Science.gov

Sample records for heavy dense materials

  1. Dense, finely, grained composite materials

    DOEpatents

    Dunmead, Stephen D.; Holt, Joseph B.; Kingman, Donald D.; Munir, Zuhair A.

    1990-01-01

    Dense, finely grained composite materials comprising one or more ceramic phase or phase and one or more metallic and/or intermetallic phase or phases are produced by combustion synthesis. Spherical ceramic grains are homogeneously dispersed within the matrix. Methods are provided, which include the step of applying mechanical pressure during or immediately after ignition, by which the microstructures in the resulting composites can be controllably selected.

  2. A High-Energy, Ultrashort-Pulse X-Ray System for the Dynamic Study of Heavy, Dense Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Gibson, David Jeremy

    2004-01-01

    Thomson-scattering based x-ray radiation sources, in which a laser beam is scattered off a relativistic electron beam resulting in a high-energy x-ray beam, are currently being developed by several groups around the world to enable studies of dynamic material properties which require temporal resolution on the order of tens of femtoseconds to tens of picoseconds. These sources offer pulses that are shorter than available from synchrotrons, more tunable than available from so-called Ka sources, and more penetrating and more directly probing than ultrafast lasers. Furthermore, Thomson-scattering sources can scale directly up to x-ray energies in the few MeV range, providing peak brightnesses far exceeding any other sources in this regime. This dissertation presents the development effort of one such source at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, the Picosecond Laser-Electron InterAction for the Dynamic Evaluation of Structures (PLEIADES) project, designed to target energies from 30 keV to 200 keV, with a peak brightness on the order of 1018 photons • s-1 • mm-2 • mrad-2 • 0.01% bandwidth-1. A 10 TW Ti:Sapphire based laser system provides the photons for the interaction, and a 100 MeV accelerator with a 1.6 cell S-Band photoinjector at the front end provides the electron beam. The details of both these systems are presented, as is the initial x-ray production and characterization, validating the theory of Thomson scattering. In addition to the systems used to enable PLEIADES, two alternative systems are discussed. An 8.5 GHz X-Band photoinjector, capable of sustaining higher accelerating gradients and producing lower emittance electron beams in a smaller space than the S-Band gun, is presented, and the initial operation and commissioning of this gun is presented. Also, a hybrid chirped-pulse amplification system is presented as an alternative to the standard regenerative amplifier technology in high

  3. Heavy Vehicle Propulsion Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Ray Johnson

    2000-01-31

    The objectives are to Provide Key Enabling Materials Technologies to Increase Energy Efficiency and Reduce Exhaust Emissions. The following goals are listed: Goal 1: By 3rd quarter 2002, complete development of materials enabling the maintenance or improvement of fuel efficiency {ge} 45% of class 7-8 truck engines while meeting the EPA/Justice Department ''Consent Decree'' for emissions reduction. Goal 2: By 4th quarter 2004, complete development of enabling materials for light-duty (class 1-2) diesel truck engines with efficiency over 40%, over a wide range of loads and speeds, while meeting EPA Tier 2 emission regulations. Goal 3: By 4th quarter 2006, complete development of materials solutions to enable heavy-duty diesel engine efficiency of 50% while meeting the emission reduction goals identified in the EPA proposed rule for heavy-duty highway engines.''

  4. Equation of state for cold and dense heavy QCD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glesaaen, Jonas; Neuman, Mathias; Philipsen, Owe

    2016-03-01

    A previously derived three-dimensional effective lattice theory describing the thermodynamics of QCD with heavy quarks in the cold and dense region is extended through order ˜ u 5 κ 8 in the combined character and hopping expansion of the original four-dimensional Wilson action. The systematics of the effective theory is investigated to determine its range of validity in parameter space. We demonstrate the severe cut-off effects due to lattice saturation, which afflict any lattice results at finite baryon density independent of the sign problem or the quality of effective theories, and which have to be removed by continuum extrapolation. We then show how the effective theory can be solved analytically by means of a linked cluster expansion, which is completely unaffected by the sign problem, in quantitative agreement with numerical simulations. As an application, we compute the cold nuclear equation of state of heavy QCD. Our continuum extrapolated result is consistent with a polytropic equation of state for non-relativistic fermions.

  5. Synthesis of dense energetic materials. Annual report

    SciTech Connect

    Coon, C.

    1982-07-01

    The objective of the research described in the report is to synthesize new, dense, stable, highly energetic materials which will ultimately be a candidates for improved explosive and propellant formulations. Following strict guidelines pertaining to energy, density, stability, etc. Specific target molecules were chosen that appear to possess the improved properties desired for new energetic materials. This report summarizes research on the synthesis of these target materials from February 1981 to January 1982. The following compounds were synthesized: 5,5'-diamino-3,3'-bioxadiazole(1,2,4); 5,5'-bis(trichloromethyl)-3,3'-di(1,2,4-oxadiazole); 3,3'-bi(1,2,4-oxadiazole); ethylene tetranitramine (ETNA); N,N-bis(methoxymethyl)acetamide; N,N-bis(chloromethyl)acetamide; 7,8-dimethylglycoluril; Synthesis of 3,9-Di(t-butyl)-13,14-dimethyl-tetracyclo-(5,5,2,0/sup 5/ /sup 13/ 0/sup 11/ /sup 14/)-1,3,5,7,9,11-hexaaza-6,12-dioxotetradecane.

  6. State variables in dense granular materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daniels, Karen

    2009-11-01

    Granular materials are integral to many parts of our daily lives, from the coffee beans that fuel our mornings to the coal that fuels our power plants. Two related aspects of their dynamics are particularly striking: their ability to exhibit both solid-like and liquid-like behavior, and the presence of highly heterogeneous force chains in which the magnitude of the local stress varies widely over short distances. These distinctive behaviors are connected to the fact that granular materials are always out of equilibrium: first, because they are typically both driven and dissipative, but also because they remain in metastable states even when they aren't being driven. I will present recent results from several experiments ranging from the theoretically-motivated (the equilibration of state variables within a non-equilibrium system) to the practical (particle-segregation by size). The results of these experiments elucidate the complex behaviors which underlay granular dynamics, and provide a reason to hope that statistical physics might hold the keys to explaining the observed phenomena.

  7. Estimation of vulnerable zones due to accidental release of toxic materials resulting in dense gas clouds.

    PubMed

    Singh, M P; Mohan, M; Panwar, T S; Chopra, H V

    1991-09-01

    Heavy gas dispersion models have been developed at IIT (hereinafter referred as IIT heavy gas models I and II) with a view to estimate vulnerable zones due to accidental (both instantaneous and continuous, respectively) release of dense toxic material in the atmosphere. The results obtained from IIT heavy gas models have been compared with those obtained from the DEGADIS model [Dense Gas Dispersion Model, developed by Havens and Spicer (1985) for the U.S. Coast Guard] as well as with the observed data collected during the Burro Series, Maplin Sands, and Thorney Island field trials. Both of these models include relevant features of dense gas dispersion, viz., gravity slumping, air entrainment, cloud heating, and transition to the passive phase, etc. The DEGADIS model has been considered for comparing the performance of IIT heavy gas models in this study because it incorporates most of the physical processes of dense gas dispersion in an elaborate manner, and has also been satisfactorily tested against field observations. The predictions from IIT heavy gas models indicate a fairly similar trend to the observed values from Thorney Island, Burro Series, and Maplin experiments with a tendency toward overprediction. There is a good agreement between the prediction of IIT Heavy Gas models I and II with those from DEGADIS, except for the simulations of IIT heavy gas model-I pertaining to very large release quantities under highly stable atmospheric conditions. In summary, the performance of IIT heavy gas models have been found to be reasonably good both with respect to the limited field data available and various simulations (selected on the basis of relevant storages in the industries and prevalent meteorological conditions performed with DEGADIS). However, there is a scope of improvement in the IIT heavy gas models (viz., better formulation for entrainment, modification of coefficients, transition criteria, etc.). Further, isotons (nomograms) have been prepared by using

  8. General trend for pressurized superconducting hydrogen-dense materials

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Duck Young; Scheicher, Ralph H.; Mao, Ho-kwang; Kang, T. W.; Ahuja, Rajeev

    2010-02-16

    The long-standing prediction that hydrogen can assume a metallic state under high pressure, combined with arguments put forward more recently that this state might even be superconducting up to high temperatures, continues to spur tremendous research activities toward the experimental realization of metallic hydrogen. These efforts have however so far been impeded by the enormous challenges associated with the exceedingly large required pressure. Hydrogen-dense materials, of the MH{sub 4} form (where M can be, e.g., Si, Ge, or Sn) or of the MH{sub 3} form (with M being, e.g., Al, Sc, Y, or La), allow for the rather exciting opportunity to carry out a proxy study of metallic hydrogen and associated high-temperature superconductivity at pressures within the reach of current techniques. At least one experimental report indicates that a superconducting state might have been observed already in SiH{sub 4}, and several theoretical studies have predicted superconductivity in pressurized hydrogen-rich materials; however, no systematic dependence on the applied pressure has yet been identified so far. In the present work, we have used first-principles methods in an attempt to predict the superconducting critical temperature (T{sub c}) as a function of pressure (P) for three metal-hydride systems of the MH{sub 3} form, namely ScH{sub 3}, YH{sub 3}, and LaH{sub 3}. By comparing the obtained results, we are able to point out a general trend in the T{sub c}-dependence on P. These gained insights presented here are likely to stimulate further theoretical studies of metallic phases of hydrogen-dense materials and should lead to new experimental investigations of their superconducting properties.

  9. Survival of high p{sub T} light and heavy flavors in a dense medium

    SciTech Connect

    Kopeliovich, B. Z.

    2011-04-26

    This talk presents an attempt at a critical overview of the current status of modeling for high-p{sub T} processes in nuclei. In particular, it includes discussion of the space-time development of hadronization of highly virtual light and heavy partons, and the related time scales; the role of early production and subsequent attenuation of pre-hadrons in a dense medium. We identify several challenging problems within the current interpretation of high-p{sub T} processes and propose solutions for some of them.

  10. Energy and momentum relaxation of heavy fermion in dense and warm plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Sarkar, Sreemoyee; Dutt-Mazumder, Abhee K.

    2010-09-01

    We determine the drag and the momentum diffusion coefficients of heavy fermion in dense plasma. It is seen that in degenerate matter the drag coefficient at the leading order mediated by the transverse photon is proportional to (E-{mu}){sup 2} while for the longitudinal exchange this goes as (E-{mu}){sup 3}. We also calculate the longitudinal diffusion coefficient to obtain the Einstein relation in a relativistic degenerate plasma. Finally, finite temperature corrections are included both for the drag and the diffusion coefficients.

  11. Temperature scaling in a dense vibrofluidized granular material.

    PubMed

    Sunthar, P; Kumaran, V

    1999-08-01

    The leading order "temperature" of a dense two-dimensional granular material fluidized by external vibrations is determined. The grain interactions are characterized by inelastic collisions, but the coefficient of restitution is considered to be close to 1, so that the dissipation of energy during a collision is small compared to the average energy of a particle. An asymptotic solution is obtained where the particles are considered to be elastic in the leading approximation. The velocity distribution is a Maxwell-Boltzmann distribution in the leading approximation. The density profile is determined by solving the momentum balance equation in the vertical direction, where the relation between the pressure and density is provided by the virial equation of state. The temperature is determined by relating the source of energy due to the vibrating surface and the energy dissipation due to inelastic collisions. The predictions of the present analysis show good agreement with simulation results at higher densities where theories for a dilute vibrated granular material, with the pressure-density relation provided by the ideal gas law, are in error. PMID:11969987

  12. Stress transmission and incipient yield flow in dense granular materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blumenfeld, Raphael

    2010-05-01

    Jammed granular matter transmits stresses non-uniformly like no conventional solid, especially when it is on the verge of failure. Jamming is caused by self-organization of granular matter under external loads, often giving rise to networks of force chains that support the loads non-uniformly. An ongoing debate in the literature concerns the correct way to model the static stress field in such media: good old elasticity theory or newcomer isostaticity theory. The two differ significantly and, in particular in 2D, isostaticity theory leads naturally to force chain solutions. More recently, it has been proposed that real granular materials are made of mixtures of regions, some behaving elastically and some isostatically. The theory to describe these systems has been named stato-elasticity. In this paper, I first present the rationale for stato-elasticity theory. An important step towards the construction of this theory is a good understanding of stress transmission in the regions of pure isostatic states. A brief description is given of recently derived general solutions for 2D isostatic regions with nonuniform structures, which go well beyond the over-simplistic picture of force chains. I then show how the static stress equations are related directly to incipient yield flow and derive the equations that govern yield and creep rheology of dense granular matter at the initial stages of failure. These equations are general and describe strains in granular materials of both rigid and compliant particles.

  13. Continuum Modeling of Secondary Rheology in Dense Granular Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henann, David L.; Kamrin, Ken

    2014-10-01

    Recent dense granular flow experiments have shown that shear deformation in one region of a granular medium fluidizes its entirety, including regions far from the sheared zone, effectively erasing the yield condition everywhere. This enables slow creep deformation to occur when an external force is applied to a probe in the nominally static regions of the material. The apparent change in rheology induced by far-away motion is termed the "secondary rheology," and a theoretical rationalization of this phenomenon is needed. Recently, a new nonlocal granular rheology was successfully used to predict steady granular flow fields, including grain-size-dependent shear-band widths in a wide variety of flow configurations. We show that the nonlocal fluidity model is also capable of capturing secondary rheology. Specifically, we explore creep of a circular intruder in a two-dimensional annular Couette cell and show that the model captures all salient features observed in experiments, including both the rate-independent nature of creep for sufficiently slow driving rates and the faster-than-linear increase in the creep speed with the force applied to the intruder.

  14. Formation of fibrous materials from dense calcium caseinate dispersions.

    PubMed

    Manski, Julita M; van der Goot, Atze J; Boom, Remko M

    2007-04-01

    Application of shear and cross-linking enzyme transglutaminase (Tgase) induced fibrous hierarchical structures in dense (30% w/w) calcium caseinate (Ca-caseinate) dispersions. Using Tgase was essential for the anisotropic structure formation. The fibrous materials showed anisotropy on both micro- and macroscale as determined with scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and mechanical analyses, respectively. SEM revealed protein fibers with a diameter of approximately 100-200 nm; visually, we observed fibers of about 1 mm. Both shear and Tgase affected the reinforcement of the fibers to a large extent, whereas the mechanical properties in the direction perpendicular to the shear flow remained constant. Shearing Ca-caseinate without Tgase yielded a slightly anisotropic layered structure. Both cross-linking in the absence of shear and cross-linking during mixing resulted in gels without alignment. The formation of shear- and enzyme-induced anisotropic structures was explained by aligning of protein aggregates due to shear and concurrent solidification of the aligned protein aggregates. PMID:17326681

  15. Quantum critical behavior in heavy electron materials

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yi-feng; Pines, David

    2014-01-01

    Quantum critical behavior in heavy electron materials is typically brought about by changes in pressure or magnetic field. In this paper, we develop a simple unified model for the combined influence of pressure and magnetic field on the effectiveness of the hybridization that plays a central role in the two-fluid description of heavy electron emergence. We show that it leads to quantum critical and delocalization lines that accord well with those measured for CeCoIn5, yields a quantitative explanation of the field and pressure-induced changes in antiferromagnetic ordering and quantum critical behavior measured for YbRh2Si2, and provides a valuable framework for describing the role of magnetic fields in bringing about quantum critical behavior in other heavy electron materials. PMID:24912172

  16. Experiments on the interaction of heavy-ion beams with dense plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Stoeckl, C.; Roth, M.; Suess, W.; Wetzler, H; Seelig, W.; Kulish, M.; Spiller, P.; Jacoby, J.; Hoffmann, D.H.H.

    1997-03-01

    Gas discharge plasma targets were used for energy loss and charge state measurements of fast heavy ions 5 MeV/u < E{sub kin} < 10 MeV/u in a regime of electron density and temperature up to 10{sup 19}cm{sup -3} and 20 eV, respectively. Progress has been achieved in the understanding of charge exchange processes in fully ionized hydrogen plasma. An improved model that has taken excitation-autoionization processes into account has removed some of the discrepancies of previous theoretical descriptions. Furthermore, the energy loss of the ion beam serves as an excellent diagnostic tool for measuring the electron density in partially ionized plasmas such as argon. The experience with these methods will be used in the future to diagnose dense laser-produced plasmas. A setup with a 5-GW neodymium-glass laser, currently under construction, will provide access to density ranges up to 10{sup 21} cm{sup -3} and temperatures > 100 eV. 13 refs., 7 figs.

  17. Lightweight Composite Materials for Heavy Duty Vehicles

    SciTech Connect

    Pruez, Jacky; Shoukry, Samir; Williams, Gergis; Shoukry, Mark

    2013-08-31

    The main objective of this project is to develop, analyze and validate data, methodologies and tools that support widespread applications of automotive lightweighting technologies. Two underlying principles are guiding the research efforts towards this objective: • Seamless integration between the lightweight materials selected for certain vehicle systems, cost-effective methods for their design and manufacturing, and practical means to enhance their durability while reducing their Life-Cycle-Costs (LCC). • Smooth migration of the experience and findings accumulated so far at WVU in the areas of designing with lightweight materials, innovative joining concepts and durability predictions, from applications to the area of weight savings for heavy vehicle systems and hydrogen storage tanks, to lightweighting applications of selected systems or assemblies in light–duty vehicles.

  18. Material Removes Heavy Metal Ions From Water

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Philipp, Warren H., Jr.; Street, Kenneth W.; Hill, Carol; Savino, Joseph M.

    1995-01-01

    New high capacity ion-exchange polymer material removes toxic metal cations from contaminated water. Offers several advantages. High sensitivities for such heavy metals as lead, cadmium, and copper and capable of reducing concentrations in aqueous solutions to parts-per-billion range. Removes cations even when calcium present. Material made into variety of forms, such as thin films, coatings, pellets, and fibers. As result, adapted to many applications to purify contaminated water, usually hard wherever found, whether in wastewater-treatment systems, lakes, ponds, industrial plants, or homes. Another important feature that adsorbed metals easily reclaimed by either destructive or nondestructive process. Other tests show ion-exchange polymer made inexpensively; easy to use; strong, flexible, not easily torn; and chemically stable in storage, in aqueous solutions, and in acidic or basic solution.

  19. Processes for making dense, spherical active materials for lithium-ion cells

    DOEpatents

    Kang, Sun-Ho; Amine, Khalil

    2011-11-22

    Processes are provided for making dense, spherical mixed-metal carbonate or phosphate precursors that are particularly well suited for the production of active materials for electrochemical devices such as lithium ion secondary batteries. Exemplified methods include precipitating dense, spherical particles of metal carbonates or metal phosphates from a combined aqueous solution using a precipitating agent such as ammonium hydrogen carbonate, sodium hydrogen carbonate, or a mixture that includes sodium hydrogen carbonate. Other exemplified methods include precipitating dense, spherical particles of metal phosphates using a precipitating agent such as ammonium hydrogen phosphate, ammonium dihydrogen phosphate, sodium phosphate, sodium hydrogen phosphate, sodium dihydrogen phosphate, or a mixture of any two or more thereof. Further provided are compositions of and methods of making dense, spherical metal oxides and metal phosphates using the dense, spherical metal precursors. Still further provided are electrodes and batteries using the same.

  20. Casting fine grained, fully dense, strong inorganic materials

    DOEpatents

    Brown, Sam W.; Spencer, Larry S.; Phillips, Michael R.

    2015-11-24

    Methods and apparatuses for casting inorganic materials are provided. The inorganic materials include metals, metal alloys, metal hydrides and other materials. Thermal control zones may be established to control the propagation of a freeze front through the casting. Agitation from a mechanical blade or ultrasonic energy may be used to reduce porosity and shrinkage in the casting. After solidification of the casting, the casting apparatus may be used to anneal the cast part.

  1. Short intense ion pulses for materials and warm dense matter research

    SciTech Connect

    Seidl, Peter A.; Persaud, Arun; Waldron, William L.; Barnard, John J.; Davidson, Ronald C.; Friedman, Alex; Gilson, Erik P.; Greenway, Wayne G.; Grote, David P.; Kaganovich, Igor D.; Lidia, Steven M.; Stettler, Matthew; Takakuwa, Jeffrey H.; Schenkel, Thomas

    2015-11-11

    We have commenced experiments with intense short pulses of ion beams on the Neutralized Drift Compression Experiment-II at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, by generating beam spots size with radius r<1 mm within 2 ns FWHM and approximately 1010 ions/pulse. To enable the short pulse durations and mm-scale focal spot radii, the 1.2 MeV Li+ ion beam is neutralized in a 1.6-meter drift compression section located after the last accelerator magnet. An 8-Tesla short focal length solenoid compresses the beam in the presence of the large volume plasma near the end of this section before the target. The scientific topics to be explored are warm dense matter, the dynamics of radiation damage in materials, and intense beam and beam-plasma physics including selected topics of relevance to the development of heavy-ion drivers for inertial fusion energy. Finally, we describe the accelerator commissioning and time-resolved ionoluminescence measurements of yttrium aluminum perovskite using the fully integrated accelerator and neutralized drift compression components.

  2. Short intense ion pulses for materials and warm dense matter research

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Seidl, Peter A.; Persaud, Arun; Waldron, William L.; Barnard, John J.; Davidson, Ronald C.; Friedman, Alex; Gilson, Erik P.; Greenway, Wayne G.; Grote, David P.; Kaganovich, Igor D.; et al

    2015-11-11

    We have commenced experiments with intense short pulses of ion beams on the Neutralized Drift Compression Experiment-II at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, by generating beam spots size with radius r<1 mm within 2 ns FWHM and approximately 1010 ions/pulse. To enable the short pulse durations and mm-scale focal spot radii, the 1.2 MeV Li+ ion beam is neutralized in a 1.6-meter drift compression section located after the last accelerator magnet. An 8-Tesla short focal length solenoid compresses the beam in the presence of the large volume plasma near the end of this section before the target. The scientific topics tomore » be explored are warm dense matter, the dynamics of radiation damage in materials, and intense beam and beam-plasma physics including selected topics of relevance to the development of heavy-ion drivers for inertial fusion energy. Finally, we describe the accelerator commissioning and time-resolved ionoluminescence measurements of yttrium aluminum perovskite using the fully integrated accelerator and neutralized drift compression components.« less

  3. Short Intense Ion Pulses for Materials and Warm Dense Matter Research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seidl, Peter; Ji, Q.; Lidia, S. M.; Persaud, A.; Stettler, M.; Takakuwa, J. H.; Waldron, W. L.; Schenkel, T.; Barnard, J. J.; Friedman, A.; Grote, D. P.; Davidson, R. C.; Gilson, E. P.; Kaganovich, I. D.

    2015-11-01

    We have commenced experiments with intense short pulses of ion beams on the Neutralized Drift Compression Experiment-II at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, by generating beam spots size with radius r <1 mm within 2 ns FWHM and approximately 1010 ions/pulse. To enable the short pulse durations and mm-scale focal spot radii, the 1.2 MeV Li + ion beam is neutralized in a 1.6-meter drift compression section located after the last accelerator magnet. An 8-Tesla short focal length solenoid compresses the beam in the presence of the large volume plasma near the end of this section before the target. The scientific topics to be explored are warm dense matter, the dynamics of radiation damage in materials, and intense beam and beam-plasma physics including selected topics of relevance to the development of heavy-ion drivers for inertial fusion energy. We will describe the accelerator commissioning and time-resolved ionoluminescence measurements of yttrium aluminium perovskite using the fully integrated accelerator and neutralized drift compression components (arXiv:1506.05839). This work was supported by the Director, Office of Science, Office of Fusion Energy Sciences, of the U.S. Department of Energy under Contract No. DE-AC02-05CH11231.

  4. Short intense ion pulses for materials and warm dense matter research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seidl, Peter A.; Persaud, Arun; Waldron, William L.; Barnard, John J.; Davidson, Ronald C.; Friedman, Alex; Gilson, Erik P.; Greenway, Wayne G.; Grote, David P.; Kaganovich, Igor D.; Lidia, Steven M.; Stettler, Matthew; Takakuwa, Jeffrey H.; Schenkel, Thomas

    2015-11-01

    We have commenced experiments with intense short pulses of ion beams on the Neutralized Drift Compression Experiment-II at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, by generating beam spots size with radius r<1 mm within 2 ns FWHM and approximately 1010 ions/pulse. To enable the short pulse durations and mm-scale focal spot radii, the 1.2 MeV Li+ ion beam is neutralized in a 1.6-meter drift compression section located after the last accelerator magnet. An 8-Tesla short focal length solenoid compresses the beam in the presence of the large volume plasma near the end of this section before the target. The scientific topics to be explored are warm dense matter, the dynamics of radiation damage in materials, and intense beam and beam-plasma physics including selected topics of relevance to the development of heavy-ion drivers for inertial fusion energy. Here we describe the accelerator commissioning and time-resolved ionoluminescence measurements of yttrium aluminum perovskite using the fully integrated accelerator and neutralized drift compression components.

  5. Toxic heavy metals: materials cycle optimization.

    PubMed Central

    Ayres, R U

    1992-01-01

    Long-term ecological sustainability is incompatible with an open materials cycle. The toxic heavy metals (arsenic, cadmium, chromium, copper, lead, mercury, silver, uranium/plutonium, zinc) exemplify the problem. These metals are being mobilized and dispersed into the environment by industrial activity at a rate far higher than by natural processes. Apart from losses to the environment resulting from mine wastes and primary processing, many of these metals are utilized in products that are inherently dissipative. Examples of such uses include fuels, lubricants, solvents, fire retardants, stabilizers, flocculants, pigments, biocides, and preservatives. To close the materials cycle, it will be necessary to accomplish two things. The first is to ban or otherwise discourage (e.g., by means of high severance taxes on virgin materials) dissipative uses of the above type. The second is to increase the efficiency of recycling of those materials that are not replaceable in principle. Here, also, economic instruments (such as returnable deposits) can be effective in some cases. A systems view of the problem is essential to assess the cost and effectiveness of alternative strategies. PMID:11607259

  6. Toxic heavy metals: Materials cycle optimization

    SciTech Connect

    Ayers, R.U. )

    1992-02-01

    Long-term ecological sustainability is incompatible with an open materials cycle. The toxic heavy metals (arsenic, cadmium, chromium, copper, lead, mercury, silver, uranium/plutonium, zinc) exemplify the problem. These metals are being mobilized and dispersed into the environment by industrial activity at a rate far higher than by natural processes. Apart from losses to the environment resulting from mine wastes and primary processing, many of these metals are utilized in products that are inherently dissipative. Examples of such uses include fuels, lubricants, solvents, fire retardants, stabilizers, flocculants, pigments, biocides, and preservatives. To close the materials cycle, it will be necessary to accomplish two things. The first is to ban or otherwise discourage (e.g., by means of high severance taxes on virgin materials) dissipative uses of the above type. The second is to increase the efficiency of recycling of those materials that are not replaceable in principle. Here, also, economic instruments (such as returnable deposits) can be effective in some cases. A systems view of the problem is essential to assess the cost and effectiveness of alternative strategies.

  7. Elastic and thermal expansion asymmetry in dense molecular materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burg, Joseph A.; Dauskardt, Reinhold H.

    2016-09-01

    The elastic modulus and coefficient of thermal expansion are fundamental properties of elastically stiff molecular materials and are assumed to be the same (symmetric) under both tension and compression loading. We show that molecular materials can have a marked asymmetric elastic modulus and coefficient of thermal expansion that are inherently related to terminal chemical groups that limit molecular network connectivity. In compression, terminal groups sterically interact to stiffen the network, whereas in tension they interact less and disconnect the network. The existence of asymmetric elastic and thermal expansion behaviour has fundamental implications for computational approaches to molecular materials modelling and practical implications on the thermomechanical strains and associated elastic stresses. We develop a design space to control the degree of elastic asymmetry in molecular materials, a vital step towards understanding their integration into device technologies.

  8. Probing properties of hot and dense QCD matter with heavy flavor in the PHENIX experiment at RHIC

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Nouicer, Rachid

    2015-05-29

    Hadrons carrying heavy quarks, i.e. charm or bottom, are important probes of the hot and dense medium created in relativistic heavy ion collisions. Heavy quark-antiquark pairs are mainly produced in initial hard scattering processes of partons. While some of the produced pairs form bound quarkonia, the vast majority hadronize into particles carrying open heavy flavor. Heavy quark production has been studied by the PHENIX experiment at RHIC via measurements of single leptons from semi-leptonic decays in both the electron channel at mid-rapidity and in the muon channel at forward rapidity. A large suppression and azimuthal anisotropy of single electrons havemore » been observed in Au + Au collisions at 200 GeV. These results suggest a large energy loss and flow of heavy quarks in the hot, dense matter. The PHENIX experiment has also measured J/ψ production at 200 GeV in p + p, d + Au, Cu + Cu and Au + Au collisions, both at mid- and forward-rapidities, and additionally Cu + Au and U + U at forward-rapidities. In the most energetic collisions, more suppression is observed at forward rapidity than at central rapidity. This can be interpreted either as a sign of quark recombination, or as a hint of additional cold nuclear matter effects. The centrality dependence of nuclear modification factor, RAA(pT), for J/ψ in U + U collisions at √sNN = 193 GeV shows a similar trend to the lighter systems, Au + Au and Cu + Cu, at similar energy 200 GeV.« less

  9. Probing properties of hot and dense QCD matter with heavy flavor in the PHENIX experiment at RHIC

    SciTech Connect

    Nouicer, Rachid

    2015-05-29

    Hadrons carrying heavy quarks, i.e. charm or bottom, are important probes of the hot and dense medium created in relativistic heavy ion collisions. Heavy quark-antiquark pairs are mainly produced in initial hard scattering processes of partons. While some of the produced pairs form bound quarkonia, the vast majority hadronize into particles carrying open heavy flavor. Heavy quark production has been studied by the PHENIX experiment at RHIC via measurements of single leptons from semi-leptonic decays in both the electron channel at mid-rapidity and in the muon channel at forward rapidity. A large suppression and azimuthal anisotropy of single electrons have been observed in Au + Au collisions at 200 GeV. These results suggest a large energy loss and flow of heavy quarks in the hot, dense matter. The PHENIX experiment has also measured J/ψ production at 200 GeV in p + p, d + Au, Cu + Cu and Au + Au collisions, both at mid- and forward-rapidities, and additionally Cu + Au and U + U at forward-rapidities. In the most energetic collisions, more suppression is observed at forward rapidity than at central rapidity. This can be interpreted either as a sign of quark recombination, or as a hint of additional cold nuclear matter effects. The centrality dependence of nuclear modification factor, RAA(pT), for J/ψ in U + U collisions at √sNN = 193 GeV shows a similar trend to the lighter systems, Au + Au and Cu + Cu, at similar energy 200 GeV.

  10. Multivariate spatial analysis of a heavy rain event in a densely populated delta city

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaitan, Santiago; ten Veldhuis, Marie-claire; Bruni, Guenda; van de Giesen, Nick

    2014-05-01

    Delta cities account for half of the world's population and host key infrastructure and services for the global economic growth. Due to the characteristic geography of delta areas, these cities face high vulnerability to extreme weather and pluvial flooding risks, that are expected to increase as climate change drives heavier rain events. Besides, delta cities are subjected to fast urban densification processes that progressively make them more vulnerable to pluvial flooding. Delta cities need to be adapted to better cope with this threat. The mechanism leading to damage after heavy rains is not completely understood. For instance, current research has shown that rain intensities and volumes can only partially explain the occurrence and localization of rain-related insurance claims (Spekkers et al., 2013). The goal of this paper is to provide further insights into spatial characteristics of the urban environment that can significantly be linked to pluvial-related flooding impacts. To that end, a study-case has been selected: on October 12 to 14 2013, a heavy rain event triggered pluvial floods in Rotterdam, a densely populated city which is undergoing multiple climate adaptation efforts and is located in the Meuse river Delta. While the average yearly precipitation in this city is around 800 mm, local rain gauge measurements ranged from aprox. 60 to 130 mm just during these three days. More than 600 citizens' telephonic complaints reported impacts related to rainfall. The registry of those complaints, which comprises around 300 calls made to the municipality and another 300 to the fire brigade, was made available for research. Other accessible information about this city includes a series of rainfall measurements with up to 1 min time-step at 7 different locations around the city, ground-based radar rainfall data (1 Km^2 spatial resolution and 5 min time-step), a digital elevation model (50 cm of horizontal resolution), a model of overland-flow paths, cadastral

  11. Melting of Dense Hydrogen during Heavy Ion Beam-Driven Compression

    SciTech Connect

    Grinenko, A; Gericke, D O; Vorberger, J; Glenzer, S H

    2009-03-02

    Until now the thermodynamic and structural properties of hydrogen continue to be understood unsatisfactory. A number of complex high pressure phases at relatively low temperatures has been confirmed [1]. However, conclusive answers on the existence of a plasma phase transition, the dissociation of hydrogen molecules at high densities, the metallization in the solid, and the melting line for pressures above 70GPa are still missing. A particularly interesting behavior has been predicted for the melting line at high pressures where it has a maximum and its slope changes sign [2]. In Ref. [3], we have shown that these states can be created using cylindrical compression driven by heavy ion beams. Employing ab initio simulations [4] and experimental data, a new wide range equation of state for hydrogen was constructed [3]. This new hydrogen EOS combined with hydrodynamic simulations is then used to describe the compression of hydrogen in LAPLAS targets [5] driven by heavy ion beams to be generated at the FAIR. The results shown in Fig. 1 indicate that the melting line up to its maximum as well as the transition from molecular fluids to fully ionized plasmas can be tested. By carefully tuning the number of particles in the beam, the compression can be adjusted to yield states at the solid-liquid phase transition (compare panels (a) and (b) in Fig. 1). This allows one to test the shape of the melting line beyond its maximum. It was demonstrated [3] that x-ray scattering [6] can be used to distinguish between the molecular solid and liquid phases as well as the metallic states. Hydrodynamic simulations have also highlighted the importance of temperature diagnostics, as it is more sensitive to the EOS than the density based diagnostic methods. Different materials have been considered as absorber. Although lead might seem to be the natural choice, the simulations show that aluminium is also a feasible option if slightly less compression is sufficient. Moreover, aluminium

  12. Dense velocity reconstruction from tomographic PTV with material derivatives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneiders, Jan F. G.; Scarano, Fulvio

    2016-09-01

    A method is proposed to reconstruct the instantaneous velocity field from time-resolved volumetric particle tracking velocimetry (PTV, e.g., 3D-PTV, tomographic PTV and Shake-the-Box), employing both the instantaneous velocity and the velocity material derivative of the sparse tracer particles. The constraint to the measured temporal derivative of the PTV particle tracks improves the consistency of the reconstructed velocity field. The method is christened as pouring time into space, as it leverages temporal information to increase the spatial resolution of volumetric PTV measurements. This approach becomes relevant in cases where the spatial resolution is limited by the seeding concentration. The method solves an optimization problem to find the vorticity and velocity fields that minimize a cost function, which includes next to instantaneous velocity, also the velocity material derivative. The velocity and its material derivative are related through the vorticity transport equation, and the cost function is minimized using the limited-memory Broyden-Fletcher-Goldfarb-Shanno (L-BFGS) algorithm. The procedure is assessed numerically with a simulated PTV experiment in a turbulent boundary layer from a direct numerical simulation (DNS). The experimental validation considers a tomographic particle image velocimetry (PIV) experiment in a similar turbulent boundary layer and the additional case of a jet flow. The proposed technique (`vortex-in-cell plus', VIC+) is compared to tomographic PIV analysis (3D iterative cross-correlation), PTV interpolation methods (linear and adaptive Gaussian windowing) and to vortex-in-cell (VIC) interpolation without the material derivative. A visible increase in resolved details in the turbulent structures is obtained with the VIC+ approach, both in numerical simulations and experiments. This results in a more accurate determination of the turbulent stresses distribution in turbulent boundary layer investigations. Data from a jet

  13. ULTRASONICALLY-ENHANCED DENSE-MEDIUM CYCLONING FOR FINE COAL AND COAL REFUSE IMPOUNDMENT MATERIALS

    SciTech Connect

    Dr. Mark S. Klima; Dr. Barbara J. Arnold

    2001-08-01

    The Pennsylvania State University, its project team (Typlex, Inc., DAGER, Inc., and PrepTech, Inc.), and advisory committee members have demonstrated the application of ultrasonic energy during dense-medium cyclining and subsequent recovery of fine coal and coal refuse impoundment materials. The results will help to extend the range of conventional dense-medium cyclining to sizes now typically cleaned in relatively inefficient water-only cyclone and spiral concentrators circuits. This technology also provides a potential approach to produce ultra-clean material as would be used for feedstocks for premium carbon products. This report describes Phase I of the project, which involved laboratory testing of dense-medium cyclining and subsequent medium recovery, with and without ultrasonic treatment, along with fundamental dispersion testing. Dense-medium cycloning was conducted with a 76.2-mm (3-in.) diameter cyclone under various conditions including magnetite grade, medium relative density, inlet pressure, cyclone geometry, and feed coal. Dense-medium recovery testing was carried out with a 305-mm (12-in.) diameter x 152-mm (6-in.) wide wet-drum magnetic separator using the cyclone clean coal and refuse products as the feed material. Fundamental testing of dispersion/reagglomeration phenomena was conducted with coal/clay mixtures. In almost all cases, the dense-medium cyclone was capable of achieving separations down to approximately 0.037 mm. Ultrasonic treatment had a slight effect on reducing the ash content of the clean coal. It was also found that ultrasonic treatment improved the purity of the magnetic fraction during wet-drum magnetic separation. The treatment was particularly beneficial for the cyclone overflow material. The fundamental testing indicated that agitation after ultrasonic treatment is necessary to disperse fine particles and to prevent agglomeration.

  14. Solenoid transport of a heavy ion beam for warm dense matterstudies and inertial confinement fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Armijo, Julien

    2006-10-01

    From February to July 2006, I have been doing research as a guest at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL), in the Heavy Ion Fusion group. This internship, which counts as one semester in my master's program in France, I was very pleased to do it in a field that I consider has the beauty of fundamental physics, and at the same time the special appeal of a quest for a long-term and environmentally-respectful energy source. During my stay at LBNL, I have been involved in three projects, all of them related to Neutralized Drift Compression Experiment (NDCX). The first one, experimental and analytical, has consisted in measuring the effects of the eddy currents induced by the pulsed magnets in the conducting plates of the source and diagnostic chambers of the Solenoid Transport Experiment (STX, which is a subset of NDCX). We have modeled the effect and run finite-element simulations that have reproduced the perturbation to the field. Then, we have modified WARP, the Particle-In-Cell code used to model the whole experiment, in order to import realistic fields including the eddy current effects and some details of each magnet. The second project has been to take part in a campaign of WARP simulations of the same experiment to understand the leakage of electrons that was observed in the experiment as a consequence to some diagnostics and the failure of the electrostatic electron trap. The simulations have shown qualitative agreement with the measured phenomena, but are still in progress. The third project, rather theoretical, has been related to the upcoming target experiment of a thin aluminum foil heated by a beam to the 1-eV range. At the beginning I helped by analyzing simulations of the hydrodynamic expansion and cooling of the heated material. But, progressively, my work turned into making estimates for the nature of the liquid/vapor two-phase flow. In particular, I have been working on criteria and models to predict the formation of droplets, their size, and

  15. Heavy Vehicle Propulsion Materials Program: Progress and Highlights

    SciTech Connect

    D. Ray Johnson; Sidney Diamond

    2000-06-19

    The Heavy Vehicle Propulsion Materials Program was begun in 1997 to support the enabling materials needs of the DOE Office of Heavy Vehicle Technologies (OHVT). The technical agenda for the program grew out of the technology roadmap for the OHVT and includes efforts in materials for: fuel systems, exhaust aftertreatment, valve train, air handling, structural components, electrochemical propulsion, natural gas storage, and thermal management. A five-year program plan was written in early 2000, following a stakeholders workshop. The technical issues and planned and ongoing projects are discussed. Brief summaries of several technical highlights are given.

  16. Quadrupolar Kondo effect in uranium heavy-electron materials?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cox, D. L.

    1987-01-01

    The possibility of an electric quadrupole Kondo effect for a non-Kramers doublet on a uranium (U) ion is a cubic metallic host is demonstrated by model calculations showing a Kondo upturn in the resistivity, universal quenching of the quadrupolar moment, and a heavy-electron anomaly in the electronic specific heat. With inclusion of excited crystal-field levels, some of the unusual magnetic-response data in the heavy-electron superconductor UBe13 may be understood. Structural phase transitions at unprecedented low temperatures may occur in U-based heavy-electron materials.

  17. Heavy Equipment Operator Instructional Materials. Basic Core. Volume I.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hendrix, Laborn J.; Sawatzky, Joyce

    Developed through close coordination between contractors, construction workers, and vocational educators, this instructor's manual is designed to help heavy equipment instructors present materials in a systematic format. The instructional materials in the manual are written in terms of student performance, using measurable behavioral objectives.…

  18. Evolution of heavy duty engine valves - materials and design

    SciTech Connect

    Schaefer, S.K.; Larson, J.M.; Jenkins, L.F.; Wang, Y.

    1997-12-31

    Engine poppet valves control gas flow in internal combustion engines. The combustion event and the flow of the gases formed past the valve during the intake or exhaust portion of the combustion cycle, expose heavy duty diesel valves to high temperatures, oxidizing or corroding atmospheres and high stresses from firing and seating. This paper is a review of heavy duty diesel engine valve material and design evolution over the last fifty years in North America. The primary driving forces behind the evolution have historically been the need for improved durability and more cost effective designs. However, in recent years engine emission regulatory requirements have become an equally important influence on valve material selection and design. The paper also endeavors to predict how heavy duty diesel engine valve materials and designs may change in response to these driving forces in the foreseeable future.

  19. 30 CFR 57.16017 - Hoisting heavy equipment or material.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Hoisting heavy equipment or material. 57.16017 Section 57.16017 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND METAL AND NONMETAL MINES...

  20. 30 CFR 57.16017 - Hoisting heavy equipment or material.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Hoisting heavy equipment or material. 57.16017 Section 57.16017 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND METAL AND NONMETAL MINES...

  1. 30 CFR 57.16017 - Hoisting heavy equipment or material.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Hoisting heavy equipment or material. 57.16017 Section 57.16017 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND METAL AND NONMETAL MINES...

  2. 30 CFR 57.16017 - Hoisting heavy equipment or material.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Hoisting heavy equipment or material. 57.16017 Section 57.16017 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND METAL AND NONMETAL MINES...

  3. 30 CFR 57.16017 - Hoisting heavy equipment or material.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Hoisting heavy equipment or material. 57.16017 Section 57.16017 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND METAL AND NONMETAL MINES...

  4. Extracellular Matrix-Based Biohybrid Materials for Engineering Compliant, Matrix-Dense Tissues.

    PubMed

    Bracaglia, Laura G; Fisher, John P

    2015-11-18

    An ideal tissue engineering scaffold should not only promote, but take an active role in, constructive remodeling and formation of site appropriate tissue. Extracellular matrix (ECM)-derived proteins provide unmatched cellular recognition, and therefore influence cellular response towards predicted remodeling behaviors. Materials built with only these proteins, however, can degrade rapidly or begin too weak to substitute for compliant, matrix-dense tissues. The focus of this Progress Report is on biohybrid materials that incorporate polymer components with ECM-derived proteins, to produce a substrate with desired mechanical and degradation properties, as well as actively guide tissue remodeling. Materials are described through four fabrication methods: 1) polymer and ECM-protein fibers woven together, 2) polymer and ECM proteins combined in a bilayer, 3) cell-built ECM on polymer scaffold, and 4) ECM proteins and polymers combined in a single hydrogel. Scaffolds from each fabrication method can achieve characteristics suitable for different types of tissue. In vivo testing has shown progressive remodeling in injury models, and suggests ECM-based biohybrid materials promote a prohealing immune response over single component alternatives. The prohealing immune response is associated with lasting success and long term host maintenance of the implant.

  5. Emergence of superconductivity in heavy-electron materials.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yi-feng; Pines, David

    2014-12-23

    Although the pairing glue for the attractive quasiparticle interaction responsible for unconventional superconductivity in heavy-electron materials has been identified as the spin fluctuations that arise from their proximity to a magnetic quantum critical point, there has been no model to describe their superconducting transition at temperature Tc that is comparable to that found by Bardeen, Cooper, and Schrieffer (BCS) for conventional superconductors, where phonons provide the pairing glue. Here we propose such a model: a phenomenological BCS-like expression for Tc in heavy-electron materials that is based on a simple model for the effective range and strength of the spin-fluctuation-induced quasiparticle interaction and reflects the unusual properties of the heavy-electron normal state from which superconductivity emerges. We show that it provides a quantitative understanding of the pressure-induced variation of Tc in the "hydrogen atoms" of unconventional superconductivity, CeCoIn5 and CeRhIn5, predicts scaling behavior and a dome-like structure for Tc in all heavy-electron quantum critical superconductors, provides unexpected connections between members of this family, and quantifies their variations in Tc with a single parameter.

  6. Micro-evaporators: a powerful tool to control the growth of dense organized colloidal materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burel, Celine; Leng, Jacques; Donnio, Bertrand; Dreyfus, Remi; Salmon, Jean-Baptiste

    Latex colloids have been concentrated inside a microfluidic channel, referred to as a microevaporator, in a controlled way up to the formation of millimeter-long colloidal materials. The solvent of this colloidal dispersion is transported by pervaporation through a thin PDMS membrane sealing the channel, inducing a flow from the reservoir containing the dispersion, up to the tip of the channel. Thus, as pervaporation occurs, colloids get concentrated at the tip of the channel up to the growth of a packed bed of colloids. The frontier between the dilute dispersion and the concentrated jammed or crystalline phase is clearly delimited by a concentration front. The position of the latter was recorded by using direct videomicroscopy. We investigated the dynamics of growth of such concentrated materials by measuring the position of the concentration front as a function of time. From these data we also estimated the volume fraction of the colloids within the concentrated material using mass conservation. We found that the estimated values are much smaller than the expected volume fractions for a dense colloidal assembly. We finally propose some explanations for such a discrepancy. This work was supported by CNRS-SOLVAY-UPENN and ANRT.

  7. Superhard nanocomposite of dense polymorphs of boron nitride: Noncarbon material has reached diamond hardness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dubrovinskaia, Natalia; Solozhenko, Vladimir L.; Miyajima, Nobuyoshi; Dmitriev, Vladimir; Kurakevych, Oleksandr O.; Dubrovinsky, Leonid

    2007-03-01

    The authors report a synthesis of unique superhard aggregated boron nitride nanocomposites (ABNNCs) showing the enhancement of hardness up to 100% in comparison with single crystal c-BN. Such a great hardness increase is due to the combination of the Hall-Petch and the quantum confinement effects. The decrease of the grain size down to 14nm and the simultaneous formation of the two dense BN phases with hexagonal and cubic structures within the grains at nano- and subnanolevel result in enormous mechanical property enhancement with maximum hardness of 85(5)GPa. Thus, ABNNC is the first non-carbon-based bulk material with the value of hard-ness approaching that of single crystal and polycrystalline diamond and aggregated diamond nanorods. ABNNC also has an unusually high fracture toughness for superhard materials (K1C=15MPam0.5) and wear resistance (WH=11; compare, for industrial polycrystalline diamond, WH=3-4), in combination with high thermal stability (above 1600K in air), making it an exceptional superabrasive.

  8. The frictional flow of a dense granular material based on the dilatant double shearing model

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, H.; Mehrabadi, M.M.; Massoudi, M.C.

    2007-01-01

    Slow flow of granular materials, which typically occurs during the emptying of industrial storage hoppers and bins, has great industrial relevance. In the present study, we have employed our newly developed dilatant double shearing model [H. Zhu, M.M. Mehrabadi, M. Massoudi, Incorporating the effects of fabric in the dilatant double shearing model for granular materials, Int. J. Plast. 22 (2006) 628-653] to study the slow flow of a frictional, dense granular material. Although most models pertain only to the fully developed granular flow, the application of the dilatant double shearing model is shown to be valid from the onset of granular flow to the fully developed granular flow. In this paper, we use the finite element program ABAQUS/Explicit to numerically simulate the granular Couette flow and the frictional granular flow in a silo. For the granular Couette flow, the relative density variation and the velocity profile obtained by using the dilatant double shearing model are in good quantitative agreement with those obtained from a DEM simulation. For the frictional flow in a silo, the major principal stress directions are obtained at various time steps after the onset of silo discharge. We find that, in the hopper zone, the arching of the granular material between the sloping hopper walls is clearly demonstrated by the change in direction of the major principal stress. We also compare the pressure distribution along the wall before and after the onset of silo discharge. The numerical results show that the dilatant double shearing model is capable of capturing the essential features of the frictional granular flow.

  9. Potentiometric stripping analysis of selected heavy metals in biological materials.

    PubMed

    Sattar, A; Ahmad, N; Khan, L A

    1993-01-01

    Different biological materials such as edible oils, refined and unrefined cane and beet sugar and tea (black and green) leaves were assayed for the heavy metals cadmium, copper, lead and zinc. The results revealed significant differences in heavy metal contents within each class of the biological materials (P < 0.05). Cadmium was not detectable in sugar samples. Among the oils, highest amounts of copper (0.263 microgram/g) and lead (0.154 microgram/g) were in corn oil and zinc in olive oil (3.01 micrograms/g) whereas cadmium exhibited a narrow range (0.023-0.033 microgram/g). The samples of beet-sugar generally contained higher levels of the heavy metals than cane-sugar. Black and green tea leaves contained 0.411-0.908 microgram Cd/g, 6.500-9.220 micrograms Cu/g, 2.200-5.238 micrograms Pb/g, and 14.500-25.180 micrograms Zn/g. PMID:8361526

  10. Activation of accelerator construction materials by heavy ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katrík, P.; Mustafin, E.; Hoffmann, D. H. H.; Pavlovič, M.; Strašík, I.

    2015-12-01

    Activation data for an aluminum target irradiated by 200 MeV/u 238U ion beam are presented in the paper. The target was irradiated in the stacked-foil geometry and analyzed using gamma-ray spectroscopy. The purpose of the experiment was to study the role of primary particles, projectile fragments, and target fragments in the activation process using the depth profiling of residual activity. The study brought information on which particles contribute dominantly to the target activation. The experimental data were compared with the Monte Carlo simulations by the FLUKA 2011.2c.0 code. This study is a part of a research program devoted to activation of accelerator construction materials by high-energy (⩾200 MeV/u) heavy ions at GSI Darmstadt. The experimental data are needed to validate the computer codes used for simulation of interaction of swift heavy ions with matter.

  11. High-energy electron radiography of microstructures in a dense material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qi, Rong; Tian, Ye; Zhang, Guo-Qing; Bai, Ya-Feng; Zhou, Shi-Yi; Zeng, Yu-Shan; Sun, Hai-Yi; Wang, Xing-Tao; Li, Xiao-Ya; Liu, Jian-Sheng

    2016-08-01

    This study presents experimental and numerical results for the high-energy electron-beam radiography of two types of microstructures in a dense material. A copper step target with 1- and 4-mm-thick steps is irradiated by an electron beam with an energy of 150 MeV. A peak and valley structure with 285 µm width was observed in 4-mm step target experiment, as indicated by the "valley to peak" feature at the 4-mm step boundary caused by multiple scattering. In a gap-target experiment, the rate of increase of the penetrant-electron counts with a gap width of 500-900 µm grows from 1.5 to 2.5 times the background counts. Consequently, the width of the gaps can be approximately deduced from the ratio of the penetrant-electron counts combined with the peak value. The features observed in the experiment are reproduced by a Monte Carlo-FLUKE code with parameters similar to those used experimentally.

  12. System for studying a sample of material using a heavy ion induced mass spectrometer source

    DOEpatents

    Fries, D.P.; Browning, J.F.

    1998-07-21

    A heavy ion generator is used with a plasma desorption mass spectrometer to provide an appropriate neutron flux in the direction of a fissionable material in order to desorb and ionize large molecules from the material for mass analysis. The heavy ion generator comprises a fissionable material having a high (n,f) reaction cross section. The heavy ion generator also comprises a pulsed neutron generator that is used to bombard the fissionable material with pulses of neutrons, thereby causing heavy ions to be emitted from the fissionable material. These heavy ions impinge on a material, thereby causing ions to desorb off that material. The ions desorbed off the material pass through a time-of-flight mass analyzer, wherein ions can be measured with masses greater than 25,000 amu. 3 figs.

  13. Method for studying a sample of material using a heavy ion induced mass spectrometer source

    DOEpatents

    Fries, D.P.; Browning, J.F.

    1999-02-16

    A heavy ion generator is used with a plasma desorption mass spectrometer to provide an appropriate neutron flux in the direction of a fissionable material in order to desorb and ionize large molecules from the material for mass analysis. The heavy ion generator comprises a fissionable material having a high n,f reaction cross section. The heavy ion generator also comprises a pulsed neutron generator that is used to bombard the fissionable material with pulses of neutrons, thereby causing heavy ions to be emitted from the fissionable material. These heavy ions impinge on a material, thereby causing ions to desorb off that material. The ions desorbed off the material pass through a time-of-flight mass analyzer, wherein ions can be measured with masses greater than 25,000 amu. 3 figs.

  14. Method for studying a sample of material using a heavy ion induced mass spectrometer source

    DOEpatents

    Fries, David P.; Browning, James F.

    1999-01-01

    A heavy ion generator is used with a plasma desorption mass spectrometer to provide an appropriate neutron flux in the direction of a fissionable material in order to desorb and ionize large molecules from the material for mass analysis. The heavy ion generator comprises a fissionable material having a high n,f reaction cross section. The heavy ion generator also comprises a pulsed neutron generator that is used to bombard the fissionable material with pulses of neutrons, thereby causing heavy ions to be emitted from the fissionable material. These heavy ions impinge on a material, thereby causing ions to desorb off that material. The ions desorbed off the material pass through a time-of-flight mass analyzer, wherein ions can be measured with masses greater than 25,000 amu.

  15. System for studying a sample of material using a heavy ion induced mass spectrometer source

    DOEpatents

    Fries, David P.; Browning, James F.

    1998-01-01

    A heavy ion generator is used with a plasma desorption mass spectrometer to provide an appropriate neutron flux in the direction of a fissionable material in order to desorb and ionize large molecules from the material for mass analysis. The heavy ion generator comprises a fissionable material having a high n,f reaction cross section. The heavy ion generator also comprises a pulsed neutron generator that is used to bombard the fissionable material with pulses of neutrons, thereby causing heavy ions to be emitted from the fissionable material. These heavy ions impinge on a material, thereby causing ions to desorb off that material. The ions desorbed off the material pass through a time-of-flight mass analyzer, wherein ions can be measured with masses greater than 25,000 amu.

  16. Immobilization of EAFD heavy metals using acidic materials.

    PubMed

    Mitrakas, Manassis G; Sikalidis, Constantinos A; Karamanli, Theoktisti P

    2007-03-01

    This study was undertaken to determine the chemical and leaching characteristics of the Electric Arc Furnace Dust (EAFD) generated by a Greek plant and to investigate various acidic materials efficiency on the EAFD stabilization. In order to investigate how [OH(-)] neutralization influences EAFD heavy metals leachability, Na HCO3(-), HNO3 and H3PO4 were used as acidic materials. The concentration of Pb in leachate was found between 40 and 3.7 x 10(3) mg Pb/kg of EAFD, exceeding in all EAFD samples the maximum acceptable limit (MAL) 25 mg/kg for landfill disposal. Neutralization of [OH(-)] with HCO3(-) decreased Pb concentration in leachate at 350 mg Pb/kg of EAFD, while excess over a stoichiometry in HCO3(-) addition increased leachability of Pb, Cd, Cr, Cu as well as F. Using HNO3 as an acidic material decreased leachability of almost all the parameters concerning the EC directive 33/19-01-2003 in a pH value up to 7.2, in exception of Zn. Zinc leachability showed a U shape curve as a function of pH value. The concentration of Zn was minimized in a concentration lower than 1 mg Zn/kg EAFD in a pH range 10.5 to 9 and exceeded the MAL 90 mg/kg at a pH value 7.2. However, the major disadvantage of HNO3 was proved to be its leachability, since NO3(-) concentration in leachate was equal to HNO3 dose. H3PO4 was found the most promising acidic material for the chemical immobilization of heavy metals, since it decreased their leachability in a concentration significantly lower than MAL at a pH value up to 7.1. Finally, the concentration of Cl(-) ranged between 18 and 33 x 10(3) mg Cl(-)/kg EAFD exceeding in all EAFD samples the MAL 17 x 10(3) mg/kg. This high concentration of Cl(-) is attributed to the scrap and it could be reduced only by modification of its composition.

  17. Fast six-channel pyrometer for warm-dense-matter experiments with intense heavy-ion beams

    SciTech Connect

    Ni, P.A.; Kulish, M.I.; Mintsev, V.; Nikolaev, D.N.; Ternovoi, V.Ya.; Hoffmann, D.H.H.; Udrea, S.; Tahir, N.A.; Varentsov, D.; Hug, A.

    2008-12-01

    This paper describes a fast multi-channel radiation pyrometer that was developed for warmdense-matter experiments with intense heavy ion beams at Gesellschaft fur Schwerionenforschung mbH (GSI). The pyrometer is capable of measuring of brightness temperatures from 2000 K to 50000 K, at 6 wavelengths in visible and near-infrared parts of spectrum, with 5 nanosecond temporal resolution and several micrometers spatial resolution. The pyrometer's spectral discrimination technique is based on interference filters, which act as filters and mirrors to allow for simultaneous spectral discrimination of the same ray at multiple wavelengths.

  18. Stabilized Acoustic Levitation of Dense Materials Using a High-Powered Siren

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gammell, P. M.; Croonquist, A.; Wang, T. G.

    1982-01-01

    Stabilized acoustic levitation and manipulation of dense (e.g., steel) objects of 1 cm diameter, using a high powered siren, was demonstrated in trials that investigated the harmonic content and spatial distribution of the acoustic field, as well as the effect of sample position and reflector geometries on the acoustic field. Although further optimization is possible, the most stable operation achieved is expected to be adequate for most containerless processing applications. Best stability was obtained with an open reflector system, using a flat lower reflector and a slightly concave upper one. Operation slightly below resonance enhances stability as this minimizes the second harmonic, which is suspected of being a particularly destabilizing influence.

  19. A high-powered siren for stable acoustic levitation of dense materials in the earth's gravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gammel, Paul M.; Croonquist, Arvid P.; Wang, Taylor G.

    1988-01-01

    Levitation of large dense samples (e.g., 1-cm diameter steel balls) has been performed in a 1-g environment. A siren was used to study the effects of reflector geometry and variable-frequency operation in order to attain stable acoustic positioning. The harmonic content and spatial distribution of the acoustic field have been investigated. The best stability was obtained with an open reflector system, using a flat lower reflector and a slightly concave upper reflector while operating at a frequency slightly below resonance.

  20. Minimizing the magnetic field effect in MR-linac specific QA-tests: the use of electron dense materials.

    PubMed

    van Zijp, H M; van Asselen, B; Wolthaus, J W H; Kok, J M G; de Vries, J H W; Ishakoglu, K; Beld, E; Lagendijk, J J W; Raaymakers, B W

    2016-02-01

    To address the quality assurance (QA) of a MR-linac which is an MRI combined with a linear accelerator (linac), the traditional linac QA-tests need to be redesigned, since the presence of the static magnetic field in the MR-linac alters the electron trajectory. The latter causes the asymmetry in the dose kernel which is introduced by the magnetic field and hinders accurate geometrical QA-tests for the MR-linac. We introduced the use of electron dense materials (e.g. copper) to reduce the size of the dose kernel and thereby the magnetic field effect on the dose deposition. Two examples of QA-tests are presented in which the geometrical accuracy of the MR-linac was addressed; beam profile and star-shot measurements. The introduced setup was compared with a reference setup and both were tested on a conventional and the MR-linac. The results showed that the symmetry of the recorded beam profile was restored in presence of the copper material and that the isocenter size of the MR-linac can be determined accurately with the introduced star-shot setup. The use of electron dense materials is not limited to the presented QA-tests but has a broad application for beam-specific QA-tests in presence of a magnetic field. PMID:26758570

  1. Minimizing the magnetic field effect in MR-linac specific QA-tests: the use of electron dense materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Zijp, H. M.; van Asselen, B.; Wolthaus, J. W. H.; Kok, J. M. G.; de Vries, J. H. W.; Ishakoglu, K.; Beld, E.; Lagendijk, J. J. W.; Raaymakers, B. W.

    2016-02-01

    To address the quality assurance (QA) of a MR-linac which is an MRI combined with a linear accelerator (linac), the traditional linac QA-tests need to be redesigned, since the presence of the static magnetic field in the MR-linac alters the electron trajectory. The latter causes the asymmetry in the dose kernel which is introduced by the magnetic field and hinders accurate geometrical QA-tests for the MR-linac. We introduced the use of electron dense materials (e.g. copper) to reduce the size of the dose kernel and thereby the magnetic field effect on the dose deposition. Two examples of QA-tests are presented in which the geometrical accuracy of the MR-linac was addressed; beam profile and star-shot measurements. The introduced setup was compared with a reference setup and both were tested on a conventional and the MR-linac. The results showed that the symmetry of the recorded beam profile was restored in presence of the copper material and that the isocenter size of the MR-linac can be determined accurately with the introduced star-shot setup. The use of electron dense materials is not limited to the presented QA-tests but has a broad application for beam-specific QA-tests in presence of a magnetic field.

  2. Non-Gaussian behavior in jamming / unjamming transition in dense granular materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atman, A. P. F.; Kolb, E.; Combe, G.; Paiva, H. A.; Martins, G. H. B.

    2013-06-01

    Experiments of penetration of a cylindrical intruder inside a bidimensional dense and disordered granular media were reported recently showing the jamming / unjamming transition. In the present work, we perform molecular dynamics simulations with the same geometry in order to assess both kinematic and static features of jamming / unjamming transition. We study the statistics of the particles velocities at the neighborhood of the intruder to evince that both experiments and simulations present the same qualitative behavior. We observe that the probability density functions (PDF) of velocities deviate from Gaussian depending on the packing fraction of the granular assembly. In order to quantify these deviations we consider a q-Gaussian (Tsallis) function to fit the PDF's. The q-value can be an indication of the presence of long range correlations along the system. We compare the fitted PDF's obtained with those obtained using the stretched exponential, and sketch some conclusions concerning the nature of the correlations along a granular confined flow.

  3. Study of liquid-solid transition for materials processing in space. Analysis of field effects on dense liquid materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, R. I.

    1973-01-01

    The behavior of dense liquids near the solidification point under the influence of magnetic fields or near-zero gravity conditions were analyzed within the framework of existing liquid state models and classical field theory. The dynamic body forces which are an effect of the magnetic field on liquids are discussed. It is concluded that both magnetic fields and low gravity conditions produce an increase in the diffusion coefficient which result in an increased growth rate of crystals, and time varying magnetic fields induce eddy currents in the liquid which produce body forces and tend to disrupt convection.

  4. Monitor of the concentration of particles of dense radioactive materials in a stream of air

    DOEpatents

    Yule, Thomas J.

    1979-01-01

    A monitor of the concentration of particles of radioactive materials such as plutonium oxide in diameters as small as 1/2 micron includes in combination a first stage comprising a plurality of virtual impactors, a second stage comprising a further plurality of virtual impactors, a collector for concentrating particulate material, a radiation detector disposed near the collector to respond to radiation from collected material and means for moving a stream of air, possibly containing particulate contaminants, through the apparatus.

  5. Heavy fermion and actinide materials. Annual technical progress report, February 1, 1992--January 31, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-02-01

    During this period, 1/N expansions have been systematically applied to the calculation of the properties of highly correlated electron systems. These studies include examinations of (a) the class of materials known as heavy fermion semi-conductors, (b) the high energy spectra of heavy fermion systems, and (c) the doped oxide superconductors.

  6. In vitro mineralization of dense collagen substrates: a biomimetic approach toward the development of bone-graft materials.

    PubMed

    Thula, Taili T; Rodriguez, Douglas E; Lee, Myong Hwa; Pendi, Laura; Podschun, Jacob; Gower, Laurie B

    2011-08-01

    Bone is an organic-inorganic composite which has hierarchical structuring that leads to high strength and toughness. The nanostructure of bone consists of nanocrystals of hydroxyapatite embedded and aligned within the interstices of collagen fibrils. This unique nanostructure leads to exceptional properties, both mechanical and biological, making it difficult to emulate bone properties without having a bone-like nanostructured material. A primary goal of our group's work is to use biomimetic processing techniques that lead to bone-like structures. In our prior studies, we demonstrated that intrafibrillar mineralization of porous collagen sponges, leading to a bone-like nanostructure, can be achieved using a polymer-induced liquid precursor (PILP) mineralization process. The objective of this study was to investigate the use of this polymer-directed crystallization process to mineralize dense collagen substrates. To examine collagen scaffolds that truly represent the dense-packed matrix of bone, manatee bone was demineralized to isolate its collagen matrix, consisting of a dense, lamellar osteonal microstructure. This biogenic collagen scaffold was then remineralized using polyaspartate to direct the mineralization process through an amorphous precursor pathway. The various conditions investigated included polymer molecular weight, substrate dimension and mineralization time. Mineral penetration depths of up to 100 μms were achieved using this PILP process, compared to no penetration with only surface precipitates observed for the conventional crystallization process. Electron microscopy, wide-angle X-ray diffraction and thermal analysis were used to characterize the resulting hydroxyapatite/collagen composites. These studies demonstrate that the original interpenetrating bone nanostructure and osteonal microstructure could be recovered in a biogenic matrix using the PILP process.

  7. In Vitro Mineralization of Dense Collagen Substrates: A Biomimetic Approach Toward the Development of Bone-Graft Materials

    PubMed Central

    Thula, Taili T.; Rodriguez, Douglas E.; Lee, Myong Hwa; Pendi, Laura; Podschun, Jacob; Gower, Laurie B.

    2012-01-01

    Bone is an organic-inorganic composite which has hierarchical structuring that leads to high strength and toughness. The nanostructure of bone consists of nanocrystals of hydroxyapatite embedded and aligned within the interstices of collagen fibrils. This unique nanostructure leads to exceptional properties, both mechanical and biological, making it difficult to emulate bone properties without having a bone-like nanostructured material. A primary goal of our group’s work is to use biomimetic processing techniques that lead to bone-like structures. In our prior studies, we demonstrated that intrafibrillar mineralization of porous collagen sponges, leading to a bone-like nanostructure, can be achieved using a polymer-induced liquid-precursor (PILP) mineralization process. The objective of this study was to investigate the use of this polymer-directed crystallization process to mineralize dense collagen substrates. To examine collagen scaffolds that truly represent the dense-packed matrix of bone, manatee bone was demineralized to isolate its collagen matrix, consisting of a dense, lamellar osteonal microstructure. This biogenic collagen scaffold was then remineralized using polyaspartate to direct the mineralization process through an amorphous precursor pathway. Various conditions investigated included polymer molecular weight, substrate dimension and mineralization time. Mineral penetration depths of up to 100 μms were achieved using this PILP process, compared to no penetration with only surface precipitates observed for the conventional crystallization process. Electron microscopy, wide-angle X-ray diffraction, and thermal analysis were used to characterize the resulting hydroxyapatite/collagen composites. These studies demonstrate that the original interpenetrating bone nanostructure and osteonal microstructure could be recovered in a biogenic matrix using the PILP process. PMID:21550424

  8. In vitro mineralization of dense collagen substrates: a biomimetic approach toward the development of bone-graft materials.

    PubMed

    Thula, Taili T; Rodriguez, Douglas E; Lee, Myong Hwa; Pendi, Laura; Podschun, Jacob; Gower, Laurie B

    2011-08-01

    Bone is an organic-inorganic composite which has hierarchical structuring that leads to high strength and toughness. The nanostructure of bone consists of nanocrystals of hydroxyapatite embedded and aligned within the interstices of collagen fibrils. This unique nanostructure leads to exceptional properties, both mechanical and biological, making it difficult to emulate bone properties without having a bone-like nanostructured material. A primary goal of our group's work is to use biomimetic processing techniques that lead to bone-like structures. In our prior studies, we demonstrated that intrafibrillar mineralization of porous collagen sponges, leading to a bone-like nanostructure, can be achieved using a polymer-induced liquid precursor (PILP) mineralization process. The objective of this study was to investigate the use of this polymer-directed crystallization process to mineralize dense collagen substrates. To examine collagen scaffolds that truly represent the dense-packed matrix of bone, manatee bone was demineralized to isolate its collagen matrix, consisting of a dense, lamellar osteonal microstructure. This biogenic collagen scaffold was then remineralized using polyaspartate to direct the mineralization process through an amorphous precursor pathway. The various conditions investigated included polymer molecular weight, substrate dimension and mineralization time. Mineral penetration depths of up to 100 μms were achieved using this PILP process, compared to no penetration with only surface precipitates observed for the conventional crystallization process. Electron microscopy, wide-angle X-ray diffraction and thermal analysis were used to characterize the resulting hydroxyapatite/collagen composites. These studies demonstrate that the original interpenetrating bone nanostructure and osteonal microstructure could be recovered in a biogenic matrix using the PILP process. PMID:21550424

  9. The nature of the dense obscuring material in the nucleus of NGC 1068

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tacconi, L. J.; Genzel, R.; Blietz, M.; Cameron, M.; Harris, A. I.; Madden, S.

