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Sample records for heavy ion-induced mammary

  1. Heavy-ion-induced electronic desorption of gas from metals.

    PubMed

    Molvik, A W; Kollmus, H; Mahner, E; Covo, M Kireeff; Bellachioma, M C; Bender, M; Bieniosek, F M; Hedlund, E; Krämer, A; Kwan, J; Malyshev, O B; Prost, L; Seidl, P A; Westenskow, G; Westerberg, L

    2007-02-01

    During heavy-ion operation in several particle accelerators worldwide, dynamic pressure rises of orders of magnitude were triggered by lost beam ions that bombarded the vacuum chamber walls. This ion-induced molecular desorption, observed at CERN, GSI, and BNL, can seriously limit the ion beam lifetime and intensity of the accelerator. From dedicated test stand experiments we have discovered that heavy-ion-induced gas desorption scales with the electronic energy loss (dE_{e}/dx) of the ions slowing down in matter; but it varies only little with the ion impact angle, unlike electronic sputtering. PMID:17358950

  2. Heavy-ion induced electronic desorption of gas from metals

    SciTech Connect

    Molvik, A W; Kollmus, H; Mahner, E; Covo, M K; Bellachioma, M C; Bender, M; Bieniosek, F M; Hedlund, E; Kramer, A; Kwan, J; Malyshev, O B; Prost, L; Seidl, P A; Westenskow, G; Westerberg, L

    2006-12-19

    During heavy ion operation in several particle accelerators world-wide, dynamic pressure rises of orders of magnitude were triggered by lost beam ions that bombarded the vacuum chamber walls. This ion-induced molecular desorption, observed at CERN, GSI, and BNL, can seriously limit the ion beam lifetime and intensity of the accelerator. From dedicated test stand experiments we have discovered that heavy-ion induced gas desorption scales with the electronic energy loss (dE{sub e}/d/dx) of the ions slowing down in matter; but it varies only little with the ion impact angle, unlike electronic sputtering.

  3. Solutions to heavy ion induced avalanche burnout in power devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wrobel, Theodore F.; Beutler, David E.

    1992-12-01

    A review of normal breakdown and current induced avalanche (CIA) breakdown mechanisms in silicon power transistors is presented. The applicability of the CIA model to heavy ion induced burnout is shown, and solutions to CIA in silicon power semiconductors are given. It is noted that solving the problem of CIA burnout in npn bipolar and n-channel DMOS devices is, at best, difficult. Several techniques of hardening these devices to the effects of heavy ion, dose-rate induced failure, and any other condition producing CIA are discussed. The most effective techniques are those that minimize the emitter current injection by reducing the emitter injection efficiency or making the parasitic bipolar more difficult to turn on. However, it is believed that the simplest solution to the problem is to use pnp bipolar and p-channel DMOS devices whenever possible.

  4. Heavy-ion induced genetic changes and evolution processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, C. H.; Craise, L. M.; Durante, M.; Mei, M.

    1994-10-01

    On Moon and Mars, there will be more galactic cosmic rays and higher radiation doses than on earth. Our experimental studies showed that heavy ion radiation can effectively cause mutation and chromosome aberrations and that high-LET heavy-ion induced mutants can be irreversible. Chromosome translocations and deletions are common in cells irradiated by heavy particles, and ionizing radiations are effective in causing hyperploidy. The importance of the genetic changes in the evolution of life is an interesting question. Through evolution, there is an increase of DNA content in cells from lower forms of life to higher organisms. The DNA content, however, reached a plateau in vertebrates. By increasing DNA content, there can be an increase of information in the cell. For a given DNA content, the quality of information can be changed by rearranging the DNA. Because radiation can cause hyperploidy, an increase of DNA content in cells, and can induce DNA rearrangement, it is likely that the evolution of life on Mars will be effected by its radiation environment. A simple analysis shows that the radiation level on Mars may cause a mutation frequency comparable to that of the spontaneous mutation rate on Earth. To the extent that mutation plays a role in adaptation, radiation alone on Mars may thus provide different mutation for the evolution of life.

  5. Heavy-ion induced genetic changes and evolution processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, C. H.; Craise, L. M.; Durante, M.; Mei, M.

    1994-01-01

    On Moon and Mars, there will be more galactic cosmic rays and higher radiation doses than on Earth. Our experimental studies showed that heavy ion radiation can effectively cause mutation and chromosome aberrations and that high Linear Energy Transfer (LET) heavy-ion induced mutants can be irreversible. Chromosome translocations and deletions are common in cells irradiated by heavy particles, and ionizing radiations are effective in causing hyperploidy. The importance of the genetic changes in the evolution of life is an interesting question. Through evolution, there is an increase of DNA content in cells from lower forms of life to higher organisms. The DNA content, however, reached a plateau in vertebrates. By increasing DNA content, there can be an increase of information in the cell. For a given DNA content, the quality of information can be changed by rearranging the DNA. Because radiation can cause hyperploidy, an increase of DNA content in cells, and can induce DNA rearrangement, it is likely that the evolution of life on Mars will be effected by its radiation environment. A simple analysis shows that the radiation level on Mars may cause a mutation frequency comparable to that of the spontaneous mutation rate on Earth. To the extent that mutation plays a role in adaptation, radiation alone on Mars may thus provide sufficient mutation for the evolution of life.

  6. Defect creation by swift heavy ion induced secondary electrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishra, Naresh C.; Biswal, Rajib; Kanjilal, Dinakar; Avasthi, Devesh K.

    2011-09-01

    Evolution of c-axis oriented YBa2Cu3O7-y (YBCO) thin films under 200 MeV Ag ion irradiation at 79 K is studied by in-situ temperature dependent resistivity and in-situ low temperature x-ray diffraction. The electronic energy loss (25.18 keV nm-1) of these ions is shown to induce secondary electrons, which create oxygen disorder selectively in the CuO basal planes of fully oxygenated YBCO in a cylindrical region of radius 97 nm around the ion induced latent tracks of radius 1.9 nm. This technique provides a unique way of creating oxygen disorder in a fully oxygenated YBCO, which was not possible earlier.

  7. Repair and misrepair of heavy-ion-induced chromosomal damage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goodwin, E.; Blakely, E.; Ivery, G.; Tobias, C.

    The premature chromosome condensation (PCC) technique was used to investigate chromosomal damage, repair, and misrepair in the G1 phase of a human/hamster hybrid cell line that contains a single human chromosome. Plateau-phase cell cultures were exposed to either x-rays or a 425 MeV/u beam of neon ions near the Bragg peak where the LET is 183 keV/μm. An in situ hybridization technique coupled to fluorescent staining of PCC spreads confirmed the linearity of the dose response for initial chromatin breakage in the human chromosome to high doses (1600 cGy x-ray or 1062 cGy Ne). On Giemsa-stained slides, initial chromatin breakage in the total genome and the rejoining kinetics of these breaks were determined. As a measure of chromosomal misrepair, ring PCC aberrations were also scored. Ne ions were about 1.5 x more effective per unit dose compared to x-rays at producing the initially measured chromatin breakage. 90% of the x-ray-induced breaks rejoined in cells incubated at 37°C after exposure. In contrast, only 50% of Ne-ion-induced breaks rejoined. In the irradiated G1 cells, ring PCC aberrations increased with time apparently by first order kinetics after either x-ray or Ne exposures. However, far fewer rings formed in Ne-irradiated cells after a dose giving a comparable initial number of chromatin breaks. Following x-ray exposures, the yield of rings formed after long repair times (6 to 9 hrs) fit a quadratic dose-response curve. These results indicate quantitative and qualitative differences in the chromosomal lesions induced by low- and high-LET radiations.

  8. Heavy ion induced changes in small intestinal parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carr, K. E.; McCullough, J. S.; Brennan, P.; Hayes, T. L.; Ainsworth, E. J.; Nelson, A. C.

    1994-10-01

    The effects on 17 different structural parameters of mouse small intestine three days after treatment with three types of heavy ion (neon, iron and niobium) are compared, the first two being of particular relevance to space flight. The data for niobium are given in full, showing that changes after niobium ion treatment are not standard and are concentrated in the epithelial compartment, with few of the parameters having a response which is dose dependent. When comparisons are made for the three types of heavy ion, the damage is greatest after neon ion irradiation, implying that the additional non-epithelial damage produced as LET rises from X rays through neutrons to neon ions is not necessarily maintained as LET continues to rise. Further understanding is therefore needed of the balance between changes affecting the vascular and absorptive components of the organ. Variation from group to group is also important, as is variation of strain or gastrointestinal status. All such factors are important in the understanding of changes in multicellular organs after exposure to heavy ion radiation.

  9. Heavy ion induced double strand breaks in bacteria and bacteriophages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Micke, U.; Schäfer, M.; Anton, A.; Horneck, G.; Bücker, H.

    DNA damage induced by heavy ions in bacterial cells and bacteriophages such as Bacillus subtilis, E. coli and Bacteriophage Tl were investigated by analyzing the double strand breaks in the chromosomal DNA. This kind of lesion is considered as one of the main reasons for lethal events. To analyze double strand breaks in long molecules of DNA - up to some Mbp in length - the technique of pulse field agarose gel electrophoresis has been used. This allows the detection of one double strand break per genome. Cell lysis and DNA isolation were performed in small agarose blocks directly. This procedure secured minimum DNA destruction by shearing forces. After running a gel, the DNA was stained with ethidium bromide. The light intensity of ethidium bromide fluorescence for both the outcoming (running) DNA and the remaining intact DNA were measured by scanning. The mean number of double strand breaks was calculated by determining the quotient of these intensities. Strand break induction after heavy ion and X-ray irradiation was compared.

  10. Multimodal Fission in Heavy-Ion Induced Reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Pokrovskiy, I. V.; Bogachev, A. A.; Iitkis, M. G.; Iitkis, J. M.; Kondratiev, N. A.; Kozulin, E. M.; Dorvaux, O.; Rowley, N.; Schmitt, Ch.; Stuttge, L.

    2006-08-14

    Mass, energy and folding angle distributions of the fission fragments as well as multiplicities of neutron and gamma-quanta emissions accompanying the fission process were measured for fission of 226Th, 227Pa and 234Pu compound nuclei produced in reactions with 18O and 26Mg projectiles over a wide energy range. Data were analyzed with respect to the presence of fission modes. Asymmetric fission was observed even at very high initial excitation for all the measured systems. The so-called fission mode S1 (caused by the proton shell Z{approx}50 and neutron shell N{approx}82 in heavy fragment) was found to be dominant in asymmetric fission of 234Pu. Reactions with not full linear momentum transfer were observed in the folding spectra for all the measured systems.

  11. Molecular dynamics simulations of swift heavy ion induced defect recovery in SiC

    SciTech Connect

    Backman, Marie; Toulemonde, Marcel; Pakarinen, Olli H; Juslin, Niklas; Djurabekova, Flyura; Nordlund, Kai; Debelle, Aurelien; Weber, William J

    2013-01-01

    Swift heavy ions induce a high density of electronic excitations that can cause the formation of amorphous ion tracks in insulators. No ion tracks have been observed in the semiconductor SiC, but recent experimental work suggests that irradiation damaged SiC can undergo defect recovery under swift heavy ion irradiation. It is believed that local heating of the lattice due to the electronic energy deposition can anneal, and thereby recover, some of the disordered structure. We simulate the local heating due to the ions by the inelastic thermal spike model and perform molecular dynamics simulations of dierent model damage states to study the defect recovery on an atomistic level. We find significant recovery of point defects and a disordered layer, as well as recrystallization at the amorphous-to-crystalline interface of an amorphous layer. The simulation results support the swift heavy ion annealing hypothesis.Swift heavy ions induce a high density of electronic excitations that can cause the formation of amorphous ion tracks in insulators. No ion tracks have been observed in the semiconductor SiC, but recent experimental work suggests that irradiation damaged SiC can undergo defect recovery under swift heavy ion irradiation. It is believed that local heating of the lattice due to the electronic energy deposition can anneal, and thereby recover, some of the disordered structure. We simulate the local heating due to the ions by the inelastic thermal spike model and perform molecular dynamics simulations of dierent model damage states to study the defect recovery on an atomistic level. We find significant recovery of point defects and a disordered layer, as well as recrystallization at the amorphous-to-crystalline interface of an amorphous layer. The simulation results support the swift heavy ion annealing hypothesis.

  12. A new test stand for heavy ion induced gas desorption measurements at TSL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hedlund, E.; Westerberg, L.; Malyshev, O. B.; Leandersson, M.; Fridén, C.-J.; Edqvist, E.; Kollmus, H.; Bellachioma, M. C.; Reich-Sprenger, H.; Krasnov, A.

    2008-03-01

    In several experiments at CERN, GSI and BNL it has been found that the lifetime of highly energetic heavy ions in synchrotrons decreases with increasing number of injected ions. This phenomenon occurs due to the collisions of beam ions and residual gas molecules leading to the change of charge of the ions and their loss on the vacuum chamber walls, which in turn cause ion-induced gas desorption and further pressure increase. To gain a deeper understanding of the ion-induced desorption process in the energy range 5-45 MeV/u, a dedicated test stand was built at the end of the K beamline at The Svedberg Laboratory (TSL) in Uppsala, Sweden. The energy range was chosen due to the fact that the injection energy of the heavy ion synchrotron SIS18 at GSI will be 10 MeV/u, and that there are insufficient data in this energy range. A Test Particle Monte-Carlo model of the experimental set-up was build-up, run and analysed for different sample configurations. An important result is that for the same sample material the desorption yield from a flat sample causes a 1.58 times larger pressure increase than that of a tubular sample. A detailed explanation of the set-up is presented.

  13. Heavy ion induced mutations in mammalian cells: Cross sections and molecular analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stoll, U.; Schmidt, P.; Schneider, E.; Kiefer, J.

    1994-01-01

    Our investigations of heavy ion-induced mutations in mammalian cells, which had been begun a few years ago, were systematically continued. For the first time, it was possible to cover a large LET range with a few kinds of ions. To do this, both UNILAC and SIS were used to yield comparable data for a large energy range. This is a necessary condition for a comprehensive description of the influence of such ion parameters as energy and LET. In these experiments, the induced resistance against the poison 6-thioguanin (6-TG), which is linked to the HPRT locus on the genome, is being used as mutation system. In addition to the mutation-induction cross-section measurements, the molecular changes of the DNA are being investigated by means of Multiplex PCR ('Polymerase Chain Reaction') gene amplification. From these experiments we expect further elucidation of the mutation-inducing mechanisms composing the biological action of heavy-ion radiation.

  14. Heavy ion induced DNA-DSB in yeast and mammalian cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Loebrich, M.; Ikpeme, S.; Kiefer, J.

    1994-01-01

    Molecular changes at the DNA are assumed to be the main cause for radiation effects in a number of organisms. During the course of the last decades techniques have been developed for measuring DNA double-strand breaks (dsb), generally assumed to be the most critical DNA lesions. The outcome of all those different approaches portrays a collection of data useful for a theoretical description of radiation action mechanisms. However, in the case of heavy ion induced DNA dsb the picture is not quite clear yet and further projects and strategies have to be developed. The biological systems studied in our group are yeast and mammalian cells. While in the case of yeast cells technical and methodical reasons highlight these organisms mammalian cells reach greater importance when dsb repair studies are performed. In both types of organisms the technique of pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) is applied, although with different modifications and evaluation procedures mainly due to the different genome sizes.

  15. Loss of heterozygosity in heavy-ion-induced murine T-cell lymphomas.

    PubMed

    Kakinuma, Shizuko; Kubo, Ayumi; Amasaki, Yoshiko; Nojima, Kumie; Monobe, Manami; Majima, Hideyuki J; Imaoka, Tatsuhiko; Nishimura, Mayumi; Shimada, Yoshiya

    2003-10-01

    One of the important concerns for astronauts in space environment is cancer risk associated with cosmic radiation, including heavy particle carbon-ions. But little information on cancer risk is available. In the present study, we investigated the induction of and cellular and molecular characteristics of T-cell lymphomas of B6C3F1 mice induced by carbon-ions and X-rays. The incidence, the latent period and the surface expression of T-cell differentiation antigens were similar between carbon-ion- and X-ray-induced lymphomas. The size of T-cell lymphomas induced by carbon-ions was significantly smaller than that by X-rays. Molecular analysis indicated that high frequency of loss of heterozygosity (LOH) was found on chromosomes 4, 11, 12 and 19 in both lymphomas. Interestingly, the frequency of LOH on chromosome 11 was much higher, but that on chromosome 12 was lower in carbon-ion-induced T-cell lymphomas than in X-ray-induced ones. These results indicate that mechanistic differences may exist between carbon-ion- and X-ray-induced lymphomagenesis. PMID:14676366

  16. Heavy-ion induced desorption yields of amorphous carbon filmsbombarded with 4.2MeV/u lead ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahner, E.; Holzer, D.; Küchler, D.; Scrivens, R.; Costa Pinto, P.; Vallgren, C. Yin; Bender, M.

    2011-10-01

    During the past decade, intense experimental studies on the heavy-ion induced molecular desorption were performed in several particle accelerator laboratories worldwide in order to understand and overcome large dynamic pressure rises caused by lost beam ions. Different target materials and various coatings were studied for desorption and mitigation techniques were applied to heavy-ion accelerators. For the upgrade of the CERN injector complex, a coating of the Super Proton Synchrotron (SPS) vacuum system with a thin film of amorphous carbon is under study to mitigate the electron cloud effect observed during SPS operation with the nominal proton beam for the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). Since the SPS is also part of the heavy-ion injector chain for LHC, dynamic vacuum studies of amorphous carbon films are important to determine their ion induced desorption yields. At the CERN Heavy Ion Accelerator (LINAC 3), carbon-coated accelerator-type stainless steel vacuum chambers were tested for desorption using 4.2MeV/u Pb54+ ions. We describe the experimental setup and method, present the results for unbaked and baked films, and summarize surface characterizations such as secondary electron yield measurements, x-ray photoemission spectroscopy, and scanning electron microscopy studies. Finally, we present a high-energy scaling of lead-ion induced desorption yields from the MeV/u to GeV/u range.

  17. On-line and post irradiation analysis of swift heavy ion induced modification of PMMA (polymethyl-methacrylate)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hossain, U. H.; Lima, V.; Baake, O.; Severin, D.; Bender, M.; Ensinger, W.

    2014-05-01

    The present work is part of a research program studying the swift heavy ion induced modification of aliphatic polymers with some comparable side groups, here polymethyl-methacrylate (PMMA). This paper presents a study on Fourier-transform-infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), residual gas analysis (RGA), and Ultraviolet-Visible (UV-Vis) spectroscopy of the transformations of a PMMA film under gold (Au) and uranium (U) ion irradiation in the MeV/u range in vacuum to fluences up to 3 × 1011 ions per cm2. The results show a general ion induced degradation of the polymer, with release of volatile fragments, scission of side chains and polymeric backbone, formation of conjugated double bonds, and the resulting increased absorption of the UV part in the UV-Vis spectral region. A molecular scission mechanism which explains the main degradation products is proposed.

  18. System for studying a sample of material using a heavy ion induced mass spectrometer source

    DOEpatents

    Fries, D.P.; Browning, J.F.

    1998-07-21

    A heavy ion generator is used with a plasma desorption mass spectrometer to provide an appropriate neutron flux in the direction of a fissionable material in order to desorb and ionize large molecules from the material for mass analysis. The heavy ion generator comprises a fissionable material having a high (n,f) reaction cross section. The heavy ion generator also comprises a pulsed neutron generator that is used to bombard the fissionable material with pulses of neutrons, thereby causing heavy ions to be emitted from the fissionable material. These heavy ions impinge on a material, thereby causing ions to desorb off that material. The ions desorbed off the material pass through a time-of-flight mass analyzer, wherein ions can be measured with masses greater than 25,000 amu. 3 figs.

  19. Method for studying a sample of material using a heavy ion induced mass spectrometer source

    DOEpatents

    Fries, D.P.; Browning, J.F.

    1999-02-16

    A heavy ion generator is used with a plasma desorption mass spectrometer to provide an appropriate neutron flux in the direction of a fissionable material in order to desorb and ionize large molecules from the material for mass analysis. The heavy ion generator comprises a fissionable material having a high n,f reaction cross section. The heavy ion generator also comprises a pulsed neutron generator that is used to bombard the fissionable material with pulses of neutrons, thereby causing heavy ions to be emitted from the fissionable material. These heavy ions impinge on a material, thereby causing ions to desorb off that material. The ions desorbed off the material pass through a time-of-flight mass analyzer, wherein ions can be measured with masses greater than 25,000 amu. 3 figs.

  20. Method for studying a sample of material using a heavy ion induced mass spectrometer source

    DOEpatents

    Fries, David P.; Browning, James F.

    1999-01-01

    A heavy ion generator is used with a plasma desorption mass spectrometer to provide an appropriate neutron flux in the direction of a fissionable material in order to desorb and ionize large molecules from the material for mass analysis. The heavy ion generator comprises a fissionable material having a high n,f reaction cross section. The heavy ion generator also comprises a pulsed neutron generator that is used to bombard the fissionable material with pulses of neutrons, thereby causing heavy ions to be emitted from the fissionable material. These heavy ions impinge on a material, thereby causing ions to desorb off that material. The ions desorbed off the material pass through a time-of-flight mass analyzer, wherein ions can be measured with masses greater than 25,000 amu.

  1. System for studying a sample of material using a heavy ion induced mass spectrometer source

    DOEpatents

    Fries, David P.; Browning, James F.

    1998-01-01

    A heavy ion generator is used with a plasma desorption mass spectrometer to provide an appropriate neutron flux in the direction of a fissionable material in order to desorb and ionize large molecules from the material for mass analysis. The heavy ion generator comprises a fissionable material having a high n,f reaction cross section. The heavy ion generator also comprises a pulsed neutron generator that is used to bombard the fissionable material with pulses of neutrons, thereby causing heavy ions to be emitted from the fissionable material. These heavy ions impinge on a material, thereby causing ions to desorb off that material. The ions desorbed off the material pass through a time-of-flight mass analyzer, wherein ions can be measured with masses greater than 25,000 amu.

  2. Resection is a major repair pathway of heavy ion-induced DNA lesions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durante, Marco; Averbeck, Nicole; Taucher-Scholz, Gisela

    Space radiation include densely ionizing heavy ions, which can produce clustered DNA damage with high frequency in human cells. Repair of these complex lesions is generally assumed to be more difficult than for simple double-strand breaks. We show here that human cells use break resection with increasing frequency after exposure to heavy ions. Resection can lead to misrepair of the DNA lesion, via microhomology mediated end-joining. Resection can therefore be responsible for the increased effectiveness of heavy ions in the induction of mutations and genetic late effects.

  3. Competition between fusion and quasi-fission in heavy ion induced reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Back, B.B.

    1986-09-01

    Quantitative analyses of angular distributions and angle-mass correlations have been applied to the U + Ca reaction to obtain upper limit estimates for the cross sections for complete fusion near or below the interaction barrier. Extrapolating to the systems Ca + Cm and Ca + Es using the well established scaling properties of the extra push model, an estimate of the cross sections relevant to the efforts of synthesizing super-heavy elements in the region Z = 116 and N = 184 via heavy-ion fusion reactions are obtained. A simple evaporation calculation using properties of the super heavy elements shows that the failure to observe super-heavy elements with the Ca + Cm reaction is consistent with estimates of the complete fusion process. 33 refs., 9 figs., 1 tab.

  4. Heavy-ion-induced production and preseparation of short-livedisotopes for chemistry experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Dullmann, Christoph E.; Folden III, Charles M.; Gregorich, Kenneth E.; Hoffman, Darleane C.; Leitner, Daniela; Pang, Gregory K.; Sudowe, Ralf; Zielinski, Peter M.; Nitsche, Heino

    2005-02-24

    Physical separation of short-lived isotopes produced inheavy-ion-induced fusion reactions is a powerful and well know method andoften applied in investigations of the heaviest elements, called thetransactinides (Z>=104). By extracting these isotopes from a recoilseparator, they can be made available for transport to setups locatedoutside the heavily shielded irradiation position such as chemistrysetups. This physical preseparation technique overcomes many limitationscurrently faced in the chemical investigation of transactinides. Here wedescribe the basic principle using relatively short-lived isotopes of thelighter group 4 elements zirconium (Zr) and hafnium (Hf) that are used asanalogs of the lightest transactinide element, rutherfordium (Rf, element104). The Zr and Hf isotopes were produced at the LBNL 88-Inch Cyclotronusing a cocktail of 18O and 50Ti beams and the appropriate targets.Subsequently, the isotopes were physically separated in the BerkeleyGas-filled Separator (BGS) and guided to a Recoil Transfer Chamber (RTC)to transfer them to chemistry setups. The magnetic rigidities of thereaction products in low-pressure helium gas were measured and theiridentities determined with gamma-pectroscopy. Using preseparated isotopeshas the advantages of low background and beam plasma free environment forchemistry experiments. The new possibilities that open up for chemicalinvestigations of transactinide elements are descr ibed. The method canreadily be applied to homologous elements within other groups in theperiodic table.

  5. Swift heavy ion-induced amorphization of CaZrO3 perovskite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lang, Maik; Zhang, Fuxiang; Li, Weixing; Severin, Daniel; Bender, Markus; Klaumünzer, Siegfried; Trautmann, Christina; Ewing, Rodney C.

    2012-09-01

    Perovskite, ABO3, structures are an important class of ceramics with a large variety of derivative structure-types (cubic, tetragonal, hexagonal, orthorhombic, and rhombohedral). Radiation damage in perovskites is of interest due to their potential as actinide waste forms and to understand radiation effects in uranium- and thorium-bearing phases. Powder CaZrO3 perovskite was irradiated with 940-MeV Au ions up to 1.5 × 1013 ions/cm2. Changes in the crystal structure were followed in situ as function of fluence by means of a sequence of X-ray diffraction (XRD) measurements. Ion-induced amorphization is evidenced by a decrease in diffraction intensity and an increase in diffuse scattering. Based on XRD measurements, as well as transmission electron microscopy (TEM), CaZrO3 is completely amorphized at a fluence of 1.5 × 1013 ions/cm2. From the evolution of the integrated XRD-maxima intensities with fluence, the diameter of the amorphous tracks is estimated to be 6.0 ± 0.6 nm, which is independently confirmed by bright-field TEM images: 6.7 ± 0.4 nm. Changes in the positions of diffraction maxima may be caused by at least two processes. Broadening of the diffraction maxima is analyzed using a Williamson-Hall plot. Strain-induced broadening is the dominant process.

  6. Swift heavy ion induced single event upsets in high density UV-EPROM’s

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dahiwale, S. S.; Shinde, N. S.; Kanjilal, D.; Bhoraskar, V. N.; Dhole, S. D.

    2008-04-01

    A few high density UV-EPROM's (32Kb × 8) were irradiated with 5.41 MeV energy α-particles with fluences from 104 to 108 alphas/cm2 and 100 MeV nickel, iodine and silver ions for low fluences between 5 × 107 and 108 ions/cm2. The energy and ion species was selected on the basis of predicted threshold values of linear energy transfer (LET) in silicon. The program which was stored in the memory found to be changed from 0 to 1 and 1 to 0 state, respectively. On the basis of changed states, the cross-sections (σ) were calculated to investigate the single event effects/upsets. No upset was observed in case of α-particle since it has very low LET, but the SEU cross-section found to be more in case of Iodine i.e. 2.29 × 10-3 cm2 than that of nickel, 2.12 × 10-3 cm2 and silver, 2.26 × 10-3. This mainly attributes that LET for iodine is more as compared to silver and nickel ions, which deposits large amount of energy near the sensitive node of memory cell in the form of electron-hole pairs required to change the state. These measured SEU cross-section were also compared with theoretically predicted values along with the Weibull distribution fit to the ion induced experimental SEU data. The theoretical predicted SEU cross-section 3.27 × 10-3 cm2 found to be in good agreement with the measured SEU cross-section.

  7. A new setup for the investigation of swift heavy ion induced particle emission and surface modifications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meinerzhagen, F.; Breuer, L.; Bukowska, H.; Bender, M.; Severin, D.; Herder, M.; Lebius, H.; Schleberger, M.; Wucher, A.

    2016-01-01

    The irradiation with fast ions with kinetic energies of >10 MeV leads to the deposition of a high amount of energy along their trajectory (up to several ten keV/nm). The energy is mainly transferred to the electronic subsystem and induces different secondary processes of excitations, which result in significant material modifications. A new setup to study these ion induced effects on surfaces will be described in this paper. The setup combines a variable irradiation chamber with different techniques of surface characterizations like scanning probe microscopy, time-of-flight secondary ion, and neutral mass spectrometry, as well as low energy electron diffraction under ultra high vacuum conditions, and is mounted at a beamline of the universal linear accelerator (UNILAC) of the GSI facility in Darmstadt, Germany. Here, samples can be irradiated with high-energy ions with a total kinetic energy up to several GeVs under different angles of incidence. Our setup enables the preparation and in situ analysis of different types of sample systems ranging from metals to insulators. Time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry enables us to study the chemical composition of the surface, while scanning probe microscopy allows a detailed view into the local electrical and morphological conditions of the sample surface down to atomic scales. With the new setup, particle emission during irradiation as well as persistent modifications of the surface after irradiation can thus be studied. We present first data obtained with the new setup, including a novel measuring protocol for time-of-flight mass spectrometry with the GSI UNILAC accelerator.

  8. A new setup for the investigation of swift heavy ion induced particle emission and surface modifications.

    PubMed

    Meinerzhagen, F; Breuer, L; Bukowska, H; Bender, M; Severin, D; Herder, M; Lebius, H; Schleberger, M; Wucher, A

    2016-01-01

    The irradiation with fast ions with kinetic energies of >10 MeV leads to the deposition of a high amount of energy along their trajectory (up to several ten keV/nm). The energy is mainly transferred to the electronic subsystem and induces different secondary processes of excitations, which result in significant material modifications. A new setup to study these ion induced effects on surfaces will be described in this paper. The setup combines a variable irradiation chamber with different techniques of surface characterizations like scanning probe microscopy, time-of-flight secondary ion, and neutral mass spectrometry, as well as low energy electron diffraction under ultra high vacuum conditions, and is mounted at a beamline of the universal linear accelerator (UNILAC) of the GSI facility in Darmstadt, Germany. Here, samples can be irradiated with high-energy ions with a total kinetic energy up to several GeVs under different angles of incidence. Our setup enables the preparation and in situ analysis of different types of sample systems ranging from metals to insulators. Time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry enables us to study the chemical composition of the surface, while scanning probe microscopy allows a detailed view into the local electrical and morphological conditions of the sample surface down to atomic scales. With the new setup, particle emission during irradiation as well as persistent modifications of the surface after irradiation can thus be studied. We present first data obtained with the new setup, including a novel measuring protocol for time-of-flight mass spectrometry with the GSI UNILAC accelerator.

  9. Heavy-ion-induced sucrose radicals investigated using EPR and UV spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Nakagawa, Kouichi; Karakirova, Yordanka; Yordanov, Nicola D

    2015-05-01

    The potential use of a sucrose dosimeter for estimating both linear energy transfer (LET) and the absorbed dose of heavy ion and X-ray radiation was investigated. The stable free radicals were produced when sucrose was irradiated with heavy ions, such as helium, carbon, silicon and neon ions, and when the X-ray radiation was similar to the obtained electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectra, which were ∼7 mT wide and composed of several hyperfine structures. In addition, the total spin concentration resulting from heavy-ion irradiation increased linearly as the absorbed dose increased, and decreased logarithmically as the LET increased. These empirical relations imply that the LET at a certain dose can be determined from the spin concentration. For sucrose and alanine, both cross-sections following C-ion irradiation with a 50 Gy dose were ∼1.3 × 10(-12) [μm(2)], taking into account the molecular size of the samples. The values of these cross-sections imply that multiple ionizing particles were involved in the production of stable radicals. Furthermore, UV absorbance at 267 nm of an aqueous solution of irradiated sucrose was found to linearly increase with increasing absorbed dose. Therefore, the EPR and UV results suggest that sucrose can be a useful dosimeter for heavy-ion irradiation.

  10. Heavy-ion-induced sucrose radicals investigated using EPR and UV spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Nakagawa, Kouichi; Karakirova, Yordanka; Yordanov, Nicola D

    2015-05-01

    The potential use of a sucrose dosimeter for estimating both linear energy transfer (LET) and the absorbed dose of heavy ion and X-ray radiation was investigated. The stable free radicals were produced when sucrose was irradiated with heavy ions, such as helium, carbon, silicon and neon ions, and when the X-ray radiation was similar to the obtained electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectra, which were ∼7 mT wide and composed of several hyperfine structures. In addition, the total spin concentration resulting from heavy-ion irradiation increased linearly as the absorbed dose increased, and decreased logarithmically as the LET increased. These empirical relations imply that the LET at a certain dose can be determined from the spin concentration. For sucrose and alanine, both cross-sections following C-ion irradiation with a 50 Gy dose were ∼1.3 × 10(-12) [μm(2)], taking into account the molecular size of the samples. The values of these cross-sections imply that multiple ionizing particles were involved in the production of stable radicals. Furthermore, UV absorbance at 267 nm of an aqueous solution of irradiated sucrose was found to linearly increase with increasing absorbed dose. Therefore, the EPR and UV results suggest that sucrose can be a useful dosimeter for heavy-ion irradiation. PMID:25480828

  11. Heavy-ion induced single-event upset in integrated circuits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zoutendyk, J. A.

    1991-01-01

    The cosmic ray environment in space can affect the operation of Integrated Circuit (IC) devices via the phenomenon of Single Event Upset (SEU). In particular, heavy ions passing through an IC can induce sufficient integrated current (charge) to alter the state of a bistable circuit, for example a memory cell. The SEU effect is studied in great detail in both static and dynamic memory devices, as well as microprocessors fabricated from bipolar, Complementary Metal Oxide Semiconductor (CMOS) and N channel Metal Oxide Semiconductor (NMOS) technologies. Each device/process reflects its individual characteristics (minimum scale geometry/process parameters) via a unique response to the direct ionization of electron hole pairs by heavy ion tracks. A summary of these analytical and experimental SEU investigations is presented.

  12. Swift heavy ions induced irradiation effects in monolayer graphene and highly oriented pyrolytic graphite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, J.; Yao, H. J.; Zhang, S. X.; Zhai, P. F.; Duan, J. L.; Sun, Y. M.; Li, G. P.; Liu, J.

    2014-07-01

    Monolayer graphene and highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG) were irradiated by swift heavy ions (209Bi and 112Sn) with the fluence between 1011 and 1014 ions/cm2. Both pristine and irradiated samples were investigated by Raman spectroscopy. It was found that D and D‧ peaks appear after irradiation, which indicated the ion irradiation introduced damage both in the graphene and graphite lattice. Due to the special single atomic layer structure of graphene, the irradiation fluence threshold Φth of the D band of graphene is significantly lower (<1 × 1011 ions/cm2) than that (2.5 × 1012 ions/cm2) of HOPG. The larger defect density in graphene than in HOPG indicates that the monolayer graphene is much easier to be damaged than bulk graphite by swift heavy ions. Moreover, different defect types in graphene and HOPG were detected by the different values of ID/ID‧. For the irradiation with the same electronic energy loss, the velocity effect was found in HOPG. However, in this experiment, the velocity effect was not observed in graphene samples irradiated by swift heavy ions.

  13. [Reaction mechanism studies of heavy ion induced nuclear reactions]. Annual progress report, [January 1992--February 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Mignerey, A.C.

    1993-02-01

    Completed work is summarized on the topics of excitation energy division in deep-inelastic reactions and the onset of multifragmentation in La-induced reactions at E/A = 45 MeV. Magnetic fields are being calculated for the PHOBOS detector system, a two-arm multiparticle spectrometer for studying low-transverse-momentum particles produced at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider. The Maryland Forward Array is being developed for detection of the reaction products from very peripheral collisions; it consists of two individual units of detectors: the annular silicon detector in front and the plastic phoswich detector at back.

  14. Single ion induced surface nanostructures: a comparison between slow highly charged and swift heavy ions.

    PubMed

    Aumayr, Friedrich; Facsko, Stefan; El-Said, Ayman S; Trautmann, Christina; Schleberger, Marika

    2011-10-01

    This topical review focuses on recent advances in the understanding of the formation of surface nanostructures, an intriguing phenomenon in ion-surface interaction due to the impact of individual ions. In many solid targets, swift heavy ions produce narrow cylindrical tracks accompanied by the formation of a surface nanostructure. More recently, a similar nanometric surface effect has been revealed for the impact of individual, very slow but highly charged ions. While swift ions transfer their large kinetic energy to the target via ionization and electronic excitation processes (electronic stopping), slow highly charged ions produce surface structures due to potential energy deposited at the top surface layers. Despite the differences in primary excitation, the similarity between the nanostructures is striking and strongly points to a common mechanism related to the energy transfer from the electronic to the lattice system of the target. A comparison of surface structures induced by swift heavy ions and slow highly charged ions provides a valuable insight to better understand the formation mechanisms.

  15. Single ion induced surface nanostructures: a comparison between slow highly charged and swift heavy ions.

    PubMed

    Aumayr, Friedrich; Facsko, Stefan; El-Said, Ayman S; Trautmann, Christina; Schleberger, Marika

    2011-10-01

    This topical review focuses on recent advances in the understanding of the formation of surface nanostructures, an intriguing phenomenon in ion-surface interaction due to the impact of individual ions. In many solid targets, swift heavy ions produce narrow cylindrical tracks accompanied by the formation of a surface nanostructure. More recently, a similar nanometric surface effect has been revealed for the impact of individual, very slow but highly charged ions. While swift ions transfer their large kinetic energy to the target via ionization and electronic excitation processes (electronic stopping), slow highly charged ions produce surface structures due to potential energy deposited at the top surface layers. Despite the differences in primary excitation, the similarity between the nanostructures is striking and strongly points to a common mechanism related to the energy transfer from the electronic to the lattice system of the target. A comparison of surface structures induced by swift heavy ions and slow highly charged ions provides a valuable insight to better understand the formation mechanisms. PMID:21900733

  16. Swift heavy ion induced modifications of single walled carbon nanotube thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vishalli; Raina, K. K.; Avasthi, D. K.; Srivastava, Alok; Dharamvir, Keya

    2016-04-01

    Thin films of single walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) were prepared by Langmuir-Blodgett method and irradiated with swift heavy ions, carbon and nickel each of energy 60 MeV. The ion beams have different electronic energy loss (Se) values and the samples were exposed to various irradiation doses. The irradiated films were characterized using Raman and optical absorption spectroscopy. Raman spectroscopy results indicate the competing processes of defect creation and healing (annealing) of SWCNTs at lower fluences, while at higher fluences defect creation or damage dominates. In UV-Vis-NIR spectroscopy we find that there is decrease in the intensity of characteristic peaks with every increasing fluence, indicating decrease in the optically active states with irradiation.

  17. Time delays in heavy-ion-induced fission of medium-Z nuclei, measured by crystal blocking

    SciTech Connect

    Andersen, J. U.; Chevallier, J.; Forster, J. S.; Karamian, S. A.; Vane, C Randy; Beene, James R; Gross, Carl J; Krause, Herbert F; Liang, J Felix; Shapira, Dan; Uguzzoni, A.

    2012-01-01

    Time delays in fission induced by bombardment of Mo with 170- and 180-MeV {sup 32}S, 225- and 240-MeV {sup 48}Ti, and 300-MeV {sup 58}Ni have been measured by observation of crystal blocking of fission fragments. In contrast to earlier measurements with a W target, the results are consistent with fission of a compound nucleus in competition with mainly neutron emission. Most of the fissions happen on a time scale much shorter than attoseconds but there is a significant component of fission with much longer lifetimes. The measurements are reproduced with a standard statistical model, including a Kramers correction to fission widths from the viscosity of hot nuclear matter. These new results support the interpretation of our earlier measurements with a W target, which indicate that there is a transition in heavy-ion-induced fission at large atomic number and mass, from multichance fission in the standard Bohr-Wheeler picture to fission without formation of a compound nucleus. The process is slowed down by nuclear viscosity, with measured delays of order attoseconds.

  18. Mechanism of the swift heavy ion induced epitaxial recrystallization in predamaged silicon carbide

    SciTech Connect

    Benyagoub, A.; Audren, A.

    2009-10-15

    Although silicon carbide has attracted extensive investigations of ion irradiation effects at low energy owing to its potential use in harsh environments, very few works were carried out in the field of ion irradiation at high energy. A recent preliminary study exploring the combination of low and high energy ion irradiation effects in silicon carbide revealed that the damaged layer formed by low energy ion irradiation can undergo an epitaxial recrystallization under subsequent swift heavy ion irradiation. The present paper is devoted to the investigation of the mechanisms at the origin of this phenomenon by performing additional experiments. A detailed analysis of the kinetics of this recrystallization effect demonstrates that the latter cannot be explained by the models proposed for the well-known ion-beam-induced epitaxial crystallization process. Furthermore, it is found that this effect can be accounted for by a mechanism combining the melting within the ion tracks of the amorphous zones through a thermal spike process and their subsequent epitaxial recrystallization initiated from the neighboring crystalline regions wherever the size of the latter surpasses a certain critical value.

  19. Four-dimensional Langevin dynamics of heavy-ion-induced fission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nadtochy, P. N.; Ryabov, E. G.; Gegechkori, A. E.; Anischenko, Yu. A.; Adeev, G. D.

    2012-06-01

    A four-dimensional dynamical model based on Langevin equations was developed and applied to calculate a wide set of experimental observables for the reactions 16O+208Pb→224Th and 16O+232Th→248Cf over a wide range of excitation energy. The fusion-fission and evaporation residue cross sections, fission fragment mass-energy distribution parameters, prescission neutron multiplicities, and anisotropy of angular distribution of fission fragments could be reasonably reproduced using a modified one-body mechanism for nuclear friction with a reduction coefficient of the contribution from a wall formula ks≃0.25 and a dissipation coefficient for the orientation degree of freedom (K coordinate) γK≃ 0.077 (MeVzs)-1/2. Inclusion of the K coordinate into calculation of potential energy changes the stiffness of the nucleus with respect to mass asymmetry coordinate for the values of K≠0 and results in a shift of the Businaro-Gallone point towards larger Z2/A values. The experimental data on the fission fragment mass-energy distribution parameters together with mean prescission neutron multiplicity for heavy fissioning nuclei are reproduced through the four-dimensional Langevin calculations more accurately than through three-dimensional calculations.

  20. Nanoclay and swift heavy ions induced piezoelectric and conducting nanochannel based polymeric membrane for fuel cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jana, Karun Kumar; Srivastava, Anshuman; Parkash, Om; Avasthi, Devesh K.; Rana, Dipak; Shahi, Vinod K.; Maiti, Pralay

    2016-01-01

    Through nanochannels are fabricated in poly(vinylidene fluoride-co-hexafluoro propylene) films by bombarding swift heavy ions (SHI) of energy 80 MeV and thereby creating latent tracks in the ion passage followed by chemical etching of the amorphous track. The dimension of the nanochannel is varied from 34 to 65 nm using different fluences and by dispersing organically modified nanoclay in polymer matrix. The nanochannels are grafted with polystyrene using the free radicals caused by SHI irradiation followed by their sulfonation. Nanoclay nucleates piezoelectric β-phase in copolymer whose extent gets enhanced after irradiation, grafting and sulfonation leading to a better material. The efficiency of functionalized nanochannel conduction is studied through dc conductivity of the bulk film in the semiconducting range against the insulating nature of the pristine copolymer. Current-voltage (I-V) characteristic of the membrane exhibits strong fluence dependency and shows superior conduction in functionalized nanohybrid. Proton conductivity of the functionalized nanohybrid is 6.2 × 10-2 S cm-1, while methanol permeability drastically reduces indicating higher values of the selective parameter of the developed membrane as compared to Nafion. Membrane electrode assembly studies of functionalized nanohybrid show 0.63 V as open circuit voltage leading to power density of 30.8 mW/cm2, considerably higher than the functionalized copolymer.

  1. Heavy-Ions induced SEE effects measurements for the STRURED ASIC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Robertis, G.; Ranieri, A.; Gabrielli, A.; Candelori, A.; Mattiazzo, S.; Pantano, D.; Tessaro, M.

    2011-06-01

    With the aim of developing a radiation-tolerant circuit, a digital test microelectronic device has been designed and fabricated by using a standard-cell library of a 130-nm CMOS technology, including three different architectures to correct circuit malfunctions induced by the occurrence of Single-Event Effects (SEE's). SEE's are one of the main reasons of failures affecting electronic circuits operating in harsh radiation environments, such as in experiments performed at High Energy Physics (HEP) colliders or in apparatus to be operated in Space. On the same digital circuit specifically designed, three redundant architectures added to a basic scheme have been implemented in order to evaluate their effectiveness to prevent SEE. This may give an indication on their usage in future digital circuits specifically designed for the above mentioned applications. We present the results of SEE cross section measurements performed on a test digital device exposed to a high energy heavy ion beam at the SIRAD irradiation facility of the INFN National Laboratories of Legnaro (Padova Italy).

  2. Swift heavy ion induced structural and chemical changes in BOPP film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chawla, S.; Ghosh, A. K.; Ahmad, S.; Avasthi, D. K.

    2006-03-01

    Swift heavy ions (SHIs), such as, 80 MeV Si7+ and 120 MeV Ag9+ ions were used to irradiate 15 μm bi-axially oriented polypropylene (BOPP) films. The fluence (Φ) dependence of the structural and chemical changes in BOPP was investigated. The irradiated BOPP films were analyzed ex situ by means of FTIR, UV and DSC. Due to SHI irradiation, the isotactic helical structure of polypropylene (PP) gets reduced. PP undergoes distortion of its crystal lattice in magnitude proportional to the fluence. The scission of C-H bonds and production of unsaturated groups like dienes and trienes occurred after irradiation with Si ions for Φ ⩾ 1012 ions/cm2 and Ag ions for Φ ⩾ 1011 ions/cm2. It was found that Ag ions are better than Si ions for creation of free radical active sites on BOPP. The observed findings are very useful particularly in the selection of optimum experimental conditions for SHI induced graft copolymerization.

  3. In situ study of heavy ion induced radiation damage in NF616 (P92) alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Topbasi, Cem; Motta, Arthur T.; Kirk, Mark A.

    2012-06-01

    NF616 is a nominal 9Cr ferritic-martensitic steel that is amongst the primary candidates for cladding and duct applications in the Sodium-Cooled Fast Reactor, one of the Generation IV nuclear energy systems. In this study, an in situ investigation of the microstructure evolution in NF616 under heavy ion irradiation has been conducted. NF616 was irradiated to 8.4 dpa at 50 K and to 7.6 dpa at 473 K with 1 MeV Kr ions. Nano-sized defects first appeared as white dots in dark-field TEM images and their areal density increased until saturation (˜6 dpa). Dynamic observations at 50 K and 473 K showed appearance and disappearance of TEM-visible defect clusters under irradiation that continued above saturation dose. Quantitative analysis showed no significant change in the average size (˜3-4 nm) and distribution of defect clusters with increasing dose at 50 K and 473 K. These results indicate a cascade-driven process of microstructure evolution under irradiation in these alloys that involves both the formation of TEM-visible defect clusters by various degrees of cascade overlap and cascade induced defect cluster elimination. According to this mechanism, saturation of defect cluster density is reached when the rate of defect cluster formation by overlap is equal to the rate of cluster elimination during irradiation.

  4. Dynamical simulation of energy dissipation in asymmetric heavy-ion induced fission of {sup 200}Pb, {sup 213}Fr, and {sup 251}Es

    SciTech Connect

    Mirfathi, S. M.; Pahlavani, M. R.

    2008-12-15

    The dynamical model based on the asymmetric mass division has been applied to calculate pre-scission neutron multiplicity from heavy-ion induced fusion-fission reactions. Links between the pre-scission neutron multiplicity, excitation energy, and asymmetric mass distribution are clarified based on the Monte Carlo simulation and Langevin dynamics. The pre-scission neutron multiplicity is calculated and compared with the respective experimental data over a wide range of excitation energy and nonconstant viscosity. The analysis indicates a different effect for the application of asymmetric mass division in different energy regions of such processes.

  5. Oxide thickness dependence of swift heavy ion-induced surface tracks formation in silicon dioxide on silicon structures at grazing incidence

    SciTech Connect

    Carvalho, A. M. J. F.; Touboul, A. D.; Marinoni, M.; Ramonda, M.; Guasch, C.; Saigne, F.; Bonnet, J.; Gasiot, J.

    2007-12-15

    The influence of the oxide thickness in the surface tracks formation in thin silicon dioxide layered-silicon substrate (SiO{sub 2}-Si) irradiated with swift heavy ion is dealt with. In this respect, SiO{sub 2}-Si samples with different oxide thicknesses have been characterized using atomic force microscopy before and after 7.51 MeV/u Xe ion irradiation at a grazing incident angle of 1 deg. relative to the surface plane. Experimental evidence of the existence of a threshold thickness in the formation of swift heavy ion-induced surface tracks has been addressed and discussed according to the thermal spike theory. This experimental upshot can be helpful when assessing metal-oxide-semiconductor ultrathin-gate oxide reliability issues and for growth of silicon-based nanostructures.

  6. Investigations on heavy ion induced Single-Event Transients (SETs) in highly-scaled FinFETs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaillardin, M.; Raine, M.; Paillet, P.; Adell, P. C.; Girard, S.; Duhamel, O.; Andrieu, F.; Barraud, S.; Faynot, O.

    2015-12-01

    We investigate Single-Event Transients (SET) in different designs of multiple-gate devices made of FinFETs with various geometries. Heavy ion experimental results are explained by using a thorough charge collection analysis of fast transients measured on dedicated test structures. Multi-level simulations are performed to get new insights into the charge collection mechanisms in multiple-gate devices. Implications for multiple-gate device design hardening are finally discussed.

  7. Fusion hindrance and quasi-fission in heavy-ion induced reactions: disentangling the effect of different parameters

    SciTech Connect

    Fioretto, E.; Stefanini, A. M.; Behera, B. R.; Corradi, L.; Gadea, A.; Latina, A.; Trotta, M.; Beghini, S.; Montagnoli, G.; Scarlassara, F.; Chizhov, A. Yu.; Itkis, I. M.; Itkis, M. G.; Kniajeva, G. N.; Kondratiev, N. A.; Kozulin, E. M.; Pokrovsky, I. V.; Sagaidak, R. N.; Voskressensky, V. M.; Courtin, S.

    2006-04-26

    Experimental results on the fusion inhibition effect near the Coulomb barrier due to the onset of the quasi-fission mechanism are presented. The investigation was focused on reactions induced by 48Ca projectiles on different heavy targets and comparing them to reactions induced by light ions such as 12C and 16O leading to the same compound nuclei. Cross sections and angular distributions of evaporation residues and fission fragments have been measured.

  8. [Reaction mechanism studies of heavy ion induced nuclear reactions]. [Dept. of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Univ. of Maryland, College Park, Maryland

    SciTech Connect

    Mignerey, A.C.

    1993-02-01

    Completed work is summarized on the topics of excitation energy division in deep-inelastic reactions and the onset of multifragmentation in La-induced reactions at E/A = 45 MeV. Magnetic fields are being calculated for the PHOBOS detector system, a two-arm multiparticle spectrometer for studying low-transverse-momentum particles produced at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider. The Maryland Forward Array is being developed for detection of the reaction products from very peripheral collisions; it consists of two individual units of detectors: the annular silicon detector in front and the plastic phoswich detector at back.

  9. Swift heavy ion induced structural and luminescence characterization of Y₂O₃:Eu³⁺ phosphor: a comparative study.

    PubMed

    Som, S; Sharma, S K; Lochab, S P

    2014-08-01

    We report a comparative study on structural and thermoluminescence modifications of Y2O3:Eu(3+) phosphor induced by 150 MeV Ni(7+), 120 MeV Ag(9+) and 110 MeV Au(8+) swift heavy ions (SHI) in the fluence range 1 × 10(11) to 1 × 10(13) ions/cm(2). X-Ray diffraction and transition electron microscopy studies confirm the loss of crystallinity of the phosphors after ion irradiation, which is greater in the case of Au ion irradiation. Structural refinement using the Rietveld method yields the various structural parameters of ion-irradiated phosphors. Thermoluminescence glow curves of ion-irradiated phosphors show a small shift in the position of the peaks, along with an increase in intensity with ion fluence. Stopping range of ions in Matter (SRIM) calculations were performed to correlate the change in thermoluminescence properties of various ion-irradiated phosphors. It shows that the defects created by 110 MeV Au(8+) ions are greater in number. Trapping parameters of ion-irradiated phosphors were calculated from thermoluminescence data using various glow curve analysis methods. PMID:24753140

  10. Microsatellite instability in human mammary epithelial cells transformed by heavy ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yanada, S.; Yang, T. C.; George, K.; Okayasu, R.; Ando, K.; Tsujii, H.

    1998-11-01

    We analyzed DNA and proteins obtained from normal and transformed human mammary epithelial cells for studying the neoplastic transformation by high-LET irradiation in vitro. We also examined microsatellite instability in human mammary cells transformed to various stages of carcinogenesis, such as normal, growth variant and tumorigenic, using microsatellite marker D5S177 on the chromosome 5 and CY17 on the Chromosome 10. Microsatellite instabilities were detected in the tumorigenic stage. These results suggest that microsatellite instability may play a role in the progression of tumorigenecity. The cause of the genomic instability has been suggested as abnormalities of DNA-repair systems which may be due to one of the three reasons: 1) alterations of cell cycle regulating genes. 2) mutations in any of the DNA mismatch repair genes, 3) mutation in any of the DNA strand breaks repair genes. No abnormality of these genes and encoded proteins, however was found in the present studies. These studies thus suggest that the microsatellite instability is induced by an alternative mechanism.

  11. Swift heavy ion induced structural and optical properties of Y{sub 2}O{sub 3}:Eu{sup 3+} nanophosphor

    SciTech Connect

    Som, S.; Sharma, S.K.; Lochab, S.P.

    2013-02-15

    Highlights: ► Europium doped yttrium oxide nanophosphor was synthesized via combustion method. ► Prepared nanophosphor was irradiated by 150 MeV Swift heavy ion (Ni{sup 7+}). ► Structural (XRD, FTIR, and TEM) and optical properties (DR and PL) after ion irradiation were studied. ► Band gap increases with ion fluence due to the decrease in average crystallite size. -- Abstract: This paper reports the structural and optical modifications of Y{sub 2}O{sub 3}:Eu{sup 3+} nanophosphor induced by 150 MeV Ni{sup 7+} swift heavy ions (SHI) in the fluence range 1 × 10{sup 11} to 1 × 10{sup 13} ions/cm{sup 2}. The XRD, TEM and FTIR studies confirm the loss of crystallinity of the nanophosphors after ion irradiation. Diffuse reflectance spectrum shows a blue shift in the absorption band for SHI induced nanophosphors. An increase in the intensity of photoluminescence peaks without any shift in the peak positions was observed.

  12. 100 MeV Ni{sup +7} swift heavy ion induced magnetism in cobalt doped ZnO thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, Sunil Singh, D. P.; Kumar, Ravi

    2014-04-24

    Zn{sub 0.90}Co{sub 0.10}O thin films were prepared using Sol-Gel spin coating method. Films were irradiated with 100 MeV Ni{sub +7} Swift Heavy Ions (SHI) with fluences 1× 10{sup 13} ions/cm{sup 2} using 15 UD tandem accelerator at IUAC New Delhi and its effect were studied on the structural, optical and magnetic properties of irradiated thin films. X-ray diffraction studies show single phase films with preferred c-axis orientation after irradiation. Ultraviolet-visible absorption spectroscopy shows red shift in the band gap of irradiated thin films. Magnetic field dependence of magnetization reveals weak ferromagnetism in irradiated thin films. AFM studies shows significant increase in the grain size and the surface roughness of the films after irradiation.

  13. Investigation of dissipation in the tilting degree of freedom from four-dimensional Langevin dynamics of heavy-ion-induced fission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nadtochy, P. N.; Ryabov, E. G.; Adeev, G. D.

    2015-04-01

    A four-dimensional dynamical model based on Langevin equations was applied to calculate a wide set of experimental observables for heavy fissioning compound nuclei. Three collective shape coordinates plus the tilting coordinate were considered dynamically from the ground state deformation to the scission into fission fragments. A modified one-body mechanism for nuclear dissipation with a reduction coefficient ks of the contribution from a ‘wall’ formula was used for shapes parameters. Different possibilities of deformation-dependent dissipation coefficient for the tilting coordinate ({{γ }K}) were investigated. Presented results demonstrate that the influence of the ks and γK parameters on the calculated quantities can be selectively probed. The nuclear viscosity with respect to the nuclear shape parameters influences the \\lt {{n}pre}\\gt , the fission fragment mass-energy distribution parameters, and the angular distribution of fission fragments. At the same time the viscosity coefficient γK affects the angular distribution of fission fragments only. The independence of anisotropy on the fission fragment mass is found at both Langevin calculations performed with deformation-dependent and constant γK coefficients.

  14. Ion-induced nuclear radiotherapy

    DOEpatents

    Horn, Kevin M.; Doyle, Barney L.

    1996-01-01

    Ion-induced Nuclear Radiotherapy (INRT) is a technique for conducting radiosurgery and radiotherapy with a very high degree of control over the spatial extent of the irradiated volume and the delivered dose. Based upon the concept that low energy, ion induced atomic and nuclear reactions can be used to produce highly energetic reaction products at the site of a tumor, the INRT technique is implemented through the use of a conduit-needle or tube which conducts a low energy ion beam to a position above or within the intended treatment area. At the end of the conduit-needle or tube is a specially fabricated target which, only when struck by the ion beam, acts as a source of energetic radiation products. The inherent limitations in the energy, and therefore range, of the resulting reaction products limits the spatial extent of irradiation to a pre-defined volume about the point of reaction. Furthermore, since no damage is done to tissue outside this irradiated volume, the delivered dose may be made arbitrarily large. INRT may be used both as a point-source of radiation at the site of a small tumor, or as a topical bath of radiation to broad areas of diseased tissue.

  15. Ion-induced nuclear radiotherapy

    DOEpatents

    Horn, K.M.; Doyle, B.L.

    1996-08-20

    Ion-induced Nuclear Radiotherapy (INRT) is a technique for conducting radiosurgery and radiotherapy with a very high degree of control over the spatial extent of the irradiated volume and the delivered dose. Based upon the concept that low energy, ion induced atomic and nuclear reactions can be used to produce highly energetic reaction products at the site of a tumor, the INRT technique is implemented through the use of a conduit-needle or tube which conducts a low energy ion beam to a position above or within the intended treatment area. At the end of the conduit-needle or tube is a specially fabricated target which, only when struck by the ion beam, acts as a source of energetic radiation products. The inherent limitations in the energy, and therefore range, of the resulting reaction products limits the spatial extent of irradiation to a pre-defined volume about the point of reaction. Furthermore, since no damage is done to tissue outside this irradiated volume, the delivered dose may be made arbitrarily large. INRT may be used both as a point-source of radiation at the site of a small tumor, or as a topical bath of radiation to broad areas of diseased tissue. 25 figs.

  16. Comprehensive Nuclear Model Code, Nucleons, Ions, Induced Cross-Sections

    2002-09-27

    EMPIRE-II is a flexible code for calculation of nuclear reactions in the frame of combined op0tical, Multistep Direct (TUL), Multistep Compound (NVWY) and statistical (Hauser-Feshbach) models. Incident particle can be a nucleon or any nucleus (Heavy Ion). Isomer ratios, residue production cross sections and emission spectra for neutrons, protons, alpha- particles, gamma-rays, and one type of Light Ion can be calculated. The energy range starts just above the resonance region for neutron induced reactions andmore » extends up to several hundreds of MeV for the Heavy Ion induced reactions.« less

  17. Swift heavy ion induced electron emission from solids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rothard, Hermann; Lanzanò, Gaetano; Gervais, Benoit; De Filippo, Enrico; Caron, Michel; Beuve, Michael

    2015-07-01

    We briefly summarize the results of numerous experiments performed at GANIL aimed at measuring electron yields and doubly differential yields (energy or velocity spectra at different ejection angles, angular distributions). These studies, supported by theoretical investigations and numerical simulations, contributed decisively to our understanding of the very first step in energy deposition in matter, i.e. ionization and subsequent electron transport through condensed matter. The emitted electron spectrum contains a rich variety of features including binary encounter electrons (BEE), convoy electrons (CE), Auger electrons (AE) and the low-energy peak of “secondary” electrons (SE).

  18. Helium-ion-induced human cataractogenesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blakely, E. A.; Daftari, I. K.; Meecham, W. J.; Alonso, L. C.; Collier, J. M.; Kroll, S. M.; Gillette, E. L.; Lee, A. C.; Lett, J. T.; Cox, A. B.

    1994-01-01

    Retrospective and ongoing analyses of clinical records from 347 primary intraocular melanoman patients treated with helium ions at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL) will allow examination of the exposure-response data for human cataract; which is a complication of the therapy from incidental exposure of the lens. Direct particle beam traversal of at least a portion of the lens usually is unavoidable in treatment of posterior intraocular tumors. The precise treatment planned for each patient permits quantitative assessment of the lenticular dose and its radiation quality. We are reporting our preliminary results on the development of helium-ion-induced lens opacifications and cataracts in 54 of these patients who had 10% or less of their lens in the treatment field. We believe these studies will be relevant to estimating the human risk for cataract in space flight.

  19. Presence of hyperplastic pectoral mammary glands in a white-footed mouse (Peromyscus leucopus) from a Superfund Site in Oklahoma, USA.

    PubMed

    Hays, Kimberly A; Breshears, Melanie A

    2011-01-01

    Laboratory experiments have documented the effects of hormones and endocrine-disrupting compounds on mammary development in mammals. However, few observations of mammary hyperplasia have been presented for wild rodents. We describe hyperplastic mammary glands in a wild-caught white-footed mouse (Peromyscus leucopus) from an area contaminated with heavy metals. PMID:21270018

  20. Presence of hyperplastic pectoral mammary glands in a white-footed mouse (Peromyscus leucopus) from a Superfund Site in Oklahoma, USA.

    PubMed

    Hays, Kimberly A; Breshears, Melanie A

    2011-01-01

    Laboratory experiments have documented the effects of hormones and endocrine-disrupting compounds on mammary development in mammals. However, few observations of mammary hyperplasia have been presented for wild rodents. We describe hyperplastic mammary glands in a wild-caught white-footed mouse (Peromyscus leucopus) from an area contaminated with heavy metals.

  1. Mammary Gland Development

    PubMed Central

    Macias, Hector

    2012-01-01

    The mammary gland develops through several distinct stages. The first transpires in the embryo as the ectoderm forms a mammary line that resolves into placodes. Regulated by epithelial/mesenchymal interactions, the placodes descend into the underlying mesenchyme and produce the rudimentary ductal structure of the gland present at birth. Subsequent stages of development – pubertal growth, pregnancy, lactation and involution – occur postnatally under the regulation of hormones. Puberty initiates branching morphogenesis, which requires growth hormone and estrogen, as well as IGF1, to create a ductal tree that fills the fat pad. Upon pregnancy the combined actions of progesterone and prolactin generate alveoli, which secrete milk during lactation. Lack of demand for milk at weaning initiates the process of involution whereby the gland is remodeled back to its pre-pregnancy state. These processes require numerous signaling pathways that have distinct regulatory functions at different stages of gland development. Signaling pathways also regulate a specialized subpopulation of mammary stem cells that fuel the dramatic changes in the gland occurring with each pregnancy. Our knowledge of mammary gland development and mammary stem cell biology has significantly contributed to our understanding of breast cancer and has advanced the discovery of therapies to treat this disease. PMID:22844349

  2. Helium-ion-induced release of hydrogen from graphite

    SciTech Connect

    Langley, R.A.

    1987-01-01

    The ion-induced release of hydrogen from AXF-5Q graphite was studied for 350-eV helium ions. The hydrogen was implanted into the graphite with a low energy (approx.200 eV) and to a high fluence. This achieved a thin (approx.10-nm), saturated near-surface region. The release of hydrogen was measured as a function of helium fluence. A model that includes ion-induced detrapping, retrapping, and surface recombination was used to analyze the experimental data. A value of (1.65 +- 0.2) x 10/sup -16/ cm/sup 2/ was obtained from the detrapping cross section, and a value of (0.5 to 4) x 10/sup -14/ cm/sup 4//atoms was obtained for the recombination coefficient. 11 refs., 4 figs.

  3. Silicon Carbide Power Device Performance Under Heavy-Ion Irradiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lauenstein, Jean-Marie; Casey, Megan; Topper, Alyson; Wilcox, Edward; Phan, Anthony; Ikpe, Stanley; LaBel, Ken

    2015-01-01

    Heavy-ion induced degradation and catastrophic failure data for SiC power MOSFETs and Schottky diodes are examined to provide insight into the challenge of single-event effect hardening of SiC power devices.

  4. Humanization of the mouse mammary gland.

    PubMed

    Wronski, A; Arendt, L M; Kuperwasser, Charlotte

    2015-01-01

    Although mouse models have provided invaluable information on the mechanisms of mammary gland development, anatomical and developmental differences between human and mice limit full understanding of this fundamental process. Humanization of the mouse mammary gland by injecting immortalized human breast stromal cells into the cleared murine mammary fat pad enables the growth and development of human mammary epithelial cells or tissue. This facilitates the characterization of human mammary gland development or tumorigenesis by utilizing the mouse mammary fat pad. Here we describe the process of isolating human mammary stromal and epithelial cells as well as their introduction into the mammary fat pads of immunocompromised mice.

  5. Ion induced spinodal dewetting of thin solid films

    SciTech Connect

    Repetto, Luca; Setina Batic, Barbara; Firpo, Giuseppe; Piano, Emanuele; Valbusa, Ugo

    2012-05-28

    We present experimental data and numerical simulations in order to show that the mechanism of spinodal dewetting is active during ion beam irradiation of thin solid films. The expected scaling law for the characteristic wavelengths versus the initial film thickness is modified by the presence of sputtering. The conclusion is fully supported by model simulation which shows a square law dependence for null sputtering yield and a bimodal trend when sputtering is included. This result is in contrast to earlier studies and opens the possibility to control and use ion induced dewetting for the fabrication of functional nanostructures.

  6. Ductal barriers in mammary epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Owens, Mark B; Hill, Arnold DK; Hopkins, Ann M

    2013-01-01

    Tissue barriers play an integral role in the biology and pathobiology of mammary ductal epithelium. In normal breast physiology, tight and adherens junctions undergo dynamic changes in permeability in response to hormonal and other stimuli, while several of their proteins are directly involved in mammary tumorigenesis. This review describes first the structure of mammary ductal epithelial barriers and their role in normal mammary development, examining the cyclical changes in response to puberty, pregnancy, lactation and involution. It then examines the role of adherens and tight junctions and the participation of their constituent proteins in mammary tumorigenic functions such as migration, invasion and metastasis. Finally, it discusses the potential of these adhesion proteins as both prognostic biomarkers and potential therapeutic targets in breast cancer. PMID:24665412

  7. Chemoprevention of Radiation Induced Rat Mammary Neoplasms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huso, David L.

    1999-01-01

    Radiations encountered in space include protons and heavy ions such as iron as well as their secondaries. The relative biological effect (RBE) of these ions is not known, particularly at the doses and dose-rates expected for planetary missions. Neutrons, are not particularly relevant to space travel, but have been found experimentally to have an increase in their RBE with decreasing dose. If a similar trend of increasing RBE with decreasing dose is present for heavy ions and protons during irradiation in space, the small doses received during space travel could potentially have substantial carcinogenic risk. Clearly more investigation of the effects of heavy ions and protons is needed before accurate risk assessment for prolonged travel in space can be done. One means to mitigate the increased risk of cancer due to radiation exposure in space is by developing effective countermeasures that can reduce the incidence of tumor development. Tamoxifen has recently been shown to be an effective chemopreventive agent in both animal models and humans for the prevention of mammary tumors. Tamoxifen is a unique drug, with a highly specific mechanism of action affecting a specific radiation-sensitive population of epithelial cells in the mammary gland. In human studies, the annual incidence of a primary tumor in the contralateral breast of women with previous breast cancer is about 8 per 1000, making them an exceedingly high-risk group for the development of breast cancer. In this high risk group, treated with tamoxifen, daily, for 2 years, the incidence of a new primary tumor in the contralateral breast was approximately one third of that noted in the non-tamoxifen treatment group. Tamoxifen antagonizes the action of estrogen by competing for the nuclear receptor complex thereby altering the association of the receptor complex and nuclear binding sites. Its effects in reducing the development of breast cancer could be accomplished by controlling clinically undetectable

  8. Immunobiology of the mammary gland.

    PubMed

    Sordillo, L M; Shafer-Weaver, K; DeRosa, D

    1997-08-01

    The mammary gland is a complex organ that provides neonatal offspring with milk for nourishment and disease resistance. Specific and innate immune factors associated with mammary gland tissues and secretion also play a vital role in protecting the gland from infectious disease. Through genetic selection and technological advances in milk removal, the bovine mammary gland yields for more milk than is needed to nourish the newborn calf. This excess is the basis of the dairy industry. Factors associated with the intense management of dairy cattle can profoundly affect mammary gland immunity and the ability of the host to resist mastitis. Technological advances in immunology have led to the availability of new research tools that can facilitate the study of mammary gland immunity and disease pathogenesis. In recent years, considerable research effort has focused on enhancing the natural defense mechanisms of the mammary gland during periods of heightened susceptibility to disease. This paper provides a comprehensive overview of mammary gland immunity with special emphasis on the bovine system. The underlying mechanisms of disease susceptibility and development of potential immunoregulatory strategies to control mastitis are discussed.

  9. Mammary Analogue Secretory Carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Stevens, Todd M; Parekh, Vishwas

    2016-09-01

    Mammary analogue secretory carcinoma (MASC) is a recently described salivary gland tumor that shares the same histologic appearance and ETV6 gene (12p13) rearrangement as secretory carcinoma of the breast. Prior to its recognition, MASC cases were commonly labeled acinic cell carcinoma and adenocarcinoma, not otherwise specified. Despite distinctive histologic features, MASC may be difficult to distinguish from other salivary gland tumors, in particular zymogen-poor acinic cell carcinoma and low-grade salivary duct carcinoma. Although characteristic morphologic and immunohistochemical features form the basis of a diagnosis of MASC, the presence of an ETV6-NTRK3 gene fusion is confirmatory. Given its recent recognition the true prognostic import of MASC is not yet clearly defined. PMID:27575269

  10. /sup 20/neon ion- and x-ray-induced mammary carcinogenesis in female rats

    SciTech Connect

    Shellabarger, C.J.; Baum, J.W.; Holtzman, S.; Stone, J.P.

    1983-01-01

    One of the proposed uses of heavy ion irradiation is to image lesions of the human female breast. The rat model system was chosen to assess the carcinogenic potential of heavy ion irradiation in the belief that data obtained from rat studies would have a qualitatively predictive value for the human female. Accordingly, female rats were exposed to /sup 20/Ne ions at the BEVALAC and studied for the development of mammary neoplasia for 312 +- 2 days at Brookhaven along with rats exposed concurrently to x-irradiation or to no irradiation. As the dose of either type of radiation was increased the percent of rats with mammary adenocarcinomas, and the percent of rats with mammary fibroadenomas, tended to increase. At a prevalence of 20%, the RBE for /sup 20/Neon ions for mammary adenocarcinomas was estimated to be larger than 5 and for mammary fibroadenomas the RBE was estimated to be less than 2. No conclusion was reached concerning whether or not the RBE might vary with dose. We suggest that /sup 20/Ne ions do have a carcinogenic potential for rat mammary tissue and that this carcinogenic potential is likely to be greater than for x-irradiation. (DT)

  11. [A case of malignant melanoma metastasis to the mammary gland].

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Ryota; Kashiwagi, Shinichiro; Ishihara, Sae; Asano, Yuka; Noda, Satoru; Kawajiri, Hidemi; Takashima, Tsutomu; Onoda, Naoyoshi; Ohsawa, Masahiko; Hirakawa, Kosei

    2014-11-01

    Herein, we report a rare case of malignant melanoma metastasis to the mammary gland. A 76-year-old woman had a tumor resection performed for primary malignant melanoma of the epipharynx. The patient subsequently underwent local and lymph node recurrence, for which she received heavy ion radiotherapy and lymph node dissection, respectively. The patient was referred to our hospital for a problem with her right breast. Computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging showed a mammary tumor and multiple subcutaneous tumors. A biopsy was performed, which proved positive for S100 and Melan A staining, and the diagnosis of malignant melanoma was confirmed. Partial mastectomy was performed; and S100, HMB45, and Melan A positivity was confirmed based on immunohistological findings. The diagnosis was malignant melanoma metastasis to the mammary gland. Malignant melanoma commonly metastasizes to the liver, mediastinum, mediastinal glands, lung, and brain; and metastasis to the mammary gland is rare. To our knowledge, only 2 cases have previously been reported in the Japanese literature.

  12. Ion-induced electron emission ERDA with a nuclear microprobe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bogdanović Radović, I.; Medunić, Z.; Jakšić, M.; Siketić, Z.; Skukan, N.

    2005-04-01

    With intention to be used for the 3D analysis of hydrogen, a new ion-induced electron emission (IEE) ERDA system has been installed on the nuclear microprobe. A better depth resolution has been obtained with IEE particle identification system when compared to conventional ERDA systems that use stopping foil. Spectra of the forward scattered ions as well as the recoiled atoms are collected using the same particle detector. This simplifies normalization needed for quantitative analysis without the use of an additional detector. However, well defined but rather small solid angle of the IEE detector requires higher ion beam currents if sufficient sensitivity for H detection needs to be achieved. High beam currents focused to several micrometer spot size lead to rather high current densities and increased probability of H loss from the sample, which may limit the achievable sensitivity. By positioning IEE ERDA system at 45° instead of 30°, as well as by using heavier ions (O ions instead of He), two orders of magnitude better sensitivity can be obtained without a significant deterioration of depth resolution due to the increased recoil cross-section. In this work, several different sample types containing H have been studied. The capabilities of system for 3D imaging of H in samples have been demonstrated.

