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Sample records for heated circular cylinder

  1. The behavior of the wake behind a heated circular cylinder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khashehchi, Morteza; Hooman, Kamel; Queensland Geothermal Energy Centre of Excellence (QGECE) Team

    2013-11-01

    The thermal effects on the characteristics of the wake behind a circular cylinder operating in the mixed convection regime are considered at relatively high Reynolds number using Particle Image Velocimetry. The experiments were conducted in a horizontal wind tunnel with the heated cylinder placed horizontally. With such assumptions, the direction of the thermally induced buoyancy force acting on the fluid surrounding the heated cylinder would be perpendicular to the flow direction. Experiments were conducted for three Reynolds numbers 1000, 2000 and 4000, where each of them were run at three different temperatures 25, 50 and 75°C. By adjusting different temperatures in different Reynolds numbers, the corresponding Richardson number (RiD = Gr/Re2) was varied between 0.0 (unheated) and 10, resulting in a change in the heat transfer process from forced convection to mixed convection. With increasing temperature of the heated cylinder, significant modifications of the wake flow pattern and wake vortex shedding process were clearly revealed. In low Richardson number, the size of the wake and the vortex shedding process in the wake was found to be quite similar to that of an unheated cylinder. As the Richardson number increased, the wake vortex shedding process was found to be altered and the relative position of the first detached vortices respect to the second one is changed. It was also found that the shedding frequency of the wake vortex structures and the wake closure length decreased with increasing Richardson number.

  2. Numerical simulations of flow and heat transfer past a circular cylinder with a periodic array of fins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Dong Hyuk; Ha, Man Yeong; Balachandar, S.; Lee, Sangsan

    2004-05-01

    Three-dimensional, time-dependent solutions of flow and heat transfer past a circular cylinder with a periodic array of circular fins is obtained using an accurate and efficient spectral multidomain methodology. A Fourier expansion with a corresponding uniform grid is used along the circumferential direction. A spectral multidomain method with Chebyshev collocation is used along the r-z plane to handle the periodic array of circular fins attached to the surface of the cylinder. At a Reynolds number of 300 based on the cylinder diameter, results for the finned cylinder are compared with those of a smooth cylinder in order to see the effects of the presence of the fin array on flow and heat transfer. Detailed structure of fluid flow and temperature fields are obtained as a function of time to investigate how the fin array changes heat transfer mechanism related to the vortical structure in the wake region.

  3. Effect of a rotor wake on heat transfer from a circular cylinder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simoneau, R. J.; Morehouse, K. A.; Vanfossen, G. J.; Behning, F. P.

    1984-01-01

    The effect of a rotor wake on heat transfer to a downstream stator was investigated. The rotor was modeled with a spoked wheel of 24 circular pins 1.59 mm in diameter. One of the stator pins was electrically heated in the midspan region and circumferentially averaged heat transfer coefficients were obtained. The experiment was run in an annular flow wind tunnel using air at ambient temperature and pressure. Reynolds numbers based on stator cylinder diameter ranged from .001 to .00001. Rotor blade passing frequencies ranged from zero to 2500 Hz. Stationary grids were used to vary the rotor inlet turbulence from one to four percent. The rotor-stator spacings were one and two stator pin diameters. In addition to the heat transfer coefficients, turbulence spectra and ensemble averaged wake profiles were measured. At the higher Reynolds numbers, which is the primary range of interest for turbulent heat transfer, the rotor wakes increased Nusselt number from 10 to 45 percent depending on conditions. At lower Reynolds numbers the effect was as much as a factor of two.

  4. Heat transfer in the stagnation region of the junction of a circular cylinder perpendicular to a flat plate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hinckel, J. N.; Nagamatsu, H. T.

    1986-01-01

    The heat transfer rate in the stagnation region of the junction of a circular cylinder perpendicular to a flat plate was measured for a range of Reynolds numbers varying from 3.0 x 10 to the 4th to 7.0 x 10 to the 5th and a flow Mach number of 0.14. The measurements were performed in a shock-tube facility using a reflected shockwave technique and thin-film platinum heat gages. The heat flux was measured for both the plate and the circular cylinder. A substantial increase in the heat transfer rate in the junction region was observed. The influence of the cylinder over the flat plate extended beyond 3/4 cylinder diameter for low Reynolds numbers. For high Reynolds numbers the maximum increase in the heat transfer rate was observed to be approximately 100 percent, but for very low Reynolds numbers a maximum increase in the heat flux to the plate by a factor of 5 was observed. The variations in the heat transfer rate to the stagnation point of the cylinder was very small.

  5. Simulating transitional flow and heat transfer over the flat plate and circular cylinder using a K-epsilon turbulence model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sullivan, T. J.; Ibrahim, M.

    1989-01-01

    A boundary layer computer code, called TEXSTAN, has been used to simulate external, transitional, fluid flow and heat transfer over the flat plate and circular cylinder. Turbulence modeling was accomplished by using a low-Reynolds number K-epsilon turbulence model. The study was made for free-stream turbulence intensities less than 15 percent. The comparison of the flat plate heat transfer predictions to experimental data showed good agreement, for the location of transition as well as in the heat transfer coefficient. The typical discrepancy in predicting the heat transfer coefficient was less than 5 percent of the measured value.

  6. A numerical simulation of combined radiation and natural convection heat transfer in a square enclosure heated by a centric circular cylinder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Wencan; Chen, Jiqing; Lan, Fengchong

    2013-02-01

    A numerical simulation of combined natural convection and radiation in a square enclosure heated by a centric circular cylinder and filled with absorbing-emitting medium is presented. The ideal gas law and the discrete ordinates method are used to model the density changes due to temperature differences and the radiation heat transfer correspondingly. The influence of Rayleigh number, optical thickness and temperature difference on flow and temperature fields along with the natural convection, radiation and total Nusselt number at the source surfaces is studied. The results reveal that the radiation heat transfer as well as the optical thickness of the fluid has a distinct effect on the fluid flow phenomena, especially at high Rayleigh number. The heat transfer and so the Nusselt number decreases with increase in optical thickness, while increases greatly with increase in temperature difference. The variation in radiation heat transfer with optical thickness and temperature difference is much more obvious as comparison with convection heat transfer.

  7. Effect of heat generation on free convection boundary layer flow of a viscoelastic fluid past a horizontal circular cylinder with constant surface heat flux

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohd Kasim, Abdul Rahman; Mohammad, Nurul Farahain; Shafie, Sharidan

    2012-05-01

    Effect of heat generation on free convection boundary layer flow of a viscoelastic fluid past a horizontal circular cylinder with constant surface heat flux has been investigated. The boundary layer equations are an order higher than those for the Newtonian (viscous) fluid and the adherence boundary conditions are insufficient to determine the solution of these equations completely. The governing equations are transformed into dimensionless non-similar equations by using a set of suitable transformations and solved numerically by the finite difference method along with Newton's linearization approximation. Computations are performed numerically by using Keller-box method by augmenting an extra boundary condition at infinity. We have focused our attention on the evaluation of velocity profiles, temperature profiles, shear stress in terms of local skin friction and the rate of heat transfer in terms of local Nusselt number for different values of heat generation parameter, viscoelastic parameter and the Prandlt number and the numerical results have been shown graphically.

  8. Tests on Stiffened Circular Cylinders

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holt, Marshall

    1941-01-01

    Compressive tests were made of two series of stiffened circular cylindrical shells under axial load. All the shells were 16 inches in diameter by 24 inches in length and were made of aluminum-alloy sheet curved to the proper radius and welded with one longitudinal weld. The ratios of diameter to thickness of shell wall in the two series of specimens were 258 and 572. Strains were measured with Huggenberger tensometers at a number of gage lines on the stiffeners and shell. The results of these tests indicate that a spacing of circumferential stiffeners equal to 0.67 times the radius is too great to strengthen the shell wall appreciably. The results are not inclusive enough to show the optimum in stiffeners. Plain cylinders without stiffeners developed ultimate strengths approximately half as great as the buckling strengths computed by the equation resulting from the classical theory and slightly greater than those computed by Donnell's large deflection theory.

  9. Wake modes of rotationally oscillating circular cylinder in cross-flow and its relationship with heat transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sellappan, Prabu

    Wake formation is an important problem in engineering due to its effect on phenomena such as vortex induced vibrations and heat transfer. While prior work has focused on the wake formation due to vortex shedding from stationary, stream-wise, and transversely oscillating cylinders, limited information is available on the effect of rotary oscillations on wake formation. The relationship between wake formation and heat transfer is also not fully understood. Therefore, a series of experiments were conducted to determine the effect of rotationally oscillating cylinders on wake formation and its relationship with heat transfer. Experiments were carried out at Re = 150 and 750 in a water tunnel for oscillation frequencies from 0.67 to 3.5 times the natural shedding frequency and peak-to-peak oscillation amplitudes up to 320°. Experiments were performed at the lower Re using an unheated cylinder. Two sets of experiments were performed at the higher Re, one with the cylinder unheated and the other with the cylinder heated. Digital Particle Image Velocimetry (DPIV) was used to identify and map wake modes (coherent vortical structures in the wake) to various regions of the parameter space. Previously unknown wake modes that are synchronized over two and three times the forcing frequency were also discovered. Experiments were also performed at Re = 750 to measure the heat transfer rate for a large number of cases in the parameter space. Significant heat transfer enhancement was observed under certain forcing conditions and the regions of the parameter space where this occurs was found to correspond to locked-on wake mode regions. Other factors, such as the tangential velocity and the formation length were also found to affect the heat transfer under certain conditions.

  10. Vortex motion behind a circular cylinder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Foeppl, L.

    1983-01-01

    Vortex motion behind a circular cylinder moving through water is discussed. It is shown that a pair of vortices form behind a moving cylinder and that their centers will move along a predictable curve. This curve represents an equilibrium condition which, however, is subject to perturbation. The stability of the vortex pair is investigated. Movement of the vortex pair away from the cylinder is calculated as an explanation of the resistance of the cylinder. Finally, the principles elaborated are applied to the flow around a flat plate.

  11. Effect of a rotor wake on the local heat transfer on the forward half of a circular cylinder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morehouse, K. A.; Simoneu, R. J.

    1986-01-01

    Turbine rotor-stator wake dynamics was simulated by a spoked wheel rotating in annular flow, generating rotor wakes. Spanwise averaged circumferentially local heat transfer in the circular cylindrical leading edge region of a turbine airfoil was obtained. Reynolds numbers ranged from 35,000 to 175,000. Strouhal numbers ranged from 0.63 to 2.50. Wakes were generated by 2 sets of circular cylindrical bars, 1.59 and 3.18 mm in diameter. The rotor could be rotated either clockwise or counterclockwise. Grid turbulence was introduced upstream yielding freestream turbulence of 1.0 to 2.5% at the stator. Data represented an extensive body of local heat transfer coefficients, which can be used to model the leading edge region of a turbine airfoil. In the presence of rotor wakes, an asymmetry from the leeward to windward side was noted. Windward side levels were 30 to 40% higher than the corresponding leeward side.

  12. Investigation of the effects of pressure gradient, temperature and wall temperature ratio on the stagnation point heat transfer for circular cylinders and gas turbine vanes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nagamatsu, H. T.; Duffy, R. E.

    1984-01-01

    Low and high pressure shock tubes were designed and constructed for the purpose of obtaining heat transfer data over a temperature range of 390 to 2500 K, pressures of 0.3 to 42 atm, and Mach numbers of 0.15 to 1.5 with and without pressure gradient. A square test section with adjustable top and bottom walls was constructed to produce the favorable and adverse pressure gradient over the flat plate with heat gages. A water cooled gas turbine nozzle cascade which is attached to the high pressure shock tube was obtained to measuse the heat flux over pressure and suction surfaces. Thin-film platinum heat gages with a response time of a few microseconds were developed and used to measure the heat flux for laminar, transition, and turbulent boundary layers. The laminar boundary heat flux on the shock tube wall agreed with Mirel's flat plate theory. Stagnation point heat transfer for circular cylinders at low temperature compared with the theoretical prediction, but for a gas temperature of 922 K the heat fluxes were higher than the predicted values. Preliminary flat plate heat transfer data were measured for laminar, transition, and turbulent boundary layers with and without pressure gradients for free-stream temperatures of 350 to 2575 K and flow Mach numbers of 0.11 to 1.9. The experimental heat flux data were correlated with the laminar and turbulent theories and the agreement was good at low temperatures which was not the case for higher temperatures.

  13. Mixed convection flow over a horizontal circular cylinder with constant heat flux embedded in a porous medium filled by a nanofluid: Buongiorno-Darcy model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tham, Leony; Nazar, Roslinda; Pop, Ioan

    2016-09-01

    The steady laminar mixed convection boundary layer flow from a horizontal circular cylinder in a nanofluid embedded in a porous medium, which is maintained at a constant surface heat flux, has been studied by using the Buongiorno-Darcy nanofluid model for both cases of a heated and cooled cylinder. The resulting system of nonlinear partial differential equations is solved numerically using an implicit finite-difference scheme known as the Keller box method. The solutions for the flow and heat transfer characteristics are evaluated numerically and studied for various values of the governing parameters, namely the Lewis number, Brownian number, mixed convection parameter, buoyancy ratio parameter and thermophoresis parameter. It is also found that the boundary layer separation occurs at the opposing fluid flow, that is when the mixed convection parameter is negative. It is also observed that increasing the mixed convection parameter delays the boundary layer separation and the separation can be completely suppressed for sufficiently large values of the mixed convection parameter. The Brownian and buoyancy ratio parameters appear to affect the fluid flow and heat transfer profiles.

  14. Failure of Non-Circular Composite Cylinders

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hyer, M. W.

    2004-01-01

    In this study, a progressive failure analysis is used to investigate leakage in internally pressurized non-circular composite cylinders. This type of approach accounts for the localized loss of stiffness when material failure occurs at some location in a structure by degrading the local material elastic properties by a certain factor. The manner in which this degradation of material properties takes place depends on the failure modes, which are determined by the application of a failure criterion. The finite-element code STAGS, which has the capability to perform progressive failure analysis using different degradation schemes and failure criteria, is utilized to analyze laboratory scale, graphite-epoxy, elliptical cylinders with quasi-isotropic, circumferentially-stiff, and axially-stiff material orthotropies. The results are divided into two parts. The first part shows that leakage, which is assumed to develop if there is material failure in every layer at some axial and circumferential location within the cylinder, does not occur without failure of fibers. Moreover before fibers begin to fail, only matrix tensile failures, or matrix cracking, takes place, and at least one layer in all three cylinders studied remain uncracked, preventing the formation of a leakage path. That determination is corroborated by the use of different degradation schemes and various failure criteria. Among the degradation schemes investigated are the degradation of different engineering properties, the use of various degradation factors, the recursive or non-recursive degradation of the engineering properties, and the degradation of material properties using different computational approaches. The failure criteria used in the analysis include the noninteractive maximum stress criterion and the interactive Hashin and Tsai-Wu criteria. The second part of the results shows that leakage occurs due to a combination of matrix tensile and compressive, fiber tensile and compressive, and inplane

  15. Torsion Tests of Stiffened Circular Cylinders

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, R L; Wescoat, C

    1944-01-01

    The design of curved sheet panels to resist shear involves a consideration of several factors: the buckling resistance of the sheet, the stress at which buckling becomes permanent, and the strength which may be developed beyond the buckling limit by tension-field action. Although some experimental as well as theoretical work has been done on the buckling and tension-field phases of this problem, neither of these types of action appears to be very well understood. The problem is of sufficient importance from the standpoint of aircraft design, it is believed, to warrant further experimental investigation. This report presents the results of the first series of torsion tests of stiffened circular cylinders to be completed in connection with this study at Aluminum Research Laboratories. (author)

  16. Three-dimensional computation for flow-induced vibrations of an upstream circular cylinder in two tandem circular cylinders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kondo, Norio

    2014-07-01

    It is well known from a lot of experimental data that fluid forces acting on two tandem circular cylinders are quite different from those acting on a single circular cylinder. Therefore, we first present numerical results for fluid forces acting on two tandem circular cylinders, which are mounted at various spacings in a smooth flow, and second we present numerical results for flow-induced vibrations of the upstream circular cylinder in the tandem arrangement. The two circular cylinders are arranged at close spacing in a flow field. The upstream circular cylinder is elastically placed by damper-spring systems and moves in both the in-line and cross-flow directions. In such models, each circular cylinder is assumed as a rigid body. On the other hand, we do not introduce a turbulent model such as the Large Eddy Simulation (LES) or Reynolds Averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) models into the numerical scheme to compute the fluid flow. Our numerical procedure to capture the flow-induced vibration phenomena of the upstream circular cylinder is treated as a fluid-structure interaction problem in which the ideas of weak coupling is taken into consideration.

  17. Fluid forces on two circular cylinders in crossflow

    SciTech Connect

    Jendrzejczyk, J.A.; Chen, S.S.

    1986-01-01

    Fluid excitation forces are measured in a water loop for two circular cylinders arranged in tandem and normal to flow. The Strouhal number and fluctuating drag and lift coefficients for both cylinders are presented for various spacings and incoming flow conditions. The results show the effects of Reynolds number, pitch ratio, and upstream turbulence on the fluid excitation forces.

  18. Fluid forces on two circular cylinders in crossflow

    SciTech Connect

    Jendrzejczyk, J.A.; Chen, S.S.

    1985-06-01

    Fluid excitation forces are measured in a water loop for two circular cylinders arranged in tandem and normal to flow. The Strouhal number and fluctuating drag and lift coefficients for both cylinders are presented for various spacings and incoming flow conditions. Results show the effects of Reynolds number, pitch ratio, and upstream turbulence on the fluid excitation forces.

  19. Flow control of a circular cylinder with O-rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, Hee-Chang; Lee, Sang-Joon

    2004-08-01

    The flow around a circular cylinder is controlled by attaching O-rings to reduce drag force acting on the cylinder. Wind tunnel experiments on the flow around a circular cylinder with and without ring type surface protrusions are carried out to investigate the flow characteristics of the controlled wake. Four experimental models are tested in this study; one smooth cylinder of diameter D (60 mm) and three cylinders fitted with longitudinal O-rings of diameters d=0.0167D, 0.05D and 0.067 D with various pitches. The drag force, mean velocity and turbulence intensity profiles in the near wake behind the cylinders are measured for Reynolds numbers based on the cylinder diameter in the range of ReD=7.8×10 3˜1.2×10 5. Flow field around the cylinders is visualized using a smoke-wire technique to see the flow structure qualitatively. The results are compared with those for a smooth cylinder having the same diameter. At ReD=1.2×10 5, the cylinder fitted with O-rings of d=0.0167 D in a pitch interval of 0.165 D shows the maximum drag reduction of about 9%, compared with the smooth cylinder. The drag reduction effect of O-rings of d=0.067 D is not so high and it has nearly the same value as that of the smooth cylinder. For the O-ring circular, as the Reynolds number increases, the location of peak turbulence intensity shifts downstream and the peak magnitude is decreased. In addition, the vortex shedding frequency has nearly same value as that of the smooth cylinder up to a Reynolds number of 3.2×10 4. Thereafter, the shedding frequency increases and finally disappears as the Reynolds number increases. The visualized flow for the smooth cylinder does not show distinct spanwise variation of flow pattern. However, the size of vortices and vortex formation region formed behind the O-ring cylinder are smaller, compared with the smooth cylinder. In addition, the instantaneous topological flow image shows spanwise variation of V-shaped flow pattern. Consequently, the simple

  20. Natural convective heat transfer from square cylinder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Novomestský, Marcel; Smatanová, Helena; Kapjor, Andrej

    2016-06-01

    This article is concerned with natural convective heat transfer from square cylinder mounted on a plane adiabatic base, the cylinders having an exposed cylinder surface according to different horizontal angle. The cylinder receives heat from a radiating heater which results in a buoyant flow. There are many industrial applications, including refrigeration, ventilation and the cooling of electrical components, for which the present study may be applicable

  1. Casimir energy of a semi-circular infinite cylinder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nesterenko, V. V.; Lambiase, G.; Scarpetta, G.

    2001-05-01

    The Casimir energy of a semi-circular cylindrical shell is calculated by making use of the zeta function technique. This shell is obtained by crossing an infinite circular cylindrical shell by a plane passing through the symmetry axes of the cylinder and by considering only half of this configuration. All the surfaces, including the cutting plane, are assumed to be perfectly conducting. The zeta functions for scalar massless fields obeying the Dirichlet and Neumann boundary conditions on the semi-circular cylinder are constructed exactly. The sum of these zeta functions gives the zeta function for the electromagnetic field in question. The relevant plane problem is considered also. In all the cases the final expressions for the corresponding Casimir energies contain the pole contributions which are the consequence of the edges or corners in the boundaries. This implies that further renormalization is needed in order for the finite physical values for vacuum energy to be obtained for given boundary conditions.

  2. Drag and Strouhal number measurements for porous circular cylinders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanale, Anup; Sellappan, Prabu; Luhar, Mitul

    2015-11-01

    Flow past solid bluff bodies has been studied extensively, and both experimental and computational results are well documented. However, there is limited data available for flows past porous bluff bodies, in spite of their abundance in nature. As an effort in this direction, we study the wake behind porous circular cylinders via water channel experiments employing particle image velocimetry (PIV). The experiments systematically test the effect of three dimensionless parameters: ReP , the Reynolds number based on pore size, ReD , the Reynolds number based on cylinder diamter, and ϕ the porosity of the sleeve. Specifically the PIV data are used to estimate the drag coefficient and Strouhal number for 600 <= ReD <= 5000 , 18 <= ReP <= 600 and 0 . 33 <= ϕ <= 0 . 75 . The results obtained are compared with solid cylinders to identify the effect of cylinder permeability on flow characteristics.

  3. Design guide for single circular cylinder in turbulent crossflow. [LMFBR

    SciTech Connect

    Mulcahy, T.M.

    1982-03-01

    A design procedure is proposed for predicting the dynamic structural response of a circular cylinder in turbulent crossflow. The procedure is based on recently obtained data for a stationary, rigid cylinder and on existing information. The procedure is not applicable to conditions where the wake vortex shedding frequency locks into a structural natural frequency. This report is self-contained in that all the information and structural analysis methods employed in the procedure are reviewed and developed. Also, an example is given to illustrate the use of the method for a typical reactor component. The calculated responses are found to be very small.

  4. The turbulent flow field around a circular cylinder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dargahi, B.

    1989-10-01

    The flow field around a circular cylinder mounted vertically on a flat bottom has been investigated experimentally. This type of flow occurs in several technical applications, e.g. local scouring around bridge piers. Hydrogen bubble flow visualization was carried out for Reynolds numbers ranging from 6,600 to 65,000. The main flow characteristic upstream of the cylinder is a system of horse-shoe vortices which are shed quasi-periodically. The number of vortices depends on Reynolds number. The vortex system was found to be independent of the vortices that are shed in the wake of the cylinder. The topology of the separated flow contains several separation and attachment lines which are Reynolds number dependent. In the wake region different flow patterns exist for each constant Reynolds number.

  5. Patterns of vortex shedding from an oscillating circular cylinder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, Keun-Shik; Sa, Jong-Youb

    1990-01-01

    Vortex shedding from an oscillating circular cylinder was numerically investigated at Re = 100 with the Navier-Stokes equations and the new boundary conditions. The detailed shedding patterns are characterized by means of streakline plotting and lift-coefficient curves. A parameter map is presented which distinguishes the synchronized shedding from the asynchronous and the double vortices shedding from the single vortex shedding. The computational result is in good agreement with earlier experimental results.

  6. Passive jet control of flow around a circular cylinder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Wen-Li; Gao, Dong-Lai; Yuan, Wen-Yong; Li, Hui; Hu, Hui

    2015-11-01

    In the present study, a passive flow control method, which is featured by passive windward suction combined with leeward jet over a circular cylinder for drag reduction and dynamic wind loading suppression, was experimentally investigated to manipulate unsteady wake vortex shedding from a circular cylinder. Four perforated pipe designs with different numbers of suction/jet holes (i.e., from 2 to 24 suction/jet holes) were used to create flow communicating channels between the windward and leeward stagnation points of a cylindrical test model. The experimental study was performed in a wind tunnel at a Reynolds number of Re = 4.16 × 104 based on the cylinder diameter and oncoming airflow speed. In addition to measuring surface pressure distributions to determine the dynamic wind loads acting on the test model, a digital particle image velocimetry (PIV) system was also used to quantify the wake flow characteristics in order to assess the effectiveness of the passive jet control method with different perforated pipe designs, in comparison with a baseline case without passive jet control. It was found that the passive jet control method is very effective in manipulating the wake vortex shedding process from the circular cylinder. The perforated pipe designs with more suction/jet holes were found to be more effective in reducing drag and suppressing fluctuating amplitude of the dynamic wind loads acting on the test model. With 24 suction/jet holes evenly distributed over the cylindrical test model (i.e., the N13 design of the present study), the passive jet control method was found to be able to achieve up to 33.7 % in drag reduction and 90.6 % in fluctuating wind loading suppression, in comparison with the baseline case. The PIV measurement results revealed clearly that the passive jet control method would cause airflow jets into the cylinder wake and change the shedding modes of the wake vortex structures from the cylindrical test model. Because of the dynamic

  7. Effect of plasma actuator and splitter plate on drag coefficient of a circular cylinder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akbıyık, Hürrem; Erkan Akansu, Yahya; Yavuz, Hakan; Ertuğrul Bay, Ahmet

    2016-03-01

    In this paper, an experimental study on flow control around a circular cylinder with splitter plate and plasma actuator is investigated. The study is performed in wind tunnel for Reynolds numbers at 4000 and 8000. The wake region of circular cylinder with a splitter plate is analyzed at different angles between 0 and 180 degrees. In this the study, not only plasma actuators are activated but also splitter plate is placed behind the cylinder. A couple electrodes are mounted on circular cylinder at ±90 degrees. Also, flow visualization is achieved by using smoke wire method. Drag coefficient of the circular cylinder with splitter plate and the plasma actuator are obtained for different angles and compared with the plain circular cylinder. While attack angle is 0 degree, drag coefficient is decreased about 20% by using the splitter plate behind the circular cylinder. However, when the plasma actuators are activated, the improvement of the drag reduction is measured to be 50%.

  8. Compressible potential flow with circulation about a circular cylinder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heaslet, Max A

    1944-01-01

    The potential function for flow, with circulation, of a compressible fluid about a circular cylinder is obtained in series form including terms of the orders of m(4) where m is the Mach number of the free stream. The resulting equations are used to obtain pressure coefficients as a function of Mach number at a point on the surface of the cylinder for different values of circulation. The coefficients derived are compared with the Glauert-Prandtl and Karman-Tsien approximations which are functions of the pressure coefficients of an incompressible fluid. For the cases considered, the values of the pressure coefficients computed from the theory were found to be somewhere between the two approximations, the first underestimating and the second overestimating it.

  9. Compression Tests on Circular Cylinders Stiffened Longitudinally by Closely Spaced Z-Section Stringers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peterson, James P.; Dow, Marvin B.

    1959-01-01

    Six circular cylinders stiffened longitudinally by closely spaced Z-section stringers were loaded to failure in compression. The results obtained are presented and compared with available theoretical results for the buckling of orthotropic cylinders. The results indicate that the large disparity that exists between theory and experiment for unstiffened compression cylinders may be significantly smaller for stiffened cylinders.

  10. Nonisothermal Flow Around a Circular Cylinder with a Permeable Layer at Moderate Reynolds Numbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morenko, I. V.; Snigerev, B. A.

    2016-07-01

    Results of a numerical investigation of a separation nonisothermal flow of an incompressible viscous fluid around a circular cylinder covered with a permeable porous layer at moderate Reynolds numbers are presented. This flow was defined with the use of Navier-Stokes and energy equations, and the filtration flow in the porous layer was determined by the Forchheimer law. The dependence of the hydrodynamical drag of the indicated cylinder and the length of the vortex region in the flow around it on the Reynolds and Darcy numbers was determined. An analysis of the heat transfer from cylindrical bodies covered with permeable layers of a highly heat-conducting material or a heat-insulating material has been performed.

  11. Flow control simulations around a circular cylinder by a finite-volume scheme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, San-Yih; Wu, Tsuen-Muh

    1993-07-01

    A numerical study is made of the flow past a circular cylinder with/without flow control devices. The Reynolds number ranges from 20 to 200. The numerical method for the solutions of the incompressible Navier-Stokes equations is based on an artificial compressibility approach and an upwind finite-volume method. Two kinds of the flow control devices are investigated: (1) placing an attached or a detached splitter plate in the wake behind the circular cylinder, and (2) placing a second small cylinder (control cylinder) behind the circular cylinder. The numerical investigations show that both of two are effective on the suppression of vortex shedding and the reduction of drag.

  12. Scattering matrix of infrared radiation by ice finite circular cylinders.

    PubMed

    Xu, Lisheng; Ding, Jilie; Cheng, Andrew Y S

    2002-04-20

    Scattering matrix characteristics of polydisperse, randomly oriented, small ice crystals modeled by finite circular cylinders with various ratios of the length to diameter (L/D) ratio are calculated by use of the exact T-matrix approach, with emphasis on the thermal infrared spectral region that extends from the atmospheric short-wave IR window to the far-IR wavelengths to as large as 30 microm. The observed ice crystal size distribution and the well-known power-law distribution are considered. The results of the extensive calculations show that the characteristics of scattering matrix elements of small ice circular cylinders depend strongly on wavelengths and refractive indices, particle size distributions, and the L/D ratios. The applicability of the power-law distribution and particle shapes for light scattering calculations for small ice crystals is discussed. The effects of the effective variance of size distribution on light scattering characteristics are addressed. It seems from the behavior of scattering matrix elements of small ice crystals that the combination of 25 and 3.979 microm has some advantages and potential applications for remote sensing of cirrus and other ice clouds.

  13. Water-tunnel study of transition flow around circular cylinders

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Almosnino, D.; Mcalister, K. W.

    1984-01-01

    The recently reported phenomenon of asymmetric flow separation from a circular cylinder in the critical Reynolds number regime has been confirmed in a water-tunnel experiment. For the first time, an attempt was made to visualize the wake of the cylinder during the transition from subcritical to critical flow and to correlate the visualizations with lift and drag measurements. The occurrence of a dominant asymmetric-flow state was quite repeatable, both when increasing and decreasing the Reynolds number, resulting in a mean lift coefficient of C sub L approx 1.2 and a shift in the angle of the wake by about 12 deg. A distinctive step change in the drag and shedding frequency was also found to occur. A hysteresis was confirmed to exist in this region as the Reynolds number was cycled over the transition range. Both boundaries of the asymmetry appear to be supercritical bifurcations in the flow. The asymmetry was normally steady in the mean; however, there were instances when the direction of the asymmetry reversed and remained so for the duration of the Reynolds number sweep through this transition region. A second asymmetry was observed at a higher Reynolds number; however, the mean lift coefficient was much lower, and the direction of the asymmetry was not observed to reverse. Introducing a small local disturbance into the boundary layer was found to prevent the critical asymmetry from developing along the entire span of the cylinder.

  14. Effect of location in an array on heat transfer to a cylinder in crossflow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simoneau, R. J.; Vanfossen, G. J., Jr.

    1982-01-01

    An experiment was conducted to measure the heat transfer from a heated cylinder in crossflow in an array of circular cylinders. All cylinders had a length-to-diameter ratio of 3.0. Both in-line and staggered array patterns were studied. The cylinders were spaced 2.67 diameters apart center-to-center in both the axial and transverse directions to the flow. The row containing the heated cylinder remained in a fixed position in the channel and the relative location of this row within the array was changed by adding up to five upstream rows. The working fluid was nitrogen gas at pressures from 100 to 600 kPa. The Reynolds number ranged based on cylinder diameter and average unobstructed channel velocity was from 5,000 to 125,000. Turbulence intensity: profiles were measured for each case at a point one half space upstream of the row containing the heated cylinder. The basis of comparison for all the heat transfer data was the single row with the heated cylinder. For the in-line cases the addition of a single row of cylinders upstream of the row containing the heated cylinder increased the heat transfer by an average of 50 percent above the base case. Adding up to five more rows caused no increase or decrease in heat transfer. Adding rows in the staggered array cases resulted in average increases in heat transfer of 21, 64, 58, 46, and 46 percent for one to five upstream rows, respectively.

  15. Circular cylinders with soft porous cover for flow noise reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geyer, Thomas F.; Sarradj, Ennes

    2016-03-01

    The use of porous materials is one of several approaches to passively control or minimize the generation of flow noise. In order to investigate the possible reduction of noise from struts and other protruding parts (for example components of the landing gear or pantographs), acoustic measurements were taken in a small aeroacoustic wind tunnel on a set of circular cylinders with a soft porous cover. The aim of this study was to identify those materials that result in the best noise reduction, which refers to both tonal noise and broadband noise. The porous covers were characterized by their air flow resistivity, a parameter describing the permeability of an open-porous material. The results show that materials with low air flow resistivities lead to a noticeable flow noise reduction. Thereby, the main effect of the porous cylinder covers is that the spectral peak of the aeolian tone due to vortex shedding appears much narrower, but is not suppressed completely. Based on the measurement results, a basic model for the estimation of the total peak level of the aeolian tone was derived. In addition to the minimization of the vortex shedding noise, a reduction of broadband noise can be observed, especially at higher Reynolds numbers. The noise reduction increases with decreasing air flow resistivity of the porous covers, which means that materials that are highly permeable to air result in the best noise reduction.

  16. Transient wall-jet flowing over a circular cylinder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Danon, Ron; Gregory, James W.; Greenblatt, David

    2016-09-01

    The transient flow of a two-dimensional wall-jet over a circular cylinder, following rapid initiation and termination, was investigated experimentally. Unsteady surface pressures and unsteady pressure-sensitive paint were used to gain a basic understanding of the flow physics. Jet initiation produced a starting vortex, upstream of which the Coandă flow developed, producing a large low-pressure peak. Immediately following jet termination, the pressure increased over the first quarter of the circumference, while the downstream separation region remained virtually unaffected. Simplifying analyses and dimensional arguments were used to show that the timescales characterizing the transient development of the integrated loads depend only on the square of the slot height and the kinematic viscosity and are thus independent of the jet velocity. Following jet initiation, the resulting loads varied according to a linear transient model, while small nonlinearities were observed following jet termination. Unsteady pressure-sensitive paint showed that the starting jet emerges from the slot in a two-dimensional manner and that streamwise streaks, identified as Görtler vortices, form well before the flow reaches steady state. During termination, the streamwise structures dissipate downstream initially, with the dissipation propagating upstream.

  17. Mass transfer from a circular cylinder: Effects of flow unsteadiness and slight nonuniformities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marziale, M. L.; Mayle, R. E.

    1984-01-01

    Experiments were performed to determine the effect of periodic variations in the angle of the flow incident to a turbine blade on its leading edge heat load. To model this situation, measurements were made on a circular cylinder oscillating rotationally in a uniform steady flow. A naphthalene mass transfer technique was developed and used in the experiments and heat transfer rates are inferred from the results. The investigation consisted of two parts. In the first, a stationary cylinder was used and the transfer rate was measured for Re = 75,000 to 110,000 and turbulence levels from .34 percent to 4.9 percent. Comparisons with both theory and the results of others demonstrate that the accuracy and repeatability of the developed mass transfer technique is about + or - 2 percent, a large improvement over similar methods. In the second part identical flow conditions were used but the cylinder was oscillated. A Strouhal number range from .0071 to .1406 was covered. Comparisons of the unsteady and steady results indicate that the magnitude of the effect of oscillation is small and dependent on the incident turbulence conditions.

  18. Flow past rotating and stationary circular cylinders near a plane screen. II - Characteristics of flow past a stationary cylinder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kovalenko, V. M.; Byehkov, N. M.; Kisel, G. A.; Dikovskaia, N. D.

    1984-03-01

    Measurements have been made of pressure distributions and pulsations in a cross flow past a circular cylinder placed near a plane screen of finite length. The experiments reported here have been carried out under low turbulence conditions over a range of Reynolds numbers that includes the critical values. The boundary layer separation points and the evolution of the front critical point and other characteristic zones with the distance to the screen are determined. The components of the aerodynamic force acting on the cylinder and the Strouhal number are calculated on the basis of the predominant pulsation frequencies on the cylinder.

  19. Flow past circular cylinder of finite length placed on ground plane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okamoto, Shiki

    This paper describes an experimental study of the changes of vortices formation and turbulent wake from a circular cylinder placed on a ground plane. The experiment was carried out in a blow down wind-tunnel having a working section of 500 mm x 5000 mm x 2000 mm in size at Reynolds number 25,000 to 47,000. The surface-pressure distributions on the circular cylinder were measured and the drag coefficient was determined from them. The vortices generated in the flow-field around a circular cylinder have also been observed and the velocity defects and turbulent intensities in the turbulent wake behind the circular cylinder were measured. Consequently, it is found that the flow pattern changes rapidly from H/D = 4, while the shedding vortices change from arch type to Karman type.

  20. Velocity Measurements of Turbulent Wake Flow Over a Circular Cylinder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shih, Chang-Lung; Chen, Wei-Cheng; Chang, Keh-Chin; Wang, Muh-Rong

    2016-06-01

    There are two general concerns in the velocity measurements of turbulence. One is the temporal characteristics which governs the turbulent mixing process. Turbulence is rotational and is characterized by high levels of fluctuating vorticity. In order to obtain the information of vorticity dynamics, the spatial characteristics is the other concern. These varying needs can be satisfied by using a variety of diagnostic techniques such as invasive physical probes and non-invasive optical instruments. Probe techniques for the turbulent measurements are inherently simple and less expensive than optical methods. However, the presence of a physical probe may alter the flow field, and velocity measurements usually become questionable when probing recirculation zones. The non-invasive optical methods are mostly made of the foreign particles (or seeding) instead of the fluid flow and are, thus, of indirect method. The difference between the velocities of fluid and foreign particles is always an issue to be discussed particularly in the measurements of complicated turbulent flows. Velocity measurements of the turbulent wake flow over a circular cylinder will be made by using two invasive instruments, namely, a cross-type hot-wire anemometry (HWA) and a split-fiber hot-film anemometry (HFA), and a non-invasive optical instrument, namely, particle image velocimetry (PIV) in this study. Comparison results show that all three employed diagnostic techniques yield similar measurements in the mean velocity while somewhat deviated results in the root-mean-squared velocity, particularly for the PIV measurements. It is demonstrated that HFA possesses more capability than HWA in the flow measurements of wake flow. Wake width is determined in terms of either the flatness factor or shear-induced vorticity. It is demonstrated that flow data obtained with the three employed diagnostic techniques are capable of yielding accurate determination of wake width.

  1. Effect of location in an array on heat transfer to a short cylinder in crossflow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simoneau, R. J.; Vanfossen, G. J., Jr.

    1984-02-01

    An experiment was conducted to measure the heat transfer from a heated cylinder in crossflow in an array of circular cylinders. All cylinders had a length-to-diameter ratio of 3.0. Both in-line and staggered array patterns were studied. The cylinders were spaced 2.67 diameters apart center-to-center in both the axial and transverse directions to the flow. The row containing the heated cylinder remained in a fixed position in the channel and the relative location of this row within the array was changed by adding up to five upstream rows. The working fluid was nitrogen gas at pressures from 100 to 600 kPa. The Reynolds number range based on cylinder diameter and average unobstructed channel velocity was from 5,000 to 125,000. Turbulence intensity profiles were measured for each case at a point one half space upstream of the row containing the heated cylinder. The basis of comparison for all the heat transfer data was the single row with the heated cylinder. For the in-line cases the addition of a single row of cylinders upstream of the row containing the heated cylinder increased the heat transfer by an average of 50 percent above the base case. Adding up to five more rows caused no increase or decrease in heat transfer. Adding rows in the staggered array cases resulted in average increases in heat transfer of 21, 64, 58, 46, and 46 percent for one to five upstream rows, respectively. Previously announced in STAR as N82-19493

  2. Enhanced convective transport from an isothermal circular cylinder with hydrodynamic slip boundary condition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdul Rehman, Nidhil Mohamed; Shukla, Ratnesh

    2015-11-01

    Introduction of a slip in the tangential surface velocity suppresses vorticity production in a typical bluff body flow while simultaneously enhancing vorticity convection downstream and into the wake region. As a result the flow characteristics are altered significantly and the hydrodynamic loads are reduced considerably. In this work we investigate the effect of the hydrodynamic slip on the convective heat transfer from the surface of a heated isothermal circular cylinder placed in the uniform cross flow of a viscous incompressible fluid through numerical simulations. We find that for fixed Reynolds and Prandtl numbers an increase in the Knudsen number or equivalently the hydrodynamic slip length results in a substantial augmentation of the heat transfer coefficient. We establish the dependence of the Nusselt number on the Knudsen, Reynolds and Prandtl numbers over a wide range of these parameters. We find that for given Reynolds and Prandtl numbers the Nusselt number undergoes a sharp transition between the low and high asymptotic limits that correspond to zero (no-slip) and infinite (shear-free perfect slip) Knudsen numbers. We establish that the high asymptotic limit corresponding to the shear-free perfect slip cylinder boundary scales as Nu ~ Re 0 . 5 Pr 0 . 5 .

  3. Poiseuille flow-induced vibrations of two tandem circular cylinders with different mass ratios

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Ren-Jie; Lin, Jian-Zhong

    2016-06-01

    Flow-induced vibrations of two tandem circular cylinders with different mass ratios confined between two parallel walls are numerically studied via a lattice Boltzmann method. With fixed Reynolds number Re = 100 and blockage ratio β = 1/4, the effects of mass ratio m* = [0.0625, 16] and streamwise separation between two cylinders S/D = [1.125, 10] on the cylinder motions and vortex wake modes are investigated. A variety of distinct cylinder motion regimes involving the symmetric periodic vibration, biased quasi-periodic vibration, beating vibration, and steady regimes, with the corresponding wake structures, e.g., two rows of alternately rotating vortices, a single row of same-sign vortices, and steady wake, are observed. For each current case, the cylinder motion type is exclusive and in the binary oscillation regime, both cylinders always vibrate at a common primary frequency. The lighter cylinder usually oscillates at a larger amplitude than the heavier one, while the heavier cylinder undergoes larger lift force than the lighter one. The lift force and cylinder displacement always behave as an out-of-phase state. In the gap-interference region, large-amplitude oscillations could be produced extensively and in the wake-interference region, the cylinder motions and fluid flows are mainly dependent on the upstream cylinder. When the separation is large enough, both cylinders behave as two isolated ones. The mechanisms for the excitations of cylinder vibrations have also been analysed.

  4. Detonation initiation by rotation of an elliptic cylinder inside a circular cylinder and deformation of the channel walls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levin, V. A.; Manuilovich, I. S.; Markov, V. V.

    2010-07-01

    The possibility of initiating detonation in a closed field due to motion of its boundaries for a one-step kinetic model is studied by numerical simulation of the problems of flow of a propane-air mixture inside and outside a rotating elliptic cylinder enclosed in a circular cylinder; in rotation of a circular cylinder with parabolic blades uniformly distributed along its boundary, or in rotation of a star-shaped figure with parabolic rays originating from the center of rotation; and in a plane chamber with deformable walls. Critical parameter values for which detonation occurs are determined. A method of approximate description of the processes occurring in three-dimensional helical channels is considered. In the numerical study of these processes, software based on the Godunov scheme was used.

  5. Heat transfer measurements for Stirling machine cylinders

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kornhauser, Alan A.; Kafka, B. C.; Finkbeiner, D. L.; Cantelmi, F. C.

    1994-01-01

    The primary purpose of this study was to measure the effects of inflow-produced heat turbulence on heat transfer in Stirling machine cylinders. A secondary purpose was to provide new experimental information on heat transfer in gas springs without inflow. The apparatus for the experiment consisted of a varying-volume piston-cylinder space connected to a fixed volume space by an orifice. The orifice size could be varied to adjust the level of inflow-produced turbulence, or the orifice plate could be removed completely so as to merge the two spaces into a single gas spring space. Speed, cycle mean pressure, overall volume ratio, and varying volume space clearance ratio could also be adjusted. Volume, pressure in both spaces, and local heat flux at two locations were measured. The pressure and volume measurements were used to calculate area averaged heat flux, heat transfer hysteresis loss, and other heat transfer-related effects. Experiments in the one space arrangement extended the range of previous gas spring tests to lower volume ratio and higher nondimensional speed. The tests corroborated previous results and showed that analytic models for heat transfer and loss based on volume ratio approaching 1 were valid for volume ratios ranging from 1 to 2, a range covering most gas springs in Stirling machines. Data from experiments in the two space arrangement were first analyzed based on lumping the two spaces together and examining total loss and averaged heat transfer as a function of overall nondimensional parameter. Heat transfer and loss were found to be significantly increased by inflow-produced turbulence. These increases could be modeled by appropriate adjustment of empirical coefficients in an existing semi-analytic model. An attempt was made to use an inverse, parameter optimization procedure to find the heat transfer in each of the two spaces. This procedure was successful in retrieving this information from simulated pressure-volume data with artificially

  6. The three-dimensional flow past a rapidly rotating circular cylinder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Denier, James P.; Duck, Peter W.

    1993-01-01

    The high Reynolds number (Re) flow past a rapidly rotating circular cylinder is investigated. The rotation rate of the cylinder is allowed to vary (slightly) along the axis of the cylinder, thereby provoking three-dimensional flow disturbances, which are shown to involve relatively massive (O(Re)) velocity perturbations to the flow away from the cylinder surface. Additionally, three integral conditions, analogous to the single condition determined in two dimensions by Batchelor, are derived, based on the condition of periodicity in the azimuthal direction.

  7. Flow above the free end of a surface-mounted finite-height circular cylinder: A review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sumner, D.

    2013-11-01

    The wake of a surface-mounted finite-height circular cylinder and the associated vortex patterns are strongly dependent on the cylinder aspect ratio and the thickness of the boundary layer on the ground plane relative to the dimensions of the cylinder. Above a critical aspect ratio, the mean wake is characterized by streamwise tip vortex structures and Kármán vortex shedding from the sides of the cylinder. Below a critical aspect ratio, a unique mean wake structure is observed. Recent experimental studies in the literature that used phase-averaged techniques, as well as recent numerical simulations, have led to an improved physical understanding of the near-wake vortex flow patterns. However, the flow above the free end of the finite circular cylinder, and its relationship to the near wake, has not been systematically studied. The effects of aspect ratio and boundary layer thickness on the free-end flow field are also not completely understood, nor has the influence of Reynolds number on the free-end flow field been fully explored. Common features associated with the free end include separation from the leading edge, a mean recirculation zone containing a prominent cross-stream arch (or mushroom) vortex, and reattachment onto the free-surface. Other flow features that remain to be clarified include a separation bubble near the leading edge, one or two cross-stream vortices within this separation bubble, the origins of the streamwise tip or trailing vortices, and various critical points in the near-surface flow topology. This paper reviews the current understanding of the flow above the free end of a surface-mounted finite-height circular cylinder, with a focus on models of the flow field, surface oil flow visualization studies, pressure and heat flux distributions on the free-end surface, measurements of the local velocity field, and numerical simulations, found in the literature.

  8. Forces on surface-piercing vertical circular cylinder groups on flooding staircase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Li-jie; Shao, Wei-yun; Zhu, David Z.; Sun, Zhi-lin

    2014-04-01

    Flooding into underground spaces has become a common threat and caused significant damages and casualties in the past decades. To improve the understanding of people walking through the flooding staircase, a 1:2-scale physical model of a staircase with rest platform was assembled. An instrument was developed to measure the hydrodynamic forces acting on individual vertical circular cylinders, as well as cylinder groups arranged side-by-side, in tandem and staggered cylinder arrays on the flooding staircase. The results show that the horizontal hydrodynamic force on a cylinder increases rapidly with the increasing of the inundated depth on the entrance of the staircase. With a side-by-side tight cylinder array, the force on the central cylinder is always larger than an isolated one. The force on the downstream cylinder in tandem cylinder array is always smaller. However, the drag coefficients of both cases are much larger than the corresponding ones in a horizontal bed channel. For the case of staggered cylinder array, the force on the downstream cylinder varies with the change of the transverse spacing and the longitudinal distance between cylinders.

  9. Energetically efficient proportional-integral-differential (PID) control of wake vortices behind a circular cylinder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, Pramode K.; Mathew, Sam; Shaiju, A. J.; Patnaik, B. S. V.

    2016-02-01

    The control of vortex shedding behind a circular cylinder is a precursor to a wide range of external shear flow problems in engineering, in particular the flow-induced vibrations. In the present study, numerical simulation of an energetically efficient active flow control strategy is proposed, for the control of wake vortices behind a circular cylinder at a low Reynolds number of 100. The fluid is assumed to be incompressible and Newtonian with negligible variation in properties. Reflectionally symmetric controllers are designed such that, they are located on a small sector of the cylinder over which, tangential sliding mode control is imparted. In the field of modern controls, proportional (P), integral (I) and differential (D) control strategies and their numerous combinations are extremely popular in industrial practice. To impart suitable control actuation, the vertically varying lift force on the circular cylinder, is synthesised for the construction of an error term. Four different types of controllers considered in the present study are, P, I, PI and PID. These controllers are evaluated for their energetic efficiency and performance. A linear quadratic optimal control problem is formulated, to minimise the cost functional. By performing detailed simulations, it was observed that, the system is energetically efficient, even when the twin eddies are still persisting behind the circular cylinder. To assess the adaptability of the controllers, the actuators were switched on and off to study their dynamic response.

  10. Investigation of drag reduction through a flapping mechanism on circular cylinder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asif, Md. Asafuddoula; Gupta, Avijit Das; Rana, M. D. Juwel; Ahmed, Dewan Hasan

    2016-07-01

    During flapping wing, a bird develops sufficient lift force as well as counteracts drag and increases its speed through different orientations of feathers on the flapping wings. Differently oriented feathers play a significant role in drag reduction during flying of a bird. With an objective to investigate the effect of installation of such flapping mechanism as a mean of drag reduction in case of flow over circular cylinder, this concept has been implemented through installation of continuous and mini flaps, made of MS sheet metal, where flaps are oriented at different angles as like feathers of flapping wings. The experiments are carried out in a subsonic wind tunnel. After validation and comparison with conventional result of drag analysis of a single cylinder, effects of flapping with Reynolds number variation, implementation of different orientations of mini flaps and variation of different interspacing distance between mini flaps are studied to find the most effective angle of attack of drag reduction on the body of circular cylinder. This research show that, installation of continuous flap reduces value of drag co-efficient, CD up to 66%, where as mini flaps are found more effective by reducing it up to 73%. Mini flaps of L/s=6.25, all angled at 30O, at the 30O angular position on the body of circular cylinder has been found the most effective angle of attack for drag reduction in case of flow over circular cylinder.

  11. Pressure Distribution at Subsonic Speeds over the Forepart of Two Blunt Circular Cylinders

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lockwood, V. E.

    1975-01-01

    A wind tunnel investigation was made at subsonic speeds to determine the pressure distribution over the forward part of a circular cylinder. The cylinder was equipped with interchangeable faces, one having a flat face and one having a dome shaped face. The investigation was made over angle of attack range from -1 deg to 26 deg and a Mach number range from 0.30 to 0.89. Pressure coefficients are presented in tabular form and plotted data are presented for some selected angles of attack about the surface of the cylinder.

  12. Vortex shedding from a circular cylinder in oscillatory flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barbi, C.; Favier, D.; Maresca, C.

    Vortex shedding from a cylinder in oscillatory flows has been investigated by measuring the skin friction on the cylinder surface, the lift and drag forces, and the wake velocity and then deducing the power spectrum of these fluctuating quantities. Lift and drag variations below and in the locking-on regime are discussed. In particular, it is shown that the lift oscillates, both in stationary and oscillatory flows, at the frequency of vortex shedding with high amplitude in steady flow and in the locking-on regime. The drag oscillates at a frequency that is twice the shedding frequency in stationary flows; it oscillates at the frequency of oscillatory flow even in the locking-on regime where a strong second harmonic appears.

  13. Scattering by dielectric circular cylinders in a dielectric slab.

    PubMed

    Frezza, Fabrizio; Pajewski, Lara; Ponti, Cristina; Schettini, Giuseppe

    2010-04-01

    An analytical-numerical technique for the solution of the plane-wave scattering problem by a set of dielectric cylinders embedded in a dielectric slab is presented. Scattered fields are expressed by means of expansions into cylindrical functions, and the concept of plane-wave spectrum of a cylindrical function is employed to define reflection and transmission through the planar interfaces. Multiple reflection phenomena due to the presence of a layered geometry are taken into account. Solutions can be obtained for both TM and TE polarizations and for near- and far-field regions. The numerical approach is described and the method is validated by comparison with examples given in the literature, with very good agreement. Results are presented for the scattering by a finite grid of three cylinders embedded in a slab.

  14. The Twisting of Thin-walled, Stiffened Circular Cylinders

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schapitz, E

    1938-01-01

    On the basis of the present investigation of the twisting of thin-walled, stiffened cylinders the following conclusions can be reached: 1) there is as yet no generally applicable formula for the buckling moment of the skin; 2) the mathematical treatment of the condition of the shell after buckling of the skin is based on the tension-field theory, wherein the strain condition is considered homogenous.

  15. Experimental study of noise emitted by circular cylinders with large roughness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alomar, Antoni; Angland, David; Zhang, Xin; Molin, Nicolas

    2014-12-01

    The aerodynamic noise generated by high Reynolds number flow around a bluff body with large surface roughness was investigated. This is a relevant problem in many applications, in particular aircraft landing gear noise. A circular cylinder in cross-flow and a zero-pressure-gradient turbulent boundary layer with various types of roughness was tested in a series of wind tunnel experiments. It has been shown that distributed roughness covering a circular cylinder affects the spectra over the entire frequency range. Roughness noise is dominant at high frequencies, and the peak frequency is well described by Howe's roughness noise model when scaled with the maximum outer velocity. There are differences between hemispherical and cylindrical roughness elements for both the circular cylinder and the zero-pressure-gradient turbulent boundary layer cases, indicating a dependence on roughness shape, not described by the considered roughness noise models. Cylindrical roughness generates higher noise levels at the highest frequencies, especially for the zero-pressure-gradient turbulent boundary layer case. Cable-type roughness aligned with the mean flow does not generate roughness noise, and its spectrum has been found to collapse with the smooth cylinder at medium and high frequencies. At low and medium frequencies the noise spectra have the same features as the smooth cylinder, but with higher shedding peak levels and fall-off levels, despite the decrease in spanwise correlation length. Roughness induces early separation, and thus a shift of the spectra to lower frequencies.

  16. The flow around circular cylinders partially coated with porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruck, Bodo; Klausmann, Katharina; Wacker, Tobias

    2012-05-01

    There are indications that the flow resistance of bodies can be reduced by a porous coating or porous sheath. A few numerical investigations exists in this field, however, experimental evidence is lacking. In order to investigate this phenomenon, the drag resistance of cylinders with porous coating has been investigated qualitatively and quantitatively in wind tunnel experiments. The Reynolds number was systematically varied in the range from 104 to 1.3*105. The results show that the boundary layer over the porous surface is turbulent right from the beginning and thickens faster because of the possible vertical momentum exchange at the interface. The region of flow detachment is widened resulting in a broader area with almost vanishing low flow velocities. All in all, the measurements show that a full porous coating of the cylinders increase the flow resistance. However, the measurements show that a partial coating only on the leeward side can decrease the flow resistance of the body. This effect seems due to the fact that the recirculating velocity and the underpressure in the wake is reduced significantly through a leeward porous coating. Thus, combining a smooth non-permeable windward side with a porous-coated leeward side can lead to a reduction of the body's flow resistance. These findings can be applied advantageously in many technical areas, such as energy saving of moving bodies (cars/trains/planes) or in reducing fluid loads on submersed bodies.

  17. Influence of a pulsating flow on the transfer of heat from cylinders and finned tubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perwaiz, J.; Base, T. E.

    The effect of pulsations in the flow on forced convective heat transfer coefficients around a circular cylinder and a finned tube is studied. Convection measurement experiments were performed to determine the rate of heat transfer (average Nusselt numbers) from a circular cylinder and a finned tube in a pulsating crossflow. The experiments were performed using the unsteady flow inducer wind tunnel, which had facility for generating time-dependent flow. The forced convective heat transfer in steady crossflows was checked for both the circular cylinder and the finned tube to validate the experimental techniques and apparatus. The findings indicate the dependence of heat transfer on the dimensionless frequency of the crossflow. Specifically, at higher mean flows there is considerable discrepancy between the Nusselt number for steady flows and the Nusselt number for unsteady flows with the same mean flow value. The effects on the variation in the heat transfer must be carefully taken into account in the design and analysis of thermal systems exposed to pulsating flows.

  18. Proper orthogonal decomposition analysis of vortex shedding behind a rotating circular cylinder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sham Dol, Sharul

    2016-03-01

    Turbulence studies were made in the wake of a rotating circular cylinder in a uniform free stream with the objective of describing the patterns of the vortex shedding up to suppression of the periodic vortex street at high velocity ratios, λ. The results obtained in the present study establish that shedding of Kármán vortices in a rotating circular cylinder-generated wake is modified by rotation of the cylinder. Alternate vortex shedding is highly visible when λ < 2.0 although the strength of the separated shear layers differ due to the rotation of the cylinder. The spectral density in the wakes indicate significant changes at λ = 2.0. The results indicate that the rotation of the cylinder causes significant disruption in the structure of the flow. Alternate vortex shedding is weak, distorted and close to being suppressed at λ = 2.0. It is clear that flow asymmetries will weaken vortex shedding, and when the asymmetries are significant enough, total suppression of a periodic street occurs. Particular attention was paid to the decomposition of the flow using Proper Orthogonal Decomposition (POD). By analyzing this decomposition with the help of Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV )data, it was found that large scales contribute to the coherent motion. Vorticity structures in the modes become increasingly irregular with downstream distance, suggesting turbulent interactions are occurring at the more downstream locations, especially when the cylinder rotates.

  19. Wake Modes and Heat Transfer from Rotationally Oscillating Cylinder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sellappan, Prabu; Pottebaum, Tait

    2012-11-01

    Wake formation is an important problem in engineering due to its effect on phenomena such as vortex induced vibrations and heat transfer. While prior work has focused on the wake formation due to vortex shedding from stationary and oscillating cylinders, limited information is available on the relationship between wake modes and heat transfer from rotationally oscillating cylinders. Experiments were carried out at Re=150 and 750, using an electrically heated cylinder, in a water tunnel for oscillation frequencies from 0.67 to 3.5 times the natural shedding frequency and peak-to-peak oscillation amplitudes up to 320. DPIV was used to identify and map wake modes to various regions of the parameter space. Temperature data from a thermocouple embedded in the cylinder was used to calculate heat transfer rates. Correlation between heat transfer enhancement and certain wake mode regions were observed in the parameter space. The relationship between wake formation and heat transfer enhancement will be described.

  20. Radiation by cavity-backed antennas on a circular cylinder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kempel, Leo C.; Volakis, John L.; Sliva, Randy

    1994-01-01

    Conformal antenna arrays are popular antennas for aircraft, spacecraft and land vehicle platforms due to their inherent low weight, cost and drag properties. However, to date there has been a dearth of rigorous analytical or numerical solutions to aid the designer. In fact, it has been common practice to use limited measurements and planar approximations in designing such non-planar antennas. The finite element-boundary integral method is extended to radiation by cavity-backed structures in an infinite, metallic cylinder. The formulation is used to investigate the effect of cavity size on the radiation pattern for typical circumferentially and axially polarized patch antennas. Curvature effect on the gain, pattern shape, and input impedance is also studied. Finally, the accuracy of the FE-BI approach for a microstrip patch array is demonstrated.

  1. Scattering by cavity-backed antennas on a circular cylinder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kempel, Leo C.; Volakis, John L.

    1994-01-01

    Conformal arrays are popular antennas for aircraft, spacecraft, and land vehicle platforms due to their inherent low weight and drag properties. However, to date there has been a dearth of rigorous analytical or numerical solutions to aid the designer. In fact, it has been common practice to use limited measurements and planar approximations in designing such non-planar antennas. The finite element-boundary integral method is extended to scattering by cavity-backed structures in an infinite, metallic cylinder. In particular, the formulation specifics such as weight functions, dyadic Green's function, implementation details and particular difficulties inherent to cylindrical structures are discussed. Special care is taken to ensure that the resulting computer program has low memory demand and minimal computational requirements. Scattering results are presented and validated as much as possible.

