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Sample records for heavy neutron clusters

  1. Neutron-halo nuclei in cold synthesis and cluster decay of heavy nuclei: {ital Z}=104 nucleus as an example

    SciTech Connect

    Gupta, R.K.; Singh, S.; Muenzenberg, G.; Scheid, W. ||

    1995-05-01

    Nuclei at the neutron-drip line are studied. The light neutron-halo nuclei are found to play an important role for both cold fusion reactions and exotic cluster decay studies of heavy nuclei at the neutron-drip line. For cold fusion reactions, beams of neutron-halo nuclei are shown to occur as natural extensions of the conventional lighter beams but with the corresponding target nuclei as the heavy neutron-rich radioactive nuclei. Thus, in synthesizing the various isotopes of a neutron-rich cool compound nucleus, both the target and projectile nuclei have to be richer in neutrons, with their proton numbers remaining the same. On the other hand, neutron-halo (cluster) decays are favored for a relatively less neutron-rich parent nucleus. Possible consequences of this work for the shell structure effects in neutron-rich heavy nuclei are also pointed out. This follows from the fact that the so far observed phenomena of both cold fusion and cluster radioactivity are associated with closed or nearly closed shell nuclei. Calculations are made for {sup 274,288}104, using the quantum mechanical fragmentation theory for cold fusion reaction studies and a performed cluster model for cluster decay studies.

  2. HEAVY WATER MODERATED NEUTRONIC REACTOR

    DOEpatents

    Szilard, L.

    1958-04-29

    A nuclear reactor of the type which utilizes uranium fuel elements and a liquid coolant is described. The fuel elements are in the form of elongated tubes and are disposed within outer tubes extending through a tank containing heavy water, which acts as a moderator. The ends of the fuel tubes are connected by inlet and discharge headers, and liquid bismuth is circulated between the headers and through the fuel tubes for cooling. Helium is circulated through the annular space between the outer tubes in the tank and the fuel tubes to cool the water moderator to prevent boiling. The fuel tubes are covered with a steel lining, and suitable control means, heat exchange means, and pumping means for the coolants are provided to complete the reactor assembly.

  3. The Chemical Evolution of Heavy Elements in Globular Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shingles, Luke J.; Karakas, Amanda I.; Hirschi, Raphael

    2014-01-01

    We present preliminary results from a chemical evolution model that tracks the composition of heavy elements beyond iron in a globular cluster. The heavy elements can be used as tracers of the nucleosynthetic events that defined the formation and evolution of star clusters in the early Universe. In particular, the chemical evolution model focuses on the hypothesis that rapidly-rotating massive stars produced the heavy elements via the slow neutron-capture process and seeded the proto-cluster while the stars we see today were still forming. We compare our model with heavy element abundances in M4 and M5, and M22. Our results are strongly dependent on the highly uncertain rate of the 17O(α,γ)21Ne reaction, which determines the strength of 16O as a neutron poison. We find that the [Pb/Ba] ratio is too low to match the empirical value, which might suggest that a contribution from AGB stars is required.

  4. Clusters in neutron-rich light nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jelavić Malenica, D.; Milin, M.; Di Pietro, A.; Figuera, P.; Lattuada, M.; Miljanić, D.; Musumarra, A.; Pellegriti, M. G.; Prepolec, L.; Scuderi, V.; Skukan, N.; Soić, N.; Torresi, D.; Uroić, M.

    2016-05-01

    Due to their high selectivity, transfer and sequential decay reactions are powerful tools for studies of both single particle (nucleon) and cluster states in light nuclei. Their use is particularly simple for investigations of α-particle clustering (because α-particle has Jπ=0+, which simplifies spin and parity assignments to observed cluster states), but they are also easily applicable to other types of clustering. Recent results on clustering in neutron-rich isotopes of beryllium, boron and carbon obtained measuring the 10B+10B reactions (at 50 and 72 MeV) are presented. The highly efficient and segmented detector systems used, built from 4 Double Sided Silicon Strip Detectors (DSSSD) allowed detection of double and multiple coincidences and, in that way, studies of states populated in transfer reactions, as well as their sequential decay.

  5. Cluster emissions with ? daughter from neutron-rich nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Satish; Batra, J. S.; Gupta, Raj K.

    1996-02-01

    Cluster emissions from neutron-rich 0954-3899/22/2/006/img2, and 0954-3899/22/2/006/img3 nuclei are studied within the preformed cluster model of Malik and Gupta. Q-value estimates of the decays selected on the basis of shell effects in binding energies and their relative preformation probabilities show that these nuclei are stable (Q<0) against 0954-3899/22/2/006/img4 and 0954-3899/22/2/006/img5 decays and all the metastable (Q>0) decays are of non-alpha-like heavy clusters. The most probable decays (minimum half-life times) are the ones with a doubly magic 0954-3899/22/2/006/img6 nucleus as the daughter nucleus, arising due to the WKB penetrability. Compared to the presently measurable alpha-like cluster decays of the corresponding neutron-deficient parents into a 0954-3899/22/2/006/img7 daughter nucleus, these decays are suppressed by many orders of magnitude.

  6. Production of 14 MeV neutrons by heavy ions

    DOEpatents

    Brugger, Robert M.; Miller, Lowell G.; Young, Robert C.

    1977-01-01

    This invention relates to a neutron generator and a method for the production of 14 MeV neutrons. Heavy ions are accelerated to impinge upon a target mixture of deuterium and tritium to produce recoil atoms of deuterium and tritium. These recoil atoms have a sufficient energy such that they interact with other atoms of tritium or deuterium in the target mixture to produce approximately 14 MeV neutrons.

  7. Physical particularities of nuclear reactors using heavy moderators of neutrons

    SciTech Connect

    Kulikov, G. G. Shmelev, A. N.

    2016-12-15

    In nuclear reactors, thermal neutron spectra are formed using moderators with small atomic weights. For fast reactors, inserting such moderators in the core may create problems since they efficiently decelerate the neutrons. In order to form an intermediate neutron spectrum, it is preferable to employ neutron moderators with sufficiently large atomic weights, using {sup 233}U as a fissile nuclide and {sup 232}Th and {sup 231}Pa as fertile ones. The aim of the work is to investigate the properties of heavy neutron moderators and to assess their advantages. The analysis employs the JENDL-4.0 nuclear data library and the SCALE program package for simulating the variation of fuel composition caused by irradiation in the reactor. The following main results are obtained. By using heavy moderators with small neutron moderation steps, one is able to (1) increase the rate of resonance capture, so that the amount of fertile material in the fuel may be reduced while maintaining the breeding factor of the core; (2) use the vacant space for improving the fuel-element properties by adding inert, strong, and thermally conductive materials and by implementing dispersive fuel elements in which the fissile material is self-replenished and neutron multiplication remains stable during the process of fuel burnup; and (3) employ mixtures of different fertile materials with resonance capture cross sections in order to increase the resonance-lattice density and the probability of resonance neutron capture leading to formation of fissile material. The general conclusion is that, by forming an intermediate neutron spectrum with heavy neutron moderators, one can use the fuel more efficiently and improve nuclear safety.

  8. Physical particularities of nuclear reactors using heavy moderators of neutrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kulikov, G. G.; Shmelev, A. N.

    2016-12-01

    In nuclear reactors, thermal neutron spectra are formed using moderators with small atomic weights. For fast reactors, inserting such moderators in the core may create problems since they efficiently decelerate the neutrons. In order to form an intermediate neutron spectrum, it is preferable to employ neutron moderators with sufficiently large atomic weights, using 233U as a fissile nuclide and 232Th and 231Pa as fertile ones. The aim of the work is to investigate the properties of heavy neutron moderators and to assess their advantages. The analysis employs the JENDL-4.0 nuclear data library and the SCALE program package for simulating the variation of fuel composition caused by irradiation in the reactor. The following main results are obtained. By using heavy moderators with small neutron moderation steps, one is able to (1) increase the rate of resonance capture, so that the amount of fertile material in the fuel may be reduced while maintaining the breeding factor of the core; (2) use the vacant space for improving the fuel-element properties by adding inert, strong, and thermally conductive materials and by implementing dispersive fuel elements in which the fissile material is self-replenished and neutron multiplication remains stable during the process of fuel burnup; and (3) employ mixtures of different fertile materials with resonance capture cross sections in order to increase the resonance-lattice density and the probability of resonance neutron capture leading to formation of fissile material. The general conclusion is that, by forming an intermediate neutron spectrum with heavy neutron moderators, one can use the fuel more efficiently and improve nuclear safety.

  9. Benchmarking of Neutron Production of Heavy-Ion Transport Codes

    SciTech Connect

    Remec, Igor; Ronningen, Reginald M.; Heilbronn, Lawrence

    2012-01-01

    Accurate prediction of radiation fields generated by heavy ion interactions is important in medical applications, space missions, and in design and operation of rare isotope research facilities. In recent years, several well-established computer codes in widespread use for particle and radiation transport calculations have been equipped with the capability to simulate heavy ion transport and interactions. To assess and validate these capabilities, we performed simulations of a series of benchmark-quality heavy ion experiments with the computer codes FLUKA, MARS15, MCNPX, and PHITS. We focus on the comparisons of secondary neutron production. Results are encouraging; however, further improvements in models and codes and additional benchmarking are required.

  10. NO HEAVY-ELEMENT DISPERSION IN THE GLOBULAR CLUSTER M92

    SciTech Connect

    Cohen, Judith G.

    2011-10-20

    Although there have been recent claims that there is a large dispersion in the abundances of the heavy neutron capture elements in the old Galactic globular cluster M92, we show that the measured dispersion for the absolute abundances of four of the rare earth elements within a sample of 12 luminous red giants in M92 ({<=}0.07 dex) does not exceed the relevant sources of uncertainty. As expected from previous studies, the heavy elements show the signature of the r-process. Their abundance ratios are essentially identical to those of M30, another nearby globular cluster of similar metallicity.

  11. Laser induced neutron production by explosion of the deuterium clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Holkundkar, Amol R.; Mishra, Gaurav Gupta, N. K.

    2014-01-15

    The high energy deuterium ions serve as compact source of neutrons when fused with either deuterium or tritium atoms. In view of this, the explosion of the deuterium clusters under the influence of the laser pulse with intensity ranging from 10{sup 15} to 10{sup 19} W/cm{sup 2} is being studied along with the effect of the cluster radius and inter-cluster distance. The objective of this article is to study the efficiency of the deuterium cluster as a compact source of neutrons under various laser and cluster parameters. It is being observed that the cluster density (number of clusters per unit volume) is quite important to gain high neutron yield.

  12. Alpha decay and cluster decay of some neutron-rich actinide nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carmel Vigila Bai, G. M.; Agnes, R. Nithya

    2017-03-01

    Nuclei in the actinide region are good in exhibiting cluster radioactivity. In the present work, the half-lives of α-decay and heavy cluster emission from certain actinide nuclei have been calculated using cubic plus Yukawa plus exponential model (CYEM). Our model has a cubic potential for the overlapping region which is smoothly connected by a Yukawa plus exponential potential for the region after separation. The computed half-lives are compared with those of other theoretical models and are found to be in good agreement with each other. In this work, we have also studied the deformation effects on half-lives of cluster decay. These deformation effects lower the half-life values and it is also found that the neutron-rich parent nuclei slow down the cluster decay process. Geiger-Nuttal plots for various clusters are found to be linear and most of the emitted clusters are α-like nuclei.

  13. Physics with Heavy Neutron Rich Ribs at the Hribf

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radford, David

    2002-10-01

    The Holifield Radioactive Ion Beam Facility at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory has recently produced the world's first post-accelerated beams of heavy neutron-rich nuclei. B(E2;0^+ arrow 2^+) values for neutron-rich ^126,128Sn and ^132,134,136Te isotopes have been measured by Coulomb excitation of radioactive ion beams in inverse kinematics. The results for ^132Te and ^134Te (N=80,82) show excellent agreement with systematics of lighter Te isotopes, but the B(E2) value for ^136Te (N=84) is unexpectedly small. Single-neutron transfer reactions leading to ^135Te were identified using a ^134Te beam on ^natBe and ^13C targets at energies just above the Coulomb barrier. The use of the Be target provided an unambiguous signature for neutron transfer through the detection of two correlated α particles, arising from the breakup of unstable ^8Be. The results of these experiments will be discussed, togther with plans for future experiments with these heavy n-rich RIBs.

  14. Neutron transfer and flow in reactions between heavy neutron-rich nuclei.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shapira, Dan; Liang, Felix J.; Gross, Carl J.; Varner, Robert L.; Beene, James R.

    2006-10-01

    Two Step WKB calcualtions of nucleus nucleus capture were carried out. In our calcualtions we nvestigate the possibility of enhanced capture cross sectins for neutron rich heavy nuclei. The model calculation uses a systematic potential [1] that incorporates the effect of barrier distributions due to excitation and deformation in the entrance channel. Neutron transfer is treated in a semiclassical approximation [2][3]. The transfer form factor used in neutron transfer saturates at an internuclear distance where where neutron can flow freely between the two nuclear centers [4]. [1] K. Siwek-Wilczynska and J. Wilczynski Phys. Rev. C69, 024611 (2004). [2] V. Yu. Denisov Eur. Phys. A7, 87 (2000). [3] V. I. Zagrebaev Phys. Rev. C7, 061601R (2003). [4] P.H. Stelson Phys. Lett. B205, 190 (1988).

  15. Colliding Neutron Stars as the Source of Heavy Elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2016-09-01

    Where do the heavy elements the chemical elements beyond iron in our universe come from? One of the primary candidate sources is the merger of two neutron stars, but recent observations have cast doubt on this model. Can neutron-star mergers really be responsible?Elements from Collisions?Periodic table showing the origin of each chemical element. Those produced by the r-process are shaded orange and attributed to supernovae in this image; though supernovae are one proposed source of r-process elements, an alternative source is the merger of two neutron stars. [Cmglee]When a binary-neutron-star system inspirals and the two neutron stars smash into each other, a shower of neutrons are released. These neutrons are thought to bombard the surrounding atoms, rapidly producing heavy elements in what is known as r-process nucleosynthesis.So could these mergers be responsible for producing the majority of the universes heavy r-process elements? Proponents of this model argue that its supported by observations. The overall amount of heavy r-process material in the Milky Way, for instance, is consistent with the expected ejection amounts from mergers, based both on predicted merger rates for neutron stars in the galaxy, and on the observed rates of soft gamma-ray bursts (which are thought to accompany double-neutron-star mergers).Challenges from Ultra-Faint DwarfsRecently, however, r-process elements have been observed in ultra-faint dwarf satellite galaxies. This discovery raises two major challenges to the merger model for heavy-element production:When neutron stars are born during a core-collapse supernova, mass is ejected, providing the stars with asymmetric natal kicks. During the second collapse in a double-neutron-star binary, wouldnt the kick exceed the low escape velocity of an ultra-faint dwarf, ejecting the binary before it could merge and enrich the galaxy?Ultra-faint dwarfs have very old stellar populations and the observation of r-process elements in these stars

  16. The heavy element yields of neutron capture nucleosynthesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cameron, A. G. W.

    1982-01-01

    Consideration of the contribution made to the abundances of the heavy element isotopes by the S- and R-processes of nucleosynthesis has led to the determination that the previous assumption concerning the exclusive alignment of isobars to one or the other of these processes is probably in error. If the relatively small odd and even mass number abundance fluctuations characterizing R-process abundances are always the case, as assumed by this study, S-process contributions to the abundances of R-process isobars are substantial, consistent with transient flashing episodes in the S-process neutron production processes. A smooth and monotonically-decreasing curve of the abundance of the S-process yields times the neutron capture cross-section versus mass number is therefore the primary tool for the separation of the abundances due to the two processes.

  17. Neutron skin studies of medium and heavy nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thiel, M.; Becker, D.; Ferretti, M.; Kumar, K.; Sfienti, C.

    2014-06-01

    The recent PREX experiment at JLab has demonstrated the sensitivity of parity violating electron scattering to the neutron density, meanwhile outlining its major experimental challenges. On the other side, intermediate energy photons are an ideal probe for studying the properties of strongly interacting matter from the nuclear scale down to the sub-nuclear components of the nucleus. Among others coherent pion photoproduction can provide information on the existence and nature of neutron skins in nuclei. The simultaneous combination of different techniques allows a systematic determination across the periodic table thus benchmarking modern calculation. Recently a systematic investigation of the latter method has been exploited at MAMI (Mainz). At MESA the same setup as in the measurement of the weak mixing angle can be used to determine the parity-violating asymmetry for polarized electrons scattered on heavy nuclei with a 1% resolution. Status and prospects of the projects are presented.

  18. Neutron productions in the fragmentation of relativistic heavy nuclei and formation of a beam of high-energy neutrons

    SciTech Connect

    Yurevich, V. I.

    2016-03-15

    The production of quasimonoenergetic high-energy neutrons at zero angle (0°) in the spallation of relativistic heavy nuclei is discussed by considering the example of the interaction of lead nuclei with light target nuclei. It is shown that this process can be used to generate a beam of high-energy neutrons at existing heavy ion accelerators. At the same time, itmay lead to the appearance of a parasitic neutron beam because of the interaction of the heavy-ion beam used with beam line and experimental setup materials.

  19. A Semi-microscopic Approach to Clusterization in Heavy Nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Darai, J.; Cseh, J.; Antonenko, N. V.; Jolos, R. V.; Algora, A.; Hess, P. O.; Scheid, W.

    2009-08-26

    We present a semimicroscopic approach to clusterization in heavy nuclei. The method is largely based on symmetry-considerations. As an example we determine the possible binary clusterizations of the shape isomers of the {sup 56}Ni nucleus. We combine our structure-considerations with energy-calculations.

  20. Proton skins in momentum space and neutron skins in coordinate space in heavy nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Bao-Jun; Li, Bao-An; Chen, Lie-Wen

    2016-12-01

    Neutron skins in coordinate space and proton skins in momentum space are predicted to coexist in heavy nuclei, and their correlation is governed by Liouville's theorem and Heisenberg's uncertainty principle. An analysis of their correlation within a further extended Thomas-Fermi approximation incorporating effects of nucleon short-range correlations reveals generally that protons move faster than neutrons in neutron skins of heavy nuclei.

  1. Cluster radioactivity in very heavy nuclei: a new perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Routray, T. R.; Nayak, Jagajjaya; Basu, D. N.

    2009-08-01

    Exotic cluster decay of very heavy nuclei is studied using the microscopic nuclear potentials obtained by folding density dependent M3Y effective interaction with the densities of the cluster and the daughter nuclei. The microscopic nuclear potential, Coulomb interaction and the centrifugal barrier arising out of spin-parity conservation are used to obtain the potential between the cluster and the daughter nuclei. Half life values are calculated in the WKB framework and the preformation factors are extracted. The latter values are seen to have only a very weak dependence on the mass of the emitted cluster.

  2. Cluster preformation law for heavy and superheavy nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, K.; Zhang, H. F.

    2017-08-01

    The concept of cluster radioactivity has been extended to allow emitted particles with ZC>28 for superheavy nuclei by nuclear theory [Poenaru et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 107, 062503 (2011), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.107.062503]. The preformation and emission mechanics of heavy-ion particles must be examined again before the fascinating radioactivity is observed for superheavy nuclei in laboratory. We extract the cluster preformation factor for heavy and superheavy nuclei within a preformed cluster model, in which the decay constant is the product of the preformation factor, assault frequency, and penetration probability. The calculated results show that the cluster penetration probability for superheavy nuclei is larger than that for actinide elements. The preformation factor depends on the nuclear structures of the emitted cluster and mother nucleus, and the well-known cluster preformation law S (AC) =S (α) (AC-1 )/3 [Blendowske and Walliser, Phys. Rev. Lett. 61, 1930 (1988), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.61.1930] will break down when the mass number of the emitted cluster Ac>28 , and new preformation formulas are proposed to estimate the preformation factor for heavy and superheavy nuclei.

  3. Status and prospects of investigations into the collinear cluster decay of heavy nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Pyatkov, Yu. V.; Kamanin, D. V.; Alexandrov, A. A.; Alexandrova, I. A.; Mkaza, N.; Zhuchko, V. E.; Kondratyev, N. A.; Kuznetsova, E. A. Mishinsky, G. V.; Malaza, V.; Strekalovsky, A. O.; Strekalovsky, O. V.

    2014-12-15

    Basic experimental results confirming the existence a new cluster-decay type called collinear cluster tripartition (CCT) are presented. Decays of this type manifest themselves, in particular, as a two-dimensional region of a locally enhanced yield of fragments (bump) that corresponds to specific missing-mass values in the mass-mass distribution of fission fragments. One of the decay modes that contribute to the bump can be treated as a cluster-decay type that is new in relation to the well-known heavy-ion or lead radioactivity. The conclusions drawn from an analysis of correlation mass distributions are confirmed by the results obtained from neutron-gated data, measurements of the nuclear charge for CCT events, and the direct detection of new-decay products.

  4. Generation of high-energy neutron beam by fragmentation of relativistic heavy nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yurevich, Vladimir

    2016-09-01

    The phenomenon of multiple production of neutrons in reactions with heavy nuclei induced by high-energy protons and light nuclei is analyzed using a Moving Source Model. The Lorentz transformation of the obtained neutron distributions is used to study the neutron characteristics in the inverse kinematics where relativistic heavy nuclei bombard a light-mass target. The neutron beam generated at 0∘has a Gaussian shape with a maximum at the energy of the projectile nucleons and an energy resolution σE/E < 4% above 6 GeV.

  5. Nonlinear stopping of heavy clusters in matter: A case study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anders, Christian; Urbassek, Herbert M.

    2007-05-01

    When impacting on a solid, heavy cluster atoms are stopped less then equi-velocity atoms. Using molecular-dynamics simulation, we study this so-called clearing-the-way effect systematically for the exemplary case of Au n clusters ( n = 1-402) bombarding a solid Ar target with energies in the range of Eat = 10-1000 eV/atom. We find that cluster stopping is reduced by a factor n- β with respect to that of equi-velocity atoms. The exponent β decreases from 0.46 at Eat = 10 eV/atom to 0.17 at Eat = 1000 eV/atom.

  6. Heavy elements in globular clusters: The role of asymptotic giant branch stars

    SciTech Connect

    Straniero, O.; Cristallo, S.; Piersanti, L.

    2014-04-10

    Recent observations of heavy elements in globular clusters reveal intriguing deviations from the standard paradigm of the early galactic nucleosynthesis. If the r-process contamination is a common feature of halo stars, s-process enhancements are found in a few globular clusters only. We show that the combined pollution of asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars with a mass ranging between 3 to 6 M {sub ☉} may account for most of the features of the s-process overabundance in M4 and M22. In these stars, the s process is a mixture of two very different neutron-capture nucleosynthesis episodes. The first is due to the {sup 13}C(α, n){sup 16}O reaction and takes place during the interpulse periods. The second is due to the {sup 22}Ne(α, n){sup 25}Mg reaction and takes place in the convective zones generated by thermal pulses. The production of the heaviest s elements (from Ba to Pb) requires the first neutron burst, while the second produces large overabundances of light s (Rb, Sr, Y, Zr). The first mainly operates in the less massive AGB stars, while the second dominates in the more massive. From the heavy-s/light-s ratio, we derive that the pollution phase should last for 150 ± 50 Myr, a period short enough compared to the formation timescale of the globular cluster system, but long enough to explain why the s-process pollution is observed in a few cases only. With few exceptions, our theoretical prediction provides a reasonable reproduction of the observed s-process abundances, from Sr to Hf. However, Ce is probably underproduced by our models, while Rb and Pb are overproduced. Possible solutions are discussed.

  7. Neutron yield and dose equivalent from heavy ion interactions on thick target

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sunil, C.; Saxena, A.; Choudhury, R. K.; Pant, L. M.

    2004-12-01

    Thick target neutron yields and angular distributions are essential for shielding calculations for ion beam accelerators. Most of such measurements available in the literature are for proton and alpha particle bombardments. In case of heavy ions, very few data are available in the energy region of 20 MeV amu -1 and below. We report here the neutron yield, double differential neutron yields and neutron dose equivalent values obtained from the double differential yields at 0° and 90° with respect to the beam for various heavy ions in the energy range of 3.5-7.0 MeV amu -1. Pulse shape discrimination was used to separate neutrons from gamma rays and time of flight technique was used for energy measurement. The double differential neutron yields were fitted using the moving source model and the nuclear temperature and source intensity are also determined. The neutron yield increases inversely with the mass of the projectile except in the case of 7Li where the yields are much lower than that obtained from 11B. This could be due to the structure of the loosely bound 7Li projectile. The neutron dose equivalent shows increasing trend with the decrease of the mass of the projectile.

  8. Spectroscopic factors and cluster decay half-lives of heavy nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Kuklin, S.N.; Adamian, G.G.; Antonenko, N.V.

    2005-01-01

    The cluster radioactivity is treated under the assumption that the light clusters are produced by a collective motion of the nuclear system in the charge asymmetry coordinate with further penetration through the Coulomb barrier. The known experimental data on cluster radioactivity are described. The half-lives of cluster emission of neutron-deficient actinides and medium-mass nuclei are predicted.

  9. Coupled cluster calculations of neutron-rich nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hagen, Gaute

    2016-09-01

    In this talk I will present recent highlights from ab initio computations of atomic nuclei using coupled-cluster methods with state-of-the-art interactions from chiral effective field theory (EFT). The recent progress in computing nuclei from scratch is based on new optimizations of interactions from chiral EFT, and ab initio methods with a polynomial computational cost together with available super computing resources. The physics advancements I will discuss include: (i) accurate nuclear binding energies and radii of light and medium-mass nuclei, (ii) the neutron distribution and electric dipole polarizability of the nucleus 48Ca, (iii) and the structure of the rare nucleus 78Ni from first principles. All these quantities are currently targeted by precision measurements worldwide.

  10. Second neutron star in globular cluster M4 .

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Różańska, A.; Kałużny, J.; Różyczka, M.; Krzemiński, W.; Thompson, I. B.

    We show that the optical counterpart of the brightest X-ray source C-X 1 in M4 is a ˜ 20th magnitude star, located in the color-magnitude diagram on (or very close to) the main sequence of the cluster, and exhibiting sinusoidal variations of the flux. We find the X-ray flux to be also periodically variable, with X-ray and optical minima coinciding. Stability of the optical light curve, lack of UV-excess, and unrealistic mean density resulting from period-density relation for semidetached systems speak against the original identification of CX 1 as a cataclysmic variable. We argue that the X-ray active component of this system is a neutron star, probably a millisecond pulsar.

  11. Heavy and Superheavy Elements Production in High Intensive Neutron Fluxes of Explosive Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lutostansky, Yu. S.; Lyashuk, V. I.; Panov, I. V.

    2015-06-01

    Mathematical model of heavy and superheavy nuclei production in intensive pulsed neutron fluxes of explosive process is developed. The pulse character of the process allows dividing it in time into two stages: very short rapid process of multiple neutron captures with higher temperature and very intensive neutron fluxes, and relatively slower process with lesser temperature and neutron fluxes. The model was also extended for calculation of the transuranium yields in nuclear explosions takes into account the adiabatic character of the process, the probabilities of delayed fission, and the emission of delayed neutrons. Also the binary starting target isotopes compositions were included. Calculations of heavy transuranium and transfermium nuclei production were made for "Mike", "Par" and "Barbel" experiments, performed in USA. It is shown that the production of transfermium neutron-rich nuclei and superheavy elements with A ~ 295 is only possible when using binary mixture of starting isotopes with the significant addition of heavy components, such as long-lived isotopes of curium, or californium.

  12. Neutron attenuation characteristics of polyethylene, polyvinyl chloride, and heavy aggregate concrete and mortars.

    PubMed

    Abdul-Majid, S; Othman, F

    1994-03-01

    Polyethylene and polyvinyl chloride pellets were introduced into concrete to improve its neutron attenuation characteristics while several types of heavy coarse aggregates were used to improve its gamma ray attenuation properties. Neutron and gamma ray attenuation were studied in concrete samples containing coarse aggregates of barite, pyrite, basalt, hematite, and marble as well as polyethylene and polyvinyl chloride pellets in narrow-beam geometry. The highest neutron attenuation was shown by polyethylene mortar, followed by polyvinyl chloride mortar; barite and pyrite concrete showed higher gamma ray attenuation than ordinary concrete. Broad-beam and continuous (infinite) medium geometries were used to study the neutron attenuation of samples containing polymers at different concentrations with and without heavy aggregates, the fitting equations were established, and from these the neutron removal coefficients were deduced. In a radiation field of neutrons and gamma rays, the appropriate concentration of polymer and heavy aggregate can be selected to give the optimum total dose attenuation depending on the relative intensities of each type of radiation. This would give much better design flexibility over ordinary concrete. The compressive strength tests performed on mortar and concrete samples showed that their value, in general, decreases as polymer concentration increases and that the polyvinyl chloride mortar showed higher values than the polyethylene mortar. For general construction purposes, the compression strength was considered acceptable in these samples.

  13. Abrasion-ablation model for neutron production in heavy ion reactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cucinotta, Francis A.; Wilson, John W.; Townsend, Lawrence W.

    1995-01-01

    In heavy ion reactions, neutron production at forward angles is observed to occur with a Gaussian shape that is centered near the beam energy and extends to energies well above that of the beam. This paper presents an abrasion-ablation model for making quantitative predictions of the neutron spectrum. To describe neutrons produced from the abrasion step of the reaction where the projectile and target overlap, the authors use the Glauber model and include effects of final-state interactions. They then use the prefragment mass distribution from abrasion with a statistical evaporation model to estimate the neutron spectrum resulting from ablation. Measurements of neutron production from Ne and Nb beams are compared with calculations, and good agreement is found.

  14. A high repetition rate laser-heavy water based neutron source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hah, Jungmoo; He, Zhaohan; Nees, John; Krushelnick, Karl; Thomas, Alexander; CenterUltrafast Optical Science Team

    2015-11-01

    Neutrons have numerous applications in diverse areas, such as medicine, security, and material science. For example, sources of MeV neutrons may be used for active interrogation for nuclear security applications. Recently, alternative ways to generate neutron flux have been studied. Among them, ultrashort laser pulse interactions with dense plasma have attracted significant attention as compact, pulse sources of neutrons. To generate neutrons using a laser through fusion reactions, thin solid density targets have been used in a pitcher-catcher arrangement, using deuterated plastic for example. However, the use of solid targets is limited for high-repetition rate operation due to the need to refresh the target for every laser shot. Here, we use a free flowing heavy water target with a high repetition rate (500 Hz) laser without a catcher. From the interaction between a 10 micron scale diameter heavy water stream with the Lambda-cubed laser system at the Univ. of Michigan (12mJ, 800nm, 35fs), deuterons collide with each other resulting in D-D fusion reactions generating 2.45 MeV neutrons. Under best conditions a time average of ~ 105 n/s of neutrons are generated.

  15. Controllability of depth dose distribution for neutron capture therapy at the Heavy Water Neutron Irradiation Facility of Kyoto University Research Reactor.

    PubMed

    Sakurai, Yoshinori; Kobayashi, Tooru

    2002-10-01

    The updating construction of the Heavy Water Neutron Irradiation Facility of the Kyoto University Research Reactor has been performed from November 1995 to March 1996 mainly for the improvement in neutron capture therapy. On the performance, the neutron irradiation modes with the variable energy spectra from almost pure thermal to epi-thermal neutrons became available by the control of the heavy-water thickness in the spectrum shifter and by the open-and-close of the cadmium and boral thermal neutron filters. The depth distributions of thermal, epi-thermal and fast neutron fluxes were measured by activation method using gold and indium, and the depth distributions of gamma-ray absorbed dose rate were measured using thermo-luminescent dosimeter of beryllium oxide for the several irradiation modes. From these measured data, the controllability of the depth dose distribution using the spectrum shifter and the thermal neutron filters was confirmed.

  16. Boron neutron capture enhancement (BNCE) of fast neutron irradiation for glioblastoma: increase of thermal neutron flux with heavy material collimation, a theoretical evaluation.

    PubMed

    Paquis, P; Pignol, J P; Lonjon, M; Brassart, N; Courdi, A; Chauvel, P; Grellier, P; Chatel, M

    1999-01-01

    Despite the fact that fast neutron irradiation of glioblastoma has shown on autopsies an ability to sterilize tumors, no therapeutic windows have been found for these particles due to their toxicity toward normal brain. Therefore, the Boron Neutron Capture Enhancement (BNCE) of fast neutron beam has been suggested. This paper addresses the problem of fast neutron beam collimation, which induces a dramatic decrease of the thermal neutron flux in the depth of the tissues when smaller irradiation fields are used. Thermoluminescent dosimeter TLD-600 and TLD-700 were used to determine the thermal neutron flux within a Plexiglas phantom irradiated under the Nice Biomedical Cyclotron p(60)+Be(32) fast neutron beam. A BNCE of 4.6% in physical dose was determined for a 10 x 10 cm2 field, and of 10.4% for a 20 x 20 cm2 one. A Dose Modification Factor of 1.19 was calculated for CAL 58 glioblastoma cells irradiated thanks to the larger field. In order to increase the thermal flux in depth while shaping the beam, heavy material collimation was studied with Monte Carlo simulations using coupled FLUKA and MCNP-4A codes. The use of 20 cm width lead blocks allowed a 2 fold thermal neutron flux increase in the depth of the phantom, while shielding the fast neutron beam with a fast neutron dose transmission of 23%. Using the DMF of 1.19, a BNCE of 40% was calculated in the beam axis. This enhancement might be sufficient to open, at least theoretically, a therapeutic window.

  17. Calibration of the neutron detectors for the cluster fusion experiment on the Texas Petawatt Laser

    SciTech Connect

    Bang, W.; Quevedo, H. J.; Dyer, G.; Rougk, J.; Kim, I.; McCormick, M.; Bernstein, A. C.; Ditmire, T.

    2012-06-15

    Three types of neutron detectors (plastic scintillation detectors, indium activation detectors, and CR-39 track detectors) were calibrated for the measurement of 2.45 MeV DD fusion neutron yields from the deuterium cluster fusion experiment on the Texas Petawatt Laser. A Cf-252 neutron source and 2.45 MeV fusion neutrons generated from laser-cluster interaction were used as neutron sources. The scintillation detectors were calibrated such that they can detect up to 10{sup 8} DD fusion neutrons per shot in current mode under high electromagnetic pulse environments. Indium activation detectors successfully measured neutron yields as low as 10{sup 4} per shot and up to 10{sup 11} neutrons. The use of a Cf-252 neutron source allowed cross calibration of CR-39 and indium activation detectors at high neutron yields ({approx}10{sup 11}). The CR-39 detectors provided consistent measurements of the total neutron yield of Cf-252 when a modified detection efficiency of 4.6 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -4} was used. The combined use of all three detectors allowed for a detection range of 10{sup 4} to 10{sup 11} neutrons per shot.

  18. Leap to explore the region of neutron-rich heavy element isotopes

    SciTech Connect

    Hoffman, D.C.

    1985-10-01

    The research aims of the Large Einsteinium Activation Program (LEAP) are described. This program is a major initiative to exploit currently existing expertise in heavy element research and the potential for producing very heavy actinide target materials such as 285-day /sup 254/Es at the High Flux Isotope Reactor at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The stated aims of the program are to produce heavy element isotopes, to conduct chemical studies of these isotopes, to study the nuclear properties of such isotopes, and to produce a superheavy element (183 neutrons) by the using a /sup 254/Es target and /sup 48/Ca projectiles. 13 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs. (DWL)

  19. Neutron-Capture Nucleosynthesis and the Chemical Evolution of Globular Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shingles, Luke J.

    2015-09-01

    Elements heavier than iron are almost entirely produced in stars through neutron captures and radioactive decays. Of these heavy elements, roughly half are produced by the slow neutron-capture process (s-process), which takes place under extended exposure to low neutron densities. Most of the s-process production occurs in stars with initial masses between roughly 0.8 and 8 solar masses (Msun), which evolve through the Asymptotic Giant Branch (AGB) phase. This thesis explores several topics related to AGB stars and the s-process, with a focus on comparing theoretical models to observations in the literature on planetary nebulae, post-AGB stars, and globular cluster stars. A recurring theme is the uncertainty of carbon-13-pocket formation, which is crucial for building accurate models of s-process nucleosynthesis. We first investigated whether neutron-capture reactions in AGB stars are the cause of the low sulphur abundances in planetary nebulae and post-AGB stars relative to the interstellar medium. Accounting for uncertainties in the size of the partial mixing zone that forms carbon-13 pockets and the rates of neutron-capture and neutron-producing reactions, our models failed to reproduce the observed levels of sulphur destruction. From this, we concluded that AGB nucleosynthesis is not the cause of the sulphur anomaly. We also discovered a new method to constrain the extent of the partial mixing zone using neon abundances in planetary nebulae. We next aimed to discover the stellar sites of the s-process enrichment in globular clusters that have inter- and intra-cluster variation, with the examples of M4 (relative to M5) and M22, respectively. Using a new chemical evolution code developed by the candidate, we tested models with stellar yields from rotating massive stars and AGB stars. We compared our model predictions for the production of s-process elements with abundances from s-poor and s-rich populations. We found that rotating massive stars alone do not

  20. Neutron Production from In-situ Heavy Ice Coated Targets at Vulcan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morrison, John; Krygier, A. G.; Kar, S.; Ahmed, H.; Alejo, A.; Clarke, R.; Fuchs, J.; Green, A.; Jung, D.; Kleinschmidt, A.; Najmudin, Z.; Nakamura, H.; Norreys, P.; Notley, M.; Oliver, M.; Roth, M.; Vassura, L.; Zepf, M.; Borghesi, M.; Freeman, R. R.

    2015-05-01

    Laser based neutron production experiments have been performed utilizing ultra-high intensity laser accelerated ions impinging upon a secondary target. The neutron yield from such experiments may be improved if the accelerated ions were primarily deuterons taking advantage of the d-d cross section. Recent experiments have demonstrated that selective deuteron acceleration from in-situ heavy ice coating of targets can produce ion spectra where deuterons comprise > 99 % of the measured ions. Results will be presented from integrated neutron production experiments from heavy ice targets coated in-situ recently performed on the Vulcan laser at Rutherford Appleton Laboratory. We are grateful for the Staff at RAL and acknowledge funding from the US DoE. AFOSR, European Social Fund, and the Czech Republic.

  1. Vibrational spectra of light and heavy water with application to neutron cross section calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Damian, J. I. Marquez; Granada, J. R.; Malaspina, D. C.

    2013-07-14

    The design of nuclear reactors and neutron moderators require a good representation of the interaction of low energy (E < 1 eV) neutrons with hydrogen and deuterium containing materials. These models are based on the dynamics of the material, represented by its vibrational spectrum. In this paper, we show calculations of the frequency spectrum for light and heavy water at room temperature using two flexible point charge potentials: SPC-MPG and TIP4P/2005f. The results are compared with experimental measurements, with emphasis on inelastic neutron scattering data. Finally, the resulting spectra are applied to calculation of neutron scattering cross sections for these materials, which were found to be a significant improvement over library data.

  2. Calculation of dose contributions of electron and charged heavy particles inside phantoms irradiated by monoenergetic neutron.

    PubMed

    Satoh, Daiki; Takahashi, Fumiaki; Endo, Akira; Ohmachi, Yasushi; Miyahara, Nobuyuki

    2008-09-01

    The radiation-transport code PHITS with an event generator mode has been applied to analyze energy depositions of electrons and charged heavy particles in two spherical phantoms and a voxel-based mouse phantom upon neutron irradiation. The calculations using the spherical phantoms quantitatively clarified the type and energy of charged particles which are released through interactions of neutrons with the phantom elements and contribute to the radiation dose. The relative contribution of electrons increased with an increase in the size of the phantom and with a decrease in the energy of the incident neutrons. Calculations with the voxel-based mouse phantom for 2.0-MeV neutron irradiation revealed that the doses to different locations inside the body are uniform, and that the energy is mainly deposited by recoil protons. The present study has demonstrated that analysis using PHITS can yield dose distributions that are accurate enough for RBE evaluation.

  3. Flux dependence of cluster formation in neutron-irradiated weld material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergner, F.; Ulbricht, A.; Hein, H.; Kammel, M.

    2008-03-01

    The effect of neutron flux on the formation of irradiation-induced clusters in reactor pressure vessel (RPV) steels is an unresolved issue. Small-angle neutron scattering was measured for a neutron-irradiated RPV weld material containing 0.22 wt% impurity Cu. The experiment was focused on the influence of neutron flux on the formation of irradiation-induced clusters at fixed fluence. The aim was to separate and tentatively interpret the effect of flux on the characteristics of the cluster size distribution. We have observed a pronounced effect of neutron flux on cluster size, whereas the total volume fraction of irradiation-induced clusters is insensitive to the level of flux. The result is compatible with a rate theory model according to which the range of applied fluxes covers the transition from a flux-independent regime at lower fluxes to a regime of decelerating cluster growth. The results are confronted with measured irradiation-induced changes of mechanical properties. Despite the observed flux effect on cluster size, both yield stress increase and transition temperature shift turned out to be independent of flux. This is in agreement with the volume fraction of irradiation-induced clusters being insensitive to the level of flux.

  4. Laser desorption mass spectrometry and small angle neutron scattering of heavy fossil materials

    SciTech Connect

    Hunt, J.E.; Winans, R.E.; Thiyagarajan, P.

    1997-09-01

    The determination of the structural building blocks and the molecular weight range of heavy hydrocarbon materials is of crucial importance in research on their reactivity and for their processing. The chemically and physically heterogenous nature of heavy hydrocarbon materials, such as coals, heavy petroleum fractions, and residues, dictates that their structure and reactivity patterns be complicated. The problem is further complicated by the fact that the molecular structure and molecular weight distribution of these materials is not dependent on a single molecule, but on a complex mixture of molecules which vary among coals and heavy petroleum samples. Laser Desorption mass spectrometry (LDMS) is emerging as a technique for molecular weight determination having found widespread use in biological polymer research, but is still a relatively new technique in the fossil fuel area. Small angle neutron scattering (SANS) provides information on the size and shape of heavy fossil materials. SANS offers the advantages of high penetration power even in thick cells at high temperatures and high contrast for hydrocarbon systems dispersed in deuterated solvents. LDMS coupled with time of flight has the advantages of high sensitivity and transmission and high mass range. We have used LDMS to examine various heavy fossil-derived materials including: long chain hydrocarbons, asphaltenes from petroleum vacuum resids, and coals. This paper describes the application of laser desorption and small angle neutron scattering techniques to the analysis of components in coals, petroleum resids and unsaturated polymers.

  5. Heavy Ion Reactions with Neutron-Rich Beams - Proceedings of the Riken International Workshop

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamaji, S.; Ishihara, M.; Takigawa, N.

    1993-11-01

    The Table of Contents for the book is as follows: * Preface * Opening Address * Fusion I * Heavy Ion Fusion at Subbarrier Energies: Progress and Questions * Angular Momentum in Heavy Ion Subbarrier Interaction * Fusion II * High Precision Fusion Excitation Function Measurements: What Can We Learn from Them? * Transfer Reactions for 16O + 144,152Sm near the Coulomb Barrier * Fusion III * Recent Theoretical Developments in the Study of Subbarrier Fusion * Direct Reaction Approach to Heavy Ion Scattering and Fusion at Energies near Coulomb Barrier * Fusion IV * Roles of Multi-Step Transfer in Fusion Process Induced by Heavy Ion Reactions * Special Session * RIKEN Accelerator Research Facility (RARF) * Fission I * Bimodal Nature of Nuclear Fission * Systematics of Isotope Production Rates: Mass Excess Dependence of Fission Products * Semiclassical Methods for the Multi-Dimensional Quantum Decay * Dynamics of Di-Nucleus Systems: Molecular Resonances * Fission II * The Competition Between Fusion-Fission and Deeply Inelastic Reactions in the Medium Mass Systems * Unstable Nuclei I * Coulomb Dissociation and Momentum Distributions for 11Li → 9Li+n+n Breakup Reactions * Unstable Nuclei II * Elastic Scattering and Fragmentation of Halo Nuclei * Secondary Reactions of Neutron-Rich Nuclei at Intermediate Energies * Life Time of Soft Dipole Excitation * Unstable Nuclei III * Shell Structure of Exotic Unstable Nuclei * Properties of Unstable Nuclei Within the Relativistic Many-Body Theory * Fusion with Unstable Nuclei * Barrier Distributions for Heavy Ion Fusion * Heavy Ion Reactions with Neutron-Rich Beams * Heavy Ion Fusion with Neutron-Rich Beams * Superheavy Elements * Study of α Decays Following 40Ar Bombardment on 238U * Production of Superheavy Elements via Fusion: What is Limiting Us? * Panel Session * Comments * List of Participants

  6. Thermophysical properties of saturated light and heavy water for Advanced Neutron Source applications

    SciTech Connect

    Crabtree, A.; Siman-Tov, M.

    1993-05-01

    The Advanced Neutron Source is an experimental facility being developed by Oak Ridge National Laboratory. As a new nuclear fission research reactor of unprecedented flux, the Advanced Neutron Source Reactor will provide the most intense steady-state beams of neutrons in the world. The high heat fluxes generated in the reactor [303 MW(t) with an average power density of 4.5 MW/L] will be accommodated by a flow of heavy water through the core at high velocities. In support of this experimental and analytical effort, a reliable, highly accurate, and uniform source of thermodynamic and transport property correlations for saturated light and heavy water were developed. In order to attain high accuracy in the correlations, the range of these correlations was limited to the proposed Advanced Neutron Source Reactor`s nominal operating conditions. The temperature and corresponding saturation pressure ranges used for light water were 20--300{degrees}C and 0.0025--8.5 MPa, respectively, while those for heavy water were 50--250{degrees}C and 0.012--3.9 MPa. Deviations between the correlation predictions and data from the various sources did not exceed 1.0%. Light water vapor density was the only exception, with an error of 1.76%. The physical property package consists of analytical correlations, SAS codes, and FORTRAN subroutines incorporating these correlations, as well as an interactive, easy-to-use program entitled QuikProp.

  7. Thermophysical properties of saturated light and heavy water for advanced neutron source applications

    SciTech Connect

    Crabtree, A.; Siman-Tov, M.

    1993-05-01

    The Advanced Neutron Source is an experimental facility being developed by Oak Ridge National Laboratory. As a new nuclear fission research reactor of unprecedented flux, the Advanced Neutron Source Reactor will provide the most intense steady-state beams of neutrons in the world. The high heat fluxes generated in the reactor [303 MW(t) with an average power density of 4.5 MW/L] will be accommodated by a flow of heavy water through the core at high velocities. In support of this experimental and analytical effort, a reliable, highly accurate, and uniform source of thermodynamic and transport property correlations for saturated light and heavy water were developed. In order to attain high accuracy in the correlations, the range of these correlations was limited to the proposed Advanced Neutron Source Reactor's nominal operating conditions. The temperature and corresponding saturation pressure ranges used for light water were 20--300[degrees]C and 0.0025--8.5 MPa, respectively, while those for heavy water were 50--250[degrees]C and 0.012--3.9 MPa. Deviations between the correlation predictions and data from the various sources did not exceed 1.0%. Light water vapor density was the only exception, with an error of 1.76%. The physical property package consists of analytical correlations, SAS codes, and FORTRAN subroutines incorporating these correlations, as well as an interactive, easy-to-use program entitled QuikProp.

  8. Cosmological quantum chromodynamics, neutron diffusion, and the production of primordial heavy elements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Applegate, J. H.; Hogan, Craig J.; Scherrer, R. J.

    1988-01-01

    A simple one-dimensional model is used to describe the evolution of neutron density before and during nucleosynthesis in a high-entropy bubble left over from the cosmic quark-hadron phase transition. It is shown why cosmic nucleosynthesis in such a neutron-rich environment produces a surfeit of elements heavier than lithium. Analytical and numerical techniques are used to estimate the abundances of carbon, nitrogen, and heavier elements up to Ne-22. A high-density neutron-rich region produces enough primordial N-14 to be observed in stellar atmospheres. It shown that very heavy elements may be created in a cosmological r-process; the neutron exposure in the neutron-rich regions is large enough for the Ne-22 to trigger a catastrophic r-process runaway in which the quantity of heavy elements doubles in much less than an expansion time due to fission cycling. A primordial abundance of r-process elements is predicted to appear as an excess of rare earth elements in extremely metal-poor stars.

  9. Cosmological quantum chromodynamics, neutron diffusion, and the production of primordial heavy elements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Applegate, J. H.; Hogan, Craig J.; Scherrer, R. J.

    1988-01-01

    A simple one-dimensional model is used to describe the evolution of neutron density before and during nucleosynthesis in a high-entropy bubble left over from the cosmic quark-hadron phase transition. It is shown why cosmic nucleosynthesis in such a neutron-rich environment produces a surfeit of elements heavier than lithium. Analytical and numerical techniques are used to estimate the abundances of carbon, nitrogen, and heavier elements up to Ne-22. A high-density neutron-rich region produces enough primordial N-14 to be observed in stellar atmospheres. It shown that very heavy elements may be created in a cosmological r-process; the neutron exposure in the neutron-rich regions is large enough for the Ne-22 to trigger a catastrophic r-process runaway in which the quantity of heavy elements doubles in much less than an expansion time due to fission cycling. A primordial abundance of r-process elements is predicted to appear as an excess of rare earth elements in extremely metal-poor stars.

  10. Experimental approach to measure thick target neutron yields induced by heavy ions for shielding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trinh, N. D.; Fadil, M.; Lewitowicz, M.; Brouillard, C.; Clerc, T.; Damoy, S.; Desmezières, V.; Dessay, E.; Dupuis, M.; Grinyer, G. F.; Grinyer, J.; Jacquot, B.; Ledoux, X.; Madeline, A.; Menard, N.; Michel, M.; Morel, V.; Porée, F.; Rannou, B.; Savalle, A.

    2017-09-01

    Double differential (angular and energy) neutron distributions were measured using an activation foil technique. Reactions were induced by impinging two low-energy heavy-ion beams accelerated with the GANIL CSS1 cyclotron: (36S (12 MeV/u) and 208Pb (6.25 MeV/u)) onto thick natCu targets. Results have been compared to Monte-Carlo calculations from two codes (PHITS and FLUKA) for the purpose of benchmarking radiation protection and shielding requirements. This comparison suggests a disagreement between calculations and experiment, particularly for high-energy neutrons.

  11. New insights on Ba overabundance in open clusters. Evidence for the intermediate neutron-capture process at play?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishenina, T.; Pignatari, M.; Carraro, G.; Kovtyukh, V.; Monaco, L.; Korotin, S.; Shereta, E.; Yegorova, I.; Herwig, F.

    2015-02-01

    Recently, an increasing number of studies were devoted to measure the abundances of neutron-capture elements heavier than iron in stars belonging to Galactic Open Clusters (OCs). OCs span a sizeable range in metallicity (-0.6 ≤ [Fe/H] ≤ +0.4), and they show abundances of light elements similar to disc stars of the same age. A different pattern is observed for heavy elements. A large scatter is observed for Ba, with most OCs showing [Ba/Fe] and [Ba/La] overabundant with respect to the Sun. The origin of this overabundance is not clearly understood. With the goal of providing new observational insights, we determined radial velocities, atmospheric parameters and chemical composition of 27 giant stars members of five OCs: Cr 110, Cr 261, NGC 2477, NGC 2506 and NGC 5822. We used high-resolution spectra obtained with the UVES spectrograph at European Southern Observatory Paranal. We perform a detailed spectroscopic analysis of these stars to measure the abundance of up to 22 elements per star. We study the dependence of element abundance on metallicity and age with unprecedented detail, complementing our analysis with data culled from the literature. We confirm the trend of Ba overabundance in OCs, and show its large dispersion for clusters younger than ˜4 Gyr. Finally, the implications of our results for stellar nucleosynthesis are discussed. We show in this work that the Ba enrichment compared to other neutron-capture elements in OCs cannot be explained by the contributions from the slow neutron-capture process and the rapid neutron-capture process. Instead, we argue that this anomalous signature can be explained by assuming an additional contribution by the intermediate neutron-capture process.

  12. Magnetic structures of R(Cu, Ni)2 compounds (R = heavy rare earth) studied by neutron diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smetana, Z.; Šíma, V.

    1985-11-01

    Magnetics structures of powdered orthorhombic R(Cu, Ni)2 compounds (R = heavy rare earth) determined by neutron diffraction are described. The influence of magnetocrystalline anisotropy and exchange interactions on the type of magnetic ordering is discussed.

  13. Production of heavy and superheavy neutron-rich nuclei in neutron capture processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zagrebaev, V. I.; Karpov, A. V.; Mishustin, I. N.; Greiner, Walter

    2011-10-01

    The neutron capture process is considered as an alternative method for production of superheavy (SH) nuclei. Strong neutron fluxes might be provided by nuclear reactors and nuclear explosions in the laboratory frame and by supernova explosions in nature. All these cases are discussed in the paper. There are two gaps of short-lived nuclei (one is the well-known fermium gap and the other one is located in the region of Z=106-108 and N˜170) which impede the formation of SH nuclei by rather weak neutron fluxes realized at available nuclear reactors. We find that in the course of multiple (rather “soft”) nuclear explosions these gaps may be easily bypassed, and thus, a measurable amount of the neutron-rich long-living SH nuclei located at the island of stability may be synthesized. Existing pulsed reactors do not allow one to bypass these gaps. We formulate requirements for the pulsed reactors of the next generation that could be used for production of long-living SH nuclei. Natural formation of SH nuclei (in supernova explosions) is also discussed. The yield of SH nuclei relative to lead is estimated to be about 10-12, which is not beyond the experimental sensitivity for a search of SH elements in cosmic rays.

  14. Modeling and Investigation of Heavy Oxide and Alkali-Halide Scintillators for Potential Use in Neutron and Gamma Detection Systems

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-06-01

    INVESTIGATION OF HEAVY OXIDE AND ALKALI -HALIDE SCINTILLATORS FOR POTENTIAL USE IN NEUTRON AND GAMMA DETECTION SYSTEMS by Jeremy S. Cadiente June...AND ALKALI - HALIDE SCINTILLATORS FOR POTENTIAL USE IN NEUTRON AND GAMMA DETECTION SYSTEMS 5. FUNDING NUMBERS 6. AUTHOR(S) Jeremy S. Cadiente 7...CODE 13. ABSTRACT (maximum 200 words) Heavy inorganic oxide and alkali -halide crystals, which previous experimental research has indicated to have

  15. Shielding experiment of heavy-ion produced neutrons using a tissue-equivalent proportional counter.

    PubMed

    Nunomiya, T; Yonai, S; Takada, M; Fukumura, A; Nakamura, T

    2003-01-01

    A shielding experiment was performed at the HIMAC (Heavy Ion Medical Accelerator in Chiba), of National Institute of Radiological Sciences (NIRS), to measure neutron dose using a spherical TEPC (tissue-equivalent proportional counter) of 12.55 cm inner diameter. Neutrons are produced from a 5 cm thick stopping length Cu target bombarded by 400 MeV/nucleon C6+ ions and penetrate concrete or iron shields of various thicknesses at 0 degree to the beam direction. From this shielding experiment. y-distribution, mean lineal energy, absorbed dose, dose equivalent and mean-quality factor were obtained behind the shield as a function of shield thickness. The neutron dose attenuation lengths were also obtained as 126 g cm(-2) for concrete and 211 g cm(-2) for iron. The measured results were compared with the calculated results using the MARS Monte Carlo code.

  16. Synthesis of New Neutron Rich Heavy Nuclei:. AN Experimentalist's View

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loveland, W.

    2014-09-01

    I attempt to experimentally evaluate the prospects of synthesizing new neutronrich superheavy nuclei. I consider three possible synthetic paths to neutronrich superheavy nuclei: (a) the use of neutron-rich radioactive beams. (b) the use of damped collisions and (c) the use of multi-nucleon transfer reactions. I consider the prospects of synthesizing new n-rich isotopes of Rf-Bh using light n-rich radioactive beams and targeted beams from ReA3, FRIB and SPIRAL2. For the damped collision path, I present the results of a study of a surrogate reaction, 160Gd + 186W. These data indicate the formation of Au (trans-target) fragments and the depletion of yields of target-like fragments by fission and fragment emission. The data are compared to predictions of Zagrebaev and Greiner. For the multi-nucleon transfer reactions, the results of a study of the 136Xe + 208Pb reaction are discussed. I consider the possibility of multi-nucleon transfer reactions with radioactive beams.

  17. Analytic view at alpha clustering in even-even heavy nuclei near magic numbers 82 and 126

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmed, Saad M. Saleh; Yahaya, Redzuwan; Radiman, Shahidan; Yasir, Muhamad Samudi; Kassim, Hasan Abu; Khandaker, Mayeen Uddin

    2015-02-01

    Most studies on the determination of the alpha-decay preformation factor have used decay formulae. The preformation factor is known to contain abundant information on the nuclear structure. The successful determination of the preformation factor through the cluster formation model (CFM) motivates this study to determine the factor for nuclei near the magic numbers and present results in an analytic study based on different comparisons and observations. The difference between preformation factors obtained from CFM and from the decay formula method is significant. The formula method is used for the entire process of alpha decay as a transition between two states, whereas CFM is applied for the initial state of alpha formation. The preformation factor obtained using CFM and clusterization state representation was first compared with that obtained from the decay formula. Results were used to investigate alpha formation in even-even heavy nuclei, including 72 < Z < 92 and 92 < N < 142, near the magic numbers Z = 82 and N = 126. The values of the preformation factor were discussed and explained in detail according to the clusterization state representation to describe the most possible states of ground-state nuclei. The alpha clustering described through CFM is found to be consistent with that described using the decay formula for the open-shell nuclei of N < 126. The presence of more nucleons in the open-shell nuclei results in lower probability for alpha clustering and lower value of the preformation factor. However, few nucleons beyond the closed shell can cause higher probability for alpha clustering and larger value of the preformation factor. The maximum and minimum of the alpha-cluster formation occur in the nucleus of the double-shell closure (with N = 126 and Z = 82 and in the nucleus of two protons and two neutrons more. This formation probability is sensitive to the subshells, leading to the possibility of more clusterization states, including core-cluster

  18. Small-Angle Neutron Scattering Measurements of Magnetic Cluster Sizes in Magnetic Recording Disks

    SciTech Connect

    Toney, Michael F

    2003-06-17

    We describe Small Angle Neutron Scattering measurements of the magnetic cluster size distributions for several longitudinal magnetic recording media. We find that the average magnetic cluster size is slightly larger than the average physical grain size, that there is a broad distribution of cluster sizes, and that the cluster size is inversely correlated to the media signal-to-noise ratio. These results show that intergranular magnetic coupling in these media is small and they provide empirical data for the cluster-size distribution that can be incorporated into models of magnetic recording.

  19. New evaluation of thermal neutron scattering libraries for light and heavy water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marquez Damian, Jose Ignacio; Granada, Jose Rolando; Cantargi, Florencia; Roubtsov, Danila

    2017-09-01

    In order to improve the design and safety of thermal nuclear reactors and for verification of criticality safety conditions on systems with significant amount of fissile materials and water, it is necessary to perform high-precision neutron transport calculations and estimate uncertainties of the results. These calculations are based on neutron interaction data distributed in evaluated nuclear data libraries. To improve the evaluations of thermal scattering sub-libraries, we developed a set of thermal neutron scattering cross sections (scattering kernels) for hydrogen bound in light water, and deuterium and oxygen bound in heavy water, in the ENDF-6 format from room temperature up to the critical temperatures of molecular liquids. The new evaluations were generated and processable with NJOY99 and also with NJOY-2012 with minor modifications (updates), and with the new version of NJOY-2016. The new TSL libraries are based on molecular dynamics simulations with GROMACS and recent experimental data, and result in an improvement of the calculation of single neutron scattering quantities. In this work, we discuss the importance of taking into account self-diffusion in liquids to accurately describe the neutron scattering at low neutron energies (quasi-elastic peak problem). To improve modeling of heavy water, it is important to take into account temperature-dependent static structure factors and apply Sköld approximation to the coherent inelastic components of the scattering matrix. The usage of the new set of scattering matrices and cross-sections improves the calculation of thermal critical systems moderated and/or reflected with light/heavy water obtained from the International Criticality Safety Benchmark Evaluation Project (ICSBEP) handbook. For example, the use of the new thermal scattering library for heavy water, combined with the ROSFOND-2010 evaluation of the cross sections for deuterium, results in an improvement of the C/E ratio in 48 out of 65

  20. Simulation of neutron displacement damage in bipolar junction transistors using high-energy heavy ion beams.

    SciTech Connect

    Doyle, Barney Lee; Buller, Daniel L.; Hjalmarson, Harold Paul; Fleming, Robert M; Bielejec, Edward Salvador; Vizkelethy, Gyorgy

    2006-12-01

    Electronic components such as bipolar junction transistors (BJTs) are damaged when they are exposed to radiation and, as a result, their performance can significantly degrade. In certain environments the radiation consists of short, high flux pulses of neutrons. Electronics components have traditionally been tested against short neutron pulses in pulsed nuclear reactors. These reactors are becoming less and less available; many of them were shut down permanently in the past few years. Therefore, new methods using radiation sources other than pulsed nuclear reactors needed to be developed. Neutrons affect semiconductors such as Si by causing atomic displacements of Si atoms. The recoiled Si atom creates a collision cascade which leads to displacements in Si. Since heavy ions create similar cascades in Si we can use them to create similar damage to what neutrons create. This LDRD successfully developed a new technique using easily available particle accelerators to provide an alternative to pulsed nuclear reactors to study the displacement damage and subsequent transient annealing that occurs in various transistor devices and potentially qualify them against radiation effects caused by pulsed neutrons.

  1. Simulation of Neutron Wall and Charged Particle Veto Wall for Heavy Ion Collision

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Jiashen

    2016-09-01

    Comparison of neutrons and protons emitted in heavy ion collisions is an observable to probe the density dependence of symmetry energy. The dimension of Neutron Wall (NW) at NSCL is about 2x2 m2 which is made of 25 Pyrex tubes filled with liquid Scintillator NE213 that detects recoil protons when neutron interacts with the scintillator. Although it attains excellent discrimination of γ - μ and neutron using Pulse Shape Discrimination method, it fails to discriminate charged particles from neutrons. To ensure 100% rejection of charged particles, we plan to build a Charged Particle Veto wall (VW), which will consist of 25 1-cm thick plastic scintillator bars placed directly in front of NW. Simulations using NPTool have been performed to determine the exact design of the VW. To make sure the VW completely covers the NW, overlap of alternate bars is needed. In the poster, I will show the advantage and disadvantage of the positioning plastic bars in a horizontal versus a vertical position as well as position correlation between NW and VW for signal matching. US NSF Grant No. PHY 1102511 and SURE programme, CUHK.

  2. Secondary neutron-production cross sections from heavy-ion interactions in composite targets

    SciTech Connect

    Heilbronn, L.; Iwata, Y.; Murakami, T.; Iwase, H.; Sato, H.; Nakamura, T.; Ronningen, R.M.; Ieki, K.; Gudowska, I.; Sobolevsky, N.

    2006-02-15

    Secondary neutron-production cross sections have been measured from interactions of 290 MeV/nucleon C and 600 MeV/nucleon Ne in a target composed of simulated Martian regolith and polyethylene, and from 400 MeV/nucleon Ne interactions in wall material from the International Space Station. The data were measured between 5 deg. and 80 deg. in the laboratory. We report the double-differential cross sections, angular distributions, and total neutron-production cross sections from all three systems. The spectra from all three systems exhibit behavior previously reported in other heavy-ion neutron-production experiments, namely, a peak at forward angles near the energy corresponding to the beam velocity, with the remaining spectra generated by pre-equilibrium and equilibrium processes. The double-differential cross sections are fitted with a moving-source parametrization. Also reported are the data without corrections for neutron flux attenuation in the target and other intervening materials and for neutron production in nontarget materials near the target position. These uncorrected spectra are compared with SHIELD-HIT and PHITS transport model calculations. The transport model calculations reproduce the spectral shapes well but, on average, underestimate the magnitudes of the cross sections.

  3. Secondary neutron-production cross sections from heavy-ioninteractions in composite targets.

    SciTech Connect

    Heilbronn, L.; Iwata, Y.; Iwase,H.; Murakami, T.; Sato, H.; Nakamura, T.; Ronningen, R.M.; Ieki, K.; Gudowska, I.; Sobolevsky, N.

    2005-12-19

    Secondary neutron-production cross-sections have been measured from interactions of 290 MeV/nucleon C and 600 MeV/nucleon Ne in a target composed of simulated Martian regolith and polyethylene, and from 400 MeV/nucleon Ne interactions in wall material from the International Space Station. The data were measured between 5 and 80 deg in the laboratory. We report the double-differential cross sections, angular distributions, and total neutron-production cross sections from all three systems. The spectra from all three systems exhibit behavior previously reported in other heavy-ion, neutron production experiments; namely, a peak at forward angles near the energy corresponding to the beam velocity, with the remaining spectra generated by pre-equilibrium and equilibrium processes. The double differential cross sections are fitted with a moving-source parameterization. Also reported are the data without corrections for neutron flux attenuation in the target and other intervening materials, and for neutron production in non-target materials near the target position. These uncorrected spectra are compared with SHIELD-HIT and PHITS transport model calculations. The transport model calculations reproduce the spectral shapes well, but, on average, underestimate the magnitudes of the cross sections.

  4. Model of defect reactions and the influence of clustering in pulse-neutron-irradiated Si

    SciTech Connect

    Myers, S. M.; Cooper, P. J.; Wampler, W. R.

    2008-08-15

    Transient reactions among irradiation defects, dopants, impurities, and carriers in pulse-neutron-irradiated Si were modeled taking into account the clustering of the primal defects in recoil cascades. Continuum equations describing the diffusion, field drift, and reactions of relevant species were numerically solved for a submicrometer spherical volume, within which the starting radial distributions of defects could be varied in accord with the degree of clustering. The radial profiles corresponding to neutron irradiation were chosen through pair-correlation-function analysis of vacancy and interstitial distributions obtained from the binary-collision code MARLOWE, using a spectrum of primary recoil energies computed for a fast-burst fission reactor. Model predictions of transient behavior were compared with a variety of experimental results from irradiated bulk Si, solar cells, and bipolar-junction transistors. The influence of defect clustering during neutron bombardment was further distinguished through contrast with electron irradiation, where the primal point defects are more uniformly dispersed.

  5. Collinear Cluster Tripartition as a Neutron Source--Evaluation of the Setup Parameters

    SciTech Connect

    Kamanin, D. V.; Kuznetsova, E. A.; Aleksandrov, A. A.; Aleksandrova, I. A.; Borzakov, S. B.; Chelnokov, M. L.; Pham Minh, D.; Kondratyev, N. A.; Kopach, Yu. N.; Panteleev, Ts.; Penionzhkevich, Yu. E.; Svirikhin, A. I.; Sokol, E. A.; Testov, D. A.; Zhuchko, V. E.; Yeremin, A. V.; Pyatkov, Yu. V.; Jacobs, N.; Ryabov, Yu. V.

    2010-04-30

    Forthcoming experiments aimed at studying the mechanism of collinear cluster tripartition are planning to be performed with the new facility. Charged products will be registered with the double arm time-of-flight spectrometer composed of mosaics of PIN -diodes and MCP (micro channel plates) based timing detectors. Several tens of {sup 3}He-filled counters will be gathered round the {sup 252}Cf source. In order to choose an optimal configuration of the neutron detector and other parameters of the experiment special modeling has performed using both 'neutron barrel' and known MCNP code. The first test run of the new facility is in progress also its 'neutron skin' in under construction.

