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Sample records for heavy-ion nucleon transfers

  1. Quasielastic nucleon transfer and the heavy-ion interaction potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van den Berg, A. M.; Henning, W.; Lee, L. L., Jr.; Lesko, K. T.; Rehm, K. E.; Schiffer, J. P.; Stephans, G. S. F.; Wolfs, F. L. H.; Freeman, W. S.

    1986-02-01

    Quasielastic nucleon-transfer cross sections have been mea- sured at energies ~=35% above the Coulomb barrier for 58,64Ni + 112,116,120,124Sn. The systematic trends were studied over the range of systems, which span a factor of 2 in neutron excess N-Z. The observed magnitude of the cross sections and their surface localization suggest that quasielastic processes play an important role in the average nucleus-nucleus potential, a quantity of considerable recent interest in near-barrier collisions of heavy systems.

  2. Nucleon-nucleon correlations in heavy ion transfer reactions: Recent investigations at energies far below the Coulomb barrier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corradi, Lorenzo

    2015-10-01

    Excitation functions of one- and two-neutron transfer channels have been measured for the 96Zr+40Ca and 116Sn+60Ni systems at bombarding energies ranging from the Coulomb barrier to ˜25% below. Target-like recoils have been identified in A, Z and velocity with the large solid angle magnetic spectrometer PRISMA. The experimental transfer probabilities have been compared, in absolute values and in slope, with semiclassical microscopic calculations which incorporate nucleon-nucleon pairing correlations. For the first time in a heavy ion collision, one was able to provide a consistent description of one and two neutron transfer reactions by incorporating, in the reaction mechanism, all known structure information of entrance and exit channels nuclei. In particular, there is no need to introduce any enhancement factor for the description of two neutron transfer, of course very important are the correlations induced by the pairing interaction.

  3. Quasimolecular single-nucleon effects in heavy-ion collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Erb, K.A.

    1984-01-01

    Several experimental examples are discussed to illustrate that single-particle molecular orbital behavior has become an established reality in nuclear physics over the last several years. Measurements and analyses of inelastic scattering in the /sup 13/C + /sup 12/C and /sup 17/O + /sup 12/C systems, and of neutron transfer in the /sup 13/C(/sup 13/C, /sup 12/C)/sup 14/C reaction, show that the motion of valence nucleons can be strongly and simultaneously influenced by both collision partners in heavy-ion collisions. This bvehavior is characteristic of a molecular (single-particle) rather than a direct (DWBA) mechanism: it demonstrates that the single-particle analog of atomic molecular motion plays an important role in nuclear reactions at bombarding energies near the Coulomb barrier. Such behavior may be even more pronounced in the collisions of massive nuclei that will be studied with the new generation of heavy-ion accelerators. 19 references.

  4. Nucleon exchange mechanism in heavy-ion collisions at near-barrier energies

    SciTech Connect

    Yilmaz, B.; Ayik, S.; Lacroix, D.

    2011-06-15

    Nucleon drift and diffusion mechanisms in central collisions of asymmetric heavy ions at near-barrier energies are investigated in the framework of a stochastic mean-field approach. Expressions for diffusion and drift coefficients for nucleon transfer deduced from the stochastic mean-field approach in the semiclassical approximation have similar forms familiar from the phenomenological nucleon exchange model. The variance of fragment mass distribution agrees with the empirical formula {sigma}{sub AA}{sup 2}(t)=N{sub exc}(t). The comparison with the time-dependent Hartree-Fock calculations shows that below barrier energies, the drift coefficient in the semiclassical approximation underestimates the mean number of nucleon transfer obtained in the quantal framework. Motion of the window in the dinuclear system has a significant effect on the nucleon transfer in asymmetric collisions.

  5. Universal characteristics of transverse momentum transfer in intermediate energy heavy ion collisions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khan, F.; Townsend, L. W.; Tripathi, R. K.; Cucinotta, F. A.

    1993-01-01

    A microscopic optical model formalism for estimating momentum transfer in intermediate energy heavy ion collisions predicts universal behavior of the transverse component. In particular, for symmetric systems heavier than niobium, it appears that values of P(perpendicular)/A are independent of the mass and charge of the colliding nuclei and vary only with impact parameter and incident beam energy. This suggests that momentum transfer per nucleon saturates to some limiting value with increasing mass.

  6. Universal characteristics of transverse momentum transfer in intermediate energy heavy ion collisions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khan, F.; Townsend, L. W.; Tripathi, R. K.; Cucinotta, F. A.

    1993-01-01

    A microscopic optical model formalism for estimating momentum transfer in intermediate energy heavy ion collisions predicts universal behavior of the transverse component. In particular, for symmetric systems heavier than niobium, it appears that values of P(perpendicular)/A are independent of the mass and charge of the colliding nuclei and vary only with impact parameter and incident beam energy. This suggests that momentum transfer per nucleon saturates to some limiting value with increasing mass.

  7. Nuclear fragmentation energy and momentum transfer distributions in relativistic heavy-ion collisions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khandelwal, Govind S.; Khan, Ferdous

    1989-01-01

    An optical model description of energy and momentum transfer in relativistic heavy-ion collisions, based upon composite particle multiple scattering theory, is presented. Transverse and longitudinal momentum transfers to the projectile are shown to arise from the real and absorptive part of the optical potential, respectively. Comparisons of fragment momentum distribution observables with experiments are made and trends outlined based on our knowledge of the underlying nucleon-nucleon interaction. Corrections to the above calculations are discussed. Finally, use of the model as a tool for estimating collision impact parameters is indicated.

  8. HZETRN: A heavy ion/nucleon transport code for space radiations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, John W.; Chun, Sang Y.; Badavi, Forooz F.; Townsend, Lawrence W.; Lamkin, Stanley L.

    1991-01-01

    The galactic heavy ion transport code (GCRTRN) and the nucleon transport code (BRYNTRN) are integrated into a code package (HZETRN). The code package is computer efficient and capable of operating in an engineering design environment for manned deep space mission studies. The nuclear data set used by the code is discussed including current limitations. Although the heavy ion nuclear cross sections are assumed constant, the nucleon-nuclear cross sections of BRYNTRN with full energy dependence are used. The relation of the final code to the Boltzmann equation is discussed in the context of simplifying assumptions. Error generation and propagation is discussed, and comparison is made with simplified analytic solutions to test numerical accuracy of the final results. A brief discussion of biological issues and their impact on fundamental developments in shielding technology is given.

  9. Detection of η mesons in heavy-ion collisions at 100 MeV/nucleon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Badalà, A.; Barbera, R.; Palmeri, A.; Pappalardo, G. S.; Riggi, F.; Russo, A. C.; Turrisi, R.

    1997-02-01

    A study of the detection of η mesons in heavy-ion collisions at 100 MeV/nucleon by a large array of BaF 2 modules has been carried out using full GEANT3 simulations. The most probable decay modes of the η mesons have been considered. Invariant mass spectra from the detection of two or more electromagnetic showers are discussed. The different sources of contamination are evaluated. The detection limits in terms of production cross section are discussed. An analysis of experimental data taken at 95 MeV/nucleon with the MEDEA array showed a few events which are compatible with the η → γγ decay.

  10. Nucleon and heavy-ion total and absorption cross section for selected nuclei

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, J. W.; Costner, C. M.

    1975-01-01

    Approximate solutions of the coupled-channel equations for high-energy composite particle scattering are obtained and are applied to the nuclear scattering problem. Relationships between several approximation procedures are established and discussed. The eikonal formalism is used with a small-angle approximation to calculate the coherent elastic scattered amplitude from which total and absorption cross sections are derived. Detailed comparisons with nucleon-nucleus experiments show agreement within 5 percent except at lower energies where the eikonal approximation is of questionable accuracy. Even at these lower energies, agreement is within 15 percent. Tables of cross sections required for cosmic heavy-ion transport and shielding studies are presented.

  11. Momentum transfer in relativistic heavy ion charge-exchange reactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Townsend, L. W.; Wilson, J. W.; Khan, F.; Khandelwal, G. S.

    1991-01-01

    Relativistic heavy ion charge-exchange reactions yield fragments (Delta-Z = + 1) whose longitudinal momentum distributions are downshifted by larger values than those associated with the remaining fragments (Delta-Z = 1, -2,...). Kinematics alone cannot account for the observed downshifts; therefore, an additional contribution from collision dynamics must be included. In this work, an optical model description of collision momentum transfer is used to estimate the additional dynamical momentum downshift. Good agreement between theoretical estimates and experimental data is obtained.

  12. Interplay Of Mean Field And Individual Nucleon Collisions Effects At Intermediate Energy Heavy Ion Reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Subotic, K.; Jordanov, D.; Durasevic, M.; Dragosavac, D.; Grabez, B.

    2007-04-23

    In our study of the reaction 20Ne+27Al at energy of 84 A MeV, the track detectors were used to select the target like fragments arising from processes in which the interacting system becomes disintegrated into a large number of constituent nucleons and one massive fragment. Heavy ion reaction studies at bombarding energies of several tens of MeV/nucleon have provided the evidence that most of reaction cross section, in this energy range, is associated with the production of primary projectile like and target like fragment in the first step of the nuclear reaction. The subsequent evolution of the studied reaction systems, has been usually described either using low energy models based on mean field effects (MFE), or high energy models where reaction proceeds by independent collisions (INC) of individual nucleons in the overlap region between target and projectile. The analysis of our results in terms of different MFE and INC models, prescribing consistent timings, has shown that the reaction mechanism may be defined of interplay of the mean field and individual nucleon collisions effects.

  13. Seed population for about 1 MeV per nucleon heavy ions accelerated by interplanetary shocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tan, L. C.; Mason, G. M.; Klecker, B.; Hovestadt, D.

    1989-01-01

    Data obtained between 1977 and 1982 by the ISEE 1 and ISEE 3 satellites on the composition of heavy ions of about 1 MeV per nucleon, accelerated in interplanetary shock events which followed solar flare events, are examined. It was found that the average relative abundances for C, O, and Fe in the shock events were very close to those found for energetic ions in the solar flares, suggesting that, at these energies, the shock accelerated particles have the solar energetic particles as their seed population. This hypothesis is supported by the fact that the Fe/O ratio in the solar particle events is very strongly correlated with the Fe/O ratio in associated diffusive shock events.

  14. Seed population for about 1 MeV per nucleon heavy ions accelerated by interplanetary shocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tan, L. C.; Mason, G. M.; Klecker, B.; Hovestadt, D.

    1989-01-01

    Data obtained between 1977 and 1982 by the ISEE 1 and ISEE 3 satellites on the composition of heavy ions of about 1 MeV per nucleon, accelerated in interplanetary shock events which followed solar flare events, are examined. It was found that the average relative abundances for C, O, and Fe in the shock events were very close to those found for energetic ions in the solar flares, suggesting that, at these energies, the shock accelerated particles have the solar energetic particles as their seed population. This hypothesis is supported by the fact that the Fe/O ratio in the solar particle events is very strongly correlated with the Fe/O ratio in associated diffusive shock events.

  15. Three-nucleon interaction in heavy-ion collisions at intermediate energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wada, R.

    2017-09-01

    The effect of a three-nucleon (3 N ) interaction is studied for the production of high energy protons in heavy-ion collisions in the incident energy range of 44 to 400 A MeV . The 3 N interaction is incorporated into the antisymmetrized molecular dynamics transport model of Ono [A. Ono, Phys. Rev. C 59, 853 (1999), 10.1103/PhysRevC.59.853] as a 3 N collision term, following a diagram of three consecutive binary collisions. For the theoretical 40Ar+51V reaction studies, no contribution from the 3 N collisions is observed for high energy proton production at the incident energy of 44 A MeV . However when the incident energy increases, the contribution increases gradually. At 200 A MeV and above, the contribution is observed as distinctly harder energy slopes in the proton energy spectra. The model is applied to the available Bevalac data for 40Ar+40Ca at 42 ,92 , and 137 A MeV . The experimental proton energy spectra are reasonably well reproduced at angles θ ≥70∘ for all three incident energies, showing negligible 3 N contributions at 42 A MeV and significant contributions at 137 A MeV at the large laboratory angles. Good agreement at these large angles, where the 3 N collision is a major mechanism to produce such protons, strongly indicates for the first time the importance of the 3 N interaction in intermediate heavy ion reactions in a full transport calculation. The possible relation between the 3 N collision term and the short range and the tensor interactions is suggested.

  16. Beam instrumentation for the BNL Heavy Ion Transfer Line

    SciTech Connect

    Witkover, R.L.; Buxton, W.; Castillo, V.; Feigenbaum, I.; Lazos, A.; Li, Z.G.; Smith, G.; Stoehr, R.

    1987-01-01

    The Heavy Ion Transfer Line (HITL) was constructed to transport beams from the BNL Tandem Van de Graaff (TVDG) to be injected into the AGS. Because the beam line is approximately 2000 feet long and the particle rigidity is so low, 20 beam monitor boxes were placed along the line. The intensity ranges from 1 to 100 nanoAmps for the dc trace beam used for line set-up, to over 100 ..mu..A for the pulsed beam to be injected into the AGS. Profiles are measured using multiwire arrays (HARPS) while Faraday cups and beam transformers monitor the intensity. The electronics stations are operated through 3 Instrumentation Controllers networked to Apollo workstations in the TVDG and AGS control rooms. Details of the detectors and electronics designs and performance will be given.

  17. Heavy-Ion Transfer Reactions with Deformed Nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Helmer, Karl Gerard

    1992-01-01

    One-neutron transfer reactions involving actinide nuclei are used to investigate the effects of rotational motion on transfer populations. Deexcitation gamma rays were measured using a particle -particle-gamma triple coincidence method. Rotational states up to 28^{+ }(30^{+}) were seen in ^{234}U originating from the reaction ^{235}U( ^{206}Pb, ^ {207}Pb)^{234} U at a laboratory bombarding energy of 1394 MeV. Angular distributions for both inelastic excitation and transfer are presented and the one-neutron transfer reaction cross section as well as the grazing angle have been extracted. This study demonstrates the feasibility of using heavy-ion induced transfer reactions for spectroscopic studies. The second section of this thesis explores the question of diabolical pair transfer in nuclear physics using the reactions ^{206}Pb( ^{156}Gd, ^ {154}Gd)^{208} Pb (diabolical case) and ^{206 }Pb(^{156}Gd, ^{158}Gd)^ {204}Pb (nondiabolic case) at a laboratory bombarding energy of 888 MeV. Early calculations by Nikam, Ring and Canto predicted oscillatory behavior of pair transfer matrix elements as the cranking frequency was varied, within the cranking Hartree-Fock-Bogoliubov (CHFB) model, and explained this behavior as a manifestation of Berry's phase. Significant suppression of the high spin population in the diabolical nucleus was predicted. The diabolical point is supplied by the crossing of the ground-state band with the two-quasiparticle band. The strength of this band interaction is predicted to be oscillatory with chemical potential in the CHFB model. The study of pair transfer populations can therefore shed light not only on the possible existence of Berry's phase in nuclear systems, but also on whether the band interaction goes strictly to zero as predicted by the CHFB model. The results of this experiment agree with the latest calculations that the expected effects are more subtle than the earliest calculations predicted.

  18. Heavy ion mutagenesis: linear energy transfer effects and genetic linkage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kronenberg, A.; Gauny, S.; Criddle, K.; Vannais, D.; Ueno, A.; Kraemer, S.; Waldren, C. A.; Chatterjee, A. (Principal Investigator)

    1995-01-01

    We have characterized a series of 69 independent mutants at the endogenous hprt locus of human TK6 lymphoblasts and over 200 independent S1-deficient mutants of the human x hamster hybrid cell line AL arising spontaneously or following low-fluence exposures to densely ionizing Fe ions (600 MeV/amu, linear energy transfer = 190 keV/microns). We find that large deletions are common. The entire hprt gene (> 44 kb) was missing in 19/39 Fe-induced mutants, while only 2/30 spontaneous mutants lost the entire hprt coding sequence. When the gene of interest (S1 locus = M1C1 gene) is located on a nonessential human chromosome 11, multilocus deletions of several million base pairs are observed frequently. The S1 mutation frequency is more than 50-fold greater than the frequency of hprt mutants in the same cells. Taken together, these results suggest that low-fluence exposures to Fe ions are often cytotoxic due to their ability to create multilocus deletions that may often include the loss of essential genes. In addition, the tumorigenic potential of these HZE heavy ions may be due to the high potential for loss of tumor suppressor genes. The relative insensitivity of the hprt locus to mutation is likely due to tight linkage to a gene that is required for viability.

  19. Heavy ion mutagenesis: linear energy transfer effects and genetic linkage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kronenberg, A.; Gauny, S.; Criddle, K.; Vannais, D.; Ueno, A.; Kraemer, S.; Waldren, C. A.; Chatterjee, A. (Principal Investigator)

    1995-01-01

    We have characterized a series of 69 independent mutants at the endogenous hprt locus of human TK6 lymphoblasts and over 200 independent S1-deficient mutants of the human x hamster hybrid cell line AL arising spontaneously or following low-fluence exposures to densely ionizing Fe ions (600 MeV/amu, linear energy transfer = 190 keV/microns). We find that large deletions are common. The entire hprt gene (> 44 kb) was missing in 19/39 Fe-induced mutants, while only 2/30 spontaneous mutants lost the entire hprt coding sequence. When the gene of interest (S1 locus = M1C1 gene) is located on a nonessential human chromosome 11, multilocus deletions of several million base pairs are observed frequently. The S1 mutation frequency is more than 50-fold greater than the frequency of hprt mutants in the same cells. Taken together, these results suggest that low-fluence exposures to Fe ions are often cytotoxic due to their ability to create multilocus deletions that may often include the loss of essential genes. In addition, the tumorigenic potential of these HZE heavy ions may be due to the high potential for loss of tumor suppressor genes. The relative insensitivity of the hprt locus to mutation is likely due to tight linkage to a gene that is required for viability.

  20. Search for Fractional Charges Produced in Heavy-Ion Collisions at 1.9 GeV/nucleon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindgren, Michael A.; Joyce, David C.; Abrams, Peter C.; Bland, Roger W.; Johnson, Robert T.; Knoop, Tanya D.; Savage, Maureen H.; Scholz, Marion H.; Young, Betty A.; Hodges, Christopher L.; Hahn, Alan A.; Shaw, Gordon L.; Lackner, Klaus S.; Pugh, Howel G.; Slansky, Richard

    1983-10-01

    An experiment was performed to capture fractionally charged particles produced in heavy-ion collisions and to concentrate them in samples suitable for analysis by various techniques. Two of the samples so produced have been searched, with use of an automated version of Millikan's oil-drop apparatus. The beam was 56Fe at 1.9 GeV/nucleon, incident on a lead target. Less than one fractional charge per 1.0×104 Fe-Pb collisions was found to be produced, and, with further assumptions, less than one per 2.0×106 collisions.

  1. Population of high spin states in very heavy ion transfer reactions. The experimental evidence

    SciTech Connect

    Guidry, M.W.

    1985-01-01

    Transfer reactions have been studied for some time with light heavy ions such as oxygen. Although states of spin I approx.10 h are sometimes populated in such reactions, it is assumed that collective excitation is small, and the transferred particles are responsible for the angular momentum transfer. In this paper we will discuss a qualitatively different kind of transfer reaction using very heavy ions (A greater than or equal to 40). In these reactions the collective excitation in both the entrance and exit channels is strong, and there may be appreciable angular momentum transfer associated with inelastic excitation. 12 refs., 13 figs.

  2. Nuclear stopping in heavy-ion collisions at 100 MeV/nucleon from inclusive and exclusive neutral pion measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Badala, A.; Barbera, R.; Palmeri, A.; Pappalardo, G.S.; Riggi, F.; Russo, A.C.; Russo, G.; Turrisi, R. ||

    1996-04-01

    Inclusive and exclusive measurements of neutral pions in heavy-ion collisions around 100 MeV/nucleon, carried out in a near 4{pi} geometry, have been analyzed to obtain information on the nuclear stopping of the projectile. Stopping of the projectile has been investigated by the analysis of the source velocity, of the distribution of the energetic products of the collisions, and of the associated rapidity distribution of the baryon matter. Collisions were classified according to their centrality by the charged particle multiplicity. Clear evidence for this phenomenon has been obtained by the study of different observables. Both stopping and reabsorption effects play an essential role in the interpretation of the results. {copyright} {ital 1996 The American Physical Society.}

  3. Systematic comparison of barriers for heavy-ion fusion calculated on the basis of the double-folding model by employing two versions of nucleon–nucleon interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Gontchar, I. I.; Chushnyakova, M. V.

    2016-07-15

    A systematic calculation of barriers for heavy-ion fusion was performed on the basis of the double-folding model by employing two versions of an effective nucleon–nucleon interaction: M3Y interaction and Migdal interaction. The results of calculations by the Hartree–Fockmethod with the SKX coefficients were taken for nuclear densities. The calculations reveal that the fusion barrier is higher in the case of employing theMigdal interaction than in the case of employing the Ðœ3Y interaction. In view of this, the use of the Migdal interaction in describing heavy-ion fusion is questionable.

  4. An optical model description of momentum transfer in heavy ion collisions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khan, F.; Khandelwal, G. S.; Townsend, Lawrence W.; Wilson, J. W.; Norbury, John W.

    1989-01-01

    An optical model description of momentum transfer in relativistic heavy ion collisions, based upon composite particle multiple scattering theory, is presented. The imaginary component of the complex momentum transfer, which comes from the absorptive part of the optical potential, is identified as the longitudinal momentum downshift of the projectile. Predictions of fragment momentum distribution observables are made and compared with experimental data. Use of the model as a tool for estimating collision impact parameters is discussed.

  5. Continuum effects in transfer reactions induced by heavy ions

    SciTech Connect

    Marta, H.D.; Donangelo, R.; Fernandez Niello, J.O.; Pacheco, A.J.

    2006-02-15

    In the usual treatment of transfer nuclear reactions, the continuum states of the transferred particle are neglected. Here we perform a semiclassical calculation that treats the continuum in an exact way. For comparison purposes, we perform a second calculation in which the continuum is completely disregarded. The results of these two calculations indicates that the influence of the continuum states may be very important in systems with weakly bound reactants.

  6. Origin and Properties of Quiet-time 0.11-1.28 MeV Nucleon-1 Heavy-ion Population near 1 au

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dayeh, M. A.; Desai, M. I.; Mason, G. M.; Ebert, R. W.; Farahat, A.

    2017-02-01

    Using measurements from the Advanced Composition Explorer/Ultra-Low Energy Isotope Spectrometer near 1 au, we surveyed the composition and spectra of heavy ions (He-through-Fe) during quiet times from 1998 January 1 to 2015 December 31 at suprathermal energies between ˜0.11 and ˜1.28 MeV nucleon-1. The selected time period covers the maxima of solar cycles 23 and 24 and the extended solar minimum in between. We find the following. (1) The number of quiet hours in each year correlates well with the sunspot number, year 2009 was the quietest for about 82% of the time. (2) The composition of the quiet-time suprathermal heavy-ion population (3He, C-through-Fe) correlates well with the level of solar activity, exhibiting SEP-like composition signatures during solar maximum, and CIR- or solar wind-like composition during solar minimum. (3) The heavy-ion (C-Fe) spectra exhibit suprathermal tails at energies of 0.11-0.32 MeV nucleon-1 with power-law spectral indices ranging from 1.40 to 2.97. Fe spectra soften (steepen, i.e., spectral index increases) smoothly with increasing energies compared with Fe, indicating a rollover behavior of Fe at higher energies (0.45-1.28 MeV nucleon-1). (4) Spectral indices of Fe and O do not appear to exhibit clear solar cycle dependence. (2) and (3) imply that during IP quiet times and at energies above ˜0.1 MeV nucleon-1, the IP medium is dominated by material from prior solar and interplanetary events. We discuss the implications of these extended observations in the context of the current understanding of the suprathermal ion population near 1 au.

  7. Thermal and transport properties in central heavy-ion reactions around a few hundred MeV/nucleon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, X. G.; Ma, Y. G.; Veselský, M.

    2016-10-01

    The thermalization process of nuclear matter in the central fireball region of heavy-ion collisions is investigated by employing an extended Boltzmann-Uehling-Uhlenbeck model, namely, the van der Waals Boltzmann-Uehling-Uhlenbeck (VdWBUU) model. The temperature (T ) is extracted by the quantum fermion fluctuation approach and other thermodynamic quantities, such as the density (ρ ), entropy density (s ), shear viscosity (η ), isospin diffusivity (DI), and heat conductivity (κ ), are also deduced. The liquidlike and gaslike phase signs are discussed through the behavior of the shear viscosity during the heavy-ion collision process in the VdWBUU model.

  8. Population of collective bands in Dy isotopes using heavy ion induced transfer reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Cresswell, A.J.; Butler, P.A.; Cline, D.; Cunningham, R.A.; Devlin, M.; Hannachi, F.; Ibbotson, R.; Jones, G.D.; Jones, P.M.; Simon, M.; Simpson, J.; Smith, J.F.; Wu, C.Y. ||

    1995-10-01

    It is demonstrated that low-lying collective bands in deformed nuclei are strongly populated by quasielastic heavy ion transfer reactions at near barrier energies. The {sup 161}Dy({sup 61}Ni,{sup 62}Ni){sup 160}Dy and {sup 161}Dy({sup 61}Ni,{sup 60}Ni){sup 162}Dy reactions at a beam energy of 270 MeV have been studied using a particle-{gamma} technique. Significant population of sidebands in {sup 160}Dy was observed, particularly the {ital S} band built upon the [{nu}({ital i}{sub 13/2})]{sup 2} configuration and the {ital K}{sup {pi}}=1{sup {minus}}, 2{sup {minus}}, and {gamma} bands. For {sup 162}Dy the only sideband significantly populated was the {gamma} band.

  9. Probing the nuclear structure with heavy-ion reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Broglia, R.A.

    1982-01-01

    Nuclei display distortions in both ordinary space and in gauge space. It is suggested that it is possible to learn about the spatial distribution of the Nilsson orbitals and about the change of the pairing gap with the rotational frequency through the analysis of one- and two-nucleon transfer reactions induced in heavy-ion collisions.

  10. Secondary Neutron-Production Cross Sections from Heavy-IonInteractions between 230 and 600 MeV/nucleon

    SciTech Connect

    Heilbronn, L.H.; Zeitlin, C.J.; Iwata, Y.; Murakami, T.; Iwase,H.; Nakamura, T.; Nunomiya, T.; Sato, H.; Yashima, H.; Ronningen, R.M.; Ieki, K.

    2006-10-04

    Secondary neutron-production cross-sections have beenmeasured from interactions of 230 MeV/nucleon He, 400 MeV/nucleon N, 400MeV/nucleon Kr, 400 MeV/nucleon Xe, 500 MeV/nucleon Fe, and 600MeV/nucleon Ne interacting in a variety of elemental and compositetargets. We report the double-differential production cross sections,angular distributions, energy spectra, and total cross sections from allsystems. Neutron energies were measured using the time-of-flighttechnique, and were measured at laboratory angles between 5 deg and 80deg. The spectra exhibit behavior previously reported in otherheavy-ion-induced neutron production experiments; namely, a peak atforward angles near the energy corresponding to the beam velocity, withthe remaining spectra generated by preequilibrium and equilibriumprocesses. The double-differential spectra are fitted with amoving-source parameterization. Observations on the dependence of thetotal cross sections on target and projectile mass arediscussed.

  11. Transverse-energy production and fluctuations over centrality and acceptance in relativistic heavy-ion and nucleon-nucleon collisions: Quark versus nucleon interactions and a search for the quark-gluon plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Armendariz, Raul L.

    Measuring energy produced in relativistic heavy-ion collisions is a way to investigate if a model of quark participants, or nucleon participants better describes the internal dynamics of the collision. The energy produced is proportional to the energy density in the interaction region; changes in fluctuations of energy production could be a signature for a phase transition between ordinary hadronic matter to a liberated quark-gluon plasma phase, QGP, thought to have existed one millionth of a second after the Big Bang creation of the Universe and before protons and neutrons had formed. Three experimental nuclear physics data-analyses were conducted using the sum energy of all particles produced in the direction transverse to the beam, ET, when nuclei collide in a 2.4 mile long circular atom smasher. The nuclei are accelerated in opposite directions at 99.995% the speed of light, and center-of-mass energies available for new particle production of sNN = 62.4 GeV, and 200 GeV per colliding nucleon pair were studied. The ET was recorded by the lead-scintillator electromagnetic calorimeter detectors of the Pioneering High Energy Interactions Experiment (PHENIX), at the Relativistic heavy Ion Collider (RHIC), of Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL). The collision systems studied were 200 GeV protons with protons ( p + p), deuterons with Au ions (d+Au), and 62.4 GeV and 200 GeV gold ions with gold ions (Au+Au). The first analysis, mean ET in collision centrality, explores whether a model of nucleon participants, or quark participants, better describes energy production with collision impact. The second analysis, ET fluctuations in collision centrality, looks for non-random fluctuations in ET distributions when the density of colliding partons becomes high. The third analysis, ET fluctuations in geometric acceptance, examines fluctuations as a function of detector fiducial volume in a search for correlated energy distribution in space (correlations ), known to occur in

  12. Relativistic heavy ion facilities: worldwide

    SciTech Connect

    Schroeder, L.S.

    1986-05-01

    A review of relativistic heavy ion facilities which exist, are in a construction phase, or are on the drawing boards as proposals is presented. These facilities span the energy range from fixed target machines in the 1 to 2 GeV/nucleon regime, up to heavy ion colliders of 100 GeV/nucleon on 100 GeV/nucleon. In addition to specifying the general features of such machines, an outline of the central physics themes to be carried out at these facilities is given, along with a sampling of the detectors which will be used to extract the physics. 22 refs., 17 figs., 3 tabs.

  13. Activation of the nuclear factor κB pathway by heavy ion beams of different linear energy transfer.

    PubMed

    Hellweg, Christine E; Baumstark-Khan, Christa; Schmitz, Claudia; Lau, Patrick; Meier, Matthias M; Testard, Isabelle; Berger, Thomas; Reitz, Günther

    2011-09-01

    Risk assessment of radiation exposure during long-term space missions requires the knowledge of the relative biological effectiveness (RBE) of space radiation components. Few data on gene transcription activation by different heavy ions are available, suggesting a dependence on linear energy transfer. The transcription factor Nuclear Factor κB (NF-κB) can be involved in cancerogenesis. Therefore, NF-κB activation by accelerated heavy ions of different linear energy transfer (LET) was correlated to survival. NF-κB-dependent gene induction after exposure to heavy ions was detected in stably transfected human embryonic kidney 293 cells (HEK-pNF-κB-d2EGFP/Neo cells carrying a neomycin resistance), using the destabilized Enhanced Green Fluorescent Protein (d2EGFP) as reporter. Argon (LET 272 keV/μm) and neon ions (LET 91 keV/μm) had the highest potential to activate NF-κB, resulting in a RBE of 8.9 in comparison to 150 kV X-rays. The RBE for survival also reached its maximum in this LET range, with a maximal value of 2. NF-κB might be involved in modulating survival responses of cells hit by heavy ions in the LET range of 91-272 keV/μm and could therefore become a factor to be considered for risk assessment of radiation exposure during space travel.

  14. Experimental fission study using multi-nucleon transfer reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishio, Katsuhisa; Hirose, Kentaro; Léguillon, Romain; Makii, Hiroyuki; Orlandi, Riccardo; Tsukada, Kazuaki; Smallcombe, James; Chiba, Satoshi; Aritomo, Yoshihiro; Tanaka, Shouya; Ohtsuki, Tsutomu; Tsekhanovich, Igor; Petrache, Costel M.; Andreyev, Andrei

    2017-09-01

    It is shown that the multi-nucleon transfer reactions is a powerful tool to study fission of exotic neutron-rich actinide nuclei, which cannot be accessed by particle-capture or heavy-ion fusion reactions. In this work, multi-nucleon transfer channels of the reactions of 18O+232Th, 18O+238U and 18O+248Cm are used to study fission for various nuclei from many excited states. Identification of fissioning nuclei and of their excitation energy is performed on an event-by-event basis, through the measurement of outgoing ejectile particle in coincidence with fission fragments. Fission fragment mass distributions are measured for each transfer channel. Predominantly asymmetric fission is observed at low excitation energies for all studied cases, with a gradual increase of the symmetric mode towards higher excitation energy. The experimental distributions are found to be in general agreement with predictions of the fluctuation-dissipation model. Role of multi-chance fission in fission fragment mass distributions is discussed, where it is shown that mass-asymmetric structure remaining at high excitation energies originates from low-excited nuclei by evaporation of neutrons.

  15. Effect of entrance-channel asymmetry on the isospin dependence of nucleon emission in heavy ion collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Fang; Zuo, Wei; Chen, Ji-Yan; Zhou, Zhen-Xiao

    2008-07-01

    Using the isospin- and momentum-dependent hadronic transport model IBUU04, we have investigated the influence of the entrance-channel isospin asymmetry on the sensitivity of the pre-equilibrium neutron/proton ratio to symmetry energy in central heavy-ion collisions induced by high-energy radioactive beams. Our analysis and discussion are based on the dynamical simulations of the three isotopic reaction systems 132Sn+124Sn, 124Sn+112Sn and 112Sn+112Sn which are of the same total proton number but different isospin asymmetry. We find that the kinetic-energy distributions of the pre-equilibrium neutron/proton ratio are quite sensitive to the density-dependence of symmetry energy at incident beam energy E/A = 400 MeV, and the sensitivity increases as the isospin asymmetry of the reaction system increases. Supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (10575119, 10775061), Knowledge Innovation Project of Chinese Academy of Sciences (KJCX3-SYW-N2), Major State Basic Research Developing Program of China (2007CB815004), CAS/SAFEA International Partnership Program for Creative Research Teams (CXTD-J2005-1), and the Asia-Link Project of the European Commission (CN/ASIA-LINK/008(94791))

  16. Search for {Delta}(1232)-resonance excitation in heavy-ion collisions around 100 MeV/nucleon

    SciTech Connect

    Badala, A.; Barbera, R.; Bonasera, A.; Palmeri, A.; Pappalardo, G.S.; Riggi, F.; Russo, A.C.; Russo, G.; Turrisi, R. ||

    1996-11-01

    Correlations among protons and neutral pions emitted in the reaction {sup 36}Ar+{sup 27}Al at 95 MeV/nucleon have been studied. The analysis of the ({pi}{sup 0}{minus}{ital p}) invariant-mass and relative-angle distributions shows evidences of {Delta}(1232)-resonance excitation. The experimental data are in agreement with the predictions of microscopic theoretical calculations. {copyright} {ital 1996 The American Physical Society.}

  17. From Stopping to Viscosity in Heavy Ion Collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Barker, Brent W.; Danielewicz, Pawel

    2010-04-26

    Stopping in heavy ion collisions is investigated with the aim of learning about the shear viscosity of nuclear matter. Boltzmann equation simulations are compared to available data on stopping in the energy range of 20-117 MeV/nucleon. Stopping observables used include momentum anisotropy and linear momentum transfer. The data show that modeling the transport with free nucleon-nucleon cross-sections is inaccurate and reduced cross-sections are required. Reduction of the cross-sections produces an increase in the shear viscosity of nuclear matter, compared to calculations based on free cross-sections.

  18. Influence of the time-step on the production of free nucleons and pions from heavy-ion collisions around 1 GeV/nucleon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zou, LiYan; Li, Miao; Guo, ChenChen; Wang, YongJia; Li, QingFeng; Liu, Ling

    2016-12-01

    By considering different values of the time-step for the potential updates in the ultra-relativistic quantum molecular dynamics (UrQMD) model, we examine its influence on observables, such as the yield and collective flow of nucleons and pions from heavyion collisions around 1 GeV/nucleon. It is found that these observables are affected to some extent by the choice of the time-step, and the impact of the time-step on the pion-related observables is more visible than that on the nucleon-related ones. However, its effect on the π -/ π + yield ratio and elliptic flow difference between neutrons and protons, which have been taken as sensitive observables for probing the density-dependent nuclear symmetry energy at high densities, is fairly weak.

  19. Linear Energy Transfer-Dependent Change in Rice Gene Expression Profile after Heavy-Ion Beam Irradiation

    PubMed Central

    Ishii, Kotaro; Kazama, Yusuke; Morita, Ryouhei; Hirano, Tomonari; Ikeda, Tokihiro; Usuda, Sachiko; Hayashi, Yoriko; Ohbu, Sumie; Motoyama, Ritsuko; Nagamura, Yoshiaki; Abe, Tomoko

    2016-01-01

    A heavy-ion beam has been recognized as an effective mutagen for plant breeding and applied to the many kinds of crops including rice. In contrast with X-ray or γ-ray, the heavy-ion beam is characterized by a high linear energy transfer (LET). LET is an important factor affecting several aspects of the irradiation effect, e.g. cell survival and mutation frequency, making the heavy-ion beam an effective mutagen. To study the mechanisms behind LET-dependent effects, expression profiling was performed after heavy-ion beam irradiation of imbibed rice seeds. Array-based experiments at three time points (0.5, 1, 2 h after the irradiation) revealed that the number of up- or down-regulated genes was highest 2 h after irradiation. Array-based experiments with four different LETs at 2 h after irradiation identified LET-independent regulated genes that were up/down-regulated regardless of the value of LET; LET–dependent regulated genes, whose expression level increased with the rise of LET value, were also identified. Gene ontology (GO) analysis of LET-independent up-regulated genes showed that some GO terms were commonly enriched, both 2 hours and 3 weeks after irradiation. GO terms enriched in LET-dependent regulated genes implied that some factor regulates genes that have kinase activity or DNA-binding activity in cooperation with the ATM gene. Of the LET-dependent up-regulated genes, OsPARP3 and OsPCNA were identified, which are involved in DNA repair pathways. This indicates that the Ku-independent alternative non-homologous end-joining pathway may contribute to repairing complex DNA legions induced by high-LET irradiation. These findings may clarify various LET-dependent responses in rice. PMID:27462908

  20. Heavy ion cocktail beams at the 88 inch Cyclotron

    SciTech Connect

    Leitner, Daniela; McMahan, Margaret A.; Argento, David; Gimpel, Thomas; Guy, Aran; Morel, James; Siero, Christine; Thatcher, Ray; Lyneis, Claude M.

    2002-09-03

    Cyclotrons in combination with ECR ion sources provide the ability to accelerate ''cocktails'' of ions. A cocktail is a mixture of ions of near-identical mass-to-charge (m/q) ratio. The different ions cannot be separated by the injector mass-analyzing magnet and are tuned out of the ion source together. The cyclotron then is utilized as a mass analyzer by shifting the accelerating frequency. This concept was developed soon after the first ECR ion source became operational at the 88-Inch Cyclotron and has since become a powerful tool in the field of heavy ion radiation effects testing. Several different ''cocktails'' at various energies are available at the 88-Inch cyclotron for radiation effect testing, covering a broad range of linear energy transfer and penetration depth. Two standard heavy ion cocktails at 4.5 MeV/nucleon and 10 MeV/nucleon have been developed over the years containing ions from boron to bismuth. Recently, following requests for higher penetration depths, a 15MeV/nucleon heavy ion cocktail has been developed. Up to nine different metal and gaseous ion beams at low to very high charge states are tuned out of the ion source simultaneously and injected together into the cyclotron. It is therefore crucial to balance the ion source very carefully to provide sufficient intensities throughout the cocktail. The paper describes the set-up and tuning of the ion source for the various heavy ion cocktails.

  1. Heavy ion storage rings

    SciTech Connect

    Schuch, R.

    1987-01-01

    A brief overview of synchrotron storage rings for heavy ions, which are presently under construction in different accelerator laboratories is given. Ions ranging from protons up to uranium ions at MeV/nucleon energies will be injected into these rings using multiturn injection from the accelerators available or being built in these laboratories. After injection, it is planned to cool the phase space distribution of the ions by merging them with cold electron beams or laser beams, or by using stochastic cooling. Some atomic physics experiments planned for these rings are presented.

  2. Influence of differential elastic nucleon-nucleon cross section on stopping and collective flow in heavy-ion collisions at intermediate energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yongjia; Guo, Chenchen; Li, Qingfeng; Li, Zhuxia; Su, Jun; Zhang, Hongfei

    2016-08-01

    We considered three different nucleon-nucleon (NN) elastic differential cross sections: the Cugnon et al. parameterized differential cross section [Nucl. Instrum. Methods Phys. Res., Sect. B 111, 215 (1996), 10.1016/0168-583X(95)01384-9], the differential cross section derived from the collision term of the self-consistent relativistic Boltzmann-Uehling-Uhlenbeck equation proposed by Mao et al. [Z. Phys. A 347, 173 (1994), 10.1007/BF01292373], and the isotropic differential cross section within the newly updated version of the ultrarelativistic quantum molecular dynamics (UrQMD) model. By doing so, we investigated the influence of the differential elastic NN cross section on various observables (e.g., nuclear stopping, both the rapidity and transverse-velocity dependence of the directed and elliptic flows) in Au+Au collisions at beam energies 150, 250, 400, and 800 MeV /nucleon . By comparing calculations with those three differential cross sections, we found that the nuclear stopping power and the directed and elliptic flows are affected to some extent by the differential cross sections, and the impact of differential cross section on those observables becomes more visible as the beam energy increases. The effect on the elliptic flow difference v2n-v2H and ratio v2n/v2H of neutrons versus hydrogen isotopes (Z =1 ), which have been used as sensitive observables for probing nuclear symmetry energy at high densities, is weak.

  3. HEAVY ION LINEAR ACCELERATOR

    DOEpatents

    Van Atta, C.M.; Beringer, R.; Smith, L.

    1959-01-01

    A linear accelerator of heavy ions is described. The basic contributions of the invention consist of a method and apparatus for obtaining high energy particles of an element with an increased charge-to-mass ratio. The method comprises the steps of ionizing the atoms of an element, accelerating the resultant ions to an energy substantially equal to one Mev per nucleon, stripping orbital electrons from the accelerated ions by passing the ions through a curtain of elemental vapor disposed transversely of the path of the ions to provide a second charge-to-mass ratio, and finally accelerating the resultant stripped ions to a final energy of at least ten Mev per nucleon.

  4. {alpha}-decay and fusion phenomena in heavy ion collisions using nucleon-nucleon interactions derived from relativistic mean-field theory

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, BirBikram; Sahu, B. B.; Patra, S. K.

    2011-06-15

    Nucleus-nucleus potentials are determined in the framework of the double-folding model for a new microscopic nucleon-nucleon (NN) interaction relativistic mean field-3-Yukawa (R3Y) derived from the popular relativistic mean-field theory Lagrangian, and the results are compared for the use of Michigan-3-Yukawa (M3Y) effective NN interactions. The double-folding potentials so obtained are further taken up in the context of the preformed cluster model (PCM) of Gupta and collaborators and the barrier penetration model to study respectively the ground-state (g.s.) {alpha}-decay and low-energy fusion reactions. In this paper, using PCM, we deduce empirically the {alpha} preformation probability P{sub 0}{sup {alpha}(emp)} from experimental data on a few g.s. {alpha} decays in the trans-lead region. For fusion reactions, two projectile-target systems {sup 12}C+{sup 208}Pb and {sup 16}O+{sup 208}Pb are selected for calculating the barrier energies as well positions, fusion cross sections ({sigma}{sub fus}), and fusion barrier distribution [D(E{sub c.m.})]. The barrier energies and positions change for the R3Y NN interactions in comparison with those of the M3Y NN interactions. We find that in the {alpha}-decay studies the values of P{sub 0}{sup {alpha}(emp)}(R3Y) are similar to those of P{sub 0}{sup {alpha}(emp)}(M3Y). Further, both NN interactions give similar {sigma}{sub fus} values using the Wong formula specifically when the R3Y NN interaction calculated {sigma}{sub fus} values are reduced by 1.5 times, and the results are in agreement with the experimental data for both the systems, especially for the higher energies. Results for D(E{sub c.m.}) are also quite similar for both choices of NN interaction.

  5. Heavy-ion radiotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanai, Tatsuaki

    2000-11-01

    Heavy-ion radiotherapy using high-energy carbon beams has been performed at the National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Japan. The physical frame works for heavy-ion radiotherapy are established using physical understandings of radiation physics. In order to increase the accuracy of heavy-ion radiotherapy, many physical problems should be solved. Unsolved problems, such as the depth dose distributions, range of heavy-ion in patients and heavy-ion dosimetry in the radiation therapy, are discussed. .

  6. Adaptive response of low linear energy transfer X-rays for protection against high linear energy transfer accelerated heavy ion-induced teratogenesis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Bing; Ninomiya, Yasuharu; Tanaka, Kaoru; Maruyama, Kouichi; Varès, Guillaume; Eguchi-Kasai, Kiyomi; Nenoi, Mitsuru

    2012-12-01

    Adaptive response (AR) of low linear energy transfer (LET) irradiations for protection against teratogenesis induced by high LET irradiations is not well documented. In this study, induction of AR by X-rays against teratogenesis induced by accelerated heavy ions was examined in fetal mice. Irradiations of pregnant C57BL/6J mice were performed by delivering a priming low dose from X-rays at 0.05 or 0.30 Gy on gestation day 11 followed one day later by a challenge high dose from either X-rays or accelerated heavy ions. Monoenergetic beams of carbon, neon, silicon, and iron with the LET values of about 15, 30, 55, and 200 keV/μm, respectively, were examined. Significant suppression of teratogenic effects (fetal death, malformation of live fetuses, or low body weight) was used as the endpoint for judgment of a successful AR induction. Existence of AR induced by low-LET X-rays against teratogenic effect induced by high-LET accelerated heavy ions was demonstrated. The priming low dose of X-rays significantly reduced the occurrence of prenatal fetal death, malformation, and/or low body weight induced by the challenge high dose from either X-rays or accelerated heavy ions of carbon, neon or silicon but not iron particles. Successful AR induction appears to be a radiation quality event, depending on the LET value and/or the particle species of the challenge irradiations. These findings would provide a new insight into the study on radiation-induced AR in utero. © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Electron Spectroscopy In Heavy-Ion Storage Rings: Resonant and Non-Resonant Electron Transfer Processes

    SciTech Connect

    Hagmann, S.; Stoehlker, Th.; Trotsenko, S.; Kozhuharov, Ch.; Spillmann, U.; Bosch, F.; Liesen, D.; Winters, D.; Hillenbrand, P.-M.; Shabaev, V.; Tupitsyn, I.; Kozhedub, Y.; Rothard, H.; Reuschl, R.; Ullrich, J.; Moshammer, R.; Voitkiv, A.; Surzhykov, A.; Fischer, D.; Doerner, R.

    2011-06-01

    Whereas our understanding of total cross sections for ionization and capture processes in ion-atom collisions is widely viewed as having arrived at a state of adequate maturity, the same cannot be said at all about the dynamics of collisions, multi-electron processes or the electron continua (in target and projectile) which are at the origin of total cross sections. We depict how these processes can be studied favourably in storage ring environments. We present examples of resonant and non-resonant electron transfer processes, radiative and non-radiative. This is elucidated via the relation of the electron nucleus bremsstrahlung at the high energy tip of the bremsstrahlung spectrum to the radiative electron capture cusp (RECC) and a new approach to determining molecular orbital binding energies in superheavy quasi-molecules in resonant KK charge transfer.

  8. Measurement of the space-time extent of the hard-photon emitting source in heavy-ion collisions at 100 MeV/nucleon

    SciTech Connect

    Badala, A.; Barbera, R.; Palmeri, A.; Pappalardo, G.S.; Riggi, F.; Russo, A.C.; Turrisi, R.; Barbera, R.; Riggi, F.; Rizza, G.; Russo, G.; Turrisi, R.; Russo, G.

    1997-05-01

    The correlation between the couples of high-energy photons (E{sub {gamma}}{gt}30MeV) detected in the reactions induced by a {sup 36}Ar beam on {sup 27}Al, {sup 112}Sn, and {sup 197}Au targets at 95 MeV/nucleon has been analyzed with the intensity interferometry technique. Both the size and lifetime of the emitting source have been quantitatively evaluated. Results support the nucleon-nucleon picture as the dominant hard-photon production mechanism. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  9. Recent developments in heavy-ion fusion reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Back, B. B.; Esbensen, H.; Jiang, C. L.; Rehm, K. E.

    2014-01-01

    In this review the main advances in heavy-ion fusion research that have taken place over the last decade are addressed. During this period, experimental studies have been extended to deep sub-barrier energies to reveal the unexpected phenomenon of fusion hindrance. The coupled-channels descriptions have been refined to include the effects of nucleon transfer and to account for the fusion hindrance in terms of the ion-ion potential in the strongly overlapping region. Substantial progress has been made in time-dependent Hartree-Fock theory to the point that this approach now can make parameter-free predictions of heavy-ion fusion excitation functions. As several heavy-ion fusion reactions are of crucial importance in late-stage giant-star evolution, these reactions continue to be studied with better experimental and theoretical tools in order to provide improved input to astrophysical models. The effects of loosely bound valence nucleons on the fusion cross sections are the focus of a number of experimental studies involving radioactive beams, which have only recently become available. And finally, as the active field of synthesizing superheavy elements relies on heavy-ion fusion to reach the nuclei of interest, it is important to understand the fusion dynamics that plays a crucial role in both the "cold-fusion" and "hot-fusion" approaches to the superheavy island of stability. Also this area has seen significant progress in several different approaches to the problem of predicting the cross sections for formation and survival of these rare nuclei.

  10. Chemistry of heavy ion reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Hoffman, D.C.

    1988-10-01

    The use of heavy ions to induce nuclear reactions was reported as early as 1950. Since that time it has been one of the most active areas of nuclear research. Intense beams of ions as heavy as uranium with energies high enough to overcome the Coulomb barriers of even the heaviest elements are available. The wide variety of possible reactions gives rise to a multitude of products which have been studied by many ingenious chemical and physical techniques. Chemical techniques have been of special value for the separation and unequivocal identification of low yield species from the plethora of other nuclides present. Heavy ion reactions have been essential for the production of the trans-Md elements and a host of new isotopes. The systematics of compound nucleus reactions, transfer reactions, and deeply inelastic reactions have been elucidated using chemical techniques. A review of the variety of chemical procedures and techniques which have been developed for the study of heavy ion reactions and their products is given. Determination of the chemical properties of the trans-Md elements, which are very short-lived and can only be produced an ''atom-at-a-time'' via heavy ion reactions, is discussed. 53 refs., 19 figs.

  11. Pre-equilibrium decay processes in energetic heavy ion reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Blann, M.

    1986-04-15

    The Boltzmann master equation (BME) is defined for application to precompound decay in heavy ion reactions in the 10 100 MeV/nucleon regime. Predicted neutron spectra are compared with measured results for central collisions of /sup 20/Ne and /sup 12/C with /sup 165/Ho target nuclei. Comparisons are made with subthreshold ..pi../sup 0/ yields in heavy ion reactions between 35 and 84 MeV/nucleon, and with the ..pi../sup 0/ spectra. The BME is found to be an excellent tool for investigating these experimentally observed aspects of non-equilibrium heavy ion reactions. 18 refs., 8 figs.

  12. A Theorem for Two Nucleon Transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zamick, Larry; Mekjian, Aram

    2004-05-01

    We use the short notation for a unitary 9j symbol U9j(Ja,Jb)=<(jj)Ja(jj)Ja|(jj)Jb(jj)Jb>I=0 The wave fcn of a state of 44Ti with ang momentum I can be written as sum D(Jp,Jn) [(jj)Jp (jj)Jn]I. For the I=0 ground stae Jp=Jn. We found a new relationship SumJp U9j(Jp,Jx) D(Jp,Jp)= 1/2 D(Jx,Jx) for T=0 and =-D(Jx,Jx) for T=2. We could explain this by regarding U9j for even Jp,Jx as a square matrix hamiltonian, which, when diagonalized has eigenvalues of 1/2(triply degenerate) and -1(singly degenerate) corresponding to T=0 and T=2 respectively.*This theorem is useful,in the context of 2 nucleon transfer, for counting the number of pairs of particles in 44Ti with even Jx.The expressions simplifies to 3|D(Jx,Jx|^2,thus eliminating a complex 9jsymbol A deeper understanding of this result arises if we consider the strange interplay of angular momentum and isospin. Consider the interaction 1/4-t(1).t(2),which is unity for T=0 states and zero for T=1. For n nucleons with isospin T the eigenvalues are n^2/8+n/4-T(T+1)/2 But if we evaluate this with the usual Racah algebra then we note that in the single j shell the interaction can also be written as <(jj)Ia V (jj)Ia>= (1-(-1)^Ia)/2 i.e. the interaction acts only in odd J states since they have isospin T=0.In 44Ti the matrix element of the hamiltonian is [2+2U9j(Jp,Jx)].Connecting this with the isospin expression gives us the eigenvalues above for U9j. * L.Zamick, E. Moya de Guerra,P.Sarriguren,A.Raduta and A. Escuderos, preprint.

  13. Heavy-ion dosimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Schimmerling, W.

    1980-03-01

    This lecture deals with some of the more important physical characteristics of relativistic heavy ions and their measurement, with beam delivery and beam monitoring, and with conventional radiation dosimetry as used in the operation of the BEVALAC biomedical facility for high energy heavy ions (Lyman and Howard, 1977; BEVALAC, 1977). Even so, many fundamental aspects of the interaction of relativistic heavy ions with matter, including important atomic physics and radiation chemical considerations, are not discussed beyond the reminder that such additional understanding is required before an adequte perspective of the problem can be attained.

  14. Cosmic ray heavy ion penetration deep into the magnetosphere: Results from S81-1 and CRRES

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cooper, J. F.; Chen, J.; Guzik, T. G.; Wefel, J. P.; Sang, Y.

    1995-01-01

    In spite of strong magnetic shielding by the geomagnetic field, small fractions (1-10 %) of the total high energy, heavy ion intensities of solar and galactic cosmic rays have been observed at energies below theoretical cutoffs for direct entry into the earth's magnetosphere from interplanetary space. We report on measurements of these heavy ions at 10 to 500 MeV/nucleon by cosmic ray composition experiments on the S81-1 satellite in polar orbit during 1982 and on the Combined Release and Radiation Effects Satellite (CRRES) satellite in geosynchronous transfer orbit during 1990-1991.

  15. The stopping power of heavy ions for energies below 0.2 MeV/nucleon measured by the semi-thick target method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pasternak, A. A.; Sankowska, I.; Tucholski, A.; Srebrny, J.; Morek, T.; Droste, Ch.; Grodner, E.; Sałata, M.; Mierzejewski, J.; Kisieliński, M.; Kowalczyk, M.; Perkowski, J.; Nowicki, L.; Ratajczak, R.; Stonert, A.; Jagielski, J.; Gawlik, G.; Kownacki, J.; Kordyasz, A.; Korman, A. A.; Płóciennik, W.; Ruchowska, E.; Wolińska-Cichocka, M.

    2015-02-01

    A semi-thick target method has been used to measure the stopping power for recoils produced in the 120Sn(14N, 5n)129La, 120Sn(11B, 4n)127Cs and 118Sn(11B, 4n)125Cs reactions by γ-ray lineshape analysis. The target quality and thickness (1.2 mg/cm2) were determined by the Rutherford backscattering spectrometry technique. Electronic and nuclear stopping-power parameters were determined for Cs and La ions in Sn and compared with parameters measured with the same method for Pm, Sm and Nd ions in Cd and I ions in Ag. A comparison with the LSS theory was made for the energy range below 0.2 MeV/nucleon, where the Bethe-Bloch formula has no application.

  16. Dynamical processes in heavy ion reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Blann, M.; Remington, B.A.

    1988-07-25

    In this report I review the physical assumptions of the Boltzmann Master Equation (BME). Comparisons of the model with experimental neutron spectra gated on evaporation residues for a range of incident projectile energies and masses are presented; next, I compare n spectra gated on projectile-like fragments, followed by comparisons with ungated, inclusive proton spectra. I will then consider secondary effects from the nucleon-nucleon processes involved in the heavy ion relaxation processes, specifically the high energy ..gamma..-rays which have been observed at energies up to 140 MeV in collisions of heavy ions of 20/endash/84 MeV/..mu... Another secondary effect, subthreshold pion production, was covered in the XVII School and will not be repeated. 39 refs., 16 figs.

  17. Stopping power for low-velocity heavy ions: (0-1.0)-MeV/nucleon Mg ions in 17 (Z=22-79) elemental solids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arstila, K.; Keinonen, J.; Tikkanen, P.

    1990-04-01

    The stopping power for 24,26Mg ions in 17 (Z=22-79) elemental solids has been studied in the energy region 0-1.0 MeV/nucleon by application of the Doppler-shift attenuation method. At velocities 2v0

  18. Heavy-ion radiography and heavy-ion computed tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Fabrikant, J.I.; Holley, W.R.; McFarland, E.W.; Tobias, C.a.

    1982-02-01

    Heavy-ion projection and CT radiography is being developed into a safe, low-dose, noninvasive radiological procedure that can quantitate and image small density differences in human tissues. The applications to heavy-ion mammography and heavy-ion CT imaging of the brain in clinical patients suggest their potential value in cancer diagnosis.

  19. The heavy ion injection scheme for RHIC (Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider)

    SciTech Connect

    Rhoades-Brown, M.J.

    1989-01-01

    The Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) at Brookhaven has a multi-component injection system. The Collider requires very heavy ions such as /sub 79//sup 197/Au to be injected fully stripped of atomic electrons, at a kinetic energy of approximately 10 GeV/nucleon. However, the heavy ions are produced initially at a negative ion source and accelerated first in a 15 MV Tandem. These partially stripped ions have a kinetic energy of approximately 1 MeV/nucleon on leaving the Tandem. In order to achieve the injection requirements for RHIC, the partially stripped ions are accelerated in the Booster (currently under construction) and pass through a stripping foil on their way to the Alternating Gradient Synchrotron (AGS), where they are further accelerated before injection into RHIC. Recent theoretical calculations have shown quite convincingly that very heavy ions with 2 electrons in the filled K-shell may be accelerated with negligible loss in the AGS. 13 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs.

  20. The Glauber model and heavy ion reaction and elastic scattering cross sections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mehndiratta, Ajay; Shukla, Prashant

    2017-05-01

    We revisit the Glauber model to study the heavy ion reaction cross sections and elastic scattering angular distributions at low and intermediate energies. The Glauber model takes nucleon-nucleon cross sections and nuclear densities as inputs and has no free parameter and thus can predict the cross sections for unknown systems. The Glauber model works at low energies down to Coulomb barrier with very simple modifications. We present new parametrization of measured total cross sections as well as ratio of real to imaginary parts of the scattering amplitudes for pp and np collisions as a function of nucleon kinetic energy. The nuclear (charge) densities obtained by electron scattering form factors measured in large momentum transfer range are used in the calculations. The heavy ion reaction cross sections are calculated for light and heavy systems and are compared with available data measured over large energy range. The model gives excellent description of the data. The elastic scattering angular distributions are calculated for various systems at different energies. The model gives good description of the data at small momentum transfer but the calculations deviate from the data at large momentum transfer.

  1. Prompt processes in heavy ion reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Blann, M.; Remington, B.A.

    1987-12-01

    We test a relaxation model based on two body nucleon-nucleon scattering processes to interpret phenomena observed in heavy ion reactions. We use the Boltzmann Master Equation to accomplish this. By assuming that the projectile nucleons partition the total excitation with equal a-priori probability of all configurations, we are able to reproduce several sets of neutron spectra from /sup 20/Ne and /sup 12/C induced reactions on /sup 165/Ho and from reactions of /sup 40/Ar or /sup 40/Ca. We point out ambiguities in deducing angle-integrated energy spectra from double differential spectra. With no additional free parameters, our model successfully reproduces a large body of high energy ..gamma..-ray spectra by assuming an incoherent n-p-bremsstrahlung mechanism. 45 refs., 13 figs.

  2. Energy-dependent parameterization of heavy-ion absorption cross sections.

    PubMed

    Townsend, L W; Wilson, J W

    1986-01-01

    An energy-dependent parameterization of the total absorption (reaction) cross sections for heavy ion (Z > or = 2) collisions at energies above 25 MeV per nucleon is presented. The formula will be especially useful in heavy-ion transport applications.

  3. Nucleon Transfer Reactions in Few-Body Nuclear Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deltuva, A.

    2017-03-01

    Three- and four-body scattering is described solving Faddeev-Yakubovsky or equivalent Alt-Grassberger-Sandhas integral equations for transition operators in momentum-space. Several realistic nuclear interaction models are used; the Coulomb force between charged particles is taken into account via the screening and renormalization method. Differential cross sections and spin observables for various nucleon transfer reactions are calculated and compared with experimental data.

  4. Heavy ion collisions and the pre-equilibrium exciton model

    SciTech Connect

    Betak, E.

    2012-10-20

    We present a feasible way to apply the pre-equilibrium exciton model in its masterequation formulation to heavy-ion induced reactions including spin variables. Emission of nucleons, {gamma}'s and also light clusters is included in our model.

  5. Operational Stochastic Cooling in the Relativistic Heavy-Ion Collider

    SciTech Connect

    Blaskiewicz, M.; Brennan, J. M.; Severino, F.

    2008-05-02

    Operational stochastic cooling of 100 GeV/nucleon gold beams has been achieved in the BNL Relativistic Heavy-Ion Collider. We discuss the physics and technology of the longitudinal cooling system and present results with the beams. A simulation algorithm is described and shown to accurately model the system.

  6. NSAC Recommends a Relativistic Heavy-Ion Collider.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Physics Today, 1984

    1984-01-01

    Describes the plan submitted by the Nuclear Science Advisory Committee to the Department of Energy and National Science Foundation urging construction of an ultrarelativistic heavy-ion collider designed to accelerate nucleon beams of ions as heavy as uranium. Discusses the process of selecting the type of facility as well as siting. (JM)

  7. Ultra-Relativistic Heavy Ion Nuclear Physics

    SciTech Connect

    Braithwaite, W. J.

    1995-05-31

    This report describes an on-going research initiative for the University of Arkansas at Little Rock (UALR): investigating the physics of ultra-relativistic heavy ions, i.e. collisions between massive nuclei which have been accelerated to kinetic energies so large that the rest mass of the ions is a negligible fraction of their total mass-energy. This progress report is being submitted in conjunction with a 3-year grant-renewal proposal, containing additional materials. Three main categories drive the UALRGultra-relativistic heavy ion research. (1) investigations of multi-particle Hanbury-Brown-Twiss (HBT) correlations in the CERN and RHIC energy domains strongly influence the URHI experimental effort, (2) participation in the NA49 Experiment to study 33 TeV (160 GeV/nucleon) Pb on Pb collisions using the SPS facili& at CERN, and (3) participation in the STAR collaboration which is developing a major detector for use with the STAR Experiment at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC), being built at BNL.

  8. Review of the heavy ion physics sessions

    SciTech Connect

    Jacak, B.V.