  13. Ion-induced nucleation of pure biogenic particles.

    PubMed

    Kirkby, Jasper; Duplissy, Jonathan; Sengupta, Kamalika; Frege, Carla; Gordon, Hamish; Williamson, Christina; Heinritzi, Martin; Simon, Mario; Yan, Chao; Almeida, João; Tröstl, Jasmin; Nieminen, Tuomo; Ortega, Ismael K; Wagner, Robert; Adamov, Alexey; Amorim, Antonio; Bernhammer, Anne-Kathrin; Bianchi, Federico; Breitenlechner, Martin; Brilke, Sophia; Chen, Xuemeng; Craven, Jill; Dias, Antonio; Ehrhart, Sebastian; Flagan, Richard C; Franchin, Alessandro; Fuchs, Claudia; Guida, Roberto; Hakala, Jani; Hoyle, Christopher R; Jokinen, Tuija; Junninen, Heikki; Kangasluoma, Juha; Kim, Jaeseok; Krapf, Manuel; Kürten, Andreas; Laaksonen, Ari; Lehtipalo, Katrianne; Makhmutov, Vladimir; Mathot, Serge; Molteni, Ugo; Onnela, Antti; Peräkylä, Otso; Piel, Felix; Petäjä, Tuukka; Praplan, Arnaud P; Pringle, Kirsty; Rap, Alexandru; Richards, Nigel A D; Riipinen, Ilona; Rissanen, Matti P; Rondo, Linda; Sarnela, Nina; Schobesberger, Siegfried; Scott, Catherine E; Seinfeld, John H; Sipilä, Mikko; Steiner, Gerhard; Stozhkov, Yuri; Stratmann, Frank; Tomé, Antonio; Virtanen, Annele; Vogel, Alexander L; Wagner, Andrea C; Wagner, Paul E; Weingartner, Ernest; Wimmer, Daniela; Winkler, Paul M; Ye, Penglin; Zhang, Xuan; Hansel, Armin; Dommen, Josef; Donahue, Neil M; Worsnop, Douglas R; Baltensperger, Urs; Kulmala, Markku; Carslaw, Kenneth S; Curtius, Joachim

    2016-05-25

    Atmospheric aerosols and their effect on clouds are thought to be important for anthropogenic radiative forcing of the climate, yet remain poorly understood. Globally, around half of cloud condensation nuclei originate from nucleation of atmospheric vapours. It is thought that sulfuric acid is essential to initiate most particle formation in the atmosphere, and that ions have a relatively minor role. Some laboratory studies, however, have reported organic particle formation without the intentional addition of sulfuric acid, although contamination could not be excluded. Here we present evidence for the formation of aerosol particles from highly oxidized biogenic vapours in the absence of sulfuric acid in a large chamber under atmospheric conditions. The highly oxygenated molecules (HOMs) are produced by ozonolysis of α-pinene. We find that ions from Galactic cosmic rays increase the nucleation rate by one to two orders of magnitude compared with neutral nucleation. Our experimental findings are supported by quantum chemical calculations of the cluster binding energies of representative HOMs. Ion-induced nucleation of pure organic particles constitutes a potentially widespread source of aerosol particles in terrestrial environments with low sulfuric acid pollution.

  14. Ion-induced nucleation of pure biogenic particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirkby, Jasper; Duplissy, Jonathan; Sengupta, Kamalika; Frege, Carla; Gordon, Hamish; Williamson, Christina; Heinritzi, Martin; Simon, Mario; Yan, Chao; Almeida, João; Tröstl, Jasmin; Nieminen, Tuomo; Ortega, Ismael K.; Wagner, Robert; Adamov, Alexey; Amorim, Antonio; Bernhammer, Anne-Kathrin; Bianchi, Federico; Breitenlechner, Martin; Brilke, Sophia; Chen, Xuemeng; Craven, Jill; Dias, Antonio; Ehrhart, Sebastian; Flagan, Richard C.; Franchin, Alessandro; Fuchs, Claudia; Guida, Roberto; Hakala, Jani; Hoyle, Christopher R.; Jokinen, Tuija; Junninen, Heikki; Kangasluoma, Juha; Kim, Jaeseok; Krapf, Manuel; Kürten, Andreas; Laaksonen, Ari; Lehtipalo, Katrianne; Makhmutov, Vladimir; Mathot, Serge; Molteni, Ugo; Onnela, Antti; Peräkylä, Otso; Piel, Felix; Petäjä, Tuukka; Praplan, Arnaud P.; Pringle, Kirsty; Rap, Alexandru; Richards, Nigel A. D.; Riipinen, Ilona; Rissanen, Matti P.; Rondo, Linda; Sarnela, Nina; Schobesberger, Siegfried; Scott, Catherine E.; Seinfeld, John H.; Sipilä, Mikko; Steiner, Gerhard; Stozhkov, Yuri; Stratmann, Frank; Tomé, Antonio; Virtanen, Annele; Vogel, Alexander L.; Wagner, Andrea C.; Wagner, Paul E.; Weingartner, Ernest; Wimmer, Daniela; Winkler, Paul M.; Ye, Penglin; Zhang, Xuan; Hansel, Armin; Dommen, Josef; Donahue, Neil M.; Worsnop, Douglas R.; Baltensperger, Urs; Kulmala, Markku; Carslaw, Kenneth S.; Curtius, Joachim

    2016-05-01

    Atmospheric aerosols and their effect on clouds are thought to be important for anthropogenic radiative forcing of the climate, yet remain poorly understood. Globally, around half of cloud condensation nuclei originate from nucleation of atmospheric vapours. It is thought that sulfuric acid is essential to initiate most particle formation in the atmosphere, and that ions have a relatively minor role. Some laboratory studies, however, have reported organic particle formation without the intentional addition of sulfuric acid, although contamination could not be excluded. Here we present evidence for the formation of aerosol particles from highly oxidized biogenic vapours in the absence of sulfuric acid in a large chamber under atmospheric conditions. The highly oxygenated molecules (HOMs) are produced by ozonolysis of α-pinene. We find that ions from Galactic cosmic rays increase the nucleation rate by one to two orders of magnitude compared with neutral nucleation. Our experimental findings are supported by quantum chemical calculations of the cluster binding energies of representative HOMs. Ion-induced nucleation of pure organic particles constitutes a potentially widespread source of aerosol particles in terrestrial environments with low sulfuric acid pollution.

  15. Ion-induced nucleation of pure biogenic particles.

    PubMed

    Kirkby, Jasper; Duplissy, Jonathan; Sengupta, Kamalika; Frege, Carla; Gordon, Hamish; Williamson, Christina; Heinritzi, Martin; Simon, Mario; Yan, Chao; Almeida, João; Tröstl, Jasmin; Nieminen, Tuomo; Ortega, Ismael K; Wagner, Robert; Adamov, Alexey; Amorim, Antonio; Bernhammer, Anne-Kathrin; Bianchi, Federico; Breitenlechner, Martin; Brilke, Sophia; Chen, Xuemeng; Craven, Jill; Dias, Antonio; Ehrhart, Sebastian; Flagan, Richard C; Franchin, Alessandro; Fuchs, Claudia; Guida, Roberto; Hakala, Jani; Hoyle, Christopher R; Jokinen, Tuija; Junninen, Heikki; Kangasluoma, Juha; Kim, Jaeseok; Krapf, Manuel; Kürten, Andreas; Laaksonen, Ari; Lehtipalo, Katrianne; Makhmutov, Vladimir; Mathot, Serge; Molteni, Ugo; Onnela, Antti; Peräkylä, Otso; Piel, Felix; Petäjä, Tuukka; Praplan, Arnaud P; Pringle, Kirsty; Rap, Alexandru; Richards, Nigel A D; Riipinen, Ilona; Rissanen, Matti P; Rondo, Linda; Sarnela, Nina; Schobesberger, Siegfried; Scott, Catherine E; Seinfeld, John H; Sipilä, Mikko; Steiner, Gerhard; Stozhkov, Yuri; Stratmann, Frank; Tomé, Antonio; Virtanen, Annele; Vogel, Alexander L; Wagner, Andrea C; Wagner, Paul E; Weingartner, Ernest; Wimmer, Daniela; Winkler, Paul M; Ye, Penglin; Zhang, Xuan; Hansel, Armin; Dommen, Josef; Donahue, Neil M; Worsnop, Douglas R; Baltensperger, Urs; Kulmala, Markku; Carslaw, Kenneth S; Curtius, Joachim

    2016-05-26

    Atmospheric aerosols and their effect on clouds are thought to be important for anthropogenic radiative forcing of the climate, yet remain poorly understood. Globally, around half of cloud condensation nuclei originate from nucleation of atmospheric vapours. It is thought that sulfuric acid is essential to initiate most particle formation in the atmosphere, and that ions have a relatively minor role. Some laboratory studies, however, have reported organic particle formation without the intentional addition of sulfuric acid, although contamination could not be excluded. Here we present evidence for the formation of aerosol particles from highly oxidized biogenic vapours in the absence of sulfuric acid in a large chamber under atmospheric conditions. The highly oxygenated molecules (HOMs) are produced by ozonolysis of α-pinene. We find that ions from Galactic cosmic rays increase the nucleation rate by one to two orders of magnitude compared with neutral nucleation. Our experimental findings are supported by quantum chemical calculations of the cluster binding energies of representative HOMs. Ion-induced nucleation of pure organic particles constitutes a potentially widespread source of aerosol particles in terrestrial environments with low sulfuric acid pollution. PMID:27225125

  16. Insulin receptors in the mammary gland

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, D.H.

    1986-01-01

    Insulin binding studies were conducted using mammary membrane preparations to further the authors understanding of insulin's role in regulating mammary metabolism, particularly ruminant mammary metabolism. Specific objectives were to: (1) characterize insulin binding to bovine mammary microsomes and determine if the specificity and kinetics of binding indicate the presence of insulin receptors in bovine mammary gland; (2) examine and compare insulin binding by liver and mammary microsomes of the pig and dairy cow; (3) examine insulin binding to bovine milk fat globule membranes (MFGM) and evaluate this model's usefulness in assessing insulin receptor regulation in the mammary gland of the cow; (4) examine the effect of dietary fat in insulin binding by rat mammary and liver microsomes. The specificity and kinetics of /sup 125/I-insulin binding of bovine mammary microsomes indicated the presence of insulin receptors in bovine mammary gland. Bovine liver and mammary microsomes specifically bound less /sup 125/I-insulin than did the corresponding porcine microsomes, and mammary microsomes, regardless of species, specifically bound less /sup 125/I-insulin than did liver microsomes. These differences in binding suggest differences in insulin responsiveness between pigs and cattle, as well as between the liver and mammary glands.

  17. Initiation of oncogenic transformation in human mammary epithelial cells by charged particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, T. C.; Georgy, K. A.; Craise, L. M.; Durante, M.

    1997-01-01

    Experimental studies have shown that high linear-energy transfer (LET) charged particles can be more effective than x-rays and gamma-rays in inducing oncogenic transformation in cultured cells and tumors in animals. Based on these results, experiments were designed and performed with an immortal human mammary epithelial cell line (H184B5), and several clones transformed by heavy ions were obtained. Cell fusion experiments were subsequently done, and results indicate that the transforming gene(s) is recessive. Chromosome analysis with fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) techniques also showed additional translocations in transformed human mammary epithelial cells. In addition, studies with these cell lines indicate that heavy ions can effectively induce deletion, break, and dicentrics. Deletion of tumor suppressor gene(s) and/or formation of translocation through DNA double strand breaks is a likely mechanism for the initiation of oncogenic transformation in human mammary epithelial cells.

  18. The Mammary Glands of Macaques

    PubMed Central

    Cline, J. Mark; Wood, Charles E.

    2009-01-01

    This review describes the normal biology and physiology of the mammary gland in macaques, including the typical histologic appearance across the life span (development, reproductive maturity, lactation, and senescence). The molecular events regulating breast morphogenesis are described, as well as systemic and local hormonal regulators of mammary gland proliferation, differentiation, and function. Similarities and differences to the human breast are described. Regulatory events are illuminated by discussion of genetically modified mouse models. Tissue response markers, including immunohistochemical markers of proliferation and other hormonally induced changes and studies to date, regarding the effects of exogenous hormones, are briefly summarized. In general, estrogens stimulate progesterone receptor expression and proliferation in the mammary gland, and combinations of estrogens and progestogens cause greater proliferation than estrogens alone. Evaluation of novel chemical agents in macaques requires careful evaluation of age and hormonal context to avoid the confounding effects of mammary gland development, past reproductive history, and other influences on mammary gland morphology. The expression of proliferation markers and progesterone receptors may be used as biomarkers to measure chemically induced hormonal effects. PMID:21475638

  19. Heavy ion induced Single Event Phenomena (SEP) data for semiconductor devices from engineering testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nichols, Donald K.; Huebner, Mark A.; Price, William E.; Smith, L. S.; Coss, James R.

    1988-01-01

    The accumulation of JPL data on Single Event Phenomena (SEP), from 1979 to August 1986, is presented in full report format. It is expected that every two years a supplement report will be issued for the follow-on period. This data for 135 devices expands on the abbreviated test data presented as part of Refs. (1) and (3) by including figures of Single Event Upset (SEU) cross sections as a function of beam Linear Energy Transfer (LET) when available. It also includes some of the data complied in the JPL computer in RADATA and the SPACERAD data bank. This volume encompasses bipolar and MOS (CMOS and MHNOS) device data as two broad categories for both upsets (bit-flips) and latchup. It also includes comments on less well known phenomena, such as transient upsets and permanent damage modes.

  20. Swift heavy ion induced phase transformation and thermoluminescence properties of zirconium oxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lokesha, H. S.; Nagabhushana, K. R.; Singh, Fouran

    2016-07-01

    Zirconium oxide (ZrO2) powder is synthesized by combustion technique. XRD pattern of ZrO2 shows monoclinic phase with average crystallite size 35 nm. Pellets of ZrO2 are irradiated with 100 MeV swift Si7+, Ni7+ and 120 MeV swift Ag9+ ions in the fluence range 3 × 1010-3 × 1013 ions cm-2. XRD pattern show the main diffraction peak correspond to monoclinic and tetragonal phase of ZrO2 in 2θ range 27-33°. Structural phase transformation is observed for Ni7+ and Ag9+ ion irradiated samples at a fluence 1 × 1013 ions cm-2 and 3 × 1012 ions cm-2 respectively, since the deposited electronic energy loss exceeds an effective threshold (>12 keV nm-1). Phase transition induced by Ag9+ ion is nearly 2.9 times faster than Ni7+ ion at 1 × 1013 ions cm-2. Ag9+ ion irradiation leads two ion impact processes. Thermoluminescence (TL) glow curves exhibit two glows, a well resolved peak at ∼424 K and unresolved peak at 550 K for all SHI irradiated samples. TL response is decreased with increase of ion fluence. Beyond 3 × 1012 ions cm-2, samples don't exhibit TL due to annihilation of defects.

  1. Analysis of Heavy Ion-Induced Chromosome Aberrations in Human Fibroblast Cells Using In Situ Hybridization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, Honglu; Durante, Marco; Furusawa, Yoshiya; George, Kerry; Kawata, Tetsuya; Cucinotta, Francis A.

    2003-01-01

    Confluent human fibroblast cells (AG1522) were irradiated with gamma rays, 490 MeV/nucleon Si, or with Fe ions at either 200 or 500 MeV/nucleon. The cells were allowed to repair at 37 0 C for 24 hours after exposure, and a chemically induced premature chromosome condensation (PCC) technique was used to condense chromosomes in the G2 phase of the cell cycle. Unrejoined chromosomal breaks and complex exchanges were analyzed in the irradiated samples. In order to verify that chromosomal breaks were truly unrejoined, chromosome aberrations were analyzed using a combination of whole chromosome specific probes and probes specific for the telomere region of the chromosome. Results showed that the frequency of unrejoined chromosome breaks was higher after high-LET radiation, and consequently, the ratio of incomplete to complete exchanges increased steadily with LET up to 440 keV/micron, the highest LET value in the present study. For samples exposed to 200 MeV/nucleon Fe ions, chromosome aberrations were analyzed using the multicolor FISH (mFISH) technique that allows identification of both complex and truly incomplete exchanges. Results of the mFISH study showed that 0.7 and 3 Gy dose of the Fe ions produced similar ratios of complex to simple exchanges and incomplete to complete exchanges, values for which were higher than those obtained after a 6 Gy gamma exposure. After 0.7 Gy of Fe ions, most complex aberrations were found to involve three or four chromosomes, indicating the maximum number of chromosome domains traversed by a single Fe ion track. 2

  2. Heavy ion induced damage to plasmid DNA: plateau region vs. spread out Bragg-peak

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dang, H. M.; van Goethem, M. J.; van der Graaf, E. R.; Brandenburg, S.; Hoekstra, R.; Schlathölter, T.

    2011-08-01

    We have investigated the damage of synthetic plasmid pBR322 DNA in dilute aqueous solutions induced by fast carbon ions. The relative contribution of indirect damage and direct damage to the DNA itself is expected to vary with linear energy transfer along the ion track, with the direct damage contribution increasing towards the Bragg peak. Therefore, 12C ions at the spread-out Bragg peak (dose averaged LET∞ = 189 ± 15 keV/ μm) and in the plateau region of the Bragg curve (LET = 40 keV/ μm) were employed and the radical scavenger concentration in the plasmid solution was varied to quantify the indirect effect. In order to minimize the influence of 12C break-up fragments, a relatively low initial energy of 90 MeV/nucleon was employed for the carbon ions. DNA damage has been quantified by subsequent electrophoresis on agarose gels. We find that strand breaks due to both indirect and direct effects are systematically higher in the plateau region as compared to the Bragg peak region with the difference being smallest at high scavenging capacities. In view of the fact that the relative biological effectiveness for many biological endpoints is maximum at the Bragg peak our findings imply that DNA damage at the Bragg peak is qualitatively most severe.

  3. Interplay between as grown defects and heavy ion induced defects in YBCO films

    SciTech Connect

    Crescio, E.; Gerbaldo, R.; Ghigo, G.; Gozzelino, L.; Camerlingo, C.; Monaco, A.; Nappi, C.; Cuttone, G.; Rovelli, A.

    1999-04-20

    The dominating pinning mechanism in YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7{minus}x} thin film has been investigated by means of resistivity and ac susceptibility measurements and by structural characterizations. The aim of the work is to determine optimal pinning conditions in order to prevent the field-induced drop of the critical current density. The Clem and Sanchez model is used to extract critical current values from the susceptibility data. In this framework, the role of columnar-like defects is extensively studied. The formation of columnar pins was promoted by a suitable modification in the preparation process. In addition, columnar tracks of different density were induced by Au-ion irradiation. Analysis of the critical current dependence on the magnetic field reveals that linearly-correlated defects are effective in improving the vortex lattice stability in matching regions of field and temperature.

  4. Comparison of fast cascade plus statistical models for heavy ion induced multifragmentation reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mustafa, M. G.; Blann, M.; Peilert, G.; Botvina, A.

    1994-05-01

    We consider the reaction 36Ar+197Au at incident 36Ar energies of 35, 50, 80, and 110A MeV, comparing calculations of precompound decay using the Boltzmann master equation (BME) and quantum molecular dynamics (QMD) models. We then estimate quasiequilibrated nuclei and excitations using the BME, and use these values as input into statistical multifragmentation models. For the latter we compare sequential binary decay as an extension of the Weisskopf-Ewing evaporation model, and a simultaneous multifragmentation for an expanded low density gas. The exclusive multiplicities predicted by these models are compared with experimental results.

  5. Idiopathic internal mammary artery aneurysm

    PubMed Central

    Heyn, Jens; Zimmermann, Hanna; Klose, Alexander; Luchting, Benjamin; Hinske, Christian; Sadeghi-Azandaryani, Mojtaba

    2014-01-01

    Aneurysms of the internal mammary artery are extremely rare, and their presentation and treatment are variable. Since these aneurysms often tend to rupture and cause haemothorax and life-threatening conditions, the knowledge of secure treatment options is indispensable. We here report the case of an idiopathic internal mammary aneurysm in a 46-year-old man. Open surgical resection of the aneurysm was performed in this case without any complications. The postoperative course was uneventful and the patient was in a good physical condition without any vascular or neurological abnormalities during follow-up. PMID:25452261

  6. Effect of implanted species on thermal evolution of ion-induced defects in ZnO

    SciTech Connect

    Azarov, A. Yu.; Rauwel, P.; Kuznetsov, A. Yu.; Svensson, B. G.; Hallén, A.; Du, X. L.

    2014-02-21

    Implanted atoms can affect the evolution of ion-induced defects in radiation hard materials exhibiting a high dynamic annealing and these processes are poorly understood. Here, we study the thermal evolution of structural defects in wurtzite ZnO samples implanted at room temperature with a wide range of ion species (from {sup 11}B to {sup 209}Bi) to ion doses up to 2 × 10{sup 16} cm{sup −2}. The structural disorder was characterized by a combination of Rutherford backscattering spectrometry, nuclear reaction analysis, and transmission electron microscopy, while secondary ion mass spectrometry was used to monitor the behavior of both the implanted elements and residual impurities, such as Li. The results show that the damage formation and its thermal evolution strongly depend on the ion species. In particular, for F implanted samples, a strong out-diffusion of the implanted ions results in an efficient crystal recovery already at 600 °C, while co-implantation with B (via BF{sub 2}) ions suppresses both the F out-diffusion and the lattice recovery at such low temperatures. The damage produced by heavy ions (such as Cd, Au, and Bi) exhibits a two-stage annealing behavior where efficient removal of point defects and small defect clusters occurs at temperatures ∼500 °C, while the second stage is characterized by a gradual and partial annealing of extended defects. These defects can persist even after treatment at 900 °C. In contrast, the defects produced by light and medium mass ions (O, B, and Zn) exhibit a more gradual annealing with increasing temperature without distinct stages. In addition, effects of the implanted species may lead to a nontrivial defect evolution during the annealing, with N, Ag, and Er as prime examples. In general, the obtained results are interpreted in terms of formation of different dopant-defect complexes and their thermal stability.

  7. Plasma-ion-induced Sputtering And Heating Of Titan'S Atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tucker, Orenthal J.

    2006-09-01

    Plasma-ion-induced sputtering and heating of Titan's atmosphere O.J. Tucker (1), R.E. Johnson (1), M. Michael (1), V.I. Shematovich (1,2) J.H. Luhmann (3), S.A. Ledvina (3) (1) University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA 22904, USA (2) Institute of Astronomy RAS, Moscow 109017, Russia, (3) University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720, USA Titan is unique among the outer solar system icy satellites in having an atmosphere with a column density about ten times that of the Earth's atmosphere. Atmospheres equivalent in size similar to that at Titan would have been removed from the icy Galilean satellites by the plasma trapped in the Jovian magnetosphere (Johnson 2004). In this paper we describe the deposition of energy, the erosion and the expansion of the upper atmosphere of Titan using Direct Simulation Monte Carlo models (Shematovich et al. 2003; Michael et al. 2005). These calculations are used to calibrate semi-empirical models of atmospheric sputtering (Johnson 1994) that can be employed in interpreting Cassini data at Titan. It is shown that the globally averaged flux of magnetospheric and pickup ions deposit more energy in Titan's upper atmosphere than solar radiation. Using a number of plasma conditions, the temperature and density vs. altitude above the exobase and the rate of escape are calculated and compared to available Cassini data. References: Johnson, R.E. "Plasma-induced Sputtering of an Atmosphere" in Space Science Reviews 69 215-253 (1994). Johnson. R.E., “ The magnetospheric plasma-driven evolution of satellite atmospheres” Astrophys. J. 609, L99-L102 (2004). Michael M., R.E. Johnson, F. Leblanc, M. Liu, J.G. Luhmann, and V.I. Shematovich, "Ejection of nitrogen from Titan's atmosphere by magnetospheric ions and pick-up ions", Icarus 175, 263-267 (2005). Shematovich, V.I., R.E. Johnson, M. Michael, and J.G. Luhmann,"Nitrogen loss from Titan", JGR 108, No. E8, 5087, doi:10.1029/2003JE002094 (2003). 1

  8. Mammary candidosis in lactating women.

    PubMed

    Heinig, M J; Francis, J; Pappagianis, D

    1999-12-01

    Though perceived to be a growing problem by lactation professionals, fungal infection of the breast (mammary candidosis) is largely unstudied. Candida albicans, a commensal organism encountered frequently in the vagina and gastrointestinal tract of humans, has been reported to be responsible for both superficial (cutaneous) and localized (ductal) infection of the mammary gland in lactating women, though the latter association is not universally accepted. Severe pain is considered to be characteristic of yeast infection of the breast and may be a cause of premature weaning among lactating mothers. Given that pain is often the complaint that prompts mothers to consult lactation professionals, it is important that healthcare providers working with lactating women be knowledgeable about this disease. In this article, current research regarding yeast infection of the breast is summarized, including morphology and pathology, diagnosis, risk factors, and common treatment options.

  9. Functional adaptations of the transcriptome to mastitis-causing pathogens: the mammary gland and beyond.

    PubMed

    Loor, Juan J; Moyes, Kasey M; Bionaz, Massimo

    2011-12-01

    Application of microarrays to the study of intramammary infections in recent years has provided a wealth of fundamental information on the transcriptomics adaptation of tissue/cells to the disease. Due to its heavy toll on productivity and health of the animal, in vivo and in vitro transcriptomics works involving different mastitis-causing pathogens have been conducted on the mammary gland, primarily on livestock species such as cow and sheep, with few studies in non-ruminants. However, the response to an infectious challenge originating in the mammary gland elicits systemic responses in the animal and encompasses tissues such as liver and immune cells in the circulation, with also potential effects on other tissues such as adipose. The susceptibility of the animal to develop mastitis likely is affected by factors beyond the mammary gland, e.g. negative energy balance as it occurs around parturition. Objectives of this review are to discuss the use of systems biology concepts for the holistic study of animal responses to intramammary infection; providing an update of recent work using transcriptomics to study mammary and peripheral tissue (i.e. liver) as well as neutrophils and macrophage responses to mastitis-causing pathogens; discuss the effect of negative energy balance on mastitis predisposition; and analyze the bovine and murine mammary innate-immune responses during lactation and involution using a novel functional analysis approach to uncover potential predisposing factors to mastitis throughout an animal's productive life.

  10. Evo-devo of the mammary gland.

    PubMed

    Oftedal, Olav T; Dhouailly, Danielle

    2013-06-01

    We propose a new scenario for mammary evolution based on comparative review of early mammary development among mammals. Mammary development proceeds through homologous phases across taxa, but evolutionary modifications in early development produce different final morphologies. In monotremes, the mammary placode spreads out to form a plate-like mammary bulb from which more than 100 primary sprouts descend into mesenchyme. At their distal ends, secondary sprouts develop, including pilosebaceous anlagen, resulting in a mature structure in which mammary lobules and sebaceous glands empty into the infundibula of hair follicles; these structural triads (mammolobular-pilo-sebaceous units or MPSUs) represent an ancestral condition. In marsupials a flask-like mammary bulb elongates as a sprout, but then hollows out; its secondary sprouts include hair and sebaceous anlagen (MPSUs), but the hairs are shed during nipple formation. In some eutherians (cat, horse, human) MPSUs form at the distal ends of primary sprouts; pilosebaceous components either regress or develop into mature structures. We propose that a preexisting structural triad (the apocrine-pilo-sebaceous unit) was incorporated into the evolving mammary structure, and coupled to additional developmental processes that form the mammary line, placode, bulb and primary sprout. In this scenario only mammary ductal trees and secretory tissue derive from ancestral apocrine-like glands. The mammary gland appears to have coopted signaling pathways and genes for secretory products from even earlier integumentary structures, such as odontode (tooth-like) or odontode-derived structures. We speculate that modifications in signal use (such as PTHrP and BMP4) may contribute to taxonomic differences in MPSU development. PMID:23681303

  11. Mammary hypertrophy in an ovariohysterectomized cat.

    PubMed

    Pukay, B P; Stevenson, D A

    1983-05-01

    A four year old ovariohysterectomized domestic short-haired cat under treatment for behavioral urine spraying and idiopathic alopecia developed mammary gland hypertrophy following treatment with megestrol acetate. Withdrawal of the progestin and treatment with androgen failed to cause regression of the hypertrophy. The affected mammary gland was surgically excised and recovery was uneventful.

  12. Heavy ion collisions and the pre-equilibrium exciton model

    SciTech Connect

    Betak, E.

    2012-10-20

    We present a feasible way to apply the pre-equilibrium exciton model in its masterequation formulation to heavy-ion induced reactions including spin variables. Emission of nucleons, {gamma}'s and also light clusters is included in our model.

  13. Preface: Photon and fast Ion induced Processes in Atoms, MOlecules and Nanostructures (PIPAMON)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kövér, László

    2016-02-01

    This Special Issue contains selected papers of contributions presented in the International Workshop on Photon and fast Ion induced Processes in Atoms, MOlecules and Nanostructures (PIPAMON), held between March 24 and 26, 2015 in Debrecen, Hungary. The venue, the Aquaticum Thermal and Wellness Hotel provided a pleasant "all-under-one-roof" environment for the event.

  14. 9 CFR 310.17 - Inspection of mammary glands.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Inspection of mammary glands. 310.17... INSPECTION AND CERTIFICATION POST-MORTEM INSPECTION § 310.17 Inspection of mammary glands. (a) Lactating mammary glands and diseased mammary glands of cattle, sheep, swine, and goats shall be removed...

  15. Mammary and extramammary Paget's disease.

    PubMed

    Lopes Filho, Lauro Lourival; Lopes, Ione Maria Ribeiro Soares; Lopes, Lauro Rodolpho Soares; Enokihara, Milvia M S S; Michalany, Alexandre Osores; Matsunaga, Nobuo

    2015-01-01

    Paget's disease, described by Sir James Paget in 1874, is classified as mammary and extramammary. The mammary type is rare and often associated with intraductal cancer (93-100% of cases). It is more prevalent in postmenopausal women and it appears as an eczematoid, erythematous, moist or crusted lesion, with or without fine scaling, infiltration and inversion of the nipple. It must be distinguished from erosive adenomatosis of the nipple, cutaneous extension of breast carcinoma, psoriasis, atopic dermatitis, contact dermatitis, chronic eczema, lactiferous ducts ectasia, Bowen's disease, basal cell carcinoma, melanoma and intraductal papilloma. Diagnosis is histological and prognosis and treatment depend on the type of underlying breast cancer. Extramammary Paget's disease is considered an adenocarcinoma originating from the skin or skin appendages in areas with apocrine glands. The primary location is the vulvar area, followed by the perianal region, scrotum, penis and axillae. It starts as an erythematous plaque of indolent growth, with well-defined edges, fine scaling, excoriations, exulcerations and lichenification. In most cases it is not associated with cancer, although there are publications linking it to tumors of the vulva, vagina, cervix and corpus uteri, bladder, ovary, gallbladder, liver, breast, colon and rectum. Differential diagnoses are candidiasis, psoriasis and chronic lichen simplex. Histopathology confirms the diagnosis. Before treatment begins, associated malignancies should be investigated. Surgical excision and micrographic surgery are the best treatment options, although recurrences are frequent. PMID:25830993

  16. Mouse mammary tumor biology: a short history.

    PubMed

    Cardiff, Robert D; Kenney, Nicholas

    2007-01-01

    For over a century, mouse mammary tumor biology and the associated Mouse mammary tumor virus (MMTV) have served as the foundation for experimental cancer research, in general, and, in particular, experimental breast cancer research. Spontaneous mouse mammary tumors were the basis for studies of the natural history of neoplasia, oncogenic viruses, host responses, endocrinology, and neoplastic progression. However, lacking formal proof of a human mammary tumor virus, the preeminence of the mouse model faded in the 1980s. Since the late 1980s, genetically engineered mice (GEM) have proven extremely useful for studying breast cancer and have become the animal model for human breast cancer. Hundreds of mouse models of human breast cancer have been developed since the first demonstration, in 1984, that the mouse mammary gland could be molecularly targeted and used to test the oncogenicity of candidate human genes. Now, very few scientists can avoid using a mouse model to test the biology of their favorite gene. The GEM have attracted a new generation of molecular and cellular biologists eager to apply their skills to these surrogates of the human disease. Newcomers often enter the field without an appreciation of the origins of mouse mammary tumor biology and the basis for many of the prevailing concepts. Our purpose in writing this short history of mouse mammary tumor biology is to provide a historical perspective for the benefit of the newcomers. If Einstein was correct in that "we stand on the shoulders of giants," the neophytes should meet their giants.

  17. Beam Energy Scaling on Ion-Induced Electron Yield from K+ Impacton Stainless Steel

    SciTech Connect

    Kireeff Covo, Michel; Molvik, Arthur; Friedman, Alex; Westenskow,Glen; Barnard, John J.; Cohen, Ronald; Grote, David; Lund, Steven M.; Seidl, Peter; Kwan, Joe W.; Logan, Grant; Baca, David; Bieniosek, Frank; Celata, Christine M.; Vay Jean-Luc; Vujic, Jasmina L.

    2006-01-01

    Electron clouds limit the performance of many major accelerators. Significant quantities of electrons result when halo ions are lost to beam tubes, generating gas which can be ionized and ion-induced electrons that can multiply and accumulate, causing degradation or loss of the ion beam. In order to understand the physical mechanisms of ion-induced electron production, experiments studied the impact of 50 to 400 keV K{sup +} ions on stainless steel surfaces near grazing incidence, using the 500 kilovolts Ion Source Test Stand (STS-500) at LLNL. The experimental electron yield scales with the electronic component (dE{sub e}/dx) of the stopping power. A theoretical model is developed, using TRIM code to evaluate dE{sub e}/dx at several depths in the target, to estimate the electron yield, which is compared with the experimental results.

  18. Radiogenic transformation of human mammary epithelial cells in vitro

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, T. C.; Georgy, K. A.; Tavakoli, A.; Craise, L. M.; Durante, M.

    1996-01-01

    Cancer induction by space radiations is a major concern for manned space exploration. Accurate assessment of radiation risk at low doses requires basic understanding of mechanism(s) of radiation carcinogenesis. For determining the oncogenic effects of ionizing radiation in human epithelial cells, we transformed a mammary epithelial cell line (185B5), which was immortalized by benzo(a)pyrene, with energetic heavy ions and obtained several transformed clones. These transformed cells showed growth properties on Matrigel similar to human mammary tumor cells. To better understand the mechanisms of radiogenic transformation of human cells, we systematically examined the alterations in chromosomes and cancer genes. Among 16 autosomes examined for translocations, by using fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) technique, chromosomes 3, 12, 13, 15, 16, and 18 appeared to be normal in transformed cells. Chromosomes 1, 4, 6, 8, and 17 in transformed cells, however, showed patterns different from those in nontransformed cells. Southern blot analyses indicated no detectable alterations in myc, ras, Rb, or p53 genes. Further studies of chromosome 17 by using in situ hybridization with unique sequence p53 gene probe and a centromere probe showed no loss of p53 gene in transformed cells. Experimental results from cell fusion studies indicated that the transforming gene(s) is recessive. The role of genomic instability and tumor suppressor gene(s) in radiogenic transformation of human breast cells remains to be identified.

  19. Ion-induced grain growth and texturing in refractory thin films-A low temperature process

    SciTech Connect

    Seita, M.; Reiser, A.; Spolenak, R.

    2012-12-17

    Selective grain growth can be promoted in thin films independently of the materials intrinsic properties, such as the melting temperature, by ion-irradiation. This enables the previously impossible evolution of large grain-sized microstructures with controlled crystallographic textures even in refractory metals, such as {alpha}-tantalum. Experimental results from materials with different crystal structure are compared on the basis of a theoretical model, which reveals the differences in ion-induced grain-growth dynamics.

  20. The mammary cellular hierarchy and breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Oakes, Samantha R; Gallego-Ortega, David; Ormandy, Christopher J

    2014-11-01

    Advances in the study of hematopoietic cell maturation have paved the way to a deeper understanding the stem and progenitor cellular hierarchy in the mammary gland. The mammary epithelium, unlike the hematopoietic cellular hierarchy, sits in a complex niche where communication between epithelial cells and signals from the systemic hormonal milieu, as well as from extra-cellular matrix, influence cell fate decisions and contribute to tissue homeostasis. We review the discovery, definition and regulation of the mammary cellular hierarchy and we describe the development of the concepts that have guided our investigations. We outline recent advances in in vivo lineage tracing that is now challenging many of our assumptions regarding the behavior of mammary stem cells, and we show how understanding these cellular lineages has altered our view of breast cancer.

  1. Gordon Research Conference on Mammary Gland Biology

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-01-01

    The 1989 conference was the tenth in the series of biennial Gordon Research Conferences on Mammary Gland Biology. Traditionally this conference brings together scientists from diverse backgrounds and experience but with a common interest in the biology of the mammary gland. Investigators from agricultural and medical schools, biochemists, cell and molecular biologists, endocrinologists, immunologists, and representatives from the emerging biotechnology industries met to discuss current concepts and results on the function and regulation of the normal and neoplastic mammary gland in a variety of species. Of the participants, approximately three-fourths were engaged in studying the normal mammary gland function, whereas the other quarter were engaged in studying the neoplastic gland. The interactions between scientists, clinicians, veterinarians examining both normal and neoplastic cell function serves to foster the multi-disciplinary goals of the conference and has stimulated many cooperative projects among participants in previous years.

  2. Mammary gland: From embryogenesis to adult life.

    PubMed

    Musumeci, Giuseppe; Castrogiovanni, Paola; Szychlinska, Marta Anna; Aiello, Flavia Concetta; Vecchio, Giada Maria; Salvatorelli, Lucia; Magro, Gaetano; Imbesi, Rosa

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this review is to focus on the molecular factors that ensure the optimal development and maintenance of the mammary gland thanks to their integration and coordination. The development of the mammary gland is supported, not only by endocrine signals, but also by regulatory molecules, which are able to integrate signals from the surrounding microenvironment. A major role is certainly played by homeotic genes, but their incorrect expression during the spatiotemporal regulation of proliferative, functional and differentiation cycles of the mammary gland, may result in the onset of neoplastic processes. Attention is directed also to the endocrine aspects and sexual dimorphism of mammary gland development, as well as the role played by ovarian steroids and their receptors in adult life.

  3. Genetic component in rat mammary carcinogenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Vogel, H.J. Jr.; Turner, J.E.

    1982-02-01

    Five genetically defined strains of female rats were exposed to whole-body radiation with a single dose of 50 rad of fission neutrons. After 1 year 56% of the Long-Evans and Sprague-Dawely strains showed at least one mammary tumor; 25-29% of the Buffalo and Fischer-344 strains and only 5% of the Wistar-Lewis strain and palpable mammary tumors. Only one tumor was found among 73 unirradiated controls during the 1-year observation period. Approximately two-thirds of 50 mammary analyzed pathologically were adenofibromas and fibroadenomas; one-third were adenocarcinomas. The Kaplan-Meier method of life table analysis was used to deal with the problem of intercurrent mortality. A genetic factor seems evident in rat mammary tumorigenesis following exposure to fission neutrons.

  4. Pleiotrophin (PTN) expression and function and in the mouse mammary gland and mammary epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Rosenfield, Sonia M; Bowden, Emma T; Cohen-Missner, Shani; Gibby, Krissa A; Ory, Virginie; Henke, Ralf T; Riegel, Anna T; Wellstein, Anton

    2012-01-01

    Expression of the heparin-binding growth factor, pleiotrophin (PTN) in the mammary gland has been reported but its function during mammary gland development is not known. We examined the expression of PTN and its receptor ALK (Anaplastic Lymphoma Kinase) at various stages of mouse mammary gland development and found that their expression in epithelial cells is regulated in parallel during pregnancy. A 30-fold downregulation of PTN mRNA expression was observed during mid-pregnancy when the mammary gland undergoes lobular-alveolar differentiation. After weaning of pups, PTN expression was restored although baseline expression of PTN was reduced significantly in mammary glands of mice that had undergone multiple pregnancies. We found PTN expressed in epithelial cells of the mammary gland and thus used a monoclonal anti-PTN blocking antibody to elucidate its function in cultured mammary epithelial cells (MECs) as well as during gland development. Real-time impedance monitoring of MECs growth, migration and invasion during anti-PTN blocking antibody treatment showed that MECs motility and invasion but not proliferation depend on the activity of endogenous PTN. Increased number of mammospheres with laminin deposition after anti-PTN blocking antibody treatment of MECs in 3D culture and expression of progenitor markers suggest that the endogenously expressed PTN inhibits the expansion and differentiation of epithelial progenitor cells by disrupting cell-matrix adhesion. In vivo, PTN activity was found to inhibit ductal outgrowth and branching via the inhibition of phospho ERK1/2 signaling in the mammary epithelial cells. We conclude that PTN delays the maturation of the mammary gland by maintaining mammary epithelial cells in a progenitor phenotype and by inhibiting their differentiation during mammary gland development.

  5. Mammary Adipose Tissue-Derived Lysophospholipids Promote Estrogen Receptor-Negative Mammary Epithelial Cell Proliferation.

    PubMed

    Volden, Paul A; Skor, Maxwell N; Johnson, Marianna B; Singh, Puneet; Patel, Feenalie N; McClintock, Martha K; Brady, Matthew J; Conzen, Suzanne D

    2016-05-01

    Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA), acting in an autocrine or paracrine fashion through G protein-coupled receptors, has been implicated in many physiologic and pathologic processes, including cancer. LPA is converted from lysophosphatidylcholine (LPC) by the secreted phospholipase autotaxin (ATX). Although various cell types can produce ATX, adipocyte-derived ATX is believed to be the major source of circulating ATX and also to be the major regulator of plasma LPA levels. In addition to ATX, adipocytes secrete numerous other factors (adipokines); although several adipokines have been implicated in breast cancer biology, the contribution of mammary adipose tissue-derived LPC/ATX/LPA (LPA axis) signaling to breast cancer is poorly understood. Using murine mammary fat-conditioned medium, we investigated the contribution of LPA signaling to mammary epithelial cancer cell biology and identified LPA signaling as a significant contributor to the oncogenic effects of the mammary adipose tissue secretome. To interrogate the role of mammary fat in the LPA axis during breast cancer progression, we exposed mammary adipose tissue to secreted factors from estrogen receptor-negative mammary epithelial cell lines and monitored changes in the mammary fat pad LPA axis. Our data indicate that bidirectional interactions between mammary cancer cells and mammary adipocytes alter the local LPA axis and increase ATX expression in the mammary fat pad during breast cancer progression. Thus, the LPC/ATX/LPA axis may be a useful target for prevention in patients at risk of ER-negative breast cancer. Cancer Prev Res; 9(5); 367-78. ©2016 AACR. PMID:26862086

  6. Stem cells and the developing mammary gland.

    PubMed

    Makarem, Maisam; Spike, Benjamin T; Dravis, Christopher; Kannan, Nagarajan; Wahl, Geoffrey M; Eaves, Connie J

    2013-06-01

    The mammary gland undergoes dynamic changes throughout life. In the mouse, these begin with initial morphogenesis of the gland in the mid-gestation embryo followed by hormonally regulated changes during puberty and later in adulthood. The adult mammary gland contains a hierarchy of cell types with varying potentials for self-maintenance and differentiation. These include cells able to produce complete, functional mammary glands in vivo and that contain daughter cells with the same remarkable regenerative potential, as well as cells with more limited clonogenic activity in vitro. Here we review how applying in vitro and in vivo methods for quantifying these cells in adult mammary tissue to fetal mammary cells has enabled the first cells fulfilling the functional criteria of transplantable, isolated mammary stem cells to be identified a few days before birth. Thereafter, the number of these cells increases rapidly. Populations containing these fetal stem cells display growth and gene expression programs that differ from their adult counterparts but share signatures characteristic of certain types of breast cancer. Such observations reinforce growing evidence of important differences between tissue-specific fetal and adult cells with stem cell properties and emphasize the merits of investigating their molecular basis.

  7. Mammary gland involution is associated with rapid down regulation of major mammary Ca**2+-ATPases

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Sixty percent of calcium in milk is transported across the mammary cells apical membrane by the plasma membrane Ca**2+-ATPase 2 (PMCA2). The effect of abrupt cessation of milk production on the Ca**2+-ATPases and mammary calcium transport is unknown. We found that 24 hours after stopping milk prod...

  8. Morphological and histological characteristics of mammary dysplasias occurring in cell dissociation-derived murine mammary outgrowths

    SciTech Connect

    Ethier, S.P.; Adams, L.M.; Ullrich, R.L.

    1984-10-01

    The morphological and histological characteristics of ductal dysplasias that were observed in mammary outgrowths derived from monodispersed mammary cells of carcinogen-treated mice are described. Mammary outgrowths were derived by injecting either 10(4) or 10(5) enzymatically dissociated mammary cells, obtained from control or carcinogen-treated BALB/c mice, into gland-free mammary fat pads of syngeneic hosts. The mammary dysplasias observed varied considerably in morphological and histological characteristics. The majority of the lesions were ductal in origin and were associated with epithelial hyperplasia which ranged from mild hyperplasia, in which only a few extra layers of epithelium were present, to severe hyperplasia, in which the ducts and end buds were occluded and distended with epithelial cells. In addition, papillary and lobular lesions were observed which were also associated with varying degrees of hyperplasia. The range of mammary dysplasias observed in these outgrowths closely resembles that of lesions associated with the pathogenesis of mammary carcinoma in mice, rats, and humans.

  9. Mammary Fat Can Adjust Prolactin Effect on Mammary Epithelial Cells via Leptin and Estrogen.

    PubMed

    Feuermann, Yonatan; Mabjeesh, Sameer J; Shamay, Avi

    2009-01-01

    Leptin, like estrogen, is one of the endo/paracrine factors, which are synthesized in and secreted from mature adipocytes. The roles of the mammary fat pad and mammary adipocytes in the initiation of lactation are not clear. In this study, we showed that combination of prolactin, leptin and estrogen elevated the expression of the milk protein beta-lactoglobulin. We also showed that after prolactin stimulate the secretion of leptin from the mammary fat, leptin upregulated the expression of estrogen receptor alpha in the mammary epithelial cells. Also, prolactin affected aromatase mRNA expression in the bovine mammary fat and we demonstrated that leptin and prolactin can affect cholesterol secretion from explants in culture to the medium. Therefore, we suggest that prolactin initiates estrogen expression (as represented by aromatase mRNA) in the mammary fat pad, whereas leptin stimulates estrogen receptor alpha expression in the mammary epithelial cells. We hypothesize that leptin and estrogen, secreted from the mammary fat regulate lactation after stimulation of prolactin. PMID:20049155

  10. Prevalence of Glomerulopathies in Canine Mammary Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The incidence and prevalence of paraneoplastic glomerulopathy, especially associated with carcinoma, are a matter of debate and the causal link between cancer and glomerular diseases remains unclear. The aim of this study was to evaluate renal biopsies of selected bitches with spontaneous mammary gland carcinoma. We hypothesized that dogs with mammary carcinomas would show histologic evidence of glomerular pathology. A prospective study was performed in dogs with naturally occurring mammary carcinoma that were undergoing tumor resection and ovariohysterectomy. We evaluated renal biopsies of 32 bitches with spontaneous mammary gland carcinoma and 11 control dogs without mammary gland neoplasia. Samples were obtained from the left kidney and the biopsy material was divided for light microscopy (LM), immunofluorescence (IF) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Light microscopy abnormalities were identified in 78.1% of dogs with mammary carcinoma (n = 25) and in none of the dogs in the control group. Focal glomerular mesangial matrix expansion was the most common alteration (n = 15, 60.0%), but mesangial cell proliferation (n = 9, 36.0%) and focal segmental glomerulosclerosis (n = 9, 36.0%), synechiae (n = 7, 28.0%), and globally sclerotic glomeruli (n = 6, 24.0%) were also frequent in dogs with malignancy. Immunofluorescence microscopy revealed strong IgM staining was demonstrated in 64.3% (n = 18) of carcinoma dogs. Transmission electron microscopy from dogs with carcinoma revealed slight changes, the most frequent of which was faint sub-endothelial and mesangial deposits of electron-dense material (78%). Mesangial cell interpositioning and segmental effacement of podocyte foot processes were identified in some specimens (45%). Changes in the glomerulus and proteinuria are common in dogs with naturally occurring mammary carcinoma and this condition appears to provide an excellent large animal model for cancer-associated glomerulopathy in humans. PMID:27764139

  11. 9 CFR 310.17 - Inspection of mammary glands.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... mammary glands and diseased mammary glands of cattle, sheep, swine, and goats shall be removed without..., swine, and goats shall not be saved for edible purposes. (d) The udders from cows officially...

  12. Comparative aspects of mammary gland development and homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Capuco, Anthony V; Ellis, Steven E

    2013-01-01

    Mammary glands are crucial to the reproductive strategy of mammals, and the milk of domesticated ruminants serves as an important source of nutrients for the human population. The majority of mammary gland development occurs postnatally, and the mammary gland undergoes cyclical periods of growth, differentiation, lactation, and regression that are coordinated to provide nutrients for offspring or are driven by strategies to manage reproduction and milk production of domesticated species. Growth and maintenance of the mammary epithelium depends on the function of mammary stem cells and progenitor cells. In this review, we provide an overview of postnatal mammary gland development, cyclical phases of mammary gland regression (regression during lactation and between successive lactations), and mammary stem cells and progenitor cells. Where possible, these processes are related to animal production and compared across species, particularly bovine, porcine, murine, and human.

  13. Ion-induced Processing of Cosmic Silicates: A Possible Formation Pathway to GEMS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jäger, C.; Sabri, T.; Wendler, E.; Henning, Th.

    2016-11-01

    Ion-induced processing of dust grains in the interstellar medium and in protoplanetary and planetary disks plays an important role in the entire dust cycle. We have studied the ion-induced processing of amorphous MgFeSiO4 and Mg2SiO4 grains by 10 and 20 keV protons and 90 keV Ar+ ions. The Ar+ ions were used to compare the significance of the light protons with that of heavier, but chemically inert projectiles. The bombardment was performed in a two-beam irradiation chamber for in situ ion-implantation at temperatures of 15 and 300 K and Rutherford Backscattering Spectroscopy to monitor the alteration of the silicate composition under ion irradiation. A depletion of oxygen from the silicate structure by selective sputtering of oxygen from the surface of the grains was observed in both samples. The silicate particles kept their amorphous structure, but the loss of oxygen caused the reduction of ferrous (Fe2+) ions and the formation of iron inclusions in the MgFeSiO4 grains. A few Si inclusions were produced in the iron-free magnesium silicate sample pointing to a much less efficient reduction of Si4+ and formation of metallic Si inclusions. Consequently, ion-induced processing of magnesium-iron silicates can produce grains that are very similar to the glassy grains with embedded metals and sulfides frequently observed in interplanetary dust particles and meteorites. The metallic iron inclusions are strong absorbers in the NIR range and therefore a ubiquitous requirement to increase the temperature of silicate dust grains in IR-dominated astrophysical environments such as circumstellar shells or protoplanetary disks.

  14. Prolactin affects leptin action in the bovine mammary gland via the mammary fat pad.

    PubMed

    Feuermann, Y; Mabjeesh, S J; Niv-Spector, L; Levin, D; Shamay, A

    2006-11-01

    One of the roles of the endocrine system is to synchronize mammary function. Hormones, such as estrogen, progesterone, and prolactin act directly on the mammary gland. Metabolic hormones, such as GH, glucocorticoids, insulin, and leptin are responsible for coordinating the body's response to metabolic homeostasis. Leptin has been shown to be an important factor in regulating the metabolic adaptation of nutrient partitioning during the energy-consuming processes of lactation. In the present study, we show that leptin is secreted from the mammary fat, and is regulated by prolactin. The expression of alpha-casein in a co-culture of epithelial cells and fat explants was enhanced by prolactin compared with that in epithelial cells cultured alone. Leptin antagonist abolished the effect of leptin on alpha-casein expression in mammary gland explants when exogenous leptin was not present in the medium. This finding supports our hypothesis that the antagonist abolishes the action of endogenous leptin secreted by the mammary adipocytes. These results lead us to the hypothesis that prolactin and leptin act in the bovine mammary gland, via mammary fat pad/adipocytes. PMID:17088410

  15. The Cleared Mammary Fat Pad Transplantation Assay for Mammary Epithelial Organogenesis.

    PubMed

    Lawson, Devon A; Werb, Zena; Zong, Yang; Goldstein, Andrew S

    2015-12-01

    Cleared mammary fat pad (MFP) transplantation has been a standard technique for studies of mammary development and cancer for several decades. The mammary gland is comprised of several fundamental components: The epithelial compartment contains basal/myoepithelial cells and luminal cells, and the stromal compartment (called the MFP) contains adipocytes, smooth muscle cells, fibroblasts, and immune cells. In 3- to 4-wk-old female mice, the mammary epithelium is concentrated very close to the nipple and has not yet grown beyond the mammary lymph node to penetrate the bulk of the MFP. This developmental feature provides an anatomical fixed point, and enables one to cut away the portion of the MFP from the nipple to the lymph node, leaving behind the majority of the MFP free of epithelium. The "cleared" MFP can serve as a supportive native microenvironment fully sufficient for the organogenesis of injected donor epithelium. Normal mammary epithelial donor cells will produce histologically and functionally normal mammary ductal epithelium several weeks posttransplant, with the exception that the ducts will not be connected to the nipple. The assay described here provides a powerful platform for assessing the developmental and tumorigenic potential of engineered cells of interest. PMID:26631119

  16. The Cleared Mammary Fat Pad Transplantation Assay for Mammary Epithelial Organogenesis.

    PubMed

    Lawson, Devon A; Werb, Zena; Zong, Yang; Goldstein, Andrew S

    2015-12-02

    Cleared mammary fat pad (MFP) transplantation has been a standard technique for studies of mammary development and cancer for several decades. The mammary gland is comprised of several fundamental components: The epithelial compartment contains basal/myoepithelial cells and luminal cells, and the stromal compartment (called the MFP) contains adipocytes, smooth muscle cells, fibroblasts, and immune cells. In 3- to 4-wk-old female mice, the mammary epithelium is concentrated very close to the nipple and has not yet grown beyond the mammary lymph node to penetrate the bulk of the MFP. This developmental feature provides an anatomical fixed point, and enables one to cut away the portion of the MFP from the nipple to the lymph node, leaving behind the majority of the MFP free of epithelium. The "cleared" MFP can serve as a supportive native microenvironment fully sufficient for the organogenesis of injected donor epithelium. Normal mammary epithelial donor cells will produce histologically and functionally normal mammary ductal epithelium several weeks posttransplant, with the exception that the ducts will not be connected to the nipple. The assay described here provides a powerful platform for assessing the developmental and tumorigenic potential of engineered cells of interest.

  17. Applications of simultaneous ion backscattering and ion-induced x-ray emission

    SciTech Connect

    Musket, R.G.

    1983-05-01

    Simultaneous ion backscattering and ion-induced x-ray emission (E/sub x/greater than or equal to 300 eV) analyses have been performed using helium ions as probes of the first few hundred nanometers of various materials. These studies serve as a demonstration of the complementary nature of the two types of information obtained. Uncertainties associated with each of the individual techniques were reduced by performing both analyses. The principal advantages of simultaneous analyses over sequential analyses have been delineated.

  18. Microstructural evolution in H ion induced splitting of freestanding GaN

    SciTech Connect

    Moutanabbir, O.; Scholz, R.; Senz, S.; Goesele, U.; Chicoine, M.; Schiettekatte, F.; Suesskraut, F.; Krause-Rehberg, R.

    2008-07-21

    We investigated the microstructural transformations during hydrogen ion-induced splitting of GaN thin layers. Cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy and positron annihilation spectroscopy data show that the implanted region is decorated with a high density of 1-2 nm bubbles resulting from vacancy clustering during implantation. These nanobubbles persist up to 450 deg. C. Ion channeling data show a strong dechanneling enhancement in this temperature range tentatively attributed to strain-induced lattice distortion. The dechanneling level decreases following the formation of plateletlike structures at 475 deg. C. Extended internal surfaces develop around 550 deg. C leading to the exfoliation of GaN thin layer.

  19. 9 CFR 310.17 - Inspection of mammary glands.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... mammary glands and diseased mammary glands of cattle, sheep, swine, and goats shall be removed without... accordance with the provisions of part 311 of this subchapter. (c) Lactating mammary glands of cattle, sheep... as “Brucellosis reactors” or as “Mastitis elimination cows” shall be condemned....

  20. Mammary stem cells have myoepithelial cell properties

    PubMed Central

    Prater, Michael D.; Petit, Valérie; Russell, I. Alasdair; Giraddi, Rajshekhar; Shehata, Mona; Menon, Suraj; Schulte, Reiner; Kalajzic, Ivo; Rath, Nicola; Olson, Michael F.; Metzger, Daniel; Faraldo, Marisa M.; Deugnier, Marie-Ange; Glukhova, Marina A.; Stingl, John

    2014-01-01

    Contractile myoepithelial cells dominate the basal layer of the mammary epithelium and are considered to be differentiated cells. However, we observe that up to 54% of single basal cells can form colonies when seeded into adherent culture in the presence of agents that disrupt acin-myosin interactions, and on average, 65% of the single-cell-derived basal colonies can repopulate a mammary gland when transplanted in vivo. This indicates that a high proportion of basal myoepithelial cells can give rise to a mammary repopulating unit (MRU). We demonstrate that myoepithelial cells, flow-sorted using 2 independent myoepithelial-specific reporter strategies, have MRU capacity. Using an inducible lineage tracing approach we follow the progeny of α-smooth muscle actin-expressing myoepithelial cells and show that they function as long-lived lineage-restricted stem cells in the virgin state and during pregnancy. PMID:25173976

  1. Of Microenvironments and Mammary Stem Cells

    SciTech Connect

    LaBarge, Mark A; Petersen, Ole W; Bissell, Mina J

    2007-06-01

    In most adult tissues there reside pools of stem and progenitor cells inside specialized microenvironments referred to as niches. The niche protects the stem cells from inappropriate expansion and directs their critical functions. Thus guided, stem cells are able to maintain tissue homeostasis throughout the ebb and flow of metabolic and physical demands encountered over a lifetime. Indeed, a pool of stem cells maintains mammary gland structure throughout development, and responds to the physiological demands associated with pregnancy. This review discusses how stem cells were identified in both human and mouse mammary glands; each requiring different techniques that were determined by differing biological needs and ethical constraints. These studies together create a robust portrait of mammary gland biology and identify the location of the stem cell niche, elucidate a developmental hierarchy, and suggest how the niche might be manipulated for therapeutic benefit.

  2. Growth of human normal and neoplastic mammary tissues in the cleared mammary fat pad of the nude mouse.

    PubMed

    Outzen, H C; Custer, R P

    1975-12-01

    Dysplastic and malignant human breast tissues were grown successfully in the cleared mammary fat pads (CFP) of nude mice. The mammary fat pads were cleared while the mice were in a germfree isolator. Prepared mice were removed fron the germfree enviornment to facilitate transplantation of the human mammary tissue into their CFP and subsequently were maintained in sterile laminar flow racks.

  3. Beam Energy Scaling of Ion-Induced Electron Yield from K+ Impact on Stainless Steel

    SciTech Connect

    Covo, M K; Molvik, A; Friedman, A; Westenskow, G; Barnard, J J; Cohen, R; Seidl, P; Kwan, J W; Logan, G; Baca, D; Bieniosek, F; Celata, C M; Vay, J; Vujic, J L

    2006-03-06

    Electron clouds limit the performance of many major accelerators and storage rings. Significant quantities of electrons result when halo ions are lost to beam tubes, generating gas which can be ionized and ion-induced electrons that can multiply and accumulate, causing degradation or loss of the ion beam. In order to understand the physical mechanisms of ion-induced electron production, experiments studied the impact of 50 to 400 keV K{sup +} ions on stainless steel surfaces near grazing incidence, using the 500 kV Ion Source Test Stand (STS-500) at LLNL. The experimental electron yield scales with the electronic component (dE{sub e}/dx) of the stopping power and its angular dependence does not follow l/cos({theta}). A theoretical model is developed, using TRIM code to evaluate dE{sub e}/dx at several depths in the target, to estimate the electron yield, which is compared with the experimental results. The experiment extends the range of energy from previous works and the model reproduces the angular dependence and magnitude of the electron yield.

  4. Ion-induced Aerosol-formation By Jet Aircraft: Implications For Contrail- and Cloud-formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eichkorn, S.; Wilhelm, S.; Arnold, F.

    Jet aircraft produced gaseous ions so called chemiions (CI) may promote the forma- tion of volatile aerosol particles (VAP). VAP are potentially important by acting as water vapor condensation nuclei in contrail- and perhaps even cloud-formation. This ion-induced VAP-formation proceeds via the formation of cluster ions which are suf- ficiently large to form stable VAP upon neutralisation by ion-ion recombination. Here we report the first measurements of large cluster ions in sulfur-poor and -rich exhaust plumes of jet aircraft in flight equipped with modern and old engines. Measurements were performed in the wake of an Airbus A340, a Boeing B707 and the German Re- search Aircraft ATTAS. Our measurements suggest that ion induced VAP-formation takes place and that gaseous sulphuric acid and gaseous low volatility organic com- pounds are involved. For modern engines burning fuel with a typical mean fuel sulfur content sulphuric acid seems to be the most abundant condensate in a contrail-free exhaust-plume.

  5. Composite alginate hydrogel microparticulate delivery system of zidovudine hydrochloride based on counter ion induced aggregation

    PubMed Central

    Roy, Harekrishna; Rao, P. Venkateswar; Panda, Sanjay Kumar; Biswal, Asim Kumar; Parida, Kirti Ranjan; Dash, Jharana

    2014-01-01

    Aim: The present study deals with preparation of zidovudine loaded microparticle by counter ion induced aggregation method. During this study effect of polyacrylates and hypromellose polymers on release study were investigated. Materials and Methods: The ion induced aggregated alginate based microparticles were characterized for surface morphology, particle size analysis, drug entrapment study, in-vitro study, Fourier-transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) study. Results and Discussion: The result showed Eudragit RL-100 (ERL) based formulations had smoother surface as well as their mean particle sizes were found greater compared with Eudragit RS-100 (ERS) microparticles. Furthermore, drug entrapments were found to be more in ERL formulae as compared with ERS. RL3 released 101.05% drug over a period of 8th h and followed Higuchi profile and Fickian diffusion. Moreover, data obtained illustrated that, higher amount of quaternary ammonium group, alkali value, and glass transition temperature may be possible reason for improving permeability of ERL based formulations. It was also noticed, hyroxypropyl methylcellulose (HPMC) K4M premium grade polymer sustained drug release more than HPMC K15M. In addition, drug-excipient interaction study was carried out by FTIR and DSC study. PMID:25298940

  6. Conformation and orientation dependence in ion-induced collisions with DNA and RNA building blocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bacchus-Montabonel, Marie-Christine

    2015-04-01

    Action of radiations on biological tissues is of major concern in cancer therapy development. Understanding the mechanisms involved at the molecular level in such reactions may be of crucial interest. In particular ion-induced ionization processes appear at the early stage of damage and a detailed analysis has been performed on the charge transfer dynamics of carbon ions with the different DNA and RNA building blocks in order to analyze their respective behavior in ion-induced collisions. We have considered the pyrimidine nucleobases uracil and thymine and the 5-halouracil molecules corresponding to the same skeleton, as well as the sugar moiety 2-deoxy-D-ribose. The calculations have been performed by means of ab initio quantum chemistry molecular methods followed by a semi-classical collision treatment in a wide collision energy range. Considerations of the structure of the biological target as well as analysis of the anisotropy of the process have been performed. The comparison with proton collisions has been developed with regard to previous results. Qualitative trends of interest for DNA building blocks damage may be pointed out.

  7. Stromal Effects on Mammary Gland Development and Breast Cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiseman, Bryony S.; Werb, Zena

    2002-05-01

    Breast cancer manifests itself in the mammary epithelium, yet there is a growing recognition that mammary stromal cells also play an important role in tumorigenesis. During its developmental cycle, the mammary gland displays many of the properties associated with breast cancer, and many of the stromal factors necessary for mammary development also promote or protect against breast cancer. Here we review our present knowledge of the specific factors and cell types that contribute to epithelial-stromal crosstalk during mammary development. To find cures for diseases like breast cancer that rely on epithelial-stromal crosstalk, we must understand how these different cell types communicate with each other.

  8. Fission and quasifission modes in heavy-ion-induced reactions leading to the formation of Hs{sup *}

    SciTech Connect

    Itkis, I. M.; Kozulin, E. M.; Itkis, M. G.; Knyazheva, G. N.; Bogachev, A. A.; Chernysheva, E. V.; Krupa, L.; Oganessian, Yu. Ts.; Zagrebaev, V. I.; Rusanov, A. Ya.; Goennenwein, F.; Dorvaux, O.; Stuttge, L.; Hanappe, F.; Vardaci, E.; Goes Brennand, E. de

    2011-06-15

    Mass and energy distributions of binary reaction products obtained in the reactions {sup 22}Ne+{sup 249}Cf,{sup 26}Mg+{sup 248}Cm, {sup 36}S+{sup 238}U, and {sup 58}Fe+{sup 208}Pb have been measured. All reactions lead to Hs isotopes. At energies below the Coulomb barrier the bimodal fission of Hs{sup *}, formed in the reaction {sup 26}Mg+{sup 248}Cm, is observed. In the reaction {sup 36}S+{sup 238}U, leading to the formation of a similar compound nucleus, the main part of the symmetric fragments arises from the quasifission process. At energies above the Coulomb barrier fusion-fission is the main process leading to the formation of symmetric fragments for both reactions with Mg and S ions. In the case of the {sup 58}Fe+{sup 208}Pb reaction the quasifission process dominates at all measured energies.

  9. Charge-state dependence of fast heavy-ion-induced desorption yields described in a thermal model

    SciTech Connect

    Nieschler, E.; Nees, B.; Voit, H.

    1988-11-01

    Yields for secondary ions desorbed from valine, tetrabutylammonium tetraphenylborate, and CsI samples by 13- and 30-MeV /sup 16/O ions have been measured as a function of the primary-ion charge state. The experimental data can be reproduced in terms of a simple thermal model.

  10. CLINICOPATHOLOGIC FEATURES OF MAMMARY MASSES IN CAPTIVE LIONS (PANTHERA LEO).

    PubMed

    Sadler, Ryan A; Craig, Linden E; Ramsay, Edward C; Helmick, Kelly; Collins, Darin; Garner, Michael M

    2016-03-01

    A multi-institutional retrospective analysis of 330 pathology accessions from 285 different lions found 15 captive, female African lions (Panthera leo) with confirmed mammary masses. Aside from the presence of a mammary mass, the most common initial clinical sign was inappetence. Histologic diagnoses were predominantly adenocarcinoma (n = 12), though two benign masses (mammary hyperplasia and a mammary cyst) and one squamous cell carcinoma were identified. Nine of 13 malignant tumors had metastasized to lymph nodes or viscera at the time of necropsy. Six lions with adenocarcinoma and two lions with benign mammary masses had received hormonal contraception, though little evidence of mammary lobular hyperplasia was seen in association with the adenocarcinomas. The most common concurrent disease processes found at necropsy were chronic urinary tract disease and other malignancies. These cases demonstrate that mammary malignancies occur in captive lions and frequently metastasize.

  11. Positional variations in mammary gland development and cancer.

    PubMed

    Veltmaat, Jacqueline M; Ramsdell, Ann F; Sterneck, Esta

    2013-06-01

    Most mammals develop their mammary glands in pairs of which the two counterparts are symmetrically displaced away from the ventral midline. Based on this symmetry and the same functional outcome as a milk-producing organ, the mammary glands are easily presumed to be mere copies of one another. Based on our analysis of published data with inclusion of new results related to mammary development and pathology in mice, we argue that this presumption is incorrect: Between and within pairs, mammary glands differ from one another, and tumor incidence and biology depend on the position along the anterior-posterior and the left-right axis as well. This insight has implications for experimental designs with mouse models and for data extrapolation between mammary glands within and between species. We suggest that improved documentation of location-specific mammary gland features will lead to more insights into the molecular mechanisms of mammary gland development and cancer biology in both mice and humans.

  12. CLINICOPATHOLOGIC FEATURES OF MAMMARY MASSES IN CAPTIVE LIONS (PANTHERA LEO).

    PubMed

    Sadler, Ryan A; Craig, Linden E; Ramsay, Edward C; Helmick, Kelly; Collins, Darin; Garner, Michael M

    2016-03-01

    A multi-institutional retrospective analysis of 330 pathology accessions from 285 different lions found 15 captive, female African lions (Panthera leo) with confirmed mammary masses. Aside from the presence of a mammary mass, the most common initial clinical sign was inappetence. Histologic diagnoses were predominantly adenocarcinoma (n = 12), though two benign masses (mammary hyperplasia and a mammary cyst) and one squamous cell carcinoma were identified. Nine of 13 malignant tumors had metastasized to lymph nodes or viscera at the time of necropsy. Six lions with adenocarcinoma and two lions with benign mammary masses had received hormonal contraception, though little evidence of mammary lobular hyperplasia was seen in association with the adenocarcinomas. The most common concurrent disease processes found at necropsy were chronic urinary tract disease and other malignancies. These cases demonstrate that mammary malignancies occur in captive lions and frequently metastasize. PMID:27010273

  13. Proximity potential for heavy ion reactions on deformed nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Baltz, A. J.; Bayman, B. F.

    1982-01-01

    The usual treatment of the deformed optical model for analysis of heavy ion induced inelastic scattering data involves a deformed (target) radius, a spherical (projectile) radius and a potential strength dependent on the surface separation along the line between the two centers. Several authors using various approaches have shown that this center line potential is geometrically inadequate especially for description of higher L deformation parameters probed in heavy ion induced inelastic scattering experiments. A quantitatively adequate form of the deformed proximity potential suitable for use with a coupled channels reaction code in the analysis of inelastic scattering data above the Coulomb barrier is described. A major objective is to be able to extract reliably higher deformed multipole moments from such data. The deformed potential calculated in the folding model will serve as a geometrically exact benchmark to evaluate the accuracy of the proximity potential prescriptions. (WHK)

  14. Mouse Mammary Tumor Virus-Like Nucleotide Sequences in Canine and Feline Mammary Tumors▿

    PubMed Central

    Hsu, Wei-Li; Lin, Hsing-Yi; Chiou, Shyan-Song; Chang, Chao-Chin; Wang, Szu-Pong; Lin, Kuan-Hsun; Chulakasian, Songkhla; Wong, Min-Liang; Chang, Shih-Chieh

    2010-01-01

    Mouse mammary tumor virus (MMTV) has been speculated to be involved in human breast cancer. Companion animals, dogs, and cats with intimate human contacts may contribute to the transmission of MMTV between mouse and human. The aim of this study was to detect MMTV-like nucleotide sequences in canine and feline mammary tumors by nested PCR. Results showed that the presence of MMTV-like env and LTR sequences in canine malignant mammary tumors was 3.49% (3/86) and 18.60% (16/86), respectively. For feline malignant mammary tumors, the presence of both env and LTR sequences was found to be 22.22% (2/9). Nevertheless, the MMTV-like LTR and env sequences also were detected in normal mammary glands of dogs and cats. In comparisons of the MMTV-like DNA sequences of our findings to those of NIH 3T3 (MMTV-positive murine cell line) and human breast cancer cells, the sequence similarities ranged from 94 to 98%. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that intermixing among sequences identified from tissues of different hosts, i.e., mouse, dog, cat, and human, indicated the MMTV-like DNA existing in these hosts. Moreover, the env transcript was detected in 1 of the 19 MMTV-positive samples by reverse transcription-PCR. Taken together, our study provides evidence for the existence and expression of MMTV-like sequences in neoplastic and normal mammary glands of dogs and cats. PMID:20881168

  15. Mammary Stem Cells: A Clinician's View.

    PubMed

    Schneider, José

    2015-01-01

    Mammary stem cells were identified and isolated more than a decade ago and, although much remains to be learned, a lot has been revealed about their properties and behavior. Yet there is a gap between the newly acquired knowledge and its successful clinical application. This chapter presented a critical view from the perspective of a clinician. PMID:26040694

  16. Dietary genistein stimulates mammary development in gilts

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The possible role of the phytoestrogen, genistein, on prepubertal development of mammary glands, hormonal status and bone resorption was investigated in gilts. Forty-five gilts were fed a control diet containing soya (CTLS, n = 15), a control diet without soya (CTL0, n = 15) or the CTLS diet supplem...

  17. Process in high energy heavy ion acceleration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dinev, D.

    2009-03-01

    A review of processes that occur in high energy heavy ion acceleration by synchrotrons and colliders and that are essential for the accelerator performance is presented. Interactions of ions with the residual gas molecules/atoms and with stripping foils that deliberately intercept the ion trajectories are described in details. These interactions limit both the beam intensity and the beam quality. The processes of electron loss and capture lie at the root of heavy ion charge exchange injection. The review pays special attention to the ion induced vacuum pressure instability which is one of the main factors limiting the beam intensity. The intrabeam scattering phenomena which restricts the average luminosity of ion colliders is discussed. Some processes in nuclear interactions of ultra-relativistic heavy ions that could be dangerous for the performance of ion colliders are represented in the last chapter.

  18. Surface sensitivity of ion-induced Auger electron emission (IAE) spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verucchi, R.; Altieri, S.; Valeri, S.

    1995-07-01

    We investigated the electron emission induced by energetic sputter-deposited Si particles during ion beam sputter deposition of Si on Ge substrate. Electron emission is strictly similar to the ion-induced Auger (IAE) Si spectra and originates in SiSi collisions. Monitoring this "IAE-like" Si yield during the Si layer-by-layer growth, we measured the surface sensitivity of particle-induced electron emission for different energies of the involved particles and for different experimental geometries. We found that the depth sampled by IAE spectroscopy critically depends on the experimental parameters. The surface sensitivity of IAE is, in several cases, larger than that of the corresponding, conventional electron-induced Auger electron emission.

  19. Impact of helium implantation and ion-induced damage on reflectivity of molybdenum mirrors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia-Carrasco, A.; Petersson, P.; Hallén, A.; Grzonka, J.; Gilbert, M. R.; Fortuna-Zalesna, E.; Rubel, M.