  6. Microscopic dynamics simulations of heavy-ion fusion reactions induced by neutron-rich nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Ning; Ou, Li; Zhang, Yingxun; Li, Zhuxia

    2014-06-01

    The heavy-ion fusion reactions induced by neutron-rich nuclei are investigated with the improved quantum molecular dynamics (ImQMD) model. With a subtle consideration of the neutron skin thickness of nuclei and the symmetry potential, the stability of nuclei and the fusion excitation functions of heavy-ion fusion reactions O16 + Ge76, O16 + Sm154, Ca40 + Zr96, and Sn132 + Ca40 are systematically studied. The fusion cross sections of these reactions at energies around the Coulomb barrier can be well reproduced by using the ImQMD model. The corresponding slope parameter of the symmetry energy adopted in the calculations is L ≈78 MeV and the surface energy coefficient is gsur=18±1.5 MeV fm2. In addition, it is found that the surface-symmetry term significantly influences the fusion cross sections of neutron-rich fusion systems. For sub-barrier fusion, the dynamical fluctuations in the densities of the reaction partners and the enhanced surface diffuseness at neck side result in the lowering of the fusion barrier.

  7. Clustering of water molecules in ultramicroporous carbon: In-situ small-angle neutron scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Bahadur, Jitendra; Contescu, Cristian I.; Rai, Durgesh K.; Gallego, Nidia C.; Melnichenko, Yuri B.

    2016-10-19

    The adsorption of water is central to most of the applications of microporous carbon as adsorbent material. We report early kinetics of water adsorption in the microporous carbon using in-situ small-angle neutron scattering. It is observed that adsorption of water occurs via cluster formation of molecules. Interestingly, the cluster size remains constant throughout the adsorption process whereas number density of clusters increases with time. The role of surface chemistry of microporous carbon on the early kinetics of adsorption process was also investigated. Lastly, the present study provides direct experimental evidence for cluster assisted adsorption of water molecules in microporous carbon (Do-Do model).

  8. Neutron exposure parameters for the fifth heavy section steel technology irradiation series

    SciTech Connect

    Stallmann, F.W.; Kam, F.B.K.; Baldwin, C.A.

    1985-07-01

    The NRC's Heavy Section Steel Technology (HSST) Program is concerned with the investigation of cracklike flaws in reactor pressure vessel steels. In the fifth irradiation series, capsules containing a variety of metallurgical test specimens were irradiated to fluences in the range of 1 . 10/sup 19/ to 3 . 10/sup 19/ neutrons/cm/sup 2/ (E > 1.0 MeV). In order to correlate radiation embrittlement to damage fluences, accurate determination of the neutron fluence spectra at the critical location of the test specimen is needed. The part of the neutron spectrum which is responsible for the radiation damage is characterized as ''damage exposure parameter.'' Fluences for energies greater than 1.0 MeV (F > 1.0 MeV) is the most widely used parameter; however, current thinking favors displacements per atom (dpa) in iron as better related to the physical mechanism of radiation damage. Fluences for energies greater than 0.1 MeV (F > 0.1 MeV) are also considered since neutrons in the 0.1 and 1.0 MeV range are likely to contribute to the damage. In order not to prejudice future investigations, all three damage parameters F > 1.0, MeV F > 0.1 MeV, and dpa are listed in this report.

  9. Antisymmetrized molecular dynamics studies for exotic clustering phenomena in neutron-rich nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kimura, M.; Suhara, T.; Kanada-En'yo, Y.

    2016-12-01

    We present a review of recent works on clustering phenomena in unstable nuclei studied by antisymmetrized molecular dynamics (AMD). The AMD studies in these decades have uncovered novel types of clustering phenomena brought about by the excess neutrons. Among them, this review focuses on the molecule-like structure of unstable nuclei. One of the earliest discussions on the clustering in unstable nuclei was made for neutron-rich Be and B isotopes. AMD calculations predicted that the ground state clustering is enhanced or reduced depending on the number of excess neutrons. Today, the experiments are confirming this prediction as the change of the proton radii. Behind this enhancement and reduction of the clustering, there are underlying shell effects called molecular and atomic orbits. These orbits form covalent and ionic bonding of the clusters analogous to the atomic molecules. It was found that this "molecular-orbit picture" reasonably explains the low-lying spectra of Be isotopes. The molecular-orbit picture is extended to other systems having parity asymmetric cluster cores and to the three cluster systems. O and Ne isotopes are the candidates of the former, while the 3 α linear chains in C isotopes are the latter. For both subjects, many intensive studies are now in progress. We also pay a special attention to the observables which are the fingerprint of the clustering. In particular, we focus on the monopole and dipole transitions which are recently regarded as good probe for the clustering. We discuss how they have and will reveal the exotic clustering.

  10. Neutron star natal kicks and the long-term survival of star clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Contenta, Filippo; Varri, Anna Lisa; Heggie, Douglas C.

    2015-04-01

    We investigate the dynamical evolution of a star cluster in an external tidal field by using N-body simulations, with focus on the effects of the presence or absence of neutron star natal velocity kicks. We show that, even if neutron stars typically represent less than 2 per cent of the total bound mass of a star cluster, their primordial kinematic properties may affect the lifetime of the system by up to almost a factor of 4. We interpret this result in the light of two known modes of star cluster dissolution, dominated by either early stellar evolution mass-loss or two-body relaxation. The competition between these effects shapes the mass-loss profile of star clusters, which may either dissolve abruptly (`jumping'), in the pre-core-collapse phase, or gradually (`skiing'), after having reached core collapse.

  11. Neutron Capture Elements in the Open Cluster Chemical Abundance & Mapping (OCCAM) Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Connell, Julia; Frinchaboy, Peter M.; Shetrone, Matthew D.; Hearty, Fred R.; Majewski, Steven R.; Zasowski, Gail; Sdss /Apogee-1, III

    2015-01-01

    The Open Cluster Chemical Abundance & Mapping (OCCAM) survey is a systematic survey of Galactic open clusters using data primarily from the SDSS-III/APOGEE-1 survey. The high-resolution (R=22,500), near-infrared (H-band) APOGEE-1 survey allows for cluster membership probability determination and analysis of light and iron-peak elements. Neutron capture elements, however, prove to be elusive in the IR region covered by APOGEE. In an effort to fully study detailed Galactic chemical evolution, we conducted a high resolution (R~60,000) spectroscopic abundance analysis of neutron capture elements for OCCAM clusters in the optical regime to complement the APOGEE results. We present results based on prominent resonance lines for Eu, La, Ba, and Ce in the ~5400-6750 AA range using data obtained at McDonald Observatory with the 2.1m Otto Struve telescope and Sandiford Echelle Spectrograph.

  12. The Open Cluster Chemical Abundances and Mapping (OCCAM) Survey: Optical Extension for Neutron Capture Elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melendez, Matthew; O'Connell, Julia; Frinchaboy, Peter M.; Donor, John; Cunha, Katia M. L.; Shetrone, Matthew D.; Majewski, Steven R.; Zasowski, Gail; Pinsonneault, Marc H.; Roman-Lopes, Alexandre; Stassun, Keivan G.; APOGEE Team

    2017-01-01

    The Open Cluster Chemical Abundance & Mapping (OCCAM) survey is a systematic survey of Galactic open clusters using data primarily from the SDSS-III/APOGEE-1 survey. However, neutron capture elements are very limited in the IR region covered by APOGEE. In an effort to fully study detailed Galactic chemical evolution, we are conducting a high resolution (R~60,000) spectroscopic abundance analysis of neutron capture elements for OCCAM clusters in the optical regime to complement the APOGEE results. As part of this effort, we present Ba II, La II, Ce II and Eu II results for a few open clusters without previous abundance measurements using data obtained at McDonald Observatory with the 2.1m Otto Struve telescope and Sandiford Echelle Spectrograph.This work is supported by an NSF AAG grant AST-1311835.

  13. Electron and neutron electric dipole moment in the 3-3-1 model with heavy leptons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Conto, G.; Pleitez, V.

    2015-01-01

    We calculate the electric dipole moment for the electron and neutron in the framework of the 3-3-1 model with heavy charged leptons. We assume that the only source of C P violation arises from a complex trilinear coupling constant and the three complex vacuum expectation values. However, two of the vacua phases are absorbed and the other two are equal up to a minus sign. Hence only one physical phase survives. In order to be compatible with the experimental data this phase has to be smaller than 1 0-6.

  14. Single-particle selection and alignment with heavy atom cluster-antibody conjugates

    PubMed Central

    Jensen, Grant J.; Kornberg, Roger D.

    1998-01-01

    A method is proposed for selecting and aligning images of single biological particles to obtain high-resolution structural information by cryoelectron microscopy. The particles will be labeled with multiple heavy atom clusters to permit the precise determination of particle locations and relative orientations even when imaged close to focus with a low electron dose, conditions optimal for recording high-resolution detail. Heavy atom clusters should also allow selection of images free from many kinds of defects, including specimen movement and particle inhomogeneity. Heavy atom clusters may be introduced in a general way by the construction of “adaptor” molecules based on single-chain Fv antibody fragments, consisting of a constant framework region engineered for optimal cluster binding and a variable antigen binding region selected for a specific target. The success of the method depends on the mobility of the heavy atom cluster on the particle, on the precision to which clusters can be located in an image, and on the sufficiency of cluster projections alone to orient and select particles for averaging. The necessary computational algorithms were developed and implemented in simulations that address the feasibility of the method. PMID:9689068

  15. Method of using deuterium-cluster foils for an intense pulsed neutron source

    DOEpatents

    Miley, George H.; Yang, Xiaoling

    2013-09-03

    A method is provided for producing neutrons, comprising: providing a converter foil comprising deuterium clusters; focusing a laser on the foil with power and energy sufficient to cause deuteron ions to separate from the foil; and striking a surface of a target with the deuteron ions from the converter foil with energy sufficient to cause neutron production by a reaction selected from the group consisting of D-D fusion, D-T fusion, D-metal nuclear spallation, and p-metal. A further method is provided for assembling a plurality of target assemblies for a target injector to be used in the previously mentioned manner. A further method is provided for producing neutrons, comprising: splitting a laser beam into a first beam and a second beam; striking a first surface of a target with the first beam, and an opposite second surface of the target with the second beam with energy sufficient to cause neutron production.

  16. Gamma-ray spectroscopy of neutron-rich products of heavy-ion collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Carpenter, M.P.; Janssens, R.V.F.; Ahmad, I.

    1995-08-01

    Thick-target {gamma}{gamma} coincidence techniques are being used to explore the spectroscopy of otherwise hard-to-reach neutron-rich products of deep-inelastic heavy ion reactions. Extensive {gamma}{gamma} coincidence measurements were performed at ATLAS using pulsed beams of {sup 80}Se, {sup 136}Xe, and {sup 238}U on lead-backed {sup 122,124}Sn targets with energies 10-15% above the Coulomb barrier. Gamma-ray coincidence intensities were used to map out yield distributions with A and Z for even-even product nuclei around the target and around the projectile. The main features of the yield patterns are understandable in terms of N/Z equilibration. We had the most success in studying the decays of yrast isomers. Thus far, more than thirty new {mu}s isomers in the Z = 50 region were found and characterized. Making isotopic assignments for previously unknown {gamma}-ray cascades proves to be one of the biggest problems. Our assignments were based (a) on rare overlaps with radioactivity data, (b) on the relative yields with different beams, and (c) on observed cross-coincidences between {gamma} rays from light and heavy reaction partners. However, the primary products of deep inelastic collisions often are sufficiently excited for subsequent neutron evaporation, so {gamma}{gamma} cross-coincidence results require careful interpretation.

  17. Characteristics of a heavy water photoneutron source in boron neutron capture therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Danial, Salehi; Dariush, Sardari; M. Salehi, Jozani

    2013-07-01

    Bremsstrahlung photon beams produced by medical linear accelerators are currently the most commonly used method of radiation therapy for cancerous tumors. Photons with energies greater than 8-10 MeV potentially generate neutrons through photonuclear interactions in the accelerator's treatment head, patient's body, and treatment room ambient. Electrons impinging on a heavy target generate a cascade shower of bremsstrahlung photons, the energy spectrum of which shows an end point equal to the electron beam energy. By varying the target thickness, an optimum thickness exists for which, at the given electron energy, maximum photon flux is achievable. If a source of high-energy photons i.e. bremsstrahlung, is conveniently directed to a suitable D2O target, a novel approach for production of an acceptable flux of filterable photoneturons for boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) application is possible. This study consists of two parts. 1. Comparison and assessment of deuterium photonuclear cross section data. 2. Evaluation of the heavy water photonuclear source.

  18. HZETRN: neutron and proton production in quasi-elastic scattering of GCR heavy-ions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shavers, M. R.; Cucinotta, F. A.; Wilson, J. W.

    2001-01-01

    The development of transport models for radiation shielding design and evaluation has provided a series of deterministic computer codes that describe galactic cosmic radiation (GCR), solar particle events, and experimental beams at particle accelerators. These codes continue to be modified to accommodate new theory and improvements to the particle interaction database (Cucinotta et al., 1994, NASA Technical Paper 3472, US Government Printing Office, Washington DC). The solution employed by the heavy-ion transport code HZETRN was derived with the assumption that nuclear fragments are emitted with the same velocity as the incident ion through velocity conserving nuclear interactions. This paper presents a version of the HZETRN transport code that provides a more realistic distribution of the energy of protons and neutrons emitted from GCR interactions in shields. This study shows that the expected GCR dose equivalent is lower than previously calculated for water shields that are less than 110 g cm-2 thick. Calculations of neutron energy spectra in low Earth orbit indicate substantial contributions from relativistic neutrons. c2001 Elsevier Science Ltd. All rights reseved.

  19. HZETRN: neutron and proton production in quasi-elastic scattering of GCR heavy-ions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shavers, M. R.; Cucinotta, F. A.; Wilson, J. W.

    2001-01-01

    The development of transport models for radiation shielding design and evaluation has provided a series of deterministic computer codes that describe galactic cosmic radiation (GCR), solar particle events, and experimental beams at particle accelerators. These codes continue to be modified to accommodate new theory and improvements to the particle interaction database (Cucinotta et al., 1994, NASA Technical Paper 3472, US Government Printing Office, Washington DC). The solution employed by the heavy-ion transport code HZETRN was derived with the assumption that nuclear fragments are emitted with the same velocity as the incident ion through velocity conserving nuclear interactions. This paper presents a version of the HZETRN transport code that provides a more realistic distribution of the energy of protons and neutrons emitted from GCR interactions in shields. This study shows that the expected GCR dose equivalent is lower than previously calculated for water shields that are less than 110 g cm-2 thick. Calculations of neutron energy spectra in low Earth orbit indicate substantial contributions from relativistic neutrons. c2001 Elsevier Science Ltd. All rights reseved.

  20. Production cross sections of heavy neutron-rich nuclei approaching the nucleosynthesis r-process path around A =195

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurtukian-Nieto, T.; Benlliure, J.; Schmidt, K.-H.; Audouin, L.; Becker, F.; Blank, B.; Casarejos, E.; Farget, F.; Fernández-Ordóñez, M.; Giovinazzo, J.; Henzlova, D.; Jurado, B.; Pereira, J.; Yordanov, O.

    2014-02-01

    In the present work we were able to synthesize and measure with high accuracy the production cross sections of more than 190 heavy neutron-rich nuclei by the in-flight fragmentation of relativistic 208Pb projectiles, 26 of which were produced for the first time. This work has shown that the N =126 region far below the doubly magic 208Pb has become accessible experimentally and represents a step further towards the study of heavy neutron-rich nuclei approaching the r-process waiting point at A =195.

  1. Cluster-transfer reactions with radioactive beams: A spectroscopic tool for neutron-rich nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bottoni, S.; Leoni, S.; Fornal, B.; Raabe, R.; Rusek, K.; Benzoni, G.; Bracco, A.; Crespi, F. C. L.; Morales, A. I.; Bednarczyk, P.; Cieplicka-Oryńczak, N.; Królas, W.; Maj, A.; Szpak, B.; Callens, M.; Bouma, J.; Elseviers, J.; De Witte, H.; Flavigny, F.; Orlandi, R.; Reiter, P.; Seidlitz, M.; Warr, N.; Siebeck, B.; Hellgartner, S.; Mücher, D.; Pakarinen, J.; Vermeulen, M.; Bauer, C.; Georgiev, G.; Janssens, R. V. F.; Balabanski, D.; Sferrazza, M.; Kowalska, M.; Rapisarda, E.; Voulot, D.; Lozano Benito, M.; Wenander, F.

    2015-08-01

    An exploratory experiment performed at REX-ISOLDE to investigate cluster-transfer reactions with radioactive beams in inverse kinematics is presented. The aim of the experiment was to test the potential of cluster-transfer reactions at the Coulomb barrier as a mechanism to explore the structure of exotic neutron-rich nuclei. The reactions 7Li(98Rb,α xn ) and 7Li(98Rb,t xn ) were studied through particle-γ coincidence measurements, and the results are presented in terms of the observed excitation energies and spins. Moreover, the reaction mechanism is qualitatively discussed as a transfer of a clusterlike particle within a distorted-wave Born approximation framework. The results indicate that cluster-transfer reactions can be described well as a direct process and that they can be an efficient method to investigate the structure of neutron-rich nuclei at medium-high excitation energies and spins.

  2. Cluster-transfer reactions with radioactive beams: A spectroscopic tool for neutron-rich nuclei

    DOE PAGES

    Bottoni, S.; Leoni, S.; Fornal, B.; ...

    2015-08-27

    An exploratory experiment performed at REX-ISOLDE to investigate cluster-transfer reactions with radioactive beams in inverse kinematics is presented. The aim of the experiment was to test the potential of cluster-transfer reactions at the Coulomb barrier as a mechanism to explore the structure of exotic neutron-rich nuclei. The reactions 7Li(98Rb,αxn) and 7Li(98Rb,txn) were studied through particle-γ coincidence measurements, and the results are presented in terms of the observed excitation energies and spins. Moreover, the reaction mechanism is qualitatively discussed as a transfer of a clusterlike particle within a distorted-wave Born approximation framework. The results indicate that cluster-transfer reactions can be describedmore » well as a direct process and that they can be an efficient method to investigate the structure of neutron-rich nuclei at medium-high excitation energies and spins.« less

  3. Stellar encounters involving neutron stars in globular cluster cores

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davies, M. B.; Benz, W.; Hills, J. G.

    1992-01-01

    Encounters between a 1.4 solar mass neutron star and a 0.8 solar mass red giant (RG) and between a 1.4 solar mass neutron star (NS) and an 0.8 solar mass main-sequence (MS) star have been successfully simulated. In the case of encounters involving an RG, bound systems are produced when the separation at periastron passage R(MIN) is less than about 2.5 R(RG). At least 70 percent of these bound systems are composed of the RG core and NS forming a binary engulfed in a common envelope of what remains of the former RG envelope. Once the envelope is ejected, a tight white dwarf-NS binary remains. For MS stars, encounters with NSs will produce bound systems when R(MIN) is less than about 3.5 R(MS). Some 50 percent of these systems will be single objects with the NS engulfed in a thick disk of gas almost as massive as the original MS star. The ultimate fate of such systems is unclear.

  4. New Neutron-capture Measurements in 23 Open Clusters. I. The r-Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Overbeek, Jamie C.; Friel, Eileen D.; Jacobson, Heather R.

    2016-06-01

    Neutron-capture elements, those with Z > 35, are the least well understood in terms of nucleosynthesis and formation environments. The rapid neutron-capture, or r-process, elements are formed in the environments and/or remnants of massive stars, while the slow neutron-capture, or s-process, elements are primarily formed in low-mass AGB stars. These elements can provide much information about Galactic star formation and enrichment, but observational data are limited. We have assembled a sample of 68 stars in 23 open clusters that we use to probe abundance trends for six neutron-capture elements (Eu, Gd, Dy, Mo, Pr, and Nd) with cluster age and location in the disk of the Galaxy. In order to keep our analysis as homogeneous as possible, we use an automated synthesis fitting program, which also enables us to measure multiple (3-10) lines for each element. We find that the pure r-process elements (Eu, Gd, and Dy) have positive trends with increasing cluster age, while the mixed r- and s-process elements (Mo, Pr, and Nd) have insignificant trends consistent with zero. Pr, Nd, Eu, Gd, and Dy have similar, slight (although mostly statistically significant) gradients of ˜0.04 dex kpc-1. The mixed elements also appear to have nonlinear relationships with R GC.

  5. Heavy cluster decay of trans-zirconium ``stable'' nuclides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poenaru, D. N.; Greiner, W.; Ivascu, M.; Sandulescu, A.

    1985-12-01

    By using the analytical superasymmetric fission model it is shown that all ``stable'' nuclei lighter than lead with Z>40 are metastable relative to the spontaneous emission of nuclear clusters. An even-odd effect is included in the zero point vibration energy. Half-lives in the range 1040-1050 s are obtained for Z>62. The region of metastability against these new decay modes is extended beyond that for α decay and in some cases, in the competing region, the emission rates for nuclear clusters are larger than for α decay.

  6. Localization and orientation of heavy-atom cluster compounds in protein crystals using molecular replacement.

    PubMed

    Dahms, Sven O; Kuester, Miriam; Streb, Carsten; Roth, Christian; Sträter, Norbert; Than, Manuel E

    2013-02-01

    Heavy-atom clusters (HA clusters) containing a large number of specifically arranged electron-dense scatterers are especially useful for experimental phase determination of large complex structures, weakly diffracting crystals or structures with large unit cells. Often, the determination of the exact orientation of the HA cluster and hence of the individual heavy-atom positions proves to be the critical step in successful phasing and subsequent structure solution. Here, it is demonstrated that molecular replacement (MR) with either anomalous or isomorphous differences is a useful strategy for the correct placement of HA cluster compounds. The polyoxometallate cluster hexasodium α-metatungstate (HMT) was applied in phasing the structure of death receptor 6. Even though the HA cluster is bound in alternate partially occupied orientations and is located at a special position, its correct localization and orientation could be determined at resolutions as low as 4.9 Å. The broad applicability of this approach was demonstrated for five different derivative crystals that included the compounds tantalum tetradecabromide and trisodium phosphotungstate in addition to HMT. The correct placement of the HA cluster depends on the length of the intramolecular vectors chosen for MR, such that both a larger cluster size and the optimal choice of the wavelength used for anomalous data collection strongly affect the outcome.

  7. Irradiation of nuclear track emulsions with thermal neutrons, heavy ions, and muons

    SciTech Connect

    Artemenkov, D. A. Bradnova, V.; Zaitsev, A. A.; Zarubin, P. I.; Zarubina, I. G.; Kattabekov, R. R.; Mamatkulov, K. Z.; Rusakova, V. V.

    2015-07-15

    Exposures of test samples of nuclear track emulsion were analyzed. Angular and energy correlations of products originating from the thermal-neutron-induced reaction n{sub th} +{sup 10} B → {sup 7} Li + (γ)+ α were studied in nuclear track emulsions enriched in boron. Nuclear track emulsions were also irradiated with {sup 86}Kr{sup +17} and {sup 124}Xe{sup +26} ions of energy about 1.2 MeV per nucleon. Measurements of ranges of heavy ions in nuclear track emulsionsmade it possible to determine their energies on the basis of the SRIM model. The formation of high-multiplicity nuclear stars was observed upon irradiating nuclear track emulsions with ultrarelativistic muons. Kinematical features studied in this exposure of nuclear track emulsions for events of the muon-induced splitting of carbon nuclei to three alpha particles are indicative of the nucleardiffraction interaction mechanism.

  8. Heavy-baryon chiral perturbation theory approach to thermal neutron capture on {sup 3}He

    SciTech Connect

    Lazauskas, Rimantas; Park, Tae-Sun

    2011-03-15

    The cross section for radiative thermal neutron capture on {sup 3}He ({sup 3}He+n{yields}{sup 4}He+{gamma}; known as the hen reaction) is calculated based on heavy-baryon chiral perturbation theory. The relevant M1 operators are derived up to next-to-next-to-next-to-leading order (N{sup 3}LO). The initial and final nuclear wave functions are obtained from the rigorous Faddeev-Yakubovski equations for five sets of realistic nuclear interactions. Up to N{sup 3}LO, the M1 operators contain two low-energy constants, which appear as the coefficients of nonderivative two-nucleon contact terms. After determining these two constants using the experimental values of the magnetic moments of the triton and {sup 3}He, we carry out a parameter-free calculation of the hen cross section. The results are in good agreement with the data.

  9. Clustering of water molecules in ultramicroporous carbon: In-situ small-angle neutron scattering

    DOE PAGES

    Bahadur, Jitendra; Contescu, Cristian I.; Rai, Durgesh K.; ...

    2016-10-19

    The adsorption of water is central to most of the applications of microporous carbon as adsorbent material. We report early kinetics of water adsorption in the microporous carbon using in-situ small-angle neutron scattering. It is observed that adsorption of water occurs via cluster formation of molecules. Interestingly, the cluster size remains constant throughout the adsorption process whereas number density of clusters increases with time. The role of surface chemistry of microporous carbon on the early kinetics of adsorption process was also investigated. Lastly, the present study provides direct experimental evidence for cluster assisted adsorption of water molecules in microporous carbonmore » (Do-Do model).« less

  10. Temperature dependence of clusters with attracting vortices in superconducting niobium studied by neutron scattering.

    PubMed

    Pautrat, A; Brûlet, A

    2014-06-11

    We investigated the intermediate mixed state of a superconducting niobium sample using very small angle neutron scattering. We show that this state is stabilized through a sequence where a regular vortex lattice appears, which then coexists with vortex clusters before vanishing at low temperature. Vortices in clusters have a constant periodicity regardless of the applied field and exhibit a temperature dependence close to the one of the penetration depth. The clusters disappear in the high temperature limit. All the results agree with an explanation in terms of vortex attraction due to non-local effects and indicate a negligible role for pinning. Phase coexistence between the Abrikosov vortex lattice and vortex clusters is reported, showing the first-order nature of the boundary line.

  11. Joint Discussion 6 Neutron stars and black holes in star clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rasio, F. A.; Baumgardt, Holger; Corongiu, Alessandro; D'Antona, Francesca; Fabbiano, Giuseppina; Fregeau, John M.; Gebhardt, Karl; Heinke, Craig O.; Hut, Piet; Ivanova, Nataliya; Maccarone, Thomas J.; Ransom, Scott M.; Webb, Natalie A.

    2007-08-01

    This article was co-authored by all invited speakers at Joint Discussion 6 on Neutron Stars and Black Holes in Star Clusters, which took place during the IAU General Assembly in Prague, Czech Republic, on August 17 and 18, 2006. Each section presents a short summary of recent developments in a key area of research, incorporating the main ideas expressed during the corresponding panel discussion at the meeting.

  12. Neutron Capture Elements in the Open Cluster Chemical Abundance & Mapping (OCCAM) Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Connell, Julia; Frinchaboy, Peter M.; Shetrone, Matthew D.; Majewski, Steven R.; Zasowski, Gail; Hearty, Fred R.

    2016-01-01

    The Open Cluster Chemical Abundance & Mapping (OCCAM) survey is a systematic survey of Galactic open clusters using data primarily from the SDSS-III/APOGEE-1 survey. The high-resolution (R=22,500), near-infrared (H-band) APOGEE-1 survey allows for cluster membership probability determination and analysis of light and iron-peak elements. Neutron capture elements, however, prove to be elusive in the IR region covered by APOGEE. In an effort to fully study detailed Galactic chemical evolution, we conducted a high resolution (R~60,000) spectroscopic abundance analysis of neutron capture elements for OCCAM clusters in the optical regime to complement the APOGEE results. We present results for ten open clusters using data obtained at McDonald Observatory with the 2.1m Otto Struve telescope and Sandiford Echelle Spectrograph. We see abundance trends for Ba II, La II and Eu II that are consistent with Galactic abundance patterns for these elements. Ce II appears to be slightly enhanced in all program stars with a median value of ~0.1 dex and a spread of 0.5 dex for the entire sample.

  13. The Open Cluster Chemical Abundances and Mapping (OCCAM) Survey: Galactic Neutron CaptureAbundance Gradients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Connell, Julia; Frinchaboy, Peter M.; Shetrone, Matthew D.; Melendez, Matthew; Cunha, Katia; Majewski, Steven R.; Zasowski, Gail; APOGEE Team

    2017-06-01

    The evolution of elements, as a function or age, throughout the Milky Way disk provides a key constraint for galaxy evolution models. In an effort to provide these constraints, we have conducted an investigation into the r- and s- process elemental abundances for a large sample of open clusters as part of an optical follow-up to the SDSS-III/APOGEE-1 survey. Stars were identified as cluster members by the Open Cluster Chemical Abundance & Mapping (OCCAM) survey, which culls member candidates by radial velocity, metallicity and proper motion from the observed APOGEE sample. To obtain data for neutron capture elements in these clusters, we conducted a long-term observing campaign covering three years (2013-2016) using the McDonald Observatory Otto Struve 2.1-m telescope and Sandiford Cass Echelle Spectrograph (R ~ 60,000). We present Galactic neutron capture abundance gradients using 30+ clusters, within 6 kpc of the Sun, covering a range of ages from ~80 Myr to ~10 Gyr .

  14. The Open Cluster Chemical Abundances and Mapping (OCCAM) Survey: Galactic Neutron Capture Abundance Gradients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Connell, Julia; Frinchaboy, Peter M.; Shetrone, Matthew D.; Melendez, Matthew; Cunha, Katia M. L.; Majewski, Steven R.; Zasowski, Gail; APOGEE Team

    2017-01-01

    The evolution of elements, as a function or age, throughout the Milky Way disk provides a key constraint for galaxy evolution models. In an effort to provide these constraints, we have conducted an investigation into the r- and s- process elemental abundances for a large sample of open clusters as part of an optical follow-up to the SDSS-III/APOGEE-1 survey. Stars were identified as cluster members by the Open Cluster Chemical Abundance & Mapping (OCCAM) survey, which culls member candidates by radial velocity, metallicity, and proper motion from the observed APOGEE sample. To obtain data for neutron capture elements in these clusters, we conducted a long-term observing campaign covering three years (2013-2016) using the McDonald Observatory Otto Struve 2.1-m telescope and Sandiford Cass Echelle Spectrograph (R ~ 60,000). We present Galactic neutron-capture abundance gradients using 30+ clusters, within 6 kpc of the Sun, covering a range of ages from ~80 Myr to ~10 Gyr .

  15. Neutron stars and millisecond pulsars from accretion-induced collapse in globular clusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bailyn, Charles D.; Grindlay, Jonathan E.

    1990-01-01

    This paper examines the limits on the number of millisecond pulsars which could be formed in globular clusters by the generally accepted scenario (in which a neutron star is created by the supernova of an initially massive star and subsequently captures a companion to form a low-mass X-ray binary which eventually becomes a millisecond pulsar). It is found that, while the number of observed low-mass X-ray binaries can be adequately explained in this way, the reasonable assumption that the pulsar luminosity function in clusters extends below the current observational limits down to the luminosity of the faintest millisecond pulsars in the field suggests a cluster population of millisecond pulsars which is substantially larger than the standard model can produce. Alleviating this problem by postulating much shorter lifetimes for the X-ray binaries requires massive star populations sufficiently large that the mass loss resulting from their evolution would be likely to unbind the cluster. It is argued that neutron star formation in globular clusters by accretion-induced collapse of white dwarfs may resolve the discrepancy in birthrates.

  16. Odd-even staggering of heavy cluster spontaneous emission rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poenaru, D. N.; Greiner, W.; Ivaşcu, M.; Mazilu, D.; Plonski, I. H.

    1986-12-01

    Experimentally observed enhanced14C and24Ne emission rates from even-even parents in comparison with that from even-odd or odd-even nuclei are explained in the framework of the analytical superasymmetric fission model, by taking various prescriptions for the zero point vibration energy of even-even, even-odd, odd-even and odd-odd emitters. Longer half-lives than previously computed are obtained by extrapolating the present prescriptions to emitted clusters heavier than24Ne.

  17. Spontaneous heavy cluster emission rates using microscopic potentials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basu, D. N.

    2002-08-01

    The nuclear cluster radioactivities have been studied theoretically in the framework of a microscopic superasymmetric fission model (MSAFM). The nuclear interaction potentials required for binary cold fission processes are calculated by folding in the density distribution functions of the two fragments with a realistic effective interaction. The microscopic nuclear potential thus obtained has been used to calculate the action integral within the WKB approximation. The calculated half-lives of the present MSAFM calculations are found to be in good agreement over a wide range of observed experimental data.

  18. Estimating neutron dose equivalent rates from heavy ion reactions around 10 MeV amu(-1) using the PHITS code.

    PubMed

    Iwamoto, Yosuke; Ronningen, R M; Niita, Koji

    2010-04-01

    It has been sometimes necessary for personnel to work in areas where low-energy heavy ions interact with targets or with beam transport equipment and thereby produce significant levels of radiation. Methods to predict doses and to assist shielding design are desirable. The Particle and Heavy Ion Transport code System (PHITS) has been typically used to predict radiation levels around high-energy (above 100 MeV amu(-1)) heavy ion accelerator facilities. However, predictions by PHITS of radiation levels around low-energy (around 10 MeV amu(-1)) heavy ion facilities to our knowledge have not yet been investigated. The influence of the "switching time" in PHITS calculations of low-energy heavy ion reactions, defined as the time when the JAERI Quantum Molecular Dynamics model (JQMD) calculation stops and the Generalized Evaporation Model (GEM) calculation begins, was studied using neutron energy spectra from 6.25 MeV amu(-1) and 10 MeV amu(-1) (12)C ions and 10 MeV amu(-1) (16)O ions incident on a copper target. Using a value of 100 fm c(-1) for the switching time, calculated neutron energy spectra obtained agree well with the experimental data. PHITS was then used with the switching time of 100 fm c(-1) to simulate an experimental study by Ohnesorge et al. by calculating neutron dose equivalent rates produced by 3 MeV amu(-1) to 16 MeV amu(-1) (12)C, (14)N, (16)O, and (20)Ne beams incident on iron, nickel and copper targets. The calculated neutron dose equivalent rates agree very well with the data and follow a general pattern which appears to be insensitive to the heavy ion species but is sensitive to the target material.

  19. Setup with Laser Ionization in Gas Cell for Production and Study of Neutron-Rich Heavy Nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zagrebaev, V. I.; Zemlyanoy, S. G.; Kozulin, E. M.; Kudryavtsev, Yu.; Fedosseev, V.; Bark, R.; Janas, Z.; Othman, H. A.

    2015-11-01

    The present limits of the upper part of the nuclear map are very close to stability while the unexplored area of heavy neutron-rich nuclides along the neutron closed shell N=126 is extremely important for nuclear astrophysics investigations and, in particular, for the understanding of the r-process of astrophysical nucleosynthesis. This area of the nuclear map can be reached neither in fusion-fission reactions nor in fragmentation processes widely used nowadays for the production of exotic nuclei. A new way was recently proposed for the production of these nuclei via low-energy multi-nucleon transfer reactions. The estimated yields of neutron-rich nuclei are found to be significantly high in such reactions and several tens of new nuclides can be produced, for example, in the near-barrier collision of 136Xe with 208Pb. A new setup is proposed to produce and study heavy neutron-rich nuclei located along the neutron closed shell N=126.

  20. Characterization of neutron fields from bare and heavy water moderated (252)Cf spontaneous fission source using Bonner Sphere Spectrometer.

    PubMed

    Atanackovic, Jovica; Yonkeu, Andre; Dubeau, Jacques; Witharana, Sampath Hakmana; Priest, Nicholas

    2015-05-01

    In this work a calibrated Bonner Sphere Spectrometer (BSS), together with ISO shadow cones, was used to quantify the total and scattered components of bare and heavy water moderated (252)Cf neutron fields. All measurements were performed with a BSS that was calibrated at the National Physical Laboratory (NPL), Teddington, UK, which is a global primary standard laboratory and world-leading facility for neutron metrology and neutron instruments calibration. The fields were characterized for source-spectrometer distances of 80, 100, 150 and 200cm; and at heights of 103 and 200cm from the facility floor. As expected, the scattered contribution was greatest at the farthest distance from the source and closer to the floor. Hence, at a distance of 200cm and a height of 103cm, the scatter added to the direct field up to 162% of the total neutron fluence and up to 61% of the ambient dose equivalent, while at the same distance and height of 200cm above the floor, these values were up to 146% and 52%, respectively. In the case of heavy water moderated (252)Cf neutron fields, a shadow cone subtraction technique could not be implemented, however Monte Carlo simulations were utilized in order to differentiate between the direct and scatter components of the neutron fields. In this case, at a source-detector distance of 200cm and a height of 103cm, the scatter added to the direct field up to 148% of the total neutron fluence and up to 45% of the ambient dose equivalent, while at the same distance and a height of 200cm above the floor, these values were up to 134% and 42%, respectively. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Cluster decay in very heavy nuclei in a relativistic mean field model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattacharya, Madhubrata; Gangopadhyay, G.

    2008-02-01

    Exotic cluster decay of very heavy nuclei was studied in the microscopic Super-Asymmetric Fission Model. The Relativistic Mean Field model with the force FSU Gold was employed to obtain the densities of the cluster and the daughter nuclei. The microscopic nuclear interaction DDM3Y1, which has an exponential density dependence, and the Coulomb interaction were used in the double folding model to obtain the potential between the cluster and the daughter. Half-life values were calculated in the WKB approximation and the spectroscopic factors were extracted. The latter values are seen to have a simple dependence of the mass of the cluster as has been observed earlier. Predictions were made for some possible decays.

  2. Nuclear cluster structure effect on elliptic and triangular flows in heavy-ion collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, S.; Ma, Y. G.; Chen, J. H.; He, W. B.; Zhong, C.

    2017-06-01

    The initial geometry effect on collective flows, which are inherited from initial projectile structure, is studied in relativistic heavy-ion collisions of 12C+197Au by using a multiphase transport model (AMPT). Elliptic flow (v2) and triangular flow (v3) which are significantly resulted from the chain and triangle structure of 12C with three-α clusters, respectively, in central 12C+197Au collisions are compared with the flow from the Woods-Saxon distribution of nucleons in 12C. v3/v2 is proposed as a probe to distinguish the pattern of α -clustered 12C. This study demonstrates that the initial geometry of the collision zone inherited from nuclear structure can be explored by collective flow at the final stage in heavy-ion collisions.

  3. Heavy metals and rare earth elements source-sink in some Egyptian cigarettes as determined by neutron activation analysis.

    PubMed

    Nada, A; Abdel-Wahab, M; Sroor, A; Abdel-Haleem, A S; Abdel-Sabour, M F

    1999-07-01

    Heavy metals and rare earth elements in two types of cigarettes were studied. The contents of trace elements were determined by using delayed neutron activation analysis. In the present study 11 elements have been detected in popular and fine brand cigarettes marketed in Egypt. Evaluation of these elements with their potential hazards for smokers is briefly discussed. The material balance (source and sink) for each element was determined. Also the ratio of element recovery to the total amount was assessed.

  4. Isobaric yield ratios in heavy-ion reactions, and symmetry energy of neutron-rich nuclei at intermediate energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Chun-Wang; Wang, Fang; Ma, Yu-Gang; Jin, Chan

    2011-06-01

    The isobaric yield ratios of the fragments produced in the neutron-rich Ca48 and Ni64 projectile fragmentation are analyzed in the framework of a modified Fisher model. The correlations between the isobaric yield ratios (R) and the energy coefficients in the Weiszäcker-Beth semiclassical mass formula (the symmetry-energy term asym, the Coulomb-energy term ac, and the pairing-energy term ap) and the difference between the chemical potentials of the neutron and proton (μn-μp) are investigated. Simple correlations between (μn-μp)/T, ac/T, asym/T, and ap/T (where T is the temperature), and lnR are obtained. It is suggested that (μn-μp)/T, ac/T, asym/T, and ap/T of neutron-rich nuclei can be extracted using isobaric yield ratios for heavy-ion collisions at intermediate energies.

  5. Alpha-cluster preformation factor within cluster-formation model for odd-A and odd-odd heavy nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saleh Ahmed, Saad M.

    2017-06-01

    The alpha-cluster probability that represents the preformation of alpha particle in alpha-decay nuclei was determined for high-intensity alpha-decay mode odd-A and odd-odd heavy nuclei, 82 < Z < 114, 111 < N < 174. This probability was calculated using the energy-dependent formula derived from the formulation of clusterisation states representation (CSR) and the hypothesised cluster-formation model (CFM) as in our previous work. Our previous successful determination of phenomenological values of alpha-cluster preformation factors for even-even nuclei motivated us to expand the work to cover other types of nuclei. The formation energy of interior alpha cluster needed to be derived for the different nuclear systems with considering the unpaired-nucleon effect. The results showed the phenomenological value of alpha preformation probability and reflected the unpaired nucleon effect and the magic and sub-magic effects in nuclei. These results and their analyses presented are very useful for future work concerning the calculation of the alpha decay constants and the progress of its theory.

  6. Quarteting and spin-aligned proton-neutron pairs in heavy N =Z nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sambataro, M.; Sandulescu, N.

    2015-06-01

    We analyze the role of maximally aligned isoscalar pairs in heavy N =Z nuclei by employing a formalism of quartets. Quartets are superpositions of two neutrons and two protons coupled to total isospin T =0 and given J . The study is focused on the contribution of spin-aligned pairs carrying the angular momentum J =9 to the structure of 96Cd and 92Pd . We show that the role played by the J =9 pairs is quite sensitive to the model space and, in particular, it decreases considerably by passing from the simple 0 g9 /2 space to the more complete 1 p1 /2,1 p3 /2,0 f5 /2,0 g9 /2 space. In the latter case the description of these nuclei in terms of only spin-aligned J =9 pairs turns out to be unsatisfactory while an important contribution, particularly in the ground state, is seen to arise from isovector J =0 and isoscalar J =1 pairs. Thus, contrary to previous studies, we find no compelling evidence of a spin-aligned pairing phase in 92Pd .

  7. Cluster structure of neutron-rich 10Be and 14C via resonant alpha scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, D.; Ahn, T.; Bazin, D.; Becchetti, F. D.; Beceiro-Novo, S.; Fritsch, A.; Kolata, J. J.; Mittig, W.; AT-TPC Collaboration

    2017-09-01

    Neutron-rich ^{10} Be and ^{14} C nuclei were studied via resonant α scattering of radioactive 6 He and ^{10} Be beams, respectively, produced by the TwinSol facility at the University of Notre Dame. The Prototype Active-Target Time-Projection Chamber (pAT-TPC) was used as a thick gaseous α target to induce resonant scattering and as a device to track reacted particles inside the target, providing continuous excitation functions and angular distributions over a wide range of energies and angles. The experimental results indicate a melting phenomenon of α clusters in the 4+ rotational member of the ^{10} Be ground state and a linear chain alignment of three α clusters in ^{14} C excited states, as recently predicted by an anti-symmetrized molecular dynamics calculation.

  8. Nucleon pairing correlations and the α cluster preformation probability inside heavy and superheavy nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seif, W. M.

    2015-01-01

    The presence of paired or unpaired protons and neutrons in the open-shell radioactive α emitter affects the preformation probability of the α cluster inside it. The α-preformation probability inside the odd ( Z )-even ( N ) , even ( Z )-odd ( N ) , and odd ( Z )-odd ( N ) α emitters is investigated. The study is restricted to those decays with no angular momentum transfer to make a precise prediction about the mere pairing effect. The extended cluster model of α decay and the WKB approximation are used by taking into account the deformation degrees of freedom to carry out the calculations for 105 parent nuclei in the mass region of A =175 -289 . The α + daughter interaction potential is calculated by using the Hamiltonian energy-density approach in terms of the SLy4 Skyrme-like interaction, then it is implemented to find the average decay width over the different orientations. The half-life of the decay is then estimated and employed in turn to extract the α-preformation probability by taking account of errors on both the released energy and the experimental half-life time. According to the present calculations, it is found that the α cluster preformation probability inside the nuclei which have unpaired nucleons is less than it would be in the neighboring nuclei of the same shell and subshell closures but have no unpaired nucleons. In particular, the effect of the single unpaired neutron in the even ( Z )-odd ( N ) nuclei is slightly larger than that of the single unpaired proton in the odd ( Z )-even ( N ) ones. The effect of the unpaired nucleons appears more clearly in the odd ( Z )-odd ( N ) nuclei which have both an unpaired neutron and an unpaired proton. Based on the obtained results, an empirical pairing term is added to the empirical formula [J. Phys. G 40, 105102 (2013), 10.1088/0954-3899/40/10/105102] that relates the α cluster preformation probability to the proton and neutron numbers outside the closed shells of the parent nucleus.

  9. Geographic clustering of elevated blood heavy metal levels in pregnant women.

    PubMed

    King, Katherine E; Darrah, Thomas H; Money, Eric; Meentemeyer, Ross; Maguire, Rachel L; Nye, Monica D; Michener, Lloyd; Murtha, Amy P; Jirtle, Randy; Murphy, Susan K; Mendez, Michelle A; Robarge, Wayne; Vengosh, Avner; Hoyo, Cathrine

    2015-10-09

    Cadmium (Cd), lead (Pb), mercury (Hg), and arsenic (As) exposure is ubiquitous and has been associated with higher risk of growth restriction and cardiometabolic and neurodevelopmental disorders. However, cost-efficient strategies to identify at-risk populations and potential sources of exposure to inform mitigation efforts are limited. The objective of this study was to describe the spatial distribution and identify factors associated with Cd, Pb, Hg, and As concentrations in peripheral blood of pregnant women. Heavy metals were measured in whole peripheral blood of 310 pregnant women obtained at gestational age ~12 weeks. Prenatal residential addresses were geocoded and geospatial analysis (Getis-Ord Gi* statistics) was used to determine if elevated blood concentrations were geographically clustered. Logistic regression models were used to identify factors associated with elevated blood metal levels and cluster membership. Geospatial clusters for Cd and Pb were identified with high confidence (p-value for Gi* statistic <0.01). The Cd and Pb clusters comprised 10.5 and 9.2 % of Durham County residents, respectively. Medians and interquartile ranges of blood concentrations (μg/dL) for all participants were Cd 0.02 (0.01-0.04), Hg 0.03 (0.01-0.07), Pb 0.34 (0.16-0.83), and As 0.04 (0.04-0.05). In the Cd cluster, medians and interquartile ranges of blood concentrations (μg/dL) were Cd 0.06 (0.02-0.16), Hg 0.02 (0.00-0.05), Pb 0.54 (0.23-1.23), and As 0.05 (0.04-0.05). In the Pb cluster, medians and interquartile ranges of blood concentrations (μg/dL) were Cd 0.03 (0.02-0.15), Hg 0.01 (0.01-0.05), Pb 0.39 (0.24-0.74), and As 0.04 (0.04-0.05). Co-exposure with Pb and Cd was also clustered, the p-values for the Gi* statistic for Pb and Cd was <0.01. Cluster membership was associated with lower education levels and higher pre-pregnancy BMI. Our data support that elevated blood concentrations of Cd and Pb are spatially clustered in this urban environment compared to

  10. Fuzzy hierarchical cross-clustering of data from abandoned mine site contaminated with heavy metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pourjabbar, A.; Sârbu, C.; Kostarelos, K.; Einax, J. W.; Büchel, G.

    2014-11-01

    The characteristics of pore water and slate samples are critically analyzed using fuzzy hierarchical cross-clustering statistical techniques. The main aim of this study was to investigate the source of contamination near an abandoned uranium mine in Germany. The mining activities were abandoned in 1990 the site was closed, and the surrounding area was remediated. However, heavy metal contamination is still detectable in water, soil and plants today. Hence, investigating the source of the current contamination is an important task. In order to achieve the goal, results from chemical analysis of both pore water samples and leachates from slate samples were initially analyzed using hard (classical) hierarchical clustering algorithms that did not provide meaningful results. By using two fuzzy clustering algorithms, Fuzzy Divisive Hierarchical Clustering (FDHC) and Fuzzy Hierarchical Cross-Clustering (FHCC), a relationship between the leachate from Ordovician-Silurian slate samples (10 samples collected from the test site and the surrounding area) and pore water samples (53 samples collected from 3 locations within the test site at 3 depths over the course of 4 years) was identified. The leachate data formed a cluster which was statistically similar to the cluster formed by the pore water samples collected from two of three locations. In addition, the fuzzy cross-clustering approach allowed for the identification of the characteristics (qualitative and quantitative) responsible for the observed similarities between all the samples. We conclude that the fuzzy algorithms were a better tool for the analysis and interpretation of geological/hydrogeological data where the data sets have an inherent vagueness/uncertainty.

  11. Small-angle neutron scattering data on C{sub 60} clusters in weakly polar solutions of fullerenes

    SciTech Connect

    Tropin, T. V. Avdeev, M. V.; Aksenov, V. L.

    2007-05-15

    Solutions of fullerence C{sub 60} in carbon disulfide CS{sub 2} have been investigated by small-angle neutron scattering. Combination of solubility, contrast, and incoherent scattering make it possible to measure and analyze the relatively small scattering cross section of this system. Along with single fullerene molecules, a small amount of large fullerene clusters (more than 100 A in size) is found in these solutions. The formation of these clusters depends on the procedure of solution preparation. The size distribution functions of clusters are compared with the results of the phenomenological cluster model of fullerene solubility.

  12. Exotic clusters in an unbound region of light neutron-rich systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ito, Makoto

    2009-10-01

    In light neutron-rich systems, many kinds of molecular structures are discussed from the view point of the clustering phenomena.In particular, much attention has been concentrated on Be isotopes. The molecular orbital (MO), such as &-circ; and &+circ; associated with the covalent binding of atomic molecules, have been shown to give a good description for the low-lying states of these isotopes. In their highly-excited states, furthermore, recent experiments revealed the existence of the interesting resonant states which dominantly decay to the ^6,8He fragments. In this report, we show the unified study of the exotic structures of ^12Be=α+α+4N in an unbound region and the α+^6,8He resonant scattering. We applied the generalized two-center cluster model in which the covalent MO and the atomic orbital (AO) configurations with ^xHe+^yHe could be described in a unified manner. First, we calculated the energy spectra below an α decay-threshold. The (π32^-)^2 (σ12^+)^2 configuration corresponding to ν(0p)^4(sd)^2 becomes the ground state, while (π3 2^-)^2(π12^-)^2 having a large overlap with ν(0p)^6 appears as the first excited state. The rotational band of the ground state reaches to the maximum spin of J^π = 8^+. This result means that the magicity of N=8 is broken in ^12Be due to the formation of (π3 2^-)^2(σ12^+)^2. Next, we solved the scattering problem of α+^8He and identified the several resonance poles. In the continuum region, we found the rotational bands having the AO configurations of α+^8He, ^6He+^6He, and ^5He+^7 He. Furthermore, a much more exotic band appears in the same energy region. In this band, two valence neutrons are localized at individual α-cores (the ^5He+^5He cluster), while the other two neutrons form the covalent &+circ;- bonding between two ^5He clusters; hence, it has a ``hybrid structure'' between the MO configuration and the AO one. In the J^π=0^+ state, it is strongly excited by the two-neutron transfer reaction, α+^8He

  13. Proton and neutron density distributions at supranormal density in low- and medium-energy heavy-ion collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stone, J. R.; Danielewicz, P.; Iwata, Y.

    2017-07-01

    Background: The distribution of protons and neutrons in the matter created in heavy-ion collisions is one of the main points of interest for the collision physics, especially at supranormal densities. These distributions are the basis for predictions of the density dependence of the symmetry energy and the density range that can be achieved in a given colliding system. We report results of the first systematic simulation of proton and neutron density distributions in central heavy-ion collisions within the beam energy range of Ebeam≤800 MeV /nucl . The symmetric 40Ca+40Ca , 48Ca+48Ca , 100Sn+100Sn , and 120Sn+120Sn and asymmetric 40Ca+48Ca and 100Sn+120Sn systems were chosen for the simulations. Purpose: We simulate development of proton and neutron densities and asymmetries as a function of initial state, beam energy, and system size in the selected collisions in order to guide further experiments pursuing the density dependence of the symmetry energy. Methods: The Boltzmann-Uhlenbeck-Uehling (pBUU) transport model with four empirical models for the density dependence of the symmetry energy was employed. Results of simulations using pure Vlasov dynamics were added for completeness. In addition, the time-dependent Hartree-Fock (TDHF) model, with the SV-bas Skyrme interaction, was used to model the heavy-ion collisions at Ebeam≤40 MeV /nucl . Maximum proton and neutron densities ρpmax and ρnmax, reached in the course of a collision, were determined from the time evolution of ρp and ρn. Results: The highest total densities predicted at Ebeam=800 MeV /nucl . were of the order of ˜2.5 ρ0 (ρ0=0.16 fm-3 ) for both Sn and Ca systems. They were found to be only weakly dependent on the initial conditions, beam energy, system size, and a model of the symmetry energy. The proton-neutron asymmetry δ =(ρnmax-ρpmax) /(ρnmax+ρpmax) at maximum density does depend, though, on these parameters. The highest value of δ found in all systems and at all investigated beam

  14. Systematic study of neutron-rich rare isotope production in peripheral heavy-ion collisions below the Fermi energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fountas, P. N.; Souliotis, G. A.; Veselsky, M.; Bonasera, A.

    2014-12-01

    Detailed calculations of the yields of projectilelike fragments (with focus on the neutron-rich isotopes) are presented for the interaction of 86Kr (15 MeV/nucleon) with 64Ni, 58Ni, and 124Sn, 112Sn, as well as 86Kr (25 MeV/nucleon) with 124Sn and compared with our recently published experimental data for these reactions. The calculations are based on a two-step approach: the dynamical stage of the collision was described with the microscopic constrained molecular dynamics (CoMD) model, as well as the phenomenological deep-inelastic transfer (DIT) model and its modified (DITm) version. The deexcitation of the hot projectile fragments was performed with the statistical multifragmentation model (SMM) and the binary-decay model gemini, which provided nearly similar results for the neutron-rich products from the reactions studied. An overall good agreement of the calculations with the experimental results, especially for near-projectile isotopes was observed using both the CoMD model and the DITm model for the dynamical stage. The successful description of the production of neutron-rich isotopes with the CoMD model is of particular importance, due to the predictive power of the microscopic approach that essentially does not depend on the reaction dynamics. Our studies to date suggest that peripheral heavy-ion collisions at this energy range (i.e., well above the Coulomb barrier, but below the Fermi energy), if induced by neutron-rich rare-isotope beams of adequate intensity may offer a unique route to access extremely neutron-rich rare isotopes toward the astrophysical r -process path and the presently uncharted neutron drip line.

  15. Choice of a process design for simultaneous detritiation and upgrading of heavy water for the Advanced Neutron Source

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, A.I.; Spagnolo, D.A.; DeVore, J.R.

    1995-11-01

    Tritium removal and heavy water upgrading are essential components of the heavy water-moderated reactor that is the heart of the Advanced Neutron Source (ANS) to be built at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The technologies for these two processes, which are closely related, are reviewed in the context of the ANS requirements. The evolution of the design of the Heavy Water Upgrading and Detritiation Facility (HWUDF) for ANS is outlined, and the final conceptual design is presented. The conceptual design of HWUDF has two main component systems: (a) a front-end combined electrolysis and catalytic exchange (CECE) system and (b) a back-end cryogenic distillation (CD) system. The CECE process consists of a countercurrent exchange column for hydrogen-water exchange over a wetproofed catalyst and electrolysis to convert water into hydrogen. It accepts all the tritiated heavy water streams of the reactor and performs an almost total separation into a protium (light hydrogen) stream containing tritium and deuterium at only natural abundance and a deuterium stream containing all the tritium and almost no protium. The tritium-containing deuterium stream is then processed by a CD unit, which removes over 90% of the tritium and concentrates it to >99% tritium for indefinite storage as a metal tritide. Deuterium gas with a small residue of tritium is recombined with oxygen from the electrolytic cells and returned as heavy water to the reactor.

  16. Optimization of the neutron yield in fusion plasmas produced by Coulomb explosions of deuterium clusters irradiated by a petawatt laser.

    PubMed

    Bang, W; Dyer, G; Quevedo, H J; Bernstein, A C; Gaul, E; Donovan, M; Ditmire, T

    2013-02-01

    The kinetic energy of hot (multi-keV) ions from the laser-driven Coulomb explosion of deuterium clusters and the resulting fusion yield in plasmas formed from these exploding clusters has been investigated under a variety of conditions using the Texas Petawatt laser. An optimum laser intensity was found for producing neutrons in these cluster fusion plasmas with corresponding average ion energies of 14 keV. The substantial volume (1-10 mm(3)) of the laser-cluster interaction produced by the petawatt peak power laser pulse led to a fusion yield of 1.6×10(7) neutrons in a single shot with a 120 J, 170 fs laser pulse. Possible effects of prepulses are discussed.

  17. INTERACTION OF LASER RADIATION WITH MATTER: Coulomb explosion of deuterium clusters in a magnetic trap and generation of neutrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaretsky, D. F.

    2004-07-01

    A new method is proposed for injecting hot ions into a magnetic trap, which is based on the Coulomb explosion of clusters ionised by radiation from a high-power femtosecond laser. The parameters of the trap required for the confinement of the hot plasma produced after the explosion of deuterium clusters are estimated. It is shown that the neutron yield in the d — d reaction in the trap can substantially exceed this yield directly in the laser beam focus.

  18. Single-Crystal Neutron Diffraction Study of the Heavy-Electron Superconductor CeNiGe3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ikeda, Yoichi; Ueta, Daichi; Yoshizawa, Hideki; Nakao, Akiko; Munakata, Koji; Ohhara, Takashi

    2015-12-01

    A single-crystal neutron diffraction study was performed on anomalous antiferromagnetic ordering in the heavy-electron superconductor CeNiGe3. We observed incommensurate magnetic Bragg reflections characterized by the incommensurate propagation vector k2 = (0,0.41,1/2) below the Néel temperature of 5 K, but no significant magnetic reflection with the commensurate propagation vector k1 = (1,0,0), at which another magnetic reflection was observed in a previous neutron diffraction study with a polycrystalline sample. From the single-crystal study, we suggest that the magnetic phase of CeNiGe3 at ambient pressure is characterized only by the incommensurate propagation vector k2.

  19. Lampreys have a single gene cluster for the fast skeletal myosin heavy chain gene family.

    PubMed

    Ikeda, Daisuke; Ono, Yosuke; Hirano, Shigeki; Kan-no, Nobuhiro; Watabe, Shugo

    2013-01-01

    Muscle tissues contain the most classic sarcomeric myosin, called myosin II, which consists of 2 heavy chains (MYHs) and 4 light chains. In the case of humans (tetrapod), a total of 6 fast skeletal-type MYH genes (MYHs) are clustered on a single chromosome. In contrast, torafugu (teleost) contains at least 13 fast skeletal MYHs, which are distributed in 5 genomic regions; the MYHs are clustered in 3 of these regions. In the present study, the evolutionary relationship among fast skeletal MYHs is elucidated by comparing the MYHs of teleosts and tetrapods with those of cyclostome lampreys, one of two groups of extant jawless vertebrates (agnathans). We found that lampreys contain at least 3 fast skeletal MYHs, which are clustered in a head-to-tail manner in a single genomic region. Although there was apparent synteny in the corresponding MYH cluster regions between lampreys and tetrapods, phylogenetic analysis indicated that lamprey and tetrapod MYHs have independently duplicated and diversified. Subsequent transgenic approaches showed that the 5'-flanking sequences of Japanese lamprey fast skeletal MYHs function as a regulatory sequence to drive specific reporter gene expression in the fast skeletal muscle of zebrafish embryos. Although zebrafish MYH promoters showed apparent activity to direct reporter gene expression in myogenic cells derived from mice, promoters from Japanese lamprey MYHs had no activity. These results suggest that the muscle-specific regulatory mechanisms are partially conserved between teleosts and tetrapods but not between cyclostomes and tetrapods, despite the conserved synteny.

  20. Lampreys Have a Single Gene Cluster for the Fast Skeletal Myosin Heavy Chain Gene Family

    PubMed Central

    Ikeda, Daisuke; Ono, Yosuke; Hirano, Shigeki; Kan-no, Nobuhiro; Watabe, Shugo

    2013-01-01

    Muscle tissues contain the most classic sarcomeric myosin, called myosin II, which consists of 2 heavy chains (MYHs) and 4 light chains. In the case of humans (tetrapod), a total of 6 fast skeletal-type MYH genes (MYHs) are clustered on a single chromosome. In contrast, torafugu (teleost) contains at least 13 fast skeletal MYHs, which are distributed in 5 genomic regions; the MYHs are clustered in 3 of these regions. In the present study, the evolutionary relationship among fast skeletal MYHs is elucidated by comparing the MYHs of teleosts and tetrapods with those of cyclostome lampreys, one of two groups of extant jawless vertebrates (agnathans). We found that lampreys contain at least 3 fast skeletal MYHs, which are clustered in a head-to-tail manner in a single genomic region. Although there was apparent synteny in the corresponding MYH cluster regions between lampreys and tetrapods, phylogenetic analysis indicated that lamprey and tetrapod MYHs have independently duplicated and diversified. Subsequent transgenic approaches showed that the 5′-flanking sequences of Japanese lamprey fast skeletal MYHs function as a regulatory sequence to drive specific reporter gene expression in the fast skeletal muscle of zebrafish embryos. Although zebrafish MYH promoters showed apparent activity to direct reporter gene expression in myogenic cells derived from mice, promoters from Japanese lamprey MYHs had no activity. These results suggest that the muscle-specific regulatory mechanisms are partially conserved between teleosts and tetrapods but not between cyclostomes and tetrapods, despite the conserved synteny. PMID:24376886

  1. Hemorrhage in mouse tumors induced by dodecaborate cluster lipids intended for boron neutron capture therapy.

    PubMed

    Schaffran, Tanja; Jiang, Nan; Bergmann, Markus; Küstermann, Ekkehard; Süss, Regine; Schubert, Rolf; Wagner, Franz M; Awad, Doaa; Gabel, Detlef

    2014-01-01

    The potential of boron-containing lipids with three different structures, which were intended for use in boron neutron capture therapy, was investigated. All three types of boron lipids contained the anionic dodecaborate cluster as the headgroup. Their effects on two different tumor models in mice following intravenous injection were tested; for this, liposomes with boron lipid, distearoyl phosphatidylcholine, and cholesterol as helper lipids, and containing a polyethylene glycol lipid for steric protection, were administered intravenously into tumor-bearing mice (C3H mice for SCCVII squamous cell carcinoma and BALB/c mice for CT26/WT colon carcinoma). With the exception of one lipid (B-THF-14), the lipids were well tolerated, and no other animal was lost due to systemic toxicity. The lipid which led to death was not found to be much more toxic in cell culture than the other boron lipids. All of the lipids that were well tolerated showed hemorrhage in both tumor models within a few hours after administration. The hemorrhage could be seen by in vivo magnetic resonance and histology, and was found to occur within a few hours. The degree of hemorrhage depended on the amount of boron administered and on the tumor model. The observed unwanted effect of the lipids precludes their use in boron neutron capture therapy.

  2. Abrasion-ablation model for neutron production in heavy ion collisions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cucinotta, F. A.; Wilson, J. W.; Townsend, L. W.

    1997-01-01

    In intermediate energy nucleus-nucleus collisions, neutron production at forward angles is observed to occur with a Gaussian shape that is centered near the beam energy and extends to energies well above that of the beam. This paper presents an abrasion-ablation model for making quantitative predictions of the neutron spectrum. To describe neutrons produced from the abrasion step of the reaction where the projectile and target overlap, we use the Glauber model and include effects of final-state interactions. We then use the prefragment mass distribution from abrasion with a statistical evaporation model to estimate the neutron spectrum resulting from ablation. Measurements of neutron production from Ne and Nb beams are compared with calculations, and good agreement is found.

  3. Isobaric yield ratios in heavy-ion reactions, and symmetry energy of neutron-rich nuclei at intermediate energies

    SciTech Connect

    Ma Chunwang; Wang Fang; Ma Yugang; Jin Chan

    2011-06-15

    The isobaric yield ratios of the fragments produced in the neutron-rich {sup 48}Ca and {sup 64}Ni projectile fragmentation are analyzed in the framework of a modified Fisher model. The correlations between the isobaric yield ratios (R) and the energy coefficients in the Weiszaecker-Beth semiclassical mass formula (the symmetry-energy term a{sub sym}, the Coulomb-energy term a{sub c}, and the pairing-energy term a{sub p}) and the difference between the chemical potentials of the neutron and proton ({mu}{sub n}-{mu}{sub p}) are investigated. Simple correlations between ({mu}{sub n}-{mu}{sub p})/T, a{sub c}/T, a{sub sym}/T, and a{sub p}/T (where T is the temperature), and lnR are obtained. It is suggested that ({mu}{sub n}-{mu}{sub p})/T, a{sub c}/T, a{sub sym}/T, and a{sub p}/T of neutron-rich nuclei can be extracted using isobaric yield ratios for heavy-ion collisions at intermediate energies.

  4. Assessment of PM10 and heavy metals concentration in a Ceramic Cluster (NE Spain)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belen Vicente, Ana; Pardo, Francisco; Sanfeliu, Teofilo; Bech, Joan

    2013-04-01

    Environmental pollution control is one of the most important goals in pollution risk assessment today. The aim of this study is conducting a retrospective view of the evolution of particulate matter (PM10) and heavy metals (As, Cd, Ni and Pb) at different localities in the Spanish cluster ceramic in the period between January 2007 and December 2011. The study area is in the province of Castellón. This province is a strategical area in the framework of European Union Pollution control. Approximately 80% of European ceramic tiles and ceramic frits manufacturers are concentrated in two areas, forming the so-called "Ceramics Clusters"; one is in Modena (Italy) and the other in Castellón (Spain). In this kind of areas, there are a lot of pollutants from this industry that represent an important contribution to soil contamination so it is necessary to control the air quality in them. These atmospheric particles are deposited in the ground through both dry and wet deposition. Soil is a major sink for heavy metals released into the environment. The level of pollution of soils by heavy metals depends on the retention capacity of the soil, especially on physical-chemical properties (mineralogy, grain size, organic matter) affecting soil particle surfaces and also on the chemical properties of the metal. The most direct consequences on the ground of air pollutants are acidification, salinization and the pollutions that can cause heavy metals as components of suspended particulate matter. For this purpose the levels of PM10 in ambient air and the corresponding annual and weekly trend were calculated. The results of the study show that the PM10 and heavy metals concentrations are below the limit values recommended by European Union Legislation for the protection of human health and ecosystems in the study period. There is an important reduction of them from 2009 in all control stations due to the economic crisis. References Moral, R., Gilkes, R.J., Jordán, M.M., 2005

  5. ZIRCONIUM—HAFNIUM ISOTOPE EVIDENCE FROM METEORITES FOR THE DECOUPLED SYNTHESIS OF LIGHT AND HEAVY NEUTRON-RICH NUCLEI

    SciTech Connect

    Akram, W.; Schönbächler, M.; Sprung, P.; Vogel, N.

