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  1. American Society of Clinical Oncology

    MedlinePlus

    ... Conference Missouri Oncology Society State Affiliate View Event Neuroscience Update in Pediatric Neuro-Oncology Houston, Texas, United States April 22 Neuroscience Update in Pediatric Neuro-Oncology MD Anderson Informational; ...

  2. European Society for Clinical Virology - winter meeting.

    PubMed

    Westh, Henrik

    2004-02-01

    The European Society for Clinical Virology annual winter meeting mainly appeals to clinical virologists interested in human disease. Basic and clinical data were presented, highlighting a number of interesting findings. This report briefly describes options in HIV antiviral treatment, and focuses on fusion inhibitors, a new anti-HIV class of drugs. Recent improvements in experimental DNA vaccines are also presented.

  3. Postmastectomy Radiotherapy: An American Society of Clinical Oncology, American Society for Radiation Oncology, and Society of Surgical Oncology Focused Guideline Update.

    PubMed

    Recht, Abram; Comen, Elizabeth A; Fine, Richard E; Fleming, Gini F; Hardenbergh, Patricia H; Ho, Alice Y; Hudis, Clifford A; Hwang, E Shelley; Kirshner, Jeffrey J; Morrow, Monica; Salerno, Kilian E; Sledge, George W; Solin, Lawrence J; Spears, Patricia A; Whelan, Timothy J; Somerfield, Mark R; Edge, Stephen B

    A joint American Society of Clinical Oncology, American Society for Radiation Oncology, and Society of Surgical Oncology panel convened to develop a focused update of the American Society of Clinical Oncology guideline concerning use of postmastectomy radiotherapy (PMRT).

  4. A history of the American Society for Clinical Investigation

    PubMed Central

    Howell, Joel D.

    2009-01-01

    One hundred years ago, in 1909, the American Society for Clinical Investigation (ASCI) held its first annual meeting. The founding members based this new society on a revolutionary approach to research that emphasized newer physiological methods. In 1924 the ASCI started a new journal, the Journal of Clinical Investigation. The ASCI has also held an annual meeting almost every year. The society has long debated who could be a member, with discussions about whether members must be physicians, what sorts of research they could do, and the role of women within the society. The ASCI has also grappled with what else the society should do, especially whether it ought to take a stand on policy issues. ASCI history has reflected changing social, political, and economic contexts, including several wars, concerns about the ethics of biomedical research, massive increases in federal research funding, and an increasingly large and specialized medical environment. PMID:19348041

  5. Implementation of the American Society of Clinical Oncology and Oncology Nursing Society chemotherapy safety standards.

    PubMed

    Vioral, Anna N; Kennihan, Heather K

    2012-12-01

    Chemotherapy involves an intricate, high-risk, multidisciplinary process of prescribing, dispensing, and administering complex multimedication regimens with narrow therapeutic indices. Chemotherapeutic agents also require safe-handling precautions for patients and healthcare providers. In addition, a number of chemotherapy and targeted therapies have expanded to nononcology populations. This complexity demands standardization of chemotherapy practice for all healthcare providers to ensure safe outcomes. This article describes one organization's multidisciplinary effort to standardize chemotherapy practice according to the American Society of Clinical Oncology and Oncology Nursing Society's 31 safety standards for chemotherapy administration. The article also describes how the organization integrated and developed standards of practice using interdisciplinary approaches. The educational processes used during implementation and the lessons learned are discussed to assist healthcare providers involved in standardizing chemotherapy administration. The article equips healthcare professionals with a multidisciplinary process for high-quality clinical standards of practice that may reduce errors and ensure safety.

  6. American Cancer Society/American Society of Clinical Oncology Breast Cancer Survivorship Care Guideline.

    PubMed

    Runowicz, Carolyn D; Leach, Corinne R; Henry, N Lynn; Henry, Karen S; Mackey, Heather T; Cowens-Alvarado, Rebecca L; Cannady, Rachel S; Pratt-Chapman, Mandi L; Edge, Stephen B; Jacobs, Linda A; Hurria, Arti; Marks, Lawrence B; LaMonte, Samuel J; Warner, Ellen; Lyman, Gary H; Ganz, Patricia A

    2016-02-20

    The purpose of the American Cancer Society/American Society of Clinical Oncology Breast Cancer Survivorship Care Guideline is to provide recommendations to assist primary care and other clinicians in the care of female adult survivors of breast cancer. A systematic review of the literature was conducted using PubMed through April 2015. A multidisciplinary expert workgroup with expertise in primary care, gynecology, surgical oncology, medical oncology, radiation oncology, and nursing was formed and tasked with drafting the Breast Cancer Survivorship Care Guideline. A total of 1,073 articles met inclusion criteria; and, after full text review, 237 were included as the evidence base. Patients should undergo regular surveillance for breast cancer recurrence, including evaluation with a cancer-related history and physical examination, and should be screened for new primary breast cancer. Data do not support performing routine laboratory tests or imaging tests in asymptomatic patients to evaluate for breast cancer recurrence. Primary care clinicians should counsel patients about the importance of maintaining a healthy lifestyle, monitor for post-treatment symptoms that can adversely affect quality of life, and monitor for adherence to endocrine therapy. Recommendations provided in this guideline are based on current evidence in the literature and expert consensus opinion. Most of the evidence is not sufficient to warrant a strong evidence-based recommendation. Recommendations on surveillance for breast cancer recurrence, screening for second primary cancers, assessment and management of physical and psychosocial long-term and late effects of breast cancer and its treatment, health promotion, and care coordination/practice implications are made.This guideline was developed through a collaboration between the American Cancer Society and the American Society of Clinical Oncology and has been published jointly by invitation and consent in both CA: A Cancer Journal for

  7. Treatment of Cushing's Syndrome: An Endocrine Society Clinical Practice Guideline

    PubMed Central

    Nieman, Lynnette K.; Biller, Beverly M. K.; Findling, James W.; Murad, M. Hassan; Newell-Price, John; Savage, Martin O.; Tabarin, Antoine

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The objective is to formulate clinical practice guidelines for treating Cushing's syndrome. Participants: Participants include an Endocrine Society-appointed Task Force of experts, a methodologist, and a medical writer. The European Society for Endocrinology co-sponsored the guideline. Evidence: The Task Force used the Grading of Recommendations, Assessment, Development, and Evaluation system to describe the strength of recommendations and the quality of evidence. The Task Force commissioned three systematic reviews and used the best available evidence from other published systematic reviews and individual studies. Consensus Process: The Task Force achieved consensus through one group meeting, several conference calls, and numerous e-mail communications. Committees and members of The Endocrine Society and the European Society of Endocrinology reviewed and commented on preliminary drafts of these guidelines. Conclusions: Treatment of Cushing's syndrome is essential to reduce mortality and associated comorbidities. Effective treatment includes the normalization of cortisol levels or action. It also includes the normalization of comorbidities via directly treating the cause of Cushing's syndrome and by adjunctive treatments (eg, antihypertensives). Surgical resection of the causal lesion(s) is generally the first-line approach. The choice of second-line treatments, including medication, bilateral adrenalectomy, and radiation therapy (for corticotrope tumors), must be individualized to each patient. PMID:26222757

  8. American Cancer Society/American Society of Clinical Oncology Breast Cancer Survivorship Care Guideline.

    PubMed

    Runowicz, Carolyn D; Leach, Corinne R; Henry, N Lynn; Henry, Karen S; Mackey, Heather T; Cowens-Alvarado, Rebecca L; Cannady, Rachel S; Pratt-Chapman, Mandi L; Edge, Stephen B; Jacobs, Linda A; Hurria, Arti; Marks, Lawrence B; LaMonte, Samuel J; Warner, Ellen; Lyman, Gary H; Ganz, Patricia A

    2016-01-01

    Answer questions and earn CME/CNE The purpose of the American Cancer Society/American Society of Clinical Oncology Breast Cancer Survivorship Care Guideline is to provide recommendations to assist primary care and other clinicians in the care of female adult survivors of breast cancer. A systematic review of the literature was conducted using PubMed through April 2015. A multidisciplinary expert workgroup with expertise in primary care, gynecology, surgical oncology, medical oncology, radiation oncology, and nursing was formed and tasked with drafting the Breast Cancer Survivorship Care Guideline. A total of 1073 articles met inclusion criteria; and, after full text review, 237 were included as the evidence base. Patients should undergo regular surveillance for breast cancer recurrence, including evaluation with a cancer-related history and physical examination, and should be screened for new primary breast cancer. Data do not support performing routine laboratory tests or imaging tests in asymptomatic patients to evaluate for breast cancer recurrence. Primary care clinicians should counsel patients about the importance of maintaining a healthy lifestyle, monitor for post-treatment symptoms that can adversely affect quality of life, and monitor for adherence to endocrine therapy. Recommendations provided in this guideline are based on current evidence in the literature and expert consensus opinion. Most of the evidence is not sufficient to warrant a strong evidence-based recommendation. Recommendations on surveillance for breast cancer recurrence, screening for second primary cancers, assessment and management of physical and psychosocial long-term and late effects of breast cancer and its treatment, health promotion, and care coordination/practice implications are made.

  9. Indian Psychiatric Society Survey on Clinical Practice Guidelines

    PubMed Central

    Grover, Sandeep; Avasthi, Ajit

    2017-01-01

    Aim: This survey aimed to assess the utility of the earlier published clinical practice guidelines (CPGs) by IPS and to understand the expectations of members of Indian Psychiatric Society from the proposed revised CPGs. In addition, the survey also evaluated the current level of practice of psychiatry in terms of availability of different investigation facilities, prescription patterns in terms of use of polypharmacy, and competence in carrying out certain nonpharmacological treatments. Methodology: An online survey was received by 3475 psychiatrist, of whom 608 (17.5%) participants completed the survey. Results: Almost all (93.8%) of the psychiatrists agreed that there should be separate CPGs for Indian setting. In terms of problems with the previous version of the CPGs, this survey shows that the previous version of guidelines was used in making clinical decisions by only one-third (31.25%) of the participating psychiatrists. The major limitations of the previous version of CPGs which were pointed out included the lack of consideration of socio-cultural issues (33.2%), lack of recommendations for many clinical situations that are encountered in clinical practice (43.15) and poor dissemination (35.2%). In terms of expectations, the membership expects the society to come up with guidelines, which are shorter in length (82.2%), has significant proportion of information in the form of tables and flow diagrams (58.7%), besides the evidence base must also take expert opinions into account (84.7%), must be circulated before adopting (88.7%), must be disseminated by displaying the same on the website (72%), and also by sending the same by E-mails (62%). Further, the membership expects the IPS to design online continuing medical education program on CPGs (54.3%). The survey also suggests that it is feasible on the part of more than two-third of the psychiatrists to monitor the metabolic parameters in routine clinical practice and carryout various nonpharmacological

  10. Hereditary Colorectal Cancer Syndromes: American Society of Clinical Oncology Clinical Practice Guideline Endorsement of the Familial Risk–Colorectal Cancer: European Society for Medical Oncology Clinical Practice Guidelines

    PubMed Central

    Stoffel, Elena M.; Mangu, Pamela B.; Gruber, Stephen B.; Hamilton, Stanley R.; Kalady, Matthew F.; Lau, Michelle Wan Yee; Lu, Karen H.; Roach, Nancy; Limburg, Paul J.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To provide recommendations on prevention, screening, genetics, treatment, and management for people at risk for hereditary colorectal cancer (CRC) syndromes. The American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) has a policy and set of procedures for endorsing clinical practice guidelines that have been developed by other professional organizations. Methods The Familial Risk–Colorectal Cancer: European Society for Medical Oncology Clinical Practice Guideline published in 2013 on behalf of the European Society for Medical Oncology (ESMO) Guidelines Working Group in Annals of Oncology was reviewed for developmental rigor by methodologists, with content and recommendations reviewed by an ASCO endorsement panel. Results The ASCO endorsement panel determined that the recommendations of the ESMO guidelines are clear, thorough, and based on the most relevant scientific evidence. The ASCO panel endorsed the ESMO guidelines and added a few qualifying statements. Recommendations Approximately 5% to 6% of patient cases of CRC are associated with germline mutations that confer an inherited predisposition for cancer. The possibility of a hereditary cancer syndrome should be assessed for every patient at the time of CRC diagnosis. A diagnosis of Lynch syndrome, familial adenomatous polyposis, or another genetic syndrome can influence clinical management for patients with CRC and their family members. Screening for hereditary cancer syndromes in patients with CRC should include review of personal and family histories and testing of tumors for DNA mismatch repair deficiency and/or microsatellite instability. Formal genetic evaluation is recommended for individuals who meet defined criteria. PMID:25452455

  11. Japanese Society of Clinical Oncology clinical practice guidelines 2010 for antiemesis in oncology: executive summary.

    PubMed

    Takeuchi, Hideki; Saeki, Toshiaki; Aiba, Keisuke; Tamura, Kazuo; Aogi, Kenjiro; Eguchi, Kenji; Okita, Kenji; Kagami, Yoshikazu; Tanaka, Ryuhei; Nakagawa, Kazuhiko; Fujii, Hirofumi; Boku, Narikazu; Wada, Makoto; Akechi, Tatsuo; Udagawa, Yasuhiro; Okawa, Yutaka; Onozawa, Yusuke; Sasaki, Hidenori; Shima, Yasuo; Shimoyama, Naohito; Takeda, Masayuki; Nishidate, Toshihiko; Yamamoto, Akifumi; Ikeda, Tadashi; Hirata, Koichi

    2016-02-01

    The purpose of this article is to disseminate the standard of antiemetic therapy for Japanese clinical oncologists. On the basis of the Appraisal of Guidelines for Research and Evaluation II instrument, which reflects evidence-based clinical practice guidelines, a working group of the Japanese Society of Clinical Oncology (JSCO) reviewed clinical practice guidelines for antiemesis and performed a systematic review of evidence-based domestic practice guidelines for antiemetic therapy in Japan. In addition, because health-insurance systems in Japan are different from those in other countries, a consensus was reached regarding standard treatments for chemotherapy that induce nausea and vomiting. Current evidence was collected by use of MEDLINE, from materials from meetings of the American Society of Clinical Oncology National Comprehensive Cancer Network, and from European Society of Medical Oncology/Multinational Association of Supportive Care in Cancer guidelines for antiemesis. Initially, 21 clinical questions (CQ) were selected on the basis of CQs from other guidelines. Patients treated with highly emetic agents should receive a serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine; 5HT3) receptor antagonist, dexamethasone, and a neurokinin 1 receptor antagonist. For patients with moderate emetic risk, 5HT3 receptor antagonists and dexamethasone were recommended, whereas for those receiving chemotherapy with low emetic risk dexamethasone only is recommended. Patients receiving high-emetic-risk radiation therapy should also receive a 5HT3 receptor antagonist. In this paper the 2010 JSCO clinical practice guidelines for antiemesis are presented in English; they reveal high concordance of Japanese medical circumstances with other antiemetic guidelines that are similarly based on evidence.

  12. What does a clinically-scientific professional society stand for?

    PubMed Central

    Gerris, J; Ombelet, W

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Originated as a mainly social group of befriended colleagues, the VVOG has evolved over the past 55 years to become a truly professional society facing successfully such diverse challenges as organizing scientific congresses, postgraduate training, ethical debates, hands-on training courses, social events, interactions with national and international sister societies but also with the industry, insurers, the government, politicians and patient organisations. PMID:27909563

  13. American Cancer Society, American Society for Colposcopy and Cervical Pathology, and American Society for Clinical Pathology screening guidelines for the prevention and early detection of cervical cancer.

    PubMed

    Saslow, Debbie; Solomon, Diane; Lawson, Herschel W; Killackey, Maureen; Kulasingam, Shalini L; Cain, Joanna; Garcia, Francisco A R; Moriarty, Ann T; Waxman, Alan G; Wilbur, David C; Wentzensen, Nicolas; Downs, Levi S; Spitzer, Mark; Moscicki, Anna-Barbara; Franco, Eduardo L; Stoler, Mark H; Schiffman, Mark; Castle, Philip E; Myers, Evan R

    2012-01-01

    An update to the American Cancer Society (ACS) guideline regarding screening for the early detection of cervical precancerous lesions and cancer is presented. The guidelines are based on a systematic evidence review, contributions from 6 working groups, and a recent symposium cosponsored by the ACS, the American Society for Colposcopy and Cervical Pathology, and the American Society for Clinical Pathology, which was attended by 25 organizations. The new screening recommendations address age-appropriate screening strategies, including the use of cytology and high-risk human papillomavirus (HPV) testing, follow-up (eg, the management of screen positives and screening intervals for screen negatives) of women after screening, the age at which to exit screening, future considerations regarding HPV testing alone as a primary screening approach, and screening strategies for women vaccinated against HPV16 and HPV18 infections.

  14. American Cancer Society, American Society for Colposcopy and Cervical Pathology, and American Society for Clinical Pathology screening guidelines for the prevention and early detection of cervical cancer.

    PubMed

    Saslow, Debbie; Solomon, Diane; Lawson, Herschel W; Killackey, Maureen; Kulasingam, Shalini L; Cain, Joanna; Garcia, Francisco A R; Moriarty, Ann T; Waxman, Alan G; Wilbur, David C; Wentzensen, Nicolas; Downs, Levi S; Spitzer, Mark; Moscicki, Anna-Barbara; Franco, Eduardo L; Stoler, Mark H; Schiffman, Mark; Castle, Philip E; Myers, Evan R

    2012-04-01

    An update to the American Cancer Society (ACS) guideline regarding screening for the early detection of cervical precancerous lesions and cancer is presented. The guidelines are based on a systematic evidence review, contributions from 6 working groups, and a recent symposium cosponsored by the ACS, the American Society for Colposcopy and Cervical Pathology, and the American Society for Clinical Pathology, which was attended by 25 organizations. The new screening recommendations address age-appropriate screening strategies, including the use of cytology and high-risk human papillomavirus (HPV) testing, follow-up (eg, the management of screen positives and screening intervals for screen negatives) of women after screening, the age at which to exit screening, future considerations regarding HPV testing alone as a primary screening approach, and screening strategies for women vaccinated against HPV16 and HPV18 infections.

  15. American Cancer Society, American Society for Colposcopy and Cervical Pathology, and American Society for Clinical Pathology screening guidelines for the prevention and early detection of cervical cancer.

    PubMed

    Saslow, Debbie; Solomon, Diane; Lawson, Herschel W; Killackey, Maureen; Kulasingam, Shalini L; Cain, Joanna M; Garcia, Francisco A R; Moriarty, Ann T; Waxman, Alan G; Wilbur, David C; Wentzensen, Nicolas; Downs, Levi S; Spitzer, Mark; Moscicki, Anna-Barbara; Franco, Eduardo L; Stoler, Mark H; Schiffman, Mark; Castle, Philip E; Myers, Evan R; Chelmow, David; Herzig, Abbe; Kim, Jane J; Kinney, Walter; Herschel, W Lawson; Waldman, Jeffrey

    2012-07-01

    An update to the American Cancer Society (ACS) guideline regarding screening for the early detection of cervical precancerous lesions and cancer is presented. The guidelines are based on a systematic evidence review, contributions from six working groups, and a recent symposium co-sponsored by the ACS, American Society for Colposcopy and Cervical Pathology (ASCCP), and American Society for Clinical Pathology (ASCP), which was attended by 25 organizations. The new screening recommendations address age-appropriate screening strategies, including the use of cytology and high-risk human papillomavirus (HPV) testing, follow-up (e.g., management of screen positives and screening interval for screen negatives) of women after screening, age at which to exit screening, future considerations regarding HPV testing alone as a primary screening approach, and screening strategies for women vaccinated against HPV16/18 infections.

  16. American Society of Clinical Oncology clinical practice guidelines: opportunities and challenges.

    PubMed

    Somerfield, Mark R; Einhaus, Kaitlin; Hagerty, Karen L; Brouwers, Melissa C; Seidenfeld, Jerome; Lyman, Gary H

    2008-08-20

    The American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) published its first clinical practice guideline, which focused on the use of hematopoietic colony-stimulating factors, in 1994. Since then, ASCO has published 24 additional guidelines or technology assessments on a range of topics and is developing 11 additional guidelines. Guidelines are among ASCO's most valued products, according to membership surveys and data from the JCO.org Web site. However, the same data from ASCO members have highlighted a number of limitations to the guideline program. These relate to the timelines of guideline updates, difficulties locating guidelines and related products, and challenges to implementing ASCO guidelines in everyday clinical practice. This article outlines the concrete steps that the ASCO Health Services Committee (HSC) is taking to address these limitations, including the institution of a more aggressive guideline updating schedule, a transition from narrative to systematic literature reviews to support the practice recommendations, a new Board of Directors-approved policy to permit endorsement of other groups' guidelines, and a robust Clinical Tools and Resources program that offers a range of guideline dissemination and implementation aids. Additional work is underway to establish stronger and deeper collaborations with practicing oncologists to expand their role in the review, field testing, and implementation of guideline clinical tools and resources. Finally, the HSC is discussing evaluation of the guidelines program to maximize the impact of ASCO clinical practice guidelines on clinical decision making and, ultimately, the quality of cancer care.

  17. [25 years of clinical psychology of the East German Society of Psychology].

    PubMed

    Göth, N

    1988-02-01

    In the 25. year of existing of Section Clinical Psychology of society for Psychology in the GDR are analysed the todays performance, educational points and developments. The very young history of clinical Psychology is demonstrating the value of clinical Psychologist in the socialistic healthy work and the international important positions of special education to psychological specialist of medicine. The analysis of last years is showing stronger a interweave from clinical Psychology and clinical medicine.