    1991-01-01

    The parallel sessions on Heavy Ion Physics covered several areas of recent progress in characterizing the nuclear equation of state and the search for deconfined quark matter. Studies of systems from 1 to several hundred GeV/nucleon have been made in order to map the behavior of nuclear matter over a wide range of temperatures and pressures. We have also considered results from proton-nucleus reactions in the heavy ion physics discussions. This should help untangle nuclear effects'' due to the presence of relatively undisturbed nuclear matter from observables arising in the hot, dense part of the system. Even though heavy ion physics covers a large range of bombarding energies, the same two basic questions must be answered. The first problem is to characterize the system that has been produced. We need to determine the energy density, lifetime, temperature and baryon density reached in the collision before expansion and particle production. Then we may address the second issue and look for evidence of new physics. At this meeting, we heard new results from experiments, and theoretical analyses which strive to explain all available data, including those from proton-nucleus collisions. We explored heavy quark production, which may indicate quark matter through color screening of c{bar c} pairs. We heard new results in strangeness production, which has been predicted to be enhanced if quark matter is formed. There were also discussions of jets and minijets, which may probe the hot, dense matter existing early in the collision.

  9. Probing the direct step of relativistic heavy ion fragmentation: (/sup 12/C, /sup 11/B+p) at 2. 1 GeV/nucleon with C and CH/sub 2/ targets

    SciTech Connect

    Webb, M.L.

    1987-06-01

    Relativistic heavy ion collisions may be classified as central (and near central), peripheral, and grazing with each collision type producing different proton and other charged projectile fragment scattering mechanisms and characteristics. This report focuses on peripheral and grazing collisions in the fragmentation of Carbon-12 into Boron-11 and a proton, testing models of the kinetics involved in this reaction. The data were measured at the Heavy Ion Superconducting Spectrometer (HISS) at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory and include excitation energy for the p/Boron-11 pair, and rapidity versus transverse momentum for protons and Boron-11. 58 refs., 35 figs., 8 tabs. (DWL)

  10. CERN achievements in relativistic heavy ion collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eugenio Bruno, Giuseppe

    2015-05-01

    Twenty years after a Letter of Intent by the GSI and LBL groups for the "Study of particle production and target fragmentation in central 20Ne on Pb reactions, at 12 GeV per nucleon energy of the CERN PS external beam" [1], based on the results found by the NA45/CERES, NA49, NA50, and WA97/NA57 experiments at the SPS, CERN announced compelling evidence for the formation of a new state of matter in heavyion collisions at CERN-SPS energies [2]. Some of the experiments were indeed the 2nd or 3rd generation successors of the apparatuses originally proposed by the GSI-LBL collaboration. Actually, the CERN ion program initiated at the SPS with the acceleration of oxygen ions at 60 and 200 GeV/nucleon only in 1986, and continued with sulphur ions at 200 GeV/nucleon up to 1993. The rest is history: lead-ion beams at 160 GeV/nucleon became available at the SPS in 1994; the LHC accelerated and collided lead beams at a center of mass energy per nucleon pair √sNN = 2.76 TeV in 2010. Heavy ion physics is definitely in the future program of CERN: ALICE will operate a major upgrade of its detectors during the second long shutdown of the LHC, in 2018-2019, and the associated physics program will span the third and fourth LHC runs, till late 2020s.

  11. Heavy ion beam probing

    SciTech Connect

    Hickok, R L

    1980-07-01

    This report consists of the notes distributed to the participants at the IEEE Mini-Course on Modern Plasma Diagnostics that was held in Madison, Wisconsin in May 1980. It presents an overview of Heavy Ion Beam Probing that briefly describes the principles and discuss the types of measurements that can be made. The problems associated with implementing beam probes are noted, possible variations are described, estimated costs of present day systems, and the scaling requirements for large plasma devices are presented. The final chapter illustrates typical results that have been obtained on a variety of plasma devices. No detailed calculations are included in the report, but a list of references that will provide more detailed information is included.

  12. Relativistic heavy ions physics

    SciTech Connect

    Mueller, B.

    1989-01-01

    Central nuclear collisions at energies far above 1 GeV/nucleon may provide for conditions, where the transition from highly excited hadronic matter into quark matter or quark-gluon plasma can be probed. We review current ideas about the nature of, and signals for, this transition, and we discuss the (hadronic) string model approach to the nuclear collisions dynamics. At even higher energies in the TeV/nucleon range peripheral nuclear collisions may become a laboratory for electroweak physics at the unification scale allowing, e.g., for Higgs boson production. 42 refs., 29 figs.,

  13. Imaging using accelerated heavy ions

    SciTech Connect

    Chu, W.T.

    1982-05-01

    Several methods for imaging using accelerated heavy ion beams are being investigated at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory. Using the HILAC (Heavy-Ion Linear Accelerator) as an injector, the Bevalac can accelerate fully stripped atomic nuclei from carbon (Z = 6) to krypton (Z = 34), and partly stripped ions up to uranium (Z = 92). Radiographic studies to date have been conducted with helium (from 184-inch cyclotron), carbon, oxygen, and neon beams. Useful ranges in tissue of 40 cm or more are available. To investigate the potential of heavy-ion projection radiography and computed tomography (CT), several methods and instrumentation have been studied.

  14. Model for Cumulative Solar Heavy Ion Energy and LET Spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Xapsos, Mike; Barth, Janet; Stauffer, Craig; Jordan, Tom; Mewaldt, Richard

    2007-01-01

    A probabilistic model of cumulative solar heavy ion energy and lineary energy transfer (LET) spectra is developed for spacecraft design applications. Spectra are given as a function of confidence level, mission time period during solar maximum and shielding thickness. It is shown that long-term solar heavy ion fluxes exceed galactic cosmic ray fluxes during solar maximum for shielding levels of interest. Cumulative solar heavy ion fluences should therefore be accounted for in single event effects rate calculations and in the planning of space missions.

  15. Ultra-relativistic heavy ions and cosmic rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McLerran, L.

    1983-05-01

    The collisions of ultra-relativistic heavy ions, E/sub /N/ greater than or equal to 1 TeV/nucleon are most interesting, since, at these energies, matter is produced at a sufficiently high energy density that a quark-gluon plasma has a good chance to form. Very heavy ions are also most interesting since the matter forms in a larger volume than for light ions, and the matter is at a somewhat higher density. At very high energies with very heavy ions there is great flexibility in the experimental signals which might be studied, as well as the nature of the matter which is produced. The fragmentation region and central region provide different environments where a plasma might form. The former is baryon rich while the central region is high temperature with low baryon number density and is not accessible except at very high energies.

  16. Characterizing the Energetic Heavy Ion Environment Inside 4 Jovian Radii

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cohen, C. M.; Stone, E. C.

    2004-05-01

    On 21 September 2003 Galileo impacted Jupiter to end its 8-year tour of the Jovian magentosphere. During this last phase data was collected in the very inner part of the magnetosphere at distances < 4 Rj. The region from 2 to 4 Rj was previously explored by Galileo during its 34th orbit around Jupiter. We present the combined data from these two passes obtained by the Heavy Ion Counter (HIC) for heavy ions at energies above 2 MeV/nucleon. In particular we discuss the significant ion absorption near the moons Thebe and Amalthea, the anisotropic pitch angle distribution and the dramatic increase in heavy ion intensity with decreasing radius seen in this region

  17. Ultra-relativistic heavy ions and cosmic rays

    SciTech Connect

    McLerran, L.

    1983-05-01

    The collisions of ultra-relativistic heavy ions, E/sub /N/ greater than or equal to 1 TeV/nucleon are most interesting, since, at these energies, matter is produced at sufficiently high energy density that a quark-gluon plasma has a good chance to form. Very heavy ions are also most interesting since the matter forms in a larger volume than for light ions, and the matter is at a somewhat higher energy density. At very high energies with very heavy ions there is great flexibility in the experimental signals which might be studied, as well as the nature of the matter which is produced. The fragmentation region and central region provide different environments where a plasma might form. The former is baryon rich while the central region is high temperature with low baryon number density and is not accessible except at very high energies.

  18. The future of heavy ion radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Jäkel, Oliver; Karger, Christian P.; Debus, Jürgen

    2008-12-15

    Currently, there is an increasing interest in heavy ion radiotherapy (RT) and a number of new facilities are being installed in Europe and Japan. This development is accompanied by intensive technical, physical, and clinical research. The authors identify six research fields where progress is likely and propose a thesis on the expected achievements for each of the fields: (1) Synchrotrons with active energy variation and three-dimensional beam scanning will be the standard in ion beam RT. (2) Common standards for precise measurement, prescription, and reporting of dose will be available. (3) Intensity-modulated particle therapy will be state-of-the-art. (4) Time-adaptive treatments of moving targets will be feasible. (5) Therapeutic effectiveness of heavy ions will be known for the most important indications while cost effectiveness will remain to be shown. (6) The potential of high-linear energy transfer radiation will be known. The rationale for each of these theses is described.

  19. The future of heavy ion radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Jäkel, Oliver; Karger, Christian P; Debus, Jürgen

    2008-12-01

    Currently, there is an increasing interest in heavy ion radiotherapy (RT) and a number of new facilities are being installed in Europe and Japan. This development is accompanied by intensive technical, physical, and clinical research. The authors identify six research fields where progress is likely and propose a thesis on the expected achievements for each of the fields: (1) Synchrotrons with active energy variation and three-dimensional beam scanning will be the standard in ion beam RT. (2) Common standards for precise measurement, prescription, and reporting of dose will be available. (3) Intensity-modulated particle therapy will be state-of-the-art. (4) Time-adaptive treatments of moving targets will be feasible. (5) Therapeutic effectiveness of heavy ions will be known for the most important indications while cost effectiveness will remain to be shown. (6) The potential of high-linear energy transfer radiation will be known. The rationale for each of these theses is described.

  20. High gluon densities in heavy ion collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blaizot, Jean-Paul

    2017-03-01

    The early stages of heavy ion collisions are dominated by high density systems of gluons that carry each a small fraction x of the momenta of the colliding nucleons. A distinguishing feature of such systems is the phenomenon of ‘saturation’ which tames the expected growth of the gluon density as the energy of the collision increases. The onset of saturation occurs at a particular transverse momentum scale, the ‘saturation momentum’, that emerges dynamically and that marks the onset of non-linear gluon interactions. At high energy, and for large nuclei, the saturation momentum is large compared to the typical hadronic scale, making high density gluons amenable to a description with weak coupling techniques. This paper reviews some of the challenges faced in the study of such dense systems of small x gluons, and of the progress made in addressing them. The focus is on conceptual issues, and the presentation is both pedagogical, and critical. Examples where high gluon density could play a visible role in heavy ion collisions are briefly discussed at the end, for illustration purpose.

  1. Study of multi-nucleon transfer reactions with light nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Benzoni, G.; Montanari, D.; Bracco, A.; Blasi, N.; Camera, F.; Crespi, F. C. L.; Corsi, A.; Leoni, S.; Million, B.; Nicolini, R.; Wieland, O.; Zalite, A.; Zocca, F.; Azaiez, F.; Franchoo, S.; Stefan, I.; Ibrahim, F.; Verney, D.; Battacharyya, S.; De France, G.

    2008-05-12

    Multi-nucleon transfer reactions are useful tools to populate exotic nuclei, particularly the neutron-rich ones. In this view, two different experiments have been performed employing a stable ({sup 22}Ne) and a radioactive ({sup 24}Ne) beam, both impinging on a {sup 208}Pb target. The first reaction has been studied using the CLARA-PRISMA-DANTE set-up at Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro (Legnaro-Italy), while the second reaction was performed at Ganil (Caen-France) employing a SPIRAL radioactive beam of {sup 24}Ne. In this case recoils and coincident {gamma} rays were detected with the VAMOS-EXOGAM set-up.The data show that MNT reactions can selectively populate states of different nature and, therefore, are a good tool to study nuclear structure further away from stability.

  2. Chromosomal instability induced by heavy ion irradiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Limoli, C. L.; Ponnaiya, B.; Corcoran, J. J.; Giedzinski, E.; Morgan, W. F.

    2000-01-01

    PURPOSE: To establish the dose-response relationship for the induction of chromosomal instability in GM10115 cells exposed to high-energy iron ions (1 GeV/nucleon, mean LET 146 keV/microm) and gold ions (11 GeV/nucleon, mean LET 1450 keV/microm). Past work has established that sparsely ionizing X-rays can induce a long-lived destabilization of chromosomes in a dose-dependent manner at an incidence of approximately 3% per gray. The present investigation assesses the capacity of High-Z and High-energy (HZE) particles to elicit this same endpoint. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Clonal populations derived from single progenitor cells surviving heavy-ion irradiation were analyzed cytogenetically to identify those clones showing a persistent destablization of chromosomes. RESULTS: Dose-response data, with a particular emphasis at low dose (< 1.0 Gy), indicate a frequency of approximately 4% per gray for the induction of chromosomal instability in clones derived from single progenitor cells surviving exposure to iron ions. The induction of chromosomal instability by gold ions was, however, less responsive to applied dose, as the observed incidence of this phenotype varied from 0 to 10% over 1-8 Gy. Both iron and gold ions gave dose-dependent increases in the yield of chromosomal aberrations (both chromosome- and chromatid-type) measured at the first mitosis following irradiation, as well as shoulderless survival curves having D0=0.87 and 1.1 Gy respectively. CONCLUSIONS: Based on the present dose-response data, the relative biological effectiveness of iron ions is 1.3 for the induction of chromosomal instability, and this indicates that heavy ions are only slightly more efficient than X-rays at eliciting this delayed phenotype.

  3. Chromosomal instability induced by heavy ion irradiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Limoli, C. L.; Ponnaiya, B.; Corcoran, J. J.; Giedzinski, E.; Morgan, W. F.

    2000-01-01

    PURPOSE: To establish the dose-response relationship for the induction of chromosomal instability in GM10115 cells exposed to high-energy iron ions (1 GeV/nucleon, mean LET 146 keV/microm) and gold ions (11 GeV/nucleon, mean LET 1450 keV/microm). Past work has established that sparsely ionizing X-rays can induce a long-lived destabilization of chromosomes in a dose-dependent manner at an incidence of approximately 3% per gray. The present investigation assesses the capacity of High-Z and High-energy (HZE) particles to elicit this same endpoint. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Clonal populations derived from single progenitor cells surviving heavy-ion irradiation were analyzed cytogenetically to identify those clones showing a persistent destablization of chromosomes. RESULTS: Dose-response data, with a particular emphasis at low dose (< 1.0 Gy), indicate a frequency of approximately 4% per gray for the induction of chromosomal instability in clones derived from single progenitor cells surviving exposure to iron ions. The induction of chromosomal instability by gold ions was, however, less responsive to applied dose, as the observed incidence of this phenotype varied from 0 to 10% over 1-8 Gy. Both iron and gold ions gave dose-dependent increases in the yield of chromosomal aberrations (both chromosome- and chromatid-type) measured at the first mitosis following irradiation, as well as shoulderless survival curves having D0=0.87 and 1.1 Gy respectively. CONCLUSIONS: Based on the present dose-response data, the relative biological effectiveness of iron ions is 1.3 for the induction of chromosomal instability, and this indicates that heavy ions are only slightly more efficient than X-rays at eliciting this delayed phenotype.

  4. Bremsstrahlung from relativistic heavy ions in matter

    SciTech Connect

    Soerensen, Allan H.

    2010-02-15

    The emission of electromagnetic radiation by relativistic bare heavy ions penetrating ordinary matter is investigated. Our main aim is to determine the bremsstrahlung which we define as the radiation emitted when the projectile does not break up. It pertains to collisions without nuclear contact ('ultraperipheral collisions'). Requirement of coherent action of the nucleons in order to keep the penetrating projectile intact limits bremsstrahlung to relatively soft photons. The spectrum shows a resonance structure with peak position near 2{gamma} times the position of the giant dipole resonance, that is, near 25{gamma} MeV for a lead ion ({gamma}{identical_to}E/Mc{sup 2} is the Lorentz factor of the projectile of energy E and mass M). The maximum exceeds the bremsstrahlung from a hypothetical structureless, pointlike particle of the same charge and mass as the incoming nucleus, but rapid depletion follows on the high-energy side of the peak. As a result of its relative softness, bremsstrahlung never dominates the energy-loss process for heavy ions. As to the emission of electromagnetic radiation in collisions with nuclear break-up, it appears modest when pertaining to incoherent action of the projectile nucleons in noncontact collisions. In collisions with nuclear contact, though, substantial radiation is emitted. It overshoots the bremsstrahlung. However, despite the violence of contact events, the associated photon emission only exceeds the radiation from a hypothetical structureless pointlike nucleus [emitted energy per unit photon-energy interval essentially constant up to ({gamma}-1)Mc{sup 2}] at relatively low photon energies (for lead roughly below 0.2{gamma} GeV, a limit which is about an order of magnitude above the position of the bremsstrahlung peak). Results are presented for bare lead ions penetrating a solid lead target at energies of 158 GeV/n ({gamma}=170) and beyond.

  5. Swift Heavy Ions in Matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rothard, Hermann; Severin, Daniel; Trautmann, Christina

    2015-12-01

    The present volume contains the proceedings of the Ninth International Symposium on Swift Heavy Ions in Matter (SHIM). This conference was held in Darmstadt, from 18 to 21 May 2015. SHIM is a triennial series, which started about 25 years ago by a joint initiative of CIRIL - Caen and GSI - Darmstadt, with the aim of promoting fundamental and applied interdisciplinary research in the field of high-energy, heavy-ion interaction processes with matter. SHIM was successively organized in Caen (1989), Bensheim (1992), Caen (1995), Berlin (1998), Catania (2002), Aschaffenburg (2005), Lyon (2008), and Kyoto (2012). The conference attracts scientists from many different fields using high-energy heavy ions delivered by large accelerator facilities and characterized by strong and short electronic excitations.

  6. Results of heavy ion radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Castro, J.R.

    1994-04-01

    The potential of heavy ion therapy for clinical use in cancer therapy stems from the biological parameters of heavy charged particles, and their precise dose localization. Biologically, carbon, neon and other heavy ion beams (up to about silicon) are clinically useful in overcoming the radioresistance of hypoxic tumors, thus increasing biological effectiveness relative to low-LET x-ray or electron beams. Cells irradiated by heavy ions show less variation in cell-cycle related radiosensitivity and decreased repair of radiation injury. The physical parameters of these heavy charged particles allow precise delivery of high radiation doses to tumors while minimizing irradiation of normal tissues. Clinical use requires close interaction between radiation oncologists, medical physicists, accelerator physicists, engineers, computer scientists and radiation biologists.

  7. Heavy ion collisions and cosmology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Floerchinger, Stefan

    2016-12-01

    There are interesting parallels between the physics of heavy ion collisions and cosmology. Both systems are out-of-equilibrium and relativistic fluid dynamics plays an important role for their theoretical description. From a comparison one can draw interesting conclusions for both sides. For heavy ion physics it could be rewarding to attempt a theoretical description of fluid perturbations similar to cosmological perturbation theory. In the context of late time cosmology, it could be interesting to study dissipative properties such as shear and bulk viscosity and corresponding relaxation times in more detail. Knowledge and experience from heavy ion physics could help to constrain the microscopic properties of dark matter from observational knowledge of the cosmological fluid properties.

  8. Disappearance of flow in heavy-ion collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Krofcheck, D.; Bauer, W.; Crawley, G.M.; Djalali, C.; Howden, S.; Ogilvie, C.A.; Vander Molen, A.; Westfall, G.D.; Wilson, W.K. ); Tickle, R.S. ); Gale, C. )

    1989-11-06

    We report the first observation of the disappearance of flow in heavy-ion collisions. This is accomplished by measuring the excitation function of the average in-plane transverse momentum for the symmetric system {sup 139}La+{sup 139}La, using beam energies of 130, 70, and 50 MeV/nucleon. The observation is indicative of a change from dominantly repulsive to attractive scattering. We also present the results of calculations performed with the Boltzmann-Uehling-Uhlenbeck equation which support the concept of vanishing flow for this system in the energy region between 30 and 50 MeV/nucleon.

  9. Accelerators for heavy ion fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Bangerter, R.O.

    1985-10-01

    Large fusion devices will almost certainly produce net energy. However, a successful commercial fusion energy system must also satisfy important engineering and economic constraints. Inertial confinement fusion power plants driven by multi-stage, heavy-ion accelerators appear capable of meeting these constraints. The reasons behind this promising outlook for heavy-ion fusion are given in this report. This report is based on the transcript of a talk presented at the Symposium on Lasers and Particle Beams for Fusion and Strategic Defense at the University of Rochester on April 17-19, 1985.

  10. Effects of absorption by Io on composition of energetic heavy ions.

    PubMed

    Garrard, T L; Stone, E C; Murphy, N

    1996-10-18

    The Galileo heavy ion counter is sensitive to ions with atomic numbers Z >/= 6 and energies greater than approximately 6 MeV per nucleon. During Galileo's passage through Jupiter's inner magnetosphere, the observed composition of these heavy ions was consistent with the presence of singly ionized iogenic O, Na, and S and highly ionized solar C, O, and Ne. The solar component is absorbed more strongly by Io because its gyroradius is smaller than Io's diameter.

  11. Ultra-relativistic heavy ion collisions in a multi-string model

    SciTech Connect

    Werner, K.

    1987-01-01

    We present a model for ultra-relativistic heavy ion collisions based on color string formation and subsequent independent string fragmentation. Strings are formed due to color exchange between quarks at each individual nucleon nucleon collision. The fragmentation is treated as in e/sup +/e/sup -/ or lepton nucleon scattering. Calculation for pp, pA, and AA were carried out using the Monte Carlo code VENUS for Very Energetic Nuclear Scattering (version 1.0). 20 refs., 6 figs.

  12. Equilibration and multifragmentation in heavy ion reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Peilert, G.; Mustafa, M.G.; Blann, M.; Botvina, A.

    1993-09-01

    Modeling of multifragmentation measurements from heavy ion reactions generally requires separate treatment of the initial fast part of the reaction, during which energetic nucleons are emitted, and of a quasi-equilibrated system where sufficient degrees of freedom have been excited, so that statistical approaches may be applied. Some of the more sophisticated fast cascade models, e.g., Quantum molecular dynamics (QMD), might also produce fragment yields, however, transport models have not yet been able to satisfactorily reproduce fragmentation properties of nuclear reactions. In this work we consider the interactions of {sup 36}Ar with {sup 197}Au at incident energies of 35 to 110 MeV{center_dot}A, which was investigated by de Souza et al. We will first look at two dynamic models which may be used to estimate the excitation remaining for quasi-equilibrated systems following the fast nucleonic cascade, specifically the Boltzmann master equation (BME) and Quantum molecular dynamics (QMD) approaches. Using excitations from the BME model to estimate values for quasi-equilibrated nuclei, we will explore two approaches to statistical multifragmentation calculations, one of sequential binary decay, the other a simultaneous multifragmentation model (SMM). We will consider central collisions in our calculations, and experimental results gated on the highest total charged particle emissions -- those deduced to be central collisions.

  13. Dynamical Aspects of Heavy-Ion Collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia-Solis, Edmundo Javier

    1995-01-01

    Two independent studies on heavy-ion collisions are presented. In the first part, the charge and mass of the projectile-like fragments produced in the 15-MeV per nucleon ^{40}Ca+^{209 } Bi reaction were determined for products detected near the grazing angle. Neutron number-charge (N-Z) distributions were generated as a function of the total kinetic energy loss and parameterized by their centroids, variances and correlation coefficients. After the interaction, a drift of the charge and mass centroids towards asymmetry is observed. The production of projectile -like fragments is consistent with a tendency of the projectile -like fragments to retain the projectile neutron-to-proton ratio < N > / < Z > = 1. The correlation coefficient remains well below 1.0 for the entire range of total kinetic energy lost. Predictions of two nucleon exchange models, Randrup's and Tassan-Got's, are compared to the experimental results. The models are not able to reproduce the evolution of the experimental distributions, especially the fact that the variances reach a maximum and then decrease as function of the energy loss. This behavior supports the hypothesis that some form of projectile -like fragmentation or cluster emission is perturbing the product distribution from that expected from a damped mechanism. In the second part of the thesis a clustering model that allows the recognition of mass fragments from dynamical simulations has been developed. Studying the evolution of a microscopic computation based on the nuclear -Boltzman transport equation, a suitable time is chosen to identify the bound clusters. At this time the number of binding surfaces for each test nucleon is found. Based on the number of nucleon bindings the interior nucleons are identified, and the cluster kernels are formed. An iterative routine is then applied to determine the coalescence of the surrounding free nucleons. Once the fragment formation has been established, a statistical decay code is used to

  14. Production of actinide nuclei by multi-nucleon transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Lauritsen, T.; Ahmad, I.; Carpenter, M.P.

    1995-08-01

    Multi-nucleon transfers have increasingly allowed us to reach parts of the nuclear chart where regular compound nuclear reactions are prohibited. The interesting region of Ra and Rn, where a rich tapestry of nuclear structure manifests itself, is now accessible using this technique of deep inelastic scattering. In particular, these nuclei are predicted to lie at the onset of octupole deformation and the region is rich in examples of shape coexistence. There are several theoretical predictions of nuclear structure of these nuclei that have not been experimentally tested. Moreover, there is serious disagreement among these theories. We used a beam of {sup 136}Xe at 720 MeV from ATLAS on a target of {sup 232}Th to produce a range of Rn isotopes, with a mass from 220 to 224, and Ra isotopes with masses greater than 222. The beam energy, target and beam were selected carefully to enhance the cross-section for production of these nuclei and reduce the Doppler broadening of the gamma rays that were observed in the Argonne Notre Dame gamma-ray facility. The 12 germanium detectors of this array allowed the observation of gamma-gamma coincidences. The inner ball of 50 BGO detectors allowed us to record the multiplicity and sum-energy information for each event. The latter should permit us to determine the entry region in the products of the transfer reaction. We had four successful days of beam-time, when we collected in excess of 8 x 10{sup 7} events. Data analysis is in progress at the University of Liverpool. A complete set of spectroscopic information on the yrast structure of the many nuclei produced in this reaction is being extracted.

  15. Antiproton production in heavy ion collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacak, B. V.

    In high energy p-p and alpha-alpha collisions, baryons are observed predominantly at rapidities near those of target and projectile; the mean rapidity shift of projectile and target nucleons is approximately one unit. In the central rapidity region, the number of baryons is quite small. In fact, the number of baryons and antibaryons is rather similar, indicating that most of these baryons are CREATED particles rather than projectile and target fragments. Antibaryon production is of interest in heavy ion collisions as enhanced antiquark production has been predicted as a potential signature of quark-gluon plasma formation. Antibaryons also provide a sensitive probe of the hadronic environment, via annihilation and/or mean field effects upon their final distributions. However, the collision dynamics also affect the baryon and antibaryon distributions. Baryons are more shifted toward midrapidity in nucleus-nucleus and p-p nucleus collisions than in p-p collisions, increasing the probability of annihilating the antibaryons. The interpretation of antibaryon yields is further complicated by collective processes which may take place in the dense hadronic medium formed in nucleus-nucleus collisions. Jahns and coworkers have shown that multistep processes can increase antibaryon production near threshold. Antiproton production is clearly very interesting, but is sensitive to a combination of processes taking place in the collision. The final number of observed antiprotons depends on the balance between mechanisms for extra antiproton production beyond those from the individual nucleon-nucleon collisions and annihilation with surrounding baryons. We can hope to sort out these things by systematic studies, varying the system size and beam energy. I will review what is known about antiproton production at both the AGS and SPS, and look at trends going from p-p to p-nucleus to nucleus-nucleus collisions.

  16. Heavy ion event generator HYDJET++ (HYDrodynamics plus JETs)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lokhtin, I. P.; Malinina, L. V.; Petrushanko, S. V.; Snigirev, A. M.; Arsene, I.; Tywoniuk, K.

    2009-05-01

    process in NN collisions with the minimum transverse momentum transfer pTmin. In order to take into account the effect of nuclear shadowing on parton distribution functions, the impact parameter dependent parameterization obtained in the framework of Glauber-Gribov theory [16] is used. The soft part of HYDJET++ event is the "thermal" hadronic state generated on the chemical and thermal freeze-out hypersurfaces obtained from the parameterization of relativistic hydrodynamics with preset freeze-out conditions (the adapted C++ code FAST MC [17,18]). Hadron multiplicities are calculated using the effective thermal volume approximation and Poisson multiplicity distribution around its mean value, which is supposed to be proportional to the number of participating nucleons at a given impact parameter of AA collision. The fast soft hadron simulation procedure includes generation of the 4-momentum of a hadron in the rest frame of a liquid element in accordance with the equilibrium distribution function; generation of the spatial position of a liquid element and its local 4-velocity in accordance with phase space and the character of motion of the fluid; the standard von Neumann rejection/acceptance procedure to account for the difference between the true and generated probabilities; boost of the hadron 4-momentum in the center mass frame of the event; the two- and three-body decays of resonances with branching ratios taken from the SHARE particle decay table [19]. The high generation speed in HYDJET++ is achieved due to almost 100% generation efficiency of the "soft" part because of the nearly uniform residual invariant weights which appear in the freeze-out momentum and coordinate simulation. Although HYDJET++ is optimized for very high energies of RHIC and LHC colliders (c.m.s. energies of heavy ion beams √{s}=200 and 5500 GeV per nucleon pair, respectively), in practice it can also be used for studying the particle production in a wider energy range down to √{s}˜10 GeV per

  17. Effects of heavy ion radiation on the brain vascular system and embryonic development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, T. C.; Tobias, C. A.

    1984-01-01

    The present investigation is concerned with the effects of heavy-ion radiation on the vascular system and the embryonic development, taking into account the results of experiments with neonatal rats and mouse embryos. It is found that heavy ions can be highly effective in producing brain hemorrhages and in causing body deformities. Attention is given to aspects of methodology, the induction of brain hemorrhages by X-rays and heavy ions, and the effect of iron particles on embryonic development. Reported results suggest that high linear energy transfer (LET) heavy ions can be very effective in producing developmental abnormalities.

  18. Effects of heavy ion radiation on the brain vascular system and embryonic development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, T. C.; Tobias, C. A.

    1984-01-01

    The present investigation is concerned with the effects of heavy-ion radiation on the vascular system and the embryonic development, taking into account the results of experiments with neonatal rats and mouse embryos. It is found that heavy ions can be highly effective in producing brain hemorrhages and in causing body deformities. Attention is given to aspects of methodology, the induction of brain hemorrhages by X-rays and heavy ions, and the effect of iron particles on embryonic development. Reported results suggest that high linear energy transfer (LET) heavy ions can be very effective in producing developmental abnormalities.

  19. Semiholography for heavy ion collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukhopadhyay, Ayan; Preis, Florian

    2017-03-01

    The formation of QGP in heavy ion collisions gives us a great opportunity for learning about nonperturbative dynamics of QCD. Semiholography provides a new consistent framework to combine perturbative and non-perturbative effects in a coherent way and can be applied to obtain an effective description for heavy ion collisions. In particular, it allows us to include nonperturbative effects in existing glasma effective theory and QCD kinetic theory for the weakly coupled saturated degrees of freedom liberated by the collisions in the initial stages in a consistent manner. We argue why the full framework should be able to confront experiments with only a few phenomenological parameters and present feasibility tests for the necessary numerical computations. Furthermore, we discuss that semiholography leads to a new description of collective flow in the form of a generalised non-Newtonian fluid. We discuss some open questions which we hope to answer in the near future.

  20. STAR heavy-ion highlights

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rusnakova, Olga

    2016-11-01

    Parton energy loss, quarkonium sequential melting and particle production from electromagnetic interactions are tools to study Quark Gluon Plasma properties. The STAR detector, with large acceptance at mid-rapidity, excellent particle identification and wide transverse momentum coverage, is able to study these probes in details. Di-electron spectra form Beam Energy Scan, measurements of reconstructed jets in Au+Au collisions and quarkonium measurements in p+p and heavy ion collisions are reported in this paper.

  1. Central collisions of heavy ions

    SciTech Connect

    Fung, Sun-yiu.

    1992-10-01

    This report describes the activities of the Heavy Ion Physics Group at the University of California, Riverside from October 1, 1991 to September 30, 1992. During this period, the program focused on particle production at AGS energies, and correlation studies at the Bevalac in nucleus-nucleus central collisions. As part of the PHENIX collaboration, contributions were made to the Preliminary Conceptual Design Report (pCDR), and work on a RHIC silicon microstrip detector R D project was performed.

  2. Heavy ion measurement on LDEF

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jonathal, D.; Beaujean, R.; Enge, W.

    1993-01-01

    Heavy ions with nuclear charge Z = 6 to Z = 26 are detected in a stack of plastic track detectors. The measured energies in the range of 10-240 MeV/nuc are well below the geomagnetic cut off value of the Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF) orbit. The arrival directions of the low energy particles (Z = 6-26, E less than 40 MeV/nuc) are consistent with a trapped component incident in the South Atlantic Anomaly.

  3. Heavy ion therapy: Bevalac epoch

    SciTech Connect

    Castro, J.R.

    1993-10-01

    An overview of heavy ion therapy at the Bevelac complex (SuperHILac linear accelerator + Bevatron) is given. Treatment planning, clinical results with helium ions on the skull base and uveal melanoma, clinical results with high-LET charged particles, neon radiotherapy of prostate cancer, heavy charged particle irradiation for unfavorable soft tissue sarcoma, preliminary results in heavy charged particle irradiation of bone sarcoma, and irradiation of bile duct carcinoma with charged particles and-or photons are all covered. (GHH)

  4. Relativistic effects in heavy-ion Coulomb scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Ravinder; Bertulani, C. A.; Robinson, G.

    2017-09-01

    The role of relativistic corrections in heavy-ion Coulomb scattering at intermediate energies (Elab≳50 MeV/nucleon) is investigated by numerically solving a full set of coupled equations. We compare two methods: (a) one involving an exact account of interaction retardation and (b) a method based on the expansion of effective Lagrangians in powers of the ion velocities, v /c . Our study makes it possible to infer the relevance of kinematic corrections, retardation, and magnetic interactions such as the Darwin force. We show that analytical formulas are able to describe all aspects of experimental interest in relativistic effects in heavy-ion Coulomb scattering at intermediate energies without having to solve numerically the coupled equations.

  5. Redox changes induced in hippocampal precursor cells by heavy ion irradiation.

    PubMed

    Limoli, C L; Giedzinski, E; Baure, J; Rola, R; Fike, J R

    2007-06-01

    Hippocampal precursors retain the capacity to proliferate and differentiate throughout life, and their progeny, immature neurons, can undergo neurogenesis, a process believed to be important in maintaining the cognitive health of an organism. A variety of stresses including irradiation have been shown to deplete neural precursor cells, an effect that inhibits neurogenesis and is associated with the onset of cognitive impairments. Our past work has shown that neural precursor cells exposed to X-rays or protons exhibit a prolonged increase in oxidative stress, a factor we hypothesize to be critical in regulating the function of these cells after irradiation and other stresses. Here we report that irradiation of hippocampal precursor cells with high-linear energy transfer (LET) 1 GeV/nucleon 56Fe ions leads to significantly higher levels of oxidative stress when compared to lower LET radiations (X-rays, protons). Irradiation with 1 Gy of 56Fe ions elicits twofold to fivefold higher levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) compared to unirradiated controls, and at lower doses (heavy ion exposure. The use of the antioxidant lipoic acid (LA) was able to reduce ROS levels below background levels when added before or after 56Fe ion irradiation. These results conclusively show that low doses of 56Fe ions can elicit significant levels of oxidative stress in neural precursor cells. Given the prevalence of heavy ions in space and the duration of interplanetary travel, these data suggest that astronauts are at risk for developing cognitive decrements. However, our results also indicate that antioxidants delivered before as radioprotective agents or after as mitigating agents hold promise as effective countermeasures for ameliorating certain adverse effects of heavy ion exposure to the CNS.

  6. Neoplastic transformation of hamster embyro cells by heavy ions.

    PubMed

    Han, Z; Suzuki, H; Suzuki, F; Suzuki, M; Furusawa, Y; Kato, T; Ikenaga, M

    1998-01-01

    We have studied the induction of morphological transformation of Syrian hamster embryo cells by low doses of heavy ions with different linear energy transfer (LET), ranging from 13 to 400 keV/micrometer. Exponentially growing cells were irradiated with 12C or 28Si ion beams generated by the Heavy Ion Medical Accelerator in Chiba (HIMAC), inoculated to culture dishes, and transformed colonies were identified when the cells were densely stacked and showed a crisscross pattern. Over the LET range examined, the frequency of transformation induced by the heavy ions increased sharply at very low doses no greater than 5 cGy. The relative biological effectiveness (RBE) of the heavy ions relative to 250 kVp X-rays showed an initial increase with LET, reaching a maximum value of about 7 at 100 keV/micrometer, and then decreased with the further increase in LET. Thus, we confirmed that high LET heavy ions are significantly more effective than X-rays for the induction of in vitro cell transformation.

  7. The heavy ion compositional signature in 3He-rich solar particle events

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mason, G. M.; Reames, D. V.; Klecker, B.; Hovestadt, D.; Vonrosenvinge, T. T.

    1985-01-01

    A survey of the approx. 1 MeV/nucleon heavy ion abundances in 66 He3-rich solar particle events was performed using the Max-Planck-Institut/University of Maryland and Goddard Space Flight Center instruments on the ISEE-3 spacecraft. The observations were carried out in interplanetary space over the period 1978 October through 1982 June. Earlier observations were confirmed which show an enrichment of heavy ions in HE3-rich events, relative to the average solar energetic particle composition in large particle events. For the survey near 1.5 MeV/nucleon the enrichments compared to large solar particle events are approximately He4:C:O:Ne:Mg:Si:Fe = 0.44:0.66:1.:3.4:3.5:4.1:9.6. Surprising new results emerging from the present broad survey are that the heavy ion enrichment pattern is the same within a factor of approx. 2 for almost all cases, and the degree of heavy ion enrichment is uncorrelated with the He3 enrichment. Overall, the features established appear to be best explained by an acceleration mechanism in which the He3 enrichment process is not responsible for the heavy ion enrichment, but rather the heavy ion enrichment is a measure of the ambient coronal composition at the sites where the He3-rich events occur.

  8. Jets in heavy ion collisions at the LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roland, Christof

    2015-11-01

    In this document I present a brief review of the concepts of jet physics employed in heavy ion physics. Fast partons originating from scatterings with large momentum transfer are produced at very short time-scales and subsequently propagate through the strongly interacting medium produced in the collisions of heavy nuclei. They feature the only experimental handle available to directly study the interaction of a well defined probe and the medium. Consequently they are ideally suited to investigate the nature of the medium produced in these collisions and the mechanism of interaction between the medium and the partons. The experimental methods necessary to reconstruct jets originating from fragmenting partons in the environment of high particle multiplicity heavy ion collisions will be discussed. Physics observables suited to investigate the parton medium interaction will be introduced and a summary of recent results on jet physics in heavy ion collisions is presented.

  9. Failla Memorial Lecture: the future of heavy-ion science in biology and medicine

    SciTech Connect

    Tobias, C.A.

    1985-07-01

    An extensive review, with over 100 references, of the use of accelerator techniques in radiobiology is presented. Currently, beams of any stable isotope species up to uranium are available at kinetic energies of several hundred MeV/nucleon at the Berkeley Bevalac. The heavy ions hold interest for a broad spectrum of research because of their effectiveness in producing a series of major lesions in DNA along single particle tracks and because of the Bragg depth ionization properties that allow the precise deposition of highly localized doses deep in the human body. Heavy ions, when compared to low-LET radiation, have increased effectiveness for mammalian cell lethality, chromosome mutations, and cell transformation. The molecular mechanisms are not completely understood but appear to involve fragmentation and reintegration of DNA. Heavy ions do not require the presence of oxygen for producing their effects. Heavy ions are effective in delaying or blocking the cell division process. These radiobiological properties, combined with the ability to deliver highly localized internal doses, make accelerated heavy ions potentially important radiotherapeutic tools. Other novel approaches include the utilization of radioactive heavy beams as instant tracers. Heavy-ion radiography and microscopy respond to delicate changes in tissue electron density. The authors laboratory is in the process of proposing a research biomedical heavy-ion accelerator; the availability of such machines would greatly accelerate cancer and brain research with particle beams.

  10. Hadron Production in Heavy Ion Collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Ritter, Hans Georg; Xu, Nu

    2009-05-19

    Heavy ion collisions are an ideal tool to explore the QCD phase diagram. The goal is to study the equation of state (EOS) and to search for possible in-medium modifications of hadrons. By varying the collision energy a variety of regimes with their specific physics interest can be studied. At energies of a few GeV per nucleon, the regime where experiments were performed first at the Berkeley Bevalac and later at the Schwer-Ionen-Synchrotron (SIS) at GSI in Darmstadt, we study the equation of state of dense nuclear matter and try to identify in-medium modifications of hadrons. Towards higher energies, the regime of the Alternating Gradient Synchrotron (AGS) at the Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), the Super-Proton Synchrotron (SPS) at CERN, and the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) at BNL, we expect to produce a new state of matter, the Quark-Gluon Plasma (QGP). The physics goal is to identify the QGP and to study its properties. By varying the energy, different forms of matter are produced. At low energies we study dense nuclear matter, similar to the type of matter neutron stars are made of. As the energy is increased the main constituents of the matter will change. Baryon excitations will become more prevalent (resonance matter). Eventually we produce deconfined partonic matter that is thought to be in the core of neutron stars and that existed in the early universe. At low energies a great variety of collective effects is observed and a rather good understanding of the particle production has been achieved, especially that of the most abundantly produced pions and kaons. Many observations can be interpreted as time-ordered emission of various particle species. It is possible to determine, albeit model dependent, the equation of state of nuclear matter. We also have seen indications, that the kaon mass, especially the mass of the K{sup +}, might be modified by the medium created in heavy ion collisions. At AGS energies and above, emphasis shifts towards

  11. Laser ion source for multi-nucleon transfer reaction products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirayama, Y.; Watanabe, Y. X.; Imai, N.; Ishiyama, H.; Jeong, S. C.; Miyatake, H.; Oyaizu, M.; Kimura, S.; Mukai, M.; Kim, Y. H.; Sonoda, T.; Wada, M.; Huyse, M.; Kudryavtsev, Yu.; Van Duppen, P.

    2015-06-01

    We have developed a laser ion source for the target-like fragments (TLFs) produced in multi-nucleon transfer (MNT) reactions. The operation principle of the source is based on the in-gas laser ionization and spectroscopy (IGLIS) approach. In the source TLFs are thermalized and neutralized in high pressure and high purity argon gas, and are extracted after being selectively re-ionized in a multi-step laser resonance ionization process. The laser ion source has been implemented at the KEK Isotope Separation System (KISS) for β-decay spectroscopy of neutron-rich isotopes with N = 126 of nuclear astrophysical interest. The simulations of gas flow and ion-beam optics have been performed to optimize the gas cell for efficient thermalization and fast transporting the TLFs, and the mass-separator for efficient transport with high mass-resolving power, respectively. To confirm the performances expected at the design stage, off-line experiments have been performed by using 56Fe atoms evaporated from a filament in the gas cell. The gas-transport time of 230 ms in the argon cell and the measured KISS mass-resolving power of 900 are consistent with the designed values. The high purity of the gas-cell system, which is extremely important for efficient and highly-selective production of laser ions, was achieved and confirmed from the mass distribution of the extracted ions. After the off-line tests, on-line experiments were conducted by directly injecting energetic 56Fe beam into the gas cell. After thermalization of the injected 56Fe beam, laser-produced singly-charged 56Fe+ ions were extracted. The extraction efficiency and selectivity of the gas cell in the presence of plasma induced by 56Fe beam injection as well as the time profile of the extracted ions were investigated; extraction efficiency of 0.25%, a beam purity of >99% and an extraction time of 270 ms. It has been confirmed that the performance of the KISS laser ion source is satisfactory to start the measurements of

  12. Strange Particles and Heavy Ion Physics

    SciTech Connect

    Bassalleck, Bernd; Fields, Douglas

    2016-04-28

    This very long-running grant has supported many experiments in nuclear and particle physics by a group from the University of New Mexico. The gamut of these experiments runs from many aspects of Strangeness Nuclear Physics, to rare Kaon decays, to searches for exotic Hadrons such as Pentaquark or H-Dibaryon, and finally to Spin Physics within the PHENIX collaboration at RHIC. These experiments were performed at a number of laboratories worldwide: first and foremost at Brookhaven National Lab (BNL), but also at CERN, KEK, and most recently at J-PARC. In this Final Technical Report we summarize progress and achievements for this award since our last Progress Report, i.e. for the period of fall 2013 until the award’s termination on November 30, 2015. The report consists of two parts, representing our two most recent experimental efforts, participation in the Nucleon Spin Physics program of the PHENIX experiment at RHIC, the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider at BNL – Task 1, led by Douglas Fields; and participation in several Strangeness Nuclear Physics experiments at J-PARC, the Japan Proton Accelerator Research Center in Tokai-mura, Japan – Task 2, led by Bernd Bassalleck.

  13. Single and Multi-Nucleon Transfer Reactions for Nuclear Moment Studies Toward Radioactive-Ion Beams

    SciTech Connect

    Lozeva, R. L.; Georgiev, G. P.; Audi, G.; Cabaret, S.; Fiori, E.; Gaulard, C.; Hauschilda, K.; Lopez-Martens, A.; Risegari, L.; Blazhev, A.; Jolie, J.; Moschner, K.; Zell, K.-O.; Daugas, J.-M.; Faul, T.; Morel, P.; Roig, O.; Ferraton, M.; Ibrahim, F.

    2010-04-30

    This study is a part of an experimental program to measure nuclear moments in transfer reactions. It aims to probe for a first time the nuclear -spin orientation in multi-nucleon transfer. Fist experiments were performed to measure the quadrupole moment of an isomeric state in {sup 66}Cu (I{sup p}i 6{sup -}, E{sub x} = 1154 keV, T{sub 1/2} = 595(20) ns) in single nucleon transfer and the population of mus isomers in {sup 66}Cu and {sup 63}Ni in multi-nucleon transfer. The experimentally tested methodology allows broad applications toward more exotic species and feasibility of these reactions to produce species away from stability.

  14. Directed flow in ultrarelativistic heavy-ion collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Bozek, Piotr; Wyskiel, Iwona

    2010-05-15

    We study the generation of the directed flow in the hydrodynamic expansion of hot matter formed in ultrarelativistic heavy-ion collisions at sq root(s)=200 GeV. The experimentally observed negative-directed flow in a wide range of central pseudorapidities is reproduced, assuming that the fireball is tilted away from the collision axis. The tilt of the source is consistent with a preferential emission in the forward-backward hemisphere from forward-backward participating nucleons. The model reproduces the experimentally observed scaling of the directed flow when going from Au-Au to Cu-Cu systems.

  15. The Bucharest heavy ion accelerator facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ceauşescu, V.; Dobrescu, S.; Duma, M.; Indreas, G.; Ivaşcu, M.; Păpureanu, S.; Pascovici, G.; Semenescu, G.

    1986-02-01

    The heavy ion accelerator facility of the Heavy Ion Physics Department at the Institute of Physics and Nuclear Engineering in Bucharest is described. The Tandem accelerator development and the operation of the first stage of the heavy ion postaccelerating system are discussed. Details are given concerning the resonance cavities, the pulsing system matching the dc beam to the RF cavities and the computer control system.

  16. The ANSTO high energy heavy ion microprobe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siegele, Rainer; Cohen, David D.; Dytlewski, Nick

    1999-10-01

    Recently the construction of the ANSTO High Energy Heavy Ion Microprobe (HIMP) at the 10 MV ANTARES tandem accelerator has been completed. The high energy heavy ion microprobe focuses not only light ions at energies of 2-3 MeV, but is also capable of focusing heavy ions at high energies with ME/ q2 values up to 150 MeV amu and greater. First performance tests and results are reported here.

  17. The Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider, Rhic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foelsche, H.; Hahn, H.; Harrison, M.; Ozaki, S.; Rhoades-Brown, M. J.

    1993-03-01

    The scope of the first relativistic energy heavy ion collider, RHIC, is discussed. Particular attention is paid to those novel features of a heavy ion collider that are distinct from the more usual proton machines. These features are derived from the experimental requirements of operation with a variety of ion species over a wide energy range as well as the increased demands on available ion sources and injector complexes. Storage of heavy ion beams for many hours is severely impacted by intrabeam scattering.

  18. The Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fischer, Wolfram

    The Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC), shown in Fig. 1, was build to study the interactions of quarks and gluons at high energies [Harrison, Ludlam and Ozaki (2003)]. The theory of Quantum Chromodynamics (QCD) describes these interactions. One of the main goals for the RHIC experiments was the creation and study of the Quark-Gluon Plasma (QGP), which was expected to be formed after the collision of heavy ions at a temperature of approximately 2 trillion kelvin (or equivalently an energy of 150 MeV). The QGP is the substance which existed only a few microseconds after the Big Bang. The QGP was anticipated to be weakly interacting like a gas but turned out to be strongly interacting and more like a liquid. Among its unusual properties is its extremely low viscosity [Auerbach and Schlomo (2009)], which makes the QGP the substance closest to a perfect liquid known to date. The QGP is opaque to moderate energy quarks and gluons leading to a phenomenon called jet quenching, where of a jet and its recoil jet only one is observable and the other suppressed after traversing and interacting with the QGP [Jacak and Müller (2012)]...

  19. Heavy ion measurement on LDEF

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beaujean, R.; Jonathal, D.; Enge, W.

    1991-01-01

    The Kiel Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF) experiment M0002, mounted on experiment tray E6, was designed to measure the heavy ion environment by means of CR-39 plastic solid state track detectors. The detector stack with a size of 40x34x4.5 cu cm was exposed in vacuum covered by thermal protection foils with a total thickness of approx. 14 mg/sq cm. After etching small samples of the detector foils tracks with Z greater than or = 6 could be easily detected on a background of small etch pits, which were probably produced by secondaries from proton interactions. The LDEF orientation with respect to the magnetic field lines within the South Atlantic Anomaly (SAA) is expected to be constant during the mission. Therefore, the azimuth angle distribution was measured on the detector foils for low energy stopping particles. All detected arrival directions are close to a plane perpendicular to the magnetic field line of -20 deg declination and -40 deg inclination at location 34 deg W and 27 deg S. Together with the steep energy spectrum, this spatial distribution close to the mirror plane in the SAA is an evidence that heavy ions were detected from a radiation belt population.

  20. RELATIVISTIC HEAVY ION COLLISIONS: EXPERIMENT

    SciTech Connect

    Friedlander, Erwin M.; Heckman, Harry H.

    1982-04-01

    Relativistic heavy ion physics began as a 'no man's land' between particle and nuclear physics, with both sides frowning upon it as 'unclean', because on one hand, hadronic interactions and particle production cloud nuclear structure effects, while on the other, the baryonic environment complicates the interpretation of production experiments. They have attempted to review here the experimental evidence on RHI collisions from the point of view that it represents a new endeavor in the understanding of strong interaction physics. Such an approach appears increasingly justified; first, by the accumulation of data and observations of new features of hadronic interactions that could not have been detected outside a baryonic environment; second, by the maturation of the field owing to the advances made over the past several years in experimental inquiries on particle production by RHI, including pions, kaons, hyperons, and searches for antiprotons; and third, by the steady and progressive increase in the energy and mass ranges of light nuclear beams that have become available to the experiment; indeed the energy range has widened from the {approx} 0.2 to 2 AGeV at the Bevalac to {approx}4 AGeV at Dubna and recently, to the quantum jump in energies to {approx} 1000 equivalent AGeV at the CERN PS-ISR. Accompanying these expansions in the energy frontier are the immediate prospects for very heavy ion beams at the Bevalac up to, and including, 1 AGeV {sup 238}U, thereby extending the 'mass frontier' to its ultimate extent.

  1. Progress in Heavy Ion Fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Herrmannsfeldt, W.B.

    1988-09-01

    The progress of the field of Heavy Ion Fusion has been documented in the proceedings of the series of International Symposia that, in recent years, have occurred every second year. The latest of these conferences was hosted by Gesellshaft fuer Schwerionenforshung (GSI) in Darmstadt, West Germany, June 28-30, 1988. For this report, a few highlights from the conference are selected, stressing experimental progress and prospects for future advances. A little extra time is devoted to report on the developments at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL) which is the center for most of the HIFAR program. The Director of the HIFAR program at LBL is Denis Keefe, who presented the HIF report at the last two of the meetings in this series, and in whose place the author is appearing now. 4 refs., 1 fig.

  2. Highlights of the heavy ion fusion symposium

    SciTech Connect

    Keefe, D.

    1986-07-01

    The current status and prospects for inertial confinement fusion based on the use of intense beams of heavy ions will be described in the light of results presented at the International Symposium on Heavy Ion Fusion, (Washington, DC, May 27-29, 1986).

  3. Conformity between IBM and TQM (SU(6) quadrupole phonon model) in treating two-nucleon transfer reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kyrchev, G.; Paar, V.

    1983-03-01

    It is shown that TQM is capable of treating two-nucleon transfer (TNT) reactions in an analogous manner to IBM. A proof that the IBM two-nucleon transfer amplitudes can be identically converted into standard matrix elements for TQM, is presented, using the relation between the Schwinger and Holstein-Primakoff representations of the SU(6) generators.

  4. Model for hypernucleus production in heavy ion collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Topor Pop, V.; Das Gupta, S.

    2010-05-15

    We estimate the production cross sections of hypernuclei in projectile-like fragments (PLFs) in heavy ion collisions. The discussed scenario for the formation cross section of a LAMBDA hypernucleus is (a) LAMBDA particles are produced in the participant region but have a considerable rapidity spread and (b) LAMBDA with rapidity close to that of the PLF and total momentum (in the rest system of the PLF) up to Fermi motion can then be trapped and produce hypernuclei. Process (a) is considered here within the heavy ion jet interaction generator (HIJING/BB) model, and process (b) in the canonical thermodynamic model (CTM). We estimate the production cross sections for a hypernucleus {sub L}AMBDA{sup A}{sub F}Z where Z=1, 2, 3, and 4 for C + C at total nucleon-nucleon center of mass (c.m.) energy sq root(s{sub NN})=3.7 GeV, and for Ne + Ne and Ar + Ar collisions at sq root(s{sub NN})=5.0 GeV. By taking into account explicitly the impact parameter dependence of the colliding systems, it is found that the cross section is different from that predicted by the coalescence model, and large discrepancy is obtained for {sub L}AMBDA{sup 6}He and {sub L}AMBDA{sup 9}Be hypernuclei.

  5. Torqued fireballs in relativistic heavy-ion collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Bozek, Piotr; Broniowski, Wojciech; Moreira, Joao

    2011-03-15

    We show that the fluctuations in the wounded-nucleon model of the initial stage of relativistic heavy-ion collisions, together with the natural assumption that the forward- (backward-) moving wounded nucleons emit particles preferably in the forward (backward) direction, lead to an event-by-event torqued fireball. The principal axes associated with the transverse shape are rotated in the forward region in the opposite direction than in the backward region. On the average, the standard deviation of the relative torque angle between the forward and backward rapidity regions is {approx}20 deg. for the central and 10 deg. for the midperipheral collisions. The hydrodynamic expansion of a torqued fireball leads to a torqued collective flow, yielding, in turn, torqued principal axes of the transverse-momentum distributions at different rapidities. We propose experimental measures, based on cumulants involving particles in different rapidity regions, which should allow for a quantitative determination of the effect from the data. To estimate the nonflow contributions from resonance decays we run Monte Carlo simulations with therminator, a thermal heavy-ion generator. If the event-by-event torque effect is found in the data, it will support the assumptions concerning the fluctuations in the early stage of the fireball formation, as well as the hypothesis of the asymmetric rapidity shape of the emission functions of the moving sources in the nucleus-nucleus collisions.

  6. The composition of heavy ions in solar energetic particle events

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fan, C. Y.; Gloeckler, G.; Hovestadt, D.

    1983-01-01

    Recent advances in determining the elemental, charge state, and isotopic composition of or approximate to 1 to or approximate to 20 MeV per nucleon ions in solar energetic particle (SEP) events and outline our current understanding of the nature of solar and interplanetary processes which may explain the observations. Average values of relative abundances measured in a large number of SEP events were found to be roughly energy independent in the approx. 1 to approx. 20 MeV per nucleon range, and showed a systematic deviation from photospheric abundances which seems to be organized in terms of the first ionization potential of the ion. Direct measurements of the charge states of SEPs revealed the surprisingly common presence of energetic He(+) along with heavy ion with typically coronal ionization states. High resolution measurements of isotopic abundance ratios in a small number of SEP events showed these to be consistent with the universal composition except for the puzzling overabundance of the SEP(22)Ne/(20)Ne relative to this isotopes ratio in the solar wind. The broad spectrum of observed elemental abundance variations, which in their extreme result in composition anomalies characteristic of (3)He rich, heavy ion rich and carbon poor SEP events, along with direct measurements of the ionization states of SEPs provided essential information on the physical characteristics of, and conditions in the source regions, as well as important constraints to possible models for SEP production.

  7. High-energy proton emission and Fermi motion in intermediate-energy heavy-ion collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, W.; Liu, X.; Wada, R.; Huang, M.; Ren, P.; Tian, G.; Luo, F.; Sun, Q.; Chen, Z.; Xiao, G. Q.; Han, R.; Shi, F.; Liu, J.; Gou, B.

    2016-12-01

    An antisymmetrized molecular dynamics model (AMD-FM), modified to take into account the Fermi motion explicitly in its nucleon-nucleon collision process, is presented. Calculated high-energy proton spectra are compared with those of 40Ar+51V at 44 MeV/nucleon from Coniglione et al. [Phys. Lett. B 471, 339 (2000), 10.1016/S0370-2693(99)01383-0] and those of 36Ar+181Ta at 94 MeV/nucleon from Germain et al. [Nucl. Phys. A 620, 81 (1997), 10.1016/S0375-9474(97)00146-2]. Both of the experimental data are reasonably well reproduced by the newly added Fermi boost in the nucleon-nucleon collision process without additional processes, such as a three-body collision or a short-range correlation. The production mechanism of high-energy protons in intermediate-energy heavy-ion collisions is discussed.

  8. Heavy ion precompound phenomena: A glance at hard gamma and subthreshold pion production

    SciTech Connect

    Blann, M.; Remington, B.A.

    1987-08-01

    We test a relaxation model based on two body nucleon-nucleon scattering processes to interpret phenomena observed in heavy ion reactions. We use the Boltzmann master equation to accomplish this. By assuming that the projectile nucleons share the total excitation with equal a-priori probability of all configurations, we are able to reproduce several sets of neutron spectra from /sup 20/Ne and /sup 12/C induced reactions on /sup 165/Ho. With no additional free parameters our model successfully reproduces subthreshold pion production cross sections, high energy ..gamma..-ray spectra, and angular distributions of high energy ..gamma..-rays. 40 refs., 12 figs., 2 tabs.

  9. Helium and heavy ion measurements with the CRRES satellite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clayton, Edmund Gary

    The CRRES satellite was in service from July 1990 to October 1991, during a period of high solar modulation and solar activity. The ONR-604 experiment aboard CRRES measured helium with isotopic resolution in the energy range 38-110 MeV/nucleon, and heavy ions through iron at 200-500 MeV/nucleon. Although solar modulation was high throughout the CRRES mission, the mission included periods of solar quiescence as well as a number of large solar flares and associated solar energetic particle events. Measurements were made of helium and heavy ions during both the quiet times and the flare periods. A study was made to search for anomalous component helium in the Earth's magnetosphere using the magnetic field as a rigidity filter. This effort was inconclusive due to background in the outer electron radiation belt. During the solar quiet times, the helium spectrum above 60 MeV/nucleon is consistent with the galactic cosmic rays. Below that energy, a separate component appears early in the mission and rises in prominence over the course of the mission, dominating over the galactic cosmic rays below 60 MeV/nucleon. The distinctness of this component is seen both in the helium spectra and the 3He/4He ratio. An association of this component with interplanetary shocks driven by coronal mass ejections is suggested. During the March and June 1991 flare periods, helium spectral characteristics and isotopic ratios are measured. The results are compared to related diagnostic phenomena of gradual and impulsive solar energetic particle acceleration. The average 3He/4He ratio in both periods is enriched relative to the solar wind; 0.01 in June 1991 and 0.07 in March. The March period contains spikes in the isotopic ratio rising to 0.22. Signatures of known solar phenomena are compared to attempt to identify the predominant acceleration mechanism of each major flare. The development of the CRRES/SPACERAD Heavy Ion Model of the Environment (CHIME) is described and the results presented.

  10. Two-nucleon transfer reactions as a test of quantum phase transitions in nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Y.; Iachello, F.

    2017-03-01

    A quantal and a semiclassical analysis of two-nucleon transfer intensities is done within the framework of the interacting boson model. The expected features of these quantities for the quantum phase transition (QPT) between spherical, U(5), and axially deformed, SU(3), shapes are discussed. Experimental data for (p ,t ) and (t ,p ) transfer reactions clearly show the occurrence of QPTs in Gd, Sm, and Nd.

  11. Pion production in heavy ion reactions near absolute thresholds

    SciTech Connect

    Stachel, J.; Braun-Munzinger, P.; Paul, P.; Zhang, P.H.; Obenshain, F.E.; Plasil, F.; Young, G.R.

    1984-01-01

    Pion production in heavy ion collisions at energies below the free nucleon-nucleon threshold, i.e., at energies, where the pion mass exceeds the kinetic energy of a projectile nucleon in the zero momentum frame, has been discussed for a long time in terms of probing the intrinsic Fermi motion in the projectile and target nuclei. However, as the beam energy is lowered, this process gets more and more unlikely and below a certain energy it should not be observed anymore. In a sharp cut-off Fermi gas model this occurs at E/sub lab/=50 MeV/u. However, as long as the total center of mass energy exceeds the pion mass, pions still can be produced by a cooperative sharing of the beam energy of several (or all) projectile nucleons. The experiments presented here are meant to extend the experimental information into that kinematic domain and represent the up to now lowest beam energy, where pion production has been identified unambiguously. The production of a pion of 100 MeV kinematic energy with a 35 MeV/u /sup 14/N beam requires Fermi momenta as high as approx.350 MeV/c or alternatively 60% of the total beam energy. The information from the present experiments together with the results of previous experiments at higher beam energies of 44 MeV/u and 60 to 84 MeV/u allows one to distinguish between the alternative production mechanisms.

  12. Heavy Ion Fusion Accelerator Research (HIFAR)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-04-01

    This report discusses the following topics: emittance variations in current-amplifying ion induction lina; transverse emittance studies of an induction accelerator of heavy ions; drift compression experiments on MBE-4 and related emittance; low emittance uniform- density C{sub s}+ sources for heavy ion fusion accelerator studies; survey of alignment of MBE-4; time-of-flight dependence on the MBE-4 quadrupole voltage; high order calculation of the multiple content of three dimensional electrostatic geometries; an induction linac injector for scaled experiments; induction accelerator test module for HIF; longitudinal instability in HIF beams; and analysis of resonant longitudinal instability in a heavy ion induction linac.

  13. Nucleon transfer in the (35,37)Cl + (58,60,62,64)Ni systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurz, Kristin Lynn

    1998-07-01

    Nucleon transfer measurements were carried out for the 35,37Cl + 58,60,62,64Ni systems at energies above the Coulomb barrier (Ecm/VC/approx 1.55 and 1.75) using the Enge split-pole spectrograph at the Nuclear Structure Research Laboratory at the University of Rochester. The Rochester recoil mass spectrometer was used to measure one-nucleon transfer cross sections for these systems below the Coulomb barrier at Elab = 88 MeV (Ecm/VC/approx 0.85). These measurements were used to study the influence of nucleon transfer on the enhancement of sub-barrier fusion cross sections for heavy systems compared to the one- dimensional barrier penetration model. Coupled-channel fusion calculations including couplings to inelastic and transfer degrees of freedom were performed for the 37Cl + 58,60,62,64Ni systems. Coupled- channel calculations for other systems for which measurements of both fusion and transfer cross sections in the region of the barrier exist were also carried out. The results suggest that there is a strong correlation between transfer strength and sub-barrier fusion enhancement.