  2. Eulerian and Lagrangian Analysis of a Simulated unsteady Flow Behind a Circular cylinder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holmes, Keith; Green, Melissa

    2012-11-01

    The unsteady wake behind a circular cylinder is numerically simulated and analyzed utilizing various Eulerian methods and the Lagrangian finite-time Lyapunov exponent (FTLE). The objective is to identify and distinguish among shed vortices in the wake, and particular attention is given to the near wake immediately downstream of the cylinder. The Eulerian methods capably determine regions of the flow associated with greatest magnitude of vorticity in the near wake, as has been shown previously. Ridges of the FTLE field are able to objectively identify structures in the near wake by outlining the boundaries between vortices. This includes boundaries among structures of the same sign, a distinction not possible using the Eulerian methods. The formation of these boundaries help to distinguish between structures still developing around the cylinder surface and those that have been shed from the cylinder. Syracuse University

  3. Analysis of electromagnetic field due to a buried coated PEMC circular cylinder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shahzad, Anjum; Ahmed, Shakeel; Naqvi, Q. A.

    2010-12-01

    An analytical solution for the scattering of an electromagnetic plane wave from a coated perfect electromagnetic conducting (PEMC) circular cylinder, buried in the dielectric half space, is presented. Scattering characteristics of a buried PEMC cylinder when coated by double-positive (DPS) or double-negative (DNG) materials is investigated. The cylinder as well as coating layer is of infinite length (2-D problem). Plane wave spectral representations of the fields have been used to solve the problem. Saddle point method is used to solve the integral arising in the analysis. All the multiple interactions between the buried geometry and the dielectric interface separating the two half spaces have been considered in the analysis. The derivation includes both TM and TE polarization cases. It is observed that the response of the coated PEMC cylinder can be used to detect the underground pipes and other buried objects having a cylindrical shape.

  4. Drag characteristics of circular cylinders in a laminar boundary layer at supersonic free-stream velocities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stallings, R. L., Jr.; Lamb, M.; Howell, D. T.

    1973-01-01

    Drag measurements were obtained with circular cylinders attached to a flat-plate surface with their longitudinal axes perpendicular to the plate surface. When more than one cylinder was tested, they were alined in a spanwise row perpendicular to the free-stream velocity vector. The drag measurements were obtained through a range of Mach numbers from 2.3 to 4.6, cylinder heights ranging from approximately 0.4 to 3 times the undisturbed laminar boundary-layer thickness, and cylinder height-to-diameter ratios of 1.0 and approximately 2. Included in the paper is a complete presentation in figure form of the experimental results and a discussion of the more significant findings. An attempt is made to select the most appropriate parameters for correlating the experimental results and, where possible, these results are compared with theoretical calculations.

  5. An Experiment in Heat Conduction Using Hollow Cylinders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ortuno, M.; Marquez, A.; Gallego, S.; Neipp, C.; Belendez, A.

    2011-01-01

    An experimental apparatus was designed and built to allow students to carry out heat conduction experiments in hollow cylinders made of different materials, as well as to determine the thermal conductivity of these materials. The evolution of the temperature difference between the inner and outer walls of the cylinder as a function of time is…

  6. Vortex-shedding suppression in two-dimensional mixed convective flows past circular and square cylinders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasan, Nadeem; Ali, Rashid

    2013-05-01

    Vortex-shedding suppression in two-dimensional mixed convective flows past circular and square cylinders is investigated numerically at two supercritical Reynolds numbers, Re = 60 and 100, at a fixed Prandtl (Pr) number of 0.71. The Richardson number (Ri) and free-stream orientation (α) are varied in the range [0, 1.6] and [0, π/2], respectively. The investigations involve the numerical solutions of mass, momentum, and energy equations subject to Boussinesq approximation in generalized curvilinear body-fitted coordinates. The critical Richardson numbers corresponding to the onset of suppression of vortex-shedding are determined for different free-stream orientations using the numerical data and the Stuart-Landau theory. For the case of circular cylinder, the critical Richardson number exhibits a "cosine-law" with respect to the free-stream orientation, while a non-monotonic trend is observed for the case of the square cylinder. By examining the near critical steady flow field data, two distinct components of the baroclinic vorticity generation rate are identified that appear to control the shedding suppression laws (relationships between the critical Richardson number and free-stream orientation) in theRi-α parametric space for the circular and the square cylinders. Supported by numerical experiments, the plausible roles of these baroclinic vorticity generation rate components are identified and utilized to theoretically deduce the functional forms of the shedding suppression laws that agree with the laws observed in the numerical experiments.

  7. An analytical approach to multi-cylinder regenerative machines with application to 3-cylinder heat-aided Stirling heat pump

    SciTech Connect

    Yagyu, Sumio; Fujishima, Ichiro; Corey, J.; Isshiki, Naotsugu

    1996-12-31

    This paper describes a method for analysis and optimization of multi-cylinder regenerative machines. The authors have devised this method in a project at KUBOTA to develop an improved gas engine-driven heat pump using both shaft power and exhaust heat sources. Based on combinations of included Stirling cycles, this analytical approach allows use of well-established and validated Stirling simulation models to optimize partial systems. The technique further provides a method of integrating such optimal partial-system Stirling cycles into a complex combination system. It is shown that this remains an optimum solution for the three-cylinder heat-assisted heat pump case. Results from hardware tests of the main Stirling heat pump cycle (2-cylinders) are given and compared with analytical expectations using Sage simulation code. This is extended to validate Sage modeling of 3-cylinder machines.

  8. Heat-transfer processes in air-cooled engine cylinders

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pinkel, Benjamin

    1938-01-01

    From a consideration of heat-transfer theory, semi-empirical expressions are set up for the transfer of heat from the combustion gases to the cylinder of an air-cooled engine and from the cylinder to the cooling air. Simple equations for the average head and barrel temperatures as functions of the important engine and cooling variables are obtained from these expressions. The expressions involve a few empirical constants, which may be readily determined from engine tests. Numerical values for these constants were obtained from single-cylinder engine tests for cylinders of the Pratt & Whitney 1535 and 1340-h engines. The equations provide a means of calculating the effect of the various engine and cooling variables on the cylinder temperatures and also of correlating the results of engine cooling tests. An example is given of the application of the equations to the correlation of cooling-test data obtained in flight.

  9. Application of wave mechanics theory to fluid dynamics problems: Boundary layer on a circular cylinder including turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krzywoblocki, M. Z. V.

    1974-01-01

    The application of the elements of quantum (wave) mechanics to some special problems in the field of macroscopic fluid dynamics is discussed. Emphasis is placed on the flow of a viscous, incompressible fluid around a circular cylinder. The following subjects are considered: (1) the flow of a nonviscous fluid around a circular cylinder, (2) the restrictions imposed the stream function by the number of dimensions of space, and (3) the flow past three dimensional bodies in a viscous fluid, particularly past a circular cylinder in the symmetrical case.

  10. Heat storage capability of a rolling cylinder using Glauber's salt

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herrick, C. S.; Zarnoch, K. P.

    1980-01-01

    The rolling cylinder phase change heat storage concept was developed to the point where a prototype design is completed and a cost analysis is prepared. A series of experimental and analytical tasks are defined to establish the thermal, mechanical, and materials behavior of rolling cylinder devices. These tasks include: analyses of internal and external heat transfer; performance and lifetime testing of the phase change materials; corrosion evaluation; development of a mathematical model; and design of a prototype and associated test equipment.

  11. Experimental investigation of flow-induced vibration on isolated and tandem circular cylinders fitted with strakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korkischko, I.; Meneghini, J. R.

    2010-05-01

    The effect of varying the geometric parameters of helical strakes on vortex-induced vibration (VIV) is investigated in this paper. The degree of oscillation attenuation or even suppression is analysed for isolated circular cylinder cases. How a cylinder fitted with strakes behaves when immersed in the wake of another cylinder in tandem arrangement is also investigated and these results are compared to those with a single straked cylinder. The experimental tests are conducted at a circulating water channel facility and the cylindrical models are mounted on a low-damping air bearing elastic base with one degree-of-freedom, restricted to oscillate in the transverse direction to the channel flow. Three strake pitches (p) and heights (h) are tested: p=5, 10, 15d, and h=0.1, 0.2, 0.25d. The mass ratio is 1.8 for all models. The Reynolds number range is from 1000 to 10 000, and the reduced velocity varies up to 21. The cases with h=0.1d strakes reduce the amplitude response when compared to the isolated plain cylinder, however the oscillation still persists. On the other hand, the cases with h=0.2, 0.25d strakes almost completely suppress VIV. Spanwise vorticity fields, obtained through stereoscopic digital particle image velocimetry (SDPIV), show an alternating vortex wake for the p=10d and h=0.1d straked cylinder. The p=10d and h=0.2d cylinder wake has separated shear layers with constant width and no roll-up close to the body. The strakes do not increase the magnitude of the out-of-plane velocity compared to the isolated plain cylinder. However, they deflect the flow in the out-of-plane direction in a controlled way, which can prevent the vortex shedding correlation along the span. In order to investigate the wake interference effect on the strake efficiency, an experimental arrangement with two cylinders in tandem is employed. The centre-to-centre distance for the tandem arrangement varies from 2 to 6. When the downstream p=10d and h=0.2d cylinder is immersed in the

  12. Hydrodynamic interactions of water waves with a group of independently oscillating truncated circular cylinders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Xiaohui; Shi, Min; Huang, Shanlin

    2016-07-01

    In this study, we examine the water wave radiation by arrays of truncated circular cylinders. Each cylinder can oscillate independently in any rigid oscillation mode with a prescribed amplitude, including translational and rotational modes such as surge, sway, heave, pitch, roll, and their combinations. Based on the eigenfunction expansion and Graf's addition theorem for Bessel functions, we developed an analytical method that includes the effects of evanescent modes in order to analyze such arrays of cylinders. To investigate the effects of several influential factors on convergence, our objective is to dramatically reduce the number of tests required and determine the influencing relationships between truncation number and convergence behavior for different factor combinations. We use the orthogonal test method to fulfill the objective. Lastly, we present our results regarding the effects of evanescent modes on hydrodynamic coefficients.

  13. Buckling Analysis for Stiffened Anisotropic Circular Cylinders Based on Sanders Nonlinear Shell Theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nemeth, Michael P.

    2014-01-01

    Nonlinear and bifurcation buckling equations for elastic, stiffened, geometrically perfect, right-circular cylindrical, anisotropic shells subjected to combined loads are presented that are based on Sanders' shell theory. Based on these equations, a three-parameter approximate Rayleigh-Ritz solution and a classical solution to the buckling problem are presented for cylinders with simply supported edges. Extensive comparisons of results obtained from these solutions with published results are also presented for a wide range of cylinder constructions. These comparisons include laminated-composite cylinders with a wide variety of shell-wall orthotropies and anisotropies. Numerous results are also given that show the discrepancies between the results obtained by using Donnell's equations and variants of Sanders' equations. For some cases, nondimensional parameters are identified and "master" curves are presented that facilitate the concise representation of results.

  14. Bending Tests of Circular Cylinders of Corrugated Aluminum-alloy Sheet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buckwalter, John C; Reed, Warren D; Niles, Alfred S

    1937-01-01

    Bending tests were made of two circular cylinders of corrugated aluminum-alloy sheet. In each test failure occurred by bending of the corrugations in a plane normal to the skin. It was found, after analysis of the effect of short end bays, that the computed stress on the extreme fiber of a corrugated cylinder is in excess of that for a flat panel of the same basic pattern and panel length tested as a pin-ended column. It is concluded that this increased strength was due to the effects of curvature of the pitch line. It is also concluded from the tests that light bulkheads closely spaced strengthen corrugated cylinders very materially.

  15. Wave multiple scattering by a finite number of unclosed circular cylinders

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Veliyev, E. I.; Veremey, V. V.

    1984-01-01

    The boundary value problem of plane H-polarized electromagnetic wave multiple scattering by a finite number of unclosed circular cylinders is solved. The solution is obtained by two different methods: the method of successive scattering and the method of partial matrix inversion for simultaneous dual equations. The advantages of the successive scattering method are shown. Computer calculations of the suface currents and the total cross section are presented for the structure of two screens.

  16. UF{sub 6} pressure excursions during cylinder heating

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, P.G.

    1991-12-31

    As liquid UF{sub 6} inside a cylinder changes from a liquid to a solid, it forms a porous solid which occupies approximately the same volume as that of the liquid before cooling. Simultaneously as the liquid cools, UF{sub 6} vapor in the cylinder ullage above the liquid desublimes on the upper region of the inner cylinder wall. This solid is a dense, glass-like material which can accumulate to a significant thickness. The thickness of the solid coating on the upper cylinder wall and directly behind the cylinder valve area will vary depending on the conditions during the cooling stage. The amount of time lapsed between UF{sub 6} solidification and UF{sub 6} liquefaction can also affect the UF{sub 6} coating. This is due to the daily ambient heat cycle causing the coating to sublime from the cylinder wall to cooler areas, thus decreasing the thickness. Structural weakening of the dense UF{sub 6} layer also occurs due to cylinder transport vibration and thermal expansion. During cylinder heating, the UF{sub 6} nearest the cylinder wall will liquefy first. As the solid coating behind the cylinder valve begins to liquefy, it results in increased pressure depending upon the available volume for expansion. At the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP) during the liquefaction of the UF{sub 6} in cylinders in the UF{sub 6} feed and sampling autoclaves, this pressure increase has resulted in the activation of the systems rupture discs which are rated at 100 pounds per square inch differential.

  17. Reliability Analysis and Reliability-Based Design Optimization of Circular Composite Cylinders Under Axial Compression

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rais-Rohani, Masoud

    2001-01-01

    This report describes the preliminary results of an investigation on component reliability analysis and reliability-based design optimization of thin-walled circular composite cylinders with average diameter and average length of 15 inches. Structural reliability is based on axial buckling strength of the cylinder. Both Monte Carlo simulation and First Order Reliability Method are considered for reliability analysis with the latter incorporated into the reliability-based structural optimization problem. To improve the efficiency of reliability sensitivity analysis and design optimization solution, the buckling strength of the cylinder is estimated using a second-order response surface model. The sensitivity of the reliability index with respect to the mean and standard deviation of each random variable is calculated and compared. The reliability index is found to be extremely sensitive to the applied load and elastic modulus of the material in the fiber direction. The cylinder diameter was found to have the third highest impact on the reliability index. Also the uncertainty in the applied load, captured by examining different values for its coefficient of variation, is found to have a large influence on cylinder reliability. The optimization problem for minimum weight is solved subject to a design constraint on element reliability index. The methodology, solution procedure and optimization results are included in this report.

  18. Sting-free measurements on a magnetically supported right circular cylinder aligned with the free stream

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Higuchi, Hiroshi; Sawada, Hideo; Kato, Hiroyuki

    The flow over cylinders of varying fineness ratio (length to diameter) aligned with the free stream was examined using a magnetic suspension and balance system in order to avoid model support interference. The drag coefficient variation of a right circular cylinder was obtained for a wide range of fineness ratios. Particle image velocimetry (PIV) was used to examine the flow field, particularly the behaviour of the leading-edge separation shear layer and its effect on the wake. Reynolds numbers based on the cylinder diameter ranged from 5105, while the major portion of the experiment was conducted at ReD=1.0×105. For moderately large fineness ratio, the shear layer reattaches with subsequent growth of the boundary layer, whereas over shorter cylinders, the shear layer remains detached. Differences in the wake recirculation region and the immediate wake patterns are clarified in terms of both the mean velocity and turbulent flow fields, including longitudinal vortical structures in the cross-flow plane of the wake. The minimum drag corresponded to the fineness ratio for which the separated shear layer reattached at the trailing edge of the cylinder. The base pressure was obtained with a telemetry technique. Pressure fields and aerodynamic force fluctuations are also discussed.

  19. Flow past square and circular cross-section cylinders with a wavy stagnation face

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Darekar, Rupad; Sherwin, Spencer

    2000-11-01

    Numerical investigations have been performed for the flow past square and circular cross-section cylinders with a spanwise geometric deformation leading to a stagnation face with a sinusoidal waviness. The computations were performed using a spectral/hp element solver over a range of Reynolds numbers from 10 to 500. Starting from fully developed shedding past a straight cylinder at a Reynolds number of 100, a sufficiently high waviness is impulsively introduced resulting in the stabilisation of the near-wake to a time-independent state. It is shown that the spanwise waviness sets up a cross-flow within the growing boundary layer on the leading edge surface thereby generating streamwise and vertical components of vorticity. These additional components of vorticity appear in regions close to the inflection points of the wavy stagnation face where the spanwise vorticity is weakened. This redistribution of vorticity leads to the breakdown of the unsteady and staggered Kármán vortex wake into a steady and symmetric near-wake structure. The steady nature of the near-wake is associated with a reduction in total drag of about 16% at a Reynolds number of 100 as compared with the straight, non-wavy cylinder. Further increases in the amplitude of the waviness lead to the emergence of hairpin vortices from the near-wake region. This wake topology has similarities to the wake of a sphere at low Reynolds numbers. The physical structure of the wake due to the variation of the amplitude of the waviness is identified with five distinct regimes. Furthermore, the introduction of a waviness at a wavelength close to the mode A wavelength and the primary wavelength of the straight square section cylinder leads to the suppression of the von-Kármán street at a minimal waviness amplitude. Results for the wavy circular cylinders will also be presented.

  20. Extinction efficiencies from DDA calculations solved for finite circular cylinders and disks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Withrow, J. R.; Cox, S. K.

    1993-01-01

    One of the most commonly noted uncertainties with respect to the modeling of cirrus clouds and their effect upon the planetary radiation balance is the disputed validity of the use of Mie scattering results as an approximation to the scattering results of the hexagonal plates and columns found in cirrus clouds. This approximation has historically been a kind of default, a result of the lack of an appropriate analytical solution of Maxwell's equations to particles other than infinite cylinders and spheroids. Recently, however, the use of such approximate techniques as the Discrete Dipole Approximation has made scattering solutions on such particles a computationally intensive but feasible possibility. In this study, the Discrete Dipole Approximation (DDA) developed by Flatau (1992) is used to find such solutions for homogeneous, circular cylinders and disks. This can serve to not only assess the validity of the current radiative transfer schemes which are available for the study of cirrus but also to extend the current approximation of equivalent spheres to an approximation of second order, homogeneous finite circular cylinders and disks. The results will be presented in the form of a single variable, the extinction efficiency.

  1. A numerical study of shock wave diffraction by a circular cylinder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, J.-Y.; Liu, Y.; Lomax, H.

    1986-01-01

    The nonstationary shock wave diffraction patterns generated by a blast wave impinging on a circular cylinder are numerically simulated using a second-order hybrid upwind method for solving the two-dimensional inviscid compressible Euler equations of gasdynamics. The complete diffraction patterns, including the transition from regular to Mach reflection, trajectory of the Mach triple point and the complex shock-on-shock interaction at the wake region resulting from the Mach shocks collision behind the cylinder are reported in detail. Pressure-time history and various contour plots are also included. Comparison between the work of Bryson and Gross (1961) which included both experimental schlieren pictures and theoretical calculations using Whitham's ray-shock theory and results of the present finite difference computation indicate good agreement in every aspect except for some nonideal gas and viscous effects which are not accounted for by the Euler equations.

  2. Scattering of a partially-coherent wave from a material circular cylinder.

    PubMed

    Hyde, Milo W; Bogle, Andrew E; Havrilla, Michael J

    2013-12-30

    The case of a partially-coherent wave scattered from a material circular cylinder is investigated. Expressions for the TMz and TEz scattered-field cross-spectral density functions are derived by utilizing the plane-wave spectrum representation of electromagnetic fields and cylindrical wave transformations. From the analytical scattered-field cross-spectral density functions, the mean scattering widths are derived and subsequently validated via comparison with those computed from Method of Moments Monte Carlo simulations. The analytical relations as well as the simulation results are discussed and physically interpreted. Key insights are noted and subsequently analyzed.

  3. Control of the near wake behind a circular cylinder using superhydrophobic surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Nayoung; Kim, Hyunseok; Park, Hyungmin

    2014-11-01

    In the present study, the effect of superhydrophobic (SHPo) surface on turbulent wake behind a circular cylinder is studied. Using 2D particle image velocimetry, velocity fields are measured in a water tunnel at ReD = 0 . 7 - 2 . 5 ×104 . For SHPo surfaces, spray-coating of hydrophobic nanoparticles and roughened Teflon (with a sandpaper) are applied. The griding direction of a Teflon surface is varied as streamwise and spanwise ones, respectively, to see the effect of slip direction as well. It is found that the surface slip increases the turbulence in the flows above the circular cylinder and along the separating shear layers, which result in the delay of flow separation and early vortex roll-up in the wake. As a result, the recirculation bubble in the wake is reduced by up to 50%, and the wake survey estimates the drag reduction of about 10%. On the other hand, the spanwise slip is found to be more effective than streamwise one in flow control, supporting the suggested mechanism. Finally, the SHPo surfaces are applied locally by varying its installation angle and SHPo surface applied around the separation point was most effective, indicating that the surface slip directly controls the flow separation. Supported by the NRF Programs (NRF-2012M2A8A4055647, NRF-2013R1A1A1008373) of Korean government.

  4. The velocity and vorticity fields of the turbulent near wake of a circular cylinder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wallace, James; Ong, Lawrence; Moin, Parviz

    1995-01-01

    The purpose of this research is to provide a detailed experimental database of velocity and vorticity statistics in the very near wake (x/d less than 10) of a circular cylinder at Reynolds number of 3900. This study has determined that estimations of the streamwise velocity component in flow fields with large nonzero cross-stream components are not accurate. Similarly, X-wire measurements of the u and v velocity components in flows containing large w are also subject to the errors due to binormal cooling. Using the look-up table (LUT) technique, and by calibrating the X-wire probe used here to include the range of expected angles of attack (+/- 40 deg), accurate X-wire measurements of instantaneous u and v velocity components in the very near wake region of a circular cylinder has been accomplished. The approximate two-dimensionality of the present flow field was verified with four-wire probe measurements, and to some extent the spanwise correlation measurements with the multisensor rake. Hence, binormal cooling errors in the present X-wire measurements are small.

  5. Flow around circular cylinder oscillating at low Keulegan-Carpenter number

    SciTech Connect

    Sunahara, Shunji; Kinoshita, Takeshi

    1994-12-31

    This paper shows experimental results of hydrodynamic forces acting on a vertical circular cylinder oscillating sinusoidally at low frequencies in the still water and results of the flow visualization, to examine the flow around a circular cylinder, particularly the lift forces at low Keulegan-Carpenter number Kc. The instability of streaked flow of which section is mushroom shape is observed by flow visualization, and the flows are asymmetrical in some cases. The asymmetrical streaked flow may have a close relationship to the lift force at low Kc, Kc {le} 4 or 5. Asymmetrical mushroom vortex ring is visible for Kc {le} 1. The mushroom vortex ring is symmetrical, or the streaks of the rings arrange themselves alternately for 1 {le} Kc {le} 1.5. A clear ring of mushroom vortices is not formed due to diffusion of dye sheets, though a flow streaked with mushroom vortices is visible for 1.5 {le} Kc {le} 2.5 and for Kc {ge} 2.5 the flow is almost turbulent.

  6. Axial flow over a blunt circular cylinder with and without shear layer reattachment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Higuchi, H.; van Langen, P.; Sawada, H.; Tinney, C. E.

    2006-08-01

    Flow over a circular cylinder with its axis aligned with the free stream was investigated experimentally. Both upstream and downstream faces of the cylinder are sharply truncated. The fineness ratio (length to diameter ratio) was varied and the behavior of the leading-edge separating shear layer and its effect on the wake were studied in water using both flow visualization and PIV techniques. For the moderately large fineness ratio, the shear layer reattaches with subsequent boundary layer growth, whereas over a shorter cylinder the shear layer remains detached. This causes differences in the wake recirculation region and the immediate wake patterns. The shear layer structure was analyzed using the proper orthogonal decomposition (POD). The model in the water channel was sting-mounted and in some cases the effect of model support was detected in the wake measurements. To avoid such disturbance from the model support, an experiment was initiated in air using a magnetic model support and balance system. The drag variation with fineness ratio is presented and discussed in light of the flowfield measurements.

  7. Asymmetric turbulent boundary layers along long thin circular cylinders at low-Re

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jordan, Stephen A.

    2015-09-01

    Notable deviations of the asymmetric turbulent boundary layer (TBL) statistics from their axisymmetric counterpart along long thin circular cylinders are vitally important to the naval and oceanographic jurisdictions. Although the available experimental evidence backs their concern, the realm of parametric variability (both geometric and kinematic) is extremely limited to draw solid conclusions. We know that only small misalignments which quantify less than one degree of incidence between the freestream and the straight cylinder axis can substantially alter the boundary layer thicknesses, mean axial velocity, and Reynolds stresses. But the statistical database is plainly inadequate to justify modifying the design tools that were founded solely for axisymmetric flow conditions. Herein, we begin rectifying this drawback by numerical means. The investigation centers on low turbulent Reynolds numbers (500 ≤ Rea ≤ 2500) and small angles-of-incidence (0° < α < 9°) to validate and complement the lions-share of the present database (Rea = aUo/ν, where a, Uo, and ν are the cylinder radius, freestream velocity, and kinematic viscosity, respectively). In particular, we numerically resolved the statistical responses of the TBL, mean axial velocity, Reynolds stresses, and skin friction under angles-of-incidence up to the earliest signs of Strouhal-type shedding. Clearly, the first prominent response was the thinning and thickening of the TBL along the respective windward and leeward sides to only a minor misalignment. Tilting the straight cylinder to slightly higher yaw angles transformed the TBL to a transitional boundary layer along the windward side for all simulated Reynolds numbers. For yaw angles α > 2°, all turbulent statistics of the asymmetric boundary layer were measurably dissimilar to those of the axisymmetric state.

  8. Heat of detonation, the cylinder test, and performance munitions

    SciTech Connect

    Akst, I.B.

    1989-01-01

    Heats of detonation of CHNO explosives correlate well with copper cylinder test expansion data. The detonation products/calorimetry data can be used to estimate performance in the cylinder test, in munitions, and for new molecules or mixtures of explosives before these are made. Confidence in the accuracy of the performance estimates is presently limited by large deviations of a few materials from the regression predictions; but these same deviations, as in the insensitive explosive DINGU and the low carbon systems, appear to be sources of information useful for detonation and explosives research. The performance correlations are functions more of the detonation products and thermochemical energy than they are of the familiar parameters of detonation pressure and velocity, and the predictions are closer to a regression line on average than are those provided by CJ calculations. The prediction computations are simple but the measurements (detonation calorimetry/products and cylinder experiments) are not. 17 refs., 5 tabs.

  9. Adaptive individual-cylinder thermal state control using intake air heating for a GDCI engine

    DOEpatents

    Roth, Gregory T.; Sellnau, Mark C.

    2016-08-09

    A system for a multi-cylinder compression ignition engine includes a plurality of heaters, at least one heater per cylinder, with each heater configured to heat air introduced into a cylinder. Independent control of the heaters is provided on a cylinder-by-cylinder basis. A combustion parameter is determined for combustion in each cylinder of the engine, and control of the heater for that cylinder is based on the value of the combustion parameter for combustion in that cylinder. A method for influencing combustion in a multi-cylinder compression ignition engine, including determining a combustion parameter for combustion taking place in a cylinder of the engine and controlling a heater configured to heat air introduced into that cylinder, is also provided.

  10. On the symmetrical potential flow of compressible fluid past a circular cylinder in the tunnel in the subcritical zone

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lamla, Ernst

    1942-01-01

    The two-dimensional symmetrical potential flow of compressible fluid past a circular cylinder placed in the center line of a straight tunnel is analyzed in second approximation according to the Jansen-Rayleigh method. The departure of the profile from the exact circular shape can be kept to the same magnitude as for the incompressible flow. The velocities in the narrowest section of the tunnel wall and at the profile edge are discussed in detail.

  11. A visual investigation of turbulence in stagnation flow about a circular cylinder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sadeh, W. Z.; Brauer, H. J.

    1978-01-01

    A visual investigation of turbulence in stagnation flow around a circular cylinder was carried out in order to gain a physical insight into the model advocated by the corticity-amplification theory. Motion pictures were taken from three different viewpoints, and a frame by frame examination of selected movie strips was conducted. Qualitative and quantitative analyses of the flow events focused on tracing the temporal and spatial evolution of a cross-vortex tube outlined by the entrained smoke filaments. The visualization supplied evidence verifying: (1) the selective stretching of cross-vortex tubes which is responsible for the amplification of cross vorticity and, hence, of streamwise turbulence; (2) the streamwise tilting of stretched cross-vortex tubes; (3) the existence of a coherent array of vortices near the stagnation zone; (4) the interaction of the amplified vorticity with the body laminar boundary layer; and, (5) the growth of a turbulent boundary layer.

  12. Form drag, skin friction, and vortex shedding frequencies for subsonic and transonic crossflows on circular cylinder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murthy, V. S.; Rose, W. C.

    1977-01-01

    A series of wind-tunnel tests covering a range of Mach numbers and Reynolds numbers in subsonic and transonic flows was conducted on a circular cylinder placed normal to the flow. Form drag coefficients were determined from surface-pressure measurements and displayed as a function of Mach number to show the drag rise phenomenon. Buried wire gages arranged on the model surface were used to measure skin-friction distributions and vortex-shedding frequencies at different flow conditions. It was found that detectable periodic shedding ceases above M = 0.9. The measured skin-friction distributions indicate the positions of mean separation points clearly; these values are documented for the different flow conditions.

  13. Sound diffraction at wall impedance discontinuities in a circular cylinder, investigated using Wiener-Hopf technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cho, Y. C.

    1983-01-01

    Rigorous solutions are presented for sound diffraction in a circular cylinder with axial discontinuities of the wall admittance (or impedance). Analytical expressions are derived for the reflection and the transmission coefficients for duct modes. The results are discussed quantitatively in the limits of small admittance shifts (delta) and of low frequencies (ka). One of the results is the low frequency behavior of the reflection coefficient R(o) sub 00 of the fundamental mode. For the mode of a hardwall duct reflected from the junction with a softwall duct, (R(o) sub oo yields - (1-square root of (ka) square root of (2/i delta)); this result is in contrast to the frequency dependence of the reflection from the open end of a hardwall duct, for which R(o) sub oo yields - 1-(ka) squared/2 .

  14. The inviscid axisymmetric stability of the supersonic flow along a circular cylinder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duck, Peter W.

    1990-01-01

    The supersonic flow past a thin straight circular cylinder is investigated. The associated boundary-layer flow (i.e. the velocity and temperature field) is computed; the asymptotic, far downstream solution is obtained, and compared with the full numerical results. The inviscid, linear, axisymmetric (temporal) stability of this boundary layer is also studied. A so-called 'doubly generalized' inflexion condition is derived, which is a condition for the existence of so-called 'subsonic' neutral modes. The eigenvalue problem (for the complex wavespeed) is computed for two free-stream Mach numbers (2.8 and 3.8), and this reveals that curvature has a profound effect on the stability of the flow. The first unstable inviscid mode is seen to disappear rapidly as curvature is introduced, while the second (and generally the most important) mode suffers a substantially reduced amplification rate.

  15. The inviscid axisymmetric stability of the supersonic flow along a circular cylinder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duck, Peter W.

    1989-01-01

    The supersonic flow past a thin straight circular cylinder is investigated. The associated boundary layer flow (i.e., the velocity and temperature field) is computed; the asymptotic, far downstream solution is obtained, and compared with the full numerical results. The inviscid, linear, axisymmetric (temporal) stability of this boundary layer is also studied. A so called doubly generalized inflexion condition is derived, which is a condition for the existence of so called subsonic neutral modes. The eigenvalue problem (for the complex wavespeed) is computed for two freestream Mach numbers (2.8 and 3.8), and this reveals that curvature has a profound effect on the stability of the flow. The first unstable inviscid mode is seen to rapidly disappear as curvature is introduced, while the second (and generally the most important) mode suffers a substantially reduced amplification rate.

  16. Structural Sensitivity of the Finite-Amplitude Vortex Shedding Behind a Circular Cylinder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luchini, P.; Giannetti, F.; Pralits, J.

    In this paper we study the structural sensitivity of the nonlinear periodic oscillation arising in the wake of a circular cylinder for Re47. The sensibility of the periodic state to a spatially localised feedback from velocity to force is analysed by performing a structural stability analysis of the problem. The sensitivity of the vortex shedding frequency is analysed by evaluating the adjoint eigenvectors of the Floquet transition operator. The product of the resulting neutral mode with the nonlinear periodic state is then used to localise the instability core. The results obtained with this new approach are then compared with those derived by Giannetti & Luchini [8]. An excellent agreement is found comparing the present results with the experimental data of Strykowski & Sreenivasan [7].

  17. Secondary frequencies in the wake of a circular cylinder with vortex shedding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abarbanel, Saul S.; Don, Wai Sun; Gottlieb, David; Rudy, David H.; Townsend, James C.

    1990-01-01

    A detailed numerical study of two-dimensional flow past a circular cylinder at moderately low Reynolds numbers was conducted using three different numerical algorithms for solving the time-dependent compressible Navier-Stokes equations. It was found that if the algorithm and associated boundary conditions were consistent and stable, then the major features of the unsteady wake were well-predicted. However, it was also found that even stable and consistent boundary conditions could introduce additional periodic phenomena reminiscent of the type seen in previous wind-tunnel experiments. However, these additional frequencies were eliminated by formulating the boundary conditions in terms of the characteristic variables. An analysis based on a simplified model provides an explanation for this behavior.

  18. Piezoelectric energy harvesting from vortex-induced vibrations of circular cylinder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mehmood, A.; Abdelkefi, A.; Hajj, M. R.; Nayfeh, A. H.; Akhtar, I.; Nuhait, A. O.

    2013-09-01

    The concept of harvesting energy from a circular cylinder undergoing vortex-induced vibrations is investigated. The energy is harvested by attaching a piezoelectric transducer to the transverse degree of freedom. Numerical simulations are performed for Reynolds numbers (Re) in the range 96≤Re≤118, which covers the pre-synchronization, synchronization, and post-synchronization regimes. Load resistances (R) in the range 500 Ω≤R≤5 MΩ are considered. The results show that the load resistance has a significant effect on the oscillation amplitude, lift coefficient, voltage output, and harvested power. The results also show that the synchronization region widens when the load resistance increases. It is also found that there is an optimum value of the load resistance for which the harvested power is maximum. This optimum value does not correspond to the case of largest oscillations, which points to the need for a coupled analysis as performed here.

  19. Computation of Sound Generated by Viscous Flow Over a Circular Cylinder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cox, Jared S.; Rumsey, Christopher L.; Brentner, Kenneth S.; Younis, Bassam A.

    1997-01-01

    The Lighthill acoustic analogy approach combined with Reynolds-averaged Navier Stokes is used to predict the sound generated by unsteady viscous flow past a circular cylinder assuming a correlation length of 10 cylinder diameters. The two-dimensional unsteady flow field is computed using two Navier-Stokes codes at a low Mach number over a range of Reynolds numbers from 100 to 5 million. Both laminar flow as well as turbulent flow with a variety of eddy viscosity turbulence models are employed. Mean drag and Strouhal number are examined, and trends similar to experiments are observed. Computing the noise within the Reynolds number regime where transition to turbulence occurs near the separation point is problematic: laminar flow exhibits chaotic behavior and turbulent flow exhibits strong dependence on the turbulence model employed. Comparisons of far-field noise with experiment at a Reynolds number of 90,000, therefore, vary significantly, depending on the turbulence model. At a high Reynolds number outside this regime, three different turbulence models yield self-consistent results.

  20. Computation of Vortex Shedding and Radiated Sound for a Circular Cylinder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cox, Jared S.; Brentner, Kenneth S.; Rumsey, Christopher L.; Younis, Bassam A.

    1997-01-01

    The Lighthill acoustic analogy approach combined with Reynolds-averaged Navier Stokes is used to predict the sound generated by unsteady viscous flow past a circular cylinder assuming a correlation length of ten cylinder diameters. The two- dimensional unsteady ow field is computed using two Navier-Stokes codes at a low Mach number over a range of Reynolds numbers from 100 to 5 million. Both laminar ow as well as turbulent ow with a variety of eddy viscosity turbulence models are employed. Mean drag and Strouhal number are examined, and trends similar to experiments are observed. Computing the noise within the Reynolds number regime where transition to turbulence occurs near the separation point is problematic: laminar flow exhibits chaotic behavior and turbulent ow exhibits strong dependence on the turbulence model employed. Comparisons of far-field noise with experiment at a Reynolds number of 90,000, therefore, vary significantly, depending on the turbulence model. At a high Reynolds number outside this regime, three different turbulence models yield self-consistent results.

  1. Heat transfer enhancement and vortex flow structure over a heated cylinder oscillating in the crossflow direction

    SciTech Connect

    Gau, C.; Wu, J.M.; Liang, C.Y.

    1999-11-01

    Experiments are performed to study the flow structure and heat transfer over a heated oscillating cylinder. Both flow visualization using a smoke wire and local heat transfer measurements around the cylinder were made. The excitation frequencies of the cylinder are selected at F{sub e}/F{sub n} = 0, 0.5, 1, 1.5, 2, 2.5, and 3. These include excitations at harmonic, subharmonic, superharmonic, and non harmonic frequencies. Synchronization of vortex shedding with the cylinder excitation occurs not only at F{sub e}/F{sub n} = 1 but also at F{sub e}/F{sub n} = 3, which can greatly enhance the heat transfer. The simultaneous enhancement of heat transfer at the stagnation point, its downstream region, and the wake region of the flow suggests that different modes of instabilities occurring in the shear layer of the near wake are actually initiated and amplified far upstream in the stagnation point, which were suppressed in the accelerated flow region and re-amplified in the decelerated flow region. As long as the dominant mode of the instability is amplified by the excitation of cylinder, enhancement of heat transfer can be obtained. During the experiments, the Reynolds numbers vary from 1,600 to 4,800, the ratios of oscillation amplitude to diameter of the cylinder from 0.064 to 0.016.

  2. Numerical investigation of flow-induced rotary oscillation of circular cylinder with rigid splitter plate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Lin; Guo, Xiao-ling; Tang, Guo-qiang; Liu, Ming-ming; Chen, Chuan-qi; Xie, Zhi-hua

    2016-09-01

    Numerical results of fluid flow over a rotationally oscillating circular cylinder with splitter plate are presented here. Different from the previous examinations with freely rotatable assembly, the fluid and structure interactions are treated as a coupled dynamic system by fully considering the structural inertia, stiffness, and damping. The hydrodynamic characteristics are examined in terms of reduced velocity Ur at a relatively low Reynolds number Re = 100 for different plate lengths of L/D = 0.5, 1.0, and 1.5, where Ur = U/(Dfn), Re = UD/υ and fn = (κ/J)0.5/2π with U the free stream velocity, D the diameter of the circular cylinder, υ the fluid kinematic viscosity, fn the natural frequency, J the inertial moment, κ the torsional stiffness, and L the plate length. Contrast to the freely rotating cylinder/plate body, that is, in the limit of κ → 0 or Ur →∞, remarkable rotary oscillation is observed at relatively low reduced velocities. For the typical case with L/D = 1.0, the maximum amplitude may reach five times that at the highest reduced velocity of Ur = 15.0 considered in this work. At the critical reduced velocity Ur = 4.2, notable hydrodynamic jumps are identified for the rotation amplitude, response frequency, mean drag coefficient, lift amplitude, and vortex shedding frequency. Moreover, the phase angle between the fluid moment and rotary oscillation abruptly changes from 0 to π at Ur = 6.5. Due to the combined effect of fluid moment, rotation response, and phase difference, the natural frequency of the rotating body varies in flow, leading to a wide regime of lock-in/synchronization (Ur ≥4.2, for L/D = 1.0). The phenomenon of rotation bifurcation, i.e., the equilibrium position of the rotary oscillation deflects to a position which is not parallel to the free stream, is found to only occur at higher reduced velocities. The longer splitter plate has the lower critical reduced velocity. The occurrence of bifurcation is attributed to the

  3. Investigation of flow characteristics effects on heat transfer in water-cooled cylinder heads

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hassan, M. A. M.; Abd El-Hameed, H. M.; Mahmoud, Osama E.

    2016-08-01

    An experimental and theoretical study has been performed to investigate the effect of flow characteristics on heat-transfer in water impingement-cooled cylinder heads. Numerous investigations have been made using a three-dimensional model, which is designed and solved by FLUENT software using both realizable k-ɛ turbulent and heat transfer models. The simulation investigates a fully developed turbulent-water flow in asymmetric heated circular passage cooled by parallel flow or impingement of circular submerged confined liquid jet. The following parameters were investigated for both parallel flow and jet impingement flow: flow velocities (1, 2 and 3 m/s), bulk fluid temperatures (50, 70 and 90 °C), main duct diameters (6, 8, 10 and 12 mm). While the following parameters were investigated for jet impingement flow, jet diameter ratio (0.6, 0.8 and 1) and jet inclination angles as measured from horizontal (45°, 60° and 90°). Experimental results were used to verify the theoretical model. Results indicate that, the normal jet (90°) gives the maximum cooling effect in comparison to other angles while the maximum heat transfer coefficient is found at jet interface position.

  4. Heat Transfer Over the Circumference of a Heated Cylinder in Transverse Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmidt, Ernst; Wenner, Karl

    1943-01-01

    A method for recording the local heat-transfer coefficients on bodies in flow was developed. The cylinder surface was kept at constant temperature by the condensation of vapor except for a narrow strip which is heated separately to the same temperature by electricity. The heat-transfer coefficient at each point was determined from the electric heat output and the temperature increase. The distribution of the heat transfer along the circumference of cylinders was recorded over a range of Reynolds numbers of from 5000 to 426,000. The pressure distribution was measured at the same time. At Reynolds numbers up to around 100,000 high maximums of the heat transfer occurred in the forward stagnation point at and on the rear side at 180C, while at around 80 the heat-transfer coefficient on both sides of the cylinder behind the forward stagnation point manifested distinct minimums. Two other maximums occurred at around 115 C behind the forward stagnation point between 170,000 and 426,000. At 426,000 the heat transfer at the location of those maximums was almost twice as great as in the forward stagnation point, and the rear half of the cylinder diffused about 60 percent of the entire heat, The tests are compared with the results of other experimental and theoretical investigations.

  5. Turbulent fluid-structure interaction of water-entry/exit of a rotating circular cylinder using SPH method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghazanfarian, Jafar; Saghatchi, Roozbeh; Gorji-Bandpy, Mofid

    2015-12-01

    This paper studies the two-dimensional (2D) water-entry and exit of a rotating circular cylinder using the Sub-Particle Scale (SPS) turbulence model of a Lagrangian particle-based Smoothed-Particle Hydrodynamics (SPH) method. The full Navier-Stokes (NS) equations along with the continuity have been solved as the governing equations of the problem. The accuracy of the numerical code is verified using the case of water-entry and exit of a nonrotating circular cylinder. The numerical simulations of water-entry and exit of the rotating circular cylinder are performed at Froude numbers of 2, 5, 8, and specific gravities of 0.25, 0.5, 0.75, 1, 1.75, rotating at the dimensionless rates of 0, 0.25, 0.5, 0.75. The effect of governing parameters and vortex shedding behind the cylinder on the trajectory curves, velocity components in the flow field, and the deformation of free surface for both cases have been investigated in detail. It is seen that the rotation has a great effect on the curvature of the trajectory path and velocity components in water-entry and exit cases due to the interaction of imposed lift and drag forces with the inertia force.

  6. Phenomenology of a flow around a circular cylinder at sub-critical and critical Reynolds numbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capone, Alessandro; Klein, Christian; Di Felice, Fabio; Miozzi, Massimo

    2016-07-01

    In this work, the flow around a circular cylinder is investigated at Reynolds numbers ranging from 79 000 up to 238 000 by means of a combined acquisition system based on Temperature Sensitive Paint (TSP) and particle velocimetry. The proposed setup allows simultaneous and time-resolved measurement of absolute temperature and relative skin friction fields onto the cylinder surface and near-wake velocity field. Combination of time-resolved surface measurements and planar near-field velocity data allows the investigation of the profound modifications undergone by the wall shear stress topology and its connections to the near-field structure as the flow regime travels from the sub-critical to the critical regime. Laminar boundary-layer separation, transition, and re-attachment are analyzed in the light of temperature, relative skin friction maps, and Reynolds stress fields bringing about a new perspective on the relationship between boundary layer development and shear layer evolution. The fast-responding TSP employed allows high acquisition frequency and calculation of power spectral density from surface data. Correlation maps of surface and near-wake data provide insight into the relationship between boundary-layer evolution and vortex shedding. We find that as the Reynolds number approaches the critical state, the separation line oscillations feature an increasingly weaker spectrum peak compared to the near-wake velocity spectrum. In the critical regime, separation line oscillations are strongly reduced and the correlation to the local vorticity undergoes an overall decrease giving evidence of modifications in the vortex shedding mechanism.

  7. A Lagrangian Coherent Structures Analysis of the Unsteady Wake Behind a Circular Cylinder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rockwood, Matthew; Morrida, Jacob; Green, Melissa

    2013-11-01

    The experimentally measured unsteady wake behind a circular cylinder was studied and compared with numerical results. The location and evolution of coherent structures, or vortices, in the flow were analyzed to facilitate the understanding of the vortex shedding physics in the near wake region. This understanding is critical to the control of vortex shedding from bluff bodies. The two-component velocity data was collected using a DPIV measurement system, and Eulerian vortex criteria were applied along with a Lagrangian coherent structures (LCS) analysis to determine the properties of the wake. The LCS analysis utilizes the Finite Time Lyapunov Exponent (FTLE) method to objectively determine the locations of vortex boundaries in the flow. This technique offers new insight on the development of the unsteady wake, and shows an objective change in curvature of the LCS in the region where the new vortex will form before traditional Eulerian techniques show any changes. This information can be used to highlight regions to be targeted by flow control techniques. Work was completed as a student at Syracuse University.

  8. Turbulence effect on crossflow around a circular cylinder at subcritical Reynolds numbers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sadeh, W. Z.; Saharon, D. B.

    1982-01-01

    An investigation of the effect of freestream turbulence on the flow around a smooth circular cylinder at subcritical Reynolds numbers from 5.2 x 10 to the 4th power to 2.09 x 10 to the 5th power was conducted. Measurements show that the interaction of incident turbulence with the initial laminar boundary layer: (1) modifies the characteristics of the mean surface pressure distribution; (2) induces an aft shift in the separation point ranging from 5 to 50 beyond the laminar separation angle of 80 degrees; and, (3) reduces the mean drag coefficient to values between 97 and 46% of its nearly constant laminar counterpart. The extent of these changes depends on the particular Reynolds number background turbulence combination. These results demonstrate that a boundary-layer flow similar to that found in critical, supercritical and/or transcritical flow regimes is induced by turbulence at subcritical Reynolds numbers and, hence, the effect of turbulence is equivalent to an effective increase in the Reynolds number. The change in the nature and properties of the boundary layer in the subcritical regime, consequent upon the penetration of turbulence into it, is in agreement with the model proposed by the vorticity-amplification theory.

  9. Acoustic scattering by circular cylinders of various aspect ratios. [pressure gradient microphones

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maciulaitis, A.

    1979-01-01

    The effects of acoustic scattering on the useful frequency range of pressure gradient microphones were investigated experimentally between ka values of 0.407 and 4.232 using two circular cylindrical models (L/D = 0.5 and 0.25) having a 25 cm outside diameter. Small condenser microphones, attached to preamplifiers by flexible connectors, were installed from inside the cylindrical bodies, and flush mounted on the exterior surface of the cylinders. A 38 cm diameter woofer in a large speaker enclosure was used as the sound source. Surface pressure augmentation and phase differences were computed from measured data for various sound wave incidence angles. Results are graphically compared with theoretical predictions supplied by NASA for ka = 0.407, 2.288, and 4.232. All other results are tabulated in the appendices. With minor exceptions, the experimentally determined pressure augmentations agreed within 0.75 dB with theoretical predictions. The agreement for relative phase angles was within 5 percent without any exceptions. Scattering parameter variations with ka and L/D ratio, as computed from experimental data, are also presented.

  10. Anomalous diffraction theory for arbitrarily oriented finite circular cylinders and comparison with exact T-matrix results.

    PubMed

    Liu, Y; Arnott, W P; Hallett, J

    1998-07-20

    A general method is developed to formulate extinction and absorption efficiency for nonspherical particles at arbitrary and random orientations by use of anomalous diffraction theory (ADT). An ADT for finite circular cylinders is evaluated as an example. Existing ADT's for infinite cylinders at arbitrary orientations and for finite cylinders at the normal incidence are shown to be special cases of the new formulation. ADT solutions for finite cylinders are shown to approach the rigorous T-matrix results when the refractive indices approach unity. The importance of some physical processes that are neglected in the ADT approximation are evaluated by comparisons between ADT and rigorous calculations for different particle geometries. For spheres, van de Hulst's ADT and Mie theory are used, whereas the ADT that we present and T-matrix calculations are used for cylinders of different diameter-to-length ratios. The results show that the differences in extinction between ADT and exact solutions generally decrease with nonsphericity. A similar decrease occurs for absorption at wavelengths of relatively strong absorption. The influence of complex refractive index is evaluated. Our results suggest that ADT may provide a useful approximation in parameterization and remote sensing of cirrus clouds in the Christiansen bands where the real part of the refractive index approaches unity and/or where relative absorption is strong.

  11. Heat Transfer from a Horizontal Cylinder Rotating in Oil

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seban, R. A.; Johnson, H. A.

    1959-01-01

    Measurements of the heat transfer from a horizontal cylinder rotating about its axis have been made with oil as the surrounding fluid to provide an addition to the heat-transfer results for this system heretofore available only for air. The results embrace a Prandtl number range from about 130 to 660, with Reynolds numbers up to 3 x 10(exp 4), and show an increasing dependence of free-convection heat transfer on rotation as the Prandtl number is increased by reducing the oil temperature. Some correlation of this effect, which agrees with the prior results for air, has been achieved. At higher rotative speeds the flow becomes turbulent, the free- convection effect vanishes, and the results with oil can be correlated generally with those for air and with mass-transfer results for even higher Prandtl numbers. For this system, however, the analogy calculations which have successfully related the heat transfer to the friction for pipe flows at high Prandtl numbers fail.

  12. Flow control around a circular cylinder using pulsed dielectric barrier discharge surface plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Jukes, Timothy N.; Choi, Kwing-So

    2009-08-15

    Dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) plasma actuators have been used to control the flow around a circular cylinder at Re=15 000, where the near-wake structure was studied using time-resolved particle image velocimetry with simultaneous measurements of the dynamic lift and drag forces. It was shown that the vortex shedding was suppressed when the surface plasma placed near the natural separation point was activated in a pulsed mode at nondimensional frequency, f{sub p}{sup +}, above 0.6 with a force coefficient, C{sub p}, greater than 0.05%. Plasma actuator performance on flow control was summarized by mapping the changes in drag and lift fluctuations as a function of the forcing frequency and the force coefficient. They showed that more than 70% reduction in lift fluctuations was obtained with up to 32% drag reduction at f{sub p}{sup +}=2.0 and C{sub p}=0.32%. Here, narrowing of the wake was observed as the plasma promoted shear-layer roll-ups at the forcing frequency. This, however, did not affect the shear layer on the opposite side of the wake. At nondimensional forcing frequencies less than 0.6, the vortex shedding locked onto a multiple of the plasma frequency to amplify the wake oscillations. This caused more than 85% increase in lift fluctuations with 8% drag increase at f{sub p}{sup +}=0.2 and C{sub p}=0.01%. The efficiency of flow control using DBD plasma was found to be 1%-2% for drag reduction while around 6% for drag increase.

  13. Turbulent boundary layers along straight and curved long thin circular cylinders at low angles-of-incidence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jordan, Stephen A.

    2016-05-01

    Long thin circular cylinders commonly serve as towed sonar tracking devices, where the radius-of-curvature along the longitudinal axis is quite low [ρr = O(10-4)]. Because no understanding presently exists about the direct impact of longitudinal curvature on the turbulent statistics, the long cylinder is simply viewed as a chain of straight segments at various (increasing then decreasing) small inclinations to the freestream direction. Realistically, even our statistical evidence along straight thin cylinders at low incidence angles is inadequate to build solid evidence towards forming reliable empirical models. In the present study, we address these shortcomings by executing Large-Eddy Simulations (LESs) of straight and longitudinally curved thin cylinders at low to moderate turbulent radius-based Reynolds numbers (500 ≤ Rea ≤ 3500) and small angles-of-incidence (α = 0° → 9°). Coupled with the previous experimental measurements and numerical results, the new expanded database (311 ≤ Rea ≤ 56 500) delivered sufficient means to propose power-law expressions for the longitudinal evolution of the skin friction, normal drag, and turbulent boundary layer (TBL) length scales. Surprisingly, the LES computations of the curved cylinders at analogous geometric and kinematic conditions as the straight cylinder showed similar character in terms of the longitudinal skin friction. Beyond incidence 1°-3° (upper end corresponds to the highest simulated Rea), the skin friction was directly proportional to the yaw angle and monotonically shifted downward with higher Rea. Conversely, the flow structure, normal drag, TBL length scales, Reynolds stresses, and the separation state of the transverse shear layers towards regular vortex shedding for the curved cylinder were highly dissimilar than the straight one at equivalent incidence angles.

  14. Forced Convection Heat Transfer in Circular Pipes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tosun, Ismail

    2007-01-01

    One of the pitfalls of engineering education is to lose the physical insight of the problem while tackling the mathematical part. Forced convection heat transfer (the Graetz-Nusselt problem) certainly falls into this category. The equation of energy together with the equation of motion leads to a partial differential equation subject to various…

  15. Natural convection heat transfer on two horizontal cylinders in liquid sodium

    SciTech Connect

    Hata, K.; Shiotsu, M.; Takeuchi, Y.

    1995-09-01

    Natural convection heat transfer on two horizontal 7.6 mm diameter test cylinders assembled with the ratio of the distance between each cylinder axis to the cylinder diameter, S/D, of 2 in liquid sodium was studied experimentally and theoretically. The heat transfer coefficients on the cylinder surface due to the same heat inputs ranging from 1.0 X 10{sup 7} to 1.0 x 10{sup 9} W/m{sup 3} were obtained experimentally for various setting angeles, {gamma}, between vertical direction and the plane including both of these cylinder axis over the range of zero to 90{degrees}. Theoretical equations for laminar natural convection heat transfer from the two horizontal cylinders were numerically solved for the same conditions as the experimental ones considering the temperature dependence of thermophysical properties concerned. The average Nusselt numbers, Nu, values on the Nu versus modified Rayleigh number, R{sub f}, graph. The experimental values of Nu for the upper cylinder are about 20% lower than those for the lower cylinder at {gamma} = 0{degrees} for the range of R{sub f} tested here. The value of Nu for the upper cylinder becomes higher and approaches that for the lower cylinder with the increase in {gamma} over range of 0 to 90{degrees}. The values of Nu for the lower cylinder at each {gamma} are almost in agreement with those for a single cylinder. The theoretical values of Nu on two cylinders except those for R{sub f}<4 at {gamma} = 0{degrees} are in agreement with the experimental data at each {gamma} with the deviations less than 15%. Correlations for Nu on the upper and lower cylinders were obtained as functions of S/D and {gamma} based n the theoretical solutions for the S/D ranged over 1.5 to 4.0.

  16. X-ray densitometry based void fraction flow field measurements of cavitating flow in the wake of a circular cylinder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Tiezhi; Ganesh, Harish; Ceccio, Steven

    2015-11-01

    At sufficiently low cavitation number, the wake vortices behind bluff objects will cavitate. The presence of developed cavitation can alter the underlying vortical flow. In this study, cavitation dynamics in the wake of a circular cylinder is examined in order to determine the relationship between the void fraction in the cavity wake and the resulting modification to the flow compared to the non-cavitating flow. Cavitation in the wake of a cylinder is investigated using high-speed video cameras and cinematographic X-ray densitometry. Using synchronized top and side views from high-speed video cameras, the morphology and extent of the cavities forming on the wake of the circular cylinder is studied for a range of cavitation numbers, at a Reynolds number of 1x10-5, which lies at the transition region between sub-critical to critical regime of wake transitions. The time resolved and mean X-ray densitometry based void fraction of the spanwise and plan view averaged flow field will be related to the vortex dynamics in an attempt to understand the role of vapor production in the observed dynamics.

  17. Modeling of Reduction in the Drag and of Cessation of the Action of an Alternating Transverse Force on a Circular Cylinder due to the Throttling Effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isaev, S. A.; Sudakov, A. G.; Zhukova, Yu. V.; Usachovd, A. E.

    2014-07-01

    An analysis of the physical processes in unsteady fl ow past a circular cylinder surrounded by a sheath with ports for bleeding of the medium has been made by a factorized fi nite-volume method on the basis of numerical solution of Navier-Stokes equations closed with the Menter sheer-stress-transfer model. It has been shown that such arrangement of a circular cylinder ensures stabilization of the wake of the cylinder, and also the reduction in its drag and cessation of the action of an alternating transverse force at Reynolds numbers higher than 105.

  18. Large-eddy simulation of circular cylinder flow at subcritical Reynolds number: Turbulent wake and sound radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Li; Zhang, Xing; He, Guowei

    2016-02-01

    The flows past a circular cylinder at Reynolds number 3900 are simulated using large-eddy simulation (LES) and the far-field sound is calculated from the LES results. A low dissipation energy-conserving finite volume scheme is used to discretize the incompressible Navier-Stokes equations. The dynamic global coefficient version of the Vreman's subgrid scale (SGS) model is used to compute the sub-grid stresses. Curle's integral of Lighthill's acoustic analogy is used to extract the sound radiated from the cylinder. The profiles of mean velocity and turbulent fluctuations obtained are consistent with the previous experimental and computational results. The sound radiation at far field exhibits the characteristic of a dipole and directivity. The sound spectra display the -5/3 power law. It is shown that Vreman's SGS model in company with dynamic procedure is suitable for LES of turbulence generated noise.

  19. Evaluation of a Second-Order Accurate Navier-Stokes Code for Detached Eddy Simulation Past a Circular Cylinder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vatsa, Veer N.; Singer, Bart A.

    2003-01-01

    We evaluate the applicability of a production computational fluid dynamics code for conducting detached eddy simulation for unsteady flows. A second-order accurate Navier-Stokes code developed at NASA Langley Research Center, known as TLNS3D, is used for these simulations. We focus our attention on high Reynolds number flow (Re = 5 x 10(sup 4) - 1.4 x 10(sup 5)) past a circular cylinder to simulate flows with large-scale separations. We consider two types of flow situations: one in which the flow at the separation point is laminar, and the other in which the flow is already turbulent when it detaches from the surface of the cylinder. Solutions are presented for two- and three-dimensional calculations using both the unsteady Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes paradigm and the detached eddy simulation treatment. All calculations use the standard Spalart-Allmaras turbulence model as the base model.

  20. Frequency lock-in and phase synchronization of vortex shedding behind circular cylinder due to surface waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gunnoo, Hans; Abcha, Nizar; Ezersky, Alexander

    2016-02-01

    The influence of harmonic surface wave on non-regular Karman Vortex Street is investigated. In our experiments, Karman Street arises behind a vertical circular cylinder in a water flow and harmonic surface waves propagating upstream. It is found that surface waves can modify regimes of shedding in Karman Street: frequency lock-in and synchronization of vortex shedding can arise. Intensive surface waves can excite symmetric vortex street instead of chess-like street, and completely suppress shedding behind the cylinder. It is shown experimentally that such effects occur if frequency of harmonic surface wave is approximately twice higher than the frequency of vortex shedding. Region of frequency lock-in is found on the plane amplitude-frequency of surface wave.