  18. American Clinical Neurophysiology Society Guideline 7: Guidelines for EEG Reporting.

    PubMed

    Tatum, William O; Olga, Selioutski; Ochoa, Juan G; Munger Clary, Heidi; Cheek, Janna; Drislane, Frank; Tsuchida, Tammy N

    2016-08-01

    This EEG Guideline incorporates the practice of structuring a report of results obtained during routine adult electroencephalography. It is intended to reflect one of the current practices in reporting an EEG and serves as a revision of the previous guideline entitled "Writing an EEG Report." The goal of this guideline is not only to convey clinically relevant information, but also to improve interrater reliability for clinical and research use by standardizing the format of EEG reports. With this in mind, there is expanded documentation of the patient history to include more relevant clinical information that can affect the EEG recording and interpretation. Recommendations for the technical conditions of the recording are also enhanced to include post hoc review parameters and type of EEG recording. Sleep feature documentation is also expanded upon. More descriptive terms are included for background features and interictal discharges that are concordant with efforts to standardize terminology. In the clinical correlation section, examples of common clinical scenarios are now provided that encourages uniformity in reporting. Including digital samples of abnormal waveforms is now readily available with current EEG recording systems and may be beneficial in augmenting reports when controversial waveforms or important features are encountered.

  19. Parent-Adolescent Cross-Informant Agreement in Clinically Referred Samples: Findings From Seven Societies.

    PubMed

    Rescorla, Leslie A; Ewing, Grace; Ivanova, Masha Y; Aebi, Marcel; Bilenberg, Niels; Dieleman, Gwen C; Döpfner, Manfred; Kajokiene, Ilona; Leung, Patrick W L; Plück, Julia; Steinhausen, Hans-Christoph; Winkler Metzke, Christa; Zukauskiene, Rita; Verhulst, Frank C

    2017-01-01

    To conduct international comparisons of parent-adolescent cross-informant agreement in clinical samples, we analyzed ratings on the Child Behavior Checklist (CBCL) and Youth Self-Report (YSR) for 6,762 clinically referred adolescents ages 11-18 from 7 societies (M = 14.5 years, SD = 2.0 years; 51% boys). Using CBCL and YSR data, we asked the following questions: (a) Do parents report more problems for their adolescent children than the adolescents report about themselves? (b) How do cross-informant correlations (rs) for scale scores differ by problem type and by society? (c) How well do parents and adolescents, on average, agree regarding which problems they rate as low, medium, or high? (d) How does within-dyad item agreement vary within and between societies? (e) How do societies vary in dichotomous cross-informant agreement with respect to the deviance status of the adolescents? CBCL and YSR scores were quite similar, with small and inconsistent informant effects across societies. Cross-informant rs averaged .47 across scales and societies. On average, parents and adolescents agreed well regarding which problem items received low, medium, or high ratings (M r = .87). Mean within-dyad item agreement was moderate across all societies, but dyadic agreement varied widely within every society. In most societies, adolescent noncorroboration of parent-reported deviance was more common than parental noncorroboration of adolescent-reported deviance. Overall, somewhat better parent-adolescent agreement and more consistency in agreement patterns across diverse societies were found in these seven clinical samples than in population samples studied using the same methods.

  20. Home mechanical ventilation: a Canadian Thoracic Society clinical practice guideline.

    PubMed

    McKim, Douglas A; Road, Jeremy; Avendano, Monica; Abdool, Steve; Cote, Fabien; Duguid, Nigel; Fraser, Janet; Maltais, Fracois; Morrison, Debra L; O'Connell, Colleen; Petrof, Basil J; Rimmer, Karen; Skomro, Robert

    2011-01-01

    Increasing numbers of patients are surviving episodes of prolonged mechanical ventilation or benefitting from the recent availability of userfriendly noninvasive ventilators. Although many publications pertaining to specific aspects of home mechanical ventilation (HMV) exist, very few comprehensive guidelines that bring together all of the current literature on patients at risk for or using mechanical ventilatory support are available. The Canadian Thoracic Society HMV Guideline Committee has reviewed the available English literature on topics related to HMV in adults, and completed a detailed guideline that will help standardize and improve the assessment and management of individuals requiring noninvasive or invasive HMV. The guideline provides a disease-specific review of illnesses including amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, spinal cord injury, muscular dystrophies, myotonic dystrophy, kyphoscoliosis, post-polio syndrome, central hypoventilation syndrome, obesity hypoventilation syndrome, and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease as well as important common themes such as airway clearance and the process of transition to home. The guidelines have been extensively reviewed by international experts, allied health professionals and target audiences. They will be updated on a regular basis to incorporate any new information.

  1. Potentially Curable Pancreatic Cancer: American Society of Clinical Oncology Clinical Practice Guideline Update.

    PubMed

    Khorana, Alok A; Mangu, Pamela B; Berlin, Jordan; Engebretson, Anitra; Hong, Theodore S; Maitra, Anirban; Mohile, Supriya G; Mumber, Matthew; Schulick, Richard; Shapiro, Marc; Urba, Susan; Zeh, Herbert J; Katz, Matthew H G

    2017-04-11

    Purpose To update the Potentially Curable Pancreatic Cancer: American Society of Clinical Oncology Clinical Practice Guideline published on May 31, 2016. The October 2016 update focuses solely on new evidence that pertains to clinical question 4 of the guideline: What is the appropriate adjuvant regimen for patients with pancreatic cancer who have undergone an R0 or R1 resection of their primary tumor? Methods The recently published results of a randomized phase III study prompted an update of this guideline. The high quality of the reported evidence and the potential for its clinical impact prompted the Expert Panel to revise one of the guideline recommendations. Results The ESPAC-4 study, a multicenter, international, open-label randomized controlled phase III trial of adjuvant combination chemotherapy compared gemcitabine and capecitabine with gemcitabine monotherapy in 730 evaluable patients with resected pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma. Median overall survival was improved in the doublet arm to 28.0 months (95% CI, 23.5 to 31.5 months) versus 25.5 months (95% CI, 22.7 to 27.9 months) for gemcitabine alone (hazard ratio, 0.82; 95% CI, 0.68 to 0.98; P = .032). Grade 3 and 4 adverse events were similar in both arms, although higher rates of hand-foot syndrome and diarrhea occurred in patients randomly assigned to the doublet arm. Recommendations All patients with resected pancreatic cancer who did not receive preoperative therapy should be offered 6 months of adjuvant chemotherapy in the absence of medical or surgical contraindications. The doublet regimen of gemcitabine and capecitabine is preferred in the absence of concerns for toxicity or tolerance; alternatively, monotherapy with gemcitabine or fluorouracil plus folinic acid can be offered. Adjuvant treatment should be initiated within 8 weeks of surgical resection, assuming complete recovery. The remaining recommendations from the original 2016 ASCO guideline are unchanged.

  2. Comparative Evaluation of American Cancer Society and American Lung Association Smoking Cessation Clinics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lando, Harry A.; And Others

    1990-01-01

    Compared the effectiveness of the American Cancer Society's "FreshStart," the American Lung Association's "Freedom from Smoking," and a laboratory smoking cessation clinic. A one-year followup favored the more intensive laboratory and "Freedom from Smoking" clinics over the "FreshStart" method. (FMW)

  3. Fertility Preservation for Patients With Cancer: American Society of Clinical Oncology Clinical Practice Guideline Update

    PubMed Central

    Loren, Alison W.; Mangu, Pamela B.; Beck, Lindsay Nohr; Brennan, Lawrence; Magdalinski, Anthony J.; Partridge, Ann H.; Quinn, Gwendolyn; Wallace, W. Hamish; Oktay, Kutluk

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To update guidance for health care providers about fertility preservation for adults and children with cancer. Methods A systematic review of the literature published from March 2006 through January 2013 was completed using MEDLINE and the Cochrane Collaboration Library. An Update Panel reviewed the evidence and updated the recommendation language. Results There were 222 new publications that met inclusion criteria. A majority were observational studies, cohort studies, and case series or reports, with few randomized clinical trials. After review of the new evidence, the Update Panel concluded that no major, substantive revisions to the 2006 American Society of Clinical Oncology recommendations were warranted, but clarifications were added. Recommendations As part of education and informed consent before cancer therapy, health care providers (including medical oncologists, radiation oncologists, gynecologic oncologists, urologists, hematologists, pediatric oncologists, and surgeons) should address the possibility of infertility with patients treated during their reproductive years (or with parents or guardians of children) and be prepared to discuss fertility preservation options and/or to refer all potential patients to appropriate reproductive specialists. Although patients may be focused initially on their cancer diagnosis, the Update Panel encourages providers to advise patients regarding potential threats to fertility as early as possible in the treatment process so as to allow for the widest array of options for fertility preservation. The discussion should be documented. Sperm and embryo cryopreservation as well as oocyte cryopreservation are considered standard practice and are widely available. Other fertility preservation methods should be considered investigational and should be performed by providers with the necessary expertise. PMID:23715580

  4. Maintaining Life-saving Testing for Patients With Infectious Diseases: Infectious Diseases Society of America, American Society for Microbiology, and Pan American Society for Clinical Virology Recommendations on the Regulation of Laboratory-developed Tests.

    PubMed

    Caliendo, Angela M; Couturier, Marc R; Ginocchio, Christine C; Hanson, Kimberly E; Miller, Melissa B; Walker, Kimberly E; Frank, Gregory M

    2016-07-15

    In 2014, the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) proposed to regulate laboratory-developed tests (LDTs)-diagnostics designed, manufactured, and used within a single laboratory. The Infectious Diseases Society of America, the American Society for Microbiology, and the Pan American Society for Clinical Virology recognize that the FDA is committed to protecting patients. However, our societies are concerned that the proposed regulations will limit access to testing and negatively impact infectious diseases (ID) LDTs. In this joint commentary, our societies discuss why LDTs are critical for ID patient care, hospital infection control, and public health responses. We also highlight how the FDA's proposed regulation of LDTs could impair patient access to life-saving tests and stifle innovation in ID diagnostics. Finally, our societies make specific recommendations for the FDA's consideration to reduce the burden of the proposed new rules on clinical laboratories and protect patients' access to state-of-the art, quality LDTs.

  5. Inside the 2016 American Society of Clinical Oncology Genitourinary Cancers Symposium: part 1 - kidney cancer.

    PubMed

    Buti, Sebastiano; Ciccarese, Chiara; Iacovelli, Roberto; Bersanelli, Melissa; Scarpelli, Marina; Lopez-Beltran, Antonio; Cheng, Liang; Montironi, Rodolfo; Tortora, Giampaolo; Massari, Francesco

    2016-09-01

    The American Society of Clinical Oncology Genitourinary Cancers Symposium, Moscone West Building, San Francisco, CA, USA, 7-9 January 2016 The American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) Genitourinary Cancers Symposium, held in San Francisco (CA, USA), from 7 to 9 January 2016, focused on 'patient-centric care: translating research to results'. Every year, this meeting is a must for anyone studying genitourinary tumors to keep abreast of the most recent innovations in this field, exchange views on behaviors customarily adopted in daily clinical practice, and discuss future topics of scientific research. This two-part report highlights the key themes presented at the 2016 ASCO Genitourinary Cancers Symposium, with part 1 reporting the main novelties of kidney cancer and part 2 discussing the most relevant issues which have emerged for bladder and prostate tumors.

  6. [Clinical and therapeutic management of respiratory tract infections. Consensus document of the Andalusian Infectious Diseases Society and the Andalusian Family and Community Medicine Society].

    PubMed

    Cordero Matía, Elisa; de Dios Alcántara Bellón, Juan; Caballero Granado, Javier; de la Torre Lima, Javier; Girón González, José Antonio; Lama Herrera, Carmen; Morán Rodríguez, Ana; Zapata López, Angel

    2007-04-01

    Respiratory tract infections are frequent and they are one of the commonest causes of antibiotic prescription. However, there are few clinical guidelines that consider this group of infections. This document has been written by the Andalusian Infectious Diseases Society and the Andalusian Family and Community Medicine Society. The primary objective has been to define the recommendations for the diagnosis and antibiotic treatment of respiratory tract infections apart from pneumonia. The clinical syndromes evaluated have been: a) pharyngitis; b) sinusitis; c) acute otitis media and otitis externa; d) acute bronchitis, laryngitis, epiglottitis; e) acute exacerbation of chronic bronchitis; and f) respiratory infectious in patients with bronchiectasis. This document has focused on immunocompetent patients.

  7. Clinical Anatomy of the Liver: Review of the 19th Meeting of the Japanese Research Society of Clinical Anatomy

    PubMed Central

    Sakamoto, Yoshihiro; Kokudo, Norihiro; Kawaguchi, Yoshikuni; Akita, Keiichi

    2017-01-01

    Precise clinical knowledge of liver anatomy is required to safely perform a hepatectomy, for both open and laparoscopic surgery. At the 19th meeting of the Japanese Research Society of Clinical Anatomy (JRSCA), we conducted special symposia on essential issues of liver surgery, such as the history of hepatic segmentation, the glissonean pedicle approach, application of 3-D imaging simulation and fluorescent imaging using indocyanine green solution, a variety of segmentectomies including caudate lobectomy, the associating liver partition and portal vein embolization for stage hepatectomy and harvesting liver grafts for living donor liver transplantation. The present review article provides useful information for liver surgeons and anatomic researchers. PMID:28275581

  8. The "Commitment Model" for Clinical Ethics Consultations: Society's Involvement in the Solution of Individual Cases.

    PubMed

    Fournier, Véronique; Spranzi, Marta; Foureur, Nicolas; Brunet, Laurence

    2015-01-01

    Several approaches to clinical ethics consultation (CEC) exist in medical practice and are widely discussed in the clinical ethics literature; different models of CECs are classified according to their methods, goals, and consultant's attitude. Although the "facilitation" model has been endorsed by the American Society for Bioethics and Humanities (ASBH) and is described in an influential manual, alternative approaches, such as advocacy, moral expertise, mediation, and engagement are practiced and defended in the clinical ethics field. Our Clinical Ethics Center in Paris was founded in 2002 in the wake of the Patients' Rights Act, and to date it is the largest center that provides consultation services in France. In this article we shall describe and defend our own approach to clinical ethics consultation, which we call the "Commitment Model," in comparison with other existing models. Indeed commitment implies, among other meanings, continuity through time, a series of coherent actions, and the realization of important social goals. By drawing on a recent consultation case, we shall describe the main steps of our consultation procedure: interviews with major stakeholders, including patients and proxies; case conferences; and follow up. We shall show why we have chosen the term "commitment" to represent our approach at three different but interrelated levels: commitment towards patients, within the case conference group, and towards society as a whole.

  9. Diagnosis and Treatment of Primary Adrenal Insufficiency: An Endocrine Society Clinical Practice Guideline

    PubMed Central

    Bornstein, Stefan R.; Allolio, Bruno; Arlt, Wiebke; Barthel, Andreas; Don-Wauchope, Andrew; Hammer, Gary D.; Husebye, Eystein S.; Merke, Deborah P.; Murad, M. Hassan; Stratakis, Constantine A.; Torpy, David J.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: This clinical practice guideline addresses the diagnosis and treatment of primary adrenal insufficiency. Participants: The Task Force included a chair, selected by The Clinical Guidelines Subcommittee of the Endocrine Society, eight additional clinicians experienced with the disease, a methodologist, and a medical writer. The co-sponsoring associations (European Society of Endocrinology and the American Association for Clinical Chemistry) had participating members. The Task Force received no corporate funding or remuneration in connection with this review. Evidence: This evidence-based guideline was developed using the Grading of Recommendations, Assessment, Development, and Evaluation (GRADE) system to determine the strength of recommendations and the quality of evidence. Consensus Process: The evidence used to formulate recommendations was derived from two commissioned systematic reviews as well as other published systematic reviews and studies identified by the Task Force. The guideline was reviewed and approved sequentially by the Endocrine Society's Clinical Guidelines Subcommittee and Clinical Affairs Core Committee, members responding to a web posting, and the Endocrine Society Council. At each stage, the Task Force incorporated changes in response to written comments. Conclusions: We recommend diagnostic tests for the exclusion of primary adrenal insufficiency in all patients with indicative clinical symptoms or signs. In particular, we suggest a low diagnostic (and therapeutic) threshold in acutely ill patients, as well as in patients with predisposing factors. This is also recommended for pregnant women with unexplained persistent nausea, fatigue, and hypotension. We recommend a short corticotropin test (250 μg) as the “gold standard” diagnostic tool to establish the diagnosis. If a short corticotropin test is not possible in the first instance, we recommend an initial screening procedure comprising the measurement of morning plasma ACTH

  10. Advances in brain metastases presented at the American Society of Clinical Oncology 2016 Annual Meeting: Part I.

    PubMed

    Chen, Lucy F; Patel, Jyoti D; Lukas, Rimas V

    2016-11-01

    American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) Annual Meeting, Chicago, IL, USA, 3-7 June 2016 The American Society of Clinical Oncology Annual Meeting took place in Chicago, IL, USA from 3 to 7 June 2016. Over 30,000 oncologists, researchers, related professionals and advocates participated in the conference which covered all aspects of oncology. An overview of the key studies in brain metastases presented at the 2016 American Society of Clinical Oncology Annual Meeting is highlighted here. This report highlights biology, epidemiology, prognosis and treatment sequelae of brain metastases.

  11. Advances in brain metastases presented at the American Society of Clinical Oncology 2016 Annual Meeting: Part II.

    PubMed

    Chen, Lucy F; Patel, Jyoti D; Lukas, Rimas V

    2016-12-01

    American Society of Clinical Oncology Annual Meeting, Chicago, IL, USA, 3-7 June 2016 The American Society of Clinical Oncology Annual Meeting took place in Chicago, IL, USA, from 3 to 7 June 2016. Over 30,000 oncologists, researchers, related professionals and advocates participated in the conference, which covered all aspects of oncology. An overview of the key studies in brain metastases presented at the 2016 American Society of Clinical Oncology Annual Meeting is highlighted here. Key data presented on radiotherapy, and systemic therapy for brain metastases are reviewed.

  12. The Canadian Society of Clinical Chemists: highlights of its first 50 years.

    PubMed

    Crowe, Arlene J

    2006-05-01

    This article has been written to mark the 50th anniversary of the Canadian Society of Clinical Chemists (CSCC). It is not an exhaustive history of CSCC's activities but rather a review of many of the highlights that the Society and its members have experienced since its founding in October 1956. The names of many members who made important contributions to CSCC's development (but by no means all) are mentioned in the text. The historical material is presented by the decade but with blurred boundaries, as noteworthy advances in CSCC's history have most often developed gradually over several years and the terms of office of several CSCC Councils. From a founding roster of slightly over 70 members, the membership has grown to several hundred. The two main objectives for the Society's founding were stated by one of the three Montrealers who extended the original invitation, Dr. William S. Bauld: "to raise the standards of performance, and to raise the professional standing of clinical chemists". The early reports of committees on Instrumentation, Methods and Quality Control had rapid impact on individual members' laboratory practices across the country. The struggle for recognition of clinical chemists by other health professions inside and outside the clinical laboratories has taken much longer and has consisted of a long series of incremental successes through certification by examination, training programs, continuing education and, ultimately, the formation in 1986 of the Canadian Academy of Clinical Biochemistry. The CSCC's means of intra- and inter-communication with external organizations consist of its newsletter CSCC News, its scientific journal Clinical Biochemistry (established in 1967), and its more recently created website www.cscc.ca (1997). These three mechanisms ensure exchange of information between the officers of CSCC Council and the general membership and among members as well. National and international conferences have offered the newest

  13. The American Society of Clinical Oncology's Efforts to Support Global Cancer Medicine

    PubMed Central

    El-Saghir, Nagi S.; Cufer, Tanja; Cazap, Eduardo; de Guzman, Roselle; Othieno-Abinya, Nicholas Anthony; Sanchez, Jose Angel; Pyle, Doug

    2016-01-01

    Despite much progress in the management of malignant diseases, the number of new cases and cancer-related deaths continues to rise around the world. More than half of new cases occur in economically developing countries, where more than two thirds of cancer deaths are expected. However, implementation of all necessary steps to accomplish the dissemination of state-of-the-art prevention, diagnosis, and management will require increased allocation of resources, and, more importantly, harmonization of the efforts of hundreds of national and international public health agencies, policy-setting bodies, governments, pharmaceutical companies, and philanthropic organizations. More than 30% of the members of the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) reside and practice outside US borders, and more than half of attendees at all of the scientific congresses and symposia organized by ASCO are international. As cancer has become an increasingly global disease, ASCO has evolved as a global organization. The ASCO Board of Directors currently includes members from France, Brazil, and Canada. In 2013, the ASCO Board of Directors identified a number of strategic priorities for the future. Recognizing the importance of non-US members to the society, their first strategic priority was improving the society's service to non-US members and defining these members' identity in the international oncology community. This article reviews current ASCO activities in the international arena and its future plans in global oncology. PMID:26578614

  14. Head and Neck Cancer Survivorship Care Guideline: American Society of Clinical Oncology Clinical Practice Guideline Endorsement of the American Cancer Society Guideline.