  14. Nucleon transfer at large internuclear distances in S-32 and Mo-92,96,100

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herrick, Diane Marie

    1997-10-01

    Nucleon transfer probability at large internuclear distances has been measured for the systems 32S + 92,96,100Mo in two energy regimes: below and above the Coulomb barrier. For the below-barrier measurements, target-like reaction products were detected in the focal plane of a recoil mass spectrometer. For the above- barrier measurements, projectile-like reaction products were detected in the focal plane of an Enge split-pole spectrograph. In both energy regimes, the transfer probabilities show exponential fall-off with increasing distance of closest approach, consistent with a tunneling picture of nucleon transfer. The measured decay constants for the below-barrier transfer probability agree with binding-energy derived decay constants predicted on the basis of the semi-classical model of nucleon transfer. However, at above-barrier energies, the measured decay constants are smaller than the predicted values. The observed enhancements of the transfer probability at large internuclear distances for above-barrier energies are discussed in terms of quantal diffraction.

  15. Few-nucleon transfer reactions on deformed nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    van den Berg, A.M.

    1985-01-01

    Recent developments discussed include: alpha-transfer reactions on deformed nuclei, quasi-elastic neutron transfer reactions induced by /sup 58/Ni beams on spherical and deformed samarium nuclei, and the population of low-lying states in neutron rich nuclei using (particle,..gamma..) or (particle,e) coincidence methods. 37 refs., 10 figs. (LEW)

  16. Beam diagnostics for the heavy ion cancer therapy facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peters, Andreas; Forck, Peter

    2000-11-01

    A dedicated accelerator facility for cancer treatment is planned for the university hospital in Heidelberg. At GSI the detailed layout of this heavy ion cancer therapy (HICAT) facility has been worked out. The relevant beam parameters and the required diagnostic devices are summarized for the different parts of the facility (Linac, Synchroton, transfer lines and Gantry sections). In addition, special requirements of beam diagnostics concerning the timing and control system will be discussed.

  17. Relativistic heavy ion fragmentation at HISS (Heavy Ion Spectrometer System)

    SciTech Connect

    Tull, C.E.

    1990-10-01

    An experiment was conducted at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory to measure projectile fragmentation of relativistic heavy ions. Charge identification was obtained by the use of a Cerenkov Hodoscope operating above the threshold for total internal reflection, while velocity measurement was performed by use of a second set of Cerenkov radiators operating at the threshold for total internal reflection. Charge and mass resolution for the system was {sigma}{sub Z} = 0.2 e and {sigma}{sub A} = 0.2 u. Measurements of the elemental and isotopic production cross sections for the fragmentation of {sup 40}Ar at 1.65{center dot}A GeV have been compared with an Abrasion-Ablation Model based on the evaporation computer code GEMINI. The model proves to be an accurate predictor of the cross sections for fragments between Chlorine and Boron. The measured cross section were reproduced using simple geometry with charge dispersions induced by zero-point vibrations of the giant dipole resonance for the prompt abrasion stage, and injecting an excitation energy spectrum based on a final state interaction with scaling factor E{sub fsi} = 38.8 MeV/c. Measurement of the longitudinal momentum distribution widths for projectile fragments are consistent with previous experiment and can be interpreted as reflecting the Fermi momentum distribution in the initial projectile nucleus. Measurement of the transverse momentum indicate an additional, unexplained dependence of the reduced momentum widths on fragment mass. This dependence has the same sign and similar slope to previously measured fragments of {sup 139}La, and to predictions based on phase-space constraints on the final state of the system.

  18. Ultra Heavy Ion Collector (UHIC)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stone, E. C.

    1997-01-01

    The purpose of this final report is to study the propagation of heavy nuclei in cosmic radiation. Topics include: Mass Distributions of Fragments from the Interactions of 600 MeV/n Silver Nuclei; Charge-pickup by Heavy Relativistic Nuclei; Fragmentation and Propagation Heavy UH Cosmic Ray Nuclei; Nuclear Fragmentation Parameters Needed for Interpretation of Observed Fluxes of UH Cosmic Ray Nuclei; Fragmentation and Electromagnetic Dissociation of 10.6 GeV/nucleon (197) Au Nuclei; Nuclear Interaction Cross Sections for UltraHeavy Nuclei; The Charge-Changing Fragmentation of 10.6 GeV/nucleon 197 Au Nuclei; Fragmentation Cross Sections of Relativistic 84/36 Kr and 109/47 Ag Nuclei in Targets from Hydrogen to Lead; Mission Concept for the Study of Ultraheavy Galactic Cosmic Rays; and Propagation of the Heaviest UH - Cosmic Ray Nuclei.

  19. Heavy-Ion Fusion Accelerator Research, 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-03-01

    This report discusses the following topics: research with multiple- beam experiment MBE-4; induction linac systems experiments; and long- range research and development of heavy-ion fusion accelerators.

  20. Historical aspects of heavy ion radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Raju, M.R.

    1995-03-01

    This paper presents historical developments of heavy-ion radiotherapy including discussion of HILAC and HIMAC and discussion of cooperation between Japan and the United States, along with personal reflections.

  1. Jets in relativistic heavy ion collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Xin-Nian; Gyulassy, M.

    1990-09-01

    Several aspects of hard and semihard QCD jets in relativistic heavy ion collisions are discussed, including multiproduction of minijets and the interaction of a jet with dense nuclear matter. The reduction of jet quenching effect in deconfined phase of nuclear matter is speculated to provide a signature of the formation of quark gluon plasma. HIJING Monte Carlo program which can simulate events of jets production and quenching in heavy ion collisions is briefly described. 35 refs., 13 figs.

  2. Description of nucleon-transfer and fusion reactions within time-dependent approaches and coupled-channel method

    SciTech Connect

    Samarin, V. V.

    2015-01-15

    The time-dependent Schrödinger equation and the method of perturbed stationary states that is based on the expansion of the total wave function for the system of two nuclear cores and a nucleon in a set of nucleon two-center functions are used to describe nucleon transfers and fusion in low-energy nuclear reactions. A set of multichannel equations that couple the relative motion of nuclei to the motion of the nucleon is obtained. The kinetic-energy coupling matrix is similar to the coupling matrix for collective excitations of nuclei.

  3. Numerical simulations of relativistic heavy-ion reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daffin, Frank Cecil

    Bulk quantities of nuclear matter exist only in the compact bodies of the universe. There the crushing gravitational forces overcome the Coulomb repulsion in massive stellar collapses. Nuclear matter is subjected to high pressures and temperatures as shock waves propagate and burn their way through stellar cores. The bulk properties of nuclear matter are important parameters in the evolution of these collapses, some of which lead to nucleosynthesis. The nucleus is rich in physical phenomena. Above the Coulomb barrier, complex interactions lead to the distortion of, and as collision energies increase, the destruction of the nuclear volume. Of critical importance to the understanding of these events is an understanding of the aggregate microscopic processes which govern them. In an effort to understand relativistic heavy-ion reactions, the Boltzmann-Uehling-Uhlenbeck (Ueh33) (BUU) transport equation is used as the framework for a numerical model. In the years since its introduction, the numerical model has been instrumental in providing a coherent, microscopic, physical description of these complex, highly non-linear events. This treatise describes the background leading to the creation of our numerical model of the BUU transport equation, details of its numerical implementation, its application to the study of relativistic heavy-ion collisions, and some of the experimental observables used to compare calculated results to empirical results. The formalism evolves the one-body Wigner phase-space distribution of nucleons in time under the influence of a single-particle nuclear mean field interaction and a collision source term. This is essentially the familiar Boltzmann transport equation whose source term has been modified to address the Pauli exclusion principle. Two elements of the model allow extrapolation from the study of nuclear collisions to bulk quantities of nuclear matter: the modification of nucleon scattering cross sections in nuclear matter, and the

  4. Numerical simulations of relativistic heavy-ion reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daffin, Frank Cecil

    Bulk quantities of nuclear matter exist only in the compact bodies of the universe. There the crushing gravitational forces overcome the Coulomb repulsion in massive stellar collapses. Nuclear matter is subjected to high pressures and temperatures as shock waves propagate and burn their way through stellar cores. The bulk properties of nuclear matter are important parameters in the evolution of these collapses, some of which lead to nucleosynthesis. The nucleus is rich in physical phenomena. Above the Coulomb barrier, complex interactions lead to the distortion of, and as collision energies increase, the destruction of the nuclear volume. Of critical importance to the understanding of these events is an understanding of the aggregate microscopic processes which govern them. In an effort to understand relativistic heavy-ion reactions, the Boltzmann-Uehling-Uhlenbeck (Ueh33) (BUU) transport equation is used as the framework for a numerical model. In the years since its introduction, the numerical model has been instrumental in providing a coherent, microscopic, physical description of these complex, highly non-linear events. This treatise describes the background leading to the creation of our numerical model of the BUU transport equation, details of its numerical implementation, its application to the study of relativistic heavy-ion collisions, and some of the experimental observables used to compare calculated results to empirical results. The formalism evolves the one-body Wigner phase-space distribution of nucleons in time under the influence of a single-particle nuclear mean field interaction and a collision source term. This is essentially the familiar Boltzmann transport equation whose source term has been modified to address the Pauli exclusion principle. Two elements of the model allow extrapolation from the study of nuclear collisions to bulk quantities of nuclear matter: the modification of nucleon scattering cross sections in nuclear matter, and the

  5. Modeling multi-nucleon transfer in symmetric collisions of massive nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Welsh, T.; Loveland, W.; Yanez, R.; Barrett, J. S.; McCutchan, E. A.; Sonzogni, A. A.; Johnson, T.; Zhu, S.; Greene, J. P.; Ayangeakaa, A. D.; Carpenter, M. P.; Lauritsen, T.; Harker, J. L.; Walters, W. B.; Amro, B. M. S.; Copp, P.

    2017-08-01

    Symmetric collisions of massive nuclei, such as 238U + 248Cm, have been proposed as ways to make new n-rich heavy nuclei via multi-nucleon transfer (MNT) reactions. We have measured the yields of several projectile-like and target-like fragments from the reaction of 1360 MeV 204Hg + 198Pt. We find that current models for this symmetric collision (GRAZING, DNS, ImQMD) significantly underestimate the yields of these transfer products, even for small transfers.

  6. Modeling multi-nucleon transfer in symmetric collisions of massive nuclei

    DOE PAGES

    Welsh, T.; Loveland, W.; Yanez, R.; ...

    2017-05-18

    We propose symmetric collisions of massive nuclei, such as 238U + 248Cm, as ways to make new n-rich heavy nuclei via multi-nucleon transfer (MNT) reactions. We have measured the yields of several projectile-like and target-like fragments from the reaction of 1360 MeV 204Hg + 198Pt. We also find that current models for this symmetric collision (GRAZING, DNS, ImQMD) significantly underestimate the yields of these transfer products, even for small transfers.

  7. Fission of actinide nuclei using multi-nucleon transfer reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Léguillon, Romain; Nishio, Katsuhisa; Hirose, Kentaro; Orlandi, Riccardo; Makii, Hiroyuki; Nishinaka, Ichiro; Ishii, Tetsuro; Tsukada, Kazuaki; Asai, Masato; Chiba, Satoshi; Ohtsuki, Tsutomu; Araki, Shohei; Watanabe, Yukinobu; Tatsuzawa, Ryotaro; Takaki, Naoyuki

    2014-09-01

    We are promoting a campaign to measure fission-fragment mass distributions for neutron-rich actinide nuclei populated by transfer reactions from their ground state up to an excitation energy of several tens MeV. We thus obtain the excitation energy dependence of the mass distribution. The experiment was carried out at the 20 MV JAEA tandem facility at Tokai. We report on the data obtained in the direct reaction 18 O + 232 Th . Transfer-channels and excitation energies of the fissioning nuclei were identified using silicon dE-E detectors located at forward angle. Two fission fragments were detected in coincidence using multi-wire proportional counters. Fission fragment masses were determined by kinematic consideration. We obtained the fission fragment mass distributions for 13 nuclei from actinium to uranium and some fission barrier heights. We are promoting a campaign to measure fission-fragment mass distributions for neutron-rich actinide nuclei populated by transfer reactions from their ground state up to an excitation energy of several tens MeV. We thus obtain the excitation energy dependence of the mass distribution. The experiment was carried out at the 20 MV JAEA tandem facility at Tokai. We report on the data obtained in the direct reaction 18 O + 232 Th . Transfer-channels and excitation energies of the fissioning nuclei were identified using silicon dE-E detectors located at forward angle. Two fission fragments were detected in coincidence using multi-wire proportional counters. Fission fragment masses were determined by kinematic consideration. We obtained the fission fragment mass distributions for 13 nuclei from actinium to uranium and some fission barrier heights. Present study is supported by the Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology of Japan.

  8. Intermediate energy heavy ion reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grégoire, C.; Tamain, B.

    The intermediate energy heavy ion induced reactions are extensively studied for several years. In this paper, we try to summarize the present knowledge. The peripheral reactions appear to be intermediate between the fragmentation and the deep inelastic regimes. Many questions remain open concerning the energy relaxation mechanisms and an eventual participant zone creation. In the case of central collisions, it has been shown that very hot nuclei can be built. The fusion limits are discussed and the very hot nuclei properties are considered. In some cases, hot spot formation or compression effects could play a role. Multifragmentation is discussed as a possible decay channel. In all these aspects, a difficult question concerns the validity of the temperature concept and more generally of collective thermodynamical variables. Such collective effects have been investigated in pion production experiments. Les réactions induites par ions lourds d'énergie intermédiaire sont très étudiées depuis quelques années. Dans cet article, nous essayons de résumer l'état actuel des connaissances. Les mécanismes mis en jeu dans les collisions périphériques sont intermédiaires entre les collisions très inélastiques et la fragmentation. La cible joue clairement un rôle déterminant et des effets importants de champ moyen demeurent. De nombreuses questions restent sans réponse comme par exemple les mécanismes de relaxation d'énergie ou l'existence d'une éventuelle zone participante. Dans le cas des collisions centrales, il a pu être montré que des noyaux très chauds sont fabriqués. Les limites au processus de fusion et les propriétés des noyaux très chauds sont discutées. Dans certains cas, des effets de compression ou de points chauds peuvent être envisagés. La multifragmentation est une voie de désexcitation possible. Une importante question concerne la validité du concept de température et plus généralement la notion de variable collective

  9. Relative effectiveness at 1 gy after acute and fractionated exposures of heavy ions with different linear energy transfer for lung tumorigenesis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiang; Farris Iii, Alton B; Wang, Ping; Zhang, Xiangming; Wang, Hongyan; Wang, Ya

    2015-02-01

    Space radiation, which is comprised of high-energy charged (HZE) particles with different high-linear energy transfer (LET), induces more severe biological effects than the Earth's radiation. NASA has mandated that risk estimates of carcinogenesis induced by exposure to HZE particles with different LET be determined before conducting human explorations of Mars. Because lung cancer is the most commonly diagnosed cancer and the leading cause of cancer death in humans, it is critical the risk of that radiation-induced lung tumorigenesis be included when estimating the risks of space radiation to astronauts. To address this, we examined the incidence of lung tumorigenesis in wild-type C57BL/6 mice at 1.5 years after 1 Gy exposure (single or fractionated dose) to different types of radiation with different LET (iron, silicon, oxygen and X ray). We chose wild-type mice for this study because previous studies of radiation-induced lung tumorigenesis using mutant mice models (either downregulated tumor suppressors or upregulated oncogenes) may not accurately reflect the response of healthy individuals (astronauts) to space radiation. Our study clearly showed that HZE particles (iron, silicon and oxygen) induced a higher incidence of lung tumorigenesis than X rays, and that their relative effectiveness at 1 Gy was >6. In addition, we found that silicon exposure appears to induce more aggressive lung tumors. These results provide valuable information for future followup experiments to study the underlying mechanism of lung tumorigenesis, which will improve risk estimation of space radiation-induced lung tumorigenesis and help in the development of mitigators to reduce risk if it exceeds NASA guidelines.

  10. RELATIVISTIC HEAVY ION PHYSICS : RESULTS FROM AGS TO RHIC.

    SciTech Connect

    STEINBERG,P.

    2002-06-20

    High-energy collisions of heavy ions provide a means to study QCD in a regime of high parton density, and may provide insight into its phme structure. Results from the four experiments at RHIC (BRAHMS, PHENIX, PHOBOS and STAR) are presented, and placed in context with the lower energy data from the AGS and SPS accelerators. The focus is on the insights these measurements provide into the time history of the collision process. Taken together, the data point to the creation of a deconfined state of matter that forms quickly, expands rapidly and freezes out suddenly. With the new RHIC data, systematic data now exists for heavy ion collisions as a function of {radical}s over several orders of magnitude and as a function of impact parameter. These data test the interplay between hard and soft processes in a large-volume system where nucleons are struck multiple times. The data is consistent with creating a deconfined state (jet quenching) that forms quickly (saturation models), expands rapidly (radial and elliptic flow) and freezes out suddenly (single freezeout and blast wave fits). There are also intriguing connections with particle production in elementary systems, which point to the role of the energy available for particle production on the features of the final state. Many in this field are optimistic that the careful understanding of this experimental data may lead t o the theoretical breakthroughs that will connect these complex systems to the fundamental lattice predict ions.

  11. Shape analysis applied in heavy ion reactions near Fermi energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, S.; Huang, M.; Wada, R.; Liu, X.; Lin, W.; Wang, J.

    2017-03-01

    A new method is proposed to perform shape analyses and to evaluate their validity in heavy ion collisions near the Fermi energy. In order to avoid erroneous values of shape parameters in the calculation, a test particle method is utilized in which each nucleon is represented by n test particles, similar to that used in the Boltzmann–Uehling–Uhlenbeck (BUU) calculations. The method is applied to the events simulated by an antisymmetrized molecular dynamics model. The geometrical shape of fragments is reasonably extracted when n = 100 is used. A significant deformation is observed for all fragments created in the multifragmentation process. The method is also applied to the shape of the momentum distribution for event classification. In the momentum case, the errors in the eigenvalue calculation become much smaller than those of the geometrical shape analysis and the results become similar between those with and without the test particle method, indicating that in intermediate heavy ion collisions the shape analysis of momentum distribution can be used for the event classification without the test particle method.

  12. Bound-free electron-positron pair production in relativistic heavy-ion collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Şengül, M. Y.; Güçlü, M. C.; Fritzsche, S.

    2009-10-01

    The bound-free electron-positron pair production is considered for relativistic heavy ion collisions. In particular, cross sections are calculated for the pair production with the simultaneous capture of the electron into the 1s ground state of one of the ions and for energies that are relevant for the relativistic heavy ion collider and the large hadron colliders. In the framework of perturbation theory, we applied Monte Carlo integration techniques to compute the lowest-order Feynman diagrams amplitudes by using Darwin wave functions for the bound states of the electrons and Sommerfeld-Maue wave functions for the continuum states of the positrons. Calculations were performed especially for the collision of Au+Au at 100 GeV/nucleon and Pb+Pb at 3400 GeV/nucleon.

  13. Optical model calculations of heavy-ion target fragmentation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Townsend, L. W.; Wilson, J. W.; Cucinotta, F. A.; Norbury, J. W.

    1986-01-01

    The fragmentation of target nuclei by relativistic protons and heavy ions is described within the context of a simple abrasion-ablation-final-state interaction model. Abrasion is described by a quantum mechanical formalism utilizing an optical model potential approximation. Nuclear charge distributions of the excited prefragments are calculated by both a hypergeometric distribution and a method based upon the zero-point oscillations of the giant dipole resonance. Excitation energies are estimated from the excess surface energy resulting from the abrasion process and the additional energy deposited by frictional spectator interactions of the abraded nucleons. The ablation probabilities are obtained from the EVA-3 computer program. Isotope production cross sections for the spallation of copper targets by relativistic protons and for the fragmenting of carbon targets by relativistic carbon, neon, and iron projectiles are calculated and compared with available experimental data.

  14. Chemical freeze-out in relativistic heavy-ion collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Jun; Ko, Che Ming

    2017-09-01

    One surprising result in relativistic heavy-ion collisions is that the abundance of various particles measured in experiments is consistent with the picture that they reach chemical equilibrium at a temperature much higher than the temperature they freeze out kinetically. Using a multiphase transport model to study particle production in these collisions, we find, as an example, that the effective pion to nucleon ratio, which includes those from resonance decays, indeed changes very little during the evolution of the hadronic matter from the chemical to the kinetic freeze-out, and it is also accompanied by an almost constant specific entropy. We further use a hadron resonance gas model to illustrate the results from the transport model study.

  15. Fluctuating glasma initial conditions and flow in heavy ion collisions.

    PubMed

    Schenke, Björn; Tribedy, Prithwish; Venugopalan, Raju

    2012-06-22

    We compute initial conditions in heavy ion collisions within the color glass condensate framework by combining the impact parameter dependent saturation model with the classical Yang-Mills description of initial Glasma fields. In addition to fluctuations of nucleon positions, this impact parameter dependent Glasma description includes quantum fluctuations of color charges on the length scale determined by the inverse nuclear saturation scale Q(s). The model naturally produces initial energy fluctuations that are described by a negative binomial distribution. The ratio of triangularity to eccentricity ε(3)/ε(2) is close to that in a model tuned to reproduce experimental flow data. We compare transverse momentum spectra and v(2,3,4)(p(T)) of pions from different models of initial conditions using relativistic viscous hydrodynamic evolution.

  16. Mutagenic effects of heavy ion radiation in plants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mei, M.; Deng, H.; Lu, Y.; Zhuang, C.; Liu, Z.; Qiu, Q.; Qiu, Y.; Yang, T. C.

    1994-01-01

    Genetic and developmental effects of heavy ions in maize and rice were investigated. Heavy particles with various charges and energies were accelerated at the BEVALAC. The frequency of occurrence of white-yellow stripes on leaves of plants developed from irradiated maize seeds increased linearly with dose, and high Linear Energy Transfer (LET) heavy charged particles, e.g., neon, argon, and iron, were 2-12 times as effective as gamma rays in inducing this type of mutation. The effectiveness of high-LET heavy ion in (1) inhibiting rice seedling growth, (2) reducing plant fertility, (3) inducing chromosome aberration and micronuclei in root tip cells and pollen mother cells of the first generation plants developed from exposed seeds, and (4) inducing mutation in the second generation, were greater than that of low-LET gamma rays. All effects observed were dose-dependent; however, there appeared to be an optimal range of doses for inducing certain types of mutation, for example, for argon ions (400 MeV/u) at 90-100 Gy, several valuable mutant lines with favorable characters, such as semidwarf, early maturity and high yield ability, were obtained. Experimental results suggest that the potential application of heavy ions in crop improvement is promising. Restriction-fragment-length-polymorphism (RFLP) analysis of two semidwarf mutants induced by argon particles revealed that large DNA alterations might be involved in these mutants.

  17. Mutagenic effects of heavy ion radiation in plants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mei, M.; Deng, H.; Lu, Y.; Zhuang, C.; Liu, Z.; Qiu, Q.; Qiu, Y.; Yang, T. C.

    1994-01-01

    Genetic and developmental effects of heavy ions in maize and rice were investigated. Heavy particles with various charges and energies were accelerated at the BEVALAC. The frequency of occurrence of white-yellow stripes on leaves of plants developed from irradiated maize seeds increased linearly with dose, and high Linear Energy Transfer (LET) heavy charged particles, e.g., neon, argon, and iron, were 2-12 times as effective as gamma rays in inducing this type of mutation. The effectiveness of high-LET heavy ion in (1) inhibiting rice seedling growth, (2) reducing plant fertility, (3) inducing chromosome aberration and micronuclei in root tip cells and pollen mother cells of the first generation plants developed from exposed seeds, and (4) inducing mutation in the second generation, were greater than that of low-LET gamma rays. All effects observed were dose-dependent; however, there appeared to be an optimal range of doses for inducing certain types of mutation, for example, for argon ions (400 MeV/u) at 90-100 Gy, several valuable mutant lines with favorable characters, such as semidwarf, early maturity and high yield ability, were obtained. Experimental results suggest that the potential application of heavy ions in crop improvement is promising. Restriction-fragment-length-polymorphism (RFLP) analysis of two semidwarf mutants induced by argon particles revealed that large DNA alterations might be involved in these mutants.

  18. Moon originating heavy ions associated with CIR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saito, Yoshifumi; Yokota, Shoichiro; Nishino, Masaki; Tsunakawa, Hideo

    2014-05-01

    Existance of a tenuous alkali atmosphere around the Moon was discovered by ground-based optical observations in 1980s. Since then the generation mechanism of the alkali atmosphere has been actively investigated. Currently, photon-stimulated desorption is regarded as the major generation process of the lunar alkai atmosphere such as sodium and potassium. MAP-PACE-IMA on Kaguya found four typical ion populations on the dayside of the Moon. These includes (1) solar wind protons backscattered at the lunar surface, (2) solar wind protons reflected by magnetic anomalies on the lunar surface, (3) reflected/backscattered protons picked-up by the solar wind, and (4) ions originating from the lunar surface/lunar exosphere. One of these populations: (4) ions originating from the lunar surface/lunar exosphere usually consisted of heavy ions such as carbon, oxygen, sodium, and potassium. Some of these ions were generated on the lunar surface by photon-stimulated desorption especially for alkali ions such as sodium and potassium and some others were generated by solar wind sputtering. Photo-ionized neutral particles were also included in these ions. These heavy ions were accelerated by the solar wind convection electric field and detected by the ion energy mass spectrometer MAP-PACE-IMA on Kaguya. Since the gyro-radius of these heavy ions was much larger than the Moon, the energy of these ions detected at 100km altitude was in most cases lower than the incident solar wind ion energy. Two special examples were found where the energy of the heavy ions was higher than the incident solar wind ion energy. These high-energy heavy ions were observed on the dayside of the Moon when CIR (Corotating Interaction Region) passed the Moon. The high energy heavy ions were observed for several hours with the highest heavy ion flux observed when the solar wind pressure increased due to the passage of the CIR. The mass spectrum of the heavy ions observed associated with CIR showed H+, He++, He

  19. Inclusive inelastic scattering of heavy ions and nuclear correlations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cucinotta, Francis A.; Townsend, Lawrence W.; Wilson, John W.; Khandelwal, Govind S.

    1990-01-01

    Calculations of inclusive inelastic scattering distributions for heavy ion collisions are considered within the high energy optical model. Using ground state sum rules, the inclusive projectile and complete projectile-target inelastic angular distributions are treated in both independent particle and correlated nuclear models. Comparisons between the models introduced are made for alpha particles colliding with He-4, C-12, and O-16 targets and protons colliding with O-16. Results indicate that correlations contribute significantly, at small momentum transfers, to the inelastic sum. Correlation effects are hidden, however, when total scattering distributions are considered because of the dominance of elastic scattering at small momentum transfers.

  20. Polarization in heavy-ion reactions. [Lectures

    SciTech Connect

    Fick, D.

    1983-08-01

    Determination of the polarization and spin alignment of reaction products emitted from heavy ion reactions should provide a sensitive test of reaction mechanisms. Techniques for producing both polarized beams and polarized targets are advancing rapidly. At the Oak Ridge National Laboraotry interest in this field has lead to the design and construction of a laser optically pumped polarized target by illuminating a supersonic gas jet. This target, which is mounted in the scattering chamber of a magnetic spectrometer, will be used to observe effects when deformed polarized targets are bombarded by heavy ions. Mutual research interests led to the invitation of Professor Fick, a pioneer in heavy ion polarization research who recently reviewed the status of this field, to Oak Ridge. While at ORNL he presented a series of lectures on this subject. Notes from these lectures are presented. (WHK)

  1. Medical heavy ion accelerator proposals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gough, R. A.

    1985-05-01

    For several decades, accelerators designed primarily for research in nuclear and high energy physics have been adapted for biomedical research including radiotherapeutic treatment of human diseases such as pituitary disorders, cancer, and more recently, arteriovascular malformations. The particles used in these treatments include pions, protons and heavier ions such as carbon, neon, silicon and argon. Maximum beam energies must be available to penetrate into an equivalent of about 30 cm of water, requiring treatment beams of 250 to 1000 MeV/nucleon. Intensities must be adequate to complete a 100 rad treatment fraction in about 1 minute. The favored technical approach in these proposals utilizes a conventional, strong-focusing synchrotron capable of fast switching between ions and energies, and servicing multiple treatment rooms. Specialized techniques for shaping the dose to conform to irregularly-shaped target volumes, while simultaneously sparing surrounding, healthy tissue and critical structures, are employed in each treatment room, together with the sophisticated dosimetry necessary for verification, monitoring, and patient safety.

  2. Failla Memorial lecture. The future of heavy-ion science in biology and medicine.

    PubMed

    Tobias, C A

    1985-07-01

    Interplanetary space contains fluxes of fast moving atomic nuclei. The distribution of these reflects the atomic composition of the universe, and such particles may pose limitations for space flight and for life in space. Over the past 50 years, since the invention of Ernest Lawrence's cyclotron, advances in accelerator technology have permitted the acceleration of charged nuclei to very high velocities. Currently, beams of any stable isotope species up to uranium are available at kinetic energies of several hundred MeV/nucleon at the Berkeley Bevalac. Recently, new areas of particle physics research relating to the mechanisms of spallation and fission have opened up for investigation, and it is now realistic to search for nuclear super-dense states that might be produced in heavy nuclear collisions. The heavy ions hold interest for a broad spectrum of research because of their effectiveness in producing a series of major lesions in DNA along single particle tracks and because of the Bragg depth ionization properties that allow the precise deposition of highly localized doses deep in the human body. Individual heavy ions can also interrupt the continuity of membraneous regions in cells. Heavy ions, when compared to low-LET radiation, have increased effectiveness for mammalian cell lethality, chromosome mutations, and cell transformation. The molecular mechanisms are not completely understood but appear to involve fragmentation and reintegration of DNA. Cells attempt to repair these lesions, and many of the deleterious effects are due to misrepair or misrejoining of DNA. Heavy ions do not require the presence of oxygen for producing their effects, and hypoxic cells in necrotic regions have nearly the same sensitivity as cells in well-oxygenated tissues. Heavy ions are effective in delaying or blocking the cell division process. Heavy ions are also strong enhancers of viral-induced cell transformation, a process that requires integration of foreign DNA. Some cell

  3. Jets In Heavy Ion Collisions with CMS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salur, Sevil

    2016-08-01

    Jet physics in heavy ion collisions is a rich field which has been rapidly evolving since the first observations of medium interactions at RHIC through back-to-back hadron correlations and at LHC via reconstructed jets. In order to completely characterize the final state via jet-medium interactions and distinguish between competing energy loss mechanisms, complementary and robust jet observables are investigated. Latest developments of jet finding techniques and their applications to heavy ion environments are discussed with an emphasis given on experimental results from CMS experiment.

  4. Angular spectrum analysis in heavy ion collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Llanes-Estrada, Felipe J.; Muñoz Martínez, Jose L.

    2017-01-01

    Heavy Ion Collisions serve to study some features of early-universe cosmology. In this contribution we adapt data analysis frequently used to understand the Cosmic Microwave Background anisotropies (such as the Mollweide projection and the angular power spectrum) to heavy ion collisions at the LHC. We examine a few publicly available events of the ALICE collaboration under this light. Because the ALICE time projection chamber has limited coverage in rapidity and some blind angles in the transverse plane, the angular spectrum seems very influenced by the detector's acceptance.

  5. Induction linacs for heavy ion fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Keefe, D.

    1986-11-01

    Experimental progress to date has strengthened our belief in the soundness and attractiveness of the heavy ion method for fusion. What surprises that have shown up in the laboratory (e.g., in SBTE) have all been of the pleasant kind so far. The systems assessment has supported the view that the heavy ion approach can lead to economically attractive electric power and that a wide variety of options exists in all parameters. The systems work has also been of great help in pointing the way for the research and development activities.

  6. Holographic heavy ion collisions with baryon charge

    SciTech Connect

    Casalderrey-Solana, Jorge; Mateos, David; van der Schee, Wilke; Triana, Miquel

    2016-09-19

    We numerically simulate collisions of charged shockwaves in Einstein-Maxwell theory in anti-de Sitter space as a toy model of heavy ion collisions with non-zero baryon charge. The stress tensor and the baryon current become well described by charged hydrodynamics at roughly the same time. The effect of the charge density on generic observables is typically no larger than 15%. Finally, we find significant stopping of the baryon charge and compare our results with those in heavy ion collision experiments.

  7. New developments in heavy ion fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Herrmannsfeldt, W.B.

    1983-04-01

    Beginning in 1984, the US Department of Energy plans a program aimed at determining the feasibility of using heavy ion accelerators as pellet drivers for Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF). This paper will describe the events in the field of Heavy Ion Fusion (HIF) that have occurred in the three years since the Lausanne conference in this series. The emphasis will be on the events leading towards the new energy oriented program. in addition to providing an overview of progress in HIF, such a discussion may prove useful for promoters of any emerging energy technology.

  8. Holographic heavy ion collisions with baryon charge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casalderrey-Solana, Jorge; Mateos, David; van der Schee, Wilke; Triana, Miquel

    2016-09-01

    We numerically simulate collisions of charged shockwaves in Einstein-Maxwell theory in anti-de Sitter space as a toy model of heavy ion collisions with non-zero baryon charge. The stress tensor and the baryon current become well described by charged hydrodynamics at roughly the same time. The effect of the charge density on generic observables is typically no larger than 15%. We find significant stopping of the baryon charge and compare our results with those in heavy ion collision experiments.

  9. Solenoid transport for heavy ion fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Edward

    2004-06-15

    Solenoid transport of high current, heavy ion beams is considered for several stages of a heavy ion fusion driver. In general this option is more efficient than magnetic quadrupole transport at sufficiently low kinetic energy and/or large e/m, and for this reason it has been employed in electron induction linacs. Ideally an ion beam would be transported in a state of Brillouin flow, i.e. cold in the transverse plane and spinning at one half the cyclotron frequency. The design of appropriate solenoids and the equilibrium and stability of transported ion beams are discussed. An outline of application to a fusion driver is also presented.

  10. The Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider control system

    SciTech Connect

    Clifford, T.S.; Barton, D.S.; Oerter, B.R.

    1997-12-01

    The Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider control system has been used in the commissioning of the AGS to RHIC transfer line and in the first RHIC sextant test. Much of the controls infrastructure for networks and links has been installed throughout the collider. All of the controls hardware modules needed to be built for early RHIC operations have been designed and tested. Many of these VME modules are already being used in normal AGS operations. Over 150 VME based front end computers and device controllers will be installed by the Summer of 1998 in order to be ready for Fall of 1998. A few features are being added to the front end computer core software. The bulk of the Accelerator Device Objects (ADOs) which are instantiated in the FECs, have been written and tested in the early commissioning. A configuration database has been designed. Generic control and display of ADO parameters via a spreadsheet like program on the console level computers was provided early on in the control system development. User interface tools that were developed for the AGS control system have been used in RHIC applications. Some of the basic operations programs, like alarm display and save/restore, that are used in the AGS operations have been or will be expanded to support RHIC operations. A model for application programs which involves a console level manager servicing ADOs have been verified with a few RHIC applications. More applications need to be written for the Fall of 1998 commissioning effort. A sequencer for automatic control of the fill is being written with the expectation that it will be useful in early commissioning.

  11. Apoptosis and injuries of heavy ion beam and x-ray radiation on malignant melanoma cell.

    PubMed

    Qin, Jin; Li, Sha; Zhang, Chao; Gao, Dong-Wei; Li, Qiang; Zhang, Hong; Jin, Xiao-Dong; Liu, Yang

    2017-01-01

    This study aims to investigate the influence of high linear energy transfer (LET) heavy ion ((12)C(6+)) and low LET X-ray radiation on apoptosis and related proteins of malignant melanoma on tumor-bearing mice under the same physical dosage. C57BL/6 J mice were burdened by tumors and randomized into three groups. These mice received heavy ion ((12)C(6+)) and X-ray radiation under the same physical dosage, respectively; their weight and tumor volumes were measured every three days post-radiation. After 30 days, these mice were sacrificed. Then, median survival time was calculated and tumors on mice were proliferated. In addition, immunohistochemistry was carried out for apoptosis-related proteins to reflect the expression level. After tumor-bearing mice were radiated to heavy ion, median survival time improved and tumor volume significantly decreased in conjunction with the upregulated expression of pro-apoptosis factors, Bax and cytochrome C, and the downregulated expression of apoptosis-profilin (Bcl-2, Survivin) and proliferation-related proteins (proliferating cell nuclear antigen). The results indicated that radiation can promote the apoptosis of malignant melanoma cells and inhibit their proliferation. This case was more suitable for heavy ion ((12)C(6+)). High LET heavy ion ((12)C(6+)) radiation could significantly improve the killing ability for malignant melanoma cells by inducing apoptosis in tumor cells and inhibiting their proliferation. These results demonstrated that heavy ion ((12)C(6+)) presented special advantages in terms of treating malignant melanoma.

  12. State density formalism of the Iwamoto-Harada model: A suitable tool to treat cluster emission from heavy-ion collisions with account for spin variables

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Běták, Emil; Cseh, József

    2017-09-01

    We study the possibility to include the cluster emission into the statistical pre-equilibrium (exciton) model suitable also for heavy ion collisions. The direct motivation of this paper is a possibility of producing superdeformed nuclei, which are easier to be detected in heavy-ion reactions than in those induced by light projectiles (nucleons, deuterons, α-particles). Note to the reader: the pdf file has been changed on September 22, 2017.

  13. Heavy ion acceleration in the radiation pressure acceleration and breakout afterburner regimes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrov, G. M.; McGuffey, C.; Thomas, A. G. R.; Krushelnick, K.; Beg, F. N.

    2017-07-01

    We present a theoretical study of heavy ion acceleration from ultrathin (20 nm) gold foil irradiated by high-intensity sub-picosecond lasers. Using two-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations, three laser systems are modeled that cover the range between femtosecond and picosecond pulses. By varying the laser pulse duration we observe a transition from radiation pressure acceleration (RPA) to the relativistic induced transparency (RIT) regime for heavy ions akin to light ions. The underlying physics of beam formation and acceleration is similar for light and heavy ions, however, nuances of the acceleration process make the heavy ions more challenging. A more detailed study involving variation of peak laser intensity I 0 and pulse duration τFWHM revealed that the transition point from RPA to RIT regime depends on the peak laser intensity on target and occurs for pulse duration {τ }{{F}{{W}}{{H}}{{M}}}{{R}{{P}}{{A}}\\to {{R}}{{I}}{{T}}}[{{f}}{{s}}]\\cong 210/\\sqrt{{I}0[{{W}} {{{cm}}}-2]/{10}21}. The most abundant gold ion and charge-to-mass ratio are Au51+ and q/M ≈ 1/4, respectively, half that of light ions. For ultrathin foils, on the order of one skin depth, we established a linear scaling of the maximum energy per nucleon (E/M)max with (q/M)max, which is more favorable than the quadratic one found previously. The numerical simulations predict heavy ion beams with very attractive properties for applications: high directionality (<10° half-angle), high fluxes (>1011 ions sr-1) and energy (>20 MeV/nucleon) from laser systems delivering >20 J of energy on target.

  14. Relative biological effectiveness of accelerated heavy ions for induction of morphological transformation in Syrian hamster embryo cells.

    PubMed

    Han, Z B; Suzuki, H; Suzuki, F; Suzuki, M; Furusawa, Y; Kato, T; Ikenaga, M

    1998-09-01

    Syrian hamster embryo cells were used to study the morphological transformation induced by accelerated heavy ions with different linear energy transfer (LET) ranging from 13 to 400 keV/micron. Exponentially growing cells were irradiated with 12C or 28Si ion beams generated by the Heavy Ion Medical Accelerator in Chiba (HIMAC), then inoculated to culture dishes. Morphologically altered colonies were scored as transformants. Over the LET range examined, the frequency of transformation induced by the heavy ions increased sharply at very low doses no greater than 5 cGy. The relative biological effectiveness (RBE) of the heavy ions relative to X-rays first increased with LET, reached a maximum value of about 7 at 100 keV/micron, then decreased with the further increase of LET. Our findings confirmed that high LET heavy ions are much more effective than X-rays for the induction of in vitro cell transformation.

  15. Size of lethality target in mouse immature oocytes determined with accelerated heavy ions.

    PubMed

    Straume, T; Dobson, R L; Kwan, T C

    1989-01-01

    Mouse immature oocytes were irradiated in vivo with highly charged, heavy ions from the Bevalac accelerator at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory. The particles used were 670-MeV/nucleon Si14+, 570-MeV/nucleon Ar18+, and 450-MeV/nucleon Fe26+. The cross-sectional area of the lethality target in these extremely radiosensitive cells was determined from fluence-response curves and information on energy deposition by delta rays. Results indicate a target cross-section larger than that of the nucleus, one which closely approximates the cross-sectional area of the entire oocyte. For 450-MeV/nucleon Fe26+ particles, the predicted target cross-sectional area is 120 +/- 16 microns2, comparing well with the microscopically determined cross-sectional area of 111 +/- 12 microns2 for these cells. The present results are in agreement with our previous target studies which implicate the oocyte plasma membrane.

  16. Pions from and about heavy ions

    SciTech Connect

    Rasmussen, J.O.

    1982-09-01

    A review is presented of the possibilities of pion production with heavy ion reactions. Major headings include: pion thermometry; hills and valleys in pion spectra; pionic orbits of nuclear size; pion confinement in the fireball; anomalons; and Schroedinger equation solutions for pionic atoms. 47 references, 9 figures. (GHT)

  17. Green's function methods in heavy ion shielding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, John W.; Costen, Robert C.; Shinn, Judy L.; Badavi, Francis F.

    1993-01-01

    An analytic solution to the heavy ion transport in terms of Green's function is used to generate a highly efficient computer code for space applications. The efficiency of the computer code is accomplished by a nonperturbative technique extending Green's function over the solution domain. The computer code can also be applied to accelerator boundary conditions to allow code validation in laboratory experiments.

  18. Super high energy heavy ion collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Geist, W.M.

    1987-12-01

    Basic theoretical ideas on a phase transition to a plasma of free quarks and gluons in heavy ion collisions are outlined. First results from experiments with oxygen beams at 14.5 GeV/c/N (BNL), 60 and 200 GeV/c/N (CERN) are discussed. 30 refs., 9 figs.

  19. Superconducting heavy-ion accelerating structures

    SciTech Connect

    Shepard, K.W.

    1996-08-01

    This paper briefly reviews the technical history of superconducting ion-accelerating structures. Various superconducting cavities currently used and being developed for use in ion linacs are discussed. Principal parameters and operational characteristics of superconducting structures in active use at various heavy-ion facilities are described.

  20. Relativistic Hydrodynamics for Heavy-Ion Collisions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ollitrault, Jean-Yves

    2008-01-01

    Relativistic hydrodynamics is essential to our current understanding of nucleus-nucleus collisions at ultrarelativistic energies (current experiments at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider, forthcoming experiments at the CERN Large Hadron Collider). This is an introduction to relativistic hydrodynamics for graduate students. It includes a detailed…

  1. The heavy ion program at CERN

    SciTech Connect

    Lissauer, D.

    1986-09-30

    During two periods in 1986 and 1987, oxygen ion beams with energies up to 3.2 TeV will be available at the CERN-SPS. A brief review of the five large heavy ion experiments is presented and the different physics addressed by each of the experiments is discussed. 11 refs., 5 figs.

  2. Resonant structures in heavy-ion reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Sanders, S.J.; Henning, W.; Ernst, H.; Geesaman, D.F.; Jachcinski, C.; Kovar, D.G.; Paul, M.; Schiffer, J.P.

    1980-01-01

    An investigation of heavy-ion resonance structures using the /sup 24/Mg(/sup 16/O, /sup 12/C)/sup 28/Si reaction is presented. The data are analyzed in the context of Breit-Wigner resonances added to a direct-reaction background.

  3. Pion probes of heavy ion collision dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Rasmussen, J.O.

    1985-03-01

    Pion interferometry data (2-pion correlation) are examined for information on size and lifetime of the pion-emitting matter. The temperatures inferred from pion, proton and kaon spectra are considered. An explanation consistent with the above size and temperature data is proposed. New theoretical Monte Carlo results on spectator effects on heavy-ion pion spectra are presented. 23 refs., 9 figs.

  4. Relativistic Hydrodynamics for Heavy-Ion Collisions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ollitrault, Jean-Yves

    2008-01-01

    Relativistic hydrodynamics is essential to our current understanding of nucleus-nucleus collisions at ultrarelativistic energies (current experiments at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider, forthcoming experiments at the CERN Large Hadron Collider). This is an introduction to relativistic hydrodynamics for graduate students. It includes a detailed…

  5. RELATIVISTIC HEAVY ION PHYSICS: A THEORETICAL OVERVIEW.

    SciTech Connect

    KHARZEEV,D.

    2004-03-28

    This is a mini-review of recent theoretical work in the field of relativistic heavy ion physics. The following topics are discussed initial conditions and the Color Glass Condensate; approach to thermalization and the hydrodynamic evolution; hard probes and the properties of the Quark-Gluon Plasma. Some of the unsolved problems and potentially promising directions for future research are listed as well.

  6. Heavy-ion fusion accelerator research, 1989

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-06-01

    This report discusses the following topics on heavy-ion fusion accelerator research: MBE-4: the induction-linac approach; transverse beam dynamics and current amplification; scaling up the results; through ILSE to a driver; ion-source and injector development; and accelerator component research and development.

  7. Nano- and microstructuring of solids by swift heavy ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Komarov, F. F.

    2017-08-01

    We review the current stage of research of track formation processes and mechanisms in materials irradiated by swift ions. We show that the nature and morphology of tracks depend on the type and structure of the material and on the energy density transfer to its electron subsystem. Swift heavy ions serve as tools to synthesize nanoclusters and nanowires, to controllably change their morphology, and to tailor electronic, magnetic, and optical properties. The unique optical, photoelectric, and conducting properties of tracks can be used to create a new generation of electronic and optoelectronic nanosize devices. These low-dimensional objects exhibit quantum behavior and are stimulating a broad range of fundamental and applied research.

  8. Fifth high-energy heavy-ion study

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-10-01

    This was the fifth of a continuing series of summer studies held at LBL to discuss high energy heavy ion collisions. Recently, a similar meeting has been held on alternate years at GSI (Darmstadt); and, in 1979, we held a meeting at LBL exclusively devoted to ultra-relativistic nuclear collisions. Two new features distinguish this study from earlier meetings in the series. First, the energy range for discussion was broadened by including collisions from about 20 MeV/nucleon to the highest available in the cosmic radiation. The lower range, particularly below 100 MeV/nucleon, will be under intense study in the near future with machines such as the upgraded Bevalac, Michigan State University Superconducting Cyclotron, GANIL in France, and the SC at CERN. Recently, the high energy collision regime has been expanded by the successful operation of the CERN ISR with alpha particles. Second, in addition to an extensive program of invited talks, we decided for the first time to actively solicit contributions. Forty-seven individual items from the conference were prepared separately for the data base. (GHT)

  9. Late degeneration in rabbit tissues after irradiation by heavy ions.

    PubMed

    Lett, J T; Cox, A B; Keng, P C; Lee, A C; Su, C M; Bergtold, D S

    1980-01-01

    In 1974, using the rabbit as a model, we began long-term experiments designed to help in the evaluation of the hazards to man from extended exposure to heavy ions in space. Such exposure would occur, for example, during the construction of solar power stations in stationary orbits or on round trips to Mars. Our experiments with 400 MeV/nucleon Ne ions and 570 MeV/nucleon Ar ions have shown that true late effects of a degenerative nature are manifested only years after irradiation. At the appropriate doses (the high end of the experimental dose range), the magnitudes of the late effects are comparable with those encountered in human patients given radiation therapy with neutrons. Such comparisons show that the rabbit experiments are applicable to man. Given that basis, the results from the low end of the experimental dose range lead to the conclusion that astronauts subjected to the radiation fluxes anticipated during flights of the above duration could experience late radiation effects one or more decades after exposure. Late degenerative changes will occur in tissues of the central nervous system, terminally differentiating systems and stem cell populations. The studies also indicate that individual tissues may be "prematurely aged" by radiation in the sense that the "life spans" of those tissues can be decreased without the appearance of malignancies.

  10. Heavy ion driven LMF design concept

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, E.P.

    1991-08-01

    The USA Department of Energy has conducted a multi-year study of the requirements, designs and costs for a Laboratory Microfusion Facility (LMF). The primary purpose of the LMF would be testing of weapons physics and effects simulation using the output from microexplosions of inertial fusion pellets. It does not need a high repetition rate, efficient driver system as required by an electrical generating plant. However there would be so many features in common that the design, construction and operation of an LMF would considerably advance the application of inertial confinement fusion to energy production. The DOE study has concentrated particularly on the LMF driver, with design and component development undertaken at several national laboratories. Principally, these are LLNL (Solid State Laser), LANL (Gas Laser), and SNLA (Light Ions). Heavy Ions, although considered a possible LMF driver did not receive attention until the final stages of this study since its program management was through the Office of Energy Research rather than Defense Programs. During preparation of a summary report for the study it was decided that some account of heavy ions was needed for a complete survey of the driver candidates. A conceptual heavy ion LMF driver design was created for the DOE report which is titled LMC Phase II Design Concepts. The heavy ion driver did not receive the level of scrutiny of the other concepts and, unlike the others, no costs analysis by an independent contractor was performed. Since much of heavy ion driver design lore was brought together in this exercise it is worthwhile to make it available as an independent report. This is reproduced here as it appears in the DOE report.

  11. Heavy ion driven LMF design concept

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, E. P.

    1991-08-01

    The US Department of Energy has conducted a multi-year study of the requirements, designs and costs for a Laboratory Microfusion Facility (LMF). The primary purpose of the LMF would be testing of weapons physics and effects simulation using the output from microexplosions of inertial fusion pellets. It does not need a high repetition rate, efficient driver system as required by an electrical generating plant. However there would be so many features in common that the design, construction and operation of an LMF would considerably advance the application of inertial confinement fusion to energy production. The DOE study has concentrated particularly on the LMF driver, with design and component development undertaken at several national laboratories. Principally, these are LLNL (Solid State Laser), LANL (Gas Laser), and SNLA (Light Ions). Heavy Ions, although considered a possible LMF driver did not receive attention until the final stages of this study since its program management was through the Office of Energy Research rather than Defense Programs. During preparation of a summary report for the study it was decided that some account of heavy ions was needed for a complete survey of the driver candidates. A conceptual heavy ion LMF driver design was created for the DOE report which is titled LMC Phase II Design Concepts. The heavy ion driver did not receive the level of scrutiny of the other concepts and, unlike the others, no costs analysis by an independent contractor was performed. Since much of heavy ion driver design lore was brought together in this exercise it is worthwhile to make it available as an independent report. This is reproduced here as it appears in the DOE report.

  12. Heavy Ion Reactions with Neutron-Rich Beams - Proceedings of the Riken International Workshop

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamaji, S.; Ishihara, M.; Takigawa, N.

    1993-11-01

    The Table of Contents for the book is as follows: * Preface * Opening Address * Fusion I * Heavy Ion Fusion at Subbarrier Energies: Progress and Questions * Angular Momentum in Heavy Ion Subbarrier Interaction * Fusion II * High Precision Fusion Excitation Function Measurements: What Can We Learn from Them? * Transfer Reactions for 16O + 144,152Sm near the Coulomb Barrier * Fusion III * Recent Theoretical Developments in the Study of Subbarrier Fusion * Direct Reaction Approach to Heavy Ion Scattering and Fusion at Energies near Coulomb Barrier * Fusion IV * Roles of Multi-Step Transfer in Fusion Process Induced by Heavy Ion Reactions * Special Session * RIKEN Accelerator Research Facility (RARF) * Fission I * Bimodal Nature of Nuclear Fission * Systematics of Isotope Production Rates: Mass Excess Dependence of Fission Products * Semiclassical Methods for the Multi-Dimensional Quantum Decay * Dynamics of Di-Nucleus Systems: Molecular Resonances * Fission II * The Competition Between Fusion-Fission and Deeply Inelastic Reactions in the Medium Mass Systems * Unstable Nuclei I * Coulomb Dissociation and Momentum Distributions for 11Li → 9Li+n+n Breakup Reactions * Unstable Nuclei II * Elastic Scattering and Fragmentation of Halo Nuclei * Secondary Reactions of Neutron-Rich Nuclei at Intermediate Energies * Life Time of Soft Dipole Excitation * Unstable Nuclei III * Shell Structure of Exotic Unstable Nuclei * Properties of Unstable Nuclei Within the Relativistic Many-Body Theory * Fusion with Unstable Nuclei * Barrier Distributions for Heavy Ion Fusion * Heavy Ion Reactions with Neutron-Rich Beams * Heavy Ion Fusion with Neutron-Rich Beams * Superheavy Elements * Study of α Decays Following 40Ar Bombardment on 238U * Production of Superheavy Elements via Fusion: What is Limiting Us? * Panel Session * Comments * List of Participants

  13. Biomedical research with heavy ions at the IMP accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Qiang

    The main ion-beam acceleration facilities and research activities at the Institute of Modern Physics (IMP), Chinese Academy of Sciences are briefly introduced. Some of the biomedical research with heavy ions such as heavy-ion biological effect, basic research related to heavy-ion cancer therapy and radiation breeding at the IMP accelerators are presented.

  14. Science and art in heavy-ion collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Weiss, M.S.

    1982-08-09

    One of the more intriguing phenomena discovered in heavy-ion physics is the seeming appearance of high energy structure in the excitation spectra of inelastically scattered heavy ions. For reasons illustrated, these may well be a phenomena unique to heavy ions and their explanation perhaps unique to TDHF.

  15. Heavy ion action on single cells: Cellular inactivation capability of single accelerated heavy ions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kost, M.; Pross, H.-D.; Russmann, C.; Schneider, E.; Kiefer, J.; Kraft, G.; Lenz, G.; Becher, W.

    1994-01-01

    Heavy ions (HZE-particles) constitute an important part of radiation in space. Although their number is small the high amount of energy transferred by individual particles may cause severe biological effects. Their investigation requires special techniques which were tested by experiments performed at the UNILAC at the GSI (Darmstadt). Diploid yeast was used which is a suitable eucaryotic test system because of its resistance to extreme conditions like dryness and vacuum. Cells were placed on nuclear track detector foils and exposed to ions of different atomic number and energy. To assess the action of one single ion on an individual cell, track parameters and the respective colony forming abilities (CFA) were determined with the help of computer aided image analysis. There is mounting evidence that not only the amount of energy deposited along the particle path, commonly given by the LET, is of importance but also the spatial problem of energy deposition at a submicroscopical scale. It is virtually impossible to investigate track structure effects in detail with whole cell populations and (globally applied) high particle fluences. It is, therefore, necessary to detect the action of simple ions in individual cells. The results show that the biological action depends on atomic number and specific energy of the impinging ions, which can be compared with model calculations of recent track structure models.

  16. Hypertriton and light nuclei production at Lambda-production subthreshold energy in heavy-ion collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, S.; Zu, Z.; Chen, J.H., Ma, Y.G., Cai, X-Z, Ma, G.L., Zhong, C.

    2011-08-01

    High-energy heavy-ion collisions produce abundant hyperons and nucleons. A dynamical coalescence model coupled with the ART model is employed to study the production probabilities of light clusters, deuteron (d), triton (t), helion ({sup 3}He), and hypertriton ({sub {Lambda}}{sup 3}H) at subthreshold energy of Aproduction ({approx} 1 GeV per nucleon). We study the dependence on the reaction system size of the coalescence penalty factor per additional nucleon and entropy per nucleon. The Strangeness Population Factor (S{sub 3} = {sup 3}{sub {Lambda}}H/({sup 3}He x {Lambda}/p)) shows an extra suppression of hypertriton comparing to light clusters of the same mass number. This model predicts a hypertriton production cross-section of a few {mu}b in {sup 36}Ar+{sup 36}Ar, {sup 40}Ca+{sup 40}Ca and {sup 56}Ni+{sup 56}Ni in 1 A GeV reactions. The production rate is as high as a few hypertritons per million collisions, which shows that the fixed-target heavy-ion collisions at CSR (Lanzhou/China) at {Lambda} subthreshold energy are suitable for breaking new ground in hypernuclear physics.

  17. Exotic hadrons from heavy ion collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Sungtae; Hyodo, Tetsuo; Jido, Daisuke; Ko, Che Ming; Lee, Su Houng; Maeda, Saori; Miyahara, Kenta; Morita, Kenji; Nielsen, Marina; Ohnishi, Akira; Sekihara, Takayasu; Song, Taesoo; Yasui, Shigehiro; Yazaki, Koichi

    2017-07-01

    High energy heavy ion collisions are excellent ways for producing heavy hadrons and composite particles, including the light (anti)nuclei. With upgraded detectors at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) and the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), it has become possible to measure hadrons beyond their ground states. Therefore, heavy ion collisions provide a new method for studying exotic hadrons that are either molecular states made of various hadrons or compact system consisting of multiquarks. Because their structures are related to the fundamental properties of Quantum Chromodynamics (QCD), studying exotic hadrons is currently one of the most active areas of research in hadron physics. Experiments carried out at various accelerator facilities have indicated that some exotic hadrons may have already been produced. The present review is a summary of the current understanding of a selected set of exotic particle candidates that can be potentially measured in heavy ion collisions. It also includes discussions on the production of resonances, exotics and hadronic molecular states in these collisions based on the coalescence model and the statistical model. A more detailed discussion is given on the results from these models, leading to the conclusion that the yield of a hadron that is a compact multiquark state is typically an order of magnitude smaller than if it is an excited hadronic state with normal quark numbers or a loosely bound hadronic molecule. Attention is also given to some of the proposed heavy exotic hadrons that could be produced with sufficient abundance in heavy ion collisions because of the significant numbers of charm and bottom quarks that are produced at RHIC and even larger numbers at LHC, making it possible to study them in these experiments. Further included in the discussion are the general formalism for the coalescence model that involves resonance particles and its implication on the present estimated yield for resonance production. Finally

  18. RHIC performance for FY2011 Au+Au heavy ion run

    SciTech Connect

    Marr, G.; Ahrens, L.; Bai, M.; Beebe-Wang, J.; Blackler, I.; Blaskiewicz, M.; Brennan, J.M.; Brown, K.A.; Bruno, D.; Butler, J.; Carlson, C.; Connolly, R.; D'Ottavio, T.; Drees, K.A.; Fedotov, A.V.; Fischer, W.; Fu, W.; Gardner, C.J.; Gassner, D.M.; Glenn, J.W.; Gu, X.; Harvey, M.; Hayes, T.; Hoff, L.; Huang, H.; Ingrassia, P.F.; Jamilkowski, J.P.; Kling, N.; Lafky, M.; Laster, J.S.; Liu, C.; Luo, Y.; Mapes, M.; Marusic, A.; Mernick, K.; Michnoff, R.J.; Minty, M.G.; Montag, C.; Morris, J.; Naylor, C.; Nemesure, S.; Polizzo, S.; Ptitsyn, V.; Robert-Demolaize, G.; Roser, T.; Sampson, P.; Sandberg, J.; Schoefer, V.; Schultheiss, C.; Severino, F.; Shrey, T.; Smith, K.; Steski, D.; Tepikian, S.; Thieberger, P.; Trbojevic, D.; Tsoupas, N.; Tuozzolo, J.E.; VanKuik, B.; Wang, G.; Wilinski, M.; Zaltsman, A.; Zeno, K.; Zhang, S.Y.

    2011-09-04

    Following the Fiscal Year (FY) 2010 (Run-10) Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) Au+Au run, RHIC experiment upgrades sought to improve detector capabilities. In turn, accelerator improvements were made to improve the luminosity available to the experiments for this run (Run-11). These improvements included: a redesign of the stochastic cooling systems for improved reliability; a relocation of 'common' RF cavities to alleviate intensity limits due to beam loading; and an improved usage of feedback systems to control orbit, tune and coupling during energy ramps as well as while colliding at top energy. We present an overview of changes to the Collider and review the performance of the collider with respect to instantaneous and integrated luminosity goals. At the conclusion of the FY 2011 polarized proton run, preparations for heavy ion run proceeded on April 18, with Au+Au collisions continuing through June 28. Our standard operations at 100 GeV/nucleon beam energy was bracketed by two shorter periods of collisions at lower energies (9.8 and 13.5 GeV/nucleon), continuing a previously established program of low and medium energy runs. Table 1 summarizes our history of heavy ion operations at RHIC.

  19. Heavy Ions In Space (HIIS) experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adams, James H., Jr.; Beahm, Lorraine P.; Tylka, Allan J.

    1992-01-01

    The Heavy Ions In Space (HIIS) experiment has two primary objectives: (1) to measure the elemental composition of ultraheavy Galactic cosmic rays, beginning in the tin-barium region of the periodic table; and (2) to study heavy ions which arrive at LDEF below the geomagnetic cutoff, either because they are not fully stripped of electrons or because their source is within the magnetosphere. Both have practical as well as astrophysical consequences. The HIIS experiment used eight thick stacks of plastic track detectors mounted in two trays on the space facing end of LDEF. Since the last LDEF symposium, the statistics were increased of the observations and have extended the analysis to a second stack and to detector sheets near the top of a stack. New results are reported on the detector resolution and on the observations of both stopping and relativistic particles.

  20. Chiral Magnetic Effect in Heavy Ion Collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Liao, Jinfeng

    2016-12-01

    The Chiral Magnetic Effect (CME) is a remarkable phenomenon that stems from highly nontrivial interplay of QCD chiral symmetry, axial anomaly, and gluonic topology. We show it is of fundamental importance to search for the CME in experiments. The heavy ion collisions provide a unique environment where a hot chiral-symmetric quark-gluon plasma is created, gluonic topological fluctuations generate chirality imbalance, and very strong magnetic fields |Β|~m2π are present during the early stage of such collisions. Significant efforts have been made to look for CME signals in heavy ion collision experiments. Lastly, in this contribution we give a brief overview on the status of such efforts.

  1. Chiral Magnetic Effect in Heavy Ion Collisions

    DOE PAGES

    Liao, Jinfeng

    2016-12-01

    The Chiral Magnetic Effect (CME) is a remarkable phenomenon that stems from highly nontrivial interplay of QCD chiral symmetry, axial anomaly, and gluonic topology. We show it is of fundamental importance to search for the CME in experiments. The heavy ion collisions provide a unique environment where a hot chiral-symmetric quark-gluon plasma is created, gluonic topological fluctuations generate chirality imbalance, and very strong magnetic fields |Β→|~m2π are present during the early stage of such collisions. Significant efforts have been made to look for CME signals in heavy ion collision experiments. Lastly, in this contribution we give a brief overview onmore » the status of such efforts.« less

  2. Heavy Ion Fragmentation Experiments at the Bevatron

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heckman, H. H.

