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Sample records for heavy kaluza-klein electroweak

  1. Distinctive ultraviolet structure of extra-dimensional Yang-Mills theories by integration of heavy Kaluza-Klein modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García-Jiménez, I.; Novales-Sánchez, H.; Toscano, J. J.

    2016-05-01

    One-loop Standard Model observables produced by virtual heavy Kaluza-Klein fields play a prominent role in the minimal model of universal extra dimensions. Motivated by this aspect, we integrate out all the Kaluza-Klein heavy modes coming from the Yang-Mills theory set on a spacetime with an arbitrary number, n , of compact extra dimensions. After fixing the gauge with respect to the Kaluza-Klein heavy gauge modes in a covariant manner, we calculate a gauge-independent effective Lagrangian expansion containing multiple Kaluza-Klein sums that entail a bad divergent behavior. We use the Epstein-zeta function to regularize and characterize discrete divergences within such multiple sums, and then we discuss the interplay between the number of extra dimensions and the degree of accuracy of effective Lagrangians to generate or not divergent terms of discrete origin. We find that nonrenormalizable terms with mass dimension k are finite as long as k >4 +n . Multiple Kaluza-Klein sums of nondecoupling logarithmic terms, not treatable by Epstein-zeta regularization, are produced by four-dimensional momentum integration. On the grounds of standard renormalization, we argue that such effects are unobservable.

  2. Residue theorem and summing over Kaluza-Klein excitations

    SciTech Connect

    Feng Taifu; Chen Jianbin; Gao Tiejun; Sun Kesheng

    2011-11-01

    Applying the equations of motion together with corresponding boundary conditions of bulk profiles at infrared and ultraviolet branes, we verify some lemmas on the eigenvalues of Kaluza-Klein modes in extension of the standard model with a warped extra dimension and the custodial symmetry SU(3){sub c}xSU(2){sub L}xSU(2){sub R}xU(1){sub X}xP{sub LR}. Using the lemmas and performing properly analytic extensions of bulk profiles, we present the sufficient condition for a convergent series of Kaluza-Klein excitations and sum over the series through the residue theorem. The method can also be applied to sum over the infinite series of Kaluza-Klein excitations in a universal extra dimension. Furthermore, we analyze the possible connection between the propagators in five-dimensional full theory and the product of bulk profiles with corresponding propagators of exciting Kaluza-Klein modes in four-dimensional effective theory, and recover some relations presented in the literature for warped and universal extra dimensions, respectively. As an example, we present the correction from new physics to the branching ratio of B{yields}X{sub s{gamma}} to the order O({mu}{sub EW}{sup 2}/{Lambda}{sub KK}{sup 2}) in extension of the standard model with a warped extra dimension and the custodial symmetry, where {Lambda}{sub KK} denotes the energy scale of low-lying Kaluza-Klein excitations and {mu}{sub EW} denotes the electroweak energy scale.

  3. A Kaluza-Klein subtractor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jana, Sanjib; Krishnan, Chethan

    2014-05-01

    We generalize the results of arXiv:1212.1875 and arXiv:1212.6919 on attraction basins and their boundaries to the case of a specific class of rotating black holes, namely the ergo-free branch of extremal black holes in Kaluza-Klein theory. We find that exact solutions that span the attraction basin can be found even in the rotating case by appealing to certain symmetries of the equations of motion. They are characterized by two asymptotic parameters that generalize those of the non-rotating case, and the boundaries of the basin are spinning versions of the (generalized) subtractor geometry. We also give examples to illustrate that the shape of the attraction basin can drastically change depending on the theory.

  4. Motion in Kaluza-Klein type theories

    SciTech Connect

    Kahil, M.E.

    2006-05-15

    Path and path deviation equations for charged, spinning and spinning charged objects in different versions of Kaluza-Klein (KK) theory using a modified Bazanski Lagrangian have been derived. The significance of motion in five dimensions, especially for a charged spinning object, has been examined. We have also extended the modified Bazanski approach to derive the path and path deviation equations of a test particle in a version of non-symmetric KK theory.

  5. The abundance of Kaluza-Klein dark matter with coannihilation

    SciTech Connect

    Burnell, Fiona; Kribs, Graham D.

    2006-01-01

    In universal extra dimension models, the lightest Kaluza-Klein (KK) particle is generically the first KK excitation of the photon and can be stable, serving as particle dark matter. We calculate the thermal relic abundance of the KK photon for a general mass spectrum of KK excitations including full coannihilation effects with all (level-one) KK excitations. We find that including coannihilation can significantly change the relic abundance when the coannihilating particles are within about 20% of the mass of the KK photon. Matching the relic abundance with cosmological data, we find the mass range of the KK photon is much wider than previously found, up to about 2 TeV if the masses of the strongly interacting level-one KK particles are within 5% of the mass of the KK photon. We also find cases where several coannihilation channels compete (constructively and destructively) with one another. The lower bound on the KK photon mass, about 540 GeV when just right-handed KK leptons coannihilate with the KK photon, relaxes upward by several hundred GeV when coannihilation with electroweak KK gauge bosons of the same mass is included.

  6. Kaluza-Klein relics from warped reheating

    SciTech Connect

    Berndsen, Aaron; Cline, James M.; Stoica, Horace

    2008-06-15

    It has been suggested that after brane-antibrane inflation in a Klebanov-Strassler (KS) warped throat, metastable Kaluza-Klein excitations can be formed due to nearly-conserved angular momenta along isometric directions in the throat. If sufficiently long lived, these relics could conflict with big bang nucleosynthesis or baryogenesis by dominating the energy density of the Universe. We make a detailed estimate of the decay rate of such relics using the low-energy effective action of type IIB string theory compactified on the throat geometry, with attention to powers of the warp factor. We find that it is necessary to turn on supersymmetry (SUSY)-breaking deformations of the KS background in order to ensure that the most dangerous relics will decay fast enough. The decay rate is found to be much larger than the naive guess based on the dimension of the operators which break the angular isometries of the throat. For an inflationary warp factor of order w{approx}10{sup -4}, we obtain the bound M{sub 3/2} > or approx. 10{sup 9} GeV on the scale of SUSY breaking to avoid cosmological problems from the relics, which is satisfied in the Kachru, Kallosh, Linde, and Trivedi construction assumed to stabilize the compactification. Given the requirement that the relics decay before nucleosynthesis or baryogenesis, we place bounds on the mass of the relic as a function of the warp factor in the throat for more general warped backgrounds.

  7. Einstein-Yang-Mills-Dirac systems from the discretized Kaluza-Klein theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wali, Kameshwar; Viet, Nguyen Ali

    2017-01-01

    A unified theory of the non-Abelian gauge interactions with gravity in the framework of a discretized Kaluza-Klein theory is constructed with a modified Dirac operator and wedge product. All the couplings of chiral spinors to the non-Abelian gauge fields emerge naturally as components of the coupling of the chiral spinors in the generalized gravity together with some new interactions. In particular, the currently prevailing gravity-QCD quark and gravity-electroweak-quark and lepton models are shown to follow as special cases of the general framework.

  8. Klein-Gordon oscillator in Kaluza-Klein theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carvalho, Josevi; Carvalho, Alexandre M. de M.; Cavalcante, Everton; Furtado, Claudio

    2016-07-01

    In this contribution we study the Klein-Gordon oscillator on the curved background within the Kaluza-Klein theory. The problem of the interaction between particles coupled harmonically with topological defects in Kaluza-Klein theory is studied. We consider a series of topological defects, then we treat the Klein-Gordon oscillator coupled to this background, and we find the energy levels and corresponding eigenfunctions in these cases. We show that the energy levels depend on the global parameters characterizing these spacetimes. We also investigate a quantum particle described by the Klein-Gordon oscillator interacting with a cosmic dislocation in Som-Raychaudhuri spacetime in the presence of homogeneous magnetic field in a Kaluza-Klein theory. In this case, the energy spectrum is determined, and we observe that these energy levels represent themselves as the sum of the terms related with Aharonov-Bohm flux and of the parameter associated to the rotation of the spacetime.

  9. Light Kaluza Klein States in Randall-Sundrum Models with Custodial SU(2)

    SciTech Connect

    Carena, Marcela; Ponton, Eduardo; Santiago, Jose; Wagner, Carlos E.M.; /Argonne /Chicago U., EFI /KICP, Chicago

    2006-07-01

    We consider Randall-Sundrum scenarios based on SU(2){sub L} x SU(2){sub R} and a discrete parity exchanging L with R. The custodial and parity symmetries can be used to make the tree level contribution to the T parameter and the anomalous couplings of the bottom quark to the Z very small. We show that the resulting quantum numbers typically induce a negative T parameter at one loop that, together with the positive value of the S parameter, restrict considerably these models. There are nevertheless regions of parameter space that successfully reproduce the fit to electroweak precision observables with light Kaluza-Klein excitations accessible at colliders. We consider models of gauge-Higgs unification that implement the custodial and parity symmetries and find that the electroweak data singles out a very well defined region in parameter space. In this region one typically finds light gauge boson Kaluza-Klein excitations as well as light SU(2){sub L} singlet, and sometimes also doublet, fermionic states, that mix with the top quark, and that may yield interesting signatures at future colliders.

  10. Neutrinos from Kaluza-Klein dark matter in the Sun

    SciTech Connect

    Blennow, Mattias; Melbéus, Henrik; Ohlsson, Tommy E-mail: melbeus@kth.se

    2010-01-01

    We investigate indirect neutrino signals from annihilations of Kaluza-Klein dark matter in the Sun. Especially, we examine a five- as well as a six-dimensional model, and allow for the possibility that boundary localized terms could affect the spectrum to give different lightest Kaluza-Klein particles, which could constitute the dark matter. The dark matter candidates that are interesting for the purpose of indirect detection of neutrinos are the first Kaluza-Klein mode of the gauge boson and the neutral component of the gauge bosons. Using the DarkSUSY and WimpSim packages, we calculate muon fluxes at an Earth-based neutrino telescope, such as IceCube. For the five-dimensional model, the results that we obtained agree reasonably well with the results that have previously been presented in the literature, whereas for the six-dimensional model, we find that, at tree-level, the results are the same as for the five-dimensional model. Finally, if the first Kaluza-Klein mode of the gauge boson constitutes the dark matter, IceCube can constrain the parameter space. However, in the case that the neutral component of the gauge bosons is the LKP, the signal is too weak to be observed.

  11. Charged black holes on a Kaluza-Klein bubble

    SciTech Connect

    Kunz, Jutta; Yazadjiev, Stoytcho

    2009-01-15

    We construct a solution of two black holes on a Kaluza-Klein bubble in Einstein-Maxwell-dilaton theory. We explore the consequences of the presence of charge for the properties of this solution, and obtain a generalized Smarr relation and first law.

  12. Cosmological model of the Kaluza-Klein type

    SciTech Connect

    Kopczyn-ski, W.

    1987-12-15

    The theory of a fluid composed of multidimensional objects is joined with the Kaluza-Klein idea with the following aim: an explanation of the distinction between the internal and the external spaces. On the cosmic scale, the internal space contracts and the external space expands. A formula for the rate of decrease of the gravitational constant is discussed.

  13. Finite temperature effective potential in a Kaluza-Klein universe

    SciTech Connect

    Roy, P. )

    1990-01-20

    The authors evaluate the finite temperature one-loop effective potential for scalar fields in Kaluza-Klein universe consisting of the product of a space with open Robertson-Walker metric and the N sphere S{sup N}. The one-loop effective potential has been computed in both high and low temperature limits.

  14. State-relevant Maxwell's equation from Kaluza-Klein theory

    SciTech Connect

    Luan Jing; Ma Yongge; Ma Boqiang

    2007-11-15

    We study a five-dimensional perfect fluid coupled with Kaluza-Klein gravity. By dimensional reduction, a modified form of Maxwell's equation is obtained, which is relevant to the equation of state of the source. Since the relativistic magnetohydrodynamics and the three-dimensional formulation are widely used to study space matter, we derive the modified Maxwell's equations and relativistic magnetohydrodynamics in 3+1 form. We then take an ideal Fermi gas as an example to study the modified effect, which can be visible under high-density or high-energy conditions, while the traditional Maxwell's equation can be regarded as a result in the low density and low temperature limit. We also indicate the possibility to test the state-relevant effect of Kaluza-Klein theory in a telluric laboratory.

  15. Kaluza-Klein mesons in universal extra dimensions

    SciTech Connect

    De Pree, Erin; Sher, Marc

    2005-11-01

    In models with universal extra dimensions, the isosinglet Kaluza-Klein (KK) quarks (q{sup 1}) have very narrow widths, of O(5-10) MeV, and will thus hadronize. Studies of KK quarkonia (q{sup 1}q{sup 1}) show very sharp resonances and dramatic signatures at the linear collider. In this Brief Report, we consider the possibility of detecting KK mesons (q{sup 1}q), and show that detection at a linear collider is unlikely.

  16. Topology change in Kaluza-Klein and superstring theories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tipler, Frank J.

    1985-12-01

    It is shown that topology change-for instance, true dynamical compactification - cannot occur in classical Kaluza-Klein and superstring theories without causality violation either in the form of a breakdown in predictability (a failure of global hyperbolicity), or in the form of closed timelike curves. This implies that if causality holds, then any topological distinction between the spacetime and internal dimensions either has to be present ab initio, or else must arise in the quantum gravity regime. Permanent address.

  17. Constraints on cosmic superstrings from Kaluza-Klein emission.

    PubMed

    Dufaux, Jean-François

    2012-07-06

    Cosmic superstrings interact generically with a tower of light and/or strongly coupled Kaluza-Klein (KK) modes associated with the geometry of the internal space. We study the production of KK particles by cosmic superstring loops, and show that it is constrained by big bang nucleosynthesis. We study the resulting constraints in the parameter space of the underlying string theory model and highlight their complementarity with the regions that can be probed by current and upcoming gravitational wave experiments.

  18. Causal Anomalies in Kaluza-Klein Gravity Theories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rebouças, M. J.; Teixeira, A. F. F.

    Causal anomalies in two Kaluza-Klein gravity theories are examined, particularly as to whether these theories permit solutions in which the causality principle is violated. It is found that similarly to general relativity the field equations of the space-time-mass Kaluza-Klein (STM-KK) gravity theory do not exclude violation of causality of Gödel type, whereas the induced matter Kaluza-Klein (IM-KK) gravity rules out noncausal Gödel-type models. The induced matter version of general relativity is shown to be an efficient therapy for causal anomalies that occurs in a wide class of noncausal geometries. Perfect fluid and dust Gödel-type solutions of the STM-KK field equations are studied. It is shown that every Gödel-type perfect fluid solution is isometric to the unique dust solution of the STM-KK field equations. The question as to whether 5D Gödel-type noncausal geometries induce any physically acceptable 4D energy-momentum tensor is also addressed.

  19. Enhanced line signals from annihilating Kaluza-Klein dark matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arina, Chiara; Bringmann, Torsten; Silk, Joseph; Vollmann, Martin

    2014-10-01

    Monochromatic gamma ray lines have long been known to provide potential smoking-gun signals for annihilating dark matter. Here, we demonstrate that the situation is particularly interesting for Kaluza-Klein dark matter because resonant annihilation is generically expected for small, but not necessarily vanishing relative velocities of the annihilating particles. We calculate the contribution from those hitherto neglected resonances and show that the annihilation rate into monochromatic photons can be significantly enhanced, in a way that is much more pronounced than for the associated production of continuum photons. For favorable astrophysical conditions, this leads to promising prospects for the detection of TeV-scale Kaluza-Klein dark matter. We also point out that the situation may be even more interesting in the vicinity of black holes, like the supermassive black hole at the center of our Galaxy, where in principle center-of-mass energies much larger than the rest mass are available. In this case, annihilating Kaluza-Klein dark matter may show the striking and unique signature of several gamma ray lines, with an equidistant spacing corresponding to twice the compactification radius of the extra dimension.

  20. Asymptotic safety and Kaluza-Klein gravitons at the LHC

    SciTech Connect

    Gerwick, Erik; Litim, Daniel; Plehn, Tilman

    2011-04-15

    We study Drell-Yan production at the LHC in low-scale quantum gravity models with extra dimensions. Asymptotic safety implies that the ultraviolet behavior of gravity is dictated by a fixed point. We show how the energy dependence of Newton's coupling regularizes the gravitational amplitude using a renormalization group improvement. We study LHC predictions and find that Kaluza-Klein graviton signals are well above standard model backgrounds. This leaves a significant sensitivity to the energy scale {Lambda}{sub T} where the gravitational couplings crossover from classical to fixed point scaling.

  1. Massless fermions and Kaluza--Klein theory with torsion

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Y.; Zee, A.

    1984-09-01

    A pure Kaluza--Klein theory contains no massless fermion in four-dimensional theory. We investigate the effect of introducing torsion on the internal manifold and find that there are massless fermions. The hope is that given an isometry group the representation to which these fermions belong is fixed, in contrast to the situation in Yang--Mills theory. We show that this is indeed the case, but the representations do not appear to be the ones favored by current theoretical prejudice. The cases with parallelizable torsions on a group manifold as the internal manifold are analyzed in detail.

  2. Wormhole in 5D Kaluza-Klein cosmology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biswas, Gargi; Modak, B.

    2017-03-01

    We present wormhole as a solution of Euclidean field equations as well as the solution of the Wheeler-deWitt (WD) equation satisfying Hawking-Page wormhole boundary conditions in (4 + 1)-dimensional Kaluza-Klein cosmology. The wormholes are considered in the cases of pure gravity, minimally coupled scalar (imaginary) field and with a positive cosmological constant assuming dynamical extra-dimensional space. In above cases, wormholes are allowed both from Euclidean field equations and WD equation. The dimensional reduction is possible.

  3. Constraints on the size of the extra dimension from Kaluza-Klein gravitino decay

    SciTech Connect

    Gherson, David

    2007-08-15

    We study the consequences of the gravitino decay into dark matter. We suppose that the lightest neutralino is the main component of dark matter. In our framework the gravitino is heavy enough to decay before big bang nucleosynthesis starts. We consider a model coming from a five dimensional supergravity compactified on S{sup 1}/Z{sub 2} with gravity in the bulk and matter localized on tensionless branes at the orbifold fixed points. We require that the dark matter, which is produced thermally and in the decay of Kaluza-Klein modes of the gravitino, has an abundance compatible with observation. We deduce from our model that there are curves of constraints between the size of the extra dimension and the reheating temperature of the Universe after inflation.

  4. Vacuum Stability in Kaluza-Klein Geometric Sigma Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasilić, M.

    2002-09-01

    In Kaluza-Klein geometric sigma models, the scalar fields coupled to higher-dimensional gravity are pure gauge. The gauge fixed theory contains no matter fields, and can consistently be reduced to 4 dimensions, provided the internal space is chosen in the form of a group manifold. The effective 4-dimensional theory includes standard Einstein and Yang-Mills sectors, and is free of the classical cosmological constant problem. In this paper, the stability of the internal excitations is analyzed. It is shown that the initial Lagrangian can be modified to lead to a classically stable effective 4-dimensional theory, independently of the particular group used, and retaining all the basic features of the unmodified theory.

  5. Universal extra dimension: Violation of Kaluza-Klein parity

    SciTech Connect

    Bhattacherjee, Biplob

    2009-01-01

    The minimal universal extra dimension (mUED) model respects the Kaluza-Klein (KK) parity (-1){sup n}, where n is the KK number. However, it is possible to have interactions located at only one of the two fixed points of the S{sub 1}/Z{sub 2} orbifold. Such asymmetric interactions violate the KK parity. This kills the cold dark matter component of UED but also removes the upper bound on the inverse compactification radius, and thus nonobservation of the KK excitations even at the Large Hadron Collider does not necessarily invalidate the model. Apart from the decay of the lightest n=1 KK excitation, this leads to collider signals which are markedly different from those in the mUED scenario. The phenomenological consequences of such KK-parity violating terms are explored.

  6. The Spacetime Between Einstein and Kaluza-Klein: Further Explorations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vuille, Chris

    2017-01-01

    Tensor multinomials can be used to create a generalization of Einstein's general relativity that in a mathematical sense falls between Einstein's original theory in four dimensions and the Kaluza-Klein theory in five dimensions. In the extended theory there are only four physical dimensions, but the tensor multinomials are expanded operators that can accommodate other forces of nature. The equivalent Ricci tensor of this geometry yields vacuum general relativity and electromagnetism, as well as a Klein-Gordon-like quantum scalar field. With a generalization of the stress-energy tensor, an exact solution for a plane-symmetric dust can be found where the scalar portion of the field drives early universe inflation, levels off for a period, then causes a later continued universal acceleration, a possible geometric mechanism for the inflaton or dark energy. Some new explorations of the equations, the problems, and possibilities will be presented and discussed.

  7. Cosmological and coupling constants in Kaluza-Klein supergravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duff, M. J.; Pope, C. N.; Warner, N. P.

    1983-10-01

    Weinberg's formula, relating the Yang-Mills coupling constant, g, to the size of the extra dimensions in a Kaluza-Klein theory, requires modification when gravity is coupled to antisymmetric tensor gauge fields. In particular, in the spontaneous compactification of d = 11 supergravity on the round S7 of radius m-, the Weinberg formula g2 = 64πGm2 is changed to g2 = 16πGm2 owing to the AMNP field. Combined with the cosmological constant relation Λ = 12m2 one finds 4πGΛ = -3g2, which is precisely the relation in the gauged N = 8 supergravity of de Wit and Nicolai. Present address: Lauritsen Laboratory, Californian Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125, USA.

  8. Hawking radiation from squashed Kaluza-Klein black holes: A window to extra dimensions

    SciTech Connect

    Ishihara, Hideki; Soda, Jiro

    2007-09-15

    We explore the observability of extra dimensions through five-dimensional squashed Kaluza-Klein black holes residing in the Kaluza-Klein spacetime. With the expectation that the Hawking radiation reflects the five-dimensional nature of the squashed horizon, we study the Hawking radiation of a scalar field in the squashed black hole background. As a result, we show that the luminosity of Hawking radiation tells us the size of the extra dimension, namely, the squashed Kaluza-Klein black holes open a window to extra dimensions.

  9. An exact conformal symmetry Ansatz on Kaluza-Klein reduced TMG

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moutsopoulos, George; Ritter, Patricia

    2011-11-01

    Using a Kaluza-Klein dimensional reduction, and further imposing a conformal Killing symmetry on the reduced metric generated by the dilaton, we show an Ansatz that yields many of the known stationary axisymmetric solutions to TMG.

  10. Kaluza-Klein gluon + jets associated production at the Large Hadron Collider

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iyer, A. M.; Mahmoudi, F.; Manglani, N.; Sridhar, K.

    2016-08-01

    The Kaluza-Klein excitations of gluons offer the exciting possibility of probing bulk Randall-Sundrum (RS) models. In these bulk models either a custodial symmetry or a deformation of the metric away from AdS is invoked in order to deal with electroweak precision tests. Addressing both these models, we suggest a new channel in which to study the production of KK-gluons (gKK): one where it is produced in association with one or more hard jets. The cross-section for the gKK + jets channel is significant because of several contributing sub-processes. In particular, the 1-jet and the 2-jet associated processes are important because at these orders in QCD the qg and the gg initial states respectively come into play. We have performed a hadron-level simulation of the signal and present strategies to effectively extract the signal from what could potentially be a huge background. We present results for the kinematic reach of the LHC Run-II for different gKK masses in bulk-RS models.

  11. Kaluza-Klein dark matter: Direct detection vis-a-vis CERN LHC

    SciTech Connect

    Arrenberg, Sebastian; Baudis, Laura; Kong, Kyoungchul; Matchev, Konstantin T.; Yoo, Jonghee

    2008-09-01

    We explore the phenomenology of Kaluza-Klein (KK) dark matter in very general models with universal extra dimensions (UEDs), emphasizing the complementarity between high-energy colliders and dark matter direct detection experiments. In models with relatively small mass splittings between the dark matter candidate and the rest of the (colored) spectrum, the collider sensitivity is diminished, but direct detection rates are enhanced. UEDs provide a natural framework for such mass degeneracies. We consider both five-dimensional and six-dimensional nonminimal UED models, and discuss the detection prospects for various KK dark matter candidates: the KK photon {gamma}{sub 1}, the KK Z boson Z{sub 1}, the KK Higgs boson H{sub 1}, and the spinless KK photon {gamma}{sub H}. We combine collider limits, such as electroweak precision data and expected LHC reach, with cosmological constraints from WMAP, and the sensitivity of current or planned direct detection experiments. Allowing for general mass splittings, we show that neither colliders nor direct detection experiments by themselves can explore all of the relevant KK dark matter parameter space. Nevertheless, they probe different parameter space regions, and the combination of the two types of constraints can be quite powerful. For example, in the case of {gamma}{sub 1} in 5D UEDs the relevant parameter space will be almost completely covered by the combined CERN LHC and direct detection sensitivities expected in the near future.

  12. Kaluza-Klein Dark Matter: Direct Detection vis-a-vis LHC

    SciTech Connect

    Arrenberg, Sebastian; Baudis, Laura; Kong, Kyoungchul; Matchev, Konstantin T.; Yoo, Jonghee; /Fermilab

    2008-11-01

    We explore the phenomenology of Kaluza-Klein (KK) dark matter in very general models with universal extra dimensions (UEDs), emphasizing the complementarity between high-energy colliders and dark matter direct detection experiments. In models with relatively small mass splittings between the dark matter candidate and the rest of the (colored) spectrum, the collider sensitivity is diminished, but direct detection rates are enhanced. UEDs provide a natural framework for such mass degeneracies. We consider both 5-dimensional and 6-dimensional non-minimal UED models, and discuss the detection prospects for various KK dark matter candidates: the KK photon {gamma}{sub 1} (5D) the KK Z-boson Z{sub 1} (5D) and the spinless KK photon {gamma}{sub H} (6D). We combine collider limits such as electroweak precision data and expected LHC reach, with cosmological constraints from WMAP and the sensitivity of current or planned direct detection experiments. Allowing for general mass splittings, we show that neither colliders, nor direct detection experiments by themselves can explore all of the relevant KK dark matter parameter space. Nevertheless, they probe different parameter space regions and the combination of the two types of constraints can be quite powerful. For example, in the case of {gamma}{sub 1} in 5D UEDs the relevant parameter space will be almost completely covered by the combined LHC and direct detection sensitivities expected in the near future.

  13. Direct detection of Kaluza-Klein particles in neutrino telescopes

    SciTech Connect

    Albuquerque, Ivone F. M.; Burdman, Gustavo; Krenke, Christopher A.; Nosratpour, Baran

    2008-07-01

    In theories with universal extra dimensions, all standard model fields propagate in the bulk and the lightest state of the first Kaluza-Klein (KK) level can be made stable by imposing a Z{sub 2} parity. We consider a framework where the lightest KK particle (LKP) is a neutral, extremely weakly interacting particle such as the first KK excitation of the graviton, while the next-to-lightest KK particle (NLKP) is the first KK mode of a charged right-handed lepton. In such a scenario, due to its very small couplings to the LKP, the NLKP is long-lived. We investigate the production of these particles from the interaction of high energy neutrinos with nucleons in the Earth and determine the rate of NLKP events in neutrino telescopes. Using the Waxman-Bahcall limit for the neutrino flux, we find that the rate can be as large as a few hundreds of events a year for realistic values of the NLKP mass.

  14. Cosmic super-strings and Kaluza-Klein modes

    SciTech Connect

    Dufaux, Jean-François

    2012-09-01

    Cosmic super-strings interact generically with a tower of relatively light and/or strongly coupled Kaluza-Klein (KK) modes associated with the geometry of the internal space. In this paper, we study the production of spin-2 KK particles by cusps on loops of cosmic F- and D-strings. We consider cosmic super-strings localized either at the bottom of a warped throat or in a flat internal space with large volume. The total energy emitted by cusps in KK modes is comparable in both cases, although the number of produced KK modes may differ significantly. We then show that KK emission is constrained by the photo-dissociation of light elements and by observations of the diffuse gamma ray background. We show that this rules out regions of the parameter space of cosmic super-strings that are complementary to the regions that can be probed by current and upcoming gravitational wave experiments. KK modes are also expected to play an important role in the friction-dominated epoch of cosmic super-string evolution.

  15. Testing extra dimensions below the production threshold of Kaluza-Klein excitations

    SciTech Connect

    Boos, Edward E.; Bunichev, Viacheslav E.; Smolyakov, Mikhail N.; Volobuev, Igor P.

    2009-05-15

    We consider a stabilized Randall Sundrum 1 model in the energy range below the direct production of Kaluza-Klein (KK) states. In this range, we work out the effective Lagrangian due to exchange of heavy KK tensor graviton and scalar radion states and compute explicitly the corresponding effective coupling constants. As an example, the Drell-Yan lepton pair production at the Tevatron and the LHC is analyzed in two situations, when the first KK resonance is too heavy to be directly detected at the colliders, and when the first KK resonance is visible, but other states are still too heavy. It is shown that in both cases the contribution from the KK invisible tower leads to a modification of final particles distributions. In particular, for the second case a nontrivial interference between the first KK mode and the rest KK tower takes place. Expected 95% C.L. limits for model parameters for the Tevatron and the LHC are given. In the Appendix, useful formulas for the cross sections and distributions of various new 2{yields}2 processes via heavy KK tower exchange are presented, the new formulas containing nonzero particle masses for final state fermions and bosons. The formulas and numerical results are obtained by means of the CompHEP code, in which all new effective interactions are implemented providing a tool for simulation of corresponding events and a more detailed analysis.

  16. Angular Momentum-Free of the Entropy Relations for Rotating Kaluza-Klein Black Holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Hang; Meng, Xin-he

    2017-02-01

    Based on a mathematical lemma related to the Vandermonde determinant and two theorems derived from the first law of black hole thermodynamics, we investigate the angular momentum independence of the entropy sum as well as the entropy product of general rotating Kaluza-Klein black holes in higher dimensions. We show that for both non-charged rotating Kaluza-Klein black holes and non-charged rotating Kaluza-Klein-AdS black holes, the angular momentum of the black holes will not be present in entropy sum relation in dimensions d≥4, while the independence of angular momentum of the entropy product holds provided that the black holes possess at least one zero rotation parameter a j = 0 in higher dimensions d≥5, which means that the cosmological constant does not affect the angular momentum-free property of entropy sum and entropy product under the circumstances that charge δ=0. For the reason that the entropy relations of charged rotating Kaluza-Klein black holes as well as the non-charged rotating Kaluza-Klein black holes in asymptotically flat spacetime act the same way, it is found that the charge has no effect in the angular momentum-independence of entropy sum and product in asymptotically flat spactime.

  17. Angular Momentum-Free of the Entropy Relations for Rotating Kaluza-Klein Black Holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Hang; Meng, Xin-he

    2016-11-01

    Based on a mathematical lemma related to the Vandermonde determinant and two theorems derived from the first law of black hole thermodynamics, we investigate the angular momentum independence of the entropy sum as well as the entropy product of general rotating Kaluza-Klein black holes in higher dimensions. We show that for both non-charged rotating Kaluza-Klein black holes and non-charged rotating Kaluza-Klein-AdS black holes, the angular momentum of the black holes will not be present in entropy sum relation in dimensions d≥4, while the independence of angular momentum of the entropy product holds provided that the black holes possess at least one zero rotation parameter a j = 0 in higher dimensions d≥5, which means that the cosmological constant does not affect the angular momentum-free property of entropy sum and entropy product under the circumstances that charge δ=0. For the reason that the entropy relations of charged rotating Kaluza-Klein black holes as well as the non-charged rotating Kaluza-Klein black holes in asymptotically flat spacetime act the same way, it is found that the charge has no effect in the angular momentum-independence of entropy sum and product in asymptotically flat spactime.

  18. Hawking radiation as tunneling from squashed Kaluza-Klein black hole

    SciTech Connect

    Matsuno, Ken; Umetsu, Koichiro

    2011-03-15

    We discuss Hawking radiation from a five-dimensional squashed Kaluza-Klein black hole on the basis of the tunneling mechanism. A simple method, which was recently suggested by Umetsu, may be used to extend the original derivation by Parikh and Wilczek to various black holes. That is, we use the two-dimensional effective metric, which is obtained by the dimensional reduction near the horizon, as the background metric. Using the same method, we derive both the desired result of the Hawking temperature and the effect of the backreaction associated with the radiation in the squashed Kaluza-Klein black hole background.

  19. Hawking radiation in a rotating Kaluza-Klein black hole with squashed horizons

    SciTech Connect

    Chen Songbai; Wang Bin; Su Rukeng

    2008-01-15

    We explore the signature of the extra dimension in the Hawking radiation in a rotating Kaluza-Klein black hole with squashed horizons. Comparing with the spherical case, we find that the rotating parameter brings richer physics. We obtain the appropriate size of the extra dimension which can enhance the Hawking radiation and may open a window to detect the extra dimensions.

  20. Z boson decay to photon plus Kaluza Klein graviton: large extra dimensional bounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allanach, B. C.; Skittrall, J. P.

    2008-05-01

    We consider the phenomenology of the decay of a Z boson into a photon and a Kaluza Klein excitation of the graviton in the ADD model. Using LEP data, we obtain an upper bound on the branching ratio corresponding to this process of ˜10-11. We also investigate energy profiles of the process.

  1. On Pauli's Invention of Non-Abelian Kaluza-Klein Theory in 1953

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Straumann, N.

    2002-12-01

    There are documents which show that Wolfgang Pauli developed in 1953 the first consistent generalization of the five-dimensional theory of Kaluza, Klein, Fock and others to a higher dimensional internal space. Because he saw no way to give masses to the gauge bosons, he refrained from publishing his results formally.

  2. Deformed phase space Kaluza-Klein cosmology and late time acceleration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sabido, M.; Yee-Romero, C.

    2016-06-01

    The effects of phase space deformations on Kaluza-Klein cosmology are studied. The deformation is introduced by modifying the symplectic structure of the minisuperspace variables. In the deformed model, we find an accelerating scale factor and therefore infer the existence of an effective cosmological constant from the phase space deformation parameter β.

  3. Bohr-Sommerfeld Quantization of Hydrogen-Like Atoms in Kaluza-Klein Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, Weldon J.

    1984-12-01

    A low energy phenomenon in quantum theories with extra dimensions is studied. The method of Bohr and Sommerfeld is used to compute the relativistic bound state energy spectrum for hydrogen-like atoms in the flat, five-dimensional Kaluza-Klein model.

  4. Uniqueness theorem for Kaluza-Klein black holes in five-dimensional minimal supergravity

    SciTech Connect

    Tomizawa, Shinya

    2010-11-15

    We show a uniqueness theorem for Kaluza-Klein black holes in the bosonic sector of five-dimensional minimal supergravity. More precisely, under the assumptions of the existence of two commuting axial isometries and a nondegenerate connected event horizon of the cross-section topology S{sup 3}, or lens space, we prove that a stationary charged rotating Kaluza-Klein black hole in five-dimensional minimal supergravity is uniquely characterized by its mass, two independent angular momenta, electric charge, magnetic flux, and nut charge, provided that there exists neither a nut nor a bolt (a bubble) in the domain of outer communication. We also show that under the assumptions of the same symmetry, same asymptotics, and the horizon cross section of S{sup 1}xS{sup 2}, a black ring within the same theory--if it exists--is uniquely determined by its dipole charge and rod intervals besides the charges and magnetic flux.

  5. Hoop conjecture and the horizon formation cross section in Kaluza-Klein spacetimes

    SciTech Connect

    Yoo, Chul-Moon; Ishihara, Hideki; Kimura, Masashi; Tanzawa, Sugure

    2010-01-15

    We analyze momentarily static initial data sets of the gravitational field produced by two-point sources in five-dimensional Kaluza-Klein spacetimes. These initial data sets are characterized by the mass, the separation of sources and the size of an extra dimension. Using these initial data sets, we discuss the condition for black hole formation, and propose a new conjecture which is a hybrid of the four-dimensional hoop conjecture and the five-dimensional hyperhoop conjecture. By using the new conjecture, we estimate the cross section of black hole formation due to collisions of particles in Kaluza-Klein spacetimes. We show that the mass dependence of the cross section gives us information about the size and the number of the compactified extra dimensions.

  6. Harrison transformation and charged black objects in Kaluza-Klein theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kleihaus, Burkhard; Kunz, Jutta; Radu, Eugen; Stelea, Cristian

    2009-09-01

    We generate charged black brane solutions in D-dimensions in a theory of gravity coupled to a dilaton and an antisymmetric form, by using a Harrison-type transformation. The seed vacuum solutions that we use correspond to uplifted Kaluza-Klein black strings and black holes in (D-p)-dimensions. A generalization of the Marolf-Mann quasilocal formalism to the Kaluza-Klein theory is also presented, the global charges of the black objects being computed in this way. We argue that the thermodynamics of the charged solutions can be derived from that of the vacuum configurations. Our results show that all charged Kaluza-Klein solutions constructed by means of Harrison transformations are thermodynamically unstable in a grand canonical ensemble. The general formalism is applied to the case of nonuniform black strings and caged black hole solutions in D = 5,6 Einstein-Maxwell-dilaton gravity, whose geometrical properties and thermodynamics are discussed. We argue that the topology changing transition scenario, which was previously proposed in the vacuum case, also holds in this case. Spinning generalizations of the charged black strings are constructed in six dimensions in the slowly rotating limit. We find that the gyromagnetic ratio of these solutions possesses a nontrivial dependence on the nonuniformity parameter.

  7. Graviton Kaluza-Klein modes in nonflat branes with stabilized modulus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paul, Tanmoy; SenGupta, Soumitra

    2016-04-01

    We consider a generalized two brane Randall-Sundrum model where the branes are endowed with nonzero cosmological constant. In this scenario, we re-examine the modulus stabilization mechanism and the nature of Kaluza-Klein (KK) graviton modes. Our result reveals that while the KK mode graviton masses may change significantly with the brane cosmological constant, the Goldberger-Wise stabilization mechanism, which assumes a negligible backreaction on the background metric, continues to hold even when the branes have a large cosmological constant. The possibility of having a global minimum for the modulus is also discussed. Our results also include an analysis for the radion mass in this nonflat brane scenario.

  8. Hawking Radiation via Damour-Ruffini Method in Squashed Charged Rotating Kaluza-Klein Black Holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Ji-Wan; Wu, Jing-He; Liu, Xian-Ming

    2016-12-01

    Using the Damour-Ruffini method, Hawking radiation of charged particles from squashed charged rotating five-dimensional Kaluza-Klein black holes is investigated extensively. Under the generalized tortoise coordinate transformation, Hawking temperature of the black holes is calculated by using charged scalar particles and Dirac fermions respectively. We find that the obtained Hawking temperature for charged Dirac fermions is the same as for charged scalar particles. What's more, the spectrum of Hawking radiation contains the information of the size of the extra dimension, which could provide insight for further investigation of large extra dimensions in the future.

  9. Schwinger pair creation of Kaluza-Klein particles: Pair creation without tunneling

    SciTech Connect

    Friedmann, Tamar; Verlinde, Herman

    2005-03-15

    We study Schwinger pair creation of charged Kaluza-Klein (KK) particles from a static KK electric field. We find that the gravitational backreaction of the electric field on the geometry--which is incorporated via the electric KK-Melvin solution--prevents the electrostatic potential from overcoming the rest mass of the KK particles, thus impeding the tunneling mechanism which is often thought of as responsible for the pair creation. However, we find that pair creation still occurs with a finite rate formally similar to the classic Schwinger result, but via an apparently different mechanism, involving a combination of the Unruh effect and vacuum polarization due to the E-field.

  10. Hawking Radiation via Damour-Ruffini Method in Squashed Charged Rotating Kaluza-Klein Black Holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Ji-Wan; Wu, Jing-He; Liu, Xian-Ming

    2017-02-01

    Using the Damour-Ruffini method, Hawking radiation of charged particles from squashed charged rotating five-dimensional Kaluza-Klein black holes is investigated extensively. Under the generalized tortoise coordinate transformation, Hawking temperature of the black holes is calculated by using charged scalar particles and Dirac fermions respectively. We find that the obtained Hawking temperature for charged Dirac fermions is the same as for charged scalar particles. What's more, the spectrum of Hawking radiation contains the information of the size of the extra dimension, which could provide insight for further investigation of large extra dimensions in the future.

  11. Hawking Radiation of the Charged Particle via Tunneling from the Kaluza-Klein Black Hole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pu, Jin; Han, Yan

    2016-12-01

    In this paper, by applying the Lagrangian analysis on the action, we first redefine the geodesic equation of the charged massive particle. Then, basing on the new definition of the geodesic equation, we revisit the Hawking radiation of the charged massive particle via tunneling from the event horizon of the Kaluza-Klein black hole. In our treatment, the geodesic equation of the charged massive particle is defined uniformly with that of the massless particle, which overcomes the shortcomings of its previous definition, and is more suitable for the tunneling mechanism. The highlight of our work is a new and important development for the Parikh-Wilczek's tunneling method.

  12. Compact hyperbolic extra dimensions: branes, kaluza-klein modes, and cosmology

    PubMed

    Kaloper; March-Russell; Starkman; Trodden

    2000-07-31

    We reconsider theories with low gravitational (or string) scale M(*) where Newton's constant is generated via new large-volume spatial dimensions, while standard model states are localized to a 3-brane. Utilizing compact hyperbolic manifolds we show that the spectrum of Kaluza-Klein modes is radically altered. This allows the early Universe to evolve normally up to substantial temperatures, and completely negates the astrophysical constraints on M(*). Furthermore, an exponential hierarchy between the usual Planck scale and the true fundamental scale of physics can emerge with only O(1) coefficients. The linear size of the internal space remains small. The proposal has striking testable signatures.

  13. Kaluza-Klein cosmology from five-dimensional Lovelock-Cartan theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castillo-Felisola, Oscar; Corral, Cristóbal; del Pino, Simón; Ramírez, Francisca

    2016-12-01

    We study the Kaluza-Klein dimensional reduction of the Lovelock-Cartan theory in five-dimensional spacetime, with a compact dimension of S1 topology. We find cosmological solutions of the Friedmann-Robertson-Walker class in the reduced spacetime. The torsion and the fields arising from the dimensional reduction induce a nonvanishing energy-momentum tensor in four dimensions. We find solutions describing expanding, contracting, and bouncing universes. The model shows a dynamical compactification of the extra dimension in some regions of the parameter space.

  14. Born-Infeld action and Chern-Simons term from Kaluza-Klein monopole in M-theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Imamura, Yosuke

    1997-11-01

    We investigate the zero modes of the Kaluza-Klein monopole in M-theory and show that the Born-Infeld action and the Chern-Simons term of a D6-brane are reproduced to quadratic order in the field strength of the U(1) field on the brane.

  15. Supersymmetric and Kaluza-Klein Particles Multiple Scattering in the Earth

    SciTech Connect

    Albuquerque, Ivone; Klein, Spencer

    2009-05-19

    Neutrino telescopes with cubic kilometer volume have the potential to discover new particles. Among them are next to lightest supersymmetric (NLSPs) and next to lightest Kaluza-Klein (NLKPs) particles. Two NLSPs or NLKPs will transverse the detector simultaneously producing parallel charged tracks. The track separation inside the detector can be a few hundred meters. As these particles might propagate a few thousand kilometers before reaching the detector, multiple scattering could enhance the pair separation at the detector. We find that the multiple scattering will alter the separation distribution enough to increase the number of NLKP pairs separated by more than 100 meters (a reasonable experimental cut) by up to 46% depending on the NLKP mass. Vertical upcoming NLSPs will have their separation increased by 24% due to multiple scattering.

  16. Plasmon annihilation into Kaluza-Klein gravitons: New astrophysical constraints on large extra dimensions?

    SciTech Connect

    Das, Prasanta Kumar; Satheeshkumar, V. H.; Suresh, P. K.

    2008-09-15

    In the large extra dimensional Kaluza-Klein (KK) scenario, where the usual standard model (SM) matter is confined to a 3+1-dimensional hypersurface called the 3-brane and gravity can propagate to the bulk (D=4+d, d being the number of extra spatial dimensions), the light graviton KK modes can be produced inside the supernova core due to the usual nucleon-nucleon bremstrahlung, electron-positron, and photon-photon annihilations. This photon inside the supernova becomes a plasmon due to the plasma effect. In this paper, we study the energy-loss rate of SN 1987A due to the KK gravitons produced from the plasmon-plasmon annihilation. We find that the SN 1987A cooling rate leads to the conservative bound M{sub D}>22.9 TeV and 1.38 TeV for the case of two and three spacelike extra dimensions.

  17. Significant effects of second Kaluza-Klein particles on dark matter physics

    SciTech Connect

    Kakizaki, Mitsuru; Senami, Masato; Matsumoto, Shigeki; Sato, Yoshio

    2005-06-15

    We point out that Kaluza-Klein (KK) dark matter physics is drastically affected by second KK particles. In this work various interesting phenomena caused by the second KK modes are discussed. In particular, we reevaluate the annihilation cross section relevant to the thermal relic density of KK dark matter in universal extra dimension models. In these models, the first KK mode of a B boson is a viable dark matter candidate by virtue of KK parity. We demonstrate that the KK dark matter annihilation cross section can be enhanced, compared with the tree-level cross section mediated only by first KK particles. The mass of the first KK mode of the B boson consistent with the Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe observation is increased.

  18. Next-to-leading order gravitational spin1-spin2 coupling with Kaluza-Klein reduction

    SciTech Connect

    Levi, Michele

    2010-09-15

    We use the recently proposed Kaluza-Klein (KK) reduction over the time dimension, within an effective field theory (EFT) approach, to calculate the next-to-leading order gravitational spin1-spin2 interaction between two spinning compact objects. It is shown here that to next-to-leading order in the spin1-spin2 interaction, the reduced KK action within the stationary approximation is sufficient to describe the gravitational interaction, and that it simplifies calculation substantially. We also find here that the gravitomagnetic vector field defined within the KK decomposition of the metric mostly dominates the mediation of the interaction. Our results coincide with those calculated in the Arnowitt-Deser-Misner Hamiltonian formalism, and we provide another explanation for the discrepancy with the result previously derived within the EFT approach, thus demonstrating clearly the equivalence of the Arnowitt-Deser-Misner Hamiltonian formalism and the EFT action approach.

  19. Kaluza-Klein masses in nonprime orbifolds: Z{sub 12-I} compactification and threshold correction

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Jihn E.; Kyae, Bumseok

    2008-05-15

    Analyzing the one-loop partition function, we discuss possible Kaluza-Klein (KK) states in the orbifold compactification of the heterotic string theory, toward the application to the threshold correction. The KK massive states associated with (relatively) large extra dimensions can arise only in nonprime orbifolds. The Gliozzi-Scherk-Olive (GSO) projection condition by a shift vector V{sup I} is somewhat relaxed above the compactification scale 1/R. We also present the other condition on Wilson line W, P{center_dot}W=integer. With the knowledge of the partition function, we obtain the threshold corrections to gauge couplings, which include the Wilson line effects. We point out the differences in string and field theoretic orbifolds.

  20. On Hamiltonians with position-dependent mass from Kaluza-Klein compactifications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ballesteros, Ángel; Gutiérrez-Sagredo, Iván; Naranjo, Pedro

    2017-02-01

    In a recent paper (Morris (2015) [1]), an inhomogeneous compactification of the extra dimension of a five-dimensional Kaluza-Klein metric has been shown to generate a position-dependent mass (PDM) in the corresponding four-dimensional system. As an application of this dimensional reduction mechanism, a specific static dilatonic scalar field has been connected with a PDM Lagrangian describing a well-known nonlinear PDM oscillator. Here we present more instances of this construction that lead to PDM systems with radial symmetry, and the properties of their corresponding inhomogeneous extra dimensions are compared with the ones in the nonlinear oscillator model. Moreover, it is also shown how the compactification introduced in this type of models can alternatively be interpreted as a novel mechanism for the dynamical generation of curvature.

  1. Kaluza-Klein consistency, Killing vectors and Kähler spaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoxha, P.; Martinez-Acosta, R. R.; Pope, C. N.

    2000-10-01

    We make a detailed investigation of all spaces Qn1...nNq1...qN of the form of U(1) bundles over arbitrary products ∏iCPni of complex projective spaces, with arbitrary winding numbers qi over each factor in the base. Special cases, including Q1111 (sometimes known as T11), Q111111 and Q2132, are relevant for compactifications of type IIB and D = 11 supergravity. Remarkable `conspiracies' allow consistent Kaluza-Klein S5, S4 and S7 sphere reductions of these theories that retain all the Yang-Mills fields of the isometry group in a massless truncation. We prove that such conspiracies do not occur for the reductions on the Qn1...nNq1...qN spaces, and that it is inconsistent to make a massless truncation in which the non-Abelian SU(ni + 1) factors in their isometry groups are retained. In the course of proving this we derive many properties of the spaces Qn1...nNq1...qN of more general utility. In particular, we show that they always admit Einstein metrics, and that the spaces where qi = (ni + 1)/l all admit two Killing spinors. We also obtain an iterative construction for real metrics on CPn, and construct the Killing vectors on Qn1...nNq1...qN in terms of scalar eigenfunctions on CPni. We derive bounds that allow us to prove that certain Killing-vector identities on spheres, necessary for consistent Kaluza-Klein reductions, are never satisfied on Qn1...nNq1...qN.

  2. Electroweak symmetry breaking by extra dimensions

    SciTech Connect

    Hsin-Chia Cheng; Bogdan A. Dobrescu and Christopher T. Hill

    2000-05-25

    Electroweak symmetry breaking may be naturally induced by the observed quark and gauge fields in extra dimensions without a fundamental Higgs field. The authors show that a composite Higgs doublet can arise as a bound state of (t,b){sub L} and a linear combination of the Kaluza-Klein states of t{sub R}, due to QCD in extra dimensions. The top quark mass depends on the number of active t{sub R} Kaluza-Klein modes, and is consistent with the experimental value.

  3. Improved generating technique for D=5 supergravities and squashed Kaluza-Klein black holes

    SciTech Connect

    Gal'tsov, Dmitri V.; Scherbluk, Nikolai G.

    2009-03-15

    Recently we suggested a solution-generating technique for five-dimensional supergravity with three Abelian vector fields based on the hidden SO(4,4) symmetry of the three-dimensionally reduced theory. This technique generalizes the G{sub 2(2)} generating technique developed earlier for minimal five-dimensional supergravity (A. Bouchareb, G. Clement, C-M. Chen, D. V. Gal'tsov, N. G. Scherbluk, and Th. Wolf, Phys. Rev. D 76, 104032 (2007)) and provides a new matrix representation for cosets forming the corresponding sigma-models in both cases. Here we further improve these methods introducing a matrix-valued dualization procedure which helps to avoid difficulties associated with solving the dualization equations in the component form. This new approach is used to generate a five-parametric rotating charged Kaluza-Klein black hole with the squashed horizon adding one parameter more to the recent solution by Tomizawa, Yasui, and Morisawa, which was constructed using the previous version of the G{sub 2(2)} generating technique.

  4. Search for Kaluza-Klein gravitons in extra dimension models via forward detectors at the LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Gi-Chol; Kono, Takanori; Mawatari, Kentarou; Yamashita, Kimiko

    2015-06-01

    We investigate contributions of Kaluza-Klein (KK) graviton in extra dimension models to the process p p →p γ p →p γ j X , where a proton emits a quasireal photon and is detected by using the very forward detectors planned at the LHC. In addition to the γ q initial state as in the Compton scattering in the standard model, the γ g scattering contributes through the t -channel exchange of KK gravitons. Taking account of pileup contributions to the background and examining viable kinematical cuts, constraints on the parameter space of both the ADD (Arkani-Hamed, Dimopoulos and Dvali) model and the RS (Randall and Sundrum) model are studied. With 200 fb-1 data at a center-of-mass energy of 14 TeV, the expected lower bound on the cutoff scale for the ADD model is 6.3 TeV at 95% confidence level, while a lower limit of 2.0 (0.5) TeV is set on the mass of the first excited graviton with the coupling parameter k /M¯ Pl=0.1 (0.01 ) for the RS model.

  5. Gravitational Kaluza-Klein modes in the string-cigar braneworld

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veras, D. F. S.; Silva, J. E. G.; Cruz, W. T.; Almeida, C. A. S.

    2015-03-01

    In this work we analyze the properties of the gravitational Kaluza-Klein (KK) modes in two stringlike braneworlds, the thin Gherghetta-Shaposhnikov (GS) model and the thick string-cigar model. The string-cigar model is a smooth generalization of the GS model that undergoes a Ricci geometrical flow. We find a new massless mode in both models satisfying the respective Schrödinger equations. By means of a numerical analysis, we obtain the complete graviton spectrum and its respective eigenfunctions. The KK spectrum exhibits the usual linear regime for large discrete index n and we find a new decreasing regime for small n . Moreover, there is an asymmetric mass gap between the massless mode and the massive KK tower. The mass gap in the GS model is bigger than in the string-cigar model. In addition, the mass gap remains invariant upon the geometrical flow. It turns out that in the string-cigar model the brane structure smoothes and amplifies the KK modes near the brane core. The presence of a potential well in the string-cigar scenario allows the existence of resonant massive gravitons for small masses.

  6. Lightest Kaluza-Klein graviton mode in a back-reacted Randall-Sundrum scenario

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, Ashmita; SenGupta, Soumitra

    2016-08-01

    In search of the extra dimensions in the ongoing LHC experiments, the signatures of the Randall-Sundrum (RS) lightest KK graviton have been in the main focus in recent years. The recent data from the dilepton decay channel at the LHC has determined the experimental lower bound on the mass of the RS lightest Kaluza-Klein (KK) graviton for different choices of the underlying parameters of the theory. In this work we explore the effects of the back-reaction of the bulk scalar field, which is employed to stabilise the RS model, in modifying the couplings of the lightest KK graviton with the standard model matter fields located on the visible brane. In such a modified background geometry we show that the coupling of the lightest KK graviton with the SM matter fields gets a significant suppression due to the inclusion of the back-reaction of the bulk stabilising scalar field. This implies that the back-reaction parameter weakens the signals from the RS scenario in collider experiments, which in turn explains the non-visibility of KK graviton in colliders. Thus we show that the modulus stabilisation plays a crucial role in the search of warped extra dimensions in collider experiments.

  7. Integration of Kaluza-Klein modes in Yang-Mills theories

    SciTech Connect

    Novales-Sanchez, H.; Toscano, J. J.

    2011-10-01

    A five-dimensional pure Yang-Mills theory, with the fifth coordinate compactified on the orbifold S{sup 1}/Z{sub 2} of radius R, leads to a four-dimensional theory which is governed by two types of infinitesimal gauge transformations, namely, the well-known standard gauge transformations (SGT) dictated by the SU{sub 4}(N) group under which the zero Fourier modes A{sub {mu}}{sup (0)a} transform as gauge fields, and a set of nonstandard gauge transformations (NSGT) determining the gauge nature of the Kaluza-Klein (KK) excitations A{sub {mu}}{sup (m)a}. By using a SGT-covariant gauge-fixing procedure for removing the degeneration associated with the NSGT, we integrate out the KK excitations and obtain a low-energy effective Lagrangian expansion involving all of the independent canonical-dimension-six operators that are invariant under the SGT of the SU{sub 4}(N) group and that are constituted by light gauge fields, A{sub {mu}}{sup (0)a}, exclusively. It is shown that this effective Lagrangian is invariant under the SGT, but it depends on the gauge-fixing of the gauge KK excitations. Our result shows explicitly that the one-loop contributions of the KK excitations to light (standard) Green's functions are renormalizable.

  8. Kaluza-Klein gravitons are negative energy dust in brane cosmology

    SciTech Connect

    Minamitsuji, Masato; Sasaki, Misao; Langlois, David

    2005-04-15

    We discuss the effect of Kaluza-Klein (KK) modes of bulk metric perturbations on the second Randall-Sundrum (RS II) type brane cosmology, taking the possible backreaction in the bulk and on the brane into account. KK gravitons may be produced via quantum fluctuations during a de Sitter (dS) inflating phase of our brane universe. In an effective 4-dimensional theory in which one integrates out the extra-dimensional dependence in the action, KK gravitons are equivalent to massive gravitons on the brane with masses m>3H/2, where H represents the expansion rate of a dS brane. Thus production of even a tiny amount of KK gravitons may eventually have a significant impact on the late-time brane cosmology. As a first step to quantify the effect of KK gravitons on the brane, we calculate the effective energy density and pressure for a single KK mode. Surprisingly, we find that a KK mode behaves as cosmic dust with a negative energy density on the brane. We note that the bulk energy density of a KK mode is positive definite and there occurs no singular phenomenon in the bulk.

  9. Dangerous angular Kaluza-Klein/glueball relics in string theory cosmology

    SciTech Connect

    Dufaux, J. F.; Kofman, L.; Peloso, M.

    2008-07-15

    The presence of Kaluza-Klein (KK) particles in the universe is a potential manifestation of string theory cosmology. In general, they can be present in the high temperature bath of the early universe. In particular examples, string theory inflation often ends with brane-antibrane annihilation followed by the energy cascading through massive closed string loops to KK modes which then decay into lighter standard model particles. However, massive KK modes in the early universe may become dangerous cosmological relics if the inner manifold contains warped throat(s) with approximate isometries. In the complimentary picture, in the AdS/CFT dual gauge theory with extra isometries, massive glueballs of various spins become the dangerous cosmological relics. The decay of these angular KK modes/glueballs, located around the tip of the throat, is caused by isometry breaking which results from gluing the throat to the compact Calabi-Yau (CY) manifold. We address the problem of these angular KK particles/glueballs, studying their interactions and decay channels, from the theory side, and the resulting cosmological constraints on the warped compactification parameters, from the phenomenology side. The abundance and decay time of the long-lived nonrelativistic angular KK modes depend strongly on the parameters of the warped geometry, so that observational constraints rule out a significant fraction of the parameter space. In particular, the coupling of the angular KK particles can be weaker than gravitational.

  10. PAMELA and Fermi LAT signals from long-lived Kaluza-Klein dark matter

    SciTech Connect

    Okada, Nobuchika; Yamada, Toshifumi

    2009-10-01

    We propose a simple extension of the minimal universal extra dimension model by introducing a small curvature. The model is formulated as a small anti-de Sitter curvature limit of the five-dimensional standard model (SM) in the Randall-Sundrum background geometry. While the lightest Kaluza-Klein (KK) particle can be thermal relic dark matter as usual in the universal extra dimension model, the KK parity is explicitly broken in the presence of the small curvature and the KK dark matter decays into the SM fermions with a long lifetime. Couplings of the KK dark matter with SM fermion pairs in the five-dimensional bulk are controlled by fermion bulk masses. By tuning bulk masses of quarks, we can suppress KK dark matter decay into quarks. With a suitable choice of bulk masses for leptons, KK dark matter decay into leptons can account for the cosmic-ray electron/positron excesses reported by the recent PAMELA and Fermi LAT satellite experiments.

  11. Kaluza-Klein cosmological model in f(R, T) gravity with Λ(T)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahoo, P. K.; Mishra, B.; Tripathy, S. K.

    2016-04-01

    A class of Kaluza-Klein cosmological models in $f(R,T)$ theory of gravity have been investigated. In the work, we have considered the functional $f(R,T)$ to be in the form $f(R,T)=f(R)+f(T)$ with $f(R)=\\lambda R$ and $f(T)=\\lambda T$. Such a choice of the functional $f(R,T)$ leads to an evolving effective cosmological constant $\\Lambda$ which depends on the stress energy tensor. The source of the matter field is taken to be a perfect cosmic fluid. The exact solutions of the field equations are obtained by considering a constant deceleration parameter which leads two different aspects of the volumetric expansion namely a power law and an exponential volumetric expansion. Keeping an eye on the accelerating nature of the universe in the present epoch, the dynamics and physical behaviour of the models have been discussed. From statefinder diagnostic pair we found that the model with exponential volumetric expansion behaves more like a $\\Lambda$CDM model.

  12. Static wormholes on the brane inspired by Kaluza-Klein gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Leon, J. Ponce de

    2009-11-01

    We use static solutions of 5-dimensional Kaluza-Klein gravity to generate several classes of static, spherically symmetric spacetimes which are analytic solutions to the equation {sup (4)}R = 0, where {sup (4)}R is the four-dimensional Ricci scalar. In the Randall and Sundrum scenario they can be interpreted as vacuum solutions on the brane. The solutions contain the Schwarzschild black hole, and generate new families of traversable Lorenzian wormholes as well as nakedly singular spacetimes. They generalize a number of previously known solutions in the literature, e.g., the temporal and spatial Schwarzschild solutions of braneworld theory as well as the class of self-dual Lorenzian wormholes. A major departure of our solutions from Lorenzian wormholes a la Morris and Thorne is that, for certain values of the parameters of the solutions, they contain three spherical surfaces (instead of one) which are extremal and have finite area. Two of them have the same size, meet the ''flare-out'' requirements, and show the typical violation of the energy conditions that characterizes a wormhole throat. The other extremal sphere is ''flaring-in'' in the sense that its sectional area is a local maximum and the weak, null and dominant energy conditions are satisfied in its neighborhood. After bouncing back at this second surface a traveler crosses into another space which is the double of the one she/he started in. Another interesting feature is that the size of the throat can be less than the Schwarzschild radius 2M, which no longer defines the horizon, i.e., to a distant observer a particle or light falling down crosses the Schwarzschild radius in a finite time.

  13. Hamiltonian Map to Conformal Modification of Spacetime Metric: Kaluza-Klein and TeVeS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horwitz, Lawrence; Gershon, Avi; Schiffer, Marcelo

    2011-01-01

    It has been shown that the orbits of motion for a wide class of non-relativistic Hamiltonian systems can be described as geodesic flows on a manifold and an associated dual by means of a conformal map. This method can be applied to a four dimensional manifold of orbits in spacetime associated with a relativistic system. We show that a relativistic Hamiltonian which generates Einstein geodesics, with the addition of a world scalar field, can be put into correspondence in this way with another Hamiltonian with conformally modified metric. Such a construction could account for part of the requirements of Bekenstein for achieving the MOND theory of Milgrom in the post-Newtonian limit. The constraints on the MOND theory imposed by the galactic rotation curves, through this correspondence, would then imply constraints on the structure of the world scalar field. We then use the fact that a Hamiltonian with vector gauge fields results, through such a conformal map, in a Kaluza-Klein type theory, and indicate how the TeVeS structure of Bekenstein and Saunders can be put into this framework. We exhibit a class of infinitesimal gauge transformations on the gauge fields {mathcal{U}}_{μ}(x) which preserve the Bekenstein-Sanders condition {mathcal{U}}_{μ}{mathcal{U}}^{μ}=-1. The underlying quantum structure giving rise to these gauge fields is a Hilbert bundle, and the gauge transformations induce a non-commutative behavior to the fields, i.e. they become of Yang-Mills type. Working in the infinitesimal gauge neighborhood of the initial Abelian theory we show that in the Abelian limit the Yang-Mills field equations provide residual nonlinear terms which may avoid the caustic singularity found by Contaldi et al.

  14. Photo-production of a 750 GeV di-photon resonance mediated by Kaluza-Klein leptons in the loop

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abel, Steven; Khoze, Valentin V.

    2016-05-01

    We consider the phenomenology of a 750 GeV resonance X which can be produced at the LHC by only photon fusion and subsequently decay into di-photons. We propose that the spin-zero state X is coupled to a heavy lepton that lives in the bulk of a higher-dimensional theory and interacts only with the photons of the Standard Model. We compute the di-photon rate in these models with two and more compact extra dimensions and demonstrate that they allow for a compelling explanation of the di-photon excess recently observed by the ATLAS and CMS collaborations. The central role in our approach is played by the summation over the Kaluza-Klein modes of the new leptons, thus providing a significant enhancement of the X → γγ loops for the production and decay subprocesses. It is expected that the jet activity accompanying these purely electromagnetic (at the partonic level) processes is numerically suppressed by factors such as {α}_{em}^2{{C}}_{qoverline{q}}/{{C}}_{γ γ}˜ 1{0}^{-3}.

  15. Limits on a muon flux from Kaluza-Klein dark matter annihilations in the Sun from the IceCube 22-string detector

    SciTech Connect

    IceCube Collaboration; Abbasi, R.; al., et

    2009-10-23

    A search for muon neutrinos from Kaluza-Klein dark matter annihilations in the Sun has been performed with the 22-string configuration of the IceCube neutrino detector using data collected in 104.3 days of live-time in 2007. No excess over the expected atmospheric background has been observed. Upper limits have been obtained on the annihilation rate of captured lightest Kaluza-Klein particle (LKP) WIMPs in the Sun and converted to limits on the LKP-proton cross-sections for LKP masses in the range 250 - 3000 GeV. These results are the most stringent limits to date on LKP annihilation in the Sun.

  16. Uniqueness theorem for black holes with Kaluza-Klein asymptotic in 5D Einstein-Maxwell gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Yazadjiev, Stoytcho

    2010-07-15

    In the present paper, we prove a uniqueness theorem for stationary multi-black hole configurations with Kaluza-Klein asymptotic in a certain sector of 5D Einstein-Maxwell gravity. As a part of the technical assumptions in the theorem, we assume that the Killing vector associated with the compact dimension is orthogonal to the other Killing vectors and that it is also hypersurface orthogonal. About the Maxwell field, we assume that it is invariant under the Killing symmetries and has a nonzero component only along the Killing vector associated with the compact dimension. We show that such multi-black hole configurations are uniquely specified by the interval structure, angular momenta of the horizons, magnetic charges, and the magnetic flux. A straightforward generalization of the uniqueness theorem for 5D Einstein-Maxwell-dilaton gravity is also given.

  17. Productions of second Kaluza-Klein gauge bosons in the minimal universal extra dimension model at LHC

    SciTech Connect

    Matsumoto, Shigeki; Sato, Joe; Yamanaka, Masato; Senami, Masato

    2009-09-01

    We calculate the production rates of the second Kaluza-Klein (KK) photon {gamma}{sup (2)} and Z boson Z{sup (2)} at the LHC including all significant processes in the minimal universal extra dimension (MUED) model. For discrimination of the MUED model from other TeV scale models at the LHC, {gamma}{sup (2)} and Z{sup (2)} play a crucial role. In order to discuss the discrimination and calculate their production rates, we derive KK number violating operators including the contribution of the top Yukawa coupling. Using these operators, we accurately calculate branching ratios of second KK particles. In addition we find that these KK number violating operators provide new processes for {gamma}{sup (2)} and Z{sup (2)} productions, such as cascade decay from second KK quarks produced through these operators. They have large contributions to their total production rates. In particular, these production processes give the dominant contribution for {gamma}{sup (2)} production for 1/R > or approx. 800 GeV. As a result, with an integrated luminosity of 100 fb{sup -1}, the number of produced {gamma}{sup (2)} and Z{sup (2)} are estimated as 10{sup 6}-10{sup 2} for the compactification scale between 400 and 2000 GeV.

  18. Searches for Kaluza-Klein graviton excitations and microscopic black holes with the aid of the CMS detector at the LHC

    SciTech Connect

    Savina, M. V.

    2015-06-15

    A survey of the results of the Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) experiment that concern searches for massive Kaluza-Klein graviton excitations and microscopic black holes, quantum black holes, and string balls within models of low-energy multidimensional gravity is presented on behalf of the CMS Collaboration. The analysis in question is performed on the basis of a complete sample of data accumulated for proton-proton collisions at the c.m. energies of 7 and 8 TeV at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) over the period spanning 2010 and 2012.

  19. Approach of background metric expansion to a new metric ansatz for gauged and ungauged Kaluza-Klein supergravity black holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Shuang-Qing; Wang, He

    2015-05-01

    In a previous paper [S. Q. Wu, Phys. Rev. D 83, 121502(R) (2011)], a new kind of metric ansatz was found to fairly describe all already-known black hole solutions in the ungauged Kaluza-Klein (KK) supergravity theories. That metric ansatz somewhat resembles the famous Kerr-Schild (KS) form, but it is different from the KS one in two distinct aspects. That is, apart from a global conformal factor, the metric ansatz can be written as a vacuum background spacetime plus a "perturbation" modification term, the latter of which is associated with a timelike geodesic vector field rather than a null geodesic congruence in the usual KS ansatz. Replacing the flat vacuum background metric by the (anti-)de Sitter [(A)dS] spacetime, the general rotating charged KK-(A)dS black hole solutions in all higher dimensions have been successfully constructed and put into a unified form. In this paper, we shall study this novel metric ansatz in detail, aiming at achieving some inspiration as to the construction of rotating charged AdS black holes with multiple charges in other gauged supergravity theories. We find that the traditional perturbation expansion method often successfully used in the KS form is no longer useful in our new ansatz, since here no good parameter can be chosen as a suitable perturbation indicator. In order to investigate the metric properties of the general KK-AdS solutions, in this paper we devise a new effective method, dubbed the background metric expansion method, which can be thought of as a generalization of the perturbation expansion method, to deal with the Lagrangian and all equations of motion. In addition to two previously known conditions, namely the timelike and geodesic properties of the vector, we get three additional constraints via contracting the Maxwell and Einstein equations once or twice with this timelike geodesic vector. In particular, we find that these are a simpler set of sufficient conditions to determine the vector and the dilaton scalar

  20. Cosmological properties and reconstruction of scalar field models of the Holographic Dark Energy model with Granda-Oliveros cut-off in Kaluza-Klein cosmology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pasqua, Antonio; Chattopadhyay, Surajit; Assaf, Khudhair A.; Salako, Ines G.