    PubMed

    Nekhlyudov, Larissa; Lacchetti, Christina; Davis, Nancy B; Garvey, Thomas Q; Goldstein, David P; Nunnink, J Chris; Ninfea, Jose I Ruades; Salner, Andrew L; Salz, Talya; Siu, Lillian L

    2017-02-27

    Purpose This guideline provides recommendations on the management of adults after head and neck cancer (HNC) treatment, focusing on surveillance and screening for recurrence or second primary cancers, assessment and management of long-term and late effects, health promotion, care coordination, and practice implications. Methods ASCO has a policy and set of procedures for endorsing clinical practice guidelines that have been developed by other professional organizations. The American Cancer Society (ACS) HNC Survivorship Care Guideline was reviewed for developmental rigor by methodologists. An ASCO Expert Panel reviewed the content and recommendations, offering modifications and/or qualifying statements when deemed necessary. Results The ASCO Expert Panel determined that the ACS HNC Survivorship Care Guideline, published in 2016, is clear, thorough, clinically practical, and helpful, despite the limited availability of high-quality evidence to support many of the recommendations. ASCO endorsed the ACS HNC Survivorship Care Guideline, adding qualifying statements aimed at promoting team-based, multispecialty, multidisciplinary, collaborative head and neck survivorship care. Recommendations The ASCO Expert Panel emphasized that caring for HNC survivors requires a team-based approach that includes primary care clinicians, oncology specialists, otolaryngologists, dentists, and other allied professionals. The HNC treatment team should educate the primary care clinicians and patients about the type(s) of treatment received, the likelihood of potential recurrence, and the potential late and long-term complications. Primary care clinicians should recognize symptoms of recurrence and coordinate a prompt evaluation. They should also be prepared to manage late effects either directly or by referral to appropriate specialists. Health promotion is critical, particularly regarding tobacco cessation and dental care. Additional information is available at www

  15. American Society of Clinical Oncology Policy Statement on Clinical Pathways in Oncology.

    PubMed

    Zon, Robin T; Frame, James N; Neuss, Michael N; Page, Ray D; Wollins, Dana S; Stranne, Steven; Bosserman, Linda D

    2016-03-01

    The use of clinical pathways in oncology care is increasingly important to patients and oncology providers as a tool for enhancing both quality and value. However, with increasing adoption of pathways into oncology practice, concerns have been raised by ASCO members and other stakeholders. These include the process being used for pathway development, the administrative burdens on oncology practices of reporting on pathway adherence, and understanding the true impact of pathway use on patient health outcomes. To address these concerns, ASCO's Board of Directors established a Task Force on Clinical Pathways, charged with articulating a set of recommendations to improve the development of oncology pathways and processes, allowing the demonstration of pathway concordance in a manner that promotes evidence-based, high-value care respecting input from patients, payers, and providers. These recommendations have been approved and adopted by ASCO's Board of Directors on August 12, 2015, and are presented herein.

  16. Injection immunotherapy. British Society for Allergy and Clinical Immunology Working Party.

    PubMed Central

    Frew, A J

    1993-01-01

    A working party of the British Society for Allergy and Clinical Immunology has reviewed the role of specific allergen immunotherapy in the treatment of allergic disease and produced a position statement summarising the available evidence for efficacy and safety. The working party recommends specific allergen immunotherapy for treating summer hay fever uncontrolled by conventional medication and for wasp and bee venom hypersensitivity. It is not recommended for asthma or for allergic rhinitis due to other allergens. For the recommended indications the risk:benefit ratio is acceptable provided patients are carefully selected; in particular, patients with asthma should be excluded as they are especially vulnerable to adverse reactions. Injections should be given only by doctors experiences in this form of treatment in a clinic where full resuscitative facilities are immediately available. Provided patients remain symptom free a 60 minute observation period after injection is sufficient to detect all serious adverse reactions. PMID:8241857

  17. Do current clinical trials meet society's needs?: a critical review of recent evidence.

    PubMed

    Pocock, Stuart J; Gersh, Bernard J

    2014-10-14

    This paper describes some important controversies regarding the current state of clinical trials research in cardiology. Topics covered include the inadequacy of trial research on medical devices, problems with industry-sponsored trials, the lack of head-to-head trials of new effective treatments, the need for wiser handling of drug safety issues, the credibility (or lack thereof) of trial reports in medical journals, problems with globalization of trials, the role of personalized (stratified) medicine in trials, the need for new trials of old drugs, the need for trials of treatment withdrawal, the importance of pragmatic trials of treatment strategies, and the limitations of observational comparative effectiveness studies. All issues are illustrated by recent topical trials in cardiology. Overall, we explore the extent to which clinical trials, as currently practiced, are successful in meeting society's expectations.

  18. American Geriatrics Society abstracted clinical practice guideline for postoperative delirium in older adults.

    PubMed

    2015-01-01

    The abstracted set of recommendations presented here provides essential guidance both on the prevention of postoperative delirium in older patients at risk of delirium and on the treatment of older surgical patients with delirium, and is based on the 2014 American Geriatrics Society (AGS) Guideline. The full version of the guideline, American Geriatrics Society Clinical Practice Guideline for Postoperative Delirium in Older Adults is available at the website of the AGS. The overall aims of the study were twofold: first, to present nonpharmacologic and pharmacologic interventions that should be implemented perioperatively for the prevention of postoperative delirium in older adults; and second, to present nonpharmacologic and pharmacologic interventions that should be implemented perioperatively for the treatment of postoperative delirium in older adults. Prevention recommendations focused on primary prevention (i.e., preventing delirium before it occurs) in patients who are at risk for postoperative delirium (e.g., those identified as moderate-to-high risk based on previous risk stratification models such as the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) guidelines, Delirium: Diagnosis, Prevention and Management. Clinical Guideline 103; London (UK): 2010 July 29). For management of delirium, the goals of this guideline are to decrease delirium severity and duration, ensure patient safety and improve outcomes.

  19. The 34th Annual Meeting of the German Society of Immunology with participation of the Polish Society of Experimental and Clinical Immunology.

    PubMed

    Wysocki, P J; Mackiewicz-Wysocka, M; Mackiewicz, A

    2004-02-01

    The 34th Annual Meeting of the German Society of Immunology was held in Berlin on 24 - 27 September 2003. This meeting, organised for the first time in cooperation with the Polish Society for Experimental and Clinical Immunology, gathered 1200 participants, mostly from central Europe. The programme comprised > 30 symposium lectures and > 750 oral and poster presentations. The main concept of this meeting was based on the rule of ABC--Applied, Basic and Clinical immunology. The state-of-the-art lectures devoted to immuno-based therapies provided by experts in the particular fields discussed some well-known therapeutic approaches. However, several workshop presentations demonstrated novel approaches employing biological therapies. These lectures are the focus of these meeting highlights.

  20. Ovarian cancer clinical trial endpoints: Society of Gynecologic Oncology white paper

    PubMed Central

    Herzog, Thomas J.; Armstrong, Deborah K.; Brady, Mark F.; Coleman, Robert L.; Einstein, Mark H.; Monk, Bradley J.; Mannel, Robert S.; Thigpen, J. Tate; Umpierre, Sharee A.; Villella, Jeannine A.; Alvarez, Ronald D.

    2015-01-01

    Objective To explore the value of multiple clinical endpoints in the unique setting of ovarian cancer. Methods A clinical trial workgroup was established by the Society of Gynecologic Oncology to develop a consensus statement via multiple conference calls, meetings and white paper drafts. Results Clinical trial endpoints have profound effects on late phase clinical trial design, result interpretation, drug development, and regulatory approval of therapeutics. Selection of the optimal clinical trial endpoint is particularly provocative in ovarian cancer where long overall survival (OS) is observed. The lack of new regulatory approvals and the lack of harmony between regulatory bodies globally for ovarian cancer therapeutics are of concern. The advantages and disadvantages of the numerous endpoints available are herein discussed within the unique context of ovarian cancer where both crossover and post-progression therapies potentially uncouple surrogacy between progression-free survival (PFS) and OS, the two most widely supported and utilized endpoints. The roles of patient reported outcomes (PRO) and health related quality of life (HRQoL) are discussed, but even these widely supported parameters are affected by the unique characteristics of ovarian cancer where a significant percentage of patients may be asymptomatic. Original data regarding the endpoint preferences of ovarian cancer advocates is presented. Conclusions Endpoint selection in ovarian cancer clinical trials should reflect the impact on disease burden and unique characteristics of the treatment cohort while reflecting true patient benefit. Both OS and PFS have led to regulatory approvals and are clinically important. OS remains the most objective and accepted endpoint because it is least vulnerable to bias; however, the feasibility of OS in ovarian cancer is compromised by the requirement for large trial size, prolonged time-line for final analysis, and potential for unintended loss of treatment effect

  1. Improving the Evidence Base for Treating Older Adults With Cancer: American Society of Clinical Oncology Statement.

    PubMed

    Hurria, Arti; Levit, Laura A; Dale, William; Mohile, Supriya G; Muss, Hyman B; Fehrenbacher, Louis; Magnuson, Allison; Lichtman, Stuart M; Bruinooge, Suanna S; Soto-Perez-de-Celis, Enrique; Tew, William P; Postow, Michael A; Cohen, Harvey J

    2015-11-10

    The American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) convened a subcommittee to develop recommendations on improving the evidence base for treating older adults with cancer in response to a critical need identified by the Institute of Medicine. Older adults experience the majority of cancer diagnoses and deaths and make up the majority of cancer survivors. Older adults are also the fastest growing segment of the US population. However, the evidence base for treating this population is sparse, because older adults are underrepresented in clinical trials, and trials designed specifically for older adults are rare. The result is that clinicians have less evidence on how to treat older adults, who represent the majority of patients with cancer. Clinicians and patients are forced to extrapolate from trials conducted in younger, healthier populations when developing treatment plans. This has created a dearth of knowledge regarding the risk of toxicity in the average older patient and about key end points of importance to older adults. ASCO makes five recommendations to improve evidence generation in this population: (1) Use clinical trials to improve the evidence base for treating older adults with cancer, (2) leverage research designs and infrastructure for generating evidence on older adults with cancer, (3) increase US Food and Drug Administration authority to incentivize and require research involving older adults with cancer, (4) increase clinicians' recruitment of older adults with cancer to clinical trials, and (5) use journal policies to improve researchers' reporting on the age distribution and health risk profiles of research participants.

  2. [Report of the 10th Annual Meeting of the Chinese society of Clinical Oncology].

    PubMed

    Cho, William Chi-Shing

    2008-03-01

    The 10th Annual Meeting of the Chinese Society of Clinical Oncology (CSCO) was held on 19-23 September 2007 in Harbin. The theme of this conference was "putting standard multidisciplinary cancer management into practice" and special reports of standard multidisciplinary management on various cancers were presented. Over 3 500 clinical oncologists and scientists participated in the 2007 CSCO Annual Meeting where more than ten international top experts were invited to exchange valuable experiences with the delegates. The programs consisted of Education Session, Satellite Symposium and Meet the Professor Session. The latest research results were presented as oral presentations and posters at the congress. Several hotspots were particularly highlighted in this report, including innovative radiotherapy and chemotherapy methods, researches on molecular targets and clinical trials of targeted therapy, such as endostatin, volociximab, cetuximab, bevacizumab and temozolomide. The remarkable research results of anti-cancer Chinese medicine, cancer screening and prognosis were also introduced. This article tries to call the attention to some hot topics in the program that are both new and noteworthy, and it may serve as a highlight of this important international cancer research meeting for clinical oncologists and scientists.

  3. An official American thoracic society workshop report: developing performance measures from clinical practice guidelines.

    PubMed

    Kahn, Jeremy M; Gould, Michael K; Krishnan, Jerry A; Wilson, Kevin C; Au, David H; Cooke, Colin R; Douglas, Ivor S; Feemster, Laura C; Mularski, Richard A; Slatore, Christopher G; Wiener, Renda Soylemez

    2014-05-01

    Many health care performance measures are either not based on high-quality clinical evidence or not tightly linked to patient-centered outcomes, limiting their usefulness in quality improvement. In this report we summarize the proceedings of an American Thoracic Society workshop convened to address this problem by reviewing current approaches to performance measure development and creating a framework for developing high-quality performance measures by basing them directly on recommendations from well-constructed clinical practice guidelines. Workshop participants concluded that ideally performance measures addressing care processes should be linked to clinical practice guidelines that explicitly rate the quality of evidence and the strength of recommendations, such as the Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development, and Evaluation (GRADE) process. Under this framework, process-based performance measures would only be developed from strong recommendations based on high- or moderate-quality evidence. This approach would help ensure that clinical processes specified in performance measures are both of clear benefit to patients and supported by strong evidence. Although this approach may result in fewer performance measures, it would substantially increase the likelihood that quality-improvement programs based on these measures actually improve patient care.

  4. 2016 Updated American Society of Clinical Oncology/Oncology Nursing Society Chemotherapy Administration Safety Standards, Including Standards for Pediatric Oncology.

    PubMed

    Neuss, Michael N; Gilmore, Terry R; Belderson, Kristin M; Billett, Amy L; Conti-Kalchik, Tara; Harvey, Brittany E; Hendricks, Carolyn; LeFebvre, Kristine B; Mangu, Pamela B; McNiff, Kristen; Olsen, MiKaela; Schulmeister, Lisa; Von Gehr, Ann; Polovich, Martha

    2016-12-01

    Purpose To update the ASCO/Oncology Nursing Society (ONS) Chemotherapy Administration Safety Standards and to highlight standards for pediatric oncology. Methods The ASCO/ONS Chemotherapy Administration Safety Standards were first published in 2009 and updated in 2011 to include inpatient settings. A subsequent 2013 revision expanded the standards to include the safe administration and management of oral chemotherapy. A joint ASCO/ONS workshop with stakeholder participation, including that of the Association of Pediatric Hematology Oncology Nurses and American Society of Pediatric Hematology/Oncology, was held on May 12, 2015, to review the 2013 standards. An extensive literature search was subsequently conducted, and public comments on the revised draft standards were solicited. Results The updated 2016 standards presented here include clarification and expansion of existing standards to include pediatric oncology and to introduce new standards: most notably, two-person verification of chemotherapy preparation processes, administration of vinca alkaloids via minibags in facilities in which intrathecal medications are administered, and labeling of medications dispensed from the health care setting to be taken by the patient at home. The standards were reordered and renumbered to align with the sequential processes of chemotherapy prescription, preparation, and administration. Several standards were separated into their respective components for clarity and to facilitate measurement of adherence to a standard. Conclusion As oncology practice has changed, so have chemotherapy administration safety standards. Advances in technology, cancer treatment, and education and training have prompted the need for periodic review and revision of the standards. Additional information is available at http://www.asco.org/chemo-standards .

  5. Management of Small Renal Masses: American Society of Clinical Oncology Clinical Practice Guideline.

    PubMed

    Finelli, Antonio; Ismaila, Nofisat; Bro, Bill; Durack, Jeremy; Eggener, Scott; Evans, Andrew; Gill, Inderbir; Graham, David; Huang, William; Jewett, Michael A S; Latcha, Sheron; Lowrance, William; Rosner, Mitchell; Shayegan, Bobby; Thompson, R Houston; Uzzo, Robert; Russo, Paul

    2017-02-20

    Purpose To provide recommendations for the management options for patients with small renal masses (SRMs). Methods By using a literature search and prospectively defined study selection, we sought systematic reviews, meta-analyses, randomized clinical trials, prospective comparative observational studies, and retrospective studies published from 2000 through 2015. Outcomes included recurrence-free survival, disease-specific survival, and overall survival. Results Eighty-three studies, including 20 systematic reviews and 63 primary studies, met the eligibility criteria and form the evidentiary basis for the guideline recommendations. Recommendations On the basis of tumor-specific findings and competing risks of mortality, all patients with an SRM should be considered for a biopsy when the results may alter management. Active surveillance should be an initial management option for patients who have significant comorbidities and limited life expectancy. Partial nephrectomy (PN) for SRMs is the standard treatment that should be offered to all patients for whom an intervention is indicated and who possess a tumor that is amenable to this approach. Percutaneous thermal ablation should be considered an option if complete ablation can reliably be achieved. Radical nephrectomy for SRMs should only be reserved for patients who possess a tumor of significant complexity that is not amenable to PN or for whom PN may result in unacceptable morbidity even when performed at centers with expertise. Referral to a nephrologist should be considered if chronic kidney disease (estimated glomerular filtration rate < 45 mL/min/1.73 m(2)) or progressive chronic kidney disease occurs after treatment, especially if associated with proteinuria.

  6. [Past roles and future prospects of the National Clinical Database for board-certifying systems of the Japan Surgical Society].

    PubMed

    Kitago, Minoru; Kitagawa, Yuko

    2014-01-01

    Board-certifying systems play an important role as guideposts in postgraduate training courses to develop superior surgeons with both general and subspecialty surgery competence. The board-certified surgeon designation of the Japan Surgical Society (JSS) as the first guidepost has provided the foundations for board-certified surgeon systems of subspecialty surgical societies as the second guidepost. In April 2010, the National Clinical Database (NCD) was founded by the JSS and other societies. Data on surgery and treatment have been entered into the NCD from January 1, 2011, and more than 1 million cases were submitted to the NCD in that year. The NCD is an unprecedented, advanced activity. The data will be used for the authorization of board-certified surgeons of subspecialty surgical societies as well as that of the JSS. The data will be also used for benchmarking, and clinical research teams will cooperate with the NCD.

  7. American Society of Clinical Oncology policy for relationships with companies: background and rationale.

    PubMed

    2013-06-01

    The American Society of Clinical Oncology's (ASCO's) new conflict of interest policy reflects a commitment to transparency and independence in the development and presentation of scientific and educational content. ASCO supports thorough and accessible disclosure of financial relationships with companies at institutional and individual levels and calls for rigorous evaluation of content in light of the information disclosed. For abstracts and articles presenting original research, ASCO holds first, last, and corresponding authors to a clear standard of independence. In imposing restrictions, the new policy focuses on the role of these authors rather than of the principal investigator(s) as in the previous policy. ASCO remains actively engaged with the broader scientific community in seeking and implementing efficient, effective approaches to conflict of interest management.

  8. Biliary stenting: indications, choice of stents and results: European Society of Gastrointestinal Endoscopy (ESGE) clinical guideline.

    PubMed

    Dumonceau, J-M; Tringali, A; Blero, D; Devière, J; Laugiers, R; Heresbach, D; Costamagna, G

    2012-03-01

    This article is part of a combined publication that expresses the current view of the European Society of Gastrointestinal Endoscopy about endoscopic biliary stenting. The present Clinical Guideline describes short-term and long-term results of biliary stenting depending on indications and stent models; it makes recommendations on when, how, and with which stent to perform biliary drainage in most common clinical settings, including in patients with a potentially resectable malignant biliary obstruction and in those who require palliative drainage of common bile duct or hilar strictures. Treatment of benign conditions (strictures related to chronic pancreatitis, liver transplantation, or cholecystectomy, and leaks and failed biliary stone extraction) and management of complications (including stent revision) are also discussed. A two-page executive summary of evidence statements and recommendations is provided. A separate Technology Review describes the models of biliary stents available and the stenting techniques, including advanced techniques such as insertion of multiple plastic stents, drainage of hilar strictures, retrieval of migrated stents and combined stenting in malignant biliary and duodenal obstructions.The target readership for the Clinical Guideline mostly includes digestive endoscopists, gastroenterologists, oncologists, radiologists, internists, and surgeons while the Technology Review should be most useful to endoscopists who perform biliary drainage.

  9. Clinical cancer advances 2011: Annual Report on Progress Against Cancer from the American Society of Clinical Oncology.

    PubMed

    Vogelzang, Nicholas J; Benowitz, Steven I; Adams, Sylvia; Aghajanian, Carol; Chang, Susan Marina; Dreyer, Zoann Eckert; Janne, Pasi A; Ko, Andrew H; Masters, Greg A; Odenike, Olatoyosi; Patel, Jyoti D; Roth, Bruce J; Samlowski, Wolfram E; Seidman, Andrew D; Tap, William D; Temel, Jennifer S; Von Roenn, Jamie H; Kris, Mark G

    2012-01-01

    A message from ASCO'S President. It has been forty years since President Richard Nixon signed the National Cancer Act of 1971, which many view as the nation's declaration of the "War on Cancer." The bill has led to major investments in cancer research and significant increases in cancer survival. Today, two-thirds of patients survive at least five years after being diagnosed with cancer compared with just half of all diagnosed patients surviving five years after diagnosis in 1975. The research advances detailed in this year's Clinical Cancer Advances demonstrate that improvements in cancer screening, treatment, and prevention save and improve lives. But although much progress has been made, cancer remains one of the world's most serious health problems. In the United States, the disease is expected to become the nation's leading cause of death in the years ahead as our population ages. I believe we can accelerate the pace of progress, provided that everyone involved in cancer care works together to achieve this goal. It is this viewpoint that has shaped the theme for my presidential term: Collaborating to Conquer Cancer. In practice, this means that physicians and researchers must learn from every patient's experience, ensure greater collaboration between members of a patient's medical team, and involve more patients in the search for cures through clinical trials. Cancer advocates, insurers, and government agencies also have important roles to play. Today, we have an incredible opportunity to improve the quality of cancer care by drawing lessons from the real-world experiences of patients. The American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) is taking the lead in this area, in part through innovative use of health information technology. In addition to our existing quality initiatives, ASCO is working with partners to develop a comprehensive rapid-learning system for cancer care. When complete, this system will provide physicians with personalized, real

  10. Integration of Palliative Care Into Standard Oncology Care: American Society of Clinical Oncology Clinical Practice Guideline Update.