    1975-01-01

    Fragmentation processes of heavy nuclei in matter using the heavy-ion capability of the Bevatron were studied. The purpose was to obtain the single particle inclusive spectra of secondary nuclei produced at 0 deg by the fragmentation of heavy ion beam projectiles. The process being examined is B+T yields F + anything, where B is the beam nucleus, T is the target nucleus, and F is the detected fragment. The fragments F are isotopically identified by experimental procedures involving magnetic analysis, energy loss and time-of-flight measurements. Attempts were also made to: (1) measure the total and partial production cross section for all isotopes, (2) test the applicability of high-energy multi-particle interaction theory to nuclear fragmentation, (3) apply the cross-section data and fragmentation probabilities to cosmic ray transport theory, and (4) search for systematic behavior of fragment production as a means to improve existing semi-empirical theories of cross sections.

  3. Heavy-Ion Imaging Applied To Medicine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fabrikant, J. I.; Tobias, C. A.; Capp, M. P.; Benton, E. V.; Holley, W. R.

    1980-08-01

    Heavy particle radiography is a newly developed noninvasive low dose imaging procedure with increased resolution of minute density differences in soft tissues of the body. The method utilizes accelerated high energy ions, primarily carbon and neon, at the BEVALAC accelerator at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory. The research program applied to medicine utilizes heavy-ion radiography for low dose mammography, for treatment planning for cancer patients, and for imaging and accurate densitometry of skeletal structures and brain and spinal neoplasms. The presentation will be illustrated with clinical cases under study. Discussion will include the potential of heavy-ion imaging, and particularly reconstruction tomography, as an adjunct to existing diagnostic imaging procedures in medicine, both for the applications to the diagnosis, management and treatment of clinical cancer in man, but also for the early detection of small soft tissue tumors at low radiation dose.

  4. High energy heavy ions: techniques and applications

    SciTech Connect

    Alonso, J.R.

    1985-04-01

    Pioneering work at the Bevalac has given significant insight into the field of relativistic heavy ions, both in the development of techniques for acceleration and delivery of these beams as well as in many novel areas of applications. This paper will outline our experiences at the Bevalac; ion sources, low velocity acceleration, matching to the synchrotron booster, and beam delivery. Applications discussed will include the observation of new effects in central nuclear collisions, production of beams of exotic short-lived (down to 1 ..mu..sec) isotopes through peripheral nuclear collisions, atomic physics with hydrogen-like uranium ions, effects of heavy ''cosmic rays'' on satellite equipment, and an ongoing cancer radiotherapy program with heavy ions. 39 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  5. Viscous photons in relativistic heavy ion collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dion, Maxime; Paquet, Jean-François; Schenke, Björn; Young, Clint; Jeon, Sangyong; Gale, Charles

    2011-12-01

    Theoretical studies of the production of real thermal photons in relativistic heavy ion collisions at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) are performed. The space-time evolution of the colliding system is modelled using music, a 3+1D relativistic hydrodynamic simulation, using both its ideal and viscous versions. The inclusive spectrum and its azimuthal angular anisotropy are studied separately, and the relative contributions of the different photon sources are highlighted. It is shown that the photon v2 coefficient is especially sensitive to the details of the microscopic dynamics like the equation of state, the ratio of shear viscosity over entropy density, η/s, and to the morphology of the initial state.

  6. Design status of heavy ion injector program

    SciTech Connect

    Ballard, E.O.; Meyer, E.A.; Rutkowski, H.L.; Shurter, R.P.; Van Haaften, F.W.; Riepe, K.B.

    1985-01-01

    Design and development of a sixteen beam, heavy ion injector is in progress at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) to demonstrate the injector technology for the High Temperature Experiment (HTE) proposed by Lawrence Livermore Laboratory (LBL). The injector design provides for individual ion sources mounted to a support plate defining the sixteen beam array. The beamlets are electrostatically accelerated through a series of electrodes inside an evacuated (10/sup -7/ torr) high voltage (HV) accelerating column.

  7. Design status of heavy ion injector program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ballard, E. O.; Meyer, E. A.; Rutkowski, H. L.; Shurter, R. P.; Vanhaaften, F. W.; Riepe, K. B.

    1985-05-01

    Design and development of a sixteen beam, heavy ion injector is in progress at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) to demonstrate the injector technology for the High Temperature Experiment (HTE) proposed by Lawrence Livermore Laboratory (LBL). The injector design provides for individual ion sources mounted to a support plate defining the sixteen beam array. The beamlets are electrostatically accelerated through a series of electrodes inside an evacuate 10 to the minus 7th power torr high voltage (HV) accelerating column.

  8. Heavy Ion Fusion Systems Assessment study

    SciTech Connect

    Dudziak, D.J.; Herrmannsfeldt, W.B.

    1986-07-01

    The Heavy Ion Fusion Systems Assessment (HIFSA) study was conducted with the specific objective of evaluating the prospects of using induction linac drivers to generate economical electrical power from inertial confinement fusion. The study used algorithmic models of representative components of a fusion system to identify favored areas in the multidimensional parameter space. The resulting cost-of-electricity (COE) projections are comparable to those from other (magnetic) fusion scenarios, at a plant size of 100 MWe.

  9. Femtoscopy in Relativistic Heavy Ion Collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Lisa, M; Pratt, S; Soltz, R A; Wiedemann, U

    2005-07-29

    Analyses of two-particle correlations have provided the chief means for determining spatio-temporal characteristics of relativistic heavy ion collisions. We discuss the theoretical formalism behind these studies and the experimental methods used in carrying them out. Recent results from RHIC are put into context in a systematic review of correlation measurements performed over the past two decades. The current understanding of these results are discussed in terms of model comparisons and overall trends.

  10. Holifield Heavy Ion Research Facility: Users handbook

    SciTech Connect

    Auble, R.L.

    1987-01-01

    The primary objective of this handbook is to provide information for those who plan to carry out research programs at the Holifield Heavy Ion Research Facility (HHIRF) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The accelerator systems and experimental apparatus available are described. The mechanism for obtaining accelerator time and the responsibilities of those users who are granted accelerator time are described. The names and phone numbers of ORNL personnel to call for information about specific areas are given. (LEW)

  11. Heavy ion fusion 2 MV injector

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, S.; Eylon, S.; Henestroza, E.

    1995-04-01

    A heavy-ion-fusion driver-scale injector has been constructed and operated at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory. The injector has produced 2.3 MV and 950 mA of K{sup +}, 15% above original design goals in energy and current. Normalized edge emittance of less than 1 {pi} mm-mr was measured over a broad range of parameters. The head-to-tail energy flatness is less than {+-} 0.2% over the 1 {micro}s pulse.

  12. Medium energy heavy ion operations at RHIC

    SciTech Connect

    Drees, K.A.; Ahrens, L.; Bai, M.; Beebe-Wang, J.; Blackler, I.M.C.; Blaskiewicz, M.; Brown, K.A.; Brennan, M.; Bruno, D.; Butler, J.; Carlson, C.; Connolly, R.; D'Ottavio, T.; Fischer, W.; Fu, W.; Gassner, D.; Harvey, M.; Hayes, T.; Huang, H.; Hulsart, R.; Ingrassia, P.; Kling, N.; Lafky, M.; Laster, J.; Lee, R.C.; Litvinenko, V.; Luo, Y.; MacKay, W.W.; Marr, G.; Mapes. M.; Marusic, A.; Mernick, K.; Michnoff, R.; Minty, M.; Montag, C.; Morris, J.; Naylor, C.; Nemesure, S.; Pilat, F.; Ptitsyn, V.; Robert-Demolaize, G.; Roser, T.; Sampson, P.; Satogata, T.; Schoefer, V.; Schultheiss, C.; Severino, F.; Shrey, T.; Smith, K.S.; Tepikian, S.; Thieberger, P.; Trbojevic, D.; Tsoupas, N.; Tuozzolo, J.; van Kuik, B.; Wilinski, M.; Zaltsman, A.; Zeno, K.; Zhang, S.Y.

    2011-03-28

    As part of the search for a phase transition or critical point on the QCD phase diagram, an energy scan including 5 different energy settings was performed during the 2010 RHIC heavy ion run. While the top beam energy for heavy ions is at 100 GeV/n and the lowest achieved energy setpoint was significantly below RHICs injection energy of approximately 10 GeV/n, we also provided beams for data taking in a medium energy range above injection energy and below top beam energy. This paper reviews RHIC experience and challenges for RHIC medium energy operations that produced full experimental data sets at beam energies of 31.2 GeV/n and 19.5 GeV/n. The medium energy AuAu run covered two beam energies, both above the RHIC injection energy of 9.8 GeV but well below the standard store energy of 100 GeV (see table 1). The low energy and full energy runs with heavy ions in FY10 are summarized in [1] and [2]. Stochastic Cooling ([3]) was only used for 100 GeV beams and not used in the medium energy run. The efficiency of the transition from 100 GeV operation to 31.2 GeV and then to 19.5 GeV was remarkable. Setup took 32 h and 19 h respectively for the two energy settings. The time in store, defined to be the percentage of time RHIC provides beams in physics conditions versus calendar time, was approximately 52% for the entire FY10 heavy ion run. In both medium energy runs it was well above this average, 68% for 31.5 GeV and 82% for 19.5 GeV. For both energies RHIC was filled with 111 bunches with 1.2 10{sup 9} and 1.3 10{sup 9} ions per bunch respectively.

  13. Hyperons polarization in heavy-ion collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baznat, Mircea; Gudima, Konstantin; Sorin, Alexander; Teryaev, Oleg

    2017-03-01

    We study the structure of vorticity and hydrodynamic helicity fields in peripheral heavy-ion collisions using the kinetic Quark-Gluon Strings Model. The angular momentum which is a source of P-odd observables is preserved within this model with a good accuracy. We observe the formation of specific toroidal structures of vorticity field. Their existence is mirrored in the polarization of hyperons of the percent order. The observed qualitative energy dependence of polarization was predicted earlier and is quantified now.

  14. Effects of heavy ions on bacteria.

    PubMed

    Atlan, H

    1973-01-01

    Genetically well-known bacteria have been used to study efficiencies of heavy ions for mutation induction. For space experiments a technique of correlation of tracks of particles (in emulsion stacked on and between Petri dishes) with individual mutations, has been designed and checked in balloon flights. No clear cut results could be obtained without previous identification of genetic markers sensitive to irradiation by heavy ions. Accelerator experiments were performed at the Berkeley HILAC for systematic study. The results obtained on a strain of E. coli K12F- requiring threonine, leucine and arginine showed that the cell inactivation kinetics for gamma rays, helium, carbon and oxygen ions were almost identical (LD90 approaches 22krads) while argon was less effective (LD90 approaches 40 krads). Heavy ions up to oxygen were either equally or less efficient than gamma rays for induction of reverse mutations. Discrepancies between these findings and previous data on bacteria, yeast and Neurospora systems are discussed on the basis of radiosensitivity, ploidy, deletions, forward and reverse mutations.

  15. Overview of US heavy ion fusion research

    SciTech Connect

    Logan, B.G.; Bieniosek, F.M.; Celata, C.M.; Henestroza, E.; Kwan,J.W.; Lee, E.P.; Leitner, M.; Roy, P.K.; Seidl, P.A.; Eylon, S.; Vay,J-L.; Waldron, W.L.; Yu, S.S.; Barnard, J.J.; Callahan, D.A.; Cohen,R.H.; Friedman, A.; Grote, D.P; Covo, Kireeff M.; Meier, W.R.; Molvik,A.W.; Lund, S.M.; Davidson, R.C.; Efthimion, P.C.; Gilson, E.P.; Grisham,L.R.; Kaganovich, I.D.; Qin, H.; Startsev, E.A.; Rose, D.V.; Welch, D.R.; Olson, C.L.; Kishek, R.A.; O'Shea, P.; Haber, I.; Prost, L.R.; Prost, L.

    2004-11-01

    Significant experimental and theoretical progress has been made in the U.S. heavy ion fusion program on high-current sources, injectors, transport, final focusing, chambers and targets for high energy density physics (HEDP) and inertial fusion energy (IFE) driven by induction linac accelerators. One focus of present research is the beam physics associated with quadrupole focusing of intense, space-charge dominated heavy-ion beams, including gas and electron cloud effects at high currents, and the study of long-distance-propagation effects such as emittance growth due to field errors in scaled experiments. A second area of emphasis in present research is the introduction of background plasma to neutralize the space charge of intense heavy ion beams and assist in focusing the beams to a small spot size. In the near future, research will continue in the above areas, and a new area of emphasis will be to explore the physics of neutralized beam compression and focusing to high intensities required to heat targets to high energy density conditions as well as for inertial fusion energy.

  16. Overview of US heavy ion fusion research

    SciTech Connect

    Logan, B.G.; Bieniosek, F.M.; Celata, C.M.; Henestroza, E.; Kwan,J.W.; Lee, E.P.; Leitner, M.; Roy, P.K.; Seidl, P.A.; Eylon, S.; Vay,J-L.; Waldron, W.L.; Yu, S.S.; Barnard, J.J.; Callahan, D.A.; Cohen,R.H.; Friedman, A.; Grote, D.P.; Kireeff Covo, M.; Meier, W.R.; Molvik,A.W.; Lund, S.M.; Davidson, R.C.; Efthimion, P.C.; Gilson, E.P.; Grisham,L.R.; Kaganovich, I.D.; Qin, H.; Startsev, E.A.; Rose, D.V.; Welch, D.R.; Olson, C.L.; Kishek, R.A.; O'Shea, P.; Haber, I.; Prost, L.R.

    2005-06-23

    Significant experimental and theoretical progress has been made in the U.S. heavy ion fusion program on high-current sources, injectors, transport, final focusing, chambers and targets for high energy density physics (HEDP) and inertial fusion energy (IFE) driven by induction linac accelerators. One focus of present research is the beam physics associated with quadrupole focusing of intense, space-charge dominated heavy-ion beams, including gas and electron cloud effects at high currents, and the study of long-distance-propagation effects such as emittance growth due to field errors in scaled experiments. A second area of emphasis in present research is the introduction of background plasma to neutralize the space charge of intense heavy ion beams and assist in focusing the beams to a small spot size. In the near future, research will continue in the above areas, and a new area of emphasis will be to explore the physics of neutralized beam compression and focusing to high intensities required to heat targets to high energy density conditions as well as for inertial fusion energy.

  17. Heavy ion driven LMF design concept. Revised

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, E.P.

    1995-07-01

    From 1988 to 1991, the US Department of Energy conducted a study of the requirements, designs and costs for a Laboratory Microfusion Facility (LMF). The primary purpose of the LMF would be testing of weapons physics and effects simulation using the output from microexplosions of inertial fusion targets. It does not need a high repetition rate, efficient driver system as required by an electrical generating plant; however there would be so many features in common that the design, construction and operation of an LMF would considerably advance the application of inertial confinement fusion to energy production. The DOE study concentrated particularly on the LMF driver, with design and component development undertaken at several national laboratories. Heavy Ions, although considered a possible LMF driver, did not receive attention until the final stages of this study since its program management was through the Office of Energy Research rather than Defense Programs. However, during preparation of the summary report for the study it was decided that an account of heavy ions was needed for a complete survey of the driver candidates. The conceptual heavy ion LMF driver design created for the DOE report did not receive the level of scrutiny of the other driver concepts and, unlike the others, no cost analysis by an independent contractor was performed.

  18. Two components in charged particle production in heavy-ion collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bylinkin, A. A.; Chernyavskaya, N. S.; Rostovtsev, A. A.

    2016-02-01

    Transverse momentum spectra of charged particle production in heavy-ion collisions are considered in terms of a recently introduced Two Component parameterization combining exponential (;soft;) and power-law (;hard;) functional forms. The charged hadron densities calculated separately for them are plotted versus number of participating nucleons, Npart. The obtained dependences are discussed and the possible link between the two component parameterization introduced by the authors and the two component model historically used for the case of heavy-ion collisions is established. Next, the variations of the parameters of the introduced approach with the center of mass energy and centrality are studied using the available data from RHIC and LHC experiments. The spectra shapes are found to show universal dependences on Npart for all investigated collision energies.

  19. Nuclear cluster structure effect on elliptic and triangular flows in heavy-ion collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, S.; Ma, Y. G.; Chen, J. H.; He, W. B.; Zhong, C.

    2017-06-01

    The initial geometry effect on collective flows, which are inherited from initial projectile structure, is studied in relativistic heavy-ion collisions of 12C+197Au by using a multiphase transport model (AMPT). Elliptic flow (v2) and triangular flow (v3) which are significantly resulted from the chain and triangle structure of 12C with three-α clusters, respectively, in central 12C+197Au collisions are compared with the flow from the Woods-Saxon distribution of nucleons in 12C. v3/v2 is proposed as a probe to distinguish the pattern of α -clustered 12C. This study demonstrates that the initial geometry of the collision zone inherited from nuclear structure can be explored by collective flow at the final stage in heavy-ion collisions.

  20. Generation of heavy ion beams using high-intensity short pulse lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrov, George; McGuffey, Chris; Thomas, Alec; Krushelnick, Karl; Beg, Farhat

    2016-10-01

    A theoretical study of ion acceleration from high-Z material irradiated by intense sub-picosecond lasers is presented. The underlying physics of beam formation and acceleration is similar for light and heavy ions, however, nuances of the acceleration process make the heavy ions more challenging. At least four technical hurdles have been identified: low charge-to-mass ratio, limited number of ions amenable to acceleration, delayed acceleration and poor energy coupling due to high reflectivity of the plasma. Using two dimensional particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations, we observed transitions from Radiation Pressure Acceleration (RPA) to the Breakout Afterburner regime (BoA) and to Target Normal Sheath Acceleration (TNSA) akin to light ions. The numerical simulations predict gold ions beams with high directionality (<10 degrees half-angle), high fluxes (>1011 ions/sr) and energy (>10 MeV/nucleon) from laser systems delivering >20 J of energy on target.

  1. Heavy-ion effects: from track structure to DNA and chromosome damage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ballarini, F.; Alloni, D.; Facoetti, A.; Ottolenghi, A.

    2008-07-01

    The use of carbon ions for the treatment of certain tumour types, especially radioresistant tumours, is becoming more frequent due to the carbon-ion dose localization and high relative biological effectiveness (RBE) in the Bragg peak region. Human beings can also be exposed to heavy ions in space, since galactic cosmic rays are a mixed field consisting of not only high-energy protons and He ions, but also heavier ions including iron. Due to their high linear energy transfer (LET), heavy ions have peculiar track structures, characterized by a high level of energy deposition clustering. Furthermore, high-energy ions produce energetic secondary electrons ('delta rays') which can give rise to energy depositions several micrometres away from the core of the primary particle track. Also in view of hadron therapy and space radiation applications, it is therefore important to characterize heavy-ion tracks from a physical and biophysical point of view. In this framework, herein we will discuss the main physical features of heavy-ion track structure, as well as heavy-ion-induced DNA double-strand breaks, which are regarded as one of the most important initial radiobiological lesions and chromosome aberrations, which are correlated both with cell death and with cell conversion to malignancy.

  2. Heavy-ion induced genetic changes and evolution processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, C. H.; Craise, L. M.; Durante, M.; Mei, M.

    1994-01-01

    On Moon and Mars, there will be more galactic cosmic rays and higher radiation doses than on Earth. Our experimental studies showed that heavy ion radiation can effectively cause mutation and chromosome aberrations and that high Linear Energy Transfer (LET) heavy-ion induced mutants can be irreversible. Chromosome translocations and deletions are common in cells irradiated by heavy particles, and ionizing radiations are effective in causing hyperploidy. The importance of the genetic changes in the evolution of life is an interesting question. Through evolution, there is an increase of DNA content in cells from lower forms of life to higher organisms. The DNA content, however, reached a plateau in vertebrates. By increasing DNA content, there can be an increase of information in the cell. For a given DNA content, the quality of information can be changed by rearranging the DNA. Because radiation can cause hyperploidy, an increase of DNA content in cells, and can induce DNA rearrangement, it is likely that the evolution of life on Mars will be effected by its radiation environment. A simple analysis shows that the radiation level on Mars may cause a mutation frequency comparable to that of the spontaneous mutation rate on Earth. To the extent that mutation plays a role in adaptation, radiation alone on Mars may thus provide sufficient mutation for the evolution of life.

  3. Heavy-ion induced genetic changes and evolution processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, C. H.; Craise, L. M.; Durante, M.; Mei, M.

    1994-01-01

    On Moon and Mars, there will be more galactic cosmic rays and higher radiation doses than on Earth. Our experimental studies showed that heavy ion radiation can effectively cause mutation and chromosome aberrations and that high Linear Energy Transfer (LET) heavy-ion induced mutants can be irreversible. Chromosome translocations and deletions are common in cells irradiated by heavy particles, and ionizing radiations are effective in causing hyperploidy. The importance of the genetic changes in the evolution of life is an interesting question. Through evolution, there is an increase of DNA content in cells from lower forms of life to higher organisms. The DNA content, however, reached a plateau in vertebrates. By increasing DNA content, there can be an increase of information in the cell. For a given DNA content, the quality of information can be changed by rearranging the DNA. Because radiation can cause hyperploidy, an increase of DNA content in cells, and can induce DNA rearrangement, it is likely that the evolution of life on Mars will be effected by its radiation environment. A simple analysis shows that the radiation level on Mars may cause a mutation frequency comparable to that of the spontaneous mutation rate on Earth. To the extent that mutation plays a role in adaptation, radiation alone on Mars may thus provide sufficient mutation for the evolution of life.

  4. Centrality dependence of strangeness enhancement in ultrarelativistic heavy ion collisions: A core-corona effect

    SciTech Connect

    Aichelin, J.; Werner, K.

    2009-06-15

    In ultrarelativistic heavy ion collisions, the multiplicity of multistrange baryons per participating nucleon increases with centrality in a different fashion for different systems and energies. At RHIC, for copper+copper (CuCu) collisions the increase is much steeper than for gold-gold (AuAu) collisions. We show that this system size dependence is due to a core-corona effect: the relative importance of the corona as compared to the core (thermalized matter) contribution varies and the contribution of a corona nucleon to the multiplicity differs from that of a core nucleon. {phi} mesons follow--as all hadrons--the same trend, but the difference between core and corona multiplicity is relatively small, and therefore the CuCu and AuAu results are quite similar. This simple geometrical explanation makes also a strong case in favor of the validity of Glauber geometry in the peripheral regions of ultrarelativistic heavy ion collisions, which is crucial for understanding the early evolution of the system.

  5. Studies of Heavy-Ion Reactions and Transuranic Nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Schroeder, W. Udo

    2016-07-28

    Studies of heavy-ion reactions and transuranic nuclei performed by the University of Rochester Nuclear Science Research Group have been successful in furthering experimental systematics and theoretical understanding of the behavior of nuclear systems excited to their limits of stability. The theoretical results explain specifically the “boiling” and “vaporization” of atomic nuclei, but are more generally applicable to isolated, quantal many-particle systems which, under thermal or mechanical stresses, all disintegrate by evaporation, via surface cluster emission, or via fission-like processes. Accompanying experimental investigations by the group have demonstrated several new types of dynamical instability of nuclei: In central, “head-on” collisions, target nuclei exhibit limited ability to stop energetic projectile nuclei and to dissipate the imparted linear momentum. Substantial matter overlap (“neck”) between projectile and target nuclei, which is observed at elevated collision energies, can be stretched considerably and break at several places simultaneously. These results provide new testing grounds for microscopic theory of the cohesion of nuclear matter. This property has remained elusive, even though the elementary nucleon-nucleon forces are well known since some time. Technical R&D has resulted in a detailed characterization of a novel plastic material, which can now be used in the design of sensitive diagnostic systems for various types of radio-activity. Innovative application of powerful laser systems has produced intense, controllable sources of exotic particle radioactivity for nuclear investigations. Several students have received their Ph.D. degree in experimental nuclear science for their work on basic nuclear research or R&D projects.

  6. Genetic effects on heavy ions in drosophila

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kale, P. G.

    1986-01-01

    Drosophila sex-linked recessive lethal mutation test was used to study the dose response relation and relative biological effectiveness of heavy ions. The experiments were performed using the heavy ion beams at BEVALAC of Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory. These experiments were undertaken according to the proposed milestones and included Ne-20, A-40 and Fe-65 ions with respective energies of 600 MeV, 840 MeV and 850 MeV. At these energies several doses of these radiations ranging from 20 to 1280 R were used. Space radiation exposure to astronauts is supposed to be quite low and therefore very low dose experiments i.e., 20 R, were also performed for the three ions. The mutation response was measured in all germ cell types i.e., spermatozoa, spermatids, spermatocytes and spermatogonia of treated Drosophila males. A linear dose frequency relation was observed for most of the range except at high doses where the saturation effect was observed. Also, a very significant difference was observed among the sensitivity of the four germ cell stages where spermatozoa and spermatids were more sensitive. At the higher doses of this range, most of the spermatogonia and spermatocytes were killed. Although comparative and identical experiments with X-rays or neutrons have not been performed, the compassion of our data with the ones available in literature suggest that the heavy ions have a high rbe and that they are several times more effective than low LET X-rays. The rbe compared to neutrons however appears to be only slightly higher.

  7. Properties of the suprathermal heavy ion population near 1 AU during solar cycles 23 and 24

    SciTech Connect

    Dayeh, Maher A. Ebert, Robert W.; Desai, Mihir I.; Mason, Glenn M.

    2016-03-25

    Using measurements from the Advanced Composition Explorer/Ultra-Low Energy Isotope Spectrometer (ACE/ULEIS) near 1 AU, we surveyed the composition and spectra of heavy ions (He-through-Fe) during interplanetary quiet times from 1998 January 1 to 2014 December 31 at suprathermal energies between ∼0.11 and ∼1.28 MeV nucleon{sup −1}. The selected time period covers the maxima of solar cycles 23 and 24 and the extended solar minimum in between. We find the following: (1) The number of quiet-hours in each year correlates well with the sunspot number, year 2009 was the quietest for about 90% of the time; (2) The composition of the quiet-time suprathermal heavy ion population ({sup 3}He, C-through-O, and Fe) correlates well with the level of solar activity, exhibiting SEP-like composition signatures during solar maximum, and CIR- or solar wind-like composition during solar minimum; (3) The heavy ion spectra at ∼0.11-0.32 MeV nucleon{sup −1} exhibit suprathermal tails with power-law spectral indices ranging from 1.4 to 2.7. (4) Fe spectral indices get softer (steeper) from solar minimum of cycle 23 to solar cycle 24 maximum. These results imply that during IP quiet times and at energies above ∼0.1 MeV nucleon{sup −1}, the IP medium is dominated by material from prior solar and interplanetary events.

  8. Track Structure in DNA Irradiated with Heavy Ions

    SciTech Connect

    Bowman, Michael K.; Becker, David; Sevilla, Michael D.; Zimbrick, John D.

    2005-04-01

    The spatial properties of trapped radicals produced in heavy ion-irradiated solid DNA at 77 K have been probed using pulsed Electron Paramagnetic Double Resonance (PELDOR or DEER) techniques. Salmon testes DNA hydrated to twelve water molecules per nucleotide was irradiated with 40Ar ions of energy 100 MeV/nucleon and LET ranging from 300 to 400 keV/?. Irradiated samples were maintained at cryogenic temperature at all times. PELDOR measurements were made using a refocused echo detection sequence that allows dipolar interaction between trapped radicals to be observed. The EPR spectrum is attributed to electron loss/gain DNA base radicals and neutral carbon-centered radicals that likely arise from sugar damage. We find a radical concentration of 13.5*1018 cm-3 in the tracks and a track radius of 6.79 nm. The cross section of these tracks is 144 nm2 yielding a lineal radical density of 2.6 radicals/nm. Based upon the yields previously determined for particles having calculated LET values of 300-400 keV/mm and our measured lineal density, we obtain an LET of 270 keV/mm, which is in good agreement with the calculated range of values. These measurements of radical density and spatial extent provide the first direct experimental determination of track characteristics in irradiated DNA.

  9. Large amounts of antiproton production by heavy ion collision

    SciTech Connect

    Takahashi, Hiroshi; Powell, J.

    1987-01-01

    To produce large amounts of antiprotons, on the order of several grams/year, use of machines to produce nuclear collisions are studied. These can be of either proton-proton, proton-nucleus and nucleus-nucleus in nature. To achieve high luminosity colliding beams, on the order of 10/sup 41/ m/cm/sup 2/, a self-colliding machine is required, rather than a conventional circular colliding type. The self-colliding machine can produce additional antiprotons through successive collisions of secondary particles, such as spectator nucleons. A key problem is how to collect the produced antiprotons without capture by beam nuclei in the collision zone. Production costs for anti-matter are projected for various energy source options and technology levels. Dedicated facilities using heavy ion collisions could produce antiproton at substantially less than 1 million $/milligram. With co-production of other valuable products, e.g., nuclear fuel for power reactors, antiproton costs could be reduced to even lower values.

  10. Physics with relativistic heavy ions: QGP and other delicacies

    SciTech Connect

    Young, G.R.

    1995-02-01

    Conditions favorable to formation and observation of a deconfined state of quarks and gluons (often called the quark-gluon plasma) are thought to exist following the collision of very heavy nuclei at center-of-mass energies exceeding several tens of GeV/nucleon. The Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider under construction at BNL since 1991 is designed to provide such collisions at energies up to {radical}s/A = 200 GeV. Two large dedicated experiments are being built to operate there; these two experiments take rather different approaches to the problem of classifying such collisions and probing for signals of QGP formation. Two smaller experiments are proposed to focus on specific aspects of these collisions. Recent developments in the understanding of the initial state formed in such collisions include, particularly, the possible rapid equilibration of the gluon density, leading in an equilibrium picture to such high temperatures that sizable thermal excitation of charm becomes probable. Recent theoretical conjectures have focussed on the possible formation of a disordered chiral condensate following chiral symmetry restoration in heavy-nucleus collisions, which might be a consequence of nonequilibrium deexcitation of a dense partonic state.

  11. Vorticity in heavy-ion collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Wei-Tian; Huang, Xu-Guang

    2016-06-01

    We study the event-by-event generation of flow vorticity in the BNL Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider Au +Au collisions and CERN Large Hadron Collider Pb +Pb collisions by using the hijing model. Different definitions of the vorticity field and velocity field are considered. A variety of properties of the vorticity are explored, including the impact parameter dependence, the collision energy dependence, the spatial distribution, the event-by-event fluctuation of the magnitude and azimuthal direction, and the time evolution. In addition, the spatial distribution of the flow helicity is also studied.

  12. Jet reconstruction in heavy ion collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cacciari, Matteo; Rojo, Juan; Salam, Gavin P.; Soyez, Gregory

    2011-01-01

    We examine the problem of jet reconstruction at heavy-ion colliders using jet-area-based background subtraction tools as provided by FastJet. We use Monte Carlo simulations with and without quenching to study the performance of several jet algorithms, including the option of filtering, under conditions corresponding to RHIC and LHC collisions. We find that most standard algorithms perform well, though the anti- k t and filtered Cambridge/Aachen algorithms have clear advantages in terms of the reconstructed p t offset and dispersion.

  13. Progress in understanding heavy-ion stopping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sigmund, P.; Schinner, A.

    2016-09-01

    We report some highlights of our work with heavy-ion stopping in the energy range where Bethe stopping theory breaks down. Main tools are our binary stopping theory (PASS code), the reciprocity principle, and Paul's data base. Comparisons are made between PASS and three alternative theoretical schemes (CasP, HISTOP and SLPA). In addition to equilibrium stopping we discuss frozen-charge stopping, deviations from linear velocity dependence below the Bragg peak, application of the reciprocity principle in low-velocity stopping, modeling of equilibrium charges, and the significance of the so-called effective charge.

  14. Faster Heavy Ion Transport for HZETRN

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slaba, Tony C.

    2013-01-01

    The deterministic particle transport code HZETRN was developed to enable fast and accurate space radiation transport through materials. As more complex transport solutions are implemented for neutrons, light ions (Z < 2), mesons, and leptons, it is important to maintain overall computational efficiency. In this work, the heavy ion (Z > 2) transport algorithm in HZETRN is reviewed, and a simple modification is shown to provide an approximate 5x decrease in execution time for galactic cosmic ray transport. Convergence tests and other comparisons are carried out to verify that numerical accuracy is maintained in the new algorithm.

  15. Non abelian hydrodynamics and heavy ion collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Calzetta, E.

    2014-01-14

    The goal of the relativistic heavy ion collisions (RHIC) program is to create a state of matter where color degrees of freedom are deconfined. The dynamics of matter in this state, in spite of the complexities of quantum chromodynamics, is largely determined by the conservation laws of energy momentum and color currents. Therefore it is possible to describe its main features in hydrodynamic terms, the very short color neutralization time notwithstanding. In this lecture we shall give a simple derivation of the hydrodynamics of a color charged fluid, by generalizing the usual derivation of hydrodynamics from kinetic theory to the non abelian case.

  16. Pair creation in heavy ion channeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belov, N. A.; Harman, Z.

    2016-04-01

    Heavy ions channeled through crystals with multi-GeV kinetic energies can create electron-positron pairs. In the framework of the ion, the energy of virtual photons arising from the periodic crystal potential may exceed the threshold 2mec2. The repeated periodic collisions with the crystal ions yield high pair production rates. When the virtual photon frequency matches a nuclear transition in the ion, the production rate can be resonantly increased. In this two-step excitation-pair conversion scheme, the excitation rates are coherently enhanced, and scale approximately quadratically with the number of crystal sites along the channel.

  17. Nonrelativistic theory of heavy-ion collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Bertsch, G.

    1984-07-17

    A wide range of phenomena is observed in heavy-ion collisions, calling for a comprehensive theory based on fundamental principles of many-particle quantum mechanics. At low energies, the nuclear dynamics is controlled by the mean field, as we know from spectroscopic nuclear physics. We therefore expect the comprehensive theory of collisions to contain mean-field theory at low energies. The mean-field theory is the subject of the first lectures in this chapter. This theory can be studied quantum mechanically, in which form it is called TDHF (time-dependent Hartree-Fock), or classically, where the equation is called the Vlasov equation. 25 references, 14 figures.

  18. Economic aspects of heavy ion fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Herrmannsfeldt, W.B.

    1984-01-01

    The usual parameter space for examining scenarios for heavy ion fusion power plants has generally been based on large, slow cycling, reactor chambers which are only marginally different from chambers proposed for laser drivers. This paper will examine the economic implications of assuming that an inexpensive, low gain pellet is available and that a suitable high-repetition rate reactor has been devised. Interesting scenarios are found that generate economically feasible power from a system with a minimum net capacity of approx. 1 GWe compared to the larger approx. 4 GWe required in previous studies.

  19. High-energy accelerator for beams of heavy ions

    DOEpatents

    Martin, Ronald L.; Arnold, Richard C.

    1978-01-01

    An apparatus for accelerating heavy ions to high energies and directing the accelerated ions at a target comprises a source of singly ionized heavy ions of an element or compound of greater than 100 atomic mass units, means for accelerating the heavy ions, a storage ring for accumulating the accelerated heavy ions and switching means for switching the heavy ions from the storage ring to strike a target substantially simultaneously from a plurality of directions. In a particular embodiment the heavy ion that is accelerated is singly ionized hydrogen iodide. After acceleration, if the beam is of molecular ions, the ions are dissociated to leave an accelerated singly ionized atomic ion in a beam. Extraction of the beam may be accomplished by stripping all the electrons from the atomic ion to switch the beam from the storage ring by bending it in magnetic field of the storage ring.

  20. LEICA - A low energy ion composition analyzer for the study of solar and magnetospheric heavy ions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mason, Glenn M.; Hamilton, Douglas C.; Walpole, Peter H.; Heuerman, Karl F.; James, Tommy L.; Lennard, Michael H.; Mazur, Joseph E.

    1993-01-01

    The SAMPEX LEICA instrument is designed to measure about 0.5-5 MeV/nucleon solar and magnetospheric ions over the range from He to Ni. The instrument is a time-of-flight mass spectrometer which measures particle time-of-flight over an about 0.5 m path, and the residual energy deposited in an array of Si solid state detectors. Large area microchannel plates are used, resulting in a large geometrical factor for the instrument (0.6 sq cm sr) which is essential for accurate compositional measurements in small solar flares, and in studies of precipitating magnetospheric heavy ions.

  1. An evaluation of energy-independent heavy ion transport coefficient approximations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Townsend, L. W.; Wilson, J. W.

    1988-01-01

    Utilizing a one-dimensional transport theory for heavy ion propagation, evaluations of typical energy-dependent transport coefficient approximations are made by comparing theoretical depth-dose predictions to published experimental values for incident 670 MeV/nucleon Ne-20 beams in water. Results are presented for cases where the input nuclear absorption cross sections, or input fragmentation parameters, or both, are fixed. The lack of fragment charge and mass concentration resulting from the use of Silberberg-Tsao fragmentation parameters continues to be the main source of disagreement between theory and experiment.

  2. A heavy ion spectrometer system for the measurement of projectile fragmentation of relativistic heavy ions

    SciTech Connect

    Engelage, J.; Crawford, H.J.; Greiner, L.; Kuo, C.

    1996-06-01

    The Heavy Ion Spectrometer System (HISS) at the LBL Bevalac provided a unique facility for measuring projectile fragmentation cross sections important in deconvolving the Galactic Cosmic Ray (GCR) source composition. The general characteristics of the apparatus specific to this application are described and the main features of the event reconstruction and analysis used in the TRANSPORT experiment are discussed.

  3. Multiplicity and theremalization time in heavy-ions collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aref'eva, Irina

    2016-10-01

    We present a concise review of quark-gluon plasma formation in heavy-ions collisions within the holographic approach. In particular, we discuss how to get the total multiplicity in heavy ions collision to fit the recent experimental data. We also discuss theoretical estimations of time formation of QGP in heavy ions collision and show that different observables can give the different times of QGP formation.

  4. Local brain heavy ion irradiation induced Immunosuppression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lei, Runhong; Deng, Yulin; Huiyang Zhu, Bitlife.; Zhao, Tuo; Wang, Hailong; Yu, Yingqi; Ma, Hong; Wang, Xiao; Zhuang, Fengyuan; Qing, Hong

    Purpose: To investigate the long term effect of acute local brain heavy ion irradiation on the peripheral immune system in rat model. Methodology: Only the brain of adult male Wistar rats were radiated by heavy ions at the dose of 15 Gy. One, two and three months after irradiation, thymus and spleen were analyzed by four ways. Tunel assay was performed to evaluate the percentage of apoptotic cells in thymus and spleen, level of Inflammatory cytokines (IL-2, IL-6, SSAO, and TNF-α) was detected by ELISA assay, the differentiation of thymus T lymphocyte subsets were measured by flow cytometry and the relative expression levels of genes related to thymus immune cell development were measured by using quantitative real-time PCR. Results: Thymus and spleen showed significant atrophy from one month to three months after irradiation. A high level of apoptosis in thymus and spleen were obtained and the latter was more vulnerable, also, high level of inflammatory cytokines were found. Genes (c-kit, Rag1, Rag2 and Sca1) related to thymus lymphocytes’ development were down-regulated. Conclusion: Local area radiation in the rat brain would cause the immunosuppression, especially, the losing of cell-mediated immune functions. In this model, radiation caused inflammation and then induced apoptosis of cells in the immune organs, which contributed to immunosuppression.

  5. The Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider at Brookhaven

    SciTech Connect

    Hahn, H.

    1988-01-01

    The conceptual design of a Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RACK) to be constructed in the existing 3.8 km tunnel at Brookhaven has been developed. The collider has been designed to provide collisions of gold ions at six intersection points with a luminosity of about 5 /times/ 10/sup 26/cm/sup /minus/2/sec/sup /minus/1/ at an energy of 100 GeV/u in each beam. Collisions with different ion species, including protons, will be possible. The collider consists of two interlaced, but otherwise separate, superconducting magnet rings. The 9.7 m long dipoles will operate at 3.5 T. Their 8 cm aperture was determined by the dimensions of gold ion beams taking into account diffusion due to intrabeam scattering. Heavy ion beams will be available from the Tandem Van de Graaff/Booster/AGS complex. The salient design features and the reasons for major design choices of the proposed machine are discussed in this paper. 24 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs.

  6. Hydrodynamic approaches in relativistic heavy ion reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Derradi de Souza, R.; Koide, T.; Kodama, T.

    2016-01-01

    We review several facets of the hydrodynamic description of the relativistic heavy ion collisions, starting from the historical motivation to the present understandings of the observed collective aspects of experimental data, especially those of the most recent RHIC and LHC results. In this report, we particularly focus on the conceptual questions and the physical foundations of the validity of the hydrodynamic approach itself. We also discuss recent efforts to clarify some of the points in this direction, such as the various forms of derivations of relativistic hydrodynamics together with the limitations intrinsic to the traditional approaches, variational approaches, known analytic solutions for special cases, and several new theoretical developments. Throughout this review, we stress the role of course-graining procedure in the hydrodynamic description and discuss its relation to the physical observables through the analysis of a hydrodynamic mapping of a microscopic transport model. Several questions to be answered to clarify the physics of collective phenomena in the relativistic heavy ion collisions are pointed out.

  7. Chamber transport for heavy ion fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olson, Craig L.

    2014-01-01

    A brief review is given of research on chamber transport for HIF (heavy ion fusion) dating from the first HIF Workshop in 1976 to the present. Chamber transport modes are categorized into ballistic transport modes and channel-like modes. Four major HIF reactor studies are summarized (HIBALL-II, HYLIFE-II, Prometheus-H, OSIRIS), with emphasis on the chamber transport environment. In general, many beams are used to provide the required symmetry and to permit focusing to the required small spots. Target parameters are then discussed, with a summary of the individual heavy ion beam parameters required for HIF. The beam parameters are then classified as to their line charge density and perveance, with special emphasis on the perveance limits for radial space charge spreading, for the space charge limiting current, and for the magnetic (Alfven) limiting current. The major experiments on ballistic transport (SFFE, Sabre beamlets, GAMBLE II, NTX, NDCX) are summarized, with specific reference to the axial electron trapping limit for charge neutralization. The major experiments on channel-like transport (GAMBLE II channel, GAMBLE II self-pinch, LBNL channels, GSI channels) are discussed. The status of current research on HIF chamber transport is summarized, and the value of future NDCX-II transport experiments for the future of HIF is noted.

  8. Heavy ion fragmentation experiments at the bevatron

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heckman, H. H.

    1976-01-01

    Collaborative research efforts to study the fragmentation processes of heavy nuclei in matter using heavy ion beams of the Bevatron/Bevalac are described. The goal of the program is to obtain the single particle inclusive spectra of secondary nuclei produced at 0 deg by the fragmentation of heavy ion beam projectiles. The process being examined is B+T yields F + anything, where B is the beam nucleus, T is the target nucleus, and F is the detected fragment. The fragments F are isotopically identified by experimental procedures involving magnetic analysis, energy loss and time-of-flight measurements. Effects were also made to: (a) study processes of heavy nuclei in matter, (b) measure the total and partial production cross section for all isotopes, (c) test the applicability of high energy multiparticle interaction theory to nuclear fragmentation, (d) apply the cross section data and fragmentation probabilities to cosmic ray transport theory, and (e) search for systematic behavior of fragment production as a means to improve existing semi-empirical theories of cross-sections.

  9. Induction accelerator development for heavy ion fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Reginato, L.L.

    1993-05-01

    For approximately a decade, the Heavy Ion Fusion Accelerator Research (HIFAR) group at LBL has been exploring the use of induction accelerators with multiple beams as the driver for inertial fusion targets. Scaled experiments have investigated the transport of space charge dominated beams (SBTE), and the current amplification and transverse emittance control in induction linacs (MBE-4) with very encouraging results. In order to study many of the beam manipulations required by a driver and to further develop economically competitive technology, a proposal has been made in partnership with LLNL to build a 10 MeV accelerator and to conduct a series of experiments collectively called the Induction Linac System Experiments (ILSE). The major components critical to the ILSE accelerator are currently under development. We have constructed a full scale induction module and we have tested a number of amorphous magnetic materials developed by Allied Signal to establish an overall optimal design. The electric and magnetic quadrupoles critical to the transport and focusing of heavy ion beams are also under development The hardware is intended to be economically competitive for a driver without sacrificing any of the physics or performance requirements. This paper will concentrate on the recent developments and tests of the major components required by the ILSE accelerator.

  10. Mutagenic effects of heavy ions in bacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krasavin, E. A.; Kozubek, S.; Amirtayev, K. G.; Tokarova, B.; Bonev, M.

    The peculiarities and mechanisms of the mutagenic action of γ-rays and heavy ions on bacterial cells have been investigated. Direct mutations in the lac-operon of E. coli in wild type cells and repair deficient strains have been detected. Furthermore, the induction of revertants in Salmonella tester strains was measured. It was found that the mutation rate was a linear-quadratic function of dose in the case of both γ-rays and heavy ions with LET up to 200 keV/μm. The relative biological effectiveness (RBE) increased with LET up to 20 keV/μm. Low mutation rates were observed in repair deficient mutants with a block of SOS-induction. The induction of SOS-repair by ionizing radiation has been investigated by means of the ``SOS-chromotest'' and λ-prophage induction. It was shown that the intensity of the SOS-induction in E. coli increased with increasing LET up to 40-60 keV/μm.

  11. The Compact Muon Solenoid Heavy Ion program

    SciTech Connect

    Dr. Pablo Yepes

    2005-12-15

    The Pb-Pb center of mass energy at the LHC will exceed that of Au-Au collisions at RHIC (Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider) by nearly a factor of 30, providing exciting opportunities for addressing unique physics issues in a completely new energy domain. The interest of the Heavy Ion (HI) Physics at LHC is discussed in more detail in the LHC-USA white paper and the Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) Heavy Ion proposal. A few highlights are presented in this document. Heavy ion collisions at LHC energies will explore regions of energy and particle density significantly beyond those reachable at RHIC. The energy density of the thermalized matter created at the LHC is estimated to be 20 times higher than at RHIC, implying an initial temperature, which is greater than at RHIC by more than a factor of two. The higher density of produced partons also allows a faster thermalization. As a consequence, the ratio of the quark-gluon plasma lifetime to the thermalization time increases by a factor of 10 over RHIC. Thus the hot, dense systems created in HI collisions at the LHC spend most of the time in a purely partonic state. The longer lifetime of the quark-gluon plasma state widens significantly the time window available to probe it experimentally. RHIC experiments have reported evidence for jet production in HI collisions and for suppression of high p{sub T} particle production. Those results open a new field of exploration of hot and dense nuclear matter. Even though RHIC has already broken ground, the production rates for jets with p{sub T} > 30 GeV are several orders of magnitude larger at the LHC than at RHIC, allowing for systematic studies with high statistics in a clean kinematic region. High p{sub T} quark and gluon jets can be used to study the hot hadronic medium produced in HI interactions. The larger Q{sup 2} causes jets to materialize very soon after the collision. They are thus embedded in and propagate through the dense environment as it forms and evolves. Through

  12. Exposure to Heavy Ion Radiation Induces Persistent Oxidative Stress in Mouse Intestine

    PubMed Central

    Datta, Kamal; Suman, Shubhankar; Kallakury, Bhaskar V. S.; Fornace, Albert J.

    2012-01-01

    Ionizing radiation-induced oxidative stress is attributed to generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) due to radiolysis of water molecules and is short lived. Persistent oxidative stress has also been observed after radiation exposure and is implicated in the late effects of radiation. The goal of this study was to determine if long-term oxidative stress in freshly isolated mouse intestinal epithelial cells (IEC) is dependent on radiation quality at a dose relevant to fractionated radiotherapy. Mice (C57BL/6J; 6 to 8 weeks; female) were irradiated with 2 Gy of γ-rays, a low-linear energy transfer (LET) radiation, and intestinal tissues and IEC were collected 1 year after radiation exposure. Intracellular ROS, mitochondrial function, and antioxidant activity in IEC were studied by flow cytometry and biochemical assays. Oxidative DNA damage, cell death, and mitogenic activity in IEC were assessed by immunohistochemistry. Effects of γ radiation were compared to 56Fe radiation (iso-toxic dose: 1.6 Gy; energy: 1000 MeV/nucleon; LET: 148 keV/µm), we used as representative of high-LET radiation, since it's one of the important sources of high Z and high energy (HZE) radiation in cosmic rays. Radiation quality affected the level of persistent oxidative stress with higher elevation of intracellular ROS and mitochondrial superoxide in high-LET 56Fe radiation compared to unirradiated controls and γ radiation. NADPH oxidase activity, mitochondrial membrane damage, and loss of mitochondrial membrane potential were greater in 56Fe-irradiated mice. Compared to γ radiation oxidative DNA damage was higher, cell death ratio was unchanged, and mitotic activity was increased after 56Fe radiation. Taken together our results indicate that long-term functional dysregulation of mitochondria and increased NADPH oxidase activity are major contributing factors towards heavy ion radiation-induced persistent oxidative stress in IEC with potential for neoplastic transformation. PMID

  13. Tests of Multi-Nucleon Transfer Models Using Gamma-Ray Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCaleb, Kyle; Yanez, Ricardo; Loveland, Walter; OSU-ANL-BNL-ANU-UMd Collaboration

    2016-09-01

    It has been suggested that multi-nucleon transfer (MNT) reactions can be effective tools in synthesizing N=126 and n-rich heavy nuclei. We are engaged in a program to measure the yields of projectile-like fragments (PLFs) and target-like fragments (TLFs) in the interaction of 450 MeV 136Xe with 208Pb, 860 MeV 136Xe with 198Pt, and 1360 and 1700 MeV 204Hg with 208Pb. The use of in-beam, out of beam and post irradiation γ-ray spectroscopy using Gammasphere and single Ge detectors. We compare our results to the predictions of Zagrebaev and Greiner and semi-classical models such as GRAZING-F. We find the predictions of the GRAZING-F model represent, at best, the yields of the ΔZ = +/- 0,1,2 products while the Z-G predictions do a much better job of representing the yields of the large transfers. This work was supported, in part, by the Director, Office of Energy Research, Division of Nuclear Physics of the Office of High Energy and Nuclear Physics of the U.S. Department of Energy under Grant DE-SC0014380 and the National Science Foundation.

  14. Molecular dynamics simulations of ion range profiles for heavy ions in light targets

    SciTech Connect

    Lan, Chune; Xue, Jianming; Zhang, Yanwen; Morris, James R.; Zhu, Zihua; Gao, Yuan; Wang, Yugang; Yan, Sha; Weber, William J.

    2012-09-01

    The determination of stopping powers for slow heavy ions in targets containing light elements is important to accurately describe ion-solid interactions, evaluate ion irradiation effects and predict ion ranges for device fabrication and nuclear applications. Recently, discrepancies of up to 40% between the experimental results and SRIM (Stopping and Range of Ions in Matter) predictions of ion ranges for heavy ions with medium and low energies (<25 keV/nucleon) in light elemental targets have been reported. The longer experimental ion ranges indicate that the stopping powers used in the SRIM code are overestimated. Here, a molecular dynamics simulation scheme is developed to calculate the ion ranges of heavy ions in light elemental targets. Electronic stopping powers generated from both a reciprocity approach and the SRIM code are used to investigate the influence of electronic stopping on ion range profiles. The ion range profiles for Au and Pb ions in SiC and Er ions in Si, with energies between 20 and 5250 keV, are simulated. The simulation results show that the depth profiles of implanted ions are deeper and in better agreement with the experiments when using the electronic stopping power values derived from the reciprocity approach. These results indicate that the origin of the discrepancy in ion ranges between experimental results and SRIM predictions in the low energy region may be an overestimation of the electronic stopping powers used in SRIM.

  15. Molecular dynamics simulations of ion range profiles for heavy ions in light targets

    SciTech Connect

    Lan, Chune; Xue, Jianming; Zhang, Yanwen; Morris, James R; Zhu, Zihua; Gao, Yuan; Wang, Yugang; Yan, Sha; Weber, William J

    2012-01-01

    The determination of stopping powers for slow heavy ions in targets containing light elements is important to accurately describe ion-solid interactions, evaluate ion irradiation effects and predict ion ranges for device fabrication and nuclear applications. Recently, discrepancies of up to 40% between the experimental results and SRIM (Stopping and Range of Ions in Matter) predictions of ion ranges for heavy ions with medium and low energies (< {approx} 25 keV/nucleon) in light elemental targets have been reported. The longer experimental ion ranges indicate that the stopping powers used in the SRIM code are overestimated. Here, a molecular dynamics simulation scheme is developed to calculate the ion ranges of heavy ions in light elemental targets. Electronic stopping powers generated from both a reciprocity approach and the SRIM code are used to investigate the influence of electronic stopping on ion range profiles. The ion range profiles for Au and Pb ions in SiC and Er ions in Si, with energies between 20 and 5250 keV, are simulated. The simulation results show that the depth profiles of implanted ions are deeper and in better agreement with the experiments when using the electronic stopping power values derived from the reciprocity approach. These results indicate that the origin of the discrepancy in ion ranges between experimental results and SRIM predictions in the low energy region may be an overestimation of the electronic stopping powers used in SRIM.

  16. Event Generators for Simulating Heavy Ion Interactions of Interest in Evaluating Risks in Human Spaceflight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, Thomas L.; Pinsky, Lawrence; Andersen, Victor; Empl, Anton; Lee, Kerry; Smirmov, Georgi; Zapp, Neal; Ferrari, Alfredo; Tsoulou, Katerina; Roesler, Stefan; Vlachoudis, Vasilis

    2005-01-01

    Simulating the Space Radiation environment with Monte Carlo Codes, such as FLUKA, requires the ability to model the interactions of heavy ions as they penetrate spacecraft and crew member's bodies. Monte-Carlo-type transport codes use total interaction cross sections to determine probabilistically when a particular type of interaction has occurred. Then, at that point, a distinct event generator is employed to determine separately the results of that interaction. The space radiation environment contains a full spectrum of radiation types, including relativistic nuclei, which are the most important component for the evaluation of crew doses. Interactions between incident protons with target nuclei in the spacecraft materials and crew member's bodies are well understood. However, the situation is substantially less comfortable for incident heavier nuclei (heavy ions). We have been engaged in developing several related heavy ion interaction models based on a Quantum Molecular Dynamics-type approach for energies up through about 5 GeV per nucleon (GeV/A) as part of a NASA Consortium that includes a parallel program of cross section measurements to guide and verify this code development.

  17. Improved calculation of total cross section for pair production by relativistic heavy ions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eby, P. B.

    1989-01-01

    A calculation of the total cross section for direct electron-positron pair production by heavy ions is described. It combines the use of the Weizsaecker-Williams method for low-energy transfers and existing calculations for high-energy transfers. Higher-order corrections to the total cross section are calculated based on the Weizsaecher-Williams method and existing results for pair production by photons.

  18. Elastic, inelastic, and 1-nucleon transfer channels in the 7Li+120Sn system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kundu, A.; Santra, S.; Pal, A.; Chattopadhyay, D.; Tripathi, R.; Roy, B. J.; Nag, T. N.; Nayak, B. K.; Saxena, A.; Kailas, S.

    2017-03-01

    Background: Simultaneous description of major outgoing channels for a nuclear reaction by coupled-channels calculations using the same set of potential and coupling parameters is one of the difficult tasks to accomplish in nuclear reaction studies. Purpose: To measure the elastic, inelastic, and transfer cross sections for as many channels as possible in 7Li+120Sn system at different beam energies and simultaneously describe them by a single set of model calculations using fresco. Methods: Projectile-like fragments were detected using six sets of Si-detector telescopes to measure the cross sections for elastic, inelastic, and 1-nucleon transfer channels at two beam energies of 28 and 30 MeV. Optical model analysis of elastic data and coupled-reaction-channels (CRC) calculations that include around 30 reaction channels coupled directly to the entrance channel, with respective structural parameters, were performed to understand the measured cross sections. Results: Structure information available in the literature for some of the identified states did not reproduce the present data. Cross sections obtained from CRC calculations using a modified but single set of potential and coupling parameters were able to describe simultaneously the measured data for all the channels at both the measured energies as well as the existing data for elastic and inelastic cross sections at 44 MeV. Conclusions: Non-reproduction of some of the cross sections using the structure information available in the literature which are extracted from reactions involving different projectiles indicates that such measurements are probe dependent. New structural parameters were assigned for such states as well as for several new transfer states whose spectroscopic factors were not known.

  19. Interplay of the emission from thermal and direct sources in relativistic heavy ion collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Bozek, Piotr

    2009-05-15

    The separation of the source created in ultrarelativistic heavy ion collisions into a thermalized dense core and an outer mantle consisting of independent nucleon-nucleon collisions is discussed. Indications for such a two-component picture are found in the transverse mass spectra of kaons, protons, and antiprotons produced in Au-Au collisions at {radical}(s)=200 GeV. Estimates of the sizes of the thermal and direct sources are compared with models separating the interaction zone into a core and a corona. New initial conditions corresponding to the dense core lead to a stronger azimuthal asymmetry of the fireball, and pressure gradients also increase. We find faster transverse hydrodynamic expansion and stronger elliptic flow for the dense core initial conditions.

  20. Heavy-Ion Double-Charge Exchange Study via a 12C(18O,18Ne)12Be Reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takaki, Motonobu; Matsubara, Hiroaki; Uesaka, Tomohiro; Aoi, Nori; Dozono, Masanori; Hashimoto, Takashi; Kawabata, Takahiro; Kawase, Shoichiro; Kisamori, Keiichi; Kubota, Yuki; Lee, Cheng Soo; Lee, Jenny; Maeda, Yukie; Michimasa, Shin'ichiro; Miki, Kenjiro; Ota, Shinsuke; Sasano, Masaki; Shimoura, Susumu; Suzuki, Tomokazu; Takahisa, Keiji; Tang, Tsz Leung; Tamii, Atsushi; Tokieda, Hiroshi; Yako, Kentaro; Yokoyama, Rin; Zenihiro, Juzo

    Heavy-ion double-charge exchange (HIDCX) reactions are a new promising spectroscopic tool for double spin-isospin flips excitation modes by taking an advantage of transferring isospin and/or spin quantum numbers by an amount of two to target nuclei. However, the data on HIDCX reactions is very scarce. A measurement of a (n,p)-type HIDCX reaction, 12C(18O,18Ne)12Be at 80 MeV/nucleon, was performed by employing the high-resolution spectrometer Grand Raiden at Research Center Nuclear Physics, Osaka University. The excitation energy spectrum of 12Be was obtained, and three clear peaks were observed at 0.0, 2.2, and 4.5 MeV, which are corresponding to ground and excited states of 12Be. The angular distributions of the cross sections for these peaks were obtained within the scattering angle range of 0.0°-4.0° in the center of mass system. We found that the angular distributions have characteristic shapes according to their mulpolarities.

  1. Microscopic dynamics simulations of multinucleon transfer in 86Kr+64Ni at 25 MeV/nucleon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Hong; Wang, Ning

    2017-01-01

    Multinucleon transfer in 86Kr+64Ni at an incident energy of 25 MeV/nucleon is for the first time investigated with a microscopic dynamics model: improved quantum molecular dynamics (ImQMD) model. The measured isotope distributions are reasonably well reproduced by using the ImQMD model together with a statistical code (gemini) for describing the secondary decay of fragments. The reaction mechanism is explored with the microscopic dynamics simulations from central to peripheral collisions. In central collisions there exists a strong competition among fusion, deep-inelastic scattering, and multifragmentation at such an incident energy. In semiperipheral collisions, binary scattering together with nucleon transfer is dominant, and the probability of elastic + inelastic scattering events increases rapidly with impact parameter in peripheral collisions and approaches one when b >14 fm. The mass-total kinetic energy distribution in central collisions due to the competition is quite different from those in peripheral collisions and the distribution of total kinetic energy loss for binary events with nucleon transfer is much more broader than those without transfer.

  2. Beam dynamics in heavy ion fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Seidl, P.

    1995-04-01

    A standard design for heavy ion fusion drivers under study in the US is an induction linac with electrostatic focusing at low energy and magnetic focusing at higher energy. The need to focus the intense beam to a few-millimeter size spot at the deuterium-tritium target establishes the emittance budget for the accelerator. Economic and technological considerations favor a larger number of beams in the low-energy, electrostatic-focusing section than in the high-energy, magnetic-focusing section. Combining four beams into a single focusing channel is a viable option, depending on the growth in emittance due to the combining process. Several significant beam dynamics issues that are, or have been, under active study are discussed: large space charge and image forces, beam wall clearances, halos, alignment, longitudinal instability, and bunch length control.

  3. Heavy Ion Reaction Modeling for Hadrontherapy Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Cerutti, F.; Ferrari, A.; Enghardt, W.; Gadioli, E.; Mairani, A.; Parodi, K.; Sommerer, F.

    2007-10-26

    A comprehensive and reliable description of nucleus-nucleus interactions represents a crucial need in different interdisciplinary fields. In particular, hadrontherapy monitoring by means of in-beam positron emission tomography (PET) requires, in addition to measuring, the capability of calculating the activity of {beta}{sup +}-decaying nuclei produced in the irradiated tissue. For this purpose, in view of treatment monitoring at the Heidelberg Ion Therapy (HIT) facility, the transport and interaction Monte Carlo code FLUKA is a promising candidate. It is provided with the description of heavy ion reactions at intermediate and low energies by two specific event generators. In-beam PET experiments performed at GSI for a few beam-target combinations have been simulated and first comparisons between the measured and calculated {beta}{sup +}-activity are available.

  4. Focal-surface detector for heavy ions

    DOEpatents

    Erskine, John R.; Braid, Thomas H.; Stoltzfus, Joseph C.

    1979-01-01

    A detector of the properties of individual charged particles in a beam includes a gridded ionization chamber, a cathode, a plurality of resistive-wire proportional counters, a plurality of anode sections, and means for controlling the composition and pressure of gas in the chamber. Signals generated in response to the passage of charged particles can be processed to identify the energy of the particles, their loss of energy per unit distance in an absorber, and their angle of incidence. In conjunction with a magnetic spectrograph, the signals can be used to identify particles and their state of charge. The detector is especially useful for analyzing beams of heavy ions, defined as ions of atomic mass greater than 10 atomic mass units.

  5. Latchup in CMOS devices from heavy ions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Soliman, K.; Nichols, D. K.

    1983-01-01

    It is noted that complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) microcircuits are inherently latchup prone. The four-layer n-p-n-p structures formed from the parasitic pnp and npn transistors make up a silicon controlled rectifier. If properly biased, this rectifier may be triggered 'ON' by electrical transients, ionizing radiation, or a single heavy ion. This latchup phenomenon might lead to a loss of functionality or device burnout. Results are presented from tests on 19 different device types from six manufacturers which investigate their latchup sensitivity with argon and krypton beams. The parasitic npnp paths are identified in general, and a qualitative rationale is given for latchup susceptibility, along with a latchup cross section for each type of device. Also presented is the correlation between bit-flip sensitivity and latchup susceptibility.

  6. Latchup in CMOS devices from heavy ions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Soliman, K.; Nichols, D. K.