    2016-06-01

    In this paper, we study the properties of the Holographic Dark Energy (HDE) model in the context of Kaluza-Klein (KK) cosmology with infrared cut-off given by the recently proposed by Granda-Oliveros cut-off, which contains a term proportional to the time derivative of the Hubble parameter and one proportional to the Hubble parameter squared. Moreover, this cut-off is characterized by two free parameters which are the proportional constants of the two terms of the cut-off. We derive the expression of the Equation of State (EoS) parameter ωD and of the deceleration parameter q for both non-interacting and interacting Dark Sectors and in the limiting case of a flat Dark Dominated Universe. Moreover, we study the squared speed of the sound vs2 and the statefinder diagnostic \\{r,s\\} in order to understand the cosmological properties of the model considered. We also develop a correspondence between the model considered and three scalar field models: the tachyon, the k-essence and the quintessence ones.

  1. Flavor changing neutral current constraints from Kaluza-Klein gluons and quark mass matrices in the Randall-Sundrum I framework

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, W.-F.; Ng, John N.; Wu, Jackson M. S.

    2009-03-01

    We continue our previous study on what are the allowed forms of quark mass matrices in the Randall-Sundrum framework that can reproduce the experimentally observed quark mass spectrum and the pattern of Cabibbo-Kobayashi-Maskawa mixing. We study the constraints the {delta}F=2 processes in the neutral meson sector placed on the admissible forms found there, and we found only the asymmetrical type of quark mass matrices arising from anarchical Yukawa structures remain viable at the few TeV scale reachable at the LHC. We study also the decay of the first Kaluza-Klein (KK) excitation of the gluon. We give the decay branching ratios of the first KK gluon into quark pairs, and we point out that measurements of the decay width and just one of the quark spins in the dominant tt decays can be used to extract the effective coupling of the first KK gluon to top quarks for both chiralities. This provides a further probe into the flavor structure of the Randall-Sundrum framework.

  2. Bulk Randall-Sundrum models, electroweak precision tests, and the 125 GeV Higgs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iyer, Abhishek M.; Sridhar, K.; Vempati, Sudhir K.

    2016-04-01

    We present up-to-date electroweak fits of various Randall-Sundrum (RS) models. We consider the bulk RS, deformed RS, and the custodial RS models. For the bulk RS case we find the lightest Kaluza-Klein (KK) mode of the gauge boson to be ˜8 TeV , while for the custodial case it is ˜3 TeV . The deformed model is the least fine-tuned of all which can give a good fit for KK masses <2 TeV depending on the choice of the model parameters. We also comment on the fine-tuning in each case.

  3. Search for heavy resonances, and resonant diboson production with the ATLAS detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tal Hod, Noam

    2013-05-01

    Heavy resonances decaying into a pair of fundamental particles such as jj, ℓ+ℓ-, γγ, and ℓV, are among the most common features to search for phenomena beyond the standard model (SM). Electroweak boson pair production, such as WW or ZZ with subsequent decays to ℓVℓ'V' and ℓℓjj respectively, is a powerful test of the spontaneously broken gauge symmetry of the SM and can be also used to search for phenomena beyond the SM. There is a wide spectrum of theoretical models predicting these kinds of resonant signatures. This note covers several searches for these new phenomena conducted within ATLAS in 2011 and 2012 for the LHC 7 and 8 TeV center of mass energies respectively. No significant deviations from the SM have been observed and therefore, limits are set on the characteristic parameters of several new physics models. These benchmark models include new heavy Z'/W' gauge bosons, chiral excitation of the SM weak gauge bosons, Z*/W* Randal-Sundrum and ADD gravitons, Composite models for quarks, e.g. q* with substructure scale Λ, Quantum black holes, TeV-1 Kaluza-Klein excitation of γ/Z and more.

  4. Dynamical Electroweak Symmetry Breaking with a Heavy Fermion in Light of Recent LHC Results

    DOE PAGES

    Hung, Pham Q.

    2013-01-01

    The recent announcement of a discovery of a possible Higgs-like particle—its spin and parity are yet to be determined—at the LHC with a mass of 126 GeV necessitates a fresh look at the nature of the electroweak symmetry breaking, in particular if this newly-discovered particle will turn out to have the quantum numbers of a Standard Model Higgs boson. Even if it were a 0 + scalar with the properties expected for a SM Higgs boson, there is still the quintessential hierarchy problem that one has to deal with and which, by itself, suggests a new physics energy scale aroundmore » 1 TeV. This paper presents a minireview of one possible scenario: the formation of a fermion-antifermion condensate coming from a very heavy fourth generation, carrying the quantum number of the SM Higgs field, and thus breaking the electroweak symmetry.« less

  5. Heavy Baryons:. a Combined Large Nc and Heavy Quark Expansion for Electroweak Currents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gelman, Boris A.

    2002-09-01

    The combined large Nc and heavy quark limit for baryons containing a single heavy quark is discussed. The combined large Nc and heavy quark expansion of the heavy quark bilinear operators is obtained. In this expansion, the corrections proportional to mN/mQ are summed to all orders. In particular, the expansion can be used to determine semileptonic form factors of heavy baryons in the combined limit.

  6. Heavy neutral scalar decays into electroweak gauge bosons in the littlest Higgs model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aranda, J. I.; Cortés-Maldonado, I.; Montejo-Montejo, S.; Ramírez-Zavaleta, F.; Tututi, E. S.

    2017-04-01

    We study the heavy neutral scalar decays into standard model electroweak gauge bosons in the context of the littlest Higgs model. We focus our attention on the {{{Φ }}}0\\to {WW},γ V processes induced at the one-loop level, with V=γ ,Z. Since the branching ratios of the {{{Φ }}}0\\to γ V decays are very suppressed, only the {{{Φ }}}0\\to {WW} process is analyzed in the framework of possible experimental scenarios by using heavy scalar masses between 1.6 TeV and 3.3 TeV. The branching ratio for the {{{Φ }}}0\\to {WW} decay is of the order of 10‑3 throughout the interval 2 {TeV}< f< 4 {TeV}, which represents the global symmetry breaking scale of the theory. Thus, the associated production cross section for {pp}\\to {{{Φ }}}0X\\to {WW} is estimated, finding around ten events for {m}{{{Φ }}0}≈ 1.6 {TeV} at best.

  7. LHC signals for warped electroweak charged gauge bosons

    SciTech Connect

    Agashe, Kaustubh; Gopalakrishna, Shrihari; Soni, Amarjit; Han Tao; Huang Guiyu

    2009-10-01

    We study signals at the LHC for the Kaluza-Klein (KK) excitations of electroweak charged gauge bosons in the framework of the standard model (SM) fields propagating in the bulk of a warped extra dimension. Such a scenario can solve both the Planck-weak and flavor hierarchy problems of the SM. There are two such charged states in this scenario with couplings to light quarks and leptons being suppressed relative to those in the SM, whereas the couplings to top/bottom quarks are enhanced, similar to the case of electroweak neutral gauge bosons previously studied. However, unlike the case of electroweak neutral gauge bosons, there is no irreducible QCD background (including pollution from possibly degenerate KK gluons) for decays to top+bottom final states so that this channel is useful for the discovery of the charged states. Moreover, decays of electroweak charged gauge bosons to longitudinal W, Z and Higgs are enhanced just as for the neutral bosons. However, unlike for the neutral gauge bosons, the purely leptonic (and hence clean) decay mode of the WZ is fully reconstructible so that the ratio of the signal to the SM (electroweak) background can potentially be enhanced by restricting to the resonance region more efficiently. We show that such final states can give sensitivity to 2(3) TeV masses with an integrated luminosity of 100(300) fb{sup -1}. We emphasize that improvements in discriminating a QCD jet from a highly boosted hadronically decaying W, and a highly boosted top jet from a bottom jet will enhance the reach for these KK particles, and that the signals we study for the warped extra dimensional model might actually be applicable also to a wider class of nonsupersymmetric models of electroweak symmetry breaking.

  8. Particle creation in Kaluza-Klein cosmology.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wunghong, Huang

    1989-10-01

    The author exactly calculates the particle number N of scalar fields which are created from an initial vacuum in certain higher-dimensional cosmological models. The spacetimes in these models are the four-dimensional Chitre-Hartle or radiation-dominated universe with extra spaces which are static or power-law contracting. Except for some models in which no particles could be produced, the distribution of created particles shows a thermal behavior, at least in the limit of high three-dimensional "momentum" k. In some models, N does not depend on the magnitude of the extra-dimensional "momentum" kc if kc is nonvanishing. A cutoff momentum kc may emerge in some models, and particles with k ≤ kc could not be produced. The author discusses these results.

  9. Searches for Exotics: Heavy resonances with the ATLAS detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viel, Simon; ATLAS Collaboration

    2013-08-01

    Many theories that go beyond the Standard Model predict the existence of new heavy resonances decaying into pairs of particles. This review summarizes a wide collection of recent results from the ATLAS experiment at the Large Hadron Collider on searches for resonances decaying into various combinations of charged leptons, neutrinos, jets from gluons or light quarks, top quarks, photons and heavy gauge bosons. Limits are set on a variety of theories beyond the Standard Model used as benchmarks, among them Kaluza-Klein, Randall-Sundrum and ADD models with extra dimensions, as well as Grand Unified Theories and Technicolour.

  10. Does the three site Higgsless model survive the electroweak precision tests at loop?

    SciTech Connect

    Abe, Tomohiro; Tanabashi, Masaharu; Matsuzaki, Shinya

    2008-09-01

    We complete the list of one-loop renormalization group equations and matching conditions relevant for the computation of the electroweak precision parameters S and T in the three site Higgsless model. We obtain one-loop formulas for S and T expressed in terms of physical observables such as the Kaluza-Klein (KK) gauge boson mass M{sub W{sup '}}, the KK fermion mass M, and the KK gauge boson (W{sup '}) couplings with light quarks and leptons g{sub W{sup '}}{sub ff}. It is shown that these physical observables, M{sub W{sup '}}, M, and g{sub W{sup '}}{sub ff} are severely constrained by the electroweak precision data. Unlike the tree level analysis on the ideally delocalized fermion, we find that perfect fermiophobity of W{sup '} is ruled out by the precision data. We also study the cutoff dependence of our analysis. Although the model is nonrenormalizable, the dependence on the cutoff parameter {lambda} is shown to be nonsignificant.

  11. A note on gauge-fixing in the electroweak sector of non-minimal UED

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Datta, Anindya; Shaw, Avirup

    2016-09-01

    Electroweak observables are highly sensitive to the loop corrections. Therefore, a proper gauge-fixing mechanism is always needed to define the propagators which are involved in Feynman loop amplitude. With this spirit, we compute gauge-fixing mechanism in five-dimensional (5D) universal extra-dimensional (UED) model with boundary localized terms (BLTs). These BLTs are not 5D operators in four-dimensional (4D) effective theory but some sort of boundary conditions on the respective fields at the fixed points of S1/Z 2 orbifold. Furthermore, these BLTs nontrivially modify the Kaluza-Klein (KK) spectra and some of the interactions among the KK-excitations compared to the minimal UED (mUED), in which, these BLTs are absent. In this note, we calculate the gauge-fixing mechanism in the electroweak sector of such nontrivial UED scenario. Moreover, we discuss the composition and masses of Goldstone and any physical scalar that emerge after the symmetry breaking in this set up with different choices of gauge.

  12. Precision electroweak measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Demarteau, M.

    1996-11-01

    Recent electroweak precision measurements fro {ital e}{sup +}{ital e}{sup -} and {ital p{anti p}} colliders are presented. Some emphasis is placed on the recent developments in the heavy flavor sector. The measurements are compared to predictions from the Standard Model of electroweak interactions. All results are found to be consistent with the Standard Model. The indirect constraint on the top quark mass from all measurements is in excellent agreement with the direct {ital m{sub t}} measurements. Using the world`s electroweak data in conjunction with the current measurement of the top quark mass, the constraints on the Higgs` mass are discussed.

  13. Electroweak measurements using heavy quarks identified in e(+)e(-) annihilation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodin, Jonathan P.

    1998-12-01

    Since 1989, the Large Electron Positron collider at CERN has been used to study electroweak physics to an unprecedented precision. The data have acted as spectacular confirmation of the Standard Model as the best description of electroweak interactions at scales of ~100 GeV. However, in 1995, a possible anomaly appeared in the LEP measurement of Rb=[Γ(Z/to b/bar b)/overΓ(Z/to[ hadrons])] which was more than three standard deviations above the Standard Model prediction. This effect could not be accounted for by minor adjustment of model parameters, in particular the mass of the top quark which had recently been directly measured at the Fermilab Tevatron. In order to investigate whether the deviation could be an indication of physics beyond the Standard Model we present new precise measurements of both Rb and the forward- backward asymmetry of b quark production, AFBb, using ~63 pb-1 of data at the Z peak recorded by the L3 detector during 1994-95. The results are:/eqalign[Rb&=0.2146/pm0.0017(stat)/pm0.0033(sys)- 0.139/ (Rc-0.171)/cr AFBb&=9.33/pm1.40(stat)/pm.0.65(sys)/ pm0.10(QCD)/%/cr]This value for Rb agrees with the Standard Model to within one standard deviation. AFBb leads to a value for the effective weak mixing angle for b- quarkssin2θweff=0.2333/ pm0.0025(stat)/pm 0.0012(sys)which is consistent with values obtained using different decay modes of the Z and from neutrino physics, supporting flavour universality. We thus observe no deviation from the Standard Model and, from the Rb measurement, limit the effects of new physics to <1.7% in b decays. (Copies available exclusively from MIT Libraries, Rm. 14-0551, Cambridge, MA 02139- 4307. Ph. 617-253-5668; Fax 617-253-1690.)

  14. CERN LHC signals for warped electroweak neutral gauge bosons

    SciTech Connect

    Agashe, Kaustubh; Davoudiasl, Hooman; Gopalakrishna, Shrihari; Soni, Amarjit; Han Tao; Huang, G.-Y.; Perez, Gilad; Si Zongguo

    2007-12-01

    We study signals at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) for Kaluza-Klein (KK) excitations of the electroweak gauge bosons in the framework with the standard model (SM) gauge and fermion fields propagating in a warped extra dimension. Such a framework addresses both the Planck-weak and flavor hierarchy problems of the SM. Unlike the often studied Z{sup '} cases, in this framework, there are three neutral gauge bosons due to the underlying SU(2){sub L}xSU(2){sub R}xU(1){sub X} gauge group in the bulk. Furthermore, couplings of these KK states to light quarks and leptons are suppressed, whereas those to top and bottom quarks are enhanced compared to the SM gauge couplings. Therefore, the production of light quark and lepton states is suppressed relative to other beyond the SM constructions, and the fermionic decays of these states are dominated by the top and bottom quarks, which are, though, overwhelmed by KK gluons dominantly decaying into them. However, as we emphasize in this paper, decays of these states to longitudinal W, Z and Higgs are also enhanced similarly to the case of top and bottom quarks. We show that the W, Z and Higgs final states can give significant sensitivity at the LHC to {approx}2(3) TeV KK scale with an integrated luminosity of {approx}100 fb{sup -1} ({approx}1 ab{sup -1}). Since current theoretical framework(s) favor KK masses > or approx. 3 TeV, a luminosity upgrade of LHC is likely to be crucial in observing these states.

  15. Electroweak and QCD corrections to top-pair hadroproduction in association with heavy bosons

    SciTech Connect

    Frixione, Stefano; Hirschi, V.; Pagani, D.; Shao, H. -S.; Zaro, M.

    2015-06-26

    Here, we compute the contribution of order αS2α2 to the cross section of a top-antitop pair in association with at least one heavy Standard Model boson — Z, W±, and Higgs — by including all effects of QCD, QED, and weak origin and by working in the automated MadGraph5_aMC@NLO framework. Furthermore, this next-to-leading order contribution is then combined with that of order αS3α, and with the two dominant lowest-order ones, αS2α and αSα2, to obtain phenomenological results relevant to a 8, 13, and 100 TeV pp collider.

  16. Electroweak and QCD corrections to top-pair hadroproduction in association with heavy bosons

    DOE PAGES

    Frixione, Stefano; Hirschi, V.; Pagani, D.; ...

    2015-06-26

    Here, we compute the contribution of order αS2α2 to the cross section of a top-antitop pair in association with at least one heavy Standard Model boson — Z, W±, and Higgs — by including all effects of QCD, QED, and weak origin and by working in the automated MadGraph5_aMC@NLO framework. Furthermore, this next-to-leading order contribution is then combined with that of order αS3α, and with the two dominant lowest-order ones, αS2α and αSα2, to obtain phenomenological results relevant to a 8, 13, and 100 TeV pp collider.

  17. Top Quark Produced Through the Electroweak Force: Discovery Using the Matrix Element Analysis and Search for Heavy Gauge Bosons Using Boosted Decision Trees

    SciTech Connect

    Pangilinan, Monica

    2010-05-01

    The top quark produced through the electroweak channel provides a direct measurement of the Vtb element in the CKM matrix which can be viewed as a transition rate of a top quark to a bottom quark. This production channel of top quark is also sensitive to different theories beyond the Standard Model such as heavy charged gauged bosons termed W'. This thesis measures the cross section of the electroweak produced top quark using a technique based on using the matrix elements of the processes under consideration. The technique is applied to 2.3 fb-1 of data from the D0 detector. From a comparison of the matrix element discriminants between data and the signal and background model using Bayesian statistics, we measure the cross section of the top quark produced through the electroweak mechanism σ(p$\\bar{p}$ → tb + X, tqb + X) = 4.30-1.20+0.98 pb. The measured result corresponds to a 4.9σ Gaussian-equivalent significance. By combining this analysis with other analyses based on the Bayesian Neural Network (BNN) and Boosted Decision Tree (BDT) method, the measured cross section is 3.94 ± 0.88 pb with a significance of 5.0σ, resulting in the discovery of electroweak produced top quarks. Using this measured cross section and constraining |Vtb| < 1, the 95% confidence level (C.L.) lower limit is |Vtb| > 0.78. Additionally, a search is made for the production of W' using the same samples from the electroweak produced top quark. An analysis based on the BDT method is used to separate the signal from expected backgrounds. No significant excess is found and 95% C.L. upper limits on the production cross section are set for W' with masses within 600-950 GeV. For four general models of W{prime} boson production using decay channel W' → t$\\bar{p}$, the lower mass limits are the following: M(W'L with SM couplings) > 840 GeV; M(W'R) > 880 GeV or 890 GeV if the right-handed neutrino is

  18. Top quark produced through the electroweak force: Discovery using the matrix element analysis and search for heavy gauge bosons using boosted decision trees

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pangilinan, Monica

    The top quark produced through the electroweak channel provides a direct measurement of the Vtb element in the CKM matrix which can be viewed as a transition rate of a top quark to a bottom quark. This production channel of top quark is also sensitive to different theories beyond the Standard Model such as heavy charged gauged bosons termed W'. This thesis measures the cross section of the electroweak produced top quark using a technique based on using the matrix elements of the processes under consideration. The technique is applied to 2.3 fb--1 of data from the DO detector. From a comparison of the matrix element discriminants between data and the signal and background model using Bayesian statistics, we measure the cross section of the top quark produced through the electroweak mechanism spp¯→ tb+X,tqb+X=4.30+0.98-1.2 0pb The measured result corresponds to a 4.9sigma Gaussian-equivalent significance. By combining this analysis with other analyses based on the Bayesian Neural Network (BNN) and Boosted Decision Tree (BDT) method, the measured cross section is 3.94 +/- 0.88 pb with a significance of 5.0sigma, resulting in the discovery of electroweak produced top quarks. Using this measured cross section and constraining |Vtb| < 1, the 95% confidence level (C.L.) lower limit is |Vtb| > 0.78. Additionally, a search is made for the production of W' using the same samples from the electroweak produced top quark. An analysis based on the BDT method is used to separate the signal from expected backgrounds. No significant excess is found and 95% C.L. upper limits on the production cross section are set for W' with masses within 600--950 GeV. For four general models of W' boson production using decay channel W' → tb¯, the lower mass limits are the following: M( W'L with SM couplings) > 840 GeV; M( W'R ) > 880 GeV or 890 GeV if the right-handed neutrino is lighter or heavier than W'R ; and M( W'L+R ) > 915 GeV.

  19. Kaluza-Klein magnetized cylindrical wormhole and its gravitational lensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hashemi, S. Sedigheh; Riazi, Nematollah

    2016-10-01

    A new exact vacuum solution in five dimensions, which describes a magnetized cylindrical wormhole in 3+1 dimensions is presented. The magnetic field lines are stretched along the wormhole throat and are concentrated near to it. We study the motion of neutral and charged test particles under the influence of the magnetized wormhole. The effective potential for a neutral test particle around and across the magnetized wormhole has a repulsive character. The gravitational lensing for the magnetized wormhole for various lens parameters are calculated and compared. The total magnetic flux on either side of the wormhole is obtained. We present analytic expressions which show regions in which the null energy condition is violated.

  20. Consistent Kaluza-Klein truncations via exceptional field theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hohm, Olaf; Samtleben, Henning

    2015-01-01

    We present the generalized Scherk-Schwarz reduction ansatz for the full supersymmetric exceptional field theory in terms of group valued twist matrices subject to consistency equations. With this ansatz the field equations precisely reduce to those of lower-dimensional gauged supergravity parametrized by an embedding tensor. We explicitly construct a family of twist matrices as solutions of the consistency equations. They induce gauged supergravities with gauge groups SO( p, q) and CSO( p, q, r). Geometrically, they describe compactifications on internal spaces given by spheres and (warped) hyperboloides H p,q , thus extending the applicability of generalized Scherk-Schwarz reductions beyond homogeneous spaces. Together with the dictionary that relates exceptional field theory to D = 11 and IIB supergravity, respectively, the construction defines an entire new family of consistent truncations of the original theories. These include not only compactifications on spheres of different dimensions (such as AdS5 × S 5), but also various hyperboloid compactifications giving rise to a higher-dimensional embedding of supergravities with non-compact and non-semisimple gauge groups.

  1. Electroweak symmetry breaking: Top quard condensates

    SciTech Connect

    Bardeen, W.A.

    1990-12-01

    The fundamental mechanisms for the dynamical breaking of the electroweak gauge symmetries remain a mystery. This paper examines the possible role of heavy fermions, particularly the top quark, in generating the observed electroweak symmetry breaking, the masses of the W and Z bosons and the masses of all observed quarks and leptons. 27 refs., 10 figs., 4 tabs.

  2. Boosted top quark signals for heavy vector boson excitations in a universal extra dimension model

    SciTech Connect

    Bhattacherjee, Biplob; Raychaudhuri, Sreerup; Sridhar, K.; Guchait, Monoranjan

    2010-09-01

    In view of the fact that the n=1 Kaluza-Klein (KK) modes in a model with a universal extra dimension could mimic supersymmetry signatures at the LHC, it is necessary to look for the n=2 KK modes, which have no analogues in supersymmetry. We discuss the possibility of searching for heavy n=2 vector boson resonances--especially the g{sub 2}--through their decays to a highly boosted top quark-antiquark pair using recently developed top-jet tagging techniques in the hadronic channel. It is shown that tt signals from the n=2 gluon resonance are as efficient a discovery mode at the LHC as dilepton channels from the {gamma}{sub 2} and Z{sub 2} resonances.

  3. Electroweak interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Bjorken, J.D.

    1980-10-01

    A point of view of the electroweak interaction is presented. It begins phenomenologically and moves in stages toward the conventional gauge theory formalism containing elementary scalar Higgs-fields and then beyond. The purpose in so doing is that the success of the standard SU(2) x U(1) theory in accounting for low energy phenomena need not automatically imply success at high energies. It is deemed unlikely by most theorists that the predicted W/sup + -/ or Z/sup 0/ does not exist or does not have the mass and/or couplings anticipated in the standard model. However, the odds that the standard predictions will work are not 100%. Therefore there is some reason to look at the subject as one would were he forced by a wrong experimental outcome - to go back to fundamentals and ascertain what is the minimal amount of theory necessary to account for the data.

  4. Searches for Heavy Quark States at ATLAS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Hok-Chuen Tom; ATLAS Collaboration

    2016-11-01

    This talk highlights the latest results of heavy quark searches from the ATLAS collaboration, mainly on resonance searches and vector-like quarks (VLQs) searches. Searches for it resonances using lepton-plus-jets events in proton-proton collisions at center-of-mass energy of 8 and 13 TeV are presented. Limits are set for BSM particles such as topcolor-assisted technicolor Z' TC , Kaluza-Klein (K-K) gluons gKK and K-K excitations of graviton GKK in the Randall-Sundrum model of extra dimensions. VLQs arise naturally in many models such as Little Higgs and Composite Higgs and typically couple preferably to the third generation SM quarks and weak bosons. Limits are set for vector-like bottom (B) and top (T) quarks decay to lepton-plus-jets final states via Hb+X and Ht+X channels in two analyses using 8 and 13 TeV datasets from ATLAS.

  5. Dual technicolor with hidden local symmetry

    SciTech Connect

    Belitsky, A. V.

    2010-08-15

    We consider a dual description of the technicolor-like gauge theory within the D4/D8-brane configuration with varying confinement and electroweak symmetry breaking scales. Constructing an effective truncated model valid below a certain cutoff, we identify the particle spectrum with Kaluza-Klein modes of the model in a manner consistent with the hidden local symmetry. Integrating out heavy states, we find that the low-energy action receives nontrivial corrections stemming from the mixing between standard model and heavy gauge bosons, which results in reduction of oblique parameters.

  6. Electroweak phase transitions

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, G.W.

    1991-09-16

    An analytic treatment of the one Higgs doublet, electroweak phase transition is given. The phase transition is first order, occurs by the nucleation of thin walled bubbles and completes at a temperature where the order parameter, {l_angle}{phi}{r_angle}{sub T} is significantly smaller than it is when the origin becomes absolutely unstable. The rate of anomalous baryon number violation is an exponentially function of {l_angle}{phi}{r_angle}{sub T}. In very minimal extensions of the standard model it is quite easy to increase {l_angle}{phi}{r_angle}{sub T} so that anomalous baryon number violation is suppressed after completion of the phase transition. Hence baryogenesis at the electroweak phase transition is tenable in minimal of the standard model. In some cases additional phase transitions are possible. For a light Higgs boson, when the top quark mass is sufficiently large, the state where the Higgs field has a vacuum expectation value {l_angle}{phi}{r_angle} = 246 GeV is not the true minimum of the Higgs potential. When this is the case, and when the top quark mass exceeds some critical value, thermal fluctuations in the early universe would have rendered the state {l_angle}{phi}{r_angle} = 246 GeV unstable. The requirement that the state {l_angle}{phi}{r_angle} = 246 GeV is sufficiently long lived constrains the masses of the Higgs boson and the top quark. Finally, we consider whether local phase transitions can be induced by heavy particles which act as seeds for deformations in the scalar field.

  7. Electroweak phase transitions

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, G.W.

    1991-09-16

    An analytic treatment of the one Higgs doublet, electroweak phase transition is given. The phase transition is first order, occurs by the nucleation of thin walled bubbles and completes at a temperature where the order parameter, {l angle}{phi}{r angle}{sub T} is significantly smaller than it is when the origin becomes absolutely unstable. The rate of anomalous baryon number violation is an exponentially function of {l angle}{phi}{r angle}{sub T}. In very minimal extensions of the standard model it is quite easy to increase {l angle}{phi}{r angle}{sub T} so that anomalous baryon number violation is suppressed after completion of the phase transition. Hence baryogenesis at the electroweak phase transition is tenable in minimal of the standard model. In some cases additional phase transitions are possible. For a light Higgs boson, when the top quark mass is sufficiently large, the state where the Higgs field has a vacuum expectation value {l angle}{phi}{r angle} = 246 GeV is not the true minimum of the Higgs potential. When this is the case, and when the top quark mass exceeds some critical value, thermal fluctuations in the early universe would have rendered the state {l angle}{phi}{r angle} = 246 GeV unstable. The requirement that the state {l angle}{phi}{r angle} = 246 GeV is sufficiently long lived constrains the masses of the Higgs boson and the top quark. Finally, we consider whether local phase transitions can be induced by heavy particles which act as seeds for deformations in the scalar field.

  8. Gravitationally coupled electroweak monopole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Y. M.; Kimm, Kyoungtae; Yoon, J. H.

    2016-10-01

    We present a family of gravitationally coupled electroweak monopole solutions in Einstein-Weinberg-Salam theory. Our result confirms the existence of globally regular gravitating electroweak monopole which changes to the magnetically charged black hole as the Higgs vacuum value approaches to the Planck scale. Moreover, our solutions could provide a more accurate description of the monopole stars and magnetically charged black holes.

  9. The electroweak theory

    SciTech Connect

    Chris Quigg

    2001-08-10

    After a short essay on the current state of particle physics, the author reviews the antecedents of the modern picture of the weak and electromagnetic interactions and then undertakes a brief survey of the SU(2){sub L} {circle_times} U(1){sub Y} electroweak theory. The authors reviews the features of electroweak phenomenology at tree level and beyond, presents an introduction to the Higgs boson and the 1-TeV scale, and examines arguments for enlarging the electroweak theory. The author concludes with a brief look at low-scale gravity.

  10. Electroweak results from CDF

    SciTech Connect

    D. S. Waters

    2004-06-02

    Inclusive W and Z production cross-sections have been measured by CDF and certain electroweak parameters extracted with high precision from these measurements. New results on diboson production at the Tevatron are also presented.

  11. Heavy-light decay topologies as a new strategy to discover a heavy gluon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bini, Cesare; Contino, Roberto; Vignaroli, Natascia

    2012-01-01

    We study the collider phenomenology of the lightest Kaluza-Klein excitation of the gluon, G*, in theories with a warped extra dimension. We do so by means of a two-site effective lagrangian which includes only the lowest-lying spin-1 and spin-1/2 resonances. We point out the importance of the decays of G* to one SM plus one heavy fermion, that were overlooked in the previous literature. It turns out that, when kinematically allowed, such heavy-light decays are powerful channels for discovering the G*. In particular, we present a parton-level Montecarlo analysis of the final state W tb that follows from the decay of G* to one SM top or bottom quark plus its heavy partner. We find that at sqrt {s} = 7{text{TeV}} and with 10fb-1 of integrated luminosity, the LHC can discover a KK gluon with mass in the range M G* = (1 .8 - 2 .2) TeV if its coupling to a pair of light quarks is {g_{{G*qoverline q }}} = left( {0.2 - 0.5} right){g_3} . The same process is also competitive for the discovery of the top and bottom partners as well. We find, for example, that the LHC at sqrt {s} = {7}{text{TeV}} can discover a 1 TeV KK bottom quark with an integrated luminosity of (5 .3 - 0 .61) fb-1 for {g_{{G*qoverline q }}} = left( {0.2 - 0.5} right){g_3}.

  12. Constraint on Seesaw Model Parameters with Electroweak Vacuum Stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okane, H.; Morozumi, T.

    2017-03-01

    Within the standard model, the electroweak vacuum is metastable. We study how heavy right-handed neutrinos in seesaw model have impact on the stability through their loop effect for the Higgs potential. Requiring the lifetime of the electroweak vacuum is longer than the age of the Universe, the constraint on parameters such as their masses and the strength of the Yukawa couplings is obtained.

  13. Electroweak physics at CDF

    SciTech Connect

    Nodulman, L.; CDF Collaboration

    1996-06-01

    The CDF collaboration is engaged in a broad program of electroweak measurements. The production of WW, WZ, ZZ, W{sub {gamma}}, Z{sub {gamma}} and the high mass Drell Yan charge asymmetry will be discussed, along with a status report on extracting a new W mass from the most recent 90 pb{sup {minus}1} data sample.

  14. Hyperbolic Kac-Moody algebras and chaos in Kaluza-Klein models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Damour, T.; Henneaux, M.; Julia, B.; Nicolai, H.

    2001-06-01

    Some time ago, it was found that the never-ending oscillatory chaotic behaviour discovered by Belinskii, Khalatnikov and Lifshitz (BKL) for the generic solution of the vacuum Einstein equations in the vicinity of a spacelike (``cosmological'') singularity disappears in spacetime dimensions /D≡d+1>10. Recently, a study of the generalization of the BKL chaotic behaviour to the superstring effective Lagrangians has revealed that this chaos is rooted in the structure of the fundamental Weyl chamber of some underlying hyperbolic Kac-Moody algebra. In this Letter we show that the same connection applies to pure gravity in any spacetime dimension />=4, where the relevant algebras are AEd. In this way the disappearance of chaos in pure gravity models in /D>=11 dimensions becomes linked to the fact that the Kac-Moody algebras AEd are no longer hyperbolic for /d>=10.

  15. Microstates of the D1-D5-Kaluza-Klein monopole system

    SciTech Connect

    Bena, Iosif; Kraus, Per

    2005-07-15

    We find supergravity solutions corresponding to all U(1)xU(1) invariant chiral primaries of the D1-D5-KK system. These solutions are 1/8 BPS, carry angular momentum, and are asymptotically flat in the 3+1 dimensional sense. They can be thought of as representing the ground states of the four-dimensional black hole constructed from the D1-D5-KK-P system. Demanding the absence of unphysical singularities in our solutions determines all free parameters, and gives precise agreement with the quantum numbers expected from the CFT point of view. The physical mechanism behind the smoothness of the solutions is that the D1 branes and D5 branes expand into a KK-monopole supertube in the transverse space of the original KK monopole.

  16. Kaluza-Klein Dark Matter: Direct Detection vis-a-vis LHC (2013 update)

    SciTech Connect

    Arrenberg, Sebastian; Baudis, Laura; Kong, Kyoungchul; Matchev, Konstantin T.; Yoo, Jonghee

    2013-07-24

    We present updated results on the complementarity between high-energy colliders and dark matter direct detection experiments in the context of Universal Extra Dimensions (UED). In models with relatively small mass splittings between the dark matter candidate and the rest of the (colored) spectrum, the collider sensitivity is diminished, but direct detection rates are enhanced. UED provide a natural framework to study such mass degeneracies. We discuss the detection prospects for the KK photon $\\gamma_1$ and the KK $Z$-boson $Z_1$, combining the expected LHC reach with cosmological constraints from WMAP/Planck, and the sensitivity of current or planned direct detection experiments. Allowing for general mass splittings, neither colliders, nor direct detection experiments by themselves can explore all of the relevant KK dark matter parameter space. Nevertheless, they probe different parameter space regions, and the combination of the two types of constraints can be quite powerful.

  17. Evolution of perturbations of squashed Kaluza-Klein black holes: Escape from instability

    SciTech Connect

    Ishihara, Hideki; Kimura, Masashi; Konoplya, Roman A.; Murata, Keiju; Soda, Jiro; Zhidenko, Alexander

    2008-04-15

    The squashed Kaluza-Klien (KK) black holes differ from the Schwarzschild black holes with asymptotic flatness or the black strings even at energies for which the KK modes are not excited yet, so that squashed KK black holes open a window in higher dimensions. Another important feature is that the squashed KK black holes are apparently stable and, thereby, let us avoid the Gregory-Laflamme instability. In the present paper, the evolution of scalar and gravitational perturbations in time and frequency domains is considered for these squashed KK black holes. The scalar field perturbations are analyzed for general rotating squashed KK black holes. Gravitational perturbations for the so-called zero mode are shown to be decayed for nonrotating black holes, in concordance with the stability of the squashed KK black holes. The correlation of quasinormal frequencies with the size of extra dimension is discussed.

  18. Kaluza-Klein type of cosmological models and its astrophysical significances.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chatterjee, S.

    Postulating homogeneity in matter content the author has obtained exact solutions for cosmological models in higher dimensions under different symmetries. Depending on the form of the metric the models are either uniquely Robertson-Walker in higher dimensions or differ significantly from the latter in the sense that the geometry is spatially inhomogeneous.

  19. D-dimensional torus as compact manifold and Kaluza-Klein cosmological model.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srivastava, S. K.

    1992-09-01

    Singularity-free solutions of higher-dimensional Einstein field equations are obtained in the background of M4×TD manifold (M4 is a usual four-dimensional Friedmann- Robertson-Walker model and TD is a D-dimensional torus). Moreover, through dimensional reduction and one-loop quantum correction to scalar field, time-dependent cosmological constant Λ, effective gravitational constant Geff, and a fine-structure constant e/4π are derived in the effective four-dimensional theory using solutions of Einstein's equations. It is found that at late times Λ ≍ 0.

  20. Cosmological compactification in Kaluza-Klein model and time-dependent cosmological term

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srivastava, S. K.

    1992-12-01

    Einstein's equations for the generalized (4+ D)-dimensional Robertson-Walker model are solved taking the conformally invariant action for the matter field. Compactification of this model is discussed and the compactification time/compactification mass scale for different values of D is calculated. The resulting 4-dimensional action for gravity is obtained. It is found that a time-dependent cosmological constant is induced which is very large when the cosmic time is small and very small when the cosmic time is large.

  1. Kaluza-Klein reduction of massive and partially massless spin-2 fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonifacio, James; Hinterbichler, Kurt

    2017-01-01

    We describe the dimensional reduction of massive and partially massless spin-2 fields on general Einstein direct product manifolds. As with massless fields, the higher-dimensional gauge symmetry of the partially massless field displays itself upon dimensional reduction as a tower of Stückelberg symmetries for the massive modes of the tower. Unlike the massless case, the zero mode of the gauge symmetry does not display itself as a lower-dimensional non-Stückelberg gauge symmetry enforcing partial masslessness on the zero mode. Partial masslessness is destroyed by the dimensional reduction and the zero-mode gauge symmetry instead serves to eliminate the radion. In addition, we study the fully nonlinear dimensional reduction of de Rham-Gabadadze-Tolley massive gravity on a circle, which results in a massive scalar-tensor-vector theory which we expect to be ghost free, and whose scalar-tensor sector is a special case of mass-varying massive gravity.

  2. Electroweak baryogenesis with lepton flavor violation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiang, Cheng-Wei; Fuyuto, Kaori; Senaha, Eibun

    2016-11-01

    We investigate the feasibility of electroweak baryogenesis in a two-Higgs doublet model with lepton flavor violation. By scrutinizing the heavy Higgs boson mass spectrum, regions satisfying both strong first-order electroweak phase transition and the muon g - 2 anomaly are identified. We also estimate the baryon number density by exploiting extra Yukawa couplings in the μ-τ sector. It is found that a CP-violating source term can be enhanced by the μ-τ flavor-violating coupling together with the extra τ coupling. With O (1) Yukawa couplings and CP-violating phases, the observed baryon number density is marginally produced under a generous assumption for the bubble wall profile.

  3. Introduction to Electroweak Symmetry Breaking

    SciTech Connect

    Dawson, S.

    2009-04-20

    In these lectures, I review the status of the electroweak sector of the Standard Model, with an emphasis on the importance of radiative corrections and searches for the Standard Model Higgs boson. A discussion of the special role of the TeV energy scale in electroweak physics is included.

  4. Chiral electroweak currents in nuclei

    DOE PAGES

    Riska, D. O.; Schiavilla, R.

    2017-01-10

    Here, the development of the chiral dynamics based description of nuclear electroweak currents is reviewed. Gerald E. (Gerry) Brown’s role in basing theoretical nuclear physics on chiral Lagrangians is emphasized. Illustrative examples of the successful description of electroweak observables of light nuclei obtained from chiral effective field theory are presented.

  5. Electroweak interactions in the nuclear domain

    SciTech Connect

    Pollock, S.J.

    1988-01-01

    A variety of electroweak interactions with nucleons and nuclei is considered as a means to yield tests of the Standard Model, to provide measurements of hadronic structure, and to serve as a guide to experimental efforts. In Part I, single nucleon elastic electroweak processes are studied. The general formalism is outlined, and formulae are presented for cross section for e{sup {minus}} and {upsilon} neutral current processes, {epsilon} charge-changing events, and parity violation. Means have been found to extract both vector and axial form factors from experiment, at arbitrary q{sup 2}. Numerical predictions are presented for these processes, assuming a set of phenomenological form factors. Low every structure in charge-changing reactions would provide tests of CVC and a measurement of the pseudoscalar form factor. Relations between the processes which yield tests of the Standard Model and provide an experimental means to determine the effects of intrinsic parity violation, isospin breaking, and heavy quark content are presented. Parity violation is discussed as a means to measure sin{sup 2}{theta}{sub 2} in the low energy quark-lepton sector, and to measure the weak form factors of the nucleon. Sources of uncertainity are considered, including poorly known electromagnetic neutron form factors, and axial weak form factors. A means to detect anomalous effective axial isoscalar current is provided and the bounds on extra heavy neutral Z bosons a CEBAF parity experiment would provide are discussed. In Part II, coincidence cross sections are studied. The formalism for electroweak single-particle coincidence experiments is outlined. The general angular distribution for single-nucleon coincidence measurements on a deuterium (spin 1) target is derived.

  6. Electroweak Symmetry Breaking: With Dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Chivukula, R. Sekhar

    2005-03-22

    In this note I provide a brief description of models of dynamical electroweak symmetry breaking, including walking technicolor, top-color assisted technicolor, the top-quark seesaw model, and little higgs theories.

  7. Resonant relaxation in electroweak baryogenesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Christopher; Cirigliano, Vincenzo; Ramsey-Musolf, Michael J.

    2005-04-01

    We compute the leading, chiral charge-changing relaxation term in the quantum transport equations that govern electroweak baryogenesis using the closed time path formulation of nonequilibrium quantum field theory. We show that the relaxation transport coefficients may be resonantly enhanced under appropriate conditions on electroweak model parameters and that such enhancements can mitigate the impact of similar enhancements in the CP-violating source terms. We also develop a power counting in the time and energy scales entering electroweak baryogenesis and include effects through second order in ratios ɛ of the small and large scales. We illustrate the implications of the resonantly enhanced O(ɛ2) terms using the Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model, focusing on the interplay between the requirements of baryogenesis and constraints obtained from collider studies, precision electroweak data, and electric dipole moment searches.

  8. Electroweak results from the tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    Wood, D.

    1997-01-01

    Electroweak results are presented from the CDF and DO experiments based on data collected in recent runs of the Fermilab Tevatron Collider. The measurements include the mass and width of the W boson, the production cross sections of the W and Z bosons, and the W charge asymmetry. Additional results come from studies of events with pairs of electroweak gauge bosons and include limits on anomalous couplings.

  9. Strong and Electroweak Matter 2004

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eskola, Kari J.; Kainulainen, Kimmo; Kajantie, Keijo; Rummukainen, Kari

    RHIC experimental summary: the message from pp, d+Au and Au+Au collisions / M. Calderón de la Barca Sánchez -- Hydrodynamic aspects of relativistic heavy ion collisions at RHIC / P. F. Kolb -- Photon emission in a hot QCD plasma / P. Aurenche -- In search of the saturation scale: intrinsic features of the CGC / H. Weigert -- From leading hadron suppression to jet quenching at RHIC and LHC / U. A. Wiedemann -- Lattice simulations with chemical potential / C. Schmidt -- Mesonic correlators in hot QCD / M. Laine -- Thermalization and plasma instabilities / P. Arnold -- Transport coefficients in hot QCD / G. D. Moore -- Classical fields and heavy ion collisions / T. Lappi -- Progress in nonequilibrium quantum field theory II / J. Berges and J. Serreau -- A general effective theory for dense quark matter / P. T. Reuter, Q. Wang and D. H. Rischke -- Thermal leptogenesis / M. Plümacher -- Cold electroweak Baryogenesis / J. Smit -- Proton-nucleus collisions in the color glass condensate framework / J.-P. Blaizot, F. Gelis and R. Venugopalan -- From classical to quantum saturation in the nuclear wavefunction / D. N. Triantafyllopoulos -- Charge correlations in heavy ion collisions / A. Rajantie -- Whitening of the quark-gluon plasma / S. Mrówczyński -- Progress in anisotropic plasma physics / P. Romatschke and M. Strickland -- Deconfinement and chiral symmetry: competing orders / K. Tuominen -- Relation between the chiral and deconfinement phase transitions / Y. Hatta -- Renormalized Polyakov loops, matrix models and the Gross-Witten point / A. Dumitru and J. T. Lenaghan -- The nature of the soft excitation at the critical end point of QCD / A. Jakovác ... [et al.] -- Thermodynamics of the 1+1-dimensional nonlinear sigma model through next-to-leading order in 1/N / H. J. Warringa -- Light quark meson correlations at high temperature / E. Laemann ... [et al.] -- Charmonia at finite momenta in a deconfined plasma / S. Datta ... [et al.] -- QCD thermodynamics: lattice

  10. Electroweak Baryogenesis and Higgs Properties

    SciTech Connect

    Cohen, Timothy; Morrissey, David E.; Pierce, Aaron; /Michigan U., MCTP

    2012-03-13

    We explore the connection between the strength of the electroweak phase transition and the properties of the Higgs boson. Our interest is in regions of parameter space that can realize electroweak baryogenesis. We do so in a simplified framework in which a single Higgs field couples to new scalar fields charged under SU(3){sub c} by way of the Higgs portal. Such new scalars can make the electroweak phase transition more strongly first-order, while contributing to the effective Higgs boson couplings to gluons and photons through loop effects. For Higgs boson masses in the range 115 {approx}< m{sub h} {approx}< 130 GeV, whenever the phase transition becomes strong enough for successful electroweak baryogenesis, we find that Higgs boson properties are modified by an amount observable by the LHC. We also discuss the baryogenesis window of the minimal supersymmetric standard model (MSSM), which appears to be under tension. Furthermore, we argue that the discovery of a Higgs boson with standard model-like couplings to gluons and photons will rule out electroweak baryogenesis in the MSSM.

  11. Electroweak symmetry breaking via QCD.

    PubMed

    Kubo, Jisuke; Lim, Kher Sham; Lindner, Manfred

    2014-08-29

    We propose a new mechanism to generate the electroweak scale within the framework of QCD, which is extended to include conformally invariant scalar degrees of freedom belonging to a larger irreducible representation of SU(3)c. The electroweak symmetry breaking is triggered dynamically via the Higgs portal by the condensation of the colored scalar field around 1 TeV. The mass of the colored boson is restricted to be 350  GeV≲mS≲3  TeV, with the upper bound obtained from perturbative renormalization group evolution. This implies that the colored boson can be produced at the LHC. If the colored boson is electrically charged, the branching fraction of the Higgs boson decaying into two photons can slightly increase, and moreover, it can be produced at future linear colliders. Our idea of nonperturbative electroweak scale generation can serve as a new starting point for more realistic model building in solving the hierarchy problem.

  12. Fluctuation driven electroweak phase transition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gleiser, Marcelo; Kolb, Edward W.

    1991-01-01

    We examine the dynamics of the electroweak phase transition in the early Universe. For Higgs masses in the range 46 less than or = M sub H less than or = 150 GeV and top quark masses less than 200 GeV, regions of symmetric and asymmetric vacuum coexist to below the critical temperature, with thermal equilibrium between the two phases maintained by fluctuations of both phases. We propose that the transition to the asymmetric vacuum is completed by percolation of these subcritical fluctuations. Our results are relevant to scenarios of baryogenesis that invoke a weakly first-order phase transition at the electroweak scale.

  13. Electroweak physics at the LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berryhill, J.; Oh, A.

    2017-02-01

    The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) has completed in 2012 its first running phase and the experiments have collected data sets of proton-proton collisions at center-of-mass energies of 7 and 8 TeV with an integrated luminosity of about 5 and 20 {{fb}}-1, respectively. Analyses of these data sets have produced a rich set of results in the electroweak sector of the standard model. This article reviews the status of electroweak measurements of the ATLAS, CMS and LHCb experiments at the LHC.

  14. Electroweak physics from D0

    SciTech Connect

    Roe, N.A.; D0 Collaboration

    1993-05-01

    The D0 detector was recently commissioned at the Tevatron p{bar p} collider and is presently taking data. Preliminary results from D0 are presented on properties of the W and Z electroweak gauge bosons, using final states containing electrons and muons.

  15. Latest Electroweak Results from CDF

    SciTech Connect

    Lancaster, Mark

    2010-05-01

    The latest results in electroweak physics from proton anti-proton collisions at the Fermilab Tevatron recorded by the CDF detector are presented. The results provide constraints on parton distribution functions, the mass of the Higgs boson and beyond the Standard Model physics.

  16. Moriond Electroweak 2006: Theory summary

    SciTech Connect

    Lykken, Joseph D.; /Fermilab

    2006-07-01

    A concise look at the big picture of particle physics, including the status of the Standard Model, neutrinos, supersymmetry, extra dimensions and cosmology. Based upon the theoretical summary presented at the XLIst Rencontres de Moriond on Electroweak Interactions and Unified Theories, La Thuile, 11-18 March 2006.

  17. Resonances from two universal extra dimensions

    SciTech Connect

    Burdman, Gustavo; Dobrescu, Bogdan A.; Ponton, Eduardo

    2006-10-01

    Standard model gauge bosons propagating in two universal extra dimensions give rise to heavy spin-1 and spin-0 particles. The lightest of these, carrying Kaluza-Klein numbers (1,0), may be produced only in pairs at colliders, whereas the (1,1) modes, which are heavier by a factor of {radical}(2), may be singly produced. We show that the cascade decays of (1,1) particles generate a series of closely-spaced narrow resonances in the tt invariant mass distribution. At the Tevatron, s-channel production of (1,1) gluons and electroweak bosons will be sensitive to tt resonances up to masses in the 0.5-0.7 TeV range. Searches at the LHC for resonances originating from several higher-level modes will further test the existence of two universal extra dimensions.

  18. Research on Electroweak and Flavor Symmetry Breaking

    SciTech Connect

    Lane, Kenneth Douglas

    2013-05-01

    Abstract of Project Summary, as written in August 2012: The objective of this research is the primary one of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN in Geneva: the discovery and study of the origin of electroweak symmetry breaking (EWSB). This is the mission of the LHC's two large general-purpose detectors, ATLAS and CMS. Lane's approach to this goal assumes that a new strong interaction at the electroweak energy scale of 100's of GeV, called ``technicolor'' (TC), is responsible for triggering EWSB. He is one of the developers of technicolor, particularly of its flavor-physics component, called extended technicolor (ETC). The TC/ETC theory of this physics provides not only the dynamics of EWSB, but also an understanding of the types (flavors) of quarks and leptons and of their masses and mixing. The main thrust of this research involves close collaboration with members of ATLAS and CMS to search for the signatures of TC/ETC that are most accessible experimentally. These are new, rather heavy, spin-one particles --- technivector bosons ($\\tro$, $\\tom$, $\\ta$) --- readily produced at the LHC and decaying into electroweak bosons, $\\gamma, W, Z$, and spin-zero bosons called technipions, $\\tpi$. If these particles exist, they hold the key to understanding flavor physics. A very important recent development at the LHC is the discovery of a new 125-GeV boson decaying into $\\gamma\\gamma$, $ZZ$ and $WW$. This particle is widely suspected to be the long-sought Higgs boson, a basic component of the so-called standard model of EWSB. But, from a purely theoretical standpoint, this resolution to the origin of EWSB is very unsatisfactory. Moreover, there are interesting and possibly significant discrepancies of the data with this interpretation. Lane and collaborators are proposing that this boson is, in fact, a special kind of technipion. He is also working with ATLAS experimentalists to test this hypothesis. The LHC data to be collected and analyzed by ATLAS and CMS over

  19. Electroweak and flavor dynamics at hadron colliders - I

    SciTech Connect

    Elchtent, E.; Lane, K.

    1998-02-01

    This is the first of two reports cataloging the principal signatures of electroweak and flavor dynamics at {anti p}p and pp colliders. Here, we discuss some of the signatures of dynamical electroweak and flavor symmetry breaking. The framework for dynamical symmetry breaking we assume is technicolor, with a walking coupling {alpha}{sub TC}, and extended technicolor. The reactions discussed occur mainly at subprocess energies {radical}{cflx s}{approx_lt} 1 TeV. They include production of color-singlet and octet technirhos and their decay into pairs of technipions, longitudinal weak bosons, or jets. Technipions, in turn, decay predominantly into heavy fermions. This report will appear in the Proceedings of the 1996 DPF/DPB Summer Study on New Directions for High Energy Physics (Snowmass 96).

  20. Unanswered Questions in the Electroweak Theory

    SciTech Connect

    Quigg, Chris

    2009-11-01

    This article is devoted to the status of the electroweak theory on the eve of experimentation at CERN's Large Hadron Collider. A compact summary of the logic and structure of the electroweak theory precedes an examination of what experimental tests have established so far. The outstanding unconfirmed prediction of the electroweak theory is the existence of the Higgs boson, a weakly interacting spin-zero particle that is the agent of electroweak symmetry breaking, the giver of mass to the weak gauge bosons, the quarks, and the leptons. General arguments imply that the Higgs boson or other new physics is required on the TeV energy scale. Indirect constraints from global analyses of electroweak measurements suggest that the mass of the standard-model Higgs boson is less than 200 GeV. Once its mass is assumed, the properties of the Higgs boson follow from the electroweak theory, and these inform the search for the Higgs boson. Alternative mechanisms for electroweak symmetry breaking are reviewed, and the importance of electroweak symmetry breaking is illuminated by considering a world without a specific mechanism to hide the electroweak symmetry. For all its triumphs, the electroweak theory has many shortcomings.

  1. Electroweak results from D0

    SciTech Connect

    Demarteau, M.; D0 Collaboration

    1993-05-01

    Preliminary results from D0 are presented on properties of the W{sup {plus_minus}} and Z{sup 0} electroweak gauge bosons, using final states containing electrons and muons. In particular, preliminary measurements of the W{sup {plus_minus}} and Z{sup 0} production cross sections with decay into final states containing electrons are shown and a status report on the determination of M{sub w}/M{sub z} is given.

  2. Electroweak measurements at the Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    Garcia, Jose E.; /INFN, Pisa

    2006-06-01

    Recent Electroweak measurements by the CDF and D0 collaborations in p{bar p} collisions {radical}s = 1.96 TeV are presented here. Measurements of W, Z and diboson production cross sections as well as W asymmetry using integrated luminosities up to 800 pb{sup -1} are reviewed. Limits on triple gauge anomalous couplings on diboson production are discussed elsewhere.

  3. Proceedings of the 1992 workshops on high-energy physics with colliding beams. Volume 3, Electroweak symmetry breaking at colliding-beam facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Rogers, J.

    1992-12-31

    This report contains viewgraphs on the following topics: Introduction to Electroweak Symmetry Breaking: Intermediate-Mass Higgs Bosons; Extended Higgs Sectors and Novel Searches; and Heavy Higgs Bosons and Strong WW Scattering.

  4. History of electroweak symmetry breaking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kibble, T. W. B.

    2015-07-01

    In this talk, I recall the history of the development of the unified electroweak theory, incorporating the symmetry-breaking Higgs mechanism, as I saw it from my standpoint as a member of Abdus Salam's group at Imperial College. I start by describing the state of physics in the years after the Second World War, explain how the goal of a unified gauge theory of weak and electromagnetic interactions emerged, the obstacles encountered, in particular the Goldstone theorem, and how they were overcome, followed by a brief account of more recent history, culminating in the historic discovery of the Higgs boson in 2012.

  5. Links between flavor and electroweak symmetry breaking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hou, George Wei-Shu

    2014-08-01

    Fermion mass generation in the standard model was invented by Weinberg, while it is an old notion that strong Yukawa coupling could be the agent of electroweak symmetry breaking. Observation of the 126 GeV boson has crashed the prospects for such a heavy chiral quark doublet Q. However, the dilaton possibility can only be ruled out by confirming vector boson fusion with Run 2 data at the LHC, which starts only in 2015. We recast the Q\\bar Q condensation scenario as Fermi-Yang model v2.0. A Gap Equation has been constructed, with numerical solution demonstrating dynamical mQ generation; scale invariance of this equation may be consistent with a dilaton. Other consequences to be checked are Q\\bar Q -> n VL "annihilation stars," and enhanced Bd →μ+μ-, KL →π0νν, and possibly sin ϕs. If verified in Nature, the Agent of BEH mechanism would differ from current perception, the 126 GeV boson would be the first New Physics at the LHC, and we would have enough CP violation for baryogenesis.

  6. Electroweak relaxation from finite temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hardy, Edward

    2015-11-01

    We study theories which naturally select a vacuum with parametrically small Electroweak Scale due to finite temperature effects in the early universe. In particular, there is a scalar with an approximate shift symmetry broken by a technically natural small coupling to the Higgs, and a temperature dependent potential. As the temperature of the universe drops, the scalar follows the minimum of its potential altering the Higgs mass squared parameter. The scalar also has a periodic potential with amplitude proportional to the Higgs expectation value, which traps it in a vacuum with a small Electroweak Scale. The required temperature dependence of the potential can occur through strong coupling effects in a hidden sector that are suppressed at high temperatures. Alternatively, it can be generated perturbatively from a one-loop thermal potential. In both cases, for the scalar to be displaced, a hidden sector must be reheated to temperatures significantly higher than the visible sector. However this does not violate observational constraints provided the hidden sector energy density is transferred to the visible sector without disrupting big bang nucleosynthesis. We also study how the mechanism can be implemented when the visible sector is completed to the Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model at a high scale. Models with a UV cutoff of 10 TeV and no fields taking values over a range greater than 1012 GeV are possible, although the scalar must have a range of order 108 times the effective decay constant in the periodic part of its potential.

  7. Flavor from the electroweak scale

    DOE PAGES

    Bauer, Martin; Carena, Marcela; Gemmler, Katrin

    2015-11-04

    We discuss the possibility that flavor hierarchies arise from the electroweak scale in a two Higgs doublet model, in which the two Higgs doublets jointly act as the flavon. Quark masses and mixing angles are explained by effective Yukawa couplings, generated by higher dimensional operators involving quarks and Higgs doublets. Modified Higgs couplings yield important effects on the production cross sections and decay rates of the light Standard Model like Higgs. In addition, flavor changing neutral currents arise at tree-level and lead to strong constraints from meson-antimeson mixing. Remarkably, flavor constraints turn out to prefer a region in parameter spacemore » that is in excellent agreement with the one preferred by recent Higgs precision measurements at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). Direct searches for extra scalars at the LHC lead to further constraints. Precise predictions for the production and decay modes of the additional Higgs bosons are derived, and we present benchmark scenarios for searches at the LHC Run II. As a result, flavor breaking at the electroweak scale as well as strong coupling effects demand a UV completion at the scale of a few TeV, possibly within the reach of the LHC.« less

  8. Flavor from the electroweak scale

    SciTech Connect

    Bauer, Martin; Carena, Marcela; Gemmler, Katrin

    2015-11-04

    We discuss the possibility that flavor hierarchies arise from the electroweak scale in a two Higgs doublet model, in which the two Higgs doublets jointly act as the flavon. Quark masses and mixing angles are explained by effective Yukawa couplings, generated by higher dimensional operators involving quarks and Higgs doublets. Modified Higgs couplings yield important effects on the production cross sections and decay rates of the light Standard Model like Higgs. In addition, flavor changing neutral currents arise at tree-level and lead to strong constraints from meson-antimeson mixing. Remarkably, flavor constraints turn out to prefer a region in parameter space that is in excellent agreement with the one preferred by recent Higgs precision measurements at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). Direct searches for extra scalars at the LHC lead to further constraints. Precise predictions for the production and decay modes of the additional Higgs bosons are derived, and we present benchmark scenarios for searches at the LHC Run II. As a result, flavor breaking at the electroweak scale as well as strong coupling effects demand a UV completion at the scale of a few TeV, possibly within the reach of the LHC.

  9. Nonminimal universal extra dimensions

    SciTech Connect

    Flacke, Thomas; Menon, A.; Phalen, Daniel J.

    2009-03-01

    In this paper, we investigate the phenomenological implications of boundary localized terms (BLTs) in the model of universal extra dimensions (UED). In particular, we study the electroweak Kaluza-Klein mass spectrum resulting from BLTs and their effect on electroweak symmetry breaking via the five-dimensional Higgs mechanism. We find that the addition of BLTs to massive five-dimensional fields induces a nontrivial extra-dimensional profile for the zero and nonzero Kaluza-Klein (KK) modes. Hence BLTs generically lead to a modification of standard model parameters and are therefore experimentally constrained, even at tree level. We study standard model constraints on three representative nonminimal UED models in detail and find that the constraints on BLTs are weak. On the contrary, nonzero BLTs have a major impact on the spectrum and couplings of nonzero KK modes. For example, there are regions of parameter space where the lightest Kaluza-Klein particle is either the Kaluza-Klein Higgs boson or the first KK mode of the W{sup 3}.

  10. Electroweak Baryogenesis and Colored Scalars

    SciTech Connect

    Cohen, Timothy; Pierce, Aaron; /Michigan U., MCTP

    2012-02-15

    We consider the 2-loop finite temperature effective potential for a Standard Model-like Higgs boson, allowing Higgs boson couplings to additional scalars. If the scalars transform under color, they contribute 2-loop diagrams to the effective potential that include gluons. These 2-loop effects are perhaps stronger than previously appreciated. For a Higgs boson mass of 115 GeV, they can increase the strength of the phase transition by as much as a factor of 3.5. It is this effect that is responsible for the survival of the tenuous electroweak baryogenesis window of the Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model. We further illuminate the importance of these 2-loop diagrams by contrasting models with colored scalars to models with singlet scalars. We conclude that baryogenesis favors models with light colored scalars. This motivates searches for pair-produced di-jet resonances or jet(s) + = E{sub T}.

  11. Energy spectrum of the electroweak Pomeron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartels, Jochen; Levin, Eugene; Siddikov, Marat

    2016-09-01

    In this paper we study the high energy behavior of electroweak Standard Model for a nonzero Weinberg angle θW . We evaluate the spectrum of the electroweak Pomeron and demonstrate that the leading intercept is given by αe .w .4 ln 2 and does not depend on the mixing angle θW. Due to its very small numerical value, we conclude that the high energy behavior of electroweak theory cannot be discussed without including the QCD Pomeron which, at sufficiently large energies, will dominate.

  12. New strong interactions above the electroweak scale

    SciTech Connect

    White, A.R.

    1994-08-09

    Theoretical arguments for a new higher-color quark sector, based on Pomeron physics in QCD, are briefly described. The electroweak symmetry-breaking, Strong CP conservation, and electroweak scale CP violation, that is naturally produced by this sector is also outlined. A further consequence is that above the electroweak scale there will be a radical change in the strong interaction. Electroweak states, in particular multiple W`s and Z`s, and new, semi-stable, very massive, baryons, will be commonly produced. The possible correlation of expected phenomena with a wide range of observed Cosmic Ray effects at and above the primary spectrum knee is described. Related phenomena that might be seen in the highest energy hard scattering events at the Fermilab Tevatron, some of which could be confused with top production, are also briefly discussed.

  13. Illuminating new electroweak states at hadron colliders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ismail, Ahmed; Izaguirre, Eder; Shuve, Brian

    2016-07-01

    In this paper, we propose a novel powerful strategy to perform searches for new electroweak states. Uncolored electroweak states appear in generic extensions of the Standard Model (SM) and yet are challenging to discover at hadron colliders. This problem is particularly acute when the lightest state in the electroweak multiplet is neutral and all multiplet components are approximately degenerate. In this scenario, production of the charged fields of the multiplet is followed by decay into nearly invisible states; if this decay occurs promptly, the only way to infer the presence of the reaction is through its missing energy signature. Our proposal relies on emission of photon radiation from the new charged states as a means of discriminating the signal from SM backgrounds. We demonstrate its broad applicability by studying two examples: a pure Higgsino doublet and an electroweak quintuplet field.

  14. Illuminating new electroweak states at hadron colliders

    DOE PAGES

    Ismail, Ahmed; Izaguirre, Eder; Shuve, Brian

    2016-07-01

    In this paper, we propose a novel powerful strategy to perform searches for new electroweak states. Uncolored electroweak states appear in generic extensions of the Standard Model (SM) and yet are challenging to discover at hadron colliders. This problem is particularly acute when the lightest state in the electroweak multiplet is neutral and all multiplet components are approximately degenerate. In this scenario, production of the charged fields of the multiplet is followed by decay into nearly invisible states; if this decay occurs promptly, the only way to infer the presence of the reaction is through its missing energy signature. Ourmore » proposal relies on emission of photon radiation from the new charged states as a means of discriminating the signal from SM backgrounds. Lastly, we demonstrate its broad applicability by studying two examples: a pure Higgsino doublet and an electroweak quintuplet field.« less

  15. Illuminating new electroweak states at hadron colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Ismail, Ahmed; Izaguirre, Eder; Shuve, Brian

    2016-07-01

    In this paper, we propose a novel powerful strategy to perform searches for new electroweak states. Uncolored electroweak states appear in generic extensions of the Standard Model (SM) and yet are challenging to discover at hadron colliders. This problem is particularly acute when the lightest state in the electroweak multiplet is neutral and all multiplet components are approximately degenerate. In this scenario, production of the charged fields of the multiplet is followed by decay into nearly invisible states; if this decay occurs promptly, the only way to infer the presence of the reaction is through its missing energy signature. Our proposal relies on emission of photon radiation from the new charged states as a means of discriminating the signal from SM backgrounds. Lastly, we demonstrate its broad applicability by studying two examples: a pure Higgsino doublet and an electroweak quintuplet field.

  16. Aspects of the electroweak phase transition

    SciTech Connect

    Huet, P.

    1992-11-01

    The electroweak phase transition is reviewed in light of some recent developments. Emphasis is on the issue whether the transition is first or second order and its possible role in the generation of the baryon asymmetry of the universe.

  17. Radiative and Electroweak Penguins at Belle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hyun, HyoJung

    2010-02-01

    Radiative and electroweak penguin decays of B mesons are a sensitive probe of new physics beyond the Standard Model. We study the inclusive and exclusive radiative and electroweak penguin decays of B meson and also search an exotic particle seen by the HyperCP experiment. The measurements are based on a large data sample of 605 fb-1 containing 657 millions BB¯ pairs collected at the Υ(4S) with the Belle detector at the KEKB energy asymmetric e+e- collider.

  18. An electroweak enigma: Hyperon radiative decays

    SciTech Connect

    Vorobyov, A.,; Jastrzembski, E.; Lach, J.; Marriner, J.; Golovtsov, V.; Krivshich, A.; Schegelsky, V.; Smirnov, N.; Terentiev, N.K.; Uvarov, L.; McCliment, E.; Newsom, C.; Norbeck, E.; Cooper, P.S.; /Yale U.

    1985-04-03

    The main thrust of this experiment will be to measure the asymmetry parameter for the electroweak decay {Sigma}{sup +} {yields} p{gamma} and verify its branching ratio. As a secondary goal they will measure, or set new upper limits for, the branching ratio of the electroweak decay {Xi}{sup -} {yields} {Sigma}{sup -}{gamma}. Since the {Xi}{sup -} are expected to be polarized, information on the asymmetry parameter may also be available.

  19. Electroweak baryogenesis and standard model CP violation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huet, Patrick; Sather, Eric

    1995-01-01

    We analyze the mechanism of electroweak baryogenesis proposed by Farrar and Shaposhnikov in which the phase of the CKM mixing matrix is the only source of CP violation. This mechanism is based on a phase separation of baryons via the scattering of quasiparticles by the wall of an expanding bubble produced at the electroweak phase transition. In agreement with the recent work of Gavela, Hernández, Orloff, and Pène, we conclude the QCD damping effects reduce the asymmetry produced to a negligible amount. We interpret the damping as quantum decoherence. We compute the asymmetry analytically. Our analysis reflects the observation that only a thin, outer layer of the bubble contributes to the coherent scattering of the quasiparticles. The generality of our arguments rules out any mechanism of electroweak baryogenesis that does not make use of a new source of CP violation.

  20. Electroweak phase transition in nearly conformal technicolor

    SciTech Connect

    Cline, James M.; Jaervinen, Matti; Sannino, Francesco

    2008-10-01

    We examine the temperature-dependent electroweak phase transition in extensions of the standard model in which the electroweak symmetry is spontaneously broken via strongly coupled, nearly conformal dynamics. In particular, we focus on the low energy effective theory used to describe minimal walking technicolor at the phase transition. Using the one-loop effective potential with ring improvement, we identify significant regions of parameter space which yield a sufficiently strong first-order transition for electroweak baryogenesis. The composite particle spectrum corresponding to these regions can be produced and studied at the Large Hadron Collider experiment. We note the possible emergence of a second phase transition at lower temperatures. This occurs when the underlying technicolor theory possesses a nontrivial center symmetry.