    PubMed

    Ferrell, Betty R; Temel, Jennifer S; Temin, Sarah; Alesi, Erin R; Balboni, Tracy A; Basch, Ethan M; Firn, Janice I; Paice, Judith A; Peppercorn, Jeffrey M; Phillips, Tanyanika; Stovall, Ellen L; Zimmermann, Camilla; Smith, Thomas J

    2017-01-01

    Purpose To provide evidence-based recommendations to oncology clinicians, patients, family and friend caregivers, and palliative care specialists to update the 2012 American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) provisional clinical opinion (PCO) on the integration of palliative care into standard oncology care for all patients diagnosed with cancer. Methods ASCO convened an Expert Panel of members of the ASCO Ad Hoc Palliative Care Expert Panel to develop an update. The 2012 PCO was based on a review of a randomized controlled trial (RCT) by the National Cancer Institute Physicians Data Query and additional trials. The panel conducted an updated systematic review seeking randomized clinical trials, systematic reviews, and meta-analyses, as well as secondary analyses of RCTs in the 2012 PCO, published from March 2010 to January 2016. Results The guideline update reflects changes in evidence since the previous guideline. Nine RCTs, one quasiexperimental trial, and five secondary analyses from RCTs in the 2012 PCO on providing palliative care services to patients with cancer and/or their caregivers, including family caregivers, were found to inform the update. Recommendations Inpatients and outpatients with advanced cancer should receive dedicated palliative care services, early in the disease course, concurrent with active treatment. Referral of patients to interdisciplinary palliative care teams is optimal, and services may complement existing programs. Providers may refer family and friend caregivers of patients with early or advanced cancer to palliative care services.

  11. The Official Positions of the International Society for Clinical Densitometry: body composition analysis reporting.

    PubMed

    Petak, Steven; Barbu, Carmen G; Yu, Elaine W; Fielding, Roger; Mulligan, Kathleen; Sabowitz, Brian; Wu, Chih-Hsing; Shepherd, John A

    2013-01-01

    Dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry (DXA) measurements of body composition increasingly are used in the evaluation of clinical disorders, but there has been little guidance on how to effectively report these measures. Uniformity in reporting of body composition measures will aid in the diagnosis of clinical disorders such as obesity, sarcopenia, and lipodystrophy. At the 2013 International Society for Clinical Densitometry Position Development Conference on body composition, the reporting section recommended that all DXA body composition reports should contain parameters of body mass index, bone mineral density, BMC, total mass, total lean mass, total fat mass, and percent fat mass. The inclusion of additional measures of adiposity and lean mass are optional, including visceral adipose tissue, appendicular lean mass index, android/gynoid percent fat ratio, trunk to leg fat mass ratio, lean mass index, and fat mass index. Within the United States, we recommend the use of the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 1999-2004 body composition dataset as an age-, gender-, and race-specific reference and to calibrate BMC in 4-compartment models. Z-scores and percentiles of body composition measures may be useful for clinical interpretation if methods are used to adjust for non-normality. In particular, DXA body composition measures may be useful for risk-stratification of obese and sarcopenic patients, but there needs to be validation of thresholds to define obesity and sarcopenia. To summarize, these guidelines provide evidence-based standards for the reporting and clinical application of DXA-based measures of body composition.

  12. [Second Clinical Consensus of the Ibero-American Society of Neonatology: hemodynamic management of newborns].

    PubMed

    Golombek, Sergio G; Fariña, Diana; Sola, Augusto; Baquero, Hernando; Cabañas, Fernando; Dominguez, Fernando; Fajardo, Carlos; Goldsmit, Gustavo S; Flores, Gabriel Lara; Lee, Mario; Varela, Lourdes Lemus; Mariani, Gonzalo; Miura, Ernani; Pérez, Jose Maria; Zambosco, Guillermo; Pellicer, Adelina; Bancalari, Eduardo

    2011-04-01

    This study reports on the process and results of the Second Clinical Consensus of the Ibero-American Society of Neonatology. Eighty neonatologists from 23 countries were invited to collaborate and participate in the event. Several questions of clinical-physiological importance in the hemodynamic management of newborns were addressed. Participants were divided into groups to facilitate interaction and teamwork, with instructions to respond to three to five questions by analyzing the literature and local factors. Meeting in Mar del Plata, Argentina, the Consensus Group served as a form for various presentations and discussions. In all, 54 neonatologists from 21 countries attended, with the objective of reaching a consensus on such matters as concepts and definitions of hemodynamic instability, the physiopathology of hemodynamic compromise, recommended therapy strategies, and hemodynamic monitoring. It is hoped that this international experience will serve as a useful initiative for future consensus building and reduction of the existing disparities among the countries of the Region in terms of treatment and outcomes.

  13. The impact of HIV infection on society's perception of clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Levine, R J

    1994-06-01

    All international codes of research ethics and virtually all national legislation and regulation in the field of research involving human subjects project an attitude of protectionism. Written with the aim of avoiding a repetition of atrocities like those committed by the Nazi physician-researchers, calamities like the thalidomide experience, or ethical violations like those of the Tuskegee syphilis study, their dominant concerns are the protection of individuals from injury and from exploitation. In recent years, however, society's perception of clinical research has shifted dramatically. Now, largely as a consequence of the efforts of the AIDS activists, clinical research is widely perceived as benign and beneficial. Although this shift in attitude has resulted in some important improvements in research policies and practices, this new perception is just as wrong-headed as was the earlier excessive protectionism. It is necessary to maintain a balanced perspective; our policies should encourage the conduct of ethical research while maintaining the vigilance necessary to safeguard the rights and welfare of the subjects.

  14. Official American Thoracic Society/Centers for Disease Control and Prevention/Infectious Diseases Society of America Clinical Practice Guidelines: Treatment of Drug-Susceptible Tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Nahid, Payam; Dorman, Susan E; Alipanah, Narges; Barry, Pennan M; Brozek, Jan L; Cattamanchi, Adithya; Chaisson, Lelia H; Chaisson, Richard E; Daley, Charles L; Grzemska, Malgosia; Higashi, Julie M; Ho, Christine S; Hopewell, Philip C; Keshavjee, Salmaan A; Lienhardt, Christian; Menzies, Richard; Merrifield, Cynthia; Narita, Masahiro; O'Brien, Rick; Peloquin, Charles A; Raftery, Ann; Saukkonen, Jussi; Schaaf, H Simon; Sotgiu, Giovanni; Starke, Jeffrey R; Migliori, Giovanni Battista; Vernon, Andrew

    2016-10-01

    The American Thoracic Society, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, and Infectious Diseases Society of America jointly sponsored the development of this guideline for the treatment of drug-susceptible tuberculosis, which is also endorsed by the European Respiratory Society and the US National Tuberculosis Controllers Association. Representatives from the American Academy of Pediatrics, the Canadian Thoracic Society, the International Union Against Tuberculosis and Lung Disease, and the World Health Organization also participated in the development of the guideline. This guideline provides recommendations on the clinical and public health management of tuberculosis in children and adults in settings in which mycobacterial cultures, molecular and phenotypic drug susceptibility tests, and radiographic studies, among other diagnostic tools, are available on a routine basis. For all recommendations, literature reviews were performed, followed by discussion by an expert committee according to the Grading of Recommendations, Assessment, Development and Evaluation methodology. Given the public health implications of prompt diagnosis and effective management of tuberculosis, empiric multidrug treatment is initiated in almost all situations in which active tuberculosis is suspected. Additional characteristics such as presence of comorbidities, severity of disease, and response to treatment influence management decisions. Specific recommendations on the use of case management strategies (including directly observed therapy), regimen and dosing selection in adults and children (daily vs intermittent), treatment of tuberculosis in the presence of HIV infection (duration of tuberculosis treatment and timing of initiation of antiretroviral therapy), as well as treatment of extrapulmonary disease (central nervous system, pericardial among other sites) are provided. The development of more potent and better-tolerated drug regimens, optimization of drug exposure for the

  15. Executive Summary: Official American Thoracic Society/Centers for Disease Control and Prevention/Infectious Diseases Society of America Clinical Practice Guidelines: Treatment of Drug-Susceptible Tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Nahid, Payam; Dorman, Susan E; Alipanah, Narges; Barry, Pennan M; Brozek, Jan L; Cattamanchi, Adithya; Chaisson, Lelia H; Chaisson, Richard E; Daley, Charles L; Grzemska, Malgosia; Higashi, Julie M; Ho, Christine S; Hopewell, Philip C; Keshavjee, Salmaan A; Lienhardt, Christian; Menzies, Richard; Merrifield, Cynthia; Narita, Masahiro; O'Brien, Rick; Peloquin, Charles A; Raftery, Ann; Saukkonen, Jussi; Schaaf, H Simon; Sotgiu, Giovanni; Starke, Jeffrey R; Migliori, Giovanni Battista; Vernon, Andrew

    2016-10-01

    The American Thoracic Society, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, and Infectious Diseases Society of America jointly sponsored the development of this guideline for the treatment of drug-susceptible tuberculosis, which is also endorsed by the European Respiratory Society and the US National Tuberculosis Controllers Association. Representatives from the American Academy of Pediatrics, the Canadian Thoracic Society, the International Union Against Tuberculosis and Lung Disease, and the World Health Organization also participated in the development of the guideline. This guideline provides recommendations on the clinical and public health management of tuberculosis in children and adults in settings in which mycobacterial cultures, molecular and phenotypic drug susceptibility tests, and radiographic studies, among other diagnostic tools, are available on a routine basis. For all recommendations, literature reviews were performed, followed by discussion by an expert committee according to the Grading of Recommendations, Assessment, Development and Evaluation methodology. Given the public health implications of prompt diagnosis and effective management of tuberculosis, empiric multidrug treatment is initiated in almost all situations in which active tuberculosis is suspected. Additional characteristics such as presence of comorbidities, severity of disease, and response to treatment influence management decisions. Specific recommendations on the use of case management strategies (including directly observed therapy), regimen and dosing selection in adults and children (daily vs intermittent), treatment of tuberculosis in the presence of HIV infection (duration of tuberculosis treatment and timing of initiation of antiretroviral therapy), as well as treatment of extrapulmonary disease (central nervous system, pericardial among other sites) are provided. The development of more potent and better-tolerated drug regimens, optimization of drug exposure for the

  16. Clinical guidelines on central venous catheterisation. Swedish Society of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care Medicine.

    PubMed

    Frykholm, P; Pikwer, A; Hammarskjöld, F; Larsson, A T; Lindgren, S; Lindwall, R; Taxbro, K; Oberg, F; Acosta, S; Akeson, J

    2014-05-01

    Safe and reliable venous access is mandatory in modern health care, but central venous catheters (CVCs) are associated with significant morbidity and mortality, This paper describes current Swedish guidelines for clinical management of CVCs The guidelines supply updated recommendations that may be useful in other countries as well. Literature retrieval in the Cochrane and Pubmed databases, of papers written in English or Swedish and pertaining to CVC management, was done by members of a task force of the Swedish Society of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care Medicine. Consensus meetings were held throughout the review process to allow all parts of the guidelines to be embraced by all contributors. All of the content was carefully scored according to criteria by the Oxford Centre for Evidence-Based Medicine. We aimed at producing useful and reliable guidelines on bleeding diathesis, vascular approach, ultrasonic guidance, catheter tip positioning, prevention and management of associated trauma and infection, and specific training and follow-up. A structured patient history focused on bleeding should be taken prior to insertion of a CVCs. The right internal jugular vein should primarily be chosen for insertion of a wide-bore CVC. Catheter tip positioning in the right atrium or lower third of the superior caval vein should be verified for long-term use. Ultrasonic guidance should be used for catheterisation by the internal jugular or femoral veins and may also be used for insertion via the subclavian veins or the veins of the upper limb. The operator inserting a CVC should wear cap, mask, and sterile gown and gloves. For long-term intravenous access, tunnelled CVC or subcutaneous venous ports are preferred. Intravenous position of the catheter tip should be verified by clinical or radiological methods after insertion and before each use. Simulator-assisted training of CVC insertion should precede bedside training in patients. Units inserting and managing CVC should

  17. Alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency targeted testing and augmentation therapy: A Canadian Thoracic Society clinical practice guideline

    PubMed Central

    Marciniuk, DD; Hernandez, P; Balter, M; Bourbeau, J; Chapman, KR; Ford, GT; Lauzon, JL; Maltais, F; O’Donnell, DE; Goodridge, D; Strange, C; Cave, AJ; Curren, K; Muthuri, S

    2012-01-01

    Alpha-1 antitrypsin (A1AT) functions primarily to inhibit neutrophil elastase, and deficiency predisposes individuals to the development of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Severe A1AT deficiency occurs in one in 5000 to one in 5500 of the North American population. While the exact prevalence of A1AT deficiency in patients with diagnosed COPD is not known, results from small studies provide estimates of 1% to 5%. The present document updates a previous Canadian Thoracic Society position statement from 2001, and was initiated because of lack of consensus and understanding of appropriate patients suitable for targeted testing for A1AT deficiency, and for the use of A1AT augmentation therapy. Using revised guideline development methodology, the present clinical practice guideline document systematically reviews the published literature and provides an evidence-based update. The evidence supports the practice that targeted testing for A1AT deficiency be considered in individuals with COPD diagnosed before 65 years of age or with a smoking history of <20 pack years. The evidence also supports consideration of A1AT augmentation therapy in nonsmoking or exsmoking patients with COPD (forced expiratory volume in 1 s of 25% to 80% predicted) attributable to emphysema and documented A1AT deficiency (level ≤11 μmol/L) who are receiving optimal pharmacological and nonpharmacological therapies (including comprehensive case management and pulmonary rehabilitation) because of benefits in computed tomography scan lung density and mortality. PMID:22536580

  18. American Society of Clinical Oncology Policy Statement Update: Genetic and Genomic Testing for Cancer Susceptibility.

    PubMed

    Robson, Mark E; Bradbury, Angela R; Arun, Banu; Domchek, Susan M; Ford, James M; Hampel, Heather L; Lipkin, Stephen M; Syngal, Sapna; Wollins, Dana S; Lindor, Noralane M

    2015-11-01

    The American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) has long affirmed that the recognition and management of individuals with an inherited susceptibility to cancer are core elements of oncology care. ASCO released its first statement on genetic testing in 1996 and updated that statement in 2003 and 2010 in response to developments in the field. In 2014, the Cancer Prevention and Ethics Committees of ASCO commissioned another update to reflect the impact of advances in this area on oncology practice. In particular, there was an interest in addressing the opportunities and challenges arising from the application of massively parallel sequencing-also known as next-generation sequencing-to cancer susceptibility testing. This technology introduces a new level of complexity into the practice of cancer risk assessment and management, requiring renewed effort on the part of ASCO to ensure that those providing care to patients with cancer receive the necessary education to use this new technology in the most effective, beneficial manner. The purpose of this statement is to explore the challenges of new and emerging technologies in cancer genetics and provide recommendations to ensure their optimal deployment in oncology practice. Specifically, the statement makes recommendations in the following areas: germline implications of somatic mutation profiling, multigene panel testing for cancer susceptibility, quality assurance in genetic testing, education of oncology professionals, and access to cancer genetic services.

  19. American Society of Clinical Oncology National Census of Oncology Practices: preliminary report.

    PubMed

    Forte, Gaetano J; Hanley, Amy; Hagerty, Karen; Kurup, Anupama; Neuss, Michael N; Mulvey, Therese M

    2013-01-01

    In response to reports of increasing financial and administrative burdens on oncology practices and a lack of systematic information related to these issues, American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) leadership started an effort to collect key practice-level data from all oncology practices in the United States. The result of the effort is the ASCO National Census of Oncology Practices (Census) launched in June 2012. The initial Census work involved compiling an inventory of oncology practices from existing lists of oncology physicians in the United States. A comprehensive, online data collection instrument was developed, which covered a number of areas, including practice characteristics (staffing configuration, organizational structure, patient mix and volume, types of services offered); organizational, staffing, and service changes over the past 12 months; and an assessment of the likelihood that the practice would experience organizational, staffing, and service changes in the next 12 months. More than 600 practices participated in the Census by providing information. In this article, we present preliminary highlights from the data gathered to date. We found that practice size was related to having experienced practice mergers, hiring additional staff, and increasing staff pay in the past 12 months, that geographic location was related to having experienced hiring additional staff, and that practices in metropolitan areas were more likely to have experienced practice mergers in the past 12 months than those in nonmetropolitan areas. We also found that practice size and geographic location were related to higher likelihoods of anticipating practice mergers, sales, and purchases in the future.

  20. The organization of an educational program for specialists in clinical chemistry by the Greek Society of Clinical Chemistry-Clinical Biochemistry.

    PubMed

    Rizos, Demetrios; Karababa, Photini; Sarandakou, Angeliki; Panagiotakis, Othon; Haliassos, Alexander; Makris, Konstantinos; Psarra, Katerina; Bairaktari, Eleni; Spyropoulou, Panagiota; Nikolou, Chara; Galiatsatos, Nikolaos; Trakas, Nikolaos; Ferderigou, Angeliki; Seferiadis, Konstantin

    2011-01-01

    In Greece, there is no officially organized training in clinical chemistry for scientists. The Greek Society of Clinical Chemistry-Clinical Biochemistry decided to organize an intensive educational program of 18 seminars on clinical chemistry content as it is described in the EC4 Syllabus. The duration of each seminar was about 6 hours and consisted of 6 to 9 lectures. At the end of each seminar there was a voluntary written examination, comprised of 24 multiple choice questions. Successful completion of the Educational program was leading to a Certificate of Competence. Two cycles of the 18 seminars were performed: 1st cycle from October 2003 to December 2005 and 2nd cycle from March 2005 to October 2007. One hundred eighty nine colleagues was the mean attendance per seminar for the seminars of the 1st cycle and 38 colleagues for the seminars of the 2nd cycle. The mean participation to the examination for each seminar was almost 80% for the 1st cycle and 68% for the 2nd cycle. More than 80% of the participants performed Good or Very good in the examination in both cycles. It is estimated that more than 40% of the scientists who practice Clinical Chemistry in Greece, participated to this educational activity. This program is now provided as an e-learning application, and it is open for all scientists who want to follow the discipline of clinical chemistry.

  1. Health Disparities in Endocrine Disorders: Biological, Clinical, and Nonclinical Factors—An Endocrine Society Scientific Statement

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Arleen; Cauley, Jane A.; Chin, Marshall H.; Gary-Webb, Tiffany L.; Kim, Catherine; Sosa, Julie Ann; Sumner, Anne E.; Anton, Blair

    2012-01-01

    Objective: The aim was to provide a scholarly review of the published literature on biological, clinical, and nonclinical contributors to race/ethnic and sex disparities in endocrine disorders and to identify current gaps in knowledge as a focus for future research needs. Participants in Development of Scientific Statement: The Endocrine Society's Scientific Statement Task Force (SSTF) selected the leader of the statement development group (S.H.G.). She selected an eight-member writing group with expertise in endocrinology and health disparities, which was approved by the Society. All discussions regarding the scientific statement content occurred via teleconference or written correspondence. No funding was provided to any expert or peer reviewer, and all participants volunteered their time to prepare this Scientific Statement. Evidence: The primary sources of data on global disease prevalence are from the World Health Organization. A comprehensive literature search of PubMed identified U.S. population-based studies. Search strategies combining Medical Subject Headings terms and keyword terms and phrases defined two concepts: 1) racial, ethnic, and sex differences including specific populations; and 2) the specific endocrine disorder or condition. The search identified systematic reviews, meta-analyses, large cohort and population-based studies, and original studies focusing on the prevalence and determinants of disparities in endocrine disorders. Consensus Process: The writing group focused on population differences in the highly prevalent endocrine diseases of type 2 diabetes mellitus and related conditions (prediabetes and diabetic complications), gestational diabetes, metabolic syndrome with a focus on obesity and dyslipidemia, thyroid disorders, osteoporosis, and vitamin D deficiency. Authors reviewed and synthesized evidence in their areas of expertise. The final statement incorporated responses to several levels of review: 1) comments of the SSTF and the

  2. Clinical Pharmacology in Denmark in 2016 - 40 Years with the Danish Society of Clinical Pharmacology and 20 Years as a Medical Speciality.

    PubMed

    Brøsen, Kim; Andersen, Stig Ejdrup; Borregaard, Jeanett; Christensen, Hanne Rolighed; Christensen, Palle Mark; Dalhoff, Kim Peder; Damkier, Per; Hallas, Jesper; Heisterberg, Jens; Jessen, Niels; Jürgens, Gesche; Kampmann, Jens Peter Konnerup; Laursen, Britt Elmedal; Laursen, Torben; Nielsen, Lars Peter; Poulsen, Birgitte Klindt; Poulsen, Henrik Enghusen; Andersen, Ljubica Vukelic; Senderovitz, Thomas; Sonne, Jesper

    2016-12-01

    The Danish Society of Clinical Pharmacology was founded in 1976, and mainly thanks to the persistent efforts of the society, clinical pharmacology became an independent medical speciality in Denmark in 1996. Since then, clinical pharmacology has gone from strength to strength. In the Danish healthcare system, clinical pharmacology has established itself as an indispensible part of the efforts to promote the rational, safe and economic use of drugs. Clinical pharmacologists are active in drug committees both in hospitals and in the primary sector. All clinical pharmacology centres offer a local medicines information service. Some centres have established an adverse drug effect manager function. Only one centre offers a therapeutic drug monitoring service. Clinical pharmacologists are responsible for the toxicological advice at the Danish Poison Information Centre at Bispebjerg University Hospital in the Capital Region. The Department of Clinical Pharmacology at Aarhus University Hospital works closely together with forensic toxicologists and pathologists, covering issues regarding illicit substances, forensic pharmacology, post-mortem toxicology, expert testimony and research. Therapeutic geriatric and psychiatric teach-inns for specialist and junior doctors are among the newest initiatives organized by clinical pharmacologists. Clinical pharmacologists work also in the Danish Medicines Agency and in the Danish pharmaceutical industry, and the latter has in particular a great growth potential for creating new jobs and career opportunities for clinical pharmacologists. As of July 2016, the Danish Society of Clinical Pharmacology has 175 members, and 70 of these are specialists in clinical pharmacology corresponding to approximately 2.5 specialists per 1000 doctors (Denmark has in total 28,000 doctors) or approximately 12 specialists per one million inhabitants.