    1994-01-01

    High spatial and spectral resolution observations of the distribution, physical parameters, and kinematics of the molecular interstellar medium toward the nucleus of the Seyfert 2 galaxy NGC 1068 are reported. The data consist of 2.4 by 3.4 arcseconds resolution interferometry of the 88.6 GHz HCN J = 1 towards 0 line at 17 km/s spectral resolution, single dish observations of several mm/submm isotopic lines of CO and HCN, and 0.85 arcseconds imaging spectroscopy of the 2.12 micron H2 S(1) line at a velocity resolution of 110 km/s. The central few hundred parsecs of NGC 1068 contain a system of dense (N(H2) approximately 10(exp 5) cm(exp -3)), warm (T greater than or equal to 70 K) molecular cloud cores. The low density molecular envelopes have probably been stripped by the nuclear wind and radiation. The molecular gas layer is located in the plane of NGC 1068's large scale disk (inclination approximately 35 deg) and orbits in elliptical streamlines in response to the central stellar bar. The spatial distribution of the 2 micron H2 emission suggests that gas is shocked at the leading edge of the bar, probably resulting in gas influx into the central 100 pc at a rate of a few solar mass per year. In addition to large scale streaming (with a solid body rotation curve), the HCN velocity field requires the presence of random motions of order 100 km/s. We interpret these large random motions as implying the nuclear gas disk to be very thick (scale height/radius approximately 1), probably as the result of the impact of nuclear radiation and wind on orbiting molecular clouds. Geometry and column density of the molecular cloud layer between approximately 30 pc to 300 pc from the nucleus can plausibly account for the nuclear obscuration and anisotropy of the radiation field in the visible and UV.

  10. Conduction and Narrow Escape in Dense, Disordered, Particulate-based Heterogeneous Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lechman, Jeremy

    For optimal and reliable performance, many technological devices rely on complex, disordered heterogeneous or composite materials and their associated manufacturing processes. Examples include many powder and particulate-based materials found in phyrotechnic devices for car airbags, electrodes in energy storage devices, and various advanced composite materials. Due to their technological importance and complex structure, these materials have been the subject of much research in a number of fields. Moreover, the advent of new manufacturing techniques based on powder bed and particulate process routes, the potential of functional nano-structured materials, and the additional recognition of persistent shortcomings in predicting reliable performance of high consequence applications; leading to ballooning costs of fielding and maintaining advanced technologies, should motivate renewed efforts in understanding, predicting and controlling these materials' fabrication and behavior. Our particular effort seeks to understand the link between the top-down control presented in specific non-equilibrium processes routes (i.e., manufacturing processes) and the variability and uncertainty of the end product performance. Our ultimate aim is to quantify the variability inherent in these constrained dynamical or random processes and to use it to optimize and predict resulting material properties/performance and to inform component design with precise margins. In fact, this raises a set of deep and broad-ranging issues that have been recognized and as touching the core of a major research challenge at Sandia National Laboratories. In this talk, we will give an overview of recent efforts to address aspects of this vision. In particular the case of conductive properties of packed particulate materials will be highlighted. Combining a number of existing approaches we will discuss new insights and potential directions for further development toward the stated goal. Sandia National

  11. Instruments to reduce the leaching of heavy metals from building materials in the Netherlands.

    PubMed

    van Breemen, A J H; Vermij, P H M

    2007-01-01

    In the Netherlands the leaching of heavy metals from metal building and constructing materials results in serious contamination problems in the water system. The most common sources of these heavy metals in construction materials are copper waterworks and roofs, zinc roofs, gutters and rain pipes, zinced steel, stainless steel, and lead sealing material. In urban waters the surface water and sediment standards are often exceeded. Although building and construction materials are certainly not the only source of heavy metals, they are an important part of the problem. This article focuses on six instruments that are in use in the Netherlands to try to reduce impact on the surface waters. In addition to this, national as well as international, a reconsideration of the risks and surface water standards for several heavy metals is considered. A balanced use of instruments can be considered as the application of a best practice.

  12. Micro-statics and micro-kinematics of capillary phenomena in dense granular materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chareyre, B.; Scholtès, L.; Darve, F.

    2009-06-01

    A capillary stress tensor and an effective stress tensor are defined in DEM simulations of spheres packings with capillary effect. It is shown that induced fabric anisotropy results in an anisotropy of the capillary stress, so that any stress-like variable used to represent the effect of capillarity in granular materials should be represented by a non-spherical tensor. The response of a sample to small isotropic stress increments is also presented, the loading being imposed either by a small variation of the stress imposed at boundaries (method A) or by a variation of matric suction (method B). The comparison of the results, with emphasis on micromechanical aspects, shows some differences between the results obtained with methods A and B, even though the increment of effective stress is the same in both cases. The effective stress concept in unsaturated granular materials is questionned on the basis of these results.

  13. Preparation of dense bulk high T/sub c/ superconducting materials using hot isostatic pressing

    SciTech Connect

    Imam, M.A.; Sadananda, K.; Osofsky, M.

    1989-03-01

    It is important to improve the intergrain contact by eliminating internal porosity in sintered products. This is accomplished for Ba-Cu-O with Er or Nd, Bi-Sr-Ca-Cu-O and Tl-Ba-Ca-Cu-O systems using hot isostatic pressing (HIP). Sintered superconducting materials were encapsulated in an evacuated stainless steel or pyrex glass containers and processed in a HIP unit a high temperatures and pressures. Optimum HIP conditions to obtain bulk samples of nearly theoretical density were determined. Results indicate that in addition to density, HIP also improved T/sub c/. Furthermore, for the 1-2-3 system, the grain size is significantly reduced during HIP and is attributed to fracturing of course particles in the sintered compact due to high strain rates experienced during the pressurization. HIP materials can be machined to any shape and size and is being used for making specimens for J/sub c/ measurements and superconducting devices.

  14. Laser desorption mass spectrometry and small angle neutron scattering of heavy fossil materials

    SciTech Connect

    Hunt, J.E.; Winans, R.E.; Thiyagarajan, P.

    1997-09-01

    The determination of the structural building blocks and the molecular weight range of heavy hydrocarbon materials is of crucial importance in research on their reactivity and for their processing. The chemically and physically heterogenous nature of heavy hydrocarbon materials, such as coals, heavy petroleum fractions, and residues, dictates that their structure and reactivity patterns be complicated. The problem is further complicated by the fact that the molecular structure and molecular weight distribution of these materials is not dependent on a single molecule, but on a complex mixture of molecules which vary among coals and heavy petroleum samples. Laser Desorption mass spectrometry (LDMS) is emerging as a technique for molecular weight determination having found widespread use in biological polymer research, but is still a relatively new technique in the fossil fuel area. Small angle neutron scattering (SANS) provides information on the size and shape of heavy fossil materials. SANS offers the advantages of high penetration power even in thick cells at high temperatures and high contrast for hydrocarbon systems dispersed in deuterated solvents. LDMS coupled with time of flight has the advantages of high sensitivity and transmission and high mass range. We have used LDMS to examine various heavy fossil-derived materials including: long chain hydrocarbons, asphaltenes from petroleum vacuum resids, and coals. This paper describes the application of laser desorption and small angle neutron scattering techniques to the analysis of components in coals, petroleum resids and unsaturated polymers.

  15. Development and testing of a pulsed helium ion source for probing materials and warm dense matter studies.

    PubMed

    Ji, Q; Seidl, P A; Waldron, W L; Takakuwa, J H; Friedman, A; Grote, D P; Persaud, A; Barnard, J J; Schenkel, T

    2016-02-01

    The neutralized drift compression experiment was designed and commissioned as a pulsed, linear induction accelerator to drive thin targets to warm dense matter (WDM) states with peak temperatures of ∼1 eV using intense, short pulses (∼1 ns) of 1.2 MeV lithium ions. At that kinetic energy, heating a thin target foil near the Bragg peak energy using He(+) ions leads to more uniform energy deposition of the target material than Li(+) ions. Experiments show that a higher current density of helium ions can be delivered from a plasma source compared to Li(+) ions from a hot plate type ion source. He(+) beam pulses as high as 200 mA at the peak and 4 μs long were measured from a multi-aperture 7-cm-diameter emission area. Within ±5% variation, the uniform beam area is approximately 6 cm across. The accelerated and compressed pulsed ion beams can be used for materials studies and isochoric heating of target materials for high energy density physics experiments and WDM studies. PMID:26932070

  16. Development and testing of a pulsed helium ion source for probing materials and warm dense matter studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, Q.; Seidl, P. A.; Waldron, W. L.; Takakuwa, J. H.; Friedman, A.; Grote, D. P.; Persaud, A.; Barnard, J. J.; Schenkel, T.

    2016-02-01

    The neutralized drift compression experiment was designed and commissioned as a pulsed, linear induction accelerator to drive thin targets to warm dense matter (WDM) states with peak temperatures of ˜1 eV using intense, short pulses (˜1 ns) of 1.2 MeV lithium ions. At that kinetic energy, heating a thin target foil near the Bragg peak energy using He+ ions leads to more uniform energy deposition of the target material than Li+ ions. Experiments show that a higher current density of helium ions can be delivered from a plasma source compared to Li+ ions from a hot plate type ion source. He+ beam pulses as high as 200 mA at the peak and 4 μs long were measured from a multi-aperture 7-cm-diameter emission area. Within ±5% variation, the uniform beam area is approximately 6 cm across. The accelerated and compressed pulsed ion beams can be used for materials studies and isochoric heating of target materials for high energy density physics experiments and WDM studies.

  17. Effect of vermicomposting on concentration and speciation of heavy metals in sewage sludge with additive materials.

    PubMed

    He, Xin; Zhang, Yaxin; Shen, Maocai; Zeng, Guangming; Zhou, Mucen; Li, Meirong

    2016-10-01

    The aim of this work was to evaluate the total content and speciation of heavy metals (As, Cr, Cd, Cu, Fe, Mn, Ni, Pb and Zn) during vermicomposting of sewage sludge by Eisenia fetida earthworm with different additive materials (soil, straw, fly ash and sawdust). Results showed that the pH, total organic carbon were reduced, while the electric conductivity and germination index increased after a combined composting - vermicomposting process. The addition of bulking agents accelerated the stabilization of sludge and eliminated its toxicity. The total heavy metals after vermicomposting in 10 scenarios were lowered as compared with the initial values and the control without amendment. BCR sequential extraction indicated that vermicomposting significantly decreased the mobility of all heavy metals by increasing the residual fractions. The activity of earthworms and appropriate addition of amendment materials played a positive role in sequestering heavy metals during the treatment of sewage sludge. PMID:27434304

  18. Experimental results on the irradiation of nuclear fusion relevant materials at the dense plasma focus ‘Bora’ device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cicuttin, A.; Crespo, M. L.; Gribkov, V. A.; Niemela, J.; Tuniz, C.; Zanolli, C.; Chernyshova, M.; Demina, E. V.; Latyshev, S. V.; Pimenov, V. N.; Talab, A. A.

    2015-06-01

    Samples of materials counted as perspective ones for use in the first-wall and construction elements in nuclear fusion reactors (FRs) with magnetic and inertial plasma confinement (W, Ti, Al, low-activated ferritic steel ‘Eurofer’ and some alloys) were irradiated in the dense plasma focus (DPF) device ‘Bora’ having a bank energy of ⩽5 kJ. The device generates hot dense (T ˜ 1 keV, n ˜ 1019 cm-3) deuterium plasma, powerful plasma streams (v ˜ 3 × 107 cm s-1) and fast (E ˜ 0.1 … 1.0 MeV) deuterons of power flux densities q up to 1010 and 1012 W cm-2 correspondingly. ‘Damage factor’ F = q × τ0.5 ensures an opportunity to simulate radiation loads (predictable for both reactors types) by the plasma/ion streams, which have the same nature and namely those parameters as expected in the FR modules. Before and after irradiation we provided investigations of our samples by means of a number of analytical techniques. Among them we used optical and scanning electron microscopy to understand character and parameters of damageability of the surface layers of the samples. Atomic force microscopy was applied to measure roughness of the surface after irradiation. These characteristics are quite important for understanding mechanisms and values of dust production in FR that may relate to tritium retention and emergency situations in FR facilities. We also applied two new techniques. For the surface we elaborated the portable x-ray diffractometer that combines x-ray single photon detection with high spectroscopic and angular resolutions. For bulk damageability investigations we applied an x-ray microCT system where x-rays were produced by a Hamamatsu microfocus source (150 kV, 500 µA, 5 µm minimum focal spot size). The detector was a Hamamatsu CMOS flat panel coupled to a fibre optic plate under the GOS scintillator. The reconstruction of three-dimensional data was run with Cobra 7.4 and DIGIX CT software while VG Studio Max 2.1, and Amira 5.3 were used for

  19. Heavy-ion irradiation induced diamond formation in carbonaceous materials.

    SciTech Connect

    Daulton, T. L.

    1999-01-08

    The basic mechanisms of metastable phase formation produced under highly non-equilibrium thermodynamic conditions within high-energy particle tracks are investigated. In particular, the possible formation of diamond by heavy-ion irradiation of graphite at ambient temperature is examined. This work was motivated, in part, by earlier studies which discovered nanometer-grain polycrystalline diamond aggregates of submicron-size in uranium-rich carbonaceous mineral assemblages of Precambrian age. It was proposed that the radioactive decay of uranium formed diamond in the fission particle tracks produced in the carbonaceous minerals. To test the hypothesis that nanodiamonds can form by ion irradiation, fine-grain polycrystalline graphite sheets were irradiated with 400 MeV Kr ions. The ion irradiated graphite (and unirradiated graphite control) were then subjected to acid dissolution treatments to remove the graphite and isolate any diamonds that were produced. The acid residues were then characterized by analytical and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy. The acid residues of the ion-irradiated graphite were found to contain ppm concentrations of nanodiamonds, suggesting that ion irradiation of bulk graphite at ambient temperature can produce diamond.

  20. The sputtering of insulating materials by fast heavy ions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seiberling, L. E.; Meins, C. K.; Cooper, B. H.; Griffith, J. E.; Mendenhall, M. H.; Tombrello, T. A.

    1982-01-01

    In this paper recent experimental results on sputtering of UF4 and H2O (ice) by fast heavy ions are reviewed. Measurements have been made of the dependence of the sputtering yield on the incident ion type, charge state, and energy. In the case of UF4, the energy spectra of neutral sputtered particles have been obtained as well. There is a clear dependence of the sputtering yield on the electronic part of the stopping power, and the yield is strongly affected by the charge state of the incident ion, which shows that in the near-surface region from which sputtered particles arise, the charge state of the incident ion has not reached equilibrium. The shape of the energy spectra observed for UF4 targets is that expected from a thermal distribution rather than that of the collision cascade form typical of ordinary sputtering. A model of the sputtering-track registration process that has arisen from these data is shown to provide a framework of understanding the close relationship of these observations to the 'plasma desorption' of marcromolecules.

  1. Comparison of filter media materials for heavy metal removal from urban stormwater runoff using biofiltration systems.

    PubMed

    Lim, H S; Lim, W; Hu, J Y; Ziegler, A; Ong, S L

    2015-01-01

    The filter media in biofiltration systems play an important role in removing potentially harmful pollutants from urban stormwater runoff. This study compares the heavy metal removal potential (Cu, Zn, Cd, Pb) of five materials (potting soil, compost, coconut coir, sludge and a commercial mix) using laboratory columns. Total/dissolved organic carbon (TOC/DOC) was also analysed because some of the test materials had high carbon content which affects heavy metal uptake/release. Potting soil and the commercial mix offered the best metal uptake when dosed with low (Cu: 44.78 μg/L, Zn: 436.4 μg/L, Cd, 1.82 μg/L, Pb: 51.32 μg/L) and high concentrations of heavy metals (Cu: 241 μg/L, Zn: 1127 μg/L, Cd: 4.57 μg/L, Pb: 90.25 μg/L). Compost and sludge also had high removal efficiencies (>90%). Heavy metal leaching from these materials was negligible. A one-month dry period between dosing experiments did not affect metal removal efficiencies. TOC concentrations from all materials increased after the dry period. Heavy metal removal was not affected by filter media depth (600 mm vs. 300 mm). Heavy metals tended to accumulate at the upper 5 cm of the filter media although potting soil showed bottom-enriched concentrations. We recommend using potting soil as the principal media mixed with compost or sludge since these materials perform well and are readily available. The use of renewable materials commonly found in Singapore supports a sustainable approach to urban water management.

  2. Comparison of filter media materials for heavy metal removal from urban stormwater runoff using biofiltration systems.

    PubMed

    Lim, H S; Lim, W; Hu, J Y; Ziegler, A; Ong, S L

    2015-01-01

    The filter media in biofiltration systems play an important role in removing potentially harmful pollutants from urban stormwater runoff. This study compares the heavy metal removal potential (Cu, Zn, Cd, Pb) of five materials (potting soil, compost, coconut coir, sludge and a commercial mix) using laboratory columns. Total/dissolved organic carbon (TOC/DOC) was also analysed because some of the test materials had high carbon content which affects heavy metal uptake/release. Potting soil and the commercial mix offered the best metal uptake when dosed with low (Cu: 44.78 μg/L, Zn: 436.4 μg/L, Cd, 1.82 μg/L, Pb: 51.32 μg/L) and high concentrations of heavy metals (Cu: 241 μg/L, Zn: 1127 μg/L, Cd: 4.57 μg/L, Pb: 90.25 μg/L). Compost and sludge also had high removal efficiencies (>90%). Heavy metal leaching from these materials was negligible. A one-month dry period between dosing experiments did not affect metal removal efficiencies. TOC concentrations from all materials increased after the dry period. Heavy metal removal was not affected by filter media depth (600 mm vs. 300 mm). Heavy metals tended to accumulate at the upper 5 cm of the filter media although potting soil showed bottom-enriched concentrations. We recommend using potting soil as the principal media mixed with compost or sludge since these materials perform well and are readily available. The use of renewable materials commonly found in Singapore supports a sustainable approach to urban water management. PMID:25261749

  3. Heavy vehicle propulsion system materials program semiannual progress report for April 1998 thru September 1998

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, D.R.

    1999-01-01

    The purpose of the Heavy Vehicle Propulsion System Materials Program is the development of materials: ceramics, intermetallics, metal alloys, and metal and ceramic coatings, to support the dieselization of class 1--3 trucks to realize a 35{percent} fuel-economy improvement over current gasoline-fueled trucks and to support commercialization of fuel-flexible LE-55 low-emissions, high-efficiency diesel engines for class 7--8 trucks. The Office of Transportation Technologies, Office of Heavy Vehicle Technologies (OTT OHVT) has an active program to develop the technology for advanced LE-55 diesel engines with 55{percent} efficiency and low emissions levels of 2.0 g/bhp-h NO{sub x} and 0.05 g/bhp-h particulates. The goal is also for the LE-55 engine to run on natural gas with efficiency approaching that of diesel fuel. The LE-55 program is being completed in FY 1997 and, after approximately 10 years of effort, has largely met the program goals of 55{percent} efficiency and low emissions. However, the commercialization of the LE-55 technology requires more durable materials than those that have been used to demonstrate the goals. Heavy Vehicle Propulsion System Materials will, in concert with the heavy-duty diesel engine companies, develop the durable materials required to commercialize the LE-55 technologies.

  4. Mineral materials as feasible amendments to stabilize heavy metals in polluted urban soils.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Mingkui; Pu, Jincheng

    2011-01-01

    Four minerals, agricultural limestone (AL), rock phosphate (RP), palygorskite (PG), and calcium magnesium phosphate (CMP), were evaluated by means of chemical fractions of heavy metals in soils and concentrations of heavy metals in leachates from columns to determine their ability to stabilize heavy metals in polluted urban soils. Two urban soils (calcareous soil and acidic soil) polluted with cadmium, copper, zinc and lead were selected and amended in the laboratory with the mineral materials) for 12 months. Results indicated that application of the mineral materials reduced exchangeable metals in the sequence of Pb, Cd > Cu > Zn. The reduction of exchangeable fraction of heavy metals in the soils amended with different mineral materials followed the sequence of CMP, PG > AL > RP. Reductions of heavy metals leached were based on comparison with cumulative totals of heavy metals eluted through 12 pore volumes from an untreated soil. The reductions of the metals eluted from the calcareous soil amended with the RP, AL, PG and CMP were 1.98%, 38.89%, 64.81% and 75.93% for Cd, 8.51%, 40.42%, 60.64% and 55.32% for Cu, 1.76%, 52.94%, 70.00% and 74.12% for Pb, and 28.42%, 52.74%, 64.38% and 49.66% for Zn. Those from the acidic soil amended with the CMP, PG, AL, and RP were 25.65%, 68.06%, 78.01% and 79.06% for Cd, 26.56%, 49.64%, 43.40% and 34.68% for Cu, 44.44%, 33.32%, 61.11% and 69.44% for Pb, and 18.46%, 43.77%, 41.98% and 40.68% for Zn. The CMP and PG treatments were superior to the AL and RP for stabilizing heavy metals in the polluted urban soils.

  5. Studies on X-ray and Ion Emission from Dense Plasma Focus and Its Application in Material Modification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhuyan, Heman

    In the recent years, the radiations, namely X-rays and ions, from high temperature and high density plasma have become extremely important because of their applications in diverse areas. In micro- and nano-electronics industries, the current predominant trend of shrinkage of integrated circuits demands powerful, clean and bright pulsed X-ray sources. These sources are in hunt for not only electronics industries but also for other disciplines like micro-radiography, microscopy, crystallography etc.. Likewise, the quest for plasma based ion sources has been growing phenomenally during last decades for the synthesis of novel materials. These novel materials have plenty of applications in automotive, aerospace, biomedical and electronics industries. The need of present hour is to develop compact, cost-effective and efficient plasma based radiation sources so as to fulfill industrial requirements. The work presented in this thesis mainly focuses on how to operate the Dense Plasma Focus facility of Centre of Plasma Physics (CPP DPF) in an enhanced X-ray and ion emission mode. Four research problems are addressed in this thesis: (i) study of current sheet dynamics; (ii) investigation of X-ray emission; (iii) analysis of ion emission; and (iv) utilization of ions for material modification. Salient features of the different chapters of this thesis are described hereafter. Chapter 1, in addition to a brief introduction to the importance of plasma physics, provides information on X-ray and ion sources and their current scenario of industrial applications. Besides, this chapter provides a short introduction to DPF device along with current sheet dynamics and other related plasma phenomena. Chapter 2 presents the design and fabrication details of CPP DPF facility (pulsed power driver, plasma focus tube with pumping system) along with the basic diagnostic techniques (Rogowski coil and resistive voltage divider). In addition, the discharge performance of DPF facility, which is

  6. The application of prepared porous carbon materials: Effect of different components on the heavy metal adsorption.

    PubMed

    Song, Min; Wei, Yuexing; Yu, Lei; Tang, Xinhong

    2016-06-01

    In this study, five typical municipal solid waste (MSW) components (tyres, cardboard, polyvinyl chloride (PVC), acrylic textile, toilet paper) were used as raw materials to prepare four kinds of MSW-based carbon materials (paperboard-based carbon materials (AC1); the tyres and paperboard-based carbon materials (AC2); the tyres, paperboard and PVC-based carbon materials (AC3); the tyres, paperboard, toilet paper, PVC and acrylic textile-based carbon materials (AC4)) by the KOH activation method. The characteristic results illustrate that the prepared carbon adsorbents exhibited a large pore volume, high surface area and sufficient oxygen functional groups. Furthermore, the application of AC1, AC2, AC3, AC4 on different heavy metal (Cu(2+), Zn(2+), Pb(2+), Cr(3+)) removals was explored to investigate their adsorption properties. The effects of reaction time, pH, temperature and adsorbent dosage on the adsorption capability of heavy metals were investigated. Comparisons of heavy metal adsorption on carbon of different components were carried out. Among the four samples, AC1 exhibits the highest adsorption capacity for Cu(2+); the highest adsorption capacities of Pb(2+) and Zn(2+) are obtained for AC2; that of Cr(3+) are obtained for AC4. In addition, the carbon materials exhibit better adsorption capability of Cu(2+) and Pb(2+) than the other two kind of metal ions (Zn(2+) and Cr(3+)).

  7. The application of prepared porous carbon materials: Effect of different components on the heavy metal adsorption.

    PubMed

    Song, Min; Wei, Yuexing; Yu, Lei; Tang, Xinhong

    2016-06-01

    In this study, five typical municipal solid waste (MSW) components (tyres, cardboard, polyvinyl chloride (PVC), acrylic textile, toilet paper) were used as raw materials to prepare four kinds of MSW-based carbon materials (paperboard-based carbon materials (AC1); the tyres and paperboard-based carbon materials (AC2); the tyres, paperboard and PVC-based carbon materials (AC3); the tyres, paperboard, toilet paper, PVC and acrylic textile-based carbon materials (AC4)) by the KOH activation method. The characteristic results illustrate that the prepared carbon adsorbents exhibited a large pore volume, high surface area and sufficient oxygen functional groups. Furthermore, the application of AC1, AC2, AC3, AC4 on different heavy metal (Cu(2+), Zn(2+), Pb(2+), Cr(3+)) removals was explored to investigate their adsorption properties. The effects of reaction time, pH, temperature and adsorbent dosage on the adsorption capability of heavy metals were investigated. Comparisons of heavy metal adsorption on carbon of different components were carried out. Among the four samples, AC1 exhibits the highest adsorption capacity for Cu(2+); the highest adsorption capacities of Pb(2+) and Zn(2+) are obtained for AC2; that of Cr(3+) are obtained for AC4. In addition, the carbon materials exhibit better adsorption capability of Cu(2+) and Pb(2+) than the other two kind of metal ions (Zn(2+) and Cr(3+)). PMID:26951338

  8. UPTAKE OF HEAVY METALS IN BATCH SYSTEMS BY A RECYCLED IRON-BEARING MATERIAL

    EPA Science Inventory

    An iron-bearing material deriving from surface finishing operations in the manufacturing of cast-iron components demonstrates potential for removal of heavy metals from aqueous waste streams. Batch isotherm and rate experiments were conducted for uptake of cadmium, zinc, and lead...

  9. Heavy vehicle propulsion system materials program semiannual progress report for April 1999 through September 1999

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, D.R.

    2000-01-01

    The purpose of the Heavy Vehicle Propulsion System Materials Program is the development of materials: ceramics, intermetallics, metal alloys, and metal and ceramic coatings, to support the dieselization of class 1-3 trucks to realize a 35% fuel-economy improvement over current gasoline-fueled trucks and to support commercialization of fuel-flexible LE-55 low-emissions, high-efficiency diesel engines for class 7-8 trucks.

  10. A new material for removing heavy metals from water

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Philipp, Warren H., Jr.; Street, Kenneth W., Jr.

    1994-01-01

    The NASA Lewis Research Center developed and is patenting a new high capacity ion exchange material (IEM) that removes toxic metals from contaminated water in laboratory tests. The IEM can be made into many forms, such as thin films, coatings, pellets, and fibers. As a result, it can be adapted to many applications to purify contaminated water wherever it is found, be it in waste water treatment systems, lakes, ponds, industrial plants, or in homes. Laboratory tests have been conducted on aqueous solutions containing only one of the following metal cations: lead, copper, mercury, cadmium, silver, chromium (III), nickel, zinc, and yttrium. Tests were also conducted with: (1) calcium present to determine its effects on the uptake of cadmium and copper, and (2) uranium and lanthanides which are stand-ins for other radioactive elements, (3) drinking water for the removal of copper and lead, and (3) others compositions. The results revealed that the IEM removes all these cations, even in the presence of the calcium. Of particular interest are the results of the tests with the drinking water: the lead concentration was reduced from 142 ppb down to 2.8 ppb (well below the accepted EPA standard).

  11. Issues in heavy fermions and in high-T c superconductive materials raised at this conference

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varma, C. M.

    1991-05-01

    In this closing session at the conference I would like, in the light of the presentations at this conference to briefly summarize the remarkable progress achieved in the heavy-fermion and heavy-fermion superconductivity problems, and point to what seem to me the principal problems remaining. The situation in the theory of high- Tc materials, on the face of it, appears much less bright. Unlike the heavy fermions, there is no agreement on what model represents the essentials of the problem. I believe, the difficulty in achieving a consensus here is only partly scientific. It is also sociological. I will paint a rather sanguine picture of the scientific developments there as well.

  12. Heavy vehicle propulsion system materials program: Semiannual progress report, April 1996--September 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, D.R.

    1997-04-01

    The purpose of the Heavy Vehicle Propulsion System Materials Program is the development of materials: ceramics, intermetallics, metal alloys, and metal and ceramic coatings, to support the dieselization of class 1-3 trucks to realize a 35% fuel-economy improvement over current gasoline-fueled trucks and to support commercialization of fuel-flexible LE-55 low-emissions, high-efficiency diesel engines for class 7-8 trucks. The Office of Transportation Technologies, Office of Heavy Vehicle Technologies (OTT OHVT) has an active program to develop the technology for advanced LE-55 diesel engines with 55% efficiency and low emissions levels of 2.0 g/bhp-h NO{sub x} and 0.05 g/bhp-h particulates. The goal is also for the LE-55 engine to run on natural gas with efficiency approaching that of diesel fuel. The LE-55 program is being completed in FY 1997 and, after approximately 10 years of effort, has largely met the program goals of 55% efficiency and low emissions. However, the commercialization of the LE-55 technology requires more durable materials than those that have been used to demonstrate the goals. Heavy Vehicle Propulsion System Materials will, in concert with the heavy duty diesel engine companies, develop the durable materials required to commercialize the LE-55 technologies. OTT OHVT also recognizes a significant opportunity for reduction in petroleum consumption by dieselization of pickup trucks, vans, and sport utility vehicles. Application of the diesel engine to class 1, 2, and 3 trucks is expected to yield a 35% increase in fuel economy per vehicle. The foremost barrier to diesel use in this market is emission control. Once an engine is made certifiable, subsequent challenges will be in cost; noise, vibration, and harshness (NVH); and performance. Separate abstracts have been submitted to the database for contributions to this report.

  13. Heavy Vehicle Propulsion System Materials Program Semiannual Progress Report for October 1998 Through March 1999

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, R.D.

    1999-06-01

    The purpose of the Heavy Vehicle Propulsion System Materials Program is the development of materials: ceramics, intermetallics, metal alloys, and metal and ceramic coatings, to support the dieselization of class 1-3 trucks to realize a 35% fuel-economy improvement over current gasoline-fueled trucks and to support commercialization of fuel-flexible LE-55 low-emissions, high-efficiency diesel engines for class 7-8 trucks. The Office of Transportation Technologies, Office of Heavy Vehicle Technologies (OIT OHVT) has an active program to develop the technology for advanced LE-55 diesel engines with 55% efficiency and low emissions levels of 2.0 g/bhp-h NOX and 0.05 g/bhp-h particulate. The goal is also for the LE-55 engine to run on natural gas with efficiency approaching that of diesel fuel. The LE-55 program is being completed in FY 1997 and, after approximately 10 years of effort, has largely met the program goals of 55% efficiency and low emissions. However, the commercialization of the LE-55 technology requires more durable materials than those that have been used to demonstrate the goals. Heavy Vehicle Propulsion System Materials will, in concert with the heavy duty diesel engine companies, develop the durable materials required to commercialize the LE-55 technologies. OIT OHVT also recognizes a significant opportunity for reduction in petroleum consumption by dieselization of pickup trucks, vans, and sport utility vehicles. Application of the diesel engine to class 1,2, and 3 trucks is expected to yield a 35% increase in fuel economy per vehicle. The foremost barrier to diesel use in this market is emission control. Once an engine is made certifiable, subsequent challenges will be in cost; noise, vibration, and harshness (NVH); and performance. The design of advanced components for high-efficiency diesel engines has, in some cases, pushed the performance envelope for materials of construction past the point of reliable operation. Higher mechanical and

  14. Long range order and two-fluid behavior in heavy electron materials

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Shirer, Kent R.; Shockley, Abigail C.; Dioguardi, Adam P.; Crocker, John; Lin, Ching H.; apRoberts-Warren, Nicholas; Nisson, David M.; Klavins, Peter; Cooley, Jason C.; Yang, Yi -feng; et al

    2012-09-24

    The heavy electron Kondo liquid is an emergent state of condensed matter that displays universal behavior independent of material details. Properties of the heavy electron liquid are best probed by NMR Knight shift measurements, which provide a direct measure of the behavior of the heavy electron liquid that emerges below the Kondo lattice coherence temperature as the lattice of local moments hybridizes with the background conduction electrons. Because the transfer of spectral weight between the localized and itinerant electronic degrees of freedom is gradual, the Kondo liquid typically coexists with the local moment component until the material orders at lowmore » temperatures. The two-fluid formula captures this behavior in a broad range of materials in the paramagnetic state. In order to investigate two-fluid behavior and the onset and physical origin of different long range ordered ground states in heavy electron materials, we have extended Knight shift measurements to URu2Si2, CeIrIn5, and CeRhIn5. In CeRhIn5 we find that the antiferromagnetic order is preceded by a relocalization of the Kondo liquid, providing independent evidence for a local moment origin of antiferromagnetism. In URu2Si2 the hidden order is shown to emerge directly from the Kondo liquid and so is not associated with local moment physics. Lastly, our results imply that the nature of the ground state is strongly coupled with the hybridization in the Kondo lattice in agreement with phase diagram proposed by Yang and Pines.« less

  15. Marriage of heavy main group elements with π-conjugated materials for optoelectronic applications.

    PubMed

    Parke, Sarah M; Boone, Michael P; Rivard, Eric

    2016-08-01

    This review article summarizes recent progress in the synthesis and optoelectronic properties of conjugated materials containing heavy main group elements from Group 13-16 as integral components. As will be discussed, the introduction of these elements can promote novel phosphorescent behavior and support desirable molecular and polymeric properties such as low optical band gaps and high charge mobilities for photovoltaic and thin film transistor applications. PMID:27344980

  16. Geometrical Optics of Dense Aerosols

    SciTech Connect

    Hay, Michael J.; Valeo, Ernest J.; Fisch, Nathaniel J.

    2013-04-24

    Assembling a free-standing, sharp-edged slab of homogeneous material that is much denser than gas, but much more rare ed than a solid, is an outstanding technological challenge. The solution may lie in focusing a dense aerosol to assume this geometry. However, whereas the geometrical optics of dilute aerosols is a well-developed fi eld, the dense aerosol limit is mostly unexplored. Yet controlling the geometrical optics of dense aerosols is necessary in preparing such a material slab. Focusing dense aerosols is shown here to be possible, but the nite particle density reduces the eff ective Stokes number of the flow, a critical result for controlled focusing. __________________________________________________

  17. Heavy wax distillate as a raw material for the production of solid hydrocarbons

    SciTech Connect

    Gundyrev, R.A.; Fokina, T.V.; Garun, Y.E.; Kazakova, L.P.; Sochevko, T.I.

    1984-07-01

    This article discusses the feasibility of recovering solid hydrocarbons from a heavy wax distillate in order to expand the raw material base for the production of high-melting waxes. The examined distillate has a melting point of 45/sup 0/C, a wax content of 34% by weight, a viscosity (at 100/sup 0/C) of 8.2 mm/sup 2//sec, a molecular weight of 345, a content of paraffinic and naphthenic hydrocarbons of 59.1% by weight, contents of aromatic hydrocarbons (light, medium and heavy) of 8.9%, 5.1%, and 20.4% by weight, respectively, and a content of hydrocarbons forming and not forming urea adducts of 21.8% and 78.2%, respectively. The heavy wax distillate was filtered in a Bogdanov laboratory unit containing a filter press consisting of a crystallizer and a slack wax chamber. The filtration residue from the crystallizer beaker and the slack wax cake from the wax chamber are collected in a preweighed container. It is concluded that the heavy wax distillate can be successfully dewaxed for wax production if it is modified by dilution with a filtrate and the incorporation of a structure modifier.

  18. Heavy Vehicle Propulsion System Materials Program Semiannual Progress Report for April 2000 Through September 2000

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, DR

    2000-12-11

    The purpose of the Heavy Vehicle Propulsion System Materials Program is the development of materials: ceramics, intermetallics, metal alloys, and metal and ceramic coatings, to support the dieselization of class 1-3 trucks to realize a 35% fuel-economy improvement over current gasoline-fueled trucks and to support commercialization of fuel-flexible LE-55 low-emissions, high-efficiency diesel engines for class 7-8 trucks. The Office of Transportation Technologies, Office of Heavy Vehicle Technologies (OTT OHVT) has an active program to develop the technology for advantages LE-55 diesel engines with 55% efficiency and low emissions levels of 2.0 g/bhp-h NOx and 0.05 g/bhp-h particulates. The goal is also for the LE-55 engine to run on natural gas with efficiency approaching that of diesel fuel. The LE-55 program is being completed in FY 1997 and, after approximately 10 years of effort, has largely met the program goals of 55% efficiency and low emissions. However, the commercialization of the LE-55 technology requires more durable materials than those that have been used to demonstrate the goals. Heavy Vehicle Propulsion System Materials will, in concert with the heavy duty diesel engine companies, develop the durable materials required to commercialize the LE-55 technologies. OTT OHVT also recognizes a significant opportunity for reduction in petroleum consumption by dieselization of pickup trucks, vans, and sport utility vehicles. Application of the diesel engine to class 1, 2, and 3 trucks is expected to yield a 35% increase in fuel economy per vehicle. The foremost barrier to diesel use in this market is emission control. Once an engine is made certifiable, subsequent challenges will be in cost; noise, vibration, and harshness (NVH); and performance. The design of advanced components for high-efficiency diesel engines has, in some cases, pushed the performance envelope for materials of construction past the point of reliable operation. Higher mechanical and

  19. Functional Material Features of Bombyx mori Silk Light vs. Heavy Chain Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Zafar, Muhammad S.; Belton, David J.; Hanby, Benjamin; Kaplan, David L.; Perry, Carole C.

    2016-01-01

    Bombyx mori (BM) silk fibroin is composed of two different subunits; heavy chain and light chain fibroin linked by a covalent disulphide bond. Current methods of separating the two silk fractions is complicated and produces inadequate quantities of the isolated components for the study of the individual light and heavy chain silks with respect to new materials. We report a simple method of separating silk fractions using formic acid. The formic acid treatment partially releases predominately the light chain fragment (soluble fraction) and then the soluble fraction and insoluble fractions can be converted into new materials. The regenerated original (total) silk fibroin and the separated fractions (soluble vs. insoluble) had different molecular weights and showed distinctive pH stabilities against aggregation/precipitation based on particle charging. All silk fractions could be electrospun to give fibre mats with viscosity of the regenerated fractions being the controlling factor for successful electrospinning. The silk fractions could be mixed to give blends with different proportions of the two fractions to modify the diameter and uniformity of the electrospun fibres formed. The soluble fraction containing the light chain was able to modify the viscosity by thinning the insoluble fraction containing heavy chain fragments, perhaps analogous to its role in natural fibre formation where the light chain provides increased mobility and the heavy chain producing shear thickening effects. The simplicity of this new separation method should enable access to these different silk protein fractions and accelerate the identification of methods, modifications and potential applications of these materials in biomedical and industrial applications. PMID:25565556

  20. [Speciation Distribution and Risk Assessment of Heavy Metals in Typical Material Roof Dusts].

    PubMed

    Li, Dun-zhu; Guan, Yun-tao; Liu, An; Li, Si-yuan

    2015-09-01

    With the modified BCR sequential extraction procedure, the chemical speciation and risk for 10 heavy metals (Ba, Co, Cr, Cu, Mn, Ni, Pb, Sb, Sr and Zn) in roof dusts were investigated. The subjects of this study were collected from four typical material paved roofs (i. e., ceramic tile, concrete, metal and asphalt) in southeast China. The results indicated that the average contents of heavy metals in roof dust significantly exceeded road dust. The analysis of chemical fraction showed that the acid soluble/exchangeable fraction of Zn was much higher than other elements, the existence of Pb and Cu was mainly in oxidization fraction, while other heavy metals dominated by the residual fraction. The mobility sequence percentages for all roof dust samples decreased in the order of Pb > Zn > Cu >Mn > Co >Sr > Sb > Ni > Ba > Cr, and it should be noted that Pb, Zn, Cu, Mn and Co all have more than 50% proportion in mobility sequence. Based on environmental risk assessment, the highest values of contamination factors (Cf) and risk assessment code (RAC) consistently was observed in Zn, which indicated that Zn had relatively high ecological risk. Health risk assessment showed that the non-carcinogenic hazard indexes (HI) of heavy metals decreased in the order of Pb > Cr > Sb > Zn > Mn > Cu > Ba > Ni > Co > Sr, the HI of heavy metals for adults were lower than safe value while the HI of Pb for children was higher than safe value, suggesting that they will not harm the adult's health except Pb for children. The carcinogenic risk for Cr, Co and Ni were all below the threshold values, which indicated that there was no carcinogenic risk. PMID:26717687

  1. [Speciation Distribution and Risk Assessment of Heavy Metals in Typical Material Roof Dusts].

    PubMed

    Li, Dun-zhu; Guan, Yun-tao; Liu, An; Li, Si-yuan

    2015-09-01

    With the modified BCR sequential extraction procedure, the chemical speciation and risk for 10 heavy metals (Ba, Co, Cr, Cu, Mn, Ni, Pb, Sb, Sr and Zn) in roof dusts were investigated. The subjects of this study were collected from four typical material paved roofs (i. e., ceramic tile, concrete, metal and asphalt) in southeast China. The results indicated that the average contents of heavy metals in roof dust significantly exceeded road dust. The analysis of chemical fraction showed that the acid soluble/exchangeable fraction of Zn was much higher than other elements, the existence of Pb and Cu was mainly in oxidization fraction, while other heavy metals dominated by the residual fraction. The mobility sequence percentages for all roof dust samples decreased in the order of Pb > Zn > Cu >Mn > Co >Sr > Sb > Ni > Ba > Cr, and it should be noted that Pb, Zn, Cu, Mn and Co all have more than 50% proportion in mobility sequence. Based on environmental risk assessment, the highest values of contamination factors (Cf) and risk assessment code (RAC) consistently was observed in Zn, which indicated that Zn had relatively high ecological risk. Health risk assessment showed that the non-carcinogenic hazard indexes (HI) of heavy metals decreased in the order of Pb > Cr > Sb > Zn > Mn > Cu > Ba > Ni > Co > Sr, the HI of heavy metals for adults were lower than safe value while the HI of Pb for children was higher than safe value, suggesting that they will not harm the adult's health except Pb for children. The carcinogenic risk for Cr, Co and Ni were all below the threshold values, which indicated that there was no carcinogenic risk.

  2. Estimates of Sputter Yields of Solar-Wind Heavy Ions of Lunar Regolith Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barghouty, Abdulmasser F.; Adams, James H., Jr.

    2008-01-01

    At energies of approximately 1 keV/amu, solar-wind protons and heavy ions interact with the lunar surface materials via a number of microscopic interactions that include sputtering. Solar-wind induced sputtering is a main mechanism by which the composition of the topmost layers of the lunar surface can change, dynamically and preferentially. This work concentrates on sputtering induced by solar-wind heavy ions. Sputtering associated with slow (speeds the electrons speed in its first Bohr orbit) and highly charged ions are known to include both kinetic and potential sputtering. Potential sputtering enjoys some unique characteristics that makes it of special interest to lunar science and exploration. Unlike the yield from kinetic sputtering where simulation and approximation schemes exist, the yield from potential sputtering is not as easy to estimate. This work will present a preliminary numerical scheme designed to estimate potential sputtering yields from reactions relevant to this aspect of solar-wind lunar-surface coupling.

  3. High temperature solid lubricant materials for heavy duty and advanced heat engines

    SciTech Connect

    DellaCorte, C.; Wood, J.C.

    1994-10-01

    Advanced engine designs incorporate higher mechanical and thermal loading to achieve efficiency improvements. This approach often leads to higher operating temperatures of critical sliding elements (e.g. piston ring/cylinder wall contacts and valve guides) which compromise the use of conventional and even advanced synthetic liquid lubricants. For these applications solid lubricants must be considered. Several novel solid lubricant composites and coatings designated PS/PM200 have been employed to dry and marginally oil lubricated contacts in advanced heat engines. These applications include cylinder kits of heavy duty diesels, and high temperature sterling engines, sidewall seals of rotary engines and various exhaust valve and exhaust component applications. The following paper describes the tribological and thermophysical properties of these tribomaterials and reviews the results of applying them to engine applications. Other potential tribological materials and applications are also discussed with particular emphasis to heavy duty and advanced heat engines.

  4. High Temperature Solid Lubricant Materials for Heavy Duty and Advanced Heat Engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dellacorte, C.; Wood, J. C.

    1994-01-01

    Advanced engine designs incorporate higher mechanical and thermal loading to achieve efficiency improvements. This approach often leads to higher operating temperatures of critical sliding elements (e.g. piston ring/cylinder wall contacts and valve guides) which compromise the use of conventional and even advanced synthetic liquid lubricants. For these applications solid lubricants must be considered. Several novel solid lubricant composites and coatings designated PS/PM200 have been employed to dry and marginally oil lubricated contacts in advanced heat engines. These applications include cylinder kits of heavy duty diesels, and high temperature Stirling engines, sidewall seals of rotary engines, and various exhaust valve and exhaust component applications. This paper describes the tribological and thermophysical properties of these tribomaterials and reviews the results of applying them to engine applications. Other potential tribological materials and applications are also discussed with particular emphasis on heavy duty and advanced heat engines.

  5. Sucrose as a dosimetric material for photon and heavy particle radiation: A review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karakirova, Yordanka; Yordanov, Nicola D.

    2015-05-01

    The application of high-energy radiation in many areas of human activity and its harmful effects on human health makes necessary knowledge of the radiation chemistry of various materials upon exposure to high-energy radiation. Among these materials, saccharides (particularly sucrose) maintain the greatest advantage for potential radiochemistry applications. Until now, radiation chemistry studies have been conducted primarily with γ-ray irradiation; however, in the past few years there has been increased interest in the fields of radiotherapy and radiochemistry on substances irradiated with heavy particles. To this end, this review discusses the possibilities of employing sucrose as a radiation-sensitive material for the determination of absorbed doses of high-energy radiation both for emergency situations and for dosimeters used in standard applications.

  6. Solidification/stabilization of heavy metal contaminated mine tailings using polymeric materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Min, K.; Kim, T.; Lee, H.

    2009-12-01

    Polymeric materials in addition to Portland cement and hydrated limes were used to solidify and stabilize heavy metal contaminated tailings from five abandoned metal mines in Korea. Mine tailings were mixed separately with Portland cement and hydrated lime at a concentration of 20-30 wt% and 6-9 wt%, respectively and Ethylene Vinyl Acetate (EVA) powder was added to each specimen at a ratio of 2.5 and 5.0 wt% to binders. Polymer-added and polymer-free solidified/stabilized (s/s) forms were evaluated for their appropriateness in accordance with the suggested test methods. Regardless of addition of polymeric materials, all s/s forms satisfy the uniaxial comprehensive strength (USC) requirements (0.35MPa) for land reclamation and show remarkably reduced leaching concentrations of heavy metals such as As, Cd, Cu, Pb and Zn less than the toxicity criteria of Korean standard leaching test (KSLT). The addition of polymeric materials increased the USC of s/s forms to improve a long-term stability of s/s mine tailings.

  7. Heavy Vehicle Propulsion System Materials Program semiannual progress report for October 1996 through March 1997

    SciTech Connect

    1997-07-01

    The purpose of the Heavy Vehicle Propulsion System Materials Program is the development of materials: ceramics, intermetallics, metal alloys, and metal and ceramic coatings, to support the dieselization of class 1-3 trucks to realize a 35% fuel-economy improvement over current gasoline-fueled trucks and to support commercialization of fuel-flexible LE-55 low-emissions, high-efficiency diesel engines for class 7-8 trucks. The design of advanced components for high-efficiency diesel engines has, in some cases, pushed the performance envelope for materials of construction past the point of reliable operation. Higher mechanical and tribological stresses and higher temperatures of advanced designs limit the engine designers; advanced materials allow the design of components that may operate reliably at higher stresses and temperatures, thus enabling more efficient engine designs. Advanced materials also offer the opportunity to improve the emissions, NVH, and performance of diesel engines for pickup trucks, vans, and sport utility vehicles. The principal areas of research are: (1) cost effective high performance materials and processing; (2) advanced manufacturing technology; (3) testing and characterization; and (4) materials and testing standards.

  8. The relative biological effectiveness of densely ionizing heavy-ion radiation for inducing ocular cataracts in wild type versus mice heterozygous for the ATM gene.

    PubMed

    Hall, Eric J; Worgul, Basil V; Smilenov, Lubomir; Elliston, Carl D; Brenner, David J

    2006-07-01

    The accelerated appearance of ocular cataracts at younger ages has been recorded in both astronauts and airline pilots, and is usually attributed to high-energy heavy ions in galactic cosmic ray radiation. We have previously shown that high-LET 1-GeV/nucleon (56)Fe ions are significantly more effective than X-rays in producing cataracts in mice. We have also shown that mice haploinsufficient for ATM develop cataracts earlier than wild-type animals, when exposed to either low-LET X-rays or high-LET (56)Fe ions. In this paper we derive quantitative estimates for the relative biological effectiveness (RBE) of high energy (56)Fe ions compared with X-rays, both for wild type and for mice haploinsufficient for ATM. There is a clear trend toward higher RBE's in haploinsufficient animals, both for low- and high-grade cataracts. Haploinsufficiency for ATM results in an enhanced sensitivity to X-rays compared with the wild type, and this enhancement appears even larger after exposure to high-LET heavy ions. PMID:16799786

  9. Dense Plasma Focus: physics and applications (radiation material science, single-shot disclosure of hidden illegal objects, radiation biology and medicine, etc.)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gribkov, V. A.; Miklaszewski, R.; Paduch, M.; Zielinska, E.; Chernyshova, M.; Pisarczyk, T.; Pimenov, V. N.; Demina, E. V.; Niemela, J.; Crespo, M.-L.; Cicuttin, A.; Tomaszewski, K.; Sadowski, M. J.; Skladnik-Sadowska, E.; Pytel, K.; Zawadka, A.; Giannini, G.; Longo, F.; Talab, A.; Ul'yanenko, S. E.

    2015-03-01

    The paper presents some outcomes obtained during the year of 2013 of the activity in the frame of the International Atomic Energy Agency Co-ordinated research project "Investigations of Materials under High Repetition and Intense Fusion-Relevant Pulses". The main results are related to the effects created at the interaction of powerful pulses of different types of radiation (soft and hard X-rays, hot plasma and fast ion streams, neutrons, etc. generated in Dense Plasma Focus (DPF) facilities) with various materials including those that are counted as perspective ones for their use in future thermonuclear reactors. Besides we discuss phenomena observed at the irradiation of biological test objects. We examine possible applications of nanosecond powerful pulses of neutrons to the aims of nuclear medicine and for disclosure of hidden illegal objects. Special attention is devoted to discussions of a possibility to create extremely large and enormously diminutive DPF devices and probabilities of their use in energetics, medicine and modern electronics.

  10. Laser-induced fusion in ultra-dense deuterium D(-1): Optimizing MeV particle emission by carrier material selection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holmlid, Leif

    2013-02-01

    Power generation by laser-induced nuclear fusion in ultra-dense deuterium D(-1) requires that the carrier material interacts correctly with D(-1) prior to the laser pulse and also during the laser pulse. In previous studies, the interaction between the superfluid D(-1) layer and various carrier materials prior to the laser pulse has been investigated. It was shown that organic polymer materials do not give a condensed D(-1) layer. Metal surfaces carry thicker D(-1) layers useful for fusion. Here, the interaction between the carrier and the nuclear fusion process is investigated by observing the MeV particle emission (e.g. 14 MeV protons) using twelve different carrier materials and two different methods of detection. Several factors have been analyzed for the performance of the carrier materials: the hardness and the melting point of the material, and the chemical properties of the surface layer. The best performance is found for the high-melting metals Ti and Ta, but also Cu performs well as carrier despite its low melting point. The unexpectedly meager performance of Ni and Ir may be due to their catalytic activity towards hydrogen which may give atomic association to deuterium molecules at the low D2 pressure used.

  11. Dense nitrogen-rich energetic materials: a study of 5,5'-bis(1H-tetrazolyl)amine [corrected].

    PubMed

    Laniel, Dominique; Sebastiao, Elena; Cook, Cyril; Murugesu, Muralee; Hu, Anguang; Zhang, Fan; Desgreniers, Serge

    2014-05-14

    5,5'-bis(1H-tetrazolyl)amine (BTA), a nitrogen rich molecular solid has been investigated under compression at room temperature [corrected]. Powder x-ray diffraction using synchrotron radiation and micro-Raman spectroscopy were carried out to pressures up to 12.9 GPa. BTA conserves the crystalline structure of its room condition phase up to the highest pressure, i.e., an orthorhombic unit cell (Pbca). A fit of the isothermal compression data to the Birch-Murnaghan equation of state reveals the high compressibility of BTA. An analysis of the volume change with pressure yields a bulk modulus and its derivative similar to that of high-nitrogen content molecular crystals. Upon laser heating to approximately 1100 K, the sample decomposed while pressurized at 2.1 GPa, resulting in a graphitic compound. Finally, numerical simulations demonstrate that the minimum energy conformation is not experimentally observed since a higher energy conformation allows for a more stable dense packing of the BTA molecules. PMID:24832293

  12. Dense nitrogen-rich energetic materials: A study of 5,5{sup ′}-(1H-tetrazolyl)amine

    SciTech Connect

    Laniel, Dominique; Desgreniers, Serge; Sebastiao, Elena; Cook, Cyril; Murugesu, Muralee; Hu, Anguang; Zhang, Fan

    2014-05-14

    5,5{sup ′}-(1H-tetrazolyl)amine (BTA), a nitrogen rich molecular solid has been investigated under compression at room temperature. Powder x-ray diffraction using synchrotron radiation and micro-Raman spectroscopy were carried out to pressures up to 12.9 GPa. BTA conserves the crystalline structure of its room condition phase up to the highest pressure, i.e., an orthorhombic unit cell (Pbca). A fit of the isothermal compression data to the Birch-Murnaghan equation of state reveals the high compressibility of BTA. An analysis of the volume change with pressure yields a bulk modulus and its derivative similar to that of high-nitrogen content molecular crystals. Upon laser heating to approximately 1100 K, the sample decomposed while pressurized at 2.1 GPa, resulting in a graphitic compound. Finally, numerical simulations demonstrate that the minimum energy conformation is not experimentally observed since a higher energy conformation allows for a more stable dense packing of the BTA molecules.

  13. Solar-Wind Protons and Heavy Ions Sputtering of Lunar Surface Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Barghouty, N.; Meyer, Fred W; Harris, Peter R

    2011-01-01

    Lunar surface materials are exposed to {approx}1 keV/amu solar-wind protons and heavy ions on almost continuous basis. As the lunar surface consists of mostly oxides, these materials suffer, in principle, both kinetic and potential sputtering due to the actions of the solar-wind ions. Sputtering is an important mechanism affecting the composition of both the lunar surface and its tenuous exosphere. While the contribution of kinetic sputtering to the changes in the composition of the surface layer of these oxides is well understood and modeled, the role and implications of potential sputtering remain unclear. As new potential-sputtering data from multi-charged ions impacting lunar regolith simulants are becoming available from Oak Ridge National Laboratory's MIRF, we examine the role and possible implications of potential sputtering of Lunar KREEP soil. Using a non-equilibrium model we demonstrate that solar-wind heavy ions induced sputtering is critical in establishing the timescale of the overall solar-wind sputtering process of the lunar surface. We also show that potential sputtering leads to a more pronounced and significant differentiation between depleted and enriched surface elements. We briefly discuss the impacts of enhanced sputtering on the composition of the regolith and the exosphere, as well as of solar-wind sputtering as a source of hydrogen and water on the moon.

  14. Nanocrystalline materials for the dosimetry of heavy charged particles: A review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salah, Numan

    2011-01-01

    Thermally stimulated luminescence or better known as thermoluminescence (TL) is a powerful technique extensively used for dosimetry of ionizing radiations. TL dosimeter (TLD) materials presently in use are inorganic crystalline materials. They are in the form of chips, single crystals or microcrystalline size powder. The most popular are LiF:Mg,Ti, LiF:Mg,Cu,P, CaSO 4:Dy, CaF 2:Dy and Al 2O 3:C. However, these TLD materials are not capable of precisely detecting heavy charged particles (HCP) irradiations in their present forms. The saturation effect is the major problem, which occurs at relatively low fluences (doses). Moreover, there is a significant variation in the TL glow curves structure with increase in doses, which is undesirable for the use in dosimetry. However, with the use of very tiny particles such as nanoscale TLD materials, this problem is overcome to a major extent. The TL results of the recently reported nanomaterials have revealed very imperative characteristics such as high sensitivity and saturation at very high doses. Recent studies on different luminescent nanomaterials showed that they have a potential application in dosimetry of heavy charged particles using TL technique, where the conventional microcrystalline phosphors saturate. This paper is a review on the prepared TLD nanomaterials, studied for their TL response to HCP. These are CaSO 4:Dy, LiF:Mg,Cu,P, K 2Ca 2(SO 4) 3:Eu and Ba 0.97Ca 0.03SO 4:Eu nanomaterials. The important results obtained in these nanomaterials and the possibility of using them as HCP dosimeters are discussed.

  15. A Linkage Between Parent Materials of Soil and Potential Risk of Heavy Metals in Yunnan province, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, X.

    2015-12-01

    A large area exceeding soil quality standards for heavy metals in South western China has been identified previously reported on a nationwide survey of soil pollution, yet the ecological risk of heavy metal in soil is unknown or uncertainty.To assess thoroughly the ecological risk in this region, seven soil profiles with a depth of 2m on the different parent materials of soil were conducted in Yunnan province, China, and the level of total concentrations and the fraction of water soluble, ion exchangeable, carbonates, humic acid, iron and manganese oxides and organic matter of As, Cd, Hg and Pb was investigated in soil profiles. The results indicate that parent materials of soil critically influenced the ecological risk of heavy metal.The fraction of water soluble and ion exchangeable of Cd and Hg in alluvial material and in terrigenous clastic rocks showed 2-6 times higher than those in carbonate rock; As and Pb has almost same fraction of water soluble and ion exchangeable in three parent materials of soil.The findings suggest that parent materials of soil play a critical role in ecological risk of heavy metal.Thus, more studies are needed to better understand a linkage between the parent materials of soil, different soil-forming processes and the potential risk of heavy metals under various geographic conditions, which is the key for the evaluating soil quality and food safety. Those soils with high concentration of Cd and Hg originated alluvial material and terrigenous clastic rocks need to be continuously monitored before determining a cost-effective remediation technology. Keywords: Heavy metals; Ecological risk;Parent materials of soil;China

  16. Characterization of thermal conductivity degradation induced by heavy ion irradiation in ceramic materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    David, L.; Gomès, S.; Carlot, G.; Roger, J.-P.; Fournier, D.; Valot, C.; Raynaud, M.

    2008-02-01

    Thermal conductivity degradation of three semi-metallic ceramics: titanium carbide, zirconium carbide and titanium nitride, and a covalent compound: 6H silicon carbide, induced by irradiation with energetic heavy ions at room temperature, is studied and quantified. Irradiations by 25.8 MeV krypton ions at 1016 and 6 × 1016 ions cm-2 doses were used to produce defects in the considered materials. Modulated thermoreflectance microscopy measurements were performed to characterize the resulting subsurfasic degradation of the thermal conductivity for each of the investigated materials. The study considers the two collision domains produced by the inelastic collisions and the elastic collisions that occur during an ion irradiation. A significant thermal conductivity degradation in the two collision domains for all materials is obtained. Elastic collisions are shown to degrade the thermal properties more strongly than the inelastic ones. The scattering of thermal energy carriers is larger in the elastic collision domain because displacement cascades produce a very high concentration of point defects. The degradation coming from electronic interactions is found to be more important in SiC, which can be explained by the presence of large populations of generated extended defects, facing generated individual point defects in the studied semi-metallic materials.

  17. Dynamic Analysis of Heavy Vehicle Medium Duty Drive Shaft Using Conventional and Composite Material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Ashwani; Jain, Rajat; Patil, Pravin P.

    2016-09-01

    The main highlight of this study is structural and modal analysis of single piece drive shaft for selection of material. Drive shaft is used for torque carrying from vehicle transmission to rear wheel differential system. Heavy vehicle medium duty transmission drive shaft was selected as research object. Conventional materials (Steel SM45 C, Stainless Steel) and composite materials (HS carbon epoxy, E Glass Polyester Resin Composite) were selected for the analysis. Single piece composite material drive shaft has advantage over conventional two-piece steel drive shaft. It has higher specific strength, longer life, less weight, high critical speed and higher torque carrying capacity. The main criteria for drive shaft failure are strength and weight. Maximum modal frequency obtained is 919 Hz. Various harmful vibration modes (lateral vibration and torsional vibration) were identified and maximum deflection region was specified. For single-piece drive shaft the natural bending frequency should be higher because it is subjected to torsion and shear stress. Single piece drive shaft was modelled using Solid Edge and Pro-E. Finite Element Analysis was used for structural and modal analysis with actual running boundary condition like frictional support, torque and moment. FEA simulation results were validated with experimental literature results.

  18. The role of different factors related to social impact of heavy rain events: considerations about the intensity thresholds in densely populated areas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barbería, L.; Amaro, J.; Aran, M.; Llasat, M. C.

    2014-07-01

    In the assessment of social impact caused by meteorological events, factors of different natures need to be considered. Not only does hazard itself determine the impact that a severe weather event has on society, but also other features related to vulnerability and exposure. The requests of data related to insurance claims received in meteorological services proved to be a good indicator of the social impact that a weather event causes, according to studies carried out by the Social Impact Research Group, created within the framework of the MEDEX project. Taking these requests as proxy data, diverse aspects connected to the impact of heavy rain events have been studied. Understanding TeV-band The rainfall intensity, in conjunction with the population density, has established itself as one of the key factors in social impact studies. One of the conclusions we obtained is that various thresholds of rainfall should be applied for areas of varying populations. In this study, the role of rainfall intensity has been analysed for a highly populated urban area like Barcelona. A period without significant population changes has been selected for the study to minimise the effects linked to vulnerability and exposure modifications. First, correlations between rainfall recorded in different time intervals and requests were carried out. Afterwards, a method to include the intensity factor in the social impact index was suggested based on return periods given by intensity-duration-frequency (IDF) curves.

  19. The role of different factors related to social impact of heavy rain events: considerations about the intensity thresholds in densely populated areas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barbería, L.; Amaro, J.; Aran, M.; Llasat, M. C.

    2014-01-01

    In the assessment of social impact caused by meteorological events, factors of different nature need to be considered. Not only does hazard itself determine the impact that a severe weather event has on society, but also other features related to vulnerability and exposure. The requests of data related to insurance claims received in Meteorological Services proved to be a good indicator of the social impact that a weather event causes, according to studies carried out by the Social Impact Research Group, created under the frame of the MEDEX project. Taking these requests as proxy data, diverse aspects connected to the impact of heavy rain events have been studied. The rainfall intensity in conjunction with the population density has demonstrated to be one of the key factors in social impact studies. One of the conclusions we obtained is that various thresholds of rainfall should be applied for differently populated areas. In this study, the role of rainfall intensity has been analysed for a highly populated urban area like Barcelona. A period without significant population changes has been selected for the study to minimise the effects linked to vulnerability and exposure. First, correlations between rainfall recorded in different time intervals and requests have been carried out. Afterwards, a method to include the intensity factor in the social impact index has been suggested, based on return periods given by Intensity-Duration-Frequency (IDF) curves.

  20. Heavy ion track-structure calculations for radial dose in arbitrary materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cucinotta, Francis A.; Katz, Robert; Wilson, John W.; Dubey, Rajendra R.

    1995-01-01

    The delta-ray theory of track structure is compared with experimental data for the radial dose from heavy ion irradiation. The effects of electron transmission and the angular dependence of secondary electron ejection are included in the calculations. Several empirical formulas for electron range and energy are compared in a wide variety of materials in order to extend the application of the track-structure theory. The model of Rudd for the secondary electron-spectrum in proton collisions, which is based on a modified classical kinematics binary encounter model at high energies and a molecular promotion model at low energies, is employed. For heavier projectiles, the secondary electron spectrum is found by scaling the effective charge. Radial dose calculations for carbon, water, silicon, and gold are discussed. The theoretical data agreed well with the experimental data.

  1. Bremsstrahlung from relativistic bare heavy ions: Nuclear and electronic contributions in amorphous and crystalline materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jensen, Tue V.; Sørensen, Allan H.

    2013-02-01

    A charged particle emits bremsstrahlung while traversing matter. We calculate the radiation cross section for bare heavy ions penetrating amorphous materials and single crystals at highly relativistic energies. The main component originates in scattering of the virtual photons of screened target nuclei on the projectile. It appears at, approximately, 2γ times the energy of the giant dipole resonance of the projectile, approximately 25γ MeV for a lead nucleus (γ≡E/Mc2, where E and M denote the projectile energy and mass). The emission pertains to relatively close impacts, with impact parameters ranging to, at maximum, the screening radius of the target atoms. As a result, the main bremsstrahlung component shows channeling dips, that is, dips in yield upon variation of the incidence angle to major crystallographic directions of a single crystal. The minimum yield increases with γ but saturates at a very low value. Incoherent interaction with single target electrons gives rise to two additional bremsstrahlung components, a modest component due to scattering of virtual photons of the electrons on the projectile and a strong low-energy component due to scattering of the virtual photons of the projectile on the electrons. The difference in radiation levels can be traced to the mass of the scatterer. Since target electrons are more widely distributed than nuclei in a crystal channel the variation of the electron component of the bremsstrahlung with incidence angle to a major crystallographic direction is less abrupt than the variation of the nuclear component. In consequence, the shape of the total bremsstrahlung spectrum changes when the crystal is tilted and the individual components may be singled out. Pair creation is also sensitive to the orientation of a crystalline material, resulting in a pronounced directional dependence of the energy loss of bare heavy ions at extreme relativistic energies.

  2. Thermal conductivity degradation induced by heavy ion irradiation at room temperature in ceramic materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomès, S.; David, L.; Roger, J.-P.; Carlot, G.; Fournier, D.; Valot, C.; Raynaud, M.

    2008-01-01

    The thermal conductivity degradation induced by irradiation with energetic heavy ions at room temperature is studied and quantified. Three semi-metallic systems: titanium and zirconium carbides, titanium nitride, as well as a covalent compound: 6H silicon carbide were irradiated by 25.8 MeV krypton ions at 1016 and 6 \\cdot 1016 ions.cm-2 doses to produce defects. During ion irradiation, inelastic collisions and elastic collisions occur at a different depth in a material. Two collision domains can be defined. Modulated thermoreflectance microscopy measurements were performed at differing frequencies to characterize the thermal conductivity degradation in these two domains for each of the investigated materials. Our results reveal a significant thermal conductivity degradation in the two collision domains for all materials. Elastic collisions are shown to degrade more strongly the thermal properties than inelastic ones. Scattering of thermal energy carriers is larger in elastic collision domain because displacement cascades produce a very high concentration of point defects: vacancies, interstitials and implanted Kr ions. The degradation coming from electronic interactions that seems to be more important in SiC can be explained by the presence of large populations of generated extended defects, facing to generated individual point defects in TiC, TiN or ZrC.

  3. Feasibility study of heavy-ion beams and compound target materials for muon production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sohn, Jae Bum; Lee, Ju Hahn; Kim, Gi Dong; Kim, Yong Kyun

    2015-10-01

    We have investigated the feasibility of using compound materials as targets for muon production by virtue of simulations using a GEANT4 toolkit. A graphite material and two thermostable compound materials, beryllium oxide (BeO) and boron carbide (B4C), were considered as muon production targets, and their muon production rates for a 600-MeV proton beam were calculated and compared. For the thermal analysis, the total heat deposited on the targets by the proton beams and the secondary particles was calculated with the MCNPX code; then, the temperature distribution of target was derived from the calculated heat by using the ANSYS code with consideration of heat transfer mechanisms such as thermal conduction and thermal radiation. In addition, we have investigated whether the heavy-ion beams can be utilized for muon production. For various beam species such as 3He2, 4He, 7Li, 10B and 12C, their muon production rates were calculated and compared with the rates experimentally-obtained for a proton beam.

  4. A vision-based material tracking system for heavy plate rolling mills

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tratnig, Mark; Reisinger, Johann; Hlobil, Helmut

    2007-01-01

    A modern heavy plate rolling mill can process more than 20 slabs and plates simultaneously. To avoid material confusions during a compact occupancy and the permanent discharging and re-entering of parts, one must know the identity and position of each part at every moment. One possibility to determine the identity and position of each slab and plate is the application of a comprehensive visual-based tracking system. Compared to a tracking system that calculates the position of a plate based on the diameter and the turns of the transport rolls, a visual system is not corrupted by a position- and material dependent transmission slip. In this paper we therefore present a vision-based material tracking system for the 2-dimensional tracking of glowing material in harsh environment. It covers the production area from the plant's descaler to the pre-stand of the rolling mill and consists of four independent, synchronized overlapping cameras. The paper first presents the conceptual design of the tracking system - and continues then with the camera calibration, the determination of pixel contours, the data segmentation and the fitting & modelling of the objects bodies. In a next step, the work will then show the testing setup. It will be described how the material tracking system was implemented into the control system of the rolling mill and how the delivered tracking data was checked on its correctness. Finally, the paper presents some results. It will be shown that the position of some moving plates was estimated with a precision of approx. 0.5m. The results will be analyzed and it will be explained where the inaccuracies come from and how they eventually can be removed. The paper ends with a conclusion and an outlook on future work.

  5. STAR heavy flavor tracker

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiu, Hao

    2014-11-01

    Hadrons containing heavy quarks are a clean probe of the early dynamic evolution of the dense and hot medium created in high-energy nuclear collisions. To explore heavy quark production at RHIC, the Heavy Flavor Tracker (HFT) for the STAR experiment was built and installed in time for RHIC Run 14. The HFT consists of four layers of silicon detectors. The two outermost layers are silicon strip detectors and the two innermost layers are made from state-of-the-art ultra-thin CMOS Monolithic Active Pixel Sensors (MAPS). This is the first application of a CMOS MAPS detector in a collider experiment. The use of thin pixel sensors plus the use of carbon fiber supporting material limits the material budget to be only 0.4% radiation length per pixel detector layer, enabling the reconstruction of low pT heavy flavor hadrons. The status and performance of the HFT in the RHIC 200 GeV Au + Au run in 2014 are reported. Very good detector efficiency, hit residuals and track resolution (DCAs) were observed in the cosmic ray data and in the Au + Au data.

  6. Uniform heating of materials into the warm dense matter regime with laser-driven quasimonoenergetic ion beams

    SciTech Connect

    Bang, W.; Albright, B. J.; Bradley, P. A.; Vold, E. L.; Boettger, J. C.; Fernández, J. C.