    2013-11-10

    Recent work based on analyses of meteorite and terrestrial whole-rock samples showed that the r- and s- process isotopes of Hf were homogeneously distributed throughout the inner solar system. We report new Hf isotope data for Calcium-Aluminum-rich inclusions (CAIs) of the CV3 carbonaceous chondrite Allende, and novel high-precision Zr isotope data for these CAIs and three carbonaceous chondrites (CM, CO, CK). Our Zr data reveal enrichments in the neutron-rich isotope {sup 96}Zr (≤1ε in {sup 96}Zr/{sup 90}Zr) for bulk chondrites and CAIs (∼2ε). Potential isotope effects due to incomplete sample dissolution, galactic and cosmic ray spallation, and the nuclear field shift are assessed and excluded, leading to the conclusion that the {sup 96}Zr isotope variations are of nucleosynthetic origin. The {sup 96}Zr enrichments are coupled with {sup 50}Ti excesses suggesting that both nuclides were produced in the same astrophysical environment. The same CAIs also exhibit deficits in r-process Hf isotopes, which provides strong evidence for a decoupling between the nucleosynthetic processes that produce the light (A ≤ 130) and heavy (A > 130) neutron-rich isotopes. We propose that the light neutron-capture isotopes largely formed in Type II supernovae (SNeII) with higher mass progenitors than the supernovae that produced the heavy r-process isotopes. In the context of our model, the light isotopes (e.g. {sup 96}Zr) are predominantly synthesized via charged-particle reactions in a high entropy wind environment, in which Hf isotopes are not produced. Collectively, our data indicates that CAIs sampled an excess of materials produced in a normal mass (12-25 M{sub ☉}) SNII.

  6. Violence of heavy-ion reactions from neutron multiplicity: 11 to 20A-italic MeV /sup 20/Ne+ /sup 238/U

    SciTech Connect

    Jahnke, U.; Ingold, G.; Hilscher, D.; Lehmann, M.; Schwinn, E.; Zank, P.

    1986-07-14

    The suitability of the neutron multiplicity as a gauge for the violence of medium-energy heavy-ion reactions is investigated for the first time. For this purpose the number of neutrons emitted from fission reactions induced by 220-, 290-, and 400-MeV /sup 20/Ne on /sup 238/U is registered event-by-event with a large 4..pi.. scintillator tank. It is shown that the neutron multiplicity is indeed closely related to the two quantities characterizing the violence: the induced total intrinsic excitation and the linear momentum transfer.

  7. Inertial confinement fusion using hohlraum radiation generated by heavy-ion clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Tahir, N.A.; Lutz, K.; Geb, O.; Maruhn, J.A.; Deutsch, C.; Hoffmann, D.H.

    1997-03-01

    This paper discusses the feasibility of employing heavy-ion cluster beams to generate thermal radiation that can be used to drive inertial fusion capsules. The low charge-to-mass ratio of a cluster may allow the driver beam to be focused to a very small spot size with a radius of the order of 100 {mu}m, while the low energy per nucleon (of the order of 10 keV) may lead to a very short range of the driver particles in the converter material. This would result in high specific power deposition that may lead to a very high conversion efficiency. The problem of cluster stopping in cold matter, as well as in hot dense plasmas has been thoroughly investigated. The conversion efficiency of cluster ions using a low-density gold converter has also been calculated over a wide range of parameters including converter density, converter geometry, and specific power deposition. These calculations have been carried out using a one-dimensional hydrodynamic computer code that includes a multigroup radiation transport scheme [Ramis {ital et al.}, Comput. Phys. Commun. {bold 49}, 475 (1988)]. The problem of symmetrization of this radiation field in a hohlraum with solid gold walls has also been thoroughly investigated using a three-dimensional view factor code. The characteristics of the radiation field obtained by this study are used as input to capsule implosion calculations that are done with a three-temperature radiation-hydrodynamic computer code MEDUSA-KAT [Tahir {ital et al.}, J. Appl. Phys. {bold 60}, 898 (1986)]. A reactor-size capsule which contains 5 mg deuterium{endash}tritium (DT) fuel is used in these calculations. The problem of using a fuel mixture with a substantially reduced tritium content has also been discussed. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

  8. Neutrons as Party Animals: An Analogy for Understanding Heavy-Element Fissility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reed, B. Cameron

    2012-12-01

    I teach a general education class on the history of nuclear physics and the Manhattan Project. About halfway through the course we come to the discovery of fission and Niels Bohr's insight that it is the rare isotope of uranium, U-235, which fissions under slow-neutron bombardment as opposed to the much more common U-238 isotope. As an "explanation" of the differing responses of the two isotopes to bombarding neutrons, I use the known (measured) masses of the various isotopes involved to compute the energies released upon neutron capture and then compare them to the fission barriers of the "compound" nuclei so formed (U-236 and U-239). The energy released in the (neutron + U-235) reaction exceeds the fission barrier by about one million electron-volts (1 MeV), while that for the (neutron + U-238) case falls about 1.6 MeV short. (The fission barriers are respectively about 5.7 and 6.5 MeV.)

  9. Neutron spectrometry with large volume, heavy-loaded superheated droplet detectors: a simple spin-off.

    PubMed

    Ramos, A R; Giuliani, F; Felizardo, M; Girard, T A; Morlat, T; Marques, J G; Oliveira, C; Limagne, D; Waysand, G; Fernandes, A C

    2005-01-01

    SIMPLE is a superheated droplet detector (SDD) experiment designed to search for the evidence of spin-dependent weakly interacting neutralino dark matter (WIMPs). SDDs, a type of emulsion detector, consist of a uniform suspension of superheated liquid droplets in a compliant material such as a polymeric or aqueous gel. We report on the first neutron spectrometry experiments with SIMPLE SDDs, a spin-off of the neutron detector calibrations performed at the Portuguese Research Reactor. SIMPLE SDDs differ from most SDDs available commercially as they have a 10 times higher loading factor, containing 10(3) times more freon than their commercial counterparts and a 100 times larger volume. We have analysed the response of SIMPLE SDDs to two quasi-monochromatic neutron beams of energies 54 and 144 keV obtained with passive filters. Results show that the characteristic peaks in the fluence distribution of both filters could be determined and their energy position obtained using a simple thermodynamic relation.

  10. Recent β-delayed neutron branching ratios of measurements with heavy nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caballero-Folch, Roger; Dillmann, Iris; Agramunt, Jorge; Tain, Jose Luis

    2016-09-01

    The understanding of the nuclear structure of the neutron-rich nuclei and several astrophysical phenomena, such as the r-process, is a challenge that need new experimental values to provide more realistic data inputs in theoretical models. The aim of this study is to achieve new β-delayed neutron branching ratios, Pn, of very neutron-rich nuclei. Experiments recently performed at the RIB facilities of GSI Darmstadt (Germany) and IGISOL in Jyväskylä (Finland) allowed to determine Pn values for heavier isotopes than those measured so far with a 4pi neutron detector based on 3He counters. At GSI it was possible to measure β1n emitters for several Hg and Tl isotopes with masses beyond A>200 and N>126, and at IGISOL the β2n emitter 136Sb, which represents an important leap in terms of mass since the heaviest known were around A 150 for β1n and A 100 for β2n. Results of P1n and P2n values will be presented, together with the new plans for β-delayed neutron emitter measurements at RIKEN (Japan). The BRIKEN project aims to measure more than a hundred of β1n, and many β2n and β3n emitters, a lot of them for the first time. These isotopes will be the most neutron-rich species measured so far. This work was partially supported by the Spanish Ministry of Economy and Competitivity under Grant FPA2011-28770-C03-03. TRIUMF receives federal funding via a contribution agreement with the National Research Council of Canada.

  11. Neutron skin and centrality classification in high-energy heavy-ion collisions at the LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paukkunen, Hannu

    2015-05-01

    The concept of centrality in high-energy nuclear collisions has recently become a subject of an active debate. In particular, the experimental methods to determine the centrality that have given reasonable results for many observables in high-energy lead-lead collisions at the LHC have led to surprising behavior in the case of proton-lead collisions. In this letter, we discuss the possibility to calibrate the experimental determination of centrality by asymmetries caused by mutually different spatial distributions of protons and neutrons inside the nuclei - a well-known phenomenon in nuclear physics known as the neutron-skin effect.

  12. Neutrons as Party Animals: An Analogy for Understanding Heavy-Element Fissility

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reed, B. Cameron

    2012-01-01

    I teach a general education class on the history of nuclear physics and the Manhattan Project. About halfway through the course we come to the discovery of fission and Niels Bohr's insight that it is the rare isotope of uranium, U-235, which fissions under slow-neutron bombardment as opposed to the much more common U-238 isotope. As an…

  13. Neutrons as Party Animals: An Analogy for Understanding Heavy-Element Fissility

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reed, B. Cameron

    2012-01-01

    I teach a general education class on the history of nuclear physics and the Manhattan Project. About halfway through the course we come to the discovery of fission and Niels Bohr's insight that it is the rare isotope of uranium, U-235, which fissions under slow-neutron bombardment as opposed to the much more common U-238 isotope. As an…

  14. Radiation Detection and Classification of Heavy Oxide Inorganic Scintillator Crystals for Detection of Fast Neutrons

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-06-01

    and alkali -halide scintillators for potential use in neutron and gamma detection systems.” M.S. thesis, Dept. Physics, Naval Posgraduate School...assets.newport.com/webDocuments- EN/images/2151_And_2153_User_Manual_RevC.pdf Accessed Apr. 1, 2016. [25] Metal package PMT with cooler photosensor modules

  15. Search for continuous gravitational waves from neutron stars in globular cluster NGC 6544

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abbott, B. P.; Abbott, R.; Abbott, T. D.; Abernathy, M. R.; Acernese, F.; Ackley, K.; Adams, C.; Adams, T.; Addesso, P.; Adhikari, R. X.; Adya, V. B.; Affeldt, C.; Agathos, M.; Agatsuma, K.; Aggarwal, N.; Aguiar, O. D.; Aiello, L.; Ain, A.; Allen, B.; Allocca, A.; Altin, P. A.; Anderson, S. B.; Anderson, W. G.; Arai, K.; Araya, M. C.; Arceneaux, C. C.; Areeda, J. S.; Arnaud, N.; Arun, K. G.; Ascenzi, S.; Ashton, G.; Ast, M.; Aston, S. M.; Astone, P.; Aufmuth, P.; Aulbert, C.; Babak, S.; Bacon, P.; Bader, M. K. M.; Baker, P. T.; Baldaccini, F.; Ballardin, G.; Ballmer, S. W.; Barayoga, J. C.; Barclay, S. E.; Barish, B. C.; Barker, D.; Barone, F.; Barr, B.; Barsotti, L.; Barsuglia, M.; Barta, D.; Bartlett, J.; Bartos, I.; Bassiri, R.; Basti, A.; Batch, J. C.; Baune, C.; Bavigadda, V.; Bazzan, M.; Bejger, M.; Bell, A. S.; Berger, B. K.; Bergmann, G.; Berry, C. P. L.; Bersanetti, D.; Bertolini, A.; Betzwieser, J.; Bhagwat, S.; Bhandare, R.; Bilenko, I. A.; Billingsley, G.; Birch, J.; Birney, R.; Biscans, S.; Bisht, A.; Bitossi, M.; Biwer, C.; Bizouard, M. A.; Blackburn, J. K.; Blair, C. D.; Blair, D. G.; Blair, R. M.; Bloemen, S.; Bock, O.; Boer, M.; Bogaert, G.; Bogan, C.; Bohe, A.; Bond, C.; Bondu, F.; Bonnand, R.; Boom, B. A.; Bork, R.; Boschi, V.; Bose, S.; Bouffanais, Y.; Bozzi, A.; Bradaschia, C.; Brady, P. R.; Braginsky, V. B.; Branchesi, M.; Brau, J. E.; Briant, T.; Brillet, A.; Brinkmann, M.; Brisson, V.; Brockill, P.; Broida, J. E.; Brooks, A. F.; Brown, D. A.; Brown, D. D.; Brown, N. M.; Brunett, S.; Buchanan, C. C.; Buikema, A.; Bulik, T.; Bulten, H. J.; Buonanno, A.; Buskulic, D.; Buy, C.; Byer, R. L.; Cabero, M.; Cadonati, L.; Cagnoli, G.; Cahillane, C.; Calderón Bustillo, J.; Callister, T.; Calloni, E.; Camp, J. B.; Cannon, K. C.; Cao, J.; Capano, C. D.; Capocasa, E.; Carbognani, F.; Caride, S.; Casanueva Diaz, J.; Casentini, C.; Caudill, S.; Cavaglià, M.; Cavalier, F.; Cavalieri, R.; Cella, G.; Cepeda, C. B.; Cerboni Baiardi, L.; Cerretani, G.; Cesarini, E.; Chamberlin, S. J.; Chan, M.; Chao, S.; Charlton, P.; Chassande-Mottin, E.; Cheeseboro, B. D.; Chen, H. Y.; Chen, Y.; Cheng, C.; Chincarini, A.; Chiummo, A.; Cho, H. S.; Cho, M.; Chow, J. H.; Christensen, N.; Chu, Q.; Chua, S.; Chung, S.; Ciani, G.; Clara, F.; Clark, J. A.; Cleva, F.; Coccia, E.; Cohadon, P.-F.; Colla, A.; Collette, C. G.; Cominsky, L.; Constancio, M.; Conte, A.; Conti, L.; Cook, D.; Corbitt, T. R.; Cornish, N.; Corsi, A.; Cortese, S.; Costa, C. A.; Coughlin, M. W.; Coughlin, S. B.; Coulon, J.-P.; Countryman, S. T.; Couvares, P.; Cowan, E. E.; Coward, D. M.; Cowart, M. J.; Coyne, D. C.; Coyne, R.; Craig, K.; Creighton, J. D. E.; Creighton, T.; Cripe, J.; Crowder, S. G.; Cumming, A.; Cunningham, L.; Cuoco, E.; Dal Canton, T.; Danilishin, S. L.; D'Antonio, S.; Danzmann, K.; Darman, N. S.; Dasgupta, A.; Da Silva Costa, C. F.; Dattilo, V.; Dave, I.; Davier, M.; Davies, G. S.; Daw, E. J.; Day, R.; De, S.; DeBra, D.; Debreczeni, G.; Degallaix, J.; De Laurentis, M.; Deléglise, S.; Del Pozzo, W.; Denker, T.; Dent, T.; Dergachev, V.; De Rosa, R.; DeRosa, R. T.; DeSalvo, R.; Devine, R. C.; Dhurandhar, S.; Díaz, M. C.; Di Fiore, L.; Di Giovanni, M.; Di Girolamo, T.; Di Lieto, A.; Di Pace, S.; Di Palma, I.; Di Virgilio, A.; Dolique, V.; Donovan, F.; Dooley, K. L.; Doravari, S.; Douglas, R.; Downes, T. P.; Drago, M.; Drever, R. W. P.; Driggers, J. C.; Ducrot, M.; Dwyer, S. E.; Edo, T. B.; Edwards, M. C.; Effler, A.; Eggenstein, H.-B.; Ehrens, P.; Eichholz, J.; Eikenberry, S. S.; Engels, W.; Essick, R. C.; Etzel, T.; Evans, M.; Evans, T. M.; Everett, R.; Factourovich, M.; Fafone, V.; Fair, H.; Fan, X.; Fang, Q.; Farinon, S.; Farr, B.; Farr, W. M.; Favata, M.; Fays, M.; Fehrmann, H.; Fejer, M. M.; Fenyvesi, E.; Ferrante, I.; Ferreira, E. C.; Ferrini, F.; Fidecaro, F.; Fiori, I.; Fiorucci, D.; Fisher, R. P.; Flaminio, R.; Fletcher, M.; Fournier, J.-D.; Frasca, S.; Frasconi, F.; Frei, Z.; Freise, A.; Frey, R.; Frey, V.; Fritschel, P.; Frolov, V. V.; Fulda, P.; Fyffe, M.; Gabbard, H. A. G.; Gair, J. R.; Gammaitoni, L.; Gaonkar, S. G.; Garufi, F.; Gaur, G.; Gehrels, N.; Gemme, G.; Geng, P.; Genin, E.; Gennai, A.; George, J.; Gergely, L.; Germain, V.; Ghosh, Abhirup; Ghosh, Archisman; Ghosh, S.; Giaime, J. A.; Giardina, K. D.; Giazotto, A.; Gill, K.; Glaefke, A.; Goetz, E.; Goetz, R.; Gondan, L.; González, G.; Gonzalez Castro, J. M.; Gopakumar, A.; Gordon, N. A.; Gorodetsky, M. L.; Gossan, S. E.; Gosselin, M.; Gouaty, R.; Grado, A.; Graef, C.; Graff, P. B.; Granata, M.; Grant, A.; Gras, S.; Gray, C.; Greco, G.; Green, A. C.; Groot, P.; Grote, H.; Grunewald, S.; Guidi, G. M.; Guo, X.; Gupta, A.; Gupta, M. K.; Gushwa, K. E.; Gustafson, E. K.; Gustafson, R.; Hacker, J. J.; Hall, B. R.; Hall, E. D.; Hammond, G.; Haney, M.; Hanke, M. M.; Hanks, J.; Hanna, C.; Hanson, J.; Hardwick, T.; Harms, J.; Harry, G. M.; Harry, I. W.; Hart, M. J.; Hartman, M. T.; Haster, C.-J.; Haughian, K.; Heidmann, A.; Heintze, M. C.; Heitmann, H.; Hello, P.; Hemming, G.; Hendry, M.; Heng, I. S.; Hennig, J.; Henry, J.; Heptonstall, A. W.; Heurs, M.; Hild, S.; Hoak, D.; Hofman, D.; Holt, K.; Holz, D. E.; Hopkins, P.; Hough, J.; Houston, E. A.; Howell, E. J.; Hu, Y. M.; Huang, S.; Huerta, E. A.; Huet, D.; Hughey, B.; Husa, S.; Huttner, S. H.; Huynh-Dinh, T.; Indik, N.; Ingram, D. R.; Inta, R.; Isa, H. N.; Isac, J.-M.; Isi, M.; Isogai, T.; Iyer, B. R.; Izumi, K.; Jacqmin, T.; Jang, H.; Jani, K.; Jaranowski, P.; Jawahar, S.; Jian, L.; Jiménez-Forteza, F.; Johnson, W. W.; Jones, D. I.; Jones, R.; Jonker, R. J. G.; Ju, L.; Haris, K.; Kalaghatgi, C. V.; Kalogera, V.; Kandhasamy, S.; Kang, G.; Kanner, J. B.; Kapadia, S. J.; Karki, S.; Karvinen, K. S.; Kasprzack, M.; Katsavounidis, E.; Katzman, W.; Kaufer, S.; Kaur, T.; Kawabe, K.; Kéfélian, F.; Kehl, M. S.; Keitel, D.; Kelley, D. B.; Kells, W.; Kennedy, R.; Key, J. S.; Khalili, F. Y.; Khan, I.; Khan, S.; Khan, Z.; Khazanov, E. A.; Kijbunchoo, N.; Kim, Chi-Woong; Kim, Chunglee; Kim, J.; Kim, K.; Kim, N.; Kim, W.; Kim, Y.-M.; Kimbrell, S. J.; King, E. J.; King, P. J.; Kissel, J. S.; Klein, B.; Kleybolte, L.; Klimenko, S.; Koehlenbeck, S. M.; Koley, S.; Kondrashov, V.; Kontos, A.; Korobko, M.; Korth, W. Z.; Kowalska, I.; Kozak, D. B.; Kringel, V.; Krishnan, B.; Królak, A.; Krueger, C.; Kuehn, G.; Kumar, P.; Kumar, R.; Kuo, L.; Kutynia, A.; Lackey, B. D.; Landry, M.; Lange, J.; Lantz, B.; Lasky, P. D.; Laxen, M.; Lazzaro, C.; Leaci, P.; Leavey, S.; Lebigot, E. O.; Lee, C. H.; Lee, H. K.; Lee, H. M.; Lee, K.; Lenon, A.; Leonardi, M.; Leong, J. R.; Leroy, N.; Letendre, N.; Levin, Y.; Lewis, J. B.; Li, T. G. F.; Libson, A.; Littenberg, T. B.; Lockerbie, N. A.; Lombardi, A. L.; London, L. T.; Lord, J. E.; Lorenzini, M.; Loriette, V.; Lormand, M.; Losurdo, G.; Lough, J. D.; Lück, H.; Lundgren, A. P.; Lynch, R.; Ma, Y.; Machenschalk, B.; MacInnis, M.; Macleod, D. M.; Magaña-Sandoval, F.; Magaña Zertuche, L.; Magee, R. M.; Majorana, E.; Maksimovic, I.; Malvezzi, V.; Man, N.; Mandic, V.; Mangano, V.; Mansell, G. L.; Manske, M.; Mantovani, M.; Marchesoni, F.; Marion, F.; Márka, S.; Márka, Z.; Markosyan, A. S.; Maros, E.; Martelli, F.; Martellini, L.; Martin, I. W.; Martynov, D. V.; Marx, J. N.; Mason, K.; Masserot, A.; Massinger, T. J.; Masso-Reid, M.; Mastrogiovanni, S.; Matichard, F.; Matone, L.; Mavalvala, N.; Mazumder, N.; McCarthy, R.; McClelland, D. E.; McCormick, S.; McGuire, S. C.; McIntyre, G.; McIver, J.; McManus, D. J.; McRae, T.; McWilliams, S. T.; Meacher, D.; Meadors, G. D.; Meidam, J.; Melatos, A.; Mendell, G.; Mercer, R. A.; Merilh, E. L.; Merzougui, M.; Meshkov, S.; Messenger, C.; Messick, C.; Metzdorff, R.; Meyers, P. M.; Mezzani, F.; Miao, H.; Michel, C.; Middleton, H.; Mikhailov, E. E.; Milano, L.; Miller, A. L.; Miller, A.; Miller, B. B.; Miller, J.; Millhouse, M.; Minenkov, Y.; Ming, J.; Mirshekari, S.; Mishra, C.; Mitra, S.; Mitrofanov, V. P.; Mitselmakher, G.; Mittleman, R.; Moggi, A.; Mohan, M.; Mohapatra, S. R. P.; Montani, M.; Moore, B. C.; Moore, C. J.; Moraru, D.; Moreno, G.; Morriss, S. R.; Mossavi, K.; Mours, B.; Mow-Lowry, C. M.; Mueller, G.; Muir, A. W.; Mukherjee, Arunava; Mukherjee, D.; Mukherjee, S.; Mukund, N.; Mullavey, A.; Munch, J.; Murphy, D. J.; Murray, P. G.; Mytidis, A.; Nardecchia, I.; Naticchioni, L.; Nayak, R. K.; Nedkova, K.; Nelemans, G.; Nelson, T. J. N.; Neri, M.; Neunzert, A.; Newton, G.; Nguyen, T. T.; Nielsen, A. B.; Nissanke, S.; Nitz, A.; Nocera, F.; Nolting, D.; Normandin, M. E. N.; Nuttall, L. K.; Oberling, J.; Ochsner, E.; O'Dell, J.; Oelker, E.; Ogin, G. H.; Oh, J. J.; Oh, S. H.; Ohme, F.; Oliver, M.; Oppermann, P.; Oram, Richard J.; O'Reilly, B.; O'Shaughnessy, R.; Ottaway, D. J.; Overmier, H.; Owen, B. J.; Pai, A.; Pai, S. A.; Palamos, J. R.; Palashov, O.; Palomba, C.; Pal-Singh, A.; Pan, H.; Pankow, C.; Pannarale, F.; Pant, B. C.; Paoletti, F.; Paoli, A.; Papa, M. A.; Paris, H. R.; Parker, W.; Pascucci, D.; Pasqualetti, A.; Passaquieti, R.; Passuello, D.; Patel, P.; Patricelli, B.; Patrick, Z.; Pearlstone, B. L.; Pedraza, M.; Pedurand, R.; Pekowsky, L.; Pele, A.; Penn, S.; Perreca, A.; Perri, L. M.; Phelps, M.; Piccinni, O. J.; Pichot, M.; Piergiovanni, F.; Pierro, V.; Pillant, G.; Pinard, L.; Pinto, I. M.; Pitkin, M.; Poe, M.; Poggiani, R.; Popolizio, P.; Post, A.; Powell, J.; Prasad, J.; Predoi, V.; Prestegard, T.; Price, L. R.; Prijatelj, M.; Principe, M.; Privitera, S.; Prix, R.; Prodi, G. A.; Prokhorov, L.; Puncken, O.; Punturo, M.; Puppo, P.; Pürrer, M.; Qi, H.; Qin, J.; Qiu, S.; Quetschke, V.; Quintero, E. A.; Quitzow-James, R.; Raab, F. J.; Rabeling, D. S.; Radkins, H.; Raffai, P.; Raja, S.; Rajan, C.; Rakhmanov, M.; Rapagnani, P.; Raymond, V.; Razzano, M.; Re, V.; Read, J.; Reed, C. M.; Regimbau, T.; Rei, L.; Reid, S.; Reitze, D. H.; Rew, H.; Reyes, S. D.; Ricci, F.; Riles, K.; Rizzo, M.; Robertson, N. A.; Robie, R.; Robinet, F.; Rocchi, A.; Rolland, L.; Rollins, J. G.; Roma, V. J.; Romano, R.; Romanov, G.; Romie, J. H.; Rosińska, D.; Rowan, S.; Rüdiger, A.; Ruggi, P.; Ryan, K.; Sachdev, S.; Sadecki, T.; Sadeghian, L.; Sakellariadou, M.; Salconi, L.; Saleem, M.; Salemi, F.; Samajdar, A.; Sammut, L.; Sanchez, E. J.; Sandberg, V.; Sandeen, B.; Sanders, J. R.; Sassolas, B.; Saulson, P. R.; Sauter, O. E. S.; Savage, R. L.; Sawadsky, A.; Schale, P.; Schilling, R.; Schmidt, J.; Schmidt, P.; Schnabel, R.; Schofield, R. M. S.; Schönbeck, A.; Schreiber, E.; Schuette, D.; Schutz, B. F.; Scott, J.; Scott, S. M.; Sellers, D.; Sengupta, A. S.; Sentenac, D.; Sequino, V.; Sergeev, A.; Setyawati, Y.; Shaddock, D. A.; Shaffer, T.; Shahriar, M. S.; Shaltev, M.; Shapiro, B.; Shawhan, P.; Sheperd, A.; Shoemaker, D. H.; Shoemaker, D. M.; Siellez, K.; Siemens, X.; Sieniawska, M.; Sigg, D.; Silva, A. D.; Singer, A.; Singer, L. P.; Singh, A.; Singh, R.; Singhal, A.; Sintes, A. M.; Slagmolen, B. J. J.; Smith, J. R.; Smith, N. D.; Smith, R. J. E.; Son, E. J.; Sorazu, B.; Sorrentino, F.; Souradeep, T.; Srivastava, A. K.; Staley, A.; Steinke, M.; Steinlechner, J.; Steinlechner, S.; Steinmeyer, D.; Stephens, B. C.; Stone, R.; Strain, K. A.; Straniero, N.; Stratta, G.; Strauss, N. A.; Strigin, S.; Sturani, R.; Stuver, A. L.; Summerscales, T. Z.; Sun, L.; Sunil, S.; Sutton, P. J.; Swinkels, B. L.; Szczepańczyk, M. J.; Tacca, M.; Talukder, D.; Tanner, D. B.; Tápai, M.; Tarabrin, S. P.; Taracchini, A.; Taylor, R.; Theeg, T.; Thirugnanasambandam, M. P.; Thomas, E. G.; Thomas, M.; Thomas, P.; Thorne, K. A.; Thrane, E.; Tiwari, S.; Tiwari, V.; Tokmakov, K. V.; Toland, K.; Tomlinson, C.; Tonelli, M.; Tornasi, Z.; Torres, C. V.; Torrie, C. I.; Töyrä, D.; Travasso, F.; Traylor, G.; Trifirò, D.; Tringali, M. C.; Trozzo, L.; Tse, M.; Turconi, M.; Tuyenbayev, D.; Ugolini, D.; Unnikrishnan, C. S.; Urban, A. L.; Usman, S. A.; Vahlbruch, H.; Vajente, G.; Valdes, G.; van Bakel, N.; van Beuzekom, M.; van den Brand, J. F. J.; Van Den Broeck, C.; Vander-Hyde, D. C.; van der Schaaf, L.; van Heijningen, J. V.; van Veggel, A. A.; Vardaro, M.; Vass, S.; Vasúth, M.; Vaulin, R.; Vecchio, A.; Vedovato, G.; Veitch, J.; Veitch, P. J.; Venkateswara, K.; Verkindt, D.; Vetrano, F.; Viceré, A.; Vinciguerra, S.; Vine, D. J.; Vinet, J.-Y.; Vitale, S.; Vo, T.; Vocca, H.; Vorvick, C.; Voss, D. V.; Vousden, W. D.; Vyatchanin, S. P.; Wade, A. R.; Wade, L. E.; Wade, M.; Walker, M.; Wallace, L.; Walsh, S.; Wang, G.; Wang, H.; Wang, M.; Wang, X.; Wang, Y.; Ward, R. L.; Warner, J.; Was, M.; Weaver, B.; Wei, L.-W.; Weinert, M.; Weinstein, A. J.; Weiss, R.; Wen, L.; Weßels, P.; Westphal, T.; Wette, K.; Whelan, J. T.; Whiting, B. F.; Williams, R. D.; Williamson, A. R.; Willis, J. L.; Willke, B.; Wimmer, M. H.; Winkler, W.; Wipf, C. C.; Wittel, H.; Woan, G.; Woehler, J.; Worden, J.; Wright, J. L.; Wu, D. S.; Wu, G.; Yablon, J.; Yam, W.; Yamamoto, H.; Yancey, C. C.; Yu, H.; Yvert, M.; ZadroŻny, A.; Zangrando, L.; Zanolin, M.; Zendri, J.-P.; Zevin, M.; Zhang, L.; Zhang, M.; Zhang, Y.; Zhao, C.; Zhou, M.; Zhou, Z.; Zhu, X. J.; Zucker, M. E.; Zuraw, S. E.; Zweizig, J.; Sigurdsson, S.; LIGO Scientific Collaboration; Virgo Collaboration

    2017-04-01

    We describe a directed search for continuous gravitational waves in data from the sixth initial LIGO science run. The target was the nearby globular cluster NGC 6544 at a distance of ≈2.7 kpc . The search covered a broad band of frequencies along with first and second frequency derivatives for a fixed sky position. The search coherently integrated data from the two LIGO interferometers over a time span of 9.2 days using the matched-filtering F -statistic. We found no gravitational-wave signals and set 95% confidence upper limits as stringent as 6.0 ×10-25 on intrinsic strain and 8.5 ×10-6 on fiducial ellipticity. These values beat the indirect limits from energy conservation for stars with characteristic spin-down ages older than 300 years and are within the range of theoretical predictions for possible neutron-star ellipticities. An important feature of this search was use of a barycentric resampling algorithm which substantially reduced computational cost; this method is used extensively in searches of Advanced LIGO and Virgo detector data.

  16. Nano-cluster stability following neutron irradiation in MA957 oxide dispersion strengthened material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ribis, J.; Lozano-Perez, S.

    2014-01-01

    ODS steels are promising materials for Sodium cooled Fast Reactors since their fine distribution of nano-clusters confers excellent mechanical properties. However, the nano-feature stability needs to be assessed under neutron irradiation. Before irradiation, the characterizations show that nano-particles are finely distributed within the ferritic matrix and are identified to have a pyrochlore type structure. After irradiation of the MA957 alloy in the Phenix French reactor at 412 °C up to 50 dpa and 430 °C up to 75 dpa, transmission electron microscopy characterization reveals a very slight density fall but no distinguishable difference in nano-features size before and after irradiation. In addition, after both irradiations, the nano-oxides are still (Y, Ti, O) compounds with orientation relationship with the matrix. A multislice simulation of high resolution images suggests that nano-particles still have a fcc pyrochlore type structure after irradiation. A possible change of lattice parameter seems to be highlighted, possibly due to disordering by cascade effect.

  17. Isomeric states observed in heavy neutron-rich nuclei populated in the fragmentation of a 208Pb beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steer, S. J.; Podolyák, Zs.; Pietri, S.; Górska, M.; Grawe, H.; Maier, K. H.; Regan, P. H.; Rudolph, D.; Garnsworthy, A. B.; Hoischen, R.; Gerl, J.; Wollersheim, H. J.; Becker, F.; Bednarczyk, P.; Cáceres, L.; Doornenbal, P.; Geissel, H.; Grębosz, J.; Kelic, A.; Kojouharov, I.; Kurz, N.; Montes, F.; Prokopwicz, W.; Saito, T.; Schaffner, H.; Tashenov, S.; Heinz, A.; Pfützner, M.; Kurtukian-Nieto, T.; Benzoni, G.; Jungclaus, A.; Balabanski, D. L.; Bowry, M.; Brandau, C.; Brown, A.; Bruce, A. M.; Catford, W. N.; Cullen, I. J.; Dombrádi, Zs.; Estevez, M. E.; Gelletly, W.; Ilie, G.; Jolie, J.; Jones, G. A.; Kmiecik, M.; Kondev, F. G.; Krücken, R.; Lalkovski, S.; Liu, Z.; Maj, A.; Myalski, S.; Schwertel, S.; Shizuma, T.; Walker, P. M.; Werner-Malento, E.; Wieland, O.

    2011-10-01

    Heavy neutron-rich nuclei were populated via the fragmentation of a E/A=1 GeV 20882Pb beam. Secondary fragments were separated and identified and subsequently implanted in a passive stopper. By the detection of delayed γ rays, isomeric decays associated with these nuclei have been identified. A total of 49 isomers were detected, with the majority of them observed for the first time. The newly discovered isomers are in 204,20580Hg, 201,202,204,20579Au, 197,203,20478Pt, 195,199-20377Ir, 193,197-19976Os, 19675Re, 190,19174W, and 18973Ta. Possible level schemes are constructed and the structure of the nuclei discussed. To aid the interpretation, shell-model as well as BCS calculations were performed.

  18. Millisecond pulsars and neutron stars in globular clusters: 47Tuc vs. NGC6397

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grindlay, J.; Heinke, C.; Edmonds, P.; Camilo, F.

    origins of MSPs and neutron stars in globular clusters.

  19. Neutron skins and neutron stars

    SciTech Connect

    Piekarewicz, J.

    2013-11-07

    The neutron-skin thickness of heavy nuclei provides a fundamental link to the equation of state of neutron-rich matter, and hence to the properties of neutron stars. The Lead Radius Experiment ('PREX') at Jefferson Laboratory has recently provided the first model-independence evidence on the existence of a neutron-rich skin in {sup 208}Pb. In this contribution we examine how the increased accuracy in the determination of neutron skins expected from the commissioning of intense polarized electron beams may impact the physics of neutron stars.

  20. Competition between α and β decays for heavy deformed neutron-deficient Pa, U, Np, and Pu isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ni, Dongdong; Ren, Zhongzhou

    2017-01-01

    The competition between α and β decays is investigated for neutron-deficient Pa, U, Np, and Pu isotopes. β+/electron-capture (EC) decay rates are calculated within the deformed quasiparticle random-phase approximation with realistic nucleon-nucleon (N N ) interactions. Contributions from allowed Gamow-Teller and Fermi transitions as well as first-forbidden transitions are considered. α -decay calculations are performed within the generalized density-dependent cluster model. Effects of differences between neutron and proton distributions and nuclear deformation are taken into account. In the calculations, Reid-93 N N interactions are used for β+/EC decays, while Michigan three-range Yukawa effective interactions, based on the G -matrix elements of Reid N N potentials, are used for α decay. The calculated β -decay half-lives show good agreement with the experimental data over a range of magnitude from 102 to 105 s. The resulting total half-lives including α and β contributions are found to be in good agreement with the experimental data, together with the α /β -decay branching ratios.

  1. HEAVY-ELEMENT DISPERSION IN THE METAL-POOR GLOBULAR CLUSTER M92

    SciTech Connect

    Roederer, Ian U.; Sneden, Christopher

    2011-07-15

    Dispersion among the light elements is common in globular clusters (GCs), while dispersion among heavier elements is less common. We present detection of r-process dispersion relative to Fe in 19 red giants of the metal-poor GC M92. Using spectra obtained with the Hydra multi-object spectrograph on the WIYN Telescope at Kitt Peak National Observatory, we derive differential abundances for 21 species of 19 elements. The Fe-group elements, plus Y and Zr, are homogeneous at a level of 0.07-0.16 dex. The heavy-elements La, Eu, and Ho exhibit clear star-to-star dispersion spanning 0.5-0.8 dex. The abundances of these elements are correlated with one another, and we demonstrate that they were produced by r-process nucleosynthesis. This r-process dispersion is not correlated with the dispersion in C, N, or Na in M92, indicating that r-process inhomogeneities were present in the gas throughout star formation. The r-process dispersion is similar to that previously observed in the metal-poor GC M15, but its origin in M15 or M92 is unknown at present.

  2. Strong enhancement of dynamical emission of heavy fragments in the neutron-rich {sup 124}Sn+{sup 64}Ni reaction at 35A MeV

    SciTech Connect

    Russotto, P.; Amorini, F.; Cavallaro, S.; Di Toro, M.; Giustolisi, F.; Porto, F.; Rizzo, F.; De Filippo, E.; Pagano, A.; Cardella, G.; Lanzano, G.; Papa, M.; Pirrone, S.; Piasecki, E.; Auditore, L.; Trifiro, A.; Trimarchi, M.

    2010-06-15

    A quantitative comparison is made between the absolute cross sections associated with statistical and dynamical emission of heavy fragments in the {sup 124}Sn+{sup 64}Ni and {sup 112}Sn+{sup 58}Ni collisions experimentally investigated at 35A MeV beam energy using the multidetector CHIMERA. The result shows that the dynamical process is about twice as probable in the neutron-rich {sup 124}Sn+{sup 64}Ni system as in the {sup 112}Sn+{sup 58}Ni neutron-poor one. This unexpected and significant difference indicates that the reaction mechanism is strongly dependent on the entrance-channel isospin (N/Z) content.

  3. Isospin and kinematical properties of heavy residues from the multifragmentation of neutron-rich systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Souliotis, G. A.; Veselsky, M.; Botvina, A. S.; Keksis, A.; Martin, E.; Shetty, D. V.; Yennello, S. J.

    2004-05-01

    The yields and velocity distributions of isotopically resolved projectile residues from the reactions of 86Kr(25MeV/nucleon) with 64Ni,58Ni,124Sn,112Sn and 208Pb, as well as 124Sn(20MeV/u) with 124Sn are studied in this work [1,2]. Special attention is given to residues produced at excitation energies near the multifragmentation threshold ( ˜2-3MeV/nucleon). Both the isospin and the kinematical properties of the observed residues are well described by a hybrid approach consisting of a deep inelastic transfer model for the dynamical stage of the collision and the statistical multifragmentation model (SMM) for the de-excitation stage [3]. The present version of SMM features a fully microcanonically-based partition of fragmentation space and a detailed treatment of Coulomb interaction (including the interaction of fragments with target `spectators'). Apart from a nuclear reaction standpoint, the present study also addresses, both experimentally and theoretically, the practical issue of the production of very neutron-rich rare isotopes in multifragmentation of neutron-rich systems. [1] G.A. Souliotis et al., Phys. Rev. C 68 024605 (2003). [2] G.A. Souliotis et al., Nucl. Instrum. Methods B 204 166 (2003). [3] A.S. Botvina et al. Phys. Rev. C 65 044610 (2002) and references therein.

  4. Spectroscopy of neutron-rich nuclei populated through binary heavy-ion collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Lunardi, S.

    2009-05-04

    Neutron-rich nuclei from A = 50 to A = 80 have been studied through multi-nucleon transfer reactions by bombarding {sup 208}Pb and {sup 238}U targets with beams of {sup 48}Ca, {sup 64}Ni, {sup 70}Zn and {sup 82}Se. The gamma-array CLARA coupled to the large-acceptance magnetic spectrometer PRISMA gave unambiguous identification of prompt {gamma} rays belonging to each nucleus. The existence of the N = 32 sub-shell closure has been corroborated through the study of odd V isotopes, whereas a sizable gap at N = 34 has been evidenced from the spectroscopy of {sup 51}Ca and {sup 52}Sc. The evolution of the N = 50 shell closure far from stability has been studied down to Z = 31. With the {sup 48}Ca beam we have applied for the first time the Recoil Distance Dopple Shift technique to measure lifetimes of neutron-rich nuclei populated in multi-nucleon transfer reactions. Effective charges in the fp shell above {sup 48}Ca have been derived. The first implementation of the tracking array AGATA (the so called 'Demon-strator') will be soon coupled to the PRISMA spectrometer at Legnaro. The future prospects with the use of the Demonstrator are also presented.

  5. NEUTRONIC REACTORS

    DOEpatents

    Wigner, E.P.

    1960-11-22

    A nuclear reactor is described wherein horizontal rods of thermal- neutron-fissionable material are disposed in a body of heavy water and extend through and are supported by spaced parallel walls of graphite.

  6. Production of new neutron-rich isotopes of heavy elements in fragmentation reactions of {sup 238}U projectiles at 1A GeV

    SciTech Connect

    Alvarez-Pol, H.; Benlliure, J.; Casarejos, E.; Cortina-Gil, D.; Fernandez-Dominguez, B.; Pereira, J.; Audouin, L.; Enqvist, T.; Schmidt, K.-H.; Yordanov, O.; Junghans, A. R.; Jurado, B.; Rejmund, F.

    2010-10-15

    The production of heavy neutron-rich nuclei has been investigated using cold-fragmentation reactions of {sup 238}U projectiles at relativistic energies. The experiment performed at the high-resolving-power magnetic spectrometer Fragment Separator at GSI made it possible to identify 40 new heavy neutron-rich nuclei: {sup 205}Pt, {sup 207-210}Au, {sup 211-216}Hg, {sup 214-217}Tl, {sup 215-220}Pb, {sup 219-224}Bi, {sup 223-227}Po, {sup 225-229}At, {sup 230,231}Rn, and {sup 233}Fr. The production cross sections of these nuclei were also determined and used to benchmark reaction codes that predict the production of nuclei far from stability.

  7. Concluding Remarks: Connecting Relativistic Heavy Ion Collisions and Neutron Star Mergers by the Equation of State of Dense Hadron- and Quark Matter as signalled by Gravitational Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanauske, Matthias; Steinheimer, Jan; Bovard, Luke; Mukherjee, Ayon; Schramm, Stefan; Takami, Kentaro; Papenfort, Jens; Wechselberger, Natascha; Rezzolla, Luciano; Stöcker, Horst

    2017-07-01

    The underlying open questions in the fields of general relativistic astrophysics and elementary particle and nuclear physics are strongly connected and their results are interdependent. Although the physical systems are quite different, the 4D-simulation of a merger of a binary system of two neutron stars and the properties of the hot and dense matter created in high energy heavy ion collisions, strongly depend on the equation of state of fundamental elementary matter. Neutron star mergers represent optimal astrophysical laboratories to investigate the QCD phase structure using a spectrogram of the post-merger phase of the emitted gravitational waves. These studies can be supplemented by observations from heavy ion collisions to possibly reach a conclusive picture on the QCD phase structure at high density and temperature. As gravitational waves (GWs) emitted from merging neutron star binaries are on the verge of their first detection, it is important to understand the main characteristics of the underlying merging system in order to predict the expected GW signal. Based on numerical-relativity simulations of merging neutron star binaries, the emitted GW and the interior structure of the generated hypermassive neutron stars (HMNS) have been analyzed in detail. This article will focus on the internal and rotational HMNS properties and their connection with the emitted GW signal. Especially, the appearance of the hadon-quark phase transition in the interior region of the HMNS and its conjunction with the spectral properties of the emitted GW will be addressed and confronted with the simulation results of high energy heavy ion collisions.

  8. Health risk assessment of heavy metals in soils and vegetables from wastewater irrigated area, Beijing-Tianjin city cluster, China.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yanchun; Qiao, Min; Liu, Yunxia; Zhu, Yongguan

    2012-01-01

    The possible health risks of heavy metals contamination to local population through food chain were evaluated in Beijing and Tianjin city cluster, China, where have a long history of sewage irrigation. The transfer factors (TF) for heavy metals from soil to vegetables for six elements including Cu, Zn, Pb, Cr, As and Cd were calculated and the pollution load indexes (PLI) were also assessed. Results indicate that only Cd exceeded the maximum acceptable limit in these sites. So far, the heavy metal concentrations in soils and vegetables were all below the permissible limits set by the Ministry of Environmental Protection of China and World Health Organization. The transfer factors of six heavy metals showed the trend as Cd > Zn > Cu > Pb > As > Cr, which were dependent on the vegetable species. The estimated dietary intakes of Cu, Zn, Pb, Cr, As and Cd were far below the tolerable limits and the target hazard quotient (THQ) values were less than 1, which suggested that the health risks of heavy metals exposure through consuming vegetables were generally assumed to be safe.

  9. Energy Distributions of Neutrons Scattered from Graphite, Light and Heavy Water, Ice, Zirconium Hydride, Lithium Hydride, Sodium Hydride and Ammonium Chloride by the Beryllium Detector Method

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Woods, A. D. B.; Brockhouse, Bertram N.; Sakamoto, M.; Sinclair, R. N.

    1960-09-12

    Energy distributions of neutrons scattered from various moderators and from several hydrogenous substances were measured at energy transfers of 0.02 to 0.24 ev. Results from experiments on graphite, light and heavy water, ice, ZrH, LiH, NaH, and NH4Cl are included. It is noted that the results are of a preliminary character; however, they are probably the most accurate measurements of high-energy transfers yet made. (J.R.D.)

  10. Heavy ion collisions with A = 10/sup 57/: Aspects of nuclear stability and the nuclear equation of state in coalescing neutron-star binary systems

    SciTech Connect

    Mathews, G.J.; Wilson, J.R.; Evans, C.R.; Detweiler, S.L.

    1987-12-01

    The dynamics of the final stages of the coalescence of two neturon stars (such as the binary pulsar PSR 1913+16) is an unsolved problem in astrophysics. Such systems are probably efficient generators of gravitational radiation, and may be significant contributors to heavy-element nucleosynthesis. The input physics for the study of such systems is similar to that required for the strudy of heavy-ion collision hydrodynamics; e.g., a finite temperature nuclear equation of state, properties of nuclei away from stability, etc. We discuss the development of a relativistic hydrodynamics code in three spatial dimensions for the purpose of studying such neutron-star systems. The properties of the mass-radius relation (determined by the nuclear equation of state) may lead to a proposed mechanism by which hot, highly neutronized matter is ejected from the coalescing stars. This material is photodisintegrated into a free (mostly) neutron gas which may subsequently experience rapid-neutron capture (r-process) nucleosynthesis. 15 refs., 4 figs.

  11. Recoil proton, alpha particle, and heavy ion impacts on microdosimetry and RBE of fast neutrons: analysis of kerma spectra calculated by Monte Carlo simulation.

    PubMed

    Pignol, J P; Slabbert, J

    2001-02-01

    Fast neutrons (FN) have a higher radio-biological effectiveness (RBE) compared with photons, however the mechanism of this increase remains a controversial issue. RBE variations are seen among various FN facilities and at the same facility when different tissue depths or thicknesses of hardening filters are used. These variations lead to uncertainties in dose reporting as well as in the comparisons of clinical results. Besides radiobiology and microdosimetry, another powerful method for the characterization of FN beams is the calculation of total proton and heavy ion kerma spectra. FLUKA and MCNP Monte Carlo code were used to simulate these kerma spectra following a set of microdosimetry measurements performed at the National Accelerator Centre. The calculated spectra confirmed major classical statements: RBE increase is linked to both slow energy protons and alpha particles yielded by (n,alpha) reactions on carbon and oxygen nuclei. The slow energy protons are produced by neutrons having an energy between 10 keV and 10 MeV, while the alpha particles are produced by neutrons having an energy between 10 keV and 15 MeV. Looking at the heavy ion kerma from <15 MeV and the proton kerma from neutrons <10 MeV, it is possible to anticipate y* and RBE trends.

  12. LOW-FIDELITY COVARIANCES FOR NEUTRON CROSS SECTIONS ON 57 STRUCTURAL AND 31 HEAVY NUCLEI IN THE FAST REGION.

    SciTech Connect

    PIGNI,M.T.; HERMAN, M.; OBLOZINSKY, P.

    2008-03-01

    We produced a large set of neutron cross section covariances in the energy range of 5 keV-20 MeV. The present set of data on 57 structural materials and 31 heavy nuclei follows our earlier work on 219 fission product materials and completes our extensive contribution to the low-fidelity covariance project (307 materials). This project aims to provide initial, low-fidelity yet consistent estimates of covariance data for nuclear criticality safety applications. The evaluation methodology combines the nuclear reaction model code EMPIRE which calculates sensitivity to nuclear reaction model parameters, and the Bayesian code KALMAN that propagates uncertainties of the model parameters to cross sections. Taking into account the large scale of the project, only marginal reference to experimental data was made. The covariances were derived from the perturbation of several key model parameters selected by the sensitivity analysis. These parameters refer to the optical model potential, the level densities and the strength of the pre-equilibrium emission. This work represents the first attempt ever to generate nuclear data covariances on such a large scale.

  13. On the charge to mass ratio of neutron cores and heavy nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Patricelli, B.; Rotondo, M.; Ruffini, R.

    2008-01-03

    We determine theoretically the relation between the total number of protons N{sub p} and the mass number A (the charge to mass ratio) of nuclei and neutron cores with the model recently proposed by Ruffini et al. (2007) and we compare it with other N{sub p} versus A relations: the empirical one, related to the Periodic Table, and the semi-empirical relation, obtained by minimizing the Weizsaecker mass formula. We find that there is a very good agreement between all the relations for values of A typical of nuclei, with differences of the order of per cent. Our relation and the semi-empirical one are in agreement up to A{approx}10{sup 4}; for higher values, we find that the two relations differ. We interprete the different behaviour of our theoretical relation as a result of the penetration of electrons (initially confined in an external shell) inside the core, that becomes more and more important by increasing A; these effects are not taken into account in the semi-empirical mass-formula.

  14. Isotopic yield measurement in the heavy mass region for {sup 239}Pu thermal neutron induced fission

    SciTech Connect

    Bail, A.; Serot, O.; Mathieu, L.; Litaize, O.; Materna, T.; Koester, U.; Faust, H.; Letourneau, A.; Panebianco, S.

    2011-09-15

    Despite the huge number of fission yield data available in the different evaluated nuclear data libraries, such as JEFF-3.1.1, ENDF/B-VII.0, and JENDL-4.0, more accurate data are still needed both for nuclear energy applications and for our understanding of the fission process itself. It is within the framework of this that measurements on the recoil mass spectrometer Lohengrin (at the Institut Laue-Langevin, Grenoble, France) was undertaken, to determine isotopic yields for the heavy fission products from the {sup 239}Pu(n{sub th},f) reaction. In order to do this, a new experimental method based on {gamma}-ray spectrometry was developed and validated by comparing our results with those performed in the light mass region with completely different setups. Hence, about 65 fission product yields were measured with an uncertainty that has been reduced on average by a factor of 2 compared to that previously available in the nuclear data libraries. In addition, for some fission products, a strongly deformed ionic charge distribution compared to a normal Gaussian shape was found, which was interpreted as being caused by the presence of a nanosecond isomeric state. Finally, a nuclear charge polarization has been observed in agreement, with the one described on other close fissioning systems.

  15. Demonstrating the Likely Neutron Star Nature of Five M31 Globular Cluster Sources with Swift-NuSTAR Spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maccarone, Thomas J.; Yukita, Mihoko; Hornschemeier, Ann; Lehmer, Bret D.; Antoniou, Vallia; Ptak, Andrew; Wik, Daniel R.; Zezas, Andreas; Boyd, Padi; Kennea, Jamie; Stern, Daniel; Zhang, William W.

    2016-01-01

    We present the results of a joint Swift-NuSTAR spectroscopy campaign on M31. We focus on the five brightest globular cluster X-ray sources in our fields. Two of these had previously been argued to be black hole candidates on the basis of apparent hard-state spectra at luminosities above those for which neutron stars are in hard states. We show that these two sources are likely to be Z-sources (i.e. low magnetic field neutron stars accreting near their Eddington limits), or perhaps bright atoll sources (low magnetic field neutron stars which are just a bit fainter than this level) on the basis of simultaneous Swift and NuSTAR spectra which cover a broader range of energies. These new observations reveal spectral curvature above 6-8 keV that would be hard to detect without the broader energy coverage the NuSTAR data provide relative to Chandra and XMM-Newton. We show that the other three sources are also likely to be bright neutron star X-ray binaries, rather than black hole X-ray binaries. We discuss why it should already have been realized that it was unlikely that these objects were black holes on the basis of their being persistent sources, and we re-examine past work which suggested that tidal capture products would be persistently bright X-ray emitters. We discuss how this problem is likely due to neglecting disc winds in older work that predict which systems will be persistent and which will be transient.

  16. Demonstrating the Likely Neutron Star Nature of Five M31 Globular Cluster Sources with Swift-NuSTAR Spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maccarone, Thomas J.; Yukita, Mihoko; Hornschemeier, Ann; Lehmer, Bret D.; Antoniou, Vallia; Ptak, Andrew; Wik, Daniel R.; Zezas, Andreas; Boyd, Padi; Kennea, Jamie; hide

    2016-01-01

    We present the results of a joint Swift-NuSTAR spectroscopy campaign on M31. We focus on the five brightest globular cluster X-ray sources in our fields. Two of these had previously been argued to be black hole candidates on the basis of apparent hard-state spectra at luminosities above those for which neutron stars are in hard states. We show that these two sources are likely to be Z-sources (i.e. low magnetic field neutron stars accreting near their Eddington limits), or perhaps bright atoll sources (low magnetic field neutron stars which are just a bit fainter than this level) on the basis of simultaneous Swift and NuSTAR spectra which cover a broader range of energies. These new observations reveal spectral curvature above 6-8 keV that would be hard to detect without the broader energy coverage the NuSTAR data provide relative to Chandra and XMM-Newton. We show that the other three sources are also likely to be bright neutron star X-ray binaries, rather than black hole X-ray binaries. We discuss why it should already have been realized that it was unlikely that these objects were black holes on the basis of their being persistent sources, and we re-examine past work which suggested that tidal capture products would be persistently bright X-ray emitters. We discuss how this problem is likely due to neglecting disc winds in older work that predict which systems will be persistent and which will be transient.

  17. Demonstrating the likely neutron star nature of five M31 globular cluster sources with Swift-NuSTAR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maccarone, Thomas J.; Yukita, Mihoko; Hornschemeier, Ann; Lehmer, Bret D.; Antoniou, Vallia; Ptak, Andrew; Wik, Daniel R.; Zezas, Andreas; Boyd, Padi; Kennea, Jamie; Page, Kim L.; Eracleous, Mike; Williams, Benjamin F.; Boggs, Steven E.; Christensen, Finn E.; Craig, William W.; Hailey, Charles J.; Harrison, Fiona A.; Stern, Daniel; Zhang, William W.

    2016-06-01

    We present the results of a joint Swift-NuSTAR spectroscopy campaign on M31. We focus on the five brightest globular cluster X-ray sources in our fields. Two of these had previously been argued to be black hole candidates on the basis of apparent hard-state spectra at luminosities above those for which neutron stars are in hard states. We show that these two sources are likely to be Z-sources (i.e. low magnetic field neutron stars accreting near their Eddington limits), or perhaps bright atoll sources (low magnetic field neutron stars which are just a bit fainter than this level) on the basis of simultaneous Swift and NuSTAR spectra which cover a broader range of energies. These new observations reveal spectral curvature above 6-8 keV that would be hard to detect without the broader energy coverage the NuSTAR data provide relative to Chandra and XMM-Newton. We show that the other three sources are also likely to be bright neutron star X-ray binaries, rather than black hole X-ray binaries. We discuss why it should already have been realized that it was unlikely that these objects were black holes on the basis of their being persistent sources, and we re-examine past work which suggested that tidal capture products would be persistently bright X-ray emitters. We discuss how this problem is likely due to neglecting disc winds in older work that predict which systems will be persistent and which will be transient.

  18. A novel Al 2O 3 fluorescent nuclear track detector for heavy charged particles and neutrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akselrod, G. M.; Akselrod, M. S.; Benton, E. R.; Yasuda, N.

    2006-06-01

    A novel Al2O3 fluorescent nuclear track detector (FNTD), recently developed by Landauer, Inc., has demonstrated sensitivity and functionality superior to that of existing nuclear track detectors. The FNTD is based on single crystals of aluminum oxide doped with carbon and magnesium, and having aggregate oxygen vacancy defects (Al2O3:C,Mg). Radiation-induced color centers in the new material have an absorption band at 620 nm and produce fluorescence at 750 nm with a high quantum yield and a short, 75 ± 5 ns, fluorescence lifetime. Non-destructive readout of the detector is performed using a confocal fluorescence microscope. Scanning of the three-dimensional spatial distribution of fluorescence intensity along the track of a heavy charged particle (HCP) permits reconstruction of particle trajectories through the crystal and the LET can be determined as a function of distance along the trajectory based on the fluorescence intensity. Major advantages of Al2O3:C,Mg FNTD over conventionally processed CR-39 plastic nuclear track detector include superior spatial resolution, a wider range of LET sensitivity, no need for post-irradiation chemical processing of the detector and the capability to anneal and reuse the detector. Preliminary experiments have demonstrated that the material possesses a low-LET threshold of <1 keV/μm, does not saturate at LET in water as high as 1800 keV/μm, and is capable of irradiation to fluences in excess of 106 cm-2 without saturation (track overlap).

  19. Clustered DNA damages induced by high and low LET radiation, including heavy ions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sutherland, B. M.; Bennett, P. V.; Schenk, H.; Sidorkina, O.; Laval, J.; Trunk, J.; Monteleone, D.; Sutherland, J.; Lowenstein, D. I. (Principal Investigator)

    2001-01-01

    Clustered DNA damages--here defined as two or more lesions (strand breaks, oxidized purines, oxidized pyrimidines or abasic sites) within a few helical turns--have been postulated as difficult to repair accurately, and thus highly significant biological lesions. Further, attempted repair of clusters may produce double strand breaks (DSBs). However, until recently, there was no way to measure ionizing radiation-induced clustered damages, except DSB. We recently described an approach for measuring classes of clustered damages (oxidized purine clusters, oxidized pyrimidine clusters, abasic clusters, along with DSB). We showed that ionizing radiation (gamma rays and Fe ions, 1 GeV/amu) does induce such clusters in genomic DNA in solution and in human cells. These studies also showed that each damage cluster results from one radiation hit (and its track), thus indicating that they can be induced by very low doses of radiation, i.e. two independent hits are not required for cluster induction. Further, among all complex damages, double strand breaks comprise--at most-- 20%, with the other clustered damages being at least 80%.

  20. Clustered DNA damages induced by high and low LET radiation, including heavy ions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sutherland, B. M.; Bennett, P. V.; Schenk, H.; Sidorkina, O.; Laval, J.; Trunk, J.; Monteleone, D.; Sutherland, J.; Lowenstein, D. I. (Principal Investigator)

    2001-01-01

    Clustered DNA damages--here defined as two or more lesions (strand breaks, oxidized purines, oxidized pyrimidines or abasic sites) within a few helical turns--have been postulated as difficult to repair accurately, and thus highly significant biological lesions. Further, attempted repair of clusters may produce double strand breaks (DSBs). However, until recently, there was no way to measure ionizing radiation-induced clustered damages, except DSB. We recently described an approach for measuring classes of clustered damages (oxidized purine clusters, oxidized pyrimidine clusters, abasic clusters, along with DSB). We showed that ionizing radiation (gamma rays and Fe ions, 1 GeV/amu) does induce such clusters in genomic DNA in solution and in human cells. These studies also showed that each damage cluster results from one radiation hit (and its track), thus indicating that they can be induced by very low doses of radiation, i.e. two independent hits are not required for cluster induction. Further, among all complex damages, double strand breaks comprise--at most-- 20%, with the other clustered damages being at least 80%.

  1. Measurements of neutron effective doses and attenuation lengths for shielding materials at the heavy-ion medical accelerator in Chiba.

    PubMed

    Kumamoto, Yoshikazu; Noda, Yutaka; Sato, Yukio; Kanai, Tatsuaki; Murakami, Takeshi

    2005-05-01

    The effective doses and attenuation lengths for concrete and iron were measured for the design of heavy ion facilities. Neutrons were produced through the reaction of copper, carbon, and lead bombarded by carbon ions at 230 and 400 MeV.A, neon ions at 400 and 600 MeV.A, and silicon ions at 600 and 800 MeV.A. The detectors used were a Linus and a Andersson-Braun-type rem counter and a detector based on the activation of a plastic scintillator. Representative effective dose rates (in units of 10(-8) microSv h(-1) pps(-1) at 1 m from the incident target surface, where pps means particles per second) and the attenuation lengths (in units of m) were 9.4 x 10(4), 0.46 for carbon ions at 230 MeV.A; 8.9 x 10(5), 0.48 for carbon ions at 400 MeV.A; 9.3 x 10(5), 0.48 for neon ions at 400 MeV.A; 3.8 x 10(6), 0.50 for neon ions at 600 MeV.A; 3.9 x 10(6), 0.50 for silicon ions at 600 MeV.A; and 1.1 x 10(7), 0.51 for silicon ions at 800 MeV.A. The attenuation provided by an iron plate approximately 20 cm thick (nearly equal to the attenuation length) corresponded to that of a 50-cm block of concrete in the present energy range. Miscellaneous results, such as the angular distributions of the neutron effective dose, narrow beam attenuation experiments, decay of gamma-ray doses after the bombardment of targets, doses around an irradiation room, order effects in the multi-layer (concrete and iron) shielding, the doses from different targets, the doses measured with a scintillator activation detector, the gamma-ray doses out of walls and the ratio of the response between the Andersson-Braun-type and the Linus rem counters are also reported.

  2. Finding Groups Using Model-based Cluster Analysis: Heterogeneous Emotional Self-regulatory Processes and Heavy Alcohol Use Risk

    PubMed Central

    Mun, Eun-Young; von Eye, Alexander; Bates, Marsha E.; Vaschillo, Evgeny G.

    2010-01-01

    Model-based cluster analysis is a new clustering procedure to investigate population heterogeneity utilizing finite mixture multivariate normal densities. It is an inferentially based, statistically principled procedure that allows comparison of non-nested models using the Bayesian Information Criterion (BIC) to compare multiple models and identify the optimum number of clusters. The current study clustered 36 young men and women based on their baseline heart rate (HR) and HR variability (HRV), chronic alcohol use, and reasons for drinking. Two cluster groups were identified and labeled High Alcohol Risk and Normative groups. Compared to the Normative group, individuals in the High Alcohol Risk group had higher levels of alcohol use and more strongly endorsed disinhibition and suppression reasons for use. The High Alcohol Risk group showed significant HRV changes in response to positive and negative emotional and appetitive picture cues, compared to neutral cues. In contrast, the Normative group showed a significant HRV change only to negative cues. Findings suggest that the individuals with autonomic self-regulatory difficulties may be more susceptible to heavy alcohol use and use alcohol for emotional regulation. PMID:18331138

  3. In Situ Studies on Twin-Thickness-Dependent Distribution of Defect Clusters in Heavy Ion-Irradiated Nanotwinned Ag

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jin; Chen, Y.; Wang, H.; Zhang, X.

    2017-03-01

    Recent studies have shown that twin boundaries are effective defect sinks in heavy ion irradiated nanotwinned (nt) metals. Prior in situ radiation studies on nt Ag at room temperature indicate that the accumulative defect concentration is higher in center areas in the 60-nm-thick twins, and twin boundaries are distorted and self-heal during the absorption of different types of defect clusters. In this follow-up study, we show that the spatial distribution of accumulative defect concentrations in nt metals has a clear dependence on twin thickness, and in certain cases, the trend of spatial distribution is reversed. Potential mechanisms for the counterintuitive findings are discussed.

  4. In Situ Studies on Twin-Thickness-Dependent Distribution of Defect Clusters in Heavy Ion-Irradiated Nanotwinned Ag

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jin; Chen, Y.; Wang, H.; Zhang, X.

    2017-01-01

    Recent studies have shown that twin boundaries are effective defect sinks in heavy ion irradiated nanotwinned (nt) metals. Prior in situ radiation studies on nt Ag at room temperature indicate that the accumulative defect concentration is higher in center areas in the 60-nm-thick twins, and twin boundaries are distorted and self-heal during the absorption of different types of defect clusters. In this follow-up study, we show that the spatial distribution of accumulative defect concentrations in nt metals has a clear dependence on twin thickness, and in certain cases, the trend of spatial distribution is reversed. Potential mechanisms for the counterintuitive findings are discussed.

  5. On the internal pollution mechanisms in the globular cluster NGC 6121 (M4): heavy-element abundances and AGB models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Orazi, V.; Campbell, S. W.; Lugaro, M.; Lattanzio, J. C.; Pignatari, M.; Carretta, E.

    2013-07-01

    Globular clusters display significant variations in their light-element content, pointing to the existence of a second stellar generation formed from the ejecta of an earlier generation. The nature of these internal polluters is still a matter of debate: the two most popular scenarios indicate intermediate-mass asymptotic giant branch (IM-AGB) stars and fast rotating massive stars. Abundances determination for some key elements can help distinguish between these competitor candidates. We present in this paper Y abundances for a sample of 103 red giant branch stars in NGC 6121. Within measurement errors, we find that the [Y/Fe] is constant in this cluster contrary to a recent suggestion. For a subsample of six stars we also find [Rb/Fe] to be constant, consistent with previous studies showing no variation in other s-process elements. We also present a new set of stellar yields for IM-AGB stellar models of 5 and 6 M⊙, including heavy element s-process abundances. The uncertainties on the mass-loss rate, the mixing length parameter and the nuclear reaction rates have a major impact on the stellar abundances. Within the IM-AGB pollution scenario, the constant abundance of heavy elements inside the cluster requires a marginal s-process efficiency in IM-AGB stars. Such a constrain could still be satisfied by the present models assuming a stronger mass-loss rate. The uncertainties mentioned above are limiting the predictive power of IM-AGB models. For these reasons, at the moment we are not able to clearly rule out their role as main polluters of the second population stars in globular clusters.

  6. Neutron-rich rare-isotope production from projectile fission of heavy nuclei near 20 MeV/nucleon beam energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vonta, N.; Souliotis, G. A.; Loveland, W.; Kwon, Y. K.; Tshoo, K.; Jeong, S. C.; Veselsky, M.; Bonasera, A.; Botvina, A.

    2016-12-01

    We investigate the possibilities of producing neutron-rich nuclides in projectile fission of heavy beams in the energy range of 20 MeV/nucleon expected from low-energy facilities. We report our efforts to theoretically describe the reaction mechanism of projectile fission following a multinucleon transfer collision at this energy range. Our calculations are mainly based on a two-step approach: The dynamical stage of the collision is described with either the phenomenological deep-inelastic transfer model (DIT) or with the microscopic constrained molecular dynamics model (CoMD). The de-excitation or fission of the hot heavy projectile fragments is performed with the statistical multifragmentation model (SMM). We compared our model calculations with our previous experimental projectile-fission data of 238U (20 MeV/nucleon) + 208Pb and 197Au (20 MeV/nucleon) + 197Au and found an overall reasonable agreement. Our study suggests that projectile fission following peripheral heavy-ion collisions at this energy range offers an effective route to access very neutron-rich rare isotopes toward and beyond the astrophysical r-process path.

