-diameter ratio of L/D = 2, and several values of buoyancy strength or Richardson number Ri = Gr/Re2. The results reported herein demonstrate how the wall confinement, interference effects and opposing buoyancy affect the flow structure and heat transfer characteristics of the cylinder array. This research was supported by the Consejo Nacional de Ciencia y Tecnología (CONACYT), Grant number 167474 and by the Secretaría de Investigación y Posgrado del IPN, Grant number SIP 20141309.

  3. Numerical study of thermal performance of perforated circular pin fin heat sinks in forced convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wen, Mao-Yu; Yeh, Cheng-Hsiung

    2016-12-01

    This paper presents a numerical simulation of the heat transfer performance under forced convection for two different types of circular pin fin heat sinks with (Type A) and without (Type B) a hollow in the heated base. COMSOL Multiphysics, which is used for the thermal hydraulic analyses, has proven to be a powerful finite-element-based simulation tool for solving multiple physics-based systems of partial and ordinary differential equations. The standard κ- ɛ two-equations turbulence model is employed to describe the turbulent structure and behavior. The numerical results are validated with the experimental results, and are shown to be in good agreement. The effects of the Reynolds number, height of the fin, finning factor and the perforated base plate on the heat-transfer coefficient are investigated and evaluated. The present study strongly recommends the use of a small hollow ( (Dh /Db ) < 0.15 ) constructed in the base plate of the pin fin heat sink.

  4. An experimental investigation of the flow past a finite circular cylinder at a low subcritical Reynolds number

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Budair, M.; Ayoub, A.; Karamcheti, K.

    1981-01-01

    Results of hot wire measurements made in the near wake at a Reynolds number of 9955 are reported. The measurements include the mean velocity profiles, root mean square values of the velocity fluctuations, frequency spectra, and velocity cross correlations. The mean velocity profiles were used to determine the wake width, whose variation in the downstream and spanwise directions was examined. It is observed that close to the cylinder, the wake is narrower toward the free end than it is away from it, while further downstream the wake is wider toward the tip than it is away from it. It is found that the flow over the span can be characterized by four regions: a tip region where vortex shedding occurs at a lower frequency than that prevalent for away from the tip; an intermediate region adjacent to the first one where a frequency component of a nonshedding character is present; a third region characterized by a gradually increasing shedding frequency with increasing distance from the tip; and a two dimensional region where the shedding frequency is constant.

  5. Analysis of laminar flow heat transfer in uniform temperature circular tubes with tape inserts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manglik, R. M.; Bergles, A. E.

    1986-05-01

    Constant property, laminar flow heat transfer in a semicircular tube with uniform wall temperature has been analyzed to define the lower bound of heat transfer augmentation in circular tubes with twisted-tape inserts. Two thermal boundary conditions, which correspond to the two extremes of the fin effect of twisted tapes encountered in practical applications, are considered. Numerical solutions, employing finite-difference formulations for the governing momentum and energy equations were carried out for the thermal entrance region and for fully developed flow.

  6. Further analyses of laminar flow heat transfer in circular sector ducts

    SciTech Connect

    Lei, Q.M.; Trupp, A.C. )

    1989-11-01

    Heat transfer in circular sector ducts is often encountered in multipassage tubes. Certain flow characteristics of circular sector ducts for apex angles up to {pi} have been determined as documented by Shah and London (1978). Recently, Lei and Trupp (1989) have more completely analyzed the flow characteristics of fully developed laminar flow for apex angles up to 2{pi}, including the location of the maximum velocity. Heat transfer results of fully developed laminar flow in circular sector ducts are also available for certain boundary conditions. Trupp and Lau (1984) numerically determined the average Nusselt number (Nu{sub T}) for isothermal walls. Eckert et al. (1958) initially derived an analytical expression for the temperature profile for the case of H1. Sparrow and Haji-angles up to {pi}. However, the above work required numerical integration (or equivalent) to obtain a value for Nu{sub H1}. Regarding the H1{sub ad} boundary condition, Date (1974) numerically obtained a limiting value of Nu{sub H1}{sub ad} for the semicircular duct from the prediction of circular tubes containing a twisted tape (straight and nonconducting tape). Hong and Bergles (1976) also reported an asymptotic value of Nu{sub H1}{sub ad} for the semicircular duct from their entrance region solution. Otherwise it appears that there are no published analytical results of Nu{sub H1}{sub ad} for circular sector ducts. The purpose of this technical note is to communicate these results. In addition, a novel series expression for Nu{sub H1} is presented together with results for apex angles up to 2{pi}.

  7. Magnetohydrodynamic Flow by a Stretching Cylinder with Newtonian Heating and Homogeneous-Heterogeneous Reactions.

    PubMed

    Hayat, T; Hussain, Zakir; Alsaedi, A; Farooq, M

    2016-01-01

    This article examines the effects of homogeneous-heterogeneous reactions and Newtonian heating in magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) flow of Powell-Eyring fluid by a stretching cylinder. The nonlinear partial differential equations of momentum, energy and concentration are reduced to the nonlinear ordinary differential equations. Convergent solutions of momentum, energy and reaction equations are developed by using homotopy analysis method (HAM). This method is very efficient for development of series solutions of highly nonlinear differential equations. It does not depend on any small or large parameter like the other methods i. e., perturbation method, δ-perturbation expansion method etc. We get more accurate result as we increase the order of approximations. Effects of different parameters on the velocity, temperature and concentration distributions are sketched and discussed. Comparison of present study with the previous published work is also made in the limiting sense. Numerical values of skin friction coefficient and Nusselt number are also computed and analyzed. It is noticed that the flow accelerates for large values of Powell-Eyring fluid parameter. Further temperature profile decreases and concentration profile increases when Powell-Eyring fluid parameter enhances. Concentration distribution is decreasing function of homogeneous reaction parameter while opposite influence of heterogeneous reaction parameter appears.

  8. Magnetohydrodynamic Flow by a Stretching Cylinder with Newtonian Heating and Homogeneous-Heterogeneous Reactions

    PubMed Central

    Hayat, T.; Hussain, Zakir; Alsaedi, A.; Farooq, M.

    2016-01-01

    This article examines the effects of homogeneous-heterogeneous reactions and Newtonian heating in magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) flow of Powell-Eyring fluid by a stretching cylinder. The nonlinear partial differential equations of momentum, energy and concentration are reduced to the nonlinear ordinary differential equations. Convergent solutions of momentum, energy and reaction equations are developed by using homotopy analysis method (HAM). This method is very efficient for development of series solutions of highly nonlinear differential equations. It does not depend on any small or large parameter like the other methods i. e., perturbation method, δ—perturbation expansion method etc. We get more accurate result as we increase the order of approximations. Effects of different parameters on the velocity, temperature and concentration distributions are sketched and discussed. Comparison of present study with the previous published work is also made in the limiting sense. Numerical values of skin friction coefficient and Nusselt number are also computed and analyzed. It is noticed that the flow accelerates for large values of Powell-Eyring fluid parameter. Further temperature profile decreases and concentration profile increases when Powell-Eyring fluid parameter enhances. Concentration distribution is decreasing function of homogeneous reaction parameter while opposite influence of heterogeneous reaction parameter appears. PMID:27280883

  9. On the effect of fractal generated turbulence on the heat transfer of circular impinging jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Astarita, Tommaso; Cafiero, Gioacchino; Discetti, Stefano

    2013-11-01

    The intense local heat transfer achieved by circular impinging jets is exploited in countless industrial applications (cooling of turbine blades, paper drying, tempering of glass and metals, etc). The heat transfer rate depends mainly on the Reynolds number, the nozzle-to-plate distance and the upstream turbulence. It is possible to enhance the heat transfer by exciting/altering the large scale structures embedded within the jet. In this work turbulent energy is injected by using a fractal grid at the nozzle exit. Fractal grids can generate more intense turbulence with respect to regular grids with the same blockage ratio by enhancing the jet turbulence over different scales. Consequently, they are expected to improve the convective heat transfer. The results outline that a significant improvement is achieved (for small nozzle-to-plate distances up to 100% at the stagnation point and more than 10% on the integral heat transfer over a circular area of 3 nozzle diameters) under the same power input.

  10. Thermal convection in a cylinder and the problem of planform selection in an internally heated fluid layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolmychkov, V. V.; Shcheritsa, O. V.; Mazhorova, O. S.

    2016-12-01

    The paper deals with the hexagonal convective flow near the stability threshold in an internally heated fluid layer. In our previous numerical study of convection near the stability threshold in a square box with internal heat generation [Phys. Lett. A 377, 2111 (2013)], 10.1016/j.physleta.2013.06.013 for a region of large horizontal extent, it has been shown that at small values of Prandtl number (Pr), convection sets in as a pattern of hexagonal cells with upward motion in the center (up-hexagons), whereas at large Pr, a stable flow pattern is formed by hexagonal cells with a downward motion in the center (down-hexagons). Here, we study axisymmetric convection in a cylinder as a model of motion in a single hexagonal cell. The radius of the cylinder matches the size of hexagons observed in our three-dimensional simulation. The lateral boundary of the cylinder is free and heat insulated. Horizontal bounding surfaces are rigid. The upper boundary is maintained at a constant temperature; the lower one is insulated. Two stable, steady-state motions with the upward and downward flow at the cylinder axis have been attained in calculations, irrespective of Pr. Cylindrical motion with the same direction of circulation as in the stable hexagons has a maximum temperature drop measured along the radius at the bottom of the cell. We suggest maximization of the temperature drop as a selection criterion, which determines the preferred state of motion in an internally heated fluid layer. This new selection principle is validated by the comparative analysis of the dominant nonlinear effects in low- and high-Prandtl number convection.

  11. Transition process leading to microbubble emission boiling on horizontal circular heated surface in subcooled pool

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ueno, Ichiro; Ando, Jun; Horiuchi, Kazuna; Saiki, Takahito; Kaneko, Toshihiro

    2016-11-01

    Microbubble emission boiling (MEB) produces a higher heat flux than critical heat flux (CHF) and therefore has been investigated in terms of its heat transfer characteristics as well as the conditions under which MEB occurs. Its physical mechanism, however, is not yet clearly understood. We carried out a series of experiments to examine boiling on horizontal circular heated surfaces of 5 mm and of 10 mm in diameter, in a subcooled pool, paying close attention to the transition process to MEB. High-speed observation results show that, in the MEB regime, the growth, condensation, and collapse of the vapor bubbles occur within a very short time. In addition, a number of fine bubbles are emitted from the collapse of the vapor bubbles. By tracking these tiny bubbles, we clearly visualize that the collapse of the vapor bubbles drives the liquid near the bubbles towards the heated surface, such that the convection field around the vapor bubbles under MEB significantly differs from that under nucleate boiling. Moreover, the axial temperature gradient in a heated block (quasi-heat flux) indicates a clear difference between nucleate boiling and MEB. A combination of quasi-heat flux and the measurement of the behavior of the vapor bubbles allows us to discuss the transition to MEB. This work was financially supported by the 45th Research Grant in Natural Sciences from The Mitsubishi Foundation (2014 - 2015), and by Research Grant for Boiler and Pressurized Vessels from The Japan Boiler Association (2016).

  12. Pressure drop reduction and heat transfer deterioration of slush nitrogen in triangular and circular pipe flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohira, Katsuhide; Kurose, Kizuku; Okuyama, Jun; Saito, Yutaro; Takahashi, Koichi

    2017-01-01

    Slush fluids such as slush hydrogen and slush nitrogen are characterized by superior properties as functional thermal fluids due to their density and heat of fusion. In addition to allowing efficient hydrogen transport and storage, slush hydrogen can serve as a refrigerant for high-temperature superconducting (HTS) equipment using MgB2, with the potential for synergistic effects. In this study, pressure drop reduction and heat transfer deterioration experiments were performed on slush nitrogen flowing in a horizontal triangular pipe with sides of 20 mm under the conditions of three different cross-sectional orientations. Experimental conditions consisted of flow velocity (0.3-4.2 m/s), solid fraction (0-25 wt.%), and heat flux (0, 10, and 20 kW/m2). Pressure drop reduction became apparent at flow velocities exceeding about 1.3-1.8 m/s, representing a maximum amount of reduction of 16-19% in comparison with liquid nitrogen, regardless of heating. Heat transfer deterioration was seen at flow velocities of over 1.2-1.8 m/s, for a maximum amount of deterioration of 13-16%. The authors of the current study compared the results for pressure drop reduction and heat transfer deterioration in triangular pipe with those obtained previously for circular and square pipes, clarifying differences in flow and heat transfer properties. Also, a correlation equation was obtained between the slush Reynolds number and the pipe friction factor, which is important in the estimation of pressure drop in unheated triangular pipe. Furthermore, a second correlation equation was derived between the modified slush Reynolds number and the pipe friction factor, enabling the integrated prediction of pressure drop in both unheated triangular and circular pipes.

  13. Heat Transfer from Cylinders in Transition From Slip Flow to Free-Molecule Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cybulski, Ronald J.; Baldwin, Lionel V.

    1959-01-01

    Over 600 measured heat-transfer coefficients in the transition from slip to free-molecule flow have been correlated by using the Nusselt number Nu as a function of the Knudsen Kn and Reynolds Re (or Mach M) numbers. The experimental range for these heat-transfer data from transverse cylinders in air corresponds to the following dimensionless groups: M, 0.10 to 0.90; Re, 0.03 to 11.5; Kn, 0.10 to 5.0. The total air temperature T(sub t) was maintained constant at 80 F, but wire temperature was Varied from 150 to 580 F. At Kn=0.10, Nu extrapolates smoothly into slip-flow empirical curves that show Nu as a function of Re and M or Kn. The correlation gradually changes from the square root of Re(sub t) dependence characteristic of continuum flow to first-power Re dependence as Kn increases (decreasing Re). At the experimental limit Kn ft 5.0, the Nu data correlate with a mean fractional error of 413 percent by the prediction of free-molecule-flow theory. In comparing experimental results with theory, an accommodation coefficient of 0.57+/-0.07 was inferred from the heat-transfer data, which were obtained with etched tungsten wire in air. The wire recovery temperature T(sub e) was measured and compared with existing data and theory in terms of a ratio eta(equivalent to T(sub e)/T(sub t). The results can be divided into three groups by Kn criteria: For Kn less than 2.01, eta is independent of Kn, and eta decreases from 1.0 to 0.97 as M increases from 0 to 0.90; for 2.0 less than Kn less than 5.0, eta is a function of both Kn and M in this transition region to fully developed free-molecule flow; and for Kn greater than 5.0, eta predicted by free-molecule-flow theory is observed and increases from 1.0 to 1.08 as M increases from 0 to 0.90, again independent of Kn. Therefore, these T(sub e) data provide a guide to the boundary of fully developed free-molecule flow, which is.inferred from this research to exist for Kn greater than 5.0. This boundary criterion is substantiated

  14. Compressibility and Heating Effects on Pressure Loss and Cooling of a Baffled Cylinder Barrel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldstein, Arthur W.; Ellerbrock, Herman H., Jr.

    1944-01-01

    Theoretical investigations have shown that, because air is compressible, the pressure-drop requirements for cooling an air-cooled engine will be much greater at high altitudes and high speeds than at sea level and low speeds. Tests were conducted by the NACA to obtain some experimental confirmation of the effect of air compressibility on cooling and pressure loss of a baffled cylinder barrel and to evaluate various methods of analysis. The results reported in the present paper are regarded as preliminary to tests on single-cylinder and multi-cylinder engines. Tests were conducted over a wide range of air flows and density altitudes.

  15. Non-homogeneous Steady-State Heat Conduction Problem in a Thin Circular Plate and Its Thermal Stresses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deshmukh, K. C.; Warbhe, S. D.; Kulkarni, V. S.

    2009-10-01

    The present paper deals with the determination of the displacement and thermal stresses in a thin circular plate defined as 0 ≤ r ≤ b, 0 ≤ z ≤ h under a steady temperature field, due to a constant rate of heat generation within it. A thin circular plate is insulated at the fixed circular boundary ( r = b), and the remaining boundary surfaces ( z = 0, z = h) are kept at zero temperature. The governing heat conduction equation has been solved by using an integral transform technique. The results are obtained in series form in terms of modified Bessel functions. The results for displacement and stresses have been computed numerically and are illustrated graphically.

  16. Comparative analysis of the calculation data on an unsteady flow around a circular cylinder obtained using the VP2/3 and fluent packages and the Spalart-Allmaras and Menter turbulence models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isaev, S. A.; Baranov, P. A.; Kudryavtsev, N. A.; Lysenko, D. A.; Usachev, A. E.

    2005-11-01

    An unsteady flow around a transversal circular cylinder has been analyzed on the basis of solution of Navier-Stokes and Reynolds equations, closed, in the latter case, using one-and two-parameter differential models of turbulence, by the implicit factorized method with the use of different-density structured and nonstructured grids. Solvers of specialized multiblock and universal packages have been tested.

  17. Correlation formulas for the frost thickness and heat transfer coefficient on a cylinder in humid air cross flow

    SciTech Connect

    Sengupta, S.; Sherif, S.A.; Wong, K.V.

    1995-12-31

    This paper reports on results of an experimental investigation where the emphasis was placed on obtaining empirical correlations for the frost thickness-time history and the heat transfer coefficient-time history for a cylinder in humid air cross flow. The facility employed for the investigation consisted of a low velocity wind tunnel comprised of a rectangular test section, a transition section and a honeycomb placed at the tunnel entrance. An external refrigerator was used to cool an antifreeze solution having a mixture of 90% methanol and 10% ethylene glycol. Measured parameters included, among other things, the heat transfer coefficient as well as the frost thickness.

  18. Heat transfer and pressure drop studies in a circular tube fitted with straight full twist

    SciTech Connect

    Krishna, Siva Rama; Pathipaka, Govardhan; Sivashanmugam, P.

    2009-03-15

    Experimental investigation of heat transfer characteristics of circular tube fitted with straight full twist insert has been presented. The heat transfer coefficient increases with Reynolds number and decreasing spacer distance with maximum being 2 in. spacer distance for both the type of twist inserts. Also, there is no appreciable increase in heat transfer enhancement in straight full twist insert with 2 in. spacer distance. Experiments were carried out in turbulent flow using straight full twist insert with 4 in. spacer and similar trend of increasing Nusselt number with Reynolds number was observed. Performance evaluation analysis was made and the maximum performance ratio was obtained for each twist insert corresponding to the Reynolds number of 2550. (author)

  19. Dissipated energy and entropy production for an unconventional heat engine: the stepwise `circular cycle'

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    di Liberto, Francesco; Pastore, Raffaele; Peruggi, Fulvio

    2011-05-01

    When some entropy is transferred, by means of a reversible engine, from a hot heat source to a colder one, the maximum efficiency occurs, i.e. the maximum available work is obtained. Similarly, a reversible heat pumps transfer entropy from a cold heat source to a hotter one with the minimum expense of energy. In contrast, if we are faced with non-reversible devices, there is some lost work for heat engines, and some extra work for heat pumps. These quantities are both related to entropy production. The lost work, i.e. ? , is also called 'degraded energy' or 'energy unavailable to do work'. The extra work, i.e. ? , is the excess of work performed on the system in the irreversible process with respect to the reversible one (or the excess of heat given to the hotter source in the irreversible process). Both quantities are analysed in detail and are evaluated for a complex process, i.e. the stepwise circular cycle, which is similar to the stepwise Carnot cycle. The stepwise circular cycle is a cycle performed by means of N small weights, dw, which are first added and then removed from the piston of the vessel containing the gas or vice versa. The work performed by the gas can be found as the increase of the potential energy of the dw's. Each single dw is identified and its increase, i.e. its increase in potential energy, evaluated. In such a way it is found how the energy output of the cycle is distributed among the dw's. The size of the dw's affects entropy production and therefore the lost and extra work. The distribution of increases depends on the chosen removal process.

  20. High Rayleigh number heat transfer in a horizontal cylinder with adiabatic wall

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schiroky, G. H.; Rosenberger, F.

    1984-01-01

    The present investigation is concerned with an experimentally guided approach to the estimation of Nusselt numbers (Nu) at high Rayleigh numbers (Ra) for a cylinder with an adiabatic side wall. The Rayleigh number dependence of the Nusselt number for a horizontal cylinder with an adiabatic wall is presented in a graph. The obtained data are compared with results reported by Shih (1981). Shih has extended a three-term expansion for velocity and temperature distributions reported by Bejan and Tien (1978).

  1. Experimental studies of effects of tilt and structural asymmetry on vibration characteristics of thin-wall circular cylinders partly filled with liquid

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herr, R. W.

    1978-01-01

    The effects of tilt and structural asymmetry on the vibration characteristics of partly liquid-filled thin-wall cylinders were experimentally studied. It was found that tilting the longitudinal axis of a partly filled axisymmetric cylinder from the vertical could markedly reduce its resonant frequencies and change significantly the shape of the circumferential modes. For the minimum frequency modes, vibratory motion occurred only on that side of the cylinder where the liquid was deepest. An empirical equation was derived that gives the equivalent liquid depth of an untilted cylinder having the same minimum resonant frequency as a tilted, partly filled cylinder. Circumferential mode shapes of an untilted asymmetric cylinder were similar to those of the tilted, partly filled axisymmetric cylinder. Vibratory motion in the minimum frequency modes occurred in most instances only on the side of minimum thickness. Correlation between test data and results from a reformulated NASTRAN hydroelastic analysis was excellent.

  2. Laminar convective heat transfer characteristic of Al2O3/water nanofluid in a circular microchannel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trinavee, K.; Gogoi, T. K.; Pandey, M.

    2016-10-01

    In this study, laminar convective heat transfer characteristics Al2O3/water nanofluid in a circular microchannel is investigated using a two-phase (discrete phase) model. The computational fluid dynamic code FLUENT (ANSYS) is employed to solve the coupled momentum and energy equations with the boundary conditions of uniform wall heat flux and velocity at channel inlet. Detail analysis is done showing variation of wall temperature, fluid bulk mean temperature, heat transfer coefficient, Nusselt number, shear stress, friction, pressure drop, entropy generation etc. along the microchannel at two particle volume concentrations (1% and 4%) of the nanofluid. Comparison of results is provided between base and nanofluid and also for two cases, one with constant property and the other with variable temperature thermal conductivity and viscosity. Results show that heat transfer is enhanced in case of the nanofluid with low entropy generation and the heat transfer parameters increase with increase in nanoparticle volume concentration and Reynolds number. However, use of nanofluid also causes increase in pressure drop and shear stress. A comparison of the constant and variable property model showed that heat transfer is further enhanced; entropy, shear stress and pressure drop further decrease when temperature dependent properties of the nanofluid are considered instead of constant properties.

  3. Effect of swirl flow on heat transfer characteristics in a circular pipe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siddique, Hossain; Hoque, Md. Shafkat Bin; Ali, Mohammad

    2016-07-01

    Swirl flow is of great stature in heat transfer enhancement and in numerous engineering applications. In the present numerical study, the swirl flow of water in a circular pipe is considered. Here the Reynolds Number is kept within 2000. The pipe contains stationary blades to produce the swirl flow. The blades are considered heat resistant. The three-dimensional Navier-Stokes equations for incompressible Newtonian fluid flow are used. The code is corroborated by comparing the simulation results with the established Hagen-Poiseuille law. The comparison is quite satisfactory and thus the code is used for present investigation. In this study, the heat transfer performance of the swirl flow is evaluated. Two cases are considered on the outer surface of the pipe: (i) Constant heat flux and (ii) Constant temperature. This investigation reveals that the swirl flow increases the mean outlet temperature in both cases. The effects of the vane angle, pipe length and diameter on heat transfer characteristics are also evaluated.

  4. Fully developed laminar heat transfer in circular-segment ducts with uniform wall temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Manglik, R.M.; Bergles, A.E. . Dept. of Mechanical Engineering, Aeronautical Engineering and Mechanics)

    1994-11-01

    Heat transfer to constant-property, fully developed, laminar flows in circular-segment ducts with uniform wall temperature (T) has been analyzed. Besides representing a compact surface, the segment duct geometry models the flow cross section of a circular tube with a straight-tape insert. Two variations in the T thermal boundary condition are considered: constant axial and circumferential wall temperature, and constant temperature on the curved surface but an adiabatic flat wall. These two conditions model the extremes of the fine effects of a straight-tape insert, i.e., 100% and zero fin efficiencies, respectively. Numerical solutions, obtained by using finite difference techniques, are presented for both the velocity and temperature fields. The isothermal friction factors are in excellent agreement with analytical solutions reported in the literature. The Nusselt number results for the two thermal boundary conditions are presented for different segment shapes, 0[degree] [<=] [theta] [<=] 90[degree], and they represent the lower limit of the heat transfer enhancement due to twisted-tape inserts.

  5. Compressibility and Heating Effects on Pressure Loss and Cooling of a Baffled Cylinder Barrel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldstein, Arthur W; Ellerbrock, Herman H , Jr

    1944-01-01

    Theoretical investigations have shown that, because air is compressible, the pressure-drop requirements for cooling an air-cooled engine will be much greater at high altitudes and high speeds than at sea level and low speeds. Tests were conducted by the NACA to obtain some experimental confirmation of the effect of air compressibility on cooling and pressure loss of a baffled cylinder barrel and to evaluate various methods of analysis. The results reported in the present paper are regarded as preliminary to tests on single-cylinder and multicylinder engines. Tests were conducted over a wide range of air flows and density altitudes.

  6. Study on solid liquid interface heat transfer of PCM under simultaneous charging and discharging (SCD) in horizontal cylinder annulus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Omojaro, Adebola Peter; Breitkopf, Cornelia

    2017-01-01

    Heat transfer performance during the simultaneous charging and discharging (SCD) operation process for phase change materials (PCM) contained inside the annulus of concentric horizontal cylinder was investigated. In the experimental set-up, the PCM inside the annulus serves as the heat sink along with an externally imposed forced cooling air. The obtained time wise temperature profile was used to determine the effects of different heat fluxes and the imposed forced convection cooling on the melt fraction values and the transition shift time from the observed conduction to natural convection heat transfer patterns. Furthermore, non-dimensional analysis was presented for the heat transfer at the interface to enable generalizing the result. Comparison of the results show that the SCD operation mode establish the condition that enables much PCM phase transition time and thus longer time of large latent heat transfer effect than the Partial and non simultaneous operations. Analysis results show that the variation of the heat flux for the SCD mode did not change the dominance of the natural convection over conduction heat transfers in the PCM. However, it significantly influences the commencement/transition shift time and melting rate while higher heat fluxes yields melt fraction that was 38-63% more for investigated process time. Variation with different cooling air flow rate shows more influences on the melt fraction than on the mode of heat transfer occurring in the PCM during melting. Available non-SCD modes correlation was shown to be insufficient to accurately predict interface heat transfer for the SCD modes.

  7. Coupled heat and mass transfer by natural convection adjacent to a permeable horizontal cylinder in a saturated porous medium

    SciTech Connect

    Yih, K.A.

    1999-04-01

    Coupled heat and mass transfer (or double-diffusion) driven by buoyancy, due to temperature and concentration variations in a saturated porous medium, has several important applications in geothermal and geophysical engineering such as the migration of moisture through the air contained in fibrous insulation, the extraction of geothermal energy, underground disposal of nuclear wastes, and the spreading of chemical contaminants through water-saturated soil. Here, the heat and mass transfer characteristics of free convection about a permeable horizontal cylinder embedded in porous media under the coupled effects of thermal and mass diffusion are numerically analyzed. The surface of the horizontal cylinder is maintained at a uniform wall temperature and uniform wall concentration. The transformed governing equations are obtained and solved by Keller box method. Numerical results for the dimensionless temperature profiles, the dimensionless concentration profiles, the Nusselt number and the Sherwood number are presented. Increasing the buoyancy ratio N and the transpiration parameter f{sub w} increases the Nusselt number and the Sherwood number. For thermally assisting flow, when Lewis number Le increases, the Nusselt (Sherwood) number decreases (increases). Whereas, for thermally opposing flow, both the Nusselt number and the Sherwood number increase with increasing the Lewis number.

  8. Heat Transfer Characteristics of Impinging Jets by Four Circular Nozzles Arranged in Square-type

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ichimiya, Koichi

    This paper presents the experimental results on the impingement heat transfer by 4-circular nozzles arranged in square type. Experiments were performed for the dimensionless space H(= h/D)=0.5-8,the Reynolds number Re(= VoD/v)=3000-40000, and the dimensionless pitch Pi(= pi/D)=8. The two-dimensional behavior of the local Nusselt number was corresponded to the flow visualization by oil film method on the impingement surface. The average Nusselt number was expressed by the geometric function and Re2/3. The maximum average Nusselt number was obtained at the dimensionless nozzle-impingement surface spacing H=2 for constant Reynolds number.

  9. Vortices induced in a stagnation region by wakes - Their incipient formation and effects on heat transfer from cylinders

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nagib, H. M.; Hodson, P. R.

    1977-01-01

    Horseshoe-like vortices, induced by wakes in the stagnation region of bluff bodies, are proposed as an efficient mechanism for augmentation of convective heat transfer. The vortex 'flow module' induced by single or multiple wakes, which had not been observed previously, was first documented and the resulting flow field was studied using various visualization techniques and hot-wire anemometry. In an attempt to understand the driving force behind this flow module, the conditions at which incipient formation of the vortices occurs were investigated. Existence of such a threshold is essential and was hitherto an open question in analytical studies of stability of flow in stagnation region. Finally, effects of the flow module on heat transfer from a cylinder were measured.

  10. Experimental investigation of nucleate boiling heat transfer mechanisms for cylinders in water and FC-72

    SciTech Connect

    Ammerman, C.N.; You, S.M.; Hong, Y.S.