    1983-01-01

    It is noted that complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) microcircuits are inherently latchup prone. The four-layer n-p-n-p structures formed from the parasitic pnp and npn transistors make up a silicon controlled rectifier. If properly biased, this rectifier may be triggered 'ON' by electrical transients, ionizing radiation, or a single heavy ion. This latchup phenomenon might lead to a loss of functionality or device burnout. Results are presented from tests on 19 different device types from six manufacturers which investigate their latchup sensitivity with argon and krypton beams. The parasitic npnp paths are identified in general, and a qualitative rationale is given for latchup susceptibility, along with a latchup cross section for each type of device. Also presented is the correlation between bit-flip sensitivity and latchup susceptibility.

  7. Identifying Multiquark Hadrons from Heavy Ion Collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Cho, Sungtae; Furumoto, Takenori; Yazaki, Koichi; Hyodo, Tetsuo; Jido, Daisuke; Ohnishi, Akira; Ko, Che Ming; Lee, Su Houng; Nielsen, Marina; Sekihara, Takayasu; Yasui, Shigehiro

    2011-05-27

    Identifying hadronic molecular states and/or hadrons with multiquark components either with or without exotic quantum numbers is a long-standing challenge in hadronic physics. We suggest that studying the production of these hadrons in relativistic heavy ion collisions offers a promising resolution to this problem as yields of exotic hadrons are expected to be strongly affected by their structures. Using the coalescence model for hadron production, we find that, compared to the case of a nonexotic hadron with normal quark numbers, the yield of an exotic hadron is typically an order of magnitude smaller when it is a compact multiquark state and a factor of 2 or more larger when it is a loosely bound hadronic molecule. We further find that some of the newly proposed heavy exotic states could be produced and realistically measured in these experiments.

  8. Nuclei at HERA and heavy ion physics

    SciTech Connect

    Gavin, S.; Strikman, M.

    1995-12-31

    Copies of 16 viewgraph sets from a workshop held at Brookhaven National Laboratory, 17-18 November, 1995. Titles of talks: HERA: The Present; HERA: Potential with Nuclei; Review of Hadron-Lepton Nucleus Data; Fermilab E665: results in muon scattering; Interactions of Quarks and Gluons with Nuclear Matter; Rescattering in Nuclear Targets for Photoproduction and DIS; Structure Functions and Nuclear Effect at PHENIX; Probing Spin-Averaged and Spin-Dependent Parton Distributions Using the Solenoidal Tracker at RHIC (STAR); Jet Quenching in eA, pA, AA; Nuclear Gluon Shadowing via Continuum Lepton Pairs; What can we learn from HERA with a colliding heavy ion beam? The limiting curve of leading particles at infinite A; Coherent Production of Vector Mesons off Light Nuclei in DIS; A Model of High Parton Densities in PQCD; Gluon Production for Weizaecker-Williams Field in Nucleus-Nucleus Collisions; Summary Talk.

  9. Ion sources for heavy ion fusion (invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Simon S.; Eylon, S.; Chupp, W.; Henestroza, E.; Lidia, S.; Peters, C.; Reginato, L.; Tauschwitz, A.; Grote, D.; Deadrick, F.

    1996-03-01

    The development of ion sources for heavy ion fusion will be reported with particular emphasis on a recently built 2 MV injector. The new injector is based on an electrostatic quadrupole configuration, and has produced pulsed K+ ions of 950 mA peak from a 6.7 in. curved alumino silicate source. The ion beam has reached 2.3 MV with an energy flatness of ±0.2% over 1 μs. The measured normalized edge emittance of less than 1 π mm mrad is close to the source temperature limit. The design, construction, performance, and comparisons with three-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations will be described.

  10. Cold fission as heavy ion emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poenaru, D. N.; Maruhn, J. A.; Greiner, W.; Ivaşcu, M.; Mazilu, D.; Gherghescu, R.

    1987-09-01

    The last version of the analytical superasymmetric fission model is applied to study cold fission processes. Strong shell effects are present either in one or both fission fragments. A smooth behaviour is observed when the proton or the neutron numbers are changed by four units. Increasing Z and N, in the transuranium region, a sharp transition from asymmetry with a large peak-to-valley ratio to symmetry at Z=100 and/or N=164 is obtained. The transition toward asymmetry at higher Z and N is much smoother. The most probable cold fission light fragments from234U,236U,239Np and240Pu are100Zr,104Mo,106Mo and106Mo, respectively, in good agreement with experimental data. The unified treatment of alpha decay, heavy ion radioactivities and cold fission is illustrated for234U — the first nucleus in which all three groups have been already observed.

  11. Mutagenic effects of heavy ions in bacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horneck, G.; Krasavin, E. A.; Kozubek, S.

    1994-10-01

    Various mutagenic effects by heavy ions were studied in bacteria, irradiated at accelerators in Dubna, Prague, Berkeley or Darmstadt. Endpoints investigated are histidine reversion (B. subtilis, S. typhimurium), azide resistance (B. subtilis), mutation in the lactose operon (E. coli), SOS chromotest (E. coli) and λ-prophage induction (E. coli). It was found that the cross sections of the different endpoints show a similar dependence on energy. For light ions (Z <= 4) the cross section decreases with increasing energy. For ions of Z = 10, it is nearly independent of energy. For heavier ions (Z >= 26) it increases with energy up to a maximum or saturation. The increment becomes steeper with increasing Z. This dependence on energy suggests a ``mutagenic belt'' inside the track that is restricted to an area where the density of departed energy is low enough not to kill the cell, but high enough to induce mutations.

  12. Rapidity dependence in holographic heavy ion collisions

    DOE PAGES

    Wilke van der Schee; Schenke, Bjorn

    2015-12-11

    We present an attempt to closely mimic the initial stage of heavy ion collisions within holography, assuming a decoupling of longitudinal and transverse dynamics in the very early stage. We subsequently evolve the obtained initial state using state-of-the-art hydrodynamic simulations and compare results with experimental data. We present results for charged hadron pseudorapidity spectra and directed and elliptic flow as functions of pseudorapidity for √sNN = 200GeV Au-Au and 2.76TeV Pb-Pb collisions. As a result, the directed flow interestingly turns out to be quite sensitive to the viscosity. The results can explain qualitative features of the collisions, but the rapiditymore » spectra in our current model is narrower than the experimental data.« less

  13. Rapidity dependence in holographic heavy ion collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Wilke van der Schee; Schenke, Bjorn

    2015-12-11

    We present an attempt to closely mimic the initial stage of heavy ion collisions within holography, assuming a decoupling of longitudinal and transverse dynamics in the very early stage. We subsequently evolve the obtained initial state using state-of-the-art hydrodynamic simulations and compare results with experimental data. We present results for charged hadron pseudorapidity spectra and directed and elliptic flow as functions of pseudorapidity for √sNN = 200GeV Au-Au and 2.76TeV Pb-Pb collisions. As a result, the directed flow interestingly turns out to be quite sensitive to the viscosity. The results can explain qualitative features of the collisions, but the rapidity spectra in our current model is narrower than the experimental data.

  14. Superconducting heavy-ion linac at Argonne

    SciTech Connect

    Aron, J.; Benaroya, R.; Bollinger, L.M.; Clifft, B.G.; Johnson, K.W.; Nixon, J.M.; Markovich, P.; Pardo, R.C.; Shepard, K.W.

    1981-01-01

    The design, status, and performance of the first operating superconducting heavy-ion accelerator, a linac used to boost the energies of beams from a 9-MV tandem, is summarized. When completed in 1981, the linac will consist of 24 independently-phased split-ring niobium resonators operating at 97 MHz. This linac is designed to provide 29 MV of acceleration. Because of the modular character of the system, the linac has been operable and useful since mid-1978, when a beam was accelerated through 2 units and the first nuclear-physics experiments were preformed. Now, 16 resonators are in use, and a beam has been accelerated for approx. 6000 h. Resonator performance has been remarkably stable, in spite of vacuum accidents, and the linac as a whole operates reliably without operators in attendance during nights and weekends. The ease and speed with which the beam energy can be changed is proving to be unexpectedly valuable to users.

  15. Mutagenic effect of accelerated heavy ions on bacterial cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boreyko, A. V.; Krasavin, E. A.

    2011-11-01

    The heavy ion accelerators of the Joint Institute for Nuclear Research were used to study the regularities and mechanisms of formation of different types of mutations in prokaryote cells. The induction of direct (lac-, ton B-, col B) mutations for Esherichia coli cells and reverse his- → His+ mutations of Salmonella typhimurium, Bacillus subtilis cells under the action of radiation in a wide range of linear energy transfer (LET) was studied. The regularities of formation of gene and structural (tonB trp-) mutations for Esherichia coli bacteria under the action of accelerated heavy ions were studied. It was demonstrated that the rate of gene mutations as a function of the dose under the action of Γ rays and accelerated heavy ions is described by linear-quadratic functions. For structural mutations, linear "dose-effect" dependences are typical. The quadratic character of mutagenesis dose curves is determined by the "interaction" of two independent "hitting" events in the course of SOS repair of genetic structures. The conclusion made was that gene mutations under the action of accelerated heavy ions are induced by δ electron regions of charged particle tracks. The methods of SOS chromotest, SOS lux test, and λ prophage induction were used to study the regularities of SOS response of cells under the action of radiations in a wide LET range. The following proposition was substantiated: the molecular basis for formation of gene mutations are cluster single-strand DNA breaks, and that for structural mutations, double-strand DNA breaks. It was found out that the LET dependence of the relative biological efficiency of accelerated ions is described by curves with a local maximum. It was demonstrated that the biological efficiency of ionizing radiations with different physical characteristics on cells with different genotype, estimated by the lethal action, induction of gene and deletion mutations, precision excision of transposons, is determined by the specific

  16. Heavy-Ion Fusion Accelerator Research, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-06-01

    The National Energy Strategy calls for a demonstration IFE power plant by the year 2025. The cornerstone of the plan to meet this ambitious goal is research and development for heavy-ion driver technology. A series of successes indicates that the technology being studied by the HIFAR Group -- the induction accelerator -- is a prime candidate for further technology development toward this long-range goal. The HIFAR program addresses the generation of high-power, high-brightness beams of heavy ions; the understanding of the scaling laws that apply in this hitherto little-explored physics regime; and the validation of new, potentially more economical accelerator strategies. Key specific elements to be addressed include: fundamental physical limits of transverse and longitudinal beam quality; development of induction modules for accelerators, along with multiple-beam hardware, at reasonable cost; acceleration of multiple beams, merging of the beams, and amplification of current without significant dilution of beam quality; final bunching, transport, and focusing onto a small target. In 1992, the HIFAR Program was concerned principally with the next step toward a driver: the design of ILSE, the Induction Linac Systems Experiments. ILSE will address most of the remaining beam-control and beam-manipulation issues at partial driver scale. A few parameters -- most importantly, the line charge density and consequently the size of the ILSE beams -- will be at full driver scale. A theory group closely integrated with the experimental groups continues supporting present-day work and looking ahead toward larger experiments and the eventual driver. Highlights of this long-range, driver-oriented research included continued investigations of longitudinal instability and some new insights into scaled experiments with which the authors might examine hard-to-calculate beam-dynamics phenomena.

  17. Bose condensation of nuclei in heavy ion collisions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tripathi, Ram K.; Townsend, Lawrence W.

    1994-01-01

    Using a fully self-consistent quantum statistical model, we demonstrate the possibility of Bose condensation of nuclei in heavy ion collisions. The most favorable conditions of high densities and low temperatures are usually associated with astrophysical processes and may be difficult to achieve in heavy ion collisions. Nonetheless, some suggestions for the possible experimental verification of the existence of this phenomenon are made.

  18. Recent Progress in Isospin Physics with Heavy-Ion Reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Chen Liewen; Ko, Che Ming; Li Baoan

    2008-11-11

    We review recent progress in the determination of the subsaturation density behavior of the nuclear symmetry energy from heavy-ion collisions as well as the theoretical progress in probing the high density behavior of the symmetry energy in heavy-ion reactions induced by future high energy radioactive beams. Implications of these results for the nuclear effective interactions are also discussed.

  19. Induction linac drivers for commercial heavy-ion beam fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Keefe, D.

    1987-11-01

    This paper discusses induction linac drivers necessary to accelerate heavy ions at inertial fusion targets. Topics discussed are: driver configurations, the current-amplifying induction linac, high current beam behavior and emittance growth, new considerations for driver design, the heavy ion fusion systems study, and future studies. 13 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab. (LSP)

  20. Theoretical Concepts for Ultra-Relativistic Heavy Ion Collisions

    SciTech Connect

    McLerran,L.

    2009-07-27

    Various forms of matter may be produced in ultra-relativistic heavy ion collisions. These are the Quark GluonPlasma, the Color Glass Condensate , the Glasma and Quarkyoninc Matter. A novel effect that may beassociated with topological charge fluctuations is the Chiral Magnetic Effect. I explain these concepts andexplain how they may be seen in ultra-relatvistic heavy ion collisions

  1. Laser ion source for low charge heavy ion beams

    SciTech Connect

    Okamura,M.; Pikin, A.; Zajic, V.; Kanesue, T.; Tamura, J.

    2008-08-03

    For heavy ion inertial fusion application, a combination of a laser ion source and direct plasma injection scheme into an RFQ is proposed. The combination might provide more than 100 mA of singly charged heavy ion beam from a single laser shot. A planned feasibility test with moderate current is also discussed.

  2. Heavy ion recoil spectrometry of barium strontium titanate films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stannard, W. B.; Johnston, P. N.; Walker, S. R.; Bubb, I. F.; Scott, J. F.; Cohen, D. D.; Dytlewski, N.; Martin, J. W.

    1995-05-01

    Thin films of barium strontium titanate have been analysed using heavy ion recoil spectrometry with 77 and 98 MeV 127I ions at the new heavy ion recoil facility at ANSTO, Lucas Heights. New calibration procedures have been developed for quantitative analysis. Energy spectra for each of the elements present reveal interdiffusion that was not previously known.

  3. Boltzmann-Langevin transport model for heavy-ion collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Ayik, S. |

    1994-06-01

    Heavy-ion collisions at intermediate energies exhibit catastrophic phenomena which requires descriptions based on stochastic transport models. First, the Boltzmann-Langevin model, which provides an example of such stochastic approaches, is briefly described. Then, a projection method for obtaining numerical solutions of the Boltzmann-Langevin equation is discussed. Finally, some applications of the model to heavy-ion collisions are presented.

  4. Systematic study of neutron-rich rare isotope production in peripheral heavy-ion collisions below the Fermi energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fountas, P. N.; Souliotis, G. A.; Veselsky, M.; Bonasera, A.

    2014-12-01

    Detailed calculations of the yields of projectilelike fragments (with focus on the neutron-rich isotopes) are presented for the interaction of 86Kr (15 MeV/nucleon) with 64Ni, 58Ni, and 124Sn, 112Sn, as well as 86Kr (25 MeV/nucleon) with 124Sn and compared with our recently published experimental data for these reactions. The calculations are based on a two-step approach: the dynamical stage of the collision was described with the microscopic constrained molecular dynamics (CoMD) model, as well as the phenomenological deep-inelastic transfer (DIT) model and its modified (DITm) version. The deexcitation of the hot projectile fragments was performed with the statistical multifragmentation model (SMM) and the binary-decay model gemini, which provided nearly similar results for the neutron-rich products from the reactions studied. An overall good agreement of the calculations with the experimental results, especially for near-projectile isotopes was observed using both the CoMD model and the DITm model for the dynamical stage. The successful description of the production of neutron-rich isotopes with the CoMD model is of particular importance, due to the predictive power of the microscopic approach that essentially does not depend on the reaction dynamics. Our studies to date suggest that peripheral heavy-ion collisions at this energy range (i.e., well above the Coulomb barrier, but below the Fermi energy), if induced by neutron-rich rare-isotope beams of adequate intensity may offer a unique route to access extremely neutron-rich rare isotopes toward the astrophysical r -process path and the presently uncharted neutron drip line.

  5. Preliminary results from the heavy ions in space experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adams, J. H., Jr.; Beahm, L. P.; Tylka, A. J.

    1991-01-01

    The Heavy Ions In Space (HIIS) experiment is intended to provide a deep survey of intensely ionizing particles in low earth orbit. Intensely ionizing particles produce single event effects in microelectronic components and are now recognized as the principal cause of spacecraft anomalies. These particles also make an important contribution to radiation doses. Besides the practical applications, HIIS data will be used to study several important scientific questions. By measuring heavy ions that stop in HIIS, the anomalous component of cosmic rays can be studied, evidence can be searched for of heavy ions trapped in the earth's magnetic field and by comparing HISS data with observations from outside the magnetosphere, the mean ionic charge state can be determined of solar energetic particles. HIIS will also record relativistic ultraheavy galactic cosmic rays. Their elemental composition will be measured from tin to uranium. Results are presented on the elemental resolution for stopping heavy ions and relativistic heavy ions.

  6. Heavy ion radiobiology for hadrontherapy and space radiation protection.

    PubMed

    Durante, Marco

    2004-12-01

    Research in the field of biological effects of heavy charged particles is needed for both heavy-ion therapy (hadrontherapy) and protection from the exposure to galactic cosmic radiation in long-term manned space missions. Although the exposure conditions (e.g. high- vs. low-dose rate) and relevant endpoints (e.g. cell killing vs. neoplastic transformation) are different in the two fields, it is clear that a substantial overlap exists in several research topics. Three such topics are discussed in this short review: individual radiosensitivity, mixed radiation fields, and late stochastic effects of heavy ions. In addition, researchers involved either in experimental studies on space radiation protection or heavy-ion therapy will basically use the same accelerator facilities. It seems to be important that novel accelerator facilities planned (or under construction) for heavy-ion therapy reserve a substantial amount of beamtime to basic studies of heavy-ion radiobiology and its applications in space radiation research.

  7. Heavy-ion-induced sucrose radicals investigated using EPR and UV spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Nakagawa, Kouichi; Karakirova, Yordanka; Yordanov, Nicola D

    2015-05-01

    The potential use of a sucrose dosimeter for estimating both linear energy transfer (LET) and the absorbed dose of heavy ion and X-ray radiation was investigated. The stable free radicals were produced when sucrose was irradiated with heavy ions, such as helium, carbon, silicon and neon ions, and when the X-ray radiation was similar to the obtained electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectra, which were ∼7 mT wide and composed of several hyperfine structures. In addition, the total spin concentration resulting from heavy-ion irradiation increased linearly as the absorbed dose increased, and decreased logarithmically as the LET increased. These empirical relations imply that the LET at a certain dose can be determined from the spin concentration. For sucrose and alanine, both cross-sections following C-ion irradiation with a 50 Gy dose were ∼1.3 × 10(-12) [μm(2)], taking into account the molecular size of the samples. The values of these cross-sections imply that multiple ionizing particles were involved in the production of stable radicals. Furthermore, UV absorbance at 267 nm of an aqueous solution of irradiated sucrose was found to linearly increase with increasing absorbed dose. Therefore, the EPR and UV results suggest that sucrose can be a useful dosimeter for heavy-ion irradiation. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Japan Radiation Research Society and Japanese Society for Radiation Oncology.

  8. Heavy-ion-induced sucrose radicals investigated using EPR and UV spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Nakagawa, Kouichi; Karakirova, Yordanka; Yordanov, Nicola D.

    2015-01-01

    The potential use of a sucrose dosimeter for estimating both linear energy transfer (LET) and the absorbed dose of heavy ion and X-ray radiation was investigated. The stable free radicals were produced when sucrose was irradiated with heavy ions, such as helium, carbon, silicon and neon ions, and when the X-ray radiation was similar to the obtained electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectra, which were ∼7 mT wide and composed of several hyperfine structures. In addition, the total spin concentration resulting from heavy-ion irradiation increased linearly as the absorbed dose increased, and decreased logarithmically as the LET increased. These empirical relations imply that the LET at a certain dose can be determined from the spin concentration. For sucrose and alanine, both cross-sections following C-ion irradiation with a 50 Gy dose were ∼1.3 × 10−12 [μm2], taking into account the molecular size of the samples. The values of these cross-sections imply that multiple ionizing particles were involved in the production of stable radicals. Furthermore, UV absorbance at 267 nm of an aqueous solution of irradiated sucrose was found to linearly increase with increasing absorbed dose. Therefore, the EPR and UV results suggest that sucrose can be a useful dosimeter for heavy-ion irradiation. PMID:25480828

  9. Composition variations of low energy heavy ions during large solar energetic particle events

    SciTech Connect

    Ho, George C. Mason, Glenn M.

    2016-03-25

    The time-intensity profile of large solar energetic particle (SEP) event is well organized by solar longitude as observed at Earth orbit. This is mostly due to different magnetic connection to the shock that is associated with large SEP event propagates from the Sun to the heliosphere. Earlier studies have shown event averaged heavy ion abundance ratios can also vary as a function of solar longitude. It was found that the Fe/O ratio for high energy particle (>10 MeV/nucleon) is higher for those western magnetically well connected events compare to the eastern events as observed at L1 by the Advanced Composition Explorer (ACE) spacecraft. In this paper, we examined the low energy (∼1 MeV/nucleon) heavy ions in 110 isolated SEP events from 2009 to the end of 2014. In addition, the optical and radio signatures for all of our events are identified and when data are available we also located the associated coronal mass ejection (CME) data. Our survey shows a higher Fe/O ratio at events in the well-connected region, while there are no corrections between the event averaged elemental composition with the associated coronal mass ejection speed. This is inconsistent with the higher energy results, but inline with other recent low-energy measurements.

  10. Report on the Oak Ridge workshop on Monte Carlo codes for relativistic heavy-ion collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Awes, T.C.; Sorensen, S.P.

    1988-01-01

    In order to make detailed predictions for the case of purely hadronic matter, several Monte Carlo codes have been developed to describe relativistic nucleus-nucleus collisions. Although these various models build upon models of hadron-hadron interactions and have been fitted to reproduce hadron-hadron collision data, they have rather different pictures of the underlying hadron collision process and of subsequent particle production. Until now, the different Monte Carlo codes have, in general, been compared to different sets of experimental data, according to which results were readily available to the model builder or which Monte Carlo code was readily available to an experimental group. As a result, it has been difficult to draw firm conclusions about whether the observed deviations between experiments and calculations were due to deficiencies in the particular model, experimental discrepancies, or interesting effects beyond a simple superposition of nucleon-nucleon collisions. For this reason, it was decided that it would be productive to have a structured confrontation between the available experimental data and the many models of high-energy nuclear collisions in a manner in which it could be ensured that the computer codes were run correctly and the experimental acceptances were properly taken into account. With this purpose in mind, a Workshop on Monte Carlo Codes for Relativistic Heavy-Ion Collisions was organized at the Joint Institute for Heavy Ion Research at Oak Ridge National Laboratory from September 12--23, 1988. This paper reviews this workshop. 11 refs., 6 figs.

  11. Heavy ion tracks in polycarbonate. Comparison with a heavy ion irradiated model compound (diphenyl carbonate)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferain, E.; Legras, R.

    1993-09-01

    The chemical modifications induced by energetic heavy ion irradiation of polycarbonate (PC) film are determined by GPC, HPLC, ESR, TGA, IR and UV spectrophotometry. The main results of the irradiation are creation of radicals, chain scission, cross-linking and appearance of new chemical groups in the main polymer chain. As far as the creation of new groups is concerned, they are determined by means of a model compound of PC: the diphenyl carbonate (DPC). The following compounds are identified after energetic heavy ion irradiation of DPC: salicylic acid, phenol, 4,4'-biphenol, 2,4'-biphenol, 2,2'-biphenol, 4-phenoxyphenol, 2-phenoxyphenol, phenyl ether, phenyl benzoate, phenyl salicylate, 2-phenylphenol and 2-phenoxyphenyl benzoate. A similarity between the heavy ion irradiation and a heat treatment has also been established with DPC. On the basis of these results, we try to give an explanation of the preferential attack along the tracks of the irradiated film. Also, an explanation of the well-known beneficial effect of an UV exposition of the irradiated film on the selectivity of this preferential chemical attack is suggested.

  12. Study of multi-nucleon transfer reactions in 58, 64Ni + 207Pb collisions at the velocity filter SHIP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Comas, V. F.; Heinz, S.; Hofmann, S.; Ackermann, D.; Heredia, J. A.; Heßberger, F. P.; Khuyagbaatar, J.; Kindler, B.; Lommel, B.; Mann, R.

    2013-09-01

    We investigated multi-nucleon transfer reactions in collisions of 58Ni + 207Pb and 64Ni + 207Pb at Coulomb barrier energies. The new aspect is that we used a velocity filter (SHIP at GSI) for the separation of the heavy target-like transfer products from background events. The isotopic identification was performed via the decay properties of the reaction products. The goal of the experiment was to study the characteristics of multi-nucleon transfer reactions in the region of heavy nuclei and the applicability of existing separation and detection techniques, which are usually used for identification of heavy fusion-evaporation residues, to heavy transfer products. This was motivated by recent theoretical results from macroscopic-microscopic models which suggest deep inelastic transfer reactions in heavy systems as a means to produce new neutron-rich isotopes in the region of N = 126 and in the region of superheavy nuclei. In this paper we present the isotopic yields, the excitation functions and the excitation energies of the heavy transfer products with Z > 82 as well as the influence of shell effects on the reaction products. The influence of the different neutron numbers of the projectiles is also discussed.

  13. Chiral electric field in relativistic heavy-ion collisions at energies available at the BNL Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider and at the CERN Large Hadron Collider

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhong, Yang; Yang, Chun-Bin; Cai, Xu; Feng, Sheng-Qin

    2016-08-01

    It has been proposed that electric fields may lead to chiral separation in quark-gluon plasma (QGP). This is called the chiral electric separation effect. The strong electromagnetic field and the QCD vacuum can both be completely produced in off-central nuclear-nuclear collision. We use the Woods-Saxon nucleon distribution to calculate the electric field distributions of off-central collisions. The chiral electric field spatial distribution at Relativistic Heavy-Ion Collider (RHIC) and Large Hadron Collider (LHC) energy regions are systematically studied in this paper. The dependence of the electric field produced by the thermal quark in the central position with different impact parameters on the proper time with different collision energies in the RHIC and LHC energy regions are studied in this paper. Supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (11375069, 11435054, 11075061, 11221504) and Key Laboratory Foundation of Quark and Lepton Physics (Hua-Zhong Normal University)(QLPL2014P01)

  14. Heavy ion microprobes: a unique tool for bystander research and other radiobiological applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voss, K. O.; Fournier, C.; Taucher-Scholz, G.

    2008-07-01

    The risk assessment for low doses of high linear energy transfer (LET) radiation has been challenged by a growing body of experimental evidence showing that non-irradiated bystander cells can receive signals from irradiated cells to elicit a variety of cellular responses. These may be significant for radiation protection but also for radiation therapy using heavy ions. Charged particle microbeams for radiobiological application provide a unique means to address these issues by allowing the precise irradiation of single cells with a counted numbers of ions. Here, we focus specifically on heavy ion microbeam facilities currently in use for biological purposes, describing their technical features and biological results. Typically, ion species up to argon are used for targeted biological irradiation at the vertically collimated microbeam at JAEA (Takasaki, Japan). At the SNAKE microprobe in Munich, mostly oxygen ions have been used in a horizontal focused beam line for cell targeting. At GSI (Darmstadt), a horizontal microprobe with a focused beam for defined targeting using ion species up to uranium is operational. The visualization of DNA damage response proteins relocalizing to defined sites of ion traversal has been accomplished at the three heavy ion microbeam facilities described above and is used to study mechanistic aspects of heavy ion effects. However, bystander studies have constituted the main focus of biological applications. While for cell inactivation and effects on cell cycle progression a response of non-targeted cells has been described at JAEA and GSI, respectively, in part controversial results have been obtained for the induction of DNA damage measured by double-strand formation or at the cytogenetic level. The results emphasize the influence of the cellular environment, and standardization of experimental conditions for cellular studies at different facilities as well as the investigation of bystander effects in tissue will be the aims of future

  15. The response of tissue-equivalent proportional counters to heavy ions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nikjoo, Hooshang; Khvostunov, Igor K.; Cucinotta, Francis A.

    2002-01-01

    The paper presents a theoretical model for the response of a tissue-equivalent proportional counter (TEPC) irradiated with charged particles. Heavy ions and iron ions in particular constitute a significant part of radiation in space. TEPCs are used for all space shuttle and International Space Station (ISS) missions to estimate the dose and radiation quality (in terms of lineal energy) inside spacecraft. The response of the tissue-equivalent proportional counters shows distortions at the wall/cavity interface. In this paper, we present microdosimetric investigation using Monte Carlo track structure calculations to simulate the response of a TEPC to charged particles of various LET (1 MeV protons, 2.4 MeV alpha particles, 46 MeV/nucleon 20Ne, 55 MeV/nucleon 20Ne, 45 MeV/nucleon 40Ar, and 1.05 GeV/nucleon 56Fe). Data are presented for energy lost and energy absorbed in the counter cavity and wall. The model calculations are in good agreement with the results of Rademacher et al. (Radiat. Res. 149, 387-389, 1998), including the study of the interface between the wall and the sensitive region of the counter. It is shown that the anomalous response observed at large event sizes in the experiment is due to an enhanced entry of secondary electrons from the wall into the gas cavity.

  16. Conducting swift heavy ion track networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fink, D.; Kiv, A.; Fuks, D.; Saad, A.; Vacík, J.; Hnatowicz, V.; Chandra, A.

    2010-03-01

    In this paper, the electronic behavior of conducting swift heavy ion track networks is studied. On the one hand, the transient conductivity of ion tracks in metal oxides on silicon in status nascendi is exploited for this purpose, and on the other hand, conducting tracks are produced by ion irradiation of insulating membranes (either self-supported or deposited onto silicon substrates), subsequent etching and finally inserting conducting materials of whatever provenience (in this work preferentially electrolytes). Depending on their manufacture, the conducting tracks either act as electronically active or passive elements. When applying a voltage across individual tracks in the first case, one observes current spikes with negative differential resistances. These tracks interact among themselves, leading to phase-locked synchronous coupled oscillations with complex patterns that are quite similar to those emerging from neural networks. The other case corresponds to networks of electronically passive conducting tracks which become overall electronically active only through their collective interactions. Though the aforementioned effects had been experimentally described earlier, they are re-visited here to make clear that the corresponding systems have to be considered as being artificial neural networks. On this occasion, some new findings are added.

  17. Inertially confined fusion using heavy ion drivers

    SciTech Connect

    Herrmannsfeldt, W.B. ); Bangerter, R.O. ); Bock, R. ); Hogan, W.J.; Lindl, J.D. )

    1991-10-01

    The various technical issues of HIF will be briefly reviewed in this paper. It will be seen that there are numerous areas in common in all the approaches to HIF. In the recent International Symposium on Heavy Ion Inertial Fusion, the attendees met in specialized workshop sessions to consider the needs for research in each area. Each of the workshop groups considered the key questions of this report: (1) Is this an appropriate time for international collaboration in HIF (2) Which problems are most appropriate for such collaboration (3) Can the sharing of target design information be set aside until other driver and systems issues are better resolved, by which time it might be supposed that there could be a relaxation of classification of target issues (4) What form(s) of collaboration are most appropriate, e.g., bilateral or multilateral (5) Can international collaboration be sensibly attempted without significant increases in funding for HIF The authors of this report share the conviction that collaboration on a broad scale is mandatory for HIF to have the resources, both financial and personnel, to progress to a demonstration experiment. Ultimately it may be possible for a single driver with the energy, power, focusibility, and pulse shape to satisfy the needs of the international community for target physics research. Such a facility could service multiple experimental chambers with a variety of beam geometries and target concepts.

  18. Inertially confined fusion using heavy ion drivers

    SciTech Connect

    Herrmannsfeldt, W.B.; Bangerter, R.O.; Bock, R.; Hogan, W.J.; Lindl, J.D.

    1991-10-01

    The various technical issues of HIF will be briefly reviewed in this paper. It will be seen that there are numerous areas in common in all the approaches to HIF. In the recent International Symposium on Heavy Ion Inertial Fusion, the attendees met in specialized workshop sessions to consider the needs for research in each area. Each of the workshop groups considered the key questions of this report: (1) Is this an appropriate time for international collaboration in HIF? (2) Which problems are most appropriate for such collaboration? (3) Can the sharing of target design information be set aside until other driver and systems issues are better resolved, by which time it might be supposed that there could be a relaxation of classification of target issues? (4) What form(s) of collaboration are most appropriate, e.g., bilateral or multilateral? (5) Can international collaboration be sensibly attempted without significant increases in funding for HIF? The authors of this report share the conviction that collaboration on a broad scale is mandatory for HIF to have the resources, both financial and personnel, to progress to a demonstration experiment. Ultimately it may be possible for a single driver with the energy, power, focusibility, and pulse shape to satisfy the needs of the international community for target physics research. Such a facility could service multiple experimental chambers with a variety of beam geometries and target concepts.

  19. High current injector for heavy ion fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, S.; Eylon, S.; Chupp, W. W.

    1993-05-01

    A 2 MV, 800 mA, K(+) injector for heavy ion fusion studies is under construction. This new injector is a one-beam version of the proposed 4-beam ILSE injector. A new 36-module MARX is being built to achieve a 5 micro-s flat top. The high voltage generator is stiff (less than 5k Omega) to minimize effects of beam-induced transients. A large (approximately 7 in. diameter) curved hot alumina-silicate source emits a 1 micro-s long beam pulse through a gridless extraction electrode, and the ions are accelerated to 1 MV in a diode configuration. Acceleration to 2 MV takes place in a set of electrostatic quadrupole (ESQ) units, arranged to simultaneously focus and accelerate the ion beam. Heavy shields and other protection devices have been built in to minimize risks of high voltage breakdown. Beam aberration effects through the ESQ have been studied extensively with theory, simulations, and scaled experiments. The design, simulations, experiments, and engineering of the ESQ injector will be presented.

  20. New results for ultraperipheral heavy ion collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szczurek, Antoni; Kłusek-Gawenda, Mariola; Lebiedowicz, Piotr; Schäfer, Wolfgang

    2017-03-01

    We discuss diphoton semi(exclusive) production in ultraperipheral PbPb collisions at energy of √{sN N }=5.5 TeV (LHC). The nuclear calculations are based on equivalent photon approximation in the impact parameter space. The cross sections for elementary γγ → γγ subprocess are calculated including three different mechanisms: box diagrams with leptons and quarks in the loops, a VDM-Regge contribution with virtual intermediate hadronic excitations of the photons and the two-gluon exchange contribution (formally three-loops). We got relatively high cross sections in PbPb collisions. This opens a possibility to study the γγ → γγ (quasi)elastic scattering at the LHC. We find that the cross section for elastic γγ scattering could be measured in the lead-lead collisions for the diphoton invariant mass up to Wγγ ≈ 15 - 20 GeV. We identify region(s) of phase space where the two-gluon exchange contribution becomes important ingredient compared to box and nonperturbative VDM-Regge mechanisms. We discuss also first results concerning production of two e+e- pairs in UPCs of heavy ions. We considered only double scattering mechanism.

  1. Design status of heavy ion injector program

    SciTech Connect

    Ballard, E.O.; Meyer, E.A.; Riepe, K.B.; Rutkowski, H.L.; Shurter, R.P.; Van Haaften, F.W.

    1985-10-01

    Design and development of a sixteen beam, heavy ion injector is in progress at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) to demonstrate the injector technology for the High Temperature Experiment (HTE) proposed by Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory. The injector design provides for individual ion sources mounted to a support plate defining the sixteen beam array. The beamlets are electrostatically accelerated through a series of electrodes inside an evacuated (10 X torr) high voltage (HV) accelerating column. The column consists of two 28-inch diameter insulator modules made of 85 percent Al2O3 ceramic rings brazed to niobium feedthrough rings to which the electrodes are mechanically attached. Field shaping is used to minimize electron avalanche induced flashover along the inside surface of the ceramic rings. The column is self-supporting and is cantilevered from one end of the containment vessel. A brazed assembly was chosen to provide the required bond strength and high vacuum capability. The HV pulsed power supply is a 2MV Marx generator cantilevered from the opposite end of the containment vessel. The stainless steel pressure vessel (PV) contains a 65 psig mixture of SF6(30%) and nitrogen (70%) to provide the electrical insulation.

  2. Developments in accelerators for heavy ion fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Keefe, D.

    1985-05-01

    The long term goal of Heavy Ion Fusion (HIF) is the development of an accelerator with the large beam power, large beam stored-energy, and high brightness needed to implode small deuterium-tritium capsules for fusion power. While studies of an rf linac/storage ring combination as an inertial fusion driver continue in Japan and Europe, the US program in recent times has concentrated on the study of the suitability of linear induction acceleration of ions for this purpose. Novel features required include use of multiple beams, beam current amplification in the linac, and manipulation of long beam bunches with a large velocity difference between head and tail. Recent experiments with an intense bright beam of cesium ions have established that much higher currents can be transported in a long quadrupole system than was believed possible a few years ago. A proof-of-principle ion induction linac to demonstrate beam current amplification with multiple beams is at present being fabricated at LBL. 28 refs., 4 figs.

  3. Heavy ion fusion: Prospects and status

    SciTech Connect

    Herrmannsfeldt, W.B.

    1995-10-01

    The main purpose of this talk is to review the status of HIF as it was presented at Princeton, and also to try to deduce something about the prospects for HIF in particular, and fusion in general, from the world and US political scene. The status of the field is largely, though not entirely, expressed through presentations from the two leading HIF efforts: (1) the US program, centered at LBNL and LLNL, is primarily concerned with applying induction linac technology for HIF drivers; (2) the European program, centered at GSI, Darmstadt, but including several other laboratories, is primarily directed towards the rf linac approach using storage rings for energy compression. Several developments in the field of HIF should be noted: (1) progress towards construction of the National Ignition Facility (NIF) gives strength to the whole rational for developing a driver for Inertial Fusion Energy; (2) the field of accelerator science has matured far beyond the status that it had in 1976; (3) Heavy Ion Fusion has passed some more reviews, including one by the Fusion Energy Advisory Committee (FEAC), and has received the usual good marks; (5) as the budgets for Magnetic Fusion have fallen, the pressures on the Office of Fusion energy (OFE) have intensified, and a move is underway to shift the HIF program out of the IFE program and back into the ICF program in the Defense Programs (DP) side of the DOE.

  4. Benchmarking of Neutron Production of Heavy-Ion Transport Codes

    SciTech Connect

    Remec, Igor; Ronningen, Reginald M.; Heilbronn, Lawrence

    2012-01-01

    Accurate prediction of radiation fields generated by heavy ion interactions is important in medical applications, space missions, and in design and operation of rare isotope research facilities. In recent years, several well-established computer codes in widespread use for particle and radiation transport calculations have been equipped with the capability to simulate heavy ion transport and interactions. To assess and validate these capabilities, we performed simulations of a series of benchmark-quality heavy ion experiments with the computer codes FLUKA, MARS15, MCNPX, and PHITS. We focus on the comparisons of secondary neutron production. Results are encouraging; however, further improvements in models and codes and additional benchmarking are required.

  5. Soft errors in 10-nm-scale magnetic tunnel junctions exposed to high-energy heavy-ion radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobayashi, Daisuke; Hirose, Kazuyuki; Makino, Takahiro; Onoda, Shinobu; Ohshima, Takeshi; Ikeda, Shoji; Sato, Hideo; Inocencio Enobio, Eli Christopher; Endoh, Tetsuo; Ohno, Hideo

    2017-08-01

    The influences of various types of high-energy heavy-ion radiation on 10-nm-scale CoFeB-MgO magnetic tunnel junctions with a perpendicular easy axis have been investigated. In addition to possible latent damage, which has already been pointed out in previous studies, high-energy heavy-ion bombardments demonstrated that the magnetic tunnel junctions may exhibit clear flips between their high- and low-resistance states designed for a digital bit 1 or 0. It was also demonstrated that flipped magnetic tunnel junctions still may provide proper memory functions such as read, write, and hold capabilities. These two findings proved that high-energy heavy ions can produce recoverable bit flips in magnetic tunnel junctions, i.e., soft errors. Data analyses suggested that the resistance flips stem from magnetization reversals of the ferromagnetic layers and that each of them is caused by a single strike of heavy ions. It was concurrently found that an ion strike does not always result in a flip, suggesting a stochastic process behind the flip. Experimental data also showed that the flip phenomenon is dependent on the device and heavy-ion characteristics. Among them, the diameter of the device and the linear energy transfer of the heavy ions were revealed as the key parameters. From their dependences, the physical mechanism behind the flip was discussed. It is likely that a 10-nm-scale ferromagnetic disk loses its magnetization due to a local temperature increase induced by a single strike of heavy ions; this demagnetization is followed by a cooling period associated with a possible stochastic recovery process. On the basis of this hypothesis, a simple analytical model was developed, and it was found that the model accounts for the results reasonably well. This model also predicted that magnetic tunnel junctions provide sufficiently high soft-error reliability for use in space, highlighting their advantage over their counterpart conventional semiconductor memories.

  6. Coupled-Channel Effects in Collisions Between Heavy Ions Near the Coulomb Barrier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beck, C.

    With the recent availability of state-of-the-art heavy-ion stable and radioactive beams, there has been a renew interest in the investigation of nuclear reactions with heavy ions. I first present the role of inelastic and transfer channel couplings in fusion reactions induced by stable heavy ions. Analysis of experimental fusion cross sections by using standard coupled-channel calculations is discussed. The role of multi-neutron transfer is investigated in the fusion process below the Coulomb barrier by analyzing ^{32}S+{^{90,96}}{Zr} as benchmark reactions. The enhancement of fusion cross sections for ^{32}S+{^{96}}{Zr} is well reproduced at sub-barrier energies by NTFus code calculations including the coupling of the neutron-transfer channels following the Zagrebaev semi-classical model. Similar effects for ^{40}{Ca}+{^{90}}{Zr} and ^{40}{Ca}+ {^{96}}{Zr} fusion excitation functions are found. The breakup coupling in both the elastic scattering and in the fusion process induced by weakly bound stable projectiles is also shown to be crucial. In this lecture, full coupled-channel calculations of the fusion excitation functions are performed by using the breakup coupling for the more neutron-rich reaction and for the more weakly bound projectiles. I clearly demonstrate that Continuum-Discretized Coupled-Channel calculations are capable to reproduce the fusion enhancement from the breakup coupling in 6{Li}+{^{59}}{Co}.

  7. Nucleon-nucleon interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Wiringa, R.B.

    1996-12-31

    Nucleon-nucleon interactions are at the heart of nuclear physics, bridging the gap between QCD and the effective interactions appropriate for the shell model. We discuss the current status of {ital NN} data sets, partial-wave analyses, and some of the issues that go into the construction of potential models. Our remarks are illustrated by reference to the Argonne {ital v}{sub 18} potential, one of a number of new potentials that fit elastic nucleon-nucleon data up to 350 MeV with a {Chi}{sup 2} per datum near 1. We also discuss the related issues of three-nucleon potentials, two-nucleon charge and current operators, and relativistic effects. We give some examples of calculations that can be made using these realistic descriptions of {ital NN} interactions. We conclude with some remarks on how our empirical knowledge of {ital NN} interactions may help constrain models at the quark level, and hence models of nucleon structure.

  8. Dynamic processes in heavy-ion collisions at intermediate energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prendergast, E. P.

    1999-03-01

    This thesis describes the study of the reaction dynamics in heavy-ion collisions of small nuclear systems at intermediate energies. For this, experiments were performed of 24Mg+27A1 at 45 and 95 AMeV. The experiments described in this thesis were performed at the GANIL accelerator facility in Caeri (France) using the Huygens detectors in conjunction with the ‘MUR’. The Huygens detectors consist of the CsI(Tl)-Wall (CIW) covering the backward hemisphere and, located at mid-rapidity, the central trigger detector (CTD), a gas chamber with microstrip read-out backed by 48 plastic scintillators. The forward region is covered by 16 of the plastic scintillators of the CTD and by the MUR, a time-of-flight wall consisting of 96 plastic scintillator sheets. In earlier experiments only fragments with atomic number, Z, greater then two could be identifled in the CTD. Therefore, an investigation was done into the properties of different drift gases. The use of freon (CF4) in the drift chamber, combined with an increase of the gas pressure to 150 mbar, makes it possible to identify all particles with Z ≥ 2. Under these conditions particles with Z = 1 can only be identifled to approximately 25 AMeV. The Isospin Quantum Molecular Dynamics (IQMD) model has been used, to interpret the measured data. This model gives a microscopical description of heavy-ion collisions and simulates collisions on an event by event basis. In IQMD all protons and neutrons are represented as individual Gaussian wave packets. After initialisation the path of each nucleon is calculated for 200 fm/c, after which the simulation is stopped. At this time, nucleons which are close in space are clustered into fragments. The events generated by IQMD can then be processed by a GEANT detector simulation. This calculation takes into account the effects of the detector on the incoming particles. By using the GEANT simulation it is possible to give a direct comparison between the results of IQMD and the

  9. Statistics at work in heavy-ion reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Moretto, L.G.

    1982-07-01

    In the first part special aspects of the compound nucleus decay are considered. The evaporation of particles intermediate between nucleons and fission fragments is explored both theoretically and experimentally. The limitations of the fission decay width expression obtained with the transition state method are discussed, and a more general approach is proposed. In the second part the process of angular momentum transfer in deep inelastic reactions is considered. The limit of statistical equilibrium is studied and specifically applied to the estimation of the degree of alignment of the fragment spins. The magnitude and alignment of the transferred angular momentum is experimentally determined from sequentially emitted alpha, gamma, and fission fragments.

  10. Positrons from heavy ions: A puzzle for physicists

    SciTech Connect

    Mueller, B.

    1986-10-15

    A review of experimental data and models for positron production in relativistic heavy ion reactions is presented. The mass range of nuclei is A = 180--247 (nuclear charge range is Z1+Z2 = 163--188). (AIP)

  11. Silicon Carbide Power Device Performance Under Heavy-Ion Irradiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lauenstein, Jean-Marie; Casey, Megan; Topper, Alyson; Wilcox, Edward; Phan, Anthony; Ikpe, Stanley; LaBel, Ken

    2015-01-01

    Heavy-ion induced degradation and catastrophic failure data for SiC power MOSFETs and Schottky diodes are examined to provide insight into the challenge of single-event effect hardening of SiC power devices.

  12. Failure Analysis of Heavy-Ion-Irradiated Schottky Diodes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Casey, Megan C.; Lauenstein, Jean-Marie; Wilcox, Edward P.; Topper, Alyson D.; Campola, Michael J.; Label, Kenneth A.

    2017-01-01

    In this work, we use high- and low-magnitude optical microscope images, infrared camera images, and scanning electron microscope images to identify and describe the failure locations in heavy-ion-irradiated Schottky diodes.

  13. Elastic recoil detection analysis on the ANSTO heavy ion microprobe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siegele, R.; Orlic, I.; Cohen, David D.

    2002-05-01

    The heavy ion microprobe at the Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation is capable of focussing heavy ions with an ME/ q2 of up to 100 amu MeV. This makes the microprobe ideally suited for heavy ion elastic recoil detection analysis (ERDA). However, beam currents on a microprobe are usually very small, which requires a detection system with a large solid angle. We apply microbeam heavy ion ERDA using a large solid angle ΔE- E telescope with a gas ΔE detector to layered structures. We demonstrate the capability to measure oxygen and carbon with a lateral resolution of 20 μm, together with determination of the depth of the contamination in thin deposited layers.

  14. Theoretical perspective on RHIC (relativistic heavy ion collider) physics

    SciTech Connect

    Dover, C.B.

    1990-10-01

    We discuss the status of the relativistic heavy ion collider (RHIC) project at Brookhaven, and assess some key experiments which propose to detect the signatures of a transient quark-gluon plasma (QGP) phase in such collisions. 24 refs.

  15. Report of the heavy-ion fusion task group

    SciTech Connect

    Sawyer, G.A.; Booth, L.A.; Henderson, D.B.; Jameson, R.A.; Kindel, J.M.; Knapp, E.A.; Pollock, R.; Talbert, W.L.; Thode, L.E.; Williams, J.M.

    1980-02-01

    An assessment of heavy-ion fusion has been completed. Energetic heavy ions, for example 10-GeV uranium, provided by an rf linac or an induction linac, are used as alternatives to laser light to drive inertial confinement fusion pellets. The assessment has covered accelerator technology, transport of heavy-ion beams, target interaction physics, civilian power issues, and military applications. It is concluded that particle accelerators promise to be efficient pellet drivers, but that there are formidable technical problems to be solved. It is recommended that a moderate level research program on heavy-ion fusion be pursued and that LASL should continue to work on critical issues in accelerator development, beam transport, reactor systems studies, and target physics over the next few years.

  16. Heavy ion radiation exposure triggered higher intestinal tumor frequency and greater β-catenin activation than γ radiation in APC(Min/+) mice.

    PubMed

    Datta, Kamal; Suman, Shubhankar; Kallakury, Bhaskar V S; Fornace, Albert J

    2013-01-01

    Risk of colorectal cancer (CRC) after exposure to low linear energy transfer (low-LET) radiation such as γ-ray is highlighted by the studies in atom bomb survivors. On the contrary, CRC risk prediction after exposure to high-LET cosmic heavy ion radiation exposure is hindered due to scarcity of in vivo data. Therefore, intestinal tumor frequency, size, cluster, and grade were studied in APC(Min/+) mice (n = 20 per group; 6 to 8 wks old; female) 100 to 110 days after exposure to 1.6 or 4 Gy of heavy ion (56)Fe radiation (energy: 1000 MeV/nucleon) and results were compared to γ radiation doses of 2 or 5 Gy, which are equitoxic to 1.6 and 4 Gy (56)Fe respectively. Due to relevance of lower doses to radiotherapy treatment fractions and space exploration, we followed 2 Gy γ and equitoxic 1.6 Gy (56)Fe for comparative analysis of intestinal epithelial cell (IEC) proliferation, differentiation, and β-catenin signaling pathway alterations between the two radiation types using immunoblot, and immunohistochemistry. Relative to controls and γ-ray, intestinal tumor frequency and grade was significantly higher after (56)Fe radiation. Additionally, tumor incidence per unit of radiation (per cGy) was also higher after (56)Fe radiation relative to γ radiation. Staining for phospho-histone H3, indicative of IEC proliferation, was more and alcian blue staining, indicative of IEC differentiation, was less in (56)Fe than γ irradiated samples. Activation of β-catenin was more in (56)Fe-irradiated tumor-free and tumor-bearing areas of the intestinal tissues. When considered along with higher levels of cyclin D1, we infer that relative to γ radiation exposure to (56)Fe radiation induced markedly reduced differentiation, and increased proliferative index in IEC resulting in increased intestinal tumors of larger size and grade due to preferentially greater activation of β-catenin and its downstream effectors.

  17. Skyrme tensor force in heavy ion collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stevenson, P. D.; Suckling, E. B.; Fracasso, S.; Barton, M. C.; Umar, A. S.

    2016-05-01

    Background: It is generally acknowledged that the time-dependent Hartree-Fock (TDHF) method provides a useful foundation for a fully microscopic many-body theory of low-energy heavy ion reactions. The TDHF method is also known in nuclear physics in the small-amplitude domain, where it provides a useful description of collective states, and is based on the mean-field formalism, which has been a relatively successful approximation to the nuclear many-body problem. Currently, the TDHF theory is being widely used in the study of fusion excitation functions, fission, and deep-inelastic scattering of heavy mass systems, while providing a natural foundation for many other studies. Purpose: With the advancement of computational power it is now possible to undertake TDHF calculations without any symmetry assumptions and incorporate the major strides made by the nuclear structure community in improving the energy density functionals used in these calculations. In particular, time-odd and tensor terms in these functionals are naturally present during the dynamical evolution, while being absent or minimally important for most static calculations. The parameters of these terms are determined by the requirement of Galilean invariance or local gauge invariance but their significance for the reaction dynamics have not been fully studied. This work addresses this question with emphasis on the tensor force. Method: The full version of the Skyrme force, including terms arising only from the Skyrme tensor force, is applied to the study of collisions within a completely symmetry-unrestricted TDHF implementation. Results: We examine the effect on upper fusion thresholds with and without the tensor force terms and find an effect on the fusion threshold energy of the order several MeV. Details of the distribution of the energy within terms in the energy density functional are also discussed. Conclusions: Terms in the energy density functional linked to the tensor force can play a non

  18. Heavy-ion collisions at the LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roland, G.; Šafařík, K.; Steinberg, P.

    2014-07-01

    A new era in the study of high-energy nuclear collisions began when the CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC) provided the first collisions of lead nuclei in late 2010. In the first three years of operation the ALICE, ATLAS and CMS experiments each collected Pb-Pb data samples of more than 50 μb at √{sNN}=2.76 TeV, exceeding the previously studied collision energies by more than an order of magnitude. These data have provided new insights into the properties of QCD matter under extreme conditions, with extensive measurements of soft particle production and newly accessible hard probes of the hot and dense medium. In this review, we provide a comprehensive overview of the results obtained in heavy-ion collisions at the LHC so far, with particular emphasis on the complementary nature of the observations by the three experiments. In particular, the combination of ALICE’s strengths at hadron identification, the strengths of ATLAS and CMS to make precise measurements of high pT probes, and the resourceful measurements of collective flow by all of the experiments have provided a rich and diverse dataset in only a few years. While the basic paradigm established at RHIC - that of a hot, dense medium that flows with a viscosity to shear-entropy ratio near the predicted lower bound, and which degrades the energy of probes, such as jets, heavy-flavours and J/ψ - is confirmed at the LHC, the new data suggest many new avenues for extracting its properties in detail.

  19. Heavy ion induced permanent damage in MNOS gate insulators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pickel, J. C.; Blandford, J. T., Jr.; Waskiewicz, A. E.; Strahan, V. H., Jr.

    1985-12-01

    Heavy-ion-induced permanent damage in MNOS gate insulators has been investigated using a Cf252 fission source. The electric field and ion LET thresholds for onset of the damage has been characterized. The results are consistent with a thermal runaway mechanism in the silicon nitride layer initiated by a single heavy ion and leading to a permanent high conductivity path through the dielectric layers.

  20. Engineering systems designs for a recirculating heavy ion induction accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Newton, M.A.; Barnard, J.J.; Reginato, L.L.; Yu, S.S.

    1991-05-01

    Recirculating heavy ion induction accelerators are being investigated as possible drivers for heavy ion fusion. Part of this investigation has included the generation of a conceptual design for a recirculator system. This paper will describe the overall engineering conceptual design of this recirculator, including discussions of the dipole magnet system, the superconducting quadrupole system and the beam acceleration system. Major engineering issues, evaluation of feasibility, and cost tradeoffs of the complete recirculator system will be presented and discussed. 5 refs., 4 figs.

  1. High baryon density from relativistic heavy ion collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Pang, Y.; Kahana, S.H.; Schlagel, T.J. |

    1993-10-01

    A quantitative model, based on hadronic physics, is developed and applied to heavy ion collisions at BNL-AGS energies. This model is in excellent agreement with observed particle spectra in heavy ion collisions using Si beams, where baryon densities of three and four times the normal nuclear matter density ({rho}{sub 0}) are reached. For Au on Au collisions, the authors predict the formation of matter at very high densities (up to 10 {rho}{sub 0}).

  2. HIGH-INTENSITY, HIGH CHARGE-STATE HEAVY ION SOURCES

    SciTech Connect

    ALESSI,J.G.

    2004-08-16

    There are many accelerator applications for high intensity heavy ion sources, with recent needs including dc beams for RIA, and pulsed beams for injection into synchrotrons such as RHIC and LHC. The present status of sources producing high currents of high charge state heavy ions is reviewed. These sources include ECR, EBIS, and Laser ion sources. Benefits and limitations for these type sources are described. Possible future improvements in these sources are also mentioned.

  3. Pion correlations in relativistic heavy ion collisions at Heavy Ion Spectrometer Systems (HISS)

    SciTech Connect

    Christie, W.B. Jr.

    1990-05-01

    This thesis contains the setup, analysis and results of experiment E684H Multi-Pion Correlations in Relativistic Heavy Ion Collisions''. The goals of the original proposal were: (1) To initiate the use of the HISS facility in the study of central Relativistic Heavy Ion Collisions (RHIC). (2) To perform a second generation experiment for the detailed study of the pion source in RHIC. The first generation experiments, implied by the second goal above, refer to pion correlation studies which the Riverside group had performed at the LBL streamer chamber. The major advantage offered by moving the pion correlation studies to HISS is that, being an electronic detector system, as opposed to the Streamer Chamber which is a visual detector, one can greatly increase the statistics for a study of this sort. An additional advantage is that once one has written the necessary detector and physics analysis code to do a particular type of study, the study may be extended to investigate the systematics, with much less effort and in a relatively short time. This paper discusses the Physics motivation for this experiment, the experimental setup and detectors used, the pion correlation analysis, the results, and the conclusions possible future directions for pion studies at HISS. If one is not interested in all the details of the experiment, I believe that by reading the sections on intensity interferometry, the section the fitting of the correlation function and the systematic corrections applied, and the results section, one will get a fairly complete synopsis of the experiment.

  4. Charge exchange processes of high energy heavy ions channeled in crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andriamonje, S.; Chevallier, M.; Cohen, C.; Dural, J.; Genre, R.; Girard, Y.; Groeneveld, K. O.; Kemmler, J.; Kirsch, R.; L'Hoir, A.; Maier, R.; Poizat, J. C.; Quéré, Y.; Remillieux, J.; Schmaus, D.; Toulemonde, M.

    The interaction of moving ions with single crystals is very sensitive to the orientation of the incident beam with respect to the crystalline directions of the target. The experiments show that high energy heavy ion channeling deeply modifies the slowing down and charge exchange processes. In this review, we describe the opportunity offered by channeling conditions to study the charge exchange processes. Some aspects of the charge exchange processes with high energy channeled heavy ions are selected from the extensive literature published over the past few years on this subject. Special attention is given to the work performed at the GANIL facility on the study of Radiative Electron Capture (REC), Electron Impact Ionisation (EII), and convoy electron emission. Finally we emphasize the interest of studying resonant charge exchange processes such as Resonant Coherent Excitation (RCE), Resonant Transfer and Excitation (RTE) or Dielectronic Recombination (DR) and the recently proposed Nuclear Excitation by Electron Capture (NEEC).

  5. Comparing Tsallis and Boltzmann temperatures from relativistic heavy ion collider and large hadron collider heavy-ion data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Y.-Q.; Liu, F.-H.

    2016-03-01

    The transverse momentum spectra of charged particles produced in Au + Au collisions at the relativistic heavy ion collider and in Pb + Pb collisions at the large hadron collider with different centrality intervals are described by the multisource thermal model which is based on different statistic distributions for a singular source. Each source in the present work is described by the Tsallis distribution and the Boltzmann distribution, respectively. Then, the interacting system is described by the (two-component) Tsallis distribution and the (two-component) Boltzmann distribution, respectively. The results calculated by the two distributions are in agreement with the experimental data of the Solenoidal Tracker At Relativistic heavy ion collider, Pioneering High Energy Nuclear Interaction eXperiment, and A Large Ion Collider Experiment Collaborations. The effective temperature parameters extracted from the two distributions on the descriptions of heavy-ion data at the relativistic heavy ion collider and large hadron collider are obtained to show a linear correlation.

  6. Cellular and tissue responses to heavy ions: basic considerations.

    PubMed

    Lett, J T; Cox, A B; Bergtold, D S

    1986-01-01

    Responses of the S/S variant of the L5178Y murine leukemic lymphoblast, the photoreceptor cell of the rabbit retina and the lenticular epithelium of the rabbit to heavy ions (20Ne, 28Si, 40Ar and 56Fe) are described and discussed primarily from the standpoint of the need for a comprehensive theory of cellular radiosensitivity from which a general theory of tissue radiosensitivity can be constructed. The radiation responses of the very radiosensitive, repair-deficient S/S variant during the G1- and early S phases of the cell cycle were found to be unlike those of normally radioresistant cells in culture: the relative biological effectiveness (RBE) did not increase with the linear energy transfer (LET infinity) of the incident radiation. Such behavior could be anticipated for a cell which is lacking the repair system that operates in other (normal) cells when they are exposed to ionizing radiations in the G1 phase of the cell cycle. The S/S variant does exhibit a peak of radioresistance to X-photons mid-G1 + 8 h into the cell cycle, however, and as the LET infinity was increased, the repair capacity responsible for that radioresistance was reduced progressively. Sensory cells (photoreceptors) in the retina of the New Zealand white (NZW) rabbit are very radioresistant to ionizing radiations, and several years elapsed after localized exposure (e.g., 5-10 Gy) to heavy ions (20Ne, 40Ar) before photoreceptor cells were lost from the retina. During the first few weeks after such irradiations, damage to DNA in the photoreceptor cells was repaired to a point where it could not be demonstrated by reorienting gradient sedimentation under alkaline conditions, a technique that can detect DNA damage produced by less than 0.1 Gy of X-photons. Restitution of DNA structure was not permanent, however, and months or years later, but before loss of photoreceptor cells from the retina could be detected, progressive deterioration of the DNA structure began. Age dependencies of late

  7. DNA Repair-Protein Relocalization After Heavy Ion Exposure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Metting, N. F.

    1999-01-01

    Ionizing radiation is good at making DNA double strand breaks, and high linear energy transfer (LET) radiations such as heavy ion particles are particularly efficient. For this reason, the proteins belonging to repair systems that deal with double strand breaks are of particular interest. One such protein is Ku, a component in the non-homologous recombination repair system. The Ku protein is an abundant, heterodimeric DNA end-binding complex, composed of one 70 and one 86 kDa subunit. Ku protein binds to DNA ends, nicks, gaps, and regions of transition between single and double-stranded structure. These binding properties suggest an important role in DNA repair. The Ku antigen is important in this study because it is present in relatively large copy numbers and it is part of a double-strand-break repair system. More importantly, we consistently measure an apparent upregulation in situ that is not verified by whole-cell-lysate immunoblot measurements. This apparent upregulation is triggered by very low doses of radiation, thus showing a potentially useful high sensitivity. However, elucidation of the mechanism underlying this phenomenon is still to be done.

  8. DNA Repair-Protein Relocalization After Heavy Ion Exposure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Metting, N. F.

    1999-01-01

    Ionizing radiation is good at making DNA double strand breaks, and high linear energy transfer (LET) radiations such as heavy ion particles are particularly efficient. For this reason, the proteins belonging to repair systems that deal with double strand breaks are of particular interest. One such protein is Ku, a component in the non-homologous recombination repair system. The Ku protein is an abundant, heterodimeric DNA end-binding complex, composed of one 70 and one 86 kDa subunit. Ku protein binds to DNA ends, nicks, gaps, and regions of transition between single and double-stranded structure. These binding properties suggest an important role in DNA repair. The Ku antigen is important in this study because it is present in relatively large copy numbers and it is part of a double-strand-break repair system. More importantly, we consistently measure an apparent upregulation in situ that is not verified by whole-cell-lysate immunoblot measurements. This apparent upregulation is triggered by very low doses of radiation, thus showing a potentially useful high sensitivity. However, elucidation of the mechanism underlying this phenomenon is still to be done.

  9. Excitation and relaxation of olivine after swift heavy ion impact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorbunov, S. A.; Medvedev, N. A.; Rymzhanov, R. A.; Terekhin, P. N.; Volkov, A. E.