  7. Shared Gene Structures and Clusters of Mutually Exclusive Spliced Exons within the Metazoan Muscle Myosin Heavy Chain Genes

    PubMed Central

    Kollmar, Martin; Hatje, Klas

    2014-01-01

    Multicellular animals possess two to three different types of muscle tissues. Striated muscles have considerable ultrastructural similarity and contain a core set of proteins including the muscle myosin heavy chain (Mhc) protein. The ATPase activity of this myosin motor protein largely dictates muscle performance at the molecular level. Two different solutions to adjusting myosin properties to different muscle subtypes have been identified so far: Vertebrates and nematodes contain many independent differentially expressed Mhc genes while arthropods have single Mhc genes with clusters of mutually exclusive spliced exons (MXEs). The availability of hundreds of metazoan genomes now allowed us to study whether the ancient bilateria already contained MXEs, how MXE complexity subsequently evolved, and whether additional scenarios to control contractile properties in different muscles could be proposed, By reconstructing the Mhc genes from 116 metazoans we showed that all intron positions within the motor domain coding regions are conserved in all bilateria analysed. The last common ancestor of the bilateria already contained a cluster of MXEs coding for part of the loop-2 actin-binding sequence. Subsequently the protostomes and later the arthropods gained many further clusters while MXEs got completely lost independently in several branches (vertebrates and nematodes) and species (for example the annelid Helobdella robusta and the salmon louse Lepeophtheirus salmonis). Several bilateria have been found to encode multiple Mhc genes that might all or in part contain clusters of MXEs. Notable examples are a cluster of six tandemly arrayed Mhc genes, of which two contain MXEs, in the owl limpet Lottia gigantea and four Mhc genes with three encoding MXEs in the predatory mite Metaseiulus occidentalis. Our analysis showed that similar solutions to provide different myosin isoforms (multiple genes or clusters of MXEs or both) have independently been developed several times

  8. Systematic study of heavy cluster emission from 210-226Ra isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santhosh, K. P.; Sahadevan, Sabina; Priyanka, B.; Unnikrishnan, M. S.

    2012-05-01

    The half lives for various clusters lying in the cold reaction valleys of 210-226Ra isotopes are computed using our Coulomb and proximity potential model (CPPM). The computed half lives of 4He and 14C clusters from 210-226Ra isotopes are in good agreement with experimental data. Half lives are also computed using the universal formula for cluster decay (UNIV) of Poenaru et al., and are found to be in agreement with CPPM values. Our study reveals the role of doubly magic 208Pb daughter in cluster decay process. Geiger-Nuttall plots for all clusters up to 62Fe are studied and are found to be linear with different slopes and intercepts. 12,14C emission from 220Ra; 14C emission from 222,224Ra; 14C and 20O emission from 226Ra are found to be most favourable for measurement and this observation will serve as a guide to the future experiments.

  9. Neutron diffraction study of magnetic field induced behavior in the heavy Fermion Ce3Co4Sn13

    SciTech Connect

    Christianson, Andrew D; Goremychkin, E. A.; Gardner, J. S.; Kang, H. J.; Chung, J.-H.; Manuel, P.; Thompson, J. D.; Sarrao, J. L.; Lawrence, J. M.

    2008-01-01

    The specific heat of Ce3Co4Sn13 exhibits a crossover from heavy Fermion behavior with antiferromagnetic correlations at low field to single impurity Kondo behavior above 2 T. We have performed neutron diffraction measurements in magnetic fields up to 6 Tesla on single crystal samples. The (001) position shows a dramatic increase in intensity in field which appears to arise from static polarization of the 4f level and which at 0.14 K also exhibits an anomaly near 2T reflecting the crossover to single impurity behavior.

  10. Impact of new data for neutron-rich heavy nuclei on theoretical models for r-process nucleosynthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kajino, Toshitaka; Mathews, Grant J.

    2017-08-01

    Current models for the r process are summarized with an emphasis on the key constraints from both nuclear physics measurements and astronomical observations. In particular, we analyze the importance of nuclear physics input such as beta-decay rates; nuclear masses; neutron-capture cross sections; beta-delayed neutron emission; probability of spontaneous fission, beta- and neutron-induced fission, fission fragment mass distributions; neutrino-induced reaction cross sections, etc. We highlight the effects on models for r-process nucleosynthesis of newly measured β-decay half-lives, masses, and spectroscopy of neutron-rich nuclei near the r-process path. We overview r-process nucleosynthesis in the neutrino driven wind above the proto-neutron star in core collapse supernovae along with the possibility of magneto-hydrodynamic jets from rotating supernova explosion models. We also consider the possibility of neutron star mergers as an r-process environment. A key outcome of newly measured nuclear properties far from stability is the degree of shell quenching for neutron rich isotopes near the closed neutron shells. This leads to important constraints on the sites for r-process nucleosynthesis in which freezeout occurs on a rapid timescale.

  11. Impact of new data for neutron-rich heavy nuclei on theoretical models for r-process nucleosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Kajino, Toshitaka; Mathews, Grant J

    2017-08-01

    Current models for the r process are summarized with an emphasis on the key constraints from both nuclear physics measurements and astronomical observations. In particular, we analyze the importance of nuclear physics input such as beta-decay rates; nuclear masses; neutron-capture cross sections; beta-delayed neutron emission; probability of spontaneous fission, beta- and neutron-induced fission, fission fragment mass distributions; neutrino-induced reaction cross sections, etc. We highlight the effects on models for r-process nucleosynthesis of newly measured β-decay half-lives, masses, and spectroscopy of neutron-rich nuclei near the r-process path. We overview r-process nucleosynthesis in the neutrino driven wind above the proto-neutron star in core collapse supernovae along with the possibility of magneto-hydrodynamic jets from rotating supernova explosion models. We also consider the possibility of neutron star mergers as an r-process environment. A key outcome of newly measured nuclear properties far from stability is the degree of shell quenching for neutron rich isotopes near the closed neutron shells. This leads to important constraints on the sites for r-process nucleosynthesis in which freezeout occurs on a rapid timescale.

  12. On the idea of low-energy nuclear reactions in metallic lattices by producing neutrons from protons capturing "heavy" electrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tennfors, Einar

    2013-02-01

    The present article is a critical comment on Widom and Larsens speculations concerning low-energy nuclear reactions (LENR) based on spontaneous collective motion of protons in a room temperature metallic hydride lattice producing oscillating electric fields that renormalize the electron self-energy, adding significantly to the effective electron mass and enabling production of low-energy neutrons. The frequency and mean proton displacement estimated on the basis of neutron scattering from protons in palladium and applied to the Widom and Larsens model of the proton oscillations yield an electron mass enhancement less than one percent, far below the threshold for the proposed neutron production and even farther below the mass enhancement obtained by Widom and Larsen assuming a high charge density. Neutrons are not stopped by the Coulomb barrier, but the energy required for the neutron production is not low.

  13. Neutron diffraction study of the Sr 1-xBi xF 2+x solid solution quenched from 700°C : Proposition of a clustering process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soubeyroux, J. L.; Réau, J. M.; Wahbi, M.; Sénégas, J.; Soo, Suh Kyung

    1992-07-01

    A neutron diffraction investigation of the fluorite-type Sr 1-xBi xF 2+x (0 ⩽ x ≲ 0.50) solid solution has revealed the existence of three F' F″ and F'″ interstitial flouride ions. The anionic distribution between normal and interstitial sites has been determined as a function of x. A clustering process has been proposed in Sr 1-xBi xF 2+x on the basis of neutron diffraction results and of the composition dependence of electrical properties. It consists in a progressive transformation with increasing x of 3:2:3:0 clusters into "1:0:3:0" clusters.

  14. Ab-initio coupled-cluster effective interactions for the shell model: Application to neutron-rich oxygen and carbon isotopes

    SciTech Connect

    Jansen, G. R.; Engel, Jonathan; Hagen, Gaute; Navratil, Petr; Signoracci, Angelo J.

    2014-10-03

    We derive and compute effective valence-space shell-model interactions from ab initio coupled-cluster theory and apply them to open-shell and neutron-rich oxygen and carbon isotopes. Our shell-model interactions are based on nucleon-nucleon and three-nucleon forces from chiral effective-field theory. We compute the energies of ground and low-lying states, and find good agreement with experiment. In particular, our computed 2+ states are consistent with N=14,16 shell closures in 22,24O, and a weaker N=14 shell closure in 20C. We find good agreement between our coupled-cluster effective-interaction results with those obtained from standard single-reference coupled-cluster calculations for up to eight valence neutrons.

  15. State density formalism of the Iwamoto-Harada model: A suitable tool to treat cluster emission from heavy-ion collisions with account for spin variables

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Běták, Emil; Cseh, József

    2017-09-01

    We study the possibility to include the cluster emission into the statistical pre-equilibrium (exciton) model suitable also for heavy ion collisions. The direct motivation of this paper is a possibility of producing superdeformed nuclei, which are easier to be detected in heavy-ion reactions than in those induced by light projectiles (nucleons, deuterons, α-particles). Note to the reader: the pdf file has been changed on September 22, 2017.

  16. Can a relativistic differential equation be set up to treat the angularity of the valence electron density in heavy atom clusters?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    March, N. H.; Glasser, M. L.

    2015-01-01

    This work provides an explicit relativistic non-linear differential equation to estimate the ground-state electron density, and especially its directionality dependence, for large clusters of heavy atoms, such as Pb, at their experimentally measured equilibrium geometry. The study embodies the early theory of Vallarta and Rosen, which seems to us to build a firm foundation on relativistic semi-classical many-electron theory. Assuming a finite nuclear radius for the heavy atoms would be advisable in subsequent numerical applications.

  17. Light and Heavy Element Abundance Variations in the Outer Halo Globular Cluster NGC 6229

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Christian I.; Caldwell, Nelson; Rich, R. Michael; Walker, Matthew G.

    2017-10-01

    NGC 6229 is a relatively massive outer halo globular cluster that is primarily known for exhibiting a peculiar bimodal horizontal branch morphology. Given the paucity of spectroscopic data on this cluster, we present a detailed chemical composition analysis of 11 red giant branch members based on high resolution (R ≈ 38,000), high S/N (>100) spectra obtained with the MMT-Hectochelle instrument. We find the cluster to have a mean heliocentric radial velocity of -{138.1}-1.0+1.0 {km} {{{s}}}-1, a small dispersion of {3.8}-0.7+1.0 {km} {{{s}}}-1, and a relatively low {(M/{L}{{V}})}ȯ ={0.82}-0.28+0.49. The cluster is moderately metal-poor with < [{Fe}/{{H}}]> =-1.13 dex and a modest dispersion of 0.06 dex. However, 18% (2/11) of the stars in our sample have strongly enhanced [La, Nd/Fe] ratios that are correlated with a small (∼0.05 dex) increase in [Fe/H]. NGC 6229 shares several chemical signatures with M75, NGC 1851, and the intermediate metallicity populations of ω Cen, which lead us to conclude that NGC 6229 is a lower mass iron-complex cluster. The light elements exhibit the classical (anti-)correlations that extend up to Si, but the cluster possesses a large gap in the O–Na plane that separates first and second generation stars. NGC 6229 also has unusually low [Na, Al/Fe] abundances that are consistent with an accretion origin. A comparison with M54 and other Sagittarius clusters suggests that NGC 6229 could also be the remnant core of a former dwarf spheroidal galaxy.

  18. Robust upward dispersion of the neutron spin resonance in the heavy fermion superconductor Ce1-xYbxCoIn5

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Yu; van Dyke, John; Lum, I. K.; White, B. D.; Jang, Sooyoung; Yazici, Duygu; Shu, L.; Schneidewind, A.; Čermák, Petr; Qiu, Y.; Maple, M. B.; Morr, Dirk K.; Dai, Pengcheng

    2016-09-01

    The neutron spin resonance is a collective magnetic excitation that appears in the unconventional copper oxide, iron pnictide and heavy fermion superconductors. Although the resonance is commonly associated with a spin-exciton due to the d(s+/-)-wave symmetry of the superconducting order parameter, it has also been proposed to be a magnon-like excitation appearing in the superconducting state. Here we use inelastic neutron scattering to demonstrate that the resonance in the heavy fermion superconductor Ce1-xYbxCoIn5 with x=0, 0.05 and 0.3 has a ring-like upward dispersion that is robust against Yb-doping. By comparing our experimental data with a random phase approximation calculation using the electronic structure and the momentum dependence of the -wave superconducting gap determined from scanning tunnelling microscopy (STM) for CeCoIn5, we conclude that the robust upward-dispersing resonance mode in Ce1-xYbxCoIn5 is inconsistent with the downward dispersion predicted within the spin-exciton scenario.

  19. Robust upward dispersion of the neutron spin resonance in the heavy fermion superconductor Ce1−xYbxCoIn5

    PubMed Central

    Song, Yu; Van Dyke, John; Lum, I. K.; White, B. D.; Jang, Sooyoung; Yazici, Duygu; Shu, L.; Schneidewind, A.; Čermák, Petr; Qiu, Y.; Maple, M. B.; Morr, Dirk K.; Dai, Pengcheng

    2016-01-01

    The neutron spin resonance is a collective magnetic excitation that appears in the unconventional copper oxide, iron pnictide and heavy fermion superconductors. Although the resonance is commonly associated with a spin-exciton due to the d(s±)-wave symmetry of the superconducting order parameter, it has also been proposed to be a magnon-like excitation appearing in the superconducting state. Here we use inelastic neutron scattering to demonstrate that the resonance in the heavy fermion superconductor Ce1−xYbxCoIn5 with x=0, 0.05 and 0.3 has a ring-like upward dispersion that is robust against Yb-doping. By comparing our experimental data with a random phase approximation calculation using the electronic structure and the momentum dependence of the -wave superconducting gap determined from scanning tunnelling microscopy (STM) for CeCoIn5, we conclude that the robust upward-dispersing resonance mode in Ce1−xYbxCoIn5 is inconsistent with the downward dispersion predicted within the spin-exciton scenario. PMID:27677397

  20. Robust upward dispersion of the neutron spin resonance in the heavy fermion superconductor Ce1–xYbxCoIn5

    DOE PAGES

    Song, Yu; Van Dyke, John; Lum, I. K.; ...

    2016-09-28

    Here, the neutron spin resonance is a collective magnetic excitation that appears in copper oxide, iron pnictide, and heavy fermion unconventional superconductors. Although the resonance is commonly associated with a spin-exciton due to the d(s±)-wave symmetry of the superconducting order parameter, it has also been proposed to be a magnon-like excitation appearing in the superconducting state. Here we use inelastic neutron scattering to demonstrate that the resonance in the heavy fermion superconductor Ce1–xYbxCoIn5 with x=0,0.05,0.3 has a ring-like upward dispersion that is robust against Yb-doping. By comparing our experimental data with random phase approximation calculation using the electronic structure andmore » the momentum dependence of the dx2–y2-wave superconducting gap determined from scanning tunneling microscopy for CeCoIn5, we conclude the robust upward dispersing resonance mode in Ce1–xYbxCoIn5 is inconsistent with the downward dispersion predicted within the spin-exciton scenari« less

  1. Robust upward dispersion of the neutron spin resonance in the heavy fermion superconductor Ce1-xYbxCoIn5.

    PubMed

    Song, Yu; Van Dyke, John; Lum, I K; White, B D; Jang, Sooyoung; Yazici, Duygu; Shu, L; Schneidewind, A; Čermák, Petr; Qiu, Y; Maple, M B; Morr, Dirk K; Dai, Pengcheng

    2016-09-28

    The neutron spin resonance is a collective magnetic excitation that appears in the unconventional copper oxide, iron pnictide and heavy fermion superconductors. Although the resonance is commonly associated with a spin-exciton due to the d(s(±))-wave symmetry of the superconducting order parameter, it has also been proposed to be a magnon-like excitation appearing in the superconducting state. Here we use inelastic neutron scattering to demonstrate that the resonance in the heavy fermion superconductor Ce1-xYbxCoIn5 with x=0, 0.05 and 0.3 has a ring-like upward dispersion that is robust against Yb-doping. By comparing our experimental data with a random phase approximation calculation using the electronic structure and the momentum dependence of the -wave superconducting gap determined from scanning tunnelling microscopy (STM) for CeCoIn5, we conclude that the robust upward-dispersing resonance mode in Ce1-xYbxCoIn5 is inconsistent with the downward dispersion predicted within the spin-exciton scenario.

  2. Two-dimensional DORT discrete ordinates X-Y geometry neutron flux calculations for the Halden Heavy Boiling Water Reactor core configurations

    SciTech Connect

    Slater, C.O.

    1990-07-01

    Results are reported for two-dimensional discrete ordinates, X-Y geometry calculations performed for seven Halden Heavy Boiling Water Reactor core configurations. The calculations were performed in support of an effort to reassess the neutron fluence received by the reactor vessel. Nickel foil measurement data indicated considerable underprediction of fluences by the previously used multigroup removal- diffusion method. Therefore, calculations by a more accurate method were deemed appropriate. For each core configuration, data are presented for (1) integral fluxes in the core and near the vessel wall, (2) neutron spectra at selected locations, (3) isoflux contours superimposed on the geometry models, (4) plots of the geometry models, and (5) input for the calculations. The initial calculations were performed with several mesh sizes. Comparisons of the results from these calculations indicated that the uncertainty in the calculated fluxes should be less than 10%. However, three-dimensional effects (such as axial asymmetry in the fuel loading) could contribute to much greater uncertainty in the calculated neutron fluxes. 7 refs., 22 figs., 11 tabs.

  3. Neutron field for boron neutron capture therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Kanda, K.; Kobayashi, T.

    1986-01-01

    Recently, the development of an epithermal neutron source has been required by medical doctors for deeper neutron penetrations, which is to be used for deep tumor treatment and diagnosis of metastasis. Several attempts have already been made to realize an epithermal neutron field, such as the undermoderated neutron beam, the filtered neutron beam, and the use of a fission plate. At present, these facilities can not be used for actual therapy. For the treatment of deep tumor, another method has been also proposed in normal water in the body is replaced by heavy water to attain a deeper neutron penetration. At Kyoto University's Research Reactor Institute, almost all physics problems have been settled relative to thermal neutron capture therapy that has been used for treating brain tumors and for biological experiments on malignant melanoma. Very recently feasibility studies to use heavy water have been started both theoretically and experimentally. The calculation shows the deeper penetration of neutrons as expected. Two kinds of experiments were done by using the KUR guide tube: 1. Thermal neutron penetration measurement. 2. Heavy water uptake in vitro sample. In addition to the above experiment using heavy water, the development of a new epithermal neutron source using a large fission plate is in progress, which is part of a mockup experiment of an atomic bomb field newly estimated.

  4. RBE and genetic susceptibility of mouse and rat spermatogonial stem cells to protons, heavy charged particles and 1.5 MeV neutrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaglenov, A.; Fedorenko, B.; Kaltenboeck, B.

    The main purpose of the present study is to provide data on RBE and genetic susceptibility in the mouse and the rat when exposed to protons, HZE particles and neutrons. Genetic damage from exposure to 50 MeV and 9 GeV protons, 4 GeV/nucleon helium ions, 4 GeV/nucleon carbon ions and 1.5 MeV neutrons was studied in adult (CBA × C57Bl/6J) F1 mice. Damage from 9 GeV protons and 4 GeV helium ions was studied in adult Wistar rats. The incidence of reciprocal translocations (RT) induced in the spermatogonial stem cells of each species was recorded. RBE values were derived by comparing linear regression coefficients from dose-responses within the same dose-range for each of the radiation types tested and 60Co γ-rays or by means of a direct nonparametric method. RT yields measured after mouse and rat spermatogonial irradiation with protons, heavy charged particles and neutrons fit the linear model of the dose-response relationship. Relative to 60Co γ-rays, RBE values are as follows for mouse spermatogonia: 0.9 for 50 MeV protons; 1.3 for 9 GeV protons; 0.7 for 4 GeV helium ions; and 1.3 for 4 GeV carbon ions. For rat spermatogonia, values were: 1.7 for 9 GeV protons and 1.3 for helium ions. Compared to mice irradiated using the same experimental design, rats were more susceptible to high-LET radiations, with susceptibility assessed by genetic damage to their spermatogonial stem cells. The RBE of 1.5 MeV neutron is about 6.6.

  5. Transfer reactions with heavy elements

    SciTech Connect

    Hoffman, D.C.

    1986-04-01

    Transfer reactions for several transuranium elements are studied. (/sup 248/Cm, /sup 249/Bk, /sup 249/CF, /sup 254/Es), /sup 16,18/O, /sup 20,22/Ne, and /sup 40,48/Ca projectiles are used. The production of neutron-rich heavy actinides is enhanced by the use of neutron-rich projectiles /sup 18/O and /sup 22/Ne. The maxima of the isotopic distributions occur at only 2 to 3 mass numbers larger for /sup 48/Ca than for /sup 40/Ca reactions with /sup 248/Cm. The cross sections decrease rapidly with the number of nucleons transferred. The use of neutron-rich targets favors the production of neutron-rich isotopes. ''Cold'' heavy targets are produced. Comparisons with simple calculations of the product excitation energies assuming binary transfers indicate that the maxima of the isotopic distributions occur at the lightest product isotope for which the energy exceeds the reaction barrier. The cross sections for transfer of the same nucleon clusters appear to be comparable for a wide variety of systems. 23 refs., 4 figs., 4 tabs.

  6. Secondary Neutron-Production Cross Sections from Heavy-IonInteractions between 230 and 600 MeV/nucleon

    SciTech Connect

    Heilbronn, L.H.; Zeitlin, C.J.; Iwata, Y.; Murakami, T.; Iwase,H.; Nakamura, T.; Nunomiya, T.; Sato, H.; Yashima, H.; Ronningen, R.M.; Ieki, K.

    2006-10-04

    Secondary neutron-production cross-sections have beenmeasured from interactions of 230 MeV/nucleon He, 400 MeV/nucleon N, 400MeV/nucleon Kr, 400 MeV/nucleon Xe, 500 MeV/nucleon Fe, and 600MeV/nucleon Ne interacting in a variety of elemental and compositetargets. We report the double-differential production cross sections,angular distributions, energy spectra, and total cross sections from allsystems. Neutron energies were measured using the time-of-flighttechnique, and were measured at laboratory angles between 5 deg and 80deg. The spectra exhibit behavior previously reported in otherheavy-ion-induced neutron production experiments; namely, a peak atforward angles near the energy corresponding to the beam velocity, withthe remaining spectra generated by preequilibrium and equilibriumprocesses. The double-differential spectra are fitted with amoving-source parameterization. Observations on the dependence of thetotal cross sections on target and projectile mass arediscussed.

  7. Neutron Exposure Parameters for the Dosimetry Capsule in the Heavy-Section Steel Irradiation Program Tenth Irradiation Series

    SciTech Connect

    C.A. Baldwin; F.B.K. Kam; I. Remec

    1998-10-01

    This report describes the computational methodology for the least-squares adjustment of the dosimetry data from the HSSI 10.OD dosimetry capsule with neutronics calculations. It presents exposure rates at each dosimetry location for the neutron fluence greater than 1.0 MeV, fluence greater than 0.1 MeV, and displacements per atom. Exposure parameter distributions are also described in terms of three- dimensional fitting functions. When fitting functions are used it is suggested that an uncertainty of 6% (1 o) should be associated with the exposure rate values. The specific activity of each dosimeter at the end of irradiation is listed in the Appendix.

  8. Small-angle neutron scattering analysis of Mn–C clusters in high-manganese 18Mn–0.6C steel

    SciTech Connect

    Kang, Mihyun; Shin, Eunjoo; Woo, Wanchuck; Lee, Young-Kook

    2014-10-15

    Nanometer-scale particles (Mn–C clusters) were analyzed quantitatively using small-angle neutron scattering in 18Mn–0.6C (wt.%) austenite high-manganese steel. The size, number, and volume fraction of the particles were determined as a function of strain (0, 5, 15, 30, 45, 50%) at different temperatures (25 and 100 °C). The diameter of the cluster ranges from 2 to 14 nm in the matrix. The total volume fraction of the cluster significantly increases from 2.7 × 10{sup −6} to 8.7 × 10{sup −6} as the strain increases. Such clustering phenomenon is correlated to the serration behavior under loading in high-manganese steels. - Highlights: • Show Mn-C clustering as function of strain in 18Mn-0.6C TWIP steel. • Determine the size, number, and volume fraction of clusters quantitatively. • Compare the clustering behavior at 25 and 100 °C.

  9. Comparison and physical interpretation of MCNP and TART neutron and γ Monte Carlo shielding calculations for a heavy-ion ICF system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mainardi, E.; Premuda, F.; Lee, E.

    2004-01-01

    Inertial confinement fusion (ICF) aims to induce implosions of D-T pellets to obtain a extremely dense and hot plasma with lasers or heavy-ion beams. For heavy-ion fusion (HIF), recent research has focused on "liquid-protected" designs that allow highly compact target chambers. In the design of a reactor such as HYLIFE-II [Fus. Techol. 25 (1984); HYLIFE-II Progress Report, UCID-21816, 4.82-100], the liquid used is a molten salt made of F 10, Li 6, Li 7, Be 9 (called flibe). Flibe allows the final-focus magnets to be closer to the target, which helps to reduce the focus spot size and in turn the size of the driver, with a large reduction of the cost of HIF electricity. Consequently the superconducting coils of the magnets closer to the D-T neutron source will potentially suffer higher damage though they can stand only a certain amount of energy deposited before quenching. This work has been primarily focusing on verifying that total energy deposited by fusion neutrons and induced γ rays remain under such limit values and the final purpose is the optimization of the shielding of the magnetic lens system from the points of view of the geometrical configuration and of the physical nature of the materials adopted. The system is analyzed in terms of six geometrical models going from simplified up to much more realistic representations of a system of 192 beam lines, each focused by six magnets. A 3-D transport calculation of the radiation penetrating through ducts, that takes into account the complexity of the system, requires Monte Carlo methods. The technical nature of the design problem and the methodology followed were presented in a previous paper [Nucl. Instr. and Meth. A 464 (2001) 410] by summarizing briefly the results for the deposited energy distribution on the six focal magnets of a beam line. Now a comparison of the performances of the two codes TART98 [TART98: A Coupled Neutron-Photon 3-D Combinational Geometry Monte Carlo Transport Code, Lawrence Livermore

  10. Role of isolated and clustered DNA damage and the post-irradiating repair process in the effects of heavy ion beam irradiation.

    PubMed

    Tokuyama, Yuka; Furusawa, Yoshiya; Ide, Hiroshi; Yasui, Akira; Terato, Hiroaki

    2015-05-01

    Clustered DNA damage is a specific type of DNA damage induced by ionizing radiation. Any type of ionizing radiation traverses the target DNA molecule as a beam, inducing damage along its track. Our previous study showed that clustered DNA damage yields decreased with increased linear energy transfer (LET), leading us to investigate the importance of clustered DNA damage in the biological effects of heavy ion beam radiation. In this study, we analyzed the yield of clustered base damage (comprising multiple base lesions) in cultured cells irradiated with various heavy ion beams, and investigated isolated base damage and the repair process in post-irradiation cultured cells. Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells were irradiated by carbon, silicon, argon and iron ion beams with LETs of 13, 55, 90 and 200 keV µm(-1), respectively. Agarose gel electrophoresis of the cells with enzymatic treatments indicated that clustered base damage yields decreased as the LET increased. The aldehyde reactive probe procedure showed that isolated base damage yields in the irradiated cells followed the same pattern. To analyze the cellular base damage process, clustered DNA damage repair was investigated using DNA repair mutant cells. DNA double-strand breaks accumulated in CHO mutant cells lacking Xrcc1 after irradiation, and the cell viability decreased. On the other hand, mouse embryonic fibroblast (Mef) cells lacking both Nth1 and Ogg1 became more resistant than the wild type Mef. Thus, clustered base damage seems to be involved in the expression of heavy ion beam biological effects via the repair process. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Japan Radiation Research Society and Japanese Society for Radiation Oncology.

  11. Role of isolated and clustered DNA damage and the post-irradiating repair process in the effects of heavy ion beam irradiation

    PubMed Central

    Tokuyama, Yuka; Furusawa, Yoshiya; Ide, Hiroshi; Yasui, Akira; Terato, Hiroaki

    2015-01-01

    Clustered DNA damage is a specific type of DNA damage induced by ionizing radiation. Any type of ionizing radiation traverses the target DNA molecule as a beam, inducing damage along its track. Our previous study showed that clustered DNA damage yields decreased with increased linear energy transfer (LET), leading us to investigate the importance of clustered DNA damage in the biological effects of heavy ion beam radiation. In this study, we analyzed the yield of clustered base damage (comprising multiple base lesions) in cultured cells irradiated with various heavy ion beams, and investigated isolated base damage and the repair process in post-irradiation cultured cells. Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells were irradiated by carbon, silicon, argon and iron ion beams with LETs of 13, 55, 90 and 200 keV µm−1, respectively. Agarose gel electrophoresis of the cells with enzymatic treatments indicated that clustered base damage yields decreased as the LET increased. The aldehyde reactive probe procedure showed that isolated base damage yields in the irradiated cells followed the same pattern. To analyze the cellular base damage process, clustered DNA damage repair was investigated using DNA repair mutant cells. DNA double-strand breaks accumulated in CHO mutant cells lacking Xrcc1 after irradiation, and the cell viability decreased. On the other hand, mouse embryonic fibroblast (Mef) cells lacking both Nth1 and Ogg1 became more resistant than the wild type Mef. Thus, clustered base damage seems to be involved in the expression of heavy ion beam biological effects via the repair process. PMID:25717060

  12. Tandem repeats 3{prime} of the IGHA genes in the human immunoglobulin heavy chain gene cluster

    SciTech Connect

    Kang, H.K.; Cox, D.W. |

    1996-07-01

    The human IGH constant region spans 350 kb and includes nine genes and two pseudogenes. All of the constant region gene cluster has been cloned except for sequences between the IGHD and IGHG3 genes, between the IGHA1 and IGHA2 gene. The regions 3{prime} of the IGHA genes, which are not cloned, are of interest since transcriptional control elements were found downstream of the IGHA genes in the rat and the mouse IGH loci. In addition, by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis mapping, CpG islands were identified approximately 30 kb downstream of each IGHA gene, within the uncloned portion of the human IGH. These findings indicate that the regions 3{prime} of the IGHA genes to be unclonable by standard cloning methods. Therefore, we applied the Inverse-PCR technique to amplify the sequences flanking the IGHA1 gene. The new sequence included tandem repeats of 20 bp, which we propose is the cause of the unclonability of this region. 39 refs., 6 figs.

  13. How the projectile neutron number influences the evaporation cross section in complete fusion reactions with heavy ions

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Chengbin; Zhang Jinjuan; Ren, Z. Z.; Shen, C. W.

    2010-11-15

    The influence of the projectile neutron number on the evaporation residue cross sections for the reactions {sup 208}Pb({sup 52,54}Cr,n,2n){sup 258-261}Sg and {sup 208}Pb({sup 48,50}Ti,n,2n){sup 254-257}Rf has been studied within the framework of a fusion-fission statistical model. The results obtained with the kewpie2 code are compared with recent experimental data. The excitation functions represent the experimental results well both in the maximum value and the lactation of the peak. The calculations show that the projectile neutron number greatly influences both the capture cross section and the fusion probability.

  14. Heavy metals assessment in urban soil around industrial clusters in Ghaziabad, India: probabilistic health risk approach.

    PubMed

    Chabukdhara, Mayuri; Nema, Arvind K

    2013-01-01

    Metal contamination in the urban soil in the industrial city of Ghaziabad district was investigated. Spatial distribution of Cu, Cr, Pb, Cd, Zn, Mn, Fe and Ni in the urban soil was produced. The mean Cu, Cr, Pb, Cd, Zn, Mn, Fe and Ni contents in the urban topsoil samples (122, 288, 147, 0.4, 187, 386, 21,433 and 147mg/kg, respectively) were compared with the mean concentrations for other cities around the world. Cu, Cr, Pb, Zn and Ni concentrations appears to be higher than many other cities in the world. Non-cancer risk (Hazard Index) and cancer risk of children and adults due to exposure to the urban soil were estimated using 95th percentile values of total metal concentrations. Cluster analysis classified the sampling sites into three groups. Group 1 sites near commercial, industrial or dumpsite showed relatively higher concentrations of metals as compared to group 2 and 3 that were basically commercial or residential sites. It clearly indicates significant effects of rapid urbanization and industrialization in the last few decades in Ghaziabad. Correlation analysis and principal component analysis indicated common industrial source for Cu, Pb and Zn for group 1 sites. Cr may have point anthropogenic source. Except for Zn and Ni in group 2 sites, other metals may have come from natural sources while in group 3, all metals may have lithogenic source. Combined (ingestion, dermal and inhalation) hazard index (HI) values for children exceeded the safe level (HI=1) for Cr (2.21) and Pb (0.67) close to 1. Cancer risk due to Cr, Pb, Cd and Ni were within acceptable range (1E-06 to 1E-04). Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Delivery of Brief Interventions for Heavy Drinking in Primary Care: Outcomes of the ODHIN 5-Country Cluster Randomized Trial.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Peter; Coulton, Simon; Kaner, Eileen; Bendtsen, Preben; Kłoda, Karolina; Reynolds, Jillian; Segura, Lidia; Wojnar, Marcin; Mierzecki, Artur; Deluca, Paolo; Newbury-Birch, Dorothy; Parkinson, Kathryn; Okulicz-Kozaryn, Katarzyna; Drummond, Colin; Gual, Antoni

    2017-07-01

    We aimed to test whether 3 strategies-training and support, financial reimbursement, and an option to direct screen-positive patients to an Internet-based method of giving brief advice-have a longer-term effect on primary care clinicians' delivery of screening and advice to heavy drinkers operationalized with the Alcohol Use Disorders Identification Test-Consumption (AUDIT-C) tool. We undertook a cluster randomized factorial trial with a 12-week implementation period in 120 primary health care units throughout Catalonia, England, Netherlands, Poland, and Sweden. Units were randomized to 8 groups: care as usual (control); training and support alone; financial reimbursement alone; electronic brief advice alone; paired combinations of these conditions; and all 3 combined. The primary outcome was the proportion of consulting adult patients (aged 18 years and older) receiving intervention-screening and, if screen-positive, advice-at 9 months. Based on the factorial design, the ratio of the log of the proportion of patients given intervention at the 9-month follow-up was 1.39 (95% CI, 1.03-1.88) in units that received training and support as compared with units that did not. Neither financial reimbursement nor directing screen-positive patients to electronic brief advice led to a higher proportion of patients receiving intervention. Training and support of primary health care units has a lasting, albeit small, impact on the proportion of adult patients given an alcohol intervention at 9 months. © 2017 Annals of Family Medicine, Inc.

  16. Use of boron cluster-containing redox nanoparticles with ROS scavenging ability in boron neutron capture therapy to achieve high therapeutic efficiency and low adverse effects.

    PubMed

    Gao, Zhenyu; Horiguchi, Yukichi; Nakai, Kei; Matsumura, Akira; Suzuki, Minoru; Ono, Koji; Nagasaki, Yukio

    2016-10-01

    A boron delivery system with high therapeutic efficiency and low adverse effects is crucial for a successful boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT). In this study, we developed boron cluster-containing redox nanoparticles (BNPs) via polyion complex (PIC) formation, using a newly synthesized poly(ethylene glycol)-polyanion (PEG-polyanion, possessing a (10)B-enriched boron cluster as a side chain of one of its segments) and PEG-polycation (possessing a reactive oxygen species (ROS) scavenger as a side chain of one of its segments). The BNPs exhibited high colloidal stability, selective uptake in tumor cells, specific accumulation, and long retention in tumor tissue and ROS scavenging ability. After thermal neutron irradiation, significant suppression of tumor growth was observed in the BNP-treated group, with only 5-ppm (10)B in tumor tissues, whereas at least 20-ppm (10)B is generally required for low molecular weight (LMW) (10)B agents. In addition, increased leukocyte levels were observed in the LMW (10)B agent-treated group after thermal neutron irradiation, and not in BNP-treated group, which might be attributed to its ROS scavenging ability. No visual metastasis of tumor cells to other organs was observed 1 month after irradiation in the BNP-treated group. These results suggest that BNPs are promising for enhancing the BNCT performance.

  17. Structural organization of the immunoglobulin heavy chain locus in the channel catfish: the IgH locus represents a composite of two gene clusters.

    PubMed

    Ventura-Holman, Tereza; Lobb, Craig J

    2002-01-01

    Two structurally-related genomic clusters of catfish immunoglobulin heavy chain gene segments are known. The first gene cluster contains DH and JH segments, as well as the C region exons encoding the functional Cmu. The second gene cluster contains multiple VH gene segments representing different VH families, a germline-joined VDJ, a single JH segment, and at least two pseudogene Cmu exons. It was not known whether these gene clusters were linked, nor was the organization or the location of VH segments associated within the first gene cluster known. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis studies have been used to determine the structural organization of these gene clusters. Restriction mapping studies show that the two gene clusters are closely linked; the second gene cluster is located upstream from the first with the Cmu regions within the clusters separated by about 725kb. The clusters are in the same relative transcriptional orientation, and the results indicate that the complete IgH locus spans no more than 1000kb and may be as small as 750-800kb. VH gene segments are located both upstream and downstream of the pseudo-Cmu exons; however, no VH gene segments that hybridized with the VH specific probes were detected downstream of the functional Cmu. These studies coupled with earlier sequence analyses indicate that the catfish IgH locus arose from a massive internal duplication event. Subsequent gene rearrangement within the duplicated cluster likely resulted in the presence of the germline VDJ and the deletion of intervening V, D and J segments. Transposition by a member of the Tc1/mariner family of transposable elements appears to have led to the disruption of the duplicated Cmu.

  18. A cluster-glass magnetic state in R5Pd2 (R = Ho, Tb) compounds evidenced by AC-susceptibility and neutron scattering measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gubkin, A. F.; Sherstobitova, E. A.; Terentyev, P. B.; Hoser, A.; Baranov, N. V.

    2013-06-01

    AC- and DC-susceptibility, high-field magnetization and neutron diffraction measurements have been performed in order to study the magnetic state of R5Pd2 (R = Ho, Tb) compounds. The results show that both compounds undergo cluster-glass freezing upon cooling below Tf. According to the neutron diffraction a long-range magnetic order is absent down to 2 K and magnetic clusters with short-range incommensurate antiferromagnetic correlations exist not only below Tf but also in a wide temperature range above the freezing temperature (at least up to 2Tf). A complex cluster-glass magnetic state existing in Ho5Pd2 and Tb5Pd2 down to low temperatures results in rather complicated magnetization behavior in DC and AC magnetic fields. Such an unusual magnetic state in compounds with a high rare-earth concentration may be associated with the layered type of their crystal structure and with substantial atomic disorder, which results in frustrations in the magnetic subsystem.

  19. A cluster-glass magnetic state in R5Pd2 (R = Ho, Tb) compounds evidenced by AC-susceptibility and neutron scattering measurements.

    PubMed

    Gubkin, A F; Sherstobitova, E A; Terentyev, P B; Hoser, A; Baranov, N V

    2013-06-12

    AC- and DC-susceptibility, high-field magnetization and neutron diffraction measurements have been performed in order to study the magnetic state of R5Pd2 (R = Ho, Tb) compounds. The results show that both compounds undergo cluster-glass freezing upon cooling below Tf. According to the neutron diffraction a long-range magnetic order is absent down to 2 K and magnetic clusters with short-range incommensurate antiferromagnetic correlations exist not only below Tf but also in a wide temperature range above the freezing temperature (at least up to 2Tf). A complex cluster-glass magnetic state existing in Ho5Pd2 and Tb5Pd2 down to low temperatures results in rather complicated magnetization behavior in DC and AC magnetic fields. Such an unusual magnetic state in compounds with a high rare-earth concentration may be associated with the layered type of their crystal structure and with substantial atomic disorder, which results in frustrations in the magnetic subsystem.

  20. Neutron measurements

    SciTech Connect

    McCall, R.C.

    1981-01-01

    Methods of neutron detection and measurement are discussed. Topics include sources of neutrons, neutrons in medicine, interactions of neutrons with matter, neutron shielding, neutron measurement units, measurement methods, and neutron spectroscopy. (ACR)

  1. Heavy Metal Content in Airborne Dust of Childhood Leukemia Cluster Areas: Even Small Towns Have Air Pollutants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheppard, P. R.; Witten, M. L.

    2004-12-01

    Currently in the US, there are at least two ongoing clusters of childhood leukemia, where the incidence rate over the last several years has exceeded the national norm. In Fallon, Nevada, a town of 8,000 people, 16 children have been diagnosed with leukemia since 1995, three of whom have died. In Sierra Vista, Arizona, a town of 38,000 people, 12 children have been diagnosed since 1998, two of whom have died. A possible third cluster of childhood leukemia and other cancers is being monitored in Elk Grove, California, a suburb of Sacramento. For the purpose of characterizing the heavy metal content of airborne dust of these three communities, total suspended particulate samples were collected from each town as well as from nearby towns that could be considered as control comparisons. Sampling was done using portable high-volume blowers and glass- or quartz-fiber filter media. Filters were measured for elemental concentrations using inductively coupled plasma mass spectroscopy. To date, our most notable results are from the Nevada region. Compared to other control towns in the region, Fallon had significantly more tungsten in its airborne dust. Uranium was also higher in dust of Fallon than in other control towns. Uranium is a known health hazard, though it is not necessarily specifically related to childhood leukemia. The role of tungsten in childhood leukemia has not been widely studied. However, other research has identified tungsten exposure as an environmental concern in Fallon. A CDC study of human tissue samples from Fallon has shown high tungsten levels in people of Fallon, and a USGS study of drinking water in Fallon also has shown high tungsten there. Tree-ring research on selected trees has shown high tungsten values in recent rings compared to earlier rings. While these multiple indications of tungsten in the Fallon environment do not directly lead to the conclusion that tungsten causes leukemia, they do combine to suggest that biomedical research on the

  2. Coupled-cluster method for open-shell heavy-element systems with spin-orbit coupling.

    PubMed

    Cao, Zhanli; Wang, Fan; Yang, Mingli

    2017-04-07

    The coupled-cluster approach with spin-orbit coupling (SOC) included in post-self-consistent field treatment (SOC-CC) using relativistic effective core potentials is extended to spatially non-degenerate open-shell systems in this work. The unrestricted Hartree-Fock determinant corresponding to the scalar relativistic Hamiltonian is employed as the reference and the open-shell SOC-CC approach is implemented at the CC singles and doubles (CCSD) level as well as at the CCSD level augmented by a perturbative treatment of triple excitations (CCSD(T)). Due to the breaking of time-reversal symmetry and spatial symmetry, this open-shell SOC-CC approach is rather expensive compared with the closed-shell SOC-CC approach. The open-shell SOC-CC approach is applied to some open-shell atoms and diatomic molecules with s(1), p(3), σ(1), or π(2) configuration. Our results indicate that rather accurate results can be achieved with the open-shell SOC-CCSD(T) approach for these systems. Dissociation energies for some closed-shell molecules containing heavy IIIA or VIIA atoms are also calculated using the closed-shell SOC-CC approach, where energies of the IIIA or VIIA atoms are obtained from those of the closed-shell ions and experimental ionization potentials or electron affinities. SOC-CCSD(T) approach affords reliable dissociation energies for these molecules. Furthermore, scalar-relativistic CCSD(T) approach with the same strategy can also provide reasonable dissociation energies for the 5th row IIIA or VIIA molecules, while the error becomes pronounced for the 6th row elements.

  3. Coupled-cluster method for open-shell heavy-element systems with spin-orbit coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Zhanli; Wang, Fan; Yang, Mingli

    2017-04-01

    The coupled-cluster approach with spin-orbit coupling (SOC) included in post-self-consistent field treatment (SOC-CC) using relativistic effective core potentials is extended to spatially non-degenerate open-shell systems in this work. The unrestricted Hartree-Fock determinant corresponding to the scalar relativistic Hamiltonian is employed as the reference and the open-shell SOC-CC approach is implemented at the CC singles and doubles (CCSD) level as well as at the CCSD level augmented by a perturbative treatment of triple excitations (CCSD(T)). Due to the breaking of time-reversal symmetry and spatial symmetry, this open-shell SOC-CC approach is rather expensive compared with the closed-shell SOC-CC approach. The open-shell SOC-CC approach is applied to some open-shell atoms and diatomic molecules with s1, p3, σ1, or π2 configuration. Our results indicate that rather accurate results can be achieved with the open-shell SOC-CCSD(T) approach for these systems. Dissociation energies for some closed-shell molecules containing heavy IIIA or VIIA atoms are also calculated using the closed-shell SOC-CC approach, where energies of the IIIA or VIIA atoms are obtained from those of the closed-shell ions and experimental ionization potentials or electron affinities. SOC-CCSD(T) approach affords reliable dissociation energies for these molecules. Furthermore, scalar-relativistic CCSD(T) approach with the same strategy can also provide reasonable dissociation energies for the 5th row IIIA or VIIA molecules, while the error becomes pronounced for the 6th row elements.

  4. Study of atomic clusters in neutron irradiated reactor pressure vessel surveillance samples by extended X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cammelli, S.; Degueldre, C.; Kuri, G.; Bertsch, J.; Lützenkirchen-Hecht, D.; Frahm, R.

    2009-03-01

    Copper and nickel impurities in nuclear reactor pressure vessel (RPV) steel can form nano-clusters, which have a strong impact on the ductile-brittle transition temperature of the material. Thus, for control purposes and simulation of long irradiation times, surveillance samples are submitted to enhanced neutron irradiation. In this work, surveillance samples from a Swiss nuclear power plant were investigated by extended X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy (EXAFS). The density of Cu and Ni atoms determined in the first and second shells around the absorber is affected by the irradiation and temperature. The comparison of the EXAFS data at Cu and Ni K-edges shows that these elements reside in arrangements similar to bcc Fe. However, the EXAFS analysis reveals local irradiation damage in the form of vacancy fractions, which can be determined with a precision of ∼5%. There are indications that the formation of Cu and Ni clusters differs significantly.

  5. On the use of Cox regression to examine the temporal clustering of flooding and heavy precipitation across the central United States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mallakpour, Iman; Villarini, Gabriele; Jones, Michael P.; Smith, James A.

    2017-08-01

    The central United States is plagued by frequent catastrophic flooding, such as the flood events of 1993, 2008, 2011, 2013, 2014 and 2016. The goal of this study is to examine whether it is possible to describe the occurrence of flood and heavy precipitation events at the sub-seasonal scale in terms of variations in the climate system. Daily streamflow and precipitation time series over the central United States (defined here to include North Dakota, South Dakota, Nebraska, Kansas, Missouri, Iowa, Minnesota, Wisconsin, Illinois, West Virginia, Kentucky, Ohio, Indiana, and Michigan) are used in this study. We model the occurrence/non-occurrence of a flood and heavy precipitation event over time using regression models based on Cox processes, which can be viewed as a generalization of Poisson processes. Rather than assuming that an event (i.e., flooding or precipitation) occurs independently of the occurrence of the previous one (as in Poisson processes), Cox processes allow us to account for the potential presence of temporal clustering, which manifests itself in an alternation of quiet and active periods. Here we model the occurrence/non-occurrence of flood and heavy precipitation events using two climate indices as time-varying covariates: the Arctic Oscillation (AO) and the Pacific-North American pattern (PNA). We find that AO and/or PNA are important predictors in explaining the temporal clustering in flood occurrences in over 78% of the stream gages we considered. Similar results are obtained when working with heavy precipitation events. Analyses of the sensitivity of the results to different thresholds used to identify events lead to the same conclusions. The findings of this work highlight that variations in the climate system play a critical role in explaining the occurrence of flood and heavy precipitation events at the sub-seasonal scale over the central United States.

  6. Cs-137 geochronology, epithermal neutron activation analysis, and principal component analysis of heavy metals pollution of the Black Sea anoxic continental shelf sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duliu, O. G.; Cristache, C.; Oaie, G.; Culicov, O. A.; Frontasyeva, M. V.

    2009-04-01

    concentrations; k represents the surface to plateau relative increment of concentration; Z represents concentration decrement: the depth at which the concentration becomes 1+k times greater than plateau one. Final results have shown with clarity that in the case of Zn, As, Br, Sn and Sb, the concentrations near sediment surface were 1.6 to 4.1 times greater then the plateau ones while Sc vertical profile, excepting some small fluctuations observed between 18 to 25 cm below surface, shown to be almost constant. Moreover, the concentration decrements Z of Zn, Br, Sn and Sb were almost coincident within one standard deviation while in the case of As, this coincidence appears within two standard deviation, these facts pleading for a comparable time evolution in the past 100 years. On the other hand, in the case of Sn and As, the maximum concentrations were reached 1 cm below the sediment surface, roughly corresponding to 1990 year, while the concentrations of all other three elements monotonously increases up to sediment surface. Further Principal Components Analysis of the data concerning the vertical distribution of all six elements illustrates the presence of two distinct clusters, one consisting of Zn, As, Br, Sn and Sb and the other on only of Sn, attesting both differences and similarities in the vertical distribution of considered elements. By comparing the experimental concentrations of all five elements with Romania Regulations concerning heavy metal pollution, we remarked that, by respect to these Regulations the only Zn, As, Br and Sb slightly exceeded normal accepted limits while the minimum alert concentrations were exceeded only in few cases by of As and Br, but no elements concentrations reached the intervention threshold. In our opinion, these results reflect the dynamics of the industrial activity in the riparian to Danube River European countries: a steady increase beginning with the last half of the XIX-th century followed by a slightly decline after the fall of

  7. Concomitant formation of different nature clusters and hardening in reactor pressure vessel steels irradiated by heavy ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujii, K.; Fukuya, K.; Hojo, T.

    2013-11-01

    Specimens of A533B steels containing 0.04, 0.09 and 0.21 wt%Cu were irradiated at 290 °C to 3 dpa with 3 MeV Fe ions and subjected to atom probe analyses, transmission electron microscopy observations and hardness measurements. The atom probe analysis results showed that two types of solute clusters were formed: Cu-enriched clusters containing Mn, Ni and Si atoms as irradiation-enhanced solute atom clusters and Mn/Ni/Si-enriched clusters as irradiation-induced solute atom clusters. Both cluster types occurred in the highest Cu-content steel and the ratio of Mn/Ni/Si-enriched clusters to Cu-enriched clusters increased with irradiation doses. It was confirmed that the cluster formation was a key factor in the microstructure evolution until the high dose irradiation was reached even in the low Cu content steels though the dislocation loops with much lower density than that of the clusters were observed as matrix damage. The difference in the hardening efficiency due to the difference in the nature of the clusters was small. The irradiation-induced clustering of undersized Si atoms suggested that a clustering driving force other than vacancy-driven diffusion, probably an interstitial mechanism, may become important at higher dose rates.

  8. Estimate of the neutron fields in ATLAS based on ATLAS-MPX detectors data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouchami, J.; Dallaire, F.; Gutiérrez, A.; Idarraga, J.; Král, V.; Leroy, C.; Picard, S.; Pospíšil, S.; Scallon, O.; Solc, J.; Suk, M.; Turecek, D.; Vykydal, Z.; Žemlièka, J.

    2011-01-01

    The ATLAS-MPX detectors are based on Medipix2 silicon devices designed by CERN for the detection of different types of radiation. These detectors are covered with converting layers of 6LiF and polyethylene (PE) to increase their sensitivity to thermal and fast neutrons, respectively. These devices allow the measurement of the composition and spectroscopic characteristics of the radiation field in ATLAS, particularly of neutrons. These detectors can operate in low or high preset energy threshold mode. The signature of particles interacting in a ATLAS-MPX detector at low threshold are clusters of adjacent pixels with different size and form depending on their type, energy and incidence angle. The classification of particles into different categories can be done using the geometrical parameters of these clusters. The Medipix analysis framework (MAFalda) — based on the ROOT application — allows the recognition of particle tracks left in ATLAS-MPX devices located at various positions in the ATLAS detector and cavern. The pattern recognition obtained from the application of MAFalda was configured to distinguish the response of neutrons from other radiation. The neutron response at low threshold is characterized by clusters of adjoining pixels (heavy tracks and heavy blobs) left by protons and heavy ions resulting from neutron interactions in the converting layers of the ATLAS-MPX devices. The neutron detection efficiency of ATLAS-MPX devices has been determined by the exposure of two detectors of reference to radionuclide sources of neutrons (252Cf and 241AmBe). With these results, an estimate of the neutrons fields produced at the devices locations during ATLAS operation was done.

  9. Effects of T-odd asymmetry of the emission of light charged particles and photons during fission of heavy nuclei by polarized neutrons

    SciTech Connect

    Gagarskii, A. M.; Guseva, I. S.; Goennenwein, F.; Kopach, Yu. N.; Mutterer, M.; Kuz'mina, T. E.; Petrov, G. A.; Tyurin, G.; Nesvizhevsky, V.

    2011-12-15

    The new physical effects of T-odd asymmetry of the emission of light charged particles (LCPs) during the ternary fission of some heavy nuclei by cold polarized neutrons have been experimentally studied. The coefficients of triple scalar and vector correlation of the pulses of light particles and fission fragments (TRI effect) and the fivefold correlation of the same vectors (ROT effect) have been measured. These effects are believed to be caused by the rotation of polarized fissioning system around its polarization direction. The treatment of the experimental data for LCPs in the framework of this hypothesis leads to a good agreement between the calculation results and experimental data. The calculated value of the angle of rotation of the fission axis in the ternary fission of the polarized fissioning {sup 236}U* compound nucleus was used to process the results of measuring the ROT effect for {gamma} photons from binary-fission fragments of the same nucleus. A satisfactory description of these experimental data is obtained which serves a convincing confirmation of the rotation hypothesis.

  10. Intracellular delivery and passive tumor targeting of a self-assembled nanogel containing carborane clusters for boron neutron capture therapy.

    PubMed

    Kawasaki, Riku; Sasaki, Yoshihiro; Akiyoshi, Kazunari

    2017-01-29

    Boron neutron capture therapy, based on the release of thermal neutron irradiation from boron, is a targeted radiation therapy for cancer. Targeted and sufficient accumulation of boron in tumor cells to achieve cytotoxic efficacy and reduce off-target effects remains a challenge. Carborane has been investigated for use as a delivery agent in boron neutron capture therapy because of its high boron content and chemical stability; however, it is cytotoxic, making safe delivery difficult. The aim of this study was to investigate the potential of carborane-bearing pullulan nanogels to safely and effectively deliver boron to tumor cells in vitro and in vivo and, consequently, assess their potential as a boron neutron capture therapeutic. Murine fibrosarcoma cells (CMS5a) were used for in vitro investigations of nanogel cytotoxicity, cell uptake. A mouse fibrosarcoma xenograft model was used to investigate the bio-distribution of nanogels after intravenous administration. The nanogels produced no apparent cytotoxicity and underwent cell uptake in CMS5a cells after a 24 h incubation at up to 2000 μg/mL and 400 μg/mL, respectively. The internalized nanogels were localized around the nuclear membrane. The nanogels were administered intravenously to mice bearing fibrosarcoma xenografts. Nanogel tumor localization likely occurred through the enhanced permeation and retention effect. The nanogels successfully reduced the cytotoxicity of carborane, were internalized into tumor cells, acted as a dual-delivery therapeutic and accumulated in tumors in vivo. Consequently, they demonstrate significant potential as a boron neutron capture therapeutic. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Clustering effects and decay analysis of the light-mass N =Z and N ≠Z composite systems formed in heavy ion collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaur, Manpreet; Singh, BirBikram; Patra, S. K.; Gupta, Raj K.

    2017-01-01

    We investigate the clustering effects in light mass N =Z and N ≠Z composite systems *20Ne, *28Si, *40Ca and Ne,22*21, *39K, respectively, formed in low-energy heavy ion reactions at different excitation energies, within the collective clusterization approach of the dynamical cluster-decay model (DCM) of Gupta and collaborators based on quantum-mechanical fragmentation theory (QMFT). Considering quadrupole deformed and compact orientated nuclei, a comparative decay analysis of these systems has been undertaken for the emission of different intermediate mass fragments (IMFs) or clusters, specifically the IMFs having Z =3 , 4, and 5 (or Z =7 , 6, and 5 complimentary fragments from the *20Ne and Ne,22*21 composite systems) which are having the experimental data available for their Z distribution. Quite interestingly, the QMFT supports clustering in N =Z (*20Ne and *28Si) and N ≠Z (*21Ne and *22Ne) nuclear systems at excitation energies corresponding to their respective decay threshold or resonant-state energies for the 4 α , 16O cluster and non-α cluster 14C (more so in *22NeN ≠Z composite system), supported by the Ikeda diagrams, taking into account the proper pairing strength in the temperature-dependent liquid drop energies. Within the DCM, we notice that at higher excitation energies in addition to x α -type (where x is an integer) clusters from N =Z composite systems and x n -x α -type clusters from N ≠Z composite systems, n p -x α -type clusters are relatively quite dominant, with larger preformation probability due to the decreased pairing strength at higher temperatures in the liquid drop energies. Also, the study reveals the presence of competing reaction mechanisms of compound nucleus (fusion-fission, FF) and of noncompound nucleus origin (deep inelastic orbiting, DIO) in the decay of very-light-mass composite systems *20,21,22Ne and *28Si at different excitation energies. The DIO contribution in the IMF cross section σIMF is extracted for these

  12. Phosphatidylinositol 4,5-Bisphosphate Clusters the Cell Adhesion Molecule CD44 and Assembles a Specific CD44-Ezrin Heterocomplex, as Revealed by Small Angle Neutron Scattering*

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xiaodong; Khajeh, Jahan Ali; Ju, Jeong Ho; Gupta, Yogesh K.; Stanley, Christopher B.; Do, Changwoo; Heller, William T.; Aggarwal, Aneel K.; Callaway, David J. E.; Bu, Zimei

    2015-01-01

    The cell adhesion molecule CD44 regulates diverse cellular functions, including cell-cell and cell-matrix interaction, cell motility, migration, differentiation, and growth. In cells, CD44 co-localizes with the membrane-cytoskeleton adapter protein Ezrin that links the CD44 assembled receptor signaling complexes to the cytoskeletal actin network, which organizes the spatial and temporal localization of signaling events. Here we report that the cytoplasmic tail of CD44 (CD44ct) is largely disordered. Upon binding to the signaling lipid phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate (PIP2), CD44ct clusters into aggregates. Further, contrary to the generally accepted model, CD44ct does not bind directly to the FERM domain of Ezrin or to the full-length Ezrin but only forms a complex with FERM or with the full-length Ezrin in the presence of PIP2. Using contrast variation small angle neutron scattering, we show that PIP2 mediates the assembly of a specific heterotetramer complex of CD44ct with Ezrin. This study reveals the role of PIP2 in clustering CD44 and in assembling multimeric CD44-Ezrin complexes. We hypothesize that polyvalent electrostatic interactions are responsible for the assembly of CD44 clusters and the multimeric PIP2-CD44-Ezrin complexes. PMID:25572402

  13. Finding Groups Using Model-Based Cluster Analysis: Heterogeneous Emotional Self-Regulatory Processes and Heavy Alcohol Use Risk

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mun, Eun Young; von Eye, Alexander; Bates, Marsha E.; Vaschillo, Evgeny G.

    2008-01-01

    Model-based cluster analysis is a new clustering procedure to investigate population heterogeneity utilizing finite mixture multivariate normal densities. It is an inferentially based, statistically principled procedure that allows comparison of nonnested models using the Bayesian information criterion to compare multiple models and identify the…

  14. Finding Groups Using Model-Based Cluster Analysis: Heterogeneous Emotional Self-Regulatory Processes and Heavy Alcohol Use Risk

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mun, Eun Young; von Eye, Alexander; Bates, Marsha E.; Vaschillo, Evgeny G.

    2008-01-01

    Model-based cluster analysis is a new clustering procedure to investigate population heterogeneity utilizing finite mixture multivariate normal densities. It is an inferentially based, statistically principled procedure that allows comparison of nonnested models using the Bayesian information criterion to compare multiple models and identify the…

  15. Level crossings and zero-field splitting in the {Cr8}-cubane spin-cluster studied using inelastic neutron scattering and magnetization

    SciTech Connect

    Vaknin, D.; Garlea, Vasile O; Demmel, F.; Mamontov, Eugene; Nojiri, H; Martin, Catalin; Chiorescu, Irinel; Qiu, Y.; Luban, M.; Kogerler, P.; Fielden, J.; Engelhardt, L; Rainey, C

    2010-01-01

    Inelastic neutron scattering (INS) in variable magnetic field and high-field magnetization measurements in the millikelvin temperature range were performed to gain insight into the low-energy magnetic excitation spectrum and the field-induced level crossings in the molecular spin cluster {Cr8}-cubane. These complementary techniques provide consistent estimates of the lowest level-crossing field. The overall features of the experimental data are explained using an isotropic Heisenberg model, based on three distinct exchange interactions linking the eight CrIII paramagnetic centers (spins s = 3/2), that is supplemented with a relatively large molecular magnetic anisotropy term for the lowest S = 1 multiplet. It is noted that the existence of the anisotropy is clearly evident from the magnetic field dependence of the excitations in the INS measurements, while the magnetization measurements are not sensitive to its effects.

  16. Level crossings and zero-field splitting in the {Cr8}-cubane spin cluster studied using inelastic neutron scattering and magnetization.

    PubMed

    Vaknin, D; Garlea, V O; Demmel, F; Mamontov, E; Nojiri, H; Martin, C; Chiorescu, I; Qiu, Y; Kögerler, P; Fielden, J; Engelhardt, L; Rainey, C; Luban, M

    2010-11-24

    Inelastic neutron scattering (INS) in variable magnetic field and high-field magnetization measurements in the millikelvin temperature range were performed to gain insight into the low-energy magnetic excitation spectrum and the field-induced level crossings in the molecular spin cluster {Cr(8)}-cubane. These complementary techniques provide consistent estimates of the lowest level-crossing field. The overall features of the experimental data are explained using an isotropic Heisenberg model, based on three distinct exchange interactions linking the eight Cr(III) paramagnetic centers (spins s = 3/2), that is supplemented with a relatively large molecular magnetic anisotropy term for the lowest S = 1 multiplet. It is noted that the existence of the anisotropy is clearly evident from the magnetic field dependence of the excitations in the INS measurements, while the magnetization measurements are not sensitive to its effects.

  17. Alteration of water structure by peptide clusters revealed by neutron scattering in the small-angle region (below 1 Å–1)

    SciTech Connect

    Daidone, Isabella; Iacobucci, Claudio; McLain, Sylvia; Smith, Jeremy C.

    2012-10-03

    Solution scattering of neutrons and x-rays can provide direct information on local interactions of importance for biomolecular folding and structure. Here, neutron scattering experiments are combined with molecular-dynamics simulation to interpret the scattering signal of a series of dipeptides with varying degrees of hydrophobicity (GlyAla, GlyPro, and AlaPro) in concentrated aqueous solution (1:20 solute/water ratio) in which the peptides form large segregates (up to 50 60 amino acids). Two main results are found: 1), the shift to lower Q of the so-called water-ring peak (Q ≈ 2Å–1) arises mainly from an overlap of water-peptide and peptide-peptide correlations in the region of 1.3 < Q < 2Å–1 , rather than from a shift of the water signal induced by the presence of the clusters; and 2), in the low-Q region (Q ≈ 0.6Å–1) a positive peak is observed originating from both the solute-solute correlations and changes in the water structure induced by the formation of the clusters. In particular, the water molecules are found to be more connected than in the bulk with hydrogen-bonding directions tangential to the exposed hydrophobic surfaces, and this effect increases with increasing peptide hydrophobicity. Lastly, this work demonstrates that important information on the (hydrophobic) hydration of biomolecules can be obtained in the very-small-angle region.

  18. Heavy particle radiotherapy: prospects and pitfalls

    SciTech Connect

    Faju, M.R.

    1980-01-01

    The use of heavy particles in radiotherapy of tumor volumes is examined. Particles considered are protons, helium ions, heavy ions, negative pions, and fast neutrons. Advantages and disadvantages are discussed. (ACR)

  19. Neutron Pairing Correlations in an {α}-{n}-{n} Three-Cluster Model of the {6}He Nucleus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamada, H.; Furuya, J.; Yamaguchi, M.; Oryu, S.

    2016-04-01

    An {α}- n- n three-cluster model of the {^6}He nucleus is studied by solving the Faddeev equations, where the cluster potential between {α} and n takes into account the Pauli exclusion correction, using the Fish-Bone Optical Model (Schmid in Z Phys A 297:105, 1980). The resulting binding energy of the ground state ({0^+}) is 0.831 MeV and the resonance energy of the first excited state ({2^+}), 0.60-i0.012 MeV, is extracted from the three-cluster break-up threshold. These theoretical values are in reasonable agreement with the experimental data: 0.973 MeV and 0.824-i0.056 MeV, respectively. In order to investigate the structure of these states, we calculate the angle density matrix for the {angle n_1 α n_2} angle in the triangle formed by the three clusters. The angle density matrix of the ground state has two peaks and the configuration of {0^+} wave function corresponding to the peaks constitutes a mixture of an acute-angled triangle structure and an obtuse-angled one. This finding is consistent with the former result from a variational approach (Hagino and Sagawa in Phys Rev C 72:044321, 2005). On the other hand, in the case of {2^+} state only a single peak is obtained.

  20. Characterization of damage induced by heavy neutron irradiation on multilayered {sup 6}LiF-single crystal chemical vapor deposition diamond detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Almaviva, S.; Marinelli, Marco; Milani, E.; Prestopino, G.; Tucciarone, A.; Verona, C.; Verona-Rinati, G.; Angelone, M.; Pillon, M.

    2009-10-01

    High performance neutron detectors sensitive to both thermal and fast neutrons are of great interest to monitor the high neutron flux produced, e.g., by fission and fusion reactors. An obvious requirement for such an application is neutron irradiation hardness. This is why diamond based neutron detectors are currently under test in some of these facilities. In this paper the damaging effects induced in chemical vapor deposition (CVD) diamond based detectors by a neutron fluence of approx2x10{sup 16} neutrons/cm{sup 2} have been studied and significant changes in spectroscopic, electrical, and optical properties have been observed. The detectors are fabricated using high quality synthetic CVD single crystal diamond using the p-type/intrinsic/Schottky metal/{sup 6}LiF layered structure recently proposed by Marinelli et al. [Appl. Phys. Lett. 89, 143509 (2006)], which allows simultaneous detection of thermal and fast neutrons. Neutron radiation hardness up to at least 2x10{sup 14} n/cm{sup 2} fast (14 MeV) neutron fluence has been confirmed so far [see Pillon et al., (Fusion Eng. Des. 82, 1174 (2007)]. However, at the much higher neutron fluence of approx2x10{sup 16} neutrons/cm{sup 2} damage is observed. The detector response to 5.5 MeV {sup 241}Am alpha-particles still shows a well resolved alpha-peak, thus confirming the good radiation hardness of the device but a remarkable degradation and a significant instability with time of charge collection efficiency and energy resolution arise. Symmetric, nearly Ohmic I-V (current-voltage) characteristics have been recorded from the metal/intrinsic/p-doped diamond layered structure, which before neutron irradiation acted as a Schottky barrier diode with a strong rectifying behavior. The nature and the distribution of the radiation induced damage have been deeply examined by means of cathodoluminescence spectroscopy. A more heavily damaged area into the intrinsic diamond at the same position and with the same extension of

  1. Overview of neutron radiology

    SciTech Connect

    Berger, H.