  1. Electroweak phase transition in ultraminimal technicolor

    SciTech Connect

    Jaervinen, Matti; Sannino, Francesco; Ryttov, Thomas A.

    2009-05-01

    We unveil the temperature-dependent electroweak phase transition in new extensions of the standard model in which the electroweak symmetry is spontaneously broken via strongly coupled, nearly conformal dynamics achieved by the means of multiple matter representations. In particular, we focus on the low energy effective theory introduced to describe ultra minimal walking technicolor at the phase transition. Using the one-loop effective potential with ring improvement, we identify regions of parameter space, which yield a strong first-order transition. A striking feature of the model is the existence of a second phase transition associated to the electroweak-singlet sector. The interplay between these two transitions leads to an extremely rich phase diagram.

  2. Workshop on electroweak symmetry breaking: proceedings

    SciTech Connect

    Hinchliffe, I.

    1984-10-01

    A theoretical workshop on electroweak symmetry breaking at the Superconducting Supercollider was held at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, June 4-22, 1984. The purpose of the workshop was to focus theoretical attention on the ways in which experimentation at the SSC could reveal manifestations of the phenomenon responsible for electroweak symmetry breaking. This issue represents, at present, the most compelling scientific argument for the need to explore the energy region to be made accessible by the SSC, and a major aim of the workshop was to involve a broad cross section of particle theorists in the ongoing process of sharpening the requirements for both accelerator and detector design that will ensure detection and identification of meaningful signals, whatever form the electroweak symmetry breaking phenomenon should actually take. Separate entries were prepared for the data base for the papers presented.

  3. Quadratic electroweak corrections for polarized Moller scattering

    SciTech Connect

    A. Aleksejevs, S. Barkanova, Y. Kolomensky, E. Kuraev, V. Zykunov

    2012-01-01

    The paper discusses the two-loop (NNLO) electroweak radiative corrections to the parity violating electron-electron scattering asymmetry induced by squaring one-loop diagrams. The calculations are relevant for the ultra-precise 11 GeV MOLLER experiment planned at Jefferson Laboratory and experiments at high-energy future electron colliders. The imaginary parts of the amplitudes are taken into consideration consistently in both the infrared-finite and divergent terms. The size of the obtained partial correction is significant, which indicates a need for a complete study of the two-loop electroweak radiative corrections in order to meet the precision goals of future experiments.

  4. Top and Electroweak Measurements at the Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    Bartos, P.

    2016-01-01

    In this report, we summarize the latest results of the top-quark mass and electroweak measurements from the Tevatron. Since the world combination of top-quark mass measurements was done, CDF and D0 experiments improved the precision of several results. Some of them reach the relative precition below 1% for a single measurement. From the electroweak results, we report on the WW and WZ production cross section, measurements of the weak mixing angle and indirect measurements of W boson mass. The Tevatron results of the weak mixing angle are still the most precise ones of hadron colliders.

  5. Electroweak naturalness and deflected mirage mediation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barger, Vernon; Everett, Lisa L.; Garon, Todd S.

    2016-04-01

    We investigate the question of electroweak naturalness within the deflected mirage mediation (DMM) framework for supersymmetry breaking in the minimal supersymmetric standard model. The class of DMM models considered are nine-parameter theories that fall within the general classification of the 19-parameter phenomenological minimal supersymmetric standard model. Our results show that these DMM models have regions of parameter space with very low electroweak fine-tuning, at levels comparable to the phenomenological minimal supersymmetric standard model. These parameter regions should be probed extensively in the current LHC run.

  6. Radiative and Electroweak Penguins at Belle

    SciTech Connect

    Hyun, Hyo Jung

    2010-02-10

    Radiative and electroweak penguin decays of B mesons are a sensitive probe of new physics beyond the Standard Model. We study the inclusive and exclusive radiative and electroweak penguin decays of B meson and also search an exotic particle seen by the HyperCP experiment. The measurements are based on a large data sample of 605 fb{sup -1} containing 657 millions BB-bar pairs collected at the UPSILON(4S) with the Belle detector at the KEKB energy asymmetric e{sup +}e{sup -} collider.

  7. Electroweak fragmentation functions for dark matter annihilation

    SciTech Connect

    Cavasonza, Leila Ali; Krämer, Michael; Pellen, Mathieu

    2015-02-18

    Electroweak corrections can play a crucial role in dark matter annihilation. The emission of gauge bosons, in particular, leads to a secondary flux consisting of all Standard Model particles, and may be described by electroweak fragmentation functions. To assess the quality of the fragmentation function approximation to electroweak radiation in dark matter annihilation, we have calculated the flux of secondary particles from gauge-boson emission in models with Majorana fermion and vector dark matter, respectively. For both models, we have compared cross sections and energy spectra of positrons and antiprotons after propagation through the galactic halo in the fragmentation function approximation and in the full calculation. Fragmentation functions fail to describe the particle fluxes in the case of Majorana fermion annihilation into light fermions: the helicity suppression of the lowest-order cross section in such models cannot be lifted by the leading logarithmic contributions included in the fragmentation function approach. However, for other classes of models like vector dark matter, where the lowest-order cross section is not suppressed, electroweak fragmentation functions provide a simple, model-independent and accurate description of secondary particle fluxes.

  8. On the Ambjorn-Olesen electroweak condensates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartolucci, Daniele; De Marchis, Francesca

    2012-07-01

    We obtain sufficient conditions for the existence of the Ambjorn-Olesen ["On electroweak magnetism," Nucl. Phys. B315, 606-614 (1989), 10.1016/0550-3213(89)90004-7] electroweak N-vortices in case N ⩾ 1 and therefore generalize earlier results [D. Bartolucci and G. Tarantello, "Liouville type equations with singular data and their applications to periodic multivortices for the electroweak theory," Commun. Math. Phys. 229, 3-47 (2002), 10.1007/s002200200664; J. Spruck and Y. Yang, "On multivortices in the electroweak theory I: Existence of periodic solutions," Commun. Math. Phys. 144, 1-16 (1992), 10.1007/BF02099188] which handled the cases N ∈ {1, 2, 3, 4}. The variational argument provided here has its own independent interest as it generalizes the one adopted by Ding et al. ["Existence results for mean field equations," Ann. Inst. Henri Poincare, Anal. Non Lineaire 16, 653-666 (1999), 10.1016/S0294-1449(99)80031-6] to obtain solutions for Liouville-type equations on closed 2-manifolds. In fact, we obtain at once a second proof of the existence of supercritical conformal metrics on surfaces with conical singularities and prescribed Gaussian curvature recently established by Bartolucci, De Marchis and Malchiodi [Int. Math. Res. Not. 24, 5625-5643 (2011), 10.1093/imrn/rnq285].

  9. Loop suppressed electroweak symmetry breaking and naturally heavy superpartners

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dermíšek, Radovan

    2017-01-01

    A model is presented in which O (10 TeV ) stop masses, typically required by the Higgs boson mass in supersymmetric models, do not originate from soft supersymmetry breaking terms that would drive the Higgs mass squared parameter to large negative values but rather from the mixing with vectorlike partners. Their contribution to the Higgs mass squared parameter is reduced to threshold corrections and, thus, it is one loop suppressed compared to usual scenarios. New fermion and scalar partners of the top quark with O (10 TeV ) masses are predicted.

  10. Theory of precision electroweak measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Peskin, M.E.

    1990-03-01

    In these lectures, I will review the theoretical concepts needed to understand the goals and implications of experiments in this new era of weak interactions. I will explain how to compute the most important order-{alpha} radiative corrections to weak interaction processes and discuss the physical implications of these correction terms. I hope that this discussion will be useful to those --- experimentalists and theorists --- who will try to interpret the new data that we will soon receive. This paper is organized as follows: I will review the structure of the standard weak interaction model at zeroth order. I will discuss the measurement of the Z{sup 0} boson mass in e{sup +}e{sup {minus}} annihilation. This measurement is affected by radiative correction to the form of the Z{sup 0} resonance, and so I will review the theory of the resonance line shape. I will briefly review the modifications of the properties of the Z{sup 0} which would be produced by additional neutral gauge bosons. I will review the theory of the renormalization of weak interaction parameters such as sin{sup 2} {theta}{sub {omega}}, concentrating especially on the contributions of the top quark and other heavy, undiscovered particles.

  11. Natural Electroweak Breaking from a Mirror Symmetry

    SciTech Connect

    Chacko, Z.; Goh, Hock-Seng; Harnik, Roni

    2006-06-16

    We present ''twin Higgs models,'' simple realizations of the Higgs boson as a pseudo Goldstone boson that protect the weak scale from radiative corrections up to scales of order 5-10 TeV. In the ultraviolet these theories have a discrete symmetry which interchanges each standard model particle with a corresponding particle which transforms under a twin or a mirror standard model gauge group. In addition, the Higgs sector respects an approximate global symmetry. When this global symmetry is broken, the discrete symmetry tightly constrains the form of corrections to the pseudo Goldstone Higgs potential, allowing natural electroweak symmetry breaking. Precision electroweak constraints are satisfied by construction. These models demonstrate that, contrary to the conventional wisdom, stabilizing the weak scale does not require new light particles charged under the standard model gauge groups.

  12. Fate of electroweak vacuum during preheating

    SciTech Connect

    Ema, Yohei; Mukaida, Kyohei; Nakayama, Kazunori

    2016-10-28

    Our electroweak vacuum may be metastable in light of the current experimental data of the Higgs/top quark mass. If this is really the case, high-scale inflation models require a stabilization mechanism of our vacuum during inflation. A possible candidate is the Higgs-inflaton/-curvature coupling because it induces an additional mass term to the Higgs during the slow roll regime. However, after inflation, the additional mass term oscillates, and it can destabilize our electroweak vacuum via production of large Higgs fluctuations during the inflaton oscillation era. In this paper, we study whether or not the Higgs-inflaton/-curvature coupling can save our vacuum by properly taking account of Higgs production during the preheating stage. We put upper bounds on the Higgs-inflaton and -curvature couplings, and discuss possible dynamics that might relax them.

  13. Testing electroweak baryogenesis with future colliders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Curtin, David; Meade, Patrick; Yu, Chiu-Tien

    2014-11-01

    Electroweak Baryogenesis (EWBG) is a compelling scenario for explaining the matter-antimatter asymmetry in the universe. Its connection to the electroweak phase transition makes it inherently testable. However, completely excluding this scenario can seem difficult in practice, due to the sheer number of proposed models. We investigate the possibility of postulating a "no-lose" theorem for testing EWBG in future e + e - or hadron colliders. As a first step we focus on a factorized picture of EWBG which separates the sources of a stronger phase transition from those that provide new sources of CP violation. We then construct a "nightmare scenario" that generates a strong first-order phase transition as required by EWBG, but is very difficult to test experimentally. We show that a 100 TeV hadron collider is both necessary and possibly sufficient for testing the parameter space of the nightmare scenario that is consistent with EWBG.

  14. Electroweak Symmetry Breaking in Historical Perspective

    DOE PAGES

    Quigg, Chris

    2015-10-01

    The discovery of the Higgs boson is a major milestone in our progress toward understanding the natural world. A particular aim of my review is to show how diverse ideas came together in the conception of electroweak symmetry breaking that led up to the discovery. Furthermore, I survey what we know now that we did not know before, what properties of the Higgs boson remain to be established, and what new questions we may now hope to address.

  15. Signatures from an extra-dimensional seesaw model

    SciTech Connect

    Blennow, Mattias; Melbeus, Henrik; Ohlsson, Tommy; Zhang He

    2010-08-15

    We study the generation of small neutrino masses in an extra-dimensional model, where singlet fermions are allowed to propagate in the extra dimension, while the standard model particles are confined to a brane. Motivated by the fact that extra-dimensional models are nonrenormalizable, we truncate the Kaluza-Klein towers at a maximal Kaluza-Klein number. This truncation, together with the structure of the bulk Majorana mass term, motivated by the Sherk-Schwarz mechanism, implies that the Kaluza-Klein modes of the singlet fermions pair to form Dirac fermions, except for a number of unpaired Majorana fermions at the top of each tower. These heavy Majorana fermions are the only sources of lepton number breaking in the model, and similarly to the type-I seesaw mechanism, they naturally generate small masses for the left-handed neutrinos. The lower Kaluza-Klein modes mix with the light neutrinos, and the mixing effects are not suppressed with respect to the light-neutrino masses. Compared to conventional fermionic seesaw models, such mixing can be more significant. We study the signals of this model at the Large Hadron Collider, and find that the current low-energy bounds on the nonunitarity of the leptonic mixing matrix are strong enough to exclude an observation.

  16. Electroweak physics results from the Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    Demarteau, M.

    1996-11-01

    An overview of recent electroweak physics results from the Tevatron is given. Properties of the W{sup {+-}} and Z{sup 0} gauge bosons using final states containing electrons and muons based on large integrated luminosities are presented. In particular, measurements of the W{sup {+-}} and Z{sup 0} production cross sections, the W-charge asymmetry and the measurement of the W-mass are summarized. Gauge boson self interactions are measured by studying gauge boson pair production and Emits on anomalous gauge boson couplings are discussed.

  17. Four generations, the electroweak phase transition, and supersymmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fok, Ricky; Kribs, Graham D.

    2008-10-01

    We calculate the strength of the electroweak phase transition in a supersymmetric model with four chiral generations. The additional chiral fermions (and scalar partners) lower the critical temperature and thus strengthen the first-order phase transition. The scalar partners stabilize the potential, leading to an effective theory that is bounded from below. We identify the ensemble of parameters where ϕc/Tc≳1 simultaneous with obtaining a large enough Higgs mass. Our calculations focus on a subset of the full four generational supersymmetric parameter space: We take the pseudoscalar heavy, tan⁡β=1, and neglect all subleading contributions to the effective potential. We find that the region of parameter space with a strong first-order phase transition requires mq˜'/mq'≲1.1 while the constraint on the lightest Higgs mass requires mq˜'/mq'≳1 with mq'≳300GeV. We are led to an intriguing prediction of quarks and squarks just beyond the current Tevatron direct search limits that are poised to be discovered quickly at the LHC.

  18. Embedding Brans-Dicke gravity into electroweak theory

    SciTech Connect

    Chernodub, M. N.; Niemi, Antti J.

    2008-06-15

    We argue that a version of the four dimensional Brans-Dicke theory can be embedded in the standard flat spacetime electroweak theory. The embedding involves a change of variables that separates the isospin from the hypercharge in the electroweak theory.

  19. Enabling electroweak baryogenesis through dark matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewicki, Marek; Rindler-Daller, Tanja; Wells, James D.

    2016-06-01

    We study the impact on electroweak baryogenesis from a swifter cosmological expansion induced by dark matter. We detail the experimental bounds that one can place on models that realize it, and we investigate the modifications of these bounds that result from a non-standard cosmological history. The modifications can be sizeable if the expansion rate of the Universe increases by several orders of magnitude. We illustrate the impact through the example of scalar field dark matter, which can alter the cosmological history enough to enable a strong-enough first-order phase transition in the Standard Model when it is supplemented by a dimension six operator directly modifying the Higgs boson potential. We show that due to the modified cosmological history, electroweak baryogenesis can be realized, while keeping deviations of the triple Higgs coupling below HL-LHC sensitivies. The required scale of new physics to effectuate a strong-enough first order phase transition can change by as much as twenty percent as the expansion rate increases by six orders of magnitude.

  20. Electroweak Baryogenesis in R-symmetric Supersymmetry

    SciTech Connect

    Fok, R.; Kribs, Graham D.; Martin, Adam; Tsai, Yuhsin

    2013-03-01

    We demonstrate that electroweak baryogenesis can occur in a supersymmetric model with an exact R-symmetry. The minimal R-symmetric supersymmetric model contains chiral superfields in the adjoint representation, giving Dirac gaugino masses, and an additional set of "R-partner" Higgs superfields, giving R-symmetric \\mu-terms. New superpotential couplings between the adjoints and the Higgs fields can simultaneously increase the strength of the electroweak phase transition and provide additional tree-level contributions to the lightest Higgs mass. Notably, no light stop is present in this framework, and in fact, we require both stops to be above a few TeV to provide sufficient radiative corrections to the lightest Higgs mass to bring it up to 125 GeV. Large CP-violating phases in the gaugino/higgsino sector allow us to match the baryon asymmetry of the Universe with no constraints from electric dipole moments due to R-symmetry. We briefly discuss some of the more interesting phenomenology, particularly of the of the lightest CP-odd scalar.

  1. Electroweak standard model with very special relativity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alfaro, Jorge; González, Pablo; Ávila, Ricardo

    2015-05-01

    The very special relativity electroweak Standard Model (VSR EW SM) is a theory with SU (2 )L×U (1 )R symmetry, with the same number of leptons and gauge fields as in the usual Weinberg-Salam model. No new particles are introduced. The model is renormalizable and unitarity is preserved. However, photons obtain mass and the massive bosons obtain different masses for different polarizations. Besides, neutrino masses are generated. A VSR-invariant term will produce neutrino oscillations and new processes are allowed. In particular, we compute the rate of the decays μ →e +γ . All these processes, which are forbidden in the electroweak Standard Model, put stringent bounds on the parameters of our model and measure the violation of Lorentz invariance. We investigate the canonical quantization of this nonlocal model. Second quantization is carried out, and we obtain a well-defined particle content. Additionally, we do a counting of the degrees of freedom associated with the gauge bosons involved in this work, after spontaneous symmetry breaking has been realized. Violations of Lorentz invariance have been predicted by several theories of quantum gravity [J. Alfaro, H. Morales-Tecotl, and L. F. Urrutia, Phys. Rev. Lett. 84, 2318 (2000); Phys. Rev. D 65, 103509 (2002)]. It is a remarkable possibility that the low-energy effects of Lorentz violation induced by quantum gravity could be contained in the nonlocal terms of the VSR EW SM.

  2. Golden Probe of Electroweak Symmetry Breaking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yi; Lykken, Joe; Spiropulu, Maria; Stolarski, Daniel; Vega-Morales, Roberto

    2016-12-01

    The ratio of the Higgs couplings to W W and Z Z pairs, λW Z, is a fundamental parameter in electroweak symmetry breaking as well as a measure of the (approximate) custodial symmetry possessed by the gauge boson mass matrix. We show that Higgs decays to four leptons are sensitive, via tree level or one-loop interference effects, to both the magnitude and, in particular, overall sign of λW Z. Determining this sign requires interference effects, as it is nearly impossible to measure with rate information. Furthermore, simply determining the sign effectively establishes the custodial representation of the Higgs boson. We find that h →4 ℓ (4 ℓ≡2 e 2 μ , 4 e , 4 μ ) decays have excellent prospects of directly establishing the overall sign at a high luminosity 13 TeV LHC. We also examine the ultimate LHC sensitivity in h →4 ℓ to the magnitude of λW Z. Our results are independent of other measurements of the Higgs boson couplings and, in particular, largely free of assumptions about the top quark Yukawa couplings which also enter at one loop. This makes h →4 ℓ a unique and independent probe of electroweak symmetry breaking and custodial symmetry.

  3. Low-energy signals from kinetic mixing with a warped abelian hidden sector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McDonald, Kristian L.; Morrissey, David E.

    2011-02-01

    We investigate the detailed phenomenology of a light Abelian hidden sector in the Randall-Sundrum framework. Relative to other works with light hidden sectors, the main new feature is a tower of hidden Kaluza-Klein vectors that kinetically mix with the Standard Model photon and Z. We investigate the decay properties of the hidden sector fields in some detail, and develop an approach for calculating processes initiated on the ultraviolet brane of a warped space with large injection momentum relative to the infrared scale. Using these results, we determine the detailed bounds on the light warped hidden sector from precision electroweak measurements and low-energy experiments. We find viable regions of parameter space that lead to significant production rates for several of the hidden Kaluza-Klein vectors in meson factories and fixed-target experiments. This offers the possibility of exploring the structure of an extra spacetime dimension with lower-energy probes.

  4. Diphoton resonance from a warped extra dimension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bauer, Martin; Hörner, Clara; Neubert, Matthias

    2016-07-01

    We argue that extensions of the Standard Model (SM) with a warped extra dimension, which successfully address the hierarchy and flavor problems of elementary particle physics, can provide an elegant explanation of the 750 GeV diphoton excess recently reported by ATLAS and CMS. A gauge-singlet bulk scalar with {O} (1) couplings to fermions is identified as the new resonance S, and the vector-like Kaluza-Klein excitations of the SM quarks and leptons mediate its loop-induced couplings to photons and gluons. The electroweak gauge symmetry almost unambiguously dictates the bulk matter content and hence the hierarchies of the Sto γ γ, W W,ZZ,Zγ, toverline{t} and dijet decay rates. We find that the S → Zγ decay mode is strongly suppressed, such that Br( S → Zγ) /Br( S → γγ) < 0 .1. The hierarchy problem for the new scalar boson is solved in analogy with the Higgs boson by localizing it near the infrared brane. The infinite sums over the Kaluza-Klein towers of fermion states converge and can be calculated in closed form with a remarkably simple result. Reproducing the observed pp → S → γγ signal requires Kaluza-Klein masses in the multi-TeV range, consistent with bounds from flavor physics and electroweak precision observables.

  5. Precision Electroweak Measurements on the Z Presonance

    SciTech Connect

    Aleph,Delphi,L3,Opal,SLD , Collaborations

    2005-09-08

    The authors report on the final electroweak measurements performed with data taken at the Z resonance by the experiments operating at the electron-positron colliders SLC and LEP. the data consist of 17 million Z decays accumulated by the ALEPH, DELPHI, L3 and OPAL experiments at LEP, and 600 thousand Z decays by the SLD experiment using a polarized beam at SLC. The measurements include cross-sections, forward-backward asymmetries and polarized asymmetries. The mass and width of the Z boson, m{sub Z} and {Lambda}{sub Z}, and its couplings to fermions, for example the {rho} parameter and the effective electroweak mixing angle for leptons, are precisely measured: m{sub Z} = 91.1875 {+-} 0.0021 GeV; {Lambda}{sub Z} = 2.4952 {+-} 0.0023 GeV; {rho}{sub {ell}} = 1.0050 {+-} 0.0010; sin{sup 2} {theta}{sub eff}{sup lept} = 0.23153 {+-} 0.00016. The number of light neutrino species is determined to be 2.9840 {+-} 0.0082, in agreement with the three observed generations of fundamental fermions. The results are compared to the predictions of the Standard Model. At the Z-pole, electroweak radiative corrections beyond the running of the QED and QCD coupling constants are observed with a significance of five standard deviations, and in agreement with the Standard Model. of the many Z-pole measurements, the forward-backward asymmetry in b-quark production shows the largest difference with respect to its Standard Model expectation, at the level of 2.8 standard deviations. Through radiative corrections evaluated in the framework of the Standard Model, the Z-pole data are also used to predict the mass of the top quark, m{sub t} = 173{sub -10}{sup +13} GeV, and the mass of the W boson, m{sub W} = 80.363 {+-} 0.032 GeV. These indirect constraints are compared to the direct measurements, providing a stringent test of the Standard Model. Using in addition the direct measurements of m{sub t} and m{sub W}, the mass of the as yet unobserved Standard Model Higgs boson is predicted with a

  6. Fixed target electroweak and hard scattering physics

    SciTech Connect

    Brock, R. ); Brown, C.N.; Montgomery, H.E. ); Corcoran, M.D. )

    1990-02-01

    The possibilities for future physics and experiments involving weak and electromagnetic interactions, neutrino oscillations, general hard scattering and experiments involving nuclear targets were explored. The studies were limited to the physics accessible using fixed target experimentation. While some of the avenues explored turn out to be relatively unrewarding in the light of competition elsewhere in the world, there are a number of positive conclusions reached about experimentation in the energy range available to the Main Injector and Tevatron. Some of the experiments would benefit from the increased intensity available from the Tevatron utilizing the Main Injector, while some require this increase. Finally, some of the experiments would use the Main Injector low energy, high intensity extracted beams directly. A program of electroweak and hard scattering experiments at fixed target energies retains the potential for important contributions to physics. The key to major parts of this program would appear to be the existence of the Main Injector. 115 refs, 17 figs.

  7. High energy factorization in electroweak processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Camici, G.; Ciafaloni, M.

    1994-06-01

    We propose to use high energy, k⊥-dependent, factorization (HEF) in electroweak fusion processes in order to systematically improve the effective W approximation (EWA) at collider energies. Starting from the example of top production, we show that HEF provides correctly all quasi constant terms in the production cross section, i.e. not only the ones O(1/ Mw2) which are typical of the EWA and are due to longitudinal polarizations of exchanged bosons, but also the ones O(1/ Mw2) which are partly due to transverse polarizations. It turns out that latter contributions cannot be accounted for by collinear factorization only, but also come from longitudinal off-shell effects, typical of broken gauge theories, which are explicitly evaluated here.

  8. Diphotons from electroweak triplet-singlet mixing

    DOE PAGES

    Howe, Kiel; Knapen, Simon; Robinson, Dean J.

    2016-08-23

    The neutral component of a real pseudoscalar electroweak (EW) triplet can produce a diphoton excess at 750 GeV, if it is somewhat mixed with an EW singlet pseudoscalar. This triplet-singlet mixing allows for greater freedom in the diboson branching ratios than the singlet-only case, but it is still possible to probe the parameter space extensively with 300 fb-1. The charged component of the triplet is pair produced at the LHC, which results in a striking signal in the form of a pair of Wγ resonances with an irreducible rate of 0.27 fb. Other signatures include multiboson final states from cascade decays ofmore » the triplet-singlet neutral states. In conclusion, a large class of composite models feature both EW singlet and triplet pseudo-Nambu-Goldstone bosons in their spectrum, with the diboson couplings generated by axial anomalies.« less

  9. Diphotons from electroweak triplet-singlet mixing

    SciTech Connect

    Howe, Kiel; Knapen, Simon; Robinson, Dean J.

    2016-08-23

    The neutral component of a real pseudoscalar electroweak (EW) triplet can produce a diphoton excess at 750 GeV, if it is somewhat mixed with an EW singlet pseudoscalar. This triplet-singlet mixing allows for greater freedom in the diboson branching ratios than the singlet-only case, but it is still possible to probe the parameter space extensively with 300 fb-1. The charged component of the triplet is pair produced at the LHC, which results in a striking signal in the form of a pair of Wγ resonances with an irreducible rate of 0.27 fb. Other signatures include multiboson final states from cascade decays of the triplet-singlet neutral states. In conclusion, a large class of composite models feature both EW singlet and triplet pseudo-Nambu-Goldstone bosons in their spectrum, with the diboson couplings generated by axial anomalies.

  10. Radiative And Electroweak Penguin Decays of B

    SciTech Connect

    Richman, Jeffrey D.; /UC, Santa Barbara

    2007-11-09

    Radiative and electroweak penguin decays of B mesons are flavor-changing-neutral-current processes that provide powerful ways to test the Standard Model at the one-loop level, to search for the effects of new physics, and to extract Standard Model parameters such as CKM matrix elements and quark masses. The large data samples obtained by the B-factory experiments BaBar and Belle, together with an intensive theoretical effort, have led to significant progress towards understanding these rare decays. Recent experimental results include the measurements of the b {yields} d{gamma} decays B {yields} {rho}({omega}){gamma}, the observation of B {yields} K(*){ell}{sup +}{ell}{sup -} decays (together with studies of the associated kinematic distributions), and improved measurements of the inclusive B {yields} Xs{gamma} rate and photon energy spectrum.

  11. Neutrino dynamics below the electroweak crossover

    SciTech Connect

    Ghiglieri, J.; Laine, M.

    2016-07-12

    We estimate the thermal masses and damping rates of active (m< eV) and sterile (M∼ GeV) neutrinos with thermal momenta k∼3T at temperatures below the electroweak crossover (5 GeV 130 GeV remains an option. Our differential rates are tabulated in a form suitable for studies of specific scenarios with given neutrino Yukawa matrices.

  12. Effective theory for electroweak doublet dark matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dedes, A.; Karamitros, D.; Spanos, V. C.

    2016-11-01

    We perform a detailed study of an effective field theory which includes the standard model particle content extended by a pair of Weyl fermionic SU(2) doublets with opposite hypercharges. A discrete symmetry guarantees that a linear combination of the doublet components is stable and can act as a candidate particle for dark matter. The dark sector fermions interact with the Higgs and gauge bosons through renormalizable d =4 operators, and nonrenormalizable d =5 operators that appear after integrating out extra degrees of freedom above the TeV scale. We study collider, cosmological and astrophysical probes for this effective theory of dark matter. We find that a weakly interacting dark matter particle with a mass nearby the electroweak scale, and thus observable at the LHC, is consistent with collider and astrophysical data only when fairly large magnetic dipole moment transition operators with the gauge bosons exist, together with moderate Yukawa interactions.

  13. Classically conformal U(1 ) ' extended standard model, electroweak vacuum stability, and LHC Run-2 bounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, Arindam; Oda, Satsuki; Okada, Nobuchika; Takahashi, Dai-suke

    2016-06-01

    We consider the minimal U(1 ) ' extension of the standard model (SM) with the classically conformal invariance, where an anomaly-free U(1 ) ' gauge symmetry is introduced along with three generations of right-handed neutrinos and a U(1 ) ' Higgs field. Since the classically conformal symmetry forbids all dimensional parameters in the model, the U(1 ) ' gauge symmetry is broken by the Coleman-Weinberg mechanism, generating the mass terms of the U(1 ) ' gauge boson (Z' boson) and the right-handed neutrinos. Through a mixing quartic coupling between the U(1 ) ' Higgs field and the SM Higgs doublet field, the radiative U(1 ) ' gauge symmetry breaking also triggers the breaking of the electroweak symmetry. In this model context, we first investigate the electroweak vacuum instability problem in the SM. Employing the renormalization group equations at the two-loop level and the central values for the world average masses of the top quark (mt=173.34 GeV ) and the Higgs boson (mh=125.09 GeV ), we perform parameter scans to identify the parameter region for resolving the electroweak vacuum instability problem. Next we interpret the recent ATLAS and CMS search limits at the LHC Run-2 for the sequential Z' boson to constrain the parameter region in our model. Combining the constraints from the electroweak vacuum stability and the LHC Run-2 results, we find a bound on the Z' boson mass as mZ'≳3.5 TeV . We also calculate self-energy corrections to the SM Higgs doublet field through the heavy states, the right-handed neutrinos and the Z' boson, and find the naturalness bound as mZ'≲7 TeV , in order to reproduce the right electroweak scale for the fine-tuning level better than 10%. The resultant mass range of 3.5 TeV ≲mZ'≲7 TeV will be explored at the LHC Run-2 in the near future.

  14. Lower bound on the electroweak wall velocity from hydrodynamic instability

    SciTech Connect

    Mégevand, Ariel; Membiela, Federico Agustín; Sánchez, Alejandro D.

    2015-03-27

    The subsonic expansion of bubbles in a strongly first-order electroweak phase transition is a convenient scenario for electroweak baryogenesis. For most extensions of the Standard Model, stationary subsonic solutions (i.e., deflagrations) exist for the propagation of phase transition fronts. However, deflagrations are known to be hydrodynamically unstable for wall velocities below a certain critical value. We calculate this critical velocity for several extensions of the Standard Model and compare with an estimation of the wall velocity. In general, we find a region in parameter space which gives stable deflagrations as well as favorable conditions for electroweak baryogenesis.

  15. Models of little Higgs and electroweak precision tests

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Mu-Chun; /Fermilab

    2006-01-01

    The little Higgs idea is an alternative to supersymmetry as a solution to the gauge hierarchy problem. In this note, the author reviews various little Higgs models and their phenomenology with emphasis on the precision electroweak constraints in these models.

  16. Studies of Electroweak Symmetry Breaking at Mexican Institutions

    SciTech Connect

    Diaz Cruz, J. Lorenzo

    2006-09-25

    This paper is aimed to review the contribution made by scientists working at Mexican Institutions on the subject of Electroweak symmetry breaking. This review covers the period from the 80 up to the present.

  17. Electroweak Supersymmetry with an Approximate U(1)_PQ

    SciTech Connect

    Hall, L.J.; Watari, T.

    2004-05-12

    A predictive framework for supersymmetry at the TeV scale is presented, which incorporates the Ciafaloni-Pomarol mechanism for the dynamical determination of the \\mu parameter of the MSSM. It is replaced by (\\lambda S), where S is a singlet field, and the axion becomes a heavy pseudoscalar, G, by adding a mass, m_G, by hand. The explicit breaking of Peccei-Quinn (PQ) symmetry is assumed to be sufficiently weak at the TeV scale that the only observable consequence is the mass m_G. Three models for the explicit PQ breaking are given; but the utility of this framework is that the predictions for all physics at the electroweak scale are independent of the particular model for PQ breaking. Our framework leads to a theory similar to the MSSM, except that \\mu is predicted by the Ciafaloni-Pomarol relation, and there are light, weakly-coupled states in the spectrum. The production and cascade decay of superpartners at colliders occurs as in the MSSM, except that there is one extra stage of the cascade chain, with the next-to-LSP decaying to its"superpartner" and \\tilde{s}, dramatically altering the collider signatures for supersymmetry. The framework is compatible with terrestrial experiments and astrophysical observations for a wide range of m_G and. If G is as light as possible, 300 keV< m_G< 3 MeV, it can have interesting effects on the radiation energy density during the cosmological eras of nucleosynthesis and acoustic oscillation, leading to predictions for N_{\

  18. Electroweak corrections and unitarity in linear moose models

    SciTech Connect

    Chivukula, R. Sekhar; Simmons, Elizabeth H.; He, H.-J.; Kurachi, Masafumi; Tanabashi, Masaharu

    2005-02-01

    We calculate the form of the corrections to the electroweak interactions in the class of Higgsless models which can be deconstructed to a chain of SU(2) gauge groups adjacent to a chain of U(1) gauge groups, and with the fermions coupled to any single SU(2) group and to any single U(1) group along the chain. The primary advantage of our technique is that the size of corrections to electroweak processes can be directly related to the spectrum of vector bosons ('KK modes'). In Higgsless models, this spectrum is constrained by unitarity. Our methods also allow for arbitrary background 5D geometry, spatially dependent gauge-couplings, and brane kinetic energy terms. We find that, due to the size of corrections to electroweak processes in any unitary theory, Higgsless models with localized fermions are disfavored by precision electroweak data. Although we stress our results as they apply to continuum Higgsless 5D models, they apply to any linear moose model including those with only a few extra vector bosons. Our calculations of electroweak corrections also apply directly to the electroweak gauge sector of 5D theories with a bulk scalar Higgs boson; the constraints arising from unitarity do not apply in this case.

  19. Heavy quark spectroscopy and decay

    SciTech Connect

    Schindler, R.H.

    1987-01-01

    The understanding of q anti q systems containing heavy, charmed, and bottom quarks has progressed rapidly in recent years, through steady improvements in experimental techniques for production and detection of their decays. These lectures are meant to be an experimentalist's review of the subject. In the first of two lectures, the existing data on the spectroscopy of the bound c anti c and b anti b systems will be discussed. Emphasis is placed on comparisons with the theoretical models. The second lecture covers the rapidly changing subject of the decays of heavy mesons (c anti q and b anti q), and their excited states. In combination, the spectroscopy and decays of heavy quarks are shown to provide interesting insights into both the strong and electroweak interactions of the heavy quarks. 103 refs., 39 figs.

  20. Excluding electroweak baryogenesis in the MSSM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Curtin, David; Jaiswal, Prerit; Meade, Patrick

    2012-08-01

    In the context of the MSSM the Light Stop Scenario (LSS) is the only region of parameter space that allows for successful Electroweak Baryogenesis (EWBG). This possibility is very phenomenologically attractive, since it allows for the direct production of light stops and could be tested at the LHC. The ATLAS and CMS experiments have recently supplied tantalizing hints for a Higgs boson with a mass of ≈ 125 GeV. This Higgs mass severely restricts the parameter space of the LSS, and we discuss the specific predictions made for EWBG in the MSSM. Combining data from all the available ATLAS and CMS Higgs searches reveals a tension with the predictions of EWBG even at this early stage. This allows us to exclude EWBG in the MSSM at greater than (90) 98% confidence level in the (non-)decoupling limit, by examining correlations between different Higgs decay channels. We also examine the exclusion without the assumption of a ≈ 125 GeV Higgs. The Higgs searches are still highly constraining, excluding the entire EWBG parameter space at greater than 90% CL except for a small window of m h ≈ 117-119 GeV.

  1. Where the electroweak phase transition ends

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gürtler, M.; Ilgenfritz, E.-M.; Schiller, A.

    1997-10-01

    We give a more precise characterization of the end of the electroweak phase transition in the framework of the effective three-dimensional SU(2)-Higgs lattice model than has been given before. The model has now been simulated at gauge couplings βG=12 and 16 for Higgs boson masses M*H=70, 74, 76, and 80 GeV up to lattices 963 and the data have been used for reweighting. The breakdown of finite volume scaling of the Lee-Yang zeroes indicates the change from a first order transition to a crossover at λ3/g23=0.102(2) in rough agreement with results of Karsch, Neuhaus, Patkós, and Rank at βG=9 and smaller lattices. The infinite volume extrapolation of the discontinuity Δ<φ+φ>/g23 turns out to be zero at λ3/g23=0.107(2) being an upper limit. We comment on the limitations of the second method.

  2. Electroweak pinch technique to all orders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Binosi, Daniele

    2004-09-01

    The generalization of the pinch technique to all orders in the electroweak sector of the Standard Model within the class of the renormalizable 't Hooft gauges, is presented. In particular, both the all-order PT gauge-boson- and scalar-fermion vertices, as well as the diagonal and mixed gauge-boson and scalar self-energies are explicitly constructed. This is achieved through the generalization to the Standard Model of the procedure recently applied to the QCD case, which consists of two steps: (i) the identification of special Green's functions, which serve as a common kernel to all self-energy and vertex diagrams and (ii) the study of the (on-shell) Slavnov-Taylor identities they satisfy. It is then shown that the ghost, scalar and scalar-gauge-boson Green's functions appearing in these identities capture precisely the result of the pinching action at arbitrary order. It turns out that the aforementioned Green's functions play a crucial role, their net effect being the non-trivial modification of the ghost, scalar and scalar-gauge-boson diagrams of the gauge-boson- or scalar-fermion vertex we have started from, in such a way as to dynamically generate the characteristic ghost and scalar sector of the background field method. The pinch technique gauge-boson and scalar self-energies are also explicitly constructed by resorting to the method of the background-quantum identities.

  3. Nonperturbative QCD corrections to electroweak observables

    SciTech Connect

    Dru B Renner, Xu Feng, Karl Jansen, Marcus Petschlies

    2011-12-01

    Nonperturbative QCD corrections are important to many low-energy electroweak observables, for example the muon magnetic moment. However, hadronic corrections also play a significant role at much higher energies due to their impact on the running of standard model parameters, such as the electromagnetic coupling. Currently, these hadronic contributions are accounted for by a combination of experimental measurements and phenomenological modeling but ideally should be calculated from first principles. Recent developments indicate that many of the most important hadronic corrections may be feasibly calculated using lattice QCD methods. To illustrate this, we will examine the lattice computation of the leading-order QCD corrections to the muon magnetic moment, paying particular attention to a recently developed method but also reviewing the results from other calculations. We will then continue with several examples that demonstrate the potential impact of the new approach: the leading-order corrections to the electron and tau magnetic moments, the running of the electromagnetic coupling, and a class of the next-to-leading-order corrections for the muon magnetic moment. Along the way, we will mention applications to the Adler function, the determination of the strong coupling constant and QCD corrections to muonic-hydrogen.

  4. Electroweak Corrections at the LHC with MCFM

    SciTech Connect

    Campbell, John M.; Wackeroth, Doreen; Zhou, Jia

    2015-07-10

    Electroweak (EW) corrections at the LHC can be enhanced at high energies due to soft/collinear radiation of W and Z bosons, being dominated by Sudakov-like corrections in the form of $\\alpha_W^l\\log^n(Q^2/M_W^2)$ $(n \\le 2l, \\alpha_W = \\alpha/(4\\pi\\sin\\theta_W^2))$ when the energy scale $Q$ enters the TeV regime. Thus, the inclusion of EW corrections in LHC predictions is important for the search of possible signals of new physics in tails of kinematic distributions. EW corrections should also be taken into account in virtue of their comparable size ($\\mathcal{O}(\\alpha)$) to that of higher order QCD corrections ($\\mathcal{O}(\\alpha_s^2)$). We calculated the next-to-leading-order (NLO) weak corrections to the neutral-current (NC) Drell-Yan process, top-quark pair production and di-jet producion, and implemented them in the Monte-Carlo program MCFM. This enables a combined study with the corresponding NLO QCD corrections. We provide both the full NLO weak corrections and their weak Sudakov approximation valid at high energies. The latter is often used for a fast evaluation of weak effects, and having the exact result available as well allows to quantify the validity of the Sudakov approximation.

  5. Dynamical Electroweak Symmetry Breaking from Extra Dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hashimoto, Michio; Tanabashi, Masaharu; Yamawaki, Koichi

    2003-08-01

    We study the dynamical electroweak symmetry breaking (DEWSB) in the D(= 6, 8, ⋯)-dimensional bulk with compactified extra dimensions. We identify the critical binding strength for triggering the DEWSB, based on the ladder Schwinger-Dyson equation. In the top mode standard model with extra dimensions, where the standard model gauge bosons and the third generation of quarks and leptons are put in the bulk, we analyze the most attractive channel (MAC) by using renormalization group equations (RGEs) of (dimensionless) bulk gauge couplings and determine the effective cutoff where the MAC coupling exceeds the critical value. We then find that the top-condensation can take place for D = 8. Combining RGEs of top-Yukawa and Higgs-quartic couplings with compositeness conditions, we predict the top mass, mt = 173 - 180 GeV, and the Higgs mass, mH = 181 - 211 GeV, for D = 8, where we took the universal compactification scale 1/R = 1 - 100 TeV.

  6. Recent electroweak results from SLC/SLD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frey, Raymond E.

    1997-06-01

    Key electroweak measurements performed by the SLD collaboration at the SLC are described and recent results given. The left-right cross-section asymmetry, ALR, has been updated to include the 1996 data. It remains the single most precise measurement of sin2 θWeff and it is compared to the LEP results. The polarized differential cross section for b-quarks is measured and is used to perform a unique direct measurement of the parity violation parameter for b quarks, Ab. The excellent capability to perform secondary vertexing at SLC with CCD-based vertex detectors is described, including first physics results with the new detector VXD3. The vertexing is used to full advantage to make a highly pure B tag to measure the fraction of hadronic Z0 decays going to b quarks, Rb. The vertexing, in combination with electron-beam polarization, is used to measure Bd0 mixing. The prospects for making a Bs0 mixing measurement are excellent given good SLC performance in the upcoming SLC run(s).

  7. MSSM Electroweak Baryogenesis and LHC Data

    SciTech Connect

    Carena, Marcela; Nardini, Germano; Quiros, Mariano; Wagner, Carlos E.M.

    2013-02-01

    Electroweak baryogenesis is an attractive scenario for the generation of the baryon asymmetry of the universe as its realization depends on the presence at the weak scale of new particles which may be searched for at high energy colliders. In the MSSM it may only be realized in the presence of light stops, and with moderate or small mixing between the left- and right-handed components. Consistency with the observed Higgs mass around 125 GeV demands the heavier stop mass to be much larger than the weak scale. Moreover the lighter stop leads to an increase of the gluon-gluon fusion Higgs production cross section which seems to be in contradiction with indications from current LHC data. We show that this tension may be considerably relaxed in the presence of a light neutralino with a mass lower than about 60 GeV, satisfying all present experimental constraints. In such a case the Higgs may have a significant invisible decay width and the stop decays through a three or four body decay channel, including a bottom quark and the lightest neutralino in the final state. All these properties make this scenario testable at a high luminosity LHC.

  8. Spontaneous compactification and coupling constants in a geometric model for SU(2)×U(1) with gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nahmad-Achar, E.; Rosenbaum, M.; Bautista, R.; Mucio, J.

    1990-07-01

    A fiber-bundle treatment for Kaluza-Klein-type geometric unification of gravitation with the bosonic sector of the standard electroweak theory was presented by Rosenbaum et al. Here we show that it admits spontaneously compactified solutions where the dimensions of the internal space are of the order of the Planck length. Furthermore, the model is able to predict a numerical value for the ratio of the SU(2) and U(1) coupling constants at the energy where both compactification and the unification of gravitational with electroweak interactions would occur, and this value is in agreement with that obtained from applying the renormalization group to the standard model.

  9. Electroweak and QCD corrections to Higgs production via vector-boson fusion at the CERN LHC

    SciTech Connect

    Ciccolini, M.; Denner, A.; Dittmaier, S.

    2008-01-01

    The radiative corrections of the strong and electroweak interactions are calculated at next-to-leading order for Higgs-boson production in the weak-boson-fusion channel at hadron colliders. Specifically, the calculation includes all weak-boson fusion and quark-antiquark annihilation diagrams to Higgs-boson production in association with two hard jets, including all corresponding interferences. The results on the QCD corrections confirm that previously made approximations of neglecting s-channel diagrams and interferences are well suited for predictions of Higgs production with dedicated vector-boson fusion cuts at the LHC. The electroweak corrections, which also include real corrections from incoming photons and leading heavy Higgs-boson effects at two-loop order, are of the same size as the QCD corrections, viz. typically at the level of 5%-10% for a Higgs-boson mass up to {approx}700 GeV. In general, both types of corrections do not simply rescale differential distributions, but induce distortions at the level of 10%. The discussed corrections have been implemented in a flexible Monte Carlo event generator.

  10. Capture and decay of electroweak WIMPonium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asadi, Pouya; Baumgart, Matthew; Fitzpatrick, Patrick J.; Krupczak, Emmett; Slatyer, Tracy R.

    2017-02-01

    The spectrum of Weakly-Interacting-Massive-Particle (WIMP) dark matter generically possesses bound states when the WIMP mass becomes sufficiently large relative to the mass of the electroweak gauge bosons. The presence of these bound states enhances the annihilation rate via resonances in the Sommerfeld enhancement, but they can also be produced directly with the emission of a low-energy photon. In this work we compute the rate for SU(2) triplet dark matter (the wino) to bind into WIMPonium—which is possible via single-photon emission for wino masses above 5 TeV for relative velocity v < O(10‑2) —and study the subsequent decays of these bound states. We present results with applications beyond the wino case, e.g. for dark matter inhabiting a nonabelian dark sector; these include analytic capture and transition rates for general dark sectors in the limit of vanishing force carrier mass, efficient numerical routines for calculating positive and negative-energy eigenstates of a Hamiltonian containing interactions with both massive and massless force carriers, and a study of the scaling of bound state formation in the short-range Hulth&apos{e}n potential. In the specific case of the wino, we find that the rate for bound state formation is suppressed relative to direct annihilation, and so provides only a small correction to the overall annihilation rate. The soft photons radiated by the capture process and by bound state transitions could permit measurement of the dark matter's quantum numbers; for wino-like dark matter, such photons are rare, but might be observable by a future ground-based gamma-ray telescope combining large effective area and a low energy threshold.

  11. LEP precision electroweak measurements from the Z{sup 0} resonance

    SciTech Connect

    Strom, D.

    1997-01-01

    Preliminary electroweak measurements from the LEP Collaboration from data taken at the Z{sup 0} resonance are presented. Most of the results presented are based on a total data sample of 12 x 10{sup 6} recorded Z{sup 0} events which included data from the 1993 and 1994 LEP runs. The Z{sup 0} resonance parameters, including hadronic and leptonic cross sections and asymmetries, {tau} polarization and its asymmetry, and heavy-quark asymmetries and partial widths, are evaluated and confronted with the predictions of the Standard Model. This comparison incorporates the constraints provided by the recent determination of the top-quark mass at the Tevatron. The Z{sup 0} resonance parameters are found to be in good agreement with the Standard Model prediction using the Tevatron top-quark mass, with the exception of the partial widths for Z{sup 0} decays to pairs of b and c quarks.

  12. Limiting case of modified electroweak model for contracted gauge group

    SciTech Connect

    Gromov, N. A.

    2011-06-15

    The modification of the Electroweak Model with 3-dimensional spherical geometry in the matter fields space is suggested. The Lagrangian of this model is given by the sum of the free (without any potential term) matter fields Lagrangian and the standard gauge fields Lagrangian. The vector boson masses are generated by transformation of this Lagrangian from Cartesian coordinates to coordinates on the sphere S{sup 3}. The limiting case of the bosonic part of the modified model, which corresponds to the contracted gauge group SU(2; j) x U(1) is discussed. Within framework of the limit model Z boson and electromagnetic fields can be regarded as external ones with respect to W-boson fields in the sence that W-boson fields do not effect on these external fields. The masses of all particles of the Electroweak Model remain the same, but field interactions in contracted model are more simple as compared with the standard Electroweak Model.

  13. The electroweak phase transition in the Inert Doublet Model

    SciTech Connect

    Blinov, Nikita; Profumo, Stefano; Stefaniak, Tim

    2015-07-21

    We study the strength of a first-order electroweak phase transition in the Inert Doublet Model (IDM), where particle dark matter (DM) is comprised of the lightest neutral inert Higgs boson. We improve over previous studies in the description and treatment of the finite-temperature effective potential and of the electroweak phase transition. We focus on a set of benchmark models inspired by the key mechanisms in the IDM leading to a viable dark matter particle candidate, and illustrate how to enhance the strength of the electroweak phase transition by adjusting the masses of the yet undiscovered IDM Higgs states. We argue that across a variety of DM masses, obtaining a strong enough first-order phase transition is a generic possibility in the IDM. We find that due to direct dark matter searches and collider constraints, a sufficiently strong transition and a thermal relic density matching the universal DM abundance is possible only in the Higgs funnel regime.

  14. The electroweak phase transition in the Inert Doublet Model

    SciTech Connect

    Blinov, Nikita; Profumo, Stefano; Stefaniak, Tim E-mail: profumo@ucsc.edu

    2015-07-01

    We study the strength of a first-order electroweak phase transition in the Inert Doublet Model (IDM), where particle dark matter (DM) is comprised of the lightest neutral inert Higgs boson. We improve over previous studies in the description and treatment of the finite-temperature effective potential and of the electroweak phase transition. We focus on a set of benchmark models inspired by the key mechanisms in the IDM leading to a viable dark matter particle candidate, and illustrate how to enhance the strength of the electroweak phase transition by adjusting the masses of the yet undiscovered IDM Higgs states. We argue that across a variety of DM masses, obtaining a strong enough first-order phase transition is a generic possibility in the IDM. We find that due to direct dark matter searches and collider constraints, a sufficiently strong transition and a thermal relic density matching the universal DM abundance is possible only in the Higgs funnel regime.

  15. Combined QCD and electroweak analysis of HERA data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abramowicz, H.; Abt, I.; Adamczyk, L.; Adamus, M.; Antonelli, S.; Aushev, V.; Behnke, O.; Behrens, U.; Bertolin, A.; Bhadra, S.; Bloch, I.; Boos, E. G.; Brock, I.; Brook, N. H.; Brugnera, R.; Bruni, A.; Bussey, P. J.; Caldwell, A.; Capua, M.; Catterall, C. D.; Chwastowski, J.; Ciborowski, J.; Ciesielski, R.; Cooper-Sarkar, A. M.; Corradi, M.; Dementiev, R. K.; Devenish, R. C. E.; Dusini, S.; Foster, B.; Gach, G.; Gallo, E.; Garfagnini, A.; Geiser, A.; Gizhko, A.; Gladilin, L. K.; Golubkov, Yu. A.; Grzelak, G.; Guzik, M.; Gwenlan, C.; Hain, W.; Hlushchenko, O.; Hochman, D.; Hori, R.; Ibrahim, Z. A.; Iga, Y.; Ishitsuka, M.; Januschek, F.; Jomhari, N. Z.; Kadenko, I.; Kananov, S.; Karshon, U.; Kaur, P.; Kisielewska, D.; Klanner, R.; Klein, U.; Korzhavina, I. A.; Kotański, A.; Kötz, U.; Kovalchuk, N.; Kowalski, H.; Krupa, B.; Kuprash, O.; Kuze, M.; Levchenko, B. B.; Levy, A.; Limentani, S.; Lisovyi, M.; Lobodzinska, E.; Löhr, B.; Lohrmann, E.; Longhin, A.; Lontkovskyi, D.; Lukina, O. Yu.; Makarenko, I.; Malka, J.; Mastroberardino, A.; Mohamad Idris, F.; Mohammad Nasir, N.; Myronenko, V.; Nagano, K.; Nobe, T.; Nowak, R. J.; Onishchuk, Yu.; Paul, E.; Perlański, W.; Pokrovskiy, N. S.; Polini, A.; Przybycień, M.; Roloff, P.; Ruspa, M.; Saxon, D. H.; Schioppa, M.; Schneekloth, U.; Schörner-Sadenius, T.; Shcheglova, L. M.; Shevchenko, R.; Shkola, O.; Shyrma, Yu.; Singh, I.; Skillicorn, I. O.; Słomiński, W.; Solano, A.; Stanco, L.; Stefaniuk, N.; Stern, A.; Stopa, P.; Sztuk-Dambietz, J.; Tassi, E.; Tokushuku, K.; Tomaszewska, J.; Tsurugai, T.; Turcato, M.; Turkot, O.; Tymieniecka, T.; Verbytskyi, A.; Wan Abdullah, W. A. T.; Wichmann, K.; Wing, M.; Yamada, S.; Yamazaki, Y.; Zakharchuk, N.; Żarnecki, A. F.; Zawiejski, L.; Zenaiev, O.; Zhautykov, B. O.; Zotkin, D. S.; ZEUS Collaboration

    2016-05-01

    A simultaneous fit of parton distribution functions (PDFs) and electroweak parameters to HERA data on deep inelastic scattering is presented. The input data are the neutral current and charged current inclusive cross sections which were previously used in the QCD analysis leading to the HERAPDF2.0 PDFs. In addition, the polarization of the electron beam was taken into account for the ZEUS data recorded between 2004 and 2007. Results on the vector and axial-vector couplings of the Z boson to u - and d -type quarks, on the value of the electroweak mixing angle and the mass of the W boson are presented. The values obtained for the electroweak parameters are in agreement with Standard Model predictions.

  16. Production of a KK-graviton and a vector boson in ADD model via gluon fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shivaji, Ambresh; Ravindran, V.; Agrawal, Pankaj

    2012-02-01

    In the models with large extra-dimensions, we examine the production of a vector boson (γ/ Z) in association with the Kaluza-Klein (KK) modes of the graviton via gluon fusion. At the leading order, the process takes place through quark-loop box and triangle diagrams and it is ultraviolate finite. We report the results for the LHC. We also discuss the issues of anomaly and decoupling of heavy quarks in the amplitude.

  17. The heavy top quark and supersymmetry

    SciTech Connect

    Hall, L.J. |

    1997-01-01

    Three aspects of supersymmetric theories are discussed: electroweak symmetry breaking, the issues of flavor, and gauge unification. The heavy top quark plays an important, sometimes dominant, role in each case. Additional symmetries lead to extensions of the Standard Model which can provide an understanding for many of the outstanding problems of particle physics. A broken supersymmetric extension of spacetime allows electroweak symmetry breaking to follow from the dynamics of the heavy top quark; an extension of isospin provides a constrained framework for understanding the pattern of quark and lepton masses; and a grand unified extension of the Standard Model gauge group provides an elegant understanding of the gauge quantum numbers of the components of a generation. Experimental signatures for each of these additional symmetries are discussed.

  18. The heavy top quark and supersymmetry

    SciTech Connect

    Hall, L.J. |

    1996-05-08

    Three aspects of supersymmetric theories are discussed: electroweak symmetry breaking, the issues of flavor, and gauge unification. The heavy top quark plays an important, sometimes dominant, role in each case. Additional symmetries lead to extensions of the standard model which can provide an understanding for many of the outstanding problems of particle physics. A broken supersymmetric extension of spacetime allows electroweak symmetry breaking to follow from the dynamics of the heavy top quark; an extension of isospin provides a constrained framework for understanding the pattern of quark and lepton masses; and a grand unified extension of the standard model gauge group provides an elegant understanding of the gauge quantum numbers of the components of a generation. Experimental signatures for each of these additional symmetries are discussed.

  19. Electroweak baryogenesis in the exceptional supersymmetric standard model

    SciTech Connect

    Chao, Wei

    2015-08-28

    We study electroweak baryogenesis in the E{sub 6} inspired exceptional supersymmetric standard model (E{sub 6}SSM). The relaxation coefficients driven by singlinos and the new gaugino as well as the transport equation of the Higgs supermultiplet number density in the E{sub 6}SSM are calculated. Our numerical simulation shows that both CP-violating source terms from singlinos and the new gaugino can solely give rise to a correct baryon asymmetry of the Universe via the electroweak baryogenesis mechanism.

  20. Production of Electroweak Bosons at Hadron Colliders: Theoretical Aspects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mangano, Michelangelo L.

    2016-10-01

    Since the W± and Z0 discovery, hadron colliders have provided a fertile ground, in which continuously improving measurements and theoretical predictions allow to precisely determine the gauge boson properties, and to probe the dynamics of electroweak and strong interactions. This article will review, from a theoretical perspective, the role played by the study, at hadron colliders, of electroweak boson production properties, from the better understanding of the proton structure, to the discovery and studies of the top quark and of the Higgs, to the searches for new phenomena beyond the Standard Model.

  1. Fluctuation-driven electroweak phase transition. [in early universe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gleiser, Marcelo; Kolb, Edward W.

    1992-01-01

    We examine the dynamics of the electroweak phase transition in the early Universe. For Higgs masses in the range 46 less than or = M sub H less than or = 150 GeV and top quark masses less than 200 GeV, regions of symmetric and asymmetric vacuum coexist to below the critical temperature, with thermal equilibrium between the two phases maintained by fluctuations of both phases. We propose that the transition to the asymmetric vacuum is completed by percolation of these subcritical fluctuations. Our results are relevant to scenarios of baryogenesis that invoke a weakly first-order phase transition at the electroweak scale.

  2. Electroweak and B physics results from the Fermilab Tevatron Collider

    SciTech Connect

    Pitts, K.T.

    2001-01-30

    This writeup is an introduction to some of the experimental issues involved in performing electroweak and b physics measurements at the Fermilab Tevatron. In the electroweak sector, we discuss W and Z boson cross section measurements as well as the measurement of the mass of the W boson. For b physics, we discuss measurements of B{sup 0}/{bar B}{sup 0} mixing and CP violation. This paper is geared towards nonexperts who are interested in understanding some of the issues and motivations for these measurements and how the measurements are carried out.

  3. Review of Physics Results from the Tevatron. Electroweak Physics

    DOE PAGES

    Kotwal, Ashutosh V.; Schellman, Heidi; Sekaric, Jadranka

    2015-02-17

    We summarize an extensive Tevatron (1984–2011) electroweak physics program that involves a variety of W and Z boson precision measurements. The relevance of these studies using single and associated gauge boson production to our understanding of the electroweak sector, quantum chromodynamics and searches for new physics is emphasized. Furthermore,we discuss the importance of the W boson mass measurement, the W/Z boson distributions and asymmetries, and diboson studies. We also highlight the recent Tevatron measurements and prospects for the final Tevatron measurements.

  4. Recent results in electroweak physics at the Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    Giulia Manca

    2004-02-13

    The Run II physics program of CDF and D0 has just begun with the first 72 pb{sup -1} of analysis quality data collected at the center-of-mass energy of 1.96 TeV. The Electroweak measurements are among the first and most important benchmarks for the best understanding of the detectors and testing the Standard Model. We present measurements of the W and Z inclusive cross sections and decays asymmetries, recent results in di-boson physics and searches for new physics which make use of distinct electroweak signatures.

  5. Electroweak matching conditions for top pair production at threshold

    SciTech Connect

    Hoang, Andre H.; Reisser, Christoph J.

    2006-08-01

    We determine the real parts of electroweak matching conditions relevant for top quark pair production close to threshold in e{sup +}e{sup -} annihilation at next-to-next-to-leading logarithmic (NNLL) order. Numerically the corrections are comparable to the NNLL QCD corrections.

  6. Natural cold baryogenesis from strongly interacting electroweak symmetry breaking

    SciTech Connect

    Konstandin, Thomas; Servant, Géraldine E-mail: geraldine.servant@cern.ch

    2011-07-01

    The mechanism of ''cold electroweak baryogenesis'' has been so far unpopular because its proposal has relied on the ad-hoc assumption of a period of hybrid inflation at the electroweak scale with the Higgs acting as the waterfall field. We argue here that cold baryogenesis can be naturally realized without the need to introduce any slow-roll potential. Our point is that composite Higgs models where electroweak symmetry breaking arises via a strongly first-order phase transition provide a well-motivated framework for cold baryogenesis. In this case, reheating proceeds by bubble collisions and we argue that this can induce changes in Chern-Simons number, which in the presence of new sources of CP violation commonly lead to baryogenesis. We illustrate this mechanism using as a source of CP violation an effective dimension-six operator which is free from EDM constraints, another advantage of cold baryogenesis compared to the standard theory of electroweak baryogenesis. Our results are general as they do not rely on any particular UV completion but only on a stage of supercooling ended by a first-order phase transition in the evolution of the universe, which can be natural if there is nearly conformal dynamics at the TeV scale. Besides, baryon-number violation originates from the Standard Model only.

  7. Measurement of Electroweak Top Quark Production at {D\\O}

    SciTech Connect

    Tsai, Yun-Tse

    2013-01-01

    We present a new model-independent measurement of the electroweak single top-quark production cross section in proton-antiproton (p- $\\bar{p}$) collisions at √s = 1.96 TeV in 9.7 fb-1 of integrated luminosity collected with the DØ detector.

  8. A strong electroweak phase transition from the inflaton field

    SciTech Connect

    Tenkanen, Tommi; Tuominen, Kimmo; Vaskonen, Ville

    2016-09-22

    We study a singlet scalar extension of the Standard Model. The singlet scalar is coupled non-minimally to gravity and assumed to drive inflation, and also couple sufficiently strongly with the SM Higgs field in order to provide for a strong first order electroweak phase transition. Requiring the model to describe inflation successfully, be compatible with the LHC data, and yield a strong first order electroweak phase transition, we identify the regions of the parameter space where the model is viable. We also include a singlet fermion with scalar coupling to the singlet scalar to probe the sensitivity of the constraints on additional degrees of freedom and their couplings in the singlet sector. We also comment on the general feasibility of these fields to act as dark matter.

  9. Precision Electroweak Measurements and Constraints on the Standard Model

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2011-11-11

    This note presents constraints on Standard Model parameters using published and preliminary precision electroweak results measured at the electron-positron colliders LEP and SLC. The results are compared with precise electroweak measurements from other experiments, notably CDF and D0 at the Tevatron. Constraints on the input parameters of the Standard Model are derived from the results obtained in high-Q{sup 2} interactions, and used to predict results in low-Q{sup 2} experiments, such as atomic parity violation, Moller scattering, and neutrino-nucleon scattering. The main changes with respect to the experimental results presented in 2007 are new combinations of results on the W-boson mass and width and the mass of the top quark.

  10. Electroweak radiative corrections to neutrino-nucleon scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Kwangwoo

    The main subject of this thesis is to study the impact of electroweak O (alpha) corrections on neutrino-nucleon scattering processes, in particular on the extraction of electroweak parameters at the NuTeV experiment. The Standard Model (SM) represents the best current understanding of electroweak and strong interactions of elementary particles. In recent years it has been impressively confirmed experimentally through the precise determination of W and Z boson properties at the CERN LEP and the Stanford Linear e+e - colliders, and the discovery of the top quark at the Fermilab Tevatron pp collider. The W boson mass (MW) is one of the fundamental parameters in electroweak theory. A precise measurement of MW does not only provide a further precisely known SM input parameter, but significantly improves the indirect limit on the Higgs-boson mass obtained by comparing SM predictions with electroweak precision data. MW is measured directly at the CERN LEP2 e+e- and the Fermilab Tevatron pp colliders. A measurement of MW can also be extracted from a measurement of the sine squared of the weak mixing angle, i.e. sin 2 thetaW, via the well-known relation between the W and Z boson mass, M2W=M2Z (1 - sin2 thetaW). The NuTeV collaboration [20] extracts sin2 theta W, and thus MW, from the ratio of neutral and charged-current neutrino and anti-neutrino cross sections. Their result differs from direct measurements performed at LEP2 and the Fermilab Tevatron by about 3sigma. Much effort both experimental and theoretical has gone into understanding this discrepancy. These efforts include QCD corrections, parton distribution functions, and nuclear structure [21]. However, the effect of electroweak radiative corrections has not been fully studied yet. In the extraction of MW from NuTeV data, only part of the electroweak corrections have been included [20]. Although the complete calculation of these corrections is available in [17] and [18], their impact on the NuTeV measurement of MW

  11. Strong electroweak phase transition from Supersymmetric Custodial Triplets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia-Pepin, Mateo; Quiros, Mariano

    2016-05-01

    The Supersymmetric Custodial Triplet Model, a supersymmetric generalization of the Georgi-Machacek model, has proven to be an interesting modification of the MSSM. It extends the MSSM Higgs sector by three extra SU(2) L triplets in such a way that approximate custodial invariance is preserved and ρ-parameter deviations are kept under control. By means of a sizeable triplet contribution to electroweak breaking the model is able to generate a barrier at tree level between the false vacuum and the electroweak one. This will result in a strong first order phase transition for an important region of the parameter space. We also look at the gravitational waves that could be generated as a result of the phase transition and show how future interferometers could be used as a probe of the model.

  12. Top-quark and electroweak results from ATLAS and CMS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spighi, Roberto

    2013-12-01

    A selection of top-quark and electroweak results performed by ATLAS and CMS are presented. The results obtained with proton-proton collision at the center of mass energies of 7 and 8 TeV cover the 2010-2012 data taking period. We present the total and differential cross sections of the top-quark pair, single top-quark and top-quark production in association with a Gauge boson, together with some of the main properties of the top-quark as mass, charge asymmetry and spin. Regarding the electroweak physics, we present the total cross sections of single and double bosons and show results on the lepton universality of electrons and muons, the weak mixing angle sinθw, the W helicity and the study of the Triple Gauge Coupling. All the presented results are in agreement with the Standard Model predictions.

  13. Dark matter as the trigger of strong electroweak phase transition

    SciTech Connect

    Chowdhury, Talal Ahmed; Nemevšek, Miha; Senjanović, Goran; Zhang, Yue E-mail: miha@ictp.it E-mail: yuezhang@ictp.it

    2012-02-01

    In this paper, we propose a new possible connection between dark matter relic density and baryon asymmetry of the universe. The portal between standard model sector and dark matter not only controls the relic density and detections of dark matter, but also allows the dark matter to trigger the first order electroweak phase transition. We discuss systematically possible scalar dark matter candidates, starting from a real singlet to arbitrary high representations. We show that the simplest realization is provided by a doublet, and that strong first-order electroweak phase transition implies a lower bound on the dark matter direct detection rate. The mass of dark matter lies between 45 and 80 GeV, allowing for an appreciable invisible decay width of the Standard Model Higgs boson, which is constrained to be lighter than 130 GeV for the sake of the strong phase transition.

  14. Combined electroweak and QCD fit to HERA data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abt, I.; Cooper-Sarkar, A. M.; Foster, B.; Gwenlan, C.; Myronenko, V.; Turkot, O.; Wichmann, K.

    2016-09-01

    A simultaneous electroweak and QCD fit of electroweak parameters and parton distribution functions to HERA data on deep inelastic scattering is presented. The input data are neutral current and charged current inclusive cross sections measured by the H1 and ZEUS collaborations at the e p collider HERA. The polarization of the electron beam was taken into account for the ZEUS and H1 data recorded between 2004 and 2007. Results are presented on the vector and axial-vector couplings of the Z boson to u - and d -type quarks. The values are in agreement with Standard Model predictions. The results on au and vu represent the most precise measurements from a single process.