    2015-12-01

    In a recent experiment at the Trident laser facility, a laser-driven beam of quasimonoenergetic aluminum ions was used to heat solid gold and diamond foils isochorically to 5.5 and 1.7 eV, respectively. Here theoretical calculations are presented that suggest the gold and diamond were heated uniformly by these laser-driven ion beams. According to calculations and SESAME equation-of-state tables, laser-driven aluminum ion beams achievable at Trident, with a finite energy spread of ΔE/E~20%, are expected to heat the targets more uniformly than a beam of 140-MeV aluminum ions with zero energy spread. As a result, the robustness of the expected heating uniformity relative to the changes in the incident ion energy spectra is evaluated, and expected plasma temperatures of various target materials achievable with the current experimental platform are presented.

  7. Uniform heating of materials into the warm dense matter regime with laser-driven quasimonoenergetic ion beams

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Bang, W.; Albright, B. J.; Bradley, P. A.; Vold, E. L.; Boettger, J. C.; Fernández, J. C.

    2015-12-01

    In a recent experiment at the Trident laser facility, a laser-driven beam of quasimonoenergetic aluminum ions was used to heat solid gold and diamond foils isochorically to 5.5 and 1.7 eV, respectively. Here theoretical calculations are presented that suggest the gold and diamond were heated uniformly by these laser-driven ion beams. According to calculations and SESAME equation-of-state tables, laser-driven aluminum ion beams achievable at Trident, with a finite energy spread of ΔE/E~20%, are expected to heat the targets more uniformly than a beam of 140-MeV aluminum ions with zero energy spread. As a result, the robustness of the expected heatingmore » uniformity relative to the changes in the incident ion energy spectra is evaluated, and expected plasma temperatures of various target materials achievable with the current experimental platform are presented.« less

  8. Heavy vehicle propulsion system materials program semi-annual progress report for October 1997 through March 1998

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, D.R.

    1998-06-01

    The purpose of the Heavy Vehicle Propulsion System materials Program is the development of materials: ceramics, intermetallics, metal alloys, and metal and ceramic coatings, to support the dieselization of class 1--3 trucks to realize a 35{percent} fuel-economy improvement over current gasoline-fueled trucks and to support commercialization of fuel-flexible LE-55 low-emissions, high-efficiency diesel engines for class 7--8 trucks. The Office of Transportation Technologies, Office of Heavy Vehicle Technologies (OTT OHVT) has an active program to develop the technology for advanced LE-55 diesel engines with 55{percent} efficiency and low emissions levels of 2.0 g/bhp-h NO{sub x} and 0.05 g/bhp-h particulates. The goal is also for the LE-55 engine to run on natural gas with efficiency approaching that of diesel fuel. The LE-55 program is being completed in FY 1997 and, after approximately 10 years of effort, has largely met the program goals of 55{percent} efficiency and low emissions. However, the commercialization of the LE-55 technology requires more durable materials than those that have been used to demonstrate the goals. Heavy Vehicle Propulsion System Materials will, in concert with the heavy-duty diesel engine companies, develop the durable materials required to commercialize the LE-55 technologies.

  9. Materials-Enabled High-Efficiency (MEHE) Heavy-Duty Diesel Engines

    SciTech Connect

    Kass, M.; Veliz, M.

    2011-09-30

    The purpose of this Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) between UTBattelle, Inc. and Caterpillar, Inc. was to improve diesel engine efficiency by incorporating advanced materials to enable higher combustion pressures and temperatures necessary for improved combustion. The project scope also included novel materials for use in advanced components and designs associated with waste-heat recovery and other concepts for improved thermal efficiency. Caterpillar initially provided ORNL with a 2004 Tier 2 C15 ACERT diesel engine (designed for on-highway use) and two 600 hp motoring dynamometers. The first year of the CRADA effort was focused on establishing a heavy-duty experimental engine research cell. First year activities included procuring, installing and commissioning the cell infrastructure. Infrastructure components consisted of intake air handling system, water tower, exhaust handling system, and cell air conditioning. Other necessary infrastructure items included the fuel delivery system and bottled gas handling to support the analytical instrumentation. The second year of the CRADA focused on commissioning the dynamometer system to enable engine experimentation. In addition to the requirements associated with the dynamometer controller, the electrical system needed a power factor correction system to maintain continuity with the electrical grid. During the second year the engine was instrumented and baseline operated to confirm performance and commission the dynamometer. The engine performance was mapped and modeled according to requirements provided by Caterpillar. This activity was further supported by a Work-for-Others project from Caterpillar to evaluate a proprietary modeling system. A second Work-for-Others activity was performed to evaluate a novel turbocharger design. This project was highly successful and may lead to new turbocharger designs for Caterpillar heavy-duty diesel engines. During the third (and final) year of the CRADA, a

  10. Heavy metal uptake, translocation, and bioaccumulation studies of Triticum aestivum cultivated in contaminated dredged materials.

    PubMed

    Shumaker, Ketia L; Begonia, Gregorio

    2005-08-01

    Phytoremediation is a technology that uses vegetation to remediate contaminants from water, soil, and sediments. Unlike traditional remediation techniques such as soil washing or vitrification, phytoremediation offers a technology that is solar-driven, aesthetically pleasing, and cost effective. Recent studies indicate that winter wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) is a potential accumulator for heavy metals such as lead (Pb) and cadmium (Cd) in hydroponic systems. Based on these findings, a laboratory study was conducted with the primary objective of determining the phytoaccumulation capability of this plant species for heavy metals from contaminated dredged materials (DMs) originating from two confined disposal facilities (CDF). The United States Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) manages several hundred million cubic meters of DMs each year, and 5 to 10 % of these DMs require special handling because they are contaminated with hazardous substances that can move from the substrates into food webs causing unacceptable risk outside CDFs. Phytoremediation may offer an alternative to decrease this risk. Chemical analyses by USACE personnel identified 17 metals in various DMs, but in this present study, only zinc (Zn) and Cd were investigated. Pre-germinated seeds of the test plants were planted under laboratory conditions in pots containing the various DMs and reference soil. Four weeks after planting, plants were harvested and separated into roots and shoots for biomass production and tissue metal concentrations analyses. Results showed that T. aestivum plants have the capacity to tolerate and grow in multiple-metal contaminated DMs with the potential of accumulating various amounts of Zn and Cd. Root and shoot biomass of T. aestivum were not significantly affected by the DMs on which the plants were grown suggesting that this plant species can grow just as well on DMs contaminated by various metals as in the reference soil. No significant differences in the Zn tissue

  11. Induced damage by high energy heavy ion irradiation at the GANIL accelerator in semiconductor materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levalois, M.; Bogdanski, P.; Toulemonde, M.

    1992-01-01

    The advantages of using a high energy (several GeV) heavy ion accelerator for irradiation are first recalled: the ranges of ions in materials are significant; an a priori relative evaluation of the damage creation rates from elastic collisions is possible; last, the ratio of the electronic stopping power to the nuclear stopping power is very large. The experimental methods used are in situ resistance and Hall mobility measurements. The irradiated samples are also analyzed in the laboratory by means of different methods (DLTS, photoluminescence, electron microscopy). The resistance has the same behaviour in silicon and gallium arsenide. It increases continuously during the irradiation. On the other hand, in n-type germanium, the resistance first increases, passes through a maximum, and decreases afterwards. A type-conversion takes place in the material. Moreover, the comparison of damage creation rates from one irradiation to another, in germanium and gallium arsenide, seems to show that the electron excitation produces a relative decrease of the damage creation rate. This effect is not visible in silicon.

  12. Correlation between ground state and orbital anisotropy in heavy fermion materials

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Willers, Thomas; Strigari, Fabio; Hu, Zhiwei; Sessi, Violetta; Brookes, Nicholas B.; Bauer, Eric D.; Sarrao, John L.; Thompson, J. D.; Tanaka, Arata; Wirth, Steffen; et al

    2015-02-09

    The interplay of structural, orbital, charge, and spin degrees of freedom is at the heart of many emergent phenomena, including superconductivity. We find that unraveling the underlying forces of such novel phases is a great challenge because it not only requires understanding each of these degrees of freedom, it also involves accounting for the interplay between them. Cerium-based heavy fermion compounds are an ideal playground for investigating these interdependencies, and we present evidence for a correlation between orbital anisotropy and the ground states in a representative family of materials. We have measured the 4f crystal-electric field ground-state wave functions ofmore » the strongly correlated materials CeRh1₋xIrxIn5 with great accuracy using linear polarization-dependent soft X-ray absorption spectroscopy. These measurements show that these wave functions correlate with the ground-state properties of the substitution series, which covers long-range antiferromagnetic order, unconventional superconductivity, and coexistence of these two states.« less

  13. Correlation between ground state and orbital anisotropy in heavy fermion materials

    SciTech Connect

    Willers, Thomas; Strigari, Fabio; Hu, Zhiwei; Sessi, Violetta; Brookes, Nicholas B.; Bauer, Eric D.; Sarrao, John L.; Thompson, J. D.; Tanaka, Arata; Wirth, Steffen; Tjeng, Liu Hao; Severing, Andrea

    2015-02-09

    The interplay of structural, orbital, charge, and spin degrees of freedom is at the heart of many emergent phenomena, including superconductivity. We find that unraveling the underlying forces of such novel phases is a great challenge because it not only requires understanding each of these degrees of freedom, it also involves accounting for the interplay between them. Cerium-based heavy fermion compounds are an ideal playground for investigating these interdependencies, and we present evidence for a correlation between orbital anisotropy and the ground states in a representative family of materials. We have measured the 4f crystal-electric field ground-state wave functions of the strongly correlated materials CeRh1₋xIrxIn5 with great accuracy using linear polarization-dependent soft X-ray absorption spectroscopy. These measurements show that these wave functions correlate with the ground-state properties of the substitution series, which covers long-range antiferromagnetic order, unconventional superconductivity, and coexistence of these two states.

  14. Heavy metal removal mechanisms of sorptive filter materials for road runoff treatment and remobilization under de-icing salt applications.

    PubMed

    Huber, Maximilian; Hilbig, Harald; Badenberg, Sophia C; Fassnacht, Julius; Drewes, Jörg E; Helmreich, Brigitte

    2016-10-01

    The objective of this research study was to elucidate the removal and remobilization behaviors of five heavy metals (i.e., Cd, Cu, Ni, Pb, and Zn) that had been fixed onto sorptive filter materials used in decentralized stormwater treatment systems receiving traffic area runoff. Six filter materials (i.e., granular activated carbon, a mixture of granular activated alumina and porous concrete, granular activated lignite, half-burnt dolomite, and two granular ferric hydroxides) were evaluated in column experiments. First, a simultaneous preloading with the heavy metals was performed for each filter material. Subsequently, the remobilization effect was tested by three de-icing salt experiments in duplicate using pure NaCl, a mixture of NaCl and CaCl2, and a mixture of NaCl and MgCl2. Three layers of each column were separated to specify the attenuation of heavy metals as a function of depth. Cu and Pb were retained best by most of the selected filter materials, and Cu was often released the least of all metals by the three de-icing salts. The mixture of NaCl and CaCl2 resulted in a stronger effect upon remobilization than the other two de-icing salts. For the material with the highest retention, the effect of the preloading level upon remobilization was measured. The removal mechanisms of all filter materials were determined by advanced laboratory methods. For example, the different intrusions of heavy metals into the particles were determined. Findings of this study can result in improved filter materials used in decentralized stormwater treatment systems.

  15. Heavy metal removal mechanisms of sorptive filter materials for road runoff treatment and remobilization under de-icing salt applications.

    PubMed

    Huber, Maximilian; Hilbig, Harald; Badenberg, Sophia C; Fassnacht, Julius; Drewes, Jörg E; Helmreich, Brigitte

    2016-10-01

    The objective of this research study was to elucidate the removal and remobilization behaviors of five heavy metals (i.e., Cd, Cu, Ni, Pb, and Zn) that had been fixed onto sorptive filter materials used in decentralized stormwater treatment systems receiving traffic area runoff. Six filter materials (i.e., granular activated carbon, a mixture of granular activated alumina and porous concrete, granular activated lignite, half-burnt dolomite, and two granular ferric hydroxides) were evaluated in column experiments. First, a simultaneous preloading with the heavy metals was performed for each filter material. Subsequently, the remobilization effect was tested by three de-icing salt experiments in duplicate using pure NaCl, a mixture of NaCl and CaCl2, and a mixture of NaCl and MgCl2. Three layers of each column were separated to specify the attenuation of heavy metals as a function of depth. Cu and Pb were retained best by most of the selected filter materials, and Cu was often released the least of all metals by the three de-icing salts. The mixture of NaCl and CaCl2 resulted in a stronger effect upon remobilization than the other two de-icing salts. For the material with the highest retention, the effect of the preloading level upon remobilization was measured. The removal mechanisms of all filter materials were determined by advanced laboratory methods. For example, the different intrusions of heavy metals into the particles were determined. Findings of this study can result in improved filter materials used in decentralized stormwater treatment systems. PMID:27423405

  16. Super-heavy electron material as metallic refrigerant for adiabatic demagnetization cooling

    PubMed Central

    Tokiwa, Yoshifumi; Piening, Boy; Jeevan, Hirale S.; Bud’ko, Sergey L.; Canfield, Paul C.; Gegenwart, Philipp

    2016-01-01

    Low-temperature refrigeration is of crucial importance in fundamental research of condensed matter physics, because the investigations of fascinating quantum phenomena, such as superconductivity, superfluidity, and quantum criticality, often require refrigeration down to very low temperatures. Currently, cryogenic refrigerators with 3He gas are widely used for cooling below 1 K. However, usage of the gas has been increasingly difficult because of the current worldwide shortage. Therefore, it is important to consider alternative methods of refrigeration. We show that a new type of refrigerant, the super-heavy electron metal YbCo2Zn20, can be used for adiabatic demagnetization refrigeration, which does not require 3He gas. This method has a number of advantages, including much better metallic thermal conductivity compared to the conventional insulating refrigerants. We also demonstrate that the cooling performance is optimized in Yb1−xScxCo2Zn20 by partial Sc substitution, with x ~ 0.19. The substitution induces chemical pressure that drives the materials to a zero-field quantum critical point. This leads to an additional enhancement of the magnetocaloric effect in low fields and low temperatures, enabling final temperatures well below 100 mK. This performance has, up to now, been restricted to insulators. For nearly a century, the same principle of using local magnetic moments has been applied for adiabatic demagnetization cooling. This study opens new possibilities of using itinerant magnetic moments for cryogen-free refrigeration.

  17. Super-heavy electron material as metallic refrigerant for adiabatic demagnetization cooling

    PubMed Central

    Tokiwa, Yoshifumi; Piening, Boy; Jeevan, Hirale S.; Bud’ko, Sergey L.; Canfield, Paul C.; Gegenwart, Philipp

    2016-01-01

    Low-temperature refrigeration is of crucial importance in fundamental research of condensed matter physics, because the investigations of fascinating quantum phenomena, such as superconductivity, superfluidity, and quantum criticality, often require refrigeration down to very low temperatures. Currently, cryogenic refrigerators with 3He gas are widely used for cooling below 1 K. However, usage of the gas has been increasingly difficult because of the current worldwide shortage. Therefore, it is important to consider alternative methods of refrigeration. We show that a new type of refrigerant, the super-heavy electron metal YbCo2Zn20, can be used for adiabatic demagnetization refrigeration, which does not require 3He gas. This method has a number of advantages, including much better metallic thermal conductivity compared to the conventional insulating refrigerants. We also demonstrate that the cooling performance is optimized in Yb1−xScxCo2Zn20 by partial Sc substitution, with x ~ 0.19. The substitution induces chemical pressure that drives the materials to a zero-field quantum critical point. This leads to an additional enhancement of the magnetocaloric effect in low fields and low temperatures, enabling final temperatures well below 100 mK. This performance has, up to now, been restricted to insulators. For nearly a century, the same principle of using local magnetic moments has been applied for adiabatic demagnetization cooling. This study opens new possibilities of using itinerant magnetic moments for cryogen-free refrigeration. PMID:27626073

  18. Identification of genotoxic components of the heavy ends of energy-related materials

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, M.L. . Dept. of Chemistry); Castle, R.N. . Dept. of Chemistry)

    1990-02-01

    The objective of this work was to develop capillary supercritical fluid chromatographic methods for the analysis of the high-molecular-weight components in high boiling, heavy and materials that are responsible for genotoxic activity. Since these compounds were largely unknown, 62 standard reference compounds were synthesized for comparison with actual high boiling coal-derived products. These compounds were comprised of two- and three-ring aromatic moieties coupled together with carbon, oxygen, sulfur, and nitrogen bridging groups. Mass spectral evidence indicated that a number of these compound types could be present in various coal products at a concentration level of 0.01--0.2 percent, although none of them could be positively identified because of the complexities of the fractions. A number of capillary supercritical fluid chromatographic instrumental developments were made as a result of this work. These include a supercritical fluid fractionation system for group-type separation of complex samples and a direct coupled supercritical fluid chromatograph/double focusing mass spectrometer system. Finally, a number of supercritical fluid chromatographic mobile phase combinations were evaluated for the analysis of large polycyclic aromatic compounds. 34 refs., 23 figs., 2 tabs.

  19. Super-heavy electron material as metallic refrigerant for adiabatic demagnetization cooling.

    PubMed

    Tokiwa, Yoshifumi; Piening, Boy; Jeevan, Hirale S; Bud'ko, Sergey L; Canfield, Paul C; Gegenwart, Philipp

    2016-09-01

    Low-temperature refrigeration is of crucial importance in fundamental research of condensed matter physics, because the investigations of fascinating quantum phenomena, such as superconductivity, superfluidity, and quantum criticality, often require refrigeration down to very low temperatures. Currently, cryogenic refrigerators with (3)He gas are widely used for cooling below 1 K. However, usage of the gas has been increasingly difficult because of the current worldwide shortage. Therefore, it is important to consider alternative methods of refrigeration. We show that a new type of refrigerant, the super-heavy electron metal YbCo2Zn20, can be used for adiabatic demagnetization refrigeration, which does not require (3)He gas. This method has a number of advantages, including much better metallic thermal conductivity compared to the conventional insulating refrigerants. We also demonstrate that the cooling performance is optimized in Yb1-x Sc x Co2Zn20 by partial Sc substitution, with x ~ 0.19. The substitution induces chemical pressure that drives the materials to a zero-field quantum critical point. This leads to an additional enhancement of the magnetocaloric effect in low fields and low temperatures, enabling final temperatures well below 100 mK. This performance has, up to now, been restricted to insulators. For nearly a century, the same principle of using local magnetic moments has been applied for adiabatic demagnetization cooling. This study opens new possibilities of using itinerant magnetic moments for cryogen-free refrigeration. PMID:27626073

  20. Mechanically induced self-propagating reaction and consequent consolidation for the production of fully dense nanocrystalline Ti{sub 55}C{sub 45} bulk material

    SciTech Connect

    Sherif El-Eskandarany, M. Al-Hazza, Abdulsalam

    2014-11-15

    We employed a high-energy ball mill for the synthesis of nanograined Ti{sub 55}C{sub 45} powders starting from elemental Ti and C powders. The mechanically induced self-propagating reaction that occurred between the reactant materials was monitored via a gas atmosphere gas-temperature-monitoring system. A single phase of NaCl-type TiC was obtained after 5 h of ball milling. To decrease the powder and grain sizes, the material was subjected to further ball milling time. The powders obtained after 200 h of milling possessed spherical-like morphology with average particle and grain sizes of 45 μm and 4.2 nm, respectively. The end-products obtained after 200 h of ball milling time, were then consolidated into full dense compacts, using hot pressing and spark plasma sintering at 1500 and 34.5 MPa, with heating rates of 20 °C/min and 500 °C/min, respectively. Whereas hot pressing of the powders led to severe grain growth (∼ 436 nm in diameter), the as-spark plasma sintered powders maintained their nanograined characteristics (∼ 28 nm in diameter). The as-synthesized and as-consolidated powders were characterized, using X-ray diffraction, high-resolution electron microscopy, and scanning electron microscopy. The mechanical properties of the consolidated samples obtained via the hot pressing and spark plasma sintering techniques were characterized, using Vickers microhardness and non-destructive testing techniques. The Vickers hardness, Young's modulus, shear modulus and fracture toughness of as-spark plasma sintered samples were 32 GPa, 358 GPa, 151 GPa and 6.4 MPa·m{sup 1/2}, respectively. The effects of the consolidation approach on the grain size and mechanical properties were investigated and are discussed. - Highlights: • Room-temperature synthesizing of NaCl-type TiC • Dependence on the grain size on the ball milling time • Fabrication of equiaxed nanocrystalline grains with a diameter of 4.2 nm • Fabrication of nanocrystalline bulk TiC material by

  1. Heavy metal fractionation and pedogenesis in subalpine and alpine soils on ophiolitic materials, western Alps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Amico, M.; Previtali, F.

    2009-04-01

    Soils on ultramafic materials are usually rich in Mg, Fe and heavy metals (particularly Ni, Cr, Mn, Co). These chemical properties could cause toxicity effects on biological communities. Metal fractionation shows the soil phases to which metals are associated (exchangeable, associated with organic matter, with amorphous or crystalline Fe or Mn oxides, in the crystal structure of primary minerals), and thus it is strictly related with metal mobilization and bioavailability. Ni, Cr, Mn, Co and Fe fractionations (6 fractions, analysed by a selective sequential extraction technique) were analysed in 6 subalpine and in 17 alpine soils (i.e., respectively under coniferous forest or above the present-day treeline) in the ophiolitic area of Mont Avic Natural Park (Valle d'Aosta, Italian Alps), on soils formed from metal-rich serpentinite or from metal-poor mafic rocks and calcschists. The results show a tight relationship between vegetation, soil forming processes, metal fractionation and bioavailability: below and above the present-day treeline soil forming processes and metal speciation change dramatically. Serpentinite soils are always extremely rich in metals, but metal speciation in analogous habitats is similar on every substrate. The results show a tight relationship between vegetation, soil forming processes, metal fractionation and bioavailability: below and above the present-day treeline soil forming processes and metal speciation change dramatically. Serpentinite soils are always extremely rich in metals, but metal speciation in analogous habitats is similar on every substrate. Under subalpine forest, the main pedogenic process is podzolization. In the extremely acidic and leached podzolic soils, all metals are mobilized and their lowest concentration is in the bleached E horizon, while there is a higher content in organic matter-rich surface horizon and in the spodic (illuvial) B. Not considering the amount associated with primary minerals (residual fraction

  2. [Effects of Different Kinds of Organic Materials on Soil Heavy Metal Phytoremediation Efficiency by Sedum alfredii Hance].

    PubMed

    Yao, Gui-hua; Xu, Hai-zhou; Zhu, Lin-gang; Ma, Jia-wei; Liu, Dan; Ye, Zheng-qian

    2015-11-01

    In this study, a pot experiment was conducted to investigate the effect of clean organic materials i. e., biogas residue (BR), mushroom residue (MR), and bamboo shell (BS) on phytoextraction remediation of two heavy metal contaminated soils (collected from Wenzhou and Fuyang, which referred to "Wenzhou soil" and "Fuyang soil", respectively.) using a cadmium (Cd) and zinc (Zn) hyperaccumulator Sedum alfredii Hance. The results indicated that the effects of organic materials on availabilities of soil heavy metals were different due to different kinds of heavy metals, organic materials, and the application rates of the organic materials. Addition with 5% BR showed the greatest activation to copper (Cu), Zn in Wenzhou soil, and in Fuyang soil 1% BS had the highest activation for Cu, Zn, lead ( Ph) and Cd. Growth of shoot biomass of Sedum alfredii Hance increased with the addition rate of organic materials, and the plant dry weights were increased by 23.7%-93.0%. In Wenzhou soil, only 1% BS treatment had the best effect on Cd uptake and accumulation in shoots of Sedum alfredii Hance, increased by 22.6%, while other treatments were inferior to the control. For Zn, MR treatments were inferior to the control, while other treafments were superior to the control, of which 5% BR, 1% BS and 5% BS exceeded the control by 39. 6%, 32.6% and 23.8%, respectively. In Fuyang soil, for Cd, the treatment effects of 5% BS, 1% BR and 5% BR were the greatest, of which Cd accumulation in shoots exceeded the control by 12.9%, 12.8% and 6.2%, respectively, while Cd accumulations in shoots in all other treatments were less than that of control. For Zn, the treatments of adding organic materials promoted Zn accumulation in shoots of Sedum alfredii Hance, and the best treatments were as follows: 5% BS. 5% BR and 5% MR, exceeded the control by 38.4%, 25.7% and 22.4%, respectively.

  3. Physical processes taking place in dense plasma focus devices at the interaction of hot plasma and fast ion streams with materials under test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gribkov, V. A.

    2015-06-01

    The dense plasma focus (DPF) device represents a source of powerful streams of penetrating radiations (hot plasma, fast electron and ion beams, x-rays and neutrons) of ns-scale pulse durations. Power flux densities of the radiation types may reach in certain cases the values up to 1013 W cm  -  2. They are widely used at present time in more than 30 labs in the world in the field of radiation material science. Areas of their implementations are testing of the materials perspective for use in modern fusion reactors (FR) of both types, modification of surface layers with an aim of improvements their properties, production of some nanostructures on their surface, and so on. To use a DPF correctly in these applications it is important to understand the mechanisms of generation of the above-mentioned radiations, their dynamics inside and outside of the pinch and processes of interaction of these streams with targets. In this paper, the most important issues on the above matter we discuss in relation to the cumulative hot plasma stream and the beam of fast ions with illustration of experimental results obtained at four DPF devices ranged in the limits of bank energies from 1 kJ to 1 MJ. Among them mechanisms of a jet formation, a current abruption phenomenon, a super-Alfven ion beam propagation inside and outside of DPF plasma, generation of secondary plasma and formation of shock waves in plasma and inside a solid-state target, etc. Nanosecond time-resolved techniques (electric probes, laser interferometry, frame self-luminescent imaging, x-ray/neutron probes, etc) give an opportunity to investigate the above-mentioned events and to observe the process of interaction of the radiation types with targets. After irradiation, we analyzed the specimens by contemporary instrumentation: optical and scanning electron microscopy, local x-ray spectral and structure analysis, atomic force microscopy, the portable x-ray diffractometer that combines x-ray single

  4. Extended application of Kohn-Sham first-principles molecular dynamics method with plane wave approximation at high energy—From cold materials to hot dense plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Shen; Wang, Hongwei; Kang, Wei; Zhang, Ping; He, X. T.

    2016-04-01

    An extended first-principles molecular dynamics (FPMD) method based on Kohn-Sham scheme is proposed to elevate the temperature limit of the FPMD method in the calculation of dense plasmas. The extended method treats the wave functions of high energy electrons as plane waves analytically and thus expands the application of the FPMD method to the region of hot dense plasmas without suffering from the formidable computational costs. In addition, the extended method inherits the high accuracy of the Kohn-Sham scheme and keeps the information of electronic structures. This gives an edge to the extended method in the calculation of mixtures of plasmas composed of heterogeneous ions, high-Z dense plasmas, lowering of ionization potentials, X-ray absorption/emission spectra, and opacities, which are of particular interest to astrophysics, inertial confinement fusion engineering, and laboratory astrophysics.

  5. Ground-based simulations of cosmic ray heavy ion interactions in spacecraft and planetary habitat shielding materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, J.; Zeitlin, C.; Heilbronn, L.; Borak, T.; Carter, T.; Frankel, K. A.; Fukumura, A.; Murakami, T.; Rademacher, S. E.; Schimmerling, W.; Stronach, C.; Chatterjee, A. (Principal Investigator)

    1998-01-01

    This paper surveys some recent accelerator-based measurements of the nuclear fragmentation of high energy nuclei in shielding and tissue-equivalent materials. These data are needed to make accurate predictions of the radiation field produced at depth in spacecraft and planetary habitat shielding materials and in the human body by heavy charged particles in the galactic cosmic radiation. Projectile-target combinations include 1 GeV/nucleon 56Fe incident on aluminum and graphite and 600 MeV/nucleon 56Fe and 290 MeV/nucleon 12C on polyethylene. We present examples of the dependence of fragmentation on material type and thickness, of a comparison between data and a fragmentation model, and of multiple fragments produced along the beam axis.

  6. Dense with Sense

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aletras, Anthony H.; Ingkanisorn, W. Patricia; Mancini, Christine; Arai, Andrew E.

    2005-09-01

    Displacement encoding with stimulated echoes (DENSE) with a low encoding strength phase-cycled meta-DENSE readout and a two fold SENSE acceleration ( R = 2) is described. This combination reduces total breath-hold times for increased patient comfort during cardiac regional myocardial contractility studies. Images from phantoms, normal volunteers, and a patient are provided to demonstrate the SENSE-DENSE combination of methods. The overall breath-hold time is halved while preserving strain map quality.

  7. Removal of radioactive materials and heavy metals from water using magnetic resin

    DOEpatents

    Kochen, Robert L.; Navratil, James D.

    1997-01-21

    Magnetic polymer resins capable of efficient removal of actinides and heavy metals from contaminated water are disclosed together with methods for making, using, and regenerating them. The resins comprise polyamine-epichlorohydrin resin beads with ferrites attached to the surfaces of the beads. Markedly improved water decontamination is demonstrated using these magnetic polymer resins of the invention in the presence of a magnetic field, as compared with water decontamination methods employing ordinary ion exchange resins or ferrites taken separately.

  8. Removal of radioactive materials and heavy metals from water using magnetic resin

    DOEpatents

    Kochen, R.L.; Navratil, J.D.

    1997-01-21

    Magnetic polymer resins capable of efficient removal of actinides and heavy metals from contaminated water are disclosed together with methods for making, using, and regenerating them. The resins comprise polyamine-epichlorohydrin resin beads with ferrites attached to the surfaces of the beads. Markedly improved water decontamination is demonstrated using these magnetic polymer resins of the invention in the presence of a magnetic field, as compared with water decontamination methods employing ordinary ion exchange resins or ferrites taken separately. 9 figs.

  9. [Effects of Different Kinds of Organic Materials on Soil Heavy Metal Phytoremediation Efficiency by Sedum alfredii Hance].

    PubMed

    Yao, Gui-hua; Xu, Hai-zhou; Zhu, Lin-gang; Ma, Jia-wei; Liu, Dan; Ye, Zheng-qian

    2015-11-01

    In this study, a pot experiment was conducted to investigate the effect of clean organic materials i. e., biogas residue (BR), mushroom residue (MR), and bamboo shell (BS) on phytoextraction remediation of two heavy metal contaminated soils (collected from Wenzhou and Fuyang, which referred to "Wenzhou soil" and "Fuyang soil", respectively.) using a cadmium (Cd) and zinc (Zn) hyperaccumulator Sedum alfredii Hance. The results indicated that the effects of organic materials on availabilities of soil heavy metals were different due to different kinds of heavy metals, organic materials, and the application rates of the organic materials. Addition with 5% BR showed the greatest activation to copper (Cu), Zn in Wenzhou soil, and in Fuyang soil 1% BS had the highest activation for Cu, Zn, lead ( Ph) and Cd. Growth of shoot biomass of Sedum alfredii Hance increased with the addition rate of organic materials, and the plant dry weights were increased by 23.7%-93.0%. In Wenzhou soil, only 1% BS treatment had the best effect on Cd uptake and accumulation in shoots of Sedum alfredii Hance, increased by 22.6%, while other treatments were inferior to the control. For Zn, MR treatments were inferior to the control, while other treafments were superior to the control, of which 5% BR, 1% BS and 5% BS exceeded the control by 39. 6%, 32.6% and 23.8%, respectively. In Fuyang soil, for Cd, the treatment effects of 5% BS, 1% BR and 5% BR were the greatest, of which Cd accumulation in shoots exceeded the control by 12.9%, 12.8% and 6.2%, respectively, while Cd accumulations in shoots in all other treatments were less than that of control. For Zn, the treatments of adding organic materials promoted Zn accumulation in shoots of Sedum alfredii Hance, and the best treatments were as follows: 5% BS. 5% BR and 5% MR, exceeded the control by 38.4%, 25.7% and 22.4%, respectively. PMID:26911018

  10. Atoms in dense plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    More, R.M.

    1986-01-01

    Recent experiments with high-power pulsed lasers have strongly encouraged the development of improved theoretical understanding of highly charged ions in a dense plasma environment. This work examines the theory of dense plasmas with emphasis on general rules which govern matter at extreme high temperature and density. 106 refs., 23 figs.

  11. Studies on chelating adsorption properties of novel composite material polyethyleneimine/silica gel for heavy-metal ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Baojiao; An, Fuqiang; Liu, Kangkai

    2006-12-01

    Firstly, the coordination processes of line-type polyethyleneimine with Cu 2+, Cd 2+ and Zn 2+ were studied by using visible light absorption spectroscopy and chelation conductivity titration method, and the structures of the chelates were determined. Afterwards, polyethyleneimine (PEI) was grafted onto the surface of silica gel particles via the coupling effect of γ-chloropropyl trimethoxysilane (CP), and the novel composite adsorption material PEI/SiO 2 with strong adsorption ability towards heavy-metal ions was prepared. The chelating adsorption properties of PEI/SiO 2 for Cu 2+, Cd 2+ and Zn 2+ were researched by both static (batch) and dynamic (flow) methods. The experiment results show that water-soluble polyamine PEI with line-type structure reacts with Cu 2+, Cd 2+ and Zn 2+ easily and quantitatively, and water-soluble chelates with four ligands are formed. The composite material PEI/SiO 2 possesses very strong chelating adsorption ability for heavy-metal ions, and the saturated adsorption amount can reach 25.94 mg g -1 and 50.01 mg g -1 for Cu 2+ under static and dynamic conditions, respectively. The isothermal adsorption data fit to Langmuir equation, and the adsorption is typical chemical adsorption with monomolecular layer. The adsorbing ability of PEI/SiO 2 towards the three kinds of the ions follows the order of Cu 2+ > Cd 2+ > Zn 2+. The pH value has great influence on the sorption, and at pH 6-7, the adsorption capacity is the greatest. The fact that adsorption capacity increases with temperature rising indicates the adsorbing process of PEI/SiO 2 for metal ions is endothermic. As diluted hydrochloric acid is used as eluent, the adsorbed heavy-metal ions are eluted easily from PEI/SiO 2, and the regeneration and reuse without decreasing sorption for PEI/SiO 2 are demonstrated.

  12. Spatial interferences in the electron transport of heavy-fermion materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Shu-feng; Liu, Yu; Song, Hai-Feng; Yang, Yi-feng

    2016-08-01

    The scanning tunneling microscopy/spectroscopy and the point contact spectroscopy represent major progress in recent heavy-fermion research. Both have revealed important information on the composite nature of the emergent heavy-electron quasiparticles. However, a detailed and thorough microscopic understanding of the similarities and differences in the underlying physical processes of these techniques is still lacking. Here we study the electron transport in the normal state of the periodic Anderson lattice by using the Keldysh nonequilibrium Green's function technique. In addition to the well-known Fano interference between the conduction and f -electron channels, our results further reveal the effect of spatial interference between different spatial paths at the interface on the differential conductance and their interesting interplay with the band features such as the hybridization gap and the Van Hove singularity. We find that the spatial interference leads to a weighted average in the momentum space for the electron transport and could cause suppression of the electronic band features under certain circumstances. In particular, it reduces the capability of probing the f -electron spectral weight near the edges of the hybridization gap for large interface depending on the Fermi surface of the lead. Our results indicate an intrinsic inefficiency of the point contact spectroscopy in probing the f electrons.

  13. Warm Dense Matter: An Overview

    SciTech Connect

    Kalantar, D H; Lee, R W; Molitoris, J D

    2004-04-21

    This document provides a summary of the ''LLNL Workshop on Extreme States of Materials: Warm Dense Matter to NIF'' which was held on 20, 21, and 22 February 2002 at the Wente Conference Center in Livermore, CA. The warm dense matter regime, the transitional phase space region between cold material and hot plasma, is presently poorly understood. The drive to understand the nature of matter in this regime is sparking scientific activity worldwide. In addition to pure scientific interest, finite temperature dense matter occurs in the regimes of interest to the SSMP (Stockpile Stewardship Materials Program). So that obtaining a better understanding of WDM is important to performing effective experiments at, e.g., NIF, a primary mission of LLNL. At this workshop we examined current experimental and theoretical work performed at, and in conjunction with, LLNL to focus future activities and define our role in this rapidly emerging research area. On the experimental front LLNL plays a leading role in three of the five relevant areas and has the opportunity to become a major player in the other two. Discussion at the workshop indicated that the path forward for the experimental efforts at LLNL were two fold: First, we are doing reasonable baseline work at SPLs, HE, and High Energy Lasers with more effort encouraged. Second, we need to plan effectively for the next evolution in large scale facilities, both laser (NIF) and Light/Beam sources (LCLS/TESLA and GSI) Theoretically, LLNL has major research advantages in areas as diverse as the thermochemical approach to warm dense matter equations of state to first principles molecular dynamics simulations. However, it was clear that there is much work to be done theoretically to understand warm dense matter. Further, there is a need for a close collaboration between the generation of verifiable experimental data that can provide benchmarks of both the experimental techniques and the theoretical capabilities. The conclusion of this

  14. Heavy Duty and Industrial Alternative Fuel Applications. Forklift and Material Handling. Alternative Fuels Training.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eckert, Doug; Casto, Lori

    This training manual is designed to lay the foundation for trainers and technicians by showing the steps to achieve and maintain good indoor air quality through use of cleaner-burning forklifts and materials handlers. The first part of the manual consists of nine units that provide informational material and diagrams on these topics: comparison of…

  15. Realizing high figure of merit in heavy-band p-type half-Heusler thermoelectric materials.

    PubMed

    Fu, Chenguang; Bai, Shengqiang; Liu, Yintu; Tang, Yunshan; Chen, Lidong; Zhao, Xinbing; Zhu, Tiejun

    2015-01-01

    Solid-state thermoelectric technology offers a promising solution for converting waste heat to useful electrical power. Both high operating temperature and high figure of merit zT are desirable for high-efficiency thermoelectric power generation. Here we report a high zT of ∼1.5 at 1,200 K for the p-type FeNbSb heavy-band half-Heusler alloys. High content of heavier Hf dopant simultaneously optimizes the electrical power factor and suppresses thermal conductivity. Both the enhanced point-defect and electron-phonon scatterings contribute to a significant reduction in the lattice thermal conductivity. An eight couple prototype thermoelectric module exhibits a high conversion efficiency of 6.2% and a high power density of 2.2 W cm(-2) at a temperature difference of 655 K. These findings highlight the optimization strategy for heavy-band thermoelectric materials and demonstrate a realistic prospect of high-temperature thermoelectric modules based on half-Heusler alloys with low cost, excellent mechanical robustness and stability.

  16. Realizing high figure of merit in heavy-band p-type half-Heusler thermoelectric materials

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Chenguang; Bai, Shengqiang; Liu, Yintu; Tang, Yunshan; Chen, Lidong; Zhao, Xinbing; Zhu, Tiejun

    2015-01-01

    Solid-state thermoelectric technology offers a promising solution for converting waste heat to useful electrical power. Both high operating temperature and high figure of merit zT are desirable for high-efficiency thermoelectric power generation. Here we report a high zT of ∼1.5 at 1,200 K for the p-type FeNbSb heavy-band half-Heusler alloys. High content of heavier Hf dopant simultaneously optimizes the electrical power factor and suppresses thermal conductivity. Both the enhanced point-defect and electron–phonon scatterings contribute to a significant reduction in the lattice thermal conductivity. An eight couple prototype thermoelectric module exhibits a high conversion efficiency of 6.2% and a high power density of 2.2 W cm−2 at a temperature difference of 655 K. These findings highlight the optimization strategy for heavy-band thermoelectric materials and demonstrate a realistic prospect of high-temperature thermoelectric modules based on half-Heusler alloys with low cost, excellent mechanical robustness and stability. PMID:26330371

  17. Realizing high figure of merit in heavy-band p-type half-Heusler thermoelectric materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Chenguang; Bai, Shengqiang; Liu, Yintu; Tang, Yunshan; Chen, Lidong; Zhao, Xinbing; Zhu, Tiejun

    2015-09-01

    Solid-state thermoelectric technology offers a promising solution for converting waste heat to useful electrical power. Both high operating temperature and high figure of merit zT are desirable for high-efficiency thermoelectric power generation. Here we report a high zT of ~1.5 at 1,200 K for the p-type FeNbSb heavy-band half-Heusler alloys. High content of heavier Hf dopant simultaneously optimizes the electrical power factor and suppresses thermal conductivity. Both the enhanced point-defect and electron-phonon scatterings contribute to a significant reduction in the lattice thermal conductivity. An eight couple prototype thermoelectric module exhibits a high conversion efficiency of 6.2% and a high power density of 2.2 W cm-2 at a temperature difference of 655 K. These findings highlight the optimization strategy for heavy-band thermoelectric materials and demonstrate a realistic prospect of high-temperature thermoelectric modules based on half-Heusler alloys with low cost, excellent mechanical robustness and stability.

  18. Effect of Long-time Heating for Polyvinyl Chloride and Polypropylene Resin Pellet Certified Reference Materials for Heavy Metal Analysis.

    PubMed

    Ohata, Masaki

    2016-01-01

    The effect of long-time heating for both polyvinyl chloride (PVC) and polypropylene (PP) resin pellet certified reference materials (CRMs) for heavy metal analysis, which contained Cd, Cr, Hg and Pb, was examined in the present study. The temperature of the drying oven was 80°C, which was used for drying these CRMs before analysis, and the long-time heating was carried out for up to 480 h. As a result, a relative decrease in mass of ca. 0.3% was observed for both CRMs. Moreover, a decrease in concentration of ca. 10% was observed for Cr, even though the concentrations for other elements did not change during the long-time heating. Since the chemical form of Cr was an organometallic compound with lower melting point, it was considered that concentration decreased due to the heat. PMID:27682407

  19. Electrokinetic stabilization as a reclamation tool for waste materials polluted by both salts and heavy metals.

    PubMed

    Traina, G; Ferro, S; De Battisti, A

    2009-05-01

    A method for detoxifying industrial wastes is presented, aiming at a safer management and reuse. Focusing, in particular, on bottom ashes from a municipal solid waste incinerator, the proposed "ElectroKinetic Stabilization" (EKS) technique requires a relatively short treatment time and improves the remediation of ashes by combining a fast extraction of chlorides by electromigration, together with a stabilization of metals through their reaction with phosphate anions, which migrate through the ash under the influence of the electric field. Heavy metals react with the phosphate anions, leading to the precipitation of metal hydroxy-apatite or chloro-apatite (for Pb and Ba), or to their trapping in a calcium-apatite mineral, that formed during the process. Along with precipitation, metal immobilization is allowed by the decrease of ash pH to 9-11 by means of H(+) produced at the anode from the electrolysis of water. The migration of salts through the wet ashes is very fast and the treatment time could be decreased to 24h. After EKS, Ba, Pb and F(-) leaching was reduced by 97%, 92% and 92%, respectively, below the allowed limits. In contrast, the final leaching of Cu and chlorides was reduced by 90% and 80%, respectively, still above the allowed limits. PMID:19201011

  20. Heavy metals fractionation and organic matter mineralisation in contaminated calcareous soil amended with organic materials.

    PubMed

    Clemente, Rafael; Escolar, Angeles; Bernal, M Pilar

    2006-10-01

    Degradation of organic matter (OM) from organic amendments used in the remediation of metal contaminated soils leads to changes in soil chemical properties shortly after their addition, which may affect the soil metal distribution. The effects of two differing organic amendments on OM mineralisation and fractionation of heavy metals in a contaminated soil were investigated in an incubation experiment. The treatments were: control unamended soil, soil amended with fresh cow manure, and soil amended with a compost having a high maturity degree. The soil used was characteristic of the mining area at La Unión (Murcia, Spain) with 28% CaCO(3) and sandy-loam texture (pH 7.7; 2602 mg kg(-1)Zn; 1572 mg kg(-1)Pb). Manure and compost C-mineralisation after 56 days (24% and 3.8%, respectively) were below values reported previously for uncontaminated soils. Both amendments favoured Zn and Pb fixation, particularly the manure. Mn solubility increased at the beginning of the experiment due to a pH effect, and only Cu solubility increased through organic matter chelation in both amended soils.

  1. Evaluation of the leachability of heavy metals from cement-based materials.

    PubMed

    Dell'Orso, Marcello; Mangialardi, Teresa; Paolini, Antonio Evangelista; Piga, Luigi

    2012-08-15

    A new leaching test on comminuted (0.125-2.0mm gradation) cementitious matrices, designated as Modified-Pore Water (M-PW) test, was developed to evaluate the effect of varying leachate pH (4-12.8) and/or liquid-to-solid, L/S, ratio (0.6-50 dm(3)/kg) on the availability factor, F(AV), of heavy metals. The M-PW test was applied to leaching of lead and zinc ions from ground Portland cement mortar incorporating Municipal Solid Waste Incinerator (MSWI) fly ash. Correlation of M-PW test results (F(AV)-L/S data) allowed the determination of the pore-liquid availability factor, F(AVP), at different leachate pHs. These F(AVP) values were utilized, in conjunction with a kinetic pseudo-diffusional model, to evaluate the leaching behavior of monolithic mortar specimens subjected to dynamic leaching tests (constant leachant pH 4 or 6).A good agreement was found between the effective diffusion coefficients, D(e), of lead and zinc ions calculated by such a methodological approach and those obtained from recognized microstructural models. In contrast, no satisfactory agreement was found when these D(e) values were compared with the ones calculated from the results of other availability tests on granular solid samples (NEN 7341 and AAT tests).

  2. Heavy fermions, quantum criticality, and unconventional superconductivity in filled skutterudites and related materials

    SciTech Connect

    Andraka, Bohdan

    2015-05-14

    The main goal of this program was to explore the possibility of novel states and behaviors in Pr-based system exhibiting quantum critical behavior, PrOs₄Sb₁₂. Upon small changes of external parameter, such as magnetic field, physical properties of PrOs₄Sb₁₂ are drastically altered from those corresponding to a superconductor, to heavy fermion, to field-induced ordered phase with primary quadrupolar order parameter. All these states are highly unconventional and not understood in terms of current theories thus offer an opportunity to expand our knowledge and understanding of condensed matter. At the same time, these novel states and behaviors are subjects to intense international controversies. In particular, two superconducting phases with different transition temperatures were observed in some samples and not observed in others leading to speculations that sample defects might be partially responsible for these exotic behaviors. This work clearly established that crystal disorder is important consideration, but contrary to current consensus this disorder suppresses exotic behavior. Superconducting properties imply unconventional inhomogeneous state that emerges from unconventional homogeneous normal state. Comprehensive structural investigations demonstrated that upper superconducting transition is intrinsic, bulk, and unconventional. The high quality of in-house synthesized single crystals was indirectly confirmed by de Haas-van Alphen quantum oscillation measurements. These measurements, for the first time ever reported, spanned several different phases, offering unprecedented possibility of studying quantum oscillations across phase boundaries.

  3. Simple model for coupled magnetic and quadrupolar instabilities in uranium heavy-fermion materials

    SciTech Connect

    Libero, V.L. ); Cox, D.L. )

    1993-08-01

    We present a mean-field calculation of the phase diagram of a simple model of localized moments, in the hexagonal uranium heavy-fermion compounds. The model considers a non-Kramers quadrupolar doublet ground state magnetically coupled with a singlet excited state, favoring in-plane van Vleck magnetism, as has been conjectured for UPt[sub 3]. The Hamiltonian that defines the model is Heisenberg-like in both magnetic and quadrupolar moments. No Kondo-effect physics is included in the calculations. Among our main results are (i) for zero intersite quadrupolar coupling, the magnetic order is achieved by a first-order transition above a critical intersite magnetic coupling value, which becomes second order at higher coupling strengths (ii) for finite intersite quadrupolar coupling, at temperatures below a second-order quadrupolar ordering transition, the minimal magnetic coupling value is increased, but (a) the magnetic ordering temperature is enhanced above this value, and (b) the ordering of first- and second-order transitions in the phase diagram is reversed. By considering the general structure of the Ginsburg-Landau free energy, we argue that the Kondo effect will not modify the shape of the phase diagram, but will modify the quantitative values at which transitions occur.

  4. Heavy-Section Steel Irradiation Program on irradiation effects in light-water reactor pressure vessel materials

    SciTech Connect

    Nanstad, R.K.; Corwin, W.R.; Alexander, D.J.; Haggag, F.M.; Iskander, S.K.; McCabe, D.E.; Sokolov, M.A.; Stoller, R.E.

    1995-07-01

    The safety of commercial light-water nuclear plants is highly dependent on the structural integrity of the reactor pressure vessel (RPV). In the absence of radiation damage to the RPV, fracture of the vessel is difficult to postulate. Exposure to high energy neutrons can result in embrittlement of radiation-sensitive RPV materials. The Heavy-Section Steel Irradiation (HSSI) Program at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, sponsored by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (USNRC), is assessing the effects of neutron irradiation on RPV material behavior, especially fracture toughness. The results of these and other studies are used by the USNRC in the evaluation of RPV integrity and regulation of overall nuclear plant safety. In assessing the effects of irradiation, prototypic RPV materials are characterized in the unirradiated condition and exposed to radiation under varying conditions. Mechanical property tests are conducted to provide data which can be used in the development of guidelines for structural integrity evaluations, while metallurgical examinations and mechanistic modeling are performed to improve understanding of the mechanisms responsible for embrittlement. The results of these investigations, in conjunction with results from commercial reactor surveillance programs, are used to develop a methodology for the prediction of radiation effects on RPV materials. This irradiation-induced degradation of the materials can be mitigated by thermal annealing, i.e., heating the RPV to a temperature above that of normal operation. Thus, thermal annealing and evaluation of reirradiation behavior are major tasks of the HSSI Program. This paper describes the HSSI Program activities by summarizing some past and recent results, as well as current and planned studies. 30 refs., 8 figs., 1 tab.

  5. The Development of a Pin-on-Twin Scuffing Test to Evaluate Materials for Heavy Duty Diesel Fuel Injectors

    SciTech Connect

    Qu, Jun; Blau, Peter Julian; Truhan, John J.; Ott, Ronald D

    2007-01-01

    In order to meet stricter emissions requirements, advanced heavy-duty diesel fuel injection systems will be required to operate at higher pressures and temperatures and in fuels that have poorer lubricity. Scuffing, as a mode of failure, severely limits injector life, and new materials and processes are required to resist scuffing in these more stringent operating conditions. Consequently, there is a need to test the ability of candidate fuel system materials to resist scuffing in fuel-lubricated environments. This paper describes a pin-on-twin reciprocating wear test in which a cylindrical specimen slides, under load, across two fixed, parallel cylindrical specimens that are perpendicular to the axis of the upper sliding specimen. Cylinders of annealed AISI 52100 were tested dry and lubricated by Jet A fuel and on-highway no. 2 diesel fuel. The friction force was found to give a reliable real-time determination of the onset of scuffing as verified by the morphology of the wear scar. The scar width and surface roughness profiles either did not reliably detect the onset or were difficult to carry out with this geometry.

  6. Optical Spectroscopy of Strongly Correlated (MOTT-HUBBARD, Heavy-Fermion, Unconventional Superconductor) Materials Tuned Pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Goncharov, A; Struzhkin, V V

    2003-11-12

    During the past years, the Co-PI's have been responsible for the development and operation of optical techniques (Raman, IR, fluorescence, absorption and reflectance spectroscopy at ultrahigh pressures and high and low temperatures) which have proven to be extremely powerful for studying low-Z, molecular solids including hydrogen, ice, etc. (see results below). Meanwhile, it has become increasingly clear that optical spectroscopy has an equally extraordinary potential for studying metals and superconductors at ultrahigh pressures, thus the result will have a major impact on material research. However, because of the extreme difference in optical properties of opaque metals and transparent insulating molecular solids, successful accomplishment of the present project will require substantial effort in improving the present equipment and developing new techniques, and funds for this are requested here. Below we provide a short description of the work done and techniques developed during the last years. We also propose to explore new frontiers in compressed materials close to the insulator-metal boundaries, spin-crossover, and other quantum critical points.

  7. Comparison of the time behavior in the separation of light and heavy materials in X-ray backscattered method as a diagnostic tool in inspection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faezeh, Rahmani; Sepideh Sadat, Azimi; Esmaiel, Bayat; Vahid, Dost Mohammadi

    2016-03-01

    X-ray backscattered method based on Compton backscattering is used in the inspection field. In contrast to transmission method, source and detectors are positioned on one side of the target, so in the situation that transmission inspection is difficult, X-ray backscattered method can be provided suitable data in the inspection field. Also, detection of hidden explosives and narcotic materials are very difficult or impossible in transmission methods. High intensity backscattered beam from light materials (low-Z), such as explosives and narcotics, in comparison to the heavy materials (high-Z), made this method as the strong technique in inspection. X-ray and gamma photons scattered by the light material (such as PE and PTFE) as well as heavy material (such as Fe and Cu) were studied using MCNPX2.6 Monte Carlo code. The results showed that rise time of pulse from light materials are slower than that of from heavy materials due to multi scattering of low energy photons in the light ones, so time expansion would occur in signals from light elements. If measurement is possible, the difference in time behavior can be used as a novel method in complementary diagnostic tool beside the use of pulse height in X-ray backscattered method.

  8. Electrospun and oxidized cellulose materials for environmental remediation of heavy metals in groundwater

    SciTech Connect

    Han, Dong; Halada, Gary P.; Spalding, Brian Patrick; Brooks, Scott C

    2009-12-01

    This chapter focuses on the use of modified cellulosic materials in the field of environmental remediation. Two different chemical methods were involved in fabricating oxidized cellulose (OC), which has shown promise as a metal ion chelator in environmental applications. Electrospinning was utilized to introduce a more porous structure into an oxidized cellulose matrix. FTIR and Raman spectroscopy were used to study both the formation of OC and its surface complexation with metal ions. IR and Raman spectroscopic data demonstrate the formation of characteristic carboxylic groups in the structure of the final products and the successful formation of OC-metal complexes. Subsequent field tests at the Field Research Site at Oak Ridge National Laboratory confirmed the value of OC for sorption of both U and Th ions.

  9. Uniformly dense polymeric foam body

    DOEpatents

    Whinnery, Jr., Leroy

    2003-07-15

    A method for providing a uniformly dense polymer foam body having a density between about 0.013 g/cm.sup.3 to about 0.5 g/cm.sup.3 is disclosed. The method utilizes a thermally expandable polymer microsphere material wherein some of the microspheres are unexpanded and some are only partially expanded. It is shown that by mixing the two types of materials in appropriate ratios to achieve the desired bulk final density, filling a mold with this mixture so as to displace all or essentially all of the internal volume of the mold, heating the mold for a predetermined interval at a temperature above about 130.degree. C., and then cooling the mold to a temperature below 80.degree. C. the molded part achieves a bulk density which varies by less then about .+-.6% everywhere throughout the part volume.

  10. METHOD OF PRODUCING DENSE CONSOLIDATED METALLIC REGULUS

    DOEpatents

    Magel, T.T.

    1959-08-11

    A methcd is presented for reducing dense metal compositions while simultaneously separating impurities from the reduced dense metal and casting the reduced parified dense metal, such as uranium, into well consolidated metal ingots. The reduction is accomplished by heating the dense metallic salt in the presence of a reducing agent, such as an alkali metal or alkaline earth metal in a bomb type reacting chamber, while applying centrifugal force on the reacting materials. Separation of the metal from the impurities is accomplished essentially by the incorporation of a constricted passageway at the vertex of a conical reacting chamber which is in direct communication with a collecting chamber. When a centrifugal force is applled to the molten metal and slag from the reduction in a direction collinear with the axis of the constricted passage, the dense molten metal is forced therethrough while the less dense slag is retained within the reaction chamber, resulting in a simultaneous separation of the reduced molten metal from the slag and a compacting of the reduced metal in a homogeneous mass.

  11. Changes in speciation and leaching behaviors of heavy metals in dredged sediment solidified/stabilized with various materials.

    PubMed

    Bao, Jianping; Wang, Liang; Xiao, Man

    2016-05-01

    Solidification/stabilization (S/S) of sediments is frequently used to treat contaminants in dredged sediments. In this study, sediment collected from the Pearl River Delta (China) was solidified/stabilized with three different kinds of functional materials: cement, lime and bentonite. Lime primarily acted via induced increases in pH, while cements stabilization occurred through their silicate-based systems and the main function of bentonite was adsorption. The speciation and leaching behaviors of specific heavy metals before and after S/S were analyzed and the results showed that the residual speciation of Cd, Cr, Ni, Pb and Zn increased in all treatments except for Cu, as the exchangeable speciation, carbonate-bound speciation and Fe-Mn-oxide-bound speciation of Cu (all of which could be stabilized) were less than 2 % of the total amount. Pb leaching only decreased when pH increased, while the mobility of Cr and Ni only decreased in response to the silicate-based systems. The leached portion of the Fe-Mn-oxide-bound speciation followed the order Zn > Cu > Ni/Cd > Pb > Cr. The leached portion of organic-matter-bound species was less than 4 % for Cd, Cr, Ni and Pb, but 35.1 % and 20.6 % for Cu and Zn, respectively.

  12. In-situ high temperature irradiation setup for temperature dependent structural studies of materials under swift heavy ion irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kulriya, P. K.; Kumari, Renu; Kumar, Rajesh; Grover, V.; Shukla, R.; Tyagi, A. K.; Avasthi, D. K.

    2015-01-01

    An in-situ high temperature (1000 K) setup is designed and installed in the materials science beam line of superconducting linear accelerator at the Inter-University Accelerator Centre (IUAC) for temperature dependent ion irradiation studies on the materials exposed with swift heavy ion (SHI) irradiation. The Gd2Ti2O7 pyrochlore is irradiated using 120 MeV Au ion at 1000 K using the high temperature irradiation facility and characterized by ex-situ X-ray diffraction (XRD). Another set of Gd2Ti2O7 samples are irradiated with the same ion beam parameter at 300 K and simultaneously characterized using in-situ XRD available in same beam line. The XRD studies along with the Raman spectroscopic investigations reveal that the structural modification induced by the ion irradiation is strongly dependent on the temperature of the sample. The Gd2Ti2O7 is readily amorphized at an ion fluence 6 × 1012 ions/cm2 on irradiation at 300 K, whereas it is transformed to a radiation-resistant anion-deficient fluorite structure on high temperature irradiation, that amorphized at ion fluence higher than 1 × 1013 ions/cm2. The temperature dependent ion irradiation studies showed that the ion fluence required to cause amorphization at 1000 K irradiation is significantly higher than that required at room temperature irradiation. In addition to testing the efficiency of the in-situ high temperature irradiation facility, the present study establishes that the radiation stability of the pyrochlore is enhanced at higher temperatures.

  13. Dense high temperature ceramic oxide superconductors

    DOEpatents

    Landingham, Richard L.

    1993-01-01

    Dense superconducting ceramic oxide articles of manufacture and methods for producing these articles are described. Generally these articles are produced by first processing these superconducting oxides by ceramic processing techniques to optimize materials properties, followed by reestablishing the superconducting state in a desired portion of the ceramic oxide composite.

  14. Dense high temperature ceramic oxide superconductors

    DOEpatents

    Landingham, R.L.

    1993-10-12

    Dense superconducting ceramic oxide articles of manufacture and methods for producing these articles are described. Generally these articles are produced by first processing these superconducting oxides by ceramic processing techniques to optimize materials properties, followed by reestablishing the superconducting state in a desired portion of the ceramic oxide composite.

  15. Br-rich tips of calcified crab claws are less hard but more fracture resistant: a comparison of mineralized and heavy-element biological materials.

    PubMed

    Schofield, Robert M S; Niedbala, Jack C; Nesson, Michael H; Tao, Ye; Shokes, Jacob E; Scott, Robert A; Latimer, Matthew J

    2009-06-01

    We find that the spoon-like tips of the chelipeds (large claws) of the crab Pachygrapsus crassipes differ from the rest of the claw in that they are not calcified, but instead contain about 1% bromine--thus they represent a new example of a class of structural biological materials that contain heavy elements such as Zn, Mn, Fe, Cu, and Br bound in an organic matrix. X-ray absorption spectroscopy data suggest that the bromine is bound to phenyl rings, possibly in tyrosine. We measure a broad array of mechanical properties of a heavy-element biological material for the first time (abrasion resistance, coefficient of kinetic friction, energy of fracture, hardness, modulus of elasticity and dynamic mechanical properties), and we make a direct comparison with a mineralized tissue. Our results suggest that the greatest advantage of bromine-rich cuticle over calcified cuticle is resistance to fracture (the energy of fracture is about an order of magnitude greater than for calcified cuticle). The greatest advantage relative to unenriched cuticle, represented by ant mandible cuticle, is a factor of about 1.5 greater hardness and modulus of elasticity.The spoon-like tips gain additional fracture resistance from the orientation of the constituent laminae and from the viscoelasticity of the material. We suggest that fracture resistance is of greater importance in smaller organisms, and we speculate that one function of heavy elements in structural biological materials is to reduce molecular resonant frequencies and thereby increase absorption of energy from impacts.

  16. Heavy metal speciation in solid-phase materials from a bacterial sulfate reducing bioreactor using sequential extraction procedure combined with acid volatile sulfide analysis.

    PubMed

    Jong, Tony; Parry, David L

    2004-04-01

    Heavy metal mobility, bioavailability and toxicity depends largely on the chemical form of metals and ultimately determines potential for environmental pollution. For this reason, determining the chemical form of heavy metals and metalloids, immobilized in sludges by biological mediated sulfate reduction, is important to evaluate their mobility and bioavailability. A modified Tessier sequential extraction procedure (SEP), complemented with acid volatile sulfide (AVS) and simultaneous extracted metals (SEM) measurements, were applied to determine the partitioning of five heavy metals (defined as Fe, Ni, Zn and Cu, and the metalloid As) in anoxic solid-phase material (ASM) from an anaerobic, sulfate reducing bioreactor into six operationally defined fractions. These fractions were water soluble, exchangeable, bound to carbonates (acid soluble), bound to Fe-Mn oxides (reducible), bound to organic matter and sulfides (oxidizable) and residual. It was found that the distribution of Fe, Ni, Zn, Cu and As in ASM was strongly influenced by its association with the above solid fractions. The fraction corresponding to organic matter and sulfides appeared to be the most important scavenging phases of As, Fe, Ni, Zn and Cu in ASM (59.8-86.7%). This result was supported by AVS and SEM (Sigma Zn, Ni and Cu) measurements, which indicated that the heavy metals existed overwhelmingly as sulfides in the organic matter and sulfide fraction. A substantial amount of Fe and Ni at 16.4 and 20.1%, respectively, were also present in the carbonate fraction, while an appreciable portion of As (18.3%) and Zn (19.4%) was bound to Fe-Mn oxides. A significant amount of heavy metals was also associated with the residual fraction, ranging from 2.1% for Zn to 18.8% for As. Based on the average total extractable heavy metal (TEHM) values, the concentration of heavy metals in the ASM was in the order of Cu > Ni > Zn > Fe > As. If the mobility and bioavailability of heavy metals are assumed to be

  17. Geophagic clay materials from Nigeria: a potential source of heavy metals and human health implications in mostly women and children who practice it.

    PubMed

    Lar, U A; Agene, J I; Umar, A I

    2015-04-01

    Geophagy is a common practice among certain cultural groups especially women in some rural communities in Nigeria. The safety of eating such clays in terms of their heavy metal composition has not been ascertained, neither is the link between them and disease conditions established in geophagists. The analysis of field survey data reveals that the majority (about 90 %) of the women did not go beyond secondary school education. The geology of an area has a direct influence on the chemical composition of the soils. Therefore, this research was carried out to determine the mineralogical and the heavy metal content of some geophagic clay materials from Nigeria. All the geophagic clay materials are hydrated silicates of either Al, (Na and Ca), (Al and Mg), or/and (Mg and Fe). The concentration levels of Na, Al, Ca, Fe, Mg, Cu, and Zn are tolerable and apparently could serve as a veritable source of mineral nutrients deficient in the human body. An assessment of the level of contamination of heavy metals on the basis of the index of geo-accumulation (I(geo)) shows that Cr, Cu, Zn, Co, and Ni (all with I(geo) < 1) did not contaminate the clay materials. On the contrary, they are extremely contaminated by As, Cd and Se (I(geo) = >5), and are moderately to strongly contaminated by Pb and Sb (I (geo) = 2-3). In terms of health risk assessment, the presence of heavy metals such as As, Cd, Pb, Se, and Sb with a health risk index (HRI) >1, renders the geophagic clays unsafe for human consumption. Similarly, Al, Fe, and Na are in excess in the clay (HRI ⋙ 1) posing serious human health risks. Thus, the ingestion of geophagic clay materials by pregnant women and children when it contains heavy metals like Pb, As, Cd, Se, and Sb poses the risk of some medical disorders and should therefore be considered a public health problem. Since geophagic practice will persist despite civilization, we advocate finding ways of reducing heavy metal pollutants in geophagic clays through

  18. Geophagic clay materials from Nigeria: a potential source of heavy metals and human health implications in mostly women and children who practice it.

    PubMed

    Lar, U A; Agene, J I; Umar, A I

    2015-04-01

    Geophagy is a common practice among certain cultural groups especially women in some rural communities in Nigeria. The safety of eating such clays in terms of their heavy metal composition has not been ascertained, neither is the link between them and disease conditions established in geophagists. The analysis of field survey data reveals that the majority (about 90 %) of the women did not go beyond secondary school education. The geology of an area has a direct influence on the chemical composition of the soils. Therefore, this research was carried out to determine the mineralogical and the heavy metal content of some geophagic clay materials from Nigeria. All the geophagic clay materials are hydrated silicates of either Al, (Na and Ca), (Al and Mg), or/and (Mg and Fe). The concentration levels of Na, Al, Ca, Fe, Mg, Cu, and Zn are tolerable and apparently could serve as a veritable source of mineral nutrients deficient in the human body. An assessment of the level of contamination of heavy metals on the basis of the index of geo-accumulation (I(geo)) shows that Cr, Cu, Zn, Co, and Ni (all with I(geo) < 1) did not contaminate the clay materials. On the contrary, they are extremely contaminated by As, Cd and Se (I(geo) = >5), and are moderately to strongly contaminated by Pb and Sb (I (geo) = 2-3). In terms of health risk assessment, the presence of heavy metals such as As, Cd, Pb, Se, and Sb with a health risk index (HRI) >1, renders the geophagic clays unsafe for human consumption. Similarly, Al, Fe, and Na are in excess in the clay (HRI ⋙ 1) posing serious human health risks. Thus, the ingestion of geophagic clay materials by pregnant women and children when it contains heavy metals like Pb, As, Cd, Se, and Sb poses the risk of some medical disorders and should therefore be considered a public health problem. Since geophagic practice will persist despite civilization, we advocate finding ways of reducing heavy metal pollutants in geophagic clays through

  19. Dense Axion Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohapatra, Abhishek; Braaten, Eric; Zhang, Hong

    2016-03-01

    If the dark matter consists of axions, gravity can cause them to coalesce into axion stars, which are stable gravitationally bound Bose-Einstein condensates of axions. In the previously known axion stars, gravity and the attractive force between pairs of axions are balanced by the kinetic pressure. If the axion mass energy is mc2 =10-4 eV, these dilute axion stars have a maximum mass of about 10-14M⊙ . We point out that there are also dense axion stars in which gravity is balanced by the mean-field pressure of the axion condensate. We study axion stars using the leading term in a systematically improvable approximation to the effective potential of the nonrelativistic effective field theory for axions. Using the Thomas-Fermi approximation in which the kinetic pressure is neglected, we find a sequence of new branches of axion stars in which gravity is balanced by the mean-field interaction energy of the axion condensate. If mc2 =10-4 4 eV, the first branch of these dense axion stars has mass ranging from about 10-11M⊙ toabout M⊙.

  20. Warm dense crystallography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valenza, Ryan A.; Seidler, Gerald T.

    2016-03-01

    The intense femtosecond-scale pulses from x-ray free electron lasers (XFELs) are able to create and interrogate interesting states of matter characterized by long-lived nonequilibrium semicore or core electron occupancies or by the heating of dense phases via the relaxation cascade initiated by the photoelectric effect. We address here the latter case of "warm dense matter" (WDM) and investigate the observable consequences of x-ray heating of the electronic degrees of freedom in crystalline systems. We report temperature-dependent density functional theory calculations for the x-ray diffraction from crystalline LiF, graphite, diamond, and Be. We find testable, strong signatures of condensed-phase effects that emphasize the importance of wide-angle scattering to study nonequilibrium states. These results also suggest that the reorganization of the valence electron density at eV-scale temperatures presents a confounding factor to achieving atomic resolution in macromolecular serial femtosecond crystallography (SFX) studies at XFELs, as performed under the "diffract before destroy" paradigm.

  1. DENSE MEDIUM CYCLONE OPTIMIZATON

    SciTech Connect

    Gerald H. Luttrell; Chris J. Barbee; Peter J. Bethell; Chris J. Wood

    2005-06-30

    Dense medium cyclones (DMCs) are known to be efficient, high-tonnage devices suitable for upgrading particles in the 50 to 0.5 mm size range. This versatile separator, which uses centrifugal forces to enhance the separation of fine particles that cannot be upgraded in static dense medium separators, can be found in most modern coal plants and in a variety of mineral plants treating iron ore, dolomite, diamonds, potash and lead-zinc ores. Due to the high tonnage, a small increase in DMC efficiency can have a large impact on plant profitability. Unfortunately, the knowledge base required to properly design and operate DMCs has been seriously eroded during the past several decades. In an attempt to correct this problem, a set of engineering tools have been developed to allow producers to improve the efficiency of their DMC circuits. These tools include (1) low-cost density tracers that can be used by plant operators to rapidly assess DMC performance, (2) mathematical process models that can be used to predict the influence of changes in operating and design variables on DMC performance, and (3) an expert advisor system that provides plant operators with a user-friendly interface for evaluating, optimizing and trouble-shooting DMC circuits. The field data required to develop these tools was collected by conducting detailed sampling and evaluation programs at several industrial plant sites. These data were used to demonstrate the technical, economic and environmental benefits that can be realized through the application of these engineering tools.