    1995-12-31

    A recently developed photographic method is used to quantify vapor volumetric flow rate above a boiling wire. The volumetric flow rate is combined with additional analyses to determine the overall contributions to the total heat flux from four nucleate boiling heat transfer mechanisms (latent heat, natural convection, Marangoni flow, and micro-convection). This technique is used to quantify the boiling heat transfer mechanisms versus heat flux for a 510-{micro}m wire immersed in saturated water and in water with a small amount of liquid soap added. These data are compared with similar data taken for a 75-{micro}m wire boiling in saturated FC-72. For all cases, latent heat is the dominant heat transfer mechanism in the fully developed nucleate boiling regime. In addition, the latent heat component is significantly increased by the addition of small amounts of soap (surfactant).

  11. Three-dimensional transition of a water flow around a heated cylinder at {{Re {=} 85}} and {{Ri {=} 1.0}}

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Maosheng; Rindt, Camilo C. M.; van Steenhoven, Anton A.

    2006-11-01

    The three-dimensional flow transition behind a heated cylinder subjected to a horizontal flow (water is used as the working fluid; Pr {≃} 7) at a Reynolds number Re {=} 85 and a Richardson number Ri {=} 1.0, manifests itself in the far wake as escaping mushroom-type structures from the upper vortices. The origin of the escaping mushroom-type structures lies in the generation of streamwise vorticity in the near wake, which is described as a cyclic process. In the presence of a spanwise temperature gradient in the near wake, streamwise vorticity is generated, which results from baroclinic vorticity production. Owing to these streamwise vorticity regions, low-speed flow will move upwards at so-called in-plume positions resulting in high- and low-speed streaks in the upper half of the wake. Next, ‘transverse’ vorticity is generated by the spanwise gradients in the streamwise velocity component, resulting in counter-rotating vortices directly behind the cylinder. These vortices lead to high- and low-temperature regions in the spanwise direction and the process repeats itself.

  12. Multiple Long-Time Solutions for Intermediate Reynolds Number Flow past a Circular Cylinder with a Nonlinear Inertial and Dissipative Attachment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blanchard, Antoine B. E.; Bergman, Lawrence A.; Vakakis, Alexander F.; Pearlstein, Arne J.

    2016-11-01

    We consider two-dimensional flow past a linearly-sprung cylinder allowed to undergo rectilinear motion normal to the mean flow, with an attached "nonlinear energy sink" consisting of a mass allowed to rotate about the cylinder axis, and whose rotational motion is linearly damped by a viscous damper. For Re < 50, where the flow is expected to be two-dimensional, we use different inlet transients to identify multiple long-time solutions, and to study how they depend on Re and a dimensionless spring constant. For fixed values of the ratio of cylinder density to fluid density, dimensionless damping coefficient, and ratio of the rotating mass to the total mass, we find that different inlet transients lead to different long-time solutions, including solutions that are steady and symmetric (with a motionless cylinder), time-periodic, quasi-periodic, and chaotic. The results show that over a wide range of the parameters, the steady symmetric motionless-cylinder solution is locally, but not globally, stable. Supported by NSF Grant CMMI-1363231.

  13. Heat Transfer and Flow of a Casson Fluid Due to a Stretching Cylinder with the Soret and Dufour Effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahdy, A.

    2015-07-01

    Numerical solutions of the problem on flow and heat transfer of a non-Newtonian fluid outside a stretching permeable cylinder are obtained with regard to suction or blowing and the Soret and Dufour effects. The Casson fluid model is used to characterize the non-Newtonian fluid behavior. The governing partial differential equations are reduced to a system of nonlinear ordinary differential equations by employing similarity transformations, and the obtained equations are solved numerically by using the shooting technique. The main purpose of the study is to investigate the effect of the governing parameters, namely, the Casson, Soret, and Dufour parameters, the suction/injection parameter, and the Prandtl and Reynolds numbers, on the velocity and temperature profiles, as well as on the skin friction coefficient and temperature gradient at the surface.

  14. Characterization of hole circularity and heat affected zone in pulsed CO2 laser drilling of alumina ceramics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bharatish, A.; Narasimha Murthy, H. N.; Anand, B.; Madhusoodana, C. D.; Praveena, G. S.; Krishna, M.

    2013-12-01

    Circularity of drilled hole at the entry and exit, heat affected zone and taper are important attributes which influence the quality of a drilled hole in laser drilling. This paper examines the effect of laser parameters on the quality of drilled holes in Alumina ceramics which are widely used in microelectronic devices, based on orthogonal array experimentation and response surface methodology. Both entrance and exit circularities were significantly influenced by hole diameter and laser power. Heat affected zone was influenced by frequency. Taper was also significantly influenced by laser power. Response surface model predicted nominal entrance circularity at 2.5 kHz, 240 W, 2.5 mm/s, 1 mm hole, exit circularity and taper at 7.5 kHz, 240 W, 4.5 mm/s, and 1 mm hole. The model predicted lowest heat affected zone at 7.5 kHz, 240 W, 2.5 mm/s, and 1 mm. Multiobjective optimization achieved using both response surface model and gray relational analysis indicated that all the four quality parameters are optimized at 7.5 kHz, 240 W, 3.85 mm/s and 1 mm.

  15. Mixed convection flow of viscoelastic fluid by a stretching cylinder with heat transfer.

    PubMed

    Hayat, Tasawar; Anwar, Muhammad Shoaib; Farooq, Muhammad; Alsaedi, Ahmad

    2015-01-01

    Flow of viscoelastic fluid due to an impermeable stretching cylinder is discussed. Effects of mixed convection and variable thermal conductivity are present. Thermal conductivity is taken temperature dependent. Nonlinear partial differential system is reduced into the nonlinear ordinary differential system. Resulting nonlinear system is computed for the convergent series solutions. Numerical values of skin friction coefficient and Nusselt number are computed and discussed. The results obtained with the current method are in agreement with previous studies using other methods as well as theoretical ideas. Physical interpretation reflecting the contribution of influential parameters in the present flow is presented. It is hoped that present study serves as a stimulus for modeling further stretching flows especially in polymeric and paper production processes.

  16. Mixed Convection Flow of Viscoelastic Fluid by a Stretching Cylinder with Heat Transfer

    PubMed Central

    Hayat, Tasawar; Anwar, Muhammad Shoaib; Farooq, Muhammad; Alsaedi, Ahmad

    2015-01-01

    Flow of viscoelastic fluid due to an impermeable stretching cylinder is discussed. Effects of mixed convection and variable thermal conductivity are present. Thermal conductivity is taken temperature dependent. Nonlinear partial differential system is reduced into the nonlinear ordinary differential system. Resulting nonlinear system is computed for the convergent series solutions. Numerical values of skin friction coefficient and Nusselt number are computed and discussed. The results obtained with the current method are in agreement with previous studies using other methods as well as theoretical ideas. Physical interpretation reflecting the contribution of influential parameters in the present flow is presented. It is hoped that present study serves as a stimulus for modeling further stretching flows especially in polymeric and paper production processes. PMID:25775032

  17. Method for Calculation of Laminar Heat Transfer in Air Flow Around Cylinders of Arbitrary Cross Section (including Large Temperature Differences and Transpiration Cooling)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eckert, E R; Livingood, John N B

    1953-01-01

    The solution of heat-transfer problems has become vital for many aeronautical applications. The shapes of objects to be cooled can often be approximated by cylinders of various cross sections with flow normal to the axis as, for instance heat transfer on gas-turbine blades and on air foils heated for deicing purposes. A laminar region always exists near the stagnation point of such objects. A method previously presented by E. R. G. Eckert permits the calculation of local heat transfer around the periphery of cylinders of arbitrary cross section in the laminar region for flow of a fluid with constant property values with an accuracy sufficient for engineering purposes. The method is based on exact solutions of the boundary-layer equations for incompressible wedge-type flow and on the postulate that at any point on the cylinder the boundary-layer growth is the same as that on a wedge with comparable flow conditions. This method is extended herein to take into account the influence of large temperature differences between the cylinder wall and the flow as well as the influence of transpiration cooling when the same medium as the outside flow is used as coolant.

  18. Optimization of circular orifice jets mixing into a heated cross flow in a cylindrical duct

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kroll, J. T.; Sowa, W. A.; Samuelsen, G. S.; Holdeman, J. D.

    1993-01-01

    To examine the mixing characteristics of circular jets in an axisymmetric can geometry, temperature measurements were obtained downstream of a row of cold jet injected into a heated cross stream. The objective was to obtain uniform mixing within one duct radius downstream of the leading edge of the jet orifices. An area weighted standard deviation of the mixture fraction was used to help quantify the degree of mixedness at a given plane. Non-reacting experiments were conducted to determine the influence of the number of jets on the mixedness in a cylindrical configuration. Results show that the number of orifices significantly impacts the mixing characteristics of jets injected from round hole orifices in a can geometry. Optimum mixing occurs when the mean jet trajectory aligns with the radius which divides the cross sectional area of the can into two equal parts at one mixer radius downstream of the leading edge of the orifice. The optimum number of holes at momentum-flux ratios of 25 and 52 is 10 and 15 respectively.

  19. Periodic unsteady effects on turbulent boundary layer transport and heat transfer: An experimental investigation in a cylinder-wall junction flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Qi

    Heat transfer in a turbulent boundary layer downstream of junction with a cylinder has many engineering applications including controlling heat transfer to the endwall in gas turbine passages and cooling of protruding electronic chips. The main objective of this research is to study the fundamental process of heat transport and wall heat transfer in a turbulent three-dimensional flow superimposed with local large-scale periodic unsteadiness generated by vortex shedding from the cylinder. Direct measurements of the Reynolds heat fluxes (/line{utheta},\\ /line{vtheta}\\ and\\ /line{wtheta}) and time-resolved wall heat transfer rate will provide insight into unsteady flow behavior and data for advanced turbulence models for numerical simulation of complex engineering flows. Experiments were conducted in an open-circuit, low-speed wind tunnel. Reynolds stresses and heat fluxes were obtained from turbulent heat-flux probes which consisted of two hot wires, arranged in an X-wire configuration, and a cold wire located in front of the X-wire. Thin-film surface heat flux sensors were designed for measuring time-resolved wall heat flux. A reference probe and conditional-sampling technique connected the flow field dynamics to wall heat transfer. An event detecting and ensemble-averaging method was developed to separate effects of unsteadiness from those of background turbulence. Results indicate that unsteadiness affects both heat transport and wall heat transfer. The flow behind the cylinder can be characterized by three regions: (1) Wake region, where unsteadiness is observed to have modest effect; (2) Unsteady region, where the strongest unsteadiness effect is found; (3) Outer region, where the flow approaches the two-dimensional boundary-layer behavior. Vortex shedding from both sides of the cylinder contributes to mixing enhancement in the wake region. Unsteadiness contributes up to 51% of vertical and 59% of spanwise turbulent heat fluxes in the unsteady region. The

  20. Experimental investigation of convection heat transfer of CO{sub 2} at supercritical pressures in a vertical circular tube

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Zhi-Hui; Jiang, Pei-Xue; Zhao, Chen-Ru; Zhang, Yu.

    2010-11-15

    The convection heat transfer characteristics of supercritical CO{sub 2} in a vertical circular tube of 2 mm inner diameter were investigated experimentally for pressures ranging from 78 to 95 bar, inlet temperatures from 25 to 40 C, and inlet Reynolds numbers from 3800 to 20,000. The effects of the heat flux, thermo-physical properties, buoyancy and thermal acceleration on the convection heat transfer were analyzed. The experimental results show that for high inlet Reynolds numbers (e.g. Re = 9000) and high heat fluxes, a significant local deterioration and recovery of the heat transfer was found for upward flows but not for downward flows. Comparison of the experimental data for inlet Reynolds numbers from 3800 to 20,000 with some well-known empirical correlations showed large differences especially when the heat transfer deteriorates and then recovers when the effect of buoyancy is significant. The experimental data was used to develop modified local turbulent Nusselt number correlations for supercritical CO{sub 2} flowing in vertical small circular tubes. (author)

  1. Effects of Yaw on the Heat Transfer to a Blunt Cone-Cylinder Configuration at a Mach Number of 1.98

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    English, Roland D.

    1958-01-01

    A heat-transfer investigation has been made on a blunt cone-cylinder model at a Mach number of 1.98 at yaw angles from 0 deg to 9 deg. The results indicate that, except for the hemispherical nose, the heat-transfer coefficient increased on the windward side and decreased on the leeward side as yaw angle was increased. In general, the increase in heat transfer on the windward side was higher than the corresponding decrease on the leeward side. A comparison with theory (NACA Technical Note 4208) yielded agreement which was, in general, within 10 percent on the cone at all test conditions and on the cylinder at an angle of yaw of 0 deg.

  2. Design and fabrication of circular and rectangular components for electron-cyclotron-resonant heating of tandem mirror experiment-upgrade

    SciTech Connect

    Felker, B.; Calderon, M.O.; Chargin, A.K.; Coffield, F.E.; Lang, D.D.; Rubert, R.R.; Pedrotti, L.R.; Stallard, B.W.; Gallagher, N.C. Jr.; Sweeney, D.W.

    1983-11-18

    The electron-cyclotron-resonant heating (ECRH) systems of rectangular waveguides on Tandem Mirror Experiment-Upgrade (TMX-U) operated with a overall efficiency of 50%, each system using a 28-GHz, 200-kW pulsed gyrotron. We designed and built four circular-waveguide systems with greater efficiency and greater power-handling capabilities to replace the rectangular waveguides. Two of these circular systems, at the 5-kG second-harmonic heating locations, have a total transmission efficiency of >90%. The two systems at the 10-kG fundamental heating locations have a total transmission efficiency of 80%. The difference in efficiency is due to the additional components required to launch the microwaves in the desired orientation and polarization with respect to magnetic-field lines at the 10-kG points. These systems handle the total power available from each gyrotron but do not have the arcing limitation problem of the rectangular waveguide. Each system requires several complex components. The overall physical layout and the design considerations for the rectangular and circular waveguide components are described here.

  3. Vortex-induced vibration for an isolated circular cylinder under the wake interference of an oscillating airfoil: Part II. Single degree of freedom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, G. Q.; Ji, L. C.; Hu, X.

    2017-04-01

    The vortex-induced vibration behind an isolated cylinder under the wake interference of an oscillating airfoil at different oscillating frequencies and amplitudes have been studied numerically. Our previous research [11] mainly focused on the two degree of freedom vibration problem, several types of the phase portraits of the displacement have been newly found, including the "half -8″ and "cone-net" types as reduced velocity increases. At present, we have continued the research to the single degree of freedom vibration, the corresponding results had been found that under the wake of the free steady flow, as the reduced velocity increases, the phase portraits displacements of the single degree of freedom vibrating cylinder will begin to rotate counterclockwise from the first and third quadrants to the second and fourth quadrants in a Cartesian coordinate system. Under the wake of the oscillating airfoil, the single bending curve and the single closed orbit (double ;8-shape; like) of the displacements are newly found in the drag and thrust producing cases respectively. Except this, the two triplets of vortices have also been newly found in the pair and single plus pair wakes at each cycle. The vorticity dynamics behind the vibrating cylinder together with the corresponding force variations have also been obtained computationally and analyzed in details.

  4. Cooling Characteristics of the V-1650-7 Engine. 1; Coolant-Flow Distribution, Cylinder Temperatures, and Heat Rejections at Typical Operating Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Povolny, John H.; Bogdan, Louis J.

    1947-01-01

    An investigation was conducted to determine the coolant-flow distribu tion, the cylinder temperatures, and the heat rejections of the V-165 0-7 engine . The tests were run a t several power levels varying from minimum fuel consumption to war emergency power and at each power l evel the coolant flows corresponded to the extremes of those likely t o be encountered in typical airplane installations, A mixture of 30-p ercent ethylene glycol and 70-percent water was used as the coolant. The temperature of each cylinder was measured between the exhaust val ves, between the intake valves, in the center of the head, on the exh aust-valve guide, at the top of the barrel on the exhaust side, and o n each exhaust spark-plug gasket. For an increase in engine power fro m 628 to approximately 1700 brake horsepower the average temperature for the cylinder heads between the exhaust valves increased from 437 deg to 517 deg F, the engine coolant heat rejection increased from 12 ,600 to 22,700 Btu. per minute, the oil heat rejection increased from 1030 to 4600 Btu per minute, and the aftercooler-coolant heat reject ion increased from 450 to 3500 Btu -per minute.

  5. Mixed convection through vertical porous annuli locally heated from the inner cylinder

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, C.Y. ); Kulacki, F.A. )

    1992-02-01

    The purpose of the present study is to examine the influence of both aiding and opposing external flows on the buoyancy-induced natural convection in vertical porous annuli. The effects of radius ratio are taken into account in a numerical study. Measurements of heat transfer coefficients in aiding and opposing flows cover the free to forced convective heat transfer regimes. Mixed convection in a vertical annulus filled with a saturated porous medium is numerically and experimentally investigated. Calculations are carried out under the traditional Darcy assumptions and cover the ranges 10 {le} Ra {le} 200 and 0.01 {le} Pe {le} 200. Both numerical and experimental results show that the Nusselt number increases with either Ra or Pe when the imposed flow is in the same direction as the buoyancy-induced flow. When the imposed flow opposes buoyancy-induced flow, the Nusselt number first decreases with an increase of the Peclet number and reaches a minimum before increasing again. Under certain circumstances, the Nusselt number for a lower Rayleigh number may exceed that for larger value. Nusselt numbers are correlated by the parameter groups Nu/Pe{sup 1/2} and Ra/Pe{sup 3/2}. Good agreement exists between measured and predicted Nusselt numbers, and the occurrence of a minimum Nusselt number in mean flow that opposes buoyancy is verified experimentally.

  6. Calculation of Flow Fields from Bow-Wave Profiles for the Downstream Region of Blunt-Nosed Circular Cylinders in Axial Hypersonic Flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seiff, Alvin; Whiting, Ellis E.

    1961-01-01

    A method by which known bow-wave profiles may be analyzed to give the flow fields around blunt-nosed cylinders in axial hypersonic flow is presented. In the method, the assumption is made that the pressure distribution curve in a transverse plane is similar to that given by blast- wave theory. Numerical analysis based on the one-dimensional energy and continuity equations then leads to distributions of all the flow variables in the cross section, for either a perfect gas or a real gas. The entire flow field need not be solved. Attention can be confined to any desired station. The critical question is the validity of the above assumption. It is tested for the case of a hemisphere cylinder in flight at 20,000 ft/sec. The flow is analyzed for three stations along the cylindrical afterbody, and found to compare very closely with the results of an exact (inviscid) solution. The assumed form of the pressure distribution occurs at stations as close as 1.2 diameters to the body nose. However, it is suggested that the assumption may not apply this far forward in general, particularly when bodies of nonsmooth contour are considered.

  7. Fast ignition of precompressed DT fuel placed in an absolutely rigid heat-insulated cylinder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charakhch'yan, A. A.; Khishchenko, K. V.

    2016-11-01

    A two-dimensional axisymmetric problem on fast ignition of a cylindrical target of precompressed DT-mixture surrounded by a stationary heat-insulated shell is considered. The target end is ignited with a proton beam, the intensity of which is independent of the radial coordinate. Self-radiation of plasma and α-particles of the thermonuclear reaction freely escape out of the fuel through the lateral boundary of the shell. It is shown that the ignition energy threshold for the mixture density 22 and 110 g/cm3 about 10 times less than in the case of the known problem with the radius of the beam much less than the radius of fuel. Previously developed quasi-one-dimensional model underestimates the ignition energy threshold by the target radius about 4 times in comparison with the problem under consideration. Estimates for the magnetic field and the shell density at which the corresponding problems are in some sense close to the problem under consideration are presented.

  8. Surface flow and heating distributions on a cylinder in near wake of Aeroassist Flight Experiment (AFE) configuration at incidence in Mach 10 Air

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wells, William L.

    1990-01-01

    Experimental heat transfer distributions and surface streamline directions are presented for a cylinder in the near wake of the Aeroassist Flight Experiment forebody configuration. Tests were conducted in air at a nominal free stream Mach number of 10, with post shock Reynolds numbers based on model base height of 6,450 to 50,770, and angles of attack of 5, 0, -5, and -10 degrees. Heat transfer data were obtained with thin film resistance gage and surface streamline directions by the oil flow technique. Comparisons between measured values and predicted values were made by using a Navier-Stokes computer code.

  9. Numerical analysis of convective heat transfer of nanofluids in circular ducts with two-phase mixture model approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sert, İsmail Ozan; Sezer-Uzol, Nilay

    2016-09-01

    Computational fluid dynamics simulations for initially hydro-dynamically fully developed laminar flow with nanofluids in a circular duct under constant wall temperature condition are performed with two-phase mixture model by using Fluent software. Thermal behaviors of the system are investigated for constant wall temperature condition for Al2O3/water nanofluid. Hamilton-Crosser model and the Brownian motion effect are used for the thermal conductivity model of nanofluid instead of the Fluent default model for mixtures which gives extraordinary high thermal conductivity values and is valid for macro systems. Also, thermal conductivity and viscosity of the base fluid are taken as temperature dependent. The effects of nanoparticle volume fraction, nanoparticle size, and inlet Peclet number on the heat transfer enhancement are investigated. The results are compared with single-phase results which give slightly lower heat transfer coefficient values than the results of two-phase mixture model.

  10. Experimental investigation of convective heat transfer agumentation using Al2O3/water nanofluid in circular pipe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chavan, Durgeshkumar; Pise, Ashok T.

    2015-09-01

    In the present paper, experimental study is performed to investigate convective heat transfer and flow characteristics of nanofluids through a circular tube. The heat transfer coefficient and friction factor of the γ-Al2O3-water nanofluid flowing through a pipe of 10 mm inner ID and 1 m in length, with constant wall temperature under turbulent flow conditions are investigated. Experiments are conducted with 30 nm size γ-Al2O3 nanoparticle with a volume fraction between 0.1 and to 1.0 and Reynolds number between 8,000 and 14,000. Experimental results emphasize the heat transfer enhancement with the increase in a Reynolds number or nanoparticle volume fraction. The maximum enhancement of 36 % in the heat transfer coefficient for a Reynolds number of 8,550, by using nanofluid with 1.0 vol% was observed compared with base fluid. Experimental measurement also shows the considerable increase in the pressure drop with small addition of nanoparticles in base fluid. Experimental results of nanofluids were compared with existing convective heat transfer correlations in the turbulent regime. Comparison shows that Maiga's correlation has close agreement with experimental results in comparison with Dittus Boelter correlation.

  11. CFD analysis of heat transfer and friction factor charaterstics in a circular tube fitted with horizontal baffles twisted tape inserts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salman, Sami D.; Kadhum, Abdul Amir H.; Takriff, Mohd S.; Bakar Mohamad, Abu

    2013-12-01

    Swirl/vortex flow generator is an important form of passive augmentation techniques. Twisted-tape is one of the most important members of this form which is used extensively in different type heat exchangers. This paper reports the effect of twisted tape inserts on heat transfer and friction factor characteristics in circular tube under constant heat flux and laminar flow conditions using CFD simulation. Plain twisted tape inserts with twist ratios (y = 2.93, 3.91) and baffled twisted tape inserts with twist ratio (y = 2.93) have been used for the simulation using Fluent version 6.3.26. The results obtained by simulation matched with the literature correlations for plain tube with the discrepancy of less than ± 8% for Nusselt number and ± 6.25% for friction factor. The results have also revealed that the heat transfer in term of the Nusselt number enhanced with increases of Reynolds number, decreases of twist ratio and baffle insert. Among the various twist ratios, the twisted tape with twist ratio of y=2.93 and baffle is offered a maximum heat transfer enhancement.

  12. Cooling Characteristics of the V-1650-7 Engine. II - Effect of Coolant Conditions on Cylinder Temperatures and Heat Rejection at Several Engine Powers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Povolny, John H.; Bogdan, Louis J.; Chelko, Louis J.

    1947-01-01

    An investigation has been conducted on a V-1650-7 engine to determine the cylinder temperatures and the coolant and oil heat rejections over a range of coolant flows (50 to 200 gal/min) and oil inlet temperatures (160 to 2150 F) for two values of coolant outlet temperature (250 deg and 275 F) at each of four power conditions ranging from approximately 1100 to 2000 brake horsepower. Data were obtained for several values of block-outlet pressure at each of the two coolant outlet temperatures. A mixture of 30 percent by volume of ethylene glycol and 70-percent water was used as the coolant. The effect of varying coolant flow, coolant outlet temperature, and coolant outlet pressure over the ranges investigated on cylinder-head temperatures was small (0 deg to 25 F) whereas the effect of increasing the engine power condition from ll00 to 2000 brake horsepower was large (maximum head-temperature increase, 110 F).

  13. Minor ion heating in spectra of linearly and circularly polarized Alfvén waves: Thermal and non-thermal motions associated with perpendicular heating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Chuanfei

    2014-02-01

    Minor ion (such as He2+) heating via nonresonant interaction with spectra of linearly and circularly polarized Alfvén waves (LPAWs and CPAWs hereafter) is studied. The obtained analytic solutions are in good agreement with the simulation results, indicating that newborn ions are heated by low-frequency Alfvén waves with finite amplitude in low-beta plasmas such as the solar corona. The analytic solutions also reproduce the preferential heating of heavy ions in the solar wind. In the presence of parallel propagating Alfvén waves, turbulence-induced particle motion is clearly observed in the wave (magnetic field) polarized directions. After the waves diminish, the newborn ions are heated, which is caused by the phase difference (randomization) between ions due to their different parallel thermal motions. The heating is dominant in the direction perpendicular to the ambient magnetic field. The perpendicular heating, η =(Ti⊥R-Ti0⊥R)/Ti0⊥R (where Ti0⊥R and Ti⊥R are the perpendicular temperature of species i before and after genuine heating, respectively), in the spectrum of CPAWs is a factor of two stronger than that of LPAWs. Moreover, we also study the effect of field-aligned differential flow speed of species i relative to H+, δvip=(vi-vp).B /|B| (where vi and vp denote vector velocities of the H+ and species i, respectively), on the perpendicular heating. It reveals that large drift speed, vd=δvip, has an effect on reducing the efficiency of perpendicular heating, which is consistent with observations.

  14. Heat transfer in turbulent decaying swirl flow in a circular pipe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Algifri, A. H.; Bhardwaj, R. K.; Rao, Y. V. N.

    1988-08-01

    Heat transfer coefficients for air are measured along a heated pipe for decaying swirl flow, generated by radial blade cascade. The results are compared with an expression proposed for predicting the heat transfer coefficients in swirling flow. The theoretical predictions are in good agreement with the experimental data, with average and maximum deviations of 7 and 11 percent, respectively. The application of the theoretical approach to the experimental results obtained by other investigators for heat transfer in a decaying swirl flow generated by short-twisted tapes and tangential slots at inlet also give rise to encouraging agreement.

  15. Potential Remedies for the High Synchrotron-Radiation-Induced Heat Load for Future Highest-Energy-Proton Circular Colliders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cimino, R.; Baglin, V.; Schäfers, F.

    2015-12-01

    We propose a new method for handling the high synchrotron radiation (SR) induced heat load of future circular hadron colliders (like FCC-hh). FCC-hh are dominated by the production of SR, which causes a significant heat load on the accelerator walls. Removal of such a heat load in the cold part of the machine, as done in the Large Hadron Collider, will require more than 100 MW of electrical power and a major cooling system. We studied a totally different approach, identifying an accelerator beam screen whose illuminated surface is able to forward reflect most of the photons impinging onto it. Such a reflecting beam screen will transport a significant part of this heat load outside the cold dipoles. Then, in room temperature sections, it could be more efficiently dissipated. Here we will analyze the proposed solution and address its full compatibility with all other aspects an accelerator beam screen must fulfill to keep under control beam instabilities as caused by electron cloud formation, impedance, dynamic vacuum issues, etc. If experimentally fully validated, a highly reflecting beam screen surface will provide a viable and solid solution to be eligible as a baseline design in FCC-hh projects to come, rendering them more cost effective and sustainable.

  16. Forced and mixed convection heat transfer to supercritical CO{sub 2} vertically flowing in a uniformly-heated circular tube

    SciTech Connect

    Bae, Yoon-Yeong; Kim, Hwan-Yeol; Kang, Deog-Ji

    2010-11-15

    An experiment of heat transfer to CO{sub 2}, which flows upward and downward in a circular tube with an inner diameter of 6.32 mm, was carried out with mass flux of 285-1200 kg/m{sup 2} s and heat flux of 30-170 kW/m{sup 2} at pressures of 7.75 and 8.12 MPa, respectively. The corresponding Reynolds number at the tube test section inlet ranges from 1.8 x 10{sup 4} to 3.8 x 10{sup 5}. The tube inner diameter corresponds to the equivalent hydraulic diameter of the fuel assembly sub-channel, which is being studied at KAERI. Among the tested correlations, the Bishop correlation predicted the experimental data most accurately, but only 66.9% of normal heat transfer data were predicted within {+-}30% error range. The Watts and Chou correlation, which is claimed to be valid for both the normal and deteriorated heat transfer regime, showed unsatisfactory performance. A significant decrease in Nusselt number was observed in the range of 10{sup -6}heat transfer deterioration regime. The heat transfer deteriorated when the value of the buoyancy parameter Gr{sub b}/Re{sub b}{sup 2.7} exceeded 2.0 x 10{sup -5} close to the Jackson and Hall's criterion. As soon as the heat transfer deteriorated, it entered a new regime and did not return to a normal heat transfer regime, although the value of buoyancy parameter Gr{sub b}/Re{sub b}{sup 2.7} reduced below the deterioration criterion 2.0 x 10{sup -5}. It may justify the requirement of developing separate correlations for the normal and deterioration regimes, as proposed in this paper. (author)

  17. Dual stratified mixed convection flow of Eyring-Powell fluid over an inclined stretching cylinder with heat generation/absorption effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rehman, Khalil Ur; Malik, M. Y.; Salahuddin, T.; Naseer, M.