  1. Gas motion and heat transfer in a hollow cylinder with applications to arc welding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solana, P.; Kapadia, P.; Dowden, J.

    1999-10-01

    The problem of the steady heat transfer in a hollow cylinder subject to intense heating on its walls is studied and solved analytically. The heat supplied to the inner cylinder wall is supposed to be generated by the action of a laser beam on a gas circulating inside the hollow cylinder, acting as the cathode of an arc-welding device. The inverse problem is also solved and analysed for a variety of heat flux profiles. The analytical solution is compared with former numerical approaches of the inverse problem.

  2. Mixed convection heat transfer inside a differentially heated square enclosure in presence of a rotating heat conducting cylinder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alam, Muntasir; Kamruzzaman, Ahsan, Faraz; Hasan, Mohammad Nasim

    2016-07-01

    A numerical study of mixed convection heat transfer phenomena in a square cavity containing a heat conducting rotating cylinder has been investigated. A discrete isoflux heater is placed at the bottom wall of the enclosure while the top wall is kept adiabatic. Left and right sidewalls of the enclosure are assumed to be maintained at constant low temperature. A two-dimensional solution for steady laminar mixed convection flow is obtained by using the finite element scheme based on the Galerkin method of weighted residuals for different rotating speeds of the cylinder varying over the range of 0-1000 keeping the Rayleigh number fixed at 5×104 and the Prandtl number at 0.7. The effects of rotating speeds of the cylinder, its radius and conductivity ratio of the rotating cylinder and working fluid on the streamlines, isotherms, local Nusselt number, average Nusselt number and other heat transfer and fluid flow phenomena are investigated. The results indicate that the flow field, temperature distribution and heat transfer rate are dependent on rotating speeds and cylinder size. However, it has been observed that the effect of conductivity ratio is not so prominent.

  3. An experimental study on the effects of rough hydrophobic surfaces on the flow around a circular cylinder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Nayoung; Kim, Hyunseok; Park, Hyungmin

    2015-08-01

    The present study investigates the effect that rough hydrophobic (or superhydrophobic) surfaces have on the flow separation and subsequent vortex structures in a turbulent wake behind a circular cylinder. The velocity fields were measured using two-dimensional particle image velocimetry in a water tunnel with Reynolds numbers of 0.7-2.3 × 104. The spray-coating of hydrophobic nanoparticles and roughened Teflon was used to produce the rough hydrophobic surfaces, and sandpapers with two different grit sizes were used to sand the Teflon into streamwise and spanwise directions, respectively, in order to examine the effect of the slip direction. The rough hydrophobic surface was found to enhance the turbulence in the flows above the circular cylinder and along the separating shear layers, resulting in a delay of the flow separation and early vortex roll-up in the wake. As a result, the size of the recirculation bubble in the wake was reduced by up to 40%, while the drag reduction of less than 10% is estimated from a wake survey. However, these effects are reversed as the Reynolds number increases. The surface texture normal to the flow direction (spanwise slip) was found to be more effective than that aligned to the flow (streamwise slip), supporting the suggested mechanism. In addition, the superhydrophobic surface is locally applied by varying the installation angle and that applied around the separation point is most effective, indicating that the rough hydrophobic surface directly affects the boundary layer at flow separation. In order to control the flow around a circular cylinder using rough hydrophobic surfaces, it is suggested to have a smaller roughness width, which can stably retain air pockets. In addition, a higher gas fraction and a more uniform distribution of the roughness size are helpful to enhance the performance such as the separation delay and drag reduction.

  4. Proceedings of the ASME Heat Transfer Division. Volume 4: Natural convection within a horizontal circular cylinder heated from below and cooled from above; Numerical methods for coupled fluid-thermal-structural interaction; Thermal analysis in waste processing and disposal; Heat transfer in fire and combustion systems; HTD-Volume 335

    SciTech Connect

    Pepper, D.W.; Douglass, R.W.; Heinrich, J.C.

    1996-12-31

    The first two sections as listed in the title contain 7 papers. The third section on thermal analysis contains 18 papers arranged into the following topical areas: Thermal treatment and municipal wastes; Thermal hydraulics in hazardous and nuclear waste processing and disposal; and Waste processing. Heat transfer in fire and combustion systems contains 17 papers arranged into the following topical sections: Soot/radiation; Combustion systems; Multiphase combustion; and Flames and fires. Most papers have been processed separately for inclusion on the data base.

  5. Aerodynamic Characteristics of a Circular Cylinder at Mach Number 6.86 and Angles of Attack up to 90 Degrees

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Penland, Jim A

    1957-01-01

    Pressure-distribution and force tests of a circular cylinder have been made in the Langley 11-inch hypersonic tunnel at a Mach number of 6.88, a Reynolds number of 129,000, and angles of attack up to 90 degrees. The results are compared with the hypersonic approximation of Grimminger, Williams, and Young and a simple modification of the Newtonian flow theory. An evaluation of the crossflow theory is made through comparison of present results with available crossflow Mach number drag coefficients.

  6. Extending the size-parameter range for plane-wave light scattering from infinite homogeneous circular cylinders

    SciTech Connect

    Hau-Riege, S

    2005-04-12

    We have developed an algorithm that extends the possible size-parameter range for the calculation of plane-wave light scattering from infinite homogeneous circular cylinders using a Mie-type analysis. Our algorithm is based on the calculation of the ratios of Bessel functions instead of calculating the Bessel functions or their logarithmic derivatives directly. We have found that this algorithm agrees with existing methods (when those methods converge). We have also found that our algorithm converges in cases of very large size parameters, in which case other algorithms often do not.

  7. Diffraction of a plane wave by an infinitely long circular cylinder or a sphere: solution from Mie theory.

    PubMed

    Shen, Jianqi; Jia, Xiaowei

    2013-08-10

    Diffraction of an infinitely long circular cylinder normally illuminated by a plane wave is discussed from the classical Mie theory. A rigorous expression of the diffracted light is obtained, which is simply characterized by a factor (θ/2)/sin(θ/2) and the sinc function sin(αθ)/(αθ). Numerical calculation shows an apparent difference between our results and those from scalar wave diffraction theory, especially in large diffraction angles. The factor (θ/2)/sin(θ/2) is introduced into the diffracted light by a sphere, which leads to an alternative approximation of the diffracted light.

  8. Microwave heating and joining of ceramic cylinders: A mathematical model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Booty, Michael R.; Kriegsmann, Gregory A.

    1994-01-01

    A thin cylindrical ceramic sample is placed in a single mode microwave applicator in such a way that the electric field strength is allowed to vary along its axis. The sample can either be a single rod or two rods butted together. We present a simple mathematical model which describes the microwave heating process. It is built on the assumption that the Biot number of the material is small, and that the electric field is known and uniform throughout the cylinder's cross-section. The model takes the form of a nonlinear parabolic equation of reaction-diffusion type, with a spatially varying reaction term that corresponds to the spatial variation of the electromagnetic field strength in the waveguide. The equation is analyzed and a solution is found which develops a hot spot near the center of the cylindrical sample and which then propagates outwards until it stabilizes. The propagation and stabilization phenomenon concentrates the microwave energy in a localized region about the center where elevated temperatures may be desirable.

  9. Sweep effect on the drag of rows of perpendicular circular cylinders in a laminar boundary layer at supersonic free-stream velocities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lamb, M.; Stallings, R. L., Jr.

    1972-01-01

    Drag measurements were obtained for circular cylinders attached perpendicularly to a flat-plate surface. Measurements were obtained for a single cylinder and for rows of cylinders. The cylinders were alined at various sweep angles relative to the free-stream velocity vector and at spacings appropriate for roughness elements used as boundary layer trips. The drag measurements were obtained for Mach numbers of 3.95 and 4.60, ratios of cylinder height to an undisturbed laminar boundary layer displacement thickness of approximately 1.0 to 3.0, a cylinder height-to-diameter ratio of approximately 2, and sweep angles up to 60. A complete presentation of the experimental results is given. A discussion of the more significant findings, including the most appropriate parameters for correlating the experimental results, is presented.

  10. The Effect of Baffles on the Temperature Distribution and Heat-transfer Coefficients of Finned Cylinders

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schey, Oscar W; Rollin, Vern G

    1936-01-01

    This report presents the results of an investigation to determine the effect of baffles on the temperature distribution and the heat-transfer coefficient of finned cylinders. The tests were conducted in a 30-inch wind tunnel on electrically heated cylinders with fins of 0.25 and 0.31 inch pitch. The results of these tests showed that the use of integral baffles gave a reduction of 31.9 percent in the rear wall temperatures and an increase of 54.2 percent in the heat transfer coefficient as compared with a cylinder without baffles.

  11. Optimal Design of General Stiffened Composite Circular Cylinders for Global Buckling with Strength Constraints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jaunky, N.; Ambur, D. R.; Knight, N. F., Jr.

    1998-01-01

    A design strategy for optimal design of composite grid-stiffened cylinders subjected to global and local buckling constraints and strength constraints was developed using a discrete optimizer based on a genetic algorithm. An improved smeared stiffener theory was used for the global analysis. Local buckling of skin segments were assessed using a Rayleigh-Ritz method that accounts for material anisotropy. The local buckling of stiffener segments were also assessed. Constraints on the axial membrane strain in the skin and stiffener segments were imposed to include strength criteria in the grid-stiffened cylinder design. Design variables used in this study were the axial and transverse stiffener spacings, stiffener height and thickness, skin laminate stacking sequence and stiffening configuration, where stiffening configuration is a design variable that indicates the combination of axial, transverse and diagonal stiffener in the grid-stiffened cylinder. The design optimization process was adapted to identify the best suited stiffening configurations and stiffener spacings for grid-stiffened composite cylinder with the length and radius of the cylinder, the design in-plane loads and material properties as inputs. The effect of having axial membrane strain constraints in the skin and stiffener segments in the optimization process is also studied for selected stiffening configurations.

  12. Natural convection heat transfer for a staggered array of heated, horizontal cylinders within a rectangular enclosure

    SciTech Connect

    Triplett, C.E.

    1996-12-01

    This thesis presents the results of an experimental investigation of natural convection heat transfer in a staggered array of heated cylinders, oriented horizontally within a rectangular enclosure. The main purpose of this research was to extend the knowledge of heat transfer within enclosed bundles of spent nuclear fuel rods sealed within a shipping or storage container. This research extends Canaan`s investigation of an aligned array of heated cylinders that thermally simulated a boiling water reactor (BWR) spent fuel assembly sealed within a shipping or storage cask. The results are presented in terms of piecewise Nusselt-Rayleigh number correlations of the form Nu = C(Ra){sup n}, where C and n are constants. Correlations are presented both for individual rods within the array and for the array as a whole. The correlations are based only on the convective component of the heat transfer. The radiative component was calculated with a finite-element code that used measured surface temperatures, rod array geometry, and measured surface emissivities as inputs. The correlation results are compared to Canaan`s aligned array results and to other studies of natural convection in horizontal tube arrays.

  13. Numerical study of mixed convection heat transfer from a rotating cylinder inside a trapezoidal enclosure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khan, Mohammed; Khan, Arham Amin; Hasan, Mohammad Nasim

    2016-07-01

    This article reports a numerical investigation of mixed convection heat transfer phenomena around an active rotating heated cylinder placed inside a trapezoidal enclosure. The cavity is configured such that top and bottom walls remain thermally insulated while the remaining two sidewalls experience a constant cold temperature. The heated cylinder is located at the centre of the trapezoidal enclosure and undergoes counter clockwise rotation. The numerical solution of various governing equations (i.e. continuity, momentum and energy equations) for the present problem is obtained by using Galerkin finite element method. The present study focused on the influence of the variation of inertia effect of the rotating cylinder as manifested by the parameter, Reynolds number (Re) for various Grashof number (Gr) ranging from 103 to 105 while keeping the Richardson number constant as 1, which essentially represents the case of pure mixed convection. An envision of flow field and thermal field has been made by studying the streamlines, isotherms respectively while for the study of heat transfer characteristics, local and average Nusselt number over the heated cylinder has been considered. The result indicates that both the side wall inclination angle as well as the inertia effect of the rotating cylinder has greater impact on heat transfer characteristics compared to the case of motionless heated cylinder placed in a square cavity.

  14. Heat transfer distributions around nominal ice accretion shapes formed on a cylinder in the NASA Lewis icing research tunnel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vanfossen, G. J.; Simoneau, R. J.; Olsen, W. A.; Shaw, R. J.

    Local heat transfer coefficients were obtained on irregular cylindrical shapes which typify the accretion of ice on circular cylinders in cross flow. The ice shapes were grown on a 5.1 cm (2.0 in.) diameter cylinder in the NASA Lewis Icing Research Tunnel. The shapes were 2, 5, and 15 min accumulations of glaze ice and 15 min accumulation of rime ice. Heat transfer coefficients were also measured around the cylinder with no ice accretion. These icing shapes were averaged axially to obtain a nominal shape of constant cross section for the heat transfer tests. Heat transfer coefficients around the perimeter of each shape were measured with electrically heated copper strips embedded in the surface of the model which was cast from polyurethane foam. Each strip contained a thermocouple to measure the local surface temperature. The models were run in a 15.2 x 68.6 cm (6 x 27 in.) wind tunnel at several velocities. Background turbulence in the wind tunnel was less than 0.5 percent. The models were also run with a turbulence producing grid which gave about 3.5 percent turbulence at the model location with the model removed. The effect of roughness was also simulated with sand grains glued to the surface. Results are presented as Nusselt number versus angle from the stagnation line for the smooth and rough models for both high and low levels of free stream turblence. Roughness of the surface in the region prior to flow separation plays a major role in determining the heat transfer distribution.

  15. The Flow Field Downstream of a Dynamic Low Aspect Ratio Circular Cylinder: A Parametric Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gildersleeve, Samantha; Dan, Clingman; Amitay, Michael

    2015-11-01

    Flow past a static, low aspect ratio cylinder (pin) has shown the formation of vortical structures, namely the horseshoe and arch-type vortex. These vortical structures may have substantial effects in controlling flow separation over airfoils. In the present experiments, the flow field associated with a low aspect ratio cylinder as it interacts with a laminar boundary layer under static and dynamic conditions was investigated through a parametric study over a flat plate. As a result of the pin being actuated in the wall-normal direction, the structures formed in the wake of the pin were seen to be a strong function of actuation amplitude, driving frequency, and aspect ratio of the cylinder. The study was conducted at a Reynolds number of 1875, based on the local boundary layer thickness, with a free stream velocity of 10 m/s. SPIV data were collected for two aspect ratios of 0.75 and 1.125, actuation amplitudes of 6.7% and 16.7%, and driving frequencies of 175 Hz and 350 Hz. Results indicate that the presence and interactions between vortical structures are altered in comparison to the static case and suggest increased large-scale mixing when the pin is driven at the shedding frequency (350 Hz). Supported by the Boeing Company.

  16. Numerical simulation of fluid flow of two rotating side-by-side circular cylinders by Lattice Boltzmann method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nemati, Hasan; Sedighi, Kurosh; Farhadi, Mousa; Pirouz, Mohammad Mohammadi; Fattahi, Ehsan

    2010-03-01

    A numerical investigation of the two-dimensional laminar flow around side-by-side rotating circular cylinders using Lattice Boltzmann method is conducted. The effects of variation of rotational speed ratio β and different gap spacings g* at Reynolds number of 100 are studied. A various range of rotational speed ratio 0 ≤ β ≤ 2 for four different gap spacings of 3, 1.5, 0.7 and 0.2 are investigated. Flow conditions and its characteristics, such as lift and drag coefficients and Strouhal number, is studied. The results indicated that as β increases, the flow changes its condition from periodic to steady after a critical rotational speed. Results also indicated that variation of the gap spacing and rotational speed has significant effect on wake pattern. Wake pattern in turn has significant effect on the Strouhal number. Finally, the result is compared with experimental and other numerical data.

  17. Development of the wake behind a circular cylinder impulsively started into rotatory and rectilinear motion: Intermediate rotation rates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Yen-Ming; Ou, Yuh-Roung; Pearlstein, Arne J.

    1991-01-01

    The temporal development of two-dimensional viscous incompressible flow generated by a circular cylinder started impulsively into steady rotatory and rectilinear motion is studied by integration of a velocity/vorticity formulation of the governing equations, using an explicit finite-difference/pseudo-spectral technique and an implementation of the Biot-Savart law. Results are presented for a Reynolds number of 200 (based on the cylinder diameter 2a and the magnitude U of the rectilinear velocity) for several values of the angular/rectilinear speed ratio alpha = (omega x a)/U (where omega is the angular speed) up to 3.25. Several aspects of the kinematics and dynamics of the flow not considered earlier are discussed. For higher values of alpha, the results indicate that for Re = 200, vortex shedding does indeed occur for alpha = 3.25. The shedding process is; however, very different from that which gives rise to the usual Karman vortex street for alpha = 0. In particular, consecutive vortices shed by the body can be shed from the same side and be of the same sense, in contrast to the nonrotating case, in which mirror-image vortices of opposite sense are shed alternately on opposite sides of the body. The implications of the results are discussed in relation to the possibility of suppressing vortex shedding by open or closed-loop control of the rotation rate.

  18. Linear stability of radially-heated circular Couette flow with simulated radial gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tagg, Randy; Weidman, Patrick D.

    2007-05-01

    The stability of circular Couette flow between vertical concentric cylinders in the presence of a radial temperature gradient is considered with an effective “radial gravity.” In addition to terrestrial buoyancy - ρg e z we include the term - ρg m f(r)e r where g m f(r) is the effective gravitational acceleration directed radially inward across the gap. Physically, this body force arises in experiments using ferrofluid in the annular gap of a Taylor Couette cell whose inner cylinder surrounds a vertical stack of equally spaced disk magnets. The radial dependence f(r) of this force is proportional to the modified Bessel function K 1(κr), where 2π/κ is the spatial period of the magnetic stack and r is the radial coordinate. Linear stability calculations made to compare with conditions reported by Ali and Weidman (J. Fluid Mech., 220, 1990) show strong destabilization effects, measured by the onset Rayleigh number R, when the inner wall is warmer, and strong stabilization effects when the outer wall is warmer, with increasing values of the dimensionless radial gravity γ = g m /g. Further calculations presented for the geometry and fluid properties of a terrestrial laboratory experiment reveal a hitherto unappreciated structure of the stability problem for differentially-heated cylinders: multiple wavenumber minima exist in the marginal stability curves. Transitions in global minima among these curves give rise to a competition between differing instabilities of the same spiral mode number, but widely separated axial wavenumbers.

  19. A numerical investigation of the effects of flow pulsations over a cylinder on dynamic forces and heat transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'herde, Eric J.

    Flow over a fixed circular cylinder is a fundamental fluid mechanics problem that involves a simple geometry; yet, as the Reynolds number is incremented, increasingly complex flow patterns emerge. Most notably, when the Reynolds number exceeds a value of about 46, a Benard-von Karman vortex street pattern appears. It is associated with a characteristic natural vortex shedding frequency. The objectives of this study are to numerically investigate the effects of an incoming free-stream velocity pulsation with a mean Reynolds number of 100 on the dynamic forces acting on a fixed circular cylinder, on the flow regimes behind the cylinder, and on heat transfer between the cylinder and surrounding fluid. Sinusoidal free-stream pulsations with velocity amplitude Av values of 25%, 50% and 75% that of the mean free-stream velocity, and selected frequencies in the range of one fourth the natural shedding frequency fs to five times fs were considered. Of particular interest, is the interaction between forced pulsating frequencies and the natural vortex shedding frequency. At frequencies close to the natural frequency, and to twice the natural frequency, sudden reductions in the mean value of the drag coefficient are observed, as the imposed frequency increases. These sudden reductions are accompanied by complex changes in flow regimes and vortex shedding patterns. The complexity of flow regimes as a function of the imposed pulsation variables was compiled into a frequency-amplitude map. This original map enables one to correlate changes in flow regimes to both dynamic forces and heat transfer characteristics. No net mean drag reduction was observed in the range of dimensionless amplitudes and frequencies considered, at a Reynolds number of 100. Local heat transfer enhancements of up to 86% were achieved for a specific frequency-amplitude pair. A particular finding is the appearance, for a narrow range of frequencies, of a non-zero mean lift coefficient, despite the overall

  20. Measurement of convective heat transfer coefficient for a horizontal cylinder rotating in quiescent air

    SciTech Connect

    Oezerdem, B.

    2000-04-01

    Heat transfer from a rotating cylinder is one of the problems, which is drawing attention due to its wide range of engineering applications. The present paper deals with convective heat transfer from a horizontal cylinder rotating in quiescent air, experimentally. The average convective heat transfer coefficients have been measured by using radiation pyrometer, which offers a new method. According to the experimental results, a correlation in terms of the average Nusselt number and rotating Reynolds number has been established. The average Nusselt number increased with an increase in the rotating speed. Comparison of the results, with previous studies, have been showed a good agreement with each other.

  1. A finite element-boundary integral method for cavities in a circular cylinder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kempel, Leo C.; Volakis, John L.

    1992-01-01

    Conformal antenna arrays offer many cost and weight advantages over conventional antenna systems. However, due to a lack of rigorous mathematical models for conformal antenna arrays, antenna designers resort to measurement and planar antenna concepts for designing non-planar conformal antennas. Recently, we have found the finite element-boundary integral method to be very successful in modeling large planar arrays of arbitrary composition in a metallic plane. We extend this formulation to conformal arrays on large metallic cylinders. In this report, we develop the mathematical formulation. In particular, we discuss the shape functions, the resulting finite elements and the boundary integral equations, and the solution of the conformal finite element-boundary integral system. Some validation results are presented and we further show how this formulation can be applied with minimal computational and memory resources.

  2. Stability of flow of a thermoviscoelastic fluid between rotating coaxial circular cylinders

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ghandour, N. N.; Narasimhan, M. N. L.

    1976-01-01

    The stability problem of thermoviscoelastic fluid flow between rotating coaxial cylinders is investigated using nonlinear thermoviscoelastic constitutive equations due to Eringen and Koh. The velocity field is found to be identical with that of the classical viscous case and the case of the viscoelastic fluid, but the temperature and pressure fields are found to be different. By imposing some physically reasonable mechanical and geometrical restrictions on the flow, and by a suitable mathematical analysis, the problem is reduced to a characteristic value problem. The resulting problem is solved and stability criteria are obtained in terms of critical Taylor numbers. In general, it is found that thermoviscoelastic fluids are more stable than classical viscous fluids and viscoinelastic fluids under similar conditions.

  3. A finite element-boundary integral method for conformal antenna arrays on a circular cylinder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kempel, Leo C.; Volakis, John L.; Woo, Alex C.; Yu, C. Long

    1992-01-01

    Conformal antenna arrays offer many cost and weight advantages over conventional antenna systems. In the past, antenna designers have had to resort to expensive measurements in order to develop a conformal array design. This is due to the lack of rigorous mathematical models for conformal antenna arrays, and as a result the design of conformal arrays is primarily based on planar antenna design concepts. Recently, we have found the finite element-boundary integral method to be very successful in modeling large planar arrays of arbitrary composition in a metallic plane. Herewith we shall extend this formulation for conformal arrays on large metallic cylinders. In this we develop the mathematical formulation. In particular we discuss the finite element equations, the shape elements, and the boundary integral evaluation, and it is shown how this formulation can be applied with minimal computation and memory requirements. The implementation shall be discussed in a later report.

  4. Radiation and scattering by cavity-backed antennas on a circular cylinder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kempel, Leo C.; Volakis, John L.

    1993-01-01

    Conformal arrays are popular antennas for aircraft and missile platforms due to their inherent low weight and drag properties. However, to date there has been a dearth of rigorous analytical or numerical solutions to aid the designer. In fact, it has been common practice to use limited measurements and planar approximations in designing such non-planar antennas. The finite element-boundary integral method is extended to scattering and radiation by cavity-backed structures in an infinite, metallic cylinder. In particular, the formulation specifics such as weight functions, dyadic Green's function, implementation details, and particular difficulties inherent to cylindrical structures are discussed. Special care is taken to ensure that the resulting computer program has low memory demand and minimal computational requirements. Both scattering and radiation parameters are computed and validated as much as possible.

  5. A finite element-boundary integral method for conformal antenna arrays on a circular cylinder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kempel, Leo C.; Volakis, John L.

    1992-01-01

    Conformal antenna arrays offer many cost and weight advantages over conventional antenna systems. In the past, antenna designers have had to resort to expensive measurements in order to develop a conformal array design. This was due to the lack of rigorous mathematical models for conformal antenna arrays. As a result, the design of conformal arrays was primarily based on planar antenna design concepts. Recently, we have found the finite element-boundary integral method to be very successful in modeling large planar arrays of arbitrary composition in a metallic plane. We are extending this formulation to conformal arrays on large metallic cylinders. In doing so, we will develop a mathematical formulation. In particular, we discuss the finite element equations, the shape elements, and the boundary integral evaluation. It is shown how this formulation can be applied with minimal computation and memory requirements.

  6. FUNDAMENTAL AREAS OF PHENOMENOLOGY (INCLUDING APPLICATIONS): Lattice Boltzmann Simulation of the Cross Flow Over a Cantilevered and Longitudinally Vibrating Circular Cylinder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, Yong; Lu, De-Tang; Liu, Yang; Xu, You-Sheng

    2009-03-01

    The multiple-relaxation-time lattice Boltzmann method (MRT-LBM) is implemented to numerically simulate the cross flow over a longitudinal vibrating circular cylinder. This research is carried out on a three-dimensional (3D) finite cantilevered cylinder to investigate the effect of forced vibration on the wake characteristics and the 3D effect of a cantilevered cylinder. To meet the accuracy of this method, the present calculation is carried out at a low Reynolds number Re = 100, as well as to make the vibration obvious, we make the vibration strong enough. The calculation results indicate that the vibration has significant influence on the wake characteristics. When the vibrating is big enough, our early works show that the 2D vortex shedding would be locked up by vibration. Contrarily, this phenomenon would not appear in the present 3D case because of the end effect of the cantilevered cylinder.

  7. Test Method Designed to Evaluate Cylinder Liner-Piston Ring Coatings for Advanced Heat Engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Radil, Kevin C.

    1997-01-01

    Research on advanced heat engine concepts, such as the low-heat-rejection engine, have shown the potential for increased thermal efficiency, reduced emissions, lighter weight, simpler design, and longer life in comparison to current diesel engine designs. A major obstacle in the development of a functional advanced heat engine is overcoming the problems caused by the high combustion temperatures at the piston ring/cylinder liner interface, specifically at top ring reversal (TRR). Therefore, advanced cylinder liner and piston ring materials are needed that can survive under these extreme conditions. To address this need, researchers at the NASA Lewis Research Center have designed a tribological test method to help evaluate candidate piston ring and cylinder liner materials for advanced diesel engines.

  8. Development of Advanced In-Cylinder Components and Tribological Systems for Low Heat Rejection Diesel Engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yonushonis, T. M.; Wiczynski, P. D.; Myers, M. R.; Anderson, D. D.; McDonald, A. C.; Weber, H. G.; Richardson, D. E.; Stafford, R. J.; Naylor, M. G.

    1999-01-01

    In-cylinder components and tribological system concepts were designed, fabricated and tested at conditions anticipated for a 55% thermal efficiency heavy duty diesel engine for the year 2000 and beyond. A Cummins L10 single cylinder research engine was used to evaluate a spherical joint piston and connecting rod with 19.3 MPa (2800 psi) peak cylinder pressure capability, a thermal fatigue resistant insulated cylinder head, radial combustion seal cylinder liners, a highly compliant steel top compression ring, a variable geometry turbocharger, and a microwave heated particulate trap. Components successfully demonstrated in the final test included spherical joint connecting rod with a fiber reinforced piston, high conformability steel top rings with wear resistant coatings, ceramic exhaust ports with strategic oil cooling and radial combustion seal cylinder liner with cooling jacket transfer fins. A Cummins 6B diesel was used to develop the analytical methods, materials, manufacturing technology and engine components for lighter weight diesel engines without sacrificing performance or durability. A 6B diesel engine was built and tested to calibrate analytical models for the aluminum cylinder head and aluminum block.

  9. Flow of Supercritical Hydrogen in a Uniformly Heated Circular Tube

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Youn, B.; Mills, A. F.

    1993-01-01

    Turbulent flow of supercritical hydrogen through a uniformly heated circular tube has been investigated using numerical methods, for the range of 4 x 10(exp 5) less than Re less than 3 x 10(exp 6), 5 less than or equal to q(sub W) less than or equal to 10 MW/sq m, 30 less than or equal to T(sub in) less than or equal to 90 K, and 5 less than or equal to P(sub in) less than or equal to 15 MPa. The purpose is to validate a turbulence model and calculation method for the design of active cooling systems of hydrogen-fueled hypersonic aircraft, where the hydrogen fuel a used as coolant. The PHOENICS software package was used for the computations, which required special provision for evaluation of the thermophysical properties of the supercritical hydrogen, and a low Reynolds number form of the k-epsilon turbulence model. Pressure drop and heat transfer data were compared with experiment and existing correlations and good agreement was demonstrated. For the pressure range considered here a "thermal spike" was observed and shown to be due to the secondary peak in specific heat, rather than the primary peak.

  10. Numerical investigation of flow and scour around a vertical circular cylinder

    PubMed Central

    Baykal, C.; Sumer, B. M.; Fuhrman, D. R.; Jacobsen, N. G.; Fredsøe, J.

    2015-01-01

    Flow and scour around a vertical cylinder exposed to current are investigated by using a three-dimensional numerical model based on incompressible Reynolds-averaged Navier–Stokes equations. The model incorporates (i) k-ω turbulence closure, (ii) vortex-shedding processes, (iii) sediment transport (both bed and suspended load), as well as (iv) bed morphology. The influence of vortex shedding and suspended load on the scour are specifically investigated. For the selected geometry and flow conditions, it is found that the equilibrium scour depth is decreased by 50% when the suspended sediment transport is not accounted for. Alternatively, the effects of vortex shedding are found to be limited to the very early stage of the scour process. Flow features such as the horseshoe vortex, as well as lee-wake vortices, including their vertical frequency variation, are discussed. Large-scale counter-rotating streamwise phase-averaged vortices in the lee wake are likewise demonstrated via numerical flow visualization. These features are linked to scour around a vertical pile in a steady current. PMID:25512595

  11. Computation of transitional flow past a circular cylinder using multiblock lattice Boltzmann method with a dynamic subgrid scale model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Premnath, Kannan N.; Pattison, Martin J.; Banerjee, Sanjoy

    2013-10-01

    Lattice Boltzmann method (LBM) is a kinetic based numerical scheme for the simulation of fluid flow. While the approach has attracted considerable attention during the last two decades, there is a need for systematic investigation of its applicability for complex canonical turbulent flow problems of engineering interest, where the nature of the numerical properties of the underlying scheme plays an important role for their accurate solution. In this paper, we discuss and evaluate a LBM based on a multiblock approach for efficient large eddy simulation of three-dimensional external flow past a circular cylinder in the transitional regime characterized by the presence of multiple scales. For enhanced numerical stability at higher Reynolds numbers, a multiple relaxation time formulation is considered. The effect of subgrid scales is represented by means of a Smagorinsky eddy-viscosity model, where the model coefficient is computed locally by means of a dynamic procedure, providing better representation of flow physics with reduced empiricism. Simulations are performed for a Reynolds number of 3900 based on the free stream velocity and cylinder diameter for which prior data is available for comparison. The presence of laminar boundary layer which separates into a pair of shear layers that evolve into turbulent wakes impose particular challenge for numerical methods for this condition. The relatively low numerical dissipation introduced by the inherently parallel and second-order accurate LBM is an important computational asset in this regard. Computations using five different grid levels, where the various blocks are suitably aligned to resolve multiscale flow features show that the structure of the recirculation region is well reproduced and the statistics of the mean flow and turbulent fluctuations are in satisfactory agreement with prior data.

  12. Anisotropic charge and heat conduction through arrays of parallel elliptic cylinders in a continuous medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, James E.; Ribaudo, Troy

    2013-04-01

    Arrays of circular pores in silicon can exhibit a phononic bandgap when the lattice constant is smaller than the phonon scattering length, and so have become of interest for use as thermoelectric materials, due to the large reduction in thermal conductivity that this bandgap can cause. The reduction in electrical conductivity is expected to be less, because the lattice constant of these arrays is engineered to be much larger than the electron scattering length. As a result, electron transport through the effective medium is well described by the diffusion equation, and the Seebeck coefficient is expected to increase. In this paper, we develop an expression for the purely diffusive thermal (or electrical) conductivity of a composite comprised of square or hexagonal arrays of parallel circular or elliptic cylinders of one material in a continuum of a second material. The transport parallel to the cylinders is straightforward, so we consider the transport in the two principal directions normal to the cylinders, using a self-consistent local field calculation based on the point dipole approximation. There are two limiting cases: large negative contrast (e.g., pores in a conductor) and large positive contrast (conducting pillars in air). In the large negative contrast case, the transport is only slightly affected parallel to the major axis of the elliptic cylinders but can be significantly affected parallel to the minor axis, even in the limit of zero volume fraction of pores. The positive contrast case is just the opposite: the transport is only slightly affected parallel to the minor axis of the pillars but can be significantly affected parallel to the major axis, even in the limit of zero volume fraction of pillars. The analytical results are compared to extensive FEA calculations obtained using Comsol™ and the agreement is generally very good, provided the cylinders are sufficiently small compared to the lattice constant.

  13. Optimal transient disturbances behind a circular cylinder in a quasi-two-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic duct flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hussam, Wisam K.; Thompson, Mark C.; Sheard, Gregory J.

    2012-02-01

    The transient response of optimal linear perturbations of liquid metal flow under a strong axial magnetic field in an electrically insulated rectangular duct is considered. The focus is on the subcritical regime, below the onset of von Kármán vortex shedding, to determine the role of optimal disturbances in developing wake instabilities. In this configuration, the flow is quasi-two-dimensional and can be solved over a two-dimensional domain. Parameter ranges considered include Reynolds numbers 50 le textit {Re}lesssim 2100, modified Hartmann numbers 50 le {textit {Ha}^star }lesssim 500, and blockage ratios 0.1 ⩽ β ⩽ 0.4. In some instances, the optimal disturbances are found to generate energy growth of greater than four orders of magnitude. Variation in the wake recirculation length in the steady flow regime is determined as a function of Reynolds number, Hartman number, and blockage ratio, and a universal expression is proposed. For all β, the energy amplification of the disturbances is found to decrease significantly with increasing Hartmann number and the peak growth shifts towards smaller times. The optimal initial disturbances are consistently located in the vicinity of the boundary layer separation from the cylinder, and the structure of these disturbances is consistent for all Hartmann numbers and blockage ratios considered in this study. The time evolution of the optimal perturbations is presented, and is shown to correspond to sinuous oscillations of the shear layer downstream of the wake recirculation. The critical Reynolds number for the onset of growth at different Hartmann numbers and blockage ratios is determined. It is found that it increases rapidly with increasing Hartmann number and blockage ratio. For all β, the peak energy amplification grows exponentially with textit {Re} at low and high Hartmann numbers. Direct numerical simulation in which the inflow is perturbed by a random white noise confirms the predictions arising from the

  14. Azimuthally asymmetric eigenmodes of a magnetized plasma cylinder around a dielectric rod in a circular waveguide

    SciTech Connect

    Shlapakovski, A. S.; Krasnitskiy, M. Yu.

    2008-01-15

    The electrodynamics of a circular waveguide with a dielectric rod surrounded by a magnetized plasma layer is considered. A general dispersion relation for azimuthally asymmetric perturbations is derived, and its solutions describing slow waves-specifically, electromagnetic and plasma modes, as well as (and primarily) hybrid waves that combine the properties of both mode types-are investigated numerically. For the fundamental waveguide mode of the system-the HE{sub 11} mode-the parameters of the plasma layer are determined at which the mode cannot be subject to Cherenkov interaction with a relativistic electron beam at a given frequency. For both waveguide and plasma modes, the radial profiles of the longitudinal components of the electric field and Poynting vector, the fractions of RF power carried within the dielectric and plasma regions and vacuum gap, and the coupling impedance are calculated as functions of the parameters of the plasma layer. The evolution of the field structure during the formation of asymmetric hybrid waves is traced. The results of calculating the dispersion and coupling impedance are analyzed as applied to an antenna-amplifier-a relativistic traveling-wave tube operating on the HE{sub 11} mode of the dielectric rod: specifically, the implementability of the concept in the presence of a plasma at the rod surface is estimated, and the possible role of azimuthally asymmetric and symmetric plasma modes is examined.

  15. Nodal integral method for transient heat conduction in a cylinder

    SciTech Connect

    Esser, P.D. )

    1993-01-01

    The accuracy and efficiency of nodal solution methods are well established for neutron diffusion in a variety of geometries, as well as for heat transfer and fluid flow in rectangular coordinates. This paper describes the development of a nodal integral method to solve the transient heat conduction equation in cylindrical geometry. Results for a test problem with an analytical solution indicate that the nodal solution provides higher accuracy than a conventional implicit finite difference scheme, while maintaining similar stability characteristics.

  16. Numerical study on turbulent flow and heat transfer in circular Couette flows

    SciTech Connect

    Torii, Shuichi . Dept. of Mechanical Engineering); Yang, W.J. . Dept. of Mechanical Engineering and Applied Mechanics)

    1994-09-01

    A numerical study is performed to investigate heat transfer and fluid flow in the entrance and fully developed regions of an annulus, consisting of a rotating, insulated inner cylinder and a stationary, heated outer cylinder. Several different [kappa]-[epsilon] turbulence models are employed to determine the turbulent kinetic energy, its dissipation rate, and the heat transfer performance. The governing boundary layer equations are discretized by means of a control volume finite difference technique and numerically solved using the marching procedure. In the entrance region the axial rotation of the inner cylinder induces a thermal development and causes an increase in both the Nusselt number and the turbulent kinetic energy in the inner cylinder wall region. In the fully developed region, an increase in the Taylor number causes an amplification of the turbulent kinetic energy over the whole cross section, resulting in a substantial enhancement in the Nusselt number. These transport phenomena are also affected by the radius ratio and Reynolds number.

  17. The appearance of two lock-in states in the vortex flow around an in-line forced oscillating circular cylinder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yokoi, Y.; Hirao, K.

    2014-03-01

    In this study, the flow features of vortex shedding from a circular cylinder forced-oscillating in the in-line direction were investigated by use of flow visualization experiment and numerical simulation at the Reynolds number Re=620, with varied amplitude ratio and varied frequency ratio. As a result of the experiments, it was found that although the flow structure around the circular cylinder is two-dimensional in the lock-in state of simultaneous vortex shedding, the large scale three-dimensional instability is observed in the lock-in state of alternate vortex shedding through a time lag in the boundary layer separation along the cylinder span. As a result of calculations, two typical flow patterns of the lock-in were shown, and it was confirmed that the calculated flow patterns were in reasonable agreement with previous experimental results. The fluid force act on the oscillating cylinder was investigated. It was clarified that the amplitude of the lift coefficient was larger than the amplitude of the drag coefficient in the lock-in of alternate vortex shedding, and the amplitude of the drag coefficient was larger than the amplitude of the lift coefficient in the lock-in of simultaneous vortex shedding. When the amplitude ratio 2a/d grows, this tendency becomes remarkable.

  18. Development of a UF{sub 6} cylinder transient heat transfer/stress analysis model

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, W.R.

    1991-12-31

    A heat transfer/stress analysis model is being developed to simulate the heating to a point of rupture of a cylinder containing UF{sub 6} when it is exposed to a fire. The assumptions underlying the heat transfer portion of the model, which has been the focus of work to date, will be discussed. A key aspect of this model is a lumped parameter approach to modeling heat transfer. Preliminary results and future efforts to develop an integrated thermal/stress model will be outlined.

  19. Stability analysis of Rayleigh-Bénard convection in a cylinder with internal heat generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Bo-Fu; Zhou, Lin; Wan, Zhen-Hua; Ma, Dong-Jun; Sun, De-Jun

    2016-07-01

    The flow instabilities of Rayleigh-Bénard convection in a cylinder with effect of uniform internal heat source are investigated numerically. The instabilities of the static state and of axisymmetric flows are investigated by linear stability analysis. The convection threshold depends on the strength of internal heat source q and the aspect ratio of the cylinder Γ . The stability of axisymmetric flows is strongly affected by these two parameters, as well as the Prandtl number Pr. Depending on the value of q , three regimes are identified: weak internal heating, moderate internal heating, and strong internal heating regime. In a weak internal heating regime, the instability characteristics are similar to Rayleigh-Bénard convection. In a moderate internal heating regime, intense interaction of buoyancy instability and hydrodynamic instability result in complex instability curves. When q is large enough, the internal heating effect overwhelms the boundary heating effect. Specifically, the influence of Pr on instability is studied at a moderate internal heat strength q =6.4 . An extremely multivalued stability curve is observed. At most five critical Rayleigh numbers can be determined for the axisymmetry-breaking instability at a certain Prandtl number. An axisymmetric unsteady instability mode is observed as well. By nonlinear simulation, the oscillatory flow patterns are obtained, and the axisymmetry-breaking bifurcation of the unsteady toroidal flow is studied.

  20. Stability analysis of Rayleigh-Bénard convection in a cylinder with internal heat generation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Bo-Fu; Zhou, Lin; Wan, Zhen-Hua; Ma, Dong-Jun; Sun, De-Jun

    2016-07-01

    The flow instabilities of Rayleigh-Bénard convection in a cylinder with effect of uniform internal heat source are investigated numerically. The instabilities of the static state and of axisymmetric flows are investigated by linear stability analysis. The convection threshold depends on the strength of internal heat source q and the aspect ratio of the cylinder Γ. The stability of axisymmetric flows is strongly affected by these two parameters, as well as the Prandtl number Pr. Depending on the value of q, three regimes are identified: weak internal heating, moderate internal heating, and strong internal heating regime. In a weak internal heating regime, the instability characteristics are similar to Rayleigh-Bénard convection. In a moderate internal heating regime, intense interaction of buoyancy instability and hydrodynamic instability result in complex instability curves. When q is large enough, the internal heating effect overwhelms the boundary heating effect. Specifically, the influence of Pr on instability is studied at a moderate internal heat strength q=6.4. An extremely multivalued stability curve is observed. At most five critical Rayleigh numbers can be determined for the axisymmetry-breaking instability at a certain Prandtl number. An axisymmetric unsteady instability mode is observed as well. By nonlinear simulation, the oscillatory flow patterns are obtained, and the axisymmetry-breaking bifurcation of the unsteady toroidal flow is studied.

  1. Stability analysis of Rayleigh-Bénard convection in a cylinder with internal heat generation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Bo-Fu; Zhou, Lin; Wan, Zhen-Hua; Ma, Dong-Jun; Sun, De-Jun

    2016-07-01

    The flow instabilities of Rayleigh-Bénard convection in a cylinder with effect of uniform internal heat source are investigated numerically. The instabilities of the static state and of axisymmetric flows are investigated by linear stability analysis. The convection threshold depends on the strength of internal heat source q and the aspect ratio of the cylinder Γ. The stability of axisymmetric flows is strongly affected by these two parameters, as well as the Prandtl number Pr. Depending on the value of q, three regimes are identified: weak internal heating, moderate internal heating, and strong internal heating regime. In a weak internal heating regime, the instability characteristics are similar to Rayleigh-Bénard convection. In a moderate internal heating regime, intense interaction of buoyancy instability and hydrodynamic instability result in complex instability curves. When q is large enough, the internal heating effect overwhelms the boundary heating effect. Specifically, the influence of Pr on instability is studied at a moderate internal heat strength q=6.4. An extremely multivalued stability curve is observed. At most five critical Rayleigh numbers can be determined for the axisymmetry-breaking instability at a certain Prandtl number. An axisymmetric unsteady instability mode is observed as well. By nonlinear simulation, the oscillatory flow patterns are obtained, and the axisymmetry-breaking bifurcation of the unsteady toroidal flow is studied. PMID:27575218

  2. Effect on the flow and heat transfer characteristics for sinusoidal pulsating laminar flow in a heated square cylinder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Jiu-Yang; Lin, Wei; Zheng, Xiao-Tao

    2014-06-01

    Two-dimensional numerical simulation is performed to understand the effect of flow pulsation on the flow and heat transfer from a heated square cylinder at Re = 100. Numerical calculations are carried out by using a finite volume method based on the pressure-implicit with splitting of operators algorithm in a collocated grid. The effects of flow pulsation amplitude (0.2 ≤ A ≤ 0.8) and frequency (0 ≤ f p ≤ 20 Hz) on the detailed kinematics of flow (streamlines, vorticity patterns), the macroscopic parameters (drag coefficient, vortex shedding frequency) and heat transfer enhancement are presented in detail. The Strouhal number of vortices shedding, drag coefficient for non-pulsating flow are compared with the previously published data, and good agreement is found. The lock-on phenomenon is observed for a square cylinder in the present flow pulsation. When the pulsating frequency is within the lock-on regime, time averaged drag coefficient and heat transfer from the square cylinder is substantially augmented, and when the pulsating frequency in about the natural vortex shedding frequency, the heat transfer is also substantially enhanced. In addition, the influence of the pulsating amplitude on the time averaged drag coefficient, heat transfer enhancement and lock-on occurrence is discussed in detail.

  3. Multiple buoyancy driven flows in a vertical cylinder heated from below

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yamaguchi, Y.; Chang, C. J.; Brown, R. A.

    1983-01-01

    The structure of axisymmetric buoyancy-driven convection in a vertical cylinder heated from below is probed by finite element solution of the Boussinesq equations coupled with computed-implemented perturbation techniques for detecting and tracking multiple flows and for determining flow stability. Results are reported for fluids with Prandtl number of one and for cylinders with aspect ratio (Lambda) (defined as the height to radius of the cylinder) between 0.5 and 2.25. Extensive calculations of the neutral stability curve for the static solution and of the nonlinear motions along the bifurcating flow families show a continuous evolution of the primary cellular motion from a single toroidal cell to two and three cells nested radially in the cylinder, instead of the sharp transitions found for a cylinder with shear-free sidewalls. The smooth transitions in flow structure with Rayleigh number and lambda are explained by nonlinear connectivity between the first two bifurcating flow families formed either by a secondary bifurcation point for Lambda or = Lambda * approximately 0.80 or by a limit point for Lambda Lambda *. The transition between these two modes may be described by the theory of multiple limit point bifurcation.

  4. Effect of Groundboard Height on the Aerodynamic Characteristics of a Lifting Circular Cylinder Using Tangential Blowing from Surface Slots for Lift Generation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lockwood, Vernard E.

    1961-01-01

    A wind-tunnel investigation has been made to determine the ground effect on the aerodynamic characteristics of a lifting circular cylinder using tangential blowing from surface slots to generate high lift coefficients. The tests were made on a semispan model having a length 4 times the cylinder diameter and an end plate of 2.5 diameters. The tests were made at low speeds at a Reynolds number of approximately 290,000, over a range of momentum coefficients from 0.14 to 4.60, and over a range of groundboard heights from 1.5 to 10 cylinder diameters. The investigation showed an earlier stall angle and a large loss of lift coefficient as the groundboard was brought close to the cylinder when large lift coefficients were being generated. For example, at a momentum coefficient of 4.60 the maximum lift coefficient was reduced from a value of 20.3 at a groundboard height of 10 cylinder diameters to a value of 8.7 at a groundboard height of 1.5 cylinder diameters. In contrast to this there was little effect on the lift characteristics of changes in groundboard height when lift coefficients of about 4.5 were being generated. At a height of 1.5 cylinder diameters the drag coefficients generally increased rapidly when the slot position angle for maximum lift was exceeded. Slightly below the slot position angle for maximum lift, the groundboard had a beneficial effect, that is, the drag for a given lift was less near the groundboard than away from the groundboard. The variation of maximum circulation lift coefficient (maximum lift coefficient minus momentum coefficient) obtained in this investigation is in general agreement with a theory developed for a jet-flap wing which assumes that the loss in circulation is the result of blockage of the main stream beneath the wing.

  5. Convective heat transfer between a moving cylinder and flowing non-Newtonian fluids

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, T.Y.

    1996-01-01

    An analysis of steady laminar forced convection heat transfer from a moving or stationary slender cylinder to a quiescent or flowing non-Newtonian fluid has been presented. A relative velocity parameter, {gamma}, is proposed to serve as a controlling index that properly indicates the relative importance of the velocity of the slender cylinder and the velocity of the free stream. The value of this parameter lies between 0 and 1. Furthermore, the coordinates and dependent variables are transformed to yield computationally efficient numerical solution that are valid over the entire range of relative velocity parameter from the limiting case of a non-Newtonian fluid free stream flowing over a stationary cylinder ({gamma} = 0) to the other limiting case of a moving cylinder in a quiescent non-Newtonian fluid ({gamma} = 1). The effects of the relative velocity parameter, the transverse curvature parameter, the power-law viscosity index and the generalized Prandtl number on the velocity profiles, the temperature distributions and the heat transfer group are clearly illustrated.

  6. The effect of water subcooling on film boiling heat transfer from vertical cylinders

    SciTech Connect

    Greene, G.A.; Irvine, T.F. Jr.

    1994-03-01

    The effect of subcooling on the film boiling heat transfer of water from vertical copper cylinders has been investigated experimentally using a transient quench technique. A lumped parameter model was utilized since the Blot numbers were always less than 0.05. The amount of subcooling varied from 0 K to 70 K and the initial cylinder wall temperatures were of the order of 1100 K. Heat transfer coefficient were measured at the midpoint of the cylinders and were obtained over quench times in which they were verified to be constant. Subcooling had a significant effect on both the film boiling heat transfer coefficient and the minimum film boiling temperature. As the subcooling varied from 0 K to 70 K, the h transfer coefficient increased by a factor of five. As the subcooling varied from 0 K to 60 K, the minimum film boiling temperature increased from approximately 600 K to 1000 K. An attempt to correlate the heat transfer coefficient data with a method recently proposed by Sakurai et al. was only successful at subcooled temperature differences less than 10 K. A modified correlation is presented using the Sakurai et al. parameters which better represents the data over the complete subcooling range.

  7. Heat transfer in thin, compact heat exchangers with circular, rectangular, or pin-fin flow passages

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Olson, D. A.

    1992-01-01

    Heat transfer and pressure drop have been measured of three thin, compact heat exchangers in helium gas at 3.5 MPa and higher, with Reynolds numbers of 450 to 36,000. The flow geometries for the three heat exchanger specimens were: circular tube, rectangular channel, and staggered pin fin with tapered pins. The specimens were heated radiatively at heat fluxes up to 77 W/sq cm. Correlations were developed for the isothermal friction factor as a function of Reynolds number, and for the Nusselt number as a function of Reynolds number and the ratio of wall temperature to fluid temperature. The specimen with the pin fin internal geometry had significantly better heat transfer than the other specimens, but it also had higher pressure drop. For certain conditions of helium flow and heating, the temperature more than doubled from the inlet to the outlet of the specimens, producing large changes in gas velocity, density, viscosity, and thermal conductivity. These changes in properties did not affect the correlations for friction factor and Nusselt number in turbulent flow.

  8. Nonlinear radiative heat transfer to stagnation-point flow of Sisko fluid past a stretching cylinder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khan, Masood; Malik, Rabia; Hussain, M.

    2016-05-01

    In the present paper, we endeavor to perform a numerical analysis in connection with the nonlinear radiative stagnation-point flow and heat transfer to Sisko fluid past a stretching cylinder in the presence of convective boundary conditions. The influence of thermal radiation using nonlinear Rosseland approximation is explored. The numerical solutions of transformed governing equations are calculated through forth order Runge-Kutta method using shooting technique. With the help of graphs and tables, the influence of non-dimensional parameters on velocity and temperature along with the local skin friction and Nusselt number is discussed. The results reveal that the temperature increases however, heat transfer from the surface of cylinder decreases with the increasing values of thermal radiation and temperature ratio parameters. Moreover, the authenticity of numerical solutions is validated by finding their good agreement with the HAM solutions.

  9. Some Investigations of the General Instability of Stiffened Metal Cylinders IV : Continuation of Tests of Sheet-covered Specimens and Studies of the Buckling Phenomena of Unstiffened Circular Cylinders

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1943-01-01

    This is the fourth of a series of reports covering an investigation of the general instability problem by the California Institute of Technology. The first five reports of this series cover investigations of the general instability problem under the loading conditions of pure bending and were prepared under the sponsorship of the Civil Aeronautics Administration. The succeeding reports of this series cover the work done on other loading conditions under the sponsorship of the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics. This report is to deal primarily with the continuation of tests of sheet-covered specimens and studies of the buckling phenomena of unstiffened circular cylinders.

  10. Numerical investigation on heat transfer of liquid flow at low Reynolds number in micro-cylinder-groups

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guan, Ning; Liu, Zhi-Gang; Zhang, Cheng-Wu

    2012-07-01

    Heat transfer of de-ionized water over in-line and staggered micro-cylinder-groups have been numerically investigated with Reynolds number varying in the range from 25 to 150. A 3-D incompressible numerical model is employed to investigate the vortex distributions and the influences of the vortices on heat transfer characteristics at low Re numbers in micro-cylinder-groups with different geometrical parameters, including micro-cylinder diameters (100, 250 and 500 μm), ratios of pitch to micro-cylinder diameter (1.5, 2 and 2.5) and ratios of micro-cylinder height to diameter (0.5, 1, 1.5 and 2). The vortex distributions, the temperature fields, and the relationships among them are investigated by solving the numerical model with the finite volume method. It is found that the vortex number become more with the increase of pitch ratio and the change of flow rate distribution affects the heat transfer characteristics apparently. Meanwhile, the local heat transfer coefficients nearby the locations of vortices greatly increase due to the boundary layer separation, which further enhance the heat transfer in micro-cylinder-groups. The new correlations which to Nusselt number of de-ionized water over micro-cylinders with Re number varying from 25 to 150 have been proposed considering the differential pressure resistance and the buoyancy effect basing on numerical calculations in this paper.

  11. Scattering of a plane electromagnetic wave by an infinite wedge with a truncated circular cylinder coated coaxially with a magnetodielectric layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shepilko, E. V.

    2010-08-01

    We formulate and solve the problem of scattering of a plane electromagnetic wave by an infinite, perfectly conducting wedge with a truncated, perfectly conducting circular cylinder which is coated coaxially with a magnetodielectric layer and located along the wedge edge. The rigorous solution is obtained and reduced to a system of linear algebraic equations of the second kind for unknown coefficients of Fourier expansions of the scattered field. The results of calculating the scattered field in the far zone with a specified accuracy are presented for the case of an H-polarized wave. It is shown that for certain values of the electric radius of the cylinder, the backscattering cross section of such a structure has pronounced maxima.

  12. Test of the FDTD accuracy in the analysis of the scattering resonances associated with high-Q whispering-gallery modes of a circular cylinder.

    PubMed

    Boriskin, Artem V; Boriskina, Svetlana V; Rolland, Anthony; Sauleau, Ronan; Nosich, Alexander I

    2008-05-01

    Our objective is the assessment of the accuracy of a conventional finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) code in the computation of the near- and far-field scattering characteristics of a circular dielectric cylinder. We excite the cylinder with an electric or magnetic line current and demonstrate the failure of the two-dimensional FDTD algorithm to accurately characterize the emission rate and the field patterns near high-Q whispering-gallery-mode resonances. This is proven by comparison with the exact series solutions. The computational errors in the emission rate are then studied at the resonances still detectable with FDTD, i.e., having Q-factors up to 10(3).

  13. Simulation of the flow past a circular cylinder in the supercritical regime by blending RANS and variational-multiscale LES models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moussaed, Carine; Vittoria Salvetti, Maria; Wornom, Stephen; Koobus, Bruno; Dervieux, Alain

    2014-05-01

    A strategy which blends a variational multiscale large eddy simulation (VMS-LES) model and a RANS model in a hybrid approach is investigated. A smooth blending function, which is based on the value of a blending parameter, is used for switching from VMS-LES to RANS. Different definitions of the blending parameter are investigated. The capabilities of the novel hybrid approach are appraised in the simulation of the flow around a circular cylinder at a Reynolds number 1.4×105, based on the freestream velocity and on the cylinder diameter, in the presence of turbulent boundary-layer due to turbulent inflow conditions. A second study at Reynolds numbers from Re=6.7×105 to 1.25×106 is also presented. The effect of using the VMS-LES approach in the hybrid model is evaluated. Results are compared to those of other RANS, LES and hybrid simulations in the literature and with experimental data

  14. Circular Dichroism Method for Heat Capacity Determination of Proteins

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Cecil L.; Bailey, Chris; Bheemarti, Kiran Kumar

    2006-01-01

    Circular dichroism spectroscopy was used to measure the thermal unfolding of bovine pancreatic ribonuclease A (RNase A) with various concentrations of guanidine hydrochloride (GuHCl). A red shift in transition midpoint temperatures, T[subscript m], occurred with increasing concentration of the strong protein denaturant. van Hoff enthalpy changes,…

  15. Non-Newtonian unconfined flow and heat transfer over a heated cylinder using the direct-forcing immersed boundary-thermal lattice Boltzmann method.

    PubMed

    Amiri Delouei, A; Nazari, M; Kayhani, M H; Succi, S

    2014-05-01

    In this study, the immersed boundary-thermal lattice Boltzmann method has been used to simulate non-Newtonian fluid flow over a heated circular cylinder. The direct-forcing algorithm has been employed to couple the off-lattice obstacles and on-lattice fluid nodes. To investigate the effect of boundary sharpness, two different diffuse interface schemes are considered to interpolate the velocity and temperature between the boundary and computational grid points. The lattice Boltzmann equation with split-forcing term is applied to consider the effects of the discrete lattice and the body force to the momentum flux, simultaneously. A method for calculating the Nusselt number based on diffuse interface schemes is developed. The rheological and thermal properties of non-Newtonian fluids are investigated under the different power-law indices and Reynolds numbers. The effect of numerical parameters on the accuracy of the proposed method has been investigated in detail. Results show that the rheological and thermal properties of non-Newtonian fluids in the presence of a heated immersed body can be suitably captured using the immersed boundary thermal lattice Boltzmann method. PMID:25353919

  16. MHD Boundary Layer Slip Flow and Heat Transfer of Ferrofluid along a Stretching Cylinder with Prescribed Heat Flux

    PubMed Central

    Qasim, Muhammad; Khan, Zafar Hayat; Khan, Waqar Ahmad; Ali Shah, Inayat

    2014-01-01

    This study investigates the magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) flow of ferrofluid along a stretching cylinder. The velocity slip and prescribed surface heat flux boundary conditions are employed on the cylinder surface. Water as conventional base fluid containing nanoparticles of magnetite (Fe3O4) is used. Comparison between magnetic (Fe3O4) and non-magnetic (Al2O3) nanoparticles is also made. The governing non-linear partial differential equations are reduced to non-linear ordinary differential equations and then solved numerically using shooting method. Present results are compared with the available data in the limiting cases. The present results are found to be in an excellent agreement. It is observed that with an increase in the magnetic field strength, the percent difference in the heat transfer rate of magnetic nanoparticles with Al2O3 decreases. Surface shear stress and the heat transfer rate at the surface increase as the curvature parameter increases, i.e curvature helps to enhance the heat transfer. PMID:24465388

  17. MHD boundary layer slip flow and heat transfer of ferrofluid along a stretching cylinder with prescribed heat flux.

    PubMed

    Qasim, Muhammad; Khan, Zafar Hayat; Khan, Waqar Ahmad; Ali Shah, Inayat

    2014-01-01

    This study investigates the magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) flow of ferrofluid along a stretching cylinder. The velocity slip and prescribed surface heat flux boundary conditions are employed on the cylinder surface. Water as conventional base fluid containing nanoparticles of magnetite (Fe3O4) is used. Comparison between magnetic (Fe3O4) and non-magnetic (Al2O3) nanoparticles is also made. The governing non-linear partial differential equations are reduced to non-linear ordinary differential equations and then solved numerically using shooting method. Present results are compared with the available data in the limiting cases. The present results are found to be in an excellent agreement. It is observed that with an increase in the magnetic field strength, the percent difference in the heat transfer rate of magnetic nanoparticles with Al2O3 decreases. Surface shear stress and the heat transfer rate at the surface increase as the curvature parameter increases, i.e curvature helps to enhance the heat transfer. PMID:24465388

  18. MHD boundary layer slip flow and heat transfer of ferrofluid along a stretching cylinder with prescribed heat flux.

    PubMed

    Qasim, Muhammad; Khan, Zafar Hayat; Khan, Waqar Ahmad; Ali Shah, Inayat

    2014-01-01

    This study investigates the magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) flow of ferrofluid along a stretching cylinder. The velocity slip and prescribed surface heat flux boundary conditions are employed on the cylinder surface. Water as conventional base fluid containing nanoparticles of magnetite (Fe3O4) is used. Comparison between magnetic (Fe3O4) and non-magnetic (Al2O3) nanoparticles is also made. The governing non-linear partial differential equations are reduced to non-linear ordinary differential equations and then solved numerically using shooting method. Present results are compared with the available data in the limiting cases. The present results are found to be in an excellent agreement. It is observed that with an increase in the magnetic field strength, the percent difference in the heat transfer rate of magnetic nanoparticles with Al2O3 decreases. Surface shear stress and the heat transfer rate at the surface increase as the curvature parameter increases, i.e curvature helps to enhance the heat transfer.