    2016-09-01

    Molybdenum mirrors were irradiated with Mo and He ions to simulate the effect of neutron irradiation on diagnostic first mirrors in next-generation fusion devices. Up to 30 dpa were produced under molybdenum irradiation leading to a slight decrease of reflectivity in the near infrared range. After 3 × 1017 cm-2 of helium irradiation, reflectivity decreased by up to 20%. Combined irradiation by helium and molybdenum led to similar effects on reflectivity as irradiation with helium alone. Ion beam analysis showed that only 7% of the implanted helium was retained in the first 40 nm layer of the mirror. The structure of the near-surface layer after irradiation was studied with scanning transmission electron microscopy and the extent and size distribution of helium bubbles was documented. The consequences of ion-induced damage on the performance of diagnostic components are discussed.

  20. Molecular dynamics study of accelerated ion-induced shock waves in biological media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Vera, Pablo; Mason, Nigel J.; Currell, Fred J.; Solov'yov, Andrey V.

    2016-09-01

    We present a molecular dynamics study of the effects of carbon- and iron-ion induced shock waves in DNA duplexes in liquid water. We use the CHARMM force field implemented within the MBN Explorer simulation package to optimize and equilibrate DNA duplexes in liquid water boxes of different sizes and shapes. The translational and vibrational degrees of freedom of water molecules are excited according to the energy deposited by the ions and the subsequent shock waves in liquid water are simulated. The pressure waves generated are studied and compared with an analytical hydrodynamics model which serves as a benchmark for evaluating the suitability of the simulation boxes. The energy deposition in the DNA backbone bonds is also monitored as an estimation of biological damage, something which is not possible with the analytical model. Contribution to the Topical Issue "Atomic Cluster Collisions (7th International Symposium)", edited by Gerardo Delgado Barrio, Andrey V. Solov'yov, Pablo Villarreal, Rita Prosmiti.

  1. Calcium ions induce collapse of charged O-side chains of lipopolysaccharides from Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Schneck, Emanuel; Papp-Szabo, Erzsebet; Quinn, Bonnie E.; Konovalov, Oleg V.; Beveridge, Terry J.; Pink, David A.; Tanaka, Motomu

    2009-01-01

    Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) monolayers deposited on planar, hydrophobic substrates were used as a defined model of outer membranes of Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain dps 89. To investigate the influence of ions on the (out-of-plane) monolayer structure, we measured specular X-ray reflectivity at high energy (22 keV) to ensure transmission through water. Electron density profiles were reconstructed from the reflectivity curves, and they indicate that the presence of Ca2+ ions induces a significant change in the conformation of the charged polysaccharide head groups (O-side chains). Monte Carlo simulations based on a minimal computer model of LPS molecules allow for the modelling of 100 or more molecules over 10−3 s and theoretically explained the tendency found by experiments. PMID:19605401

  2. Quantum nature of the sign preference in ion-induced nucleation.

    PubMed

    Nadykto, Alexey B; Al Natsheh, Anas; Yu, Fangqun; Mikkelsen, K V; Ruuskanen, J

    2006-03-31

    Observed first in Wilson's pioneering experiments in the cloud chamber, the sign preference has remained a mystery for more than a century. We investigate the sign preference using a quantum approach and show that this puzzling phenomenon is essentially quantum in nature. It is shown that the effect of the chemical identity of the core ion is controlled by the electronic structure of the core ion through the influence on the intermolecular bonding energies during the initial steps of cluster formation. Our results demonstrate the superiority of the quantum approach and indicate fundamental problems of conventional ion-induced nucleation theories, in which the electronic structure of the core ion is either ignored or not treated rigorously. PMID:16605928

  3. Molecular dynamics study of accelerated ion-induced shock waves in biological media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Vera, Pablo; Mason, Nigel J.; Currell, Fred J.; Solov'yov, Andrey V.

    2016-09-01

    We present a molecular dynamics study of the effects of carbon- and iron-ion induced shock waves in DNA duplexes in liquid water. We use the CHARMM force field implemented within the MBN Explorer simulation package to optimize and equilibrate DNA duplexes in liquid water boxes of different sizes and shapes. The translational and vibrational degrees of freedom of water molecules are excited according to the energy deposited by the ions and the subsequent shock waves in liquid water are simulated. The pressure waves generated are studied and compared with an analytical hydrodynamics model which serves as a benchmark for evaluating the suitability of the simulation boxes. The energy deposition in the DNA backbone bonds is also monitored as an estimation of biological damage, something which is not possible with the analytical model.

  4. Potential for ion-induced nucleation of volatile organic compounds by radon decay in indoor environments

    SciTech Connect

    Daisey, J.M.

    1991-11-01

    There is considerable interest in the unattached'' fraction of radon progeny in indoor air because of its significance to the estimation of the risks of radon exposure. Because of its high mobility in air, the unattached fraction is more efficiently deposited in the respiratory tract. Variation in the diameter of the unattached'' fraction and in its diffusion coefficient can be due to clustering of other atmospheric species around the {sup 218}PoO{sub 2}{sup +} ion. The purpose of this study was to investigate the potential for the formation of clusters of vapor phase organic compounds, found in indoor air, around the {sup 218}PoO{sub 2}{sup +} ion and to determine which were most likely to form clusters. A secondary purpose was to provide a compilation of measurements of indoor organic compounds for future experiments and theoretical calculations by the radon research community. The classical charged liquid droplet theory (Thomson equation) was used to estimate the Gibbs free energy of ion-induced nucleation and to provide an indication of the indoor organic compounds most likely to undergo ion-induced nucleation. Forty-four volatile and semi-volatile organic compounds out of the more than 300 which have been reported in indoor air were investigated. Water vapor was included for comparison. The results indicate that there is a potential for the formation of clusters of organic compounds around the {sup 218}PoO{sub 2}{sup +} ion. The compounds with the greatest potential for cluster formation are the volatile oxidized hydrocarbons (e.g., n-butanol, phenol, hexanal, nonanal, benzaldehyde, the ketones and the acetates) and the semi-volatile organic compounds (pentachlorophenol, nicotine, chlordane, chlorpyrifos).

  5. Potential for ion-induced nucleation of volatile organic compounds by radon decay in indoor environments

    SciTech Connect

    Daisey, J.M.

    1991-11-01

    There is considerable interest in the ``unattached`` fraction of radon progeny in indoor air because of its significance to the estimation of the risks of radon exposure. Because of its high mobility in air, the unattached fraction is more efficiently deposited in the respiratory tract. Variation in the diameter of the ``unattached`` fraction and in its diffusion coefficient can be due to clustering of other atmospheric species around the {sup 218}PoO{sub 2}{sup +} ion. The purpose of this study was to investigate the potential for the formation of clusters of vapor phase organic compounds, found in indoor air, around the {sup 218}PoO{sub 2}{sup +} ion and to determine which were most likely to form clusters. A secondary purpose was to provide a compilation of measurements of indoor organic compounds for future experiments and theoretical calculations by the radon research community. The classical charged liquid droplet theory (Thomson equation) was used to estimate the Gibbs free energy of ion-induced nucleation and to provide an indication of the indoor organic compounds most likely to undergo ion-induced nucleation. Forty-four volatile and semi-volatile organic compounds out of the more than 300 which have been reported in indoor air were investigated. Water vapor was included for comparison. The results indicate that there is a potential for the formation of clusters of organic compounds around the {sup 218}PoO{sub 2}{sup +} ion. The compounds with the greatest potential for cluster formation are the volatile oxidized hydrocarbons (e.g., n-butanol, phenol, hexanal, nonanal, benzaldehyde, the ketones and the acetates) and the semi-volatile organic compounds (pentachlorophenol, nicotine, chlordane, chlorpyrifos).

  6. GH-producing mammary tumors in two dogs with acromegaly.

    PubMed

    Murai, Atsuko; Nishii, Naohito; Morita, Takehito; Yuki, Masashi

    2012-06-01

    Two intact female dogs were admitted for growing mammary tumors. They had symptoms of acromegaly including weight gain, enlargement of the head, excessive skin folds, and inspiratory stridor. Serum concentrations of growth hormone (GH), insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I), and insulin were elevated in the two cases. From these findings, both dogs were diagnosed with acromegaly. In case 1, the GH, IGF-I, and insulin levels subsided after removal of the focal benign mammary tumors and ovariohysterectomy. In case 2, those levels subsided after removal of only focal mammary carcinoma. In both cases, immunohistochemical investigations for GH were positive in the mammary tumor cells but not in the normal mammary glands. We concluded that GH-producing mammary tumors caused the present acromegaly.

  7. Cox-2 levels in canine mammary tumors, including inflammatory mammary carcinoma: clinicopathological features and prognostic significance.

    PubMed

    Queiroga, Felisbina Luisa; Perez-Alenza, Maria Dolores; Silvan, Gema; Peña, Laura; Lopes, Carlos; Illera, Juan Carlos

    2005-01-01

    Cyclo-oxygenase (Cox-2) plays an important role in mammary carcinogenesis, nevertheless, its role in canine mammary tumors, and particularly in inflammatory mammary carcinoma (IMC), is unknown. Tumor Cox-2 levels were analyzed by enzyme immunoassay, in post-surgical tumor homogenates of 129 mammary tumors (62 dysplasias and benign tumors, 57 malignant non-IMC and 10 IMC) from 57 female dogs. The highest Cox-2 values were detected in the IMC group. In non-IMC malignant tumors, high values of Cox-2 were related to skin ulceration (p < 0.001) and tumor size (p < 0.001). The follow-up study revealed that high Cox-2 levels were related with recurrence (p = 0.002), metastases (p < 0.001), disease-free survival (p < 0.001) and overall survival (p < 0.001). This study demonstrates an association between intra-tumor Cox-2 levels and poor prognosis. The high levels found in IMC cases could indicate a special role of Cox-2 in the inflammatory phenotype and open the possibility of additional new therapeutic approaches in this special type of mammary cancer in humans and dogs.

  8. The role of neutralizing antibodies for mouse mammary tumor virus transmission and mammary cancer development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Finke, Daniela; Luther, Sanjiv A.; Acha-Orbea, Hans

    2003-01-01

    Mouse mammary tumor virus (MMTV) infection establishes chronic germinal centers and a lifelong neutralizing Ab response. We show that removal of the draining lymph node after establishment of the germinal center reaction led to complete loss of neutralizing Abs despite comparable infection levels in peripheral lymphocytes. Importantly, in the absence of neutralization, only the exocrine organs mammary gland, salivary gland, pancreas, and skin showed strikingly increased infection, resulting in accelerated mammary tumor development. Induction of stronger neutralization did not influence chronic infection levels of peripheral lymphoid organs but strongly inhibited mammary gland infection and virus transmission to the next generation. Taken together, we provide evidence that a tight equilibrium in virus neutralization allows limited infection of exocrine organs and controls cancer development in susceptible mouse strains. These experiments show that a strong neutralizing Ab response induced after infection is not able to control lymphoid MMTV infection. Strong neutralization, however, is capable of blocking amplification of mammary gland infection, tumor development, and virus transmission to the next generation. The results also indicate a role of neutralization in natural resistance to MMTV infection.

  9. Adipose and mammary epithelial tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Wenting; Nelson, Celeste M

    2013-01-01

    Breast reconstruction is a type of surgery for women who have had a mastectomy, and involves using autologous tissue or prosthetic material to construct a natural-looking breast. Adipose tissue is the major contributor to the volume of the breast, whereas epithelial cells comprise the functional unit of the mammary gland. Adipose-derived stem cells (ASCs) can differentiate into both adipocytes and epithelial cells and can be acquired from autologous sources. ASCs are therefore an attractive candidate for clinical applications to repair or regenerate the breast. Here we review the current state of adipose tissue engineering methods, including the biomaterials used for adipose tissue engineering and the application of these techniques for mammary epithelial tissue engineering. Adipose tissue engineering combined with microfabrication approaches to engineer the epithelium represents a promising avenue to replicate the native structure of the breast.

  10. Cytokine signalling in mammary gland development.

    PubMed

    Watson, Christine J; Oliver, Carrie H; Khaled, Walid T

    2011-03-01

    Mammary gland development occurs in three distinct stages during the lifetime of the female mammal: in embryonic, pubertal and reproductive life. At each of these developmental stages, different signalling molecules induce changes in both the epithelium and the surrounding stroma. However, it is during pregnancy that the most dramatic changes occur, resulting in a massive increase in the number of epithelial cells and in their function. Pregnancy initiates the development of a new epithelial lineage, the alveolar cells, which form the milk-producing lobuloalveolar structures. These cells become redundant at the end of lactation and are removed in an exquisitely controlled process of tissue remodelling coupled with extensive cell death. All of these events require not only steroid hormones but also sequential signalling by cytokines. A recent surprising discovery was that the signalling pathways and cytokines that regulate lineage determination in T helper cells are also involved in mammary gland development during pregnancy.

  11. Adipose and mammary epithelial tissue engineering

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Wenting; Nelson, Celeste M.

    2013-01-01

    Breast reconstruction is a type of surgery for women who have had a mastectomy, and involves using autologous tissue or prosthetic material to construct a natural-looking breast. Adipose tissue is the major contributor to the volume of the breast, whereas epithelial cells comprise the functional unit of the mammary gland. Adipose-derived stem cells (ASCs) can differentiate into both adipocytes and epithelial cells and can be acquired from autologous sources. ASCs are therefore an attractive candidate for clinical applications to repair or regenerate the breast. Here we review the current state of adipose tissue engineering methods, including the biomaterials used for adipose tissue engineering and the application of these techniques for mammary epithelial tissue engineering. Adipose tissue engineering combined with microfabrication approaches to engineer the epithelium represents a promising avenue to replicate the native structure of the breast. PMID:23628872

  12. Bovine mammary stem cells: new perspective for dairy science.

    PubMed

    Martignani, E; Cravero, D; Miretti, S; Accornero, P; Baratta, M

    2014-01-01

    Mammary stem cells provide opportunities for the cyclic remodelling of the bovine mammary gland. Therefore, understanding the character and regulation of mammary stem cells is important for increasing animal health and productivity. The exciting possibility that stem cell expansion can influence milk production is currently being investigated by several researchers. In fact, appropriate regulation of mammary stem cells could hopefully benefit milk yield, persistency of lactation, dry period management and tissue repair. Accordingly, we and others have attempted to characterize and regulate the function of bovine mammary stem cells. However, research on mammary stem cells requires tissue biopsies, which represents a limitation for the management of animal welfare. Interestingly, different studies recently reported the identification of putative mammary stem cells in human breast milk. The possible identification of primitive cell types within cow's milk may provide a non-invasive source of relevant mammary cells for a wide range of applications. In this review, we have summarized the main achievements in this field for dairy cow science and described the interesting perspectives open to manipulate milk persistency during lactation and to cope with oxidative stress during the transition period by regulating mammary stem cells.

  13. Epigenetic regulation of LSD1 during mammary carcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Yadi; Zhou, Binhua P

    2014-01-01

    Inheritable epigenetic regulation is integral to the dynamic control of gene expression under different stimuli for cellular homeostasis and disease progression. Histone methylation is a common and important type of chromatin modification. LSD1, the first known histone lysine-specific demethylase, operates as a key component of several corepressor complexes during development and in disease states. In this review, we focus on the regulation of LSD1 in mammary carcinogenesis. LSD1 plays a role in promoting mammary tumor metastasis and proliferation and in maintaining mammary cancer stem cells. Therefore, LSD1 represents a viable therapeutic target for effective treatment of mammary carcinogenesis. PMID:27308339

  14. Absence of canine papillomavirus sequences in canine mammary tumours.

    PubMed

    Sardon, D; Blundell, R; Burrai, G P; Alberti, A; Tore, G; Passino, E Sanna; Antuofermo, E

    2015-01-01

    Human papillomaviruses (PVs) are found in human breast cancer tissue; however, it remains controversial as to whether these viruses play a role in the aetiology of this tumour. There has been minimal study of whether PVs are found in normal or abnormal mammary glands of animals. The present study investigated whether a PV sequence could be found in the mammary glands of 33 female dogs by rolling circle amplification and polymerase chain reaction. No PV DNA was found in normal or neoplastic canine mammary tissues, suggesting that canine PVs are probably not involved in the pathogenesis of canine mammary neoplasia. PMID:25435511

  15. Establishment of mammary gland model in vitro: culture and evaluation of a yak mammary epithelial cell line.

    PubMed

    Fu, Mei; Chen, Yabing; Xiong, Xianrong; Lan, Daoliang; Li, Jian

    2014-01-01

    This study aimed to establish yak mammary epithelial cells (YMECs) for an in vitro model of yak mammary gland biology. The primary culture of YMECs was obtained from mammary gland tissues of lactating yak and then characterized using immunocytochemistry, RT-PCR, and western blot analysis. Whether foreign genes could be transfected into the YMECs were examined by transfecting the EGFP gene into the cells. Finally, the effect of Staphylococcus aureus infection on YMECs was determined. The established YMECs retained the mammary epithelial cell characteristics. A spontaneously immortalized yak mammary epithelial cell line was established and could be continuously subcultured for more than 60 passages without senescence. The EGFP gene was successfully transferred into the YMECs, and the transfected cells could be maintained for a long duration in the culture by continuous subculturing. The cells expressed more antimicrobial peptides upon S.aureus invasion. Therefore, the established cell line could be considered a model system to understand yak mammary gland biology.

  16. Mammary stem cells: expansion and animal productivity

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Identification and characterization of mammary stem cells and progenitor cells from dairy animals is important in the understanding of mammogenesis, tissue turnover, lactation persistency and regenerative therapy. It has been realized by many investigators that altered lactation, long dry periods (non-milking period between two consecutive lactation cycles), abrupt cessation of lactation (common in water buffaloes) and disease conditions like mastitis, greatly reduce milk yield thus render huge financial losses within the dairy sector. Cellular manipulation of specialized cell types within the mammary gland, called mammary stem cells (MaSCs)/progenitor cells, might provide potential solutions to these problems and may improve milk production. In addition, MaSCs/progenitor cells could be used in regenerative therapy against tissue damage caused by mastitis. This review discusses methods of MaSC/progenitor cell manipulation and their mechanisms in bovine and caprine animals. Author believes that intervention of MaSCs/progenitor cells could lessen the huge financial losses to the dairy industry globally. PMID:25057352

  17. PKA signaling drives mammary tumorigenesis through Src.

    PubMed

    Beristain, A G; Molyneux, S D; Joshi, P A; Pomroy, N C; Di Grappa, M A; Chang, M C; Kirschner, L S; Privé, G G; Pujana, M A; Khokha, R

    2015-02-26

    Protein kinase A (PKA) hyperactivation causes hereditary endocrine neoplasias; however, its role in sporadic epithelial cancers is unknown. Here, we show that heightened PKA activity in the mammary epithelium generates tumors. Mammary-restricted biallelic ablation of Prkar1a, which encodes for the critical type-I PKA regulatory subunit, induced spontaneous breast tumors characterized by enhanced type-II PKA activity. Downstream of this, Src phosphorylation occurs at residues serine-17 and tyrosine-416 and mammary cell transformation is driven through a mechanism involving Src signaling. The phenotypic consequences of these alterations consisted of increased cell proliferation and, accordingly, expansion of both luminal and basal epithelial cell populations. In human breast cancer, low PRKAR1A/high SRC expression defines basal-like and HER2 breast tumors associated with poor clinical outcome. Together, the results of this study define a novel molecular mechanism altered in breast carcinogenesis and highlight the potential strategy of inhibiting SRC signaling in treating this cancer subtype in humans. PMID:24662820

  18. Oxytocin binding sites in bovine mammary tissue

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, Xin.

    1989-01-01

    Oxytocin binding sites were identified and characterized in bovine mammary tissue. ({sup 3}H)-oxytocin binding reached equilibrium by 50 min at 20{degree}C and by 8 hr at 4{degree}C. The half-time of displacement at 20{degree}C was approximately 1 hr. Thyrotropin releasing hormone, adrenocorticotropin, angiotensin I, angiotensin II, pentagastrin, bradykinin, xenopsin and L-valyl-histidyl-L-leucyl-L-threonyl-L-prolyl-L-valyl-L-glutamyl-L-lysine were not competitive. In the presence of 10 nM LiCl, addition of oxytocin to dispersed bovine mammary cells, in which phosphatidylinositol was pre-labelled, caused a time and dose-dependent increase in radioactive inositiol monophosphate incorporation. The possibility that there are distinct vasopressin receptors in bovine mammary tissue was investigated. ({sup 3}H)-vasopressin binding reached equilibrium by 40 min at 20{degree}. The half-time of displacement at 20{degree}C was approximately 1 hr. The ability of the peptides to inhibit ({sup 3}H)-vasopressin binding was: (Thr{sup 4},Gly{sup 7})-oxytocin > Arg{sup 8}-vasopressin > (lys{sup 8})-vasopressin > (Deamino{sup 1},D-arg{sup 8})-vasopressin > oxytocin > d (CH{sub 2}){sub 5}Tyr(Me)AVP.

  19. Mammary stem cells: expansion and animal productivity.

    PubMed

    Choudhary, Ratan K

    2014-01-01

    Identification and characterization of mammary stem cells and progenitor cells from dairy animals is important in the understanding of mammogenesis, tissue turnover, lactation persistency and regenerative therapy. It has been realized by many investigators that altered lactation, long dry periods (non-milking period between two consecutive lactation cycles), abrupt cessation of lactation (common in water buffaloes) and disease conditions like mastitis, greatly reduce milk yield thus render huge financial losses within the dairy sector. Cellular manipulation of specialized cell types within the mammary gland, called mammary stem cells (MaSCs)/progenitor cells, might provide potential solutions to these problems and may improve milk production. In addition, MaSCs/progenitor cells could be used in regenerative therapy against tissue damage caused by mastitis. This review discusses methods of MaSC/progenitor cell manipulation and their mechanisms in bovine and caprine animals. Author believes that intervention of MaSCs/progenitor cells could lessen the huge financial losses to the dairy industry globally.

  20. Proton and Fe Ion-Induced Early and Late Chromosome Aberrations in Different Cell Types

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lu, Tao; Zhang, Ye; Yeshitla, Samrawit; Bowler, Deborah; Kadhim, Munira; Wilson, Bobby; Wu, Honglu

    2016-01-01

    Genomic instability, induced by various metabolic, genetic, and environmental factors, is the driving force of tumorigenesis. Radiation exposure from different types of radiation sources induces different types of DNA damages, increases mutation and chromosome aberration rates, and increases cellular transformation in vitro and in vivo experiments. The cell survival rates and frequency of chromosome aberrations depend on the genetic background and radiation sources. To further understand genomic instability induced by charged particles, we exposed human lymphocytes ex vivo, human fibroblast cells, human mammary epithelial cells, and bone marrow cells isolated from CBA/CaH and C57BL/6 mice to high energy protons and Fe ions, and collected chromosomes at different generations after exposure. Chromosome aberrations were analyzed with fluorescent in situ hybridization with whole chromosome specific probes.

  1. Amplification of mouse mammary tumor virus genomes in non-mammary tumor cells.

    PubMed Central

    Racevskis, J; Beyer, H

    1989-01-01

    Extra proviral copies of mouse mammary tumor virus (MMTV) are known to be present in the genomes of certain T-cell lymphomas of mice. Analysis of additional non-mammary tumor cell types known to express MMTV transcripts and antigens revealed the presence of extra acquired MMTV proviruses in a pituitary tumor cell line, a macrophage line, and Leydig testicular tumor cells. The nature of the amplified MMTV proviruses in these various tumor cell types differed with regard to copy number and presence of alterations in the long terminal repeat region. Images PMID:2535749

  2. Track damage and erosion of insulators by ion-induced electronic processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tombrello, T. A.

    1984-01-01

    Track damage and the associated ejection of atoms and molecules from insulators, which occur as a result of ion-induced electronic excitation, are of interest both in their own right and because of the mechanisms through which the energy in the excited electrons is transformed into atomic motion. In this paper an overview is given of the phenomena that are observed. We show that there is a remarkable similarity between the damage profile along the ion's track in the solid and the yield of ejected atoms at the energy that corresponds to each point on the track. It is also seen that the density of extended defects (or, correspondingly, the ejected particle yield) appears to have a 'universal' form that is weakly dependent on the type of material. In the model presented this is a consequence of the inner-shell ionization of light elements in the solid by the incident ion; the resulting Auger decay produces an intense ionization spike that locally triggers the track formation/erosion process. This model allows the estimation of erosion yields/damage profiles for different ions and materials.

  3. A multiscale crater function model for ion-induced pattern formation in silicon.

    PubMed

    Kalyanasundaram, N; Freund, J B; Johnson, H T

    2009-06-01

    The ion-induced formation of nanometer-scale ripples on semiconductors, long known as the sputter erosion surface instability, is explained using a coupled atomistic-continuum framework. Molecular dynamics simulations of individual medium energy ion impacts on an amorphous silicon target show that the average effect of an incident ion is to leave an ångström-scale crater-like impression on the surface, complete with a crater rim. The summation of many such impacts on a micron-scale surface, combined with the smoothing effect of surface diffusion, leads to the formation of surface ripples aligned perpendicular to the projected ion beam direction. The same numerical approach can be used to evaluate the standard analytical model for this process, known as the Bradley-Harper model. Both Bradley-Harper surface evolution and the atomistically determined crater function surface evolution are computed over time under conditions similar to those for known experimental data. The results show that the surface mass rearrangement associated with the finite atomistic crater rims explains a key experimental observation, ripple amplitude saturation, which cannot be accurately explained using the Bradley-Harper model or any other known numerical or analytical model for the sputter erosion surface instability.

  4. Sign preference in ion-induced nucleation: contributions to the free energy barrier.

    PubMed

    Keasler, Samuel J; Kim, Hyunmi; Chen, Bin

    2012-11-01

    We have performed a series of computer simulations using the AVUS-HR approach to better understand the origin of the sign preference in ion-induced nucleation. In particular, we emphasize the importance of distinguishing between the total formation free energy of a cluster, and the nucleation free energy, which involves only those steps contributing to the free energy barrier. We have separately considered how the ion-water potential energy, the water-water potential energy, and the entropy contribute to both the cluster formation free energy, and the nucleation free energy. These simulations have shown that while the ion-water potential energies make the largest contribution to the formation free energy difference between positive and negative ions, the entropy is the contribution leading to lower nucleation free energy barriers for negative ions. The primary reason for this is the larger stable (but precritical) clusters formed around negative ions. We have further shown that the distinction between formation and nucleation free energies is of particular importance when comparing small cations with larger anions where the formation free energies can be much lower for the cationic clusters, even though the nucleation barriers are lower for the anionic clusters.

  5. Metal ion-induced lateral aggregation of filamentous viruses fd and M13.

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Jay X; Janmey, Paul A; Lyubartsev, Alexander; Nordenskiöld, Lars

    2002-01-01

    We report a detailed comparison between calculations of inter-filament interactions based on Monte-Carlo simulations and experimental features of lateral aggregation of bacteriophages fd and M13 induced by a number of divalent metal ions. The general findings are consistent with the polyelectrolyte nature of the virus filaments and confirm that the solution electrostatics account for most of the experimental features observed. One particularly interesting discovery is resolubilization for bundles of either fd or M13 viruses when the concentration of the bundle-inducing metal ion Mg(2+) or Ca(2+) is increased to large (>100 mM) values. In the range of Mg(2+) or Ca(2+) concentrations where large bundles of the virus filaments are formed, the optimal attractive interaction energy between the virus filaments is estimated to be on the order of 0.01 kT per net charge on the virus surface when a recent analytical prediction to the experimentally defined conditions of resolubilization is applied. We also observed qualitatively distinct behavior between the alkali-earth metal ions and the divalent transition metal ions in their action on the charged viruses. The understanding of metal ions-induced reversible aggregation based on solution electrostatics may lead to potential applications in molecular biology and medicine. PMID:12080143

  6. Modeling ion induced effects in thin films and coatings for lunar and space environment applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, Edward W.; Pirich, Ronald

    2013-09-01

    Protective thin film coatings are important for many near-Earth and interplanetary space systems applications using photonic components, optical elements, solar cells and detector-sensor front surfaces to name but a few environmentally at-risk technologies. The near-Earth and natural space environment consists of known degradation processes induced within these technologies brought about by atomic oxygen, micrometeorite impacts, space debris and dust, solar generated charged particles, Van Allen belt trapped particles, and galactic cosmic radiation. This paper will focus on presenting the results of an investigation based on simulated ion-induced defect-modeling and nuclear irradiation testing of several innovative hybrid-polymeric self-cleaning hydrophobic coatings investigated for application to space photonic components, lunar surface, avionic and terrestrial applications. Data is reported regarding the radiation resistance of several hybrid polymer coatings containing various loadings of nanometer-sized TiO2 fillers for protecting sensors, structures, human and space vehicles from dust contamination found in space and on the Lunar and other planetary surfaces.

  7. Ion-induced folding of the hammerhead ribozyme: a fluorescence resonance energy transfer study.

    PubMed Central

    Bassi, G S; Murchie, A I; Walter, F; Clegg, R M; Lilley, D M

    1997-01-01

    The ion-induced folding transitions of the hammerhead ribozyme have been analysed by fluorescence resonance energy transfer. The hammerhead ribozyme may be regarded as a special example of a three-way RNA junction, the global structure of which has been studied by comparing the distances (as energy transfer efficiencies) between the ends of pairs of labelled arms for the three possible end-to-end vectors as a function of magnesium ion concentration. The data support two sequential ion-dependent transitions, which can be interpreted in the light of the crystal structures of the hammerhead ribozyme. The first transition corresponds to the formation of a coaxial stacking between helices II and III; the data can be fully explained by a model in which the transition is induced by a single magnesium ion which binds with an apparent association constant of 8000-10 000 M-1. The second structural transition corresponds to the formation of the catalytic domain of the ribozyme, induced by a single magnesium ion with an apparent association constant of approximately 1100 M-1. The hammerhead ribozyme provides a well-defined example of ion-dependent folding in RNA. PMID:9405376

  8. Dissection of the ion-induced folding of the hammerhead ribozyme using 19F NMR

    PubMed Central

    Hammann, Christian; Norman, David G.; Lilley, David M. J.

    2001-01-01

    We have used 19F NMR to analyze the metal ion-induced folding of the hammerhead ribozyme by selective incorporation of 5fluorouridine. We have studied the chemical shift and linewidths of 19F resonances of 5-fluorouridine at the 4 and 7 positions in the ribozyme core as a function of added Mg2+. The data fit well to a simple two-state model whereby the formation of domain 1 is induced by the noncooperative binding of Mg2+ with an association constant in the range of 100 to 500 M−1, depending on the concentration of monovalent ions present. The results are in excellent agreement with data reporting on changes in the global shape of the ribozyme. However, the NMR experiments exploit reporters located in the center of the RNA sections undergoing the folding transitions, thereby allowing the assignment of specific nucleotides to the separate stages. The results define the folding pathway at high resolution and provide a time scale for the first transition in the millisecond range. PMID:11331743

  9. The use of low energy, ion induced nuclear reactions for proton radiotherapy applications

    SciTech Connect

    Horn, K.M.; Doyle, B.; Segal, M.N.; Hamm, R.W.; Adler, R.J.; Glatstein, E.

    1995-04-01

    Medical radiotherapy has traditionally relied upon the use of external photon beams and internally implanted radioisotopes as the chief means of irradiating tumors. However, advances in accelerator technology and the exploitation of novel means of producing radiation may provide useful alternatives to some current modes of medical radiation delivery with reduced total dose to surrounding healthy tissue, reduced expense, or increased treatment accessibility. This paper will briefly overview currently established modes of radiation therapy, techniques still considered experimental but in clinical use, innovative concepts under study that may enable new forms of treatment or enhance existing ones. The potential role of low energy, ion-induced nuclear reactions in radiotherapy applications is examined specifically for the 650 keV d({sup 3}He,p){sup 4}He nuclear reaction. This examination will describe the basic physics associated with this reaction`s production of 17.4 MeV protons and the processes used to fabricate the necessary materials used in the technique. Calculations of the delivered radiation dose, heat generation, and required exposure times are presented. Experimental data are also presented validating the dose calculations. The design of small, lower cost ion accelerators, as embodied in `nested`-tandem and radio frequency quadrupole accelerators is examined, as is the potential use of high-output {sup 3}He and deuterium ion sources. Finally, potential clinical applications are discussed in terms of the advantages and disadvantages of this technique with respect to current radiotherapy methods and equipment.

  10. Ferrous ion induced photon emission as a method to quantify oxidative stress in stored boar spermatozoa.

    PubMed

    Gogol, Piotr; Pieszka, Marek

    2008-01-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate the effect of semen storage on ferrous ion induced luminescence of boar spermatozoa and to determine the relationship between parameters of this luminescence and lipid peroxidation as measured by malondialdehyde (MDA) contents. Boar semen samples were diluted in Biosolwens extender and stored for 12 days at 15 degrees C. Luminescence and MDA were measured directly after dilution (day 0) and at 6 and 12 days of semen storage. Luminescence was measured at 20 degrees C using a luminometer equipped with a cooled photomultiplier with a spectral response range from 370 to 620 nm. Emission was induced by adding FeSO4 solution (final concentration 0.05 mM). MDA content was measured by the HPLC method. The day of storage had a significant effect on some luminescence parameters and MDA content in spermatozoa. A significant correlation was observed between luminescence parameters and MDA concentration. The results of the study confirm that induced luminescence is strictly related to lipid peroxidation in spermatozoa that occur during boar semen storage. Parameters of luminescence treated as a holistic response of cells to oxidative stress can be useful for monitoring spermatozoa quality during semen preservation. PMID:19055043

  11. Ion-induced fabrication of silk fibroin nanoparticles from Chinese oak tasar Antheraea pernyi.

    PubMed

    Wang, Juan; Zhang, Shanshan; Xing, Tieling; Kundu, Banani; Li, Mingzhong; Kundu, Subhas C; Lu, Shenzhou

    2015-08-01

    Silk protein fibroin in nanoparticles form is a promising material for drug delivery due to its pleiotropic properties, including biocompatibility, biodegradability, ease in fabrication into smaller diameters, high bioavailability, and therapeutic retention at target sites. In the present study, silk nanoparticles are fabricated from regenerated fibroin solution of the Chinese temperate oak tasar Antheraea pernyi by novel ion-induced self-assembly in a very short time under mild conditions. The resultant fibroin nanoparticles range in size from 100 to 500 nm. The molecular conformation of regenerated fibroin changes from α-helical to a β-sheet structure as a rapid function of the ionic strength and the hydrophobic and electrostatic interactions. The mild conditions are potentially advantageous for the encapsulation of sensitive drugs and therapeutic molecules such as doxorubicin hydrochloride, an amphiphilic anticancer therapeutic. In vitro release of doxorubicin from nanoparticles is pH sensitive, with approx. 65% doxorubicin remaining in the fibroin nanoparticles after 11 days. The activity of fibroin nanoparticles on hepatomas indicates the efficacy of the fibroin nanoparticles to maintain the bioactivity of the loaded doxorubicin and impart a dose-dependent cell growth inhibition. The results suggest that Chinese temperate oak tasar silk fibroin nanoparticles can be used as a sustained drug delivery vehicle.

  12. An autoregulatory enhancer controls mammary-specific STAT5 functions

    PubMed Central

    Metser, Gil; Shin, Ha Youn; Wang, Chaochen; Yoo, Kyung Hyun; Oh, Sumin; Villarino, Alejandro V.; O'Shea, John J.; Kang, Keunsoo; Hennighausen, Lothar

    2016-01-01

    Signal Transducers and Activators of Transcription (STATs) are principal transcription factors downstream of cytokine receptors. Although STAT5A is expressed in most tissues it remains to be understood why its premier, non-redundant functions are restricted to prolactin-induced mammary gland development and function. We report that the ubiquitously expressed Stat5a/b locus is subject to additional lineage-specific transcriptional control in mammary epithelium. Genome-wide surveys of epigenetic status and transcription factor occupancy uncovered a putative mammary-specific enhancer within the intergenic sequences separating the two Stat5 genes. This region exhibited several hallmarks of genomic enhancers, including DNaseI hypersensitivity, H3K27 acetylation and binding by GR, NFIB, ELF5 and MED1. Mammary-specific STAT5 binding was obtained at two canonical STAT5 binding motifs. CRISPR/Cas9-mediated genome editing was used to delete these sites in mice and determine their biological function. Mutant animals exhibited an 80% reduction of Stat5 levels in mammary epithelium and a concomitant reduction of STAT5-dependent gene expression. Transcriptome analysis identified a class of mammary-restricted genes that was particularly dependent on high STAT5 levels as a result of the intergenic enhancer. Taken together, the mammary-specific enhancer enables a positive feedback circuit that contributes to the remarkable abundance of STAT5 and, in turn, to the efficacy of STAT5-dependent mammary physiology. PMID:26446995

  13. An autoregulatory enhancer controls mammary-specific STAT5 functions.

    PubMed

    Metser, Gil; Shin, Ha Youn; Wang, Chaochen; Yoo, Kyung Hyun; Oh, Sumin; Villarino, Alejandro V; O'Shea, John J; Kang, Keunsoo; Hennighausen, Lothar

    2016-02-18

    Signal Transducers and Activators of Transcription (STATs) are principal transcription factors downstream of cytokine receptors. Although STAT5A is expressed in most tissues it remains to be understood why its premier, non-redundant functions are restricted to prolactin-induced mammary gland development and function. We report that the ubiquitously expressed Stat5a/b locus is subject to additional lineage-specific transcriptional control in mammary epithelium. Genome-wide surveys of epigenetic status and transcription factor occupancy uncovered a putative mammary-specific enhancer within the intergenic sequences separating the two Stat5 genes. This region exhibited several hallmarks of genomic enhancers, including DNaseI hypersensitivity, H3K27 acetylation and binding by GR, NFIB, ELF5 and MED1. Mammary-specific STAT5 binding was obtained at two canonical STAT5 binding motifs. CRISPR/Cas9-mediated genome editing was used to delete these sites in mice and determine their biological function. Mutant animals exhibited an 80% reduction of Stat5 levels in mammary epithelium and a concomitant reduction of STAT5-dependent gene expression. Transcriptome analysis identified a class of mammary-restricted genes that was particularly dependent on high STAT5 levels as a result of the intergenic enhancer. Taken together, the mammary-specific enhancer enables a positive feedback circuit that contributes to the remarkable abundance of STAT5 and, in turn, to the efficacy of STAT5-dependent mammary physiology.

  14. 9 CFR 310.17 - Inspection of mammary glands.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... mammary glands and diseased mammary glands of cattle, sheep, swine, and goats shall be removed without opening the milk ducts or sinuses. If pus or other objectionable material is permitted to come in contact..., swine, and goats shall not be saved for edible purposes. (d) The udders from cows officially...

  15. 9 CFR 310.17 - Inspection of mammary glands.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... mammary glands and diseased mammary glands of cattle, sheep, swine, and goats shall be removed without opening the milk ducts or sinuses. If pus or other objectionable material is permitted to come in contact..., swine, and goats shall not be saved for edible purposes. (d) The udders from cows officially...

  16. Bovine mammary stem cells: Cell biology meets production agriculture

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Mammary stem cells (MaSC) provide for net growth, renewal and turnover of mammary epithelial cells, and are therefore potential targets for strategies to increase production efficiency. Appropriate regulation of MaSC can potentially benefit milk yield, persistency, dry period management and tissue ...

  17. Pim-1 kinase expression during murine mammary development

    SciTech Connect

    Gapter, Leslie A.; Magnuson, Nancy S.; Ng, Ka-yun; Hosick, Howard L. . E-mail: hosick@wsu.edu

    2006-07-07

    Pim-1 kinase phosphorylates substrates whose activities are linked to proliferation, survival, differentiation, and apoptosis. Although pim-1 is induced by hormones and cytokines, the hormonal control and contribution of Pim-1 to mammary gland development have not been evaluated. We examined Pim-1 expression in mammary cell lines, investigated whether Pim-1 levels could be altered in breast epithelia by mammogenic hormones, and evaluated Pim-1 expression during mammary development. We found that Pim-1 was elevated in most mammary carcinoma cell lines and progesterone increased Pim-1 protein to some extent in non-tumorigenic mammary epithelia. Pim-1 expression in situ was consistent with the documented profile of progesterone activity in mouse mammary glands. Pim-1 nuclear localization correlated with cytoplasmic distribution for its substrate, p21{sup CIP/Waf1}, and we found that Pim-1 and p21 associate in vitro. Our results suggest that Pim-1 expression may be regulated by progesterone during mammary development and Pim-1 associates with p21 in mammary epithelial cells.

  18. Mammary Development and Breast Cancer: A Wnt Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Qing Cissy; Verheyen, Esther M.; Zeng, Yi Arial

    2016-01-01

    The Wnt pathway has emerged as a key signaling cascade participating in mammary organogenesis and breast oncogenesis. In this review, we will summarize the current knowledge of how the pathway regulates stem cells and normal development of the mammary gland, and discuss how its various components contribute to breast carcinoma pathology. PMID:27420097

  19. Roles of Fas and Fas ligand during mammary gland remodeling

    PubMed Central

    Song, Joon; Sapi, Eva; Brown, Wendi; Nilsen, Jon; Tartaro, Karrie; Kacinski, Barry M.; Craft, Joseph; Naftolin, Frederick; Mor, Gil

    2000-01-01

    Mammary involution is associated with degeneration of the alveolar structure and programmed cell death of mammary epithelial cells. In this study, we evaluated the expression of Fas and Fas ligand (FasL) in the mammary gland tissue and their possible role in the induction of apoptosis of mammary cells. FasL-positive cells were observed in normal mammary epithelium from pregnant and lactating mice, but not in nonpregnant/virgin mouse mammary tissue. Fas expression was observed in epithelial and stromal cells in nonpregnant mice but was absent during pregnancy. At day 1 after weaning, high levels of both Fas and FasL proteins and caspase 3 were observed and coincided with the appearance of apoptotic cells in ducts and glands. During the same period, no apoptotic cells were found in the Fas-deficient (MRL/lpr) and FasL-deficient (C3H/gld) mice. Increase in Fas and FasL protein was demonstrated in human (MCF10A) and mouse (HC-11) mammary epithelial cells after incubation in hormone-deprived media, before apoptosis was detected. These results suggest that the Fas-FasL interaction plays an important role in the normal remodeling of mammary tissue. Furthermore, this autocrine induction of apoptosis may prevent accumulation of cells with mutations and subsequent neoplastic development. Failure of the Fas/FasL signal could contribute to tumor development. PMID:11086022

  20. Mammary Development and Breast Cancer: A Wnt Perspective.

    PubMed

    Yu, Qing Cissy; Verheyen, Esther M; Zeng, Yi Arial

    2016-01-01

    The Wnt pathway has emerged as a key signaling cascade participating in mammary organogenesis and breast oncogenesis. In this review, we will summarize the current knowledge of how the pathway regulates stem cells and normal development of the mammary gland, and discuss how its various components contribute to breast carcinoma pathology. PMID:27420097

  1. P-cadherin expression in feline mammary tissues.

    PubMed

    Figueira, Ana Catarina; Teodósio, Ana Sofia; Carvalheira, Júlio; Lacerda, Manuela; de Matos, Augusto; Gärtner, Fátima

    2012-01-01

    The search for molecular markers in the feline mammary gland, namely, the adhesion molecules belonging to the cadherin family, is useful in the understanding of the development of mammary carcinomas in felines and humans. To study P-cadherin expression in the feline mammary gland, 61 samples of normal (n = 4), hyperplastic (n = 12), and neoplastic (n = 45) feline mammary tissues were examined. In both normal and hyperplastic mammary tissues as well as in benign tumours, P-cadherin immunolabelling was restricted to myoepithelial cells. In malignant tumours, however, there was an aberrant epithelial P-cadherin immunoexpression in 64.1% (n = 25) of cases, with a membranous and/or cytoplasmic pattern of distribution. A statistically significant relationship was seen between epithelial P-cadherin expression and malignant mammary lesions (P = 0.0001). In malignant mammary tumours, there was likewise a statistically significant relationship between aberrant P-cadherin immunoexpression and histological grade (P = 0.0132). Aberrant epithelial P-cadherin expression seems to be related to malignancy in the feline mammary gland. To confirm the results of this investigation, further studies with larger samples and follow-up studies are warranted.

  2. Autophagy mitigates metabolic stress and genome damage in mammary tumorigenesis

    PubMed Central

    Karantza-Wadsworth, Vassiliki; Patel, Shyam; Kravchuk, Olga; Chen, Guanghua; Mathew, Robin; Jin, Shengkan; White, Eileen

    2007-01-01

    Autophagy is a catabolic process involving self-digestion of cellular organelles during starvation as a means of cell survival; however, if it proceeds to completion, autophagy can lead to cell death. Autophagy is also a haploinsufficient tumor suppressor mechanism for mammary tumorigenesis, as the essential autophagy regulator beclin1 is monoallelically deleted in breast carcinomas. However, the mechanism by which autophagy suppresses breast cancer remains elusive. Here we show that allelic loss of beclin1 and defective autophagy sensitized mammary epithelial cells to metabolic stress and accelerated lumen formation in mammary acini. Autophagy defects also activated the DNA damage response in vitro and in mammary tumors in vivo, promoted gene amplification, and synergized with defective apoptosis to promote mammary tumorigenesis. Therefore, we propose that autophagy limits metabolic stress to protect the genome, and that defective autophagy increases DNA damage and genomic instability that ultimately facilitate breast cancer progression. PMID:17606641

  3. Prenatal TCDD Exposure Predisposes for Mammary Cancer in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Jenkins, Sarah; Rowell, Craig; Wang, Jun; Lamartiniere, Coral A.

    2007-01-01

    Epidemiological data are conflicting in the link between 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) exposure and breast cancer causation. We have hypothesized that timing of exposure to endocrine disruptors, such as TCDD, will alter breast cancer susceptibility. Using a carcinogen induced rat mammary cancer model, we have shown that prenatal exposure to TCDD alters mammary gland differentiation and increases susceptibility for mammary cancer. Investigations into imprinting via DNA methylation mechanisms showed that there were no changes in protein expression in DNA methyltransferases, ER-alpha, ER-beta, GST-pi, or MDGI. Using 2-D gels and mass spectrometry, we have found seven proteins to be differentially regulated, including a decrease in superoxide dismutase 1 (SOD1). Down-regulation of SOD1 could provide an environment ill equipped to deal with subsequent free radical exposure. We conclude that prenatal TCDD can predispose for mammary cancer susceptibility in the adult offspring by altering the mammary proteome. PMID:17157473

  4. Stem cells in normal mammary gland and breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Luo, Jie; Yin, Xin; Ma, Tao; Lu, Jun

    2010-04-01

    The mammary gland is a structurally dynamic organ that undergoes dramatic alterations with age, menstrual cycle, and reproductive status. Mammary gland stem cells, the minor cell population within the mature organ, are thought to have multiple functions in regulating mammary gland development, tissue maintenance, major growth, and structural remodeling. In addition, accumulative evidence suggests that breast cancers are initiated and maintained by a subpopulation of tumor cells with stem cell features (called cancer stem cells). A variety of methods have been developed to identify and characterize mammary stem cells, and several signal transduction pathways have been identified to be essential for the self-renewal and differentiation of mammary gland stem cells. Understanding the origin of breast cancer stem cells, their relationship to breast cancer development, and the differences between normal and cancer stem cells may lead to novel approaches to breast cancer diagnosis, prevention, and treatment.

  5. Asparagus cochinchinensis Extract Alleviates Metal Ion-Induced Gut Injury in Drosophila: An In Silico Analysis of Potential Active Constituents.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Weiyu; Jin, Li Hua

    2016-01-01

    Metal ions and sulfate are components of atmospheric pollutants that have diverse ways of entering the human body. We used Drosophila as a model to investigate the effect of Asparagus cochinchinensis (A. cochinchinensis) extracts on the gut and characterized gut homeostasis following the ingestion of metal ions (copper, zinc, and aluminum). In this study, we found that the aqueous A. cochinchinensis extract increased the survival rate, decreased epithelial cell death, and attenuated metal ion-induced gut morphological changes in flies following chronic exposure to metal ions. In addition, we screened out, by network pharmacology, six natural products (NPs) that could serve as putative active components of A. cochinchinensis that prevented gut injury. Altogether, the results of our study provide evidence that A. cochinchinensis might be an effective phytomedicine for the treatment of metal ion-induced gut injury. PMID:27123034

  6. Asparagus cochinchinensis Extract Alleviates Metal Ion-Induced Gut Injury in Drosophila: An In Silico Analysis of Potential Active Constituents

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Weiyu; Jin, Li Hua

    2016-01-01

    Metal ions and sulfate are components of atmospheric pollutants that have diverse ways of entering the human body. We used Drosophila as a model to investigate the effect of Asparagus cochinchinensis (A. cochinchinensis) extracts on the gut and characterized gut homeostasis following the ingestion of metal ions (copper, zinc, and aluminum). In this study, we found that the aqueous A. cochinchinensis extract increased the survival rate, decreased epithelial cell death, and attenuated metal ion-induced gut morphological changes in flies following chronic exposure to metal ions. In addition, we screened out, by network pharmacology, six natural products (NPs) that could serve as putative active components of A. cochinchinensis that prevented gut injury. Altogether, the results of our study provide evidence that A. cochinchinensis might be an effective phytomedicine for the treatment of metal ion-induced gut injury. PMID:27123034

  7. Mammary epithelial cells isolated from milk are a valuable, non-invasive source of mammary transcripts

    PubMed Central

    Boutinaud, Marion; Herve, Lucile; Lollivier, Vanessa

    2015-01-01

    Milk is produced in the udder by mammary epithelial cells (MEC). Milk contains MEC, which are gradually exfoliated from the epithelium during lactation. Isolation of MEC from milk using immunomagnetic separation may be a useful non-invasive method to investigate transcriptional regulations in ruminants’ udder. This review aims to describe the process of isolating MEC from milk, to provide an overview on the studies that use this method to analyze gene expression by qRT PCR and to evaluate the validity of this method by analyzing and comparing the results between studies. In several goat and cow studies, consistent reductions in alpha-lactalbumin mRNA levels during once-daily milking (ODM) and in SLC2A1 mRNA level during feed restriction are observed. The effect of ODM on alpha-lactalbumin mRNA level was similarly observed in milk isolated MEC and mammary biopsy. Moreover, we and others showed decreasing alpha-lactalbumin and increasing BAX mRNA levels with advanced stages of lactation in dairy cows and buffalo. The relevance of using the milk-isolated MEC method to analyze mammary gene expression is proven, as the transcript variations were also consistent with milk yield and composition variations under the effect of different factors such as prolactin inhibition or photoperiod. However, the RNA from milk-isolated MEC is particularly sensitive to degradation. This could explain the differences obtained between milk-isolated MEC and mammary biopsy in two studies where gene expression was compared using qRT-PCR or RNA Sequencing analyses. As a conclusion, when the RNA quality is conserved, MEC isolated from milk are a valuable, non-invasive source of mammary mRNA to study various factors that impact milk yield and composition (ODM, feeding level, endocrine status, photoperiod modulation, and stage of lactation). PMID:26579195

  8. Genistein-mediated inhibition of mammary stromal adipocyte differentiation limits expansion of mammary stem/progenitor cells by paracrine signaling

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Mammary adiposity may contribute to breast cancer development and progression by releasing cytokines and other inflammatory mediators that promote mammary epithelial proliferation. We evaluated the effects of soy isoflavone genistein (GEN) on the adipogenic differentiation of a SV40-immortalized mou...

  9. Proton and Fe Ion-Induced Early and Late Chromosome Aberrations in Different Cell Types

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, Honglu; Lu, Tao; Yeshitla, Samrawit; Zhang, Ye; Kadhim, Munira

    2016-01-01

    An early stage of cancer development is believed to be genomic instability (GI) which accelerates the mutation rate in the descendants of the cells surviving radiation exposure. To investigate GI induced by charged particles, we exposed human lymphocytes, human fibroblast cells, and human mammary epithelial cells to high energy protons and Fe ions. In addition, we also investigated GI in bone marrow cells isolated from CBA/CaH (CBA) and C57BL/6 (C57) mice, by analyzing cell survival and chromosome aberrations in the cells after multiple cell divisions. Results analyzed so far from the experiments indicated different sensitivities to charged particles between CBA/CaH (CBA) and C57BL/6 (C57) mouse strains, suggesting that there are two main types of response to irradiation: 1) responses associated with survival of damaged cells and 2) responses associated with the induction of non-clonal chromosomal instability in the surviving progeny of stem cells. Previously, we reported that the RBE for initial chromosome damages was high in human lymphocytes exposed to Fe ions. Our results with different cell types demonstrated different RBE values between different cell types and between early and late chromosomal damages. This study also attempts to offer an explanation for the varying RBE values for different cancer types.

  10. Effectiveness of photodynamic therapy for mammary and extra-mammary Paget's disease: a state of the science review

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Paget's disease is a rare skin disorder occurring in the breast (mammary) or in the groin, genital, peri-anal and axillary regions (extra-mammary). Typical treatment involves surgical excision, which in the case of extra-mammary Paget's disease, can lead to significant morbidity. Photodynamic therapy (PDT) which uses a topical or intravenous photosensitizing agent that is activated by a light source to ablate abnormal tissue, offers a minimally invasive alternative. The purpose of this study was to assess the effectiveness of photodynamic therapy in the treatment of Paget's disease. Methods Following Cochrane guidelines, a comprehensive systematic review of all clinical studies and reports examining the use of PDT for mammary and extra-mammary Paget's disease was conducted. Study quality was assessed using the Oxford Levels of Evidence Scale. Results 21 retrospective and 2 prospective non-comparative studies were identified and included in the review: 9 case reports with 1-2 patients and 14 case series with 1-16 patients. These reports totalled 99 patients with 133 extra-mammary Paget's lesions and 3 patients (with 3 lesions) with mammary Paget's disease. Follow-up periods were typically one year or less, with 77/133 extra-mammary lesions exhibiting complete response to PDT. One recurrent mammary skin lesion and two mammary lesions treated concomitantly with surgery also exhibited complete responses. Conclusions Evidence of the effectiveness of PDT for Paget's disease is promising, but limited. This may, in part, be explained by the rarity of the condition, making controlled comparative clinical trials challenging. PMID:21676258

  11. Surface scanning: an application to mammary surgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rigotti, Camilla; Ferrigno, Giancarlo; Aliverti, Andrea; Pedotti, Antonio

    1998-04-01

    The possibility of mathematically describing the body surface represents a useful tool for several medical sectors, such as prosthetics or plastic surgery, and could improve diagnosis and objective evaluation of deformities and the follow-up of progressive diseases. The approach presented is based on the acquisition of a surface scanned by a laser beam. The 3D coordinates of the spot generated on the surface by the laser beam are computed by an automatic image analyzer. Using at least two different views of the subject, the 3D coordinates are obtained by stereophotogrammetry. A software package for graphic representation and extraction of linear superficial and volumetric features from the acquired surface has been developed and some preliminary results with mammary reconstruction are presented. A good mammary reconstruction after mastectomy must achieve two results. First, the reconstruction should follow the patients' wishes and second, the reconstructed breast should be as similar as possible to the contralateral one. To achieve these goals, a knowledge of breast volume, area, and shape features are essential for the surgeon. In such a context, this system could be a valuable tool in improving breast reconstructive surgery.

  12. Gene expression pattern in canine mammary osteosarcoma.

    PubMed

    Pawłowski, K M; Majewska, A; Szyszko, K; Dolka, I; Motyl, T; Król, M

    2011-01-01

    Canine mammary sarcomas are usually very aggressive and easily metastasize. Unfortunately the biology of this type of tumor is not well known because they are a very rare type of tumors. The aim of this study was to find differences in gene expression patterns in canine mammary osteosarcomas (malignant) versus osteomas (benign) using DNA microarrays. Our microarray experiment showed that 11 genes were up-regulated in osteosarcoma in comparison to osteoma whereas 36 genes were down-regulated. Among the up-regulated genes were: PDK1, EXT1, and EIF4H which are involved in AKT/PI3K and GLI/Hedgehog pathways. These genes play an important role in cell biology (cancer cell proliferation) and may be essential in osteosarcoma formation and development. Analyzing the down-regulated genes, the most interesting seemed to be HSPB8 and SEPP1. HSPB8 is a small heat shock protein that plays an important role in cell cycle regulation, apoptosis, and breast carcinogenesis. Also SEPP1 may play a role in carcinogenesis, as its down-regulation may induce oxidative stress possibly resulting in carcinogenesis. The preliminary results of the present study indicate that the up-regulation of three genes EXT1, EIF4H, and PDK1 may play an essential role in osteosarcoma formation, development and proliferation. In our opinion the cross-talk between GLI/Hedgehog and PI3K/AKT pathways may be a key factor to increase tumor proliferation and malignancy. PMID:21528706

  13. CELL CONTACTS IN THE MOUSE MAMMARY GLAND

    PubMed Central

    Pitelka, Dorothy R.; Hamamoto, Susan T.; Duafala, Joan G.; Nemanic, Michael K.

    1973-01-01

    The nature and distribution of cell contacts have been examined in thin sections and freeze-fracture replicas of mammary gland samples from female C3H/Crgl mice at stages from birth through pregnancy, lactation, and postweaning involution. Epithelial cells of major mammary ducts at all stages examined are linked at their luminal borders by junctional complexes consisting of tight junctions, variable intermediate junctions, occasional small gap junctions, and one or more series of desmosomes. Scattered desmosomes and gap junctions link ductal epithelial and myoepithelial cells in all combinations; hemidesmosomes attach myoepithelial cells to the basal lamina. Freeze-fracture replicas confirm the erratic distribution of gap junctions and reveal a loose, irregular network of ridges comprising the continuous tight-junctional belts. Alveoli develop early in gestation and initially resemble ducts. Later, as alveoli and small ducts become actively secretory, they lose all desmosomes and most intermediate junctions, whereas tight and gap junctions persist, The tight-junctional network becomes compact and orderly, its undulating ridges oriented predominantly parallel to the luminal surface. It is suggested that these changes in junctional morphology, occurring in secretory cells around parturition, may be related to the greatly enhanced rate of movement of milk precursors and products through the lactating epithelium, or to the profound and recurrent changes in shape of secretory cells that occur in relation to myoepithelial cell contraction, or to both. PMID:4569313

  14. Ion-induced ionization and capture cross sections for DNA nucleobases impacted by light ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Champion, Christophe; Galassi, Mariel E.; Weck, Philippe F.; Fojón, Omar; Hanssen, Jocelyn; Rivarola, Roberto D.

    2012-11-01

    Two quantum mechanical models (CB1 and CDW-EIS) are here presented for describing electron ionization and electron capture induced by heavy charged particles in DNA bases. Multiple differential and total cross sections are determined and compared with the scarce existing experimental data.

  15. Fibronectin Expression Modulates Mammary Epithelial Cell Proliferation during Acinar Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Courtney M.; Engler, Adam J.; Slone, R. Daniel; Galante, Leontine L.; Schwarzbauer, Jean E.

    2009-01-01

    The mammary gland consists of a polarized epithelium surrounded by a basement membrane matrix that forms a series of branching ducts ending in hollow, sphere-like acini. Essential roles for the epithelial basement membrane during acinar differentiation, in particular laminin and its integrin receptors, have been identified using mammary epithelial cells cultured on a reconstituted basement membrane. Contributions from fibronectin, which is abundant in the mammary gland during development and tumorigenesis, have not been fully examined. Here, we show that fibronectin expression by mammary epithelial cells is dynamically regulated during the morphogenic process. Experiments with synthetic polyacrylamide gel substrates implicate both specific extracellular matrix components, including fibronectin itself, and matrix rigidity in this regulation. Alterations in fibronectin levels perturbed acinar organization. During acinar development, increased fibronectin levels resulted in overproliferation of mammary epithelial cells and increased acinar size. Addition of fibronectin to differentiated acini stimulated proliferation and reversed growth arrest of mammary epithelial cells negatively affecting maintenance of proper acinar morphology. These results show that expression of fibronectin creates a permissive environment for cell growth that antagonizes the differentiation signals from the basement membrane. These effects suggest a link between fibronectin expression and epithelial cell growth during development and oncogenesis in the mammary gland. PMID:18451144

  16. STAT signaling in mammary gland differentiation, cell survival and tumorigenesis.

    PubMed

    Haricharan, S; Li, Y

    2014-01-25

    The mammary gland is a unique organ that undergoes extensive and profound changes during puberty, menstruation, pregnancy, lactation and involution. The changes that take place during puberty involve large-scale proliferation and invasion of the fat-pad. During pregnancy and lactation, the mammary cells are exposed to signaling pathways that inhibit apoptosis, induce proliferation and invoke terminal differentiation. Finally, during involution the mammary gland is exposed to milk stasis, programmed cell death and stromal reorganization to clear the differentiated milk-producing cells. Not surprisingly, the signaling pathways responsible for bringing about these changes in breast cells are often subverted during the process of tumorigenesis. The STAT family of proteins is involved in every stage of mammary gland development, and is also frequently implicated in breast tumorigenesis. While the roles of STAT3 and STAT5 during mammary gland development and tumorigenesis are well studied, others members, e.g. STAT1 and STAT6, have only recently been observed to play a role in mammary gland biology. Continued investigation into the STAT protein network in the mammary gland will likely yield new biomarkers and risk factors for breast cancer, and may also lead to novel prophylactic or therapeutic strategies against breast cancer.

  17. The mammary gland and its origin during synapsid evolution.

    PubMed

    Oftedal, Olav T

    2002-07-01

    Lactation appears to be an ancient reproductive trait that predates the origin of mammals. The synapsid branch of the amniote tree that separated from other taxa in the Pennsylvanian (>310 million years ago) evolved a glandular rather than scaled integument. Repeated radiations of synapsids produced a gradual accrual of mammalian features. The mammary gland apparently derives from an ancestral apocrine-like gland that was associated with hair follicles. This association is retained by monotreme mammary glands and is evident as vestigial mammary hair during early ontogenetic development of marsupials. The dense cluster of mammo-pilo-sebaceous units that open onto a nipple-less mammary patch in monotremes may reflect a structure that evolved to provide moisture and other constituents to permeable eggs. Mammary patch secretions were coopted to provide nutrients to hatchlings, but some constituents including lactose may have been secreted by ancestral apocrine-like glands in early synapsids. Advanced Triassic therapsids, such as cynodonts, almost certainly secreted complex, nutrient-rich milk, allowing a progressive decline in egg size and an increasingly altricial state of the young at hatching. This is indicated by the very small body size, presence of epipubic bones, and limited tooth replacement in advanced cynodonts and early mammaliaforms. Nipples that arose from the mammary patch rendered mammary hairs obsolete, while placental structures have allowed lactation to be truncated in living eutherians. PMID:12751889

  18. Heavy flavors

    SciTech Connect

    Cox, B.; Gilman, F.J.; Gottschalk, T.D.

    1986-11-01

    A range of issues pertaining to heavy flavors at the SSC is examined including heavy flavor production by gluon-gluon fusion and by shower evolution of gluon jets, flavor tagging, reconstruction of Higgs and W bosons, and the study of rare decays and CP violation in the B meson system. A specific detector for doing heavy flavor physics and tuned to this latter study at the SSC, the TASTER, is described. 36 refs., 10 figs.

  19. Sequencing the transcriptome of milk production: milk trumps mammary tissue

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Studies of normal human mammary gland development and function have mostly relied on cell culture, limited surgical specimens, and rodent models. Although RNA extracted from human milk has been used to assay the mammary transcriptome non-invasively, this assay has not been adequately validated in primates. Thus, the objectives of the current study were to assess the suitability of lactating rhesus macaques as a model for lactating humans and to determine whether RNA extracted from milk fractions is representative of RNA extracted from mammary tissue for the purpose of studying the transcriptome of milk-producing cells. Results We confirmed that macaque milk contains cytoplasmic crescents and that ample high-quality RNA can be obtained for sequencing. Using RNA sequencing, RNA extracted from macaque milk fat and milk cell fractions more accurately represented RNA from mammary epithelial cells (cells that produce milk) than did RNA from whole mammary tissue. Mammary epithelium-specific transcripts were more abundant in macaque milk fat, whereas adipose or stroma-specific transcripts were more abundant in mammary tissue. Functional analyses confirmed the validity of milk as a source of RNA from milk-producing mammary epithelial cells. Conclusions RNA extracted from the milk fat during lactation accurately portrayed the RNA profile of milk-producing mammary epithelial cells in a non-human primate. However, this sample type clearly requires protocols that minimize RNA degradation. Overall, we validated the use of RNA extracted from human and macaque milk and provided evidence to support the use of lactating macaques as a model for human lactation. PMID:24330573

  20. Mammary Epithelial Cell Hierarchy in the Dairy Cow Throughout Lactation.

    PubMed

    Perruchot, Marie-Hélène; Arévalo-Turrubiarte, Magdalena; Dufreneix, Florence; Finot, Laurence; Lollivier, Vanessa; Chanat, Eric; Mayeur, Frédérique; Dessauge, Frédéric

    2016-10-01

    The plasticity of the mammary gland relies on adult mammary stem cells (MaSCs) and their progenitors, which give rise to various populations of mammary epithelial cells (MECs). To face global challenges, an in-depth characterization of milk-producing animal mammary gland plasticity is required, to select more sustainable and robust dairy cows. The identification and characterization of MaSC and their progenitors will also provide innovative tools in veterinary/human medicine regarding mammary tissue damage (carcinogenesis, bacterial infections). This study aimed to determine the dynamics of mammary cell populations throughout a lactation cycle. Using mammary biopsies from primiparous lactating dairy cows at 30, 90, 150, and 250 days of lactation, we phenotyped cell populations by flow cytometry. To investigate cell lineages, we used specific cell-surface markers, including CD49f, CD24, EpCAM (epithelial cell adhesion molecule), and CD10. Two cell populations linked to milk production were identified: CD49f(+)/EpCAM(-) (y = 0.88x + 4.42, R(2) = 0.36, P < 0.05) and CD49f(-)/EpCAM(-) (y = -1.15x + 92.44, R(2) = 0.51, P < 0.05) cells. Combining immunostaining analysis, flow cytometry, daily milk production data, and statistical approaches, we defined a stem cell population (CD24(+)/CD49f(+)) and four progenitor cell populations that include bipotent luminal progenitors (CD24(-)/CD49f(+)), lumino-alveolar progenitors (CD24(-)/EpCAM(+)), myoepithelial progenitors (CD24(+)/CD10(-)), and lumino-ductal progenitors (CD49f(-)/EpCAM(+)). Interestingly, we found that the bipotent luminal progenitors (CD24(-)/CD49f(+)) decreased significantly (P < 0.05) during lactation. This study provides the first results of mammary cell lineage, allowing insight into mammary cell plasticity during lactation.

  1. Mammary Epithelial Cell Hierarchy in the Dairy Cow Throughout Lactation.

    PubMed

    Perruchot, Marie-Hélène; Arévalo-Turrubiarte, Magdalena; Dufreneix, Florence; Finot, Laurence; Lollivier, Vanessa; Chanat, Eric; Mayeur, Frédérique; Dessauge, Frédéric

    2016-10-01

    The plasticity of the mammary gland relies on adult mammary stem cells (MaSCs) and their progenitors, which give rise to various populations of mammary epithelial cells (MECs). To face global challenges, an in-depth characterization of milk-producing animal mammary gland plasticity is required, to select more sustainable and robust dairy cows. The identification and characterization of MaSC and their progenitors will also provide innovative tools in veterinary/human medicine regarding mammary tissue damage (carcinogenesis, bacterial infections). This study aimed to determine the dynamics of mammary cell populations throughout a lactation cycle. Using mammary biopsies from primiparous lactating dairy cows at 30, 90, 150, and 250 days of lactation, we phenotyped cell populations by flow cytometry. To investigate cell lineages, we used specific cell-surface markers, including CD49f, CD24, EpCAM (epithelial cell adhesion molecule), and CD10. Two cell populations linked to milk production were identified: CD49f(+)/EpCAM(-) (y = 0.88x + 4.42, R(2) = 0.36, P < 0.05) and CD49f(-)/EpCAM(-) (y = -1.15x + 92.44, R(2) = 0.51, P < 0.05) cells. Combining immunostaining analysis, flow cytometry, daily milk production data, and statistical approaches, we defined a stem cell population (CD24(+)/CD49f(+)) and four progenitor cell populations that include bipotent luminal progenitors (CD24(-)/CD49f(+)), lumino-alveolar progenitors (CD24(-)/EpCAM(+)), myoepithelial progenitors (CD24(+)/CD10(-)), and lumino-ductal progenitors (CD49f(-)/EpCAM(+)). Interestingly, we found that the bipotent luminal progenitors (CD24(-)/CD49f(+)) decreased significantly (P < 0.05) during lactation. This study provides the first results of mammary cell lineage, allowing insight into mammary cell plasticity during lactation. PMID:27520504

  2. Extra-mammary findings on breast MRI: a pictorial review.

    PubMed

    Karp, Norna L; Price, Elissa R; Wisner, Dorota J; Chang, C Belinda; Hylton, Nola M; Joe, Bonnie N

    2015-01-01

    Recent improvements in breast coil performance have made detection of extra-mammary findings increasingly common. Some of these findings have important clinical implications. The radiologist should be aware of the spectrum of extra-mammary pathologies found on breast magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and be able to distinguish clinically significant findings from those that are inconsequential. The purpose of this essay is to demonstrate various common and uncommon extra-mammary findings encountered while interpreting breast MRI and to detail appropriate management recommendations.

  3. Contractile effects of 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine on the human internal mammary artery.

    PubMed

    Silva, Sónia; Carvalho, Félix; Fernandes, Eduarda; Antunes, Manuel J; Cotrim, Maria Dulce

    2016-08-01

    Since the late 1980s numerous reports have detailed adverse reactions to the use of 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA) associated with cardiovascular collapse and sudden death, following ventricular tachycardia and hypertension. For a better understanding of the effects of MDMA on the cardiovascular system, it is critical to determine their effects at the vasculature level, including the transporter or neurotransmitter systems that are most affected at the whole range of drug doses. With this purpose in mind, the aim of our study was to evaluate the contractile effect of MDMA in the human internal mammary artery, the contribution of SERT for this effect and the responsiveness of this artery to 5-HT in the presence of MDMA. We have also studied the possible involvement of 5-HT2 receptors on the MDMA contractile effect in this human blood vessel using ketanserin. Our results showed that MDMA contracted the studied human's internal mammary artery in a SERT-independent form, through activation of 5-HT2A receptors. Considering the high plasma concentrations achieved in heavy users or in situations of acute exposure to drugs, this effect is probably involved in the cardiovascular risk profile of this psychostimulant, especially in subjects with pre-existing cardiovascular disease. PMID:27079619

  4. Developmental biology: cell fate in the mammary gland

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Most breast cancers have their origin in the luminal epithelial cells of the mammary gland. Defining how a master regulator controls the development of this cell lineage could provide important hints about why this should be. ...

  5. Genes affected by mouse mammary tumor virus (MMTV) proviral insertions in mouse mammary tumors are deregulated or mutated in primary human mammary tumors

    PubMed Central

    Callahan, Robert; Mudunuri, Uma; Bargo, Sharon; Raafat, Ahmed; McCurdy, David; Boulanger, Corinne; Lowther, William; Stephens, Robert; Luke, Brian T.; Stewart, Claudia; Wu, Xiaolin; Munroe, David; Smith, Gilbert H.

    2012-01-01

    The accumulation of mutations is a contributing factor in the initiation of premalignant mammary lesions and their progression to malignancy and metastasis. We have used a mouse model in which the carcinogen is the mouse mammary tumor virus (MMTV) which induces clonal premalignant mammary lesions and malignant mammary tumors by insertional mutagenesis. Identification of the genes and signaling pathways affected in MMTV-induced mouse mammary lesions provides a rationale for determining whether genetic alteration of the human orthologues of these genes/pathways may contribute to human breast carcinogenesis. A high-throughput platform for inverse PCR to identify MMTV-host junction fragments and their nucleotide sequences in a large panel of MMTV-induced lesions was developed. Validation of the genes affected by MMTV-insertion was carried out by microarray analysis. Common integration site (CIS) means that the gene was altered by an MMTV proviral insertion in at least two independent lesions arising in different hosts. Three of the new genes identified as CIS for MMTV were assayed for their capability to confer on HC11 mouse mammary epithelial cells the ability for invasion, anchorage independent growth and tumor development in nude mice. Analysis of MMTV induced mammary premalignant hyperplastic outgrowth (HOG) lines and mammary tumors led to the identification of CIS restricted to 35 loci. Within these loci members of the Wnt, Fgf and Rspo gene families plus two linked genes (Npm3 and Ddn) were frequently activated in tumors induced by MMTV. A second group of 15 CIS occur at a low frequency (2-5 observations) in mammary HOGs or tumors. In this latter group the expression of either Phf19 or Sdc2 was shown to increase HC11 cells invasion capability. Foxl1 expression conferred on HC11 cells the capability for anchorage-independent colony formation in soft agar and tumor development in nude mice. The published transcriptome and nucleotide sequence analysis of gene

  6. Heavy Ion Microbeam- and Broadbeam-Induced Transients in SiGe HBTs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pellish, Jonathan A.; Reed, Robert A.; McMorrow, Dale; Vizkelethy, Gyorgy; Ferlet-Cavrois, Veronique; Baggio, Jacques; Duhamel, Olivier; Moen, Kurt A.; Phillips, Stanley D.; Diestelhorst, Ryan M.; Cressler, John D.; Sutton, Akil K.; Raman, Ashok; Turowski, Marek; Dodd, Paul E.; Alles, Michael L.; Schrimpf, Ronald D.; Marshall, Paul W.; LaBel, Kenneth A.

    2009-01-01

    SiGe HBT heavy ion-induced current transients are measured using Sandia National Laboratories microbeam and high- and low-energy broadbeam sources at the Grand Accelerateur National d'Ions Lourds and the University of Jyvaskyla. The data were captured using a custom broadband IC package and real-time digital phosphor oscilloscopes with at least 16 GHz of analog bandwidth. These data provide detailed insight into the effects of ion strike location, range, and LET.