    2016-07-01

    Present work is made to study the effects of double stratified medium on the mixed convection boundary layer flow of Eyring-Powell fluid induced by an inclined stretching cylinder. Flow analysis is conceded in the presence of heat generation/absorption. Temperature and concentration are supposed to be higher than ambient fluid across the surface of cylinder. The arising flow conducting system of partial differential equations is primarily transformed into coupled non-linear ordinary differential equations with the aid of suitable transformations. Numerical solutions of resulting intricate non-linear boundary value problem are computed successfully by utilizing fifth order Runge-Kutta algorithm with shooting technique. The effect logs of physical flow controlling parameters on velocity, temperature and concentration profiles are examined graphically. Further, numerical findings are obtained for two distinct cases namely, zero (plate) and non-zero (cylinder) values of curvature parameter and the behaviour are presented through graphs for skin-friction coefficient, Nusselt number and Sherwood number. The current analysis is validated by developing comparison with previously published work, which sets a benchmark of quality of numerical approach.

  18. Correlating equations for impingement cooling of small heat sources with multiple circular liquid jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Womac, D. J.; Incropera, F. P.; Ramadhyani, S.

    1994-05-01

    Experiments were performed to investigate single-phase heat transfer from a 12.7 mm x 12.7 mm heat source to 2 x 2 and 3 x 3 arrays of free-surface and submerged jets. The objective was to study the efficacy of using arrays of free surface or submerged liquid jets to cool a small, chip-like heat source. The data are correlated by obtaining area-weighted combinations of separate correlations associated with impingement and wall jet region.

  19. Monoenergetic acceleration of a target foil by circularly polarized laser pulse in RPA regime without thermal heating

    SciTech Connect

    Khudik, V.; Yi, S. A.; Siemon, C.; Shvets, G.

    2012-12-21

    A kinetic model of the monoenergetic acceleration of a target foil irradiated by the circularly polarized laser pulse is developed. The target moves without thermal heating with constant acceleration which is provided by chirping the frequency of the laser pulse and correspondingly increasing its intensity. In the accelerated reference frame, bulk plasma in the target is neutral and its parameters are stationary: cold ions are immobile while nonrelativistic electrons bounce back and forth inside the potential well formed by ponderomotive and electrostatic potentials. It is shown that a positive charge left behind of the moving target in the ion tail and a negative charge in front of the target in the electron sheath form a capacitor whose constant electric field accelerates the ions of the target. The charge separation is maintained by the radiation pressure pushing electrons forward. The scalings of the target thickness and electromagnetic radiation with the electron temperature are found.

  20. Studies on wake-affected heat transfer around the circular leading edge of blunt body

    SciTech Connect

    Funazaki, K.

    1996-07-01

    Detailed measurements are performed about time-averaged heat transfer distributions around the leading edge of a blunt body, which is affected by incoming periodic wakes from the upstream moving bars. The blunt body is a test model of a front portion of a turbine blade in gas turbines and consists of a semicircular cylindrical leading edge and a flat plate afterbody. A wide range of the steady and unsteady flow conditions are adopted as for the Reynolds number based on the diameter of the leading edge and the bar-passing Strouhal number. The measured heat transfer distributions indicate that the wakes passing over the leading edge cause a significant increase in heat transfer before the separation and the higher Strouhal number results in higher heat transfer. From this experiment, a correlation for the heat transfer enhancement around the leading edge due to the periodic wakes is deduced as a function of the Stanton number and it is reviewed by comparison with the other experimental works.

  1. Axial cylinder internal combustion engine

    SciTech Connect

    Gonzalez, C.

    1992-03-10

    This patent describes improvement in a barrel type internal combustion engine including an engine block having axial-positioned cylinders with reciprocating pistons arranged in a circular pattern: a drive shaft concentrically positioned within the cylinder block having an offset portion extending outside the cylinder block; a wobble spider rotatably journaled to the offset portion; connecting rods for each cylinder connecting each piston to the wobble spider. The improvement comprising: a first sleeve bearing means supporting the drive shaft in the engine block in a cantilevered manner for radial loads; a second sleeve bearing means rotatably supporting the wobble spider on the offset portion of the drive shaft for radial loads; a first roller bearing means positioned between the offset portion of the drive shaft and the wobble spider carrying thrust loadings only; a second roller bearing means carrying thrust loads only reacting to the first roller bearing located on the opposite end of the driveshaft between the shaft and the engine block.

  2. Correlation of cylinder-head temperatures and coolant heat rejections of a multicylinder, liquid-cooled engine of 1710-cubic-inch displacement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lundin, Bruce T; Povolny, John H; Chelko, Louis J

    1949-01-01

    Data obtained from an extensive investigation of the cooling characteristics of four multicylinder, liquid-cooled engines have been analyzed and a correlation of both the cylinder-head temperatures and the coolant heat rejections with the primary engine and coolant variables was obtained. The method of correlation was previously developed by the NACA from an analysis of the cooling processes involved in a liquid-cooled-engine cylinder and is based on the theory of nonboiling, forced-convection heat transfer. The data correlated included engine power outputs from 275 to 1860 brake horsepower; coolant flows from 50 to 320 gallons per minute; coolants varying in composition from 100 percent water to 97 percent ethylene glycol and 3 percent water; and ranges of engine speed, manifold pressure, carburetor-air temperature, fuel-air ratio, exhaust-gas pressure, ignition timing, and coolant temperature. The effect on engine cooling of scale formation on the coolant passages of the engine and of boiling of the coolant under various operating conditions is also discussed.

  3. Calculations of Laminar Heat Transfer Around Cylinders of Arbitrary Cross Section and Transpiration-Cooled Walls with Application to Turbine Blade Cooling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eckert, E.R.G.; Livingood, John N.B.

    1951-01-01

    An approximate method for development of flow and thermal boundary layers in laminar regime on cylinders with arbitrary cross section and transpiration-cooled walls is obtained by use of Karman's integrated momentum equation and an analogous heat-flow equation. Incompressible flow with constant property values throughout boundary layer is assumed. Shape parameters for approximated velocity and temperature profiles and functions necessary for solution of boundary-layer equations are presented as charts, reducing calculations to a minimum. The method is applied to determine local heat-transfer coefficients and surface temperature-cooled turbine blades for a given flow rate. Coolant flow distributions necessary for maintaining uniform blade temperatures are also determined.

  4. Heat transfer characteristics of a single circular air jet impinging on a concave hemispherical shell

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Livingood, J. N. B.; Gauntner, J. W.

    1973-01-01

    An experimental study was made of the local and average heat-transfer characteristics of a single turbulent air jet impinging on the concave surface of a hemisphere. Correlations were developed for expressing the effects of a number of dimensionless variables on the local and average Nusselt numbers. Results of the present study are compared with those from a similar study concerning a concave surface of a semicylindrical shell.

  5. Modeling of heat transfer and fluid flow for decaying swirl flow in a circular pipe

    SciTech Connect

    Bali, T.

    1998-04-01

    The economic benefits of energy and material savings have prompted and received greatest attention in order to increase convective heat transfer rates in the process equipment. In the present study, a propeller type swirl generator was developed, and its effects on heat transfer and fluid flow were investigated numerically and experimentally for air flow in a pipe. In the numerical study, for axisymmetrically, incompressible turbulent swirl flows, the Navier-Stokes equations were solved using the {kappa}-{var_epsilon} turbulent model. So that a computer program in Fortran was constructed using the SIMPLEC Algorithm. In experimental work, axial and tangential velocity distributions behind the swirl generator were measured by using hot-wire anemometry. Experimental and numerical axial and tangential velocity distributions along the pipe were compared, and good agreement was found. Axial velocity profile showed a decrement in the central portion of the pipe and an increased axial velocity was seen in near the wall. Tangential velocity profiles had a maximum value and its location moved in radially with distance. The effects of swirl flow on the heat transfer and pressure drop were also investigated experimentally.

  6. Global aerodynamic instability of twin cylinders in cross flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alam, Md. Mahbub; Meyer, J. P.

    2013-08-01

    This paper comprises an in-depth physical discussion of the flow-induced vibration of two circular cylinders in view of the time-mean lift force on stationary cylinders and interaction mechanisms. The gap-spacing ratio T/D is varied from 0.1 to 5 and the attack angle α from 0° to 180° where T is the gap width between the cylinders and D is the diameter of a cylinder. Mechanisms of interaction between two cylinders are discussed based on time-mean lift, fluctuating lift, flow structures and flow-induced responses. The whole regime is classified into seven interaction regimes, i.e., no interaction regime; boundary layer and cylinder interaction regime; shear-layer/wake and cylinder interaction regime; shear-layer and shear-layer interaction regime; vortex and cylinder interaction regime; vortex and shear-layer interaction regime; and vortex and vortex interaction regime. Though a single non-interfering circular cylinder does not correspond to a galloping following quasi-steady galloping theory, two circular cylinders experience violent galloping vibration due to shear-layer/wake and cylinder interaction as well as boundary layer and cylinder interaction. A larger magnitude of fluctuating lift communicates to a larger amplitude vortex excitation.

  7. CFD simulation of the effect of particle size on the nanofluids convective heat transfer in the developed region in a circular tube.

    PubMed

    Davarnejad, Reza; Barati, Sara; Kooshki, Maryam

    2013-12-01

    The CFD simulation of heat transfer characteristics of a nanofluid in a circular tube under constant heat flux was considered using Fluent software (version 6.3.26) in the laminar flow. Al2O3 nanoparticles in water with concentrations of 0.5%, 1.0%, 1.5%, 2% and 2.5% were used in this simulation. All of the thermo-physical properties of nanofluids were assumed to be temperature independent. Two particle sizes with average size of 20 and 50 nm were used in this research. It was concluded that heat transfer coefficient increased by increasing the Reynolds number and the concentration of nanoparticles. The maximum convective heat transfer coefficient was observed at the highest concentration of nano-particles in water (2.5%). Furthermore, the two nanofluids showed higher heat transfer than the base fluid (water) although the nanofluid with particles size of 20 nm had the highest heat transfer coefficient.

  8. Light-intensity modulator withstands high heat fluxes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maples, H. G.; Strass, H. K.

    1966-01-01

    Mechanism modulates and controls the intensity of luminous radiation in light beams associated with high-intensity heat flux. This modulator incorporates two fluid-cooled, externally grooved, contracting metal cylinders which when rotated about their longitudinal axes present a circular aperture of varying size depending on the degree of rotation.

  9. Stabilization of flow past a rounded cylinder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samtaney, Ravi; Zhang, Wei

    2016-11-01

    We perform global linear stability analysis on low-Re flow past a rounded cylinder. The cylinder corners are rounded with a radius R, normalized as R+ = R / D where D is the cylinder diameter, and its effect on the flow stability characteristics is investigated. We compute the critical Reynolds number (Recr) for the onset of first instability, and quantify the perturbation growth rate for the super-critical flows. It is found that the flow can be stabilized by partially rounding the cylinder. Compared with the square and circular cylinders, the partially rounded cylinder has a higher Recr , attaining a maximum at around R+ = 0 . 30 , and the perturbation growth rate of the super-critical flows is reduced for Re <= 100 . We perform sensitivity analysis to explore the source of the stabilization. The growth rate sensitivity to base flow modification has two different spatial structures: the growth rate is sensitive to the wake backflow in a large region for square-like cylinders (R+ -> 0 . 00), while only the near-wake backflow is crucial for circular-like cylinders (R+ -> 0 . 50). The stability analysis results are also verified with those of the direct simulations and very good agreement is achieved. Supported by the KAUST Office of Competitive Research Funds under Award No. URF/1/1394-01. The supercomputer Shaheen at KAUST was utilized for the simulations.

  10. Measurements of Heat Transfer and Boundary-Layer Transition on an 8-Inch-Diameter Hemisphere-Cylinder in Free Flight for a Mach Number Range of 2.00 to 3.88

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garland, Benjamine J.; Chauvin, Leo T.

    1957-01-01

    Measurements of aerodynamic heat transfer have been made along the hemisphere and cylinder of a hemisphere-cylinder rocket-propelled model in free flight up to a Mach number of 3.88. The test Reynolds number based on free-stream condition and diameter of model covered a range from 2.69 x l0(exp 6) to 11.70 x 10(exp 6). Laminar, transitional, and turbulent heat-transfer coefficients were obtained. The laminar data along the body agreed with laminar theory for blunt bodies whereas the turbulent data along the cylinder were consistently lower than that predicted by the turbulent theory for a flat plate. Measurements of heat transfer at the stagnation point were, in general, lower than the theory for stagnation-point heat transfer. When the Reynolds number to the junction of the hemisphere-cylinder was greater than 6 x l0(exp 6), the transitional Reynolds number varied from 0.8 x l0(exp 6) to 3.0 x 10(exp 6); however, than 6 x l(exp 6) when the Reynolds number to the junction was less, than the transitional Reynolds number varied from 7.0 x l0(exp 6) to 24.7 x 10(exp 6).

  11. CFD Analysis to Study Effect of Circular Vortex Generator Placed in Inlet Section to Investigate Heat Transfer Aspects of Solar Air Heater

    PubMed Central

    Gawande, Vipin B.; Dhoble, A. S.; Zodpe, D. B.

    2014-01-01

    CFD analysis of 2-dimensional artificially roughened solar air heater duct with additional circular vortex generator, inserted in inlet section is carried out. Circular transverse ribs on the absorber plate are placed as usual. The analysis is done to investigate the effect of inserting additional vortex generator on the heat transfer and flow friction characteristics inside the solar air heater duct. This investigation covers relative roughness pitch in the range of 10 ≤ P/e ≤ 25 and relevant Reynolds numbers in the range of 3800 ≤ Re ≤ 18000. Relative roughness height (e/D) is kept constant as 0.03 for analysis. The turbulence created due to additional circular vortex generator increases the heat transfer rate and at the same time there is also increase in friction factor values. For combined arrangement of ribs and vortex generator, maximum Nusselt number is found to be 2.05 times that of the smooth duct. The enhancement in Nusselt number with ribs and additional vortex generator is found to be 1.06 times that of duct using ribs alone. The maximum increase in friction factor with ribs and circular vortex generator is found to be 2.91 times that of the smooth duct. Friction factor in a combined arrangement is 1.114 times that in a duct with ribs alone on the absorber plate. The augmentation in Thermal Enhancement Factor (TEF) with vortex generator in inlet section is found to be 1.06 times more than with circular ribs alone on the absorber plate. PMID:25254251

  12. CFD analysis to study effect of circular vortex generator placed in inlet section to investigate heat transfer aspects of solar air heater.

    PubMed

    Gawande, Vipin B; Dhoble, A S; Zodpe, D B

    2014-01-01

    CFD analysis of 2-dimensional artificially roughened solar air heater duct with additional circular vortex generator, inserted in inlet section is carried out. Circular transverse ribs on the absorber plate are placed as usual. The analysis is done to investigate the effect of inserting additional vortex generator on the heat transfer and flow friction characteristics inside the solar air heater duct. This investigation covers relative roughness pitch in the range of 10 ≤ P/e ≤ 25 and relevant Reynolds numbers in the range of 3800 ≤ Re ≤ 18000. Relative roughness height (e/D) is kept constant as 0.03 for analysis. The turbulence created due to additional circular vortex generator increases the heat transfer rate and at the same time there is also increase in friction factor values. For combined arrangement of ribs and vortex generator, maximum Nusselt number is found to be 2.05 times that of the smooth duct. The enhancement in Nusselt number with ribs and additional vortex generator is found to be 1.06 times that of duct using ribs alone. The maximum increase in friction factor with ribs and circular vortex generator is found to be 2.91 times that of the smooth duct. Friction factor in a combined arrangement is 1.114 times that in a duct with ribs alone on the absorber plate. The augmentation in Thermal Enhancement Factor (TEF) with vortex generator in inlet section is found to be 1.06 times more than with circular ribs alone on the absorber plate.

  13. Calculations of Laminar Heat Transfer Around Cylinders of Arbitrary Cross Section and Transpiration-Cooled Walls with Application to Turbine Blade Cooling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eckert, E R G; Livingood, J N B

    1955-01-01

    An approximate method for the development of flow and thermal boundary layers in the laminar region on cylinders with arbitrary cross section and transpiration-cooled walls is obtained by the use of Karman's integrated momentum equation and an analogous heat-flow equation. Incompressible flow with constant property values throughout the boundary layer is assumed. The velocity and temperature profiles within the boundary layer are approximated by expressions composed of trigonometric functions. Shape parameters for these profiles and functions necessary for the solution of the boundary-layer equations are presented as graphs so that the calculation for any specific case is reduced to the solution of two first-order differential equations. This method is applied to determine local heat-transfer coefficients and surface temperatures in the laminar flow region of the transpiration-cooled turbine blades for a given coolant flow rate, or to calculate the coolant flow distribution which is necessary in order to keep the blade temperature uniform along the surface.

  14. Circular Coinduction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosu, Grigore; Goguen, Joseph; Norvig, Peter (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Circular coinduction is a technique for behavioral reasoning that extends cobasis coinduction to specifications with circularities. Because behavioral satisfaction is not recursively enumerable, no algorithm can work for every behavioral statement. However. algorithms using circular coinduction can prove every practical behavioral result that we know. This paper proves the correctness of circular coinduction and some consequences.

  15. Static Pressure Distribution on Long Cylinders as Function of Angle of Yaw and Reynolds Number,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-07-01

    pressure coefficient around a perpendicularly aligned cylinder xiv 1. INTRODUCTION The problem addressed in this investigation is that of the static...pressure distribution developed on the surface of a long circular cylinder immersed in a laminar flow at small angles of yaw. The interest in this problem ...cylinder. The problem of flow over yawed cylinders or cylinders at angle of attack first attracted attention in the 1950’s. At that time, r esearch was

  16. Relativistic currents on ideal Aharonov-Bohm cylinders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cotăescu, Ion I.; Băltăţeanu, Doru-Marcel S.; Cotăescu, Ion I.

    2016-06-01

    The relativistic theory of the Dirac fermions moving on cylinders in external Aharonov-Bohm (AB) field is built starting with a suitably restricted Dirac equation whose spin degrees of freedom are not affected. The exact solutions of this equation on finite or infinite AB cylinders allow one to derive the relativistic circular and longitudinal currents pointing out their principal features. It is shown that all the circular currents are related to the energy in the same manner on cylinders or rings either in the relativistic approach or in the nonrelativistic one. The specific relativistic effect is the saturation of the circular currents for high values of the total angular momentum. Based on this property some approximative closed formulas are deduced for the total persistent current at T = 0 on finite AB cylinders. Moreover, it is shown that all the persistent currents on finite cylinders or rings have similar nonrelativistic limits.

  17. Model of laser/composite interaction based on scattering by multiple cylinders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dedieu, Cyril; Chinesta, Francisco; Barasinski, Anaïs; Leygue, Adrien; Dupillier, Jean-Marc

    2016-10-01

    In the context of processing long-fiber reinforced thermoplastic composites with laser-heating, the spatial distribution of the heat flux is one of the main parameters which controls the induced processing temperature. Unfortunately, the illuminated geometry might be not trivial, and the optical properties related to absorption and scattering phenomena of such a material are not well-established. In order to study and characterize the laser/composite interaction at the scale of the micro-structure, a model based on multiple cylinders is envisaged. The method consists in the calculation of a semi-analytical solution for the electromagnetic scattering from an array of circular cylinders due to an obliquely incident plane wave.

  18. Two interacting cylinders in cross flow.

    PubMed

    Alam, Md Mahbub; Meyer, J P

    2011-11-01

    Cylindrical structures in a group are frequently seen on land and in the ocean. Mutual flow interaction between the structures makes the wake very excited or tranquil depending on the spacing between the structures. The excited wake-enhancing forces in some cases cause a catastrophic failure of the structures. This paper presents results of an experimental investigation of Strouhal number (St), time-mean, and fluctuating forces on, and flow structures around, two identical circular cylinders at stagger angle α = 0°-180° and gap-spacing ratio T/D=0.1-5, where T is the gap width between the cylinders, and D is the diameter of a cylinder. While forces were measured using a load cell, St was from spectral analysis of fluctuating pressures measured on the side surfaces of the cylinders. A flow visualization test was conducted to observe flow structures around the cylinders. Based on forces, St, and flow structures, 19 distinct flow categories in the ranges of α and T/D investigated are observed, including one quadristable flow, three kinds of tristable flows, and four kinds of bistable flows. The quadristable, tristable, and bistable flows ensue from instabilities of the gap flow, shear layers, vortices, separation bubbles, and wakes, engendering a strong jump or drop in forces and St of the cylinders. The two cylinders interact with each other in six different mechanisms, namely interaction between boundary layer and cylinder, shear layer or wake and cylinder, shear layer and shear layer, vortex and cylinder, vortex and shear layer, and vortex and vortex. While the interaction between vortex and cylinder results in a very high fluctuating drag, that between vortex and shear layer results in a high fluctuating lift. On the other hand, the interaction between shear layer or wake and cylinder weakens mean and fluctuating forces and flow unsteadiness. A mutual discussion of forces, St, and flow structures is presented in this paper.

  19. Behavior in normal and reduced gravity of an enclosed liquid/gas system with nonuniform heating from above

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ross, H. D.; Schiller, D. N.; Disimile, P.; Sirignano, W. A.

    1989-01-01

    The temperature and velocity fields have been investigated for a single-phase gas system and a two-layer gas-and-liquid system enclosed in a circular cylinder being heated suddenly and nonuniformly from above. The transient response of the gas, liquid, and container walls was modelled numerically in normal and reduced gravity (10 to the -5 g). Verification of the model was accomplished via flow visualization experiments in 10 cm high by 10 cm diameter plexiglass cylinders.

  20. A Highly Efficient Six-Stroke Internal Combustion Engine Cycle with Water Injection for In-Cylinder Exhaust Heat Recovery

    SciTech Connect

    Conklin, Jim; Szybist, James P

    2010-01-01

    A concept is presented here that adds two additional strokes to the four-stroke Otto or Diesel cycle that has the potential to increase fuel efficiency of the basic cycle. The engine cycle can be thought of as a 4 stroke Otto or Diesel cycle followed by a 2-stroke heat recovery steam cycle. Early exhaust valve closing during the exhaust stroke coupled with water injection are employed to add an additional power stroke at the end of the conventional four-stroke Otto or Diesel cycle. An ideal thermodynamics model of the exhaust gas compression, water injection at top center, and expansion was used to investigate this modification that effectively recovers waste heat from both the engine coolant and combustion exhaust gas. Thus, this concept recovers energy from two waste heat sources of current engine designs and converts heat normally discarded to useable power and work. This concept has the potential of a substantial increase in fuel efficiency over existing conventional internal combustion engines, and under appropriate injected water conditions, increase the fuel efficiency without incurring a decrease in power density. By changing the exhaust valve closing angle during the exhaust stroke, the ideal amount of exhaust can be recompressed for the amount of water injected, thereby minimizing the work input and maximizing the mean effective pressure of the steam expansion stroke (MEPsteam). The value of this exhaust valve closing for maximum MEPsteam depends on the limiting conditions of either one bar or the dew point temperature of the expansion gas/moisture mixture when the exhaust valve opens to discard the spent gas mixture in the sixth stroke. The range of MEPsteam calculated for the geometry of a conventional gasoline spark-ignited internal combustion engine and for plausible water injection parameters is from 0.75 to 2.5 bars. Typical combustion mean effective pressures (MEPcombustion) of naturally aspirated gasoline engines are up to 10 bar, thus this

  1. Blower Cooling of Finned Cylinders

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schey, Oscar W; Ellerbrock, Herman H , Jr

    1937-01-01

    Several electrically heated finned steel cylinders enclosed in jackets were cooled by air from a blower. The effect of the air conditions and fin dimensions on the average surface heat-transfer coefficient q and the power required to force the air around the cylinders were determined. Tests were conducted at air velocities between the fins from 10 to 130 miles per hour and at specific weights of the air varying from 0.046 to 0.074 pound per cubic foot. The fin dimensions of the cylinders covered a range in pitches from 0.057 to 0.25 inch average fin thicknesses from 0.035 to 0.04 inch, and fin widths from 0.67 to 1.22 inches.

  2. Three-Dimensional Thermal Boundary Layer Corrections for Circular Heat Flux Gauges Mounted in a Flat Plate with a Surface Temperature Discontinuity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kandula, M.; Haddad, G. F.; Chen, R.-H.

    2006-01-01

    Three-dimensional Navier-Stokes computational fluid dynamics (CFD) analysis has been performed in an effort to determine thermal boundary layer correction factors for circular convective heat flux gauges (such as Schmidt-Boelter and plug type)mounted flush in a flat plate subjected to a stepwise surface temperature discontinuity. Turbulent flow solutions with temperature-dependent properties are obtained for a free stream Reynolds number of 1E6, and freestream Mach numbers of 2 and 4. The effect of gauge diameter and the plate surface temperature have been investigated. The 3-D CFD results for the heat flux correction factors are compared to quasi-21) results deduced from constant property integral solutions and also 2-D CFD analysis with both constant and variable properties. The role of three-dimensionality and of property variations on the heat flux correction factors has been demonstrated.

  3. Joule-heating power dissipation in a type-II superconductor tube.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Urban, E. W.

    1972-01-01

    The theoretical analysis of the Joule-heating power density in a specific hollow cylinder of a NbZr superconductor is presented. It is seen that the power density, which is the primary source of internal heating neglecting localized annihilation heating, can have a very complicated behavior, especially in the circular region. Rough estimates of the relative temperature changes are made, and the locations at which instabilities are more likely to initiate are considered.

  4. Experimental investigation of the unusual behavior of local heat transfer coefficient in the transition region of a circular tube with a bell-mouth entrance

    SciTech Connect

    Tam, L.M.; Ghajar, A.J.

    1996-12-31

    The local heat transfer characteristics for ethylene glycol water mixtures flowing in a horizontal circular straight tube with a bell-mouth inlet have been determined experimentally over a flow Reynolds number range of 1,500 to 27,000. A wall-boundary heating condition of uniform heat flux was imposed. The variation of local heat transfer coefficient with length in the transition and turbulent flow regimes is very unusual. For the bell-mouth inlet, the boundary layer along the tube wall is at first laminar and then changes through a transition region to the turbulent condition causing a dip in the Nu-x/D curve. The length of the dip in the transition region is much longer than that in the turbulent region. For the experiments the length of the dip in the transition region varied from x/D = 100 to 175 in comparison to an x/D < 25 for the turbulent region. The presence of the dip in the transition region causes a significant influence on both the local and the average heat transfer coefficients. This is particularly important for heat transfer calculations in short tubes with a bell-mouth inlet.

  5. Pressure fluctuations on the surface of a cylinder in uniform flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ayoub, A.; Karamcheti, K.

    1976-01-01

    The problem of determining the pressure fluctuations induced on the surface of a cylinder by the fluctuating wake behind it is formulated. A formal solution relating the unsteady surface pressure field to the velocity field in the wake is derived and used to obtain general results independent of cylinder shape and Reynolds number. The case of the circular cylinder is then examined in detail.

  6. 46 CFR 197.338 - Compressed gas cylinders.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Compressed gas cylinders. 197.338 Section 197.338... STANDARDS GENERAL PROVISIONS Commercial Diving Operations Equipment § 197.338 Compressed gas cylinders. Each compressed gas cylinder must— (a) Be stored in a ventilated area; (b) Be protected from excessive heat;...

  7. 46 CFR 197.338 - Compressed gas cylinders.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Compressed gas cylinders. 197.338 Section 197.338... STANDARDS GENERAL PROVISIONS Commercial Diving Operations Equipment § 197.338 Compressed gas cylinders. Each compressed gas cylinder must— (a) Be stored in a ventilated area; (b) Be protected from excessive heat;...

  8. 46 CFR 197.338 - Compressed gas cylinders.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Compressed gas cylinders. 197.338 Section 197.338... STANDARDS GENERAL PROVISIONS Commercial Diving Operations Equipment § 197.338 Compressed gas cylinders. Each compressed gas cylinder must— (a) Be stored in a ventilated area; (b) Be protected from excessive heat;...

  9. Heat Transfer Enhancement for Finned-tube Heat Exchangers with Winglets

    SciTech Connect

    O'Brien, James Edward; Sohal, Manohar Singh

    2000-11-01

    This paper presents the results of an experimental study of forced convection heat transfer in a narrow rectangular duct fitted with a circular tube and/or a delta-winglet pair. The duct was designed to simulate a single passage in a fin-tube heat exchanger. Heat transfer measurements were obtained using a transient technique in which a heated airflow is suddenly introduced to the test section. High-resolution local fin-surface temperature distributions were obtained at several times after initiation of the transient using an imaging infrared camera. Corresponding local fin-surface heat transfer coefficient distributions were then calculated from a locally applied one-dimensional semi-infinite inverse heat conduction model. Heat transfer results were obtained over an airflow rate ranging from 1.51 x 10-3 to 14.0 x 10-3 kg/s. These flow rates correspond to a duct-height Reynolds number range of 670 – 6300 with a duct height of 1.106 cm and a duct width-toheight ratio, W/H, of 11.25. The test cylinder was sized such that the diameter-to-duct height ratio, D/H is 5. Results presented in this paper reveal visual and quantitative details of local fin-surface heat transfer distributions in the vicinity of a circular tube, a delta-winglet pair, and a combination of a circular tube and a delta-winglet pair. Comparisons of local and average heat transfer distributions for the circular tube with and without winglets are provided. Overall mean finsurface Nusselt-number results indicate a significant level of heat transfer enhancement associated with the deployment of the winglets with the circular cylinder. At the lowest Reynolds numbers (which correspond to the laminar operating conditions of existing geothermal air-cooled condensers), the enhancement level is nearly a factor of two. At higher Reynolds numbers, the enhancement level is close to 50%.

  10. Circular motion in NUT space-time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jefremov, Paul I.; Perlick, Volker

    2016-12-01

    We consider circular motion in the NUT (Newman-Unti-Tamburino) space-time. Among other things, we determine the location of circular time-like geodesic orbits, in particular of the innermost stable circular orbit (ISCO) and of the marginally bound circular orbit. Moreover, we discuss the von Zeipel cylinders with respect to the stationary observers and with respect to the zero angular momentum observers (ZAMOs). We also investigate the relation of von Zeipel cylinders to inertial forces, in particular in the ultra-relativistic limit. Finally, we generalise the construction of thick accretion tori (‘Polish doughnuts’) which are well known on the Schwarzschild or Kerr background to the case of the NUT metric. We argue that, in principle, an NUT source could be distinguished from a Schwarzschild or Kerr source by observing the features of circular matter flows in its neighbourhood.