  19. Effects of prescribed heat flux and transpiration on MHD axisymmetric flow impinging on stretching cylinder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mabood, Fazle; Lorenzini, Giulio; Pochai, Napporat; Ibrahim, Sheikh Muhammad

    2016-07-01

    A numerical treatment for axisymmetric flow and heat transfer due to a stretching cylinder under the influence of a uniform magnetic field and prescribed surface heat flux is presented. Numerical results are obtained for dimensionless velocity, temperature, skin friction coefficient and Nusselt number for several values of the suction/injection, magnetic and curvature parameters as well as the Prandtl number. The present study reveals that the controlling parameters have strong effects on the physical quantities of interest. It is seen that the magnetic field enhances the dimensionless temperature inside the thermal boundary layer, whereas it reduces the dimensionless velocity inside the hydrodynamic boundary layer. Heat transfer rate reduces, while the skin friction coefficient increases with magnetic field.

  20. Effects of prescribed heat flux and transpiration on MHD axisymmetric flow impinging on stretching cylinder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mabood, Fazle; Lorenzini, Giulio; Pochai, Nopparat; Ibrahim, Sheikh Muhammad

    2016-11-01

    A numerical treatment for axisymmetric flow and heat transfer due to a stretching cylinder under the influence of a uniform magnetic field and prescribed surface heat flux is presented. Numerical results are obtained for dimensionless velocity, temperature, skin friction coefficient and Nusselt number for several values of the suction/injection, magnetic and curvature parameters as well as the Prandtl number. The present study reveals that the controlling parameters have strong effects on the physical quantities of interest. It is seen that the magnetic field enhances the dimensionless temperature inside the thermal boundary layer, whereas it reduces the dimensionless velocity inside the hydrodynamic boundary layer. Heat transfer rate reduces, while the skin friction coefficient increases with magnetic field.

  1. Browns Ferry waste heat greenhouse. Progress report. Circular Z-117

    SciTech Connect

    Burns, E.R.; Carter, J.; Pile, R.S.; Roetheli, J.C.

    1980-08-01

    A 25,000-ft/sup 2/ experimental greenhouse at Browns Ferry Nuclear Plant was divided into three sections to compare two heat exchange systems using waste heat in condenser cooling water (CCW) with a conventionally heated zone. A 125-hp pump at each of the three power plant units provides a 3000 gal/min pumping capacity for the CCW which is pumped about 2000 ft through a 12-in. pipe to the greenhouse. Construction was completed in November 1978; initial engineering tests were not conducted on system performance until January 1979; and the first tomato crop was planted January 10, 1979. Harvest was completed in July 1979; and cucumbers, chrysanthemums, poinsettias, and gloxinias were grown during the following summer and fall. Low winter greenhouse temperatures reduced the yield and quality of tomatoes in the two waste heat sections which averaged 13.0 lbs/plant. The conventionally heated zone produced 15.4 lbs/plant. In January and February, temperatures of the CCW were sometimes as low as 52/sup 0/F, or 18/sup 0/F below the predicted 70/sup 0/F which was the minimum simulated CCW temperature used to develop the pilot greenhouse heating system at Muscle Shoals. The two heat exchange systems using CCW performed near design expectations - keeping the greenhouse air temperature within 10/sup 0/ to 12/sup 0/F of the incoming water temperature. Summer and fall production of cucumbers and ornamental crops was successful in all three sections, which were conventionally cooled. Production budgets indicated a greater potential for ornamental production than vegetable production in waste heat greenhouses. Economic studies showed that heat exchange systems using waste heat from CCW will require higher capital investment and greater electrical consumption than a conventionally heated greenhouse. However, depending upon the costs charged for CCW, the waste heat systems may show potential economic advantages as a result of reduced heating costs.

  2. Measurement of temperature gradient in a heated liquid cylinder using rainbow refractometry assisted with infrared thermometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Feihu; Xu, Chuanlong; Wang, Shimin; Li, Zhenfeng

    2016-12-01

    In a heated liquid cylinder, a temperature gradient exists between the hotter surface and the colder core. Measurement of the temperature gradient is very important for the in-depth investigation into the mechanism and optimized control of the heat transfer process. Rainbow refractometry has been attempted to achieve the measurement since several years ago. Yet there is no effective inversion algorithm without predicting refractive index profiles based on experience. In the paper, an improved rainbow refractometry assisted with infrared thermometry was proposed to measure the diameter and the inside temperature gradient of a heated liquid cylinder. The inversion algorithm was designed based on the nonlinear least square method and an optimization process. To evaluate the feasibility of the proposed method, numerical simulations and experiments were carried out. The results of the numerical simulation showed that the relative error of the inversion diameter was about 1%, and the error of the refractive index was less than 6×10-4 at all the radial locations. In the experimental research, t rainbows reconstructed with the reversion parameters were all similar to the corresponding captured ones.

  3. The exterior unsteady viscous flow and heat transfer due to a porous expanding or contracting cylinder.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chao; Si, Xinhui; Shen, Yanan; Zheng, Liancun; Lin, Ping

    2015-01-01

    Since the vessels in the biological tissues are characterized by low seepage Reynolds numbers and contracting or expanding walls, more attention is paid on the viscous flow outside the porous pipe with small expansion or contraction. This paper presents a numerical solution of the flow and heat transfer outside an expanding or contracting porous cylinder. The coupled nonlinear similarity equations are solved by Bvp4c, which is a collocation method with MATLAB. The effects of the different physical parameters, namely the permeability Reynolds number,the expansion ratio and the Prandtl number, on the velocity and temperature distribution are obtained and the results are shown graphically. PMID:26406014

  4. A new hydrodynamic prediction of the peak heat flux from horizontal cylinders in low speed upflow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ungar, E. K.; Eichhorn, R.

    1988-01-01

    Flow-boiling data have been obtained for horizontal cylinders in saturated acetone, isopropanol, and water, yielding heat flux vs. wall superheat boiling curves for the organic liquids. A region of low speed upflow is identified in which long cylindrical bubbles break off from the wake with regular frequency. The Strouhal number of bubble breakoff is a function only of the Froude number in any liquid, and the effective wake thickness in all liquids is a function of the density ratio and the Froude number. A low speed flow boiling burnout prediction procedure is presented which yields accurate results in widely dissimilar liquids.

  5. The exterior unsteady viscous flow and heat transfer due to a porous expanding or contracting cylinder.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chao; Si, Xinhui; Shen, Yanan; Zheng, Liancun; Lin, Ping

    2015-01-01

    Since the vessels in the biological tissues are characterized by low seepage Reynolds numbers and contracting or expanding walls, more attention is paid on the viscous flow outside the porous pipe with small expansion or contraction. This paper presents a numerical solution of the flow and heat transfer outside an expanding or contracting porous cylinder. The coupled nonlinear similarity equations are solved by Bvp4c, which is a collocation method with MATLAB. The effects of the different physical parameters, namely the permeability Reynolds number,the expansion ratio and the Prandtl number, on the velocity and temperature distribution are obtained and the results are shown graphically.

  6. Measured and predicted aerodynamic heating on a cylinder in wake of AFE configuration at incidence. [Aeroassist Flight Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wells, William L.

    1989-01-01

    Thin-film resistance gages were used to measure cylinder surface heat-transfer rates in the near wake of the Aeroassist Flight Experiment vehicle configuration, while surface-streamline directions were ascertained by the oil-flow techniques under the same configuration and test conditions. Both heat transfer distributions and flow over the entire cylinder surface were influenced by impingement of that portion of the free shear layer originating at the forebody shoulder in the upper symmetry plane. Heating rate distributions predicted with a Navier-Stokes solver computer code were in general agreement with measurements.

  7. The Effect of Internal Pressure on the Buckling Stress of Thin-Walled Circular Cylinders Under Torsion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crate, Harold; Batdorf, S B; Baab, George W

    1944-01-01

    The results of a series of tests to determine the effect of internal pressure on the buckling load of a thin cylinder under an applied torque indicated that internal pressure raises the shear buckling stress. The experimental results were analyzed with the aid of previously developed theory and a simple interaction formula was derived. (author)

  8. Analysis of transient thermal stress in heat-generating plates and hollow cylinders caused by sudden environmental temperature changes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosenberg, G. S.; Schoeberle, D. F.; Valentin, R. A.

    1969-01-01

    Analysis and solution are presented for transient thermal stresses in a free heat-generating flat plate and a free, hollow-generating cylinder as a result of sudden environmental changes. The technique used and graphical results obtained are of interest to the heat transfer industry.

  9. EXACT SOLUTION OF HEAT CONDUCTION IN A TWO-DOMAIN COMPOSITE CYLINDER WITH AN ORTHOTROPIC OUTER LAYER.

    SciTech Connect

    C. AVILES-RAMOS; C. RUDY

    2000-11-01

    The transient exact solution of heat conduction in a two-domain composite cylinder is developed using the separation of variables technique. The inner cylinder is isotropic and the outer cylindrical layer is orthotropic. Temperature solutions are obtained for boundary conditions of the first and second kinds at the outer surface of the orthotropic layer. These solutions are applied to heat flow calorimeters modeling assuming that there is heat generation due to nuclear reactions in the inner cylinder. Heat flow calorimeter simulations are carried out assuming that the inner cylinder is filled with plutonium oxide powder. The first objective in these simulations is to predict the onset of thermal equilibrium of the calorimeter with its environment. Two types of boundary conditions at the outer surface of the orthotropic layer are used to predict thermal equilibrium. The procedure developed to carry out these simulations can be used as a guideline for the design of calorimeters. Another important application of these solutions is on the estimation of thermophysical properties of orthotropic cylinders. The thermal conductivities in the vertical, radial and circumferential directions of the orthotropic outer layer can be estimated using this exact solution and experimental data. Simultaneous estimation of the volumetric heat capacity and thermal conductivities is also possible. Furthermore, this solution has potential applications to the solution of the inverse heat conduction problem in this cylindrical geometry. An interesting feature of the construction of this solution is that two different sets of eigenfunctions need to be considered in the eigenfunction expansion. These eigenfunctions sets depend on the relative values of the thermal diffusivity of the inner cylinder and the thermal diffusivity in the vertical direction of the outer cylindrical layer.

  10. User manual for EXCALIBUR: A FE-BI numerical laboratory for cavity-backed antennas in a circular cylinder, version 1.2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kempel, Leo C.

    1994-01-01

    The Finite Element-Boundary Integral (FE-BI) technique was used to analyze the scattering and radiation properties of cavity-backed patch antennas recessed in a metallic groundplane. A program, CAVITY3D, was written and found to yield accurate results for large arrays without the usual high memory and computational demand associated with competing formulations. Recently, the FE-BI approach was extended to cavity-backed antennas recessed in an infinite, metallic circular cylinder. EXCALIBUR is a computer program written in the Radiation Laboratory of the University of Michigan which implements this formulation. This user manual gives a brief introduction to EXCALIBUR and some hints as to its proper use. As with all computational electromagnetics programs (especially finite element programs), skilled use and best performance are only obtained through experience. However, several important aspects of the program such as portability, geometry generation, interpretation of results, and custom modification are addressed.

  11. MHD mixed convection flow through a diverging channel with heated circular obstacle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alam, Md. S.; Shaha, J.; Khan, M. A. H.; Nasrin, R.

    2016-07-01

    A numerical study of steady MHD mixed convection heat transfer and fluid flow through a diverging channel with heated circular obstacle is carried out in this paper. The circular obstacle placed at the centre of the channel is hot with temperature Th. The top and bottom walls are non-adiabatic. The basic nonlinear governing partial differential equations are transformed into dimensionless ordinary differential equations using similarity transformations. These equations have been solved numerically for different values of the governing parameters, namely Reynolds number (Re), Hartmann number (Ha), Richardson number (Ri) and Prandtl number (Pr) using finite element method. The streamlines, isotherms, average Nusselt number and average temperature of the fluid for various relevant dimensionless parameters are displayed graphically. The study revealed that the flow and thermal fields in the diverging channel depend significantly on the heated body. In addition, it is observed that the magnetic field acts to increase the rate of heat transfer within the channel.

  12. Aerodynamic Characteristics of a Circular Cylinder at Mach Number of 6.86 and Angles of Attack up to 90 Degrees

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Penland, Jim A

    1954-01-01

    Pressure-distribution and force tests of a circular cylinder have been made in the Langley 11-inch hypersonic tunnel at a Mach number of 6.86, a Reynolds number of 129,000 based on diameter, and angles of attack up to 90 degrees. The results are compared with the hypersonic approximation of Grimminger, Williams, and Young and with a simple modification of the Newtonian flow theory. The comparison of experimental results shows that either theory gives adequate general aerodynamic characteristics but that the modified Newtonian theory gives a more accurate prediction of the pressure distribution. The calculated crossflow drag coefficients plotted as a function of crossflow Mach number were found to be in reasonable agreement with similar results obtained from other investigations at lower supersonic Mach numbers. Comparison of the results of this investigation with data obtained at a lower Mach number indicates that the drag coefficient of a cylinder normal to the flow is relatively constant for Mach numbers above about 4.

  13. Numerical Study of Flow Past a Circular Cylinder Using RANS, Hybrid RANS/LES and PANS Formulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elmiligui, Alaa A.; Abdol-Hamid, Khaled S.; Massey, Steven J.; Pao, S. Paul

    2004-01-01

    Two multiscale type turbulence models are implemented in the PAB3D solver. The models are based on modifying the Reynolds Averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) equations. The first scheme is a hybrid RANS/LES model utilizing the two-equation (k(sub epsilon)) model with a RANS/LES transition function dependent on grid spacing and the computed turbulence length scale. The second scheme is a modified version of the partially averaged Navier-Stokes (PANS) model, where the unresolved kinetic energy parameter (f(sub k)) is allowed to vary as a function of grid spacing and the turbulence length scale. Solutions from these models are compared to RANS results and experimental data for a stationary and rotating cylinder. The parameter f(sub k) varies between zero and one and has the characteristic to be equal to one in the viscous sub layer, and when the RANS turbulent viscosity becomes smaller than the LES viscosity. The formulation, usage methodology, and validation example are presented to demonstrate the enhancement of PAB3D's time-accurate and turbulence modeling capabilities. The models are compared to RANS results and experimental data for turbulent separated flows (TS) and laminar separated flows (LS) around stationary and rotating cylinders. For a stationary cylinder, the TS case is accurately simulated using the general two-equation k(sub epsilon) turbulence model (eddy-viscosity model). PAB3D accurately predicts the drag coefficient (CD), lift coefficient (CL) and the Strouhal number (St). The LS case was a challenge for the RANS computation with an eddy-viscosity turbulence model. The RANS/LES and PANS performed well and showed marked improvements over the RANS solution. The modified PANS model was the most accurate. For the rotating cylinder, the spin ratio varied from zero to one, and the PANS results were in good agreement with published experimental data. RANS/LES and PANS capture both temporal and spatial fluctuations and produce large-scale structures that do not

  14. Average heat-transfer characteristics of a row of circular air jets impinging on a concave surface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Livingood, J. N. B.; Gauntner, J. W.

    1972-01-01

    A study of the average heat-transfer characteristics of air jets impinging on the concave side of a right-circular semicylinder is reported. Results from existing correlating are compared with each other and with experimental heat-transfer data for a row of circular jets. Two correlations available in the literature are recommended for use in designing cooled turbine vanes and blades.

  15. Mixed convection boundary layer flow over a horizontal elliptic cylinder with constant heat flux

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Javed, Tariq; Ahmad, Hussain; Ghaffari, Abuzar

    2015-12-01

    Mixed convection boundary layer flow of a viscous fluid over a horizontal elliptic cylinder with a constant heat flux is investigated numerically. The governing partial differential equations are transformed to non-dimensional form and then are solved by an efficient implicit finite different scheme known as Keller-box method. The solutions are expressed in the form of skin friction and Nusselt number, which are plotted against the eccentric angle. The effect of pertinent parameters such as mixed convection parameter, aspect ratio (ratio of lengths of minor axis to major axis), and Prandtl number on skin friction and Nusselt number are illustrated through graphs for both blunt and slender orientations. The increase in the value of mixed convection parameter results in increase in skin friction coefficient and Nusselt number for blunt as well as slender orientations.

  16. Compressible Laminar Boundary Layer over a Yawed Infinite Cylinder with Heat Transfer and Arbitrary Prandtl Number

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reshotko, Eli; Beckwith, Ivan E

    1958-01-01

    The equations are presented for the development of the compressible laminar boundary layer over a yawed infinite cylinder. For compressible flow with a pressure gradient the chordwise and spanwise flows are not independent. Using the Stewartson transformation and a linear viscosity-temperature relation yields a set of three simultaneous ordinary differential equations in a form yielding similar solutions. These equations are solved for stagnation-line flow for surface temperatures from zero to twice the free-stream stagnation temperature and for a wide range of yaw angle and free-stream Mach number. The results indicate that the effect of yaw on the heat-transfer coefficient at the stagnation line depends markedly on the free-stream Mach number. An unusual result of the solutions is that for large yaw angles and stream Mach numbers the chordwise velocity within the boundary layer exceeds the local external chordwise velocity, even for a highly cooled wall.

  17. Adhesive contact of a rigid circular cylinder to a soft elastic substrate--the role of surface tension.

    PubMed

    Liu, Tianshu; Jagota, Anand; Hui, Chung-Yuen

    2015-05-21

    This article studies the effects of surface tension on the adhesive contact mechanics of a long rigid cylinder on an infinite half space comprising an incompressible elastic material. We present an exact solution based on small strain theory. The relationship between the indentation force and contact width was found to depend on a single dimensionless parameter ω = σ/[4(μR)(2/3)(W(ad)/2π)(1/3'), where R is the cylinder radius, Wad is the interfacial work of adhesion, and σ and μ are the surface tension and shear modulus of the half space, respectively. For small ω the solution reduces to the classical Johnson-Kendall-Roberts (JKR) theory, whereas for large ω the solution reduces to the small slope version of the Young-Dupre equation. The pull-off phenomenon was carefully examined and it was found that the contact width at pull-off reduces to zero when surface tension is larger than a critical value.

  18. Development of advanced high temperature in-cylinder components and tribological systems for low heat rejection diesel engines, phase 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kroeger, C. A.; Larson, H. J.

    1992-01-01

    Analysis and concept design work completed in Phase 1 have identified a low heat rejection engine configuration with the potential to meet the Heavy Duty Transport Technology program specific fuel consumption goal of 152 g/kW-hr. The proposed engine configuration incorporates low heat rejection, in-cylinder components designed for operation at 24 MPa peak cylinder pressure. Water cooling is eliminated by selective oil cooling of the components. A high temperature lubricant will be required due to increased in-cylinder operating temperatures. A two-stage turbocharger air system with intercooling and aftercooling was selected to meet engine boost and BMEP requirements. A turbocompound turbine stage is incorporated for exhaust energy recovery. The concept engine cost was estimated to be 43 percent higher compared to a Caterpillar 3176 engine. The higher initial engine cost is predicted to be offset by reduced operating costs due the lower fuel consumption.

  19. Development of advanced high temperature in-cylinder components and tribological systems for low heat rejection diesel engines, phase 1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kroeger, C. A.; Larson, H. J.

    1992-03-01

    Analysis and concept design work completed in Phase 1 have identified a low heat rejection engine configuration with the potential to meet the Heavy Duty Transport Technology program specific fuel consumption goal of 152 g/kW-hr. The proposed engine configuration incorporates low heat rejection, in-cylinder components designed for operation at 24 MPa peak cylinder pressure. Water cooling is eliminated by selective oil cooling of the components. A high temperature lubricant will be required due to increased in-cylinder operating temperatures. A two-stage turbocharger air system with intercooling and aftercooling was selected to meet engine boost and BMEP requirements. A turbocompound turbine stage is incorporated for exhaust energy recovery. The concept engine cost was estimated to be 43 percent higher compared to a Caterpillar 3176 engine. The higher initial engine cost is predicted to be offset by reduced operating costs due the lower fuel consumption.

  20. Stagnation point flow and heat transfer behavior of Cu-water nanofluid towards horizontal and exponentially stretching/shrinking cylinders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sulochana, C.; Sandeep, N.

    2016-03-01

    In this study we analyzed the stagnation point flow and heat transfer behavior of Cu-water nanofluid towards horizontal and exponentially permeable stretching/shrinking cylinders in presence of suction/injection, heat source and shape of nanoparticles. The governing boundary layer equations are transformed to nonlinear ordinary differential equations using similarity transformation which are then solved numerically using bvp4c Matlab package. The influence of non-dimensional governing parameters on the flow field and heat transfer characteristics are discussed and presented through graphs and tables. The study indicates that the solutions for the horizontal and exponential cylinders are non-unique and shape of nanoparticles also influences the rate of heat transfer. Comparisons of the present results with existed studies are presented. Present study has an excellent agreement with the existed studies under some special conditions.

  1. Fatigue Performance of Fluidized Bed Heat Treated 319 Alloy Diesel Cylinder Heads

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaudhury, Sujoy K.; Apelian, Diran; Meyer, Philippe; Massinon, Denis; Morichon, Julien

    2015-07-01

    Effects of various heat treatment tempers on fatigue performance of 319 alloy diesel cylinder heads were investigated. Castings were heat treated to T5, T6, and T7 tempers. Castings were solution heat treated and quenched using fluidized beds and aged using both conventional air convective furnace and fluidized bed for T6 and T7 tempers; while they were aged after casting for T5 temper using conventional furnace. Fatigue tests were performed at 373 K (100 °C) and stress ratio equal to -1. Results show that heat treatment has significant effect on the fatigue behavior of 319 alloy. The fatigue strength of T6 tempered 319 alloy is greater than T5 and T7 treatments. Weibull analysis shows that the Weibull modulus and characteristic fatigue life of castings treated (using conventional forced air circulation electrical resistance furnace) to T6 and T7 tempers are greater than T5 temper. This implies that castings treated to T6 and T7 tempers have greater reliability vis-à-vis T5 temper. Fractographic analyses reveal three distinct regions. These are: (I) crack initiation region from the surface, (II) crack propagation region, and (III) catastrophic or monotonic failure region. The relative size of the crack propagation region in T6 and T7 treated samples is greater than T5 treated samples. In general, the monotonic failure region shows typical dimple morphology, which implies significant plastic deformation prior to failure. Dimples on the fractured surface of T5 treated alloy are relatively more faceted than those treated to T6 and T7 tempers. This implies that the 319 alloy treated to T6 and T7 tempers underwent higher degree of plasticity prior to failure than that in the T5 condition.

  2. Buoyancy-driven flows of a radiatively participating fluid in a vertical cylinder heated from below

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salinger, A. G.; Brandon, S.; Aris, R.; Derby, J. J.

    1993-01-01

    The effect of radiative energy transport on the onset and evolution of natural convective flows is studied in a Rayleigh-Benard system. Steady, axisymmetric flows of a radiatively participating fluid contained in a rigid-walled, vertical cylinder which is heated on the base, cooled on top, and insulated on the side wall are calculated by using the Galerkin FEM. Bifurcation analysis techniques are used to investigate the changes in the flow structure due to internal radiation. The results of this two-parameter study - where the Rayleigh number, Ra and optical thickness, tau, are varied - apply to fluids ranging from opaque to nearly transparent with respect to IR radiation. For any nonopaque fluid, internal radiation eliminates the static state that without radiation, exists for all values of the Rayleigh number. This heat transfer mechanism also destroys a symmetry of the system that relates clockwise and counterclockwise flows. The connectivity between characteristic flow families and the range of Ra where families are stable are found to depend greatly on tau. Results demonstrate the inadequacy of characterizing the behavior of this system using simple notions of radiative transfer in optically thick or thin media; the nonlinear interaction of radiation and flow are far more complicated than these asymptotic limits would imply.

  3. Microstructure and Mechanical Properties of Heat-Treated B319 Alloy Diesel Cylinder Heads

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaudhury, S. K.; Apelian, D.; Meyer, P.; Massinon, D.; Morichon, J.

    2015-07-01

    Microstructure and mechanical properties of B319 alloy diesel cylinder heads were investigated in this study. Cylinder heads were heat treated to T5, T6, and T7 tempers using fluidized bed technology. Three different fluidized beds were used, each to solutionize, quench, and age the castings. For comparative purposes, castings were also aged using conventional forced-air circulation electric-resistance furnace. Effects of processing parameters such as temperature, time, and heating rate on microstructural evolution and mechanical properties namely tensile properties and hardness of B319 alloy castings were studied. The number density and size range of precipitates were measured. Results show that the T5 temper has no effect on eutectic phases such as Si- and Fe-rich intermetallic, and Al2Cu. On contrary, both T6 and T7 tempers result in spherodization of the eutectic Si and partial dissolution of the Al2Cu phase. Prolonged solution heat treatment for 8 hours in fluidized bed results in limited dissolution of the secondary eutectic Al2Cu phase. Aging (T6, T7, and T5) results in precipitation of Al5Cu2Mg8Si6 and Al2Cu phases in B319 alloy. The number density of precipitates in T6 temper is greater than in T7 and T5 tempers. The number density of precipitates is also affected by the duration of solution heat treatment. In general, long solution heat treatment (8 hours) results in greater precipitate density than short solution treatment (2 hours). The distribution of precipitates is inhomogeneous and varied across the dendritic structure. In general, precipitation rate of Al5Cu2Mg8Si6 phase is greater near the periphery of the dendrite as compared to the center. This is because Al5Cu2Mg8Si6 nucleates on Si particle, grain boundaries, and triple junction between recrystallized Al grains and Si particles. Similarly, heterogeneous sites such as grain boundaries and Al/Si interface also act as nucleating sites for the precipitation of Al2Cu phase. In general, the

  4. An experimental investigation of the flow past a finite circular cylinder at a low subcritical Reynolds number

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Budair, M.; Ayoub, A.; Karamcheti, K.

    1981-01-01

    Results of hot wire measurements made in the near wake at a Reynolds number of 9955 are reported. The measurements include the mean velocity profiles, root mean square values of the velocity fluctuations, frequency spectra, and velocity cross correlations. The mean velocity profiles were used to determine the wake width, whose variation in the downstream and spanwise directions was examined. It is observed that close to the cylinder, the wake is narrower toward the free end than it is away from it, while further downstream the wake is wider toward the tip than it is away from it. It is found that the flow over the span can be characterized by four regions: a tip region where vortex shedding occurs at a lower frequency than that prevalent for away from the tip; an intermediate region adjacent to the first one where a frequency component of a nonshedding character is present; a third region characterized by a gradually increasing shedding frequency with increasing distance from the tip; and a two dimensional region where the shedding frequency is constant.

  5. LES of fluid and heat flow over a wall-bounded short cylinder at different inflow conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borello, D.; Hanjalić, K.

    2011-12-01

    We report on LES studies of flow patterns, vortical structures and heat transfer in flows over a short single cylinder of diameter D placed in a plane channel of height h = 0.4D in which the bottom wall is heated. The Reynolds number of 6150, based on D, corresponds to the water experiments reported by Sahin et al. (2008). For the basic computational domain of 24×14×0.4D three different inflow conditions have been considered: a non-turbulent flow with a uniform initial velocity developing along the channel (NT), a fully developed channel flows (FD) (generated a priori) and periodic conditions (PC). The latter boundary conditions have also been considered for two shorter domain lengths of 6D and 3D corresponding to a cylinder in a compact matrix. For the long domain, despite the length of the channel of 9.5 D before (and after) the cylinder, the inlet conditions show strong effects on the formation and evolution of the multiple vortex systems both in front and behind the cylinder, influencing significantly also friction and heat transfer. Simulations show some agreement with experimental data though the comparison is impaired by the uncertainty in the experimental inflow conditions. For the shortest cylinder spacing the wake never closes and the flow shows enhanced unsteadiness and turbulence level. Interestingly, the comparison for the same short domain (3Dx3D) using the mean temperature at the inflow to this domain as a reference shows the lowest average base-wall Nusselt number in the PC 3D case that corresponds to compact heat exchangers.

  6. Unsteady flow and heat transfer in a channel with a built-in tandem of rectangular cylinders

    SciTech Connect

    Valencia, A.

    1996-05-10

    The incompressible unsteady flow past a channel with a pair of cylinders of rectangular cross section, placed in tandem normal to the flow, is investigated by numerical simulation. The objective is to evaluate the effect of cylinder separation distance, S/H, on the flow behavior and heat transfer on the channel walls, over a range of Reynolds numbers. Above a critical Reynolds number, these flows bifurcate to a time-periodic self-sustained oscillatory state. The results reveal for S/H = 2.0 three distinct flow patterns: steady flow (Re = 200), time-periodic oscillatory state (400 {le} Re {le} 800), and quasi-periodic oscillatory flow (Re = 1,000). For S/H < 2.0 the intercylinder flow consists of a pair of steady counterrotating eddies that do not exchange fluid with the surrounding and unsteady eddies. Eddy shedding is observed only for the downstream cylinder for Re > 600.

  7. Buoyancy and blockage effects on transient laminar opposing mixed convection heat transfer from two horizontal confined isothermal cylinder in tandem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martínez-Suástegui, Lorenzo; Salcedo, Erick; Cajas, Juan; Treviño, César

    2015-11-01

    Transient mixed convection in a laminar cross-flow from two isothermal cylinders in tandem arrangement confined inside a vertical channel is studied numerically using the vorticity-stream function formulation of the unsteady two-dimensional Navier-Stokes and energy equations. Numerical experiments are performed for a Reynolds number based on cylinder diameter of Re = 200, Prandtl number of Pr = 7, blockage ratio of D/H = 0.2, a pitch-to-diameter ratio of L/D = 2, and several values of buoyancy strength or Richardson number Ri = Gr/Re2. The results reported herein demonstrate how the wall confinement, interference effects and opposing buoyancy affect the flow structure and heat transfer characteristics of the cylinder array. This research was supported by the Consejo Nacional de Ciencia y Tecnología (CONACYT), Grant number 167474 and by the Secretaría de Investigación y Posgrado del IPN, Grant number SIP 20141309.

  8. Boiling heat transfer with three fluids in small circular and rectangular channels

    SciTech Connect

    Tran, T.N.; Wambsganss, M.W.; France, D.M.

    1995-01-01

    Small circular and noncircular channels are representative of flow passages act evaporators and condensers. This report describes results of an ental study on heat transfer to the flow boiling of refrigerants (R-12) and refrigerant-134a (R-134a) in a small horizontal circular-cross-section tube. The tube diameter of 2.46 mm was chosen to approximate the hydraulic diameter of a 4.06 {times} 1.70 mm rectangular channel previously studied with R-12, and a 2.92-mm-diameter circular tube previously studied with R-113. The objective of this study was to assess the effects of channel geometry and fluid properties on the heat transfer coefficient and to obtain additional insights relative to the heat transfer mechanism(s). The current circular flow channel for the R-12 and R-134a tests was made of brass and had an overall length of 0.9 in. The channel wall was electrically heated, and thermocouples were installed on the channel wall and in the bulk fluid stream. Voltage taps were located at the same axial locations as the stream thermocouples to allow testing over an exit quality range to 0.94 and a large range of mass flux (58 to 832 kg/m{sup 2}s) and heat flux (3.6 to 59 kW/m{sup 2}). Saturation pressure was nearly constant, averaging 0.82 MPa for most of the testing, with some tests performed at a lower pressure of 0.4--0.5 MPa. Local heat transfer coefficients were determined experimentally as a function of quality along the length of the test section. Analysis of all data for three tubes and three fluids supported the conclusion that a nucleation mechanism dominates for flow boiling in small channels. Nevertheless, a convection-dominant region was obtained experimentally in this study at very low values of wall superheat (< {approx} 2.75{degrees}C). The circular and rectangular tube data for three fluids were successfully correlated in the nucleation-dominant region.

  9. Circular radiation heat shields with temperature dependent emissivities: transient and steady-state analyses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, H.; Li, X.; Hu, S.; Li, Z.; Chen, A.

    2016-03-01

    Radiation heat loss is an important type of heat loss in thermal systems. In this work, a numerical study of the transient response of two circular radiation heat shields inserted between two parallel and circular surfaces of emissivities ɛ1 and ɛ2 is presented. The same dimensions have been assumed for the two main radiating surfaces and the two radiation shields. The radiation shields are assumed to have different emissivities on their top (ɛ3 and ɛ5) and bottom ( ɛ4 and ɛ6) surfaces, and both are assumed to be different but linear functions of temperature. A specific configuration is investigated in detail to highlight the transient temperature and heat transfer characteristics of the system. Some new results for the transient temperature and heat transfer characteristics of the system such as the effect of shield location, shield emissivities, the temperature dependence of shield emissivities, system dimensions, temperatures of the hot and cold surfaces and emissivities of the hot and cold surfaces are presented for future references. It has been observed that increasing the temperature of the first radiation shield by changing a parameter such as surface emissivity or distance between the radiation shield or the temperature of the hot surface, will not necessarily decrease the temperature of the second radiation shield.

  10. Passive heat transfer augmentation in a cylindrical annulus utilizing multiple perturbations on the inner and outer cylinders

    SciTech Connect

    Iyer, S.V.; Vafai, K.

    1999-05-14

    The study of natural convection flow and heat transfer within a cylindrical annulus has received considerable attention because of its numerous applications, such as in nuclear reactor design, electronic component cooling, thermal storage systems, energy conservation, energy storage, and energy transmission. Here, the effects of multiple geometric perturbations on the inner and outer cylinders of an annulus with impermeable end walls are investigated in this work. A three-dimensional study was done using a numerical scheme based on a Galerkin method of finite element formulation. The nature of the buoyancy-induced flow field has been analyzed in detail. The flow fields for the cases considered were found to be qualitatively similar, and the introduction of each additional perturbation altered the flow field in a regular and recurring manner. The introduction of each perturbation on the outer cylinder causes clockwise and counterclock-wise rotating patterns on either side of the perturbation in the upper circumferential regions of the annulus. The motion of the fluid entrained by these circulatory patterns constitutes the key features of the flow pattern observed in the annulus. It is observed that the presence of multiple perturbations on the inner and outer cylinders substantially increases the overall heat transfer rate as compared to the regular annulus without any perturbation. Key qualitative and quantitative effects of the introduction of perturbations on both the inner and outer cylinders of the annulus are discussed.

  11. High temperature tribology for piston ring and cylinder liner in advanced low heat rejection engines

    SciTech Connect

    Kamo, L.S.; Kleyman, A.S.; Bryzik, W.; Mekari, M.

    1996-12-31

    High temperature tribology research efforts being pursued at Adiabatics are directed in the area of post treatment densified plasma sprayed coatings. Previous work has yielded good results for laboratory bench tests using no liquid lubrication. The process infiltrates a thermal sprayed coating layer with Chrome Oxide and Phosphate Glass compounds which serve to enhance the mechanical bond of a thermal sprayed layer, while improving its internal integrity, and sealing off open porosity. It has been applied to over 150 different wear combinations. Of these tests, Iron Oxide based coatings versus Molybdenum alloy materials provide the best results. Testing in a modified Low Heat Rejection (LHR) single cylinder diesel engine proved this wear combination superior to the state of the art materials available today. These data show improvement over past research efforts directed at developing solid lubricants, but they do not achieve goals set for operation in future advanced military LHR diesel powerplants. Through involvement with the support of the US Army Tank Automotive Research Development and Engineering Center (TARDEC) the authors have predetermined a goal of attaining bench test friction coefficients of {mu}{sub f} < 0.10, and material wear rates {le}1.0 mg/hr, at a temperature of 540 C. The research efforts discussed in this paper, focus on optimizing material friction and wear combinations and their interaction with liquid lubricants to generate boundary lubrication effects noted in previous studies and their correlation to advanced diesel engine design.

  12. Magnetohydrodynamic Flow by a Stretching Cylinder with Newtonian Heating and Homogeneous-Heterogeneous Reactions.

    PubMed

    Hayat, T; Hussain, Zakir; Alsaedi, A; Farooq, M

    2016-01-01

    This article examines the effects of homogeneous-heterogeneous reactions and Newtonian heating in magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) flow of Powell-Eyring fluid by a stretching cylinder. The nonlinear partial differential equations of momentum, energy and concentration are reduced to the nonlinear ordinary differential equations. Convergent solutions of momentum, energy and reaction equations are developed by using homotopy analysis method (HAM). This method is very efficient for development of series solutions of highly nonlinear differential equations. It does not depend on any small or large parameter like the other methods i. e., perturbation method, δ-perturbation expansion method etc. We get more accurate result as we increase the order of approximations. Effects of different parameters on the velocity, temperature and concentration distributions are sketched and discussed. Comparison of present study with the previous published work is also made in the limiting sense. Numerical values of skin friction coefficient and Nusselt number are also computed and analyzed. It is noticed that the flow accelerates for large values of Powell-Eyring fluid parameter. Further temperature profile decreases and concentration profile increases when Powell-Eyring fluid parameter enhances. Concentration distribution is decreasing function of homogeneous reaction parameter while opposite influence of heterogeneous reaction parameter appears.

  13. Magnetohydrodynamic Flow by a Stretching Cylinder with Newtonian Heating and Homogeneous-Heterogeneous Reactions.

    PubMed

    Hayat, T; Hussain, Zakir; Alsaedi, A; Farooq, M

    2016-01-01

    This article examines the effects of homogeneous-heterogeneous reactions and Newtonian heating in magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) flow of Powell-Eyring fluid by a stretching cylinder. The nonlinear partial differential equations of momentum, energy and concentration are reduced to the nonlinear ordinary differential equations. Convergent solutions of momentum, energy and reaction equations are developed by using homotopy analysis method (HAM). This method is very efficient for development of series solutions of highly nonlinear differential equations. It does not depend on any small or large parameter like the other methods i. e., perturbation method, δ-perturbation expansion method etc. We get more accurate result as we increase the order of approximations. Effects of different parameters on the velocity, temperature and concentration distributions are sketched and discussed. Comparison of present study with the previous published work is also made in the limiting sense. Numerical values of skin friction coefficient and Nusselt number are also computed and analyzed. It is noticed that the flow accelerates for large values of Powell-Eyring fluid parameter. Further temperature profile decreases and concentration profile increases when Powell-Eyring fluid parameter enhances. Concentration distribution is decreasing function of homogeneous reaction parameter while opposite influence of heterogeneous reaction parameter appears. PMID:27280883

  14. Magnetohydrodynamic Flow by a Stretching Cylinder with Newtonian Heating and Homogeneous-Heterogeneous Reactions

    PubMed Central

    Hayat, T.; Hussain, Zakir; Alsaedi, A.; Farooq, M.

    2016-01-01

    This article examines the effects of homogeneous-heterogeneous reactions and Newtonian heating in magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) flow of Powell-Eyring fluid by a stretching cylinder. The nonlinear partial differential equations of momentum, energy and concentration are reduced to the nonlinear ordinary differential equations. Convergent solutions of momentum, energy and reaction equations are developed by using homotopy analysis method (HAM). This method is very efficient for development of series solutions of highly nonlinear differential equations. It does not depend on any small or large parameter like the other methods i. e., perturbation method, δ—perturbation expansion method etc. We get more accurate result as we increase the order of approximations. Effects of different parameters on the velocity, temperature and concentration distributions are sketched and discussed. Comparison of present study with the previous published work is also made in the limiting sense. Numerical values of skin friction coefficient and Nusselt number are also computed and analyzed. It is noticed that the flow accelerates for large values of Powell-Eyring fluid parameter. Further temperature profile decreases and concentration profile increases when Powell-Eyring fluid parameter enhances. Concentration distribution is decreasing function of homogeneous reaction parameter while opposite influence of heterogeneous reaction parameter appears. PMID:27280883

  15. Torsion of Noncircular Composite Cylinders

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rouse, Marshall; Hyer, Michael W.; Haynie, Waddy T.

    2005-01-01

    The paper presents a brief overview of the predicted deformation and failure characteristics of noncircular composite cylinders subjected to torsion. Using a numerical analysis, elliptical cylinders with a minor-to-major diameter ratio of 0.7 are considered. Counterpart circular cylinders with the same circumference as the elliptical cylinders are included for comparison. The cylinders are constructed of a medium-modulus graphite-epoxy material in a quasi-isotropic lay-up. Imperfections generated from the buckling mode shapes are included in the initial cross-sectional geometry of the cylinders. Deformations until first fiber failure, as predicted using the maximum stress failure criterion and a material degradation scheme, are presented. For increasing levels of torsion, the deformations of the elliptical cylinders, in the form of wrinkling of the cylinder wall, occur primarily in the flatter regions of the cross section. By comparison the wrinkling deformations of the circular cylinders are more uniformly distributed around the circumference. Differences in the initial failure and damage progression and the overall torque vs. twist relationship between the elliptical and circular cylinders are presented. Despite differences in the response as the cylinders are being loaded, at first fiber failure the torque and twist for the elliptical and circular cylinders nearly coincide.

  16. Heat Transfer from Cylinders in Transition From Slip Flow to Free-Molecule Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cybulski, Ronald J.; Baldwin, Lionel V.

    1959-01-01

    Over 600 measured heat-transfer coefficients in the transition from slip to free-molecule flow have been correlated by using the Nusselt number Nu as a function of the Knudsen Kn and Reynolds Re (or Mach M) numbers. The experimental range for these heat-transfer data from transverse cylinders in air corresponds to the following dimensionless groups: M, 0.10 to 0.90; Re, 0.03 to 11.5; Kn, 0.10 to 5.0. The total air temperature T(sub t) was maintained constant at 80 F, but wire temperature was Varied from 150 to 580 F. At Kn=0.10, Nu extrapolates smoothly into slip-flow empirical curves that show Nu as a function of Re and M or Kn. The correlation gradually changes from the square root of Re(sub t) dependence characteristic of continuum flow to first-power Re dependence as Kn increases (decreasing Re). At the experimental limit Kn ft 5.0, the Nu data correlate with a mean fractional error of 413 percent by the prediction of free-molecule-flow theory. In comparing experimental results with theory, an accommodation coefficient of 0.57+/-0.07 was inferred from the heat-transfer data, which were obtained with etched tungsten wire in air. The wire recovery temperature T(sub e) was measured and compared with existing data and theory in terms of a ratio eta(equivalent to T(sub e)/T(sub t). The results can be divided into three groups by Kn criteria: For Kn less than 2.01, eta is independent of Kn, and eta decreases from 1.0 to 0.97 as M increases from 0 to 0.90; for 2.0 less than Kn less than 5.0, eta is a function of both Kn and M in this transition region to fully developed free-molecule flow; and for Kn greater than 5.0, eta predicted by free-molecule-flow theory is observed and increases from 1.0 to 1.08 as M increases from 0 to 0.90, again independent of Kn. Therefore, these T(sub e) data provide a guide to the boundary of fully developed free-molecule flow, which is.inferred from this research to exist for Kn greater than 5.0. This boundary criterion is substantiated

  17. An experimental study on a suction flow control method to reduce the unsteadiness of the wind loads acting on a circular cylinder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Wen-Li; Li, Hui; Hu, Hui

    2014-04-01

    An experimental investigation was conducted to assess the effectiveness of a suction flow control method for vortex-induced vibration (VIV) suppression. The flow control method uses a limited number of isolated suction holes to manipulate the vortex shedding in the wake behind a circular cylinder in order to reduce the unsteadiness of the dynamic wind loads acting on the cylinder. The experimental study was performed at Re ≈ 3.0 × 104, i.e., in the typical Reynolds number range of VIV for the cables of cable-stayed bridges. In addition to measuring the surface pressure distributions to determine the resultant dynamic wind loads acting on the test model, a digital particle image velocimetry system was used to conduct detailed flow field measurements to reveal the changes in the shedding process of the unsteady wake vortex structures from the test model with and without the suction flow control. The effects of important controlling parameters (i.e., the azimuthal locations of the suction holes in respect to the oncoming airflow, the spanwise spacing between the suction holes, and the suction flow rate through the suction holes) on the wake flow characteristics, the surface pressure distributions, and the resultant dynamic wind loads were assessed quantitatively. While a higher suction flow rate and smaller spanwise spacing between the suction holes were beneficial to the effectiveness of the suction flow control, the azimuthal locations of the suction holes were found to be very critical for reducing the fluctuating amplitudes of the dynamic wind loads acting on the test model using the suction flow control method. With the suction holes located at the proper azimuthal locations on the test model (i.e., at the azimuthal angle of θ = 90° and 270° for the present study), the characteristics of the wake flow behind the test model were found to change significantly along the entire span of the test model, even though only a limited number of the isolated suction

  18. Dissipated energy and entropy production for an unconventional heat engine: the stepwise `circular cycle'

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    di Liberto, Francesco; Pastore, Raffaele; Peruggi, Fulvio

    2011-05-01

    When some entropy is transferred, by means of a reversible engine, from a hot heat source to a colder one, the maximum efficiency occurs, i.e. the maximum available work is obtained. Similarly, a reversible heat pumps transfer entropy from a cold heat source to a hotter one with the minimum expense of energy. In contrast, if we are faced with non-reversible devices, there is some lost work for heat engines, and some extra work for heat pumps. These quantities are both related to entropy production. The lost work, i.e. ? , is also called 'degraded energy' or 'energy unavailable to do work'. The extra work, i.e. ? , is the excess of work performed on the system in the irreversible process with respect to the reversible one (or the excess of heat given to the hotter source in the irreversible process). Both quantities are analysed in detail and are evaluated for a complex process, i.e. the stepwise circular cycle, which is similar to the stepwise Carnot cycle. The stepwise circular cycle is a cycle performed by means of N small weights, dw, which are first added and then removed from the piston of the vessel containing the gas or vice versa. The work performed by the gas can be found as the increase of the potential energy of the dw's. Each single dw is identified and its increase, i.e. its increase in potential energy, evaluated. In such a way it is found how the energy output of the cycle is distributed among the dw's. The size of the dw's affects entropy production and therefore the lost and extra work. The distribution of increases depends on the chosen removal process.

  19. Experimental studies of effects of tilt and structural asymmetry on vibration characteristics of thin-wall circular cylinders partly filled with liquid

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herr, R. W.

    1978-01-01

    The effects of tilt and structural asymmetry on the vibration characteristics of partly liquid-filled thin-wall cylinders were experimentally studied. It was found that tilting the longitudinal axis of a partly filled axisymmetric cylinder from the vertical could markedly reduce its resonant frequencies and change significantly the shape of the circumferential modes. For the minimum frequency modes, vibratory motion occurred only on that side of the cylinder where the liquid was deepest. An empirical equation was derived that gives the equivalent liquid depth of an untilted cylinder having the same minimum resonant frequency as a tilted, partly filled cylinder. Circumferential mode shapes of an untilted asymmetric cylinder were similar to those of the tilted, partly filled axisymmetric cylinder. Vibratory motion in the minimum frequency modes occurred in most instances only on the side of minimum thickness. Correlation between test data and results from a reformulated NASTRAN hydroelastic analysis was excellent.

  20. Development status on a TPV cylinder for combined heat and electric power for the home

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fraas, Lewis; Samaras, John; Huang, Han-Xiang; Seal, Michael; West, Edward

    1999-03-01

    Several first-generation water-cooled TPV cylinders have been built and tested. The existing units contain 380 GaSb cells mounted on 20 circuits; the design and test results on these photovoltaic converter arrays are presented here. Tested with a 1600 °C glowbar, one of these cylinders generated 990 Watts from a cell active area of 396 cm2, which is an electric power density of 2.5 Watts per cm2. A second-generation design is presented, using a new shingled circuit assembly. These shingled circuits allow for a slightly larger cylinder design with nearly double the cell active area. Using a SiC emitter operating at 1425 °C, this second-generation cylinder should produce over 1.5 kW of power with improved efficiency.

  1. Heating Rate Distributions at Mach 10 on a Circular Body Earth-to-Orbit Transport Vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wells, William L.; MacConochie, Ian O.; Helms, Vernon T., III; Raney, David

    1985-01-01

    Among the concepts being considered for future Earth-to-orbit transport vehicles are fully reusable single-stage systems which take off vertically and land horizontally. Because these vehicles carry their own propellant internally, they are much larger than the present Space Shuttle Orbiter. One such single-stage vehicle under study is the circular body configuration which has the advantages of simple structural design and large volume-to-weight ratio. As part of an overall evaluation of this configuration, a series of heat transfer and surface flow tests were conducted. The phase-change paint and oil-flow tests were performed in the Langley 31-Inch Mach-10 Tunnel at angles of attack from 20 through 40 degrees in 5-degree increments. Heat-transfer coefficient data are presented for all angles of attack and detailed oil-flow photographs are shown for windward and leeward surfaces at 25 and 40 degrees angle of attack. In many ways, heating was similar to that previously determined for the Shuttle Orbiter so that, in a cursory sense, existing thermal protection systems would appear to be adequate for the proposed circular-body configurations.

  2. Correlation formulas for the frost thickness and heat transfer coefficient on a cylinder in humid air cross flow

    SciTech Connect

    Sengupta, S.; Sherif, S.A.; Wong, K.V.

    1995-12-31

    This paper reports on results of an experimental investigation where the emphasis was placed on obtaining empirical correlations for the frost thickness-time history and the heat transfer coefficient-time history for a cylinder in humid air cross flow. The facility employed for the investigation consisted of a low velocity wind tunnel comprised of a rectangular test section, a transition section and a honeycomb placed at the tunnel entrance. An external refrigerator was used to cool an antifreeze solution having a mixture of 90% methanol and 10% ethylene glycol. Measured parameters included, among other things, the heat transfer coefficient as well as the frost thickness.

  3. Investigation of Separation and the Associated Heat-Transfer and Pressure Distribution on Cone-Cylinder-Flare Configurations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schaefer, John W.; Ferguson, Harold

    1962-01-01

    The separated region across the cylinder-flare junction of a conecylinder-flare configuration and its effect on the overall heat-transfer and pressure distributions were investigated at a Mach number of 4.98. Results are presented for pure laminar and transitional separation and for both laminar and turbulent attached flow on a 15 deg half-angle cone-cylinder model with conical flare afterbodies of 10 deg, 17 deg, 24 deg, and. 56 deg half-angles. The free-stream unit Reynolds number ranged from l.6x10(sup 6)to 5.5x(sup 6) ft(sup -1)and the wall temperature from T(sub w/T(sub aw) = 0.18 to 1.0. The extent of a pure laminar separation and a transitional separation was found to decrease with wall cooling, decreasing flare angle, and increasing unit Reynolds number. The heat transfer at reattachment and downstream was dependent on the type of separation - pure laminar or transitional. Low heat-transfer rates were found downstream of a pure laminar separation. For transitional separation, the heat transfer downstream of reattachment was at the high values associated with a thin turbulent boundary layer, with peak heating in the vicinity of reattachment.

  4. Effect of swirl flow on heat transfer characteristics in a circular pipe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siddique, Hossain; Hoque, Md. Shafkat Bin; Ali, Mohammad

    2016-07-01

    Swirl flow is of great stature in heat transfer enhancement and in numerous engineering applications. In the present numerical study, the swirl flow of water in a circular pipe is considered. Here the Reynolds Number is kept within 2000. The pipe contains stationary blades to produce the swirl flow. The blades are considered heat resistant. The three-dimensional Navier-Stokes equations for incompressible Newtonian fluid flow are used. The code is corroborated by comparing the simulation results with the established Hagen-Poiseuille law. The comparison is quite satisfactory and thus the code is used for present investigation. In this study, the heat transfer performance of the swirl flow is evaluated. Two cases are considered on the outer surface of the pipe: (i) Constant heat flux and (ii) Constant temperature. This investigation reveals that the swirl flow increases the mean outlet temperature in both cases. The effects of the vane angle, pipe length and diameter on heat transfer characteristics are also evaluated.

  5. Transient heat transfer in viscous rarefied gas between concentric cylinders. Effect of curvature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gospodinov, P.; Roussinov, V.; Dankov, D.

    2015-10-01

    The thermoacoustic waves arising in cylindrical or planar Couette rarefied gas flow between rotating cylinders is studied in the cases of suddenly cylinder (active) wall velocity direction turn on. An unlimited increase in the radius of the inner cylinder flow can be interpreted as Couette flow between the two flat plates. Based on the developed in previous publications Navier-Stockes-Fourier (NSF) model and Direct Simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) method and their numerical solutions, are considered transient processes in the gas phase. Macroscopic flow characteristics (velocity, density, temperature) are received. The cylindrical flow cases for fixed velocity and temperature of the both walls are considered. The curvature effects over the wave's distribution and attenuation are studied numerically.

  6. Compressibility and Heating Effects on Pressure Loss and Cooling of a Baffled Cylinder Barrel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldstein, Arthur W; Ellerbrock, Herman H , Jr

    1944-01-01

    Theoretical investigations have shown that, because air is compressible, the pressure-drop requirements for cooling an air-cooled engine will be much greater at high altitudes and high speeds than at sea level and low speeds. Tests were conducted by the NACA to obtain some experimental confirmation of the effect of air compressibility on cooling and pressure loss of a baffled cylinder barrel and to evaluate various methods of analysis. The results reported in the present paper are regarded as preliminary to tests on single-cylinder and multicylinder engines. Tests were conducted over a wide range of air flows and density altitudes.

  7. Numerical solution of Williamson fluid flow past a stretching cylinder and heat transfer with variable thermal conductivity and heat generation/absorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malik, M. Y.; Bibi, M.; Khan, Farzana; Salahuddin, T.

    2016-03-01

    In this article, Williamson fluid flow and heat transfer over a stretching cylinder is discussed. The thermal conductivity is assumed to be vary linearly with temperature. Heat generation/absorption effects are also taken into account. Modeled partial differential equations are converted into ordinary differential form by using appropriate transformations. Shooting method in conjunction with Runge-Kutta-Fehlberg method is used to find the solution of the problem. Moreover, the effects of different flow parameters γ, λ, ɛ, β and Pr on velocity and temperature profiles are shown graphically. Local Nusselt number and skin friction coefficient are shown in tabular and graphical form.

  8. Effect of heat treatment on longitudinal gas and liquid permeability of circular and square-shaped native hardwood specimens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taghiyari, Hamid Reza; Moradi Malek, Bahman

    2014-08-01

    Effects of heat-treatment on longitudinal permeability of circular and square wood specimens were studied here. Specimens were heated to 50, 75, 100, 125, 150, and 185 °C. Results showed that permeability increased at the lowest temperature due to shrinkage; then, it decreased due to irreversible hydrogen bonding and stiffness. The highest temperature increased permeability due to micro-cracks. The higher perimeter in the square specimens aggravated the effects of heat treatment.

  9. Viscous dissipation and thermal radiation effects on the magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) flow and heat transfer over a stretching slender cylinder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalteh, M.; Ghorbani, S.; Khademinejad, T.

    2016-05-01

    An axisymmetric magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) boundary layer flow and heat transfer of a fluid over a slender cylinder are investigated numerically. The effects of viscous dissipation, thermal radiation, and surface transverse curvature are taken into account in the simulations. For this purpose, the governing partial differential equations are transformed to ordinary differential equations by using appropriate similarity transformations. The resultant ordinary differential equations along with appropriate boundary conditions are solved by the fourth-order Runge-Kutta method combined with the shooting technique. The effects of various parameters on the velocity and temperature profiles, local skin friction coefficient, and Nusselt number are analyzed.

  10. Convective heat transfer in the laminar-turbulent transition region with molten salt in a circular tube

    SciTech Connect

    Yu-ting, Wu; Bin, Liu; Chong-fang, Ma; Hang, Guo

    2009-10-15

    In order to understand the heat transfer characteristics of molten salt and testify the validity of the well-known empirical convective heat transfer correlations, experimental study on transition convective heat transfer with molten salt in a circular tube was conducted. Molten salt circulations were realized and operated in a specially designed system over 1000 h. The average forced convective heat transfer coefficients of molten salt were determined by least-squares method based on the measured data of flow rates and temperatures. Finally, a heat transfer correlation of transition flow with molten salt in a circular tube was obtained and good agreement was observed between the experimental data of molten salt and the well-known correlations presented by Hausen and Gnielinski, respectively. (author)

  11. Cylinder Test Specification

    SciTech Connect

    Richard Catanach; Larry Hill; Herbert Harry; Ernest Aragon; Don Murk

    1999-10-01

    The purpose of the cylinder testis two-fold: (1) to characterize the metal-pushing ability of an explosive relative to that of other explosives as evaluated by the E{sub 19} cylinder energy and the G{sub 19} Gurney energy and (2) to help establish the explosive product equation-of-state (historically, the Jones-Wilkins-Lee (JWL) equation). This specification details the material requirements and procedures necessary to assemble and fire a typical Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) cylinder test. Strict adherence to the cylinder. material properties, machining tolerances, material heat-treatment and etching processes, and high explosive machining tolerances is essential for test-to-test consistency and to maximize radial wall expansions. Assembly and setup of the cylinder test require precise attention to detail, especially when placing intricate pin wires on the cylinder wall. The cylinder test is typically fired outdoors and at ambient temperature.

  12. Experimental investigation of nucleate boiling heat transfer mechanisms for cylinders in water and FC-72

    SciTech Connect

    Ammerman, C.N.; You, S.M.; Hong, Y.S.

    1995-12-31

    A recently developed photographic method is used to quantify vapor volumetric flow rate above a boiling wire. The volumetric flow rate is combined with additional analyses to determine the overall contributions to the total heat flux from four nucleate boiling heat transfer mechanisms (latent heat, natural convection, Marangoni flow, and micro-convection). This technique is used to quantify the boiling heat transfer mechanisms versus heat flux for a 510-{micro}m wire immersed in saturated water and in water with a small amount of liquid soap added. These data are compared with similar data taken for a 75-{micro}m wire boiling in saturated FC-72. For all cases, latent heat is the dominant heat transfer mechanism in the fully developed nucleate boiling regime. In addition, the latent heat component is significantly increased by the addition of small amounts of soap (surfactant).

  13. Numerical and experimental investigations of heat transfer enhancement in circular tubes with transverse twisted-baffles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nanan, K.; Piriyarungrod, N.; Thianpong, C.; Wongcharee, K.; Eiamsa-ard, S.

    2016-10-01

    Transverse twisted-baffles (T-TBs) and transverse baffles (TBs) were employed for heat transfer enhancement in circular tubes. The experimental and numerical studies were carried out to investigate heat transfer, friction loss and thermal performance factor associated with the use of the baffles (T-TBs/TBs). The studies encompass three different baffle width ratios ( w/ D = 0.1, 0.2 and 0.3, for TBs and T-TBs), three baffle twist ratios ( y/ w = 2.0, 3.0 and 4.0, for T-TBs) and Reynolds numbers from 6000 to 20,000. The experimental results reveal that at similar conditions, thermal performance factors of the tubes with the T-TBs are consistently higher than those of the ones with the TBs. This is attributed to the superior heat transfer enhancement with lower pressure drop penalty as the beneficial effects given by the T-TBs, as compared to those given by the TBs. For T-TBs, thermal performance factor increases as baffle width ratio ( w/ D) increases and twist ratio ( y/ w) decreases. The T-TBs with the smallest twist ratio ( y/ w = 2.0) give higher thermal performance factors than the ones with 3.0 and 4.0 by around 4.7-6.1 and 10.2-15 %, respectively. For the studied range, the T-TBs with the optimal geometric parameters, ( y/ w = 2.0 and w/ D = 0.3), give the thermal performance factors in a range of 1.46-1.69.