  2. Dense neutron star matter

    SciTech Connect

    Stone, J. R.

    2014-05-02

    The microscopic composition and properties of matter at super-saturation densities have been a subject of intense investigation for decades. The scarcity of experimental and observational data has lead to the necessary reliance on theoretical models. However, there remains great uncertainty in these models, which, of necessity, have to go beyond the over-simple assumption that high-density matter consists only of nucleons and leptons. Heavy strange baryons, mesons and quark matter in different forms and phases have to be included to fulfill basic requirements of fundamental laws of physics.

  3. Br-rich tips of calcified crab claws are less hard but more fracture resistant: a comparison of mineralized and heavy-element biological materials.

    PubMed

    Schofield, Robert M S; Niedbala, Jack C; Nesson, Michael H; Tao, Ye; Shokes, Jacob E; Scott, Robert A; Latimer, Matthew J

    2009-06-01

    We find that the spoon-like tips of the chelipeds (large claws) of the crab Pachygrapsus crassipes differ from the rest of the claw in that they are not calcified, but instead contain about 1% bromine--thus they represent a new example of a class of structural biological materials that contain heavy elements such as Zn, Mn, Fe, Cu, and Br bound in an organic matrix. X-ray absorption spectroscopy data suggest that the bromine is bound to phenyl rings, possibly in tyrosine. We measure a broad array of mechanical properties of a heavy-element biological material for the first time (abrasion resistance, coefficient of kinetic friction, energy of fracture, hardness, modulus of elasticity and dynamic mechanical properties), and we make a direct comparison with a mineralized tissue. Our results suggest that the greatest advantage of bromine-rich cuticle over calcified cuticle is resistance to fracture (the energy of fracture is about an order of magnitude greater than for calcified cuticle). The greatest advantage relative to unenriched cuticle, represented by ant mandible cuticle, is a factor of about 1.5 greater hardness and modulus of elasticity.The spoon-like tips gain additional fracture resistance from the orientation of the constituent laminae and from the viscoelasticity of the material. We suggest that fracture resistance is of greater importance in smaller organisms, and we speculate that one function of heavy elements in structural biological materials is to reduce molecular resonant frequencies and thereby increase absorption of energy from impacts. PMID:19422071

  4. Dense Hypervelocity Plasma Jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Case, Andrew; Witherspoon, F. Douglas; Messer, Sarah; Bomgardner, Richard; Phillips, Michael; van Doren, David; Elton, Raymond; Uzun-Kaymak, Ilker

    2007-11-01

    We are developing high velocity dense plasma jets for fusion and HEDP applications. Traditional coaxial plasma accelerators suffer from the blow-by instability which limits the mass accelerated to high velocity. In the current design blow-by is delayed by a combination of electrode shaping and use of a tailored plasma armature created by injection of a high density plasma at a few eV generated by arrays of capillary discharges or sparkgaps. Experimental data will be presented for a complete 32 injector gun system built for driving rotation in the Maryland MCX experiment, including data on penetration of the plasma jet through a magnetic field. We present spectroscopic measurements of plasma velocity, temperature, and density, as well as total momentum measured using a ballistic pendulum. Measurements are in agreement with each other and with time of flight data from photodiodes and a multichannel PMT. Plasma density is above 10^15 cm-3, velocities range up to about 100 km/s. Preliminary results from a quadrature heterodyne HeNe interferometer are consistent with these results.

  5. Ariel's Densely Pitted Surface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1986-01-01

    This mosaic of the four highest-resolution images of Ariel represents the most detailed Voyager 2 picture of this satellite of Uranus. The images were taken through the clear filter of Voyager's narrow-angle camera on Jan. 24, 1986, at a distance of about 130,000 kilometers (80,000 miles). Ariel is about 1,200 km (750 mi) in diameter; the resolution here is 2.4 km (1.5 mi). Much of Ariel's surface is densely pitted with craters 5 to 10 km (3 to 6 mi) across. These craters are close to the threshold of detection in this picture. Numerous valleys and fault scarps crisscross the highly pitted terrain. Voyager scientists believe the valleys have formed over down-dropped fault blocks (graben); apparently, extensive faulting has occurred as a result of expansion and stretching of Ariel's crust. The largest fault valleys, near the terminator at right, as well as a smooth region near the center of this image, have been partly filled with deposits that are younger and less heavily cratered than the pitted terrain. Narrow, somewhat sinuous scarps and valleys have been formed, in turn, in these young deposits. It is not yet clear whether these sinuous features have been formed by faulting or by the flow of fluids.

    JPL manages the Voyager project for NASA's Office of Space Science.

  6. Structures for dense, crack free thin films

    DOEpatents

    Jacobson, Craig P.; Visco, Steven J.; De Jonghe, Lutgard C.

    2011-03-08

    The process described herein provides a simple and cost effective method for making crack free, high density thin ceramic film. The steps involve depositing a layer of a ceramic material on a porous or dense substrate. The deposited layer is compacted and then the resultant laminate is sintered to achieve a higher density than would have been possible without the pre-firing compaction step.

  7. Shear dispersion in dense granular flows

    SciTech Connect

    Christov, Ivan C.; Stone, Howard A.

    2014-04-18

    We formulate and solve a model problem of dispersion of dense granular materials in rapid shear flow down an incline. The effective dispersivity of the depth-averaged concentration of the dispersing powder is shown to vary as the Péclet number squared, as in classical Taylor–Aris dispersion of molecular solutes. An extension to generic shear profiles is presented, and possible applications to industrial and geological granular flows are noted.

  8. Dense deposit disease is not a membranoproliferative glomerulonephritis.

    PubMed

    Walker, Patrick D; Ferrario, Franco; Joh, Kensuke; Bonsib, Stephen M

    2007-06-01

    Dense deposit disease (first reported in 1962) was classified as subtype II of membranoproliferative glomerulonephritis in the early 1970s. Over the last 30 years, marked differences in etiology and pathogenesis between type I membranoproliferative glomerulonephritis and dense deposit disease have become apparent. The sporadic observation that dense deposit disease can be seen with markedly different light microscopy appearances prompted this study. The goal was to examine a large number of renal biopsies from around the world to characterize the histopathologic features of dense deposit disease. Eighty-one cases of dense deposit disease were received from centers across North America, Europe and Japan. Biopsy reports, light microscopy materials and electron photomicrographs were reviewed and histopathologic features scored. Sixty-nine cases were acceptable for review. Five patterns were seen: (1) membranoproliferative n=17; (2) mesangial proliferative n=30; (3) crescentic n=12; (4) acute proliferative and exudative n=8 and (5) unclassified n=2. The age range was 3-67 years, with 74% in the range of 3-20 years; 15% 21-30 years and 11% over 30 years. Males accounted for 54% and females 46%. All patients with either crescentic dense deposit disease or acute proliferative dense deposit disease were between the ages of 3 and 18 years. The essential diagnostic feature of dense deposit disease is not the membranoproliferative pattern but the presence of electron dense transformation of the glomerular basement membranes. Based upon this study and the extensive data developed over the past 30 years, dense deposit disease is clinically distinct from membranoproliferative glomerulonephritis and is morphologically heterogeneous with only a minority of cases having a membranoproliferative pattern. Therefore, dense deposit disease should no longer be regarded as a subtype of membranoproliferative glomerulonephritis. PMID:17396142

  9. Kaon condensation in dense stellar matter

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Chang-Hwan; Rho, M. |

    1995-03-01

    This article combines two talks given by the authors and is based on Works done in collaboration with G.E. Brown and D.P. Min on kaon condensation in dense baryonic medium treated in chiral perturbation theory using heavy-baryon formalism. It contains, in addition to what was recently published, astrophysical backgrounds for kaon condensation discussed by Brown and Bethe, a discussion on a renormalization-group analysis to meson condensation worked out together with H.K. Lee and S.J. Sin, and the recent results of K.M. Westerberg in the bound-state approach to the Skyrme model. Negatively charged kaons are predicted to condense at a critical density 2 {approx_lt} {rho}/{rho}o {approx_lt} 4, in the range to allow the intriguing new phenomena predicted by Brown and Bethe to take place in compact star matter.

  10. Assessment of radioactive materials and heavy metals in the surface soil around uranium mining area of Tongliao, China.

    PubMed

    Haribala; Hu, Bitao; Wang, Chengguo; Gerilemandahu; Xu, Xiao; Zhang, Shuai; Bao, Shanhu; Li, Yuhong

    2016-08-01

    Natural and artificial radionuclides and heavy metals in the surface soil of the uranium mining area of Tongliao, China, were measured using gamma spectrometry, flame atomic absorption spectrophotometry, graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrophotometry and microwave dissolution atomic fluorescence spectrometry respectively. The estimated average activity concentrations of (238)U, (232)Th, (226)Ra, (40)K and (137)Cs are 27.53±16.01, 15.89±5.20, 12.64±4.27, 746.84±38.24 and 4.23±4.76Bq/kg respectively. The estimated average absorbed dose rate in the air and annual effective dose rate are 46.58±5.26nGy/h and 57.13±6.45μSv, respectively. The radium equivalent activity, external and internal hazard indices were also calculated and their mean values are within the acceptable limits. The heavy metal concentrations of Pb, Cd, Cu, Zn, Hg and As from the surface soil were measured and their health risks were then determined. Although the content of Cd is much higher than the average background in China, its non-cancer and cancer risk indices are all within the acceptable ranges. These calculated hazard indices to estimate the potential radiological health risk in soil and the dose rate are well below their permissible limit. In addition the correlations between the radioactivity concentrations of the radionuclides and the heavy metals in soil were determined by the Pearson linear coefficient.

  11. Assessment of radioactive materials and heavy metals in the surface soil around uranium mining area of Tongliao, China.

    PubMed

    Haribala; Hu, Bitao; Wang, Chengguo; Gerilemandahu; Xu, Xiao; Zhang, Shuai; Bao, Shanhu; Li, Yuhong

    2016-08-01

    Natural and artificial radionuclides and heavy metals in the surface soil of the uranium mining area of Tongliao, China, were measured using gamma spectrometry, flame atomic absorption spectrophotometry, graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrophotometry and microwave dissolution atomic fluorescence spectrometry respectively. The estimated average activity concentrations of (238)U, (232)Th, (226)Ra, (40)K and (137)Cs are 27.53±16.01, 15.89±5.20, 12.64±4.27, 746.84±38.24 and 4.23±4.76Bq/kg respectively. The estimated average absorbed dose rate in the air and annual effective dose rate are 46.58±5.26nGy/h and 57.13±6.45μSv, respectively. The radium equivalent activity, external and internal hazard indices were also calculated and their mean values are within the acceptable limits. The heavy metal concentrations of Pb, Cd, Cu, Zn, Hg and As from the surface soil were measured and their health risks were then determined. Although the content of Cd is much higher than the average background in China, its non-cancer and cancer risk indices are all within the acceptable ranges. These calculated hazard indices to estimate the potential radiological health risk in soil and the dose rate are well below their permissible limit. In addition the correlations between the radioactivity concentrations of the radionuclides and the heavy metals in soil were determined by the Pearson linear coefficient. PMID:27107776

  12. In situ synthesis and properties of reduced graphene oxide/Bi nanocomposites: as an electroactive material for analysis of heavy metals.

    PubMed

    Sahoo, P K; Panigrahy, Bharati; Sahoo, S; Satpati, A K; Li, Dan; Bahadur, D

    2013-05-15

    An in situ modified Hummers method (without the use of any surfactants) has been used for the deposition of bismuth (Bi) nanoparticles onto the surface of reduced graphene oxide (RGO) sheets. The as-synthesized nanocomposites were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, Raman spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy (TEM), thermogravimetry (TG) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). The morphology of the RGO/Bi nanocomposites provides a better choice as an electrode material for detection of heavy metal ions due to its better functional properties over the Bi film electrode. Trace analysis of heavy metal ions like Cd(+2), Pb(+2), Cu(+2) and Zn(+2) in water is carried out by stripping voltammetric analysis using RGO/Bi nanocomposite as an electrode material. The sensitivity and detection limit of the electrode were quantitatively estimated from the analysis. The three sigma detection limits at different deposition potential for Cd(2+), Pb(2+), Zn(2+) and Cu(2+) were obtained as 2.8, 0.55, 17 and 26μgL(-1), respectively. Copper detection using Bi-film electrode was a major challenge, which has been resolved using the RGO/Bi nanocomposite electrode.

  13. Impacts by Compact Ultra Dense Objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Birrell, Jeremey; Labun, Lance; Rafelski, Johann

    2012-03-01

    We propose to search for nuclear density or greater compact ultra dense objects (CUDOs), which could constitute a significant fraction of the dark matter [1]. Considering their high density, the gravitational tidal forces are significant and atomic-density matter cannot stop an impacting CUDO, which punctures the surface of the target body, pulverizing, heating and entraining material near its trajectory through the target [2]. Because impact features endure over geologic timescales, the Earth, Moon, Mars, Mercury and large asteroids are well-suited to act as time-integrating CUDO detectors. There are several potential candidates for CUDO structure such as strangelet fragments or more generally dark matter if mechanisms exist for it to form compact objects. [4pt] [1] B. J. Carr, K. Kohri, Y. Sendouda, & J.'i. Yokoyama, Phys. Rev. D81, 104019 (2010). [0pt] [2] L. Labun, J. Birrell, J. Rafelski, Solar System Signatures of Impacts by Compact Ultra Dense Objects, arXiv:1104.4572.

  14. Collaborative Research: Neutrinos & Nucleosynthesis in Hot Dense Matter

    SciTech Connect

    Reddy, Sanjay

    2013-09-06

    It is now firmly established that neutrinos, which are copiously produced in the hot and dense core of the supernova, play a role in the supernova explosion mechanism and in the synthesis of heavy elements through a phenomena known as r-process nucleosynthesis. They are also detectable in terrestrial neutrino experiments, and serve as a probe of the extreme environment and complex dynamics encountered in the supernova. The major goal of the UW research activity relevant to this project was to calculate the neutrino interaction rates in hot and dense matter of relevance to core collapse supernova. These serve as key input physics in large scale computer simulations of the supernova dynamics and nucleosynthesis being pursued at national laboratories here in the United States and by other groups in Europe and Japan. Our calculations show that neutrino production and scattering rate are altered by the nuclear interactions and that these modifications have important implications for nucleosynthesis and terrestrial neutrino detection. The calculation of neutrino rates in dense matter are difficult because nucleons in the dense matter are strongly coupled. A neutrino interacts with several nucleons and the quantum interference between scattering off different nucleons depends on the nature of correlations between them in dense matter. To describe these correlations we used analytic methods based on mean field theory and hydrodynamics, and computational methods such as Quantum Monte Carlo. We found that due to nuclear effects neutrino production rates at relevant temperatures are enhanced, and that electron neutrinos are more easily absorbed than anti-electron neutrinos in dense matter. The latter, was shown to favor synthesis of heavy neutron-rich elements in the supernova.

  15. Assessment of heavy metal pollution in surface soils and plant material in the post-industrial city of Katowice, Poland.

    PubMed

    Steindor, Karolina A; Franiel, Izabella J; Bierza, Wojciech M; Pawlak, Beata; Palowski, Bernard F

    2016-01-01

    This investigation was undertaken to assess the level of environment pollution by biological monitoring. The leaves and bark of popular ornamental trees Acer pseudoplatanus L. and Acer platanoides L. and soil from the sampling sites were used to perform heavy metals pollution monitoring in urban areas with different pollution sources, as well to investigate the suitability of the leaves and bark as bioindicators of Pb, Zn, Cd and Cu pollution. Plant samples were collected at nine locations classified into three pollution groups based on metal content in the soils. The chosen pollution indices were used to assess the level of contamination according to background values. Soils in the Katowice area are found to be relatively heavily contaminated with Pb, Zn and Cd. Both of the maple tree species did not statistically differ in terms of the investigated elements' concentration in leaves or bark. Only bark samples reflected the pollution level, showing differences between the sampling points, and therefore are recommended for biomonitoring purposes.

  16. Changes in dissolved organic material determine exposure of stream benthic communities to UV-B radiation and heavy metals: Implications for climate change

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Clements, W.H.; Brooks, M.L.; Kashian, D.R.; Zuellig, R.E.

    2008-01-01

    Changes in regional climate in the Rocky Mountains over the next 100 years are expected to have significant effects on biogeochemical cycles and hydrological processes. In particular, decreased discharge and lower stream depth during summer when ultraviolet radiation (UVR) is the highest combined with greater photo-oxidation of dissolved organic materials (DOM) will significantly increase exposure of benthic communities to UVR. Communities in many Rocky Mountain streams are simultaneously exposed to elevated metals from abandoned mines, the toxicity and bioavailability of which are also determined by DOM. We integrated field surveys of 19 streams (21 sites) along a gradient of metal contamination with microcosm and field experiments conducted in Colorado, USA, and New Zealand to investigate the influence of DOM on bioavailability of heavy metals and exposure of benthic communities to UVR. Spatial and seasonal variation in DOM were closely related to stream discharge and significantly influenced heavy metal uptake in benthic organisms. Qualitative and quantitative changes in DOM resulting from exposure to sunlight increased UV-B (290-320nm) penetration and toxicity of heavy metals. Results of microcosm experiments showed that benthic communities from a metal-polluted stream were tolerant of metals, but were more sensitive to UV-B than communities from a reference stream. We speculate that the greater sensitivity of these communities to UV-B resulted from costs associated with metal tolerance. Exclusion of UVR from 12 separate Colorado streams and from outdoor stream microcosms in New Zealand increased the abundance of benthic organisms (mayflies, stoneflies, and caddisflies) by 18% and 54%, respectively. Our findings demonstrate the importance of considering changes in regional climate and UV-B exposure when assessing the effects of local anthropogenic stressors. ?? Journal compilation ?? 2008 Blackwell Publishing.

  17. Materials management in an internationally safeguarded fuels reprocessing plant. [1500 and 210 metric tons heavy metal per year

    SciTech Connect

    Hakkila, E.A.; Cobb, D.D.; Dayem, H.A.; Dietz, R.J.; Kern, E.A.; Markin, J.T.; Shipley, J.P.; Barnes, J.W.; Scheinman, L.

    1980-04-01

    The second volume describes the requirements and functions of materials measurement and accounting systems (MMAS) and conceptual designs for an MMAS incorporating both conventional and near-real-time (dynamic) measurement and accounting techniques. Effectiveness evaluations, based on recently developed modeling, simulation, and analysis procedures, show that conventional accountability can meet IAEA goal quantities and detection times in these reference facilities only for low-enriched uranium. Dynamic materials accounting may meet IAEA goals for detecting the abrupt (1-3 weeks) diversion of 8 kg of plutonium. Current materials accounting techniques probably cannot meet the 1-y protracted-diversion goal of 8 kg for plutonium.

  18. Particle sorting in dense granular flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hill, K. M.; Fan, Y.; Yohannes, B.

    2008-12-01

    Mixtures of particles tend to unmix by particle property. One of the most dramatically destructive examples of this occurs in debris flow: boulders, rocks, and mud tumble down a hillside, and the largest rocks migrate toward the top and then the front of the flow where they do the most damage. Rotating drums and chute flows are two of the most common apparatuses used to systematically study segregation in dense, gravity driven granular flows. In these cases, smaller or, alternatively, denser particles segregate away from the free surface, phenomena that have been modeled using mechanisms such as kinetic sieving and buoyancy, respectively. Other segregation mechanisms have been identified in suspensions and in more energetic systems such as a gradient in granular temperature -- the kinetic energy of velocity fluctuations -- and curvature effects. However, with most experimental systems the dominant segregation mechanism is difficult to ascertain. In typical experimental systems designed to study segregation in dense granular flow (such as chutes and rotated drums), gravity, velocity gradients and porosity gradients coexist in the direction of segregation. We study the segregation of mixtures of particles numerically and experimentally in a split-bottom cell and in a rotating drum to isolate three possible driving mechanisms for segregation of densely-sheared granular mixtures: gravity, porosity, and velocity gradients and their associated dynamics. We find gravity alone does not drive segregation associated with particle size without a sufficiently large porosity or porosity gradient. A velocity gradient, however, appears capable of driving segregation associated both with particle size and material density in dense flows. We present our results and discuss the implications for some particle segregation behaviors observed in natural systems such as debris flows and sediment transport.

  19. Dense energetic nitraminofurazanes.

    PubMed

    Fischer, Dennis; Klapötke, Thomas M; Reymann, Marius; Stierstorfer, Jörg

    2014-05-19

    3,3'-Diamino-4,4'-bifurazane (1), 3,3'-diaminoazo-4,4'-furazane (2), and 3,3'-diaminoazoxy-4,4'-furazane (3) were nitrated in 100 % HNO3 to give corresponding 3,3'-dinitramino-4,4'-bifurazane (4), 3,3'-dinitramino-4,4'-azofurazane (5) and 3,3'-dinitramino-4,4'-azoxyfurazane (6), respectively. The neutral compounds show very imposing explosive performance but possess lower thermal stability and higher sensitivity than hexogen (RDX). More than 40 nitrogen-rich compounds and metal salts were prepared. Most compounds were characterized by low-temperature X-ray diffraction, all of them by infrared and Raman spectroscopy, multinuclear NMR spectroscopy, elemental analysis, and by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). Calculated energetic performances using the EXPLO5 code based on calculated (CBS-4M) heats of formation and X-ray densities support the high energetic performances of the nitraminofurazanes as energetic materials. The sensitivities towards impact, friction, and electrostatic discharge were also explored. Additionally the general toxicity of the anions against vibrio fischeri, representative for an aquatic microorganism, was determined.

  20. Safety Analysis of 'Older/Aged' Handling and Transportation Equipment for Heavy Loads, Radioactive Waste and Materials in Accordance with German Nuclear Standards KTA 3902, 3903 and 3905

    SciTech Connect

    Macias, P.; Prucker, E.; Stang, W.

    2006-07-01

    The purpose of this paper is to present a general safety analysis of important handling and transportation processes and their related equipment ('load chains' consisting of cranes, load-bearing equipment and load-attaching points). This project was arranged by the responsible Bavarian ministry for environment, health and consumer protection (StMUGV) in agreement with the power plant operators of all Bavarian nuclear power plants to work out potential safety improvements. The range of the equipment (e.g. reactor building, crane, refuelling machine, load-bearing equipment and load-attaching points) covers the handling and transportation of fuel elements (e. g. with fuel flasks), heavy loads (e.g. reactor pressure vessel closure head, shielding slabs) and radioactive materials and waste (e.g. waste flasks, control elements, fuel channels, structure elements). The handling equipment was subjected to a general safety analysis taking into account the ageing of the equipment and the progress of standards. Compliance with the current valid requirements of the state of science and technology as required by German Atomic Act and particularly of the nuclear safety KTA-standards (3902, 3903 and 3905) was examined. The higher protection aims 'safe handling and transportation of heavy loads and safe handling of radioactive materials and waste' of the whole analysis are to avoid a criticality accident, the release of radioactivity and inadmissible effects on important technical equipment and buildings. The scope of the analysis was to check whether these protection aims were fulfilled for all important technical handling and transportation processes. In particularly the design and manufacturing of the components and the regulations of the handling itself were examined. (authors)

  1. Heavy Flavour production at RHIC

    SciTech Connect

    Kabana, Sonia

    2010-12-22

    We present a review of Heavy Flavour production in p+p, d+Au and A+A collisions at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC). We focus on two important topics, jet quenching and quarkonia. Anomalous energy loss (jet quenching) of quarks passing through the dense and hot matter build in heavy ion collisions is one of the outstanding discoveries made at RHIC, allowing for an estimate of the initial density. Furthermore, color screening of hidden charm and beauty states is a key signature of the QCD phase transition, allowing an estimate of the initial temperature. We present results on the flavour dependence of jet quenching. Heavy flavour production in A+A as compared to p+p collisions will be discussed for open and hidden charm.

  2. Analysis of the series of moderately heavy fermion materials: CeSn/sub 3/, USn/sub 3/, and NpSn/sub 3/

    SciTech Connect

    Norman, M.R.; Koelling, D.D.

    1985-05-01

    The materials CeSn/sub 3/, USn/sub 3/, and NpSn/sub 3/ are all moderately heavy Fermion compounds with electronic specific heat coefficients of 73, 169, and 242 mJ/mole K/sup 2/. CeSn/sub 3/ is known as a mixed valent system and NpSn/sub 3/ is a weak itinerant antiferromagnet. All three are strongly enhanced. Being in the relatively simple Au/sub 3/Cu structure, they form an excellent set of materials to study as representatives of strongly enhanced systems. One would like to ascertain what properties can be determined from band calculations based on density functional theory in the local density approximation. It has already been shown that the Fermi surface topology of CeSn/sub 3/ can be well described in this way even though the experimental masses are much larger than the band results. The enhancement factor for USn/sub 3/ is even larger and NpSN/sub 3/ is indeed predicted to go magnetic. We present here fully relativistic SCF calculations for these materials and discuss the relation between our results and what is known experimentally.

  3. Ion-ion dynamic structure factor of warm dense mixtures

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Gill, N. M.; Heinonen, R. A.; Starrett, C. E.; Saumon, D.

    2015-06-25

    In this study, the ion-ion dynamic structure factor of warm dense matter is determined using the recently developed pseudoatom molecular dynamics method [Starrett et al., Phys. Rev. E 91, 013104 (2015)]. The method uses density functional theory to determine ion-ion pair interaction potentials that have no free parameters. These potentials are used in classical molecular dynamics simulations. This constitutes a computationally efficient and realistic model of dense plasmas. Comparison with recently published simulations of the ion-ion dynamic structure factor and sound speed of warm dense aluminum finds good to reasonable agreement. Using this method, we make predictions of the ion-ionmore » dynamical structure factor and sound speed of a warm dense mixture—equimolar carbon-hydrogen. This material is commonly used as an ablator in inertial confinement fusion capsules, and our results are amenable to direct experimental measurement.« less

  4. Ion-ion dynamic structure factor of warm dense mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Gill, N. M.; Heinonen, R. A.; Starrett, C. E.; Saumon, D.

    2015-06-25

    In this study, the ion-ion dynamic structure factor of warm dense matter is determined using the recently developed pseudoatom molecular dynamics method [Starrett et al., Phys. Rev. E 91, 013104 (2015)]. The method uses density functional theory to determine ion-ion pair interaction potentials that have no free parameters. These potentials are used in classical molecular dynamics simulations. This constitutes a computationally efficient and realistic model of dense plasmas. Comparison with recently published simulations of the ion-ion dynamic structure factor and sound speed of warm dense aluminum finds good to reasonable agreement. Using this method, we make predictions of the ion-ion dynamical structure factor and sound speed of a warm dense mixture—equimolar carbon-hydrogen. This material is commonly used as an ablator in inertial confinement fusion capsules, and our results are amenable to direct experimental measurement.

  5. Prediction of heavy metal removal by different liner materials from landfill leachate: modeling of experimental results using artificial intelligence technique.

    PubMed

    Turan, Nurdan Gamze; Gümüşel, Emine Beril; Ozgonenel, Okan

    2013-01-01

    An intensive study has been made to see the performance of the different liner materials with bentonite on the removal efficiency of Cu(II) and Zn(II) from industrial leachate. An artificial neural network (ANN) was used to display the significant levels of the analyzed liner materials on the removal efficiency. The statistical analysis proves that the effect of natural zeolite was significant by a cubic spline model with a 99.93% removal efficiency. Optimization of liner materials was achieved by minimizing bentonite mixtures, which were costly, and maximizing Cu(II) and Zn(II) removal efficiency. The removal efficiencies were calculated as 45.07% and 48.19% for Cu(II) and Zn(II), respectively, when only bentonite was used as liner material. However, 60% of natural zeolite with 40% of bentonite combination was found to be the best for Cu(II) removal (95%), and 80% of vermiculite and pumice with 20% of bentonite combination was found to be the best for Zn(II) removal (61.24% and 65.09%). Similarly, 60% of natural zeolite with 40% of bentonite combination was found to be the best for Zn(II) removal (89.19%), and 80% of vermiculite and pumice with 20% of bentonite combination was found to be the best for Zn(II) removal (82.76% and 74.89%). PMID:23844384

  6. Prediction of Heavy Metal Removal by Different Liner Materials from Landfill Leachate: Modeling of Experimental Results Using Artificial Intelligence Technique

    PubMed Central

    Turan, Nurdan Gamze; Gümüşel, Emine Beril; Ozgonenel, Okan

    2013-01-01

    An intensive study has been made to see the performance of the different liner materials with bentonite on the removal efficiency of Cu(II) and Zn(II) from industrial leachate. An artificial neural network (ANN) was used to display the significant levels of the analyzed liner materials on the removal efficiency. The statistical analysis proves that the effect of natural zeolite was significant by a cubic spline model with a 99.93% removal efficiency. Optimization of liner materials was achieved by minimizing bentonite mixtures, which were costly, and maximizing Cu(II) and Zn(II) removal efficiency. The removal efficiencies were calculated as 45.07% and 48.19% for Cu(II) and Zn(II), respectively, when only bentonite was used as liner material. However, 60% of natural zeolite with 40% of bentonite combination was found to be the best for Cu(II) removal (95%), and 80% of vermiculite and pumice with 20% of bentonite combination was found to be the best for Zn(II) removal (61.24% and 65.09%). Similarly, 60% of natural zeolite with 40% of bentonite combination was found to be the best for Zn(II) removal (89.19%), and 80% of vermiculite and pumice with 20% of bentonite combination was found to be the best for Zn(II) removal (82.76% and 74.89%). PMID:23844384

  7. Synergistic adsorption of heavy metal ions and organic pollutants by supramolecular polysaccharide composite materials from cellulose, chitosan and crown ether

    PubMed Central

    Mututuvari, Tamutsiwa M.; Tran, Chieu D.

    2013-01-01

    We have developed a simple one-step method to synthesize novel supramolecular polysaccharide composites from cellulose (CEL), chitosan (CS) and benzo-15-crown 5 (B15C5). Butylmethylimidazolium chloride [BMIm+Cl−], an ionic liquid (IL), was used as a sole solvent for dissolution and preparation of the composites. Since majority of [BMIm+Cl−] used was recovered for reuse, the method is recyclable. The [CEL/CS + B15C5] composites obtained retain properties of their components, namely superior mechanical strength (from CEL), excellent adsorption capability for heavy metal ions and organic pollutants (from B15C5 and CS). More importantly, the [CEL/CS + B15C5] composites exhibit truly supramolecular properties. By itself CS, CEL and B15C5 can effectively adsorb Cd2+, Zn2+ and 2,4,5-trichlorophenol. However, adsorption capability of the composite was substantially and synergistically enhanced by adding B15C5 to either CEL and/or CS. That is, the adsorption capacity (qe values) for Cd2+ and Zn2+ by [CS + B15C5], [CEL + B15C5] and [CEL + CS + B15C5] composites are much higher than combined qe values of individual CS, CEL and B15C5 composites. It seems that B15C5 synergistically interact with CS (or CEL) to form more stable complexes with Cd2+ (or Zn2+), and as a consequence, the [CS + B15C5] (or the [CEL + B15C5]) composite can adsorb relatively larger amount Cd2+ (or Zn2+). Moreover, the pollutants adsorbed on the composites can be quantitatively desorbed to enable the [CS + CEL + B15C5] composites to be reused with similar adsorption efficiency. PMID:24333678

  8. Wettability alteration: A comprehensive review of materials/methods and testing the selected ones on heavy-oil containing oil-wet systems.

    PubMed

    Mohammed, Mohammedalmojtaba; Babadagli, Tayfun

    2015-06-01

    Changing the wetting state of materials is a growing field of research in many areas of engineering and science. In the oil industry, the term wettability alteration usually refers to the process of making the reservoir rock more water-wet. This is of particular importance in naturally hydrophobic carbonates, fractured formations, and heavy-oil systems. This shift in wettability enhances oil recovery in oil-wet and weakly water-wet reservoirs and eventually increases the ultimate oil recovery. For wettability alteration, two methods have been traditionally used: Thermal and chemical. Although many attempts have been made on reviewing the advancement of research in certain aspects of wettability, a comprehensive review of these techniques, especially in terms of the classification of the chemicals used, has been ignored. In this paper, we begin with this review and provide the past experience of wettability alteration in sandstone and carbonate reservoirs. More than 100 papers were reviewed extensively with an in-depth analysis of different methods suggested in literature. The areas of controversy and contradicted observations are discussed. The limitations and the applicability of each method were analyzed. Concerns on up-scaling laboratory findings to field scale are also addressed. The most promising potential methods are identified and their critical conditions highlighted. At the end, a selection of reviewed methods is validated experimentally for one of the most challenging cases: Extra heavy-oil and bitumen recovery from fractured-strongly-oil-wet carbonates. Berea sandstone (aged to be oil-wet) and Indiana limestone samples were saturated with heavy oil (3600cp). Next, the process was initiated by soaking the cores into solvent (heptane or diluent oil) and the oil recovery was estimated using refractive index measurements. Note that solvent was selected to dilute the oil and recover a considerable amount of oil as any chemical or thermal methods yielded

  9. Wettability alteration: A comprehensive review of materials/methods and testing the selected ones on heavy-oil containing oil-wet systems.

    PubMed

    Mohammed, Mohammedalmojtaba; Babadagli, Tayfun

    2015-06-01

    Changing the wetting state of materials is a growing field of research in many areas of engineering and science. In the oil industry, the term wettability alteration usually refers to the process of making the reservoir rock more water-wet. This is of particular importance in naturally hydrophobic carbonates, fractured formations, and heavy-oil systems. This shift in wettability enhances oil recovery in oil-wet and weakly water-wet reservoirs and eventually increases the ultimate oil recovery. For wettability alteration, two methods have been traditionally used: Thermal and chemical. Although many attempts have been made on reviewing the advancement of research in certain aspects of wettability, a comprehensive review of these techniques, especially in terms of the classification of the chemicals used, has been ignored. In this paper, we begin with this review and provide the past experience of wettability alteration in sandstone and carbonate reservoirs. More than 100 papers were reviewed extensively with an in-depth analysis of different methods suggested in literature. The areas of controversy and contradicted observations are discussed. The limitations and the applicability of each method were analyzed. Concerns on up-scaling laboratory findings to field scale are also addressed. The most promising potential methods are identified and their critical conditions highlighted. At the end, a selection of reviewed methods is validated experimentally for one of the most challenging cases: Extra heavy-oil and bitumen recovery from fractured-strongly-oil-wet carbonates. Berea sandstone (aged to be oil-wet) and Indiana limestone samples were saturated with heavy oil (3600cp). Next, the process was initiated by soaking the cores into solvent (heptane or diluent oil) and the oil recovery was estimated using refractive index measurements. Note that solvent was selected to dilute the oil and recover a considerable amount of oil as any chemical or thermal methods yielded

  10. Jets in relativistic heavy ion collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Xin-Nian; Gyulassy, M.

    1990-09-01

    Several aspects of hard and semihard QCD jets in relativistic heavy ion collisions are discussed, including multiproduction of minijets and the interaction of a jet with dense nuclear matter. The reduction of jet quenching effect in deconfined phase of nuclear matter is speculated to provide a signature of the formation of quark gluon plasma. HIJING Monte Carlo program which can simulate events of jets production and quenching in heavy ion collisions is briefly described. 35 refs., 13 figs.

  11. Heavy flavors

    SciTech Connect

    Cox, B.; Gilman, F.J.; Gottschalk, T.D.

    1986-11-01

    A range of issues pertaining to heavy flavors at the SSC is examined including heavy flavor production by gluon-gluon fusion and by shower evolution of gluon jets, flavor tagging, reconstruction of Higgs and W bosons, and the study of rare decays and CP violation in the B meson system. A specific detector for doing heavy flavor physics and tuned to this latter study at the SSC, the TASTER, is described. 36 refs., 10 figs.

  12. Enstrophy cascades in two-dimensional dense granular flows.

    PubMed

    Saitoh, Kuniyasu; Mizuno, Hideyuki

    2016-08-01

    Employing two-dimensional molecular dynamics simulations of dense granular materials under simple shear deformations, we investigate vortex structures of particle rearrangements. Introducing vorticity fields as a measure of local spinning motions of the particles, we observe their heterogeneous distributions, where statistics of vorticity fields exhibit the highly non-Gaussian behavior and typical domain sizes of vorticity fields significantly increase if the system is yielding under quasistatic deformations. In such dense granular flows, a power-law decay of vorticity spectra can be observed at mesoscopic scale, implying anomalous local structures of kinetic energy dissipation. We explain the power-law decay, or enstrophy cascades in dense granular materials, by a dimensional analysis, where the dependence of vorticity spectra not only on the wave number, but also on the shear rate, is well explained. From our dimensional analyses, the scaling of granular temperature and rotational kinetic energy is also predicted.

  13. Construction and characterization of kilobasepair densely labeled peptide-DNA.

    PubMed

    Kovacic, Suzana; Samii, Laleh; Lamour, Guillaume; Li, Hongbin; Linke, Heiner; Bromley, Elizabeth H C; Woolfson, Derek N; Curmi, Paul M G; Forde, Nancy R

    2014-11-10

    Directed assembly of biocompatible materials benefits from modular building blocks in which structural organization is independent of introduced functional modifications. For soft materials, such modifications have been limited. Here, long DNA is successfully functionalized with dense decoration by peptides. Following introduction of alkyne-modified nucleotides into kilobasepair DNA, measurements of persistence length show that DNA mechanics are unaltered by the dense incorporation of alkynes (∼1 alkyne/2 bp) and after click-chemistry attachment of a tunable density of peptides. Proteolytic cleavage of densely tethered peptides (∼1 peptide/3 bp) demonstrates addressability of the functional groups, showing that this accessible approach to creating hybrid structures can maintain orthogonality between backbone mechanics and overlaid function. The synthesis and characterization of these hybrid constructs establishes the groundwork for their implementation in future applications, such as building blocks in modular approaches to a range of problems in synthetic biology.

  14. Construction and characterization of kilobasepair densely labeled peptide-DNA.

    PubMed

    Kovacic, Suzana; Samii, Laleh; Lamour, Guillaume; Li, Hongbin; Linke, Heiner; Bromley, Elizabeth H C; Woolfson, Derek N; Curmi, Paul M G; Forde, Nancy R

    2014-11-10

    Directed assembly of biocompatible materials benefits from modular building blocks in which structural organization is independent of introduced functional modifications. For soft materials, such modifications have been limited. Here, long DNA is successfully functionalized with dense decoration by peptides. Following introduction of alkyne-modified nucleotides into kilobasepair DNA, measurements of persistence length show that DNA mechanics are unaltered by the dense incorporation of alkynes (∼1 alkyne/2 bp) and after click-chemistry attachment of a tunable density of peptides. Proteolytic cleavage of densely tethered peptides (∼1 peptide/3 bp) demonstrates addressability of the functional groups, showing that this accessible approach to creating hybrid structures can maintain orthogonality between backbone mechanics and overlaid function. The synthesis and characterization of these hybrid constructs establishes the groundwork for their implementation in future applications, such as building blocks in modular approaches to a range of problems in synthetic biology. PMID:25233124

  15. Enstrophy cascades in two-dimensional dense granular flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saitoh, Kuniyasu; Mizuno, Hideyuki

    2016-08-01

    Employing two-dimensional molecular dynamics simulations of dense granular materials under simple shear deformations, we investigate vortex structures of particle rearrangements. Introducing vorticity fields as a measure of local spinning motions of the particles, we observe their heterogeneous distributions, where statistics of vorticity fields exhibit the highly non-Gaussian behavior and typical domain sizes of vorticity fields significantly increase if the system is yielding under quasistatic deformations. In such dense granular flows, a power-law decay of vorticity spectra can be observed at mesoscopic scale, implying anomalous local structures of kinetic energy dissipation. We explain the power-law decay, or enstrophy cascades in dense granular materials, by a dimensional analysis, where the dependence of vorticity spectra not only on the wave number, but also on the shear rate, is well explained. From our dimensional analyses, the scaling of granular temperature and rotational kinetic energy is also predicted.

  16. Enstrophy cascades in two-dimensional dense granular flows.

    PubMed

    Saitoh, Kuniyasu; Mizuno, Hideyuki

    2016-08-01

    Employing two-dimensional molecular dynamics simulations of dense granular materials under simple shear deformations, we investigate vortex structures of particle rearrangements. Introducing vorticity fields as a measure of local spinning motions of the particles, we observe their heterogeneous distributions, where statistics of vorticity fields exhibit the highly non-Gaussian behavior and typical domain sizes of vorticity fields significantly increase if the system is yielding under quasistatic deformations. In such dense granular flows, a power-law decay of vorticity spectra can be observed at mesoscopic scale, implying anomalous local structures of kinetic energy dissipation. We explain the power-law decay, or enstrophy cascades in dense granular materials, by a dimensional analysis, where the dependence of vorticity spectra not only on the wave number, but also on the shear rate, is well explained. From our dimensional analyses, the scaling of granular temperature and rotational kinetic energy is also predicted. PMID:27627381

  17. Constitutive relations for steady, dense granular flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vescovi, D.; Berzi, D.; di Prisco, C. G.

    2011-12-01

    In the recent past, the flow of dense granular materials has been the subject of many scientific works; this is due to the large number of natural phenomena involving solid particles flowing at high concentration (e.g., debris flows and landslides). In contrast with the flow of dilute granular media, where the energy is essentially dissipated in binary collisions, the flow of dense granular materials is characterized by multiple, long-lasting and frictional contacts among the particles. The work focuses on the mechanical response of dry granular materials under steady, simple shear conditions. In particular, the goal is to obtain a complete rheology able to describe the material behavior within the entire range of concentrations for which the flow can be considered dense. The total stress is assumed to be the linear sum of a frictional and a kinetic component. The frictional and the kinetic contribution are modeled in the context of the critical state theory [8, 10] and the kinetic theory of dense granular gases [1, 3, 7], respectively. In the critical state theory, the granular material approaches a certain attractor state, independent on the initial arrangement, characterized by the capability of developing unlimited shear strains without any change in the concentration. Given that a disordered granular packing exists only for a range of concentration between the random loose and close packing [11], a form for the concentration dependence of the frictional normal stress that makes the latter vanish at the random loose packing is defined. In the kinetic theory, the particles are assumed to interact through instantaneous, binary and uncorrelated collisions. A new state variable of the problem is introduced, the granular temperature, which accounts for the velocity fluctuations. The model has been extended to account for the decrease in the energy dissipation due to the existence of correlated motion among the particles [5, 6] and to deal with non

  18. Metal chalcogenide nanoparticle gel networks: Their formation mechanism and application for novel material generation and heavy metal water remediation via cation exchange reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palhares, Leticia F.

    overall reaction is kinetically controlled, since systems with similar solubility, and thus similar thermodynamic driving force (e.g. PbS and CdS) exchange at very different rates. A correlation exists between the speed of the reaction and the difference between the reduction potential of the incoming cation and that of Zn2+; the larger the difference, the faster the exchange. At the same time, the porosity of the aerogels and the surfactant-free surfaces hold great importance for the exchange reactions, allowing for exchange between cations of similar size and charge (i.e. Pb2+ for Zn2+), a phenomenon that was previously reported as impossible in ligand-capped metal chalcogenide nanoparticles. These observations allowed for a better understanding of the factors governing the cation exchange reaction in nanoscale metal chalcogenides. Quaternary ZnS-CuInS2 gels were obtained by cation exchange with Cu+ and In3+, but the pure CuInS2 phase was not obtained under the mild reaction conditions used, probably due to the very different mobility of the two exchanging cations. The kinetically fast cation exchange process and the propensity of the soft chalcogenide gel networks to bind heavy metal ions selectively, suggest that these materials could also be suitable for the removal of heavy metal ions from the environment. The dissertation research studied the capacity of ZnS aerogels to sequester heavy metal ions such as Pb2+ and Hg2+ from water. The materials are efficient in removing the heavy metal ions from aqueous solutions with a wide range of initial concentrations. For initial concentrations that mimic an environmental spill (i.e. 100 ppb Pb2+), the treatment with the aerogel affords a final concentration lower than the 15 ppm action level recommended by the EPA. Under thermodynamically forcing conditions, the water remediation capacity of the ZnS nanoparticle aerogels was determined to be 14.2 mmol Pb2+ / g ZnS aerogel, which is the highest value reported to date.

  19. Constructing Dense Graphs with Unique Hamiltonian Cycles

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lynch, Mark A. M.

    2012-01-01

    It is not difficult to construct dense graphs containing Hamiltonian cycles, but it is difficult to generate dense graphs that are guaranteed to contain a unique Hamiltonian cycle. This article presents an algorithm for generating arbitrarily large simple graphs containing "unique" Hamiltonian cycles. These graphs can be turned into dense graphs…

  20. The physics of hot and dense quark-gluon matter

    SciTech Connect

    Kharzeev, Dmitri E

    2012-05-10

    This technical report describes the work done under the DOE grant DE-FG-88ER41723 (final award number DE-SC0005645), "The physics of hot and dense quark-gluon matter", during the year of 12/01/2010 through 11/30/2011. As planned in the proposal, the performed research focused along two main thrusts: 1) topological effects in hot quark-gluon matter and 2) phenomenology of relativistic heavy ion collisions. The results of research are presented in 12 papers published in reputable refereed journals (Physical Review Letters, Physical Review, Physics Letters and Nuclear Physics). All of the performed research is directly related to the experimental programs of DOE, especially at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider. Much of it also has broader interdisciplinary implications - for example, the work on the non-dissipative chiral magnetic current is directly relevant for quantum computing. The attached report describes the performed work in detail.

  1. Explosive desorption of icy grain mantles in dense clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schutte, W. A.; Greenberg, J. M.

    1991-01-01

    The cycling of the condensible material in dense clouds between the gas phase and the icy grain mantles is investigated. In the model studied, desorption of the ice occurs due to grain mantle explosions when photochemically stored energy is released after transient heating by a cosmic ray particle. It is shown that, depending on the grain size distribution in dense clouds, explosive desorption can maintain up to about eight percent of the carbon in the form of CO in the gas phase at typical cloud densities.

  2. Probing Cold Dense Nuclear Matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Subedi, R.; Shneor, R.; Monaghan, P.; Anderson, B. D.; Aniol, K.; Annand, J.; Arrington, J.; Benaoum, H.; Benmokhtar, F.; Boeglin, W.; Chen, J.-P.; Choi, Seonho; Cisbani, E.; Craver, B.; Frullani, S.; Garibaldi, F.; Gilad, S.; Gilman, R.; Glamazdin, O.; Hansen, J.-O.; Higinbotham, D. W.; Holmstrom, T.; Ibrahim, H.; Igarashi, R.; de Jager, C. W.; Jans, E.; Jiang, X.; Kaufman, L. J.; Kelleher, A.; Kolarkar, A.; Kumbartzki, G.; LeRose, J. J.; Lindgren, R.; Liyanage, N.; Margaziotis, D. J.; Markowitz, P.; Marrone, S.; Mazouz, M.; Meekins, D.; Michaels, R.; Moffit, B.; Perdrisat, C. F.; Piasetzky, E.; Potokar, M.; Punjabi, V.; Qiang, Y.; Reinhold, J.; Ron, G.; Rosner, G.; Saha, A.; Sawatzky, B.; Shahinyan, A.; Širca, S.; Slifer, K.; Solvignon, P.; Sulkosky, V.; Urciuoli, G. M.; Voutier, E.; Watson, J. W.; Weinstein, L. B.; Wojtsekhowski, B.; Wood, S.; Zheng, X.-C.; Zhu, L.

    2008-06-01

    The protons and neutrons in a nucleus can form strongly correlated nucleon pairs. Scattering experiments, in which a proton is knocked out of the nucleus with high-momentum transfer and high missing momentum, show that in carbon-12 the neutron-proton pairs are nearly 20 times as prevalent as proton-proton pairs and, by inference, neutron-neutron pairs. This difference between the types of pairs is due to the nature of the strong force and has implications for understanding cold dense nuclear systems such as neutron stars.

  3. Dilatons in Dense Baryonic Matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Hyun Kyu; Rho, Mannque

    We discuss the role of dilaton, which is supposed to be representing a special feature of scale symmetry of QCD, trace anomaly, in dense baryonic matter. The idea that the scale symmetry breaking of QCD is responsible for the spontaneous breaking of chiral symmetry is presented along the similar spirit of Freund-Nambu model. The incorporation of dilaton field in the hidden local symmetric parity doublet model is briefly sketched with the possible role of dilaton at high density baryonic matter, the emergence of linear sigma model in dilaton limit.

  4. Granular flow model for dense planetary rings

    SciTech Connect

    Borderies, N.; Goldreich, P.; Tremaine, S.

    1985-09-01

    In the present study of the viscosity of a differentially rotating particle disk, in the limiting case where the particles are densely packed and their collective behavior resembles that of a liquid, the pressure tensor is derived from both the equations of hydrodynamics and a simple kinetic model of collisions due to Haff (1983). Density waves and narrow circular rings are unstable if the liquid approximation applies, and the consequent nonlinear perturbations may generate splashing of the ring material in the vertical direction. These results are pertinent to the origin of the ellipticities of ringlets, the nonaxisymmetric features near the outer edge of the Saturn B ring, and unexplained residuals in kinematic models of the Saturn and Uranus rings. 24 references.

  5. Simulations for experimental study of warm dense matter and inertial fusion energy applications on NDCX-II

    SciTech Connect

    Barnard, J J; Armijo, J; Bieniosek, F M; Friedman, A; Hay, M J; Henestroza, E; Logan, B G; More, R M; Ni, P A; Perkins, L J; Ng, S; Wurtele, J S; Yu, S S; Zylstra, A B

    2010-03-19

    The Neutralized Drift Compression Experiment II (NDCX II) is an induction accelerator planned for initial commissioning in 2012. The final design calls for a {approx}3 MeV, {approx}30 A Li{sup +} ion beam, delivered in a bunch with characteristic pulse duration of 1 ns, and transverse dimension of order 1 mm. The purpose of NDCX II is to carry out experimental studies of material in the warm dense matter regime, and ion beam/hydrodynamic coupling experiments relevant to heavy ion based inertial fusion energy. In preparation for this new machine, we have carried out hydrodynamic simulations of ion-beam-heated, metallic solid targets, connecting quantities related to observables, such as brightness temperature and expansion velocity at the critical frequency, with the simulated fluid density, temperature, and velocity. We examine how these quantities depend on two commonly used equations of state.

  6. Simulations for experimental study of warm dense matter and inertial fusion energy applications on NDCX-II

    SciTech Connect

    Barnard, J.J.; Armijo, J.; Bieniosek, F.M.; Friedman, A.; Hay, M.; Henestroza, E.; Logan, B.G.; More, R.M.; Ni, P.A.; Perkins, L. J.; Ng, S-F.; Wurtele, J.S.; Yu, S.S.; Zylstra, A.B.

    2009-09-01

    The Neutralized Drift Compression Experiment II (NDCX II) is an induction accelerator planned for initial commissioning in 2012. The final design calls for a {approx}3 MeV, {approx}30 A Li{sup +} ion beam, delivered in a bunch with characteristic pulse duration of 1 ns, and ransverse dimension of order 1 mm. The purpose of NDCX II is to carry out experimental studies of material in the warm dense matter regime, and ion beam/hydrodynamic coupling experiments relevant to heavy ion based inertial fusion energy. In preparation for this new machine, we have carried out hydrodynamic simulations of ion-beam-heated, metallic solid targets, connecting quantities related to observables, such as brightness temperature and expansion velocity at the critical frequency, with the simulated fluid density, temperature, and velocity. We examine how these quantities depend on two commonly used equations of state.

  7. Characterization of Dense Plasma Targets for Equation of State Experiments.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hurry, Tom; Benage, John; Cobble, Jim; Dodd, Evan; Herrmann, Hans; Ortiz, Tom; Workman, Jonathan

    2006-10-01

    The measurement of the Equation of State (EOS) of materials in the dense-plasma state is difficult. The standard method for measuring EOS relies on the shock driven Hugoniot technique, where the material is initially at standard temperature and pressure and is shocked using a flyer plate. The locus of states produced using this technique is called the standard Hugoniot. However, the states produced do not fall into the regime of dense plasmas, where the EOS of the material is quite uncertain. We are developing a technique for measuring the EOS in a dense plasma, conditions far away from the standard Hugoniot. This technique requires that the initial condition of the material be at densities well below and temperatures well above standard. We have completed initial experiments producing and characterizing the plasma targets using visible spectroscopy and imaging. We have also begun development of a dynamic phase contrast imaging system required for measuring the shock velocity in the plasma. Simulations of these initial measurements and of the laser drive necessary to produce a uniform shock in the material are also shown. The conditions that we calculate to be produced by this shock are then compared to models for the EOS of this material.

  8. Experimental Studies of the Transport Parameters of Warm Dense Matter

    SciTech Connect

    Chouffani, Khalid

    2014-12-01

    There is a need to establish fundamental properties of matter and energy under extreme physical conditions. Although high energy density physics (HEDP) research spans a wide range of plasma conditions, there is one unifying regime that is of particular importance and complexity: that of warm dense matter, the transitional state between solid state condensed matter and energetic plasmas. Most laboratory experimental conditions, including inertial confinement implosion, fall into this regime. Because all aspects of laboratory-created high-energy-density plasmas transition through the warm dense matter regime, understanding the fundamental properties to determine how matter and energy interact in this regime is an important aspect of major research efforts in HEDP. Improved understanding of warm dense matter would have significant and wide-ranging impact on HEDP science, from helping to explain wire initiation studies on the Sandia Z machine to increasing the predictive power of inertial confinement fusion modeling. The central goal or objective of our proposed research is to experimentally determine the electrical resistivity, temperature, density, and average ionization state of a variety of materials in the warm dense matter regime, without the use of theoretical calculations. Since the lack of an accurate energy of state (EOS) model is primarily due to the lack of experimental data, we propose an experimental study of the transport coefficients of warm dense matter.

  9. Managing Inventories of Heavy Actinides

    SciTech Connect

    Wham, Robert M; Patton, Bradley D

    2011-01-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) has stored a limited inventory of heavy actinides contained in irradiated targets, some partially processed, at the Savannah River Site (SRS) and Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The 'heavy actinides' of interest include plutonium, americium, and curium isotopes; specifically 242Pu and 244Pu, 243Am, and 244/246/248Cm. No alternate supplies of these heavy actinides and no other capabilities for producing them are currently available. Some of these heavy actinide materials are important for use as feedstock for producing heavy isotopes and elements needed for research and commercial application. The rare isotope 244Pu is valuable for research, environmental safeguards, and nuclear forensics. Because the production of these heavy actinides was made possible only by the enormous investment of time and money associated with defense production efforts, the remaining inventories of these rare nuclear materials are an important part of the legacy of the Nuclear Weapons Program. Significant unique heavy actinide inventories reside in irradiated Mark-18A and Mark-42 targets at SRS and ORNL, with no plans to separate and store the isotopes for future use. Although the costs of preserving these heavy actinide materials would be considerable, for all practical purposes they are irreplaceable. The effort required to reproduce these heavy actinides today would likely cost billions of dollars and encompass a series of irradiation and chemical separation cycles for at least 50 years; thus, reproduction is virtually impossible. DOE has a limited window of opportunity to recover and preserve these heavy actinides before they are disposed of as waste. A path forward is presented to recover and manage these irreplaceable National Asset materials for future use in research, nuclear forensics, and other potential applications.

  10. Crystallization of dense neutron matter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Canuto, V.; Chitre, S. M.

    1974-01-01

    The equation of state for cold neutron matter at high density is studied in the t-matrix formulation, and it is shown that energetically it is convenient to have neutrons in a crystalline configuration rather than in a liquid state for values of the density exceeding 1600 Tg/cu cm. The study of the mechanical properties indicates that the system is stable against shearing stresses. A solid core in the deep interior of heavy neutron stars appears to offer the most plausible explanation of speed-ups observed in the Vela pulsar.

  11. The performance of dense medium processes

    SciTech Connect

    Horsfall, D.W.

    1993-12-31

    Dense medium washing in baths and cyclones is widely carried out in South Africa. The paper shows the reason for the preferred use of dense medium processes rather than gravity concentrators such as jigs. The factors leading to efficient separation in baths are listed and an indication given of the extent to which these factors may be controlled and embodied in the deployment of baths and dense medium cyclones in the planning stages of a plant.

  12. Screening of Quarkonia in hot and dense media: historical overview and latest lattice results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karsch, Frithjof

    2016-03-01

    Already the first lattice QCD calculations at non-zero temperature, performed around 1980, showed that the interaction among heavy (static) quarks that are emerged into a hot and dense medium of quarks and gluons is strongly modified. The heavy quark potential is screened and will not allow for the formation of bound states when the Debye screening radius becomes smaller than the typical size of heavy quark bound states. This observation has been utilized in the seminal 1986 paper by Matsui and Satz on J / Ψ suppression by quark-gluon plasma formation to predict the dissolution of bound states of heavy quarks at sufficiently high temperature. They established the reduction of quarkonium yields in heavy ion collisions as a sensitive tool for probing thermal properties of hot and dense matter. We discuss progress made in understanding the thermal modification of heavy quark bound states and the sequential suppression pattern, predicted for higher excited states, through refined lattice QCD calculations of temperature dependent potentials as well as through direct calculations of spectral functions.

  13. Modified composites based on mesostructured iron oxyhydroxide and synthetic minerals: a potential material for the treatment of various toxic heavy metals and its toxicity.

    PubMed

    Chung, Seung-Gun; Ryu, Jae-Chun; Song, Mi-Kyung; An, Byungryul; Kim, Song-Bae; Lee, Sang-Hyup; Choi, Jae-Woo

    2014-02-28

    The composites of mesostructured iron oxyhydroxide and/or commercial synthetic zeolite were investigated for use in the removal of toxic heavy metals, such as cadmium, copper, lead and arsenic, from aqueous solution. Four types of adsorbents, dried alginate beads (DABs), synthetic-zeolite impregnated beads (SZIBs), meso-iron-oxyhydroxide impregnated beads (MIOIBs) and synthetic-zeolite/meso-iron-oxyhydroxide composite beads (SZMIOIBs), were prepared for heavy metal adsorption tests. Laboratory experiments were conducted to investigate the removal efficiencies of cations and anions of heavy metals and the possibility of regenerating the adsorbents. Among these adsorbents, the MIOIBs can simultaneously remove cations and anions of heavy metals; they have high adsorption capacities for lead (60.1mgg(-1)) and arsenic (71.9mgg(-1)) compared with other adsorbents, such as DABs (158.1 and 0.0mgg(-1)), SZIB (42.9 and 0.0mgg(-1)) and SZMIOIB (54.0 and 5.9mgg(-1)) for lead and arsenic, respectively. Additionally, the removal efficiency was consistent at approximately 90%, notwithstanding repetitive regeneration. The characteristics of meso-iron-oxyhydroxide powder were confirmed by X-ray diffraction, Brunauer-Emmett-Teller and transmission electron microscopy. We also performed a comparative toxicity study that indicated that much lower concentrations of the powdered form of mesostructured iron oxyhydroxide had stronger cytotoxicity than the granular form. These results suggest that the granular form of meso iron oxyhydroxide is a more useful and safer adsorbent for heavy metal treatment than the powdered form. This research provides promising results for the application of MIOIBs as an adsorbent for various heavy metals from wastewater and sewage.

  14. Intense ion beams as a tool for opacity measurements in warm dense matter

    SciTech Connect

    Abdallah, Joseph; Tauschwiz, An; Jacoby, J; Maruhn, J A; Novikov, V G; Tauschwitz, A; Onkels, E; Wittle, K; Rosmej, F B; Schott, R

    2009-01-01

    Opacity measurements in warm dense matter (WDM) provide a valuable benchmark for the diverging theoretical models in this regime. Heating of thin foils with intense heavy-ion beams allows one to create isolated samples of warm dense matter suitable for experimental determination of frequency-dependent opacities. A prerequisite for the measurements is the isothermal expansion of the heated foil. Hydrodynamic simulations predict that this condition is fulfilled. The analysis shows that existing ion-beam accelerators are capable to contribute to this field of research.

  15. Percolation in dense storage arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirkpatrick, Scott; Wilcke, Winfried W.; Garner, Robert B.; Huels, Harald

    2002-11-01

    As computers and their accessories become smaller, cheaper, and faster the providers of news, retail sales, and other services we now take for granted on the Internet have met their increasing computing needs by putting more and more computers, hard disks, power supplies, and the data communications linking them to each other and to the rest of the wired world into ever smaller spaces. This has created a new and quite interesting percolation problem. It is no longer desirable to fix computers, storage or switchgear which fail in such a dense array. Attempts to repair things are all too likely to make problems worse. The alternative approach, letting units “fail in place”, be removed from service and routed around, means that a data communications environment will evolve with an underlying regular structure but a very high density of missing pieces. Some of the properties of this kind of network can be described within the existing paradigm of site or bond percolation on lattices, but other important questions have not been explored. I will discuss 3D arrays of hundreds to thousands of storage servers (something which it is quite feasible to build in the next few years), and show that bandwidth, but not percolation fraction or shortest path lengths, is the critical factor affected by the “fail in place” disorder. Redundancy strategies traditionally employed in storage systems may have to be revised. Novel approaches to routing information among the servers have been developed to minimize the impact.

  16. An experimental study of dense aerosol aggregations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dhaubhadel, Rajan

    We demonstrated that an aerosol can gel. This gelation was then used for a one-step method to produce an ultralow density porous carbon or silica material. This material was named an aerosol gel because it was made via gelation of particles in the aerosol phase. The carbon and silica aerosol gels had high specific surface area (200--350 sq m2/g for carbon and 300--500 sq m2/g for silica) and an extremely low density (2.5--6.0 mg/cm3), properties similar to conventional aerogels. Key aspects to form a gel from an aerosol are large volume fraction, ca. 10-4 or greater, and small primary particle size, 50 nm or smaller, so that the gel time is fast compared to other characteristic times. Next we report the results of a study of the cluster morphology and kinetics of a dense aggregating aerosol system using the small angle light scattering technique. The soot particles started as individual monomers, ca. 38 nm radius, grew to bigger clusters with time and finally stopped evolving after spanning a network across the whole system volume. This spanning is aerosol gelation. The gelled system showed a hybrid morphology with a lower fractal dimension at length scales of a micron or smaller and a higher fractal dimension at length scales greater than a micron. The study of the kinetics of the aggregating system showed that when the system gelled, the aggregation kernel homogeneity lambda attained a value 0.4 or higher. The magnitude of the aggregation kernel showed an increase with increasing volume fraction. We also used image analysis technique to study the cluster morphology. From the digitized pictures of soot clusters the cluster morphology was determined by two different methods: structure factor and perimeter analysis. We find a hybrid, superaggregate morphology characterized by a fractal dimension of Df ≈ to 1.8 between the monomer size, ca. 50 nm, and 1 mum micron and Df ≈ to 2.6 at larger length scales up to ˜ 10 mum. The superaggregate morphology is a

  17. Compacting Plastic-Bonded Explosive Molding Powders to Dense Solids

    SciTech Connect

    B. Olinger

    2005-04-15

    Dense solid high explosives are made by compacting plastic-bonded explosive molding powders with high pressures and temperatures for extended periods of time. The density is influenced by manufacturing processes of the powders, compaction temperature, the magnitude of compaction pressure, pressure duration, and number of repeated applications of pressure. The internal density variation of compacted explosives depends on method of compaction and the material being compacted.

  18. Method for making dense crack free thin films

    DOEpatents

    Jacobson, Craig P.; Visco, Steven J.; De Jonghe, Lutgard C.

    2007-01-16

    The process described herein provides a simple and cost effective method for making crack free, high density thin ceramic film. The steps involve depositing a layer of a ceramic material on a porous or dense substrate. The deposited layer is compacted and then the resultant laminate is sintered to achieve a higher density than would have been possible without the pre-firing compaction step.

  19. A new mechanism for dendritic pattern formation in dense systems

    PubMed Central

    Oikawa, Noriko; Kurita, Rei

    2016-01-01

    Patterns are often formed when particles cluster: Since patterns reflect the connectivity of different types of material, the emergence of patterns affects the physical and chemical properties of systems and shares a close relationship to their macroscopic functions. A radial dendritic pattern (RDP) is observed in many systems such as snow crystals, polymer crystals and biological systems. Although most of these systems are considered as dense particle suspensions, the mechanism of RDP formation in dense particle systems is not yet understood. It should be noted that the diffusion limited aggregation model is not applicable to RDP formation in dense systems, but in dilute particle systems. Here, we propose a simple model that exhibits RDP formation in a dense particle system. The model potential for the inter-particle interaction is composed of two parts, a repulsive and an attractive force. The repulsive force is applied to all the particles all the time and the attractive force is exerted only among particles inside a circular domain, which expands at a certain speed as a wave front propagating from a preselected centre. It is found that an RDP is formed if the velocity of the wave front that triggers the attractive interaction is of the same order of magnitude as the time scale defined by the aggregation speed. PMID:27353447

  20. A new mechanism for dendritic pattern formation in dense systems.

    PubMed

    Oikawa, Noriko; Kurita, Rei

    2016-01-01

    Patterns are often formed when particles cluster: Since patterns reflect the connectivity of different types of material, the emergence of patterns affects the physical and chemical properties of systems and shares a close relationship to their macroscopic functions. A radial dendritic pattern (RDP) is observed in many systems such as snow crystals, polymer crystals and biological systems. Although most of these systems are considered as dense particle suspensions, the mechanism of RDP formation in dense particle systems is not yet understood. It should be noted that the diffusion limited aggregation model is not applicable to RDP formation in dense systems, but in dilute particle systems. Here, we propose a simple model that exhibits RDP formation in a dense particle system. The model potential for the inter-particle interaction is composed of two parts, a repulsive and an attractive force. The repulsive force is applied to all the particles all the time and the attractive force is exerted only among particles inside a circular domain, which expands at a certain speed as a wave front propagating from a preselected centre. It is found that an RDP is formed if the velocity of the wave front that triggers the attractive interaction is of the same order of magnitude as the time scale defined by the aggregation speed. PMID:27353447

  1. A new mechanism for dendritic pattern formation in dense systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oikawa, Noriko; Kurita, Rei

    2016-06-01

    Patterns are often formed when particles cluster: Since patterns reflect the connectivity of different types of material, the emergence of patterns affects the physical and chemical properties of systems and shares a close relationship to their macroscopic functions. A radial dendritic pattern (RDP) is observed in many systems such as snow crystals, polymer crystals and biological systems. Although most of these systems are considered as dense particle suspensions, the mechanism of RDP formation in dense particle systems is not yet understood. It should be noted that the diffusion limited aggregation model is not applicable to RDP formation in dense systems, but in dilute particle systems. Here, we propose a simple model that exhibits RDP formation in a dense particle system. The model potential for the inter-particle interaction is composed of two parts, a repulsive and an attractive force. The repulsive force is applied to all the particles all the time and the attractive force is exerted only among particles inside a circular domain, which expands at a certain speed as a wave front propagating from a preselected centre. It is found that an RDP is formed if the velocity of the wave front that triggers the attractive interaction is of the same order of magnitude as the time scale defined by the aggregation speed.

  2. Dynamics and evolution of dense stellar systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fregeau, John M.

    2004-10-01

    The research presented in this thesis comprises a theoretical study of several aspects relating to the dynamics and evolution of dense stellar systems such as globular clusters. First, I present the results of a study of mass segregation in two-component star clusters, based on a large number of numerical N-body simulations using our Monte-Carlo code. Heavy objects, which could represent stellar remnants such as neutron stars or black holes, exhibit behavior that is in quantitative agreement with simple analytical arguments. Light objects, which could represent free-floating planets or brown dwarfs, are predominantly lost from the cluster, as expected from simple analytical arguments, but may remain in the halo in larger numbers than expected. Using a recent null detection of planetary-mass microlensing events in M22, I find an upper limit of ˜25% at the 63% confidence level for the current mass fraction of M22 in the form of very low-mass objects. Turning to more realistic clusters, I present a study of the evolution of clusters containing primordial binaries, based on an enhanced version of the Monte-Carlo code that treats binary interactions via cross sections and analytical prescriptions. All models exhibit a long-lived “binary burning” phase lasting many tens of relaxation times. The structural parameters of the models during this phase match well those of most observed Galactic globular clusters. At the end of this phase, clusters that have survived tidal disruption undergo deep core collapse, followed by gravothermal oscillations. The results clearly show that the presence of even a small fraction of binaries in a cluster is sufficient to support the core against collapse significantly beyond the normal core collapse time predicted without the presence of binaries. For tidally truncated systems, collapse is delayed sufficiently that the cluster will undergo complete tidal disruption before core collapse. Moving a step beyond analytical prescriptions, I

  3. HIGH ENERGY DENSITY PHYSICS EXPERIMENTS WITH INTENSE HEAVY ION BEAMS

    SciTech Connect

    Bieniosek, F.M.; Henestroza, E.; Leitner, M.; Logan, B.G.; More, R.M.; Roy, P.K.; Ni, P.; Seidl, P.A.; Waldron, W.L.; Barnard, J.J.

    2008-08-01

    The US heavy ion fusion science program has developed techniques for heating ion-beam-driven warm dense matter (WDM) targets. The WDM conditions are to be achieved by combined longitudinal and transverse space-charge neutralized drift compression of the ion beam to provide a hot spot on the target with a beam spot size of about 1 mm, and pulse length about 1-2 ns. As a technique for heating volumetric samples of matter to high energy density, intense beams of heavy ions are capable of delivering precise and uniform beam energy deposition dE/dx, in a relatively large sample size, and the ability to heat any solid-phase target material. Initial experiments use a 0.3 MeV K+ beam (below the Bragg peak) from the NDCX-I accelerator. Future plans include target experiments using the NDCX-II accelerator, which is designed to heat targets at the Bragg peak using a 3-6 MeV lithium ion beam. The range of the beams in solid matter targets is about 1 micron, which can be lengthened by using porous targets at reduced density. We have completed the fabrication of a new experimental target chamber facility for WDM experiments, and implemented initial target diagnostics to be used for the first target experiments in NDCX-1. The target chamber has been installed on the NDCX-I beamline. The target diagnostics include a fast multi-channel optical pyrometer, optical streak camera, VISAR, and high-speed gated cameras. Initial WDM experiments will heat targets by compressed NDCX-I beams and will explore measurement of temperature and other target parameters. Experiments are planned in areas such as dense electronegative targets, porous target homogenization and two-phase equation of state.