  3. Inside the 2016 American Society of Clinical Oncology Genitourinary Cancers Symposium: part 2 - prostate and bladder cancer.

    PubMed

    Buti, Sebastiano; Ciccarese, Chiara; Iacovelli, Roberto; Bersanelli, Melissa; Scarpelli, Marina; Lopez-Beltran, Antonio; Cheng, Liang; Montironi, Rodolfo; Tortora, Giampaolo; Massari, Francesco

    2016-09-01

    The American Society of Clinical Oncology Genitourinary Cancers Symposium, Moscone West Building, San Francisco, CA, USA, 7-9 January 2016 The American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) Genitourinary Cancers Symposium, held in San Francisco (CA, USA), from 7 to 9 January 2016, focused on 'patient-centric care: translating research to results'. Every year, this meeting is a must for anyone studying genitourinary tumors to keep abreast of the most recent innovations in this field, exchange views on behaviors customarily adopted in daily clinical practice and discuss future topics of scientific research. This two-part report highlights the key themes presented at the 2016 ASCO Genitourinary Cancers Symposium, with part 1 reporting the main novelties of kidney cancer and part 2 discussing the most relevant issues which have emerged for bladder and prostate tumors.

  4. Clinical indications for computed tomographic colonography: European Society of Gastrointestinal Endoscopy (ESGE) and European Society of Gastrointestinal and Abdominal Radiology (ESGAR) Guideline.

    PubMed

    Spada, Cristiano; Stoker, Jaap; Alarcon, Onofre; Barbaro, Federico; Bellini, Davide; Bretthauer, Michael; De Haan, Margriet C; Dumonceau, Jean-Marc; Ferlitsch, Monika; Halligan, Steve; Helbren, Emma; Hellstrom, Mikael; Kuipers, Ernst J; Lefere, Philippe; Mang, Thomas; Neri, Emanuele; Petruzziello, Lucio; Plumb, Andrew; Regge, Daniele; Taylor, Stuart A; Hassan, Cesare; Laghi, Andrea

    2014-10-01

    This is an official guideline of the European Society of Gastrointestinal Endoscopy (ESGE) and the European Society of Gastrointestinal and Abdominal Radiology (ESGAR). It addresses the clinical indications for the use of computed tomographic colonography (CTC). A targeted literature search was performed to evaluate the evidence supporting the use of CTC. The Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation (GRADE) system was adopted to define the strength of recommendations and the quality of evidence. Main recommendations 1 ESGE/ESGAR recommend computed tomographic colonography (CTC) as the radiological examination of choice for the diagnosis of colorectal neoplasia. ESGE/ESGAR do not recommend barium enema in this setting (strong recommendation, high quality evidence). 2 ESGE/ESGAR recommend CTC, preferably the same or next day, if colonoscopy is incomplete. Delay of CTC should be considered following endoscopic resection. In the case of obstructing colorectal cancer, preoperative contrast-enhanced CTC may also allow location or staging of malignant lesions (strong recommendation, moderate quality evidence). 3 When endoscopy is contraindicated or not possible, ESGE/ESGAR recommend CTC as an acceptable and equally sensitive alternative for patients with symptoms suggestive of colorectal cancer (strong recommendation, high quality evidence). 4 ESGE/ESGAR recommend referral for endoscopic polypectomy in patients with at least one polyp  ≥  6  mm in diameter detected at CTC. CTC surveillance may be clinically considered if patients do not undergo polypectomy (strong recommendation, moderate quality evidence). 5 ESGE/ESGAR do not recommend CTC as a primary test for population screening or in individuals with a positive first-degree family history of colorectal cancer (CRC). However, it may be proposed as a CRC screening test on an individual basis providing the screenee is adequately informed about test characteristics, benefits, and risks

  5. Clinical management and outcome of refractory asthma in the UK from the British Thoracic Society Difficult Asthma Registry.

    PubMed

    Sweeney, Joan; Brightling, Chris E; Menzies-Gow, Andrew; Niven, Robert; Patterson, Chris C; Heaney, Liam G

    2012-08-01

    Refractory asthma represents a significant unmet clinical need. Data from a national online registry audited clinical outcome in 349 adults with refractory asthma from four UK specialist centres in the British Thoracic Society Difficult Asthma Network. At follow-up, lung function improved, with a reduction in important healthcare outcomes, specifically hospital admission, unscheduled healthcare visits and rescue courses of oral steroids. The most frequent therapeutic intervention was maintenance oral corticosteroids and most steroid sparing agents (apart from omalizumab) demonstrated minimal steroid sparing benefit. A significant unmet clinical need remains in this group, specifically a requirement for therapies which reduce systemic steroid exposure.

  6. Are the Endocrine Society's Clinical Practice Guidelines on Androgen Therapy in Women misguided? A commentary.

    PubMed

    Traish, Abdulmaged; Guay, Andre T; Spark, Richard F

    2007-09-01

    The Endocrine Society Clinical Guidelines on Androgen Therapy in Women (henceforth referred to as the Guidelines) do not necessarily represent the opinion held by the many health-care professionals and clinicians who are specialized in the evaluation, diagnosis, and treatment of women's health in androgen insufficiency states. The recommendations provided in the published Guidelines are neither accurate nor complete. We disagree with the therapeutic nihilism promoted by these Guidelines. The members of the Guidelines Panel (henceforth referred to as the Panel), in their own disclaimer, stated that the Guidelines do not establish a standard of care. Based on data available in the contemporary literature, on the role of androgens in women's health, we provide in this commentary a point-by-point discussion of the arguments made by the Panel in arriving at their recommendations. It is our view that the Guidelines are not based on the preponderance of scientific evidence. Health-care professionals, physicians, and scientists often disagree when determining how best to address and manage new and emerging clinical issues. This is where we stand now as we endeavor to understand the role of androgens in a woman's health and welfare. Indeed, some basic facts are not in contention. All agree that dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate (DHEA-S) production from the adrenal gland begins during the preteen years, peaks in the mid 20s, then declines progressively over time. In contrast, ovarian androgen (i.e., testosterone) secretion commences at puberty, is sustained during a woman's peak reproductive years and declines as a woman ages, with a more rapid and steep decrease after surgical menopause. However, there are ample data to suggest that adrenal androgens play a role in the development of axillary and pubic hair, and that testosterone is critical for women's libido and sexual function. We take this opportunity to invite members of the Panel on Androgen Therapy in Women to discuss

  7. Interpretation and use of FRAX in clinical practice - position paper of the International Osteoporosis Foundation and the International Society for Clinical Densitometry

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The International Osteoporosis Foundation (IOF) and the International Society for Clinical Densitometry (ISCD) appointed a joint Task Force to develop resource documents in order to make recommendations on how to improve FRAX and better inform clinicians who use FRAX. The Task Force met in November...

  8. Ehlers-Danlos Society

    MedlinePlus

    ... Scientific Board Staff Volunteer Leaders The Ehlers-Danlos Society Center for EDS Research & Clinical Care Our History ... Message Boards Patient Resource Library The Ehlers-Danlos Society Center for EDS Research & Clinical Care Loose Connections ...

  9. Ehlers-Danlos Society

    MedlinePlus

    ... Patient Expert Panel Volunteer Leaders The Ehlers-Danlos Society Center for EDS Research & Clinical Care Our History ... Online Communities Patient Resource Library The Ehlers-Danlos Society Center for EDS Research & Clinical Care Loose Connections ...

  10. EBM-based Clinical Guidelines for Pancreatic Cancer (2013) issued by the Japan Pancreas Society: a synopsis.

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, Koji; Okusaka, Takuji; Shimizu, Kyoko; Furuse, Junji; Ito, Yoshinori; Hanada, Keiji; Shimosegawa, Tooru

    2014-10-01

    Clinical practice guidelines for pancreatic cancer based on evidence-based medicine (2006) were published by the Japan Pancreas Society (Committee for revision of clinical guidelines for pancreatic cancer) in March 2009 in Japanese, revised to Clinical Practice Guidelines for Pancreatic Cancer based on evidence-based medicine (2009) in July 2009 in Japanese and further revised to Clinical Practice Guidelines for Pancreatic Cancer (2013) in October 2013 in Japanese. These guidelines were established according to evidence-based medicine. A total of 629 papers were collected from among 4612 reports concerning pancreatic cancer listed in PubMed and Igakuchuo Zasshi between May 2007 and January 2011. This new set of guidelines was written by members of the Committee for the Revision of Clinical Practice Guidelines for Pancreatic Cancer in the Japan Pancreas Society. The guidelines provide an algorithm for the diagnosis (Fig. 1) and treatment (Fig. 2) of pancreatic cancer and address six subjects (Diagnosis, Surgery, Adjuvant therapy, Radiation therapy, Chemotherapy and stent therapy), with 35 clinical questions and 57 recommendations.

  11. A golden anniversary: highlights of the 50th annual meeting of the American Society of Clinical Oncology

    PubMed Central

    McVie, Gordon; Nailor, Audrey

    2014-01-01

    The 50th Annual Meeting of the American Society of Clinical Oncology showed a shift in the culture of cancer research, moving towards multidisciplinary, integrated, and patient-centric work. Hormone-sensitive cancers were particularly highlighted at this meeting, and impressive strides were made in the previously underserved areas of the lung and thyroid cancer. Interestingly, immunotherapy was one of the strongest themes to emerge. PMID:25075218

  12. Report on the 10th International Conference of the Asian Clinical Oncology Society (ACOS 2012).

    PubMed

    Kim, Yeul Hong; Yang, Han-Kwang; Kim, Tae Won; Lee, Jung Shin; Seong, Jinsil; Lee, Woo Yong; Ahn, Yong Chan; Lim, Ho Yeong; Won, Jong-Ho; Park, Kyong Hwa; Cho, Kyung Sam

    2013-04-01

    The 10th International Conference of the Asian Clinical Oncology Society (ACOS 2012) in conjunction with the 38th Annual Meeting of the Korean Cancer Association, was held on June 13 to 15 (3 days) 2012 at COEX Convention and Exhibition Center in Seoul, Korea. ACOS has a 20-year history starting from the first conference in Osaka, Japan, which was chaired by Prof. Tetsuo Taguchi and the ACOS conferences have since been conducted in Asian countries every 2 years. Under the theme of "Work Together to Make a Difference for Cancer Therapy in Asia", the 10th ACOS was prepared to discuss various subjects through a high-quality academic program, exhibition, and social events. The ACOS 2012 Committee was composed of the ACOS Organizing Committee, Honorary Advisors, Local Advisors, and ACOS 2012 Organizing Committee. The comprehensive academic program had a total of 92 sessions (3 Plenary Lectures, 1 Award Lectures, 1 Memorial Lectures, 9 Special Lectures, 15 Symposia, 1 Debate & Summary Sessions, 1 Case Conferences, 19 Educational Lectures, 1 Research & Development Session, 18 Satellite Symposia, 9 Meet the Professors, 14 Oral Presentations) and a total 292 presentations were delivered throughout the entire program. Amongst Free Papers, 462 research papers (110 oral presentations and 352 poster presentations) were selected to be presented. This conference was the largest of all ACOS conferences in its scale with around 1,500 participants from 30 countries. Furthermore, despite strict new financial policies and requirements governing fundraising alongside global economic stagnation, a total of 14 companies participated as sponsors and an additional 35 companies purchased 76 exhibition booths. Lastly, the conference social events provided attendees with a variety of opportunities to experience and enjoy Korea's rich culture and traditions during the Opening Ceremony, Welcome Reception, Invitee Dinner, Banquet, and Closing Ceremony. Overall, ACOS 2012 reinforced and promoted

  13. American Society of Clinical Oncology guidance statement: the cost of cancer care.

    PubMed

    Meropol, Neal J; Schrag, Deborah; Smith, Thomas J; Mulvey, Therese M; Langdon, Robert M; Blum, Diane; Ubel, Peter A; Schnipper, Lowell E

    2009-08-10

    Advances in early detection, prevention, and treatment have resulted in consistently falling cancer death rates in the United States. In parallel with these advances have come significant increases in the cost of cancer care. It is well established that the cost of health care (including cancer care) in the United States is growing more rapidly than the overall economy. In part, this is a result of the prices and rapid uptake of new agents and other technologies, including advances in imaging and therapeutic radiology. Conventional understanding suggests that high prices may reflect the costs and risks associated with the development, production, and marketing of new drugs and technologies, many of which are valued highly by physicians, patients, and payers. The increasing cost of cancer care impacts many stakeholders who play a role in a complex health care system. Our patients are the most vulnerable because they often experience uneven insurance coverage, leading to financial strain or even ruin. Other key groups include pharmaceutical manufacturers that pass along research, development, and marketing costs to the consumer; providers of cancer care who dispense increasingly expensive drugs and technologies; and the insurance industry, which ultimately passes costs to consumers. Increasingly, the economic burden of health care in general, and high-quality cancer care in particular, will be less and less affordable for an increasing number of Americans unless steps are taken to curb current trends. The American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) is committed to improving cancer prevention, diagnosis, and treatment and eliminating disparities in cancer care through support of evidence-based and cost-effective practices. To address this goal, ASCO established a Cost of Care Task Force, which has developed this Guidance Statement on the Cost of Cancer Care. This Guidance Statement provides a concise overview of the economic issues facing stakeholders in the cancer

  14. The American Society of Clinical Oncology Cancer Foundation Grants Program: a 25-year report and a look toward the future.

    PubMed

    King, Jennifer C; Lawrence, Theodore S; Murphy, Sharon B; Davidson, Nancy E; Mayer, Robert J

    2010-03-20

    The American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) Grants Program began in 1984 with a single $16,000 grant to a young investigator for start-up research funding. In 2009, the Grants Program, now administered by The ASCO Cancer Foundation, awarded more than $6.5 million to 70 different investigators. This article, celebrating the 25th anniversary of this initiative, describes the history and evolution of the Grants Program, attempts to measure the impact of the program on clinical cancer research through an analysis of the career paths of past recipients, and addresses challenges that the program will face as it enters its second 25 years.

  15. Some personal thoughts on the Australasian Society of Clinical and Experimental Pharmacologists in the 1980s.

    PubMed

    Johnston, Graham A R

    2017-02-01

    There were a number of highly significant events regarding ASCEP in the 1980s: a tour of China by ASCEP pharmacologists; the Sydney IUPHAR Congress; and the initiation of the Australasian Visitor to the BPS scheme. ASCEP appointed a professional secretariat, established an investment portfolio, and initiated Special Interest Groups. The Society entered the 1990s welcoming toxicologists into the new ASCEPT.

  16. 8th Argentinean Bioengineering Society Conference (SABI 2011) and 7th Clinical Engineering Meeting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meschino, Gustavo Javier; Ballarin, Virginia L.

    2011-12-01

    In September 2011, the Eighteenth Edition of the Argentinean Bioengineering Society Conference (SABI 2011) and Seventh Clinical Engineering Meeting were held in Mar del Plata, Argetina. The Mar del Plata SABI Regional and the School of Engineering of the Universidad Nacional de Mar del Plata invited All bioengineers, engineers, physicists, mathematicians, biologists, physicians and health professionals working in the field of Bioengineering to participate in this event. The overall objectives of the Conference were: To provide discussion of scientific research results in Bioengineering and Clinical Engineering. To promote technological development experiences. To strengthen the institutional and scientific communication links in the area of Bioengineering, mainly between Universities of Latin America. To encourage students, teachers, researchers and professionals to establish exchanges of experiences and knowledge. To provide biomedical engineering technology solutions to the society and contributing ideas for low cost care. Conference photograph Conference photograph Conference photograph Conference photograph EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE SABI 2011 Chair Dra Virginia L Ballarin Universidad Nacional de Mar del Plata Co-Chair Dra Teresita R Cuadrado Universidad Nacional de Mar del Plata - CONICET Local Comittee Dr Gustavo Abraham Universidad Nacional de Mar del Plata - CONICET Dra Josefina Ballarre Universidad Nacional de Mar del Plata - CONICET Dr Eduardo Blotta Universidad Nacional de Mar del Plata Dra Agustina Bouchet Universidad Nacional de Mar del Plata Dr Marcel Brun Universidad Nacional de Mar del Plata Dra Silvia Ceré Universidad Nacional de Mar del Plata - CONICET Dra Mariela Azul Gonzalez Universidad Nacional de Mar del Plata - CONICET Dra Lucia Isabel Passoni Universidad Nacional de Mar del Plata Dr Juan Ignacio Pastore Universidad Nacional de Mar del Plata - CONICET Dra Adriana Scandurra Universidad Nacional de Mar del Plata SCIENTIFIC ADVISORY COMMITTEE

  17. Clinically relevant variants - identifying, collecting, interpreting, and disseminating: the 2013 annual scientific meeting of the Human Genome Variation Society.

    PubMed

    Stanley, Christine M; Sunyaev, Shamil R; Greenblatt, Marc S; Oetting, William S

    2014-04-01

    The dramatic advances in genetic sequencing technologies used in research laboratories are now entering the clinic, and applications of whole-genome and whole-exome sequencing to disease diagnosis, predisposition, and treatment will soon be commonplace. However, the standards and methods for identifying clinically relevant variants are currently being debated and defined. Multiple agencies worldwide have recognized that we have reached an exciting and critical transition point into the clinic, and many important issues are being discussed that impact how genetic variation data in the clinic will be interpreted and used. The 2013 annual scientific meeting of the Human Genome Variation Society (HGVS) had as its main theme the discovery, interpretation, and dissemination of clinically relevant DNA variants. The meeting featured the continuously developing technology of databasing genetic variation and computational tools for allelic variant discovery. Attention was given to curating and integrating these data with clinical findings, including approaches to distinguish between functional alleles underlying clinical phenotypes and benign sequence variants and making data sources interoperable and functional for clinical diagnostic utility, citing examples in specific diseases.

  18. Trends in Twitter Use by Physicians at the American Society of Clinical Oncology Annual Meeting, 2010 and 2011

    PubMed Central

    Chaudhry, Aafia; Glodé, L. Michael; Gillman, Matt; Miller, Robert S.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Social media channels such as Twitter are gaining increasing acceptance as mechanisms for instantaneous scientific dialogue. Professional medical societies such as ASCO are using social media to expand the reach of scientific communications at and around their scientific meetings. This article examines the how Twitter use by oncologists expanded at the ASCO Annual Meetings from 2010 to 2011. Methods: In both years, tweets that were specifically generated by physicians and that incorporated the official meeting hashtag were harvested from the public domain, and a discourse analysis was performed by three independent raters. Follow-up surveys were conducted to assess physician attitudes toward Twitter and its potential role in clinical practice. Results: A combined total of 12,644 tweets were analyzed for 2010 and 2011. Although the number of physicians authoring tweets was small (14 in 2010, 34 in 2011), this group generated nearly 29% of the total meeting dialogue examined in this analysis in 2010 and 23% in 2011. Physicians used Twitter for reporting clinical news from scientific sessions, for discussions of treatment issues, for promotion, and to provide social commentary. The tangible impact of Twitter discussions on clinical practice remains unclear. Conclusion: Despite the 140-character limit, Twitter was successfully used by physicians at the 2010 and 2011 ASCO Annual Meetings to engage in clinical discussions, whether or not an author was on site as a live attendee. Twitter usage grew significantly from 2010 to 2011. Professional societies should monitor these phenomena to enhance annual meeting attendee user experience. PMID:22942812

  19. The American Society for Clinical Investigation, 1952--1975: a personal perspective.

    PubMed

    Braunwald, Eugene

    2008-04-01

    In this perspective, I trace my experiences with the ASCI, beginning in 1952, when as a medical student I attended my first meeting, until 1975, when I completed my term as president of the Society. I focus attention on the sociological aspects of the Atlantic City meetings and the critically important role these meetings played in the evolution of academic medicine during the third quarter of the 20th century.

  20. The Infectious Diseases Society of America emerging infections network: bridging the gap between clinical infectious diseases and public health.

    PubMed

    Pillai, Satish K; Beekmann, Susan E; Santibanez, Scott; Polgreen, Philip M

    2014-04-01

    In 1995, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention granted a Cooperative Agreement Program award to the Infectious Diseases Society of America to develop a provider-based emerging infections sentinel network, the Emerging Infections Network (EIN). Over the past 17 years, the EIN has evolved into a flexible, nationwide network with membership representing a broad cross-section of infectious disease physicians. The EIN has an active electronic mail conference (listserv) that facilitates communication among infectious disease providers and the public health community, and also sends members periodic queries (short surveys on infectious disease topics) that have addressed numerous topics relevant to both clinical infectious diseases and public health practice. The article reviews how the various functions of EIN contribute to clinical care and public health, identifies opportunities to further link clinical medicine and public health, and describes future directions for the EIN.

  1. Molecular Biomarkers for the Evaluation of Colorectal Cancer: Guideline From the American Society for Clinical Pathology, College of American Pathologists, Association for Molecular Pathology, and the American Society of Clinical Oncology.