  15. Gedanken Worlds without Higgs: QCD-Induced Electroweak Symmetry Breaking

    SciTech Connect

    Quigg, Chris; Shrock, Robert; /YITP, Stony Brook

    2009-01-01

    To illuminate how electroweak symmetry breaking shapes the physical world, we investigate toy models in which no Higgs fields or other constructs are introduced to induce spontaneous symmetry breaking. Two models incorporate the standard SU(3){sub c} {circle_times} SU(2){sub L} {circle_times} U(1){sub Y} gauge symmetry and fermion content similar to that of the standard model. The first class--like the standard electroweak theory--contains no bare mass terms, so the spontaneous breaking of chiral symmetry within quantum chromodynamics is the only source of electroweak symmetry breaking. The second class adds bare fermion masses sufficiently small that QCD remains the dominant source of electroweak symmetry breaking and the model can serve as a well-behaved low-energy effective field theory to energies somewhat above the hadronic scale. A third class of models is based on the left-right-symmetric SU(3){sub c} {circle_times} SU(2){sub L} {circle_times} SU(2){sub R} {circle_times} U(1)B?L gauge group. In a fourth class of models, built on SU(4){sub PS} {circle_times} SU(2){sub L} {circle_times} SU(2){sub R} gauge symmetry, lepton number is treated as a fourth color. Many interesting characteristics of the models stem from the fact that the effective strength of the weak interactions is much closer to that of the residual strong interactions than in the real world. The Higgs-free models not only provide informative contrasts to the real world, but also lead us to consider intriguing issues in the application of field theory to the real world.

  16. Strong Electroweak Symmetry Breaking in the Large Hadron Collider Era

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evans, Jared Andrew

    2011-12-01

    With the Large Hadron Collider collecting data, both the pursuit of novel detection techniques and the exploration of new ideas are more important than ever. Novel detection techniques are essential in order for the community to garner the most worth from the machine. New ideas are needed both to expand the boundaries of what could be observed and to foster the creative mindset of the community that moves particle physics into fascinating, and often unexpected, directions. Discovering whether electroweak symmetry is broken strongly or weakly is one of the most pressing questions to be answered. Exploring the possibility of strong electroweak symmetry breaking is the topic of this work. The first of two major sectors in this work concerns the theory of conformal technicolor. We present the low energy minimal model for conformal technicolor and verify that it can satisfy current constraints from experiment. We will also provide a UV completion for this model, which realistically extends the sector with high-energy supersymmetry. Two complete models of flavor are presented. This is the first example of a complete, consistent model of strong electroweak symmetry breaking. The second of the two sectors discusses experimental signatures arising in a large class of general technicolor models at the Large Hadron Collider. The possible existence of narrow scalar states that can be produced via gluon-gluon fusion is first discussed. These states can decay into exotic final states of multiple electroweak gauge bosons, third generation particles and even light composite Higgs particles. A two Higgs doublet model is proposed as an effective way to model these exciting states. Lastly, we discuss the array of possible final states and their possible discovery.

  17. Local and nonlocal defect-mediated electroweak baryogenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Brandenberger, R.; Davis, A.; Prokopec, T.; Trodden, M. |||

    1996-04-01

    We consider the effects of particle transport in topological defect-mediated electroweak baryogenesis scenarios. We analyze the cases of both thin and thick defects and demonstrate an enhancement of the original mechanism in both cases due to an increased effective volume in which baryogenesis occurs. This phenomenon is a result of an imperfect cancellation between the baryons and antibaryons produced on opposite faces of the defect. {copyright} {ital 1996 The American Physical Society.}

  18. Electroweak Penguin and Leptonic Decays at BaBar

    SciTech Connect

    Bucci, F.; /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa

    2005-08-26

    Recent BABAR results on electroweak penguin and leptonic decays are reviewed. In particular, the measurements of B {yields} K{sup (*)}l{sup +}l{sup -} and the preliminary results on B {yields} X{sub s}l{sup +}l{sup -} are presented. Also summarized are the preliminary limits on B{sup +} {yields} l{sup +}{nu} (l = e,{mu}) and B{sup +} {yields} K{sup +}{nu}{bar {nu}}.

  19. A few words about resonances in the electroweak effective Lagrangian

    SciTech Connect

    Rosell, Ignasi; Sanz-Cillero, Juan José

    2016-01-22

    Contrary to a widely spread believe, we have demonstrated that strongly coupled electroweak models including both a light Higgs-like boson and massive spin-1 resonances are not in conflict with experimental constraints on the oblique S and T parameters. We use an effective Lagrangian implementing the chiral symmetry breaking SU (2){sub L} ⊗ SU (2){sub R} → SU (2){sub L+R} that contains the Standard Model gauge bosons coupled to the electroweak Goldstones, one Higgs-like scalar state h with mass m{sub h} = 126 GeV and the lightest vector and axial-vector resonance multiplets V and A. We have considered the one-loop calculation of S and T in order to study the viability of these strongly-coupled scenarios, being short-distance constraints and dispersive relations the main ingredients of the calculation. Once we have constrained the resonance parameters, we do a first approach to the determination of the low energy constants of the electroweak effective theory at low energies (without resonances). We show this determination in the case of the purely Higgsless bosonic Lagrangian.

  20. Cosmological consequences of dilatons in the electroweak model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McDonald, J.

    1992-01-01

    We consider the cosmological evolution of an electroweak model with a Jordan-Brans-Dicke dilaton, as would result from spontaneously breaking scale-invariance in a complete theory. For the case where the Friedman-Robertson-Walker (FRW) metric is introduced in the Einstein frame, it is shown that the phase transition is first-order, in agreement with previous treatments of this question. It is however argued that the treatment given here is more physically correct than previous treatments. It is also shown that at the electroweak phase transition, which occurs at the temperature of chiral symmetry breaking, most of the vacuum energy goes into oscillations of the dilaton field, with essentially no reheating or increase in entropy. As a result, the universe becomes effectively matter dominated before nucleosynthesis, ruling out the model. The only way to avoid this problem is to have scale-invariance broken at less than O(107) GeV. For the case where the FRW metric is introduced in the Jordan frame, the electroweak phase transition is of second-order as for the minimal standard model. The question of the energy density in dilatons is dependent upon the assumed form of the dilaton potential.

  1. Fundamental composite electroweak dynamics: Status at the LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arbey, Alexandre; Cacciapaglia, Giacomo; Cai, Haiying; Deandrea, Aldo; Le Corre, Solène; Sannino, Francesco

    2017-01-01

    Using the recent joint results from the ATLAS and CMS collaborations on the Higgs boson, we determine the current status of composite electroweak dynamics models based on the expected scalar sector. Our analysis can be used as a minimal template for a wider class of models between the two limiting cases of composite Goldstone Higgs and Technicolor-like ones. This is possible due to the existence of a unified description, both at the effective and fundamental Lagrangian levels, of models of composite Higgs dynamics where the Higgs boson itself can emerge, depending on the way the electroweak symmetry is embedded, either as a pseudo-Goldstone boson or as a massive excitation of the condensate. In our template, a mass term for the fermions in the fundamental theory acts as a stabilizer of the Higgs potential, without the need for partners of the top quark. We constrain the available parameter space at the effective Lagrangian level. We show that a wide class of models of fundamental composite electroweak dynamics are still compatible with the present constraints. The results are relevant for the ongoing and future searches at the Large Hadron Collider.

  2. Observation of Electroweak Single Top-Quark Production with the CDF II Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Lueck, Jan

    2009-07-24

    predicted cross section. Therefore, the vast majority of the CDF and D0 single top-quark analyses search for the combined s- and t-channel signal, with the production ratio to be given by the SM. In Tevatron Run I, several limits on the single top-quark production cross section were set by CDF and D0, whereas in Run II, even stronger limits followed by both collaborations. Furthermore, limits on the non-SM production of single top-quarks via flavor-changing neutral currents could be obtained. The electroweak production of single top-quarks has not yet been observed up to the time of this thesis, although the D0 and shortly thereafter the CDF Collaborations found first evidence. The experimental challenge of the search for single top-quark production is the tiny expected signal beneath a large and imprecisely known amount of background processes. The relative fraction of background events is at the order of about ten times higher compared to the top-quark pair production. Consequently, the expected signal amounts to about 5% of the full candidate event sample whose background contribution is only known to a level at the order of 20%. Furthermore, the signal events themselves are expected to be not as distinct from the background as the top-quark pair production since there is only one heavy object present in the event. Thus, experimental methods like simple counting experiments are not sufficiently sensitive and the development of more sophisticated analysis techniques is required to distinguish such small signals from alike and inaccurately known background processes. Neural networks comply with those requirements. They can be used to distinguish between signal and background processes by combining the information contained in several variables into a powerful discriminant, while each variable has a rather low separation capability. The application of those neural network discriminants to collision data provide a method for the extraction of the signal fraction and its

  3. Significant enhancement of neutralino dark matter annihilation from electroweak bremsstrahlung.

    PubMed

    Bringmann, Torsten; Calore, Francesca

    2014-02-21

    Indirect searches for the cosmological dark matter have become ever more competitive during the past years. Here, we report the first full calculation of leading electroweak corrections to the annihilation rate of supersymmetric neutralino dark matter. We find that these corrections can be huge, partially due to contributions that have been overlooked so far. Our results imply a significantly enhanced discovery potential of this well motivated dark matter candidate with current and upcoming cosmic ray experiments, in particular for gamma rays and models with somewhat small annihilation rates at the tree level.

  4. Electroweak radiative corrections to polarized Mo/ller scattering asymmetries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Czarnecki, Andrzej; Marciano, William J.

    1996-02-01

    One loop electroweak radiative corrections to left-right parity-violating Mo/ller scattering (e-e--->e-e-) asymmetries are presented. They reduce the standard model (tree level) prediction by 40+/-3% where the main shift and uncertainty stem from hadronic vacuum polarization loops. A similar reduction also occurs for the electron-electron atomic parity-violating interaction. That effect can be attributed to an increase of sin2θW(q2) by 3% in running from q2=m2Z to 0. The sensitivity of the asymmetry to ``new physics'' is also discussed.

  5. A six-dimensional Jordan model for electroweak interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martínez Merino, Aldo; Obregon, Octavio

    2014-03-01

    We present a model for the electroweak interactions based on the commutative but non-associative exceptional Jordan algebra of Hermitian matrices valued on the octonions. By this means, we propose a construction of a gauge theory which take values in this algebra. Following closely the six-dimensional model proposed by D. Fairlie years ago and using a supergroup, we found a natural structure that provides the weak interaction action with some additional terms; we will briefly comment on their possible meaning. Postdoctoral Fellow at Universidad de Guanajuato.

  6. Baryon number violation and a new electroweak interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Chernodub, M. N.; Niemi, Antti J.

    2009-04-01

    We introduce a new supercurrent in the electroweak sector of the standard model. Its interaction with the hypergauge field influences the mass of the Z boson but has no effect on the W{sup {+-}} boson masses. In the leptonic sector it affects the numerical value of the vector and axial coupling constants between neutral currents and the Z boson, and a comparison with experimental values yields an upper bound to the strength of the coupling between the supercurrent and the hypergauge field. In the baryonic sector the supercurrent gives a new contribution to the anomaly equation for baryon number current. As a consequence it may have an effect on baryogenesis.

  7. ElectroWeak symmetry breaking in Tevatron Run II

    SciTech Connect

    G. Chiarelli

    2001-11-27

    The Tevatron Run II will provide CDF and D0 with a large dataset of p{bar p} interactions collected at {radical}s = 2 TeV. They discuss the opportunity for the two experiments to improve the understanding of electroweak and top physics in the first years of data taking (Run IIa, 2fb{sup -1}) in view of the upgrades of the detectors. They also discuss the prospectives for a Higgs discovery at the Tevatron in view of the Run IIb data taking period which will deliver an additional of about 13 fb{sup -1} to each experiment.

  8. Minimal but non-minimal inflation and electroweak symmetry breaking

    SciTech Connect

    Marzola, Luca; Racioppi, Antonio

    2016-10-07

    We consider the most minimal scale invariant extension of the standard model that allows for successful radiative electroweak symmetry breaking and inflation. The framework involves an extra scalar singlet, that plays the rôle of the inflaton, and is compatibile with current experimental bounds owing to the non-minimal coupling of the latter to gravity. This inflationary scenario predicts a very low tensor-to-scalar ratio r≈10{sup −3}, typical of Higgs-inflation models, but in contrast yields a scalar spectral index n{sub s}≃0.97 which departs from the Starobinsky limit. We briefly discuss the collider phenomenology of the framework.

  9. Near-threshold production of heavy quarks with QQbar_threshold

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beneke, M.; Kiyo, Y.; Maier, A.; Piclum, J.

    2016-12-01

    We describe the QQbar_threshold library for computing the production cross section of heavy quark-antiquark pairs near threshold at electron-positron colliders. The prediction includes all presently known QCD, electroweak, Higgs, and nonresonant corrections in the combined nonrelativistic and weak-coupling expansion.

  10. A novel approach for the study of near conformal theories for electroweak symmetry breaking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weinberg, Evan

    The discovery of a light scalar at the Large Hadron Collider is in basic agreement with the predictions of an elementary Higgs in the Standard Model (SM). Nonetheless, a light, fundamental scalar is difficult to accommodate in the SM because quantum corrections suggest its mass should be much higher than the scale of electroweak symmetry breaking (EWSB). A natural possibility is to replace the Higgs by a strongly coupled composite. Composite dynamics also gives a natural explanation to the origin of EWSB. Phenomenologically viable composite models of EWSB are constrained by experiment to feature approximate scale invariance. This behavior may follow from near conformal dynamics. At present, lattice gauge theory (LGT) provides the only quantitative method to study near conformal composite Higgs dynamics in a fully consistent strongly coupled relativistic quantum field theory. As a novel approach to the question of finding and studying near conformal theories, I will apply LGT to the study of a generalization of Quantum ChromoDynamics (QCD) with four chiral fermion flavors plus eight flavors of finite, tunable mass. By continuously varying the mass of the eight heavy flavors, I can tune between the four flavor chirally broken theory, which exhibits features similar to QCD, and the twelve flavor theory, which is known to have a conformal fixed point. This is the "4+8 Model" for directly studying near-conformal behavior. In this dissertation, I will review modern composite phenomenology, followed by outlining a study of the 4+8 Model over a range of heavy flavor masses. As a check of near-conformal behavior, I will measure the scale dependent coupling with the method of the Wilson Flow. After verifying the existence of controllable, approximate scale invariance, I will measure the low energy particle spectrum of the 4+8 Model. This includes a Higgs-like light composite scalar. Throughout this dissertation I will make reference to LGT measurement code I wrote and

  11. Electroweak Symmetry Breaking via UV Insensitive Anomaly Mediation

    SciTech Connect

    Kitano, Ryuichiro; Kribs, Graham D.; Murayama, Hitoshi

    2004-02-19

    Anomaly mediation solves the supersymmetric flavor and CP problems. This is because the superconformal anomaly dictates that supersymmetry breaking is transmitted through nearly flavor-blind infrared physics that is highly predictive and UV insensitive. Slepton mass squareds, however, are predicted to be negative. This can be solved by adding D-terms for U(1)_Y and U(1)_{B-L} while retaining the UV insensitivity. In this paper we consider electroweak symmetry breaking via UV insensitive anomaly mediation in several models. For the MSSM we find a stable vacuum when tanbeta< 1, but in this region the top Yukawa coupling blows up only slightly above the supersymmetry breaking scale. For the NMSSM, we find a stable electroweak breaking vacuum but with a chargino that is too light. Replacing the cubic singlet term in the NMSSM superpotential with a term linear in the singlet wefind a stable vacuum and viable spectrum. Most of the parameter region with correct vacua requires a large superpotential coupling, precisely what is expected in the"Fat Higgs'" model in which the superpotential is generated dynamically. We have therefore found the first viable UV complete, UV insensitive supersymmetry breaking model that solves the flavor and CP problems automatically: the Fat Higgs model with UV insensitive anomaly mediation. Moreover, the cosmological gravitino problem is naturally solved, opening up the possibility of realistic thermal leptogenesis.

  12. Galvano-rotational effect induced by electroweak interactions in pulsars

    SciTech Connect

    Dvornikov, Maxim

    2015-05-21

    We study electroweakly interacting particles in rotating matter. The existence of the electric current along the axis of the matter rotation is predicted in this system. This new galvano-rotational effect is caused by the parity violating interaction between massless charged particles in the rotating matter. We start with the exact solution of the Dirac equation for a fermion involved in the electroweak interaction in the rotating frame. This equation includes the noninertial effects. Then, using the obtained solution, we derive the induced electric current which turns out to flow along the rotation axis. We study the possibility of the appearance of the galvano-rotational effect in dense matter of compact astrophysical objects. The particular example of neutron and hypothetical quark stars is discussed. It is shown that, using this effect, one can expect the generation of toroidal magnetic fields comparable with poloidal ones in old millisecond pulsars. We also briefly discuss the generation of the magnetic helicity in these stars. Finally we analyze the possibility to apply the galvano-rotational effect for the description of the asymmetric neutrino emission from a neutron star to explain pulsars kicks.

  13. New insights in the electroweak phase transition in the NMSSM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Weicong; Kang, Zhaofeng; Shu, Jing; Wu, Peiwen; Yang, Jin Min

    2015-01-01

    We perform a detailed semianalytical analysis of the electroweak phase transition (EWPT) property in the Next-to-Minimal Supersymmetric standard model, which serves as a good benchmark model in which the 126 GeV Higgs mixes with a singlet. In this case, a strongly first-order electroweak phase transition (SFOEWPT) is achieved by the tree-level effects, and the phase transition strength γc is determined by the vacua energy gap at T =0 . We make an anatomy of the energy gap at both tree level and loop level and extract out a dimensionless phase transition parameter Rκ≡4 κ vs/Aκ, which can replace Aκ in the parameterization and affect the light CP-odd/even Higgs spectra. We find that SFOEWPT only occurs in Rκ˜-1 and positive Rκ≲O (10 ), which in the non-PQ limit case would prefer either a relatively light CP-odd or CP-even Higgs boson ˜(60 ,100 ) GeV , and therefore serves as a smoking gun signal and requires new search strategies at the LHC.

  14. Galvano-rotational effect induced by electroweak interactions in pulsars

    SciTech Connect

    Dvornikov, Maxim

    2015-05-01

    We study electroweakly interacting particles in rotating matter. The existence of the electric current along the axis of the matter rotation is predicted in this system. This new galvano-rotational effect is caused by the parity violating interaction between massless charged particles in the rotating matter. We start with the exact solution of the Dirac equation for a fermion involved in the electroweak interaction in the rotating frame. This equation includes the noninertial effects. Then, using the obtained solution, we derive the induced electric current which turns out to flow along the rotation axis. We study the possibility of the appearance of the galvano-rotational effect in dense matter of compact astrophysical objects. The particular example of neutron and hypothetical quark stars is discussed. It is shown that, using this effect, one can expect the generation of toroidal magnetic fields comparable with poloidal ones in old millisecond pulsars. We also briefly discuss the generation of the magnetic helicity in these stars. Finally we analyze the possibility to apply the galvano-rotational effect for the description of the asymmetric neutrino emission from a neutron star to explain pulsars kicks.

  15. Bounds on dark matter interactions with electroweak gauge bosons

    SciTech Connect

    Cotta, R. C.; Hewett, J. L.; Le, M. -P.; Rizzo, T. G.

    2013-12-01

    We investigate scenarios in which dark matter interacts with the Standard Model primarily through electroweak gauge bosons. We employ an effective field theory framework wherein the Standard Model and the dark matter particle are the only light states in order to derive model-independent bounds. Bounds on such interactions are derived from dark matter production by weak boson fusion at the LHC, indirect detection searches for the products of dark matter annihilation and from the measured invisible width of the Z 0 . We find that limits on the UV scale, Λ , reach weak scale values for most operators and values of the dark matter mass, thus probing the most natural scenarios in the weakly interacting massive particle dark matter paradigm. Our bounds suggest that light dark matter ( m χ ≲ m Z / 2 or m χ ≲ 100 – 200 GeV , depending on the operator) cannot interact only with the electroweak gauge bosons of the Standard Model, but rather requires additional operator contributions or dark sector structure to avoid overclosing the Universe.

  16. Hearing the echoes of electroweak baryogenesis with gravitational wave detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Fa Peng; Wan, Youping; Wang, Dong-Gang; Cai, Yi-Fu; Zhang, Xinmin

    2016-08-01

    We report on the first joint analysis of observational signatures from the electroweak baryogenesis in both gravitational wave (GW) detectors and particle colliders. With an effective extension of the Higgs sector in terms of the dimension-six operators, we derive a strong first-order phase transition associated with a sizable CP violation to realize a successful electroweak baryogenesis. We calculate the GW spectrum resulting from the bubble nucleation, plasma transportation, and magnetohydrodynamic turbulence of this process that occurred after the big bang and find that it yields GW signals testable with the Evolved Laser Interferometer Space Antenna, Deci-hertz Interferometer Gravitational Wave Observatory, and Big Bang Observer. We further identify collider signals from the same mechanism that are observable at the planning Circular Electron Positron Collider. Our analysis bridges astrophysics and cosmology with particle physics by providing significant motivation for searches for GW events peaking at the (1 0-4,1 ) Hz range, which are associated with signals at colliders, and highlights the possibility of an interdisciplinary observational window into baryogenesis. The technique applied in analyzing early Universe phase transitions may enlighten the study of phase transitions in applied science.

  17. Heavy-neutrino effects on tau-lepton decays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pilaftsis, A.

    1994-11-01

    Minimal extensions of the Standard Model that are motivated by grand unified theories or superstring models with an E(6) symmetry can naturally predict heavy neutrinos of a Dirac or Majorana nature. Such heavy neutral leptons violate the decoupling theorem at the one-loop electroweak order and hence offer a unique chance for possible lepton-flavor decays of the tau lepton, e.g. tau to eee or tau to (mu)(mu)(mu), to be seen in LEP experiments. We analyze such decays in models with three and four generations.

  18. Heavy-Neutrino Effects on τ-LEPTON Decays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pilaftsis, A.

    Minimal extensions of the standard model that are motivated by grand unified theories or superstring models with an E6 symmetry can naturally predict heavy neutrinos of Dirac or Majorana nature. Such heavy neutral leptons violate the decoupling theorem at the one-loop electroweak order and hence offer a unique chance for possible lepton-flavor decays of the τ-lepton, e.g. τ→eee or τ→μμμ, to be seen in LEP experiments. We analyze such decays in models with three and four generations.

  19. Electroweak radiative corrections to polarized Mo/ller scattering asymmetries

    SciTech Connect

    Czarnecki, A.; Marciano, W.J. |

    1996-02-01

    One loop electroweak radiative corrections to left-right parity-violating Mo/ller scattering ({ital e}{sup {minus}}{ital e}{sup {minus}}{r_arrow}{ital e}{sup {minus}}{ital e}{sup {minus}}) asymmetries are presented. They reduce the standard model (tree level) prediction by 40{plus_minus}3{percent} where the main shift and uncertainty stem from hadronic vacuum polarization loops. A similar reduction also occurs for the electron-electron atomic parity-violating interaction. That effect can be attributed to an increase of sin{sup 2}{theta}{sub {ital W}}({ital q}{sup 2}) by 3{percent} in running from {ital q}{sup 2}={ital m}{sub {ital Z}}{sup 2} to 0. The sensitivity of the asymmetry to {open_quote}{open_quote}new physics{close_quote}{close_quote} is also discussed. {copyright} {ital 1996 The American Physical Society.}

  20. Electroweak radiative corrections to triple photon production at the ILC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yu; Li, Wei-Hua; Duan, Peng-Fei; Song, Mao; Li, Gang

    2016-07-01

    In this paper, we present the precision predictions for three photon production in the standard model (SM) at the ILC including the full next-to-leading (NLO) electroweak (EW) corrections, high order initial state radiation (h.o.ISR) contributions and beamstrahlung effects. We present the LO and the NLO EW + h.o.ISR + beamstrahlung corrected total cross sections for various colliding energy when √{ s} ≥ 200 GeV and the kinematic distributions of final photons with √{ s} = 500 GeV at ILC, and find that the NLO EW corrections, the h.o.ISR contributions and the beamstrahlung effects are important in exploring the process e+e- → γγγ.

  1. Electroweak Sudakov corrections to new physics searches at the LHC.

    PubMed

    Chiesa, Mauro; Montagna, Guido; Barzè, Luca; Moretti, Mauro; Nicrosini, Oreste; Piccinini, Fulvio; Tramontano, Francesco

    2013-09-20

    We compute the one-loop electroweak Sudakov corrections to the production process Z(νν)+n jets, with n=1, 2, 3, in pp collisions at the LHC. It represents the main irreducible background to new physics searches at the energy frontier. The results are obtained at the leading and next-to-leading logarithmic accuracy by implementing the general algorithm of Denner and Pozzorini in the event generator for multiparton processes alpgen. For the standard selection cuts used by the ATLAS and CMS Collaborations, we show that the Sudakov corrections to the relevant observables can grow up to -40% at sqrt[s ]= 14 TeV. We also include the contribution due to undetected real radiation of massive gauge bosons, to show to what extent the partial cancellation with the large negative virtual corrections takes place in realistic event selections.

  2. Twistor-inspired construction of electroweak vector boson currents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bern, Zvi; Forde, Darren; Kosower, David A.; Mastrolia, Pierpaolo

    2005-07-01

    We present an extension of the twistor-motivated MHV vertices and accompanying rules presented by Cachazo, Svrček and Witten to the construction of vector-boson currents coupling to an arbitrary source. In particular, we give rules for constructing off-shell vector-boson currents with one fermion pair and n gluons of arbitrary helicity. These currents may be employed directly in the computation of electroweak amplitudes. The rules yield expressions in agreement with previously-obtained results for Z,W,γ*→q¯q+n gluons (analytically up to n=3, beyond via the Berends-Giele recursion relations). We also confirm that the contribution to a seven-point amplitude containing the nonabelian triple vector-boson coupling obtained using the next-to-MHV currents matches the previous result in the literature.

  3. Recent Run II Electroweak and QCD Results from D0

    SciTech Connect

    Robert L. Kehoe

    2003-12-17

    The D0 Detector is a hermetic, multipurpose detector residing at one interaction region designated for p{bar p} collisions at 2 TeV at the Fermilab Tevatron. Both the detector and accelerator have undergone major upgrades to increase the luminosity and handle higher interaction rates. This paper presents recent results from Run II data which explore QCD and electroweak physics at the energy frontier. The dijet mass cross section and a search for Z' in dielectron decays are presented, and these are already approaching sensitivities seen in Run I. Additionally, the first measurement of the {sigma}{sub Z} * BR(Z {yields} {mu}{mu}) is given for the new collision energy.

  4. Dynamics Behind the Quark Mass Hierarchy and Electroweak Symmetry breaking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miransky, Vladimir A.

    2011-05-01

    I review the dynamics in a new class of models describing the quark mass hierarchy, suggested recently by Michio Hashimoto and the author. In this class, the dynamics primarily responsible for electroweak symmetry breaking (EWSB) leads to the mass spectrum of quarks with no (or weak) isospin violation. Moreover, the values of these masses are of the order of the observed masses of the down-type quarks. Then, strong (although subcritical) horizontal diagonal interactions for the t quark plus horizontal flavor-changing neutral interactions between different families lead (with no fine tuning) to a realistic quark mass spectrum. In this scenario, many composite Higgs bosons occur. A concrete model with the dynamical EWSB with the fourth family is described in detail.

  5. Gauge-Higgs unification and quark-lepton phenomenology in the warped spacetime

    SciTech Connect

    Hosotani, Y.; Noda, S.; Sakamura, Y.; Shimasaki, S.

    2006-05-01

    In the dynamical gauge-Higgs unification of electroweak interactions in the Randall-Sundrum warped spacetime, the Higgs boson mass is predicted in the range 120-290 GeV, provided that the spacetime structure is determined at the Planck scale. Couplings of quarks and leptons to gauge bosons and their Kaluza-Klein excited states are determined by the masses of quarks and leptons. All quarks and leptons other than top quarks have very small couplings to the Kaluza-Klein excited states of gauge bosons. The universality of weak interactions is slightly broken by magnitudes of 10{sup -8}, 10{sup -6}, and 10{sup -2} for {mu}-e, {tau}-e and t-e, respectively. Yukawa couplings become substantially smaller than those in the standard model, by a factor cos(1/2){theta}{sub W} where {theta}{sub W} is the non-Abelian Aharonov-Bohm phase (the Wilson line phase) associated with dynamical electroweak symmetry breaking.

  6. Higgs bosons, electroweak symmetry breaking, and the physics of the Large Hadron Collider

    SciTech Connect

    Quigg, Chris; /Fermilab /CERN

    2007-02-01

    The Large Hadron Collider, a 7 {circle_plus} 7 TeV proton-proton collider under construction at CERN (the European Laboratory for Particle Physics in Geneva), will take experiments squarely into a new energy domain where mysteries of the electroweak interaction will be unveiled. What marks the 1-TeV scale as an important target? Why is understanding how the electroweak symmetry is hidden important to our conception of the world around us? What expectations do we have for the agent that hides the electroweak symmetry? Why do particle physicists anticipate a great harvest of discoveries within reach of the LHC?

  7. Disappearing inflaton potential via heavy field dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Kitajima, Naoya; Takahashi, Fuminobu E-mail: fumi@tuhep.phys.tohoku.ac.jp

    2016-02-01

    We propose a possibility that the inflaton potential is significantly modified after inflation due to heavy field dynamics. During inflation such a heavy scalar field may be stabilized at a value deviated from the low-energy minimum. In extreme cases, the inflaton potential vanishes and the inflaton becomes almost massless at some time after inflation. Such transition of the inflaton potential has interesting implications for primordial density perturbations, reheating, creation of unwanted relics, dark radiation, and experimental search for light degrees of freedom. To be concrete, we consider a chaotic inflation in supergravity where the inflaton mass parameter is promoted to a modulus field, finding that the inflaton becomes stable after the transition and contributes to dark matter. Another example is a hilltop inflation (also called new inflation) by the MSSM Higgs field which acquires a large expectation value just after inflation, but it returns to the origin after the transition and finally rolls down to the electroweak vacuum. Interestingly, the smallness of the electroweak scale compared to the Planck scale is directly related to the flatness of the inflaton potential.

  8. Light stop mass limits from Higgs rate measurements in the MSSM: Is MSSM electroweak baryogenesis still alive after all?

    DOE PAGES

    Liebler, Stefan; Profumo, Stefano; Stefaniak, Tim

    2016-04-22

    We investigate the implications of the Higgs rate measurements from Run 1 of the LHC for the mass of the light scalar top partner (stop) in the Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model (MSSM). We focus on light stop masses, and we decouple the second, heavy stop and the gluino to the multi-TeV range in order to obtain a Higgs mass of ~125 GeV. We derive lower mass limits for the light stop within various scenarios, taking into account the effects of a possibly light scalar tau partner (stau) or chargino on the Higgs rates, of additional Higgs decays to undetectable “newmore » physics”, as well as of non-decoupling of the heavy Higgs sector. Under conservative assumptions, the stop can be as light as 123 GeV. Relaxing certain theoretical and experimental constraints, such as vacuum stability and model-dependent bounds on sparticle masses from LEP, we find that the light stop mass can be as light as 116 GeV. Lastly, our indirect limits are complementary to direct limits on the light stop mass from collider searches and have important implications for electroweak baryogenesis in the MSSM as a possible explanation for the observed matter-antimatter asymmetry of the Universe.« less

  9. Light stop mass limits from Higgs rate measurements in the MSSM: Is MSSM electroweak baryogenesis still alive after all?

    SciTech Connect

    Liebler, Stefan; Profumo, Stefano; Stefaniak, Tim

    2016-04-22

    We investigate the implications of the Higgs rate measurements from Run 1 of the LHC for the mass of the light scalar top partner (stop) in the Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model (MSSM). We focus on light stop masses, and we decouple the second, heavy stop and the gluino to the multi-TeV range in order to obtain a Higgs mass of ~125 GeV. We derive lower mass limits for the light stop within various scenarios, taking into account the effects of a possibly light scalar tau partner (stau) or chargino on the Higgs rates, of additional Higgs decays to undetectable “new physics”, as well as of non-decoupling of the heavy Higgs sector. Under conservative assumptions, the stop can be as light as 123 GeV. Relaxing certain theoretical and experimental constraints, such as vacuum stability and model-dependent bounds on sparticle masses from LEP, we find that the light stop mass can be as light as 116 GeV. Lastly, our indirect limits are complementary to direct limits on the light stop mass from collider searches and have important implications for electroweak baryogenesis in the MSSM as a possible explanation for the observed matter-antimatter asymmetry of the Universe.

  10. Electroweak corrections to squark--anti-squark pair production at the LHC

    SciTech Connect

    Hollik, W.; Mirabella, E.

    2008-11-23

    Presented are the complete NLO electroweak contributions to the production of diagonal squark--anti-squark pairs at the LHC. We discuss their effects for the production of squarks of the first two generations, in different SUSY scenarios.

  11. Precision Studies of Hadronic and Electro-Weak Interactions for Collider Physics. Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Yost, Scott A

    2014-04-02

    This project was directed toward developing precision computational tools for proton collisions at the Large Hadron Collider, focusing primarily on electroweak boson production and electroweak radiative corrections. The programs developed under this project carried the name HERWIRI, for High Energy Radiation With Infra-Red Improvements, and are the first steps in an ongoing program to develop a set of hadronic event generators based on combined QCD and QED exponentiation. HERWIRI1 applied these improvements to the hadronic shower, while HERWIRI2 will apply the electroweak corrections from the program KKMC developed for electron-positron scattering to a hadronic event generator, including exponentiated initial and final state radiation together with first-order electroweak corrections to the hard process. Some progress was also made on developing differential reduction techniques for hypergeometric functions, for application to the computation of Feynman diagrams.

  12. Electroweak Structure of Three- and Four-Body Nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Marcucci, Laura Elisa

    2000-06-01

    This work reports results for (i) the elastic electromagnetic form factors of the trin- of ucleons; (ii) the nuclear response functions of interest in ~ experiments, 3 He(~e; e 0 ) experiments, at VERSITY excitation energies below the deuteron breakup threshold; (iii) the astrophysical ark S-factor for proton weak capture on 3 He (the hep reaction). The initial and nal using state wave functions are calculated using the correlated hyperspherical harmonics onsisting method, from a realistic Hamiltonian consisting of the Argonne v 18 two-nucleon uclear and Urbana IX three-nucleon interactions. The nuclear electroweak charge and ts. current operators include one- and many-body components. The predicted mag- netic form factor of 3 H, charge form factors and static properties of both 3 H and ntal 3 He, are in satisfactory agreement with the experimental data. However, the po- sition of the zero in the magnetic form factor of 3 He is underpredicted by theory. disintegration The calculated nuclear response functions in 3 He electrodisintegration at thresh- er old are in good agreement with the experimental data, which have however rather s large errors. Finally, the astrophysical S-factor for the hep reaction is predicted ortant ' 4.5 larger than the value adopted in the standard-solar-model, with important consequences for the solar neutrino spectrum measured by the Super-Kamiokande collaboration.

  13. Parity-violating electroweak asymmetry in {rvec e} p scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Konrad Aniol; David Armstrong; Todd Averett; Maud Baylac; Etienne Burtin; John Calarco; Gordon Cates; Christian Cavata; Zhengwei Chai; C. Chang; Jian-Ping Chen; Eugene Chudakov; Evaristo Cisbani; Marius Coman; Daniel Dale; Alexandre Deur; Pibero Djawotho; Martin Epstein; Stephanie Escoffier; Lars Ewell; Nicolas Falletto; John Finn; Kevin Fissum; A.Fleck; Bernard Frois; Salvatore Frullani; Haiyan Gao; Franco Garibaldi; Ashot Gasparian; G.Gerstner; Ronald Gilman; Oleksandr Glamazdin; Javier Gomez; Viktor Gorbenko; Jens-Ole Hansen; F. Hersman; Douglas Higinbotham; Richard Holmes; Maurik Holtrop; Thomas Humensky; Sebastien Incerti; Mauro Iodice; Cornelis de Jager; David Jardillier; Xiaodong Jiang; Mark Jones; J.Jorda; Christophe Jutier; Kahl; James Kelly; Donghee Kim; Min Kim; Minsuk Kim; Ioannis Kominis; Edgar Kooijman; Kevin Kramer; Krishna Kumar; Michael Kuss; John LeRose; Raffaele De Leo; M.Leuschner; David Lhuillier; Meihua Liang; Nilanga Liyanage; R.Lourie; Richard Madey; Sergey Malov; Demetrius Margaziotis; Frederic Marie; Pete Markowitz; Jacques Martino; Peter Mastromarino; Kathy McCormick; Justin McIntyre; Zein-Eddine Meziani; Robert Michaels; Brian Milbrath; Gerald Miller; Joseph Mitchell; Ludyvine Morand; Damien Neyret; Charles Perdrisat; Gerassimos Petratos; Roman Pomatsalyuk; John Price; David Prout; Vina Punjabi; Thierry Pussieux; Gilles Quemener; Ronald Ransome; David Relyea; Yves Roblin; Julie Roche; Gary Rutledge; Paul Rutt; Marat Rvachev; Franck Sabatie; Arunava Saha; Paul Souder; Marcus Spradlin; Steffen Strauch; Riad Suleiman; Jeffrey Templon; Tatsuo Terasawa; J.Thompson; Raphael Tieulent; Luminita Todor; Baris Tonguc; Paul Ulmer; Guido Urciuoli; Branislav Vlahovic; Krishni Wijesooriya; R.Wilson; Bogdan Wojtsekhowski; Rhett Woo; Wang Xu; Imran Younus; C. Zhang

    2004-02-01

    We have measured the parity-violating electroweak asymmetry in the elastic scattering of polarized electrons from protons. Significant contributions to this asymmetry could arise from the contributions of strange form factors in the nucleon. The measured asymmetry is A = -15.05 {+-} 0.98(stat) {+-} 0.56(syst) ppm at the kinematic point <{theta}{sub lab}> = 12.3{sup o} and = 0.477 (GeV/c){sup 2}. Based on these data as well as data on electromagnetic form factors, we extract the linear combination of strange form factors G{sub E}{sup s} + 0.392G{sub M}{sup s} = 0.014 {+-} 0.020 {+-} 0.010 where the first error arises from this experiment and the second arises from the electromagnetic form factor data. This paper provides a full description of the special experimental techniques employed for precisely measuring the small asymmetry, including the first use of a strained GaAs crystal and a laser-Compton polarimeter in a fixed target parity-violation experiment.

  14. Gravitational and electroweak unification by replacing diffeomorphisms with larger group

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pandres, Dave

    2009-11-01

    The covariance group for general relativity, the diffeomorphisms, is replaced by a group of coordinate transformations which contains the diffeomorphisms as a proper subgroup. The larger group is defined by the assumption that all observers will agree whether any given quantity is conserved. Alternatively, and equivalently, it is defined by the assumption that all observers will agree that the general relativistic wave equation describes the propagation of light. Thus, the group replacement is analogous to the replacement of the Lorentz group by the diffeomorphisms that led Einstein from special relativity to general relativity, and is also consistent with the assumption of constant light velocity that led him to special relativity. The enlarged covariance group leads to a non-commutative geometry based not on a manifold, but on a nonlocal space in which paths, rather than points, are the most primitive invariant entities. This yields a theory which unifies the gravitational and electroweak interactions. The theory contains no adjustable parameters, such as those that are chosen arbitrarily in the standard model.

  15. Baryon- and lepton-number violation by electroweak instantons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noble, Robert J.

    1982-02-01

    We make a quantitative study of instanton-induced baryon- and lepton-number-violating processes in an SU(2)×U(1) electroweak gauge theory at zero and finite temperatures (in the "dilute-instanton-gas" approximation). As an example we consider a simplified model involving only the proton, neutron, electron, and electron neutrino. At zero temperature the total cross sections for p+n-->e¯+ν¯ and eleven other similar reactions are of order s×10-195 cm2, where s is the total center-of-momentum energy squared in GeV2. The neutron decays via n-->p¯+e¯+ν¯ with a lifetime of the order 10146 years. The cross sections and neutron decay width decrease with temperature because color-electric-charge screening reduces the self-dual-instanton density at finite temperature. At high temperature the cross sections (for a given s) and neutron decay width fall off as T-473 in this simplified model. It is suggested that correctly treating the instanton gas as very dense (as discussed by Berg, Luscher, and Stehr) and including finite-energy tunneling solutions could increase the predicted reaction rates.

  16. Effective field theory, electric dipole moments and electroweak baryogenesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balazs, Csaba; White, Graham; Yue, Jason

    2017-03-01

    Negative searches for permanent electric dipole moments (EDMs) heavily constrain models of baryogenesis utilising various higher dimensional charge and parity violating (CPV) operators. Using effective field theory, we create a model independent connection between these EDM constraints and the baryon asymmetry of the universe (BAU) produced during a strongly first order electroweak phase transition. The thermal aspects of the high scale physics driving the phase transition are paramaterised by the usual kink solution for the bubble wall profile. We find that operators involving derivatives of the Higgs field yield CPV contributions to the BAU containing derivatives of the Higgs vacuum expectation value (vev), while non-derivative operators lack such contributions. Consequently, derivative operators cannot be eliminated in terms of non-derivative operators (via the equations of motion) if one is agnostic to the new physics that leads to the phase transition. Thus, we re-classify the independent dimension six operators, restricting ourselves to third generation quarks, gauge bosons and the Higgs. Finally, we calculate the BAU (as a function of the bubble wall width and the cutoff) for a derivative and a non-derivative operator, and relate it to the EDM constraints.

  17. Electroweak and top physics at CDF in Run II

    SciTech Connect

    A. Taffard

    2003-06-12

    The CDF experiment at the Tevatron has used p{bar p} collisions at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV to measure the production cross sections of W and Z bosons using several leptonic final states. An indirect measurement of the W width and the ratio of tau and electron electroweak couplings have been extracted. The forward-backward charge asymmetry, A{sub FB}, in Drell-Yan dilectron production has been measured up to an invariant mass of 600 GeV/c{sup 2}. CDF has also started looking for WW production in the dilepton channel, WW{prime} {yields} ll{prime}vv, with the aim of measuring its cross section and derive limits on the anomalous WWZ and WW{gamma} couplings. The presence of a top quark signal in the Tevatron data has been reestablished by measuring the top quark pair production cross section in the dilepton channel, t{bar t} {yields} WbW{bar b} {yields} {bar l}v{sub l}bl{prime}{bar v}{sub l{prime}}{bar b} and in the lepton plus jets channel, t{bar t} {yields} WbW{bar b} {yields} q{bar q}lbl{bar b}{sub l}{bar b} + {bar l}v{sub l}bq{bar q}{prime}{bar b}. A pre-tagged lepton plus jets sample has also been used to reconstruct the top quark mass.

  18. Invisible axionlike dark matter from the electroweak bosonic seesaw mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishida, Hiroyuki; Matsuzaki, Shinya; Yamaguchi, Yuya

    2016-11-01

    We explore a model based on the classically scale-invariant standard model (SM) with a strongly coupled vectorlike dynamics, which is called hypercolor (HC). The scale symmetry is dynamically broken by the vectorlike condensation at the TeV scale, so that the SM Higgs acquires the negative mass squared by the bosonic seesaw mechanism to realize the electroweak symmetry breaking. An elementary pseudoscalar S is introduced to give masses for the composite Nambu-Goldstone bosons (HC pions): The HC pion can be a good target to explore through a diphoton channel at the LHC. As a consequence of the bosonic seesaw, the fluctuating mode of S , which we call s , develops tiny couplings to the SM particles and is predicted to be very light. The s predominantly decays to a diphoton and can behave as invisible axionlike dark matter. The mass of the s dark matter is constrained by currently available cosmological and astrophysical limits to be 10-4 eV ≲ms≲1 eV . We find that a sufficient amount of relic abundance for the s dark matter can be accumulated via the coherent oscillation. The detection potential in microwave cavity experiments is also addressed.

  19. LHC Higgs signatures from extended electroweak gauge symmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abe, Tomohiro; Chen, Ning; He, Hong-Jian

    2013-01-01

    We study LHC Higgs signatures from the extended electroweak gauge symmetry SU(2) ⊗ SU(2) ⊗ U(1). Under this gauge structure, we present an effective UV completion of the 3-site moose model with ideal fermion delocalization, which contains two neutral Higgs states ( h, H) plus three new gauge bosons ( W ' , Z '). We study the unitarity, and reveal that the exact E 2 cancellation in the longitudinal V L V L scattering amplitudes is achieved by the joint role of exchanging both spin-1 new gauge bosons W ' /Z ' and spin-0 Higgs bosons h/H. We identify the lighter Higgs state h with mass 125 GeV, and derive the unitarity bound on the mass of heavier Higgs boson H. The parameter space of this model is highly predictive. We study the production and decay signals of this 125 GeV Higgs boson h at the LHC. We demonstrate that the h Higgs boson can naturally have enhanced signals in the diphoton channel gg → h → γγ, while the event rates in the reactions gg → h → W W ∗ and gg → h → ZZ ∗ are generally suppressed relative to the SM expectation. Searching the h Higgs boson via the associated production and the vector boson fusions are also discussed for our model. We further analyze the LHC signals of the heavier Higgs boson H as a new physics discriminator from the SM. For wide mass-ranges of H, we derive constraints from the existing LHC searches, and study the discovery potential of H at the LHC (8 TeV) and LHC (14 TeV).

  20. Uncovering the single top: observation of electroweak top quark production

    SciTech Connect

    Benitez, Jorge Armando

    2009-01-01

    The top quark is generally produced in quark and anti-quark pairs. However, the Standard Model also predicts the production of only one top quark which is mediated by the electroweak interaction, known as 'Single Top'. Single Top quark production is important because it provides a unique and direct way to measure the CKM matrix element Vtb, and can be used to explore physics possibilities beyond the Standard Model predictions. This dissertation presents the results of the observation of Single Top using 2.3 fb-1 of Data collected with the D0 detector at the Fermilab Tevatron collider. The analysis includes the Single Top muon+jets and electron+jets final states and employs Boosted Decision Tress as a method to separate the signal from the background. The resulting Single Top cross section measurement is: (1) σ(p$\\bar{p}$→ tb + X, tqb + X) = 3.74-0.74+0.95 pb, where the errors include both statistical and systematic uncertainties. The probability to measure a cross section at this value or higher in the absence of signal is p = 1.9 x 10-6. This corresponds to a standard deviation Gaussian equivalence of 4.6. When combining this result with two other analysis methods, the resulting cross section measurement is: (2) σ(p$\\bar{p}$ → tb + X, tqb + X) = 3.94 ± 0.88 pb, and the corresponding measurement significance is 5.0 standard deviations.

  1. Non-canonical inflation coupled to matter

    SciTech Connect

    Céspedes, Sebastián; Davis, Anne-Christine E-mail: a.c.davis@damtp.cam.ac.uk

    2015-11-01

    We compute corrections to the inflationary potential due to conformally coupled non-relativistic matter. We find that under certain conditions of the matter coupling, inflation may be interrupted abruptly. We display this in the superconformal Starobinsky model, where matter is conformally coupled to the Einstein frame metric. These corrections may easily stop inflation provided that there is an initial density of non-relativistic matter. Since these additional heavy degrees of freedom generically occur in higher dimension theories, for example as Kaluza-Klein modes, this effect can arise in multiple scenarios.

  2. Magnetic fields at first order phase transition: a threat to electroweak baryogenesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Simone, Andrea; Nardini, Germano; Quirós, Mariano; Riotto, Antonio

    2011-10-01

    The generation of the observed baryon asymmetry may have taken place during the electroweak phase transition, thus involving physics testable at LHC, a scenario dubbed electroweak baryogenesis. In this paper we point out that the magnetic field which is produced in the bubbles of a first order phase transition endangers the baryon asymmetry produced in the bubble walls. The reason being that the produced magnetic field couples to the sphaleron magnetic moment and lowers the sphaleron energy; this strengthens the sphaleron transitions inside the bubbles and triggers a more effective wash out of the baryon asymmetry. We apply this scenario to the Minimal Supersymmetric extension of the Standard Model (MSSM) where, in the absence of a magnetic field, successful electroweak baryogenesis requires the lightest CP-even Higgs and the right-handed stop masses to be lighter than about 127 GeV and 120 GeV, respectively. We show that even for moderate values of the magnetic field, the Higgs mass required to preserve the baryon asymmetry is below the present experimental bound. As a consequence electroweak baryogenesis within the MSSM should be confronted on the one hand to future measurements at the LHC on the Higgs and the right-handed stop masses, and on the other hand to more precise calculations of the magnetic field produced at the electroweak phase transition.

  3. Non-custodial warped extra dimensions at the LHC?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dillon, Barry M.; Huber, Stephan J.

    2015-06-01

    With the prospect of improved Higgs measurements at the LHC and at proposed future colliders such as ILC, CLIC and TLEP we study the non-custodial Randall-Sundrum model with bulk SM fields and compare brane and bulk Higgs scenarios. The latter bear resemblance to the well studied type III two-Higgs-doublet models. We compute the electroweak precision observables and argue that incalculable contributions to these, in the form of higher dimensional operators, could have an impact on the T -parameter. This could potentially reduce the bound on the lowest Kaluza-Klein gauge boson masses to the 5 TeV range, making them detectable at the LHC. In a second part, we compute the misalignment between fermion masses and Yukawa couplings caused by vector-like Kaluza-Klein fermions in this setup. The misalignment of the top Yukawa can easily reach 10%, making it observable at the high-luminosity LHC. Corrections to the bottom and tau Yukawa couplings can be at the percent level and detectable at ILC, CLIC or TLEP.

  4. Heavy Flavors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cox, B.; Soni, A.

    This is a summary report of the working group on Heavy Flavors. Discussions at the workshop were centered on B physics and on the signals for heavy quarks and leptons at the SSC. The Working Group Members were: V. Barger, H.-U. Bengtsson, C. Buchanan, I. Bigi, M. Block, B. Cox, N. Glover, J. Hewett, W.Y. Keung, B. Margolis, T. Rizzo, M. Suzuki, A. Soni, D. Stork, and S. Willenbrock.

  5. Flavor-changing decays of the top quark in 5D warped models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Díaz-Furlong, Alfonso; Frank, Mariana; Pourtolami, Nima; Toharia, Manuel; Xoxocotzi, Reyna

    2016-08-01

    We study flavor-changing neutral current decays of the top quark in the context of general warped extra dimensions, where the five-dimensional (5D) metric is slightly modified from 5D anti-de Sitter (AdS5 ). These models address the Planck-electroweak hierarchies of the Standard Model and can obey all the low-energy flavor bounds and electroweak precision tests, while allowing the scale of new physics to be at the TeV level, and thus within the reach of the LHC at Run II. We perform the calculation of these exotic top decay rates for the case of a bulk Higgs, and thus include in particular the effect of the additional Kaluza-Klein (KK) Higgs modes running in the loops, along with the usual KK fermions and KK gluons.

  6. Signatures of spherical compactification at the CERN LHC

    SciTech Connect

    Davoudiasl, Hooman; Rizzo, Thomas G.

    2007-09-01

    TeV-scale extra dimensions may play an important role in electroweak or supersymmetry breaking. We examine the phenomenology of such dimensions, compactified on a sphere S{sup n}, n{>=}2, and show that they possess distinct features and signatures. For example, unlike flat toroidal manifolds, spheres do not trivially allow fermion massless modes. Acceptable phenomenology then generically leads to 'nonuniversal' extra dimensions with 'pole-localized' 4D fermions; the bosonic fields can be in the bulk. Because of spherical symmetry, some Kaluza-Klein (KK) modes of bulk gauge fields are either stable or extremely long-lived, depending on the graviton KK spectrum. Using precision electroweak data, we constrain the lightest gauge field KK modes to lie above {approx_equal}4 TeV. We show that some of these KK resonances are within the reach of the LHC in several different production channels. The models we study can be uniquely identified by their collider signatures.

  7. Scalar representations in the light of electroweak phase transition and cold dark matter phenomenology

    SciTech Connect

    AbdusSalam, Shehu S.; Chowdhury, Talal Ahmed E-mail: chowdhu@sissa.it

    2014-05-01

    The extension of the standard model's minimal Higgs sector with an inert SU(2){sub L} scalar doublet can provide light dark matter candidate and simultaneously induce a strong phase transition for explaining Baryogenesis. There is however no symmetry reasons to prevent the extension using scalars with higher SU(2){sub L} representations. By making random scans over the models' parameters, we show that in the light of electroweak physics constraints, strong first order electroweak phase transition and the possibility of having sub-TeV cold dark matter candidate the higher representations are rather disfavored compared to the inert doublet. This is done by computing generic perturbativity behavior and impact on electroweak phase transitions of higher representations in comparison with the inert doublet model. Explicit phase transition and cold dark matter phenomenology within the context of the inert triplet and quartet representations are used for detailed illustrations.

  8. Implications of Gauge Invariance on a Heavy Diphoton Resonance

    SciTech Connect

    Low, Ian; Lykken, Joseph

    2015-12-30

    Assuming a heavy electroweak singlet scalar, which couples to the Standard Model gauge bosons only through loop-induced couplings, SU(2)_L x U(1)_Y gauge invariance imposes interesting patterns on its decays into electroweak gauge bosons, which are dictated by only two free parameters. Therefore experimental measurements on any two of the four possible electroweak channels would determine the remaining two decay channels completely. Furthermore, searches in the WW/ZZ channels probe a complimentary region of parameter space from searches in the gamma-gamma/Z-gamma channels. We derive a model-independent upper bound on the branching fraction in each decay channel, which for the diphoton channel turns out to be about 61%. Including the coupling to gluons, the upper bound on the diphoton branching fraction implies an upper bound on the mass scale of additional colored particles mediating the gluon-fusion production. Using an event rate of about 5 fb for the reported 750 GeV diphoton excess, we find the new colored particle must be lighter than O(1.7 TeV) and O(2.6 TeV) for a pure CP-even and a pure CP-odd singlet scalar, respectively.

  9. Collider searches and cosmology in the MSSM with heavy scalars

    SciTech Connect

    Carena, Marcela; Freitas, A.; /Zurich U.

    2006-08-01

    In a variety of supersymmetric extensions of the Standard Model, the scalar partners of the quarks and leptons are predicted to be very heavy and beyond the reach of next-generation colliders. For instance, the realization of electroweak baryogenesis in supersymmetry requires new sources of CP-violation, which can only be naturally accommodated with electric dipole moment constraints if the first and second generation scalar fermions are beyond the TeV scale. Also in focus-point supersymmetry and split supersymmetry the scalar fermions are very heavy. In this work, the phenomenology of scenarios with electroweak baryogenesis and in the focus point region at the LHC and ILC is studied, which becomes challenging due to the presence of heavy scalar fermions. Implications for the analysis of baryogenesis and dark matter are deduced. It is found that precision measurements of superpartner properties allow an accurate determination of the dark matter relic density in both scenarios, while important but only incomplete information about the baryogenesis mechanism can be obtained.

  10. Observation of $t$-channel electroweak top quark production

    SciTech Connect

    Triplett, Nathan

    2011-01-01

    The top quark is the heaviest known fundamental particle, with a mass of 172.0+0.9-1.3GeV. This is nearly twice the mass of the second heaviest known particle, the Z boson, and roughly the mass of a gold atom. Because of its unusually large mass, studying the top quark may provide insight into the Higgs mechanism and other beyond the standard model physics. Only two accelerators in the world are powerful enough to produce top quarks. The Tevatron, which first accelerated protons in 1983, has produced almost 400,000 top quarks, roughly half at each of its two detectors: DO and CDF. The LHC is a much newer accelerator which currently has accumulated about 0.5% as much data as the Tevatron. However, when running at full luminosity, the LHC is capable of producing a top quark about once every second and will quickly surpass the Tevatron as the leading producer of top quarks. This analysis uses data from the DØ detector at the Tevatron, which are described in chapter 3. Top quarks are produced most often in pairs of top and anti-top quarks through an interaction of the strong force. This production mode was first observed in 1995 at the Tevatron. However, top quarks can also be produced though an electroweak interaction, which produces just one top quark. This production mode was first observed at the Tevatron in 2008. Single top quark production can occur in different channels. In this analysis, a measurement of the cross section of the t-channel production mode is performed. This measurement uses 5.4 fb-1 of data and uses the technique of boosted decision trees in order to separate signal from background events. The t-channel cross section is measured to be: σ(p$\\bar{p}$ → tqb + X) = 3.03+0.78-0.66 pb (0.0.1). Additional cross section measurements were also performed for the s-channel as well as the s + t-channel. The measurement of each one of these three cross sections was repeated three times using

  11. Electro-Weak Penguin and Leptonic Decays in BaBar

    SciTech Connect

    Di Lodovico, F.; /Queen Mary, U. of London

    2005-09-08

    Electro-weak penguin and leptonic decays provide an indirect probe for physics beyond the Standard Model and contribute to the determination of Standard Model parameters. Copious quantities of B mesons produced at the B-Factories permit precision measurements of the electro-weak penguin decays and searches for leptonic decays. We review the current experimental status of b {yields} s(d){gamma}, B{sup 0} {yields} D*{sup 0}{gamma}, b {yields} s{ell}{sup +}{ell}{sup -} and finally B{sup +} {yields} {tau}{sup +}{nu}{sub {tau}} decays at BABAR.

  12. Gravity waves as a probe of the Hubble expansion rate during an electroweak scale phase transition

    SciTech Connect

    Chung, Daniel J. H.; Zhou Peng

    2010-07-15

    Just as big bang nucleosynthesis allows us to probe the expansion rate when the temperature of the Universe was around 1 MeV, the measurement of gravity waves from electroweak scale first order phase transitions may allow us to probe the expansion rate when the temperature of the Universe was at the electroweak scale. We compute the simple transformation rule for the gravity wave spectrum under the scaling transformation of the Hubble expansion rate. We then apply this directly to the scenario of quintessence kination domination and show how gravity wave spectra would shift relative to Laser Interferometer Space Antenna and Big Bang Observer projected sensitivities.

  13. Bethe-Salpeter dynamics and the constituent mass concept for heavy quark mesons

    SciTech Connect

    Souchlas, N.; Stratakis, D.

    2010-06-01

    The definition of a quark as heavy requires a comparison of its mass with the nonperturbative chiral symmetry breaking scale which is about 1 GeV ({Lambda}{sub {chi}{approx}1} GeV) or with the scale {Lambda}{sub QCD{approx}}0.2 GeV that characterizes the distinction between perturbative and nonperturbative QCD. For quark masses significantly larger than these scales, nonperturbative dressing effects, or equivalently nonperturbative self-energy contributions, and relativistic effects are believed to be less important for physical observables. We explore the concept of a constituent mass for heavy quarks in the Dyson-Schwinger equations formalism, for light-heavy and heavy-heavy quark mesons by studying their masses and electroweak decay constants.

  14. Effect of Vacuum Properties on Electroweak Processes - A Theoretical Interpretation of Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stumpf, Harald

    2008-06-01

    Recently for discharges in fluids induced nuclear transmutations have been observed. It is our hypothesis that these reactions are due to a symmetry breaking of the electroweak vacuum by the experimental arrangement. The treatment of this hypothesis is based on the assumption that electroweak bosons, leptons and quarks possess a substructure of elementary fermionic constituents. The dynamical law of these fermionic constituents is given by a relativistically invariant nonlinear spinor field equation with local interaction, canonical quantization, selfregularization and probability interpretation. Phenomenological quantities of electroweak processes follow from the derivation of corresponding effective theories obtained by algebraic weak mapping theorems where the latter theories depend on the spinor field propagator, i. e. a vacuum expectation value. This propagator and its equation are studied for conserved and for broken discrete symmetries. For combined CP- and isospin symmetry breaking it is shown that the propagator corresponds to the experimental arrangements under consideration. The modifications of the effective electroweak theory due to this modified propagator are discussed. Based on these results a mechanism is sketched which offers a qualitative interpretation of the appearance of induced nuclear transmutations. A numerical estimate of electron capture is given.

  15. Change of Electroweak Nuclear Reaction Rates by CP- and Isospin Symmetry Breaking - A Model Calculation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stumpf, Harald

    2006-09-01

    Based on the assumption that electroweak bosons, leptons and quarks possess a substructure of elementary fermionic constituents, in previous papers the effect of CP-symmetry breaking on the effective dynamics of these particles was calculated. Motivated by the phenomenological procedure in this paper, isospin symmetry breaking will be added and the physical consequences of these calculations will be discussed. The dynamical law of the fermionic constituents is given by a relativistically invariant nonlinear spinor field equation with local interaction, canonical quantization, selfregularization and probability interpretation. The corresponding effective dynamics is derived by algebraic weak mapping theorems. In contrast to the commonly applied modifications of the quark mass matrices, CP-symmetry breaking is introduced into this algebraic formalism by an inequivalent vacuum with respect to the CP-invariant case, represented by a modified spinor field propagator. This leads to an extension of the standard model as effective theory which contains besides the "electric" electroweak bosons additional "magnetic" electroweak bosons and corresponding interactions. If furthermore the isospin invariance of the propagator is broken too, it will be demonstrated in detail that in combination with CP-symmetry breaking this induces a considerable modification of electroweak nuclear reaction rates.

  16. New Physics search in the processes of the electroweak top quark production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baskakov, Alexey; Boos, Edward; Bunichev, Vycheslav; Dubinin, Mikhail; Dudko, Lev; Myagkov, Igor; Perfilov, Maxim; Vorotnikov, Georgy

    2016-10-01

    The processes involving single top quark production have an electroweak nature with unique properties. They are very interesting from both theoretical and experimental points of view. The article contains a brief overview of possible "New Physics" manifestations in the single top quark production processes.

  17. Cosmic ΔB from lepton violating interactions at the electroweak phase transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masiero, Antonio; Riotto, Antonio

    1992-09-01

    We propose a new mechanism for late cosmological baryon asymmetry in models with first order electroweak phase transition. Lepton asymmetry arises through the decay of particles produced out of equilibrium in bubble collision and is converted into baryon asymmetry by sphalerons. Supersymmetric models with explicitly broken R-parity may provide a suitable framework for the implementation of this mechanism.

  18. Large electroweak penguin contribution in B{yields}K{pi} and {pi}{pi} decay modes

    SciTech Connect

    Mishima, Satoshi; Yoshikawa, Tadashi

    2004-11-01

    We discuss a possibility of large electroweak penguin contribution in B{yields}K{pi} and {pi}{pi} from recent experimental data. The experimental data may be suggesting that there are some discrepancies between the data and theoretical estimation in the branching ratios of them. In B{yields}K{pi} decays, to explain it, a large electroweak penguin contribution and large strong phase differences seem to be needed. The contributions should appear also in B{yields}{pi}{pi}. We show, as an example, a solution to solve the discrepancies in both B{yields}K{pi} and B{yields}{pi}{pi}. However the magnitude of the parameters and the strong phase estimated from experimental data are quite large compared with the theoretical estimations. It may be suggesting some new physics effects are included in these processes. We will have to discuss about the dependence of the new physics. To explain both modes at once, we may need large electroweak penguin contribution with new weak phases and some SU(3) breaking effects by new physics in both QCD and electroweak penguin-type processes.

  19. Characterizing invisible electroweak particles through single-photon processes at high energy e+e- colliders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Seong Youl; Han, Tao; Kalinowski, Jan; Rolbiecki, Krzysztof; Wang, Xing

    2015-11-01

    We explore the scenarios where the only accessible new states at the electroweak scale consist of a pair of color-singlet electroweak particles, the masses of which are degenerate at the tree level and split only by electroweak symmetry breaking at the loop level. For the sake of illustration, we consider a supersymmetric model and study the following three representative cases with the lower-lying states as (a) two spin-1 /2 Higgsino SU(2 ) L doublets, (b) a spin-1 /2 wino SU(2 ) L triplet and (c) a spin-0 left-handed slepton SU(2 ) L doublet. Due to the mass degeneracy, those lower-lying electroweak states are difficult to observe at the LHC and rather challenging to detect at the e+e- collider as well. We exploit the pair production in association with a hard photon radiation in high energy e+e- collisions. If kinematically accessible, such single-photon processes at e+e- colliders with polarized beams enable us to characterize each scenario by measuring the energy of the associated hard photon and to determine the spin of the nearly invisible particles unambiguously through the threshold behavior in the photon energy distribution.

  20. Electroweak Higgs boson plus three jet production at next-to-leading-order QCD.

    PubMed

    Campanario, Francisco; Figy, Terrance M; Plätzer, Simon; Sjödahl, Malin

    2013-11-22

    We calculate next-to-leading order (NLO) QCD corrections to electroweak Higgs boson plus three jet production. Both vector boson fusion (VBF) and Higgs-strahlung type contributions are included along with all interferences. The calculation is implemented within the Matchbox NLO framework of the Herwig++ event generator.

  1. Revisiting the global electroweak fit of the Standard Model and beyond with Gfitter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flächer, H.; Goebel, M.; Haller, J.; Hoecker, A.; Mönig, K.; Stelzer, J.

    2009-04-01

    The global fit of the Standard Model to electroweak precision data, routinely performed by the LEP electroweak working group and others, demonstrated impressively the predictive power of electroweak unification and quantum loop corrections. We have revisited this fit in view of (i) the development of the new generic fitting package, Gfitter, allowing for flexible and efficient model testing in high-energy physics, (ii) the insertion of constraints from direct Higgs searches at LEP and the Tevatron, and (iii) a more thorough statistical interpretation of the results. Gfitter is a modular fitting toolkit, which features predictive theoretical models as independent plug-ins, and a statistical analysis of the fit results using toy Monte Carlo techniques. The state-of-the-art electroweak Standard Model is fully implemented, as well as generic extensions to it. Theoretical uncertainties are explicitly included in the fit through scale parameters varying within given error ranges. This paper introduces the Gfitter project, and presents state-of-the-art results for the global electroweak fit in the Standard Model (SM), and for a model with an extended Higgs sector (2HDM). Numerical and graphical results for fits with and without including the constraints from the direct Higgs searches at LEP and Tevatron are given. Perspectives for future colliders are analysed and discussed. In the SM fit including the direct Higgs searches, we find M H =116.4{-1.3/+18.3} GeV, and the 2 σ and 3 σ allowed regions [114,145] GeV and [[113,168] and [180,225

  2. Gauge bosons and heavy quarks: Proceedings of Summer Institute on Particle Physics

    SciTech Connect

    Hawthorne, J.F.

    1991-01-01

    This report contains papers on the following topics: Z decays and tests of the standard model; future possibilities for LEP; studies of the interactions of electroweak gauge bosons; top quark topics; the next linear collider; electroweak processes in hadron colliders; theoretical topics in B-physics; experimental aspects of B-physics; B-factory storage ring design; rare kaon decays; CP violation in K{sup 0} decays at CERN; recent K{sup 0} decay results from Fermilab E-731; results from LEP on heavy quark physics; review of recent results on heavy flavor production; weak matrix elements and the determination of the weak mixing angles; recent results from CLEO I and a glance at CLEO II data; recent results from ARGUS; neutrino lepton physics with the CHARM 2 detector; recent results from the three TRISTAN experiments; baryon number violation at high energy in the standard model: fact or fiction New particle searches at LEP; review of QCD at LEP; electroweak interactions at LEP; recent results on W physics from the UA2 experiment at the CERN {rho}{bar {rho}} collider; B physics at CDF; and review of particle astrophysics.

  3. Studies of strong electroweak symmetry breaking at future e{sup +}e{sup {minus}} linear colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Barklow, T.L.

    1994-08-01

    Methods of studying strong electroweak symmetry breaking at future e{sup +}e{sup {minus}} linear colliders are reviewed. Specifically, we review precision measurements of triple gauge boson vertex parameters and the rescattering of longitudinal W bosons in the process e{sup +}e{sup {minus}} {yields} W{sup +}W{sup {minus}}. Quantitative estimates of the sensitivity of each technique to strong electroweak symmetry breaking are included.

  4. Baryon and lepton number violation in the electroweak theory at TeV energies

    SciTech Connect

    Mottola, E.

    1990-01-01

    In the standard Weinberg-Salam electroweak theory baryon and lepton number (B and L) are NOT exactly conserved. The nonconservation of B and L can be traced to the existence of parity violation in the electroweak theory, together with the chiral current anomaly. This subtle effect gives negligibly small amplitudes for B and L violation at energies and temperatures significantly smaller than M{sub w} sin{sup 2} {theta}{sub w}/{alpha} {approximately} 10 TeV. However, recent theoretical work shows that the rate for B and L nonconservation is unsuppressed at higher energies. The consequences of this for cosmology and the baryon asymmetry of the universe, as well as the prospects for direct verification at the SSC are discussed. 13 refs., 3 figs.

  5. Recent Results in Electroweak B Decays from the BaBar Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Koeneke, Karsten; /MIT, LNS /SLAC

    2006-09-01

    A review of the most recent BABAR results on electroweak penguin B decays is presented. The focus of this paper is on the measurement of observables in the decays B {yields} X{sub s}{gamma}, B {yields} K{sup (*)}l{sup +}l{sup -} B {yields} K{sub s}{sup 0}{pi}{sup 0}{gamma} (time-dependent analysis) and B {yields} ({rho}/{omega}){gamma}.