  7. Radiogenic neoplasia in thyroid and mammary clonogens

    SciTech Connect

    Clifton, K.H.

    1991-05-31

    We have developed rat thyroid and mammary clonogen transplantation systems for the study of radiogenic cancer induction at the target cell level in vivo. The epithelial cell populations of both glands contain small subpopulations of cells which are capable of giving rise to monoclonal glandular structures when transplanted and stimulated with appropriate hormones. During the end of the last grant year and the first half of the current grant year, we have completed analyses and summarized for publication: investigations on the relationship between grafted thyroid cell number and the rapidity and degree of reestablishment of the thyroid-hypothalamicpituitary axis in thyroidectomized rats maintained on a normal diet or an iodine deficient diet; studies of the persistence of, and the differentiation potential and functional characteristics of, the TSH- (thyrotropin-) responsive sub-population of clonogens during goitrogenesis, the plateau-phase of goiter growth, and goiter involution; studies of changes in the size of the clonogen sub-population during goitrogenesis, goiter involution and the response to goitrogen rechallenge; and the results of the large carcinogenesis experiment on the nature of the grafted thyroid cell number-dependent suppression of promotion/progression to neoplasia in grafts of radiation-initiated thyroid cells. We are testing new techniques for the culture, cytofluorescent analysis and characterization mammary epithelial cells and of clonogens in a parallel project, and plan to apply similar technology to the thyroid epithelial cells and clonogen population. Data from these studies will be used in the design of future carcinogenesis experiments on neoplastic initiation by high and low LET radiations and on cells interactions during the neoplastic process.

  8. Hippo pathway in mammary gland development and breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Shi, Peiguo; Feng, Jing; Chen, Ceshi

    2015-01-01

    Accumulated evidence suggests that the Hippo signaling pathway plays crucial roles in mammary gland development and breast cancer. Key components of the Hippo pathway regulate breast epithelial cell proliferation, migration, invasion, and stemness. Additionally, the Hippo pathway regulates breast tumor growth, metastasis, and drug resistance. It is expected that the Hippo pathway will provide novel therapeutic targets for breast cancer. This review will discuss and summarize the roles of several core components of the Hippo pathway in mammary gland development and breast cancer.

  9. Genomic and Phenomic Study of Mammary Pathogenic Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Blum, Shlomo E.; Heller, Elimelech D.; Sela, Shlomo; Elad, Daniel; Edery, Nir; Leitner, Gabriel

    2015-01-01

    Escherichia coli is a major etiological agent of intra-mammary infections (IMI) in cows, leading to acute mastitis and causing great economic losses in dairy production worldwide. Particular strains cause persistent IMI, leading to recurrent mastitis. Virulence factors of mammary pathogenic E. coli (MPEC) involved pathogenesis of mastitis as well as those differentiating strains causing acute or persistent mastitis are largely unknown. This study aimed to identify virulence markers in MPEC through whole genome and phenome comparative analysis. MPEC strains causing acute (VL2874 and P4) or persistent (VL2732) mastitis were compared to an environmental strain (K71) and to the genomes of strains representing different E. coli pathotypes. Intra-mammary challenge in mice confirmed experimentally that the strains studied here have different pathogenic potential, and that the environmental strain K71 is non-pathogenic in the mammary gland. Analysis of whole genome sequences and predicted proteomes revealed high similarity among MPEC, whereas MPEC significantly differed from the non-mammary pathogenic strain K71, and from E. coli genomes from other pathotypes. Functional features identified in MPEC genomes and lacking in the non-mammary pathogenic strain were associated with synthesis of lipopolysaccharide and other membrane antigens, ferric-dicitrate iron acquisition and sugars metabolism. Features associated with cytotoxicity or intra-cellular survival were found specifically in the genomes of strains from severe and acute (VL2874) or persistent (VL2732) mastitis, respectively. MPEC genomes were relatively similar to strain K-12, which was subsequently shown here to be possibly pathogenic in the mammary gland. Phenome analysis showed that the persistent MPEC was the most versatile in terms of nutrients metabolized and acute MPEC the least. Among phenotypes unique to MPEC compared to the non-mammary pathogenic strain were uric acid and D-serine metabolism. This study

  10. Internal mammary silicone lymphadenopathy diagnosed by robotic thoracoscopic lymphadenectomy.

    PubMed

    Schwartz, Gary S; Antoun, David; Klein, Paula; Belsley, Scott J; Connery, Cliff P

    2013-06-01

    Internal mammary lymphadenopathy can be caused by a variety of disease processes and is a difficult diagnostic dilemma. We report a case of internal mammary lymphadenopathy, in a patient with a significant history of malignancy, requiring a tissue diagnosis. Robotic thoracoscopic lymphadenectomy was used to facilitate excisional biopsy. Pathology was significant for silicone granulomatous lymphadenitis secondary to silicone breast implants inserted after mastectomy for breast cancer. PMID:27000915

  11. Genomic and Phenomic Study of Mammary Pathogenic Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Blum, Shlomo E; Heller, Elimelech D; Sela, Shlomo; Elad, Daniel; Edery, Nir; Leitner, Gabriel

    2015-01-01

    Escherichia coli is a major etiological agent of intra-mammary infections (IMI) in cows, leading to acute mastitis and causing great economic losses in dairy production worldwide. Particular strains cause persistent IMI, leading to recurrent mastitis. Virulence factors of mammary pathogenic E. coli (MPEC) involved pathogenesis of mastitis as well as those differentiating strains causing acute or persistent mastitis are largely unknown. This study aimed to identify virulence markers in MPEC through whole genome and phenome comparative analysis. MPEC strains causing acute (VL2874 and P4) or persistent (VL2732) mastitis were compared to an environmental strain (K71) and to the genomes of strains representing different E. coli pathotypes. Intra-mammary challenge in mice confirmed experimentally that the strains studied here have different pathogenic potential, and that the environmental strain K71 is non-pathogenic in the mammary gland. Analysis of whole genome sequences and predicted proteomes revealed high similarity among MPEC, whereas MPEC significantly differed from the non-mammary pathogenic strain K71, and from E. coli genomes from other pathotypes. Functional features identified in MPEC genomes and lacking in the non-mammary pathogenic strain were associated with synthesis of lipopolysaccharide and other membrane antigens, ferric-dicitrate iron acquisition and sugars metabolism. Features associated with cytotoxicity or intra-cellular survival were found specifically in the genomes of strains from severe and acute (VL2874) or persistent (VL2732) mastitis, respectively. MPEC genomes were relatively similar to strain K-12, which was subsequently shown here to be possibly pathogenic in the mammary gland. Phenome analysis showed that the persistent MPEC was the most versatile in terms of nutrients metabolized and acute MPEC the least. Among phenotypes unique to MPEC compared to the non-mammary pathogenic strain were uric acid and D-serine metabolism. This study

  12. Two monoclonal antibodies selective for human mammary carcinoma.

    PubMed

    White, C A; Dulbecco, R; Allen, R; Bowman, M; Armstrong, B

    1985-03-01

    Mouse myeloma cells were fused with spleen cells from BALB/c mice immunized with the MCF-7 human mammary carcinoma cell line. Among hybridomas, two (3B18 and 15A8) were selected and cloned. Hybridoma 3B18 produces kappa-IgG1 antibodies that react with a cytoplasmic component of MCF-7 cells. In immunoperoxidase assays, 3B18 reacts with 27 of 31 specimens of human mammary carcinoma. It reacts most consistently with poorly differentiated and infiltrating ductal breast cancers, but it also reacts with isolated cells in 3 of 5 benign mammary pathological lesions with a variable distribution. The antibody does not react with normal mammary epithelium. It does not react with any normal human tissues, and it reacts with only one of 19 other cancers tested. Hybridoma 15A8 produces kappa-IgG1 antibodies that react with the surface membranes of the cells of two human breast cancer cell lines but not with a human fibroblast cell line. In immunoperoxidase assays, the antibody reacted with 28 out of 31 human mammary carcinomas. The antibody also reacts more weakly with normal human epithelial cells of breast, renal proximal tubule, skin, esophagus, and salivary gland, but no other normal tissue. The antibody was unreactive with 14 of 18 other malignant tissues tested. Since 3B18 and 15A8 detect antigens found predominantly in human mammary carcinomas and, possibly, distinguish overlapping categories of human mammary carcinomas, they may prove useful in determining the cellular lineage from which human mammary carcinomas arise, or they may have other clinical applications in breast cancer.

  13. Dynamics of fission and heavy ion reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Nix, J.R.; Sierk, A.J.

    1984-05-01

    Recent advances in a unified macroscopic-microscopic description of large-amplitude collective nuclear motion such as occurs in fission and heavy ion reactions are discussed. With the goal of finding observable quantities that depend upon the magnitude and mechanism of nuclear dissipation, one-body dissipation and two-body viscosity within the framework of a generalized Fokker-Planck equation for the time dependence of the distribution function in phase space of collective coordinates and momenta are considered. Proceeding in two separate directions, the generalized Hamilton equations of motion for the first moments of the distribution function with a new shape parametrization and other technical innovations are first solved. This yields the mean translational fission-fragment kinetic energy and mass of a third fragment that sometimes forms between the two end fragments, as well as the energy required for fusion in symmetric heavy-ion reactions and the mass transfer and capture cross section in asymmetric heavy-ion reactions. In a second direction, we specialize to an inverted-oscillator fission barrier and use Kramers' stationary solution to calculate the mean time from the saddle point to scission for a heavy-ion-induced fission reaction for which experimental information is becoming available. 25 references.

  14. The role of tight junctions in mammary gland function.

    PubMed

    Stelwagen, Kerst; Singh, Kuljeet

    2014-03-01

    Tight junctions (TJ) are cellular structures that facilitate cell-cell communication and are important in maintaining the three-dimensional structure of epithelia. It is only during the last two decades that the molecular make-up of TJ is becoming unravelled, with two major transmembrane-spanning structural protein families, called occludin and claudins, being the true constituents of the TJ. These TJ proteins are linked via specific scaffolding proteins to the cell's cytoskeleton. In the mammary gland TJ between adjacent secretory epithelial cells are formed during lactogenesis and are instrumental in establishing and maintaining milk synthesis and secretion, whereas TJ integrity is compromised during mammary involution and also as result of mastitis and periods of mammary inflamation (including mastitis). They prevent the paracellular transport of ions and small molecules between the blood and milk compartments. Formation of intact TJ at the start of lactation is important for the establishment of the lactation. Conversely, loss of TJ integrity has been linked to reduced milk secretion and mammary function and increased paracellular transport of blood components into the milk and vice versa. In addition to acting as a paracellular barrier, the TJ is increasingly linked to playing an active role in intracellular signalling. This review focusses on the role of TJ in mammary function of the normal, non-malignant mammary gland, predominantly in ruminants, the major dairy producing species.

  15. Mast cells in canine cutaneous hemangioma, hemangiosarcoma and mammary tumors.

    PubMed

    Woldemeskel, Moges; Rajeev, Sreekumari

    2010-02-01

    Mast cell count (MCC) in 45 dogs with cutaneous hemangioma (HA, n = 12), hemangiosarcoma (HSA, n = 12), mammary adenoma (AD, n = 9) and mammary adenocarcinoma (AC, n = 12) was made using Toluidine blue stained sections. Antibodies against endothelial cell markers, Factor VIII and VEGF were used to visualize and determine the hot spot micro-vessel density (MVD). Total MCC and MCC along the invasive edges were significantly higher (p < 0.001) in canine mammary AC than in AD. The total MCC did not significantly differ (p > 0.05), in HSAs (8.6 +/- 3.3) than in HAs (5.5 +/- 2.8). There is a positive correlation (r = 0.14) between the hot spot MCC and MVD in mammary AC, although not significant (p = 0.3172), indicating that mast cells are associated with angiogenesis in canine mammary AC. This study suggests that mast cells may play an important role in neovascularization of canine cutaneous vascular and mammary neoplasms. Detailed studies encompassing correlation of MCC and MVD with clinical outcomes and prognosis in these neoplasms are recommended.

  16. Technical note: Isolation and characterization of porcine mammary epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Dahanayaka, S; Rezaei, R; Porter, W W; Johnson, G A; Burghardt, R C; Bazer, F W; Hou, Y Q; Wu, Z L; Wu, G

    2015-11-01

    Within the mammary gland, functional synthesis of milk is performed by its epithelial (alveolar) cells. The availability of a stable mammary epithelial cell line is essential for biochemical studies to elucidate cellular and molecular mechanisms responsible for nutritional regulation of lactation. Therefore, porcine mammary epithelial cells (PMEC) were isolated from mammary glands of a 9-mo-old nonpregnant and nonlactating gilt and cultured to establish a nonimmortalized cell line. These cells were characterized by expression of cytokeratin-18 (an intermediate filament specific for epithelial cells), β-casein (a specific marker for mammary epithelial cells), and α-lactalbumin. In culture, the PMEC doubled in number every 24 h and maintained a cobblestone morphology, typical for cultured epithelial cells, for at least 15 passages. Addition of 0.2 to 2 μg/mL prolactin to culture medium for 3 d induced the production of β-casein and α-lactalbumin by PMEC in a dose-dependent manner. Thus, we have successfully developed a useful PMEC line for future studies of cellular and molecular regulation of milk synthesis by mammary epithelial cells of the sow. PMID:26641038

  17. Influence of lithium on mammary tumor growth in vivo.

    PubMed

    Ziche, M; Maiorana, A; Oka, T; Gullino, P M

    1980-05-01

    The possibility that lithium ions stimulate growth of mammary tumors in vivo has been suggested by their mitogenic action in vitro on normal and neoplastic mammary epithelium [8] and their clinical use as stimulators of neutrophil production in tumor-bearing patients treated with cytotoxic drugs [14,15]. Three experiments were performed to assess this possibility. Buffalo/N female rats received a single injection of N-nitrosomethylurea (NMU) at a dose known to produce mammary carcinomas in about 50% of animals under standard conditions. Under lithium treatment, the incidence of tumors did not increase significantly. Sprague-Dawley female rats treated with a single dose of 7,12-dimethylbenz[alpha] anthracene (DMBA), but showing no mammary tumors after 4 months, received lithium in their drinking water for 3 additional months. The number of late-appearing tumors was not increased by lithium treatment. Buffalo/N females with NMU-induced tumors were castrated, and the subsequent changes in tumor volume were compared in lithium-treated and control animals. The regression-regrowth curves were not altered by lithium treatment. These results are in contrast to the growth stimulatory capacity of lithium on mammary epithelium observed in vitro [8] and indicate it is very unlikely that lithium ions have an undesirable growth stimulatory action on primary mammary carcinomas in vivo.

  18. Ion-induced x-ray studies with a high luminosity von Hamos crystal spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    Vane, C.R.; Smith, M.; Raman, S.; Heard, J.; Walkiewicz, T.

    1986-01-01

    A high-resolution, high-efficiency, von Hamos geometry, Bragg crystal x-ray spectrometer has been developed and mounted on a beamline at the Holifield Heavy Ion Research Facility at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Measurements have been made of K and L x-rays emitted from a variety of targets and projectiles. Instrument performance characteristics are reported here along with spectra from fast projectile ions and very low intensity target emission - areas of measurement for which this spectrometer is especially suitable.

  19. In-beam fission study for Heavy Element Synthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishio, Katsuhisa

    2013-12-01

    Fission fragment mass distributions were measured in heavy-ion induced fissions using 238U target nucleus. The measured mass distributions changed drastically with incident energy. The results are explained by a change of the ratio between fusion and qasifission with nuclear orientation. A calculation based on a fluctuation dissipation model reproduced the mass distributions and their incident energy dependence. Fusion probability was determined in the analysis. Evaporation residue cross sections were calculated with a statistical model in the reactions of 30Si + 238U and 34S + 238U using the obtained fusion probability in the entrance channel. The results agree with the measured cross sections for seaborgium and hassium isotopes.

  20. Mammary sensitivity to protein restriction and re-alimentation.

    PubMed

    Goodwill, M G; Jessop, N S; Oldham, J D

    1996-09-01

    The present study tested the influence of protein undernutrition and re-alimentation on mammary gland size and secretory cell activity in lactating rats. During gestation, female Sprague-Dawley rats were offered a high-protein diet (215 g crude protein (N x 6.25; CP)/kg DM; H); litters were standardized to twelve pups at parturition. During lactation, two diets were offered ad libitum, diet H and a low-protein diet (90 g CP/kg DM; L). Lactational dietary treatments were the supply ad libitum of either diet H (HHH) or diet L (LLL) for the first 12 d of lactation, or diet L transferring to diet H on either day 6 (LHH) or 9 (LLH) of lactation. On days 1, 6, 9 and 12 of lactation, rats from each group (n > or = 6) were used to estimate mammary dry mass, fat, protein, DNA and RNA; the activities of lactose synthetase (EC 2.4.1.22) enzyme and Na+,K(+)-ATPase (EC 3.6.1.37) were also measured. Rats offered a diet considered protein sufficient (H) from day 1 of lactation showed a decrease in mammary dry mass and fat but an increase in DNA, RNA and protein on day 6, after which there was no further change, except for mammary protein which continued to increase. However, rats offered diet L showed a steady loss in mammary mass and fat throughout the 12 d lactation period and no change in mammary DNA, RNA or protein. Rats previously protein restricted for either the first 6 or 9 d of lactation had their mammary dry mass and mammary fat loss halted and showed a rapid increase in mammary DNA, RNA and protein on re-alimentation. Lactose production in group HHH, as measured by lactose synthetase activity, was similar on days 1 and 6 of lactation, after which a significant increase was seen. Protein-restricted rats showed no change in lactose synthetase activity during the 12 d experimental period. Changing from diet L to diet H led to a significant increase in lactose synthetase activity to levels comparable with those offered diet H from day 1. These results show that rats

  1. 60 keV Ar⁺-ion induced modification of microstructural, compositional, and vibrational properties of InSb

    SciTech Connect

    Datta, D. P.; Garg, S. K.; Som, T.; Satpati, B.; Kanjilal, A.; Dhara, S.; Kanjilal, D.

    2014-10-14

    Room temperature irradiation of InSb(111) by 60 keV Ar⁺-ions at normal (0°) and oblique (60°) angles of incidence led to the formation of nanoporous structure in the high fluence regime of 1×10¹⁷ to 3×10¹⁸ ions cm⁻². While a porous layer comprising of a network of interconnected nanofibers was generated by normal ion incidence, evolution of plate-like structures was observed for obliquely incident ions. Systematic studies of composition and structure using energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy, Raman spectroscopy, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, Raman mapping, grazing incidence x-ray diffraction, and cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy revealed a high degree of oxidation of the ion-induced microstructures with the presence of In₂O₃ and Sb₂O₃ phases and presence of nanocrystallites within the nanoporous structures. The observed structural evolution was understood in terms of processes driven by ion-induced defect accumulation within InSb.

  2. First-Principles Exploration of the Competing Mechanisms for the Sign Preference in Ion-induced Nucleation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Liubin; Chen, Wei; Cui, Ping; Zhang, Zhenyu

    2015-03-01

    Ion-induced nucleation plays an important part in aerosol formation, under both atmospheric and experimental conditions. However, the dominant mechanism underlying the so-called sign preference, a phenomenon that ions of the same magnitude of charge but opposite signs exhibit notably different enhancement of nucleation, remains an enigma. Recent experiments revealed a negative charge affinity of 1-propanol molecules condensing on tungsten oxide seeds, while prevailing first-principles calculations indicated a positive preference. In this study, we investigate the adsorption of organic molecules on charged transition metal oxide via density functional theory (DFT) calculations by including new physical factors that were absent in previous theoretical studies. First, we demonstrate the significant role of van der Waals interactions in such systems. Furthermore, we show that the change of charge state effectively varies the spin moment of the seeds, which can be utilized to selectively influence the strengths of the intermolecular bindings. These new factors may prove to be instrumental in gaining an eventual complete understanding of the long-standing sign preference puzzle in ion-induced nucleation.

  3. Social isolation induces autophagy in the mouse mammary gland: link to increased mammary cancer risk.

    PubMed

    Sumis, Allison; Cook, Katherine L; Andrade, Fabia O; Hu, Rong; Kidney, Emma; Zhang, Xiyuan; Kim, Dominic; Carney, Elissa; Nguyen, Nguyen; Yu, Wei; Bouker, Kerrie B; Cruz, Idalia; Clarke, Robert; Hilakivi-Clarke, Leena

    2016-10-01

    Social isolation is a strong predictor of early all-cause mortality and consistently increases breast cancer risk in both women and animal models. Because social isolation increases body weight, we compared its effects to those caused by a consumption of obesity-inducing diet (OID) in C57BL/6 mice. Social isolation and OID impaired insulin and glucose sensitivity. In socially isolated, OID-fed mice (I-OID), insulin resistance was linked to reduced Pparg expression and increased neuropeptide Y levels, but in group-housed OID fed mice (G-OID), it was linked to increased leptin and reduced adiponectin levels, indicating that the pathways leading to insulin resistance are different. Carcinogen-induced mammary tumorigenesis was significantly higher in I-OID mice than in the other groups, but cancer risk was also increased in socially isolated, control diet-fed mice (I-C) and G-OID mice compared with that in controls. Unfolded protein response (UPR) signaling (GRP78; IRE1) was upregulated in the mammary glands of OID-fed mice, but not in control diet-fed, socially isolated I-C mice. In contrast, expression of BECLIN1, ATG7 and LC3II were increased, and p62 was downregulated by social isolation, indicating increased autophagy. In the mammary glands of socially isolated mice, but not in G-OID mice, mRNA expressions of p53 and the p53-regulated autophagy inducer Dram1 were upregulated, and nuclear p53 staining was strong. Our findings further indicated that autophagy and tumorigenesis were not increased in Atg7(+/-) mice kept in social isolation and fed OID. Thus, social isolation may increase breast cancer risk by inducing autophagy, independent of changes in body weight. PMID:27550962

  4. Social isolation induces autophagy in the mouse mammary gland: link to increased mammary cancer risk.

    PubMed

    Sumis, Allison; Cook, Katherine L; Andrade, Fabia O; Hu, Rong; Kidney, Emma; Zhang, Xiyuan; Kim, Dominic; Carney, Elissa; Nguyen, Nguyen; Yu, Wei; Bouker, Kerrie B; Cruz, Idalia; Clarke, Robert; Hilakivi-Clarke, Leena

    2016-10-01

    Social isolation is a strong predictor of early all-cause mortality and consistently increases breast cancer risk in both women and animal models. Because social isolation increases body weight, we compared its effects to those caused by a consumption of obesity-inducing diet (OID) in C57BL/6 mice. Social isolation and OID impaired insulin and glucose sensitivity. In socially isolated, OID-fed mice (I-OID), insulin resistance was linked to reduced Pparg expression and increased neuropeptide Y levels, but in group-housed OID fed mice (G-OID), it was linked to increased leptin and reduced adiponectin levels, indicating that the pathways leading to insulin resistance are different. Carcinogen-induced mammary tumorigenesis was significantly higher in I-OID mice than in the other groups, but cancer risk was also increased in socially isolated, control diet-fed mice (I-C) and G-OID mice compared with that in controls. Unfolded protein response (UPR) signaling (GRP78; IRE1) was upregulated in the mammary glands of OID-fed mice, but not in control diet-fed, socially isolated I-C mice. In contrast, expression of BECLIN1, ATG7 and LC3II were increased, and p62 was downregulated by social isolation, indicating increased autophagy. In the mammary glands of socially isolated mice, but not in G-OID mice, mRNA expressions of p53 and the p53-regulated autophagy inducer Dram1 were upregulated, and nuclear p53 staining was strong. Our findings further indicated that autophagy and tumorigenesis were not increased in Atg7(+/-) mice kept in social isolation and fed OID. Thus, social isolation may increase breast cancer risk by inducing autophagy, independent of changes in body weight.

  5. Crystal blocking in heavy ion reactions

    SciTech Connect

    del Campo, J.G.

    1986-01-01

    The crystal blocking technique, used to measure very short lifetime (10/sup -18/ sec), was developed during the 1960's primarily in connection with the study of the channeling effect. Early blocking lifetime measurements involved light ion resonance reactions yielding typical lifetime values down to the order of 10/sup -17/ sec. Recently, studies of heavy-ion induced fission and fusion have extended the technique into the 10/sup -18/ to 10/sup -19/ sec scale. In this work measurements of fusion for /sup 16/O + Ge and deep inelastic reactions for /sup 28/Si + Ge are presented for bombarding energies around 8 nucleon. Also measurements of the projectile fragmenatation of 44 MeV/nucleon /sup 40/Ar + Ge are discussed. In all reactions studied the presence of particle evaporation is the dominant mechanism that determines the reaction times of about 10/sup -18/ sec extracted with the blocking technique. 16 refs., 9 figs.

  6. Metabotropic glutamate receptor 1 disrupts mammary acinar architecture and initiates malignant transformation of mammary epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Teh, Jessica L F; Shah, Raj; La Cava, Stephanie; Dolfi, Sonia C; Mehta, Madhura S; Kongara, Sameera; Price, Sandy; Ganesan, Shridar; Reuhl, Kenneth R; Hirshfield, Kim M; Karantza, Vassiliki; Chen, Suzie

    2015-05-01

    Metabotropic glutamate receptor 1 (mGluR1/Grm1) is a member of the G-protein-coupled receptor superfamily, which was once thought to only participate in synaptic transmission and neuronal excitability, but has more recently been implicated in non-neuronal tissue functions. We previously described the oncogenic properties of Grm1 in cultured melanocytes in vitro and in spontaneous melanoma development with 100 % penetrance in vivo. Aberrant mGluR1 expression was detected in 60-80 % of human melanoma cell lines and biopsy samples. As most human cancers are of epithelial origin, we utilized immortalized mouse mammary epithelial cells (iMMECs) as a model system to study the transformative properties of Grm1. We introduced Grm1 into iMMECs and isolated several stable mGluR1-expressing clones. Phenotypic alterations in mammary acinar architecture were assessed using three-dimensional morphogenesis assays. We found that mGluR1-expressing iMMECs exhibited delayed lumen formation in association with decreased central acinar cell death, disrupted cell polarity, and a dramatic increase in the activation of the mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway. Orthotopic implantation of mGluR1-expressing iMMEC clones into mammary fat pads of immunodeficient nude mice resulted in mammary tumor formation in vivo. Persistent mGluR1 expression was required for the maintenance of the tumorigenic phenotypes in vitro and in vivo, as demonstrated by an inducible Grm1-silencing RNA system. Furthermore, mGluR1 was found be expressed in human breast cancer cell lines and breast tumor biopsies. Elevated levels of extracellular glutamate were observed in mGluR1-expressing breast cancer cell lines and concurrent treatment of MCF7 xenografts with glutamate release inhibitor, riluzole, and an AKT inhibitor led to suppression of tumor progression. Our results are likely relevant to human breast cancer, highlighting a putative role of mGluR1 in the pathophysiology of breast cancer and the potential

  7. Neuropilin-2 promotes branching morphogenesis in the mouse mammary gland.

    PubMed

    Goel, Hira Lal; Bae, Donggoo; Pursell, Bryan; Gouvin, Lindsey M; Lu, Shaolei; Mercurio, Arthur M

    2011-07-01

    Although the neuropilins were characterized as semaphorin receptors that regulate axon guidance, they also function as vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) receptors and contribute to the development of other tissues. Here, we assessed the role of NRP2 in mouse mammary gland development based on our observation that NRP2 is expressed preferentially in the terminal end buds of developing glands. A floxed NRP2 mouse was bred with an MMTV-Cre strain to generate a mammary gland-specific knockout of NRP2. MMTV-Cre;NRP2(loxP/loxP) mice exhibited significant defects in branching morphogenesis and ductal outgrowth compared with either littermate MMTV-Cre;NRP2(+/loxP) or MMTV-Cre mice. Mechanistic insight into this morphological defect was obtained from a mouse mammary cell line in which we observed that VEGF(165), an NRP2 ligand, induces branching morphogenesis in 3D cultures and that branching is dependent upon NRP2 as shown using shRNAs and a function-blocking antibody. Epithelial cells in the mouse mammary gland express VEGF, supporting the hypothesis that this NRP2 ligand contributes to mammary gland morphogenesis. Importantly, we demonstrate that VEGF and NRP2 activate focal adhesion kinase (FAK) and promote FAK-dependent branching morphogenesis in vitro. The significance of this mechanism is substantiated by our finding that FAK activation is diminished significantly in developing MMTV-Cre;NRP2(loxP/loxP) mammary glands compared with control glands. Together, our data reveal a VEGF/NRP2/FAK signaling axis that is important for branching morphogenesis and mammary gland development. In a broader context, our data support an emerging hypothesis that directional outgrowth and branching morphogenesis in a variety of tissues are influenced by signals that were identified initially for their role in axon guidance.

  8. Prepubertal exposure to zearalenone or genistein reduces mammary tumorigenesis.

    PubMed

    Hilakivi-Clarke, L; Onojafe, I; Raygada, M; Cho, E; Skaar, T; Russo, I; Clarke, R

    1999-08-01

    Prepubertal exposure to a pharmacological dose (500 mg kg(-1)) of the phyto-oestrogen genistein can reduce the incidence and multiplicity of carcinogen-induced mammary tumours in rats. However, such an exposure also disrupts the function of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis, making it unsuitable for breast cancer prevention. We studied whether prepubertal exposure to genistein at a total body dose broadly comparable to the level typical of Oriental countries, approximately 1 mg kg(-1) body weight, affects mammary tumorigenesis. We also studied whether prepubertal exposure to zearalenone, a major source for phyto-oestrogens in the USA, influences breast cancer risk. Prepubertal rats were treated between postnatal days 7 and 20, with 20 microg (approximately 1 mg kg(-1) body weight) of either genistein or zearalenone. Zearalenone exposure significantly reduced both the incidence and multiplicity of mammary tumours induced by 7,12-dimethylbenz(a)anthracene (DMBA). Genistein exposure significantly reduced tumour multiplicity, but not tumour incidence, when compared with vehicle-treated animals. Furthermore, 60% of the tumours in the genistein group were not malignant, while all the tumours analysed for histopathology in the vehicle and zearalenone groups were adenocarcinomas. A higher number of differentiated alveolar buds, and lower number of terminal ducts, were present in the DMBA-treated mammary glands of the phyto-oestrogen exposed rats. The concentration of oestrogen receptor (ER) binding sites after the DMBA treatment was low in the mammary glands of all groups but a significantly higher proportion of the glands in the zearalenone exposed rats were ER-positive (i.e. ER levels > or = 5 fmol mg(-1) protein) than the glands of the vehicle controls. Our data suggest that a prepubertal exposure to a low dose of either zearalenone or genistein may protect the mammary gland from carcinogen-induced malignant transformation, possibly by increasing differentiation

  9. Vitamin D(3) receptor ablation alters mammary gland morphogenesis.

    PubMed

    Zinser, Glendon; Packman, Kathryn; Welsh, JoEllen

    2002-07-01

    Postnatal mammary gland morphogenesis is achieved through coordination of signaling networks in both the epithelial and stromal cells of the developing gland. While the major proliferative hormones driving pubertal mammary gland development are estrogen and progesterone, studies in transgenic and knockout mice have successfully identified other steroid and peptide hormones that impact on mammary gland development. The vitamin D(3) receptor (VDR), whose ligand 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D(3) is the biologically active form of vitamin D(3), has been implicated in control of differentiation, cell cycle and apoptosis of mammary cells in culture, but little is known about the physiological relevance of the vitamin D(3) endocrine system in the developing gland. In these studies, we report the expression of the VDR in epithelial cells of the terminal end bud and subtending ducts, in stromal cells and in a subset of lymphocytes within the lymph node. In the terminal end bud, a distinct gradient of VDR expression is observed, with weak VDR staining in proliferative populations and strong VDR staining in differentiated populations. The role of the VDR in ductal morphogenesis was examined in Vdr knockout mice fed high dietary Ca(2+) which normalizes fertility, serum estrogen and neonatal growth. Our results indicate that mammary glands from virgin Vdr knockout mice are heavier and exhibit enhanced growth, as evidenced by higher numbers of terminal end buds, greater ductal outgrowth and enhanced secondary branch points, compared with glands from age- and weight-matched wild-type mice. In addition, glands from Vdr knockout mice exhibit enhanced growth in response to exogenous estrogen and progesterone, both in vivo and in organ culture, compared with glands from wild-type mice. Our data provide the first in vivo evidence that 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D(3) and the VDR impact on ductal elongation and branching morphogenesis during pubertal development of the mammary gland. Collectively

  10. Deduction of compound nucleus formation probability from the fragment angular distributions in heavy-ion reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yadav, C.; Thomas, R. G.; Mohanty, A. K.; Kapoor, S. S.

    2015-07-01

    The presence of various fissionlike reactions in heavy-ion induced reactions is a major hurdle in the path to laboratory synthesis of heavy and super-heavy nuclei. It is known that the cross section of forming a heavy evaporation residue in fusion reactions depends on the three factors—the capture cross section, probability of compound nucleus formation PCN, and the survival probability of the compound nucleus against fission. As the probability of compound nucleus formation, PCN is difficult to theoretically estimate because of its complex dependence on several parameters; attempts have been made in the past to deduce it from the fission fragment anisotropy data. In the present work, the fragment anisotropy data for a number of heavy-ion reactions are analyzed and it is found that deduction of PCN from the anisotropy data also requires the knowledge of the ratio of relaxation time of the K degree of freedom to pre-equilibrium fission time.

  11. Ion-induced molecular emission of polymers: analytical potentialities of FTIR and mass spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Picq, V.; Balanzat, E.

    1999-05-01

    The release of small gaseous molecules is a general phenomenon of irradiated polymers. Polyethylene (PE), polypropylene (PP) and polybutene (PB) were irradiated with ions of different electronic stopping power. We show that the gas emission can provide important information on the damage process if a reliable chemical identification of the molecules released and accurate yield values are obtained. The outgassing products were analysed by two techniques: (1) by a novel set-up using a Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) analysis of the gas mixture released from the polymer film and (2) by residual gas analysis (RGA) with a quadrupole mass spectrometer. Comparing the analytical potentialities of both methods we come to the conclusion that the FTIR method gives a more straightforward and accurate determination of the chemical nature and of the yield of most of the released molecules. However, RGA provides complementary information on the gas release kinetics and also on the release of heavy hydrocarbon molecules and symmetric molecules like molecular hydrogen.

  12. INDUCTION OF MAMMARY GLAND DEVELOPMENT IN ESTROGEN RECEPTOR-ALPHA KNOCKOUT MICE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Mammary glands from the estrogen receptor knockout ( ERKO) mouse do not undergo ductal morphogenesis or alveolar development. Disrupted Er signaling may result in reduced estrogen-responsive gene products in the mammary gland or reduced mammotropic hormones that contribute t...

  13. Application of ion-induced nucleation mass spectrometry in the analysis of trace gases evolved from a polyimide film during the thermal curing stages

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, A. C.

    1982-01-01

    Trace gases evolved from a polyimide film during its thermal curing stages have been studied using ion-induced nucleation mass spectrometry. The technique involved exposing the test gas sample to a low energy beta source and recording the masses of the ion-induced molecular clusters formed in the reaction chamber. On the basis of the experimentally observed molecular cluster spectra, it has been concluded that the dominant trace component had a molecular weight of 87 atomic mass units. This component has been identified as a molecule of dimethylacetamide (DMAC) which had been used as a solvent in the preparation of the test polyimide specimen. This identification has been further confirmed by comparing the spectra of the test gas sample and the DMAC calibration sample obtained with a conventional mass spectrometer. The advantages of the ion-induced nucleation mass spectrometer versus the conventional mass spectrometer are discussed.

  14. FAMILIAL MAMMARY TUMORS IN THE RABBIT

    PubMed Central

    Greene, Harry S. N.

    1940-01-01

    A series of experiments is described in which fragments derived from two mammary tumors of distinct types were transferred at different developmental stages to the anterior chamber of the eye of normal rabbits. It was found that the ability to survive and to grow progressively after transplantation was not immediately related to anaplastic cellular changes. On the other hand, there existed a definite correlation between the success of transplantation and the morphological relationship of tumor cells and the normal cells of the host. Transplantation to normal animals could not be effected during stages of local tissue invasion but was successfully performed as soon as the tumor cells manifested the ability to invade foreign tissues or to metastasize in the spontaneous host. It was concluded, therefore, that neither anaplasia nor local tissue invasion represented autonomy but, rather, stages in its development and that the final attainment of this condition was only evidenced by metastasis or by invasion in foreign tissues. The tumors were successfully transplanted to normal animals during this series of experiments and have been carried by serial transfer to the present time. The most outstanding feature in the transplantation of the papillary type tumor was the marked difference in susceptibility exhibited by the two sexes. The acinar type tumor was distinguished by high transplantability, an extremely rapid growth rate and early regression. PMID:19870965

  15. Mammary analogue secretory carcinoma mimicking salivary adenoma.

    PubMed

    Williams, Lindsay; Chiosea, Simion I

    2013-12-01

    Mammary analogue secretory carcinoma (MASC) is a recently described salivary gland tumor characterized by ETV6 translocation. It appears that prior studies have identified MASC by reviewing salivary gland carcinomas, such as acinic cell carcinoma and adenocarcinoma, not otherwise specified. To address the possibility of MASC mimicking benign salivary neoplasms we reviewed 12 salivary gland (cyst)adenomas diagnosed prior to the discovery of MASC. One encapsulated (cyst)adenoma of the parotid gland demonstrated features of MASC. The diagnosis was confirmed by fluorescence in situ hybridization with an ETV6 break-apart probe. An unusual complex pattern of ETV6 rearrangement with duplication of the telomeric/distal ETV6 probe was identified. This case illustrates that MASC may mimic salivary (cyst)adenomas. To more accurately assess true clinical and morphologic spectrum of MASC, future studies may have to include review of salivary (cyst)adenomas. The differential diagnosis of MASC may have to be expanded to include cases resembling salivary (cyst)adenomas.

  16. Isolation of Endoplasmic Reticulum Fractions from Mammary Epithelial Tissue.

    PubMed

    Chanat, Eric; Le Parc, Annabelle; Lahouassa, Hichem; Badaoui, Bouabid

    2016-06-01

    In the mammary glands of lactating animals, the mammary epithelial cells that surround the lumen of the acini produce and secrete copious amounts of milk. Functional differentiation of these mammary epithelial cells depends on the development of high-efficiency secretory pathways, notably for protein and lipid secretion. Protein secretion is a fundamental process common to all animal cells that involves a subset of cellular organelles, including the endoplasmic reticulum and the Golgi apparatus. In contrast, en masse secretion of triglycerides and cholesterol esters in the form of milk fat globules is a unique feature of the mammary epithelial cell. Cytoplasmic lipid droplets, the intracellular precursors of milk fat globules, originate from the endoplasmic reticulum, as do most milk-specific proteins. This organelle is therefore pivotal in the biogenesis of milk components. Fractionation of the cell into its subcellular parts is an approach that has proven very powerful for understanding organelle function and for studying the specific role of an organelle in a given cell activity. Here we describe a method for the purification of both smooth and rough microsomes, the membrane-bound endoplasmic reticulum fragments that form from endoplasmic reticulum domains when cells are broken up, from mammary gland tissue at lactation.

  17. Hormonal regulation of the immune microenvironment in the mammary gland.

    PubMed

    Need, Eleanor F; Atashgaran, Vahid; Ingman, Wendy V; Dasari, Pallave

    2014-07-01

    It is well established that the development and homeostasis of the mammary gland are highly dependent upon the actions of ovarian hormones progesterone and estrogen, as well as the availability of prolactin for the pregnant and lactating gland. More recently it has become apparent that immune system cells and cytokines play essential roles in both mammary gland development as well as breast cancer. Here, we review hormonal effects on mammary gland biology during puberty, menstrual cycling, pregnancy, lactation and involution, and dissect how hormonal control of the immune system may contribute to mammary development at each stage via cytokine secretion and recruitment of macrophages, eosinophils, mast cells and lymphocytes. Collectively, these alterations may create an immunotolerant or inflammatory immune environment at specific developmental stages or phases of the menstrual cycle. Of particular interest for further research is investigation of the combinatorial actions of progesterone and estrogen during the luteal phase of the menstrual cycle and key developmental points where the immune system may play an active role both in mammary development as well as in the creation of an immunotolerant environment, thereby affecting breast cancer risk.

  18. Pseudoangiomatous hyperplasia of mammary stroma associated with gynaecomastia.

    PubMed Central

    Milanezi, M F; Saggioro, F P; Zanati, S G; Bazan, R; Schmitt, F C

    1998-01-01

    AIMS: To evaluate the prevalence of pseudoangiomatous hyperplasia of mammary stroma in gynaecomastia and its immunohistochemical profile in this setting. METHODS: Eighty eight cases of gynaecomastia recovered from the files of the department of pathology, Botucatu School of Medicine from 1976 to 1996 were studied. In the cases associated with pseudoangiomatous hyperplasia of mammary stroma, immunoreactivity for cytokeratins (CAM 5.2), vimentin, CD34, factor VIII related antigen, and the oestrogen and progesterone receptors were studied. RESULTS: Pseudoangiomatous hyperplasia of mammary stroma was found in 21 of 88 cases of gynaecomastia (23.8%). In all cases, the cells lining the spaces were positive for vimentin, whereas CAM 5.2 and factor VIII related antigen were consistently negative. Nineteen of the 21 cases showed immunoreactivity for CD34. Ductal epithelial cells were positive for both the oestrogen receptor and the progesterone receptor, whereas stromal cells were negative. CONCLUSIONS: Pseudoangiomatous hyperplasia of mammary stroma was present in approximately one quarter of the cases of gynaecomastia. This immunohistochemical study confirms the mesenchymal origin of the stromal cells that line the pseudovascular spaces, as has been found in female cases of pseudoangiomatous hyperplasia of mammary stroma. Images PMID:9659260

  19. Mammary carcinogenesis in rats: basic facts and recent results in Brookhaven

    SciTech Connect

    Shellabarger, C.J.; Stone, J.P.; Holtzman, s.

    1982-01-01

    Some research results from experiments investigating neutron-induced mammary carcinogenesis in rats are presented. The additive effects of neutrons and 3-methylcholanthrene on mammary adenocarcinoma were determined. Synergism between diethylstilbestrol and neutrons was likewise studied. Differences in mammary neoplastic response between strains of laboratory rats was also investigated. (ACR)

  20. Interaction of dimethylbenzanthracene and diethylstilbestrol on mammary adenocarcinoma formation in female ACI rats

    SciTech Connect

    Shellabarger, C.J.; McKnight, B.; Stone, J.P.; Holtzman, S.

    1980-06-01

    It has been reported that x-irradiation and diethylstilbestrol (DES) act synergistically on mammary adenocarcinoma formation in female ACI rats. The physical carcinogen, x-irradiation, was replaced by a chemical carcinogen, dimethylbenzanthracene (DMBA), and their interaction was studied in this system. Thirty-three female ACI rats were given 13.3 mg of DMBA per 100 grams of body weight. A total of 10 mammary adenocarcinomas were found, 8 in rats with a single mammary adenocarcinoma and 2 in a single rat, over a 266-day study period. Twenty-nine rats were implanted with a cholesterol pellet containing 5 mg of DES, and a total of 47 mammary adenocarcinomas were found, 5 in rats with a single mammary adenocarcinoma and 42 in 5 rats with 2 or more mammary adenocarcinomas. Twenty-four rats were given a combined treatment of both compounds, DES 2 days before DMBA, and a total of 126 mammary adenocarcinomas were found, 2 in rats with a single mammary adenocarcinoma and 124 in 18 rats with 2 or more mammary adenocarcinomas. The interaction between DMBA and DES was interpreted to be synergistic in regard to the proportion of rats with one or more mammary adenocarcinomas, and the median times of appearance of both first and second mammary adenocarcinomas. These interactions between DMBA and DES resemble the previously reported synergistic interactions between radiation and DES on mammary adenocarcinoma formation in female ACI rats.

  1. Mammary fibroadenomatous hyperplasia in a young cat attributed to treatment with megestrol acetate

    PubMed Central

    MacDougall, Lori D.

    2003-01-01

    A male, neutered cat was presented for lethargy, reluctance to walk, and mammary enlargement after recent treatment with megestrol acetate. Mammary fibroadenomatous hyperplasia was diagnosed on the basis of history, clinical signs, and histopathological findings. Pathogenesis, clinical signs, and treatment options for mammary fibroadenomatous hyperplasia attributed to megestrol acetate treatment are discussed. PMID:12677692

  2. Expression of novel, putative stem cell markers in prepubertal and lactating mammary glands of bovine

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Mammary stem cells (MaSC) are essential for growth and maintenance of the mammary epithelium. Two main phases of mammary growth include ductal elongation prior to puberty and lobulo-alveolar growth and development during pregnancy. Some studies have utilized morphological characteristics and retenti...

  3. Ab initio treatment of ion-induced charge transfer dynamics of isolated 2-deoxy-D-ribose.

    PubMed

    Bacchus-Montabonel, Marie-Christine

    2014-08-21

    Modeling-induced radiation damage in biological systems, in particular, in DNA building blocks, is of major concern in cancer therapy studies. Ion-induced charge-transfer dynamics may indeed be involved in proton and hadrontherapy treatments. We have thus performed a theoretical approach of the charge-transfer dynamics in collision of C(4+) ions and protons with isolated 2-deoxy-D-ribose in a wide collision energy range by means of ab initio quantum chemistry molecular methods. The comparison of both projectile ions has been performed with regard to previous theoretical and experimental results. The charge transfer appears markedly less efficient with the 2-deoxy-D-ribose target than that with pyrimidine nucleobases, which would induce an enhancement of the fragmentation process in agreement with experimental measurements. The mechanism has been analyzed with regard to inner orbital excitations, and qualitative tendencies have been pointed out for studies on DNA buiding block damage. PMID:24093626

  4. Int-6, a highly conserved, widely expressed gene, is mutated by mouse mammary tumor virus in mammary preneoplasia.

    PubMed Central

    Marchetti, A; Buttitta, F; Miyazaki, S; Gallahan, D; Smith, G H; Callahan, R

    1995-01-01

    With a unique mouse mammary tumor model system in which mouse mammary tumor virus (MMTV) insertional mutations can be detected during progression from preneoplasia to frank malignancy, including metastasis, we have discovered a new common integration site (designated Int-6) for MMTV in mouse mammary tumors. MMTV was integrated into Int-6 in a mammary hyperplastic outgrowth line, its tumors and metastases, and two independent mammary tumors arising in unrelated mice. The Int-6 gene is ubiquitously expressed as a 1.4-kb RNA species in adult tissues and is detected beginning at day 8 of embryonic development. The nucleotide sequence of Int-6 is unrelated to any of the known genes in the GenBank database. MMTV integrates within introns of the gene in the opposite transcriptional orientation. In each tumor tested, this results in the expression of a truncated Int-6/long terminal repeat (LTR) chimeric RNA species which is terminated at a cryptic termination signal in the MMTV LTR. Since the nonrearranged Int-6 alleles in these tumors contain no mutations, we favor the conclusion that truncation of the Int-6 gene product either biologically activates its function or represents a dominant-negative mutation. PMID:7853537

  5. To grow mouse mammary epithelial cells in culture

    PubMed Central

    1984-01-01

    Normal mouse mammary epithelial cells from Balb/c mice were successfully cultivated on tissue culture plastic with lethally irradiated LA7 feeder cells. The feeder cells also promoted colony formation from single mouse mammary cells, and the fraction of cells that formed colonies was proportional to the density of feeder cells. The mouse mammary cells could be passaged at least 8-12 times as long as new feeder cells were added at each passage. The cells now in culture have doubled in number at least 30 times, but the in vitro lifespan is not yet known. The cultures of mouse cells maintained by this technique never became overgrown with fibroblasts and numerous domes formed in the cultures. PMID:6699079

  6. Mammary blood flow regulation in the nursing rabbit

    SciTech Connect

    Katz, M.; Creasy, R.K.

    1984-11-01

    Cardiac output and mammary blood flow distribution prior to and after suckling were studied in 10 nursing rabbits by means of radionuclide-labeled microspheres. Suckling was followed by a 5.8% rise in cardiac output and a 20.4% rise in mammary blood flow. Determinations of intraglandular blood flow distribution have shown that there was a 43% increase in blood flow to the glands suckled from as compared to a 22.7% rise to the contralateral untouched glands and a 4.9% rise in the remainder of untouched glands. The conclusion is that a local mechanism may be involved in the regulation of mammary blood flow in the nursing rabbit.

  7. Survivin and related proteins in canine mammary tumors: immunohistochemical expression.

    PubMed

    Bongiovanni, L; Romanucci, M; Malatesta, D; D'Andrea, A; Ciccarelli, A; Della Salda, L

    2015-03-01

    Survivin is reexpressed in most human breast cancers, where its expression has been associated with tumor aggressiveness, poor prognosis, and poor response to therapy. Survivin expression was evaluated in 41 malignant canine mammary tumors (CMTs) by immunohistochemistry, in relation to histological grade and stage, and correlated with that of some related molecules (β-catenin, caspase 3, heat shock proteins) to understand their possible role in canine mammary tumorigenesis. An increase in nuclear survivin expression, compared with healthy mammary glands, was observed in CMTs, where nuclear immunolabeling was related to the presence of necrosis. No statistically significant relation was found between the expression of the investigated molecules and the histological grade or stage. The present study may suggest an important involvement of survivin in CMT tumorigenesis. Its overexpression in most of the cases evaluated might suggest that targeting survivin in CMTs may be a valid anticancer therapy. PMID:24686389

  8. Oxytocin binding by myoepithelial cell membranes from involuted mammary tissue.

    PubMed

    Ruberti, A; Olins, G M; Eakle, K A; Bremel, R D

    1983-04-29

    Oxytocin binding activity of myoepithelial cell membranes from mammary tissue was measured under a variety of different experimental conditions. Mammary tissue from non-lactating rats bound oxytocin with a Kd of 9.2 +/- 1.6 nM (+/- S.E.) and indicates that receptors are retained by the myoepithelial cells in a non-lactating state. Ovariectomy of non-lactating rats did not depress the binding activity of the membranes. Administration of the estrogenic compounds estradiol-17 beta and diethylstibestrol at doses which affect uterine weight and are known to increase uterine oxytocin binding did not influence the binding activity of the myoepithelial cells. This indicates that the oxytocin receptors of the mammary gland are not under the same endocrine control as the uterine receptors. PMID:6303330

  9. Micro-radiosurgery: a new concept for radiotherapy based upon low energy, ion-induced nuclear reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horn, K. M.; Doyle, B. L.

    1993-06-01

    Traditionally, proton radiotherapy has required the use of high energy proton beams (50-200 MeV) which can penetrate into a patient's body to the site of a tumor that is to be destroyed through irradiation. However, substantial damage is still done to healthy tissue along the path of the incident proton beam, as much as 30% of that done at the tumor site. We propose a new concept for the production and delivery of energetic protons for use in medical radiotherapy, based upon the fact that low energy, ion-induced nuclear reactions can produce radiation products suitable for use in radiotherapy applications. By employing specially fabricated "conduit needles" to deliver beams of energetic ions to selected target materials plugging the end of the needle, ion beam-induced nuclear reactions can be generated at the needle tip, emitting reaction-specific radiation products directly at the tumor site. In this paper, we show that the 13.6 MeV protons produced by the d( 3He, p) 4He nuclear reaction can deliver a lethal dose (7 krad) of radiation to a 4.4 mm diameter sphere of tissue in only 30 s using a 1 μA, 800 keV 3He ion beam. If also proven clinically feasible, the use of low energy, ion-induced nuclear reactions would allow the utilization of relatively inexpensive, compact, low energy ion accelerators for proton radiotherapy and minimize unintended radiation damage to healthy tissue by providing much greater precision in controlling the irradiated volume.

  10. Biology of glucose transport in the mammary gland.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Feng-Qi

    2014-03-01

    Glucose is the major precursor of lactose, which is synthesized in Golgi vesicles of mammary secretory alveolar epithelial cells during lactation. Glucose is taken up by mammary epithelial cells through a passive, facilitative process, which is driven by the downward glucose concentration gradient across the plasma membrane. This process is mediated by facilitative glucose transporters (GLUTs), of which there are 14 known isoforms. Mammary glands mainly express GLUT1 and GLUT8, and GLUT1 is the predominant isoform with a Km of ~10 mM and transport activity for mannose and galactose in addition to glucose. Mammary glucose transport activity increases dramatically from the virgin state to the lactation state, with a concomitant increase in GLUT expression. The increased GLUT expression during lactogenesis is not stimulated by the accepted lactogenic hormones. New evidence indicates that a possible low oxygen tension resulting from increased metabolic rate and oxygen consumption may play a major role in stimulating glucose uptake and GLUT1 expression in mammary epithelial cells during lactogenesis. In addition to its primary presence on the plasma membrane, GLUT1 is also expressed on the Golgi membrane of mammary epithelial cells and is likely involved in facilitating the uptake of glucose and galactose to the site of lactose synthesis. Because lactose synthesis dictates milk volume, regulation of GLUT expression and trafficking represents potentially fruitful areas for further research in dairy production. In addition, this research will have pathological implications for the treatment of breast cancer because glucose uptake and GLUT expression are up-regulated in breast cancer cells to accommodate the increased glucose need.

  11. Malignant mammary tumor in female dogs: environmental contaminants

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Mammary tumors of female dogs have greatly increased in recent years, thus demanding rapid diagnosis and effective treatment in order to determine the animal survival. There is considerable scientific interest in the possible role of environmental contaminants in the etiology of mammary tumors, specifically in relation to synthetic chemical substances released into the environment to which living beings are either directly or indirectly exposed. In this study, the presence of pyrethroid insecticide was observed in adjacent adipose tissue of canine mammary tumor. High Precision Liquid Chromatography - HPLC was adapted to detect and identify environmental contaminants in adipose tissue adjacent to malignant mammary tumor in nine female dogs, without predilection for breed or age. After surgery, masses were carefully examined for malignant neoplastic lesions. Five grams of adipose tissue adjacent to the tumor were collected to detect of environmental contaminants. The identified pyrethroids were allethrin, cyhalothrin, cypermethrin, deltamethrin and tetramethrin, with a contamination level of 33.3%. Histopathology demonstrated six female dogs (66.7%) as having complex carcinoma and three (33.3%) with simple carcinoma. From these tumors, seven (77.8%) presented aggressiveness degree III and two (22.2%) degree I. Five tumors were positive for estrogen receptors in immunohistochemical analysis. The contamination level was observed in more aggressive tumors. This was the first report in which the level of environmental contaminants could be detected in adipose tissue of female dogs with malignant mammary tumor, by HPLC. Results suggest the possible involvement of pyrethroid in the canine mammary tumor carcinogenesis. Hence, the dog may be used as a sentinel animal for human breast cancer, since human beings share the same environment and basically have the same eating habits. PMID:20587072

  12. Radiogenic neoplasia in thyroid and mammary clonogens

    SciTech Connect

    Clifton, K.H.

    1992-05-20

    We have developed rat thyroid and mammary clonogen transplantation systems for the study of radiogenic cancer induction at the target cell level in vivo. The epithelial cell populations of both glands contain small subpopulations of cells which are capable of giving rise to monoclonal glandular structures when transplanted and stimulated with appropriate hormones. Previous results indicated that these clonogens are the precursor cells of radiogenic cancer, and that initiation, is common event at the clonegenic cell level. Detailed information on the physiologic control of clonogen proliferation, differentiation, and total numbers is thus essential to an understanding of the carcinogenic process. We report here studies on investigations on the relationships between grafted thyroid cell number and the rapidity and degree of reestablishment of the thyroid-hypothalamus-pituitary feedback axis in thyroidectomized rats maintained on a normal diet or an iodine deficient diet; studies of the persistence of, and the differentiation potential and functional characteristics of, the TSH-(thyrotropin-) responsive sub- population of clonogens during goitrogenesis, the plateau-phase of goiter growth, and goiter involution; studies of changes in the size of the clonogen sub-population during goitrogenesis, goiter involution and the response to goitrogen rechallenge; and a large carcinogenesis experiment on the nature of the grafted thyroid cell number-dependent suppression of promotion/progression to neoplasia in grafts of radiation-initiated thyroid cells. Data from these studies will be used in the design of future carcinogenesis experiments on neoplastic initiation by high and low LET radiations and on cell interactions during the neoplastic process.

  13. Mammary-type myofibroblastoma with the nephrotic syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Vankawala, Preksha; Kuperman, Michael B.; Mennel, Robert G.

    2016-01-01

    We describe a 23-year-old white man who presented with anasarca and a new periumbilical mass. He had preserved kidney function and laboratory findings consistent with nephrotic syndrome, including 9.7 g/day albuminuria. Serum serologies were positive for anti-SSa and anti-SSb and low complements but were negative for antinuclear antibody. Pathologic findings of the abdominal mass showed a mammary-type myofibroblastoma. A kidney biopsy revealed a diffuse proliferative and membranous immune-mediated glomerulonephritis with 10% interstitial fibrosis. This is a novel case of mammary-type myofibroblastoma associated with nephrotic syndrome mimicking a proliferative lupus pattern. PMID:27365885

  14. [Progress of Japan Mammary Cancer Society and future perspectives].

    PubMed

    Kuno, K

    1985-05-01

    One of the important past achievements of the Japan Mammary Cancer Society was the establishment of the general rule for clinical and pathological record of mammary cancer. The past two decades have seen major changes in our understanding of the biology of the breast cancer as well as in diagnosis and management. The prediction of the future is extremely difficult. However, there is a future need to develop tests of tumor and host potential for spread. A future goal of chemotherapy selectivity would be to develop ways of testing for drug selection.

  15. Internal mammary lymph node biopsy guided by computed tomography

    PubMed Central

    Irving, Henry C.; Hardy, Graham J.

    1982-01-01

    Internal mammary lymph node enlargement may be demonstrated using computed tomography (CT), and a confirmatory tissue diagnosis of metastatic involvement may be obtained using fine needle aspiration biopsy with needle tip placement guided by the CT scanner. A case history is described to illustrate how a patient presented 9 years after mastectomy with an internal mammary lymph node metastasis and how cytopathological diagnosis of this metastasis was achieved by CT guided biopsy. ImagesFig. 1Fig. 2Fig. 3Fig. 4 PMID:7145793

  16. BST-2/tetherin is overexpressed in mammary gland and tumor tissues in MMTV-induced mammary cancer

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Philip H.; Mahauad-Fernandez, Wadie D.; Madison, M. Nia; Okeoma, Chioma M.

    2014-01-01

    BST-2 restricts MMTV replication, but once infection has established, MMTV modulates BST-2 levels. MMTV-directed BST-2 modulation is tissue-specific and dependent on infection and neoplastic transformation status of cells. In the lymphoid compartment of infected mice, BST-2 expression is first upregulated and then significantly downregulated regardless of absence or presence of mammary tumors. However, in mammary gland tissues, upregulation of BST-2 expression is dependent on the presence of mammary tumors and tumor tissues themselves have high BST-2 levels. Elevated BST-2 expression in these tissues is not attributable to IFN since levels of IFNα and IFNγ negatively correlate with BST-2. Importantly, soluble factors released by tumor cells suppress IFNα and IFNγ but induce BST-2. These data suggest that overexpression of BST-2 in carcinoma tissues could not be attributed to IFNs but to a yet to be determined factor that upregulates BST-2 once oncogenesis is initiated. PMID:23806386

  17. The mammary glands of the Amazonian manatee, Trichechus inunguis (Mammalia: Sirenia): morphological characteristics and microscopic anatomy.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, Fernanda Rosa; da Silva, Vera Maria Ferreira; Barcellos, José Fernando Marques

    2014-08-01

    The mammaries from carcasses of two female Amazonian manatees were examined. Trichechus inunguis possesses two axillary mammaries beneath the pectoral fins, one on each side of the body. Each papilla mammae has a small hole on its apex--the ostium papillare. The mammaries are covered by a stratified squamous keratinized epithelium. The epithelium of the mammary ducts became thinner more deeply in the tissue and varied from stratified to simple cuboidal. There was no evidence of glandular activity or secretion into the ducts of the mammary glands.

  18. The mammary glands of the Amazonian manatee, Trichechus inunguis (Mammalia: Sirenia): morphological characteristics and microscopic anatomy.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, Fernanda Rosa; da Silva, Vera Maria Ferreira; Barcellos, José Fernando Marques

    2014-08-01

    The mammaries from carcasses of two female Amazonian manatees were examined. Trichechus inunguis possesses two axillary mammaries beneath the pectoral fins, one on each side of the body. Each papilla mammae has a small hole on its apex--the ostium papillare. The mammaries are covered by a stratified squamous keratinized epithelium. The epithelium of the mammary ducts became thinner more deeply in the tissue and varied from stratified to simple cuboidal. There was no evidence of glandular activity or secretion into the ducts of the mammary glands. PMID:24920139

  19. Mammary gland development: cell fate specification, stem cells and the microenvironment.

    PubMed

    Inman, Jamie L; Robertson, Claire; Mott, Joni D; Bissell, Mina J

    2015-03-15

    The development of the mammary gland is unique: the final stages of development occur postnatally at puberty under the influence of hormonal cues. Furthermore, during the life of the female, the mammary gland can undergo many rounds of expansion and proliferation. The mammary gland thus provides an excellent model for studying the 'stem/progenitor' cells that allow this repeated expansion and renewal. In this Review, we provide an overview of the different cell types that constitute the mammary gland, and discuss how these cell types arise and differentiate. As cellular differentiation cannot occur without proper signals, we also describe how the tissue microenvironment influences mammary gland development.

  20. Quantification of mammary organoid toxicant response and mammary tissue motility using OCT fluctuation spectroscopy (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Xiao; Blackmon, Richard L.; Carabas-Hernendez, Patricia; Fuller, Ashley; Troester, Melissa A.; Oldenburg, Amy L.

    2016-03-01

    Mammary epithelial cell (MEC) organoids in 3D culture recapitulate features of breast ducts in vivo. OCT has the ability to monitor the evolution of MEC organoids non-invasively and longitudinally. The anti-cancer drug Doxorubicin (Dox) is able to inhibit proliferation of cancer cells and has been widely used for chemotherapy of breast cancers; while environmental toxins implicated in breast cancer such as estrogen regulates mammary tumor growth and stimulates the proliferation and metastatic potential of breast cancers. Here we propose a quantitative method for measuring motility of breast cells in 3D cultures based upon OCT speckle fluctuation spectroscopy. The metrics of the inverse power-law exponent (α) and fractional modulation amplitude (M) were extracted from speckle fluctuation spectra. These were used to quantify the responses of MEC organoids to Dox, and estrogen. We investigated MEC organoids comprised of two different MEC lines: MCF10DCIS.com exposed to Dox, and MCF7 exposed to estrogen. We found an increase (p<0.001) in α of MEC along time (t=0, 1 hour, 24 hours, 48 hours and 6 days) at each dose of Dox (0, 1 μM and 10 μM), indicating lower fluctuation intensity at higher frequencies. We also observed a decrease (p<0.001) in M for increasing time. However, both α and M of MCF7 treated with estrogen (0, 1 nM and 10 nM) exhibited the opposite trend along time. This novel technology provides rapid and non-invasive measurements of the effects of toxicants on MEC motility for understanding breast cancer development and assessing anti-cancer drugs.

  1. Diet-induced obesity disrupts ductal development in the mammary glands of nonpregnant mice.

    PubMed

    Kamikawa, Akihiro; Ichii, Osamu; Yamaji, Daisuke; Imao, Takeshi; Suzuki, Chiharu; Okamatsu-Ogura, Yuko; Terao, Akira; Kon, Yasuhiro; Kimura, Kazuhiro

    2009-05-01

    Mammary glands develop postnatally in response to the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis. Obesity-induced changes in the local environment, however, retard mammary gland development during late pregnancy and lactation. To clarify the effects of obesity on fundamental duct development, we compared the mammary glands of nulliparous nonpregnant obese mice fed a high-fat diet with those of lean mice fed a normal diet. Obese mice had enlarged mammary glands, reflecting fat pad size, whereas the ducts in obese mice showed a less dense distribution with less frequent branching. Additionally, the ducts were surrounded by thick collagen layers, and were incompletely lined with myoepithelium. Because leptin receptors were localized in the epithelium region and leptin that was highly expressed in the obese glands suppressed mammary epithelial cell proliferation in vitro, the present results suggest that obesity disrupts mammary ductal development, possibly by remodeling the mammary microenvironment and promoting the expression of such paracrine factors as leptin.

  2. Effects of alpha-particles on survival and chromosomal aberrations in human mammary epithelial cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Durante, M.; Grossi, G. F.; Gialanella, G.; Pugliese, M.; Nappo, M.; Yang, T. C.

    1995-01-01

    We have studied the radiation responses of a human mammary epithelial cell line, H184B5 F5-1 M/10. This cell line was derived from primary mammary cells after treatment with chemicals and heavy ions. The F5-1 M/10 cells are immortal, density-inhibited in growth, and non-tumorigenic in athymic nude mice and represent an in vitro model of the human epithelium for radiation studies. Because epithelial cells are the target of alpha-particles emitted from radon daughters, we concentrated our studies on the efficiency of alpha-particles. Confluent cultures of M/10 cells were exposed to accelerated alpha-particles [beam energy incident at the cell monolayer = 3.85 MeV, incident linear energy transfer (LET) in cell = 109 keV/microns] and, for comparison, to 80 kVp x-rays. The following endpoints were studied: (1) survival, (2) chromosome aberrations at the first postirradiation mitosis, and (3) chromosome alterations at later passages following irradiation. The survival curve was exponential for alpha-particles (D0 = 0.73 +/- 0.04 Gy), while a shoulder was observed for x-rays (alpha/beta = 2.9 Gy; D0 = 2.5 Gy, extrapolation number 1.6). The relative biological effectiveness (RBE) of high-LET alpha-particles for human epithelial cell killing was 3.3 at 37% survival. Dose-response curves for the induction of chromosome aberrations were linear for alpha-particles and linearquadratic for x-rays. The RBE for the induction of chromosome aberrations varied with the type of aberration scored and was high (about 5) for chromosome breaks and low (about 2) for chromosome exchanges.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS).

  3. Immunohistochemical evidence of rapid extracellular matrix remodeling after iron-particle irradiation of mouse mammary gland

    SciTech Connect

    Ehrhart, E.J.; Gillette, E.L.; Barcellos-Hoff, M.H.

    1996-02-01

    High-LET radiation has unique physical and biological properties compared to sparsely ionizing radiation. Recent studies demonstrate that sparsely ionizing radiation rapidly alters the pattern of extracellular matrix expression in several tissues, but little is known about the effect of heavy-ion radiation. This study investigates densely ionizing radiation-induced changes in extracellular matrix localization in the mammary glands of adult female BALB/c mice after whole-body irradiation with 0.8 Gy 600 MeV iron particles. The basement membrane and interstitial extracellular matrix proteins of the mammary gland stroma were mapped with respect to time postirradiation using immunofluorescence. Collagen III was induced in the adipose stroma within 1 day, continued to increase through day 9 and was resolved by day 14. Immunoreactive tenascin was induced in the epithelium by day 1, was evident at the epithelial-stromal interface by day 5-9 and persisted as a condensed layer beneath the basement membrane through day 14. These findings parallel similar changes induced by {gamma} irradiation but demonstrate different onset and chronicity. In contrast, the integrity of epithelial basement membrane, which was unaffected by sparsely ionizing radiation, was disrupted by iron-particle irradiation. Laminin inummoreactivity was mildly irregular at 1 h postirradiation and showed discontinuities and thickening from days 1 to 9. Continuity was restored by day 14. Thus high-LET radiation, like sparsely ionizing radiation, induces rapid remodeling of the stromal extracellular matrix but also appears to alter the integrity of the epithelial basement membrane, which is an important regulator of epithelial cell proliferation and differentiation. 40 refs., 3 figs.

  4. Immunohistochemical evidence of rapid extracellular matrix remodeling after iron-particle irradiation of mouse mammary gland

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ehrhart, E. J.; Gillette, E. L.; Barcellos-Hoff, M. H.; Chaterjee, A. (Principal Investigator)

    1996-01-01

    High-LET radiation has unique physical and biological properties compared to sparsely ionizing radiation. Recent studies demonstrate that sparsely ionizing radiation rapidly alters the pattern of extracellular matrix expression in several tissues, but little is known about the effect of heavy-ion radiation. This study investigates densely ionizing radiation-induced changes in extracellular matrix localization in the mammary glands of adult female BALB/c mice after whole-body irradiation with 0.8 Gy 600 MeV iron particles. The basement membrane and interstitial extracellular matrix proteins of the mammary gland stroma were mapped with respect to time postirradiation using immunofluorescence. Collagen III was induced in the adipose stroma within 1 day, continued to increase through day 9 and was resolved by day 14. Immunoreactive tenascin was induced in the epithelium by day 1, was evident at the epithelial-stromal interface by day 5-9 and persisted as a condensed layer beneath the basement membrane through day 14. These findings parallel similar changes induced by gamma irradiation but demonstrate different onset and chronicity. In contrast, the integrity of epithelial basement membrane, which was unaffected by sparsely ionizing radiation, was disrupted by iron-particle irradiation. Laminin immunoreactivity was mildly irregular at 1 h postirradiation and showed discontinuities and thickening from days 1 to 9. Continuity was restored by day 14. Thus high-LET radiation, like sparsely ionizing radiation, induces rapid-remodeling of the stromal extracellular matrix but also appears to alter the integrity of the epithelial basement membrane, which is an important regulator of epithelial cell proliferation and differentiation.

  5. The dynamics of murine mammary stem/progenitor cells

    PubMed Central

    DONG, Qiaoxiang; SUN, Lu-Zhe

    2014-01-01

    The stem/progenitor cells in the murine mammary gland are a highly dynamic population of cells that are responsible for ductal elongation in puberty, homeostasis maintenance in adult, and lobulo-alveolar genesis during pregnancy. In recent years understanding the epithelial cell hierarchy within the mammary gland is becoming particularly important as these different stem/progenitor cells were perceived to be the cells of origin for various subtypes of breast cancer. Although significant advances have been made in enrichment and isolation of stem/progenitor cells by combinations of antibodies against cell surface proteins together with flow cytometry, and in identification of stem/progenitor cells with multi-lineage differentiation and self-renewal using mammary fat pad reconstitution assay and in vivo genetic labeling technique, a clear understanding of how these different stem/progenitors are orchestrated in the mammary gland is still lacking. Here we discuss the different in vivo and in vitro methods currently available for stem/progenitor identification, their associated caveats, and a possible new hierarchy model to reconcile various putative stem/progenitor cell populations identified by different research groups. PMID:25580105

  6. Cholera toxin stimulation of human mammary epithelial cells in culture

    SciTech Connect

    Stampfer, M.R.

    1982-06-01

    Addition of cholera toxin to human mammary epithelial cultures derived from reduction mammoplasties and primary carcinomas greatly stimulated cell growth and increased the number of times the cells could be successfully subcultured. Other agents known to increase intracellular cAMP levels were also growth stimulatory. The increased growth potential conferred by cholera toxin enhances the usefulness of this cell culture system.

  7. Laminin Mediates Tissue-specific Gene Expression in Mammary Epithelia

    SciTech Connect

    Streuli, Charles H; Schmidhauser, Christian; Bailey, Nina; Yurchenco, Peter; Skubitz, Amy P. N.; Roskelley, Calvin; Bissell, Mina J

    1995-04-01

    Tissue-specific gene expression in mammary epithelium is dependent on the extracellular matrix as well as hormones. There is good evidence that the basement membrane provides signals for regulating beta-casein expression, and that integrins are involved in this process. Here, we demonstrate that in the presence of lactogenic hormones, laminin can direct expression of the beta-casein gene. Mouse mammary epithelial cells plated on gels of native laminin or laminin-entactin undergo functional differentiation. On tissue culture plastic, mammary cells respond to soluble basement membrane or purified laminin, but not other extracellular matrix components, by synthesizing beta-casein. In mammary cells transfected with chloramphenicol acetyl transferase reporter constructs, laminin activates transcription from the beta-casein promoter through a specific enhancer element. The inductive effect of laminin on casein expression was specifically blocked by the E3 fragment of the carboxy terminal region of the alpha 1 chain of laminin, by antisera raised against the E3 fragment, and by a peptide corresponding to a sequence within this region. Our results demonstrate that laminin can direct tissue-specific gene expression in epithelial cells through its globular domain.

  8. Laminin mediates tissue-specific gene expression in mammary epithelia

    PubMed Central

    1995-01-01

    Tissue-specific gene expression in mammary epithelium is dependent on the extracellular matrix as well as hormones. There is good evidence that the basement membrane provides signals for regulating beta-casein expression, and that integrins are involved in this process. Here, we demonstrate that in the presence of lactogenic hormones, laminin can direct expression of the beta-casein gene. Mouse mammary epithelial cells plated on gels of native laminin or laminin-entactin undergo functional differentiation. On tissue culture plastic, mammary cells respond to soluble basement membrane or purified laminin, but not other extracellular matrix components, by synthesizing beta-casein. In mammary cells transfected with chloramphenicol acetyl transferase reporter constructs, laminin activates transcription from the beta- casein promoter through a specific enhancer element. The inductive effect of laminin on casein expression was specifically blocked by the E3 fragment of the carboxy terminal region of the alpha 1 chain of laminin, by antisera raised against the E3 fragment, and by a peptide corresponding to a sequence within this region. Our results demonstrate that laminin can direct tissue-specific gene expression in epithelial cells through its globular domain. PMID:7730398

  9. Conditional knockout of fibronectin abrogates mouse mammary gland lobuloalveolar differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Keyi; Cheng, Le; Flesken-Nikitin, Andrea; Huang, Lynn; Nikitin, Alexander Y.; Pauli, Bendicht U.