  4. HIGH ENERGY DENSITY PHYSICS EXPERIMENTS WITH INTENSE HEAVY ION BEAMS

    SciTech Connect

    Henestroza, E.; Leitner, M.; Logan, B.G.; More, R.M.; Roy, P.K.; Ni, P.; Seidl, P.A.; Waldron, W.L.; Barnard, J.J.

    2010-03-16

    The US heavy ion fusion science program has developed techniques for heating ion-beam-driven warm dense matter (WDM) targets. The WDM conditions are to be achieved by combined longitudinal and transverse space-charge neutralized drift compression of the ion beam to provide a hot spot on the target with a beam spot size of about 1 mm, and pulse length about 1-2 ns. As a technique for heating volumetric samples of matter to high energy density, intense beams of heavy ions are capable of delivering precise and uniform beam energy deposition dE/dx, in a relatively large sample size, and the ability to heat any solid-phase target material. Initial experiments use a 0.3 MeV K+ beam (below the Bragg peak) from the NDCX-I accelerator. Future plans include target experiments using the NDCX-II accelerator, which is designed to heat targets at the Bragg peak using a 3-6 MeV lithium ion beam. The range of the beams in solid matter targets is about 1 micron, which can be lengthened by using porous targets at reduced density. We have completed the fabrication of a new experimental target chamber facility for WDM experiments, and implemented initial target diagnostics to be used for the first target experiments in NDCX-1. The target chamber has been installed on the NDCX-I beamline. The target diagnostics include a fast multi-channel optical pyrometer, optical streak camera, VISAR, and high-speed gated cameras. Initial WDM experiments will heat targets by compressed NDCX-I beams and will explore measurement of temperature and other target parameters. Experiments are planned in areas such as dense electronegative targets, porous target homogenization and two-phase equation of state.

  5. Identification of genotoxic components of the heavy ends of energy-related materials: Annual technical progress report, January 1, 1987-November 30, 1987

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, M.L.; Castle, R.N.

    1987-12-01

    Fourteen standard compounds were synthesized for use in determining compound types in coal-derived liquids. Capillary column gas chromatographhy/mass spectrometry was used to determine whether or not linked aromatic compounds were present in coal-derived liquids. Results indicate the possible presence of these compounds, but at extremely low levels (<0.05%). Therefore, a more direct approach to fractionating, separating, and identifying the heavy end fractions was pursued. Gel permeation chromatography was used to provide molecular weight fractions of an SRC II heavy distillate for analysis by supercritical fluid chromatography. The effects of addition of polar modifiers (propylene carbonate and dimethylformamide) on supercritical fluid solvating power were studied. These modifiers greatly increased the solvating power for large PAH, and will be useful in the application to heavy ends. The liquid crystalline polysiloxane stationary phase was shown to be effective in separating large PAH under supercritical conditions. Finally, a direct heated interface for coupling of a supercritical fluid chromatograph to a mass spectrometer was constructed and successfully evaluated. High molecular weight compounds were successfully analyzed under electron impact ionization conditions at the low nanogram level. 21 figs., 3 tabs.

  6. Effective Field Theories for Hot and Dense Matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blaschke, D.

    2010-10-01

    The lecture is divided in two parts. The first one deals with an introduction to the physics of hot, dense many-particle systems in quantum field theory [1, 2]. The basics of the path integral approach to the partition function are explained for the example of chiral quark models. The QCD phase diagram is discussed in the meanfield approximation while QCD bound states in the medium are treated in the rainbow-ladder approximation (Gaussian fluctuations). Special emphasis is devoted to the discussion of the Mott effect, i.e. the transition of bound states to unbound, but resonant scattering states in the continnum under the influence of compression and heating of the system. Three examples are given: (1) the QCD model phase diagram with chiral symmetry ¨ restoration and color superconductivity [3], (2) the Schrodinger equation for heavy-quarkonia [4], and (2) Pions [5] as well as Kaons and D-mesons in the finite-temperature Bethe-Salpeter equation [6]. We discuss recent applications of this quantum field theoretical approach to hot and dense quark matter for a description of anomalous J/ψ supression in heavy-ion collisions [7] and for the structure and cooling of compact stars with quark matter interiors [8]. The second part provides a detailed introduction to the Polyakov-loop Nambu-Jona-Lasinio model [9] for thermodynamics and mesonic correlations [10] in the phase diagram of quark matter. Important relationships of low-energy QCD like the Gell-Mann-Oakes-Renner relation are generalized to finite temperatures. The effect of including the coupling to the Polyakov-loop potential on the phase diagram and mesonic correlations is discussed. An outlook is given to effects of nonlocality of the interactions [11] and of mesonic correlations in the medium [12] which go beyond the meanfield description.

  7. Dense Metal Plasma in a Solenoid for Ion Beam Neutralization

    SciTech Connect

    Anders, Andre; Kauffeldt, Marina; Oks, Efim M.; Roy, Prabir K.

    2010-10-30

    Space-charge neutralization is required to compress and focus a pulsed, high-current ion beam on a target for warm dense matter physics or heavy ion fusion experiments. We described approaches to produce dense plasma in and near the final focusing solenoid through which the ion beam travels, thereby providing an opportunity for the beam to acquire the necessary space-charge compensating electrons. Among the options are plasma injection from pulsed vacuum arc sources located outside the solenoid, and using a high current (> 4 kA) pulsed vacuum arc plasma from a ring cathode near the edge of the solenoid. The plasma distribution is characterized by photographic means, by an array of movable Langmuir probes, by a small single probe, and by evaluating Stark broadening of the Balmer H beta spectral line. In the main approach described here, the plasma is produced at several cathode spots distributed azimuthally on the ring cathode. It is shown that the plasma is essentially hollow, as determined by the structure of the magnetic field, though the plasma density exceeds 1014 cm-3 in practically all zones of the solenoid volume if the ring electrode is placed a few centimeters off the center of the solenoid. The plasma is non-uniform and fluctuating, however, since its density exceeds the ion beam density it is believed that this approach could provide a practical solution to the space charge neutralization challenge.

  8. Dense cores in the dark cloud complex LDN 1188

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verebélyi , E.; Könyves, V.; Nikolić, S.; Kiss, Cs.; Moór, A.; Ábrahám, P.; Kun, M.

    2013-11-01

    We present a molecular line emission study of the LDN 1188 dark cloud complex located in Cepheus. In this work we focused on the densest parts of the cloud and on the close neighbourhood of infrared point sources. We made ammonia mapping with the Effelsberg 100 m radio telescope and identified 3 dense cores. CS(1-0), CS(2-1) and HCO+(1-0) measurements performed with the Onsala 20 m telescope revealed the distribution of dense molecular material. The molecular line measurements were supplemented by mapping the dust emission at 1.2 mm in some selected directions using the IRAM 30 m telescope. With these data we could work out a likely evolutionary sequence in this dark cloud complex.

  9. Pulsar-irradiated stars in dense globular clusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tavani, Marco

    1992-01-01

    We discuss the properties of stars irradiated by millisecond pulsars in 'hard' binaries of dense globular clusters. Irradiation by a relativistic pulsar wind as in the case of the eclipsing millisecond pulsar PSR 1957+20 alter both the magnitude and color of the companion star. Some of the blue stragglers (BSs) recently discovered in dense globular clusters can be irradiated stars in binaries containing powerful millisecond pulsars. The discovery of pulsar-driven orbital modulations of BS brightness and color with periods of a few hours together with evidence for radio and/or gamma-ray emission from BS binaries would valuably contribute to the understanding of the evolution of collapsed stars in globular clusters. Pulsar-driven optical modulation of cluster stars might be the only observable effect of a new class of binary pulsars, i.e., hidden millisecond pulsars enshrouded in the evaporated material lifted off from the irradiated companion star.

  10. Effective atomic number, energy loss and radiation damage studies in some materials commonly used in nuclear applications for heavy charged particles such as H, C, Mg, Fe, Te, Pb and U

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurudirek, Murat

    2016-05-01

    Commonly used nuclear physics materials such as water, concrete, Pb-glass, paraffin, freon and P 10 gases, some alloys such as brass, bronze, stainless-steel and some scintillators such as anthracene, stilbene and toluene have been investigated with respect to the heavy charged particle interaction as means of projected range and effective atomic number (Zeff) in the energy region 10 keV to 10 MeV. Calculations were performed for heavy ions such as H, C, Mg, Fe, Te, Pb and U. Also, the energy loss and radiation damage were studied using SRIM Monte Carlo code for anthracene for different heavy ions of 100 keV kinetic energy. It has been observed that the variation in Zeff becomes less when the atomic number of the ions increase. Glass-Pb, bronze, brass, stainless-steel and Freon gas were found to vary less than 10% in the energy region 10 keV to 10 MeV. For total proton interaction, discrepancies up to 10% and 18% between two databases namely PSTAR and SRIM were noted in mass stopping power and Zeff of water, respectively. The range calculations resulted with a conclusion that the metal alloys and glass-Pb have lowest values of ranges confirming best shielding against energetic heavy ions whereas freon and P 10 gases have the highest values of ranges in the entire energy region. The simulation results showed that the energy loss (%) to target electrons decreases as the Z of the incident ion increases. Also, it was observed that the radiation damage first increases with Z of the ion and then keeps almost constant for ions with Z≥52.

  11. Wide Variation Seen in 'Dense' Breast Diagnoses

    MedlinePlus

    ... defined mammography patients' breasts as dense. Higher breast density is a risk factor for breast cancer, experts ... could have implications for the so-called breast density notification laws that have been passed in about ...

  12. Modeling Warm Dense Matter Experiments using the 3D ALE-AMR Code and the Move Toward Exascale Computing

    SciTech Connect

    Koniges, A; Eder, E; Liu, W; Barnard, J; Friedman, A; Logan, G; Fisher, A; Masers, N; Bertozzi, A

    2011-11-04

    The Neutralized Drift Compression Experiment II (NDCX II) is an induction accelerator planned for initial commissioning in 2012. The final design calls for a 3 MeV, Li+ ion beam, delivered in a bunch with characteristic pulse duration of 1 ns, and transverse dimension of order 1 mm. The NDCX II will be used in studies of material in the warm dense matter (WDM) regime, and ion beam/hydrodynamic coupling experiments relevant to heavy ion based inertial fusion energy. We discuss recent efforts to adapt the 3D ALE-AMR code to model WDM experiments on NDCX II. The code, which combines Arbitrary Lagrangian Eulerian (ALE) hydrodynamics with Adaptive Mesh Refinement (AMR), has physics models that include ion deposition, radiation hydrodynamics, thermal diffusion, anisotropic material strength with material time history, and advanced models for fragmentation. Experiments at NDCX-II will explore the process of bubble and droplet formation (two-phase expansion) of superheated metal solids using ion beams. Experiments at higher temperatures will explore equation of state and heavy ion fusion beam-to-target energy coupling efficiency. Ion beams allow precise control of local beam energy deposition providing uniform volumetric heating on a timescale shorter than that of hydrodynamic expansion. The ALE-AMR code does not have any export control restrictions and is currently running at the National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center (NERSC) at LBNL and has been shown to scale well to thousands of CPUs. New surface tension models that are being implemented and applied to WDM experiments. Some of the approaches use a diffuse interface surface tension model that is based on the advective Cahn-Hilliard equations, which allows for droplet breakup in divergent velocity fields without the need for imposed perturbations. Other methods require seeding or other methods for droplet breakup. We also briefly discuss the effects of the move to exascale computing and related

  13. Heavy loads

    SciTech Connect

    Metz, D.

    1982-01-01

    The extreme pressures on the roof and walls of an earth-sheltered residential home are discussed and the need for careful planning is stressed. Pertinent terms are defined. Footings and wall structure (reinforced concrete walls and concrete block walls) are described. Roofing systems are discussed in detail and illustrated: (1) poured-in-place concrete roof slabs; (2) pre-cast concrete planks; and (3) heavy timber roofs. Insulation of earth-sheltered homes is reviewed in terms of using: (1) urethanes; (2) extruded polystyrene; and (3) expanded polystyrene. Advantages, disadvantages, R-factors, costs, and installation are discussed. (MJJ)

  14. Dynamical theory of dense groups of galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mamon, Gary A.

    1990-01-01

    It is well known that galaxies associate in groups and clusters. Perhaps 40% of all galaxies are found in groups of 4 to 20 galaxies (e.g., Tully 1987). Although most groups appear to be so loose that the galaxy interactions within them ought to be insignificant, the apparently densest groups, known as compact groups appear so dense when seen in projection onto the plane of the sky that their members often overlap. These groups thus appear as dense as the cores of rich clusters. The most popular catalog of compact groups, compiled by Hickson (1982), includes isolation among its selection critera. Therefore, in comparison with the cores of rich clusters, Hickson's compact groups (HCGs) appear to be the densest isolated regions in the Universe (in galaxies per unit volume), and thus provide in principle a clean laboratory for studying the competition of very strong gravitational interactions. The $64,000 question here is then: Are compact groups really bound systems as dense as they appear? If dense groups indeed exist, then one expects that each of the dynamical processes leading to the interaction of their member galaxies should be greatly enhanced. This leads us to the questions: How stable are dense groups? How do they form? And the related question, fascinating to any theorist: What dynamical processes predominate in dense groups of galaxies? If HCGs are not bound dense systems, but instead 1D change alignments (Mamon 1986, 1987; Walke & Mamon 1989) or 3D transient cores (Rose 1979) within larger looser systems of galaxies, then the relevant question is: How frequent are chance configurations within loose groups? Here, the author answers these last four questions after comparing in some detail the methods used and the results obtained in the different studies of dense groups.

  15. Magnetic Phases in Dense Quark Matter

    SciTech Connect

    Incera, Vivian de la

    2007-10-26

    In this paper I discuss the magnetic phases of the three-flavor color superconductor. These phases can take place at different field strengths in a highly dense quark system. Given that the best natural candidates for the realization of color superconductivity are the extremely dense cores of neutron stars, which typically have very large magnetic fields, the magnetic phases here discussed could have implications for the physics of these compact objects.

  16. Transport of cosmic ray nuclei in various materials.

    PubMed

    Silberberg, R; Tsao, C H; Letaw, J R

    1988-01-01

    Cosmic-ray heavy ions have become a concern in space radiation effects analyses. Heavy ions rapidly deposit energy and create dense ionization trails as they traverse materials. Collection of the free charge disrupts the operation of microelectronic circuits. This effect, called the single-event upset, can cause a loss of digital data. Passage of high linear energy transfer particles through the eyes has been observed by Apollo astronauts. These heavy ions have great radiobiological effectiveness and are the primary risk factor for leukemia induction on a manned Mars mission. Models of the transport of heavy cosmic-ray nuclei through materials depend heavily on our understanding of the cosmic-ray environment, nuclear spallation cross sections, and computer transport codes. Our group has initiated and pursued the development of a full capability for modeling these transport processes. A recent review of this ongoing effort is presented in Ref. 5. In this paper, we discuss transport methods and present new results comparing the attenuation of cosmic rays in various materials. PMID:11538213

  17. Transport of cosmic ray nuclei in various materials.

    PubMed

    Silberberg, R; Tsao, C H; Letaw, J R

    1988-01-01

    Cosmic-ray heavy ions have become a concern in space radiation effects analyses. Heavy ions rapidly deposit energy and create dense ionization trails as they traverse materials. Collection of the free charge disrupts the operation of microelectronic circuits. This effect, called the single-event upset, can cause a loss of digital data. Passage of high linear energy transfer particles through the eyes has been observed by Apollo astronauts. These heavy ions have great radiobiological effectiveness and are the primary risk factor for leukemia induction on a manned Mars mission. Models of the transport of heavy cosmic-ray nuclei through materials depend heavily on our understanding of the cosmic-ray environment, nuclear spallation cross sections, and computer transport codes. Our group has initiated and pursued the development of a full capability for modeling these transport processes. A recent review of this ongoing effort is presented in Ref. 5. In this paper, we discuss transport methods and present new results comparing the attenuation of cosmic rays in various materials.

  18. Transport of cosmic ray nuclei in various materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Silberberg, R.; Tsao, C. H.; Letaw, J. R.

    1988-01-01

    Cosmic-ray heavy ions have become a concern in space radiation effects analyses. Heavy ions rapidly deposit energy and create dense ionization trails as they traverse materials. Collection of the free charge disrupts the operation of microelectronic circuits. This effect, called the single-event upset, can cause a loss of digital data. Passage of high linear energy transfer particles through the eyes has been observed by Apollo astronauts. These heavy ions have great radiobiological effectiveness and are the primary risk factor for leukemia induction on a manned Mars mission. Models of the transport of heavy cosmic-ray nuclei through materials depend heavily on our understanding of the cosmic-ray environment, nuclear spallation cross sections, and computer transport codes. Our group has initiated and pursued the development of a full capability for modeling these transport processes. A recent review of this ongoing effort is presented in Ref. 5. In this paper, we discuss transport methods and present new results comparing the attenuation of cosmic rays in various materials.

  19. Latest Heavy Flavor Results from the PHENIX Experiment at RHIC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lebedev, Alexandre

    2016-08-01

    Heavy quark production can be used as a stringent test of perturbative QCD in proton-proton collisions, and is a valuable reference for the study of heavy ion collisions. In nucleus-nucleus collisions, the measurement of heavy quark production provides a powerful tool for studying the properties of hot and dense matter created in these collisions. The PHENIX experiment has studied many important observables related to heavy flavor via leptonic measurements. Such observables include the invariant yield and azimuthal anisotropy of electrons from non-photonic sources and prompt single muons, both of which are dominated by decays of D and B mesons. Complimentary to single lepton measurements, PHENIX has measured invariant yield, flow, and polarization of various quarkonia states. Such measurements provide additional insight into heavy flavor production mechanisms. The most recent PHENIX heavy flavor results will be presented, and compared to various theoretical model predictions.

  20. Chitosan modified ordered mesoporous silica as micro-column packing materials for on-line flow injection-inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry determination of trace heavy metals in environmental water samples.

    PubMed

    Chen, Dahui; Hu, Bin; Huang, Chaozhang

    2009-04-30

    A novel adsorbent of chitosan chemically modified ordered mesoporous silica was synthesized and employed as a solid phase extraction (SPE) material for flow injection (FI) micro-column preconcentration on-line coupled with inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry (ICP-OES) determination of trace heavy metals V, Cu, Pb, Cd and Hg in environmental water samples. The factors affecting separation and preconcentration of target heavy metals such as pH, sample flow rate and volume, eluent concentration and volume, interfering ions were investigated. Under the optimized experimental conditions, an enrichment factor of 20 and sampling frequency of 10h(-1) were obtained. The detection limits of the method for V, Cu, Pb, Cd and Hg were 0.33, 0.30, 0.96, 0.05 and 0.93 ng mL(-1), and the relative standard deviations (RSDs) were 2.8%, 6.7%, 1.8%, 4.0% and 5.3% (n=7, C=10 ng mL(-1)), respectively. The adsorption capacities of chitosan modified ordered mesoporous silica for V, Cu, Pb, Cd, and Hg were found to be 16.3, 21.7, 22.9, 12.2 and 13.5 mg g(-1), respectively. In order to validate the developed method, a certified reference material of GSBZ50009-88 environmental water sample was analyzed and the determined values were in good agreement with the certified values. The proposed method has also been applied to the determination of trace heavy metals in natural water samples with satisfactory results.

  1. Case study: heavy metals and fluoride contents in the materials of Syrian phosphate industry and in the vicinity of phosphogypsum piles.

    PubMed

    Al Attar, L; Al-Oudat, M; Shamali, K; Abdul Ghany, B; Kanakri, S

    2012-01-01

    This study focuses on the determination of heavy metals and fluoride concentrations in the Syrian phosphate industry and in the vicinity of the phosphogypsum (PG) piles. Four sampling campaigns were carried out, in which 86 soil, 139 plant, 30 air particulate, 16 water, 12 PG, 6 phosphate ore (raw and treated) and 3 fertilizer samples were collected. Differential pulse anode stripping voltammetry was used for Pb and Cd determination, atomic absorption spectrometry was used for Zn, Cr and Cu determination, and instrumental neutron activation analysis was used for Se, Ni, As and Hg determination. Fluoride concentration was determined via fluoride ion selective electrode. The data revealed that most of the heavy metals were retained in the fertilizer. Fluoride content in PG was 0.47%. The presence of PG piles showed no impact on the run-off and ground and lake waters in the area. However, fluoride concentration was double the permissible airborne threshold in the sites to the east of the PG piles because of the prevailing wind in the region. Similarly, enhanced concentrations of fluoride were recorded for the eastern soil samples. The content of heavy metals in plants was element- and plant-specific and influenced by the element concentration in soil, the soil texture and the pH. The maximal mean of fluoride was found in the plants species of the eastern sites (699 mg kg(-1)), which mainly related to PG erosion and airborne deposition. Thus, the main impact of the PG piles was to increase the concentration of fluoride in the surrounding area. A national action should be taken to regulate PG piles.

  2. Porous and Dense Cordierite Ceramic from Illite Clay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rundans, M.; Sperberga, I.; Sedmale, G.

    2016-04-01

    Ternary system MgO-Al2O3-SiO2 contains many technically valuable crystalline phases such as enstatite, forsterite, spinel and cordierite. For most of these phases coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) is extremely low (as low as 1.5·10-6K-1) which allows for them to be used in conjunction with other thermally demanding materials like quartz, for example. Also, other important properties like their high mechanical strength and good dielectric permeability is of value for potential use in practical applications. Formation of cordierite from oxide powders takes place above 1350 °C. Rational preparation of such material requires modifications in synthesis rout, i.e., addition of flux forming agents or presence of volatile compounds. In this work the use of Latvian illite clay as partial raw material for preparation of both dense and porous cordierite ceramics was studied. No additional artificial flux and/or volatiles were used. Obtained dense and porous ceramic samples were tested for their phase composition, mechanical strength and porosity. It was determined that the use of illite clay of no less than 1/3 of total mass was enough to form both extremely dense and tough (compressive strength of about 400 MPa) and extremely porous (about 59% apparent porosity) materials by just adjusting thermal treatment regime. The X-Ray diffraction of the samples showed that formation of single-phase crystalline cordierite can also be achieved in relatively lower temperatures, e.g., as low as 1300 °C.

  3. Development of dense ceramic membranes for methane conversion

    SciTech Connect

    Balachandran, U.; Dusek, J.T.; Maiya, P.S.; Ma, B.; Mieville, R.L.; Kleefisch, M.S.; Udovich, C.A.; Fleisch, T.H.

    1995-06-01

    The most significant cost associated with partial oxidation of methane to syngas is that of the oxygen plant. In this paper, the authors offer a technology, based on dense ceramic membranes, that uses air as the oxidant for methane conversion reactions, thus eliminating the need for the oxygen plant. Certain ceramic materials exhibit both electronic and ionic conductivities (of particular interest is oxygen-ion conductivity). These materials transport not only oxygen ions (functioning as selective oxygen separators) but also electrons back from the reactor side to the oxygen/reduction interface. No external electrodes are required, and, if the driving potential of transport is adequate, the partial oxidation reactions should be spontaneous. Such a system will operate without an externally applied potential. Oxygen is transported across the ceramic material in the form of oxygen ions, not oxygen molecules. Recent reports in the literature suggest that dense ceramic membranes made of these mixed conductors can successfully separate oxygen from air at flux rates that could be considered commercially feasible. Thus, these membranes have the potential to improve the economics of methane conversion processes. In principle, the dense ceramic materials can be shaped into hollow-tube reactors, in which air passes over the outside of the membrane and methane flows through the inside. The surfaces can also be reversed. The membrane is permeable to oxygen at high temperatures, but not to nitrogen or other gases. Thus, only oxygen from air can be transported through the membrane to the inside of the reactor surface, where it reacts with methane. Other geometric forms, such as honeycombs or corrugations, of the reactor are possible and can provide substantially greater surface areas for reaction.

  4. INTERACTIONS BETWEEN FORMING STARS AND DENSE GAS IN THE SMALL LOW-MASS CLUSTER CEDERBLAD 110

    SciTech Connect

    Ladd, E. F.; Wong, T.; Bourke, T. L.; Thompson, K. L.

    2011-12-20

    We present observations of dense gas and outflow activity in the Cederblad 110 region of the Chamaeleon I dark cloud complex. The region contains nine forming low-mass stars in evolutionary stages ranging from Class 0 to Class II/III crowded into a 0.2 pc region with high surface density ({Sigma}{sub YSO} {approx} 150 pc{sup -2}). The analysis of our N{sub 2}H{sup +} (J = 1{yields}0) maps indicates the presence of 13 {+-} 3 solar masses of dense (n {approx} 10{sup 5} cm{sup -3}) gas in this region, much of which is unstable against gravitational collapse. The most unstable material is located near the Class 0 source MMS-1, which is almost certainly actively accreting material from its dense core. Smaller column densities of more stable dense gas are found toward the region's Class I sources, IRS 4, 11, and 6. Little or no dense gas is colocated with the Class II and III sources in the region. The outflow from IRS 4 is interacting with the dense core associated with MMS-1. The molecular component of the outflow, measured in the (J = 1{yields}0) line of {sup 12}CO, appears to be deflected by the densest part of the core, after which it appears to plow through some of the lower column density portions of the core. The working surface between the head of the outflow lobe and the dense core material can be seen in the enhanced velocity dispersion of the dense gas. IRS 2, the Class III source that produces the optical reflection nebula that gives the Cederblad 110 region its name, may also be influencing the dense gas in the region. A dust temperature gradient across the MMS-1 dense core is consistent with warming from IRS 2, and a sharp gradient in dense gas column density may be caused by winds from this source. Taken together, our data indicate that this region has been producing several young stars in the recent past, and that sources which began forming first are interacting with the remaining dense gas in the region, thereby influencing current and future star

  5. Influence of raw materials and distillation equipment on the heavy metal content of waste from an alcoholic anis-type beverage.

    PubMed

    Moutsatsou, A; Chalarakis, E; Zarangas, G

    2003-01-01

    This study focused on the heavy metal content waste resulting from the production of an anis-type beverage. Although natural ingredients were used in the production process, the waste contains heavy metals and is considered hazardous. Several metals were found in the waste (Fe, Cu, Ni, Zn, Cr and Cd), with concentrations of Fe to 157.5, Cu to 82.5, Zn to 31 and Ni to 8.5mg/l. To collect information on the source of these metals, the residues of the herbs used for flavoring were examined for processes employing metallic and non-metallic pot stills. Herbs distillation residues were found to contain metals in non-metallic stills, e.g. aniseed residues from glass stills contained Cu up to 1.02 and Ni up to 0.9 mg/l. Fennel residues contained Ni up to 1.2 and Zn up to 6.6mg/l. The main source for the metals was the bronze pot stills. The metals were in complexed form in the solution. The existence of metals in the amorphous phase as shown by a SEM micrograph indicates forming of metal-organic complexes, also verified by HPLC. Complexation data can be used for selecting the proper wash treatment method. The formation of large molecules favors precipitation and chemi-sorption treatment methods.

  6. Frontiers of the Physics of Dense Plasmas and Planetary Interiors: Experiment, Theory, Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Fortney, J J; Glenzer, S H; Koenig, M; Brambrink, E; Militzer, B; Saumon, D; Valencia, D

    2008-09-12

    We review recent developments of dynamic x-ray characterization experiments of dense matter, with particular emphasis on conditions relevant to interiors of terrestrial and gas giant planets. These studies include characterization of compressed states of matter in light elements by x-ray scattering and imaging of shocked iron by radiography. We examine several applications of this work. These include the structure of massive 'Super Earth' terrestrial planets around other stars, the 40 known extrasolar gas giants with measured masses and radii, and Jupiter itself, which serves as our benchmark for giant planets. We are now in an era of dramatic improvement in our knowledge of the physics of materials at high density. For light elements, this theoretical and experimental work has many applications, including internal confinement fusion as well as the interiors of gas giant planets. For heavy elements, experiments on silicates and iron at high pressure are helping to better understand the Earth, as well as terrestrial planets as a class of objects. In particular, the discovery of rocky and gaseous planets in other planetary systems has opened our imaginations to planets not found in our own solar system. While the fields of experiments of matter at high densities, first principles calculations of equations of state (EOS), planetary science, and astronomy do progress independently of each other, it is important for there to be communication between fields. For instance, in the realm of planets, physicists can learn of key problems that exist in the area of planetary structure, and how advances in our understanding of input physics could shed new light in this area. Astronomers and planetary scientists can learn where breakthroughs in physics of materials under extreme conditions are occurring, and be ready to apply these findings within their fields.

  7. Reproductive and Hormonal Factors Associated with Fatty or Dense Breast Patterns among Korean Women

    PubMed Central

    Jeon, Jei-Hun; Kang, Jung-Hyun; Lee, Hoo-Yeon; Choi, Kui Son; Jun, Jae Kwan; Oh, Dong-Kwan; Lee, Chang Yoon; Ko, Kyungran; Park, Eun-Cheol

    2011-01-01

    Purpose Dense breasts have been suggested as a risk factor for breast cancer, but controversy still remains. This study evaluates the association of reproductive and hormonal factors with dense breasts among Korean women. Materials and Methods Using a cross-sectional design, 516 women were recruited and classified for breast density patterns as being either fatty or dense, using the Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System (BI-RADS) of the American College of Radiology. Univariate and multivariate logistic regression models were used for statistical analysis. Results In univariate logistic regression, older age, higher body mass index, older age at menarche, and oral contraceptive use were associated with more fatty breasts. On the contrary, longer duration of education, alcohol consumption, lower parity, menopause and use of hormone replacement therapy were associated with dense breasts. After adjustment, age and body mass index were inversely associated with breast density (p-value for trend <0.01, respectively), whereas nulliparous and premenopausal status were positively associated. Compared to women who had ≥2 children, nulliparous women had an 11.8-fold increase of dense breasts (p-value for trend <0.01). Compared to postmenopausal women, premenopausal women had 2.4-fold increase of dense breasts (odds ratio, 2.42; 95% confidence interval, 1.36 to 4.32). Conclusion Young age, lower body mass index, lower parity, and premenopausal status were significantly associated with dense breasts in Korea. PMID:21509162

  8. H3+ in dense and diffuse clouds.

    PubMed

    McCall, B J; Hinkle, K H; Geballe, T R; Oka, T

    1998-01-01

    Interstellar H3+ has been detected in dense as well as diffuse clouds using three 3.7 microns infrared spectral lines of the nu 2 fundamental band. Column densities of H3+ from (1.7-5.5) x 10(14) cm-2 have been measured in dense clouds in absorption against the infrared continua of the deeply embedded young stellar objects GL2136, W33A, MonR2 IRS 3, GL961E, and GL2591. Strong and broad H3+ absorptions have been detected in dense and diffuse clouds towards GC IRS 3 and GCS3-2 in the region of the galactic center. A large column density of H3+, comparable to that of a dense cloud, has been detected towards the visible star Cygnus OB2 No. 12, which has a line of sight that crosses mostly diffuse clouds. The H3+ chemistry of dense and diffuse clouds are discussed using a very simple model. Some future projects and problems are discussed.

  9. SUPPORTED DENSE CERAMIC MEMBRANES FOR OXYGEN SEPARATION

    SciTech Connect

    Timothy L. Ward

    2003-03-01

    This project addresses the need for reliable fabrication methods of supported thin/thick dense ceramic membranes for oxygen separation. Some ceramic materials that possess mixed conductivity (electronic and ionic) at high temperature have the potential to permeate oxygen with perfect selectivity, making them very attractive for oxygen separation and membrane reactor applications. In order to maximize permeation rates at the lowest possible temperatures, it is desirable to minimize diffusional limitations within the ceramic by reducing the thickness of the ceramic membrane, preferably to thicknesses of 10 {micro}m or thinner. It has proven to be very challenging to reliably fabricate dense, defect-free ceramic membrane layers of such thickness. In this project we are investigating the use of ultrafine SrCo{sub 0.5}FeO{sub x} (SCFO) powders produced by aerosol pyrolysis to fabricate such supported membranes. SrCo{sub 0.5}FeO{sub x} is a ceramic composition that has been shown to have desirable oxygen permeability, as well as good chemical stability in the reducing environments that are encountered in some important applications. Our approach is to use a doctor blade procedure to deposit pastes prepared from the aerosol-derived SCFO powders onto porous SCFO supports. We have previously shown that membrane layers deposited from the aerosol powders can be sintered to high density without densification of the underlying support. However, these membrane layers contained large-scale cracks and open areas, making them unacceptable for membrane purposes. In the past year, we have refined the paste formulations based on guidance from the ceramic tape casting literature. We have identified a multicomponent organic formulation utilizing castor oil as dispersant in a solvent of mineral spirits and isopropanol. Other additives were polyvinylbutyral as binder and dibutylphthalate as plasticizer. The nonaqueous formulation has superior wetting properties with the powder, and

  10. Source identification and hazardous risk delineation of heavy metal contamination in Yanqi basin, northwest China.

    PubMed

    Mamat, Zulpiya; Yimit, Hamid; Ji, Rou Zi A; Eziz, Mamattursun

    2014-09-15

    A total of 469 surface soil samples were collected from the Yanqi basin in northwest China and evaluated for levels of ten heavy metals. Multivariate statistical analyses were used to study sources of and map the spatial distribution of heavy metals, as well as determine the relationship between land use types and soil source materials. It was found that: (1) the average amounts of ten heavy metals in the Yanqi basin were all below the national soil environmental quality standards of China (GB15618-1998), but the average amount of Cd, Hg, Mn, Ni, Pb, and Zn all exceeded the heavy metal background levels of soil in Xinjiang, China and exhibited accumulation. The ten heavy metals analyzed in this study can be categorized into four principal components as follows: Principal component 1 was Co, Cr, Mn, Ni, and Zn, and principal component 3 was As and Cu. Both of these originated from a natural geological background. Principal component 2 consisted of Cd and Pb and originated from industrial, agricultural and transportation influences. Principal component 4 consisted of Hg and was due to industrial influences. Our study found that Pb and Zn were a large part in the principal components 1 and 3 and were influenced by a combination of geologic background and human activity. (2) Heavy metals Cd and Hg were at high levels in construction land and farmland, while Co, Cr, Cu, Mn, and Ni were significantly higher in lacustrine deposits than in sandy shale from weathered material, coarse crystalline rock weathered material, and diluvial material. The land use types correlated significantly with the accumulation of Cd and Hg, and the soil parent material was the major factor for the accumulation of As, Co, Cr, Cu, Mn, and Ni. (3) The single element, element integration and the corresponding principal component presented similar spatial patterns of hazardous risk. Following comprehensive assessment of all elements, the high risk regions were found to be located in densely

  11. Three-dimensional activated graphene network-sulfonate-terminated polymer nanocomposite as a new electrode material for the sensitive determination of dopamine and heavy metal ions.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Xiaoyan; Zhang, Yijia; Yang, Lu; Deng, Wenfang; Tan, Yueming; Ma, Ming; Xie, Qingji

    2015-03-01

    We report here that three-dimensional activated graphene networks (3DAGNs) are a better matrix to prepare graphene-polymer nanocomposites for sensitive electroanalysis than two-dimensional graphene nanosheets (2DGNs). 3DAGNs were synthesized in advance by the direct carbonization and simultaneous chemical activation of a cobalt ion-impregnated D113-type ion exchange resin, which showed an interconnected network structure and a large specific surface area. Then, the 3DAGN-sulfonate-terminated polymer (STP) nanocomposite was prepared via the in situ chemical co-polymerization of m-aminobenzene sulfonic acid and aniline in the presence of 3DAGNs. The 3DAGN-STP nanocomposite can adsorb dopamine (DA) and heavy metal ions, which was confirmed by quartz crystal microbalance studies. The 3DAGN-STP modified glassy carbon electrode (GCE) was used for the electrochemical detection of DA in the presence of ascorbic acid and uric acid, with a linear response range of 0.1-32 μM and a limit of detection of 10 nM. In addition, differential pulse voltammetry was used for the simultaneous determination of Cd(2+) and Pb(2+) at the 3DAGN-STP/GCE further modified with a bismuth film, exhibiting linear response ranges of 1-70 μg L(-1) for Cd(2+) and 1-80 μg L(-1) for Pb(2+) with limits of detection of 0.1 μg L(-1) for Cd(2+) and 0.2 μg L(-1) for Pb(2+). Because the 3DAGN-STP can integrate the advantages of 3DAGNs with STPs, the 3DAGN-STP/GCE was more sensitive than the bare GCE, 3DAGN/GCE, and 2DGN-STP/GCE for the determination of DA and heavy metal ions. PMID:25611429

  12. Warm, Dense Plasma Characterization by X-ray Thomson Scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Landen, O L; Glenzer, S H; Cauble, R C; Lee, R W; Edwards, J E; Degroot, J S

    2000-07-18

    We describe how the powerful technique of spectrally resolved Thomson scattering can be extended to the x-ray regime, for direct measurements of the ionization state, density, temperature, and the microscopic behavior of dense cool plasmas. Such a direct measurement of microscopic parameters of solid density plasmas could eventually be used to properly interpret laboratory measurements of material properties such as thermal and electrical conductivity, EUS and opacity. In addition, x-ray Thomson scattering will provide new information on the characteristics of rarely and hitherto difficult to diagnose Fermi degenerate and strongly coupled plasmas.

  13. Preparation Of Strong, Dense Potassium Beta''-Alumina Ceramic

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, Roger M.; Jeffries-Nakamura, Barbara; Ryan, Margaret A.; O'Connor, Dennis E.; Kisor, Adam; Kikkert, Stanley J.; Losey, Robert; Suitor, Jerry W.

    1995-01-01

    Improved process for making mechanically strong, dense, phase-pure potassium beta''-alumina solid electrolyte (K-BASE) results in material superior to all previous K-BASE preparations and similar to commercial Na-BASE in strength, phase purity and high-temperature ionic conductivity. Potassium-based alkali-metal thermal-to-electric conversion (AMTEC) cells expected to operate efficiently at lower heat-input temperatures and lower rejection temperatures than sodium-based AMTEC cells, making them appropriate for somewhat different applications.

  14. X-ray sources for radiography of warm dense matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benuzzi-Mounaix, Alessandra; Brambrink, Erik; Barbrel, Benjamin; Koenig, Michel; Gregory, Chris; Loupias, Bérénice; Ravasio, Alessandra; Rabec Le Gloahec, Marc; Vinci, Tommaso; Boehly, Tom; Endo, Takashi; Kimura, Tomoaki; Ozaki, Norimasa; Wei, Huigang; Aglitskiy, Yefim; Faenov, Anatoly; Pikuz, Tatiana

    2008-11-01

    The knowledge of Warm Dense Matter is important in different domains such as inertial confinement fusion, astrophysics and geophysics. The development of techniques for direct probing of this type of matter is of great interest. X-ray radiography is one of the most promising diagnostic to measure density directly. Here we present some results of low-Z material radiography and an experiment devoted to characterize a short pulse laser driven hard x-ray source for the radiography of medium and high Z matter. Experiments have been performed on LULI2000 and TW facilities at the Ecole Polytechnique.

  15. Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glaessgen, Edward H.; Schoeppner, Gregory A.

    2006-01-01

    NASA Langley Research Center has successfully developed an electron beam freeform fabrication (EBF3) process, a rapid metal deposition process that works efficiently with a variety of weldable alloys. The EBF3 process can be used to build a complex, unitized part in a layer-additive fashion, although the more immediate payoff is for use as a manufacturing process for adding details to components fabricated from simplified castings and forgings or plate products. The EBF3 process produces structural metallic parts with strengths comparable to that of wrought product forms and has been demonstrated on aluminum, titanium, and nickel-based alloys to date. The EBF3 process introduces metal wire feedstock into a molten pool that is created and sustained using a focused electron beam in a vacuum environment. Operation in a vacuum ensures a clean process environment and eliminates the need for a consumable shield gas. Advanced metal manufacturing methods such as EBF3 are being explored for fabrication and repair of aerospace structures, offering potential for improvements in cost, weight, and performance to enhance mission success for aircraft, launch vehicles, and spacecraft. Near-term applications of the EBF3 process are most likely to be implemented for cost reduction and lead time reduction through addition of details onto simplified preforms (casting or forging). This is particularly attractive for components with protruding details that would require a significantly large volume of material to be machined away from an oversized forging, offering significant reductions to the buy-to-fly ratio. Future far-term applications promise improved structural efficiency through reduced weight and improved performance by exploiting the layer-additive nature of the EBF3 process to fabricate tailored unitized structures with functionally graded microstructures and compositions.

  16. Thermal conductivity measurements of proton-heated warm dense matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKelvey, A.; Fernandez-Panella, A.; Hua, R.; Kim, J.; King, J.; Sio, H.; McGuffey, C.; Kemp, G. E.; Freeman, R. R.; Beg, F. N.; Shepherd, R.; Ping, Y.

    2015-06-01

    Accurate knowledge of conductivity characteristics in the strongly coupled plasma regime is extremely important for ICF processes such as the onset of hydrodynamic instabilities, thermonuclear burn propagation waves, shell mixing, and efficient x-ray conversion of indirect drive schemes. Recently, an experiment was performed on the Titan laser platform at the Jupiter Laser Facility to measure the thermal conductivity of proton-heated warm dense matter. In the experiment, proton beams generated via target normal sheath acceleration were used to heat bi-layer targets with high-Z front layers and lower-Z back layers. The stopping power of a material is approximately proportional to Z2 so a sharp temperature gradient is established between the two materials. The subsequent thermal conduction from the higher-Z material to the lower-Z was measured with time resolved streaked optical pyrometry (SOP) and Fourier domain interferometry (FDI) of the rear surface. Results will be used to compare predictions from the thermal conduction equation and the Wiedemann-Franz Law in the warm dense matter regime. Data from the time resolved diagnostics for Au/Al and Au/C Targets of 20-200 nm thickness will be presented.

  17. Coalescence preference in densely packed microbubbles

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Yeseul; Lim, Su Jin; Gim, Bopil; Weon, Byung Mook

    2015-01-13

    A bubble merged from two parent bubbles with different size tends to be placed closer to the larger parent. This phenomenon is known as the coalescence preference. Here we demonstrate that the coalescence preference can be blocked inside a densely packed cluster of bubbles. We utilized high-speed high-resolution X-ray microscopy to clearly visualize individual coalescence events inside densely packed microbubbles with a local packing fraction of ~40%. Thus, the surface energy release theory predicts an exponent of 5 in a relation between the relative coalescence position and the parent size ratio, whereas our observation for coalescence in densely packed microbubbles shows a different exponent of 2. We believe that this result would be important to understand the reality of coalescence dynamics in a variety of packing situations of soft matter.

  18. Coalescence preference in densely packed microbubbles

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Kim, Yeseul; Lim, Su Jin; Gim, Bopil; Weon, Byung Mook

    2015-01-13

    A bubble merged from two parent bubbles with different size tends to be placed closer to the larger parent. This phenomenon is known as the coalescence preference. Here we demonstrate that the coalescence preference can be blocked inside a densely packed cluster of bubbles. We utilized high-speed high-resolution X-ray microscopy to clearly visualize individual coalescence events inside densely packed microbubbles with a local packing fraction of ~40%. Thus, the surface energy release theory predicts an exponent of 5 in a relation between the relative coalescence position and the parent size ratio, whereas our observation for coalescence in densely packed microbubblesmore » shows a different exponent of 2. We believe that this result would be important to understand the reality of coalescence dynamics in a variety of packing situations of soft matter.« less

  19. Propagation of light in a Dense Medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masood, Samina; Saleem, Iram

    Propagation of light is studied in a very dense system. Renormalization scheme of QED is used to understand the propagation of light in a hot and dense medium. We consider a medium of a very large chemical potential with relatively small temperature. The generalized results of vacuum polarization of photon in a hot and dense medium is used to study the behavior of light in such a system. Our hypothetical system corresponds to a heat bath of electrons at an equilibrium temperature and the density of electrons is larger as compared to the temperature of the medium. Such type of systems have previously been identified as classical systems because the chemical potential is large enough to dominate temperature.

  20. Heavy ions in Jupiter's environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, R. A.

    1980-01-01

    The extended atmosphere of the Jupiter system consists of atoms and ions of heavy elements. This material originates on the satellite Io. Energy is lost from the thermal plasma in collisionally excited optical and ultraviolet emission. The juxtaposition of Earth and spacecraft measurements provide insight concerning the underlying processes of particle transport and energy supply.

  1. Ab Initio Simulations of Dense Helium Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Cong; He Xiantu; Zhang Ping

    2011-04-08

    We study the thermophysical properties of dense helium plasmas by using quantum molecular dynamics and orbital-free molecular dynamics simulations, where densities are considered from 400 to 800 g/cm{sup 3} and temperatures up to 800 eV. Results are presented for the equation of state. From the Kubo-Greenwood formula, we derive the electrical conductivity and electronic thermal conductivity. In particular, with the increase in temperature, we discuss the change in the Lorenz number, which indicates a transition from strong coupling and degenerate state to moderate coupling and partial degeneracy regime for dense helium.

  2. An Experimental Review on Heavy-Flavor v 2 in Heavy-Ion Collision

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Nasim, Md.; Esha, Roli; Huang, Huan Zhong

    2016-01-01

    For overmore » a decade now, the primary purpose of relativistic heavy-ion collisions at the Relativistic Heavy-Ion Collider (RHIC) and the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) has been to study the properties of QCD matter under extreme conditions—high temperature and high density. The heavy-ion experiments at both RHIC and LHC have recorded a wealth of data in p+p, p+Pb, d+Au, Cu+Cu, Cu+Au, Au+Au, Pb+Pb, and U+U collisions at energies ranging from s N N = 7.7  GeV to 7 TeV. Heavy quarks are considered good probe to study the QCD matter created in relativistic collisions due to their very large mass and other unique properties. A precise measurement of various properties of heavy-flavor hadrons provides an insight into the fundamental properties of the hot and dense medium created in these nucleus-nucleus collisions, such as transport coefficient and thermalization and hadronization mechanisms. The main focus of this paper is to present a review on the measurements of azimuthal anisotropy of heavy-flavor hadrons and to outline the scientific opportunities in this sector due to future detector upgrade. We will mainly discuss the elliptic flow of open charmed meson ( D -meson), J / ψ , and leptons from heavy-flavor decay at RHIC and LHC energy.« less

  3. Health risk assessment of heavy metals contamination in tomato and green pepper plants grown in soils amended with phosphogypsum waste materials.

    PubMed

    Al-Hwaiti, Mohammad; Al-Khashman, Omar

    2015-04-01

    Phosphogypsum (PG) is a waste produced by the phosphate fertilizer industry that has relatively high concentrations of some heavy metals (e.g., Cd, Cr, Cu, Pb, V, and Zn). The present study was conducted to investigate heavy metal contamination in soils and vegetables (tomatoes and green peppers) and to evaluate the possible health risks associated with the consumption of vegetables grown in PG-amended soils. The enrichment factor values indicated that Pb, Cr, Cu, Ni, Zn, and V were depleted to minimally enriched, and Cd was moderately enriched. The pollution load index values indicated that the PG-amended soils were strongly polluted with Cd, moderately polluted with Cr and Ni, and slightly polluted with Pb, Cu, Zn and V. The geo-accumulation index values indicated that the PG-amended soils were uncontaminated with Pb, Cr, Cu, Ni, Zn, V, and moderately contaminated with Cd. The trace metal transfer for Cd, Cr, Pb, and Zn concentrations was below what are considered as acceptable limits (<1) for food production in soil and vegetables (tomatoes and green peppers) at each site area. Soil-to-plant transfer factor values decreased in order of Zn > Pb > Cd > Cr. The biological absorption coefficients in plants are, in order of highest to lowest, Pb > Zn > Cd > Cr, which suggests that Pb is more bioavailable to plants than Cd, Cr, and Zn. Furthermore, this study highlights that both adults and children consuming vegetables (e.g., tomatoes and green peppers) grown in PG-amended soils ingest significant amounts of the metals studied. However, the daily intake of metals (DIM) and the health risk index (HRI) values are <1, indicating a relative absence of health risks associated with the consumption of vegetables/fruits grown in PG-amended soils. However, while DIM and HRI values suggest that the consumption of plants grown in PG-amended soils is nearly free of risks, there are other sources of metal exposures such as dust inhalation, dermal contact, and ingestion (for

  4. Health risk assessment of heavy metals contamination in tomato and green pepper plants grown in soils amended with phosphogypsum waste materials.

    PubMed

    Al-Hwaiti, Mohammad; Al-Khashman, Omar

    2015-04-01

    Phosphogypsum (PG) is a waste produced by the phosphate fertilizer industry that has relatively high concentrations of some heavy metals (e.g., Cd, Cr, Cu, Pb, V, and Zn). The present study was conducted to investigate heavy metal contamination in soils and vegetables (tomatoes and green peppers) and to evaluate the possible health risks associated with the consumption of vegetables grown in PG-amended soils. The enrichment factor values indicated that Pb, Cr, Cu, Ni, Zn, and V were depleted to minimally enriched, and Cd was moderately enriched. The pollution load index values indicated that the PG-amended soils were strongly polluted with Cd, moderately polluted with Cr and Ni, and slightly polluted with Pb, Cu, Zn and V. The geo-accumulation index values indicated that the PG-amended soils were uncontaminated with Pb, Cr, Cu, Ni, Zn, V, and moderately contaminated with Cd. The trace metal transfer for Cd, Cr, Pb, and Zn concentrations was below what are considered as acceptable limits (<1) for food production in soil and vegetables (tomatoes and green peppers) at each site area. Soil-to-plant transfer factor values decreased in order of Zn > Pb > Cd > Cr. The biological absorption coefficients in plants are, in order of highest to lowest, Pb > Zn > Cd > Cr, which suggests that Pb is more bioavailable to plants than Cd, Cr, and Zn. Furthermore, this study highlights that both adults and children consuming vegetables (e.g., tomatoes and green peppers) grown in PG-amended soils ingest significant amounts of the metals studied. However, the daily intake of metals (DIM) and the health risk index (HRI) values are <1, indicating a relative absence of health risks associated with the consumption of vegetables/fruits grown in PG-amended soils. However, while DIM and HRI values suggest that the consumption of plants grown in PG-amended soils is nearly free of risks, there are other sources of metal exposures such as dust inhalation, dermal contact, and ingestion (for

  5. SUPPORTED DENSE CERAMIC MEMBRANES FOR OXYGEN SEPARATION

    SciTech Connect

    Timothy L. Ward

    2000-06-30

    Mixed-conducting membranes have the ability to conduct oxygen with perfect selectivity at elevated temperatures, which makes them an extremely attractive alternative for oxygen separation and membrane reactor applications. The ability to reliably fabricate these membranes in thin or thick films would enable solid-state divisional limitations to be minimized, thus providing higher oxygen flux. Based on that motivation, the overall objective for this project is to develop and demonstrate a strategy for the fabrication of supported Wick film ceramic mixed conducting membranes, and improve the understanding of the fundamental issues associated with reliable fabrication of these membranes. The project has focused on the mixed-conducting ceramic composition SrCo{sub 0.5}FeO{sub x} because of its superior permeability and stability in reducing atmospheres. The fabrication strategy employed involves the deposition of SrCo{sub 0.5}FeO{sub x} thick films onto porous supports of the same composition. In the second year of this project, we completed characterization of the sintering and phase behavior of the porous SrCo{sub 0.5}FeO{sub x} supports, leading to a standard support fabrication methodology. Using a doctor blade method, pastes made from aerosol-derived SrCo{sub 0.5}FeO{sub x} powder dispersed with polyethylene glycol were applied to the supports, and the sintering behavior of the thick film membranes was examined in air and nitrogen atmospheres. It has been demonstrated that the desired crystalline phase content can be produced in the membranes, and that the material in the membrane layer can be highly densified without densifying the underlying support. However, considerable cracking and opening of the film occurred when films densified to a high extent. The addition of MgO into the SrCo{sub 0.5}FeO{sub x} supports was shown to inhibit support sintering so that temperatures up to 1300 C, where significant liquid formation occurs, could be used for film sintering

  6. DENSE NONAQUEOUS PHASE LIQUIDS -- A WORKSHOP SUMMARY

    EPA Science Inventory

    site characterization, and, therefore, DNAPL remediation, can be expected. Dense nonaqueous phase liquids (DNAPLs) in the subsurface are long-term sources of ground-water contamination, and may persist for centuries before dissolving completely in adjacent ground water. In respo...

  7. The Southern California Dense GPS Geodetic Array

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Webb, F.

    1994-01-01

    The Southern California Earthquake Center is coordinating a effort by scientists at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, the U.S. Geological Survey, and various academic institutions to establish a dense 250 station, continuously recording GPS geodetic array in southern California for measuring crustal deformation associated with slip on the numerous faults that underlie the major metropolitan areas of southern california.

  8. Coalescence preference in dense packing of bubbles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Yeseul; Gim, Bopil; Gim, Bopil; Weon, Byung Mook

    2015-11-01

    Coalescence preference is the tendency that a merged bubble from the contact of two original bubbles (parent) tends to be near to the bigger parent. Here, we show that the coalescence preference can be blocked by densely packing of neighbor bubbles. We use high-speed high-resolution X-ray microscopy to clearly visualize individual coalescence phenomenon which occurs in micro scale seconds and inside dense packing of microbubbles with a local packing fraction of ~40%. Previous theory and experimental evidence predict a power of -5 between the relative coalescence position and the parent size. However, our new observation for coalescence preference in densely packed microbubbles shows a different power of -2. We believe that this result may be important to understand coalescence dynamics in dense packing of soft matter. This work (NRF-2013R1A22A04008115) was supported by Mid-career Researcher Program through NRF grant funded by the MEST and also was supported by Ministry of Science, ICT and Future Planning (2009-0082580) and by Basic Science Research Program through the National Research Foundation of Korea (NRF) funded by the Ministry and Education, Science and Technology (NRF-2012R1A6A3A04039257).

  9. Preparation of a dense, polycrystalline ceramic structure

    DOEpatents

    Cooley, Jason; Chen, Ching-Fong; Alexander, David

    2010-12-07

    Ceramic nanopowder was sealed inside a metal container under a vacuum. The sealed evacuated container was forced through a severe deformation channel at an elevated temperature below the melting point of the ceramic nanopowder. The result was a dense nanocrystalline ceramic structure inside the metal container.

  10. DENSE CLUMPS AND CANDIDATES FOR MOLECULAR OUTFLOWS IN W40

    SciTech Connect

    Shimoikura, Tomomi; Dobashi, Kazuhito; Nakamura, Fumitaka; Hara, Chihomi; Kawabe, Ryohei; Tanaka, Tomohiro; Shimajiri, Yoshito

    2015-06-20

    We report the results of the {sup 12}CO (J = 3−2) and HCO{sup +} (J = 4−3) observations of the W40 H ii region with the Atacama Submillimeter Telescope Experiment (ASTE) 10 m telescope (HPBW ≃ 22″) to search for molecular outflows and dense clumps. We found that the velocity field in the region is highly complex, consisting of at least four distinct velocity components at V{sub LSR} ≃ 3, 5, 7, and 10 km s{sup −1}. The ∼7 km s{sup −1} component represents the systemic velocity of cold gas surrounding the entire region, and causes heavy absorption in the {sup 12}CO spectra over the velocity range 6 ≲ V{sub LSR} ≲ 9 km s{sup −1}. The ∼5 and ∼10 km s{sup −1} components exhibit high {sup 12}CO temperature (≳40 K) and are found mostly around the H ii region, suggesting that these components are likely to be tracing dense gas interacting with the expanding shell around the H ii region. Based on the {sup 12}CO data, we identified 13 regions of high velocity gas, which we interpret as candidate outflow lobes. Using the HCO{sup +} data, we also identified six clumps and estimated their physical parameters. On the basis of the ASTE data and near-infrared images from 2MASS, we present an updated three-dimensional model of this region. In order to investigate molecular outflows in W40, the SiO (J = 1−0, v = 0) emission line and some other emission lines at 40 GHz were also observed with the 45 m telescope at the Nobeyama Radio Observatory, but they were not detected at the present sensitivity.

  11. Physical Modelling of Proton and Heavy Ion Radiation using Geant4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Douglass, M.; Bezak, E.

    2012-10-01

    Protons and heavy ion particles are considered to be ideal particles for use in external beam radiotherapy due to superior properties of the dose distribution that results when these particles are incident externally and due to their relative biological effectiveness. While significant research has been performed into the properties and physical dose characteristics of heavy ions, the nuclear reactions (direct and fragmentation) undergone by He4, C12 and Ne20 nuclei used in radiotherapy in materials other than water is still largely unexplored. In the current project, input code was developed for the Monte Carlo toolkit Geant 4 version 9.3 to simulate the transport of several mono-energetic heavy ions through water. The relative dose contributions from secondary particles and nuclear fragments originating from the primary particles were investigated for each ion in both water and dense bone (ICRU) media. The results indicated that the relative contribution to the total physical dose from nuclear fragments increased with both increasing particle mass and with increasing medium density. In the case of 150 MeV protons, secondary particles were shown to contribute less than 0.5% of the peak dose and as high as 25% when using 10570 MeV neon ions in bone. When water was substituted for a bone medium, the contributions from fragments increased by more than 6% for C12 and Ne20.

  12. Formation and evolution of black holes in dense star clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goswami, Sanghamitra

    Using supercomputer simulations combining stellar dynamics and stellar evolution, we have studied various problems related to the existence of black holes in dense star clusters. We consider both stellar and intermediate-mass black holes, and we focus on massive, dense star clusters, such as old globular clusters and young, so called "super star clusters." The first problem concerns the formation of intermediate-mass black holes in young clusters through the runaway collision instability. A promising mechanism to form intermediate-mass black holes (IMBHs) is runaway mergers in dense star clusters, where main-sequence stars collide re- peatedly and form a very massive star (VMS), which then collapses to a black hole (BH). Here we study the effects of primordial mass segregation and the importance of the stellar initial mass function (IMF) on the runaway growth of VMSs using a dynamical Monte Carlo code to model systems with N as high as 10^6 stars. Our Monte Carlo code includes an explicittreatment of all stellar collisions. We place special emphasis on the possibility of top-heavy IMFs, as observed in some very young massive clusters. We find that both primordial mass segregation and the shape of the IMF affect the rate of core collapse of star clusters and thus the time of the runaway. When we include primordial mass segregation we generally see a decrease in core collapse time (tcc). Although for smaller degrees of primordial mass segregation this decrease in tcc is mostly due to the change in the density profile of the cluster, for highly mass-segregated (primordial) clusters, it is the increase in the average mass in the core which reduces the central relaxation time, decreasing tcc. Finally, flatter IMFs generally increase the average mass in the whole cluster, which increases tcc. For the range of IMFs investigated in this thesis, this increase in tcc is to some degree balanced by stellar collisions, which accelerate core collapse. Thus there is no

  13. Method for forming a uniformly dense polymer foam body

    DOEpatents

    Whinnery, Jr., Leroy

    2002-01-01

    A method for providing a uniformly dense polymer foam body having a density between about 0.013 .sup.g /.sub.cm.sup..sub.3 to about 0.5 .sup.g /.sub.cm.sup..sub.3 is disclosed. The method utilizes a thermally expandable polymer microballoon material wherein some of the microballoons are unexpanded and some are only partially expanded. It is shown that by mixing the two types of materials in appropriate ratios to achieve the desired bulk final density, filling a mold with this mixture so as to displace all or essentially all of the internal volume of the mold, heating the mold for a predetermined interval at a temperature above about 130.degree. C., and then cooling the mold to a temperature below 80.degree. C. the molded part achieves a bulk density which varies by less then about .+-.6% everywhere throughout the part volume.

  14. Current and Perspective Applications of Dense Plasma Focus Devices

    SciTech Connect

    Gribkov, V. A.

    2008-04-07

    Dense Plasma Focus (DPF) devices' applications, which are intended to support the main-stream large-scale nuclear fusion programs (NFP) from one side (both in fundamental problems of Dense Magnetized Plasma physics and in its engineering issues) as well as elaborated for an immediate use in a number of fields from the other one, are described. In the first direction such problems as self-generated magnetic fields, implosion stability of plasma shells having a high aspect ratio, etc. are important for the Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) programs (e.g. as NIF), whereas different problems of current disruption phenomenon, plasma turbulence, mechanisms of generation of fast particles and neutrons in magnetized plasmas are of great interest for the large devices of the Magnetic Plasma Confinement--MPC (e.g. as ITER). In a sphere of the engineering problems of NFP it is shown that in particular the radiation material sciences have DPF as a very efficient tool for radiation tests of prospect materials and for improvement of their characteristics. In the field of broad-band current applications some results obtained in the fields of radiation material sciences, radiobiology, nuclear medicine, express Neutron Activation Analysis (including a single-shot interrogation of hidden illegal objects), dynamic non-destructive quality control, X-Ray microlithography and micromachining, and micro-radiography are presented. As the examples of the potential future applications it is proposed to use DPF as a powerful high-flux neutron source to generate very powerful pulses of neutrons in the nanosecond (ns) range of its duration for innovative experiments in nuclear physics, for the goals of radiation treatment of malignant tumors, for neutron tests of materials of the first wall, blankets and NFP device's constructions (with fluences up to 1 dpa per a year term), and ns pulses of fast electrons, neutrons and hard X-Rays for brachytherapy.

  15. Current and Perspective Applications of Dense Plasma Focus Devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gribkov, V. A.

    2008-04-01

    Dense Plasma Focus (DPF) devices' applications, which are intended to support the main-stream large-scale nuclear fusion programs (NFP) from one side (both in fundamental problems of Dense Magnetized Plasma physics and in its engineering issues) as well as elaborated for an immediate use in a number of fields from the other one, are described. In the first direction such problems as self-generated magnetic fields, implosion stability of plasma shells having a high aspect ratio, etc. are important for the Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) programs (e.g. as NIF), whereas different problems of current disruption phenomenon, plasma turbulence, mechanisms of generation of fast particles and neutrons in magnetized plasmas are of great interest for the large devices of the Magnetic Plasma Confinement—MPC (e.g. as ITER). In a sphere of the engineering problems of NFP it is shown that in particular the radiation material sciences have DPF as a very efficient tool for radiation tests of prospect materials and for improvement of their characteristics. In the field of broad-band current applications some results obtained in the fields of radiation material sciences, radiobiology, nuclear medicine, express Neutron Activation Analysis (including a single-shot interrogation of hidden illegal objects), dynamic non-destructive quality control, X-Ray microlithography and micromachining, and micro-radiography are presented. As the examples of the potential future applications it is proposed to use DPF as a powerful high-flux neutron source to generate very powerful pulses of neutrons in the nanosecond (ns) range of its duration for innovative experiments in nuclear physics, for the goals of radiation treatment of malignant tumors, for neutron tests of materials of the first wall, blankets and NFP device's constructions (with fluences up to 1 dpa per a year term), and ns pulses of fast electrons, neutrons and hard X-Rays for brachytherapy.

  16. Shock waves and double layers in electron degenerate dense plasma with viscous ion fluids

    SciTech Connect

    Mamun, A. A.; Zobaer, M. S.

    2014-02-15

    The properties of ion-acoustic shock waves and double layers propagating in a viscous degenerate dense plasma (containing inertial viscous ion fluid, non-relativistic and ultra-relativistic degenerate electron fluid, and negatively charged stationary heavy element) is investigated. A new nonlinear equation (viz. Gardner equation with additional dissipative term) is derived by the reductive perturbation method. The properties of the ion-acoustic shock waves and double layers are examined by the analysis of the shock and double layer solutions of this new equation (we would like to call it “M-Z equation”). It is found that the properties of these shock and double layer structures obtained from this analysis are significantly different from those obtained from the analysis of standard Gardner or Burgers’ equation. The implications of our results to dense plasmas in astrophysical objects (e.g., non-rotating white dwarf stars) are briefly discussed.

  17. A Seemingly Simple Task: Filling a Solenoid Volume in Vacuum with Dense Plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Anders, Andre; Kauffeldt, Marina; Roy, Prabir; Oks, Efim

    2010-06-24

    Space-charge neutralization of a pulsed, high-current ion beam is required to compress and focus the beam on a target for warm dense matter physics or heavy ion fusion experiments. We described attempts to produce dense plasma in and near the final focusing solenoid through which the ion beam travels, thereby providing an opportunity for the beam to acquire the necessary charge-compensating electrons. Among the options are plasma injection from four pulsed vacuum arc sources located outside the solenoid, and using a high current (> 4 kA) pulsed vacuum arc plasma from a ring cathode near the edge of the solenoid. The plasma distribution is characterized by photographic means and by an array of movable Langmuir probes. The plasma is produced at several cathode spots distributed azimuthally on the ring cathode. Beam neutralization and compression are accomplished, though issues of density, uniformity, and pulse-to-pulse reproducibly remain to be solved.

  18. PHOTOCHEMICAL HEATING OF DENSE MOLECULAR GAS

    SciTech Connect

    Glassgold, A. E.; Najita, J. R.

    2015-09-10

    Photochemical heating is analyzed with an emphasis on the heating generated by chemical reactions initiated by the products of photodissociation and photoionization. The immediate products are slowed down by collisions with the ambient gas and then heat the gas. In addition to this direct process, heating is also produced by the subsequent chemical reactions initiated by these products. Some of this chemical heating comes from the kinetic energy of the reaction products and the rest from collisional de-excitation of the product atoms and molecules. In considering dense gas dominated by molecular hydrogen, we find that the chemical heating is sometimes as large, if not much larger than, the direct heating. In very dense gas, the total photochemical heating approaches 10 eV per photodissociation (or photoionization), competitive with other ways of heating molecular gas.

  19. Active fluidization in dense glassy systems.

    PubMed

    Mandal, Rituparno; Bhuyan, Pranab Jyoti; Rao, Madan; Dasgupta, Chandan

    2016-07-20

    Dense soft glasses show strong collective caging behavior at sufficiently low temperatures. Using molecular dynamics simulations of a model glass former, we show that the incorporation of activity or self-propulsion, f0, can induce cage breaking and fluidization, resulting in the disappearance of the glassy phase beyond a critical f0. The diffusion coefficient crosses over from being strongly to weakly temperature dependent as f0 is increased. In addition, we demonstrate that activity induces a crossover from a fragile to a strong glass and a tendency of active particles to cluster. Our results are of direct relevance to the collective dynamics of dense active colloidal glasses and to recent experiments on tagged particle diffusion in living cells. PMID:27380935

  20. Dense Deposit Disease and C3 Glomerulopathy

    PubMed Central

    Barbour, Thomas D.; Pickering, Matthew C.; Terence Cook, H.

    2013-01-01

    Summary C3 glomerulopathy refers to those renal lesions characterized histologically by predominant C3 accumulation within the glomerulus, and pathogenetically by aberrant regulation of the alternative pathway of complement. Dense deposit disease is distinguished from other forms of C3 glomerulopathy by its characteristic appearance on electron microscopy. The extent to which dense deposit disease also differs from other forms of C3 glomerulopathy in terms of clinical features, natural history, and outcomes of treatment including renal transplantation is less clear. We discuss the pathophysiology of C3 glomerulopathy, with evidence for alternative pathway dysregulation obtained from affected individuals and complement factor H (Cfh)-deficient animal models. Recent linkage studies in familial C3 glomerulopathy have shown genomic rearrangements in the Cfh-related genes, for which the novel pathophysiologic concept of Cfh deregulation has been proposed. PMID:24161036

  1. Deterministic dense coding with partially entangled states

    SciTech Connect

    Mozes, Shay; Reznik, Benni; Oppenheim, Jonathan

    2005-01-01

    The utilization of a d-level partially entangled state, shared by two parties wishing to communicate classical information without errors over a noiseless quantum channel, is discussed. We analytically construct deterministic dense coding schemes for certain classes of nonmaximally entangled states, and numerically obtain schemes in the general case. We study the dependency of the maximal alphabet size of such schemes on the partially entangled state shared by the two parties. Surprisingly, for d>2 it is possible to have deterministic dense coding with less than one ebit. In this case the number of alphabet letters that can be communicated by a single particle is between d and 2d. In general, we numerically find that the maximal alphabet size is any integer in the range [d,d{sup 2}] with the possible exception of d{sup 2}-1. We also find that states with less entanglement can have a greater deterministic communication capacity than other more entangled states.

  2. Dense silica coatings on ceramic powder particles

    SciTech Connect

    Opitz, J.F.A.; Mayr, W.

    1995-09-01

    Dense silica coatings on the surface of inorganic powders particles are prepared by the hydrolysis of tetraethoxysilane (TEOS) in alcoholic suspensions. In a first reaction step, the TEOS is pre-hydrolysed in acidic solution and afterwards, a suspension of powder particles in this reaction solution is treated with ammonia which results in a dense silica coating of typically 10 - 100 nm thickness. Different luminescent powders which are used in the manufacture of cathode-ray tubes or fluorescent lamps have been coated by this procedure. The silica coating forms a transparent layer and the suspension properties of the coated powders are determined by the silica layer. The silica coating also protects sulfidic luminescent powders from being attacked by oxidizing agents like dichromate ions which are used in the suspension formulations for TV tube fabrication.

  3. The kinetic chemistry of dense interstellar clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Graedel, T. E.; Langer, W. D.; Frerking, M. A.

    1982-01-01

    A model of the time-dependent chemistry of dense interstellar clouds is formulated to study the dominant chemical processes in carbon and oxygen isotope fractionation, the formation of nitrogen-containing molecules, and the evolution of product molecules as a function of cloud density and temperature. The abundances of the dominant isotopes of the carbon- and oxygen-bearing molecules are calculated. The chemical abundances are found to be quite sensitive to electron concentration since the electron concentration determines the ratio of H3(+) to He(+), and the electron density is strongly influenced by the metals abundance. For typical metal abundances and for H2 cloud density not less than 10,000 molecules/cu cm, nearly all carbon exists as CO at late cloud ages. At high cloud density, many aspects of the chemistry are strongly time dependent. Finally, model calculations agree well with abundances deduced from observations of molecular line emission in cold dense clouds.

  4. Hydrodynamic stellar interactions in dense star clusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rasio, Frederic A.