  6. Electroweak measurements in electron-positron collisions at W-boson-pair energies at LEP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    ALEPH Collaboration; DELPHI Collaboration; L3 Collaboration; OPAL Collaboration; LEP Electroweak Working Group 1

    2013-11-01

    Electroweak measurements performed with data taken at the electron-positron collider LEP at CERN from 1995 to 2000 are reported. The combined data set considered in this report corresponds to a total luminosity of about 3 fb-1 collected by the four LEP experiments ALEPH, DELPHI, L3 and OPAL, at centre-of-mass energies ranging from 130 GeV to 209 GeV.

  7. Electroweak vacuum stability in classically conformal B-L extension of the standard model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, Arindam; Okada, Nobuchika; Papapietro, Nathan

    2017-02-01

    We consider the minimal U(1)_{B-L} extension of the standard model (SM) with the classically conformal invariance, where an anomaly-free U(1)_{B-L} gauge symmetry is introduced along with three generations of right-handed neutrinos and a U(1)_{B-L} Higgs field. Because of the classically conformal symmetry, all dimensional parameters are forbidden. The B-L gauge symmetry is radiatively broken through the Coleman-Weinberg mechanism, generating the mass for the U(1)_{B-L} gauge boson (Z^' boson) and the right-handed neutrinos. Through a small negative coupling between the SM Higgs doublet and the B-L Higgs field, the negative mass term for the SM Higgs doublet is generated and the electroweak symmetry is broken. In this model context, we investigate the electroweak vacuum instability problem in the SM. It is well known that in the classically conformal U(1)_{B-L} extension of the SM, the electroweak vacuum remains unstable in the renormalization group analysis at the one-loop level. In this paper, we extend the analysis to the two-loop level, and perform parameter scans. We identify a parameter region which not only solve the vacuum instability problem, but also satisfy the recent ATLAS and CMS bounds from search for Z^' boson resonance at the LHC Run-2. Considering self-energy corrections to the SM Higgs doublet through the right-handed neutrinos and the Z^' boson, we derive the naturalness bound on the model parameters to realize the electroweak scale without fine-tunings.

  8. NLO QCD Corrections to Electroweak Higgs Boson Production in Association with Three Jets at the LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Figy, Terrance

    2017-01-01

    In this talk I will discuss the implementation of the next-to-leading order (NLO) perturbative QCD corrections to electroweak Higgs boson plus three jet production at the CERN Large Hadron Collider experiment within the Matchbox framework of the Herwig 7 event generator. Numerical results for integrated cross sections and kinematic distributions will be presented for a fixed-order NLO calculation and for a NLO calculation matched to a parton shower.

  9. Vacuum stability and radiative electroweak symmetry breaking in an SO(10) dark matter model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mambrini, Yann; Nagata, Natsumi; Olive, Keith A.; Zheng, Jiaming

    2016-06-01

    Vacuum stability in the Standard Model is problematic as the Higgs quartic self-coupling runs negative at a renormalization scale of about 1010 GeV . We consider a nonsupersymmetric SO(10) grand unification model for which gauge coupling unification is made possible through an intermediate scale gauge group, Gint=SU (3 )C⊗SU (2 )L⊗SU (2 )R⊗U (1 )B -L . Gint is broken by the vacuum expectation value of a 126 of SO(10) which not only provides for neutrino masses through the seesaw mechanism but also preserves a discrete Z2 that can account for the stability of a dark matter candidate, here taken to be the Standard Model singlet component of a bosonic 16 . We show that in addition to these features the model insures the positivity of the Higgs quartic coupling through its interactions to the dark matter multiplet and 126 . We also show that the Higgs mass squared runs negative, triggering electroweak symmetry breaking. Thus, the vacuum stability is achieved along with radiative electroweak symmetry breaking and captures two more important elements of supersymmetric models without low-energy supersymmetry. The conditions for perturbativity of quartic couplings and for radiative electroweak symmetry breaking lead to tight upper and lower limits on the dark matter mass, respectively, and this dark matter mass region (1.35-2 TeV) can be probed in future direct detection experiments.

  10. Electroweak corrections using effective field theory: Applications to the CERN LHC

    SciTech Connect

    Chiu Juiyu; Kelley, Randall; Manohar, Aneesh V.

    2008-10-01

    Electroweak Sudakov logarithms at high energy, of the form ({alpha}/sin{sup 2}{theta}{sub W}){sup n}log{sup m}s/M{sub Z,W}{sup 2}, are summed using effective theory (EFT) methods. The exponentiation of Sudakov logarithms and factorization is discussed in the EFT formalism. Radiative corrections are computed to scattering processes in the standard model involving an arbitrary number of external particles. The computations include nonzero particle masses such as the t-quark mass, electroweak mixing effects which lead to unequal W and Z masses and a massless photon, and Higgs corrections proportional to the top-quark Yukawa coupling. The structure of the radiative corrections, and which terms are summed by the EFT renormalization group is discussed in detail. The omitted terms are smaller than 1%. We give numerical results for the corrections to dijet production, dilepton production, tt production, and squark pair production. The purely electroweak corrections are significant--about 15% at 1 TeV, increasing to 30% at 5 TeV, and they change both the scattering rate and angular distribution. The QCD corrections (which are well-known) are also computed with the EFT. They are much larger--about a factor of 4 at 1 TeV, increasing to a factor of 30 at 5 TeV. Mass effects are also significant; the qq{yields}tt rate is enhanced relative to the light-quark production rate by 40%.

  11. Two-loop electroweak corrections for the K→πνν¯ decays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brod, Joachim; Gorbahn, Martin; Stamou, Emmanuel

    2011-02-01

    The rare K→πνν¯ decays play a central role in testing the standard model and its extensions. Upcoming experiments plan to measure the decay rates with high accuracy. Yet, unknown higher-order electroweak corrections result in a sizeable theory error. We remove this uncertainty by computing the full two-loop electroweak corrections to the top-quark contribution Xt to the rare decays KL→π0νν¯, K+→π+νν¯, and B→Xd,sνν¯ in the standard model. The remaining theoretical uncertainty related to electroweak effects is now far below 1%. Finally we update the branching ratios to find Br(KL→π0νν¯)=2.43(39)(6)×10-11 and Br(K+→π+νν¯)=7.81(75)(29)×10-11. The first error summarizes the parametric, the second the remaining theoretical uncertainties.

  12. Electroweak phase transition and LHC signatures in the singlet Majoron model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cline, James M.; Laporte, Guillaume; Yamashita, Hiroki; Kraml, Sabine

    2009-07-01

    We reconsider the strength of the electroweak phase transition in the singlet Majoron extension of the Standard Model, with a low (lesssim TeV) scale of the singlet VEV. A strongly first order phase transition, of interest for electroweak baryogenesis, is found in sizeable regions of the parameter space, especially when the cross-coupling λhs|S|2|H|2 between the singlet and the doublet Higgs is significant. Large Majorana Yukawa couplings of the singlet neutrinos, yiSνicνi, are also important for strengthening the transition. We incorporate the LEP and Tevatron constraints on the Higgs masses, and electroweak precision constraints, in our search for allowed parameters; successful examples include singlet masses ranging from 5 GeV to several TeV. Models with a strong phase transition typically predict a nonstandard Higgs with mass in the range 113GeVlesssimmHlesssim200GeV and production cross sections reduced by mixing with the singlet, with cos 2θ significantly less than 1. We also find examples where the singlet is light and the decay H → SS can modify the Higgs branching ratios relative to Standard Model expectations.

  13. Cosmological baryon and lepton number in the presence of electroweak fermion-number violation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harvey, Jeffrey A.; Turner, Michael S.

    1990-01-01

    In the presence of rapid fermion-number violation due to nonperturbative electroweak effects certain relations between the baryon number of the Universe and the lepton numbers of the Universe are predicted. In some cases the electron-neutrino asymmetry is exactly specified in terms of the baryon asymmetry. Without introducing new particles, beyond the usual quarks and leptons, it is necessary that the Universe possess a nonzero value of B - L prior to the epoch of fermion-number violation if baryon and lepton asymmetries are to survive. Contrary to intuition, even though electroweak processes violate B + L, a nonzero value of B + L persists after the epoch of rapid fermion-number violation. If the standard model is extended to include lepton-number violation, for example through Majorana neutrino masses, then electroweak processes will reduce the baryon number to zero even in the presence of an initial B - L unless 20 M(sub L) approximately greater than the square root of (T(sub B - L) m(sub P1)) where M(sub L) sets the scale of lepton number violation and T(sub B - L) is the temperature at which a B - L asymmetry is produced. In many models this implies that neutrinos must be so light that they cannot contribute appreciably to the mass density of the Universe.

  14. More and more indirect signals for extra dimensions at more and more colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Rizzo, T.G.

    1999-06-01

    It has been recently suggested by Arkani-Hamed, Dimopoulos and Dvali that gravity may become strong at energies not far above the electroweak scale and thus remove the hierarchy problem. Such a scenario can be tested at both present and future accelerators since towers of Kaluza-Klein gravitons and associated scalar fields now play an important phenomenological role. In this paper we examine several processes for their sensitivity to a low scale for quantum gravity including deep inelastic ep scattering at DESY HERA, high precision low energy {nu}N scattering, Bhabha and Mo/ller scattering at linear colliders and both fermion and gluon pair production at {gamma}{gamma} colliders. {copyright} {ital 1999} {ital The American Physical Society}

  15. Search for extra dimensions in the diphoton final state with ATLAS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buat, Quentin

    2012-06-01

    The large difference between the Planck scale and the electroweak scale, known as the hierarchy problem, has been addressed in some models through the existence of extra spatial dimensions. A search for evidence of extra spatial dimensions has been performed, through an analysis of the diphoton final state in data recorded in 2011 with the ATLAS detector at the CERN Large Hadron Collider. The analysis uses a dataset of 2.12 fb-1 of proton-proton collisions at √s = 7 TeV. The diphoton invariant mass spectrum is observed to be in good agreement with the expected Standard Model (SM) background. We set 95% CL lower limits on the scale related to virtual graviton exchange process in the context of the Arkani-Hamed, Dimopoulos, Dvali model (ADD) and on the lightest Kaluza Klein excitation mass in the context of the Randall-Sundrum model (RS).

  16. A Higgs in the warped bulk and LHC signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahmoudi, F.; Maitra, U.; Manglani, N.; Sridhar, K.

    2016-11-01

    Warped models with the Higgs in the bulk can generate light Kaluza-Klein (KK) Higgs modes consistent with the electroweak precision analysis. The first KK mode of the Higgs ( h 1) could lie in the 1-2 TeV range in the models with a bulk custodial symmetry. We find that the h 1 is gaugephobic and decays dominantly into a toverline{t} pair. We also discuss the search strategy for h 1 decaying to toverline{t} at the Large Hadron Collider. We used substructure tools to suppress the large QCD background associated with this channel. We find that h 1 can be probed at the LHC run-2 with an integrated luminosity of 300 fb-1.

  17. Dirac neutrino in warped extra dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, We-Fu; Ng, John N.; Wu, Jackson M. S.

    2009-12-01

    We implement Dirac neutrinos in the minimal custodial Randall-Sundrum setting via the Krauss-Wilczek mechanism. We demonstrate by giving explicit lepton mass matrices that with neutrinos in the normal hierarchy, lepton mass and mixing patterns can be naturally reproduced at the scale set by the constraints from electroweak precision measurements, and at the same time without violating bounds set by lepton flavor violations. Our scenario generically predicts a nonzero neutrino mixing angle θ13, as well as the existence of sub-TeV right-handed Kaluza-Klein neutrinos, which partner the right-handed standard model charged leptons. These relatively light KK neutrinos may be searched for at the LHC.

  18. Diphoton signal via Chern-Simons interaction in a warped geometry scenario

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakrabarty, Nabarun; Mukhopadhyaya, Biswarup; SenGupta, Soumitra

    2017-01-01

    The Kalb-Ramond field, identifiable with bulk torsion in a five-dimensional Randall Sundrum (RS) scenario, has Chern-Simons interactions with gauge bosons, from the requirement of gauge anomaly cancellation. Its lowest Kaluza Klein (KK) mode on the visible 3-brane can be identified with a spin-0 C P -odd field, namely, the axion. By virtue of the warped geometry and Chern-Simons couplings, this axion has unsuppressed interactions with gauge bosons in contrast to ultra-suppressed interactions with fermions. The ensuing dynamics can lead to a peak in the diphoton spectrum, which could be observed at the LHC, subject to the prominence of the signal. Moreover, the results can be numerically justified when the warp factor is precisely in the range required for stabilization of the electroweak scale.

  19. Higgs-gluon coupling in warped extra dimensional models with brane kinetic terms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dey, Ujjal Kumar; Ray, Tirtha Sankar

    2016-01-01

    Warped models with the Higgs confined to the weak brane and the gauge and matter fields accessing the AdS5 bulk provide a viable setting to address the gauge hierarchy problem. Brane kinetic terms for the bulk fields are known to ease some of the tensions of these models with precision electroweak observables and flavor constraints. We study the loop-driven Higgs coupling to the gluons that are relevant to the Higgs program at the LHC, in this scenario. We demonstrate a partial cancellation in the contribution of the fermionic Kaluza-Klein (KK) towers within such framework relatively independent of the 5D parameters. The entire dependence of this coupling on the new physics arises from the mixing between the Standard Model states and the KK excitations. We find that the present precision in measurement of these couplings can lead to a constraint on the KK scale up to 1.2 TeV at 95% confidence level.

  20. Indirect Searches for Z'-like Resonances at the LHC

    SciTech Connect

    Rizzo, Thomas G.; /SLAC

    2009-06-19

    We explore the possibility of indirectly observing the effects of Z{prime}-like particles with electroweak strength couplings in the Drell-Yan channel at the LHC with masses above the resonance direct search reach. We find that, mostly due to statistical limitations, this is very unlikely in almost all classes of models independently of the spin of the resonance. Not unexpectedly, the one exception to this general result is the case of degenerate Kaluza-Klein (KK) excitations of the photon and Z that occur in some extra-dimensional models. In this special case, the strong destructive interference with the Standard Model (SM) exchanges below the resonance mass leads to a well-known significant suppression of the cross section and thus increased sensitivity to this particular new physics scenario.

  1. Search for resonances in the dilepton mass distribution in pp collisions at sqrt {s} = 7 TeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chatrchyan, S.; Khachatryan, V.; Sirunyan, A. M.; Tumasyan, A.; Adam, W.; Bergauer, T.; Dragicevic, M.; Erö, J.; Fabjan, C.; Friedl, M.; Frühwirth, R.; Ghete, V. M.; Hammer, J.; Hänsel, S.; Hoch, M.; Hörmann, N.; Hrubec, J.; Jeitler, M.; Kasieczka, G.; Kiesenhofer, W.; Krammer, M.; Liko, D.; Mikulec, I.; Pernicka, M.; Rohringer, H.; Schöfbeck, R.; Strauss, J.; Teischinger, F.; Wagner, P.; Waltenberger, W.; Walzel, G.; Widl, E.; Wulz, C.-E.; Mossolov, V.; Shumeiko, N.; Suarez Gonzalez, J.; Benucci, L.; De Wolf, E. A.; Janssen, X.; Maes, T.; Mucibello, L.; Ochesanu, S.; Roland, B.; Rougny, R.; Selvaggi, M.; Van Haevermaet, H.; Van Mechelen, P.; Van Remortel, N.; Blekman, F.; Blyweert, S.; D'Hondt, J.; Devroede, O.; Gonzalez Suarez, R.; Kalogeropoulos, A.; Maes, J.; Maes, M.; Van Doninck, W.; Van Mulders, P.; Van Onsem, G. P.; Villella, I.; Charaf, O.; Clerbaux, B.; De Lentdecker, G.; Dero, V.; Gay, A. P. R.; Hammad, G. H.; Hreus, T.; Marage, P. E.; Thomas, L.; Vander Velde, C.; Vanlaer, P.; Adler, V.; Cimmino, A.; Costantini, S.; Grunewald, M.; Klein, B.; Lellouch, J.; Marinov, A.; Mccartin, J.; Ryckbosch, D.; Thyssen, F.; Tytgat, M.; Vanelderen, L.; Verwilligen, P.; Walsh, S.; Zaganidis, N.; Basegmez, S.; Bruno, G.; Caudron, J.; Ceard, L.; Cortina Gil, E.; De Favereau De Jeneret, J.; Delaere, C.; Favart, D.; Giammanco, A.; Grégoire, G.; Hollar, J.; Lemaitre, V.; Liao, J.; Militaru, O.; Ovyn, S.; Pagano, D.; Pin, A.; Piotrzkowski, K.; Schul, N.; Beliy, N.; Caebergs, T.; Daubie, E.; Alves, G. A.; De Jesus Damiao, D.; Pol, M. E.; Souza, M. H. G.; Carvalho, W.; Da Costa, E. M.; De Oliveira Martins, C.; De Souza, S. Fonseca; Mundim, L.; Nogima, H.; Oguri, V.; Prado Da Silva, W. L.; Santoro, A.; Silva Do Amaral, S. M.; Sznajder, A.; Da Silva De Araujo, F. Torres; Dias, F. A.; Fernandez Perez Tomei, T. R.; Gregores, E. M.; Lagana, C.; Marinho, F.; Mercadante, P. G.; Novaes, S. F.; Padula, Sandra S.; Darmenov, N.; Dimitrov, L.; Genchev, V.; Iaydjiev, P.; Piperov, S.; Rodozov, M.; Stoykova, S.; Sultanov, G.; Tcholakov, V.; Trayanov, R.; Vankov, I.; Dimitrov, A.; Hadjiiska, R.; Karadzhinova, A.; Kozhuharov, V.; Litov, L.; Mateev, M.; Pavlov, B.; Petkov, P.; Bian, J. G.; Chen, G. M.; Chen, H. S.; Jiang, C. H.; Liang, D.; Liang, S.; Meng, X.; Tao, J.; Wang, J.; Wang, J.; Wang, X.; Wang, Z.; Xiao, H.; Xu, M.; Zang, J.; Zhang, Z.; Ban, Y.; Guo, S.; Guo, Y.; Li, W.; Mao, Y.; Qian, S. J.; Teng, H.; Zhang, L.; Zhu, B.; Zou, W.; Cabrera, A.; Gomez Moreno, B.; Ocampo Rios, A. A.; Osorio Oliveros, A. F.; Sanabria, J. C.; Godinovic, N.; Lelas, D.; Lelas, K.; Plestina, R.; Polic, D.; Puljak, I.; Antunovic, Z.; Dzelalija, M.; Brigljevic, V.; Duric, S.; Kadija, K.; Morovic, S.; Attikis, A.; Galanti, M.; Mousa, J.; Nicolaou, C.; Ptochos, F.; Razis, P. A.; Finger, M.; Finger, M.; Assran, Y.; Khalil, S.; Mahmoud, M. 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R.; Kuhr, T.; Martschei, D.; Mueller, S.; Müller, Th.; Niegel, M.; Oberst, O.; Oehler, A.; Ott, J.; Peiffer, T.; Piparo, D.; Quast, G.; Rabbertz, K.; Ratnikov, F.; Ratnikova, N.; Renz, M.; Saout, C.; Scheurer, A.; Schieferdecker, P.; Schilling, F.-P.; Schmanau, M.; Schott, G.; Simonis, H. J.; Stober, F. M.; Troendle, D.; Wagner-Kuhr, J.; Weiler, T.; Zeise, M.; Zhukov, V.; Ziebarth, E. B.; Daskalakis, G.; Geralis, T.; Karafasoulis, K.; Kesisoglou, S.; Kyriakis, A.; Loukas, D.; Manolakos, I.; Markou, A.; Markou, C.; Mavrommatis, C.; Ntomari, E.; Petrakou, E.; Gouskos, L.; Mertzimekis, T. J.; Panagiotou, A.; Stiliaris, E.; Evangelou, I.; Foudas, C.; Kokkas, P.; Manthos, N.; Papadopoulos, I.; Patras, V.; Triantis, F. A.; Aranyi, A.; Bencze, G.; Boldizsar, L.; Hajdu, C.; Hidas, P.; Horvath, D.; Kapusi, A.; Krajczar, K.; Sikler, F.; Veres, G. I.; Vesztergombi, G.; Beni, N.; Molnar, J.; Palinkas, J.; Szillasi, Z.; Veszpremi, V.; Raics, P.; Trocsanyi, Z. L.; Ujvari, B.; Bansal, S.; Beri, S. 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T.; Nespolo, M.; Perrozzi, L.; Pozzobon, N.; Ronchese, P.; Simonetto, F.; Torassa, E.; Tosi, M.; Vanini, S.; Zotto, P.; Zumerle, G.; Baesso, P.; Berzano, U.; Ratti, S. P.; Riccardi, C.; Torre, P.; Vitulo, P.; Viviani, C.; Biasini, M.; Bilei, G. M.; Caponeri, B.; Fanò, L.; Lariccia, P.; Lucaroni, A.; Mantovani, G.; Menichelli, M.; Nappi, A.; Romeo, F.; Santocchia, A.; Taroni, S.; Valdata, M.; Azzurri, P.; Bagliesi, G.; Bernardini, J.; Boccali, T.; Broccolo, G.; Castaldi, R.; D'Agnolo, R. T.; Dell'Orso, R.; Fiori, F.; Foà, L.; Giassi, A.; Kraan, A.; Ligabue, F.; Lomtadze, T.; Martini, L.; Messineo, A.; Palla, F.; Segneri, G.; Serban, A. T.; Spagnolo, P.; Tenchini, R.; Tonelli, G.; Venturi, A.; Verdini, P. G.; Barone, L.; Cavallari, F.; Del Re, D.; Di Marco, E.; Diemoz, M.; Franci, D.; Grassi, M.; Longo, E.; Nourbakhsh, S.; Organtini, G.; Pandolfi, F.; Paramatti, R.; Rahatlou, S.; Amapane, N.; Arcidiacono, R.; Argiro, S.; Arneodo, M.; Biino, C.; Botta, C.; Cartiglia, N.; Castello, R.; Costa, M.; Demaria, N.; Graziano, A.; Mariotti, C.; Marone, M.; Maselli, S.; Migliore, E.; Mila, G.; Monaco, V.; Musich, M.; Obertino, M. M.; Pastrone, N.; Pelliccioni, M.; Romero, A.; Ruspa, M.; Sacchi, R.; Sola, V.; Solano, A.; Staiano, A.; Vilela Pereira, A.; Belforte, S.; Cossutti, F.; Della Ricca, G.; Gobbo, B.; Montanino, D.; Penzo, A.; Heo, S. G.; Nam, S. K.; Chang, S.; Chung, J.; Kim, D. H.; Kim, G. N.; Kim, J. E.; Kong, D. J.; Park, H.; Ro, S. R.; Son, D.; Son, D. C.; Son, T.; Kim, Zero; Kim, J. Y.; Song, S.; Choi, S.; Hong, B.; Jeong, M. S.; Jo, M.; Kim, H.; Kim, J. H.; Kim, T. J.; Lee, K. S.; Moon, D. H.; Park, S. K.; Rhee, H. B.; Seo, E.; Shin, S.; Sim, K. 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H.; Chang, Y. W.; Chao, Y.; Chen, K. F.; Hou, W.-S.; Hsiung, Y.; Kao, K. Y.; Lei, Y. J.; Lu, R.-S.; Shiu, J. G.; Tzeng, Y. M.; Wang, M.; Adiguzel, A.; Bakirci, M. N.; Cerci, S.; Dozen, C.; Dumanoglu, I.; Eskut, E.; Girgis, S.; Gokbulut, G.; Guler, Y.; Gurpinar, E.; Hos, I.; Kangal, E. E.; Karaman, T.; Kayis Topaksu, A.; Nart, A.; Onengut, G.; Ozdemir, K.; Ozturk, S.; Polatoz, A.; Sogut, K.; Sunar Cerci, D.; Tali, B.; Topakli, H.; Uzun, D.; Vergili, L. N.; Vergili, M.; Zorbilmez, C.; Akin, I. V.; Aliev, T.; Bilmis, S.; Deniz, M.; Gamsizkan, H.; Guler, A. M.; Ocalan, K.; Ozpineci, A.; Serin, M.; Sever, R.; Surat, U. E.; Yildirim, E.; Zeyrek, M.; Deliomeroglu, M.; Demir, D.; Gülmez, E.; Isildak, B.; Kaya, M.; Kaya, O.; Ozkorucuklu, S.; Sonmez, N.; Levchuk, L.; Bostock, F.; Brooke, J. J.; Cheng, T. L.; Clement, E.; Cussans, D.; Frazier, R.; Goldstein, J.; Grimes, M.; Hansen, M.; Hartley, D.; Heath, G. P.; Heath, H. F.; Jackson, J.; Kreczko, L.; Metson, S.; Newbold, D. M.; Nirunpong, K.; Poll, A.; Senkin, S.; Smith, V. J.; Ward, S.; Basso, L.; Bell, K. W.; Belyaev, A.; Brew, C.; Brown, R. M.; Camanzi, B.; Cockerill, D. J. A.; Coughlan, J. A.; Harder, K.; Harper, S.; Kennedy, B. W.; Olaiya, E.; Petyt, D.; Radburn-Smith, B. C.; Shepherd-Themistocleous, C. H.; Tomalin, I. R.; Womersley, W. J.; Worm, S. D.; Bainbridge, R.; Ball, G.; Ballin, J.; Beuselinck, R.; Buchmuller, O.; Colling, D.; Cripps, N.; Cutajar, M.; Davies, G.; Della Negra, M.; Ferguson, W.; Fulcher, J.; Futyan, D.; Gilbert, A.; Guneratne Bryer, A.; Hall, G.; Hatherell, Z.; Hays, J.; Iles, G.; Jarvis, M.; Karapostoli, G.; Lyons, L.; MacEvoy, B. C.; Magnan, A.-M.; Marrouche, J.; Mathias, B.; Nandi, R.; Nash, J.; Nikitenko, A.; Papageorgiou, A.; Pesaresi, M.; Petridis, K.; Pioppi, M.; Raymond, D. M.; Rogerson, S.; Rompotis, N.; Rose, A.; Ryan, M. J.; Seez, C.; Sharp, P.; Sparrow, A.; Tapper, A.; Tourneur, S.; Vazquez Acosta, M.; Virdee, T.; Wakefield, S.; Wardle, N.; Wardrope, D.; Whyntie, T.; Accomando, E.; King, S.; Barrett, M.; Chadwick, M.; Cole, J. E.; Hobson, P. R.; Khan, A.; Kyberd, P.; Leslie, D.; Martin, W.; Reid, I. D.; Teodorescu, L.; Hatakeyama, K.; Bose, T.; Carrera Jarrin, E.; Fantasia, C.; Heister, A.; John, J. St.; Lawson, P.; Lazic, D.; Rohlf, J.; Sperka, D.; Sulak, L.; Avetisyan, A.; Bhattacharya, S.; Chou, J. P.; Cutts, D.; Ferapontov, A.; Heintz, U.; Jabeen, S.; Kukartsev, G.; Landsberg, G.; Narain, M.; Nguyen, D.; Segala, M.; Sinthuprasith, T.; Speer, T.; Tsang, K. V.; Breedon, R.; Calderon De La Barca Sanchez, M.; Chauhan, S.; Chertok, M.; Conway, J.; Cox, P. T.; Dolen, J.; Erbacher, R.; Friis, E.; Ko, W.; Kopecky, A.; Lander, R.; Liu, H.; Maruyama, S.; Miceli, T.; Nikolic, M.; Pellett, D.; Robles, J.; Salur, S.; Schwarz, T.; Searle, M.; Smith, J.; Squires, M.; Tripathi, M.; Vasquez Sierra, R.; Veelken, C.; Andreev, V.; Arisaka, K.; Cline, D.; Cousins, R.; Deisher, A.; Duris, J.; Erhan, S.; Farrell, C.; Hauser, J.; Ignatenko, M.; Jarvis, C.; Plager, C.; Rakness, G.; Schlein, P.; Tucker, J.; Valuev, V.; Babb, J.; Chandra, A.; Clare, R.; Ellison, J.; Gary, J. W.; Giordano, F.; Hanson, G.; Jeng, G. Y.; Kao, S. C.; Liu, F.; Liu, H.; Long, O. R.; Luthra, A.; Nguyen, H.; Shen, B. C.; Stringer, R.; Sturdy, J.; Sumowidagdo, S.; Wilken, R.; Wimpenny, S.; Andrews, W.; Branson, J. G.; Cerati, G. B.; Dusinberre, E.; Evans, D.; Golf, F.; Holzner, A.; Kelley, R.; Lebourgeois, M.; Letts, J.; Mangano, B.; Padhi, S.; Palmer, C.; Petrucciani, G.; Pi, H.; Pieri, M.; Ranieri, R.; Sani, M.; Sharma, V.; Simon, S.; Tu, Y.; Vartak, A.; Wasserbaech, S.; Würthwein, F.; Yagil, A.; Yoo, J.; Barge, D.; Bellan, R.; Campagnari, C.; D'Alfonso, M.; Danielson, T.; Flowers, K.; Geffert, P.; Incandela, J.; Justus, C.; Kalavase, P.; Koay, S. A.; Kovalskyi, D.; Krutelyov, V.; Lowette, S.; Mccoll, N.; Pavlunin, V.; Rebassoo, F.; Ribnik, J.; Richman, J.; Rossin, R.; Stuart, D.; To, W.; Vlimant, J. R.; Apresyan, A.; Bornheim, A.; Bunn, J.; Chen, Y.; Gataullin, M.; Ma, Y.; Mott, A.; Newman, H. B.; Rogan, C.; Shin, K.; Timciuc, V.; Traczyk, P.; Veverka, J.; Wilkinson, R.; Yang, Y.; Zhu, R. Y.; Akgun, B.; Carroll, R.; Ferguson, T.; Iiyama, Y.; Jang, D. W.; Jun, S. Y.; Liu, Y. F.; Paulini, M.; Russ, J.; Vogel, H.; Vorobiev, I.; Cumalat, J. P.; Dinardo, M. E.; Drell, B. R.; Edelmaier, C. J.; Ford, W. T.; Gaz, A.; Heyburn, B.; Luiggi Lopez, E.; Nauenberg, U.; Smith, J. G.; Stenson, K.; Ulmer, K. A.; Wagner, S. R.; Zang, S. L.; Agostino, L.; Alexander, J.; Cassel, D.; Chatterjee, A.; Das, S.; Eggert, N.; Gibbons, L. K.; Heltsley, B.; Hopkins, W.; Khukhunaishvili, A.; Kreis, B.; Nicolas Kaufman, G.; Patterson, J. R.; Puigh, D.; Ryd, A.; Salvati, E.; Shi, X.; Sun, W.; Teo, W. D.; Thom, J.; Thompson, J.; Vaughan, J.; Weng, Y.; Winstrom, L.; Wittich, P.; Biselli, A.; Cirino, G.; Winn, D.; Abdullin, S.; Albrow, M.; Anderson, J.; Apollinari, G.; Atac, M.; Bakken, J. A.; Banerjee, S.; Bauerdick, L. A. T.; Beretvas, A.; Berryhill, J.; Bhat, P. C.; Bloch, I.; Borcherding, F.; Burkett, K.; Butler, J. N.; Chetluru, V.; Cheung, H. W. K.; Chlebana, F.; Cihangir, S.; Cooper, W.; Eartly, D. P.; Elvira, V. D.; Esen, S.; Fisk, I.; Freeman, J.; Gao, Y.; Gottschalk, E.; Green, D.; Gunthoti, K.; Gutsche, O.; Hanlon, J.; Harris, R. M.; Hirschauer, J.; Hooberman, B.; Jensen, H.; Johnson, M.; Joshi, U.; Khatiwada, R.; Klima, B.; Kousouris, K.; Kunori, S.; Kwan, S.; Leonidopoulos, C.; Limon, P.; Lincoln, D.; Lipton, R.; Lykken, J.; Maeshima, K.; Marraffino, J. M.; Mason, D.; McBride, P.; Miao, T.; Mishra, K.; Mrenna, S.; Musienko, Y.; Newman-Holmes, C.; O'Dell, V.; Pordes, R.; Prokofyev, O.; Saoulidou, N.; Sexton-Kennedy, E.; Sharma, S.; Spalding, W. J.; Spiegel, L.; Tan, P.; Taylor, L.; Tkaczyk, S.; Uplegger, L.; Vaandering, E. W.; Vidal, R.; Whitmore, J.; Wu, W.; Yang, F.; Yumiceva, F.; Yun, J. C.; Acosta, D.; Avery, P.; Bourilkov, D.; Chen, M.; De Gruttola, M.; Di Giovanni, G. P.; Dobur, D.; Drozdetskiy, A.; Field, R. D.; Fisher, M.; Fu, Y.; Furic, I. K.; Gartner, J.; Kim, B.; Konigsberg, J.; Korytov, A.; Kropivnitskaya, A.; Kypreos, T.; Matchev, K.; Mitselmakher, G.; Muniz, L.; Prescott, C.; Remington, R.; Schmitt, M.; Scurlock, B.; Sellers, P.; Skhirtladze, N.; Snowball, M.; Wang, D.; Yelton, J.; Zakaria, M.; Ceron, C.; Gaultney, V.; Kramer, L.; Lebolo, L. M.; Linn, S.; Markowitz, P.; Martinez, G.; Mesa, D.; Rodriguez, J. L.; Adams, T.; Askew, A.; Bandurin, D.; Bochenek, J.; Chen, J.; Diamond, B.; Gleyzer, S. V.; Haas, J.; Hagopian, S.; Hagopian, V.; Jenkins, M.; Johnson, K. F.; Prosper, H.; Quertenmont, L.; Sekmen, S.; Veeraraghavan, V.; Baarmand, M. M.; Dorney, B.; Guragain, S.; Hohlmann, M.; Kalakhety, H.; Ralich, R.; Vodopiyanov, I.; Adams, M. R.; Anghel, I. M.; Apanasevich, L.; Bai, Y.; Bazterra, V. E.; Betts, R. R.; Callner, J.; Cavanaugh, R.; Dragoiu, C.; Gauthier, L.; Gerber, C. E.; Hofman, D. J.; Khalatyan, S.; Kunde, G. J.; Lacroix, F.; Malek, M.; O'Brien, C.; Silvestre, C.; Smoron, A.; Strom, D.; Varelas, N.; Akgun, U.; Albayrak, E. A.; Bilki, B.; Clarida, W.; Duru, F.; Lae, C. K.; McCliment, E.; Merlo, J.-P.; Mermerkaya, H.; Mestvirishvili, A.; Moeller, A.; Nachtman, J.; Newsom, C. R.; Norbeck, E.; Olson, J.; Onel, Y.; Ozok, F.; Sen, S.; Wetzel, J.; Yetkin, T.; Yi, K.; Barnett, B. A.; Blumenfeld, B.; Bonato, A.; Eskew, C.; Fehling, D.; Giurgiu, G.; Gritsan, A. V.; Hu, G.; Maksimovic, P.; Rappoccio, S.; Swartz, M.; Tran, N. V.; Whitbeck, A.; Baringer, P.; Bean, A.; Benelli, G.; Grachov, O.; Kenny, R. P., Iii; Murray, M.; Noonan, D.; Sanders, S.; Wood, J. S.; Zhukova, V.; Barfuss, A. f.; Bolton, T.; Chakaberia, I.; Ivanov, A.; Khalil, S.; Makouski, M.; Maravin, Y.; Shrestha, S.; Svintradze, I.; Wan, Z.; Gronberg, J.; Lange, D.; Wright, D.; Baden, A.; Boutemeur, M.; Eno, S. C.; Ferencek, D.; Gomez, J. A.; Hadley, N. J.; Kellogg, R. G.; Kirn, M.; Lu, Y.; Mignerey, A. C.; Rossato, K.; Rumerio, P.; Santanastasio, F.; Skuja, A.; Temple, J.; Tonjes, M. B.; Tonwar, S. C.; Twedt, E.; Alver, B.; Bauer, G.; Bendavid, J.; Busza, W.; Butz, E.; Cali, I. A.; Chan, M.; Dutta, V.; Everaerts, P.; Gomez Ceballos, G.; Goncharov, M.; Hahn, K. A.; Harris, P.; Kim, Y.; Klute, M.; Lee, Y.-J.; Li, W.; Loizides, C.; Luckey, P. D.; Ma, T.; Nahn, S.; Paus, C.; Ralph, D.; Roland, C.; Roland, G.; Rudolph, M.; Stephans, G. S. F.; Stöckli, F.; Sumorok, K.; Sung, K.; Wenger, E. A.; Xie, S.; Yang, M.; Yilmaz, Y.; Yoon, A. S.; Zanetti, M.; Cooper, S. I.; Cushman, P.; Dahmes, B.; De Benedetti, A.; Dudero, P. R.; Franzoni, G.; Haupt, J.; Klapoetke, K.; Kubota, Y.; Mans, J.; Rekovic, V.; Rusack, R.; Sasseville, M.; Singovsky, A.; Cremaldi, L. M.; Godang, R.; Kroeger, R.; Perera, L.; Rahmat, R.; Sanders, D. A.; Summers, D.; Bloom, K.; Bose, S.; Butt, J.; Claes, D. R.; Dominguez, A.; Eads, M.; Keller, J.; Kelly, T.; Kravchenko, I.; Lazo-Flores, J.; Malbouisson, H.; Malik, S.; Snow, G. R.; Baur, U.; Godshalk, A.; Iashvili, I.; Jain, S.; Kharchilava, A.; Kumar, A.; Shipkowski, S. P.; Smith, K.; Alverson, G.; Barberis, E.; Baumgartel, D.; Boeriu, O.; Chasco, M.; Reucroft, S.; Swain, J.; Trocino, D.; Wood, D.; Zhang, J.; Anastassov, A.; Kubik, A.; Odell, N.; Ofierzynski, R. A.; Pollack, B.; Pozdnyakov, A.; Schmitt, M.; Stoynev, S.; Velasco, M.; Won, S.; Antonelli, L.; Berry, D.; Hildreth, M.; Jessop, C.; Karmgard, D. J.; Kolb, J.; Kolberg, T.; Lannon, K.; Luo, W.; Lynch, S.; Marinelli, N.; Morse, D. M.; Pearson, T.; Ruchti, R.; Slaunwhite, J.; Valls, N.; Wayne, M.; Ziegler, J.; Bylsma, B.; Durkin, L. S.; Gu, J.; Hill, C.; Killewald, P.; Kotov, K.; Ling, T. Y.; Rodenburg, M.; Williams, G.; Adam, N.; Berry, E.; Elmer, P.; Gerbaudo, D.; Halyo, V.; Hebda, P.; Hunt, A.; Jones, J.; Laird, E.; Lopes Pegna, D.; Marlow, D.; Medvedeva, T.; Mooney, M.; Olsen, J.; Piroué, P.; Quan, X.; Saka, H.; Stickland, D.; Tully, C.; Werner, J. S.; Zuranski, A.; Acosta, J. G.; Huang, X. T.; Lopez, A.; Mendez, H.; Oliveros, S.; Ramirez Vargas, J. E.; Zatserklyaniy, A.; Alagoz, E.; Barnes, V. E.; Bolla, G.; Borrello, L.; Bortoletto, D.; Everett, A.; Garfinkel, A. F.; Gutay, L.; Hu, Z.; Jones, M.; Koybasi, O.; Kress, M.; Laasanen, A. T.; Leonardo, N.; Liu, C.; Maroussov, V.; Merkel, P.; Miller, D. H.; Neumeister, N.; Shipsey, I.; Silvers, D.; Svyatkovskiy, A.; Yoo, H. D.; Zablocki, J.; Zheng, Y.; Jindal, P.; Parashar, N.; Boulahouache, C.; Cuplov, V.; Ecklund, K. M.; Geurts, F. J. M.; Padley, B. P.; Redjimi, R.; Roberts, J.; Zabel, J.; Betchart, B.; Bodek, A.; Chung, Y. S.; Covarelli, R.; de Barbaro, P.; Demina, R.; Eshaq, Y.; Flacher, H.; Garcia-Bellido, A.; Goldenzweig, P.; Gotra, Y.; Han, J.; Harel, A.; Miner, D. C.; Orbaker, D.; Petrillo, G.; Vishnevskiy, D.; Zielinski, M.; Bhatti, A.; Ciesielski, R.; Demortier, L.; Goulianos, K.; Lungu, G.; Malik, S.; Mesropian, C.; Yan, M.; Atramentov, O.; Barker, A.; Duggan, D.; Gershtein, Y.; Gray, R.; Halkiadakis, E.; Hidas, D.; Hits, D.; Lath, A.; Panwalkar, S.; Patel, R.; Richards, A.; Rose, K.; Schnetzer, S.; Somalwar, S.; Stone, R.; Thomas, S.; Cerizza, G.; Hollingsworth, M.; Spanier, S.; Yang, Z. C.; York, A.; Asaadi, J.; Eusebi, R.; Gilmore, J.; Gurrola, A.; Kamon, T.; Khotilovich, V.; Montalvo, R.; Nguyen, C. N.; Osipenkov, I.; Pakhotin, Y.; Pivarski, J.; Safonov, A.; Sengupta, S.; Tatarinov, A.; Toback, D.; Weinberger, M.; Akchurin, N.; Bardak, C.; Damgov, J.; Jeong, C.; Kovitanggoon, K.; Lee, S. W.; Roh, Y.; Sill, A.; Volobouev, I.; Wigmans, R.; Yazgan, E.; Appelt, E.; Brownson, E.; Engh, D.; Florez, C.; Gabella, W.; Issah, M.; Johns, W.; Kurt, P.; Maguire, C.; Melo, A.; Sheldon, P.; Snook, B.; Tuo, S.; Velkovska, J.; Arenton, M. W.; Balazs, M.; Boutle, S.; Cox, B.; Francis, B.; Hirosky, R.; Ledovskoy, A.; Lin, C.; Neu, C.; Yohay, R.; Gollapinni, S.; Harr, R.; Karchin, P. E.; Lamichhane, P.; Mattson, M.; Milstène, C.; Sakharov, A.; Anderson, M.; Bachtis, M.; Bellinger, J. N.; Carlsmith, D.; Dasu, S.; Efron, J.; Flood, K.; Gray, L.; Grogg, K. S.; Grothe, M.; Hall-Wilton, R.; Herndon, M.; Klabbers, P.; Klukas, J.; Lanaro, A.; Lazaridis, C.; Leonard, J.; Loveless, R.; Mohapatra, A.; Palmonari, F.; Reeder, D.; Ross, I.; Savin, A.; Smith, W. H.; Swanson, J.; Weinberg, M.

    2011-05-01

    A search for narrow resonances at high mass in the dimuon and dielectron channels has been performed by the CMS experiment at the CERN LHC, using pp collision data recorded at sqrt {s} = 7 TeV. The event samples correspond to integrated luminosities of 40 pb-1 in the dimuon channel and 35 pb-1 in the dielectron channel. Heavy dilepton resonances are predicted in theoretical models with extra gauge bosons (Z') or as Kaluza-Klein graviton excitations (GKK) in the Randall-Sundrum model. Upper limits on the inclusive cross section of Z'(GKK) → ℓ + ℓ - relative to Z → ℓ + ℓ - are presented. These limits exclude at 95% confidence level a Z' with standard-model-like couplings below 1140GeV, the superstring-inspired Z ψ ' below 887 GeV, and, for values of the coupling parameter {{k} left/ {{{{overline M }_{text{Pl}}}}} right.} of 0.05 (0.1), Kaluza-Klein gravitons below 855 (1079) GeV.

  2. Enhanced Higgs mass in Compact Supersymmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tobioka, Kohsaku; Kitano, Ryuichiro; Murayama, Hitoshi

    2016-04-01

    The current LHC results make weak scale supersymmetry difficult due to relatively heavy mass of the discovered Higgs boson and the null results of new particle searches. Geometrical supersymmetry breaking from extra dimensions, Scherk-Schwarz mechanism, is possible to accommodate such situations. A concrete example, the Compact Supersymmetry model, has a compressed spectrum ameliorating the LHC bounds and large mixing in the top and scalar top quark sector with |{A}_t|˜ 2{m}_{tilde{t}} which radiatively raises the Higgs mass. While the zero mode contribution of the model has been considered, in this paper we calculate the Kaluza-Klein tower effect to the Higgs mass. Although such contributions are naively expected to be as small as a percent level for 10 TeV Kaluza-Klein modes, we find the effect significantly enhances the radiative correction to the Higgs quartic coupling by from 10 to 50%. This is mainly because the top quark wave function is pushed out from the brane, which makes the top mass depend on higher powers in the Higgs field. As a result the Higgs mass is enhanced up to 15 GeV from the previous calculation. We also show the whole parameter space is testable at the LHC run II.

  3. Higgs production and decay in models of a warped extra dimension with a bulk Higgs

    SciTech Connect

    Archer, Paul R.; Carena, Marcela; Carmona, Adrian; Neubert, Matthias

    2015-01-13

    Warped extra-dimension models in which the Higgs boson is allowed to propagate in the bulk of a compact AdS5 space are conjectured to be dual to models featuring a partially composite Higgs boson. They offer a framework with which to investigate the implications of changing the scaling dimension of the Higgs operator, which can be used to reduce the constraints from electroweak precision data. In the context of such models, we calculate the cross section for Higgs production in gluon fusion and the H → γγ decay rate and show that they are finite (at one-loop order) as a consequence of gauge invariance. The extended scalar sector comprising the Kaluza-Klein excitations of the Standard Model scalars is constructed in detail. The largest effects are due to virtual KK fermions, whose contributions to the cross section and decay rate introduce a quadratic sensitivity to the maximum allowed value y* of the random complex entries of the 5D anarchic Yukawa matrices. We find an enhancement of the gluon-fusion cross section and a reduction of the H → γγ rate as well as of the tree-level Higgs couplings to fermions and electroweak gauge bosons. As a result, we perform a detailed study of the correlated signal strengths for different production mechanisms and decay channels as functions of y*, the mass scale of Kaluza-Klein resonances and the scaling dimension of the composite Higgs operator.

  4. Higgs production and decay in models of a warped extra dimension with a bulk Higgs

    DOE PAGES

    Archer, Paul R.; Carena, Marcela; Carmona, Adrian; ...

    2015-01-13

    Warped extra-dimension models in which the Higgs boson is allowed to propagate in the bulk of a compact AdS5 space are conjectured to be dual to models featuring a partially composite Higgs boson. They offer a framework with which to investigate the implications of changing the scaling dimension of the Higgs operator, which can be used to reduce the constraints from electroweak precision data. In the context of such models, we calculate the cross section for Higgs production in gluon fusion and the H → γγ decay rate and show that they are finite (at one-loop order) as a consequencemore » of gauge invariance. The extended scalar sector comprising the Kaluza-Klein excitations of the Standard Model scalars is constructed in detail. The largest effects are due to virtual KK fermions, whose contributions to the cross section and decay rate introduce a quadratic sensitivity to the maximum allowed value y* of the random complex entries of the 5D anarchic Yukawa matrices. We find an enhancement of the gluon-fusion cross section and a reduction of the H → γγ rate as well as of the tree-level Higgs couplings to fermions and electroweak gauge bosons. As a result, we perform a detailed study of the correlated signal strengths for different production mechanisms and decay channels as functions of y*, the mass scale of Kaluza-Klein resonances and the scaling dimension of the composite Higgs operator.« less

  5. Hiding a Heavy Higgs Boson at the 7 TeV LHC

    SciTech Connect

    Bai, Yang; Fan, JiJi; Hewett, JoAnne L.

    2012-03-20

    A heavy Standard Model Higgs boson is not only disfavored by electroweak precision observables but is also excluded by direct searches at the 7 TeV LHC for a wide range of masses. Here, we examine scenarios where a heavy Higgs boson can be made consistent with both the indirect constraints and the direct null searches by adding only one new particle beyond the Standard Model. This new particle should be a weak multiplet in order to have additional contributions to the oblique parameters. If it is a color singlet, we find that a heavy Higgs with an intermediate mass of 200-300 GeV can decay into the new states, suppressing the branching ratios for the standard model modes, and thus hiding a heavy Higgs at the LHC. If the new particle is also charged under QCD, the Higgs production cross section from gluon fusion can be reduced significantly due to the new colored particle one-loop contribution. Current collider constraints on the new particles allow for viable parameter space to exist in order to hide a heavy Higgs boson. We categorize the general signatures of these new particles, identify favored regions of their parameter space and point out that discovering or excluding them at the LHC can provide important indirect information for a heavy Higgs. Finally, for a very heavy Higgs boson, beyond the search limit at the 7 TeV LHC, we discuss three additional scenarios where models would be consistent with electroweak precision tests: including an additional vector-like fermion mixing with the top quark, adding another U(1) gauge boson and modifying triple-gauge boson couplings.

  6. Soft collinear effective theory for heavy WIMP annihilation

    SciTech Connect

    Bauer, Martin; Cohen, Timothy; Hill, Richard J.; Solon, Mikhail P.

    2015-01-19

    In a large class of models for Weakly Interacting Massive Particles (WIMPs), the WIMP mass M lies far above the weak scale mW . This work identifies universal Sudakov-type logarithms ~ α log2(2 M/mW) that spoil the naive convergence of perturbation theory for annihilation processes. An effective field theory (EFT) framework is presented, allowing the systematic resummation of these logarithms. Another impact of the large separation of scales is that a long-distance wavefunction distortion from electroweak boson exchange leads to observable modifications of the cross section. Careful accounting of momentum regions in the EFT allows the rigorous disentanglement of this so-called Sommerfeld enhancement from the short-distance hard annihilation process. In addition, the WIMP is described as a heavy-particle field, while the electroweak gauge bosons are treated as soft and collinear fields. Hard matching coefficients are computed at renormalization scale μ ~ 2 M , then evolved down to μ ~ mW , where electroweak symmetry breaking is incorporated and the matching onto the relevant quantum mechanical Hamiltonian is performed. The example of an SU(2)W triplet scalar dark matter candidate annihilating to line photons is used for concreteness, allowing the numerical exploration of the impact of next-to-leading order corrections and log resummation. As a result, for M ≃ 3 TeV, the resummed Sommerfeld enhanced cross section is reduced by a factor of ~ 3 with respect to the treelevel fixed order result.

  7. Soft collinear effective theory for heavy WIMP annihilation

    DOE PAGES

    Bauer, Martin; Cohen, Timothy; Hill, Richard J.; ...

    2015-01-19

    In a large class of models for Weakly Interacting Massive Particles (WIMPs), the WIMP mass M lies far above the weak scale mW . This work identifies universal Sudakov-type logarithms ~ α log2(2 M/mW) that spoil the naive convergence of perturbation theory for annihilation processes. An effective field theory (EFT) framework is presented, allowing the systematic resummation of these logarithms. Another impact of the large separation of scales is that a long-distance wavefunction distortion from electroweak boson exchange leads to observable modifications of the cross section. Careful accounting of momentum regions in the EFT allows the rigorous disentanglement of thismore » so-called Sommerfeld enhancement from the short-distance hard annihilation process. In addition, the WIMP is described as a heavy-particle field, while the electroweak gauge bosons are treated as soft and collinear fields. Hard matching coefficients are computed at renormalization scale μ ~ 2 M , then evolved down to μ ~ mW , where electroweak symmetry breaking is incorporated and the matching onto the relevant quantum mechanical Hamiltonian is performed. The example of an SU(2)W triplet scalar dark matter candidate annihilating to line photons is used for concreteness, allowing the numerical exploration of the impact of next-to-leading order corrections and log resummation. As a result, for M ≃ 3 TeV, the resummed Sommerfeld enhanced cross section is reduced by a factor of ~ 3 with respect to the treelevel fixed order result.« less

  8. Leptogenesis from oscillations of heavy neutrinos with large mixing angles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drewes, Marco; Garbrecht, Björn; Gueter, Dario; Klarić, Juraj

    2016-12-01

    The extension of the Standard Model by heavy right-handed neutrinos can simultaneously explain the observed neutrino masses via the seesaw mechanism and the baryon asymmetry of the Universe via leptogenesis. If the mass of the heavy neutrinos is below the electroweak scale, they may be found at the LHC, BELLE II, NA62, the proposed SHiP experiment or a future high-energy collider. In this mass range, the baryon asymmetry is generated via CP -violating oscillations of the heavy neutrinos during their production. We study the generation of the baryon asymmetry of the Universe in this scenario from first principles of non-equilibrium quantum field theory, including spectator processes and feedback effects. We eliminate several uncertainties from previous calcula-tions and find that the baryon asymmetry of the Universe can be explained with larger heavy neutrino mixing angles, increasing the chance for an experimental discovery. For the limiting cases of fast and strongly overdamped oscillations of right-handed neutrinos, the generation of the baryon asymmetry can be calculated analytically up to corrections of order one.

  9. Electroweak Radiative Corrections to the Parity-violating Asymmetry for SLAC Experiment E158

    SciTech Connect

    Zykunov, Vladimir A.; /Gomel State Tech. U.

    2012-04-04

    Electroweak radiative corrections to observable quantities of Moeller scattering of polarized particles are calculated. We emphasize the contribution induced by infrared divergent parts of cross section. The covariant method is used to remove infrared divergences, so that our results do not involve any unphysical parameters. When applied to the kinematics of SLAC E158 experiment, these corrections reduce the parity violating asymmetry by about -6.5% at E = 48 GeV and y = 0.5, and kinematically weighted 'hard' bremsstrahlung effect for SLAC E158 is {approx} 1%.

  10. Standard model explanations for the NuTeV electroweak measurements

    SciTech Connect

    R. H. Bernstein

    2003-12-23

    The NuTeV Collaboration has measured the electroweak parameters sin{sup 2} {theta}{sub W} and {rho} in neutrino-nucleon deep-inelastic scattering using a sign-selected beam. The nearly pure {nu} or {bar {nu}} beams that result provide many of the cancellations of systematics associated with the Paschos-Wolfenstein relation. The extracted result for sin{sup 2} {theta}{sub W}(on-shell) = 1 - M{sub W}{sup 2}/M{sub Z}{sup 2} is three standard deviations from prediction. We discuss Standard Model explanations for the puzzle.

  11. Electroweak corrections to top quark pair production in association with a hard photon at hadron colliders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duan, Peng-Fei; Zhang, Yu; Wang, Yong; Song, Mao; Li, Gang

    2017-03-01

    We present the next-to-leading order (NLO) electroweak (EW) corrections to the top quark pair production associated with a hard photon at the current and future hadron colliders. The dependence of the leading order (LO) and NLO EW corrected cross sections on the photon transverse momentum cut are investigated. We also provide the LO and NLO EW corrected distributions of the transverse momentum of final top quark and photon and the invariant mass of top quark pair and top-antitop-photon system. The results show that the NLO EW corrections are significant in high energy regions due to the EW Sudakov effect.

  12. Electroweak production of hybrid mesons in a flux-tube simulation of lattice QCD.

    PubMed

    Close, F E; Dudek, J J

    2003-10-03

    We make the first calculation of the electroweak couplings of hybrid mesons to conventional mesons appropriate to photoproduction and to the decays of B or D mesons. E1 amplitudes are found to be large and may contribute in charge exchange gammap-->nH(+) allowing production of (among others) the charged 1(-+) exotic hybrid off a(2) exchange. Axial hybrid meson photoproduction is predicted to be large courtesy of pi exchange, and its strange hybrid counterpart is predicted in B-->psiK(H)(1(+)) with branching ratio B approximately 10(-4). Higher multipoles and some implications for hybrid charmonium are briefly discussed.

  13. DZero (D0) Experiment Results for Electroweak Physics from the Fermilab Tevatron

    DOE Data Explorer

    The D0 (DZero) Experiment is a worldwide collaboration of scientists conducting research on the fundamental nature of matter. The experiment is located at the Tevatron Collider, Fermilab. The research is focused on precise studies of interactions of protons and antiprotons and involves an intense search for subatomic clues that reveal the character of the building blocks of the universe. This web page provides access to Run II research results of the Electroweak Physics group, including preliminary, submitted, and published results. Figures and data plots are found in the directories with their respective papers.

  14. Strongly first-order electroweak phase transition and classical scale invariance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farzinnia, Arsham; Ren, Jing

    2014-10-01

    In this work, we examine the possibility of realizing a strongly first-order electroweak phase transition within the minimal classically scale-invariant extension of the standard model (SM), previously proposed and analyzed as a potential solution to the hierarchy problem. By introducing one complex gauge-singlet scalar and three (weak scale) right-handed Majorana neutrinos, the scenario was successfully rendered capable of achieving a radiative breaking of the electroweak symmetry (by means of the Coleman-Weinberg mechanism), inducing nonzero masses for the SM neutrinos (via the seesaw mechanism), presenting a pseudoscalar dark matter candidate (protected by the CP symmetry of the potential), and predicting the existence of a second CP-even boson (with suppressed couplings to the SM content) in addition to the 125 GeV scalar. In the present treatment, we construct the full finite-temperature one-loop effective potential of the model, including the resummed thermal daisy loops, and demonstrate that finite-temperature effects induce a first-order electroweak phase transition. Requiring the thermally driven first-order phase transition to be sufficiently strong at the onset of the bubble nucleation (corresponding to nucleation temperatures TN˜100-200 GeV) further constrains the model's parameter space; in particular, an O(0.01) fraction of the dark matter in the Universe may be simultaneously accommodated with a strongly first-order electroweak phase transition. Moreover, such a phase transition disfavors right-handed Majorana neutrino masses above several hundreds of GeV, confines the pseudoscalar dark matter masses to ˜1-2 TeV, predicts the mass of the second CP-even scalar to be ˜100-300 GeV, and requires the mixing angle between the CP-even components of the SM doublet and the complex singlet to lie within the range 0.2≲sinω ≲0.4. The obtained results are displayed in comprehensive exclusion plots, identifying the viable regions of the parameter space

  15. Generation of strong magnetic fields in dense quark matter driven by the electroweak interaction of quarks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dvornikov, Maxim

    2016-12-01

    We study the generation of strong large scale magnetic fields in dense quark matter. The magnetic field growth is owing to the magnetic field instability driven by the electroweak interaction of quarks. We discuss the situation when the chiral symmetry is unbroken in the degenerate quark matter. In this case we predict the amplification of the seed magnetic field 1012G to the strengths (1014 -1015)G. In our analysis we use the typical parameters of the quark matter in the core of a hybrid star or in a quark star. We also discuss the application of the obtained results to describe the magnetic fields generation in magnetars.

  16. Electroweak radiative corrections for polarized Moeller scattering at the future 11 GeV JLab experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Aleksejevs, Aleksandrs; Barkanova, Svetlana; Ilyichev, Alexander; Zykunov, Vladimir

    2010-11-01

    We perform updated and detailed calculations of the complete next-to-leading order set of electroweak radiative corrections to parity-violating e{sup -}e{sup -}{yields}e{sup -}e{sup -}({gamma}) scattering asymmetries at energies relevant for the ultraprecise Moeller experiment to be performed at JLab. Our numerical results are presented for a range of experimental cuts and the relative importance of various contributions is analyzed. We also provide very compact expressions analytically free from nonphysical parameters and show them to be valid for fast, yet accurate estimations.

  17. The Role of Electroweak Corrections for the Dark Matter Relic Abundance

    SciTech Connect

    Ciafaloni, Paolo; Comelli, Denis; Simone, Andrea De; Morgante, Enrico; Riotto, Antonio; Urbano, Alfredo E-mail: comelli@fe.infn.it E-mail: enrico.morgante@unige.ch E-mail: alfredo.urbano@sissa.it

    2013-10-01

    We analyze the validity of the theorems concerning the cancellation of the infrared and collinar divergences in the case of dark matter freeze-out in the early universe. In particular, we compute the electroweak logarithmic corrections of infrared origin to the annihilation cross section of a dark matter particle being the neutral component of a SU(2){sub L} multiplet. The inclusion of processes with final state W can modify significantly the cross sections computed with only virtual W exchange. Our results show that the inclusion of infrared logs is necessary for a precise computation of the dark matter relic abundance.

  18. Gaussian effective potential for the standard model SU(2)xU(1) electroweak theory

    SciTech Connect

    Siringo, Fabio; Marotta, Luca

    2008-07-01

    The Gaussian effective potential is derived for the non-Abelian SU(2)xU(1) gauge theory of electroweak interactions. At variance with naive derivations, the Gaussian effective potential is proven to be a genuine variational tool in any gauge. The role of ghosts is discussed and the unitarity gauge is shown to be the only choice which allows calculability without insertion of further approximations. The full non-Abelian calculation confirms the existence of a light Higgs boson in the nonperturbative strong coupling regime of the Higgs sector.

  19. First-order electroweak phase transition powered by additional F-term loop effects in an extended supersymmetric Higgs sector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanemura, Shinya; Senaha, Eibun; Shindou, Tetsuo

    2011-11-01

    We investigate the one-loop effect of new charged scalar bosons on the Higgs potential at finite temperatures in the supersymmetric standard model with four Higgs doublet chiral superfields as well as a pair of charged singlet chiral superfields. In this model, the mass of the lightest Higgs boson h is determined only by the D-term in the Higgs potential at the tree-level, while the triple Higgs boson coupling for hhh can receive a significant radiative correction due to nondecoupling one-loop contributions of the additional charged scalar bosons. We find that the same nondecoupling mechanism can also contribute to realize stronger first order electroweak phase transition than that in the minimal supersymmetric standard model, which is definitely required for a successful scenario of electroweak baryogenesis. Therefore, this model can be a new candidate for a model in which the baryon asymmetry of the Universe is explained at the electroweak scale.

  20. Heavy-ion radiotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanai, Tatsuaki

    2000-11-01

    Heavy-ion radiotherapy using high-energy carbon beams has been performed at the National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Japan. The physical frame works for heavy-ion radiotherapy are established using physical understandings of radiation physics. In order to increase the accuracy of heavy-ion radiotherapy, many physical problems should be solved. Unsolved problems, such as the depth dose distributions, range of heavy-ion in patients and heavy-ion dosimetry in the radiation therapy, are discussed. .

  1. Dark matter interpretations of ATLAS searches for the electroweak production of supersymmetric particles in s = 8 $$ \\sqrt{s}=8 $$ TeV proton-proton collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Aaboud, M.; Aad, G.; Abbott, B.; Abdallah, J.; Abdinov, O.; Abeloos, B.; Aben, R.; AbouZeid, O. S.; Abraham, N. L.; Abramowicz, H.; Abreu, H.; Abreu, R.; Abulaiti, Y.; Acharya, B. S.; Adachi, S.; Adamczyk, L.; Adams, D. L.; Adelman, J.; Adomeit, S.; Adye, T.; Affolder, A. A.; Agatonovic-Jovin, T.; Aguilar-Saavedra, J. A.; Ahlen, S. P.; Ahmadov, F.; Aielli, G.; Akerstedt, H.; Åkesson, T. P. A.; Akimov, A. V.; Alberghi, G. L.; Albert, J.; Albrand, S.; Alconada Verzini, M. J.; Aleksa, M.; Aleksandrov, I. N.; Alexa, C.; Alexander, G.; Alexopoulos, T.; Alhroob, M.; Ali, B.; Aliev, M.; Alimonti, G.; Alison, J.; Alkire, S. P.; Allbrooke, B. M. M.; Allen, B. W.; Allport, P. P.; Aloisio, A.; Alonso, A.; Alonso, F.; Alpigiani, C.; Alshehri, A. A.; Alstaty, M.; Alvarez Gonzalez, B.; Álvarez Piqueras, D.; Alviggi, M. G.; Amadio, B. T.; Amako, K.; Amaral Coutinho, Y.; Amelung, C.; Amidei, D.; Amor Dos Santos, S. P.; Amorim, A.; Amoroso, S.; Amundsen, G.; Anastopoulos, C.; Ancu, L. S.; Andari, N.; Andeen, T.; Anders, C. F.; Anders, G.; Anders, J. K.; Anderson, K. J.; Andreazza, A.; Andrei, V.; Angelidakis, S.; Angelozzi, I.; Angerami, A.; Anghinolfi, F.; Anisenkov, A. V.; Anjos, N.; Annovi, A.; Antel, C.; Antonelli, M.; Antonov, A.; Anulli, F.; Aoki, M.; Aperio Bella, L.; Arabidze, G.; Arai, Y.; Araque, J. P.; Arce, A. T. H.; Arduh, F. A.; Arguin, J-F.; Argyropoulos, S.; Arik, M.; Armbruster, A. J.; Armitage, L. J.; Arnaez, O.; Arnold, H.; Arratia, M.; Arslan, O.; Artamonov, A.; Artoni, G.; Artz, S.; Asai, S.; Asbah, N.; Ashkenazi, A.; Åsman, B.; Asquith, L.; Assamagan, K.; Astalos, R.; Atkinson, M.; Atlay, N. B.; Augsten, K.; Avolio, G.; Axen, B.; Ayoub, M. K.; Azuelos, G.; Baak, M. A.; Baas, A. E.; Baca, M. J.; Bachacou, H.; Bachas, K.; Backes, M.; Backhaus, M.; Bagiacchi, P.; Bagnaia, P.; Bai, Y.; Baines, J. T.; Baker, O. K.; Baldin, E. M.; Balek, P.; Balestri, T.; Balli, F.; Balunas, W. K.; Banas, E.; Banerjee, Sw.; Bannoura, A. A. E.; Barak, L.; Barberio, E. L.; Barberis, D.; Barbero, M.; Barillari, T.; Barisits, M-S; Barklow, T.; Barlow, N.; Barnes, S. L.; Barnett, B. M.; Barnett, R. M.; Barnovska-Blenessy, Z.; Baroncelli, A.; Barone, G.; Barr, A. J.; Barranco Navarro, L.; Barreiro, F.; Barreiro Guimarães da Costa, J.; Bartoldus, R.; Barton, A. E.; Bartos, P.; Basalaev, A.; Bassalat, A.; Bates, R. L.; Batista, S. J.; Batley, J. R.; Battaglia, M.; Bauce, M.; Bauer, F.; Bawa, H. S.; Beacham, J. B.; Beattie, M. D.; Beau, T.; Beauchemin, P. H.; Bechtle, P.; Beck, H. P.; Becker, K.; Becker, M.; Beckingham, M.; Becot, C.; Beddall, A. J.; Beddall, A.; Bednyakov, V. A.; Bedognetti, M.; Bee, C. P.; Beemster, L. J.; Beermann, T. A.; Begel, M.; Behr, J. K.; Belanger-Champagne, C.; Bell, A. S.; Bella, G.; Bellagamba, L.; Bellerive, A.; Bellomo, M.; Belotskiy, K.; Beltramello, O.; Belyaev, N. L.; Benary, O.; Benchekroun, D.; Bender, M.; Bendtz, K.; Benekos, N.; Benhammou, Y.; Benhar Noccioli, E.; Benitez, J.; Benjamin, D. P.; Bensinger, J. R.; Bentvelsen, S.; Beresford, L.; Beretta, M.; Berge, D.; Bergeaas Kuutmann, E.; Berger, N.; Beringer, J.; Berlendis, S.; Bernard, N. R.; Bernius, C.; Bernlochner, F. U.; Berry, T.; Berta, P.; Bertella, C.; Bertoli, G.; Bertolucci, F.; Bertone, G.; Bertram, I. A.; Bertsche, C.; Bertsche, D.; Besjes, G. J.; Bessidskaia Bylund, O.; Bessner, M.; Besson, N.; Betancourt, C.; Bethani, A.; Bethke, S.; Bevan, A. J.; Bianchi, R. M.; Bianchini, L.; Bianco, M.; Biebel, O.; Biedermann, D.; Bielski, R.; Biesuz, N. V.; Biglietti, M.; Bilbao De Mendizabal, J.; Billoud, T. R. V.; Bilokon, H.; Bindi, M.; Binet, S.; Bingul, A.; Bini, C.; Biondi, S.; Bisanz, T.; Bjergaard, D. M.; Black, C. W.; Black, J. E.; Black, K. M.; Blackburn, D.; Blair, R. E.; Blanchard, J. -B.; Blazek, T.; Bloch, I.; Blocker, C.; Blue, A.; Blum, W.; Blumenschein, U.; Blunier, S.; Bobbink, G. J.; Bobrovnikov, V. S.; Bocchetta, S. S.; Bocci, A.; Bock, C.; Boehler, M.; Boerner, D.; Bogaerts, J. A.; Bogavac, D.; Bogdanchikov, A. G.; Bohm, C.; Boisvert, V.; Bokan, P.; Bold, T.; Boldyrev, A. S.; Bomben, M.; Bona, M.; Boonekamp, M.; Borisov, A.; Borissov, G.; Bortfeldt, J.; Bortoletto, D.; Bortolotto, V.; Bos, K.; Boscherini, D.; Bosman, M.; Bossio Sola, J. D.; Boudreau, J.; Bouffard, J.; Bouhova-Thacker, E. V.; Boumediene, D.; Bourdarios, C.; Boutle, S. K.; Boveia, A.; Boyd, J.; Boyko, I. R.; Bracinik, J.; Brandt, A.; Brandt, G.; Brandt, O.; Bratzler, U.; Brau, B.; Brau, J. E.; Breaden Madden, W. D.; Brendlinger, K.; Brennan, A. J.; Brenner, L.; Brenner, R.; Bressler, S.; Bristow, T. M.; Britton, D.; Britzger, D.; Brochu, F. M.; Brock, I.; Brock, R.; Brooijmans, G.; Brooks, T.; Brooks, W. K.; Brosamer, J.; Brost, E.; Broughton, J. H.; Bruckman de Renstrom, P. A.; Bruncko, D.; Bruneliere, R.