    2010-01-01

    Fibronectin (Fn) plays an important part in the branching morphogenesis of salivary gland, lung, and kidney. Here, we examine the effect of the conditional knockout of Fn in the mammary epithelium [FnMEp−/−] on postnatal mammary gland development, using Cre-loxP mediated gene knockout technology. Our data show that Fn deletion causes a moderate retardation in outgrowth and branching of the ductal tree in 5-week old mice. These defects are partially compensated in virgin 16-week old mice. However, mammary glands consisting of Fn-deficient epithelial cells fail to undergo normal lobuloalveolar differentiation during pregnancy. The severity of lobuloalveolar impairment ranged from lobular hypoplasia to aplasia in some cases and was associated with the amount of Fn protein recovered from these glands. Decreased rates of mammary epithelial cell proliferation accounted for delayed ductal outgrowth in virgin and lack of alveologenesis in pregnant FnMEp−/− mice. Concomitant decreased expression of integrin β1 (Itgb1) and lack of autophosphorylation of focal adhesion kinase (Fak) suggest that this pathology might, at least in part, be mediated by disruption of the Fn/Itgb1/Fak signaling pathway. PMID:20624380

  10. Culture and characterization of mammary cancer stem cells in mammospheres.

    PubMed

    Piscitelli, Eleonora; Cocola, Cinzia; Thaden, Frank Rüdiger; Pelucchi, Paride; Gray, Brian; Bertalot, Giovanni; Albertini, Alberto; Reinbold, Rolland; Zucchi, Ileana

    2015-01-01

    Mammospheres (MMs) are a model for culturing and maintaining mammary gland stem cells (SCs) or cancer stem cells (CSCs) ex situ. As MMs recapitulate the micro-niche of the mammary gland or a tumor, MMs are a model for studying the properties of SCs or CSCs, and for mapping, isolating, and characterizing the SC/CSC generated lineages. Cancer stem cells share with normal SCs the properties of self-renewal and the capacity to generate all cell types and organ structures of the mammary gland. Analysis of human tumor samples suggests that CSCs are heterogeneous in terms of proliferation and differentiation potential. Mammospheres from CSCs likewise display heterogeneity. This heterogeneity makes analysis of CSC generated MMs challenging. To identify the unique and diverse properties of MM derived CSCs, comparative analysis with MMs obtained from normal SCs is required. Here we present protocols for identifying and enriching cells with SC features from a cancer cell line using the LA7CSCs as a model. A comprehensive and comparative approach for identifying, isolating, and characterizing MMs from SCs and CSCs from human breast is also introduced. In addition, we describe detailed procedures for identifying, isolating, and characterizing mammary gland specific cell types, generated during MM formation.

  11. The epigenetic landscape of mammary gland development and functional differentiation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Most of the development and functional differentiation in the mammary gland occur after birth. Epigenetics is defined as the stable alterations in gene expression potential that arise during development and proliferation. Epigenetic changes are mediated at the biochemical level by the chromatin conf...

  12. Amphiregulin: role in mammary gland development and breast cancer.

    PubMed

    McBryan, Jean; Howlin, Jillian; Napoletano, Silvia; Martin, Finian

    2008-06-01

    Extensive epithelial cell proliferation underlies the ductal morphogenesis of puberty that generates the mammary tree that will eventually fill the fat pad. This estrogen-dependent process is believed to be essentially dependent on locally produced growth factors that act in a paracrine fashion. EGF-like growth factor ligands, acting through EGF receptors are some of the principal promoters of pubertal ductal morphogenesis. Amphiregulin is the most abundant EGF-like growth factor in the pubertal mammary gland. Its gene is transcriptionally regulated by ERalpha, and recent evidence identifies it as a key mediator of the estrogen-driven epithelial cell proliferation of puberty: The pubertal deficiency in mammary gland ductal morphogenesis in ERalpha, amphiregulin, and EGFR knockout mice phenocopy each other. As a prognostic indicator in human breast cancer, amphiregulin indicates an outcome identical to that predicted by ERalpha presence. Despite this, a range of studies both on preneoplastic human breast tissue and on cell culture based models of breast cancer, suggest a possibly significant role for amphiregulin in driving human breast cancer progression. Here we summarise our current understanding of amphiregulin's contribution to mammary gland development and breast cancer progression.

  13. The role of activin in mammary gland development and oncogenesis.

    PubMed

    Dunphy, Karen A; Schneyer, Alan L; Hagen, Mary J; Jerry, D Joseph

    2011-06-01

    TGFβ contributes to mammary gland development and has paradoxical roles in breast cancer because it has both tumor suppressor and tumor promoter activity. Another member of the TGFβ superfamily, activin, also has roles in the developing mammary gland, but these functions, and the role of activin in breast cancer, are not well characterized. TGFβ and activin share the same intracellular signaling pathways, but divergence in their signaling pathways are suggested. The purpose of this review is to compare the spatial and temporal expression of TGFβ and activin during mammary gland development, with consideration given to their functions during each developmental period. We also review the contributions of TGFβ and activin to breast cancer resistance and susceptibility. Finally, we consider the systemic contributions of activin in regulating obesity and diabetes; and the impact this regulation has on breast cancer. Elevated levels of activin in serum during pregnancy and its influence on pregnancy associated breast cancer are also considered. We conclude that evidence demonstrates that activin has tumor suppressing potential, without definitive indication of tumor promoting activity in the mammary gland, making it a good target for development of therapeutics.

  14. Internal mammary sentinel lymph node biopsy: abandon or persist?

    PubMed

    Qiu, Peng-Fei; Liu, Yan-Bing; Wang, Yong-Sheng

    2016-01-01

    Although the 2009 American Joint Committee on Cancer incorporated the internal mammary sentinel lymph node biopsy (IM-SLNB) concept, there has been little change in surgical practice patterns due to the low visualization rate of internal mammary sentinel lymph nodes with the traditional injection technique. Meanwhile, as internal mammary lymph nodes (IMLN) metastases are mostly found concomitantly with axillary lymph nodes (ALN) metastases, previous IM-SLNB clinical trials fail to evaluate the status of IMLN in patients who are really in need (only in clinically ALN negative patients). Our modified injection technique (periareolar intraparenchymal, high volume, and ultrasonographic guidance) significantly improved the visualization rate of internal mammary sentinel lymph nodes, making the routine IM-SLNB possible in daily practice. IM-SLNB could provide individual minimally invasive staging, prognosis, and decision-making for breast cancer patients, especially for patients with clinically positive ALN. Moreover, IMLN radiotherapy should be tailored and balanced between the potential benefit and toxicity, and IM-SLNB-guided IMLN radiotherapy could achieve this goal. In the era of effective adjuvant therapy, within the changing treatment approach - more systemic therapy, less loco-regional therapy - clinicians should deliberate the application of regional IMLN therapy. PMID:27390528

  15. MAMMARY GLAND DEVELOPMENT: EARLY LIFE EFFECTS FROM THE ENVIRONMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    Mammary Gland Development: Early Life Effects from the Environment

    S.E. Fenton. Reproductive Toxicology Division, National Health and Environmental Effects Laboratory, ORD, U.S. EPA, Research Triangle Park, NC 27711.

    As signs of precocious puberty in girls reach ...

  16. Proliferation of human mammary cancer cells exposed to 27-hydroxycholesterol

    PubMed Central

    CRUZ, PAMELA; TORRES, CRISTIAN; RAMÍREZ, MARÍA EUGENIA; EPUÑÁN, MARÍA JOSÉ; VALLADARES, LUIS EMILIO; SIERRALTA, WALTER DANIEL

    2010-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to identify the possible mechanisms by which certain estradiol receptor (ER)-positive mammary tumor cells remain resistant to treatment with anti-estrogens or inhibitors of local estradiol (E2) production. To this end, we compared the proliferative effects on mammary cancer cells of the novel selective ER modulator 27-hydroxycholesterol (27OHC) to those of E2, and evaluated their inhibition by ICI 182,780 (ICI). Analysis of the effects on the cell cycle of 27OHC and E2 in the absence or presence of ICI was conducted. In ER-positive mammary tumor cells, we detected the blocking of 27OHC proliferation-stimulatory activity by simvastatin, as well as the inhibition of E2-stimulated proliferation by an α-fetoprotein-derived cyclic nonapeptide. The effects reported herein may be extrapolated to infiltrating mammary cancer, where the activity of local macrophages may stimulate tumor growth. We suggest that increased breast cancer growth in obese patients may be related to increased 27OHC circulatory levels. PMID:22993572

  17. Precursors of hexoneogenesis within the human mammary gland

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The human mammary gland is capable of de novo synthesis of glucose and galactose (hexoneogenesis); however, the carbon source is incompletely understood. In this study, we investigated the role of acetate, glutamine, lactate and glycerol as potential carbon sources for hexoneogenesis. Healthy breast...

  18. The effect of lipopolysaccharide on bovine mammary macrophage function.

    PubMed Central

    Politis, I; Zhao, X; McBride, B W; Burton, J H

    1991-01-01

    The effect of Escherichia coli lipopolysaccharide (LPS) on the expression of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II molecules by bovine mammary macrophages was examined. The ability of LPS-treated mammary macrophages to support antigen-specific T-cell proliferation, as a measure of their antigen presentation ability, was also evaluated. For this purpose, control and LPS-treated macrophages were pulsed with heat-killed Staphylococcus aureus and then cultured with S. aureus-sensitized T-cells. Our data show that LPS had no significant effect on the expression of MHC class II molecules on the surface of mammary macrophages. Furthermore, LPS-induced macrophages were no more active in supporting T-cell proliferation on a per cell basis than unstimulated macrophages. The lack of macrophage response to LPS with respect to expression of MHC class II molecules and the antigen presentation ability is another example of the hyporesponsive nature of macrophages isolated from the bovine mammary gland. PMID:1889031

  19. Aflatoxins ingestion and canine mammary tumors: There is an association?

    PubMed

    Frehse, M S; Martins, M I M; Ono, E Y S; Bracarense, A P F R L; Bissoqui, L Y; Teixeira, E M K; Santos, N J R; Freire, R L

    2015-10-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the presence of mycotoxins on dogs feed and to explore the potential association between mycotoxins exposure and the chance of mamary tumors in a case-control study. The study included 256 female dogs from a hospital population, 85 with mammary tumors (case group) and 171 without mammary tumors (control group). An epidemiological questionnaire was applied to both groups, and the data were analyzed by the EpiInfo statistical package. For the study, 168 samples of the feed offered to dogs were analyzed for the presence of aflatoxins, fumonisins and zearalenone by high-performance liquid chromatography. Mycotoxins were found in 79 samples (100%) in the case group and 87/89 (97.8%) in the control group. Mycotoxins were detected in all types of feed, regardless feed quality. Level of aflatoxin B1 (p = 0.0356, OR = 2.74, 95%, CI 1.13 to 6.60), aflatoxin G1 (AFG1) (p = 0.00007, OR = 4.60, 95%, CI = 2.16 to 9.79), and aflatoxin G2 (AFG2) (p = 0.0133, OR = 9.91, 95%, CI 1.21 to 81.15) were statistically higher in case of mammary cancer. In contrast, neutering was a protective factor for mammary cancer (p = 0.0004, OR = 0.32, 95%, CI = 0.17 to 0.60).

  20. FEEDING GENISTEIN TO PREPUBERTAL GILTS STIMULATES THEIR MAMMARY DEVELOPMENT

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The possible role of dietary genistein on mammary development of prepubertal gilts was investigated. Forty-five gilts were fed one of three diets from 90 d of age until slaughter (day 183 ± 1). Diets were: without soya (CTL0, n=15); soya-based commercial (CTLS, n=15); and soya-based commercial with ...

  1. Three-Dimensional Cultures of Mouse Mammary Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Mroue, Rana; Bissell, Mina J.

    2013-01-01

    The mammary gland is an ideal “model organism” for studying tissue specificity and gene expression in mammals: it is one of the few organs that develop after birth and it undergoes multiple cycles of growth, differentiation and regression during the animal’s lifetime in preparation for the important function of lactation. The basic “functional differentiation” unit in the gland is the mammary acinus made up of a layer of polarized epithelial cells specialized for milk production surrounded by myoepithelial contractile cells, and the two-layered structure is surrounded by basement membrane. Much knowledge about the regulation of mammary gland development has been acquired from studying the physiology of the gland and of lactation in rodents. Culture studies, however, were hampered by the inability to maintain functional differentiation on conventional tissue culture plastic. We now know that the microenvironment, including the extracellular matrix and tissue architecture, plays a crucial role in directing functional differentiation of organs. Thus, in order for culture systems to be effective experimental models, they need to recapitulate the basic unit of differentiated function in the tissue or organ and to maintain its three-dimensional (3D) structure. Mouse mammary culture models evolved from basic monolayers of cells to an array of complex 3D systems that observe the importance of the microenvironment in dictating proper tissue function and structure. In this chapter, we focus on how 3D mouse mammary epithelial cultures have enabled investigators to gain a better understanding of the organization, development and function of the acinus, and to identify key molecular, structural, and mechanical cues important for maintaining mammary function and architecture. The accompanying chapter of Vidi et al. describes 3D models developed for human cells. Here, we describe how mouse primary epithelial cells and cell lines—essentially those we use in our

  2. In situ force mapping of mammary gland transformation

    PubMed Central

    Lopez, Jose I.; Kang, Inkyung; You, Weon-Kyoo; McDonald, Donald M.; Weaver, Valerie M.

    2013-01-01

    Tumor progression is characterized by an incremental stiffening of the tissue. The importance of tissue rigidity to cancer is appreciated, yet the contribution of specific tissue elements to tumor stiffening and their physiological significance remains unclear. We performed high-resolution atomic force microscopy indentation in live and snap-frozen fluorescently labeled mammary tissues to explore the origin of the tissue stiffening associated with mammary tumor development in PyMT mice. The tumor epithelium, the tumor-associated vasculature and the extracellular matrix all contributed to mammary gland stiffening as it transitioned from normal to invasive carcinoma. Consistent with the concept that extracellular matrix stiffness modifies cell tension, we found that isolated transformed mammary epithelial cells were intrinsically stiffer than their normal counterparts but that the malignant epithelium in situ was far stiffer than isolated breast tumor cells. Moreover, using an in situ vitrification approach, we determined that the extracellular matrix adjacent to the epithelium progressively stiffened as tissue evolved from normal through benign to an invasive state. Importantly, we also noted that there was significant mechanical heterogeneity within the transformed tissue both in the epithelium and the tumor-associated neovasculature. The vascular bed within the tumor core was substantially stiffer than the large patent vessels at the invasive front that are surrounded by the stiffest extracellular matrix. These findings clarify the contribution of individual mammary gland tissue elements to the altered biomechanical landscape of cancerous tissues and emphasize the importance of studying cancer cell evolution under conditions that preserve native interactions. PMID:21842067

  3. RUNX2 in mammary gland development and breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Ferrari, Nicola; McDonald, Laura; Morris, Joanna S; Cameron, Ewan R; Blyth, Karen

    2013-06-01

    Runx2 is best known as an essential factor in osteoblast differentiation and bone development but, like many other transcription factors involved in development, is known to operate over a much wider tissue range. Our understanding of these other aspects of Runx2 function is still at a relatively early stage and the importance of its role in cell fate decisions and lineage maintenance in non-osseous tissues is only beginning to emerge. One such tissue is the mammary gland, where Runx2 is known to be expressed and participate in the regulation of mammary specific genes. Furthermore, differential and temporal expression of this gene is observed during mammary epithelial differentiation in vivo, strongly indicative of an important functional role. Although the precise nature of that role remains elusive, preliminary evidence hints at possible involvement in the regulation of mammary stem and/or progenitor cells. As with many genes important in regulating cell fate, RUNX2 has also been linked to metastatic cancer where in some established breast cell lines, retention of expression is associated with a more invasive phenotype. More recently, expression analysis has been extended to primary breast cancers where high levels of RUNX2 align with a specific subtype of the disease. That RUNX2 expression correlates with the so called "Triple Negative" subtype is particularly interesting given the known cross talk between Runx2 and estrogen receptor signaling pathways. This review summaries our current understanding of Runx2 in mammary gland development and cancer, and postulates a role that may link both these processes.

  4. Epimorphin Functions as a Key Morphoregulator for Mammary Epithelial Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Hirai, H.; Lochter, A.; Galosy, S.; Koshida, S.; Niwa, S.; Bissell, M.J.

    1997-10-13

    Hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) and EGF have been reported to promote branching morphogenesis of mammary epithelial cells. We now show that it is epimorphin that is primarily responsible for this phenomenon. In vivo, epimorphin was detected in the stromal compartment but not in lumenal epithelial cells of the mammary gland; in culture, however, a subpopulation of mammary epithelial cells produced significant amounts of epimorphin. When epimorphin-expressing epithelial cell clones were cultured in collagen gels they displayed branching morphogenesis in the presence of HGF, EGF, keratinocyte growth factor, or fibroblast growth factor, a process that was inhibited by anti-epimorphin but not anti-HGF antibodies. The branch length, however, was roughly proportional to the ability of the factors to induce growth. Accordingly, epimorphin-negative epithelial cells simply grew in a cluster in response to the growth factors and failed to branch. When recombinant epimorphin was added to these collagen gels, epimorphin-negative cells underwent branching morphogenesis. The mode of action of epimorphin on morphogenesis of the gland, however, was dependent on how it was presented to the mammary cells. If epimorphin was overexpressed in epimorphin-negative epithelial cells under regulation of an inducible promoter or was allowed to coat the surface of each epithelial cell in a nonpolar fashion, the cells formed globular, alveoli-like structures with a large central lumen instead of branching ducts. This process was enhanced also by addition of HGF, EGF, or other growth factors and was inhibited by epimorphin antibodies. These results suggest that epimorphin is the primary morphogen in the mammary gland but that growth factors are necessary to achieve the appropriate cell numbers for the resulting morphogenesis to be visualized.

  5. Model for roughening and ripple instability due to ion-induced mass redistribution [Addendum to H. Hofsäss, Appl. Phys. A 114 (2014) 401, "Surface instability and pattern formation by ion-induced erosion and mass redistribution"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hofsäss, Hans

    2015-05-01

    Carter and Vishnyakov introduced a model (CV model) to describe roughening and ripple instability due to ion-induced mass redistribution. This model is based on the assumption that the irradiated surface layer on a static solid substrate is described by a viscous incompressible thin film bound to the substrate by a "no slip" and "no transport" kinematic boundary condition, i.e. similar to a thin film of viscous paint. However, this boundary condition is incomplete for a layer under ion irradiation. The boundary condition must allow exchange of atoms between the substrate and the irradiated film, so that the thickness of the film is always determined by the size of the collision cascade, independent of the evolution of the surface height profile. In addition, the film thickness depends on the local ion incidence angle, which leads to a time dependence of the film thickness at a given position. The equation of motion of the surface and interface profiles for these boundary conditions is introduced, and a new curvature-dependent coefficient is found which is absent in the CV model. This curvature coefficient depends on the angular derivative of the layer thickness and the atomic drift velocity at the film surface induced by recoil events. Such a stabilizing curvature coefficient was introduced in Appl. Phys. A 114 (2014) 401 and is most pronounced at intermediate angles.

  6. Fractal and multifractal characteristics of swift heavy ion induced self-affine nanostructured BaF{sub 2} thin film surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Yadav, R. P.; Mittal, A. K.; Kumar, Manvendra Pandey, A. C.

    2015-08-15

    Fractal and multifractal characteristics of self-affine surfaces of BaF{sub 2} thin films, deposited on crystalline Si 〈1 1 1〉 substrate at room temperature, were studied. Self-affine surfaces were prepared by irradiation of 120 MeV Ag{sup 9+} ions which modified the surface morphology at nanometer scale. The surface morphology of virgin thin film and those irradiated with different ion fluences are characterized by atomic force microscopy technique. The surface roughness (interface width) shows monotonic decrease with ion fluences, while the other parameters, such as lateral correlation length, roughness exponent, and fractal dimension, did not show either monotonic decrease or increase in nature. The self-affine nature of the films is further confirmed by autocorrelation function. The power spectral density of thin films surfaces exhibits inverse power law variation with spatial frequency, suggesting the existence of fractal component in surface morphology. The multifractal detrended fluctuation analysis based on the partition function approach is also performed on virgin and irradiated thin films. It is found that the partition function exhibits the power law behavior with the segment size. Moreover, it is also seen that the scaling exponents vary nonlinearly with the moment, thereby exhibiting the multifractal nature.

  7. Swift heavy ion-induced radiation damage in isotropic graphite studied by micro-indentation and in-situ electrical resistivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hubert, Christian; Voss, Kay Obbe; Bender, Markus; Kupka, Katharina; Romanenko, Anton; Severin, Daniel; Trautmann, Christina; Tomut, Marilena

    2015-12-01

    Due to its excellent thermo-physical properties and radiation hardness, isotropic graphite is presently the most promising material candidate for new high-power ion accelerators which will provide highest beam intensities and energies. Under these extreme conditions, specific accelerator components including production targets and beam protection modules are facing the risk of degradation due to radiation damage. Ion-beam induced damage effects were tested by irradiating polycrystalline, isotropic graphite samples at the UNILAC (GSI, Darmstadt) with 4.8 MeV per nucleon 132Xe, 150Sm, 197Au, and 238U ions applying fluences between 1 × 1011 and 1 × 1014 ions/cm2. The overall damage accumulation and its dependence on energy loss of the ions were studied by in situ 4-point resistivity measurements. With increasing fluence, the electric resistivity increases due to disordering of the graphitic structure. Irradiated samples were also analyzed off-line by means of micro-indentation in order to characterize mesoscale effects such as beam-induced hardening and stress fields within the specimen. With increasing fluence and energy loss, hardening becomes more pronounced.

  8. β-casein gene expression by in vitro cultured bovine mammary epithelial cells derived from developing mammary glands.

    PubMed

    Monzani, P S; Bressan, F F; Mesquita, L G; Sangalli, J R; Meirelles, F V

    2011-04-12

    Epithelial cells from mammary gland tissue that are cultured in vitro are able to maintain specific functions of this gland, such as cellular differentiation and milk protein synthesis. These characteristics make these cells a useful model to study mammary gland physiology, development and differentiation; they can also be used for production of exogenous proteins of pharmaceutical interest. Bovine mammary epithelial cells were cultured in vitro after isolation from mammary gland tissue of animals at different stages of development. The cells were plated on Petri dishes and isolated from fibroblasts using saline/EDTA treatment, followed by trypsinization. Cells isolated on plastic were capable of differentiating into alveolus-like structures; however, only cells derived from non-pregnant and non-lactating animals expressed β-casein. Real-time qPCR and epifluorescence microscopy analyses revealed that alveolus-like structures were competent at expressing Emerald green fluorescent protein (EmGFP) driven by the β-casein promoter, independent of β-casein expression.

  9. A novel non-mouse mammary tumor virus activation of the Int-3 gene in a spontaneous mouse mammary tumor.

    PubMed Central

    Kordon, E C; Smith, G H; Callahan, R; Gallahan, D

    1995-01-01

    In a mouse mammary tumor model system in which carcinogenic progression can be investigated, we have found a unique mutation of Int-3 associated with progression from premalignant lobular hyperplasia to tumor. Sequence analysis of the rearranged fragment revealed an insertion of an intracisternal type A particle (IAP) within the Int-3 gene. Int-3 is mutated frequently in mouse mammary tumor virus (MMTV)-induced mammary tumors by insertion of MMTV proviral DNA into this intragenic region. In these mutations, the insertion produces a chimeric Int-3 transcript encoding the cytoplasmic portion of the Int-3 protein driven by the MMTV long terminal repeat promoter. In this case, the IAP DNA was inserted in the opposite transcriptional orientation relative to Int-3; nevertheless, a similar chimeric RNA transcript driven by a cryptic promoter in the oppositely oriented 5' IAP long terminal repeat was generated. This is the first demonstration that an insertional mutation unrelated to MMTV activates an Int gene commonly associated with mammary tumorigenesis. PMID:7494323

  10. Ectodysplasin/NF-κB Promotes Mammary Cell Fate via Wnt/β-catenin Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Voutilainen, Maria; Lönnblad, Darielle; Shirokova, Vera; Elo, Teresa; Rysti, Elisa; Schmidt-Ullrich, Ruth; Schneider, Pascal; Mikkola, Marja L.

    2015-01-01

    Mammary gland development commences during embryogenesis with the establishment of a species typical number of mammary primordia on each flank of the embryo. It is thought that mammary cell fate can only be induced along the mammary line, a narrow region of the ventro-lateral skin running from the axilla to the groin. Ectodysplasin (Eda) is a tumor necrosis factor family ligand that regulates morphogenesis of several ectodermal appendages. We have previously shown that transgenic overexpression of Eda (K14-Eda mice) induces formation of supernumerary mammary placodes along the mammary line. Here, we investigate in more detail the role of Eda and its downstream mediator transcription factor NF-κB in mammary cell fate specification. We report that K14-Eda mice harbor accessory mammary glands also in the neck region indicating wider epidermal cell plasticity that previously appreciated. We show that even though NF-κB is not required for formation of endogenous mammary placodes, it is indispensable for the ability of Eda to induce supernumerary placodes. A genome-wide profiling of Eda-induced genes in mammary buds identified several Wnt pathway components as potential transcriptional targets of Eda. Using an ex vivo culture system, we show that suppression of canonical Wnt signalling leads to a dose-dependent inhibition of supernumerary placodes in K14-Eda tissue explants. PMID:26581094

  11. Induction of mammary gland development in estrogen receptor-alpha knockout mice.

    PubMed

    Bocchinfuso, W P; Lindzey, J K; Hewitt, S C; Clark, J A; Myers, P H; Cooper, R; Korach, K S

    2000-08-01

    Mammary glands from the estrogen receptor-a knockout (alphaERKO) mouse do not undergo ductal morphogenesis or alveolar development. Disrupted ERalpha signaling may result in reduced estrogen-responsive gene products in the mammary gland or reduced mammotropic hormones that contribute to the alphaERKO mammary phenotype. We report that circulating PRL is reduced in the female alphaERKO mouse. Implantation of an age-matched, heterozygous ERalpha pituitary isograft under the renal capsule of 25-day-old or 12-week-old alphaERKO mice increased circulating PRL and progesterone levels, and induced mammary gland development. Grafted alphaERKO mice also possessed hypertrophied corpora lutea demonstrating that PRL is luteotropic in the alphaERKO ovary. By contrast, ovariectomy at the time of pituitary grafting prevented mammary gland development in alphaERKO mice despite elevated PRL levels. Hormone replacement using pellet implants demonstrated that pharmacological doses of estradiol induced limited mammary ductal elongation, and estradiol in combination with progesterone stimulated lobuloalveolar development. PRL alone or in combination with progesterone or estradiol did not induce alphaERKO mammary growth. Estradiol and progesterone are required for the structural development of the alphaERKO mammary gland, and PRL contributes to this development by inducing ovarian progesterone levels. Therefore, the manifestation of the alphaERKO mammary phenotype appears due to the lack of direct estrogen action at the mammary gland and an indirect contributory role of estrogen signaling at the hypothalamic/pituitary axis.

  12. Ectodysplasin/NF-κB Promotes Mammary Cell Fate via Wnt/β-catenin Pathway.

    PubMed

    Voutilainen, Maria; Lindfors, Päivi H; Trela, Ewelina; Lönnblad, Darielle; Shirokova, Vera; Elo, Teresa; Rysti, Elisa; Schmidt-Ullrich, Ruth; Schneider, Pascal; Mikkola, Marja L

    2015-11-01

    Mammary gland development commences during embryogenesis with the establishment of a species typical number of mammary primordia on each flank of the embryo. It is thought that mammary cell fate can only be induced along the mammary line, a narrow region of the ventro-lateral skin running from the axilla to the groin. Ectodysplasin (Eda) is a tumor necrosis factor family ligand that regulates morphogenesis of several ectodermal appendages. We have previously shown that transgenic overexpression of Eda (K14-Eda mice) induces formation of supernumerary mammary placodes along the mammary line. Here, we investigate in more detail the role of Eda and its downstream mediator transcription factor NF-κB in mammary cell fate specification. We report that K14-Eda mice harbor accessory mammary glands also in the neck region indicating wider epidermal cell plasticity that previously appreciated. We show that even though NF-κB is not required for formation of endogenous mammary placodes, it is indispensable for the ability of Eda to induce supernumerary placodes. A genome-wide profiling of Eda-induced genes in mammary buds identified several Wnt pathway components as potential transcriptional targets of Eda. Using an ex vivo culture system, we show that suppression of canonical Wnt signalling leads to a dose-dependent inhibition of supernumerary placodes in K14-Eda tissue explants. PMID:26581094

  13. Ectodysplasin/NF-κB Promotes Mammary Cell Fate via Wnt/β-catenin Pathway.

    PubMed

    Voutilainen, Maria; Lindfors, Päivi H; Trela, Ewelina; Lönnblad, Darielle; Shirokova, Vera; Elo, Teresa; Rysti, Elisa; Schmidt-Ullrich, Ruth; Schneider, Pascal; Mikkola, Marja L

    2015-11-01

    Mammary gland development commences during embryogenesis with the establishment of a species typical number of mammary primordia on each flank of the embryo. It is thought that mammary cell fate can only be induced along the mammary line, a narrow region of the ventro-lateral skin running from the axilla to the groin. Ectodysplasin (Eda) is a tumor necrosis factor family ligand that regulates morphogenesis of several ectodermal appendages. We have previously shown that transgenic overexpression of Eda (K14-Eda mice) induces formation of supernumerary mammary placodes along the mammary line. Here, we investigate in more detail the role of Eda and its downstream mediator transcription factor NF-κB in mammary cell fate specification. We report that K14-Eda mice harbor accessory mammary glands also in the neck region indicating wider epidermal cell plasticity that previously appreciated. We show that even though NF-κB is not required for formation of endogenous mammary placodes, it is indispensable for the ability of Eda to induce supernumerary placodes. A genome-wide profiling of Eda-induced genes in mammary buds identified several Wnt pathway components as potential transcriptional targets of Eda. Using an ex vivo culture system, we show that suppression of canonical Wnt signalling leads to a dose-dependent inhibition of supernumerary placodes in K14-Eda tissue explants.

  14. Heavy loads

    SciTech Connect

    Metz, D.

    1982-01-01

    The extreme pressures on the roof and walls of an earth-sheltered residential home are discussed and the need for careful planning is stressed. Pertinent terms are defined. Footings and wall structure (reinforced concrete walls and concrete block walls) are described. Roofing systems are discussed in detail and illustrated: (1) poured-in-place concrete roof slabs; (2) pre-cast concrete planks; and (3) heavy timber roofs. Insulation of earth-sheltered homes is reviewed in terms of using: (1) urethanes; (2) extruded polystyrene; and (3) expanded polystyrene. Advantages, disadvantages, R-factors, costs, and installation are discussed. (MJJ)

  15. Integrin β4 regulation of PTHrP underlies its contribution to mammary gland development.

    PubMed

    Li, Jiarong; Sun, Huayan; Feltri, M Laura; Mercurio, Arthur M

    2015-11-15

    The integrin α6β4 (referred to as β4) is expressed in epithelial cells where it functions as a laminin receptor. Although in vitro studies have implicated β4 in the biology of mammary epithelial cells, its contribution to mammary gland development has not been settled. To address this problem, we generated and analyzed itgb4(flox/flox)MMTV-Cre(-) and itgb4(flox/flox)MMTV-Cre(+) mice. The salient features of embryonic mammary tissue from itgb4(flox/flox)MMTV-Cre(+) mice were significantly smaller mammary buds and increased apoptosis in the surrounding mesenchyme. Also, compared to control glands, the itgb4-deleted mammary buds lacked expression of the progenitor cell marker CK14 and they were unable to generate mammary glands upon transplantation into cleared fat pads of recipient mice. Analysis of mammary glands at puberty and during pregnancy revealed that itgb4-diminished mammary tissue was unable to elongate and undergo branching morphogenesis. Micro-dissection of epithelial cells in the mammary bud and of the surrounding mesenchyme revealed that loss of β4 resulted in a significant decrease in the expression of parathyroid hormone related protein (PTHrP) in epithelial cells and of target genes of the PTHrP receptor in mesenchymal cells. Given that the phenotype of the itgb4-deleted mammary tissue mimicked that of the PTHrP knockout, we hypothesized that β4 contributes to mammary gland development by sustaining PTHrP expression and enabling PTHrP signaling. Indeed, the inability of itgb4-deleted mammary buds to elongate was rescued by exogenous PTHrP. These data implicate a critical role for the β4 integrin in mammary gland development and provide a mechanism for this role.

  16. The biology of zinc transport in mammary epithelial cells: implications for mammary gland development, lactation, and involution.

    PubMed

    McCormick, Nicholas H; Hennigar, Stephen R; Kiselyov, Kirill; Kelleher, Shannon L

    2014-03-01

    Zinc plays a critical role in a vast array of cellular functions including gene transcription, protein translation, cell proliferation, differentiation, bioenergetics, and programmed cell death. The mammary gland depends upon tight coordination of these processes during development and reproduction for optimal expansion, differentiation, and involution. For example, zinc is required for activation of matrix metalloproteinases, intracellular signaling cascades such as MAPK and PKC, and the activation of both mitochondrial-mediated apoptosis and lysosomal-mediated cell death. In addition to functional needs, during lactation the mammary gland must balance providing optimal zinc for cellular requirements with the need to secrete a substantial amount of zinc into milk to meet the requirements of the developing neonate. Finally, the mammary gland exhibits the most profound example of programmed cell death, which is driven by both apoptotic and lysosomal-mediated cell death. Two families of zinc-specific transporters regulate zinc delivery for these diverse functions. Members of the ZIP family of zinc transporters (ZIP1-14) import zinc into the cytoplasm from outside the cell or from subcellular organelles, while members of the ZnT family (ZnT1-10) export zinc from the cytoplasm. Recently, the ion channel transient receptor potential mucolipin 1 (TRPML1) has also been implicated in zinc transport. Herein, we review our current understanding of the molecular mechanisms through which mammary epithelial cells utilize zinc with a focus on the transport of zinc into discrete subcellular organelles for specific cellular functions during mammary gland development, lactation, and involution.

  17. Unilateral once daily milking locally induces differential gene expression in both mammary tissue and milk epithelial cells revealing mammary remodeling.

    PubMed

    Boutinaud, Marion; Galio, Laurent; Lollivier, Vanessa; Finot, Laurence; Wiart, Sandra; Esquerré, Diane; Devinoy, Eve

    2013-10-16

    Once daily milking reduces milk yield, but the underlying mechanisms are not yet fully understood. Local regulation due to milk stasis in the tissue may contribute to this effect, but such mechanisms have not yet been fully described. To challenge this hypothesis, one udder half of six Holstein dairy cows was milked once a day (ODM), and the other twice a day (TDM). On the 8th day of unilateral ODM, mammary epithelial cells (MEC) were purified from the milk using immunomagnetic separation. Mammary biopsies were harvested from both udder halves. The differences in transcript profiles between biopsies from ODM and TDM udder halves were analyzed by a 22k bovine oligonucleotide array, revealing 490 transcripts that were differentially expressed. The principal category of upregulated transcripts concerned mechanisms involved in cell proliferation and death. We further confirmed remodeling of the mammary tissue by immunohistochemistry, which showed less cell proliferation and more apoptosis in ODM udder halves. Gene expression analyzed by RT-qPCR in MEC purified from milk and mammary biopsies showed a common downregulation of six transcripts (ABCG2, FABP3, NUCB2, RNASE1 and 5, and SLC34A2) but also some discrepancies. First, none of the upregulated transcripts in biopsies varied in milk-purified MEC. Second, only milk-purified MEC showed significant LALBA downregulation, which suggests therefore that they correspond to a mammary epithelial cell subpopulation. Our results, obtained after unilateral milking, suggest that cell remodeling during ODM is due to a local effect, which may be triggered by milk accumulation.

  18. White/blue-emitting, water-dispersible CdSe quantum dots prepared by counter ion-induced polymer collapse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jing; Goh, Jane Betty; Goh, M. Cynthia; Giri, Neeraj Kumar; Paige, Matthew F.

    2015-09-01

    The synthesis and characterization of water-dispersible, luminescent CdSe/ZnS semiconductor quantum dots that exhibit nominal "white" fluorescence emission and have potential applications in solid-state lighting is described. The nanomaterials, prepared through counter ion-induced collapse and UV cross-linking of high-molecular weight polyacrylic acid in the presence of appropriate aqueous inorganic ions, were of ∼2-3 nm diameter and could be prepared in gram quantities. The quantum dots exhibited strong luminescence emission in two bands, the first in the blue-region (band edge) of the optical spectrum and the second, a broad emission in the red-region (attributed to deep trap states) of the optical spectrum. Because of the relative strength of emission of the band edge and deep trap state luminescence, it was possible to achieve visible white luminescence from the quantum dots in aqueous solution and in dried, solid films. The optical spectroscopic properties of the nanomaterials, including ensemble and single-molecule spectroscopy, was performed, with results compared to other white-emitting quantum dot systems described previously in the literature.

  19. Possible Immune Regulation of Natural Killer T Cells in a Murine Model of Metal Ion-Induced Allergic Contact Dermatitis.

    PubMed

    Kumagai, Kenichi; Horikawa, Tatsuya; Shigematsu, Hiroaki; Matsubara, Ryota; Kitaura, Kazutaka; Eguchi, Takanori; Kobayashi, Hiroshi; Nakasone, Yasunari; Sato, Koichiro; Yamada, Hiroyuki; Suzuki, Satsuki; Hamada, Yoshiki; Suzuki, Ryuji

    2016-01-12

    Metal often causes delayed-type hypersensitivity reactions, which are possibly mediated by accumulating T cells in the inflamed skin, called irritant or allergic contact dermatitis. However, accumulating T cells during development of a metal allergy are poorly characterized because a suitable animal model is unavailable. We have previously established novel murine models of metal allergy and found accumulation of both metal-specific T cells and natural killer (NK) T cells in the inflamed skin. In our novel models of metal allergy, skin hypersensitivity responses were induced through repeated sensitizations by administration of metal chloride and lipopolysaccharide into the mouse groin followed by metal chloride challenge in the footpad. These models enabled us to investigate the precise mechanisms of the immune responses of metal allergy in the inflamed skin. In this review, we summarize the immune responses in several murine models of metal allergy and describe which antigen-specific responses occur in the inflamed skin during allergic contact dermatitis in terms of the T cell receptor. In addition, we consider the immune regulation of accumulated NK T cells in metal ion-induced allergic contact dermatitis.

  20. Single step purification of recombinant proteins using the metal ion-inducible autocleavage (MIIA) domain as linker for tag removal.

    PubMed

    Ibe, Susan; Schirrmeister, Jana; Zehner, Susanne

    2015-08-20

    For fast and easy purification, proteins are typically fused with an affinity tag, which often needs to be removed after purification. Here, we present a method for the removal of the affinity tag from the target protein in a single step protocol. The protein VIC_001052 of the coral pathogen Vibrio coralliilyticus ATCC BAA-450 contains a metal ion-inducible autocatalytic cleavage (MIIA) domain. Its coding sequence was inserted into an expression vector for the production of recombinant fusion proteins. Following, the target proteins MalE and mCherry were produced as MIIA-Strep fusion proteins in Escherichia coli. The target proteins could be separated from the MIIA-Strep part simply by the addition of calcium or manganese(II) ions within minutes. The cleavage is not affected in the pH range from 5.0 to 9.0 or at low temperatures (6°C). Autocleavage was also observed with immobilized protein on an affinity column. The protein yield was similar to that achieved with a conventional purification protocol.

  1. Optimization and characterization of an in vitro bovine mammary cell culture system to study regulation of milk protein synthesis and mammary differentiation

    SciTech Connect

    Talhouk, R.S.

    1988-01-01

    A long term bovine mammary cell culture system that maintains normal mammary cell function was established and optimized to study milk protein synthesis and secretion and mammary differentiation. This culture system used bovine mammary acini isolated from developing or lactating mammary gland by enzymatic dissociation, and cryopreserved until thawed and plated for growth in vitro for these studies. Cells in M199 with lactogenic hormones {plus minus} fetal calf serum (FCS) were cultured on plastic, 100ul and 500ul type I collagen, and Matrigel, or embedded within type I collagen. Cell morphology, cell number, and total TCA-precipitable {sup 35}S-labelled proteins were monitored. Milk protein ({alpha}{sub s,1}-casein, lactoferrin (LF), {alpha}-lactalbumin, and {beta}-lactoglobulin) secretion and intracellular levels were determined by an ELISA assay.

  2. Autocrine-paracrine regulation of the mammary gland.

    PubMed

    Weaver, S R; Hernandez, L L

    2016-01-01

    The mammary gland has a remarkable capacity for regulation at a local level, particularly with respect to its main function: milk secretion. Regulation of milk synthesis has significant effects on animal and human health, at the level of both the mother and the neonate. Control by the mammary gland of its essential function, milk synthesis, is an evolutionary necessity and is therefore tightly regulated at a local level. For at least the last 60 yr, researchers have been interested in elucidating the mechanisms underpinning the mammary gland's ability to self-regulate, largely without the influence from systemic hormones or signals. By the 1960s, scientists realized the importance of milk removal in the capacity of the gland to produce milk and that the dynamics of this removal, including emptying of the alveolar spaces and frequency of milking, were controlled locally as opposed to traditional systemic hormonal regulation. Using both in vitro systems and various mammalian species, including goats, marsupials, humans, and dairy cows, it has been demonstrated that the mammary gland is largely self-regulating in its capacity to support the young, which is the evolutionary basis for milk production. Local control occurs at the level of the mammary epithelial cell through pressure and stretching negative-feedback mechanisms, and also in an autocrine fashion through bioactive factors within the milk which act as inhibitors, regulating milk secretion within the alveoli themselves. It is only within the last 20 to 30 yr that potential candidates for these bioactive factors have been examined at a molecular level. Several, including parathyroid hormone-related protein, growth factors (transforming growth factor, insulin-like growth factor, epidermal growth factor), and serotonin, are synthesized within and act upon the gland and possess dynamic receptor activity resulting in diverse effects on growth, calcium homeostasis, and milk composition. This review will focus on the

  3. Autocrine-paracrine regulation of the mammary gland.

    PubMed

    Weaver, S R; Hernandez, L L

    2016-01-01

    The mammary gland has a remarkable capacity for regulation at a local level, particularly with respect to its main function: milk secretion. Regulation of milk synthesis has significant effects on animal and human health, at the level of both the mother and the neonate. Control by the mammary gland of its essential function, milk synthesis, is an evolutionary necessity and is therefore tightly regulated at a local level. For at least the last 60 yr, researchers have been interested in elucidating the mechanisms underpinning the mammary gland's ability to self-regulate, largely without the influence from systemic hormones or signals. By the 1960s, scientists realized the importance of milk removal in the capacity of the gland to produce milk and that the dynamics of this removal, including emptying of the alveolar spaces and frequency of milking, were controlled locally as opposed to traditional systemic hormonal regulation. Using both in vitro systems and various mammalian species, including goats, marsupials, humans, and dairy cows, it has been demonstrated that the mammary gland is largely self-regulating in its capacity to support the young, which is the evolutionary basis for milk production. Local control occurs at the level of the mammary epithelial cell through pressure and stretching negative-feedback mechanisms, and also in an autocrine fashion through bioactive factors within the milk which act as inhibitors, regulating milk secretion within the alveoli themselves. It is only within the last 20 to 30 yr that potential candidates for these bioactive factors have been examined at a molecular level. Several, including parathyroid hormone-related protein, growth factors (transforming growth factor, insulin-like growth factor, epidermal growth factor), and serotonin, are synthesized within and act upon the gland and possess dynamic receptor activity resulting in diverse effects on growth, calcium homeostasis, and milk composition. This review will focus on the

  4. Similarity of GATA-3 Expression between Rat and Human Mammary Glands.

    PubMed

    Kinoshita, Yuichi; Yoshizawa, Katsuhiko; Emoto, Yuko; Yuki, Michiko; Yuri, Takashi; Shikata, Nobuaki; Tsubura, Airo

    2014-07-01

    The GATA family members are zinc finger transcription factors involved in cell differentiation and proliferation. In particular, GATA-3 is necessary for mammary gland maturation and is a useful marker in the characterization of mammary carcinoma in humans. The expression of GATA-3 protein in normal mammary glands, fibroadenomas and carcinomas was immunohistochemically compared in female rats and humans. In normal mammary glands of rats and humans, scattered luminal cells in the acini and whole ductal epithelial cells were positive for GATA-3 in the nuclei. No positive cells were detected in rat or human fibroadenomas. In rat and human mammary carcinomas, the nuclei of proliferating luminal-derived cancer cells expressed GATA-3. Therefore, GATA-3 protein is a candidate marker for mammary carcinoma in rats as well as humans.

  5. Tenascin is a Stromal Marker for Epithelial Malignancy in the Mammary Gland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mackie, Eleanor J.; Chiquet-Ehrismann, Ruth; Adams Pearson, Carolyn; Inaguma, Yutaka; Taya, Koji; Kawarada, Yoshifumi; Sakakura, Teruyo

    1987-07-01

    Tenascin is an extracellular matrix glycoprotein that is not present in the normal mature rat mammary gland. The distribution of tenascin was examined by immunohistochemistry in mammary tumors from carcinogen-treated and untreated rats, in virus-induced mammary tumors from mice, and in a variety of mammary gland lesions from humans. Tenascin was detectable in the stroma of the malignant but not of the benign tumors from all species. An inhibition ELISA, testing homogenates of rat tumors, confirmed that tenascin was present in malignant but not in benign tumors. Thus, tenascin was consistently found to be a stromal marker for epithelial malignancy in the mammary gland. It is concluded that tenascin may be involved in the interactions between the epithelial and mesenchyme-derived (stromal) components of the mammary gland, which are known to influence epithelial carcinogenesis in this organ.

  6. Burnout thresholds and cross section of power MOS transistors with heavy ions. Technical report, 1 May 1986-30 April 1988

    SciTech Connect

    Waskiewicz, A.E.; Groninger, J.W.

    1990-02-01

    Power MOSFET heavy ion-induced Single Event Burnout tests were performed jointly by representatives of the Aerospace Corporation, NASA Goddard, NWSC Crane and Rockwell International. For the most part, presented are the results of the burnout threshold and cross section characterizations performed on n-channel power MOSFETs, however a small amount of p-channel data is also included. In addition, data on the effect of temperature, gate bias, total dose and inductive loading on MOSFET Single Event Burnout sensitivity is preferred. At the time of the test effort, radiation hardened devices were being developed by International Rectifier and RCA/GE. The heavy-ion-induced burnout test results on available samples of these devices are also incorporated for comparison to the commercial and JEDEC versions tested.

  7. [THE ROLE OF ENDOSCOPIC MAMMODUCTOSCOPY IN COMPLEX DIAGNOSIS OF INTRADUCTAL TUMORS OF MAMMARY GLAND].

    PubMed

    Aksyonov, O A

    2015-11-01

    First Ukrainian experience in endoscopic mammoductoscopy (EMDS) conduction in 112 patients for revealing of intraductal tumors of mammary gland is presented. In comparison with roentgenological, ultrasonographic and cytological diagnostical methods, EMDS for intraductal tumors of mammary gland differs by highest sensitivity (90.3%) and accuracy (80.2%), but insufficient (47.4%) specificity. To improve the surgical treatment results the authors propose their own method of marking of the mammary gland intraductal tumors under endoscopic and echographic control.

  8. A versatile retractor for use in harvesting the internal mammary artery and performing standard cardiac operations.

    PubMed

    Phillips, S J; Core, M

    1989-04-01

    A versatile retractor is described that can be used to harvest either mammary artery without disturbing the operative field and can be converted to a standard sternotomy retractor. It uses the principle of elevating the cut sternal edge and applying external pressure to the area of the costochrondal junction to rotate the mammary pedicle into view. We have used this retractor and found it to be very efficient in exposing the mammary pedicle while being atraumatic to the sternum.

  9. [THE ROLE OF ENDOSCOPIC MAMMODUCTOSCOPY IN COMPLEX DIAGNOSIS OF INTRADUCTAL TUMORS OF MAMMARY GLAND].

    PubMed

    Aksyonov, O A

    2015-11-01

    First Ukrainian experience in endoscopic mammoductoscopy (EMDS) conduction in 112 patients for revealing of intraductal tumors of mammary gland is presented. In comparison with roentgenological, ultrasonographic and cytological diagnostical methods, EMDS for intraductal tumors of mammary gland differs by highest sensitivity (90.3%) and accuracy (80.2%), but insufficient (47.4%) specificity. To improve the surgical treatment results the authors propose their own method of marking of the mammary gland intraductal tumors under endoscopic and echographic control. PMID:26939431

  10. [Pathomorphosis of the mammary gland tissue during radical interventions using high-frequency electrosurgical welding].

    PubMed

    Bondar', G V; Sedakov, I E; Kobets, R A

    2011-04-01

    High-frequency electric welding of a live soft tissues (HFEW LST) is applied widely in all surgical specialties. Its application in surgery of mammary gland cancer constitutes a perspective trend. The impact of HFEW LST and monopolar electrocoagulation on tissues while performing radical operations in patients-women for mammary gland cancer was studied up. Basing on analysis of pathomorphological investigations data, the possibility and perspective of the welding technologies application, while performing radical operations on mammary glands, were established.

  11. Quantification of regenerative potential in primary human mammary epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Linnemann, Jelena R.; Miura, Haruko; Meixner, Lisa K.; Irmler, Martin; Kloos, Uwe J.; Hirschi, Benjamin; Bartsch, Harald S.; Sass, Steffen; Beckers, Johannes; Theis, Fabian J.; Gabka, Christian; Sotlar, Karl; Scheel, Christina H.

    2015-01-01

    We present an organoid regeneration assay in which freshly isolated human mammary epithelial cells are cultured in adherent or floating collagen gels, corresponding to a rigid or compliant matrix environment. In both conditions, luminal progenitors form spheres, whereas basal cells generate branched ductal structures. In compliant but not rigid collagen gels, branching ducts form alveoli at their tips, express basal and luminal markers at correct positions, and display contractility, which is required for alveologenesis. Thereby, branched structures generated in compliant collagen gels resemble terminal ductal-lobular units (TDLUs), the functional units of the mammary gland. Using the membrane metallo-endopeptidase CD10 as a surface marker enriches for TDLU formation and reveals the presence of stromal cells within the CD49fhi/EpCAM− population. In summary, we describe a defined in vitro assay system to quantify cells with regenerative potential and systematically investigate their interaction with the physical environment at distinct steps of morphogenesis. PMID:26071498

  12. Ocular melanoma and mammary mucinous carcinoma in an African lion

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Reports of neoplasms in Panthera species are increasing, but they are still an uncommon cause of disease and death in captive wild felids. The presence of two or more primary tumor in large felids is rarely reported, and there are no documented cases of ocular melanoma and mammary mucinous carcinoma in African lions. Case presentation An ocular melanoma and a mammary mucinous carcinoma are described in an African lion (Panthera leo). The first tumour was histologically characterized by the presence of epithelioid and fusiform melanocytes, while the latter was composed of mucus-producing cells with an epithelial phenotype that contained periodic acid-Schiff (PAS) and Alcian blue staining mucins. Metastases of both tumor were identified in various organs and indirect immunohistochemistry was used to characterize them. Peribiliary cysts were observed in the liver. Conclusions This is the first description of these tumor in African lions. PMID:23009723

  13. Modeling and analysis of transport in the mammary glands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quezada, Ana; Vafai, Kambiz

    2014-08-01

    The transport of three toxins moving from the blood stream into the ducts of the mammary glands is analyzed in this work. The model predictions are compared with experimental data from the literature. The utility of the model lies in its potential to improve our understanding of toxin transport as a pre-disposing factor to breast cancer. This work is based on a multi-layer transport model to analyze the toxins present in the breast milk. The breast milk in comparison with other sampling strategies allows us to understand the mass transport of toxins once inside the bloodstream of breastfeeding women. The multi-layer model presented describes the transport of caffeine, DDT and cimetidine. The analysis performed takes into account the unique transport mechanisms for each of the toxins. Our model predicts the movement of toxins and/or drugs within the mammary glands as well as their bioaccumulation in the tissues.

  14. Mammary gland tumor formation in transgenic mice overexpressing stromelysin-1

    SciTech Connect

    Sympson, Carolyn J; Bissell, Mina J; Werb, Zena

    1995-06-01

    An intact basement membrane (BM) is essential for the proper function, differentiation and morphology of many epithelial cells. The disruption or loss of this BM occurs during normal development as well as in the disease state. To examine the importance of BM during mammary gland development in vivo, we generated transgenic mice that inappropriately express autoactivating isoforms of the matrix metalloproteinase stromelysin-1. The mammary glands from these mice are both functionally and morphologically altered throughout development. We have now documented a dramatic incidence of breast tumors in several independent lines of these mice. These data suggest that overexpression of stromelysin-1 and disruption of the BM may be a key step in the multi-step process of breast cancer.

  15. Significance of rat mammary tumors for human risk assessment.

    PubMed

    Russo, Jose

    2015-02-01

    We have previously indicated that the ideal animal tumor model should mimic the human disease. This means that the investigator should be able to ascertain the influence of host factors on the initiation of tumorigenesis, mimic the susceptibility of tumor response based on age and reproductive history, and determine the response of the tumors induced to chemotherapy. The utilization of experimental models of mammary carcinogenesis in risk assessment requires that the influence of ovarian, pituitary, and placental hormones, among others, as well as overall reproductive events are taken into consideration, since they are important modifiers of the susceptibility of the organ to neoplastic development. Several species, such as rodents, dogs, cats, and monkeys, have been evaluated for these purposes; however, none of them fulfills all the criteria specified previously. Rodents, however, are the most widely used models; therefore, this work will concentrate on discussing the rat rodent model of mammary carcinogenesis. PMID:25714400

  16. Serotoninergic and Circadian Systems: Driving Mammary Gland Development and Function.

    PubMed

    Suárez-Trujillo, Aridany; Casey, Theresa M

    2016-01-01

    Since lactation is one of the most metabolically demanding states in adult female mammals, beautifully complex regulatory mechanisms are in place to time lactation to begin after birth and cease when the neonate is weaned. Lactation is regulated by numerous different homeorhetic factors, all of them tightly coordinated with the demands of milk production. Emerging evidence support that among these factors are the serotonergic and circadian clock systems. Here we review the serotoninergic and circadian clock systems and their roles in the regulation of mammary gland development and lactation physiology. We conclude by presenting our hypothesis that these two systems interact to accommodate the metabolic demands of lactation and thus adaptive changes in these systems occur to maintain mammary and systemic homeostasis through the reproductive cycles of female mammals. PMID:27471474

  17. Quantification of regenerative potential in primary human mammary epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Linnemann, Jelena R; Miura, Haruko; Meixner, Lisa K; Irmler, Martin; Kloos, Uwe J; Hirschi, Benjamin; Bartsch, Harald S; Sass, Steffen; Beckers, Johannes; Theis, Fabian J; Gabka, Christian; Sotlar, Karl; Scheel, Christina H

    2015-09-15

    We present an organoid regeneration assay in which freshly isolated human mammary epithelial cells are cultured in adherent or floating collagen gels, corresponding to a rigid or compliant matrix environment. In both conditions, luminal progenitors form spheres, whereas basal cells generate branched ductal structures. In compliant but not rigid collagen gels, branching ducts form alveoli at their tips, express basal and luminal markers at correct positions, and display contractility, which is required for alveologenesis. Thereby, branched structures generated in compliant collagen gels resemble terminal ductal-lobular units (TDLUs), the functional units of the mammary gland. Using the membrane metallo-endopeptidase CD10 as a surface marker enriches for TDLU formation and reveals the presence of stromal cells within the CD49f(hi)/EpCAM(-) population. In summary, we describe a defined in vitro assay system to quantify cells with regenerative potential and systematically investigate their interaction with the physical environment at distinct steps of morphogenesis.

  18. Mammary gland tumors in irradiated and untreated guinea pigs

    SciTech Connect

    Hoch-Ligeti, C.; Liebelt, A.G.; Congdon, C.C.; Stewart, H.L.

    1986-01-01

    This is a report of mammary gland tumors from 62 guinea pigs. The tumors arose in the terminal ductal-lobular units as either lobular acinar carcinoma or cystadenocarcinoma or as papillary carcinomas within large ducts near the mammilla. About half the number of the males had terminal ductal-lobular carcinomas and all but 2 of the papillary duct carcinomas also arose in males. Large tumors frequently exhibited squamous, chondromatous, osseous, fatty and myoepitheliomatous types of tissues. In 2 irradiated males and 1 female the tumors metastasized. Whole-body irradiation did not produce significant changes in the number or sex distribution or in the morphology of mammary gland tumors in inbred or outbred guinea pigs. All females had cystic ovaries without increase in granulosa cells, 24 (66.6%) had uterine tumors and 13 (34.2%) had adrenal gland tumors; all males had atrophic testes, 5 (16.5%) had testicular and 6 (22.2%) had adrenal gland tumors.

  19. Control of Differentiation of a Mammary Cell Line by Lipids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dulbecco, Renato; Bologna, Mauro; Unger, Michael

    1980-03-01

    A rat mammary cell line (LA7) undergoes spontaneous differentiation into domes due to production of specific inducers by the cells. Some of these inducers may be lipids, and we show that lipids regulate this differentiation as both inducers and inhibitors. One inhibitor is the tumor promoter tetradecanoyl-13 phorbol 12-acetate. The inducers are saturated fatty acids of two groups: butyric acid and acids with chain lengths from C13 to C16, especially myristic acid (C14). Other inducers are myristoyl and palmitoyl lysolecithins, myristic acid methyl ester, and two cationic detergents with a tetradecenyl chain. We propose that the lipids with a C14-C16 alkyl chain affect differentiation by recognizing specific receptors through their alkyl chains and that the effects obtained depend on the head groups. These lipids may be physiological regulators in the mammary gland.

  20. Serotoninergic and Circadian Systems: Driving Mammary Gland Development and Function

    PubMed Central

    Suárez-Trujillo, Aridany; Casey, Theresa M.

    2016-01-01

    Since lactation is one of the most metabolically demanding states in adult female mammals, beautifully complex regulatory mechanisms are in place to time lactation to begin after birth and cease when the neonate is weaned. Lactation is regulated by numerous different homeorhetic factors, all of them tightly coordinated with the demands of milk production. Emerging evidence support that among these factors are the serotonergic and circadian clock systems. Here we review the serotoninergic and circadian clock systems and their roles in the regulation of mammary gland development and lactation physiology. We conclude by presenting our hypothesis that these two systems interact to accommodate the metabolic demands of lactation and thus adaptive changes in these systems occur to maintain mammary and systemic homeostasis through the reproductive cycles of female mammals. PMID:27471474

  1. Myofibroblastoma arising in mammary hamartoma: a case report.

    PubMed

    Uchôa, Diego M; Cruz, Dênnis Baroni; Schaefer, Pedro Guilherme; Pêgas, Karla Laís; Cambruzzi, Eduardo

    2010-01-01

    Myofibroblastoma (MFB) is a rare mesenchymal tumor arising in breast's soft tissue with a great variety of microscopic features that can be mistaken with a wide variety of biphasic lesions. The authors report a rare case of myofibroblastoma of the breast arising in a mammary hamartoma (MH), present a review of the clinicopathological features of these lesions, and make some diagnostic considerations. The tumour consisted of a well-circumscribed nodule. MFB component comprised about fifty percent of the lesion and was made up of bipolar spindle cells arranged in fascicular clusters separated by bands of hyalinized collagen. There were fat cells and several residual hamartoma glands intermingled and distorted in MFB area. MFB component was positive for Desmin, CD34, bcl-2, and Calponin. To the best of our knowledge, MFB has not been reported in MH, neither has any of the reports described mammary glands joined within MFB. PMID:21151720

  2. Glucocorticoid modulation of casein gene transcription in mouse mammary gland.

    PubMed Central

    Ganguly, R; Mehta, N M; Ganguly, N; Banerjee, M R

    1979-01-01

    The influence of cortisol and prolactin on casein gene expression in the mammary gland of lactating BALB/c mice was measured by using a specific cDNA probe to 15S casein mRNA (cDNAcsn). Casein mRNA (mRNAcsn) level in the mammary gland was decreased by 85% 5 days after adrenal ablation, but then was increased 4.4-fold 12 hr after a single injection of hydrocortisone-21-acetate. An 80% decrease in serum prolactin level, induced by the prolactin inhibitor 2-bromo-alpha-ergocryptin (CB-154), did not alter the level of mRNAcsn in the gland. Specific transcription of the casein gene in nuclei isolated from lactating mammary glands was measured by cDNAcsn hybridization to the in vitro synthesized Hg-CTP-containing RNA (Hg-RNA), which was purified by SH-agarose chromatography. The level of the mRNAcsn in Hg-RNA synthesized in the isolated nuclei was 0.09% and this was decreased 85% by alpha-amanitin, indicating that the mRNAcsn sequences in the Hg-RNA were the products of RNA polymerase II-directed DNA-dependent RNA synthesis. Transcription of the mRNAcsn in isolated nuclei was decreased by 70% 5 days after adrenalectomy and a single injection of the glucocorticoid then increased the transcription level 2-fold at 6 hr. Essentially no alteration of the level of transcription was detectable in mammary nuclei isolated from lactating mice with 80% decreased serum prolactin level, induced by CB-154 treatment. The results thus demonstrate a glucocorticoid involvement on the modulation of casein gene expression at the transcriptional level of control. PMID:293734

  3. Amphiregulin mediates self-renewal in an immortal mammary epithelial cell line with stem cell characteristics

    SciTech Connect

    Booth, Brian W.; Boulanger, Corinne A.; Anderson, Lisa H.; Jimenez-Rojo, Lucia; Brisken, Cathrin; Smith, Gilbert H.

    2010-02-01

    Amphiregulin (AREG), a ligand for epidermal growth factor receptor, is required for mammary gland ductal morphogenesis and mediates estrogen actions in vivo, emerging as an essential growth factor during mammary gland growth and differentiation. The COMMA-D {beta}-geo (CD{beta}geo) mouse mammary cell line displays characteristics of normal mammary progenitor cells including the ability to regenerate a mammary gland when transplanted into the cleared fat pad of a juvenile mouse, nuclear label retention, and the capacity to form anchorage-independent mammospheres. We demonstrate that AREG is essential for formation of floating mammospheres by CD{beta}geo cells and that the mitogen activated protein kinase signaling pathway is involved in AREG-mediated mammosphere formation. Addition of exogenous AREG promotes mammosphere formation in cells where AREG expression is knocked down by siRNA and mammosphere formation by AREG{sup -/-} mammary epithelial cells. AREG knockdown inhibits mammosphere formation by duct-limited mammary progenitor cells but not lobule-limited mammary progenitor cells. These data demonstrate AREG mediates the function of a subset of mammary progenitor cells in vitro.

  4. Growth hormone mRNA in mammary gland tumors of dogs and cats.

    PubMed Central

    Mol, J A; van Garderen, E; Selman, P J; Wolfswinkel, J; Rijinberk, A; Rutteman, G R

    1995-01-01

    We have shown recently that in the dog progestin administration results in mammary production of immunoreactive growth hormone (GH). At present we demonstrate the expression of the gene encoding GH in the mammary gland of dogs and cats using reverse-transcriptase PCR. GH mRNA was found in the great majority of normal mammary tissues as well as benign and malignant mammary tumors of the dog and was associated with the presence of immunoreactive GH in cryostat sections. The mammary PCR product proved to be identical to that of the pituitary. The highest expression levels were found after prolonged treatment with progestins. In carcinomas GH mRNA was also found in progesterone receptor-negative tissue samples, indicating that after malignant transformation GH gene expression may become progestin independent. GH mRNA was also present in mammary tissues of cats with progestin-induced fibroadenomatous changes. It is concluded that GH gene expression occurs in normal, hyperplastic, and neoplastic mammary tissue of the dog. The expression in normal tissue is stimulated by progestins and might mediate the progestin-stimulated development of canine mammary tumors. The demonstration of progestin-stimulated GH expression in mammary tissue of cats indicates that the phenomenon is more generalized among mammals. Images PMID:7738169

  5. [Estimation of the Average Glandular Dose Using the Mammary Gland Image Analysis in Mammography].

    PubMed

    Otsuka, Tomoko; Teramoto, Atsushi; Asada, Yasuki; Suzuki, Shoichi; Fujita, Hiroshi; Kamiya, Satoru; Anno, Hirofumi

    2016-05-01

    Currently, the glandular dose is evaluated quantitatively on the basis of the measured data using phantom, and not in a dose based on the mammary gland structure of an individual patient. However, mammary gland structures of the patients are different from each other and mammary gland dose of an individual patient cannot be obtained by the existing methods. In this study, we present an automated estimation method of mammary gland dose by means of mammary structure which is measured automatically using mammogram. In this method, mammary gland structure is extracted by Gabor filter; mammary region is segmented by the automated thresholding. For the evaluation, mammograms of 100 patients diagnosed with category 1 were collected. Using these mammograms we compared the mammary gland ratio measured by proposed method and visual evaluation. As a result, 78% of the total cases were matched. Furthermore, the mammary gland ratio and average glandular dose among the patients with same breast thickness was matched well. These results show that the proposed method may be useful for the estimation of average glandular dose for the individual patients.

  6. Neuregulin 3 and erbb signalling networks in embryonic mammary gland development.

    PubMed

    Kogata, Naoko; Zvelebil, Marketa; Howard, Beatrice A

    2013-06-01

    We review the role of Neuregulin 3 (Nrg3) and Erbb receptor signalling in embryonic mammary gland development. Neuregulins are growth factors that bind and activate its cognate Erbb receptor tyrosine kinases, which form a signalling network with established roles in breast development and breast cancer. Studies have shown that Nrg3 expression profoundly impacts early stages of embryonic mammary development. Network analysis shows how Nrg/Erbb signals could integrate with other major regulators of embryonic mammary development to elicit the morphogenetic processes and cell fate decisions that occur as the mammary lineage is established.

  7. Promoter mutation and reduced expression of BRCA1 in canine mammary tumors.

    PubMed

    Qiu, H B; Sun, W D; Yang, X; Jiang, Q Y; Chen, S; Lin, D G

    2015-12-01

    Breast cancer 1, early onset (BRCA1) is one of the most important genes in human familial breast cancer, which also plays an important role in canine mammary tumors. The objectives of this study were to determine the promoter sequence of canine BRCA1, to investigate its promoter mutation status and to describe BRCA1 expression pattern in canine mammary tumors. The promoter sequence of canine BRCA1 was acquired by aligning human BRCA1 promoter sequence with canine genomic sequence and confirmed by standard promoter activity analysis. Same as human BRCA1 promoter, the CAAT box and G/C box were found in canine BRCA1 promoter. In order to explore the mutation status of the promoter region and to investigate the expression pattern of this gene, 10 normal canine mammary tissues, 15 benign mammary tumors and 15 malignant mammary tumors were used. By sequencing, 46.7% of the malignant mammary tumors were found with a deletion of one cytosine in the promoter region. The mRNA expression of BRCA1 was significantly reduced in benign and malignant mammary tumors (P<0.05), and the protein expression of BRCA1 was significantly reduced in malignant mammary tumors (P<0.05). This study is the first time to determine the canine BRCA1 promoter sequence and to describe the promoter mutation status in canine mammary tumors. PMID:26679809

  8. [Estimation of the Average Glandular Dose Using the Mammary Gland Image Analysis in Mammography].

    PubMed

    Otsuka, Tomoko; Teramoto, Atsushi; Asada, Yasuki; Suzuki, Shoichi; Fujita, Hiroshi; Kamiya, Satoru; Anno, Hirofumi

    2016-05-01

    Currently, the glandular dose is evaluated quantitatively on the basis of the measured data using phantom, and not in a dose based on the mammary gland structure of an individual patient. However, mammary gland structures of the patients are different from each other and mammary gland dose of an individual patient cannot be obtained by the existing methods. In this study, we present an automated estimation method of mammary gland dose by means of mammary structure which is measured automatically using mammogram. In this method, mammary gland structure is extracted by Gabor filter; mammary region is segmented by the automated thresholding. For the evaluation, mammograms of 100 patients diagnosed with category 1 were collected. Using these mammograms we compared the mammary gland ratio measured by proposed method and visual evaluation. As a result, 78% of the total cases were matched. Furthermore, the mammary gland ratio and average glandular dose among the patients with same breast thickness was matched well. These results show that the proposed method may be useful for the estimation of average glandular dose for the individual patients. PMID:27211083

  9. Comparison of mouse mammary gland imaging techniques and applications: Reflectance confocal microscopy, GFP Imaging, and ultrasound

    PubMed Central

    Tilli, Maddalena T; Parrish, Angela R; Cotarla, Ion; Jones, Laundette P; Johnson, Michael D; Furth, Priscilla A

    2008-01-01

    Background Genetically engineered mouse models of mammary gland cancer enable the in vivo study of molecular mechanisms and signaling during development and cancer pathophysiology. However, traditional whole mount and histological imaging modalities are only applicable to non-viable tissue. Methods We evaluated three techniques that can be quickly applied to living tissue for imaging normal and cancerous mammary gland: reflectance confocal microscopy, green fluorescent protein imaging, and ultrasound imaging. Results In the current study, reflectance confocal imaging offered the highest resolution and was used to optically section mammary ductal structures in the whole mammary gland. Glands remained viable in mammary gland whole organ culture when 1% acetic acid was used as a contrast agent. Our application of using green fluorescent protein expressing transgenic mice in our study allowed for whole mammary gland ductal structures imaging and enabled straightforward serial imaging of mammary gland ducts in whole organ culture to visualize the growth and differentiation process. Ultrasound imaging showed the lowest resolution. However, ultrasound was able to detect mammary preneoplastic lesions 0.2 mm in size and was used to follow cancer growth with serial imaging in living mice. Conclusion In conclusion, each technique enabled serial imaging of living mammary tissue and visualization of growth and development, quickly and with minimal tissue preparation. The use of the higher resolution reflectance confocal and green fluorescent protein imaging techniques and lower resolution ultrasound were complementary. PMID:18215290

  10. Experimental elucidation of vacancy complexes associated with hydrogen ion-induced splitting of bulk GaN

    SciTech Connect

    Moutanabbir, O.; Scholz, R.; Goesele, U.; Guittoum, A.; Jungmann, M.; Butterling, M.; Krause-Rehberg, R.; Anwand, W.; Egger, W.; Sperr, P.

    2010-03-15

    We present a detailed study of the thermal evolution of H ion-induced vacancy related complexes and voids in bulk GaN implanted under ion-cut conditions. By using transmission electron microscopy, we found that the damage band in as-implanted GaN is decorated with a high density of nanobubbles of approx1-2 nm in diameter. Variable energy Doppler broadening spectroscopy showed that this band contains vacancy clusters and voids. In addition to vacancy clusters, the presence of V{sub Ga}, V{sub Ga}-H{sub 2}, and V{sub Ga}V{sub N} complexes was evidenced by pulsed low-energy positron lifetime spectroscopy. Subtle changes upon annealing in these vacancy complexes were also investigated. As a general trend, a growth in open-volume defects is detected in parallel to an increase in both size and density of nanobubbles. The observed vacancy complexes appear to be stable during annealing. However, for temperatures above 450 deg. C, unusually large lifetimes were measured. These lifetimes are attributed to the formation of positronium in GaN. Since the formation of positronium is not possible in a dense semiconductor, our finding demonstrates the presence of sufficiently large open-volume defects in this temperature range. Based on the Tao-Eldrup model, the average lattice opening during thermal annealing was quantified. We found that a void diameter of 0.4 nm is induced by annealing at 600 deg. C. The role of these complexes in the subsurface microcracking is discussed.

  11. Characterization of an epithelial cell line from bovine mammary gland.

    PubMed

    German, Tania; Barash, Itamar

    2002-05-01

    Elucidation of the bovine mammary gland's unique characteristics depends on obtaining an authentic cell line that will reproduce its function in vitro. Representative clones from bovine mammary cell populations, differing in their attachment capabilities, were cultured. L-1 cells showed strong attachment to the plate, whereas H-7 cells detached easily. Cultures established from these clones were nontumorigenic upon transplantation to an immunodeficient host; they exhibited the epithelial cell characteristics of positive cytokeratin but not smooth muscle actin staining. Both cell lines depended on fetal calf serum for proliferation. They exhibited distinct levels of differentiation on Matrigel in serum-free, insulin-supplemented medium on the basis of their organization and beta-lactoglobulin (BLG) secretion. H-7 cells organized into mammospheres, whereas L-1 cells arrested in a duct-like morphology. In both cell lines, prolactin activated phosphorylation of the signal transducer and activator of transcription, Stat5-a regulator of milk protein gene transcription, and of PHAS-I-an inhibitor of translation initiation in its nonphosphorylated form. De novo synthesis and secretion of BLG were detected in differentiated cultures: in L-1 cells, BLG was dependent on lactogenic hormones for maximal induction but was less stringently controlled than was beta-casein in the mouse CID-9 cell line. L-1 cells also encompassed a near-diploid chromosomal karyotype and may serve as a tool for studying functional characteristics of the bovine mammary gland.

  12. Automatic segmentation of histological structures in mammary gland tissue sections

    SciTech Connect

    Fernandez-Gonzalez, Rodrigo; Deschamps, Thomas; Idica, Adam K.; Malladi, Ravikanth; Ortiz de Solorzano, Carlos

    2004-02-17

    Real-time three-dimensional (3D) reconstruction of epithelial structures in human mammary gland tissue blocks mapped with selected markers would be an extremely helpful tool for breast cancer diagnosis and treatment planning. Besides its clear clinical application, this tool could also shed a great deal of light on the molecular basis of breast cancer initiation and progression. In this paper we present a framework for real-time segmentation of epithelial structures in two-dimensional (2D) images of sections of normal and neoplastic mammary gland tissue blocks. Complete 3D rendering of the tissue can then be done by surface rendering of the structures detected in consecutive sections of the blocks. Paraffin embedded or frozen tissue blocks are first sliced, and sections are stained with Hematoxylin and Eosin. The sections are then imaged using conventional bright field microscopy and their background is corrected using a phantom image. We then use the Fast-Marching algorithm to roughly extract the contours of the different morphological structures in the images. The result is then refined with the Level-Set method which converges to an accurate (sub-pixel) solution for the segmentation problem. Finally, our system stacks together the 2D results obtained in order to reconstruct a 3D representation of the entire tissue block under study. Our method is illustrated with results from the segmentation of human and mouse mammary gland tissue samples.

  13. Primary Cilia Regulate Branching Morphogenesis During Mammary Gland Development

    PubMed Central

    McDermott, Kimberly M.; Liu, Bob Y.; Tlsty, Thea D.; Pazour, Gregory J.