    2014-05-01

    A multiscale model was developed to describe excitation and initial relaxation of an insulator after an impact of a swift heavy ion (SHI) decelerated in the electronic stopping regime. This model consists of a combination of three methods: (a) Monte Carlo simulations of the nonequilibrium kinetics of the electron subsystem of a solid at the femtosecond scale after the projectile passage. The complex dielectric function (CDF) is used to construct the cross sections for the MC model taking into account a collective response of the electron ensemble to excitation. (b) A molecular-kinetic approach describing further spatial spreading of electrons after finishing of ionization cascades up to hundred femtoseconds. And (c) molecular dynamics simulations of a reaction of the lattice on the excess energy transferred from the relaxing electron subsystem at the picosecond time scale. The dynamic structure factor (DSF) formalism is used to calculate the electron-lattice energy exchange in a general way which is valid for sub-picosecond timescales, beyond the phononic approximation of the lattice dynamics. The calculations were performed for 2 GeV Au ion in olivine, demonstrating a heating of the lattice up to 700 K in the nanometric scale picoseconds after the projectile passage.

  10. Actinide Production in the Reaction of Heavy Ions withCurium-248

    SciTech Connect

    Moody, K.J.

    1983-07-01

    Chemical experiments were performed to examine the usefulness of heavy ion transfer reactions in producing new, neutron-rich actinide nuclides. A general quasi-elastic to deep-inelastic mechanism is proposed, and the utility of this method as opposed to other methods (e.g. complete fusion) is discussed. The relative merits of various techniques of actinide target synthesis are discussed. A description is given of a target system designed to remove the large amounts of heat generated by the passage of a heavy ion beam through matter, thereby maximizing the beam intensity which can be safely used in an experiment. Also described is a general separation scheme for the actinide elements from protactinium (Z = 91) to mendelevium (Z = 101), and fast specific procedures for plutonium, americium and berkelium. The cross sections for the production of several nuclides from the bombardment of {sup 248}Cm with {sup 18}O, {sup 86}Kr and {sup 136}Xe projectiles at several energies near and below the Coulomb barrier were determined. The results are compared with yields from {sup 48}Ca and {sup 238}U bombardments of {sup 248}Cm. Simple extrapolation of the product yields into unknown regions of charge and mass indicates that the use of heavy ion transfer reactions to produce new, neutron-rich above-target species is limited. The substantial production of neutron-rich below-target species, however, indicates that with very heavy ions like {sup 136}Xe and {sup 238}U the new species {sup 248}Am, {sup 249}Am and {sup 247}Pu should be produced with large cross sections from a {sup 248}Cm target. A preliminary, unsuccessful attempt to isolate {sup 247}Pu is outlined. The failure is probably due to the half life of the decay, which is calculated to be less than 3 minutes. The absolute gamma ray intensities from {sup 251}Bk decay, necessary for calculating the {sup 251}Bk cross section, are also determined.

  11. Achieving Stable Radiation Pressure Acceleration of Heavy Ions via Successive Electron Replenishment from Ionization of a High-Z Material Coating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, X. F.; Qiao, B.; Chang, H. X.; Kar, S.; Zhou, C. T.; Borghesi, M.; He, X. T.

    2016-10-01

    Generation of monoenergetic heavy ion beams aroused more scientific interest in recent years. Radiation pressure acceleration (RPA) is an ideal mechanism for obtaining high-quality heavy ion beams, in principle. However, to achieve the same energy per nucleon (velocity) as protons, heavy ions undergo much more serious Rayleigh-Taylor-like (RT) instability and afterwards much worse Coulomb explosion due to loss of co-moving electrons. This leads to premature acceleration termination of heavy ions and very low energy attained in experiment. The utilization of a high-Z coating in front of the target may suppress the RT instability and Coulomb explosion by continuously replenishing the accelerating heavy ion foil with co-moving electrons due to its successive ionization under laser fields with Gaussian temporal and spatial profiles. Thus stable RPA can be realized. Two-dimensional and three-dimensional particles-in-cell simulations with dynamic ionization show that a monoenergetic Al13+ beam with peak energy 4.0GeV and particle number 1010 (charge > 20nC) can be obtained at intensity 1022 W/cm2. Supported by the NSF, Nos. 11575298 and 1000-Talents Program of China.

  12. NF-kB activation and its downstream target genes expression after heavy ions exposure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chishti, Arif Ali; Baumstark-Khan, Christa; Hellweg, Christine; Schmitz, Claudia; Koch, Kristina; Feles, Sebastian

    2016-07-01

    To enable long-term human space flight cellular radiation response to densely ionizing radiation needs to be better understood for developing appropriate countermeasures to mitigate acute effects and late radiation risks for the astronaut. The biological effectiveness of accelerated heavy ions (which constitute the most important radiation type in space) with high linear energy transfer (LET) for effecting DNA damage response pathways as a gateway to cell death or survival is of major concern not only for space missions but also for new regimes of tumor radiotherapy. In the current research study, the contribution of NF-κB in response to space-relevant radiation qualities was determined by a NF-κB reporter cell line (HEK-pNF-κB-d2EGFP/Neo L2). The NF-κB dependent reporter gene expression (d2EGFP) after ionizing radiation (X-rays and heavy ions) exposure was evaluated by flow cytometry. Because of differences in the extent of NF-κB activation after X-irradiation and heavy ions exposure, it was expected that radiation quality (LET) might play an important role in the cellular radiation response. In addition, the biological effectiveness (RBE) of NF-κB activation and reduction of cellular survival was examined for heavy ions having a broad range of LET (˜0.3 - 9674 keV/µm). Furthermore, the effect of LET on NF-κB target gene expression was analyzed by real time reverse transcriptase quantitative PCR (RT-qPCR). In this study it was proven that NF-κB activation and NF-κB dependent gene expression comprises an early step in cellular radiation response. Taken together, this study clearly demonstrates that NF-κB activation and NF-κB-dependent gene expression by heavy ions are highest in the LET range of ˜50-200 keV/μupm. The up-regulated chemokines and cytokines (CXCL1, CXCL2, CXCL10, IL-8 and TNF) might be important for cell-cell communication among hit as well as unhit cells (bystander effect). The results obtained suggest the NF-κB pathway to be a

  13. Excitation and photon decay of giant multipole resonances - the role and future of medium-energy heavy ions

    SciTech Connect

    Bertrand, F.E.; Beene, J.R.; Horen, D.J.

    1988-01-01

    Inelastic scattering of medium energy heavy ions provides very large cross sections and peak-to-continuum ratios for excitation of giant resonances. For energies above about 50 MeV/nucleon, giant resonances are excited primarily through Coulomb excitation, which is indifferent to isospin, thus providing a good probe for the study of isovector giant resonances. The extremely large cross sections available from heavy ion excitation permit the study of rare decay modes of the photon decay of giant resonances following excitation by 22 and 84 MeV/nucleon /sup 17/O projectiles. The singles results at 84 MeV/nucleon yield peak cross sections for the isoscalar giant quadrupole resonance and the isovector giant dipole resonance of approximately 0.8 and 3 barns/sr, respectively. Data on the ground state decay of the isoscalar giant quadrupole and isovector giant dipole resonances are presented and compared with calculations. Decays to low-lying excited states are also discussed. Preliminary results from an experiment to isolate the /sup 208/Pb isovector quadrupole resonance using its gamma decay are presented.

  14. Damage profile and ion distribution of slow heavy ions in compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Yanwen; Wang Chongmin; Zhu Zihua; Jiang Weilin; Weber, William J.; Bae, I.-T.; Sun Kai; Ishimaru, Manabu

    2009-05-15

    Slow heavy ions inevitably produce a significant concentration of defects and lattice disorder in solids during their slowing-down process via ion-solid interactions. For irradiation effects research and many industrial applications, atomic defect production, ion range, and doping concentration are commonly estimated by the stopping and range of ions in matter (SRIM) code. In this study, ion-induced damage and projectile ranges of low energy Au ions in SiC are determined using complementary ion beam and microscopy techniques. Considerable errors in both disorder profile and ion range predicted by the SRIM code indicate an overestimation of the electronic stopping power, by a factor of 2 in most cases, in the energy region up to 25 keV/nucleon. Such large discrepancies are also observed for slow heavy ions, including Pt, Au, and Pb ions, in other compound materials, such as GaN, AlN, and SrTiO{sub 3}. Due to the importance of these materials for advanced device and nuclear applications, better electronic stopping cross section predictions, based on a reciprocity principle developed by Sigmund, is suggested with fitting parameters for possible improvement.

  15. Damage Profile and Ion Distribution of Slow Heavy Ions in Compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Yanwen; Bae, In-Tae; Sun, Kai; Wang, Chong M.; Ishimaru, Manabu; Zhu, Zihua; Jiang, Weilin; Weber, William J.

    2009-05-18

    Slow heavy ions inevitably produce a significant concentration of defects and lattice disorder in solids during their slowing-down process via ion-solid interactions. For irradiation effects research and many industrial applications, atomic defect production, ion range and doping concentration are commonly estimated by the Stopping and Range of Ions in Matter (SRIM) code. In this study, ion-induced damage and projectile ranges of low energy Au ions in SiC are determined using complementary ion beam and microscopy techniques. Considerable errors in both disorder profile and ion range predicted by the SRIM code indicate an overestimation of the electronic stopping power, by a factor of 2 in most cases, in the energy region up to 25 keV/nucleon. Such large discrepancies are also observed for slow heavy ions, including Pt, Au and Pb ions, in other functional materials, such as GaN, AlN and SrTiO3. Due to the importance of these materials for advanced device and nuclear applications, better electronic stopping cross section predictions, based on a reciprocity principle developed by Sigmund, is suggested with fitting parameters for possible improvement.

  16. Collision-geometry fluctuations and triangular flow in heavy-ion collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Alver, B.; Roland, G.

    2010-05-15

    We introduce the concepts of participant triangularity and triangular flow in heavy-ion collisions, analogous to the definitions of participant eccentricity and elliptic flow. The participant triangularity characterizes the triangular anisotropy of the initial nuclear overlap geometry and arises from event-by-event fluctuations in the participant-nucleon collision points. In studies using a multiphase transport model (AMPT), a triangular flow signal is observed that is proportional to the participant triangularity and corresponds to a large third Fourier coefficient in two-particle azimuthal correlation functions. Using two-particle azimuthal correlations at large pseudorapidity separations measured by the PHOBOS and STAR experiments, we show that this Fourier component is also present in data. Ratios of the second and third Fourier coefficients in data exhibit similar trends as a function of centrality and transverse momentum as in AMPT calculations. These findings suggest a significant contribution of triangular flow to the ridge and broad away-side features observed in data. Triangular flow provides a new handle on the initial collision geometry and collective expansion dynamics in heavy-ion collisions.

  17. Experimental heavy ion physics at high energies. Progress report, September 1992--November 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-12-31

    This report summarizes the research activities of the experimental high energy heavy ion physics group at Vanderbilt University carried out under Grant No. DE-FG05092ER40712 with the Department of Energy during the period Oct 1, 1992 to Nov 30, 1993. This research encompasses four areas of related inquiry in relativistic and high energy nuclear reactions. The preparation of the PHENIX experiment which has been approved as one of the two major experiments at RHIC to start in 1998. The RD10/RD45 Muon Identifier experiment which will provide essential input for the design of the Muon Endcap arm detector sub-system in PHENIX. The E855 Soft Photon Experiment at the AGS designed to clarify the status of a possible quark-gluon-plasma signature with presently available heavy-ion collisions. The construction CsI Ball detector project at Texas A&M which is designed as part of a comprehensive detector system which will probe the nuclear equation of state in the 50 MeV/nucleon domain.

  18. Secondary neutron-production cross sections from heavy-ion interactions in composite targets

    SciTech Connect

    Heilbronn, L.; Iwata, Y.; Murakami, T.; Iwase, H.; Sato, H.; Nakamura, T.; Ronningen, R.M.; Ieki, K.; Gudowska, I.; Sobolevsky, N.

    2006-02-15

    Secondary neutron-production cross sections have been measured from interactions of 290 MeV/nucleon C and 600 MeV/nucleon Ne in a target composed of simulated Martian regolith and polyethylene, and from 400 MeV/nucleon Ne interactions in wall material from the International Space Station. The data were measured between 5 deg. and 80 deg. in the laboratory. We report the double-differential cross sections, angular distributions, and total neutron-production cross sections from all three systems. The spectra from all three systems exhibit behavior previously reported in other heavy-ion neutron-production experiments, namely, a peak at forward angles near the energy corresponding to the beam velocity, with the remaining spectra generated by pre-equilibrium and equilibrium processes. The double-differential cross sections are fitted with a moving-source parametrization. Also reported are the data without corrections for neutron flux attenuation in the target and other intervening materials and for neutron production in nontarget materials near the target position. These uncorrected spectra are compared with SHIELD-HIT and PHITS transport model calculations. The transport model calculations reproduce the spectral shapes well but, on average, underestimate the magnitudes of the cross sections.

  19. W Boson Production in Ultrarelativistic Heavy-Ion Collisions at the CERN LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balestri, Thomas E.

    Ultrarelativistic heavy-ion collisions at the CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC) are capable of producing a medium of deconfined quarks and gluons. This phase of nuclear matter is called a Quark-Gluon Plasma (QGP) and is believed to have been present during the first microseconds following the Big Bang. W bosons are a unique probe in a QGP since they do not carry color charge and thus do not interact with a strongly-coupled medium. Furthermore, the kinematics of W bosons are sensitive to the Bjorken momentum fraction x of partons within nucleons, and therefore W bosons may also be used to constrain parton distribution functions and to detect the presence of nuclear effects. This thesis presents the measurement of W boson production in the dense nuclear environment created in Pb+Pb collisions at a per nucleon pair center-of-mass energy squareroot of sNN = 2.76 TeV. The data for this measurement were collected with the ATLAS detector in 2011 and correspond to an integrated luminosity ƒ Ldt = 0.14 nb-1. The production of W bosons is detected using the W → munu mu decay channel, resulting in fiducial yields of 5487 +/-96 (stat.) +/-86(syst.) W+ → mu +numu events and 5262 +/-95 (stat.) +/-83(syst.) W- → mu- numu events. These results are combined with yields from the corresponding electron channel W → enue, and the combined measurement is used to construct the differential production yields and lepton charge asymmetry as a function of lepton absolute pseudorapidity. The integrated production yields and charge ratio as a function of the mean number of binary nucleon-nucleon collisions < Npart> are also presented. The results are compared to predictions based on next-to-leading order QCD calculations. These observables can aid in better understanding nucleon structure within a heavy nucleus as well as provide insight into the mechanism of jet energy loss in a QGP.

  20. THERMALIZATION OF HEAVY IONS IN THE SOLAR WIND

    SciTech Connect

    Tracy, Patrick J.; Kasper, Justin C.; Zurbuchen, Thomas H.; Raines, Jim M.; Shearer, Paul; Gilbert, Jason

    2015-10-20

    Observations of velocity distribution functions from the Advanced Composition Explorer/Solar Wind Ion Composition Spectrometer heavy ion composition instrument are used to calculate ratios of kinetic temperature and Coulomb collisional interactions of an unprecedented 50 ion species in the solar wind. These ions cover a mass per charge range of 1–5.5 amu/e and were collected in the time range of 1998–2011. We report the first calculation of the Coulomb thermalization rate between each of the heavy ion (A > 4 amu) species present in the solar wind along with protons (H{sup +}) and alpha particles (He{sup 2+}). From these rates, we find that protons are the dominant source of Coulomb collisional thermalization for heavy ions in the solar wind and use this fact to calculate a collisional age for those heavy ion populations. The heavy ion thermal properties are well organized by this collisional age, but we find that the temperature of all heavy ions does not simply approach that of protons as Coulomb collisions become more important. We show that He{sup 2+} and C{sup 6+} follow a monotonic decay toward equal temperatures with protons with increasing collisional age, but O{sup 6+} shows a noted deviation from this monotonic decay. Furthermore, we show that the deviation from monotonic decay for O{sup 6+} occurs in solar wind of all origins, as determined by its Fe/O ratio. The observed differences in heavy ion temperature behavior point toward a local heating mechanism that favors ions depending on their charge and mass.

  1. Delta excitations and shell-model information in heavy-ion, charge-exchange reactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deutchman, P. A.; Maung, K. M.; Norbury, J. W.; Rasmussen, J. O.; Townsend, L. W.

    1986-01-01

    We calculate total cross sections for coherent pion production using localized plane-wave approximations for the shell-structure of valence nucleons that are excited to delta particles in the intermediate state in the (12C, 12B) and (12C, 12N) charge-exchange, heavy-ion reactions. We find comparable agreement to projectile downshift data for 12C(12C, 12B)12N. Then we improve the formalism by replacing the localized plane wave bound states with harmonic oscillator states which are imbedded in a multipole expansion approach and calculate pion differential cross sections to test for the sensitivity of the spectra to the single-particle mass parameter.

  2. Inclusive reconstruction of hadron resonances in elementary and heavy-ion collisions with HADES

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kornakov, Georgy

    2016-11-01

    The unambiguous identification of hadron modifications in hot and dense QCD matter is one of the important goals in nuclear physics. In the regime of 1 - 2 GeV kinetic energy per nucleon, HADES has measured rare and penetrating probes in elementary and heavy-ion collisions. The main creation mechanism of mesons is the excitation and decay of baryonic resonances throughout the fireball evolution. The reconstruction of shortlived (≈ 1 fm/c) resonance states through their decay products is notoriously difficult. We have developed a new iterative algorithm, which builds the best hypothesis of signal and background by distortion of individual particle properties. This allows to extract signals with signal-to-background ratios of <1%.

  3. Irradiation of nuclear track emulsions with thermal neutrons, heavy ions, and muons

    SciTech Connect

    Artemenkov, D. A. Bradnova, V.; Zaitsev, A. A.; Zarubin, P. I.; Zarubina, I. G.; Kattabekov, R. R.; Mamatkulov, K. Z.; Rusakova, V. V.

    2015-07-15

    Exposures of test samples of nuclear track emulsion were analyzed. Angular and energy correlations of products originating from the thermal-neutron-induced reaction n{sub th} +{sup 10} B → {sup 7} Li + (γ)+ α were studied in nuclear track emulsions enriched in boron. Nuclear track emulsions were also irradiated with {sup 86}Kr{sup +17} and {sup 124}Xe{sup +26} ions of energy about 1.2 MeV per nucleon. Measurements of ranges of heavy ions in nuclear track emulsionsmade it possible to determine their energies on the basis of the SRIM model. The formation of high-multiplicity nuclear stars was observed upon irradiating nuclear track emulsions with ultrarelativistic muons. Kinematical features studied in this exposure of nuclear track emulsions for events of the muon-induced splitting of carbon nuclei to three alpha particles are indicative of the nucleardiffraction interaction mechanism.

  4. Low-energy extensions of the eikonal approximation to heavy-ion scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Aguiar, C.E.; Aguiar, C.E.; Zardi, F.; Vitturi, A.

    1997-09-01

    We discuss different schemes devised to extend the eikonal approximation to the regime of low bombarding energies (below 50 MeV per nucleon) in heavy-ion collisions. From one side we consider the first- and second-order corrections derived from Wallace{close_quote}s expansion. As an alternative approach we examine the procedure of accounting for the distortion of the eikonal straight-line trajectory by shifting the impact parameter to the corresponding classical turning point. The two methods are tested for different combinations of colliding systems and bombarding energies, by comparing the angular distributions they provide with the exact solution of the scattering problem. We find that the best results are obtained with the shifted trajectories, the Wallace expansion showing a slow convergence at low energies, in particular for heavy systems characterized by a strong Coulomb field. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  5. Shielding experiment of heavy-ion produced neutrons using a tissue-equivalent proportional counter.

    PubMed

    Nunomiya, T; Yonai, S; Takada, M; Fukumura, A; Nakamura, T

    2003-01-01

    A shielding experiment was performed at the HIMAC (Heavy Ion Medical Accelerator in Chiba), of National Institute of Radiological Sciences (NIRS), to measure neutron dose using a spherical TEPC (tissue-equivalent proportional counter) of 12.55 cm inner diameter. Neutrons are produced from a 5 cm thick stopping length Cu target bombarded by 400 MeV/nucleon C6+ ions and penetrate concrete or iron shields of various thicknesses at 0 degree to the beam direction. From this shielding experiment. y-distribution, mean lineal energy, absorbed dose, dose equivalent and mean-quality factor were obtained behind the shield as a function of shield thickness. The neutron dose attenuation lengths were also obtained as 126 g cm(-2) for concrete and 211 g cm(-2) for iron. The measured results were compared with the calculated results using the MARS Monte Carlo code.

  6. Recent Improvements of Particle and Heavy Ion Transport code System: PHITS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Tatsuhiko; Niita, Koji; Iwamoto, Yosuke; Hashimoto, Shintaro; Ogawa, Tatsuhiko; Furuta, Takuya; Abe, Shin-ichiro; Kai, Takeshi; Matsuda, Norihiro; Okumura, Keisuke; Kai, Tetsuya; Iwase, Hiroshi; Sihver, Lembit

    2017-09-01

    The Particle and Heavy Ion Transport code System, PHITS, has been developed under the collaboration of several research institutes in Japan and Europe. This system can simulate the transport of most particles with energy levels up to 1 TeV (per nucleon for ion) using different nuclear reaction models and data libraries. More than 2,500 registered researchers and technicians have used this system for various applications such as accelerator design, radiation shielding and protection, medical physics, and space- and geo-sciences. This paper summarizes the physics models and functions recently implemented in PHITS, between versions 2.52 and 2.88, especially those related to source generation useful for simulating brachytherapy and internal exposures of radioisotopes.

  7. Loss of Telomeres in the Progeny of Human Lymphocytes Exposed to Energetic Heavy Ions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cucinotta, F.A.; George, K.; Durante, M.

    2006-01-01

    We have used cross-species multi-color banding (RxFISH) combined with telomere FISH probes, to measure chromosomal aberrations in the progeny of human peripheral blood lymphocytes exposed to ionizing radiation. Accelerated iron particles (energy 1 GeV/nucleon) induced many more terminal deletions than the same dose of gamma-rays. We found that truncated chromosomes without telomeres could be transmitted for at least three cell cycles following exposure, and represented about 10% of all aberrations observed in the progeny of cells exposed to iron ions. High energy heavy ions generate the most significant health risk for human space exploration and the results suggest that telomere loss may be the leading mechanism for their high efficiency in the induction of late effects.

  8. The Heidelberg test storage ring for heavy ions and its use for atomic physics

    SciTech Connect

    Schuch, R.

    1986-11-01

    A brief description of the Heavy-Ion Test Storage Ring (TSR) presently being built at the Max-Planck Institut in Heidelberg is given. It will be able to store ions injected from the tandem postaccelerator combination up to about 30 MeV/nucleon for a charge to mass ratio of 0.5. One of the main purposes of the TSR will be the study of electron cooling. Some atomic physics experiments are discussed using the electron cooling device which provides an electron-ion collision facility with good energy resolution and ion beams of high currents and low emittances. Here the possibilities for measurements of spontaneous and laser-induced radiative recombination and dielectronic recombination in the electron cooling section are discussed.

  9. ELLIPTIC FLOW, INITIAL ECCENTRICITY AND ELLIPTIC FLOW FLUCTUATIONS IN HEAVY ION COLLISIONS AT RHIC.

    SciTech Connect

    NOUICER,R.; ALVER, B.; BACK, B.B.; BAKER, M.D.; BALLINTIJN, M.; BARTON, D.S.; ET AL.

    2007-02-19

    We present measurements of elliptic flow and event-by-event fluctuations established by the PHOBOS experiment. Elliptic flow scaled by participant eccentricity is found to be similar for both systems when collisions with the same number of participants or the same particle area density are compared. The agreement of elliptic flow between Au+Au and Cu+Cu collisions provides evidence that the matter is created in the initial stage of relativistic heavy ion collisions with transverse granularity similar to that of the participant nucleons. The event-by-event fluctuation results reveal that the initial collision geometry is translated into the final state azimuthal particle distribution, leading to an event-by-event proportionality between the observed elliptic flow and initial eccentricity.

  10. Optical model methods of predicting nuclide production cross sections from heavy ion fragmentation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Townsend, L. W.; Ramsey, C. R.; Tripathi, R. K.; Cucinotta, F. A.; Norbury, J. W.; Wilson, J. W. (Principal Investigator)

    1999-01-01

    Quantum mechanical optical potential methods for calculating inclusive isotope and element production cross sections from the fragmenting of heavy nuclei by intermediate- and high-energy protons and heavy ions are presented based upon a modified abrasion-ablation-FSI (frictional spectator interaction) collision model. The abrasion stage is treated as a quantum mechanical knockout process that leaves the residual prefragment in an excited state. Prefragment excitation energies are estimated using a combined liquid drop and FSI method. In ablation the prefragment deexcites by particle and photon emission to produce the final fragment. Contributions from electromagnetic dissociation to single nucleon removal cross sections are incorporated using a Weiszacker-Williams theory that includes electric dipole and electric quadrupole interactions. Estimates of elemental and isotopic production cross sections are in good agreement with published cross section measurements for a variety of projectile-target-beam energy combinations.

  11. Calculation of Heavy Ion Inactivation and Mutation Rates in Radial Dose Model of Track Structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cucinotta, Francis A.; Wilson, John W.; Shavers, Mark R.; Katz, Robert

    1997-01-01

    In the track structure model, the inactivation cross section is found by summing an inactivation probability over all impact parameters from the ion to the sensitive sites within the cell nucleus. The inactivation probability is evaluated by using the dose response of the system to gamma rays and the radial dose of the ions and may be equal to unity at small impact parameters. We apply the track structure model to recent data with heavy ion beams irradiating biological samples of E. Coli, B. Subtilis spores, and Chinese hamster (V79) cells. Heavy ions have observed cross sections for inactivation that approach and sometimes exceed the geometric size of the cell nucleus. We show how the effects of inactivation may be taken into account in the evaluation of the mutation cross sections in the track structure model through correlation of sites for gene mutation and cell inactivation. The model is fit to available data for HPRT (hypoxanthine guanine phosphoribosyl transferase) mutations in V79 cells, and good agreement is found. Calculations show the high probability for mutation by relativistic ions due to the radial extension of ions track from delta rays. The effects of inactivation on mutation rates make it very unlikely that a single parameter such as LET (linear energy transfer) can be used to specify radiation quality for heavy ion bombardment.

  12. A model of the effects of heavy ion radiation on human tissue

    SciTech Connect

    Ponomarev, A.L.; Guida, P.; Ponomarev, A.L.; Sundaresan, A.; Vazquez, M.E.; Guida, P.; Kim, A.; Cucinotta, F.A.

    2010-08-09

    In heavy ion radiotherapy and space travel humans are exposed to energetic heavy ions (C, Si, Fe and others). This type of irradiation often produces more severe biological effects per unit dose than more common X-rays. A new Monte Carlo model generates a physical space with the complex geometry of human tissue or a cell culture based model of tissue, which is affected by the passage of ionizing radiation. For irradiation, the model relies on a physical code for the ion track structure; for tissues, cellular maps are derived from two- or three-dimensional confocal microscopy images using image segmentation algorithm, which defines cells as pixilated volumes. The model is used to study tissue-specific statistics of direct ion hits and the remote ion action on cells. As an application of the technique, we considered the spatial pattern of apoptotic cells after heavy ion irradiation. The pattern of apoptosis is modeled as a stochastic process, which is defined by the action cross section taken from available experimental data. To characterize the degree of apoptosis, an autocorrelation function that describes the spatial correlation of apoptotic cells is introduced. The values of the autocorrelation function demonstrate the effect of the directionality of the radiation track on the spatial arrangements of inactivated cells in tissue. This effect is intrinsic only to high linear-energy-transfer radiation.

  13. Single-cell/Single-particle Irradiation Using Heavy-ion Microbeams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobayashi, Yasuhiko

    Heavy charged particles transfer their energy to biological organisms through high-density ionization along the particle trajectories. The population of cells exposed to a very low dose of heavy-ion beams contains a few cells hit by a particle, while the majority of the cells receive no radiation damage. At somewhat higher doses, some of the cells receive two or more events according to the Poisson distribution of ion injections. This fluctuation of particle trajectories through individual cells makes interpretation of radiological effects of heavy ions difficult. Furthermore, there has recently been an increasing interest in ionizing radiation-induced “bystander effects”, that is, radiation effects transmitted from hit cells to neighboring un-hit cells. Therefore, we have established a single-cell/single-particle irradiation system using a heavy-ion microbeam apparatus at JAEA-Takasaki to study radiobiological processes in hit cells and bystander cells exposed to low dose and low dose-rate high-LET radiations, in ways that cannot be achieved using conventional broad-field exposures.

  14. A model of the effects of heavy ion radiation on human tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ponomarev, Artem L.; Sundaresan, Alamelu; Vazquez, Marcelo E.; Guida, Peter; Kim, Angela; Cucinotta, Francis A.

    2011-01-01

    In heavy ion radiotherapy and space travel humans are exposed to energetic heavy ions (C, Si, Fe and others). This type of irradiation often produces more severe biological effects per unit dose than more common X-rays. A new Monte Carlo model generates a physical space with the complex geometry of human tissue or a cell culture based model of tissue, which is affected by the passage of ionizing radiation. For irradiation, the model relies on a physical code for the ion track structure; for tissues, cellular maps are derived from two- or three-dimensional confocal microscopy images using image segmentation algorithm, which defines cells as pixilated volumes. The model is used to study tissue-specific statistics of direct ion hits and the remote ion action on cells. As an application of the technique, we considered the spatial pattern of apoptotic cells after heavy ion irradiation. The pattern of apoptosis is modeled as a stochastic process, which is defined by the action cross section taken from available experimental data. To characterize the degree of apoptosis, an autocorrelation function that describes the spatial correlation of apoptotic cells is introduced. The values of the autocorrelation function demonstrate the effect of the directionality of the radiation track on the spatial arrangements of inactivated cells in tissue. This effect is intrinsic only to high linear-energy-transfer radiation.

  15. The effects of heavy ion radiation on digital micromirror device performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Travinsky, Anton; Vorobiev, Dmitry; Ninkov, Zoran; Raisanen, Alan D.; Pellish, Jonathan A.; Robberto, Massimo; Heap, Sara

    2016-07-01

    There is a pressing need in the astronomical community for space-suitable multi-object spectrometers (MOSs). Several digital micromirror device (DMD)-based prototype MOSs have been developed for ground-based observatories; however, their main use will come with deployment on a space based mission. Therefore, performance of DMDs under exoatmospheric radiation needs to be evaluated. In our previous work we demonstrated that DMDs are tolerant to heavy ion irradiation in general and calculated upset rate of 4.3 micromirrors in 24 hours in orbit for 1-megapixel device. The goal of this additional experiment was to acquire more data and therefore increase the accuracy of the predicted in-orbit micromirror upset rate. Similar to the previous experiment, for this testing 0.7 XGA DMDs were re-windowed with 2 μm thick pellicle and tested under accelerated heavy-ion radiation (with control electronics shielded from radiation) with a focus on detection of single-event upsets (SEUs). We concentrated on ions with low levels of linear energy transfer (LET) 1.8 - 13 MeV•cm2•mg-1 to cover the most critical range of the Weibull curve for those devices. As during the previous experiment, we observed and documented non-destructive heavy ion-induced micromirror state changes. All SEUs were always cleared with a soft reset (that is, sending a new pattern to the device). The DMDs we tested did not experience single-event induced permanent damage or functional changes that required a hard reset (power cycle), even at high ion fluences. Based on the data obtained in the experiments we predict micromirror in-orbit upset rate of 5.6 micromirrors in 24 hours in-orbit for the tested devices. This suggests that the heavy-ion induced SEU rate burden for a DMD-based instrument will be manageable when exposed to solar particle fluxes and cosmic rays in orbit.

  16. Long-Term Differential Changes in Mouse Intestinal Metabolomics after γ and Heavy Ion Radiation Exposure

    PubMed Central

    Kaur, Prabhjit; Singh, Rajbir; Fornace, Albert J.; Datta, Kamal

    2014-01-01

    Tissue consequences of radiation exposure are dependent on radiation quality and high linear energy transfer (high-LET) radiation, such as heavy ions in space is known to deposit higher energy in tissues and cause greater damage than low-LET γ radiation. While radiation exposure has been linked to intestinal pathologies, there are very few studies on long-term effects of radiation, fewer involved a therapeutically relevant γ radiation dose, and none explored persistent tissue metabolomic alterations after heavy ion space radiation exposure. Using a metabolomics approach, we report long-term metabolomic markers of radiation injury and perturbation of signaling pathways linked to metabolic alterations in mice after heavy ion or γ radiation exposure. Intestinal tissues (C57BL/6J, female, 6 to 8 wks) were analyzed using ultra performance liquid chromatography coupled with electrospray quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry (UPLC-QToF-MS) two months after 2 Gy γ radiation and results were compared to an equitoxic 56Fe (1.6 Gy) radiation dose. The biological relevance of the metabolites was determined using Ingenuity Pathway Analysis, immunoblots, and immunohistochemistry. Metabolic profile analysis showed radiation-type-dependent spatial separation of the groups. Decreased adenine and guanosine and increased inosine and uridine suggested perturbed nucleotide metabolism. While both the radiation types affected amino acid metabolism, the 56Fe radiation preferentially altered dipeptide metabolism. Furthermore, 56Fe radiation caused upregulation of ‘prostanoid biosynthesis’ and ‘eicosanoid signaling’, which are interlinked events related to cellular inflammation and have implications for nutrient absorption and inflammatory bowel disease during space missions and after radiotherapy. In conclusion, our data showed for the first time that metabolomics can not only be used to distinguish between heavy ion and γ radiation exposures, but also as a radiation

  17. Long-term differential changes in mouse intestinal metabolomics after γ and heavy ion radiation exposure.

    PubMed

    Cheema, Amrita K; Suman, Shubhankar; Kaur, Prabhjit; Singh, Rajbir; Fornace, Albert J; Datta, Kamal

    2014-01-01

    Tissue consequences of radiation exposure are dependent on radiation quality and high linear energy transfer (high-LET) radiation, such as heavy ions in space is known to deposit higher energy in tissues and cause greater damage than low-LET γ radiation. While radiation exposure has been linked to intestinal pathologies, there are very few studies on long-term effects of radiation, fewer involved a therapeutically relevant γ radiation dose, and none explored persistent tissue metabolomic alterations after heavy ion space radiation exposure. Using a metabolomics approach, we report long-term metabolomic markers of radiation injury and perturbation of signaling pathways linked to metabolic alterations in mice after heavy ion or γ radiation exposure. Intestinal tissues (C57BL/6J, female, 6 to 8 wks) were analyzed using ultra performance liquid chromatography coupled with electrospray quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry (UPLC-QToF-MS) two months after 2 Gy γ radiation and results were compared to an equitoxic ⁵⁶Fe (1.6 Gy) radiation dose. The biological relevance of the metabolites was determined using Ingenuity Pathway Analysis, immunoblots, and immunohistochemistry. Metabolic profile analysis showed radiation-type-dependent spatial separation of the groups. Decreased adenine and guanosine and increased inosine and uridine suggested perturbed nucleotide metabolism. While both the radiation types affected amino acid metabolism, the ⁵⁶Fe radiation preferentially altered dipeptide metabolism. Furthermore, ⁵⁶Fe radiation caused upregulation of 'prostanoid biosynthesis' and 'eicosanoid signaling', which are interlinked events related to cellular inflammation and have implications for nutrient absorption and inflammatory bowel disease during space missions and after radiotherapy. In conclusion, our data showed for the first time that metabolomics can not only be used to distinguish between heavy ion and γ radiation exposures, but also as a radiation

  18. Simulated microgravity increases heavy ion radiation-induced apoptosis in human B lymphoblasts.

    PubMed

    Dang, Bingrong; Yang, Yuping; Zhang, Erdong; Li, Wenjian; Mi, Xiangquan; Meng, Yue; Yan, Siqi; Wang, Zhuanzi; Wei, Wei; Shao, Chunlin; Xing, Rui; Lin, Changjun

    2014-03-03

    Microgravity and radiation, common in space, are the main factors influencing astronauts' health in space flight, but their combined effects on immune cells are extremely limited. Therefore, the effect of simulated microgravity on heavy ion radiation-induced apoptosis, and reactive oxygen species (ROS)-sensitive apoptosis signaling were investigated in human B lymphoblast HMy2.CIR cells. Simulated microgravity was achieved using a Rotating Wall Vessel Bioreactor at 37°C for 30 min. Heavy carbon-ion irradiation was carried out at 300 MeV/u, with a linear energy transfer (LET) value of 30 keV/μm and a dose rate of 1Gy/min. Cell survival was evaluated using the Trypan blue exclusion assay. Apoptosis was indicated by Annexin V/propidium iodide staining. ROS production was assessed by cytometry with a fluorescent probe dichlorofluorescein. Malondialdehyde was detected using a kit. Extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK), mitogen-activated protein kinase phosphatase-1 (MKP-1) and caspase-3 activation were measured by immunoblotting. Simulated microgravity decreased heavy ion radiation-induced cell survival and increased apoptosis in HMy2.CIR cells. It also amplified heavy ion radiation-elicited intracellular ROS generation, which induced ROS-sensitive ERK/MKP-1/caspase-3 activation in HMy2.CIR cells. The above phenomena could be reversed by the antioxidants N-acetyl cysteine (NAC) and quercetin. These results illustrated that simulated microgravity increased heavy ion radiation-induced cell apoptosis, mediated by a ROS-sensitive signal pathway in human B lymphoblasts. Further, the antioxidants NAC and quercetin, especially NAC, might be good candidate drugs for protecting astronauts' and space travelers' health and safety. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Chiral symmetry restoration versus deconfinement in heavy-ion collisions at high baryon density

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cassing, W.; Palmese, A.; Moreau, P.; Bratkovskaya, E. L.

    2016-01-01

    We study the production of strange hadrons in nucleus-nucleus collisions from 4 to 160 A GeV within the parton-hadron-string dynamics (PHSD) transport approach that is extended to incorporate essentials aspects of chiral symmetry restoration (CSR) in the hadronic sector (via the Schwinger mechanism) on top of the deconfinement phase transition as implemented in PHSD. Especially the K+/π+ and the (Λ +Σ0) /π- ratios in central Au+Au collisions are found to provide information on the relative importance of both transitions. The modeling of chiral symmetry restoration is driven by the pion-nucleon Σ term in the computation of the quark scalar condensate that serves as an order parameter for CSR and also scales approximately with the effective quark masses ms and mq. Furthermore, the nucleon scalar density ρs, which also enters the computation of , is evaluated within the nonlinear σ -ω model which is constrained by Dirac-Brueckner calculations and low-energy heavy-ion reactions. The Schwinger mechanism (for string decay) fixes the ratio of strange to light quark production in the hadronic medium. We find that above ˜80 A GeV the reaction dynamics of heavy nuclei is dominantly driven by partonic degrees of freedom such that traces of the chiral symmetry restoration are hard to identify. Our studies support the conjecture of "quarkyonic matter" in heavy-ion collisions from about 5 to 40 A GeV and provide a microscopic explanation for the maximum in the K+/π+ ratio at about 30 A GeV, which only shows up if a transition to partonic degrees of freedom is incorporated in the reaction dynamics and is discarded in the traditional hadron-string models.

  20. Nucleon-nucleon data

    SciTech Connect

    McNaughton, M.W.; Gulmez, E.; Whitten, C.A.

    1997-10-01

    This is the final report of a one-year, Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). This work completes the determination of the nucleon-nucleon (NN) scattering amplitudes from 485 to 800 MeV. The data set is completed by the publication of two papers. These new data have a precision better than 1% and an absolute accuracy about 1%, which is generally an order of magnitude better than previous data. The NN data set is now complete and consistent. The set of spin-dependent NN-scattering amplitudes is now well determined up to 800 MeV.

  1. Geometrical methods in heavy ion collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taliotis, Anastasios

    Currently there exists no known way to construct the Stress-Energy tensor (Tmunu) of the medium produced in heavy ion collisions at strong coupling from purely theoretical grounds. In this work, some steps are taken in that direction. In particular, the evolution of Tmunu at strong coupling and at high energies is being studied for early proper times (tau). This is achieved in the context of the AdS/CFT duality by constructing the evolution of the dual geometry in an AdS5 background. We consider high energy collisions of two shock waves in AdS5 as a model of ultra-relativistic nucleus-nucleus collisions in the boundary theory. We first calculate the graviton field produced in the collisions in the LO, NLO and NNLO approximations, corresponding to two, three and four-graviton exchanges with the shock waves. We use this model to study Tmunu and in particular the energy density of the strongly-coupled matter created immediately after the collision because as we argue, the expansion of the energy density (epsilon) in the powers of proper time tau squared corresponds on the gravity side to a perturbative expansion of the metric in graviton exchanges. We point out that shock waves corresponding to physical energy-momentum tensors of the nuclei is likely to completely stop after the collision; on the field theory side, this corresponds to complete nuclear stopping due to strong coupling effects, likely leading to Landau hydrodynamics. This motivates a more detailed investigation. For this reason we consider the asymmetric limit where the energy density in one shock wave is much higher than in the other one. In the boundary theory this setup corresponds to proton-nucleus collisions. Employing the eikonal approximation we find the exact high energy analytic solution for the metric in AdS5 for the asymmetric collision of two delta-function shock waves. The solution resums all-order graviton exchanges with the nucleus-shock wave and a single-graviton exchange with the proton

  2. Antiradiation vaccine: Technology and development of prophylaxis, prevention and treatment of biological consequences from Heavy Ion irradiation.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popov, Dmitri; Maliev, Vecheslav

    Introduction: An anti-radiation vaccine could be an important part of a countermeasures reg-imen for effective radioprotection, immunoprophylaxis and immunotherapy of the acute radi-ation syndromes (ARS) after gamma-irradiation, neutron irradiation or heavy ion irradiation. Reliable protection of non-neoplastic regions of patients with different forms of cancer which undergo to heavy ion therapy ( e.g. Hadron-therapy) can significantly extend the efficiency of the therapeutic course. The protection of cosmonauts astronauts from the heavy ion ra-diation component of space radiation with specific immunoprophylaxis by the anti-radiation vaccine may be an important part of medical management for long term space missions. Meth-ods and experiments: 1. The Antiradiation Vaccine preparation -standard (mixture of toxoid form of Radiation Toxins -SRD-group) which include Cerebrovascular RT Neurotoxin, Car-diovascular RT Neurotoxin, Gastrointestinal RT Neurotoxin, Hematopoietic RT Hematotoxin. Radiation Toxins Specific Radiation Determinant Group were isolated from a central lymph of gamma-irradiated animals with Cerebrovascular, Cardiovascular, Gastrointestiinal, Hematopoi-etic forms of ARS. Devices for γ-radiation are "Panorama", "Puma". 2. Heavy ion exposure was accomplished at Department of Scientific Research Institute of Nuclear Physics, Dubna, Russia. The heavy ions irradiation was generated in heavy ion (Fe56) accelerator -UTI. Heavy Ion linear transfer energy -2000-2600 KeV mkm, 600 MeV U. Absorbed Dose -3820 Rad. 3. Experimental Design: Rabbits from all groups were irradiated by heavy ion accelerator. Group A -control -10 rabbits; Group B -placebo -5 rabbits; Group C -radioprotectant Cystamine (50 mg kg)-5 rabbits, 15 minutes before irradiation -5 rabbits; Group D -radioprotectant Gammafos (Amifostine -400mg kg ), -5 rabbits; Group E -Antiradiation Vaccine: subcuta-neus administration or IM -2 ml of active substance, 14 days before irradiation -5 rabbits. 4

  3. Energy loss measurements of 63Cu, 28Si and 27Al heavy ions crossing thin Polyvinylchloride (PVC) foil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dib, A.; Ammi, H.; Guesmia, A.; Msimanga, M.; Mammeri, S.; Hedibel, M.; Guedioura, B.; Pineda-Vargas, C. A.

    2015-11-01

    Experimental stopping data of, 63Cu, 28Si and 27Al heavy ions in thin Polyvinylchloride (H3C2Cl1) foil have been obtained over the 0.045-0.50 MeV/nucleon energy range. The measured energy losses were carried out by Heavy Ion Elastic Recoil Detection Analysis (HI-ERDA) technique coupled with time of flight (ToF) spectrometer. A continuous stopping power data obtained in this work are well fitted by our proposed semi-empirical formula and the results are compared to those calculated by LSS formula or generated by SRIM-2013 and MSTAR predictions. Calculations using our formula agree well with the obtained experimental stopping powers, while the LSS formula underestimates the experimental data in the whole investigated energy range. In this work a simple expression for electronic stopping power of heavy ions at low energy in solid targets is introduced. This formula is based on the Firsov and Lindhard-Sharff stopping power models with a small modification made to the original expression, by incorporating the effective charge of moving ions concept and with exponential fit function.

  4. INERTIAL FUSION DRIVEN BY INTENSE HEAVY-ION BEAMS

    SciTech Connect

    Sharp, W. M.; Friedman, A.; Grote, D. P.; Barnard, J. J.; Cohen, R. H.; Dorf, M. A.; Lund, S. M.; Perkins, L. J.; Terry, M. R.; Logan, B. G.; Bieniosek, F. M.; Faltens, A.; Henestroza, E.; Jung, J. Y.; Kwan, J. W.; Lee, E. P.; Lidia, S. M.; Ni, P. A.; Reginato, L. L.; Roy, P. K.; Seidl, P. A.; Takakuwa, J. H.; Vay, J.-L.; Waldron, W. L.; Davidson, R. C.; Gilson, E. P.; Kaganovich, I. D.; Qin, H.; Startsev, E.; Haber, I.; Kishek, R. A.; Koniges, A. E.

    2011-03-31

    Intense heavy-ion beams have long been considered a promising driver option for inertial-fusion energy production. This paper briefly compares inertial confinement fusion (ICF) to the more-familiar magnetic-confinement approach and presents some advantages of using beams of heavy ions to drive ICF instead of lasers. Key design choices in heavy-ion fusion (HIF) facilities are discussed, particularly the type of accelerator. We then review experiments carried out at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) over the past thirty years to understand various aspects of HIF driver physics. A brief review follows of present HIF research in the US and abroad, focusing on a new facility, NDCX-II, being built at LBNL to study the physics of warm dense matter heated by ions, as well as aspects of HIF target physics. Future research directions are briefly summarized.

  5. Heavy Ion Heating from the Sun to 1AU

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korreck, K. E.; Lepri, S. T.; Kasper, J. C.; Case, A. W.; Kozarev, K. A.; Opher, M.; Evans, R. M.; Stevens, M. L.; Schwadron, N. A.

    2012-12-01

    The heating of heavy ions at the Sun and as they travel through the interplanetary space is relevant to both identifying the solar wind source region as well as the overall heating mechanisms and kinetics of the solar wind. Using ACE SWICS data on heavy ions from the shock associated with a CME on May 13, 2005, we examine the heavy ion heating and non-thermal nature of the helium distributions at 1AU as well as bulk solar wind parameters around the time of the CME. We utilize current work on high resolution 3D MHD models to compare the bulk solar wind parameters from the Sun to the inner heliosphere with a CME input. The relationship between the model's parameters and the observations at different regions of interest i.e the Solar Probe and Solar Orbiter orbits will be extrapolated. This model will in the future be extended to quiescent times of the solar wind.

  6. Solar heavy ion Heinrich fluence spectrum at low earth orbit.

    PubMed

    Croley, D R; Spitale, G C

    1998-01-01

    Solar heavy ions from the JPL Solar Heavy Ion Model have been transported into low earth orbit using the Schulz cutoff criterion for L-shell access by ions of a specific charge to mass ratio. The NASA Brouwer orbit generator was used to get L values along the orbit at 60 second time intervals. Heavy ion fluences of ions 2 < or = Z < or = 92 have been determined for the LET range 1 to 130 MeV-cm2/mg by 60, 120 or 250 mils of aluminum over a period of 24 hours in a 425 km circular orbit inclined 51 degrees. The ion fluence is time dependent in the sense that the position of the spacecraft in the orbit at the flare onset time fixes the relationship between particle flux and spacecraft passage through high L-values where particles have access to the spacecraft.

  7. Ultra-relativistic heavy ions and the CBA

    SciTech Connect

    McLerran, L.D.

    1982-01-01

    The study of ultra-relativistic heavy ions at an accelerator such as the CBA provides a unique glimpse of matter as it may have appeared in the early universe. This hot dense matter very probably appears as a quark-gluon plasma which expands and cools into hadronic matter. The CBA would provide data at the very highest energies, and produce matter at the highest energy densities. The possibility of using a cyclotron to inject very heavy ions into the AGS and then into the CBA would also allow the production of quark-gluon matter at higher energy densities than would light ions, and would make the matter in a larger volume where surface effects are minimized. At the highest energies with very heavy ions, there is great flexibility in the experimental signals which might be studied, as well as the nature of the matter which is produced. Some of the possibilities are discussed. (WHK)

  8. Ultrarelativistic heavy ion collisions: the first billion seconds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baym, Gordon

    2016-12-01

    I first review the early history of the ultrarelativistic heavy ion program, starting with the 1974 Bear Mountain Workshop, and the 1983 Aurora meeting of the U.S. Nuclear Science Committtee, just one billion seconds ago, which laid out the initial science goals of an ultrarelativistic collider. The primary goal, to discover the properties of nuclear matter at the highest energy densities, included finding new states of matter - the quark-gluon plasma primarily - and to use collisions to open a new window on related problems of matter in cosmology, neutron stars, supernovae, and elsewhere. To bring out how the study of heavy ions and hot, dense matter in QCD has been fulfilling these goals, I concentrate on a few topics, the phase diagram of matter in QCD, and connections of heavy ion physics to cold atoms, cosmology, and neutron stars.

  9. Clinical trial of cancer therapy with heavy ions at heavy ion research facility in lanzhou

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Hong

    With collaborative efforts of scientists from the Institute of Modern Physics (IMP), Chinese Academy of Sciences and hospitals in Gansu, initial clinical trial on cancer therapy with heavy ions has been successfully carried out in China. From November 2006 to December 2007, 51 patients with superficially-placed tumors were treated with carbon ions at Heavy Ion Research Facility in Lanzhou (HIRFL) within four beam time blocks of 6-11 days, collaborating with the General Hospital of Lanzhou Command and the Tumor Hospital of Gansu Province. Patients and Methods: There were 51 patients (31 males and 20 females) with superficially-placed tumors (squamous cell carcinoma of the skin, basal cell carcinoma of the skin, malignant skin melanoma, sarcoma, lymphoma, breast cancer, metastatic lymph nodes of carcinomas and other skin lesions). The tumors were less than 2.1 cm deep to the skin surface. All patients had histological confirmation of their tumors. Karnofsky Performance Scale (KPS) of all patients was more than 70. The majority of patients were with failures or recurrences of conventional therapies. Median age at the time of radiotherapy (RT) was 55.5 years (range 5-85 years). Patients were immobilized with a vacuum cushion or a head mask and irradiated by carbon ion beams with energy 80-100 MeV/u at spread-out Bragg peak field generated from HIRFL, with two and three-dimensional conformal irradiation methods. Target volume was defined by physical palpation [ultrasonography and Computerized tomography (CT), for some cases]. The clinical target volume (CTV) was defined as the gross total volume GTV with a 0.5-1.0cm margin axially. Field placement for radiation treatment planning was done based on the surface markings. RBE of 2.5-3 within the target volume, and 40-75 GyE with a weekly fractionation of 7 × 3-15 GyE/fraction were used in the trial. Patients had follow-up examinations performed 1 month after treatment, in 1 or 2 months for the first 6 months, and 3

  10. Laser ion source for isobaric heavy ion collider experiment.

    PubMed

    Kanesue, T; Kumaki, M; Ikeda, S; Okamura, M

    2016-02-01

    Heavy-ion collider experiment in isobaric system is under investigation at Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider. For this experiment, ion source is required to maximize the abundance of the intended isotope. The candidate of the experiment is (96)Ru + (96)Zr. Since the natural abundance of particular isotope is low and composition of isotope from ion source depends on the composites of the target, an isotope enriched material may be needed as a target. We studied the performance of the laser ion source required for the experiment for Zr ions.

  11. Experimental Overview of Direct Photon Results in Heavy Ion Collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Novitzky, Norbert

    2016-07-01

    Direct photons are color blind probes and thus they provide unique opportunities to study the colored medium created in heavy ion collisions. There are many different sources of direct photons each probing different physics processes as the system evolves. In basic 2 → 2 processes the prompt photons from primary hard scatterings offer the most precise measurements of the outgoing parton energy in the opposite direction. In heavy ion collisions the created medium emits photons as thermal radiation, whose rate and anisotropies provide a unique prospective on the properties and evolution of the system. Recent results on direct photons from the LHC and RHIC experiments are briefly summarized in this paper.

  12. Laser ion source for high brightness heavy ion beam

    SciTech Connect

    Okamura, M.

    2016-09-01

    A laser ion source is known as a high current high charge state heavy ion source. But, we place great emphasis on the capability to realize a high brightness ion source. A laser ion source has a pinpoint small volume where materials are ionized and can achieve quite uniform low temperature ion beam. Those features may enable us to realize very small emittance beams. Furthermore, a low charge state high brightness laser ion source was successfully commissioned in Brookhaven National Laboratory in 2014. Now most of all the solid based heavy ions are being provided from the laser ion source for regular operation.

  13. Heavy Ion Current Transients in SiGe HBTs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pellish, Jonathan A.; Reed, Robert A.; Vizkelethy, Gyorgy; McMorrow, Dale; Ferlet-Cavrois, Veronique; Baggio, Jacques; Paillet, Philipe; Duhanel, Olivier; Phillips, Stanley D.; Sutton, Akil K.; hide

    2009-01-01

    Time-resolved ion beam induced charge reveals heavy ion response of IBM 5AM SiGe HBT: a) Position correlation[ b) Unique response for different bias schemes; c) Similarities to TPA pulsed-laser data. Heavy ion broad-beam transients provide more realistic device response: a) Feedback using microbeam data; b) Overcome issues of LET and ion range with microbeam. Both micro- and broad-beam data sets yield valuable input for TCAD simulations. Uncover detailed mechanisms for SiGe HBTs and other devices fabricated on lightly-doped substrates.

  14. Laser ion source for high brightness heavy ion beam

    DOE PAGES

    Okamura, M.

    2016-09-01

    A laser ion source is known as a high current high charge state heavy ion source. But, we place great emphasis on the capability to realize a high brightness ion source. A laser ion source has a pinpoint small volume where materials are ionized and can achieve quite uniform low temperature ion beam. Those features may enable us to realize very small emittance beams. Furthermore, a low charge state high brightness laser ion source was successfully commissioned in Brookhaven National Laboratory in 2014. Now most of all the solid based heavy ions are being provided from the laser ion sourcemore » for regular operation.« less

  15. Laser ion source for isobaric heavy ion collider experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Kanesue, T. Okamura, M.; Kumaki, M.; Ikeda, S.

    2016-02-15

    Heavy-ion collider experiment in isobaric system is under investigation at Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider. For this experiment, ion source is required to maximize the abundance of the intended isotope. The candidate of the experiment is {sup 96}Ru + {sup 96}Zr. Since the natural abundance of particular isotope is low and composition of isotope from ion source depends on the composites of the target, an isotope enriched material may be needed as a target. We studied the performance of the laser ion source required for the experiment for Zr ions.

  16. Development of Superconducting Focusing Quadrupoles for Heavy Ion Drivers

    SciTech Connect

    Martovetsky, N; Manahan, R; Lietzke, A F

    2001-09-10

    Heavy Ion Fusion (HIF) is exploring a promising path to a practical inertial-confinement fusion reactor. The associated heavy ion driver will require a large number of focusing quadrupole magnets. A concept for a superconducting quadrupole array, using many simple racetrack coils, was developed at LLNL. Two, single-bore quadrupole prototypes of the same design, with distinctly different conductor, were designed, built, and tested. Both prototypes reached their short sample currents with little or no training. Magnet design, and test results, are presented and discussed.

  17. Heavy ions at steamboat: summary of parallel sessions

    SciTech Connect

    Ludlam, T.W.

    1984-01-01

    The interest in heavy ions at the intersection between particle and nuclear physics is motivated by the opportunity for an entirely new approach to the understanding of fundamental interactions by studying extreme states of nuclear matter. At this conference we have seen important new results on some of the central issues including: (1) how well can we predict the landscape of the extremes - that is, the phase structure of QCD and nuclear matter; (2) can we explore it with heavy ion collisions; and (3) can we recognize the appearance of new terrain. Our present understanding of the behavior of nuclear matter under extreme conditions is briefly discussed. 16 references. (WHK)

  18. Laser ion source for high brightness heavy ion beam

    SciTech Connect

    Okamura, M.

    2016-09-01

    A laser ion source is known as a high current high charge state heavy ion source. But, we place great emphasis on the capability to realize a high brightness ion source. A laser ion source has a pinpoint small volume where materials are ionized and can achieve quite uniform low temperature ion beam. Those features may enable us to realize very small emittance beams. Furthermore, a low charge state high brightness laser ion source was successfully commissioned in Brookhaven National Laboratory in 2014. Now most of all the solid based heavy ions are being provided from the laser ion source for regular operation.

  19. Heavy ion beam transport and interaction with ICF targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Velarde, G.; Aragonés, J. M.; Gago, J. A.; Gámez, L.; González, M. C.; Honrubia, J. J.; Martínez-Val, J. M.; Mínguez, E.; Ocaña, J. L.; Otero, R.; Perlado, J. M.; Santolaya, J. M.; Serrano, J. F.; Velarde, P. M.

    1986-01-01

    Numerical simulation codes provide an essential tool for analyzing the very broad range of concepts and variables considered in ICF targets. In this paper, the relevant processes embodied in the NORCLA code, needed to simulate ICF targets driven by heavy ion beams will be presented. Atomic physic models developed at DENIM to improve the atomic data needed for ion beam plasma interaction will be explained. Concerning the stopping power, the average ionization potential following a Thomas-Fermi model has been calculated, and results are compared with full quantum calculations. Finally, a parametric study of multilayered single shell targets driven by heavy ion beams will be shown.

  20. Laser ion source for high brightness heavy ion beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okamura, M.

    2016-09-01

    A laser ion source is known as a high current high charge state heavy ion source. However we place great emphasis on the capability to realize a high brightness ion source. A laser ion source has a pinpoint small volume where materials are ionized and can achieve quite uniform low temperature ion beam. Those features may enable us to realize very small emittance beams. In 2014, a low charge state high brightness laser ion source was successfully commissioned in Brookhaven National Laboratory. Now most of all the solid based heavy ions are being provided from the laser ion source for regular operation.

  1. On the probability of cure for heavy-ion radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Hanin, Leonid; Zaider, Marco

    2014-07-21

    The probability of a cure in radiation therapy (RT)-viewed as the probability of eventual extinction of all cancer cells-is unobservable, and the only way to compute it is through modeling the dynamics of cancer cell population during and post-treatment. The conundrum at the heart of biophysical models aimed at such prospective calculations is the absence of information on the initial size of the subpopulation of clonogenic cancer cells (also called stem-like cancer cells), that largely determines the outcome of RT, both in an individual and population settings. Other relevant parameters (e.g. potential doubling time, cell loss factor and survival probability as a function of dose) are, at least in principle, amenable to empirical determination. In this article we demonstrate that, for heavy-ion RT, microdosimetric considerations (justifiably ignored in conventional RT) combined with an expression for the clone extinction probability obtained from a mechanistic model of radiation cell survival lead to useful upper bounds on the size of the pre-treatment population of clonogenic cancer cells as well as upper and lower bounds on the cure probability. The main practical impact of these limiting values is the ability to make predictions about the probability of a cure for a given population of patients treated to newer, still unexplored treatment modalities from the empirically determined probability of a cure for the same or similar population resulting from conventional low linear energy transfer (typically photon/electron) RT. We also propose that the current trend to deliver a lower total dose in a smaller number of fractions with larger-than-conventional doses per fraction has physical limits that must be understood before embarking on a particular treatment schedule.

  2. On the probability of cure for heavy-ion radiotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanin, Leonid; Zaider, Marco

    2014-07-01

    The probability of a cure in radiation therapy (RT)—viewed as the probability of eventual extinction of all cancer cells—is unobservable, and the only way to compute it is through modeling the dynamics of cancer cell population during and post-treatment. The conundrum at the heart of biophysical models aimed at such prospective calculations is the absence of information on the initial size of the subpopulation of clonogenic cancer cells (also called stem-like cancer cells), that largely determines the outcome of RT, both in an individual and population settings. Other relevant parameters (e.g. potential doubling time, cell loss factor and survival probability as a function of dose) are, at least in principle, amenable to empirical determination. In this article we demonstrate that, for heavy-ion RT, microdosimetric considerations (justifiably ignored in conventional RT) combined with an expression for the clone extinction probability obtained from a mechanistic model of radiation cell survival lead to useful upper bounds on the size of the pre-treatment population of clonogenic cancer cells as well as upper and lower bounds on the cure probability. The main practical impact of these limiting values is the ability to make predictions about the probability of a cure for a given population of patients treated to newer, still unexplored treatment modalities from the empirically determined probability of a cure for the same or similar population resulting from conventional low linear energy transfer (typically photon/electron) RT. We also propose that the current trend to deliver a lower total dose in a smaller number of fractions with larger-than-conventional doses per fraction has physical limits that must be understood before embarking on a particular treatment schedule.

  3. Simulations of an accelerator-based shielding experiment using the particle and heavy-ion transport code system PHITS.

    PubMed

    Sato, T; Sihver, L; Iwase, H; Nakashima, H; Niita, K

    2005-01-01

    In order to estimate the biological effects of HZE particles, an accurate knowledge of the physics of interaction of HZE particles is necessary. Since the heavy ion transport problem is a complex one, there is a need for both experimental and theoretical studies to develop accurate transport models. RIST and JAERI (Japan), GSI (Germany) and Chalmers (Sweden) are therefore currently developing and bench marking the General-Purpose Particle and Heavy-Ion Transport code System (PHITS), which is based on the NMTC and MCNP for nucleon/meson and neutron transport respectively, and the JAM hadron cascade model. PHITS uses JAERI Quantum Molecular Dynamics (JQMD) and the Generalized Evaporation Model (GEM) for calculations of fission and evaporation processes, a model developed at NASA Langley for calculation of total reaction cross sections, and the SPAR model for stopping power calculations. The future development of PHITS includes better parameterization in the JQMD model used for the nucleus-nucleus reactions, and improvement of the models used for calculating total reaction cross sections, and addition of routines for calculating elastic scattering of heavy ions, and inclusion of radioactivity and burn up processes. As a part of an extensive bench marking of PHITS, we have compared energy spectra of secondary neutrons created by reactions of HZE particles with different targets, with thicknesses ranging from <1 to 200 cm. We have also compared simulated and measured spatial, fluence and depth-dose distributions from different high energy heavy ion reactions. In this paper, we report simulations of an accelerator-based shielding experiment, in which a beam of 1 GeV/n Fe-ions has passed through thin slabs of polyethylene, Al, and Pb at an acceptance angle up to 4 degrees. c2005 Published by Elsevier Ltd on behalf of COSPAR.