    1993-12-31

    Neutron radiography is a recognized method for nondestructive testing (NDT). It is one of eight established NDT methods offered for certification by ASNT. There are ASTM standards describing selected characteristics associated with neutron radiography, as discussed later in this session. Neutron radiography standards are proceeding in the international community (International Organization for Standardization, ISO). A primary advantage of using neutrons for radiologic inspection follows from the fact that the attenuation of thermal neutrons is very different from that of X-rays. A comparison of the attenuation of the elements for thermal neutrons (small dots) and 125 kV X-rays (solid line) is shown. As opposed to the increasing attenuation with increasing atomic number (Z) for X-rays, the neutron attenuation pattern is scattered. If there is a pattern for the neutrons, it tends to be the reverse of the X-ray case, namely, high neutron attenuation for light materials, such as hydrogen, lithium, and boron (H, Li, and B) and low attenuation for the heavy materials, such as lead, bismuth, and uranium (Pb, Bi, and U). The capability of thermal neutrons to image low-Z material, particularly hydrogen, in metal assemblies is in sharp contrast to that of X-rays. This opens up many practical inspection applications involving, for example, explosives, adhesives, corrosion, water intrusion, and hydriding of metals.

  2. Phasing and structure of bestrophin-1: a case study in the use of heavy-atom cluster compounds with multi-subunit transmembrane proteins.

    PubMed

    Kane Dickson, Veronica

    2016-03-01

    The purification and three-dimensional crystallization of membrane proteins are commonly affected by a cumulation of pathologies that are less prevalent in their soluble counterparts. This may include severe anisotropy, poor spot shape, poor to moderate-resolution diffraction, crystal twinning, translational pseudo-symmetry and poor uptake of heavy atoms for derivatization. Such challenges must be circumvented by adaptations in the approach to crystallization and/or phasing. Here, an example of a protein that exhibited all of the above-mentioned complications is presented. Bestrophin-1 is a eukaryotic calcium-activated chloride channel, the structure of which was recently determined in complex with monoclonal antibody fragments using SAD phasing with tantalum bromide clusters (Ta6Br12·Br2). Some of the obstacles to obtaining improved diffraction and phasing for this particular channel are discussed, as well as the approach and adaptations that were key to determining the structure.

  3. Clustering and pasta phases in nuclear density functional theory

    DOE PAGES

    Schuetrumpf, Bastian; Zhang, Chunli; Nazarewicz, Witold

    2017-05-23

    Nuclear density functional theory is the tool of choice in describing properties of complex nuclei and intricate phases of bulk nucleonic matter. It is a microscopic approach based on an energy density functional representing the nuclear interaction. An attractive feature of nuclear DFT is that it can be applied to both finite nuclei and pasta phases appearing in the inner crust of neutron stars. While nuclear pasta clusters in a neutron star can be easily characterized through their density distributions, the level of clustering of nucleons in a nucleus can often be difficult to assess. To this end, we usemore » the concept of nucleon localization. We demonstrate that the localization measure provides us with fingerprints of clusters in light and heavy nuclei, including fissioning systems. Furthermore we investigate the rod-like pasta phase using twist-averaged boundary conditions, which enable calculations in finite volumes accessible by state of the art DFT solvers.« less

  4. Density functional investigation of mercury and arsenic adsorption on nitrogen doped graphene decorated with palladium clusters: A promising heavy metal sensing material in farmland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Chunjiang; Wu, Huarui

    2017-03-01

    Density functional theory calculations are carried out to study the adsorption of mercury and arsenic on Pdn (n = 1-6) supported on pyridine-like nitrogen doped graphene (PNG). Owing to the promising sensitivity in trace amounts of atoms or molecules, PNG can be acted as micro-sensor for sensing heavy metals in agriculture soils. Through the analyses of structural and electronic properties of pristine PNG and Pd atom decorated PNG, we find that the most favorable adsorption site for Pd atom is the vacancy site. The analyses of structural and electronic properties reveal that the Pd atom or clusters can enhance the reactivity for Hg and AsH3 adsorption on PNG. The adsorption ability of Hg on Pdn decorated PNG is found to be related to the d-band center (εd) of the Pdn, in which the closer εd of Pdn to the Fermi level, the higher adsorption strength for Hg on Pdn decorated PNG. Moreover, the charge transfer between Pdn and arsenic may constitute arsenic adsorption on Pdn decorated PNG. Further design of highly efficient carbon based sorbents for heavy metals removal should be focused on tailoring εd of adsorbed metals.

  5. Probable Heavy Particle Decays from 306-339128 Superheavy Nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santhosh, K. P.; Sukumaran, Indu

    2016-12-01

    The heavy particle decays that are probable from the isotopes of Z = 128 superheavy nuclei within the range A = 306-339 have been analyzed within the Coulomb and proximity potential model (CPPM). The study includes the evaluation of heavy particle decay half-lives of 24 clusters, including both odd and even clusters that are supposed to be emitted from the Z = 128 superheavy nuclei. The predicted values in comparison with the models Universal curve (UNIV), Universal decay law (UDL), and scaling law of Horoi et al. are observed to follow the same trend, and almost all the values lie well within the experimental limit ( T 1/2 <1030s). The interesting point of the study is the confirmation of the importance of neutron magicity in the superheavy region, noticed from the plots of log10( T 1/2) vs. neutron number of the daughter nuclei. The minimum observed corresponds to the daughter nucleus with N = 184, which strongly supports the possibility of N = 184 to be a shell closure number. Also, the abrupt increase in the half-lives at A = 330 of the parent nuclei is the signature of neutron magicity at N = 202 associated with the parent nuclei. In addition, in the emission of odd mass clusters, the odd-even staggering (OES) effect is found which is more prominent in the case of heavy odd mass clusters. Importantly, the different slopes and intercepts obtained from the Geiger-Nuttall plots of log10( T 1/2) vs. Q -1/2 confirming the presence of shell closure effect and the plot of universal curve of log10( T 1 /2) vs.-lnP revealed the reliability of the model CPPM.

  6. Robust upward dispersion of the neutron spin resonance in the heavy fermion superconductor Ce1–xYbxCoIn5

    SciTech Connect

    Song, Yu; Van Dyke, John; Lum, I. K.; White, B. D.; Jang, Sooyoung; Yazici, Duygu; Shu, L.; Schneidewind, A.; Čermák, Petr; Qiu, Y.; Maple, M. B.; Morr, Dirk K.; Dai, Pengcheng

    2016-09-28

    Here, the neutron spin resonance is a collective magnetic excitation that appears in copper oxide, iron pnictide, and heavy fermion unconventional superconductors. Although the resonance is commonly associated with a spin-exciton due to the d(s±)-wave symmetry of the superconducting order parameter, it has also been proposed to be a magnon-like excitation appearing in the superconducting state. Here we use inelastic neutron scattering to demonstrate that the resonance in the heavy fermion superconductor Ce1–xYbxCoIn5 with x=0,0.05,0.3 has a ring-like upward dispersion that is robust against Yb-doping. By comparing our experimental data with random phase approximation calculation using the electronic structure and the momentum dependence of the dx2–y2-wave superconducting gap determined from scanning tunneling microscopy for CeCoIn5, we conclude the robust upward dispersing resonance mode in Ce1–xYbxCoIn5 is inconsistent with the downward dispersion predicted within the spin-exciton scenari

  7. Theoretical study on production of heavy neutron-rich isotopes around the N = 126 shell closure in radioactive beam induced transfer reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Long; Su, Jun; Xie, Wen-Jie; Zhang, Feng-Shou

    2017-04-01

    In order to produce more unknown neutron-rich nuclei around N = 126, the transfer reactions 136Xe + 198Pt, 136-144Xe + 208Pb, and 132Sn + 208Pb are investigated within the framework of the dinuclear system (DNS) model. The influence of neutron excess of projectile on production cross sections of target-like products is studied through the reactions 136,144Xe + 208Pb. We find that the radioactive projectile 144Xe with much larger neutron excess is favorable to produce neutron-rich nuclei with charge number less than the target rather than produce transtarget nuclei. The incident energy dependence of yield distributions of fragments in the reaction 132Sn + 208Pb are also studied. The production cross sections of neutron-rich nuclei with Z = 72- 77 are predicted in the reactions 136-144Xe + 208Pb and 132Sn + 208Pb. It is noticed that the production cross sections of unknown neutron-rich nuclei in the reaction 144Xe + 208Pb are at least two orders of magnitude larger than those in the reaction 136Xe + 208Pb. The radioactive beam induced transfer reactions 139,144Xe + 208Pb, considering beam intensities proposed in SPIRAL2 (Production System of Radioactive Ion and Acceleration On-Line) project as well, for production of neutron-rich nuclei around the N = 126 shell closure are investigated for the first time. It is found that, in comparison to the stable beam 136Xe, the radioactive beam 144Xe shows great advantages for producing neutron-rich nuclei with N = 126 and the advantages get more obvious for producing nuclei with less charge number.

  8. Superconducting properties of the heavy-ions and neutron irradiated (Cu,C)Ba 2Ca n-1 Cu nO 2 n+4- δ ( n=3, 4 and 5)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kitô, Hijiri; Iyo, Akira; Hirai, Manabu; Crisan, A.; Tokumoto, Madoka; Okayasu, Satoru; Sasase, Masahito; Ihara, Hideo

    2002-10-01

    For further enhancement of critical currents density Jc and irreversibility field Hirr of (Cu 1- xC x) Ba 2Ca n-1 Cu nO 2 n+4- δ ((Cu,C)-( n-1) n, n=3, 4 and 5) family, pinning centers were introduced by ion and neutron irradiation in these compounds. The polycrystalline samples were irradiated with 3.6×10 17 neutrons/cm 2 or with Au 15+ ions (240 MeV energy) at a fluence of 1×10 11 ions/cm 2. Jc and Hirr were determined for the irradiated samples as well as unirradiated samples. The intragrain Jc was evaluated from M- H curves using Bean's critical state model. In (Cu,C)-12( n-1) n, Jc (77 K, 1 T) shows a remarkable increase from 3.9×10 4 to 9.1×10 5 A/cm 2 for neutron irradiated (Cu,C)-1234 and from 3.9×10 4 to 4.1×10 6 A/cm 2 for heavy-ion irradiated (Cu,C)-1234. These results indicate the possibility of further enhancement of Jc and of achieving a very high Hirr of (Cu,C)-1234 in (Cu,C)-12( n-1) n family.

  9. Hydrido copper clusters supported by dithiocarbamates: oxidative hydride removal and neutron diffraction analysis of [Cu7(H){S2C(aza-15-crown-5)}6].

    PubMed

    Liao, Ping-Kuei; Fang, Ching-Shiang; Edwards, Alison J; Kahlal, Samia; Saillard, Jean-Yves; Liu, C W

    2012-06-18

    Reactions of Cu(I) salts with Na(S(2)CR) (R = N(n)Pr(2), NEt(2), aza-15-crown-5), and (Bu(4)N)(BH(4)) in an 8:6:1 ratio in CH(3)CN solution at room temperature yield the monocationic hydride-centered octanuclear Cu(I) clusters, [Cu(8)(H){S(2)CR}(6)](PF(6)) (R = N(n)Pr(2), 1(H); NEt(2), 2(H); aza-15-crown-5, 3(H)). Further reactions of [Cu(8)(H){S(2)CR}(6)](PF(6)) with 1 equiv of (Bu(4)N)(BH(4)) produced neutral heptanuclear copper clusters, [Cu(7)(H){S(2)CR}(6)] (R = N(n)Pr(2), 4(H); NEt(2), 5(H); aza-15-crown-5, 6(H)) and clusters 4-6 can also be generated from the reaction of Cu(BF(4))(2), Na(S(2)CR), and (Bu(4)N)(BH(4)) in a 7:6:8 molar ratio in CH(3)CN. Reformation of cationic Cu(I)(8) clusters by adding 1 equiv of Cu(I) salt to the neutral Cu(7) clusters in solution is observed. Intriguingly, the central hydride in [Cu(8)(H){S(2)CN(n)Pr(2)}(6)](PF(6)) can be oxidatively removed as H(2) by Ce(NO(3))(6)(2-) to yield [Cu(II)(S(2)CN(n)Pr(2))(2)] exploiting the redox-tolerant nature of dithiocarbamates. Regeneration of hydride-centered octanuclear copper clusters from the [Cu(II)(S(2)CN(n)Pr(2))(2)] can be achieved by reaction with Cu(I) ions and borohydride. The hydride release and regeneration of Cu(I)(8) was monitored by UV-visible titration experiments. To our knowledge, this is the first time that hydride encapsulated within a copper cluster can be released as H(2) via chemical means. All complexes have been fully characterized by (1)H NMR, FT-IR, UV-vis, and elemental analysis, and molecular structures of 1(H), 2(H), and 6(H) were clearly established by single-crystal X-ray diffraction. Both 1(H) and 2(H) exhibit a tetracapped tetrahedral Cu(8) skeleton, which is inscribed within a S(12) icosahedron constituted by six dialkyl dithiocarbamate ligands in a tetrametallic-tetraconnective (μ(2), μ(2)) bonding mode. The copper framework of 6(H) is a tricapped distorted tetrahedron in which the four-coordinate hydride is demonstrated to occupy the central site by

  10. METHOD OF PRODUCING NEUTRONS

    DOEpatents

    Imhoff, D.H.; Harker, W.H.

    1964-01-14

    This patent relates to a method of producing neutrons in which there is produced a heated plasma containing heavy hydrogen isotope ions wherein heated ions are injected and confined in an elongated axially symmetric magnetic field having at least one magnetic field gradient region. In accordance with the method herein, the amplitude of the field and gradients are varied at an oscillatory periodic frequency to effect confinement by providing proper ratios of rotational to axial velocity components in the motion of said particles. The energetic neutrons may then be used as in a blanket zone containing a moderator and a source fissionable material to produce heat and thermal neutron fissionable materials. (AEC)

  11. Galaxy clusters as reservoirs of heavy dark matter and high-energy cosmic rays: constraints from neutrino observations

    SciTech Connect

    Murase, Kohta; Beacom, John F. E-mail: beacom.7@osu.edu

    2013-02-01

    Galaxy Clusters (GCs) are the largest reservoirs of both dark matter and cosmic rays (CRs). Dark matter self-annihilation can lead to a high luminosity in gamma rays and neutrinos, enhanced by a strong degree of clustering in dark matter substructures. Hadronic CR interactions can also lead to a high luminosity in gamma rays and neutrinos, enhanced by the confinement of CRs from cluster accretion/merger shocks and active galactic nuclei. We show that IceCube/KM3Net observations of high-energy neutrinos can probe the nature of GCs and the separate dark matter and CR emission processes, taking into account how the results depend on the still-substantial uncertainties. Neutrino observations are relevant at high energies, especially at ∼>10 TeV. Our results should be useful for improving experimental searches for high-energy neutrino emission. Neutrino telescopes are sensitive to extended sources formed by dark matter substructures and CRs distributed over large scales. Recent observations by Fermi and imaging atmospheric Cherenkov telescopes have placed interesting constraints on the gamma-ray emission from GCs. We also provide calculations of the gamma-ray fluxes, taking into account electromagnetic cascades inside GCs, which can be important for injections at sufficiently high energies. This also allows us to extend previous gamma-ray constraints to very high dark matter masses and significant CR injections at very high energies. Using both neutrinos and gamma rays, which can lead to comparable constraints, will allow more complete understandings of GCs. Neutrinos are essential for dark matter annihilation channels like χχ→μ{sup +}μ{sup −}, where the neutrino signals are larger than the gamma-ray signals, and for hadronic instead of electronic CRs, because only the first leads to neutrinos. Our results suggest that the multi-messenger observations of GCs will be able to give useful constraints on specific models of dark matter and CRs.

  12. Ethnographic explanations for the clustering of attendance, injury, and health problems in a heavy machinery assembly plant.

    PubMed

    Janes, C R; Ames, G M

    1992-10-01

    We examine the clustering of attendance, illness, and accidental injury problems in a large unionized manufacturing plant using both quantitative and qualitative methods. We find that the distribution of workers into problem groups is related to 1) conflicts over seniority, 2) physical stressors and their influence on perceived desirability of certain kinds of jobs, and 3) organizational conditions and environments congenial to the development of distinct occupational "subcultures." We suggest that the case study approach we apply in this paper is critical to the design of programs of preventive intervention and complements the more commonly applied multiple-site and individually focused, survey approaches.

  13. Magnetic excitations in an exchange-coupled tetramer cluster of cobalt (II): a study by inelastic neutron scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gómez-García, C. J.; Coronado, E.; Borrás-Almenar, J. J.; Aebersold, M.; Güdel, H. U.; Mutka, H.

    1992-06-01

    The polyoxometalate K 10[Co 4(H 2O) 2(PW 9O 34) 2].20H 2O contains a ferromagnetically exchange-coupled tetramer of Co 11 encapsulated in between two diamagnetic molecules (PW 9O 34-9. At 2.5K several inelastic peaks are observed in the energy range 1.5-7 meV, which are assigned to magnetic excitations in the cluster. A tentative interpretation of these data from an anisotropic exchange model yields a cobalt-cobalt interaction of 3meV (24cm -1) and an amount of anisotropy Jxy/ Jz≌0.6. These values are consistent with the magnetic susceptibility measurements.

  14. Inelastic neutron scattering in valence fluctuation compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Jon M Lawrence

    2011-02-15

    The valence fluctuation compounds are rare earth intermetallics where hybridization of the nearly-localized 4f electrons with the conduction electrons leads to incorporation of the 4f's into the itinerant states. This hybridization slows down the conduction electrons and hence gives them a heavy effective mass, justifying application of the term 'heavy Fermion' (HF) to these materials. During the project period, we grew large single crystals of several such compounds and measured their properties using both standard thermodynamic probes and state-of-the-art inelastic neutron scattering. We obtained three main results. For the intermediate valence compounds CePd{sub 3} and YbAl{sub 3}, we showed that the scattering of neutrons by the fluctuations of the 4f magnetic moment does not have the momentum dependence expected for the itinerant heavy mass state; rather, the scattering is more typical of a localized spin fluctuation. We believe that incoherent scattering localizes the excitation. For the heavy Fermion compound Ce(Ni{sub 0.935}Pd{sub 0.065}){sub 2}Ge{sub 2}, which sits at a T = 0 critical point for transformation into an antiferromagnetic (AF) phase, we showed that the scattering from the AF fluctuations does not exhibit any of the divergences that are expected at a phase transition. We speculate that alloy disorder profoundly suppresses the growth of the fluctuating AF regions, leading to short range clusters rather than regions of infinite size. Finally, we explored the applicability of key concepts used to describe the behavior of rare earth heavy Fermions to uranium based HF compounds where the 5f electrons are itinerant as opposed to localized. We found that scaling laws relating the spin fluctuation energy measured in neutron scattering to the low temperature specific heat and susceptibility are valid for the uranium compounds, once corrections are made for AF fluctuations; however, the degeneracy of the high temperature moment is smaller than expected

  15. Dynamical cluster decay model applied to very light mass compound systems of mass A~30 formed in heavy ion reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bikram Singh, Bir; Kaur, Mandeep; Sharma, Manoj K.; Gupta, Raj K.

    2014-12-01

    The study of the decay of 32S* and 31P* compound systems formed in 20Ne+12C and 19F+12C reactions, respectively, is further extended on the basis of collective clusterization process within the dynamical cluster model (DCM) of Gupta and collaborators, with the effects of deformations and orientations included, at an excitation energy E*CN=60 MeV. In the present study, we have investigated the effects of deformations and orientations on the target, i.e., 12C like yield, denoted C-yield (σC), which contains fusion-fission (FF) decay cross-section, σFF, from compound nucleus process and deep inelastic orbiting (DIO) cross-section, σD1O, from non-compound nucleus process. As observed in one of our earlier study for 32S* system there is a competition between FF and DIO, while, for 31P* there is a contribution of FF cross-section only, in the total C-yield. The comparative analysis of C-Yield for the considerations of spherical and oriented nuclei, shows similar results with the only difference of the values of neck length parameter (ΔR), which are more for the later case. The calculated cross-sections ac show good agreement with experimental data for both the considerations.

  16. Spectroscopy of Neutron-rich Nuclei of the A{approx_equal}60 region populated through binary heavy-ion collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Lunardi, S.

    2008-11-11

    Neutron-rich nuclei of the mass A = 60 region (from V to Fe) have been studied through multi-nucleon transfer reactions by bombarding a {sup 238}U target with beams of {sup 64}Ni and {sup 70}Zn. Unambiguous identification of prompt {gamma} rays belonging to each nucleus has been achieved by using the efficient gamma-array CLARA coupled to the large-acceptance magnetic spectrometer PRISMA installed at the Legnaro National Laboratories. With the new data, the existence of the N = 32 sub-shell closure has been corroborated through the study of odd V isotopes, whereas a new region of deformation appears for neutron-rich Fe nuclei close to N = 40. The results obtained for all these nuclei are compared with shell model calculations which reproduces quite well the experimental data also for the most neutron-rich nuclei when excitations from the fp shell into the upper g{sub 9/2} orbital are allowed.

  17. Assessment of heavy metal contamination in water and sediments of Trepça and Sitnica rivers, Kosovo, using pollution indicators and multivariate cluster analysis.

    PubMed

    Ferati, Flora; Kerolli-Mustafa, Mihone; Kraja-Ylli, Arjana

    2015-06-01

    The concentrations of As, Cd, Cr, Co, Cu, Ni, Pb, and Zn in water and sediment samples from Trepça and Sitnica rivers were determined to assess the level of contamination. Six water and sediment samples were collected during the period from April to July 2014. Most of the water samples was found within the European and Kosovo permissible limits. The highest concentration of As, Cd, Pb, and Zn originates primarily from anthropogenic sources such discharge of industrial water from mining flotation and from the mine waste eroded from the river banks. Sediment contamination assessment was carried out using the pollution indicators such as contamination factor (CF), degree of contamination (Cd), modified degree of contamination (mCd), pollution load index (PLI), and geo-accumulation index (Igeo). The CF values for the investigated metals indicated a high contaminated nature of sediments, while the Cd values indicated a very high contamination degree of sediments. The mCd values indicate a high degree of contamination of Sitnica river sediment to ultrahigh degree of contamination of Trepça river sediment. The PLI values ranged from 1.89 to 14.1 which indicate that the heavy metal concentration levels in all investigated sites exceeded the background values and sediment quality guidelines. The average values of Igeo revealed the following ranking of intensity of heavy metal contamination of the Trepça and Sitnica river sediments: Cd > As > Pb > Zn > Cu > Co > Cr > Ni. Cluster analysis suggests that As, Cd, Cr, Co, Cu, Ni, Pb, and Zn are derived from anthropogenic sources, particularly discharges from mining flotation and erosion form waste from a zinc mine plant. In order to protect the sediments from further contamination, the designing of a monitoring network and reducing the anthropogenic discharges are suggested.

  18. Neutronic Reactor Structure

    DOEpatents

    Vernon, H. C.; Weinberg, A. M.

    1961-05-30

    The neutronic reactor is comprised of a core consisting of natural uranium and heavy water with a K-factor greater than unity. The core is surrounded by a reflector consisting of natural uranium and ordinary water with a Kfactor less than unity. (AEC)

  19. NEUTRONIC REACTOR STRUCTURE

    DOEpatents

    Weinberg, A.M.; Vernon, H.C.

    1961-05-30

    A neutronic reactor is described. It has a core consisting of natural uranium and heavy water and having a K-factor greater than unity which is surrounded by a reflector consisting of natural uranium and ordinary water having a Kfactor less than unity.

  20. Two RND proteins involved in heavy metal efflux in Caulobacter crescentus belong to separate clusters within proteobacteria

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Heavy metal Resistance-Nodulation-Division (HME-RND) efflux systems help Gram-negative bacteria to keep the intracellular homeostasis under high metal concentrations. These proteins constitute the cytoplasmic membrane channel of the tripartite RND transport systems. Caulobacter crescentus NA1000 possess two HME-RND proteins, and the aim of this work was to determine their involvement in the response to cadmium, zinc, cobalt and nickel, and to analyze the phylogenetic distribution and characteristic signatures of orthologs of these two proteins. Results Expression assays of the czrCBA operon showed significant induction in the presence of cadmium and zinc, and moderate induction by cobalt and nickel. The nczCBA operon is highly induced in the presence of nickel and cobalt, moderately induced by zinc and not induced by cadmium. Analysis of the resistance phenotype of mutant strains showed that the ΔczrA strain is highly sensitive to cadmium, zinc and cobalt, but resistant to nickel. The ΔnczA strain and the double mutant strain showed reduced growth in the presence of all metals tested. Phylogenetic analysis of the C. crescentus HME-RND proteins showed that CzrA-like proteins, in contrast to those similar to NczA, are almost exclusively found in the Alphaproteobacteria group, and the characteristic protein signatures of each group were highlighted. Conclusions The czrCBA efflux system is involved mainly in response to cadmium and zinc with a secondary role in response to cobalt. The nczCBA efflux system is involved mainly in response to nickel and cobalt, with a secondary role in response to cadmium and zinc. CzrA belongs to the HME2 subfamily, which is almost exclusively found in the Alphaproteobacteria group, as shown by phylogenetic analysis. NczA belongs to the HME1 subfamily which is more widespread among diverse Proteobacteria groups. Each of these subfamilies present distinctive amino acid signatures. PMID:23578014

  1. Changes in the structure of nuclei between the magic neutron numbers 50 and 82 as indicated by a rotating-cluster analysis of the energy values of the first 2j excited states of isotopes of cadmium

    SciTech Connect

    Pauling, L.

    1981-09-01

    Values of R, the radius of rotation of the rotating cluster, are calculated from the observed values of the energy of the lowest 2/sup +/ states of the even isotopes of Cd, Sn, and Te with the assumption that the cluster is ..cap alpha.., pb, and ..cap alpha.., respectively. R shows a maximum at approx. N = 58, a minimum at approx. N = 62, and a second maximum at approx. N = 70. The increase to the first maximum is interpreted as resulting from the overcrowding of spherons (alphas and tritons) in the mantle (outer layer) of the nuclei, causing the cluster to change from rotating in the mantle to skimming over its surface; the decrease to the minimum results from the addition of three dineutrons to the core, expanding the mantle and permitting the rotating cluster to begin to drop back into it; and the increase to the second maximum results from the overcrowding of the larger mantle surrounding the core containing the semimagic number 14 of neutrons rather than the magic numbers 8 for N = 50. The decrease after the second maximum results from the further increase in the number of core neutrons to 20, corresponding to the magic number 82. Some additional evidence for the change to an intermediate structure between N = 50 and N = 82 is also discussed.

  2. Spin-Orbit Effects in Closed-Shell Heavy and Superheavy Element Monohydrides and Monofluorides with Coupled-Cluster Theory.

    PubMed

    Gao, Dong-Dong; Cao, Zhanli; Wang, Fan

    2016-03-03

    Bond lengths and force constants of a set of closed-shell sixth-row and superheavy element monohydrides and monofluorides are calculated in this work. Kramers restricted coupled-cluster approaches (KR-CC) with spin-orbit coupling (SOC) included at the self-consistent field (SCF) level as well as CC approaches with SOC included in post-SCF treatment (SOC-CC) are employed in calculations. Recently published relativistic effective core potentials are employed, and highly accurate results for superheavy element molecules are achieved with KR-CCSD(T). SOC effects on bond lengths and force constants of these molecules are investigated. Effects of electron correlation are shown to be affected by SOC to a large extent for some superheavy element molecules. Bond lengths and force constants with SOC-CC agree very well with those of KR-CC for most of the sixth-row element molecules. As for superheavy element molecules, SOC-CCSD is able to afford results that are in good agreement with those of KR-CCSD except for 111F, while the error of SOC-CCSD(T) is more pronounced. Large error would be encountered with SOC-CC approaches for molecules when both SOC and electron correlation effects are sizable.

  3. Microscopic cluster model for the description of new experimental results on the 13C(18O,16O) 15C two-neutron transfer at 84 MeV incident energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carbone, D.; Ferreira, J. L.; Cappuzzello, F.; Lubian, J.; Agodi, C.; Cavallaro, M.; Foti, A.; Gargano, A.; Lenzi, S. M.; Linares, R.; Santagati, G.

    2017-03-01

    The 13C(18O,16O) 15C reaction is studied at 84 MeV incident energy. Excitation energy spectra and absolute cross-section angular distributions for the strongest transitions are measured with good energy and angular resolutions. Strong selectivity for two-neutron configurations in the states of the residual nucleus is found. The measured cross-section angular distributions are analyzed by exact finite-range coupled reaction channel calculations. The two-particle wave functions are extracted using the extreme cluster and the independent coordinate scheme with shell-model derived coupling strengths. A new approach also is introduced, the microscopic cluster, in which the spectroscopic amplitudes in the center-of-mass reference frame are derived from shell-model calculations using the Moshinsky transformation brackets. This new model is able to describe well the experimental cross section and to highlight cluster configurations in the involved wave functions.

  4. Neutron Star Mass-Radius Constraints of the Quiescent Low-mass X-Ray Binaries X7 and X5 in the Globular Cluster 47 Tuc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bogdanov, Slavko; Heinke, Craig O.; Özel, Feryal; Güver, Tolga

    2016-11-01

    We present Chandra/ACIS-S subarray observations of the quiescent neutron star (NS) low-mass X-ray binaries X7 and X5 in the globular cluster 47 Tuc. The large reduction in photon pile-up compared to previous deep exposures enables a substantial improvement in the spectroscopic determination of the NS radius and mass of these NSs. Modeling the thermal emission from the NS surface with a non-magnetized hydrogen atmosphere and accounting for numerous sources of uncertainties, we obtain for the NS in X7 a radius of R={11.1}-0.7+0.8 km for an assumed stellar mass of M = 1.4 M ⊙ (68% confidence level). We argue, based on astrophysical grounds, that the presence of a He atmosphere is unlikely for this source. Due to the excision of data affected by eclipses and variable absorption, the quiescent low-mass X-ray binary X5 provides less stringent constraints, leading to a radius of R={9.6}-1.1+0.9 km, assuming a hydrogen atmosphere and a mass of M = 1.4 M ⊙. When combined with all existing spectroscopic radius measurements from other quiescent low-mass X-ray binaries and Type I X-ray bursts, these measurements strongly favor radii in the 9.9-11.2 km range for a ˜1.5 M ⊙ NS and point to a dense matter equation of state that is somewhat softer than the nucleonic ones that are consistent with laboratory experiments at low densities.

  5. DNA Double-strand Breaks Induced byFractionated Neutron Beam Irradiation for Boron Neutron Capture Therapy.

    PubMed

    Kinashi, Yuko; Yokomizo, Natsuya; Takahashi, Sentaro

    2017-04-01

    To use the 53BP1 foci assay to detect DNA double-strand breaks induced by fractionated neutron beam irradiation of normal cells. The Kyoto University Research Reactor heavy-water facility and gamma-ray irradiation system were used as experimental radiation sources. After fixation of Chinese Hamster Ovary cells with 3.6% formalin, immunofluorescence staining was performed. Number and size of foci were analyzed using ImageJ software. Fractionated neutron irradiation induced 25% fewer 53BP1 foci than single irradiation at the same dose. By contrast, gamma irradiation induced 30% fewer 53BP1 foci than single irradiation at the same dose. Fractionated neutron irradiation induced larger foci than gamma irradiation, raising the possibility that persistent unrepaired DNA damage was amplified due to the high linear energy transfer component in the neutron beam. Unrepaired cluster DNA damage was more prevalent after fractionated neutron irradiation than after gamma irradiation. Copyright© 2017, International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. George J. Delinasios), All rights reserved.

  6. Enhanced clustering tendency of Cu-impurities with a number of oxygen vacancies in heavy carbon-loaded TiO2 - the bulk and surface morphologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zatsepin, D. A.; Boukhvalov, D. W.; Kurmaev, E. Z.; Zatsepin, A. F.; Kim, S. S.; Gavrilov, N. V.; Zhidkov, I. S.

    2017-09-01

    The over threshold carbon-loadings (∼50 at.%) of initial TiO2-hosts and posterior Cu-sensitization (∼7 at.%) was made using pulsed ion-implantation technique in sequential mode with 1 h vacuum-idle cycle between sequential stages of embedding. The final Cx-TiO2:Cu samples were qualified using XPS wide-scan elemental analysis, core-levels and valence band mappings. The results obtained were discussed on the theoretic background employing DFT-calculations. The combined XPS-and-DFT analysis allows to establish and prove the final formula of the synthesized samples as Cx-TiO2:[Cu+][Cu2+] for the bulk and Cx-TiO2:[Cu+][Cu0] for thin-films. It was demonstrated the in the mode of heavy carbon-loadings the remaining majority of neutral C-C bonds (sp3-type) is dominating and only a lack of embedded carbon is fabricating the O-Cdbnd O clusters. No valence base-band width altering was established after sequential carbon-copper modification of the atomic structure of initial TiO2-hosts except the dominating majority of Cu 3s states after Cu-sensitization. The crucial role of neutral carbon low-dimensional impurities as the precursors for the new phases growth was shown for Cu-sensitized Cx-TiO2 intermediate-state hosts.

  7. Measurement of neutron diffraction with compact neutron source RANS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ikeda, Y.; Takamura, M.; Taketani, A.; Sunaga, H.; Otake, Y.; Suzuki, H.; Kumagai, M.; Oba, Y.; Hama, T.

    2016-11-01

    Diffraction is used as a measurement technique for crystal structure. X-rays or electron beam with wavelength that is close to the lattice constant of the crystal is often used for the measurement. They have sensitivity in surface (0.01mm) of heavy metals due to the mean free path for heavy ions. Neutron diffraction has the probe of the internal structure of the heavy metals because it has a longer mean free path than that of the X-rays or the electrons. However, the neutron diffraction measurement is not widely used because large facilities are required in the many neutron sources. RANS (Riken Accelerator-driven Compact Neutron Source) is developed as a neutron source which is usable easily in laboratories and factories. In RANS, fast neutrons are generated by 7MeV protons colliding on a Be target. Some fast neutrons are moderated with polyethylene to thermal neutrons. The thermal neutrons of 10meV which have wavelength of 10nm can be used for the diffraction measurement. In this study, the texture evolution in steels was measured with RANS and the validity of the compact neutron source was proved. The texture of IF steel sheets with the thickness of 1.0mm was measured with 10minutes run. The resolution is 2% and is enough to analyze a evolution in texture due to compression/tensile deformation or a volume fraction of two phases in the steel sample. These results have proven the possibility to use compact neutron source for the analysis of mesoscopic structure of metallic materials.

  8. CHARACTERIZING THE HEAVY ELEMENTS IN GLOBULAR CLUSTER M22 AND AN EMPIRICAL s-PROCESS ABUNDANCE DISTRIBUTION DERIVED FROM THE TWO STELLAR GROUPS

    SciTech Connect

    Roederer, I. U.; Marino, A. F.; Sneden, C.

    2011-11-20

    We present an empirical s-process abundance distribution derived with explicit knowledge of the r-process component in the low-metallicity globular cluster M22. We have obtained high-resolution, high signal-to-noise spectra for six red giants in M22 using the Magellan Inamori Kyocera Echelle spectrograph on the Magellan-Clay Telescope at Las Campanas Observatory. In each star we derive abundances for 44 species of 40 elements, including 24 elements heavier than zinc (Z = 30) produced by neutron-capture reactions. Previous studies determined that three of these stars (the 'r+s group') have an enhancement of s-process material relative to the other three stars (the 'r-only group'). We confirm that the r+s group is moderately enriched in Pb relative to the r-only group. Both groups of stars were born with the same amount of r-process material, but s-process material was also present in the gas from which the r+s group formed. The s-process abundances are inconsistent with predictions for asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars with M {<=} 3 M{sub Sun} and suggest an origin in more massive AGB stars capable of activating the {sup 22}Ne({alpha},n){sup 25}Mg reaction. We calculate the s-process 'residual' by subtracting the r-process pattern in the r-only group from the abundances in the r+s group. In contrast to previous r- and s-process decompositions, this approach makes no assumptions about the r- and s-process distributions in the solar system and provides a unique opportunity to explore s-process yields in a metal-poor environment.

  9. Future Challenges for Nuclear Clustering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freer, M.

    2017-06-01

    This contribution will focus on some of the advances that have been made since the last Cluster Conference in Debrecen, Hungary, and the challenges that remain for the subject before the next conference in Brazil. It addresses the question of cluster structure above and below the cluster decay threshold, dynamical symmetries, molecular structures and clustering at the neutron drip-line.

  10. MEASUREMENT OF THE RADIUS OF NEUTRON STARS WITH HIGH SIGNAL-TO-NOISE QUIESCENT LOW-MASS X-RAY BINARIES IN GLOBULAR CLUSTERS

    SciTech Connect

    Guillot, Sebastien; Rutledge, Robert E.; Servillat, Mathieu; Webb, Natalie A. E-mail: rutledge@physics.mcgill.ca

    2013-07-20

    This paper presents the measurement of the neutron star (NS) radius using the thermal spectra from quiescent low-mass X-ray binaries (qLMXBs) inside globular clusters (GCs). Recent observations of NSs have presented evidence that cold ultra dense matter-present in the core of NSs-is best described by ''normal matter'' equations of state (EoSs). Such EoSs predict that the radii of NSs, R{sub NS}, are quasi-constant (within measurement errors, of {approx}10%) for astrophysically relevant masses (M{sub NS}>0.5 M{sub Sun }). The present work adopts this theoretical prediction as an assumption, and uses it to constrain a single R{sub NS} value from five qLMXB targets with available high signal-to-noise X-ray spectroscopic data. Employing a Markov chain Monte-Carlo approach, we produce the marginalized posterior distribution for R{sub NS}, constrained to be the same value for all five NSs in the sample. An effort was made to include all quantifiable sources of uncertainty into the uncertainty of the quoted radius measurement. These include the uncertainties in the distances to the GCs, the uncertainties due to the Galactic absorption in the direction of the GCs, and the possibility of a hard power-law spectral component for count excesses at high photon energy, which are observed in some qLMXBs in the Galactic plane. Using conservative assumptions, we found that the radius, common to the five qLMXBs and constant for a wide range of masses, lies in the low range of possible NS radii, R{sub NS}=9.1{sup +1.3}{sub -1.5} km (90%-confidence). Such a value is consistent with low-R{sub NS} equations of state. We compare this result with previous radius measurements of NSs from various analyses of different types of systems. In addition, we compare the spectral analyses of individual qLMXBs to previous works.

  11. The Evolution of Neutron-Capture Elements in the Milky Way

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Overbeek, Jamie C.

    Neutron-capture elements (those with Z>30) are formed in two ways: slow neutron-capture (the s-process) and rapid neutron-capture (the r-process). The s-process is thought to mainly occur in low and intermediate-mass asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars; the r-process site has not been conclusively identified but probably involves core collapse supernovae or neutron star mergers. A conflict has recently arisen between s-process models and observations, as [Ba/Fe] ratios appear to increase dramatically with decreasing age in open clusters to a degree not predicted by standard s-process models. Other s-process elements do not show the degree of enhancement in young clusters that Ba does. Various solutions have been proposed, including an intermediate process which may disproportionally create Ba, and an increased neutron source in low-mass (M<1.5M) AGB stars. We have assembled and analyzed a sample of 75 stars in 24 open clusters to measure abundances of three light s-process elements (Sr, Y, Zr), three heavy s-process elements (Ba, La, Ce), three r-process elements (Eu, Dy, and Gd), and three elements with significant contributions from both processes (`mixed' elements Mo, Pr, and Nd). Examining [s-process/Fe] trends with age confirms that Ba is unique in its behavior, as it has a large trend with age of -0.05 dex/Gyr but the other s-process elements have more modest trends with cluster age of -0.01 to -0.02 dex/Gyr. All of the s-process elements except Ba fit models based on an enhanced neutron source in low-mass AGB stars; we also do not see in our data the heavy s-process element trends with metallicity predicted by standard models. Problems we encountered with measuring Ba features combined with the uncertainty in predictions of i-process models require caution in interpreting the i-process as a solution to the Ba discrepancy. We do not find strong trends in s-process elements with Galactocentric radius, although there is some evidence of a break in the s

  12. PREFACE: Nuclear Cluster Conference; Cluster'07

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freer, Martin

    2008-05-01

    The Cluster Conference is a long-running conference series dating back to the 1960's, the first being initiated by Wildermuth in Bochum, Germany, in 1969. The most recent meeting was held in Nara, Japan, in 2003, and in 2007 the 9th Cluster Conference was held in Stratford-upon-Avon, UK. As the name suggests the town of Stratford lies upon the River Avon, and shortly before the conference, due to unprecedented rainfall in the area (approximately 10 cm within half a day), lay in the River Avon! Stratford is the birthplace of the `Bard of Avon' William Shakespeare, and this formed an intriguing conference backdrop. The meeting was attended by some 90 delegates and the programme contained 65 70 oral presentations, and was opened by a historical perspective presented by Professor Brink (Oxford) and closed by Professor Horiuchi (RCNP) with an overview of the conference and future perspectives. In between, the conference covered aspects of clustering in exotic nuclei (both neutron and proton-rich), molecular structures in which valence neutrons are exchanged between cluster cores, condensates in nuclei, neutron-clusters, superheavy nuclei, clusters in nuclear astrophysical processes and exotic cluster decays such as 2p and ternary cluster decay. The field of nuclear clustering has become strongly influenced by the physics of radioactive beam facilities (reflected in the programme), and by the excitement that clustering may have an important impact on the structure of nuclei at the neutron drip-line. It was clear that since Nara the field had progressed substantially and that new themes had emerged and others had crystallized. Two particular topics resonated strongly condensates and nuclear molecules. These topics are thus likely to be central in the next cluster conference which will be held in 2011 in the Hungarian city of Debrechen. Martin Freer Participants and Cluster'07

  13. Reexamining cluster radioactivity in trans-lead nuclei with consideration of specific density distributions in daughter nuclei and clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qian, Yibin; Ren, Zhongzhou; Ni, Dongdong

    2016-08-01

    We further investigate the cluster emission from heavy nuclei beyond the lead region in the framework of the preformed cluster model. The refined cluster-core potential is constructed by the double-folding integral of the density distributions of the daughter nucleus and the emitted cluster, where the radius or the diffuseness parameter in the Fermi density distribution formula is determined according to the available experimental data on the charge radii and the neutron skin thickness. The Schrödinger equation of the cluster-daughter relative motion is then solved within the outgoing Coulomb wave-function boundary conditions to obtain the decay width. It is found that the present decay width of cluster emitters is clearly enhanced as compared to that in the previous case, which involved the fixed parametrization for the density distributions of daughter nuclei and clusters. Among the whole procedure, the nuclear deformation of clusters is also introduced into the calculations, and the degree of its influence on the final decay half-life is checked to some extent. Moreover, the effect from the bubble density distribution of clusters on the final decay width is carefully discussed by using the central depressed distribution.

  14. Polarized neutrons in RHIC

    SciTech Connect

    Courant, E.D.

    1998-04-20

    There does not appear to be any obvious way to accelerate neutrons, polarized or otherwise, to high energies by themselves. To investigate the behavior of polarized neutrons the authors therefore have to obtain them by accelerating them as components of heavier nuclei, and then sorting out the contribution of the neutrons in the analysis of the reactions produced by the heavy ion beams. The best neutron carriers for this purpose are probably {sup 3}He nuclei and deuterons. A polarized deuteron is primarily a combination of a proton and a neutron with their spins pointing in the same direction; in the {sup 3}He nucleus the spins of the two protons are opposite and the net spin (and magnetic moment) is almost the same as that of a free neutron. Polarized ions other than protons may be accelerated, stored and collided in a ring such as RHIC provided the techniques proposed for polarized proton operation can be adapted (or replaced by other strategies) for these ions. This paper discusses techniques for accelerating polarized {sup 3}He nuclei and deuterons.

  15. Mass Segregation in Globular Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fregeau, J. M.; Joshi, K. J.; Portegies Zwart, S. F.; Rasio, F. A.

    2002-05-01

    We present the results of a new study of mass segregation in two-component star clusters, based on a large number of numerical N-body simulations using our recently developed dynamical Monte Carlo code. Specifically, we follow the dynamical evolution of clusters containing stars with individual masses m1 as well as a tracer population of objects with individual masses m2. We consider both light tracers (μ≡m2/m1<1) and heavy tracers (μ>1) and a variety of King model initial conditions. In all of our simulations we use a realistically large number of stars for globular clusters, N=105, but we ignore the effects of binaries and stellar evolution. For heavy tracers, which could represent stellar remnants such as neutron stars or black holes in a globular cluster, we characterize in a variety of ways the tendency for these objects to concentrate in or near the cluster core. In agreement with simple theoretical arguments, we find that the characteristic time for this mass segregation process varies as 1/μ. For models with very light tracers (μ<~10-2), which could represent free-floating planets or brown dwarfs, we find the expected depletion of light objects in the cluster core but also sometimes a significant enhancement in the halo. That is, for some initial conditions, the number density of light objects in the cluster halo increases over time, in spite of the higher overall evaporation rate of lighter objects through the tidal boundary. Using these results along with a simplified initial mass function, we estimate the optical depth to gravitational microlensing by planetary mass objects or brown dwarfs in typical globular clusters. For some initial conditions, the optical depth in the halo owing to very low mass objects could be much greater than that of luminous stars. If we apply our results to M22, using the recent null detection of Sahu, Anderson, & King, we find an upper limit of ~25% at the 63% confidence level for the current mass fraction of M22 in the

  16. High-resolution neutron and X-ray diffraction room-temperature studies of an H-FABP-oleic acid complex: study of the internal water cluster and ligand binding by a transferred multipolar electron-density distribution.

    PubMed

    Howard, E I; Guillot, B; Blakeley, M P; Haertlein, M; Moulin, M; Mitschler, A; Cousido-Siah, A; Fadel, F; Valsecchi, W M; Tomizaki, Takashi; Petrova, T; Claudot, J; Podjarny, A

    2016-03-01

    Crystal diffraction data of heart fatty acid binding protein (H-FABP) in complex with oleic acid were measured at room temperature with high-resolution X-ray and neutron protein crystallography (0.98 and 1.90 Å resolution, respectively). These data provided very detailed information about the cluster of water molecules and the bound oleic acid in the H-FABP large internal cavity. The jointly refined X-ray/neutron structure of H-FABP was complemented by a transferred multipolar electron-density distribution using the parameters of the ELMAMII library. The resulting electron density allowed a precise determination of the electrostatic potential in the fatty acid (FA) binding pocket. Bader's quantum theory of atoms in molecules was then used to study interactions involving the internal water molecules, the FA and the protein. This approach showed H⋯H contacts of the FA with highly conserved hydrophobic residues known to play a role in the stabilization of long-chain FAs in the binding cavity. The determination of water hydrogen (deuterium) positions allowed the analysis of the orientation and electrostatic properties of the water molecules in the very ordered cluster. As a result, a significant alignment of the permanent dipoles of the water molecules with the protein electrostatic field was observed. This can be related to the dielectric properties of hydration layers around proteins, where the shielding of electrostatic interactions depends directly on the rotational degrees of freedom of the water molecules in the interface.

  17. Heavy-element nucleosynthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Mathews, G.J.

    1990-10-30

    New measurements and theoretical studies of nuclear properties, together with new astronomical data on the growth of heavy-element abundances during the early history of the Galaxy, now provide a clearer picture of where in nature the elements heavier than iron are produced by rapid (r-process) and show (s-process) neutron capture reactions. The nuclear data suggest that the r-process involves a high-neutron-density beta-flow equilibrium environment and that the s-process may have occurred at a temperature and neutron density consistent with a {sup 13}C({alpha},n){sup 16}0 neutron source. The astronomical data, when compared with simple galactic chemical evolution modes, suggests that the r-process is associated with type II supernovae and that the neutron source must be manufactured by the star. Low-mass type II supernovae are proposed as the most important contributors to the r-process. A {sup 13}C neutron source in intermediate-mass stars is proposed for the s-process. 64 refs., 7 figs.

  18. Probing neutron rich matter with parity violation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horowitz, Charles

    2016-03-01

    Many compact and energetic astrophysical systems are made of neutron rich matter. In contrast, most terrestrial nuclei involve approximately symmetric nuclear matter with more equal numbers of neutrons and protons. However, heavy nuclei have a surface region that contains many extra neutrons. Precision measurements of this neutron rich skin can determine properties of neutron rich matter. Parity violating electron scattering provides a uniquely clean probe of neutrons, because the weak charge of a neutron is much larger than that of a proton. We describe first results and future plans for the Jefferson Laboratory experiment PREX that measures the thickness of the neutron skin in 208Pb. Another JLAB experiment CREX will measure the neutron radius of 48Ca and test recent microscopic calculations of this neutron rich 48 nucleon system. Finally, we show how measuring parity violation at multiple momentum transfers can determine not just the neutron radius but the full radial structure of the neutron density in 48Ca. A neutron star is eighteen orders of magnitude larger than a nucleus (km vs fm) but both the star and the neutron rich nuclear skin are made of the same neutrons, with the same strong interactions, and the same equation of state. A large pressure pushes neutrons out against surface tension and gives a thick neutron skin. Therefore, PREX will constrain the equation of state of neutron rich matter and improve predictions for the structure of neutron stars. Supported in part by DOE Grants DE-FG02-87ER40365 (Indiana University) and DE-SC0008808 (NUCLEI SciDAC Collaboration).

  19. Molecule-like structure with covalent neutrons of F isotopes toward the neutron drip line

    SciTech Connect

    Kimura, M.; Furutachi, N.

    2011-04-15

    The {alpha}-cluster structure of F isotopes has been studied based on antisymmetrized molecular dynamics. By using the constraint on the principal quantum number, various neutron configurations are investigated. It is found that a proton excitation into an sd shell does not necessarily induce {alpha} clustering in {sup 21}F and {sup 23}F. However, once one or two neutrons are excited into the pf shell together with a proton excitation, the core nuclei have {alpha} clustering. The calculation is extended toward the neutron drip line. The neutron-rich F isotopes also have {alpha} clustering in the excited states and their excitation energy greatly decreases toward the neutron drip line. The relation between the reduction of their excitation energies and the breaking of the neutron magic number N=20 is suggested.

  20. Crystallization of dense neutron matter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Canuto, V.; Chitre, S. M.

    1974-01-01

    The equation of state for cold neutron matter at high density is studied in the t-matrix formulation, and it is shown that energetically it is convenient to have neutrons in a crystalline configuration rather than in a liquid state for values of the density exceeding 1600 Tg/cu cm. The study of the mechanical properties indicates that the system is stable against shearing stresses. A solid core in the deep interior of heavy neutron stars appears to offer the most plausible explanation of speed-ups observed in the Vela pulsar.

  1. ACCELERATOR BASED CONTINUOUS NEUTRON SOURCE.

    SciTech Connect

    SHAPIRO,S.M.; RUGGIERO,A.G.; LUDEWIG,H.

    2003-03-25

    Until the last decade, most neutron experiments have been performed at steady-state, reactor-based sources. Recently, however, pulsed spallation sources have been shown to be very useful in a wide range of neutron studies. A major review of neutron sources in the US was conducted by a committee chaired by Nobel laureate Prof. W. Kohn: ''Neutron Sources for America's Future-BESAC Panel on Neutron Sources 1/93''. This distinguished panel concluded that steady state and pulsed sources are complementary and that the nation has need for both to maintain a balanced neutron research program. The report recommended that both a new reactor and a spallation source be built. This complementarity is recognized worldwide. The conclusion of this report is that a new continuous neutron source is needed for the second decade of the 20 year plan to replace aging US research reactors and close the US neutron gap. it is based on spallation production of neutrons using a high power continuous superconducting linac to generate protons impinging on a heavy metal target. There do not appear to be any major technical challenges to the building of such a facility since a continuous spallation source has been operating in Switzerland for several years.

  2. Detection of Neutrons with Scintillation Counters

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Hofstadter, R.

    1948-11-01

    Detection of slow neutrons by: detection of single gamma rays following capture by cadmium or mercury; detection of more than one gamma ray by observing coincidences after capture; detection of heavy charged particles after capture in lithium or baron nuclei; possible use of anthracene for counting fast neutrons investigated briefly.

  3. Neutron Star Discovered Where a Black Hole Was Expected

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2005-11-01

    A very massive star collapsed to form a neutron star and not a black hole as expected, according to new results from NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory. This discovery shows that nature has a harder time making black holes than previously thought. Scientists found this neutron star -- a dense whirling ball of neutrons about 12 miles in diameter -- in an extremely young star cluster. Astronomers were able to use well-determined properties of other stars in the cluster to deduce that the progenitor of this neutron star was at least 40 times the mass of the Sun. ESO Optical Image of Westerlund 1 ESO Optical Image of Westerlund 1 "Our discovery shows that some of the most massive stars do not collapse to form black holes as predicted, but instead form neutron stars," said Michael Muno, a UCLA postdoctoral Hubble Fellow and lead author of a paper to be published in The Astrophysical Journal Letters. When very massive stars make neutron stars and not black holes, they will have a greater influence on the composition of future generations of stars. When the star collapses to form the neutron star, more than 95% of its mass, much of which is metal-rich material from its core, is returned to the space around it. "This means that enormous amounts of heavy elements are put back into circulation and can form other stars and planets," said J. Simon Clark of the Open University in the United Kingdom. Animation: Dissolve from Optical to X-ray Image of Westerlund 1 Animation: Dissolve from Optical to X-ray Image of Westerlund 1 Astronomers do not completely understand how massive a star must be to form a black hole rather than a neutron star. The most reliable method for estimating the mass of the progenitor star is to show that the neutron star or black hole is a member of a cluster of stars, all of which are close to the same age. Because more massive stars evolve faster than less massive ones, the mass of a star can be estimated from if its evolutionary stage is known. Neutron

  4. All-electron all-virtual spinor space relativistic coupled-cluster calculations for molecules of heavy elements using contracted basis set: Prediction of atomization energy of PbH4*

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malli, Gulzari L.; Siegert, Martin; Turner, David P.

    All-electron all-virtual spinor space (AVSS) relativistic second order Møller-Plesset (RMP2), coupled-cluster singles doubles (RCCSD), RCCSD(T) (RCCSD plus the triple excitation correction included perturbationally) calculations are reported for tetrahedral (Td) PbH4 at various bond lengths using our finite contracted universal Gaussian basis set. Our relativistic calculations predict the RMP2, RCCSD, and RCCD(T) molecular correlation energy for PbH4 as -2.2563, -2.1917, and -2.2311 au, respectively. Ours are the first AVSS RMP2, RCCSD, and RCCSD(T) molecular calculations for electron correlation energy of the heavy element molecule PbH4. All-electron AVSS coupled-cluster calculations for the Pb atom are also reported and these were used (in conjunction with the corresponding molecular electron correlation energy calculations for PbH4) to predict atomization energy (Ae) of PbH4 at various levels of coupled-cluster electron correlation. Our predicted atomization energy for PbH4 (at the optimized bond length of 1.749 Å) with our Dirac-Fock, RMP2, RCCSD, and RCCSD(T) calculations is 5.73, 7.27, 11.24, and 11.62 eV, respectively. Neither such relativistic molecular correlation energy nor atomization energy has been reported so far for heavy polyatomic with 86 electrons. Calculation of relativistic molecular correlation energy is no more a nightmare, and bottlenecks are broken for the calculation of relativistic correlation as well as atomization energy for molecules of heavy elements.

  5. Complete sequence of a plasmid from a bovine methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus harbouring a novel ica-like gene cluster in addition to antimicrobial and heavy metal resistance genes.

    PubMed

    Feßler, Andrea T; Zhao, Qin; Schoenfelder, Sonja; Kadlec, Kristina; Brenner Michael, Geovana; Wang, Yang; Ziebuhr, Wilma; Shen, Jianzhong; Schwarz, Stefan

    2017-02-01

    The multiresistance plasmid pAFS11, obtained from a bovine methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) isolate, was completely sequenced and analysed for its structure and organisation. Moreover, the susceptibility to the heavy metals cadmium and copper was determined by broth macrodilution. The 49,189-bp plasmid harboured the apramycin resistance gene apmA, two copies of the macrolide/lincosamide/streptogramin B resistance gene erm(B) (both located on remnants of a truncated transposon Tn917), the kanamycin/neomycin resistance gene aadD, the tetracycline resistance gene tet(L) and the trimethoprim resistance gene dfrK. The latter three genes were part of a 7,284-bp segment which was bracketed by two copies of IS431. In addition, the cadmium resistance operon cadDX as well as the copper resistance genes copA and mco were located on the plasmid and mediated a reduced susceptibility to cadmium and copper. Moreover, a complete novel ica-like gene cluster of so far unknown genetic origin was detected on this plasmid. The ica-like gene cluster comprised four different genes whose products showed 64.4-76.9% homology to the Ica proteins known to be involved in biofilm formation of the S. aureus strains Mu50, Mu3 and N315. However, 96.2-99.4% homology was seen to proteins from S. sciuri NS1 indicating an S. sciuri origin. The finding of five different antibiotic resistance genes co-located on a plasmid with heavy metal resistance genes and an ica-like gene cluster is alarming. With the acquisition of this plasmid, antimicrobial multiresistance, heavy metal resistances and potential virulence properties may be co-selected and spread via a single horizontal gene transfer event.

  6. Atmospheric neutrons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Korff, S. A.; Mendell, R. B.; Merker, M.; Light, E. S.; Verschell, H. J.; Sandie, W. S.

    1979-01-01

    Contributions to fast neutron measurements in the atmosphere are outlined. The results of a calculation to determine the production, distribution and final disappearance of atmospheric neutrons over the entire spectrum are presented. An attempt is made to answer questions that relate to processes such as neutron escape from the atmosphere and C-14 production. In addition, since variations of secondary neutrons can be related to variations in the primary radiation, comment on the modulation of both radiation components is made.

  7. Pulsed thermal neutron source at the fast neutron generator.

    PubMed

    Tracz, Grzegorz; Drozdowicz, Krzysztof; Gabańska, Barbara; Krynicka, Ewa

    2009-06-01

    A small pulsed thermal neutron source has been designed based on results of the MCNP simulations of the thermalization of 14 MeV neutrons in a cluster-moderator which consists of small moderating cells decoupled by an absorber. Optimum dimensions of the single cell and of the whole cluster have been selected, considering the thermal neutron intensity and the short decay time of the thermal neutron flux. The source has been built and the test experiments have been performed. To ensure the response is not due to the choice of target for the experiments, calculations have been done to demonstrate the response is valid regardless of the thermalization properties of the target.

  8. Neutron dosimetry

    DOEpatents

    Quinby, Thomas C.

    1976-07-27

    A method of measuring neutron radiation within a nuclear reactor is provided. A sintered oxide wire is disposed within the reactor and exposed to neutron radiation. The induced radioactivity is measured to provide an indication of the neutron energy and flux within the reactor.

  9. Neutron guide

    DOEpatents

    Greene, Geoffrey L.

    1999-01-01

    A neutron guide in which lengths of cylindrical glass tubing have rectangular glass plates properly dimensioned to allow insertion into the cylindrical glass tubing so that a sealed geometrically precise polygonal cross-section is formed in the cylindrical glass tubing. The neutron guide provides easier alignment between adjacent sections than do the neutron guides of the prior art.

  10. Neutron sources: Present practice and future potential

    SciTech Connect

    Cierjacks, S.; Smith, A.B.

    1988-01-01

    The present capability and future potential of accelerator-based monoenergetic and white neutron sources are outlined in the context of fundamental and applied neutron-nuclear research. The neutron energy range extends from thermal to 500 MeV, and the time domain from steady-state to pico-second pulsed sources. Accelerator technology is summarized, including the production of intense light-ion, heavy-ion and electron beams. Target capabilities are discussed with attention to neutron-producing efficiency and power-handling capabilities. The status of underlying neutron-producing reactions is summarized. The present and future use of neutron sources in: fundamental neutron-nuclear research, nuclear data acquisition, materials damage studies, engineering tests, and biomedical applications are discussed. Emphasis is given to current status, near-term advances well within current technology, and to long-range projections. 90 refs., 4 figs.

  11. Neutron sources: present practice and future potential

    SciTech Connect

    Cierjacks, S.; Smith, A.B.

    1988-01-01

    The present capability and future potential of accelerator-based monoenergetic and white neutron sources are outlined in the context of fundamental and applied neutron-nuclear research. The neutron energy range extends from thermal to 500+ MeV, and the time domain from steady-state to pico-second pulsed sources. Accelerator technology is summarized, including the production of intense light-ion, heavy-ion and electron beams. Target capabilities are discussed with attention to neutron-production efficiency and power-handling capabilities. The status of underlying neutron-producing reactions is summarized. The present and future use of neutron sources in: (i) fundamental neutron-nuclear research, (ii) nuclear-data acquisition, (iii) materials-damage studies, (iv) engineering test, and (v) biomedical applications are discussed. Emphasis is given to current status, near-term advances well within current technology, and to long-range projections.

  12. Scintillating Fiber Technology for a High Neutron Spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuznetsov, Evgeny; Adams, James, Jr.; Christl, Mark; Norwood, Joseph; Watts, John

    2014-01-01

    Develop a compact low-power neutron spectrometer that uniquely identifies neutrons in the mixed radiation field expected on crewed deep-space missions. Secondary neutrons are generated by cosmic rays striking heavy crewed spacecraft as well as lunar and planetary surfaces1,2. It has been shown that secondary neutrons can account for up to 50% if the total dose-equivalent received by the crew.

  13. Superfluid hydrodynamics in the inner crust of neutron stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, Noël; Urban, Michael

    2016-12-01

    The inner crust of neutron stars is supposed to be inhomogeneous and composed of dense structures (clusters) that are immersed in a dilute gas of unbound neutrons. Here we consider spherical clusters forming a body-centered cubic (BCC) crystal and cylindrical rods arranged in a hexagonal lattice. We study the relative motion of these dense structures and the neutron gas using superfluid hydrodynamics. Within this approach, which relies on the assumption that Cooper pairs are small compared to the crystalline structures, we find that the entrainment of neutrons by the clusters is very weak since neutrons of the gas can flow through the clusters. Consequently, we obtain a low effective mass of the clusters and a superfluid density that is even higher than the density of unbound neutrons. Consequences for the constraints from glitch observations are discussed.

  14. High-resolution neutron and X-ray diffraction room-temperature studies of an H-FABP–oleic acid complex: study of the internal water cluster and ligand binding by a transferred multipolar electron-density distribution

    PubMed Central

    Howard, E. I.; Guillot, B.; Blakeley, M. P.; Haertlein, M.; Moulin, M.; Mitschler, A.; Cousido-Siah, A.; Fadel, F.; Valsecchi, W. M.; Tomizaki, Takashi; Petrova, T.; Claudot, J.; Podjarny, A.

    2016-01-01

    Crystal diffraction data of heart fatty acid binding protein (H-FABP) in complex with oleic acid were measured at room temperature with high-resolution X-ray and neutron protein crystallography (0.98 and 1.90 Å resolution, respectively). These data provided very detailed information about the cluster of water molecules and the bound oleic acid in the H-FABP large internal cavity. The jointly refined X-ray/neutron structure of H-FABP was complemented by a transferred multipolar electron-density distribution using the parameters of the ELMAMII library. The resulting electron density allowed a precise determination of the electrostatic potential in the fatty acid (FA) binding pocket. Bader’s quantum theory of atoms in molecules was then used to study interactions involving the internal water molecules, the FA and the protein. This approach showed H⋯H contacts of the FA with highly conserved hydrophobic residues known to play a role in the stabilization of long-chain FAs in the binding cavity. The determination of water hydrogen (deuterium) positions allowed the analysis of the orientation and electrostatic properties of the water molecules in the very ordered cluster. As a result, a significant alignment of the permanent dipoles of the water molecules with the protein electrostatic field was observed. This can be related to the dielectric properties of hydration layers around proteins, where the shielding of electrostatic interactions depends directly on the rotational degrees of freedom of the water molecules in the interface. PMID:27006775

  15. A Comparison of the Detailed Chemical Abundances of Globular Clusters in the Milky Way, Andromeda, and Centaurus A Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colucci, Janet E.; Bernstein, Rebecca

    2016-01-01

    We present a homogeneous analysis of high resolution spectra of globular clusters in three massive galaxies: the Milky Way, M31, and NGC 5128. We measure detailed abundance ratios for alpha, light, Fe-peak, and neutron capture elements using our technique for analyzing the integrated light spectra of globular clusters. For many of the heavy elements we provide a first look at the detailed chemistry of old populations in an early type galaxy. We discuss similarities and differences between the galaxies and the potential implications for their star formation histories.

  16. Proton Distribution in Heavy Nuclei

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Johnson, M. H; Teller, E.

    1953-11-13

    It is reasoned that, from considerations connected with beta-decay stability and Coulomb repulsion forces, a neutron excess is developed on the surface of heavy nuclei. Several consequences of this qualitative analysis in nucleon interactions are briefly noted. (K.S.)

  17. Neutron Radiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heller, A. K.; Brenizer, J. S.

    Neutron radiography and its related two-dimensional (2D) neutron imaging techniques have been established as invaluable nondestructive inspection methods and quantitative measurement tools. They have been used in a wide variety of applications ranging from inspection of aircraft engine turbine blades to study of two-phase fluid flow in operating proton exchange membrane fuel cells. Neutron radiography is similar to X-ray radiography in that the method produces a 2D attenuation map of neutron radiation that has penetrated the object being examined. However, the images produced differ and are often complementary due to the differences between X-ray and neutron interaction mechanisms. The uses and types of 2D neutron imaging have expanded over the past 15 years as a result of advances in imaging technology and improvements in neutron generators/sources and computers. Still, high-intensity sources such as those from reactors and spallation neutron sources, together with conventional film radiography, remain the mainstay of high-resolution, large field-of-view neutron imaging. This chapter presents a summary of the history, methods, and related variations of neutron radiography techniques.

  18. Beta-Delayed Neutron Emission in Neutron-Rich Nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marketin, Tomislav; Sieverding, André; Wu, Meng-Ru; Paar, Nils; Martínez-Pinedo, Gabriel

    β-delayed neutron emission is the process of emission of one or more neutrons, after β-decay, from the excited daughter nucleus. The probabilities of emission are an important physical quantity in a variety of nuclear physics applications, from the simulations of heavy element nucleosynthesis to control of reactor power levels and nuclear waste management. However, it is relatively difficult to measure and much less data is available than for β-decay, particularly for nuclei that are expected to take part in the r-process. In this work we will present a calculation of β-decay half-lives and β-delayed neutron emission probabilities in neutron-rich nuclei using the transition strength obtained with a microscopic model combined with a statistical calculation of level densities. We explore the effect of altered emission probabilities, with respect to the simple calculation, on the r-process.

  19. POLARIZED NEUTRONS IN RHIC

    SciTech Connect

    COURANT,E.D.

    1998-04-27

    There does not appear to be any obvious way to accelerate neutrons, polarized or otherwise, to high energies by themselves. To investigate the behavior of polarized neutrons the authors therefore have to obtain them by accelerating them as components of heavier nuclei, and then sorting out the contribution of the neutrons in the analysis of the reactions produced by the heavy ion beams. The best neutron carriers for this purpose are probably {sup 3}He nuclei and deuterons. A polarized deuteron is primarily a combination of a proton and a neutron with their spins pointing in the same direction; in the {sup 3}He nucleus the spins of the two protons are opposite and the net spin (and magnetic moment) is almost the same as that of a free neutron. Polarized ions other than protons may be accelerated, stored and collided in a ring such as RHIC provided the techniques proposed for polarized proton operation can be adapted (or replaced by other strategies) for these ions. To accelerate polarized particles in a ring, one must make provisions for overcoming the depolarizing resonances that occur at certain energies. These resonances arise when the spin tune (ratio of spin precession frequency to orbit frequency) resonates with a component present in the horizontal field. The horizontal field oscillates with the vertical motion of the particles (due to vertical focusing); its frequency spectrum is dominated by the vertical oscillation frequency and its modulation by the periodic structure of the accelerator ring. In addition, the magnet imperfections that distort the closed orbit vertically contain all integral Fourier harmonics of the orbit frequency.