    1993-01-01

    Highly detailed HST observations of globular-cluster cores and galactic nuclei motivate new theoretical studies of the violent dynamical processes which govern the evolution of these very dense stellar systems. These processes include close stellar encounters and direct physical collisions between stars. Such hydrodynamic stellar interactions are thought to explain the large populations of blue stragglers, millisecond pulsars, X-ray binaries, and other peculiar sources observed in globular clusters. Three-dimensional hydrodynamics techniques now make it possible to perform realistic numerical simulations of these interactions. The results, when combined with those of N-body simulations of stellar dynamics, should provide for the first time a realistic description of dense star clusters. Here I review briefly current theoretical work on hydrodynamic stellar interactions, emphasizing its relevance to recent observations.

  5. New dense hydrous magnesium silicate in the lower mantle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishi, M.; Irifune, T.; Tsuchiya, J.; Tange, Y.; Nishihara, Y.; Fujino, K.; Higo, Y.

    2013-12-01

    A small amount of water has been shown to strongly affect several key properties of the deep mantle, such as melting temperature, rheological property, electrical conductivity, atomic diffusivity. Recent experimental studies suggest that dense hydrous magnesium silicates (DHMS) are stable over a wide range of pressure, and therefore DHMS possibly carry water into the deep Eath's interior. The most dense form of DHMS, phase D, has been believed to be stable at least under the uppermost part of the lower mantle conditions along cold slab geotherms. However, little is known about the high pressure transformation of phase D, and the other DHMS that can be stable in the lower mantle. To determine the stability fields of the DHMS in the lower mantle, we conducted the high pressure and high temperature experiments using a large volume multianvil apparatus with sintered diamond as the second-stage anvils. In-situ X-ray diffraction measurements were also conducted in order to observe the structure of the present dense hydrous magnesium phases. The starting materials were mixture of Mg(OH)2 brucite and SiO2 silica powder. The microstructures and chemical compositions of the recovered samples were examined using a field emission-scanning electron microscope with an energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. We found that phase D transforms to an assemblage with a new DHMS at pressures above ~48 GPa. Phase H has a chemical composition close to MgSiH2O4. A significant amount of water is retained in the descending slabs of this new DHMS, which may be delivered to the deepest part of the lower mantle and may influence the structure and dynamics of the mantle.

  6. Observations of Plasmons in Warm Dense Matter

    SciTech Connect

    Glenzer, S H; Landen, O L; Neumayer, P; Lee, R W; Widmann, K; Pollaine, S W; Wallace, R J; Gregori, G; Holl, A; Bornath, T; Thiele, R; Schwarz, V; Kraeft, W; Redmer, R

    2006-09-05

    We present the first collective x-ray scattering measurements of plasmons in solid-density plasmas. The forward scattering spectra of a laser-produced narrow-band x-ray line from isochorically heated beryllium show that the plasmon frequency is a sensitive measure of the electron density. Dynamic structure calculations that include collisions and detailed balance match the measured plasmon spectrum indicating that this technique will enable new applications to determine the equation of state and compressibility of dense matter.

  7. Oxygen ion-conducting dense ceramic

    DOEpatents

    Balachandran, Uthamalingam; Kleefisch, Mark S.; Kobylinski, Thaddeus P.; Morissette, Sherry L.; Pei, Shiyou

    1998-01-01

    Preparation, structure, and properties of mixed metal oxide compositions and their uses are described. Mixed metal oxide compositions of the invention have stratified crystalline structure identifiable by means of powder X-ray diffraction patterns. In the form of dense ceramic membranes, the present compositions demonstrate an ability to separate oxygen selectively from a gaseous mixture containing oxygen and one or more other volatile components by means of ionic conductivities.

  8. Dense Molecular Gas in Centaurus A

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wild, Wolfgang; Eckart, Andreas

    1999-10-01

    Centaurus A (NGC 5128) is the closest radio galaxy, and its molecular interstellar medium has been studied extensively in recent years. However, these studies used mostly molecular lines tracing low to medium density gas (see e.g. Eckart et al. 1990. Wild et al. 1997). The amount and distribution of the dense component remained largely unknown. We present spectra of the HCN(1-0) emission - which traces dense (n(H2) > 104 cm-3) molecular gas - at the center and along the prominent dust lane at offset positions +/- 60" and +/- 100", as well as single CS(2-1) and CS(3-2) spectra, observed with the SEST on La Silla, Chile. At the central position, the integrated intensity ratio I(HCN)/I(CO) peaks at 0.064, and decreases to somewhat equal to 0.02 to 0.04 in the dust lane. Based on the line luminosity ratio L(HCN)/L(CO) we estimate that there is a significant amount of dense gas in Centaurus A. The fraction of dense molecular gas as well as the star formation efficiency LFIR/LCO towards the center of Cen A is comparable to ultra-luminous infrared galaxies, and falls in between the values for ULIRGs and normal galaxies for positions in the dust lane. Details will be published in Wild & Eckart (A&A, in prep.). Eckart et al. 1990, ApJ 363, 451 Rydbeck et al. 1993, Astr.Ap. (Letters) 270, L13. Wild, W., Eckart, A. & Wiklind, T. 1997, Astr.Ap. 322, 419.

  9. Computational electromagnetics and parallel dense matrix computations

    SciTech Connect

    Forsman, K.; Kettunen, L.; Gropp, W.; Levine, D.

    1995-06-01

    We present computational results using CORAL, a parallel, three-dimensional, nonlinear magnetostatic code based on a volume integral equation formulation. A key feature of CORAL is the ability to solve, in parallel, the large, dense systems of linear equations that are inherent in the use of integral equation methods. Using the Chameleon and PSLES libraries ensures portability and access to the latest linear algebra solution technology.

  10. Composite material and method of making

    DOEpatents

    Fryxell, Glen E.; Samuels, William D.; Simmons, Kevin L.

    2004-04-20

    The composite material and methods of making the present invention rely upon a fully dense monolayer of molecules attached to an oxygenated surface at one end, and an organic terminal group at the other end, which is in turn bonded to a polymer. Thus, the composite material is a second material chemically bonded to a polymer with fully dense monolayer there between.

  11. Hybrid-Based Dense Stereo Matching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chuang, T. Y.; Ting, H. W.; Jaw, J. J.

    2016-06-01

    Stereo matching generating accurate and dense disparity maps is an indispensable technique for 3D exploitation of imagery in the fields of Computer vision and Photogrammetry. Although numerous solutions and advances have been proposed in the literature, occlusions, disparity discontinuities, sparse texture, image distortion, and illumination changes still lead to problematic issues and await better treatment. In this paper, a hybrid-based method based on semi-global matching is presented to tackle the challenges on dense stereo matching. To ease the sensitiveness of SGM cost aggregation towards penalty parameters, a formal way to provide proper penalty estimates is proposed. To this end, the study manipulates a shape-adaptive cross-based matching with an edge constraint to generate an initial disparity map for penalty estimation. Image edges, indicating the potential locations of occlusions as well as disparity discontinuities, are approved by the edge drawing algorithm to ensure the local support regions not to cover significant disparity changes. Besides, an additional penalty parameter 𝑃𝑒 is imposed onto the energy function of SGM cost aggregation to specifically handle edge pixels. Furthermore, the final disparities of edge pixels are found by weighting both values derived from the SGM cost aggregation and the U-SURF matching, providing more reliable estimates at disparity discontinuity areas. Evaluations on Middlebury stereo benchmarks demonstrate satisfactory performance and reveal the potency of the hybrid-based dense stereo matching method.

  12. Dense spray evaporation as a mixing process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Rivas, A.; Villermaux, E.

    2016-05-01

    We explore the processes by which a dense set of small liquid droplets (a spray) evaporates in a dry, stirred gas phase. A dense spray of micron-sized liquid (water or ethanol) droplets is formed in air by a pneumatic atomizer in a closed chamber. The spray is conveyed in ambient air as a plume whose extension depends on the relative humidity of the diluting medium. Standard shear instabilities develop at the plume edge, forming the stretched lamellar structures familiar with passive scalars. Unlike passive scalars however, these lamellae vanish in a finite time, because individual droplets evaporate at their border in contact with the dry environment. Experiments demonstrate that the lifetime of an individual droplet embedded in a lamellae is much larger than expected from the usual d2 law describing the fate of a single drop evaporating in a quiescent environment. By analogy with the way mixing times are understood from the convection-diffusion equation for passive scalars, we show that the lifetime of a spray lamellae stretched at a constant rate γ is tv=1/γ ln(1/+ϕ ϕ ) , where ϕ is a parameter that incorporates the thermodynamic and diffusional properties of the vapor in the diluting phase. The case of time-dependent stretching rates is examined too. A dense spray behaves almost as a (nonconserved) passive scalar.

  13. Confined magnetic monopoles in dense QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Gorsky, A.; Shifman, M.; Yung, A.

    2011-04-15

    Non-Abelian strings exist in the color-flavor locked phase of dense QCD. We show that kinks appearing in the world-sheet theory on these strings, in the form of the kink-antikink bound pairs, are the magnetic monopoles-descendants of the 't Hooft-Polyakov monopoles surviving in such a special form in dense QCD. Our consideration is heavily based on analogies and inspiration coming from certain supersymmetric non-Abelian theories. This is the first ever analytic demonstration that objects unambiguously identifiable as the magnetic monopoles are native to non-Abelian Yang-Mills theories (albeit our analysis extends only to the phase of the monopole confinement and has nothing to say about their condensation). Technically, our demonstration becomes possible due to the fact that low-energy dynamics of the non-Abelian strings in dense QCD is that of the orientational zero modes. It is described by an effective two-dimensional CP(2) model on the string world sheet. The kinks in this model representing confined magnetic monopoles are in a highly quantum regime.

  14. Multishock Compression Properties of Warm Dense Argon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Jun; Chen, Qifeng; Yunjun, Gu; Li, Zhiguo; Shen, Zhijun

    2015-10-01

    Warm dense argon was generated by a shock reverberation technique. The diagnostics of warm dense argon were performed by a multichannel optical pyrometer and a velocity interferometer system. The equations of state in the pressure-density range of 20-150 GPa and 1.9-5.3 g/cm3 from the first- to fourth-shock compression were presented. The single-shock temperatures in the range of 17.2-23.4 kK were obtained from the spectral radiance. Experimental results indicates that multiple shock-compression ratio (ηi = ρi/ρ0) is greatly enhanced from 3.3 to 8.8, where ρ0 is the initial density of argon and ρi (i = 1, 2, 3, 4) is the compressed density from first to fourth shock, respectively. For the relative compression ratio (ηi’ = ρi/ρi-1), an interesting finding is that a turning point occurs at the second shocked states under the conditions of different experiments, and ηi’ increases with pressure in lower density regime and reversely decreases with pressure in higher density regime. The evolution of the compression ratio is controlled by the excitation of internal degrees of freedom, which increase the compression, and by the interaction effects between particles that reduce it. A temperature-density plot shows that current multishock compression states of argon have distributed into warm dense regime.

  15. Multishock Compression Properties of Warm Dense Argon.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Jun; Chen, Qifeng; Yunjun, Gu; Li, Zhiguo; Shen, Zhijun

    2015-01-01

    Warm dense argon was generated by a shock reverberation technique. The diagnostics of warm dense argon were performed by a multichannel optical pyrometer and a velocity interferometer system. The equations of state in the pressure-density range of 20-150 GPa and 1.9-5.3 g/cm(3) from the first- to fourth-shock compression were presented. The single-shock temperatures in the range of 17.2-23.4 kK were obtained from the spectral radiance. Experimental results indicates that multiple shock-compression ratio (ηi = ρi/ρ0) is greatly enhanced from 3.3 to 8.8, where ρ0 is the initial density of argon and ρi (i = 1, 2, 3, 4) is the compressed density from first to fourth shock, respectively. For the relative compression ratio (ηi' = ρi/ρi-1), an interesting finding is that a turning point occurs at the second shocked states under the conditions of different experiments, and ηi' increases with pressure in lower density regime and reversely decreases with pressure in higher density regime. The evolution of the compression ratio is controlled by the excitation of internal degrees of freedom, which increase the compression, and by the interaction effects between particles that reduce it. A temperature-density plot shows that current multishock compression states of argon have distributed into warm dense regime. PMID:26515505

  16. Bonding and structure in dense multi-component molecular mixtures

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Meyer, Edmund R.; Ticknor, Christopher; Bethkenhagen, Mandy; Hamel, Sebastien; Redmer, Ronald; Kress, Joel D.; Collins, Lee A.

    2015-10-30

    We have performed finite-temperature density functional theory molecular dynamics simulations on dense methane, ammonia, and water mixtures (CH4:NH3:H2O) for various compositions and temperatures (2000 K ≤ T ≤ 10000 K) that span a set of possible conditions in the interiors of ice-giant exoplanets. The equation-of-state, pair distribution functions, and bond autocorrelation functions (BACF) were used to probe the structure and dynamics of these complex fluids. In particular, an improvement to the choice of the cutoff in the BACF was developed that allowed analysis refinements for density and temperature effects. We note the relative changes in the nature of these systemsmore » engendered by variations in the concentration ratios. As a result, a basic tenet emerges from all these comparisons that varying the relative amounts of the three heavy components (C,N,O) can effect considerable changes in the nature of the fluid and may in turn have ramifications for the structure and composition of various planetary layers.« less

  17. Bonding and structure in dense multi-component molecular mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Meyer, Edmund R.; Ticknor, Christopher; Bethkenhagen, Mandy; Hamel, Sebastien; Redmer, Ronald; Kress, Joel D.; Collins, Lee A.

    2015-10-30

    We have performed finite-temperature density functional theory molecular dynamics simulations on dense methane, ammonia, and water mixtures (CH4:NH3:H2O) for various compositions and temperatures (2000 K ≤ T ≤ 10000 K) that span a set of possible conditions in the interiors of ice-giant exoplanets. The equation-of-state, pair distribution functions, and bond autocorrelation functions (BACF) were used to probe the structure and dynamics of these complex fluids. In particular, an improvement to the choice of the cutoff in the BACF was developed that allowed analysis refinements for density and temperature effects. We note the relative changes in the nature of these systems engendered by variations in the concentration ratios. As a result, a basic tenet emerges from all these comparisons that varying the relative amounts of the three heavy components (C,N,O) can effect considerable changes in the nature of the fluid and may in turn have ramifications for the structure and composition of various planetary layers.

  18. Laser induced focusing for over-dense plasma beams

    SciTech Connect

    Schmidt, Peter; Boine-Frankenheim, Oliver; Mulser, Peter

    2015-09-15

    The capability of ion acceleration with high power, pulsed lasers has become an active field of research in the past years. In this context, the radiation pressure acceleration (RPA) mechanism has been the topic of numerous theoretical and experimental publications. Within that mechanism, a high power, pulsed laser beam hits a thin film target. In contrast to the target normal sheath acceleration, the entire film target is accelerated as a bulk by the radiation pressure of the laser. Simulations predict heavy ion beams with kinetic energy up to GeV, as well as solid body densities. However, there are several effects which limit the efficiency of the RPA: On the one hand, the Rayleigh-Taylor-instability limits the predicted density. On the other hand, conventional accelerator elements, such as magnetic focusing devices are too bulky to be installed right after the target. Therefore, we present a new beam transport method, suitable for RPA-like/over-dense plasma beams: laser induced focusing.

  19. Heavy ion irradiations on synthetic hollandite-type materials: Ba1.0Cs0.3A2.3Ti5.7O16 (A=Cr, Fe, Al)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Ming; Tumurugoti, Priyatham; Clark, Braeden; Sundaram, S. K.; Amoroso, Jake; Marra, James; Sun, Cheng; Lu, Ping; Wang, Yongqiang; Jiang, Ying.-Bing.

    2016-07-01

    The hollandite supergroup of minerals has received considerable attention as a nuclear waste form for immobilization of Cs. The radiation stability of synthetic hollandite-type compounds described generally as Ba1.0Cs0.3A2.3Ti5.7O16 (A=Cr, Fe, Al) were evaluated by heavy ion (Kr) irradiations on polycrystalline single phase materials and multiphase materials incorporating the hollandite phases. Ion irradiation damage effects on these samples were examined using grazing incidence X-ray diffraction (GIXRD) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Single phase compounds possess tetragonal structure with space group I4/m. GIXRD and TEM observations revealed that 600 keV Kr irradiation-induced amorphization on single phase hollandites compounds occurred at a fluence between 2.5×1014 Kr/cm2 and 5×1014 Kr/cm2. The critical amorphization fluence of single phase hollandite compounds obtained by in situ 1 MeV Kr ion irradiation was around 3.25×1014 Kr/cm2. The hollandite phase exhibited similar amorphization susceptibility under Kr ion irradiation when incorporated into a multiphase system.

  20. X-ray Thomson Scattering from Dense Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Glenzer, S

    2007-05-14

    Advances in the development of laser-produced x-ray sources have enabled a new class of high-energy density physics experiments. Powerful narrow-bandwidth x rays penetrate through short-lived hot dense states of matter and probe the physical properties with spectrally resolved x-ray scattering. Experiments from isochorically-heated plasmas with electron densities in the range of solid density and above have been demonstrated allowing for the first time exploration of the microscopic properties of dense matter regime close to strongly-coupled and Fermi degenerate conditions. Backscatter measurements have accessed the non-collective Compton scattering regime, which provides accurate diagnostic information on the temperature, density and ionization states. The forward scattering spectrum has been shown to measure the collective plasmon oscillations. Besides extracting the standard plasma parameters, density and temperature, forward scattering yields new observables such as a direct measure of collisions, quantum effects and detailed balance. In this talk, we will discuss new results important for applications of this technique for novel experiments in a wide range of research areas such as inertial confinement fusion, radiation-hydrodynamics, material science, and laboratory astrophysics.

  1. Review of Electrical Resistivity Measurements of Dense Aluminum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benage, John F.

    1999-11-01

    We have completed an analysis of recent experiments that were done at Los Alamos and other laboratories that measured the electrical resistivity of aluminum at conditions where the aluminum is in a dense, strongly coupled, plasma state. Strongly coupled plasmas occur in laboratory systems of high energy density whenever material is rapidly heated to plasma conditions, such as laser heated plasmas and ohmically heated metals. The properties of these plasmas cannot be treated using standard plasma theory, which treats the correlations among particles as a small effect. Many theories have been developed which predict the properties of such plasmas, but little experimental data exists with which to compare. These recent experiments provide data for a more comprehensive comparison of electrical resistivity with dense plasma theories. The experiments were carried out under a wide range of conditions, from temperatures << 1 eV up to 25 eV and densities from nearly solid density to << 1comparison of the data with various theoretical predictions. From this comparison we draw some conclusions concerning under what conditions these theories are accurate. A discussion of yet unresolved issues will also be presented.

  2. Simulations of nonequilibrium warm dense gold produced by ultrafast heating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holst, B.; Recoules, V.; Torrent, M.; Chen, Z.; Sametoglu, V.; Tsui, Y. Y.; Kirkwood, S. E.; Reid, M.; Mazevet, S.; Ng, A.

    2013-03-01

    The interaction of femtosecond laser pulses with metals produces nonequilibrium states consisting of hot electrons and cold ions. These can last for many picoseconds before relaxing to a thermodynamic equilibrium. Recent experiments using a chirped pulse probe technique provided AC conductivity data of gold at a sufficient time resolution to observe this relaxation process. We developed an ab-initio model that characterizes thermodynamic properties of warm dense matter states in nonequilibrium. Our theoretical scheme combines a standard two temperature model with temperature dependent material parameters and an energy transfer rate that are obtained by means of ab-initio simulations. This enables us to give a prediction for the temperature evolution during the relaxation process. Additionally, we derive the AC conductivity of the nonequilibrium states from our simulations using the Kubo-Greenwood formula. It is used to test our model against measurements. We observe agreement with experiment using an energy relaxation rate, that is smaller than predicted, giving us reason to revisit its determination. We can furthermore provide thermodynamical and structural data of nonequilibrium warm dense gold which are not accessible in experiment.

  3. Enhancement of Curie temperature of barium hexaferrite by dense electronic excitations

    SciTech Connect

    Sharma, Manju; Kashyap, Subhash C.; Gupta, Hem C.; Dimri, Mukesh C.; Asokan, K.

    2014-07-15

    Curie temperature of polycrystalline barium hexaferrite (BaFe{sub 12}O{sub 19}), prepared by conventional solid state technique, is anomalously and significantly enhanced (by nearly 15%) by energetic heavy ion irradiation (150 MeV, Ag{sup 12+}) at ambient temperature due to dense electronic excitations Moderate fluence (1 × 10{sup 12} ions/cm{sup 2}) induces structural defects giving rise to above enhancement. As established by X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy and Raman studies, higher fluence (1 × 10{sup 13} ions/cm{sup 2}) has structurally transformed the sample to amorphous phase with marginal change in magnetization and Curie temperature.

  4. Studies on heavy ion fusion and high energy density physics in Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawata, S.; Horioka, K.; Murakami, M.; Oguri, Y.; Hasegawa, J.; Takayama, K.; Yoneda, H.; Miyazawa, K.; Someya, T.; Ogoyski, A. I.; Seino, M.; Kikuchi, T.; Kawamura, T.; Ogawa, M.

    2007-07-01

    In this paper, significant progresses of Japanese research activities are presented in heavy ion fusion (HIF) and high energy density physics (HEDP). Heavy ion beam (HIB) is a prominent tool to study HEDP and HIF, and HIBs may be a promising inertial fusion driver. HIB accelerators have been studied intensively for a long time; HIB pulse profile, a particle energy and a HIB quality are controllable. A HIB energy deposition profile is also well defined, and HIB energy is deposited inside a material. By focusing and using the HIB excellent properties, Japanese HIF and HEDP activities have covered a wide variety of subjects ranging from new accelerators to future HIF studies: ion source, new inductive accelerator, beam physics, beam bunching, beam instabilities, HIB interactions with gas or materials, laser ion acceleration, HIB transport, HIB-based warm dense (WD) state generation, new measurement of HED or WD matters, HIB stopping power, atomic physics, multi-HIBs illumination on a target, HIF target implosion, impact ignition scheme, HIB-radiation conversion, radiation confinement and transport in HED matter or in HIF, and so on.

  5. Variational Theory of Hot Dense Matter

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mukherjee, Abhishek

    2009-01-01

    We develop a variational theory of hot nuclear matter in neutron stars and supernovae. It can also be used to study charged, hot nuclear matter which may be produced in heavy-ion collisions. This theory is a generalization of the variational theory of cold nuclear and neutron star matter based on realistic models of nuclear forces and pair…

  6. Interface interaction induced ultra-dense nanoparticles assemblies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Yujun; Wang, Yan; Li, Bin Bin; Fernandes, Carlos; Ruda, Harry E.

    2013-07-01

    We demonstrate a simple and clean physical methodology for fabricating such nanoparticle assemblies (dense arrays and/or dendrites) related to the interfacial interaction between the constructed materials and the anodized aluminum oxide (AAO) porous templates. The interfacial interaction can be regulated by the surface tension of the constructed materials and the AAO membrane, and the AAO-template structure, such as pore size, membrane thickness and surface morphologies. Depending on the interfacial interaction between the constructed materials and the AAO templates, NP arrays with mean particle diameters from 3.8 +/- 1.0 nm to 12.5 +/- 2.9 nm, mean inter-edge spacings from 3.5 +/- 1.4 nm to 7.9 +/- 3.4 nm and areal densities from 5.6 × 1011 NPs per cm2 to 1.5 × 1012 NPs per cm2 are fabricated over large areas (currently ~2 cm × 3 cm). The fabrication process includes firstly thermal evaporation of metal layers no more than 10 nm thick on the pre-coated Si wafer by AAO templates with a thickness of less than 150 nm and mean pore sizes no more than 12 nm, and then removal of the AAO templates. The NP arrays can be stable for hours at a temperature slightly below the melting point of the constructed materials (e.g., ~800 °C for Au NPs for 4 hours) with little change in size and inter-particle separation. Using one of them (e.g., 11.8 nm Au NPs) as growth-oriented catalysts, ultra-thin (12.1 +/- 2.3 nm) dense nanowires can be conveniently obtained. Furthermore, dendrite superstructures can be generated easily from eutectic alloy NPs with diameters of ~10 nm pre-formed by thermal evaporation of metal layers more than 20 nm thick on surface-patterned thick AAO templates (e.g., 500 nm). The resulting dendrites, dense arrays and other superstructures (i.e., nanorods and nanowires) formed using NP arrays as catalysts, should have broad applications in catalysis, information technology, photovoltaics and biomedical engineering.We demonstrate a simple and clean physical

  7. Numerical tests of constitutive laws for dense granular flows.

    PubMed

    Lois, Gregg; Lemaître, Anaël; Carlson, Jean M

    2005-11-01

    We numerically and theoretically study the macroscopic properties of dense, sheared granular materials. In this process we first consider an invariance in Newton's equations, explain how it leads to Bagnold's scaling, and discuss how it relates to the dynamics of granular temperature. Next we implement numerical simulations of granular materials in two different geometries--simple shear and flow down an incline--and show that measurements can be extrapolated from one geometry to the other. Then we observe nonaffine rearrangements of clusters of grains in response to shear strain and show that fundamental observations, which served as a basis for the shear transformation zone (STZ) theory of amorphous solids [M. L. Falk and J. S. Langer, Phys. Rev. E. 57, 7192 (1998); M.R.S. Bull 25, 40 (2000)], can be reproduced in granular materials. Finally we present constitutive equations for granular materials as proposed by Lemaître [Phys. Rev. Lett. 89, 064303 (2002)], based on the dynamics of granular temperature and STZ theory, and show that they match remarkably well with our numerical data from both geometries.

  8. Continuum modeling of diffusion and dispersion in dense granular flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christov, Ivan C.; Stone, Howard A.

    2014-03-01

    Continuum modeling of granular flows remains a challenge of modern statistical physics. Granular materials do not perform Brownian motion, yet diffusion and shear dispersion can be observed in such systems when agitation causes inelastic collisions between particles. In a number of canonical flow regimes (e.g., in a rotating container or down an incline), granular materials can behave like fluids. We formulate and solve the granular counterparts to two basic fluid mechanics problems: diffusion of a pulse and shear dispersion of a pulse for dense granular materials in rapid flow. We provide a theory to account for the concentration-dependent diffusivity of bidisperse granular mixtures, and we give an asymptotic argument for the self-similar behavior of such a diffusion process for which an exact self-similar analytical solution does not exist. For shear dispersion, we show that the effective dispersivity of the depth-averaged concentration of the dispersing powder varies as the Péclet number squared, as in classical Taylor-Aris dispersion of molecular solutes. The calculation is extended to generic shear profiles, showing a significant enhancement for convex profiles due to the shear-rate dependence of the diffusivity of granular materials. ICC was supported by NSF Grant DMS-1104047 and the U.S. DOE through the LANL/LDRD Program; HAS was supported by NSF Grant CBET-1234500.

  9. Continuum modeling of diffusion and dispersion in dense granular flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christov, Ivan C.; Stone, Howard A.

    2014-11-01

    Continuum modeling of granular flows remains a challenge of modern statistical physics. Granular materials do not perform Brownian motion, yet diffusion and shear dispersion can be observed in such systems when agitation causes inelastic collisions between particles. In a number of canonical flow regimes (e.g., in a rotating container or down an incline), granular materials can behave like fluids. We formulate and solve the granular counterparts to two basic fluid mechanics problems: diffusion of a pulse and shear dispersion of a pulse for dense granular materials in rapid flow. We provide a theory to account for the concentration-dependent diffusivity of bidisperse granular mixtures, and we give an asymptotic argument for the self-similar behavior of such a diffusion process for which an exact self-similar analytical solution does not exist. For shear dispersion, we show that the effective dispersivity of the depth-averaged concentration of the dispersing powder varies as the Péclet number squared, as in classical Taylor-Aris dispersion of molecular solutes. The calculation is extended to generic shear profiles, showing a significant enhancement for convex profiles due to the shear-rate dependence of the diffusivity of granular materials. ICC was supported by NSF Grant DMS-1104047 and the U.S. DOE through the LANL/LDRD Program; HAS was supported by NSF Grant CBET-1234500.

  10. Multishock Compression Properties of Warm Dense Argon

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Jun; Chen, Qifeng; Yunjun, Gu; Li, Zhiguo; Shen, Zhijun

    2015-01-01

    Warm dense argon was generated by a shock reverberation technique. The diagnostics of warm dense argon were performed by a multichannel optical pyrometer and a velocity interferometer system. The equations of state in the pressure-density range of 20–150 GPa and 1.9–5.3 g/cm3 from the first- to fourth-shock compression were presented. The single-shock temperatures in the range of 17.2–23.4 kK were obtained from the spectral radiance. Experimental results indicates that multiple shock-compression ratio (ηi = ρi/ρ0) is greatly enhanced from 3.3 to 8.8, where ρ0 is the initial density of argon and ρi (i = 1, 2, 3, 4) is the compressed density from first to fourth shock, respectively. For the relative compression ratio (ηi’ = ρi/ρi-1), an interesting finding is that a turning point occurs at the second shocked states under the conditions of different experiments, and ηi’ increases with pressure in lower density regime and reversely decreases with pressure in higher density regime. The evolution of the compression ratio is controlled by the excitation of internal degrees of freedom, which increase the compression, and by the interaction effects between particles that reduce it. A temperature-density plot shows that current multishock compression states of argon have distributed into warm dense regime. PMID:26515505

  11. Dense Subgraph Partition of Positive Hypergraphs.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hairong; Latecki, Longin Jan; Yan, Shuicheng

    2015-03-01

    In this paper, we present a novel partition framework, called dense subgraph partition (DSP), to automatically, precisely and efficiently decompose a positive hypergraph into dense subgraphs. A positive hypergraph is a graph or hypergraph whose edges, except self-loops, have positive weights. We first define the concepts of core subgraph, conditional core subgraph, and disjoint partition of a conditional core subgraph, then define DSP based on them. The result of DSP is an ordered list of dense subgraphs with decreasing densities, which uncovers all underlying clusters, as well as outliers. A divide-and-conquer algorithm, called min-partition evolution, is proposed to efficiently compute the partition. DSP has many appealing properties. First, it is a nonparametric partition and it reveals all meaningful clusters in a bottom-up way. Second, it has an exact and efficient solution, called min-partition evolution algorithm. The min-partition evolution algorithm is a divide-and-conquer algorithm, thus time-efficient and memory-friendly, and suitable for parallel processing. Third, it is a unified partition framework for a broad range of graphs and hypergraphs. We also establish its relationship with the densest k-subgraph problem (DkS), an NP-hard but fundamental problem in graph theory, and prove that DSP gives precise solutions to DkS for all kin a graph-dependent set, called critical k-set. To our best knowledge, this is a strong result which has not been reported before. Moreover, as our experimental results show, for sparse graphs, especially web graphs, the size of critical k-set is close to the number of vertices in the graph. We test the proposed partition framework on various tasks, and the experimental results clearly illustrate its advantages.

  12. Effects of Heavy Elements and Excited States in the Equation of State of the Solar Interior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gong, Zhigang; Däppen, Werner; Nayfonov, Alan

    2001-12-01

    Although 98% of the solar material consists of hydrogen and helium, the remaining chemical elements contribute in a discernible way to the thermodynamic quantities. An adequate treatment of the heavy elements and their excited states is important for solar models that are subject to the stringent requirements of helioseismology. The contribution of various heavy elements in a set of thermodynamic quantities has been examined. Characteristic features that can trace individual heavy elements in the adiabatic exponent γ1=(∂lnp/∂lnϱ)s (s being specific entropy), and hence in the adiabatic sound speed, were searched. It has emerged that prominent signatures of individual elements exist and that these effects are greatest in the ionization zones, typically located near the bottom of the convection zone. The main result is that part of the features found here depend strongly on both the given species (atom or ion) and its detailed internal partition function, whereas other features only depend on the presence of the species itself, not on details such as the internal partition function. The latter features are obviously well suited for a helioseismic abundance determination, while the former features present a unique opportunity to use the Sun as a laboratory to test the validity of physical theories of partial ionization in a relatively dense and hot plasma. This domain of plasma physics has so far no competition from terrestrial laboratories. Another, quite general, finding of this work is that the inclusion of a relatively large number of heavy elements has a tendency to smear out individual features. This affects both the features that determine the abundance of elements and the ones that identify physical effects. This property alleviates the task of solar modelers because it helps to construct a good working equation of state that is relatively free of the uncertainties from basic physics. By the same token, it makes more difficult the reverse task, which is

  13. Temperature relaxation in dense plasma mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faussurier, Gérald; Blancard, Christophe

    2016-09-01

    We present a model to calculate temperature-relaxation rates in dense plasma mixtures. The electron-ion relaxation rates are calculated using an average-atom model and the ion-ion relaxation rates by the Landau-Spitzer approach. This method allows the study of the temperature relaxation in many-temperature electron-ion and ion-ion systems such as those encountered in inertial confinement fusion simulations. It is of interest for general nonequilibrium thermodynamics dealing with energy flows between various systems and should find broad use in present high energy density experiments.

  14. Resolving ultrafast heating of dense cryogenic hydrogen.

    PubMed

    Zastrau, U; Sperling, P; Harmand, M; Becker, A; Bornath, T; Bredow, R; Dziarzhytski, S; Fennel, T; Fletcher, L B; Förster, E; Göde, S; Gregori, G; Hilbert, V; Hochhaus, D; Holst, B; Laarmann, T; Lee, H J; Ma, T; Mithen, J P; Mitzner, R; Murphy, C D; Nakatsutsumi, M; Neumayer, P; Przystawik, A; Roling, S; Schulz, M; Siemer, B; Skruszewicz, S; Tiggesbäumker, J; Toleikis, S; Tschentscher, T; White, T; Wöstmann, M; Zacharias, H; Döppner, T; Glenzer, S H; Redmer, R

    2014-03-14

    We report on the dynamics of ultrafast heating in cryogenic hydrogen initiated by a ≲300  fs, 92 eV free electron laser x-ray burst. The rise of the x-ray scattering amplitude from a second x-ray pulse probes the transition from dense cryogenic molecular hydrogen to a nearly uncorrelated plasmalike structure, indicating an electron-ion equilibration time of ∼0.9  ps. The rise time agrees with radiation hydrodynamics simulations based on a conductivity model for partially ionized plasma that is validated by two-temperature density-functional theory.

  15. Electrical and thermal conductivities in dense plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Faussurier, G. Blancard, C.; Combis, P.; Videau, L.

    2014-09-15

    Expressions for the electrical and thermal conductivities in dense plasmas are derived combining the Chester-Thellung-Kubo-Greenwood approach and the Kramers approximation. The infrared divergence is removed assuming a Drude-like behaviour. An analytical expression is obtained for the Lorenz number that interpolates between the cold solid-state and the hot plasma phases. An expression for the electrical resistivity is proposed using the Ziman-Evans formula, from which the thermal conductivity can be deduced using the analytical expression for the Lorenz number. The present method can be used to estimate electrical and thermal conductivities of mixtures. Comparisons with experiment and quantum molecular dynamics simulations are done.

  16. Phase boundary of hot dense fluid hydrogen

    PubMed Central

    Ohta, Kenji; Ichimaru, Kota; Einaga, Mari; Kawaguchi, Sho; Shimizu, Katsuya; Matsuoka, Takahiro; Hirao, Naohisa; Ohishi, Yasuo

    2015-01-01

    We investigated the phase transformation of hot dense fluid hydrogen using static high-pressure laser-heating experiments in a laser-heated diamond anvil cell. The results show anomalies in the heating efficiency that are likely to be attributed to the phase transition from a diatomic to monoatomic fluid hydrogen (plasma phase transition) in the pressure range between 82 and 106 GPa. This study imposes tighter constraints on the location of the hydrogen plasma phase transition boundary and suggests higher critical point than that predicted by the theoretical calculations. PMID:26548442

  17. Electrical Resistivity Measurements of Hot Dense Aluminum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benage, J. F.; Shanahan, W. R.; Murillo, M. S.

    1999-10-01

    Electrical transport properties of dense aluminum are measured in the disordered liquidlike phase using a well-tamped, thermally equilibrated, exploding wire z pinch. Direct measurements of the electrical conductivity have been made using voltage and current measurements. Our measurements span the minimum conductivity regime, at higher densities than have been produced previously. We find that some Ziman-like theoretical predictions are in fair agreement with the data and one Ziman-like theoretical approach is in good agreement, in contrast to other experiments performed in similar regimes which indicate poor agreement with such theories.

  18. Dense optical-electrical interface module

    SciTech Connect

    Paul Chang

    2000-12-21

    The DOIM (Dense Optical-electrical Interface Modules) is a custom-designed optical data transmission module employed in the upgrade of Silicon Vertex Detector of CDF experiment at Fermilab. Each DOIM module consists of a transmitter (TX) converting electrical differential input signals to optical outputs, a middle segment of jacketed fiber ribbon cable, and a receiver (RX) which senses the light inputs and converts them back to electrical signals. The targeted operational frequency is 53 MHz, and higher rate is achievable. This article outlines the design goals, implementation methods, production test results, and radiation hardness tests of these modules.

  19. Effective ion-ion potentials in warm dense matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vorberger, J.; Gericke, D. O.

    2013-03-01

    The effective ion-ion potential is extracted from first principle simulations and from experimental structure factors for several warm dense matter systems. Results of three different methods are compared for simple elements like hydrogen or beryllium as well as for composite materials like lithium-hydride and hydrogen-helium plasmas. It is shown that iterative techniques based on the pair distribution function are not unique in their solution and direct force-matching from first principle simulations is subject to finite size effects. Moreover, both methods are not able to provide potentials for small distances. These disadvantages can be avoided by using the static structure factor as input, although higher order correlations are only accounted for within the hypernetted chain approximation in this case. Furthermore, we discuss possibilities to use the extracted effective potentials to investigate the dielectric function beyond linear response.

  20. A granular flow model for dense planetary rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borderies, N.; Goldreich, P.; Tremaine, S.

    1985-09-01

    The authors study the viscosity of a differentially rotating particle disk in the limiting case where the particles are densely packed and their collective behavior resembles that of a liquid. The pressure tensor is derived from the equations of hydrodynamics and from a simple kinetic model of collisions described by Haff (1983). They find that density waves and narrow circular rings are unstable if the liquid approximation applies. The resulting development of nonlinear perturbations may give rise to "splashing" of the ring material in the vertical direction. These results may help in understanding the origin of the ellipticities of ringlets, the nonaxisymmetric features near the outer edge of the Saturnian B ring, and the unexplained residuals in kinematic models of the Saturnian and Uranian rings.

  1. Warm dense mater: another application for pulsed power hydrodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Reinovsky, Robert Emil

    2009-01-01

    Pulsed Power Hydrodynamics (PPH) is an application of low-impedance pulsed power, and high magnetic field technology to the study of advanced hydrodynamic problems, instabilities, turbulence, and material properties. PPH can potentially be applied to the study of the properties of warm dense matter (WDM) as well. Exploration of the properties of warm dense matter such as equation of state, viscosity, conductivity is an emerging area of study focused on the behavior of matter at density near solid density (from 10% of solid density to slightly above solid density) and modest temperatures ({approx}1-10 eV). Conditions characteristic of WDM are difficult to obtain, and even more difficult to diagnose. One approach to producing WDM uses laser or particle beam heating of very small quantities of matter on timescales short compared to the subsequent hydrodynamic expansion timescales (isochoric heating) and a vigorous community of researchers are applying these techniques. Pulsed power hydrodynamic techniques, such as large convergence liner compression of a large volume, modest density, low temperature plasma to densities approaching solid density or through multiple shock compression and heating of normal density material between a massive, high density, energetic liner and a high density central 'anvil' are possible ways to reach relevant conditions. Another avenue to WDM conditions is through the explosion and subsequent expansion of a conductor (wire) against a high pressure (density) gas background (isobaric expansion) techniques. However, both techniques demand substantial energy, proper power conditioning and delivery, and an understanding of the hydrodynamic and instability processes that limit each technique. In this paper we will examine the challenges to pulsed power technology and to pulsed power systems presented by the opportunity to explore this interesting region of parameter space.

  2. Numerical modeling of the early interaction of a planar shock with a dense particle field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Regele, Jonathan; Blanquart, Guillaume

    2011-11-01

    Dense compressible multiphase flows are of interest for multiphase turbomachinary and energetic material detonations. Still, there is little understanding of the detailed interaction mechanisms between shock waves and dense (particle volume fraction αd > 0 . 001) particle fields. A recent experimental study [Wagner et al, AIAA Aero. Sci., Orlando, 2011-188] has focused on the impingement of a planar shock wave on a dense particle curtain. In the present work, numerical solutions of the Euler equations in one and two dimensions are performed for a planar shock wave impinging on a fixed particle curtain and are compared to the experimental data for early times. Comparison of the one- and two-dimensional results demonstrate that the one-dimensional description captures the large scale flow behavior, but is inadequate to capture all the details observed in the experiments. The two-dimensional solutions are shown to reproduce the experimentally observed flow structures and provide insight into how these details originate.

  3. Highly Dense Isolated Metal Atom Catalytic Sites: Dynamic Formation and In Situ Observations.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yaxin; Kasama, Takeshi; Huang, Zhiwei; Hu, Pingping; Chen, Jianmin; Liu, Xi; Tang, Xingfu

    2015-11-23

    Atomically dispersed noble-metal catalysts with highly dense active sites are promising materials with which to maximise metal efficiency and to enhance catalytic performance; however, their fabrication remains challenging because metal atoms are prone to sintering, especially at a high metal loading. A dynamic process of formation of isolated metal atom catalytic sites on the surface of the support, which was achieved starting from silver nanoparticles by using a thermal surface-mediated diffusion method, was observed directly by using in situ electron microscopy and in situ synchrotron X-ray diffraction. A combination of electron microscopy images with X-ray absorption spectra demonstrated that the silver atoms were anchored on five-fold oxygen-terminated cavities on the surface of the support to form highly dense isolated metal active sites, leading to excellent reactivity in catalytic oxidation at low temperature. This work provides a general strategy for designing atomically dispersed noble-metal catalysts with highly dense active sites.

  4. Method and apparatus for biological material separation

    DOEpatents

    Robinson, Donna L.

    2005-05-10

    There has been invented an apparatus comprising a separation barrier for excluding denser cell materials from less dense cell materials after centrifuging of the cells so that selected materials can be withdrawn from the less dense cell materials without inclusion of the denser cell materials or clogging of sampling equipment with denser cell materials. Cells from which selected material is to be withdrawn are centrifuged, either as cells or cells in media. Once the denser cell materials are isolated in a layer by centrifugal force, an invention screen or seive is submerged in the less dense cell material to a level above the layer of denser cell materials to isolate the denser cell materials from the less dense cell materials, preventing mixing of the denser cell materials back into the less dense cell materials when the cells or the cells in media are no longer being centrifuged and to prevent clogging of sampling equipment with denser cell materials. In a particularly useful application of the invention method and apparatus, plasmid DNA can be withdrawn from less dense cell materials without contamination or interference with denser cell materials.

  5. Neutron Emission in Deuterium Dense Plasma Foci

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Appelbe, Brian; Chittenden, Jeremy

    2013-10-01

    We present the results of a computational study of the deuterium dense plasma focus (DPF) carried out to improve understanding of the neutron production mechanism in the DPF. The device currents studied range from 70 kA to several MA. The complete evolution of the DPF is simulated in 3D from rundown through to neutron emission using a hybrid computational method. The rundown, pinching, stagnation and post-stagnation (pinch break-up) phases are simulated using the 3D MHD code Gorgon. Kinetic computational tools are used to model the formation and transport of non-thermal ion populations and neutron production during the stagnation and post-stagnation phases, resulting in the production of synthetic neutron spectra. It is observed that the break-up phase plays an important role in the formation of non-thermal ions. Large electric fields generated during pinch break-up cause ions to be accelerated from the edges of dense plasma regions. The dependence on current of the neutron yield, neutron spectra shape and isotropy is studied. The effect of magnetization of the non-thermal ions is evident as the anisotropy of the neutron spectra decreases at higher current.

  6. Ion Acoustic Modes in Warm Dense Matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartley, Nicholas; Monaco, Guilio; White, Thomas; Gregori, Gianluca; Graham, Peter; Fletcher, Luke; Appel, Karen; Tschentscher, Thomas; Lee, Hae Ja; Nagler, Bob; Galtier, Eric; Granados, Eduardo; Heimann, Philip; Zastrau, Ulf; Doeppner, Tilo; Gericke, Dirk; Lepape, Sebastien; Ma, Tammy; Pak, Art; Schropp, Andreas; Glenzer, Siegfried; Hastings, Jerry

    2015-06-01

    We present results that, for the first time, show scattering from ion acoustic modes in warm dense matter, representing an unprecedented level of energy resolution in the study of dense plasmas. The experiment was carried out at the LCLS facility in California on an aluminum sample at 7 g/cc and 5 eV. Using an X-ray probe at 8 keV, shifted peaks at +/-150 meV were observed. Although the energy shifts from interactions with the acoustic waves agree with predicted values from DFT-MD models, a central (elastic) peak was also observed, which did not appear in modelled spectra and may be due to the finite timescale of the simulation. Data fitting with a hydrodynamic form has proved able to match the observed spectrum, and provide measurements of some thermodynamic properties of the system, which mostly agree with predicted values. Suggest for further experiments to determine the cause of the disparity are also given.

  7. Nuclear quantum dynamics in dense hydrogen

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Dongdong; Sun, Huayang; Dai, Jiayu; Chen, Wenbo; Zhao, Zengxiu; Hou, Yong; Zeng, Jiaolong; Yuan, Jianmin

    2014-01-01

    Nuclear dynamics in dense hydrogen, which is determined by the key physics of large-angle scattering or many-body collisions between particles, is crucial for the dynamics of planet's evolution and hydrodynamical processes in inertial confinement confusion. Here, using improved ab initio path-integral molecular dynamics simulations, we investigated the nuclear quantum dynamics regarding transport behaviors of dense hydrogen up to the temperatures of 1 eV. With the inclusion of nuclear quantum effects (NQEs), the ionic diffusions are largely higher than the classical treatment by the magnitude from 20% to 146% as the temperature is decreased from 1 eV to 0.3 eV at 10 g/cm3, meanwhile, electrical and thermal conductivities are significantly lowered. In particular, the ionic diffusion is found much larger than that without NQEs even when both the ionic distributions are the same at 1 eV. The significant quantum delocalization of ions introduces remarkably different scattering cross section between protons compared with classical particle treatments, which explains the large difference of transport properties induced by NQEs. The Stokes-Einstein relation, Wiedemann-Franz law, and isotope effects are re-examined, showing different behaviors in nuclear quantum dynamics. PMID:24968754

  8. Dynamics of Kr in dense clathrate hydrates.

    SciTech Connect

    Klug, D. D.; Tse, J. S.; Zhao, J. Y.; Sturhahn, W.; Alp, E. E.; Tulk, C. A.

    2011-01-01

    The dynamics of Kr atoms as guests in dense clathrate hydrate structures are investigated using site specific {sup 83}Kr nuclear resonant inelastic x-ray scattering (NRIXS) spectroscopy in combination with molecular dynamics simulations. The dense structure H hydrate and filled-ice structures are studied at high pressures in a diamond anvil high-pressure cell. The dynamics of Kr in the structure H clathrate hydrate quench recovered at 77 K is also investigated. The Kr phonon density of states obtained from the experimental NRIXS data are compared with molecular dynamics simulations. The temperature and pressure dependence of the phonon spectra provide details of the Kr dynamics in the clathrate hydrate cages. Comparison with the dynamics of Kr atoms in the low-pressure structure II obtained previously was made. The Lamb-Mossbauer factor obtained from NRIXS experiments and molecular dynamics calculations are in excellent agreement and are shown to yield unique information on the strength and temperature dependence of guest-host interactions.

  9. Probing the Physical Structures of Dense Filaments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Di

    2015-08-01

    Filament is a common feature in cosmological structures of various scales, ranging from dark matter cosmic web, galaxy clusters, inter-galactic gas flows, to Galactic ISM clouds. Even within cold dense molecular cores, filaments have been detected. Theories and simulations with (or without) different combination of physical principles, including gravity, thermal balance, turbulence, and magnetic field, can reproduce intriguing images of filaments. The ubiquity of filaments and the similarity in simulated ones make physical parameters, beyond dust column density, a necessity for understanding filament evolution. I report three projects attempting to measure physical parameters of filaments. We derive the volume density of a dense Taurus filament based on several cyanoacetylene transitions observed by GBT and ART. We measure the gas temperature of the OMC 2-3 filament based on combined GBT+VLA ammonia images. We also measured the sub-millimeter polarization vectors along OMC3. These filaments were found to be likely a cylinder-type structure, without dynamic heating, and likely accreting mass along the magnetic field lines.

  10. Solids flow rate measurement in dense slurries

    SciTech Connect

    Porges, K.G.; Doss, E.D.

    1993-09-01

    Accurate and rapid flow rate measurement of solids in dense slurries remains an unsolved technical problem, with important industrial applications in chemical processing plants and long-distance solids conveyance. In a hostile two-phase medium, such a measurement calls for two independent parameter determinations, both by non-intrusive means. Typically, dense slurries tend to flow in laminar, non-Newtonian mode, eliminating most conventional means that usually rely on calibration (which becomes more difficult and costly for high pressure and temperature media). These issues are reviewed, and specific solutions are recommended in this report. Detailed calculations that lead to improved measuring device designs are presented for both bulk density and average velocity measurements. Cross-correlation, chosen here for the latter task, has long been too inaccurate for practical applications. The cause and the cure of this deficiency are discussed using theory-supported modeling. Fluid Mechanics are used to develop the velocity profiles of laminar non-Newtonian flow in a rectangular duct. This geometry uniquely allows the design of highly accurate `capacitive` devices and also lends itself to gamma transmission densitometry on an absolute basis. An absolute readout, though of less accuracy, is also available from a capacitive densitometer and a pair of capacitive sensors yields signals suitable for cross-correlation velocity measurement.

  11. Quantum molecular dynamics simulations of dense matter

    SciTech Connect

    Collins, L.; Kress, J.; Troullier, N.; Lenosky, T.; Kwon, I.

    1997-12-31

    The authors have developed a quantum molecular dynamics (QMD) simulation method for investigating the properties of dense matter in a variety of environments. The technique treats a periodically-replicated reference cell containing N atoms in which the nuclei move according to the classical equations-of-motion. The interatomic forces are generated from the quantum mechanical interactions of the (between?) electrons and nuclei. To generate these forces, the authors employ several methods of varying sophistication from the tight-binding (TB) to elaborate density functional (DF) schemes. In the latter case, lengthy simulations on the order of 200 atoms are routinely performed, while for the TB, which requires no self-consistency, upwards to 1000 atoms are systematically treated. The QMD method has been applied to a variety cases: (1) fluid/plasma Hydrogen from liquid density to 20 times volume-compressed for temperatures of a thousand to a million degrees Kelvin; (2) isotopic hydrogenic mixtures, (3) liquid metals (Li, Na, K); (4) impurities such as Argon in dense hydrogen plasmas; and (5) metal/insulator transitions in rare gas systems (Ar,Kr) under high compressions. The advent of parallel versions of the methods, especially for fast eigensolvers, presage LDA simulations in the range of 500--1000 atoms and TB runs for tens of thousands of particles. This leap should allow treatment of shock chemistry as well as large-scale mixtures of species in highly transient environments.

  12. Synthesis of thin, long heavy nuclei in ternary collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iwata, Yoritaka; Iida, Kei; Itagaki, Naoyuki

    2013-01-01

    We illustrate the formation of a thin, long structure of heavy nuclei by three-nucleus simultaneous collisions within time-dependent density functional theory. The impact parameter dependence for such a formation is systematically demonstrated through clarifications of the difference between binary and ternary collision events. A new method for producing thin, long heavy nuclei in the laboratory is suggested, as well as the possible formation of the thin, long structure in hot dense matter such as that encountered in core collapse supernovae.

  13. Advances in U.S. Heavy Ion Fusion Science

    SciTech Connect

    Barnard, JJ; Logan, B.G.; Barnard, J.J.; Bieniosek, F.M.; Cohen, R.H.; Coleman, J.E.; Davidson, R.C.; Efthimion, P.C.; Friedman, A.; Gilson, E.P.; Grisham, L.R.; Grote, D.P.; Henestroza, E.; Kaganovich, I.D.; Kireeff-Covo, M.; Lee, E.P.; Leitner, M.A.; Lund, S.M.; Molvik, A.W.; Ni, P.; Perkins, L.J.; Qin, H.; Roy, P.K.; Sefkow, A.B.; Seidl, P.A.; Startsev, E.A.; Waldron, W.L.

    2007-09-03

    During the past two years, the US heavy ion fusion science program has made significant experimental and theoretical progress in simultaneous transverse and longitudinal beam compression, ion-beam-driven warm dense matter targets, high-brightness beam transport, advanced theory and numerical simulations, and heavy ion target physics for fusion. First experiments combining radial and longitudinal compression {pi} of intense ion beams propagating through background plasma resulted in on-axis beam densities increased by 700X at the focal plane. With further improvements planned in 2008, these results enable initial ion beam target experiments in warm dense matter to begin next year. They are assessing how these new techniques apply to higher-gain direct-drive targets for inertial fusion energy.

  14. Advances in U.S. Heavy Ion Fusion Science

    SciTech Connect

    Logan, B.G.; Barnard, J.J.; Bieniosek, F.M.; Cohen, R.H.; Coleman, J.E.; Davidson, R.C.; Efthimion, P.C.; Friedman, A.; Gilson, E.P.; Grisham, L.R.; Grote, D.P.; Henestroza, E.; Kaganovich, I.D.; Kireeff-Covo, M.; Lee, E.P.; Leitner, M.A.; Lund, S.M.; Molvik, A.W.; Ni, P.; Perkins, L. J.; Qin, H.; Roy, P.K.; Sefkow, A.B.; Seidl, P.A.; Startsev, E.A.; Waldron, W.L.

    2007-09-01

    During the past two years, the US heavy ion fusion science program has made significant experimental and theoretical progress in simultaneous transverse and longitudinal beam compression, ion-beam-driven warm dense matter targets, high-brightness beam transport, advanced theory and numerical simulations, and heavy ion target physics for fusion. First experiments combining radial and longitudinal compression {pi} of intense ion beams propagating through background plasma resulted in on-axis beam densities increased by 700X at the focal plane. With further improvements planned in 2008, these results enable initial ion beam target experiments in warm dense matter to begin next year. They are assessing how these new techniques apply to higher-gain direct-drive targets for inertial fusion energy.

  15. Shape-engineerable and highly densely packed single-walled carbon nanotubes and their application as super-capacitor electrodes.

    PubMed

    Futaba, Don N; Hata, Kenji; Yamada, Takeo; Hiraoka, Tatsuki; Hayamizu, Yuhei; Kakudate, Yozo; Tanaike, Osamu; Hatori, Hiroaki; Yumura, Motoo; Iijima, Sumio

    2006-12-01

    We present a rational and general method to fabricate a high-densely packed and aligned single-walled carbon-nanotube (SWNT) material by using the zipping effect of liquids to draw tubes together. This bulk carbon-nanotube material retains the intrinsic properties of individual SWNTs, such as high surface area, flexibility and electrical conductivity. By controlling the fabrication process, it is possible to fabricate a wide range of solids in numerous shapes and structures. This dense SWNT material is advantageous for numerous applications, and here we demonstrate its use as flexible heaters as well as supercapacitor electrodes for compact energy-storage devices.

  16. Equation of state measurement of warm dense aluminum and carbon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Falk, Katerina; Benage, John; Watt, Robert; Montgomery, David; Williams, James; Schmidt, Derek

    2012-10-01

    The equation of state of light elements is essential to understanding the structure of Jovian planets and inertial confinement fusion (ICF) experiments. Here we present results from a combination of experimental techniques used to characterize thermodynamic properties of warm dense matter (WDM). The Omega laser was used to create WDM conditions, solid density at ˜ 10 eV, using the novel technique of laser driven shock and release. This technique takes advantage of recent shock results on low density aerogel foam that enable the initially strongly shocked target material to undergo a large pressure release into a well-characterized low density pressure standard. The primary diagnostic is for the WDM target is spatially resolved x-ray Thomson scattering, which provides a direct and simultaneous measurement of the density, temperature, and ionization state of the WDM target material, either aluminum or carbon. To complete the EOS determination, VISAR is used to determine the shock velocity in the pressure standard and therefore to determine the pressure in the WDM material. Recent developments in the design of the new imaging spectrometer to enable better scattering data will be presented. Various equation of state models are compared to the experimental results.

  17. FORMATION OF DENSE MOLECULAR GAS AND STARS AT THE CIRCUMNUCLEAR STARBURST RING IN THE BARRED GALAXY NGC 7552

    SciTech Connect

    Pan, Hsi-An; Lim, Jeremy; Matsushita, Satoki; Wong, Tony; Ryder, Stuart

    2013-05-01

    We present millimeter molecular line complemented by optical observations, along with a reanalysis of archival centimeter H I and continuum data, to infer the global dynamics and determine where dense molecular gas and massive stars preferentially form in the circumnuclear starburst ring of the barred-spiral galaxy NGC 7552. We find diffuse molecular gas in a pair of dust lanes each running along the large-scale galactic bar, as well as in the circumnuclear starburst ring. We do not detect dense molecular gas in the dust lanes, but find such gas concentrated in two knots where the dust lanes make contact with the circumnuclear starburst ring. When convolved to the same angular resolution as the images in dense gas, the radio continuum emission of the circumnuclear starburst ring also exhibits two knots, each lying downstream of an adjacent knot in dense gas. The results agree qualitatively with the idea that massive stars form from dense gas at the contact points, where diffuse gas is channeled into the ring along the dust lanes, and later explode as supernovae downstream of the contact points. Based on the inferred rotation curve, however, the propagation time between the respective pairs of dense gas and centimeter continuum knots is about an order of magnitude shorter than the lifetimes of OB stars. We discuss possible reasons for this discrepancy, and conclude that either the initial mass function is top-heavy or massive stars in the ring do not form exclusively at the contact points where dense molecular gas is concentrated.

  18. Diamonds in dense molecular clouds - A challenge to the standard interstellar medium paradigm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allamandola, L. J.; Sandford, S. A.; Tielens, A. G. G. M.; Herbst, T. M.

    1993-01-01

    Observations of a newly discovered infrared C-H stretching band indicate that interstellar diamond-like material appears to be characteristic of dense clouds. In sharp contrast, the spectral signature of dust in the diffuse interstellar medium is dominated by -CH2- and -CH3 groups. This dichotomy in the aliphatic organic component between the dense and diffuse media challenges standard assumptions about the processes occurring in, and interactions between, these two media. The ubiquity of this interstellar diamond-like material rules out models for meteoritic diamond formation in unusual circumstellar environments and implies that the formation of the diamond-like material is associated with common interstellar processes or stellar types.

  19. Diamonds in dense molecular clouds: a challenge to the standard interstellar medium paradigm.

    PubMed

    Allamandola, L J; Sandford, S A; Tielens, A G; Herbst, T M

    1993-04-01

    Observations of a newly discovered infrared C-H stretching band indicate that interstellar diamond-like material appears to be characteristic of dense clouds. In sharp contrast, the spectral signature of dust in the diffuse interstellar medium is dominated by -CH2- and -CH3 groups. This dichotomy in the aliphatic organic component between the dense and diffuse media challenges standard assumptions about the processes occurring in, and interactions between, these two media. The ubiquity of this interstellar diamond-like material rules out models for meteoritic diamond formation in unusual circumstellar environments and implies that the formation of the diamond-like material is associated with common interstellar processes or stellar types.

  20. Dense gas shock tube: Design and analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fergason, Stephen Harrison

    The study of BZT fluids in the single-phase vapor region is largely unexamined experimentally. To date, only one experimental study focused on nonclassical behavior in the single-phase vapor region. A new experimental program is proposed to examine the possibility of generating nonclassical behaviors in a shock tube apparatus. A design methodology is developed to identify the most important experimental characteristics and provide appropriate analytical and computational tools for subsequent study. Analysis suggests initial conditions, viscous effects, and wave interference as critical experimental characteristics. A shock tube design is proposed based on the results of the methodology. An algorithm is developed and applied to classical state equations to generate experimentally feasible initial conditions which maximize the possibility of detecting a single-phase rarefaction shock wave within experimental accuracy and precision. The algorithm was applied to a commercially available fluid thought to exhibit dense gas behavior. It was found that the range of possible initial conditions generating dense gas phenomena is larger than previously assumed. The shock tube is computationally modeled to validate the triple-discontinuity initial conditions and investigate the appropriate design dimensions. A two-step, flux-limited, total variation diminishing scheme was implemented to integrate the unsteady Navier-Stokes equations using three independent gas models. The triple-discontinuity flow field was verified with simulations. A novel shock tube was constructed based on the previous analysis. A sixteen-foot stainless steel pipe with a single diaphragm was placed within a series of electric ovens. The test section thermal environment was controlled utilizing sixteen independent PID control loops. Initial conditions similar in pressure and temperature to dense gas conditions were generated for nitrogen gas. The nitrogen test results were compared with classical one

  1. Plasmon resonance in warm dense matter

    SciTech Connect

    Thiele, R; Bornath, T; Fortmann, C; Holl, A; Redmer, R; Reinholz, H; Ropke, G; Wierling, A; Glenzer, S H; Gregori, G

    2008-02-21

    Collective Thomson scattering with extreme ultraviolet light or x-rays is shown to allow for a robust measurement of the free electron density in dense plasmas. Collective excitations like plasmons appear as maxima in the scattering signal. Their frequency position can directly be related to the free electron density. The range of applicability of the standard Gross-Bohm dispersion relation and of an improved dispersion relation in comparison to calculations based on the dielectric function in random phase approximation is investigated. More important, this well-established treatment of Thomson scattering on free electrons is generalized in the Born-Mermin approximation by including collisions. We show that, in the transition region from collective to non-collective scattering, the consideration of collisions is important.

  2. GRAPE-6 Simulations of Dense Star Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slavin, Shawn D.; Maxwell, J. E.; Cohn, H. N.; Lugger, P. M.

    2007-12-01

    We report on recent results from a long-term program of N-body simulations of dense star cluster evolution which is being done with GRAPE-6 systems at Indiana University and Purdue University Calumet. We have been simulating cases of star cluster evolution with a particular focus on the dynamical evolution of hard binary populations of varying size. Initial models with a range of mass spectra, both with and without primordial binary populations, are being investigated to points well beyond core collapse. Our goal is to better understand the evoultion of compact binary populations in collapsed-core globular clusters. Observations of collapsed-core clusters with HST and Chandra have revealed populations of hard, X-ray binaries well outside the cluster core. Our work is focused on understanding the diffusion of these dynamically hardened binaries to regions in the cluster halo and the robustness of this process in models with mass spectra versus single-mass models.

  3. Carbon nitride frameworks and dense crystalline polymorphs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pickard, Chris J.; Salamat, Ashkan; Bojdys, Michael J.; Needs, Richard J.; McMillan, Paul F.

    2016-09-01

    We used ab initio random structure searching (AIRSS) to investigate polymorphism in C3N4 carbon nitride as a function of pressure. Our calculations reveal new framework structures, including a particularly stable chiral polymorph of space group P 43212 containing mixed s p2 and s p3 bonding, that we have produced experimentally and recovered to ambient conditions. As pressure is increased a sequence of structures with fully s p3 -bonded C atoms and three-fold-coordinated N atoms is predicted, culminating in a dense P n m a phase above 250 GPa. Beyond 650 GPa we find that C3N4 becomes unstable to decomposition into diamond and pyrite-structured CN2.

  4. Prediction of viscosity of dense fluid mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Royal, Damian D.; Vesovic, Velisa; Trusler, J. P. Martin; Wakeham, William. A.

    The Vesovic-Wakeham (VW) method of predicting the viscosity of dense fluid mixtures has been improved by implementing new mixing rules based on the rigid sphere formalism. The proposed mixing rules are based on both Lebowitz's solution of the Percus-Yevick equation and on the Carnahan-Starling equation. The predictions of the modified VW method have been compared with experimental viscosity data for a number of diverse fluid mixtures: natural gas, hexane + hheptane, hexane + octane, cyclopentane + toluene, and a ternary mixture of hydrofluorocarbons (R32 + R125 + R134a). The results indicate that the proposed improvements make possible the extension of the original VW method to liquid mixtures and to mixtures containing polar species, while retaining its original accuracy.

  5. Nonlinear extraordinary wave in dense plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Krasovitskiy, V. B.; Turikov, V. A.

    2013-10-15

    Conditions for the propagation of a slow extraordinary wave in dense magnetized plasma are found. A solution to the set of relativistic hydrodynamic equations and Maxwell’s equations under the plasma resonance conditions, when the phase velocity of the nonlinear wave is equal to the speed of light, is obtained. The deviation of the wave frequency from the resonance frequency is accompanied by nonlinear longitudinal-transverse oscillations. It is shown that, in this case, the solution to the set of self-consistent equations obtained by averaging the initial equations over the period of high-frequency oscillations has the form of an envelope soliton. The possibility of excitation of a nonlinear wave in plasma by an external electromagnetic pulse is confirmed by numerical simulations.

  6. Properties of industrial dense gas plumes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaver, E. M.; Forney, L. J.

    Hazardous gases and vapors are often discharged into the atmosphere from industrial plants during catastrophic events (e.g. Union Carbide incident in Bhopal, India). In many cases the discharged components are more dense than air and settle to the ground surface downstream from the stack exit. In the present paper, the buoyant plume model of Hoult, Fay and Forney (1969, J. Air Pollut. Control Ass. 19, 585-590.) has been altered to predict the properties of hazardous discharges. In particular, the plume impingement point, radius and concentration are predicted for typical stack exit conditions, wind speeds and temperature profiles. Asymptotic expressions for plume properties at the impingement point are also derived for a constant crosswind and neutral temperature profile. These formulae are shown to be useful for all conditions.

  7. Oxygen ion-conducting dense ceramic

    DOEpatents

    Balachandran, Uthamalingam; Kleefisch, Mark S.; Kobylinski, Thaddeus P.; Morissette, Sherry L.; Pei, Shiyou

    1996-01-01

    Preparation, structure, and properties of mixed metal oxide compositions containing at least strontium, cobalt, iron and oxygen are described. The crystalline mixed metal oxide compositions of this invention have, for example, structure represented by Sr.sub..alpha. (Fe.sub.1-x Co.sub.x).sub..alpha.+.beta. O.sub..delta. where x is a number in a range from 0.01 to about 1, .alpha. is a number in a range from about 1 to about 4, .beta. is a number in a range upward from 0 to about 20, and .delta. is a number which renders the compound charge neutral, and wherein the composition has a non-perovskite structure. Use of the mixed metal oxides in dense ceramic membranes which exhibit oxygen ionic conductivity and selective oxygen separation, are described as well as their use in separation of oxygen from an oxygen-containing gaseous mixture.

  8. Oxygen ion-conducting dense ceramic

    DOEpatents

    Balachandran, Uthamalingam; Kleefisch, Mark S.; Kobylinski, Thaddeus P.; Morissette, Sherry L.; Pei, Shiyou

    1997-01-01

    Preparation, structure, and properties of mixed metal oxide compositions containing at least strontium, cobalt, iron and oxygen are described. The crystalline mixed metal oxide compositions of this invention have, for example, structure represented by Sr.sub..alpha. (Fe.sub.1-x Co.sub.x).sub..alpha.+.beta. O.sub..delta. where x is a number in a range from 0.01 to about 1, .alpha. is a number in a range from about 1 to about 4, .beta. is a number in a range upward from 0 to about 20, and .delta. is a number which renders the compound charge neutral, and wherein the composition has a non-perovskite structure. Use of the mixed metal oxides in dense ceramic membranes which exhibit oxygen ionic conductivity and selective oxygen separation, are described as well as their use in separation of oxygen from an oxygen-containing gaseous mixture.

  9. Dense LU Factorization on Multicore Supercomputer Nodes

    SciTech Connect

    Lifflander, Jonathan; Miller, Phil; Venkataraman, Ramprasad; Arya, Anshu; Jones, Terry R; Kale, Laxmikant V

    2012-01-01

    Dense LU factorization is a prominent benchmark used to rank the performance of supercomputers. Many implementations, including the reference code HPL, use block-cyclic distributions of matrix blocks onto a two-dimensional process grid. The process grid dimensions drive a trade-off between communication and computation and are architecture- and implementation-sensitive. We show how the critical panel factorization steps can be made less communication-bound by overlapping asynchronous collectives for pivot identification and exchange with the computation of rank-k updates. By shifting this trade-off, a modified block-cyclic distribution can beneficially exploit more available parallelism on the critical path, and reduce panel factorization's memory hierarchy contention on now-ubiquitous multi-core architectures. The missed parallelism in traditional block-cyclic distributions arises because active panel factorization, triangular solves, and subsequent broadcasts are spread over single process columns or rows (respectively) of the process grid. Increasing one dimension of the process grid decreases the number of distinct processes in the other dimension. To increase parallelism in both dimensions, periodic 'rotation' is applied to the process grid to recover the row-parallelism lost by a tall process grid. During active panel factorization, rank-1 updates stream through memory with minimal reuse. In a column-major process grid, the performance of this access pattern degrades as too many streaming processors contend for access to memory. A block-cyclic mapping in the more popular row-major order does not encounter this problem, but consequently sacrifices node and network locality in the critical pivoting steps. We introduce 'striding' to vary between the two extremes of row- and column-major process grids. As a test-bed for further mapping experiments, we describe a dense LU implementation that allows a block distribution to be defined as a general function of block

  10. Heavy quark masses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Testa, Massimo

    1990-01-01

    In the large quark mass limit, an argument which identifies the mass of the heavy-light pseudoscalar or scalar bound state with the renormalized mass of the heavy quark is given. The following equation is discussed: m(sub Q) = m(sub B), where m(sub Q) and m(sub B) are respectively the mass of the heavy quark and the mass of the pseudoscalar bound state.