    PubMed

    Sepulveda, Antonia R; Hamilton, Stanley R; Allegra, Carmen J; Grody, Wayne; Cushman-Vokoun, Allison M; Funkhouser, William K; Kopetz, Scott E; Lieu, Christopher; Lindor, Noralane M; Minsky, Bruce D; Monzon, Federico A; Sargent, Daniel J; Singh, Veena M; Willis, Joseph; Clark, Jennifer; Colasacco, Carol; Rumble, R Bryan; Temple-Smolkin, Robyn; Ventura, Christina B; Nowak, Jan A

    2017-02-06

    Purpose Molecular testing of colorectal cancers (CRCs) to improve patient care and outcomes of targeted and conventional therapies has been the center of many recent studies, including clinical trials. Evidence-based recommendations for the molecular testing of CRC tissues to guide epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) -targeted therapies and conventional chemotherapy regimens are warranted in clinical practice. The purpose of this guideline is to develop evidence-based recommendations to help establish standard molecular biomarker testing for CRC through a systematic review of the literature. Methods The American Society for Clinical Pathology (ASCP), College of American Pathologists (CAP), Association for Molecular Pathology (AMP), and the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) convened an Expert Panel to develop an evidence-based guideline to help establish standard molecular biomarker testing, guide targeted therapies, and advance personalized care for patients with CRC. A comprehensive literature search that included over 4,000 articles was conducted to gather data to inform this guideline. Results Twenty-one guideline statements (eight recommendations, 10 expert consensus opinions and three no recommendations) were established. Recommendations Evidence supports mutational testing for genes in the EGFR signaling pathway, since they provide clinically actionable information as negative predictors of benefit to anti-EGFR monoclonal antibody therapies for targeted therapy of CRC. Mutations in several of the biomarkers have clear prognostic value. Laboratory approaches to operationalize molecular testing for predictive and prognostic molecular biomarkers involve selection of assays, type of specimens to be tested, timing of ordering of tests and turnaround time for testing results. Additional information is available at: www.asco.org/CRC-markers-guideline and www.asco.org/guidelineswiki.

  2. American Society for Clinical Pharmacology and Therapeutics (ASCPT)-111th annual meeting. 17-20 March 2010, Atlanta, GA, USA.

    PubMed

    Veryard, Claire

    2010-05-01

    The 111th Annual Meeting of the American Society for Clinical Pharmacology and Therapeutics, held in Atlanta, included topics covering disclosures of new data in the field of pharmacokinetics and drug interactions. This conference report highlights selected presentations on pharmacokinetic studies of several investigational drugs, including evatanepag (Pfizer Inc), AEG-33773 (Aegera Therapeutics Inc), JNJ-16269110 (Johnson & Johnson Pharmaceutical Research & Development LLC), PF-3716539 (ViiV Healthcare), MK-0736 (Merck & Co Inc), a combination of Ginkgo biloba and cilostazol (Renexin SK Chemicals Co Ltd), PP-101 (Pacific Pharmaceuticals Co Ltd), ACT-178882 (Acetlion Ltd/Merck & Co Inc) and edoxaban (Daiichi Sankyo Co Ltd).

  3. Self-expandable metal stents for obstructing colonic and extracolonic cancer: European Society of Gastrointestinal Endoscopy (ESGE) Clinical Guideline.

    PubMed

    van Hooft, Jeanin E; van Halsema, Emo E; Vanbiervliet, Geoffroy; Beets-Tan, Regina G H; DeWitt, John M; Donnellan, Fergal; Dumonceau, Jean-Marc; Glynne-Jones, Robert G T; Hassan, Cesare; Jiménez-Perez, Javier; Meisner, Søren; Muthusamy, V Raman; Parker, Michael C; Regimbeau, Jean-Marc; Sabbagh, Charles; Sagar, Jayesh; Tanis, Pieter J; Vandervoort, Jo; Webster, George J; Manes, Gianpiero; Barthet, Marc A; Repici, Alessandro

    2014-11-01

    This Guideline is an official statement of the European Society of Gastrointestinal Endoscopy (ESGE). This Guideline was also reviewed and endorsed by the Governing Board of the American Society for Gastrointestinal Endoscopy (ASGE). The Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development, and Evaluation (GRADE) system was adopted to define the strength of recommendations and the quality of evidence. Main recommendations The following recommendations should only be applied after a thorough diagnostic evaluation including a contrast-enhanced computed tomography (CT) scan. 1 Prophylactic colonic stent placement is not recommended. Colonic stenting should be reserved for patients with clinical symptoms and imaging evidence of malignant large-bowel obstruction, without signs of perforation (strong recommendation, low quality evidence). 2 Colonic self-expandable metal stent (SEMS) placement as a bridge to elective surgery is not recommended as a standard treatment of symptomatic left-sided malignant colonic obstruction (strong recommendation, high quality evidence). 3 For patients with potentially curable but obstructing left-sided colonic cancer, stent placement may be considered as an alternative to emergency surgery in those who have an increased risk of postoperative mortality, I. e. American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA) Physical Status ≥ III and/or age > 70 years (weak recommendation, low quality evidence). 4 SEMS placement is recommended as the preferred treatment for palliation of malignant colonic obstruction (strong recommendation, high quality evidence), except in patients treated or considered for treatment with antiangiogenic drugs (e. g. bevacizumab) (strong recommendation, low quality evidence).

  4. Current perceptions of the term Clinical Pharmacy and its relationship to Pharmaceutical Care: a survey of members of the European Society of Clinical Pharmacy.

    PubMed

    Dreischulte, Tobias; Fernandez-Llimos, Fernando

    2016-12-01

    Background The definitions that are being used for the terms 'clinical pharmacy' and 'pharmaceutical care' seem to have a certain overlap. Responsibility for therapy outcomes seems to be especially linked to the latter term. Both terms need clarification before a proper definition of clinical pharmacy can be drafted. Objective To identify current disagreements regarding the term 'Clinical Pharmacy' and its relationship to 'Pharmaceutical Care' and to assess to which extent pharmacists with an interest in Clinical Pharmacy are willing to accept responsibility for drug therapy outcomes. Setting The membership of the European Society of Clinical Pharmacy. Methods A total of 1,285 individuals affiliated with the European Society of Clinical Pharmacy were invited by email to participate in an online survey asking participants to state whether certain professional activities, providers, settings, aims and general descriptors constituted (a) 'Clinical Pharmacy only', (b) 'Pharmaceutical Care only', (c) 'both' or (d) 'neither'. Further questions examined pharmacists' willingness to accept ethical or legal responsibility for drug therapy outcomes, under current and ideal working conditions. Main outcome measures Level of agreement with a number of statements. Results There was disagreement (<80% agreement among all participants) regarding 'Clinical Pharmacy' activities, whether non-pharmacists could provide 'Clinical Pharmacy' services, and whether such services could be provided in non-hospital settings. There was disagreement (<80% agreement among those linking items to Clinical Pharmacy) as to whether Pharmaceutical care also encompassed certain professional activities, constituted a scientific discipline and targeted cost effectiveness. The proportions of participants willing to accept legal responsibility under current/ideal working conditions were: safety (32.7%/64.3%), effectiveness (17.9%/49.2%), patient-centeredness (17.1%/46.2%), cost-effectiveness (20

  5. Clinical decisions in patients with diabetes and other cardiovascular risk factors. A statement of the Spanish Society of Internal Medicine.

    PubMed

    Gómez-Huelgas, R; Pérez-Jiménez, F; Serrano-Ríos, M; González-Santos, P; Román, P; Camafort, M; Conthe, P; García-Alegría, J; Guijarro, R; López-Miranda, J; Tirado-Miranda, R; Valdivielso, P

    2014-05-01

    Although the mortality associated to cardiovascular diseases (CVD) has been reduced in the last decades, CVD remains the main cause of mortality in Spain and they are associated with an important morbidity and a huge economic burden. The increasing prevalence of obesity and diabetes could be slowing down the mortality reduction in Spain. Clinicians have often difficulty making clinical decisions due to the multiple clinical guidelines available. Moreover, in the current context of economic crisis it is critical to promote an efficient use of diagnostic and therapeutic proceedings to ensure the viability of public health care systems. The Spanish Society of Internal Medicine (SEMI) has coordinated a consensus document to answer questions of daily practice with the aim of facilitating physicians' decision-making in the management of diabetes and cardiovascular risk factors from a cost-efficiency point of view.

  6. Canadian Society of Nephrology Commentary on the 2012 KDIGO clinical practice guideline for glomerulonephritis: management of glomerulonephritis in adults.

    PubMed

    Cybulsky, Andrey V; Walsh, Michael; Knoll, Greg; Hladunewich, Michelle; Bargman, Joanne; Reich, Heather; Humar, Atul; Samuel, Susan; Bitzan, Martin; Zappitelli, Michael; Dart, Allison; Mammen, Cherry; Pinsk, Maury; Muirhead, Norman

    2014-03-01

    The KDIGO (Kidney Disease: Improving Global Outcomes) clinical practice guideline for management of glomerulonephritis was recently released. The Canadian Society of Nephrology convened a working group to review the recommendations and comment on their relevancy and applicability to the Canadian context. A subgroup of adult nephrologists reviewed the guideline statements for management of glomerular disease in adults and agreed with most of the guideline statements developed by KDIGO. This commentary highlights areas for which there is lack of evidence and areas in need of translation of evidence into clinical practice. Areas of controversy or uncertainty, including the choice of second-line agents, are discussed in more detail. Existing practice variation also is addressed. The relevance of treatment recommendations to the Canadian practitioner is discussed.

  7. Canadian Society of Nephrology Commentary on the 2012 KDIGO clinical practice guideline for glomerulonephritis: management of nephrotic syndrome in children.

    PubMed

    Samuel, Susan; Bitzan, Martin; Zappitelli, Michael; Dart, Allison; Mammen, Cherry; Pinsk, Maury; Cybulsky, Andrey V; Walsh, Michael; Knoll, Greg; Hladunewich, Michelle; Bargman, Joanne; Reich, Heather; Humar, Atul; Muirhead, Norman

    2014-03-01

    The KDIGO (Kidney Disease: Improving Global Outcomes) clinical practice guideline for management of glomerulonephritis was recently released. The Canadian Society of Nephrology convened a working group to review the recommendations and comment on their relevancy and applicability to the Canadian context. A subgroup of pediatric nephrologists reviewed the guideline statements for management of childhood nephrotic syndrome and agreed with most of the guideline statements developed by KDIGO. This commentary highlights areas in which there is lack of evidence and areas in need of translation of evidence into clinical practice. Areas of controversy or uncertainty, including the length of corticosteroid therapy for the initial presentation and relapses, definitions of steroid resistance, and choice of second-line agents, are discussed in more detail. Existing practice variation is also addressed.

  8. [Quality assessment program of the Spanish Society of Infectious Diseases and Clinical Microbiology. Analysis of results. 2005].

    PubMed

    Orta Mira, Nieves; Guna Serrano, M del Remedio; Pérez, José L; Gimeno Cardona, Concepción

    2006-10-01

    Quality assurance of the analytical processes performed at the clinical microbiology laboratory is mandatory and should be carried out by using external and internal quality control activities. External quality assessment programs allow intercomparison within laboratories, detection of errors, and evaluation of the suitability of some reagents or diagnostic kits for the purpose for which they were designed; these activities are also useful for continuous education. The program launched 15 years ago by the Spanish Society of Infectious Diseases and Clinical Microbiology is based on sending typified materials along with a clinical and microbiological case related to these control materials. The spectrum of the samples is broad, including bacteriology (monthly and three-monthly), serology, mycology, parasitology, mycobacteria, virology, and molecular microbiology. After receiving the results from the participants, the program organization delivers an individual certificate comparing the results with those of a reference laboratory. Additionally, a report is generated by analyzing all the results sent by the participants; laboratories are also sent review articles on the subject of each assessment as a tool for continuous education in clinical microbiology. In this article, the most relevant conclusions and lessons from the 2005 assessments are presented.

  9. 78 FR 20664 - Society of Clinical Research Associates-Food and Drug Administration: Food and Drug...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-05

    ... authority of FDA and to facilitate interaction with FDA representatives. The program will focus on the... provide those engaged in FDA-regulated (human) clinical trials with information on a number of topics... community a high priority to help ensure the quality of FDA-regulated drugs and devices. The workshop...

  10. Endocardial Lead Extraction in the Polish Registry – clinical practice versus current Heart Rhythm Society consensus

    PubMed Central

    Kutarski, Andrzej; Mitkowski, Przemysław; Przybylski, Andrzej; Lewek, Joanna; Małecka, Barbara; Smukowski, Tomasz; Maciąg, Aleksander; Śmigielski, Janusz

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Over the last 10 years, there has been an increasing number of patients with pacemaker (PM) and cardioverter-defibrillator (ICD). This study is a retrospective analysis of indications for endocardial pacemaker and ICD lead extractions between 2003 and 2009 based on the experience of three Polish Referral Lead Extraction Centers. Material and methods Since 2003, the authors have consecutively retrospectively collected all cases and entered the information in the database. All patients which had indication for lead extraction according to Heart Rhythm Society Guidelines were included to final analyze. Between 2003 and 2005, the data were analyzed together. Since 2006, data have been collected and analyzed annually. Results In each year, a significant increase in lead extraction was observed. The main indications for LE were infections in 52.4% of patients. Nonfunctioning lead extraction constituted the second group of indications for LE in 29.7% of patients. During the registry period, the percentage of class I indications decreased from 80% in 2006 to only 47% in 2009. On the other hand, increasingly more leads were removed because of class 2, especially class 2b. In 2009, 40% of leads were extracted due to class 2b. Conclusions Polish Registry of Endocardial Lead Extraction 2003-2009, shows an increasing frequency of lead extraction. The main indication for LE is infection: systemic and pocket. An increase in class 2, especially 2b, LE indication in every center during the study period was found. PMID:24904658

  11. The Infectious Diseases Society of America Lyme guidelines: a cautionary tale about the development of clinical practice guidelines.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Lorraine; Stricker, Raphael B

    2010-06-09

    Flawed clinical practice guidelines may compromise patient care. Commercial conflicts of interest on panels that write treatment guidelines are particularly problematic, because panelists may have conflicting agendas that influence guideline recommendations. Historically, there has been no legal remedy for conflicts of interest on guidelines panels. However, in May 2008, the Attorney General of Connecticut concluded a ground-breaking antitrust investigation into the development of Lyme disease treatment guidelines by one of the largest medical societies in the United States, the Infectious Diseases Society of America (IDSA). Although the investigation found significant flaws in the IDSA guidelines development process, the subsequent review of the guidelines mandated by the settlement was compromised by a lack of impartiality at various stages of the IDSA review process. This article will examine the interplay between the recent calls for guidelines reform, the ethical canons of medicine, and due process considerations under antitrust laws as they apply to the formulation of the IDSA Lyme disease treatment guidelines. The article will also discuss pitfalls in the implementation of the IDSA antitrust settlement that should be avoided in the future.

  12. [Spanish Society of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases (SEIMC) guidelines for the diagnosis of invasive fungal infections. 2010 update].

    PubMed

    Ayats, Josefina; Martín-Mazuelos, Estrella; Pemán, Javier; Quindós, Guillermo; Sánchez, Fernando; García-Rodríguez, Julio; Guarro, Josep; Guinea, Jesús; Linares, María J; Pontón, José; Rodríguez-Tudela, Juan L; Cuenca-Estrella, Manuel

    2011-01-01

    These guidelines are an update of recommendations for the diagnosis of invasive fungal infections by the Spanish Society of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases (SEIMC) published in 2004 (Enferm Infecc Microbiol Clin. 2004, 22:32-9). In this updated version of the guidelines, a comprehensive review of the most recent diagnostic innovations and levels of evidence to recommend those diagnostic procedures are included. We first analyse conventional diagnostic methods, microscopic examination and culture, underlining their limitations which have led to the development of alternative methods, such as fungal antigen and DNA quantification. Those alternative methods of diagnosis are analysed by fungal infection. We also briefly review the methods for molecular identification of fungal species and recommendations for carrying out susceptibility tests for antifungal drugs, including reference procedures, commercial techniques and their indications.

  13. Prevention and Monitoring of Cardiac Dysfunction in Survivors of Adult Cancers: American Society of Clinical Oncology Clinical Practice Guideline.

    PubMed

    Armenian, Saro H; Lacchetti, Christina; Barac, Ana; Carver, Joseph; Constine, Louis S; Denduluri, Neelima; Dent, Susan; Douglas, Pamela S; Durand, Jean-Bernard; Ewer, Michael; Fabian, Carol; Hudson, Melissa; Jessup, Mariell; Jones, Lee W; Ky, Bonnie; Mayer, Erica L; Moslehi, Javid; Oeffinger, Kevin; Ray, Katharine; Ruddy, Kathryn; Lenihan, Daniel

    2016-12-05

    Purpose Cardiac dysfunction is a serious adverse effect of certain cancer-directed therapies that can interfere with the efficacy of treatment, decrease quality of life, or impact the actual survival of the patient with cancer. The purpose of this effort was to develop recommendations for prevention and monitoring of cardiac dysfunction in survivors of adult-onset cancers. Methods Recommendations were developed by an expert panel with multidisciplinary representation using a systematic review (1996 to 2016) of meta-analyses, randomized clinical trials, observational studies, and clinical experience. Study quality was assessed using established methods, per study design. The guideline recommendations were crafted in part using the Guidelines Into Decision Support methodology. Results A total of 104 studies met eligibility criteria and compose the evidentiary basis for the recommendations. The strength of the recommendations in these guidelines is based on the quality, amount, and consistency of the evidence and the balance between benefits and harms. Recommendations It is important for health care providers to initiate the discussion regarding the potential for cardiac dysfunction in individuals in whom the risk is sufficiently high before beginning therapy. Certain higher risk populations of survivors of cancer may benefit from prevention and screening strategies implemented during cancer-directed therapies. Clinical suspicion for cardiac disease should be high and threshold for cardiac evaluation should be low in any survivor who has received potentially cardiotoxic therapy. For certain higher risk survivors of cancer, routine surveillance with cardiac imaging may be warranted after completion of cancer-directed therapy, so that appropriate interventions can be initiated to halt or even reverse the progression of cardiac dysfunction.

  14. The Lebanese Society for Infectious Diseases and Clinical Microbiology (LSIDCM) guidelines for adult community-acquired pneumonia (Cap) in Lebanon.

    PubMed

    Moghnieh, Rima; Yared Sakr, Nadine; Kanj, Souha S; Musharrafieh, Umayya; Husni, Rula; Jradeh, Mona; Al-Awar, Ghassan; Matar, Madona; Jureij, Wafa; Antoine, Saad; Azar, Eid; Abi Hanna, Pierre; Minari, Afaf; Hammoud, Jamale; Kfoury, Joumana; Mahfouz, Tahsin; Abou Chakra, Diaa; Zaatari, Mohamad; Tabbarah, Zuhayr A

    2014-01-01

    Adult community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) is a common cause of morbidity and mortality which is managed by different disciplines in a heterogeneous fashion. Development of consensus guidelines to standardize these wide variations in care has become a prime objective. The Lebanese Society of Infectious Diseases and Clinical Microbiology (LSIDCM) convened to set Lebanese national guidelines for the management of CAP since it is a major and a prevalent disease affecting the Lebanese population. These guidelines, besides being helpful in direct clinical practice, play a major role in establishing stewardship programs in hospitals in an effort to contain antimicrobial resistance on the national level. These guidelines are intended for primary care practitioners and emergency medicine physicians. They constitute an appropriate starting point for specialists' consultation being based on the available local epidemiological and resistance data. This document includes the following: 1/ Rationale and scope of the guidelines; 2/ Microbiology of CAP based on Lebanese data; 3/ Clinical presentation and diagnostic workup of CAP; 4/ Management and prevention strategies based on the IDSA/ATS Consensus Guidelines, 2007, and the ESCMID Guidelines, 2011, and tailored to the microbiological data in Lebanon; 5/ Comparison to regional guidelines. The recommendations made in this document were graded based on the strength of the evidence as in the 2007 IDSA/ATS Consensus Guidelines. Hopefully, these guidelines will be an important step towards standardization of CAP care in Lebanon and set the agenda for further research in this area.

  15. Time, clinic technologies, and the making of reflexive longevity: the cultural work of time left in an ageing society.

    PubMed

    Kaufman, Sharon R

    2010-02-01

    Developments in clinical intervention are having a profound impact on health and health behaviours in late life and on ideas about longevity and the appropriate time for death. The fact that the timing of death is even considered to be a controllable event is a relatively new cultural phenomenon. The activities that make up life extension, like other medical practices scrutinised by social scientists, constitute a site for the emergence of new forms of subjectivity. For older adults the clinical encounter forces a calculation about how much time left is wanted in relation to age. The twin dimensions of the transformation of time highlighted in this article - the control over the timing of death and the creation of time left - both contribute to and are a widespread effect of biomedicalisation in affluent sectors of society. Through three stories this paper begins to map the cultural work that the concept, time left, does, the socio-medical ways in which that notion is talked about, organised and calculated in the American clinic today. It asks, what kind of subject emerges when longevity, imbued with the technological, becomes a reflexive practice and an object of intervention and apparent choice?

  16. Reliability and validity of the subjective component of the American Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Society clinical rating scales.

    PubMed

    Ibrahim, Talal; Beiri, Almoghera; Azzabi, Mohamed; Best, Alistair J; Taylor, Grahame J; Menon, Dipen K

    2007-01-01

    This study evaluates the criterion validity of the subjective component of the American Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Society (AOFAS) clinical rating scales by correlating scores obtained with these rating scales to scores obtained with the Foot Function Index (FFI) in patients with foot and ankle conditions. To date, the AOFAS scoring scales have not been shown to provide valid information despite their popularity. The FFI, on the other hand, has previously been shown to provide valid information in regard to conditions affecting the foot and ankle. A moderately strong inverse criterion validity correlation (Pearson correlation coefficient = -0.68) was shown when preoperative patients were administered both the AOFAS and FFI questionnaires, and the resultant scores were compared. Test-retest reliability measurements showed no significant difference (P = .27) between preoperative AOFAS scale scores measured at least 2 weeks apart. Construct validity was shown (P = .006) when dependent preoperative and postoperative (at least 3 months) AOFAS scale scores were compared, indicative of the clinical rating scales' ability to discriminate and predict quality of life related to foot and ankle conditions. The moderate level of correlation, satisfactory degree of reliability, and responsiveness (ability to distinguish differences between preoperative and postoperative conditions in the same patient) observed in this study suggest that the subjective component of the AOFAS clinical rating scales provides quality-of-life information that conveys acceptable validity regarding conditions affecting the foot and ankle.