  11. Multi-cylinder hot gas engine

    DOEpatents

    Corey, John A.

    1985-01-01

    A multi-cylinder hot gas engine having an equal angle, V-shaped engine block in which two banks of parallel, equal length, equally sized cylinders are formed together with annular regenerator/cooler units surrounding each cylinder, and wherein the pistons are connected to a single crankshaft. The hot gas engine further includes an annular heater head disposed around a central circular combustor volume having a new balanced-flow hot-working-fluid manifold assembly that provides optimum balanced flow of the working fluid through the heater head working fluid passageways which are connected between each of the cylinders and their respective associated annular regenerator units. This balanced flow provides even heater head temperatures and, therefore, maximum average working fluid temperature for best operating efficiency with the use of a single crankshaft V-shaped engine block.

  12. Steady streaming around a cylinder pair

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coenen, W.

    2016-11-01

    The steady streaming motion that appears around a pair of circular cylinders placed in a small-amplitude oscillatory flow is considered. Attention is focused on the case where the Stokes layer thickness at the surface of the cylinders is much smaller than the cylinder radius, and the streaming Reynolds number is of order unity or larger. In that case, the steady streaming velocity that persists at the edge of the Stokes layer can be imposed as a boundary condition to numerically solve the outer streaming motion that it drives in the bulk of the fluid. It is investigated how the gap width between the cylinders and the streaming Reynolds number affect the flow topology. The results are compared against experimental observations.

  13. Numerical investigation of heat transfer and friction factor characteristics in a circular tube fitted with V-cut twisted tape inserts.

    PubMed

    Salman, Sami D; Kadhum, Abdul Amir H; Takriff, Mohd S; Mohamad, Abu Bakar

    2013-01-01

    Numerical investigation of the heat transfer and friction factor characteristics of a circular fitted with V-cut twisted tape (VCT) insert with twist ratio (y = 2.93) and different cut depths (w = 0.5, 1, and 1.5 cm) were studied for laminar flow using CFD package (FLUENT-6.3.26). The data obtained from plain tube were verified with the literature correlation to ensure the validation of simulation results. Classical twisted tape (CTT) with different twist ratios (y = 2.93, 3.91, 4.89) were also studied for comparison. The results show that the enhancement of heat transfer rate induced by the classical and V-cut twisted tape inserts increases with the Reynolds number and decreases with twist ratio. The results also revealed that the V-cut twisted tape with twist ratio y = 2.93 and cut depth w = 0.5 cm offered higher heat transfer rate with significant increases in friction factor than other tapes. In addition the results of V-cut twist tape compared with experimental and simulated data of right-left helical tape inserts (RLT), it is found that the V-cut twist tape offered better thermal contact between the surface and the fluid which ultimately leads to a high heat transfer coefficient. Consequently, 107% of maximum heat transfer was obtained by using this configuration.

  14. Experimental studies on heat transfer and friction factor characteristics of laminar flow through a circular tube fitted with regularly spaced helical screw-tape inserts

    SciTech Connect

    Sivashanmugam, P.; Suresh, S.

    2007-02-15

    Experimental investigation of heat transfer and friction factor characteristics of circular tube fitted with full-length helical screw element of different twist ratio, and helical screw inserts with spacer length 100, 200, 300 and 400mm have been studied with uniform heat flux under laminar flow condition. The experimental data obtained are verified with those obtained from plain tube published data. The effect of spacer length on heat transfer augmentation and friction factor, and the effect of twist ratio on heat transfer augmentation and friction factor have been presented separately. The decrease in Nusselt number for the helical twist with spacer length is within 10% for each subsequent 100mm increase in spacer length. The decrease in friction factor is nearly two times lower than the full length helical twist at low Reynolds number, and four times lower than the full length helical twist at high Reynolds number for all twist ratio. The regularly spaced helical screw inserts can safely be used for heat transfer augmentation without much increase in pressure drop than full length helical screw inserts. (author)

  15. Numerical Investigation of Heat Transfer and Friction Factor Characteristics in a Circular Tube Fitted with V-Cut Twisted Tape Inserts

    PubMed Central

    Salman, Sami D.; Kadhum, Abdul Amir H.; Takriff, Mohd S.; Mohamad, Abu Bakar

    2013-01-01

    Numerical investigation of the heat transfer and friction factor characteristics of a circular fitted with V-cut twisted tape (VCT) insert with twist ratio (y = 2.93) and different cut depths (w = 0.5, 1, and 1.5 cm) were studied for laminar flow using CFD package (FLUENT-6.3.26). The data obtained from plain tube were verified with the literature correlation to ensure the validation of simulation results. Classical twisted tape (CTT) with different twist ratios (y = 2.93, 3.91, 4.89) were also studied for comparison. The results show that the enhancement of heat transfer rate induced by the classical and V-cut twisted tape inserts increases with the Reynolds number and decreases with twist ratio. The results also revealed that the V-cut twisted tape with twist ratio y = 2.93 and cut depth w = 0.5 cm offered higher heat transfer rate with significant increases in friction factor than other tapes. In addition the results of V-cut twist tape compared with experimental and simulated data of right-left helical tape inserts (RLT), it is found that the V-cut twist tape offered better thermal contact between the surface and the fluid which ultimately leads to a high heat transfer coefficient. Consequently, 107% of maximum heat transfer was obtained by using this configuration. PMID:24078795

  16. An asymmetric pair of vortices adjacent to a spinning cylinder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iosilevskii, G.; Seginer, A.

    The two-dimensional flow field over a spinning circular cylinder is analyzed using an extension of the Foeppl method. Equilibrium equations for two asymmetric point vortices in the wake of the cylinder are solved for a case when both vortices are equidistant from the cylinder. The two Foeppl solutions for the cylinder are presented. It is observed that the spin does not affect the angle between the two vortices; however, it displaces the vortex pair in the spin direction and the sinus of the displacement angle is proportional to the spin rate.

  17. Quick release engine cylinder

    DOEpatents

    Sunnarborg, Duane A.

    2000-01-01

    A quick release engine cylinder allows optical access to an essentially unaltered combustion chamber, is suitable for use with actual combustion processes, and is amenable to rapid and repeated disassembly and cleaning. A cylinder member, adapted to constrain a piston to a defined path through the cylinder member, sealingly engages a cylinder head to provide a production-like combustion chamber. A support member mounts with the cylinder member. The support-to-cylinder mounting allows two relationships therebetween. In the first mounting relationship, the support engages the cylinder member and restrains the cylinder against the head. In the second mounting relationship, the cylinder member can pass through the support member, moving away from the head and providing access to the piston-top and head.

  18. Numerical study of the enhancement of heat transfer for hybrid CuO-Cu Nanofluids flowing in a circular pipe.

    PubMed

    Balla, Hyder H; Abdullah, Shahrir; Mohdfaizal, Wan; Zulkifli, Rozli; Sopian, Kamaruzaman

    2013-01-01

    A numerical simulation model for laminar flow of nanofluids in a pipe with constant heat flux on the wall was built to study the effect of the Reynolds number on convective heat transfer and pressure loss. The investigation was performed for hybrid nanofluids consisting of CuO-Cu nanoparticles and compared with CuO and Cu in which the nanoparticles have a spherical shape with size 50, 50, 50nm respectively. The nanofluids were prepared, following which the thermal conductivity and dynamic viscosity were measured for a range of temperatures (10 -60°C). The numerical results obtained were compared with the existing well-established correlation. The prediction of the Nusselt number for nanofluids agrees well with the Shah correlation. The comparison of heat transfer coefficients for CuO, Cu and CuO-Cu presented an increase in thermal conductivity of the nanofluid as the convective heat transfer coefficient increased. It was found that the pressure loss increases with an increase in the Reynolds number, nanoparticle density and particle volume fraction. However, the flow demonstrates enhancement in heat transfer which becomes greater with an increase in the Reynolds number for the nanofluid flow.

  19. Near-wake flow structure of elliptic cylinders close to a free surface: effect of cylinder aspect ratio

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daichin, K. V.; Lee, Sang Joon

    The flow fields behind elliptic cylinders adjacent to a free surface were investigated experimentally in a circulating water channel. A range of cylinder aspect ratios (AR=2, 3, 4) were considered, while the cross-sectional area of the elliptical cylinder was kept constant. The main objective of this study was to investigate the effect of cylinder aspect ratio and a free surface on the flow structure in the near-wake behind elliptic cylinders. For each elliptic cylinder, the flow structure was analyzed for various values of the submergence depth of the cylinder beneath the free surface. The flow fields were measured using a single-frame double-exposure PIV (Particle Image Velocimetry) system. For each experimental condition, 350 instantaneous velocity fields were obtained and ensemble-averaged to obtain the mean velocity field and spatial distribution of the mean vorticity statistics. The results show that near-wake can be classified into three typical flow patterns: formation of a Coanda flow, generation of substantial jet-like flow, and attachment of this jet flow to the free surface. The general flow structure observed behind the elliptic cylinders resembles the structure previously reported for a circular cylinder submerged near a free surface. However, the wake width and the angle of downward deflection of the shear layer developed from the lower surface of the elliptic cylinder differ from those observed for a circular cylinder. These trends are enhanced as cylinder aspect ratio is increased. In addition, the free surface distortion is also discussed in the paper.

  20. Heat Transfer Enhancement of Laminar Nanofluids Flow in a Circular Tube Fitted with Parabolic-Cut Twisted Tape Inserts

    PubMed Central

    Salman, Sami D.; Kadhum, Abdul Amir H.; Takriff, Mohd S.; Mohamad, Abu Bakar

    2014-01-01

    Numerical investigation has been carried out on heat transfer and friction factor characteristics of copper-water nanofluid flow in a constant heat-fluxed tube with the existence of new configuration of vortex generator using Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) simulation. Two types of swirl flow generator: Classical twisted tape (CTT) and Parabolic-cut twisted tape (PCT) with a different twist ratio (y = 2.93, 3.91 and 4.89) and different cut depth (w = 0.5, 1.0 and 1.5 cm) with 2% and 4% volume concentration of CuO nanofluid were used for simulation. The effect of different parameters such as flow Reynolds number, twist ratio, cut depth and nanofluid were considered. The results show that the enhancement of heat transfer rate and the friction factor induced by the Classical (CTT) and Parabolic-cut (PCT) inserts increases with twist ratio and cut depth decreases. The results also revealed that the heat transfer enhancement increases with an increase in the volume fraction of the CuO nanoparticle. Furthermore, the twisted tape with twist ratio (y = 2.93) and cut depth w = 0.5 cm offered 10% enhancement of the average Nusselt number with significant increases in friction factor than those of Classical twisted tape. PMID:24605055

  1. Heat transfer enhancement of laminar nanofluids flow in a circular tube fitted with parabolic-cut twisted tape inserts.

    PubMed

    Salman, Sami D; Kadhum, Abdul Amir H; Takriff, Mohd S; Mohamad, Abu Bakar

    2014-01-01

    Numerical investigation has been carried out on heat transfer and friction factor characteristics of copper-water nanofluid flow in a constant heat-fluxed tube with the existence of new configuration of vortex generator using Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) simulation. Two types of swirl flow generator: Classical twisted tape (CTT) and Parabolic-cut twisted tape (PCT) with a different twist ratio (y = 2.93, 3.91 and 4.89) and different cut depth (w = 0.5, 1.0 and 1.5 cm) with 2% and 4% volume concentration of CuO nanofluid were used for simulation. The effect of different parameters such as flow Reynolds number, twist ratio, cut depth and nanofluid were considered. The results show that the enhancement of heat transfer rate and the friction factor induced by the Classical (CTT) and Parabolic-cut (PCT) inserts increases with twist ratio and cut depth decreases. The results also revealed that the heat transfer enhancement increases with an increase in the volume fraction of the CuO nanoparticle. Furthermore, the twisted tape with twist ratio (y = 2.93) and cut depth w = 0.5 cm offered 10% enhancement of the average Nusselt number with significant increases in friction factor than those of Classical twisted tape.

  2. Strength Tests of Thin-walled Duralumin Cylinders of Elliptic Section

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lundquist, Eugene E; Burke, Walter F

    1935-01-01

    This report is the fifth of a series presenting the results of strength tests of thin-walled cylinders and truncated cones of circular and elliptic section; it includes the results obtained from torsion tests on 30 cylinders, pure bending tests on 30 cylinders, and combined transverse shear and bending tests on 60 cylinders. All the cylinders tested were elliptic section with the ends clamped to rigid bulkheads. In the pure bending and combined transverse shear and bending tests the loads were applied in the plane of the major axis. The results of the tests on elliptic cylinders are correlated with the results of corresponding tests on circular cylinders and are presented in charts suitable for use in design.

  3. Circular Motion.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Paul D.

    1995-01-01

    Provides a period-long activity using battery powered cars rolling in a circular motion on a tile floor. Students measure the time and distance as the car moves to derive the equation for centripetal acceleration. (MVL)

  4. Measurements of the Flowfield Interaction Between Tandem Cylinders

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neuhart, Dan H.; Jenkins, Luther N.; Choudhari, Meelan M.; Khorrami, Mehdi R.

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents the most recent measurements from an ongoing investigation of the unsteady wake interference between a pair of circular cylinders in tandem. The purpose of this investigation is to help build an in-depth experimental database for this canonical flow configuration that embodies the effects of component interaction in landing gear noise. This new set of measurements augments the previous database at the primary Reynolds number (based on tunnel speed and cylinder diameter) of 1.66 105 in four important respects. First, better circumferential resolution of surface pressure fluctuations is obtained via cylinder "clocking". Second, higher resolution particle image velocimetry measurements of the shear layer separating from the cylinders are achieved. Third, the effects of simultaneous boundary layer trips along both the front and rear cylinders, versus front cylinder alone in the previous measurements, are studied. Lastly, on-surface and off-surface characteristics of unsteady flow near the "critical" cylinder spacing, wherein the flow switches intermittently between two states that are characteristic of lower and higher spacings, are examined. This critical spacing occurs in the middle of a relatively sudden change in the drag of either cylinder and is characterized by a loud intermittent noise and a flow behavior that randomly transitions between shear layer attachment to the rear cylinder and constant shedding and rollup in front of it. Analysis of this bistable flow state reveals much larger spanwise correlation lengths of surface pressure fluctuations than those at larger and smaller values of the cylinder spacing.

  5. Heat transfer characteristics of decaying swirl flow through a circular tube with co/counter dual twisted-tape swirl generators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Changcharoen, W.; Samruaisin, P.; Eiamsa-ard, P.; Eiamsa-ard, S.

    2016-07-01

    The influence of co/counter dual-twisted tapes (CoT/CT) on heat transfer rate in a circular tube has been investigated experimentally. In the experiment, the dual-twisted tapes are placed at the entry of the test tube in two arrangements: (1) each of dual twisted tape was twisted in the same direction that can produce co-swirl flow at the entry and (2) each of dual twisted tape was twisted in the opposite direction that can produce counter-swirl flow. Dual tapes were twisted in three different twist ratios ( y/w = 3, 4, and 5) for generating different swirl intensities at the entry of the test section while the single twisted tape (ST) was also the test for comparison. The aim at using the dual twisted tapes is to create co/counter-rotating swirl flows having a significant influence on the flow turbulence intensity at the entry section leading to higher heat transfer enhancement. Average Nusselt numbers of CoT/CT are determined and also compared with those obtained from other similar cases, i.e., ST. The experimental results on the heat transfer rates indicated that the tubes with the dual twisted tapes (CoT/CT) are higher than those with the single tape at the entry section ( x/D = 0 to 10). The heat transfer rates at longer distance became lower due to high interaction of each swirl. In addition, the mean Nusselt number and friction factor for the swirl generator created by the CT is nearly similar to CoT results.

  6. Vortex noise from nonrotating cylinders and airfoils

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schlinker, R. H.; Amiet, R. K.; Fink, M. R.

    1976-01-01

    An experimental study of vortex-shedding noise was conducted in an acoustic research tunnel over a Reynolds-number range applicable to full-scale helicopter tail-rotor blades. Two-dimensional tapered-chord nonrotating models were tested to simulate the effect of spanwise frequency variation on the vortex-shedding mechanism. Both a tapered circular cylinder and tapered airfoils were investigated. The results were compared with data for constant-diameter cylinder and constant-chord airfoil models also tested during this study. Far-field noise, surface pressure fluctuations, and spanwise correlation lengths were measured for each configuration. Vortex-shedding noise for tapered cylinders and airfoils was found to contain many narrowband-random peaks which occurred within a range of frequencies corresponding to a predictable Strouhal number referenced to the maximum and minimum chord. The noise was observed to depend on surface roughness and Reynolds number.

  7. Crystal Ice Formation of Solution and Its Removal Phenomena around Vertical Cooled Cylinder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirata, Tetsuo; Ishikawa, Masaaki; Akutsu, Nobuaki

    Experimental and analytical studies for freezing phenomena of ethylene glycol solution around a vertical cooled polyvinyl-chloride cylinder have been performed. It is found that the crystal ice formed around the vertical cylinder is removed from the cylinder surface due to buoyancy force acting on the crystal ice. The crystal ice slides along the cylinder surface due to buoyancy force and grows in a shape of tube by joining with the neighbour ice. It is shown that the onset of ice removal condition is related to the heat flux at the cylinder surface when the latent heat of fusion is discharged with freezing, and that the heat flux ratio of 'from the cylinder surface into the cylinder' to 'from the cylinder surface to the solution' is an important parameter for the onset conditions. The ice removal occurs easily for short cylinders than for long ones.

  8. Measurement of the flow past a cactus-inspired cylinder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oweis, Ghanem F.; El-Makdah, Adnan M.

    2012-11-01

    Desert cacti are tall cylindrical plants characterized by longitudinal u- or v-shaped grooves that run parallel to the plant axis, covering its surface area. We study the wake flow modifications resulting from the introduction of cactus-inspired surface grooves to a circular cylinder. Particle image velocimetry PIV is implemented in a wind tunnel to visualize and quantify the wake flow from a cactus cylinder in cross wind and an equivalent circular cylinder at Re O(1E5). The cactus wake exhibits superior behavior over its circular counterpart as seen from the mean and turbulent velocity profiles. The surface flow within the grooves is also probed to elucidate the origins of the wake alterations. Lastly, we use simple statistical analysis based only on the wake velocity fields, under the assumption of periodicity of the shedding, to recover the time varying flow from the randomly acquired PIV snapshots.

  9. Coupled Thermo-Mechanical Analyses of Dynamically Loaded Rubber Cylinders

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Arthur R.; Chen, Tzi-Kang

    2000-01-01

    A procedure that models coupled thermo-mechanical deformations of viscoelastic rubber cylinders by employing the ABAQUS finite element code is described. Computational simulations of hysteretic heating are presented for several tall and short rubber cylinders both with and without a steel disk at their centers. The cylinders are compressed axially and are then cyclically loaded about the compressed state. The non-uniform hysteretic heating of the rubber cylinders containing a steel disk is presented. The analyses performed suggest that the coupling procedure should be considered for further development as a design tool for rubber degradation studies.

  10. Impingement heat transfer within arrays of circular jets. II - Effects of crossflow in the presence of roughness elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trabold, T. A.; Obot, N. T.

    1987-05-01

    An experimental investigation was carried out to determine the effects of jet-induced crossflow on impingement heat transfer from rough surfaces. The jets impinged on surfaces having repeated square ribs, with transverse flow of the spent air. Two crossflow schemes were tested: discharge of the spent air through two opposite sides (intermediate crossflow) and through one side (complete or maximum crossflow) of the rectangular impingement surface. The rib height was fixed at 0.813 mm, while the pitch-to-height ratio (p/e) was varied between 6 and 10. The study covered standoff spacing and jet Reynolds number in the range 2 to 16 jet hole diameters and, 1300 to 21,000, respectively. Three nozzle plates, having 48, 90 and 180 square-edged holes, were tested. For the maximum crossflow scheme, the presence of roughness results in small upstream reductions in heat transfer coefficient, with marked improvement in the downstream section; indicating that roughness elements can be used to compensate for the degradation that is usually associated with impingement on smooth surfaces.

  11. Two-dimensional wakes of a variable diameter cylinder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Wenchao; Stremler, Mark

    2016-11-01

    It is well known that periodic variations in the position of a circular cylinder can produce a variety of complex vortex wake patterns. We will discuss what we believe is the first investigation of the wake patterns produced by a stationary circular cylinder undergoing periodic variations in the cylinder diameter. In our experiments, cylinder variations are produced by oscillating a cone perpendicularly through a flowing soap film. The wake flow generates thickness variations in the thin soap film, allowing direct observation of wake patterns through visualization of interference fringes. We consider diameter variations ranging from 0.1 to 0.5 times the mean diameter, with the Reynolds number varying from 50 to 150. The frequency of the diameter's variation influences the wake patterns. When the variation frequency is negligible compared to the vortex shedding frequency, the wake is a quasi-steady representation of fixed cylinder shedding. We will discuss wake pattern bifurcations that occur as the variation frequency becomes comparable to the vortex shedding frequency. Comparisons will be made with the wake patterns generated by a constant-diameter circular cylinder forced to oscillate transverse to the free stream.

  12. Cylinder monitoring program

    SciTech Connect

    Alderson, J.H.

    1991-12-31

    Cylinders containing depleted uranium hexafluoride (UF{sub 6}) in storage at the Department of Energy (DOE) gaseous diffusion plants, managed by Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc., are being evaluated to determine their expected storage life. Cylinders evaluated recently have been in storage service for 30 to 40 years. In the present environment, the remaining life for these storage cylinders is estimated to be 30 years or greater. The group of cylinders involved in recent tests will continue to be monitored on a periodic basis, and other storage cylinders will be observed as on a statistical sample population. The program has been extended to all types of large capacity UF{sub 6} cylinders.

  13. Collapsing bacterial cylinders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Betterton, M. D.; Brenner, Michael P.

    2001-12-01

    Under special conditions bacteria excrete an attractant and aggregate. The high density regions initially collapse into cylindrical structures, which subsequently destabilize and break up into spherical aggregates. This paper presents a theoretical description of the process, from the structure of the collapsing cylinder to the spacing of the final aggregates. We show that cylindrical collapse involves a delicate balance in which bacterial attraction and diffusion nearly cancel, leading to corrections to the collapse laws expected from dimensional analysis. The instability of a collapsing cylinder is composed of two distinct stages: Initially, slow modulations to the cylinder develop, which correspond to a variation of the collapse time along the cylinder axis. Ultimately, one point on the cylinder pinches off. At this final stage of the instability, a front propagates from the pinch into the remainder of the cylinder. The spacing of the resulting spherical aggregates is determined by the front propagation.

  14. Acoustic resonances in cylinder bundles oscillating in a compressibile fluid

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, W.H.; Raptis, A.C.

    1984-12-01

    This paper deals with an analytical study on acoustic resonances of elastic oscillations of a group of parallel, circular, thin cylinders in an unbounded volume of barotropic, compressible, inviscid fluid. The perturbed motion of the fluid is assumed due entirely to the flexural oscillations of the cylinders. The motion of the fluid disturbances is first formulated in a three-dimensional wave form and then casted into a two-dimensional Helmholtz equation for the harmonic motion in time and in axial space. The acoustic motion in the fluid and the elastic motion in the cylinders are solved simultaneously. Acoustic resonances were approximately determined from the secular (eigenvalue) equation by the method of successive iteration with the use of digital computers for a given set of the fluid properties and the cylinders' geometry and properties. Effects of the flexural wavenumber and the configuration of and the spacing between the cylinders on the acoustic resonances were thoroughly investigated.

  15. Compressive testing of filament-wound cylinders

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jensen, David W.; Hipp, Patrick A.

    1991-01-01

    An experimental investigation has been conducted on the compressive buckling and failure of filament-wound circular cylinders. This investigation identifies one of the relationships between structural performance and scale, as well as some of the causes of reduced structural performance in large-scale structures. It is hypothesized that this effect is related to two conditions: first, the number of fiber tow undulations; and second, the percentage of weak interfaces within the structure. The effect of winding pattern and the resulting location of the fiber undulations were studied by varying the winding parameters. Three types of cylinders were manufactured from Amoco T650-35/1908 graphite/epoxy preimpregnated tow with different winding sequences (0/+/-60)s, (+/-30/90)s, and (90/+/-30)s. The (90/+/-30)s cylinders were manufactured with two different winding patterns (distributed and classical) and radius-to-thickness ratios (15 and 55). All cylinders were loaded in compression to failure. Comparisons of the compressive strength and failure modes demonstrate the relationship between the winding parameters, scale, and structural performance of filament-wound composite cylinders.

  16. Unsteady heat transfer and direct comparison to steady-state measurements in a rotor-wake experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Obrien, J. E.; Simoneau, R. J.; Lagraff, J. E.; Morehouse, K. A.

    1986-01-01

    Circumferentially local and time-resolved heat transfer measurements were obtained for a circular cylinder in crossflow located downstream of a rotating spoked wheel wake generator in a steady flow tunnel. The unsteady heat transfer effects were obtained by developing an extension of a thin film gauge technique employed to date exclusively in short-duration facilities. The time-average thin film results and conventional steady-state heat transfer measurements were compared. Time-averaged wake-induced stagnation heat transfer enhancement levels above the nowake case were about 10% for the four cylinder Reynolds numbers. This enhancement level was nearly independent of bar passing frequency and was related directly to the time integral of the heat transfer spikes observed at the bar passing frequency. It is observed that the wake-induced heat transfer spikes have peak magnitudes averaging 30 to 40% above the interwake heat transfer level.

  17. Delamination of Composite Cylinders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davies, Peter; Carlsson, Leif A.

    The delamination resistance of filament wound glass/epoxy cylinders has been characterized for a range of winding angles and fracture mode ratios using beam fracture specimens. The results reveal that the delamination fracture resistance increases with increasing winding angle and mode II (shear) fraction (GΠ/G). It was also found that interlaced fiber bundles in the filament wound cylinder wall acted as effective crack arresters in mode I loading. To examine the sensitivity of delamina-tion damage on the strength of the cylinders, external pressure tests were performed on filament-wound glass/epoxy composite cylinders with artificial defects and impact damage. The results revealed that the cylinder strength was insensitive to the presence of single delaminations but impact damage caused reductions in failure pressure. The insensitivity of the failure pressure to a single delamination is attributed to the absence of buckling of the delaminated sublaminates before the cylinder wall collapsed. The impacted cylinders contained multiple delaminations, which caused local reduction in the compressive load capability and reduction in failure pressure. The response of glass/epoxy cylinders was compared to impacted carbon reinforced cylinders. Carbon/epoxy is more sensitive to damage but retains higher implosion resistance while carbon/PEEK shows the opposite trend.

  18. Ceramics Technology Project database: September 1991 summary report. [Materials for piston ring-cylinder liner for advanced heat/diesel engines

    SciTech Connect

    Keyes, B.L.P.

    1992-06-01

    The piston ring-cylinder liner area of the internal combustion engine must withstand very-high-temperature gradients, highly-corrosive environments, and constant friction. Improving the efficiency in the engine requires ring and cylinder liner materials that can survive this abusive environment and lubricants that resist decomposition at elevated temperatures. Wear and friction tests have been done on many material combinations in environments similar to actual use to find the right materials for the situation. This report covers tribology information produced from 1986 through July 1991 by Battelle columbus Laboratories, Caterpillar Inc., and Cummins Engine Company, Inc. for the Ceramic Technology Project (CTP). All data in this report were taken from the project's semiannual and bimonthly progress reports and cover base materials, coatings, and lubricants. The data, including test rig descriptions and material characterizations, are stored in the CTP database and are available to all project participants on request. Objective of this report is to make available the test results from these studies, but not to draw conclusions from these data.

  19. Stresses in a two-bay noncircular cylinder under transverse loads

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Griffith, George E

    1952-01-01

    A method, taking into account the effects of flexibility and based on a general eighth-order differential equation, is presented for finding the stresses in a two-bay, noncircular cylinder the cross section of which can be composed of circular arcs. Numerical examples are given for two cases of ring flexibility for a cylinder of doubly symmetrical (essentially elliptic) cross section, subjected to concentrated radial, moment, and tangential loads. The results paralleled those already obtained for shells with circular rings.

  20. Counter-extrapolation method for conjugate interfaces in computational heat and mass transfer.

    PubMed

    Le, Guigao; Oulaid, Othmane; Zhang, Junfeng

    2015-03-01

    In this paper a conjugate interface method is developed by performing extrapolations along the normal direction. Compared to other existing conjugate models, our method has several technical advantages, including the simple and straightforward algorithm, accurate representation of the interface geometry, applicability to any interface-lattice relative orientation, and availability of the normal gradient. The model is validated by simulating the steady and unsteady convection-diffusion system with a flat interface and the steady diffusion system with a circular interface, and good agreement is observed when comparing the lattice Boltzmann results with respective analytical solutions. A more general system with unsteady convection-diffusion process and a curved interface, i.e., the cooling process of a hot cylinder in a cold flow, is also simulated as an example to illustrate the practical usefulness of our model, and the effects of the cylinder heat capacity and thermal diffusivity on the cooling process are examined. Results show that the cylinder with a larger heat capacity can release more heat energy into the fluid and the cylinder temperature cools down slower, while the enhanced heat conduction inside the cylinder can facilitate the cooling process of the system. Although these findings appear obvious from physical principles, the confirming results demonstrates the application potential of our method in more complex systems. In addition, the basic idea and algorithm of the counter-extrapolation procedure presented here can be readily extended to other lattice Boltzmann models and even other computational technologies for heat and mass transfer systems.