  20. The effectiveness of a web-based brief alcohol intervention in reducing heavy drinking among adolescents aged 15–20 years with a low educational background: a two-arm parallel group cluster randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background To evaluate the slightly modified version of the web-based brief alcohol intervention “What Do You Drink” (WDYD) among heavy drinking adolescents and young adults aged 15–20 years with a low educational background at one and six months follow-up. Methods A two-arm parallel group cluster randomized controlled trial was conducted online in the Netherlands in 2011–2012. Participants included in the trial were recruited from preparatory and secondary vocational education institutions and had to be between 15 and 20 years of age and report heavy drinking in the past six months. In total, 73 classes representing 609 (59.9% male) participants were allocated to the experimental condition (37 classes, 318 participants: WDYD intervention) or control condition (36 classes, 291 participants: no intervention). Outcomes were heavy drinking, weekly alcohol consumption, and frequency of binge drinking. Results Regressions analyses revealed no significant main intervention effects on any of the alcohol outcomes at one and six month’s follow-up according to the intention-to-treat principle. Additionally, there were no moderating effects of gender, age, educational level, and readiness to change on the relation between the WDYD intervention and the alcohol outcomes at follow-up. Conclusions The WDYD intervention was not effective in reducing alcohol consumption among heavy drinking adolescents and young adults aged 15–20 years with a low educational background at one and six months follow-up. However, the absence of intervention effectiveness cannot be used as an argument for not conducting these types of interventions with low educated individuals, since our study was the first to target this population. Trial registration Netherlands Trial Register NTR2971 PMID:23895403

  1. Neutron detector

    DOEpatents

    Stephan, Andrew C.; Jardret; Vincent D.

    2011-04-05

    A neutron detector has a volume of neutron moderating material and a plurality of individual neutron sensing elements dispersed at selected locations throughout the moderator, and particularly arranged so that some of the detecting elements are closer to the surface of the moderator assembly and others are more deeply embedded. The arrangement captures some thermalized neutrons that might otherwise be scattered away from a single, centrally located detector element. Different geometrical arrangements may be used while preserving its fundamental characteristics. Different types of neutron sensing elements may be used, which may operate on any of a number of physical principles to perform the function of sensing a neutron, either by a capture or a scattering reaction, and converting that reaction to a detectable signal. High detection efficiency, an ability to acquire spectral information, and directional sensitivity may be obtained.

  2. Atmospheric neutrons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Preszler, A. M.; Moon, S.; White, R. S.

    1976-01-01

    Additional calibrations of the University of California double-scatter neutron detector and additional analysis corrections lead to slightly changed neutron fluxes. The theoretical angular distributions of Merker (1975) are in general agreement with the reported experimental fluxes but do not give the peaks for vertical upward and downward moving neutrons. The theoretical neutron escape current is in agreement with the experimental values from 10 to 100 MeV. The experimental fluxes obtained agree with those of Kanbach et al. (1974) in the overlap region from 70 to 100 MeV.

  3. Neutron Stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cottam, J.

    2007-01-01

    Neutron stars were discovered almost 40 years ago, and yet many of their most fundamental properties remain mysteries. There have been many attempts to measure the mass and radius of a neutron star and thereby constrain the equation of state of the dense nuclear matter at their cores. These have been complicated by unknown parameters such as the source distance and burning fractions. A clean, straightforward way to access the neutron star parameters is with high-resolution spectroscopy. I will present the results of searches for gravitationally red-shifted absorption lines from the neutron star atmosphere using XMM-Newton and Chandra.

  4. Neutron radiography

    SciTech Connect

    Berger, H.; Iddings, F.

    1998-08-01

    Neutron radiography is becoming a well established nondestructive testing (NDT) method. The American Society for Nondestructive Testing (ASNT) has recognized the method through its recommended practice SNT-TCIA which outlines training, knowledge, and experience necessary to obtain levels of competency in the method. Certification of nondestructive testing personnel is also covered in a military standard. Technical publications in the field of NDT and nuclear technology carry articles on neutron radiography and technical meetings include papers or even entire sessions on neutron radiography. There is an on-going series of international conferences on neutron radiography. Many books are available to provide introductory and advanced material on neutron radiographic techniques and applications. Neutron radiography as a service for hire is available, similar to that offered for other NDT services. The method is being adopted to solve NDT problems in specialty areas. The objective of this report is to provide a brief survey of the current state of the art in the use of neutron radiography. The survey will include information on the technique including principles of the method, sources of neutrons, detection methodology, standards and image quality indicators, and representative applications. An extensive reference list provides additional information for those who wish to investigate further and a Glossary is included which provides definitions for terms used in Neutron Radiography.

  5. Fission and Properties of Neutron-Rich Nuclei - Proceedings of the Second International Conference

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamilton, J. H.; Phillips, W. R.; Carter, H. K.

    The Table of Contents for the book is as follows: * Preface * Structure of Elementary Matter: Cold Valleys and Their Importance in Fission, Fusion and for Superheavy Nuclei * Tunnelling Phenomena in Nuclear Physics * Heavy Nuclei Studies Using Transfer Reactions * Isomeric Properties of Nuclei Near 78Ni * Investigation of Light Actinide Nuclei at Yale and Beyond * U-Projectile Fission at Relativistic Energies * Cluster Description of Cold Fission Modes in 252Cf * Neutron-pair Transfer Theory for Pear-shaped Ba Fission Fragments * New RMFA Parameters of Normal and Exotic Nuclei * Study of Fission Fragments from 12C+238U Reactions: Prompt and Delayed Spectroscopy * γ-Ray Angular Correlations in 252Cf and 248Cm Fission Fragments * Fragment Angular Momentum and Descent Dynamics in 252Cf Spontaneous Fission * The Experimental Investigation of Neutron-Rich Nuclei * High-Spin Structure of Some Odd-Z Nuclei with A ≈ 100 From Heavy-Ion Induced Fission * Coexistence of Symmetric and Asymmetric Nuclear Shapes and 10Be Ternary Fission * Octupole Effects in the Lanthanides * High Spin Structure of the 113-1l6Cd Isotopes Produced by Heavy-Ion Induced Fission Reaction * Temperature-Dependent Fission Barriers and Mass Distributions for 239U * Strength Distributions for Gamow Teller Transitions in Very Weakly Bound Systems * High Spin Fragmentation Spectroscopy * Search for a Four-Neutron Transfer From 8He to 4He * Microsecond Isomers in Fission Fragments in the Vicinity of the Doubly Magic 132Sn * Recent On-Line NMR/on Nuclear Magnetic Dipole Moments Near 132Sn: Meson Exchange Current Effects at the Shell Closure and Shell Model Treatment of Variation with Proton and Neutron Number * High-spin K-Isomers Beyond the Fusion Limit * High Energy Neutron Induced Fission: Charge Yield Distributions and Search and Spectroscopy of New Isomers * Hartree-Fock Mean-Field Models Using Separable Interactions * Variation of Fission Characteristics Over the Nuclear Chart * Investigation of

  6. Assessment of atmospheric heavy metal deposition in the Tarkwa gold mining area of Ghana using epiphytic lichens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boamponsem, L. K.; Adam, J. I.; Dampare, S. B.; Nyarko, B. J. B.; Essumang, D. K.

    2010-05-01

    In situ lichens ( Parmelia sulcata) have been used to assess atmospheric heavy metal deposition in the Tarkwa gold mining area of Ghana. Total heavy metal concentrations obtained by instrumental neutron activation analysis (INAA) were processed by positive matrix factorization (PMF), principal component (PCA) and cluster (CA) analyses. The pollution index factor (PIF) and pollution load index (PLI) criteria revealed elevated levels of Sb, Mn, Cu, V, Al, Co, Hg, Cd and As in excess of the background values. The PCA and CA classified the examined elements into anthropogenic and natural sources, and PMF resolved three primary sources/factors: agricultural activities and other non-point anthropogenic origins, natural soil dust, and gold mining activities. Gold mining activities, which are characterized by dominant species of Sb, Th, As, Hg, Cd and Co, and significant contributions of Cu, Al, Mn and V, are the main contributors of heavy metals in the atmosphere of the study area.

  7. Neutron capture reactions at DANCE

    SciTech Connect

    Bredeweg, T. A.

    2008-05-12

    The Detector for Advanced Neutron Capture Experiments (DANCE) is a 4{pi} BaF{sub 2} array consisting of 160 active detector elements. The primary purpose of the array is to perform neutron capture cross section measurements on small (> or approx.100 {mu}g) and/or radioactive (< or approx. 100 mCi) species. The measurements made possible with this array will be useful in answering outstanding questions in the areas of national security, threat reduction, nuclear astrophysics, advanced reactor design and accelerator transmutation of waste. Since the commissioning of DANCE we have performed neutron capture cross section measurements on a wide array of medium to heavy mass nuclides. Measurements to date include neutron capture cross sections on {sup 241,243}Am, neutron capture and neutron-induced fission cross sections and capture-to-fission ratio ({alpha} = {sigma}{sub {gamma}}/{sigma}{sub f}) for {sup 235}U using a new fission-tagging detector as well as neutron capture cross sections for several astrophysics branch-point nuclei. Results from several of these measurements will be presented along with a discussion of additional physics information that can be extracted from the DANCE data.

  8. Neutron capture reactions at DANCE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bredeweg, T. A.

    2008-05-01

    The Detector for Advanced Neutron Capture Experiments (DANCE) is a 4π BaF2 array consisting of 160 active detector elements. The primary purpose of the array is to perform neutron capture cross section measurements on small (>~100 μg) and/or radioactive (<~100 mCi) species. The measurements made possible with this array will be useful in answering outstanding questions in the areas of national security, threat reduction, nuclear astrophysics, advanced reactor design and accelerator transmutation of waste. Since the commissioning of DANCE we have performed neutron capture cross section measurements on a wide array of medium to heavy mass nuclides. Measurements to date include neutron capture cross sections on 241,243Am, neutron capture and neutron-induced fission cross sections and capture-to-fission ratio (α = σγ/σf) for 235U using a new fission-tagging detector as well as neutron capture cross sections for several astrophysics branch-point nuclei. Results from several of these measurements will be presented along with a discussion of additional physics information that can be extracted from the DANCE data.

  9. Nuclear methods of analysis in the advanced neutron source

    SciTech Connect

    Robinson, L.; Dyer, F.F.

    1994-12-31

    The Advanced Neutron Source (ANS) research reactor is presently in the conceptual design phase. The thermal power of this heavy water cooled and moderated reactor will be about 350 megawatts. The core volume of 27 liter is designed to provide the optimum neutron fluence rate for the numerous experimental facilities. The peak thermal neutron fluence rate is expected to be slightly less than 10{sup 20} neutrons/m{sup 2}s. In addition to the more than 40 neutron scattering stations, there will be extensive facilities for isotope production, material irradiation and analytical chemistry including neutron activation analysis (NAA) and a slow positron source. The highlight of this reactor will be the capability that it will provide for conducting research using cold neutrons. Two cryostats containing helium-cooled liquid deuterium will be located in the heavy water reflector tank. Each cryostat will provide low-temperature neutrons to researchers via numerous guides. A hot source with two beam tubes and several thermal beam tubes will also be available. The NAA facilities in the ANS will consist of seven pneumatic tubes, one cold neutron guide for prompt gamma-ray neutron activation analysis (PGNAA), and one cold neutron slanted guide for neutron depth profiling (NDP). In addition to these neutron interrogation systems, a gamma-ray irradiation facility for materials testing will be housed in a spent fuel storage pool. This paper will provide detailed information regarding the design and use of these various experimental systems.

  10. Comment on {open_quotes}Stopping power of nonmonochromatic heavy-ion clusters with two-ion correlation effects{close_quotes}

    SciTech Connect

    Tkachenko, I.M.; Munoz-Cobo, J.L.; Munoz, A. |

    1997-11-01

    We reconsider the results of Lontano and Raimondi [Phys. Rev. E {bold 51}, R2755 (1995)] within the full random-phase approximation. We show that the correlation and also velocity dispersion of the cluster ions enhance and reduce the stopping power, respectively. Nevertheless, the enhancement of energy losses due to ionic correlation is much stronger than that obtained by Lontano and Raimondi, and furthermore, the projectile velocity dependence of the stopping power is strictly monotonic, presenting no oscillations. We also did not obtain negative values for the cluster stopping power, as did Lontano and Raimondi. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  11. A New Oxide Spin Glass System of (1-x) FeTiO3-xFe2O3. II. Neutron Scattering Studies of a Cluster Type Spin Glass of 90FeTiO3-10Fe2O3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arai, Masatoshi; Ishikawa, Yoshikazu; Saito, Norio; Takei, Humihiko

    1985-02-01

    The spin correlations in a cluster type spin glass of 90FeTiO3-10Fe2O3 have been studied by neutron small and high angle scattering from a single crystal. The magnetic correlations of the moments parallel and perpendicular to the c axis, < S\\mbi{q}||S\\mbi{-q}||> and < S\\mbi{q}\\botS\\mbi{-q}\\bot> have been separately determined and the spin configuration inside the cluster as well as the cluster configuration have been determined. The spin glass transition temperature has been found to correspond to the temperature where the spin axis inside the cluster aligns in the c axis and the antiferromagnetic modulation starts to occur inside the cluster.

  12. The decompression of cold neutron star matter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lattimer, J. M.; Mackie, F.; Ravenhall, D. G.; Schramm, D. N.

    1977-01-01

    The ejection of cold neutron-star matter is examined, and an attempt is made to determine whether the final composition of this matter may be similar to that normally associated with the hot high-neutron-flux r-process. A semiempirical liquid-drop model is used for the nucleus, and the equilibrium composition of the matter is determined by assuming it to be in its absolute ground state at a given density. Physical mechanisms operating during the expansion are analyzed, and the composition of the ejected matter is found as a function of its density during expansion. The results indicate that it is virtually impossible for deuterium to form, that neutrons can be captured only after beta decay increases the atomic numbers of nuclei, and that no free neutrons can escape. It is concluded that neutron-star ejecta can produce heavy neutron-rich nuclei and may produce somewhat heavier nuclei than a standard r-process.

  13. Cold neutrons trapped in external fields.

    PubMed

    Gandolfi, S; Carlson, J; Pieper, Steven C

    2011-01-07

    The properties of inhomogeneous neutron matter are crucial to the physics of neutron-rich nuclei and the crust of neutron stars. Advances in computational techniques now allow us to accurately determine the binding energies and densities of many neutrons interacting via realistic microscopic interactions and confined in external fields. We perform calculations for different external fields and across several shells to place important constraints on inhomogeneous neutron matter, and hence the large isospin limit of the nuclear energy density functionals that are used to predict properties of heavy nuclei and neutron star crusts. We find important differences between microscopic calculations and current density functionals; in particular, the isovector gradient terms are significantly more repulsive than in traditional models, and the spin-orbit and pairing forces are comparatively weaker.

  14. The decompression of cold neutron star matter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lattimer, J. M.; Mackie, F.; Ravenhall, D. G.; Schramm, D. N.

    1977-01-01

    The ejection of cold neutron-star matter is examined, and an attempt is made to determine whether the final composition of this matter may be similar to that normally associated with the hot high-neutron-flux r-process. A semiempirical liquid-drop model is used for the nucleus, and the equilibrium composition of the matter is determined by assuming it to be in its absolute ground state at a given density. Physical mechanisms operating during the expansion are analyzed, and the composition of the ejected matter is found as a function of its density during expansion. The results indicate that it is virtually impossible for deuterium to form, that neutrons can be captured only after beta decay increases the atomic numbers of nuclei, and that no free neutrons can escape. It is concluded that neutron-star ejecta can produce heavy neutron-rich nuclei and may produce somewhat heavier nuclei than a standard r-process.

  15. NEUTRONIC REACTOR

    DOEpatents

    Fermi, E.; Zinn, W.H.; Anderson, H.L.

    1958-09-16

    Means are presenied for increasing the reproduction ratio of a gaphite- moderated neutronic reactor by diminishing the neutron loss due to absorption or capture by gaseous impurities within the reactor. This means comprised of a fluid-tight casing or envelope completely enclosing the reactor and provided with a valve through which the casing, and thereby the reactor, may be evacuated of atmospheric air.

  16. Neutronic reactor

    DOEpatents

    Wende, Charles W. J.

    1976-08-17

    A safety rod for a nuclear reactor has an inner end portion having a gamma absorption coefficient and neutron capture cross section approximately equal to those of the adjacent shield, a central portion containing materials of high neutron capture cross section and an outer end portion having a gamma absorption coefficient at least equal to that of the adjacent shield.

  17. Neutron source

    DOEpatents

    Cason, J.L. Jr.; Shaw, C.B.

    1975-10-21

    A neutron source which is particularly useful for neutron radiography consists of a vessel containing a moderating media of relatively low moderating ratio, a flux trap including a moderating media of relatively high moderating ratio at the center of the vessel, a shell of depleted uranium dioxide surrounding the moderating media of relatively high moderating ratio, a plurality of guide tubes each containing a movable source of neutrons surrounding the flux trap, a neutron shield surrounding one part of each guide tube, and at least one collimator extending from the flux trap to the exterior of the neutron source. The shell of depleted uranium dioxide has a window provided with depleted uranium dioxide shutters for each collimator. Reflectors are provided above and below the flux trap and on the guide tubes away from the flux trap.

  18. Neutron tubes

    DOEpatents

    Leung, Ka-Ngo; Lou, Tak Pui; Reijonen, Jani

    2008-03-11

    A neutron tube or generator is based on a RF driven plasma ion source having a quartz or other chamber surrounded by an external RF antenna. A deuterium or mixed deuterium/tritium (or even just a tritium) plasma is generated in the chamber and D or D/T (or T) ions are extracted from the plasma. A neutron generating target is positioned so that the ion beam is incident thereon and loads the target. Incident ions cause D-D or D-T (or T-T) reactions which generate neutrons. Various embodiments differ primarily in size of the chamber and position and shape of the neutron generating target. Some neutron generators are small enough for implantation in the body. The target may be at the end of a catheter-like drift tube. The target may have a tapered or conical surface to increase target surface area.

  19. Approximate relativistic coupled-cluster calculations on heavy alkali-metal diatomics: Application to the spin-orbit-coupled A1Σ+ and b3Π states of RbCs and Cs2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaitsevskii, A.; Mosyagin, N. S.; Stolyarov, A. V.; Eliav, E.

    2017-08-01

    A simple approximate version of the Fock-space relativistic coupled-cluster method is developed and applied for modeling the spin-orbit-coupling effect in the A1Σ(u) + and b3Π(u ) states of the heavy alkali diatomics RbCs and Cs2. Numerical stability in a wide range of molecular geometries is achieved at the cost of a very moderate loss of accuracy for low-lying states and negligibly small deviations of the computational scheme from strict size consistency. The adiabatic potential energy curves computed for the (2 ,3 ) 0+ (RbCs) and (1 ,2 ) 0u+ (Cs2) states are converted into "quasidiabatic" potentials and effective spin-orbit-coupling functions via projection of the scalar relativistic states onto the subsets of fully relativistic states. A detailed comparison of the present ab initio results with their experimental and preceding theoretical counterparts is performed.

  20. Nucleosynthesis of heavy elements in the r-process

    SciTech Connect

    Panov, I. V.

    2016-03-15

    The current state of the problem of heavy-element production in the astrophysical r-process is surveyed. The nucleosynthesis process in the neutron-star-merger scenario, within which the problem of free-neutron source is solved, is considered most comprehensively. A model that describes well the observed abundances of heavy elements is examined. Theoretical approaches used in this model to calculate a number of features of short-lived neutron-rich nuclei are described. The contributions of various fission processes to the production of heavy elements are assessed. The possibility of superheavy-element production in the r-process is demonstrated.

  1. Exploring neutron detection with HADES

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chlad, L.

    2016-08-01

    The HADES experiment at GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung in Darmstadt (Germany) is fixed target experiment using SIS-18 accelerator to study collisions of protons, heavy-ions or secondary pions with target nuclei. HADES was designed and provides very accurate measurement of di-electrons and charged hadrons. The pion induced reactions provide unique opportunity to study exclusive reactions with neutrons in the final state. Using the inclusive channel π- + p → π- + π+ n we can optimize the selection criteria for neutron hits in TOF/RPC. Dedicated simulations are compared with preliminary results of real data analysis for reaction channels with two neutral particles in the final state.

  2. Accelerator-based neutron source for boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) and method

    DOEpatents

    Yoon, Woo Y.; Jones, James L.; Nigg, David W.; Harker, Yale D.

    1999-01-01

    A source for boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) comprises a body of photoneutron emitter that includes heavy water and is closely surrounded in heat-imparting relationship by target material; one or more electron linear accelerators for supplying electron radiation having energy of substantially 2 to 10 MeV and for impinging such radiation on the target material, whereby photoneutrons are produced and heat is absorbed from the target material by the body of photoneutron emitter. The heavy water is circulated through a cooling arrangement to remove heat. A tank, desirably cylindrical or spherical, contains the heavy water, and a desired number of the electron accelerators circumferentially surround the tank and the target material as preferably made up of thin plates of metallic tungsten. Neutrons generated within the tank are passed through a surrounding region containing neutron filtering and moderating materials and through neutron delimiting structure to produce a beam or beams of epithermal neutrons normally having a minimum flux intensity level of 1.0.times.10.sup.9 neutrons per square centimeter per second. Such beam or beams of epithermal neutrons are passed through gamma ray attenuating material to provide the required epithermal neutrons for BNCT use.

  3. Accelerator-based neutron source for boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) and method

    DOEpatents

    Yoon, W.Y.; Jones, J.L.; Nigg, D.W.; Harker, Y.D.

    1999-05-11

    A source for boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) comprises a body of photoneutron emitter that includes heavy water and is closely surrounded in heat-imparting relationship by target material; one or more electron linear accelerators for supplying electron radiation having energy of substantially 2 to 10 MeV and for impinging such radiation on the target material, whereby photoneutrons are produced and heat is absorbed from the target material by the body of photoneutron emitter. The heavy water is circulated through a cooling arrangement to remove heat. A tank, desirably cylindrical or spherical, contains the heavy water, and a desired number of the electron accelerators circumferentially surround the tank and the target material as preferably made up of thin plates of metallic tungsten. Neutrons generated within the tank are passed through a surrounding region containing neutron filtering and moderating materials and through neutron delimiting structure to produce a beam or beams of epithermal neutrons normally having a minimum flux intensity level of 1.0{times}10{sup 9} neutrons per square centimeter per second. Such beam or beams of epithermal neutrons are passed through gamma ray attenuating material to provide the required epithermal neutrons for BNCT use. 3 figs.

  4. Clues to pathogenesis of Waldenström macroglobulinemia and immunoglobulin M monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance provided by analysis of immunoglobulin heavy chain gene rearrangement and clustering of B-cell receptors.

    PubMed

    Varettoni, Marzia; Zibellini, Silvia; Capello, Daniela; Arcaini, Luca; Rossi, Davide; Pascutto, Cristiana; Rattotti, Sara; Mangiacavalli, Silvia; Pochintesta, Lara; Gotti, Manuel; Gaidano, Gianluca; Cazzola, Mario

    2013-11-01

    We characterized immunoglobulin heavy chain (IGH) gene rearrangements and searched for clusters of stereotyped B-cell receptors in 123 patients with Waldenström macroglobulinemia (WM; n = 59) or immunoglobulin M monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance (IgM-MGUS) (n = 64). A productive monoclonal IGHV-D-J rearrangement was obtained in 99/123 patients (80%). Immunoglobulin heavy chain variable (IGHV) genes were mutated in 94/99 patients (95%) with a median somatic hypermutation rate of 6.7% (2.1-14.5). Compared with the normal B-cell repertoire, patients with WM/IgM-MGUS showed an over-representation of the IGHV3 subgroup (83% vs. 55%, p < 0.0001) and an under-representation of IGHV1 (7% vs. 14%, p = 0.04) and IGHV4 (7% vs. 23%, p = 0.0001) subgroups. At the gene level, in WM/IgM-MGUS there was an over-representation of IGHV3-23 (24% vs. 12%, p = 0.0003), IGHV3-64 (3% vs. < 1%, p = 0.003), IGHV3-7 (12% vs. 4%, p = 0.0001) and IGHV3-74 (9% vs. 2%, p < 0.0001), while IGHV4-39 was never used (0 vs. 5%, p = 0.03). Intra-WM/IgM-MGUS search for HCDR3 similarity showed no association fulfilling criteria for stereotyped receptors. WM/IgM-MGUS sequences were unrelated to known chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL), splenic marginal zone lymphoma (SMZL) or mantle cell lymphoma (MCL) subsets. In conclusion, the IGHV gene usage in WM and IgM-MGUS is remarkably biased as compared to the normal B-cell repertoire. WM and IgM-MGUS-specific HCDR3 clusters do not occur with a frequency detectable with currently available databases, not supporting a B-cell receptor-driven pathogenesis in WM and IgM-MGUS.

  5. Magnetic fluctuations and possible formation of a spin-singlet cluster under pressure in the heavy-fermion spinel LiV2O4 probed by 7Li and 51V NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takeda, Hikaru; Kato, Yusuke; Yoshimura, Masahiro; Shimizu, Yasuhiro; Itoh, Masayuki; Niitaka, Seiji; Takagi, Hidenori

    2015-07-01

    7Li and 51V NMR measurements up to 9.8 GPa have been made to elucidate local magnetic properties of a heavy-fermion spinel oxide LiV2O4 which undergoes a metal-insulator transition above ˜7 GPa. The temperature T and pressure P dependences of the 7Li and 51V Knight shifts and the nuclear spin-lattice relaxation rates 1 /T1 show that in the metallic phase, there is a crossover from a high-T region with weak ferromagnetic fluctuations to a low-T one with antiferromagnetic (AFM) fluctuations. The AFM fluctuations are enhanced below 20 K and 1.5 GPa, where a heavy Fermi-liquid state with the modified Korringa relation is formed. The evolution of the magnetic fluctuations is discussed from the aspect of the competition among several magnetic interactions. Above PMI˜6.7 GPa, we find the coexistence of metallic and insulating phases due to the first-order metal-insulator transition. The 7Li and 51V NMR spectra coming from the insulating phase have T -independent small Knight shifts and 7(1 /T1 ) with the thermally activated T dependence, indicating the formation of a spin-singlet cluster. We propose a model of a spin-singlet tetramer as discussed in geometrically frustrated materials.

  6. Dynamical Aspects of Heavy-Ion Collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia-Solis, Edmundo Javier

    1995-01-01

    Two independent studies on heavy-ion collisions are presented. In the first part, the charge and mass of the projectile-like fragments produced in the 15-MeV per nucleon ^{40}Ca+^{209 } Bi reaction were determined for products detected near the grazing angle. Neutron number-charge (N-Z) distributions were generated as a function of the total kinetic energy loss and parameterized by their centroids, variances and correlation coefficients. After the interaction, a drift of the charge and mass centroids towards asymmetry is observed. The production of projectile -like fragments is consistent with a tendency of the projectile -like fragments to retain the projectile neutron-to-proton ratio < N > / < Z > = 1. The correlation coefficient remains well below 1.0 for the entire range of total kinetic energy lost. Predictions of two nucleon exchange models, Randrup's and Tassan-Got's, are compared to the experimental results. The models are not able to reproduce the evolution of the experimental distributions, especially the fact that the variances reach a maximum and then decrease as function of the energy loss. This behavior supports the hypothesis that some form of projectile -like fragmentation or cluster emission is perturbing the product distribution from that expected from a damped mechanism. In the second part of the thesis a clustering model that allows the recognition of mass fragments from dynamical simulations has been developed. Studying the evolution of a microscopic computation based on the nuclear -Boltzman transport equation, a suitable time is chosen to identify the bound clusters. At this time the number of binding surfaces for each test nucleon is found. Based on the number of nucleon bindings the interior nucleons are identified, and the cluster kernels are formed. An iterative routine is then applied to determine the coalescence of the surrounding free nucleons. Once the fragment formation has been established, a statistical decay code is used to

  7. Cyclotron-based neutron source for BNCT

    SciTech Connect

    Mitsumoto, T.; Yajima, S.; Tsutsui, H.; Ogasawara, T.; Fujita, K.; Tanaka, H.; Sakurai, Y.; Maruhashi, A.

    2013-04-19

    Kyoto University Research Reactor Institute (KURRI) and Sumitomo Heavy Industries, Ltd. (SHI) have developed a cyclotron-based neutron source for Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT). It was installed at KURRI in Osaka prefecture. The neutron source consists of a proton cyclotron named HM-30, a beam transport system and an irradiation and treatment system. In the cyclotron, H- ions are accelerated and extracted as 30 MeV proton beams of 1 mA. The proton beams is transported to the neutron production target made by a beryllium plate. Emitted neutrons are moderated by lead, iron, aluminum and calcium fluoride. The aperture diameter of neutron collimator is in the range from 100 mm to 250 mm. The peak neutron flux in the water phantom is 1.8 Multiplication-Sign 109 neutrons/cm{sup 2}/sec at 20 mm from the surface at 1 mA proton beam. The neutron source have been stably operated for 3 years with 30 kW proton beam. Various pre-clinical tests including animal tests have been done by using the cyclotron-based neutron source with {sup 10}B-p-Borono-phenylalanine. Clinical trials of malignant brain tumors will be started in this year.

  8. Neutron fluctuations: The importance of being delayed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Houchmandzadeh, B.; Dumonteil, E.; Mazzolo, A.; Zoia, A.

    2015-11-01

    The neutron population in a nuclear reactor is subject to fluctuations in time and in space due to the competition of diffusion by scattering, births by fission events, and deaths by absorptions. As such, fission chains provide a prototype model for the study of spatial clustering phenomena. In order for the reactor to be operated in stationary conditions at the critical point, the population of prompt neutrons instantaneously emitted at fission must be in equilibrium with the much smaller population of delayed neutrons, emitted after a Poissonian time by nuclear decay of the fissioned nuclei. In this work, we will show that the delayed neutrons, although representing a tiny fraction of the total number of neutrons in the reactor, actually have a key impact on the fluctuations, and their contribution is very effective in quenching the spatial clustering.

  9. Neutron fluctuations: The importance of being delayed.

    PubMed

    Houchmandzadeh, B; Dumonteil, E; Mazzolo, A; Zoia, A

    2015-11-01

    The neutron population in a nuclear reactor is subject to fluctuations in time and in space due to the competition of diffusion by scattering, births by fission events, and deaths by absorptions. As such, fission chains provide a prototype model for the study of spatial clustering phenomena. In order for the reactor to be operated in stationary conditions at the critical point, the population of prompt neutrons instantaneously emitted at fission must be in equilibrium with the much smaller population of delayed neutrons, emitted after a Poissonian time by nuclear decay of the fissioned nuclei. In this work, we will show that the delayed neutrons, although representing a tiny fraction of the total number of neutrons in the reactor, actually have a key impact on the fluctuations, and their contribution is very effective in quenching the spatial clustering.

  10. Thermal neutron detection system

    DOEpatents

    Peurrung, Anthony J.; Stromswold, David C.

    2000-01-01

    According to the present invention, a system for measuring a thermal neutron emission from a neutron source, has a reflector/moderator proximate the neutron source that reflects and moderates neutrons from the neutron source. The reflector/moderator further directs thermal neutrons toward an unmoderated thermal neutron detector.

  11. NEUTRON SOURCE

    DOEpatents

    Bernander, N.K. et al.

    1960-10-18

    An apparatus is described for producing neutrons through target bombardment with deuterons. Deuterium gas is ionized by electron bombardment and the deuteron ions are accelerated through a magnetic field to collimate them into a continuous high intensity beam. The ion beam is directed against a deuteron pervious metal target of substantially the same nnaterial throughout to embed the deuterous therein and react them to produce neutrons. A large quantity of neutrons is produced in this manner due to the increased energy and quantity of ions bombarding the target.

  12. First principle-based AKMC modelling of the formation and medium-term evolution of point defect and solute-rich clusters in a neutron irradiated complex Fe-CuMnNiSiP alloy representative of reactor pressure vessel steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ngayam-Happy, R.; Becquart, C. S.; Domain, C.

    2013-09-01

    The formation and medium-term evolution of point defect and solute-rich clusters under neutron irradiation have been modelled in a complex Fe-CuMnNiSiP alloy representative of RPV steels, by means of first principle-based atomistic kinetic Monte Carlo simulations. The results obtained reproduce most features observed in available experimental studies, highlighting the very good agreement between both series. According to simulation, solute-rich clusters form and develop via an induced segregation mechanism on either the vacancy or interstitial clusters, and these point defect clusters are efficiently generated only in cascade debris and not Frenkel pair flux. The results have revealed the existence of two distinct populations of clusters with different characteristic features. Solute-rich clusters in the first group are bound essentially to interstitial clusters and they are enriched in Mn mostly, but also Ni to a lesser extent. Over the low dose regime, their density increases in the alloy as a result of the accumulation of highly stable interstitial clusters. In the second group, the solute-rich clusters are merged with vacancy clusters, and they contain mostly Cu and Si, but also substantial amount of Mn and Ni. The formation of a sub-population of pure solute clusters has been observed, which results from annihilation of the low stable vacancy clusters on sinks. The results indicate finally that the Mn content in clusters is up to 50%, Cu, Si, and Ni sharing the other half in more or less equivalent amounts. This composition has not demonstrated any noticeable modification with increasing dose over irradiation.

  13. Phosphatidylinositol 4,5-Bisphosphate Clusters the Cell Adhesion Molecule CD44 and Assembles a Specific CD44-Ezrin Heterocomplex, as Revealed by Small Angle Neutron Scattering

    DOE PAGES

    Khajeh, Jahan Ali; Ju, Jeong Ho; Gupta, Yogesh K.; ...

    2015-01-08

    The cell adhesion molecule CD44 regulates diverse cellular functions, including cell-cell and cell-matrix interaction, cell motility, migration, differentiation, and growth. In cells, CD44 co-localizes with the membrane-cytoskeleton adapter protein Ezrin, which links the CD44 assembled receptor signaling complexes to the cytoskeletal actin and organizes the spatial and temporal localization of signaling events. Here we report that the cytoplasmic tail of CD44 (CD44ct) is largely disordered and adopts an autoinhibited conformation, which prevents CD44ct from binding directly to activated Ezrin in solution. Binding to the signaling lipid phosphatidylinositol 4,5-biphosphlate (PIP2) disrupts autoinhibition in CD44ct, and activates CD44ct to associate with Ezrin.more » Further, using contrast variation small angle neutron scattering, we show that PIP2 mediates the assembly of a specific hetero-tetramer complex of CD44ct with Ezrin. This study reveals a novel autoregulation mechanism in the cytoplasmic tail of CD44 and the role of PIP2 in mediating the assembly of multimeric CD44ct-Ezrin complexes. We hypothesize that polyvalent electrostatic interactions are responsible for the assembly of multimeric PIP2-CD44-Ezrin complexes.« less

  14. Phosphatidylinositol 4,5-Bisphosphate Clusters the Cell Adhesion Molecule CD44 and Assembles a Specific CD44-Ezrin Heterocomplex, as Revealed by Small Angle Neutron Scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Khajeh, Jahan Ali; Ju, Jeong Ho; Gupta, Yogesh K.; Stanley, Christopher B.; Do, Changwoo; Heller, William T.; Aggarwal, Aneel K.; Callaway, David J.E.; Bu, Zimei

    2015-01-08

    The cell adhesion molecule CD44 regulates diverse cellular functions, including cell-cell and cell-matrix interaction, cell motility, migration, differentiation, and growth. In cells, CD44 co-localizes with the membrane-cytoskeleton adapter protein Ezrin, which links the CD44 assembled receptor signaling complexes to the cytoskeletal actin and organizes the spatial and temporal localization of signaling events. Here we report that the cytoplasmic tail of CD44 (CD44ct) is largely disordered and adopts an autoinhibited conformation, which prevents CD44ct from binding directly to activated Ezrin in solution. Binding to the signaling lipid phosphatidylinositol 4,5-biphosphlate (PIP2) disrupts autoinhibition in CD44ct, and activates CD44ct to associate with Ezrin. Further, using contrast variation small angle neutron scattering, we show that PIP2 mediates the assembly of a specific hetero-tetramer complex of CD44ct with Ezrin. This study reveals a novel autoregulation mechanism in the cytoplasmic tail of CD44 and the role of PIP2 in mediating the assembly of multimeric CD44ct-Ezrin complexes. We hypothesize that polyvalent electrostatic interactions are responsible for the assembly of multimeric PIP2-CD44-Ezrin complexes.

  15. Monte-Carlo Simulations of Heavy Ions Track Structures and Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Plante, Ianik; Cucinotta, Francia A.

    2013-01-01

    In space, astronauts are exposed to protons, high ]energy heavy (HZE) ions that have a high charge (Z) and energy (E), and secondary radiation, including neutrons and recoil nuclei produced by nuclear reactions in spacecraft walls or in tissue. The astronauts can only be partly shielded from these particles. Therefore, on travelling to Mars, it is estimated that every cell nucleus in an astronaut fs body would be hit by a proton or secondary electron (e.g., electrons of the target atoms ionized by the HZE ion) every few days and by an HZE ion about once a month. The risks related to these heavy ions are not well known and of concern for long duration space exploration missions. Medical ion therapy is another situation where human beings can be irradiated by heavy ions, usually to treat cancer. Heavy ions have a peculiar track structure characterized by high levels of energy ]deposition clustering, especially in near the track ends in the so ]called eBragg peak f region. In radiotherapy, these features of heavy ions can provide an improved dose conformation with respect to photons, also considering that the relative biological effectiveness (RBE) of therapeutic ions in the plateau region before the peak is sufficiently low. Therefore, several proton and carbon ion therapy facilities are under construction at this moment

  16. Possible Supernova Detection with Neutron Detectors near the SNO Laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duba, C. A.; Browne, M. C.; Robertson, R. G. H.

    1998-10-01

    Before neutron detectors are installed into the heavy water at SNO to detect neutral-current interactions, they are allowed to 'cool down' underground from surface cosmic-ray activation. During this time, they will be in a position to measure neutron flux from the INCO Creighton Mine's norite rock walls. A nearby galactic supernova will increase neutron production in the norite via charged- and neutral-current interactions. The increase in the neutron flux, as well as the neutral-current detectors' sensitivity to neutron flux, will be summarized and the possible use of these proportional counters as a supernova detector will be discussed.

  17. NEUTRONIC REACTOR

    DOEpatents

    Wade, E.J.

    1958-09-16

    This patent relates to a reflector means for a neutronic reactor. A reflector comprised of a plurality of vertically movable beryllium control members is provided surrounding the sides of the reactor core. An absorber of fast neutrons comprised of natural uramum surrounds the reflector. An absorber of slow neutrons surrounds the absorber of fast neutrons and is formed of a plurality of beryllium blocks having natural uranium members distributcd therethrough. in addition, a movable body is positioned directly below the core and is comprised of a beryllium reflector and an absorbing member attached to the botiom thereof, the absorbing member containing a substance selected from the goup consisting of natural urantum and Th/sup 232/.

  18. Neutron reflectivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cousin, Fabrice; Menelle, Alain

    2015-10-01

    The specular neutron reflectivity is a technique enabling the measurement of neutron scattering length density profile perpendicular to the plane of a surface or an interface, and thereby the profile of chemical composition. The characteristic sizes that are probed range from around 5 Å up 5000 Å. It is a scattering technique that averages information on the entire surface and it is therefore not possible to obtain information within the plane of the interface. The specific properties of neutrons (possibility of tuning the contrast by isotopic substitution, sensitivity to magnetism, negligible absorption, low energy of the incident neutrons) makes it particularly interesting in the fields of soft matter, biophysics and magnetic thin films. This course is a basic introduction to the technique and does not address the magnetic reflectivity. It is composed of three parts describing respectively its principle and its formalism, the experimental aspects of the method (spectrometers, samples) and two examples related to the materials for energy.

  19. 2013 Review of Neutron and Non-Neutron Nuclear Data

    SciTech Connect

    Holden, N. E.

    2014-05-23

    The results of a review and evaluation of neutron and non-neutron nuclear data published in the scientific literature over the past three years since the ISRD-14 Symposium has been performed and the highlights are presented. Included in the data review are the status of new chemical elements, new measurements of the isotopic composition for many chemical elements and the resulting change in the atomic weight values. New half-life measurements for both short-lived and longlived nuclides, some alpha decay and double beta decay measurements for quasistable nuclides are discussed. The latest evaluation of atomic masses has been published. Data from new measurements on the very heavy (trans-meitnerium) elements are discussed and tabulated. Data on various recent neutron cross section and resonance integral measurements are discussed and tabulated.

  20. 2013 Review of Neutron and Non-Neutron Nuclear Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holden, N. E.

    2016-02-01

    The results of a review and evaluation of neutron and non-neutron nuclear data published in the scientific literature over the past three years since the ISRD-14 Symposium has been performed and the highlights are presented. Included in the data review are the status of new chemical elements, new measurements of the isotopic composition for many chemical elements and the resulting change in the atomic weight values. New half-life measurements for both short-lived and long-lived nuclides, some alpha decay and double beta decay measurements for quasi-stable nuclides are discussed. The latest evaluation of atomic masses has been published. Data from new measurements on the very heavy (trans-meitnerium) elements are discussed and tabulated. Data on various recent neutron cross section and resonance integral measurements are discussed and tabulated.

  1. NEUTRON SOURCES

    DOEpatents

    Richmond, J.L.; Wells, C.E.

    1963-01-15

    A neutron source is obtained without employing any separate beryllia receptacle, as was formerly required. The new method is safer and faster, and affords a source with both improved yield and symmetry of neutron emission. A Be container is used to hold and react with Pu. This container has a thin isolating layer that does not obstruct the desired Pu--Be reaction and obviates procedures previously employed to disassemble and remove a beryllia receptacle. (AEC)

  2. NEUTRONIC REACTOR

    DOEpatents

    Fraas, A.P.; Mills, C.B.

    1961-11-21

    A neutronic reactor in which neutron moderation is achieved primarily in its reflector is described. The reactor structure consists of a cylindrical central "island" of moderator and a spherical moderating reflector spaced therefrom, thereby providing an annular space. An essentially unmoderated liquid fuel is continuously passed through the annular space and undergoes fission while contained therein. The reactor, because of its small size, is particularly adapted for propulsion uses, including the propulsion of aircraft. (AEC)

  3. Overview of secondary neutron production relevant to shielding inspace

    SciTech Connect

    Heilbronn, L.; Nakamura, T.; Iwata, Y.; Kurosawa, T.; Iwase, H.; Townsend, L.W.

    2004-12-03

    An overview of experimental secondary neutron measurements relevant to space-related activities is presented. Stopping target yields and cross section measurements conducted at particle accelerators using heavy ions with energies >100 MeV per nucleon are discussed.

  4. NEUTRONIC REACTOR

    DOEpatents

    Wigner, E.P.

    1958-04-22

    A nuclear reactor for isotope production is described. This reactor is designed to provide a maximum thermal neutron flux in a region adjacent to the periphery of the reactor rather than in the center of the reactor. The core of the reactor is generally centrally located with respect tn a surrounding first reflector, constructed of beryllium. The beryllium reflector is surrounded by a second reflector, constructed of graphite, which, in tune, is surrounded by a conventional thermal shield. Water is circulated through the core and the reflector and functions both as a moderator and a coolant. In order to produce a greatsr maximum thermal neutron flux adjacent to the periphery of the reactor rather than in the core, the reactor is designed so tbat the ratio of neutron scattering cross section to neutron absorption cross section averaged over all of the materials in the reflector is approximately twice the ratio of neutron scattering cross section to neutron absorption cross section averaged over all of the material of the core of the reactor.

  5. FOREWORD: Neutron metrology Neutron metrology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, David J.; Nolte, Ralf; Gressier, Vincent

    2011-12-01

    The International Committee for Weights and Measures (CIPM) has consultative committees covering various areas of metrology. The Consultative Committee for Ionizing Radiation (CCRI) differs from the others in having three sections: Section (I) deals with radiation dosimetry, Section (II) with radionuclide metrology and Section (III) with neutron metrology. In 2003 a proposal was made to publish special issues of Metrologia covering the work of the three Sections. Section (II) was the first to complete their task, and their special issue was published in 2007, volume 44(4). This was followed in 2009 by the special issue on radiation dosimetry, volume 46(2). The present issue, volume 48(6), completes the trilogy and attempts to explain neutron metrology, the youngest of the three disciplines, the neutron only having been discovered in 1932, to a wider audience and to highlight the relevance and importance of this field. When originally approached with the idea of this special issue, Section (III) immediately saw the value of a publication specifically on neutron metrology. It is a topic area where papers tend to be scattered throughout the literature in journals covering, for example, nuclear instrumentation, radiation protection or radiation measurements in general. Review articles tend to be few. People new to the field often ask for an introduction to the various topics. There are some excellent older textbooks, but these are now becoming obsolete. More experienced workers in specific areas of neutron metrology can find it difficult to know the latest position in related areas. The papers in this issue attempt, without presenting a purely historical outline, to describe the field in a sufficiently logical way to provide the novice with a clear introduction, while being sufficiently up-to-date to provide the more experienced reader with the latest scientific developments in the different topic areas. Neutron radiation fields obviously occur throughout the nuclear

  6. Further study of α-decay in heavy isotopic chains considering the isospin effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qian, Yibin; Ren, Zhongzhou

    2016-06-01

    We have enhanced the deformed density-dependent cluster model to improve the quantitative description of α-decay in heavy even-even nuclei with 84≤slant Z≤slant 92. To preliminarily introduce the isospin effect into α-decay, the neutron excess term is added in the establishment of the crucial α-core potential. The proton and neutron density distributions are respectively considered in different parameterized formulas by combining them with available experimental data of both the charge radius and the neutron skin thickness. The calculated α-decay half-lives are found to be in somewhat better agreement with the experimental data as compared with our previous results. Strikingly, it is noted that the relatively large deviation between theory and experiment, along the tail of the isotopic chain, is obviously reduced and smoother. This may indicate the necessity of considering the isospin effect in α-decay, especially for extremely neutron-rich nuclei, which appears to be essential for the extended study of heaviest nuclei as well.

  7. Study of the cluster structure of10Be and16C neutron-rich isotopes by means of intermediate energies breakup reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dell'Aquila, D.; Acosta, L.; Auditore, L.; Cardella, G.; De Filippo, E.; De Luca, S.; Francalanza, L.; Gnoffo, B.; Lanzalone, G.; Lombardo, I.; Martorana, N. S.; Pagano, A.; Pagano, E. V.; Papa, M.; Pirrone, S.; Politi, G.; Quattrocchi, L.; Rizzo, F.; Rosato, E.; Russotto, P.; Trifirò, A.; Trimarchi, M.; Verde, G.; Vigilante, M.

    2017-06-01

    We describe the results of a new experiment aimed to investigate the possible existence of cluster structures in10Be and16C isotopes. They have been investigated at the FRIBs facility of INFN-LNS by means of an invariant mass analysis on correlated projectile breakup fragments carried out with the CHIMERA 4π detector. From the analysis of the6He+4He channel we found evidence of a new state in10Be at 13.5MeV excitation energy. Concerning16C, we investigated6He+10Be correlated fragments and we found a non-vanishing yield at about 20.5MeV in the corresponding excitation energy spectrum. Finally, we describe few details of a new experiment performed at the FRIBs facility where the CHIMERA detector was coupled to the FARCOS hodoscope, with the aim to improve the presently obtained results.

  8. Biomembranes research using thermal and cold neutrons.

    PubMed

    Heberle, F A; Myles, D A A; Katsaras, J

    2015-11-01

    In 1932 James Chadwick discovered the neutron using a polonium source and a beryllium target (Chadwick, 1932). In a letter to Niels Bohr dated February 24, 1932, Chadwick wrote: "whatever the radiation from Be may be, it has most remarkable properties." Where it concerns hydrogen-rich biological materials, the "most remarkable" property is the neutron's differential sensitivity for hydrogen and its isotope deuterium. Such differential sensitivity is unique to neutron scattering, which unlike X-ray scattering, arises from nuclear forces. Consequently, the coherent neutron scattering length can experience a dramatic change in magnitude and phase as a result of resonance scattering, imparting sensitivity to both light and heavy atoms, and in favorable cases to their isotopic variants. This article describes recent biomembranes research using a variety of neutron scattering techniques.

  9. Two neutron correlations in photo-fission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dale, D. S.; Kosinov, O.; Forest, T.; Burggraf, J.; Stave, S.; Warren, G.; Starovoitova, V.

    2016-09-01

    A large body of experimental work has established the strong kinematical correlation between fission fragments and fission neutrons. Here, we report on the progress of investigations of the potential for strong two neutron correlations arising from the nearly back-to-back nature of the two fission fragments that emit these neutrons in the photo-fission process. In initial measurements, a pulsed electron linear accelerator was used to generate bremsstrahlung photons that impinged upon an actinide target, and the energy and opening angle distributions of coincident neutrons were measured using a large acceptance neutron detector array. A planned comprehensive set of measurements of two neutron correlations in the photo-fission of actinides is expected to shed light on several fundamental aspects of the fission process including the multiplicity distributions associated with the light and heavy fission fragments, the nuclear temperatures of the fission fragments, and the mass distribution of the fission fragments as a function of energy released. In addition to these measurements providing important nuclear data, the unique kinematics of fission and the resulting two neutron correlations have the potential to be the basis for a new tool to detect fissionable materials. A key technical challenge of this program arises from the need to perform coincidence measurements with a low duty factor, pulsed electron accelerator. This has motivated the construction of a large acceptance neutron detector array, and the development of data analysis techniques to directly measure uncorrelated two neutron backgrounds.

  10. Two neutron correlations in photo-fission

    SciTech Connect

    Dale, D. S.; Kosinov, O.; Forest, T.; Burggraf, J.; Stave, S.; Warren, G.; Starovoitova, V.

    2016-01-01

    A large body of experimental work has established the strong kinematical correlation between fission fragments and fission neutrons. Here, we report on the progress of investigations of the potential for strong two neutron correlations arising from the nearly back-to-back nature of the two fission fragments that emit these neutrons in the photo-fission process. In initial measurements, a pulsed electron linear accelerator was used to generate bremsstrahlung photons that impinged upon an actinide target, and the energy and opening angle distributions of coincident neutrons were measured using a large acceptance neutron detector array. A planned comprehensive set of measurements of two neutron correlations in the photo-fission of actinides is expected to shed light on several fundamental aspects of the fission process including the multiplicity distributions associated with the light and heavy fission fragments, the nuclear temperatures of the fission fragments, and the mass distribution of the fission fragments as a function of energy released. In addition to these measurements providing important nuclear data, the unique kinematics of fission and the resulting two neutron correlations have the potential to be the basis for a new tool to detect fissionable materials. A key technical challenge of this program arises from the need to perform coincidence measurements with a low duty factor, pulsed electron accelerator. This has motivated the construction of a large acceptance neutron detector array, and the development of data analysis techniques to directly measure uncorrelated two neutron backgrounds.

  11. Attitudes and Learning through Practice Are Key to Delivering Brief Interventions for Heavy Drinking in Primary Health Care: Analyses from the ODHIN Five Country Cluster Randomized Factorial Trial.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Peter; Kaner, Eileen; Keurhorst, Myrna; Bendtsen, Preben; Steenkiste, Ben van; Reynolds, Jillian; Segura, Lidia; Wojnar, Marcin; Kłoda, Karolina; Parkinson, Kathryn; Drummond, Colin; Okulicz-Kozaryn, Katarzyna; Mierzecki, Artur; Laurant, Miranda; Newbury-Birch, Dorothy; Gual, Antoni

    2017-01-26

    In this paper, we test path models that study the interrelations between primary health care provider attitudes towards working with drinkers, their screening and brief advice activity, and their receipt of training and support and financial reimbursement. Study participants were 756 primary health care providers from 120 primary health care units (PHCUs) in different locations throughout Catalonia, England, The Netherlands, Poland, and Sweden. Our interventions were training and support and financial reimbursement to providers. Our design was a randomized factorial trial with baseline measurement period, 12-week implementation period, and 9-month follow-up measurement period. Our outcome measures were: attitudes of individual providers in working with drinkers as measured by the Short Alcohol and Alcohol Problems Perception Questionnaire; and the proportion of consulting adult patients (age 18+ years) who screened positive and were given advice to reduce their alcohol consumption (intervention activity). We found that more positive attitudes were associated with higher intervention activity, and higher intervention activity was then associated with more positive attitudes. Training and support was associated with both positive changes in attitudes and higher intervention activity. Financial reimbursement was associated with more positive attitudes through its impact on higher intervention activity. We conclude that improving primary health care providers' screening and brief advice activity for heavy drinking requires a combination of training and support and on-the-job experience of actually delivering screening and brief advice activity.

  12. Attitudes and Learning through Practice Are Key to Delivering Brief Interventions for Heavy Drinking in Primary Health Care: Analyses from the ODHIN Five Country Cluster Randomized Factorial Trial

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Peter; Kaner, Eileen; Keurhorst, Myrna; Bendtsen, Preben; van Steenkiste, Ben; Reynolds, Jillian; Segura, Lidia; Wojnar, Marcin; Kłoda, Karolina; Parkinson, Kathryn; Drummond, Colin; Okulicz-Kozaryn, Katarzyna; Mierzecki, Artur; Laurant, Miranda; Newbury-Birch, Dorothy; Gual, Antoni

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, we test path models that study the interrelations between primary health care provider attitudes towards working with drinkers, their screening and brief advice activity, and their receipt of training and support and financial reimbursement. Study participants were 756 primary health care providers from 120 primary health care units (PHCUs) in different locations throughout Catalonia, England, The Netherlands, Poland, and Sweden. Our interventions were training and support and financial reimbursement to providers. Our design was a randomized factorial trial with baseline measurement period, 12-week implementation period, and 9-month follow-up measurement period. Our outcome measures were: attitudes of individual providers in working with drinkers as measured by the Short Alcohol and Alcohol Problems Perception Questionnaire; and the proportion of consulting adult patients (age 18+ years) who screened positive and were given advice to reduce their alcohol consumption (intervention activity). We found that more positive attitudes were associated with higher intervention activity, and higher intervention activity was then associated with more positive attitudes. Training and support was associated with both positive changes in attitudes and higher intervention activity. Financial reimbursement was associated with more positive attitudes through its impact on higher intervention activity. We conclude that improving primary health care providers’ screening and brief advice activity for heavy drinking requires a combination of training and support and on-the-job experience of actually delivering screening and brief advice activity. PMID:28134783

  13. Neutron therapy of cancer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frigerio, N. A.; Nellans, H. N.; Shaw, M. J.

    1969-01-01

    Reports relate applications of neutrons to the problem of cancer therapy. The biochemical and biophysical aspects of fast-neutron therapy, neutron-capture and neutron-conversion therapy with intermediate-range neutrons are presented. Also included is a computer program for neutron-gamma radiobiology.

  14. NEUTRONIC REACTOR

    DOEpatents

    Hurwitz, H. Jr.; Brooks, H.; Mannal, C.; Payne, J.H.; Luebke, E.A.

    1959-03-24

    A reactor of the heterogeneous, liquid cooled type is described. This reactor is comprised of a central region of a plurality of vertically disposed elongated tubes surrounded by a region of moderator material. The central region is comprised of a central core surrounded by a reflector region which is surrounded by a fast neutron absorber region, which in turn is surrounded by a slow neutron absorber region. Liquid sodium is used as the primary coolant and circulates through the core which contains the fuel elements. Control of the reactor is accomplished by varying the ability of the reflector region to reflect neutrons back into the core of the reactor. For this purpose the reflector is comprised of moderator and control elements having varying effects on reactivity, the control elements being arranged and actuated by groups to give regulation, shim, and safety control.

  15. NEUTRON SOURCE

    DOEpatents

    Foster, J.S. Jr.

    1960-04-19

    A compact electronic device capable of providing short time high density outputs of neutrons is described. The device of the invention includes an evacuated vacuum housing adapted to be supplied with a deuterium, tritium, or other atmosphere and means for establishing an electrical discharge along a path through the gas. An energized solenoid is arranged to constrain the ionized gas (plasma) along the path. An anode bearing adsorbed or adherent target material is arranged to enclose the constrained plasma. To produce neutrons a high voltage is applied from appropriate supply means between the plasma and anode to accelerate ions from the plasma to impinge upcn the target material, e.g., comprising deuterium.

  16. NEUTRONIC REACTOR

    DOEpatents

    Fermi, E.; Szilard, L.

    1957-09-24

    Reactors of the type employing plates of natural uranium in a moderator are discussed wherein the plates are um-formly disposed in parallel relationship to each other thereby separating the moderator material into distinct and individual layers. Each plate has an uninterrupted sunface area substantially equal to the cross-sectional area of the active portion of the reactor, the particular size of the plates and the volume ratio of moderator to uranium required to sustain a chain reaction being determinable from the known purity of these materials and other characteristics such as the predictable neutron losses due to the formation of radioactive elements of extremely high neutron capture cross section.

  17. NEUTRONIC REACTOR

    DOEpatents

    Wigner, E.P.; Weinberg, A.W.; Young, G.J.

    1958-04-15

    A nuclear reactor which uses uranium in the form of elongated tubes as fuel elements and liquid as a coolant is described. Elongated tubular uranium bodies are vertically disposed in an efficient neutron slowing agent, such as graphite, for example, to form a lattice structure which is disposed between upper and lower coolant tanks. Fluid coolant tubes extend through the uranium bodies and communicate with the upper and lower tanks and serve to convey the coolant through the uranium body. The reactor is also provided with means for circulating the cooling fluid through the coolant tanks and coolant tubes, suitable neutron and gnmma ray shields, and control means.

  18. THE OPTICAL COLORS OF GIANT ELLIPTICAL GALAXIES AND THEIR METAL-RICH GLOBULAR CLUSTERS INDICATE A BOTTOM-HEAVY INITIAL MASS FUNCTION

    SciTech Connect

    Goudfrooij, Paul; Diederik Kruijssen, J. M. E-mail: kruijssen@mpa-garching.mpg.de

    2013-01-10

    We report a systematic and statistically significant offset between the optical (g - z or B - I) colors of seven massive elliptical galaxies and the mean colors of their associated massive metal-rich globular clusters (GCs) in the sense that the parent galaxies are redder by {approx}0.12-0.20 mag at a given galactocentric distance. However, spectroscopic indices in the blue indicate that the luminosity-weighted ages and metallicities of such galaxies are equal to that of their averaged massive metal-rich GCs at a given galactocentric distance, to within small uncertainties. The observed color differences between the red GC systems and their parent galaxies cannot be explained by the presence of multiple stellar generations in massive metal-rich GCs, as the impact of the latter to the populations' integrated g - z or B - I colors is found to be negligible. However, we show that this paradox can be explained if the stellar initial mass function (IMF) in these massive elliptical galaxies was significantly steeper at subsolar masses than canonical IMFs derived from star counts in the solar neighborhood, with the GC colors having become bluer due to dynamical evolution, causing a significant flattening of the stellar MF of the average surviving GC.

  19. Association of a variant in the CHRNA5-A3-B4 gene cluster region to heavy smoking in the Italian population

    PubMed Central

    Sorice, Rossella; Bione, Silvia; Sansanelli, Serena; Ulivi, Sheila; Athanasakis, Emmanouil; Lanzara, Carmela; Nutile, Teresa; Sala, Cinzia; Camaschella, Clara; D'Adamo, Pio; Gasparini, Paolo; Ciullo, Marina; Toniolo, Daniela

    2011-01-01

    Large-scale population studies have established that genetic factors contribute to individual differences in smoking behavior. Linkage and genome-wide association studies have shown many chromosomal regions and genes associated with different smoking behaviors. One study was the association of single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the CHRNA5-A3-B4 gene cluster to nicotine addiction. Here, we report a replication of this association in the Italian population represented by three genetically isolated populations. One, the Val Borbera, is a genetic isolate from North-Western Italy; the Cilento population, is located in South-Western Italy; and the Carlantino village is located in South-Eastern Italy. Owing to their position and their isolation, the three populations have a different environment, different history and genetic structure. The variant A of the rs1051730 SNP was significantly associated with smoking quantity in two populations, Val Borbera and Cilento, no association was found in Carlantino population probably because difference in LD pattern in the variant region. PMID:21248747

  20. Martian Neutron Energy Spectrometer (MANES)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maurer, R. H.; Roth, D. R.; Kinnison, J. D.; Goldsten, J. O.; Fainchtein, R.; Badhwar, G.

    2000-01-01

    High energy charged particles of extragalactic, galactic, and solar origin collide with spacecraft structures and planetary atmospheres. These primaries create a number of secondary particles inside the structures or on the surfaces of planets to produce a significant radiation environment. This radiation is a threat to long term inhabitants and travelers for interplanetary missions and produces an increased risk of carcinogenesis, central nervous system (CNS) and DNA damage. Charged particles are readily detected; but, neutrons, being electrically neutral, are much more difficult to monitor. These secondary neutrons are reported to contribute 30-60% of the dose equivalent in the Shuttle and MIR station. The Martian atmosphere has an areal density of 37 g/sq cm primarily of carbon dioxide molecules. This shallow atmosphere presents fewer mean free paths to the bombarding cosmic rays and solar particles. The secondary neutrons present at the surface of Mars will have undergone fewer generations of collisions and have higher energies than at sea level on Earth. Albedo neutrons produced by collisions with the Martian surface material will also contribute to the radiation environment. The increased threat of radiation damage to humans on Mars occurs when neutrons of higher mean energy traverse the thin, dry Martian atmosphere and encounter water in the astronaut's body. Water, being hydrogeneous, efficiently moderates the high energy neutrons thereby slowing them as they penetrate deeply into the body. Consequently, greater radiation doses can be deposited in or near critical organs such as the liver or spleen than is the case on Earth. A second significant threat is the possibility of a high energy heavy ion or neutron causing a DNA double strand break in a single strike.

  1. Martian Neutron Energy Spectrometer (MANES)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maurer, R. H.; Roth, D. R.; Kinnison, J. D.; Goldsten, J. O.; Fainchtein, R.; Badhwar, G.

    2000-01-01

    High energy charged particles of extragalactic, galactic, and solar origin collide with spacecraft structures and planetary atmospheres. These primaries create a number of secondary particles inside the structures or on the surfaces of planets to produce a significant radiation environment. This radiation is a threat to long term inhabitants and travelers for interplanetary missions and produces an increased risk of carcinogenesis, central nervous system (CNS) and DNA damage. Charged particles are readily detected; but, neutrons, being electrically neutral, are much more difficult to monitor. These secondary neutrons are reported to contribute 30-60% of the dose equivalent in the Shuttle and MIR station. The Martian atmosphere has an areal density of 37 g/sq cm primarily of carbon dioxide molecules. This shallow atmosphere presents fewer mean free paths to the bombarding cosmic rays and solar particles. The secondary neutrons present at the surface of Mars will have undergone fewer generations of collisions and have higher energies than at sea level on Earth. Albedo neutrons produced by collisions with the Martian surface material will also contribute to the radiation environment. The increased threat of radiation damage to humans on Mars occurs when neutrons of higher mean energy traverse the thin, dry Martian atmosphere and encounter water in the astronaut's body. Water, being hydrogeneous, efficiently moderates the high energy neutrons thereby slowing them as they penetrate deeply into the body. Consequently, greater radiation doses can be deposited in or near critical organs such as the liver or spleen than is the case on Earth. A second significant threat is the possibility of a high energy heavy ion or neutron causing a DNA double strand break in a single strike.

  2. Pair natural orbital and canonical coupled cluster reaction enthalpies involving light to heavy alkali and alkaline earth metals: the importance of sub-valence correlation.

    PubMed

    Minenkov, Yury; Bistoni, Giovanni; Riplinger, Christoph; Auer, Alexander A; Neese, Frank; Cavallo, Luigi

    2017-04-05

    In this work, we tested canonical and domain based pair natural orbital coupled cluster methods (CCSD(T) and DLPNO-CCSD(T), respectively) for a set of 32 ligand exchange and association/dissociation reaction enthalpies involving ionic complexes of Li, Be, Na, Mg, Ca, Sr, Ba and Pb(ii). Two strategies were investigated: in the former, only valence electrons were included in the correlation treatment, giving rise to the computationally very efficient FC (frozen core) approach; in the latter, all non-ECP electrons were included in the correlation treatment, giving rise to the AE (all electron) approach. Apart from reactions involving Li and Be, the FC approach resulted in non-homogeneous performance. The FC approach leads to very small errors (<2 kcal mol(-1)) for some reactions of Na, Mg, Ca, Sr, Ba and Pb, while for a few reactions of Ca and Ba deviations up to 40 kcal mol(-1) have been obtained. Large errors are both due to artificial mixing of the core (sub-valence) orbitals of metals and the valence orbitals of oxygen and halogens in the molecular orbitals treated as core, and due to neglecting core-core and core-valence correlation effects. These large errors are reduced to a few kcal mol(-1) if the AE approach is used or the sub-valence orbitals of metals are included in the correlation treatment. On the technical side, the CCSD(T) and DLPNO-CCSD(T) results differ by a fraction of kcal mol(-1), indicating the latter method as the perfect choice when the CPU efficiency is essential. For completely black-box applications, as requested in catalysis or thermochemical calculations, we recommend the DLPNO-CCSD(T) method with all electrons that are not covered by effective core potentials included in the correlation treatment and correlation-consistent polarized core valence basis sets of cc-pwCVQZ(-PP) quality.

  3. Neutronic reactor

    DOEpatents

    Carleton, John T.

    1977-01-25

    A graphite-moderated nuclear reactor includes channels between blocks of graphite and also includes spacer blocks between adjacent channeled blocks with an axis of extension normal to that of the axis of elongation of the channeled blocks to minimize changes in the physical properties of the graphite as a result of prolonged neutron bombardment.

  4. NEUTRONIC REACTORS

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, H.L.

    1958-10-01

    The design of control rods for nuclear reactors are described. In this design the control rod consists essentially of an elongated member constructed in part of a neutron absorbing material and having tube means extending therethrough for conducting a liquid to cool the rod when in use.

  5. Neutron Star Cooling with Various Superfluid and Superconducting States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noda, Tsuneo; Hashimoto, Masa-aki; Matsuo, Yasuhide; Yasutake, Nobutoshi; Maruyama, Toshiki; Tatsumi, Toshitaka

    A neutron star is a highly dense object which lasts after a supernova explosion. The density of a neutron star overcomes the nuclear density, and the temperature is high at the beginning of its history. An isolated neutron star does not have any heat sources, and it cools down emitting thermal energy by neutrinos. The neutrino emission process depends on the state of interior matter of the neutron star. To compare theoretical simulations and observations of neutron stars, it can constrain the nuclear theory of high density region. We create a model of neutron stars with colour superconducting quark matter and nucleon superfluidity/superconductivity, to satisfy recent observations, including two 2M ⊙ neutron stars. We parameterize these super-states and demonstrate the cooling curves, which show heavy stars do not always cool faster than lighter stars.