    2016-09-01

    A selection of searches by the ATLAS experiment at the LHC for the electroweak production of SUSY particles are used to study their impact on the constraints on dark matter candidates. The searches use 20 fb-1 of proton-proton collision data at s√=8s=8 TeV. A likelihood-driven scan of a five-dimensional effective model focusing on the gaugino-higgsino and Higgs sector of the phenomenological minimal supersymmetric Standard Model is performed. This scan uses data from direct dark matter detection experiments, the relic dark matter density and precision flavour physics results. Further constraints from the ATLAS Higgs mass measurement and SUSY searches at LEP are also applied. A subset of models selected from this scan are used to assess the impact of the selected ATLAS searches in this five-dimensional parameter space. These ATLAS searches substantially impact those models for which the mass m(χ~01)m(χ~10) of the lightest neutralino is less than 65 GeV, excluding 86% of such models. The searches have limited impact on models with larger m(χ~01)m(χ~10) due to either heavy electroweakinos or compressed mass spectra where the mass splittings between the produced particles and the lightest supersymmetric particle is small.

  2. Dark matter interpretations of ATLAS searches for the electroweak production of supersymmetric particles in √{s}=8 TeV proton-proton collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aaboud, M.; Aad, G.; Abbott, B.; Abdallah, J.; Abdinov, O.; Abeloos, B.; Aben, R.; AbouZeid, O. S.; Abraham, N. L.; Abramowicz, H.; Abreu, H.; Abreu, R.; Abulaiti, Y.; Acharya, B. S.; Adachi, S.; Adamczyk, L.; Adams, D. L.; Adelman, J.; Adomeit, S.; Adye, T.; Affolder, A. A.; Agatonovic-Jovin, T.; Aguilar-Saavedra, J. A.; Ahlen, S. P.; Ahmadov, F.; Aielli, G.; Akerstedt, H.; Åkesson, T. P. A.; Akimov, A. V.; Alberghi, G. L.; Albert, J.; Albrand, S.; Alconada Verzini, M. J.; Aleksa, M.; Aleksandrov, I. N.; Alexa, C.; Alexander, G.; Alexopoulos, T.; Alhroob, M.; Ali, B.; Aliev, M.; Alimonti, G.; Alison, J.; Alkire, S. P.; Allbrooke, B. M. M.; Allen, B. W.; Allport, P. P.; Aloisio, A.; Alonso, A.; Alonso, F.; Alpigiani, C.; Alshehri, A. A.; Alstaty, M.; Alvarez Gonzalez, B.; Álvarez Piqueras, D.; Alviggi, M. G.; Amadio, B. T.; Amako, K.; Amaral Coutinho, Y.; Amelung, C.; Amidei, D.; Amor Dos Santos, S. P.; Amorim, A.; Amoroso, S.; Amundsen, G.; Anastopoulos, C.; Ancu, L. S.; Andari, N.; Andeen, T.; Anders, C. F.; Anders, G.; Anders, J. K.; Anderson, K. J.; Andreazza, A.; Andrei, V.; Angelidakis, S.; Angelozzi, I.; Angerami, A.; Anghinolfi, F.; Anisenkov, A. V.; Anjos, N.; Annovi, A.; Antel, C.; Antonelli, M.; Antonov, A.; Anulli, F.; Aoki, M.; Aperio Bella, L.; Arabidze, G.; Arai, Y.; Araque, J. P.; Arce, A. T. H.; Arduh, F. A.; Arguin, J.-F.; Argyropoulos, S.; Arik, M.; Armbruster, A. J.; Armitage, L. J.; Arnaez, O.; Arnold, H.; Arratia, M.; Arslan, O.; Artamonov, A.; Artoni, G.; Artz, S.; Asai, S.; Asbah, N.; Ashkenazi, A.; Åsman, B.; Asquith, L.; Assamagan, K.; Astalos, R.; Atkinson, M.; Atlay, N. B.; Augsten, K.; Avolio, G.; Axen, B.; Ayoub, M. K.; Azuelos, G.; Baak, M. A.; Baas, A. E.; Baca, M. J.; Bachacou, H.; Bachas, K.; Backes, M.; Backhaus, M.; Bagiacchi, P.; Bagnaia, P.; Bai, Y.; Baines, J. T.; Baker, O. K.; Baldin, E. M.; Balek, P.; Balestri, T.; Balli, F.; Balunas, W. K.; Banas, E.; Banerjee, Sw.; Bannoura, A. A. E.; Barak, L.; Barberio, E. L.; Barberis, D.; Barbero, M.; Barillari, T.; Barisits, M.-S.; Barklow, T.; Barlow, N.; Barnes, S. L.; Barnett, B. M.; Barnett, R. M.; Barnovska-Blenessy, Z.; Baroncelli, A.; Barone, G.; Barr, A. J.; Barranco Navarro, L.; Barreiro, F.; Barreiro Guimarães da Costa, J.; Bartoldus, R.; Barton, A. E.; Bartos, P.; Basalaev, A.; Bassalat, A.; Bates, R. L.; Batista, S. J.; Batley, J. R.; Battaglia, M.; Bauce, M.; Bauer, F.; Bawa, H. S.; Beacham, J. B.; Beattie, M. D.; Beau, T.; Beauchemin, P. H.; Bechtle, P.; Beck, H. P.; Becker, K.; Becker, M.; Beckingham, M.; Becot, C.; Beddall, A. J.; Beddall, A.; Bednyakov, V. A.; Bedognetti, M.; Bee, C. P.; Beemster, L. J.; Beermann, T. A.; Begel, M.; Behr, J. K.; Belanger-Champagne, C.; Bell, A. S.; Bella, G.; Bellagamba, L.; Bellerive, A.; Bellomo, M.; Belotskiy, K.; Beltramello, O.; Belyaev, N. L.; Benary, O.; Benchekroun, D.; Bender, M.; Bendtz, K.; Benekos, N.; Benhammou, Y.; Benhar Noccioli, E.; Benitez, J.; Benjamin, D. P.; Bensinger, J. R.; Bentvelsen, S.; Beresford, L.; Beretta, M.; Berge, D.; Bergeaas Kuutmann, E.; Berger, N.; Beringer, J.; Berlendis, S.; Bernard, N. R.; Bernius, C.; Bernlochner, F. U.; Berry, T.; Berta, P.; Bertella, C.; Bertoli, G.; Bertolucci, F.; Bertone, G.; Bertram, I. A.; Bertsche, C.; Bertsche, D.; Besjes, G. J.; Bessidskaia Bylund, O.; Bessner, M.; Besson, N.; Betancourt, C.; Bethani, A.; Bethke, S.; Bevan, A. J.; Bianchi, R. M.; Bianchini, L.; Bianco, M.; Biebel, O.; Biedermann, D.; Bielski, R.; Biesuz, N. V.; Biglietti, M.; Bilbao De Mendizabal, J.; Billoud, T. R. V.; Bilokon, H.; Bindi, M.; Binet, S.; Bingul, A.; Bini, C.; Biondi, S.; Bisanz, T.; Bjergaard, D. M.; Black, C. W.; Black, J. E.; Black, K. M.; Blackburn, D.; Blair, R. E.; Blanchard, J.-B.; Blazek, T.; Bloch, I.; Blocker, C.; Blue, A.; Blum, W.; Blumenschein, U.; Blunier, S.; Bobbink, G. J.; Bobrovnikov, V. S.; Bocchetta, S. S.; Bocci, A.; Bock, C.; Boehler, M.; Boerner, D.; Bogaerts, J. A.; Bogavac, D.; Bogdanchikov, A. G.; Bohm, C.; Boisvert, V.; Bokan, P.; Bold, T.; Boldyrev, A. S.; Bomben, M.; Bona, M.; Boonekamp, M.; Borisov, A.; Borissov, G.; Bortfeldt, J.; Bortoletto, D.; Bortolotto, V.; Bos, K.; Boscherini, D.; Bosman, M.; Bossio Sola, J. D.; Boudreau, J.; Bouffard, J.; Bouhova-Thacker, E. V.; Boumediene, D.; Bourdarios, C.; Boutle, S. K.; Boveia, A.; Boyd, J.; Boyko, I. R.; Bracinik, J.; Brandt, A.; Brandt, G.; Brandt, O.; Bratzler, U.; Brau, B.; Brau, J. E.; Breaden Madden, W. D.; Brendlinger, K.; Brennan, A. J.; Brenner, L.; Brenner, R.; Bressler, S.; Bristow, T. M.; Britton, D.; Britzger, D.; Brochu, F. M.; Brock, I.; Brock, R.; Brooijmans, G.; Brooks, T.; Brooks, W. K.; Brosamer, J.; Brost, E.; Broughton, J. H.; Bruckman de Renstrom, P. A.; Bruncko, D.; Bruneliere, R.; Bruni, A.; Bruni, G.; Bruni, L. S.; Brunt, BH; Bruschi, M.; Bruscino, N.; Bryant, P.; Bryngemark, L.; Buanes, T.; Buat, Q.; Buchholz, P.; Buckley, A. G.; Budagov, I. A.; Buehrer, F.; Bugge, M. K.; Bulekov, O.; Bullock, D.; Burckhart, H.; Burdin, S.; Burgard, C. D.; Burghgrave, B.; Burka, K.; Burke, S.; Burmeister, I.; Burr, J. T. P.; Busato, E.; Büscher, D.; Büscher, V.; Bussey, P.; Butler, J. M.; Buttar, C. M.; Butterworth, J. M.; Butti, P.; Buttinger, W.; Buzatu, A.; Buzykaev, A. R.; Cabrera Urbán, S.; Caforio, D.; Cairo, V. M.; Cakir, O.; Calace, N.; Calafiura, P.; Calandri, A.; Calderini, G.; Calfayan, P.; Callea, G.; Caloba, L. P.; Calvente Lopez, S.; Calvet, D.; Calvet, S.; Calvet, T. P.; Camacho Toro, R.; Camarda, S.; Camarri, P.; Cameron, D.; Caminal Armadans, R.; Camincher, C.; Campana, S.; Campanelli, M.; Camplani, A.; Campoverde, A.; Canale, V.; Canepa, A.; Cano Bret, M.; Cantero, J.; Cao, T.; Capeans Garrido, M. D. M.; Caprini, I.; Caprini, M.; Capua, M.; Carbone, R. M.; Cardarelli, R.; Cardillo, F.; Carli, I.; Carli, T.; Carlino, G.; Carminati, L.; Caron, S.; Carquin, E.; Carrillo-Montoya, G. D.; Carter, J. R.; Carvalho, J.; Casadei, D.; Casado, M. P.; Casolino, M.; Casper, D. W.; Castaneda-Miranda, E.; Castelijn, R.; Castelli, A.; Castillo Gimenez, V.; Castro, N. F.; Catinaccio, A.; Catmore, J. R.; Cattai, A.; Caudron, J.; Cavaliere, V.; Cavallaro, E.; Cavalli, D.; Cavalli-Sforza, M.; Cavasinni, V.; Ceradini, F.; Cerda Alberich, L.; Cerqueira, A. S.; Cerri, A.; Cerrito, L.; Cerutti, F.; Cerv, M.; Cervelli, A.; Cetin, S. A.; Chafaq, A.; Chakraborty, D.; Chan, S. K.; Chan, Y. L.; Chang, P.; Chapman, J. D.; Charlton, D. G.; Chatterjee, A.; Chau, C. C.; Chavez Barajas, C. A.; Che, S.; Cheatham, S.; Chegwidden, A.; Chekanov, S.; Chekulaev, S. V.; Chelkov, G. A.; Chelstowska, M. A.; Chen, C.; Chen, H.; Chen, K.; Chen, S.; Chen, S.; Chen, X.; Chen, Y.; Cheng, H. C.; Cheng, H. J.; Cheng, Y.; Cheplakov, A.; Cheremushkina, E.; Cherkaoui El Moursli, R.; Chernyatin, V.; Cheu, E.; Chevalier, L.; Chiarella, V.; Chiarelli, G.; Chiodini, G.; Chisholm, A. S.; Chitan, A.; Chizhov, M. V.; Choi, K.; Chomont, A. R.; Chouridou, S.; Chow, B. K. B.; Christodoulou, V.; Chromek-Burckhart, D.; Chudoba, J.; Chuinard, A. J.; Chwastowski, J. J.; Chytka, L.; Ciapetti, G.; Ciftci, A. K.; Cinca, D.; Cindro, V.; Cioara, I. A.; Ciocca, C.; Ciocio, A.; Cirotto, F.; Citron, Z. H.; Citterio, M.; Ciubancan, M.; Clark, A.; Clark, B. L.; Clark, M. R.; Clark, P. J.; Clarke, R. N.; Clement, C.; Coadou, Y.; Cobal, M.; Coccaro, A.; Cochran, J.; Colasurdo, L.; Cole, B.; Colijn, A. P.; Collot, J.; Colombo, T.; Compostella, G.; Conde Muiño, P.; Coniavitis, E.; Connell, S. H.; Connelly, I. A.; Consorti, V.; Constantinescu, S.; Conti, G.; Conventi, F.; Cooke, M.; Cooper, B. D.; Cooper-Sarkar, A. M.; Cormier, K. J. 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A.; Vazeille, F.; Vazquez Schroeder, T.; Veatch, J.; Veeraraghavan, V.; Veloce, L. M.; Veloso, F.; Veneziano, S.; Ventura, A.; Venturi, M.; Venturi, N.; Venturini, A.; Vercesi, V.; Verducci, M.; Verkerke, W.; Vermeulen, J. C.; Vest, A.; Vetterli, M. C.; Viazlo, O.; Vichou, I.; Vickey, T.; Vickey Boeriu, O. E.; Viehhauser, G. H. A.; Viel, S.; Vigani, L.; Villa, M.; Villaplana Perez, M.; Vilucchi, E.; Vincter, M. G.; Vinogradov, V. B.; Vittori, C.; Vivarelli, I.; Vlachos, S.; Vlasak, M.; Vogel, M.; Vokac, P.; Volpi, G.; Volpi, M.; von der Schmitt, H.; von Toerne, E.; Vorobel, V.; Vorobev, K.; Vos, M.; Voss, R.; Vossebeld, J. H.; Vranjes, N.; Vranjes Milosavljevic, M.; Vrba, V.; Vreeswijk, M.; Vuillermet, R.; Vukotic, I.; Vykydal, Z.; Wagner, P.; Wagner, W.; Wahlberg, H.; Wahrmund, S.; Wakabayashi, J.; Walder, J.; Walker, R.; Walkowiak, W.; Wallangen, V.; Wang, C.; Wang, C.; Wang, F.; Wang, H.; Wang, H.; Wang, J.; Wang, J.; Wang, K.; Wang, R.; Wang, S. M.; Wang, T.; Wang, T.; Wang, W.; Wanotayaroj, C.; Warburton, A.; Ward, C. P.; Wardrope, D. R.; Washbrook, A.; Watkins, P. M.; Watson, A. T.; Watson, M. F.; Watts, G.; Watts, S.; Waugh, B. M.; Webb, S.; Weber, M. S.; Weber, S. W.; Weber, S. A.; Webster, J. S.; Weidberg, A. R.; Weinert, B.; Weingarten, J.; Weiser, C.; Weits, H.; Wells, P. S.; Wenaus, T.; Wengler, T.; Wenig, S.; Wermes, N.; Werner, M.; Werner, M. D.; Werner, P.; Wessels, M.; Wetter, J.; Whalen, K.; Whallon, N. L.; Wharton, A. M.; White, A.; White, M. J.; White, R.; Whiteson, D.; Wickens, F. J.; Wiedenmann, W.; Wielers, M.; Wiglesworth, C.; Wiik-Fuchs, L. A. M.; Wildauer, A.; Wilk, F.; Wilkens, H. G.; Williams, H. H.; Williams, S.; Willis, C.; Willocq, S.; Wilson, J. A.; Wingerter-Seez, I.; Winklmeier, F.; Winston, O. J.; Winter, B. T.; Wittgen, M.; Wittkowski, J.; Wolf, T. M. H.; Wolter, M. W.; Wolters, H.; Worm, S. D.; Wosiek, B. K.; Wotschack, J.; Woudstra, M. J.; Wozniak, K. W.; Wu, M.; Wu, M.; Wu, S. L.; Wu, X.; Wu, Y.; Wyatt, T. R.; Wynne, B. M.; Xella, S.; Xu, D.; Xu, L.; Yabsley, B.; Yacoob, S.; Yamaguchi, D.; Yamaguchi, Y.; Yamamoto, A.; Yamamoto, S.; Yamanaka, T.; Yamauchi, K.; Yamazaki, Y.; Yan, Z.; Yang, H.; Yang, H.; Yang, Y.; Yang, Z.; Yao, W.-M.; Yap, Y. C.; Yasu, Y.; Yatsenko, E.; Yau Wong, K. H.; Ye, J.; Ye, S.; Yeletskikh, I.; Yildirim, E.; Yorita, K.; Yoshida, R.; Yoshihara, K.; Young, C.; Young, C. J. S.; Youssef, S.; Yu, D. R.; Yu, J.; Yu, J. M.; Yu, J.; Yuan, L.; Yuen, S. P. Y.; Yusuff, I.; Zabinski, B.; Zaidan, R.; Zaitsev, A. M.; Zakharchuk, N.; Zalieckas, J.; Zaman, A.; Zambito, S.; Zanello, L.; Zanzi, D.; Zeitnitz, C.; Zeman, M.; Zemla, A.; Zeng, J. C.; Zeng, Q.; Zenin, O.; Ženiš, T.; Zerwas, D.; Zhang, D.; Zhang, F.; Zhang, G.; Zhang, H.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, L.; Zhang, M.; Zhang, R.; Zhang, R.; Zhang, X.; Zhang, Z.; Zhao, X.; Zhao, Y.; Zhao, Z.; Zhemchugov, A.; Zhong, J.; Zhou, B.; Zhou, C.; Zhou, L.; Zhou, L.; Zhou, M.; Zhou, N.; Zhu, C. G.; Zhu, H.; Zhu, J.; Zhu, Y.; Zhuang, X.; Zhukov, K.; Zibell, A.; Zieminska, D.; Zimine, N. I.; Zimmermann, C.; Zimmermann, S.; Zinonos, Z.; Zinser, M.; Ziolkowski, M.; Živković, L.; Zobernig, G.; Zoccoli, A.; zur Nedden, M.; Zwalinski, L.

    2016-09-01

    A selection of searches by the ATLAS experiment at the LHC for the electroweak production of SUSY particles are used to study their impact on the constraints on dark matter candidates. The searches use 20 fb-1 of proton-proton collision data at √{s}=8 TeV. A likelihood-driven scan of a five-dimensional effective model focusing on the gaugino-higgsino and Higgs sector of the phenomenological minimal supersymmetric Standard Model is performed. This scan uses data from direct dark matter detection experiments, the relic dark matter density and precision flavour physics results. Further constraints from the ATLAS Higgs mass measurement and SUSY searches at LEP are also applied. A subset of models selected from this scan are used to assess the impact of the selected ATLAS searches in this five-dimensional parameter space. These ATLAS searches substantially impact those models for which the mass m({tilde{χ}}_1^0) of the lightest neutralino is less than 65 GeV, excluding 86% of such models. The searches have limited impact on models with larger m({tilde{χ}}_1^0) due to either heavy electroweakinos or compressed mass spectra where the mass splittings between the produced particles and the lightest supersymmetric particle is small. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  3. Heavy-flavor results for the era of SUSY and TeV-scale

    SciTech Connect

    Kwon, Youngjoon

    2008-11-23

    In this talk, we review recent experimental results in the heavy-flavor physics, in particular, in the B meson and {tau} lepton systems. We focus on the phenomena which could be sensitive to new physics effects in the TeV scale, including SUSY. The CP violations in B and B{sub s} mesons, radiative and electroweak penguin decays of B, search for lepton-flavor-violaing {tau} decays, prospects of CP violation search in {tau} and B decays to final states including {tau} leptons are discussed.

  4. Standard model extended by a heavy singlet: Linear vs. nonlinear EFT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buchalla, G.; Catà, O.; Celis, A.; Krause, C.

    2017-04-01

    We consider the Standard Model extended by a heavy scalar singlet in different regions of parameter space and construct the appropriate low-energy effective field theories up to first nontrivial order. This top-down exercise in effective field theory is meant primarily to illustrate with a simple example the systematics of the linear and nonlinear electroweak effective Lagrangians and to clarify the relation between them. We discuss power-counting aspects and the transition between both effective theories on the basis of the model, confirming in all cases the rules and procedures derived in previous works from a bottom-up approach.

  5. Can primordial magnetic fields seeded by electroweak strings cause an alignment of quasar axes on cosmological scales?

    PubMed

    Poltis, Robert; Stojkovic, Dejan

    2010-10-15

    The decay of nontopological electroweak strings may leave an observable imprint in the Universe today in the form of primordial magnetic fields. Protogalaxies preferentially tend to form with their axis of rotation parallel to an external magnetic field, and, moreover, an external magnetic field produces torque which tends to align the galaxy axis with the magnetic field. We demonstrate that the shape of a magnetic field left over from two looped electroweak strings can explain the observed nontrivial alignment of quasar polarization vectors and make predictions for future observations.

  6. Two-loop electroweak corrections to Higgs-gluon couplings to higher orders in the dimensional regularization parameter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonetti, Marco; Melnikov, Kirill; Tancredi, Lorenzo

    2017-03-01

    We compute the two-loop electroweak correction to the production of the Higgs boson in gluon fusion to higher orders in the dimensional-regularization parameter ε = (d - 4) / 2. We employ the method of differential equations augmented by the choice of a canonical basis to compute the relevant integrals and express them in terms of Goncharov polylogarithms. Our calculation provides useful results for the computation of the NLO mixed QCD-electroweak corrections to gg → H and establishes the necessary framework towards the calculation of the missing three-loop virtual corrections.

  7. Resonances of the Electroweak Symmetry Breaking Sector in unitarized Higgs-EFT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Llanes-Estrada, Felipe J.; Delgado, Rafael L.; Dobado, Antonio

    2017-01-01

    Because of the gap between the known 100 GeV scale and any new physics, it is natural to formulate an effective Lagrangian (HEFT) with the particles of the Electroweak Symmetry Breaking Sector (WL,ZL and h). To use it with any new particles and resonances that may be found at the LHC we extend it by means of dispersion relations that yield unitarized amplitudes valid even in the presence of new strong interactions. We have studied several such methods (Inverse Amplitude, N/D, Improved K-matrix, etc.) to assess the systematics, and find that they give qualitatively similar results and succesfully produce unitary amplitudes in the nonperturbative regime. We have computed all the necessary one-loop amplitudes in the HEFT and unitarized them numerically with those methods. We are thus in a position to describe new physics in the 0.5 TeV-3 TeV (region of validity of our approximations: the effective theory and the equivalence theorem to substitute WL, ZL by the Goldstone bosons of electroweak symmetry breaking). We have also computed the coupling of the EWSBS to the top-antitop and two-photon channels to describe resonances that decay through them or to study their photon-photon production, for example. The approach is universal and useful for many BSM theories at low energy. Funded by spanish grant MINECO:FPA2014-53375-C2-1-P.

  8. Probable or improbable universe? Correlating electroweak vacuum instability with the scale of inflation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hook, Anson; Kearney, John; Shakya, Bibhushan; Zurek, Kathryn M.

    2015-01-01

    Measurements of the Higgs boson and top quark masses indicate that the Standard Model Higgs potential becomes unstable around Λ I ˜ 1011 GeV. This instability is cosmologically relevant since quantum fluctuations during inflation can easily destabilize the electroweak vacuum if the Hubble parameter during inflation is larger than Λ I (as preferred by the recent BICEP2 measurement). We perform a careful study of the evolution of the Higgs field during inflation, obtaining different results from those currently in the literature. We consider both tunneling via a Coleman-de Luccia or Hawking-Moss instanton, valid when the scale of inflation is below the instability scale, as well as a statistical treatment via the Fokker-Planck equation appropriate in the opposite regime. We show that a better understanding of the post-inflation evolution of the unstable AdS vacuum regions is crucial for determining the eventual fate of the universe. If these AdS regions devour all of space, a universe like ours is indeed extremely unlikely without new physics to stabilize the Higgs potential; however, if these regions crunch, our universe survives, but inflation must last a few e-folds longer to compensate for the lost AdS regions. Lastly, we examine the effects of generic Planck-suppressed corrections to the Higgs potential, which can be sufficient to stabilize the electroweak vacuum during inflation.

  9. Tadpole-Induced Electroweak Symmetry Breaking and pNGB Higgs Models

    SciTech Connect

    Harnik, Roni; Howe, Kiel; Kearney, John

    2016-03-11

    We investigate induced electroweak symmetry breaking (EWSB) in models in which the Higgs is a pseudo-Nambu-Goldstone boson (pNGB). In pNGB Higgs models, Higgs properties and precision electroweak measurements imply a hierarchy between the EWSB and global symmetry-breaking scales, $v_H \\ll f_H$. When the pNGB potential is generated radiatively, this hierarchy requires fine-tuning to a degree of at least $\\sim v_H^2/f_H^2$. We show that if Higgs EWSB is induced by a tadpole arising from an auxiliary sector at scale $f_\\Sigma \\ll v_H$, this tuning is significantly ameliorated or can even be removed. We present explicit examples both in Twin Higgs models and in Composite Higgs models based on $SO(5)/SO(4)$. For the Twin case, the result is a fully natural model with $f_H \\sim 1$ TeV and the lightest colored top partners at 2 TeV. These models also have an appealing mechanism to generate the scales of the auxiliary sector and Higgs EWSB directly from the scale $f_H$, with a natural hierarchy $f_\\Sigma \\ll v_H \\ll f_H \\sim{\\rm TeV}$. The framework predicts modified Higgs coupling as well as new Higgs and vector states at LHC13.

  10. Strong first order electroweak phase transition in the CP-conserving 2HDM revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basler, P.; Krause, M.; Mühlleitner, M.; Wittbrodt, J.; Wlotzka, A.

    2017-02-01

    The discovery of the Higgs boson by the LHC experiments ATLAS and CMS has marked a milestone for particle physics. Yet, there are still many open questions that cannot be answered within the Standard Model (SM). For example, the generation of the observed matter-antimatter asymmetry in the universe through baryogenesis can only be explained qualitatively in the SM. A simple extension of the SM compatible with the current theoretical and experimental constraints is given by the 2-Higgs-Doublet Model (2HDM) where a second Higgs doublet is added to the Higgs sector. We investigate the possibility of a strong first order electroweak phase transition in the CP-conserving 2HDM type I and type II where either of the CP-even Higgs bosons is identified with the SM-like Higgs boson. The renormalisation that we apply on the loop-corrected Higgs potential allows us to efficiently scan the 2HDM parameter space and simultaneously take into account all relevant theoretical and up-to-date experimental constraints. The 2HDM parameter regions found to be compatible with the applied constraints and a strong electroweak phase transition are analysed systematically. Our results show that there is a strong interplay between the requirement of a strong phase transition and collider phenomenology with testable implications for searches at the LHC.

  11. Probing new physics in electroweak penguins through Bd and Bs decays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hofer, Lars; Scherer, Dominik; Vernazza, Leonardo

    2011-12-01

    An enhanced electroweak penguin amplitude due to the presence of unknown new physics can explain the discrepancies found between theory and experiment in the B → πK decays, in particular in ACP(B- → π0K-) - ACP(bar B0 → π+K-), but the current precision of the theoretical and experimental results does not allow to draw a firm conclusion. We argue that the bar Bs → phiρ0 and bar Bs → phiπ0 decays offer an additional tool to investigate this possibility. These purely isospin-violating decays are dominated by electroweak penguins and we show that in presence of a new physics contribution their branching ratio can be enhanced by about an order of magnitude, without violating any constraints from other hadronic B decays. This makes them very interesting modes for LHCb and future B factories. In [1] we have performed both a model-independent analysis and a study within realistic New Physics models such as a modified-Z0-penguin scenario, a model with an additional Z' boson and the MSSM. In this article we summarise the most important results of our study.

  12. Tadpole-induced electroweak symmetry breaking and pNGB Higgs models

    DOE PAGES

    Harnik, Roni; Howe, Kiel; Kearney, John

    2017-03-22

    We investigate induced electroweak symmetry breaking (EWSB) in models in which the Higgs is a pseudo-Nambu-Goldstone boson (pNGB). In pNGB Higgs models, Higgs properties and precision electroweak measurements imply a hierarchy between the EWSB and global symmetry-breaking scales,more » $$v_H \\ll f_H$$. When the pNGB potential is generated radiatively, this hierarchy requires fine-tuning to a degree of at least $$\\sim v_H^2/f_H^2$$. We show that if Higgs EWSB is induced by a tadpole arising from an auxiliary sector at scale $$f_\\Sigma \\ll v_H$$, this tuning is significantly ameliorated or can even be removed. We present explicit examples both in Twin Higgs models and in Composite Higgs models based on $SO(5)/SO(4)$. For the Twin case, the result is a fully natural model with $$f_H \\sim 1$$ TeV and the lightest colored top partners at 2 TeV. These models also have an appealing mechanism to generate the scales of the auxiliary sector and Higgs EWSB directly from the scale $$f_H$$, with a natural hierarchy $$f_\\Sigma \\ll v_H \\ll f_H \\sim{\\rm TeV}$$. Finally, the framework predicts modified Higgs coupling as well as new Higgs and vector states at LHC13.« less

  13. Electroweak higher-order effects and theoretical uncertainties in deep-inelastic neutrino scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Diener, K.-P.O.; Dittmaier, S.; Hollik, W.

    2005-11-01

    A previous calculation of electroweak O({alpha}) corrections to deep-inelastic neutrino scattering, as e.g. measured by NuTeV and NOMAD, is supplemented by higher-order effects. In detail, we take into account universal two-loop effects from {delta}{alpha} and {delta}{rho} as well as higher-order final-state photon radiation off muons in the structure function approach. Moreover, we make use of the recently released O({alpha})-improved parton distributions MRST2004QED and identify the relevant QED factorization scheme, which is DIS-like. As a technical by-product, we describe slicing and subtraction techniques for an efficient calculation of a new type of real corrections that are induced by the generated photon distribution. A numerical discussion of the higher-order effects suggests that the remaining theoretical uncertainty from unknown electroweak corrections is dominated by nonuniversal two-loop effects and is of the order 0.0003 when translated into a shift in sin{sup 2}{theta}{sub W}=1-M{sub W}{sup 2}/M{sub Z}{sup 2}. The O({alpha}) corrections implicitly included in the parton distributions lead to a shift of about 0.0004.

  14. Discriminative phenomenological features of scale invariant models for electroweak symmetry breaking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hashino, Katsuya; Kanemura, Shinya; Orikasa, Yuta

    2016-01-01

    Classical scale invariance (CSI) may be one of the solutions for the hierarchy problem. Realistic models for electroweak symmetry breaking based on CSI require extended scalar sectors without mass terms, and the electroweak symmetry is broken dynamically at the quantum level by the Coleman-Weinberg mechanism. We discuss discriminative features of these models. First, using the experimental value of the mass of the discovered Higgs boson h (125), we obtain an upper bound on the mass of the lightest additional scalar boson (≃ 543 GeV), which does not depend on its isospin and hypercharge. Second, a discriminative prediction on the Higgs-photon-photon coupling is given as a function of the number of charged scalar bosons, by which we can narrow down possible models using current and future data for the di-photon decay of h (125). Finally, for the triple Higgs boson coupling a large deviation (∼ + 70%) from the SM prediction is universally predicted, which is independent of masses, quantum numbers and even the number of additional scalars. These models based on CSI can be well tested at LHC Run II and at future lepton colliders.

  15. Search for Electroweak Single-Top Quark Production with the CDF II Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Buehler, Matthias; /Karlsruhe U., EKP

    2006-08-01

    The CDF II experiment and the Tevatron proton-antiproton collider are parts of the Fermi National Laboratories (Fermilab). The Fermilab is located in the vicinity of Chicago, USA. Today, the Tevatron is the only collider which is able to produce the heaviest known elementary particle, the top quark. The top quark was discovered at the Tevatron by the CDF and the D0 collaborations in 1995 [1]. So far, all the top quarks found are produced via the strong interaction as top-antitop pairs. The Standard Model of elementary particle physics also predicts single-top quark production via the electroweak interaction. This production mode has not yet been observed. The CDF and the D0 collaborations have set upper limits on the cross section for that process in Run I [2, 3] and improved those results in Run II [4, 5]. Single-top quark production is one of the major interests in Run II of the Tevatron as it offers several ways to test the Standard Model and to search for potential physics beyond the Standard Model. The measurement of the cross section of singly produced top quarks via the electroweak interaction offers the possibility to determine the Cabbibo-Kobayashi-Maskawa (CKM) matrix element V{sub tb} directly. The CKM matrix defines the transformation from the eigenstates of the electroweak interactions to the mass eigenstates of the quarks. V{sub tb} gives the strength of the coupling at the Wtb vertex. The single-top quark is produced at this vertex and therefore the cross section of the single-top quark production is directly proportional to |V{sub tb}|{sup 2}. In the Standard Model, three generations of quarks and the unitarity of the CKM matrix are predicted. This leads to V{sub tb} {approx} 1. Up to now, there is no possibility to measure V{sub tb} without using the assumption that there are a certain number of quark generations. Since the measurement of the cross section of single-top quark production is independent of this assumption it could verify another

  16. Relativistic heavy ions physics

    SciTech Connect

    Mueller, B.

    1989-01-01

    Central nuclear collisions at energies far above 1 GeV/nucleon may provide for conditions, where the transition from highly excited hadronic matter into quark matter or quark-gluon plasma can be probed. We review current ideas about the nature of, and signals for, this transition, and we discuss the (hadronic) string model approach to the nuclear collisions dynamics. At even higher energies in the TeV/nucleon range peripheral nuclear collisions may become a laboratory for electroweak physics at the unification scale allowing, e.g., for Higgs boson production. 42 refs., 29 figs.,

  17. Evolution of the baryon asymmetry through the electroweak crossover in the presence of a helical magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamada, Kohei; Long, Andrew J.

    2016-12-01

    We elaborate upon the model of baryogenesis from decaying magnetic helicity by focusing on the evolution of the baryon number and magnetic field through the Standard Model electroweak crossover. The baryon asymmetry is determined by a competition between the helical hypermagnetic field, which sources baryon number, and the electroweak sphaleron, which tends to wash out baryon number. At the electroweak crossover, both of these processes become inactive; the hypermagnetic field is converted into an electromagnetic field, which does not source baryon number, and the weak gauge boson masses grow, suppressing the electroweak sphaleron reaction. An accurate prediction of the relic baryon asymmetry requires a careful treatment of the crossover. We extend our previous study [K. Kamada and A. J. Long, Phys. Rev. D 94, 063501 (2016)], taking into account the gradual conversion of the hypermagnetic into the electromagnetic field. If the conversion is not completed by the time of sphaleron freeze-out, as both analytic and numerical studies suggest, the relic baryon asymmetry is enhanced compared to previous calculations. The observed baryon asymmetry of the Universe can be obtained for a primordial magnetic field that has a present-day field strength and coherence length of B0˜10-17 G and λ0˜10-3 pc and a positive helicity. For larger B0 the baryon asymmetry is overproduced, which may be in conflict with blazar observations that provide evidence for an intergalactic magnetic field of strength B0≳10-14 - 16 G .

  18. Combined effects of strong and electroweak flavor changing neutral current effective operators in top quark physics at the CERN LHC

    SciTech Connect

    Ferreira, P. M.; Guedes, R. B.; Santos, R.

    2008-06-01

    We study the combined effects of both strong and electroweak dimension six effective operators on flavor changing top quark physics at the CERN LHC. Analytic expressions for the cross sections and decay widths of several flavor changing processes will be presented, as well as an analysis of the feasibility of their observation at the LHC.

  19. SUSY models under siege: LHC constraints and electroweak fine-tuning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baer, Howard; Barger, Vernon; Mickelson, Dan; Padeffke-Kirkland, Maren

    2014-06-01

    Recent null results from LHC8 supersymmetry (SUSY) searches along with the discovery of a standard model (SM)-like Higgs boson with mass mh≃125.5 GeV indicates sparticle masses in the TeV range, causing tension with conventional measures of electroweak fine-tuning. We propose a simple fine-tuning rule which should be followed under any credible evaluation of fine-tuning. We believe that overestimates of electroweak fine-tuning by conventional measures all arise from violations of this rule. We show that to gain accord with the fine-tuning rule, then both the Higgs mass and the traditional ΔBG fine-tuning measures reduce to the model-independent electroweak fine-tuning measure ΔEW. This occurs by combining dependent contributions to mZ or mh into independent units. Then, using ΔEW, we evaluate EW fine-tuning for a variety of SUSY models including mSUGRA, NUHM1, NUHM2, mGMSB, mAMSB, hyper-charged AMSB, gaugino AMSB and nine cases of mixed moduli-anomaly (mirage) mediated SUSY breaking models while respecting LHC Higgs mass and B-decay constraints (we do not impose LHC8 sparticle mass constraints due to the possibility of compressed spectra within many of these models). We find mSUGRA, mGMSB and the AMSB models all to be highly fine-tuned. The NUHM1 model is moderately fine-tuned while NUHM2 which allows for radiatively driven naturalness (RNS) allows for fine-tuning at a meager 10% level in the case where m(Higgsinos)˜100-200 GeV and the TeV-scale top squarks are well mixed. Models with RNS may or may not be detectable at LHC14. A √s ˜500 GeV e+e- collider will be required to make a definitive search for the requisite light Higgsinos.

  20. Theoretical aspects of electroweak and other interactions in medium energy nuclear physics. Interim progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Mukhopadhyay, N.C.

    1994-12-05

    Significant progress has been made in the current project year in the development of chiral soliton model and its applications to the electroweak structure of the nucleon and the Delta (1232) resonance. Further progress also has been made in the application of the perturbative QCD (pQCD) and the study of physics beyond the standard model. The postdoctoral associate and the graduate student working towards his Ph.D. degree have both made good progress. The review panel of the DOE has rated this program as a ``strong, high priority`` one. A total of fifteen research communications -- eight journal papers and, conference reports and seven other communications -- have been made during the project year so far. The principal investigator is a member of the Physics Advisory Committee of two nuclear accelerator facilities.

  1. a Unified Gravity-Electroweak Model Based on a Generalized Yang-Mills Framework

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsu, Jong-Ping

    Gravitational and electroweak interactions can be unified in analogy with the unification in the Weinberg-Salam theory. The Yang-Mills framework is generalized to include spacetime translational group T(4), whose generators Tμ ( = ∂/∂xμ) do not have constant matrix representations. By gauging T(4) × SU(2) × U(1) in flat spacetime, we have a new tensor field ϕμν which universally couples to all particles and anti-particles with the same constant g, which has the dimension of length. In this unified model, the T(4) gauge symmetry dictates that all wave equations of fermions, massive bosons and the photon in flat spacetime reduce to a Hamilton-Jacobi equation with the same "effective Riemann metric tensor" in the geometric-optics limit. Consequently, the results are consistent with experiments. We demonstrated that the T(4) gravitational gauge field can be quantized in inertial frames.

  2. Search for electroweak production of single top quarks in pp¯ collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abbott, B.; Abolins, M.; Abramov, V.; Acharya, B. S.; Adams, D. L.; Adams, M.; Alves, G. A.; Amos, N.; Anderson, E. W.; Baarmand, M. M.; Babintsev, V. V.; Babukhadia, L.; Baden, A.; Baldin, B.; Balm, P. W.; Banerjee, S.; Bantly, J.; Barberis, E.; Baringer, P.; Bartlett, J. F.; Bassler, U.; Bean, A.; Begel, M.; Belyaev, A.; Beri, S. B.; Bernardi, G.; Bertram, I.; Besson, A.; Bezzubov, V. A.; Bhat, P. C.; Bhatnagar, V.; Bhattacharjee, M.; Blazey, G.; Blessing, S.; Boehnlein, A.; Bojko, N. I.; Boos, E. E.; Borcherding, F.; Brandt, A.; Breedon, R.; Briskin, G.; Brock, R.; Brooijmans, G.; Bross, A.; Buchholz, D.; Buehler, M.; Buescher, V.; Burtovoi, V. S.; Butler, J. M.; Canelli, F.; Carvalho, W.; Casey, D.; Casilum, Z.; Castilla-Valdez, H.; Chakraborty, D.; Chan, K. M.; Chekulaev, S. V.; Cho, D. K.; Choi, S.; Chopra, S.; Christenson, J. H.; Chung, M.; Claes, D.; Clark, A. R.; Cochran, J.; Coney, L.; Connolly, B.; Cooper, W. E.; Coppage, D.; Cummings, M. A.; Cutts, D.; Dahl, O. I.; Davis, G. A.; Davis, K.; de, K.; del Signore, K.; Demarteau, M.; Demina, R.; Demine, P.; Denisov, D.; Denisov, S. P.; Desai, S.; Diehl, H. T.; Diesburg, M.; di Loreto, G.; Doulas, S.; Draper, P.; Ducros, Y.; Dudko, L. V.; Duensing, S.; Dugad, S. R.; Dyshkant, A.; Edmunds, D.; Ellison, J.; Elvira, V. D.; Engelmann, R.; Eno, S.; Eppley, G.; Ermolov, P.; Eroshin, O. V.; Estrada, J.; Evans, H.; Evdokimov, V. N.; Fahland, T.; Feher, S.; Fein, D.; Ferbel, T.; Fisk, H. E.; Fisyak, Y.; Flattum, E.; Fleuret, F.; Fortner, M.; Frame, K. C.; Fuess, S.; Gallas, E.; Galyaev, A. N.; Gartung, P.; Gavrilov, V.; Genik, R. J.; Genser, K.; Gerber, C. E.; Gershtein, Y.; Gibbard, B.; Gilmartin, R.; Ginther, G.; Gómez, B.; Gómez, G.; Goncharov, P. I.; González Solís, J. L.; Gordon, H.; Goss, L. T.; Gounder, K.; Goussiou, A.; Graf, N.; Graham, G.; Grannis, P. D.; Green, J. A.; Greenlee, H.; Grinstein, S.; Groer, L.; Grudberg, P.; Grünendahl, S.; Gupta, A.; Gurzhiev, S. N.; Gutierrez, G.; Gutierrez, P.; Hadley, N. J.; Haggerty, H.; Hagopian, S.; Hagopian, V.; Hahn, K. S.; Hall, R. E.; Hanlet, P.; Hansen, S.; Hauptman, J. M.; Hays, C.; Hebert, C.; Hedin, D.; Heinson, A. P.; Heintz, U.; Heuring, T.; Hirosky, R.; Hobbs, J. D.; Hoeneisen, B.; Hoftun, J. S.; Hou, S.; Huang, Y.; Ito, A. S.; Jerger, S. A.; Jesik, R.; Johns, K.; Johnson, M.; Jonckheere, A.; Jones, M.; Jöstlein, H.; Juste, A.; Kahn, S.; Kajfasz, E.; Karmanov, D.; Karmgard, D.; Kehoe, R.; Kim, S. K.; Klima, B.; Klopfenstein, C.; Knuteson, B.; Ko, W.; Kohli, J. M.; Kostritskiy, A. V.; Kotcher, J.; Kotwal, A. V.; Kozelov, A. V.; Kozlovsky, E. A.; Krane, J.; Krishnaswamy, M. R.; Krzywdzinski, S.; Kubantsev, M.; Kuleshov, S.; Kulik, Y.; Kunori, S.; Kuznetsov, V. E.; Landsberg, G.; Leflat, A.; Lehner, F.; Li, J.; Li, Q. Z.; Lima, J. G.; Lincoln, D.; Linn, S. L.; Linnemann, J.; Lipton, R.; Lucotte, A.; Lueking, L.; Lundstedt, C.; Maciel, A. K.; Madaras, R. J.; Manankov, V.; Mao, H. S.; Marshall, T.; Martin, M. I.; Martin, R. D.; Mauritz, K. M.; May, B.; Mayorov, A. A.; McCarthy, R.; McDonald, J.; McMahon, T.; Melanson, H. L.; Meng, X. C.; Merkin, M.; Merritt, K. W.; Miao, C.; Miettinen, H.; Mihalcea, D.; Mincer, A.; Mishra, C. S.; Mokhov, N.; Mondal, N. K.; Montgomery, H. E.; Moore, R. W.; Mostafa, M.; da Motta, H.; Nagy, E.; Nang, F.; Narain, M.; Narasimham, V. S.; Neal, H. A.; Negret, J. P.; Negroni, S.; Norman, D.; Oesch, L.; Oguri, V.; Olivier, B.; Oshima, N.; Padley, P.; Pan, L. J.; Para, A.; Parashar, N.; Partridge, R.; Parua, N.; Paterno, M.; Patwa, A.; Pawlik, B.; Perkins, J.; Peters, M.; Peters, O.; Piegaia, R.; Piekarz, H.; Pope, B. G.; Popkov, E.; Prosper, H. B.; Protopopescu, S.; Qian, J.; Quintas, P. Z.; Raja, R.; Rajagopalan, S.; Ramberg, E.; Rapidis, P. A.; Reay, N. W.; Reucroft, S.; Rha, J.; Rijssenbeek, M.; Rockwell, T.; Roco, M.; Rubinov, P.; Ruchti, R.; Rutherfoord, J.; Santoro, A.; Sawyer, L.; Schamberger, R. D.; Schellman, H.; Schwartzman, A.; Sculli, J.; Sen, N.; Shabalina, E.; Shankar, H. C.; Shivpuri, R. K.; Shpakov, D.; Shupe, M.; Sidwell, R. A.; Simak, V.; Singh, H.; Singh, J. B.; Sirotenko, V.; Slattery, P.; Smith, E.; Smith, R. P.; Snihur, R.; Snow, G. R.; Snow, J.; Snyder, S.; Solomon, J.; Sorín, V.; Sosebee, M.; Sotnikova, N.; Soustruznik, K.; Souza, M.; Stanton, N. R.; Steinbrück, G.; Stephens, R. W.; Stevenson, M. L.; Stichelbaut, F.; Stoker, D.; Stolin, V.; Stoyanova, D. A.; Strauss, M.; Streets, K.; Strovink, M.; Stutte, L.; Sznajder, A.; Taylor, W.; Tentindo-Repond, S.; Thompson, J.; Toback, D.; Tripathi, S. M.; Trippe, T. G.; Turcot, A. S.; Tuts, P. M.; van Gemmeren, P.; Vaniev, V.; van Kooten, R.; Varelas, N.; Volkov, A. A.; Vorobiev, A. P.; Wahl, H. D.; Wang, H.; Wang, Z.-M.; Warchol, J.; Watts, G.; Wayne, M.; Weerts, H.; White, A.; White, J. T.; Whiteson, D.; Wightman, J. A.; Wijngaarden, D. A.; Willis, S.; Wimpenny, S. J.; Wirjawan, J. V.; Womersley, J.; Wood, D. R.; Yamada, R.; Yamin, P.; Yasuda, T.; Yip, K.; Youssef, S.; Yu, J.; Yu, Z.; Zanabria, M.; Zheng, H.; Zhou, Z.; Zhu, Z. H.; Zielinski, M.; Zieminska, D.; Zieminski, A.; Zutshi, V.; Zverev, E. G.; Zylberstejn, A.

    2001-02-01

    We present a search for electroweak production of single top quarks in the electron+jets and muon+jets decay channels. The measurements use ~90 pb-1 of data from Run 1 of the Fermilab Tevatron collider, collected at 1.8 TeV with the DØ detector between 1992 and 1995. We use events that include a tagging muon, implying the presence of a b jet, to set an upper limit at the 95% confidence level on the cross section for the s-channel process pp¯-->tb+X of 39 pb. The upper limit for the t-channel process pp¯-->tqb+X is 58 pb.

  3. Electroweak radiative corrections to parity-violating electroexcitation of the Delta

    SciTech Connect

    C.M. Maekawa; Michael Ramsey-Musolf; Barry Holstein; Shi-Lin Zhu; Gianfranco Sacco

    2001-12-01

    We analyze the degree to which parity-violating (PV) electroexcitation of the {Delta}(1232)$ resonance may be used to extract the weak neutral axial vector transition form factors. We find that the axial vector electroweak radiative corrections are large and theoretically uncertain, thereby modifying the nominal interpretation of the PV asymmetry in terms of the weak neutral form factors. We also show that, in contrast to the situation for elastic electron scattering, the axial N {yields} {Delta} PV asymmetry does not vanish at the photon point as a consequence of a new term entering the radiative corrections. We argue that an experimental determination of these radiative corrections would be of interest for hadron structure theory, possibly shedding light on the violation of Hara's theorem in weak, radiative hyperon decays.

  4. Electroweak contribution to the top quark forward-backward asymmetry at the Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    Hollik, Wolfgang; Pagani, Davide

    2011-11-01

    The electroweak contributions to the forward-backward asymmetry in the production of top-quark pairs at the Tevatron are evaluated at O({alpha}{sup 2}) and O({alpha}{alpha}{sub s}{sup 2}). We perform a detailed analysis of all partonic channels that produce an asymmetry and combine them with the QCD contributions. They provide a non-negligible addition to the QCD-induced asymmetry with the same overall sign, thus enlarging the standard model prediction and diminishing the observed deviation. For the observed mass-dependent forward-backward asymmetry a 3{sigma} deviation still remains at an invariant-mass cut of M{sub tt}>450 GeV.

  5. Studies of top quark properties and search for electroweak single top quark production at the Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    Datta, Mousumi; /Fermilab

    2007-10-01

    The top quark was discovered in 1995 by the CDF and D0 experiments at the Fermilab Tevatron during the Run I operation. Since the start of the Tevatron Run II in 2001, both experiments have collected {approx}2 fb{sup -1} data samples, which are over twenty times larger than that used in the Run 1 discovery. This larger data sample allows more precise studies of top-quark properties; differences between observed top-quark properties and the Standard Model (SM) prediction may give hints to possible physics beyond the SM. Here we present the latest results on the measurements of top-quark properties and the search for electroweak (EW) single top quark production from the CDF and D0 collaborations. The integrated luminosity used for the measurements corresponds to about 1 fb{sup -1}.

  6. Charm production in association with an electroweak gauge boson at the LHC.

    PubMed

    Stirling, W J; Vryonidou, E

    2012-08-24

    The production of charm quark jets in association with electroweak gauge bosons at the LHC can be used as a tool to constrain quark parton distribution functions (PDFs). Motivated by recent measurements at the Tevatron and LHC, we calculate cross sections for W/Z+c, comparing these to W/Z+jet, for various PDF sets. The cross-section differences can be understood in terms of the different underlying PDFs, with the strange quark distribution being particularly important for W+c production. We suggest measurements of appropriately defined ratios and comment on how these measurements at the LHC can be used to extract information on the strange and charm content of the proton at high Q(2) scales.

  7. Electroweak Decay Studies of Highly Charged Radioactive Ions with TITAN at TRIUMF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leach, Kyle; Dillmann, Iris; Klawitter, Renee; Leistenschneider, Erich; Lennarz, Annika; Brunner, Thomas; Frekers, Dieter; Andreoiu, Corina; Kwiatkowski, Anna; Dilling, Jens

    2017-03-01

    Several modes of electroweak radioactive decay require an interaction between the nucleus and bound electrons within the constituent atom. Thus, the probabilities of the respective decays are not only influenced by the structure of the initial and final states in the nucleus, but can also depend strongly on the atomic charge. Conditions suitable for the partial or complete ionization of these rare isotopes occur naturally in hot, dense astrophysical environments, but can also be artificially generated in the laboratory to selectively block certain radioactive decay modes. Direct experimental studies on such scenarios are extremely difficult due to the laboratory conditions required to generate and store radioactive ions at high charge states. A new electron-beam ion trap (EBIT) decay setup with the TITAN experiment at TRIUMF has successfully demonstrated such techniques for performing spectroscopy on the radioactive decay of highly charged ions.

  8. Probing electroweak physics for all B{yields}XM decays in the endpoint region

    SciTech Connect

    Chay, Junegone; Kim, Chul; Leibovich, Adam K.; Zupan, Jure

    2007-11-01

    Using soft-collinear effective theory we describe at leading order in 1/m{sub b} all the semi-inclusive hadronic B{yields}XM decays near the endpoint, where an energetic light meson M recoils against an inclusive jet X. Here we extend to the decays in which spectator quarks go into the jet X, and also include the decays involving {eta}, {eta}{sup '} mesons that receive additional contributions from gluonic operators. The predicted branching ratios and CP asymmetries depend on fewer hadronic parameters than the corresponding two-body B decays. This makes semi-inclusive hadronic B{yields}XM decays a powerful probe of the potential nonperturbative nature of charming penguins as well as a useful probe of new physics effects in electroweak flavor changing transitions. A comparison with B{yields}KX data from BABAR points to an enhanced charming penguin, albeit with large experimental errors.

  9. Stationary configurations of the Standard Model Higgs potential: Electroweak stability and rising inflection point

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iacobellis, Giuseppe; Masina, Isabella

    2016-10-01

    We study the gauge-independent observables associated with two interesting stationary configurations of the Standard Model Higgs potential (extrapolated to high energy according to the present state of the art, namely the next-to-next-to-leading order): i) the value of the top mass ensuring the stability of the SM electroweak minimum and ii) the value of the Higgs potential at a rising inflection point. We examine in detail and reappraise the experimental and theoretical uncertainties which plague their determination, finding that i) the stability of the SM is compatible with the present data at the 1.5 σ level and ii) despite the large theoretical error plaguing the value of the Higgs potential at a rising inflection point, the application of such a configuration to models of primordial inflation displays a 3 σ tension with the recent bounds on the tensor-to-scalar ratio of cosmological perturbations.

  10. Gravitational wave and collider implications of electroweak baryogenesis aided by non-standard cosmology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Artymowski, Michal; Lewicki, Marek; Wells, James D.

    2017-03-01

    We consider various models realizing baryogenesis during the electroweak phase transition (EWBG). Our focus is their possible detection in future collider experiments and possible observation of gravitational waves emitted during the phase transition. We also discuss the possibility of a non-standard cosmological history which can facilitate EWBG. We show how acceptable parameter space can be extended due to such a modification and conclude that next generation precision experiments such as the ILC will be able to confirm or falsify many models realizing EWBG. We also show that, in general, collider searches are a more powerful probe than gravitational wave searches. However, observation of a deviation from the SM without any hints of gravitational waves can point to models with modified cosmological history that generically enable EWBG with weaker phase transition and thus, smaller GW signals.

  11. Quark Propagator with electroweak interactions in the Dyson-Schwinger approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mian, Walid Ahmed; Maas, Axel

    2017-03-01

    Motivated by the non-negligible dynamical backcoupling of the electroweak interactions with the strong interaction during neutron star mergers, we study the effects of the explicit breaking of C, P and flavor symmetry on the strong sector. The quark propagator is the simplest object which encodes the consequences of these breakings. To asses the impact, we study the influence of especially parity violation on the propagator for various masses. For this purpose the functional methods in form of Dyson-Schwinger-Equations are employed. We find that explicit isospin breaking leads to a qualitative change of behavior even for a slight explicit breaking, which is in contrast to the expectations from perturbation theory. Our results thus suggest that non-perturbative backcoupling effects could be larger than expected.

  12. Non-minimal CW inflation, electroweak symmetry breaking and the 750 GeV anomaly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marzola, L.; Racioppi, A.; Raidal, M.; Urban, F. R.; Veermäe, H.

    2016-03-01

    We study whether the hinted 750 GeV resonance at the LHC can be a Coleman-Weinberg inflaton which is non-minimally coupled to gravity. Since the inflaton must couple to new charged and coloured states to reproduce the LHC diphoton signature, the same interaction can generate its effective potential and trigger the electroweak symmetry breaking via the portal coupling to the Higgs boson. This inflationary scenario predicts a lower bound on the tensor-to-scalar ratio of r ≳ 0.006, where the minimal value corresponds to the measured spectral index n s ≃ 0.97. However, we find that the compatibility with the LHC diphoton signal requires exotic new physics at energy scales accessible at the LHC. We study and quantify the properties of the predicted exotic particles.

  13. Electroweak Symmetry Breaking from the Soft Portal into Dark Matter and Prediction for Direct Detection

    SciTech Connect

    Kadastik, Mario; Kannike, Kristjan; Racioppi, Antonio; Raidal, Martti

    2010-05-21

    Scalar dark matter (DM) can have dimensionful coupling to the Higgs boson - the soft portal into DM - which is predicted to be unsuppressed by the underlying SO(10) grand unified theory (GUT). The dimensionful coupling can be large, {mu}/v>>1, without spoiling the perturbativity of low energy theory up to the GUT scale. We show that the soft portal into DM naturally triggers radiative electroweak symmetry breaking (EWSB) via large 1-loop DM corrections to the effective potential. In this scenario, EWSB, the DM thermal freeze-out cross section, and DM scattering on nuclei are all dominated by the same coupling, predicting the DM mass range to be 700 GeV

  14. WLWL scattering in Higgsless models: Identifying better effective theories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belyaev, Alexander S.; Chivukula, R. Sekhar; Christensen, Neil D.; He, Hong-Jian; Kurachi, Masafumi; Simmons, Elizabeth H.; Tanabashi, Masaharu

    2009-09-01

    The three-site model has been offered as a benchmark for studying the collider phenomenology of Higgsless models. In this paper we analyze how well the three-site model performs as a general exemplar of Higgsless models in describing WLWL scattering, and which modifications can make it more representative. We employ general sum rules relating the masses and couplings of the Kaluza-Klein modes of the gauge fields in continuum and deconstructed Higgsless models as a way to compare the different theories. We show that the size of the four-point vertex for the (unphysical) Nambu-Goldstone modes and the degree to which the sum rules are saturated by contributions from the lowest-lying Kaluza-Klein resonances both provide good measures of the extent to which a highly deconstructed theory can accurately describe the low-energy physics of a continuum 5D Higgsless model. After comparing the three-site model to flat and warped continuum models, we analyze extensions of the three-site model to a longer open linear moose with an additional U(1) group and to a ring (“breaking electroweak symmetry strongly” or “hidden local symmetry”) model with three sites and three links. Both cases may be readily analyzed in the framework of the general sum rules. We demonstrate that WLWL scattering in the ring model can very closely approximate scattering in the continuum models, provided that the hidden local symmetry parameter a is chosen to mimic ρ-meson dominance of ππ scattering in QCD. The hadron and lepton collider phenomenology of both extended models is briefly discussed, with a focus on the complementary information to be gained from precision measurements of the Z' line shape and ZWW coupling at a high-energy lepton collider.

  15. Gamma-ray constraints on dark-matter annihilation to electroweak gauge and Higgs bosons

    SciTech Connect

    Fedderke, Michael A.; Kolb, Edward W.; Lin, Tongyan; Wang, Lian-Tao E-mail: Rocky.Kolb@uchicago.edu E-mail: liantaow@uchicago.edu

    2014-01-01

    Dark-matter annihilation into electroweak gauge and Higgs bosons results in γ-ray emission. We use observational upper limits on the fluxes of both line and continuum γ-rays from the Milky Way Galactic Center and from Milky Way dwarf companion galaxies to set exclusion limits on allowed dark-matter masses. (Generally, Galactic Center γ-ray line search limits from the Fermi-LAT and the H.E.S.S. experiments are most restrictive.) Our limits apply under the following assumptions: a) the dark matter species is a cold thermal relic with present mass density equal to the measured dark-matter density of the universe; b) dark-matter annihilation to standard-model particles is described in the non-relativistic limit by a single effective operator O∝J{sub DM}⋅J{sub SM}, where J{sub DM} is a standard-model singlet current consisting of dark-matter fields (Dirac fermions or complex scalars), and J{sub SM} is a standard-model singlet current consisting of electroweak gauge and Higgs bosons; and c) the dark-matter mass is in the range 5 GeV to 20 TeV. We consider, in turn, the 34 possible operators with mass dimension 8 or lower with non-zero s-wave annihilation channels satisfying the above assumptions. Our limits are presented in a large number of figures, one for each of the 34 possible operators; these limits can be grouped into 13 classes determined by the field content and structure of the operators. We also identify three classes of operators (coupling to the Higgs and SU(2){sub L} gauge bosons) that can supply a 130 GeV line with the desired strength to fit the putative line signal in the Fermi-LAT data, while saturating the relic density and satisfying all other indirect constraints we consider.

  16. Probing new physics scales from Higgs and electroweak observables at e + e - Higgs factory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ge, Shao-Feng; He, Hong-Jian; Xiao, Rui-Qing

    2016-10-01

    New physics beyond the standard model (SM) can be model-independently formulated via dimension-6 effective operators, whose coefficients (cutoffs) characterize the scales of new physics. We study the probe of new physics scales from the electroweak precision observables (EWPO) and the Higgs observables (HO) at the future e + e - Higgs factory (such as CEPC). To optimize constraints of new physics from all available observables, we establish a scheme-independent approach. With this formulation, we treat the SM electroweak parameters and the coefficients of dimension-6 operators on equal footing, which can be fitted simultaneously by the same χ 2 function. As deviations from the SM are generally small, we can expand the new physics parameters up to linear order and perform an analytical χ 2 fit to derive the potential reach of the new physics scales. We find that the HO from both Higgs produnction and decay rates can probe the new physics scales up to 10 TeV (and to 44 TeV for the case of gluon-involved operator O_g ), and the new physics scales of Yukawa-type operators can be probed by the precision Higgs coupling measurements up to (13 - 25) TeV. Further including the EWPO can push the limit up to 35 TeV. From this prospect, we demonstrate that the EWPO measured in the early phase of a Higgs factory can be as important as the Higgs observables. These indirect probes of new physics scales at the Higgs factory can mainly cover the energy range to be directly explored by the next generation hadron colliders of pp (50 -100 TeV), such as the SPPC and FCC-hh.

  17. Mixed heavy-light matching in the Universal One-Loop Effective Action

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ellis, Sebastian A. R.; Quevillon, Jérémie; You, Tevong; Zhang, Zhengkang

    2016-11-01

    Recently, a general result for evaluating the path integral at one loop was obtained in the form of the Universal One-Loop Effective Action. It may be used to derive effective field theory operators of dimensions up to six, by evaluating the traces of matrices in this expression, with the mass dependence encapsulated in the universal coefficients. Here we show that it can account for loops of mixed heavy-light particles in the matching procedure. Our prescription for computing these mixed contributions to the Wilson coefficients is conceptually simple. Moreover it has the advantage of maintaining the universal structure of the effective action, which we illustrate using the example of integrating out a heavy electroweak triplet scalar coupling to a light Higgs doublet. Finally we also identify new structures that were previously neglected in the universal results.

  18. Heavy quark masses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Testa, Massimo

    1990-01-01

    In the large quark mass limit, an argument which identifies the mass of the heavy-light pseudoscalar or scalar bound state with the renormalized mass of the heavy quark is given. The following equation is discussed: m(sub Q) = m(sub B), where m(sub Q) and m(sub B) are respectively the mass of the heavy quark and the mass of the pseudoscalar bound state.

  19. Electroweak Corrections to pp→μ^{+}μ^{-}e^{+}e^{-}+X at the LHC: A Higgs Boson Background Study.

    PubMed

    Biedermann, B; Denner, A; Dittmaier, S; Hofer, L; Jäger, B

    2016-04-22

    The first complete calculation of the next-to-leading-order electroweak corrections to four-lepton production at the LHC is presented, where all off-shell effects of intermediate Z bosons and photons are taken into account. Focusing on the mixed final state μ^{+}μ^{-}e^{+}e^{-}, we study differential cross sections that are particularly interesting for Higgs boson analyses. The electroweak corrections are divided into photonic and purely weak corrections. The former exhibit patterns familiar from similar W- or Z-boson production processes with very large radiative tails near resonances and kinematical shoulders. The weak corrections are of the generic size of 5% and show interesting variations, in particular, a sign change between the regions of resonant Z-pair production and the Higgs signal.

  20. Interactions of two heavy systems in large-N(c) QCD: Studies of heavy baryons and of the nucleon-nucleon interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gelman, Boris A.

    The forces between quarks, which produce hadrons, and the forces between nucleons, which bind them into nuclei, are determined by the nonpertubative regime of the quantum chromodynamics (QCD). Nonperturbative methods are needed to connect the hadronic and nuclear physics to QCD. In this dissertation, methods based on large Nc QCD (N c is the number of colors) and the heavy quark expansion---an expansion in inverse powers of masses of the heavy quarks, 1/m Q---are used to describe two aspects of the strong interaction physics. In the first instance, a combined large Nc and heavy quark expansion is used to study the properties of the isoscalar baryons containing one heavy quark---the heavy baryons---and their low-energy excited states. The combined large Nc and heavy quark limit is useful due to the existence of a symmetry in the heavy baryon spectrum in the combined limit. This symmetry connects the low-energy excited states of the heavy baryons to the ground state. The symmetry is described by a contracted O(8) group. In addition, an energy gap appears in the excitation spectrum of the heavy baryons near the combined limit. This scale separation is used to obtain an effective Hamiltonian that describes the low-energy degrees of freedom. In addition, the combined large Nc and heavy quark expansion for electroweak operators and their matrix elements is obtained. The effective Hamiltonian is used to determine the masses of the spin-doublet of the first excited state of Λc and Λb baryons. The effective electroweak operators are used to determine the heavy baryon semileptonic decay form factors and the total electromagnetic decay rates of the excited heavy baryons. At leading order in the combined limit all observables depend on a single unknown parameter which can be eliminated using the (spin-averaged) excitation energy of the first excited state of Λc. At next-to-leading order an additional parameter is required to predict the heavy baryon observables. The

  1. Non-existence of black-hole solutions for the electroweak Einstein Dirac Yang/Mills equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernard, Yann

    2006-07-01

    We consider a static, spherically symmetric system of a Dirac particle interacting with classical gravity and an electroweak Yang Mills field. It is shown that the only black-hole solutions of the corresponding coupled equations must be the extreme Reissner Nordström solutions, locally near the event horizon. This work generalizes a series of papers published by F Finster, J Smoller and S-T Yau.

  2. How conventional measures overestimate electroweak fine-tuning in supersymmetric theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baer, Howard; Barger, Vernon; Mickelson, Dan

    2013-11-01

    The lack of evidence for superparticles at the CERN LHC, along with the rather high value of the Higgs boson mass, has sharpened the perception that what remains of supersymmetric model parameter space suffers a high degree of electroweak fine-tuning (EWFT). We compare three different measures of fine-tuning in supersymmetric models. First, ΔHS measures a subset of terms containing large log contributions to mZ (and mh) that are inevitable in models defined at scales much higher than the electroweak scale. Second, the traditional ΔBG measures fractional variation in mZ against fractional variation of model parameters and allows for correlations among high scale parameters which are not included in ΔHS. Third, the model-independent ΔEW measures how naturally a model can generate the measured value of mZ=91.2GeV (or mh) in terms of weak scale parameters alone. We hypothesize an overarching ultimate theory (UTH) wherein the high scale soft terms are all correlated. The UTH might be contained within the more general effective supersymmetry theories which are popular in the literature. In the case of ΔHS, EWFT can be grossly overestimated by neglecting additional nonindependent terms which lead to large cancellations. In the case of ΔBG, EWFT can be overestimated by applying the measure to the effective theories instead of to the UTH. The measure ΔEW allows for the possibility of parameter correlations which should be present in the UTH and, since it is model independent, provides the same value of EWFT for the effective theories as should occur for the UTH. We find that the well-known minimal supergravity model/constrained minimal supersymmetric model is fine-tuned under all three measures so that it is unlikely to contain the UTH. The nonuniversal Higgs model NUHM2 appears fine-tuned with ΔHS,BG≳103. But since ΔEW can be as small as 7 (corresponding to 14% fine-tuning), it may contain the UTH for parameter ranges which allow for low true EWFT.