  14. LES and Hybrid LES/RANS Study of Flow and Heat Transfer around a Wall-Bounded Short Cylinder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borello, D.; Delibra, G.; Hanjalić, K.; Rispoli, F.

    The flow in plate-fin-and-tube heat exchangers is featured by interesting dynamics of vortical structures, which, due to close proximity of bounding walls that suppress instabilities, differs significantly from the better-known patterns around long cylinders. Typically, several distinct vortex systems can be identified both in front and behind the pin. Their signature on the pin and end-walls reflects directly in the local heat transfer. The Reynolds numbers is usually moderate and the incoming flow is non-turbulent, transiting to turbulence on or just behind the first or few subsequent pin/tube rows. Upstream from the first pin a sequence of several horseshoe vortices attached to the boundingwall is created, while the unsteady wake contains also multiple vortical systems which control the entrainment of fresh fluid and its mixing with the hot fluid that was in contact with the heated surfaces [1]. The conventional CFD using standard turbulence models, as practiced by heat exchangers industries, falls short in capturing the subtle details of the complex vortex systems. A fine-grid LES can provide accurate solutions, but for more complex configurations and higher Re numbers a hybrid RANS/LES using a coarser grid seems a more rational option, provided it can capture all important flow and vortical features.

  15. Heat Transfer and Flow of a Casson Fluid Due to a Stretching Cylinder with the Soret and Dufour Effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahdy, A.

    2015-07-01

    Numerical solutions of the problem on flow and heat transfer of a non-Newtonian fluid outside a stretching permeable cylinder are obtained with regard to suction or blowing and the Soret and Dufour effects. The Casson fluid model is used to characterize the non-Newtonian fluid behavior. The governing partial differential equations are reduced to a system of nonlinear ordinary differential equations by employing similarity transformations, and the obtained equations are solved numerically by using the shooting technique. The main purpose of the study is to investigate the effect of the governing parameters, namely, the Casson, Soret, and Dufour parameters, the suction/injection parameter, and the Prandtl and Reynolds numbers, on the velocity and temperature profiles, as well as on the skin friction coefficient and temperature gradient at the surface.

  16. Mixed Convection Flow of Viscoelastic Fluid by a Stretching Cylinder with Heat Transfer

    PubMed Central

    Hayat, Tasawar; Anwar, Muhammad Shoaib; Farooq, Muhammad; Alsaedi, Ahmad

    2015-01-01

    Flow of viscoelastic fluid due to an impermeable stretching cylinder is discussed. Effects of mixed convection and variable thermal conductivity are present. Thermal conductivity is taken temperature dependent. Nonlinear partial differential system is reduced into the nonlinear ordinary differential system. Resulting nonlinear system is computed for the convergent series solutions. Numerical values of skin friction coefficient and Nusselt number are computed and discussed. The results obtained with the current method are in agreement with previous studies using other methods as well as theoretical ideas. Physical interpretation reflecting the contribution of influential parameters in the present flow is presented. It is hoped that present study serves as a stimulus for modeling further stretching flows especially in polymeric and paper production processes. PMID:25775032

  17. Mixed convection flow of viscoelastic fluid by a stretching cylinder with heat transfer.

    PubMed

    Hayat, Tasawar; Anwar, Muhammad Shoaib; Farooq, Muhammad; Alsaedi, Ahmad

    2015-01-01

    Flow of viscoelastic fluid due to an impermeable stretching cylinder is discussed. Effects of mixed convection and variable thermal conductivity are present. Thermal conductivity is taken temperature dependent. Nonlinear partial differential system is reduced into the nonlinear ordinary differential system. Resulting nonlinear system is computed for the convergent series solutions. Numerical values of skin friction coefficient and Nusselt number are computed and discussed. The results obtained with the current method are in agreement with previous studies using other methods as well as theoretical ideas. Physical interpretation reflecting the contribution of influential parameters in the present flow is presented. It is hoped that present study serves as a stimulus for modeling further stretching flows especially in polymeric and paper production processes.

  18. Periodic steamwise variations of heat transfer coefficients for incline and staggered arrays of circular jets with crossflow of spent air

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Florschuetz, L. W.; Metzger, D. E.; Berry, R. A.

    1979-01-01

    Heat transfer characteristics were measured for inline and staggered arrays of circular jets impinging on a surface parallel to the jet orifice plate. The impinging flow was constrained to exit in a single direction along the channel formed by the jet plate and the heat transfer surface. In this configuration the air discharged from upstream transverse rows of jet holes imposes a crossflow of increasing magnitude on the succeeding downstream jet rows. Streamwise heat transfer coefficient profiles were determined for a streamwise resolution of one-third the streamwise hole spacing, utilizing a specially constructed test surface.

  19. Pool boiling heat transfer of water/ γ-alumina micro-fluids around the horizontal cylinder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikkhah, V.; Hormozi, F.

    2016-04-01

    A set of experiments was performed to quantify the pool boiling heat transfer coefficient of water/ γ-alumina micro-fluids at mass concentration ranged from 0.1 to 0.4 % of micro-particles with mean size of 1-2 μm. To stabilize the prepared micro-fluid, pH control, stirring and adding the SDS as a surfactant were carried out. Also, thermal conductivity of micro-fluids are measured using KD2 decagon pro. Results showed that micro-fluids have relatively higher thermal conductivity rather than the base fluids. According to the results, there are two distinguishable heat transfer regions namely natural convection and nucleate boiling regions. Influence of some operating parameters such as heat flux, mass concentration of micro-particles and surface fouling resistance on the pool boiling heat transfer coefficient were experimentally studied and briefly discussed. Results demonstrated a significant deterioration of heat transfer coefficient of micro-fluids in comparison with the base fluid over the extended time (1000 min of operation) in nucleate boiling region, while in natural convection region, enhancement of heat transfer coefficient is registered. According to the results, heat transfer coefficient is strongly controlled by/ γ-alumina concentration due to the deposition of micro-particles on the heating section. Rectilinear changes of scale formation with time in term of fouling resistance were clearly seen at regions, where natural convection is a dominant heat transfer mechanism and also for higher heat fluxes at nucleate boiling heat transfer region.

  20. Method for Calculation of Laminar Heat Transfer in Air Flow Around Cylinders of Arbitrary Cross Section (including Large Temperature Differences and Transpiration Cooling)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eckert, E R; Livingood, John N B

    1953-01-01

    The solution of heat-transfer problems has become vital for many aeronautical applications. The shapes of objects to be cooled can often be approximated by cylinders of various cross sections with flow normal to the axis as, for instance heat transfer on gas-turbine blades and on air foils heated for deicing purposes. A laminar region always exists near the stagnation point of such objects. A method previously presented by E. R. G. Eckert permits the calculation of local heat transfer around the periphery of cylinders of arbitrary cross section in the laminar region for flow of a fluid with constant property values with an accuracy sufficient for engineering purposes. The method is based on exact solutions of the boundary-layer equations for incompressible wedge-type flow and on the postulate that at any point on the cylinder the boundary-layer growth is the same as that on a wedge with comparable flow conditions. This method is extended herein to take into account the influence of large temperature differences between the cylinder wall and the flow as well as the influence of transpiration cooling when the same medium as the outside flow is used as coolant.

  1. Experimental investigation of convection heat transfer of CO{sub 2} at supercritical pressures in a vertical circular tube

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Zhi-Hui; Jiang, Pei-Xue; Zhao, Chen-Ru; Zhang, Yu.

    2010-11-15

    The convection heat transfer characteristics of supercritical CO{sub 2} in a vertical circular tube of 2 mm inner diameter were investigated experimentally for pressures ranging from 78 to 95 bar, inlet temperatures from 25 to 40 C, and inlet Reynolds numbers from 3800 to 20,000. The effects of the heat flux, thermo-physical properties, buoyancy and thermal acceleration on the convection heat transfer were analyzed. The experimental results show that for high inlet Reynolds numbers (e.g. Re = 9000) and high heat fluxes, a significant local deterioration and recovery of the heat transfer was found for upward flows but not for downward flows. Comparison of the experimental data for inlet Reynolds numbers from 3800 to 20,000 with some well-known empirical correlations showed large differences especially when the heat transfer deteriorates and then recovers when the effect of buoyancy is significant. The experimental data was used to develop modified local turbulent Nusselt number correlations for supercritical CO{sub 2} flowing in vertical small circular tubes. (author)

  2. Analytical expression of the force due to multiple TM plane-wave incidences on an infinite lossless dielectric circular cylinder of arbitrary size

    SciTech Connect

    Grzegorczyk, Tomasz M.; Kong, Jin Au

    2007-03-15

    A closed-form expression of the force on an infinite lossless dielectric cylinder illuminated by a TM incidence (electric field parallel to the cylinder's axis) is derived. The formula, expressed as a simple sum, is straightforward to compute and is shown to be faster converging than the direct application of the Maxwell stress tensor and the expansion of the fields in the cylindrical coordinate system. A generalization of the formula to multiple incidences is provided and is illustrated by studying the force due to a Gaussian beam on cylinders of various parameters. We show in this way that the effects of the gradient of the intensity profile on the transverse and longitudinal confinements are decoupled, due to the permittivity contrast and to the size of the particle. Since the formula we derive is exact and is therefore not limited to the Rayleigh or ray optics regime, we expect it to be important for the modeling of optical forces on elongated particles of arbitrary sizes.

  3. Ignition of fuel issuing from a porous cylinder located adjacent to a heated wall: a numerical study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elmahi, I.; Benkhaldoun, F.; Borghi, R.; Raghay, S.

    2004-12-01

    This work deals with the numerical simulation on an unstructured mesh of the ignition and burning in an oxidizing atmosphere of a fuel droplet heated on one side. This is relevant for studying the ignition of droplets in a spray when they are crossing a flame zone stabilized in it. The droplet here is replaced by a porous cylinder, and the flame by a hot solid wall. The reaction is assumed to be described by a single step, A + ngrB rarr P. The cell-centred finite volume scheme considered here uses a generalized Roe's approximate Riemann solver with the monotonic upwind scheme for conservative laws (MUSCL) technique for the convective part and Green-Gauss type interpolation for the viscous part. The thinness of the reaction zone is taken into account by using an adaptive refinement-unrefinement procedure. It has been found that the process of droplet ignition takes place by means of a propagation of a triple flame around the 'droplet' when the chemical reaction is sufficiently fast with respect to the molecular heat and mass diffusion process.

  4. Design and fabrication of circular and rectangular components for electron-cyclotron-resonant heating of tandem mirror experiment-upgrade

    SciTech Connect

    Felker, B.; Calderon, M.O.; Chargin, A.K.; Coffield, F.E.; Lang, D.D.; Rubert, R.R.; Pedrotti, L.R.; Stallard, B.W.; Gallagher, N.C. Jr.; Sweeney, D.W.

    1983-11-18

    The electron-cyclotron-resonant heating (ECRH) systems of rectangular waveguides on Tandem Mirror Experiment-Upgrade (TMX-U) operated with a overall efficiency of 50%, each system using a 28-GHz, 200-kW pulsed gyrotron. We designed and built four circular-waveguide systems with greater efficiency and greater power-handling capabilities to replace the rectangular waveguides. Two of these circular systems, at the 5-kG second-harmonic heating locations, have a total transmission efficiency of >90%. The two systems at the 10-kG fundamental heating locations have a total transmission efficiency of 80%. The difference in efficiency is due to the additional components required to launch the microwaves in the desired orientation and polarization with respect to magnetic-field lines at the 10-kG points. These systems handle the total power available from each gyrotron but do not have the arcing limitation problem of the rectangular waveguide. Each system requires several complex components. The overall physical layout and the design considerations for the rectangular and circular waveguide components are described here.

  5. Free-Flight Investigation of Heat Transfer to an Unswept Cylinder Subjected to an Incident Shock and Flow Interference from an Upstream Body at Mach Numbers up to 5.50

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carter, Howard S.; Carr, Robert E.

    1961-01-01

    Heat-transfer rates have been measured in free flight along the stagnation line of an unswept cylinder mounted transversely on an axial cylinder so that the shock wave from the hemispherical nose of the axial cylinder intersected the bow shock of the unswept transverse cylinder. Data were obtained at Mach numbers from 2.53 to 5.50 and at Reynolds numbers based on the transverse cylinder diameter from 1.00 x 10(exp 6) to 1.87 x 10(exp 6). Shadowgraph pictures made in a wind tunnel showed that the flow field was influenced by boundary-layer separation on the axial cylinder and by end effects on the transverse cylinder as well as by the intersecting shocks. Under these conditions, the measured heat-transfer rates had inconsistent variations both in magnitude and distribution which precluded separating the effects of these disturbances. The general magnitude of the measured heating rates at Mach numbers up to 3 was from 0.1 to 0.5 of the theoretical laminar heating rates along the stagnation line for an infinite unswept cylinder in undisturbed flow. At Mach numbers above 4 the measured heating rates were from 1.5 to 2 times the theoretical rates.

  6. Calculation of Flow Fields from Bow-Wave Profiles for the Downstream Region of Blunt-Nosed Circular Cylinders in Axial Hypersonic Flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seiff, Alvin; Whiting, Ellis E.

    1961-01-01

    A method by which known bow-wave profiles may be analyzed to give the flow fields around blunt-nosed cylinders in axial hypersonic flow is presented. In the method, the assumption is made that the pressure distribution curve in a transverse plane is similar to that given by blast- wave theory. Numerical analysis based on the one-dimensional energy and continuity equations then leads to distributions of all the flow variables in the cross section, for either a perfect gas or a real gas. The entire flow field need not be solved. Attention can be confined to any desired station. The critical question is the validity of the above assumption. It is tested for the case of a hemisphere cylinder in flight at 20,000 ft/sec. The flow is analyzed for three stations along the cylindrical afterbody, and found to compare very closely with the results of an exact (inviscid) solution. The assumed form of the pressure distribution occurs at stations as close as 1.2 diameters to the body nose. However, it is suggested that the assumption may not apply this far forward in general, particularly when bodies of nonsmooth contour are considered.

  7. Cooling Characteristics of the V-1650-7 Engine. 1; Coolant-Flow Distribution, Cylinder Temperatures, and Heat Rejections at Typical Operating Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Povolny, John H.; Bogdan, Louis J.

    1947-01-01

    An investigation was conducted to determine the coolant-flow distribu tion, the cylinder temperatures, and the heat rejections of the V-165 0-7 engine . The tests were run a t several power levels varying from minimum fuel consumption to war emergency power and at each power l evel the coolant flows corresponded to the extremes of those likely t o be encountered in typical airplane installations, A mixture of 30-p ercent ethylene glycol and 70-percent water was used as the coolant. The temperature of each cylinder was measured between the exhaust val ves, between the intake valves, in the center of the head, on the exh aust-valve guide, at the top of the barrel on the exhaust side, and o n each exhaust spark-plug gasket. For an increase in engine power fro m 628 to approximately 1700 brake horsepower the average temperature for the cylinder heads between the exhaust valves increased from 437 deg to 517 deg F, the engine coolant heat rejection increased from 12 ,600 to 22,700 Btu. per minute, the oil heat rejection increased from 1030 to 4600 Btu per minute, and the aftercooler-coolant heat reject ion increased from 450 to 3500 Btu -per minute.

  8. Finite-element design of a guarded heating cylinder to measure thermal properties of materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nicolas, J.; Martin, F.; Andre, Ph.; Rivez, J.-F.

    1990-12-01

    A device for the measurement of thermal properties of phase change materials and, in general, of medium thermal conductivity materials, is described. The measuring cell is a modified version of the guarded hot plate technique, here designed for about 8-cm-diam samples. A well-known difficulty arises in such a device: its limitation when the sample cross section becomes too small with respect to its thickness. A finite-element model is used to study the shape of isotherms in a thick sample (10 cm) for different configurations of the measuring device. This analysis has led to the selection of the optimum design. It shows that the instrument is able to handle samples with a diameter to thickness ratio of about 1 so far as the heat transfer coefficient remains beneath some limits (here 100 W/m2 K). The control system is also described and some typical results are presented.

  9. Numerical Study of Enhanced Heat Transfer and Flow of Water-glycol Mixture in Transversely Ribbed Circular Tubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, H. X.; Han, J. T.; Yu, Z. T.; Shao, L.; Wang, M. X.

    2010-03-01

    The enhanced heat transfer and flow of water-glycol mixture in transversely ribbed circular tubes was numerically investigated with a 2D axisymmetric model. A pitch long section was chosen and periodic flow with isothermal surface condition within this tube section was computed with Fluent 6.2. The mean friction factor and heat transfer data are obtained. The influence of different rib height and rib pitch on the enhanced heat transfer and flow behavior was studied. The friction factor was well correlated with e/d, p/d and Re with one equation. No critical e/d, which exists for air, was found and the correlation of Nusselt number with Re, e/d, p/d cannot be correlated with similar equations used for air. This could be due to the uncertainty in computation and further experiments are needed to examine this.

  10. Surface flow and heating distributions on a cylinder in near wake of Aeroassist Flight Experiment (AFE) configuration at incidence in Mach 10 Air

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wells, William L.

    1990-01-01

    Experimental heat transfer distributions and surface streamline directions are presented for a cylinder in the near wake of the Aeroassist Flight Experiment forebody configuration. Tests were conducted in air at a nominal free stream Mach number of 10, with post shock Reynolds numbers based on model base height of 6,450 to 50,770, and angles of attack of 5, 0, -5, and -10 degrees. Heat transfer data were obtained with thin film resistance gage and surface streamline directions by the oil flow technique. Comparisons between measured values and predicted values were made by using a Navier-Stokes computer code.

  11. Numerical analysis of convective heat transfer of nanofluids in circular ducts with two-phase mixture model approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sert, İsmail Ozan; Sezer-Uzol, Nilay

    2016-09-01

    Computational fluid dynamics simulations for initially hydro-dynamically fully developed laminar flow with nanofluids in a circular duct under constant wall temperature condition are performed with two-phase mixture model by using Fluent software. Thermal behaviors of the system are investigated for constant wall temperature condition for Al2O3/water nanofluid. Hamilton-Crosser model and the Brownian motion effect are used for the thermal conductivity model of nanofluid instead of the Fluent default model for mixtures which gives extraordinary high thermal conductivity values and is valid for macro systems. Also, thermal conductivity and viscosity of the base fluid are taken as temperature dependent. The effects of nanoparticle volume fraction, nanoparticle size, and inlet Peclet number on the heat transfer enhancement are investigated. The results are compared with single-phase results which give slightly lower heat transfer coefficient values than the results of two-phase mixture model.

  12. CFD analysis of heat transfer and friction factor charaterstics in a circular tube fitted with horizontal baffles twisted tape inserts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salman, Sami D.; Kadhum, Abdul Amir H.; Takriff, Mohd S.; Bakar Mohamad, Abu

    2013-12-01

    Swirl/vortex flow generator is an important form of passive augmentation techniques. Twisted-tape is one of the most important members of this form which is used extensively in different type heat exchangers. This paper reports the effect of twisted tape inserts on heat transfer and friction factor characteristics in circular tube under constant heat flux and laminar flow conditions using CFD simulation. Plain twisted tape inserts with twist ratios (y = 2.93, 3.91) and baffled twisted tape inserts with twist ratio (y = 2.93) have been used for the simulation using Fluent version 6.3.26. The results obtained by simulation matched with the literature correlations for plain tube with the discrepancy of less than ± 8% for Nusselt number and ± 6.25% for friction factor. The results have also revealed that the heat transfer in term of the Nusselt number enhanced with increases of Reynolds number, decreases of twist ratio and baffle insert. Among the various twist ratios, the twisted tape with twist ratio of y=2.93 and baffle is offered a maximum heat transfer enhancement.

  13. A Direct Numerical Simulation of Annular Two-Phase Laminar Flow and Heat Transfer in a Circular Pipe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tai, Cheng-feng; Chung, J. N.

    2010-06-01

    An accurate finite-volume based numerical method is developed for the direct numerical simulation of two-phase flow dynamics and heat transfer in a circular pipe consisting of a liquid slug translating in a non-reacting gas. This method is built on a sharp interface concept and developed on an Eulerian-Cartesian fixed-grid system with a cut-cell scheme and marker points to track the moving interface. The unsteady, axisymmetric Navier-Stokes equations in both liquid and gas phases are solved separately. The mass continuity and momentum flux conditions are explicitly matched at the true surface phase boundary to determine the interface shape and movement. A quadratic curve fitting algorithm with marker points is used to yield smooth and accurate information of the interface curvatures. Two-phase flow and heat transfer characteristics are predicted for air-water flows under low and high Weber numbers to evaluate the heat transfer enhancement levels due to the moving liquid slug and the effects of surface tension force. The method reported in this paper offers, for the first time, a new capability of simulating two-phase gas-liquid flow dynamics and heat transfer directly without any modeling. This numerical simulation involves liquid phase deformation, moving interface boundary, curvature variations due to surface tension, property jumps, and heat transfer at the interface.

  14. Cooling Characteristics of the V-1650-7 Engine. II - Effect of Coolant Conditions on Cylinder Temperatures and Heat Rejection at Several Engine Powers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Povolny, John H.; Bogdan, Louis J.; Chelko, Louis J.

    1947-01-01

    An investigation has been conducted on a V-1650-7 engine to determine the cylinder temperatures and the coolant and oil heat rejections over a range of coolant flows (50 to 200 gal/min) and oil inlet temperatures (160 to 2150 F) for two values of coolant outlet temperature (250 deg and 275 F) at each of four power conditions ranging from approximately 1100 to 2000 brake horsepower. Data were obtained for several values of block-outlet pressure at each of the two coolant outlet temperatures. A mixture of 30 percent by volume of ethylene glycol and 70-percent water was used as the coolant. The effect of varying coolant flow, coolant outlet temperature, and coolant outlet pressure over the ranges investigated on cylinder-head temperatures was small (0 deg to 25 F) whereas the effect of increasing the engine power condition from ll00 to 2000 brake horsepower was large (maximum head-temperature increase, 110 F).

  15. Minor ion heating in spectra of linearly and circularly polarized Alfvén waves: Thermal and non-thermal motions associated with perpendicular heating

    SciTech Connect

    Dong, Chuanfei

    2014-02-15

    Minor ion (such as He{sup 2+}) heating via nonresonant interaction with spectra of linearly and circularly polarized Alfvén waves (LPAWs and CPAWs hereafter) is studied. The obtained analytic solutions are in good agreement with the simulation results, indicating that newborn ions are heated by low-frequency Alfvén waves with finite amplitude in low-beta plasmas such as the solar corona. The analytic solutions also reproduce the preferential heating of heavy ions in the solar wind. In the presence of parallel propagating Alfvén waves, turbulence-induced particle motion is clearly observed in the wave (magnetic field) polarized directions. After the waves diminish, the newborn ions are heated, which is caused by the phase difference (randomization) between ions due to their different parallel thermal motions. The heating is dominant in the direction perpendicular to the ambient magnetic field. The perpendicular heating, η=(T{sub i⊥}{sup R}−T{sub i0⊥}{sup R})/T{sub i0⊥}{sup R} (where T{sub i0⊥}{sup R} and T{sub i⊥}{sup R} are the perpendicular temperature of species i before and after genuine heating, respectively), in the spectrum of CPAWs is a factor of two stronger than that of LPAWs. Moreover, we also study the effect of field-aligned differential flow speed of species i relative to H{sup +}, δv{sub ip}=(v{sub i}−v{sub p})·B/|B| (where v{sub i} and v{sub p} denote vector velocities of the H{sup +} and species i, respectively), on the perpendicular heating. It reveals that large drift speed, v{sub d}=δv{sub ip}, has an effect on reducing the efficiency of perpendicular heating, which is consistent with observations.

  16. Potential Remedies for the High Synchrotron-Radiation-Induced Heat Load for Future Highest-Energy-Proton Circular Colliders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cimino, R.; Baglin, V.; Schäfers, F.

    2015-12-01

    We propose a new method for handling the high synchrotron radiation (SR) induced heat load of future circular hadron colliders (like FCC-hh). FCC-hh are dominated by the production of SR, which causes a significant heat load on the accelerator walls. Removal of such a heat load in the cold part of the machine, as done in the Large Hadron Collider, will require more than 100 MW of electrical power and a major cooling system. We studied a totally different approach, identifying an accelerator beam screen whose illuminated surface is able to forward reflect most of the photons impinging onto it. Such a reflecting beam screen will transport a significant part of this heat load outside the cold dipoles. Then, in room temperature sections, it could be more efficiently dissipated. Here we will analyze the proposed solution and address its full compatibility with all other aspects an accelerator beam screen must fulfill to keep under control beam instabilities as caused by electron cloud formation, impedance, dynamic vacuum issues, etc. If experimentally fully validated, a highly reflecting beam screen surface will provide a viable and solid solution to be eligible as a baseline design in FCC-hh projects to come, rendering them more cost effective and sustainable.

  17. Potential Remedies for the High Synchrotron-Radiation-Induced Heat Load for Future Highest-Energy-Proton Circular Colliders.

    PubMed

    Cimino, R; Baglin, V; Schäfers, F

    2015-12-31

    We propose a new method for handling the high synchrotron radiation (SR) induced heat load of future circular hadron colliders (like FCC-hh). FCC-hh are dominated by the production of SR, which causes a significant heat load on the accelerator walls. Removal of such a heat load in the cold part of the machine, as done in the Large Hadron Collider, will require more than 100 MW of electrical power and a major cooling system. We studied a totally different approach, identifying an accelerator beam screen whose illuminated surface is able to forward reflect most of the photons impinging onto it. Such a reflecting beam screen will transport a significant part of this heat load outside the cold dipoles. Then, in room temperature sections, it could be more efficiently dissipated. Here we will analyze the proposed solution and address its full compatibility with all other aspects an accelerator beam screen must fulfill to keep under control beam instabilities as caused by electron cloud formation, impedance, dynamic vacuum issues, etc. If experimentally fully validated, a highly reflecting beam screen surface will provide a viable and solid solution to be eligible as a baseline design in FCC-hh projects to come, rendering them more cost effective and sustainable.

  18. Potential Remedies for the High Synchrotron-Radiation-Induced Heat Load for Future Highest-Energy-Proton Circular Colliders.

    PubMed

    Cimino, R; Baglin, V; Schäfers, F

    2015-12-31

    We propose a new method for handling the high synchrotron radiation (SR) induced heat load of future circular hadron colliders (like FCC-hh). FCC-hh are dominated by the production of SR, which causes a significant heat load on the accelerator walls. Removal of such a heat load in the cold part of the machine, as done in the Large Hadron Collider, will require more than 100 MW of electrical power and a major cooling system. We studied a totally different approach, identifying an accelerator beam screen whose illuminated surface is able to forward reflect most of the photons impinging onto it. Such a reflecting beam screen will transport a significant part of this heat load outside the cold dipoles. Then, in room temperature sections, it could be more efficiently dissipated. Here we will analyze the proposed solution and address its full compatibility with all other aspects an accelerator beam screen must fulfill to keep under control beam instabilities as caused by electron cloud formation, impedance, dynamic vacuum issues, etc. If experimentally fully validated, a highly reflecting beam screen surface will provide a viable and solid solution to be eligible as a baseline design in FCC-hh projects to come, rendering them more cost effective and sustainable. PMID:26764998

  19. Influence of the elliptical and circular orifices on the local heat transfer distribution of a flat plate impinged by under-expanded jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vinze, Ravish; Limeye, M. D.; Prabhu, S. V.

    2016-09-01

    Experimental study is carried out to explore the influence of nozzle profile on heat transfer for underexpanded impinging jets. Circular and elliptical orifices are used to generate underexpanded jets for underexpantion ratio ranging from 1.25 to 2.67. The supply pressure maintained in the present study ranges from 2.36 to 5.08 times the ambient pressure. IR thermal imaging camera is used to measure surface temperature of thin foil at different nozzle to plate distances. Shadowgraph and pressure distribution are used to understand the flow structure and distribution of circular and elliptical nozzle. It is observed that plate shock and pressure distribution over the plate have significant influence on the local heat transfer. The performance of the circular orifice is far better at lower z/d. The axis switching is observed for an elliptical orifice. Correlation for local heat transfer predicts Nusselt number comparable within 15 % of experimental results.

  20. Forced and mixed convection heat transfer to supercritical CO{sub 2} vertically flowing in a uniformly-heated circular tube

    SciTech Connect

    Bae, Yoon-Yeong; Kim, Hwan-Yeol; Kang, Deog-Ji

    2010-11-15

    An experiment of heat transfer to CO{sub 2}, which flows upward and downward in a circular tube with an inner diameter of 6.32 mm, was carried out with mass flux of 285-1200 kg/m{sup 2} s and heat flux of 30-170 kW/m{sup 2} at pressures of 7.75 and 8.12 MPa, respectively. The corresponding Reynolds number at the tube test section inlet ranges from 1.8 x 10{sup 4} to 3.8 x 10{sup 5}. The tube inner diameter corresponds to the equivalent hydraulic diameter of the fuel assembly sub-channel, which is being studied at KAERI. Among the tested correlations, the Bishop correlation predicted the experimental data most accurately, but only 66.9% of normal heat transfer data were predicted within {+-}30% error range. The Watts and Chou correlation, which is claimed to be valid for both the normal and deteriorated heat transfer regime, showed unsatisfactory performance. A significant decrease in Nusselt number was observed in the range of 10{sup -6}heat transfer deterioration regime. The heat transfer deteriorated when the value of the buoyancy parameter Gr{sub b}/Re{sub b}{sup 2.7} exceeded 2.0 x 10{sup -5} close to the Jackson and Hall's criterion. As soon as the heat transfer deteriorated, it entered a new regime and did not return to a normal heat transfer regime, although the value of buoyancy parameter Gr{sub b}/Re{sub b}{sup 2.7} reduced below the deterioration criterion 2.0 x 10{sup -5}. It may justify the requirement of developing separate correlations for the normal and deterioration regimes, as proposed in this paper. (author)

  1. Electron heating in radiation-pressure-driven proton acceleration with a circularly polarized laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paradkar, B. S.; Krishnagopal, S.

    2016-02-01

    Dynamics of electron heating in the radiation-pressure-driven acceleration through self-induced transparency (SIT) is investigated with the help of particle-in-cell simulations. The SIT is achieved through laser filamentation which is seeded by the transverse density modulations due to the Rayleigh-Taylor-like instability. We observe stronger SIT induced electron heating for the longer duration laser pulses leading to deterioration of accelerated ion beam quality (mainly energy spread). Such heating can be controlled to obtain a quasimonoenergetic beam by cascaded foils targets where a second foil behind the main accelerating foil acts as a laser reflector to suppress the SIT.

  2. Dual stratified mixed convection flow of Eyring-Powell fluid over an inclined stretching cylinder with heat generation/absorption effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rehman, Khalil Ur; Malik, M. Y.; Salahuddin, T.; Naseer, M.

    2016-07-01

    Present work is made to study the effects of double stratified medium on the mixed convection boundary layer flow of Eyring-Powell fluid induced by an inclined stretching cylinder. Flow analysis is conceded in the presence of heat generation/absorption. Temperature and concentration are supposed to be higher than ambient fluid across the surface of cylinder. The arising flow conducting system of partial differential equations is primarily transformed into coupled non-linear ordinary differential equations with the aid of suitable transformations. Numerical solutions of resulting intricate non-linear boundary value problem are computed successfully by utilizing fifth order Runge-Kutta algorithm with shooting technique. The effect logs of physical flow controlling parameters on velocity, temperature and concentration profiles are examined graphically. Further, numerical findings are obtained for two distinct cases namely, zero (plate) and non-zero (cylinder) values of curvature parameter and the behaviour are presented through graphs for skin-friction coefficient, Nusselt number and Sherwood number. The current analysis is validated by developing comparison with previously published work, which sets a benchmark of quality of numerical approach.

  3. Studies on wake-affected heat transfer around the circular leading edge of blunt body

    SciTech Connect

    Funazaki, K.

    1996-07-01

    Detailed measurements are performed about time-averaged heat transfer distributions around the leading edge of a blunt body, which is affected by incoming periodic wakes from the upstream moving bars. The blunt body is a test model of a front portion of a turbine blade in gas turbines and consists of a semicircular cylindrical leading edge and a flat plate afterbody. A wide range of the steady and unsteady flow conditions are adopted as for the Reynolds number based on the diameter of the leading edge and the bar-passing Strouhal number. The measured heat transfer distributions indicate that the wakes passing over the leading edge cause a significant increase in heat transfer before the separation and the higher Strouhal number results in higher heat transfer. From this experiment, a correlation for the heat transfer enhancement around the leading edge due to the periodic wakes is deduced as a function of the Stanton number and it is reviewed by comparison with the other experimental works.

  4. Axial cylinder internal combustion engine

    SciTech Connect

    Gonzalez, C.

    1992-03-10

    This patent describes improvement in a barrel type internal combustion engine including an engine block having axial-positioned cylinders with reciprocating pistons arranged in a circular pattern: a drive shaft concentrically positioned within the cylinder block having an offset portion extending outside the cylinder block; a wobble spider rotatably journaled to the offset portion; connecting rods for each cylinder connecting each piston to the wobble spider. The improvement comprising: a first sleeve bearing means supporting the drive shaft in the engine block in a cantilevered manner for radial loads; a second sleeve bearing means rotatably supporting the wobble spider on the offset portion of the drive shaft for radial loads; a first roller bearing means positioned between the offset portion of the drive shaft and the wobble spider carrying thrust loadings only; a second roller bearing means carrying thrust loads only reacting to the first roller bearing located on the opposite end of the driveshaft between the shaft and the engine block.

  5. Correlation of cylinder-head temperatures and coolant heat rejections of a multicylinder, liquid-cooled engine of 1710-cubic-inch displacement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lundin, Bruce T; Povolny, John H; Chelko, Louis J

    1949-01-01

    Data obtained from an extensive investigation of the cooling characteristics of four multicylinder, liquid-cooled engines have been analyzed and a correlation of both the cylinder-head temperatures and the coolant heat rejections with the primary engine and coolant variables was obtained. The method of correlation was previously developed by the NACA from an analysis of the cooling processes involved in a liquid-cooled-engine cylinder and is based on the theory of nonboiling, forced-convection heat transfer. The data correlated included engine power outputs from 275 to 1860 brake horsepower; coolant flows from 50 to 320 gallons per minute; coolants varying in composition from 100 percent water to 97 percent ethylene glycol and 3 percent water; and ranges of engine speed, manifold pressure, carburetor-air temperature, fuel-air ratio, exhaust-gas pressure, ignition timing, and coolant temperature. The effect on engine cooling of scale formation on the coolant passages of the engine and of boiling of the coolant under various operating conditions is also discussed.

  6. CFD simulation of the effect of particle size on the nanofluids convective heat transfer in the developed region in a circular tube.

    PubMed

    Davarnejad, Reza; Barati, Sara; Kooshki, Maryam

    2013-12-01

    The CFD simulation of heat transfer characteristics of a nanofluid in a circular tube under constant heat flux was considered using Fluent software (version 6.3.26) in the laminar flow. Al2O3 nanoparticles in water with concentrations of 0.5%, 1.0%, 1.5%, 2% and 2.5% were used in this simulation. All of the thermo-physical properties of nanofluids were assumed to be temperature independent. Two particle sizes with average size of 20 and 50 nm were used in this research. It was concluded that heat transfer coefficient increased by increasing the Reynolds number and the concentration of nanoparticles. The maximum convective heat transfer coefficient was observed at the highest concentration of nano-particles in water (2.5%). Furthermore, the two nanofluids showed higher heat transfer than the base fluid (water) although the nanofluid with particles size of 20 nm had the highest heat transfer coefficient.

  7. Flow Instability Past A Rounded Cylinder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Doohyun; Yang, Kyung-Soo

    2014-11-01

    Numerical simulation of flow past a rounded cylinder has been performed to study the effects of rounding corners of an angulated cylinder on the primary (2D) and the secondary (3D) instabilities associated with the corresponding flow configuration. We consider the rounded cylinders ranging from a square cylinder of height D to a circular cylinder of diameter D by rounding the four corners of a square cylinder with a quarter circle of fixed radius (r) . An immersed boundary method was adopted for implementation of the cylinder cross-sections in a Cartesian grid system. The key parameters are Reynolds number (Re) and corner radius of curvature (r) . Firstly, the characteristics of the primary instability such as critical Reynolds number (Rec) , force coefficients, and Strouhal number for vortex shedding are reported against r. It was found that Rec is maximum at r / D = 0.25, meaning that this flow is more stable than the two extreme cases of the square and circular cylinders. Furthermore, there are the optimal values of r / D for force coefficients, which vary with Re. Secondly, we studied the onset of 3D instabilities by using Floquet stability analysis. It turned out that the criticalities of 3D instability modes are significantly affected by r. This work was supported by the National Research Foundation of Korea (NRF) grant funded by the Korea government (MSIP) (No. 2012R1A2A2A01013019).

  8. Flow-induced vibration of circular cylindrical structures

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, S.S.

    1985-06-01

    This report summarizes the flow-induced vibration of circular cylinders in quiescent fluid, axial flow, and crossflow, and applications of the analytical methods and experimental data in design evaluation of various system components consisting of circular cylinders. 219 figs., 30 tabs. (JDB)

  9. Light-intensity modulator withstands high heat fluxes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maples, H. G.; Strass, H. K.

    1966-01-01

    Mechanism modulates and controls the intensity of luminous radiation in light beams associated with high-intensity heat flux. This modulator incorporates two fluid-cooled, externally grooved, contracting metal cylinders which when rotated about their longitudinal axes present a circular aperture of varying size depending on the degree of rotation.

  10. Mixed convection cooling of a cylinder using slot jet impingement at different circumferential angles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naderipour, S.; Yousefi, T.; Ashjaee, M.; Naylor, D.

    2016-08-01

    An experimental study using Mach-Zehnder interferometer has been carried out to investigate the heat transfer from an isothermal horizontal circular cylinder, which is exposed to an air slot jet at different angles of jet impingement. A square edged nozzle is mounted parallel with the cylinder axis and jet flow impinges on the side of the cylinder at angles Θ = 0°, 30°, 60° and 90°. The Reynolds number varied from 240 to 1900 while the Grashof number and slot- to cylinder-spacing is kept constant at Gr = 22,300 and H/w = 7 respectively. The Richardson number varied from 0.006 to 0.4. The flow field is greatly influenced by the slot exit velocity and the buoyancy force due to density change. The local Nusselt number around the cylinder has been calculated using the infinite fringe interferograms at 10° intervals. Average Nusselt number shows that heat transfer is decreased when the angle of jet impingement is increased .

  11. Measurements of Heat Transfer and Boundary-Layer Transition on an 8-Inch-Diameter Hemisphere-Cylinder in Free Flight for a Mach Number Range of 2.00 to 3.88

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garland, Benjamine J.; Chauvin, Leo T.

    1957-01-01

    Measurements of aerodynamic heat transfer have been made along the hemisphere and cylinder of a hemisphere-cylinder rocket-propelled model in free flight up to a Mach number of 3.88. The test Reynolds number based on free-stream condition and diameter of model covered a range from 2.69 x l0(exp 6) to 11.70 x 10(exp 6). Laminar, transitional, and turbulent heat-transfer coefficients were obtained. The laminar data along the body agreed with laminar theory for blunt bodies whereas the turbulent data along the cylinder were consistently lower than that predicted by the turbulent theory for a flat plate. Measurements of heat transfer at the stagnation point were, in general, lower than the theory for stagnation-point heat transfer. When the Reynolds number to the junction of the hemisphere-cylinder was greater than 6 x l0(exp 6), the transitional Reynolds number varied from 0.8 x l0(exp 6) to 3.0 x 10(exp 6); however, than 6 x l(exp 6) when the Reynolds number to the junction was less, than the transitional Reynolds number varied from 7.0 x l0(exp 6) to 24.7 x 10(exp 6).

  12. Heat Transfer Enhancement in Separated and Vortex Flows

    SciTech Connect

    Richard J. Goldstein

    2004-05-27

    This document summarizes the research performance done at the Heat Transfer Laboratory of the University of Minnesota on heat transfer and energy separation in separated and vortex flow supported by DOE in the period September 1, 1998--August 31, 2003. Unsteady and complicated flow structures in separated or vortex flows are the main reason for a poor understanding of heat transfer under such conditions. The research from the University of Minnesota focused on the following important aspects of understanding such flows: (1) Heat/mass transfer from a circular cylinder; (2) study of energy separation and heat transfer in free jet flows and shear layers; and (3) study of energy separation on the surface and in the wake of a cylinder in crossflow. The current study used three different experimental setups to accomplish these goals. A wind tunnel and a liquid tunnel using water and mixtures of ethylene glycol and water, is used for the study of prandtl number effect with uniform heat flux from the circular cylinder. A high velocity air jet is used to study energy separation in free jets. A high speed wind tunnel, same as used for the first part, is utilized for energy separation effects on the surface and in the wake of the circular cylinder. The final outcome of this study is a substantial advancement in this research area.

  13. Circular Coinduction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosu, Grigore; Goguen, Joseph; Norvig, Peter (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Circular coinduction is a technique for behavioral reasoning that extends cobasis coinduction to specifications with circularities. Because behavioral satisfaction is not recursively enumerable, no algorithm can work for every behavioral statement. However. algorithms using circular coinduction can prove every practical behavioral result that we know. This paper proves the correctness of circular coinduction and some consequences.

  14. Patterns of electronegative ions past a cylinder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiang, Xiaofeng; Wu, Xing; Guo, Li; Ma, Xiaoxun; Xia, Yashen

    2012-10-01

    The behavior of the wake of an electronegative gas flow past either a glass or a magnetic circular cylinder was observed using the smoke wire flow visualization technique. Converging or chaotic vortices for the electronegative flow of air and oxygen past a magnetic cylinder were seen in shedding vortices, especially at higher concentrations of electronegative molecules, eventually leading to the disappearance of a Kármán vortex, possibly due to the effect of ‘interactive solenoids’.

  15. CFD Analysis to Study Effect of Circular Vortex Generator Placed in Inlet Section to Investigate Heat Transfer Aspects of Solar Air Heater

    PubMed Central

    Gawande, Vipin B.; Dhoble, A. S.; Zodpe, D. B.

    2014-01-01

    CFD analysis of 2-dimensional artificially roughened solar air heater duct with additional circular vortex generator, inserted in inlet section is carried out. Circular transverse ribs on the absorber plate are placed as usual. The analysis is done to investigate the effect of inserting additional vortex generator on the heat transfer and flow friction characteristics inside the solar air heater duct. This investigation covers relative roughness pitch in the range of 10 ≤ P/e ≤ 25 and relevant Reynolds numbers in the range of 3800 ≤ Re ≤ 18000. Relative roughness height (e/D) is kept constant as 0.03 for analysis. The turbulence created due to additional circular vortex generator increases the heat transfer rate and at the same time there is also increase in friction factor values. For combined arrangement of ribs and vortex generator, maximum Nusselt number is found to be 2.05 times that of the smooth duct. The enhancement in Nusselt number with ribs and additional vortex generator is found to be 1.06 times that of duct using ribs alone. The maximum increase in friction factor with ribs and circular vortex generator is found to be 2.91 times that of the smooth duct. Friction factor in a combined arrangement is 1.114 times that in a duct with ribs alone on the absorber plate. The augmentation in Thermal Enhancement Factor (TEF) with vortex generator in inlet section is found to be 1.06 times more than with circular ribs alone on the absorber plate. PMID:25254251

  16. CFD analysis to study effect of circular vortex generator placed in inlet section to investigate heat transfer aspects of solar air heater.

    PubMed

    Gawande, Vipin B; Dhoble, A S; Zodpe, D B

    2014-01-01

    CFD analysis of 2-dimensional artificially roughened solar air heater duct with additional circular vortex generator, inserted in inlet section is carried out. Circular transverse ribs on the absorber plate are placed as usual. The analysis is done to investigate the effect of inserting additional vortex generator on the heat transfer and flow friction characteristics inside the solar air heater duct. This investigation covers relative roughness pitch in the range of 10 ≤ P/e ≤ 25 and relevant Reynolds numbers in the range of 3800 ≤ Re ≤ 18000. Relative roughness height (e/D) is kept constant as 0.03 for analysis. The turbulence created due to additional circular vortex generator increases the heat transfer rate and at the same time there is also increase in friction factor values. For combined arrangement of ribs and vortex generator, maximum Nusselt number is found to be 2.05 times that of the smooth duct. The enhancement in Nusselt number with ribs and additional vortex generator is found to be 1.06 times that of duct using ribs alone. The maximum increase in friction factor with ribs and circular vortex generator is found to be 2.91 times that of the smooth duct. Friction factor in a combined arrangement is 1.114 times that in a duct with ribs alone on the absorber plate. The augmentation in Thermal Enhancement Factor (TEF) with vortex generator in inlet section is found to be 1.06 times more than with circular ribs alone on the absorber plate. PMID:25254251

  17. CFD analysis to study effect of circular vortex generator placed in inlet section to investigate heat transfer aspects of solar air heater.

    PubMed

    Gawande, Vipin B; Dhoble, A S; Zodpe, D B

    2014-01-01

    CFD analysis of 2-dimensional artificially roughened solar air heater duct with additional circular vortex generator, inserted in inlet section is carried out. Circular transverse ribs on the absorber plate are placed as usual. The analysis is done to investigate the effect of inserting additional vortex generator on the heat transfer and flow friction characteristics inside the solar air heater duct. This investigation covers relative roughness pitch in the range of 10 ≤ P/e ≤ 25 and relevant Reynolds numbers in the range of 3800 ≤ Re ≤ 18000. Relative roughness height (e/D) is kept constant as 0.03 for analysis. The turbulence created due to additional circular vortex generator increases the heat transfer rate and at the same time there is also increase in friction factor values. For combined arrangement of ribs and vortex generator, maximum Nusselt number is found to be 2.05 times that of the smooth duct. The enhancement in Nusselt number with ribs and additional vortex generator is found to be 1.06 times that of duct using ribs alone. The maximum increase in friction factor with ribs and circular vortex generator is found to be 2.91 times that of the smooth duct. Friction factor in a combined arrangement is 1.114 times that in a duct with ribs alone on the absorber plate. The augmentation in Thermal Enhancement Factor (TEF) with vortex generator in inlet section is found to be 1.06 times more than with circular ribs alone on the absorber plate.

  18. Calculations of Laminar Heat Transfer Around Cylinders of Arbitrary Cross Section and Transpiration-Cooled Walls with Application to Turbine Blade Cooling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eckert, E R G; Livingood, J N B

    1955-01-01

    An approximate method for the development of flow and thermal boundary layers in the laminar region on cylinders with arbitrary cross section and transpiration-cooled walls is obtained by the use of Karman's integrated momentum equation and an analogous heat-flow equation. Incompressible flow with constant property values throughout the boundary layer is assumed. The velocity and temperature profiles within the boundary layer are approximated by expressions composed of trigonometric functions. Shape parameters for these profiles and functions necessary for the solution of the boundary-layer equations are presented as graphs so that the calculation for any specific case is reduced to the solution of two first-order differential equations. This method is applied to determine local heat-transfer coefficients and surface temperatures in the laminar flow region of the transpiration-cooled turbine blades for a given coolant flow rate, or to calculate the coolant flow distribution which is necessary in order to keep the blade temperature uniform along the surface.

  19. A Highly Efficient Six-Stroke Internal Combustion Engine Cycle with Water Injection for In-Cylinder Exhaust Heat Recovery

    SciTech Connect

    Conklin, Jim; Szybist, James P

    2010-01-01

    A concept is presented here that adds two additional strokes to the four-stroke Otto or Diesel cycle that has the potential to increase fuel efficiency of the basic cycle. The engine cycle can be thought of as a 4 stroke Otto or Diesel cycle followed by a 2-stroke heat recovery steam cycle. Early exhaust valve closing during the exhaust stroke coupled with water injection are employed to add an additional power stroke at the end of the conventional four-stroke Otto or Diesel cycle. An ideal thermodynamics model of the exhaust gas compression, water injection at top center, and expansion was used to investigate this modification that effectively recovers waste heat from both the engine coolant and combustion exhaust gas. Thus, this concept recovers energy from two waste heat sources of current engine designs and converts heat normally discarded to useable power and work. This concept has the potential of a substantial increase in fuel efficiency over existing conventional internal combustion engines, and under appropriate injected water conditions, increase the fuel efficiency without incurring a decrease in power density. By changing the exhaust valve closing angle during the exhaust stroke, the ideal amount of exhaust can be recompressed for the amount of water injected, thereby minimizing the work input and maximizing the mean effective pressure of the steam expansion stroke (MEPsteam). The value of this exhaust valve closing for maximum MEPsteam depends on the limiting conditions of either one bar or the dew point temperature of the expansion gas/moisture mixture when the exhaust valve opens to discard the spent gas mixture in the sixth stroke. The range of MEPsteam calculated for the geometry of a conventional gasoline spark-ignited internal combustion engine and for plausible water injection parameters is from 0.75 to 2.5 bars. Typical combustion mean effective pressures (MEPcombustion) of naturally aspirated gasoline engines are up to 10 bar, thus this

  20. Three-Dimensional Thermal Boundary Layer Corrections for Circular Heat Flux Gauges Mounted in a Flat Plate with a Surface Temperature Discontinuity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kandula, M.; Haddad, G. F.; Chen, R.-H.

    2006-01-01

    Three-dimensional Navier-Stokes computational fluid dynamics (CFD) analysis has been performed in an effort to determine thermal boundary layer correction factors for circular convective heat flux gauges (such as Schmidt-Boelter and plug type)mounted flush in a flat plate subjected to a stepwise surface temperature discontinuity. Turbulent flow solutions with temperature-dependent properties are obtained for a free stream Reynolds number of 1E6, and freestream Mach numbers of 2 and 4. The effect of gauge diameter and the plate surface temperature have been investigated. The 3-D CFD results for the heat flux correction factors are compared to quasi-21) results deduced from constant property integral solutions and also 2-D CFD analysis with both constant and variable properties. The role of three-dimensionality and of property variations on the heat flux correction factors has been demonstrated.

  1. Blower Cooling of Finned Cylinders

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schey, Oscar W; Ellerbrock, Herman H , Jr

    1937-01-01

    Several electrically heated finned steel cylinders enclosed in jackets were cooled by air from a blower. The effect of the air conditions and fin dimensions on the average surface heat-transfer coefficient q and the power required to force the air around the cylinders were determined. Tests were conducted at air velocities between the fins from 10 to 130 miles per hour and at specific weights of the air varying from 0.046 to 0.074 pound per cubic foot. The fin dimensions of the cylinders covered a range in pitches from 0.057 to 0.25 inch average fin thicknesses from 0.035 to 0.04 inch, and fin widths from 0.67 to 1.22 inches.

  2. Behavior in normal and reduced gravity of an enclosed liquid/gas system with nonuniform heating from above

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ross, H. D.; Schiller, D. N.; Disimile, P.; Sirignano, W. A.

    1989-01-01

    The temperature and velocity fields have been investigated for a single-phase gas system and a two-layer gas-and-liquid system enclosed in a circular cylinder being heated suddenly and nonuniformly from above. The transient response of the gas, liquid, and container walls was modelled numerically in normal and reduced gravity (10 to the -5 g). Verification of the model was accomplished via flow visualization experiments in 10 cm high by 10 cm diameter plexiglass cylinders.

  3. The influence of rotation on the heat transfer characteristics of circular, triangular and square sectioned coolant passages of gas turbine rotor blades

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harasgama, S. P.; Morris, W. D.

    1987-05-01

    This paper reports on the influence of Coriolis induced secondary flow and centripetal buoyancy on the heat transfer within typical turbine rotor blade cooling passages. The experimental results indicate that for through flow Reynolds numbers up to 30,000 increasing rotational speed tends to increase the mean levels of heat transfer relative to the stationary case when the flow is radially outward. This trend is reversed when the flow is radially inward. Increasing centripetal buoyancy for radially outward flow tends to decrease the mean level of heat transfer and in some cases these levels fall below that of the equivalent stationary values. When the flow is radially inwards, increasing centripetal buoyancy generally results in an increase in mean heat transfer, and in this case increasing buoyancy tends to increase the leading (suction) side heat transfer whilst reducing it on the trailing (pressure) side. Original correlations proposed by Morris et al for leading side heat transfer in a circular duct are shown to hold for triangular and square ducts when the hydraulic diameter concept is used.

  4. Experimental investigation of the unusual behavior of local heat transfer coefficient in the transition region of a circular tube with a bell-mouth entrance

    SciTech Connect

    Tam, L.M.; Ghajar, A.J.

    1996-12-31

    The local heat transfer characteristics for ethylene glycol water mixtures flowing in a horizontal circular straight tube with a bell-mouth inlet have been determined experimentally over a flow Reynolds number range of 1,500 to 27,000. A wall-boundary heating condition of uniform heat flux was imposed. The variation of local heat transfer coefficient with length in the transition and turbulent flow regimes is very unusual. For the bell-mouth inlet, the boundary layer along the tube wall is at first laminar and then changes through a transition region to the turbulent condition causing a dip in the Nu-x/D curve. The length of the dip in the transition region is much longer than that in the turbulent region. For the experiments the length of the dip in the transition region varied from x/D = 100 to 175 in comparison to an x/D < 25 for the turbulent region. The presence of the dip in the transition region causes a significant influence on both the local and the average heat transfer coefficients. This is particularly important for heat transfer calculations in short tubes with a bell-mouth inlet.

  5. Steady natural convection heat transfer experiments in a horizontal annulus for the United States Spent Fuel Shipping Cask Technology Program. [LMFBR

    SciTech Connect

    Boyd, R. D.

    1981-04-01

    This experimental study deals with the measurement of the heat transfer across a horizontal annulus which is formed by an inner hexagonal cylinder and an outer concentric circular cylinder. The geometry simulates, in two dimensions, a liquid metal fast breeder reactor radioactive fuel subassembly inside a shipping container. This geometry is also similar to a radioactive fuel pin inside a horizontal reactor subassembly. The objective of the experiments is to measure the local and mean heat transfer at the surface of the inner hexagonal cylinder.

  6. A new cylinder cooling system using oil

    SciTech Connect

    Harashina, Kenichi; Murata, Katsuhiro; Satoh, Hiroshi; Shimizu, Yasuo; Hamamura, Masahiro

    1995-12-31

    The design of engine cylinders must satisfy two conflicting requirements, good cooling performance and ease of manufacture. A cooling system was designed to permit the circulation of engine lubricating oil as a coolant at high speed through grooves provided on the external periphery of the cylinder liner. Testing in an actual operating engine confirmed that this cooling system design not only provides better heat transfer and higher cooling performance but also simplifies the manufacturing of the cylinder since external cooling fins are not required. In this paper, the authors will discuss the cylinder cooling effect of the new cylinder cooling system, referring mainly to the test results of a single-cylinder motorcycle engine with lubricating oil from the crankcase used as the coolant.

  7. Pressure fluctuations on the surface of a cylinder in uniform flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ayoub, A.; Karamcheti, K.

    1976-01-01

    The problem of determining the pressure fluctuations induced on the surface of a cylinder by the fluctuating wake behind it is formulated. A formal solution relating the unsteady surface pressure field to the velocity field in the wake is derived and used to obtain general results independent of cylinder shape and Reynolds number. The case of the circular cylinder is then examined in detail.

  8. Multi-cylinder hot gas engine

    DOEpatents

    Corey, John A.

    1985-01-01

    A multi-cylinder hot gas engine having an equal angle, V-shaped engine block in which two banks of parallel, equal length, equally sized cylinders are formed together with annular regenerator/cooler units surrounding each cylinder, and wherein the pistons are connected to a single crankshaft. The hot gas engine further includes an annular heater head disposed around a central circular combustor volume having a new balanced-flow hot-working-fluid manifold assembly that provides optimum balanced flow of the working fluid through the heater head working fluid passageways which are connected between each of the cylinders and their respective associated annular regenerator units. This balanced flow provides even heater head temperatures and, therefore, maximum average working fluid temperature for best operating efficiency with the use of a single crankshaft V-shaped engine block.

  9. Numerical investigation of heat transfer and friction factor characteristics in a circular tube fitted with V-cut twisted tape inserts.

    PubMed

    Salman, Sami D; Kadhum, Abdul Amir H; Takriff, Mohd S; Mohamad, Abu Bakar

    2013-01-01

    Numerical investigation of the heat transfer and friction factor characteristics of a circular fitted with V-cut twisted tape (VCT) insert with twist ratio (y = 2.93) and different cut depths (w = 0.5, 1, and 1.5 cm) were studied for laminar flow using CFD package (FLUENT-6.3.26). The data obtained from plain tube were verified with the literature correlation to ensure the validation of simulation results. Classical twisted tape (CTT) with different twist ratios (y = 2.93, 3.91, 4.89) were also studied for comparison. The results show that the enhancement of heat transfer rate induced by the classical and V-cut twisted tape inserts increases with the Reynolds number and decreases with twist ratio. The results also revealed that the V-cut twisted tape with twist ratio y = 2.93 and cut depth w = 0.5 cm offered higher heat transfer rate with significant increases in friction factor than other tapes. In addition the results of V-cut twist tape compared with experimental and simulated data of right-left helical tape inserts (RLT), it is found that the V-cut twist tape offered better thermal contact between the surface and the fluid which ultimately leads to a high heat transfer coefficient. Consequently, 107% of maximum heat transfer was obtained by using this configuration.

  10. Numerical Investigation of Heat Transfer and Friction Factor Characteristics in a Circular Tube Fitted with V-Cut Twisted Tape Inserts

    PubMed Central

    Salman, Sami D.; Kadhum, Abdul Amir H.; Takriff, Mohd S.; Mohamad, Abu Bakar

    2013-01-01

    Numerical investigation of the heat transfer and friction factor characteristics of a circular fitted with V-cut twisted tape (VCT) insert with twist ratio (y = 2.93) and different cut depths (w = 0.5, 1, and 1.5 cm) were studied for laminar flow using CFD package (FLUENT-6.3.26). The data obtained from plain tube were verified with the literature correlation to ensure the validation of simulation results. Classical twisted tape (CTT) with different twist ratios (y = 2.93, 3.91, 4.89) were also studied for comparison. The results show that the enhancement of heat transfer rate induced by the classical and V-cut twisted tape inserts increases with the Reynolds number and decreases with twist ratio. The results also revealed that the V-cut twisted tape with twist ratio y = 2.93 and cut depth w = 0.5 cm offered higher heat transfer rate with significant increases in friction factor than other tapes. In addition the results of V-cut twist tape compared with experimental and simulated data of right-left helical tape inserts (RLT), it is found that the V-cut twist tape offered better thermal contact between the surface and the fluid which ultimately leads to a high heat transfer coefficient. Consequently, 107% of maximum heat transfer was obtained by using this configuration. PMID:24078795

  11. Heat Transfer Enhancement for Finned-tube Heat Exchangers with Winglets

    SciTech Connect

    O'Brien, James Edward; Sohal, Manohar Singh

    2000-11-01

    This paper presents the results of an experimental study of forced convection heat transfer in a narrow rectangular duct fitted with a circular tube and/or a delta-winglet pair. The duct was designed to simulate a single passage in a fin-tube heat exchanger. Heat transfer measurements were obtained using a transient technique in which a heated airflow is suddenly introduced to the test section. High-resolution local fin-surface temperature distributions were obtained at several times after initiation of the transient using an imaging infrared camera. Corresponding local fin-surface heat transfer coefficient distributions were then calculated from a locally applied one-dimensional semi-infinite inverse heat conduction model. Heat transfer results were obtained over an airflow rate ranging from 1.51 x 10-3 to 14.0 x 10-3 kg/s. These flow rates correspond to a duct-height Reynolds number range of 670 – 6300 with a duct height of 1.106 cm and a duct width-toheight ratio, W/H, of 11.25. The test cylinder was sized such that the diameter-to-duct height ratio, D/H is 5. Results presented in this paper reveal visual and quantitative details of local fin-surface heat transfer distributions in the vicinity of a circular tube, a delta-winglet pair, and a combination of a circular tube and a delta-winglet pair. Comparisons of local and average heat transfer distributions for the circular tube with and without winglets are provided. Overall mean finsurface Nusselt-number results indicate a significant level of heat transfer enhancement associated with the deployment of the winglets with the circular cylinder. At the lowest Reynolds numbers (which correspond to the laminar operating conditions of existing geothermal air-cooled condensers), the enhancement level is nearly a factor of two. At higher Reynolds numbers, the enhancement level is close to 50%.