  11. A high repetition rate laser-heavy water based neutron source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hah, Jungmoo; He, Zhaohan; Nees, John; Krushelnick, Karl; Thomas, Alexander; CenterUltrafast Optical Science Team

    2015-11-01

    Neutrons have numerous applications in diverse areas, such as medicine, security, and material science. For example, sources of MeV neutrons may be used for active interrogation for nuclear security applications. Recently, alternative ways to generate neutron flux have been studied. Among them, ultrashort laser pulse interactions with dense plasma have attracted significant attention as compact, pulse sources of neutrons. To generate neutrons using a laser through fusion reactions, thin solid density targets have been used in a pitcher-catcher arrangement, using deuterated plastic for example. However, the use of solid targets is limited for high-repetition rate operation due to the need to refresh the target for every laser shot. Here, we use a free flowing heavy water target with a high repetition rate (500 Hz) laser without a catcher. From the interaction between a 10 micron scale diameter heavy water stream with the Lambda-cubed laser system at the Univ. of Michigan (12mJ, 800nm, 35fs), deuterons collide with each other resulting in D-D fusion reactions generating 2.45 MeV neutrons. Under best conditions a time average of ~ 105 n/s of neutrons are generated.

  12. Mutagenicity of heavy metals

    SciTech Connect

    Wong, P.K.

    1988-04-01

    Certain heavy metals are required, as trace elements for normal cellular functions. However, heavy metals are toxic to cells once their levels exceed their low physiological values. The toxicity of heavy metals on microorganisms, and on animals has been well-documented. These interactions may induce the alteration of the primary as well as secondary structures of the DNA and result in mutation(s). The present communication reports the results in determining the mutagenicity and carcinogenicity of ten heavy metals commonly found in polluted areas by using the Salmonella/mammalian-microsome mutagenicity test.

  13. Heavy-Quark Production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frixione, Stefano; Mangano, Michelangelo L.; Nason, Paolo; Ridolfi, Giovanni

    The following sections are included: * INTRODUCTION * FIXED-TARGET PRODUCTION * Total cross sections * Single-inclusive distributions * Double-differential distributions * HEAVY-FLAVOUR PRODUCTION AT HERA * Photoproduction cross sections * Charm photoproduction * Bottom photoproduction * Deep-inelastic production * Future physics * Determination of f^{(p)}_{g} * Polarization asymmetries * HERA-B * HEAVY-QUARK PRODUCTION AT HADRON COLLIDERS * Inclusive bottom production * Preliminaries * The effect of higher-order corrections * Comparison with experimental results * boverline{b} correlations * Heavy-quark jets in perturbative QCD * Preliminaries * The structure of heavy-quark jets at the Tevatron * Associated production of heavy quarks with W or γ * Photon plus heavy quarks * W bosons plus heavy quarks * Production of top quarks * Total toverline{t} production cross sections * Top kinematical distributions * HIGHER ORDERS AND RESUMMATION * What are soft-gluon effects * Problems with the x-space resummation formula * Phenomenological applications * HEAVY-FLAVOUR PRODUCTION IN e+e- COLLISIONS * Preliminaries * Fragmentation function * Heavy-quark production via gluon splitting * Correlations * CONCLUSIONS AND OUTLOOK * Acknowledgements * REFERENCES

  14. Heavy water physical verification in power plants

    SciTech Connect

    Morsy, S.; Schuricht, V.; Beetle, T.; Szabo, E.

    1986-01-01

    This paper is a report on the Agency experience in verifying heavy water inventories in power plants. The safeguards objectives and goals for such activities are defined in the paper. The heavy water is stratified according to the flow within the power plant, including upgraders. A safeguards scheme based on a combination of records auditing, comparing records and reports, and physical verification has been developed. This scheme has elevated the status of heavy water safeguards to a level comparable to nuclear material safeguards in bulk facilities. It leads to attribute and variable verification of the heavy water inventory in the different system components and in the store. The verification methods include volume and weight determination, sampling and analysis, non-destructive assay (NDA), and criticality check. The analysis of the different measurement methods and their limits of accuracy are discussed in the paper.

  15. The dense gas mass fraction of molecular clouds in the Milky Way

    SciTech Connect

    Battisti, Andrew J.; Heyer, Mark H. E-mail: heyer@astro.umass.edu

    2014-01-10

    The mass fraction of dense gas within giant molecular clouds (GMCs) of the Milky Way is investigated using {sup 13}CO data from the Five College Radio Astronomy Observatory Galactic Plane Surveys and the Bolocam Galactic Plane Survey (BGPS) of 1.1 mm dust continuum emission. A sample of 860 compact dust sources are selected from the BGPS catalog and kinematically linked to 344 clouds of extended (>3') {sup 13}CO J = 1-0 emission. Gas masses are tabulated for the full dust source and subregions within the dust sources with mass surface densities greater than 200 M {sub ☉} pc{sup –2}, which are assumed to be regions of enhanced volume density. Masses of the parent GMCs are calculated assuming optically thin {sup 13}CO J = 1-0 emission and local thermodynamic equilibrium conditions. The mean fractional mass of dust sources to host GMC mass is 0.11{sub −0.06}{sup +0.12}. The high column density subregions comprise 0.07{sub −0.05}{sup +0.13} of the mass of the cloud. Owing to our assumptions, these values are upper limits to the true mass fractions. The fractional mass of dense gas is independent of GMC mass and gas surface density. The low dense gas mass fraction suggests that the formation of dense structures within GMCs is the primary bottleneck for star formation. The distribution of velocity differences between the dense gas and the low density material along the line of sight is also examined. We find a strong, centrally peaked distribution centered on zero velocity displacement. This distribution of velocity differences is modeled with radially converging flows toward the dense gas position that are randomly oriented with respect to the observed line of sight. These models constrain the infall velocities to be 2-4 km s{sup –1} for various flow configurations.

  16. Development and evaluation of a dense gas plume model

    SciTech Connect

    Matthias, C.S.

    1994-12-31

    The dense gas plume model (continuous release) described in this paper has been developed using the same principles as for a dense gas puff model (instantaneous release). It is a box model for which the main goal is to predict the height H, width W, and maximum concentration C{sub b} for a steady dense plume. A secondary goal is to distribute the mass more realistically by empirically attaching Gaussian distributions in the horizontal and vertical directions. For ease of reference, the models and supporting programs will be referred to as DGM (Dense Gas Models).

  17. meta-DENSE complex acquisition for reduced intravoxel dephasing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aletras, Anthony H.; Arai, Andrew E.

    2004-08-01

    Displacement encoding with stimulated echoes (DENSE) with a meta-DENSE readout and RF phase cycling to suppress the STEAM anti-echo is described for reducing intravoxel dephasing signal loss. This RF phase cycling scheme, when combined with existing meta-DENSE suppression of the T1 recovering signal, yields higher quality DENSE myocardial strain maps. Phantom and human images are provided to demonstrate the technique, which is capable of acquiring phase contrast displacement encoded images at low encoding gradient strengths providing better spatial resolution and less signal loss due to intravoxel dephasing than prior methods.

  18. Biosorption of heavy metals

    SciTech Connect

    Volesky, B. |; Holan, Z.R.

    1995-05-01

    Only within the past decade has the potential of metal biosorption by biomass materials been well established. For economic reasons, of particular interest are abundant biomass types generated as a waste byproduct of large-scale industrial fermentations or certain metal-binding algae found in large quantities in the sea. These biomass types serve as a basis for newly developed metal biosorption processes foreseen particularly as a very competitive means for the detoxification of metal-bearing industrial effluents. The assessment of the metal-building capacity of some new biosorbents is discussed. Lead and cadmium, for instance, have been effectively removed from very dilute solutions by the dried biomass of some ubiquitous species of brown marine algae such as Ascophyllum and Sargassum, which accumulate more than 30% of biomass dry weight in the metal. Mycelia of the industrial steroid-transforming fungi Rhizopus and Absidia are excellent biosorbents for lead, cadmium, copper, zinc, and uranium and also bind other heavy metals up to 25% of the biomass dry weight. Biosorption isotherm curves, derived from equilibrium batch sorption experiments, are used in the evaluation of metal uptake by different biosorbents. Further studies are focusing on the assessment of biosorbent performance in dynamic continuous-flow sorption systems. In the course of this work, new methodologies are being developed that are aimed at mathematical modeling of biosorption systems and their effective optimization. 115 refs., 7 figs., 3 tabs.

  19. Heavy Stars Thrive among Heavy Elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2002-08-01

    -rich regions. This would be because the very strong radiation from nascent stars in such environments would be most efficiently "stopped" by the surrounding material. That leads to a repulsive effect, which would rapidly disperse the remains of the natal cloud and thereby halt any further growth beyond a certain limit. Deprived of "food", those young stellar objects would be unable to grow beyond a certain, limited mass. Stars with masses up to 100 - 200 times that of the Sun are known to exist in more "normal" regions. However, if the above ideas were true, there would be no such "heavy-weight" stars in "metal-rich" regions. Whether this is really so or not has important implications for a correct understanding of the nuclei of galaxies, the properties of massive galaxies and, in general, for all evolved regions of the Universe. VLT observes star-forming nebulae in distant galaxies ESO PR Photo 20a/02 ESO PR Photo 20a/02 [Preview - JPEG: 400 x 507 pix - 59k [Normal - JPEG: 1236 x 800 pix - 728k] [Full-Res - JPEG: 1791 x 2271 pix - 2.1M] ESO PR Photo 20b/02 ESO PR Photo 20b/02 [Preview - JPEG: 400 x 440 pix - 96k] [Normal - JPEG: 800 x 879 pix - 1.2M] [Full-Res - JPEG: 2076 x 2282 pix - 3.7M] Caption : PR Photo 20a/02 shows an image of the Virgo cluster spiral galaxy NGC 4254, with the "metal-rich" H II regions indicated that were observed with the VLT. In PR Photo 20b/02 , the very efficient multi-object-slit observing technique with the multi-mode instrument FORS1 is demonstrated on the Virgo cluster galaxy NGC 4303 . Nineteen moveable slits at the instrument focal plane are positioned so that the faint light from several H II regions in this galaxy can pass into the spectrograph, while the much stronger "background" light (from the nearby areas in the galaxy and, to a large extent, from the Earth's upper atmosphere) is blocked by the mask. This technique is explained in more detail in ESO PR Photos 38c-d/98. Using the ESO Very Large Telescope (VLT) at the Paranal

  20. Cold Nuclear Matter Effects on Heavy Quark Production in Relativistic Heavy Ion Collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durham, John Matthew

    2011-12-01

    The experimental collaborations at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) have established that dense nuclear matter with partonic degrees of freedom is formed in collisions of heavy nuclei at 200 GeV. Information from heavy quarks has given significant insight into the dynamics of this matter. Charm and bottom quarks are dominantly produced by gluon fusion in the early stages of the collision, and thus experience the complete evolution of the medium. The production baseline measured in p + p collisions can be described by fixed order plus next to leading log perturbative QCD calculations within uncertainties. In central Au+Au collisions, suppression has been measured relative to the yield in p + p scaled by the number of nucleon-nucleon collisions, indicating a significant energy loss by heavy quarks in the medium. The large elliptic flow amplitude v2 provides evidence that the heavy quarks flow along with the lighter partons. The suppression and elliptic flow of these quarks are in qualitative agreement with calculations based on Langevin transport models that imply a viscosity to entropy density ratio close to the conjectured quantum lower bound of 1/4pi. However, a full understanding of these phenomena requires measurements of cold nuclear matter (CNM) effects, which should be present in Au+Au collisions but are difficult to distinguish experimentally from effects due to interactions with the medium. This thesis presents measurements of electrons at midrapidity from the decays of heavy quarks produced in d+Au collisions at RHIC. A significant enhancement of these electrons is seen at a transverse momentum below 5 GeV/c, indicating strong CNM effects on charm quarks that are not present for lighter quarks. A simple model of CNM effects in Au+Au collisions suggests that the level of suppression in the hot nuclear medium is comparable for all quark flavors.

  1. Mutagenicity of heavy metals

    SciTech Connect

    Wong, P.K. )

    1988-05-01

    Certain heavy metals are required, as trace elements for normal cellular functions. However, heavy metals are toxic to cells once their levels exceed their low physiological values. The toxicity of heavy metals on microorganisms, on plants and on animals has been well-documented. These interactions may induce the alteration of the primary as well as secondary structures of the DNA and result in mutation(s). Though the rec assay with Bacillus subtilis and the reversion assay with Escherichia coli were used to assess the mutagenicity of some heavy metals, the present communication reports the results in determining the mutagenicity and carcinogenicity of ten heavy metals commonly found in polluted areas by using the Salmonella/mammalian-microsome mutagenicity test.

  2. Dense ceramic catalytic membranes and membrane reactors for energy and environmental applications.

    PubMed

    Dong, Xueliang; Jin, Wanqin; Xu, Nanping; Li, Kang

    2011-10-21

    Catalytic membrane reactors which carry out separation and reaction in a single unit are expected to be a promising approach to achieve green and sustainable chemistry with less energy consumption and lower pollution. This article presents a review of the recent progress of dense ceramic catalytic membranes and membrane reactors, and their potential applications in energy and environmental areas. A basic knowledge of catalytic membranes and membrane reactors is first introduced briefly, followed by a short discussion on the membrane materials including their structures, composition and strategies for material development. The configuration of catalytic membranes, the design of membrane reaction processes and the high temperature sealing are also discussed. The performance of catalytic membrane reactors for energy and environmental applications are summarized and typical catalytic membrane reaction processes are presented and discussed. Finally, current challenges and difficulties related to the industrialization of dense ceramic membrane reactors are addressed and possible future research is also outlined.

  3. Modeling and simulation of dense cloud dispersion in urban areas by means of computational fluid dynamics.

    PubMed

    Scargiali, F; Grisafi, F; Busciglio, A; Brucato, A

    2011-12-15

    The formation of toxic heavy clouds as a result of sudden accidental releases from mobile containers, such as road tankers or railway tank cars, may occur inside urban areas so the problem arises of their consequences evaluation. Due to the semi-confined nature of the dispersion site simplified models may often be inappropriate. As an alternative, computational fluid dynamics (CFD) has the potential to provide realistic simulations even for geometrically complex scenarios since the heavy gas dispersion process is described by basic conservation equations with a reduced number of approximations. In the present work a commercial general purpose CFD code (CFX 4.4 by Ansys(®)) is employed for the simulation of dense cloud dispersion in urban areas. The simulation strategy proposed involves a stationary pre-release flow field simulation followed by a dynamic after-release flow and concentration field simulations. In order to try a generalization of results, the computational domain is modeled as a simple network of straight roads with regularly distributed blocks mimicking the buildings. Results show that the presence of buildings lower concentration maxima and enlarge the side spread of the cloud. Dispersion dynamics is also found to be strongly affected by the quantity of heavy-gas released.

  4. Progress Toward Heavy Ion IFE

    SciTech Connect

    Meier, W R; Logan, B G; Waldron, W L; Sabbi, G L; Callahan-Miller, D A; Peterson, P F; Goodin, D T

    2002-01-17

    Successful development of Heavy Ion Fusion (HIF) will require scientific and technology advances in areas of targets, drivers and chambers. Design work on heavy ion targets indicates that high gain (60-130) may be possible with a -3-6 MJ driver depending on the ability to focus the beams to small spot sizes. Significant improvements have been made on key components of heavy ion drivers, including sources, injectors, insulators and ferromagnetic materials for long-pulse induction accelerator cells, solid-state pulsers, and superconducting quadrupole magnets. The leading chamber concept for HIF is the thick-liquid-wall HYLEE-II design, which uses an array of flibe jets to protect chamber structures from x-ray, debris, and neutron damage. Significant progress has been made in demonstrating the ability to create and control the types of flow needed to form the protective liquid blanket. Progress has also been made on neutron shielding for the final focus magnet arrays with predicted lifetimes now exceeding the life of the power plant. Safety analyses have been completed for the HYLEE-II design using state-of-the-art codes. Work also continues on target fabrication and injection for HE. A target injector experiment capable of > 5 Hz operation has been designed and construction will start in 2002. Methods for mass production of hohlraum targets are being evaluated with small-scale experiments and analyses. Progress in these areas will be reviewed.

  5. Elemental nitrogen partitioning in dense interstellar clouds

    PubMed Central

    Daranlot, Julien; Hincelin, Ugo; Bergeat, Astrid; Costes, Michel; Loison, Jean-Christophe; Wakelam, Valentine; Hickson, Kevin M.

    2012-01-01

    Many chemical models of dense interstellar clouds predict that the majority of gas-phase elemental nitrogen should be present as N2, with an abundance approximately five orders of magnitude less than that of hydrogen. As a homonuclear diatomic molecule, N2 is difficult to detect spectroscopically through infrared or millimeter-wavelength transitions. Therefore, its abundance is often inferred indirectly through its reaction product N2H+. Two main formation mechanisms, each involving two radical-radical reactions, are the source of N2 in such environments. Here we report measurements of the low temperature rate constants for one of these processes, the N + CN reaction, down to 56 K. The measured rate constants for this reaction, and those recently determined for two other reactions implicated in N2 formation, are tested using a gas-grain model employing a critically evaluated chemical network. We show that the amount of interstellar nitrogen present as N2 depends on the competition between its gas-phase formation and the depletion of atomic nitrogen onto grains. As the reactions controlling N2 formation are inefficient, we argue that N2 does not represent the main reservoir species for interstellar nitrogen. Instead, elevated abundances of more labile forms of nitrogen such as NH3 should be present on interstellar ices, promoting the eventual formation of nitrogen-bearing organic molecules. PMID:22689957

  6. Thermochemistry of dense hydrous magnesium silicates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bose, Kunal; Burnley, Pamela; Navrotsky, Alexandra

    1994-01-01

    Recent experimental investigations under mantle conditions have identified a suite of dense hydrous magnesium silicate (DHMS) phases that could be conduits to transport water to at least the 660 km discontinuity via mature, relatively cold, subducting slabs. Water released from successive dehydration of these phases during subduction could be responsible for deep focus earthquakes, mantle metasomatism and a host of other physico-chemical processes central to our understanding of the earth's deep interior. In order to construct a thermodynamic data base that can delineate and predict the stability ranges for DHMS phases, reliable thermochemical and thermophysical data are required. One of the major obstacles in calorimetric studies of phases synthesized under high pressure conditions has been limitation due to the small (less than 5 mg) sample mass. Our refinement of calorimeter techniques now allow precise determination of enthalpies of solution of less than 5 mg samples of hydrous magnesium silicates. For example, high temperature solution calorimetry of natural talc (Mg(0.99) Fe(0.01)Si4O10(OH)2), periclase (MgO) and quartz (SiO2) yield enthalpies of drop solution at 1044 K to be 592.2 (2.2), 52.01 (0.12) and 45.76 (0.4) kJ/mol respectively. The corresponding enthalpy of formation from oxides at 298 K for talc is minus 5908.2 kJ/mol agreeing within 0.1 percent to literature values.

  7. Thermochemistry of dense hydrous magnesium silicates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bose, Kunal; Burnley, Pamela; Navrotsky, Alexandra

    Recent experimental investigations under mantle conditions have identified a suite of dense hydrous magnesium silicate (DHMS) phases that could be conduits to transport water to at least the 660 km discontinuity via mature, relatively cold, subducting slabs. Water released from successive dehydration of these phases during subduction could be responsible for deep focus earthquakes, mantle metasomatism and a host of other physico-chemical processes central to our understanding of the earth's deep interior. In order to construct a thermodynamic data base that can delineate and predict the stability ranges for DHMS phases, reliable thermochemical and thermophysical data are required. One of the major obstacles in calorimetric studies of phases synthesized under high pressure conditions has been limitation due to the small (less than 5 mg) sample mass. Our refinement of calorimeter techniques now allow precise determination of enthalpies of solution of less than 5 mg samples of hydrous magnesium silicates. For example, high temperature solution calorimetry of natural talc (Mg(0.99) Fe(0.01)Si4O10(OH)2), periclase (MgO) and quartz (SiO2) yield enthalpies of drop solution at 1044 K to be 592.2 (2.2), 52.01 (0.12) and 45.76 (0.4) kJ/mol respectively. The corresponding enthalpy of formation from oxides at 298 K for talc is minus 5908.2 kJ/mol agreeing within 0.1 percent to literature values.

  8. Kinetic Simulations of Dense Plasma Focus Breakdown

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, A.; Higginson, D. P.; Jiang, S.; Link, A.; Povilus, A.; Sears, J.; Bennett, N.; Rose, D. V.; Welch, D. R.

    2015-11-01

    A dense plasma focus (DPF) device is a type of plasma gun that drives current through a set of coaxial electrodes to assemble gas inside the device and then implode that gas on axis to form a Z-pinch. This implosion drives hydrodynamic and kinetic instabilities that generate strong electric fields, which produces a short intense pulse of x-rays, high-energy (>100 keV) electrons and ions, and (in deuterium gas) neutrons. A strong factor in pinch performance is the initial breakdown and ionization of the gas along the insulator surface separating the two electrodes. The smoothness and isotropy of this ionized sheath are imprinted on the current sheath that travels along the electrodes, thus making it an important portion of the DPF to both understand and optimize. Here we use kinetic simulations in the Particle-in-cell code LSP to model the breakdown. Simulations are initiated with neutral gas and the breakdown modeled self-consistently as driven by a charged capacitor system. We also investigate novel geometries for the insulator and electrodes to attempt to control the electric field profile. The initial ionization fraction of gas is explored computationally to gauge possible advantages of pre-ionization which could be created experimentally via lasers or a glow-discharge. Prepared by LLNL under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  9. Inference by replication in densely connected systems

    SciTech Connect

    Neirotti, Juan P.; Saad, David

    2007-10-15

    An efficient Bayesian inference method for problems that can be mapped onto dense graphs is presented. The approach is based on message passing where messages are averaged over a large number of replicated variable systems exposed to the same evidential nodes. An assumption about the symmetry of the solutions is required for carrying out the averages; here we extend the previous derivation based on a replica-symmetric- (RS)-like structure to include a more complex one-step replica-symmetry-breaking-like (1RSB-like) ansatz. To demonstrate the potential of the approach it is employed for studying critical properties of the Ising linear perceptron and for multiuser detection in code division multiple access (CDMA) under different noise models. Results obtained under the RS assumption in the noncritical regime give rise to a highly efficient signal detection algorithm in the context of CDMA; while in the critical regime one observes a first-order transition line that ends in a continuous phase transition point. Finite size effects are also observed. While the 1RSB ansatz is not required for the original problems, it was applied to the CDMA signal detection problem with a more complex noise model that exhibits RSB behavior, resulting in an improvement in performance.

  10. The lifetime of evaporating dense sprays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Rivas, Alois; Villermaux, Emmanuel

    2015-11-01

    We study the processes by which a set of nearby liquid droplets (a spray) evaporates in a gas phase whose relative humidity (vapor concentration) is controlled at will. A dense spray of micron-sized water droplets is formed in air by a pneumatic atomizer and conveyed through a nozzle in a closed chamber whose vapor concentration has been pre-set to a controlled value. The resulting plume extension depends on the relative humidity of the diluting medium. When the spray plume is straight and laminar, droplets evaporate at its edge where the vapor is saturated, and diffuses through a boundary layer developing around the plume. We quantify the shape and length of the plume as a function of the injecting, vapor diffusion, thermodynamic and environment parameters. For higher injection Reynolds numbers, standard shear instabilities distort the plume into stretched lamellae, thus enhancing the diffusion of vapor from their boundary towards the diluting medium. These lamellae vanish in a finite time depending on the intensity of the stretching, and relative humidity of the environment, with a lifetime diverging close to the equilibrium limit, when the plume develops in an medium saturated in vapor. The dependences are described quantitatively.

  11. Packing frustration in dense confined fluids.

    PubMed

    Nygård, Kim; Sarman, Sten; Kjellander, Roland

    2014-09-01

    Packing frustration for confined fluids, i.e., the incompatibility between the preferred packing of the fluid particles and the packing constraints imposed by the confining surfaces, is studied for a dense hard-sphere fluid confined between planar hard surfaces at short separations. The detailed mechanism for the frustration is investigated via an analysis of the anisotropic pair distributions of the confined fluid, as obtained from integral equation theory for inhomogeneous fluids at pair correlation level within the anisotropic Percus-Yevick approximation. By examining the mean forces that arise from interparticle collisions around the periphery of each particle in the slit, we calculate the principal components of the mean force for the density profile--each component being the sum of collisional forces on a particle's hemisphere facing either surface. The variations of these components with the slit width give rise to rather intricate changes in the layer structure between the surfaces, but, as shown in this paper, the basis of these variations can be easily understood qualitatively and often also semi-quantitatively. It is found that the ordering of the fluid is in essence governed locally by the packing constraints at each single solid-fluid interface. A simple superposition of forces due to the presence of each surface gives surprisingly good estimates of the density profiles, but there remain nontrivial confinement effects that cannot be explained by superposition, most notably the magnitude of the excess adsorption of particles in the slit relative to bulk.

  12. Understanding shape entropy through local dense packing.

    PubMed

    van Anders, Greg; Klotsa, Daphne; Ahmed, N Khalid; Engel, Michael; Glotzer, Sharon C

    2014-11-11

    Entropy drives the phase behavior of colloids ranging from dense suspensions of hard spheres or rods to dilute suspensions of hard spheres and depletants. Entropic ordering of anisotropic shapes into complex crystals, liquid crystals, and even quasicrystals was demonstrated recently in computer simulations and experiments. The ordering of shapes appears to arise from the emergence of directional entropic forces (DEFs) that align neighboring particles, but these forces have been neither rigorously defined nor quantified in generic systems. Here, we show quantitatively that shape drives the phase behavior of systems of anisotropic particles upon crowding through DEFs. We define DEFs in generic systems and compute them for several hard particle systems. We show they are on the order of a few times the thermal energy ([Formula: see text]) at the onset of ordering, placing DEFs on par with traditional depletion, van der Waals, and other intrinsic interactions. In experimental systems with these other interactions, we provide direct quantitative evidence that entropic effects of shape also contribute to self-assembly. We use DEFs to draw a distinction between self-assembly and packing behavior. We show that the mechanism that generates directional entropic forces is the maximization of entropy by optimizing local particle packing. We show that this mechanism occurs in a wide class of systems and we treat, in a unified way, the entropy-driven phase behavior of arbitrary shapes, incorporating the well-known works of Kirkwood, Onsager, and Asakura and Oosawa.

  13. Elemental nitrogen partitioning in dense interstellar clouds.

    PubMed

    Daranlot, Julien; Hincelin, Ugo; Bergeat, Astrid; Costes, Michel; Loison, Jean-Christophe; Wakelam, Valentine; Hickson, Kevin M

    2012-06-26

    Many chemical models of dense interstellar clouds predict that the majority of gas-phase elemental nitrogen should be present as N(2), with an abundance approximately five orders of magnitude less than that of hydrogen. As a homonuclear diatomic molecule, N(2) is difficult to detect spectroscopically through infrared or millimeter-wavelength transitions. Therefore, its abundance is often inferred indirectly through its reaction product N(2)H(+). Two main formation mechanisms, each involving two radical-radical reactions, are the source of N(2) in such environments. Here we report measurements of the low temperature rate constants for one of these processes, the N + CN reaction, down to 56 K. The measured rate constants for this reaction, and those recently determined for two other reactions implicated in N(2) formation, are tested using a gas-grain model employing a critically evaluated chemical network. We show that the amount of interstellar nitrogen present as N(2) depends on the competition between its gas-phase formation and the depletion of atomic nitrogen onto grains. As the reactions controlling N(2) formation are inefficient, we argue that N(2) does not represent the main reservoir species for interstellar nitrogen. Instead, elevated abundances of more labile forms of nitrogen such as NH(3) should be present on interstellar ices, promoting the eventual formation of nitrogen-bearing organic molecules.

  14. Oblique impact of dense granular sheets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ellowitz, Jake; Guttenberg, Nicholas; Jaeger, Heinrich M.; Nagel, Sidney R.; Zhang, Wendy W.

    2013-11-01

    Motivated by experiments showing impacts of granular jets with non-circular cross sections produce thin ejecta sheets with anisotropic shapes, we study what happens when two sheets containing densely packed, rigid grains traveling at the same speed collide asymmetrically. Discrete particle simulations and a continuum frictional fluid model yield the same steady-state solution of two exit streams emerging from incident streams. When the incident angle Δθ is less than Δθc =120° +/-10° , the exit streams' angles differ from that measured in water sheet experiments. Below Δθc , the exit angles from granular and water sheet impacts agree. This correspondence is surprising because 2D Euler jet impact, the idealization relevant for both situations, is ill posed: a generic Δθ value permits a continuous family of solutions. Our finding that granular and water sheet impacts evolve into the same member of the solution family suggests previous proposals that perturbations such as viscous drag, surface tension or air entrapment select the actual outcome are not correct. Currently at Department of Physics, University of Oregon, Eugene, OR 97403.

  15. Mach reflection in a warm dense plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Foster, J. M.; Rosen, P. A.; Wilde, B. H.; Hartigan, P.; Perry, T. S.

    2010-11-15

    The phenomenon of irregular shock-wave reflection is of importance in high-temperature gas dynamics, astrophysics, inertial-confinement fusion, and related fields of high-energy-density science. However, most experimental studies of irregular reflection have used supersonic wind tunnels or shock tubes, and few or no data are available for Mach reflection phenomena in the plasma regime. Similarly, analytic studies have often been confined to calorically perfect gases. We report the first direct observation, and numerical modeling, of Mach stem formation for a warm, dense plasma. Two ablatively driven aluminum disks launch oppositely directed, near-spherical shock waves into a cylindrical plastic block. The interaction of these shocks results in the formation of a Mach-ring shock that is diagnosed by x-ray backlighting. The data are modeled using radiation hydrocodes developed by AWE and LANL. The experiments were carried out at the University of Rochester's Omega laser [J. M. Soures, R. L. McCrory, C. P. Verdon et al., Phys. Plasmas 3, 2108 (1996)] and were inspired by modeling [A. M. Khokhlov, P. A. Hoeflich, E. S. Oran et al., Astrophys J. 524, L107 (1999)] of core-collapse supernovae that suggest that in asymmetric supernova explosion significant mass may be ejected in a Mach-ring formation launched by bipolar jets.

  16. Droplet formation and scaling in dense suspensions

    PubMed Central

    Miskin, Marc Z.; Jaeger, Heinrich M.

    2012-01-01

    When a dense suspension is squeezed from a nozzle, droplet detachment can occur similar to that of pure liquids. While in pure liquids the process of droplet detachment is well characterized through self-similar profiles and known scaling laws, we show here the simple presence of particles causes suspensions to break up in a new fashion. Using high-speed imaging, we find that detachment of a suspension drop is described by a power law; specifically we find the neck minimum radius, rm, scales like near breakup at time τ = 0. We demonstrate data collapse in a variety of particle/liquid combinations, packing fractions, solvent viscosities, and initial conditions. We argue that this scaling is a consequence of particles deforming the neck surface, thereby creating a pressure that is balanced by inertia, and show how it emerges from topological constraints that relate particle configurations with macroscopic Gaussian curvature. This new type of scaling, uniquely enforced by geometry and regulated by the particles, displays memory of its initial conditions, fails to be self-similar, and has implications for the pressure given at generic suspension interfaces. PMID:22392979

  17. Polypeptide vesicles with densely packed multilayer membranes.

    PubMed

    Song, Ziyuan; Kim, Hojun; Ba, Xiaochu; Baumgartner, Ryan; Lee, Jung Seok; Tang, Haoyu; Leal, Cecilia; Cheng, Jianjun

    2015-05-28

    Multilamellar membranes are important building blocks for constructing self-assembled structures with improved barrier properties, such as multilamellar lipid vesicles. Polymeric vesicles (polymersomes) have attracted growing interest, but multilamellar polymersomes are much less explored. Here, we report the formation of polypeptide vesicles with unprecedented densely packed multilayer membrane structures with poly(ethylene glycol)-block-poly(γ-(4,5-dimethoxy-2-nitrobenzyl)-l-glutamate) (PEG-b-PL), an amphiphilic diblock rod-coil copolymer containing a short PEG block and a short hydrophobic rod-like polypeptide segment. The polypeptide rods undergo smectic ordering with PEG buried between the hydrophobic polypeptide layers. The size of both blocks and the rigidity of the hydrophobic polypeptide block are critical in determining the membrane structures. Increase of the PEG length in PEG-b-PL results in the formation of bilayer sheets, while using random-coil polypeptide block leads to the formation of large compound micelles. UV treatment causes ester bond cleavage of the polypeptide side chain, which induces helix-to-coil transition, change of copolymer amphiphilicity, and eventual disassembly of vesicles. These polypeptide vesicles with unique membrane structures provide a new insight into self-assembly structure control by precisely tuning the composition and conformation of polymeric amphiphiles.

  18. Proton Stopping Power in Warm Dense Hydrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Higginson, Drew; Chen, Sophia; Atzeni, Stefano; Gauthier, Maxence; Mangia, Feliciana; Marquès, Jean-Raphaël; Riquier, Raphaël; Fuchs, Julien

    2013-10-01

    Warm dense matter (WDM) research is fundamental to many fields of physics including fusion sciences, and astrophysical phenomena. In the WDM regime, particle stopping-power differs significantly from cold matter and ideal plasma due to free electron contributions, plasma correlation effects and electron degeneracy. The creation of WDM with temporal duration consistent with the particles probes is difficult to achieve experimentally. The short-pulse laser platform allows for the production of WDM along with relatively short bunches of protons compatible of such measurements, however, until recently, the intrinsic broadband proton spectrum was not well suited to investigate the stopping power directly. This difficulty has been overcome using a novel magnetic particle selector (ΔE/E = 10%) to select protons (in the range 100-1000 keV) as demonstrated with the ELFIE laser in LULI, France. These protons bunches probe high-density (5 × 1020 cm-3) gases (H, He) heated by a nanosecond laser to reach estimated temperatures above 100 eV. Measurement of the proton energy loss within the heated gas allows the stopping power to be determined quantitatively. The experimental results in cold matter are compared to preexisting models to give credibility to the measurement technique. The results from heated matter show that the stopping power of 450 keV protons is dramatically reduced within heated hydrogen plasma.

  19. Order and instabilities in dense bacterial colonies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsimring, Lev

    2012-02-01

    The structure of cell colonies is governed by the interplay of many physical and biological factors, ranging from properties of surrounding media to cell-cell communication and gene expression in individual cells. The biomechanical interactions arising from the growth and division of individual cells in confined environments are ubiquitous, yet little work has focused on this fundamental aspect of colony formation. By combining experimental observations of growing monolayers of non-motile strain of bacteria Escherichia coli in a shallow microfluidic chemostat with discrete-element simulations and continuous theory, we demonstrate that expansion of a dense colony leads to rapid orientational alignment of rod-like cells. However, in larger colonies, anisotropic compression may lead to buckling instability which breaks perfect nematic order. Furthermore, we found that in shallow cavities feedback between cell growth and mobility in a confined environment leads to a novel cell streaming instability. Joint work with W. Mather, D. Volfson, O. Mondrag'on-Palomino, T. Danino, S. Cookson, and J. Hasty (UCSD) and D. Boyer, S. Orozco-Fuentes (UNAM, Mexico).

  20. Understanding shape entropy through local dense packing.

    PubMed

    van Anders, Greg; Klotsa, Daphne; Ahmed, N Khalid; Engel, Michael; Glotzer, Sharon C

    2014-11-11

    Entropy drives the phase behavior of colloids ranging from dense suspensions of hard spheres or rods to dilute suspensions of hard spheres and depletants. Entropic ordering of anisotropic shapes into complex crystals, liquid crystals, and even quasicrystals was demonstrated recently in computer simulations and experiments. The ordering of shapes appears to arise from the emergence of directional entropic forces (DEFs) that align neighboring particles, but these forces have been neither rigorously defined nor quantified in generic systems. Here, we show quantitatively that shape drives the phase behavior of systems of anisotropic particles upon crowding through DEFs. We define DEFs in generic systems and compute them for several hard particle systems. We show they are on the order of a few times the thermal energy ([Formula: see text]) at the onset of ordering, placing DEFs on par with traditional depletion, van der Waals, and other intrinsic interactions. In experimental systems with these other interactions, we provide direct quantitative evidence that entropic effects of shape also contribute to self-assembly. We use DEFs to draw a distinction between self-assembly and packing behavior. We show that the mechanism that generates directional entropic forces is the maximization of entropy by optimizing local particle packing. We show that this mechanism occurs in a wide class of systems and we treat, in a unified way, the entropy-driven phase behavior of arbitrary shapes, incorporating the well-known works of Kirkwood, Onsager, and Asakura and Oosawa. PMID:25344532

  1. Numerical simulations and theoretical analysis of proposed heavy-ion-matter experiments at the GSI Darmstadt accelerator facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tahir, N. A.; Hoffmann, D. H. H.; Maruhn, J. A.; Lutz, K.-J.; Bock, R.

    1998-12-01

    This paper presents one- and two-dimensional computer simulations of the hydrodynamic response of solid cylindrical targets made of different materials that are irradiated by intense beams of energetic ions. The beam parameters considered in this study correspond to the design parameters of the heavy ion beam that will be produced at the Gesellschaft für Schwerionenforschung (GSI), Darmstadt heavy ion synchrotron facility (SIS) in 1999. A few calculations, however, were also done using the beam parameters that are currently available at the SIS. Different values for specific energy deposition including 1, 10, 50, and 100 kJ/g, respectively, have been considered, whereas a number of different pulse lengths, namely, 10, 50, 100, and 200 ns, have been assumed. Various target materials, for example, solid lead, solid neon, and solid hydrogen, have been used. It is expected that this simulation study will be very helpful in the design of efficient targets for the future experiments at the GSI. These experiments will hopefully provide very useful information about many important basic physics phenomena, such as enhanced energy loss of heavy ions in hot dense plasmas, equation-of state (EOS) of matter under extreme conditions, material opacity and shock wave propagation. Another very interesting experiment with important practical implications that could be done at this facility may be the creation of metallic hydrogen by imploding appropriately designed multilayered targets containing a layer of frozen hydrogen. This paper presents the design of such a target, together with implosion simulations of this target using a hydrodynamic simulation model. These simulations show that it may be possible to compress the frozen hydrogen to achieve the theoretically predicted physical conditions necessary for hydrogen metallization (a density of the order of 1 to 2 g/cm3, a temperature of a few 0.1 eV and a pressure of about 2-5 megabar). In some cases, compression of frozen

  2. INERTIAL FUSION DRIVEN BY INTENSE HEAVY-ION BEAMS

    SciTech Connect

    Sharp, W. M.; Friedman, A.; Grote, D. P.; Barnard, J. J.; Cohen, R. H.; Dorf, M. A.; Lund, S. M.; Perkins, L. J.; Terry, M. R.; Logan, B. G.; Bieniosek, F. M.; Faltens, A.; Henestroza, E.; Jung, J. Y.; Kwan, J. W.; Lee, E. P.; Lidia, S. M.; Ni, P. A.; Reginato, L. L.; Roy, P. K.; Seidl, P. A.; Takakuwa, J. H.; Vay, J.-L.; Waldron, W. L.; Davidson, R. C.; Gilson, E. P.; Kaganovich, I. D.; Qin, H.; Startsev, E.; Haber, I.; Kishek, R. A.; Koniges, A. E.

    2011-03-31

    Intense heavy-ion beams have long been considered a promising driver option for inertial-fusion energy production. This paper briefly compares inertial confinement fusion (ICF) to the more-familiar magnetic-confinement approach and presents some advantages of using beams of heavy ions to drive ICF instead of lasers. Key design choices in heavy-ion fusion (HIF) facilities are discussed, particularly the type of accelerator. We then review experiments carried out at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) over the past thirty years to understand various aspects of HIF driver physics. A brief review follows of present HIF research in the US and abroad, focusing on a new facility, NDCX-II, being built at LBNL to study the physics of warm dense matter heated by ions, as well as aspects of HIF target physics. Future research directions are briefly summarized.

  3. O(minus 2) grain boundary diffusion and grain growth in pure dense MgO

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kapadia, C. M.; Leipold, M. H.

    1973-01-01

    Grain growth behavior in fully dense compacts of MgO of very high purity was studied, and the results compared with other similar behaving materials. The activation energy for the intrinsic self-diffusion of Mg(2minus) is discussed along with the grain boundary diffusion of O(2minus). Grain boundary diffusion of O(2minus) is proposed as the controlling mechanism for grain growth.

  4. Prosthesis Material

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    In this photograph, Sandra Rossi user her NASA-developed prosthesis for the first time. Derived from foam insulation technology used to protect the Space Shuttle External Tank from excessive heat, FAB/CAD, a subsidiary of the Harshberger Prosthetic and Orthotic Center, utilized the technology to replace the heavy, fragile plaster they used to produce master molds for prosthetics. The new material was lighter, cheaper and easier to manufacture than plaster, resulting in lower costs to the customer.

  5. Prosthesis Material

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    In this photograph, James Carden uses a NASA-developed prosthesis to moved planks around his home. Derived from foam insulation technology used to protect the Space Shuttle External Tank from excessive heat, FAB/CAD, a subsidiary of the Harshberger Prosthetic and Orthotic Center, utilized the technology to replace the heavy, fragile plaster they used to produce master molds for prosthetics. The new material was lighter, cheaper and easier to manufacture than plaster, resulting in lower costs to the customer.

  6. Prosthesis Material

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    In this photograph, Amputee Amie Bradly uses a NASA-developed prosthesis to paint her fingernails. Derived from foam insulation technology used to protect the Space Shuttle External Tank from excessive heat, FAB/CAD, a subsidiary of the Harshberger Prosthetic and Orthotic Center, utilized the technology to replace the heavy, fragile plaster they used to produce master molds for prosthetics. The new material was lighter, cheaper and easier to manufacture than plaster, resulting in lower costs to the customer.

  7. Generalized spatiotemporal myocardial strain analysis for DENSE and SPAMM imaging.

    PubMed

    Young, Alistair A; Li, Bo; Kirton, Robert S; Cowan, Brett R

    2012-06-01

    Displacement encoding using stimulated echoes (DENSE) and spatial modulation of magnetization (SPAMM) are MRI techniques for quantifying myocardial displacement and strain. However, DENSE has not been compared against SPAMM in phantoms exhibiting nonhomogeneous strain, and interobserver variability has not been compared between DENSE and SPAMM. To perform these comparisons, there is a need for a generalized analysis framework for the evaluation of myocardial strain. A spatiotemporal mathematical model was used to represent myocardial geometry and motion. The model was warped to each frame using tissue displacement maps calculated from either automated phase unwrapping (DENSE) or nonrigid registration (SPAMM). Strain and motion were then calculated from the model using standard methods. DENSE and SPAMM results were compared in a deformable gel phantom exhibiting known nonhomogeneous strain, and interobserver errors were determined in 19 healthy human volunteers. Nonhomogeneous strain in the phantom was accurately quantified using both DENSE and SPAMM. In the healthy volunteers, DENSE produced better interobserver errors than SPAMM for radial strain (-0.009 ± 0.069 vs. 0.029 ± 0.152, respectively, bias ± 95% confidence interval). In conclusion, generalized spatiotemporal modeling enables robust myocardial strain analysis for DENSE or SPAMM.

  8. The chemistry of phosphorus in dense interstellar clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thorne, L. R.; Anicich, V. G.; Prasad, S. S.; Huntress, W. T., Jr.

    1984-01-01

    Laboratory experiments show that the ion-molecule chemistry of phosphorus is significantly different from that of nitrogen in dense interstellar clouds. The PH3 molecule is not readily formed by gas-phase, ion-molecule reactions in these regions. Laboratory results used in a simple kinetic model indicate that the most abundant molecule containing phosphorus in dense clouds is PO.

  9. Mining connected global and local dense subgraphs for bigdata

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Bo; Shen, Haiying

    2016-01-01

    The problem of discovering connected dense subgraphs of natural graphs is important in data analysis. Discovering dense subgraphs that do not contain denser subgraphs or are not contained in denser subgraphs (called significant dense subgraphs) is also critical for wide-ranging applications. In spite of many works on discovering dense subgraphs, there are no algorithms that can guarantee the connectivity of the returned subgraphs or discover significant dense subgraphs. Hence, in this paper, we define two subgraph discovery problems to discover connected and significant dense subgraphs, propose polynomial-time algorithms and theoretically prove their validity. We also propose an algorithm to further improve the time and space efficiency of our basic algorithm for discovering significant dense subgraphs in big data by taking advantage of the unique features of large natural graphs. In the experiments, we use massive natural graphs to evaluate our algorithms in comparison with previous algorithms. The experimental results show the effectiveness of our algorithms for the two problems and their efficiency. This work is also the first that reveals the physical significance of significant dense subgraphs in natural graphs from different domains.

  10. Aqueous phase deposition of dense tin oxide films with nano-structured surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Masuda, Yoshitake Ohji, Tatsuki; Kato, Kazumi

    2014-06-01

    Dense tin oxide films were successfully fabricated in an aqueous solution. The pH of the solutions was controlled to pH 1.3 by addition of HCl. Precise control of solution condition and crystal growth allowed us to obtain dense tin oxide films. Concave–convex surface of fluorine-doped tin oxide (FTO) substrates was entirely-covered with the continuous films. The films were about 65 nm in thickness and had nano-structured surfaces. Morphology of the films was strikingly different from our previous reported nano-sheet assembled structures. The films were not removed from the substrates by strong water flow or air blow to show strong adhesion strength. The aqueous solution process can be applied to surface coating of various materials such as nano/micro-structured surfaces, particles, fibers, polymers, metals or biomaterials. - Graphical abstract: Dense tin oxide films of 65 nm were successfully fabricated in an aqueous solution. They had nano-structured surfaces. Concave-convex substrates were entirely-covered with the continuous films. - Highlights: • Dense tin oxide films of 65 nm were successfully fabricated in an aqueous solution. • They had nano-structured surfaces. • Concave–convex substrates were entirely-covered with the continuous films.

  11. Evolution of enduring contacts and stress relaxation in a dense granular medium.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Duan Z

    2005-04-01

    Particle contacts in a granular material are formed at different times and have different contact ages, the differences between current time and the times when the contacts were formed. The probability distribution of the contact ages is one of the important statistical properties of particle interactions. The rate of the probability relaxation is proved to be closely related to the stress evolution in the dense granular system. While all particle contacts contribute to the stress, the major contribution is from the contacts with long contact ages compared to the binary collision time of the particles in a dense and slow granular flow, in which particle inertia can be neglected. There is a spectrum of relaxation times in the probability distribution of contact ages. These relaxation times result in different time scales of stress relaxation. As an example, the relations among stress, strain, and the strain rate are studied for a dense granular material undergoing an oscillatory simple shear. The interaction of the time scales determines the fluidlike or solidlike behavior of the material.

  12. A predictive, size-dependent continuum model for dense granular flows

    PubMed Central

    Henann, David L.; Kamrin, Ken

    2013-01-01

    Dense granular materials display a complicated set of flow properties, which differentiate them from ordinary fluids. Despite their ubiquity, no model has been developed that captures or predicts the complexities of granular flow, posing an obstacle in industrial and geophysical applications. Here we propose a 3D constitutive model for well-developed, dense granular flows aimed at filling this need. The key ingredient of the theory is a grain-size-dependent nonlocal rheology—inspired by efforts for emulsions—in which flow at a point is affected by the local stress as well as the flow in neighboring material. The microscopic physical basis for this approach borrows from recent principles in soft glassy rheology. The size-dependence is captured using a single material parameter, and the resulting model is able to quantitatively describe dense granular flows in an array of different geometries. Of particular importance, it passes the stringent test of capturing all aspects of the highly nontrivial flows observed in split-bottom cells—a geometry that has resisted modeling efforts for nearly a decade. A key benefit of the model is its simple-to-implement and highly predictive final form, as needed for many real-world applications. PMID:23536300

  13. Electromagnetic fields and anomalous transports in heavy-ion collisions—a pedagogical review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Xu-Guang

    2016-07-01

    The hot and dense matter generated in heavy-ion collisions may contain domains which are not invariant under P and CP transformations. Moreover, heavy-ion collisions can generate extremely strong magnetic fields as well as electric fields. The interplay between the electromagnetic field and triangle anomaly leads to a number of macroscopic quantum phenomena in these P- and CP-odd domains known as anomalous transports. The purpose of this article is to give a pedagogical review of various properties of the electromagnetic fields, the anomalous transport phenomena, and their experimental signatures in heavy-ion collisions.

  14. Resection is a major repair pathway of heavy ion-induced DNA lesions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durante, Marco; Averbeck, Nicole; Taucher-Scholz, Gisela

    Space radiation include densely ionizing heavy ions, which can produce clustered DNA damage with high frequency in human cells. Repair of these complex lesions is generally assumed to be more difficult than for simple double-strand breaks. We show here that human cells use break resection with increasing frequency after exposure to heavy ions. Resection can lead to misrepair of the DNA lesion, via microhomology mediated end-joining. Resection can therefore be responsible for the increased effectiveness of heavy ions in the induction of mutations and genetic late effects.

  15. Electromagnetic fields and anomalous transports in heavy-ion collisions-a pedagogical review.

    PubMed

    Huang, Xu-Guang

    2016-07-01

    The hot and dense matter generated in heavy-ion collisions may contain domains which are not invariant under P and CP transformations. Moreover, heavy-ion collisions can generate extremely strong magnetic fields as well as electric fields. The interplay between the electromagnetic field and triangle anomaly leads to a number of macroscopic quantum phenomena in these P- and CP-odd domains known as anomalous transports. The purpose of this article is to give a pedagogical review of various properties of the electromagnetic fields, the anomalous transport phenomena, and their experimental signatures in heavy-ion collisions.

  16. Two Rab2 interactors regulate dense-core vesicle maturation.

    PubMed

    Ailion, Michael; Hannemann, Mandy; Dalton, Susan; Pappas, Andrea; Watanabe, Shigeki; Hegermann, Jan; Liu, Qiang; Han, Hsiao-Fen; Gu, Mingyu; Goulding, Morgan Q; Sasidharan, Nikhil; Schuske, Kim; Hullett, Patrick; Eimer, Stefan; Jorgensen, Erik M

    2014-04-01

    Peptide neuromodulators are released from a unique organelle: the dense-core vesicle. Dense-core vesicles are generated at the trans-Golgi and then sort cargo during maturation before being secreted. To identify proteins that act in this pathway, we performed a genetic screen in Caenorhabditis elegans for mutants defective in dense-core vesicle function. We identified two conserved Rab2-binding proteins: RUND-1, a RUN domain protein, and CCCP-1, a coiled-coil protein. RUND-1 and CCCP-1 colocalize with RAB-2 at the Golgi, and rab-2, rund-1, and cccp-1 mutants have similar defects in sorting soluble and transmembrane dense-core vesicle cargos. RUND-1 also interacts with the Rab2 GAP protein TBC-8 and the BAR domain protein RIC-19, a RAB-2 effector. In summary, a pathway of conserved proteins controls the maturation of dense-core vesicles at the trans-Golgi network. PMID:24698274

  17. Quantification of Left Ventricular Volumes, Mass and Ejection Fraction using Cine Displacement Encoding with Stimulated Echoes (DENSE) MRI

    PubMed Central

    Haggerty, Christopher M.; Kramer, Sage P.; Skrinjar, Oskar; Binkley, Cassi M.; Powell, David K.; Mattingly, Andrea C.; Epstein, Frederick H.; Fornwalt, Brandon K.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To test the hypothesis that magnitude images from cine Displacement Encoding with Stimulated Echoes (DENSE) MRI can accurately quantify left ventricular (LV) volumes, mass, and ejection fraction. Materials and Methods Thirteen mice (C57BL/6J) were imaged using a 7T ClinScan MRI. A short-axis stack of cine T2-weighted black blood (BB) images was acquired for calculation of left ventricular volumes, mass, and ejection fraction (EF) using the gold standard sum-of-slices methodology. DENSE images were acquired during the same imaging session in three short-axis (basal, mid, apical) and two long-axis orientations. A custom surface fitting algorithm was applied to epicardial and endocardial borders from the DENSE magnitude images to calculate volumes, mass, and EF. Agreement between the DENSE-derived measures and BB-derived measures was assessed via coefficient of variation (CoV). Results 3D surface reconstruction was completed on the order of seconds from segmented images, and required fewer slices to be segmented. Volumes, mass, and EF from DENSE-derived surfaces matched well with BB data (CoVs ≤11%). Conclusion LV mass, volumes, and ejection fraction in mice can be quantified through sparse (5 slices) sampling with DENSE. This consolidation significantly reduces the time required to assess both mass/volume-based measures of cardiac function and advanced cardiac mechanics. PMID:24923710

  18. Dust charging in the dense Enceladus torus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yaroshenko, Victoria; Lühr, Hermann; Morfill, Gregor

    2013-04-01

    The key parameter of the dust-plasma interactions is the charge carried by a dust particle. The grain electrostatic potential is usually calculated from the so called orbit-motion limited (OML) model [1]. It is valid for a single particle immersed into collisionless plasmas with Maxwellian electron and ion distributions. Apparently, such a parameter regime cannot be directly applied to the conditions relevant for the Enceladus dense neutral torus and plume, where the plasma is multispecies and multistreaming, the dust density is high, sometimes even exceeding the plasma number density. We have examined several new factors which can significantly affect the grain charging in the dust loaded plasma of the Enceladus torus and in the plume region and which, to our knowledge, have not been investigated up to now for such plasma environments. These include: (a) influence of the multispecies plasma composition, namely the presence of two electron populations with electron temperatures ranging from a few eV up to a hundred eV [2], a few ion species (e.g. corotating water group ions, and protons, characterized by different kinetic temperatures), as well as cold nonthermalized new-born water group ions which move with Kepler velocity [3]; (b) effect of the ion-neutral collisions on the dust charging in the dense Enceladus torus and in the plume; (c) effect of high dust density, when a grain cannot be considered as an isolated particle any more (especially relevant for the plume region, where the average negative dust charge density according to Cassini measurements is of the order or even exceeds the plasma number density [4,5]). It turns out that in this case, the electrostatic potential and respective dust charge cannot be deduced from the initial OML formalism and there is a need to incorporate the effect of dust density into plasma fluxes flowing to the grain surface to calculate the grain equilibrium charge; (e) since the dust in the planetary rings comes in a wide

  19. The chemistry of dense interstellar clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Irvine, W. M.

    1991-01-01

    The basic theme of this program is the study of molecular complexity and evolution in interstellar and circumstellar clouds incorporating the biogenic elements. Recent results include the identification of a new astronomical carbon-chain molecule, C4Si. This species was detected in the envelope expelled from the evolved star IRC+10216 in observations at the Nobeyama Radio Observatory in Japan. C4Si is the carrier of six unidentified lines which had previously been observed. This detection reveals the existence of a new series of carbon-chain molecules, C sub n Si (n equals 1, 2, 4). Such molecules may well be formed from the reaction of Si(+) with acetylene and acetylene derivatives. Other recent research has concentrated on the chemical composition of the cold, dark interstellar clouds, the nearest dense molecular clouds to the solar system. Such regions have very low kinetic temperatures, on the order of 10 K, and are known to be formation sites for solar-type stars. We have recently identified for the first time in such regions the species of H2S, NO, HCOOH (formic acid). The H2S abundance appears to exceed that predicted by gas-phase models of ion-molecule chemistry, perhaps suggesting the importance of synthesis on grain surfaces. Additional observations in dark clouds have studied the ratio of ortho- to para-thioformaldehyde. Since this ratio is expected to be unaffected by both radiative and ordinary collisional processes in the cloud, it may well reflect the formation conditions for this molecule. The ratio is observed to depart from that expected under conditions of chemical equilibrium at formation, perhaps reflecting efficient interchange between cold dust grains in the gas phase.

  20. Model For Dense Molecular Cloud Cores

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doty, Steven D.; Neufeld, David A.

    1997-01-01

    We present a detailed theoretical model for the thermal balance, chemistry, and radiative transfer within quiescent dense molecular cloud cores that contain a central protostar. In the interior of such cores, we expect the dust and gas temperatures to be well coupled, while in the outer regions CO rotational emissions dominate the gas cooling and the predicted gas temperature lies significantly below the dust temperature. Large spatial variations in the gas temperature are expected to affect the gas phase chemistry dramatically; in particular, the predicted water abundance varies by more than a factor of 1000 within cloud cores that contain luminous protostars. Based upon our predictions for the thermal and chemical structure of cloud cores, we have constructed self-consistent radiative transfer models to compute the line strengths and line profiles for transitions of (12)CO, (13)CO, C(18)O, ortho- and para-H2(16)O, ortho- and para-H2(18)O, and O I. We carried out a general parameter study to determine the dependence of the model predictions upon the parameters assumed for the source. We expect many of the far-infrared and submillimeter rotational transitions of water to be detectable either in emission or absorption with the use of the Infrared Space Observatory (ISO) and the Submillimeter Wave Astronomy Satellite. Quiescent, radiatively heated hot cores are expected to show low-gain maser emission in the 183 GHz 3(sub 13)-2(sub 20) water line, such as has been observed toward several hot core regions using ground-based telescopes. We predict the (3)P(sub l) - (3)P(sub 2) fine-structure transition of atomic oxygen near 63 micron to be in strong absorption against the continuum for many sources. Our model can also account successfully for recent ISO observations of absorption in rovibrational transitions of water toward the source AFGL 2591.

  1. Heavy metals in the cell nucleus - role in pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Sas-Nowosielska, Hanna; Pawlas, Natalia

    2015-01-01

    People are exposed to heavy metals both in an occupational and natural environment. The most pronounced effects of heavy metals result from their interaction with cellular genetic material packed in form of chromatin. Heavy metals influence chromatin, mimicking and substituting natural microelements in various processes taking place in the cell, or interacting chemically with nuclear components: nucleic acids, proteins and lipids. This paper is a review of current knowledge on the effects of heavy metals on chromatin, exerted at the level of various nuclear components.

  2. Heavy-ion dosimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Schimmerling, W.

    1980-03-01

    This lecture deals with some of the more important physical characteristics of relativistic heavy ions and their measurement, with beam delivery and beam monitoring, and with conventional radiation dosimetry as used in the operation of the BEVALAC biomedical facility for high energy heavy ions (Lyman and Howard, 1977; BEVALAC, 1977). Even so, many fundamental aspects of the interaction of relativistic heavy ions with matter, including important atomic physics and radiation chemical considerations, are not discussed beyond the reminder that such additional understanding is required before an adequte perspective of the problem can be attained.

  3. ICES IN THE QUIESCENT IC 5146 DENSE CLOUD

    SciTech Connect

    Chiar, J. E.; Pendleton, Y. J.; Allamandola, L. J.; Ennico, K.; Greene, T. P.; Roellig, T. L.; Sandford, S. A.; Boogert, A. C. A.; Geballe, T. R.; Mason, R. E.; Keane, J. V.; Lada, C. J.; Tielens, A. G. G. M.; Werner, M. W.; Whittet, D. C. B.; Decin, L.; Eriksson, K.

    2011-04-10

    This paper presents spectra in the 2 to 20 {mu}m range of quiescent cloud material located in the IC 5146 cloud complex. The spectra were obtained with NASA's Infrared Telescope Facility SpeX instrument and the Spitzer Space Telescope's Infrared Spectrometer. We use these spectra to investigate dust and ice absorption features in pristine regions of the cloud that are unaltered by embedded stars. We find that the H{sub 2}O-ice threshold extinction is 4.03 {+-} 0.05 mag. Once foreground extinction is taken into account, however, the threshold drops to 3.2 mag, equivalent to that found for the Taurus dark cloud, generally assumed to be the touchstone quiescent cloud against which all other dense cloud and embedded young stellar object observations are compared. Substructure in the trough of the silicate band for two sources is attributed to CH{sub 3}OH and NH{sub 3} in the ices, present at the {approx}2% and {approx}5% levels, respectively, relative to H{sub 2}O-ice. The correlation of the silicate feature with the E(J - K) color excess is found to follow a much shallower slope relative to lines of sight that probe diffuse clouds, supporting the previous results by Chiar et al.

  4. Warm dense matter created by isochoric laser heating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ping, Y.; Correa, A. A.; Ogitsu, T.; Draeger, E.; Schwegler, E.; Ao, T.; Widmann, K.; Price, D. F.; Lee, E.; Tam, H.; Springer, P. T.; Hanson, D.; Koslow, I.; Prendergast, D.; Collins, G.; Ng, A.

    2010-06-01

    Warm Dense Matter (WDM) physics has been a growing field of high energy density physics, driven by the fundamental urge to understand the convergence between plasma and condensed matter physics, and the practical need to understand dynamic behavior of materials under extreme conditions. A platform for creating and probing WDM by isochoric heating of free-standing nano-foils has been developed recently to study the non-equilibrium processes. Results of optical measurements reveal the existence of a quasi-steady state in the time history, during which the interband component of the dielectric function shows both enhancement and a red shift. First-principles calculations of the dielectric function suggest that the enhanced red shift of the interband transition peak might be explained by a positive charge state of the gold foil due to ejection of electrons by the high intensity laser pulse. The impact on optical properties by the formation of an electronic sheath was examined by the Thomas-Fermi theory with local equilibrium approximation.

  5. Non-equilibrium Warm Dense Gold: Experiments and Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ng, Andrew

    2015-11-01

    This talk is an overview of a series of studies of non-equilibrium Warm Dense Matter using a broad range of measured properties of a single material, namely Au, as comprehensive benchmarks for theory. The measurements are made in fs-laser pump-probe experiments. For understanding lattice stability, our investigation reveals a solid phase at high energy density. This leads to the calculation of lattice dynamics using MD simulations and phonon hardening in DFT-MD simulations. For understanding electron transport in two-temperature states, AC conductivity is used to evaluate DFT-MD and Kubo-Greenwood calculations while DC conductivity is used to test Ziman calculations in a DFT average atom model. The electron density is also used to assess electronic structure calculations in DFT simulations. In our latest study of electron kinetics in states with a non-Fermi-Dirac distribution, three-body recombination is found to have a significant effect on electron thermalizaiton time. This is driving an effort to develop electron kinetics simulations using the Boltzmann equation method.

  6. DENSE, PARSEC-SCALE CLUMPS NEAR THE GREAT ANNIHILATOR

    SciTech Connect

    Hodges-Kluck, Edmund; Pound, Marc W.; Harris, Andrew I.; Lamb, James W.; Hodges, Mark

    2009-05-10

    We report on Combined Array for Research in Millimeter-Wave Astronomy and James Clerk Maxwell Telescope observations toward the Einstein source 1E 1740.7-2942, a low-mass X-ray binary commonly known as the 'Great Annihilator'. The Great Annihilator is known to be near a small, bright molecular cloud in a region largely devoid of emission in {sup 12}CO surveys of the Galactic center. This region is of interest because it is interior to the dust lanes which may be the shock zones where atomic gas from the HI nuclear disk is converted into molecular gas. We find that the region is populated with a large number of dense (n {approx} 10{sup 5} cm{sup -3}) regions of excited gas with small filling factors. The gas appears to have turbulent support and may be the result of sprays of material from collisions in the shock zone. We estimate that {approx}(1-3) x 10{sup 5} M {sub sun} of shocked gas resides in our r {approx} 3', {delta}v {sub LSR} = 100 km s{sup -1} field. If this gas has recently shocked and is interior to the inner Lindblad resonance of the dominant bar, it is in transit to the x {sub 2} disk, suggesting that a significant amount of mass may be transported to the disk by a low filling factor population of molecular clouds with low surface brightness in larger surveys.

  7. Electronic and Sturctural Transitions in Dense Liquid Sodium

    SciTech Connect

    Raty, J Y; Schwegler, E R; Bonev, S A

    2007-08-06

    At ambient conditions, the light alkali metals are free-electron like crystals with a highly symmetric structure. However, they were shown recently to exhibit unexpected complexity under pressure. It was predicted from theory and later confirmed by experiment that Li and Na undergo a sequence of symmetry breaking transitions driven by a Peierls mechanism. Most recently, measurements of the Na melting curve revealed an unprecedented and still unexplained drop in the melting temperature from 1000 K at 30 GPa to room temperature at 120 GPa. Here we report results from ab initio calculations that explain the unusual melting behavior in dense Na. We show that molten Na undergoes a series of pressure-induced structural and electronic transitions analogous to that observed in solid Na, but commencing at much lower pressure in the presence of disorder. With increasing pressure, liquid Na initially evolves by assuming a more compact local structure. However, a transition to a lower coordinated liquid takes place at a pressure around 65 GPa, accompanied by a threefold drop in electrical conductivity. A pseudogap opening at the Fermi level, an effect previously not observed in a liquid metal, drives this transition. Remarkably, the lower coordinated liquid emerges at rather elevated temperatures and above the stability region of a closed packed free electron-like metal. We predict that similar exotic behavior is possible in other materials as well.

  8. Frequency of dense fine speckled pattern in immunofluorescence screening test

    PubMed Central

    Şener, Aslı Gamze; Afşar, İlhan

    2015-01-01

    Objective The presence of antinuclear antibodies (ANA), directed against intracellular antigens, is a distinctive feature of systemic autoimmune rheumatic diseases (SARDs). The standard test for antinuclear antibody screening is the indirect immunofluorescence (IIF). Anti-dense fine speckled 70 (anti-DFS70) antibodies were initially identified as an ANA IIF pattern from a patient with interstitial cystitis, but they were later associated with various other conditions. The objective of the study was to determine the frequency of anti-DFS70 antibodies in a cohort of patients undergoing routine ANA testing. Material and Methods From January 2011 to January 2012, a total of 5800 serum samples were screened for ANA by IIF (Euroimmune AG, Lübeck, Germany). DFS pattern was searched. Results ANA were present in 1302 (22.4%) of all patients. There were 16 (1.2%) anti-DFS70 antibody-positive patients. The number of females and males who have anti-DFS70 antibody was eleven and five, respectively. All of the samples presented a titer of ≥1/320. There was one patient with SARD from the rheumatology department. Another 15 patients were from gastroenterology, endocrinology, and general internal medicine. Conclusion Although a distinctive clinical association has not been reported, anti-DFS70 have been proposed as a significant biomarker for the exclusion of SARD. The present study is a preliminary study. There is a need for a reliable assay to ensure reactivity to DFS70 and screening large populations. PMID:27708940

  9. Hot and dense matter beyond relativistic mean field theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xilin; Prakash, Madappa

    2016-05-01

    Properties of hot and dense matter are calculated in the framework of quantum hadrodynamics by including contributions from two-loop (TL) diagrams arising from the exchange of isoscalar and isovector mesons between nucleons. Our extension of mean field theory (MFT) employs the same five density-independent coupling strengths which are calibrated using the empirical properties at the equilibrium density of isospin-symmetric matter. Results of calculations from the MFT and TL approximations are compared for conditions of density, temperature, and proton fraction encountered in the study of core-collapse supernovae, young and old neutron stars, and mergers of compact binary stars. The TL results for the equation of state (EOS) of cold pure neutron matter at sub- and near-nuclear densities agree well with those of modern quantum Monte Carlo and effective field-theoretical approaches. Although the high-density EOS in the TL approximation for cold and β -equilibrated neutron-star matter is substantially softer than its MFT counterpart, it is able to support a 2 M⊙ neutron star required by recent precise determinations. In addition, radii of 1.4 M⊙ stars are smaller by ˜1 km than those obtained in MFT and lie in the range indicated by analysis of astronomical data. In contrast to MFT, the TL results also give a better account of the single-particle or optical potentials extracted from analyses of medium-energy proton-nucleus and heavy-ion experiments. In degenerate conditions, the thermal variables are well reproduced by results of Landau's Fermi-liquid theory in which density-dependent effective masses feature prominently. The ratio of the thermal components of pressure and energy density expressed as Γth=1 +(Pth/ɛth) , often used in astrophysical simulations, exhibits a stronger dependence on density than on proton fraction and temperature in both MFT and TL calculations. The prominent peak of Γth at supranuclear density found in MFT is, however, suppressed in

  10. Export of terrigenous organic carbon along submarine canyons driven by dense shelf water cascading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tesi, T.; Puig, P.; Goni, M.; Canals, M.; Langone, L.; Palanques, A.; Miserocchi, S.; Heussner, S.; Trincardi, F.; Calafat, A.; Turchetto, M.; Fabres, J.; Durrieu de Madron, X.; Boldrin, A.

    2008-12-01

    At current highstand in sea level, shelves are considered major sites of terrigenous organic carbon (OCterr) accumulation with relatively little connectivity to the ocean interior. In recent years, the process of dense water cascading from the continental shelf, which occurs in numerous places around the world, has been suggested as carrier for OCterr to the deep ocean. The land-locked Mediterranean Sea is characterized by intense and recurrent cascades of dense shelf water. In winter, cold and dry winds cause the formation of dense water over the shelf that may overflow it and travel down to the outer margin and basin. Moored instruments were deployed in the canyons of the Gulf of Lion (France-Spain) and the Adriatic Sea (Italy) to intercept particulate material escaping the shelf and to investigate hydrodynamic and physical properties of the water column. Surface sediments along the shelves were also sampled to evaluate their contribution to the particle fluxes. The relative fractions of autochthonous and advected OC in sediment trap samples were investigated using biogeochemical proxies including alkaline CuO oxidation products (lignin phenols, dicarboxylic acids, and fatty acids), radiocarbon measurements (Ä14C), and elemental and carbon stable isotope (ä13C) compositions. Lignin-derived CuO products were a powerful biogeochemical tool that allowed us to identify the provenance of the material from the continental margin and to assess the amount of OCterr transferred across the slope in both Mediterranean regions. The results indicate that the composition of OC escaping the shelf through submarine canyons depends on the geomorphological setting. At the present sea level stage, cascading on a broad shelf limits the transport of OCterr, promoting instead the down-slope export of material accumulated in the mid- and outer-shelf. In contrast, cascade events on narrow shelves lead to the efficient export of OCterr from shallower regions of the margin along with

  11. Actinide targets for the synthesis of super-heavy elements

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Roberto, J.; Alexander, Charles W.; Boll, Rose Ann; Ezold, Julie G.; Felker, Leslie Kevin; Rykaczewski, Krzysztof Piotr; Hogle, Susan L.