  3. Studies of the strong and electroweak interactions at the Z0 pole

    SciTech Connect

    Hildreth, Michael Douglas

    1995-03-01

    This thesis presents studies of the strong and electroweak forces, two of the fundamental interactions that govern the behavior of matter at high energies. The authors have used the hadronic decays of Z0 bosons produced with the unique experimental apparatus of the e+e- Linear Collider at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC) and the SLAC Large Detector (SLD) for these measurements. Employing the precision tracking capabilities of the SLD, they isolated samples of Z0 events containing primarily the decays of the Z0 to a chosen quark type. With an inclusive selection technique, they have tested the flavor independence of the strong coupling, αs by measuring the rates of multi-jet production in isolated samples of light (uds), c, and b quark events. They find: α$s\\atop{uds}$/α$s\\atop{all}$ 0.987 ± 0.027(stat) ± 0.022(syst) ± 0.022(theory), α$c\\atop{s}$/α$all\\atop{s}$ = 1.012 ± 0.104(stat) ± 0.102(syst) ± 0.096(theory), α$b\\atop{s}$/α$all\\atop{s}$ = 1.026 {+-} 0.041(stat) ± 0.030(theory), which implies that the strong interaction is independent of quark flavor within the present experimental sensitivity. They have also measured the extent of parity-violation in the Z0 c$\\bar{c}$ coupling, given by the parameter A $0\\atop{c}$, using a sample of fully and partially reconstructed D* and D+ meson decays and the longitudinal polarization of the SLC electron beam. This sample of charm quark events was derived with selection techniques based on their kinematic properties and decay topologies. They find A$0\\atop{c}$ = 0.73 ± 0.22(stat) ± 0.10(syst). This value is consistent with that expected in the electroweak standard model of particle interactions.

  4. Light dark matter, naturalness, and the radiative origin of the electroweak scale

    DOE PAGES

    Altmannshofer, Wolfgang; Bardeen, William A.; Bauer, Martin; ...

    2015-01-09

    We study classically scale invariant models in which the Standard Model Higgs mass term is replaced in the Lagrangian by a Higgs portal coupling to a complex scalar field of a dark sector. We focus on models that are weakly coupled with the quartic scalar couplings nearly vanishing at the Planck scale. The dark sector contains fermions and scalars charged under dark SU(2) × U(1) gauge interactions. Radiative breaking of the dark gauge group triggers electroweak symmetry breaking through the Higgs portal coupling. Requiring both a Higgs boson mass of 125.5 GeV and stability of the Higgs potential up tomore » the Planck scale implies that the radiative breaking of the dark gauge group occurs at the TeV scale. We present a particular model which features a long-range abelian dark force. The dominant dark matter component is neutral dark fermions, with the correct thermal relic abundance, and in reach of future direct detection experiments. The model also has lighter stable dark fermions charged under the dark force, with observable effects on galactic-scale structure. Collider signatures include a dark sector scalar boson with mass ≲ 250 GeV that decays through mixing with the Higgs boson, and can be detected at the LHC. As a result, the Higgs boson, as well as the new scalar, may have significant invisible decays into dark sector particles.« less

  5. The galactic 511 keV line from electroweak scale WIMPs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pospelov, Maxim; Ritz, Adam

    2007-07-01

    We consider possible mechanisms via which electroweak scale WIMPs χ could provide the source of the INTEGRAL/SPI 511 keV photon flux from the galactic centre. We consider scenarios where the WIMP spectrum contains near-degeneracies, with MeV-scale splitting, and focus on three possible production mechanisms for galactic positrons: (i) collisional excitation of the WIMP to a nearby charged state, χ+χ→χ+χ, with the subsequent decay producing positrons; (ii) capture of the WIMP by nuclei in the galactic interstellar medium, χ+N→e+(χN); and (iii) the decay of a nearby long-lived state surviving from the big bang, χ20→χ10+e+e. We find that process (i) requires a cross section which is significantly larger than the unitarity bound, process (ii) is allowed by unitarity, but is impractical due to terrestrial bounds on the χN cross section, while process (iii) is viable and we construct a simple model realization with singlet dark matter fields interacting with the Standard Model via the Higgs sector.

  6. NLO QCD and electroweak corrections to Z + γ production with leptonic Z-boson decays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Denner, Ansgar; Dittmaier, Stefan; Hecht, Markus; Pasold, Christian

    2016-02-01

    The next-to-leading-order electroweak corrections to ppto {l}+{l}-/overline{ν}ν +\\upgamma +X production, including all off-shell effects of intermediate Z bosons in the complex-mass scheme, are calculated for LHC energies, revealing the typically expected large corrections of tens of percent in the TeV range. Contributions from quark-photon and photon-photon initial states are taken into account as well, but their impact is found to be moderate or small. Moreover, the known next-to-leading-order QCD corrections are reproduced. In order to separate hard photons from jets, both a quark-to-photon fragmentation function á la Glover/Morgan and Frixione's cone isolation are employed. The calculation is available in the form of Monte Carlo programs allowing for the evaluation of arbitrary differential cross sections. Predictions for integrated cross sections are presented for the LHC at 7 TeV, 8 TeV, and 14 TeV, and differential distributions are discussed at 14 TeV for bare muons and dressed leptons. Finally, we consider the impact of anomalous ZZγ and Zγγ couplings.

  7. Electroweak production of light scalar-pseudoscalar pairs from extended Higgs sectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Enberg, Rikard; Klemm, William; Moretti, Stefano; Munir, Shoaib

    2017-01-01

    In models with extended Higgs sectors, it is possible that the Higgs boson discovered at the LHC is not the lightest one. We show that in a realistic model (the Type I 2-Higgs Doublet Model), when the sum of the masses of a light scalar and a pseudoscalar (h and A) is smaller than the Z boson mass, the Electroweak (EW) production of an hA pair can dominate over QCD production by orders of magnitude, a fact not previously highlighted. This is because in the gg-initiated process, hA production via a resonant Z in the s-channel is prohibited according to the Landau-Yang theorem, which is not the case for the q q bar -initiated process. We explore the parameter space of the model to highlight regions giving such hA solutions while being consistent with all constraints from collider searches, b-physics and EW precision data. We also single out a few benchmark points to discuss their salient features, including the hA search channels that can be exploited at Run II of the LHC.

  8. The two-loop electroweak bosonic corrections to sin2 ⁡ θeffb

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dubovyk, Ievgen; Freitas, Ayres; Gluza, Janusz; Riemann, Tord; Usovitsch, Johann

    2016-11-01

    The prediction of the effective electroweak mixing angle sin2 ⁡θeffb in the Standard Model at two-loop accuracy has now been completed by the first calculation of the bosonic two-loop corrections to the Z b bar b vertex. Numerical predictions are presented in the form of a fitting formula as function of MZ ,MW ,MH ,mt and Δα, αs. For central input values, we obtain a relative correction of Δκb(α2 , bos) = - 0.9855 ×10-4, amounting to about a quarter of the fermionic corrections, and corresponding to sin2 ⁡ θeffb = 0.232704. The integration of the corresponding two-loop vertex Feynman integrals with up to three dimensionless parameters in Minkowskian kinematics has been performed with two approaches: (i) Sector decomposition, implemented in the packages FIESTA 3 and SecDec 3, and (ii) Mellin-Barnes representations, implemented in AMBRE 3/MB and the new package MBnumerics.

  9. Toward electroweak scale cold dark matter with local dark gauge symmetry and beyond the DM EFT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ko, Pyungwon

    2016-06-01

    In this talk, I describe a class of electroweak (EW) scale dark matter (DM) models where its stability or longevity are the results of underlying dark gauge symmetries: stable due to unbroken local dark gauge symmetry or topology, or long-lived due to the accidental global symmetry of dark gauge theories. Compared with the usual phenomenological dark matter models (including DM EFT or simplified DM models), DM models with local dark gauge symmetries include dark gauge bosons, dark Higgs bosons and sometimes excited dark matter. And dynamics among these fields are completely fixed by local gauge principle. The idea of singlet portals including the Higgs portal can thermalize these hidden sector dark matter very efficiently, so that these DM could be easily thermal DM. I also discuss the limitation of the usual DM effective field theory or simplified DM models without the full SM gauge symmetry, and emphasize the importance of the full SM gauge symmetry and renormalizability especially for collider searches for DM.

  10. Instability of magnetic fields in electroweak plasma driven by neutrino asymmetries

    SciTech Connect

    Dvornikov, Maxim; Semikoz, Victor B. E-mail: semikoz@yandex.ru

    2014-05-01

    The magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) is modified to incorporate the parity violation in the Standard Model leading to a new instability of magnetic fields in the electroweak plasma in the presence of nonzero neutrino asymmetries. The main ingredient for such a modified MHD is the antisymmetric part of the photon polarization tensor in plasma, where the parity violating neutrino interaction with charged leptons is present. We calculate this contribution to the polarization tensor connected with the Chern-Simons term in effective Lagrangian of the electromagnetic field. The general expression for such a contribution which depends on the temperature and the chemical potential of plasma as well as on the photon's momentum is derived. The instability of a magnetic field driven by the electron neutrino asymmetry for the ν-burst during the first second of a supernova explosion can amplify a seed magnetic field of a protostar, and, perhaps, can explain the generation of strongest magnetic fields in magnetars. The growth of a cosmological magnetic field driven by the neutrino asymmetry density Δn{sub ν} = n{sub ν}−n{sub ν-bar}≠0 is provided by a lower bound on |ξ{sub ν{sub e}}| = |μ{sub ν{sub e}}|/T which is consistent with the well-known Big Bang nucleosynthesis (upper) bound on neutrino asymmetries in a hot universe plasma.

  11. Gravitational waves from phase transitions at the electroweak scale and beyond

    SciTech Connect

    Grojean, Christophe; Servant, Geraldine

    2007-02-15

    If there was a first-order phase transition in the early universe, there should be an associated stochastic background of gravitational waves. In this paper, we point out that the characteristic frequency of the spectrum due to phase transitions which took place in the temperature range 100 GeV-10{sup 7} GeV is precisely in the window that will be probed by the second generation of space-based interferometers such as the big bang observer (BBO). Taking into account the astrophysical foreground, we determine the type of phase transitions which could be detected either at LISA, LIGO or BBO, in terms of the amount of supercooling and the duration of the phase transition that are needed. Those two quantities can be calculated for any given effective scalar potential describing the phase transition. In particular, the new models of electroweak symmetry-breaking which have been proposed in the last few years typically have a different Higgs potential from the standard model. They could lead to a gravitational wave signature in the milli-Hertz frequency, which is precisely the peak sensitivity of LISA. We also show that the signal coming from phase transitions taking place at T{approx}1-100 TeV could entirely screen the relic gravitational wave signal expected from standard inflationary models.

  12. Light dark matter, naturalness, and the radiative origin of the electroweak scale

    SciTech Connect

    Altmannshofer, Wolfgang; Bardeen, William A.; Bauer, Martin; Carena, Marcela; Lykken, Joseph D.

    2015-01-09

    We study classically scale invariant models in which the Standard Model Higgs mass term is replaced in the Lagrangian by a Higgs portal coupling to a complex scalar field of a dark sector. We focus on models that are weakly coupled with the quartic scalar couplings nearly vanishing at the Planck scale. The dark sector contains fermions and scalars charged under dark SU(2) × U(1) gauge interactions. Radiative breaking of the dark gauge group triggers electroweak symmetry breaking through the Higgs portal coupling. Requiring both a Higgs boson mass of 125.5 GeV and stability of the Higgs potential up to the Planck scale implies that the radiative breaking of the dark gauge group occurs at the TeV scale. We present a particular model which features a long-range abelian dark force. The dominant dark matter component is neutral dark fermions, with the correct thermal relic abundance, and in reach of future direct detection experiments. The model also has lighter stable dark fermions charged under the dark force, with observable effects on galactic-scale structure. Collider signatures include a dark sector scalar boson with mass ≲ 250 GeV that decays through mixing with the Higgs boson, and can be detected at the LHC. As a result, the Higgs boson, as well as the new scalar, may have significant invisible decays into dark sector particles.

  13. Extending the analysis of electroweak precision constraints in composite Higgs models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, Diptimoy; Salvarezza, Matteo; Senia, Fabrizio

    2017-01-01

    In this paper we present a detailed analysis of the Electroweak Precision Observables (EWPO) in composite Higgs models based on the coset SO (5) / SO (4). In our study we include both the fermionic top partners and the spin-1 resonances and consider their possible interplay as well. In order to achieve calculability we use the assumptions of i) partial Ultra Violet Completion (PUVC) following [1] and, ii) absence of sizable effects from physics above the cut-off. Apart from the EWPO, we also take into account the constraints from the top quark, Z and the Higgs boson masses whenever they can be predicted in terms of the model parameters. After presenting our analytic results (often, in certain limits) and discussing their symmetry properties, we also perform detailed fits of the model parameters following the Bayesian approach. We show the posterior probability distributions of the parameters in various scenarios and provide with analytic understanding whenever possible. We find that in certain cases the EWPO allow the compositeness scale to lie well below 1 TeV. Moreover, fermionic top partners of mass around 1 TeV and spin-1 resonances of mass around 2-3 TeV are consistent with the precision data.

  14. Brane-localized Kinetic Terms in the Randall-Sundrum Model

    SciTech Connect

    Rizzo, Thomas G.

    2002-12-20

    We examine the effects of boundary kinetic terms in the Randall-Sundrum model with gauge fields in the bulk. We derive the resulting gauge Kaluza-Klein (KK) state wavefunctions and their corresponding masses, as well as the KK gauge field couplings to boundary fermions, and find that they are modified in the presence of the boundary terms. In particular, for natural choices of the parameters, these fermionic couplings can be substantially suppressed compared to those in the conventional Randall-Sundrum scenario. This results in a significant relaxation of the bound on the lightest gauge KK mass obtained from precision electroweak data; we demonstrate that this bound can be as low as m{sub 1} {approx}> 5 TeV. Due to the relationship between the lightest gauge KK state and the electroweak scale in this model, this weakened constraint allows for the electroweak scale to be near a TeV in this minimal extension of the Randall-Sundrum model with bulk gauge fields, as opposed to the conventional scenario.

  15. Top Quarks Spin Correlations with Graviton in ADD and RS Models at the Large Hadron Collider

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arai, Masato; Okada, Nobuchika; Smolek, Karel; Šimák, Vladislav

    2008-03-01

    In LHC physics we study the spin correlation of top-antitop pairs production to investigate the production mechanism of heavy quarks[F. Hubard et al. Eur. Phys. J. C 44 (2006) 13]. The s-channel process mediated by graviton Kaluza-Klein modes in ADD model with several extra dimensions[N. Arkani-Hamed, S. Dimopoulos and G. Dvali, Phys. Lett. 429B (1998) 263, hep-ph/9803315] or in the Randall-Sundrum model with only one extra dimension[L. Randall and R. Sundrum, Phys. Rev. Lett. 83 (1999) 3370 hep-ph/9905221] contribute to the top-antitop pair production and affects the resulting top spin correlations. We calculated the full density matrix for the top-antitop pair production. We find a sizable deviation of the top spin correlations from the Standard.

  16. Higgs boson production and decay in 5D warped models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frank, Mariana; Pourtolami, Nima; Toharia, Manuel

    2016-03-01

    We calculate the production and decay rates of the Higgs boson at the LHC in the context of general five-dimensional warped scenarios with a spacetime background modified from the usual AdS5 , with Standard Model (SM) fields propagating in the bulk. We extend previous work by considering the full flavor structure of the SM, and thus including all possible flavor effects coming from mixings with heavy fermions. We proceed in three different ways, first by only including two complete Kaluza-Klein (KK) levels (15 ×15 fermion mass matrices), then including three complete KK levels (21 ×21 fermion mass matrices) and finally we compare with the effect of including the infinite (full) KK towers. We present numerical results for the Higgs production cross section via gluon fusion and Higgs decay branching fractions in both the modified metric scenario and in the usual Randall-Sundrum metric scenario.

  17. Search for a new resonance in the boosted di-Higgs to 4 bottom quarks final state at √s = 8 TeV using the ATLAS detector at the Large Hadron Collider

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Lei

    This thesis presents a search for a new, heavy particle decaying to a pair of Higgs bosons in the 4 bottom quarks final state at √ s=8 TeV. ATLAS detector at the Large Hadron Collider. The full data collected by ATLAS in 2012 at √s=8 TeV. is used, corresponding to a total luminosity of 19.5 fb-1. A novel technique, using smaller radius track jet to tag bottom quarks in combination with two large radius calorimeter jets to fully reconstruct boosted event topologies, significantly improves the sensitivity up to the mass scale of 2 TeV. In the absence of an excess, upper limits on the production cross section are set with 95% confidence level, using Kaluza-Klein gravitons in the bulk Randal-Sundrum model with coupling c ≡ k/MPl = 1.0 and 2.0 as benchmarks.

  18. Heavy-ion dosimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Schimmerling, W.

    1980-03-01

    This lecture deals with some of the more important physical characteristics of relativistic heavy ions and their measurement, with beam delivery and beam monitoring, and with conventional radiation dosimetry as used in the operation of the BEVALAC biomedical facility for high energy heavy ions (Lyman and Howard, 1977; BEVALAC, 1977). Even so, many fundamental aspects of the interaction of relativistic heavy ions with matter, including important atomic physics and radiation chemical considerations, are not discussed beyond the reminder that such additional understanding is required before an adequte perspective of the problem can be attained.

  19. Menorrhagia (Heavy Menstrual Bleeding)

    MedlinePlus

    ... effect of using a nonhormonal intrauterine device for birth control. When an IUD is the cause of excessive menstrual bleeding, you may need to remove it. Pregnancy complications. A single, heavy, late period may be due to a miscarriage. If ...

  20. Heavy fermion quantum criticality.

    PubMed

    Nazario, Zaira; Santiago, David I

    2008-09-26

    During the last few years, investigations of rare-earth materials have made clear that heavy fermion quantum criticality exhibits novel physics not fully understood. In this work, we write for the first time the effective action describing the low energy physics of the system. The f fermions are replaced by a dynamical scalar field whose nonzero expected value corresponds to the heavy fermion phase. The effective theory is amenable to numerical studies as it is bosonic, circumventing the fermion sign problem. Via effective action techniques, renormalization group studies, and Callan-Symanzik resummations, we describe the heavy fermion criticality and predict the heavy fermion critical dynamical susceptibility and critical specific heat. The specific heat coefficient exponent we obtain (0.39) is in excellent agreement with the experimental result at low temperatures (0.4).

  1. Electroweak production of the top quark in the Run II of the D0 experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Clement, Benoit

    2006-04-28

    The work exposed in this thesis deals with the search for electroweak production of top quark (single top) in proton-antiproton collisions at √s = 1.96 TeV. This production mode has not been observed yet. Analyzed data have been collected during the Run II of the D0 experiment at the Fermilab Tevatron collider. These data correspond to an integrated luminosity of 370 pb-1. In the Standard Model, the decay of a top quark always produce a high momentum bottom quark. Therefore bottom quark jets identification plays a major role in this analysis. The large lifetime of b hadrons and the subsequent large impact parameters relative to the interaction vertex of charged particle tracks are used to tag bottom quark jets. Impact parameters of tracks attached to a jet are converted into the probability for the jet to originate from the primary vertex. This algorithm has a 45% tagging efficiency for a 0.5% mistag rate. Two processes (s and t channels) dominate single top production with slightly different final states. The searched signature consists in 2 to 4 jets with at least one bottom quark jet, one charged lepton (electron or muon) and missing energy accounting for a neutrino. This final state is background dominated and multivariate techniques are needed to separate the signal from the two main backgrounds: associated production of a W boson and jets and top quarks pair production. The achieved sensitivity is not enough to reach observation and we computed upper limits at the 95% confidence level at 5 pb (s-channel) and 4.3 pb (t-channel) on single top production cross-sections.

  2. Search for Heavy Higgs Signals at Hadronic Supercolliders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheung, Kingman

    The purpose of this thesis is to formulate strategies to search for a heavy Higgs-boson signal or a strongly -interacting symmetry-breaking sector, by studying the scattering of longitudinal weak-boson pairs (W^{+ }W^{+}, ZZ, W^ {+}W^{-} and WZ) at future pp supercolliders. The central issue is how to extract the longitudinal boson scattering contributions, so that the strongly interacting symmetry-breaking effects can be isolated. The W_sp{L}{+}W _sp{L}{+} scattering contributions to ppto W_sp{L }{+}W_sp{L}{+}X at the SSC and LHC are calculated, that have been proposed as probes of possible strong interactions in the electroweak symmetry-breaking sector. A central jet-vetoing technique is developed to extract the W_ {L}W_{L} scattering from non-scattering contributions. Next a comparative study is made of jet-inclusive and single jet-tagging in identifying the Hto ZZ signal. With single jet -tagging, the signal/background ratio and significance of the signal are improved. Another viable channel for discovery of a heavy Higgs-boson is the leptonic decay mode of H to W^{+}W^{-}to l^{+}nul^ {-}|nu. By the single jet -tagging technique and central jet-vetoing the heavy Higgs -boson signal in this channel can be separated from the SM backgrounds, including QCD production of WW pair with jets, and t| t production with each tto bW. For WZ channel, a full tree-level calculation of qqto qqWZ is made, which is the first to appear in literature. The QCD backgrounds to WZ pair production are also quantified. Any excessive production of WZ pairs above SM predictions will imply new physics.

  3. Process for removing heavy metal compounds from heavy crude oil

    DOEpatents

    Cha, Chang Y.; Boysen, John E.; Branthaver, Jan F.

    1991-01-01

    A process is provided for removing heavy metal compounds from heavy crude oil by mixing the heavy crude oil with tar sand; preheating the mixture to a temperature of about 650.degree. F.; heating said mixture to up to 800.degree. F.; and separating tar sand from the light oils formed during said heating. The heavy metals removed from the heavy oils can be recovered from the spent sand for other uses.

  4. Higgs boson production with heavy quarks at hadron colliders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jackson, Christopher B.

    2005-11-01

    One of the remaining puzzles in particle physics is the origin of electroweak symmetry breaking. In the Standard Model (SM), a single doublet of complex scalar fields is responsible for breaking the SU(2) L x U(1)Y gauge symmetry thus giving mass to the electroweak gauge bosons via the Higgs mechanism and to the fermions via Yukawa couplings. The remnant of the process is a vet to he discovered scalar particle, the Higgs boson (h). However, current and future experiments at hadron colliders hold great promise. Of particular interest at hadron colliders is the production of a Higgs boson in association with a pair of heavy quarks, pp¯(pp) → QQ¯h, where Q can be either a top or a bottom quark. Indeed, the production of a Higgs boson with a pair of top quarks provides a very distinctive signal in hadronic collisions where background processes are formidable, and it will be instrumental in the discovery of a Higgs boson below about 130 GeV at the LHC. On the other hand, the production of a Higgs boson with bottom quarks can be strongly enhanced in models of new physics beyond the SM, e.g. supersymmetric models. If this is the case, bb¯h production will play a crucial role at the Tevatron where it could provide the first signal of new physics. Given the prominent role that Higgs production with heavy quarks can play at hadron colliders, it becomes imperative to have precise theoretical predictions for total and differential cross sections. In this dissertation, we outline and present detailed results for the next-to-leading order (NLO) calculation of the Quantum Chromodynamic (QCD) corrections to QQ¯h production at both the Tevatron and the LHC. This calculation involves several difficult issues due to the three massive particles in the final state, a situation which is at the frontier of radiative correction calculations in quantum field theory. We detail the novel techniques developed to deal with these challenges. The calculation of pp¯(pp) → bb¯h at NLO in

  5. [Electroweak and other interactions in medium-energy nuclear physics]. Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Mukhopadhyay, N.C.

    1993-12-01

    This report discusses the following topics: spectrum generating algebra; vibrational spectra in the heavy quarkonia; chiral soliton model; pion neutral photoproduction from proton with polarized photons in the delta-1232 region; compton scattering in the delta- 1232 region; nucleon magnetic polarizability and the role of the delta resonance; eta photo- and electroproduction; perturbative QCD; and nuclear muon capture.

  6. Search for electroweak-scale right-handed neutrinos and mirror charged leptons through like-sign dilepton signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakdar, Shreyashi; Ghosh, K.; Hoang, V.; Hung, P. Q.; Nandi, S.

    2017-01-01

    The existence of tiny neutrino masses at a scale more than a million times smaller than the lightest charged fermion mass, namely the electron, and their mixings cannot be explained within the framework of the exceptionally successful standard model (SM). Several mechanisms were proposed to explain the tiny neutrino masses, most prominent among which is the so-called seesaw mechanism. Many models were built around this concept, one of which is the electroweak (EW)-scale νR model. In this model, right-handed neutrinos are fertile and their masses are connected to the electroweak scale ΛEW˜246 GeV . It is these two features that make the search for right-handed neutrinos at colliders such as the LHC feasible. The EW-scale νR model has new quarks and leptons of opposite chirality at the electroweak scale [for the same SM gauge symmetry S U (2 )W×U (1 )Y] compared to what we have for the standard model. With suitable modification of the Higgs sector, the EW-scale νR model satisfies the electroweak precision test and, also the constraints coming from the observed 125-GeV Higgs scalar. Since in this model, the mirror fermions are required to be in the EW scale, these can be produced at the LHC giving final states with a very low background from the SM. One such final state is the same sign dileptons with large missing pT for the events. In this work, we explore the constraint provided by the 8 TeV data, and prospect of observing this signal in the 13 TeV runs at the LHC. Additional signals will be the presence of displaced vertices depending on the smallness of the Yukawa couplings of the mirror leptons with the ordinary leptons and the singlet Higgs present in the model. Of particular importance to the EW-scale νR model is the production of νR which will be a direct test of the seesaw mechanism at collider energies.

  7. Electroweak radiative corrections for polarized Moller scattering at the future 11 GeV JLab experiment

    DOE PAGES

    Aleksejevs, Aleksandrs; Barkanova, Svetlana; Ilyichev, Alexander; ...

    2010-11-19

    We perform updated and detailed calculations of the complete NLO set of electroweak radiative corrections to parity violating e– e– → e– e– (γ) scattering asymmetries at energies relevant for the ultra-precise Moller experiment coming soon at JLab. Our numerical results are presented for a range of experimental cuts and relative importance of various contributions is analyzed. In addition, we also provide very compact expressions analytically free from non-physical parameters and show them to be valid for fast yet accurate estimations.

  8. Electroweak radiative corrections for polarized Moller scattering at the future 11 GeV JLab experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Aleksejevs, Aleksandrs; Barkanova, Svetlana; Ilyichev, Alexander; Zykunov, Vladimir

    2010-11-19

    We perform updated and detailed calculations of the complete NLO set of electroweak radiative corrections to parity violating e e → e e (γ) scattering asymmetries at energies relevant for the ultra-precise Moller experiment coming soon at JLab. Our numerical results are presented for a range of experimental cuts and relative importance of various contributions is analyzed. In addition, we also provide very compact expressions analytically free from non-physical parameters and show them to be valid for fast yet accurate estimations.

  9. Strong and Electroweak Corrections to the Production of a Higgs Boson+2 Jets via Weak Interactions at the Large Hadron Collider

    SciTech Connect

    Ciccolini, M.; Denner, A.; Dittmaier, S.

    2007-10-19

    Radiative corrections of strong and electroweak interactions are presented at next-to-leading order for the production of a Higgs boson plus two hard jets via weak interactions at the CERN Large Hadron Collider. The calculation includes all weak-boson fusion and quark-antiquark annihilation diagrams as well as the corresponding interferences. The electroweak corrections, which are discussed here for the first time, reduce the cross sections by 5% and thus are of the same order of magnitude as the QCD corrections.

  10. Search for Electroweak Single Top Quark Production in 1.96 TeV Proton-Antiproton Collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Stelzer, Bernd

    2005-01-01

    This thesis describes the first search for electroweak single top quark production in proton-antiproton collisions at a center of mass energy of 1.96 TeV. The data sample used for this analysis corresponds to 162 pb-1 recorded by the upgraded Collider Detector at Fermilab. The search is performed by doing a classic maximum likelihood fit to the HT distribution in data. The kinematic variable HT is the scalar sum of transverse energies of all final state particles in the event. This variable has the advantage that its distribution looks very similar for both contributing (s-channel and t-channel) single top processes, but is different for background processes. The combination of both channels to one signal improves the sensitivity of the search. No significant evidence for electroweak single top quark production is found and we set an upper limit at the 95% confidence level on the combined single top quark production cross section of 17.8 pb.

  11. Spectrum-doubled heavy vector bosons at the LHC

    SciTech Connect

    Appelquist, Thomas; Bai, Yang; Ingoldby, James; Piai, Maurizio

    2016-01-19

    We study a simple effective field theory incorporating six heavy vector bosons together with the standard-model field content. The new particles preserve custodial symmetry as well as an approximate left-right parity symmetry. The enhanced symmetry of the model allows it to satisfy precision electroweak constraints and bounds from Higgs physics in a regime where all the couplings are perturbative and where the amount of fine-tuning is comparable to that in the standard model itself. We find that the model could explain the recently observed excesses in di-boson processes at invariant mass close to 2TeV from LHC Run 1 for a range of allowed parameter space. The masses of all the particles differ by no more than roughly 10%. In a portion of the allowed parameter space only one of the new particles has a production cross section large enough to be detectable with the energy and luminosity of Run 1, both via its decay to WZ and to Wh, while the others have suppressed production rates. Furthermore, the model can be tested at the higher-energy and higher-luminosity run of the LHC even for an overall scale of the new particles higher than 3TeV.

  12. Spectrum-doubled heavy vector bosons at the LHC

    DOE PAGES

    Appelquist, Thomas; Bai, Yang; Ingoldby, James; ...

    2016-01-19

    We study a simple effective field theory incorporating six heavy vector bosons together with the standard-model field content. The new particles preserve custodial symmetry as well as an approximate left-right parity symmetry. The enhanced symmetry of the model allows it to satisfy precision electroweak constraints and bounds from Higgs physics in a regime where all the couplings are perturbative and where the amount of fine-tuning is comparable to that in the standard model itself. We find that the model could explain the recently observed excesses in di-boson processes at invariant mass close to 2TeV from LHC Run 1 for amore » range of allowed parameter space. The masses of all the particles differ by no more than roughly 10%. In a portion of the allowed parameter space only one of the new particles has a production cross section large enough to be detectable with the energy and luminosity of Run 1, both via its decay to WZ and to Wh, while the others have suppressed production rates. Furthermore, the model can be tested at the higher-energy and higher-luminosity run of the LHC even for an overall scale of the new particles higher than 3TeV.« less

  13. Heavy Chain Diseases

    MedlinePlus

    ... cells often prevents proper absorption of nutrients from food (malabsorption), resulting in severe diarrhea and weight loss. A rare form that affects the respiratory tract also exists. Blood tests are done when alpha heavy chain disease is suspected. Serum protein electrophoresis, measurement of ...

  14. STAR heavy flavor tracker

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiu, Hao

    2014-11-01

    Hadrons containing heavy quarks are a clean probe of the early dynamic evolution of the dense and hot medium created in high-energy nuclear collisions. To explore heavy quark production at RHIC, the Heavy Flavor Tracker (HFT) for the STAR experiment was built and installed in time for RHIC Run 14. The HFT consists of four layers of silicon detectors. The two outermost layers are silicon strip detectors and the two innermost layers are made from state-of-the-art ultra-thin CMOS Monolithic Active Pixel Sensors (MAPS). This is the first application of a CMOS MAPS detector in a collider experiment. The use of thin pixel sensors plus the use of carbon fiber supporting material limits the material budget to be only 0.4% radiation length per pixel detector layer, enabling the reconstruction of low pT heavy flavor hadrons. The status and performance of the HFT in the RHIC 200 GeV Au + Au run in 2014 are reported. Very good detector efficiency, hit residuals and track resolution (DCAs) were observed in the cosmic ray data and in the Au + Au data.

  15. Dolly For Heavy Towbar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Soper, Terry A.

    1992-01-01

    Proposed lightweight dolly enables operator to cart heavy towbar to remote site over unpaved roads or rough terrain. Acts as simple, lightweight towed vehicle to support rear of towbar. Removed quickly at point of use. Saves labor, and eliminates need for truck and forklift.

  16. Heavy Vehicle Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Sid Diamond; Richard Wares; Jules Routbort

    2000-04-11

    Heavy Vehicle (HV) systems are a necessary component of achieving OHVT goals. Elements are in place for a far-ranging program: short, intermediate, and long-term. Solicitation will bring industrial input and support. Future funding trend is positive, outlook for HV systems is good.

  17. Heavy Flavor Dynamics in Relativistic Heavy-ion Collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Shanshan

    Heavy flavor hadrons serve as valuable probes of the transport properties of the quark-gluon plasma (QGP) created in relativistic heavy-ion collisions. In this dissertation, we introduce a comprehensive framework that describes the full-time evolution of heavy flavor in heavy-ion collisions, including its initial production, in-medium evolution inside the QGP matter, hadronization process from heavy quarks to their respective mesonic bound states and the subsequent interactions between heavy mesons and the hadron gas. The in-medium energy loss of heavy quarks is studied within the framework of a Langevin equation coupled to hydrodynamic models that simulate the space-time evolution of the hot and dense QGP matter. We improve the classical Langevin approach such that, apart from quasi-elastic scatterings between heavy quarks and the medium background, radiative energy loss is incorporated as well by treating gluon radiation as a recoil force term. The subsequent hadronization of emitted heavy quarks is simulated via a hybrid fragmentation plus recombination model. The propagation of produced heavy mesons in the hadronic phase is described using the ultra-relativistic quantum molecular dynamics (UrQMD) model. Our calculation shows that while collisional energy loss dominates the heavy quark motion inside the QGP in the low transverse momentum (p T) regime, contributions from gluon radiation are found to be significant at high pT. The recombination mechanism is important for the heavy flavor meson production at intermediate energies. The hadronic final state interactions further enhance the suppression and the collective flow of heavy mesons we observe. Within our newly developed framework, we present numerical results for the nuclear modification and the elliptic flow of D mesons, which are consistent with measurements at both the CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC) and the BNL Relativistic Heavy-Ion Collider (RHIC); predictions for B mesons are also provided. In

  18. Signatures of Spherical Compactifications at the LHC

    SciTech Connect

    Davoudiasl, Hooman; Rizzo, Thomas G.

    2007-02-12

    TeV-scale extra dimensions may play an important role in electroweak or supersymmetry breaking. We examine the phenomenology of such dimensions, compactified on a sphere S{sup n}, n {ge} 2, and show that they possess distinct features and signatures. For example, unlike flat toroidal manifolds, spheres do not trivially allow fermion massless modes. Acceptable phenomenology then generically leads to ''non-universal'' extra dimensions with ''pole-localized'' 4-d fermions; the bosonic fields can be in the bulk. Due to spherical symmetry, some Kaluza-Klein (KK) modes of bulk gauge fields are either stable or extremely long-lived, depending on the graviton KK spectrum. Using precision electroweak data, we constrain the lightest gauge field KK modes to lie above {approx_equal} 4 TeV. We show that some of these KK resonances are within the reach of the LHC in several different production channels. The models we study can be uniquely identified by their collider signatures.

  19. Constraints on gauge-Higgs unification models at the LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kitazawa, Noriaki; Sakai, Yuki

    2016-02-01

    We examine the possibility of observing the Kaluza-Klein (KK) gluons in gauge-Higgs unification models at the LHC with the energy s=14 TeV. We consider a benchmark model with the gauge symmetry SU(3)C×SU(3)W in five-dimensional spacetime, where SU(3)C is the gauge symmetry of the strong interaction and SU(3)W is that for the electroweak interaction and a Higgs doublet field. It is natural in general to introduce SU(3)C gauge symmetry in five-dimensional spacetime as well as SU(3)W gauge symmetry in gauge-Higgs unification (GHU) models. Since the fifth dimension is compactified to S1/Z 2 orbifold, there are KK modes of gluons in low-energy effective theory in four-dimensional spacetime. We investigate the resonance contribution of the first KK gluon to dijet invariant mass distribution at the LHC, and provide signal-to-noise ratios in various cases of KK gluon masses and kinematical cuts. Although the results are given in a specific benchmark model, we discuss their application to general GHU models with KK gluons. GHU models can be verified or constrained through the physics of the strong interaction, though they are proposed to solve the naturalness problem in electroweak symmetry breaking.

  20. Heavy quarks and lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Andreas S. Kronfeld

    2003-11-05

    This paper is a review of heavy quarks in lattice gauge theory, focusing on methodology. It includes a status report on some of the calculations that are relevant to heavy-quark spectroscopy and to flavor physics.

  1. Pursuing the origin of electroweak symmetry breaking: a 'Bayesian Physics' argument for sqrt(s) <~; 600 GeV e+e- collider

    SciTech Connect

    Kane, G.L.; Wells, James D.

    2000-08-09

    High-energy data has been accumulating over the last ten years, and it should not be ignored when making decisions about the future experimental program. In particular, we argue that the electroweak data collected at LEP, SLC and Tevatron indicate a light scalar particle with mass less than 500 GeV. This result is based on considering a wide variety of theories including the Standard Model, supersymmetry, large extra dimensions, and composite models. We argue that a high luminosity, 600 GeV e{sup +}e{sup -} collider would then be the natural choice to feel confident about finding and studying states connected to electroweak symmetry breaking. We also argue from the data that worrying about resonances at multi-TeV energies as the only signal for electroweak symmetry breaking is not as important a discovery issue for the next generation of colliders. Such concerns should perhaps be replaced with more relevant discovery issues such as a Higgs boson that decays invisibly, and ''new physics'' that could conspire with a heavier Higgs boson to accommodate precision electroweak data. An e{sup +}e{sup -} collider with {radical}s {approx}< 600 GeV is ideally suited to cover these possibilities.

  2. Search for electroweak top quark production in the electron + jets channel in the D0 experiment at the Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    Busato, Emmanuel

    2005-04-01

    The top quark, whose mass approaches the electroweak symmetry breaking scale, is by far the heaviest known elementary particle. New physics is therefore expected to have its most important effect in the top sector. The Tevatron is, currently, the only collider able to produce the top quark. Among all possible production processes in the standard model, the top-antitop pair production via strong interaction, first observed in 1995, is the one with the largest cross section. The production via electroweak interaction (known as single top production), more difficult to extract from the background because of a lower cross section and of a lower signal to background ratio, has never been observed. In this thesis, we have searched for these processes by studying proton-antiproton collisions at $\\sqrt{s}$ =1.96 TeV produced by the Tevatron and detected with the DØ detector. The experimental study of the top quark is very sensitive to the quality of the data taken by the calorimeter. This detector showed, at the beginning of the Run II, rather important noise problems. Having identified the origin of the noise, new treatments at the offline level were implemented and their effects studied. It has been shown that these treatments reduce very significantly the effect of the noise in the reconstruction of physical quantities without notable degradation of the signal. Within the standard model, the top quark decays into W b with a branching ratio close to 100%. Leptonic decays of the into electron + neutrino have been used to identify the from the top decay. The main backgrounds to the single top signal ( +jets and QCD) are made essentially of light quark jets in the final state. Two ..-tagging algorithms have therefore been applied in order to improve the signal to background ratio. No evidence for electroweak top quark production has been found. Upper limits at the 95 % confidence level on the observed (expected) cross sections have be computed. They are found to be 14

  3. Detecting heavy quarks

    SciTech Connect

    Benenson, G.; Chau, L.L.; Ludlam, T.; Paige, F.E.; Platner, E.D.; Protopopescu, S.D.; Rehak, P.

    1983-01-01

    In this exercise we examine the performance of a detector specifically configured to tag heavy quark (HQ) jets through direct observations of D-meson decays with a high resolution vertex detector. To optimize the performance of such a detector, we assume the small diamond beam crossing configuration as described in the 1978 ISABELLE proposal, giving a luminosity of 10/sup 32/ cm/sup -2/ sec/sup -1/. Because of the very large backgrounds from light quark (LQ) jets, most triggering schemes at this luminosity require high P/sub perpendicular to/ leptons and inevitably give missing neutrinos. If alternative triggering schemes could be found, then one can hope to find and calculate the mass of objects decaying to heavy quarks. A scheme using the high resolution detector will also be discussed in detail. The study was carried out with events generated by the ISAJET Monte Carlo and a computer simulation of the described detector system. (WHK)

  4. Heavy Vehicle Propulsion Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Ray Johnson

    2000-01-31

    The objectives are to Provide Key Enabling Materials Technologies to Increase Energy Efficiency and Reduce Exhaust Emissions. The following goals are listed: Goal 1: By 3rd quarter 2002, complete development of materials enabling the maintenance or improvement of fuel efficiency {ge} 45% of class 7-8 truck engines while meeting the EPA/Justice Department ''Consent Decree'' for emissions reduction. Goal 2: By 4th quarter 2004, complete development of enabling materials for light-duty (class 1-2) diesel truck engines with efficiency over 40%, over a wide range of loads and speeds, while meeting EPA Tier 2 emission regulations. Goal 3: By 4th quarter 2006, complete development of materials solutions to enable heavy-duty diesel engine efficiency of 50% while meeting the emission reduction goals identified in the EPA proposed rule for heavy-duty highway engines.''

  5. Two Composite Higgs Doublets:. is it the Low Energy Limit of a Natural Strong Electroweak Symmetry Breaking Sector?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zerwekh, Alfonso R.

    In this paper, we propose an effective model scheme that describes the electroweak symmetry breaking sector by means of composite Higgs-like scalars, following the ideas of Minimal Walking Technicolor (MWT). We argue that, because of the general failure of Extended Technicolor (ETC) to explain the mass of the top quark, it is necessary to introduce two composite Higgs bosons: one of them originated by a MWT-ETC sector and the other produced by a Topcolor sector. We focus on the phenomenological differences between the light composite Higgs present in our model and the fundamental Higgs boson predicted by the Standard Model and their production at the LHC. We show that in this scheme the main production channel of the lighter Higgs boson is the associated production with a gauge boson and WW fusion but not the gluon-gluon fusion channel which is substantially suppressed.

  6. Electroweak Penguins, Final State Interaction Phases, and {ital CP} Violation in B {r_arrow} K {pi} Decays

    SciTech Connect

    Deshpande, N.G.; He, X.; Hou, W.; He, X.; Hou, W.; Pakvasa, S.

    1999-03-01

    The recently observed B{sup {minus}} {r_arrow} K{sup {minus}} {pi} {sup 0}, {bar K}{sup 0} {pi} {sup {minus}} and {bar B} {sup 0} {r_arrow} K{sup {minus}} {pi} {sup +} decay modes appear to have nearly equal branching ratios. This suggests that tree and electroweak penguins play an important role, and inclusion of the latter improves agreement between factorization calculation and experimental data. The value of {gamma} in the range of 90{degree} {endash} 130{degree} and 220{degree} {endash} 260{degree} is favored, while the {bar B} {sup 0} {r_arrow} {bar K} {sup 0} {pi} {sup 0} rate is suppressed. Direct CP violation for B{r_arrow} K{pi} modes can be large if final state interaction phases are large. {copyright} {ital 1999} {ital The American Physical Society}

  7. NLO corrections to electroweak and QCD production of W+W+ plus two jets in the POWHEG BOX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jäger, Barbara; Zanderighi, Giulia

    2011-11-01

    We present the matching of the next-to-leading order QCD calculation for W + W + jj production via vector-boson fusion in hadronic collisions to parton-shower MonteCarlo programs according to the POWHEG method. Our implementation complements existing code for QCD-induced W + W + jj production in the POWHEG BOX package, thereby providing a platform for the complete Standard Model production of W + W + jj events via QCD and electroweak interactions. The impact of parton-shower effects is discussed for various distributions and found to be small in most cases. However, few observables that are relevant for analyses using a central jet veto, are modified significantly when they are interfaced to a parton shower program.

  8. Two-loop radiative corrections of electroweak mixing angle and branching fraction for Z going to bb

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Yi-Cheng

    In this thesis I develop a numerical technique which is based on the Mellin-Barnes representation to calculate two-loop Feynman integrals. The resulting complex integrals of high dimensions are being applied with some treatments, such as the variable transform, reduction formulas, etc, to improve the convergence of the integrals. The approach is adopted to compute the two-loop radiative corrections of the electroweak mixing angle, sin theta W, and the hadronic branching ratio Rb for the process Z → bb¯. I focus on contributions with an internal fermion sub-loop using the on-shell renormalization scheme. The results will help to derive improved constraints on the Higgs particle.

  9. String completion of an SU(3)c ⊗ SU(3)L ⊗ U(1)X electroweak model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Addazi, Andrea; Valle, J. W. F.; Vaquera-Araujo, C. A.

    2016-08-01

    The extended electroweak SU(3)c ⊗ SU(3)L ⊗ U(1)X symmetry framework "explaining" the number of fermion families is revisited. While 331-based schemes can not easily be unified within the conventional field theory sense, we show how to do it within an approach based on D-branes and (un)oriented open strings, on Calabi-Yau singularities. We show how the theory can be UV-completed in a quiver setup, free of gauge and string anomalies. Lepton and baryon numbers are perturbatively conserved, so neutrinos are Dirac-type, and their lightness results from a novel TeV scale seesaw mechanism. Dynamical violation of baryon number by exotic instantons could induce neutron-antineutron oscillations, with proton decay and other dangerous R-parity violating processes strictly forbidden.

  10. Hadroduction of heavy flavors

    SciTech Connect

    Leedom, I.D.

    1986-04-01

    The current state of knowledge of heavy quark production, particularly charm, by hadron beams is reviewed. The state of knowledge of total cross section, p/sub T/ and x/sub F/ dependence of charm hadroproduction is given. Besides D production, production of D* is discussed. Also covered is the present evidence for hadronically produced B mesons. 28 refs., 5 figs., 3 tabs. (LEW)

  11. Utah Heavy Oil Program

    SciTech Connect

    J. Bauman; S. Burian; M. Deo; E. Eddings; R. Gani; R. Goel; C.K. Huang; M. Hogue; R. Keiter; L. Li; J. Ruple; T. Ring; P. Rose; M. Skliar; P.J. Smith; J.P. Spinti; P. Tiwari; J. Wilkey; K. Uchitel

    2009-10-20

    The Utah Heavy Oil Program (UHOP) was established in June 2006 to provide multidisciplinary research support to federal and state constituents for addressing the wide-ranging issues surrounding the creation of an industry for unconventional oil production in the United States. Additionally, UHOP was to serve as an on-going source of unbiased information to the nation surrounding technical, economic, legal and environmental aspects of developing heavy oil, oil sands, and oil shale resources. UHOP fulGilled its role by completing three tasks. First, in response to the Energy Policy Act of 2005 Section 369(p), UHOP published an update report to the 1987 technical and economic assessment of domestic heavy oil resources that was prepared by the Interstate Oil and Gas Compact Commission. The UHOP report, entitled 'A Technical, Economic, and Legal Assessment of North American Heavy Oil, Oil Sands, and Oil Shale Resources' was published in electronic and hard copy form in October 2007. Second, UHOP developed of a comprehensive, publicly accessible online repository of unconventional oil resources in North America based on the DSpace software platform. An interactive map was also developed as a source of geospatial information and as a means to interact with the repository from a geospatial setting. All documents uploaded to the repository are fully searchable by author, title, and keywords. Third, UHOP sponsored Give research projects related to unconventional fuels development. Two projects looked at issues associated with oil shale production, including oil shale pyrolysis kinetics, resource heterogeneity, and reservoir simulation. One project evaluated in situ production from Utah oil sands. Another project focused on water availability and produced water treatments. The last project considered commercial oil shale leasing from a policy, environmental, and economic perspective.

  12. Next-to-leading-order electroweak corrections to the production of four charged leptons at the LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biedermann, Benedikt; Denner, Ansgar; Dittmaier, Stefan; Hofer, Lars; Jäger, Barbara

    2017-01-01

    We present a state-of-the-art calculation of the next-to-leading-order electroweak corrections to ZZ production, including the leptonic decays of the Z bosons into μ + μ -e+e- or μ + μ - μ + μ - final states. We use complete leading-order and next-to-leading-order matrix elements for four-lepton production, including contributions of virtual photons and all off-shell effects of Z bosons, where the finite Z-boson width is taken into account using the complex-mass scheme. The matrix elements are implemented into Monte Carlo programs allowing for the evaluation of arbitrary differential distributions. We present integrated and differential cross sections for the LHC at 13 TeV both for an inclusive setup where only lepton identification cuts are applied, and for a setup motivated by Higgs-boson analyses in the four-lepton decay channel. The electroweak corrections are divided into photonic and purely weak contributions. The former show the well-known pronounced tails near kinematical thresholds and resonances; the latter are generically at the level of ˜ -5% and reach several -10% in the high-energy tails of distributions. Comparing the results for μ + μ -e+e- and μ + μ - μ + μ - final states, we find significant differences mainly in distributions that are sensitive to the μ + μ - pairing in the μ + μ - μ + μ - final state. Differences between μ + μ -e+e- and μ + μ - μ + μ - channels due to interferences of equal-flavour leptons in the final state can reach up to 10% in off-shell-sensitive regions. Contributions induced by incoming photons, i.e. photon-photon and quark-photon channels, are included, but turn out to be phenomenologically unimportant.

  13. Measurement of electroweak single top quark production in proton-antiproton collisions at 1.96 TeV

    SciTech Connect

    Dong, Peter Joseph

    2008-01-01

    The top quark is an extremely massive fundamental particle that is predominantly produced in pairs at particle collider experiments. The Standard Model of particle physics predicts that top quarks can also be produced singly by the electroweak force; however, this process is more difficult to detect because it occurs at a smaller rate and is more difficult to distinguish from background processes. The cross section of this process is related to the Cabbibo-Kobayashi-Maskawa matrix element |V tb|, and measurement of the single top quark production cross section is currently the only method to directly measure this quantity without assuming the number of generations of fermions. This thesis describes a measurement of the cross section of electroweak single top quark production in proton-antiproton collisions at a center-of-mass energy of 1.96 TeV. This analysis uses 2.2 fb-1 of integrated luminosity recorded by the Collider Detector at Fermilab. The search is performed using a matrix element method which calculates the differential cross section for each event for several signal and background hypotheses. These numbers are combined into a single discriminant and used to construct templates from Monte Carlo simulation. A maximum likelihood fit to the data distribution gives a measurement of the cross section. This analysis measures a value of 2.2$+0.8\\atop{-0.7}$ pb, which corresponds to a value of |V tb| = 0.88$+0.16\\atop{-0.14}$experimental±0.7(theoretical). The probability that this result originates from a background fluctuation in the absence of single top production (p-value) is 0.0003, which is equivalent to 3.4 standard deviations in Gaussian statistics. The expected (median) p-value as estimated from pseudo-experiments for this analysis is 0.000003, which corresponds to 4.5 standard deviations in Gaussian statistics.

  14. Production Cross-Section Estimates for Strongly-Interacting Electroweak-Symmetry Breaking Sector Resonances at Particle Colliders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dobado, Antonio; Guo, Feng-Kun; Llanes-Estrada, Felipe J.

    2015-12-01

    We are exploring a generic strongly-interacting Electroweak Symmetry Breaking Sector (EWSBS) with the low-energy effective field theory for the four experimentally known particles (W±L, ZL, h) and its dispersion-relation based unitary extension. In this contribution we provide simple estimates for the production cross-section of pairs of the EWSBS bosons and their resonances at proton-proton colliders as well as in a future e-e+ (or potentially a μ-μ+) collider with a typical few-TeV energy. We examine the simplest production mechanisms, tree-level production through a W (dominant when quantum numbers allow) and the simple effective boson approximation (in which the electroweak bosons are considered as collinear partons of the colliding fermions). We exemplify with custodial isovector and isotensor resonances at 2 TeV, the energy currently being discussed because of a slight excess in the ATLAS 2-jet data. We find it hard, though not unthinkable, to ascribe this excess to one of these WLWL rescattering resonances. An isovector resonance could be produced at a rate smaller than, but close to earlier CMS exclusion bounds, depending on the parameters of the effective theory. The ZZ excess is then problematic and requires additional physics (such as an additional scalar resonance). The isotensor one (that would describe all charge combinations) has smaller cross-section. Supported by the Spanish Excellence Network on Hadronic Physics FIS2014-57026-REDT, by Spanish Grants Universidad Complutense UCM:910309 and Ministerio de Economia y Competitividad MINECO:FPA2011-27853-C02-01, MINECO:FPA2014-53375-C2-1-P, by the Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft and National Natural Science Foundation of China through Funds Provided to the Sino-German CRC 110 “Symmetries and the Emergence of Structure in QCD” (NSFC Grant No. 11261130311) and by NSFC (Grant No. 11165005)

  15. Heavy Stars Thrive among Heavy Elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2002-08-01

    VLT Observes Wolf-Rayet Stars in Virgo Cluster Galaxies [1] Summary Do very massive stars form in metal-rich regions of the Universe and in the nuclei of galaxies ? Or does "heavy element poisoning" stop stellar growth at an early stage, before young stars reach the "heavyweight class"? What may at the first glance appear as a question for specialists actually has profound implications for our understanding of the evolution of galaxies, those systems of billions of stars - the main building blocks of the Universe. With an enormous output of electromagnetic radiation and energetic elementary particles, massive stars exert a decisive influence on the surrounding (interstellar) gas and dust clouds . They also eject large amounts of processed elements, thereby participating in the gradual build-up of the many elements we see today. Thus the presence or absence of such stars at the centres of galaxies can significantly change the overall development of those regions and hence, presumably, that of the entire galaxy. A team of European astronomers [2] has now directly observed the presence of so-called Wolf-Rayet stars (born with masses of 60 - 90 times that of the Sun or more) within metal-rich regions in some galaxies in the Virgo cluster, some 50 million light-years away. This is the first unambiguous detection of such massive stellar objects in metal-rich regions . PR Photo 20a/02 : H II regions in the Virgo cluster galaxy NGC 4254 . PR Photo 20b/02 : Multi-object-slit observation of galaxy NGC 4303 . PR Photo 20c/02 : Spectrum of H II region in NGC 4254 with Wolf-Rayet signatures. Production of heavy elements in the Universe Most scientists agree that the Universe in which we live underwent a dramatic event, known as the Big Bang , approximately 15,000 million years ago. During the early moments, elementary particles were formed which after some time united into more complex nuclei and in turn resulted in the production of hydrogen and helium atoms and their isotopes

  16. Heavy Truck Engine Program

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, Christopher

    2009-01-08

    The Heavy Duty Truck Engine Program at Cummins embodied three significant development phases. All phases of work strove to demonstrate a high level of diesel engine efficiency in the face of increasingly stringent emission requirements. Concurrently, aftertreatment system development and refinement was pursued in support of these efficiency demonstrations. The program's first phase focused on the demonstration in-vehicle of a high level of heavy duty diesel engine efficiency (45% Brake Thermal Efficiency) at a typical cruise condition while achieving composite emissions results which met the 2004 U.S. EPA legislated standards. With a combination of engine combustion calibration tuning and the development and application of Urea-based SCR and particulate aftertreatment, these demonstrations were successfully performed by Q4 of 2002. The second phase of the program directed efforts towards an in-vehicle demonstration of an engine system capable of meeting 2007 U.S. EPA legislated emissions requirements while achieving 45% Brake Thermal Efficiency at cruise conditions. Through further combustion optimization, the refinement of Cummins Cooled EGR architecture, the application of a high pressure common rail fuel system and the incorporation of optimized engine parasitics, Cummins Inc. successfully demonstrated these deliverables in Q2 of 2004. The program's final phase set a stretch goal of demonstrating 50% Brake Thermal Efficiency from a heavy duty diesel engine system capable of meeting 2010 U.S. EPA legislated emissions requirements. Cummins chose to pursue this goal through further combustion development and refinement of the Cooled EGR system architecture and also applied a Rankine cycle Waste Heat Recovery technique to convert otherwise wasted thermal energy to useful power. The engine and heat recovery system was demonstrated to achieve 50% Brake Thermal Efficiency while operating at a torque peak condition in second quarter, 2006. The 50% efficient engine

  17. Heavy ion storage rings

    SciTech Connect

    Schuch, R.

    1987-01-01

    A brief overview of synchrotron storage rings for heavy ions, which are presently under construction in different accelerator laboratories is given. Ions ranging from protons up to uranium ions at MeV/nucleon energies will be injected into these rings using multiturn injection from the accelerators available or being built in these laboratories. After injection, it is planned to cool the phase space distribution of the ions by merging them with cold electron beams or laser beams, or by using stochastic cooling. Some atomic physics experiments planned for these rings are presented.

  18. Heavy ion therapy: Bevalac epoch

    SciTech Connect

    Castro, J.R.

    1993-10-01

    An overview of heavy ion therapy at the Bevelac complex (SuperHILac linear accelerator + Bevatron) is given. Treatment planning, clinical results with helium ions on the skull base and uveal melanoma, clinical results with high-LET charged particles, neon radiotherapy of prostate cancer, heavy charged particle irradiation for unfavorable soft tissue sarcoma, preliminary results in heavy charged particle irradiation of bone sarcoma, and irradiation of bile duct carcinoma with charged particles and-or photons are all covered. (GHH)

  19. Heavy quark production and spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Appel, J.A.

    1993-11-01

    This review covers many new experimental results on heavy flavor production and spectroscopy. It also shows some of the increasingly improved theoretical understanding of results in light of basic perturbative QCD and heavy quark symmetry. At the same time, there are some remaining discrepancies among experiments as well as significant missing information on some of the anticipated lowest lying heavy quark states. Most interesting, perhaps, are some clearly measured production effects awaiting full explanation.

  20. Heavy-flavor production overview

    SciTech Connect

    Jeffrey A. Appel

    2003-12-10

    This talk serves as an introduction to the Heavy-Flavor session of the XXXIII International Symposium on Multiparticle Dynamics. A major focus of this session is on the production of heavy quarks. The talks which follow review the latest results on heavy quark production in strong, electromagnetic, and weak interactions, as well as some of the physics of the heavy quarks themselves. This talk emphasizes what we can learn from the production measurements, both about underlying QCD theory and the partonic nature of the hadrons which we see in the laboratory.

  1. Rheological properties of heavy oils and heavy oil emulsions

    SciTech Connect

    Khan, M.R.

    1996-06-01

    In this study, the author investigated the effects of a number of process variables such as shear rate, measurement temperature, pressure, the influence of pretreatment, and the role of various amounts of added water on the rheology of the resulting heavy oil or the emulsion. Rheological properties of heavy oils and the corresponding emulsions are important from transportation and processing standpoints.

  2. Propagation of heavy baryons in heavy-ion collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, Santosh K.; Torres-Rincon, Juan M.; Tolos, Laura; Minissale, Vincenzo; Scardina, Francesco; Greco, Vincenzo

    2016-12-01

    The drag and diffusion coefficients of heavy baryons (Λc and Λb ) in the hadronic phase created in the latter stage of the heavy-ion collisions at RHIC and LHC energies have been evaluated recently. In this work we compute some experimental observables, such as the nuclear suppression factor RA A and the elliptic flow v2 of heavy baryons at RHIC and LHC energies, highlighting the role of the hadronic phase contribution to these observables, which are going to be measured at Run 3 of LHC. For the time evolution of the heavy quarks in the quark and gluon plasma (QGP) and heavy baryons in the hadronic phase, we use the Langevin dynamics. For the hadronization of the heavy quarks to heavy baryons we employ Peterson fragmentation functions. We observe a strong suppression of both the Λc and Λb . We find that the hadronic medium has a sizable impact on the heavy-baryon elliptic flow whereas the impact of hadronic medium rescattering is almost unnoticeable on the nuclear suppression factor. We evaluate the Λc/D ratio at RHIC and LHC. We find that the Λc/D ratio remains unaffected due to the hadronic phase rescattering which enables it as a nobel probe of QGP phase dynamics along with its hadronization.