  6. Methods for absorbing neutrons

    DOEpatents

    Guillen, Donna P [Idaho Falls, ID; Longhurst, Glen R [Idaho Falls, ID; Porter, Douglas L [Idaho Falls, ID; Parry, James R [Idaho Falls, ID

    2012-07-24

    A conduction cooled neutron absorber may include a metal matrix composite that comprises a metal having a thermal neutron cross-section of at least about 50 barns and a metal having a thermal conductivity of at least about 1 W/cmK. Apparatus for providing a neutron flux having a high fast-to-thermal neutron ratio may include a source of neutrons that produces fast neutrons and thermal neutrons. A neutron absorber positioned adjacent the neutron source absorbs at least some of the thermal neutrons so that a region adjacent the neutron absorber has a fast-to-thermal neutron ratio of at least about 15. A coolant in thermal contact with the neutron absorber removes heat from the neutron absorber.

  7. METHOD OF OPERATING A NEUTRONIC REACTOR

    DOEpatents

    Turkevich, A.

    1963-01-22

    This patent relates to one step in a method of operating a neutronic reactor consisting of a slurry of fissionable material in heavy water. Deuterium gas is passed through the slurry to sweep gaseous fission products therefrom and the deuterium is then separated from the gaseous fission products. (AEC)

  8. Delayed neutrons in fission of polonium isotopes

    SciTech Connect

    Ramazanov, R.; Urikbaev, Z.S.; Maksyutenko, B.P.; Ignat'ev, S.V.

    1988-06-01

    A strong difference is found in the relative yields of delayed neutrons in the production of compound nuclei of polonium isotopes in reactions in which bismuth and lead are bombarded by various charged particles. The effect can be partially explained by the different lengths of the ..beta..-decay chains of the light and heavy fission products.

  9. Recent Advances in Neutron Physics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Feshbach, Herman; Sheldon, Eric

    1977-01-01

    Discusses new studies in neutron physics within the last decade, such as ultracold neutrons, neutron bottles, resonance behavior, subthreshold fission, doubly radiative capture, and neutron stars. (MLH)

  10. Recent Advances in Neutron Physics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Feshbach, Herman; Sheldon, Eric

    1977-01-01

    Discusses new studies in neutron physics within the last decade, such as ultracold neutrons, neutron bottles, resonance behavior, subthreshold fission, doubly radiative capture, and neutron stars. (MLH)

  11. Octupole correlations in the heavy elements

    SciTech Connect

    Chasman, R.R.

    1986-01-01

    The effects of octupole correlations on the nuclear structure of the heavy elements are discussed. The cluster model description of the heavy elements is analyzed. The relevance of 2/sup 6/-pole deformation and fast El transitions to an octupole model is considered. 30 refs., 21 figs., 1 tab.

  12. Coated semiconductor devices for neutron detection

    DOEpatents

    Klann, Raymond T.; McGregor, Douglas S.

    2002-01-01

    A device for detecting neutrons includes a semi-insulated bulk semiconductor substrate having opposed polished surfaces. A blocking Schottky contact comprised of a series of metals such as Ti, Pt, Au, Ge, Pd, and Ni is formed on a first polished surface of the semiconductor substrate, while a low resistivity ("ohmic") contact comprised of metals such as Au, Ge, and Ni is formed on a second, opposed polished surface of the substrate. In one embodiment, n-type low resistivity pinout contacts comprised of an Au/Ge based eutectic alloy or multi-layered Pd/Ge/Ti/Au are also formed on the opposed polished surfaces and in contact with the Schottky and ohmic contacts. Disposed on the Schottky contact is a neutron reactive film, or coating, for detecting neutrons. The coating is comprised of a hydrogen rich polymer, such as a polyolefin or paraffin; lithium or lithium fluoride; or a heavy metal fissionable material. By varying the coating thickness and electrical settings, neutrons at specific energies can be detected. The coated neutron detector is capable of performing real-time neutron radiography in high gamma fields, digital fast neutron radiography, fissile material identification, and basic neutron detection particularly in high radiation fields.

  13. Neutron reflecting supermirror structure

    DOEpatents

    Wood, James L.

    1992-01-01

    An improved neutron reflecting supermirror structure comprising a plurality of stacked sets of bilayers of neutron reflecting materials. The improved neutron reflecting supermirror structure is adapted to provide extremely good performance at high incidence angles, i.e. up to four time the critical angle of standard neutron mirror structures. The reflection of neutrons striking the supermirror structure at a high critical angle provides enhanced neutron throughput, and hence more efficient and economical use of neutron sources.

  14. Neutron reflecting supermirror structure

    DOEpatents

    Wood, J.L.

    1992-12-01

    An improved neutron reflecting supermirror structure comprising a plurality of stacked sets of bilayers of neutron reflecting materials. The improved neutron reflecting supermirror structure is adapted to provide extremely good performance at high incidence angles, i.e. up to four time the critical angle of standard neutron mirror structures. The reflection of neutrons striking the supermirror structure at a high critical angle provides enhanced neutron throughput, and hence more efficient and economical use of neutron sources. 2 figs.

  15. A Monte Carlo simulation and setup optimization of output efficiency to PGNAA thermal neutron using 252Cf neutrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jin-Zhao; Tuo, Xian-Guo

    2014-07-01

    We present the design and optimization of a prompt γ-ray neutron activation analysis (PGNAA) thermal neutron output setup based on Monte Carlo simulations using MCNP5 computer code. In these simulations, the moderator materials, reflective materials, and structure of the PGNAA 252Cf neutrons of thermal neutron output setup are optimized. The simulation results reveal that the thin layer paraffin and the thick layer of heavy water moderating effect work best for the 252Cf neutron spectrum. Our new design shows a significantly improved performance of the thermal neutron flux and flux rate, that are increased by 3.02 times and 3.27 times, respectively, compared with the conventional neutron source design.

  16. Pairing gap in the inner crust of neutron stars

    SciTech Connect

    Esbensen, H.; Broglia, R.A.; Vigezzi, E.; Barranco, F.

    1995-08-01

    The pairing gap in the inner crust of a neutron star can be strongly affected by the presence of heavy nuclei. The effect is commonly estimated in a semiclassical description, using the local density approximation. It was found that the nuclear specific heat can become comparable to the electronic specific heat at certain densities and temperatures. The quantitative result depends critically upon the magnitude of the pairing gap. We therefore decided to assess the validity of the semiclassical approach. This is done by solving the quantal BCS pairing gap equation for neutrons that are confined to the Wigner-Seitz cell that surrounds a heavy nucleus. We performed calculations that are based on the Gogny pairing force. They are feasible for realistic densities of neutrons and heavy nuclei that are expected to be found in the inner crust of neutron stars. The results will be compared to the semiclassical predictions. This work is in progress.

  17. Single event phenomena in atmospheric neutron environments

    SciTech Connect

    Gossett, C.A.; Hughlock, B.W.; Katoozi, M.; LaRue, G.S. ); Wender, S.A. )

    1993-12-01

    As integrated circuit technology achieves higher density through smaller feature sizes and as the airplane manufacturing industry integrates more sophisticated electronic components into the design of new aircraft, it has become increasingly important to evaluate the contribution of single event effects, primarily Single Event Upset (SEU), to the safety and reliability of commercial aircraft. In contrast to the effects of radiation on electronic systems in space applications for which protons and heavy ions are of major concern, in commercial aircraft applications the interactions of high energy neutrons are the dominant cause of single event effects. These high energy neutrons are produced by the interaction of solar and galactic cosmic rays, principally protons and heavy ions, in the upper atmosphere. This paper will describe direct experimental measurements of neutron-induced Single Event Effect (SEE) rates in commercial high density static random access memories in a neutron environment characteristic of that at commercial airplane altitudes. The first experimental measurements testing current models for neutron-silicon burst generation rates will be presented, as well as measurements of charge collection in silicon test structures as a function of neutron energy. These are the first laboratory SEE and charge collection measurements using a particle beam having a continuum energy spectrum and with a shape nearly identical to that observed during flight.

  18. Variational Approach to Neutron Star Matter with Hyperons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Togashi, Hajime; Hiyama, Emiko; Yamamoto, Yasuo; Takano, Masatoshi

    Equations of state (EOSs) for uniform nuclear matter including Λ and Σ- hyperons are constructed with the variational method starting from the bare baryon interactions to study the structure and composition of neutron stars (NSs). For the nucleon sector, the Argonne v18 two-nucleon potential and the Urbana IX three-nucleon potential are adopted. On the other hand, for the hyperon sector, central two-body potentials that reproduce the experimental data on hypernuclei are employed as the Λ-nucleon, Σ--nucleon and ΛΛ interactions. Since there are no experimental data on the odd-state component of the ΛΛ interaction, we prepare four odd-state ΛΛ interaction models, and calculate four EOSs of hyperonic nuclear matter for those interactions using the cluster variational method. The obtained maximum mass of NSs increases as the odd-state ΛΛ interaction becomes more repulsive, although it is still smaller than the recently observed masses of heavy NSs. Moreover, the critical density of Σ- strongly depends on the odd-state ΛΛ interaction. A phenomenological three-baryon repulsive force is employed in our variational calculations to explain the observed data on heavy NSs.

  19. On the possibility of measuring the gravitational interaction of the neutron with a macroscopic body

    SciTech Connect

    Frank, A. I.

    2009-11-15

    The possibility of experimentally observing the gravitational interaction of the neutron with a macroscopic body is discussed. It is shown that the sensitivity of neutron-optics experiments may be one to two orders of magnitude higher than that which is necessary for observing the gravitational effect. Either the deflection of the neutron trajectory in the gravitational field of a heavy attractor or the gravitation-induced shift of the neutron-wave phase can be recorded experimentally.

  20. Heavy Flavors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cox, B.; Soni, A.

    This is a summary report of the working group on Heavy Flavors. Discussions at the workshop were centered on B physics and on the signals for heavy quarks and leptons at the SSC. The Working Group Members were: V. Barger, H.-U. Bengtsson, C. Buchanan, I. Bigi, M. Block, B. Cox, N. Glover, J. Hewett, W.Y. Keung, B. Margolis, T. Rizzo, M. Suzuki, A. Soni, D. Stork, and S. Willenbrock.

  1. Star Clusters within FIRE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perez, Adrianna; Moreno, Jorge; Naiman, Jill; Ramirez-Ruiz, Enrico; Hopkins, Philip F.

    2017-01-01

    In this work, we analyze the environments surrounding star clusters of simulated merging galaxies. Our framework employs Feedback In Realistic Environments (FIRE) model (Hopkins et al., 2014). The FIRE project is a high resolution cosmological simulation that resolves star forming regions and incorporates stellar feedback in a physically realistic way. The project focuses on analyzing the properties of the star clusters formed in merging galaxies. The locations of these star clusters are identified with astrodendro.py, a publicly available dendrogram algorithm. Once star cluster properties are extracted, they will be used to create a sub-grid (smaller than the resolution scale of FIRE) of gas confinement in these clusters. Then, we can examine how the star clusters interact with these available gas reservoirs (either by accreting this mass or blowing it out via feedback), which will determine many properties of the cluster (star formation history, compact object accretion, etc). These simulations will further our understanding of star formation within stellar clusters during galaxy evolution. In the future, we aim to enhance sub-grid prescriptions for feedback specific to processes within star clusters; such as, interaction with stellar winds and gas accretion onto black holes and neutron stars.

  2. Reusable shielding material for neutron- and gamma-radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calzada, Elbio; Grünauer, Florian; Schillinger, Burkhard; Türck, Harald

    2011-09-01

    At neutron research facilities all around the world radiation shieldings are applied to reduce the background of neutron and gamma radiation as far as possible in order to perform high quality measurements and to fulfill the radiation protection requirements. The current approach with cement-based compounds has a number of shortcomings: "Heavy concrete" contains a high amount of elements, which are not desired to obtain a high attenuation of neutron and/or gamma radiation (e.g. calcium, carbon, oxygen, silicon and aluminum). A shielding material with a high density of desired nuclei such as iron, hydrogen and boron was developed for the redesign of the neutron radiography facility ANTARES at beam tube 4 (located at a cold neutron source) of FRM-II. The composition of the material was optimized by help of the Monte Carlo code MCNP5. With this shielding material a considerable higher attenuation of background radiation can be obtained compared to usual heavy concretes.

  3. Time-resolved neutron imaging at ANTARES cold neutron beamline

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tremsin, A. S.; Dangendorf, V.; Tittelmeier, K.; Schillinger, B.; Schulz, M.; Lerche, M.; Feller, W. B.

    2015-07-01

    In non-destructive evaluation with X-rays light elements embedded in dense, heavy (or high-Z) matrices show little contrast and their structural details can hardly be revealed. Neutron radiography, on the other hand, provides a solution for those cases, in particular for hydrogenous materials, owing to the large neutron scattering cross section of hydrogen and uncorrelated dependency of neutron cross section on the atomic number. The majority of neutron imaging experiments at the present time is conducted with static objects mainly due to the limited flux intensity of neutron beamline facilities and sometimes due to the limitations of the detectors. However, some applications require the studies of dynamic phenomena and can now be conducted at several high intensity beamlines such as the recently rebuilt ANTARES beam line at the FRM-II reactor. In this paper we demonstrate the capabilities of time resolved imaging for repetitive processes, where different phases of the process can be imaged simultaneously and integrated over multiple cycles. A fast MCP/Timepix neutron counting detector was used to image the water distribution within a model steam engine operating at 10 Hz frequency. Within <10 minutes integration the amount of water was measured as a function of cycle time with a sub-mm spatial resolution, thereby demonstrating the capabilities of time-resolved neutron radiography for the future applications. The neutron spectrum of the ANTARES beamline as well as transmission spectra of a Fe sample were also measured with the Time Of Flight (TOF) technique in combination with a high resolution beam chopper. The energy resolution of our setup was found to be ~ 0.8% at 5 meV and ~ 1.7% at 25 meV. The background level (most likely gammas and epithermal/fast neutrons) of the ANTARES beamline was also measured in our experiments and found to be on the scale of 3% when no filters are installed in the beam. Online supplementary data available from stacks.iop.org/jinst/10

  4. Fast neutron environments.

    SciTech Connect

    Buchheit, Thomas Edward; Kotula, Paul Gabriel; Lu, Ping; Brewer, Luke N.; Goods, Steven Howard; Foiles, Stephen Martin; Puskar, Joseph David; Hattar, Khalid Mikhiel; Doyle, Barney Lee; Boyce, Brad Lee; Clark, Blythe G.

    2011-10-01

    The goal of this LDRD project is to develop a rapid first-order experimental procedure for the testing of advanced cladding materials that may be considered for generation IV nuclear reactors. In order to investigate this, a technique was developed to expose the coupons of potential materials to high displacement damage at elevated temperatures to simulate the neutron environment expected in Generation IV reactors. This was completed through a high temperature high-energy heavy-ion implantation. The mechanical properties of the ion irradiated region were tested by either micropillar compression or nanoindentation to determine the local properties, as a function of the implantation dose and exposure temperature. In order to directly compare the microstructural evolution and property degradation from the accelerated testing and classical neutron testing, 316L, 409, and 420 stainless steels were tested. In addition, two sets of diffusion couples from 316L and HT9 stainless steels with various refractory metals. This study has shown that if the ion irradiation size scale is taken into consideration when developing and analyzing the mechanical property data, significant insight into the structural properties of the potential cladding materials can be gained in about a week.

  5. Reduction of neutron-induced background in KOTO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakagiri, Kota

    2017-01-01

    The KOTO experiment aims to study the decay at J-PARC. In order to identify the signal, we measure two photons from a π 0 decay with an electromagnetic calorimeter consisting of undoped Csl crystals, and ensure that there are no other particles with hermetic veto counters. In the analysis of data taken in 2013, the neutron-induced background, which was caused by a beam-halo neutron hitting the calorimeter was dominant. The neutron makes a primary hadronic shower and a secondary neutron emitted from the shower makes a secondary shower after traveling inside the calorimeter. If these two shower clusters are observed in the calorimeter without any hits in veto detectors, it can mimic a signal event. We developed new methods to suppress this background, such as neutron-photon discrimination methods using cluster shape and pulse shape. We obtained reduction power for the neutron-induced background.

  6. An overview of the planned advanced neutron source facility

    SciTech Connect

    West, C.D.

    1990-01-01

    The Advanced Neutron Source (ANS), now in the conceptual design stage, will be a new user facility for neutron research, including neutron beam experiments, materials irradiation testing and materials analysis capabilities, and production facilities for transuranic and lighter isotopes. The neutron source is to be the world's highest flux beam reactor and is based on existing reactor technology to minimize safety issues. The preferred fuel, U{sub 3}Si{sub 2}, has been tested in operating reactors in the United States, Japan, and Europe. The core is cooled, moderated, and reflected by heavy water, common practice for research reactors. 3 refs., 9 figs., 3 tabs.

  7. NEUTRONIC REACTORS

    DOEpatents

    Vernon, H.C.

    1959-01-13

    A neutronic reactor of the heterogeneous, fluid cooled tvpe is described. The reactor is comprised of a pressure vessel containing the moderator and a plurality of vertically disposed channels extending in spaced relationship through the moderator. Fissionable fuel material is placed within the channels in spaced relationship thereto to permit circulation of the coolant fluid. Separate means are provided for cooling the moderator and for circulating a fluid coolant thru the channel elements to cool the fuel material.

  8. Reactivity studies on the advanced neutron source. [Advanced Neutron Source

    SciTech Connect

    Ryskamp, J.M.; Redmond, E.L. II; Fletcher, C.D.

    1990-01-01

    An Advanced Neutron Source (ANS) with a peak thermal neutron flux of about 8.5 {times} 10{sup 19} m{sup {minus}2}s{sup {minus}1} is being designed for condensed matter physics, materials science, isotope production, and fundamental physics research. The ANS is a new reactor-based research facility being planned by Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to meet the need for an intense steady-state source of neutrons. The design effort is currently in the conceptual phase. A reference reactor design has been selected in order to examine the safety, performance, and costs associated with this one design. The ANS Project has an established, documented safety philosophy, and safety-related design criteria are currently being established. The purpose of this paper is to present analyses of safety aspects of the reference reactor design that are related to core reactivity events. These analyses include control rod worth, shutdown rod worth, heavy water voiding, neutron beam tube flooding, light water ingress, and single fuel element criticality. Understanding these safety aspects will allow us to make design modifications that improve the reactor safety and achieve the safety related design criteria. 8 refs., 3 tabs.

  9. Improving the delivery of brief interventions for heavy drinking in primary health care: outcome results of the Optimizing Delivery of Health Care Intervention (ODHIN) five-country cluster randomized factorial trial.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Peter; Bendtsen, Preben; Spak, Fredrik; Reynolds, Jillian; Drummond, Colin; Segura, Lidia; Keurhorst, Myrna N; Palacio-Vieira, Jorge; Wojnar, Marcin; Parkinson, Kathryn; Colom, Joan; Kłoda, Karolina; Deluca, Paolo; Baena, Begoña; Newbury-Birch, Dorothy; Wallace, Paul; Heinen, Maud; Wolstenholme, Amy; van Steenkiste, Ben; Mierzecki, Artur; Okulicz-Kozaryn, Katarzyna; Ronda, Gaby; Kaner, Eileen; Laurant, Miranda G H; Coulton, Simon; Gual, Toni

    2016-11-01

    To test if training and support, financial reimbursement and option of referring screen-positive patients to an internet-based method of giving advice (eBI) can increase primary health-care providers' delivery of Alcohol Use Disorders Identification Test (AUDIT)-C-based screening and advice to heavy drinkers. Cluster randomized factorial trial with 12-week implementation and measurement period. Primary health-care units (PHCU) in different locations throughout Catalonia, England, the Netherlands, Poland and Sweden. A total of 120 PHCU, 24 in each of Catalonia, England, the Netherlands, Poland and Sweden. PHCUs were randomized to one of eight groups: care as usual, training and support (TS), financial reimbursement (FR) and eBI; paired combinations of TS, FR and eBI, and all of FR, TS and eBI. The primary outcome measure was the proportion of eligible adult (age 18+ years) patients screened during a 12-week implementation period. Secondary outcome measures were proportion of screen-positive patients advised; and proportion of consulting adult patients given an intervention (screening and advice to screen-positives) during the same 12-week implementation period. During a 4-week baseline measurement period, the proportion of consulting adult patients who were screened for their alcohol consumption was 0.059 per PHCU (95% CI 0.034 to 0.084). Based on the factorial design, the ratio of the logged proportion screened during the 12-week implementation period was 1.48 (95% CI = 1.13-1.95) in PHCU that received TS versus PHCU that did not receive TS; for FR, the ratio was 2.00 (95% CI = 1.56-2.56). The option of referral to eBI did not lead to a higher proportion of patients screened. The ratio for TS plus FR was 2.34 (95% CI = 1.77-3.10), and the ratio for TS plus FR plus eBI was1.68 (95% CI = 1.11-2.53). Providing primary health-care units with training, support and financial reimbursement for delivering Alcohol Use Disorders Identification Test-C-based screening

  10. Formation of super-heavy elements in astrophysical nucleosynthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Zagrebaev, V. I.; Karpov, A. V.; Mishustin, I. N.; Greiner, Walter

    2012-10-20

    The unexplored area of heavy neutron-rich nuclides is extremely important for the understanding of the r process of astrophysical nucleogenesis. For elements with Z>100 only neutron deficient isotopes (located to the left of the stability line) have been synthesized so far. The 'north-east' area of the nuclear map can be reached neither in fusion reactions nor in fragmentation processes. Low energy multi-nucleon transfer reactions are quite promising for the production and study of neutron-rich heavy nuclei including those located at the superheavy (SH) island of stability [1]. The neutron capture process is considered here as an alternative method for the production of SH nuclei. Requirements for the pulsed reactors of the next generation that could be used for the synthesis of long-living neutron rich SH nuclei are formulated. Formation of SH nuclei in supernova explosions is also discussed and the abundance of SH elements in nature is estimated.

  11. Biomembranes research using thermal and cold neutrons

    SciTech Connect

    Heberle, Frederick A.; Myles, Dean A. A.; Katsaras, John

    2015-08-01

    In 1932 James Chadwick discovered the neutron using a polonium source and a beryllium target (Chadwick, 1932). In a letter to Niels Bohr dated February 24, 1932, Chadwick wrote: “whatever the radiation from Be may be, it has most remarkable properties.” Where it concerns hydrogen-rich biological materials, the “most remarkable” property is the neutron’s differential sensitivity for hydrogen and its isotope deuterium. Such differential sensitivity is unique to neutron scattering, which unlike X-ray scattering, arises from nuclear forces. Consequently, the coherent neutron scattering length can experience a dramatic change in magnitude and phase as a result of resonance scattering, imparting sensitivity to both light and heavy atoms, and in favorable cases to their isotopic variants. Furthermore, this article describes recent biomembranes research using a variety of neutron scattering techniques.

  12. Biomembranes research using thermal and cold neutrons

    DOE PAGES

    Heberle, Frederick A.; Myles, Dean A. A.; Katsaras, John

    2015-08-01

    In 1932 James Chadwick discovered the neutron using a polonium source and a beryllium target (Chadwick, 1932). In a letter to Niels Bohr dated February 24, 1932, Chadwick wrote: “whatever the radiation from Be may be, it has most remarkable properties.” Where it concerns hydrogen-rich biological materials, the “most remarkable” property is the neutron’s differential sensitivity for hydrogen and its isotope deuterium. Such differential sensitivity is unique to neutron scattering, which unlike X-ray scattering, arises from nuclear forces. Consequently, the coherent neutron scattering length can experience a dramatic change in magnitude and phase as a result of resonance scattering, impartingmore » sensitivity to both light and heavy atoms, and in favorable cases to their isotopic variants. Furthermore, this article describes recent biomembranes research using a variety of neutron scattering techniques.« less

  13. Experimental approach to neutron stars

    SciTech Connect

    Leifels, Yvonne

    2014-05-09

    The equation of state (EOS) of nuclear matter is of fundamental importance in many areas of nuclear physics and astrophysics In the laboratory, there are different means to study the nuclearmatter equation of state and its density dependence in particular: nuclear masses, neutron skins, pygmy resonance, and nuclear structure at the drip line give access to nuclear matter properties at densities lower than and at saturation density ρ0. Heavy ion reactions at energies above 0.1 AGeV are the only means to study nuclear matter at densities larger than normal nuclear matter density ρ0. In the beamenergy range of 0.1 to 2A GeV nuclear matter is compressed upto three times ρ0. Access to nuclear matter properties is achieved by simulating nuclear collisions by means of microscopic transport codes, or statistical or hydrodynamicalmodels. Characteristics of heavy-ion collisions are discussed, and experimental observables which allow to constrain nuclear matter properties by comparing experimental results with those of transport codes are presented. Special emphasis will be given to the density dependence of the symmetry energy which is the most relevant connection between neutron stars and heavy ion collisions.

  14. Neutron kinetics in moderators and SNM detection through epithermal-neutron-induced fissions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gozani, Tsahi; King, Michael J.

    2016-01-01

    Extension of the well-established Differential Die Away Analysis (DDAA) into a faster time domain, where more penetrating epithermal neutrons induce fissions, is proposed and demonstrated via simulations and experiments. In the proposed method the fissions stimulated by thermal, epithermal and even higher-energy neutrons are measured after injection of a narrow pulse of high-energy 14 MeV (d,T) or 2.5 MeV (d,D) source neutrons, appropriately moderated. The ability to measure these fissions stems from the inherent correlation of neutron energy and time ("E-T" correlation) during the process of slowing down of high-energy source neutrons in common moderating materials such as hydrogenous compounds (e.g., polyethylene), heavy water, beryllium and graphite. The kinetic behavior following injection of a delta-function-shaped pulse (in time) of 14 MeV neutrons into such moderators is studied employing MCNPX simulations and, when applicable, some simple "one-group" models. These calculations served as a guide for the design of a source moderator which was used in experiments. Qualitative relationships between slowing-down time after the pulse and the prevailing neutron energy are discussed. A laboratory system consisting of a 14 MeV neutron generator, a polyethylene-reflected Be moderator, a liquid scintillator with pulse-shape discrimination (PSD) and a two-parameter E-T data acquisition system was set up to measure prompt neutron and delayed gamma-ray fission signatures in a 19.5% enriched LEU sample. The measured time behavior of thermal and epithermal neutron fission signals agreed well with the detailed simulations. The laboratory system can readily be redesigned and deployed as a mobile inspection system for SNM in, e.g., cars and vans. A strong pulsed neutron generator with narrow pulse (<75 ns) at a reasonably high pulse frequency could make the high-energy neutron induced fission modality a realizable SNM detection technique.

  15. Nonequilibrium pulsed plasma: ICF target, neutron, and x-ray sources applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gus'kov, Sergei Y.

    2001-04-01

    The approaches based on the properties of nonequilibrium pulsed plasmas to develop ICF target design and some ICF application problems are discussed. The methods of the creation of pulsed plasmas with essential properties on the laser radiation absorption and the emission of soft x-ray, fast ions and thermonuclear neutrons are proposed. Theoretical and experimental results are presented on the following fields: 1) laser-produced plasma of porous matter of light elements as a direct ICF target absorber smoothing the laser energy deposition nonuniformities; 2) laser- produced plasma of the composed materials which are the porous medium of light elements with a distribute solid clusters of heavy elements as a wide-range x-ray converter of the ICF target at the direct irradiation by laser beams; 3) laser-produced plasma of regularly volume-structured matter consisting of an ensemble of alternate thin layers of high and low density material containing a thermonuclear fuel or an ensemble of microshells in contact with an one another mode of a material contain such a fuel as a high power neutron source with the intensity more than 1010 DT neutron per one joule of laser energy; 4) high-power- laser-produced plasma of thin foil as a source of light Mev- ions for the direct ignition of ICF target.

  16. Neutron transport study of a beam port based dynamic neutron radiography facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khaial, Anas M.

    -Carlo simulations (using MCNP-4B code) are conducted to confirm the neutron parameters along the beam path and at the imaging plane. Good agreement between the analytical and the numerical values for the thermal neutron flux at the imaging plane to within 5% has been achieved. The MCNP simulations show that neutron back scattering, due to the presence of the back-wall biological shielding and the beam catcher, have an insignificant effect on the thermal neutron flux at the imaging plane, however, the epithermal and fast neutron fluxes have increased by 4-11%. Experimental results show that the thermal neutron flux is nearly uniform over an imaging area of 20.0-cm diameter. The thermal neutron flux ranges from 1.0x107 -- 1.26x107 n/cm 2-s at a reactor operating power of 3.0 MW. The measured value for the neutron-to-gamma ratio is 6.0x105 n/cm2-muSv and the Cadmium-ratio is observed to be 1.22. These values promote real-time neutron radiography with relatively high neutron attenuating materials such as light water and high-speed neutron radiography with relatively low neutron attenuating materials such as heavy water and Freon type fluids with a minimal contrast degradation resulting from non-thermal neutron content of the beam. A dynamic neutron radiography system has been developed and modified to obtain less neutron damage to the low-light level video camera. The system is used to visualize air-water two-phase flow in a natural-circulation loop to examine the dynamic capabilities of the radiography facility. Measurements of bubble velocity, void fraction, and phase distribution are successfully made. Single frames (˜33 ms) of neutron images were captured using the dynamic neutron radiography system for air-water two-phase flow. The system was able to resolve single bubbles interfaces with an image spatial resolution of approximately 0.44 mm. Thermal neutron detectors are placed at the periphery of the neutron beam to detect neutrons scattered by a non-flowing two-phase object

  17. High energy neutron radiography

    SciTech Connect

    Gavron, A.; Morley, K.; Morris, C.; Seestrom, S.; Ullmann, J.; Yates, G.; Zumbro, J.

    1996-06-01

    High-energy spallation neutron sources are now being considered in the US and elsewhere as a replacement for neutron beams produced by reactors. High-energy and high intensity neutron beams, produced by unmoderated spallation sources, open potential new vistas of neutron radiography. The authors discuss the basic advantages and disadvantages of high-energy neutron radiography, and consider some experimental results obtained at the Weapons Neutron Research (WNR) facility at Los Alamos.

  18. Boron neutron capture therapy for cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Barth, R.E.; Soloway, A.H. ); Fairchild, R.G. State Univ. of New York, Stony Brook )

    1990-10-01

    Boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) bring together two components that when kept separate have only minor effects on normal cells. The first component is a stable isotope of boron (boron 10) that can be concentrated in tumor cells. The second is a beam of low-energy neutrons that produces short-range radiation when absorbed, or captured, by the boron. The combination of these two conditions at the site of a tumor releases intense radiation that can destroy malignant tissues. BNCT is based on the nuclear reaction that occurs when boron 10 is irradiated with an absorbs neutrons. The neutrons that it takes up are called thermal, or slow, neutrons. They are of such low energy that they cause little tissue damage as compared with other forms of radiation such as protons, gamma rays and fast neutrons. When an atom of boron 10 captures a neutron, an unstable isotope, boron 11, forms. The boron 11 instantly fissions, yielding lithium 7 nuclei and energetic alpha particles. These heavy particles, which carry 2.79 million electron volts of energy, are a highly lethal form of radiation. If the treatment proceeds as intended, the destructive effects of the capture reaction would occur primarily in those cancer cells that have accumulated boron 10. Normal cells with low concentrations of boron would be spared.

  19. Neutron Zeeman beam-splitting for the investigation of magnetic nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozhevnikov, S. V.; Ott, F.; Semenova, E.

    2017-03-01

    Zeeman spatial splitting of a neutron beam takes place during a neutron spin-flip in magnetically non-collinear systems at grazing incidence geometry. We apply the neutron beam-splitting method for the investigation of magnetically non-collinear clusters of submicron size in a thin film. The experimental results are compared with ones obtained by other methods.

  20. Neutron-neutron and neutron-photon correlations with FREYA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vogt, R.; Randrup, J.

    2017-09-01

    For many years, the state of the art for modeling fission in radiation transport codes has involved sampling from average distributions. However, in a true fission event, the energies, momenta and multiplicities of emitted particles are correlated. The FREYA (Fission Reaction Event Yield Algorithm) code generates complete fission events. Event-by-event techniques such as those of FREYA are particularly useful because it is possible to obtain complete kinematic information on the prompt neutrons and photons emitted during the fission process. It is therefore possible to extract any desired correlation observables. We describe FREYA and compare our results with neutron-neutron, neutron-light fragment and neutron-photon correlation data.

  1. Production cross sections of neutron-rich No-263261 isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jingjing; Li, Cheng; Zhang, Gen; Zhu, Long; Liu, Zhong; Zhang, Feng-Shou

    2017-05-01

    The fusion excitation functions of No-263249 are studied by using various reaction systems based on the dinuclear system model. The neutron-rich radioactive beam 22O is used to produce neutron-rich nobelium isotopes, and the new neutron-rich isotopes No-263261 are synthesized by 242Pu(22O,3 n )261No , 244Pu(22O,4 n )262No , and 244Pu(22O,3 n )263No reactions, respectively. The corresponding maximum evaporation residue cross sections are 0.628, 4.649, and 1.638 μ b , respectively. The effects of the three processes (capture, fusion, and survival) in the complete fusion reaction are also analyzed. From investigation, a neutron-rich radioactive beam as the projectile and neutron-rich actinide as the target could be a new selection of the projectile-target combination to produce a neutron-rich heavy nuclide.

  2. NEUTRON COUNTER

    DOEpatents

    Curtis, C.D.; Carlson, R.L.; Tubinis, M.P.

    1958-07-29

    An ionization chamber instrument is described for cylindrical electrodes with an ionizing gag filling the channber. The inner electrode is held in place by a hermetic insulating seal at one end of the outer electrode, the other end of the outer electrode being closed by a gas filling tube. The outer surface of the inner electrode is coated with an active material which is responsive to neutron bombardment, such as uranium235 or boron-10, to produce ionizing radiations in the gas. The transverse cross sectional area of the inner electrode is small in relation to that of the channber whereby substantially all of the radiations are directed toward the outer electrode.

  3. NEUTRON SOURCE

    DOEpatents

    Reardon, W.A.; Lennox, D.H.; Nobles, R.G.

    1959-01-13

    A neutron source of the antimony--beryllium type is presented. The source is comprised of a solid mass of beryllium having a cylindrical recess extending therein and a cylinder containing antimony-124 slidably disposed within the cylindrical recess. The antimony cylinder is encased in aluminum. A berylliunn plug is removably inserted in the open end of the cylindrical recess to completely enclose the antimony cylinder in bsryllium. The plug and antimony cylinder are each provided with a stud on their upper ends to facilitate handling remotely.

  4. The s-process enrichment of the globular clusters M4 and M22

    SciTech Connect

    Shingles, Luke J.; Karakas, Amanda I.; Fishlock, Cherie K.; Yong, David; Da Costa, Gary S.; Marino, Anna F.; Hirschi, Raphael

    2014-11-01

    We investigate the enrichment in elements produced by the slow neutron-capture process (s-process) in the globular clusters M4 (NGC 6121) and M22 (NGC 6656). Stars in M4 have homogeneous abundances of Fe and neutron-capture elements, but the entire cluster is enhanced in s-process elements (Sr, Y, Ba, Pb) relative to other clusters with a similar metallicity. In M22, two stellar groups exhibit different abundances of Fe and s-process elements. By subtracting the mean abundances of s-poor from s-rich stars, we derive s-process residuals or empirical s-process distributions for M4 and M22. We find that the s-process distribution in M22 is more weighted toward the heavy s-peak (Ba, La, Ce) and Pb than M4, which has been enriched mostly with light s-peak elements (Sr, Y, Zr). We construct simple chemical evolution models using yields from massive star models that include rotation, which dramatically increases s-process production at low metallicity. We show that our massive star models with rotation rates of up to 50% of the critical (break-up) velocity and changes to the preferred {sup 17}O(α, γ){sup 21}Ne rate produce insufficient heavy s-elements and Pb to match the empirical distributions. For models that incorporate asymptotic giant branch yields, we find that intermediate-mass yields (with a {sup 22}Ne neutron source) alone do not reproduce the light-to-heavy s-element ratios for M4 and M22, and that a small contribution from models with a {sup 13}C pocket is required. With our assumption that {sup 13}C pockets form for initial masses below a transition range between 3.0 and 3.5 M {sub ☉}, we match the light-to-heavy s-element ratio in the s-process residual of M22 and predict a minimum enrichment timescale of between 240 and 360 Myr. Our predicted value is consistent with the 300 Myr upper limit age difference between the two groups derived from isochrone fitting.

  5. Cancer Clusters

    MedlinePlus

    ... Genetics Services Directory Cancer Prevention Overview Research Cancer Clusters On This Page What is a cancer cluster? ... the number of cancer cases in the suspected cluster Many reported clusters include too few cancer cases ...

  6. Heavy particle radioactivity from superheavy nuclei leading to 298114 daughter nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santhosh, K. P.; Priyanka, B.

    2014-09-01

    The feasibility for the alpha decay and the heavy particle decay from the even-even superheavy (SH) nuclei with Z = 116- 124 has been studied within the Coulomb and proximity potential model (CPPM). Our predicted half lives agree well with the values evaluated using the Universal formula for cluster decay (UNIV) of Poenaru et al., the Universal Decay Law (UDL) of Qi et al., and the Scaling Law of Horoi et al. The spontaneous fission half lives of the corresponding parents have also been evaluated using the semi-empirical formula of Santhosh et al. Within our fission model, we have studied the cluster formation probability for various clusters and the maximum cluster formation probability is found for the decay accompanying 298114. In the plots for log10 (T1/2) against the neutron number of the daughter in the corresponding decay, the half life is found to be the minimum for the decay leading to 298114 (Z = 114, N = 184). Most of the predicted half lives are well within the present upper limit for measurements (T1/2 <1030 s) and the computed alpha half lives for 290,292Lv agree well with the experimental data.

  7. Neutron Scattering Studies of Cement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allen, Andrew

    2010-03-01

    Despite more than a century of research, basic questions remain regarding both the internal structure and the role of water in Ordinary Portland cement (OPC) concrete, the world's most widely used manufactured material. Most such questions concern the primary hydration product and strength-building phase of OPC paste, the calcium silicate hydrate (C-S-H) gel. When cement and water are mixed, this phase precipitates as clusters of nanoscale (nearly amorphous) colloidal particles with an associated water-filled inter-particle pore system. Most attempts to characterize the C-S-H gel and the behavior of the associated water involve drying or other processes that, themselves, change the bound water content within and around the gel. Neutron scattering methods do not suffer from this disadvantage. Furthermore, the neutron isotope effect and the neutron's sensitivity to molecular motion have enabled considerable progress to be made in recent years by: (i) determining the C-S-H composition, density and gel structure in small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) H/D contrast variation studies; (ii) elucidating the changing state of water within cement as hydration progresses using quasielastic neutron scattering (QENS); and (iii) measuring the production and consumption of nanoscale calcium hydroxide (CH), a by-product of cement hydration that co-exists with the C-S-H gel, using inelastic neutron scattering (INS). These experiments have provided new insights into the physics and chemistry of cement hydration, and have implications for the design of new concretes with pozzolanic cement additions that are intended to address environmental concerns and sustainability issues.

  8. Neutron Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van den Heuvel, Ed

    Radio pulsars are unique laboratories for a wide range of physics and astrophysics. Understanding how they are created, how they evolve and where we find them in the Galaxy, with or without binary companions, is highly constraining of theories of stellar and binary evolution. Pulsars' relationship with a recently discovered variety of apparently different classes of neutron stars is an interesting modern astrophysical puzzle which we consider in Part I of this review. Radio pulsars are also famous for allowing us to probe the laws of nature at a fundamental level. They act as precise cosmic clocks and, when in a binary system with a companion star, provide indispensable venues for precision tests of gravity. The different applications of radio pulsars for fundamental physics will be discussed in Part II. We finish by making mention of the newly discovered class of astrophysical objects, the Fast Radio Bursts, which may or may not be related to radio pulsars or neutron stars, but which were discovered in observations of the latter.

  9. A study of heavy-heavy nuclear reactions. [nuclear research/nuclear particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khandelwal, G. S.

    1975-01-01

    Calculations are presented for the reaction products in high energy collisions and of the atmospheric transport of particles such as protons, neutrons and other nucleons. The magnetic moments of charmed baryons are examined. Total cross sections which are required for cosmic heavy ion transport and shielding studies are also examined.

  10. ASTROPHYSICS: Neutron Stars Imply Relativity's a Drag.

    PubMed

    Schilling, G

    2000-09-01

    A new finding, based on x-rays from distant neutron stars, could be the first clear evidence of a weird relativistic effect called frame dragging, in which a heavy chunk of spinning matter wrenches the space-time around it like an eggbeater. Using data from NASA's Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer, three astronomers in Amsterdam found circumstantial evidence for frame dragging in the flickering of three neutron stars in binary systems. They announced their results in the 1 September issue of The Astrophysical Journal.

  11. Efimov physics around the neutron-rich 60Ca isotope.

    PubMed

    Hagen, G; Hagen, P; Hammer, H-W; Platter, L

    2013-09-27

    We calculate the neutron-60Ca S-wave scattering phase shifts using state of the art coupled-cluster theory combined with modern ab initio interactions derived from chiral effective theory. Effects of three-nucleon forces are included schematically as density dependent nucleon-nucleon interactions. This information is combined with halo effective field theory in order to investigate the 60Ca-neutron-neutron system. We predict correlations between different three-body observables and the two-neutron separation energy of 62Ca. This provides evidence of Efimov physics along the calcium isotope chain. Experimental key observables that facilitate a test of our findings are discussed.

  12. Neutron matter, symmetry energy and neutron stars

    SciTech Connect

    Stefano, Gandolfi; Steiner, Andrew W

    2016-01-01

    Recent progress in quantum Monte Carlo with modern nucleon-nucleon interactions have enabled the successful description of properties of light nuclei and neutron-rich matter. Of particular interest is the nuclear symmetry energy, the energy cost of creating an isospin asymmetry, and its connection to the structure of neutron stars. Combining these advances with recent observations of neutron star masses and radii gives insight into the equation of state of neutron-rich matter near and above the saturation density. In particular, neutron star radius measurements constrain the derivative of the symmetry energy.

  13. Neutron matter, symmetry energy and neutron stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gandolfi, S.; Steiner, A. W.

    2016-01-01

    Recent progress in quantum Monte Carlo with modern nucleon-nucleon interactions have enabled the successful description of properties of light nuclei and neutron- rich matter. Of particular interest is the nuclear symmetry energy, the energy cost of creating an isospin asymmetry, and its connection to the structure of neutron stars. Combining these advances with recent observations of neutron star masses and radii gives insight into the equation of state of neutron-rich matter near and above the saturation density. In particular, neutron star radius measurements constrain the derivative of the symmetry energy.

  14. Neutron standard data

    SciTech Connect

    Peelle, R.; Conde, H.

    1988-01-01

    The neutron standards are reviewed with emphasis on the evaluation for ENDFB-VI. Also discussed are the neutron spectrum of /sup 252/Cf spontaneous fission, activation cross sections for neutron flux measurement, and standards for neutron energies greater than 20 MeV. Recommendations are made for future work. 21 refs., 6 figs., 3 tabs.

  15. Borner Ball Neutron Detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    The Bonner Ball Neutron Detector measures neutron radiation. Neutrons are uncharged atomic particles that have the ability to penetrate living tissues, harming human beings in space. The Bonner Ball Neutron Detector is one of three radiation experiments during Expedition Two. The others are the Phantom Torso and Dosimetric Mapping.

  16. Mineral exploration and soil analysis using in situ neutron activation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Senftle, F.E.; Hoyte, A.F.

    1966-01-01

    A feasibility study has been made to operate by remote control an unshielded portable positive-ion accelerator type neutron source to induce activities in the ground or rock by "in situ" neutron irradiation. Selective activation techniques make it possible to detect some thirty or more elements by irradiating the ground for periods of a few minutes with either 3-MeV or 14-MeV neutrons. The depth of penetration of neutrons, the effect of water content of the soil on neutron moderation, gamma ray attenuation in the soil and other problems are considered. The analysis shows that, when exploring for most elements of economic interest, the reaction 2H(d,n)3He yielding ??? 3-MeV neutrons is most practical to produce a relatively uniform flux of neutrons of less than 1 keV to a depth of 19???-20???. Irradiation with high energy neutrons (??? 14 MeV) can also be used and may be better suited for certain problems. However, due to higher background and lower sensitivity for the heavy minerals, it is not a recommended neutron source for general exploration use. Preliminary experiments have been made which indicate that neutron activation in situ is feasible for a mineral exploration or qualititative soil analysis. ?? 1976.

  17. Neutron reflecting supermirror structure

    DOEpatents

    Wood, James L.

    1992-01-01

    An improved neutron reflecting supermirror structure comprising a plurality of stacked sets of bilayers of neutron reflecting materials. The improved neutron reflecting supermirror structure is adapted to provide extremely good performance at high incidence angles, i.e. up to four time the critical angle of standard neutron mirror structures. The reflection of neutrons striking the supermirror structure at a high critical angle provides enhanced neutron throughput, and hence more efficient and economical use of neutron sources. One layer of each set of bilayers consist of titanium, and the second layer of each set of bilayers consist of an alloy of nickel with carbon interstitially present in the nickel alloy.

  18. Neutrons in cancer therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allen, Barry J.

    1995-03-01

    The role of neutrons in the management of cancer has a long history. However, it is only in recent years that neutrons are beginning to find an accepted place as an efficacious radiation modality. Fast neutron therapy is already well established for the treatment of certain cancers, and clinical trials are ongoing. Californium neutron sources are being used in brachytherapy. Boron neutron capture therapy has been well tested with thermal neutrons and epithermal neutron dose escalation studies are about to commence in the USA and Europe. Possibilities of neutron induced auger electron therapy are also discussed. With respect to chemotherapy, prompt neutron capture analysis is being used to study the dose optimization of chemotherapy in the management of breast cancer. The rationales behind these applications of neutrons in the management of cancer are examined.

  19. Nuclear reactor neutron shielding

    DOEpatents

    Speaker, Daniel P; Neeley, Gary W; Inman, James B

    2017-09-12

    A nuclear reactor includes a reactor pressure vessel and a nuclear reactor core comprising fissile material disposed in a lower portion of the reactor pressure vessel. The lower portion of the reactor pressure vessel is disposed in a reactor cavity. An annular neutron stop is located at an elevation above the uppermost elevation of the nuclear reactor core. The annular neutron stop comprises neutron absorbing material filling an annular gap between the reactor pressure vessel and the wall of the reactor cavity. The annular neutron stop may comprise an outer neutron stop ring attached to the wall of the reactor cavity, and an inner neutron stop ring attached to the reactor pressure vessel. An excore instrument guide tube penetrates through the annular neutron stop, and a neutron plug comprising neutron absorbing material is disposed in the tube at the penetration through the neutron stop.

  20. NEUTRONIC REACTOR

    DOEpatents

    Stewart, H.B.

    1958-12-23

    A nuclear reactor of the type speclfically designed for the irradiation of materials is discussed. In this design a central cyllndrical core of moderating material ls surrounded by an active portlon comprlsed of an annular tank contalning fissionable material immersed ln a liquid moderator. The active portion ls ln turn surrounded by a reflector, and a well ls provided in the center of the core to accommodate the materlals to be irradiated. The over-all dimensions of the core ln at least one plane are equal to or greater than twice the effective slowing down length and equal to or less than twlce the effective diffuslon length for neutrons in the core materials.

  1. NEUTRONIC REACTORS

    DOEpatents

    Wigner, E.P.; Young, G.J.

    1958-10-14

    A method is presented for loading and unloading rod type fuel elements of a neutronic reactor of the heterogeneous, solld moderator, liquid cooled type. In the embodiment illustrated, the fuel rods are disposed in vertical coolant channels in the reactor core. The fuel rods are loaded and unloaded through the upper openings of the channels which are immersed in the coolant liquid, such as water. Unloading is accomplished by means of a coffer dam assembly having an outer sleeve which is placed in sealing relation around the upper opening. A radiation shield sleeve is disposed in and reciprocable through the coffer dam sleeve. A fuel rod engaging member operates through the axial bore in the radiation shield sleeve to withdraw the fuel rod from its position in the reactor coolant channel into the shield, the shield snd rod then being removed. Loading is accomplished in the reverse procedure.

  2. Non-destructive studies of fuel pellets by neutron resonance absorption radiography and thermal neutron radiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tremsin, A. S.; Vogel, S. C.; Mocko, M.; Bourke, M. A. M.; Yuan, V.; Nelson, R. O.; Brown, D. W.; Feller, W. B.

    2013-09-01

    Many isotopes in nuclear materials exhibit strong peaks in neutron absorption cross sections in the epithermal energy range (1-1000 eV). These peaks (often referred to as resonances) occur at energies specific to particular isotopes, providing a means of isotope identification and concentration measurements. The high penetration of epithermal neutrons through most materials is very useful for studies where samples consist of heavy-Z elements opaque to X-rays and sometimes to thermal neutrons as well. The characterization of nuclear fuel elements in their cladding can benefit from the development of high resolution neutron resonance absorption imaging (NRAI), enabled by recently developed spatially-resolved neutron time-of-flight detectors. In this technique the neutron transmission of the sample is measured as a function of spatial location and of neutron energy. In the region of the spectra that borders the resonance energy for a particular isotope, the reduction in transmission can be used to acquire an image revealing the 2-dimensional distribution of that isotope within the sample. Provided that the energy of each transmitted neutron is measured by the neutron detector used and the irradiated sample possesses neutron absorption resonances, then isotope-specific location maps can be acquired simultaneously for several isotopes. This can be done even in the case where samples are opaque or have very similar transmission for thermal neutrons and X-rays or where only low concentrations of particular isotopes are present (<0.1 atom% in some cases). Ultimately, such radiographs of isotope location can be utilized to measure isotope concentration, and can even be combined to produce three-dimensional distributions using tomographic methods. In this paper we present the proof-of-principle of NRAI and transmission Bragg edge imaging performed at Flight Path 5 (FP5) at the LANSCE pulsed, moderated neutron source of Los Alamos National Laboratory. A set of urania mockup

  3. Combining the spin-separated exact two-component relativistic Hamiltonian with the equation-of-motion coupled-cluster method for the treatment of spin-orbit splittings of light and heavy elements.

    PubMed

    Cao, Zhanli; Li, Zhendong; Wang, Fan; Liu, Wenjian

    2017-02-01

    The spin-separated exact two-component (X2C) relativistic Hamiltonian [sf-X2C+so-DKHn, J. Chem. Phys., 2012, 137, 154114] is combined with the equation-of-motion coupled-cluster method with singles and doubles (EOM-CCSD) for the treatment of spin-orbit splittings of open-shell molecular systems. Scalar relativistic effects are treated to infinite order from the outset via the spin-free part of the X2C Hamiltonian (sf-X2C), whereas the spin-orbit couplings (SOC) are handled at the CC level via the first-order Douglas-Kroll-Hess (DKH) type of spin-orbit operator (so-DKH1). Since the exponential of single excitations, i.e., exp(T1), introduces sufficient spin orbital relaxations, the inclusion of SOC at the CC level is essentially the same in accuracy as the inclusion of SOC from the outset in terms of the two-component spinors determined variationally by the sf-X2C+so-DKH1 Hamiltonian, but is computationally more efficient. Therefore, such an approach (denoted as sf-X2C-EOM-CCSD(SOC)) can achieve uniform accuracy for the spin-orbit splittings of both light and heavy elements. For light elements, the treatment of SOC can even be postponed until the EOM step (denoted as sf-X2C-EOM(SOC)-CCSD), so as to further reduce the computational cost. To reveal the efficacy of sf-X2C-EOM-CCSD(SOC) and sf-X2C-EOM(SOC)-CCSD, the spin-orbit splittings of the (2)Π states of monohydrides up to the sixth row of the periodic table are investigated. The results show that sf-X2C-EOM-CCSD(SOC) predicts very accurate results (within 5%) for elements up to the fifth row, whereas sf-X2C-EOM(SOC)-CCSD is useful only for light elements (up to the third row but with some exceptions). For comparison, the sf-X2C-S-TD-DFT-SOC approach [spin-adapted open-shell time-dependent density functional theory, Mol. Phys., 2013, 111, 3741] is applied to the same systems. The overall accuracy (1-10%) is satisfactory.

  4. Relativistic simulations of eccentric binary neutron star mergers: One-arm spiral instability and effects of neutron star spin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    East, William E.; Paschalidis, Vasileios; Pretorius, Frans; Shapiro, Stuart L.

    2016-01-01

    We perform general-relativistic hydrodynamical simulations of dynamical capture binary neutron star mergers, emphasizing the role played by the neutron star spin. Dynamical capture mergers may take place in globular clusters, as well as other dense stellar systems, where most neutron stars have large spins. We find significant variability in the merger outcome as a function of initial neutron star spin. For cases where the spin is aligned with the orbital angular momentum, the additional centrifugal support in the remnant hypermassive neutron star can prevent the prompt collapse to a black hole, while for antialigned cases the decreased total angular momentum can facilitate the collapse to a black hole. We show that even moderate spins can significantly increase the amount of ejected material, including the amount unbound with velocities greater than half the speed of light, leading to brighter electromagnetic signatures associated with kilonovae and interaction of the ejecta with the interstellar medium. Furthermore, we find that the initial neutron star spin can strongly affect the already rich phenomenology in the postmerger gravitational wave signatures that arise from the oscillation modes of the hypermassive neutron star. In several of our simulations, the resulting hypermassive neutron star develops the one-arm (m =1 ) spiral instability, the most pronounced cases being those with small but non-negligible neutron star spins. For long-lived hypermassive neutron stars, the presence of this instability leads to improved prospects for detecting these events through gravitational waves, and thus may give information about the neutron star equation of state.

  5. 2010 Review of neutron and non-neutron nuclear data

    SciTech Connect

    Holden, N.E.

    2011-07-01

    The results of a review and evaluation of neutron and non-neutron nuclear data published in the scientific literature over the past three years are presented. The status of new chemical elements is examined. Ten elements have had their atomic weight and uncertainty replaced by interval values of upper and lower bounds. Data on revised values for the isotopic composition of the elements are reviewed and new recommended values are presented for germanium. Radioactive half-lives are reviewed and latest values presented which include measurements on nuclides of interest and very long-lived nuclides such as double beta decay, double electron capture, long-lived alpha decay, and long-lived beta decay. The latest information and the status on the evaluation of atomic masses are discussed. Data from new measurements on the very heavy elements (trans-meitnerium elements) are discussed and tabulated. Data on various recent neutron cross-section and resonance integral measurements are also discussed and the latest measurements are tabulated in both cases. The JENDL-4.0 and ENDF/B-VII.1 nuclear data libraries are discussed. A new initiative on the existence and importance of isotopes is presented. (authors)

  6. Neutron environments on the Martian surface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clowdsley, M. S.; Wilson, J. W.; Kim, M. H.; Singleterry, R. C.; Tripathi, R. K.; Heinbockel, J. H.; Badavi, F. F.; Shinn, J. L.

    2001-01-01

    Radiation is a primary concern in the planning of a manned mission to Mars. Recent studies using NASA Langley Research Center's HZETRN space radiation transport code show that the low energy neutron fluence on the Martian surface is larger than previously expected. The upper atmosphere of Mars is exposed to a background radiation field made up of a large number of protons during a solar particle event and mixture of light and heavy ions caused by galactic cosmic rays at other times. In either case, these charged ions interact with the carbon and oxygen atoms of the Martian atmosphere through ionization and nuclear collisions producing secondary ions and neutrons which then interact with the atmospheric atoms in a similar manner. In the past, only these downward moving particles have been counted in evaluating the neutron energy spectrum on the surface. Recent enhancements in the HZETRN code allow for the additional evaluation of those neutrons created within the Martian regolith through the same types of nuclear reactions, which rise to the surface. New calculations using this improved HZETRN code show that these upward moving neutrons contribute significantly to the overall neutron spectrum for energies less than 10 MeV.

  7. Neutron environments on the Martian surface.

    PubMed

    Clowdsley, M S; Wilson, J W; Kim, M H; Singleterry, R C; Tripathi, R K; Heinbockel, J H; Badavi, F F; Shinn, J L

    2001-01-01

    Radiation is a primary concern in the planning of a manned mission to Mars. Recent studies using NASA Langley Research Center's HZETRN space radiation transport code show that the low energy neutron fluence on the Martian surface is larger than previously expected. The upper atmosphere of Mars is exposed to a background radiation field made up of a large number of protons during a solar particle event and mixture of light and heavy ions caused by galactic cosmic rays at other times. In either case, these charged ions interact with the carbon and oxygen atoms of the Martian atmosphere through ionization and nuclear collisions producing secondary ions and neutrons which then interact with the atmospheric atoms in a similar manner. In the past, only these downward moving particles have been counted in evaluating the neutron energy spectrum on the surface. Recent enhancements in the HZETRN code allow for the additional evaluation of those neutrons created within the Martian regolith through the same types of nuclear reactions, which rise to the surface. New calculations using this improved HZETRN code show that these upward moving neutrons contribute significantly to the overall neutron spectrum for energies less than 10 MeV.

  8. r-Process nucleosynthesis without excess neutrons.

    PubMed

    Meyer, Bradley S

    2002-12-02

    Matter expanding sufficiently rapidly and at high enough entropy per nucleon can enter a heavy-element synthesis regime heretofore unexplored. In this extreme regime, more similar to nucleosynthesis in the early universe than to that typical in stellar explosive environments, there is a persistent disequilibrium between free nucleons and abundant alpha particles, which allows heavy r-process nucleus production even in matter with more protons than neutrons. This observation bears on the issue of the site of the r process, on the variability of abundance yields from r-process events, and on constraints on neutrino physics derived from nucleosynthesis.

  9. First observations of power MOSFET burnout with high energy neutrons

    SciTech Connect

    Oberg, D.L.; Wert, J.L.; Normand, E.; Majewski, P.P.; Wender, S.A.

    1996-12-01

    Single event burnout was seen in power MOSFETs exposed to high energy neutrons. Devices with rated voltage {ge}400 volts exhibited burnout at substantially less than the rated voltage. Tests with high energy protons gave similar results. Burnout was also seen in limited tests with lower energy protons and neutrons. Correlations with heavy-ion data are discussed. Accelerator proton data gave favorable comparisons with burnout rates measured on the APEX spacecraft. Implications for burnout at lower altitudes are also discussed.

  10. Thermal neutron imaging in an active interrogation environment

    SciTech Connect

    Vanier,P.E.; Forman, L., and Norman, D.R.

    2009-03-10

    We have developed a thermal-neutron coded-aperture imager that reveals the locations of hydrogenous materials from which thermal neutrons are being emitted. This imaging detector can be combined with an accelerator to form an active interrogation system in which fast neutrons are produced in a heavy metal target by means of xcitation by high energy photons. The photo-induced neutrons can be either prompt or delayed, depending on whether neutronemitting fission products are generated. Provided that there are hydrogenous materials close to the target, some of the photo-induced neutrons slow down and emerge from the surface at thermal energies. These neutrons can be used to create images that show the location and shape of the thermalizing materials. Analysis of the temporal response of the neutron flux provides information about delayed neutrons from induced fission if there are fissionable materials in the target. The combination of imaging and time-of-flight discrimination helps to improve the signal-to-background ratio. It is also possible to interrogate the target with neutrons, for example using a D-T generator. In this case, an image can be obtained from hydrogenous material in a target without the presence of heavy metal. In addition, if fissionable material is present in the target, probing with fast neutrons can stimulate delayed neutrons from fission, and the imager can detect and locate the object of interest, using appropriate time gating. Operation of this sensitive detection equipment in the vicinity of an accelerator presents a number of challenges, because the accelerator emits electromagnetic interference as well as stray ionizing radiation, which can mask the signals of interest.

  11. TOPICAL REVIEW: Probing the nuclear symmetry energy with heavy-ion collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Toro, M.; Baran, V.; Colonna, M.; Greco, V.

    2010-08-01

    Heavy ion collisions (HICs) represent a unique tool to probe the in-medium nuclear interaction in regions away from saturation. In this review we present a selection of new reaction observables in dissipative collisions particularly sensitive to the symmetry term of the nuclear equation of state (Iso-EoS). We will first discuss the isospin equilibration dynamics. At low energies this manifests via the recently observed dynamical dipole radiation, due to a collective neutron-proton oscillation with the symmetry term acting as a restoring force. At higher beam energies Iso-EoS effects will be seen in an isospin diffusion mechanism, via imbalance ratio measurements, in particular from correlations to the total kinetic energy loss. For fragmentation reactions in central events we suggest to look at the coupling between isospin distillation and radial flow. In neck fragmentation reactions important Iso-EoS information can be obtained from the fragment isospin content, velocity and alignment correlations. The high-density symmetry term can be probed from isospin effects on heavy-ion reactions at relativistic energies (few A GeV range), in particular for high transverse momentum selections of the reaction products. Rather isospin sensitive observables are proposed from nucleon/cluster emissions, collective flows and meson production. The possibility of shedding light on the controversial neutron/proton effective mass splitting in asymmetric matter is also suggested. A large symmetry repulsion at high baryon density will also lead to an 'earlier' hadron-deconfinement transition in n-rich matter. The binodal transition line of the (T, ρB) diagram is lowered to a region accessible through heavy-ion collisions in the energy range of the new planned facilities, e.g. the FAIR/NICA projects. Some observable effects of the formation of a mixed phase are suggested, in particular a neutron trapping mechanism. The dependence of the results on a suitable treatment of the isovector

  12. Localization and clustering in atomic nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ebran, J.-P.; Khan, E.; Nikšić, T.; Vretenar, D.

    2017-10-01

    Nucleon localization, and formation of clusters in nucleonic matter and finite nuclei are explored in a framework based on nuclear energy density functionals. The liquid-cluster transition is investigated and different measures of localization are discussed. The formation and evolution of α-clusters in excited states of both N = Z and neutron-rich nuclei are analysed. The effects of spin-orbit coupling are discussed in relation to the confining potential.

  13. Heavy Metal Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2001-08-01

    atomic mass and hence, increasing positive charge of the nuclei, the electric repulsion between the nuclei becomes stronger and stronger. In fact, the fusion process only works up to a certain mass limit, corresponding to the element Iron [2]. All elements that are heavier than Iron cannot be produced via this path. But then, how were those heavy elements we now find on the Earth produced in the first place? From where comes the Zirconium in artificial diamonds, the Barium that colours fireworks, the Tungsten in the filaments in electric bulbs? Which process made the Lead in your car battery? Beyond iron The production of elements heavier than Iron takes place by adding neutrons to the atomic nuclei . These neutral particles do not feel any electrical repulsion from the charged nuclei. They can therefore easily approach them and thereby create heavier nuclei. This is indeed the way the heaviest chemical elements are built up. There are actually two different stellar environments where this process of "neutron capture" can happen. One place where this process occurs is inside very massive stars when they explode as supernovae . In such a dramatic event, the build-up proceeds very rapidly, via the so-called "r-process" ( "r" for rapid ). The AGB stars But not all heavy elements are created in such an explosive way. A second possibility follows a more "peaceful" road. It takes place in rather normal stars, when they burn their Helium towards the end of their lives. In the so-called "s-process" ( "s" for slow ), heavier elements are then produced by a rather gentle addition of neutral neutrons to atomic nuclei. In fact, roughly half of all the elements heavier than Iron are believed to be synthesized by this process during the late evolutionary phases of stars. This process takes place during a specific stage of stellar evolution, known as the "AGB" phase [3]. It occurs just before an old star expels its gaseous envelope into the surrounding interstellar space and sometime

  14. Neutron range spectrometer

    DOEpatents

    Manglos, Stephen H.

    1989-06-06

    A neutron range spectrometer and method for determining the neutron energy spectrum of a neutron emitting source are disclosed. Neutrons from the source are collimnated along a collimation axis and a position sensitive neutron counter is disposed in the path of the collimated neutron beam. The counter determines positions along the collimation axis of interactions between the neutrons in the neutron beam and a neutron-absorbing material in the counter. From the interaction positions, a computer analyzes the data and determines the neutron energy spectrum of the neutron beam. The counter is preferably shielded and a suitable neutron-absorbing material is He-3. The computer solves the following equation in the analysis: ##EQU1## where: N(x).DELTA.x=the number of neutron interactions measured between a position x and x+.DELTA.x, A.sub.i (E.sub.i).DELTA.E.sub.i =the number of incident neutrons with energy between E.sub.i and E.sub.i +.DELTA.E.sub.i, and C=C(E.sub.i)=N .sigma.(E.sub.i) where N=the number density of absorbing atoms in the position sensitive counter means and .sigma. (E.sub.i)=the average cross section of the absorbing interaction between E.sub.i and E.sub.i +.DELTA.E.sub.i.

  15. Neutron capture by hook or by crook

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mosby, Shea

    2016-03-01

    The neutron capture reaction is a topic of fundamental interest for both heavy element (A>60) nucleosynthesis and applications in such fields as nuclear energy and defense. The full suite of interesting isotopes ranges from stable nuclei to the most exotic, and it is not possible to directly measure all the relevant reaction rates. The DANCE instrument at Los Alamos provides direct access to the neutron capture reaction for stable and long-lived nuclei, while Apollo coupled to HELIOS at Argonne has been developed as an indirect probe for cases where a direct measurement is impossible. The basic techniques and their implications will be presented, and the status of ongoing experimental campaigns to address neutron capture in the A=60 and A=100 mass regions will be discussed.

  16. Resonance effects in neutron scattering lengths

    SciTech Connect

    Lynn, J.E.

    1989-06-01

    The nature of neutron scattering lengths is described and the nuclear effects giving rise to their variation is discussed. Some examples of the shortcomings of the available nuclear data base, particularly for heavy nuclei, are given. Methods are presented for improving this data base, in particular for obtaining the energy variation of the complex coherent scattering length from long to sub-/angstrom/ wave lengths from the available sources of slow neutron cross section data. Examples of this information are given for several of the rare earth nuclides. Some examples of the effect of resonances in neutron reflection and diffraction are discussed. This report documents a seminar given at Argonne National Laboratory in March 1989. 18 refs., 18 figs.

  17. Cluster headache

    MedlinePlus

    Histamine headache; Headache - histamine; Migrainous neuralgia; Headache - cluster; Horton's headache; Vascular headache - cluster ... Doctors do not know exactly what causes cluster headaches. They ... (chemical in the body released during an allergic response) or ...

  18. Realistic fission model and the r-process in neutron star mergers

    SciTech Connect

    Shibagaki, S.; Kajino, T.; Chiba, S.; Mathews, G. J.

    2014-05-09

    About half of heavy elements are considered to be produced by the rapid neutron-capture process, r-process. The neutron star merger is one of the viable candidates for the astrophysical site of r-process nucleosynthesis. Nuclear fission reactions play an important role in the r-process of neutron star mergers. However theoretical predictions about fission properties of neutron-rich nuclei have some uncertainties. Especially, their fission fragment distributions are totally unknown and the phenomenologically extrapolated distribution was often applied to nucleosynthesis calculations. In this study, we have carried out r-process nucleosynthesis calculations based upon new theoretical estimates of fission fragment distributions. We discuss the effects on the r-process in neutron star mergers from the nuclear fission of heavy neutron-rich actinide elements. We also discuss how variations in the fission fragment distributions affect the abundance pattern.

  19. Neutron scattering from a ferrofluid

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, M.Y. |; Luo, W.; Lynn, J.