  1. A Sequence of Cylinders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Erica

    2006-01-01

    Hoping to develop in her students an understanding of mathematics as a way of thinking more than a way of doing, the author of this article describes how her students worked on a spatial reasoning problem stemming from an iteratively constructed sequence of cylinders. She presents an activity of making cylinders out of paper models, and for every…

  2. A biharmonic relaxation method for calculating thermal stress in cooled irregular cylinders

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holms, Arthur G

    1952-01-01

    A numerical method was developed for calculating thermal stresses in irregular cylinders cooled by one or more internal passages. The use of relaxation methods and elementary methods of finite differences was found to give approximations to the correct values when compared with previously known solutions for concentric circular cylinders possessing symmetrical and asymmetrical temperature distributions.

  3. Frequency measurements in a finite cylinder wake at a subcritical Reynolds number

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Budair, M.; Ayoub, A.; Karamcheti, K.

    1991-01-01

    A spectral study of a hot-wire investigation in the near wake of a finite circular cylinder of high-aspect ratio is reported. The measurements included frequency spectra and cross correlations in spanwise and streamwise directions. The study identifies four spanwise regions, in terms of frequency, in the immediate wake of the finite cylinder.

  4. Cylinder valve packing nut studies

    SciTech Connect

    Blue, S.C.

    1991-12-31

    The design, manufacture, and use of cylinder valve packing nuts have been studied to improve their resistance to failure from stress corrosion cracking. Stress frozen photoelastic models have been analyzed to measure the stress concentrations at observed points of failure. The load effects induced by assembly torque and thermal expansion of stem packing were observed by strain gaging nuts. The effects of finishing operations and heat treatment were studied by the strain gage hole boring and X-ray methods. Modifications of manufacturing and operation practices are reducing the frequency of stress corrosion failures.

  5. Tandem Cylinder Noise Predictions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lockhard, David P.; Khorrami, Mehdi R.; CHoudhari, Meelan M.; Hutcheson, Florence V.; Brooks, Thomas F.; Stead, Daniel J.

    2007-01-01

    In an effort to better understand landing-gear noise sources, we have been examining a simplified configuration that still maintains some of the salient features of landing-gear flow fields. In particular, tandem cylinders have been studied because they model a variety of component level interactions. The present effort is directed at the case of two identical cylinders spatially separated in the streamwise direction by 3.7 diameters. Experimental measurements from the Basic Aerodynamic Research Tunnel (BART) and Quiet Flow Facility (QFF) at NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC) have provided steady surface pressures, detailed off-surface measurements of the flow field using Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV), hot-wire measurements in the wake of the rear cylinder, unsteady surface pressure data, and the radiated noise. The experiments were conducted at a Reynolds number of 166 105 based on the cylinder diameter. A trip was used on the upstream cylinder to insure a fully turbulent shedding process and simulate the effects of a high Reynolds number flow. The parallel computational effort uses the three-dimensional Navier-Stokes solver CFL3D with a hybrid, zonal turbulence model that turns off the turbulence production term everywhere except in a narrow ring surrounding solid surfaces. The current calculations further explore the influence of the grid resolution and spanwise extent on the flow and associated radiated noise. Extensive comparisons with the experimental data are used to assess the ability of the computations to simulate the details of the flow. The results show that the pressure fluctuations on the upstream cylinder, caused by vortex shedding, are smaller than those generated on the downstream cylinder by wake interaction. Consequently, the downstream cylinder dominates the noise radiation, producing an overall directivity pattern that is similar to that of an isolated cylinder. Only calculations based on the full length of the model span were able to

  6. Dopant Cylinder Lifetime Monitor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bishop, Steve; Wodjenski, Michael; Kaim, Robert; Lurcott, Steve; McManus, Jim; Smith, Gordon

    2006-11-01

    The cost of consumable materials is a significant component in the cost of implanter operation. With the higher cost of sub-atmospheric gas alternatives it is increasingly important to accurately monitor its usage. The ATMI® SDS® GasGauge™ monitoring system accurately monitors gas level in four cylinders simultaneously, throughout their lifetime, in order to optimize usage of gas and related implanter productivity. This paper displays how the GasGauge monitoring system accurately monitors the cylinder contents in SDS®, VAC® and high pressure gas cylinders. Internal and customer test data is also presented to verify these claims.

  7. In-Cylinder Fuel Blending of Gasoline/Diesel for Improved Efficiency and Lowest Possible Emissions on a Multi-Cylinder Light-Duty Diesel Engine

    SciTech Connect

    Curran, Scott; Prikhodko, Vitaly Y; Wagner, Robert M; Parks, II, James E; Cho, Kukwon; Sluder, Scott; Kokjohn, Sage; Reitz, Rolf

    2010-01-01

    In-cylinder fuel blending of gasoline/diesel fuel is investigated on a multi-cylinder light-duty diesel engine as a potential strategy to control in-cylinder fuel reactivity for improved efficiency and lowest possible emissions. This approach was developed and demonstrated at the University of Wisconsin through modeling and single-cylinder engine experiments. The objective of this study is to better understand the potential and challenges of this method on a multi-cylinder engine. More specifically, the effect of cylinder-to-cylinder imbalances, heat rejection, and in-cylinder charge motion as well as the potential limitations imposed by real-world turbo-machinery were investigated on a 1.9-liter four-cylinder engine. This investigation focused on one engine condition, 2300 rpm, 4.2 bar brake mean effective pressure (BMEP). Gasoline was introduced with a port-fuel-injection system. Parameter sweeps included gasoline-to-diesel fuel ratio, intake air mixture temperature, in-cylinder swirl number, and diesel start-of-injection phasing. In addition, engine parameters were trimmed for each cylinder to balance the combustion process for maximum efficiency and lowest emissions. An important observation was the strong influence of intake charge temperature on cylinder pressure rise rate. Experiments were able to show increased thermal efficiency along with dramatic decreases in oxides of nitrogen (NOX) and particulate matter (PM). However, indicated thermal efficiency for the multi-cylinder experiments were less than expected based on modeling and single-cylinder results. The lower indicated thermal efficiency is believed to be due increased heat transfer as compared to the model predictions and suggest a need for improved cylinder-to-cylinder control and increased heat transfer control.

  8. Frequency spectra of laminated piezoelectric cylinders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siao, J. C.-T.; Dong, S. B.; Song, J.

    1994-07-01

    A finite-element method is presented for determining the vibrational characteristics of a circular cylinder composed of bonded piezoelectric layers. Finite-element modeling occurs in the radial direction only using quadratic polynomials and the variationally derived partial differential equations are functions of the hoop and axial coordinates (theta, z) and time t. Using solution form Q exp (i(xi(z) + n(theta) + (omega)t)), with Q as the nodal amplitudes, leads to an algebraic eigensystem where any one of the three parameters (n, xi, omega), the circumferential or axial wave number or natural frequency, can act as the eigenvalue. Integer values always are assigned to n, leaving two possible eigenvalue problems. With omega as the eigenvalue and real values assigned to xi, the solutions represent propagating waves or harmonic standing vibrations in an infinite cylinder. When xi is the eigenvalue and real values assigned to omega, this eigensystem admits both real and complex eigendata. Real xi's represent propagating waves or harmonic standing vibrations as noted before. Complex conjugate pairs of xi 's describe end vibrations, which arise when an incident wave impinges upon a free end of a cylindrical bar. They are standing waves whose amplitudes decay sinusoidally or exponentially from the free end into the interior. Two examples are given to illustrate the method of analysis, viz., a solid piezoelectric cylinder of PZT-4 ceramic material and a two-layer cylinder of PZT-4 covering an isotropic material.

  9. Numerical procedure to determine geometric view factors for surfaces occluded by cylinders

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sawyer, P. L.

    1978-01-01

    A numerical procedure was developed to determine geometric view factors between connected infinite strips occluded by any number of infinite circular cylinders. The procedure requires a two-dimensional cross-sectional model of the configuration of interest. The two-dimensional model consists of a convex polygon enclosing any number of circles. Each side of the polygon represents one strip, and each circle represents a circular cylinder. A description and listing of a computer program based on this procedure are included in this report. The program calculates geometric view factors between individual strips and between individual strips and the collection of occluding cylinders.

  10. Cylinder Flow Control Using Plasma Actuators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozlov, Alexey; Thomas, Flint

    2007-11-01

    In this study the results of flow control experiments utilizing single dielectric barrier discharge plasma actuators to control flow separation and unsteady vortex shedding from a circular cylinder in cross-flow are reported. Two optimized quartz dielectric plasma actuators mounted on the cylinder surface utilizing an improved saw-tooth waveform high-voltage generator allowed flow control at Reynolds number approaching supercritical. Using either steady or unsteady actuation, it is demonstrated that the plasma-induced surface blowing gives rise to a local Coanda effect that promotes the maintenance of flow attachment. PIV based flow fields and wake velocity profiles obtained with hot-wire anemometry show large reductions in vortex shedding, wake width and turbulence intensity.

  11. Gas Cylinder Safety, Course 9518

    SciTech Connect

    Glass, George

    2016-10-27

    This course, Gas Cylinder Safety (#9518), presents an overview of the hazards and controls associated with handling, storing, using, and transporting gas cylinders. Standard components and markings of gas cylinders are also presented, as well as the process for the procurement, delivery, and return of gas cylinders at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL).

  12. Relativistic Bessel cylinders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krisch, J. P.; Glass, E. N.

    2014-10-01

    A set of cylindrical solutions to Einstein's field equations for power law densities is described. The solutions have a Bessel function contribution to the metric. For matter cylinders regular on axis, the first two solutions are the constant density Gott-Hiscock string and a cylinder with a metric Airy function. All members of this family have the Vilenkin limit to their mass per length. Some examples of Bessel shells and Bessel motion are given.

  13. Relativistic Bessel Cylinders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krisch, J. P.; Glass, E. N.

    2014-11-01

    A set of cylindrical solutions to Einstein's field equations for power law densities is described. The solutions have a Bessel function contribution to the metric. For matter cylinders regular on axis, the first two solutions are the constant density Gott-Hiscock string and a cylinder with a metric Airy function. All members of this family have the Vilenkin limit to their mass per length. Some examples of Bessel shells and Bessel motion are given.

  14. Flow-induced oscillations of tandem tethered cylinders in a channel flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nave, Gary; Michael, Tyler; Vlachos, Pavlos; Stremler, Mark

    2014-11-01

    In single degree-of-freedom (DOF) flow-induced oscillation studies of tandem rigid cylinders, the system most often consists of a front fixed cylinder and a trailing cylinder that is constrained to move perpendicular to the flow. We have conducted experiments in a water channel to investigate the behavior of a single DOF system of cylinders in which the trailing cylinder is constrained to move in a circular arc about the leading cylinder. We will discuss the dynamic response of the trailing cylinder for Reynolds numbers ranging from 10,000 to 20,000 and for inter-cylinder spacings from 3D to 5D, where D is the diameter of the cylinders. The experiments show a multi-frequency response that cannot be classified as a simple harmonic oscillator, as is assumed in typical tandem cylinder models. We compare our results with existing work on transversely constrained cylinders to determine the effect of tethering the cylinders. Work made possible by funding from the Virginia Commonwealth Research Commercialization Fund.

  15. Transient heat transfer behavior of water spray evaporative cooling on a stainless steel cylinder with structured surface for safety design application in high temperature scenario

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aamir, Muhammad; Liao, Qiang; Hong, Wang; Xun, Zhu; Song, Sihong; Sajid, Muhammad

    2017-02-01

    High heat transfer performance of spray cooling on structured surface might be an additional measure to increase the safety of an installation against any threat caused by rapid increase in the temperature. The purpose of present experimental study is to explore heat transfer performance of structured surface under different spray conditions and surface temperatures. Two cylindrical stainless steel samples were used, one with pyramid pins structured surface and other with smooth surface. Surface heat flux of 3.60, 3.46, 3.93 and 4.91 MW/m2 are estimated for sample initial average temperature of 600, 700, 800 and 900 °C, respectively for an inlet pressure of 1.0 MPa. A maximum cooling rate of 507 °C/s was estimated for an inlet pressure of 0.7 MPa at 900 °C for structured surface while for smooth surface maximum cooling rate of 356 °C/s was attained at 1.0 MPa for 700 °C. Structured surface performed better to exchange heat during spray cooling at initial sample temperature of 900 °C with a relative increase in surface heat flux by factor of 1.9, 1.56, 1.66 and 1.74 relative to smooth surface, for inlet pressure of 0.4, 0.7, 1.0 and 1.3 MPa, respectively. For smooth surface, a decreasing trend in estimated heat flux is observed, when initial sample temperature was increased from 600 to 900 °C. Temperature-based function specification method was utilized to estimate surface heat flux and surface temperature. Limited published work is available about the application of structured surface spray cooling techniques for safety of stainless steel structures at very high temperature scenario such as nuclear safety vessel and liquid natural gas storage tanks.

  16. Optimum cylinder cooling for advanced diesel engines

    SciTech Connect

    Trenc, F.; Rodman, S.; Skerget, L.; Delic, M.

    1998-07-01

    Continuous demand for higher specific engine output simultaneously introduces problems of higher mechanical and thermal stresses of the engine components. Uneven temperature distribution in the cylinder wall of a diesel engine, especially when air-cooled, is well known. Peak local temperatures, large circumferential and longitudinal temperature gradients provoke deformations that, in turn, affect the reliability of the engine. As the result of intensive numerical and experimental investigations, a horizontal, curved channel fed with engine lubrication oil was introduced in the upper part of the air-cooled cylinder. Optimization of the channel design, its position, and determination of suitable asymmetrical split oil flow have led to more favorable cylinder temperature distribution, similar to that obtained by advanced water-cooled engines. Analyses of the local laminar oil-flow phenomena and local heat transfer distribution is curved channels are discussed in the paper and can be successfully applied to advanced liquid-cooled engines.

  17. Optimum cylinder cooling for advanced diesel engines

    SciTech Connect

    Trenc, F.; Rodman, S.; Skerget, L.; Delic, M.

    1996-12-31

    Continuous demand for higher specific engine output simultaneously introduces problems of higher mechanical and thermal stresses of the engine components. Uneven temperature distribution in the cylinder wall of a Diesel engine, especially when air-cooled, is well known. Peak local temperatures, large circumferential and longitudinal temperature gradients provoke deformations that in turn affect the reliability of the engine. As the result of intensive numerical and experimental investigations a horizontal, curved channel fed with engine lubrication oil was introduced in the upper part of the air-cooled cylinder. Optimization of the channel design, its position, and determination of suitable asymmetrical split oil-flow have led to more favorable cylinder temperature distribution, similar to that obtained by advanced water-cooled engines. Analyses of the local laminar oil-flow phenomena and local heat transfer distribution in curved channels can be successfully and effectively applied to advanced liquid-cooled engines.

  18. Growth behavior of surface cracks in the circumferential plane of solid and hollow cylinders

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Forman, R. G.; Shivakumar, V.

    1986-01-01

    Experiments were conducted to study the growth behavior of surface fatigue cracks in the circumferential plane of solid and hollow cylinders. In the solid cylinders, the fatigue cracks were found to have a circular arc crack front with specific upper and lower limits to the arc radius. In the hollow cylinders, the fatigue cracks were found to agree accurately with the shape of a transformed semiellipse. A modification to the usual nondimensionalization expression used for surface flaws in flat plates was found to give correct trends for the hollow cylinder problem.

  19. The mean drift forces and yaw moment on multiple-cylinders in waves and current

    SciTech Connect

    Kinoshita, Takeshi; Bao, Weiguang; Sunahara, Shunji

    1996-12-31

    In the present work, the interaction of an assembly of circular cylinders with regular waves and slow current is considered. The interaction among cylinders is represented by additional waves emitting from adjacent cylinders towards the cylinders under consideration. By means of eigenfunction expansion, drift forces, as well as yaw moment, are evaluated by the far field method and the wave drift damping is deduced from these results semi-analytically. The contribution from the second order steady potential which is quadratic in wave amplitude is also considered. Calculated examples are presented in various wave direction. Those results are also compared with experimental measurements to verify the present theory.

  20. Acoustic characteristics of circular bends in pipes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Firth, D.; Fahy, F. J.

    1984-11-01

    The acoustic properties of circular bends in pipework systems are investigated by calculation of the mode shapes and propagation constants of the acoustic modes of the bend, the torus modes, and by evaluation of the transmission and reflection coefficients at a bend in an otherwise infinite straight pipe. The coefficients for the first three cylinder and torus modes are plotted against frequency for the case of a plane wave incident upon a 90° bend. The pipe walls are assumed to be rigid.

  1. Horseshoe vortex formation around a cylinder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eckerle, W. A.

    A turbulent boundary layer approaching a local obstruction, such as when annulus wall boundary layers encounter airfoils and support struts, creates a critical problem in gas turbine engines. The slower portion of the approaching boundary layer cannot negotiate the adverse pressure gradient generated by the obstruction and consequently separates from the endwall. The resulting flow field includes a horseshoe vortex that is swept downstream around the body. The separation affects both the local heat transfer coefficients and aerodynamic losses in the endwall region. This investigation evaluated the detailed flow processes that lead to the symmetric horseshoe vortex formation around a large-diameter cylinder. Test conditions included a freestream velocity of 30.5 m/sec, a Reynolds number based on cylinder diameter of 5.5 x 10 to the 5th power, and a boundary-layer thickness equal to 13 percent of the cylinder diameter. The final report presents endwall and cylinder surface flow visualizations, endwall and cylinder static pressure distributions, and five-hole probe measurements in the separation region.

  2. Volume Integral Equations Applied to Circular and Square Cylinders

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-12-01

    Derivation of Exact Formula 2.1.1 TM Case inc ikx LetE - ze (1) E - z E 5’•< (2) 1 lz E -E + > f>a (3) 2 scat inc From Maxwell’s equation V X E...k H (k y)J’(k •) 0 n n o in o n 1 (14) 14 2.1.2 TE Case inc ^ ikx Let H - z e (1) H - z H • a (2) 1 lz H mH + H >a(3) 2 scat inc From Maxwell’s ... equation V X H -iweE (4) 1 ýH E - z i (5) i ?H E9 - z we (6) Using boundary conditions for t and ta at - a tan tan H - H (7) lz 2z E - E (8) 10 21 15 and

  3. Numerical Analysis of Oscillating Flow about a Circular Cylinder

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-06-01

    oscillation) with a non-super computer. Murashige , Hinatsu and Kinoshita (1989) have used a similar method to analyze three cases (K = 5, 7, and 10) at...3798, Houston, TX. 6. Murashige , S., Hinatsu, M., and Kinoshita, T., 1989, "Direct Calculations of the Navier-Stokes Equations for Forces Acting on a

  4. Casimir force between a microfabricated elliptic cylinder and a plate

    SciTech Connect

    Decca, R. S.; Fischbach, E.; Klimchitskaya, G. L.; Krause, D. E.; Lopez, D.; Mostepanenko, V. M.

    2011-10-15

    We investigate the Casimir force between a microfabricated elliptic cylinder (cylindrical lens) and a plate made of real materials. After a brief discussion of the fabrication procedure, which typically results in elliptic rather than circular cylinders, the Lifshitz-type formulas for the Casimir force and for its gradient are derived. In the specific case of equal semiaxes, the resulting formulas coincide with those derived previously for circular cylinders. The nanofabrication procedure may also result in asymmetric cylindrical lenses obtained from parts of two different cylinders, or rotated through some angle about the axis of the cylinder. In these cases, the Lifshitz-type formulas for the Casimir force between a lens and a plate and for its gradient are also derived, and the influence of lens asymmetry is determined. Additionally, we obtain an expression for the shift of the natural frequency of a micromachined oscillator with an attached elliptic cylindrical lens interacting with a plate via the Casimir force in a nonlinear regime.

  5. Experimental Stress Analysis of Stiffened Cylinders with Cutouts : Shear Load

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosecrans, Richard; Schlechte , Floyd R

    1954-01-01

    A cylindrical semimonocoque shell of circular cross section was mounted as a cantilever and loaded by a direct shear at the tip. The cylinder was tested with no cutout, with a rectangular cutout on the tension side, and with the cutout centered on the neutral axis on one side of the cylinder. The cutout was successively enlarged through six sizes varying from 30 degrees to 130 degrees in circumference and from 1 and 2 bays in length. Strain measurements were made with resistance-type wire strain gages near the cutout on the stringers, the skin, and the rings for each case, and the stresses obtained are presented in tables. (author)

  6. Torque on a sphere inside a rotating cylinder.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mena, B.; Levinson, E.; Caswell, B.

    1972-01-01

    A circular cylinder of finite dimensions is made to rotate around a sphere fixed in the center of the cylinder. The couple on the sphere is measured over a wide range of rotational speeds for both Newtonian and non-Newtonian fluids. For the Newtonian liquids a comparison of the experimental results is made with Collins' (1955) expansion of the couple as a series in even powers of the angular Reynolds number. For non-Newtonian liquids the apparatus proves to be extremely useful for an accurate determination of the zero shear rate viscosity using only a small amount of fluid.

  7. Reordering transitions during annealing of block copolymer cylinder phases

    SciTech Connect

    Majewski, Pawel W.; Yager, Kevin G.

    2015-10-06

    While equilibrium block-copolymer morphologies are dictated by energy-minimization effects, the semi-ordered states observed experimentally often depend on the details of ordering pathways and kinetics. In this study, we explore reordering transitions in thin films of block-copolymer cylinder-forming polystyrene-block-poly(methyl methacrylate). We observe several transient states as films order towards horizontally-aligned cylinders. In particular, there is an early-stage reorganization from randomly-packed cylinders into hexagonally-packed vertically-aligned cylinders; followed by a reorientation transition from vertical to horizontal cylinder states. These transitions are thermally activated. The growth of horizontal grains within an otherwise vertical morphology proceeds anisotropically, resulting in anisotropic grains in the final horizontal state. The size, shape, and anisotropy of grains are influenced by ordering history; for instance, faster heating rates reduce grain anisotropy. These results help elucidate aspects of pathway-dependent ordering in block-copolymer thin films.

  8. Cylinder To Cylinder Balancing Using Intake Valve Actuation

    SciTech Connect

    Duffy, Kevin P.; Kieser, Andrew J.; Kilkenny, Jonathan P.

    2005-01-18

    A method and apparatus for balancing a combustion phasing between a plurality of cylinders located in an engine. The method and apparatus includes a determining a combustion timing in each cylinder, establishing a baseline parameter for a desired combustion timing, and varying actuation of at least one of a plurality of intake valves, each intake valve being in fluid communication with a corresponding cylinder, such that the combustion timing in each cylinder is substantially equal to the desired combustion timing.

  9. Noise control of a flow around a cylinder using high-frequency dielectric barrier discharge plasma actuators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kopiev, V. F.; Belyaev, I. V.; Zaytsev, M. Yu.; Kazansky, P. N.; Kopiev, V. A.; Moralev, I. A.

    2015-03-01

    The effect of high-frequency dielectric barrier discharge plasma actuators on the noise of a flow around a circular cylinder is experimentally studied. It is shown that the plasma actuators are able to reduce the vortex noise of a cylinder within the range of velocities typical for aeroacoustic applications.

  10. Preliminary Drag and Heat-transfer Data Obtained from Air-launched Cone-cylinder Test Vehicle over Mach Number Range from 1.5 to 5.18

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Messing, Wesley E; Rabb, Leonard; Disher, John H

    1953-01-01

    An air-launched cone-cylinder test vehicle designed to obtain data at Mach numbers above 4.0 was rocket boosted from a release Mach number of 5.18. The vehicle was launched at an altitude of 35,000 feet and reached peak velocity of 5150 feet per second at 28,500 feet. The total-drag coefficient (based on maximum cross-sectional area) decreased gradually from 0.31 at a Mach number of 1.75 to 0.145 at a Mach number of 5.18, while the Reynold's number (based on body length) increased from 31 x 10 to the 6th power to 107 x 10 to the 6th power. The skin friction coefficients, in general, were slightly lower than Van Driest's theoretical values for similar wall-temperature conditions. Convective heat-transfer coefficients were obtained from a single skin-thermocouple measurement. The maximum wall temperature recorded was 1240 degrees r.

  11. Regimes of flow induced vibration for tandem, tethered cylinders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nave, Gary; Stremler, Mark

    2015-11-01

    In the wake of a bluff body, there are a number of dynamic response regimes that exist for a trailing bluff body depending on spacing, structural restoring forces, and the mass-damping parameter m* ζ . For tandem cylinders with low values of m* ζ , two such regimes of motion are Gap Flow Switching and Wake Induced Vibration. In this study, we consider the dynamics of a single degree-of-freedom rigid cylinder in the wake of another in these regimes for a variety of center-to-center cylinder spacings (3-5 diameters) and Reynolds numbers (4,000-11,000). The system consists of a trailing cylinder constrained to a circular arc around a fixed leading cylinder, which, for small angle displacements, bears a close resemblance to the transversely oscillating cylinders found more commonly in existing literature. From experiments on this system, we compare and contrast the dynamic response within these two regimes. Our results show sustained oscillations in the absence of a structural restoring force in all cases, providing experimental support for the wake stiffness assumption, which is based on the mean lift toward the center line of flow.

  12. Turbine endwall single cylinder program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Langston, L. S.; Eckerle, W. A.

    1983-01-01

    Measurements of the flow field in front of a large-scale single cylinder, mounted in a wind tunnel are discussed. Static pressures on the endwall and cylinder surfaces, extensive five-hole probe pressures in front of and around the cylinder, and velocity fluctuations using a hot-wire probe where the flow is steady enough to yield meaningful results are included.

  13. Aerodynamic heating and the deflection of drops by an obstacle in an air stream in relation to aircraft icing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kantrowitz, Arthur

    1940-01-01

    Two topics of interest to persons attempting to apply the heat method of preventing ice formation on aircraft are considered. Surfaces moving through air at high speed are shown, both theoretically and experimentally, to be subject to important aerodynamic heating effects that will materially reduce the heat required to prevent ice. Numerical calculations of the path of water drops in an air stream around a circular cylinder are given. From these calculations, information is obtained on the percentage of the swept area cleared of drops.

  14. Effects of interference among three equidistantly arranged cylinders in a uniform flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tatsuno, Masakazu; Amamoto, Hajime; Ishi-i, Koji

    1998-05-01

    The effects of flow interference among three identical circular cylinders, which were arranged in an equidistant triangular cluster with their axes perpendicular to the uniform flow, were studied at various incidence angles to the uniform flow and at different spacing ratios. The static pressures around the circumference of each cylinder were measured individually and the drag and lift coefficients of each cylinder were determined at Reynolds number of 6.2×10 4 based on the diameter of a single cylinder. The effects of flow interference among the three cylinders are severe when the spacing ratios are small. When two cylinders arranged side by side are upstream of or behind the third one, the flow patterns are not symmetrical with respect to the uniform flow direction and the drag or lift coefficients of the two cylinders in the side-by-side arrangement are not always equal to each other at small spacing ratios. The inclination angles to the uniform flow strongly influence the drag and lift coefficients, the direction of force exerted on each cylinder and the flow patterns around the cylinders. The effects of interference among three cylinders become weak as the spacing ratios are increased.

  15. Effect of free surface on near-wake flow of elliptic cylinders with different aspect ratios

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Sang Joon; Daichin, -

    2003-04-01

    The flow fields behind elliptic cylinders with different aspect ratios adjacent to a free surface were investigated experimentally in a circulating water channel. The elliptic cylinders tested in this study have same cross section area. For each elliptic cylinder, the experiments were carried out under different conditions by varying the submergence depth of the cylinder beneath the free surface. The flow fields were measured using a single-frame double-exposure PIV system. For each experimental condition, 350 instantaneous velocity fields were captured and ensemble-averaged to obtain the mean flow field information and spatial distribution of turbulent statistics. The near-wakes can be basically classified into three typical patterns, which are formation of Coanda effect, generation of substantial jet-like flow, and attachment of jet flow to the free surface. The general flow structures behind the elliptic cylinder are similar to previous results for a circular submerged near to a free surface. However, the wake width and the angle of downward deflection of the shear layer developed from the lower surface of the elliptic cylinder are smaller than those for the circular cylinder. These trends are enhance with increasing of the cylinder aspect ratios.

  16. Experimental Investigation of Scattering from Randomly Rough Plastic Cylinders

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-09-01

    fluid, here following the form from Morse and Ingard [20] and Skudrzyk [21]. First, the adiabatic equation of state relating the pressure, p, and...wavelength, we get the standard relation between the particle velocity and the pressure u = -VP. (2.6) Rayleigh [19] and Morse and Ingard [20] derive the...the internal and scattered fields, Rayleigh [191 and Morse and Ingard [20] solve for the scattered field from an infinitely long circular cylinder by

  17. Flow-Induced Vibration of Circular Cylindrical Structures

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Shoei-Sheng

    1985-06-01

    Flow-induced vibration is a term to denote those phenomena associated with the response of structures placed in or conveying fluid flow. More specifically, the terra covers those cases in which an interaction develops between fluid-dynamic forces and the inertia, damping or elastic forces in the structures. The study of these phenomena draws on three disciplines: (1) structural mechanics, (2) mechanical vibration, and (3) fluid dynamics. The vibration of circular cylinders subject to flow has been known to man since ancient times; the vibration of a wire at its natural frequency in response to vortex shedding was known in ancient Greece as aeolian tones. But systematic studies of the problem were not made until a century ago when Strouhal established the relationship between vortex shedding frequency and flow velocity for a given cylinder diameter. The early research in this area has beer summarized by Zdravkovich (1985) and Goldstein (1965). Flow-induced structural vibration has been experienced in numerous fields, including the aerospace industry, power generation/transmission (turbine blades, heat exchanger tubes, nuclear reactor components), civil engineering (bridges, building, smoke stacks), and undersea technology. The problems have usually been encountered or created accidentally through improper design. In most cases, a structural or mechanical component, designed to meet specific objectives, develops problems when the undesired effects of flow field have not been accounted for in the design. When a flow-induced vibration problem is noted in the design stage, the engineer has different options to eliminate the detrimental vibration. Unfortunately, in many situations, the problems occur after the components are already in operation; the "fix" usually is very costly. Flow-induced vibration comprises complex and diverse phenomena; subcritical vibration of nuclear fuel assemblies, galloping of transmission lines, flutter of pipes conveying fluid, and whirling

  18. The elasticity problem for a thick-walled cylinder containing a circumferential crack

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nied, H. F.; Erdogan, F.