  3. Search for the electroweak production of supersymmetric particles in √{s }=8 TeV p p collisions with the ATLAS detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aad, G.; Abbott, B.; Abdallah, J.; Abdinov, O.; Aben, R.; Abolins, M.; Abouzeid, O. S.; Abramowicz, H.; Abreu, H.; Abreu, R.; Abulaiti, Y.; Acharya, B. S.; Adamczyk, L.; Adams, D. L.; Adelman, J.; Adomeit, S.; Adye, T.; Affolder, A. A.; Agatonovic-Jovin, T.; Agricola, J.; Aguilar-Saavedra, J. A.; Ahlen, S. P.; Ahmadov, F.; Aielli, G.; Akerstedt, H.; Åkesson, T. P. A.; Akimov, A. V.; Alberghi, G. L.; Albert, J.; Albrand, S.; Alconada Verzini, M. J.; Aleksa, M.; Aleksandrov, I. N.; Alexa, C.; Alexander, G.; Alexopoulos, T.; Alhroob, M.; Alimonti, G.; Alio, L.; Alison, J.; Alkire, S. P.; Allbrooke, B. M. M.; Allport, P. P.; Aloisio, A.; Alonso, A.; Alonso, F.; Alpigiani, C.; Altheimer, A.; Alvarez Gonzalez, B.; Álvarez Piqueras, D.; Alviggi, M. G.; Amadio, B. T.; Amako, K.; Amaral Coutinho, Y.; Amelung, C.; Amidei, D.; Amor Dos Santos, S. P.; Amorim, A.; Amoroso, S.; Amram, N.; Amundsen, G.; Anastopoulos, C.; Ancu, L. S.; Andari, N.; Andeen, T.; Anders, C. F.; Anders, G.; Anders, J. K.; Anderson, K. J.; Andreazza, A.; Andrei, V.; Angelidakis, S.; Angelozzi, I.; Anger, P.; Angerami, A.; Anghinolfi, F.; Anisenkov, A. V.; Anjos, N.; Annovi, A.; Antonelli, M.; Antonov, A.; Antos, J.; Antrim, D. J.; Anulli, F.; Aoki, M.; Aperio Bella, L.; Arabidze, G.; Arai, Y.; Araque, J. P.; Arce, A. T. H.; Arduh, F. A.; Arguin, J.-F.; Argyropoulos, S.; Arik, M.; Armbruster, A. J.; Arnaez, O.; Arnold, H.; Arratia, M.; Arslan, O.; Artamonov, A.; Artoni, G.; Asai, S.; Asbah, N.; Ashkenazi, A.; Åsman, B.; Asquith, L.; Assamagan, K.; Astalos, R.; Atkinson, M.; Atlay, N. B.; Augsten, K.; Aurousseau, M.; Avolio, G.; Axen, B.; Ayoub, M. K.; Azuelos, G.; Baak, M. A.; Baas, A. E.; Baca, M. J.; Bacci, C.; Bachacou, H.; Bachas, K.; Backes, M.; Backhaus, M.; Bagiacchi, P.; Bagnaia, P.; Bai, Y.; Bain, T.; Baines, J. T.; Baker, O. K.; Baldin, E. M.; Balek, P.; Balestri, T.; Balli, F.; Balunas, W. K.; Banas, E.; Banerjee, Sw.; Bannoura, A. A. E.; Barak, L.; Barberio, E. L.; Barberis, D.; Barbero, M.; Barillari, T.; Barisonzi, M.; Barklow, T.; Barlow, N.; Barnes, S. L.; Barnett, B. M.; Barnett, R. M.; Barnovska, Z.; Baroncelli, A.; Barone, G.; Barr, A. J.; Barreiro, F.; Barreiro Guimarães da Costa, J.; Bartoldus, R.; Barton, A. E.; Bartos, P.; Basalaev, A.; Bassalat, A.; Basye, A.; Bates, R. L.; Batista, S. J.; Batley, J. R.; Battaglia, M.; Bauce, M.; Bauer, F.; Bawa, H. S.; Beacham, J. B.; Beattie, M. D.; Beau, T.; Beauchemin, P. H.; Beccherle, R.; Bechtle, P.; Beck, H. P.; Becker, K.; Becker, M.; Beckingham, M.; Becot, C.; Beddall, A. J.; Beddall, A.; Bednyakov, V. A.; Bee, C. P.; Beemster, L. J.; Beermann, T. A.; Begel, M.; Behr, J. K.; Belanger-Champagne, C.; Bell, W. H.; Bella, G.; Bellagamba, L.; Bellerive, A.; Bellomo, M.; Belotskiy, K.; Beltramello, O.; Benary, O.; Benchekroun, D.; Bender, M.; Bendtz, K.; Benekos, N.; Benhammou, Y.; Benhar Noccioli, E.; Benitez Garcia, J. A.; Benjamin, D. P.; Bensinger, J. R.; Bentvelsen, S.; Beresford, L.; Beretta, M.; Berge, D.; Bergeaas Kuutmann, E.; Berger, N.; Berghaus, F.; Beringer, J.; Bernard, C.; Bernard, N. R.; Bernius, C.; Bernlochner, F. U.; Berry, T.; Berta, P.; Bertella, C.; Bertoli, G.; Bertolucci, F.; Bertsche, C.; Bertsche, D.; Besana, M. I.; Besjes, G. J.; Bessidskaia Bylund, O.; Bessner, M.; Besson, N.; Betancourt, C.; Bethke, S.; Bevan, A. J.; Bhimji, W.; Bianchi, R. M.; Bianchini, L.; Bianco, M.; Biebel, O.; Biedermann, D.; Bieniek, S. P.; Biesuz, N. V.; Biglietti, M.; Bilbao de Mendizabal, J.; Bilokon, H.; Bindi, M.; Binet, S.; Bingul, A.; Bini, C.; Biondi, S.; Bjergaard, D. M.; Black, C. W.; Black, J. E.; Black, K. M.; Blackburn, D.; Blair, R. E.; Blanchard, J.-B.; Blanco, J. E.; Blazek, T.; Bloch, I.; Blocker, C.; Blum, W.; Blumenschein, U.; Blunier, S.; Bobbink, G. J.; Bobrovnikov, V. S.; Bocchetta, S. S.; Bocci, A.; Bock, C.; Boehler, M.; Bogaerts, J. A.; Bogavac, D.; Bogdanchikov, A. G.; Bohm, C.; Boisvert, V.; Bold, T.; Boldea, V.; Boldyrev, A. S.; Bomben, M.; Bona, M.; Boonekamp, M.; Borisov, A.; Borissov, G.; Borroni, S.; Bortfeldt, J.; Bortolotto, V.; Bos, K.; Boscherini, D.; Bosman, M.; Boudreau, J.; Bouffard, J.; Bouhova-Thacker, E. V.; Boumediene, D.; Bourdarios, C.; Bousson, N.; Boutle, S. K.; Boveia, A.; Boyd, J.; Boyko, I. R.; Bozic, I.; Bracinik, J.; Brandt, A.; Brandt, G.; Brandt, O.; Bratzler, U.; Brau, B.; Brau, J. E.; Braun, H. M.; Breaden Madden, W. D.; Brendlinger, K.; Brennan, A. J.; Brenner, L.; Brenner, R.; Bressler, S.; Bristow, T. M.; Britton, D.; Britzger, D.; Brochu, F. M.; Brock, I.; Brock, R.; Bronner, J.; Brooijmans, G.; Brooks, T.; Brooks, W. K.; Brosamer, J.; Brost, E.; Bruckman de Renstrom, P. A.; Bruncko, D.; Bruneliere, R.; Bruni, A.; Bruni, G.; Bruschi, M.; Bruscino, N.; Bryngemark, L.; Buanes, T.; Buat, Q.; Buchholz, P.; Buckley, A. G.; Buda, S. I.; Budagov, I. A.; Buehrer, F.; Bugge, L.; Bugge, M. K.; Bulekov, O.; Bullock, D.; Burckhart, H.; Burdin, S.; Burgard, C. D.; Burghgrave, B.; Burke, S.; Burmeister, I.; Busato, E.; Büscher, D.; Büscher, V.; Bussey, P.; Butler, J. M.; Butt, A. I.; Buttar, C. M.; Butterworth, J. M.; Butti, P.; Buttinger, W.; Buzatu, A.; Buzykaev, A. R.; Cabrera Urbán, S.; Caforio, D.; Cairo, V. M.; Cakir, O.; Calace, N.; Calafiura, P.; Calandri, A.; Calderini, G.; Calfayan, P.; Caloba, L. P.; Calvet, D.; Calvet, S.; Camacho Toro, R.; Camarda, S.; Camarri, P.; Cameron, D.; Caminal Armadans, R.; Campana, S.; Campanelli, M.; Campoverde, A.; Canale, V.; Canepa, A.; Cano Bret, M.; Cantero, J.; Cantrill, R.; Cao, T.; Capeans Garrido, M. D. M.; Caprini, I.; Caprini, M.; Capua, M.; Caputo, R.; Carbone, R. M.; Cardarelli, R.; Cardillo, F.; Carli, T.; Carlino, G.; Carminati, L.; Caron, S.; Carquin, E.; Carrillo-Montoya, G. D.; Carter, J. R.; Carvalho, J.; Casadei, D.; Casado, M. P.; Casolino, M.; Castaneda-Miranda, E.; Castelli, A.; Castillo Gimenez, V.; Castro, N. F.; Catastini, P.; Catinaccio, A.; Catmore, J. R.; Cattai, A.; Caudron, J.; Cavaliere, V.; Cavalli, D.; Cavalli-Sforza, M.; Cavasinni, V.; Ceradini, F.; Cerio, B. C.; Cerny, K.; Cerqueira, A. S.; Cerri, A.; Cerrito, L.; Cerutti, F.; Cerv, M.; Cervelli, A.; Cetin, S. A.; Chafaq, A.; Chakraborty, D.; Chalupkova, I.; Chan, Y. L.; Chang, P.; Chapman, J. D.; Charlton, D. G.; Chau, C. C.; Chavez Barajas, C. A.; Cheatham, S.; Chegwidden, A.; Chekanov, S.; Chekulaev, S. V.; Chelkov, G. A.; Chelstowska, M. A.; Chen, C.; Chen, H.; Chen, K.; Chen, L.; Chen, S.; Chen, S.; Chen, X.; Chen, Y.; Cheng, H. C.; Cheng, Y.; Cheplakov, A.; Cheremushkina, E.; Cherkaoui El Moursli, R.; Chernyatin, V.; Cheu, E.; Chevalier, L.; Chiarella, V.; Chiarelli, G.; Chiodini, G.; Chisholm, A. S.; Chislett, R. T.; Chitan, A.; Chizhov, M. V.; Choi, K.; Chouridou, S.; Chow, B. K. B.; Christodoulou, V.; Chromek-Burckhart, D.; Chudoba, J.; Chuinard, A. J.; Chwastowski, J. J.; Chytka, L.; Ciapetti, G.; Ciftci, A. K.; Cinca, D.; Cindro, V.; Cioara, I. A.; Ciocio, A.; Cirotto, F.; Citron, Z. H.; Ciubancan, M.; Clark, A.; Clark, B. L.; Clark, P. J.; Clarke, R. N.; Clement, C.; Coadou, Y.; Cobal, M.; Coccaro, A.; Cochran, J.; Coffey, L.; Cogan, J. G.; Colasurdo, L.; Cole, B.; Cole, S.; Colijn, A. P.; Collot, J.; Colombo, T.; Compostella, G.; Conde Muiño, P.; Coniavitis, E.; Connell, S. H.; Connelly, I. A.; Consorti, V.; Constantinescu, S.; Conta, C.; Conti, G.; Conventi, F.; Cooke, M.; Cooper, B. D.; Cooper-Sarkar, A. M.; Cornelissen, T.; Corradi, M.; Corriveau, F.; Corso-Radu, A.; Cortes-Gonzalez, A.; Cortiana, G.; Costa, G.; Costa, M. J.; Costanzo, D.; Côté, D.; Cottin, G.; Cowan, G.; Cox, B. E.; Cranmer, K.; Cree, G.; Crépé-Renaudin, S.; Crescioli, F.; Cribbs, W. A.; Crispin Ortuzar, M.; Cristinziani, M.; Croft, V.; Crosetti, G.; Cuhadar Donszelmann, T.; Cummings, J.; Curatolo, M.; Cúth, J.; Cuthbert, C.; Czirr, H.; Czodrowski, P.; D'Auria, S.; D'Onofrio, M.; da Cunha Sargedas de Sousa, M. J.; da Via, C.; Dabrowski, W.; Dafinca, A.; Dai, T.; Dale, O.; Dallaire, F.; Dallapiccola, C.; Dam, M.; Dandoy, J. R.; Dang, N. P.; Daniells, A. C.; Danninger, M.; Dano Hoffmann, M.; Dao, V.; Darbo, G.; Darmora, S.; Dassoulas, J.; Dattagupta, A.; Davey, W.; David, C.; Davidek, T.; Davies, E.; Davies, M.; Davison, P.; Davygora, Y.; Dawe, E.; Dawson, I.; Daya-Ishmukhametova, R. K.; de, K.; de Asmundis, R.; de Benedetti, A.; de Castro, S.; de Cecco, S.; de Groot, N.; de Jong, P.; de la Torre, H.; de Lorenzi, F.; de Pedis, D.; de Salvo, A.; de Sanctis, U.; de Santo, A.; de Vivie de Regie, J. B.; Dearnaley, W. J.; Debbe, R.; Debenedetti, C.; Dedovich, D. V.; Deigaard, I.; Del Peso, J.; Del Prete, T.; Delgove, D.; Deliot, F.; Delitzsch, C. M.; Deliyergiyev, M.; Dell'Acqua, A.; Dell'Asta, L.; Dell'Orso, M.; Della Pietra, M.; Della Volpe, D.; Delmastro, M.; Delsart, P. A.; Deluca, C.; Demarco, D. A.; Demers, S.; Demichev, M.; Demilly, A.; Denisov, S. P.; Derendarz, D.; Derkaoui, J. E.; Derue, F.; Dervan, P.; Desch, K.; Deterre, C.; Dette, K.; Deviveiros, P. O.; Dewhurst, A.; Dhaliwal, S.; di Ciaccio, A.; di Ciaccio, L.; di Domenico, A.; di Donato, C.; di Girolamo, A.; di Girolamo, B.; di Mattia, A.; di Micco, B.; di Nardo, R.; di Simone, A.; di Sipio, R.; di Valentino, D.; Diaconu, C.; Diamond, M.; Dias, F. A.; Diaz, M. A.; Diehl, E. B.; Dietrich, J.; Diglio, S.; Dimitrievska, A.; Dingfelder, J.; Dita, P.; Dita, S.; Dittus, F.; Djama, F.; Djobava, T.; Djuvsland, J. I.; Do Vale, M. A. B.; Dobos, D.; Dobre, M.; Doglioni, C.; Dohmae, T.; Dolejsi, J.; Dolezal, Z.; Dolgoshein, B. A.; Donadelli, M.; Donati, S.; Dondero, P.; Donini, J.; Dopke, J.; Doria, A.; Dova, M. T.; Doyle, A. T.; Drechsler, E.; Dris, M.; Dubreuil, E.; Duchovni, E.; Duckeck, G.; Ducu, O. A.; Duda, D.; Dudarev, A.; Duflot, L.; Duguid, L.; Dührssen, M.; Dunford, M.; Duran Yildiz, H.; Düren, M.; Durglishvili, A.; Duschinger, D.; Dutta, B.; Dyndal, M.; Eckardt, C.; Ecker, K. M.; Edgar, R. C.; Edson, W.; Edwards, N. C.; Ehrenfeld, W.; Eifert, T.; Eigen, G.; Einsweiler, K.; Ekelof, T.; El Kacimi, M.; Ellert, M.; Elles, S.; Ellinghaus, F.; Elliot, A. A.; Ellis, N.; Elmsheuser, J.; Elsing, M.; Emeliyanov, D.; Enari, Y.; Endner, O. C.; Endo, M.; Erdmann, J.; Ereditato, A.; Ernis, G.; Ernst, J.; Ernst, M.; Errede, S.; Ertel, E.; Escalier, M.; Esch, H.; Escobar, C.; Esposito, B.; Etienvre, A. I.; Etzion, E.; Evans, H.; Ezhilov, A.; Fabbri, L.; Facini, G.; Fakhrutdinov, R. M.; Falciano, S.; Falla, R. J.; Faltova, J.; Fang, Y.; Fanti, M.; Farbin, A.; Farilla, A.; Farooque, T.; Farrell, S.; Farrington, S. M.; Farthouat, P.; Fassi, F.; Fassnacht, P.; Fassouliotis, D.; Faucci Giannelli, M.; Favareto, A.; Fayard, L.; Fedin, O. L.; Fedorko, W.; Feigl, S.; Feligioni, L.; Feng, C.; Feng, E. J.; Feng, H.; Fenyuk, A. B.; Feremenga, L.; Fernandez Martinez, P.; Fernandez Perez, S.; Ferrando, J.; Ferrari, A.; Ferrari, P.; Ferrari, R.; Ferreira de Lima, D. E.; Ferrer, A.; Ferrere, D.; Ferretti, C.; Ferretto Parodi, A.; Fiascaris, M.; Fiedler, F.; Filipčič, A.; Filipuzzi, M.; Filthaut, F.; Fincke-Keeler, M.; Finelli, K. D.; Fiolhais, M. C. N.; Fiorini, L.; Firan, A.; Fischer, A.; Fischer, C.; Fischer, J.; Fisher, W. C.; Flaschel, N.; Fleck, I.; Fleischmann, P.; Fletcher, G. T.; Fletcher, G.; Fletcher, R. R. M.; Flick, T.; Floderus, A.; Flores Castillo, L. R.; Flowerdew, M. J.; Formica, A.; Forti, A.; Fournier, D.; Fox, H.; Fracchia, S.; Francavilla, P.; Franchini, M.; Francis, D.; Franconi, L.; Franklin, M.; Frate, M.; Fraternali, M.; Freeborn, D.; French, S. T.; Friedrich, F.; Froidevaux, D.; Frost, J. A.; Fukunaga, C.; Fullana Torregrosa, E.; Fulsom, B. G.; Fusayasu, T.; Fuster, J.; Gabaldon, C.; Gabizon, O.; Gabrielli, A.; Gabrielli, A.; Gach, G. P.; Gadatsch, S.; Gadomski, S.; Gagliardi, G.; Gagnon, P.; Galea, C.; Galhardo, B.; Gallas, E. J.; Gallop, B. J.; Gallus, P.; Galster, G.; Gan, K. K.; Gao, J.; Gao, Y.; Gao, Y. S.; Garay Walls, F. M.; Garberson, F.; García, C.; García Navarro, J. E.; Garcia-Sciveres, M.; Gardner, R. W.; Garelli, N.; Garonne, V.; Gatti, C.; Gaudiello, A.; Gaudio, G.; Gaur, B.; Gauthier, L.; Gauzzi, P.; Gavrilenko, I. L.; Gay, C.; Gaycken, G.; Gazis, E. N.; Ge, P.; Gecse, Z.; Gee, C. N. P.; Geich-Gimbel, Ch.; Geisler, M. P.; Gemme, C.; Genest, M. H.; Gentile, S.; George, M.; George, S.; Gerbaudo, D.; Gershon, A.; Ghasemi, S.; Ghazlane, H.; Giacobbe, B.; Giagu, S.; Giangiobbe, V.; Giannetti, P.; Gibbard, B.; Gibson, S. M.; Gignac, M.; Gilchriese, M.; Gillam, T. P. S.; Gillberg, D.; Gilles, G.; Gingrich, D. M.; Giokaris, N.; Giordani, M. P.; Giorgi, F. M.; Giorgi, F. M.; Giraud, P. F.; Giromini, P.; Giugni, D.; Giuliani, C.; Giulini, M.; Gjelsten, B. K.; Gkaitatzis, S.; Gkialas, I.; Gkougkousis, E. L.; Gladilin, L. K.; Glasman, C.; Glatzer, J.; Glaysher, P. C. F.; Glazov, A.; Goblirsch-Kolb, M.; Goddard, J. R.; Godlewski, J.; Goldfarb, S.; Golling, T.; Golubkov, D.; Gomes, A.; Gonçalo, R.; Goncalves Pinto Firmino da Costa, J.; Gonella, L.; González de La Hoz, S.; Gonzalez Parra, G.; Gonzalez-Sevilla, S.; Goossens, L.; Gorbounov, P. A.; Gordon, H. A.; Gorelov, I.; Gorini, B.; Gorini, E.; Gorišek, A.; Gornicki, E.; Goshaw, A. T.; Gössling, C.; Gostkin, M. I.; Goujdami, D.; Goussiou, A. G.; Govender, N.; Gozani, E.; Grabas, H. M. X.; Graber, L.; Grabowska-Bold, I.; Gradin, P. O. J.; Grafström, P.; Gramling, J.; Gramstad, E.; Grancagnolo, S.; Gratchev, V.; Gray, H. M.; Graziani, E.; Greenwood, Z. D.; Grefe, C.; Gregersen, K.; Gregor, I. M.; Grenier, P.; Griffiths, J.; Grillo, A. A.; Grimm, K.; Grinstein, S.; Gris, Ph.; Grivaz, J.-F.; Grohs, J. P.; Grohsjean, A.; Gross, E.; Grosse-Knetter, J.; Grossi, G. C.; Grout, Z. J.; Guan, L.; Guenther, J.; Guescini, F.; Guest, D.; Gueta, O.; Guido, E.; Guillemin, T.; Guindon, S.; Gul, U.; Gumpert, C.; Guo, J.; Guo, Y.; Gupta, S.; Gustavino, G.; Gutierrez, P.; Gutierrez Ortiz, N. G.; Gutschow, C.; Guyot, C.; Gwenlan, C.; Gwilliam, C. B.; Haas, A.; Haber, C.; Hadavand, H. K.; Haddad, N.; Haefner, P.; Hageböck, S.; Hajduk, Z.; Hakobyan, H.; Haleem, M.; Haley, J.; Hall, D.; Halladjian, G.; Hallewell, G. D.; Hamacher, K.; Hamal, P.; Hamano, K.; Hamilton, A.; Hamity, G. N.; Hamnett, P. G.; Han, L.; Hanagaki, K.; Hanawa, K.; Hance, M.; Haney, B.; Hanke, P.; Hanna, R.; Hansen, J. B.; Hansen, J. D.; Hansen, M. C.; Hansen, P. H.; Hara, K.; Hard, A. S.; Harenberg, T.; Hariri, F.; Harkusha, S.; Harrington, R. D.; Harrison, P. F.; Hartjes, F.; Hasegawa, M.; Hasegawa, Y.; Hasib, A.; Hassani, S.; Haug, S.; Hauser, R.; Hauswald, L.; Havranek, M.; Hawkes, C. M.; Hawkings, R. J.; Hawkins, A. D.; Hayashi, T.; Hayden, D.; Hays, C. P.; Hays, J. M.; Hayward, H. S.; Haywood, S. J.; Head, S. J.; Heck, T.; Hedberg, V.; Heelan, L.; Heim, S.; Heim, T.; Heinemann, B.; Heinrich, L.; Hejbal, J.; Helary, L.; Hellman, S.; Hellmich, D.; Helsens, C.; Henderson, J.; Henderson, R. C. W.; Heng, Y.; Hengler, C.; Henkelmann, S.; Henrichs, A.; Henriques Correia, A. M.; Henrot-Versille, S.; Herbert, G. H.; Hernández Jiménez, Y.; Herten, G.; Hertenberger, R.; Hervas, L.; Hesketh, G. G.; Hessey, N. P.; Hetherly, J. W.; Hickling, R.; Higón-Rodriguez, E.; Hill, E.; Hill, J. C.; Hiller, K. H.; Hillier, S. J.; Hinchliffe, I.; Hines, E.; Hinman, R. R.; Hirose, M.; Hirschbuehl, D.; Hobbs, J.; Hod, N.; Hodgkinson, M. C.; Hodgson, P.; Hoecker, A.; Hoeferkamp, M. R.; Hoenig, F.; Hohlfeld, M.; Hohn, D.; Holmes, T. R.; Homann, M.; Hong, T. M.; Hopkins, W. H.; Horii, Y.; Horton, A. J.; Hostachy, J.-Y.; Hou, S.; Hoummada, A.; Howard, J.; Howarth, J.; Hrabovsky, M.; Hristova, I.; Hrivnac, J.; Hryn'ova, T.; Hrynevich, A.; Hsu, C.; Hsu, P. J.; Hsu, S.-C.; Hu, D.; Hu, Q.; Hu, X.; Huang, Y.; Hubacek, Z.; Hubaut, F.; Huegging, F.; Huffman, T. B.; Hughes, E. W.; Hughes, G.; Huhtinen, M.; Hülsing, T. A.; Huseynov, N.; Huston, J.; Huth, J.; Iacobucci, G.; Iakovidis, G.; Ibragimov, I.; Iconomidou-Fayard, L.; Ideal, E.; Idrissi, Z.; Iengo, P.; Igonkina, O.; Iizawa, T.; Ikegami, Y.; Ikematsu, K.; Ikeno, M.; Ilchenko, Y.; Iliadis, D.; Ilic, N.; Ince, T.; Introzzi, G.; Ioannou, P.; Iodice, M.; Iordanidou, K.; Ippolito, V.; Irles Quiles, A.; Isaksson, C.; Ishino, M.; Ishitsuka, M.; Ishmukhametov, R.; Issever, C.; Istin, S.; Iturbe Ponce, J. M.; Iuppa, R.; Ivarsson, J.; Iwanski, W.; Iwasaki, H.; Izen, J. M.; Izzo, V.; Jabbar, S.; Jackson, B.; Jackson, M.; Jackson, P.; Jaekel, M. R.; Jain, V.; Jakobs, K.; Jakobsen, S.; Jakoubek, T.; Jakubek, J.; Jamin, D. O.; Jana, D. K.; Jansen, E.; Jansky, R.; Janssen, J.; Janus, M.; Jarlskog, G.; Javadov, N.; Javå¯Rek, T.; Jeanty, L.; Jejelava, J.; Jeng, G.-Y.; Jennens, D.; Jenni, P.; Jentzsch, J.; Jeske, C.; Jézéquel, S.; Ji, H.; Jia, J.; Jiang, Y.; Jiggins, S.; Jimenez Pena, J.; Jin, S.; Jinaru, A.; Jinnouchi, O.; Joergensen, M. D.; Johansson, P.; Johns, K. A.; Johnson, W. J.; Jon-And, K.; Jones, G.; Jones, R. W. L.; Jones, T. J.; Jongmanns, J.; Jorge, P. M.; Joshi, K. D.; Jovicevic, J.; Ju, X.; Jussel, P.; Juste Rozas, A.; Kaci, M.; Kaczmarska, A.; Kado, M.; Kagan, H.; Kagan, M.; Kahn, S. J.; Kajomovitz, E.; Kalderon, C. W.; Kama, S.; Kamenshchikov, A.; Kanaya, N.; Kaneti, S.; Kantserov, V. A.; Kanzaki, J.; Kaplan, B.; Kaplan, L. S.; Kapliy, A.; Kar, D.; Karakostas, K.; Karamaoun, A.; Karastathis, N.; Kareem, M. J.; Karentzos, E.; Karnevskiy, M.; Karpov, S. N.; Karpova, Z. M.; Karthik, K.; Kartvelishvili, V.; Karyukhin, A. N.; Kasahara, K.; Kashif, L.; Kass, R. 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    2016-03-01

    The ATLAS experiment has performed extensive searches for the electroweak production of charginos, neutralinos, and staus. This article summarizes and extends the search for electroweak supersymmetry with new analyses targeting scenarios not covered by previously published searches. New searches use vector-boson fusion production, initial-state radiation jets, and low-momentum lepton final states, as well as multivariate analysis techniques to improve the sensitivity to scenarios with small mass splittings and low-production cross sections. Results are based on 20 fb-1 of proton-proton collision data at √{s }=8 TeV recorded with the ATLAS experiment at the Large Hadron Collider. No significant excess beyond Standard Model expectations is observed. The new and existing searches are combined and interpreted in terms of 95% confidence-level exclusion limits in simplified models, where a single production process and decay mode is assumed, as well as within phenomenological supersymmetric models.

  4. Measurement of electroweak production of two jets in association with a Z boson in proton-proton collisions at [Formula: see text].

    PubMed

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    The purely electroweak (EW) cross section for the production of two jets in association with a Z boson, in proton-proton collisions at [Formula: see text], is measured using data recorded by the CMS experiment at the CERN LHC, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 19.7[Formula: see text]. The electroweak cross section for the [Formula: see text] final state (with [Formula: see text] or [Formula: see text] and j representing the quarks produced in the hard interaction) in the kinematic region defined by [Formula: see text][Formula: see text], [Formula: see text][Formula: see text], transverse momentum [Formula: see text][Formula: see text], and pseudorapidity [Formula: see text], is found to be [Formula: see text], in agreement with the standard model prediction. The associated jet activity of the selected events is studied, in particular in a signal-enriched region of phase space, and the measurements are found to be in agreement with QCD predictions.

  5. Search for the electroweak production of supersymmetric particles in root $\\sqrt{s}$ = 8 TeV $pp$ collisions with the ATLAS detector

    SciTech Connect

    Aad, G.; Aad, G.; Abbott, B.; Abdallah, J.; Abdinov, O.; Aben, R.; Abolins, M.; AbouZeid, O. S.; Abramowicz, H.; Abreu, H.; Abreu, R.; Abulaiti, Y.; Acharya, B. S.; Adamczyk, L.; Adams, D. L.; Adelman, J.; Adomeit, S.; Adye, T.; Affolder, A. A.; Agatonovic-Jovin, T.

    2016-03-04

    The ATLAS experiment has performed extensive searches for the electroweak production of charginos, neutralinos, and staus. This article summarizes and extends the search for electroweak supersymmetry with new analyses targeting scenarios not covered by previously published searches. New searches use vector-boson fusion production, initial-state radiation jets, and low-momentum lepton final states, as well as multivariate analysis techniques to improve the sensitivity to scenarios with small mass splittings and low-production cross sections. Results are based on 20 fb$^{-1}$ of proton-proton collision data at $\\sqrt{s}$ = 8 TeV recorded with the ATLAS experiment at the Large Hadron Collider. No significant excess beyond Standard Model expectations is observed. The new and existing searches are combined and interpreted in terms of 95% confidence-level exclusion limits in simplified models, where a single production process and decay mode is assumed, as well as within phenomenological supersymmetric models.

  6. Measurement of the electroweak production of dijets in association with a Z-boson and distributions sensitive to vector boson fusion in proton-proton collisions at = 8 TeV using the ATLAS detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

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Perez; Perini, L.; Pernegger, H.; Perrino, R.; Peschke, R.; Peshekhonov, V. D.; Peters, K.; Peters, R. F. Y.; Petersen, B. A.; Petersen, J.; Petersen, T. C.; Petit, E.; Petridis, A.; Petridou, C.; Petrolo, E.; Petrucci, F.; Petteni, M.; Pezoa, R.; Phillips, P. W.; Piacquadio, G.; Pianori, E.; Picazio, A.; Piccaro, E.; Piccinini, M.; Piec, S. M.; Piegaia, R.; Pignotti, D. T.; Pilcher, J. E.; Pilkington, A. D.; Pina, J.; Pinamonti, M.; Pinder, A.; Pinfold, J. L.; Pingel, A.; Pinto, B.; Pizio, C.; Pleier, M.-A.; Pleskot, V.; Plotnikova, E.; Plucinski, P.; Poddar, S.; Podlyski, F.; Poettgen, R.; Poggioli, L.; Pohl, D.; Pohl, M.; Polesello, G.; Policicchio, A.; Polifka, R.; Polini, A.; Pollard, C. S.; Polychronakos, V.; Pommès, K.; Pontecorvo, L.; Pope, B. G.; Popeneciu, G. A.; Popovic, D. S.; Poppleton, A.; Bueso, X. Portell; Pospelov, G. E.; Pospisil, S.; Potamianos, K.; Potrap, I. N.; Potter, C. J.; Potter, C. 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    2014-04-01

    Measurements of fiducial cross sections for the electroweak production of two jets in association with a Z-boson are presented. The measurements are performed using 20 .3 fb-1 of proton-proton collision data collected at a centre-of-mass energy of = 8 TeV by the ATLAS experiment at the Large Hadron Collider. The electroweak component is extracted by a fit to the dijet invariant mass distribution in a fiducial region chosen to enhance the electroweak contribution over the dominant background in which the jets are produced via the strong interaction. The electroweak cross sections measured in two fiducial regions are in good agreement with the Standard Model expectations and the background-only hypothesis is rejected with significance above the 5 σ level. The electroweak process includes the vector boson fusion production of a Z-boson and the data are used to place limits on anomalous triple gauge boson couplings. In addition, measurements of cross sections and differential distributions for inclusive Z-boson-plus-dijet production are performed in five fiducial regions, each with different sensitivity to the electroweak contribution. The results are corrected for detector effects and compared to predictions from the Sherpa and Powheg event generators. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  7. A Search for Anomalous Heavy-Flavor Quark Production in Association with W Bosons

    SciTech Connect

    Fisher, Wade Cameron

    2005-01-01

    The production of W bosons in association with jets at the Fermilab Tevatron provides an opportunity to test predictions for electroweak and QCD processes described by the standard model. Complicating this picture, evidence for anomalous production of heavy-flavor quarks (t,b,c) in association with W bosons was reported in Run I by the CDF collaboration. In this dissertation, I present an examination of the exclusive jet spectrum in the W +jets final state in which the heavy-flavor quark content has been enhanced by requiring at least one b-tagged jet in an event. For this measurement, W bosons have been selected in W → ev and W → μv decay channels. I present a measurement of the exclusive jet spectrum for events which contain one jet tagged with more than one b-tagging algorithm. I compare data on e + jets (164.3 pb-1) and μ + jets (145.3 pb-1) channels, collected with the DØ detector during Run II of the Fermilab Tevatron pp¯ collider, to expectations from the standard model. The results of the search are used to set upper limits on anomalous production of such events.

  8. Failure Engineered Heavy Metal Penetrators

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-12-01

    ARMY RESEARCH LABORATORY Failure Engineered Heavy Metal Penetrators, Phase I, SBIR ARL-CR-5· R. Cavalieri, W. Tiarn, and D. Nicholson prepared...REPORT DATE S. REPORT TYPE AND DATES COVERED December 1992 Final Report-1/1/92 - 7/31/92 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE FAILURE ENGINEERED HEAVY METAL PENETRATORS

  9. Heavy Equipment Mechanic. Instructor Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hendrix, Laborn J.; And Others

    This manual is intended to assist heavy equipment instructors in teaching the latest concepts and functions of heavy equipment. It includes 7 sections and 27 instructional units. Sections (and units) are: orientation (shop safety and first aid, hand tools and miscellaneous tools, measuring, basic rigging and hoisting), engines (basic engine…

  10. Heavy Equipment Mechanic Program Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Georgia Univ., Athens. Dept. of Vocational Education.

    Designed to train an entry-level mechanic, this heavy equipment mechanic program guide presents the standard curriculum for technical institutes in Georgia. The curriculum addresses the minimum competencies for a heavy equipment mechanic program. The general information section contains the following: purpose and objectives; program description,…

  11. New, heavy transuranium isotopes

    SciTech Connect

    Hulet, E.K.

    1990-10-22

    In this report, we offer our most recent results concerning the decay properties for five new isotopes of Md, No, Lr, and for {sup 258m}Md. In additions to these successful experiments, we have also conducted searches for {sup 263}(105), {sup 264}(105), {sup 272}(109), and superheavy elements from bombardments of {sup 254}Es with heavy ions. {sup 2} An exciting finding in the course of this work is a new fission phenomenon, which we have termed bidmodal fission''. This is described in a subsequent section. The final part summarizes our conclusions based on the unexpectedly long half-lives and surprising fission properties of the heaviest nuclei. 27 refs., 19 figs.

  12. HEAVY ION LINEAR ACCELERATOR

    DOEpatents

    Van Atta, C.M.; Beringer, R.; Smith, L.

    1959-01-01

    A linear accelerator of heavy ions is described. The basic contributions of the invention consist of a method and apparatus for obtaining high energy particles of an element with an increased charge-to-mass ratio. The method comprises the steps of ionizing the atoms of an element, accelerating the resultant ions to an energy substantially equal to one Mev per nucleon, stripping orbital electrons from the accelerated ions by passing the ions through a curtain of elemental vapor disposed transversely of the path of the ions to provide a second charge-to-mass ratio, and finally accelerating the resultant stripped ions to a final energy of at least ten Mev per nucleon.

  13. Disorders of heavy metals.

    PubMed

    Woimant, France; Trocello, Jean-Marc

    2014-01-01

    Heavy metals and trace elements play an important role in relation to the physiology and pathology of the nervous system. Neurologic diseases related to disorders of metabolism of copper and iron are reviewed. Copper disorders are divided into two classes: ATP7A- or ATP7B-related inherited copper transport disorders (Menkes disease, occipital horn syndrome, ATP7A-related distal motor neuropathy, and Wilson disease) and acquired diseases associated with copper deficiency or copper excess. Iron brain disorders are divided into genetic neurodegeneration with brain iron accumulation (NBIA, neuroferritinopathy, and aceruloplasminemia), genetic systemic iron accumulation with neurologic features (hemochromatosis), and acquired diseases associated with iron excess (superficial siderosis) or iron deficiency (restless leg syndrome). The main features of cadmium, lead, aluminum, mercury, and manganese toxicity are summarized.

  14. Atwood's Heavy Chain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beeken, Paul

    2011-11-01

    While perusing various websites in search of a more challenging lab for my students, I came across a number of ideas where replacing the string in an Atwood's machine with a simple ball chain like the kind found in lamp pulls created an interesting system to investigate. The replacement of the string produced a nice nonuniform acceleration, but one that my AP® students found difficult to analyze given their current math background. As the year progressed, we began to explore the importance of work and its utility in making predictions on systems that did not lend themselves to easy analysis using Newtonian mechanics. The effort made it apparent that the heavy rope Atwood's machine would make a perfect system for investigation using the lessons gained from work and energy.

  15. Chiral heavy fermions in a two Higgs doublet model: 750 GeV resonance or not

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bar-Shalom, Shaouly; Soni, Amarjit

    2017-03-01

    We revisit models where a heavy chiral 4th generation doublet of fermions is embedded in a class of two Higgs doublets models (2HDM) with a discrete Z2 symmetry, which couples the ;heavy; scalar doublet only to the 4th generation fermions and the ;light; one to the Standard Model (SM) fermions - the so-called 4G2HDM introduced by us several years ago. We study the constraints imposed on the 4G2HDM from direct searches of heavy fermions, from precision electroweak data (PEWD) and from the measured production and decay signals of the 125 GeV scalar, which in the 4G2HDM corresponds to the lightest CP-even scalar h. We then show that the recently reported excess in the γγ spectrum around 750 GeV can be accommodated by the heavy CP-even scalar of the 4G2HDM, H, resulting in a unique choice of parameter space: negligible mixing (sin ⁡ α ≲ O (10-3)) between the two CP-even scalars h , H and heavy 4th generation quark and lepton masses mt‧ ,mb‧ ≲ 400 GeV and mν‧ ,mτ‧ ≳ 900 GeV, respectively. Whether or not the 750 GeV γγ resonance is confirmed, interesting phenomenology emerges in q‧ - Higgs systems (q‧ =t‧ ,b‧), that can be searched for at the LHC. For example, the heavy scalar states of the model, S = H , A ,H+, may have BR (S →qbar‧q‧) ∼ O (1), giving rise to observable qbar‧q‧ signals on resonance, followed by the flavor changing q‧ decays t‧ → uh (u = u , c) and/or b‧ → dh (d = d , s , b). This leads to rather distinct signatures, with or without charged leptons, of the form qbar‧q‧ →(nj + mb + ℓW) S (j and b being light and b-quark jets, respectively), with n + m + ℓ = 6- 8 and unique kinematic features. These high jet-multiplicity signals appear to be very challenging and may need new search strategies for detection of such heavy chiral quarks. It is also shown that the flavor structure of the 4G2HDM can easily accommodate the interesting recent indications of a percent-level branching ratio in the

  16. Heavy Quarkonium Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Faccini, Riccardo; /Rome U. /INFN, Rome

    2008-02-22

    Although the Standard Model of elementary particles is well established, strong interactions are not yet fully under control. We believe QCD is the field theory capable of describing them, but we are not yet capable, in most of the cases, to make exact predictions. Systems that include heavy quark-antiquark pairs (quarkonia) are ideal and unique laboratories to probe both the high energy regimes of QCD, where an expansion in terms of the coupling constant is possible, and the low energy regimes, where non-perturbative effects dominate. In the last years this field is experiencing a rapid expansion with a wealth of new data coming in from diverse sources: data on quarkonium formation from dedicated experiments (BES at BEPC, KEDR at VEPP-4M CLEO-c at CESR), clear samples produced by high luminosity B-factories (PEP and KEKB), and very large samples produced from gluon-gluon fusion in p{bar p} annihilations at Tevatron (CDF and D0 experiments). In this review I will first summarize recent developments in the understanding of heavy quarkonium states which have a well established quark content. Next, the core of the paper will be spent to review the experimental evidences of new states that might be aggregations of more than just a quark-antiquark pair. Although the possibility to have bound states of two quarks and two antiquarks or of quark-antiquark pairs and gluons has been predicted since the very start of the quark model [2], no observed state has yet been attributed to one of them: achieving such an attribution would be a major step in the understanding of the strong interactions.

  17. Results of heavy ion radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Castro, J.R.

    1994-04-01

    The potential of heavy ion therapy for clinical use in cancer therapy stems from the biological parameters of heavy charged particles, and their precise dose localization. Biologically, carbon, neon and other heavy ion beams (up to about silicon) are clinically useful in overcoming the radioresistance of hypoxic tumors, thus increasing biological effectiveness relative to low-LET x-ray or electron beams. Cells irradiated by heavy ions show less variation in cell-cycle related radiosensitivity and decreased repair of radiation injury. The physical parameters of these heavy charged particles allow precise delivery of high radiation doses to tumors while minimizing irradiation of normal tissues. Clinical use requires close interaction between radiation oncologists, medical physicists, accelerator physicists, engineers, computer scientists and radiation biologists.

  18. Managing Inventories of Heavy Actinides

    SciTech Connect

    Wham, Robert M; Patton, Bradley D

    2011-01-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) has stored a limited inventory of heavy actinides contained in irradiated targets, some partially processed, at the Savannah River Site (SRS) and Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The 'heavy actinides' of interest include plutonium, americium, and curium isotopes; specifically 242Pu and 244Pu, 243Am, and 244/246/248Cm. No alternate supplies of these heavy actinides and no other capabilities for producing them are currently available. Some of these heavy actinide materials are important for use as feedstock for producing heavy isotopes and elements needed for research and commercial application. The rare isotope 244Pu is valuable for research, environmental safeguards, and nuclear forensics. Because the production of these heavy actinides was made possible only by the enormous investment of time and money associated with defense production efforts, the remaining inventories of these rare nuclear materials are an important part of the legacy of the Nuclear Weapons Program. Significant unique heavy actinide inventories reside in irradiated Mark-18A and Mark-42 targets at SRS and ORNL, with no plans to separate and store the isotopes for future use. Although the costs of preserving these heavy actinide materials would be considerable, for all practical purposes they are irreplaceable. The effort required to reproduce these heavy actinides today would likely cost billions of dollars and encompass a series of irradiation and chemical separation cycles for at least 50 years; thus, reproduction is virtually impossible. DOE has a limited window of opportunity to recover and preserve these heavy actinides before they are disposed of as waste. A path forward is presented to recover and manage these irreplaceable National Asset materials for future use in research, nuclear forensics, and other potential applications.

  19. Improved measurement of the electroweak penguin process B{yields}X{sub s}l{sup +}l{sup -}

    SciTech Connect

    Iwasaki, M.; Itoh, K.; Aihara, H.; Abe, K.; Adachi, I.; Gershon, T.; Haba, J.; Hastings, N.C.; Hazumi, M.; Ishikawa, A.; Itoh, R.; Katayama, N.; Kichimi, H.; Nakamura, I.; Nakao, M.; Nakazawa, H.; Nishida, S.; Ozaki, H.; Sagawa, H.; Sakai, Y.

    2005-11-01

    We present an improved measurement of the branching fraction for the electroweak penguin process B{yields}X{sub s}l{sup +}l{sup -}, where l is an electron or a muon and X{sub s} is a hadronic system containing an s-quark. The measurement is based on a sample of 152x10{sup 6} {upsilon}(4S){yields}BB events collected with the Belle detector at the KEKB energy asymmetric e{sup +}e{sup -} collider. The X{sub s} hadronic system is reconstructed from one K{sup {+-}} or K{sub S}{sup 0} and up to four pions, where at most one pion can be neutral. Averaging over both lepton flavors, the inclusive branching fraction is measured to be B(B{yields}X{sub s}l{sup +}l{sup -})=(4.11{+-}0.83(stat){sub -0.81}{sup +0.85}(syst))x10{sup -6} for M{sub l{sup +}}{sub l{sup -}}>0.2 GeV/c{sup 2}.

  20. SU(4){sub L} x U(1){sub X} three-family model for the electroweak interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Sanchez, Luis A.; Wills-Toro, Luis A.; Zuluaga, Jorge I.

    2008-02-01

    An extension of the gauge group SU(2){sub L} x U(1){sub Y} of the standard model to the symmetry group SU(4){sub L} x U(1){sub X} (3-4-1 for short) is presented. The model does not contain exotic electric charges and anomaly cancellation is achieved with a family of quarks transforming differently from the other two, thus leading to FCNC. By introducing a discrete Z{sub 2} symmetry we obtain a consistent fermion mass spectrum, and avoid unitarity violation of the Cabibbo-Kobayashi-Maskawa mixing matrix arising from the mixing of ordinary and exotic quarks. The neutral currents coupled to all neutral vector bosons are studied, and by using CERN LEP and SLAC Linear Collider data at Z-pole and atomic parity violation data, we bound parameters of the model related to tree-level Z-Z{sup '} mixing. These parameters are further constrained by using experimental input from neutral meson mixing in the analysis of sources of FCNC present in the model. Constraints coming from the contribution of exotic particles to the one-loop oblique electroweak parameters S, T and U are also briefly discussed. Finally, a comparison is done of the predictions of different classes of 3-4-1 models without exotic electric charges.

  1. Magnetic field instability in a neutron star driven by the electroweak electron-nucleon interaction versus the chiral magnetic effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dvornikov, Maxim; Semikoz, Victor B.

    2015-03-01

    We show that the Standard Model electroweak interaction of ultrarelativistic electrons with nucleons (the e N interaction) in a neutron star (NS) permeated by a seed large-scale helical magnetic field provides its growth up to ≳1 015 G during a time comparable with the ages of young magnetars ˜1 04 yr . The magnetic field instability originates from the parity violation in the e N interaction entering the generalized Dirac equation for right and left massless electrons in an external uniform magnetic field. We calculate the average electric current given by the solution of the modified Dirac equation containing an extra current for right and left electrons (positrons), which turns out to be directed along the magnetic field. Such a current includes both a changing chiral imbalance of electrons and the e N potential given by a constant neutron density in a NS. Then we derive the system of the kinetic equations for the chiral imbalance and the magnetic helicity which accounts for the e N interaction. By solving this system, we show that a sizable chiral imbalance arising in a neutron protostar due to the Urca process eL-+p →N +νeL diminishes very rapidly because of a huge chirality-flip rate. Thus the e N term prevails over the chiral effect, providing a huge growth of the magnetic helicity and the helical magnetic field.

  2. Heavy Flavor Physics in STAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Videbæk, Flemming; STAR Collaboration

    2013-03-01

    In relativistic heavy-ion collisions at RHIC, heavy quarks are primarily created from initial hard scatterings. Since their large masses are not easily affected by the strong interaction with QCD medium they may carry information from the system at early stage. The interaction between heavy quarks and the medium is sensitive to the medium dynamics; therefore heavy quarks are suggested as an ideal probe to quantify the properties of the strongly interacting QCD matter. The STAR Collaboration should complete the Heavy Flavor Tracker (HFT) and the Muon Telescope Detector (MTD) upgrades by 2014. These detectors will greatly enhance the STAR physics capability to measure heavy quark collectivity and correlations using topologically reconstructed charmed hadrons and heavy quark decay electron-muon correlations. In addition, measurements of the quarkonium muon decay channels will enable us to separate Upsilon 1S from 2S and 3S states in p + p and A+A collisions. Selected STAR results on open charm and quarkonia production in p + p and Au+Au collisions at 200 GeV are presented. An overview of the upgrades, their expected performance and current status is presented.

  3. Imaging using accelerated heavy ions

    SciTech Connect

    Chu, W.T.

    1982-05-01

    Several methods for imaging using accelerated heavy ion beams are being investigated at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory. Using the HILAC (Heavy-Ion Linear Accelerator) as an injector, the Bevalac can accelerate fully stripped atomic nuclei from carbon (Z = 6) to krypton (Z = 34), and partly stripped ions up to uranium (Z = 92). Radiographic studies to date have been conducted with helium (from 184-inch cyclotron), carbon, oxygen, and neon beams. Useful ranges in tissue of 40 cm or more are available. To investigate the potential of heavy-ion projection radiography and computed tomography (CT), several methods and instrumentation have been studied.

  4. Heavy Hybrids: decay to and mixing with Heavy Quarkonium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oncala, Rubén; Soto, Joan

    2017-03-01

    We report on a recent QCD based research on hybrid mesons containing cc¯ or bb¯ quarks. We present results for the spectrum, the decay widths to heavy quarkonium, and the role of mixing with the latter. We point out that mixing with heavy quarkonium provides a potentially large source of spin symmetry breaking. We identify candidates to hybrid mesons among the so called XYZ states in the charmonium and bottomonium spectrum.

  5. Heavy-element nucleosynthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Mathews, G.J.

    1990-10-30

    New measurements and theoretical studies of nuclear properties, together with new astronomical data on the growth of heavy-element abundances during the early history of the Galaxy, now provide a clearer picture of where in nature the elements heavier than iron are produced by rapid (r-process) and show (s-process) neutron capture reactions. The nuclear data suggest that the r-process involves a high-neutron-density beta-flow equilibrium environment and that the s-process may have occurred at a temperature and neutron density consistent with a {sup 13}C({alpha},n){sup 16}0 neutron source. The astronomical data, when compared with simple galactic chemical evolution modes, suggests that the r-process is associated with type II supernovae and that the neutron source must be manufactured by the star. Low-mass type II supernovae are proposed as the most important contributors to the r-process. A {sup 13}C neutron source in intermediate-mass stars is proposed for the s-process. 64 refs., 7 figs.

  6. Illusory Late Heavy Bombardments

    PubMed Central

    Boehnke, Patrick; Harrison, T. Mark

    2016-01-01

    The Late Heavy Bombardment (LHB), a hypothesized impact spike at ∼3.9 Ga, is one of the major scientific concepts to emerge from Apollo-era lunar exploration. A significant portion of the evidence for the existence of the LHB comes from histograms of 40Ar/39Ar “plateau” ages (i.e., regions selected on the basis of apparent isochroneity). However, due to lunar magmatism and overprinting from subsequent impact events, virtually all Apollo-era samples show evidence for 40Ar/39Ar age spectrum disturbances, leaving open the possibility that partial 40Ar* resetting could bias interpretation of bombardment histories due to plateaus yielding misleadingly young ages. We examine this possibility through a physical model of 40Ar* diffusion in Apollo samples and test the uniqueness of the impact histories obtained by inverting plateau age histograms. Our results show that plateau histograms tend to yield age peaks, even in those cases where the input impact curve did not contain such a spike, in part due to the episodic nature of lunar crust or parent body formation. Restated, monotonically declining impact histories yield apparent age peaks that could be misinterpreted as LHB-type events. We further conclude that the assignment of apparent 40Ar/39Ar plateau ages bears an undesirably high degree of subjectivity. When compounded by inappropriate interpretations of histograms constructed from plateau ages, interpretation of apparent, but illusory, impact spikes is likely. PMID:27621460

  7. Heavy fields and gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goon, Garrett

    2017-01-01

    We study the effects of heavy fields on 4D spacetimes with flat, de Sitter and anti-de Sitter asymptotics. At low energies, matter generates specific, calculable higher derivative corrections to the GR action which perturbatively alter the Schwarzschild-( A) dS family of solutions. The effects of massive scalars, Dirac spinors and gauge fields are each considered. The six-derivative operators they produce, such as ˜ R 3 terms, generate the leading corrections. The induced changes to horizon radii, Hawking temperatures and entropies are found. Modifications to the energy of large AdS black holes are derived by imposing the first law. An explicit demonstration of the replica trick is provided, as it is used to derive black hole and cosmological horizon entropies. Considering entropy bounds, it's found that scalars and fermions increase the entropy one can store inside a region bounded by a sphere of fixed size, but vectors lead to a decrease, oddly. We also demonstrate, however, that many of the corrections fall below the resolving power of the effective field theory and are therefore untrustworthy. Defining properties of black holes, such as the horizon area and Hawking temperature, prove to be remarkably robust against higher derivative gravitational corrections.

  8. Illusory Late Heavy Bombardments.

    PubMed

    Boehnke, Patrick; Harrison, T Mark

    2016-09-27

    The Late Heavy Bombardment (LHB), a hypothesized impact spike at ∼3.9 Ga, is one of the major scientific concepts to emerge from Apollo-era lunar exploration. A significant portion of the evidence for the existence of the LHB comes from histograms of (40)Ar/(39)Ar "plateau" ages (i.e., regions selected on the basis of apparent isochroneity). However, due to lunar magmatism and overprinting from subsequent impact events, virtually all Apollo-era samples show evidence for (40)Ar/(39)Ar age spectrum disturbances, leaving open the possibility that partial (40)Ar* resetting could bias interpretation of bombardment histories due to plateaus yielding misleadingly young ages. We examine this possibility through a physical model of (40)Ar* diffusion in Apollo samples and test the uniqueness of the impact histories obtained by inverting plateau age histograms. Our results show that plateau histograms tend to yield age peaks, even in those cases where the input impact curve did not contain such a spike, in part due to the episodic nature of lunar crust or parent body formation. Restated, monotonically declining impact histories yield apparent age peaks that could be misinterpreted as LHB-type events. We further conclude that the assignment of apparent (40)Ar/(39)Ar plateau ages bears an undesirably high degree of subjectivity. When compounded by inappropriate interpretations of histograms constructed from plateau ages, interpretation of apparent, but illusory, impact spikes is likely.

  9. Spin-2 form factors at three loop in QCD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmed, Taushif; Das, Goutam; Mathews, Prakash; Rana, Narayan; Ravindran, V.

    2015-12-01

    Spin-2 fields are often candidates in physics beyond the Standard Model namely the models with extra-dimensions where spin-2 Kaluza-Klein gravitons couple to the fields of the Standard Model. Also, in the context of Higgs searches, spin-2 fields have been studied as an alternative to the scalar Higgs boson. In this article, we present the complete three loop QCD radiative corrections to the spin-2 quark-antiquark and spin-2 gluon-gluon form factors in SU(N) gauge theory with n f light flavors. These form factors contribute to both quark-antiquark and gluon-gluon initiated processes involving spin-2 particle in the hadronic reactions at the LHC. We have studied the structure of infrared singularities in these form factors up to three loop level using Sudakov integro-differential equation and found that the anomalous dimensions originating from soft and collinear regions of the loop integrals coincide with those of the electroweak vector boson and Higgs form factors confirming the universality of the infrared singularities in QCD amplitudes.

  10. Searches for hyperbolic extra dimensions at the LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melbéus, Henrik; Ohlsson, Tommy

    2008-08-01

    We investigate a model of large extra dimensions where the internal space has the geometry of a hyperbolic disc. Compared with the ADD model, this model provides a more satisfactory solution to the hierarchy problem between the electroweak scale and the Planck scale, and it also avoids constraints from astrophysics. In general, a novel feature of this model is that the physical results depend on the position of the brane in the internal space, and in particular, the signal almost disappears completely if the brane is positioned at the center of the disc. Since there is no known analytic form of the Kaluza-Klein spectrum for our choice of geometry, we obtain a spectrum based on a combination of approximations and numerical computations. We study the possible signatures of our model for hadron colliders, especially the LHC, where the most important processes are the production of a graviton together with a hadronic jet or a photon. We find that the signals are similar to those of the ADD model, regarding both qualitative behavior and strength. For the case of hadronic jet production, it is possible to obtain relatively strong signals, while for the case of photon production, this is much more difficult.

  11. CERN LHC signals from warped extra dimensions

    SciTech Connect

    Agashe, Kaustubh; Belyaev, Alexander; Krupovnickas, Tadas; Perez, Gilad; Virzi, Joseph

    2008-01-01

    We study production of Kaluza-Klein (KK) gluons at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) in the framework of a warped extra dimension with the standard model fields propagating in the bulk. We show that the detection of the KK gluon is challenging since its production is suppressed by small couplings to the proton's constituents. Moreover, the KK gluon decays mostly to top pairs due to an enhanced coupling and hence is broad. Nevertheless, we demonstrate that for M{sub KKG} < or approx. 4 TeV, 100 fb{sup -1} of data at the LHC can provide discovery of the KK gluon. We utilize a sizable left-right polarization asymmetry from the KK gluon resonance to maximize the signal significance, and we explore the novel feature of extremely highly energetic 'top-jets'. We briefly discuss how the detection of electroweak gauge KK states (Z/W) faces a similar challenge since their leptonic decays (golden modes) are suppressed. Our analysis suggests that other frameworks, for example, little Higgs, which rely on UV completion via strong dynamics might face similar challenges, namely, (1) suppressed production rates for the new particles (such as Z{sup '}), due to their 'light-fermion-phobic' nature, and (2) difficulties in detection since the new particles are broad and decay predominantly to third generation quarks and longitudinal gauge bosons.

  12. Compactification on phase space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lovelady, Benjamin; Wheeler, James

    2016-03-01

    A major challenge for string theory is to understand the dimensional reduction required for comparison with the standard model. We propose reducing the dimension of the compactification by interpreting some of the extra dimensions as the energy-momentum portion of a phase-space. Such models naturally arise as generalized quotients of the conformal group called biconformal spaces. By combining the standard Kaluza-Klein approach with such a conformal gauge theory, we may start from the conformal group of an n-dimensional Euclidean space to form a 2n-dimensional quotient manifold with symplectic structure. A pair of involutions leads naturally to two n-dimensional Lorentzian manifolds. For n = 5, this leaves only two extra dimensions, with a countable family of possible compactifications and an SO(5) Yang-Mills field on the fibers. Starting with n=6 leads to 4-dimensional compactification of the phase space. In the latter case, if the two dimensions each from spacetime and momentum space are compactified onto spheres, then there is an SU(2)xSU(2) (left-right symmetric electroweak) field between phase and configuration space and an SO(6) field on the fibers. Such a theory, with minor additional symmetry breaking, could contain all parts of the standard model.

  13. LHC Signals from Warped Extra Dimensions

    SciTech Connect

    Agashe, K.; Belyaev, A.; Krupovnickas, T.; Perez, G.; Virzi, J.

    2006-12-06

    We study production of Kaluza-Klein gluons (KKG) at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) in the framework of a warped extra dimension with the Standard Model (SM) fields propagating in the bulk. We show that the detection of KK gluon is challenging since its production is suppressed by small couplings to the proton's constituents. Moreover, the KK gluon decaysmostly to top pairs due to an enhanced coupling and hence is broad. Nevertheless, we demonstrate that for MKKG<~;; 4 TeV, 100 fb-1 of data at the LHC can provide discovery of the KK gluon. We utilize a sizeable left-right polarization asymmetry from the KK gluon resonance to maximize the signal significance, and we explore the novel feature of extremely highly energetic"top-jets." We briefly discuss how the detection of electroweak gauge KK states (Z/W) faces a similar challenge since their leptonic decays ("golden" modes) are suppressed. Our analysis suggests that other frameworks, for example little Higgs, which rely on UV completion via strong dynamics might face similar challenges, namely (1) Suppressed production rates for the new particles (such as Z'), due to their"lightfermion-phobic" nature, and (2) Difficulties in detection since the new particles are broad and decay predominantly to third generation quarks and longitudinal gauge bosons.

  14. Beyond the three-site Higgless model

    SciTech Connect

    Kurachi, Masafumi; Belyaev, Alexander S; Chivukula, R Sekhar; Christensen, Neil D; Simmon, Elizabeth H; He, Hong - Jian; Tanabashie, Masaharu

    2009-01-01

    The three-site model has been offered as a benchmark or test case for studying the collider phenomenology of Higgs-less models. It is therefore appropriate to consider how well the three-site model performs as a general representative of Higgs-less models, and which modifications might remedy any shortcomings. We employ sum rules relating the masses and couplings of the Kaluza-Klein modes of the gauge fields in continuum and deconstructed Higgs-less models as a way to compare the different theories. These identities enable us to quantify how well a given theory performs at unitarizing the scattering of electroweak gauge bosons at a particular energy scale. We will see that the tendency of the sum rules to be saturated by contributions from the lowest-lying KK resonances provides a good measure of the extent to which a highly-deconstructed theory like the three-site model can accurately describe the low-energy physics. After comparing the three-site model to a pair of continuum models, we analyze extensions of the three-site model to a longer open linear model with an additional U(I) group and to a ring model with three sites and three links; both cases can be analyzed in the framework created by the sum rules. The hadron and lepton collider phenomenology of both extended models is discussed, with a focus on the complementary information to be gained from the different facilities.

  15. Heavy Equipment Mechanic Program Standards.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Georgia Univ., Athens. Dept. of Vocational Education.

    This publication contains statewide standards for the heavy equipment mechanic program in Georgia. The standards are divided into 12 categories: foundations (philosophy, purpose, goals, program objectives, availability, evaluation); admissions (admission requirements, provisional admission requirements, recruitment, evaluation and planning);…

  16. Viscoelastic properties of heavy oils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rojas Luces, Maria Alejandra

    Rheological low frequency measurements were carried out to analyze the viscoelastic properties of four heavy oil samples. At room conditions, the heavy oil samples exhibit non-Newtonian or viscoelastic behavior since they have a viscous component and an elastic component. The latter becomes very important for temperatures below 30°C, and for seismic to ultrasonic frequencies. Above this temperature, the viscous component increases significantly in comparison to the elastic component, and for seismic frequencies heavy oils can be considered as Newtonian fluids. A new viscosity model based on the concept of activation energy was derived to predict viscosity in terms of frequency and temperature for temperatures below 60°C. A new frequency-temperature dispersion model was derived to address the variation of the complex shear modulus (G*) with frequency and temperature for the heavy oil samples. This model fits the data well for seismic and sonic frequencies but it overpredicts G* at ultrasonic frequencies.

  17. Phenomenology of heavy quark systems

    SciTech Connect

    Gilman, F.J.

    1987-03-01

    The spectroscopy of heavy quark systems is examined with regards to spin independent and spin dependent potentials. It is shown that a qualitative picture exists of the spin-independent forces, and that a semi-quantitative understanding exists for the spin-dependent effects. A brief review is then given of the subject of the decays of hadrons containing heavy quarks, including weak decays at the quark level, and describing corrections to the spectator model. (LEW)

  18. LCLS Heavy Met Outgassing Tests

    SciTech Connect

    Kishiyama, K. I.

    2010-12-01

    A Heavy Met that is 95% tungsten, 3% nickel and 2% iron and sintered to 100% density and is Ultra High Vacuum (UHV) compatible is proposed for use as the X-ray slit in the Front End Enclosure and the Fixed Mask for the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS). The Heavy Met was tested in the LLNL Vacuum Sciences and Engineering Lab (VSEL) to determine its outgassing rate and its overall compatibility with the vacuum requirements for LCLS.

  19. Conversion of heavy petroleum oils

    SciTech Connect

    Farcasiu, M.

    1982-03-02

    Heavy petroleum oils, such as vacuum resids, and heavy fractions of tar sands and shale oil, are partially converted to more volatile hydrocarbons by mixing with light aromatic hydrocarbons and treatment of the mixture with a friedel-crafts catalyst such as aluminum chloride. It is believed that the conversion found is essentially a transalkylation, I.E. The resid undergoes dealkylation with concurrent alkylation of the light aromatic hydrocarbon.

  20. Heavy Metal Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2001-08-01

    La Silla Telescope Detects Lots of Lead in Three Distant Binaries Summary Very high abundances of the heavy element Lead have been discovered in three distant stars in the Milky Way Galaxy . This finding strongly supports the long-held view that roughly half of the stable elements heavier than Iron are produced in common stars during a phase towards the end of their life when they burn their Helium - the other half results from supernova explosions. All the Lead contained in each of the three stars weighs about as much as our Moon. The observations show that these "Lead stars" - all members of binary stellar systems - have been more enriched with Lead than with any other chemical element heavier than Iron. This new result is in excellent agreement with predictions by current stellar models about the build-up of heavy elements in stellar interiors. The new observations are reported by a team of Belgian and French astronomers [1] who used the Coude Echelle Spectrometer on the ESO 3.6-m telescope at the La Silla Observatory (Chile). PR Photo 26a/01 : A photo of HD 196944 , one of the "Lead stars". PR Photo 26b/01 : A CES spectrum of HD 196944 . The build-up of heavy elements Astronomers and physicists denote the build-up of heavier elements from lighter ones as " nucleosynthesis ". Only the very lightest elements (Hydrogen, Helium and Lithium [2]) were created at the time of the Big Bang and therefore present in the early universe. All the other heavier elements we now see around us were produced at a later time by nucleosynthesis inside stars. In those "element factories", nuclei of the lighter elements are smashed together whereby they become the nuclei of heavier ones - this process is known as nuclear fusion . In our Sun and similar stars, Hydrogen is being fused into Helium. At some stage, Helium is fused into Carbon, then Oxygen, etc. The fusion process requires positively charged nuclei to move very close to each other before they can unite. But with increasing

  1. Generation of the magnetic helicity in a neutron star driven by the electroweak electron-nucleon interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Dvornikov, Maxim; Semikoz, Victor B. E-mail: semikoz@yandex.ru

    2015-05-01

    We study the instability of magnetic fields in a neutron star core driven by the parity violating part of the electron-nucleon interaction in the Standard Model. Assuming a seed field of the order 10{sup 12} G, that is a common value for pulsars, one obtains its amplification due to such a novel mechanism by about five orders of magnitude, up to 10{sup 17} G, at time scales ∼ (10{sup 3}–10{sup 5}) yr. This effect is suggested to be a possible explanation of the origin of the strongest magnetic fields observed in magnetars. The growth of a seed magnetic field energy density is stipulated by the corresponding growth of the magnetic helicity density due to the presence of the anomalous electric current in the Maxwell equation. Such an anomaly is the sum of the two competitive effects: (i) the chiral magnetic effect driven by the difference of chemical potentials for the right and left handed massless electrons and (ii) constant chiral electroweak electron-nucleon interaction term, which has the polarization origin and depends on the constant neutron density in a neutron star core. The remarkable issue for the decisive role of the magnetic helicity evolution in the suggested mechanism is the arbitrariness of an initial magnetic helicity including the case of non-helical fields from the beginning. The tendency of the magnetic helicity density to the maximal helicity case at large evolution times provides the growth of a seed magnetic field to the strongest magnetic fields in astrophysics.

  2. The heavy quark expansion of QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Falk, A.F.

    1997-06-01

    These lectures contain an elementary introduction to heavy quark symmetry and the heavy quark expansion. Applications such as the expansion of heavy meson decay constants and the treatment of inclusive and exclusive semileptonic B decays are included. Heavy hadron production via nonperturbative fragmentation processes is also discussed. 54 refs., 7 figs.

  3. Measurement of the electroweak top quark production cross section and the CKM matrix element Vtb with the D0 experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Kirsch, Matthias

    2009-06-29

    At particle accelerators the Standard Model has been tested and will be tested further to a great precision. The data analyzed in this thesis have been collected at the world's highest energetic-collider, the Tevatron, located at the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (FNAL) in the vicinity of Chicago, IL, USA. There, protons and antiprotons are collided at a center-of-mass energy of {radical}s = 1.96 TeV. The discovery of the top quark was one of the remarkable results not only for the CDF and D0 experiments at the Tevatron collider, but also for the Standard Model, which had predicted the existence of the top quark because of symmetry arguments long before already. Still, the Tevatron is the only facility able to produce top quarks. The predominant production mechanism of top quarks is the production of a top-antitop quark pair via the strong force. However, the Standard Model also allows the production of single top quarks via the electroweak interaction. This process features the unique opportunity to measure the |Vtb| matrix element of the Cabbibo-Kobayashi-Maskawa (CKM) matrix directly, without assuming unitarity of the matrix or assuming that the number of quark generations is three. Hence, the measurement of the cross section of electroweak top quark production is more than the technical challenge to extract a physics process that only occurs one out of ten billion collisions. It is also an important test of the V-A structure of the electroweak interaction and a potential window to physics beyond the Standard Model in the case where the measurement of |V{sub tb}| would result in a value significantly different from 1, the value predicted by the Standard Model. At the Tevatron two production processes contribute significantly to the production of single top quarks: the production via the t-channel, also called W-gluon fusion, and the production via the s-channel, known as well as W* process. This analysis searches for the combined s+t channel

  4. Suppression and Two-Particle Correlations of Heavy Mesons in Heavy-Ion Collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Shanshan; Qin, Guang-You; Bass, Steffen A.

    2016-12-01

    We study the medium modification of heavy quarks produced in heavy-ion collisions. The evolution of heavy quarks inside the QGP is described using a modified Langevin framework that simultaneously incorporates their collisional and radiative energy loss. Within this framework, we provide good descriptions of the heavy meson suppression and predictions for the two-particle correlation functions of heavy meson pairs.

  5. Decay properties of double heavy baryons

    SciTech Connect

    Faessler, Amand; Gutsche, Thomas; Lyubovitskij, Valery; Ivanov, Mikhail A.; Koerner, Juergen G.

    2010-08-05

    We study the semileptonic decays of double heavy baryons using a manifestly Lorentz covariant constituent three-quark model. We present complete results on transition form factors between double-heavy baryons for finite values of the heavy quark/baryon masses and in the heavy quark symmetry limit which is valid at and close to zero recoil. Decay rates are calculated and compared to each other in the full theory, keeping masses finite, and also in the heavy quark limit.

  6. Searches for electroweak production of charginos, neutralinos, and sleptons decaying to leptons and W, Z, and Higgs bosons in pp collisions at 8 TeV

    DOE PAGES

    Khachatryan, Vardan

    2014-09-26

    Our searches for the direct electroweak production of supersymmetric charginos, neutralinos, and sleptons in a variety of signatures with leptons and W, Z, and Higgs bosons are presented. Results are based on a sample of proton-proton collision data collected at center-of-mass energy √s=8TeV with the CMS detector in 2012, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 19.5 fb-1. These observed event rates are in agreement with expectations from the standard model. Finally, these results probe charginos and neutralinos with masses up to 720 GeV, and sleptons up to 260 GeV, depending on the model details.

  7. Two-body Decays of the {ital b} Quark: Applications to Direct {ital CP} Violation, Searches for Electroweak Penguins, and New Physics

    SciTech Connect

    Atwood, D.; Soni, A.

    1998-10-01

    A systematic experimental search for two-body hadronic decays of the b quark of the type b{r_arrow}quark+meson is proposed. These reactions have a well-defined experimental signature and they should be theoretically cleaner compared to exclusive decays. Many modes have appreciable branching ratios, and partial rate asymmetries may also be quite large (about 8{percent} {endash}50{percent} ) in several of them. In a few cases electroweak penguins appear to be dominant and may be measurable. CP -violating triple correlation asymmetries provide a clean test of the standard model. {copyright} {ital 1998} {ital The American Physical Society}

  8. Collider Detector at Fermilab (CDF): Data from W, Z bosons and Drell Yan lepton pairs research of the CDF Electroweak Group

    DOE Data Explorer

    The Collider Detector at Fermilab (CDF) is a Tevatron experiment at Fermilab. The Tevatron, a powerful particle accelerator, accelerates protons and antiprotons close to the speed of light, and then makes them collide head-on inside the CDF detector. The CDF detector is used to study the products of such collisions. The CDF Physics Group at Fermilab is organized into six working groups, each with a specific focus. The Electroweak group studies production and properties of W, Z bosons and Drell Yan lepton pairs. Their public web page makes data and numerous figures available from both CDF Runs I and II.

  9. Search for the single top quarks produced in s-channel via electroweak interactions at √s = 1.96 at the Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    Jabeen, Shabnam

    2006-01-01

    The authors present a search for single top quarks produced in the s-channel electroweak production mode. The search is performed in the electron+jets decay channels, with one or more secondary-vertex tagged jets to indicate the presence of a b-jet and hence improving the signal:background ratio. Separation between signal and background is further enhanced by the use of Feed Forward Neural networks. 360 pb-1 of Run II data used for this analysis was delivered by the Tevatron, and collected by D0 between August 2002 and August 2004. The resulting 95% confidence level upper limit is 4 pb.

  10. Heavy quarkonium photoproduction in ultrarelativistic heavy ion collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Gong-Ming; Cai, Yang-Bing; Li, Yun-De; Wang, Jian-Song

    2017-01-01

    Based on the factorization formalism of nonrelativistic quantum chromodynamics (NRQCD), we calculate the production cross section for the charmonium [J /ψ , ψ (2 S ) , χc J, ηc, and hc] and the bottomonium [Υ (n S ) , χb J, ηb, and hb] produced by the hard photoproduction processes and fragmentation processes in relativistic heavy ion collisions. It is shown that the existing experimental data on heavy quarkonium production at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) can be described in the framework of the NRQCD formalism, and the phenomenological values of matrix elements for color-singlet and color-octet components give the main contribution. The numerical results of photoproduction processes and fragmentation processes for the heavy quarkonium production become prominent in p -p collisions and Pb-Pb collisions at LHC energies.

  11. Chemistry of heavy ion reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Hoffman, D.C.

    1988-10-01

    The use of heavy ions to induce nuclear reactions was reported as early as 1950. Since that time it has been one of the most active areas of nuclear research. Intense beams of ions as heavy as uranium with energies high enough to overcome the Coulomb barriers of even the heaviest elements are available. The wide variety of possible reactions gives rise to a multitude of products which have been studied by many ingenious chemical and physical techniques. Chemical techniques have been of special value for the separation and unequivocal identification of low yield species from the plethora of other nuclides present. Heavy ion reactions have been essential for the production of the trans-Md elements and a host of new isotopes. The systematics of compound nucleus reactions, transfer reactions, and deeply inelastic reactions have been elucidated using chemical techniques. A review of the variety of chemical procedures and techniques which have been developed for the study of heavy ion reactions and their products is given. Determination of the chemical properties of the trans-Md elements, which are very short-lived and can only be produced an ''atom-at-a-time'' via heavy ion reactions, is discussed. 53 refs., 19 figs.

  12. Swift Heavy Ions in Matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rothard, Hermann; Severin, Daniel; Trautmann, Christina

    2015-12-01

    The present volume contains the proceedings of the Ninth International Symposium on Swift Heavy Ions in Matter (SHIM). This conference was held in Darmstadt, from 18 to 21 May 2015. SHIM is a triennial series, which started about 25 years ago by a joint initiative of CIRIL - Caen and GSI - Darmstadt, with the aim of promoting fundamental and applied interdisciplinary research in the field of high-energy, heavy-ion interaction processes with matter. SHIM was successively organized in Caen (1989), Bensheim (1992), Caen (1995), Berlin (1998), Catania (2002), Aschaffenburg (2005), Lyon (2008), and Kyoto (2012). The conference attracts scientists from many different fields using high-energy heavy ions delivered by large accelerator facilities and characterized by strong and short electronic excitations.

  13. Heavy ion collisions and cosmology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Floerchinger, Stefan

    2016-12-01

    There are interesting parallels between the physics of heavy ion collisions and cosmology. Both systems are out-of-equilibrium and relativistic fluid dynamics plays an important role for their theoretical description. From a comparison one can draw interesting conclusions for both sides. For heavy ion physics it could be rewarding to attempt a theoretical description of fluid perturbations similar to cosmological perturbation theory. In the context of late time cosmology, it could be interesting to study dissipative properties such as shear and bulk viscosity and corresponding relaxation times in more detail. Knowledge and experience from heavy ion physics could help to constrain the microscopic properties of dark matter from observational knowledge of the cosmological fluid properties.

  14. Accelerators for heavy ion fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Bangerter, R.O.

    1985-10-01

    Large fusion devices will almost certainly produce net energy. However, a successful commercial fusion energy system must also satisfy important engineering and economic constraints. Inertial confinement fusion power plants driven by multi-stage, heavy-ion accelerators appear capable of meeting these constraints. The reasons behind this promising outlook for heavy-ion fusion are given in this report. This report is based on the transcript of a talk presented at the Symposium on Lasers and Particle Beams for Fusion and Strategic Defense at the University of Rochester on April 17-19, 1985.

  15. Open Heavy Flavor Measurements in Heavy Ion Collisions with CMS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Jian

    2016-12-01

    The measurement of heavy flavor production is a powerful tool to study the properties of the high-density QCD medium created in heavy-ion collisions as heavy quarks are sensitive to the transport properties of the medium and may interact with the matter differently than light quarks. Heavy flavor jets, non-prompt J / ψ (J / ψ from B-hadron decay) and fully reconstructed B mesons have been studied in PbPb collisions at 2.76 TeV and pPb collisions at 5.02 TeV with CMS. Recently, the nuclear modification factor of prompt D0 mesons has been measured in PbPb collisions at 2.76 TeV with CMS as a function of both transverse momentum and collision centrality. These studies show that prompt D0 production is suppressed in semi-central to central PbPb collisions and the suppression is smaller at high pT. A comparison with the RAA of charged particle and non-prompt J / ψ hints a hierarchy of suppression as a function of flavor.

  16. Evidence for electroweak production of W±W±jj in pp collisions at sqrt[s] = 8 TeV with the ATLAS detector.

    PubMed

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