    2015-06-18

    Since 2000, six new super-heavy elements with atomic numbers 113 through 118 have been synthesized in hot fusion reactions of 48Ca beams on actinide targets. These target materials, including 242Pu, 244Pu, 243Am, 245Cm, 248Cm, 249Cf, and 249Bk, are available in very limited quantities and require specialized production and processing facilities resident in only a few research centers worldwide. This report describes the production and chemical processing of heavy actinide materials for super-heavy element research, current availabilities of these materials, and related target fabrication techniques. The impact of actinide materials in super-heavy element discovery is reviewed, and strategies for enhancing themore » production of rare actinides including 249Bk, 251Cf, and 254Es are described.« less

  12. Actinide targets for the synthesis of super-heavy elements

    SciTech Connect

    Roberto, J.; Alexander, Charles W.; Boll, Rose Ann; Ezold, Julie G.; Felker, Leslie Kevin; Rykaczewski, Krzysztof Piotr; Hogle, Susan L.

    2015-06-18

    Since 2000, six new super-heavy elements with atomic numbers 113 through 118 have been synthesized in hot fusion reactions of 48Ca beams on actinide targets. These target materials, including 242Pu, 244Pu, 243Am, 245Cm, 248Cm, 249Cf, and 249Bk, are available in very limited quantities and require specialized production and processing facilities resident in only a few research centers worldwide. This report describes the production and chemical processing of heavy actinide materials for super-heavy element research, current availabilities of these materials, and related target fabrication techniques. The impact of actinide materials in super-heavy element discovery is reviewed, and strategies for enhancing the production of rare actinides including 249Bk, 251Cf, and 254Es are described.

  13. Actinide targets for the synthesis of super-heavy elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roberto, J. B.; Alexander, C. W.; Boll, R. A.; Burns, J. D.; Ezold, J. G.; Felker, L. K.; Hogle, S. L.; Rykaczewski, K. P.

    2015-12-01

    Since 2000, six new super-heavy elements with atomic numbers 113 through 118 have been synthesized in hot fusion reactions of 48Ca beams on actinide targets. These target materials, including 242Pu, 244Pu, 243Am, 245Cm, 248Cm, 249Cf, and 249Bk, are available in very limited quantities and require specialized production and processing facilities resident in only a few research centers worldwide. This report describes the production and chemical processing of heavy actinide materials for super-heavy element research, current availabilities of these materials, and related target fabrication techniques. The impact of actinide materials in super-heavy element discovery is reviewed, and strategies for enhancing the production of rare actinides including 249Bk, 251Cf, and 254Es are described.

  14. Comparison of periodontal ligament cells responses to dense and nanophase hydroxyapatite.

    PubMed

    Sun, Weibin; Chu, Chenlin; Wang, Juan; Zhao, Huating

    2007-05-01

    Hydroxyapatite, a synthetic calcium phosphate ceramic, is used as a biomaterial for the restoration of human hard tissue as well as in techniques which aim to regenerate periodontal tissues. Generally, hydroxyapatite is believed to have osteoconductive effects and to be non-bioresorbable but not to induce to periodontal tissue regeneration. No report has been found on responses of periodontal ligament cells (PDLC), the main contributor to periodontal tissue regeneration, to nanoparticles of hydroxyapatite. The objective of this study was to investigate the possible effects of nanophase powder of hydroxyapatite on proliferation of periodontal ligament cells. Using a sol-gel method, the nanophase hydroxyapatite powders were fabricated. These powders were proved to comprise nanoparticles by transmission electron microscope examination. The primary periodontal ligament cells were cultured on dense particle hydroxyapatite and nanometer particle hydroxyapatite. The effects on proliferation of periodontal ligament cells on dense and nanoparticle hydroxyapatite were examined in vitro using a methyl thiazolil tetracolium (MTT) test. The intercellular effects were studied with scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and energy dispersive X-ray (EDX). In addition, the influence of the two materials on osteogenic differentiation was determined through measurement of alkaline phosphatase activity and flow cytometry. About 2, 3, and 4 days after treatment with nanoparticles of hydroxyapatite, the proliferation activity of the PDLC increased significantly compared with those proliferating on dense hydroxyapatite and of control PDLC, but no significant difference was found between the PDLC proliferation on dense hydroxyapatite and the control PDLCs. After 3 and 5 days' incubation with nanoparticles of hydroxyapatite, alkaline phosphatase activity was significantly increased as compared to PDLCs incubated with dense hydroxyapatite and control

  15. Recent U.S. advances in ion-beam-driven high energy densityphysics and heavy ion fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Logan, B.G.; Bieniosek, F.M.; Celata, C.M.; Coleman, J.; Greenway, W.; Henestroza, E.; Kwan, J.W.; Lee, E.P.; Leitner, M.; Roy,P.K.; Seidl, P.A.; Vay, J-L.; Waldron, W.L.; Yu, S.S.; Barnard, J.J.; Cohen, R.H.; Friedman, A.; Grote, D.P.; Kireeff Covo, M.; Molvik, A.W.; Lund, S.M.; Meier, W.R.; Sharp, W.; Davidson, R.C.; Efthimion, P.C.; Gilson, E.P.; Grisham, L.; Kaganovich, Qin H.; Sefkow, A.B.; Startsev,E.A.; Welch, D.; Olson, C.

    2006-07-05

    During the past two years, significant experimental and theoretical progress has been made in the US heavy ion fusion science program in longitudinal beam compression, ion-beam-driven warm dense matter, beam acceleration, high brightness beam transport; and advanced theory and numerical simulations. Innovations in longitudinal compression of intense ion beams by > 50 X propagating through background plasma enable initial beam target experiments in warm dense matter to begin within the next two years. They are assessing how these new techniques might apply to heavy ion fusion drivers for inertial fusion energy.

  16. Dense molecular clouds in the SN 2008fp host galaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cox, N. L. J.; Patat, F.

    2014-05-01

    Context. Supernovae (SNe) offer a unique opportunity to study physical properties, small-scale structure, and complex organic chemistry of the interstellar medium (ISM) in different galaxies. Aims: Interstellar absorption features, such as atomic and molecular lines as well as diffuse interstellar bands (DIBs), can be used to study the physical properties of extra-galactic diffuse interstellar clouds. Methods: We used optical high-resolution spectroscopy to study the properties of the ISM in the SN 2008fp host galaxy, ESO 428-G14. The properties of intervening dust were investigated via spectropolarimetry. Results: The spectra of SN 2008fp reveal a complex of diffuse atomic clouds at radial velocities in line with the systematic velocities of the host galaxy. In addition, a translucent (AV ~ 1.5 mag) cloud is detected at a heliocentric velocity of 1770 km s-1 (redshifted by 70 km s-1 with respect to the system velocity). This cold dense cloud is rich in dense atomic gas tracers, molecules, as well as DIBs. We have detected both C2 and C3 for the first time in a galaxy beyond the Local Group. The CN (0, 0) band-line ratios are consistent with an excitation temperature of T = 2.9 ± 0.4 K. The interstellar polarisation law deviates significantly from what is observed in the Galaxy, indicating substantial differences in the host dust/size composition. No variations over a period of about one month are observed in any of the ISM tracers. Conclusions: The lack of variability in the extra-galactic absorption line profiles implies that the absorbing material is not circumstellar and thus not directly affected by the SN event. It also shows that there are no significant density variation in the small-scale structure of the molecular cloud down to 100 AU. C2 is used to probe the cold diffuse ISM density and temperature. Here we also use observations of CN in a distant galaxies, though for now still in a limited way, for in situ measurements of the cosmic background

  17. Dense-gas dispersion advection-diffusion model

    SciTech Connect

    Ermak, D.L.

    1992-07-01

    A dense-gas version of the ADPIC particle-in-cell, advection- diffusion model was developed to simulate the atmospheric dispersion of denser-than-air releases. In developing the model, it was assumed that the dense-gas effects could be described in terms of the vertically-averaged thermodynamic properties and the local height of the cloud. The dense-gas effects were treated as a perturbation to the ambient thermodynamic properties (density and temperature), ground level heat flux, turbulence level (diffusivity), and windfield (gravity flow) within the local region of the dense-gas cloud. These perturbations were calculated from conservation of energy and conservation of momentum principles along with the ideal gas law equation of state for a mixture of gases. ADPIC, which is generally run in conjunction with a mass-conserving wind flow model to provide the advection field, contains all the dense-gas modifications within it. This feature provides the versatility of coupling the new dense-gas ADPIC with alternative wind flow models. The new dense-gas ADPIC has been used to simulate the atmospheric dispersion of ground-level, colder-than-ambient, denser-than-air releases and has compared favorably with the results of field-scale experiments.

  18. Aerodynamics of Heavy Vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Haecheon; Lee, Jungil; Park, Hyungmin

    2014-01-01

    We present an overview of the aerodynamics of heavy vehicles, such as tractor-trailers, high-speed trains, and buses. We introduce three-dimensional flow structures around simplified model vehicles and heavy vehicles and discuss the flow-control devices used for drag reduction. Finally, we suggest important unsteady flow structures to investigate for the enhancement of aerodynamic performance and future directions for experimental and numerical approaches.

  19. Baryonic matter onset in two-color QCD with heavy quarks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scior, Philipp; von Smekal, Lorenz

    2015-11-01

    We study the cold and dense regime in the phase diagram of two-color QCD with heavy quarks within a three-dimensional effective theory for Polyakov loops. This theory is derived from two-color QCD in a combined strong-coupling and hopping expansion. In particular, we study the onset of diquark density as the finite-density transition of the bosonic baryons in the two-color world. In contrast to previous studies of heavy dense QCD, our zero-temperature extrapolations are consistent with a continuous transition without binding energy. They thus provide evidence that the effective theory for heavy quarks is capable of describing the characteristic differences between diquark condensation in two-color QCD and the liquid-gas transition of nuclear matter in QCD.

  20. Process for removing heavy metal compounds from heavy crude oil

    DOEpatents

    Cha, Chang Y.; Boysen, John E.; Branthaver, Jan F.

    1991-01-01

    A process is provided for removing heavy metal compounds from heavy crude oil by mixing the heavy crude oil with tar sand; preheating the mixture to a temperature of about 650.degree. F.; heating said mixture to up to 800.degree. F.; and separating tar sand from the light oils formed during said heating. The heavy metals removed from the heavy oils can be recovered from the spent sand for other uses.

  1. Flow distortion at a dense forest edge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dellwik, E.; Mann, J.

    2012-12-01

    Results from a forest edge experiment with two masts and one horizontally pointed wind lidar are presented. The experiment was performed at a dense beech forest edge of the Tromnæs forest, which is a 24m tall mature beech forest on the island Falster, Denmark. The topography at the site is flat. The masts were placed approximately 1.5 canopy heights upwind and downwind of the edge and are two canopy heights tall. We present data showing how the forest edge distorts the flow when the flow is perpendicular to the edge and towards the forest during near-neutral atmospheric stratification. Despite that the wind gradient above the canopy is similar before and after the edge, the momentum flux is strongly reduced above the canopy. This result is especially pronounced during summer and high leaf area index, when the momentum flux was slightly positive 1.2 canopy heights above ground level. This is contrary to the results by standard Reynolds' averaged Navier Stokes models that predict an overshoot of the momentum flux. Further above the forest, the total amount of turbulent kinetic energy remained constant compared to the upwind measurements. A reduction of the vertical variance of the flow was largely compensated by an increase in the lateral variance, whereas the streamwise variance remained approximately constant. This result is in contrast to the predictions by homogeneous rapid distortion theory. We apply and develop an alternative framework based on inhomogeneous rapid distortion theory in combination with the turbulence model by Mann (1994), which can predict the observed changes of the flow. The inhomogeneous rapid distortion theory takes the blocking of the flow by the top of the canopy into account. This effect turns out to suppress the vertical momentum flux drastically and redistribute the vertical fluctuations into the lateral direction. We show one- and two-point spectra for verification of the model. The results are relevant for understanding the on

  2. Mixtures in the Warm, Dense Matter Regine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collins, Lee A.

    2009-03-01

    The bulk of normal matter from planets to the intergalactic medium exists as a composite of various elemental constituents. The interactions among these different species determine the basic properties of such diverse environments. For dilute systems, simple gas laws serve well to describe the mixing. However, once the density and temperature increase, more sophisticated treatments of the electronic component and dynamics become necessary. For the warm, dense matter (WDM) region [10^22-10^25 atoms/cm^3 and 300K - 10^6 K], quantum Monte Carlo and molecular dynamics, utilizing finite-temperature density functional theory (DFT), have served as the basic exploratory tools and benchmarks for other methods. The computational intensity of both methods, especially for mixtures, which require large sample sizes to attain statistical accuracy, has focused considerable attention on mixing prescriptions based on the properties of the pure atomic constituents. Though extensively utilized in many disciplines, these rules have received very little verification [1,2]. We examine the validity of two such rules, density and pressure mixing, for several systems and concentrations by comparing against quantum calculations for the fully-interacting composite. We find considerable differences in some regimes, especially for optical properties. We also probe dynamical properties such as diffusion and viscosity as well as the role of impurities. Finally, as a means of extending DFT results to higher temperature regimes, we also study orbital-free molecular dynamics (OFMD) approaches [3] based on various approximations to the basic density functional. These OFMD schemes permit a smooth transition from the WDM region to simpler one-component plasma and ideal gas models. Research in collaboration with J.D. Kress (LANL), D.A. Horner (LANL), and Flavien Lambert (CEA). [4pt] [1] D.A. Horner, J.D. Kress, and L.A. Collins, Phys. Rev. B 77, 064102 (2008).[0pt] [2] F. Lambert et. al. Phys. Rev. E

  3. LPM Interference and Cherenkov-like Gluon Bremsstrahlung in DenseMatter

    SciTech Connect

    Majumder, Abhijit; Wang, Xin-Nian

    2005-07-26

    Gluon bremsstrahlung induced by multiple parton scattering in a finite dense medium has a unique angular distribution with respect to the initial parton direction. A dead-cone structure with an opening angle; theta2{sub 0}; approx 2(1-z)/(zLE) for gluons with fractional energy z arises from the Landau-Pomeran chuck-Migdal (LPM) interference. In a medium where the gluon's dielectric constant is; epsilon>1, the LPM interference pattern is shown to become Cherenkov-like with an increased opening angle determined by the dielectric constant$/cos2/theta{sub c}=z+(1-z)//epsilon$. For a large dielectric constant/epsilon; gg 1+2/z2LE, the corresponding total radiative parton energy loss is about twice that from normal gluon bremsstrahlung. Implications of this Cherenkov-like gluon bremsstrahlung to the jet correlation pattern in high-energy heavy-ion collisions is discussed.

  4. Sticky Particles: Modeling Rigid Aggregates in Dense Planetary Rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perrine, Randall P.; Richardson, D. C.; Scheeres, D. J.

    2008-09-01

    We present progress on our study of planetary ring dynamics. We use local N-body simulations to examine small patches of dense rings in which self-gravity and mutual collisions dominate the dynamics of the ring material. We use the numerical code pkdgrav to model the motions of 105-7 ring particles, using a sliding patch model with modified periodic boundary conditions. The exact nature of planetary ring particles is not well understood. If covered in a frost-like layer, such irregular surfaces may allow for weak cohesion between colliding particles. Thus we have recently added new functionality to our model, allowing "sticky particles” to lock into rigid aggregates while in a rotating reference frame. This capability allows particles to adhere to one another, forming irregularly shaped aggregates that move as rigid bodies. (The bonds between particles can subsequently break, given sufficient stress.) These aggregates have greater strength than gravitationally bound "rubble piles,” and are thus able to grow larger and survive longer under similar stresses. This new functionality allows us to explore planetary ring properties and dynamics in a new way, by self-consistently forming (and destroying) non-spherical aggregates and moonlets via cohesive forces, while in a rotating frame, subjected to planetary tides. (We are not aware of any similar implementations in other existing models.) These improvements allow us to study the many effects that particle aggregation may have on the rings, such as overall ring structure; wake formation; equilibrium properties of non-spherical particles, like pitch angle, orientation, shape, size distribution, and spin; and the surface properties of the ring material. We present test cases and the latest results from this new model. This work is supported by a NASA Earth and Space Science Fellowship.

  5. INVITED ARTICLE: Towards dense, realistic granular media in 2D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luding, Stefan

    2009-12-01

    The development of an applicable theory for granular matter—with both qualitative and quantitative value—is a challenging prospect, given the multitude of states, phases and (industrial) situations it has to cover. Given the general balance equations for mass, momentum and energy, the limiting case of dilute and almost elastic granular gases, where kinetic theory works perfectly well, is the starting point. In most systems, low density co-exists with very high density, where the latter is an open problem for kinetic theory. Furthermore, many additional nonlinear phenomena and material properties are important in realistic granular media, involving, e.g.: (i) multi-particle interactions and elasticity (ii) strong dissipation, (iii) friction, (iv) long-range forces and wet contacts, (v) wide particle size distributions and (vi) various particle shapes. Note that, while some of these issues are more relevant for high density, others are important for both low and high densities; some of them can be dealt with by means of kinetic theory, some cannot. This paper is a review of recent progress towards more realistic models for dense granular media in 2D, even though most of the observations, conclusions and corrections given are qualitatively true also in 3D. Starting from an elastic, frictionless and monodisperse hard sphere gas, the (continuum) balance equations of mass, momentum and energy are given. The equation of state, the (Navier-Stokes level) transport coefficients and the energy-density dissipation rate are considered. Several corrections are applied to those constitutive material laws—one by one—in order to account for the realistic physical effects and properties listed above.

  6. Analytical computation of process noise matrix in Kalman filter for fitting curved tracks in magnetic field within dense, thick scatterers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattacharya, Kolahal; Banerjee, Sudeshna; Mondal, Naba K.

    2016-07-01

    In the context of track fitting problems by a Kalman filter, the appropriate functional forms of the elements of the random process noise matrix are derived for tracking through thick layers of dense materials and magnetic field. This work complements the form of the process noise matrix obtained by Mankel [1].

  7. Methods for natural gas and heavy hydrocarbon co-conversion

    DOEpatents

    Kong, Peter C.; Nelson, Lee O.; Detering, Brent A.

    2009-02-24

    A reactor for reactive co-conversion of heavy hydrocarbons and hydrocarbon gases and includes a dielectric barrier discharge plasma cell having a pair of electrodes separated by a dielectric material and passageway therebetween. An inlet is provided for feeding heavy hydrocarbons and other reactive materials to the passageway of the discharge plasma cell, and an outlet is provided for discharging reaction products from the reactor. A packed bed catalyst may optionally be used in the reactor to increase efficiency of conversion. The reactor can be modified to allow use of a variety of light sources for providing ultraviolet light within the discharge plasma cell. Methods for upgrading heavy hydrocarbons are also disclosed.

  8. Some engineering properties of heavy concrete added silica fume

    SciTech Connect

    Akkaş, Ayşe; Başyiğit, Celalettin; Esen, Serap

    2013-12-16

    Many different types of building materials have been used in building construction for years. Heavy concretes can be used as a building material for critical building as it can contain a mixture of many heavy elements. The barite itself for radiation shielding can be used and also in concrete to produce the workable concrete with a maximum density and adequate structural strength. In this study, some engineering properties like compressive strength, elasticity modules and flexure strength of heavy concretes’ added Silica fume have been investigated.

  9. Laboratory measurements of resistivity in warm dense plasmas relevant to the microphysics of brown dwarfs

    SciTech Connect

    Booth, N.; Robinson, A. P. L.; Hakel, P.; Clarke, R. J.; Dance, R. J.; Doria, D.; Gizzi, L. A.; Gregori, G.; Koester, P.; Labate, L.; Levato, T.; Li, B.; Makita, M.; Mancini, R. C.; Pasley, J.; Rajeev, P. P.; Riley, D.; Wagenaars, E.; Waugh, J. N.; Woolsey, N. C.

    2015-11-06

    Since the observation of the first brown dwarf in 1995, numerous studies have led to a better understanding of the structures of these objects. Here we present a method for studying material resistivity in warm dense plasmas in the laboratory, which we relate to the microphysics of brown dwarfs through viscosity and electron collisions. Here we use X-ray polarimetry to determine the resistivity of a sulphur-doped plastic target heated to Brown Dwarf conditions by an ultra-intense laser. The resistivity is determined by matching the plasma physics model to the atomic physics calculations of the measured large, positive, polarization. Furthermore, the inferred resistivity is larger than predicted using standard resistivity models, suggesting that these commonly used models will not adequately describe the resistivity of warm dense plasma related to the viscosity of brown dwarfs.

  10. Laboratory measurements of resistivity in warm dense plasmas relevant to the microphysics of brown dwarfs.

    PubMed

    Booth, N; Robinson, A P L; Hakel, P; Clarke, R J; Dance, R J; Doria, D; Gizzi, L A; Gregori, G; Koester, P; Labate, L; Levato, T; Li, B; Makita, M; Mancini, R C; Pasley, J; Rajeev, P P; Riley, D; Wagenaars, E; Waugh, J N; Woolsey, N C

    2015-11-06

    Since the observation of the first brown dwarf in 1995, numerous studies have led to a better understanding of the structures of these objects. Here we present a method for studying material resistivity in warm dense plasmas in the laboratory, which we relate to the microphysics of brown dwarfs through viscosity and electron collisions. Here we use X-ray polarimetry to determine the resistivity of a sulphur-doped plastic target heated to Brown Dwarf conditions by an ultra-intense laser. The resistivity is determined by matching the plasma physics model to the atomic physics calculations of the measured large, positive, polarization. The inferred resistivity is larger than predicted using standard resistivity models, suggesting that these commonly used models will not adequately describe the resistivity of warm dense plasma related to the viscosity of brown dwarfs.

  11. Laboratory measurements of resistivity in warm dense plasmas relevant to the microphysics of brown dwarfs

    PubMed Central

    Booth, N.; Robinson, A. P. L.; Hakel, P.; Clarke, R. J.; Dance, R. J.; Doria, D.; Gizzi, L. A.; Gregori, G.; Koester, P.; Labate, L.; Levato, T.; Li, B.; Makita, M.; Mancini, R. C.; Pasley, J.; Rajeev, P. P.; Riley, D.; Wagenaars, E.; Waugh, J. N.; Woolsey, N. C.

    2015-01-01

    Since the observation of the first brown dwarf in 1995, numerous studies have led to a better understanding of the structures of these objects. Here we present a method for studying material resistivity in warm dense plasmas in the laboratory, which we relate to the microphysics of brown dwarfs through viscosity and electron collisions. Here we use X-ray polarimetry to determine the resistivity of a sulphur-doped plastic target heated to Brown Dwarf conditions by an ultra-intense laser. The resistivity is determined by matching the plasma physics model to the atomic physics calculations of the measured large, positive, polarization. The inferred resistivity is larger than predicted using standard resistivity models, suggesting that these commonly used models will not adequately describe the resistivity of warm dense plasma related to the viscosity of brown dwarfs. PMID:26541650

  12. Laboratory measurements of resistivity in warm dense plasmas relevant to the microphysics of brown dwarfs.

    PubMed

    Booth, N; Robinson, A P L; Hakel, P; Clarke, R J; Dance, R J; Doria, D; Gizzi, L A; Gregori, G; Koester, P; Labate, L; Levato, T; Li, B; Makita, M; Mancini, R C; Pasley, J; Rajeev, P P; Riley, D; Wagenaars, E; Waugh, J N; Woolsey, N C

    2015-01-01

    Since the observation of the first brown dwarf in 1995, numerous studies have led to a better understanding of the structures of these objects. Here we present a method for studying material resistivity in warm dense plasmas in the laboratory, which we relate to the microphysics of brown dwarfs through viscosity and electron collisions. Here we use X-ray polarimetry to determine the resistivity of a sulphur-doped plastic target heated to Brown Dwarf conditions by an ultra-intense laser. The resistivity is determined by matching the plasma physics model to the atomic physics calculations of the measured large, positive, polarization. The inferred resistivity is larger than predicted using standard resistivity models, suggesting that these commonly used models will not adequately describe the resistivity of warm dense plasma related to the viscosity of brown dwarfs. PMID:26541650

  13. Ion Beam Heated Target Simulations for Warm Dense Matter Physics and Inertial Fusion Energy

    SciTech Connect

    Barnard, J J; Armijo, J; Bailey, D S; Friedman, A; Bieniosek, F M; Henestroza, E; Kaganovich, I; Leung, P T; Logan, B G; Marinak, M M; More, R M; Ng, S F; Penn, G E; Perkins, L J; Veitzer, S; Wurtele, J S; Yu, S S; Zylstra, A B

    2008-08-12

    Hydrodynamic simulations have been carried out using the multi-physics radiation hydrodynamics code HYDRA and the simplified one-dimensional hydrodynamics code DISH. We simulate possible targets for a near-term experiment at LBNL (the Neutralized Drift Compression Experiment, NDCX) and possible later experiments on a proposed facility (NDCX-II) for studies of warm dense matter and inertial fusion energy related beam-target coupling. Simulations of various target materials (including solids and foams) are presented. Experimental configurations include single pulse planar metallic solid and foam foils. Concepts for double-pulsed and ramped-energy pulses on cryogenic targets and foams have been simulated for exploring direct drive beam target coupling, and concepts and simulations for collapsing cylindrical and spherical bubbles to enhance temperature and pressure for warm dense matter studies are described.

  14. ION BEAM HEATED TARGET SIMULATIONS FOR WARM DENSE MATTER PHYSICS AND INERTIAL FUSION ENERGY

    SciTech Connect

    Barnard, J.J.; Armijo, J.; Bailey, D.S.; Friedman, A.; Bieniosek, F.M.; Henestroza, E.; Kaganovich, I.; Leung, P.T.; Logan, B.G.; Marinak, M.M.; More, R.M.; Ng, S.F.; Penn, G.E.; Perkins, L.J.; Veitzer, S.; Wurtele, J.S.; Yu, S.S.; Zylstra, A.B.

    2008-08-01

    Hydrodynamic simulations have been carried out using the multi-physics radiation hydrodynamics code HYDRA and the simplified one-dimensional hydrodynamics code DISH. We simulate possible targets for a near-term experiment at LBNL (the Neutralized Drift Compression Experiment, NDCX) and possible later experiments on a proposed facility (NDCX-II) for studies of warm dense matter and inertial fusion energy related beam-target coupling. Simulations of various target materials (including solids and foams) are presented. Experimental configurations include single pulse planar metallic solid and foam foils. Concepts for double-pulsed and ramped-energy pulses on cryogenic targets and foams have been simulated for exploring direct drive beam target coupling, and concepts and simulations for collapsing cylindrical and spherical bubbles to enhance temperature and pressure for warm dense matter studies are described.

  15. Laboratory measurements of resistivity in warm dense plasmas relevant to the microphysics of brown dwarfs

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Booth, N.; Robinson, A. P. L.; Hakel, P.; Clarke, R. J.; Dance, R. J.; Doria, D.; Gizzi, L. A.; Gregori, G.; Koester, P.; Labate, L.; et al

    2015-11-06

    Since the observation of the first brown dwarf in 1995, numerous studies have led to a better understanding of the structures of these objects. Here we present a method for studying material resistivity in warm dense plasmas in the laboratory, which we relate to the microphysics of brown dwarfs through viscosity and electron collisions. Here we use X-ray polarimetry to determine the resistivity of a sulphur-doped plastic target heated to Brown Dwarf conditions by an ultra-intense laser. The resistivity is determined by matching the plasma physics model to the atomic physics calculations of the measured large, positive, polarization. Furthermore, themore » inferred resistivity is larger than predicted using standard resistivity models, suggesting that these commonly used models will not adequately describe the resistivity of warm dense plasma related to the viscosity of brown dwarfs.« less

  16. Fabrication, Properties and Applications of Dense Hydroxyapatite: A Review.

    PubMed

    Prakasam, Mythili; Locs, Janis; Salma-Ancane, Kristine; Loca, Dagnija; Largeteau, Alain; Berzina-Cimdina, Liga

    2015-12-21

    In the last five decades, there have been vast advances in the field of biomaterials, including ceramics, glasses, glass-ceramics and metal alloys. Dense and porous ceramics have been widely used for various biomedical applications. Current applications of bioceramics include bone grafts, spinal fusion, bone repairs, bone fillers, maxillofacial reconstruction, etc. Amongst the various calcium phosphate compositions, hydroxyapatite, which has a composition similar to human bone, has attracted wide interest. Much emphasis is given to tissue engineering, both in porous and dense ceramic forms. The current review focusses on the various applications of dense hydroxyapatite and other dense biomaterials on the aspects of transparency and the mechanical and electrical behavior. Prospective future applications, established along the aforesaid applications of hydroxyapatite, appear to be promising regarding bone bonding, advanced medical treatment methods, improvement of the mechanical strength of artificial bone grafts and better in vitro/in vivo methodologies to afford more particular outcomes.

  17. Stopping Power in Dense Plasmas: Models, Simulations and Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grabowski, Paul; Fichtl, Chris; Graziani, Frank; Hazi, Andrew; Murillo, Michael; Sheperd, Ronnie; Surh, Mike; Cimarron Collaboration

    2011-10-01

    Our goal is to conclusively determine the minimal model for stopping power in dense plasmas via a three-pronged theoretical, simulation, and experimental program. Stopping power in dense plasma is important for ion beam heating of targets (e.g., fast ignition) and alpha particle energy deposition in inertial confinement fusion targets. We wish to minimize our uncertainties in the stopping power by comparing a wide range of theoretical approaches to both detailed molecular dynamics (MD) simulations and experiments. The largest uncertainties occur for slow-to-moderate velocity projectiles, dense plasmas, and highly charged projectiles. We have performed MD simulations of a classical, one component plasma to reveal where there are weaknesses in our kinetic theories of stopping power, over a wide range of plasma conditions. We have also performed stopping experiments of protons in heated warm dense carbon for validation of such models, including MD calculations, of realistic plasmas for which bound contributions are important.

  18. Fabrication, Properties and Applications of Dense Hydroxyapatite: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Prakasam, Mythili; Locs, Janis; Salma-Ancane, Kristine; Loca, Dagnija; Largeteau, Alain; Berzina-Cimdina, Liga

    2015-01-01

    In the last five decades, there have been vast advances in the field of biomaterials, including ceramics, glasses, glass-ceramics and metal alloys. Dense and porous ceramics have been widely used for various biomedical applications. Current applications of bioceramics include bone grafts, spinal fusion, bone repairs, bone fillers, maxillofacial reconstruction, etc. Amongst the various calcium phosphate compositions, hydroxyapatite, which has a composition similar to human bone, has attracted wide interest. Much emphasis is given to tissue engineering, both in porous and dense ceramic forms. The current review focusses on the various applications of dense hydroxyapatite and other dense biomaterials on the aspects of transparency and the mechanical and electrical behavior. Prospective future applications, established along the aforesaid applications of hydroxyapatite, appear to be promising regarding bone bonding, advanced medical treatment methods, improvement of the mechanical strength of artificial bone grafts and better in vitro/in vivo methodologies to afford more particular outcomes. PMID:26703750

  19. Plutonium-Based Heavy-Fermion Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bauer, E. D.; Thompson, J. D.

    2015-03-01

    An effective mass of charge carriers that is significantly larger than the mass of a free electron develops at low temperatures in certain lanthanide- and actinide-based metals, including those formed with plutonium, owing to strong electron-electron interactions. This heavy-fermion mass is reflected in a substantially enhanced electronic coefficient of specific heat γ, which for elemental Pu is much larger than that of normal metals. By our definition, there are twelve Pu-based heavy-fermion compounds, most discovered recently, whose basic properties are known and discussed. Relative to other examples, these Pu-based heavy-fermion systems are particularly complex owing in part to the possible simultaneous presence of multiple, nearly degenerate 5fn configurations. This complexity poses significant opportunities as well as challenges, including understanding the origin of unconventional superconductivity in some of these materials.

  20. A single-shot spatial chirp method for measuring initial AC conductivity evolution of femtosecond laser pulse excited warm dense matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Z.; Hering, P.; Brown, S. B.; Curry, C.; Tsui, Y. Y.; Glenzer, S. H.

    2016-11-01

    To study the rapid evolution of AC conductivity from ultrafast laser excited warm dense matter (WDM), a spatial chirp single-shot method is developed utilizing a crossing angle pump-probe configuration. The pump beam is shaped individually in two spatial dimensions so that it can provide both sufficient laser intensity to excite the material to warm dense matter state and a uniform time window of up to 1 ps with sub-100 fs FWHM temporal resolution. Temporal evolution of AC conductivity in laser excited warm dense gold was also measured.

  1. Electron-ion temperature equilibration in warm dense tantalum

    SciTech Connect

    Doppner, T; LePape, S.; Ma, T.; Pak, A.; Hartley, N. J.; Peters, L.; Gregori, G.; Belancourt, P.; Drake, R. P.; Chapman, D. A.; Richardson, S.; Gericke, D. O.; Glenzer, S. H.; Khaghani, D.; Neumayer, P.; Vorberger, J.; White, T. G.

    2014-11-05

    We present measurements of electron-ion temperature equilibration in proton-heated tantalum, under warm dense matter conditions. Our results agree with theoretical predictions for metals calculated using input data from ab initio simulations. Furthermore, the fast relaxation observed in the experiment contrasts with much longer equilibration times found in proton heated carbon, indicating that the energy flow pathways in warm dense matter are far from being fully understood.

  2. Measurement of electron-ion relaxation in warm dense copper

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Cho, B. I.; Ogitsu, T.; Engelhorn, K.; Correa, A. A.; Ping, Y.; Lee, J. W.; Bae, L. J.; Prendergast, D.; Falcone, R. W.; Heimann, P. A.

    2016-01-06

    Experimental investigation of electron-ion coupling and electron heat capacity of copper in warm and dense states are presented. From time-resolved x-ray absorption spectroscopy, the temporal evolution of electron temperature is obtained for non-equilibrium warm dense copper heated by an intense femtosecond laser pulse. Electron heat capacity and electron-ion coupling are inferred from the initial electron temperature and its decrease over 10 ps. As a result, data are compared with various theoretical models.

  3. Mapping CS in starburst galaxies: Disentangling and characterising dense gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelly, G.; Viti, S.; Bayet, E.; Aladro, R.; Yates, J.

    2015-06-01

    Aims: We observe the dense gas tracer CS in two nearby starburst galaxies to determine how the conditions of the dense gas varies across the circumnuclear regions in starburst galaxies. Methods: Using the IRAM-30m telescope, we mapped the distribution of the CS(2-1) and CS(3-2) lines in the circumnuclear regions of the nearby starburst galaxies NGC 3079 and NGC 6946. We also detected formaldehyde (H2CO) and methanol (CH3OH) in both galaxies. We marginally detect the isotopologue C34S. Results: We calculate column densities under LTE conditions for CS and CH3OH. Using the detections accumulated here to guide our inputs, we link a time and depth dependent chemical model with a molecular line radiative transfer model; we reproduce the observations, showing how conditions where CS is present are likely to vary away from the galactic centres. Conclusions: Using the rotational diagram method for CH3OH, we obtain a lower limit temperature of 14 K. In addition to this, by comparing the chemical and radiative transfer models to observations, we determine the properties of the dense gas as traced by CS (and CH3OH). We also estimate the quantity of the dense gas. We find that, provided there are between 105 and 106 dense cores in our beam, for both target galaxies, emission of CS from warm (T = 100-400 K), dense (n(H2) = 105-6 cm-3) cores, possibly with a high cosmic ray ionisation rate (ζ = 100ζ0) best describes conditions for our central pointing. In NGC 6946, conditions are generally cooler and/or less dense further from the centre, whereas in NGC 3079, conditions are more uniform. The inclusion of shocks allows for more efficient CS formation, which means that gas that is less dense by an order of magnitude is required to replicate observations in some cases.

  4. Measurement of Electron-Ion Relaxation in Warm Dense Copper

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, B. I.; Ogitsu, T.; Engelhorn, K.; Correa, A. A.; Ping, Y.; Lee, J. W.; Bae, L. J.; Prendergast, D.; Falcone, R. W.; Heimann, P. A.

    2016-01-01

    Experimental investigation of electron-ion coupling and electron heat capacity of copper in warm and dense states are presented. From time-resolved x-ray absorption spectroscopy, the temporal evolution of electron temperature is obtained for non-equilibrium warm dense copper heated by an intense femtosecond laser pulse. Electron heat capacity and electron-ion coupling are inferred from the initial electron temperature and its decrease over 10 ps. Data are compared with various theoretical models.

  5. Electron-ion temperature equilibration in warm dense tantalum

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Doppner, T; LePape, S.; Ma, T.; Pak, A.; Hartley, N. J.; Peters, L.; Gregori, G.; Belancourt, P.; Drake, R. P.; Chapman, D. A.; et al

    2014-11-05

    We present measurements of electron-ion temperature equilibration in proton-heated tantalum, under warm dense matter conditions. Our results agree with theoretical predictions for metals calculated using input data from ab initio simulations. Furthermore, the fast relaxation observed in the experiment contrasts with much longer equilibration times found in proton heated carbon, indicating that the energy flow pathways in warm dense matter are far from being fully understood.

  6. Measurement of Electron-Ion Relaxation in Warm Dense Copper

    PubMed Central

    Cho, B. I.; Ogitsu, T.; Engelhorn, K.; Correa, A. A.; Ping, Y.; Lee, J. W.; Bae, L. J.; Prendergast, D.; Falcone, R. W.; Heimann, P. A.

    2016-01-01

    Experimental investigation of electron-ion coupling and electron heat capacity of copper in warm and dense states are presented. From time-resolved x-ray absorption spectroscopy, the temporal evolution of electron temperature is obtained for non-equilibrium warm dense copper heated by an intense femtosecond laser pulse. Electron heat capacity and electron-ion coupling are inferred from the initial electron temperature and its decrease over 10 ps. Data are compared with various theoretical models. PMID:26733236

  7. Relating quantum discord with the quantum dense coding capacity

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Xin; Qiu, Liang Li, Song; Zhang, Chi; Ye, Bin

    2015-01-15

    We establish the relations between quantum discord and the quantum dense coding capacity in (n + 1)-particle quantum states. A necessary condition for the vanishing discord monogamy score is given. We also find that the loss of quantum dense coding capacity due to decoherence is bounded below by the sum of quantum discord. When these results are restricted to three-particle quantum states, some complementarity relations are obtained.

  8. The Transition from Diffuse to Dense Gas in Herschel Dust Emission Maps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldsmith, Paul

    characterize cloud structure over a vast range of spatial scales. This work has many advantages over previous studies, where information about dense cores and their environment was pieced together using a variety of methods an instruments. Now, the Herschel maps permit for the first time to characterize both molecular clouds and their cores in one shot in a single data set. We use these data to answer a variety of simple yet very important questions. First, we study whether dense cores have sharp boundaries. If such boundaries exist, they would indicate that dense cores have an individual identity well-separate from the near-fractal cloud structure on larger spatial scales. Second, we will --- in very approximate sense --- derive global density gradients for molecular clouds from radii <0.1pc to 5pc and larger. These "synoptic" density gradients provide a useful quantitative description of the relation between cloud material at very different spatial scales. Also, these measurements can be compared to synoptic density gradients derived in the same fashion for theoretical cloud models. Third, we study how dense cores are nested into the "clumps" forming molecular clouds, i.e., we study whether the most massive dense cores in a cloud (<0.1pc) reside in the most massive regions identified on lager spatial scale (1pc and larger). This will show how the properties of dense cores are influenced by their environment. Our study will derive unique constraints to cloud structure. But our small sample forbids to make strong statements. This pilot study does thus prepare future larger efforts. Our entire project builds on data reduction and analysis methods which our team has used in the past. This guarantees a swift completion of the project with predictable efficiency. We present pilot studies that demonstrate that the data and analysis methods are suited to tackle the science goals. This project is thus guaranteed to return significant results.

  9. Beam Compression in Heavy-Ion Induction Linacs

    SciTech Connect

    Seidl, P.A.; Anders, A.; Bieniosek, F.M.; Barnard, J.J.; Calanog, J.; Chen, A.X.; Cohen, R.H.; Coleman, J.E.; Dorf, M.; Gilson, E.P.; Grote, D.P.; Jung, J.Y.; Leitner, M.; Lidia, S.M.; Logan, B.G.; Ni, P.; Roy, P.K.; Van den Bogert, K.; Waldron, W.L.; Welch, D.R.

    2009-01-01

    The Heavy-Ion Fusion Sciences Virtual National Laboratory is pursuing an approach to target heating experiments in the Warm Dense Matter regime, using space-charge-dominated ion beams that are simultaneously longitudinally bunched and transversely focused. Longitudinal beam compression by large factors has been demonstrated in the LBNL Neutralized Drift Compression Experiment (NDCX) experiment with controlled ramps and forced neutralization. The achieved peak beam current and energy can be used in experiments to heat targets and create warm dense matter. Using an injected 30 mA K{sup +} ion beam with initial kinetic energy 0.3 MeV, axial compression leading to {approx}50x current amplification and simultaneous radial focusing to beam radii of a few mm have led to encouraging energy deposition approaching the intensities required for eV-range target heating experiments. We discuss experiments that are under development to reach the necessary higher beam intensities and the associated beam diagnostics.

  10. Heavy ion irradiation of astrophysical ice analogs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duarte, Eduardo Seperuelo; Domaracka, Alicja; Boduch, Philippe; Rothard, Hermann; Balanzat, Emmanuel; Dartois, Emmanuel; Pilling, Sergio; Farenzena, Lucio; da Silveira, Enio Frota

    Icy grain mantles consist of small molecules containing hydrogen, carbon, oxygen and nitrogen atoms (e.g. H2O, CO, CO2, NH3). Such ices, present in different astrophysical environments (giant planets satellites, comets, dense clouds, and protoplanetary disks), are subjected to irradiation of different energetic particles: UV radiation, ion bombardment (solar and stellar wind as well as galactic cosmic rays), and secondary electrons due to cosmic ray ionization of H2. The interaction of these particles with astrophysical ice analogs has been the object of research over the last decades. However, there is a lack of information on the effects induced by the heavy ion component of cosmic rays in the electronic energy loss regime. The aim of the present work is to simulate of the astrophysical environment where ice mantles are exposed to the heavy ion cosmic ray irradiation. Sample ice films at 13K were irradiated by nickel ions with energies in the 1-10 MeV/u range and analyzed by means of FTIR spectrometry. Nickel ions were used because their energy deposition is similar to that deposited by iron ions, which are particularly abundant cosmic rays amongst the heaviest ones. In this work the effects caused by nickel ions on condensed gases are studied (destruction and production of molecules as well as associated cross sections, sputtering yields) and compared with respective values for light ions and UV photons.

  11. Advanced composite materials and processes for the manufacture of SSC (Superconducting Super Collider) and RHIC (Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider) superconducting magnets used at cryogenic temperatures in a high radiation environment

    SciTech Connect

    Sondericker, J.H.

    1989-01-01

    Presently, BNL work on superconducting magnets centers mainly on the development of 17 meter length dipoles for the Superconducting Super Collider Project, approved for construction at Waxahatchie, Texas and 9.7 meter dipoles and quadrupoles for the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider, a BNL project to start construction next year. This paper will discuss the role of composites in the manufacture of magnets, their operational requirements in cryogenic and radiation environments, and the benefits derived from their use. 13 figs.

  12. Linear accelerator design study with direct plasma injection scheme for warm dense matter

    SciTech Connect

    Kondo, K.; Kanesue, T; Okamura, M.

    2011-03-28

    Warm Dense Matter (WDM) is a challenging science field, which is related to heavy ion inertial fusion and planetary science. It is difficult to expect the behavior because the state with high density and low temperature is completely different from ideal condition. The well-defined WDM generation is required to understand it. Moderate energy ion beams ({approx} MeV/u) slightly above Bragg peak is an advantageous method for WDM because of the uniform energy deposition. Direct Plasma Injection Scheme (DPIS) with a Interdigital H-mode (IH) accelerator has a potential for the beam parameter. We show feasible parameters of the IH accelerator for WDM. WDM physics is a challenging science and is strongly related to Heavy Ion Fusion science. WDM formation by Direct Plasma Injection Scheme (DPIS) with IH accelerator, which is a compact system, is proposed. Feasible parameters for IH accelerator are shown for WDM state. These represents that DPIS with IH accelerator can access a different parameter region of WDM.

  13. Electronic and structural transitions in dense liquid sodium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raty, Jean-Yves; Schwegler, Eric; Bonev, Stanimir A.

    2007-09-01

    At ambient conditions, the light alkali metals are free-electron-like crystals with a highly symmetric structure. However, they were found recently to exhibit unexpected complexity under pressure. It was predicted from theory-and later confirmed by experiment-that lithium and sodium undergo a sequence of symmetry-breaking transitions, driven by a Peierls mechanism, at high pressures. Measurements of the sodium melting curve have subsequently revealed an unprecedented (and still unexplained) pressure-induced drop in melting temperature from 1,000K at 30GPa down to room temperature at 120GPa. Here we report results from ab initio calculations that explain the unusual melting behaviour in dense sodium. We show that molten sodium undergoes a series of pressure-induced structural and electronic transitions, analogous to those observed in solid sodium but commencing at much lower pressure in the presence of liquid disorder. As pressure is increased, liquid sodium initially evolves by assuming a more compact local structure. However, a transition to a lower-coordinated liquid takes place at a pressure of around 65GPa, accompanied by a threefold drop in electrical conductivity. This transition is driven by the opening of a pseudogap, at the Fermi level, in the electronic density of states-an effect that has not hitherto been observed in a liquid metal. The lower-coordinated liquid emerges at high temperatures and above the stability region of a close-packed free-electron-like metal. We predict that similar exotic behaviour is possible in other materials as well.

  14. Fusion burn dynamics in dense Z-pinch (DZP)

    SciTech Connect

    Krakowski, R.A.

    1990-04-01

    The fusion burn dynamics and energy yield of the dense Z-pinch (DZP) are examined using a profile-averaged, zero-dimensional, time dependent model. A range of conditions (fuel, line density, voltage, fusion-product heating, enthalpy endloss, density and temperature profiles, current rise rate, electrode impurities) are examined. Magneto-hydrodynamic stability is assumed, and initial conditions are based on those ideally existing after the melting and ionization of a solid fiber of fusion fuel. Plasma conditions required of neutron sources for materials testing ({dot S}{sub n} {ge} 10{sup 19} n/s) and for possible commercial power production (ratio of fusion energy yield to energy input, Q{sub p} {approx equal} 15, lower values if reversible recovery of a fraction of the magnetic energy is possible) are described. If f{sub B} {approx gt} 0.8 fractional fuel burnup is possible in a nominal 800-ns DT discharge (200-ns current-rise phase at 20 MV/m followed by a 500-ns constant-current crowbarred phase), reactor-relevant values of Q{sub p} may be possible. For the simpler (and shorter) constant-voltage discharge (e.g., no voltage crowbar) the value of Q{sub p} is in the range 5--10 for discharges below 200-ns duration. Smaller levels of fuel burnup, shorter discharges, or generally lower levels of Q{sub p} will require a reversible energy transfer system to meet reactor energy-balance requirements. Imposition of a plasma current rise-time constraint that may be needed for stable plasma operation (e.g., I > 10{sup 12} A/s) will burnup, Q{sub p} and discharge time to an extent where reversible energy/transfer system will be required to meet reactor energy- balance requirements. 25 refs.

  15. Heavy ion collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Jacak, B.V.

    1994-11-01

    Heavy ion collisions at very high energies provide an opportunity to recreate in the laboratory the conditions which existed very early in the universe, just after the big bang. We prepare matter at very high energy density and search for evidence that the quarks and gluons are deconfined. I describe the kinds of observables that are experimentally accessible to characterize the system and to search for evidence of new physics. A wealth of information is now available from CERN and BNL heavy ion experiments. I discuss recent results on two particle correlations, strangeness production, and dilepton and direct photon distributions.

  16. Composition and method for removing photoresist materials from electronic components

    DOEpatents

    Davenhall, Leisa B.; Rubin, James B.; Taylor, Craig M.

    2005-01-25

    Composition and method for removing photoresist materials from electronic components. The composition is a mixture of at least one dense phase fluid and at least one dense phase fluid modifier. The method includes exposing a substrate to at least one pulse of the composition in a supercritical state to remove photoresist materials from the substrate.

  17. Composition and method for removing photoresist materials from electronic components

    DOEpatents

    Davenhall, Leisa B.; Rubin, James B.; Taylor, Craig M. V.

    2008-06-03

    Composition and method for removing photoresist materials from electronic components. The composition is a mixture of at least one dense phase fluid and at least one dense phase fluid modifier. The method includes exposing a substrate to at least one pulse of the composition in a supercritical state to remove photoresist materials from the substrate.

  18. Heavy Metal Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2001-08-01

    that the CH-stars all belong to binary systems and that they therefore have a companion star [5]. That companion is now a white dwarf star and was therefore at some earlier moment an AGB star ! During its AGB-phase, the companion star expelled much of its material, eventually producing the "planetary nebula" phenomenon, referred to above. In this process, a lot of its material, enriched with heavy elements produced by the "s-process" during the AGB phase, was deposited in the atmosphere of the CH-star that is now observed. The former AGB-star, now a slowly cooling, dim white-dwarf star, still orbits the CH-star. For this reason, the atmospheric composition of a CH-star actually carries the signature of the nucleosynthesis that took place deep inside the companion AGB star at an earlier epoch. Spectroscopic observations of CH-stars thus provide the opportunity to probe the predicted s-process in low-metallicity stars. Three stars with Lead ESO PR Photo 26b/01 ESO PR Photo 26b/01 [Preview - JPEG: 400 x 371 pix - 95k] [Normal - JPEG: 800 x 741 pix - 240k] Caption : A high-resolution spectrum of the CH-star HD 196944, obtained with the CES instrument on the ESO 3.6-m telescope in September 2000. The observed spectrum (dots) shows many absorption lines from elements that are usually seen in stars. The red line shows a model in which elements (in particular those produced by the s-process) are present in normal quantities, compared to Iron. The blue line instead shows a model where s-processing has occured. It is obvious that the red line does not fit, only the blue line reproduces the observed absorption line at wavelength 405.781 nm caused by Lead (Pb) atoms in the atmosphere of this star. A subsequent, detailed analysis demonstrated that HD 196944 is a true "Lead star". Technical information about this photo is available below. A necessary condition for these observations to succeed is a very high spectral resolution in order to detect the spectral line of Lead (Pb), in

  19. Superconductivity in highly disordered dense carbon disulfide.

    PubMed

    Dias, Ranga P; Yoo, Choong-Shik; Struzhkin, Viktor V; Kim, Minseob; Muramatsu, Takaki; Matsuoka, Takahiro; Ohishi, Yasuo; Sinogeikin, Stanislav

    2013-07-16

    High pressure plays an increasingly important role in both understanding superconductivity and the development of new superconducting materials. New superconductors were found in metallic and metal oxide systems at high pressure. However, because of the filled close-shell configuration, the superconductivity in molecular systems has been limited to charge-transferred salts and metal-doped carbon species with relatively low superconducting transition temperatures. Here, we report the low-temperature superconducting phase observed in diamagnetic carbon disulfide under high pressure. The superconductivity arises from a highly disordered extended state (CS4 phase or phase III[CS4]) at ~6.2 K over a broad pressure range from 50 to 172 GPa. Based on the X-ray scattering data, we suggest that the local structural change from a tetrahedral to an octahedral configuration is responsible for the observed superconductivity.

  20. Statins do not decrease small, dense low-density lipoprotein.

    PubMed

    Choi, Cheol Ung; Seo, Hong Seog; Lee, Eun Mi; Shin, Seung Yong; Choi, Un-Jung; Na, Jin Oh; Lim, Hong Euy; Kim, Jin Won; Kim, Eung Ju; Rha, Seung-Woon; Park, Chang Gyu; Oh, Dong Joo

    2010-01-01

    In an observational study, we examined the effect of statins on low-density-lipoprotein (LDL) subfractions.Using density-gradient ultracentrifugation, we measured small, dense LDL density in 612 patients (mean age, 61.7 ± 12.6 yr), some with and some without coronary artery disease, who were placed in a statin-treated group (n=172) or a control group (n=440) and subdivided on the basis of coronary artery disease status.Total cholesterol, LDL cholesterol, apolipoprotein B, and the LDL cholesterol/apolipoprotein B ratio were significantly lower in the statin group. However, the proportion of small, dense LDL was higher in the statin group (42.9% ± 9.5% vs 41.3% ± 8.5%; P=0.046) and the proportion of large, buoyant LDL was lower (23.6% ± 7.5% vs 25.4% ± 7.9%; P=0.011). In the statin group, persons without coronary artery disease had higher proportions of small, dense LDL, and persons with coronary artery disease tended to have higher proportions of small, dense LDL.Our study suggests that statin therapy--whether or not recipients have coronary artery disease--does not decrease the proportion of small, dense LDL among total LDL particles, but in fact increases it, while predictably reducing total LDL cholesterol, absolute amounts of small, dense LDL, and absolute amounts of large, buoyant LDL. If and when our observation proves to be reproducible in subsequent large-scale studies, it should provide new insights into small, dense LDL and its actual role in atherogenesis or the progression of atherosclerosis.

  1. Ultrabright x-ray laser scattering for dynamic warm dense matter physics

    SciTech Connect

    Fletcher, L. B.; Lee, H. J.; Doppner, T.; Galtier, E.; Nagler, B.; Heimann, P.; Fortmann, C.; Mao, T.; Millot, M.; Pak, A.; Turnbull, D.; Chapman, D. A.; Gericke, D. O.; Vorberger, J.; White, T.; Gregori, G.; Wei, M.; Barbrel, B.; Falcone, R. W.; Kao, C. -C.; Nuhn, H.; Welch, J.; Zastrau, U.; Neumayer, P.; Hastings, J. B.; Glenzer, S. H.

    2015-03-23

    In megabar shock waves, materials compress and undergo a phase transition to a dense charged-particle system that is dominated by strong correlations and quantum effects. This complex state, known as warm dense matter, exists in planetary interiors and many laboratory experiments (for example, during high-power laser interactions with solids or the compression phase of inertial confinement fusion implosions). Here, we apply record peak brightness X-rays at the Linac Coherent Light Source to resolve ionic interactions at atomic (ångström) scale lengths and to determine their physical properties. Our in situ measurements characterize the compressed lattice and resolve the transition to warm dense matter, demonstrating that short-range repulsion between ions must be accounted for to obtain accurate structure factor and equation of state data. Additionally, the unique properties of the X-ray laser provide plasmon spectra that yield the temperature and density with unprecedented precision at micrometre-scale resolution in dynamic compression experiments.

  2. Heavy Vehicle Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Sid Diamond; Richard Wares; Jules Routbort

    2000-04-11

    Heavy Vehicle (HV) systems are a necessary component of achieving OHVT goals. Elements are in place for a far-ranging program: short, intermediate, and long-term. Solicitation will bring industrial input and support. Future funding trend is positive, outlook for HV systems is good.

  3. Heavy Quark Fluorescence

    SciTech Connect

    Torres-Rincon, Juan M.; Llanes-Estrada, Felipe J.

    2010-07-09

    Heavy hadrons containing heavy quarks (for example, {Upsilon} mesons) feature a scale separation between the heavy-quark mass and the QCD scale that controls the effective masses of lighter constituents. As in ordinary molecules, the deexcitation of the lighter, faster degrees of freedom leaves the velocity distribution of the heavy quarks unchanged, populating the available decay channels in qualitatively predictable ways. Automatically an application of the Franck-Condon principle of molecular physics explains several puzzling results of {Upsilon}(5S) decays as measured by the Belle Collaboration, such as the high rate of B{sub s}*B{sub s}* versus B{sub s}*B{sub s} production, the strength of three-body B{sup *}B{pi} decays, or the dip in B momentum shown in these decays. We argue that the data show the first Sturm-Liouville zero of the {Upsilon}(5S) quantum-mechanical squared wave function and provide evidence for a largely bb composition of this meson.

  4. Heavy Chain Diseases

    MedlinePlus

    ... cells often prevents proper absorption of nutrients from food (malabsorption), resulting in severe diarrhea and weight loss. A rare form that affects the respiratory tract also exists. Blood tests are done when alpha heavy chain disease is suspected. Serum protein electrophoresis, measurement of ...

  5. Dolly For Heavy Towbar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Soper, Terry A.

    1992-01-01

    Proposed lightweight dolly enables operator to cart heavy towbar to remote site over unpaved roads or rough terrain. Acts as simple, lightweight towed vehicle to support rear of towbar. Removed quickly at point of use. Saves labor, and eliminates need for truck and forklift.

  6. [Biological activity of selenorganic compounds at heavy metal salts intoxication].

    PubMed

    Rusetskaya, N Y; Borodulin, V B

    2015-01-01

    Possible mechanisms of the antitoxic action of organoselenium compounds in heavy metal poisoning have been considered. Heavy metal toxicity associated with intensification of free radical oxidation, suppression of the antioxidant system, damage to macromolecules, mitochondria and the genetic material can cause apoptotic cell death or the development of carcinogenesis. Organic selenium compounds are effective antioxidants during heavy metal poisoning; they exhibit higher bioavailability in mammals than inorganic ones and they are able to activate antioxidant defense, bind heavy metal ions and reactive oxygen species formed during metal-induced oxidative stress. One of promising organoselenium compounds is diacetophenonyl selenide (DAPS-25), which is characterized by antioxidant and antitoxic activity, under conditions including heavy metal intoxication.

  7. X-ray and optical studies of dense plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ellwi, Samir Shakir

    X-ray and optical investigations of dense plasmas and x- ray sources for laser-plasma studies are presented in this thesis. Short pulse laser interaction with solids is reviewed. The transport of laser energy into the bulk of the target by electron thermal conduction, radiation and shock waves is described. X-ray characterisation of different types of plasma are presented. The first experiment deals with the generation of a plasma cathode x-ray source. The experimental results are compared with a simulation made using a simple self consistent model. The x-ray source size depends upon the cone angle of the tip of the anode. A wide range of experimental data for different parameters (anode-cathode separation, anode positive voltages, anode material, cathode material and different laser energies) is collected and analysed. In chapter 5 the equation of state of gold is studied using the shock wave reflection method. Experimental measurements are done for the direct and indirect drives. The experimental data are compared to the SESAME tabular data. Indirect drive is found to give a more accurate measurement compared to direct drive using the Phase Zone Plate (PZP) method technique. Preheating effects in laser driven shock waves is presented in chapter 6. We used two different diagnostics: the colour temperature measurements deduced by recording the target rear side emissivity in two spectral bands and the target rear side reflectivity measurements. We use the MULTI hydrodynamic code to measure the temperature of the preheat and in coupling with the Fresnel reflectivity model in order to compare the theoretical calculations to the experimental observations. Qualitative results of energy transport by hot fast electrons in solid cold and compressed plastic are presented in chapter 7. K-alpha emission from chlorine fluor buried layers is used to measure the fast electron transport. These data are collected from time integrated spectrometers using k-alpha spectroscopy of the

  8. Heavy quark physics in CMS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fedi, G.; CMS Collaboration

    2016-07-01

    The most recent results which concern the heavy quark hadrons done in the CMS experiment are reported. The searching area spans over the heavy quark spectroscopy, production cross sections, beauty meson decay properties, rare decays, and CP violation.

  9. Heavy quarks and lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Andreas S. Kronfeld

    2003-11-05

    This paper is a review of heavy quarks in lattice gauge theory, focusing on methodology. It includes a status report on some of the calculations that are relevant to heavy-quark spectroscopy and to flavor physics.

  10. Dense low density lipoproteins and coronary artery disease.

    PubMed

    Krauss, R M

    1995-02-23

    A common, genetically influenced lipoprotein subclass profile characterized by a predominance of small, dense low density lipoprotein (LDL) particles is associated with relative increases in plasma triglyceride and apolipoprotein (apo) B-100, and reduced levels of high density lipoprotein cholesterol and apoAI. Recently, this phenotype has also been associated with the insulin resistance syndrome and familial combined hyperlipidemia. Case-control studies of patients with myocardial infarction and angiographically documented coronary artery disease (CAD) have demonstrated that 40-50% of patients have the small, dense LDL phenotype and that this is associated with a 2- to 3-fold increase in disease risk. However, because of strong statistical correlations among the multiple features of the phenotype, it has been difficult to determine whether > or = 1 of its metabolic alterations are primarily responsible for increased CAD susceptibility. More direct evidence for enhanced atherogenicity of lipoproteins in this trait derives from a recent report that LDL-cholesterol lowering by diet and drug treatment resulted in reduced coronary angiographic progression in CAD subjects with predominantly dense LDL, but that an equivalent lowering of LDL cholesterol in subjects with more buoyant LDL was not associated with angiographic benefit. Further, in vitro findings have indicated increased susceptibility of small, dense LDL to oxidative modification and relatively greater binding of these particles to arterial wall proteoglycans. Thus, the small, dense LDL trait may underlie familial predisposition to CAD in a large proportion of the population, and its presence may indicate the potential for benefit from specific therapeutic interventions.

  11. Lattice thermal conductivity of dense silicate glass at high pressures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Y. Y.; Hsieh, W. P.

    2015-12-01

    The layered structure of the Earth's interior is generally believed to develop through the magma ocean differentiation in the early Earth. Previous seismic studies revealed the existence of ultra low velocity zones above the core mantle boundary (CMB) which was inferred to be associated with the remnant of a deep magma ocean. The heat flux through the core mantle boundary therefore would strongly depend on the thermal conductivity, both lattice (klat) and radiative (krad) of dense silicate melts and major constituent minerals of the lower mantle. Recent experimental results on the radiative thermal conductivity of dense silicate glasses and lower-mantle minerals suggest that krad of dense silicate glasses could be remarkably lower than krad of the surrounding solid mantle phases. In this case, the dense silicate melts will act as a trap for heat from the Earth's outer core. However, this conclusion remains uncertain because of the lack of direct measurements on lattice thermal conductivities of silicate glasses/melts under lower mantle pressures up to date. Here we report experimental results on lattice thermal conductivities of dense silicate glass with basaltic composition under pressures relevant to the Earth's lower mantle in a diamond-anvil cell using time-domain thermoreflectance method. The study will assist the comprehension of thermal transport properties of silicate melts in the Earth's deep interior and is crucial for understanding the dynamic and thermal evolution of the Earth's internal structure.

  12. An efficient fully atomistic potential model for dense fluid methane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Chuntao; Ouyang, Jie; Zhuang, Xin; Wang, Lihua; Li, Wuming

    2016-08-01

    A fully atomistic model aimed to obtain a general purpose model for the dense fluid methane is presented. The new optimized potential for liquid simulation (OPLS) model is a rigid five site model which consists of five fixed point charges and five Lennard-Jones centers. The parameters in the potential model are determined by a fit of the experimental data of dense fluid methane using molecular dynamics simulation. The radial distribution function and the diffusion coefficient are successfully calculated for dense fluid methane at various state points. The simulated results are in good agreement with the available experimental data shown in literature. Moreover, the distribution of mean number hydrogen bonds and the distribution of pair-energy are analyzed, which are obtained from the new model and other five reference potential models. Furthermore, the space-time correlation functions for dense fluid methane are also discussed. All the numerical results demonstrate that the new OPLS model could be well utilized to investigate the dense fluid methane.

  13. Future heavy duty trucking engine requirements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strawhorn, L. W.; Suski, V. A.

    1985-01-01

    Developers of advanced heavy duty diesel engines are engaged in probing the opportunities presented by new materials and techniques. This process is technology driven, but there is neither assurance that the eventual users of the engines so developed will be comfortable with them nor, indeed, that those consumers will continue to exist in either the same form, or numbers as they do today. To ensure maximum payoff of research dollars, the equipment development process must consider user needs. This study defines motor carrier concerns, cost tolerances, and the engine parameters which match the future projected industry needs. The approach taken to do that is to be explained and the results presented. The material to be given comes basically from a survey of motor carrier fleets. It provides indications of the role of heavy duty vehicles in the 1998 period and their desired maintenance and engine performance parameters.

  14. PROCEEDINGS OF RIKEN/BNL RESEARCH CENTER WORKSHOP, EQUILIBRIUM AND NON-EQUILIBRIM ASPECTS OF HOT, DENSE QCD, VOLUME 28.

    SciTech Connect

    De Vega, H.J.; Boyanovsky, D.

    2000-07-17

    The Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) at Brookhaven, beginning operation this year, and the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN, beginning operation {approximately}2005, will provide an unprecedented range of energies and luminosities that will allow us to probe the Gluon-Quark plasma. At RHIC and LHC, at central rapidity typical estimates of energy densities and temperatures are e * 1-10 GeV/fm3 and T0 * 300 - 900 MeV. Such energies are well above current estimates for the GQ plasma. Initially, this hot, dense plasma is far from local thermal equilibrium, making the theoretical study of transport phenomena, kinetic and chemical equilibration in dense and hot plasmas, and related issues a matter of fundamental importance. During the last few years a consistent framework to study collective effects in the Gluon-Quark plasma, and a microscopic description of transport in terms of the hard thermal (and dense) loops resummation program has emerged. This approach has the potential of providing a microscopic formulation of transport, in the regime of temperatures and densities to be achieved at RHIC and LHC. A parallel development over the last few years has provided a consistent formulation of non-equilibrium quantum field theory that provides a real-time description of phenomena out of equilibrium. Novel techniques including non-perturbative approaches and the dynamical renormalization group techniques lead to new insights into transport and relaxation. A deeper understanding of collective.excitations and transport phenomena in the GQ plasma could lead to recognize novel potential experimental signatures. New insights into small-c physics reveals a striking similarity between small-c and hard thermal loops, and novel real-time numerical simulations have recently studied the parton distributions and their thermalizations in the initial stages of a heavy ion collision.

  15. PROCEEDINGS OF RIKEN/BNL RESEARCH CENTER WORKSHOP, EQUILIBRIUM AND NON-EQUILIBRIM ASPECTTS OF HOT, DENSE QCD, VOLUME 28.

    SciTech Connect

    DE VEGA,H.J.; BOYANOVSKY,D.

    2000-07-17

    The Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) at Brookhaven, beginning operation this year, and the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN, beginning operation {approximately}2005, will provide an unprecedented range of energies and luminosities that will allow us to probe the Gluon-Quark plasma. At RHIC and LHC, at central rapidity typical estimates of energy densities and temperatures are e * 1-10 GeV/fm3 and T0 * 300 - 900 MeV. Such energies are well above current estimates for the GQ plasma. Initially, this hot, dense plasma is far from local thermal equilibrium, making the theoretical study of transport phenomena, kinetic and chemical equilibration in dense and hot plasmas, and related issues a matter of fundamental importance. During the last few years a consistent framework to study collective effects in the Gluon-Quark plasma, and a microscopic description of transport in terms of the hard thermal (and dense) loops resummation program has emerged. This approach has the potential of providing a microscopic formulation of transport, in the regime of temperatures and densities to be achieved at RHIC and LHC. A parallel development over the last few years has provided a consistent formulation of non-equilibrium quantum field theory that provides a real-time description of phenomena out of equilibrium. Novel techniques including non-perturbative approaches and the dynamical renormalization group techniques lead to new insights into transport and relaxation. A deeper understanding of collective.excitations and transport phenomena in the GQ plasma could lead to recognize novel potential experimental signatures. New insights into small-c physics reveals a striking similarity between small-c and hard thermal loops, and novel real-time numerical simulations have recently studied the parton distributions and their thermalizations in the initial stages of a heavy ion collision.

  16. Dependence of heavy hole exciton binding energy and the strain distribution in GaAs1-xBix/GaAs finite spherical quantum dots on Bi content in the material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, Subhasis; Sharma, Akant Sagar; Das, T. D.; Dhar, S.

    2015-10-01

    The ground state binding energy of heavy hole excitons confined in GaAs1-xBix/GaAs spherical quantum dots is calculated as a function of dot radius and the Bi content using a Variational method based on 1-s hydrogenic wave functions with effective mass approximation. The parameter shows strong dependence on the Bi mole fraction x, particularly at smaller values of the dot radii. The strain associated with the quantum dot is found to decrease exponentially with increase in dot radius and shows a linear increase with Bi composition.

  17. The viscosity to entropy ratio: From string theory motivated bounds to warm dense matter

    SciTech Connect

    Faussurier, G.; Libby, S. B.; Silvestrelli, P. L.

    2014-07-04

    Here, we study the ratio of viscosity to entropy density in Yukawa one-component plasmas as a function of coupling parameter at fixed screening, and in realistic warm dense matter models as a function of temperature at fixed density. In these two situations, the ratio is minimized for values of the coupling parameters that depend on screening, and for temperatures that in turn depend on density and material. In this context, we also examine Rosenfeld arguments relating transport coefficients to excess reduced entropy for Yukawa one-component plasmas. For these cases we show that this ratio is always above the lower-bound conjecture derived from string theory ideas.

  18. Method of forming a dense, high temperature electronically conductive composite layer on a porous ceramic substrate

    DOEpatents

    Isenberg, Arnold O.

    1992-01-01

    An electrochemical device, containing a solid oxide electrolyte material and an electrically conductive composite layer, has the composite layer attached by: (A) applying a layer of LaCrO.sub.3, YCrO.sub.3 or LaMnO.sub.3 particles (32), on a portion of a porous ceramic substrate (30), (B) heating to sinter bond the particles to the substrate, (C) depositing a dense filler structure (34) between the doped particles (32), (D) shaving off the top of the particles, and (E) applying an electronically conductive layer over the particles (32) as a contact.

  19. Method of forming a dense, high temperature electronically conductive composite layer on a porous ceramic substrate

    DOEpatents

    Isenberg, A.O.

    1992-04-21

    An electrochemical device, containing a solid oxide electrolyte material and an electrically conductive composite layer, has the composite layer attached by: (A) applying a layer of LaCrO[sub 3], YCrO[sub 3] or LaMnO[sub 3] particles, on a portion of a porous ceramic substrate, (B) heating to sinter bond the particles to the substrate, (C) depositing a dense filler structure between the doped particles, (D) shaving off the top of the particles, and (E) applying an electronically conductive layer over the particles as a contact. 7 figs.

  20. Visualizing expanding warm dense matter heated by laser-generated ion beams

    SciTech Connect

    Bang, Woosuk

    2015-08-24

    This PowerPoint presentation concluded with the following. We calculated the expected heating per atom and temperatures of various target materials using a Monte Carlo simulation code and SESAME EOS tables. We used aluminum ion beams to heat gold and diamond uniformly and isochorically. A streak camera imaged the expansion of warm dense gold (5.5 eV) and diamond (1.7 eV). GXI-X recorded all 16 x-ray images of the unheated gold bar targets proving that it could image the motion of the gold/diamond interface of the proposed target.