  17. European Society of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases: update of the treatment guidance document for Clostridium difficile infection.

    PubMed

    Debast, S B; Bauer, M P; Kuijper, E J

    2014-03-01

    In 2009 the first European Society of Clinical Microbiology and Infection (ESCMID) treatment guidance document for Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) was published. The guideline has been applied widely in clinical practice. In this document an update and review on the comparative effectiveness of the currently available treatment modalities of CDI is given, thereby providing evidence-based recommendations on this issue. A computerized literature search was carried out to investigate randomized and non-randomized trials investigating the effect of an intervention on the clinical outcome of CDI. The Grades of Recommendation Assessment, Development and Evaluation (GRADE) system was used to grade the strength of our recommendations and the quality of the evidence. The ESCMID and an international team of experts from 11 European countries supported the process. To improve clinical guidance in the treatment of CDI, recommendations are specified for various patient groups, e.g. initial non-severe disease, severe CDI, first recurrence or risk for recurrent disease, multiple recurrences and treatment of CDI when oral administration is not possible. Treatment options that are reviewed include: antibiotics, toxin-binding resins and polymers, immunotherapy, probiotics, and faecal or bacterial intestinal transplantation. Except for very mild CDI that is clearly induced by antibiotic usage antibiotic treatment is advised. The main antibiotics that are recommended are metronidazole, vancomycin and fidaxomicin. Faecal transplantation is strongly recommended for multiple recurrent CDI. In case of perforation of the colon and/or systemic inflammation and deteriorating clinical condition despite antibiotic therapy, total abdominal colectomy or diverting loop ileostomy combined with colonic lavage is recommended.

  18. Isolation of Tritrichomonas foetus from cats sampled at a cat clinic, cat shows and a humane society in southern Ontario.

    PubMed

    Hosein, Ansarah; Kruth, Stephen A; Pearl, David L; Richardson, Danielle; Maggs, Jocelyn C; Peach, Hillary A; Peregrine, Andrew S

    2013-08-01

    Tritrichomonas foetus is a protozoan parasite that has been associated with chronic diarrhea in cats. This study aimed to determine (i) the prevalence of T foetus shedding in cats from three different populations in southern Ontario, and (ii) associations between the presence of T foetus and potential cat management, health and demographic risk factors. A cross-sectional study was conducted involving 140 cats from a cat clinic in Guelph, 46 cats from a humane society in Guelph and 55 cats from two cat shows. Risk factor information was assessed through a questionnaire. The InPouch TF (feline) culture method was used to determine the presence of T foetus in all samples. Polymerase chain reaction was conducted on all samples positive by the InPouch TF, as well as 132 negative samples. The assays were interpreted in series and the prevalence of T foetus shedding and 95% confidence intervals (CI) were estimated at 0.7% (95% CI: 0.0-3.9%; n = 140) from the cat clinic, 0% (95% CI: 0.0-7.7%; n = 46) from the humane society and 23.6% (95% CI: 13.2-37.0%; n = 55) from the cat shows. 'Attendance at cat shows' was the only variable significant in both the univariable and multivariable analyses (P <0.05). No significant association was found between the presence of T foetus and diarrhea at the time of sampling or having a history of diarrhea in the past 6 months. The prevalence of T foetus was highly variable among populations of cats in southern Ontario, with shedding being most common in show cats.

  19. Clinical Cancer Advances 2017: Annual Report on Progress Against Cancer From the American Society of Clinical Oncology.

    PubMed

    Burstein, Harold J; Krilov, Lada; Aragon-Ching, Jeanny B; Baxter, Nancy N; Chiorean, E Gabriela; Chow, Warren Allen; De Groot, John Frederick; Devine, Steven Michael; DuBois, Steven G; El-Deiry, Wafik S; Epstein, Andrew S; Heymach, John; Jones, Joshua Adam; Mayer, Deborah K; Miksad, Rebecca A; Pennell, Nathan A; Sabel, Michael S; Schilsky, Richard L; Schuchter, Lynn Mara; Tung, Nadine; Winkfield, Karen Marie; Wirth, Lori J; Dizon, Don S

    2017-02-01

    A MESSAGE FROM ASCO'S PRESIDENT I am pleased to present Clinical Cancer Advances 2017, which highlights the most promising advances in patient-oriented cancer research over the past year. The report gives us an opportunity to reflect on what an exciting time it is for cancer research and how swiftly our understanding of cancer has improved. One year ago, the White House announced the national Cancer Moonshot program to accelerate progress against cancer. This shared vision of progress has reinvigorated the research community, identified new areas of scientific collaboration, and raised our ambitions regarding what may be possible beyond the progress we have already made. When I entered the field 35 years ago, I could not have imagined where we would be today. We can now detect cancer earlier, target treatments more effectively, and manage adverse effects more effectively to enable patients to live better, more fulfilling lives. Today, two of three people with cancer live at least 5 years after diagnosis, up from roughly one of two in the 1970s. This progress has resulted from decades of incremental advances that have collectively expanded our understanding of the molecular underpinnings of cancer. There is no better current example of this than ASCO's 2017 Advance of the Year: Immunotherapy 2.0. Over the last year, there has been a wave of new successes with immunotherapy. Research has proven this approach can be effective against a wide range of hard-to-treat advanced cancers previously considered intractable. Researchers are now working to identify biologic markers that can help increase the effectiveness of treatment and determine who is most likely to benefit from immunotherapy. This knowledge will enable oncologists to make evidence-based decisions so as many patients as possible might benefit from this new type of treatment. Each successive advance builds on the previous hard work of generations of basic, translational, and clinical cancer researchers

  20. Brief of the Canadian Society for Clinical Investigation to the science and technology review.

    PubMed

    1995-02-01

    In the context of new realities, perceptions, and concerns, it is fitting that the government has undertaken this Science and Technology Review, questioning not only how much to spend but also the justification and the best ways to carry out federally-funded research. We share the government's concern about the lack of economic competitiveness of our industries and agree that government-sponsored research should make a bigger contribution to the nation's global economic position. The CSCI, which represents the clinical investigators/scientists in this country, is grateful for having been given the opportunity to make this "tour d'horizon" of Canadian clinical research. In this brief, we have attempted to articulate the needs for, and the benefits of, basic biomedical research because it is the only type of research which will provide us with final answers. However, it should be more closely articulated with applied research, as well as with epidemiological, evaluative, and operational approaches which have been neglected. This brief has emphasized that CSCI is committed to PUTTING MORE SCIENCE INTO MEDICINE by encouraging a greater flow of discoveries from the laboratory research bench to the bedside and the community. We made the point that there is a crisis in patient-oriented research and a decrease of young physicians opting for research careers. The Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons of Canada and the MRC are responsive to this situation, which may compromise our capacity to discharge our broader mission. The MRC has given itself valid instruments to foster the creation of wealth through special programs such as the NCE, the University/Industry program, and the MRC-PMAC partnership. Some refining is in order, and close scrutiny of outcome is essential. Both the academic community and industry have their share of responsibility for the less-than-optimal transfer of knowledge to the market place. Lack of venture capital is also a serious issue. A unified

  1. Germ line genome editing in clinics: the approaches, objectives and global society

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Genome editing allows for the versatile genetic modification of somatic cells, germ cells and embryos. In particular, CRISPR/Cas9 is worldwide used in biomedical research. Although the first report on Cas9-mediated gene modification in human embryos focused on the prevention of a genetic disease in offspring, it raised profound ethical and social concerns over the safety of subsequent generations and the potential misuse of genome editing for human enhancement. The present article considers germ line genome editing approaches from various clinical and ethical viewpoints and explores its objectives. The risks and benefits of the following three likely objectives are assessed: the prevention of monogenic diseases, personalized assisted reproductive technology (ART) and genetic enhancement. Although genetic enhancement should be avoided, the international regulatory landscape suggests the inevitability of this misuse at ART centers. Under these circumstances, possible regulatory responses and the potential roles of public dialogue are discussed. PMID:26615180

  2. Germ line genome editing in clinics: the approaches, objectives and global society.

    PubMed

    Ishii, Tetsuya

    2017-01-01

    Genome editing allows for the versatile genetic modification of somatic cells, germ cells and embryos. In particular, CRISPR/Cas9 is worldwide used in biomedical research. Although the first report on Cas9-mediated gene modification in human embryos focused on the prevention of a genetic disease in offspring, it raised profound ethical and social concerns over the safety of subsequent generations and the potential misuse of genome editing for human enhancement. The present article considers germ line genome editing approaches from various clinical and ethical viewpoints and explores its objectives. The risks and benefits of the following three likely objectives are assessed: the prevention of monogenic diseases, personalized assisted reproductive technology (ART) and genetic enhancement. Although genetic enhancement should be avoided, the international regulatory landscape suggests the inevitability of this misuse at ART centers. Under these circumstances, possible regulatory responses and the potential roles of public dialogue are discussed.

  3. The future of hospital laboratories. Position statement from the Royal Belgian Society of Clinical Chemistry (RBSCC).

    PubMed

    Langlois, Michel R; Wallemacq, Pierre

    2009-01-01

    To face the economic pressures arising from the current socio-economic conjuncture, hospital laboratories are endangered by an increasing trend towards the outsourcing of clinical laboratory tests to external (mega-) laboratories. This should allow hospitals to meet their economic requirements, but with an increased risk of loss of medical quality and, mid- to long-term, loss of cost effectiveness of healthcare at the national level. To anticipate current developments (economical and technological) that inevitably will affect the future of laboratory medicine, hospital laboratories should be proactive and enhance efficiency, reduce costs by consolidation, integrate into regional networks, and form alliances or partnerships. To create additional value, the core competency of laboratory professionals must be refocused to provide medical knowledge services (consultative support to clinicians) related to in vitro diagnostic testing. To integrate cost-efficiency with medical quality, implementation of a matricial organization - operational vs. biomedical level - could be an interesting approach. This integrated structure should create total quality of laboratory testing, managing the entire medical diagnostic cycle from the pre-preanalytical to post-postanalytical phase.

  4. [Sublingual immunotherapy in children. Immunotherapy Committee of the Spanish Society for Clinical Immunology and Pediatric Allergology].

    PubMed

    Lleonart, R; Muñoz, F; Eseverri, J L; Martínez-Cañabate, A; Tabar, A I; Pedemonte, C

    2003-01-01

    Sublingual immunotherapy is currently attracting growing interest because of its ease of administration and, according to previous studies, its infrequent and mild adverse effects. However, at least in children, the efficacy of this therapy has not been completely demonstrated. In addition, the mechanisms of action remain to be elucidated since few studies have been published and the results have been contradictory and sometimes inconclusive. For this reason, we performed a literature review through the MEDLINE database, selecting double-blind studies carried out in children. Only 10 studies meeting these requirements were retrieved. All the studies were performed by European researchers and nine were published in European journals. Efficacy was evaluated by clinical parameters and by reduction in medication use. The results on efficacy are not homogeneous, although most support the utility of this route of administration. Moreover, reports of allergens other than those used in these studies dust mites and grass pollens are lacking. In conclusion, further studies evaluating the efficacy of this therapy in children are required. Among the general population, if the efficacy of sublingual immunotherapy in the treatment of sensitization to hymenoptera venoms were demonstrated, as has been the case with subcutaneous immunotherapy, the utility of this route of administration would be definitively confirmed. Finally, sublingual immunotherapy could be used in children who have shown systemic reactions to subcutaneous immunotherapy or who refuse to undergo injections.

  5. Best Practices for Dual-Energy X-ray Absorptiometry Measurement and Reporting: International Society for Clinical Densitometry Guidance.

    PubMed

    Lewiecki, E Michael; Binkley, Neil; Morgan, Sarah L; Shuhart, Christopher R; Camargos, Bruno Muzzi; Carey, John J; Gordon, Catherine M; Jankowski, Lawrence G; Lee, Joon-Kiong; Leslie, William D

    2016-01-01

    Dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) is a technology that is widely used to diagnose osteoporosis, assess fracture risk, and monitor changes in bone mineral density (BMD). The clinical utility of DXA is highly dependent on the quality of the scan acquisition, analysis, and interpretation. Clinicians are best equipped to manage patients when BMD measurements are correct and interpretation follows well-established standards. Poor-quality acquisition, analysis, or interpretation of DXA data may mislead referring clinicians, resulting in unnecessary diagnostic evaluations, failure to evaluate when needed, inappropriate treatment, or failure to provide medical treatment, with potentially ineffective, harmful, or costly consequences. Misallocation of limited healthcare resources and poor treatment decisions can be minimized, and patient care optimized, through meticulous attention to DXA instrument calibration, data acquisition and analysis, interpretation, and reporting. This document from the International Society for Clinical Densitometry describes quality standards for BMD testing at DXA facilities worldwide to provide guidance for DXA supervisors, technologists, interpreters, and clinicians. High-quality DXA testing is necessary for correct diagnostic classification and optimal fracture risk assessment, and is essential for BMD monitoring.

  6. European Society of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases: update of the diagnostic guidance document for Clostridium difficile infection.

    PubMed

    Crobach, M J T; Planche, T; Eckert, C; Barbut, F; Terveer, E M; Dekkers, O M; Wilcox, M H; Kuijper, E J

    2016-08-01

    In 2009 the first European Society of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases (ESCMID) guideline for diagnosing Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) was launched. Since then newer tests for diagnosing CDI have become available, especially nucleic acid amplification tests. The main objectives of this update of the guidance document are to summarize the currently available evidence concerning laboratory diagnosis of CDI and to formulate and revise recommendations to optimize CDI testing. This update is essential to improve the diagnosis of CDI and to improve uniformity in CDI diagnosis for surveillance purposes among Europe. An electronic search for literature concerning the laboratory diagnosis of CDI was performed. Studies evaluating a commercial laboratory test compared to a reference test were also included in a meta-analysis. The commercial tests that were evaluated included enzyme immunoassays (EIAs) detecting glutamate dehydrogenase, EIAs detecting toxins A and B and nucleic acid amplification tests. Recommendations were formulated by an executive committee, and the strength of recommendations and quality of evidence were graded using the Grades of Recommendation Assessment, Development and Evaluation (GRADE) system. No single commercial test can be used as a stand-alone test for diagnosing CDI as a result of inadequate positive predictive values at low CDI prevalence. Therefore, the use of a two-step algorithm is recommended. Samples without free toxin detected by toxins A and B EIA but with positive glutamate dehydrogenase EIA, nucleic acid amplification test or toxigenic culture results need clinical evaluation to discern CDI from asymptomatic carriage.

  7. Canadian Society of Nephrology commentary on the KDIGO clinical practice guideline for CKD evaluation and management.

    PubMed

    Akbari, Ayub; Clase, Catherine M; Acott, Phil; Battistella, Marisa; Bello, Aminu; Feltmate, Patrick; Grill, Allan; Karsanji, Meena; Komenda, Paul; Madore, Francois; Manns, Braden J; Mahdavi, Sara; Mustafa, Reem A; Smyth, Andrew; Welcher, E Sohani

    2015-02-01

    We congratulate the KDIGO (Kidney Disease: Improving Global Outcomes) work group on their comprehensive work in a broad subject area and agreed with many of the recommendations in their clinical practice guideline on the evaluation and management of chronic kidney disease. We concur with the KDIGO definitions and classification of kidney disease and welcome the addition of albuminuria categories at all levels of glomerular filtration rate (GFR), the terminology of G categories rather than stages to describe level of GFR, the division of former stage 3 into new G categories 3a and 3b, and the addition of the underlying diagnosis. We agree with the use of the heat map to illustrate the relative contributions of low GFR and albuminuria to cardiovascular and renal risk, though we thought that the highest risk category was too broad, including as it does people at disparate levels of risk. We add an albuminuria category A4 for nephrotic-range proteinuria and D and T categories for patients on dialysis or with a functioning renal transplant. We recommend target blood pressure of 140/90mm Hg regardless of diabetes or proteinuria, and against the combination of angiotensin receptor blockers with angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors. We recommend against routine protein restriction. We concur on individualization of hemoglobin A1c targets. We do not agree with routine restriction of sodium intake to <2g/d, instead suggesting reduction of sodium intake in those with high intake (>3.3g/d). We suggest screening for anemia only when GFR is <30mL/min/1.73m(2). We recognize the absence of evidence on appropriate phosphate targets and methods of achieving them and do not agree with suggestions in this area. In drug dosing, we agree with the recommendation of using absolute clearance (ie, milliliters per minute), calculated from the patient's estimated GFR (which is normalized to 1.73m(2)) and the patient's actual anthropomorphic body surface area. We agree with referral to a

  8. Amyloid fibril proteins and amyloidosis: chemical identification and clinical classification International Society of Amyloidosis 2016 Nomenclature Guidelines.

    PubMed

    Sipe, Jean D; Benson, Merrill D; Buxbaum, Joel N; Ikeda, Shu-Ichi; Merlini, Giampaolo; Saraiva, Maria J M; Westermark, Per

    2016-12-01

    The Nomenclature Committee of the International Society of Amyloidosis (ISA) met during the XVth Symposium of the Society, 3 July-7 July 2016, Uppsala, Sweden, to assess and formulate recommendations for nomenclature for amyloid fibril proteins and the clinical classification of the amyloidoses. An amyloid fibril must exhibit affinity for Congo red and with green, yellow or orange birefringence when the Congo red-stained deposits are viewed with polarized light. While congophilia and birefringence remain the gold standard for demonstration of amyloid deposits, new staining and imaging techniques are proving useful. To be included in the nomenclature list, in addition to congophilia and birefringence, the chemical identity of the protein must be unambiguously characterized by protein sequence analysis when possible. In general, it is insufficient to identify a mutation in the gene of a candidate amyloid protein without confirming the variant changes in the amyloid fibril protein. Each distinct form of amyloidosis is uniquely characterized by the chemical identity of the amyloid fibril protein that deposits in the extracellular spaces of tissues and organs and gives rise to the disease syndrome. The fibril proteins are designated as protein A followed by a suffix that is an abbreviation of the parent or precursor protein name. To date, there are 36 known extracellular fibril proteins in humans, 2 of which are iatrogenic in nature and 9 of which have also been identified in animals. Two newly recognized fibril proteins, AApoCII derived from apolipoprotein CII and AApoCIII derived from apolipoprotein CIII, have been added. AApoCII amyloidosis and AApoCIII amyloidosis are hereditary systemic amyloidoses. Intracellular protein inclusions displaying some of the properties of amyloid, "intracellular amyloid" have been reported. Two proteins which were previously characterized as intracellular inclusions, tau and α-synuclein, are now recognized to form extracellular

  9. American Epilepsy Society

    MedlinePlus

    ... Epilepsy Society CLINICAL RESOURCES FAQs GUIDELINES IOM EPILEPSY MEDICAL MARIJUANA SUDEP SURGERY DEVICES GENETICS TREATMENTS Drug Alerts and ... RESOURCES Navigation CLINICAL RESOURCES FAQs GUIDELINES IOM EPILEPSY MEDICAL MARIJUANA SUDEP SURGERY DEVICES GENETICS TREATMENTS Drug Alerts and ...

  10. Clinical practice guidelines for the diagnosis and management of osteoporosis. Scientific Advisory Board, Osteoporosis Society of Canada.

    PubMed Central

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To recommend clinical practice guidelines for the assessment of people at risk for osteoporosis, and for effective diagnosis and management of the condition. OPTIONS: Screening and diagnostic methods: risk-factor assessment, clinical evaluation, measurement of bone mineral density, laboratory investigations. Prophylactic and corrective therapies: calcium and vitamin D nutritional supplementation, physical activity and fall-avoidance techniques, ovarian hormone therapy, bisphosphonate drugs, other drug therapies. Pain-management medications and techniques. OUTCOMES: Prevention of loss of bone mineral density and fracture; increased bone mass; and improved quality of life. EVIDENCE: Epidemiologic and clinical studies and reports were examined, with emphasis on recent randomized controlled trials. Clinical practice in Canada and elsewhere was surveyed. Availability of treatment products and diagnostic equipment in Canada was considered. VALUES: Cost-effective methods and products that can be adopted across Canada were considered. A high value was given to accurate assessment of fracture risk and osteoporosis, and to increasing bone mineral density, reducing fractures and fracture risk and minimizing side effects of diagnosis and treatment. BENEFITS, HARMS AND COSTS: Proper diagnosis and management of osteoporosis minimize injury and disability, improve quality of life for patients and reduce costs to society. Rationally targeted methods of screening and diagnosis are safe and cost effective. Harmful side effects and costs of recommended therapies are minimal compared with the harms and costs of untreated osteoporosis. Alternative therapies provide a range of choices for physicians and patients. RECOMMENDATIONS: Population sets at high risk should be identified and then the diagnosis confirmed through bone densitometry. Dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry is the preferred measurement technique. Radiography can be adjunct when indicated. Calcium and vitamin D

  11. The Society for Clinical Trials opposes US legislation to permit marketing of unproven medical therapies for seriously ill patients.

    PubMed

    2006-01-01

    The proposed Bill S.1956 is a bad law. Wide early access to minimally tested treatments cannot be expected to lead to better or more compassionate care of the seriously ill patient. The long history of medicine is replete with treatments that initially seemed promising to patients, doctors, and especially to their own inventors, but which careful study revealed to be worthless or harmful. We understand the desperate plight of these patients and the importance of hope for them and their families. However, although the proposed law is portrayed as an effort to help patients in desperate need of treatment, in fact its effect would be to undermine the system of scientifically valid testing of new drugs that has been a bulwark of health care for several decades. The effect of the law would be to provide many more possible choices of treatment but much less information upon which to make the choice. Patients would be very unlikely to end up receiving an effective treatment. They would be much more likely to receive useless or possibly harmful treatments in the last days of their lives. The Society for Clinical Trials strongly opposes this legislation.