    2010-01-01

    Summary During mammary gland development an epithelial bud undergoes branching morphogenesis to expand into a continuous tree-like network of branched ducts [1]. The process involves multiple cell types that are coordinated by hormones and growth factors coupled with signaling events including Wnt and Hedgehog [2-5]. Primary cilia play key roles in the development of many organs by coordinating extracellular signaling (Wnt, Hedgehog) with cellular physiology [6-8]. During mammary development, we find cilia on luminal epithelial, myoepithelial and stromal cells during early branching morphogenesis when epithelial ducts extend into the fat pad and undergo branching morphogenesis. When branching is complete, cilia disappear from luminal epithelial cells but remain on myoepithelial and stromal cells. Ciliary dysfunction caused by intraflagellar transport (IFT) defects results in branching defects. These include decreased ductal extension and decreased secondary and tertiary branching along with reduced lobular-alveolar development during pregnancy and lactation. We find increased canonical Wnt and decreased Hedgehog signaling in the mutant glands, which is consistent with the role of cilia in regulating these pathways [6-11]. In mammary gland and other organs, increased canonical Wnt [12-14] and decreased Hedgehog [15, 16] signaling decreases branching morphogenesis suggesting that Wnt and Hedgehog signaling connect ciliary dysfunction to branching defects. PMID:20381354

  14. Mammary-Type Myofibroblastoma: A Report of Two Cases

    PubMed Central

    An, Soyeon; Song, Joon Seon; Park, Soonchan; Lee, Jung Won; Cho, Kyung-Ja

    2016-01-01

    Mammary-type myofibroblastoma (MFB) is a rare, benign spindle cell neoplasm occurring along the milkline, with extension from the mid-axilla to the medial groin. It is histologically and immunohistochemically identical to MFB of the breast and is part of a spectrum of lesions that includes spindle cell lipoma and cellular angiofibroma. Recently, we experienced two cases of mammary-type MFB involving male patients aged 30 and 58 years, respectively. The tumors were located in the right scrotal sac and in the right axilla. Wide excisions were performed. Microscopically, the masses were composed of haphazardly arranged, variably sized fascicles of bland spindle cells and were admixed with mature fat tissue. The spindle cells in both cases showed immunopositivity for desmin and CD34 and negativity for smooth muscle actin. Loss of retinoblastoma (RB)/13q14 loci is a characteristic genetic alteration of mammary-type MFB, and we identified loss of RB protein expression by immunohistochemical staining. We emphasize the importance of awareness of this rare neoplasm when a spindle cell neoplasm is accompanied by desmin immunopositivity. The second patient was alive without recurrence for 20 months, and the first patient had not been followed. PMID:27271111

  15. In vitro infectivity assay for mouse mammary tumor virus.

    PubMed

    Vacquier, J P; Cardiff, R D

    1979-08-01

    Studies of mouse mammary tumor virus (MMTV) have been impeded by the lack of an in vitro infectivity assay. We have developed a rapid, quantitative in vitro assay for MMTV infectivity based on the detection of positively staining foci by immunoperoxidase. This assay and a 50% end-point titration of MMTV infectivity gave identical virus titers. Infection of a rat hepatoma cell line, a feline kidney cell line, and a normal murine mammary gland cell line by virus from the mouse mammary tumor GR3A cell line was linear with respect to virus concentration. The infectious titers obtained in both homologous and heterologous cell lines were not significantly different, demonstrating a lack of host range specificity. Virus infectivity was inactivated by heating at 55 degrees C and by ultraviolet irradiation. Rabbit anti-MMTV serum neutralized the infectivity with a 50% neutralization end point of 1:5000. Applications of this assay to the study of the immunological, biological, and biochemical characteristics of MMTV are discussed.

  16. The effects of spaceflight on mammary metabolism in pregnant rats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Plaut, K.; Maple, R.; Vyas, C.; Munaim, S.; Darling, A.; Casey, T.; Alberts, J. R.

    1999-01-01

    The effects of spaceflight on mammary metabolism of 10 pregnant rats was measured on Day 20 of pregnancy and after parturition. Rats were flown on the space shuttle from Day 11 through Day 20 of pregnancy. After their return to earth, glucose oxidation to carbon dioxide increased 43% (P < 0.05), and incorporation into fatty acids increased 300% (P < 0.005) compared to controls. It is unclear whether the enhanced glucose use is due to spaceflight or a response to landing. Casein mRNA and gross histology were not altered at Day 20 of pregnancy. Six rats gave birth (on Day 22 to 23 of pregnancy) and mammary metabolic activity was measured immediately postpartum. The earlier effects of spaceflight were no longer apparent. There was also no difference in expression of beta-casein mRNA. It is clear from these studies that spaceflight does not impair the normal development of the mammary gland, its ability to use glucose, nor the ability to express mRNA for a major milk protein.

  17. Hedgehog signaling in the normal and neoplastic mammary gland.

    PubMed

    Visbal, Adriana P; Lewis, Michael T

    2010-09-01

    The hedgehog signal transduction network is a critical regulator of metazoan development. Inappropriate activation of this network is implicated in several different cancers, including breast. Genetic evidence in mice as well as molecular biological studies in human cells clearly indicate that activated signaling can lead to mammary hyperplasia and, in some cases, tumor formation. However, the exact role(s) activated hedgehog signaling plays in the development or progression of breast cancer also remain unclear. In this review, we have discussed recent data regarding the mechanism(s) by which the hedgehog network may signal in the mammary gland, as well as the data implicating activated signaling as a contributing factor to breast cancer development. Finally, we provide a brief update on the available hedgehog signaling inhibitors with respect to ongoing clinical trials, some of which will include locally advanced or metastatic breast cancers. Given the growing intensity with which the hedgehog signaling network is being studied in the normal and neoplastic mammary gland, a more complete understanding of this network should allow more effective targeting of its activities in breast cancer treatment or prevention.

  18. Characteristics and EGFP expression of porcine mammary gland epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Yue-Mao; He, Xiao-Ying

    2010-12-01

    The aims of this study were to establish a porcine mammary gland epithelial (PMGE) cell line, and to determine if these PMGE cells could be maintained long-term in culture by continuous subculturing following transfection with a reporter gene, enhanced green fluorescence protein (EGFP). Primary culture of PMGE cells was achieved by outgrowth of migrating cells from the fragments of the mammary gland tissue of a lactating pig. The passage sixteen PMGE cells were transfected with EGFP gene using lipofection. The expression of Cell keratins of epithelial cells in PMGE cells was tested by immunofluorescence. Βeta-Casein gene mRNA was tested for PMGE cells by RT-PCR. The results showed that PMGE cells could form dome-like structure which looked like nipple, and the cells contained different cell types. The expression of Cell keratins demonstrated the property of epithelial cells, and the PMGE cells could express transcript encoding a Βeta-Casein protein. EGFP gene was successfully transferred into the PMGE cells, and the transfected cells could be maintained long-term in culture by continuous subculturing. In conclusion, we have established a EGFP gene transfected porcine mammary gland epithelial (ET-PMGE) cell line. PMID:20400167

  19. Characteristics and EGFP expression of porcine mammary gland epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Yue-Mao; He, Xiao-Ying

    2010-12-01

    The aims of this study were to establish a porcine mammary gland epithelial (PMGE) cell line, and to determine if these PMGE cells could be maintained long-term in culture by continuous subculturing following transfection with a reporter gene, enhanced green fluorescence protein (EGFP). Primary culture of PMGE cells was achieved by outgrowth of migrating cells from the fragments of the mammary gland tissue of a lactating pig. The passage sixteen PMGE cells were transfected with EGFP gene using lipofection. The expression of Cell keratins of epithelial cells in PMGE cells was tested by immunofluorescence. Βeta-Casein gene mRNA was tested for PMGE cells by RT-PCR. The results showed that PMGE cells could form dome-like structure which looked like nipple, and the cells contained different cell types. The expression of Cell keratins demonstrated the property of epithelial cells, and the PMGE cells could express transcript encoding a Βeta-Casein protein. EGFP gene was successfully transferred into the PMGE cells, and the transfected cells could be maintained long-term in culture by continuous subculturing. In conclusion, we have established a EGFP gene transfected porcine mammary gland epithelial (ET-PMGE) cell line.

  20. Murine mammary stem/progenitor cell isolation: Different method matters?

    PubMed

    Gao, Hui; Dong, Qiaoxiang; Chen, Yuanhong; Zhang, Fuchuang; Wu, Anqi; Shi, Yuanshuo; Bandyopadhyay, Abhik; Daniel, Benjamin J; Huang, Changjiang; Sun, Lu-Zhe

    2016-01-01

    Murine mammary stem/progenitor cell isolation has been routinely used in many laboratories, yet direct comparison among different methods is lacking. In this study, we compared two frequently used digestion methods and three sets of frequently used surface markers for their efficiency in enriching mammary stem and progenitor cells in two commonly used mouse strains, C57BL/6J and FVB. Our findings revealed that the slow overnight digestion method using gentle collagenase/hyaluronidase could be easily adopted and yielded reliable and consistent results in different batches of animals. In contrast, the different fast digestion protocols, as described in published studies, yielded high percent of non-epithelial cells with very few basal epithelial cells liberated in our hands. The three sets of markers tested in our hands reveal rather equally efficiency in separating luminal and basal cells if same fluorochrome conjugations were used. However, the tendency of non-epithelial cell inclusion in the basal cell gate was highest in samples profiled by CD24/CD29 and lowest in samples profiled by CD49f/EpCAM, this is especially true in mammary cells isolated from C57BL/6J mice. This finding will have significant implication when sorted basal cells are used for subsequent gene expression analysis. PMID:26933638

  1. Mammary Gland Specific Knockdown of the Physiological Surge in Cx26 during Lactation Retains Normal Mammary Gland Development and Function

    PubMed Central

    Stewart, Michael K. G.; Plante, Isabelle; Bechberger, John F.; Naus, Christian C.; Laird, Dale W.

    2014-01-01

    Connexin26 (Cx26) is the major Cx protein expressed in the human mammary gland and is up-regulated during pregnancy while remaining elevated throughout lactation. It is currently unknown if patients with loss-of-function Cx26 mutations that result in hearing loss and skin diseases have a greater susceptibility to impaired breast development. To investigate if Cx26 plays a critical role in mammary gland development and differentiation, a novel Cx26 conditional knockout mouse model was generated by crossing Cx26fl/fl mice with mice expressing Cre under the β-Lactoglobulin promoter. Conditional knockdown of Cx26 from the mammary gland resulted in a dramatic reduction in detectable gap junction plaques confirmed by a significant ∼65-70% reduction in Cx26 mRNA and protein throughout parturition and lactation. Interestingly, this reduction was accompanied by a decrease in mammary gland Cx30 gap junction plaques at parturition, while no change was observed for Cx32 or Cx43. Whole mount, histological and immunofluorescent assessment of breast tissue revealed comparatively normal lobuloalveolar development following pregnancy in the conditionally knockdown mice compared to control mice. In addition, glands from genetically-modified mice were capable of producing milk proteins that were evident in the lumen of alveoli and ducts at similar levels as controls, suggesting normal gland function. Together, our results suggest that low levels of Cx26 expression throughout pregnancy and lactation, and not the physiological surge in Cx26, is sufficient for normal gland development and function. PMID:24988191

  2. Acceleration of Mouse Mammary Tumor Virus-Induced Murine Mammary Tumorigenesis by a p53172H Transgene

    PubMed Central

    Chatterjee, Gouri; Rosner, Andrea; Han, Yi; Zelazny, Edward T.; Li, Baolin; Cardiff, Robert D.; Perkins, Archibald S.

    2002-01-01

    We previously showed that a mammary-specific dominant-negative p53 transgene (WAP-p53172H) could accelerate ErbB2-induced mammary tumorigenesis in mice, but was not tumorigenic on its own. To identify other genes that cooperate with WAP-p53172H in tumorigenesis, we performed mouse mammary tumor virus (MMTV) proviral mutagenesis. We derived F1, N2, and N4/N5 mice from p53172H transgenic FVB mice backcrossed onto MMTV+ C3H/He mice. Results show the latency of MMTV tumorigenesis is correlated with FVB contribution. F1 tumors had the shortest latency (217 days), had a higher rate of metastasis, and were less differentiated than the N2 and N4/N5 tumors. The latency was 269 days in N2 mice, and lengthened to 346 days in N4/N5 mice. p53172H significantly accelerated MMTV tumorigenesis only in N2 mice, indicating cooperativity between p53172H and MMTV in this cohort. To identify genes that may be causally involved in MMTV-induced mammary tumorigenesis, we identified 60 sites of proviral insertion in the N2 tumors. Among the insertions in p53172H transgenic tumors were 10 genes not previously found as sites of MMTV insertion including genes involved in signaling (Pdgfra, Pde1b, Cnk1), cell adhesion (Cd44), angiogenesis (Galgt1), and transcriptional regulation (Olig1, Olig2, and Uncx4.1). These may represent cellular functions that are likely not deregulated by mutation in p53. PMID:12466138

  3. ABC- and SLC-Transporters in Murine and Bovine Mammary Epithelium - Effects of Prochloraz

    PubMed Central

    Yagdiran, Yagmur; Oskarsson, Agneta; Knight, Christopher H.; Tallkvist, Jonas

    2016-01-01

    Some chemicals are ligands to efflux transporters which may result in high concentrations in milk. Limited knowledge is available on the influence of maternal exposure to chemicals on the expression and function of transporters in the lactating mammary gland. We determined gene expression of ABC and SLC transporters in murine mammary tissue of different gestation and lactation stages, in murine mammary cells (HC11) featuring resting and secreting phenotypes and in bovine mammary tissue and cells (BME-UV). Effects on transporter expression and function of the imidazole fungicide prochloraz, previously reported to influence BCRP in mammary cells, was investigated on transporter expression and function in the two cell lines. Transporters studied were BCRP, MDR1, MRP1, OATP1A5/OATP1A2, OCTN1 and OCT1. Gene expressions of BCRP and OCT1 in murine mammary glands were increased during gestation and lactation, whereas MDR1, MRP1, OATP1A5 and OCTN1 were decreased, compared to expressions in virgins. All transporters measured in mammary glands of mice were detected in bovine mammary tissue and in HC11 cells, while only MDR1 and MRP1 were detected in BME-UV cells. Prochloraz treatment induced MDR1 gene and protein expression in both differentiated HC11 and BME-UV cells and increased protein function in HC11 cells, resulting in decreased accumulation of the MDR1 substrate digoxin. In conclusion, our results demonstrate that murine (HC11) and bovine (BME-UV) mammary epithelial cells can be applied to characterize expression and function of transporters as well as effects of contaminants on the mammary transporters. An altered expression, induced by a drug or toxic chemical, on any of the transporters expressed in the mammary epithelial cells during lactation may modulate the well-balanced composition of nutrients and/or secretion of contaminants in milk with potential adverse effects on breast-fed infants and dairy consumers. PMID:27028005

  4. ABC- and SLC-Transporters in Murine and Bovine Mammary Epithelium--Effects of Prochloraz.

    PubMed

    Yagdiran, Yagmur; Oskarsson, Agneta; Knight, Christopher H; Tallkvist, Jonas

    2016-01-01

    Some chemicals are ligands to efflux transporters which may result in high concentrations in milk. Limited knowledge is available on the influence of maternal exposure to chemicals on the expression and function of transporters in the lactating mammary gland. We determined gene expression of ABC and SLC transporters in murine mammary tissue of different gestation and lactation stages, in murine mammary cells (HC11) featuring resting and secreting phenotypes and in bovine mammary tissue and cells (BME-UV). Effects on transporter expression and function of the imidazole fungicide prochloraz, previously reported to influence BCRP in mammary cells, was investigated on transporter expression and function in the two cell lines. Transporters studied were BCRP, MDR1, MRP1, OATP1A5/OATP1A2, OCTN1 and OCT1. Gene expressions of BCRP and OCT1 in murine mammary glands were increased during gestation and lactation, whereas MDR1, MRP1, OATP1A5 and OCTN1 were decreased, compared to expressions in virgins. All transporters measured in mammary glands of mice were detected in bovine mammary tissue and in HC11 cells, while only MDR1 and MRP1 were detected in BME-UV cells. Prochloraz treatment induced MDR1 gene and protein expression in both differentiated HC11 and BME-UV cells and increased protein function in HC11 cells, resulting in decreased accumulation of the MDR1 substrate digoxin. In conclusion, our results demonstrate that murine (HC11) and bovine (BME-UV) mammary epithelial cells can be applied to characterize expression and function of transporters as well as effects of contaminants on the mammary transporters. An altered expression, induced by a drug or toxic chemical, on any of the transporters expressed in the mammary epithelial cells during lactation may modulate the well-balanced composition of nutrients and/or secretion of contaminants in milk with potential adverse effects on breast-fed infants and dairy consumers. PMID:27028005

  5. Predictors of internal mammary vessel diameter: A computed tomographic angiography-assisted anatomic analysis.

    PubMed

    Cook, Julia A; Tholpady, Sunil S; Momeni, Arash; Chu, Michael W

    2016-10-01

    The internal mammary vessels are the most common recipient vessels in free flap breast reconstruction. The literature on internal mammary vascular anatomy is limited by small sample sizes, cadaveric studies, or intraoperative changes. The purpose of this study is to analyze internal mammary anatomy using computed tomographic angiography. A retrospective review of 110 consecutive computed tomographic angiography studies of female patients was performed. Measurements of vessel caliber, distance of internal mammary vessels to sternum, location of internal mammary vein bifurcation, intercostal space height, and chest width were analyzed. Patient demographics and comorbidities were reviewed. The right internal mammary artery and vein were larger than the left in all intercostal spaces (p = 0.02 and p < 0.001, respectively). A significant correlation was found between both skeletal chest width and body mass index with internal mammary vessel caliber at the third intercostal space (p ≤ 0.02). The internal mammary vein bifurcated at the third intercostal space bilaterally, 4.3 and 1.2 mm caudal to the third rib on the right and left sides, respectively. The third intercostal space was <1.5 cm in 25% of patients. Understanding the anatomy, bifurcation, and caliber of internal mammary vessels can aid preoperative planning of autologous, free flap breast reconstruction. On average, the internal mammary vein bifurcates at the third intercostal space; patients with larger chest widths and body mass index had larger caliber internal mammary vessels, and 25% of patients had third intercostal space <1.5 cm and, thus, may not be suitable candidates for rib-sparing techniques. PMID:27475336

  6. ABC- and SLC-Transporters in Murine and Bovine Mammary Epithelium--Effects of Prochloraz.

    PubMed

    Yagdiran, Yagmur; Oskarsson, Agneta; Knight, Christopher H; Tallkvist, Jonas

    2016-01-01

    Some chemicals are ligands to efflux transporters which may result in high concentrations in milk. Limited knowledge is available on the influence of maternal exposure to chemicals on the expression and function of transporters in the lactating mammary gland. We determined gene expression of ABC and SLC transporters in murine mammary tissue of different gestation and lactation stages, in murine mammary cells (HC11) featuring resting and secreting phenotypes and in bovine mammary tissue and cells (BME-UV). Effects on transporter expression and function of the imidazole fungicide prochloraz, previously reported to influence BCRP in mammary cells, was investigated on transporter expression and function in the two cell lines. Transporters studied were BCRP, MDR1, MRP1, OATP1A5/OATP1A2, OCTN1 and OCT1. Gene expressions of BCRP and OCT1 in murine mammary glands were increased during gestation and lactation, whereas MDR1, MRP1, OATP1A5 and OCTN1 were decreased, compared to expressions in virgins. All transporters measured in mammary glands of mice were detected in bovine mammary tissue and in HC11 cells, while only MDR1 and MRP1 were detected in BME-UV cells. Prochloraz treatment induced MDR1 gene and protein expression in both differentiated HC11 and BME-UV cells and increased protein function in HC11 cells, resulting in decreased accumulation of the MDR1 substrate digoxin. In conclusion, our results demonstrate that murine (HC11) and bovine (BME-UV) mammary epithelial cells can be applied to characterize expression and function of transporters as well as effects of contaminants on the mammary transporters. An altered expression, induced by a drug or toxic chemical, on any of the transporters expressed in the mammary epithelial cells during lactation may modulate the well-balanced composition of nutrients and/or secretion of contaminants in milk with potential adverse effects on breast-fed infants and dairy consumers.

  7. Triennial Lactation Symposium: A local affair: How the mammary gland adapts to changes in milking frequency.

    PubMed

    Wall, E H; McFadden, T B

    2012-05-01

    Regular removal of milk from the mammary gland is critical to maintaining milk secretion. Early studies in rodents demonstrated that changes in milking frequency influenced mammary blood flow, as well as mammary cell number and activity. Later studies in ruminants confirmed those observations and that the response was regulated locally within the mammary gland. In addition, it was discovered that increased milking frequency (IMF) during early lactation stimulated an increase in milk production that partially persisted through late lactation, indicating long-term effects on mammary function. The local mechanisms regulating the mammary response to IMF are poorly understood, although several have been proposed. To gain insight into the mechanisms underlying the mammary response to IMF, and to identify genes associated with the response, we used a functional genomics approach and conducted experiments on dairy cows exposed to unilateral frequent milking [UFM; twice daily milking (2X) of the left udder half and 4-times daily milking (4X) of the right udder half]. Across multiple experiments, we were unable to detect an effect of UFM on mammary cell proliferation or apoptosis. We have, however, identified distinct transcriptional signatures associated with the mammary response to milk removal and to UFM during early lactation. Sequential sampling of mammary tissue revealed that when UFM was imposed during early lactation, at least 2 sets of genes were coordinately regulated with changes in differential milk production of 4X vs. 2X udder halves. Moreover, some genes were persistently differentially expressed in 4X vs. 2X udder halves after UFM and were associated with the persistent increase in milk yield. We conclude that a coordinated transcriptional response is associated with the increase in milk yield elicited by IMF during early lactation and that the 2 sets of differentially expressed genes may be a marker for the autocrine up-regulation of milk production

  8. Metal Ion Induced Pairing of Cytosine Bases: Formation of I-Motif Structures Identified by IR Ion Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Juehan; Berden, Giel; Oomens, J.

    2015-06-01

    While the Watson-Crick structure of DNA is among the most well-known molecular structures of our time, alternative base-pairing motifs are also known to occur, often depending on base sequence, pH, or presence of cations. Pairing of two cytosine (C) bases induced by the sharing of a single proton (C-H^+-C) gives rise to the so-called i-motif, occurring particularly in the telomeric region of DNA, and particularly at low pH. At physiological pH, silver cations were recently suggested to form cytosine dimers in a C-Ag^+-C structure analogous to the hemiprotonated cytosine dimer, which was later confirmed by IR spectroscopy.^1 Here we investigate whether Ag^+ is unique in this behavior. Using infrared action spectroscopy employing the free-electron laser FELIX and a tandem mass spectrometer in combination with quantum-chemical computations, we investigate a series of C-M^+-C complexes, where M is Cu, Li and Na. The complexes are formed by electrospray ionization (ESI) from a solution of cytosine and the metal chloride salt in acetonitrile/water. The complexes of interest are mass-isolated in the cell of a FT ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometer, where they are irradiated with the tunable IR radiation from FELIX in the 600 - 1800 wn range. Spectra in the H-stretching range are obtained with a LaserVision OPO. Both experimental spectra as well as theoretical calculations indicate that while Cu behaves as Ag, the alkali metal ions induce a clearly different dimer structure, in which the two cytosine units are parallelly displaced. In addition to coordination to the ring nitrogen atom, the alkali metal ions coordinate to the carbonyl oxygen atoms of both cytosine bases, indicating that the alkali metal ion coordination favorably competes with hydrogen bonding between the two cytosine sub-units of the i-motif like structure. 1. Berdakin, Steinmetz, Maitre, Pino, J. Phys. Chem. A 2014, 118, 3804

  9. Paracrine WNT5A signaling in healthy and neoplastic mammary tissue.

    PubMed

    Kusner, David; Borcherding, Nicholas; Zhang, Weizhou

    2016-01-01

    Paracrine signaling between mammary epithelial cells has long been appreciated. Recently, we found that Wnt5a, a novel noncanonical Wnt ligand of luminal origin, counteracts canonical Wnt signaling in basal mammary epithelial cells through a paracrine pathway, inhibits the expansion of Erbb2-induced tumor-initiating cells, and suppresses tumor incidence and metastasis. PMID:27308558

  10. Metastatic anaplastic adenocarcinoma suspected to be of mammary origin in an intact male rabbit (Oryctolagus cuniculus)

    PubMed Central

    Summa, Noémie M.; Eshar, David; Snyman, Heindrich N.; Lillie, Brandon N.

    2014-01-01

    A 7-year-old, intact male, pet dwarf rabbit (Oryctolagus cuniculus) was presented for a ventral abdominal subcutaneous mass. Histolopathology of the resected mass was suggestive of a mammary adenocarcinoma. Six months later, the rabbit died from severe dyspnea. Necropsy showed recurrence of the original mass with hepatic and pulmonary metastasis of the anaplastic adenocarcinoma, suspected to be of mammary origin. PMID:24790235

  11. Sox10 Regulates Stem/Progenitor and Mesenchymal Cell States in Mammary Epithelial Cells.

    PubMed

    Dravis, Christopher; Spike, Benjamin T; Harrell, J Chuck; Johns, Claire; Trejo, Christy L; Southard-Smith, E Michelle; Perou, Charles M; Wahl, Geoffrey M

    2015-09-29

    To discover mechanisms that mediate plasticity in mammary cells, we characterized signaling networks that are present in the mammary stem cells responsible for fetal and adult mammary development. These analyses identified a signaling axis between FGF signaling and the transcription factor Sox10. Here, we show that Sox10 is specifically expressed in mammary cells exhibiting the highest levels of stem/progenitor activity. This includes fetal and adult mammary cells in vivo and mammary organoids in vitro. Sox10 is functionally relevant, as its deletion reduces stem/progenitor competence whereas its overexpression increases stem/progenitor activity. Intriguingly, we also show that Sox10 overexpression causes mammary cells to undergo a mesenchymal transition. Consistent with these findings, Sox10 is preferentially expressed in stem- and mesenchymal-like breast cancers. These results demonstrate a signaling mechanism through which stem and mesenchymal states are acquired in mammary cells and suggest therapeutic avenues in breast cancers for which targeted therapies are currently unavailable. PMID:26365194

  12. Mammary stem cells: Novel markers and novel approaches to increase lactation efficiency

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Mammary stem cells (MaSC) provide for net growth, renewal and turnover of mammary epithelial cells, and are therefore potential targets for strategies to increase production efficiency. Appropriate regulation of MaSC can potentially benefit milk yield, persistency, dry period management and tissue r...

  13. First demonstration of decorin, an extracellular matrix molecule, in bovine mammary tissue

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In the mammary gland, the extracellular matrix (ECM) is secreted by and surrounds cells located in both mammary parenchyma (PAR) and stroma. Decorin is an ECM proteoglycan with cell growth regulatory effects mediated by its ability to interact with growth factors or up-regulation of cyclin-dependent...

  14. Androgen dependent mammary gland virilism in rats given the selective estrogen receptor modulator LY2066948 hydrochloride.

    PubMed

    Rudmann, Daniel G; Cohen, Ilene R; Robbins, Michelle R; Coutant, David E; Henck, Judith W

    2005-01-01

    A selective estrogen receptor modulator (SERM) is a nonsteroidal compound with tissue specific estrogen receptor (ER) agonist or antagonist activities. In animals, SERMs may produce morphologic changes in hormonally-sensitive tissues like the mammary gland. Mammary glands from female rats given the SERM LY2066948 hydrochloride (LY2066948) for 1 month at >or= 175 mg/kg had intralobular ducts and alveoli lined by multiple layers of vacuolated, hypertrophied epithelial cells, resembling in part the morphology of the normal male rat mammary gland. We hypothesized that these SERM-mediated changes represented an androgen-dependent virilism of the female rat mammary gland. To test this hypothesis, the androgen receptor antagonist flutamide was co-administered with LY2066948 (175 mg/kg) to female rats for 1 month. Female rats given SERM alone had hyperandrogenemia and the duct and alveolar changes described here. Flutamide cotreatment did not affect serum androgen levels but completely blocked the SERM-mediated mammary gland change. In the mouse, a species that does not have the sex-specific differences in the mammary gland observed in the rat, SERM treatment resulted in hyperandrogenemia but did not alter mammary gland morphology. These studies demonstrate that LY2066948 produces species-specific, androgen-dependent mammary gland virilism in the female rat.

  15. Activation of Mammalian target of rapamycin in canine mammary carcinomas: an immunohistochemical study.

    PubMed

    Delgado, L; Gärtner, F; Dias Pereira, P

    2015-01-01

    Mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) is a serine-threonine kinase involved in cell growth, proliferation and survival. Activation of mTOR has been reported in various tumour types, including human breast cancer; however, the expression of mTOR in canine mammary tumours has not been examined. In the present study, expression of the activated form of mTOR (phospho-mTOR [p-mTOR]) was examined immunohistochemically in five normal canine mammary glands, 45 canine mammary carcinomas and their corresponding metastatic lesions (n = 15). Phospho-mTOR was not expressed in normal canine mammary tissue, but cytoplasmic labelling was observed in 78% of canine mammary carcinomas. Two carcinomas had both cytoplasmic and nuclear labelling. No significant relationship was found between p-mTOR cytoplasmic expression and histological type or grading of carcinomas, degree of tubular formation, anisokaryosis, mitotic activity or lymph node metastasis. In all except one case, the expression pattern of p-mTOR in lymph node metastases was similar or decreased when compared with the primary lesion. The findings suggest that p-mTOR is involved in mammary carcinogenesis in dogs. However, p-mTOR cytoplasmic expression does not appear to be a prognostic indicator in canine mammary carcinomas, which may be related to its subcellular location in the neoplastic cells. Canine mammary tumours may provide a model for the development of innovative medical strategies involving mTOR inhibitors in human breast cancer. PMID:25670666

  16. A Spectrum of Monoclonal Antibodies Reactive with Human Mammary Tumor Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colcher, D.; Horan Hand, P.; Nuti, M.; Schlom, J.

    1981-05-01

    Splenic lymphocytes of mice, immunized with membrane-enriched fractions of metastatic human mammary carcinoma tissues, were fused with the NS-1 non-immunoglobulin-secreting murine myeloma cell line. This resulted in the generation of hybridoma cultures secreting immunoglobulins reactive in solid-phase radioimmunoassays with extracts of metastatic mammary carcinoma cells from involved livers, but not with extracts of apparently normal human liver. As a result of further screening of immunoglobulin reactivities and double cloning of cultures, 11 monoclonal antibodies were chosen that demonstrated reactivities with human mammary tumor cells and not with apparently normal human tissues. These monoclonal antibodies could be placed into at least five major groups on the basis of their differential binding to the surface of various live human mammary tumor cells in culture, to extracts of mammary tumor tissues, or to tissue sections of mammary tumor cells studied by the immunoperoxidase technique. Whereas a spectrum of reactivities to mammary tumors was observed with the 11 monoclonal antibodies, no reactivity was observed to apparently normal cells of the following human tissues: breast, lymph node, lung, skin, testis, kidney, thymus, bone marrow, spleen, uterus, thyroid, intestine, liver, bladder, tonsils, stomach, prostate, and salivary gland. Several of the antibodies also demonstrated a ``pancarcinoma'' reactivity, showing binding to selected non-breast carcinomas. None of the monoclonal antibodies showed binding to purified ferritin or carcinoembryonic antigen. Monoclonal antibodies of all five major groups, however, demonstrated binding to human metastatic mammary carcinoma cells both in axillary lymph nodes and at distal sites.

  17. Repression of mammary adipogenesis by genistein limits mammosphere formation of human MCF-7 cells

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Mammary adipose tissue may contribute to breast cancer development and progression by altering neighboring epithelial cell behavior and phenotype through paracrine signaling. Dietary exposure to soy foods is associated with lower mammary tumor risk and reduced body weight and adiposity in humans and...

  18. Intracellular killing of mastitis pathogens by penethamate hydriodide following internalization into mammary epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Almeida, R A; Patel, D; Friton, G M; Oliver, S P

    2007-04-01

    Penethamate hydriodide was highly effective in killing Streptococcus uberis, Streptococcus dysgalactiae subsp. dysgalactiae and Staphylococcus aureus that internalized mammary epithelial cells. At higher concentrations (32 microg/mL to 32 mg/mL), killing rates ranged from 85% to 100%. At lower concentrations (0.032 microg/mL to 3.2 microg/mL), killing rates ranged from 0 to 80%. Results of this proof-of-concept study demonstrated that: (1) penethamate hydriodide is capable of entering mammary epithelial cells and killing intracellular mastitis pathogens without affecting mammary epithelial cell viability, (2) the in vitro model used is capable of quantifying the fate of mastitis pathogens internalized into mammary epithelial cells, and (3) this in vitro model can be used to determine the effectiveness of antibiotics at killing bacteria within the cytoplasm of mammary epithelial cells.

  19. Insights into the role of connexins in mammary gland morphogenesis and function.

    PubMed

    Stewart, Michael K G; Simek, Jamie; Laird, Dale W

    2015-06-01

    Gap junctions formed of connexin subunits link adjacent cells by direct intercellular communication that is essential for normal tissue homeostasis in the mammary gland. The mammary gland undergoes immense remodeling and requires exquisite regulation to control the proliferative, differentiating, and cell death mechanisms regulating gland development and function. The generation of novel genetically modified mice with reduced or ablated connexin function within the mammary gland has advanced our understanding of the role of gap junctions during the complex and dynamic process of mammary gland development. These studies have revealed an important stage-specific role for Cx26 (GJA1) and Cx43 (GJB2), while Cx30 (GJB6) and Cx32 (Gjb1) can be eliminated without compromising the gland. Yet, there remain gaps in our understanding of the role of mammary gland gap junctions.

  20. Interplay between progesterone and prolactin in mammary development and implications for breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Lee, Heather J; Ormandy, Christopher J

    2012-06-24

    Progesterone and prolactin remodel mammary morphology during pregnancy by acting on the mammary epithelial cell hierarchy. The roles of each hormone in mammary development have been well studied, but evidence of signalling cross-talk between progesterone and prolactin is still emerging. Factors such as receptor activator of NFkB ligand (RANKL) may integrate signals from both hormones to orchestrate their joint actions on the epithelial cell hierarchy. Common targets of progesterone and prolactin signalling are also likely to integrate their pro-proliferative actions in breast cancer. Therefore, a thorough understanding of the interplay between progesterone and prolactin in mammary development may reveal therapeutic targets for breast cancer. This review summarises our understanding of Pg and PRL action in mammary gland development before focusing on molecular mechanisms of signalling cross-talk and the implications for breast cancer.

  1. Mixtures of environmentally relevant endocrine disrupting chemicals affect mammary gland development in female and male rats.

    PubMed

    Mandrup, Karen Riiber; Johansson, Hanna Katarina Lilith; Boberg, Julie; Pedersen, Anne Stilling; Mortensen, Mette Sidsel; Jørgensen, Jennifer Solgaard; Vinggaard, Anne Marie; Hass, Ulla

    2015-07-01

    Estrogenic chemicals are able to alter mammary gland development in female rodents, but little is known on the effects of anti-androgens and mixtures of endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs) with dissimilar modes of action. Pregnant rat dams were exposed during gestation and lactation to mixtures of environmentally relevant EDCs with estrogenic, anti-androgenic or dissimilar modes of action (TotalMix) of 100-, 200- or 450-fold high end human intake estimates. Mammary glands of prepubertal and adult female and male offspring were examined. Oestrogens increased mammary outgrowth in prepubertal females and the mRNA level of matrix metalloproteinase-3, which may be a potential biomarker for increased outgrowth. Mixtures of EDCs gave rise to ductal hyperplasia in adult males. Adult female mammary glands of the TotalMix group showed morphological changes possibly reflecting increased prolactin levels. In conclusion both estrogenic and anti-androgenic chemicals given during foetal life and lactation affected mammary glands in the offspring.

  2. Expression of the gene encoding growth hormone in the human mammary gland

    SciTech Connect

    Mol, J.A.; Misdorp, W.; Rijnberk, A.

    1995-10-01

    Progestins cause a syndrome of growth hormone (GH) excess and enhanced mammary tumorigenesis in the dog. This has been regarded as being specific for the dog. Recently we reported that progestin-induced GH excess originates from foci of hyperplastic ductular epithelium of the mammary gland in the dog. In the present report we demonstrate by reverse-transcriptase PCR and immunohistochemistry that a main factor involved in tissue growth, i.e. GH, is also expressed in normal and neoplastic human mammary glands. The gene expressed in the human mammary gland proved to be identical to the gene encoding GH in the pituitary gland. The role of progesterone in the GH expression of the human mammary gland needs, however, to be proven. It is hypothesized that this locally produced hGH may play a pathogenetic role in breast cancer. 21 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  3. Impact of diethylhexyl phthalate on gene expression and development of mammary glands of pregnant mouse.

    PubMed

    Li, Lan; Liu, Jing-Cai; Zhao, Yong; Lai, Fang-Nong; Yang, Fan; Ge, Wei; Dou, Cheng-Li; Shen, Wei; Zhang, Xi-Feng; Chen, Hong

    2015-10-01

    The widely used diethylhexyl phthalate (DEHP) is a known endocrine disruptor that causes persistent alterations in the structure and function of female reproductive system, including ovaries, uterus and oviducts. To explore the molecular mechanism of the effect of DEHP on the development of mammary glands, we investigated the cell cycle, growth, proliferation and gene expression of mammary gland cells of pregnant mice exposed to DEHP. It was demonstrated, for the first time, that the mammary gland cells of pregnant mice treated with DEHP for 0.5-3.5 days post-coitum had increased proliferation, growth rate and number of cells in the G2/S phase. The expression of cell proliferation-related genes was significantly altered after short time and low-dose DEHP treatment of mammary gland cells in vivo and in vitro. These findings showed adverse effects of DEHP on mammary gland cells in pregnant mice. PMID:26170149

  4. In vitro differentiation of a cloned bovine mammary epithelial cell.

    PubMed

    Rose, Michael T; Aso, Hisashi; Yonekura, Shinichi; Komatsu, Tokushi; Hagino, Akihiko; Ozutsumi, Kyouhei; Obara, Yoshiaki

    2002-08-01

    The aim of the study was to establish in vitro a bovine mammary epithelial cell (MEC) clone, able to respond to mitogenic growth factors and to lactogenic hormones. Mammary tissue from a 200-d pregnant Holstein cow was used as a source of MEC, from which a clone was established through a process of limiting dilution. When plated on plastic, the cells assumed a monolayer, cobblestone, epithelial-like morphology, with close contact between cells. Inclusion of IGF-1 and EGF in the media significantly increased the number of cells 5 d after plating. All cells stained strongly for cytokeratin and moderately for vimentin at young and old passage stages, indicating the epithelial nature of this cell clone. When the cells were plated at a high density on a thin layer of a commercial extracellular matrix preparation (Matrigel), lobular, alveoli-like structures developed within approximately 5 d, with a clearly visible lumen. When cells were plated onto Matrigel in differentiation media (containing lactogenic hormones), detectable quantities of alpha-casein were present in the media and particularly on the lumen side of the structures. Omission of one of the lactogenic hormones (insulin, prolactin or hydrocortisone) reduced alpha-casein release to the limit of detection of the assay used. Lactoferrin was also produced when the cells were plated on Matrigel, again principally on the lumen side of the lobules, though this was independent of the lactogenic hormones. By passage 40, the cells had senesced, and it was not possible to induce alpha-casein or lactoferrin production. This study notes the establishment of a functional bovine mammary epithelial cell clone, which is responsive to mitogenic and lactogenic hormones and an extracellular matrix.

  5. Remodeling of Endogenous Mammary Epithelium by Breast Cancer Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Parashurama, Natesh; Lobo, Neethan A.; Ito, Ken; Mosley, Adriane R.; Habte, Frezghi G.; Zabala, Maider; Smith, Bryan R.; Lam, Jessica; Weissman, Irving L.; Clarke, Michael F.; Gambhir, Sanjiv S.

    2014-01-01

    Poorly regulated tissue remodeling results in increased breast cancer risk, yet how breast cancer stem cells (CSC) participate in remodeling is unknown. We performed in vivo imaging of changes in fluorescent, endogenous duct architecture as a metric for remodeling. First, we quantitatively imaged physiologic remodeling of primary branches of the developing and regenerating mammary tree. To assess CSC-specific remodeling events, we isolated CSC from MMTV-Wnt1 (mouse mammary tumor virus long-term repeat enhancer driving Wnt1 oncogene) breast tumors, a well studied model in which tissue remodeling affects tumorigenesis. We confirm that CSC drive tumorigenesis, suggesting a link between CSC and remodeling. We find that normal, regenerating, and developing gland maintain a specific branching pattern. In contrast, transplantation of CSC results in changes in the branching patterns of endogenous ducts while non-CSC do not. Specifically, in the presence of CSC, we identified an increased number of branches, branch points, ducts which have greater than 40 branches (5/33 for CSC and 0/39 for non-CSC), and histological evidence of increased branching. Moreover, we demonstrate that only CSC implants invade into surrounding stroma with structures similar to developing mammary ducts (nine for CSC and one for non-CSC). Overall, we demonstrate a novel approach for imaging physiologic and pathological remodeling. Furthermore, we identify unique, CSC-specific, remodeling events. Our data suggest that CSC interact with the microenvironment differently than non-CSC, and that this could eventually be a therapeutic approach for targeting CSC. PMID:22899386

  6. Remodeling of endogenous mammary epithelium by breast cancer stem cells.

    PubMed

    Parashurama, Natesh; Lobo, Neethan A; Ito, Ken; Mosley, Adriane R; Habte, Frezghi G; Zabala, Maider; Smith, Bryan R; Lam, Jessica; Weissman, Irving L; Clarke, Michael F; Gambhir, Sanjiv S

    2012-10-01

    Poorly regulated tissue remodeling results in increased breast cancer risk, yet how breast cancer stem cells (CSC) participate in remodeling is unknown. We performed in vivo imaging of changes in fluorescent, endogenous duct architecture as a metric for remodeling. First, we quantitatively imaged physiologic remodeling of primary branches of the developing and regenerating mammary tree. To assess CSC-specific remodeling events, we isolated CSC from MMTV-Wnt1 (mouse mammary tumor virus long-term repeat enhancer driving Wnt1 oncogene) breast tumors, a well studied model in which tissue remodeling affects tumorigenesis. We confirm that CSC drive tumorigenesis, suggesting a link between CSC and remodeling. We find that normal, regenerating, and developing gland maintain a specific branching pattern. In contrast, transplantation of CSC results in changes in the branching patterns of endogenous ducts while non-CSC do not. Specifically, in the presence of CSC, we identified an increased number of branches, branch points, ducts which have greater than 40 branches (5/33 for CSC and 0/39 for non-CSC), and histological evidence of increased branching. Moreover, we demonstrate that only CSC implants invade into surrounding stroma with structures similar to developing mammary ducts (nine for CSC and one for non-CSC). Overall, we demonstrate a novel approach for imaging physiologic and pathological remodeling. Furthermore, we identify unique, CSC-specific, remodeling events. Our data suggest that CSC interact with the microenvironment differently than non-CSC, and that this could eventually be a therapeutic approach for targeting CSC. PMID:22899386

  7. Sequential internal mammary artery grafts. Expanded utilization of an ideal conduit

    SciTech Connect

    Kamath, M.L.; Matysik, L.S.; Schmidt, D.H.; Smith, L.L.

    1985-02-01

    The internal mammary artery, when used as a conduit for coronary artery bypass, offers a better long-term patency rate and survival rate than the saphenous vein; however, its utility has been limited. Among other factors, the availability of only two internal mammary arteries for anastomosis has been a major limitation. In an attempt to overcome this limitation, the authors constructed sequential internal mammary artery grafts in 87 patients. In 49 patients (Group I), only one internal mammary artery was used for sequential anastomosis. In another 31 patients (Group II), one internal mammary artery was used for sequential anastomosis and the other was used for single end-to-side anastomosis. Both internal mammary arteries were used in seven patients (Group III) for the construction of sequential anastomoses. Postoperatively, 64 patients were evaluated by exercise stress tests. None of these patients had a positive stress test although seven patients (11%) had electrocardiographic changes that were considered equivocal. Coronary angiography was performed in 35 of the 87 patients, with 92 vein grafts and 90 internal mammary artery anastomotic sites evaluated within 1 year of operation. A total of 83 vein grafts and 84 internal mammary artery anastomotic sites evaluated within 1 year of operation. A total of 83 vein grafts and 84 internal mammary artery anastomoses were found to be patent. Thus the patency rate for vein grafts was 90% and for internal mammary artery grafts, 93%. During the follow-up period (8 to 52 months), three patients died and one was lost to follow-up. Among the remaining patients, 79 had complete relief from symptoms, three had minimal symptoms, and one patient obtained no relief from symptoms.

  8. Expression of albumin in nonhepatic tissues and its synthesis by the bovine mammary gland.

    PubMed

    Shamay, A; Homans, R; Fuerman, Y; Levin, I; Barash, H; Silanikove, N; Mabjeesh, S J

    2005-02-01

    Albumin is a well-characterized product of the liver. In the present study, objectives were to determine if the albumin gene is also expressed in various nonhepatic tissues in the bovine; whether mammary gland epithelial cells synthesize albumin; and how its synthesis is affected by bovine mastitis. Albumin expression was monitored using reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. Tissues examined were: liver, mammary gland, tongue, intestine, lymph gland, testicle, ovary, and uterus. All tissues except the ovary expressed the albumin gene, albeit less so than the liver. The highest level of expression (other than liver) was found in the lymph nodes but expression was also found in the mammary gland. Incubation of mammary gland explants with the labeled amino acid L-[(35)S] methionine resulted in formation of labeled immunoprecipitable albumin, newly synthesized in the explant. Immunoprecipitable albumin in the medium verified that newly synthesized albumin was also secreted into the medium. This shows that the gland itself is a source of milk albumin. Albumin mRNA expression was approximately 4 times higher in mammary gland tissue from 6 mastitic cows compared with expression in mammary tissue from 6 healthy glands. Further, secretion of albumin was increased 3.5-fold from explants of mastitic mammary glands compared with secretion from explants of healthy mammary glands. Addition of lipopolysaccharide increased the synthesis and secretion of albumin in mammary gland cells in a dose-dependent manner. Exposure to lipopolysaccharide accelerated albumin synthesis in a time-dependent manner up to 48 h. These results lead us to suggest that the secretion of albumin by the mammary gland is part of the innate nonspecific defense system. PMID:15653522

  9. Postnatal and postpartal morphology of the mammary gland in nude mice.

    PubMed

    Militzer, K; Schwalenstöcker, H

    1996-08-01

    The object of this work was to compare the postnatal and postpartal morphology of the mammary gland of nu/nu with that of nu/(+)-mice. All studies were carried out on groups of female (athymic) nude mice with NMRI genetic background, their nu/(+)-siblings and dams. The various age groups (3, 21, 40, 55, 70 and 120 days) each consisted of 6 nu/nu- and 6 heterozygous nu/(+)-mice respectively. The morphological examination of the mammary gland tissue were made on histological sections and whole mounts. Body weights, total areas of the mammary glands and the number of the terminal end buds were compared. The mammary gland of the athymic nude mouse exhibited no essential morphological differences from the normal developing mammary gland of the hairy euthymic nu/(+)-animal. The area of the mammary gland increased with increasing body weight. Both collectives of mice differed only in their rate of mammary gland development. As a result, the terminal end buds appeared numerously as growth points of mammary gland in nu/(+)-animals as early as the 21st day of life. The athymic nude mice showed a maximum only on the 40th day of life and a lower degree of density and differentiation of specific mammary gland structures (lateral buds, lobulo-alveolar glandular endings) until the 70th day of life. The mammary gland of 120-day-old animals and dams of both animal groups reached the same state of maturity. Thus it is not the rate of development of the dam, but other, yet unidentified factors, which determine, if successful breeding of nude mice with homozygous parents is possible.

  10. The type 7 serotonin receptor, 5-HT 7 , is essential in the mammary gland for regulation of mammary epithelial structure and function.

    PubMed

    Pai, Vaibhav P; Hernandez, Laura L; Stull, Malinda A; Horseman, Nelson D

    2015-01-01

    Autocrine-paracrine activity of serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine, 5-HT) is a crucial homeostatic parameter in mammary gland development during lactation and involution. Published studies suggested that the 5-HT7 receptor type was important for mediating several effects of 5-HT in the mammary epithelium. Here, using 5-HT7 receptor-null (HT7KO) mice we attempt to understand the role of this receptor in mediating 5-HT actions within the mammary gland. We demonstrate for the first time that HT7KO dams are inefficient at sustaining their pups. Histologically, the HT7KO mammary epithelium shows a significant deviation from the normal secretory epithelium in morphological architecture, reduced secretory vesicles, and numerous multinucleated epithelial cells with atypically displaced nuclei, during lactation. Mammary epithelial cells in HT7KO dams also display an inability to transition from lactation to involution as normally seen by transition from a columnar to a squamous cell configuration, along with alveolar cell apoptosis and cell shedding. Our results show that 5-HT7 is required for multiple actions of 5-HT in the mammary glands including core functions that contribute to changes in cell shape and cell turnover, as well as specialized secretory functions. Understanding these actions may provide new interventions to improve lactation performance and treat diseases such as mastitis and breast cancer.

  11. The Type 7 Serotonin Receptor, 5-HT7, Is Essential in the Mammary Gland for Regulation of Mammary Epithelial Structure and Function

    PubMed Central

    Pai, Vaibhav P.; Hernandez, Laura L.; Stull, Malinda A.; Horseman, Nelson D.

    2015-01-01

    Autocrine-paracrine activity of serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine, 5-HT) is a crucial homeostatic parameter in mammary gland development during lactation and involution. Published studies suggested that the 5-HT7 receptor type was important for mediating several effects of 5-HT in the mammary epithelium. Here, using 5-HT7 receptor-null (HT7KO) mice we attempt to understand the role of this receptor in mediating 5-HT actions within the mammary gland. We demonstrate for the first time that HT7KO dams are inefficient at sustaining their pups. Histologically, the HT7KO mammary epithelium shows a significant deviation from the normal secretory epithelium in morphological architecture, reduced secretory vesicles, and numerous multinucleated epithelial cells with atypically displaced nuclei, during lactation. Mammary epithelial cells in HT7KO dams also display an inability to transition from lactation to involution as normally seen by transition from a columnar to a squamous cell configuration, along with alveolar cell apoptosis and cell shedding. Our results show that 5-HT7 is required for multiple actions of 5-HT in the mammary glands including core functions that contribute to changes in cell shape and cell turnover, as well as specialized secretory functions. Understanding these actions may provide new interventions to improve lactation performance and treat diseases such as mastitis and breast cancer. PMID:25664318

  12. Non-coding RNAs in Mammary Gland Development and Disease.

    PubMed

    Sandhu, Gurveen K; Milevskiy, Michael J G; Wilson, Wesley; Shewan, Annette M; Brown, Melissa A

    2016-01-01

    Non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs) are untranslated RNA molecules that function to regulate the expression of numerous genes and associated biochemical pathways and cellular functions. NcRNAs include small interfering RNAs (siRNAs), microRNAs (miRNAs), PIWI-interacting RNAs (piRNAs), small nucleolar RNAs (snoRNAs) and long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs). They participate in the regulation of all developmental processes and are frequently aberrantly expressed or functionally defective in disease. This Chapter will focus on the role of ncRNAs, in particular miRNAs and lncRNAs, in mammary gland development and disease.

  13. Metastatic mammary carcinoma to the orbit masquerading as maxillary sinusitis

    PubMed Central

    Abo-Shasha, Rami; Stepniak, Camilla; Yeh, David H.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: We report on a case of isolated metastatic breast cancer to the medial rectus muscle. This entity is exceedingly rare. Case: A 44-year-old female with a history of breast cancer presented with unilateral maxillary symptoms and was treated for sinusitis. Over time, she developed ocular pain, diplopia, blurred vision and eventually complete adduction deficit. Results: T1-weighted magnetic resonance imaging revealed a medial rectus lesion. Biopsy via transnasal transorbital endoscopic approach revealed metastatic mammary carcinoma. Discussion: Metastatic disease to the orbit should be considered in the differential diagnosis of refractory maxillary sinus pain in patients with a known underlying malignancy. PMID:27103558

  14. Non-coding RNAs in Mammary Gland Development and Disease.

    PubMed

    Sandhu, Gurveen K; Milevskiy, Michael J G; Wilson, Wesley; Shewan, Annette M; Brown, Melissa A

    2016-01-01

    Non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs) are untranslated RNA molecules that function to regulate the expression of numerous genes and associated biochemical pathways and cellular functions. NcRNAs include small interfering RNAs (siRNAs), microRNAs (miRNAs), PIWI-interacting RNAs (piRNAs), small nucleolar RNAs (snoRNAs) and long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs). They participate in the regulation of all developmental processes and are frequently aberrantly expressed or functionally defective in disease. This Chapter will focus on the role of ncRNAs, in particular miRNAs and lncRNAs, in mammary gland development and disease. PMID:26659490

  15. Distinct Luminal-Type Mammary Carcinomas Arise from Orthotopic Trp53-Null Mammary Transplantation of Juvenile versus Adult Mice

    SciTech Connect

    Nguyen, David H.; Ouyang, Haoxu; Mao, Jian-Hua; Hlatky, Lynn; Barcellos-Hoff, M. H.

    2014-12-01

    Age and physiologic status, such as menopause, are risk factors for breast cancer. Less clear is what factors influence the diversity of breast cancer. In this study, we investigated the effect of host age on the distribution of tumor subtypes in mouse mammary chimera consisting of wild-type hosts and Trp53 nullizygous epithelium, which undergoes a high rate of neoplastic transformation. Wild-type mammary glands cleared of endogenous epithelium at 3 weeks of age were subsequently transplanted during puberty (5 weeks) or at maturation (10 weeks) with syngeneic Trp53-null mammary tissue fragments and monitored for one year. Tumors arose sooner from adult hosts (AH) compared with juvenile hosts (JH). However, compared with AH tumors, JH tumors grew several times faster, were more perfused, exhibited a two-fold higher mitotic index, and were more highly positive for insulin-like growth factor receptor phosphorylation. Most tumors in each setting were estrogen receptor (ER)-positive (80% JH vs. 70% AH), but JH tumors were significantly more ER-immunoreactive (P = 0.0001) than AH tumors. A differential expression signature (JvA) of juvenile versus adult tumors revealed a luminal transcriptional program. Centroids of the human homologs of JvA genes showed that JH tumors were more like luminal A tumors and AH tumors were more like luminal B tumors. Hierarchical clustering with the JvA human ortholog gene list segregated luminal A and luminal B breast cancers across datasets. Lastly, these data support the notion that age-associated host physiology greatly influences the intrinsic subtype of breast cancer.

  16. Distinct Luminal-Type Mammary Carcinomas Arise from Orthotopic Trp53-Null Mammary Transplantation of Juvenile versus Adult Mice

    DOE PAGES

    Nguyen, David H.; Ouyang, Haoxu; Mao, Jian-Hua; Hlatky, Lynn; Barcellos-Hoff, M. H.

    2014-12-01

    Age and physiologic status, such as menopause, are risk factors for breast cancer. Less clear is what factors influence the diversity of breast cancer. In this study, we investigated the effect of host age on the distribution of tumor subtypes in mouse mammary chimera consisting of wild-type hosts and Trp53 nullizygous epithelium, which undergoes a high rate of neoplastic transformation. Wild-type mammary glands cleared of endogenous epithelium at 3 weeks of age were subsequently transplanted during puberty (5 weeks) or at maturation (10 weeks) with syngeneic Trp53-null mammary tissue fragments and monitored for one year. Tumors arose sooner from adultmore » hosts (AH) compared with juvenile hosts (JH). However, compared with AH tumors, JH tumors grew several times faster, were more perfused, exhibited a two-fold higher mitotic index, and were more highly positive for insulin-like growth factor receptor phosphorylation. Most tumors in each setting were estrogen receptor (ER)-positive (80% JH vs. 70% AH), but JH tumors were significantly more ER-immunoreactive (P = 0.0001) than AH tumors. A differential expression signature (JvA) of juvenile versus adult tumors revealed a luminal transcriptional program. Centroids of the human homologs of JvA genes showed that JH tumors were more like luminal A tumors and AH tumors were more like luminal B tumors. Hierarchical clustering with the JvA human ortholog gene list segregated luminal A and luminal B breast cancers across datasets. Lastly, these data support the notion that age-associated host physiology greatly influences the intrinsic subtype of breast cancer.« less

  17. Embryonic mammary signature subsets are activated in Brca1-/- and basal-like breast cancers

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Cancer is often suggested to result from development gone awry. Links between normal embryonic development and cancer biology have been postulated, but no defined genetic basis has been established. We recently published the first transcriptomic analysis of embryonic mammary cell populations. Embryonic mammary epithelial cells are an immature progenitor cell population, lacking differentiation markers, which is reflected in their very distinct genetic profiles when compared with those of their postnatal descendents. Methods We defined an embryonic mammary epithelial signature that incorporates the most highly expressed genes from embryonic mammary epithelium when compared with the postnatal mammary epithelial cells. We looked for activation of the embryonic mammary epithelial signature in mouse mammary tumors that formed in mice in which Brca1 had been conditionally deleted from the mammary epithelium and in human breast cancers to determine whether any genetic links exist between embryonic mammary cells and breast cancers. Results Small subsets of the embryonic mammary epithelial signature were consistently activated in mouse Brca1-/- tumors and human basal-like breast cancers, which encoded predominantly transcriptional regulators, cell-cycle, and actin cytoskeleton components. Other embryonic gene subsets were found activated in non-basal-like tumor subtypes and repressed in basal-like tumors, including regulators of neuronal differentiation, transcription, and cell biosynthesis. Several embryonic genes showed significant upregulation in estrogen receptor (ER)-negative, progesterone receptor (PR)-negative, and/or grade 3 breast cancers. Among them, the transcription factor, SOX11, a progenitor cell and lineage regulator of nonmammary cell types, is found highly expressed in some Brca1-/- mammary tumors. By using RNA interference to silence SOX11 expression in breast cancer cells, we found evidence that SOX11 regulates breast cancer cell

  18. Differential roles of ERα and ERβ in normal and neoplastic development in the mouse mammary gland.

    PubMed

    Mehta, Rajendra G; Hawthorne, Michael; Mehta, Rajeshwari R; Torres, Karen E O; Peng, Xinjian; McCormick, David L; Kopelovich, Levy

    2014-01-01

    The present experiments were performed to determine the roles of estrogen receptors α and β (ERα and ERβ) in normal and neoplastic development in the mouse mammary gland. In wild-type mice, in vivo administration of estradiol (E) + progesterone (P) stimulated mammary ductal growth and alveolar differentiation. Mammary glands from mice in which the ERβ gene has been deleted (βERKO mice) demonstrated normal ductal growth and differentiation in response to E + P. By contrast, mammary glands from mice in which the ERα gene has been deleted (αERKO mice) demonstrated only rudimentary ductal structures that did not differentiate in response to E + P. EGF demonstrates estrogen-like activity in the mammary glands of αERKO mice: treatment of αERKO mice with EGF + P (without E) supported normal mammary gland development, induced expression of progesterone receptor (PR), and increased levels of G-protein-coupled receptor (GPR30) protein. Mammary gland development in βERKO mice treated with EGF + P was comparable to that of wild-type mice receiving EGF + P; EGF had no statistically significant effects on the induction of PR or expression of GPR30 in mammary glands harvested from either wild-type mice or βERKO mice. In vitro exposure of mammary glands to 7,12-dimethylbenz[a]anthracene (DMBA) induced preneoplastic mammary alveolar lesions (MAL) in glands from wild-type mice and βERKO mice, but failed to induce MAL in mammary glands from αERKO mice. Microarray analysis of DMBA-treated mammary glands identified 28 functional pathways whose expression was significantly different in αERKO mice versus both βERKO and wild-type mice; key functions that were differentially expressed in αERKO mice included cell division, cell proliferation, and apoptosis. The data demonstrate distinct roles for ERα and ERβ in normal and neoplastic development in the mouse mammary gland, and suggest that EGF can mimic the ERα-mediated effects of E in this organ.

  19. Loss of vitamin D receptor signaling from the mammary epithelium or adipose tissue alters pubertal glandular development.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Abby L; Zinser, Glendon M; Waltz, Susan E

    2014-10-15

    Vitamin D₃ receptor (VDR) signaling within the mammary gland regulates various postnatal stages of glandular development, including puberty, pregnancy, involution, and tumorigenesis. Previous studies have shown that vitamin D₃ treatment induces cell-autonomous growth inhibition and differentiation of mammary epithelial cells in culture. Furthermore, mammary adipose tissue serves as a depot for vitamin D₃ storage, and both epithelial cells and adipocytes are capable of bioactivating vitamin D₃. Despite the pervasiveness of VDR in mammary tissue, individual contributions of epithelial cells and adipocytes, as well as the VDR-regulated cross-talk between these two cell types during pubertal mammary development, have yet to be investigated. To assess the cell-type specific effect of VDR signaling during pubertal mammary development, novel mouse models with mammary epithelial- or adipocyte-specific loss of VDR were generated. Interestingly, loss of VDR in either cellular compartment accelerated ductal morphogenesis with increased epithelial cell proliferation and decreased apoptosis within terminal end buds. Conversely, VDR signaling specifically in the mammary epithelium modulated hormone-induced alveolar growth, as ablation of VDR in this cell type resulted in precocious alveolar development. In examining cellular cross-talk ex vivo, we show that ligand-dependent VDR signaling in adipocytes significantly inhibits mammary epithelial cell growth in part through the vitamin D₃-dependent production of the cytokine IL-6. Collectively, these studies delineate independent roles for vitamin D₃-dependent VDR signaling in mammary adipocytes and epithelial cells in controlling pubertal mammary gland development.

  20. ApcMin, A Mutation in the Murine Apc Gene, Predisposes to Mammary Carcinomas and Focal Alveolar Hyperplasias

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moser, Amy Rapaich; Mattes, Ellen M.; Dove, William F.; Lindstrom, Mary J.; Haag, Jill D.; Gould, Michael N.

    1993-10-01

    ApcMin (Min, multiple intestinal neoplasia) is a point mutation in the murine homolog of the APC gene. Min/+ mice develop multiple intestinal adenomas, as do humans carrying germ-line mutations in APC. Female mice carrying Min are also prone to develop mammary tumors. Min/+ mammary glands are more sensitive to chemical carcinogenesis than are +/+ mammary glands. Transplantation of mammary cells from Min/+ or +/+ donors into +/+ hosts demonstrates that the propensity to develop mammary tumors is intrinsic to the Min/+ mammary cells. Long-term grafts of Min/+ mammary glands also gave rise to focal alveolar hyperplasias, indicating that the presence of the Min mutation also has a role in the development of these lesions.

  1. EDITORIAL: Focus on Heavy Ions in Biophysics and Medical Physics FOCUS ON HEAVY IONS IN BIOPHYSICS AND MEDICAL PHYSICS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durante, Marco

    2008-07-01

    include carcinogenesis, late degenerative tissue effects (including damage to the central nervous system), and hereditary effects. For these studies, microbeams represent an essential tool, considering that in space each cell in the human body will not experience more than one heavy-ion traversal. Both NASA and ESA are investing important resources in ground-based space radiation research programs, to reduce risk uncertainty and to develop countermeasures. For both cancer therapy and space radiation protection a better understanding of the effects of energetic heavy ions is needed. Physics should be improved, especially the measurements of nuclear fragmentation cross-sections, and the transport calculations. Biological effects need to be studied in greater detail, and clearly only understanding the mechanisms of heavy-ion induced biological damage will reduce the uncertainty on late effects in humans. This focus issue of New Journal of Physics aims to provide the state-of-the-art of the biophysics of energetic heavy ions and to highlight the areas where more research is urgently needed for therapy and the space program. Focus on Heavy Ions in Biophysics and Medical Physics Contents Heavy ion microprobes: a unique tool for bystander research and other radiobiological applications K O Voss, C Fournier and G Taucher-Scholz Heavy ions light flashes and brain functions: recent observations at accelerators and in spaceflight L Narici Clinical advantages of carbon-ion radiotherapy Hirohiko Tsujii, Tadashi Kamada, Masayuki Baba, Hiroshi Tsuji, Hirotoshi Kato, Shingo Kato, Shigeru Yamada, Shigeo Yasuda, Takeshi Yanagi, Hiroyuki Kato, Ryusuke Hara, Naotaka Yamamoto and Junetsu Mizoe Heavy-ion effects: from track structure to DNA and chromosome damage F Ballarini, D Alloni, A Facoetti and A Ottolenghi Shielding experiments with high-energy heavy ions for spaceflight applications C Zeitlin, S Guetersloh, L Heilbronn, J Miller, N Elkhayari, A Empl, M LeBourgeois, B W Mayes, L Pinsky

  2. Expression of tracheal antimicrobial peptide in bovine mammary epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    López-Meza, Joel E; Gutiérrez-Barroso, Angelina; Ochoa-Zarzosa, Alejandra

    2009-08-01

    The production of antimicrobial peptides is an important key of innate immunity. Tracheal antimicrobial peptide (TAP) expression has been reported in bovine tracheal epithelial cells and it can be modulated by bacterial infection or bacterial components. In mammary gland TAP expression has been reported, but the cell type that produces it is unknown. The objective of this work was to evaluate if bovine mammary epithelial cells (bMEC) express TAP mRNA, and evaluate the regulation of its expression in response to Staphylococcus aureus infection, bovine prolactin (bPRL) or acetyl salicylic acid (ASA). By retrotranscription and PCR, we demonstrated that bMEC express TAP mRNA. bMEC infected with live S. aureus down-regulates TAP expression, whereas the challenge with gentamicin-killed S. aureus up-regulates it. Also, bPRL do not significantly modify TAP expression, but in the presence of 5 mM ASA it was down-regulated, suggesting that nuclear factor kappaB (NF-kappaB) pathway can be involved in its regulation. PMID:19181355

  3. Regulatory roles of Oct proteins in the mammary gland.

    PubMed

    Qian, Xi; Zhao, Feng-Qi

    2016-06-01

    The expression of Oct-1 and -2 and their binding to the octamer motif in the mammary gland are developmentally and hormonally regulated, consistent with the expression of milk proteins. Both of these transcription factors constitutively bind to the proximal promoter of the milk protein gene β-casein and might be involved in the inhibition or activation of promoter activity via interactions with other transcription factors or cofactors at different developmental stages. In particular, the lactogenic hormone prolactin and glucocorticoids induce Oct-1 and Oct-2 binding and interaction with both the signal transducer and activator of transcription 5 (STAT5) and the glucocorticoid receptor on the β-casein promoter to activate β-casein expression. In addition, increasing evidence has shown the involvement of another Oct factor, Oct-3/4, in mammary tumorigenesis, making Oct-3/4 an emerging prognostic marker of breast cancer and a molecular target for the gene-directed therapeutic intervention, prevention and treatment of breast cancer. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: The Oct Transcription Factor Family, edited by Dr. Dean Tantin.

  4. The Deltopectoral Flap Revisited: The Internal Mammary Artery Perforator Flap.

    PubMed

    Ibrahim, Amir; Atiyeh, Bishara; Karami, Reem; Adelman, David M; Papazian, Nazareth J

    2016-03-01

    Pharyngo-esophageal and tracheostomal defects pose a challenge in head and neck reconstruction whenever microanastomosis is extremely difficult in hostile neck that is previously dissected and irradiated. The deltopectoral (DP) flap was initially described as a pedicled flap for such reconstruction with acceptable postoperative results. A major drawback is still that the DP flap is based on 3 perforator vessels leading to a decreased arc of rotation. The DP flap also left contour deformities in the donor site. The internal mammary artery perforator flap was described as a refinement of the deltopectoral flap. It is a pedicled fasciocutaneous flap based on a single perforator, with comparable and reliable blood supply compared with the DP flap, giving it the benefit of having a wide arc of rotation. It is both thin and pliable, with good skin color match and texture. The donor site can be closed primarily with no esthetic deformity and minimal morbidity. The procedure is relatively simple and does not require microvascular expertise. In this report, the authors describe a patient in whom bilateral internal mammary artery perforator flaps were used for subtotal pharyngo-esophageal reconstruction and neck resurfacing. The flaps healed uneventfully bilaterally with no postoperative complications. PMID:26854779

  5. Assessment of mammary lactogenic receptor changes in pregnant rabbits

    SciTech Connect

    Richards, S.R.; Malarkey, W.B.; Nicol, S.J.; Matthews, R.H.

    1984-05-15

    Lactogenic receptor was purified from rabbit mammary tissue and used to generate an antiserum in goats. The purified lactogenic receptor material bound lactogenic hormones specifically and reversibly. Antiserum generated in a goat bound a labeled human growth hormone/receptor complex; this was displaced by nonlabeled solubilized receptor preparations. This was used as a radioimmunoassay and was able to detect 0.037 fmol of lactogenic receptor. The specificity of the radioimmunoassay for lactogenic receptor was supported by three lines of evidence; first, the ligand used in the radioimmunoassay was an iodine 125-labeled human growth hormone/receptor combination; therefore, only membrane protein with structural homology to the protein which bound 125I-labeled human growth hormone competed for binding to the antiserum; second, depletion of radioreceptor binding sites by affinity chromatography with ovine prolactin as the fixed ligand was detected; third, an increase in breast lactogenic receptor during pregnancy was detected by both radioreceptor assay and the radioimmunoassay. We found a progressive increase in lactogenic receptors by radioimmunoassay which corresponded to parallel increases by radioreceptor assay in rabbit mammary tissue during pregnancy.

  6. Breed- and age-related differences in canine mammary tumors.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyun-Woo; Lim, Ha-Young; Shin, Jong-Il; Seung, Byung-Joon; Ju, Jung-Hyung; Sur, Jung-Hyang

    2016-04-01

    Triple-negative breast cancer is a type of breast cancer that does not express the genes for estrogen receptor (ER), progesterone receptor (PR), and human epidermal growth factor receptor-2 (HER-2). It is an important and clinically relevant condition as it has a poor prognosis and is difficult to treat. Basal-like triple-negative cancer is highly prevalent in both African-Americans and adolescents. We therefore examined whether such a cancer likewise occurs in specific breeds and age groups in dogs, focusing on basal-like triple-negative cancer in particular. In this study, 181 samples from dogs with malignant mammary carcinoma from the 5 most common breeds and 2 age groups in Korea were analyzed. Histological classification and molecular subtyping, including assessment of immunohistochemical findings, were carried out. Twenty-five of 28 (89.3%) triple-negative carcinomas were identified as basal-like triple-negative carcinomas. Analysis of associations of classified factors revealed that the shih tzu breed (9/25, 36.0%) and advanced-age (19/25, 76.0%) groups were characterized by higher prevalence of basal-like triple-negative tumors with diverse histological types and of a higher grade. These results suggest that breed- and age-related differences can be identified in canine mammary carcinoma and, notably, in the shih tzu breed and at older ages. Further investigation of these distinguishing characteristics of the shih tzu breed is warranted. PMID:27127342

  7. Biodistribution of antisense nanoparticles in mammary carcinoma rat model.

    PubMed

    Elazar, Victoria; Adwan, Hassan; Rohekar, Keren; Zepp, Michael; Lifshitz-Shovali, Rinat; Berger, Martin R; Golomb, Gershon

    2010-08-01

    Efficient and specific delivery of antisenses (ASs) and protection of the sequences from degradation are critical factors for effective therapy. Sustained release nanoparticles (NP) offer increased resistance to nuclease degradation, increased amounts of AS uptake, and the possibility of control in dosing and sustained duration of AS administration. The biodegradable and biocompatible poly(D,L-lactic-co-glycolic acid) copolymer (PLGA) was utilized to encapsulate AS directed against osteopontin (OPN), which is a promising therapeutic target in mammary carcinoma. Whole body biodistribution of OPN AS NP was evaluated in comparison to naked AS, in intact and mammary carcinoma metastasis model bearing rats. Naked and NP encapsulated AS exhibited different biodistribution profiles. AS NP, in contrast to naked AS, tended to accumulate mostly in the spleen, liver, and at the tumor inoculation site. Drug levels in intact organs were negligible. The elimination of naked AS was faster, due to rapid degradation of the unprotected sequence. It is concluded that AS NP protect the AS from degradation, provide efficient AS delivery to the tumor tissue, and minimize AS accumulation in intact organs due to the AS sustained release profile as well as the favorable NP physicochemical properties.

  8. Expression and significance of CHIP in canine mammary gland tumors.

    PubMed

    Wang, Huanan; Yang, Xu; Jin, Yipeng; Pei, Shimin; Zhang, Di; Ma, Wen; Huang, Jian; Qiu, Hengbin; Zhang, Xinke; Jiang, Qiuyue; Sun, Weidong; Zhang, Hong; Lin, Degui

    2015-11-01

    CHIP (Carboxy terminus of Hsc70 Interacting Protein) is an E3 ubiquitin ligase that can induce ubiquitination and degradation of several oncogenic proteins. The expression of CHIP is frequently lower in human breast cancer than in normal breast tissue. However, the expression and role of CHIP in the canine mammary gland tumor (CMGT) remain unclear. We investigated the potential correlation between CHIP expression and mammary gland tumor prognosis in female dogs. CHIP expression was measured in 54 dogs by immunohistochemistry and real-time RT-PCR. CHIP protein expression was significantly correlated with the histopathological diagnosis, outcome of disease and tumor classification. The transcriptional level of CHIP was significantly higher in normal tissues (P=0.001) and benign tumors (P=0.009) than it in malignant tumors. CHIP protein expression was significantly correlated with the transcriptional level of CHIP (P=0.0102). The log-rank test survival curves indicated that patients with low expression of CHIP had shorter overall periods of survival than those with higher CHIP protein expression (P=0.050). Our data suggest that CHIP may play an important role in the formation and development of CMGTs and serve as a valuable prognostic marker and potential target for genetic therapy.