  4. Preequilibrium particle emissions and in-medium effects on the pion production in heavy-ion collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Zhao-Qing

    2017-02-01

    Within the framework of the Lanzhou quantum molecular dynamics (LQMD) transport model, pion dynamics in heavy-ion collisions near threshold energies and the emission of preequilibrium particles (nucleons and light complex fragments) have been investigated. A density, momentum and isospin-dependent pion-nucleon potential based on the Δ-hole model is implemented in the transport approach, which slightly leads to the increase of the π-/π+ ratio, but reduces the total pion yields. It is found that a bump structure of the π-/π+ ratio in the kinetic energy spectra appears at the pion energy close to the Δ (1232) resonance region. The yield ratios of neutrons to protons from the squeeze-out particles perpendicular to the reaction plane are sensitive to the stiffness of nuclear symmetry energy, in particular at the high-momentum (kinetic energy) tails.

  5. Characterization of highly efficient heavy-ion mutagenesis in Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Heavy-ion mutagenesis is recognised as a powerful technology to generate new mutants, especially in higher plants. Heavy-ion beams show high linear energy transfer (LET) and thus more effectively induce DNA double-strand breaks than other mutagenic techniques. Previously, we determined the most effective heavy-ion LET (LETmax: 30.0 keV μm-1) for Arabidopsis mutagenesis by analysing the effect of LET on mutation induction. However, the molecular structure of mutated DNA induced by heavy ions with LETmax remains unclear. Knowledge of the structure of mutated DNA will contribute to the effective exploitation of heavy-ion beam mutagenesis. Results Dry Arabidopsis thaliana seeds were irradiated with carbon (C) ions with LETmax at a dose of 400 Gy and with LET of 22.5 keV μm-1 at doses of 250 Gy or 450 Gy. The effects on mutation frequency and alteration of DNA structure were compared. To characterise the structure of mutated DNA, we screened the well-characterised mutants elongated hypocotyls (hy) and glabrous (gl) and identified mutated DNA among the resulting mutants by high-resolution melting curve, PCR and sequencing analyses. The mutation frequency induced by C ions with LETmax was two-fold higher than that with 22.5 keV μm-1 and similar to the mutation frequency previously induced by ethyl methane sulfonate. We identified the structure of 22 mutated DNAs. Over 80% of the mutations caused by C ions with both LETs were base substitutions or deletions/insertions of less than 100 bp. The other mutations involved large rearrangements. Conclusions The C ions with LETmax showed high mutation efficiency and predominantly induced base substitutions or small deletions/insertions, most of which were null mutations. These small alterations can be determined by single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) detection systems. Therefore, C ions with LETmax might be useful as a highly efficient reverse genetic system in conjunction with SNP detection systems, and will be

  6. Trends in Device SEE Susceptibility from Heavy Ions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nichols, D. K.; Coss, J. R.; McCarty, K. P.; Schwartz, H. R.; Swift, G. M.; Watson, R. K.; Koga, R.; Crain, W. R.; Crawford, K. B.; Hansel, S. J.

    1995-01-01

    The sixth set of heavy ion single event effects (SEE) test data have been collected since the last IEEE publications in December issues of IEEE - Nuclear Science Transactions for 1985, 1987, 1989, 1991, and the IEEE Workshop Record, 1993. Trends in SEE susceptibility (including soft errors and latchup) for state-of- are evaluated.

  7. Three-dimensional Model of Tissue and Heavy Ions Effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ponomarev, Artem L.; Sundaresan, Alamelu; Huff, Janice L.; Cucinotta, Francis A.

    2007-01-01

    A three-dimensional tissue model was incorporated into a new Monte Carlo algorithm that simulates passage of heavy ions in a tissue box . The tissue box was given as a realistic model of tissue based on confocal microscopy images. The action of heavy ions on the cellular matrix for 2- or 3-dimensional cases was simulated. Cells were modeled as a cell culture monolayer in one example, where the data were taken directly from microscopy (2-d cell matrix), and as a multi-layer obtained from confocal microscopy (3-d case). Image segmentation was used to identify cells with precise areas/volumes in an irradiated cell culture monolayer, and slices of tissue with many cell layers. The cells were then inserted into the model box of the simulated physical space pixel by pixel. In the case of modeled tissues (3-d), the tissue box had periodic boundary conditions imposed, which extrapolates the technique to macroscopic volumes of tissue. For the real tissue (3-d), specific spatial patterns for cell apoptosis and necrosis are expected. The cell patterns were modeled based on action cross sections for apoptosis and necrosis estimated from current experimental data. A spatial correlation function indicating a higher spatial concentration of damaged cells from heavy ions relative to the low-LET radiation cell damage pattern is presented. The spatial correlation effects among necrotic cells can help studying microlesions in organs, and probable effects of directionality of heavy ion radiation on epithelium and endothelium.

  8. ON A NEW TYPE OF ACCELERATOR FOR HEAVY IONS.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    A new device (called HIPAC - Heavy Ion Plasma Accelerator) which may be capable of accelerating ions of any atomic number to energies sufficient to...achieved in this way would allow a wide variety of nuclear reactions to be studied, including inverse fission. The present primitive state of development of the HIPAC is described, and the future prospects assessed. (Author)

  9. Elastic recoil detection (ERD) with extremely heavy ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forster, J. S.; Currie, P. J.; Davies, J. A.; Siegele, R.; Wallace, S. G.; Zelenitsky, D.

    1996-06-01

    Extremely heavy-ion beams such as 209Bi in elastic recoil detection (ERD) make ERD a uniquely valuable technique for thin-film analysis of elements with mass ≤ 100. We report ERD measurements of compositional analysis of dinosaur eggshells and bones. We also show the capability of the ERD technique on studies of thin-film, high-temperature superconductors.

  10. LBL Wideroe-based heavy ion injector project

    SciTech Connect

    Staples, J.W.; Lancaster, H.D.; Yourd, R.B.

    1981-03-01

    The LBL Wideroe-based high-intensity heavy-ion injector for the SuperHILAC will be operational by April 1981. It will provide several emA of low charge state ions up through uranium at high duty factor to the SuperHILAC. Several of the subsystems have already operated to specification and will be described.

  11. Three-dimensional Model of Tissue and Heavy Ions Effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ponomarev, Artem L.; Sundaresan, Alamelu; Huff, Janice L.; Cucinotta, Francis A.

    2007-01-01

    A three-dimensional tissue model was incorporated into a new Monte Carlo algorithm that simulates passage of heavy ions in a tissue box . The tissue box was given as a realistic model of tissue based on confocal microscopy images. The action of heavy ions on the cellular matrix for 2- or 3-dimensional cases was simulated. Cells were modeled as a cell culture monolayer in one example, where the data were taken directly from microscopy (2-d cell matrix), and as a multi-layer obtained from confocal microscopy (3-d case). Image segmentation was used to identify cells with precise areas/volumes in an irradiated cell culture monolayer, and slices of tissue with many cell layers. The cells were then inserted into the model box of the simulated physical space pixel by pixel. In the case of modeled tissues (3-d), the tissue box had periodic boundary conditions imposed, which extrapolates the technique to macroscopic volumes of tissue. For the real tissue (3-d), specific spatial patterns for cell apoptosis and necrosis are expected. The cell patterns were modeled based on action cross sections for apoptosis and necrosis estimated from current experimental data. A spatial correlation function indicating a higher spatial concentration of damaged cells from heavy ions relative to the low-LET radiation cell damage pattern is presented. The spatial correlation effects among necrotic cells can help studying microlesions in organs, and probable effects of directionality of heavy ion radiation on epithelium and endothelium.

  12. Heavy ion acceleration at the AGS: Present and future plans

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Y.Y.

    1989-01-01

    The Brookhaven AGS is alternating gradient synchrotron, 807 meters in circumference, which was originally designed for only protons. Using the 15 MV Brookhaven Tandem Van de Graaff as an injector, the AGS started to accelerate heavy ions of mass lighter than sulfur. Because of the relatively poor vacuum (/approximately/10/sup /minus/8/ Torr), the AGS is not able to accelerate heavier ions which could not be fully stripped of electrons at the Tandem energy. When the AGS Booster, which is under construction, is completed the operation will be extended to all species of heavy ions including gold and uranium. Because ultra-high vacuum (/approximately/10/sup /minus/11/ Torr) is planned, the Booster can accelerate partially stripped elements. The operational experience, the parameters, and scheme of heavy ion acceleration will be presented in detail from injection to extraction, as well as future injection into the new Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC). A future plan to improve intensity of the accelerator will also be presented. 5 figs., 4 tabs.

  13. Overview of US heavy-ion fusion progress and plans

    SciTech Connect

    Logan, B.G.

    2004-06-01

    Significant experimental and theoretical progress has been made in the U.S. heavy ion fusion program on high-current sources, transport, final focusing, chambers and targets for inertial fusion energy (IFE) driven by induction linac accelerators seek to provide the scientific and technical basis for the Integrated Beam Experiment (IBX), an integrated source-to-target physics experiment recently included in the list of future facilities planned by the U.S. Department of Energy. To optimize the design of IBX and future inertial fusion energy drivers, current HIF-VNL research is addressing several key issues (representative, not inclusive): gas and electron cloud effects which can exacerbate beam loss at high beam perveance and magnet aperture fill factors; ballistic neutralized and assisted-pinch focusing of neutralized heavy ion beams; limits on longitudinal compression of both neutralized and un-neutralized heavy ion bunches; and tailoring heavy ion beams for uniform target energy deposition for high energy density physics (HEDP) studies.

  14. Inferring Magnetospheric Heavy Ion Density using EMIC Waves

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Eun-Hwa; Johnson, Jay R.; Kim, Hyomin; Lee, Dong-Hun

    2014-05-01

    We present a method to infer heavy ion concentration ratios from EMIC wave observations that result from ionion hybrid (IIH) resonance. A key feature of the ion-ion hybrid resonance is the concentration of wave energy in a field-aligned resonant mode that exhibits linear polarization. This mode converted wave is localized at the location where the frequency of a compressional wave driver matches the IIH resonance condition, which depends sensitively on the heavy ion concentration. This dependence makes it possible to estimate the heavy ion concentration ratio. In this letter, we evaluate the absorption coefficients at the IIH resonance at Earth's geosynchronous orbit for variable concentrations of He+ and field-aligned wave numbers using a dipole magnetic field. Although wave absorption occurs for a wide range of heavy ion concentrations, it only occurs for a limited range of field-aligned wave numbers such that the IIH resonance frequency is close to, but not exactly the same as the crossover frequency. Using the wave absorption and observed EMIC waves from GOES-12 satellite, we demonstrate how this technique can be used to estimate that the He+ concentration is around 4% near L = 6.6.

  15. Connecting QGP-Heavy Ion Physics to the Early Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rafelski, Johann

    2013-10-01

    We discuss properties and evolution of quark-gluon plasma in the early Universe and compare to laboratory heavy ion experiments. We describe how matter and antimatter emerged from a primordial soup of quarks and gluons. We focus our discussion on similarities and differences between the early Universe and the laboratory experiments.

  16. Electromagnetic dissociation effects in galactic heavy-ion fragmentation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norbury, J. W.; Townsend, L. W.

    1986-01-01

    Methods for calculating cross sections for the breakup of galactic heavy ions by the Coulomb fields of the interacting nuclei are presented. By using the Weizsacker-Williams method of virtual quanta, estimates of electromagnetic dissociation cross sections for a variety of reactions applicable to galactic cosmic ray shielding studies are presented and compared with other predictions and with available experimental data.

  17. Photon and dilepton production in high energy heavy ion collisions

    DOE PAGES

    Sakaguchi, Takao

    2015-05-07

    The recent results on direct photons and dileptons in high energy heavy ion collisions, obtained particularly at RHIC and LHC are reviewed. The results are new not only in terms of the probes, but also in terms of the precision. We shall discuss the physics learned from the results.

  18. Photon and dilepton production in high energy heavy ion collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Sakaguchi, Takao

    2015-05-07

    The recent results on direct photons and dileptons in high energy heavy ion collisions, obtained particularly at RHIC and LHC are reviewed. The results are new not only in terms of the probes, but also in terms of the precision. We shall discuss the physics learned from the results.

  19. Heavy-ion reaction mechanisms studied with the spin spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    Halbert, M.L.

    1983-01-01

    Experimental data and statistical-model calculations for xn and ..cap alpha..xn products of the reaction /sup 20/Ne + /sup 146/Nd at 136 MeV are shown to be in generally good agreement, indicating that equilibrium processes are dominant. Preliminary results on the heavy-ion ejectiles from /sup 19/F + /sup 159/Tb are presented.

  20. Overview of Device SEE Susceptibility from Heavy Ions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nichols, D. K.; Coss, J. R.; McCarthy, K. P.; Schwartz, H. R.; Smith, L. S.

    1998-01-01

    A fifth set of heavy ion single event effects (SEE) test data have been collected since the last IEEE publications (1,2,3,4) in December issues for 1985, 1987, 1989, and 1991. Trends in SEE susceptibility (including soft errors and latchup) for state-of-the-art parts are evaluated.

  1. Gauge/String Duality, Hot QCD and Heavy Ion Collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casalderrey-Solana, Jorge; Liu, Hong; Mateos, David; Rajagopal, Krishna; Wiedemann, Urs Achim

    2014-06-01

    1. Opening remarks; 2. A heavy ion phenomenology primer; 3. Results from lattice QCD at nonzero temperature; 4. Introducing the gauge/string duality; 5. A duality toolbox; 6. Bulk properties of strongly coupled plasma; 7. From hydrodynamics for far-from-equilibrium dynamics; 8. Probing strongly coupled plasma; 9. Quarkonium mesons in strongly coupled plasma; 10. Concluding remarks and outlook; Appendixes; References; Index.

  2. The chromatic correction in RHIC (Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider)

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, S.Y.; Dell, G.F.; Hahn, H.; Parzen, G.

    1987-01-01

    The scheme for the correction of chromatic effects in the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider at BNL is discussed. This scheme uses six families of sextupoles excited by four independent power supplies, and provides adequate control of linear and quadratic terms in the tune vs momentum dependence and reduces the variation of the betatron amplitude, vs momentum.

  3. Creating The Perfect Liquid In Heavy-Ion Collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Jacak, B.; Steinberg, P.

    2010-05-01

    In 2005 the four experimental groups at Brookhaven National Laboratory's Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) announced that collisions of gold nuclei at ultrarelativistic energies produced a 'perfect liquid' of quarks and gluons. That's something quite different from the gaseous quark-gluon state theorists and experimenters were expecting from quantum chromodynamics, the standard theory of the strong interaction.

  4. Pressure Isotropization in High Energy Heavy Ion Collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Epelbaum, Thomas; Gelis, François

    2013-12-01

    The early stages of high energy heavy ion collisions are studied in the color glass condensate framework, with a real-time classical lattice simulation. When increasing the coupling constant, we observe a rapid increase of the ratio of longitudinal to transverse pressure. The transient regime that precedes this behavior is of the order of 1fm/c.

  5. Formation of Antideuterons in Heavy-Ion Collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Ioffe, B.L.; Shushpanov, I.A.; Zyablyuk, K.N.

    2005-02-01

    The antideuteron production rate at high-energy heavy-ion collisions is calculated based on the concept of d-bar formation by antinucleons which move in the mean field of the fireball constituents (mainly pions). The explicit formula is presented for the coalescence parameter B{sub 2} in terms of deuteron binding energy and fireball volume.

  6. Dilepton production in heavy-ion collisions with in-medium spectral functions of vector mesons

    SciTech Connect

    Santini, E.; Faessler, Amand; Fuchs, C.; Cozma, M. D.; Krivoruchenko, M. I.; Martemyanov, B.

    2008-09-15

    The in-medium spectral functions of {rho} and {omega} mesons and the broadening of nucleon resonances at finite baryon density are calculated self-consistently by combining a resonance dominance model for the vector meson production with an extended vector meson dominance model. The influence of the in-medium modifications of the vector meson properties on the dilepton spectrum in heavy-ion collisions is investigated. The dilepton spectrum is generated for the C+C reaction at 2.0A GeV and compared with recent HADES Collaboration data. The collision dynamics is then described by the Tuebingen relativistic quantum molecular dynamics transport model. We find that an iterative calculation of the vector meson spectral functions that takes into account the broadening of the nucleon resonances due to their increased in-medium decay branchings is convergent and provides a reasonable description of the experimental data in the mass region 0.45{<=}M{<=}0.75 GeV. On the other side, the theoretical calculations slightly underestimate the region m{sub {pi}}{<=}M{<=}0.4 GeV. Popular in-medium scenarios such as a schematic collisional broadening and dropping vector mesons masses are discussed as well.

  7. Heavy-ion tumor therapy: Physical and radiobiological benefits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schardt, Dieter; Elsässer, Thilo; Schulz-Ertner, Daniela

    2010-01-01

    High-energy beams of charged nuclear particles (protons and heavier ions) offer significant advantages for the treatment of deep-seated local tumors in comparison to conventional megavolt photon therapy. Their physical depth-dose distribution in tissue is characterized by a small entrance dose and a distinct maximum (Bragg peak) near the end of range with a sharp fall-off at the distal edge. Taking full advantage of the well-defined range and the small lateral beam spread, modern scanning beam systems allow delivery of the dose with millimeter precision. In addition, projectiles heavier than protons such as carbon ions exhibit an enhanced biological effectiveness in the Bragg peak region caused by the dense ionization of individual particle tracks resulting in reduced cellular repair. This makes them particularly attractive for the treatment of radio-resistant tumors localized near organs at risk. While tumor therapy with protons is a well-established treatment modality with more than 60 000 patients treated worldwide, the application of heavy ions is so far restricted to a few facilities only. Nevertheless, results of clinical phase I-II trials provide evidence that carbon-ion radiotherapy might be beneficial in several tumor entities. This article reviews the progress in heavy-ion therapy, including physical and technical developments, radiobiological studies and models, as well as radiooncological studies. As a result of the promising clinical results obtained with carbon-ion beams in the past ten years at the Heavy Ion Medical Accelerator facility (Japan) and in a pilot project at GSI Darmstadt (Germany), the plans for new clinical centers for heavy-ion or combined proton and heavy-ion therapy have recently received a substantial boost.

  8. Heavy-ion radiation induced bystander effect in mice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Shujian; Sun, Yeqing; Zhang, Meng; Wang, Wei; Cui, Changna

    2012-07-01

    Radiation-induced bystander effect is defined as the induction of damage in neighboring non-hit cells by signals released from directly-irradiated cells. Recently, Low dose of high LET radiation induced bystander effects in vivo have been reported more and more. It has been indicated that radiation induced bystander effect was localized not only in bystander tissues but also in distant organs. Genomic, epigenetic, metabolomics and proteomics play significant roles in regulating heavy-ion radiation stress responses in mice. To identify the molecular mechanism that underlies bystander effects of heavy-ion radiation, the male mice head were exposed to 2000mGy dose of 12C heavy-ion radiation and the distant organ liver was detected on 1h, 6h, 12h and 24h after radiation, respectively. MSAP was used to monitor the level of polymorphic DNA methylation changes. The results show that heavy-ion irradiate mouse head can induce liver DNA methylation changes significantly. The percent of DNA methylation changes are time-dependent and highest at 6h after radiation. We also prove that the hypo-methylation changes on 1h and 6h after irradiation. But the expression level of DNA methyltransferase DNMT3a is not changed. UPLC/Synapt HDMS G2 was employed to detect the proteomics of bystander liver 1h after irradiation. 64 proteins are found significantly different between treatment and control group. GO process show that six of 64 which were unique in irradiation group are associated with apoptosis and DNA damage response. The results suggest that mice head exposed to heavy-ion radiation can induce damage and methylation pattern changed in distant organ liver. Moreover, our findings are important to understand the molecular mechanism of radiation induced bystander effects in vivo.

  9. Heavy-ion tumor therapy: Physical and radiobiological benefits

    SciTech Connect

    Schardt, Dieter; Elsaesser, Thilo; Schulz-Ertner, Daniela

    2010-01-15

    High-energy beams of charged nuclear particles (protons and heavier ions) offer significant advantages for the treatment of deep-seated local tumors in comparison to conventional megavolt photon therapy. Their physical depth-dose distribution in tissue is characterized by a small entrance dose and a distinct maximum (Bragg peak) near the end of range with a sharp fall-off at the distal edge. Taking full advantage of the well-defined range and the small lateral beam spread, modern scanning beam systems allow delivery of the dose with millimeter precision. In addition, projectiles heavier than protons such as carbon ions exhibit an enhanced biological effectiveness in the Bragg peak region caused by the dense ionization of individual particle tracks resulting in reduced cellular repair. This makes them particularly attractive for the treatment of radio-resistant tumors localized near organs at risk. While tumor therapy with protons is a well-established treatment modality with more than 60 000 patients treated worldwide, the application of heavy ions is so far restricted to a few facilities only. Nevertheless, results of clinical phase I-II trials provide evidence that carbon-ion radiotherapy might be beneficial in several tumor entities. This article reviews the progress in heavy-ion therapy, including physical and technical developments, radiobiological studies and models, as well as radiooncological studies. As a result of the promising clinical results obtained with carbon-ion beams in the past ten years at the Heavy Ion Medical Accelerator facility (Japan) and in a pilot project at GSI Darmstadt (Germany), the plans for new clinical centers for heavy-ion or combined proton and heavy-ion therapy have recently received a substantial boost.

  10. Cosmic heavy ion tracks in mesoscopic biological test objects

    SciTech Connect

    Facius, R.

    1994-12-31

    Since more than 20 years ago, when the National Academy of Sciences and the National Research Council of the U.S.A. released their report on `HZE particle effects in manned spaced flight`, it has been emphasized how difficult - if not even impossible - it is to assess their radiobiological impact on man from conventional studies where biological test organisms are stochastically exposed to `large` fluences of heavy ions. An alternative, competing approach had been realized in the BIOSTACK experiments, where the effects of single cosmic as well as accelerator - heavy ions on individual biological test organisms could be investigated. Although presented from the beginning as the preferable approach for terrestrial investigations with accelerator heavy ions too (`The BIOSTACK as an approach to high LET radiation research`), only recently this insight is gaining more widespread recognition. In space flight experiments, additional constraints imposed by the infrastructure of the vehicle or satellite further impede such investigations. Restrictions concern the physical detector systems needed for the registration of the cosmic heavy ions` trajectories as well as the biological systems eligible as test organisms. Such optimized procedures and techniques were developed for the investigations on chromosome aberrations induced by cosmic heavy ions in cells of the stem meristem of lettuce seeds (Lactuca sativa) and for the investigation of the radiobiological response of Wolffia arriza, which is the smallest flowering (water) plant. The biological effects were studied by the coworkers of the Russian Institute of Biomedical Problems (IBMP) which in cooperation with the European Space Agency ESA organized the exposure in the Biosatellites of the Cosmos series.

  11. Cosmic heavy ion tracks in mesoscopic biological test objects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Facius, R.

    1994-01-01

    Since more than 20 years ago, when the National Academy of Sciences and the National Research Council of the U.S.A. released their report on 'HZE particle effects in manned spaced flight', it has been emphasized how difficult - if not even impossible - it is to assess their radiobiological impact on man from conventional studies where biological test organisms are stochastically exposed to 'large' fluences of heavy ions. An alternative, competing approach had been realized in the BIOSTACK experiments, where the effects of single cosmic as well as accelerator - heavy ions on individual biological test organisms could be investigated. Although presented from the beginning as the preferable approach for terrestrial investigations with accelerator heavy ions too ('The BIOSTACK as an approach to high LET radiation research'), only recently this insight is gaining more widespread recognition. In space flight experiments, additional constraints imposed by the infrastructure of the vehicle or satellite further impede such investigations. Restrictions concern the physical detector systems needed for the registration of the cosmic heavy ions' trajectories as well as the biological systems eligible as test organisms. Such optimized procedures and techniques were developed for the investigations on chromosome aberrations induced by cosmic heavy ions in cells of the stem meristem of lettuce seeds (Lactuca sativa) and for the investigation of the radiobiological response of Wolffia arriza, which is the smallest flowering (water) plant. The biological effects were studied by the coworkers of the Russian Institute of Biomedical Problems (IBMP) which in cooperation with the European Space Agency ESA organized the exposure in the Biosatellites of the Cosmos series. Since biological investigations and physical measurements of particle tracks had to be performed in laboratories widely separated, the preferred fixed contact between biological test objects and the particle detectors

  12. Nucleon Electromagnetic Form Factors

    SciTech Connect

    Kees de Jager

    2004-08-01

    Although nucleons account for nearly all the visible mass in the universe, they have a complicated structure that is still incompletely understood. The first indication that nucleons have an internal structure, was the measurement of the proton magnetic moment by Frisch and Stern (1933) which revealed a large deviation from the value expected for a point-like Dirac particle. The investigation of the spatial structure of the nucleon, resulting in the first quantitative measurement of the proton charge radius, was initiated by the HEPL (Stanford) experiments in the 1950s, for which Hofstadter was awarded the 1961 Nobel prize. The first indication of a non-zero neutron charge distribution was obtained by scattering thermal neutrons off atomic electrons. The recent revival of its experimental study through the operational implementation of novel instrumentation has instigated a strong theoretical interest. Nucleon electro-magnetic form factors (EMFFs) are optimally studied through the exchange of a virtual photon, in elastic electron-nucleon scattering. The momentum transferred to the nucleon by the virtual photon can be selected to probe different scales of the nucleon, from integral properties such as the charge radius to scaling properties of its internal constituents. Polarization instrumentation, polarized beams and targets, and the measurement of the polarization of the recoiling nucleon have been essential in the accurate separation of the charge and magnetic form factors and in studies of the elusive neutron charge form factor.

  13. EDITORIAL: Focus on Heavy Ions in Biophysics and Medical Physics FOCUS ON HEAVY IONS IN BIOPHYSICS AND MEDICAL PHYSICS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durante, Marco

    2008-07-01

    Interest in energetic heavy ions is rapidly increasing in the field of biomedicine. Heavy ions are normally excluded from radiation protection, because they are not normally experienced by humans on Earth. However, knowledge of heavy ion biophysics is necessary in two fields: charged particle cancer therapy (hadrontherapy), and radiation protection in space missions. The possibility to cure tumours using accelerated heavy charged particles was first tested in Berkeley in the sixties, but results were not satisfactory. However, about 15 years ago therapy with carbon ions was resumed first in Japan and then in Europe. Heavy ions are preferable to photons for both physical and biological characteristics: the Bragg peak and limited lateral diffusion ensure a conformal dose distribution, while the high relative biological effectiveness and low oxygen enhancement ration in the Bragg peak region make the beam very effective in treating radioresistant and hypoxic tumours. Recent results coming from the National Institute of Radiological Sciences in Chiba (see the paper by Dr Tsujii and co-workers in this issue) and GSI (Germany) provide strong clinical evidence that heavy ions are indeed an extremely effective weapon in the fight against cancer. However, more research is needed in the field, especially on optimization of the treatment planning and risk of late effects in normal tissue, including secondary cancers. On the other hand, high-energy heavy ions are present in galactic cosmic radiation and, although they are rare as compared to protons, they give a major contribution in terms of equivalent dose to the crews of manned space exploratory-class missions. Exploration of the Solar System is now the main goal of the space program, and the risk caused by exposure to galactic cosmic radiation is considered a serious hindrance toward this goal, because of the high uncertainty on late effects of energetic heavy nuclei, and the lack of effective countermeasures. Risks

  14. Method for separating jets and the underlying event in heavy ion collisions at the BNL Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanks, J. A.; Sickles, A. M.; Cole, B. A.; Franz, A.; McCumber, M. P.; Morrison, D. P.; Nagle, J. L.; Pinkenburg, C. H.; Sahlmueller, B.; Steinberg, P.; von Steinkirch, M.; Stone, M.

    2012-08-01

    Reconstructed jets in heavy ion collisions are a crucial tool for understanding the quark-gluon plasma. The separation of jets from the underlying event is necessary particularly in central heavy ion reactions in order to quantify medium modifications of the parton shower and the response of the surrounding medium itself. There have been many methods proposed and implemented for studying the underlying event substructure in proton-proton and heavy ion collisions. In this paper, we detail a method for understanding underlying event contributions in Au+Au collisions at sNN=200 GeV utilizing the HIJING event generator. This method, extended from previous work by the ATLAS collaboration, provides a well-defined association of “truth jets” from the fragmentation of hard partons with “reconstructed jets” using the anti-kT algorithm. Results presented here are based on an analysis of 750M minimum bias HIJING events. We find that there is a substantial range of jet energies and radius parameters where jets are well separated from the background fluctuations (often termed “fake jets”) that make jet measurements at the BNL Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider a compelling physics program.

  15. Understanding transport simulations of heavy-ion collisions at 100 A and 400 A MeV: Comparison of heavy-ion transport codes under controlled conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Jun; Chen, Lie-Wen; Tsang, ManYee Betty; Wolter, Hermann; Zhang, Ying-Xun; Aichelin, Joerg; Colonna, Maria; Cozma, Dan; Danielewicz, Pawel; Feng, Zhao-Qing; Le Fèvre, Arnaud; Gaitanos, Theodoros; Hartnack, Christoph; Kim, Kyungil; Kim, Youngman; Ko, Che-Ming; Li, Bao-An; Li, Qing-Feng; Li, Zhu-Xia; Napolitani, Paolo; Ono, Akira; Papa, Massimo; Song, Taesoo; Su, Jun; Tian, Jun-Long; Wang, Ning; Wang, Yong-Jia; Weil, Janus; Xie, Wen-Jie; Zhang, Feng-Shou; Zhang, Guo-Qiang

    2016-04-01

    Transport simulations are very valuable for extracting physics information from heavy-ion-collision experiments. With the emergence of many different transport codes in recent years, it becomes important to estimate their robustness in extracting physics information from experiments. We report on the results of a transport-code-comparison project. Eighteen commonly used transport codes were included in this comparison: nine Boltzmann-Uehling-Uhlenbeck-type codes and nine quantum-molecular-dynamics-type codes. These codes have been asked to simulate Au +Au collisions using the same physics input for mean fields and for in-medium nucleon-nucleon cross sections, as well as the same impact parameter, the similar initialization setup, and other calculational parameters at 100 A and 400 A MeV incident energy. Among the codes we compare one-body observables such as rapidity and transverse flow distributions. We also monitor nonobservables such as the initialization of the internal states of colliding nuclei and their stability, the collision rates, and the Pauli blocking. We find that not completely identical initializations may have contributed partly to different evolutions. Different strategies to determine the collision probabilities and to enforce the Pauli blocking also produce considerably different results. There is a substantial spread in the predictions for the observables, which is much smaller at the higher incident energy. We quantify the uncertainties in the collective flow resulting from the simulation alone as about 30% at 100 A MeV and 13% at 400 A MeV, respectively. We propose further steps within the code comparison project to test the different aspects of transport simulations in a box calculation of infinite nuclear matter. This should, in particular, improve the robustness of transport model predictions at lower incident energies, where abundant amounts of data are available.

  16. Accelerator-Based Studies of Heavy Ion Interactions Relevant to Space Biomedicine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, J.; Heilbronn, L.; Zeitlin, C.

    1999-01-01

    Alternating Gradient Synchrotron at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL AGS) and the Heavy Ion Medical Accelerator (HIMAC) in Chiba, Japan. Until fairly recently most of these experiments were done to investigate fundamental problems in nuclear physics, but with the increasing interest in heavy charged particles on the part of the space flight, radiobiology and radiotherapy communities, an increasing number of experiments are being directed at these areas. Some of these measurements are discussed in references therein. Over the past several years, our group has taken cross section and fluence data at the AGS and HIMAC for several incident beams with nuclear charge, Z, between 6 and 26 at energies between 290 and 1050 MeV/nucleon. Iron (Z = 26) has been studied most extensively, since it is the heaviest ion present in significant numbers in the GCR. Targets have included tissue-equivalent and proposed shielding materials, as well as a variety of elemental targets for cross section measurements. Most of the data were taken along the beam axis, but measurements have been made off-axis, as well. Here we present selected data and briefly discuss some implications for spacecraft and planetary habitat design.

  17. Accelerator-Based Studies of Heavy Ion Interactions Relevant to Space Biomedicine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, J.; Heilbronn, L.; Zeitlin, C.

    1999-01-01

    Alternating Gradient Synchrotron at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL AGS) and the Heavy Ion Medical Accelerator (HIMAC) in Chiba, Japan. Until fairly recently most of these experiments were done to investigate fundamental problems in nuclear physics, but with the increasing interest in heavy charged particles on the part of the space flight, radiobiology and radiotherapy communities, an increasing number of experiments are being directed at these areas. Some of these measurements are discussed in references therein. Over the past several years, our group has taken cross section and fluence data at the AGS and HIMAC for several incident beams with nuclear charge, Z, between 6 and 26 at energies between 290 and 1050 MeV/nucleon. Iron (Z = 26) has been studied most extensively, since it is the heaviest ion present in significant numbers in the GCR. Targets have included tissue-equivalent and proposed shielding materials, as well as a variety of elemental targets for cross section measurements. Most of the data were taken along the beam axis, but measurements have been made off-axis, as well. Here we present selected data and briefly discuss some implications for spacecraft and planetary habitat design.

  18. Heavy Ion Collisions at the LHC - Last Call for Predictions

    SciTech Connect

    Armesto, N; Borghini, N; Jeon, S; Wiedemann, U A; Abreu, S; Akkelin, V; Alam, J; Albacete, J L; Andronic, A; Antonuv, D; Arleo, F; Armesto, N; Arsene, I C; Barnafoldi, G G; Barrette, J; Bauchle, B; Becattini, F; Betz, B; Bleicher, M; Bluhm, M; Boer, D; Bopp, F W; Braun-Munzinger, P; Bravina, L; Busza, W; Cacciari, M; Capella, A; Casalderrey-Solana, J; Chatterjee, R; Chen, L; Cleymans, J; Cole, B A; delValle, Z C; Csernai, L P; Cunqueiro, L; Dainese, A; de Deus, J D; Ding, H; Djordjevic, M; Drescher, H; Dremin, I M; Dumitru, A; El, A; Engel, R; d'Enterria, D; Eskola, K J; Fai, G; Ferreiro, E G; Fries, R J; Frodermann, E; Fujii, H; Gale, C; Gelis, F; Goncalves, V P; Greco, V; Gyulassy, M; van Hees, H; Heinz, U; Honkanen, H; Horowitz, W A; Iancu, E; Ingelman, G; Jalilian-Marian, J; Jeon, S; Kaidalov, A B; Kampfer, B; Kang, Z; Karpenko, I A; Kestin, G; Kharzeev, D; Ko, C M; Koch, B; Kopeliovich, B; Kozlov, M; Kraus, I; Kuznetsova, I; Lee, S H; Lednicky, R; Letessier, J; Levin, E; Li, B; Lin, Z; Liu, H; Liu, W; Loizides, C; Lokhtin, I P; Machado, M T; Malinina, L V; Managadze, A M; Mangano, M L; Mannarelli, M; Manuel, C; Martinez, G; Milhano, J G; Mocsy, A; Molnar, D; Nardi, M; Nayak, J K; Niemi, H; Oeschler, H; Ollitrault, J; Paic, G; Pajares, C; Pantuev, V S; Papp, G; Peressounko, D; Petreczky, P; Petrushanko, S V; Piccinini, F; Pierog, T; Pirner, H J; Porteboeuf, S; Potashnikova, I; Qin, G Y; Qiu, J; Rafelski, J; Rajagopal, K; Ranft, J; Rapp, R; Rasanen, S S; Rathsman, J; Rau, P; Redlich, K; Renk, T; Rezaeian, A H; Rischke, D; Roesler, S; Ruppert, J; Ruuskanen, P V; Salgado, C A; Sapeta, S; Sarcevic, I; Sarkar, S; Sarycheva, L I; Schmidt, I; Shoski, A I; Sinha, B; Sinyukov, Y M; Snigirev, A M; Srivastava, D K; Stachel, J; Stasto, A; Stocker, H; Teplov, C Y; Thews, R L; Torrieri, G; Pop, V T; Triantafyllopoulos, D N; Tuchin, K L; Turbide, S; Tywoniuk, K; Utermann, A; Venugopalan, R; Vitev, I; Vogt, R; Wang, E; Wang, X N; Werner, K; Wessels, E; Wheaton, S; Wicks, S; Wiedemann, U A; Wolschin, G; Xiao, B; Xu, Z; Yasui, S; Zabrodin, E; Zapp, K; Zhang, B

    2008-02-25

    In August 2006, the CERN Theory Unit announced to restructure its visitor program and to create a 'CERN Theory Institute', where 1-3 month long specific programs can take place. The first such Institute was held from 14 May to 10 June 2007, focusing on 'Heavy Ion Collisions at the LHC - Last Call for Predictions'. It brought together close to 100 scientists working on the theory of ultra-relativistic heavy ion collisions. The aim of this workshop was to review and document the status of expectations and predictions for the heavy ion program at the Large Hadron Collider LHC before its start. LHC will explore heavy ion collisions at {approx} 30 times higher center of mass energy than explored previously at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider RHIC. So, on the one hand, the charge of this workshop provided a natural forum for the exchange of the most recent ideas, and allowed to monitor how the understanding of heavy ion collisions has evolved in recent years with the data from RHIC, and with the preparation of the LHC experimental program. On the other hand, the workshop aimed at a documentation which helps to distinguish pre- from post-dictions. An analogous documentation of the 'Last Call for Predictions' [1] was prepared prior to the start of the heavy-ion program at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider RHIC, and it proved useful in the subsequent discussion and interpretation of RHIC data. The present write-up is the documentation of predictions for the LHC heavy ion program, received or presented during the CERN TH Institute. The set-up of the CERN TH Institute allowed us to aim for the wide-most coverage of predictions. There were more than 100 presentations and discussions during the workshop. Moreover, those unable to attend could still participate by submitting predictions in written form during the workshop. This followed the spirit that everybody interested in making a prediction had the right to be heard. To arrive at a concise document, we required that

  19. Argonne's program in heavy-ion fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, R.L.; Arnold, R.; Burke, R.; Watson, J.

    1980-01-01

    Argonne is constructing the initial part of a xenon accelerator which could serve as the driver for an Inertial Confinement Fusion power plant. The project consists of a Xe source, a 1.5 Mv Dynamitron preaccelerator, independently phased rf cavities as a low ..beta.. linac, and Wideroe linac at 12.5 and 25 MHz. The beam will be injected at 220 MeV into a circular ring to its space charge limit, transferred to a second ring for multiturn injection after an x-y rotation, extracted, compressed in time duration, transported and focused onto foil targets. The project thus will demonstrate nearly all of the beam manipulations involved in a full scale ICF driver. The feasibility of accelerating in the accumulator ring to 10 GeV to achieve adequate beam energy to permit energy deposition experiments in hot plasma is being studied. The status and future plans of this project are discussed.

  20. Chiral symmetry restoration versus deconfinement in heavy-ion collisions at high baryon density

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bratkovskaya, E. L.; Palmese, A.; Cassing, W.; Seifert, E.; Steinert, T.; Moreau, P.

    2017-07-01

    The effect of the chiral symmetry restoration (CSR) on observables from heavy-ion collisions is studied in the energy range \\sqrt{{s}NN}=3-20 {GeV} within the Parton-Hadron-String Dynamics (PHSD) transport approach. The PHSD includes the deconfinement phase transition as well as essential aspects of CSR in the dense and hot hadronic medium, which are incorporated in the Schwinger mechanism for the hadronic particle production. We adopt different parametrizations of the nuclear equation of state from the non-linear σ - ω model, which enter in the computation of the quark scalar density for the CSR mechanism, in order to estimate the uncertainty in our calculations. For the pion-nucleon Σ-term we adopt Σ π ≈ 45 MeV which corresponds to some ‘world average’. Our systematic studies show that chiral symmetry restoration plays a crucial role in the description of heavy-ion collisions at \\sqrt{{s}NN}=3-20 {GeV}, realizing an increase of the hadronic particle production in the strangeness sector with respect to the non-strange one. We identify particle abundances and rapidity spectra to be suitable probes in order to extract information about CSR, while transverse mass spectra are less sensitive. Our results provide a microscopic explanation for the “horn” structure in the excitation function of the K +/π + ratio: the CSR in the hadronic phase produces the steep increase of this particle ratio up to \\sqrt{{s}NN}≈ 7 {GeV}, while the drop at higher energies is associated to the appearance of a deconfined partonic medium.

  1. TOPICAL REVIEW: Probing the nuclear symmetry energy with heavy-ion collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Toro, M.; Baran, V.; Colonna, M.; Greco, V.

    2010-08-01

    Heavy ion collisions (HICs) represent a unique tool to probe the in-medium nuclear interaction in regions away from saturation. In this review we present a selection of new reaction observables in dissipative collisions particularly sensitive to the symmetry term of the nuclear equation of state (Iso-EoS). We will first discuss the isospin equilibration dynamics. At low energies this manifests via the recently observed dynamical dipole radiation, due to a collective neutron-proton oscillation with the symmetry term acting as a restoring force. At higher beam energies Iso-EoS effects will be seen in an isospin diffusion mechanism, via imbalance ratio measurements, in particular from correlations to the total kinetic energy loss. For fragmentation reactions in central events we suggest to look at the coupling between isospin distillation and radial flow. In neck fragmentation reactions important Iso-EoS information can be obtained from the fragment isospin content, velocity and alignment correlations. The high-density symmetry term can be probed from isospin effects on heavy-ion reactions at relativistic energies (few A GeV range), in particular for high transverse momentum selections of the reaction products. Rather isospin sensitive observables are proposed from nucleon/cluster emissions, collective flows and meson production. The possibility of shedding light on the controversial neutron/proton effective mass splitting in asymmetric matter is also suggested. A large symmetry repulsion at high baryon density will also lead to an 'earlier' hadron-deconfinement transition in n-rich matter. The binodal transition line of the (T, ρB) diagram is lowered to a region accessible through heavy-ion collisions in the energy range of the new planned facilities, e.g. the FAIR/NICA projects. Some observable effects of the formation of a mixed phase are suggested, in particular a neutron trapping mechanism. The dependence of the results on a suitable treatment of the isovector

  2. Single ion induced surface nanostructures: a comparison between slow highly charged and swift heavy ions.

    PubMed

    Aumayr, Friedrich; Facsko, Stefan; El-Said, Ayman S; Trautmann, Christina; Schleberger, Marika

    2011-10-05

    This topical review focuses on recent advances in the understanding of the formation of surface nanostructures, an intriguing phenomenon in ion-surface interaction due to the impact of individual ions. In many solid targets, swift heavy ions produce narrow cylindrical tracks accompanied by the formation of a surface nanostructure. More recently, a similar nanometric surface effect has been revealed for the impact of individual, very slow but highly charged ions. While swift ions transfer their large kinetic energy to the target via ionization and electronic excitation processes (electronic stopping), slow highly charged ions produce surface structures due to potential energy deposited at the top surface layers. Despite the differences in primary excitation, the similarity between the nanostructures is striking and strongly points to a common mechanism related to the energy transfer from the electronic to the lattice system of the target. A comparison of surface structures induced by swift heavy ions and slow highly charged ions provides a valuable insight to better understand the formation mechanisms.

  3. Heavy-ion microbeams and bystander effect studies at JAEA-Takasaki

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobayashi, Y.; Funayama, T.; Sakashita, T.; Furusawa, Y.; Wada, S.; Yokota, Y.; Kakizaki, T.; Hamada, N.; Ni, M.

    During a long-term space mission astronauts are constantly exposed to space radiation especially of various kinds of heavy charged particles energetic heavy ions at low dose and low dose rate Heavy charged particles transfer their energy to biological organisms through high-density ionization along the particle trajectories The population of cells exposed to a very low dose of high-LET heavy particles contains a few cells hit by a particle while the majority of the cells receive no radiation damage At somewhat higher doses some of the cells receive two or more events according to the Poisson distribution of ion injections This fluctuation of particle trajectories through individual cells makes interpretation of radiological effects of heavy ions difficult Therefore we have established a single cell irradiation system which allows selected cells to be individually hit with defined number of heavy charged particles using a collimated heavy-ion microbeam apparatus at JAEA-Takasaki This system has been developed to study radiobiological processes in hit cells and bystander cells exposed to low dose and low dose-rate high-LET radiations in ways that cannot be achieved using conventional broad-field exposures Individual cultured cells grown in special dishes were irradiated in the atmosphere with a single or defined numbers of 18 3 MeV amu 12 C 13 0 or 17 5 MeV amu 20 Ne and 11 5 MeV amu 40 Ar ions Targeting and irradiation of the cells were performed automatically according to the positional data of the target cells

  4. Effects of low-dose heavy ions on embryonic development in mice and on melanocyte differentiation in the epidermis and hair bulb

    PubMed Central

    Hirobe, Tomohisa; Eguchi-Kasai, Kiyomi; Sugaya, Kimihiko; Murakami, Masahiro

    2013-01-01

    The effects of prenatal low-dose irradiation with heavy ions on embryonic development in mice and on melanocyte differentiation are not well understood. We performed whole-body irradiation of pregnant C57BL/10J mice at embryonic Day 9 (E9) with a single dose of γ-rays, silicon, argon or iron ions. The number of living embryos and embryonic body weight at E18 decreased after exposure to heavy ions at high doses. Malformations such as small eyes and limb anomalies were observed in heavy-ion-treated embryos, but not in γ-ray-treated embryos. The frequency of abnormally curved tails was increased by exposure to γ-rays and argon and iron ions even at a dose of 0.1 Gy (P < 0.05). In contrast, a dose-dependent decrease in the number of epidermal melanoblasts/melanocytes and hair bulb melanocytes was observed after 0.1 Gy irradiation with γ-rays or heavy ions (P < 0.01). The decrease in the number of dorsal hair bulb melanocytes, dorsal and ventral epidermal melanoblasts/melanocytes and ventral hair bulb melanocytes was not necessarily correlated with the linear energy transfer of the radiation tested. Moreover, the effects of heavy ions were larger on the ventral skin than on the dorsal skin, indicating that the sensitivity of melanocytes to heavy ions differs between the dorsal and ventral skin. Taken together, these results suggest that the effects of the low-dose heavy ions differ between cell types and tissues, and the effects on the prenatal development of mice and melanocyte development are not necessarily greater than those of γ-rays. PMID:23230241

  5. Effects of low-dose heavy ions on embryonic development in mice and on melanocyte differentiation in the epidermis and hair bulb.

    PubMed

    Hirobe, Tomohisa; Eguchi-Kasai, Kiyomi; Sugaya, Kimihiko; Murakami, Masahiro

    2013-05-01

    The effects of prenatal low-dose irradiation with heavy ions on embryonic development in mice and on melanocyte differentiation are not well understood. We performed whole-body irradiation of pregnant C57BL/10J mice at embryonic Day 9 (E9) with a single dose of γ-rays, silicon, argon or iron ions. The number of living embryos and embryonic body weight at E18 decreased after exposure to heavy ions at high doses. Malformations such as small eyes and limb anomalies were observed in heavy-ion-treated embryos, but not in γ-ray-treated embryos. The frequency of abnormally curved tails was increased by exposure to γ-rays and argon and iron ions even at a dose of 0.1 Gy (P < 0.05). In contrast, a dose-dependent decrease in the number of epidermal melanoblasts/melanocytes and hair bulb melanocytes was observed after 0.1 Gy irradiation with γ-rays or heavy ions (P < 0.01). The decrease in the number of dorsal hair bulb melanocytes, dorsal and ventral epidermal melanoblasts/melanocytes and ventral hair bulb melanocytes was not necessarily correlated with the linear energy transfer of the radiation tested. Moreover, the effects of heavy ions were larger on the ventral skin than on the dorsal skin, indicating that the sensitivity of melanocytes to heavy ions differs between the dorsal and ventral skin. Taken together, these results suggest that the effects of the low-dose heavy ions differ between cell types and tissues, and the effects on the prenatal development of mice and melanocyte development are not necessarily greater than those of γ-rays.

  6. O (αs3) analysis of inclusive jet and di-jet production in heavy ion reactions at the Large Hadron Collider

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Yuncun; Vitev, Ivan; Zhang, Ben-Wei

    2012-07-01

    Jets physics in heavy ion reactions is an important new area of active research at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) and at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) that paves the way for novel tests of QCD multi-parton dynamics in dense nuclear matter. At present, perturbative QCD calculations of hard probes in elementary nucleon-nucleon reactions can be consistently combined with the effects of the nuclear medium up to O (αs3). While such accuracy is desirable but not necessary for leading particle tomography, it is absolutely essential for the new jet observables. With this motivation, we present first results and predictions to O (αs3) for the recent LHC lead-lead (Pb + Pb) run at a center-of-mass energy of 2.76 TeV per nucleon-nucleon pair. Specifically, we focus on the suppression of the single and double inclusive jet cross sections. Our analysis includes not only final-state inelastic parton interactions in the QGP, but also initial-state cold nuclear matter effects and an estimate of the non-perturbative hadronization corrections. We demonstrate how an enhanced di-jet asymmetry in central Pb + Pb reactions at the LHC, recently measured by the ATLAS and CMS experiments, can be derived from these results. We show quantitatively that a fraction of this enhancement may be related to the ambiguity in the separation between the jet and the soft background medium and/or the diffusion of the parton shower energy away from the jet axis through collisional processes. We point to a suite of measurements that can help build a consistent picture of parton shower modification in heavy ion collisions at the LHC.

  7. Selected experimental results from heavy-ion collisions at LHC

    DOE PAGES

    Singh, Ranbir; Kumar, Lokesh; Netrakanti, Pawan Kumar; ...

    2013-01-01

    We reviewmore » a subset of experimental results from the heavy-ion collisions at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) facility at CERN. Excellent consistency is observed across all the experiments at the LHC (at center of mass energysNN=2.76 TeV) for the measurements such as charged particle multiplicity density, azimuthal anisotropy coefficients, and nuclear modification factor of charged hadrons. Comparison to similar measurements from the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) at lower energy (sNN=200 GeV) suggests that the system formed at LHC has a higher energy density and larger system size and lives for a longer time. These measurements are compared to model calculations to obtain physical insights on the properties of matter created at the RHIC and LHC.« less

  8. Low- to medium-β cavities for heavy ion acceleration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Facco, Alberto

    2017-02-01

    Acceleration of low- and medium-β heavy ions by means of superconducting (SC) linear accelerators (linacs) was made possible by the development, during four decades, of a particular class of cavities characterized by low operation frequency, several different shapes and different electromagnetic modes of operation. Their performance, initially rather poor in operating accelerators, have steadily increased along with the technological progress and nowadays the gap with the high-β, elliptical cavities is close to be filled. Initially confined to a very small number of applications, this family of cavities evolved in many directions becoming one of the most widespread in linacs. Nowadays it is present in the majority of superconducting radio-frequency ion linac projects worldwide. An overview of low- and medium-β SC cavities for heavy ions, focused on their recent evolution and achievements, will be given.

  9. Longitudinal beam dynamics for heavy ion fusion using WARPrz

    SciTech Connect

    Callahan, D.A.; Langdon, A.B.; Friedman, A.; Haber, I.

    1993-02-22

    WARPrz is a 2.5 dimensional, cylindrically symmetric, electrostatic, particle-in-cell code. It is part of the WARP family of codes which has been developed to study heavy ion fusion driver issues. WARPrz is being used to study the longitudinal dynamics of heavy ion beams including a longitudinal instability that is driven by the impedance of the LINAC accelerating modules. This instability is of concern because it can enhance longitudinal momentum spread; chromatic abhoration in the lens system restricts the amount of momentum spread allowed in the beam in the final focusing system. The impedance of the modules is modeled by a continuum of resistors and capacitors in parallel in WARPrz. We discuss simulations of this instability including the effect of finite temperature and reflection of perturbations off the beam ends. We also discuss intermittency of axial confining fields (``ears`` fields) as a seed for this instability.

  10. <span class="hlt">Heavy-Ion</span> Imaging Applied To Medicine

    SciTech Connect

    Fabrikant, J. I.; Tobias, C. A.; Capp, M. P.; Benton, E. V.; Holley, W. R.; Gray, Joel E.; Hendee, William R.; Haus, Andrew G.; Properzio, William S.

    1980-08-18

    Heavy particle radiography is a newly developed noninvasive low dose imaging procedure with increased resolution of minute density differences in soft tissues of the body. The method utilizes accelerated high energy ions, primarily carbon and neon, at the BEVALAC accelerator at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory. The research program applied to medicine utilizes heavy-ion radiography for low dose mammography, for treatment planning for cancer patients, and for imaging and accurate densitometry of skeletal structures and brain and spinal neoplasms. The presentation will be illustrated with clinical cases under study. Discussion will include the potential of heavy-ion imaging, and particularly reconstruction tomography, as an adjunct to existing diagnostic imaging procedures in medicine, both for the applications to the diagnosis, management and treatment of clinical cancer in man, but also for the early detection of small soft tissue tumors at low radiation dose.

  11. Laser-driven multicharged heavy ion beam acceleration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishiuchi, M.; Sakaki, H.; Esirkepov, T. Z.; Nishio, K.; Pikuz, T. A.; Faenov, A. Y.; Pirozhkov, A. S.; Sagisaka, A.; Ogura, K.; Kanasaki, M.; Kiriyama, H.; Fukuda, Y.; Kando, M.; Yamauchi, T.; Watanabe, Y.; Bulanov, S. V.; Kondo, K.; Imai, K.; Nagamiya, S.

    2015-05-01

    Experimental demonstration of multi-charged heavy ion acceleration from the interaction between the ultra-intense short pulse laser system and the metal target is presented. The laser pulse of <10 J laser energy, 36 fs pulse width, and the contrast level of ~1010 from 200 TW class Ti:sapphire J-KAREN laser system at JAEA is used in the experiment. Almost fully stripped Fe ions accelerated up to 0.9 GeV are demonstrated. This is achieved by the high intensity laser field of ˜ 1021Wcm-2 interacting with the solid density target. The demonstrated iron ions with high charge to mass ratio (Q/M) is difficult to be achieved by the conventional heavy ion source technique in the accelerators.

  12. Anti-biofilm activity of Fe heavy ion irradiated polycarbonate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joshi, R. P.; Hareesh, K.; Bankar, A.; Sanjeev, Ganesh; Asokan, K.; Kanjilal, D.; Dahiwale, S. S.; Bhoraskar, V. N.; Dhole, S. D.

    2016-10-01

    Polycarbonate (PC) polymers were investigated before and after high energy heavy ion irradiation for anti-bacterial properties. These PC films were irradiated by Fe heavy ions with two energies, viz, 60 and 120 MeV, at different fluences in the range from 1 × 1011 ions/cm2 to 1 × 1013 ions/cm2. UV-Visible spectroscopic results showed optical band gap decreased with increase in ion fluences due to chain scission mainly at carbonyl group of PC which is also corroborated by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopic results. X-ray diffractogram results showed decrease in crystallinity of PC after irradiation which leads to decrease in molecular weight. This is confirmed by rheological studies and also by differential scanning calorimetric results. The irradiated PC samples showed modification in their surfaces prevents biofilm formation of human pathogen, Salmonella typhi.

  13. Development of heavy-ion radiotherapy technology with HIMAC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noda, Koji

    2016-09-01

    Since 1994, HIMAC has carried out clinical studies and treatments for more than 9000 cancer patients with carbon-ion beams. During the first decade of the HIMAC study, a single beam-wobbling method, adopted as the HIMAC beam-delivery technique, was improved for treatments of moving tumors and for obtaining more conformal dose distribution. During the second decade, a pencil-beam 3D scanning method has been developed toward an “adaptive cancer treatment” for treatments of both static and moving tumors. A new treatment research facility was constructed with HIMAC in order to verify the developed 3D scanning technology through a clinical study that has been successfully conducted since 2011. As the next stage, a compact heavy-ion rotating gantry with a superconducting technology has been developed for the more accurate and shorter-course treatments. The twenty-year development of the heavy-ion radiotherapy technologies including accelerator technologies with HIMAC is reviewed.

  14. Factorization, the Glasma and the Ridge in heavy ion collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Venugopalan, Raju

    2008-10-13

    High energy heavy ion collisions can be efficiently described as the collision of two sheets of Color Glass Condensate. The dynamics of the collision can be studied ab initio in a systematic effective field theory approach. This requires factorization theorems that separate the initial state evolution of the wave functions with energy from the final state interactions that produce matter with high energy densities called the Glasma. We discuss how this matter is formed, its remarkable properties and its relevance for understanding thermalization of the Quark Gluon Plasma in heavy ion collisions. Long range rapidity correlations in the collision that have a remarkable ridge like structure may allow us to probe early times in the collision and infer directly the properties of the Glasma.

  15. Multiple beam induction accelerators for heavy ion fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seidl, Peter A.; Barnard, John J.; Faltens, Andris; Friedman, Alex; Waldron, William L.

    2014-01-01

    Induction accelerators are appealing for heavy-ion driven inertial fusion energy (HIF) because of their high efficiency and their demonstrated capability to accelerate high beam current (≥10 kA in some applications). For the HIF application, accomplishments and challenges are summarized. HIF research and development has demonstrated the production of single ion beams with the required emittance, current, and energy suitable for injection into an induction linear accelerator. Driver scale beams have been transported in quadrupole channels of the order of 10% of the number of quadrupoles of a driver. We review the design and operation of induction accelerators and the relevant aspects of their use as drivers for HIF. We describe intermediate research steps that would provide the basis for a heavy-ion research facility capable of heating matter to fusion relevant temperatures and densities, and also to test and demonstrate an accelerator architecture that scales well to a fusion power plant.

  16. Accelerators for heavy ion inertial fusion: Progress and plans

    SciTech Connect

    Bangerter, R.O.; Friedman, A.; Herrmannsfeldt, W.B.

    1994-08-01

    The Heavy Ion Inertial Fusion Program is the principal part of the Inertial Fusion Energy Program in the Office of Fusion Energy of the U.S. Department of Energy. The emphasis of the Heavy Ion Program is the development of accelerators for fusion power production. Target physics research and some elements of fusion chamber development are supported in the much larger Inertial Confinement Fusion Program, a dual purpose (defense and energy) program in the Defense Programs part of the Department of Energy. The accelerator research program will establish feasibility through a sequence of scaled experiments that will demonstrate key physics and engineering issues at low cost compared to other fusion programs. This paper discusses progress in the accelerator program and outlines how the planned research will address the key economic issues of inertial fusion energy.

  17. Compact High-Current Heavy-Ion Injector

    SciTech Connect

    Westenskow, G.A.; Grote, D.P.; Kwan, J.W.; Bieniosek, F.

    2005-10-05

    To provide a compact high-brightness heavy-ion beam source for Heavy Ion Fusion (HIF), we have been experimenting with merging multi-beamlets in an injector which uses an RF plasma source. An array of converging beamlets was used to produce a beam with the envelope radius, convergence, and ellipticity matched to an electrostatic quadrupole (ESQ) channel. Experimental results were in good quantitative agreement with simulation and have demonstrated the feasibility of this concept. The size of a driver-scale injector system using this approach will be several times smaller than one designed using traditional single large-aperture beams. The success of this experiment has possible significant economical and technical impacts on the architecture of HIF drivers.

  18. Advances in U.S. Heavy Ion Fusion Science

    SciTech Connect

    Logan, B.G.; Barnard, J.J.; Bieniosek, F.M.; Cohen, R.H.; Coleman, J.E.; Davidson, R.C.; Efthimion, P.C.; Friedman, A.; Gilson, E.P.; Grisham, L.R.; Grote, D.P.; Henestroza, E.; Kaganovich, I.D.; Kireeff-Covo, M.; Lee, E.P.; Leitner, M.A.; Lund, S.M.; Molvik, A.W.; Ni, P.; Perkins, L. J.; Qin, H.; Roy, P.K.; Sefkow, A.B.; Seidl, P.A.; Startsev, E.A.; Waldron, W.L.

    2007-09-01

    During the past two years, the US heavy ion fusion science program has made significant experimental and theoretical progress in simultaneous transverse and longitudinal beam compression, ion-beam-driven warm dense matter targets, high-brightness beam transport, advanced theory and numerical simulations, and heavy ion target physics for fusion. First experiments combining radial and longitudinal compression {pi} of intense ion beams propagating through background plasma resulted in on-axis beam densities increased by 700X at the focal plane. With further improvements planned in 2008, these results enable initial ion beam target experiments in warm dense matter to begin next year. They are assessing how these new techniques apply to higher-gain direct-drive targets for inertial fusion energy.

  19. Advances in U.S. Heavy Ion Fusion Science

    SciTech Connect

    Barnard, JJ; Logan, B.G.; Barnard, J.J.; Bieniosek, F.M.; Cohen, R.H.; Coleman, J.E.; Davidson, R.C.; Efthimion, P.C.; Friedman, A.; Gilson, E.P.; Grisham, L.R.; Grote, D.P.; Henestroza, E.; Kaganovich, I.D.; Kireeff-Covo, M.; Lee, E.P.; Leitner, M.A.; Lund, S.M.; Molvik, A.W.; Ni, P.; Perkins, L.J.; Qin, H.; Roy, P.K.; Sefkow, A.B.; Seidl, P.A.; Startsev, E.A.; Waldron, W.L.

    2007-09-03

    During the past two years, the US heavy ion fusion science program has made significant experimental and theoretical progress in simultaneous transverse and longitudinal beam compression, ion-beam-driven warm dense matter targets, high-brightness beam transport, advanced theory and numerical simulations, and heavy ion target physics for fusion. First experiments combining radial and longitudinal compression {pi} of intense ion beams propagating through background plasma resulted in on-axis beam densities increased by 700X at the focal plane. With further improvements planned in 2008, these results enable initial ion beam target experiments in warm dense matter to begin next year. They are assessing how these new techniques apply to higher-gain direct-drive targets for inertial fusion energy.

  20. Nonresonant interaction of heavy ions with electromagnetic ion cyclotron waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berchem, J.; Gendrin, R.

    1985-01-01

    The motion of a heavy ion in the presence of an intense ultralow-frequency electromagnetic wave propagating along the dc magnetic field is analyzed. Starting from the basic equations of motion and from their associated two invariants, the heavy ion velocity-space trajectories are drawn. It is shown that after a certain time, particles whose initial phase angles are randomly distributed tend to bunch together, provided that the wave intensity b-sub-1 is sufficiently large. The importance of these results for the interpretation of the recently observed acceleration of singly charged He ions in conjunction with the occurrence of large-amplitude ion cyclotron waves in the equatorial magnetosphere is discussed.

  1. Energetic heavy ion dominance in the outer magnetosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cohen, Ian; Mitchell, Don; Mauk, Barry; Anderson, Brian; Ohtani, Shin; Kistler, Lynn; Hamilton, Doug; Turner, Drew; Blake, Bern; Fennell, Joe; Jaynes, Allison; Leonard, Trevor; Gerrard, Andy; Lanzerotti, Lou; Burch, Jim

    2017-04-01

    Despite the extensive study of ring current ion composition, little exists in the literature regarding the nature of energetic ions with energies >200 keV, especially in the outer magnetosphere (r > 9 RE). In particular, information on the relative fluxes and spectral shapes of the different ion species over these energy ranges is lacking. However, new observations from the Energetic Ion Spectrometer (EIS) instruments on the Magnetospheric Multiscale (MMS) spacecraft have revealed the dominance of heavy ion species (specifically oxygen and helium) at these energies in the outer magnetosphere. This result is supported by prior but previously unreported observations obtained by the Geotail spacecraft, which also show that these heavy ion species are primarily dominated by multiply-charged populations from the solar wind. Using additional observations from the inner magnetosphere obtained by the RBSPICE instrument on the Van Allen Probes suggest, we will investigate whether this effect is due to a preferential loss of protons in the outer magnetosphere.