  12. Lattice Boltzmann simulation of a fluid flow around a triangular unit of three isothermal cylinders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alinejad, J.

    2016-01-01

    The lattice Boltzmann method is employed to simulate heat transfer in the flow past three arrangements of elliptical and circular cylinders under an isothermal boundary condition. The lattice Boltzmann equations and the Bhatnagar-Gross-Krook model are used to simulate two-dimensional forced convection at 30 ≤ Re ≤ 100 and Pr = 0.71. Pressure distributions, isotherms, and streamlines are obtained. Vortex shedding maps are observed in detail for several cases. The present results are in good agreement with available experimental and numerical data.

  13. Isometric immersions of a cone and a cylinder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shtogrin, Mikhail I.

    2009-02-01

    We thoroughly analyse the method used by Pogorelov to construct piecewise-smooth tubular surfaces in \\mathbb R^3 isometric to the surface of a right circular cylinder. The properties of the inverse images of edges of any tubular surface on its planar unfolding are investigated in detail. We find conditions on plane curves lying on the unfolding that enable them to be the inverse images of edges of some tubular surface. We make a refinement concerning the number of smooth pieces that form a piecewise-smooth tubular surface. We generalize Pogorelov's method from the surface of a right circular cylinder to that of a right circular cone.

  14. Numerical study of flow and heat-transfer characteristics of cryogenic slush fluid in a horizontal circular pipe (SLUSH-3D)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohira, Katsuhide; Ota, Atsuhito; Mukai, Yasuaki; Hosono, Takumi

    2012-07-01

    Cryogenic slush fluids, such as slush hydrogen and slush nitrogen, are two-phase, single-component fluids containing solid particles in a liquid. Since their density and refrigerant capacity are greater than those of liquid-state fluids alone, there are high expectations for use of slush fluids as functionally thermal fluids in various applications, such as fuels for spacecraft engines, clean energy fuels to improve the efficiency of transportation and storage, and as refrigerants for high-temperature superconducting equipment. In this research, a three-dimensional numerical simulation code (SLUSH-3D), including the gravity effect based on the thermal non-equilibrium, two-fluid model, was constructed to clarify the flow and heat-transfer characteristics of cryogenic slush fluids in a horizontal circular pipe. The calculated results of slush nitrogen flow performed using the numerical code were compared with the authors' experimental results obtained using the PIV method. As a result of these comparisons, the numerical code was verified, making it possible to analyze the flow and heat-transfer characteristics of slush nitrogen with sufficient accuracy. The numerical results obtained for the flow and heat-transfer characteristics of slush nitrogen and slush hydrogen clarified the effects of the pipe inlet velocity, solid fraction, solid particle size, and heat flux on the flow pattern, solid-fraction distribution, turbulence energy, pressure drop, and heat-transfer coefficient. Furthermore, it became clear that the difference of the flow and heat-transfer characteristics between slush nitrogen and slush hydrogen were caused to a large extent by their thermo-physical properties, such as the solid-liquid density ratio, liquid viscosity, and latent heat of fusion.

  15. Turbulent heat transfer and fluid flow measurements downstream of abrupt expansions and in a cavity of a circular tube at a uniform wall temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Daehee

    An experimental investigation was made of the turbulent heat transfer and fluid flow in separated, recirculating and reattached regions created by an axisymmetric and asymmetric abrupt expansions and by an abrupt expansion followed by an abrupt contraction in a circular tube at a uniform wall temperature. The flow just upstream of the expansion was unheated and proved to be fully developed hydrodynamically at the entrance to the heated abrupt expansion region. Measurements were made with small to large diameter ratios of 0.4 and 0.533 and over the Reynolds numbers range of 4100 to 21900. The mean velocity and temperature profiles were measured downstream of an axisymmetric abrupt expansion. Heat transfer coefficients were determined both around the circumference of the tube and along its length. General results indicate a substantial augmentation in the heat transfer coefficients downstream of the flow separation caused by the high turbulence and mixing action, in spite of the mean velocity in the recirculating region being only a few percent of the downstream core flow velocity in the large tube.

  16. Quick release engine cylinder

    DOEpatents

    Sunnarborg, Duane A.

    2000-01-01

    A quick release engine cylinder allows optical access to an essentially unaltered combustion chamber, is suitable for use with actual combustion processes, and is amenable to rapid and repeated disassembly and cleaning. A cylinder member, adapted to constrain a piston to a defined path through the cylinder member, sealingly engages a cylinder head to provide a production-like combustion chamber. A support member mounts with the cylinder member. The support-to-cylinder mounting allows two relationships therebetween. In the first mounting relationship, the support engages the cylinder member and restrains the cylinder against the head. In the second mounting relationship, the cylinder member can pass through the support member, moving away from the head and providing access to the piston-top and head.

  17. CFD analysis of the two-phase bubbly flow characteristics in helically coiled rectangular and circular tube heat exchangers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hussain, Alamin; Fsadni, Andrew M.

    2016-03-01

    Due to their ease of manufacture, high heat transfer efficiency and compact design, helically coiled heat exchangers are increasingly being adopted in a number of industries. The higher heat transfer efficiency over straight pipes is due to the secondary flow that develops as a result of the centrifugal force. In spite of the widespread use of helically coiled heat exchangers, and the presence of bubbly two-phase flow in a number of systems, very few studies have investigated the resultant flow characteristics. This paper will therefore present the results of CFD simulations for the two-phase bubbly flow in helically coiled heat exchangers as a function of the volumetric void fraction and the tube cross-section design. The CFD results are compared to the scarce flow visualisation experimental results available in the open literature.

  18. Heat kernels on cone of AdS2 and k-wound circular Wilson loop in AdS5 × S5 superstring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergamin, R.; Tseytlin, A. A.

    2016-04-01

    We compute the one-loop world-sheet correction to partition function of {{AdS}}5× {{{S}}}5 superstring that should be representing k-fundamental circular Wilson loop in planar limit. The 2d metric of the minimal surface ending on k-wound circle at the boundary is that of a cone of AdS2 with deficit 2π (1-k). We compute the determinants of 2d fluctuation operators by first constructing heat kernels of scalar and spinor Laplacians on the cone using the Sommerfeld formula. The final expression for the k-dependent part of the one-loop correction has simple integral representation but is different from earlier results.

  19. Microwave measurement test results of circular waveguide components for electron cyclotron resonant heating (ECRH) of the Tandem Mirror Experiment-Upgrade (TMX-U)

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, C.W.; Rubert, R.R.; Coffield, F.E.; Felker, B.; Stallard, B.W.; Taska, J.

    1983-12-01

    Development of high-power components for electron cyclotron resonant heating (ECRH) applications requires extensive testing. In this paper we describe the high-power testing of various circular waveguide components designed for application on the Tandem Mirror Experiment-Upgrade (TMX-U). These include a 2.5-in. vacuum valve, polarizing reflectors, directional couplers, mode converters, and flexible waveguides. All of these components were tested to 200 kW power level with 40-ms pulses. Cold tests were used to determine field distribution. The techniques used in these tests are illustrated. The new high-power test facility at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) is described and test procedures are discussed. We discuss the following test results: efficiency at high power of mode converters, comparison of high power vs low power for waveguide components, and full power tests of the waveguide system. We also explain the reasons behind selection of these systems for use on TMX-U.

  20. Numerical study of the enhancement of heat transfer for hybrid CuO-Cu Nanofluids flowing in a circular pipe.

    PubMed

    Balla, Hyder H; Abdullah, Shahrir; Mohdfaizal, Wan; Zulkifli, Rozli; Sopian, Kamaruzaman

    2013-01-01

    A numerical simulation model for laminar flow of nanofluids in a pipe with constant heat flux on the wall was built to study the effect of the Reynolds number on convective heat transfer and pressure loss. The investigation was performed for hybrid nanofluids consisting of CuO-Cu nanoparticles and compared with CuO and Cu in which the nanoparticles have a spherical shape with size 50, 50, 50nm respectively. The nanofluids were prepared, following which the thermal conductivity and dynamic viscosity were measured for a range of temperatures (10 -60°C). The numerical results obtained were compared with the existing well-established correlation. The prediction of the Nusselt number for nanofluids agrees well with the Shah correlation. The comparison of heat transfer coefficients for CuO, Cu and CuO-Cu presented an increase in thermal conductivity of the nanofluid as the convective heat transfer coefficient increased. It was found that the pressure loss increases with an increase in the Reynolds number, nanoparticle density and particle volume fraction. However, the flow demonstrates enhancement in heat transfer which becomes greater with an increase in the Reynolds number for the nanofluid flow.

  1. Heat Transfer Enhancement of Laminar Nanofluids Flow in a Circular Tube Fitted with Parabolic-Cut Twisted Tape Inserts

    PubMed Central

    Salman, Sami D.; Kadhum, Abdul Amir H.; Takriff, Mohd S.; Mohamad, Abu Bakar

    2014-01-01

    Numerical investigation has been carried out on heat transfer and friction factor characteristics of copper-water nanofluid flow in a constant heat-fluxed tube with the existence of new configuration of vortex generator using Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) simulation. Two types of swirl flow generator: Classical twisted tape (CTT) and Parabolic-cut twisted tape (PCT) with a different twist ratio (y = 2.93, 3.91 and 4.89) and different cut depth (w = 0.5, 1.0 and 1.5 cm) with 2% and 4% volume concentration of CuO nanofluid were used for simulation. The effect of different parameters such as flow Reynolds number, twist ratio, cut depth and nanofluid were considered. The results show that the enhancement of heat transfer rate and the friction factor induced by the Classical (CTT) and Parabolic-cut (PCT) inserts increases with twist ratio and cut depth decreases. The results also revealed that the heat transfer enhancement increases with an increase in the volume fraction of the CuO nanoparticle. Furthermore, the twisted tape with twist ratio (y = 2.93) and cut depth w = 0.5 cm offered 10% enhancement of the average Nusselt number with significant increases in friction factor than those of Classical twisted tape. PMID:24605055

  2. Heat transfer enhancement of laminar nanofluids flow in a circular tube fitted with parabolic-cut twisted tape inserts.

    PubMed

    Salman, Sami D; Kadhum, Abdul Amir H; Takriff, Mohd S; Mohamad, Abu Bakar

    2014-01-01

    Numerical investigation has been carried out on heat transfer and friction factor characteristics of copper-water nanofluid flow in a constant heat-fluxed tube with the existence of new configuration of vortex generator using Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) simulation. Two types of swirl flow generator: Classical twisted tape (CTT) and Parabolic-cut twisted tape (PCT) with a different twist ratio (y = 2.93, 3.91 and 4.89) and different cut depth (w = 0.5, 1.0 and 1.5 cm) with 2% and 4% volume concentration of CuO nanofluid were used for simulation. The effect of different parameters such as flow Reynolds number, twist ratio, cut depth and nanofluid were considered. The results show that the enhancement of heat transfer rate and the friction factor induced by the Classical (CTT) and Parabolic-cut (PCT) inserts increases with twist ratio and cut depth decreases. The results also revealed that the heat transfer enhancement increases with an increase in the volume fraction of the CuO nanoparticle. Furthermore, the twisted tape with twist ratio (y = 2.93) and cut depth w = 0.5 cm offered 10% enhancement of the average Nusselt number with significant increases in friction factor than those of Classical twisted tape.

  3. Heat transfer enhancement of laminar nanofluids flow in a circular tube fitted with parabolic-cut twisted tape inserts.

    PubMed

    Salman, Sami D; Kadhum, Abdul Amir H; Takriff, Mohd S; Mohamad, Abu Bakar

    2014-01-01

    Numerical investigation has been carried out on heat transfer and friction factor characteristics of copper-water nanofluid flow in a constant heat-fluxed tube with the existence of new configuration of vortex generator using Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) simulation. Two types of swirl flow generator: Classical twisted tape (CTT) and Parabolic-cut twisted tape (PCT) with a different twist ratio (y = 2.93, 3.91 and 4.89) and different cut depth (w = 0.5, 1.0 and 1.5 cm) with 2% and 4% volume concentration of CuO nanofluid were used for simulation. The effect of different parameters such as flow Reynolds number, twist ratio, cut depth and nanofluid were considered. The results show that the enhancement of heat transfer rate and the friction factor induced by the Classical (CTT) and Parabolic-cut (PCT) inserts increases with twist ratio and cut depth decreases. The results also revealed that the heat transfer enhancement increases with an increase in the volume fraction of the CuO nanoparticle. Furthermore, the twisted tape with twist ratio (y = 2.93) and cut depth w = 0.5 cm offered 10% enhancement of the average Nusselt number with significant increases in friction factor than those of Classical twisted tape. PMID:24605055

  4. Near-wake flow structure of elliptic cylinders close to a free surface: effect of cylinder aspect ratio

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daichin, K. V.; Lee, Sang Joon

    The flow fields behind elliptic cylinders adjacent to a free surface were investigated experimentally in a circulating water channel. A range of cylinder aspect ratios (AR=2, 3, 4) were considered, while the cross-sectional area of the elliptical cylinder was kept constant. The main objective of this study was to investigate the effect of cylinder aspect ratio and a free surface on the flow structure in the near-wake behind elliptic cylinders. For each elliptic cylinder, the flow structure was analyzed for various values of the submergence depth of the cylinder beneath the free surface. The flow fields were measured using a single-frame double-exposure PIV (Particle Image Velocimetry) system. For each experimental condition, 350 instantaneous velocity fields were obtained and ensemble-averaged to obtain the mean velocity field and spatial distribution of the mean vorticity statistics. The results show that near-wake can be classified into three typical flow patterns: formation of a Coanda flow, generation of substantial jet-like flow, and attachment of this jet flow to the free surface. The general flow structure observed behind the elliptic cylinders resembles the structure previously reported for a circular cylinder submerged near a free surface. However, the wake width and the angle of downward deflection of the shear layer developed from the lower surface of the elliptic cylinder differ from those observed for a circular cylinder. These trends are enhanced as cylinder aspect ratio is increased. In addition, the free surface distortion is also discussed in the paper.

  5. Observation of the enhanced backscattering of light by the end of a tilted dielectric cylinder owing to the caustic merging transition.

    PubMed

    Marston, Philip L; Zhang, Yibing; Thiessen, David B

    2003-01-20

    The scattering of light by obliquely illuminated circular dielectric cylinders was previously demonstrated to be enhanced by a merger of Airy caustics at a critical tilt angle. [Appl. Opt. 37, 1534 (1998)]. A related enhancement is demonstrated here for backward and near-backward scattering for cylinders cut with a flat end perpendicular to the cylinder's axis. It is expected that merged caustics will enhance the backscattering by clouds of randomly oriented circular cylinders that have appropriately flat ends.

  6. Measurements of the Flowfield Interaction Between Tandem Cylinders

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neuhart, Dan H.; Jenkins, Luther N.; Choudhari, Meelan M.; Khorrami, Mehdi R.

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents the most recent measurements from an ongoing investigation of the unsteady wake interference between a pair of circular cylinders in tandem. The purpose of this investigation is to help build an in-depth experimental database for this canonical flow configuration that embodies the effects of component interaction in landing gear noise. This new set of measurements augments the previous database at the primary Reynolds number (based on tunnel speed and cylinder diameter) of 1.66 105 in four important respects. First, better circumferential resolution of surface pressure fluctuations is obtained via cylinder "clocking". Second, higher resolution particle image velocimetry measurements of the shear layer separating from the cylinders are achieved. Third, the effects of simultaneous boundary layer trips along both the front and rear cylinders, versus front cylinder alone in the previous measurements, are studied. Lastly, on-surface and off-surface characteristics of unsteady flow near the "critical" cylinder spacing, wherein the flow switches intermittently between two states that are characteristic of lower and higher spacings, are examined. This critical spacing occurs in the middle of a relatively sudden change in the drag of either cylinder and is characterized by a loud intermittent noise and a flow behavior that randomly transitions between shear layer attachment to the rear cylinder and constant shedding and rollup in front of it. Analysis of this bistable flow state reveals much larger spanwise correlation lengths of surface pressure fluctuations than those at larger and smaller values of the cylinder spacing.

  7. Measurement of the flow past a cactus-inspired cylinder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oweis, Ghanem F.; El-Makdah, Adnan M.

    2012-11-01

    Desert cacti are tall cylindrical plants characterized by longitudinal u- or v-shaped grooves that run parallel to the plant axis, covering its surface area. We study the wake flow modifications resulting from the introduction of cactus-inspired surface grooves to a circular cylinder. Particle image velocimetry PIV is implemented in a wind tunnel to visualize and quantify the wake flow from a cactus cylinder in cross wind and an equivalent circular cylinder at Re O(1E5). The cactus wake exhibits superior behavior over its circular counterpart as seen from the mean and turbulent velocity profiles. The surface flow within the grooves is also probed to elucidate the origins of the wake alterations. Lastly, we use simple statistical analysis based only on the wake velocity fields, under the assumption of periodicity of the shedding, to recover the time varying flow from the randomly acquired PIV snapshots.

  8. Numerical study of forced convection flow and heat transfer of a nanofluid flowing inside a straight circular pipe filled with a saturated porous medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baqaie Saryazdi, A.; Talebi, F.; Armaghani, T.; Pop, I.

    2016-04-01

    In this paper, the problem of developing forced convection flow of a nanofluid in a constant-wall-temperature circular tube filled with a porous medium is considered. The flow is steady and Brinkman-Forchheimer-extended Darcy equation model is employed. The thermal-equilibrium model is assumed between nanofluid and solid phase. It is also assumed that nanoparticles are distributed non-uniformly inside the pipe, hence the particles volume fraction equation is also coupled with the governing equations. A numerical study has been performed using the Finite-Volume method to analyze heat transfer coefficient of Al2O3 -water nanofluid. The effects of nanoparticles volume fraction and porosity on fluid flow and heat transfer of nanofluids are studied. The results show that the Nusselt number is increased with increasing particles volume fraction. Moreover, the wall shear stresses are increased. Finally, the effect of porosity on particle volume fraction distribution is studied and discussed in detail. We are confident that the reported results are new and original.

  9. Circular epidemiology.

    PubMed

    Kuller, L H

    1999-11-01

    Circular epidemiology can be defined as the continuation of specific types of epidemiologic studies beyond the point of reasonable doubt of the true existence of an important association or the absence of such an association. Circular epidemiology is an extreme example of studies of the consistency of associations. A basic problem for epidemiology is the lack of a systematic approach to acquiring new knowledge to reach a goal of improving public health and preventive medicine. For epidemiologists, research support unfortunately is biased toward the continued study of already proven hypotheses. Circular epidemiology, however, freezes at one point in the evolution of epidemiologic studies, failing to move from descriptive to analytical case-control and longitudinal studies, for example, to experimental, clinical trials. Good epidemiology journals are filled with very well-conducted epidemiologic studies that primarily repeat the obvious or are variations on the theme.

  10. Effect of random structure on permeability and heat transfer characteristics for flow in 2D porous medium based on MRT lattice Boltzmann method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, PeiPei; Wen, Zhi; Dou, RuiFeng; Liu, Xunliang

    2016-08-01

    Flow and heat transfer through a 2D random porous medium are studied by using the lattice Boltzmann method (LBM). For the random porous medium, the influence of disordered cylinder arrangement on permeability and Nusselt number are investigated. Results indicate that the permeability and Nusselt number for different cylinder locations are unequal even with the same number and size of cylinders. New correlations for the permeability and coefficient b‧Den of the Forchheimer equation are proposed for random porous medium composed of Gaussian distributed circular cylinders. Furthermore, a general set of heat transfer correlations is proposed and compared with existing experimental data and empirical correlations. Our results show that the Nu number increases with the increase of the porosity, hence heat transfer is found to be accurate considering the effect of porosity.

  11. Coupled Thermo-Mechanical Analyses of Dynamically Loaded Rubber Cylinders

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Arthur R.; Chen, Tzi-Kang

    2000-01-01

    A procedure that models coupled thermo-mechanical deformations of viscoelastic rubber cylinders by employing the ABAQUS finite element code is described. Computational simulations of hysteretic heating are presented for several tall and short rubber cylinders both with and without a steel disk at their centers. The cylinders are compressed axially and are then cyclically loaded about the compressed state. The non-uniform hysteretic heating of the rubber cylinders containing a steel disk is presented. The analyses performed suggest that the coupling procedure should be considered for further development as a design tool for rubber degradation studies.

  12. Engine Cylinder Temperature Control

    DOEpatents

    Kilkenny, Jonathan Patrick; Duffy, Kevin Patrick

    2005-09-27

    A method and apparatus for controlling a temperature in a combustion cylinder in an internal combustion engine. The cylinder is fluidly connected to an intake manifold and an exhaust manifold. The method and apparatus includes increasing a back pressure associated with the exhaust manifold to a level sufficient to maintain a desired quantity of residual exhaust gas in the cylinder, and varying operation of an intake valve located between the intake manifold and the cylinder to an open duration sufficient to maintain a desired quantity of fresh air from the intake manifold to the cylinder, wherein controlling the quantities of residual exhaust gas and fresh air are performed to maintain the temperature in the cylinder at a desired level.

  13. Cylinder monitoring program

    SciTech Connect

    Alderson, J.H.

    1991-12-31

    Cylinders containing depleted uranium hexafluoride (UF{sub 6}) in storage at the Department of Energy (DOE) gaseous diffusion plants, managed by Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc., are being evaluated to determine their expected storage life. Cylinders evaluated recently have been in storage service for 30 to 40 years. In the present environment, the remaining life for these storage cylinders is estimated to be 30 years or greater. The group of cylinders involved in recent tests will continue to be monitored on a periodic basis, and other storage cylinders will be observed as on a statistical sample population. The program has been extended to all types of large capacity UF{sub 6} cylinders.

  14. Delamination of Composite Cylinders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davies, Peter; Carlsson, Leif A.

    The delamination resistance of filament wound glass/epoxy cylinders has been characterized for a range of winding angles and fracture mode ratios using beam fracture specimens. The results reveal that the delamination fracture resistance increases with increasing winding angle and mode II (shear) fraction (GΠ/G). It was also found that interlaced fiber bundles in the filament wound cylinder wall acted as effective crack arresters in mode I loading. To examine the sensitivity of delamina-tion damage on the strength of the cylinders, external pressure tests were performed on filament-wound glass/epoxy composite cylinders with artificial defects and impact damage. The results revealed that the cylinder strength was insensitive to the presence of single delaminations but impact damage caused reductions in failure pressure. The insensitivity of the failure pressure to a single delamination is attributed to the absence of buckling of the delaminated sublaminates before the cylinder wall collapsed. The impacted cylinders contained multiple delaminations, which caused local reduction in the compressive load capability and reduction in failure pressure. The response of glass/epoxy cylinders was compared to impacted carbon reinforced cylinders. Carbon/epoxy is more sensitive to damage but retains higher implosion resistance while carbon/PEEK shows the opposite trend.

  15. The structure of Escherichia coli heat-stable enterotoxin b by nuclear magnetic resonance and circular dichroism.

    PubMed Central

    Sukumar, M.; Rizo, J.; Wall, M.; Dreyfus, L. A.; Kupersztoch, Y. M.; Gierasch, L. M.

    1995-01-01

    The heat-stable enterotoxin b (STb) is secreted by enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli that cause secretory diarrhea in animals and humans. It is a 48-amino acid peptide containing two disulfide bridges, between residues 10 and 48 and 21 and 36, which are crucial for its biological activity. Here, we report the solution structure of STb determined by two- and three-dimensional NMR methods. Approximate interproton distances derived from NOE data were used to construct structures of STb using distance-geometry and simulated annealing procedures. The NMR-derived structure shows that STb is helical between residues 10 and 22 and residues 38 and 44. The helical structure in the region 10-22 is amphipathic and exposes several polar residues to the solvent, some of which have been shown to be important in determining the toxicity of STb. The hydrophobic residues on the opposite face of this helix make contacts with the hydrophobic residues of the C-terminal helix. The loop region between residues 21 and 36 has another cluster of hydrophobic residues and exposes Arg 29 and Asp 30, which have been shown to be important for intestinal secretory activity. CD studies show that reduction of disulfide bridges results in a dramatic loss of structure, which correlates with loss of function. Reduced STb adopts a predominantly random-coil conformation. Chromatographic measurements of concentrations of native, fully reduced, and single-disulfide species in equilibrium mixtures of STb in redox buffers indicate that the formation of the two disulfide bonds in STb is only moderately cooperative. Similar measurements in the presence of 8 M urea suggest that the native secondary structure significantly stabilizes the disulfide bonds. PMID:8528070

  16. Integral equation for a strip coil antenna located on a dielectric cylinder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dementyev, A. N.; Klyuev, D. S.; Shatrov, S. A.

    2016-01-01

    The problem about the distribution of the surface current density in a narrow circular strip antenna as an infinitely thin perfectly conducting ribbon folded in a circle and positioned on the surface of a dielectric cylinder is reduced to a one-dimensional integral equation (IE). A method for solving the obtained IE is proposed. Complex distributions of the azimuthal component of the surface current density over the circular conductor are presented for different values of the dielectric permittivity of the cylinder.

  17. Stresses in a two-bay noncircular cylinder under transverse loads

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Griffith, George E

    1952-01-01

    A method, taking into account the effects of flexibility and based on a general eighth-order differential equation, is presented for finding the stresses in a two-bay, noncircular cylinder the cross section of which can be composed of circular arcs. Numerical examples are given for two cases of ring flexibility for a cylinder of doubly symmetrical (essentially elliptic) cross section, subjected to concentrated radial, moment, and tangential loads. The results paralleled those already obtained for shells with circular rings.

  18. Unsteady heat transfer and direct comparison to steady-state measurements in a rotor-wake experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Obrien, J. E.; Simoneau, R. J.; Morehouse, K. A.; Lagraff, J. E.

    1986-01-01

    Circumferentially local and time-resolved heat transfer measurements were obtained for a circular cylinder in crossflow located downstream of a rotating spoked wheel wake generator in a steady flow tunnel. The unsteady heat transfer effects were obtained by developing an extension of a thin film gauge technique employed to date exclusively in short-duration facilities. The time-average thin film results and conventional steady-state heat transfer measurements were compared. Time-averaged wake-induced stagnation heat transfer enhancement levels above the nowake case were about 10 percent for the four cylinder Reynolds numbers. This enhancement level was nearly independent of bar passing frequency and was related directly to the time integral of the heat transfer spikes observed at the bar passing frequency. It is observed that the wake-induced heat transfer spikes have peak magnitudes averaging 30 to 40 percent above the interwake heat transfer level.

  19. Unsteady heat transfer and direct comparison to steady-state measurements in a rotor-wake experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Obrien, J. E.; Simoneau, R. J.; Lagraff, J. E.; Morehouse, K. A.

    1986-01-01

    Circumferentially local and time-resolved heat transfer measurements were obtained for a circular cylinder in crossflow located downstream of a rotating spoked wheel wake generator in a steady flow tunnel. The unsteady heat transfer effects were obtained by developing an extension of a thin film gauge technique employed to date exclusively in short-duration facilities. The time-average thin film results and conventional steady-state heat transfer measurements were compared. Time-averaged wake-induced stagnation heat transfer enhancement levels above the nowake case were about 10% for the four cylinder Reynolds numbers. This enhancement level was nearly independent of bar passing frequency and was related directly to the time integral of the heat transfer spikes observed at the bar passing frequency. It is observed that the wake-induced heat transfer spikes have peak magnitudes averaging 30 to 40% above the interwake heat transfer level.

  20. Ceramics Technology Project database: September 1991 summary report. [Materials for piston ring-cylinder liner for advanced heat/diesel engines

    SciTech Connect

    Keyes, B.L.P.

    1992-06-01

    The piston ring-cylinder liner area of the internal combustion engine must withstand very-high-temperature gradients, highly-corrosive environments, and constant friction. Improving the efficiency in the engine requires ring and cylinder liner materials that can survive this abusive environment and lubricants that resist decomposition at elevated temperatures. Wear and friction tests have been done on many material combinations in environments similar to actual use to find the right materials for the situation. This report covers tribology information produced from 1986 through July 1991 by Battelle columbus Laboratories, Caterpillar Inc., and Cummins Engine Company, Inc. for the Ceramic Technology Project (CTP). All data in this report were taken from the project's semiannual and bimonthly progress reports and cover base materials, coatings, and lubricants. The data, including test rig descriptions and material characterizations, are stored in the CTP database and are available to all project participants on request. Objective of this report is to make available the test results from these studies, but not to draw conclusions from these data.

  1. Classification of the stratified fluid flows regimes around a square cylinder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gushchin, V. A.; Matyushin, P. V.

    2015-10-01

    The 2D density stratified (in vertical direction) viscous fluid flows around a square cylinder with diameter d (moving in horizontal direction with the velocity U) have been simulated on the basis of the Navier-Stokes equations in the Boussinesq approximation. For solving of the Navier-Stokes equations the Splitting on physical factors Method for Incompressible Fluid flows (SMIF) with hybrid explicit finite difference scheme (second-order accuracy in space, minimum scheme viscosity and dispersion, monotonous) has been used. The numerical method SMIF has been successfully applied for solving of the different problems: 2D and 3D separated homogeneous and stratified fluid flows around a sphere and a circular cylinder; the flows with free surface including regimes with broken surface wave; the air, heat and mass transfer in the clean rooms. At the present paper the original refined classification of 2D stratified viscous fluid flow regimes around a square cylinder at Re ≤ 200 has been obtained and the interesting fluid flows with two hanging vortices in the wake and with two wavy hanging sheets of density (connected with two hanging vortices) have been investigated in details at Fr = 0.1, Re = 50, where Re = U.d/ν is the Reynolds number, Fr = U/(N.d) is the internal Froude number, ν is the kinematical viscosity coefficient, N is the buoyancy frequency.

  2. Heat transfer in gas turbine engines; Proceedings of the Symposium, ASME Winter Annual Meeting, San Francisco, CA, Dec. 10-15, 1989

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, J. C.; Mayle, R. E.

    Topics presented include an experimental study of convective heat transfer in radially rotating rectangular ducts, an experimental study of heat transfer in a spanwise rotating channel turbulated with 45 deg. criss-cross ribs, local heat transfer on a flat surface roughened with broken ribs, and turbulent heat transfer and friction in a square channel with discrete rib turbulators. Also presented are simulating transitional flow and heat transfer over the flat plate and circular cylinder using a k-epsilon turbulence model, velocity and temperature profiles for stagnation film cooling, film cooling effectiveness in high turbulence flow, and local convection heat transfer on a plane wall in the vicinity of strong streamwise accelerations.

  3. Cylinder valve packing nut studies

    SciTech Connect

    Blue, S.C.

    1991-12-31

    The design, manufacture, and use of cylinder valve packing nuts have been studied to improve their resistance to failure from stress corrosion cracking. Stress frozen photoelastic models have been analyzed to measure the stress concentrations at observed points of failure. The load effects induced by assembly torque and thermal expansion of stem packing were observed by strain gaging nuts. The effects of finishing operations and heat treatment were studied by the strain gage hole boring and X-ray methods. Modifications of manufacturing and operation practices are reducing the frequency of stress corrosion failures.

  4. Counter-extrapolation method for conjugate interfaces in computational heat and mass transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le, Guigao; Oulaid, Othmane; Zhang, Junfeng

    2015-03-01

    In this paper a conjugate interface method is developed by performing extrapolations along the normal direction. Compared to other existing conjugate models, our method has several technical advantages, including the simple and straightforward algorithm, accurate representation of the interface geometry, applicability to any interface-lattice relative orientation, and availability of the normal gradient. The model is validated by simulating the steady and unsteady convection-diffusion system with a flat interface and the steady diffusion system with a circular interface, and good agreement is observed when comparing the lattice Boltzmann results with respective analytical solutions. A more general system with unsteady convection-diffusion process and a curved interface, i.e., the cooling process of a hot cylinder in a cold flow, is also simulated as an example to illustrate the practical usefulness of our model, and the effects of the cylinder heat capacity and thermal diffusivity on the cooling process are examined. Results show that the cylinder with a larger heat capacity can release more heat energy into the fluid and the cylinder temperature cools down slower, while the enhanced heat conduction inside the cylinder can facilitate the cooling process of the system. Although these findings appear obvious from physical principles, the confirming results demonstrates the application potential of our method in more complex systems. In addition, the basic idea and algorithm of the counter-extrapolation procedure presented here can be readily extended to other lattice Boltzmann models and even other computational technologies for heat and mass transfer systems.

  5. Counter-extrapolation method for conjugate interfaces in computational heat and mass transfer.

    PubMed

    Le, Guigao; Oulaid, Othmane; Zhang, Junfeng

    2015-03-01

    In this paper a conjugate interface method is developed by performing extrapolations along the normal direction. Compared to other existing conjugate models, our method has several technical advantages, including the simple and straightforward algorithm, accurate representation of the interface geometry, applicability to any interface-lattice relative orientation, and availability of the normal gradient. The model is validated by simulating the steady and unsteady convection-diffusion system with a flat interface and the steady diffusion system with a circular interface, and good agreement is observed when comparing the lattice Boltzmann results with respective analytical solutions. A more general system with unsteady convection-diffusion process and a curved interface, i.e., the cooling process of a hot cylinder in a cold flow, is also simulated as an example to illustrate the practical usefulness of our model, and the effects of the cylinder heat capacity and thermal diffusivity on the cooling process are examined. Results show that the cylinder with a larger heat capacity can release more heat energy into the fluid and the cylinder temperature cools down slower, while the enhanced heat conduction inside the cylinder can facilitate the cooling process of the system. Although these findings appear obvious from physical principles, the confirming results demonstrates the application potential of our method in more complex systems. In addition, the basic idea and algorithm of the counter-extrapolation procedure presented here can be readily extended to other lattice Boltzmann models and even other computational technologies for heat and mass transfer systems.

  6. Tandem Cylinder Noise Predictions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lockhard, David P.; Khorrami, Mehdi R.; CHoudhari, Meelan M.; Hutcheson, Florence V.; Brooks, Thomas F.; Stead, Daniel J.

    2007-01-01

    In an effort to better understand landing-gear noise sources, we have been examining a simplified configuration that still maintains some of the salient features of landing-gear flow fields. In particular, tandem cylinders have been studied because they model a variety of component level interactions. The present effort is directed at the case of two identical cylinders spatially separated in the streamwise direction by 3.7 diameters. Experimental measurements from the Basic Aerodynamic Research Tunnel (BART) and Quiet Flow Facility (QFF) at NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC) have provided steady surface pressures, detailed off-surface measurements of the flow field using Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV), hot-wire measurements in the wake of the rear cylinder, unsteady surface pressure data, and the radiated noise. The experiments were conducted at a Reynolds number of 166 105 based on the cylinder diameter. A trip was used on the upstream cylinder to insure a fully turbulent shedding process and simulate the effects of a high Reynolds number flow. The parallel computational effort uses the three-dimensional Navier-Stokes solver CFL3D with a hybrid, zonal turbulence model that turns off the turbulence production term everywhere except in a narrow ring surrounding solid surfaces. The current calculations further explore the influence of the grid resolution and spanwise extent on the flow and associated radiated noise. Extensive comparisons with the experimental data are used to assess the ability of the computations to simulate the details of the flow. The results show that the pressure fluctuations on the upstream cylinder, caused by vortex shedding, are smaller than those generated on the downstream cylinder by wake interaction. Consequently, the downstream cylinder dominates the noise radiation, producing an overall directivity pattern that is similar to that of an isolated cylinder. Only calculations based on the full length of the model span were able to

  7. Safety Analysis Using Lebesgue Strain Measure of Thick-Walled Cylinder for Functionally Graded Material under Internal and External Pressure

    PubMed Central

    Aggarwal, A. K.; Sharma, Richa; Sharma, Sanjeev

    2013-01-01

    Safety analysis has been done for thick-walled circular cylinder under internal and external pressure using transition theory which is based on the concept of generalized principal Lebesgue strain measure. Results have been analyzed theoretically and discussed numerically. From the analysis, it can be concluded that circular cylinder made of functionally graded material is on the safer side of the design as compared to homogeneous cylinder with internal and external pressure, which leads to the idea of “stress saving” that minimizes the possibility of fracture of cylinder. PMID:24089605

  8. Safety analysis using Lebesgue strain measure of thick-walled cylinder for functionally graded material under internal and external pressure.

    PubMed

    Aggarwal, A K; Sharma, Richa; Sharma, Sanjeev

    2013-01-01

    Safety analysis has been done for thick-walled circular cylinder under internal and external pressure using transition theory which is based on the concept of generalized principal Lebesgue strain measure. Results have been analyzed theoretically and discussed numerically. From the analysis, it can be concluded that circular cylinder made of functionally graded material is on the safer side of the design as compared to homogeneous cylinder with internal and external pressure, which leads to the idea of "stress saving" that minimizes the possibility of fracture of cylinder.

  9. Safety analysis using Lebesgue strain measure of thick-walled cylinder for functionally graded material under internal and external pressure.

    PubMed

    Aggarwal, A K; Sharma, Richa; Sharma, Sanjeev

    2013-01-01

    Safety analysis has been done for thick-walled circular cylinder under internal and external pressure using transition theory which is based on the concept of generalized principal Lebesgue strain measure. Results have been analyzed theoretically and discussed numerically. From the analysis, it can be concluded that circular cylinder made of functionally graded material is on the safer side of the design as compared to homogeneous cylinder with internal and external pressure, which leads to the idea of "stress saving" that minimizes the possibility of fracture of cylinder. PMID:24089605

  10. Electromagnetic scattering by arbitrarily oriented ice cylinders.

    PubMed

    Liou, K N

    1972-03-01

    The scattering of electromagnetic waves by arbitrarily oriented, infinitely long circular cylinders is solved by following the procedures outlined by van de Hulst. The far-field intensities for two cases of a linearly polarized incident wave are derived. The scattering coefficients involve the Bessel functions of the first kind, the Hankel functions of the second kind, and their first derivatives. Calculations are made for ice cylinders at three wavelengths: 0.7 micro, 3 micro, and 10 micro. The numerical results of intensity coefficients are presented as functions of the observation angle ø. A significant cross-polarized component for the scattered field, which vanishes only at normal incidence, is obtained. It is also shown that the numerous interference maxima and minima of the intensity coefficients due to single-particle effects depend on the size parameter x as well as on the oblique incident angle alpha. Since cylinder-type particles are often observed in ice clouds, the light-scattering calculations performed for a cir ular cylinder in this paper should be of use in the study of cloud microstructure.

  11. Numerical procedure to determine geometric view factors for surfaces occluded by cylinders

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sawyer, P. L.

    1978-01-01

    A numerical procedure was developed to determine geometric view factors between connected infinite strips occluded by any number of infinite circular cylinders. The procedure requires a two-dimensional cross-sectional model of the configuration of interest. The two-dimensional model consists of a convex polygon enclosing any number of circles. Each side of the polygon represents one strip, and each circle represents a circular cylinder. A description and listing of a computer program based on this procedure are included in this report. The program calculates geometric view factors between individual strips and between individual strips and the collection of occluding cylinders.

  12. Cylinder Flow Control Using Plasma Actuators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozlov, Alexey; Thomas, Flint

    2007-11-01

    In this study the results of flow control experiments utilizing single dielectric barrier discharge plasma actuators to control flow separation and unsteady vortex shedding from a circular cylinder in cross-flow are reported. Two optimized quartz dielectric plasma actuators mounted on the cylinder surface utilizing an improved saw-tooth waveform high-voltage generator allowed flow control at Reynolds number approaching supercritical. Using either steady or unsteady actuation, it is demonstrated that the plasma-induced surface blowing gives rise to a local Coanda effect that promotes the maintenance of flow attachment. PIV based flow fields and wake velocity profiles obtained with hot-wire anemometry show large reductions in vortex shedding, wake width and turbulence intensity.

  13. In-Cylinder Fuel Blending of Gasoline/Diesel for Improved Efficiency and Lowest Possible Emissions on a Multi-Cylinder Light-Duty Diesel Engine

    SciTech Connect

    Curran, Scott; Prikhodko, Vitaly Y; Wagner, Robert M; Parks, II, James E; Cho, Kukwon; Sluder, Scott; Kokjohn, Sage; Reitz, Rolf

    2010-01-01

    In-cylinder fuel blending of gasoline/diesel fuel is investigated on a multi-cylinder light-duty diesel engine as a potential strategy to control in-cylinder fuel reactivity for improved efficiency and lowest possible emissions. This approach was developed and demonstrated at the University of Wisconsin through modeling and single-cylinder engine experiments. The objective of this study is to better understand the potential and challenges of this method on a multi-cylinder engine. More specifically, the effect of cylinder-to-cylinder imbalances, heat rejection, and in-cylinder charge motion as well as the potential limitations imposed by real-world turbo-machinery were investigated on a 1.9-liter four-cylinder engine. This investigation focused on one engine condition, 2300 rpm, 4.2 bar brake mean effective pressure (BMEP). Gasoline was introduced with a port-fuel-injection system. Parameter sweeps included gasoline-to-diesel fuel ratio, intake air mixture temperature, in-cylinder swirl number, and diesel start-of-injection phasing. In addition, engine parameters were trimmed for each cylinder to balance the combustion process for maximum efficiency and lowest emissions. An important observation was the strong influence of intake charge temperature on cylinder pressure rise rate. Experiments were able to show increased thermal efficiency along with dramatic decreases in oxides of nitrogen (NOX) and particulate matter (PM). However, indicated thermal efficiency for the multi-cylinder experiments were less than expected based on modeling and single-cylinder results. The lower indicated thermal efficiency is believed to be due increased heat transfer as compared to the model predictions and suggest a need for improved cylinder-to-cylinder control and increased heat transfer control.

  14. Circular causality.

    PubMed

    Thomas, R

    2006-07-01

    The problem of disentangling complex dynamic systems is addressed, especially with a view to identifying those variables that take part in the essential qualitative behaviour of systems. The author presents a series of reflections about the methods of formalisation together with the principles that govern the global operation of systems. In particular, a section on circuits, nuclei, and circular causality and a rather detailed description of the analytic use of the generalised asynchronous logical description, together with a brief description of its synthetic use (OreverseO logic). Some basic rules are recalled, such as the fact that a positive circuit is a necessary condition of multistationarity. Also, the interest of considering as a model, rather than a well-defined set of differential equations, a variety of systems that differ from each other only by the values of constant terms is emphasised. All these systems have a common Jacobian matrix and for all of them phase space has exactly the same structure. It means that all can be partitioned in the same way as regards the signs of the eigenvalues and thus as regards the precise nature of any steady states that might be present. Which steady states are actually present, depends on the values of terms of order zero in the ordinary differential equations (ODEs), and it is easy to find for which values of these terms a given point in phase space is steady. Models can be synthesised first at the level of the circuits involved in the Jacobian matrix (that determines which types and numbers of steady states are consistent with the model), then only at the level of terms of order zero in the ODE's (that determines which of the steady states actually exist), hence the title 'Circular casuality'.

  15. Relativistic Bessel cylinders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krisch, J. P.; Glass, E. N.

    2014-10-01

    A set of cylindrical solutions to Einstein's field equations for power law densities is described. The solutions have a Bessel function contribution to the metric. For matter cylinders regular on axis, the first two solutions are the constant density Gott-Hiscock string and a cylinder with a metric Airy function. All members of this family have the Vilenkin limit to their mass per length. Some examples of Bessel shells and Bessel motion are given.

  16. 49 CFR 178.45 - Specification 3T seamless steel cylinder.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... pressure: S = A1 P / A2 Where: S = Tensile stress in psi; A1 = Internal area in cross section of cylinder...) Hydrostatic test. Each cylinder must be tested at an internal pressure by the water jacket method or other.... (2) Any internal pressure applied to the cylinder after heat treatment and before the official...

  17. 49 CFR 178.45 - Specification 3T seamless steel cylinder.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... pressure: S = A1 P / A2 Where: S = Tensile stress in psi; A1 = Internal area in cross section of cylinder...) Hydrostatic test. Each cylinder must be tested at an internal pressure by the water jacket method or other.... (2) Any internal pressure applied to the cylinder after heat treatment and before the official...

  18. 49 CFR 178.45 - Specification 3T seamless steel cylinder.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... pressure: S = A1 P / A2 Where: S = Tensile stress in psi; A1 = Internal area in cross section of cylinder...) Hydrostatic test. Each cylinder must be tested at an internal pressure by the water jacket method or other.... (2) Any internal pressure applied to the cylinder after heat treatment and before the official...

  19. 49 CFR 178.45 - Specification 3T seamless steel cylinder.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... pressure: S = A1 P / A2 Where: S = Tensile stress in psi; A1 = Internal area in cross section of cylinder...) Hydrostatic test. Each cylinder must be tested at an internal pressure by the water jacket method or other.... (2) Any internal pressure applied to the cylinder after heat treatment and before the official...

  20. Transient thermal stress problem for a circumferentially cracked hollow cylinder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nied, H. F.; Erdogan, F.

    1983-01-01

    The paper is concerned with the transient thermal stress problem for a long hollow circular cylinder containing an internal axisymmetric circumferential edge crack that is suddenly cooled from inside. It is assumed that the transient thermal stress problem is quasi-static, i.e., the inertial effects are negligible. Also, all thermoelastic coupling effects and the possible temperature dependence of the thermoelastic constants are neglected. The problem is considered in two parts. The first part is the evaluation of transient thermal stresses in an uncracked cylinder; the second part is the isothermal perturbation problem for the cracked cylinder in which the crack surface tractions, equal and opposite to the thermal stresses obtained from the first problem, are the only external loads. The superposition of the two solutions gives results for the cracked cylinder.

  1. Development of plasma spray coated cylinder liners

    SciTech Connect

    Tricard, M.; Hagan, J.; Redington, P.; Subramanian, K.; Haselkorn, M.

    1996-09-01

    Improved fuel economy and reduction of emissions can be achieved by insulation of the combustion chamber components to reduce heat rejection. However, such insulation will also increase the operating temperature of the piston ring/cylinder liner interface from approximately 150 C to over 300 C. Since existing ring/liner materials cannot withstand these higher operating temperatures alternatives are needed for this critical tribological interface. This paper describes the development of a cost effective ID grinding technique for machining the bores of plasma sprayed diesel engine cylinder liners.

  2. Transient heat transfer behavior of water spray evaporative cooling on a stainless steel cylinder with structured surface for safety design application in high temperature scenario

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aamir, Muhammad; Liao, Qiang; Hong, Wang; Xun, Zhu; Song, Sihong; Sajid, Muhammad

    2016-05-01

    High heat transfer performance of spray cooling on structured surface might be an additional measure to increase the safety of an installation against any threat caused by rapid increase in the temperature. The purpose of present experimental study is to explore heat transfer performance of structured surface under different spray conditions and surface temperatures. Two cylindrical stainless steel samples were used, one with pyramid pins structured surface and other with smooth surface. Surface heat flux of 3.60, 3.46, 3.93 and 4.91 MW/m2 are estimated for sample initial average temperature of 600, 700, 800 and 900 °C, respectively for an inlet pressure of 1.0 MPa. A maximum cooling rate of 507 °C/s was estimated for an inlet pressure of 0.7 MPa at 900 °C for structured surface while for smooth surface maximum cooling rate of 356 °C/s was attained at 1.0 MPa for 700 °C. Structured surface performed better to exchange heat during spray cooling at initial sample temperature of 900 °C with a relative increase in surface heat flux by factor of 1.9, 1.56, 1.66 and 1.74 relative to smooth surface, for inlet pressure of 0.4, 0.7, 1.0 and 1.3 MPa, respectively. For smooth surface, a decreasing trend in estimated heat flux is observed, when initial sample temperature was increased from 600 to 900 °C. Temperature-based function specification method was utilized to estimate surface heat flux and surface temperature. Limited published work is available about the application of structured surface spray cooling techniques for safety of stainless steel structures at very high temperature scenario such as nuclear safety vessel and liquid natural gas storage tanks.

  3. Omnidirectional, circularly polarized, cylindrical microstrip antenna

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stanton, Philip H. (Inventor)

    1985-01-01

    A microstrip cylindrical antenna comprised of two concentric subelements on a ground cylinder, a vertically polarized (E-field parallel to the axis of the antenna cylinder) subelement on the inside and a horizontally polarized (E-field perpendicular to the axis) subelement on the outside. The vertical subelement is a wraparound microstrip radiator. A Y-shaped microstrip patch configuration is used for the horizontally polarized radiator that is wrapped 1.5 times to provide radiating edges on opposite sides of the cylindrical antenna for improved azimuthal pattern uniformity. When these subelements are so fed that their far fields are equal in amplitude and phased 90.degree. from each other, a circularly polarized EM wave results. By stacking a plurality of like antenna elements on the ground cylinder, a linear phased array antenna is provided that can be beam steered to the desired elevation angle.

  4. Strength Tests of Thin-walled Duralumin Cylinders in Pure Bending

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lundquist, Eugene E

    1933-01-01

    This report is the third of a series presenting the results of strengths tests on thin-walled cylinders and truncated cones of circular and elliptic section; it includes the results obtained from pure bending tests on 58 thin-walled duralumin cylinders of circular section with ends clamped to rigid bulkheads. The tests show that the stress on the extreme fiber at failure as calculated by the ordinary theory of bending is from 30 to 80 percent greater than the compressive stress at failure for thin-walled cylinders in compression. The tests also show that length/radius ratio has no consistent effect upon the bending strength and that the size of the wrinkles that form on the compression half of a cylinder in bending is approximately equal to the size of the wrinkles that form in the complete circumference of a cylinder of the same dimensions in compression.

  5. Growth behavior of surface cracks in the circumferential plane of solid and hollow cylinders

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Forman, R. G.; Shivakumar, V.

    1986-01-01

    Experiments were conducted to study the growth behavior of surface fatigue cracks in the circumferential plane of solid and hollow cylinders. In the solid cylinders, the fatigue cracks were found to have a circular arc crack front with specific upper and lower limits to the arc radius. In the hollow cylinders, the fatigue cracks were found to agree accurately with the shape of a transformed semiellipse. A modification to the usual nondimensionalization expression used for surface flaws in flat plates was found to give correct trends for the hollow cylinder problem.

  6. Diffusion from solid cylinders

    SciTech Connect

    Nestor, C.W. Jr.

    1980-01-01

    The problem considered is the diffusion of material from a solid cylinder initially containng a uniform concentration and immersed in a well-stirred bath which maintains the external concentration at zero. The Fourier-Bessel series form of the fraction of the original material removed from the cylinder as a function of time converges very slowly for small time. An alternate form was obtained, which converges reasonably rapidly for small time. The convergence acceleration method of P. Wynn was also used to provide an efficient method for computation. Numerical examples and program listings are included.

  7. Conjugate heat transfer with the entropic lattice Boltzmann method.

    PubMed

    Pareschi, G; Frapolli, N; Chikatamarla, S S; Karlin, I V

    2016-07-01

    A conjugate heat-transfer model is presented based on the two-population entropic lattice Boltzmann method. The present approach relies on the extension of Grad's boundary conditions to the two-population model for thermal flows, as well as on the appropriate exact conjugate heat-transfer condition imposed at the fluid-solid interface. The simplicity and efficiency of the lattice Boltzmann method (LBM), and in particular of the entropic multirelaxation LBM, are retained in the present approach, thus enabling simulations of turbulent high Reynolds number flows and complex wall boundaries. The model is validated by means of two-dimensional parametric studies of various setups, including pure solid conduction, conjugate heat transfer with a backward-facing step flow, and conjugate heat transfer with the flow past a circular heated cylinder. Further validations are performed in three dimensions for the case of a turbulent flow around a heated mounted cube.

  8. Conjugate heat transfer with the entropic lattice Boltzmann method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pareschi, G.; Frapolli, N.; Chikatamarla, S. S.; Karlin, I. V.

    2016-07-01

    A conjugate heat-transfer model is presented based on the two-population entropic lattice Boltzmann method. The present approach relies on the extension of Grad's boundary conditions to the two-population model for thermal flows, as well as on the appropriate exact conjugate heat-transfer condition imposed at the fluid-solid interface. The simplicity and efficiency of the lattice Boltzmann method (LBM), and in particular of the entropic multirelaxation LBM, are retained in the present approach, thus enabling simulations of turbulent high Reynolds number flows and complex wall boundaries. The model is validated by means of two-dimensional parametric studies of various setups, including pure solid conduction, conjugate heat transfer with a backward-facing step flow, and conjugate heat transfer with the flow past a circular heated cylinder. Further validations are performed in three dimensions for the case of a turbulent flow around a heated mounted cube.

  9. Conjugate heat transfer with the entropic lattice Boltzmann method.

    PubMed

    Pareschi, G; Frapolli, N; Chikatamarla, S S; Karlin, I V

    2016-07-01

    A conjugate heat-transfer model is presented based on the two-population entropic lattice Boltzmann method. The present approach relies on the extension of Grad's boundary conditions to the two-population model for thermal flows, as well as on the appropriate exact conjugate heat-transfer condition imposed at the fluid-solid interface. The simplicity and efficiency of the lattice Boltzmann method (LBM), and in particular of the entropic multirelaxation LBM, are retained in the present approach, thus enabling simulations of turbulent high Reynolds number flows and complex wall boundaries. The model is validated by means of two-dimensional parametric studies of various setups, including pure solid conduction, conjugate heat transfer with a backward-facing step flow, and conjugate heat transfer with the flow past a circular heated cylinder. Further validations are performed in three dimensions for the case of a turbulent flow around a heated mounted cube. PMID:27575234

  10. 4. View showing cylinder end of two, cylinder, compound Corliss ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. View showing cylinder end of two, cylinder, compound Corliss steam engine with tandem air compressor. - International Smelting & Refining Company, Tooele Smelter, Powerhouse, State Route 178, Tooele, Tooele County, UT

  11. Torque on a sphere inside a rotating cylinder.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mena, B.; Levinson, E.; Caswell, B.

    1972-01-01

    A circular cylinder of finite dimensions is made to rotate around a sphere fixed in the center of the cylinder. The couple on the sphere is measured over a wide range of rotational speeds for both Newtonian and non-Newtonian fluids. For the Newtonian liquids a comparison of the experimental results is made with Collins' (1955) expansion of the couple as a series in even powers of the angular Reynolds number. For non-Newtonian liquids the apparatus proves to be extremely useful for an accurate determination of the zero shear rate viscosity using only a small amount of fluid.

  12. Cylinder To Cylinder Balancing Using Intake Valve Actuation

    DOEpatents

    Duffy, Kevin P.; Kieser, Andrew J.; Kilkenny, Jonathan P.

    2005-01-18

    A method and apparatus for balancing a combustion phasing between a plurality of cylinders located in an engine. The method and apparatus includes a determining a combustion timing in each cylinder, establishing a baseline parameter for a desired combustion timing, and varying actuation of at least one of a plurality of intake valves, each intake valve being in fluid communication with a corresponding cylinder, such that the combustion timing in each cylinder is substantially equal to the desired combustion timing.

  13. Noise control of a flow around a cylinder using high-frequency dielectric barrier discharge plasma actuators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kopiev, V. F.; Belyaev, I. V.; Zaytsev, M. Yu.; Kazansky, P. N.; Kopiev, V. A.; Moralev, I. A.

    2015-03-01

    The effect of high-frequency dielectric barrier discharge plasma actuators on the noise of a flow around a circular cylinder is experimentally studied. It is shown that the plasma actuators are able to reduce the vortex noise of a cylinder within the range of velocities typical for aeroacoustic applications.

  14. Reordering transitions during annealing of block copolymer cylinder phases

    SciTech Connect

    Majewski, Pawel W.; Yager, Kevin G.

    2015-10-06

    While equilibrium block-copolymer morphologies are dictated by energy-minimization effects, the semi-ordered states observed experimentally often depend on the details of ordering pathways and kinetics. In this study, we explore reordering transitions in thin films of block-copolymer cylinder-forming polystyrene-block-poly(methyl methacrylate). We observe several transient states as films order towards horizontally-aligned cylinders. In particular, there is an early-stage reorganization from randomly-packed cylinders into hexagonally-packed vertically-aligned cylinders; followed by a reorientation transition from vertical to horizontal cylinder states. These transitions are thermally activated. The growth of horizontal grains within an otherwise vertical morphology proceeds anisotropically, resulting in anisotropic grains in the final horizontal state. The size, shape, and anisotropy of grains are influenced by ordering history; for instance, faster heating rates reduce grain anisotropy. These results help elucidate aspects of pathway-dependent ordering in block-copolymer thin films.

  15. Nanowire heating by optical electromagnetic irradiation.

    PubMed

    Roder, Paden B; Pauzauskie, Peter J; Davis, E James

    2012-11-20

    The dissipative absorption of electromagnetic energy by 1D nanoscale structures at optical frequencies is applicable to several important phenomena, including biomedical photothermal theranostics, nanoscale photovoltaic materials, atmospheric aerosols, and integrated photonic devices. Closed-form analytical calculations are presented for the temperature rise within infinite circular cylinders with nanometer-scale diameters (nanowires) that are irradiated at right angles by a continuous-wave laser source polarized along the nanowire's axis. Solutions for the heat source are compared to both numerical finite-difference time domain (FDTD) simulations and well-known Mie scattering cross sections for infinite cylinders. The analysis predicts that the maximum temperature increase is affected not only by the cylinder's composition and porosity but also by morphology-dependent resonances (MDRs) that lead to significant spikes in the local temperature at particular diameters. Furthermore, silicon nanowires with high thermal conductivities are observed to exhibit extremely uniform internal temperatures during electromagnetic heating to 1 part in 10(6), including cases where there are substantial fluctuations of the internal electric-field source term that generates the Joule heating. For a highly absorbing material such as carbon, much higher temperatures are predicted, the internal temperature distribution is nonuniform, and MDRs are not encountered. PMID:23061375

  16. Nanowire heating by optical electromagnetic irradiation.

    PubMed

    Roder, Paden B; Pauzauskie, Peter J; Davis, E James

    2012-11-20

    The dissipative absorption of electromagnetic energy by 1D nanoscale structures at optical frequencies is applicable to several important phenomena, including biomedical photothermal theranostics, nanoscale photovoltaic materials, atmospheric aerosols, and integrated photonic devices. Closed-form analytical calculations are presented for the temperature rise within infinite circular cylinders with nanometer-scale diameters (nanowires) that are irradiated at right angles by a continuous-wave laser source polarized along the nanowire's axis. Solutions for the heat source are compared to both numerical finite-difference time domain (FDTD) simulations and well-known Mie scattering cross sections for infinite cylinders. The analysis predicts that the maximum temperature increase is affected not only by the cylinder's composition and porosity but also by morphology-dependent resonances (MDRs) that lead to significant spikes in the local temperature at particular diameters. Furthermore, silicon nanowires with high thermal conductivities are observed to exhibit extremely uniform internal temperatures during electromagnetic heating to 1 part in 10(6), including cases where there are substantial fluctuations of the internal electric-field source term that generates the Joule heating. For a highly absorbing material such as carbon, much higher temperatures are predicted, the internal temperature distribution is nonuniform, and MDRs are not encountered.

  17. Sunspots and the physics of magnetic flux tubes. IV - Aerodynamic lift on a thin cylinder in convective flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsinganos, K. C.

    1979-01-01

    The aerodynamic lift exerted on a long circular cylinder immersed in a convective flow pattern in an ideal fluid is calculated to establish the equilibrium position of the cylinder. The calculations establish the surprising result that the cylinder is pushed out the upwellings and the downdrafts of the convective cell, into a location midway between them. The implications for the intense magnetic flux tubes in the convection beneath the surface of the sun are considered.