  9. Breed- and age-related differences in canine mammary tumors

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hyun-Woo; Lim, Ha-Young; Shin, Jong-Il; Seung, Byung-Joon; Ju, Jung-Hyung; Sur, Jung-Hyang

    2016-01-01

    Triple-negative breast cancer is a type of breast cancer that does not express the genes for estrogen receptor (ER), progesterone receptor (PR), and human epidermal growth factor receptor-2 (HER-2). It is an important and clinically relevant condition as it has a poor prognosis and is difficult to treat. Basal-like triple-negative cancer is highly prevalent in both African-Americans and adolescents. We therefore examined whether such a cancer likewise occurs in specific breeds and age groups in dogs, focusing on basal-like triple-negative cancer in particular. In this study, 181 samples from dogs with malignant mammary carcinoma from the 5 most common breeds and 2 age groups in Korea were analyzed. Histological classification and molecular subtyping, including assessment of immunohistochemical findings, were carried out. Twenty-five of 28 (89.3%) triple-negative carcinomas were identified as basal-like triple-negative carcinomas. Analysis of associations of classified factors revealed that the shih tzu breed (9/25, 36.0%) and advanced-age (19/25, 76.0%) groups were characterized by higher prevalence of basal-like triple-negative tumors with diverse histological types and of a higher grade. These results suggest that breed- and age-related differences can be identified in canine mammary carcinoma and, notably, in the shih tzu breed and at older ages. Further investigation of these distinguishing characteristics of the shih tzu breed is warranted. PMID:27127342

  10. Angiotropic metastatic malignant melanoma in a canine mammary gland.

    PubMed

    Yang, Hai Jie; Lee, Eun-Mi; Kim, Ah-Young; Lee, Eun-Joo; Hong, Il-Hwa; Huh, Sung-Oh; Jeong, Kyu-Shik

    2011-12-01

    An eleven-year-old spayed female Yorkshire Terrier presented with a sublumbar mass and upon ultrasonographic examination, was revealed to have a mammary gland tumor. Black to reddish colored masses, located in the visceral peritoneum of the sublumbar region was observed on laparotomy with masectomy of the right side. In the laparotomy, we observed reddish masses multifocally located in the serosal membrane of the large intestine. Histopathologic examination of the intestinal and abdominal mass showed highly invasiveness into the muscle and metastasis of melanocytic tumor cells through the blood vessels. The mammary glands showed abnormal hyperplasia of melanocytes, destruction of the normal glands by tumor cells and infiltration of some lymphocytes in the pool of melanocytic cells. We have identified a malignant melanoma containing an angiotumoral complex in which tumor cells occupied a pericytic location along the microvessels with intravasation determined by immunohistochemistry for S100 protein and protein kinase C-α. Histologic findings in this dog lead to a diagnosis of an angiotropic metastatic malignant melanoma.

  11. Molecular biological aspects on canine and human mammary tumors.

    PubMed

    Rivera, P; von Euler, H

    2011-01-01

    The high incidence of mammary tumor disease reported in certain canine breeds suggests a significant genetic component, as has already been described in human familial breast cancer-in BRCA1- and BRCA2-associated breast cancer in particular. The identification of genetic risk factors is critical to improvements in the prevention, diagnosis, and treatment of these tumors. In recent years, there has been significant progress in developing the tools and reagents necessary to analyze the canine genome. This work has culminated in a high-quality draft genome sequence, as well as a single-nucleotide polymorphism map and single-nucleotide polymorphism arrays for genomewide association analysis. These tools provide an unprecedented opportunity to characterize the genetic influences in canine diseases such as cancer, eventually allowing for exploration of more effective therapies. Given the high homology between the canine genome sequence and its human counterpart--as well as the many similarities regarding the morphology, biological behavior, and clinical course of mammary tumors in both species--the dog has proven to be an excellent comparative model. This review highlights the comparative aspects regarding certain areas within molecular biology, and it discusses future perspectives. The findings in larger genomewide association analyses and cDNA expression arrays are described, and the BRCA1/BRCA2 complex is compared in detail between the 2 species. PMID:21147766

  12. Regulatory roles of Oct proteins in the mammary gland.

    PubMed

    Qian, Xi; Zhao, Feng-Qi

    2016-06-01

    The expression of Oct-1 and -2 and their binding to the octamer motif in the mammary gland are developmentally and hormonally regulated, consistent with the expression of milk proteins. Both of these transcription factors constitutively bind to the proximal promoter of the milk protein gene β-casein and might be involved in the inhibition or activation of promoter activity via interactions with other transcription factors or cofactors at different developmental stages. In particular, the lactogenic hormone prolactin and glucocorticoids induce Oct-1 and Oct-2 binding and interaction with both the signal transducer and activator of transcription 5 (STAT5) and the glucocorticoid receptor on the β-casein promoter to activate β-casein expression. In addition, increasing evidence has shown the involvement of another Oct factor, Oct-3/4, in mammary tumorigenesis, making Oct-3/4 an emerging prognostic marker of breast cancer and a molecular target for the gene-directed therapeutic intervention, prevention and treatment of breast cancer. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: The Oct Transcription Factor Family, edited by Dr. Dean Tantin. PMID:27044595

  13. ER and PR signaling nodes during mammary gland development

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    The ovarian hormones estrogen and progesterone orchestrate postnatal mammary gland development and are implicated in breast cancer. Most of our understanding of the molecular mechanisms of estrogen receptor (ER) and progesterone receptor (PR) signaling stems from in vitro studies with hormone receptor-positive cell lines. They have shown that ER and PR regulate gene transcription either by binding to DNA response elements directly or via other transcription factors and recruiting co-regulators. In addition they cross-talk with other signaling pathways through nongenomic mechanisms. Mouse genetics combined with tissue recombination techniques have provided insights about the action of these two hormones in vivo. It has emerged that hormones act on a subset of mammary epithelial cells and relegate biological functions to paracrine factors. With regards to hormonal signaling in breast carcinomas, global gene expression analyses have led to the identification of gene expression signatures that are characteristic of ERα-positive tumors that have stipulated functional studies of hitherto poorly understood transcription factors. Here, we highlight what has been learned about ER and PR signaling nodes in these different systems and attempt to lay out in which way the insights may converge. PMID:22809143

  14. Immunohistochemical vascular factor expression in canine inflammatory mammary carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Camacho, L; Peña, L; Gil, A González; Martín-Ruiz, A; Dunner, S; Illera, J C

    2014-07-01

    Human inflammatory breast carcinoma (IBC) and canine inflammatory mammary carcinoma (IMC) are considered the most malignant types of breast cancer. IMC has similar characteristics to IBC; hence, IMC has been suggested as a model to study the human disease. To compare the angiogenic and angioinvasive features of IMC with non-IMC, 3 canine mammary tumor xenograft models in female SCID mice were developed: IMC, comedocarcinoma, and osteosarcoma. Histopathological and immunohistochemical characterization of both primary canine tumors and xenografts using cellular markers pancytokeratin, cytokeratin 14, vimentin, and α-smooth muscle actin and vascular factors (VEGF-A, VEGF-D, VEGFR-3, and COX-2) was performed. Tumor cell proliferation index was measured by the Ki-67 marker. The xenograft models reproduced histological features found in the primary canine tumor and preserved the original immunophenotype. IMC xenografts showed a high invasive character with tumor emboli in the dermis, edema, and occasional observations of ulceration. In addition, compared with osteosarcoma and comedocarcinoma, the IMC model showed the highest vascular factor expression associated with a high proliferation index. Likewise, IMC xenografts showed higher COX-2 expression associated with VEGF-D and VEGFR-3, as well as a higher presence of dermal lymphatic tumor emboli, suggesting COX-2 participation in IMC lymphangiogenesis. These results provide additional evidence to consider vascular factors, their receptors, and COX-2 as therapeutic targets for IBC.

  15. Mammary gland neoplasia in long-term rodent studies.

    PubMed Central

    Russo, I H; Russo, J

    1996-01-01

    Breast cancer, the most frequent spontaneous malignancy diagnosed in women in the western world, is continuously increasing in incidence in industrialized nations. Although breast cancer develops in women as the result of a combination of external and endogenous factors such as exposure to ionizing radiation, diet, socioeconomic status, and endocrinologic, familial, or genetic factors, no specific etiologic agent(s) or the mechanisms responsible of the disease has been identified as yet. Thus, experimental models that exhibit the same complex interactions are needed for testing various mechanisms and for assessing the carcinogenic potential of given chemicals. Rodent mammary carcinomas represent such a model to a great extent because, in these species, mammary cancer is a multistep complex process that can be induced by either chemicals, radiation, viruses, or genetic factors. Long-term studies in rodent models have been particularly useful for dissecting the initiation, promotion, and progression steps of carcinogenesis. The susceptibility of the rodent mammary gland to develop neoplasms has made this organ a unique target for testing the carcinogenic potential of specific genotoxic chemicals and environmental agents. Mammary tumors induced by indirect- or direct-acting carcinogens such as 7, 12-dimethlbenz(a)anthracene or N-methyl-N-nitrosourea are, in general, hormone dependent adenocarcinomas whose incidence, number of tumors per animal, tumor latency, and tumor type are influenced by the age, reproductive history, and endocarinologic milieu of the host at the time of carcinogen exposure. Rodent models are informative in the absence of human data. They have provided valuable information on the dose and route of administration to be used and optimal host conditions for eliciting maximal tumorigenic response. Studies of the influence of normal gland development on the pathogenesis of chemically induced mammary carcinomas have clarified the role of differentiation

  16. Managing heavy metal toxicity stress in plants: biological and biotechnological tools.

    PubMed

    Ovečka, M; Takáč, T

    2014-01-01

    The maintenance of ion homeostasis in plant cells is a fundamental physiological requirement for sustainable plant growth, development and production. Plants exposed to high concentrations of heavy metals must respond in order to avoid the deleterious effects of heavy metal toxicity at the structural, physiological and molecular levels. Plant strategies for coping with heavy metal toxicity are genotype-specific and, at least to some extent, modulated by environmental conditions. There is considerable interest in the mechanisms underpinning plant metal tolerance, a complex process that enables plants to survive metal ion stress and adapt to maintain growth and development without exhibiting symptoms of toxicity. This review briefly summarizes some recent cell biological, molecular and proteomic findings concerning the responses of plant roots to heavy metal ions in the rhizosphere, metal ion-induced reactions at the cell wall-plasma membrane interface, and various aspects of heavy metal ion uptake and transport in plants via membrane transporters. The molecular and genetic approaches that are discussed are analyzed in the context of their potential practical applications in biotechnological approaches for engineering increased heavy metal tolerance in crops and other useful plants.

  17. Effect of glycogen synthase kinase-3 inactivation on mouse mammary gland development and oncogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Dembowy, J; Adissu, H A; Liu, J C; Zacksenhaus, E; Woodgett, J R

    2015-01-01

    Many components of the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway have critical functions in mammary gland development and tumor formation, yet the contribution of glycogen synthase kinase-3 (GSK-3α and GSK-3β) to mammopoiesis and oncogenesis is unclear. Here, we report that WAP-Cre-mediated deletion of GSK-3 in the mammary epithelium results in activation of Wnt/β-catenin signaling and induces mammary intraepithelial neoplasia that progresses to squamous transdifferentiation and development of adenosquamous carcinomas at 6 months. To uncover possible β-catenin-independent activities of GSK-3, we generated mammary-specific knockouts of GSK-3 and β-catenin. Squamous transdifferentiation of the mammary epithelium was largely attenuated, however, mammary epithelial cells lost the ability to form mammospheres suggesting perturbation of stem cell properties unrelated to loss of β-catenin alone. At 10 months, adenocarcinomas that developed in glands lacking GSK-3 and β-catenin displayed elevated levels of γ-catenin/plakoglobin as well as activation of the Hedgehog and Notch pathways. Collectively, these results establish the two isoforms of GSK-3 as essential integrators of multiple developmental signals that act to maintain normal mammary gland function and suppress tumorigenesis. PMID:25195860

  18. Expression and significance of PTEN and VEGF in canine mammary gland tumours.

    PubMed

    Qiu, C W; Lin, D G; Wang, J Q; Li, C Y; Deng, G Z

    2008-08-01

    To investigate the relationship between the expression of the PTEN (phosphatase and tensin homolog deleted on chromosometen) and VEGF (vascular endothelial growth factor) and the clinicopathological features in canine mammary gland tumours, the expression levels of PTEN and VEGF protein were assessed in 50 cases of canine mammary gland tumours tissues and 4 cases of normal mammary gland tissues with using immunohistochemical method. The over-expression rate of PTEN protein was 100% in normal and well-differentiated mammary gland tissues and 67% in breast cancer cases respectively with a significant difference between the two groups (P<0.01). Expression of PTEN was not related to age and tumour size, but closely correlated to lymph node metastasis (P<0.01). The over-expression rate of VEGF protein was 33.3% in normal mammary gland tissues, and 78% in canine mammary gland tumours with a significant difference between the two groups (P<0.01). Expression of VEGF was not related to age or tumour size, but closely correlated with lymph node metastasis and clinical stage (P<0.05). Therefore the combination detection of PTEN and VEGF could serve as an important index to estimate the biological behavior and prognosis of canine mammary gland tumours. Reduced expression of PTEN might be involved in carcinogenesis and progression of canine breast cancer by up-regulating the VEGF expression to enhance angiogenesis.

  19. IGF-IR Mediated Mammary Tumorigenesis Is Enhanced during Pubertal Development

    PubMed Central

    Campbell, Craig I.; Moorehead, Roger A.

    2014-01-01

    Although breast cancer typically develops in women over the age of 40, it remains unclear when breast cancer initiating events occur or whether the mammary gland is particularly susceptible to oncogenic transformation at a particular developmental stage. Using MTB-IGFIR transgenic mice that overexpress type I insulin-like growth factor receptor (IGF-IR) in a doxycycline-inducible manner, mammary tumorigenesis was initiated at different developmental stages. Tumor multiplicity was significantly increased while tumor latency was significantly decreased when the IGF-IR transgene was expressed during pubertal development compared to post-pubertal transgene expression. Moreover, metastatic spread of mammary tumors to the lungs was approximately twice as likely when IGF-IR was overexpressed in pubertal mice compared to post-pubertal mice. In addition, engraftment of pubertal MTB-IGFIR mammary tissue into cleared mammary fat pads of pubertal hosts produced tumors more frequently and faster than engraftment into adult hosts. These experiments show that the mammary microenvironment created during puberty renders mammary epithelial cells particularly susceptible to transformation. PMID:25259518

  20. Aquaporin water channels in the mammary gland: from physiology to pathophysiology and neoplasia.

    PubMed

    Mobasheri, Ali; Barrett-Jolley, Richard

    2014-03-01

    Aquaporins are membrane proteins that play fundamental roles in water and small solute transport across epithelial and endothelial barriers. Recent studies suggest that several aquaporin proteins are present in the mammary gland. Immunohistochemical techniques have confirmed the presence of aquaporin 1 (AQP1) and AQP3 water channels in rat, mouse, bovine and human mammary glands. Studies suggest that in addition to AQP1 and AQP3 AQP4, AQP5 and AQP7 proteins are expressed in different locations in the mammary gland. Aquaporins play key roles in tumor biology and are involved in cell growth, migration and formation of ascites via increased water permeability of micro-vessels. Emerging evidence suggests that expression of these proteins is altered in mammary tumors and in breast cancer cell lines although it is not yet clear whether this is a cause or a consequence of neoplastic development. This review analyzes the expression and potential functional roles of aquaporin water channels in the mammary gland. The physiological mechanisms involved in the transport of water and small solutes across mammary endothelial and epithelial barriers are discussed in the context of milk production and lactation. This paper also reviews papers from the recent cancer literature that implicate aquaporins in mammary neoplasia.

  1. Leptin affects prolactin action on milk protein and fat synthesis in the bovine mammary gland.

    PubMed

    Feuermann, Y; Mabjeesh, S J; Shamay, A

    2004-09-01

    Leptin, a protein hormone produced and secreted predominantly by white adipose tissue, has a critical role in the regulation and coordination of energy metabolism. Identification of leptin in the milk of several mammals, including humans, led us to investigate its presence and regulatory effect in the cow mammary gland. The expression of leptin receptor in tissue culture of lactating mammary gland was augmented approximately 25 times by prolactin, but had no effect on virgin calf mammary tissue. Expression of leptin in tissue culture from mammary glands of lactating cows was enhanced 2.2-fold by prolactin. No effect of prolactin on leptin and leptin receptor expression was found in mammary gland tissue culture from calves. Leptin-enhanced fatty acid synthesis in the presence of prolactin, but had no effect without presence of prolactin. A similar pattern was found in the expression of alpha-casein and beta-lactoglobulin in mammary gland explants from a lactating cow. Our findings indicate that leptin plays an important role in mammary gland lactogenesis, and that the expression of leptin requires the presence of prolactin. PMID:15375055

  2. Progesterone facilitates chromosome instability (aneuploidy) in p53 null normal mammary epithelial cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goepfert, T. M.; McCarthy, M.; Kittrell, F. S.; Stephens, C.; Ullrich, R. L.; Brinkley, B. R.; Medina, D.

    2000-01-01

    Mammary epithelial cells from p53 null mice have been shown recently to exhibit an increased risk for tumor development. Hormonal stimulation markedly increased tumor development in p53 null mammary cells. Here we demonstrate that mammary tumors arising in p53 null mammary cells are highly aneuploid, with greater than 70% of the tumor cells containing altered chromosome number and a mean chromosome number of 56. Normal mammary cells of p53 null genotype and aged less than 14 wk do not exhibit aneuploidy in primary cell culture. Significantly, the hormone progesterone, but not estrogen, increases the incidence of aneuploidy in morphologically normal p53 null mammary epithelial cells. Such cells exhibited 40% aneuploidy and a mean chromosome number of 54. The increase in aneuploidy measured in p53 null tumor cells or hormonally stimulated normal p53 null cells was not accompanied by centrosome amplification. These results suggest that normal levels of progesterone can facilitate chromosomal instability in the absence of the tumor suppressor gene, p53. The results support the emerging hypothesis based both on human epidemiological and animal model studies that progesterone markedly enhances mammary tumorigenesis.

  3. Microcalcifications in breast cancer: novel insights into the molecular mechanism and functional consequence of mammary mineralisation

    PubMed Central

    Cox, R F; Hernandez-Santana, A; Ramdass, S; McMahon, G; Harmey, J H; Morgan, M P

    2012-01-01

    Background: Mammographic microcalcifications represent one of the most reliable features of nonpalpable breast cancer yet remain largely unexplored and poorly understood. Methods: We report a novel model to investigate the in vitro mineralisation potential of a panel of mammary cell lines. Primary mammary tumours were produced by implanting tumourigenic cells into the mammary fat pads of female BALB/c mice. Results: Hydroxyapatite (HA) was deposited only by the tumourigenic cell lines, indicating mineralisation potential may be associated with cell phenotype in this in vitro model. We propose a mechanism for mammary mineralisation, which suggests that the balance between enhancers and inhibitors of physiological mineralisation are disrupted. Inhibition of alkaline phosphatase and phosphate transport prevented mineralisation, demonstrating that mineralisation is an active cell-mediated process. Hydroxyapatite was found to enhance in vitro tumour cell migration, while calcium oxalate had no effect, highlighting potential consequences of calcium deposition. In addition, HA was also deposited in primary mammary tumours produced by implanting the tumourigenic cells into the mammary fat pads of female BALB/c mice. Conclusion: This work indicates that formation of mammary HA is a cell-specific regulated process, which creates an osteomimetic niche potentially enhancing breast tumour progression. Our findings point to the cells mineralisation potential and the microenvironment regulating it, as a significant feature of breast tumour development. PMID:22233923

  4. Nuclear repartitioning of galectin-1 by an extracellular glycan switch regulates mammary morphogenesis.

    PubMed

    Bhat, Ramray; Belardi, Brian; Mori, Hidetoshi; Kuo, Peiwen; Tam, Andrew; Hines, William C; Le, Quynh-Thu; Bertozzi, Carolyn R; Bissell, Mina J

    2016-08-16

    Branching morphogenesis in the mammary gland is achieved by the migration of epithelial cells through a microenvironment consisting of stromal cells and extracellular matrix (ECM). Here we show that galectin-1 (Gal-1), an endogenous lectin that recognizes glycans bearing N-acetyllactosamine (LacNAc) epitopes, induces branching migration of mammary epithelia in vivo, ex vivo, and in 3D organotypic cultures. Surprisingly, Gal-1's effects on mammary patterning were independent of its glycan-binding ability and instead required localization within the nuclei of mammary epithelia. Nuclear translocation of Gal-1, in turn, was regulated by discrete cell-surface glycans restricted to the front of the mammary end buds. Specifically, α2,6-sialylation of terminal LacNAc residues in the end buds masked Gal-1 ligands, thereby liberating the protein for nuclear translocation. Within mammary epithelia, Gal-1 localized within nuclear Gemini bodies and drove epithelial invasiveness. Conversely, unsialylated LacNAc glycans, enriched in the epithelial ducts, sequestered Gal-1 in the extracellular environment, ultimately attenuating invasive potential. We also found that malignant breast cells possess higher levels of nuclear Gal-1 and α2,6-SA and lower levels of LacNAc than nonmalignant cells in culture and in vivo and that nuclear localization of Gal-1 promotes a transformed phenotype. Our findings suggest that differential glycosylation at the level of tissue microanatomy regulates the nuclear function of Gal-1 in the context of mammary gland morphogenesis and in cancer progression. PMID:27496330

  5. Putting the brakes on mammary tumorigenesis: Loss of STAT1 predisposes to intraepithelial neoplasias

    PubMed Central

    Schneckenleithner, Christine; Bago-Horvath, Zsuzsanna; Dolznig, Helmut; Neugebauer, Nina; Kollmann, Karoline; Kolbe, Thomas; Decker, Thomas; Kerjaschki, Dontscho; Wagner, Kay-Uwe; Müller, Mathias; Stoiber, Dagmar; Sexl, Veronika

    2011-01-01

    Multiparous Stat1−/− mice spontaneously develop mammary tumors with increased incidence: at an average age of 12 months, 55% of the animals suffer from mammary cancer, although the histopathology is heterogeneous. We consistently observed mosaic expression or down-regulation of STAT1 protein in wild-type mammary cancer evolving in the control group. Transplantation experiments show that tumorigenesis in Stat1−/− mice is partially influenced by impaired CTL mediated tumor surveillance. Additionally, STAT1 exerts an intrinsic tumor suppressing role by controlling and blocking proliferation of the mammary epithelium. Loss of STAT1 in epithelial cells enhances cell growth in both transformed and primary cells. The increased proliferative capacity leads to the loss of structured acini formation in 3D-cultures. Analogous effects were observed when Irf1−/− epithelial cells were used. Accordingly, the rate of mammary intraepithelial neoplasias (MINs) is increased in Stat1−/− animals: MINs represent the first step towards mammary tumors. The experiments characterize STAT1/IRF1 as a key growth inhibitory and tumor suppressive signaling pathway that prevents mammary cancer formation by maintaining growth control. Furthermore, they define the loss of STAT1 as a predisposing event via enhanced MIN formation. PMID:22185785

  6. From genes to milk: genomic organization and epigenetic regulation of the mammary transcriptome.

    PubMed

    Lemay, Danielle G; Pollard, Katherine S; Martin, William F; Freeman Zadrowski, Courtneay; Hernandez, Joseph; Korf, Ian; German, J Bruce; Rijnkels, Monique

    2013-01-01

    Even in genomes lacking operons, a gene's position in the genome influences its potential for expression. The mechanisms by which adjacent genes are co-expressed are still not completely understood. Using lactation and the mammary gland as a model system, we explore the hypothesis that chromatin state contributes to the co-regulation of gene neighborhoods. The mammary gland represents a unique evolutionary model, due to its recent appearance, in the context of vertebrate genomes. An understanding of how the mammary gland is regulated to produce milk is also of biomedical and agricultural importance for human lactation and dairying. Here, we integrate epigenomic and transcriptomic data to develop a comprehensive regulatory model. Neighborhoods of mammary-expressed genes were determined using expression data derived from pregnant and lactating mice and a neighborhood scoring tool, G-NEST. Regions of open and closed chromatin were identified by ChIP-Seq of histone modifications H3K36me3, H3K4me2, and H3K27me3 in the mouse mammary gland and liver tissue during lactation. We found that neighborhoods of genes in regions of uniquely active chromatin in the lactating mammary gland, compared with liver tissue, were extremely rare. Rather, genes in most neighborhoods were suppressed during lactation as reflected in their expression levels and their location in regions of silenced chromatin. Chromatin silencing was largely shared between the liver and mammary gland during lactation, and what distinguished the mammary gland was mainly a small tissue-specific repertoire of isolated, expressed genes. These findings suggest that an advantage of the neighborhood organization is in the collective repression of groups of genes via a shared mechanism of chromatin repression. Genes essential to the mammary gland's uniqueness are isolated from neighbors, and likely have less tolerance for variation in expression, properties they share with genes responsible for an organism's survival.

  7. Shh expression is required for embryonic hair follicle but not mammary gland development.

    PubMed

    Michno, Kinga; Boras-Granic, Kata; Mill, Pleasantine; Hui, C C; Hamel, Paul A

    2003-12-01

    The embryonic mammary gland and hair follicle are both derived from the ventral ectoderm, and their development depends on a number of common fundamental developmental pathways. While the Hedgehog (Hh) signaling pathway is required for hair follicle morphogenesis, the role of this pathway during embryonic mammary gland development remains undetermined. We demonstrate here that, unlike the hair follicle, both Shh and Ihh are expressed in the developing embryonic mouse mammary rudiment as early as E12.5. In Shh(-/-) embryos, hair follicle development becomes arrested at an early stage, while the mammary rudiment, which continues to express Ihh, develops in a manner indistinguishable from that of wild-type littermates. The five pairs of mammary buds in Shh(-/-) female embryos exhibit normal branching morphogenesis at E16.5, forming a rudimentary ductal structure identical to wild-type embryonic mammary glands. We further demonstrate that loss of Hh signaling causes altered cyclin D1 expression in the embryonic dermal mesenchyme. Specifically, cyclin D1 is expressed at E14.5 principally in the condensed mesenchymal cells of the presumptive hair follicles and in both mesenchymal and epithelial cells of the mammary rudiments in wild-type and Shh-deficient embryos. By E18.5, robust cyclin D1 expression is maintained in mammary rudiments of both wild-type and Shh-deficient embryos. In hair follicles of wild-type embryos by E18.5, cyclin D1 expression switches to follicular epithelial cells. In contrast, strong cyclin D1 expression is observed principally in the mesenchymal cells of arrested hair follicles in Shh(-/-) embryos at E18.5. These data reveal that, despite the common embryonic origin of hair follicles and mammary glands, distinct patterns of Hh-family expression occur in these two tissues. Furthermore, these data suggest that cyclin D1 expression in the embryonic hair follicle is mediated by both Hh-independent and Hh-dependent mechanisms.

  8. Surgical management for large chest keloids with internal mammary artery perforator flap.

    PubMed

    Xue, Dan; Qian, Huan

    2016-01-01

    Therapy for large symptomatic keloids is often plagued with complicated reconstruction manner and recurrence. This article reports a rare treatment combination for a chest keloid with internal mammary artery perforator flap reconstruction and radiation therapy. We excised the keloid and covered the defect with an internal mammary artery perforator flap. Immediate electron-beam irradiation therapy was applied on the second postoperative day. There was no sign of recurrence over the follow-up period of 18 months. The combination of internal mammary artery perforator flap and immediate radiation therapy is useful when faced with chest keloids of similar magnitude and intractability. PMID:26982790

  9. Anti-tumor effect of bevacizumab on a xenograft model of feline mammary carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    MICHISHITA, Masaki; OHTSUKA, Aya; NAKAHIRA, Rei; TAJIMA, Tsuyoshi; NAKAGAWA, Takayuki; SASAKI, Nobuo; ARAI, Toshiro; TAKAHASHI, Kimimasa

    2015-01-01

    Feline mammary carcinomas are characterized by rapid progression and metastases. Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) is a key regulator of tumor angiogenesis, proliferation and metastasis. The present study aimed to investigate the effects of a single drug therapy of bevacizumab on a xenograft model of feline mammary carcinoma expressing VEGF protein. Bevacizumab treatment suppressed tumor growth by inhibiting angiogenesis and enhancing apoptosis; however, it did not affect the tumor proliferation index. Thus, bevacizumab had anti-tumor effects on a xenograft model, and this may be useful for the treatment of feline mammary carcinoma. PMID:26616000

  10. Pleiotropic functions of fibroblast growth factor signaling in embryonic mammary gland development.

    PubMed

    Kim, Eun-Jung; Jung, Han-Sung; Lu, Pengfei

    2013-06-01

    The mammary gland is an ectodermal appendage and a defining feature of mammals. Consistent with it being a recent evolutionary novelty, many of the molecules essential for the ontogeny and morphogenesis of various vertebrate organs, including those in the fibroblast growth factor (FGF) signaling pathway, are co-opted for induction, maintenance and morphogenesis of the mammary glands. Understanding the mechanism whereby FGF signaling regulates the fundamental cell behavior during normal mammary gland develop may facilitate determination of the consequences of its deregulation during breast cancer progression.

  11. Direct visualization of macrophage-assisted tumor cell intravasation in mammary tumors.

    PubMed

    Wyckoff, Jeffrey B; Wang, Yarong; Lin, Elaine Y; Li, Jiu-feng; Goswami, Sumanta; Stanley, E Richard; Segall, Jeffrey E; Pollard, Jeffrey W; Condeelis, John

    2007-03-15

    Although the presence of macrophages in tumors has been correlated with poor prognosis, until now there was no direct observation of how macrophages are involved in hematogenous metastasis. In this study, we use multiphoton microscopy to show, for the first time, that tumor cell intravasation occurs in association with perivascular macrophages in mammary tumors. Furthermore, we show that perivascular macrophages of the mammary tumor are associated with tumor cell intravasation in the absence of local angiogenesis. These results show that the interaction between macrophages and tumor cells lying in close proximity defines a microenvironment that is directly involved in the intravasation of cancer cells in mammary tumors.

  12. Sodium butyrate inhibits the enhancing effect of high fat diet on mammary tumorigenesis.

    PubMed

    Yanagi, S; Yamashita, M; Imai, S

    1993-01-01

    We have studied the effect of butyrate on mammary tumorigenesis by 7,12-dimethylbenz(a)anthracene. As reported previously, a high incidence of mammary tumors was observed in rats fed a basal diet containing 20% margarine. However, the enhancing effect of margarine was inhibited when sodium butyrate was supplemented in the high margarine diet. Sodium butyrate did not cause any effect when it was supplemented in the basal diet. The result suggests a possibility that a part of the inhibitory effect of butter on mammary tumorigenesis, which we had previously reported, was caused by butyrate milk lipids.

  13. [Progress on the miRNA related with mammary gland development and lactation].

    PubMed

    Jin, Xiao-Lu; Yang, Jian-Xiang; Li, Zhen; Liu, Hong-Yun; Liu, Jian-Xin

    2013-06-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are non-coding RNAs that play important roles in post transcriptional regulation. They are involved in the regulation of mammary gland development and lactation. In this paper, we summarized the expression pattern of miRNAs which varied with tissues and lactation stages, and the functions of several miRNAs are also briefly reviewed. The objective of this work is to give reference for further study on miRNAs in mammary gland, and to provide theoretical basis and ideas for the use of miRNAs in improving healthy development of mammary gland and regulating the efficiency of lactation and the quality of milk.

  14. Scintillation Studies of the Mouse Mammary Tumor Virus with ^125I

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yazdi, Amir; Blue, Eric; Bradley, Eric; Majewski, Stan; Mohammed, Shira; Qian, Jianguo; Saha, Margaret; Schworer, Stephen; Sutton, Jonathan; Weisenberger, Andrew; Welsh, Robert

    2007-10-01

    We have applied the techniques of scintillation imaging to studies of the mouse mammary tumor virus (MMTV). In these studies, Sodium Iodide Symporter (NIS) transfers the radioactive ^125I to the mammary glands of lactating mice and in particular to those mammaries with visible tumors. These studies have principally been carried out using pixellated scintillators coupled to position sensitive photomultiplier tubes (PSPMTs). More recently, we have initiated such studies with a monolithic slab of LaBr3 scintillator coupled to an array of PSPMTs. Several techniques of mapping and measuring the development of such tumors have been employed. These will be discussed in detail and preliminary results will be reported.

  15. Comparison of the transcriptpmes of long-tern label retaining-cells and C cells microdissected from mammary epithelium: an initial study to character potential stem/progenitor cells

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Mammary stem cells (MaSC) account for the cell lineage of mammary epithelia and provide for mammary growth, development and tissue homeostasis. The presence of MaSC was clearly demonstrated by the generation of an entire mammary gland from a single cell implanted into epithelium-ablated mammary fat...

  16. Fusion-fission Study at JAEA for Heavy-element Synthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishio, K.

    Fission fragment mass distributions were measured in the heavy-ion induced fission using 238U target nucleus. The mass distribu- tions changed drastically with incident energy. The results are explained by a change of the ratio between fusion and qasifission with nuclear orientation. A calculation based on a fluctuation dissipation model reproduced the mass distributions and their inci- dent energy dependence. Fusion probability was determined in the analysis. Evaporation residue cross sections were calculated with a statistical model in the reactions of 30Si+238U and 34S+238U using the obtained fusion probability in the entrance channel. The results agree with the measured cross sections of 263,264Sg and 267,268Hs, produced by 30Si+238U and 34S+238U, respectively. It is also suggested that the sub-barrier energies can be used for heavy element synthesis.

  17. Ag7+ ion induced modification of morphology, optical and luminescence behaviour of charge compensated CaMoO4 nanophosphor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dutta, S.; Som, S.; Kunti, A. K.; Sharma, S. K.; Kumar, Vijay; Swart, H. C.; Visser, H. G.

    2016-10-01

    The present paper reports on the swift heavy ion (SHI) induced structural, optical and luminescence properties of CaMoO4:Dy3+/K+ nanophosphor synthesized via hydrothermal route. Herein 100 MeV Ag7+ ion beam was used varying fluence from 1 × 1011 to 1 × 1013 ions/cm2. The depth profile of the Ag7+ ions was estimated using SRIM code. XRD and FESEM results revealed the loss of crystallinity and reduction in particle size after SHI irradiations. The XPS technique confirmed the stability of oxidation states of the elements. Reflectance spectra exhibited a red shift in the absorption band, followed by a decrease in band gap. Decrease in the intensity of the photoluminescence peaks without any change in band positions was also obtained after ion irradiation. The thermoluminescence (TL) characteristics were discussed in detail, and the trapping parameter was calculated. The results were compared on the grounds of linear energy transfer of the irradiated ions.

  18. Diets rich in starch improve the efficiency of amino acids use by the mammary gland in lactating Jersey cows.

    PubMed

    Cantalapiedra-Hijar, G; Ortigues-Marty, I; Lemosquet, S

    2015-10-01

    The objective of this study was to test whether the greater milk N yield usually observed when feeding diets based on starch versus fiber was the consequence of a higher efficiency of AA use across the mammary gland and whether this effect depended on dietary crude protein (CP) content. Five midlactation multicatheterized Jersey cows were fed 4 isoenergetic diets to provide 2 different carbohydrate compositions (CHO; rich in starch vs. rich in fiber) crossed by 2 different protein levels (12.0 vs. 16.5% CP) and according to a 4 × 4 Latin square design. Blood samples were collected at the end of each treatment period from the mesenteric artery and mammary vein to determine mammary net nutrient fluxes. The nature of nutrients taken up by the mammary gland differed between starch and fiber diets: mammary net uptake of acetate increased with fiber versus starch diets, whereas mammary net uptake and clearance rate of glucose increased with starch versus fiber diets but only at a normal CP level. In addition, the mammary net uptake of total, essential, and branched-chain AA (BCAA) was significantly enhanced (12, 11, and 26% on average, respectively) when feeding starch versus fiber diets, in line with a greater milk protein yield (7% on average) and regardless of the CP level. The conversion efficiency of plasma essential AA into milk protein was improved with starch diets (33.7% on average) compared with fiber diets (27.5% on average). This higher mammary efficiency use of AA with starch diets was accompanied by a greater fractional extraction and clearance rate of AA belonging to group 2 (BCAA, Lys, Thr) by the mammary gland in absence of effects of CHO on either the mammary blood flow or the mammary AA metabolism. The positive effect of starch diets on mammary clearance rate and uptake of BCAA observed in this study was further improved when increasing dietary CP from 12.0 to 16.5%. Concerning the individual AA, Leu was the only whose mammary uptake accounted for a

  19. Retinoids induce lumen morphogenesis in mammary epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Montesano, Roberto; Soulié, Priscilla

    2002-12-01

    Lumen formation is a fundamental step in the development of the structural and functional units of glandular organs, such as alveoli and ducts. In an attempt to elucidate the molecular signals that govern this morphogenetic event, we set up an in vitro system in which cloned mammary epithelial cells grown in collagen gels under serum-free conditions form solid, lumen-less colonies. Addition of as little as 0.1% donor calf serum (DCS) was sufficient to induce the formation of a central cavity. Among a number of serum constituents analyzed, retinol was found to mimic the effect of DCS in inducing lumen morphogenesis. Since the biological activities of retinol are largely dependent on its conversion to all-trans-retinoic acid (RA), we examined in more detail the effect of RA on lumen formation. RA induced the formation of lumen-containing colonies (cysts) in a concentration- and time-dependent manner, a half-maximal effect after 9 days of culture being observed with 100 pM RA. The pleiotropic effects of retinoids are mediated by nuclear retinoic acid receptors (RARs; alpha, beta and gamma) and retinoid X receptors (RXRs; alpha, beta and gamma). To identify the signaling pathway involved in RA-induced lumen formation, we used receptor-specific synthetic retinoids. TTNPB, a selective RAR agonist, promoted lumen morphogenesis, whereas RXR-selective ligands lacked this activity. Lumen formation was also induced at picomolar concentrations by Am-580, a synthetic retinoid that selectively binds the RARalpha receptor subtype. Moreover, co-addition of Ro 41-5253, an antagonist of RARalpha, abrogated the lumen-inducing activity of both RA and DCS, indicating that this biological response is mediated through an RARalpha-dependent signaling pathway. To gain insight into the mechanisms underlying RA-induced lumen formation, we assessed the potential role of matrix metalloproteinases (MMP). Using gelatin zymography, we observed a dose-dependent increase in latent and active forms

  20. Staged Management of a Ruptured Internal Mammary Artery Aneurysm

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, O Young; Kim, Gun Jik; Oh, Tak Hyuk; Lee, Young Ok; Lee, Sang Cjeol; Cho, Jun Yong

    2016-01-01

    The rupture of an internal mammary artery (IMA) aneurysm in a patient with type 1 neurofibromatosis (NF-1) is a rare but life-threatening complication requiring emergency management. A 50-year-old man with NF-1 was transferred to the emergency department of Kyungpook National University Hospital, where an IMA aneurysmal rupture and hemothorax were diagnosed and drained. The IMA aneurysmal rupture and hemothorax were successfully repaired by staged management combining endovascular treatment and subsequent video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery (VATS). The patient required cardiopulmonary cerebral resuscitation, the staged management of coil embolization, and a subsequent VATS procedure. This staged approach may be an effective therapeutic strategy in cases of IMA aneurysmal rupture. PMID:27066438

  1. Optical diagnosis of mammary ductal carcinoma using advanced optical technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Yan; Fu, Fangmeng; Lian, Yuane; Nie, Yuting; Zhuo, Shuangmu; Wang, Chuan; Chen, Jianxin

    2015-02-01

    Clinical imaging techniques for diagnosing breast cancer mainly include X-ray mammography, ultrasound, and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), which have respective drawbacks. Multiphoton microscopy (MPM) has become a potentially attractive optical technique to bridge the current gap in clinical utility. In this paper, MPM was used to image normal and ductal cancerous breast tissues, based on two-photon excited fluorescence (TPEF) and second harmonic generation (SHG). Our results showed that MPM has the ability to exhibit the microstructure of normal breast tissue, ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) and invasive ductal carcinoma (IDC) lesions at the molecular level comparable to histopathology. These findings indicate that, with integration of MPM into currently accepted clinical imaging system, it has the potential to make a real-time histological diagnosis of mammary ductal carcinoma in vivo.

  2. Multiphoton intravital microscopy setup to visualize the mouse mammary gland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adur, Javier; Herrera Torres, Ana M.; Masedunskas, Andrius; Baratti, Mariana O.; de Thomaz, Andre A.; Pelegati, Vitor B.; Carvalho, Hernandes F.; Cesar, Carlos L.

    2013-06-01

    Recently, light microscopy-based techniques have been extended to live mammalian models leading to the development of a new imaging approach called intravital microscopy (IVM). Although IVM has been introduced at the beginning of the last century, its major advancements have occurred in the last twenty years with the development of non-linear microscopy that has enabled performing deep tissue imaging. IVM has been utilized to address many biological questions in basic research and is now a fundamental tool that provide information on tissues such as morphology, cellular architecture, and metabolic status. IVM has become an indispensable tool in numerous areas. This study presents and describes the practical aspects of IVM necessary to visualize epithelial cells of live mouse mammary gland with multiphoton techniques.

  3. Innate immune response of bovine mammary gland to pathogenic bacteria responsible for mastitis.

    PubMed

    Oviedo-Boyso, Javier; Valdez-Alarcón, Juan J; Cajero-Juárez, Marcos; Ochoa-Zarzosa, Alejandra; López-Meza, Joel E; Bravo-Patiño, Alejandro; Baizabal-Aguirre, Víctor M

    2007-04-01

    Mastitis (mammary gland inflammation) is one of the most important bovine diseases causing economic losses to dairy producers. Mammary gland inflammation is a consequence of the activity of a number of cell and soluble factors that function together to eliminate invading microorganisms. The factors involved in this inflammatory response differ depending on the infectious agent. This review analyzes the factors involved in the immunologic mechanisms against the main pathogenic bacteria causing mastitis, and emphasizes the innate immune response of the mammary gland. Knowledge, at the molecular level, of the mammary gland immune response during infection by pathogenic bacteria is fundamental to the design of effective therapies to control and eradicate bovine mastitis. PMID:16882453

  4. RANK Signaling Amplifies WNT-Responsive Mammary Progenitors through R-SPONDIN1

    PubMed Central

    Joshi, Purna A.; Waterhouse, Paul D.; Kannan, Nagarajan; Narala, Swami; Fang, Hui; Di Grappa, Marco A.; Jackson, Hartland W.; Penninger, Josef M.; Eaves, Connie; Khokha, Rama

    2015-01-01

    Summary Systemic and local signals must be integrated by mammary stem and progenitor cells to regulate their cyclic growth and turnover in the adult gland. Here, we show RANK-positive luminal progenitors exhibiting WNT pathway activation are selectively expanded in the human breast during the progesterone-high menstrual phase. To investigate underlying mechanisms, we examined mouse models and found that loss of RANK prevents the proliferation of hormone receptor-negative luminal mammary progenitors and basal cells, an accompanying loss of WNT activation, and, hence, a suppression of lobuloalveologenesis. We also show that R-spondin1 is depleted in RANK-null progenitors, and that its exogenous administration rescues key aspects of RANK deficiency by reinstating a WNT response and mammary cell expansion. Our findings point to a novel role of RANK in dictating WNT responsiveness to mediate hormone-induced changes in the growth dynamics of adult mammary cells. PMID:26095608

  5. Estrogens in the wrong place at the wrong time: fetal BPA exposure and mammary cancer

    PubMed Central

    Paulose, Tessie; Speroni, Lucia; Sonnenschein, Carlos; Soto, Ana M

    2014-01-01

    Iatrogenic gestational exposure to diethylstilbestrol (DES) induced alterations of the genital tract and predisposed individuals to develop clear cell carcinoma of the vagina as well as breast cancer later in life. Gestational exposure of rodents to a related compound, the xenoestrogen bisphenol-A (BPA) increases the propensity to develop mammary cancer during adulthood, long after cessation of exposure. Exposure to BPA during gestation induces morphological alterations in both the stroma and the epithelium of the fetal mammary gland at 18 days of age. We postulate that the primary target of BPA is the fetal stroma, the only mammary tissue expressing estrogen receptors during fetal life. BPA would then alter the reciprocal stroma-epithelial interactions that mediate mammogenesis. In addition to this direct effect on the mammary gland, BPA is postulated to affect the hypothalamus and thus in turn affect the regulation of mammotropic hormones at puberty and beyond. PMID:25277313

  6. A Cytogenetic Footprint for Mammary Carcinomas Induced by PhIP in Rats

    SciTech Connect

    Christian, A T

    2001-04-01

    PhIP (2-amino-1-methyl-6-phenylimidazo [4,5-b] pyridine), a mutagen/carcinogen belonging to the class of heterocyclic amines (HCAs) found in cooked meats, is a mammary gland carcinogen in rats and has been implicated in the etiology of certain human cancers including breast cancer. To gain insight into the genomic alterations associated with PhIP-induced mammary gland carcinogenesis, we used comparative genomic hybridization (CGH) to examine chromosomal abnormalities in rat mammary carcinomas induced by PhIP, and for comparison, by DMBA (7,12-dimethylbenz[a]anthracene), a potent experimental mammary carcinogen. There was a consistent and characteristic pattern of chromosome-region loss in PhIP-induced carcinomas that clearly distinguished them from carcinomas induced by DMBA.

  7. Consequences of epithelial or stromal TGFβ1 depletion in the mammary gland.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, David H; Martinez-Ruiz, Haydeliz; Barcellos-Hoff, Mary Helen

    2011-06-01

    Transforming growth factor β1 (TGFβ) affects stroma and epithelial composition and interactions that mediate mammary development and determine the course of cancer. The reduction of TGFβ in Tgfβ1 heterozygote mice, which are healthy and long-lived, provides an important model to dissect the contribution of TGFβ in mammary gland biology and cancer. We used both intact mice and mammary chimeras in conjunction with Tgfβ1 genetic depletion and TGFβ neutralizing antibodies to evaluate how stromal or epithelial TGFβ depletion affect mammary development and response to physiological stimuli. Our studies of radiation carcinogenesis have revealed new aspects of TGFβ biology and suggest that the paradoxical TGFβ switch from tumor suppressor to tumor promoter can be resolved by assessing distinct stromal versus epithelial actions.

  8. Estrogens in the wrong place at the wrong time: Fetal BPA exposure and mammary cancer.

    PubMed

    Paulose, Tessie; Speroni, Lucia; Sonnenschein, Carlos; Soto, Ana M

    2015-07-01

    Iatrogenic gestational exposure to diethylstilbestrol (DES) induced alterations of the genital tract and predisposed individuals to develop clear cell carcinoma of the vagina as well as breast cancer later in life. Gestational exposure of rodents to a related compound, the xenoestrogen bisphenol-A (BPA) increases the propensity to develop mammary cancer during adulthood, long after cessation of exposure. Exposure to BPA during gestation induces morphological alterations in both the stroma and the epithelium of the fetal mammary gland at 18 days of age. We postulate that the primary target of BPA is the fetal stroma, the only mammary tissue expressing estrogen receptors during fetal life. BPA would then alter the reciprocal stroma-epithelial interactions that mediate mammogenesis. In addition to this direct effect on the mammary gland, BPA is postulated to affect the hypothalamus and thus in turn affect the regulation of mammotropic hormones at puberty and beyond.

  9. Leptin up-regulates the lactogenic effect of prolactin in the bovine mammary gland in vitro.

    PubMed

    Feuermann, Y; Shamay, A; Mabjeesh, S J

    2008-11-01

    The ability of leptin to up-regulate prolactin action in the mammary gland is well established. We examined the effect of leptin and prolactin on traits associated with lactation. Leptin and prolactin enhanced proliferation (thymidine incorporation) of the mammary gland cells, elevated the cells' proliferation in a dose-responsive manner, and synergized to elevate the expression of amino acid metabolism via a 90% increase in aminopeptidase N expression. Leptin and prolactin decreased apoptosis (decreased caspase-3 expression by 60%) in the same manner. Leptin enhanced the effect of prolactin on all of these processes in bovine mammary explants. Leptin and prolactin regulated mTOR (mammalian target of rapamycin) by increasing expression by 66%, which is one of the signal-transduction junctions involved in the regulation of proliferation, apoptosis, and protein synthesis. These findings support the hypothesis that leptin up-regulates prolactin action in the bovine mammary gland. PMID:18946122

  10. Ischemia induced by coronary steal through a patent mammary artery side branch: a role for embolization.

    PubMed

    Moreno, Nuno; da Silva Castro, Alexandra; Pereira, Adriana; Silva, João Carlos; Almeida, Pedro Bernardo; Andrade, Aurora; Maciel, Maria Júlia; Pinto, Paula

    2013-06-01

    Non-occlusion of the internal mammary artery side branches may cause ischemia due to flow diversion after coronary artery bypass grafting. The authors present the case of a 67-year-old man with recurrent angina after undergoing myocardial revascularization with a left internal mammary artery to left anterior descending bypass. He presented with impaired anterior wall myocardial perfusion in the setting of a patent left internal mammary artery side branch. Effective percutaneous treatment was carried out through coil embolization, with improved flow and clinical symptoms, confirmed through ischemia testing. Coronary steal through a patent mammary artery side branch is a controversial phenomenon and this type of intervention should be considered only in carefully selected patients. PMID:23809629

  11. Stem cell marker prominin-1 regulates branching morphogenesis, but not regenerative capacity, in the mammary gland.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Lisa H; Boulanger, Corinne A; Smith, Gilbert H; Carmeliet, Peter; Watson, Christine J

    2011-03-01

    Prominin-1 (Prom1) is recognized as a stem cell marker in several tissues, including blood, neuroepithelium, and gut, and in human and mouse embryos and many cancers. Although Prom1 is routinely used as a marker for isolating stem cells, its biological function remains unclear. Here we use a knockout model to investigate the role of Prom1 in the mammary gland. We demonstrate that complete loss of Prom1 does not affect the regenerative capacity of the mammary epithelium. Surprisingly, we also show that in the absence of Prom1, mammary glands have reduced ductal branching, and an increased ratio of luminal to basal cells. The effects of Prom1 loss in the mammary gland are associated with decreased expression of prolactin receptor and matrix metalloproteinase-3. These experiments reveal a novel, functional role for Prom1 that is not related to stem cell activity, and demonstrate the importance of tissue-specific characterization of putative stem cell markers.

  12. The relationship between basal and luminal cytokeratins with histopathologic characteristics of canine mammary gland cancer.

    PubMed

    Eivani, D; Mortazavi, P

    2016-01-01

    Neoplasia occurs mostly in mammary glands in female dogs and mammary gland cancer is one of the causes of death in these animals cytokeratins are one of the most important of tumor markers for identification of tumor prognosis. In this study, 120 canine malignant tumor samples of mammary glands were studied. From each sample, a section was taken for hematoxylin-eosin staining and two sections for immunohistochemical staining of markers CK5/6 and CK7. Histopathology slides was evaluated by light microscope. The results show that the presence of markers CK7 and CK5/6 had no significant relationship with tumor grade and type (p<0.05). However, it seems that unlike humans, CK5/6 and CK7 is not an independent prognostic factor in canine mammary gland tumors. PMID:27487499

  13. Ischemia induced by coronary steal through a patent mammary artery side branch: a role for embolization.

    PubMed

    Moreno, Nuno; da Silva Castro, Alexandra; Pereira, Adriana; Silva, João Carlos; Almeida, Pedro Bernardo; Andrade, Aurora; Maciel, Maria Júlia; Pinto, Paula

    2013-06-01

    Non-occlusion of the internal mammary artery side branches may cause ischemia due to flow diversion after coronary artery bypass grafting. The authors present the case of a 67-year-old man with recurrent angina after undergoing myocardial revascularization with a left internal mammary artery to left anterior descending bypass. He presented with impaired anterior wall myocardial perfusion in the setting of a patent left internal mammary artery side branch. Effective percutaneous treatment was carried out through coil embolization, with improved flow and clinical symptoms, confirmed through ischemia testing. Coronary steal through a patent mammary artery side branch is a controversial phenomenon and this type of intervention should be considered only in carefully selected patients.

  14. ENVIRONMENTAL TOXICANTS AND DISRUPTED MAMMARY GLAND DEVELOPMENT: THE WINDOW OF SUSCEPTIBILITY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Environmental Toxicants and Altered Mammary Gland Development: The window of susceptibility. Suzanne E. Fenton, National Health and Environmental Effects Research Laboratory, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Research Triangle Park, NC 27711

    There are several enviro...

  15. ENVIRONMENTAL TOXICANTS AND ALTERED MAMMARY GLAND DEVELOPMENT: THE WINDOW OF SUSCEPTIBILITY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Environmental Toxicants and Altered Mammary Gland Development: The window of susceptibility. Suzanne E. Fenton, National Health and Environmental Effects Research Laboratory, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Research Triangle Park, NC 27711

    There are several environm...

  16. Recurrent ischemia resulting from left internal mammary artery-to-pulmonary artery fistula.

    PubMed

    Madu, E C; Hanumanthu, S K; Kim, C; Prudoff, A

    2001-03-01

    This report describes a case series of recurrent ischemia after coronary artery bypass grafting resulting from left internal mammary artery-to-pulmonary artery fistula. An angiographic demonstration of this fistula is presented.

  17. Patient tolerance of ioxaglate and iopamidol in internal mammary artery arteriography.

    PubMed

    Miller, R M; Knox, M

    1992-01-01

    To compare discomfort caused by ioxaglate and iopamidol, 25 patients scheduled for coronary angiography including internal mammary arteriography were studied. Each patient received both agents. Data were available on 22 randomly selected patients who completed the protocol. Two patients were withdrawn because of unsuccessful internal mammary artery cannulation and one because of idiosyncratic reaction to diazepam. After the internal mammary artery injections, the short-form McGill Pain Questionnaire (SF-MPQ) was completed to evaluate the patient response. Ioxaglate caused significantly less discomfort than iopamidol. Word scale (WS) p less than .05; visual analog scale (VAS) p less than .05. We conclude that ioxaglate is much better tolerated than iopamidol in internal mammary arteriography.

  18. Neuregulin-regulated gene expression in mammary carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Amin, Dhara N; Tuck, David; Stern, David F

    2005-09-10

    Recent studies have suggested that autocrine production of Neuregulin (NRG), a growth factor that activates members of the Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor/ErbB family of proto-oncogenes, is sufficient for breast tumor initiation and progression. To elucidate the molecular mechanisms regulating these events, we undertook a global analysis of genes regulated by NRG in luminal mammary epithelial cell lines. Gene expression profiling of estrogen receptor-positive T47D cells exposed to NRG-1 revealed both previously identified and novel targets of NRG activation. Profiling of other estrogen receptor-positive breast cancer cell lines, MCF7 and SUM44, yielded a group of twenty-one genes whose transcripts are upregulated by NRG in all three lines tested. The NRG targets are FBJ murine osteosarcoma viral oncogene homolog B, Early growth response 1, v-jun avian sarcoma virus 17 oncogene homolog, Activating transcription factor 3, Homo sapiens cDNA FLJ31636 fis, Jun B proto-oncogene, Forkhead box C1, Platelet/endothelial cell adhesion molecule 1, NADPH-dependent retinol dehydrogenase/reductase, Dual specificity phosphatase 5, NGF inducible protein TIS21, Connective tissue growth factor, Jun D proto-oncogene, Serum response factor, Cullin 1, v-myc avian myelocytomatosis viral oncogene, Transient receptor potential channel 1, Low density lipoprotein receptor, Transforming growth factor beta 1, Nucleoporin 88 kDa, and Pleckstrin homology-like domain A1. Since NRG activation of these cells induces resistance to anti-hormonal therapy, the identified genes may provide clues to molecular events regulating mammary tumor progression and hormone independence.

  19. Inhibition of DMBA-induced mammary tumorigenesis by rosemary extract

    SciTech Connect

    Singletary, K. )

    1991-03-15

    Extracts of the spice, rosemary, have exhibited potent antioxidant properties. In order to evaluate the ability of rosemary extract to inhibit mammary tumorigenesis induced by 7,12-dimethylbenz(a)anthracene (DMBA), two groups of 32 day old female SD rats weighing 99.4 {plus minus} 2.6 g were fed semipurified diets containing either 0 or 1.0% rosemary extract during both the initiation and promotion stages of tumor development. All rats were administered DMBA at 53 days of age. Terminal tumor incidence was 75% and 40% for rats fed the 0 and 1.0% diets, respectively. Tumors/tumor-bearing rat were 2.3 {plus minus} 0.5 and 1.8 {plus minus} 0.3, respectively. In a second study 3 groups of female rats were fed diets containing 0, 0.5 or 1.0% rosemary extract for {minus}3 to +2 weeks following DMBA administration at 53 days of age. By 13 weeks post-DMBA tumor incidence for rats fed the 1.0% rosemary diet was significantly less than for rats fed the control diet. However, by 20, weeks, incidence for rats fed 0, 0.5, and 1.0% rosemary was 72.2, 69.6 and 58.3%, respectively. Tumors/tumor bearing rat were 2.2 {plus minus} 0.3, 2.0 {plus minus} 0.4 and 2.4 {plus minus} 0.5 for rats fed the 0, 0.5 and 1.0% diets, respectively. Therefore, rosemary extract can inhibit DMBA-induced mammary tumorigenesis when fed prior to and after DMBA dosing. Its antitumorigenic effect is not due to inhibition of the initiation stage alone.

  20. Anatomy of the human mammary gland: Current status of knowledge.

    PubMed

    Hassiotou, Foteini; Geddes, Donna

    2013-01-01

    Mammary glands are unique to mammals, with the specific function of synthesizing, secreting, and delivering milk to the newborn. Given this function, it is only during a pregnancy/lactation cycle that the gland reaches a mature developmental state via hormonal influences at the cellular level that effect drastic modifications in the micro- and macro-anatomy of the gland, resulting in remodeling of the gland into a milk-secretory organ. Pubertal and post-pubertal development of the breast in females aids in preparing it to assume a functional state during pregnancy and lactation. Remarkably, this organ has the capacity to regress to a resting state upon cessation of lactation, and then undergo the same cycle of expansion and regression again in subsequent pregnancies during reproductive life. This plasticity suggests tight hormonal regulation, which is paramount for the normal function of the gland. This review presents the current status of knowledge of the normal macro- and micro-anatomy of the human mammary gland and the distinct changes it undergoes during the key developmental stages that characterize it, from embryonic life through to post-menopausal age. In addition, it discusses recent advances in our understanding of the normal function of the breast during lactation, with special reference to breastmilk, its composition, and how it can be utilized as a tool to advance knowledge on normal and aberrant breast development and function. Finally, anatomical and molecular traits associated with aberrant expansion of the breast are discussed to set the basis for future comparisons that may illuminate the origin of breast cancer.

  1. Molecular based subtyping of feline mammary carcinomas and clinicopathological characterization.

    PubMed

    Soares, Maria; Madeira, Sara; Correia, Jorge; Peleteiro, Maria; Cardoso, Fátima; Ferreira, Fernando

    2016-06-01

    Molecular classification of feline mammary carcinomas (FMC) from which specific behavioral patterns may be estimated has potential applications in veterinary clinical practice and in comparative oncology. In this perspective, the main goal of this study was to characterize both the clinical and the pathological features of the different molecular phenotypes found in a population of FMC (n = 102), using the broadly accepted IHC-based classification established by St. Gallen International Expert Consensus panel. The luminal B/HER2-negative subtype was the most common (29.4%, 30/102) followed by luminal B/HER2-positive subtype (19.6%, 20/102), triple negative basal-like (16.7%, 17/102), luminal A (14.7%, 15/102), triple negative normal-like (12.7%, 13/102) and finally, HER2-positive subtype (6.9%, 7/102). Luminal A subtype was significantly associated with smaller tumors (p = 0.024) and with well differentiated ones (p < 0.001), contrasting with the triple negative basal-like subtype, that was associated with larger and poorly differentiated tumors (p < 0.001), and with the presence of necrotic areas in the tumoral lesion (p = 0.003). In the survival analysis, cats with Luminal A subtype presented the highest survival time (mean OS = 943.6 days) and animals with triple negative basal-like subtype exhibited the lowest survival time (OS mean = 368.9 days). Moreover, two thirds (64%, 32/50) of the queens with multiple primary tumors showed different molecular subtypes in each carcinoma, revealing that all independent lesions should be analyzed in order to improve the clinical management of animals. Finally, the similarities between the subtypes of feline mammary tumors and human breast cancer, reveal that feline can be a valuable model for comparative studies. PMID:27212699

  2. Characteristics and EGFP expression of goat mammary gland epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Y-M; He, X-Y; Zhang, Y

    2010-12-01

    The aims of this study were (i) to establish a goat mammary gland epithelial (GMGE) cell line, and (ii) to determine if these GMGE cells could be maintained long-term in culture by continuous subculturing following transfection with a reporter gene, enhanced green fluorescence protein (EGFP). Primary culture of GMGE cells was achieved by outgrowth of migrating cells from the fragments of the mammary gland tissue of a lactating goat. The passage 16 GMGE cells were transfected with EGFP gene using lipofection. The expression of Cell keratins of epithelial cells in GMGE cells was test by immunofluorescence. Βeta-Casein gene mRNA was test for GMGE cells by RT-PCR. The results showed that when grown at low density on a plastic substratum, the GMGE cells formed islands, and when grown to confluency, the cells formed a monolayer and aggregated with the characteristic cobble-stone morphology of epithelial cells. GMGE cells could form dome-like structure which looked like nipple, and the lumen-like structures formed among the cells. Several blister-like structures appeared in the appearance of the cells. The GMGE cells contained different cell types, majority of the cells were short shuttle-like or polygon which were beehive-like. A part of cells were round and flat, a small number of cells were elongated. Some of the GMGE cells contained milk drops. The cell nuclei were round which had 2-4 obvious cores. The expression of Cell keratins demonstrated the property of epithelial cells in GMGE cells by immunofluorescence. The GMGE cells could express transcript encoding a Βeta-Casein protein. EGFP gene was successfully transferred into the GMGE cells, and the transfected cells could be maintained long-term in culture by continuous subculturing. In conclusion, we have established a EGFP gene transfected GMGE (ET-GMGE) cell line and maintained it long-term in culture by continuous subculturing. PMID:20113446

  3. Characteristics and EGFP expression of goat mammary gland epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Y-M; He, X-Y; Zhang, Y

    2010-12-01

    The aims of this study were (i) to establish a goat mammary gland epithelial (GMGE) cell line, and (ii) to determine if these GMGE cells could be maintained long-term in culture by continuous subculturing following transfection with a reporter gene, enhanced green fluorescence protein (EGFP). Primary culture of GMGE cells was achieved by outgrowth of migrating cells from the fragments of the mammary gland tissue of a lactating goat. The passage 16 GMGE cells were transfected with EGFP gene using lipofection. The expression of Cell keratins of epithelial cells in GMGE cells was test by immunofluorescence. Βeta-Casein gene mRNA was test for GMGE cells by RT-PCR. The results showed that when grown at low density on a plastic substratum, the GMGE cells formed islands, and when grown to confluency, the cells formed a monolayer and aggregated with the characteristic cobble-stone morphology of epithelial cells. GMGE cells could form dome-like structure which looked like nipple, and the lumen-like structures formed among the cells. Several blister-like structures appeared in the appearance of the cells. The GMGE cells contained different cell types, majority of the cells were short shuttle-like or polygon which were beehive-like. A part of cells were round and flat, a small number of cells were elongated. Some of the GMGE cells contained milk drops. The cell nuclei were round which had 2-4 obvious cores. The expression of Cell keratins demonstrated the property of epithelial cells in GMGE cells by immunofluorescence. The GMGE cells could express transcript encoding a Βeta-Casein protein. EGFP gene was successfully transferred into the GMGE cells, and the transfected cells could be maintained long-term in culture by continuous subculturing. In conclusion, we have established a EGFP gene transfected GMGE (ET-GMGE) cell line and maintained it long-term in culture by continuous subculturing.

  4. Short communication: Expression of T-box 2 and 3 in the bovine mammary gland.

    PubMed

    Hoffman, M L; McFadden, K K; Hoagland, T A; Kazmer, G W; Govoni, K E

    2014-07-01

    To increase our understanding of the mechanisms by which growth hormone (GH) and insulin-like growth factor (IGF)-I influence bovine mammary gland development, the potential roles of T-box2 (TBX2) and T-box3 (TBX3) were investigated. Although no information regarding expression of either transcription factor in the bovine mammary gland exists, it is known that TBX3 and its closely related family member, TBX2, are required for mammary gland development in humans and mice. Additionally, TBX3 mutations in humans and mice lead to ulnar mammary syndrome. Evidence is present in bone that TBX3 is required for proliferation and its expression is regulated by GH, an important regulator of mammary gland development and milk production. We hypothesized that TBX2 and TBX3 are expressed in the bovine mammary gland and that GH, IGF-I, or both increase TBX2 and TBX3 expression in bovine mammary epithelial cells (MEC). Bovine mammary gland tissue, MAC-T cells, primary MEC, and fibroblasts were obtained and TBX2 and TBX3 expression was determined by real-time reverse transcription PCR. In addition, TBX2 and TBX3 expression was examined in cells treated with 100 or 500 ng/mL of GH or 100 or 200 ng/mL of IGF-I for 24 or 48 h. Both TBX2 and TBX3 were expressed in bovine mammary tissue. Surprisingly, expression of TBX2 was only detected in mammary fibroblast cells, whereas TBX3 was expressed in all 3 cell types. Growth hormone did not alter TBX3 expression in MAC-T cells or MEC. However, IGF-I increased TBX3 expression in MAC-T, but not in primary MEC. We did not observe a change in TBX2 or TBX3 expression in fibroblasts treated with GH and IGF. Therefore, we concluded that (1) TBX2 and TBX3 are expressed in bovine mammary gland, (2) their expression is cell-type specific, and (3) IGF-I stimulates TBX3 expression in MAC-T cells. PMID:24767885

  5. Chronic social isolation is associated with metabolic gene expression changes specific to mammary adipose tissue.

    PubMed

    Volden, Paul A; Wonder, Erin L; Skor, Maxwell N; Carmean, Christopher M; Patel, Feenalie N; Ye, Honggang; Kocherginsky, Masha; McClintock, Martha K; Brady, Matthew J; Conzen, Suzanne D

    2013-07-01

    Chronic social isolation is linked to increased mammary tumor growth in rodent models of breast cancer. In the C3(1)/SV40 T-antigen FVB/N (TAg) mouse model of "triple-negative" breast cancer, the heightened stress response elicited by social isolation has been associated with increased expression of metabolic genes in the mammary gland before invasive tumors develop (i.e., during the in situ carcinoma stage). To further understand the mechanisms underlying how accelerated mammary tumor growth is associated with social isolation, we separated the mammary gland adipose tissue from adjacent ductal epithelial cells and analyzed individual cell types for changes in metabolic gene expression. Specifically, increased expression of the key metabolic genes Acaca, Hk2, and Acly was found in the adipocyte, rather than the epithelial fraction. Surprisingly, metabolic gene expression was not significantly increased in visceral adipose depots of socially isolated female mice. As expected, increased metabolic gene expression in the mammary adipocytes of socially isolated mice coincided with increased glucose metabolism, lipid synthesis, and leptin secretion from this adipose depot. Furthermore, application of media that had been cultured with isolated mouse mammary adipose tissue (conditioned media) resulted in increased proliferation of mammary cancer cells relative to group-housed-conditioned media. These results suggest that exposure to a chronic stressor (social isolation) results in specific metabolic reprogramming in mammary gland adipocytes that in turn contributes to increased proliferation of adjacent preinvasive malignant epithelial cells. Metabolites and/or tumor growth-promoting proteins secreted from adipose tissue could identify biomarkers and/or targets for preventive intervention in breast cancer.

  6. Synthesis of milk specific fatty acids and proteins by dispersed goat mammary-gland epithelial cells.

    PubMed Central

    Hansen, H O; Tornehave, D; Knudsen, J

    1986-01-01

    The method now described for preparation of dispersed lactating goat mammary-gland cells gives a high yield of morphologically and functionally normal mammary cells. The cells synthesize specific goat milk fatty acids in the right proportions, and they respond to hormones by increased protein synthesis. The cells can be frozen and thawed without losing the above properties, which makes them an excellent tool for metabolic and hormonal studies. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 2. PMID:3800930

  7. Protein tyrosine kinase 6 regulates mammary gland tumorigenesis in mouse models

    PubMed Central

    Peng, M; Ball-Kell, S M; Franks, R R; Xie, H; Tyner, A L

    2013-01-01

    Protein tyrosine kinase 6 (PTK6, also called BRK) is an intracellular tyrosine kinase expressed in the majority of human breast tumors and breast cancer cell lines, but its expression has not been reported in normal mammary gland. To study functions of PTK6 in vivo, we generated and characterized several transgenic mouse lines with expression of human PTK6 under control of the mouse mammary tumor virus (MMTV) long terminal repeat. Ectopic active PTK6 was detected in luminal epithelial cells of mature transgenic mammary glands. Lines expressing the MMTV-PTK6 transgene exhibited more than a two-fold increase in mammary gland tumor formation compared with nontransgenic control animals. PTK6 activates signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3), and active STAT3 was detected in PTK6-positive mammary gland epithelial cells. Endogenous mouse PTK6 was not detected in the normal mouse mammary gland, but it was induced in mouse mammary gland tumors of different origin, including spontaneous tumors that developed in control mice, and tumors that formed in PTK6, H-Ras, ERBB2 and PyMT transgenic models. MMTV-PTK6 and MMTV-ERBB2 transgenic mice were crossed to explore crosstalk between PTK6 and ERBB2 signaling in vivo. We found no significant increase in tumor incidence, size or metastasis in ERBB2/PTK6 double transgenic mice. Although we detected increased proliferation in ERBB2/PTK6 double transgenic tumors, an increase in apoptosis was also observed. MMTV-PTK6 clearly promotes mammary gland tumorigenesis in vivo, but its impact may be underrepresented in our transgenic models because of induction of endogenous PTK6 expression. PMID:24323291

  8. In vitro activity of a Solanum tuberosum extract against mammary carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    De Lorenzo, M S; Lorenzano Menna, P L; Alonso, D F; Gomez, D E

    2001-03-01

    We investigated the antitumor properties of a Solanum tuberosum extract (STE) on F3II mouse mammary carcinoma cells. STE significantly inhibited adhesion on fibronectin-coated surfaces and blocked migration of tumor cells in vitro. A major gelatinolytic activity (gelatinase) of 82 kD was identified in STE by zymographic analysis and characterized by exposure to different experimental conditions. Proteolytic activity of STE may be responsible, at least in part, for the in vitro effects on mammary carcinoma cells.

  9. Characterization of microRNA profile in mammary tissue of dairy and beef breed heifers.

    PubMed

    Wicik, Z; Gajewska, M; Majewska, A; Walkiewicz, D; Osińska, E; Motyl, T

    2016-02-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small non-coding RNAs that participate in the regulation of gene expression. Their role during mammary gland development is still largely unknown. In this study, we performed a microarray analysis to identify miRNAs associated with high mammogenic potential of the bovine mammary gland. We identified 54 significantly differentially expressed miRNAs between the mammary tissue of dairy (Holstein-Friesian, HF) and beef (Limousin, LM) postpubertal heifers. Fifty-two miRNAs had higher expression in the mammary tissue of LM heifers. The expression of the top candidate miRNAs (bta-miR-10b, bta-miR-29b, bta-miR-101, bta-miR-375, bta-miR-2285t, bta-miR-146b, bta-let7b, bta-miR-107, bta-miR-1434-3p) identified in the microarray experiment was additionally evaluated by qPCR. Enrichment analyses for targeted genes revealed that the major differences between miRNA expression in the mammary gland of HF versus LM were associated with the regulation of signalling pathways that are crucial for mammary gland development, such as TGF-beta, insulin, WNT and inflammatory pathways. Moreover, a number of genes potentially targeted by significantly differentially expressed miRNAs were associated with the activity of mammary stem cells. These data indicate that the high developmental potential of the mammary gland in dairy cattle, leading to high milk productivity, depends also on a specific miRNA expression pattern. PMID:26060050

  10. Development and Characterization of a Novel Rat Model of Estrogen-Induced Mammary Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Dennison, Kirsten L.; Samanas, Nyssa Becker; Harenda, Quincy Eckert; Hickman, Maureen Peters; Seiler, Nicole L.; Ding, Lina; Shull, James D.

    2015-01-01

    The ACI rat model of 17β-estradiol (E2)-induced mammary cancer is highly relevant for use in establishing the endocrine, genetic and environmental bases of breast cancer etiology and identifying novel agents and strategies for preventing breast cancer. E2 treatment rapidly induces mammary cancer in female ACI rats and simultaneously induces pituitary lactotroph hyperplasia and adenoma. The pituitary tumors can result in undesired morbidity which compromises long term studies focused on mammary cancer etiology and prevention. We have defined the genetic bases of susceptibility to E2-induced mammary cancers and pituitary tumors and have utilized the knowledge gained in these studies to develop a novel inbred rat strain, designated ACWi, that retains the high degree of susceptibility to E2-induced mammary cancer exhibited by ACI rats but lacks the treatment related morbidity associated with pituitary lactotroph hyperplasia/adenoma. When treated with E2, female ACWi rats developed palpable mammary cancer at a median latency of 116 days, an incidence of 100% by 161 days and exhibited an average of 15.6 mammary tumors per rat following 196 days of treatment. These parameters did not differ from that observed for contemporaneously treated ACI rats. None of the E2 treated ACWi rats were euthanized prior to the intended experimental end point due to any treatment related morbidity other than mammary cancer burden, whereas 20% of contemporaneously treated ACI rats exhibited treatment related morbidity that necessitated premature euthanasia. The ACWi rat strain is well suited for use by those in the research community focusing on breast cancer etiology and prevention. PMID:25800038

  11. Synthetic progestins differentially promote or prevent DMBA-induced mammary tumors in Sprague-Dawley rats

    PubMed Central

    Benakanakere, Indira; Besch-Williford, Cynthia; Carroll, Candace E.; Hyder, Salman M.