    1982-01-01

    The elasticity problem for a long hollow circular cylinder containing an axisymmetric circumferential crack subjected to general nonaxisymmetric external loads is considered. The problem is formulated in terms of a system of singular integral equations with the Fourier coefficients of the derivative of the crack surface displacement as density functions. The stress intensity factors and the crack opening displacement are calculated for a cylinder under uniform tension, bending by end couples, and self-equilibrating residual stresses.

  19. Turbulent natural convection between a perforated vertical cylinder and a surrounding array

    SciTech Connect

    McEligot, D.M.; Stoots, C.M.; Christenson, W.A.; O'Brien, J.E.; Mecham, D.C.; Lussie, W.G.

    1992-01-01

    A number of situations can be hypothesized to occur in an advanced or special purpose nuclear reactor such that the core is filled with a gas but there is no forced flow to remove the thermal energy evolved. Experiments were conducted by resistively hearing a vertical circular cylinder of length-to-diameter ratio of about 160 centered inside a concentric perforated tube which was, in turn, surrounded by three larger diameter tubes cooled internally with water flow. The ratio of the test section temperature to the cooling tube temperature was varied up to 2.6; and the Rayleigh number, based on tube diameter and properties evaluated at the cooling tube temperature, ranged from 2.9 x 10{sup 4} to 9.2 x 10{sup 5}. Results indicate that the convective heat transfer parameters for the perforated tube are about fifteen per cent higher than for the smooth bare tube centered in the same position relative to the array. The Nusselt number for convective heat transfer across the annulus between the heated test section and the perforated tube corresponded to parallel laminar flow.

  20. Turbulent natural convection between a perforated vertical cylinder and a surrounding array

    SciTech Connect

    McEligot, D.M.; Stoots, C.M.; Christenson, W.A.; O`Brien, J.E.; Mecham, D.C.; Lussie, W.G.

    1992-09-01

    A number of situations can be hypothesized to occur in an advanced or special purpose nuclear reactor such that the core is filled with a gas but there is no forced flow to remove the thermal energy evolved. Experiments were conducted by resistively hearing a vertical circular cylinder of length-to-diameter ratio of about 160 centered inside a concentric perforated tube which was, in turn, surrounded by three larger diameter tubes cooled internally with water flow. The ratio of the test section temperature to the cooling tube temperature was varied up to 2.6; and the Rayleigh number, based on tube diameter and properties evaluated at the cooling tube temperature, ranged from 2.9 x 10{sup 4} to 9.2 x 10{sup 5}. Results indicate that the convective heat transfer parameters for the perforated tube are about fifteen per cent higher than for the smooth bare tube centered in the same position relative to the array. The Nusselt number for convective heat transfer across the annulus between the heated test section and the perforated tube corresponded to parallel laminar flow.

  1. Scattering by an elliptic cylinder with a strongly elongated cross section

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andronov, I. V.; Lavrov, Yu. A.

    2015-07-01

    The paper continues an earlier study devoted to the asymptotic behavior of the field in the boundary layer near the surface of an elliptic cylinder. Using the Kirchhoff formula, the previously derived asymptotics are recalculated to the far field asymptotics, which are considered within a narrow sector near the major axis of the cylinder's cross section. The resulting asymptotic expressions are uniform with respect to the parameter characterizing the elongation of the ellipse and make it possible to trace the variation of the far field pattern from the limiting case of a strip to the case of a circular cylinder.

  2. Literature review and experimental results for a cylinder with perforations and protrusions at high Reynolds numbers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, G. S.; Horvath, T. J.; Stainback, P. C.; Beasley, W. D.; Mcghee, R. J.

    1987-01-01

    The NASA Langley Low Turbulence Pressure Tunnel has been used to conduct an experimental study of the flow around a series of circular cylinders; the models used consisted of a baseline, smooth cylinder together with a cylinder that could be reconfigured with six different arrangements of two types of surface irregularity. Mean lift and drag forces were measured on all seven model configurations, and correlations were made between unsteady pressure in the wake region and fluctuating lift forces, in order to identify coherent structures.

  3. Stability of the circular Couette flow of a ferrofluid in an axial magnetic field: influence of polydispersity.

    PubMed

    Leschhorn, A; Lücke, M; Hoffmann, C; Altmeyer, S

    2009-03-01

    The gap between two concentric rotating cylinders is filled with a ferrofluid. A homogeneous magnetic field is applied parallel to the cylinder axis. The stability of the circular Couette flow is analyzed with different models that take into account the polydispersity of the ferrofluid to a varying degree. Their results are compared and their merits are discussed.

  4. Immersed boundary modeling for interaction of oscillatory flow with cylinder array under effects of flow direction and cylinder arrangement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chern, Ming-Jyh; Shiu, Wei-Cheng; Horng, Tzyy-Leng

    2013-11-01

    An array of cylindrical structures are often used as a frame of an offshore platform. The prediction of hydrodynamic loadings on those cylindrical structures due to oscillatory flows is one of the most important issues in the design of those offshore structures. The aim of this study is to apply a direct-forcing immersed boundary method to simulating the oscillatory flow past a circular cylinder array in a square arrangement. The finite volume method was used to solve the Navier-Stokes equations. In this study, the effects of Keulegan-Carpenter (KC) number, oblique flow and the gap among four cylinders were investigated. Numerical results were visualized using vorticity contours so evolutions of oscillatory flow with the cylinder array were presented. Hydrodynamic loadings including in-line and transverse force coefficients were determined and illustrated in the time and spectral domains. Essentially, the proposed direct-forcing immersed boundary approach can be useful for scientists and engineers who would like to understand the interaction of the oscillatory flow with an array of cylinders and to estimate hydrodynamic loadings on the array of cylinders.

  5. Non-invasive determination of external forces in vortex-pair-cylinder interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartmann, D.; Schröder, W.; Shashikanth, B. N.

    2012-06-01

    Expressions for the conserved linear and angular momenta of a dynamically coupled fluid + solid system are derived. Based on the knowledge of the flow velocity field, these expressions allow the determination of the external forces exerted on a body moving in the fluid such as, e.g., swimming fish. The verification of the derived conserved quantities is done numerically. The interaction of a vortex pair with a circular cylinder in various configurations of motions representing a generic test case for a dynamically coupled fluid + solid system is investigated in a weakly compressible Navier-Stokes setting using a Cartesian cut-cell method, i.e., the moving circular cylinder is represented by cut cells on a moving mesh. The objectives of this study are twofold. The first objective is to show the robustness of the derived expressions for the conserved linear and angular momenta with respect to bounded and discrete data sets. The second objective is to study the coupled dynamics of the vortex pair and a neutrally buoyant cylinder free to move in response to the fluid stresses exerted on its surface. A comparison of the vortex-body interaction with the case of a fixed circular cylinder evidences significant differences in the vortex dynamics. When the cylinder is fixed strong secondary vorticity is generated resulting in a repeating process between the primary vortex pair and the cylinder. In the neutrally buoyant cylinder case, a stable structure consisting of the primary vortex pair and secondary vorticity shear layers stays attached to the moving cylinder. In addition to these fundamental cases, the vortex-pair-cylinder interaction is studied for locomotion at constant speed and locomotion at constant thrust. It is shown that a similar vortex structure like in the neutrally buoyant cylinder case is obtained when the cylinder moves away from the approaching vortex pair at a constant speed smaller than the vortex pair translational velocity. Finally, the idealized

  6. 15. CYLINDER DETAILS; DETAILS OF STEEL FOR CYLINDERS NO. 50 ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    15. CYLINDER DETAILS; DETAILS OF STEEL FOR CYLINDERS NO. 50 (PIER 5) AND NO. 66 (PIER 6), DWG. 83, CH BY AF, ECL, APPROVED BY O.F. LACKEY, MAY 18, 1908 - Baltimore Inner Harbor, Pier 5, South of Pratt Street between Market Place & Concord Street, Baltimore, Independent City, MD

  7. PIV measurements of near wake behind a U-grooved cylinder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, H.-C.; Lee, S.-J.

    2003-08-01

    The flow structure around a circular cylinder with U-grooved surfaces has been investigated experimentally. The results were compared with that of a smooth cylinder having the same diameter. Drag force and turbulence statistics of wake behind each cylinder were measured for Reynolds numbers based on the cylinder diameter (/D=60mm) in the range ReD=8×103-1.4×105. At ReD=1.4×105, the U-type grooves reduce the drag coefficient acting on the cylinder by 18.6%, compared with that of smooth cylinder. The flow characteristics of wake behind the U-grooved cylinder have been analyzed using two kinds of particle image velocimetry (PIV) velocity measurement techniques, cinematic PIV and high-resolution PIV. Consecutive instantaneous velocity fields were measured using the cinematic PIV technique at time interval of 5ms, corresponding to about 1% of the vortex shedding frequency of the wake. The instantaneous velocity fields measured with the high-resolution PIV technique were ensemble-averaged to get the spatial distributions of turbulent statistics including turbulent intensities and turbulent kinetic energy. For the case of smooth cylinder, large-scale vortices formed behind the cylinder maintain round shape and do not spread out noticeably in the near wake. However, for the case of U-grooved cylinder, the vortices are largely distorted and spread out significantly as they go downstream. The longitudinal grooves seem to shift the location of spanwise vortices toward the cylinder, reducing the vortex formation region, compared with the smooth cylinder. The sharp peaks of longitudinal U-shaped grooves also suppress the formation of large-scale secondary streamwise vortices. The secondary vortices are broken into smaller eddies, reducing turbulent kinetic energy in the near-wake region.

  8. Heat transfer in gas turbine engines and three-dimensional flows; Proceedings of the Symposium, ASME Winter Annual Meeting, Chicago, IL, Nov. 27-Dec. 2, 1988

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elovic, E.; O'Brien, J. E.; Pepper, D. W.

    The present conference on heat transfer characteristics of gas turbines and three-dimensional flows discusses velocity-temperature fluctuation correlations at the flow stagnation flow of a circular cylinder in turbulent flow, heat transfer across turbulent boundary layers with pressure gradients, the effect of jet grid turbulence on boundary layer heat transfer, and heat transfer characteristics predictions for discrete-hole film cooling. Also discussed are local heat transfer in internally cooled turbine airfoil leading edges, secondary flows in vane cascades and curved ducts, three-dimensional numerical modeling in gas turbine coal combustor design, numerical and experimental results for tube-fin heat exchanger airflow and heating characteristics, and the computation of external hypersonic three-dimensional flow field and heat transfer characteristics.

  9. Laminar flow developing heat transfer in circular sector ducts with H1{sub a} and H2{sub a} boundary conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Chung, B.T.F.; Hsia, R.P.

    1994-10-01

    Hydrodynamically developed and thermally developing laminar incompressible forced-convective flow in ducts containing twisted-tape inserts is analyzed. The flow is subjected to either uniform temperature or uniform heat flux on the curved duct surface, and the straight duct surfaces are insulated. The heat input into the fluid is only from the curved duct surface and is uniform axially. The thermal properties are assumed constant; the axial conduction and viscous dissipation are negligibly small. Numerical calculations of the temperature field and Nusselt number march forward axially in the thermal entrance region. The solutions of the developing temperature field as well as the heat transfer coefficient are presented as functions of axial distance for different opening angles of sector. Comparisons are made between computed results and some analytical and numerical findings reported in the literature. In all cases, satisfactory comparisons are attained.

  10. Partially ionized gas flow and heat transfer in the separation, reattachment, and redevelopment regions downstream of an abrupt circular channel expansion.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Back, L. H.; Massier, P. F.; Roschke, E. J.

    1972-01-01

    Heat transfer and pressure measurements obtained in the separation, reattachment, and redevelopment regions along a tube and nozzle located downstream of an abrupt channel expansion are presented for a very high enthalpy flow of argon. The ionization energy fraction extended up to 0.6 at the tube inlet just downstream of the arc heater. Reattachment resulted from the growth of an instability in the vortex sheet-like shear layer between the central jet that discharged into the tube and the reverse flow along the wall at the lower Reynolds numbers, as indicated by water flow visualization studies which were found to dynamically model the high-temperature gas flow. A reasonably good prediction of the heat transfer in the reattachment region where the highest heat transfer occurred and in the redevelopment region downstream can be made by using existing laminar boundary layer theory for a partially ionized gas. In the experiments as much as 90 per cent of the inlet energy was lost by heat transfer to the tube and the nozzle wall.

  11. Experimental Investigation of Average Heat-Transfer and Friction Coefficients for Air Flowing in Circular Tubes Having Square-Thread-Type Roughness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sams, E. W.

    1952-01-01

    An investigation of forced-convection heat transfer and associated pressure drops was conducted with air flowing through electrically heated Inconel tubes having various degrees of square-thread-type roughness, an inside diameter of 1/2 inch, and a length of 24 inches. were obtained for tubes having conventional roughness ratios (height of thread/radius of tube) of 0 (smooth tube), 0.016, 0.025, and 0.037 over ranges of bulk Reynolds numbers up to 350,000, average inside-tube-wall temperatures up to 1950deg R, and heat-flux densities up to 115,000 Btu per hour per square foot. Data The experimental data showed that both heat transfer and friction increased with increase in surface roughness, becoming more pronounced with increase in Reynolds number; for a given roughness, both heat transfer and friction were also influenced by the tube wall-to-bulk temperature ratio. Good correlation of the heat-transfer data for all the tubes investigated was obtained by use of a modification of the conventional Nusselt correlation parameters wherein the mass velocity in the Reynolds number was replaced by the product of air density evaluated at the average film temperature and the so-called friction velocity; in addition, the physical properties of air were evaluated at the average film temperature. The isothermal friction data for the rough tubes, when plotted in the conventional manner, resulted in curves similar to those obtained by other investigators; that is, the curve for a given roughness breaks away from the Blasius line (representing turbulent flow in smooth tubes) at some value of Reynolds number, which decreases with increase in surface roughness, and then becomes a horizontal line (friction coefficient independent of Reynolds number). A comparison of the friction data for the rough tubes used herein indicated that the conventional roughness ratio is not an adequate measure of relative roughness for tubes having a square-thread-type element. The present data, as well

  12. Thermo-Mechanical Analyses of Dynamically Loaded Rubber Cylinders

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Arthur R.; Chen, Tzi-Kang

    2002-01-01

    Thick rubber components are employed by the Army to carry large loads. In tanks, rubber covers road wheels and track systems to protect roadways. It is difficult for design engineers to simulate the details of the hysteretic heating for large strain viscoelastic deformations. In this study, an approximation to the viscoelastic energy dissipated per unit time is investigated for use in estimating mechanically induced viscoelastic heating. Coupled thermo-mechanical simulations of large cyclic deformations of rubber cylinders are presented. The cylinders are first compressed axially and then cyclically loaded about the compressed state. Details of the algorithm and some computational issues are discussed. The coupled analyses are conducted for tall and short rubber cylinders both with and without imbedded metal disks.

  13. Carbon-carbon cylinder block

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ransone, Philip O. (Inventor)

    1998-01-01

    A lightweight cylinder block composed of carbon-carbon is disclosed. The use of carbon-carbon over conventional materials, such as cast iron or aluminum, reduces the weight of the cylinder block and improves thermal efficiency of the internal combustion reciprocating engine. Due to the negligible coefficient of thermal expansion and unique strength at elevated temperatures of carbon-carbon, the piston-to-cylinder wall clearance can be small, especially when the carbon-carbon cylinder block is used in conjunction with a carbon-carbon piston. Use of the carbon-carbon cylinder block has the effect of reducing the weight of other reciprocating engine components allowing the piston to run at higher speeds and improving specific engine performance.

  14. Individual cylinder knock control by detecting cylinder pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Sawamoto, K.; Kawamura, Y.; Kita, T.; Matsushita, K.

    1987-01-01

    To improve available power, tolerance to variation in fuel octane number and high engine speed knock control, an individual cylinder knock control has been developed. Knock are detected by spark plug washer transducers, which indicate individual cylinder pressures.) Last year the authors read a paper entitled ''Cylinder Pressure Vibration Analysis Indicates Accurate Knock Detection''. They read continuously on the following items. Spark plug washer transducers - These are piezoelectric ceramic rings which fit beneath individual spark plugs. These can detect knock at high engine speed, and are very durable. Knock detection and control algorithm - Knock is indicated by the transducer's cylinder pressure vibration signal. When knock occurs in the cylinder, the ignition timing of the cylinder is controlled. During the transient condition, control response is fast by learning control. Fail safe - At transducer trouble, the ignition timing of the cylinder is controlled by other transducer signals. Electric control unit - It is included in NISSANs Electronic Concentrated Engine Control System (ECCS). Effects of this control - It improved WOT torque by 7-15%, torelance to variation in fuel octane number, and high engine speed control performance.

  15. Heat Transfer Enhancement for Finned-Tube Heat Exchangers with Vortex Generators: Experimental and Numerical Results

    SciTech Connect

    O'Brien, James Edward; Sohal, Manohar Singh; Huff, George Albert

    2002-08-01

    A combined experimental and numerical investigation is under way to investigate heat transfer enhancement techniques that may be applicable to large-scale air-cooled condensers such as those used in geothermal power applications. The research is focused on whether air-side heat transfer can be improved through the use of finsurface vortex generators (winglets,) while maintaining low heat exchanger pressure drop. A transient heat transfer visualization and measurement technique has been employed in order to obtain detailed distributions of local heat transfer coefficients on model fin surfaces. Pressure drop measurements have also been acquired in a separate multiple-tube row apparatus. In addition, numerical modeling techniques have been developed to allow prediction of local and average heat transfer for these low-Reynolds-number flows with and without winglets. Representative experimental and numerical results presented in this paper reveal quantitative details of local fin-surface heat transfer in the vicinity of a circular tube with a single delta winglet pair downstream of the cylinder. The winglets were triangular (delta) with a 1:2 height/length aspect ratio and a height equal to 90% of the channel height. Overall mean fin-surface Nusselt-number results indicate a significant level of heat transfer enhancement (average enhancement ratio 35%) associated with the deployment of the winglets with oval tubes. Pressure drop measurements have also been obtained for a variety of tube and winglet configurations using a single-channel flow apparatus that includes four tube rows in a staggered array. Comparisons of heat transfer and pressure drop results for the elliptical tube versus a circular tube with and without winglets are provided. Heat transfer and pressure-drop results have been obtained for flow Reynolds numbers based on channel height and mean flow velocity ranging from 700 to 6500.

  16. Transition along a finite-length cylinder in the presence of a thin boundary layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Hanfeng; Peng, Si; Zhou, Yu; He, Xuhui

    2016-05-01

    This work aims to investigate experimentally the transition of the aerodynamic forces on a cantilevered circular cylinder immersed in a thin boundary layer whose thickness is comparable to the cylinder diameter d. The aspect ratio H/ d of the cylinder is 5, where H is the cylinder height. The Reynolds number Re, based on the freestream velocity ( U ∞ ) and d, is varied from 0.68 × 105 to 6.12 × 105, covering the subcritical, critical and supercritical regimes. It has been found that the flow transition is non-uniform along the cylinder span, taking place at a smaller Re near the cylinder free end than near the base. Furthermore, the sectional drag coefficient of the cantilevered cylinder is smaller relative to that of a two-dimensional cylinder in the subcritical regime, but larger than the later in the supercritical regime. The sectional lift coefficient is not zero in the critical regime, with its maximum near the free end reaching almost four times of that near the base.

  17. Low-frequency oscillations of a cylinder in a viscous fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amin, Norsarahaida

    1988-05-01

    The flow induced by a circular cylinder oscillating in a viscous fluid when the amplitude of the oscillation is small and the frequecy is low is considered. This solution, obtained by the method of matched asymptotic expansions, is compared with the solution obtained from an Oseen approximation to the governing equations by Andres and Ingard (1953).

  18. [Circular migration in Indonesia].

    PubMed

    Mantra, I B

    1979-12-01

    The author examines circular migration in Indonesia, with primary focus on the 1970s. It is found that circular, or repeated return migration, generally occurs over short distances and for short periods and is more frequent than lifetime migration. The relationships between improvements in the national transport system, access to labor force opportunities in both the formal and informal sectors of the economy, and circular migration are discussed.

  19. Toroidal circular dichroism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raybould, T. A.; Fedotov, V. A.; Papasimakis, N.; Kuprov, I.; Youngs, I. J.; Chen, W. T.; Tsai, D. P.; Zheludev, N. I.

    2016-07-01

    We demonstrate that the induced toroidal dipole, represented by currents flowing on the surface of a torus, makes a distinct and indispensable contribution to circular dichroism. We show that toroidal circular dichroism supplements the well-known mechanism involving electric dipole and magnetic dipole transitions. We illustrate this with rigorous analysis of the experimentally measured polarization-sensitive transmission spectra of an artificial metamaterial, constructed from elements of toroidal symmetry. We argue that toroidal circular dichroism will be found in large biomolecules with elements of toroidal symmetry and should be taken into account in the interpretation of circular dichroism spectra of organics.

  20. A New Facility for Measurements of Three-Dimensional, Local Subcooled Flow Boiling Heat Flux and Related Critical Heat Flux for PFCs

    SciTech Connect

    Boyd, Ronald D. Sr.; Cofie, Penrose; Li Qingyuan; Ekhlassi, Ali A

    2002-01-15

    In the development of plasma-facing components for fusion reactors and high-heat-flux heat sinks (or components) for electronic applications, the components are usually subjected to a peripherally nonuniform heat flux. Even if the applied heat flux is uniform in the axial direction (which is unlikely), both intuition and recent investigations have clearly shown that both the local heat flux and the eventual critical heat flux (CHF) in this three-dimensional (3-D) case will differ significantly from similar quantities found in the voluminous body of data for uniformly heated flow channels. Although this latter case has been used in the past as an estimate for the former case, more study has become necessary to examine the 3-D temperature and heat flux distributions and related CHF. Work thus far has shown that the nonuniform peripheral heat flux condition enhances CHF in some cases.To avoid the excess costs associated with using electron or ion beams to produce the nonuniform heat flux, a new facility was developed that will allow 3-D conjugate heat transfer measurements and two-dimensional, local subcooled flow boiling heat flux and related CHF measurements.The configurations under study for this work consist of (a) a nonuniformly heated cylinder-like test section with a circular coolant channel bored through the center and (b) a monoblock that is a square cross-section parallelepiped with a circular drilled flow channel along the channel centerline. The theoretical or ideal cylinder-like test section would be a circular cylinder with half (-90 to 90 deg) of its outside boundary subjected to a uniform heat flux and the remaining half insulated. For the monoblock, a uniform heat flux is applied to one of the outside surfaces, and the remaining surfaces are insulated. The outside diameter of the cylinder-like test section is 30.0 mm, and its length is 200.0 mm. The monoblock square is 30.0 mm long. The inside diameter of the flow channel for both types of test

  1. Eigenfrequencies of vortex-pair equilibria near an elliptic cylinder or a flat plate in uniform flow.

    PubMed

    de Laat, T W G

    2007-03-01

    The eigenfrequencies of the potential-flow equilibria of a symmetric vortex pair behind an elliptic cylinder in uniform flow are calculated through the use of conformal mapping. These frequencies are shown to have values in agreement with measured Strouhal numbers reported in various papers. The special cases of the potential-flow equilibrium of a symmetric vortex pair behind a circular cylinder and the equilibrium behind a flat plate perpendicular to the uniform flow, are related to the measured Strouhal numbers of about 0.21 and 0.15, respectively. It is suggested that in the range of subcritical Reynolds numbers, 3x10(2) to 5x10(5) for the circular cylinder, a part of the drag is the result of the presence of a mean recirculation region in the near wake, which sheds vortices in the far wake and which is fed by vorticity from the cylinder wall.

  2. Broadband computation of the scattering coefficients of infinite arbitrary cylinders.

    PubMed

    Blanchard, Cédric; Guizal, Brahim; Felbacq, Didier

    2012-07-01

    We employ a time-domain method to compute the near field on a contour enclosing infinitely long cylinders of arbitrary cross section and constitution. We therefore recover the cylindrical Hankel coefficients of the expansion of the field outside the circumscribed circle of the structure. The recovered coefficients enable the wideband analysis of complex systems, e.g., the determination of the radar cross section becomes straightforward. The prescription for constructing such a numerical tool is provided in great detail. The method is validated by computing the scattering coefficients for a homogeneous circular cylinder illuminated by a plane wave, a problem for which an analytical solution exists. Finally, some radiation properties of an optical antenna are examined by employing the proposed technique.

  3. Radiative configuration factors from cylinders to coaxial axisymmetric bodies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saltiel, C.; Naraghi, M. H. N.

    1990-01-01

    Exact solutions are obtained for the radiative configuration factor between differential elements of arbitrary orientation and cylinders. A general method is then proposed for calculating the view factor from a cylinder to a coaxial axisymmetric body using only a single numerical integration. The method is illustrated for axisymmetric bodies with function generators described by a power law equation. The method may be useful in calculating radiative heat transfer between cylindrical bodies and high-density exhaust gases and between annular radiative fins and their bases.

  4. Assembly for electrical conductivity measurements in the piston cylinder device

    DOEpatents

    Watson, Heather Christine [Dublin, CA; Roberts, Jeffrey James [Livermore, CA

    2012-06-05

    An assembly apparatus for measurement of electrical conductivity or other properties of a sample in a piston cylinder device wherein pressure and heat are applied to the sample by the piston cylinder device. The assembly apparatus includes a body, a first electrode in the body, the first electrode operatively connected to the sample, a first electrical conductor connected to the first electrode, a washer constructed of a hard conducting material, the washer surrounding the first electrical conductor in the body, a second electrode in the body, the second electrode operatively connected to the sample, and a second electrical conductor connected to the second electrode.

  5. Conformal microstrip arrays on cylinders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ashkenazy, J.; Shtrikman, S.; Treves, D.

    1988-04-01

    Design and measured results for two X-band conformal microstrip arrays are presented. The two 4 x 4 arrays are built on the surface of a cylinder of small radius. They differ by the orientation of small radius. They differ by the orientation of the elements relative to the cylinder axis. The measured directivities and radiation patterns are in reasonable agreement with theoretical predictions.

  6. Turbine endwall single cylinder program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Langston, L. S.

    1982-01-01

    Detailed measurement of the flow field in front of a large-scale single cylinder, mounted in a wind tunnel is discussed. A better understanding of the three dimensional separation occuring in front of the cylinder on the endwall, and of the vortex system that is formed is sought. A data base with which to check analytical and numerical computer models of three dimensional flows is also anticipated.

  7. A low-order model for flow control studies in cylinder wakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balasubramanian, Ganapathi; Olinger, David J.; Demetriou, Michael

    1998-11-01

    Control of three-dimensional wake structures behind circular cylinders is investigated using a previously developed coupled map lattice. The map consists of circle map oscillators along the cylinder span coupled by a diffusion model. Our goal is to develop an efficient model for flow control studies in cylinder wakes. Complex vortex shedding patterns, such as vortex dislocations and frequency cells, are observed behind vibrating cables in uniform freestream flows and stationary cylinders in sheared flows. These structures are controlled by the addition of periodic control signals to the forcing term in the map. Discontinuous nonlinear control theory is used to derive the control laws. Parallel shedding is realized for the case of uniform flow and oblique shedding is achieved for sheared inflows. The effectiveness of the discontinuous nonlinear control theory is compared with the previous application of chaos control theory to the coupled map lattice.

  8. Computation of hydrodynamic loads on a bottom-mounted surface piercing cylinder

    SciTech Connect

    Haas, P.C.A. de; Berkvens, P.J.F.; Broeze, J.; Daalen, E.F.G. van; Zandbergen, P.J.

    1995-12-31

    The authors present a numerical three-dimensional time-domain method which is used to study the nonlinear wave diffraction by a vertical bottom-mounted cylinder. The flow evolution is computed using a fourth-order Runge-Kutta scheme. Laplace`s equation for the velocity potential is solved by a boundary element method. The free-surface conditions are applied on the actual water surface, the pressure on the cylinder is integrated over its actual wetted surface. The authors compute the nonlinear diffraction of steady periodic waves compute the nonlinear diffraction of steady periodic waves by a fixed surface-piercing circular cylinder. The prediction of the horizontal force acting on the cylinder is in good agreement with experimental observations and other numerical results.

  9. Piezoelectric actuator models for active sound and vibration control of cylinders

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lester, Harold C.; Lefebvre, Sylvie

    1993-01-01

    Analytical models for piezoelectric actuators, adapted from flat plate concepts, are developed for noise and vibration control applications associated with vibrating circular cylinders. The loadings applied to the cylinder by the piezoelectric actuators for the bending and in-plane force models are approximated by line moment and line force distributions, respectively, acting on the perimeter of the actuator patch area. Coupling between the cylinder and interior acoustic cavity is examined by studying the modal spectra, particularly for the low-order cylinder modes that couple efficiently with the cavity at low frequencies. Within the scope of this study, the in-plane force model produced a more favorable distribution of low-order modes, necessary for efficient interior noise control, than did the bending model.

  10. Turbulent Flow Past Spinning Cylinders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mehmedagic, Igbal; Carlucci, Donald; Carlucci, Pasquale; Thangam, Siva

    2009-11-01

    Flow past cylinders aligned along their axis where a base freely spins while attached to a non-spinning forebody is considered from a computational and experimental point of view. The time-averaged equations of motion and energy are solved using the modeled form of transport equations for the turbulence kinetic energy and the scalar form of turbulence dissipation with an efficient finite-volume algorithm. An anisotropic two-equation Reynolds-stress model that incorporates the effect of rotation-modified energy spectrum and swirl is used to perform computations for the flow past axially rotating cylinders. Both rigid cylinders as well as that of cylinders with free-spinning base are considered from a computational point of view. A subsonic wind tunnel with a forward-sting mounted spinning cylinder is used for experiments. Experiments are performed for a range of spin rates and free stream flow conditions. The experimental results of Carlucci & Thangam (2001) are used to benchmark flow over spinning cylinders. The data is extended to munitions spinning in the wake of other munitions. Applications involving the design of projectiles are discussed.