  18. Regimes of flow induced vibration for tandem, tethered cylinders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nave, Gary; Stremler, Mark

    2015-11-01

    In the wake of a bluff body, there are a number of dynamic response regimes that exist for a trailing bluff body depending on spacing, structural restoring forces, and the mass-damping parameter m* ζ . For tandem cylinders with low values of m* ζ , two such regimes of motion are Gap Flow Switching and Wake Induced Vibration. In this study, we consider the dynamics of a single degree-of-freedom rigid cylinder in the wake of another in these regimes for a variety of center-to-center cylinder spacings (3-5 diameters) and Reynolds numbers (4,000-11,000). The system consists of a trailing cylinder constrained to a circular arc around a fixed leading cylinder, which, for small angle displacements, bears a close resemblance to the transversely oscillating cylinders found more commonly in existing literature. From experiments on this system, we compare and contrast the dynamic response within these two regimes. Our results show sustained oscillations in the absence of a structural restoring force in all cases, providing experimental support for the wake stiffness assumption, which is based on the mean lift toward the center line of flow.

  19. Poiseuille flow-induced vibrations of two cylinders in tandem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Jianzhong; Jiang, Renjie; Chen, Zhongli; Ku, Xiaoke

    2013-07-01

    Laminar flows past two tandem cylinders which are free to move transversely in a parallel-wall channel were studied numerically by the lattice Boltzmann method. With fixed Reynolds number Re=100, blockage ratio β=1/4 and structural damping ξ=0, the effect of streamwise separation between two cylinders at a range of S/D=[1.1, 10] on the motions of cylinders and fluids was studied for both mass ratios of m(*)=1 and m(*)=0.1. A variety of distinct vibration regimes involving periodic, quasi-periodic and non-periodic vibrations with corresponding flow patterns were observed. A detailed analysis of the vibration amplitudes, vibration frequencies and relative equilibrium positions for both mass ratios demonstrated that as S/D increases, the interaction of the two cylinders first enhances and then reduces. In the strong coupling regime, both cylinders oscillate periodically around the centerline of the channel with large vibration amplitudes and high vibration frequencies. By comparing with the case of an isolated cylinder, a further study indicated that the gap flow plays an important role in such a dynamic system, and the vortex cores formation behind the front cylinder causes the interaction of the cylinders decouple rapidly. Based on the present observations, such a dynamic model system can be considered as a novel type of vortex-induced vibrations (VIV) and is expected to find applications in fluid mixing and heat transfer.

  20. Effect of free surface on near-wake flow of elliptic cylinders with different aspect ratios

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Sang Joon; Daichin, -

    2003-04-01

    The flow fields behind elliptic cylinders with different aspect ratios adjacent to a free surface were investigated experimentally in a circulating water channel. The elliptic cylinders tested in this study have same cross section area. For each elliptic cylinder, the experiments were carried out under different conditions by varying the submergence depth of the cylinder beneath the free surface. The flow fields were measured using a single-frame double-exposure PIV system. For each experimental condition, 350 instantaneous velocity fields were captured and ensemble-averaged to obtain the mean flow field information and spatial distribution of turbulent statistics. The near-wakes can be basically classified into three typical patterns, which are formation of Coanda effect, generation of substantial jet-like flow, and attachment of jet flow to the free surface. The general flow structures behind the elliptic cylinder are similar to previous results for a circular submerged near to a free surface. However, the wake width and the angle of downward deflection of the shear layer developed from the lower surface of the elliptic cylinder are smaller than those for the circular cylinder. These trends are enhance with increasing of the cylinder aspect ratios.

  1. The magic of the gravity-defying cylinder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De, Subhranil

    2016-03-01

    The motion of an eccentrically loaded circular hoop is analysed when it rolls without slipping in such a way that its centre of mass stays at the same vertical height, ensuring the conservation of kinetic energy of the hoop. The equation of the required path for such rolling is derived. Although the kinetic energy of the rolling hoop remains constant, its distribution into the rotational mode and the translational mode keeps varying. As a result, it turns out that the hoop’s geometric centre actually speeds up while the hoop rolls up its path, and slows down on its way down. This presents the idea of demonstrating an apparently gravity-defying situation where a closed right circular cylinder that is actually eccentrically loaded on the inside is utilised. Since its centre must speed up as it gains vertical height, and vice versa, the cylinder would look as if going against gravity.

  2. Aerodynamic heating and the deflection of drops by an obstacle in an air stream in relation to aircraft icing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kantrowitz, Arthur

    1940-01-01

    Two topics of interest to persons attempting to apply the heat method of preventing ice formation on aircraft are considered. Surfaces moving through air at high speed are shown, both theoretically and experimentally, to be subject to important aerodynamic heating effects that will materially reduce the heat required to prevent ice. Numerical calculations of the path of water drops in an air stream around a circular cylinder are given. From these calculations, information is obtained on the percentage of the swept area cleared of drops.

  3. Cylinder-temperature correlation of a single-cylinder liquid-cooled engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pinkel, Benjamin; Manganiello, Eugene J; Bernardo, Everett

    1946-01-01

    An analysis based on nonboiling forced-convection heat-transfer theory is made of the cooling processes in liquid-cooled engine cylinders. Semiempirical equations that relate the average head and barrel temperatures with the primary engine and coolant parameters are derived. A correlation method based on these equations is applied to data obtained from previously reported investigations, which were conducted over large ranges of engine and coolant conditions with two liquid-cooled cylinders using water and various aqueous ethylene glycol solutions as coolants. Upon evaluation of empirical factors, an equation for the cylinder-head temperature as a function of the engine operating conditions and the flow rate, temperature, and physical properties of the coolants is obtained, which represents the data with good accuracy.

  4. Grid generation about a fin-cylinder combination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoffman, G. H.

    1983-03-01

    An algebraic grid generation procedure is presented which produces a three dimensional, body fitted coordinate system about a right circular cylinder with four symmetric fins attached. Special features of the grid are an initial value plane normal to the cylinder axis and the ability to cluster lines near the fin and cylinder surfaces for viscous/turbulent flow calculations. The method used is a modification of the Jameson-Caughey procedure developed originally for inviscid transonic flow calculations about wing-fuselage combinations. In this procedure, a sequence of conformal transformations followed by a shearing transformation is used to map the irregular flow domain in physical space into a rectangular shaped computational domain. A three dimensional grid is produced by stacking two dimensional mappings. The method is therefore extremely fast. The main features of the procedure are discussed and two numerical examples of grids are presented for a fin composed of a symmetric Joukowsky airfoil.

  5. An experimental study of sound generated by flows around cylinders of different cross-section

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    King, W. F.; Pfizenmaier, E.

    2009-12-01

    The sound radiated by rigid cylinders placed transversely in a uniform stream has been measured in an anechoic wind tunnel over a range of Mach numbers ( M=0.09-0.2). The cylinders have different cross-sections, e.g., circular, square, rectangular, elliptic, and circular with lateral ribs or knurled surfaces. Different length to diameter ratios of the cylinders are also investigated. Results are presented as narrow band spectra, measured in the far field (acoustic as well as geometric). All spectra are presented with dimensionless (scaled) axes, as well as the original dimensional scales. It is shown that elliptic cross-sections are less noisy, compared to all other cylinders, but noise abatement techniques such as lateral ribs and knurled surfaces can also reduce tonal radiated noise. Two practical applications of these experiments are the reduction of radiated noise from pantographs of high-speed railway trains, and from the landing gear of modern passenger aircraft.

  6. Special functions arising in the study of semi-linear equations in circular domains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varlamov, Vladimir

    2007-05-01

    Rayleigh functions are defined by the formulawhere are zeros of the Bessel function J[nu](x) and n=1,2,3,..., is the number of the zero. These functions appear in the classical problems of vibrating circular membranes, heat conduction in cylinders and diffraction through circular apertures. In the present paper it is shown that a new family of special functions, convolutions of Rayleigh functions with respect to the Bessel index,arises in constructing solutions of semi-linear evolution equations in circular domains (see also [V. Varlamov, Convolution of Rayleigh functions with respect to the Bessel index, J. Math. Anal. Appl. 306 (2005) 413-424]). As an example of its application a forced Cahn-Hilliard equation is considered in a unit disc with homogeneous boundary and initial conditions. Construction of its global-in-time solutions involves the use of R1(m) and R2(m). A general representation of Rl(m) is deduced and on the basis of that a particular result for R2(m) is obtained convenient for computing its asymptotics as m-->[infinity]. The latter issue is important for establishing a function space to which a solution of the corresponding problem belongs.

  7. The elasticity problem for a thick-walled cylinder containing a circumferential crack

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nied, H. F.; Erdogan, F.

    1982-01-01

    The elasticity problem for a long hollow circular cylinder containing an axisymmetric circumferential crack subjected to general nonaxisymmetric external loads is considered. The problem is formulated in terms of a system of singular integral equations with the Fourier coefficients of the derivative of the crack surface displacement as density functions. The stress intensity factors and the crack opening displacement are calculated for a cylinder under uniform tension, bending by end couples, and self-equilibrating residual stresses.

  8. Vortex distribution and mixed convection of liquid flow across micro-cylinders in a rectangular channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guan, Ning; Luan, Tao; Liu, Zhi-Gang; Zhang, Cheng-Wu; Jiang, Guilin

    2016-03-01

    The impacts of heat flux ( q = 10, 15, 20 W/cm2), cylinder diameter ( D = 300, 600, 3000 μm), aspect ratio AR ( H/D = 1, 2, 4) and block ratio BR ( W/D = 2, 4, 16) on vortex distribution and mixed convection of liquid flow across single micro-cylinder and micro-cylinder-groups (3 × 3 cylinders) were numerically investigated. The separation angles, recirculation lengths ( Lv) and Nusselt numbers were calculated with Reynolds number ranging from 10 to 60. For the single micro-cylinder, the separation angle and the value of Lv/D both became large with the increase of heat flux, and the profiles of Lv/D versus z/H were asymmetrical, which is different from the cylinders with dimensions of millimeter-level. The discrepancies of Lv/D on the same plane of micro-cylinders with different AR in the region near end-walls were larger than those near the symmetry wall. For the 3 × 3 micro-cylinder-groups, the value of Lv/D was related to the location along the axial direction, while the separation angle became small along the flowing direction. The mixed heat transfer in rectangular channel with micro-cylinders could be enhanced by changing the dimensions of the cylinders and the channel.

  9. Anaesthesia gas supply: gas cylinders.

    PubMed

    Srivastava, Uma

    2013-09-01

    Invention of oxygen cylinder was one of the most important developments in the field of medical practice. Oxygen and other gases were compressed and stored at high pressure in seamless containers constructed from hand-forged steel in1880. Materials technology has continued to evolve and now medical gas cylinders are generally made of steel alloys or aluminum. The filling pressure as well as capacity has increased considerably while at the same time the weight of cylinders has reduced. Today oxygen cylinder of equivalent size holds a third more oxygen but weighs about 20 kg less. The cylinders are of varying sizes and are color coded. They are tested at regular intervals by the manufacturer using hydraulic, impact, and tensile tests. The top end of the cylinder is fitted with a valve with a variety of number and markings stamped on it. Common valve types include: Pin index valve, bull nose, hand wheel and integral valve. The type of valve varies with cylinder size. Small cylinders have a pin index valve while large have a bull nose type. Safety features in the cylinder are: Color coding, pin index, pressure relief device, Bodok seal, and label attached etc., Safety rules and guidelines must be followed during storage, installation and use of cylinders to ensure safety of patients, hospital personnel and the environment.

  10. Anaesthesia Gas Supply: Gas Cylinders

    PubMed Central

    Srivastava, Uma

    2013-01-01

    Invention of oxygen cylinder was one of the most important developments in the field of medical practice. Oxygen and other gases were compressed and stored at high pressure in seamless containers constructed from hand-forged steel in1880. Materials technology has continued to evolve and now medical gas cylinders are generally made of steel alloys or aluminum. The filling pressure as well as capacity has increased considerably while at the same time the weight of cylinders has reduced. Today oxygen cylinder of equivalent size holds a third more oxygen but weighs about 20 kg less. The cylinders are of varying sizes and are color coded. They are tested at regular intervals by the manufacturer using hydraulic, impact, and tensile tests. The top end of the cylinder is fitted with a valve with a variety of number and markings stamped on it. Common valve types include: Pin index valve, bull nose, hand wheel and integral valve. The type of valve varies with cylinder size. Small cylinders have a pin index valve while large have a bull nose type. Safety features in the cylinder are: Color coding, pin index, pressure relief device, Bodok seal, and label attached etc., Safety rules and guidelines must be followed during storage, installation and use of cylinders to ensure safety of patients, hospital personnel and the environment. PMID:24249883

  11. Literature review and experimental results for a cylinder with perforations and protrusions at high Reynolds numbers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, G. S.; Horvath, T. J.; Stainback, P. C.; Beasley, W. D.; Mcghee, R. J.

    1987-01-01

    The NASA Langley Low Turbulence Pressure Tunnel has been used to conduct an experimental study of the flow around a series of circular cylinders; the models used consisted of a baseline, smooth cylinder together with a cylinder that could be reconfigured with six different arrangements of two types of surface irregularity. Mean lift and drag forces were measured on all seven model configurations, and correlations were made between unsteady pressure in the wake region and fluctuating lift forces, in order to identify coherent structures.

  12. Boundary Layers of Air Adjacent to Cylinders

    PubMed Central

    Nobel, Park S.

    1974-01-01

    Using existing heat transfer data, a relatively simple expression was developed for estimating the effective thickness of the boundary layer of air surrounding cylinders. For wind velocities from 10 to 1000 cm/second, the calculated boundary-layer thickness agreed with that determined for water vapor diffusion from a moistened cylindrical surface 2 cm in diameter. It correctly predicted the resistance for water vapor movement across the boundary layers adjacent to the (cylindrical) inflorescence stems of Xanthorrhoea australis R. Br. and Scirpus validus Vahl and the leaves of Allium cepa L. The boundary-layer thickness decreased as the turbulence intensity increased. For a turbulence intensity representative of field conditions (0.5) and for νwindd between 200 and 30,000 cm2/second (where νwind is the mean wind velocity and d is the cylinder diameter), the effective boundary-layer thickness in centimeters was equal to [Formula: see text]. PMID:16658855

  13. Thermo acoustic waves in rarefied gas between two coaxial cylinders at a sudden change of the temperature of the outer cylinder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gospodinov, P.; Dankov, D.; Roussinov, V.

    2016-10-01

    The heat transfer in a monatomic rarefied gas between two concentric cylinders in the case of sudden change of the outer wall temperature is studied. Different cases were calculated for a set of radius and temperatures of outer cylinder. On the wall of the inner cylinder are used two types of thermal boundary conditions - constant temperature and adiabatic isolated inner cylinder. The study aims to determine effect of arising waves on the gas macro characteristics (density, temperature and pressure) and in the case of adiabatic isolated case the inner wall temperature and pressure variations. The obtained numerical results are applicable in the thermal conductivity gauges.

  14. Characterization of Circular RNAs.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yang; Yang, Li; Chen, Ling-Ling

    2016-01-01

    Accumulated lines of evidence reveal that a large number of circular RNAs are produced in transcriptomes from fruit fly to mouse and human. Unlike linear RNAs shaped with 5' cap and 3' tail, circular RNAs are characterized by covalently closed loop structures without open terminals, thus requiring specific treatments for their identification and validation. Here, we describe a detailed pipeline for the characterization of circular RNAs. It has been successfully applied to the study of circular intronic RNAs derived from intron lariats (ciRNAs) and circular RNAs produced from back spliced exons (circRNAs) in human. PMID:26721494

  15. Circular Dammann grating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Changhe; Jia, Jia; Liu, Liren

    2003-11-01

    A circular Dammann grating that can produce circular equal intensities at various orders in the far field is described. A set of parameters such as order, circular number, uniformity, and diffraction efficiency has been defined to describe the novel diffractive phase elements. Numerical solutions of binary-phase (0, π) circular Dammann gratings are given. The results of experiments with a four-order circular Dammann grating made by a lithographic technique are presented. This novel diffractive optical element should be highly interesting in a wide variety of practical applications.

  16. 15. CYLINDER DETAILS; DETAILS OF STEEL FOR CYLINDERS NO. 50 ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    15. CYLINDER DETAILS; DETAILS OF STEEL FOR CYLINDERS NO. 50 (PIER 5) AND NO. 66 (PIER 6), DWG. 83, CH BY AF, ECL, APPROVED BY O.F. LACKEY, MAY 18, 1908 - Baltimore Inner Harbor, Pier 5, South of Pratt Street between Market Place & Concord Street, Baltimore, Independent City, MD

  17. 10. CYLINDER DETAILS: DETAIL OF STEEL FOR CYLINDER NO. 59, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    10. CYLINDER DETAILS: DETAIL OF STEEL FOR CYLINDER NO. 59, PIER NO. 6, DWG. 86, 3/4" = 1', MADE BY A.F., CHECKED BY E.C.L., APPROVED BY O.F. LACKEY, JUNE 2, 1908 - Baltimore Inner Harbor, Pier 6, South of Pratt Street between Concord Street & Jones Falls outlet, Baltimore, Independent City, MD

  18. Non-invasive determination of external forces in vortex-pair-cylinder interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartmann, D.; Schröder, W.; Shashikanth, B. N.

    2012-06-01

    Expressions for the conserved linear and angular momenta of a dynamically coupled fluid + solid system are derived. Based on the knowledge of the flow velocity field, these expressions allow the determination of the external forces exerted on a body moving in the fluid such as, e.g., swimming fish. The verification of the derived conserved quantities is done numerically. The interaction of a vortex pair with a circular cylinder in various configurations of motions representing a generic test case for a dynamically coupled fluid + solid system is investigated in a weakly compressible Navier-Stokes setting using a Cartesian cut-cell method, i.e., the moving circular cylinder is represented by cut cells on a moving mesh. The objectives of this study are twofold. The first objective is to show the robustness of the derived expressions for the conserved linear and angular momenta with respect to bounded and discrete data sets. The second objective is to study the coupled dynamics of the vortex pair and a neutrally buoyant cylinder free to move in response to the fluid stresses exerted on its surface. A comparison of the vortex-body interaction with the case of a fixed circular cylinder evidences significant differences in the vortex dynamics. When the cylinder is fixed strong secondary vorticity is generated resulting in a repeating process between the primary vortex pair and the cylinder. In the neutrally buoyant cylinder case, a stable structure consisting of the primary vortex pair and secondary vorticity shear layers stays attached to the moving cylinder. In addition to these fundamental cases, the vortex-pair-cylinder interaction is studied for locomotion at constant speed and locomotion at constant thrust. It is shown that a similar vortex structure like in the neutrally buoyant cylinder case is obtained when the cylinder moves away from the approaching vortex pair at a constant speed smaller than the vortex pair translational velocity. Finally, the idealized

  19. PIV measurements of near wake behind a U-grooved cylinder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, H.-C.; Lee, S.-J.

    2003-08-01

    The flow structure around a circular cylinder with U-grooved surfaces has been investigated experimentally. The results were compared with that of a smooth cylinder having the same diameter. Drag force and turbulence statistics of wake behind each cylinder were measured for Reynolds numbers based on the cylinder diameter (/D=60mm) in the range ReD=8×103-1.4×105. At ReD=1.4×105, the U-type grooves reduce the drag coefficient acting on the cylinder by 18.6%, compared with that of smooth cylinder. The flow characteristics of wake behind the U-grooved cylinder have been analyzed using two kinds of particle image velocimetry (PIV) velocity measurement techniques, cinematic PIV and high-resolution PIV. Consecutive instantaneous velocity fields were measured using the cinematic PIV technique at time interval of 5ms, corresponding to about 1% of the vortex shedding frequency of the wake. The instantaneous velocity fields measured with the high-resolution PIV technique were ensemble-averaged to get the spatial distributions of turbulent statistics including turbulent intensities and turbulent kinetic energy. For the case of smooth cylinder, large-scale vortices formed behind the cylinder maintain round shape and do not spread out noticeably in the near wake. However, for the case of U-grooved cylinder, the vortices are largely distorted and spread out significantly as they go downstream. The longitudinal grooves seem to shift the location of spanwise vortices toward the cylinder, reducing the vortex formation region, compared with the smooth cylinder. The sharp peaks of longitudinal U-shaped grooves also suppress the formation of large-scale secondary streamwise vortices. The secondary vortices are broken into smaller eddies, reducing turbulent kinetic energy in the near-wake region.

  20. Carbon-carbon cylinder block

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ransone, Philip O. (Inventor)

    1998-01-01

    A lightweight cylinder block composed of carbon-carbon is disclosed. The use of carbon-carbon over conventional materials, such as cast iron or aluminum, reduces the weight of the cylinder block and improves thermal efficiency of the internal combustion reciprocating engine. Due to the negligible coefficient of thermal expansion and unique strength at elevated temperatures of carbon-carbon, the piston-to-cylinder wall clearance can be small, especially when the carbon-carbon cylinder block is used in conjunction with a carbon-carbon piston. Use of the carbon-carbon cylinder block has the effect of reducing the weight of other reciprocating engine components allowing the piston to run at higher speeds and improving specific engine performance.

  1. ANFO cylinder tests

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, L. L.; Hill, L. G.

    2001-01-01

    Cylinder test data is reported for commercially available prilled ANFO (ammonium-nitrate/fuel-oil) at 0.93 ,g/cc density and ambient temperature. The tests were four-inch inner diameter, with wall-thickness and length scaled from the standard one-inch test (0.4 inch and 48 inch, respectively). The wall expansion was measured with a rotating mirror streak camera and the velocity was measured by fine-wire pin switches, in the standard manner. The wall expansion trajectory is much smoother than for conventional explosives, which show a pronounced jump-off with subs uent ring-up. This observation is consistent with a broadened detohation shock in the granular bed. ?he data is analyzed for equation-of-state information and JWL parameters are given.

  2. ANFO Cylinder Tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, L. L.; Hill, L. G.

    2002-07-01

    Cylinder test data is reported for commercially available prilled ANFO (ammonium-nitrate/fuel-oil) at 0.93 g/cc density and ambient temperature. The tests were four-inch inner diameter, with wall-thickness and length scaled from the standard one-inch test (0.4 inch and 48 inch, respectively). The wall expansion was measured with a rotating mirror streak camera and the velocity was measured by fine-wire pin switches, in the standard manner. The wall expansion trajectory is much smoother than for conventional explosives, which show a pronounced jump-off with subsequent ring-up. This observation is consistent with a broadened detonation shock in the granular bed. The data is analyzed for equation-of-state information and JWL parameters are given.

  3. ANFO Cylinder Tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, Lloyd; Hill, Larry

    2001-06-01

    Cylinder test data is reported for commercially available prilled ANFO (ammonium nitrate - fuel oil) at ca. 0.93 g/cc density and ambient temperature. The tests were four-inch inner diameter, with wall-thickness and length scaled from the standard one-inch test (0.4 inch and 48 inch, respectively). The wall expansion was measured with a rotating mirror streak camera and the velocity was measured by fine-wire pin switches, in the standard manner. The wall expansion trajectory is much smoother than for conventional explosives, which show a pronounced jump-off with subsequent ring-up. This observation is indicative of an extended reaction zone. The data is analyzed for equation-of-state information and JWL parameters are given.

  4. Heat transfer in gas turbine engines and three-dimensional flows; Proceedings of the Symposium, ASME Winter Annual Meeting, Chicago, IL, Nov. 27-Dec. 2, 1988

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elovic, E.; O'Brien, J. E.; Pepper, D. W.

    The present conference on heat transfer characteristics of gas turbines and three-dimensional flows discusses velocity-temperature fluctuation correlations at the flow stagnation flow of a circular cylinder in turbulent flow, heat transfer across turbulent boundary layers with pressure gradients, the effect of jet grid turbulence on boundary layer heat transfer, and heat transfer characteristics predictions for discrete-hole film cooling. Also discussed are local heat transfer in internally cooled turbine airfoil leading edges, secondary flows in vane cascades and curved ducts, three-dimensional numerical modeling in gas turbine coal combustor design, numerical and experimental results for tube-fin heat exchanger airflow and heating characteristics, and the computation of external hypersonic three-dimensional flow field and heat transfer characteristics.

  5. Heat transfer in gas turbine engines and three-dimensional flows; Proceedings of the Symposium, ASME Winter Annual Meeting, Chicago, IL, Nov. 27-Dec. 2, 1988

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elovic, E. (Editor); O'Brien, J. E. (Editor); Pepper, D. W. (Editor)

    1988-01-01

    The present conference on heat transfer characteristics of gas turbines and three-dimensional flows discusses velocity-temperature fluctuation correlations at the flow stagnation flow of a circular cylinder in turbulent flow, heat transfer across turbulent boundary layers with pressure gradients, the effect of jet grid turbulence on boundary layer heat transfer, and heat transfer characteristics predictions for discrete-hole film cooling. Also discussed are local heat transfer in internally cooled turbine airfoil leading edges, secondary flows in vane cascades and curved ducts, three-dimensional numerical modeling in gas turbine coal combustor design, numerical and experimental results for tube-fin heat exchanger airflow and heating characteristics, and the computation of external hypersonic three-dimensional flow field and heat transfer characteristics.

  6. Thermo-Mechanical Analyses of Dynamically Loaded Rubber Cylinders

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Arthur R.; Chen, Tzi-Kang

    2002-01-01

    Thick rubber components are employed by the Army to carry large loads. In tanks, rubber covers road wheels and track systems to protect roadways. It is difficult for design engineers to simulate the details of the hysteretic heating for large strain viscoelastic deformations. In this study, an approximation to the viscoelastic energy dissipated per unit time is investigated for use in estimating mechanically induced viscoelastic heating. Coupled thermo-mechanical simulations of large cyclic deformations of rubber cylinders are presented. The cylinders are first compressed axially and then cyclically loaded about the compressed state. Details of the algorithm and some computational issues are discussed. The coupled analyses are conducted for tall and short rubber cylinders both with and without imbedded metal disks.

  7. Toroidal circular dichroism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raybould, T. A.; Fedotov, V. A.; Papasimakis, N.; Kuprov, I.; Youngs, I. J.; Chen, W. T.; Tsai, D. P.; Zheludev, N. I.

    2016-07-01

    We demonstrate that the induced toroidal dipole, represented by currents flowing on the surface of a torus, makes a distinct and indispensable contribution to circular dichroism. We show that toroidal circular dichroism supplements the well-known mechanism involving electric dipole and magnetic dipole transitions. We illustrate this with rigorous analysis of the experimentally measured polarization-sensitive transmission spectra of an artificial metamaterial, constructed from elements of toroidal symmetry. We argue that toroidal circular dichroism will be found in large biomolecules with elements of toroidal symmetry and should be taken into account in the interpretation of circular dichroism spectra of organics.

  8. Transition along a finite-length cylinder in the presence of a thin boundary layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Hanfeng; Peng, Si; Zhou, Yu; He, Xuhui

    2016-05-01

    This work aims to investigate experimentally the transition of the aerodynamic forces on a cantilevered circular cylinder immersed in a thin boundary layer whose thickness is comparable to the cylinder diameter d. The aspect ratio H/ d of the cylinder is 5, where H is the cylinder height. The Reynolds number Re, based on the freestream velocity ( U ∞ ) and d, is varied from 0.68 × 105 to 6.12 × 105, covering the subcritical, critical and supercritical regimes. It has been found that the flow transition is non-uniform along the cylinder span, taking place at a smaller Re near the cylinder free end than near the base. Furthermore, the sectional drag coefficient of the cantilevered cylinder is smaller relative to that of a two-dimensional cylinder in the subcritical regime, but larger than the later in the supercritical regime. The sectional lift coefficient is not zero in the critical regime, with its maximum near the free end reaching almost four times of that near the base.

  9. 75 FR 3141 - Airworthiness Directives; AVOX Systems and B/E Aerospace Oxygen Cylinder Assemblies, as Installed...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-20

    ... to improper heat treatment. We are issuing this AD to prevent an oxygen cylinder from rupturing...-16049 (74 FR 63063, December 2, 2009). That AD applies to certain AVOX Systems and B/E Aerospace oxygen... gaseous oxygen cylinder, which had insufficient strength characteristics due to improper heat...

  10. Heat Transfer Enhancement for Finned-Tube Heat Exchangers with Vortex Generators: Experimental and Numerical Results

    SciTech Connect

    O'Brien, James Edward; Sohal, Manohar Singh; Huff, George Albert

    2002-08-01

    A combined experimental and numerical investigation is under way to investigate heat transfer enhancement techniques that may be applicable to large-scale air-cooled condensers such as those used in geothermal power applications. The research is focused on whether air-side heat transfer can be improved through the use of finsurface vortex generators (winglets,) while maintaining low heat exchanger pressure drop. A transient heat transfer visualization and measurement technique has been employed in order to obtain detailed distributions of local heat transfer coefficients on model fin surfaces. Pressure drop measurements have also been acquired in a separate multiple-tube row apparatus. In addition, numerical modeling techniques have been developed to allow prediction of local and average heat transfer for these low-Reynolds-number flows with and without winglets. Representative experimental and numerical results presented in this paper reveal quantitative details of local fin-surface heat transfer in the vicinity of a circular tube with a single delta winglet pair downstream of the cylinder. The winglets were triangular (delta) with a 1:2 height/length aspect ratio and a height equal to 90% of the channel height. Overall mean fin-surface Nusselt-number results indicate a significant level of heat transfer enhancement (average enhancement ratio 35%) associated with the deployment of the winglets with oval tubes. Pressure drop measurements have also been obtained for a variety of tube and winglet configurations using a single-channel flow apparatus that includes four tube rows in a staggered array. Comparisons of heat transfer and pressure drop results for the elliptical tube versus a circular tube with and without winglets are provided. Heat transfer and pressure-drop results have been obtained for flow Reynolds numbers based on channel height and mean flow velocity ranging from 700 to 6500.

  11. 49 CFR 178.35 - General requirements for specification cylinders.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...) Inspections and analyses. Chemical analyses and tests required by this subchapter must be made within the... cylinders made by the billet-piercing process, billets must be inspected and shown to be free from pipe... specification by— (i) Making a chemical analysis of each heat of material; (ii) Obtaining a certified...

  12. The Persistence of the Candle-and-Cylinder Misconception.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Birk, James P.; Lawson, Anton E.

    1999-01-01

    Argues that the candle-and-cylinder demonstration does not show that air is composed of 21% oxygen. Finds that the heating of air results in a partial expulsion of air, and that the flame is extinguished by a local, rather than a complete, consumption of oxygen. (WRM)

  13. Wake Modes of Rotationally Oscillating Cylinders at low Re

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sellappan, Prabu; Pottebaum, Tait

    2011-11-01

    Vortex shedding from bluff bodies is important in various engineering applications because the wake can have many effects, including exciting vibrations in structures and altering convective heat transfer. While vortex shedding from cylinders in cross-flow and cylinders undergoing transverse and in-line oscillations has been studied extensively, only limited data is available for rotational oscillations and is mainly limited to spectral analysis of the wake. Water tunnel experiments were carried out at Re = 150 to investigate the wake of a rotationally oscillating cylinder for oscillation frequencies from 0.67 to 3.5 times the natural shedding frequency and peak-to-peak oscillation amplitudes up to 320°. DPIV was used to study both the near and far wake within this parameter space. Well-defined patterns of wake vortices were observed in distinct regions of the parameter space, similar to the wake modes of transversely oscillating cylinders in cross-flow. In portions of the parameter space for which information exists in the literature the wake modes are well-related to spectral data. Variants of modes in previously unexplored regions are explained in terms of harmonics. The initial application of these results to understanding heat transfer enhancement from rotationally oscillating cylinders will also be addressed.

  14. Fluid dynamics around an inclined cylinder with running water rivulets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Z. J.; Zhou, Y.; Huang, J. F.; Xu, Y. L.

    2005-11-01

    The formation of water rivulets running along an inclined circular cylinder and its effects on the near-wake were experimentally investigated. Water was released from the upper end of the cylinder at a volume flow rate Q. At an incoming wind speed U=8 15m/s, two water rivulets were observed near the flow separation points, running along the cylinder inclined at α=45° for 0°⩽β⩽90°, where β is the cylinder yaw angle, and both oscillating circumferentially. The dependence of the rivulet formation on U∞, Q and β is examined in detail. The quasi-periodic vortex street is observed intermittently with and without the presence of the rivulets. The rivulets cause an increase in the normalized dominant frequencies in the near wake and further lead to a significant increase in the drag coefficient, which is consistent with the violent vibration associated with the rain wind-structure interactions. The effect of the rivulets on the near-wake vortices is investigated. It is found that the vortex strength grows by up to 60% as β increases from 0° to 30°. A mechanism for the rain wind-induced cable vibration is proposed.

  15. Centrifugal force induced by relativistically rotating spheroids and cylinders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katz, Joseph; Lynden Bell, Donald; Bičák, Jiří

    2011-03-01

    Starting from the gravitational potential of a Newtonian spheroidal shell we discuss electrically charged rotating prolate spheroidal shells in the Maxwell theory. In particular we consider two confocal charged shells which rotate oppositely in such a way that there is no magnetic field outside the outer shell. In the Einstein theory we solve the Ernst equations in the region where the long prolate spheroids are almost cylindrical; in equatorial regions the exact Lewis 'rotating cylindrical' solution is so derived by a limiting procedure from a spatially bound system. In the second part we analyze two cylindrical shells rotating in opposite directions in such a way that the static Levi-Civita metric is produced outside and no angular momentum flux escapes to infinity. The rotation of the local inertial frames in flat space inside the inner cylinder is thus exhibited without any approximation or interpretational difficulties within this model. A test particle within the inner cylinder kept at rest with respect to axes that do not rotate as seen from infinity experiences a centrifugal force. Although in suitably chosen axes the spacetime there is exactly Minkowskian out to the inner cylinder, nevertheless, those inertial frame axes rotate with respect to infinity, so relative to the inertial frame inside the inner cylinder a test particle is traversing a circular orbit.

  16. Broadband computation of the scattering coefficients of infinite arbitrary cylinders.

    PubMed

    Blanchard, Cédric; Guizal, Brahim; Felbacq, Didier

    2012-07-01

    We employ a time-domain method to compute the near field on a contour enclosing infinitely long cylinders of arbitrary cross section and constitution. We therefore recover the cylindrical Hankel coefficients of the expansion of the field outside the circumscribed circle of the structure. The recovered coefficients enable the wideband analysis of complex systems, e.g., the determination of the radar cross section becomes straightforward. The prescription for constructing such a numerical tool is provided in great detail. The method is validated by computing the scattering coefficients for a homogeneous circular cylinder illuminated by a plane wave, a problem for which an analytical solution exists. Finally, some radiation properties of an optical antenna are examined by employing the proposed technique.

  17. Deformation of a fluid-filled compliant cylinder in a uniform flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yokoyama, M.; Mochizuki, O.

    2009-08-01

    We investigated surface compliance effects of a fluid-filled object in flow on its shape and internal flow through numerical simulation. A two-dimensional compliant cylinder containing fluid in a flow is a simple model of a cell, e.g. an erythrocyte, leukocyte or platelet. The thin membrane of the cylinder consisted of a network of mass-spring-damper (MSD) systems, representing its mechanical characteristics. We assumed that the stiffness and damping coefficients were those of latex gum. The two-dimensional flow inside and outside the membrane was obtained by solving the two-dimensional Navier-Stokes equations by using the finite element scheme at Re=400, based on the external flow velocity and diameter of an initial circular cylinder. The deformation of the membrane was calculated by solving the equation of motion for an MSD system by using the fourth-order Runge-Kutta method. The compliant cylinder deformed more if its stiffness was smaller than that of latex gum. The initial circular section of the cylinder became oval, with a flat front and a convex rear. The aspect ratio of the lateral to streamwise axis length of the oval became larger than unity, and increased with decreasing stiffness. The drag coefficient of the oval cylinder became larger than that of the circular cylinder, and increased with decreasing stiffness. The partial vibration at the rear, caused by shedding vortices, induced oscillating internal flows between two antinodes of the vibrating membrane. Since the object with smaller stiffness had higher ductility, velocity fluctuations of the external flow influenced the internal flow of the compliant object through deformation of the membrane.

  18. 49 CFR 180.211 - Repair, rebuilding and reheat treatment of DOT-4 series specification cylinders.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... insulation jacket using a mass spectrometer detection system; and (iii) Tested for heat conductivity...). (iii) The rebuilder may rebuild a DOT 4B, 4BA or 4BW cylinder having a water capacity of 9.07 kg (20...

  19. Cooling on the Front of an Air-cooled Engine Cylinder in a Conventional Engine Cowling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brevoort, M J; Joyner, U T

    1939-01-01

    Measurements were made of the cooling on the fronts of model cylinders in a conventional cowling for cooling in both the ground and the cruising conditions. The mechanisms of front and rear cooling are essentially different. Cooling on the rear baffled part of the cylinders continually increases with increasing fin width. For the front of the cylinder, an optimum fin width was found to exist beyond which an increase in width reduced the heat transfer. The heat transfer coefficient on the front of the cylinders was larger on the side of the cylinder facing the propeller swirl than on the opposite side. This effect became more pronounced as the fin width was increased. These results are introductory to the study of front cooling and show the general effect of several test parameters.

  20. Turbulent Flow Past Spinning Cylinders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mehmedagic, Igbal; Carlucci, Donald; Carlucci, Pasquale; Thangam, Siva

    2009-11-01

    Flow past cylinders aligned along their axis where a base freely spins while attached to a non-spinning forebody is considered from a computational and experimental point of view. The time-averaged equations of motion and energy are solved using the modeled form of transport equations for the turbulence kinetic energy and the scalar form of turbulence dissipation with an efficient finite-volume algorithm. An anisotropic two-equation Reynolds-stress model that incorporates the effect of rotation-modified energy spectrum and swirl is used to perform computations for the flow past axially rotating cylinders. Both rigid cylinders as well as that of cylinders with free-spinning base are considered from a computational point of view. A subsonic wind tunnel with a forward-sting mounted spinning cylinder is used for experiments. Experiments are performed for a range of spin rates and free stream flow conditions. The experimental results of Carlucci & Thangam (2001) are used to benchmark flow over spinning cylinders. The data is extended to munitions spinning in the wake of other munitions. Applications involving the design of projectiles are discussed.

  1. Piezoelectric actuator models for active sound and vibration control of cylinders

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lester, Harold C.; Lefebvre, Sylvie

    1993-01-01

    Analytical models for piezoelectric actuators, adapted from flat plate concepts, are developed for noise and vibration control applications associated with vibrating circular cylinders. The loadings applied to the cylinder by the piezoelectric actuators for the bending and in-plane force models are approximated by line moment and line force distributions, respectively, acting on the perimeter of the actuator patch area. Coupling between the cylinder and interior acoustic cavity is examined by studying the modal spectra, particularly for the low-order cylinder modes that couple efficiently with the cavity at low frequencies. Within the scope of this study, the in-plane force model produced a more favorable distribution of low-order modes, necessary for efficient interior noise control, than did the bending model.

  2. Flow-induced vibration of circular cylindrical structures

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, S.S.

    1987-01-01

    This book presents the flow-induced vibration of circular cylinders in quiescent fluid, axial flow, and crossflow, and applications of the analytical methods and experimental data in design evaluation of various system components consisting of circular cylinders. The information is organized into five general topical areas: Introduction: Chapter 1 presents an overview of flow-induced vibration of circular cylinders. It includes examples of flow-induced vibration, various fluid force components, and nondimensional parameters as well as different excitation mechanisms. The general principles are applicable under different flow conditions. Quiescent Fluid: Fluid inertia and fluid damping are discussed in Chapters 2, 3 and 4. Various flow theories are applied in different situations. Axial Flow: Axial flow can cause subcritical vibration and instability. Chapter 5 summarizes the results for internal flow, while Chapter 6 considers external flow. Both theoretical results and experimental data are examined. Crossflow: Different excitation mechanisms can be dominant in different conditions for crossflow. Those include turbulent buffeting, acoustic resonance, vortex excitation, and dynamic instability. Design Considerations: Applications of the general methods of analysis in the design evaluation of system components are described and various techniques to avoid detrimental vibration are presented.

  3. Assembly for electrical conductivity measurements in the piston cylinder device

    DOEpatents

    Watson, Heather Christine; Roberts, Jeffrey James

    2012-06-05

    An assembly apparatus for measurement of electrical conductivity or other properties of a sample in a piston cylinder device wherein pressure and heat are applied to the sample by the piston cylinder device. The assembly apparatus includes a body, a first electrode in the body, the first electrode operatively connected to the sample, a first electrical conductor connected to the first electrode, a washer constructed of a hard conducting material, the washer surrounding the first electrical conductor in the body, a second electrode in the body, the second electrode operatively connected to the sample, and a second electrical conductor connected to the second electrode.

  4. Heat exchanger for a Stirling engine

    SciTech Connect

    Fujiwara, M.; Nomaguchi, T.; Kazumoto, Y.; Tsuchino, K.; Kawajiri, K.; Hisamori, Y.

    1987-05-05

    A heat exchanger is described for a Stirling engine comprising: a domed cylinder having a domed portion and a cylindrical portion. The domed cylinder serves as a high-temperature cylinder and a regenerator housing of the Stirling engine; a cylindrical inner liner which is coaxially disposed inside the domed cylinder and which divides the inside of the domed cylinder into an expansion space inside of the inner liner and a regenerator space between the outer surface of the inner liner and the inner surface of the cylindrical portion of the domed cylinder.

  5. Circular, explosion-proof lamp provides uniform illumination

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1966-01-01

    Circular explosion-proof fluorescent lamp is fitted around a TV camera lens to provide shadowless illumination with a low radiant heat flux. The lamp is mounted in a transparent acrylic housing sealed with clear silicone rubber.

  6. Squaring a Circular Segment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gordon, Russell

    2008-01-01

    Consider a circular segment (the smaller portion of a circle cut off by one of its chords) with chord length c and height h (the greatest distance from a point on the arc of the circle to the chord). Is there a simple formula involving c and h that can be used to closely approximate the area of this circular segment? Ancient Chinese and Egyptian…

  7. Reduction of aerodynamic sound generated in a flow past an oscillating and a fixed cylinder in tandem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hattori, Yuji

    2015-11-01

    The aerodynamic sound generated in a two-dimensional flow past an oscillating and a fixed circular cylinder in tandem is studied. This flow can be regarded as a simplified model of the sound generation due to the interaction of rotating wings and a strut. The sound pressure is captured by direct numerical simulation of the compressible Navier-Stokes equations using the volume penalization method modified by the author. It is shown that synchronization plays a crucial role in sound reduction. When the frequency of the oscillating cylinder is smaller than that of vortex shedding of the fixed cylinder, the sound is significantly reduced due to synchronization as the frequency of vortex shedding is decreased. Sound reduction also depends on the distance between the cylinders. There are distances at which the forces exerted on the cylinders are in anti-phase so that the total force and thereby the resulting sound are significantly reduced.

  8. Local Heat Transfer for Finned-Tube Heat Exchangers using Oval Tubes

    SciTech Connect

    O'Brien, James Edward; Sohal, Manohar Singh

    2000-08-01

    This paper presents the results of an experimental study of forced convection heat transfer in a narrow rectangular duct fitted with either a circular tube or an elliptical tube in crossflow. The duct was designed to simulate a single passage in a fin-tube heat exchanger. Heat transfer measurements were obtained using a transient technique in which a heated airflow is suddenly introduced to the test section. High-resolution local fin-surface temperature distributions were obtained at several times after initiation of the transient using an imaging infrared camera. Corresponding local fin-surface heat transfer coefficient distributions were then calculated from a locally applied one-dimensional semi-infinite inverse heat conduction model. Heat transfer results were obtained over an airflow rate ranging from 1.56 x 10-3 to 15.6 x 10-3 kg/s. These flow rates correspond to a duct-height Reynolds number range of 630 – 6300 with a duct height of 1.106 cm and a duct width-toheight ratio, W/H, of 11.25. The test cylinder was sized such that the diameter-to-duct height ratio, D/H is 5. The elliptical tube had an aspect ratio of 3:1 and a/H equal to 4.33. Results presented in this paper reveal visual and quantitative details of local fin-surface heat transfer distributions in the vicinity of circular and oval tubes and their relationship to the complex horseshoe vortex system that forms in the flow stagnation region. Fin surface stagnation-region Nusselt numbers are shown to be proportional to the square-root of Reynolds number.

  9. Reordering transitions during annealing of block copolymer cylinder phases

    DOE PAGES

    Majewski, Pawel W.; Yager, Kevin G.

    2015-10-06

    While equilibrium block-copolymer morphologies are dictated by energy-minimization effects, the semi-ordered states observed experimentally often depend on the details of ordering pathways and kinetics. In this study, we explore reordering transitions in thin films of block-copolymer cylinder-forming polystyrene-block-poly(methyl methacrylate). We observe several transient states as films order towards horizontally-aligned cylinders. In particular, there is an early-stage reorganization from randomly-packed cylinders into hexagonally-packed vertically-aligned cylinders; followed by a reorientation transition from vertical to horizontal cylinder states. These transitions are thermally activated. The growth of horizontal grains within an otherwise vertical morphology proceeds anisotropically, resulting in anisotropic grains in the final horizontalmore » state. The size, shape, and anisotropy of grains are influenced by ordering history; for instance, faster heating rates reduce grain anisotropy. These results help elucidate aspects of pathway-dependent ordering in block-copolymer thin films.« less

  10. INVITED PAPER: The characteristics of the Aeolian tone radiated from two-dimensional cylinders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujita, Hajime

    2010-02-01

    Aerodynamic sound radiated from cylindrical objects, such as in a pantograph of a train, is a prime noise source in high-speed vehicles. The objective of this paper is to understand the generation mechanism of aerodynamic sound radiated from two-dimensional cylinders. Basic theories for aeroacoustics are reviewed. Three contributions to the field of experimental investigations of the Aeolian tone generation mechanism by the present author are reviewed. The structure of the low-noise wind tunnel and the use of proper model end plate construction to control acoustical and flow fields are discussed in section 3. Experimental investigation on the characteristics of aerodynamic sound radiated from two-dimensional models, such as a circular cylinder, square cylinders with or without rounded corners and a cylinder with modified square cross-section, is discussed in section 4. Experimental investigation of Aeolian tone generation and its relation with surface pressure fluctuation on a circular cylinder at moderate to high Reynolds number flow are discussed in section 5.

  11. Circular free-electron laser

    DOEpatents

    Brau, Charles A.; Kurnit, Norman A.; Cooper, Richard K.

    1984-01-01

    A high efficiency, free electron laser utilizing a circular relativistic electron beam accelerator and a circular whispering mode optical waveguide for guiding optical energy in a circular path in the circular relativistic electron beam accelerator such that the circular relativistic electron beam and the optical energy are spatially contiguous in a resonant condition for free electron laser operation. Both a betatron and synchrotron are disclosed for use in the present invention. A free electron laser wiggler is disposed around the circular relativistic electron beam accelerator for generating a periodic magnetic field to transform energy from the circular relativistic electron beam to optical energy.

  12. Filament winding cylinders. I - Process model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Soo-Yong; Springer, George S.

    1990-01-01

    A model was developed which describes the filament winding process of composite cylinders. The model relates the significant process variables such as winding speed, fiber tension, and applied temperature to the thermal, chemical and mechanical behavior of the composite cylinder and the mandrel. Based on the model, a user friendly code was written which can be used to calculate (1) the temperature in the cylinder and the mandrel, (2) the degree of cure and viscosity in the cylinder, (3) the fiber tensions and fiber positions, (4) the stresses and strains in the cylinder and in the mandrel, and (5) the void diameters in the cylinder.

  13. Enhancement of polarizabilities of cylinders with cylinder-slab resonances

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Meng; Huang, Xueqin; Liu, H.; Chan, C. T.

    2015-01-01

    If an object is very small in size compared with the wavelength of light, it does not scatter light efficiently. It is hence difficult to detect a very small object with light. We show using analytic theory as well as full wave numerical calculation that the effective polarizability of a small cylinder can be greatly enhanced by coupling it with a superlens type metamaterial slab. This kind of enhancement is not due to the individual resonance effect of the metamaterial slab, nor due to that of the object, but is caused by a collective resonant mode between the cylinder and the slab. We show that this type of particle-slab resonance which makes a small two-dimensional object much “brighter” is actually closely related to the reverse effect known in the literature as “cloaking by anomalous resonance” which can make a small cylinder undetectable. We also show that the enhancement of polarizability can lead to strongly enhanced electromagnetic forces that can be attractive or repulsive, depending on the material properties of the cylinder. PMID:25641391

  14. Finite-amplitude pressure waves in the radial mode of a cylinder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kubo, I.; Moore, F. K.

    1972-01-01

    A numerical study of finite-strength, isentropic pressure waves transverse to the axis of a circular cylinder was made for the radial resonant mode. The waves occur in a gas otherwise at rest, filling the cylinder. A method of characteristics was used for the numerical solution. For small but finite amplitudes, calculations indicate the existence of waves of permanent potential form. For larger amplitudes, a shock is indicated to occur. The critical value of the initial amplitude parameter in the power series is found to be 0.06 to 0.08, under various types of initial conditions.

  15. Amplification of high-order rainbows of a cylinder with an elliptical cross section.

    PubMed

    Lock, J A; Adler, C L; Stone, B R; Zajak, P D

    1998-03-20

    The intensity of high-order rainbows for normally incident light and certain rotation angles of a cylinder with an elliptical cross section is greatly amplified with respect to the intensity for a circular cross-sectional cylinder. The amplification is due to a number of the internal reflections occurring past the critical angle for total internal reflection, and the effect is especially strong for odd-order rainbows, beginning with the third order. Experimentally, the fourth- and the fifth-order rainbows of a nearly elliptical cross-sectional glass rod were observed and analyzed. PMID:18268744

  16. Compact waveguide circular polarizer

    DOEpatents

    Tantawi, Sami G.

    2016-08-16

    A multi-port waveguide is provided having a rectangular waveguide that includes a Y-shape structure with first top arm having a first rectangular waveguide port, a second top arm with second rectangular waveguide port, and a base arm with a third rectangular waveguide port for supporting a TE.sub.10 mode and a TE.sub.20 mode, where the end of the third rectangular waveguide port includes rounded edges that are parallel to a z-axis of the waveguide, a circular waveguide having a circular waveguide port for supporting a left hand and a right hand circular polarization TE.sub.11 mode and is coupled to a base arm broad wall, and a matching feature disposed on the base arm broad wall opposite of the circular waveguide for terminating the third rectangular waveguide port, where the first rectangular waveguide port, the second rectangular waveguide port and the circular waveguide port are capable of supporting 4-modes of operation.

  17. Wake flow pattern modified by small control cylinders at low Reynolds number

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuo, C.-H.; Chiou, L.-C.; Chen, C.-C.

    2007-08-01

    Passive wake control behind a circular cylinder in uniform flow is studied by numerical simulation for ReD ranging from 80 to 300. Two small control cylinders, with diameter d/D=1/8, are placed at x/D=0.5 and y/D=±0.6. Unlike the 1990 results of Strykowski and Sreenivasan, in the present study, the vortex street behind the main cylinder still exists but the fluctuating lift and the form drag on the main cylinder reduces significantly and monotonously as the Reynolds number increases from 80 to 300. Obstruction of the control cylinders to the incoming flow deflects part of the fluid to pass through the gap between the main and control cylinders, forming two symmetric streams. These streams not only eliminate the flow separation along the rear surface of the main cylinder, they also merge toward the wake centerline to create an advancing momentum in the immediate near-wake region. These two effects significantly reduce the wake width behind the main cylinder and lead to monotonous decrease of the form drag as the Reynolds number increases. As the Reynolds number gets higher, a large amount of the downstream advancing momentum significantly delays the vortex formation farther downstream, leading to a more symmetric flow structure in the near-wake region of the main cylinder. As the Reynolds number increases from 80 to 300, both increasing symmetry of the flow structure in the near-wake and significant delay of the vortex formation are the main reasons for the fluctuating lift to decrease monotonously.

  18. Design guide for calculating fluid damping for circular cylindrical structures. [LMFBR

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, S.S.

    1983-06-01

    Fluid damping plays an important role for structures submerged in fluid, subjected to flow, or conveying fluid. This design guide presents a summary of calculational procedures and design data for fluid damping for circular cylinders vibrating in quiescent fluid, crossflow, and parallel flow.

  19. Comparison of calculated and experimental results of fragmenting cylinder experiments

    SciTech Connect

    WILSON,L.T.; REEDAL,D.R.; KIPP,MARLIN E.; MARTINEZ,REINA R.; GRADY,D.E.

    2000-06-02

    The Grady-Kipp fragmentation model provides a physically based method for determining the fracture and breakup of materials under high loading rates. Recently, this model has been implemented into the CTH Shock Physics Code and has been used to simulate several published experiments. Materials studied in this paper are AerMet 100 steel and a 90% tungsten alloy. The experimental geometry consists of a right circular cylinder filled with an explosive main charge that is initiated at its center. The sudden expansion of the resulting detonation products causes fracture of the cylinder. Strain rates seen in the cylinder are on the order of 10{sup 4} s{sup {minus}1}. The average fragment sizes calculated with the Grady-Kipp fragmentation model successfully replicate the mean fragment size obtained from the experimental fragment distribution. When Poisson statistics are applied to the calculated local average fragment sizes, good correlation is also observed with the shape of the experimental cumulative fragment distribution. The experimental fragmentation results, CTH numerical simulations, and correlation of these numerical results with the experimental data are described.

  20. Rotating Cylinder Treatment System Demonstration

    EPA Science Inventory

    In August 2008, a rotating cylinder treatment system (RCTSTM) demonstration was conducted near Gladstone, CO. The RCTSTM is a novel technology developed to replace the aeration/oxidation and mixing components of a conventional lime precipitation treatment s...

  1. Video Analysis of Rolling Cylinders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Phommarach, S.; Wattanakasiwich, P.; Johnston, I.

    2012-01-01

    In this work, we studied the rolling motion of solid and hollow cylinders down an inclined plane at different angles. The motions were captured on video at 300 frames s[superscript -1], and the videos were analyzed frame by frame using video analysis software. Data from the real motion were compared with the theory of rolling down an inclined…

  2. Dragging a floating horizontal cylinder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Duck-Gyu; Kim, Ho-Young

    2010-11-01

    A cylinder immersed in a fluid stream experiences a drag, and it is well known that the drag coefficient is a function of the Reynolds number only. Here we study the force exerted on a long horizontal cylinder that is dragged perpendicular to its axis while floating on an air-water interface with a high Reynolds number. In addition to the flow-induced drag, the floating body is subjected to capillary forces along the contact line where the three phases of liquid/solid/gas meet. We first theoretically predict the meniscus profile around the horizontally moving cylinder assuming the potential flow, and show that the profile is in good agreement with that obtained experimentally. Then we compare our theoretical predictions and experimental measurement results for the drag coefficient of a floating horizontal cylinder that is given by a function of the Weber number and the Bond number. This study can help us to understand the horizontal motion of partially submerged objects at air-liquid interface, such as semi-aquatic insects and marine plants.

  3. Analysis on autofrettage of cylinders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Ruilin; Zhu, Guolin; Tang, Feng

    2012-05-01

    Autofrettage is an effective technique to improve load-bearing capacity and safety for pressure vessels. For autofrettaged cylinder, the depth of plastic zone, or overstrain is a key factor which affects load-bearing capacity and safety. The previous research on overstrain was not done in terms of the point of view of raising load-bearing capacity as far as possible and simultaneously avoiding compressive yield for cylinders experiencing autofrettage handling, and there were no analytic solutions of autofrettage in the above view point presented, the 3rd and 4th strength theories were not applied synthetically in the research to compare the results from these two theories. In this paper, with the aid of the analytic method, based on summing up the authors' previous research, results from autofrettage of a cylinder based on the 3rd and 4th strength theories are studied and compared, and the laws contained in the results are looked into. Then, the essential cause and reason for the obtained laws are analyzed and the inherent and meaning relations between various parameters in autofrettage theory are revealed. It is shown that the maximum radius ratio for equivalent residual stress at inside surface never exceeds the yield strength even for a cylinder experiencing wholly yielded autofrettage, or the critical radius ratio is k c=2.218 457 489 916 7…, irrespective of the 3rd or 4th strength theories. The equation relating the depth of plastic zone with the thickness of a cylinder is identical for the 3rd and 4th strength theories. In form, the optimum load-bearing capacity of an autofrettaged cylinder is two times the initial yield pressure of the unautofrettaged cylinder irrespective of the 3rd or 4th strength theory. The revealed inherent relations between various parameters and varying laws of the parameters as well as the forms of the relations under the 3rd and 4th strength theories not only have theoretical meanings but also have prospects in engineering

  4. 49 CFR 173.301 - General requirements for shipment of compressed gases and other hazardous materials in cylinders...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... cylinder containing a Class 8 liquid corrosive only to metal; (iii) A cylinder with a water capacity of 4.8... relief device, or bears evidence of physical abuse, fire or heat damage, or detrimental rusting or... that previously contained a Class 8 material must be requalified in accordance with § 180.205(e)...

  5. Simplified Heat-Source/Thermionic Converter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shimada, K.

    1983-01-01

    Radiation coupling of heat from heat-source cylinder to converter cylinder through vacuum gap eliminates need for high-temperature electrical insulators between reactor heat pipes and thermionic converters. In addition no radiatior heat pipe is necessary because collectors of thermionic converters from which excess heat must be removed radiate directly to space. New design concept is also applicable to terrestrial and non-nuclear thermionic power supplies.

  6. Integrated two-cylinder liquid piston Stirling engine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Ning; Rickard, Robert; Pluckter, Kevin; Sulchek, Todd

    2014-10-01

    Heat engines utilizing the Stirling cycle may run on low temperature differentials with the capacity to function at high efficiency due to their near-reversible operation. However, current approaches to building Stirling engines are laborious and costly. Typically the components are assembled by hand and additional components require a corresponding increase in manufacturing complexity, akin to electronics before the integrated circuit. We present a simple and integrated approach to fabricating Stirling engines with precisely designed cylinders. We utilize computer aided design and one-step, planar machining to form all components of the engine. The engine utilizes liquid pistons and displacers to harness useful work from heat absorption and rejection. As a proof of principle of the integrated design, a two-cylinder engine is produced and characterized and liquid pumping is demonstrated.

  7. Integrated two-cylinder liquid piston Stirling engine

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Ning; Rickard, Robert; Pluckter, Kevin; Sulchek, Todd

    2014-10-06

    Heat engines utilizing the Stirling cycle may run on low temperature differentials with the capacity to function at high efficiency due to their near-reversible operation. However, current approaches to building Stirling engines are laborious and costly. Typically the components are assembled by hand and additional components require a corresponding increase in manufacturing complexity, akin to electronics before the integrated circuit. We present a simple and integrated approach to fabricating Stirling engines with precisely designed cylinders. We utilize computer aided design and one-step, planar machining to form all components of the engine. The engine utilizes liquid pistons and displacers to harness useful work from heat absorption and rejection. As a proof of principle of the integrated design, a two-cylinder engine is produced and characterized and liquid pumping is demonstrated.

  8. Wake-induced vibrations in Tandem Cylinders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mysa, Ravi Chaithanya; Jaiman, Rajeev Kumar

    2015-11-01

    The upstream cylinder is fixed in the tandem cylinders arrangement. The downstream cylinder is placed at a distance of four diameters from the upstream cylinder in the free stream direction and is mounted on a spring. The dynamic response of the downstream cylinder is studied at Reynolds number of 10,000. The transverse displacement amplitude of the downstream cylinder is larger compared to that of single cylinder in the post-lock-in region. The transverse dynamic response of the downstream cylinder in the post-lock-in region is characterized by a dominant low frequency component compared to shed frequency, which is nearer to the structural natural frequency. The interaction of upstream wake with the downstream cylinder is carefully analyzed to understand the introduction of low frequency component in the transverse load along with the shed frequency. We found that the stagnation point moves in proportional to the velocity of the cylinder and is in-phase with the velocity. The low frequency component in the stagnation point movement on the downstream cylinder is sustained by the interaction of upstream wake. The frequencies in the movement of the stagnation point is reflected in the transverse load resulting in large deformation of the cylinder. The authors wish to acknowledge support from A*STAR- SERC and Singapore Maritime Institute.