    2010-01-01

    Recent clinical trials demonstrate that combined oral dosing with estrogen and progestin increases the incidence of breast cancer in post-menopausal women. Similarly, in a rat model system of mammary carcinogenesis, the synthetic progestin medroxyprogesterone acetate (MPA) decreases latency and increases incidence of DMBA-induced mammary tumors [Clin Can Res (2006) 12:4062]. The goal of this study was to compare the effects of four clinically-relevant progestins, MPA, norgestrel (N-EL), norethindrone (N-ONE), and megestrol acetate (MGA), on DMBA-induced mammary carcinogenesis in the rat. The experimental protocol involved implantation of 60-day release progestin pellets four weeks after rats were treated with DMBA. In contrast to the effect of MPA, N-ONE and N-EL, but not MGA, blocked DMBA-dependent carcinogenesis, and a dose-dependent effect on tumor growth was demonstrated for N-EL; MGA did not alter tumor growth. Histopathological studies demonstrated extensive hyperplastic lesions in mammary tissue of progestin-treated animals. Furthermore, following treatment with N-EL or N-ONE, immunohistochemical staining for VEGF in hyperplastic mammary tissue was lower than in animals treated with DMBA plus MPA or DMBA alone. Expression of VEGFR-1, ERα and PR was also lower in hyperplastic mammary tissue in N-EL, N-ONE and MGA treated animals. Interestingly, N-EL stimulated progression of existing mammary tumors in DMBA/MPA treated rats, suggesting stage-specific effects of N-EL in this model. Because N-EL and N-ONE prevent tumor growth in the early stages of DMBA-induced mammary carcinogenesis in rats, these progestins may have potential as chemopreventive agents in women with no history of breast disease or family history of breast cancer. PMID:20699413

  12. Chemical Genetic Screen Reveals a Role for Desmosomal Adhesion in Mammary Branching Morphogenesis*

    PubMed Central

    Basham, Kaitlin J.; Kieffer, Collin; Shelton, Dawne N.; Leonard, Christopher J.; Bhonde, Vasudev R.; Vankayalapati, Hariprasad; Milash, Brett; Bearss, David J.; Looper, Ryan E.; Welm, Bryan E.

    2013-01-01

    During the process of branching morphogenesis, the mammary gland undergoes distinct phases of remodeling to form an elaborate ductal network that ultimately produces and delivers milk to newborn animals. These developmental events rely on tight regulation of critical cellular pathways, many of which are probably disrupted during initiation and progression of breast cancer. Transgenic mouse and in vitro organoid models previously identified growth factor signaling as a key regulator of mammary branching, but the functional downstream targets of these pathways remain unclear. Here, we used purified primary mammary epithelial cells stimulated with fibroblast growth factor-2 (FGF2) to model mammary branching morphogenesis in vitro. We employed a forward chemical genetic approach to identify modulators of this process and describe a potent compound, 1023, that blocks FGF2-induced branching. In primary mammary epithelial cells, we used lentivirus-mediated knockdown of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR) to demonstrate that 1023 acts through AHR to block branching. Using 1023 as a tool, we identified desmosomal adhesion as a novel target of AHR signaling and show that desmosomes are critical for AHR agonists to block branching. Our findings support a functional role for desmosomes during mammary morphogenesis and also in blocking FGF-induced invasion. PMID:23212921

  13. PTEN is required to maintain luminal epithelial homeostasis and integrity in the adult mammary gland.

    PubMed

    Shore, Amy N; Chang, Chi-Hsuan; Kwon, Oh-Joon; Weston, Matthew C; Zhang, Mei; Xin, Li; Rosen, Jeffrey M

    2016-01-01

    In the mammary gland, PTEN loss in luminal and basal epithelial cells results in differentiation defects and enhanced proliferation, leading to the formation of tumors with basal epithelial characteristics. In breast cancer, PTEN loss is associated with a hormone receptor-negative, basal-like subtype that is thought to originate in a luminal epithelial cell. Here, we show that luminal-specific PTEN loss results in distinct effects on epithelial homeostasis and mammary tumor formation. Luminal PTEN loss increased proliferation of hormone receptor-negative cells, thereby decreasing the percentage of hormone receptor-positive cells. Moreover, luminal PTEN loss led to misoriented cell divisions and mislocalization of cells to the intraluminal space of mammary ducts. Despite their elevated levels of activated AKT, Pten-null intraluminal cells showed increased levels of apoptosis. One year after Pten deletion, the ducts had cleared and no palpable mammary tumors were detected. These data establish PTEN as a critical regulator of luminal epithelial homeostasis and integrity in the adult mammary gland, and further show that luminal PTEN loss alone is not sufficient to promote the progression of mammary tumorigenesis.

  14. Progesterone receptors in normal mammary gland: receptor modulations in relation to differentiation

    PubMed Central

    1980-01-01

    The biological basis for the observed modulation in cytoplasmic progesterone receptors (PgR) of normal mammary gland occurring during mammary development was investigated. Specifically, the relative roles of hormones vs. differentiation on (a) the decrease in PgR concentration during pregnancy and lactation and (b) the loss of mammary responsiveness to estrogen during lactation were examined. PgR were measured using the synthetic progestin, R5020, as the ligand. The hormones estrogen and progesterone were tested in vivo for their effect of PgR concentration. Mammary gland differentiation was assessed morphologically and by measuring enzymatically active alpha- lactalbumin. These studies show that there is a stepwise decrease in PgR that occurs in two stages. The first decrease is completed by day 12 of pregnancy and the second decrease occurs only after parturition. There appears to be a hormonal basis for the first decrease and it appears to be caused by the negative effect of progesterone on estrogen- mediated increase in PgR. In direct contrast, the absence of PgR during lactation and the mammary tissue insensitivity to estrogenic stimulation of PgR were not related to the hormonal milieu of lactation but were directly related to the secretory state of the mammary gland and lactation per se. PMID:7410476

  15. Mouse Mammary Gland Is Refractory to the Effects of Ethanol after Natural Lactation

    PubMed Central

    Garofalo, Jennifer-Marie; Bowers, Dawn M; Browne, Richard W; MacQueen, Brian T; Mashtare, Terry; Martin, Lisa B; Masso-Welch, Patricia A

    2013-01-01

    Ethanol is a dietary factor that dose-dependently increases breast cancer risk in women. We previously have shown that ethanol increases mammary epithelial density through increased branching after dietary exposure during puberty in CD2/F1 mice. To extend these studies to parous mice in a breast cancer model, we used a transgenic mouse model of human parity-associated breast cancer, the FVB-MMTV-Her2/Neu mouse, which overexpresses wildtype EGFR2, resulting in constitutive activation of growth signaling in the mammary epithelium. Here we describe the short-term effects of ethanol feeding on progression through involution. Mice were fed diets supplemented with 0%, 0.5%, 1%, or 2% ethanol for 4, 9, or 14 d starting on day 21 of lactation (that is, at the start of natural postlactational involution). Unlike peripubertal mice exposed to ethanol, postlactational dams showed no changes in body weight; liver, spleen, and kidney weights; and pathology. Ethanol exposure had no effect on mammary gland lobular density and adipocyte size throughout involution. Likewise, the infiltration of inflammatory cells and serum oxidized lipid species were unchanged by diet, suggesting that ethanol feeding had no effect on local inflammation (leukocyte infiltration) or systemic inflammation (oxidized lipids). In conclusion, ethanol exposure of parous dams had no effect on mammary gland structure or the regression of the lactating mammary gland to a resting state. The period of involution that follows natural lactation appears to be refractory to developmental effects of ethanol on mammary epithelium. PMID:23561936

  16. Role of phospholipids in the actions of prolactin in the mammary gland

    SciTech Connect

    Etindi, R.O.N.

    1987-01-01

    These studies were designed to determine the role of phospholipid turnover in the mechanism of action of prolactin in mammary gland explants derived from 12-14 day pregnant mice. Prolactin stimulates phospholipid biosynthesis 12-16h after cultured mouse mammary tissues are exposed to it. Prolactin stimulates phospholipid biosynthesis at physiological concentrations and the response is maximal at all PRL concentrations above 25 ng/ml. p-Bromphenacyl bromide (BPB) at concentrations of 50 ..mu..M and above and quinacrine (50 ..mu..M) abolish the actions of prolactin on casein and lipid biosynthesis in cultured mouse mammary gland explants. In mouse mammary gland explants, binding of prolactin to its receptor leads to a phospholipase C type hydrolysis of inositol phospholipids, but this effect is transient and does not occur immediately after hormone exposure. Prolactin significantly stimulated the accumulation of (/sup 3/H)label in inositol monophosphate (IP/sub 1/), inositol bisphosphate (IP/sub 2/) and inositol trisphosphate (IP/sub 3/) 1-3 hours after addition of prolactin. Gossypol, a drug which has been shown to be an inhibitor of kinase C activity in mouse mammary tissues, is shown to abolish several of the actions of prolactin in cultured mouse mammary gland expalants.

  17. Form and function: how estrogen and progesterone regulate the mammary epithelial hierarchy.

    PubMed

    Arendt, Lisa M; Kuperwasser, Charlotte

    2015-06-01

    The mammary gland undergoes dramatic post-natal growth beginning at puberty, followed by full development occurring during pregnancy and lactation. Following lactation, the alveoli undergo apoptosis, and the mammary gland reverses back to resemble the nonparous gland. This process of growth and regression occurs for multiple pregnancies, suggesting the presence of a hierarchy of stem and progenitor cells that are able to regenerate specialized populations of mammary epithelial cells. Expansion of epithelial cell populations in the mammary gland is regulated by ovarian steroids, in particular estrogen acting through its receptor estrogen receptor alpha (ERα) and progesterone signaling through progesterone receptor (PR). A diverse number of stem and progenitor cells have been identified based on expression of cell surface markers and functional assays. Here we review the current understanding of how estrogen and progesterone act together and separately to regulate stem and progenitor cells within the human and mouse mammary tissues. Better understanding of the hierarchal organization of epithelial cell populations in the mammary gland and how the hormonal milieu affects its regulation may provide important insights into the origins of different subtypes of breast cancer.

  18. Lifelong exposure to n-3 PUFA affects pubertal mammary gland development.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Breanne M; MacLennan, Mira B; Hillyer, Lyn M; Ma, David W L

    2014-06-01

    There is growing evidence that early developmental periods may importantly influence future breast cancer risk. Also, there is great interest in the role of dietary fat in breast cancer risk, but the role of dietary fat during pubertal mammary gland development remains poorly understood. This study investigated the effect of n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) using complementary dietary and genetic approaches to examine the effect of lifelong exposure of n-3 PUFA or n-6 PUFA (control) on mammary gland development and fatty acid composition. n-3 PUFA from both diet and genetics were enriched in mammary glands as early as 3 weeks of age. Parameters related to mammary gland development, including number of terminal end buds (TEB), percent coverage of ductal tree, and infiltration of TEB, were influenced by n-3 PUFA at 3 and 4 weeks of age. Overall, findings suggest that n-3 PUFA incorporation into the mammary gland early in life plays a role in the morphological development of the mammary gland during puberty.

  19. Expression of the whey acidic protein in transgenic pigs impairs mammary development.

    PubMed

    Shamay, A; Pursel, V G; Wilkinson, E; Wall, R J; Hennighausen, L

    1992-05-01

    The whey acidic protein has been found in milk of mice, rats, rabbits and camels, and its gene is expressed specifically in mammary tissue at late pregnancy and throughout lactation. A characteristic of whey acidic protein is the 'four-disulfide-core' signature which is also present in proteins involved in organ development. We have generated six lines of transgenic pigs which carry a mouse whey acidic protein transgene and express it at high levels in their mammary glands. Transgenic sows from three lines could not produce sufficient quantities of milk to support normal development of healthy offspring. This phenotype appears to be similar, if not identical, to the milchlos phenotype exhibited by mice expressing whey acidic protein transgenes. Mammary tissue from post-partum milchlos sows had an immature histological appearance, which was distinct from that observed during normal development or involution. Expression of the whey acidic protein transgene was found in mammary tissue from sexually immature pigs from milchlos lines, but not in sows from lines that appeared to lactate normally. We suggest that precocious synthesis of whey acidic protein impairs mammary development and function. Impaired mammary development due to inappropriate timing of whey acidic protein expression is consistent with the notion that proteins with the 'four-disulfide-core' signature participate in tissue formation. PMID:1284481

  20. Growth and development of the mammary glands of livestock: a veritable barnyard of opportunities.

    PubMed

    Rowson, Ashley R; Daniels, Kristy M; Ellis, Steven E; Hovey, Russell C

    2012-07-01

    The mammary glands of all mammals are rich and diverse in their histomorphogenesis, developmental biology, genomics and metabolism. Domesticated livestock comprise a unique population for the analysis of mammary gland and lactation biology, where much of what has been learned about these topics originates from studies of these species. However, with the strong trend toward using rodents as flexible and attractive models for normal mammary biology and cancer, there is a growing void of new information related to biology of the mammary glands in these relevant and informative domestic livestock. In turn, this trend threatens to reduce opportunities to either capitalize on an abundance of pre-existing data or to apply this information to studies of lactation and cancer. Herein we review the unique and discerning features of mammary gland development in several domestic livestock species including cows, sheep and pigs and provide an overview of the factors regulating it. At the same time we discuss some of the key considerations for studying these species, their limitations, and the associated opportunities. From such an analysis it quickly becomes clear that much remains to be learned about the mammary glands of domestic livestock, particularly given their many similarities to the human breast, the unique biological mechanisms they employ, and the phenotypic variation they afford.

  1. The effect of neutering on the risk of mammary tumours in dogs--a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Beauvais, W; Cardwell, J M; Brodbelt, D C

    2012-06-01

    A commonly-stated advantage of neutering bitches is a significant reduction in the risk of mammary tumours, however the evidence for this has not previously been assessed by systematic review. The objectives of this study were to estimate the magnitude and strength of evidence for any effect of neutering, or age of neutering, on the risk of mammary tumours in bitches. A systematic review was conducted based on Cochrane guidelines. Peer-reviewed analytic journal articles in English were eligible and were assessed for risk of bias by two reviewers independently. Of 11,149 search results, 13 reports in English-language peer-reviewed journals addressed the association between neutering/age at neutering and mammary tumours. Nine were judged to have a high risk of bias. The remaining four were classified as having a moderate risk of bias. One study found an association between neutering and a reduced risk of mammary tumours. Two studies found no evidence of an association. One reported "some protective effect" of neutering on the risk of mammary tumours, but no numbers were presented. Due to the limited evidence available and the risk of bias in the published results, the evidence that neutering reduces the risk of mammary neoplasia, and the evidence that age at neutering has an effect, are judged to be weak and are not a sound basis for firm recommendations.

  2. Protein tyrosine kinase 6 promotes ERBB2-induced mammary gland tumorigenesis in the mouse.

    PubMed

    Peng, M; Ball-Kell, S M; Tyner, A L

    2015-01-01

    Protein tyrosine kinase 6 (PTK6) expression, activation, and amplification of the PTK6 gene have been reported in ERBB2/HER2-positive mammary gland cancers. To explore contributions of PTK6 to mammary gland tumorigenesis promoted by activated ERBB2, we crossed Ptk6-/- mice with the mouse mammary tumor virus-ERBB2 transgenic mouse line expressing activated ERBB2 and characterized tumor development and progression. ERBB2-induced tumorigenesis was significantly delayed and diminished in mice lacking PTK6. PTK6 expression was induced in the mammary glands of ERBB2 transgenic mice before tumor development and correlated with activation of signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) and increased proliferation. Disruption of PTK6 impaired STAT3 activation and proliferation. Phosphorylation of the PTK6 substrates focal adhesion kinase (FAK) and breast cancer anti-estrogen resistance 1 (BCAR1; p130CAS) was decreased in Ptk6-/- mammary gland tumors. Reduced numbers of metastases were detected in the lungs of Ptk6-/- mice expressing activated ERBB2, compared with wild-type ERBB2 transgenic mice. PTK6 activation was detected at the edges of ERBB2-positive tumors. These data support roles for PTK6 in both ERBB2-induced mammary gland tumor initiation and metastasis, and identify STAT3, FAK, and BCAR1 as physiologically relevant PTK6 substrates in breast cancer. Including PTK6 inhibitors as part of a treatment regimen could have distinct benefits in ERBB2/HER2-positive breast cancers.

  3. Ovariectomy is associated with metabolic impairments and enhanced mammary tumor growth in MKR mice.

    PubMed

    Ben-Shmuel, Sarit; Scheinman, Eyal J; Rashed, Rola; Orr, Zila Shen; Gallagher, Emily J; LeRoith, Derek; Rostoker, Ran

    2015-12-01

    Obesity and type 2 diabetes (T2D) are associated with an increased risk of breast cancer incidence and mortality. Common features of obesity and T2D are insulin resistance and hyperinsulinemia. A mammary tumor promoting effect of insulin resistance and hyperinsulinemia was demonstrated in the transgenic female MKR mouse model of pre-diabetes inoculated with mammary cancer cells. Interestingly, in MKR mice, as well as in other diabetic mouse models, males exhibit severe hyperglycemia, while females display insulin resistance and hyperinsulinemia with only a mild increase in blood glucose levels. This gender-specific protection from hyperglycemia may be attributed to estradiol, a key player in the regulation of the metabolic state, including obesity, glucose homeostasis, insulin resistance, and lipid profile. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of ovariectomy (including the removal of endogenous estradiol) on the metabolic state of MKR female mice and subsequently on the growth of Mvt-1 mammary cancer cells, inoculated into the mammary fat pad of ovariectomized mice, compared with sham-operated mice. The results showed an increase in body weight, accompanied by increased fat mass, elevated blood glucose levels, and hypercholesterolemia, in ovariectomized MKR mice. In addition, mammary tumor growth was significantly higher in these mice. The results suggest that ovarian hormone deficiency may promote impaired metabolic homeostasis in the hyperinsulinemic MKR female mice, which in turn is associated with an increased growth of mammary tumors. PMID:26383532

  4. Immunohistochemical and molecular analysis of caveolin-1 expression in canine mammary tumors.

    PubMed

    Zuccari, D A P C; Castro, R; Gavioli, A F; Mancini, U M; Frade, C S; Leonel, C

    2012-01-01

    Caveolin-1 (Cav-1) is a structural protein present in invaginations of the cell membrane. In human breast cancer, the cav-1 gene is believed to be a tumor suppressor gene associated with inhibition of tumor metastasis. However, little is known about its expression, regulation and function in canine mammary tumors. Expression levels of cav-1 were investigated using real-time PCR and immunohistochemical detection with an anti-human Cav-1 antibody. Gene expression stability of different samples was analyzed using the geNorm software. Mammary tumors from 51 female dogs were compared to normal mammary tissue from 10 female dogs. Malignant mammary cells showed a loss of Cav-1 expression by quantitative RT-PCR and weak Cav-1 staining by immunohistochemistry compared to normal mammary gland tissue. There was a significant relationship between outcome and immunostaining as well as with tumor size, indicating that caveolin subexpression has a positive predictive value and is related to higher survival and smaller tumor size. Our findings indicate that Cav-1 is a potential prognostic marker for canine mammary tumors. PMID:22370882

  5. PTEN is required to maintain luminal epithelial homeostasis and integrity in the adult mammary gland.

    PubMed

    Shore, Amy N; Chang, Chi-Hsuan; Kwon, Oh-Joon; Weston, Matthew C; Zhang, Mei; Xin, Li; Rosen, Jeffrey M

    2016-01-01

    In the mammary gland, PTEN loss in luminal and basal epithelial cells results in differentiation defects and enhanced proliferation, leading to the formation of tumors with basal epithelial characteristics. In breast cancer, PTEN loss is associated with a hormone receptor-negative, basal-like subtype that is thought to originate in a luminal epithelial cell. Here, we show that luminal-specific PTEN loss results in distinct effects on epithelial homeostasis and mammary tumor formation. Luminal PTEN loss increased proliferation of hormone receptor-negative cells, thereby decreasing the percentage of hormone receptor-positive cells. Moreover, luminal PTEN loss led to misoriented cell divisions and mislocalization of cells to the intraluminal space of mammary ducts. Despite their elevated levels of activated AKT, Pten-null intraluminal cells showed increased levels of apoptosis. One year after Pten deletion, the ducts had cleared and no palpable mammary tumors were detected. These data establish PTEN as a critical regulator of luminal epithelial homeostasis and integrity in the adult mammary gland, and further show that luminal PTEN loss alone is not sufficient to promote the progression of mammary tumorigenesis. PMID:26526198

  6. Trefoil Factor 3 Is Oncogenic and Mediates Anti-Estrogen Resistance in Human Mammary Carcinoma123

    PubMed Central

    Kannan, Nagarajan; Kang, Jian; Kong, Xiangjun; Tang, Jianzhong; Perry, Jo K; Mohankumar, Kumarasamypet M; Miller, Lance D; Liu, Edison T; Mertani, Hichem C; Zhu, Tao; Grandison, Prudence M; Liu, Dong-Xu; Lobie, Peter E

    2010-01-01

    We report herein that trefoil factor 3 (TFF3) is oncogenic and mediates anti-estrogen resistance in human mammary carcinoma. Forced expression of TFF3 in mammary carcinoma cells increased cell proliferation and survival, enhanced anchorage-independent growth, and promoted migration and invasion. Moreover, forced expression of TFF3 increased tumor size in xenograft models. Conversely, depletion of endogenous TFF3 with small interfering RNA (siRNA) decreased the oncogenicity and invasiveness of mammary carcinoma cells. Neutralization of secreted TFF3 by antibody promoted apoptosis, decreased cell growth in vitro, and arrested mammary carcinoma xenograft growth. TFF3 expression was significantly correlated to decreased survival of estrogen receptor (ER)-positive breast cancer patients treated with tamoxifen. Forced expression of TFF3 in mammary carcinoma cells increased ER transcriptional activity, promoted estrogen-independent growth, and produced resistance to tamoxifen and fulvestrant in vitro and to tamoxifen in xenograft models. siRNA-mediated depletion or antibody inhibition of TFF3 significantly enhanced the efficacy of antiestrogens. Increased TFF3 expression was observed in tamoxifen-resistant (TAMR) cells and antibody inhibition of TFF3 in TAMR cells improved tamoxifen sensitivity. Functional antagonism of TFF3 therefore warrants consideration as a novel therapeutic strategy for mammary carcinoma. PMID:21170268

  7. Trefoil factor 3 is oncogenic and mediates anti-estrogen resistance in human mammary carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Kannan, Nagarajan; Kang, Jian; Kong, Xiangjun; Tang, Jianzhong; Perry, Jo K; Mohankumar, Kumarasamypet M; Miller, Lance D; Liu, Edison T; Mertani, Hichem C; Zhu, Tao; Grandison, Prudence M; Liu, Dong-Xu; Lobie, Peter E

    2010-12-01

    We report herein that trefoil factor 3 (TFF3) is oncogenic and mediates anti-estrogen resistance in human mammary carcinoma. Forced expression of TFF3 in mammary carcinoma cells increased cell proliferation and survival, enhanced anchorage-independent growth, and promoted migration and invasion. Moreover, forced expression of TFF3 increased tumor size in xenograft models. Conversely, depletion of endogenous TFF3 with small interfering RNA (siRNA) decreased the oncogenicity and invasiveness of mammary carcinoma cells. Neutralization of secreted TFF3 by antibody promoted apoptosis, decreased cell growth in vitro, and arrested mammary carcinoma xenograft growth. TFF3 expression was significantly correlated to decreased survival of estrogen receptor (ER)-positive breast cancer patients treated with tamoxifen. Forced expression of TFF3 in mammary carcinoma cells increased ER transcriptional activity, promoted estrogen-independent growth, and produced resistance to tamoxifen and fulvestrant in vitro and to tamoxifen in xenograft models. siRNA-mediated depletion or antibody inhibition of TFF3 significantly enhanced the efficacy of antiestrogens. Increased TFF3 expression was observed in tamoxifen-resistant (TAMR) cells and antibody inhibition of TFF3 in TAMR cells improved tamoxifen sensitivity. Functional antagonism of TFF3 therefore warrants consideration as a novel therapeutic strategy for mammary carcinoma.

  8. ERrrr…where are the progenitors? Hormone receptors and mammary cell heterogeneity.

    PubMed

    Tornillo, Giusy; Smalley, Matthew J

    2015-06-01

    The mammary epithelium is a highly heterogenous and dynamic tissue that includes a range of cell types with varying levels of proliferative capacity and differentiation potential, from stem to committed progenitor and mature cells. Generation of mature cells through expansion and specification of immature precursors is driven by hormonal and local stimuli. Intriguingly, although circulating hormones can be directly sensed only by a subset of mammary cells, they also regulate the behaviour of cells lacking their cognate receptors through paracrine mechanisms. Thus, mapping the hormonal signalling network on to the emerging mammary cell hierarchy appears to be a difficult task. Nevertheless, a first step towards a better understanding is the characterization of the hormone receptor expression pattern across individual cell types in the mammary epithelium. Here we review the most relevant findings on the cellular distribution of hormone receptors in the mammary gland, taking into account differences between mice and humans, the methods employed to assess receptor expression as well as the variety of approaches used to resolve the mammary cell heterogeneity.

  9. Biological and genetic properties of the p53 null preneoplastic mammary epithelium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Medina, Daniel; Kittrell, Frances S.; Shepard, Anne; Stephens, L. Clifton; Jiang, Cheng; Lu, Junxuan; Allred, D. Craig; McCarthy, Maureen; Ullrich, Robert L.

    2002-01-01

    The absence of the tumor suppressor gene p53 confers an increased tumorigenic risk for mammary epithelial cells. In this report, we describe the biological and genetic properties of the p53 null preneoplastic mouse mammary epithelium in a p53 wild-type environment. Mammary epithelium from p53 null mice was transplanted serially into the cleared mammary fat pads of p53 wild-type BALB/c female to develop stable outgrowth lines. The outgrowth lines were transplanted for 10 generations. The outgrowths were ductal in morphology and progressed through ductal hyperplasia and ductal carcinoma in situ before invasive cancer. The preneoplastic outgrowth lines were immortal and exhibited activated telomerase activity. They are estrogen and progesterone receptor-positive, and aneuploid, and had various levels of tumorigenic potential. The biological and genetic properties of these lines are distinct from those found in most hyperplastic alveolar outgrowth lines, the form of mammary preneoplasia occurring in most traditional models of murine mammary tumorigenesis. These results indicate that the preneoplastic cell populations found in this genetically engineered model are similar in biological properties to a subset of precurser lesions found in human breast cancer and provide a unique model to identify secondary events critical for tumorigenicity and invasiveness.

  10. Endocrine hormones and local signals during the development of the mouse mammary gland.

    PubMed

    Brisken, Cathrin; Ataca, Dalya

    2015-01-01

    Most of mammary gland development occurs postnatally under the control of female reproductive hormones, which in turn interact with other endocrine factors. While hormones impinge on many tissues and trigger very complex biological responses, tissue recombination experiments with hormone receptor-deficient mammary epithelia revealed eminent roles for estrogens, progesterone, and prolactin receptor (PrlR) signaling that are intrinsic to the mammary epithelium. A subset of the luminal mammary epithelial cells expresses the estrogen receptor α (ERα), the progesterone receptor (PR), and the PrlR and act as sensor cells. These cells convert the detected systemic signals into local signals that are developmental stage-dependent and may be direct, juxtacrine, or paracrine. This setup ensures that the original input is amplified and that the biological responses of multiple cell types can be coordinated. Some key mediators of hormone action have been identified such as Wnt, EGFR, IGFR, and RANK signaling. Multiple signaling pathways such as FGF, Hedgehog, and Notch signaling participate in driving different aspects of mammary gland development locally but how they link to the hormonal control remains to be elucidated. An increasing number of endocrine factors are appearing to have a role in mammary gland development, the adipose tissue is increasingly recognized to play a role in endocrine regulation, and a complex role of the immune system with multiple different cell types is being revealed. For further resources related to this article, please visit the WIREs website.

  11. Site-specific inductive and inhibitory activities of MMP-2 and MMP-3 orchestrate mammary gland branching morphogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Wiseman, Bryony S.; Sternlicht, Mark D.; Lund, Leif R.; Alexander, Caroline M.; Mott, Joni; Bissell, Mina J.; Soloway, Paul; Itohara, Shigeyoshi; Werb, Zena

    2003-01-01

    During puberty, mouse mammary epithelial ducts invade the stromal mammary fat pad in a wave of branching morphogenesis to form a complex ductal tree. Using pharmacologic and genetic approaches, we find that mammary gland branching morphogenesis requires transient matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) activity for invasion and branch point selection. MMP-2, but not MMP-9, facilitates terminal end bud invasion by inhibiting epithelial cell apoptosis at the start of puberty. Unexpectedly, MMP-2 also represses precocious lateral branching during mid-puberty. In contrast, MMP-3 induces secondary and tertiary lateral branching of ducts during mid-puberty and early pregnancy. Nevertheless, the mammary gland is able to develop lactational competence in MMP mutant mice. Thus, specific MMPs refine the mammary branching pattern by distinct mechanisms during mammary gland branching morphogenesis. PMID:12975354

  12. Genomic profiling of murine mammary tumors identifies potential personalized drug targets for p53-deficient mammary cancers

    PubMed Central

    Agrawal, Yash N.; Koboldt, Daniel C.; Kanchi, Krishna L.; Herschkowitz, Jason I.; Mardis, Elaine R.; Rosen, Jeffrey M.; Perou, Charles M.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Targeted therapies against basal-like breast tumors, which are typically ‘triple-negative breast cancers (TNBCs)’, remain an important unmet clinical need. Somatic TP53 mutations are the most common genetic event in basal-like breast tumors and TNBC. To identify additional drivers and possible drug targets of this subtype, a comparative study between human and murine tumors was performed by utilizing a murine Trp53-null mammary transplant tumor model. We show that two subsets of murine Trp53-null mammary transplant tumors resemble aspects of the human basal-like subtype. DNA-microarray, whole-genome and exome-based sequencing approaches were used to interrogate the secondary genetic aberrations of these tumors, which were then compared to human basal-like tumors to identify conserved somatic genetic features. DNA copy-number variation produced the largest number of conserved candidate personalized drug targets. These candidates were filtered using a DNA-RNA Pearson correlation cut-off and a requirement that the gene was deemed essential in at least 5% of human breast cancer cell lines from an RNA-mediated interference screen database. Five potential personalized drug target genes, which were spontaneously amplified loci in both murine and human basal-like tumors, were identified: Cul4a, Lamp1, Met, Pnpla6 and Tubgcp3. As a proof of concept, inhibition of Met using crizotinib caused Met-amplified murine tumors to initially undergo complete regression. This study identifies Met as a promising drug target in a subset of murine Trp53-null tumors, thus identifying a potential shared driver with a subset of human basal-like breast cancers. Our results also highlight the importance of comparative genomic studies for discovering personalized drug targets and for providing a preclinical model for further investigations of key tumor signaling pathways. PMID:27149990

  13. Establishment of two hormone-responsive mouse mammary carcinoma cell lines derived from a metastatic mammary tumor.

    PubMed

    Efeyan, Alejo; Fabris, Victoria; Merani, Susana; Lanari, Claudia; Molinolo, Alfredo A

    2004-02-01

    We report the establishment of two mouse mammary cancer cell lines, MC7-2A and MC7-2B obtained from a mouse mammary carcinoma induced by medroxyprogesterone acetate (MPA) and maintained by syngeneic transplantation in BALB/c mice. They are epithelial (express cytokeratins) and express both estrogen receptors alpha (ERalpha) and progesterone receptors (PRs) isoforms A and B (western blots). In vitro, MPA inhibited 3H-thymidine uptake, starting from concentrations as low as 10(-13) M in MC7-2A and 10(10) M in MC7-2B; the antiprogestin RU 486 exerted a stimulatory effect at 10(-14) M in both cell lines; 17-beta-estradiol (E2) also exerted a stimulatory effect starting at 10(-10) M in MC7-2A and at 10(-13) M in MC7-2B. When transplanted in syngeneic mice, both cell lines originated adenocarcinomas that gave rise to lung metastases within 3 months. In in vivo studies, in MC7-2A, the antiprogestin inhibited completely tumor growth, E2 induced a slight although significant ( p < 0.05) stimulatory effect and MPA stimulated tumor growth while MC7-2B cells were unresponsive to all treatments. ER and PR were also expressed in tumors as assessed by immunohistochemistry. Two marker chromosomes were identified by FISH as translocations between chromosomes 4 and 7, and between chromosomes X and 2; the third marker chromosome remains unidentified. All these markers were also present in the parental tumor. A new marker, a centric fusion of chromosomes 2, was acquired in both cell lines. Considering that there are very few murine breast carcinoma responsive cell lines, these cells represent new tools in which the regulatory effect of hormones can be studied. PMID:14758093

  14. Growth hormone and insulin-like growth factor-I in the transition from normal mammary development to preneoplastic mammary lesions.

    PubMed

    Kleinberg, David L; Wood, Teresa L; Furth, Priscilla A; Lee, Adrian V

    2009-02-01

    Adult female mammary development starts at puberty and is controlled by tightly regulated cross-talk between a group of hormones and growth factors. Although estrogen is the initial driving force and is joined by luteal phase progesterone, both of these hormones require GH-induced IGF-I in the mammary gland in order to act. The same group of hormones, when experimentally perturbed, can lead to development of hyperplastic lesions and increase the chances, or be precursors, of mammary carcinoma. For example, systemic administration of GH or IGF-I causes mammary hyperplasia, and overproduction of IGF-I in transgenic animals can cause the development of usual or atypical hyperplasias and sometimes carcinoma. Although studies have clearly demonstrated the transforming potential of both GH and IGF-I receptor in cell culture and in animals, debate remains as to whether their main role is actually instructive or permissive in progression to cancer in vivo. Genetic imprinting has been shown to occur in precursor lesions as early as atypical hyperplasia in women. Thus, the concept of progression from normal development to cancer through precursor lesions sensitive to hormones and growth factors discussed above is gaining support in humans as well as in animal models. Indeed, elevation of estrogen receptor, GH, IGF-I, and IGF-I receptor during progression suggests a role for these pathways in this process. New agents targeting the GH/IGF-I axis may provide a novel means to block formation and progression of precursor lesions to overt carcinoma. A novel somatostatin analog has recently been shown to prevent mammary development in rats via targeted IGF-I action inhibition at the mammary gland. Similarly, pegvisomant, a GH antagonist, and other IGF-I antagonists such as IGF binding proteins 1 and 5 also block mammary gland development. It is, therefore, possible that inhibition of IGF-I action, or perhaps GH, in the mammary gland may eventually play a role in breast cancer

  15. Characterization of swift heavy ion irradiation damage in ceria

    SciTech Connect

    Yablinsky, Clarissa A.; Devanathan, Ram; Pakarinen, Janne; Gan, Jian; Severin, Daniel; Trautmann, Christina; Allen, Todd R.

    2015-03-04

    Swift heavy ion induced radiation damage is investigated for ceria (CeO2), which serves as a UO2 fuel surrogate. Microstructural changes resulting from an irradiation with 940 MeV gold ions of 42 keV/nm electronic energy loss are investigated by means of electron microscopy accompanied by electron energy loss spectroscopy showing that there exists a small density reduction in the ion track core. While chemical changes in the ion track are not precluded, evidence of them was not observed. Classical molecular dynamics simulations of thermal spikes in CeO2 with an energy deposition of 12 and 36 keV/nm show damage consisting of isolated point defects at 12 keV/nm, and defect clusters at 36 keV/nm, with no amorphization at either energy. Inferences are drawn from modeling about density changes in the ion track and the formation of interstitial loops that shed light on features observed by electron microscopy of swift heavy ion irradiated ceria.

  16. Characterization of swift heavy ion irradiation damage in ceria

    DOE PAGES

    Yablinsky, Clarissa A.; Devanathan, Ram; Pakarinen, Janne; Gan, Jian; Severin, Daniel; Trautmann, Christina; Allen, Todd R.

    2015-03-04

    Swift heavy ion induced radiation damage is investigated for ceria (CeO2), which serves as a UO2 fuel surrogate. Microstructural changes resulting from an irradiation with 940 MeV gold ions of 42 keV/nm electronic energy loss are investigated by means of electron microscopy accompanied by electron energy loss spectroscopy showing that there exists a small density reduction in the ion track core. While chemical changes in the ion track are not precluded, evidence of them was not observed. Classical molecular dynamics simulations of thermal spikes in CeO2 with an energy deposition of 12 and 36 keV/nm show damage consisting of isolatedmore » point defects at 12 keV/nm, and defect clusters at 36 keV/nm, with no amorphization at either energy. Furthermore, inferences are drawn from modeling about density changes in the ion track and the formation of interstitial loops that shed light on features observed by electron microscopy of swift heavy ion irradiated ceria.« less

  17. Characterization of swift heavy ion irradiation damage in ceria

    SciTech Connect

    Yablinsky, Clarissa A.; Devanathan, Ram; Pakarinen, Janne; Gan, Jian; Severin, Daniel; Trautmann, Christina; Allen, Todd R.

    2015-03-04

    Swift heavy ion induced radiation damage is investigated for ceria (CeO2), which serves as a UO2 fuel surrogate. Microstructural changes resulting from an irradiation with 940 MeV gold ions of 42 keV/nm electronic energy loss are investigated by means of electron microscopy accompanied by electron energy loss spectroscopy showing that there exists a small density reduction in the ion track core. While chemical changes in the ion track are not precluded, evidence of them was not observed. Classical molecular dynamics simulations of thermal spikes in CeO2 with an energy deposition of 12 and 36 keV/nm show damage consisting of isolated point defects at 12 keV/nm, and defect clusters at 36 keV/nm, with no amorphization at either energy. Furthermore, inferences are drawn from modeling about density changes in the ion track and the formation of interstitial loops that shed light on features observed by electron microscopy of swift heavy ion irradiated ceria.

  18. Heavy quark masses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Testa, Massimo

    1990-01-01

    In the large quark mass limit, an argument which identifies the mass of the heavy-light pseudoscalar or scalar bound state with the renormalized mass of the heavy quark is given. The following equation is discussed: m(sub Q) = m(sub B), where m(sub Q) and m(sub B) are respectively the mass of the heavy quark and the mass of the pseudoscalar bound state.

  19. Mutagenicity of heavy metals

    SciTech Connect

    Wong, P.K.

    1988-04-01

    Certain heavy metals are required, as trace elements for normal cellular functions. However, heavy metals are toxic to cells once their levels exceed their low physiological values. The toxicity of heavy metals on microorganisms, and on animals has been well-documented. These interactions may induce the alteration of the primary as well as secondary structures of the DNA and result in mutation(s). The present communication reports the results in determining the mutagenicity and carcinogenicity of ten heavy metals commonly found in polluted areas by using the Salmonella/mammalian-microsome mutagenicity test.

  20. Heavy-Quark Production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frixione, Stefano; Mangano, Michelangelo L.; Nason, Paolo; Ridolfi, Giovanni

    The following sections are included: * INTRODUCTION * FIXED-TARGET PRODUCTION * Total cross sections * Single-inclusive distributions * Double-differential distributions * HEAVY-FLAVOUR PRODUCTION AT HERA * Photoproduction cross sections * Charm photoproduction * Bottom photoproduction * Deep-inelastic production * Future physics * Determination of f^{(p)}_{g} * Polarization asymmetries * HERA-B * HEAVY-QUARK PRODUCTION AT HADRON COLLIDERS * Inclusive bottom production * Preliminaries * The effect of higher-order corrections * Comparison with experimental results * boverline{b} correlations * Heavy-quark jets in perturbative QCD * Preliminaries * The structure of heavy-quark jets at the Tevatron * Associated production of heavy quarks with W or γ * Photon plus heavy quarks * W bosons plus heavy quarks * Production of top quarks * Total toverline{t} production cross sections * Top kinematical distributions * HIGHER ORDERS AND RESUMMATION * What are soft-gluon effects * Problems with the x-space resummation formula * Phenomenological applications * HEAVY-FLAVOUR PRODUCTION IN e+e- COLLISIONS * Preliminaries * Fragmentation function * Heavy-quark production via gluon splitting * Correlations * CONCLUSIONS AND OUTLOOK * Acknowledgements * REFERENCES

  1. Phenotypic and Molecular Alterations in the Mammary Tissue of R-Spondin1 Knock-Out Mice during Pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Chadi, Sead; Polyte, Jacqueline; Lefevre, Lucas; Castille, Johan; Ehanno, Aude; Laubier, Johann; Jaffrézic, Florence; Le Provost, Fabienne

    2016-01-01

    R-spondin1 (Rspo1) is a member of a secreted protein family which has pleiotropic functions in development and stem cell growth. Rspo1 knock-out mice are sex-reversed, but some remain sub-fertile, so they fail to nurse their pups. A lack of Rspo1 expression in the mammary gland results in an absence of duct side-branching development and defective alveolar formation. The aim of this study was to characterize the phenotypic and molecular alterations of mammary gland due to Rspo1 knock-out. Using the transcriptional profiling of mammary tissues, we identified misregulated genes in the mammary gland of Rspo1 knock-out mice during pregnancy. A stronger expression of mesenchymal markers was observed, without modifications to the structure of mammary epithelial tissue. Mammary epithelial cell immunohistochemical analysis revealed a persistence of virgin markers, which signify a delay in cell differentiation. Moreover, serial transplantation experiments showed that Rspo1 is associated with a regenerative potential of mammary epithelial cell control. Our finding also highlights the negatively regulated expression of Rspo1’s partners, Lgr4 and RNF43, in the mammary gland during pregnancy. Moreover, we offer evidence that Tgf-β signalling is modified in the absence of Rspo1. Taken together, our results show an abrupt halt or delay to mammary development during pregnancy due to the loss of a further differentiated function. PMID:27611670

  2. Loss of EZH2 results in precocious mammary gland development and activation of STAT5-dependent genes

    PubMed Central

    Yoo, Kyung Hyun; Oh, Sumin; Kang, Keunsoo; Hensel, Tim; Robinson, Gertraud W.; Hennighausen, Lothar

    2015-01-01

    Establishment and differentiation of mammary alveoli during pregnancy are controlled by prolactin through the transcription factors STAT5A and STAT5B (STAT5), which also regulate temporal activation of mammary signature genes. This study addressed the question whether the methyltransferase and transcriptional co-activator EZH2 controls the differentiation clock of mammary epithelium. Ablation of Ezh2 from mammary stem cells resulted in precocious differentiation of alveolar epithelium during pregnancy and the activation of mammary-specific STAT5 target genes. This coincided with enhanced occupancy of these loci by STAT5, EZH1 and RNA Pol II. Limited activation of differentiation-specific genes was observed in mammary epithelium lacking both EZH2 and STAT5, suggesting a modulating but not mandatory role for STAT5. Loss of EZH2 did not result in overt changes in genome-wide and gene-specific H3K27me3 profiles, suggesting compensation through enhanced EZH1 recruitment. Differentiated mammary epithelia did not form in the combined absence of EZH1 and EZH2. Transplantation experiments failed to demonstrate a role for EZH2 in the activity of mammary stem and progenitor cells. In summary, while EZH1 and EZH2 serve redundant functions in the establishment of H3K27me3 marks and the formation of mammary alveoli, the presence of EZH2 is required to control progressive differentiation of milk secreting epithelium during pregnancy. PMID:26250110

  3. Phenotypic and Molecular Alterations in the Mammary Tissue of R-Spondin1 Knock-Out Mice during Pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Chadi, Sead; Polyte, Jacqueline; Lefevre, Lucas; Castille, Johan; Ehanno, Aude; Laubier, Johann; Jaffrézic, Florence; Le Provost, Fabienne

    2016-01-01

    R-spondin1 (Rspo1) is a member of a secreted protein family which has pleiotropic functions in development and stem cell growth. Rspo1 knock-out mice are sex-reversed, but some remain sub-fertile, so they fail to nurse their pups. A lack of Rspo1 expression in the mammary gland results in an absence of duct side-branching development and defective alveolar formation. The aim of this study was to characterize the phenotypic and molecular alterations of mammary gland due to Rspo1 knock-out. Using the transcriptional profiling of mammary tissues, we identified misregulated genes in the mammary gland of Rspo1 knock-out mice during pregnancy. A stronger expression of mesenchymal markers was observed, without modifications to the structure of mammary epithelial tissue. Mammary epithelial cell immunohistochemical analysis revealed a persistence of virgin markers, which signify a delay in cell differentiation. Moreover, serial transplantation experiments showed that Rspo1 is associated with a regenerative potential of mammary epithelial cell control. Our finding also highlights the negatively regulated expression of Rspo1's partners, Lgr4 and RNF43, in the mammary gland during pregnancy. Moreover, we offer evidence that Tgf-β signalling is modified in the absence of Rspo1. Taken together, our results show an abrupt halt or delay to mammary development during pregnancy due to the loss of a further differentiated function.

  4. Phenotypic and Molecular Alterations in the Mammary Tissue of R-Spondin1 Knock-Out Mice during Pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Chadi, Sead; Polyte, Jacqueline; Lefevre, Lucas; Castille, Johan; Ehanno, Aude; Laubier, Johann; Jaffrézic, Florence; Le Provost, Fabienne

    2016-01-01

    R-spondin1 (Rspo1) is a member of a secreted protein family which has pleiotropic functions in development and stem cell growth. Rspo1 knock-out mice are sex-reversed, but some remain sub-fertile, so they fail to nurse their pups. A lack of Rspo1 expression in the mammary gland results in an absence of duct side-branching development and defective alveolar formation. The aim of this study was to characterize the phenotypic and molecular alterations of mammary gland due to Rspo1 knock-out. Using the transcriptional profiling of mammary tissues, we identified misregulated genes in the mammary gland of Rspo1 knock-out mice during pregnancy. A stronger expression of mesenchymal markers was observed, without modifications to the structure of mammary epithelial tissue. Mammary epithelial cell immunohistochemical analysis revealed a persistence of virgin markers, which signify a delay in cell differentiation. Moreover, serial transplantation experiments showed that Rspo1 is associated with a regenerative potential of mammary epithelial cell control. Our finding also highlights the negatively regulated expression of Rspo1's partners, Lgr4 and RNF43, in the mammary gland during pregnancy. Moreover, we offer evidence that Tgf-β signalling is modified in the absence of Rspo1. Taken together, our results show an abrupt halt or delay to mammary development during pregnancy due to the loss of a further differentiated function. PMID:27611670

  5. Expression of Putative Stem Cell Marker, Hepatocyte Nuclear Factor 4 Alpha, in Mammary Gland of Water Buffalo.

    PubMed

    Choudhary, Ratan K; Choudhary, Shanti; Kaur, Harmanjot; Pathak, Devendra

    2016-01-01

    Buffaloes account for more than 56% of total milk production in India. Cyclic remodeling of mammary glands of human, mice, cow, sheep, and goat is determined by mammary stem cells. It is logical to assume that buffalo mammary gland will have mammary stem/progenitor cells. Thus far, no report exists on identification of buffalo mammary stem cells. Hepatocyte nuclear factor 4 alpha (HNF4A) is a candidate marker for hepatic progenitor cells and has recently been suggested as a marker of bovine mammary stem/progenitor cells. We hypothesized that ( 1 ) HNF4A identifies putative buffalo mammary stem/progenitor cells and ( 2 ) the number of HNF4A-positive cells increases during mastitis. Sixteen buffalo mammary samples were collected from a local slaughterhouse. Hematoxylin and eosin staining were performed on 5-micron thick sections and on the basis of gross examination and histomorphology of the mammary glands, physiological stages of the animals were estimated as non-lactating (n = 4), mastitis (n = 9), and prepubertal (n = 3). In total, 24048 cells were counted (5-10 microscopic fields/animal; n = 16 animals) of which, 40% cells were mammary epithelial cells (MEC) and 60% cells were the stromal cells. The percentage of MEC in non-lactating animals was higher compared to mastitic animals (47.3% vs. 37.3%), which was likely due to loss of MEC in mastitis. HNF4A staining was observed in nuclei of MEC of ducts, alveoli, and stromal cells. Basal location and low frequency of HNF4A-positive MEC (ranges from 0.4-4.5%) were consistent with stem cell characteristics. Preliminary study showed coexpression of HNF4A with MSI1 (a mammary stem cell marker in sheep), suggesting HNF4A was likely to be a putative mammary stem/progenitor cell marker in buffalo. HNF4A-positive MEC (basal and luminal; light and dark stained) tended to be higher in non-lactating than the mastitic animals (8.73 ± 1.71% vs. 4.29 ± 1.19%; P = 0.07). The first hypothesis that HNF4A identify

  6. Expression of Putative Stem Cell Marker, Hepatocyte Nuclear Factor 4 Alpha, in Mammary Gland of Water Buffalo.

    PubMed

    Choudhary, Ratan K; Choudhary, Shanti; Kaur, Harmanjot; Pathak, Devendra

    2016-01-01

    Buffaloes account for more than 56% of total milk production in India. Cyclic remodeling of mammary glands of human, mice, cow, sheep, and goat is determined by mammary stem cells. It is logical to assume that buffalo mammary gland will have mammary stem/progenitor cells. Thus far, no report exists on identification of buffalo mammary stem cells. Hepatocyte nuclear factor 4 alpha (HNF4A) is a candidate marker for hepatic progenitor cells and has recently been suggested as a marker of bovine mammary stem/progenitor cells. We hypothesized that ( 1 ) HNF4A identifies putative buffalo mammary stem/progenitor cells and ( 2 ) the number of HNF4A-positive cells increases during mastitis. Sixteen buffalo mammary samples were collected from a local slaughterhouse. Hematoxylin and eosin staining were performed on 5-micron thick sections and on the basis of gross examination and histomorphology of the mammary glands, physiological stages of the animals were estimated as non-lactating (n = 4), mastitis (n = 9), and prepubertal (n = 3). In total, 24048 cells were counted (5-10 microscopic fields/animal; n = 16 animals) of which, 40% cells were mammary epithelial cells (MEC) and 60% cells were the stromal cells. The percentage of MEC in non-lactating animals was higher compared to mastitic animals (47.3% vs. 37.3%), which was likely due to loss of MEC in mastitis. HNF4A staining was observed in nuclei of MEC of ducts, alveoli, and stromal cells. Basal location and low frequency of HNF4A-positive MEC (ranges from 0.4-4.5%) were consistent with stem cell characteristics. Preliminary study showed coexpression of HNF4A with MSI1 (a mammary stem cell marker in sheep), suggesting HNF4A was likely to be a putative mammary stem/progenitor cell marker in buffalo. HNF4A-positive MEC (basal and luminal; light and dark stained) tended to be higher in non-lactating than the mastitic animals (8.73 ± 1.71% vs. 4.29 ± 1.19%; P = 0.07). The first hypothesis that HNF4A identify

  7. Characterization of methylaminoisobutyric acid transport by system A in rat mammary gland.

    PubMed

    Tovar, A R; Avila, E; DeSantiago, S; Torres, N

    2000-07-01

    During lactation, the mammary gland has a large demand for amino acids for the synthesis of milk proteins and fatty acids. Arteriovenous differences in amino acids across the mammary gland show an elevated uptake of small neutral amino acids that are mainly transported via system A. The purpose of this study was to characterize the transport of methylaminoisobutyric acid (MeAIB), an amino acid analog used to model transport by system A in lactating rat mammary gland explants. MeAIB accumulation in mammary gland cells increased steadily, and after 3 hours of incubation, the intracellular concentration of the analog was 8-fold higher than the concentration in the medium. MeAIB transport into mammary gland explants showed a Km of 3.3 +/- 0.4 mmol/L and a maximal velocity (Vmax) of 555 +/- 23 pmol/microL intracellular fluid (ICF) x min, indicating a system with high capacity but low affinity for its substrate. MeAIB transport into mammary tissue depended highly on Na+, and the uptake was inhibited by addition of natural and analog small neutral amino acids. Cationic, anionic, and large neutral amino acids did not reduce MeAIB transport into mammary gland explants. Preincubation of mammary gland explants in an amino acid-free medium stimulated MeAIB transport, suggesting an adaptive regulation. The addition of an equimolar mixture of alanine, glycine, and serine to the preincubation medium inhibited stimulation of MeAIB transport. Furthermore, stimulation of MeAIB uptake by amino acid starvation was also prevented by the addition of actinomycin D, cycloheximide, tunicamycin, and colchicine. Dibutyryl cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) increased MeAIB uptake, whereas phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) did not stimulate MeAIB transport. During the first postweaning days, kinetic analyses showed a decrease of 27% in the Vmax. Injection of rat lactating mammary gland mRNA into Xenopus laevis oocytes induced expression of the MeAIB transport system; however, the

  8. Mouse mammary tumors display Stat3 activation dependent on leukemia inhibitory factor signaling

    PubMed Central

    Quaglino, Ana; Schere-Levy, Carolina; Romorini, Leonardo; Meiss, Roberto P; Kordon, Edith C

    2007-01-01

    Introduction It has been demonstrated that leukemia inhibitory factor (LIF) induces epithelium apoptosis through Stat3 activation during mouse mammary gland involution. In contrast, it has been shown that this transcription factor is commonly activated in breast cancer cells, although what causes this effect remains unknown. Here we have tested the hypothesis that locally produced LIF can be responsible for Stat3 activation in mouse mammary tumors. Methods The studies were performed in different tumorigenic and non-tumorigenic mammary cells. The expression of LIF and LIF receptor was tested by RT-PCR analysis. In tumors, LIF and Stat3 proteins were analyzed by immunohistochemistry, whereas Stat3 and extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK)1/2 expression and phosphorylation were studied by Western blot analysis. A LIF-specific blocking antibody was used to determine whether this cytokine was responsible for Stat3 phosphorylation induced by conditioned medium. Specific pharmacological inhibitors (PD98059 and Stat3ip) that affect ERK1/2 and Stat3 activation were used to study their involvement in LIF-induced effects. To analyze cell survival, assays with crystal violet were performed. Results High levels of LIF expression and activated Stat3 were found in mammary tumors growing in vivo and in their primary cultures. We found a single mouse mammary tumor cell line, LM3, that showed low levels of activated Stat3. Incidentally, these cells also showed very little expression of LIF receptor. This suggested that autocrine/paracrine LIF would be responsible for Stat3 activation in mouse mammary tumors. This hypothesis was confirmed by the ability of conditioned medium of mammary tumor primary cultures to induce Stat3 phosphorylation, activity that was prevented by pretreatment with LIF-blocking antibody. Besides, we found that LIF increased tumor cell viability. Interestingly, blocking Stat3 activation enhanced this effect in mammary tumor cells. Conclusion LIF is

  9. CD151 represses mammary gland development by maintaining the niches of progenitor cells

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Yuanqin; Deng, Xinyu; Liu, Zeyi; Baldwin, Lauren A; Lefringhouse, Jason; Zhang, Jiayang; Hoff, John T; Erfani, Sonia F; Rucker, Edmund B; O'Connor, Kathleen; Liu, Chunming; Wu, Yadi; Zhou, Binhua P; Yang, Xiuwei H

    2014-01-01

    Tetraspanin CD151 interacts with laminin-binding integrins (i.e., α3β1, α6β1 and α6β4) and other cell surface molecules to control diverse cellular and physiological processes, ranging from cell adhesion, migration and survival to tissue architecture and homeostasis. Here, we report a novel role of CD151 in maintaining the branching morphogenesis and activity of progenitor cells during the pubertal development of mammary glands. In contrast to the disruption of laminin-binding integrins, CD151 removal in mice enhanced the tertiary branching in mammary glands by 2.4-fold and the number of terminal end buds (TEBs) by 30%, while having minimal influence on either primary or secondary ductal branching. Consistent with these morphological changes are the skewed distribution of basal/myoepithelial cells and a 3.2-fold increase in proliferating Ki67-positive cells. These novel observations suggest that CD151 impacts the branching morphogenesis of mammary glands by upregulating the activities of bipotent progenitor cells. Indeed, our subsequent analyses indicate that upon CD151 removal the proportion of CD24HiCD49fLow progenitor cells in the mammary gland increased by 34%, and their proliferating and differentiating activities were significantly upregulated. Importantly, fibronectin, a pro-branching extracellular matrix (ECM) protein deposited underlying mammary epithelial or progenitor cells, increased by >7.2-fold. Moreover, there was a concomitant increase in the expression and nuclear distribution of Slug, a transcription factor implicated in the maintenance of mammary progenitor cell activities. Taken together, our studies demonstrate that integrin-associated CD151 represses mammary branching morphogenesis by controlling progenitor cell activities, ECM integrity and transcription program. PMID:25486358

  10. Loss of Panx1 Impairs Mammary Gland Development at Lactation: Implications for Breast Tumorigenesis

    PubMed Central

    Stewart, Michael K. G.; Plante, Isabelle; Penuela, Silvia; Laird, Dale W.

    2016-01-01

    Pannexin1 (Panx1) subunits oligomerize to form large-pore channels between the intracellular and extracellular milieu that have been shown to regulate proliferation, differentiation and cell death mechanisms. These key cellular responses are ultimately necessary for normal tissue development and function but the role of Panx1 in development, differentiation and function in many tissues remains unexplored, including that of the breast. Panx1 was identified to be expressed in the mammary gland through western blot and immunofluorescent analysis and is dynamically upregulated during pregnancy and lactation. In order to evaluate the role of Panx1 in the context of mammary gland development and function, Panx1-/- mice were evaluated in comparison to wild-type mice in the mammary glands of virgin, lactating and involuting mice. Our results revealed that Panx1 ablation did not affect virgin or involuting mammary glands following histological and whole mount analysis. Panx1 was necessary for timely alveolar development during early lactation based on a decreased number of alveolar lumen following histological analysis and reduced proliferation following Ki67 immunofluorescent labelling. Importantly, the loss of Panx1 in lactating mammary glands did not overtly affect epithelial or secretory differentiation of the mammary gland suggesting that Panx1 is not critical in normal mammary gland function. In addition, PANX1 mRNA expression was correlated with negative clinical outcomes in patients with breast cancer using in silico arrays. Together, our results suggest that Panx1 is necessary for timely alveolar development following the transition from pregnancy to lactation, which may have implications extending to patients with breast cancer. PMID:27099931

  11. Pre-irradiation of mouse mammary gland stimulates cancer cell migration and development of lung metastases

    PubMed Central

    Bouchard, G; Bouvette, G; Therriault, H; Bujold, R; Saucier, C; Paquette, B

    2013-01-01

    Background: In most patients with breast cancer, radiotherapy induces inflammation that is characterised by an increase of promigratory factors in healthy tissues surrounding the tumour. However, their role in the emergence of the migration phenotype and formation of metastases is still unclear. Methods: A single mammary gland of BALB/c mice was irradiated with four doses of 6 Gy given at a 24-h interval. After the last session of irradiation, treated and control mammary glands were either collected for quantification of promigratory and proinflammatory factors or were implanted with fluorescent ubiquitination-based cell cycle indicator (FUCCI)-expressing mouse mammary cancer D2A1 cells. The migration of cancer cells in the mammary glands was monitored by optical imaging. On day 21, mammary tumours and lungs were collected for histology analyses and the quantification of metastases. Results: Pre-irradiation of the mammary gland increased by 1.8-fold the migration of cancer cells, by 2-fold the quantity of circulating cancer cells and by 2.4-fold the number of lung metastases. These adverse effects were associated with the induction of interleukin-6 (IL-6) and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2). Conclusion: The emergence of the metastasis phenotype is believed to be associated with the accumulation of mutations in cancer cells. Our results suggest an alternative mechanism based on promigratory factors from irradiated mammary glands. In clinic, the efficiency of radiotherapy could be improved by anti-inflammatory agents that would prevent the stimulation of cancer cell migration induced by radiation. PMID:24002607

  12. Influence of milk source on transplantability of histocompatible mammary tumours in mice.

    PubMed Central

    Oth, D.; Sabolovic, D.

    1977-01-01

    It is confirmed that C3H mammary tumours are much more easily transplantable in histocompatible recipients when these have been reared on C3H milk, than when they have been reared on milk from the inbred Swiss/B strain. By contrast, A.CA mammary tumours transplanted in histocompatible hosts reared on A.CA or Swiss/B milk, grow almost equally well in both sorts of recipient. Thus, rearing on Swiss/B milk has different effects on the transplantability of mammary tumours of C3H and A.CA. On the other hand, recipients which were reared on C3H or A.CA milks accept grafts of C3H mammary tumours about equally, suggesting that milks from A.CA and C3H have the same effect on the transplantability of C3H mammary tumours. The different action of Swiss/B milk on tumours of C3H and A.CA seems best attributed to differences between C3H and A.CA tumours or between mouse strain genotypes. By contrast, the transplantability of C3H mammary tumours is significantly changed when the recipients were reared on milk from the RIII strain instead of C3H. These facts suggest that the milk from RIII has an action which differs from that of both C3H and A.CA in this respect. The data are discussed on the basis of a differential tollerance-inducing action of mammary tumour viruses (MTVs) which infect C3H, A.CA and RIII, and have an important role in tumour induction. PMID:326285

  13. Tocopherols inhibit oxidative and nitrosative stress in estrogen-induced early mammary hyperplasia in ACI rats.

    PubMed

    Das Gupta, Soumyasri; So, Jae Young; Wall, Brian; Wahler, Joseph; Smolarek, Amanda K; Sae-Tan, Sudathip; Soewono, Kelvin Y; Yu, Haixiang; Lee, Mao-Jung; Thomas, Paul E; Yang, Chung S; Suh, Nanjoo

    2015-09-01

    Oxidative stress is known to play a key role in estrogen-induced breast cancer. This study assessed the chemopreventive activity of the naturally occurring γ-tocopherol-rich mixture of tocopherols (γ-TmT) in early stages of estrogen-induced mammary hyperplasia in ACI rats. ACI rats provide an established model of rodent mammary carcinogenesis due to their high sensitivity to estrogen. Female rats were implanted with 9 mg of 17β-estradiol (E2) in silastic tubings and fed with control or 0.3% γ-TmT diet for 1, 3, 7, and 14 d. γ-TmT increased the levels of tocopherols and their metabolites in the serum and mammary glands of the rats. Histological analysis revealed mammary hyperplasia in the E2 treated rats fed with control or γ-TmT diet. γ-TmT decreased the levels of E2-induced nitrosative and oxidative stress markers, nitrotyrosine, and 8-oxo-dG, respectively, in the hyperplastic mammary tissues. 8-Isoprostane, a marker of oxidative stress in the serum, was also reduced by γ-TmT. Noticeably, γ-TmT stimulated Nrf2-dependent antioxidant response in the mammary glands of E2 treated rats, evident from the induced mRNA levels of Nrf2 and its downstream antioxidant enzymes, superoxide dismutase, catalase, and glutathione peroxidase. Therefore, inhibition of nitrosative/oxidative stress through induction of antioxidant response is the primary effect of γ-TmT in early stages of E2-induced mammary hyperplasia. Due to its cytoprotective activity, γ-TmT could be a potential natural agent for the chemoprevention of estrogen-induced breast cancer.

  14. Low-dose effects of bisphenol A on mammary gland development in rats.

    PubMed

    Mandrup, K; Boberg, J; Isling, L K; Christiansen, S; Hass, U

    2016-07-01

    Bisphenol A (BPA) is widely used in food contact materials, toys, and other products. Several studies have indicated that effects observed at doses near human exposure levels may not be observed at higher doses. Many studies have shown effects on mammary glands at low doses of BPA, however, because of small number of animals or few doses investigated these data have not been used by EFSA as point of departure for the newly assessed tolerable daily intake (TDI). We performed a study with perinatal exposure to BPA (0, 0.025, 0.25, 5, and 50 mg/kg bw/day) in rats (n = 22 mated/group). One of the aims was to perform a study robust enough to contribute to the risk assessment of BPA and to elucidate possible biphasic dose-response relationships. We investigated mammary gland effects in the offspring at 22, 100, and 400 days of age. Male offspring showed increased mammary outgrowth on pup day (PD) 22 at 0.025 mg/kg BPA, indicating an increased mammary development at this low dose only. Increased prevalence of intraductal hyperplasia was observed in BPA females exposed to 0.25 mg/kg at PD 400, but not at PD 100, and not at higher or lower doses. The present findings support data from the published literature showing that perinatal exposure to BPA can induce increased mammary growth and proliferative lesions in rodents. Our results indicate that low-dose exposure to BPA can affect mammary gland development in male and female rats, although higher doses show a different pattern of effects. The observed intraductal hyperplasia in female rats could be associated with an increased risk for developing hyperplastic lesions, which are parallels to early signs of breast neoplasia in women. Collectively, current knowledge on effects of BPA on mammary gland at low doses indicates that highly exposed humans may not be sufficiently protected. PMID:27088260

  15. Common Integration Sites for MMTV in Viral Induced Mouse Mammary Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Callahan, Robert

    2011-01-01

    The paradigm of mammary cancer induction by the mouse mammary tumor virus (MMTV) is used to illustrate the body of evidence that supports the hypothesis that mammary epithelial stem/progenitor cells represent targets for oncogenic transformation. It is argued that this is not a special case applicable only to MMTV-induced mammary cancer, because MMTV acts as an environmental mutagen producing random interruptions in the somatic DNA of infected cells by insertion of proviral DNA copies. In addition to disrupting the host genome, the proviral DNA also influences gene expression through its associated enhancer sequences over significant inter-genomic distances. Genes commonly affected by MMTV insertion in multiple individual tumors include, the Wnt, FGF, RSpo gene families as well as eIF3e and Notch4. All of these gene families are known to play essential roles in stem cell maintenance and behavior in a variety of organs. The MMTV-induced mutations accumulate in cells that are long-lived and possess the properties of stem cells, namely, self-renewal and the capacity to produce divergent epithelial progeny through asymmetric division. The evidence shows that epithelial cells with these properties are present in normal mammary glands, may be infected with MMTV, become transformed to produce epithelial hyperplasia through MMTV-induced mutagenesis and progress to frank mammary malignancy. Retroviral marking via MMTV proviral insertion demonstrates that this process progresses from a single mammary epithelial cell that possesses all of the features ascribed to tissue-specific stem cells. PMID:18709449

  16. Loss of Panx1 Impairs Mammary Gland Development at Lactation: Implications for Breast Tumorigenesis.

    PubMed

    Stewart, Michael K G; Plante, Isabelle; Penuela, Silvia; Laird, Dale W

    2016-01-01

    Pannexin1 (Panx1) subunits oligomerize to form large-pore channels between the intracellular and extracellular milieu that have been shown to regulate proliferation, differentiation and cell death mechanisms. These key cellular responses are ultimately necessary for normal tissue development and function but the role of Panx1 in development, differentiation and function in many tissues remains unexplored, including that of the breast. Panx1 was identified to be expressed in the mammary gland through western blot and immunofluorescent analysis and is dynamically upregulated during pregnancy and lactation. In order to evaluate the role of Panx1 in the context of mammary gland development and function, Panx1-/- mice were evaluated in comparison to wild-type mice in the mammary glands of virgin, lactating and involuting mice. Our results revealed that Panx1 ablation did not affect virgin or involuting mammary glands following histological and whole mount analysis. Panx1 was necessary for timely alveolar development during early lactation based on a decreased number of alveolar lumen following histological analysis and reduced proliferation following Ki67 immunofluorescent labelling. Importantly, the loss of Panx1 in lactating mammary glands did not overtly affect epithelial or secretory differentiation of the mammary gland suggesting that Panx1 is not critical in normal mammary gland function. In addition, PANX1 mRNA expression was correlated with negative clinical outcomes in patients with breast cancer using in silico arrays. Together, our results suggest that Panx1 is necessary for timely alveolar development following the transition from pregnancy to lactation, which may have implications extending to patients with breast cancer. PMID:27099931

  17. Low-dose effects of bisphenol A on mammary gland development in rats.

    PubMed

    Mandrup, K; Boberg, J; Isling, L K; Christiansen, S; Hass, U

    2016-07-01

    Bisphenol A (BPA) is widely used in food contact materials, toys, and other products. Several studies have indicated that effects observed at doses near human exposure levels may not be observed at higher doses. Many studies have shown effects on mammary glands at low doses of BPA, however, because of small number of animals or few doses investigated these data have not been used by EFSA as point of departure for the newly assessed tolerable daily intake (TDI). We performed a study with perinatal exposure to BPA (0, 0.025, 0.25, 5, and 50 mg/kg bw/day) in rats (n = 22 mated/group). One of the aims was to perform a study robust enough to contribute to the risk assessment of BPA and to elucidate possible biphasic dose-response relationships. We investigated mammary gland effects in the offspring at 22, 100, and 400 days of age. Male offspring showed increased mammary outgrowth on pup day (PD) 22 at 0.025 mg/kg BPA, indicating an increased mammary development at this low dose only. Increased prevalence of intraductal hyperplasia was observed in BPA females exposed to 0.25 mg/kg at PD 400, but not at PD 100, and not at higher or lower doses. The present findings support data from the published literature showing that perinatal exposure to BPA can induce increased mammary growth and proliferative lesions in rodents. Our results indicate that low-dose exposure to BPA can affect mammary gland development in male and female rats, although higher doses show a different pattern of effects. The observed intraductal hyperplasia in female rats could be associated with an increased risk for developing hyperplastic lesions, which are parallels to early signs of breast neoplasia in women. Collectively, current knowledge on effects of BPA on mammary gland at low doses indicates that highly exposed humans may not be sufficiently protected.

  18. Precursors of hexoneogenesis within the human mammary gland.

    PubMed

    Mohammad, Mahmoud A; Maningat, Patricia; Sunehag, Agneta L; Haymond, Morey W

    2015-04-15

    The human mammary gland is capable of de novo synthesis of glucose and galactose (hexoneogenesis); however, the carbon source is incompletely understood. In this study, we investigated the role of acetate, glutamine, lactate and glycerol as potential carbon sources for hexoneogenesis. Healthy breastfeeding women were studied following a 24-h fast on two occasions separated by 1-3 wk. Five women were infused with [U-¹³C]lactate or [1,2-¹³C₂]glutamine and five women with [U-¹³C]glycerol or [1,2-¹³C₂]acetate. Enrichments of ¹³C in plasma and milk substrates were analyzed using GC-MS. Infusion of labeled lactate, glycerol, glutamine, and acetate resulted in plasma glucose being 22.0±3.7, 11.2±1.0, 2.5±0.5, and 1.3±0.2% labeled, respectively. Lactate, glutamine, or acetate did not contribute to milk glucose or galactose (0-2%). In milk, ¹³C-free glycerol enrichment was one-fourth that in plasma but free glycerol concentration in milk was fourfold higher than in plasma. Using [U-¹³C]glycerol and by accounting for tracer dilution, glycerol alone contributed to 10±2 and 69±11% of the hexoneogenesis of milk glucose and galactose, respectively. During [U-¹³C]glycerol infusion, the ratio of M₃ enrichment on 4-6 carbons/M₃ on 1-3 carbons of galactose was higher (P<0.05, 1.22±0.05) than those of glucose in plasma (1.05±0.03) and milk (1.07±0.02). Reanalysis of samples from a previous study involving [U-¹³C]glucose infusion alone suggested labeling a portion of galactose consistent with pentose phosphate pathway (PPP) activity. We conclude that, although lactate contributed significantly to gluconeogenesis, glycerol alone provides the vast majority of substrate for hexoneogenesis. The relative contribution of the PPP vs. the reversal Embden-Meyerhof pathway to hexoneogenesis within the human mammary gland remains to be determined.

  19. Key signalling nodes in mammary gland development and cancer. Mitogen-activated protein kinase signalling in experimental models of breast cancer progression and in mammary gland development.

    PubMed

    Whyte, Jacqueline; Bergin, Orla; Bianchi, Alessandro; McNally, Sara; Martin, Finian

    2009-01-01

    Seven classes of mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) intracellular signalling cascades exist, four of which are implicated in breast disease and function in mammary epithelial cells. These are the extracellular regulated kinase (ERK)1/2 pathway, the ERK5 pathway, the p38 pathway and the c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) pathway. In some forms of human breast cancer and in many experimental models of breast cancer progression, signalling through the ERK1/2 pathway, in particular, has been implicated as being important. We review the influence of ERK1/2 activity on the organised three-dimensional association of mammary epithelial cells, and in models of breast cancer cell invasion. We assess the importance of epidermal growth factor receptor family signalling through ERK1/2 in models of breast cancer progression and the influence of ERK1/2 on its substrate, the oestrogen receptor, in this context. In parallel, we consider the importance of these MAPK-centred signalling cascades during the cycle of mammary gland development. Although less extensively studied, we highlight the instances of signalling through the p38, JNK and ERK5 pathways involved in breast cancer progression and mammary gland development.

  20. Paternal selenium deficiency but not supplementation during preconception alters mammary gland development and 7,12-dimethylbenz[a]anthracene-induced mammary carcinogenesis in female rat offspring.

    PubMed

    Guido, Luiza N; Fontelles, Camile C; Rosim, Mariana P; Pires, Vanessa C; Cozzolino, Silvia M F; Castro, Inar A; Bolaños-Jiménez, Francisco; Barbisan, Luis F; Ong, Thomas P

    2016-10-15

    Breast cancer is a global public health problem and accumulating evidence indicates early-life exposures as relevant factors in the disease risk determination. Recent studies have shown that paternal nutrition can influence offspring health including breast cancer risk. Selenium is a micronutrient with essential role in central aspects of embryogenesis, male fertility and cancer and that has been extensively studied as a chemopreventive agent in several breast cancer experimental models. Thus, we designed an animal study to evaluate whether paternal selenium deficiency or supplementation during preconception could affect the female offspring mammary gland development and breast cancer susceptibility. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were fed AIN93-G diet containing 0.15 ppm (control diet), 0.05 ppm (deficient diet) or 1 ppm (supplemented diet) of selenium for 9 weeks and mated with control female rats. Mammary carcinogenesis was induced with 7,12-dimethylbenz[a]anthracene (DMBA) in their female offspring. Paternal selenium deficiency increased the number of terminal end buds, epithelial elongation and cell proliferation in the mammary gland of the female rat offspring and these effects were associated with higher susceptibility to DMBA-induced mammary tumors (increased incidence and higher grade tumors). On the other hand, paternal selenium supplementation did not influence any of these parameters. These results highlight the importance of father's nutrition including selenium status as a relevant factor affecting daughter's breast cancer risk and paternal preconception as a potential developmental stage to start disease preventive strategies. PMID:27270969