    1995-12-31

    Small angle neutron scattering experiments were performed on a eicosane-based ferrofluid. An average size of 88 {angstrom} can be extracted from the data, in agreement with results from electron microscopy. Below the frozen temperature of eicosane, however, the particles are seen to be in larger aggregates with a fractal dimension of 2.15, similar to those formed under reaction-limited cluster aggregation (RLCA) conditions. At high concentrations, particles form larger aggregates even in the liquid state. Applying a magnetic field introduces new structure and changes the density inside the aggregates.

  20. NEUTRONIC REACTOR

    DOEpatents

    Ohlinger, L.A.; Wigner, E.P.; Weinberg, A.M.; Young, G.J.

    1958-09-01

    This patent relates to neutronic reactors of the heterogeneous water cooled type, and in particular to a fuel element charging and discharging means therefor. In the embodiment illustrated the reactor contains horizontal, parallel coolant tubes in which the fuel elements are disposed. A loading cart containing a magnzine for holding a plurality of fuel elements operates along the face of the reactor at the inlet ends of the coolant tubes. The loading cart is equipped with a ram device for feeding fuel elements from the magazine through the inlot ends of the coolant tubes. Operating along the face adjacent the discharge ends of the tubes there is provided another cart means adapted to receive irradiated fuel elements as they are forced out of the discharge ends of the coolant tubes by the incoming new fuel elements. This cart is equipped with a tank coataining a coolant, such as water, into which the fuel elements fall, and a hydraulically operated plunger to hold the end of the fuel element being discharged. This inveation provides an apparatus whereby the fuel elements may be loaded into the reactor, irradiated therein, and unloaded from the reactor without stopping the fiow of the coolant and without danger to the operating personnel.

  1. Advanced Neutron Source: Plant Design Requirements

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-07-01

    The Advanced Neutron Source will be a new world-class facility for research using hot, thermal, cold, and ultra-cold neutrons. The heart of the facility will be a 330-MW (fission), heavy-water cooled and heavy-water moderated reactor. The reactor will be housed in a central reactor building, with supporting equipment located in an adjoining reactor support building. An array of cold neutron guides will fan out into a large guide hall, housing about 30 neutron research stations. Appropriate office, laboratory, and shop facilities will be included to provide a complete facility for users. The ANS is scheduled to begin operation at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory early in the next decade. This PDR document defines the plant-level requirements for the design, construction, and operation of ANS. It also defines and provides input to the individual System Design Description (SDD) documents. Together, this PDR document and the set of SDD documents will define and control the baseline configuration of ANS.

  2. Neutron Spectroscopy Using LiF Thin-Film Detectors

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-03-01

    showing 1-11 of 22. The first two functions (red and green ) do not appear in the figure because neutrons of this energy are primarily stopped by the cadmium...deposited over the semiconductor device. The neutron flux transmitted through the film as a function of distance x can be described by [17]: I(x) = I0e...de facto standard for neutron transport , has a major disadvantage 62 for this application: a lack of attestation for heavy charged particle transport

  3. NEUTRON REACTOR HAVING A Xe$sup 135$ SHIELD

    DOEpatents

    Stanton, H.E.

    1957-10-29

    Shielding for reactors of the type in which the fuel is a chain reacting liquid composition comprised essentially of a slurry of fissionable and fertile material suspended in a liquid moderator is discussed. The neutron reflector comprises a tank containing heavy water surrounding the reactor, a shield tank surrounding the reflector, a gamma ray shield surrounding said shield tank, and a means for conveying gaseous fission products, particularly Xe/sup 135/, from the reactor chamber to the shield tank, thereby serving as a neutron shield by capturing the thermalized neutrons that leak outwardly from the shield tank.

  4. Trojan Horse Method for neutrons-induced reaction studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gulino, M.; Asfin Collaboration

    2017-09-01

    Neutron-induced reactions play an important role in nuclear astrophysics in several scenario, such as primordial Big Bang Nucleosynthesis, Inhomogeneous Big Bang Nucleosynthesis, heavy-element production during the weak component of the s-process, explosive stellar nucleosynthesis. To overcome the experimental problems arising from the production of a neutron beam, the possibility to use the Trojan Horse Method to study neutron-induced reactions has been investigated. The application is of particular interest for reactions involving radioactive nuclei having short lifetime.

  5. Neutron streak camera

    DOEpatents

    Wang, Ching L.

    1983-09-13

    Apparatus for improved sensitivity and time resolution of a neutron measurement. The detector is provided with an electrode assembly having a neutron sensitive cathode which emits relatively low energy secondary electrons. The neutron sensitive cathode has a large surface area which provides increased sensitivity by intercepting a greater number of neutrons. The cathode is also curved to compensate for differences in transit time of the neutrons emanating from the point source. The slower speeds of the secondary electrons emitted from a certain portion of the cathode are matched to the transit times of the neutrons impinging thereupon.

  6. Neutron streak camera

    DOEpatents

    Wang, C.L.

    1981-05-14

    Apparatus for improved sensitivity and time resolution of a neutron measurement. The detector is provided with an electrode assembly having a neutron sensitive cathode which emits relatively low energy secondary electrons. The neutron sensitive cathode has a large surface area which provides increased sensitivity by intercepting a greater number of neutrons. The cathode is also curved to compensate for differences in transit time of the neutrons emanating from the point source. The slower speeds of the secondary electrons emitted from a certain portion of the cathode are matched to the transit times of the neutrons impinging thereupon.

  7. Neutron streak camera

    DOEpatents

    Wang, C.L.

    1983-09-13

    Disclosed is an apparatus for improved sensitivity and time resolution of a neutron measurement. The detector is provided with an electrode assembly having a neutron sensitive cathode which emits relatively low energy secondary electrons. The neutron sensitive cathode has a large surface area which provides increased sensitivity by intercepting a greater number of neutrons. The cathode is also curved to compensate for differences in transit time of the neutrons emanating from the point source. The slower speeds of the secondary electrons emitted from a certain portion of the cathode are matched to the transit times of the neutrons impinging thereupon. 4 figs.

  8. Organic metal neutron detector

    DOEpatents

    Butler, M.A.; Ginley, D.S.

    1984-11-21

    A device for detection of neutrons comprises: as an active neutron sensing element, a conductive organic polymer having an electrical conductivity and a cross-section for said neutrons whereby a detectable change in said conductivity is caused by impingement of said neutrons on the conductive organic polymer which is responsive to a property of said polymer which is altered by impingement of said neutrons on the polymer; and means for associating a change in said alterable property with the presence of neutrons at the location of said device.

  9. Layered semiconductor neutron detectors

    DOEpatents

    Mao, Samuel S; Perry, Dale L

    2013-12-10

    Room temperature operating solid state hand held neutron detectors integrate one or more relatively thin layers of a high neutron interaction cross-section element or materials with semiconductor detectors. The high neutron interaction cross-section element (e.g., Gd, B or Li) or materials comprising at least one high neutron interaction cross-section element can be in the form of unstructured layers or micro- or nano-structured arrays. Such architecture provides high efficiency neutron detector devices by capturing substantially more carriers produced from high energy .alpha.-particles or .gamma.-photons generated by neutron interaction.

  10. CLUSTER CHEMISTRY

    SciTech Connect

    Muetterties, Earl L.

    1980-05-01

    Metal cluster chemistry is one of the most rapidly developing areas of inorganic and organometallic chemistry. Prior to 1960 only a few metal clusters were well characterized. However, shortly after the early development of boron cluster chemistry, the field of metal cluster chemistry began to grow at a very rapid rate and a structural and a qualitative theoretical understanding of clusters came quickly. Analyzed here is the chemistry and the general significance of clusters with particular emphasis on the cluster research within my group. The importance of coordinately unsaturated, very reactive metal clusters is the major subject of discussion.

  11. Experimental Neutron Capture Rate Constraint Far from Stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liddick, S. N.; Spyrou, A.; Crider, B. P.; Naqvi, F.; Larsen, A. C.; Guttormsen, M.; Mumpower, M.; Surman, R.; Perdikakis, G.; Bleuel, D. L.; Couture, A.; Crespo Campo, L.; Dombos, A. C.; Lewis, R.; Mosby, S.; Nikas, S.; Prokop, C. J.; Renstrom, T.; Rubio, B.; Siem, S.; Quinn, S. J.

    2016-06-01

    Nuclear reactions where an exotic nucleus captures a neutron are critical for a wide variety of applications, from energy production and national security, to astrophysical processes, and nucleosynthesis. Neutron capture rates are well constrained near stable isotopes where experimental data are available; however, moving far from the valley of stability, uncertainties grow by orders of magnitude. This is due to the complete lack of experimental constraints, as the direct measurement of a neutron-capture reaction on a short-lived nucleus is extremely challenging. Here, we report on the first experimental extraction of a neutron capture reaction rate on 69Ni, a nucleus that is five neutrons away from the last stable isotope of Ni. The implications of this measurement on nucleosynthesis around mass 70 are discussed, and the impact of similar future measurements on the understanding of the origin of the heavy elements in the cosmos is presented.

  12. Experimental Neutron Capture Rate Constraint Far from Stability.

    PubMed

    Liddick, S N; Spyrou, A; Crider, B P; Naqvi, F; Larsen, A C; Guttormsen, M; Mumpower, M; Surman, R; Perdikakis, G; Bleuel, D L; Couture, A; Crespo Campo, L; Dombos, A C; Lewis, R; Mosby, S; Nikas, S; Prokop, C J; Renstrom, T; Rubio, B; Siem, S; Quinn, S J

    2016-06-17

    Nuclear reactions where an exotic nucleus captures a neutron are critical for a wide variety of applications, from energy production and national security, to astrophysical processes, and nucleosynthesis. Neutron capture rates are well constrained near stable isotopes where experimental data are available; however, moving far from the valley of stability, uncertainties grow by orders of magnitude. This is due to the complete lack of experimental constraints, as the direct measurement of a neutron-capture reaction on a short-lived nucleus is extremely challenging. Here, we report on the first experimental extraction of a neutron capture reaction rate on ^{69}Ni, a nucleus that is five neutrons away from the last stable isotope of Ni. The implications of this measurement on nucleosynthesis around mass 70 are discussed, and the impact of similar future measurements on the understanding of the origin of the heavy elements in the cosmos is presented.

  13. Neutronic Reactor Design to Reduce Neutron Loss

    DOEpatents

    Miles, F. T.

    1961-05-01

    A nuclear reactor construction is described in which an unmoderated layer of the fissionable material is inserted between the moderated portion of the reactor core and the core container steel wall. The wall is surrounded by successive layers of pure fertile material and moderator containing fertile material. The unmoderated layer of the fissionable material will insure that a greater portion of fast neutrons will pass through the steel wall than would thermal neutrons. Since the steel has a smaller capture cross section for the fast neutrons, greater nunnbers of neutrons will pass into the blanket, thereby increasing the over-all efficiency of the reactor. (AEC)

  14. NEUTRONIC REACTOR DESIGN TO REDUCE NEUTRON LOSS

    DOEpatents

    Mills, F.T.

    1961-05-01

    A nuclear reactor construction is described in which an unmoderated layer of the fissionable material is inserted between the moderated portion of the reactor core and the core container steel wall which is surrounded by successive layers of pure fertile material and fertile material having moderator. The unmoderated layer of the fissionable material will insure that a greater portion of fast neutrons will pass through the steel wall than would thermal neutrons. As the steel has a smaller capture cross-section for the fast neutrons, then greater numbers of the neutrons will pass into the blanket thereby increasing the over-all efficiency of the reactor.

  15. Recent applications of the Boltzmann master equation to heavy ion precompound decay phenomena

    SciTech Connect

    Blann, M.; Remington, B.A.

    1988-06-01

    The Boltzmann master equation (BME) is described and used as a tool to interpret preequilibrium neutron emission from heavy ion collisions gated on evaporation residue or fission fragments. The same approach is used to interpret neutron spectra gated on deep inelastic and quasi-elastic heavy ion collisions. Less successful applications of BME to proton inclusive data with 40 MeV/u incident /sup 12/C ions are presented, and improvements required in the exciton injection term are discussed.

  16. A Type of Dark Matter May be found by Neutron Emissions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kriske, Richard

    2015-03-01

    This author has previously suggested that Neutrons in Neutron Stars are arranged in a Quasi-Crystal Structure and when they are ejected at Relativistic Velocities maintain some of that structure in forming Very large Nuclei of many Neutrons. When the Neutrons are ejected a Nuclear Electron and a Neutrino are emitted, making Neutron Stars Neutrino Sources, both from the Surface and from the Ejected matter. Likewise large collections of the Ejected matter form Dark Matter in Outer space as they are Super Heavy Hydrogen and sometimes just large Collections of Neutrons. As time passes the Large Collections of Neutrons break apart and form many Super Heavy Hydrogen Nuclei, but of smaller mass. Each breaking produces Neutrino emissions. The Super Heavy Hydrogen combines with Oxygen to produce Super Heavy water, which collects in Comets, on Planets like Earth and on moons such as Europa. Europa should be emitting Neutrinos, as there should be some emissions from the Earth itself and from the Earth's Atmosphere. The Neutrinos emitted from around Black Holes and Neutron stars should be particularly easy to detect, as there should be a lot of them.

  17. Spectroscopy of the neutron-rich actinide nucleus 240U following multinucleon-transfer reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Birkenbach, B.; Vogt, A.; Geibel, K.; Recchia, F.; Reiter, P.; Valiente-Dobón, J. J.; Bazzacco, D.; Bowry, M.; Bracco, A.; Bruyneel, B.; Corradi, L.; Crespi, F. C. L.; de Angelis, G.; Désesquelles, P.; Eberth, J.; Farnea, E.; Fioretto, E.; Gadea, A.; Gengelbach, A.; Giaz, A.; Görgen, A.; Gottardo, A.; Grebosz, J.; Hess, H.; John, P. R.; Jolie, J.; Judson, D. S.; Jungclaus, A.; Korten, W.; Lenzi, S.; Leoni, S.; Lunardi, S.; Menegazzo, R.; Mengoni, D.; Michelagnoli, C.; Mijatović, T.; Montagnoli, G.; Montanari, D.; Napoli, D.; Pellegri, L.; Pollarolo, G.; Pullia, A.; Quintana, B.; Radeck, F.; Rosso, D.; Şahin, E.; Salsac, M. D.; Scarlassara, F.; Söderström, P.-A.; Stefanini, A. M.; Steinbach, T.; Stezowski, O.; Szilner, S.; Szpak, B.; Theisen, Ch.; Ur, C.; Vandone, V.; Wiens, A.

    2015-10-01

    Background: Nuclear structure information for the neutron-rich actinide nuclei is important since it is the benchmark for theoretical models that provide predictions for the heaviest nuclei. Purpose: γ -ray spectroscopy of neutron-rich heavy nuclei in the actinide region.

  18. Muon Induced Spallation Neutrons in the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orrell, J. L.; Ahmad, Q. R.; Hazama, R.; Wilkerson, J. F.

    2001-05-01

    Neutrons produced as spallation products from muon passage through the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory (SNO) are studied. Muons can produce spallation neutrons through inelastic scattering on nuclei. Thermalized neutrons capture on the deuterium in SNO's heavy water detector volume via d(n,γ)t. The γ-ray has an energy of 6.25-MeV and produces a detectable signal in the SNO detector. We show it is possible to extract a nearly pure sample of thermalized neutrons. The observed capture time and energy are used to confirm the events' identity as neutrons. The total detection efficiency for muon induced spallation of neutrons is estimated and used to calculate the total muon induced spallation rate of neutrons in the SNO detector. This rate will impact the analysis of the Neutral Current Detectors (NCDs). The NCDs are ^3He proportional counters which will be inserted into SNO and used to measure the neutral current reaction of neutrinos, d(ν_x,n)p, in SNO's heavy water.

  19. Production of neutrons from interactions of GCR-like particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heilbronn, L.; Frankel, K.; Holabird, K.; Zeitlin, C.; McMahan, M. A.; Rathbun, W.; Cronqvist, M.; Gong, W.; Madey, R.; Htun, M.; Elaasar, M.; Anderson, B. D.; Baldwin, A. R.; Jiang, J.; Keane, D.; Scott, A.; Shao, Y.; Watson, J. W.; Zhang, W. M.; Galonsky, A.; Ronningen, R.; Zecher, P.; Kruse, J.; Wang, J.; Miller, J. (Principal Investigator)

    1998-01-01

    In order to help assess the risk to astronauts due to the long-term exposure to the natural radiation environment in space, an understanding of how the primary radiation field is changed when passing through shielding and tissue materials must be obtained. One important aspect of the change in the primary radiation field after passing through shielding materials is the production of secondary particles from the breakup of the primary. Neutrons are an important component of the secondary particle field due to their relatively high biological weighting factors, and due to their relative abundance, especially behind thick shielding scenarios. Because of the complexity of the problem, the estimation of the risk from exposure to the secondary neutron field must be handled using calculational techniques. However, those calculations will need an extensive set of neutron cross section and thicktarget neutron yield data in order to make an accurate assessment of the risk. In this paper we briefly survey the existing neutron-production data sets that are applicable to the space radiation transport problem, and we point out how neutron production from protons is different than neutron production from heavy ions. We also make comparisons of one the heavy-ion data sets with Boltzmann-Uehling-Uhlenbeck (BUU) calculations.

  20. Production of neutrons from interactions of GCR-like particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heilbronn, L.; Frankel, K.; Holabird, K.; Zeitlin, C.; McMahan, M. A.; Rathbun, W.; Cronqvist, M.; Gong, W.; Madey, R.; Htun, M.; hide

    1998-01-01

    In order to help assess the risk to astronauts due to the long-term exposure to the natural radiation environment in space, an understanding of how the primary radiation field is changed when passing through shielding and tissue materials must be obtained. One important aspect of the change in the primary radiation field after passing through shielding materials is the production of secondary particles from the breakup of the primary. Neutrons are an important component of the secondary particle field due to their relatively high biological weighting factors, and due to their relative abundance, especially behind thick shielding scenarios. Because of the complexity of the problem, the estimation of the risk from exposure to the secondary neutron field must be handled using calculational techniques. However, those calculations will need an extensive set of neutron cross section and thicktarget neutron yield data in order to make an accurate assessment of the risk. In this paper we briefly survey the existing neutron-production data sets that are applicable to the space radiation transport problem, and we point out how neutron production from protons is different than neutron production from heavy ions. We also make comparisons of one the heavy-ion data sets with Boltzmann-Uehling-Uhlenbeck (BUU) calculations.

  1. Production of heavy elements in inhomogeneous cosmologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rauscher, Thomas; Applegate, James H.; Cowan, John J.; Thielemann, Friedrich-Karl; Wiescher, Michael

    1994-07-01

    Baryon density inhomogeneities during big bang nucleosynthesis can result from a variety of possible causes (e.g., quantum chromodynamic and electroweak phase transitions; cosmic strings). We present here the consequences of such inhomogeneities with special emphasis on the production of heavy elements in a parameter study, varying the global baryon-to-photon ratio eta (which is related to the baryon density and the Hubble constant via eta10 = 64.94 Omegab(H0/50)2 and the length scale of the density inhomogeneities. The production of heavy elements beyond Fe can only occur in neutron-rich environments; thus, we limit our study to neutron-rich zones, originating from neutron diffusion into low-density regions. In this first calculation including elements heavier than Si, we prove an earlier hypothesis that under such conditions r-process elements can be produced, strongly enhanced by the process of fission cycling. Primordial r-process abundances are, however, very sensitive to the choice of eta. Significant amounts, comparable to or larger than the (permitted) floor of heavy-element abundances found in low-metallicity stars at the onset of galactic evolution, can only be obtained for values in excess of eta10 = 133 (i.e., Omegab(h50)2 = 2.0; e.g., Omegab = 1, H0 = 71, or Omegab = 0.5, H0 = 100) and large length scales of inhomogeneities, which minimize the back-diffusion of neutrons into proton-rich regions. Recent investigations analyzing the primordial abundances of light elements seem to set tighter limits, eta10 less than 26 to 39 (Omega b)(h50)2 less than 0.4 to 0.6, from He-4 and apparently considerably lower values based on Li, Be, and B. Under such conditions the predicted abundances of heavy elements are a factor of 105 or more below presently observable limits.

  2. Nucleosynthesis, neutrino bursts and gamma-rays from coalescing neutron stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eichler, David; Livio, Mario; Piran, Tsvi; Schramm, David N.

    1989-01-01

    It is pointed out here that neutron-star collisions should synthesize neutron-rich heavy elements, thought to be formed by rapid neutron capture (the r-process). Furthermore, these collisions should produce neutrino bursts and resultant bursts of gamma rays; the latter should comprise a subclass of observable gamma-ray bursts. It is argued that observed r-process abundances and gamma-ray burst rates predict rates for these collisions that are both significant and consistent with other estimates.

  3. Linear induction accelerators for fusion and neutron production

    SciTech Connect

    Barletta, W.A. |

    1993-08-01

    Linear induction accelerators (LIA) with pulsed power drives can produce high energy, intense beams or electrons, protons, or heavy ions with megawatts of average power. The continuing development of highly reliable LIA components permits the use such accelerators as cost-effective beam sources to drive fusion pellets with heavy ions, to produce intense neutron fluxes using proton beams, and to generate with electrons microwave power to drive magnetic fusion reactors and high gradient, rf-linacs.

  4. Neutron anatomy

    SciTech Connect

    Bacon, G.E.

    1994-12-31

    The familiar extremes of crystalline material are single-crystals and random powders. In between these two extremes are polycrystalline aggregates, not randomly arranged but possessing some preferred orientation and this is the form taken by constructional materials, be they steel girders or the bones of a human or animal skeleton. The details of the preferred orientation determine the ability of the material to withstand stress in any direction. In the case of bone the crucial factor is the orientation of the c-axes of the mineral content - the crystals of the hexagonal hydroxyapatite - and this can readily be determined by neutron diffraction. In particular it can be measured over the volume of a piece of bone, utilizing distances ranging from 1mm to 10mm. The major practical problem is to avoid the intense incoherent scattering from the hydrogen in the accompanying collagen; this can best be achieved by heat-treatment and it is demonstrated that this does not affect the underlying apatite. These studies of bone give leading anatomical information on the life and activities of humans and animals - including, for example, the life history of the human femur, the locomotion of sheep, the fracture of the legs of racehorses and the life-styles of Neolithic tribes. We conclude that the material is placed economically in the bone to withstand the expected stresses of life and the environment. The experimental results are presented in terms of the magnitude of the 0002 apatite reflection. It so happens that for a random powder the 0002, 1121 reflections, which are neighboring lines in the powder pattern, are approximately equal in intensity. The latter reflection, being of manifold multiplicity, is scarcely affected by preferred orientation so that the numerical value of the 0002/1121 ratio serves quite accurately as a quantitative measure of the degree of orientation of the c-axes in any chosen direction for a sample of bone.

  5. Method for studying a sample of material using a heavy ion induced mass spectrometer source

    DOEpatents

    Fries, D.P.; Browning, J.F.

    1999-02-16

    A heavy ion generator is used with a plasma desorption mass spectrometer to provide an appropriate neutron flux in the direction of a fissionable material in order to desorb and ionize large molecules from the material for mass analysis. The heavy ion generator comprises a fissionable material having a high n,f reaction cross section. The heavy ion generator also comprises a pulsed neutron generator that is used to bombard the fissionable material with pulses of neutrons, thereby causing heavy ions to be emitted from the fissionable material. These heavy ions impinge on a material, thereby causing ions to desorb off that material. The ions desorbed off the material pass through a time-of-flight mass analyzer, wherein ions can be measured with masses greater than 25,000 amu. 3 figs.

  6. System for studying a sample of material using a heavy ion induced mass spectrometer source

    DOEpatents

    Fries, David P.; Browning, James F.

    1998-01-01

    A heavy ion generator is used with a plasma desorption mass spectrometer to provide an appropriate neutron flux in the direction of a fissionable material in order to desorb and ionize large molecules from the material for mass analysis. The heavy ion generator comprises a fissionable material having a high n,f reaction cross section. The heavy ion generator also comprises a pulsed neutron generator that is used to bombard the fissionable material with pulses of neutrons, thereby causing heavy ions to be emitted from the fissionable material. These heavy ions impinge on a material, thereby causing ions to desorb off that material. The ions desorbed off the material pass through a time-of-flight mass analyzer, wherein ions can be measured with masses greater than 25,000 amu.

  7. System for studying a sample of material using a heavy ion induced mass spectrometer source

    DOEpatents

    Fries, D.P.; Browning, J.F.

    1998-07-21

    A heavy ion generator is used with a plasma desorption mass spectrometer to provide an appropriate neutron flux in the direction of a fissionable material in order to desorb and ionize large molecules from the material for mass analysis. The heavy ion generator comprises a fissionable material having a high (n,f) reaction cross section. The heavy ion generator also comprises a pulsed neutron generator that is used to bombard the fissionable material with pulses of neutrons, thereby causing heavy ions to be emitted from the fissionable material. These heavy ions impinge on a material, thereby causing ions to desorb off that material. The ions desorbed off the material pass through a time-of-flight mass analyzer, wherein ions can be measured with masses greater than 25,000 amu. 3 figs.

  8. Method for studying a sample of material using a heavy ion induced mass spectrometer source

    DOEpatents

    Fries, David P.; Browning, James F.

    1999-01-01

    A heavy ion generator is used with a plasma desorption mass spectrometer to provide an appropriate neutron flux in the direction of a fissionable material in order to desorb and ionize large molecules from the material for mass analysis. The heavy ion generator comprises a fissionable material having a high n,f reaction cross section. The heavy ion generator also comprises a pulsed neutron generator that is used to bombard the fissionable material with pulses of neutrons, thereby causing heavy ions to be emitted from the fissionable material. These heavy ions impinge on a material, thereby causing ions to desorb off that material. The ions desorbed off the material pass through a time-of-flight mass analyzer, wherein ions can be measured with masses greater than 25,000 amu.

  9. Neutron dosimetric measurements in shuttle and MIR.

    PubMed

    Reitz, G

    2001-06-01

    Detector packages consisting of thermoluminescence detectors (TLD), nuclear emulsions and plastic track detectors were exposed at identical positions inside MIR space station and on shuttle flights inside Spacelab and Spacehab during different phases of the solar cycle. The objectives of the investigations are to provide data on charge and energy spectra of heavy ions, and the contribution of events with low-energy deposit (protons, electrons, gamma, etc.) to the dose, as well as the contribution of secondaries, such as nuclear disintegration stars and neutrons. For neutron dosimetry 6LiF (TLD600) and 7LiF (TLD700) chips were used both of which have almost the same response to gamma rays but different response to neutrons. Neutrons in space are produced mainly in evaporation and knock-on processes with energies mainly of 1-10 MeV and up to several 100 MeV, respectively. The energy spectrum undergoes continuous changes toward greater depth in the attenuating material until an equilibrium is reached. In equilibrium, the spectrum is a wide continuum extending down to thermal energies to which the 6LiF is sensitive. Based on the difference of absorbed doses in the 6LiF and 7LiF chips, thermal neutron fluxes from 1 to 2.3 cm-2 s-1 are calculated using the assumption that the maximum induced dose in TLD600 for 1 neutron cm-2 is 1.6 x 10(-10) Gy (Horowitz and Freeman, Nucl. Instr. and Meth. 157 (1978) 393). It is assumed that the flux of high-energy neutrons is at least of that quantity. Tissue doses were calculated taking as a mean ambient absorbed dose per neutron 6 x10(-12) Gy cm2 (for a10 MeV neutron). The neutron equivalent doses for the above-mentioned fluxes are 52 micro Gy d-1 and 120 micro Gy d-1. In recent experiments, a personal neutron dosimeter was integrated into the dosimeter packages. First results of this dosimeter which is based on nuclear track detectors with converter foils are reported. For future measurements, a scintillator counter with

  10. Pulsed-neutron monochromator

    DOEpatents

    Mook, Jr., Herbert A.

    1985-01-01

    In one aspect, the invention is an improved pulsed-neutron monochromator of the vibrated-crystal type. The monochromator is designed to provide neutron pulses which are characterized both by short duration and high density. A row of neutron-reflecting crystals is disposed in a neutron beam to reflect neutrons onto a common target. The crystals in the row define progressively larger neutron-scattering angles and are vibrated sequentially in descending order with respect to the size of their scattering angles, thus generating neutron pulses which arrive simultaneously at the target. Transducers are coupled to one end of the crystals to vibrate them in an essentially non-resonant mode. The transducers propagate transverse waves in the crystal which progress longitudinally therein. The wave are absorbed at the undriven ends of the crystals by damping material mounted thereon. In another aspect, the invention is a method for generating neutron pulses characterized by high intensity and short duration.

  11. Pulsed-neutron monochromator

    DOEpatents

    Mook, H.A. Jr.

    1984-01-01

    In one aspect, the invention is an improved pulsed-neutron monochromator of the vibrated-crystal type. The monochromator is designed to provide neutron pulses which are characterized both by short duration and high density. A row of neutron-reflecting crystals is disposed in a neutron beam to reflect neutrons onto a common target. The crystals in the row define progressively larger neutron-scattering angles and are vibrated sequentially in descending order with respect to the size of their scattering angles, thus generating neutron pulses which arrive simultaneously at the target. Transducers are coupled to one end of the crystals to vibrate them in an essentially non-resonant mode. The transducers propagate transverse waves in the crystal which progress longitudinally therein. The waves are absorbed at the undriven ends of the crystals by damping material mounted thereon. In another aspect, the invention is a method for generating neutron pulses characterized by high intensity and short duration.

  12. Dose equivalent neutron dosimeter

    DOEpatents

    Griffith, Richard V.; Hankins, Dale E.; Tomasino, Luigi; Gomaa, Mohamed A. M.

    1983-01-01

    A neutron dosimeter is disclosed which provides a single measurements indicating the amount of potential biological damage resulting from the neutron exposure of the wearer, for a wide range of neutron energies. The dosimeter includes a detecting sheet of track etch detecting material such as a carbonate plastic, for detecting higher energy neutrons, and a radiator layer containing conversion material such as .sup.6 Li and .sup.10 B lying adjacent to the detecting sheet for converting moderate energy neutrons to alpha particles that produce tracks in the adjacent detecting sheet. The density of conversion material in the radiator layer is of an amount which is chosen so that the density of tracks produced in the detecting sheet is proportional to the biological damage done by neutrons, regardless of whether the tracks are produced as the result of moderate energy neutrons striking the radiator layer or as the result of higher energy neutrons striking the sheet of track etch material.

  13. On neutron surface waves

    SciTech Connect

    Ignatovich, V. K.

    2009-01-15

    It is shown that neutron surface waves do not exist. The difference between the neutron wave mechanics and the wave physics of electromagnetic and acoustic processes, which allows the existence of surface waves, is analyzed.

  14. Neutron dose equivalent meter

    DOEpatents

    Olsher, Richard H.; Hsu, Hsiao-Hua; Casson, William H.; Vasilik, Dennis G.; Kleck, Jeffrey H.; Beverding, Anthony

    1996-01-01

    A neutron dose equivalent detector for measuring neutron dose capable of accurately responding to neutron energies according to published fluence to dose curves. The neutron dose equivalent meter has an inner sphere of polyethylene, with a middle shell overlying the inner sphere, the middle shell comprising RTV.RTM. silicone (organosiloxane) loaded with boron. An outer shell overlies the middle shell and comprises polyethylene loaded with tungsten. The neutron dose equivalent meter defines a channel through the outer shell, the middle shell, and the inner sphere for accepting a neutron counter tube. The outer shell is loaded with tungsten to provide neutron generation, increasing the neutron dose equivalent meter's response sensitivity above 8 MeV.

  15. Neutron Lifetime Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nico, J. S.

    2006-11-01

    Precision measurements of neutron beta decay address basic questions in nuclear and particle physics, astrophysics, and cosmology. As the simplest semileptonic decay system, the free neutron plays an important role in understanding the physics of the weak interaction, and improving the precision of the neutron lifetime is fundamental to testing the validity of the theory. The neutron lifetime also directly affects the relative abundance of primordial helium in big bang nucleosynthesis. There are two distinct strategies for measuring the lifetime. Experiments using cold neutrons measure the absolute specific activity of a beam of neutrons by counting decay protons; experiments using confined, ultracold neutrons determine the lifetime by counting neutrons that remain after some elapsed time. The status of the recent lifetime measurements using both of these techniques is discussed.

  16. Neutron Lifetime Measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Nico, J. S.

    2006-11-17

    Precision measurements of neutron beta decay address basic questions in nuclear and particle physics, astrophysics, and cosmology. As the simplest semileptonic decay system, the free neutron plays an important role in understanding the physics of the weak interaction, and improving the precision of the neutron lifetime is fundamental to testing the validity of the theory. The neutron lifetime also directly affects the relative abundance of primordial helium in big bang nucleosynthesis. There are two distinct strategies for measuring the lifetime. Experiments using cold neutrons measure the absolute specific activity of a beam of neutrons by counting decay protons; experiments using confined, ultracold neutrons determine the lifetime by counting neutrons that remain after some elapsed time. The status of the recent lifetime measurements using both of these techniques is discussed.

  17. ULTRASONIC NEUTRON DOSIMETER

    DOEpatents

    Truell, R.; de Klerk, J.; Levy, P.W.

    1960-02-23

    A neutron dosimeter is described which utilizes ultrasonic waves in the megacycle region for determination of the extent of neutron damage in a borosilicate glass through ultrasonic wave velocity and attenuation measurements before and after damage.

  18. Ultrafast neutron detector

    DOEpatents

    Wang, C.L.

    1985-06-19

    A neutron detector of very high temporal resolution is described. It may be used to measure distributions of neutrons produced by fusion reactions that persist for times as short as about 50 picoseconds.

  19. 2010 Neutron Review: ORNL Neutron Sciences Progress Report

    SciTech Connect

    Bardoel, Agatha A; Counce, Deborah M; Ekkebus, Allen E; Horak, Charlie M; Nagler, Stephen E; Kszos, Lynn A

    2011-06-01

    During 2010, the Neutron Sciences Directorate focused on producing world-class science, while supporting the needs of the scientific community. As the instrument, sample environment, and data analysis tools at High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR ) and Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) have grown over the last year, so has promising neutron scattering research. This was an exciting year in science, technology, and operations. Some topics discussed are: (1) HFIR and SNS Experiments Take Gordon Battelle Awards for Scientific Discovery - Battelle Memorial Institute presented the inaugural Gordon Battelle Prizes for scientific discovery and technology impact in 2010. Battelle awards the prizes to recognize the most significant advancements at national laboratories that it manages or co-manages. (2) Discovery of Element 117 - As part of an international team of scientists from Russia and the United States, HFIR staff played a pivotal role in the discovery by generating the berkelium used to produce the new element. A total of six atoms of ''ununseptium'' were detected in a two-year campaign employing HFIR and the Radiochemical Engineering Development Center at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and the heavy-ion accelerator capabilities at the Joint Institute for Nuclear Research in Dubna, Russia. The discovery of the new element expands the understanding of the properties of nuclei at extreme numbers of protons and neutrons. The production of a new element and observation of 11 new heaviest isotopes demonstrate the increased stability of super-heavy elements with increasing neutron numbers and provide the strongest evidence to date for the existence of an island of enhanced stability for super-heavy elements. (3) Studies of Iron-Based High-Temperature Superconductors - ORNL applied its distinctive capabilities in neutron scattering, chemistry, physics, and computation to detailed studies of the magnetic excitations of iron-based superconductors (iron pnictides and

  20. Neutron-proton effective mass splitting in neutron-rich matter and its impacts on nuclear reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Bao-An; Chen, Lie-Wen

    2015-04-01

    The neutron-proton effective mass splitting in neutron-rich nucleonic matter reflects the spacetime nonlocality of the isovector nuclear interaction. It affects the neutron/proton ratio during the earlier evolution of the Universe, cooling of proto-neutron stars, structure of rare isotopes and dynamics of heavy-ion collisions. While there is still no consensus on whether the neutron-proton effective mass splitting is negative, zero or positive and how it depends on the density as well as the isospin-asymmetry of the medium, significant progress has been made in recent years in addressing these issues. There are different kinds of nucleon effective masses. In this mini-review, we focus on the total effective masses often used in the non-relativistic description of nuclear dynamics. We first recall the connections among the neutron-proton effective mass splitting, the momentum dependence of the isovector potential and the density dependence of the symmetry energy. We then make a few observations about the progress in calculating the neutron-proton effective mass splitting using various nuclear many-body theories and its effects on the isospin-dependence of in-medium nucleon-nucleon cross-sections. Perhaps, our most reliable knowledge so far about the neutron-proton effective mass splitting at saturation density of nuclear matter comes from optical model analyses of huge sets of nucleon-nucleus scattering data accumulated over the last five decades. The momentum dependence of the symmetry potential from these analyses provide a useful boundary condition at saturation density for calibrating nuclear many-body calculations. Several observables in heavy-ion collisions have been identified as sensitive probes of the neutron-proton effective mass splitting in dense neutron-rich matter based on transport model simulations. We review these observables and comment on the latest experimental findings.

  1. Dibaryons in neutron stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Olinto, Angela V.; Haensel, Pawel; Frieman, Joshua A.

    1991-01-01

    The effects are studied of H-dibaryons on the structure of neutron stars. It was found that H particles could be present in neutron stars for a wide range of dibaryon masses. The appearance of dibaryons softens the equations of state, lowers the maximum neutron star mass, and affects the transport properties of dense matter. The parameter space is constrained for dibaryons by requiring that a 1.44 solar mass neutron star be gravitationally stable.

  2. Intense fusion neutron sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuteev, B. V.; Goncharov, P. R.; Sergeev, V. Yu.; Khripunov, V. I.

    2010-04-01

    The review describes physical principles underlying efficient production of free neutrons, up-to-date possibilities and prospects of creating fission and fusion neutron sources with intensities of 1015-1021 neutrons/s, and schemes of production and application of neutrons in fusion-fission hybrid systems. The physical processes and parameters of high-temperature plasmas are considered at which optimal conditions for producing the largest number of fusion neutrons in systems with magnetic and inertial plasma confinement are achieved. The proposed plasma methods for neutron production are compared with other methods based on fusion reactions in nonplasma media, fission reactions, spallation, and muon catalysis. At present, intense neutron fluxes are mainly used in nanotechnology, biotechnology, material science, and military and fundamental research. In the near future (10-20 years), it will be possible to apply high-power neutron sources in fusion-fission hybrid systems for producing hydrogen, electric power, and technological heat, as well as for manufacturing synthetic nuclear fuel and closing the nuclear fuel cycle. Neutron sources with intensities approaching 1020 neutrons/s may radically change the structure of power industry and considerably influence the fundamental and applied science and innovation technologies. Along with utilizing the energy produced in fusion reactions, the achievement of such high neutron intensities may stimulate wide application of subcritical fast nuclear reactors controlled by neutron sources. Superpower neutron sources will allow one to solve many problems of neutron diagnostics, monitor nano-and biological objects, and carry out radiation testing and modification of volumetric properties of materials at the industrial level. Such sources will considerably (up to 100 times) improve the accuracy of neutron physics experiments and will provide a better understanding of the structure of matter, including that of the neutron itself.

  3. Neutron removal cross section as a measure of neutron skin

    SciTech Connect

    Fang, D. Q.; Ma, Y. G.; Cai, X. Z.; Tian, W. D.; Wang, H. W.

    2010-04-15

    We study the relation between neutron removal cross section (sigma{sub -N}) and neutron skin thickness for finite neutron-rich nuclei using the statistical abrasion ablation model. Different sizes of neutron skin are obtained by adjusting the diffuseness parameter of neutrons in the Fermi distribution. It is demonstrated that there is a good linear correlation between sigma{sub -N} and the neutron skin thickness for neutron-rich nuclei. Further analysis suggests that the relative increase of neutron removal cross section could be used as a quantitative measure for neutron skin thickness in neutron-rich nuclei.

  4. Measurement of the temporal characteristics of delayed neutrons from neutron induced fission of 237Np in the energy range from 14.2 to 18 MeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gremyachkin, Dmitrii E.; Piksaikin, Vladimir M.; Egorov, Andrey S.; Mitrofanov, Konstantin V.

    2017-09-01

    Analysis of existing database on the relative abundances of delayed neutrons and half-lives of their precursors measured for neutron induced fission of heavy nuclei in the energy range above 14 MeV shows that such data are not available for many nuclides, which are important for nuclear fuel cycle. In the present work for the first time the time dependence of delayed neutron activity for the neutron-induced fission of 237Np in the energy range above 14 MeV was obtained using T(d,n)4He.

  5. LGB neutron detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quist, Nicole

    2012-10-01

    The double pulse signature of the Gadolinium Lithium Borate Cerium doped plastic detector suggests its effectiveness for analyzing neutrons while providing gamma ray insensitivity. To better understand this detector, a californium gamma/neutron time of flight facility was constructed in our lab. Reported here are efforts to understand the properties and applications of the LGB detector with regards to neutron spectroscopy.

  6. Perforated diode neutron sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McNeil, Walter J.

    A novel design of neutron sensor was investigated and developed. The perforated, or micro-structured, diode neutron sensor is a concept that has the potential to enhance neutron sensitivity of a common solid-state sensor configuration. The common thin-film coated diode neutron sensor is the only semiconductor-based neutron sensor that has proven feasible for commercial use. However, the thin-film coating restricts neutron counting efficiency and severely limits the usefulness of the sensor. This research has shown that the perforated design, when properly implemented, can increase the neutron counting efficiency by greater than a factor of 4. Methods developed in this work enable detectors to be fabricated to meet needs such as miniaturization, portability, ruggedness, and adaptability. The new detectors may be used for unique applications such as neutron imaging or the search for special nuclear materials. The research and developments described in the work include the successful fabrication of variant perforated diode neutron detector designs, general explanations of fundamental radiation detector design (with added focus on neutron detection and compactness), as well as descriptive theory and sensor design modeling useful in predicting performance of these unique solid-state radiation sensors. Several aspects in design, fabrication, and operational performance have been considered and tested including neutron counting efficiency, gamma-ray response, perforation shapes and depths, and silicon processing variations. Finally, the successfully proven technology was applied to a 1-dimensional neutron sensor array system.

  7. Advanced neutron absorber materials

    DOEpatents

    Branagan, Daniel J.; Smolik, Galen R.

    2000-01-01

    A neutron absorbing material and method utilizing rare earth elements such as gadolinium, europium and samarium to form metallic glasses and/or noble base nano/microcrystalline materials, the neutron absorbing material having a combination of superior neutron capture cross sections coupled with enhanced resistance to corrosion, oxidation and leaching.

  8. Arsenic activation neutron detector

    DOEpatents

    Jacobs, Eddy L.

    1981-01-01

    A detector of bursts of neutrons from a deuterium-deuteron reaction includes a quantity of arsenic adjacent a gamma detector such as a scintillator and photomultiplier tube. The arsenic is activated by the 2.5 Mev neutrons to release gamma radiation which is detected to give a quantitative representation of detected neutrons.

  9. Arsenic activation neutron detector

    DOEpatents

    Jacobs, E.L.

    1980-01-28

    A detector of bursts of neutrons from a deuterium-deuteron reaction includes a quantity of arsenic adjacent a gamma detector such as a scintillator and photomultiplier tube. The arsenic is activated by the 2.5-MeV neutrons to release gamma radiation which is detected to give a quantitative representation of detected neutrons.

  10. Neutron Star Structure From Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lattimer, James

    2006-10-01

    are major difficulties in accounting for atmospheres of unknown composition and uncertain magnetic field strenghs for these stars. The distances to several distant X-ray emitting neutron stars have also been estimated with some precision because they are members of globular clusters, These sources have advantages because, having undergone recent accretion, they should have relatively weak surface magnetic fields and hydrogen-dominated atmospheres. Preliminary results from the interpretation of thermal emissions indicate consistency with a radius in the range of 10-15 km, but only a restricted subset of possible equations of state can account for the (M, R) constraints of all the sources.

  11. Exotic shapes and exotic clusterization

    SciTech Connect

    Cseh, J.; Darai, J.; Algora, A.

    2011-10-28

    The interrelation of the largely elongated nuclear shapes and clusterization is discussed by applying semimicroscopic methods. {sup 36}Ar is considered as a specific example, where recent experimental heavy-ion scattering data seem to justify the theoretical predictions on the hyperdeformed states. Alpha-emitting reactions are also suggested for its population.

  12. Neutron computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Koeppe, R A; Brugger, R M; Schlapper, G A; Larsen, G N; Jost, R J

    1981-02-01

    A neutron-transmission computed tomography scanning system has been built for scanning biological materials. An oxygen filtered beam of 2.35 MeV neutrons was used for the measurements. The studies to date show that the interactions of these energy neutrons with samples simulating biological materials are more sensitive than X-rays to variations in the content of the material, thus providing the ability to produce high quality images. The neutron scans suggest that neutrons can be an effective radiation for the imaging of biological materials.

  13. PERSONNEL NEUTRON DOSIMETER

    DOEpatents

    Fitzgerald, J.J.; Detwiler, C.G. Jr.

    1960-05-24

    A description is given of a personnel neutron dosimeter capable of indicating the complete spectrum of the neutron dose received as well as the dose for each neutron energy range therein. The device consists of three sets of indium foils supported in an aluminum case. The first set consists of three foils of indium, the second set consists of a similar set of indium foils sandwiched between layers of cadmium, whereas the third set is similar to the second set but is sandwiched between layers of polyethylene. By analysis of all the foils the neutron spectrum and the total dose from neutrons of all energy levels can be ascertained.

  14. Organic metal neutron detector

    DOEpatents

    Butler, Michael A.; Ginley, David S.

    1987-01-01

    A device for detecting neutrons comprises a layer of conductive polymer sandwiched between electrodes, which may be covered on each face with a neutron transmissive insulating material layer. Conventional electrodes are used for a non-imaging integrating total neutron fluence-measuring embodiment, while wire grids are used in an imaging version of the device. The change in conductivity of the polymer after exposure to a neutron flux is determined in either case to provide the desired data. Alternatively, the exposed conductive polymer layer may be treated with a chemical reagent which selectively binds to the sites altered by neutrons to produce an image of the flux detected.

  15. Neutron activation analysis system

    DOEpatents

    Taylor, M.C.; Rhodes, J.R.

    1973-12-25

    A neutron activation analysis system for monitoring a generally fluid media, such as slurries, solutions, and fluidized powders, including two separate conduit loops for circulating fluid samples within the range of radiation sources and detectors is described. Associated with the first loop is a neutron source that emits s high flux of slow and thermal neutrons. The second loop employs a fast neutron source, the flux from which is substantially free of thermal neutrons. Adjacent to both loops are gamma counters for spectrographic determination of the fluid constituents. Other gsmma sources and detectors are arranged across a portion of each loop for deterMining the fluid density. (Official Gazette)

  16. Grazing Incidence Neutron Optics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gubarev, Mikhail V. (Inventor); Ramsey, Brian D. (Inventor); Engelhaupt, Darell E. (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    Neutron optics based on the two-reflection geometries are capable of controlling beams of long wavelength neutrons with low angular divergence. The preferred mirror fabrication technique is a replication process with electroform nickel replication process being preferable. In the preliminary demonstration test an electroform nickel optics gave the neutron current density gain at the focal spot of the mirror at least 8 for neutron wavelengths in the range from 6 to 20.ANG.. The replication techniques can be also be used to fabricate neutron beam controlling guides.

  17. Grazing incidence neutron optics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gubarev, Mikhail V. (Inventor); Ramsey, Brian D. (Inventor); Engelhaupt, Darell E. (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    Neutron optics based on the two-reflection geometries are capable of controlling beams of long wavelength neutrons with low angular divergence. The preferred mirror fabrication technique is a replication process with electroform nickel replication process being preferable. In the preliminary demonstration test an electroform nickel optics gave the neutron current density gain at the focal spot of the mirror at least 8 for neutron wavelengths in the range from 6 to 20 .ANG.. The replication techniques can be also be used to fabricate neutron beam controlling guides.

  18. High energy neutron dosimeter

    DOEpatents

    Sun, Rai Ko S.F.

    1994-01-01

    A device for measuring dose equivalents in neutron radiation fields. The device includes nested symmetrical hemispheres (forming spheres) of different neutron moderating materials that allow the measurement of dose equivalents from 0.025 eV to past 1 GeV. The layers of moderating material surround a spherical neutron counter. The neutron counter is connected by an electrical cable to an electrical sensing means which interprets the signal from the neutron counter in the center of the moderating spheres. The spherical shape of the device allows for accurate measurement of dose equivalents regardless of its positioning.

  19. Neutron scatter camera

    DOEpatents

    Mascarenhas, Nicholas; Marleau, Peter; Brennan, James S.; Krenz, Kevin D.

    2010-06-22

    An instrument that will directly image the fast fission neutrons from a special nuclear material source has been described. This instrument can improve the signal to background compared to non imaging neutron detection techniques by a factor given by ratio of the angular resolution window to 4.pi.. In addition to being a neutron imager, this instrument will also be an excellent neutron spectrometer, and will be able to differentiate between different types of neutron sources (e.g. fission, alpha-n, cosmic ray, and D-D or D-T fusion). Moreover, the instrument is able to pinpoint the source location.

  20. Semiconductor neutron detector

    DOEpatents

    Ianakiev, Kiril D.; Littlewood, Peter B.; Blagoev, Krastan B.; Swinhoe, Martyn T.; Smith, James L.; Sullivan, Clair J.; Alexandrov, Boian S.; Lashley, Jason Charles

    2011-03-08

    A neutron detector has a compound of lithium in a single crystal form as a neutron sensor element. The lithium compound, containing improved charge transport properties, is either lithium niobate or lithium tantalate. The sensor element is in direct contact with a monitor that detects an electric current. A signal proportional to the electric current is produced and is calibrated to indicate the neutrons sensed. The neutron detector is particularly useful for detecting neutrons in a radiation environment. Such radiation environment may, e.g. include gamma radiation and noise.

  1. Heavy Equipment. Trade and Industrial Education Trade Preparatory Training Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nebraska State Dept. of Education, Lincoln. Div. of Vocational Education.

    One of a series of curriculum guides prepared for the building occupations cluster of the construction/fabrication occupational group, this guide identifies the essentials of the heavy equipment trade as recommended by the successful heavy equipment operator. An instructional program based upon the implementation of the guide is expected to…

  2. Neutron-capture nucleosynthesis in the first stars

    SciTech Connect

    Roederer, Ian U.; Preston, George W.; Thompson, Ian B.; Shectman, Stephen A.; Sneden, Christopher

    2014-04-01

    Recent studies suggest that metal-poor stars enhanced in carbon but containing low levels of neutron-capture elements may have been among the first to incorporate the nucleosynthesis products of the first generation of stars. We have observed 16 stars with enhanced carbon or nitrogen using the MIKE Spectrograph on the Magellan Telescopes at Las Campanas Observatory and the Tull Spectrograph on the Smith Telescope at McDonald Observatory. We present radial velocities, stellar parameters, and detailed abundance patterns for these stars. Strontium, yttrium, zirconium, barium, europium, ytterbium, and other heavy elements are detected. In four stars, these heavy elements appear to have originated in some form of r-process nucleosynthesis. In one star, a partial s-process origin is possible. The origin of the heavy elements in the rest of the sample cannot be determined unambiguously. The presence of elements heavier than the iron group offers further evidence that zero-metallicity rapidly rotating massive stars and pair instability supernovae did not contribute substantial amounts of neutron-capture elements to the regions where the stars in our sample formed. If the carbon- or nitrogen-enhanced metal-poor stars with low levels of neutron-capture elements were enriched by products of zero-metallicity supernovae only, then the presence of these heavy elements indicates that at least one form of neutron-capture reaction operated in some of the first stars.

  3. Exploring Heavy Drinking Patterns Among Black and White Young Adults

    PubMed Central

    Klima, Tali; Skinner, Martie L; Haggerty, Kevin P; Crutchfield, Robert D; Catalano, Richard F

    2014-01-01

    Objective: This investigation examined patterns of heavy drinking among Black and White young adults from a person-centered perspective and linked family and individual factors in adolescence to young adult drinking patterns. Method: The analysis focuses on 331 10th-grade students (168 Whites, 163 Blacks; 51% males) who were followed into young adulthood (ages 20 and 22). Cluster analyses using heavy episodic drinking, drunkenness, and alcohol problems in young adulthood resulted in groups of drinkers with different patterns. Groups were examined across and within race. Associations between young adult drinking groups and adolescent family and individual factors were tested. Results: Groups followed well-established race differences, with Whites clustering into frequent drinking groups more than Blacks, and Blacks clustering into non–heavy drinking groups more than Whites. Further, Black heavy drinkers reported fewer alcohol problems than White counterparts. Parental monitoring, consistent discipline, ethnic identity, and delinquency were associated with adult heavy episodic drinking groups for both races. Monitoring and delinquency, along with parental norms, were associated with drunkenness groups for both races. However, race differences were observed for drunkenness clusters such that attachment was predictive for White clusters, and parental guidelines and discipline were predictive for Black clusters. Conclusions: Large race differences in heavy drinking at young adulthood were confirmed. Family dynamics in 10th grade were identified as important for the development of different drinking patterns in the early 20s, when many individuals have left home, which suggests a key target for substance use prevention programs. PMID:25208202

  4. Measurements of neutron skin in calcium and lead

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michaels, Robert

    2017-01-01

    Measurement of the parity-violating electron scattering asymmetry from 208Pb has demonstrated a new opportunity at Jefferson Lab to measure the weak charge form factor and hence pin down the neutron radius in nuclei in a relatively clean and model-independent way. This is because the Z boson of the weak interaction couples primarily to neutrons. We will describe the PREX and CREX experiments on 208Pb and 48Ca respectively. PREX-I ran in 2010, and CREX and a second run of PREX are currently in preparation. These are both doubly-magic nuclei whose first excited state can be discriminated by the high resolution spectrometers at JLab. The heavier lead nucleus, with a neutron excess, provides an interpretation of the neutron skin thickness in terms of properties of bulk neutron matter. For the lighter 48Ca nucleus, which is also rich in neutrons, microscopic nuclear theory calculations are feasible and are sensitive to poorly constrained 3-neutron forces. The measuements are a fundamental test of nuclear structure with applications to heavy ion research and neutron stars. Jefferson Science Associates, LLC, which operates Jefferson Lab for the U.S. DOE under U.S. DOE contract DE-AC05-060R23177.

  5. Higher spin states in neutron rich nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, S.; Zhao, X.; Hamilton, J. H.; Ramayya, A. V.; Ma, W. C.; Peker, L. K.; Kormicki, J.; Hong, X.; Gao, W. B.; Deng, J. K.

    Nuclei on the neutron rich side of beta stability have long been of interest for nuclear structure studies because they probe different regions of the single particle spectrum and different shell gap combinations for both spherical and deformed shapes. However, such nuclei have been a difficult challenge experimentally. Much information has been gained about the properties of neutron rich nuclei at low spin from the study of radioactive isotopes produced in neutron induced, and more recently, proton induced fission of uranium. Such studies have been made possible by the use of isotope separators on line to reactors and more recently to low energy proton accelerators. However, to test many of the theoretical predictions of nuclear models one needs information about the higher spin states in nuclei in addition to their low spin states populated in radioactive decays. Higher spin states in neutron rich nuclei have been an even more difficult challenge than the lower spin states accessible through decay studies. One cannot reach the higher spin states in these nuclei by heavy ion fusion evaporation in reactions as carried out extensively for proton rich nuclei. Many years ago prompt spontaneous fission studies were used to suggest for the first time that Sr-98 and Zr-100 had unusually large ground state of deformations. The availability of higher efficiency multi-detector arrays of Compton suppressed Ge detectors has brought on a renewed interest in studies of the prompt gamma rays of the fragments from spontaneous and induced fission. Groups at Argonne, Daresbury, and a Vanderbilt-Oak Ridge-Idaho-Dubna collaboration have carried out several such studies from spontaneous and heavy-ion induced fission which have revealed new insights into our knowledge of neutron rich nuclei. This paper is primarily a review of these studies, including recent, unpublished results.

  6. Cluster production within antisymmetrized molecular dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ono, Akira

    2016-06-01

    Clusters are quite important at various situations in heavy-ion collisions. Antisymmetrized molecular dynamics was improved to take into account the correlations to form light clusters, such as deuterons and α particles, and light nuclei composed of several clusters. The momentum fluctuations of emitted particles are also taken into account by a simple method. Formation of fragments and light clusters in a wide range of heavy-ion collisions was well described with a single set of model parameters. Fragmentation in a proton induced reaction was also well reproduced by introducing cluster correlations. Calculated results demonstrate strong impacts of clusters in various observables including those usually regarded as probes of the density dependence of symmetry energy.

  7. 2010 Review of Neutron and Non-Neutron Nuclear Data

    SciTech Connect

    Holden, N. E.

    2011-05-27

    The results of a review and evaluation of neutron and nonneutron nuclear data published in the scientific literature over the past three years are presented. The status of new chemical elements is examined. Ten elements have had their atomic weight and uncertainty replaced by interval values of upper and lower bounds. Data on revised values for the isotopic composition of the elements are reviewed and new recommended values are presented for germanium. Radioactive half-lives are reviewed and latest values presented which include measurements on nuclides of interest and very long-lived nuclides such as double beta decay, double electron capture, long-lived alpha decay and long-lived beta decay. The latest information and the status on the evaluation of atomic masses are discussed. Data from new measurements on the very heavy elements (trans-meitnerium elements) are discussed and tabulated. Data on various recent neutron cross-section and resonance integral measurements are also discussed and the latest measurements are tabulated in both cases. The JENDL-4.0 and ENDF/B-VII.1 nuclear data libraries are discussed. A new initiative on the existence and importance of isotopes is presented.

  8. NEUTRON DENSITY CONTROL IN A NEUTRONIC REACTOR

    DOEpatents

    Young, G.J.

    1959-06-30

    The method and means for controlling the neutron density in a nuclear reactor is described. It describes the method and means for flattening the neutron density distribution curve across the reactor by spacing the absorbing control members to varying depths in the central region closer to the center than to the periphery of the active portion of the reactor to provide a smaller neutron reproduction ratio in the region wherein the members are inserted, than in the remainder of the reactor thereby increasing the over-all potential power output.

  9. Ultracold neutron detector for neutron lifetime measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andreev, V.; Vassiljev, A.; Ivanov, E.; Ilyin, D.; Krivshich, A.; Serebrov, A.

    2017-02-01

    The gas-filled detector of ultracold neutrons has been designed and constructed for the spectrometer of the neutron lifetime measurements at the ILL, Grenoble, France. The detector has been successfully tested and is currently being used at this spectrometer. We could show that minimization of the ;wall; effect is a key factor to ensure efficient background suppression and to maximize the detection efficiency. This effect is primarily related to the composition of the gas mixture, which crucially depends on the neutron velocity spectrum.

  10. Thermalization time and specific heat of the neutron stars crust

    SciTech Connect

    Fortin, M.; Grill, F.; Margueron, J.; Page, Dany; Sandulescu, N.

    2010-12-15

    We discuss the thermalization process of the neutron star's crust described by solving the heat-transport equation with a microscopic input for the specific heat of baryonic matter. The heat equation is solved with initial conditions specific to a rapid cooling of the core. To calculate the specific heat of inner-crust baryonic matter, that is, nuclear clusters and unbound neutrons, we use the quasiparticle spectrum provided by the Hartree-Fock-Bogoliubov approach at finite temperature. In this framework, we analyze the dependence of the crust thermalization on pairing properties and on cluster structure of inner-crust matter. It is shown that the pairing correlations reduce the crust thermalization time by a large fraction. The calculations show also that the nuclear clusters have a non-negligible influence on the time evolution of the surface temperature of the neutron star.

  11. Stellar black holes in globular clusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kulkarni, S. R.; Hut, Piet; Mcmillan, Steve

    1993-01-01

    The recent discovery of large populations of millisec pulsars associated with neutron stars in globular clusters indicates that several hundred stellar black holes of about 10 solar masses each can form within a typical cluster. While, in clusters of high central density, the rapid dynamical evolution of the black-hole population leads to an ejection of nearly all holes on a short timescale, systems of intermediate density may involve a normal star's capture by one of the surviving holes to form a low-mass X-ray binary. One or more such binaries may be found in the globular clusters surrounding our galaxy.

  12. Stellar black holes in globular clusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kulkarni, S. R.; Hut, Piet; Mcmillan, Steve

    1993-01-01

    The recent discovery of large populations of millisec pulsars associated with neutron stars in globular clusters indicates that several hundred stellar black holes of about 10 solar masses each can form within a typical cluster. While, in clusters of high central density, the rapid dynamical evolution of the black-hole population leads to an ejection of nearly all holes on a short timescale, systems of intermediate density may involve a normal star's capture by one of the surviving holes to form a low-mass X-ray binary. One or more such binaries may be found in the globular clusters surrounding our galaxy.

  13. Collective Clusterization in Nuclei and Excited Compound Systems: The Dynamical Cluster-Decay Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, Raj K.

    Clustering is a general feature of light, N = Z, α-like stable nuclei for both the ground and (intrinsic) excited states. This phenomenon is observed in spontaneous decays of heavy radioactive nuclei, and seems to play an important role in the decay of excited compound systems formed in heavy ion reactions. It is also shown to be present in exotic light-halo, super-heavy and super-superheavy nuclei.

  14. Neutron detection by scintillation of noble-gas excimers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McComb, Jacob Collin

    Neutron detection is a technique essential to homeland security, nuclear reactor instrumentation, neutron diffraction science, oil-well logging, particle physics and radiation safety. The current shortage of helium-3, the neutron absorber used in most gas-filled proportional counters, has created a strong incentive to develop alternate methods of neutron detection. Excimer-based neutron detection (END) provides an alternative with many attractive properties. Like proportional counters, END relies on the conversion of a neutron into energetic charged particles, through an exothermic capture reaction with a neutron absorbing nucleus (10B, 6Li, 3He). As charged particles from these reactions lose energy in a surrounding gas, they cause electron excitation and ionization. Whereas most gas-filled detectors collect ionized charge to form a signal, END depends on the formation of diatomic noble-gas excimers (Ar*2, Kr*2,Xe* 2) . Upon decaying, excimers emit far-ultraviolet (FUV) photons, which may be collected by a photomultiplier tube or other photon detector. This phenomenon provides a means of neutron detection with a number of advantages over traditional methods. This thesis investigates excimer scintillation yield from the heavy noble gases following the boron-neutron capture reaction in 10B thin-film targets. Additionally, the thesis examines noble-gas excimer lifetimes with relationship to gas type and gas pressure. Experimental data were collected both at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) Center for Neutron Research, and on a newly developed neutron beamline at the Maryland University Training Reactor. The components of the experiment were calibrated at NIST and the University of Maryland, using FUV synchrotron radiation, neutron imaging, and foil activation techniques, among others. Computer modeling was employed to simulate charged-particle transport and excimer photon emission within the experimental apparatus. The observed excimer

  15. ARE THERE ANY STARS LACKING NEUTRON-CAPTURE ELEMENTS? EVIDENCE FROM STRONTIUM AND BARIUM

    SciTech Connect

    Roederer, Ian U.

    2013-01-01

    The cosmic dispersion in the abundances of the heavy elements strontium and barium in halo stars is well known. Strontium and barium are detected in most cool, metal-poor giants, but are these elements always detectable? To identify stars that could be considered probable candidates for lacking these elements, I examine the stellar abundance data available in the literature for 1148 field stars and 226 stars in dwarf galaxies, 776 of which have metallicities lower than [Fe/H] <-2.0. Strontium or barium have been detected in all field, globular cluster, and dwarf galaxy environments studied. All upper limits are consistent with the lowest detected ratios of [Sr/H] and [Ba/H]. The frequent appearance of these elements raises the intriguing prospect that at least one kind of neutron-capture reaction operates as often as the nucleosynthesis mechanisms that produce lighter elements, such as magnesium, calcium, or iron, although the yields of heavy elements may be more variable.

  16. Pre-equilibrium decay processes in energetic heavy ion reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Blann, M.

    1986-04-15

    The Boltzmann master equation (BME) is defined for application to precompound decay in heavy ion reactions in the 10 100 MeV/nucleon regime. Predicted neutron spectra are compared with measured results for central collisions of /sup 20/Ne and /sup 12/C with /sup 165/Ho target nuclei. Comparisons are made with subthreshold ..pi../sup 0/ yields in heavy ion reactions between 35 and 84 MeV/nucleon, and with the ..pi../sup 0/ spectra. The BME is found to be an excellent tool for investigating these experimentally observed aspects of non-equilibrium heavy ion reactions. 18 refs., 8 figs.

  17. Microstructure evolution in D-T neutron irradiated silver

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sugio, K.; Ohkubo, H.; Mukouda, I.; Shimomura, Y.; Kutsukake, C.; Takeuchi, H.

    2002-12-01

    Irradiation of high purity silver with 14 MeV D-T neutrons was carried out at the fusion neutron source facility in Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute. The range of neutron fluence was 6.1×10 17 to 1.1×10 21 n/m 2, which is lower than in earliest D-T neutron irradiations. Thin foil and bulk specimens were irradiated at 288, 423 and 573 K, and observed using transmission electron microscopy. For irradiation at 288 K, the fraction of interstitial clusters in bulk is higher than that in thin foil. In irradiation experiments at 288 and 432 K, the number density of defect clusters is proportional to the neutron fluence to the power of 1.3. In irradiation experiments at 573 K, the defects are mostly stacking fault tetrahedrons (SFTs) and their number density is proportional to the neutron fluence. During isochronal annealing of specimens irradiated at 288 K, disappearance and coalescence of defect clusters were observed, and SFTs were mobile.

  18. Neutron beam design, development, and performance for neutron capture therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Harling, O.K.; Bernard, J.A. ); Zamenhof, R.G. )

    1990-01-01

    The report presents topics presented at a workshop on neutron beams and neutron capture therapy. Topics include: neutron beam design; reactor-based neutron beams; accelerator-based neutron beams; and dosimetry and treatment planning. Individual projects are processed separately for the databases. (CBS)

  19. Replica neutron guides for experiments with ultracold neutrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serebrov, A. P.; Vasil'ev, A. V.; Lasakov, M. S.; Siber, E. V.; Murashkin, A. N.; Egorov, A. I.; Fomin, A. K.; Sbitnev, S. V.; Geltenbort, P.; Zimmer, O.

    2017-01-01

    The method for producing neutron guides for ultracold neutrons based on the replica method has been described. A comparative analysis of the quality of replica neutron guides, neutron guides made from polished anode-mechanical steel tubes, and neutron guides from electropolished tubes has been given.

  20. Physics design of a cold neutron source for KIPT neutron source facility.

    SciTech Connect

    Zhong, Z.; Gohar, Y.; Kellogg, R.; Nuclear Engineering Division

    2009-02-17

    accelerator driven subcritical facility is designed with a provision to add a cryogenically cooled moderator system. This cold neutron source could provide the neutrons beams with lower energy, which could be utilized in scattering experiment and material structures analysis. This study describes the performed physics analyses to define and characterize the cold neutron source of the KIPT neutron source facility. The cold neutron source is designed to optimize the cold neutron brightness to the experimental instruments outside the radial heavy concrete shield of the facility. Liquid hydrogen or solid methane with 20 K temperature is used as a cold moderator. Monte Carlo computer code MCNPX [4], with ENDF/B-VI nuclear data libraries, is utilized to calculate the cold neutron source performance and estimate the nuclear heat load to the cold moderator. The surface source generation capability of MCNPX code has been used to provide the possibility of analyzing different design configurations and perform design optimization analyses with reasonable computer resources. Several design configurations were analyzed and their performance were characterized and optimized.