  2. Activation of accelerator construction materials by heavy ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katrík, P.; Mustafin, E.; Hoffmann, D. H. H.; Pavlovič, M.; Strašík, I.

    2015-12-01

    Activation data for an aluminum target irradiated by 200 MeV/u 238U ion beam are presented in the paper. The target was irradiated in the stacked-foil geometry and analyzed using gamma-ray spectroscopy. The purpose of the experiment was to study the role of primary particles, projectile fragments, and target fragments in the activation process using the depth profiling of residual activity. The study brought information on which particles contribute dominantly to the target activation. The experimental data were compared with the Monte Carlo simulations by the FLUKA 2011.2c.0 code. This study is a part of a research program devoted to activation of accelerator construction materials by high-energy (⩾200 MeV/u) heavy ions at GSI Darmstadt. The experimental data are needed to validate the computer codes used for simulation of interaction of swift heavy ions with matter.

  3. Macroscopic theory of heavy-ion fusion reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, S.-W.; Lee, Y. J.; Kim, B. T.; Cha, D.

    1989-05-01

    We have studied the heavy-ion fusion reactions by a macroscopic model which was proposed by Bertsch several years ago. It employed the Newtonian dynamics and was constructed in such a way that the essential features of time-dependent Hartree-Fock results could be reproduced. We have applied the model to fusion of light heavy-ion systems leading to the same compound nucleus 56Ni. It is shown that the model, being incorporated with the angular-momentum-dependent extra-push energy of Swiatecki, can account well for the fusion cross sections up to very high energies where cross section decreases as energy increases, and that the main reason for the decrease is the opening of the low angular momentum window.

  4. UNIVERSAL BEHAVIOR OF CHARGED PARTICLE PRODUCTION IN HEAVY ION COLLISIONS.

    SciTech Connect

    STEINBERG,P.A.FOR THE PHOBOS COLLABORATION

    2002-07-24

    The PHOBOS experiment at RHIC has measured the multiplicity of primary charged particles as a function of centrality and pseudorapidity in Au+Au collisions at {radical}(s{sub NN}) = 19.6, 130 and 200 GeV. Two observations indicate universal behavior of charged particle production in heavy ion collisions. The first is that forward particle production, over a range of energies, follows a universal limiting curve with a non-trivial centrality dependence. The second arises from comparisons with pp/{bar p}p and e{sup +}e{sup -} data. / in nuclear collisions at high energy scales with {radical}s in a similar way as N{sub ch} in e{sup +}e{sup -} collisions and has a very weak centrality dependence. These features may be related to a reduction in the leading particle effect due to the multiple collisions suffered per participant in heavy ion collisions.

  5. Uniform fuel target implosion in heavy ion inertial fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawata, S.; Karino, T.; Kondo, S.; Iinuma, T.; Barada, D.; Ma, Y. Y.; Ogoyski, A. I.

    2016-05-01

    For a steady operation of a fusion power plant the target implosion should be robust against the implosion non-uniformities. In this paper the non-uniformity mitigation mechanisms in the heavy ion beam (HIB) illumination are discussed in heavy ion inertial fusion (HIF). A density valley appears in the energy absorber, and the large-scale density valley also works as a radiation energy confinement layer, which contributes to the radiation energy smoothing for the HIB illumination non-uniformity. The large density-gradient scale, which is typically ∼500μm in HIF targets, also contributes to a reduction of the Rayleigh- Taylor instability growth rate. In HIF a wobbling HIBs illumination would also reduce the Rayleigh-Taylor instability growth and to realize a uniform implosion.

  6. Solutions to heavy ion induced avalanche burnout in power devices

    SciTech Connect

    Wrobel, T.F.; Beutler, D.E.

    1991-01-01

    Silicon power devices fall into two broad categories, bipolar and field effect. Transistors using both of these technologies are often used in satellite applications for power conversion. The present trend is toward integrating power transistors and control electronics on the same chip. In this case, it is the power portion of the chip that is most susceptible to burnout failures, because of it's high voltage operation. Hence, it is important to understand the operational limitations of power transistors when exposed to intense heavy ion and/or dose-rate environments. Reviews of normal breakdown and current induced avalanche breakdown mechanisms in silicon power transistors are presented. We show the applicability of the current induced avalanche model to heavy ion induced burnouts and present solutions to current induced avalanche in silicon power semiconductors. 9 refs., 5 figs.

  7. Heavy-ion accelerator research for inertial fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1987-08-01

    Thermonuclear fusion offers a most attractive long-term solution to the problem of future energy supplies: The fuel is virtually inexhaustible and the fusion reaction is notably free of long-lived radioactive by-products. Also, because the fuel is in the form of a plasma, there is no solid fuel core that could melt down. The DOE supports two major fusion research programs to exploit these virtues, one based on magnetic confinement and a second on inertial confinement. One part of the program aimed at inertial fusion is known as Heavy Ion Fusion Accelerator Research, or HIFAR. In this booklet, the aim is to place this effort in the context of fusion research generally, to review the brief history of heavy-ion fusion, and to describe the current status of the HIFAR program.

  8. Compact High-Current Heavy-Ion Injector

    SciTech Connect

    Westenskow, G A; Grote, D P; Kwan, J W; Bieniosek, F

    2006-04-13

    To provide a compact high-brightness heavy-ion beam source for Heavy Ion Fusion (HIF), we have been experimenting with merging multi-beamlets in an injector which uses an RF plasma source. An array of converging beamlets was use to produce a beam with the envelope radius, convergence, and ellipticity matched to an electrostatic quadrupole (ESQ) channel. Experimental results were in good quantitative agreement with simulation and have demonstrated the feasibility of this concept. The size of a driver-scale injector system using this approach will be several times smaller than one designed using traditional single large-aperture beams. The success of this experiment has possible significant economical and technical impacts on the architecture of HIF drivers.

  9. Progress on the LBL ECR heavy ion source

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, D.J.; Jongen, Y.; Lyneis, C.M.

    1984-04-01

    The LBL ECR ion source, which began test operation in January 1984, has already produced a variety of high charge state heavy ion beams of sufficient intensity for cyclotron operation, although actual use must wait for completion of the beam transport system. The source has produced 40 ..mu..A of O/sup 6 +/, 2 ..mu..A of O/sup 7 +/, 40 ..mu..A of Ar/sup 8 +/, and 0.20 ..mu..A of Ar/sup 12 +/. The source development has centered on optimizing source performance with modifications and parameter tuning. Future plans include construction of an SmCo/sub 5/ octupole structure, and testing of solid feed techniques. The construction of the beam transport line and calculations on center region geometry for heavy ion axial injection into the 88-Inch Cyclotron are also underway.

  10. Folding two dimensional crystals by swift heavy ion irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ochedowski, Oliver; Bukowska, Hanna; Freire Soler, Victor M.; Brökers, Lara; Ban-d'Etat, Brigitte; Lebius, Henning; Schleberger, Marika

    2014-12-01

    Ion irradiation of graphene, the showcase model of two dimensional crystals, has been successfully applied to induce various modifications in the graphene crystal. One of these modifications is the formation of origami like foldings in graphene which are created by swift heavy ion irradiation under glancing incidence angle. These foldings can be applied to locally alter the physical properties of graphene like mechanical strength or chemical reactivity. In this work we show that the formation of foldings in two dimensional crystals is not restricted to graphene but can be applied for other materials like MoS2 and hexagonal BN as well. Further we show that chemical vapour deposited graphene forms foldings after swift heavy ion irradiation while chemical vapour deposited MoS2 does not.

  11. The magnet system of the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC)

    SciTech Connect

    Greene, A.; Anerella, M.; Cozzolino, J.

    1995-07-01

    The Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider now under construction at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) is a colliding ring accelerator to be completed in 1999. Through collisions of heavy ions it is hoped to observe the creation of matter at extremely high temperatures and densities, similar to what may have occurred in the original ``Big Bang.`` The collider rings will consist of 1740 superconducting magnet elements. Some of elements are being manufactured by industrial partners (Northrop Grumman and Everson Electric). Others are being constructed or assembled at BNL. A description is given of the magnet designs, the plan for manufacturing and test results. In the manufacturing of the magnets, emphasis has been placed on uniformity of their performance and on quality. Results so far indicate that this emphasis has been very successful.

  12. Heavy ion microscopy of single event upsets in CMOS SRAMs

    SciTech Connect

    Metzger, S.; Dreute, J.; Heinrich, W.; Roecher, H. ); Fischer, B.E. ); Harboe-Soerensen, R.; Adams, L. )

    1994-06-01

    The single event upset (SEU) imaging has been applied at the GSI heavy ion microprobe to determine the sensitivity of integrated circuits (IC) to heavy ion irradiation. This method offers the possibility to directly image those parts of an IC which are sensitive to ion-induced malfunctions. By a 3-dimensional simulation of charge collection across p-n-micro-junctions the authors can predict SEU cross-sections. For a MHS65162 2k [times] 8bit CMOS SRAM they found two regions per bit with different sensitivity and measured a total cross-section of (71[+-]18)[mu]m[sup 2] for a bitflip per cell and simulated 60[mu]m[sup 2] with an argon beam of 1.4 MeV/nucl. (LET of 19.7 MeV/mg/cm[sup 2]).

  13. Proximity potential for heavy ion reactions on deformed nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Baltz, A. J.; Bayman, B. F.

    1982-01-01

    The usual treatment of the deformed optical model for analysis of heavy ion induced inelastic scattering data involves a deformed (target) radius, a spherical (projectile) radius and a potential strength dependent on the surface separation along the line between the two centers. Several authors using various approaches have shown that this center line potential is geometrically inadequate especially for description of higher L deformation parameters probed in heavy ion induced inelastic scattering experiments. A quantitatively adequate form of the deformed proximity potential suitable for use with a coupled channels reaction code in the analysis of inelastic scattering data above the Coulomb barrier is described. A major objective is to be able to extract reliably higher deformed multipole moments from such data. The deformed potential calculated in the folding model will serve as a geometrically exact benchmark to evaluate the accuracy of the proximity potential prescriptions. (WHK)

  14. Dosimetry of heavy ions by use of CCD detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schott, J. U.

    1994-01-01

    The design and the atomic composition of Charge Coupled Devices (CCD's) make them unique for investigations of single energetic particle events. As detector system for ionizing particles they detect single particles with local resolution and near real time particle tracking. In combination with its properties as optical sensor, particle transversals of single particles are to be correlated to any objects attached to the light sensitive surface of the sensor by simple imaging of their shadow and subsequent image analysis of both, optical image and particle effects, observed in affected pixels. With biological objects it is possible for the first time to investigate effects of single heavy ions in tissue or extinguished organs of metabolizing (i.e. moving) systems with a local resolution better than 15 microns. Calibration data for particle detection in CCD's are presented for low energetic protons and heavy ions.

  15. Longitudinal instability in heavy-ion-fusion induction linacs

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, E.P.

    1993-05-01

    A induction linac accelerating a high-current pulse of heavy ions at subrelativistic velocities is predicted to exhibit unstable growth of current fluctuations. An overview is given of the mode character, estimates of growth rates, and their application to an IFE driver. The present and projected effort to understand and ameliorate the instability is described. This includes particle-in-cell simulations, calculation and measurements of impedance, and design of feedback controls.

  16. Aspects of heavy-ion collisions at the LHC

    SciTech Connect

    Wolschin, G.

    2014-01-14

    Three aspects of relativistic heavy-ion collisions are considered in this article: (1) Stopping and baryon transport in a QCD-based approach, (2) charged-hadron production in a nonequilibrium-statistical relativistic diffusion model (RDM), and (3) quarkonia suppression and in particular, Υ suppression in PbPb at the current LHC energy of √(s{sub NN}) = 2.76TeV.

  17. Quantum Electrodynamics Effects in Heavy Ions and Atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Shabaev, V. M.; Andreev, O. V.; Bondarev, A. I.; Glazov, D. A.; Kozhedub, Y. S.; Maiorova, A. V.; Tupitsyn, I. I.; Plunien, G.; Volotka, A. V.

    2011-05-11

    Quantum electrodynamics theory of heavy ions and atoms is considered. The current status of calculations of the binding energies, the hyperfine splitting and g factor values in heavy few-electron ions is reviewed. The theoretical predictions are compared with available experimental data. A special attention is focused on tests of quantum electrodynamics in strong electromagnetic fields and on determination of the fundamental constants. Recent progress in calculations of the parity nonconservation effects with heavy atoms and ions is also reported.

  18. Diffraction phenomena in elastic scattering of heavy ions

    SciTech Connect

    Kotlyar, V.V.; Shebeko, A.V.

    1981-08-01

    Nuclear diffraction phenomena in elastic scattering of heavy ions are studied in the intermediate energy range. Examination is carried out using the strong absorption models for the S-matrix in the angular momentum representation. New asymptotic expressions for the diffraction scattering amplitudes are obtained. The main attention is paid to the study of the relation between the Fresnel and the Fraunhofer parts of the amplitudes obtained in different regions of scattering angles.

  19. Studying heavy-ion collisions with FAUST-QTS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cammarata, P.; Chapman, M. B.; Souliotis, G. A.; Bakhtiari, L.; Behling, S.; Bonasera, G.; Heilborn, L. A.; Mabiala, J.; McIntosh, A. B.; May, L. W.; Raphelt, A.; Youngs, M. D.; Zarrella, A.; Yennello, S. J.

    2015-04-01

    Heavy-ion collisions at lower energies provide a rich environment for investigating reaction dynamics. Recent theory has suggested a sensitivity to the symmetry energy and the equation of state via deformations of the reaction system and ternary breaking of the deformed reaction partners into three heavy fragments. A new detection system has been commissioned at Texas A&M University in an attempt to investigate some of the observables sensitive to the nuclear equation of state.

  20. Thermalization in the initial stage of heavy ion collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Yan

    2017-03-01

    The high density non-abelian matter produced in heavy ion collisions is extremely anisotropic. Prethermal dynamics for the anisotropic and weakly coupled matter is discussed. Thermalization is realized with the effective kinetic theory in the leading order accuracy of the weakly coupled expansion. With the initial condition from color glass condensate, hydrodynamization time for the LHC energies is realized to be about 1 fm/c, while the thermalization happens much later than the hydrodynamization.

  1. Production of 14 MeV neutrons by heavy ions

    DOEpatents

    Brugger, Robert M.; Miller, Lowell G.; Young, Robert C.

    1977-01-01

    This invention relates to a neutron generator and a method for the production of 14 MeV neutrons. Heavy ions are accelerated to impinge upon a target mixture of deuterium and tritium to produce recoil atoms of deuterium and tritium. These recoil atoms have a sufficient energy such that they interact with other atoms of tritium or deuterium in the target mixture to produce approximately 14 MeV neutrons.

  2. Coherent rho(0) production in ultraperipheral heavy-ion collisions.

    PubMed

    Adler, C; Ahammed, Z; Allgower, C; Amonett, J; Anderson, B D; Anderson, M; Averichev, G S; Balewski, J; Barannikova, O; Barnby, L S; Baudot, J; Bekele, S; Belaga, V V; Bellwied, R; Berger, J; Bichsel, H; Bland, L C; Blyth, C O; Bonner, B E; Boucham, A; Brandin, A; Bravar, A; Cadman, R V; Caines, H; Calderón de la Barca Sánchez, M; Cardenas, A; Carroll, J; Castillo, J; Castro, M; Cebra, D; Chaloupka, P; Chattopadhyay, S; Chen, Y; Chernenko, S P; Cherney, M; Chikanian, A; Choi, B; Christie, W; Coffin, J P; Cormier, T M; Cramer, J G; Crawford, H J; Deng, W S; Derevschikov, A A; Didenko, L; Dietel, T; Draper, J E; Dunin, V B; Dunlop, J C; Eckardt, V; Efimov, L G; Emelianov, V; Engelage, J; Eppley, G; Erazmus, B; Fachini, P; Faine, V; Filimonov, K; Finch, E; Fisyak, Y; Flierl, D; Foley, K J; Fu, J; Gagliardi, C A; Gagunashvili, N; Gans, J; Gaudichet, L; Germain, M; Geurts, F; Ghazikhanian, V; Grachov, O; Grigoriev, V; Guedon, M; Gushin, E; Hallman, T J; Hardtke, D; Harris, J W; Henry, T W; Heppelmann, S; Herston, T; Hippolyte, B; Hirsch, A; Hjort, E; Hoffmann, G W; Horsley, M; Huang, H Z; Humanic, T J; Igo, G; Ishihara, A; Ivanshin, Yu I; Jacobs, P; Jacobs, W W; Janik, M; Johnson, I; Jones, P G; Judd, E G; Kaneta, M; Kaplan, M; Keane, D; Kiryluk, J; Kisiel, A; Klay, J; Klein, S R; Klyachko, A; Konstantinov, A S; Kopytine, M; Kotchenda, L; Kovalenko, A D; Kramer, M; Kravtsov, P; Krueger, K; Kuhn, C; Kulikov, A I; Kunde, G J; Kunz, C L; Kutuev, R Kh; Kuznetsov, A A; Lakehal-Ayat, L; Lamont, M A C; Landgraf, J M; Lange, S; Lansdell, C P; Lasiuk, B; Laue, F; Lebedev, A; Lednický, R; Leontiev, V M; LeVine, M J; Li, Q; Lindenbaum, S J; Lisa, M A; Liu, F; Liu, L; Liu, Z; Liu, Q J; Ljubicic, T; Llope, W J; LoCurto, G; Long, H; Longacre, R S; Lopez-Noriega, M; Love, W A; Ludlam, T; Lynn, D; Ma, J; Majka, R; Margetis, S; Markert, C; Martin, L; Marx, J; Matis, H S; Matulenko, Yu A; McShane, T S; Meissner, F; Melnick, Yu; Meschanin, A; Messer, M; Miller, M L; Milosevich, Z; Minaev, N G; Mitchell, J; Moiseenko, V A; Moore, C F; Morozov, V; de Moura, M M; Munhoz, M G; Nelson, J M; Nevski, P; Nikitin, V A; Nogach, L V; Norman, B; Nurushev, S B; Nystrand, J; Odyniec, G; Ogawa, A; Okorokov, V; Oldenburg, M; Olson, D; Paic, G; Pandey, S U; Panebratsev, Y; Panitkin, S Y; Pavlinov, A I; Pawlak, T; Perevoztchikov, V; Peryt, W; Petrov, V A; Planinic, M; Pluta, J; Porile, N; Porter, J; Poskanzer, A M; Potrebenikova, E; Prindle, D; Pruneau, C; Putschke, J; Rai, G; Rakness, G; Ravel, O; Ray, R L; Razin, S V; Reichhold, D; Reid, J G; Retiere, F; Ridiger, A; Ritter, H G; Roberts, J B; Rogachevski, O V; Romero, J L; Roy, C; Rykov, V; Sakrejda, I; Salur, S; Sandweiss, J; Saulys, A C; Savin, I; Schambach, J; Scharenberg, R P; Schmitz, N; Schroeder, L S; Schüttauf, A; Schweda, K; Seger, J; Seliverstov, D; Seyboth, P; Shahaliev, E; Shestermanov, K E; Shimanskii, S S; Shvetcov, V S; Skoro, G; Smirnov, N; Snellings, R; Sorensen, P; Sowinski, J; Spinka, H M; Srivastava, B; Stephenson, E J; Stock, R; Stolpovsky, A; Strikhanov, M; Stringfellow, B; Struck, C; Suaide, A A P; Sugarbaker, E; Suire, C; Sumbera, M; Surrow, B; Symons, T J M; Szanto de Toledo, A; Szarwas, P; Tai, A; Takahashi, J; Tang, A H; Thomas, J H; Thompson, M; Tikhomirov, V; Tokarev, M; Tonjes, M B; Trainor, T A; Trentalange, S; Tribble, R E; Trofimov, V; Tsai, O; Ullrich, T; Underwood, D G; Van Buren, G; VanderMolen, A M; Vasilevski, I M; Vasiliev, A N; Vigdor, S E; Voloshin, S A; Wang, F; Ward, H; Watson, J W; Wells, R; Westfall, G D; Whitten, C; Wieman, H; Willson, R; Wissink, S W; Witt, R; Wood, J; Xu, N; Xu, Z; Yakutin, A E; Yamamoto, E; Yang, J; Yepes, P; Yurevich, V I; Zanevski, Y V; Zborovský, I; Zhang, H; Zhang, W M; Zoulkarneev, R; Zubarev, A N

    2002-12-30

    The STAR Collaboration reports the first observation of exclusive rho(0) photoproduction, AuAu-->AuAurho(0), and rho(0) production accompanied by mutual nuclear Coulomb excitation, AuAu-->Au*Au*rho(0), in ultraperipheral heavy-ion collisions. The rho(0) have low transverse momenta, consistent with coherent coupling to both nuclei. The cross sections at sqrt[s(NN)]=130 GeV agree with theoretical predictions treating rho(0) production and Coulomb excitation as independent processes.

  3. Mass spectra of heavy ions near comet Halley

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Korth, A.; Richter, A. K.; Loidl, A.; Anderson, K. A.; Carlson, C. W.

    1986-01-01

    The heavy-ion analyzer, RPA2-PICCA, aboard the Giotto spacecraft, detected the first cometary ions at a distance of about 1.05 million km from the nucleus of comet Halley. In the inner coma the major ions identified are associated with the H2O, CO and CO2 groups. Ions of larger atomic mass unit are also present, corresponding possibly to various hydrocarbons, heavy metals of the iron-group or to sulphur compounds.

  4. Heavy Ion Collisions and New Forms of Matter

    SciTech Connect

    McLerran, Larry

    2007-11-20

    I discuss forms of high energy density matter in QCD. These include the Color Glass Condensate, the Glasma and the Quark Gluon Plasma. These all might be studied in ultra-relativistic heavy ion collisions, and the Color Glass Condensate might also be probed in electron-hadron collisions. I present the properties of such matter, and some aspects of what is known of their properties.

  5. Energy loss of heavy ions in a dense hydrogen plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dietrich, K.-G.; Hoffmann, D. H. H.; Wahl, H.; Haas, C. R.; Kunze, H.; Brandenburg, W.; Noll, R.

    1990-12-01

    The energy loss of heavy ions with an energy of 1.4 MeV/u in a hydrogen plasma has been measured. A 20 cm long z-pinch has been used as plasma target. Our data show a strong enhancement of the stopping power of the plasma compared to that of a cold gas with equal density. The results completely confirm the predictions of the standard stopping power model.

  6. Mass spectra of heavy ions near comet Halley

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Korth, A.; Richter, A. K.; Loidl, A.; Anderson, K. A.; Carlson, C. W.

    1986-01-01

    The heavy-ion analyzer, RPA2-PICCA, aboard the Giotto spacecraft, detected the first cometary ions at a distance of about 1.05 million km from the nucleus of comet Halley. In the inner coma the major ions identified are associated with the H2O, CO and CO2 groups. Ions of larger atomic mass unit are also present, corresponding possibly to various hydrocarbons, heavy metals of the iron-group or to sulphur compounds.

  7. The multistring model VENUS for ultrarelativistic heavy ion collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Werner, K.

    1988-02-01

    The event generator VENUS is based on a multistring model for heavy ion collisions at ultrarelativistic energies. The model is a straightforward extension of a successful model for soft proton-proton scattering, the latter one being consistent with e/sup )plus/)e/sup )minus/) annihilation and deep inelastic lepton scattering. Comparisons of VENUS results with pA and recent AA data alow some statements about intranuclear cascading. 18 refs., 7 figs

  8. Modeling space charge in beams for heavy-ion fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Sharp, W.M.

    1995-05-02

    A new analytic model is presented which accurately estimates the radially averaged axial component of the space-charge field of an axisymmetric heavy-ion beam in a cylindrical beam pipe. The model recovers details of the field near the beam ends that are overlooked by simpler models, and the results compare well to exact solutions of Poisson`s equation. Field values are shown for several simple beam profiles and are compared with values obtained from simpler models.

  9. Atomic physics experiments with stored cooled heavy ion beams

    SciTech Connect

    Datz, S.

    1986-01-01

    The wide ranging interest in the development of heavy ion synchrotrons with electron beam cooling is evident from the number of projects presently under way. Although much of the initial motivation for these rings stemmed from nuclear and particle physics, a considerable amount of atomic physics experimentation is planned. This paper surveys some of the new opportunities in atomic physics which may be made available with storage ring systems. 25 refs., 3 tabs.

  10. Realistic modeling of chamber transport for heavy-ion fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Sharp, W.M.; Grote, D.P.; Callahan, D.A.; Tabak, M.; Henestroza, E.; Yu, S.S.; Peterson, P.F.; Welch, D.R.; Rose, D.V.

    2003-05-01

    Transport of intense heavy-ion beams to an inertial-fusion target after final focus is simulated here using a realistic computer model. It is found that passing the beam through a rarefied plasma layer before it enters the fusion chamber can largely neutralize the beam space charge and lead to a usable focal spot for a range of ion species and input conditions.

  11. Mutagenic effects of heavy ion radiation in plants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mei, M.; Deng, H.; Lu, Y.; Zhuang, C.; Liu, Z.; Qiu, Q.; Qiu, Y.; Yang, T. C.

    1994-10-01

    Genetic and developmental effects of heavy ions in maize and rice were investigated. Heavy particles with various charges and energies were accelerated at the BEVALAC. The frequency of occurence of white-yellow stripes on leaves of plants developed from irradiated maize seeds increased linearly with dose, and high-LET heavy charged particles, e.g., neon, argon, and iron, were 2-12 times as effective as gamma rays in inducing this type of mutation. The effectiveness of high-LET heavy ion in (1) inhibiting rice seedling growth, (2) reducing plant fertility, (3) inducing chromosome aberration and micronuclei in root tip cells and pollen mother cells of the first generation plants developed from exposed seeds, and (4) inducing mutation in the second generation, were greater than that of low-LET gamma rays. All effects observed were dose-dependent; however, there appeared to be an optimal range of doses for inducing certain types of mutation, for example, for argon ions (400 MeV/u) at 90-100 Gy, several valuable mutant lines with favorable characters, such as semidwarf, early maturity and high yield ability, were obtained. Experimental results suggest that the potential application of heavy ions in crop improvement is promising. RFLP analysis of two semidwarf mutants induced by argon particles revealed that large DNA alterations might be involved in these mutants.

  12. Progress report on the Heavy Ions in Space (HIIS) experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adams, James H., Jr.; Beahm, Lorraine P.; Boberg, Paul R.; Tylka, Allan J.

    1993-01-01

    One of the objectives of the Heavy Ions In Space (HIIS) experiment is to investigate heavy ions which appear at Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF) below the geomagnetic cutoff for fully-ionized galactic cosmic rays. Possible sources of such 'below-cutoff' particles are partially-ionized solar energetic particles, the anomalous component of cosmic rays, and magnetospherically-trapped particles. In recent years, there have also been reports of below-cutoff ions which do not appear to be from any known source. Although most of these observations are based on only a handful of ions, they have led to speculation about 'partially-ionized galactic cosmic rays' and 'near-by cosmic ray sources'. The collecting power of HIIS is order of magnitude larger than that of the instruments which reported these results, so HIIS should be able to confirm these observations and perhaps discover the source of these particles. Preliminary results on below-cutoff heavy-ions are reported. Observations to possible known sources of such ions are compared. A second objective of the HIIS experiment is to measure the elemental composition of ultraheavy galactic cosmic rays, beginning in the tin-barium region of the periodic table. A report on the status of this analysis is presented.

  13. Preliminary results from the heavy ions in space experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adams, James H., Jr.; Beahm, Lorraine P.; Tylka, Allan J.

    1992-01-01

    The Heavy Ions In Space (HIIS) experiment has two primary objectives: (1) to measure the elemental composition of ultraheavy galactic cosmic rays, beginning in the tin-barium region of the periodic table; and (2) to study heavy ions which arrive at LDEF below the geomagnetic cutoff, either because they are not fully stripped of electrons or because their source is within the magnetosphere. Both of these objectives have practical as well as astrophysical consequences. In particular, the high atomic number of the ultraheavy galactic cosmic rays puts them among the most intensely ionizing particles in Nature. They are therefore capable of upsetting electronic components normally considered immune to such effects. The below cutoff heavy ions are intensely ionizing because of their low velocity. They can be a significant source of microelectronic anomalies in low inclination orbits, where Earth's magnetic field protects satellites from most particles from interplanetary space. The HIIS results will lead to significantly improved estimates of the intensely ionizing radiation environment.

  14. Validation of Heavy Ion Transport Capabilities in PHITS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ronningen, Reginald M.

    2007-03-01

    The performance of the Monte Carlo code system PHITS is validated for heavy ion transport capabilities by performing simulations and comparing results against experimental data from heavy ion reactions of benchmark quality. These data are from measurements of secondary neutron production cross sections in reactions of Xe at 400 MeV/u with lithium and lead targets, measurements of neutrons outside of thick concrete and iron shields, and measurements of isotope yields produced in the fragmentation of a 140 MeV/u 48Ca beam on a beryllium target and on a tantalum target. A practical example that tests magnetic field capabilities is shown for a simulated 48Ca beam at 500 MeV/u striking a lithium target to produce the rare isotope 44Si, with ion transport through a fragmentation-reaction magnetic pre-separator. The results of this study show that PHITS performs reliably for the simulation of radiation fields that is necessary for designing safe, reliable and cost effective future high-powered heavy-ion accelerators in rare isotope beam facilities.

  15. Breit interaction effect on dielectronic recombination of heavy ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakamura, Nobuyuki

    2016-11-01

    Interaction of highly charged heavy ions with electrons is one of the most important atomic processes in high temperature plasmas, including astrophysical plasmas such as solar corona and artificial plasmas such as fusion reactor plasmas. Therefore it has been well studied to date, both theoretically and experimentally, to accumulate the atomic data required for understanding or controlling such plasmas. However, there still remains interesting subjects that receive remarkable attention from the atomic physics point of view. One of them, which is the subject of this review, is substantially large Breit interaction effects on the resonance recombination process called dielectronic recombination. The Breit interaction is a relativistic effect in the electron-electron interaction potential; it is thus generally important for highly charged heavy ions. However, in the calculation of the energy levels for heavy ions, the Breit interaction is still a small perturbation compared with the main Coulomb term. On the other hand for the dielectronic recombination, it was found that the Breit interaction can enhance the cross sections significantly. It was also found that the Breit interaction can play not only an important, but even a dominant role in determining the angular distribution of x-rays emitted in the recombination processes. This topical review introduces the recent experimental and theoretical activities to clarify the essential origin of the strong effects.

  16. Strongly coupled quark-gluon plasma in heavy ion collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shuryak, Edward

    2017-07-01

    A decade ago, a brief summary of the field of the relativistic heavy ion physics could be formulated as the discovery of strongly coupled quark-gluon plasma, sQGP for short, a near-perfect fluid with surprisingly large entropy-density-to-viscosity ratio. Since 2010, the LHC heavy ion program added excellent new data and discoveries. Significant theoretical efforts have been made to understand these phenomena. Now there is a need to consolidate what we have learned and formulate a list of issues to be studied next. Studies of angular correlations of two and more secondaries reveal higher harmonics of flow, identified as the sound waves induced by the initial state perturbations. As in cosmology, detailed measurements and calculations of these correlations helped to make our knowledge of the explosion much more quantitative. In particular, their damping had quantified the viscosity. Other kinetic coefficients—the heavy-quark diffusion constants and the jet quenching parameters—also show enhancements near the critical point T ≈Tc. Since densities of QGP quarks and gluons strongly decrease at this point, these facts indicate large role of nonperturbative mechanisms, e.g., scattering on monopoles. New studies of the p p and p A collisions at high multiplicities reveal collective explosions similar to those in heavy ion A A collisions. These "smallest drops of the sQGP" revived debates about the initial out-of-equilibrium stage of the collisions and mechanisms of subsequent equilibration.

  17. Heavy Ion Inertial Fusion Energy: Summaries of Program Elements

    SciTech Connect

    Friedman, A; Barnard, J J; Kaganovich, I; Seidl, P A; Briggs, R J; Faltens, A; Kwan, J W; Lee, E P; Logan, B G

    2011-02-28

    The goal of the Heavy Ion Fusion (HIF) Program is to apply high-current accelerator technology to IFE power production. Ion beams of mass {approx}100 amu and kinetic energy {>=} 1 GeV provide efficient energy coupling into matter, and HIF enjoys R&D-supported favorable attributes of: (1) the driver, projected to be robust and efficient; see 'Heavy Ion Accelerator Drivers.'; (2) the targets, which span a continuum from full direct to full indirect drive (and perhaps fast ignition), and have metal exteriors that enable injection at {approx}10 Hz; see 'IFE Target Designs'; (3) the near-classical ion energy deposition in the targets; see 'Beam-Plasma Interactions'; (4) the magnetic final lens, robust against damage; see 'Final Optics-Heavy Ion Beams'; and (5) the fusion chamber, which may use neutronically-thick liquids; see 'Liquid-Wall Chambers.' Most studies of HIF power plants have assumed indirect drive and thick liquid wall protection, but other options are possible.

  18. Solar wind heavy ions from flare-heated coronal plasma

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bame, S. J.; Asbridge, J. R.; Feldman, W. C.; Fenimore, E. E.; Gosling, J. T.

    1979-01-01

    Information concerning the coronal expansion is carried by solar-wind heavy ions. Distinctly different energy-per-charge ion spectra are found in two classes of solar wind having the low kinetic temperatures necessary for E/q resolution of the ion species. Heavy-ion spectra which can be resolved are most frequently observed in the low-speed interstream (IS) plasma found between high speed streams; the streams are thought to originate from coronal holes. Although the sources of the IS plasma are uncertain, the heavy-ion spectra found there contain identifiable peaks of O, Si, and Fe ions. Such spectra indicate that the IS ionization state of O is established in coronal gas at a temperature of approximately 1.6 million K, while that of Fe is frozen in farther out at about 1.5 million K. On occasion anomalous spectra are found outside IS flows in solar wind with abnormally depressed local kinetic temperatures. The anomalous spectra contain Fe(16+) ions, not usually found in IS flows, and the derived coronal freezing-in temperatures are significantly higher. The coronal sources of some of these ionizationally hot flows are identified as solar flares.

  19. Inferring magnetospheric heavy ion density using EMIC waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Eun-Hwa; Johnson, Jay R.; Kim, Hyomin; Lee, Dong-Hun

    2015-08-01

    We present a method to infer heavy ion concentration ratios from electromagnetic ion cyclotron (EMIC) wave observations that result from ion-ion hybrid (IIH) resonance. A key feature of the IIH resonance is the concentration of wave energy in a field-aligned resonant mode that exhibits linear polarization. These mode-converted waves at the IIH resonance are localized at the location where the frequency of a compressional wave driver matches the IIH resonance condition, which depends sensitively on the heavy ion concentration. This dependence makes it possible to estimate the heavy ion concentration ratio. In this paper, we evaluate the absorption coefficients at the IIH resonance at Earth's geosynchronous orbit for variable concentrations of He+ and wave frequencies using a dipole magnetic field model. We find that the resonance only occurs over a limited range of wave frequency such that the IIH resonance frequency is close to but not exactly the same as the crossover frequency. Using the wave absorption and EMIC waves observed from the GOES 12 satellite, we demonstrate how this technique can be used to estimate the He+ concentration of around 4% near L = 6.6 assuming electron-H+-He+ plasma.

  20. Morphology of high-multiplicity events in heavy ion collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naselsky, P.; Christensen, C. H.; Christensen, P. R.; Damgaard, P. H.; Frejsel, A.; Gaardhøje, J. J.; Hansen, A.; Hansen, M.; Kim, J.; Verkhodanov, O.; Wiedemann, U. A.

    2012-08-01

    We discuss opportunities that may arise from subjecting high-multiplicity events in relativistic heavy ion collisions to an analysis similar to the one used in cosmology for the study of fluctuations of the cosmic microwave background (CMB). To this end, we discuss examples of how pertinent features of heavy ion collisions including global characteristics, signatures of collective flow, and event-wise fluctuations are visually represented in a Mollweide projection commonly used in CMB analysis, and how they are statistically analyzed in an expansion over spherical harmonic functions. If applied to the characterization of purely azimuthal dependent phenomena such as collective flow, the expansion coefficients of spherical harmonics are seen to contain redundancies compared to the set of harmonic flow coefficients commonly used in heavy ion collisions. Our exploratory study indicates, however, that these redundancies may offer novel opportunities for a detailed characterization of those event-wise fluctuations that remain after subtraction of the dominant collective flow signatures. By construction, the proposed approach allows also for the characterization of more complex collective phenomena like higher-order flow and other sources of fluctuations, and it may be extended to the characterization of phenomena of noncollective origin such as jets.

  1. Mutagenic effects of heavy ion radiation in plants.

    PubMed

    Mei, M; Deng, H; Lu, Y; Zhuang, C; Liu, Z; Qiu, Q; Qiu, Y; Yang, T C

    1994-10-01

    Genetic and developmental effects of heavy ions in maize and rice were investigated. Heavy particles with various charges and energies were accelerated at the BEVALAC. The frequency of occurrence of white-yellow stripes on leaves of plants developed from irradiated maize seeds increased linearly with dose, and high-LET heavy charged particles, e.g., neon, argon, and iron, were 2-12 times as effective as gamma rays in inducing this type of mutation. The effectiveness of high-LET heavy ion in (1) inhibiting rice seedling growth, (2) reducing plant fertility, (3) inducing chromosome aberration and micronuclei in root tip cells and pollen mother cells of the first generation plants developed from exposed seeds, and (4) inducing mutation in the second generation, were greater than that of low-LET gamma rays. All effects observed were dose-dependent; however, there appeared to be an optimal range of doses for inducing certain types of mutation, for example, for argon ions (400 MeV/u) at 90-100 Gy, several valuable mutant lines with favorable characters, such as semidwarf, early maturity and high yield ability, were obtained. Experimental results suggest that the potential application of heavy ions in crop improvement is promising. RFLP analysis of two semidwarf mutants induced by argon particles revealed that large DNA alterations might be involved in these mutants.

  2. Heavy ion induced changes in small intestinal parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carr, K. E.; McCullough, J. S.; Brennan, P.; Hayes, T. L.; Ainsworth, E. J.; Nelson, A. C.

    1994-10-01

    The effects on 17 different structural parameters of mouse small intestine three days after treatment with three types of heavy ion (neon, iron and niobium) are compared, the first two being of particular relevance to space flight. The data for niobium are given in full, showing that changes after niobium ion treatment are not standard and are concentrated in the epithelial compartment, with few of the parameters having a response which is dose dependent. When comparisons are made for the three types of heavy ion, the damage is greatest after neon ion irradiation, implying that the additional non-epithelial damage produced as LET rises from X rays through neutrons to neon ions is not necessarily maintained as LET continues to rise. Further understanding is therefore needed of the balance between changes affecting the vascular and absorptive components of the organ. Variation from group to group is also important, as is variation of strain or gastrointestinal status. All such factors are important in the understanding of changes in multicellular organs after exposure to heavy ion radiation.

  3. The two-photon exchange contribution to elastic electron-nucleon scattering at large momentum transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Andrei V. Afanasev; Stanley J. Brodsky; Carl E. Carlson; Yu-Chun Chen; Marc Vanderhaeghen

    2005-01-01

    We estimate the two-photon exchange contribution to elastic electron-proton scattering at large momentum transfer by using a quark-parton representation of virtual Compton scattering. We thus can relate the two-photon exchange amplitude to the generalized parton distributions which also enter in other wide angle scattering processes. We find that the interference of one- and two-photon exchange contribution is able to substantially resolve the difference between electric form factor measurements from Rosenbluth and polarization transfer experiments.

  4. Using R-matrix ideas to describe one-nucleon transfers to resonance states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Escher, J. E.; Thompson, I. J.; Arbanas, G.; Elster, Ch.; Eremenko, V.; Hlophe, L.; Nunes, F.; Torus Collaboration

    2014-09-01

    (d,p) transfer reactions have long been used to investigate nuclear structure. Carried out in inverse kinematics, they are expected to play a central role in the study of weakly-bound systems at modern RIB facilities. While the theoretical framework and its computational implementation for describing (d,p) reactions have seen much progress, open questions remain. Resonances in the low-energy spectra of weakly-bound nuclei, e.g., are of interest for astrophysical applications and can in principle be studied with transfer reactions. Applying standard transfer reaction theories is problematic, both practically in terms of achieving converged solutions and conceptually in terms of interpreting the results. Recently, a new formalism that utilizes concepts known from the successful and popular R-matrix theory was proposed for the description of (d,p) reactions [Mukhamedzhanov, PRC 2011]. The formalism covers transfers to bound and resonance states and is general enough to include deuteron breakup. We present tests of the proposed formalism, compare calculations to measured cross sections, and discuss implications [Escher et al. PRC 2014]. (d,p) transfer reactions have long been used to investigate nuclear structure. Carried out in inverse kinematics, they are expected to play a central role in the study of weakly-bound systems at modern RIB facilities. While the theoretical framework and its computational implementation for describing (d,p) reactions have seen much progress, open questions remain. Resonances in the low-energy spectra of weakly-bound nuclei, e.g., are of interest for astrophysical applications and can in principle be studied with transfer reactions. Applying standard transfer reaction theories is problematic, both practically in terms of achieving converged solutions and conceptually in terms of interpreting the results. Recently, a new formalism that utilizes concepts known from the successful and popular R-matrix theory was proposed for the description

  5. Nuclear interactions in high energy heavy ions and applications in astrophysics. Technical progress report, 1 April 1992--31 March 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Wefel, J.P.; Guzik, T.G.

    1993-01-11

    The overall objective is to study the mechanisms and the energy dependence of heavy ion fragmentation by studying the reactions of heavy ion projectiles (e.g. {sup 4}He, {sup 16}O, {sup 20}Ne, {sup 28}Si, {sup 56}Fe) in a variety of targets (H, He, C, Si, Cu, Pb) and at a number of beam energies exceeding 0.1 GeV/nucleon. The results have application to questions in high-energy nuclear astrophysics. Most of the discussion is on low-energy {sup 16}O,{sup 28}Si data analysis. The description includes analysis procedures and techniques, detector calibrations, data selections and normalizations. Cross section results for the analysis are also presented. 83 figs., 6 tabs., 73 refs.

  6. Nuclear interactions in high energy heavy ions and applications in astrophysics. [Dept. of Physics and Astronomy, Louisiana State Univ. , Baton Rouge

    SciTech Connect

    Wefel, J.P.; Guzik, T.G.

    1993-01-11

    The overall objective is to study the mechanisms and the energy dependence of heavy ion fragmentation by studying the reactions of heavy ion projectiles (e.g. [sup 4]He, [sup 16]O, [sup 20]Ne, [sup 28]Si, [sup 56]Fe) in a variety of targets (H, He, C, Si, Cu, Pb) and at a number of beam energies exceeding 0.1 GeV/nucleon. The results have application to questions in high-energy nuclear astrophysics. Most of the discussion is on low-energy [sup 16]O,[sup 28]Si data analysis. The description includes analysis procedures and techniques, detector calibrations, data selections and normalizations. Cross section results for the analysis are also presented. 83 figs., 6 tabs., 73 refs.

  7. Deuteron-induced nucleon transfer reactions within an ab initio framework: First application to p-shell nuclei

    DOE PAGES

    Raimondi, Francesco; Hupin, Guillaume; Navratil, Petr; ...

    2016-05-10

    Low-energy transfer reactions in which a proton is stripped from a deuteron projectile and dropped into a target play a crucial role in the formation of nuclei in both primordial and stellar nucleosynthesis, as well as in the study of exotic nuclei using radioactive beam facilities and inverse kinematics. Here, ab initio approaches have been successfully applied to describe the 3H(d,n)4He and 3He(d,p)4He fusion processes. An ab initio treatment of transfer reactions would also be desirable for heavier targets. In this work, we extend the ab initio description of (d,p) reactions to processes with light p-shell nuclei. As a firstmore » application, we study the elastic scattering of deuterium on 7Li and the 7Li(d,p)8Li transfer reaction based on a two-body Hamiltonian. We use the no-core shell model to compute the wave functions of the nuclei involved in the reaction, and describe the dynamics between targets and projectiles with the help of microscopic-cluster states in the spirit of the resonating group method. The shapes of the excitation functions for deuterons impinging on 7Li are qualitatively reproduced up to the deuteron breakup energy. The interplay between d–7Li and p–8Li particle-decay channels determines some features of the 9Be spectrum above the d+7Li threshold. Our prediction for the parity of the 17.298 MeV resonance is at odds with the experimental assignment. Deuteron stripping reactions with p-shell targets can now be computed ab initio, but calculations are very demanding. Finally, a quantitative description of the 7Li(d,p)8Li reaction will require further work to include the effect of three-nucleon forces and additional decay channels and to improve the convergence rate of our calculations.« less

  8. Deuteron-induced nucleon transfer reactions within an ab initio framework: First application to p -shell nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raimondi, Francesco; Hupin, Guillaume; Navrátil, Petr; Quaglioni, Sofia

    2016-05-01

    Background: Low-energy transfer reactions in which a proton is stripped from a deuteron projectile and dropped into a target play a crucial role in the formation of nuclei in both primordial and stellar nucleosynthesis, as well as in the study of exotic nuclei using radioactive beam facilities and inverse kinematics. Ab initio approaches have been successfully applied to describe the 3H (d ,n )4He and 3He(d ,p )4He fusion processes. Purpose: An ab initio treatment of transfer reactions would also be desirable for heavier targets. In this work, we extend the ab initio description of (d ,p ) reactions to processes with light p -shell nuclei. As a first application, we study the elastic scattering of deuterium on 7Li and the 7Li(d ,p )8Li transfer reaction based on a two-body Hamiltonian. Methods: We use the no-core shell model to compute the wave functions of the nuclei involved in the reaction, and describe the dynamics between targets and projectiles with the help of microscopic-cluster states in the spirit of the resonating group method. Results: The shapes of the excitation functions for deuterons impinging on 7Li are qualitatively reproduced up to the deuteron breakup energy. The interplay between d -7Li and p -8Li particle-decay channels determines some features of the 9Be spectrum above the d +7Li threshold. Our prediction for the parity of the 17.298 MeV resonance is at odds with the experimental assignment. Conclusions: Deuteron stripping reactions with p -shell targets can now be computed ab initio, but calculations are very demanding. A quantitative description of the 7Li(d ,p )8Li reaction will require further work to include the effect of three-nucleon forces and additional decay channels and to improve the convergence rate of our calculations.

  9. Comparison of Model Calculations of Biological Damage from Exposure to Heavy Ions with Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Myung-Hee Y.; Wu, Honglu; Hada, Megumi; Cucinotta, Francis

    The space environment consists of a varying field of radiation particles including high-energy ions, with spacecraft shielding material providing the major protection to astronauts from harmful exposure. Unlike low-LET g or X rays, the presence of shielding does not always reduce the radiation risks for energetic charged-particle exposure. Dose delivered by the charged particle increases sharply at the Bragg peak. However, the Bragg curve does not necessarily represent the biological damage along the particle path since biological effects are influenced by the track structures of both primary and secondary particles. Therefore, the ‘‘biological Bragg curve’’ is dependent on the energy and the type of the primary particle and may vary for different biological end points. Measurements of the induction of micronuclei (MN) have made across the Bragg curve in human fibroblasts exposed to energetic silicon and iron ions in vitro at two different energies, 300 MeV/nucleon and 1 GeV/nucleon. Although the data did not reveal an increased yield of MN at the location of the Bragg peak, the increased inhibition of cell progression, which is related to cell death, was found at the Bragg peak location. These results are compared to the calculations of biological damage using a stochastic Monte-Carlo track structure model, Galactic Cosmic Ray Event-based Risk Model (GERM) code (Cucinotta et al., 2011). The GERM code estimates the basic physical properties along the passage of heavy ions in tissue and shielding materials, by which the experimental set-up can be interpreted. The code can also be used to describe the biophysical events of interest in radiobiology, cancer therapy, and space exploration. The calculation has shown that the severely damaged cells at the Bragg peak are more likely to go through reproductive death, the so called “overkill”. F. A. Cucinotta, I. Plante, A. L. Ponomarev, and M. Y. Kim, Nuclear Interactions in Heavy Ion Transport and Event

  10. Heavy Ion Radiation Exposure Triggered Higher Intestinal Tumor Frequency and Greater β-Catenin Activation than γ Radiation in APCMin/+ Mice

    PubMed Central

    Datta, Kamal; Suman, Shubhankar; Kallakury, Bhaskar V. S.; Fornace, Albert J.

    2013-01-01

    Risk of colorectal cancer (CRC) after exposure to low linear energy transfer (low-LET) radiation such as γ-ray is highlighted by the studies in atom bomb survivors. On the contrary, CRC risk prediction after exposure to high-LET cosmic heavy ion radiation exposure is hindered due to scarcity of in vivo data. Therefore, intestinal tumor frequency, size, cluster, and grade were studied in APCMin/+ mice (n = 20 per group; 6 to 8 wks old; female) 100 to 110 days after exposure to 1.6 or 4 Gy of heavy ion 56Fe radiation (energy: 1000 MeV/nucleon) and results were compared to γ radiation doses of 2 or 5 Gy, which are equitoxic to 1.6 and 4 Gy 56Fe respectively. Due to relevance of lower doses to radiotherapy treatment fractions and space exploration, we followed 2 Gy γ and equitoxic 1.6 Gy 56Fe for comparative analysis of intestinal epithelial cell (IEC) proliferation, differentiation, and β-catenin signaling pathway alterations between the two radiation types using immunoblot, and immunohistochemistry. Relative to controls and γ-ray, intestinal tumor frequency and grade was significantly higher after 56Fe radiation. Additionally, tumor incidence per unit of radiation (per cGy) was also higher after 56Fe radiation relative to γ radiation. Staining for phospho-histone H3, indicative of IEC proliferation, was more and alcian blue staining, indicative of IEC differentiation, was less in 56Fe than γ irradiated samples. Activation of β-catenin was more in 56Fe-irradiated tumor-free and tumor-bearing areas of the intestinal tissues. When considered along with higher levels of cyclin D1, we infer that relative to γ radiation exposure to 56Fe radiation induced markedly reduced differentiation, and increased proliferative index in IEC resulting in increased intestinal tumors of larger size and grade due to preferentially greater activation of β-catenin and its downstream effectors. PMID:23555653

  11. Experimental research of heavy ion and proton induced single event effects for a Bi-CMOS technology DC/DC converter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anlin, He; Gang, Guo; Shuting, Shi; Dongjun, Shen; Jiancheng, Liu; Li, Cai; Hui, Fan

    2015-11-01

    This paper tested and analyzed heavy ion and proton induced single event effects (SEE) of a commercial DC/DC converter based on a 600 nm Bi-CMOS technology. Heavy ion induced single event transients (SET) testing has been carried out by using the Beijing HI-13 tandem accelerator at China Institute of Atomic Energy. Proton test has been carried out by using the Canadian TRIUMF proton accelerator. Both SET cross section versus linear energy transfer (LET) and proton energy has been measured. The main study conclusions are: (1) the DC/DC is both sensitive to heavy ion and proton radiations although at a pretty large feature size (600 nm), and threshold LET is about 0.06 MeV·mg/cm2 (2) heavy ion SET saturation cross section is about 5 magnitudes order larger than proton SET saturation cross section, which is consistent with the theory calculation result deduced by the RPP model and the proton nuclear reaction model; (3) on-orbit soft error rate (SER) prediction showed, on GEO orbit, proton induced SERs calculated by the heavy ion derived model are 4-5 times larger than those calculated by proton test data.

  12. The one nucleon transfer operator in the microscopic IBM without NOA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barea, J.; Alonso, C. E.; Arias, J. M.

    2014-10-01

    The mapping of the single fermion creation operator (ci†) onto the Interacting Boson-Fermion space (IBFM) is revisited within the Generalized Seniority scheme. In the original work the Number Operator Approximation (NOA) was used. Here the exact evaluation of the relevant terms using exact values for the fermion matrix elements in the Generalized Seniority scheme is worked out. This provides a new, improved, single particle transfer operator to be used in IBFM.

  13. Softening of phonons by lattice defects and structural strain in heavy ion irradiated nanocrystalline zinc oxide films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Fouran; Singh, R. G.; Kumar, Vinod; Khan, S. A.; Pivin, J. C.

    2011-10-01

    Origin of the Raman mode in nanocrystalline zinc oxide in the vicinity of A1 (LO) phonon mode induced by energetic heavy ions is reported. The evolution of this mode in the irradiated films is ascribed to the effect of disorder and the high density of lattice defects induced by irradiation. The presence of such defects is confirmed by the reduction in the intensity of E2 (high) mode and band bending of the near band edge absorption. A softening of the evolved Raman mode with increasing in ion fluence is also observed. This softening cannot be attributed to spatial confinement of phonons, as the sizes of the crystallites are large. Therefore, it is explained in terms of the combined effects of phonon localization by lattice defects and the structural strain in the lattice induced by electronic energy loss transferred by energetic heavy ions.

  14. Characterisation of a ΔE E particle telescope using the ANSTO heavy ion microprobe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siegele, Rainer; Reinhard, Mark; Prokopovich, Dale; Ionescu, Mihail; Cohen, David D.; Rosenfeld, Anatoly B.; Cornelius, Iwan M.; Wroe, Andrew; Lerch, Michael L. F.; Fazzi, A.; Pola, A.; Agosteo, S.

    2007-07-01

    Semiconductor planar processing technology has spurned the development of novel radiation detectors with applications in space, high energy physics, medical diagnostics, radiation protection and cancer therapy. The ANSTO heavy ion microprobe, which allows a wide range of ions to be focused into spot sizes of a few micrometers in diameter, has proven to be an essential tool for characterising these detectors using the Ion Beam Induced Charge (IBIC) imaging technique. The use of different ions and the wide range of available energies on the heavy ion microprobe, allows the testing of these devices with ionising particles associated with different values of linear energy transfer (LET). Quadruple coincidence measurements have been used to map the charge collection characteristics of a monolithic ΔE E telescope. This was done through simultaneous measurement of the spatial coordinates of the microbeam relative to the sample and the response of both detector elements. The resulting charge collection maps were used to better understand the functionality of the device as well as to ascertain ways in which future device designs could be modified to improve performance.

  15. Actinide production in the reaction of heavy ions with curium-248

    SciTech Connect

    Moody, K.J.

    1983-01-01

    Chemical experiments were performed to examine the usefulness of heavy ion transfer reactions in producing new, neutron-rich actinide nuclides. A general quasi-elastic to deep-inelastic mechanism is proposed, and the utility of this method as opposed to other methods (e.g. complete fusion) is discussed. The relative merits of various techniques of actinide target synthesis are discussed. A description is given of a target system designed to remove the large amounts of heat generated by the passage of a heavy ion beam through matter, thereby maximizing the beam intensity which can be safely used in an experiment. Also described is a general separation scheme for the actinide elements from protactinium (Z = 91) to mendelevium (Z = 101), and fast specific procedures for plutonium, americium and berkelium. The cross sections for the production of several nuclides from the bombardment of /sup 248/Cm with /sup 18/Kr and /sup 86/O, /sup 136/Xe projectiles at several energies near and below the Coulomb barrier were determined. The results are compared with yields from /sup 48/Ca and /sup 238/U bombardments of /sup 248/Cm. A preliminary, unsuccessful attempt to isolate /sup 247/Pu is outlined. The absolute ..gamma.. ray intensities from /sup 251/Bk decay, necessary for calculating the /sup 251/Bk cross section, are also determined.

  16. A Study of Five-Nucleon Transfer Mechanisms in the (p, 6Li) Reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Honda, T.; Kudo, Y.; Horie, H.

    1980-03-01

    The experimental angular distributions for the 5He-transfer reactions 16O(p, 6Li)11C(ground) and 11B(p, 6Li)6Li(ground) at Ep=51.9MeV and analysed in the framework of exact finite-range DWBA formalism with all one-step direct processes. The spectroscopic factors for 16Oto5He+11C, 6Lito p+5He and 11Bto5He+6Li are calculated by making use of cluster coupling shell model wave functions. Good agreements between theoretical calculations and experiments are obtained for both reactions.

  17. Generation of heavy ion beams using femtosecond laser pulses in the target normal sheath acceleration and radiation pressure acceleration regimes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrov, G. M.; McGuffey, C.; Thomas, A. G. R.; Krushelnick, K.; Beg, F. N.

    2016-06-01

    Theoretical study of heavy ion acceleration from sub-micron gold foils irradiated by a short pulse laser is presented. Using two dimensional particle-in-cell simulations, the time history of the laser pulse is examined in order to get insight into the laser energy deposition and ion acceleration process. For laser pulses with intensity 3 × 10 21 W / cm 2 , duration 32 fs, focal spot size 5 μm, and energy 27 J, the calculated reflection, transmission, and coupling coefficients from a 20 nm foil are 80%, 5%, and 15%, respectively. The conversion efficiency into gold ions is 8%. Two highly collimated counter-propagating ion beams have been identified. The forward accelerated gold ions have average and maximum charge-to-mass ratio of 0.25 and 0.3, respectively, maximum normalized energy 25 MeV/nucleon, and flux 2 × 10 11 ions / sr . An analytical model was used to determine a range of foil thicknesses suitable for acceleration of gold ions in the radiation pressure acceleration regime and the onset of the target normal sheath acceleration regime. The numerical simulations and analytical model point to at least four technical challenges hindering the heavy ion acceleration: low charge-to-mass ratio, limited number of ions amenable to acceleration, delayed acceleration, and high reflectivity of the plasma. Finally, a regime suitable for heavy ion acceleration has been identified in an alternative approach by analyzing the energy absorption and distribution among participating species and scaling of conversion efficiency, maximum energy, and flux with laser intensity.

  18. PREFACE: Heavy-Ion Spectroscopy and QED Effects in Atomic Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindgren, Ingvar; Martinson, Indrek; Schuch, Reinhold

    1993-01-01

    now essentially solved. The experimental accuracy is already so high that also higher-order QED effects become observable, and several groups are now active in trying to evaluate such effects from first principles. Another related field where substantial progress has recently been made involves precision measurements of X-ray transitions. This has created an interest in the study of deep inner holes in heavy atoms, where large relativistic and QED effects appear. These effects are as large as in corresponding highly charged ions, but the interpretation requires that the many-body effects from the surrounding electrons are accurately extracted. This is a big challenge at present. Atomic collision physics with highly charged ions has been dominated in recent years by the search for a possibility to describe electron-electron interaction within the dynamics of collisions. The experiments on multielectron transfer reactions with highly charged ions posed in this respect quite a challenge to the theory. The models developed to meet this were often based on methods and terminologies developed for describing the inter-electronic interactions in atomic structure. This caused many controversial discussions, also during this symposium. A new and fast rising field is the interaction of highly charged ions with solid surfaces. This may become an important link between atomic physics and condensed-matter physics, stimulated by the opportunity to study effects in coupled many-body systems present in the case when a large amount of electrons is transferred from the solid to each single ion. Furtheron, collision experiments with cooled ion beams in ion storage rings open new dimensions also for atomic spectroscopy. It appears possible that transition and binding energies can be measured in recombination of very heavy ions with a better quality than by conventional Auger electron or X-ray spectroscopy. Obviously, it is not possible to cover all the fields mentioned here in a single

  19. Low and high dose rate heavy ion radiation-induced intestinal and colonic tumorigenesis in APC(1638N/+) mice.

    PubMed

    Suman, Shubhankar; Kumar, Santosh; Moon, Bo-Hyun; Fornace, Albert J; Datta, Kamal

    2017-05-01

    Ionizing radiation (IR) is a recognized risk factor for colorectal cancer (CRC) and astronauts undertaking long duration space missions are expected to receive IR doses in excess of permissible limits with implications for colorectal carcinogenesis. Exposure to IR in outer space occurs at low doses and dose rates, and energetic heavy ions due to their high linear energy transfer (high-LET) characteristics remain a major concern for CRC risk in astronauts. Previously, we have demonstrated that intestinal tumorigenesis in a mouse model (APC(1638N/+)) of human colorectal cancer was significantly higher after exposure to high dose rate energetic heavy ions relative to low-LET γ radiation. The purpose of the current study was to compare intestinal tumorigenesis in APC(1638N/+) mice after exposure to energetic heavy ions at high (50cGy/min) and relatively low (0.33cGy/min) dose rate. Male and female mice (6-8 weeks old) were exposed to either 10 or 50cGy of (28)Si (energy: 300MeV/n; LET: 70keV/μm) or (56)Fe (energy: 1000MeV/n; LET: 148keV/μm) ions at NASA Space Radiation Laboratory in Brookhaven National Laboratory. Mice (n=20 mice/group) were euthanized and intestinal and colon tumor frequency and size were counted 150days after radiation exposure. Intestinal tumorigenesis in male mice exposed to (56)Fe was similar for high and low dose rate exposures. Although male mice showed a decreasing trend at low dose rate relative to high dose rate exposures, the differences in tumor frequency between the two types of exposures were not statistically significant after (28)Si radiation. In female mice, intestinal tumor frequency was similar for both radiation type and dose rates tested. In both male and female mice intestinal tumor size was not different after high and low dose rate radiation exposures. Colon tumor frequency in male and female mice after high and low dose rate energetic heavy ions was also not significantly different. In conclusion, intestinal and colonic

  20. Low and high dose rate heavy ion radiation-induced intestinal and colonic tumorigenesis in APC1638N/+ mice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suman, Shubhankar; Kumar, Santosh; Moon, Bo-Hyun; Fornace, Albert J.; Datta, Kamal

    2017-05-01

    Ionizing radiation (IR) is a recognized risk factor for colorectal cancer (CRC) and astronauts undertaking long duration space missions are expected to receive IR doses in excess of permissible limits with implications for colorectal carcinogenesis. Exposure to IR in outer space occurs at low doses and dose rates, and energetic heavy ions due to their high linear energy transfer (high-LET) characteristics remain a major concern for CRC risk in astronauts. Previously, we have demonstrated that intestinal tumorigenesis in a mouse model (APC1638N/+) of human colorectal cancer was significantly higher after exposure to high dose rate energetic heavy ions relative to low-LET γ radiation. The purpose of the current study was to compare intestinal tumorigenesis in APC1638N/+ mice after exposure to energetic heavy ions at high (50 cGy/min) and relatively low (0.33 cGy/min) dose rate. Male and female mice (6-8 weeks old) were exposed to either 10 or 50 cGy of 28Si (energy: 300 MeV/n; LET: 70 keV/μm) or 56Fe (energy: 1000 MeV/n; LET: 148 keV/μm) ions at NASA Space Radiation Laboratory in Brookhaven National Laboratory. Mice (n = 20 mice/group) were euthanized and intestinal and colon tumor frequency and size were counted 150 days after radiation exposure. Intestinal tumorigenesis in male mice exposed to 56Fe was similar for high and low dose rate exposures. Although male mice showed a decreasing trend at low dose rate relative to high dose rate exposures, the differences in tumor frequency between the two types of exposures were not statistically significant after 28Si radiation. In female mice, intestinal tumor frequency was similar for both radiation type and dose rates tested. In both male and female mice intestinal tumor size was not different after high and low dose rate radiation exposures. Colon tumor frequency in male and female mice after high and low dose rate energetic heavy ions was also not significantly different. In conclusion, intestinal and colonic tumor