  11. Experimental Investigation of Piston Heat Transfer in a Light Duty Engine

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-01-01

    Experimental Investigation of Piston Heat Transfer in a Light Duty Engine Eric Gingrich Experimental Setup Single- Cylinder Engine...Laboratory Experiments were conducted in a light-duty single- cylinder engine based on the General Motors/Fiat JTD 1.9L four- cylinder diesel engine. A stock...four cylinder head was installed atop a single cylinder block. Valves for cylinder #2 were activated by the dual overhead cams. The valvetrain for

  12. Numerical study of the laminar natural convection flow around an array of two horizontal isothermal cylinders

    SciTech Connect

    Chouikh, R.; Guizani, A.; Maalej, M.; Belghith, A.

    1999-04-01

    The amount of work accomplished in the area of natural convection heat transfer in interacting flow fields around an array of cylinders has increased in the last years. There is a growing demand for a better understanding of this phenomenon in areas like heat exchangers, electronic devices, solar heating and storing technology among others. Here, natural convection heat transfer from an array of heated cylinders has received attention in recent years. However, most of the previous investigations has been experimental and has been restricted to the influence of geometrical parameters on the overall heat transfer. The present work is devoted to the numerical study of laminar natural convection flow from an array of two horizontal isothermal cylinders. This work, that enters within the framework of general study dealing with an array of several cylinders, states the problem in Cartesian coordinates system, involves the use of a control-volume method and solves the full vorticity transport equation together with the stream function and energy equations. The modifications of the average Nusselt number evolution compared with the single cylinder are explained in terms of velocity and temperature fields of the flow around the cylinders. Results are obtained for variety of combinations of spacing and numbers of Rayleigh.

  13. An Approach to Study Elastic Vibrations of Fractal Cylinders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steinberg, Lev; Zepeda, Mario

    2016-11-01

    This paper presents our study of dynamics of fractal solids. Concepts of fractal continuum and time had been used in definitions of a fractal body deformation and motion, formulation of conservation of mass, balance of momentum, and constitutive relationships. A linearized model, which was written in terms of fractal time and spatial derivatives, has been employed to study the elastic vibrations of fractal circular cylinders. Fractal differential equations of torsional, longitudinal and transverse fractal wave equations have been obtained and solution properties such as size and time dependence have been revealed.

  14. Local Heat Transfer for Finned-Tube Heat Exchangers using Oval Tubes

    SciTech Connect

    O'Brien, James Edward; Sohal, Manohar Singh

    2000-08-01

    This paper presents the results of an experimental study of forced convection heat transfer in a narrow rectangular duct fitted with either a circular tube or an elliptical tube in crossflow. The duct was designed to simulate a single passage in a fin-tube heat exchanger. Heat transfer measurements were obtained using a transient technique in which a heated airflow is suddenly introduced to the test section. High-resolution local fin-surface temperature distributions were obtained at several times after initiation of the transient using an imaging infrared camera. Corresponding local fin-surface heat transfer coefficient distributions were then calculated from a locally applied one-dimensional semi-infinite inverse heat conduction model. Heat transfer results were obtained over an airflow rate ranging from 1.56 x 10-3 to 15.6 x 10-3 kg/s. These flow rates correspond to a duct-height Reynolds number range of 630 – 6300 with a duct height of 1.106 cm and a duct width-toheight ratio, W/H, of 11.25. The test cylinder was sized such that the diameter-to-duct height ratio, D/H is 5. The elliptical tube had an aspect ratio of 3:1 and a/H equal to 4.33. Results presented in this paper reveal visual and quantitative details of local fin-surface heat transfer distributions in the vicinity of circular and oval tubes and their relationship to the complex horseshoe vortex system that forms in the flow stagnation region. Fin surface stagnation-region Nusselt numbers are shown to be proportional to the square-root of Reynolds number.

  15. On The Solenoidal Heat Flux in Quasi-Ballistic Thermal Conduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramu, Ashok; Bowers, John

    The Boltzmann transport equation for phonons is recast directly in terms of the heat-flux by means of iteration followed by truncation at the second order in the spherical harmonic expansion of the distribution function. This procedure displays the heat-flux in an explicitly coordinate-invariant form, and leads to a natural decomposition into two components, namely the solenoidal component in addition to the usual irrotational component. The solenoidal heat-flux is explicitly shown to arise in a right-circular cylinder when the transport is in the quasi-ballistic regime. These findings are important in the context of phonon resonators that utilize the strong quasi-ballistic thermal transport reported recently in silicon membranes at room temperature. Effects due to circulating heat fluxes are noted in the effective thermal conductivity of silicon discs. This work was funded by the National Science Foundation, USA under Project Number CMMI-1363207.

  16. Collapse pressure analysis of transversely isotropic thick-walled cylinder using Lebesgue strain measure and transition theory.

    PubMed

    Aggarwal, A K; Sharma, Richa; Sharma, Sanjeev

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this paper is to provide guidance for the design of the thick-walled cylinder made up of transversely isotropic material so that collapse of cylinder due to influence of internal and external pressure can be avoided. The concept of transition theory based on Lebesgue strain measure has been used to simplify the constitutive equations. Results have been analyzed theoretically and discussed numerically. From this analysis, it has been concluded that, under the influence of internal and external pressure, circular cylinder made up of transversely isotropic material (beryl) is on the safer side of the design as compared to the cylinders made up of isotropic material (steel). This is because of the reason that percentage increase in effective pressure required for initial yielding to become fully plastic is high for beryl as compared to steel which leads to the idea of "stress saving" that reduces the possibility of collapse of thick-walled cylinder due to internal and external pressure.

  17. Reordering transitions during annealing of block copolymer cylinder phases

    DOE PAGES

    Majewski, Pawel W.; Yager, Kevin G.

    2015-10-06

    While equilibrium block-copolymer morphologies are dictated by energy-minimization effects, the semi-ordered states observed experimentally often depend on the details of ordering pathways and kinetics. In this study, we explore reordering transitions in thin films of block-copolymer cylinder-forming polystyrene-block-poly(methyl methacrylate). We observe several transient states as films order towards horizontally-aligned cylinders. In particular, there is an early-stage reorganization from randomly-packed cylinders into hexagonally-packed vertically-aligned cylinders; followed by a reorientation transition from vertical to horizontal cylinder states. These transitions are thermally activated. The growth of horizontal grains within an otherwise vertical morphology proceeds anisotropically, resulting in anisotropic grains in the final horizontalmore » state. The size, shape, and anisotropy of grains are influenced by ordering history; for instance, faster heating rates reduce grain anisotropy. These results help elucidate aspects of pathway-dependent ordering in block-copolymer thin films.« less

  18. Circular, explosion-proof lamp provides uniform illumination

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1966-01-01

    Circular explosion-proof fluorescent lamp is fitted around a TV camera lens to provide shadowless illumination with a low radiant heat flux. The lamp is mounted in a transparent acrylic housing sealed with clear silicone rubber.

  19. Squaring a Circular Segment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gordon, Russell

    2008-01-01

    Consider a circular segment (the smaller portion of a circle cut off by one of its chords) with chord length c and height h (the greatest distance from a point on the arc of the circle to the chord). Is there a simple formula involving c and h that can be used to closely approximate the area of this circular segment? Ancient Chinese and Egyptian…

  20. Filament winding cylinders. I - Process model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Soo-Yong; Springer, George S.

    1990-01-01

    A model was developed which describes the filament winding process of composite cylinders. The model relates the significant process variables such as winding speed, fiber tension, and applied temperature to the thermal, chemical and mechanical behavior of the composite cylinder and the mandrel. Based on the model, a user friendly code was written which can be used to calculate (1) the temperature in the cylinder and the mandrel, (2) the degree of cure and viscosity in the cylinder, (3) the fiber tensions and fiber positions, (4) the stresses and strains in the cylinder and in the mandrel, and (5) the void diameters in the cylinder.

  1. Laminar forced convection from a rotating horizontal cylinder in cross flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chandran, Prabul; Venugopal, G.; Jaleel, H. Abdul; Rajkumar, M. R.

    2017-04-01

    The influence of non-dimensional rotational velocity, flow Reynolds number and Prandtl number of the fluid on laminar forced convection from a rotating horizontal cylinder subject to constant heat flux boundary condition is numerically investigated. The numerical simulations have been conducted using commercial Computational Fluid Dynamics package CFX available in ANSYS Workbench 14. Results are presented for the non-dimensional rotational velocity α ranging from 0 to 4, flow Reynolds number from 25 to 40 and Prandtl number of the fluid from 0.7 to 5.4. The rotational effects results in reduction in heat transfer compared to heat transfer from stationary heated cylinder due to thickening of boundary layer as consequence of the rotation of the cylinder. Heat transfer rate increases with increase in Prandtl number of the fluid.

  2. Interaction dynamics of gap flow with vortex-induced vibration in side-by-side cylinder arrangement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Bin; Jaiman, Rajeev K.

    2016-12-01

    A numerical investigation of the vortex-induced vibration (VIV) in a side-by-side circular cylinder arrangement has been performed in a two-dimensional laminar flow environment. One of the cylinders is elastically mounted and only vibrates in the transverse direction, while its counterpart remains stationary in a uniform flow stream. When the gap ratio is sufficiently small, the flip-flopping phenomenon of the gap flow can be an additional time-dependent interference to the flow field. This phenomenon was reported in the experimental work of Bearman and Wadcock ["The interaction between a pair of circular cylinders normal to a stream," J. Fluid Mech. 61(3), 499-511 (1973)] in a side-by-side circular cylinder arrangement, in which the gap flow deflects toward one of the cylinders and switched its sides intermittently. Albeit one of the two cylinders is free to vibrate, the flip-flop of a gap flow during VIV dynamics can still be observed outside the lock-in region. The exact moments of the flip-flop phenomenon due to spontaneous symmetry breaking are observed in this numerical study. The significant characteristic vortex modes in the near-wake region are extracted via dynamic modal analysis and the interference between the gap flow and VIV is found to be mutual. In a vibrating side-by-side arrangement, the lock-in region with respect to reduced velocity becomes narrower due to the interference from its stationary counterpart. The frequency lock-in occurs and ends earlier than that of an isolated vibrating circular cylinder subjected to an identical flow environment. Similar to a tandem cylinder arrangement, in the post-lock-in region, the maximum vibration amplitudes are escalated compared with those of an isolated circular cylinder configuration. On the other hand, subjected to the influence from VIV, the biased gap flow deflects toward the vibrating cylinder quasi-stably during the frequency lock-in process. This behavior is different from the reported bi

  3. Propagation of torsional waves in pre-stretched composite cylinder with an imperfect interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ozturk, A.

    2017-02-01

    Propagation of torsional waves in pre-stressed circular cylinders is investigated within the framework of the piecewise homogeneous body model with the use of the three-dimensional linearized theory of elastic waves in an initially stressed body. It is assumed that the elasticity relations of the materials of the cylinder components are given through the Murnaghan potential. Numerical results related to the torsional wave dispersion and the influence of the mentioned initial stresses, as well as imperfectness paremeter on this dispersion are presented and discussed.

  4. Comparison of calculated and experimental results of fragmenting cylinder experiments

    SciTech Connect

    WILSON,L.T.; REEDAL,D.R.; KIPP,MARLIN E.; MARTINEZ,REINA R.; GRADY,D.E.

    2000-06-02

    The Grady-Kipp fragmentation model provides a physically based method for determining the fracture and breakup of materials under high loading rates. Recently, this model has been implemented into the CTH Shock Physics Code and has been used to simulate several published experiments. Materials studied in this paper are AerMet 100 steel and a 90% tungsten alloy. The experimental geometry consists of a right circular cylinder filled with an explosive main charge that is initiated at its center. The sudden expansion of the resulting detonation products causes fracture of the cylinder. Strain rates seen in the cylinder are on the order of 10{sup 4} s{sup {minus}1}. The average fragment sizes calculated with the Grady-Kipp fragmentation model successfully replicate the mean fragment size obtained from the experimental fragment distribution. When Poisson statistics are applied to the calculated local average fragment sizes, good correlation is also observed with the shape of the experimental cumulative fragment distribution. The experimental fragmentation results, CTH numerical simulations, and correlation of these numerical results with the experimental data are described.

  5. Circular free-electron laser

    DOEpatents

    Brau, Charles A.; Kurnit, Norman A.; Cooper, Richard K.

    1984-01-01

    A high efficiency, free electron laser utilizing a circular relativistic electron beam accelerator and a circular whispering mode optical waveguide for guiding optical energy in a circular path in the circular relativistic electron beam accelerator such that the circular relativistic electron beam and the optical energy are spatially contiguous in a resonant condition for free electron laser operation. Both a betatron and synchrotron are disclosed for use in the present invention. A free electron laser wiggler is disposed around the circular relativistic electron beam accelerator for generating a periodic magnetic field to transform energy from the circular relativistic electron beam to optical energy.

  6. Solitary surface waves on a plasma cylinder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gradov, O. M.; Stenflo, L.

    1983-03-01

    By considering electrostatic surface waves propagating along a plasma cylinder, it is demonstrated that solitary variations in the cylinder radius may appear. The properties of these slow perturbations are determined by the surface wave intensities.

  7. Integrated two-cylinder liquid piston Stirling engine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Ning; Rickard, Robert; Pluckter, Kevin; Sulchek, Todd

    2014-10-01

    Heat engines utilizing the Stirling cycle may run on low temperature differentials with the capacity to function at high efficiency due to their near-reversible operation. However, current approaches to building Stirling engines are laborious and costly. Typically the components are assembled by hand and additional components require a corresponding increase in manufacturing complexity, akin to electronics before the integrated circuit. We present a simple and integrated approach to fabricating Stirling engines with precisely designed cylinders. We utilize computer aided design and one-step, planar machining to form all components of the engine. The engine utilizes liquid pistons and displacers to harness useful work from heat absorption and rejection. As a proof of principle of the integrated design, a two-cylinder engine is produced and characterized and liquid pumping is demonstrated.

  8. Natural convection between a vertical cylinder and a surrounding array

    SciTech Connect

    McEligot, D.M.; O'Brien, J.E.; Stoots, C.M.; Larson, T.K.; Christenson, W.A.; Mecham, D.C.; Lussie, W.G.

    1992-01-01

    The generic situation considered is natural convection between a single heated, vertical cylinder and a surrounding array of cooler vertical cylinders in a triangular pattern. The ratio of the test section temperature to the cooling tube temperature was varied up to 2.6 by adjusting the electrical power. The Rayleigh number, based on test section diameter and air properties evaluated at cooling tube temperature, ranged from 2.9 x 10{sup 4} to 4.6 x 10{sup 5}. Results indicate that the convective heat transfer data could be approximated as Nu{sub D} (T{sub ts}/T{sub ct}){sup 0.14} = 0.156 Ra{sub D}{sup 1/3} in the apparent turbulent region for Ra{sub L} > 1.2 x 10{sup 11.}

  9. Natural convection between a vertical cylinder and a surrounding array

    SciTech Connect

    McEligot, D.M.; O`Brien, J.E.; Stoots, C.M.; Larson, T.K.; Christenson, W.A.; Mecham, D.C.; Lussie, W.G.

    1992-09-01

    The generic situation considered is natural convection between a single heated, vertical cylinder and a surrounding array of cooler vertical cylinders in a triangular pattern. The ratio of the test section temperature to the cooling tube temperature was varied up to 2.6 by adjusting the electrical power. The Rayleigh number, based on test section diameter and air properties evaluated at cooling tube temperature, ranged from 2.9 x 10{sup 4} to 4.6 x 10{sup 5}. Results indicate that the convective heat transfer data could be approximated as Nu{sub D} (T{sub ts}/T{sub ct}){sup 0.14} = 0.156 Ra{sub D}{sup 1/3} in the apparent turbulent region for Ra{sub L} > 1.2 x 10{sup 11.}

  10. Integrated two-cylinder liquid piston Stirling engine

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Ning; Rickard, Robert; Pluckter, Kevin; Sulchek, Todd

    2014-10-06

    Heat engines utilizing the Stirling cycle may run on low temperature differentials with the capacity to function at high efficiency due to their near-reversible operation. However, current approaches to building Stirling engines are laborious and costly. Typically the components are assembled by hand and additional components require a corresponding increase in manufacturing complexity, akin to electronics before the integrated circuit. We present a simple and integrated approach to fabricating Stirling engines with precisely designed cylinders. We utilize computer aided design and one-step, planar machining to form all components of the engine. The engine utilizes liquid pistons and displacers to harness useful work from heat absorption and rejection. As a proof of principle of the integrated design, a two-cylinder engine is produced and characterized and liquid pumping is demonstrated.

  11. Rotating Cylinder Treatment System Demonstration

    EPA Science Inventory

    In August 2008, a rotating cylinder treatment system (RCTSTM) demonstration was conducted near Gladstone, CO. The RCTSTM is a novel technology developed to replace the aeration/oxidation and mixing components of a conventional lime precipitation treatment s...

  12. Video Analysis of Rolling Cylinders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Phommarach, S.; Wattanakasiwich, P.; Johnston, I.

    2012-01-01

    In this work, we studied the rolling motion of solid and hollow cylinders down an inclined plane at different angles. The motions were captured on video at 300 frames s[superscript -1], and the videos were analyzed frame by frame using video analysis software. Data from the real motion were compared with the theory of rolling down an inclined…

  13. Turbulent Flow Between Rotating Cylinders

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shih-I, Pai

    1943-01-01

    The turbulent air flow between rotating cylinders was investigated. The distributions of mean speed and of turbulence were measured in the gap between a rotating inner and a stationary outer cylinder. The measurements led to the conclusion that the turbulent flow in the gap cannot be considered two dimensional, but that a particular type of secondary motion takes place. It is shown that the experimentally found velocity distribution can be fully understood under the assumption that this secondary motion consists of three-dimensional ring-shape vortices. The vortices occur only in pairs, and their number and size depend on the speed of the rotating cylinder; the number was found to decrease with increasing speed. The secondary motion has an essential part in the transmission of the moment of momentum. In regions where the secondary motion is negligible, the momentum transfer follows the laws known for homologous turbulence. Ring-shape vortices are known to occur in the laminar flow between rotating cylinders, but it was hitherto unknown that they exist even at speeds that are several hundred times the critical limit.

  14. Compact waveguide circular polarizer

    SciTech Connect

    Tantawi, Sami G.

    2016-08-16

    A multi-port waveguide is provided having a rectangular waveguide that includes a Y-shape structure with first top arm having a first rectangular waveguide port, a second top arm with second rectangular waveguide port, and a base arm with a third rectangular waveguide port for supporting a TE.sub.10 mode and a TE.sub.20 mode, where the end of the third rectangular waveguide port includes rounded edges that are parallel to a z-axis of the waveguide, a circular waveguide having a circular waveguide port for supporting a left hand and a right hand circular polarization TE.sub.11 mode and is coupled to a base arm broad wall, and a matching feature disposed on the base arm broad wall opposite of the circular waveguide for terminating the third rectangular waveguide port, where the first rectangular waveguide port, the second rectangular waveguide port and the circular waveguide port are capable of supporting 4-modes of operation.

  15. Comparison of aerodynamic noise from three nose-cylinder combinations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guenther, R. A.; Reding, M. P.

    1970-01-01

    Results of experiments with three different cylinder and blunted nose combinations are discussed. Combinations include smooth cylinder with single 15 deg cone, smooth cylinder with double cone of 25 and 10 deg, and longitudinally corrugated cylinder with similar double cone.

  16. Integrated hydraulic cooler and return rail in camless cylinder head

    DOEpatents

    Marriott, Craig D [Clawson, MI; Neal, Timothy L [Ortonville, MI; Swain, Jeff L [Flushing, MI; Raimao, Miguel A [Colorado Springs, CO

    2011-12-13

    An engine assembly may include a cylinder head defining an engine coolant reservoir, a pressurized fluid supply, a valve actuation assembly, and a hydraulic fluid reservoir. The valve actuation assembly may be in fluid communication with the pressurized fluid supply and may include a valve member displaceable by a force applied by the pressurized fluid supply. The hydraulic fluid reservoir may be in fluid communication with the valve actuation assembly and in a heat exchange relation to the engine coolant reservoir.

  17. Experimental study on free convection of sodium in a long cylinder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolesnichenko, I. V.; Mamykin, A. D.; Pavlinov, A. M.; Pakholkov, V. V.; Rogozhkin, S. A.; Frick, P. G.; Khalilov, R. I.; Shepelev, S. F.

    2015-06-01

    The operation experience of sodium fast reactor shows that during design-basis validation of pipelines and equipment it is necessary to take into account the sodium free convection in the enclosures. The paper presents the results of experimental study of free convection of liquid sodium in a long thermo-insulated cylinder with the end heat supply and removal. The sodium-filled cylinder diameter is 168 mm, length is 850 mm. Three experiments for horizontal, inclined (at 45° to a vertical line) and vertical position of the cylinder were compared in detail. The Rayleigh number (based on cylinder diameter) is approximately same for three experiments and is equal to 5 × 106. The structure of large-scale and small-scale flows was analyzed. Nusselt number estimations being the intensity measure of heat transfer in case of free convection were obtained. A relationship between the flow structure and the Nusselt number is revealed.

  18. Size Effect in Ferroelectric Long Cylinders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yuguo; Zhang, Peilin; Wang, Chunlei; Zhong, Weilie; N, Napp; D, R. Tilly

    1995-02-01

    The Curie temperature and polarization in a ferroelectric cylinder with infinite length have been examined using Landau free energy expansion. The Curie temperature and polarization decrease with decreasing cylinder diameter for the positive extrapolation length, and reach zero at the critical size. For negative extrapolation length, both Curie temperature and polarization increase with decreasing cylinder diameter.

  19. The behavior of concrete cylinders confined by shape memory alloy wires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Eunsoo; Nam, Tae-hyun; Cho, Sung-Chul; Chung, Young-Soo; Park, Taehyo

    2008-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to propose a new method to confine concrete cylinders or reinforced concrete columns using martensitic or austenitic shape memory alloy (SMA) wires. The prestrained martensitic SMA wire was wrapped around a concrete cylinder then heated by a heating jacket. In the process, the confining stress around the cylinder was developed in the SMA wire due to the shape memory effect, which can increase the strength and ductility of the cylinder under axial compressive load. For austenitic shape memory wires, the wires were prestrained as they were wrapped around the concrete cylinders on which post-tensioning stress was generated. In this study, martensitic and austenitic SMA wires of 1.0 mm in diameter were used for the confinement. Recovery tests were conducted on the martensitic wire to assess the recovery stress. Also, a superelastic behavior test was performed for the austenitic wire. The confinement by martensitic SMA wires increased the strength slightly and greatly increased the ductility compared to the strength and ductility of plain concrete cylinders. The austenitic SMA wires showed a similar effect on concrete cylinders to that of the martensitic wires. This study showed the potential of the SMA wire jacketing method to retrofit reinforced concrete columns and protect them from seismic risks.

  20. Configuration Factors for Exchange of Radiant Energy Between Axisymmetrical Sections of Cylinders, Cones, and Hemispheres and Their Bases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buschman, Albert J., Jr.; Pittman, Claud M.

    1961-01-01

    Radiation-interchange configuration factors are derived for axisymmetrical sections of cylinders, cones, and hemispheres radiating internally to annular and circular sections of their bases and to other axisymmetrical sections. The general procedure of obtaining configuration factors is outlined and the results are presented in the form of equations, tables, and figures.

  1. Circular Fibonacci gratings.

    PubMed

    Gao, Nan; Zhang, Yuchao; Xie, Changqing

    2011-11-01

    We introduce circular Fibonacci gratings (CFGs) that combine the concept of circular gratings and Fibonacci structures. Theoretical analysis shows that the diffraction pattern of CFGs is composed of fractal distributions of impulse rings. Numerical simulations are performed with two-dimensional fast Fourier transform to reveal the fractal behavior of the diffraction rings. Experimental results are also presented and agree well with the numerical results. The fractal nature of the diffraction field should be of great theoretical interest, and shows potential to be further developed into practical applications, such as in laser measurement with wideband illumination.

  2. Compressibility effects on the flow past a rotating cylinder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teymourtash, A. R.; Salimipour, S. E.

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, laminar flow past a rotating circular cylinder placed in a compressible uniform stream is investigated via a two-dimensional numerical simulation and the compressibility effects due to the combination of the free-stream and cylinder rotation on the flow pattern such as forming, shedding, and removing of vortices and also the lift and drag coefficients are studied. The numerical simulation of the flow is based on the discretization of convective fluxes of the unsteady Navier-Stokes equations by second-order Roe's scheme and an explicit finite volume method. Because of the importance of the time dependent parameters in the solution, the second-order time accurate is applied by a dual time stepping approach. In order to validate the operation of a computer program, some results are compared with previous experimental and numerical data. The results of this study show that the effects due to flow compressibility such as normal shock wave caused the interesting variations on the flow around the cylinder even at a free-stream with a low Mach number. At incompressible flow around the rotating cylinder, increasing the speed ratio, α (ratio of the surface speed to free-stream velocity), causes the ongoing increase in the lift coefficient, but in compressible flow for each free-stream Mach number, increasing the speed ratio results in obtaining a limited lift coefficient (a maximum mean lift coefficient). In addition, results from the compressible flow indicate that by increasing the free-stream Mach number, the maximum mean lift coefficient is decreased, while the mean drag coefficient is increased. It is also found that by increasing the Reynolds number at low Mach numbers, the maximum mean lift coefficient and critical speed ratio are decreased and the mean drag coefficient and Strouhal number are increased. However at the higher Mach numbers, these parameters become independent of the Reynolds number.

  3. Massless rotating fermions inside a cylinder

    SciTech Connect

    Ambruş, Victor E.; Winstanley, Elizabeth

    2015-12-07

    We study rotating thermal states of a massless quantum fermion field inside a cylinder in Minkowski space-time. Two possible boundary conditions for the fermion field on the cylinder are considered: the spectral and MIT bag boundary conditions. If the radius of the cylinder is sufficiently small, rotating thermal expectation values are finite everywhere inside the cylinder. We also study the Casimir divergences on the boundary. The rotating thermal expectation values and the Casimir divergences have different properties depending on the boundary conditions applied at the cylinder. This is due to the local nature of the MIT bag boundary condition, while the spectral boundary condition is nonlocal.

  4. Vortex-induced vibrations of a square cylinder under linear shear flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Wenjuan; Zhou, Dai; Tu, Jiahuang; Han, Zhaolong

    2017-04-01

    This paper investigates the numerical vortex-induced vibration (VIV) of a square cylinder which is connected to a 2-DOF mass-spring system and is immersed in the planar shear flow by employing a characteristic-based split (CBS) finite element method (FEM). The reduced mass of the square cylinder is M r = 2, while the reduced velocity, U r, is changed from 3 to 12 with an increment of ΔU r = 1. The effects of some key parameters on the cylinder dynamic responses, vibrating frequencies, the flow patterns as well as the energy transferred between the fluid and cylinder are revealed. In this study, the key parameters are selected as follows: shear ratio (k = 0, 0.05 and 0.1) and Reynolds numbers (Re = 80 and 160). Numerical results demonstrate that the X-Y trajectories of the cylinder mainly appear as a symmetrical figure ‘8’ in uniform flow (k = 0) and an unsymmetrical figure ‘8’ and ‘O’ in shear flows (k = 0.05 and 0.1). The maximum oscillation amplitudes of the square cylinder in both the inline and transverse directions have distinct characteristics compared to that of a circular cylinder. Two kinds of flow patterns, ‘2S’ and ‘P + S’, are mainly observed under the shear flow. Also, the mean values of the energy of the cylinder system increase with the reduced velocity, while the root mean square (rms) of the energy reaches its peak value at reduced velocity U r = 5.

  5. Wiimote Experiments: Circular Motion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kouh, Minjoon; Holz, Danielle; Kawam, Alae; Lamont, Mary

    2013-01-01

    The advent of new sensor technologies can provide new ways of exploring fundamental physics. In this paper, we show how a Wiimote, which is a handheld remote controller for the Nintendo Wii video game system with an accelerometer, can be used to study the dynamics of circular motion with a very simple setup such as an old record player or a…

  6. Wiimote Experiments: Circular Motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kouh, Minjoon; Holz, Danielle; Kawam, Alae; Lamont, Mary

    2013-03-01

    The advent of new sensor technologies can provide new ways of exploring fundamental physics. In this paper, we show how a Wiimote, which is a handheld remote controller for the Nintendo Wii video game system with an accelerometer, can be used to study the dynamics of circular motion with a very simple setup such as an old record player or a bicycle wheel.

  7. Copyright Basics. Circular 1.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Library of Congress, Washington, DC. Copyright Office.

    This circular answers some of the questions that are frequently asked about copyright, a form of protection provided by the laws of the United States to authors of "original works of authorship" including library, dramatic musical, artistic, and certain other intellectual works. The Copyright Act of 1976 (title 17 of the United States…

  8. Transposable elements and circular DNAs

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Circular DNAs are extra-chromosomal fragments that become circularized by genomic recombination events. We have recently shown that yeast LTR elements generate circular DNAs through recombination events between their flanking long terminal repeats (LTRs). Similarly, circular DNAs can be generated by recombination between LTRs residing at different genomic loci, in which case the circular DNA will contain the intervening sequence. In yeast, this can result in gene copy number variations when circles contain genes and origins of replication. Here, I speculate on the potential and implications of circular DNAs generated through recombination between human transposable elements. PMID:28090380

  9. Velocity field in a vicinity of cylinder bouncing off horizontal wall

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chara, Z.; Kysela, B.; Dolansky, J.