  9. 49 CFR 230.83 - Cylinder cocks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION STEAM LOCOMOTIVE INSPECTION AND MAINTENANCE STANDARDS Steam Locomotives and Tenders Cabs, Warning Signals, Sanders and Lights § 230.83 Cylinder cocks. Each steam locomotive shall be equipped with cylinder cocks which can be operated from the cab of the steam locomotive. All cylinder...

  10. 49 CFR 230.83 - Cylinder cocks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION STEAM LOCOMOTIVE INSPECTION AND MAINTENANCE STANDARDS Steam Locomotives and Tenders Cabs, Warning Signals, Sanders and Lights § 230.83 Cylinder cocks. Each steam locomotive shall be equipped with cylinder cocks which can be operated from the cab of the steam locomotive. All cylinder...

  11. 49 CFR 230.83 - Cylinder cocks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION STEAM LOCOMOTIVE INSPECTION AND MAINTENANCE STANDARDS Steam Locomotives and Tenders Cabs, Warning Signals, Sanders and Lights § 230.83 Cylinder cocks. Each steam locomotive shall be equipped with cylinder cocks which can be operated from the cab of the steam locomotive. All cylinder...

  12. 49 CFR 230.83 - Cylinder cocks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION STEAM LOCOMOTIVE INSPECTION AND MAINTENANCE STANDARDS Steam Locomotives and Tenders Cabs, Warning Signals, Sanders and Lights § 230.83 Cylinder cocks. Each steam locomotive shall be equipped with cylinder cocks which can be operated from the cab of the steam locomotive. All cylinder...

  13. 49 CFR 230.83 - Cylinder cocks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION STEAM LOCOMOTIVE INSPECTION AND MAINTENANCE STANDARDS Steam Locomotives and Tenders Cabs, Warning Signals, Sanders and Lights § 230.83 Cylinder cocks. Each steam locomotive shall be equipped with cylinder cocks which can be operated from the cab of the steam locomotive. All cylinder...

  14. Wiimote Experiments: Circular Motion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kouh, Minjoon; Holz, Danielle; Kawam, Alae; Lamont, Mary

    2013-01-01

    The advent of new sensor technologies can provide new ways of exploring fundamental physics. In this paper, we show how a Wiimote, which is a handheld remote controller for the Nintendo Wii video game system with an accelerometer, can be used to study the dynamics of circular motion with a very simple setup such as an old record player or a…

  15. Wiimote Experiments: Circular Motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kouh, Minjoon; Holz, Danielle; Kawam, Alae; Lamont, Mary

    2013-03-01

    The advent of new sensor technologies can provide new ways of exploring fundamental physics. In this paper, we show how a Wiimote, which is a handheld remote controller for the Nintendo Wii video game system with an accelerometer, can be used to study the dynamics of circular motion with a very simple setup such as an old record player or a bicycle wheel.

  16. Copyright Basics. Circular 1.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Library of Congress, Washington, DC. Copyright Office.

    This circular answers some of the questions that are frequently asked about copyright, a form of protection provided by the laws of the United States to authors of "original works of authorship" including library, dramatic musical, artistic, and certain other intellectual works. The Copyright Act of 1976 (title 17 of the United States Code), which…

  17. Integrated hydraulic cooler and return rail in camless cylinder head

    DOEpatents

    Marriott, Craig D.; Neal, Timothy L.; Swain, Jeff L.; Raimao, Miguel A.

    2011-12-13

    An engine assembly may include a cylinder head defining an engine coolant reservoir, a pressurized fluid supply, a valve actuation assembly, and a hydraulic fluid reservoir. The valve actuation assembly may be in fluid communication with the pressurized fluid supply and may include a valve member displaceable by a force applied by the pressurized fluid supply. The hydraulic fluid reservoir may be in fluid communication with the valve actuation assembly and in a heat exchange relation to the engine coolant reservoir.

  18. Steam turbine with improved blade ring and cylinder interface

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, K.P.

    1992-10-06

    This patent describes a steam turbine having a cylinder with a plurality of steam inlets which feed a plurality of nozzle blocks and a curtis stage blade ring disposed adjacent the nozzle blocks. This patent describes improvement in a kerf extending from each port through an inner circumferential margin of the tongue to reduce heat induced stresses between the ports and inner circumferential margin of the tongue and prevent cracking thereof.

  19. Experimental study on free convection of sodium in a long cylinder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolesnichenko, I. V.; Mamykin, A. D.; Pavlinov, A. M.; Pakholkov, V. V.; Rogozhkin, S. A.; Frick, P. G.; Khalilov, R. I.; Shepelev, S. F.

    2015-06-01

    The operation experience of sodium fast reactor shows that during design-basis validation of pipelines and equipment it is necessary to take into account the sodium free convection in the enclosures. The paper presents the results of experimental study of free convection of liquid sodium in a long thermo-insulated cylinder with the end heat supply and removal. The sodium-filled cylinder diameter is 168 mm, length is 850 mm. Three experiments for horizontal, inclined (at 45° to a vertical line) and vertical position of the cylinder were compared in detail. The Rayleigh number (based on cylinder diameter) is approximately same for three experiments and is equal to 5 × 106. The structure of large-scale and small-scale flows was analyzed. Nusselt number estimations being the intensity measure of heat transfer in case of free convection were obtained. A relationship between the flow structure and the Nusselt number is revealed.

  20. Aerodynamic and thermal analysis of an engine cylinder head using numerical flow simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Taghavi, R.; Dupont, A.; Dupont, J.F. )

    1990-07-01

    This paper reports on a computational fluid dynamics code used as a guide during the development stage of a passenger car spark ignition engine. The focus is on the flow proiperties of the inlet port as well as the heat transfer characteristics of the proposed cylinder head design. In the first part of this study, the aerodynamic characteristics of two slightly different inlet ports are considered and their effect on the development of in-cylinder flow is examined. The collected information is used to estimate geometric sensitivity and assess the effects of drifts between design and actual production specifications of inlet ports. In the second part, the same computational code is used to simulate in-cylinder combustion and determine the resulting temperature and heat flux distribution on the cylinder head walls. A comparison is thn carried out between numerical results and experimental measurements and good agreement is obtained.

  1. Fluid motion within the cylinder of internal combustion engines - The 1986 Freeman Scholar Lecture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heywood, John B.

    1987-03-01

    Aspects of gas motion into, within, and out of the engine cylinder which govern the combustion characteristics and capabilities of spark-ignition engines and compression-ignition or diesel engines are considered. Flow characteristics through inlet and exhaust valves in four-stroke cycle engines, and through ports in the cylinder liner in two-stroke cycle engines, are discussed. Features and turbulence characteristics of common in-cylinder flows including the large scale rotating flows precipitated by the conical intake jet and two-stroke scavenger flows are reviewed. The flow phenomenon near walls are then discussed, with application to heat transfer and hydrocarbon emissions phenomena.

  2. Circular Bioassay Platforms for Applications in Microwave-Accelerated Techniques

    PubMed Central

    Mohammed, Muzaffer; Clement, Travis C.; Aslan, Kadir

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we present the design of four different circular bioassay platforms, which are suitable for homogeneous microwave heating, using theoretical calculations (i.e., COMSOL™ multiphysics software). Circular bioassay platforms are constructed from poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) for optical transparency between 400–800 nm, has multiple sample capacity (12, 16, 19 and 21 wells) and modified with silver nanoparticle films (SNFs) to be used in microwave-accelerated bioassays (MABs). In addition, a small monomode microwave cavity, which can be operated with an external microwave generator (100 W), for use with the bioassay platforms in MABs is also developed. Our design parameters for the circular bioassay platforms and monomode microwave cavity during microwave heating were: (i) temperature profiles, (ii) electric field distributions, (iii) location of the circular bioassay platforms inside the microwave cavity, and (iv) design and number of wells on the circular bioassay platforms. We have also carried out additional simulations to assess the use of circular bioassay platforms in a conventional kitchen microwave oven (e.g., 900 W). Our results show that the location of the circular bioassay platforms in the microwave cavity was predicted to have a significant effect on the homogeneous heating of these platforms. The 21-well circular bioassay platform design in our monomode microwave cavity was predicted to offer a homogeneous heating pattern, where inter-well temperature was observed to be in between 23.72–24.13°C and intra-well temperature difference was less than 0.21°C for 60 seconds of microwave heating, which was also verified experimentally. PMID:25568813

  3. Massless rotating fermions inside a cylinder

    SciTech Connect

    Ambruş, Victor E.; Winstanley, Elizabeth

    2015-12-07

    We study rotating thermal states of a massless quantum fermion field inside a cylinder in Minkowski space-time. Two possible boundary conditions for the fermion field on the cylinder are considered: the spectral and MIT bag boundary conditions. If the radius of the cylinder is sufficiently small, rotating thermal expectation values are finite everywhere inside the cylinder. We also study the Casimir divergences on the boundary. The rotating thermal expectation values and the Casimir divergences have different properties depending on the boundary conditions applied at the cylinder. This is due to the local nature of the MIT bag boundary condition, while the spectral boundary condition is nonlocal.

  4. Stabilization of Taylor-Couette flow due to time-periodic outer cylinder oscillation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murray, B. T.; Mcfadden, G. B.; Coriell, S. R.

    1990-01-01

    The linear stability of circular Couette flow between concentric infinite cylinders is considered for the case when the inner cylinder is rotated at a constant angular velocity and the outer cylinder is driven sinusoidally in time with zero mean rotation. This configuration was studied experimentally by Walsh and Donnelly. The critical Reynolds numbers calculated from linear stability theory agree well with the experimental values, except at large modulation amplitudes and small frequencies. The theoretical values are obtained using Floquet theory implemented in two distinct approaches: a truncated Fourier series representation in time, and a fundamental solution matrix based on a Chebyshev pseudospectral representation in space. For large amplitude, low frequency modulation, the linear eigenfunctions are temporally complex, consisting of a quiescent region followed by rapid change in the perturbed flow velocities.

  5. Velocity field in a vicinity of cylinder bouncing off horizontal wall

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chara, Z.; Kysela, B.; Dolansky, J.

    2016-06-01

    The paper describes experimental and numerical investigations of velocity fields around a circular cylinder colliding perpendicularly with a plane wall. The cylinder of the diameter D = 20 mm was moving vertically in a water tank and the motion was recorded by a fast digital camera. Reynolds numbers ranged from 3000 to 8100 and the initial positions L of the cylinder above the wall were L/D = 2.5; 3.5; 4.5 and 5.5. An evolution of fluid agitation in an area close to the impact point was based on the results of the velocity field measurements. The numerical simulations were performed using a 2D-LES model.

  6. The dynamics of flow around a cylinder at subcritical Reynolds numbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yokuda, S.; Ramaprian, B. R.

    1990-05-01

    Mean and fluctuating pressure and skin friction around a circular cylinder in cross-flow were studied in the subcritical Reynolds number range, 10,000- 100,000. Results are presented for two cases, namely, with and without a splitter plate behind the cylinder. The splitter plate was used to suppress vortex shedding. The nonlinear dynamics of the flow around the cylinder was examined to characterize the process of laminar separation in terms of the number of degrees of freedom, and to determine whether the process is chaotic. For this purpose, the Grassberger-Procaccia correlation dimension and the largest Liapunov exponent were estimated from the time series of the pressure data. The results indicate a correlation dimension of the order of 10-12 both in the presence and absence of the splitter plate.

  7. Scattering by an infinite homogenous anisotropic elliptic cylinder in terms of Mathieu functions and Fourier series.

    PubMed

    Mao, Shi-Chun; Wu, Zhen-Sen

    2008-12-01

    An exact solution to the two-dimensional scattering properties of an anisotropic elliptic cylinder for transverse electric polarization is presented. The internal field in an anisotropic elliptic cylinder is expressed as integral representations of Mathieu functions and Fourier series. The coefficients of the series expansion are obtained by imposing boundary conditions on the anisotropic-free-space interface. A matrix is developed to solve the nonorthogonality properties of Mathieu functions at the interface between two different media. Numerical results are given for the bistatic radar cross section and the amplitude of the total magnetic field along the x and y axes. The result is in agreement with that available as expected when an elliptic cylinder degenerates to a circular one.

  8. Conjugate natural convection between horizontal eccentric cylinders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nasiri, Davood; Dehghan, Ali Akbar; Hadian, Mohammad Reza

    2016-06-01

    This study involved the numerical investigation of conjugate natural convection between two horizontal eccentric cylinders. Both cylinders were considered to be isothermal with only the inner cylinder having a finite wall thickness. The momentum and energy equations were discretized using finite volume method and solved by employing SIMPLER algorithm. Numerical results were presented for various solid-fluid conductivity ratios (KR) and various values of eccentricities in different thickness of inner cylinder wall and also for different angular positions of inner cylinder. From the results, it was observed that in an eccentric case, and for KR < 10, an increase in thickness of inner cylinder wall resulted in a decrease in the average equivalent conductivity coefficient (overline{{K_{eq} }} ); however, a KR > 10 value caused an increase in overline{{K_{eq} }} . It was also concluded that in any angular position of inner cylinder, the value of overline{{K_{eq} }} increased with increase in the eccentricity.

  9. Generalized Bistability in Origami Cylinders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reid, Austin; Adda-Bedia, Mokhtar; Lechenault, Frederic

    Origami folded cylinders (origami bellows) have found increasingly sophisticated applications in space flight, medicine, and even experimental nuclear physics. In spite of this interest, a general understanding of the dynamics of an origami folded cylinder has been elusive. By solving the fully constrained behavior of a periodic fundamental origami cell defined by unit vectors, we have found an analytic solution for all possible rigid-face states accessible from a cylindrical Miura-ori pattern. Although an idealized bellows has two rigid-face configurations over a well-defined region, a physical device, limited by nonzero material thickness and forced to balance hinge with plate-bending energy, often cannot stably maintain a stowed configuration. We have identified and measured the parameters which control this emergent bistability, and have demonstrated the ability to fabricate bellows with tunable deployability.

  10. [Guizhou planned parenthood circular].

    PubMed

    1980-05-29

    The Guizhou Provincial CCP Committee and the provinical people's government recently issued a circular on launching mass inspection of planned parenthood work throughout the province in late June. The inspection will look at whether or not the masses have been mobilized to pay serious attention to planned parenthood work, whether or not such education has been launched, what kind of concrete measures have been adopted, and what kind of concrete experiences have been learned. It will also include the implementation of birth control measures, the resolute prohibition on having a 3rd child, and the promotion of having only 1 child/couple. The circular urged the departments at all levels to strengthen their leadership over planned parenthood work, deepen investigation and study, continuously study the new situation and solve the new problems.

  11. Circular inferences in schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Jardri, Renaud; Denève, Sophie

    2013-11-01

    A considerable number of recent experimental and computational studies suggest that subtle impairments of excitatory to inhibitory balance or regulation are involved in many neurological and psychiatric conditions. The current paper aims to relate, specifically and quantitatively, excitatory to inhibitory imbalance with psychotic symptoms in schizophrenia. Considering that the brain constructs hierarchical causal models of the external world, we show that the failure to maintain the excitatory to inhibitory balance results in hallucinations as well as in the formation and subsequent consolidation of delusional beliefs. Indeed, the consequence of excitatory to inhibitory imbalance in a hierarchical neural network is equated to a pathological form of causal inference called 'circular belief propagation'. In circular belief propagation, bottom-up sensory information and top-down predictions are reverberated, i.e. prior beliefs are misinterpreted as sensory observations and vice versa. As a result, these predictions are counted multiple times. Circular inference explains the emergence of erroneous percepts, the patient's overconfidence when facing probabilistic choices, the learning of 'unshakable' causal relationships between unrelated events and a paradoxical immunity to perceptual illusions, which are all known to be associated with schizophrenia. PMID:24065721

  12. Circular inferences in schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Jardri, Renaud; Denève, Sophie

    2013-11-01

    A considerable number of recent experimental and computational studies suggest that subtle impairments of excitatory to inhibitory balance or regulation are involved in many neurological and psychiatric conditions. The current paper aims to relate, specifically and quantitatively, excitatory to inhibitory imbalance with psychotic symptoms in schizophrenia. Considering that the brain constructs hierarchical causal models of the external world, we show that the failure to maintain the excitatory to inhibitory balance results in hallucinations as well as in the formation and subsequent consolidation of delusional beliefs. Indeed, the consequence of excitatory to inhibitory imbalance in a hierarchical neural network is equated to a pathological form of causal inference called 'circular belief propagation'. In circular belief propagation, bottom-up sensory information and top-down predictions are reverberated, i.e. prior beliefs are misinterpreted as sensory observations and vice versa. As a result, these predictions are counted multiple times. Circular inference explains the emergence of erroneous percepts, the patient's overconfidence when facing probabilistic choices, the learning of 'unshakable' causal relationships between unrelated events and a paradoxical immunity to perceptual illusions, which are all known to be associated with schizophrenia.

  13. Switchable circular beam deflectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shang, Xiaobing; Joshi, Pankaj; Tan, Jin-Yi; De Smet, Jelle; Cuypers, Dieter; Baghdasaryan, Tigran; Vervaeke, Michael; Thienpont, Hugo; De Smet, Herbert

    2016-04-01

    In this work, we report two types of electrically tunable photonic devices with circularly symmetric polarization independent beam steering performance (beam condensing resp. beam broadening). The devices consist of circular micro grating structures combined with nematic liquid crystal (LC) layers with anti-parallel alignment. A single beam deflector converts a polarized and monochromatic green laser beam (λ =543.5 nm) into a diffraction pattern, with the peak intensity appearing at the third order when 0~{{V}\\text{pp}} is applied and at the zeroth order (no deflection) for voltages above 30~{{V}\\text{pp}} . Depending on the shape of the grating structure (non-inverted or inverted), the deflection is inwards or outwards. Both grating types can be made starting from the same diamond-tooled master mold. A polarized white light beam is symmetrically condensed resp. broadened over 2° in the off state and is passed through unchanged in the on state. By stacking two such devices with mutually orthogonal LC alignment layers, polarization independent switchable circular beam deflectors are realized with a high transmittance (>80%), and with the same beam steering performance as the polarization dependent single devices.

  14. Honeybee combs: how the circular cells transform into rounded hexagons.

    PubMed

    Karihaloo, B L; Zhang, K; Wang, J

    2013-09-01

    We report that the cells in a natural honeybee comb have a circular shape at 'birth' but quickly transform into the familiar rounded hexagonal shape, while the comb is being built. The mechanism for this transformation is the flow of molten visco-elastic wax near the triple junction between the neighbouring circular cells. The flow may be unconstrained or constrained by the unmolten wax away from the junction. The heat for melting the wax is provided by the 'hot' worker bees.

  15. Fire testing of bare uranium hexafluoride cylinders

    SciTech Connect

    Pryor, W.A.

    1991-12-31

    In 1965, the Oak Ridge Gaseous Diffusion Plant (ORGDP), now the K-25 Site, conducted a series of tests in which bare cylinders of uranium hexafluoride (UF{sub 6}) were exposed to engulfing oil fires for the US Atomic Energy Commission (AEC), now the US Department of Energy (DOE). The tests are described and the results, conclusions, and observations are presented. Two each of the following types of cylinders were tested: 3.5-in.-diam {times} 7.5-in.-long cylinders of Monel (Harshaw), 5.0-in.-diam {times} x 30-in.-long cylinders of Monel, and 8-in.-diam {times} 48-in.-long cylinders of nickel. The cylinders were filled approximately to the standard UF{sub 6} fill limits of 5, 55, and 250 lb, respectively, with a U-235 content of 0.22%. The 5-in.- and 8-in.-diam cylinders were tested individually with and without their metal valve covers. For the 3.5-in.-diam Harshaw cylinders and the 5.0-in.-diam cylinder without a valve cover, the valves failed and UF{sub 6} was released. The remaining 6 cylinders ruptured explosively in time intervals ranging from about 8.5 to 11 min.

  16. Fire testing of bare uranium hexafluoride cylinders

    SciTech Connect

    Pryor, W.A.

    1991-12-31

    In 1965, the Oak Ridge Gaseous Diffusion Plant (ORGDP), now the K-25 Site, conducted a series of tests in which bare cylinders of uranium hexafluoride (UF{sub 6}) were exposed to engulfing oil fires for the US Atomic Energy Commission (AEC), now the US Department of Energy (DOE). The tests are described and the results, conclusions, and observations are presented. Two each of the following types of cylinders were tested: 3.5-in.-diam {times} 7.5-in.-long cylinders of Monel (Harshaw), 5.0-in.-diam {times} 30-in.-long cylinders of Monel, and 8-in.-diam {times} 48-in.-long cylinders of nickel. The cylinders were filled approximately to the standard UF{sub 6} fill limits of 5, 55, and 250 lb, respectively, with a U-235 content of 0.22%. The 5-in.- and 8-in.-diam cylinders were tested individually with and without their metal valve covers. For the 3.5-in.-diam Harshaw cylinders and the 5.0-in.-diam cylinder without a valve cover the valves failed and UF{sub 6} was released. The remaining cylinders ruptured explosively in time intervals ranging from about 8.5 to 11 min.

  17. Exciting forces for a wave energy device consisting of a pair of coaxial cylinders in water of finite depth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hassan, Mohammad; Bora, Swaroop Nandan

    2013-09-01

    Two coaxial vertical cylinders-one is a riding hollow cylinder and the other a solid cylinder of greater radius at some distance above an impermeable horizontal bottom, were considered. This problem of diffraction by these two cylinders, which were considered as idealization of a buoy and a circular plate, can be considered as a wave energy device. The wave energy that is created and transferred by this device can be appropriately used in many applications in lieu of conventional energy. Method of separation of variables was used to obtain the analytical expressions for the diffracted potentials in four clearly identified regions. By applying the appropriate matching conditions along the three virtual boundaries between the regions, a system of linear equations was obtained, which was solved for the unknown coefficients. The potentials allowed us to obtain the exciting forces acting on both cylinders. Sets of exciting forces were obtained for different radii of the cylinders and for different gaps between the cylinders. It was observed that changes in radius and the gap had significant effect on the forces. It was found that mostly the exciting forces were significant only at lower frequencies. The exciting forces almost vanished at higher frequencies. The problem was also investigated for the base case of no plate arrangement, i.e., the case having only the floating cylinder tethered to the sea-bed. Comparison of forces for both arrangements was carried out. In order to take care of the radiation of the cylinders due to surge motion, the corresponding added mass and the damping coefficients for both cylinders were also computed. All the results were depicted graphically and compared with available results.

  18. Operation of a Four-Cylinder 1.9L Propane Fueled Homogeneous Charge Compression Ignition Engine: Basic Operating Characteristics and Cylinder-to-Cylinder Effects

    SciTech Connect

    Flowers, D; Aceves, S M; Martinez-Frias, J; Smith, J R; Au, M; Girard, J; Dibble, R

    2001-03-12

    A four-cylinder 1.9 Volkswagen TDI Engine has been converted to run in Homogeneous Charge Compression Ignition (HCCI) mode. The stock configuration is a turbocharged direct injection Diesel engine. The combustion chamber has been modified by discarding the in-cylinder Diesel fuel injectors and replacing them with blank inserts (which contain pressure transducers). The stock pistons contain a reentrant bowl and have been retained for the tests reported here. The intake and exhaust manifolds have also been retained, but the turbocharger has been removed. A heater has been installed upstream of the intake manifold and fuel is added just downstream of this heater. The performance of this engine in naturally aspirated HCCI operation, subject to variable intake temperature and fuel flow rate, has been studied. The engine has been run with propane fuel at a constant speed of 1800 rpm. This work is intended to characterize the HCCI operation of the engine in this configuration that has been minimally modified from the base Diesel engine. The performance (BMEP, IMEP, efficiency, etc) and emissions (THC, CO, NOx) of the engine are presented, as are combustion process results based on heat release analysis of the pressure traces from each cylinder.

  19. On vortex shedding from a hexagonal cylinder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khaledi, Hatef A.; Andersson, Helge I.

    2011-10-01

    The unsteady wake behind a hexagonal cylinder in cross-flow is investigated numerically. The time-dependent three-dimensional Navier-Stokes equations are solved for three different Reynolds numbers Re and for two different cylinder orientations. The topology of the vortex shedding depends on the orientation and the Strouhal frequency is generally higher in the wake of a face-oriented cylinder than behind a corner-oriented cylinder. For both orientations a higher Strouhal number St is observed when Re is increased from 100 to 500 whereas St is unaffected by a further increase up to Re=1000. The distinct variation of St with the orientation of the hexagonal cylinder relative to the oncoming flow is opposite of earlier findings for square cylinder wakes which exhibited a higher St with corner orientation than with face orientation.

  20. Two-stroke multi-cylinder engine

    SciTech Connect

    Okumura, S.; Hakamata, K.

    1988-11-29

    This patent describes an internal combustion engine having a pair of cylinder bores disposed at an angle to each other, pistons reciprocating in the cylinder bores, a crankshaft supported for rotation about an axis relative to the cylinder bores, connecting rods for transferring reciprocation of the pistons into rotation of the crankshaft, the connection between the pistons and the connecting rods being such that a side thrust is exerted on the pistons for causing the pistons to tilt in the cylinder bores during the power strokes of the pistons, and exhaust ports opening into the cylinder bores at one side of a plane passing through the respective cylinder bore axis and parallel to the crankshaft rotational axis, the improvement comprising each of the exhaust ports opening through the same side of the respective plane with respect to the direction of rotation of the crankshaft.

  1. Sub-grid drag models for horizontal cylinder arrays immersed in gas-particle multiphase flows

    SciTech Connect

    Sarkar, Avik; Sun, Xin; Sundaresan, Sankaran

    2013-09-08

    Immersed cylindrical tube arrays often are used as heat exchangers in gas-particle fluidized beds. In multiphase computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations of large fluidized beds, explicit resolution of small cylinders is computationally infeasible. Instead, the cylinder array may be viewed as an effective porous medium in coarse-grid simulations. The cylinders' influence on the suspension as a whole, manifested as an effective drag force, and on the relative motion between gas and particles, manifested as a correction to the gas-particle drag, must be modeled via suitable sub-grid constitutive relationships. In this work, highly resolved unit-cell simulations of flow around an array of horizontal cylinders, arranged in a staggered configuration, are filtered to construct sub-grid, or `filtered', drag models, which can be implemented in coarse-grid simulations. The force on the suspension exerted by the cylinders is comprised of, as expected, a buoyancy contribution, and a kinetic component analogous to fluid drag on a single cylinder. Furthermore, the introduction of tubes also is found to enhance segregation at the scale of the cylinder size, which, in turn, leads to a reduction in the filtered gas-particle drag.

  2. Temperature distribution in microwave sintering of alumina cylinders

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, J.R. Jr.; Katz, J.D.; Blake, R.D.

    1994-04-01

    Small cylinders of high-purity alumina were encased in a `casket` of low-density zirconia insulation and heated to sintering temperature in a large multi-mode microwave oven. Optical fiber sensors were used to monitor the temperature at several locations in the system. It was found that the alumina samples heat faster than the zirconia insulation at temperatures above 1000 C, and that the temperature distribution in the sample is essentially uniform during the heating process. A two-dimensional mathematical model of the heat transfer process was developed which reproduces the essential features of the observed phenomena. Literature data for all temperature-dependent properties were incorporated into the model. The model suggests that the alumina samples absorb a significant fraction of the microwave energy.

  3. Experimental investigation of flow characteristics around four square-cylinder arrays at subcritical Reynolds numbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Mingyue; Xiao, Longfei; Yang, Lijun

    2015-09-01

    The Deep Draft Semi-Submersible (DDS) concepts are known for their favourable vertical motion performance. However, the DDS may experience critical Vortex-Induced Motion (VIM) stemming from the fluctuating forces on the columns. In order to investigate the current-induced excitation forces of VIM, an experimental study of flow characteristics around four square-section cylinders in a square configuration is presented. A number of column spacing ratios and array attack angles were considered to investigate the parametric influences. The results comprise flow patterns, drag and lift forces, as well as Strouhal numbers. It is shown that both the drag and lift forces acting on the cylinders are slightly different between the various L/D values, and the fluctuating forces peak at L/D = 4.14. The lift force of downstream cylinders reaches its maximum at around α = 15°. Furthermore, the flow around circular-section-cylinder arrays is also discussed in comparison with that of square cylinders.

  4. Comparison of Flow Structures in the Downstream Region of a Cylinder with Flexible Strip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tekşin, Süleyman; Yayla, Sedat

    2015-05-01

    The present study investigates the details of flow structure to downstream of a circular cylinder mounted on a flat surface, in successive plan-view plane both in the boundary layer and up level region. The behavior of the flow in the wake of the bare cylinder and attached a flexible strip which has a 1400 N/mm2 modulus of elasticity vinyl PVC transperent film. The length of strip 240 mm (L/D=4) is investigated using Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) technique for Reynolds numbers based on the cylinder diameter of 2500. The flow data downstream of the cylinder are presented using time-averaged velocity vector map, Vavg, streamline patterns, ψavg, vorticity contours, ωavg, and Reynolds stress correlations, u'u' avg, v'v' avg, u'v' avg and rms velocity values. The locations of the peak values of Reynolds stress correlations and other data are also presented in both bare cylinder and attached body in order to determine the regions under high fluctuations. Another L/D ratios will be investigated in other experiments.

  5. Flow in a torsionally oscillating filled cylinder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schafer, C. F.

    1983-01-01

    The flow of a liquid in a completely filled cylinder undergoing torsional oscillations about its longitudinal symmetry axis was studied analytically and experimentally. The objective of the studies was to determine the efficacy of the torsional oscillations in mixing the confined liquid. Flow was found to be confined primarily to toroidal cells at the ends of the cylinder. Cell thickness was about equal to the cylinder radius. The use of baffles at the end walls was shown to enhance the mixing process.

  6. Wave power extraction from a transient heaving cylinder

    SciTech Connect

    Hudspeth, R. T.; Slotta, L. S.

    1980-01-01

    Wave power extracted from the transient motion of a periodically restrained-released heaving circular cylinder proposed by Falnes and Budal is examined under the limitations of linear wave theory excitation. Numerical estimates for the normalized radiated wave amplitudes required for the waveforce excitation derived by Mei are computed from the computationally efficient variational method developed by Black and Mei for the wave force diffraction regime. Wave power estimates for the rising period only of the heaving motion are given; while the falling period of the motion is neglected. A graphical summary is presented which demonstrates the parametric dependency of the dimensionless wave power rate on the design wave parameters and the body geometry for three general types of transient power systems heaving in deep water conditions. The total power requirements for the complete power extraction system as well as the real fluid viscous effects are not included.

  7. Rotating cylinder design as a lifting generator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asrokin, Azharrudin; Rizal Ramly, Mohammad; Halim Ahmad, Abdul

    2013-12-01

    The airfoil shape of a wing has always been the design to generate lift. But few realized that a simple rotating cylinder can also create lift. However, the explanation and study of how a rotating cylinder creates lift are still complex. In remote area where it is difficult for air vehicle to access, the exploration and discovery of different configuration for design concept is rather important. Due to this reason, there is a need to think of a lift generator that can produce better lift (few fold better than conventional airfoil) at lower speed to take off in a short distance of time. This paper will explain the conditions and the design of such a wing using the rotating cylinder concept that will take off in a short time and requires little takeoff and landing strip. Spokes will be attached to the cylinder to force the surrounding air to rotate along with the cylinder. This will create a vortex that hastens the speed of the air on top of the cylinder and at the same time retarding the speed of air below the cylinder. From the results, the rougher surface cylinder produces more lift when rotating and also, higher speed rotation of the cylinder greatly changes the speed of the surrounding air, thus better lift.

  8. A Visual Photographic Study of Cylinder Lubrication

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shaw, Milton C; Nussdorfer, Theodore

    1946-01-01

    A V-type engine provided with a glass cylinder was used to study visually the lubrication characteristics of an aircraft-type piston. Photographs and data were obtained with the engine motored at engine speeds up to 1000 r.p.m. and constant cylinder-head pressures of 0 and 50 pounds per square inch. A study was made of the orientation of the piston under various operating conditions, which indicated that the piston was inclined with the crown nearest the major-thrust cylinder face throughout the greater part of the cycle. The piston moved laterally in the cylinder under the influence of piston side thrust.

  9. Monitoring of corrosion in ORGDP cylinder yards

    SciTech Connect

    Henson, H.M.; Frazier, J.L.; Barlow, C.R.; Ziehlke, K.T.

    1988-01-01

    Process tailings from US uranium isotope enrichment activities are stored in mild steel cylinders designed and manufactured according to ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code criteria. Most storage facilities are open areas adjacent to the enrichment plants where the cylinders are exposed to weather; approximately 5000 cylinders are in several cylinder yards at the Oak Ridge Gaseous Diffusion Plant (ORGDP). Since mild steel will corrode under these storage conditions, significant work is being done to determine general corrosion behavior of tails cylinders and to estimate anticipated lifetimes. The program under way at the ORGDP is targeted at conditions specific to the Oak Ridge cylinder yards. The work includes (1) determination of the current conditions of cylinders stored in these yards, (2) description of rusting behavior in regions of the cylinders showing accelerated attack, (3) the monitoring of corrosion rates through periodic measurement of test coupons placed within the cylinder yards, and (4) establishment of a computer base to incorporate and retain these data. The information obtained will enhance planning for continuing safe storage of the tails materials. 8 refs., 6 figs.

  10. Overseas shipments of 48Y cylinders

    SciTech Connect

    Tanaka, R.T.; Furlan, A.S.

    1991-12-31

    This paper describes experiences with two incidents of overseas shipments of uranium hexafluoride (UF{sub 6}) cylinders. The first incident involved nine empty UF{sub 6} cylinders in enclosed sea containers. Three UF{sub 6} cylinders broke free from their tie-downs and damaged and contaminated several sea containers. This paper describes briefly how decontamination was carried out. The second incident involved a shipment of 14 full UF{sub 6} cylinders. Although the incident did not cause an accident, the potential hazard was significant. The investigation of the cause of the near accident is recounted. Recommendations to alleviate future similar incidents for both cases are presented.

  11. Fire exposure of empty 30B cylinders

    SciTech Connect

    Ziehlke, K.T.

    1991-12-31

    Cylinders for UF{sub 6} handling, transport, and storage are designed and built as unfired pressure vessels under ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code criteria and standards. They are normally filled and emptied while UF{sub 6} is in its liquid phase. Transport cylinders such as the Model 30B are designed for service at 200 psi and 250{degrees}F, to sustain the process conditions which prevail during filling or emptying operations. While in transport, however, at ambient temperature the UF{sub 6} is solid, and the cylinder interior is well below atmospheric pressure. When the cylinders contain isotopically enriched product (above 1.0 percent U-235), they are transported in protective overpacks which function to guard the cylinders and their contents against thermal or mechanical damage in the event of possible transport accidents. Two bare Model 30B cylinders were accidentally exposed to a storage warehouse fire in which a considerable amount of damage was sustained by stored materials and the building structure, as well as by the cylinder valves and valve protectors. The cylinders were about six years old, and had been cleaned, inspected, hydrotested, and re-certified for service, but were still empty at the time of the fire. The privately-owned cylinders were transferred to DOE for testing and evaluation of the fire damage.

  12. Planetary Rings: Circular and Non-circular

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    French, R. G.; Nicholson, P. D.; Colwell, J.; Marouf, E. A.; Rappaport, N. J.; Hedman, M. M.; McGhee, C.; Lonergan, K.; Sepersky, T.

    2011-12-01

    Although Saturn's rings appear at first glance to be axisymmetric, more precise measurements reveal that many of the gap edges and narrow ringlets within the rings are noncircular, a characteristic they share with the narrow uranian rings. A careful study of these features is of interest for several reasons: (i) resonantly-forced perturbations are believed to prevent the rings from spreading under the influence of collisions, (ii) unforced distortions, mostly eccentricities, can lead to estimates of the surface mass density and viscosity of the rings, and (iii) accurately-measured apsidal precession rates provide information on Saturn's zonal gravity harmonics. We present preliminary results from a comprehensive study of noncircular features in the Cassini Division and in the C ring. The data used in this study come from three Cassini experiments, and cover the period from May 2005 to September 2010. Over 120 stellar occultations have been observed by the Ultraviolet Imaging Spectrometer (UVIS) and by the Visual and Infrared Imaging Spectrometer (VIMS). In addition, we include 12 occultations of the spacecraft's radio Radio Science Subsystem (RSS) by the rings observed on Earth in May-September 2005. The simplest noncircular features can be modeled as inclined Keplerian ellipses, freely precessing under the influence of Saturn's oblate gravity field. In agreement with similar fits to the VIMS occultation data alone, we find that the inner edges of 7 of the 8 gaps within the Cassini Division are eccentric, with amplitudes ranging from 0.9 km to 28.3 km. In contrast, most of the outer gap edges are near-circular. We also find a rich assortment of normal modes on the edges of both ringlets and gaps. We have searched for modes with wavenumber m as high as 8, and find convincing evidence for modes with m = 0, 2, 3, 4 and 5, all with amplitudes of 1 km or greater. In some cases, as many as 3 or 4 normal modes coexist at a single edge with comparable amplitudes. Our fits

  13. Internal combustion engine cylinder-to-cylinder balancing with balanced air-fuel ratios

    SciTech Connect

    Harris, Ralph E.; Bourn, Gary D.; Smalley, Anthony J.

    2006-01-03

    A method of balancing combustion among cylinders of an internal combustion engine. For each cylinder, a normalized peak firing pressure is calculated as the ratio of its peak firing pressure to its combustion pressure. Each cylinder's normalized peak firing pressure is compared to a target value for normalized peak firing pressure. The fuel flow is adjusted to any cylinder whose normalized peak firing pressure is not substantially equal to the target value.

  14. Numerical modeling and experimental measurements of water spray impact and transport over a cylinder.

    SciTech Connect

    Avedisian, C. T.; Presser, Cary; DesJardin, Paul Edward; Hewson, John C.; Yoon, Sam Sukgoo

    2005-03-01

    This study compares experimental measurements and numerical simulations of liquid droplets over heated (to a near surface temperature of 423 K) and unheated cylinders. The numerical model is based on an unsteady Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) formulation using a stochastic separated flow (SSF) approach for the droplets that includes submodels for droplet dispersion, heat and mass transfer, and impact on a solid surface. The details of the droplet impact model are presented and the model is used to simulate water spray impingement on a cylinder. Computational results are compared with experimental measurements using phase Doppler interferometry (PDI).

  15. The flow past a cactus-inspired grooved cylinder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Makdah, Adnan M.; Oweis, Ghanem F.

    2013-02-01

    The star-shaped cross section of giant cylindrical cactus plants is thought to be aerodynamically favorable for protection against toppling by strong winds. Particle image velocimetry is used to investigate the flow details within the surface grooves and in the immediate wake of a cactus-inspired model cylinder with eight longitudinal grooves, at biologically relevant Reynolds numbers between 50 × 103 and 170 × 103. The wake flow is analyzed and compared to a similarly sized circular cylinder. At the lowest Re tested, the wakes from the two geometries are similar. At higher Re, the cactus wake exhibits superior behavior as seen from the mean and turbulent velocities, suggesting that the flow mechanisms are Re dependent. The flow within the surface grooves reveals counter rotating rollers, while the geometrical ridges act as vortex generators known to help with the surface flow attachment. Lastly, a simplistic analysis is described to recover, qualitatively, certain time-dependent flow features from the randomly acquired PIV realizations.

  16. Spatiotemporal spectral analysis of a forced cylinder wake.

    PubMed

    D'Adamo, Juan; Godoy-Diana, Ramiro; Wesfreid, José Eduardo

    2011-11-01

    The wake of a circular cylinder performing rotary oscillations is studied using hydrodynamic tunnel experiments at Re=100. Two-dimensional particle image velocimetry on the midplane perpendicular to the axis of a cylinder is used to characterize the spatial development of the flow and its stability properties. The lock-in phenomenon that determines the boundaries between regions of the forcing parameter space where the wake is globally unstable or convectively unstable [see Thiria and Wesfreid, J. Fluids Struct. 25, 654 (2009) for a review] is scrutinized using the experimental data. A method based on the analysis of power density spectra of the flow allows us to give a detailed description of the forced wake, shedding light on the energy distribution in the different frequency components and in particular on a cascade-like mechanism evidenced for a high amplitude of the forcing oscillation. In addition, a calculation of the drag from the velocity field is performed, allowing us to relate the resulting force on the body to the wake properties. PMID:22181499

  17. Spatiotemporal spectral analysis of a forced cylinder wake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Adamo, Juan; Godoy-Diana, Ramiro; Wesfreid, José Eduardo

    2012-11-01

    The wake of a circular cylinder performing rotary oscillations is studied using hydrodynamic tunnel experiments at Re = 100 . Two-dimensional particle image velocimetry on the mid-plane perpendicular to the axis of cylinder is used to characterize the spatial development of the flow and its stability properties. The lock-in phenomenon that determines the boundaries between regions of the forcing parameter space were the wake is globally unstable or convectively unstable is scrutinized using this experimental data. A novel method based on the analysis of power density spectra of the flow allows us to give a detailed description of the forced wake, shedding light on the energy distribution in the different frequency components and in particular on a cascade-like mechanism evidenced for a high amplitude of the forcing oscillation. In addition, a calculation of the drag from the velocity field is performed, allowing us to relate the resulting force on the body to the wake properties. The present work was supported by the Franco-Argentinian Associated Laboratory in the Physics and Mechanics of Fluids (LIA PMF-FMF).

  18. An Investigation of Pulsatile Flow Past Two Cylinders as a Model of Blood Flow in an Artificial Lung.

    PubMed

    Lin, Yu-Chun; Khanafer, Khalil M; Bartlett, Robert H; Hirschl, Ronald B; Bull, Joseph L

    2011-07-01

    Pulsatile flow across two circular cylinders with different geometric arrangements is studied experimentally using the particle image velocimetry method and numerically using the finite element method. This investigation is motivated the need to optimize gas transfer and fluid mechanical impedance for a total artificial lung, in which the right heart pumps blood across a bundle of hollow microfibers. Vortex formation was found to occur at lower Reynolds numbers in pulsatile flow than in steady flow, and the vortex structure depends strongly on the geometric arrangement of the cylinders and on the Reynolds and Stokes numbers. PMID:21701672

  19. An Investigation of Pulsatile Flow Past Two Cylinders as a Model of Blood Flow in an Artificial Lung

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Yu-chun; Khanafer, Khalil M.; Bartlett, Robert H.; Hirschl, Ronald B.; Bull, Joseph L.

    2011-01-01

    Pulsatile flow across two circular cylinders with different geometric arrangements is studied experimentally using the particle image velocimetry method and numerically using the finite element method. This investigation is motivated the need to optimize gas transfer and fluid mechanical impedance for a total artificial lung, in which the right heart pumps blood across a bundle of hollow microfibers. Vortex formation was found to occur at lower Reynolds numbers in pulsatile flow than in steady flow, and the vortex structure depends strongly on the geometric arrangement of the cylinders and on the Reynolds and Stokes numbers. PMID:21701672

  20. Emissivity measurements in support of experiments on natural convection between a vertical cylinder and a surrounding array

    SciTech Connect

    O`Brien, J.E.

    1991-12-01

    Experimental measurements of surface emissivities of three metallic samples have been obtained in support of an experiment aimed at determining natural convection and total heat transfer for a heated vertical cylinder surrounded by an array of cooled vertical tubes. In some cases, the heated stainless steel cylinder was shrouded by a perforated aluminum outer cylinder. The surrounding cooled tubes were also aluminum. In this experiment, heat transfer from the heated tube and the surrounding outer cylinder will occur by a combination of natural convection and radiation. At temperatures near the melting point of aluminum, the radiant contribution is particularly important, accounting for 50% or more of the total heat transfer. Consequently, accurate knowledge of surface emissivities of the heated rods, outer cylinders and surrounding structures is needed in order to predict the system thermal response during the transient. Direct measurements of surface emissivities have been obtained for one stainless steel and two aluminum samples. The measurements were obtained using an infrared pyrometer sensitive to the 8--14 {mu}m wavelength range. A procedure for estimating total hemispherical emissivities based on the measured spectral, normal results is also provided.

  1. Circularly polarized conical patterns from circular microstrip antennas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huang, J.

    1984-01-01

    A method is presented for generating circularly polarized conical patterns from circular microstrip antennas. These antennas are excited at higher order modes and require different feed arrangements for different mode excitations. It is determined that the peak direction of the conical pattern can be varied over a wide angular range. Modal expansion technique is employed to calculate the radiation patterns of these antennas.

  2. Casimir energies of cylinders: Universal function

    SciTech Connect

    Abalo, E. K.; Milton, K. A.; Kaplan, L.

    2010-12-15

    New exact results are given for the interior Casimir energies of infinitely long waveguides of triangular cross section (equilateral, hemiequilateral, and isosceles right triangles). Results for cylinders of rectangular cross section are rederived. In particular, results are obtained for interior modes belonging to Dirichlet and Neumann boundary conditions (TM and TE modes). These results are expressed in rapidly convergent series using the Chowla-Selberg formula, and in fact may be given in closed form, except for general rectangles. The energies are finite because only the first three heat-kernel coefficients can be nonzero for the case of polygonal boundaries. What appears to be a universal behavior of the Casimir energy as a function of the shape of the regular or quasiregular cross-sectional figure is presented. Furthermore, numerical calculations for arbitrary right triangular cross sections suggest that the universal behavior may be extended to waveguides of general polygonal cross sections. The new exact and numerical results are compared with the proximity force approximation (PFA).

  3. The effect of splitter plate on fluid flow and heat transfer characteristics past various bluff-body configurations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soumya, Sunakraneni; Prakash, K. Arul

    2015-11-01

    Numerical simulation of five different bluff body configurations with splitter plate is carried out to analyse the fluid flow and heat transfer characteristics for Reynolds number (Re) ranging from 50-200. The governing equations are discretized using SUPG - finite element method. The bluff body configurations considered are elliptic cylinder of axis ratios (AR =0.5-1.0), square cylinder, rhombus of axis ratios (AR =0.5-1.0), equilateral triangle, and semi-circular cylinder. The splitter plate length varied from L =0.0Dh-6.0Dh,(Dh = Bluff body hydraulic diameter). It is observed that interaction of separated shear layers from top and bottom surfaces of the body is inhibited and vortex shedding is suppressed for certain combinations of bluff body configuration, Re and splitter plate length and wake region is modified significantly. Reduction in drag approximately of the order 2% to 50% is attained and overall heat transfer (Q) is increased due to splitter plate.

  4. A Convenient Storage Rack for Graduated Cylinders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Love, Brian

    2004-01-01

    An attempt is made to find a solution to the occasional problem of a need for storing large numbers of graduated cylinders in many teaching and research laboratories. A design, which involves the creation of a series of parallel channels that are used to suspend inverted graduated cylinders by their bases, is proposed.

  5. Efficient visual grasping alignment for cylinders

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nicewarner, Keith E.; Kelley, Robert B.

    1991-01-01

    Monocular information from a gripper-mounted camera is used to servo the robot gripper to grasp a cylinder. The fundamental concept for rapid pose estimation is to reduce the amount of information that needs to be processed during each vision update interval. The grasping procedure is divided into four phases: learn, recognition, alignment, and approach. In the learn phase, a cylinder is placed in the gripper and the pose estimate is stored and later used as the servo target. This is performed once as a calibration step. The recognition phase verifies the presence of a cylinder in the camera field of view. An initial pose estimate is computed and uncluttered scan regions are selected. The radius of the cylinder is estimated by moving the robot a fixed distance toward the cylinder and observing the change in the image. The alignment phase processes only the scan regions obtained previously. Rapid pose estimates are used to align the robot with the cylinder at a fixed distance from it. The relative motion of the cylinder is used to generate an extrapolated pose-based trajectory for the robot controller. The approach phase guides the robot gripper to a grasping position. The cylinder can be grasped with a minimal reaction force and torque when only rough global pose information is initially available.

  6. Balancer structure for three-cylinder engines

    SciTech Connect

    Suzuki, T.

    1987-04-21

    This patent describes a balancer structure for a three-cylinder in-line engine having three cylinders, the latter comprising a first and third cylinder and a second cylinder disposed between the first and third cylinders, a crankshaft having crank arms disposed at angles of 120/sup 0/ with respect to each other and operatively connected to a piston assembly within each of the cylinders, respectively, consisting of: a single crankshaft adjacent and parallel to and rotated at the same speed as the crankshaft but in the opposite direction, means comprising first counterweights securely mounted on the crankshaft only at positions thereof corresponding to the first and third cylinders for balancing of a part of inertia forces of rotating masses and a part of inertia forces of reciprocating masses; means comprising at least one second counterweight securely mounted on the crankshaft substantially opposite to the crank arm corresponding to the second cylinder for balancing of the remainder of the inertia forces of rotating masses; at least two balancers respectively securely mounted on the countershaft at both ends respectively thereof for the balancing of the remainder of the inertia forces of reciprocating masses, and of the couple of inertia of the crankshaft about axes perpendicular to the crankshaft.

  7. Vibrations and stresses in layered anisotropic cylinders

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mulholland, G. P.; Gupta, B. P.

    1976-01-01

    An equation describing the radial displacement in a k layered anisotropic cylinder was obtained. The cylinders are initially unstressed but are subjected to either a time dependent normal stress or a displacement at the external boundaries of the laminate. The solution is obtained by utilizing the Vodicka orthogonalization technique. Numerical examples are given to illustrate the procedure.

  8. Circularly polarized microstrip antennas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lo, Y. T.; Engst, B.; Lee, R. Q. H.

    1985-01-01

    A simple microstrip antenna can be made to radiate EM waves of any polarization, in particular, the circular polarization (CP) without any phasing network and power divider. A simple and accurate theory for this family of antennas was developed. However, the CP bandwidth, (CPBW) the bandwidth in which the axial ratio (AR) is less than a certain specified value, is very small. Most of the experimental designs were made for a feed placed along the diagonal of the patch. It is shown that there are practically infinitely many possible designs with different feed location. The speculation that other designs might give a wider bandwidth is clarified and an effective method for broadening the bandwidth is shown.

  9. CIRCULAR CAVITY SLOT ANTENNA

    DOEpatents

    Kerley, P.L.

    1959-01-01

    A small-size antenna having a doughnut-shaped field pattern and which can act both as an antenna and a resonant circuit is described. The antenna is of the slotted type and comprises a resonant cavity with a center hole. A circular slot is provided in one wall of the cavity concentric with the hole and a radio frequency source is connected across the slot. The pattern and loading of the antenna are adjusted by varying the position and shape of a center element slidably disposed within the hole and projecting from the slotted side of the resonant cavity. The disclosed structure may also be used to propagate the oscillator signal down a transniission line by replacing the center element with one leg of the transmission line in a spaced relation from the walls of the cavity.

  10. The inviscid stability of supersonic flow past heated or cooled axisymmetric bodies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shaw, Stephen J.; Duck, Peter W.

    1992-01-01

    The inviscid, linear, nonaxisymmetric, temporal stability of the boundary layer associated with the supersonic flow past axisymmetric bodies (with particular emphasis on long thin, straight circular cylinders), subject to heated or cooled wall conditions is investigated. The eigenvalue problem is computed in some detail for a particular Mach number or 3.8, revealing that the effect of curvature and the choice of wall conditions both have a significant effect on the stability of the flow. Both the asymptotic, large azimuthal wavenumber solution and the asymptotic, far downstream solution are obtained for the stability analysis and compared with numerical results. Additionally, asymptotic analyses valid for large radii of curvature with cooled/heated wall conditions are presented. In general, important differences were found to exist between the wall temperature conditions imposed and the adiabatic wall conditions considered previously.

  11. The inviscid stability of supersonic flow past heated or cooled axisymmetric bodies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shaw, Stephen J.; Duck, Peter W.

    1990-01-01

    The inviscid, linear, nonaxisymmetric, temporal stability of the boundary layer associated with the supersonic flow past axisymmetric bodies (with particular emphasis on long thin, straight circular cylinders), subject to heated or cooled wall conditions is investigated. The eigenvalue problem is computed in some detail for a particular Mach number or 3.8, revealing that the effect of curvature and the choice of wall conditions both have a significant effect on the stability of the flow. Both the asymptotic, large azimuthal wavenumber solution and the asymptotic, far downstream solution are obtained for the stability analysis and compared with numerical results. Additionally, asymptotic analyses valid for large radii of curvature with cooled/heated wall conditions, are presented. In general, important differences were found to exist between the wall temperature conditions imposed and the adiabatic wall conditions considered previously.

  12. Circularly Polarized MHOHG with Bichromatic Circularly Polarized Laser Pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bandrauk, Andre D.; Mauger, Francois; Uzer, Turgay

    2016-05-01

    Circularly polarized MHOHG-Molecular High Order Harmonic Generation is shown to occur efficiently with intense ultrashort bichromatic circularly polarized pulses due to frequent electron-parent -ion recollision with co-or counter-rotating incident circular pulses as predicted in 1995. We show in this context that molecules offer a very robust and efficient frameworkfor the production of circularly polarized harmonics for the generation of single circularly polarized ``attosecond'' pulses. The efficiency of such new MHOHG is shown to depend on the compatibility of the symmetry of the molecular medium with the net electric field generated by the combination of the laser pulses.Using a time-dependent symmetry analysis with concrete examples such as H 2 + vs H 3 + we show how all the features(harmonic order and ∧ polarization) of MHOHG can be explained and predicted.

  13. 9. General view of engine between cylinders with high pressure ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    9. General view of engine between cylinders with high pressure cylinder on left and low pressure cylinder on right. - Carnegie Steel-Ohio Works, Steam Engines, 912 Salt Springs Road, Youngstown, Mahoning County, OH

  14. Motion of vortices outside a cylinder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tulu, Serdar; Yilmaz, Oguz

    2010-12-01

    The problem of motion of the vortices around an oscillating cylinder in the presence of a uniform flow is considered. The Hamiltonian for vortex motion for the case with no uniform flow and stationary cylinder is constructed, reduced, and constant Hamiltonian (energy) curves are plotted when the system is shown to be integrable according to Liouville. By adding uniform flow to the system and by allowing the cylinder to vibrate, we model the natural vibration of the cylinder in the flow field, which has applications in ocean engineering involving tethers or pipelines in a flow field. We conclude that in the chaotic case forces on the cylinder may be considerably larger than those on the integrable case depending on the initial positions of vortices and that complex phenomena such as chaotic capture and escape occur when the initial positions lie in a certain region.

  15. Measurement of local connective heat transfer coefficients of four ice accretion shapes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, M. E.; Armilli, R. V.; Keshock, E. G.

    1984-01-01

    In the analytical study of ice accretions that form on aerodynamic surfaces (airfoils, engine inlets, etc.) it is often necessary to be able to calculate convective heat transfer rates. In order to do this, local convective heat transfer coefficients for the ice accretion shapes must be known. In the past, coefficients obtained for circular cylinders were used as an approximation to the actual coefficients since no better information existed. The purpose of this experimental study was to provide local convective heat transfer coefficients for four shapes that represent ice accretions. The shapes were tested with smooth and rough surfaces. The experimental method chosen was the thin-skin heat rate technique. Using this method local Nusselt numbers were determined for the ice shapes. In general it was found that the convective heat transfer was higher in regions where the model's surfaces were convex and lower in regions where the model's surfaces were concave. The effect of roughness was to increase the heat transfer in the high heat transfer regions by approximately 100% while little change was apparent in the low heat transfer regions.

  16. Cast iron-base alloy for cylinder/regenerator housing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Witter, Stewart L.; Simmons, Harold E.; Woulds, Michael J.

    1985-01-01

    NASACC-1 is a castable iron-base alloy designed to replace the costly and strategic cobalt-base X-40 alloy used in the automotive Stirling engine cylinder/generator housing. Over 40 alloy compositions were evaluated using investment cast test bars for stress-rupture testing. Also, hydrogen compatibility and oxygen corrosion resistance tests were used to determine the optimal alloy. NASACC-1 alloy was characterized using elevated and room temperature tensile, creep-rupture, low cycle fatigue, heat capacity, specific heat, and thermal expansion testing. Furthermore, phase analysis was performed on samples with several heat treated conditions. The properties are very encouraging. NASACC-1 alloy shows stress-rupture and low cycle fatigue properties equivalent to X-40. The oxidation resistance surpassed the program goal while maintaining acceptable resistance to hydrogen exposure. The welding, brazing, and casting characteristics are excellent. Finally, the cost of NASACC-1 is significantly lower than that of X-40.

  17. Analysis and Design of Variable Stiffness Composite Cylinders

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tatting, Brian F.; Guerdal, Zafer

    1998-01-01

    An investigation of the possible performance improvements of thin circular cylindrical shells through the use of the variable stiffness concept is presented. The variable stiffness concept implies that the stiffness parameters change spatially throughout the structure. This situation is achieved mainly through the use of curvilinear fibers within a fiber-reinforced composite laminate, though the possibility of thickness variations and discrete stiffening elements is also allowed. These three mechanisms are incorporated into the constitutive laws for thin shells through the use of Classical Lamination Theory. The existence of stiffness variation within the structure warrants a formulation of the static equilibrium equations from the most basic principles. The governing equations include sufficient detail to correctly model several types of nonlinearity, including the formation of a nonlinear shell boundary layer as well as the Brazier effect due to nonlinear bending of long cylinders. Stress analysis and initial buckling estimates are formulated for a general variable stiffness cylinder. Results and comparisons for several simplifications of these highly complex governing equations are presented so that the ensuing numerical solutions are considered reliable and efficient enough for in-depth optimization studies. Four distinct cases of loading and stiffness variation are chosen to investigate possible areas of improvement that the variable stiffness concept may offer over traditional constant stiffness and/or stiffened structures. The initial investigation deals with the simplest solution for cylindrical shells in which all quantities are constant around the circumference of the cylinder. This axisymmetric case includes a stiffness variation exclusively in the axial direction, and the only pertinent loading scenarios include constant loads of axial compression, pressure, and torsion. The results for these cases indicate that little improvement over traditional

  18. Circular dichroism and conformation of fish hemoglobins.

    PubMed

    Greenwood, C; Gibson, Q H

    1983-04-10

    The circular dichroism spectrum of fully liganded CO hemoglobin from the Atlantic bluefin tuna (Tunnus thynnus) shows a pH- and temperature-dependent feature at 416 nm. It is half-developed at pH 5.9 and 20 degrees C and its change with temperature corresponds to a heat of 34 kcal/mol (tetramer) for the transition. Correlation with studies on function (Morris, R. J., and Gibson, Q. H. (1982) J. Biol. Chem. 257, 4869-4874) shows that the dichroism feature changes at about 1 pH unit below the R-T transition. There is a close correlation between the 416 nm band and changes in circular dichroism at 287 nm. The new 416 nm band is seen in several fish hemoglobins, but not with human hemoglobin. With hemoglobin from Brevoortia tyrannus, which has been sufficiently studied to permit the comparison, there is a smaller gap between the change in dichroism spectrum and the functional R-T transition. So far, no change in function has been associated with the appearance of the 416 nm circular dichroism band. PMID:6833248

  19. Circular chemiresistors for microchemical sensors

    DOEpatents

    Ho, Clifford K.

    2007-03-13

    A circular chemiresistor for use in microchemical sensors. A pair of electrodes is fabricated on an electrically insulating substrate. The pattern of electrodes is arranged in a circle-filling geometry, such as a concentric, dual-track spiral design, or a circular interdigitated design. A drop of a chemically sensitive polymer (i.e., chemiresistive ink) is deposited on the insulating substrate on the electrodes, which spreads out into a thin, circular disk contacting the pair of electrodes. This circularly-shaped electrode geometry maximizes the contact area between the pair of electrodes and the polymer deposit, which provides a lower and more stable baseline resistance than with linear-trace designs. The circularly-shaped electrode pattern also serves to minimize batch-to-batch variations in the baseline resistance due to non-uniform distributions of conductive particles in the chemiresistive polymer film.

  20. Calculation of Geometrical Parameters of Geokhod Transmission With Hydraulic Cylinders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blaschuk, M. Yu; Dronov, A. A.; Ganovichev, S. S.

    2016-08-01

    Developed analytical expressions for determining parameters of transmission hydraulic cylinders' arrangement are considered, as well as the conditions for internal arrangement of a required number of hydraulic cylinders.