    2016-06-01

    The paper describes experimental and numerical investigations of velocity fields around a circular cylinder colliding perpendicularly with a plane wall. The cylinder of the diameter D = 20 mm was moving vertically in a water tank and the motion was recorded by a fast digital camera. Reynolds numbers ranged from 3000 to 8100 and the initial positions L of the cylinder above the wall were L/D = 2.5; 3.5; 4.5 and 5.5. An evolution of fluid agitation in an area close to the impact point was based on the results of the velocity field measurements. The numerical simulations were performed using a 2D-LES model.

  10. Scattering by an infinite homogenous anisotropic elliptic cylinder in terms of Mathieu functions and Fourier series.

    PubMed

    Mao, Shi-Chun; Wu, Zhen-Sen

    2008-12-01

    An exact solution to the two-dimensional scattering properties of an anisotropic elliptic cylinder for transverse electric polarization is presented. The internal field in an anisotropic elliptic cylinder is expressed as integral representations of Mathieu functions and Fourier series. The coefficients of the series expansion are obtained by imposing boundary conditions on the anisotropic-free-space interface. A matrix is developed to solve the nonorthogonality properties of Mathieu functions at the interface between two different media. Numerical results are given for the bistatic radar cross section and the amplitude of the total magnetic field along the x and y axes. The result is in agreement with that available as expected when an elliptic cylinder degenerates to a circular one.

  11. Boundary-value problem in a cylinder with frequently changing type of boundary

    SciTech Connect

    Borisov, D I

    2002-08-31

    A singularly perturbed boundary-value problem for the eigenvalues of the Laplace operator in a cylinder with a frequent change of the type of boundary conditions on the lateral surface is considered. The case when the homogenized problem involves the second or the third boundary condition on the lateral surface is studied. For a circular cylinder complete two-parameter asymptotic power series for the eigenvalues and the eigenfunctions of the perturbed problem are constructed. In the case when the section of the cylinder is an arbitrary bounded simply connected domain with smooth boundary, the leading terms of asymptotic formulae for eigenvalues convergent to simple limiting eigenvalues, and the leading terms of asymptotic formulae for the corresponding eigenfunctions are found.

  12. Stabilization of Taylor-Couette flow due to time-periodic outer cylinder oscillation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murray, B. T.; Mcfadden, G. B.; Coriell, S. R.

    1990-01-01

    The linear stability of circular Couette flow between concentric infinite cylinders is considered for the case when the inner cylinder is rotated at a constant angular velocity and the outer cylinder is driven sinusoidally in time with zero mean rotation. This configuration was studied experimentally by Walsh and Donnelly. The critical Reynolds numbers calculated from linear stability theory agree well with the experimental values, except at large modulation amplitudes and small frequencies. The theoretical values are obtained using Floquet theory implemented in two distinct approaches: a truncated Fourier series representation in time, and a fundamental solution matrix based on a Chebyshev pseudospectral representation in space. For large amplitude, low frequency modulation, the linear eigenfunctions are temporally complex, consisting of a quiescent region followed by rapid change in the perturbed flow velocities.

  13. Conjugate natural convection between horizontal eccentric cylinders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nasiri, Davood; Dehghan, Ali Akbar; Hadian, Mohammad Reza

    2017-03-01

    This study involved the numerical investigation of conjugate natural convection between two horizontal eccentric cylinders. Both cylinders were considered to be isothermal with only the inner cylinder having a finite wall thickness. The momentum and energy equations were discretized using finite volume method and solved by employing SIMPLER algorithm. Numerical results were presented for various solid-fluid conductivity ratios ( KR) and various values of eccentricities in different thickness of inner cylinder wall and also for different angular positions of inner cylinder. From the results, it was observed that in an eccentric case, and for KR < 10, an increase in thickness of inner cylinder wall resulted in a decrease in the average equivalent conductivity coefficient (overline{{K_{eq} }}); however, a KR > 10 value caused an increase in overline{{K_{eq} }}. It was also concluded that in any angular position of inner cylinder, the value of overline{{K_{eq} }} increased with increase in the eccentricity.

  14. Circular Bioassay Platforms for Applications in Microwave-Accelerated Techniques

    PubMed Central

    Mohammed, Muzaffer; Clement, Travis C.; Aslan, Kadir

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we present the design of four different circular bioassay platforms, which are suitable for homogeneous microwave heating, using theoretical calculations (i.e., COMSOL™ multiphysics software). Circular bioassay platforms are constructed from poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) for optical transparency between 400–800 nm, has multiple sample capacity (12, 16, 19 and 21 wells) and modified with silver nanoparticle films (SNFs) to be used in microwave-accelerated bioassays (MABs). In addition, a small monomode microwave cavity, which can be operated with an external microwave generator (100 W), for use with the bioassay platforms in MABs is also developed. Our design parameters for the circular bioassay platforms and monomode microwave cavity during microwave heating were: (i) temperature profiles, (ii) electric field distributions, (iii) location of the circular bioassay platforms inside the microwave cavity, and (iv) design and number of wells on the circular bioassay platforms. We have also carried out additional simulations to assess the use of circular bioassay platforms in a conventional kitchen microwave oven (e.g., 900 W). Our results show that the location of the circular bioassay platforms in the microwave cavity was predicted to have a significant effect on the homogeneous heating of these platforms. The 21-well circular bioassay platform design in our monomode microwave cavity was predicted to offer a homogeneous heating pattern, where inter-well temperature was observed to be in between 23.72–24.13°C and intra-well temperature difference was less than 0.21°C for 60 seconds of microwave heating, which was also verified experimentally. PMID:25568813

  15. Circular Bioassay Platforms for Applications in Microwave-Accelerated Techniques.

    PubMed

    Mohammed, Muzaffer; Clement, Travis C; Aslan, Kadir

    2014-12-02

    In this paper, we present the design of four different circular bioassay platforms, which are suitable for homogeneous microwave heating, using theoretical calculations (i.e., COMSOL™ multiphysics software). Circular bioassay platforms are constructed from poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) for optical transparency between 400-800 nm, has multiple sample capacity (12, 16, 19 and 21 wells) and modified with silver nanoparticle films (SNFs) to be used in microwave-accelerated bioassays (MABs). In addition, a small monomode microwave cavity, which can be operated with an external microwave generator (100 W), for use with the bioassay platforms in MABs is also developed. Our design parameters for the circular bioassay platforms and monomode microwave cavity during microwave heating were: (i) temperature profiles, (ii) electric field distributions, (iii) location of the circular bioassay platforms inside the microwave cavity, and (iv) design and number of wells on the circular bioassay platforms. We have also carried out additional simulations to assess the use of circular bioassay platforms in a conventional kitchen microwave oven (e.g., 900 W). Our results show that the location of the circular bioassay platforms in the microwave cavity was predicted to have a significant effect on the homogeneous heating of these platforms. The 21-well circular bioassay platform design in our monomode microwave cavity was predicted to offer a homogeneous heating pattern, where inter-well temperature was observed to be in between 23.72-24.13°C and intra-well temperature difference was less than 0.21°C for 60 seconds of microwave heating, which was also verified experimentally.

  16. Optimal control of lift/drag ratios on a rotating cylinder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ou, Yuh-Roung; Burns, John A.

    1992-01-01

    We present the numerical solution to a problem of maximizing the lift to drag ratio by rotating a circular cylinder in a two-dimensional viscous incompressible flow. This problem is viewed as a test case for the newly developing theoretical and computational methods for control of fluid dynamic systems. We show that the time averaged lift to drag ratio for a fixed finite-time interval achieves its maximum value at an optimal rotation rate that depends on the time interval.

  17. Generalized Bistability in Origami Cylinders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reid, Austin; Adda-Bedia, Mokhtar; Lechenault, Frederic

    Origami folded cylinders (origami bellows) have found increasingly sophisticated applications in space flight, medicine, and even experimental nuclear physics. In spite of this interest, a general understanding of the dynamics of an origami folded cylinder has been elusive. By solving the fully constrained behavior of a periodic fundamental origami cell defined by unit vectors, we have found an analytic solution for all possible rigid-face states accessible from a cylindrical Miura-ori pattern. Although an idealized bellows has two rigid-face configurations over a well-defined region, a physical device, limited by nonzero material thickness and forced to balance hinge with plate-bending energy, often cannot stably maintain a stowed configuration. We have identified and measured the parameters which control this emergent bistability, and have demonstrated the ability to fabricate bellows with tunable deployability.

  18. Fire testing of bare uranium hexafluoride cylinders

    SciTech Connect

    Pryor, W.A.

    1991-12-31

    In 1965, the Oak Ridge Gaseous Diffusion Plant (ORGDP), now the K-25 Site, conducted a series of tests in which bare cylinders of uranium hexafluoride (UF{sub 6}) were exposed to engulfing oil fires for the US Atomic Energy Commission (AEC), now the US Department of Energy (DOE). The tests are described and the results, conclusions, and observations are presented. Two each of the following types of cylinders were tested: 3.5-in.-diam {times} 7.5-in.-long cylinders of Monel (Harshaw), 5.0-in.-diam {times} x 30-in.-long cylinders of Monel, and 8-in.-diam {times} 48-in.-long cylinders of nickel. The cylinders were filled approximately to the standard UF{sub 6} fill limits of 5, 55, and 250 lb, respectively, with a U-235 content of 0.22%. The 5-in.- and 8-in.-diam cylinders were tested individually with and without their metal valve covers. For the 3.5-in.-diam Harshaw cylinders and the 5.0-in.-diam cylinder without a valve cover, the valves failed and UF{sub 6} was released. The remaining 6 cylinders ruptured explosively in time intervals ranging from about 8.5 to 11 min.

  19. Fire testing of bare uranium hexafluoride cylinders

    SciTech Connect

    Pryor, W.A.

    1991-12-31

    In 1965, the Oak Ridge Gaseous Diffusion Plant (ORGDP), now the K-25 Site, conducted a series of tests in which bare cylinders of uranium hexafluoride (UF{sub 6}) were exposed to engulfing oil fires for the US Atomic Energy Commission (AEC), now the US Department of Energy (DOE). The tests are described and the results, conclusions, and observations are presented. Two each of the following types of cylinders were tested: 3.5-in.-diam {times} 7.5-in.-long cylinders of Monel (Harshaw), 5.0-in.-diam {times} 30-in.-long cylinders of Monel, and 8-in.-diam {times} 48-in.-long cylinders of nickel. The cylinders were filled approximately to the standard UF{sub 6} fill limits of 5, 55, and 250 lb, respectively, with a U-235 content of 0.22%. The 5-in.- and 8-in.-diam cylinders were tested individually with and without their metal valve covers. For the 3.5-in.-diam Harshaw cylinders and the 5.0-in.-diam cylinder without a valve cover the valves failed and UF{sub 6} was released. The remaining cylinders ruptured explosively in time intervals ranging from about 8.5 to 11 min.

  20. Sub-grid drag models for horizontal cylinder arrays immersed in gas-particle multiphase flows

    SciTech Connect

    Sarkar, Avik; Sun, Xin; Sundaresan, Sankaran

    2013-09-08

    Immersed cylindrical tube arrays often are used as heat exchangers in gas-particle fluidized beds. In multiphase computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations of large fluidized beds, explicit resolution of small cylinders is computationally infeasible. Instead, the cylinder array may be viewed as an effective porous medium in coarse-grid simulations. The cylinders' influence on the suspension as a whole, manifested as an effective drag force, and on the relative motion between gas and particles, manifested as a correction to the gas-particle drag, must be modeled via suitable sub-grid constitutive relationships. In this work, highly resolved unit-cell simulations of flow around an array of horizontal cylinders, arranged in a staggered configuration, are filtered to construct sub-grid, or `filtered', drag models, which can be implemented in coarse-grid simulations. The force on the suspension exerted by the cylinders is comprised of, as expected, a buoyancy contribution, and a kinetic component analogous to fluid drag on a single cylinder. Furthermore, the introduction of tubes also is found to enhance segregation at the scale of the cylinder size, which, in turn, leads to a reduction in the filtered gas-particle drag.

  1. Circular inferences in schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Jardri, Renaud; Denève, Sophie

    2013-11-01

    A considerable number of recent experimental and computational studies suggest that subtle impairments of excitatory to inhibitory balance or regulation are involved in many neurological and psychiatric conditions. The current paper aims to relate, specifically and quantitatively, excitatory to inhibitory imbalance with psychotic symptoms in schizophrenia. Considering that the brain constructs hierarchical causal models of the external world, we show that the failure to maintain the excitatory to inhibitory balance results in hallucinations as well as in the formation and subsequent consolidation of delusional beliefs. Indeed, the consequence of excitatory to inhibitory imbalance in a hierarchical neural network is equated to a pathological form of causal inference called 'circular belief propagation'. In circular belief propagation, bottom-up sensory information and top-down predictions are reverberated, i.e. prior beliefs are misinterpreted as sensory observations and vice versa. As a result, these predictions are counted multiple times. Circular inference explains the emergence of erroneous percepts, the patient's overconfidence when facing probabilistic choices, the learning of 'unshakable' causal relationships between unrelated events and a paradoxical immunity to perceptual illusions, which are all known to be associated with schizophrenia.

  2. Operation of a Four-Cylinder 1.9L Propane Fueled Homogeneous Charge Compression Ignition Engine: Basic Operating Characteristics and Cylinder-to-Cylinder Effects

    SciTech Connect

    Flowers, D; Aceves, S M; Martinez-Frias, J; Smith, J R; Au, M; Girard, J; Dibble, R

    2001-03-12

    A four-cylinder 1.9 Volkswagen TDI Engine has been converted to run in Homogeneous Charge Compression Ignition (HCCI) mode. The stock configuration is a turbocharged direct injection Diesel engine. The combustion chamber has been modified by discarding the in-cylinder Diesel fuel injectors and replacing them with blank inserts (which contain pressure transducers). The stock pistons contain a reentrant bowl and have been retained for the tests reported here. The intake and exhaust manifolds have also been retained, but the turbocharger has been removed. A heater has been installed upstream of the intake manifold and fuel is added just downstream of this heater. The performance of this engine in naturally aspirated HCCI operation, subject to variable intake temperature and fuel flow rate, has been studied. The engine has been run with propane fuel at a constant speed of 1800 rpm. This work is intended to characterize the HCCI operation of the engine in this configuration that has been minimally modified from the base Diesel engine. The performance (BMEP, IMEP, efficiency, etc) and emissions (THC, CO, NOx) of the engine are presented, as are combustion process results based on heat release analysis of the pressure traces from each cylinder.

  3. A new steel for single cylinder steam turbine rotors

    SciTech Connect

    Yamada, M.; Tsuda, Y.; Tanaka, Y.; Ikeda, Y.

    1996-12-31

    A new steel, 2.25%Cr1.7%NiMoVNbW steel has been developed for the high pressure (HP)-low pressure (LP) single cylinder steam turbine rotor in combined power plants and medium/small rating thermal power plants. This steel has good creep rupture strength equivalent to that of 1%CrMoV steel which has been used as HP rotor fogings and excellent toughness and proof stress considerably superior to the conventional HP-LP single cylinder rotor steels. This paper includes the following contents: The optimization of chemical composition and heat treatment condition; the production and evaluation of a 70 tons trial rotor forging by the application of VCD (Vacuum Carbon Deoxidation) process; the production and evaluation of a 43 tons trial ingot by the application of ESR (Electroslag Remelting) ingot process; and the production and evaluation of rotor forgings for the commercial power plant.

  4. Experimental investigation of flow characteristics around four square-cylinder arrays at subcritical Reynolds numbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Mingyue; Xiao, Longfei; Yang, Lijun

    2015-09-01

    The Deep Draft Semi-Submersible (DDS) concepts are known for their favourable vertical motion performance. However, the DDS may experience critical Vortex-Induced Motion (VIM) stemming from the fluctuating forces on the columns. In order to investigate the current-induced excitation forces of VIM, an experimental study of flow characteristics around four square-section cylinders in a square configuration is presented. A number of column spacing ratios and array attack angles were considered to investigate the parametric influences. The results comprise flow patterns, drag and lift forces, as well as Strouhal numbers. It is shown that both the drag and lift forces acting on the cylinders are slightly different between the various L/D values, and the fluctuating forces peak at L/D = 4.14. The lift force of downstream cylinders reaches its maximum at around α = 15°. Furthermore, the flow around circular-section-cylinder arrays is also discussed in comparison with that of square cylinders.

  5. Comparison of Flow Structures in the Downstream Region of a Cylinder with Flexible Strip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tekşin, Süleyman; Yayla, Sedat

    2015-05-01

    The present study investigates the details of flow structure to downstream of a circular cylinder mounted on a flat surface, in successive plan-view plane both in the boundary layer and up level region. The behavior of the flow in the wake of the bare cylinder and attached a flexible strip which has a 1400 N/mm2 modulus of elasticity vinyl PVC transperent film. The length of strip 240 mm (L/D=4) is investigated using Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) technique for Reynolds numbers based on the cylinder diameter of 2500. The flow data downstream of the cylinder are presented using time-averaged velocity vector map, Vavg, streamline patterns, ψavg, vorticity contours, ωavg, and Reynolds stress correlations, u'u' avg, v'v' avg, u'v' avg and rms velocity values. The locations of the peak values of Reynolds stress correlations and other data are also presented in both bare cylinder and attached body in order to determine the regions under high fluctuations. Another L/D ratios will be investigated in other experiments.

  6. 78 FR 14620 - Joint Development: Proposed Circular

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-06

    ... Federal Transit Administration Joint Development: Proposed Circular AGENCY: Federal Transit Administration... the form of a circular, on joint development. This circular provides guidance to recipients of Federal... joint development. This circular: (1) Defines the term ``joint development''; ] (2) explains how...

  7. Transonic Flow Past Cone Cylinders

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Solomon, George E

    1955-01-01

    Experimental results are presented for transonic flow post cone-cylinder, axially symmetric bodies. The drag coefficient and surface Mach number are studied as the free-stream Mach number is varied and, wherever possible, the experimental results are compared with theoretical predictions. Interferometric results for several typical flow configurations are shown and an example of shock-free supersonic-to-subsonic compression is experimentally demonstrated. The theoretical problem of transonic flow past finite cones is discussed briefly and an approximate solution of the axially symmetric transonic equations, valid for a semi-infinite cone, is presented.

  8. Numerical modeling and experimental measurements of water spray impact and transport over a cylinder.

    SciTech Connect

    Avedisian, C. T.; Presser, Cary; DesJardin, Paul Edward; Hewson, John C.; Yoon, Sam Sukgoo

    2005-03-01

    This study compares experimental measurements and numerical simulations of liquid droplets over heated (to a near surface temperature of 423 K) and unheated cylinders. The numerical model is based on an unsteady Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) formulation using a stochastic separated flow (SSF) approach for the droplets that includes submodels for droplet dispersion, heat and mass transfer, and impact on a solid surface. The details of the droplet impact model are presented and the model is used to simulate water spray impingement on a cylinder. Computational results are compared with experimental measurements using phase Doppler interferometry (PDI).

  9. Discontinuous Galerkin method for predicting heat transfer in hypersonic environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ching, Eric; Lv, Yu; Ihme, Matthias

    2016-11-01

    This study is concerned with predicting surface heat transfer in hypersonic flows using high-order discontinuous Galerkin methods. A robust and accurate shock capturing method designed for steady calculations that uses smooth artificial viscosity for shock stabilization is developed. To eliminate parametric dependence, an optimization method is formulated that results in the least amount of artificial viscosity necessary to sufficiently suppress nonlinear instabilities and achieve steady-state convergence. Performance is evaluated in two canonical hypersonic tests, namely a flow over a circular half-cylinder and flow over a double cone. Results show this methodology to be significantly less sensitive than conventional finite-volume techniques to mesh topology and inviscid flux function. The method is benchmarked against state-of-the-art finite-volume solvers to quantify computational cost and accuracy. Financial support from a Stanford Graduate Fellowship and the NASA Early Career Faculty program are gratefully acknowledged.

  10. Fire exposure of empty 30B cylinders

    SciTech Connect

    Ziehlke, K.T.

    1991-12-31

    Cylinders for UF{sub 6} handling, transport, and storage are designed and built as unfired pressure vessels under ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code criteria and standards. They are normally filled and emptied while UF{sub 6} is in its liquid phase. Transport cylinders such as the Model 30B are designed for service at 200 psi and 250{degrees}F, to sustain the process conditions which prevail during filling or emptying operations. While in transport, however, at ambient temperature the UF{sub 6} is solid, and the cylinder interior is well below atmospheric pressure. When the cylinders contain isotopically enriched product (above 1.0 percent U-235), they are transported in protective overpacks which function to guard the cylinders and their contents against thermal or mechanical damage in the event of possible transport accidents. Two bare Model 30B cylinders were accidentally exposed to a storage warehouse fire in which a considerable amount of damage was sustained by stored materials and the building structure, as well as by the cylinder valves and valve protectors. The cylinders were about six years old, and had been cleaned, inspected, hydrotested, and re-certified for service, but were still empty at the time of the fire. The privately-owned cylinders were transferred to DOE for testing and evaluation of the fire damage.

  11. Overseas shipments of 48Y cylinders

    SciTech Connect

    Tanaka, R.T.; Furlan, A.S.

    1991-12-31

    This paper describes experiences with two incidents of overseas shipments of uranium hexafluoride (UF{sub 6}) cylinders. The first incident involved nine empty UF{sub 6} cylinders in enclosed sea containers. Three UF{sub 6} cylinders broke free from their tie-downs and damaged and contaminated several sea containers. This paper describes briefly how decontamination was carried out. The second incident involved a shipment of 14 full UF{sub 6} cylinders. Although the incident did not cause an accident, the potential hazard was significant. The investigation of the cause of the near accident is recounted. Recommendations to alleviate future similar incidents for both cases are presented.

  12. Cylinder head cover structure for a V-type engine

    SciTech Connect

    Okada, M.; Nishida, M.; Hokazono, K.

    1988-11-15

    This patent describes a cylinder head cover structure for a cylinder engine having first and second cylinder heads for forming first and second cylinder banks, each cylinder head being provided, in an inner side wall thereof, with intake ports each communicating with a cylinder formed in the cylinder bank, at least one camshaft provided in each cylinder bank above intake and exhaust valves to drive the valves in synchronization with rotation of the engine and supported for rotation by a plurality of bearings, discrete intake passages each of which is connected to one of the intake ports of one of the cylinder banks and extends above the other cylinder bank, and cylinder head covers mounted on the respective cylinder heads, characterized in that recessed portions are formed in each of the cylinder head covers at corresponding portions of the camshaft and respective the discrete intake passages extend through corresponding ones of the recessed portions.

  13. Internal combustion engine cylinder-to-cylinder balancing with balanced air-fuel ratios

    DOEpatents

    Harris, Ralph E.; Bourn, Gary D.; Smalley, Anthony J.

    2006-01-03

    A method of balancing combustion among cylinders of an internal combustion engine. For each cylinder, a normalized peak firing pressure is calculated as the ratio of its peak firing pressure to its combustion pressure. Each cylinder's normalized peak firing pressure is compared to a target value for normalized peak firing pressure. The fuel flow is adjusted to any cylinder whose normalized peak firing pressure is not substantially equal to the target value.

  14. Emissivity measurements in support of experiments on natural convection between a vertical cylinder and a surrounding array

    SciTech Connect

    O'Brien, J.E.

    1991-12-01

    Experimental measurements of surface emissivities of three metallic samples have been obtained in support of an experiment aimed at determining natural convection and total heat transfer for a heated vertical cylinder surrounded by an array of cooled vertical tubes. In some cases, the heated stainless steel cylinder was shrouded by a perforated aluminum outer cylinder. The surrounding cooled tubes were also aluminum. In this experiment, heat transfer from the heated tube and the surrounding outer cylinder will occur by a combination of natural convection and radiation. At temperatures near the melting point of aluminum, the radiant contribution is particularly important, accounting for 50% or more of the total heat transfer. Consequently, accurate knowledge of surface emissivities of the heated rods, outer cylinders and surrounding structures is needed in order to predict the system thermal response during the transient. Direct measurements of surface emissivities have been obtained for one stainless steel and two aluminum samples. The measurements were obtained using an infrared pyrometer sensitive to the 8--14 {mu}m wavelength range. A procedure for estimating total hemispherical emissivities based on the measured spectral, normal results is also provided.

  15. The flow past a cactus-inspired grooved cylinder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Makdah, Adnan M.; Oweis, Ghanem F.

    2013-02-01

    The star-shaped cross section of giant cylindrical cactus plants is thought to be aerodynamically favorable for protection against toppling by strong winds. Particle image velocimetry is used to investigate the flow details within the surface grooves and in the immediate wake of a cactus-inspired model cylinder with eight longitudinal grooves, at biologically relevant Reynolds numbers between 50 × 103 and 170 × 103. The wake flow is analyzed and compared to a similarly sized circular cylinder. At the lowest Re tested, the wakes from the two geometries are similar. At higher Re, the cactus wake exhibits superior behavior as seen from the mean and turbulent velocities, suggesting that the flow mechanisms are Re dependent. The flow within the surface grooves reveals counter rotating rollers, while the geometrical ridges act as vortex generators known to help with the surface flow attachment. Lastly, a simplistic analysis is described to recover, qualitatively, certain time-dependent flow features from the randomly acquired PIV realizations.

  16. Spatiotemporal spectral analysis of a forced cylinder wake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Adamo, Juan; Godoy-Diana, Ramiro; Wesfreid, José Eduardo

    2012-11-01

    The wake of a circular cylinder performing rotary oscillations is studied using hydrodynamic tunnel experiments at Re = 100 . Two-dimensional particle image velocimetry on the mid-plane perpendicular to the axis of cylinder is used to characterize the spatial development of the flow and its stability properties. The lock-in phenomenon that determines the boundaries between regions of the forcing parameter space were the wake is globally unstable or convectively unstable is scrutinized using this experimental data. A novel method based on the analysis of power density spectra of the flow allows us to give a detailed description of the forced wake, shedding light on the energy distribution in the different frequency components and in particular on a cascade-like mechanism evidenced for a high amplitude of the forcing oscillation. In addition, a calculation of the drag from the velocity field is performed, allowing us to relate the resulting force on the body to the wake properties. The present work was supported by the Franco-Argentinian Associated Laboratory in the Physics and Mechanics of Fluids (LIA PMF-FMF).

  17. Controlled oscillations of a cylinder: forces and wake modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carberry, J.; Sheridan, J.; Rockwell, D.

    2005-08-01

    The wake states from a circular cylinder undergoing controlled sinusoidal oscillation transverse to the free stream are examined. As the frequency of oscillation passes through the natural Kármán frequency there is a transition between two distinctly different wake states: the low- and high-frequency states. The transition corresponds to a change in the structure of the near wake and is also characterized by a jump in the phase and amplitude of both the total and vortex lift. Over the range of flow and oscillation parameters studied the wake states exhibit a number of universal features. The phases of the vortex lift and drag forces have characteristic values for the low- and high-frequency states, which appear to be directly related to the phase of vortex shedding. A split force concept is employed, whereby instantaneous force traces and images allow discrimination between the actual loading and the physics, and their conventional time-averaged representations. The wake states for the forced oscillations show some remarkable similarities to the response branches of elastically mounted cylinders. The equivalence between forced and self-excited oscillations is addressed in detail using concepts of energy transfer.

  18. Wetting of mesoscopic soft cylinders: Structure and layering transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahrens, Heiko; Hugenberg, Norbert; Schmidt, Manfred; Helm, Christiane A.

    1999-10-01

    The wetting of soft mesoscopic long-chain particles is studied. As a model system, a cylindrical brush with poly(vinyl)pyridine side chains on the water surface is characterized by isotherms and x-ray reflectivity. The forces from the two planar interfaces and the intra- and interparticle interactions are all of comparable magnitude. Two layering transitions occur, one from the monolayer to the double layer, the next to a homogeneous multilayer. The hard wall from which layering starts is the smooth polymer/air interface. Indeed, they particles in the top layer of both the double- and the multilayer have their cylinder axis parallel to the surface and are laterally compressed. In contrast, the polymer/water interface is diffuse due to brush swelling. Generally, the long-chain particles adjacent to the respective interfaces do not maintain their circular diameters. The thickness of the monolayer can be varied by a factor 3.5, up to 53 Å. An additional phase transition occurs within the monolayer, which is attributed to a change of the side chains from a flattened to a compressed state at constant volume. Atmoic force microscope images of the monolayer transferred onto a solid indicate local cylinder alignment.

  19. The inviscid stability of supersonic flow past heated or cooled axisymmetric bodies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shaw, Stephen J.; Duck, Peter W.

    1990-01-01

    The inviscid, linear, nonaxisymmetric, temporal stability of the boundary layer associated with the supersonic flow past axisymmetric bodies (with particular emphasis on long thin, straight circular cylinders), subject to heated or cooled wall conditions is investigated. The eigenvalue problem is computed in some detail for a particular Mach number or 3.8, revealing that the effect of curvature and the choice of wall conditions both have a significant effect on the stability of the flow. Both the asymptotic, large azimuthal wavenumber solution and the asymptotic, far downstream solution are obtained for the stability analysis and compared with numerical results. Additionally, asymptotic analyses valid for large radii of curvature with cooled/heated wall conditions, are presented. In general, important differences were found to exist between the wall temperature conditions imposed and the adiabatic wall conditions considered previously.

  20. The inviscid stability of supersonic flow past heated or cooled axisymmetric bodies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shaw, Stephen J.; Duck, Peter W.

    1992-01-01

    The inviscid, linear, nonaxisymmetric, temporal stability of the boundary layer associated with the supersonic flow past axisymmetric bodies (with particular emphasis on long thin, straight circular cylinders), subject to heated or cooled wall conditions is investigated. The eigenvalue problem is computed in some detail for a particular Mach number or 3.8, revealing that the effect of curvature and the choice of wall conditions both have a significant effect on the stability of the flow. Both the asymptotic, large azimuthal wavenumber solution and the asymptotic, far downstream solution are obtained for the stability analysis and compared with numerical results. Additionally, asymptotic analyses valid for large radii of curvature with cooled/heated wall conditions are presented. In general, important differences were found to exist between the wall temperature conditions imposed and the adiabatic wall conditions considered previously.