  12. Clinical management of drug-induced hypertension: 2013 Practical Recommendations of the Italian Society of Hypertension (SIIA).

    PubMed

    Virdis, Agostino; Ghiadoni, Lorenzo; Taddei, Stefano

    2014-03-01

    Results from recent observational studies conducted in our country and including approximately 160,000 patients with hypertension, reported that only 37 % of patients achieve effective blood pressure control under treatment. These data confirm that blood pressure control amongst the hypertensive population is still largely unsatisfactory in Italy. For this reason, the Italian Society of Hypertension aims to generate a number of interventions to improve blood pressure control in Italy, including integrated actions with General Practitioners, the implementation of hypertension awareness in the general population, a larger use of home blood pressure measurements, and a survey aimed at identifying all clinical and excellence centers for hypertension diagnosis and treatment throughout the whole national territory. Many therapeutic agents or chemical substances can induce a persistent or transient increase in blood pressure or interfere with the effect of antihypertensive drugs, causing sodium retention and expansion of the extra-cellular volume, activating the sympathetic nervous system and inducing vasoconstriction. This aspect represents one of the most common cause of secondary forms of hypertension, which often is under-evaluated by the physicians. In this review article, the potential causes of secondary forms of hypertension caused by use/abuse of drugs or substances are summarized.

  13. Updates in Gastrointestinal Oncology – insights from the 2008 44th annual meeting of the American Society of Clinical Oncology

    PubMed Central

    Javle, Milind; Hsueh, Chung-Tsen

    2009-01-01

    We have reviewed the pivotal presentations rcelated to colorectal cancer (CRC) and other gastrointestinal malignancies from 2008 annual meeting of the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO). We have discussed the scientific findings and the impact on practice guidelines and ongoing clinical trials. The report on KRAS status in patients with metastatic CRC receiving epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) targeted antibody treatment has led to a change in National Comprehensive Cancer Network guideline that recommends only patients with wild-type KRAS tumor should receive this treatment. The results of double biologics (bevacizumab and anti-EGFR antibody) plus chemotherapy as first-line treatment in patients with metastatic CRC has shown a worse outcome than bevacizumab-based regimen. Microsatellite Instability has again been confirmed to be an important predictor in patients with stage II colon cancer receiving adjuvant treatment. Adjuvant gemcitabine therapy for pancreatic cancer was investigated by the CONKO-001 study; this resulted in superior survival as compared with observation and can be regarded as an acceptable option, without the addition of radiotherapy. The addition of bevacizumab to gemcitabine and erlotinib was not supior to gemcitabine and erlotinib for advanced disease. Second-line therapy for advanced pancreatic cancer with 5-fluorouracil and oxaliplatin resulted in a survival benefit. Irinotecan plus cisplatin and paclitaxel plus cisplatin result in similar survival when combined with radiotherapy for esophageal cancer. The novel fluoropyrimidine S1 appears to be active in gastric cancer, as a single agent or as combination therapy. Adjuvant intraperitoneal mitomycin-C may decrease the incidence of peritoneal recurrence of gastric cancer. Sorafenib is an effective agent in Asian patients with hepatocellular carcinoma secondary to hepatitis B; its utility in child's B cirrhosis remains to be proven. Sunitinib is also an active agent in

  14. [Consensus on the detection and management of prediabetes. Consensus and Clinical Guidelines Working Group of the Spanish Diabetes Society].

    PubMed

    Mata-Cases, M; Artola, S; Escalada, J; Ezkurra-Loyola, P; Ferrer-García, J C; Fornos, J A; Girbés, J; Rica, I

    2015-01-01

    In Spain, according to the Di@bet.es study, 13.8% of the adult population suffers from diabetes and 14.8% from some form of prediabetes (impaired glucose tolerance, impaired fasting glucose or both). Since early detection of prediabetes can facilitate the implementation of therapeutic measures to prevent its progression to diabetes, we believe that preventive strategies in primary care and specialized clinical settings should be agreed. Screening for diabetes and prediabetes using a specific questionnaire (FINDRISC) and/or the measurement of fasting plasma glucose in high risk patients leads to detecting patients at risk of developing diabetes and it is necessary to consider how they should be managed. The intervention in lifestyle can reduce the progression to diabetes and reverse a prediabetic state to normal and is a cost-effective intervention. Some drugs, such as metformin, have also been shown effective in reducing the progression to diabetes but are not superior to non-pharmacological interventions. Finally, an improvement in some cardiovascular risk factors has been observed although there is no strong evidence supporting the effectiveness of screening in terms of morbility and mortality. The Consensus and Clinical Guidelines Working Group of the Spanish Diabetes Society has issued some recommendations that have been agreed by the Sociedad Española de Endocrinología y Nutrición, Sociedad Española de Endocrinología Pediátrica, Sociedad Española de Farmacia Comunitaria, Sociedad Española de Medicina Familiar y Comunitaria, Sociedad Española de Médicos Generales, Sociedad Española de Médicos de Atención Primaria, Sociedad Española de Medicina Interna, Asociación de Enfermería Comunitaria and Red de Grupos de Estudio de la Diabetes en Atención Primaria.

  15. [Consensus on the detection and management of prediabetes. Consensus and Clinical Guidelines Working Group of the Spanish Diabetes Society].

    PubMed

    Mata-Cases, M; Artola, S; Escalada, J; Ezkurra-Loyola, P; Ferrer-García, J C; Fornos, J A; Girbés, J; Rica, I

    2015-03-01

    In Spain, according to the Di@bet.es study, 13.8% of the adult population suffers from diabetes and 14.8% from some form of prediabetes (impaired glucose tolerance, impaired fasting glucose or both). Since early detection of prediabetes can facilitate the implementation of therapeutic measures to prevent its progression to diabetes, we believe that preventive strategies in primary care and specialized clinical settings should be agreed. Screening for diabetes and prediabetes using a specific questionnaire (FINDRISC) and/or the measurement of fasting plasma glucose in high risk patients leads to detecting patients at risk of developing diabetes and it is necessary to consider how they should be managed. The intervention in lifestyle can reduce the progression to diabetes and reverse a prediabetic state to normal and is a cost-effective intervention. Some drugs, such as metformin, have also been shown effective in reducing the progression to diabetes but are not superior to non-pharmacological interventions. Finally, an improvement in some cardiovascular risk factors has been observed although there is no strong evidence supporting the effectiveness of screening in terms of morbility and mortality. The Consensus and Clinical Guidelines Working Group of the Spanish Diabetes Society has issued some recommendations that have been agreed by the Sociedad Española de Endocrinología y Nutrición, Sociedad Española de Endocrinología Pediátrica, Sociedad Española de Farmacia Comunitaria, Sociedad Española de Medicina Familiar y Comunitaria, Sociedad Española de Médicos Generales, Sociedad Española de Médicos de Atención Primaria, Sociedad Española de Medicina Interna, Asociación de Enfermería Comunitaria and Red de Grupos de Estudio de la Diabetes en Atención Primaria.

  16. Consensus on the detection and management of prediabetes. Consensus and Clinical Guidelines Working Group of the Spanish Diabetes Society.

    PubMed

    Mata-Cases, M; Artola, S; Escalada, J; Ezkurra-Loyola, P; Ferrer-García, J C; Fornos, J A; Girbés, J; Rica, I

    2015-03-01

    In Spain, according to the Di@bet.es study, 13.8% of the adult population suffers from diabetes and 14.8% from some form of prediabetes (impaired glucose tolerance, impaired fasting glucose or both). Since early detection of prediabetes can facilitate the implementation of therapeutic measures to prevent its progression to diabetes, we believe that preventive strategies in primary care and specialized clinical settings should be agreed. Screening for diabetes and prediabetes using a specific questionnaire (FINDRISC) and/or the measurement of fasting plasma glucose in high risk patients leads to detecting patients at risk of developing diabetes and it is necessary to consider how they should be managed. The intervention in lifestyle can reduce the progression to diabetes and reverse a prediabetic state to normal and is a cost-effective intervention. Some drugs, such as metformin, have also been shown effective in reducing the progression to diabetes but are not superior to non-pharmacological interventions. Finally, an improvement in some cardiovascular risk factors has been observed although there is no strong evidence supporting the effectiveness of screening in terms of morbility and mortality. The Consensus and Clinical Guidelines Working Group of the Spanish Diabetes Society has issued some recommendations that have been agreed by the Sociedad Española de Endocrinología y Nutrición, Sociedad Española de Endocrinología Pediátrica, Sociedad Española de Farmacia Comunitaria, Sociedad Española de Medicina Familiar y Comunitaria, Sociedad Española de Médicos Generales, Sociedad Española de Médicos de Atención Primaria, Sociedad Española de Medicina Interna, Asociación de Enfermería Comunitaria and Red de Grupos de Estudio de la Diabetes en Atención Primaria.

  17. Chronic kidney disease certification process manual by the Italian Society of Nephrology (SIN): part II: programme management and clinical information management.

    PubMed

    Quintaliani, Giuseppe; Cappelli, Gianni; Lodetti, Laura; Manno, Corrado; Petrucci, Virgilio; Spinelli, Cosimo; Tarchini, Renzo; Virgilio, Michele; Faini, Mario; Alloatti, Sandro; Cancarini, Giovanni; Zoccali, Carmine

    2009-01-01

    This is the second part of a document describing a voluntary certification process based on Joint Commission International (JCI) criteria developed by the Italian Society of Nephrology (SIN) and JCI representatives. In the first part we discussed standards for clinical care delivery and performance measurements related to chronic kidney disease care. Herein (Part II), we complete the description of Performace measurements and CKD care by describing issues related the management and clinical information management.

  18. Clinical cancer advances 2007: major research advances in cancer treatment, prevention, and screening--a report from the American Society of Clinical Oncology.

    PubMed

    Gralow, Julie; Ozols, Robert F; Bajorin, Dean F; Cheson, Bruce D; Sandler, Howard M; Winer, Eric P; Bonner, James; Demetri, George D; Curran, Walter; Ganz, Patricia A; Kramer, Barnett S; Kris, Mark G; Markman, Maurie; Mayer, Robert J; Raghavan, Derek; Ramsey, Scott; Reaman, Gregory H; Sawaya, Raymond; Schuchter, Lynn M; Sweetenham, John W; Vahdat, Linda T; Davidson, Nancy E; Schilsky, Richard L; Lichter, Allen S

    2008-01-10

    A MESSAGE FROM ASCO'S PRESIDENT: For the third year, the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) is publishing Clinical Cancer Advances: Major Research Advances in Cancer Treatment, Prevention, and Screening, an annual review of the most significant cancer research presented or published over the past year. ASCO publishes this report to demonstrate the important progress being made on the front lines of clinical cancer research today. The report is intended to give all those with an interest in cancer care-the general public, cancer patients and organizations, policymakers, oncologists, and other medical professionals-an accessible summary of the year's most important cancer research advances. These pages report on the use of magnetic resonance imaging for breast cancer screening, the association between hormone replacement therapy and breast cancer incidence, the link between human papillomavirus and head and neck cancers, and the use of radiation therapy to prevent lung cancer from spreading. They also report on effective new targeted therapies for cancers that have been historically difficult to treat, such as liver cancer and kidney cancer, among many others. A total of 24 advances are featured in this year's report. These advances and many more over the past several years show that the nation's long-term investment in cancer research is paying off. But there are disturbing signs that progress could slow. We are now in the midst of the longest sustained period of flat government funding for cancer research in history. The budgets for the National Institutes of Health and the National Cancer Institute (NCI) have been unchanged for four years. When adjusted for inflation, cancer research funding has actually declined 12% since 2004. These budget constraints limit the NCI's ability to fund promising cancer research. In the past several years the number of grants that the NCI has been able to fund has significantly decreased; this year, in response to just the

  19. Systemic Therapy in Men With Metastatic Castration-Resistant Prostate Cancer: American Society of Clinical Oncology and Cancer Care Ontario Clinical Practice Guideline

    PubMed Central

    Basch, Ethan; Loblaw, D. Andrew; Oliver, Thomas K.; Carducci, Michael; Chen, Ronald C.; Frame, James N.; Garrels, Kristina; Hotte, Sebastien; Kattan, Michael W.; Raghavan, Derek; Saad, Fred; Taplin, Mary-Ellen; Walker-Dilks, Cindy; Williams, James; Winquist, Eric; Bennett, Charles L.; Wootton, Ted; Rumble, R. Bryan; Dusetzina, Stacie B.; Virgo, Katherine S.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To provide treatment recommendations for men with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC). Methods The American Society of Clinical Oncology and Cancer Care Ontario convened an expert panel to develop evidence-based recommendations informed by a systematic review of the literature. Results When added to androgen deprivation, therapies demonstrating improved survival, improved quality of life (QOL), and favorable benefit-harm balance include abiraterone acetate/prednisone, enzalutamide, and radium-223 (223Ra; for men with predominantly bone metastases). Improved survival and QOL with moderate toxicity risk are associated with docetaxel/prednisone. For asymptomatic/minimally symptomatic men, improved survival with unclear QOL impact and low toxicity are associated with sipuleucel-T. For men who previously received docetaxel, improved survival, unclear QOL impact, and moderate to high toxicity risk are associated with cabazitaxel/prednisone. Modest QOL benefit (without survival benefit) and high toxicity risk are associated with mitoxantrone/prednisone after docetaxel. No benefit and excess toxicity are observed with bevacizumab, estramustine, and sunitinib. Recommendations Continue androgen deprivation (pharmaceutical or surgical) indefinitely. Abiraterone acetate/prednisone, enzalutamide, or 223Ra should be offered; docetaxel/prednisone should also be offered, accompanied by discussion of toxicity risk. Sipuleucel-T may be offered to asymptomatic/minimally symptomatic men. For men who have experienced progression with docetaxel, cabazitaxel may be offered, accompanied by discussion of toxicity risk. Mitoxantrone may be offered, accompanied by discussion of limited clinical benefit and toxicity risk. Ketoconazole or antiandrogens (eg, bicalutamide, flutamide, nilutamide) may be offered, accompanied by discussion of limited known clinical benefit. Bevacizumab, estramustine, and sunitinib should not be offered. There is insufficient evidence to

  20. Diagnosis and Treatment of Leishmaniasis: Clinical Practice Guidelines by the Infectious Diseases Society of America (IDSA) and the American Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene (ASTMH).

    PubMed

    Aronson, Naomi; Herwaldt, Barbara L; Libman, Michael; Pearson, Richard; Lopez-Velez, Rogelio; Weina, Peter; Carvalho, Edgar M; Ephros, Moshe; Jeronimo, Selma; Magill, Alan

    2016-12-15

    It is important to realize that leishmaniasis guidelines cannot always account for individual variation among patients. They are not intended to supplant physician judgment with respect to particular patients or special clinical situations. The IDSA and ASTMH consider adherence to these guidelines to be voluntary, with the ultimate determinations regarding their application to be made by the physician in the light of each patient's individual circumstances.

  1. Clinical Cancer Advances 2005: major research advances in cancer treatment, prevention, and screening--a report from the American Society of Clinical Oncology.

    PubMed

    Herbst, Roy S; Bajorin, Dean F; Bleiberg, Harry; Blum, Diane; Hao, Desirée; Johnson, Bruce E; Ozols, Robert F; Demetri, George D; Ganz, Patricia A; Kris, Mark G; Levin, Bernard; Markman, Maurie; Raghavan, Derek; Reaman, Gregory H; Sawaya, Raymond; Schuchter, Lynn M; Sweetenham, John W; Vahdat, Linda T; Vokes, Everett E; Winn, Rodger J; Mayer, Robert J

    2006-01-01

    This year, for the first time, the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) is publishing Clinical Cancer Advances 2005: Major Research Advances in Cancer Treatment, Prevention, and Screening, an annual review of the most significant clinical research presented or published over the past year across all cancer types. ASCO embarked on this project to provide the public, patients, policymakers, and physicians with an accessible summary of the year's most important research advances. While not intended to serve as a comprehensive review, this report provides a year-end snapshot of research that will have the greatest impact on patient care. As you will read, there is much good news from the front lines of cancer research. These pages report on new chemotherapy regimens that sharply reduce the risk of recurrence for very common cancers; the "coming of age" of targeted cancer therapies; promising studies of drugs to prevent cancer; and improvements in quality of life for people living with the disease, among many other advances. Survival rates for cancer are on the rise, increasing from 50% to 64% over the last 30 years. Cancer still exacts an enormous toll, however. Nearly 1.4 million Americans will be diagnosed this year, and some 570,000 will die of the disease. Clearly, more research is needed to find effective therapies for the most stubborn cancer types and stages. We need to know more about the long-term effects of newer, more targeted cancer therapies, some of which need to be taken over long periods of time. And we need to devote far greater attention to tracking and improving the care of the nearly 10 million cancer survivors in the United States today. Despite these and other challenges, the message of this report is one of hope. Through the dedicated, persistent pursuit of clinical research and participation in clinical trials by people with cancer, we steadily uncover new and better ways of treating, diagnosing, and preventing a disease that touches the

  2. [Implementation of Guidelines on Conflict of Interest in Clinical Research of the Japanese Society of Psychiatry and Neurology: actual status and future perspectives].

    PubMed

    Mikuni, Masahiko; Kurihara, Chieko; Miyaoka, Hitoshi

    2014-01-01

    In May 2011, the Japanese Society of Psychiatry and Neurology released their Guidelines on Conflict of Interest (COI) in Clinical Research and detailed regulations. These guidelines cover clinical research, although each committee of the society may have a policy to cover basic research as well as clinical research. The COI Committee implemented the guidelines, including a one-year trial period. According to the guidelines, members of the society have to disclose their COIs at the time of presentations, manuscript submissions, and publications; the board and committees members have to submit their COIs to the president of the society. During the trial period, the latter was limited to the four committees involved in the development of the guidelines: Conflict of Interest; Pharmaceutical Affairs; Research Ethics; and Editorial Committees. The COI Committee reviewed the COIs submitted by the board and committee members. The COI Committee found that, among the 382 board and committee members, 298 were without COI; 31 COIs were regarded by one committee member as not necessary to be circulated to all the attending members (total of these 2 categories: 329, 87%); 31 COIs (8%) were regarded as necessary to be circulated; and 18 cases (4.7%) were problematic: not submitted or explicit rejection of submission. Considering the seriousness of scientific misconduct by a researcher in another disease area who resigned his professorship and is now under investigation, we should further discuss the implementation of our COI guidelines.

  3. Nationwide surveillance of bacterial respiratory pathogens conducted by the surveillance committee of Japanese Society of Chemotherapy, the Japanese Association for Infectious Diseases, and the Japanese Society for Clinical Microbiology in 2010: General view of the pathogens' antibacterial susceptibility.

    PubMed

    Yanagihara, Katsunori; Kadota, Junichi; Aoki, Nobuki; Matsumoto, Tetsuya; Yoshida, Masaki; Yagisawa, Morimasa; Oguri, Toyoko; Sato, Junko; Ogasawara, Kazuhiko; Wakamura, Tomotaro; Sunakawa, Keisuke; Watanabe, Akira; Iwata, Satoshi; Kaku, Mitsuo; Hanaki, Hideaki; Ohsaki, Yoshinobu; Watari, Tomohisa; Toyoshima, Eri; Takeuchi, Kenichi; Shiokoshi, Mayumi; Takeda, Hiroaki; Miki, Makoto; Kumagai, Toshio; Nakanowatari, Susumu; Takahashi, Hiroshi; Utagawa, Mutsuko; Nishiya, Hajime; Kawakami, Sayoko; Kobayashi, Nobuyuki; Takasaki, Jin; Mezaki, Kazuhisa; Konosaki, Hisami; Aoki, Yasuko; Yamamoto, Yumiko; Shoji, Michi; Goto, Hajime; Saraya, Takeshi; Kurai, Daisuke; Okazaki, Mitsuhiro; Niki, Yoshihito; Yoshida, Koichiro; Kawana, Akihiko; Saionji, Katsu; Fujikura, Yuji; Miyazawa, Naoki; Kudo, Makoto; Sato, Yoshimi; Yamamoto, Masaki; Yoshida, Takashi; Nakamura, Masahiko; Tsukada, Hiroki; Imai, Yumiko; Tsukada, Ayami; Kawasaki, Satoshi; Honma, Yasuo; Yamamoto, Toshinobu; Ban, Nobuyoshi; Mikamo, Hiroshige; Sawamura, Haruki; Miyara, Takayuki; Toda, Hirofumi; Sato, Kaori; Nakamura, Tadahiro; Fujikawa, Yasunori; Mitsuno, Noriko; Mikasa, Keiichi; Kasahara, Kei; Sano, Reiko; Sugimoto, Keisuke; Asari, Seishi; Nishi, Isao; Toyokawa, Masahiro; Miyashita, Naoyuki; Koguchi, Yutaka; Kusano, Nobuchika; Mihara, Eiichirou; Kuwabara, Masao; Watanabe, Yaeko; Kawasaki, Yuji; Takeda, Kenichi; Tokuyasu, Hirokazu; Masui, Kayoko; Negayama, Kiyoshi; Hiramatsu, Kazufumi; Aoki, Yosuke; Fukuoka, Mami; Magarifuchi, Hiroki; Nagasawa, Zenzo; Suga, Moritaka; Muranaka, Hiroyuki; Morinaga, Yoshitomo; Honda, Junichi; Fujita, Masaki

    2015-06-01

    The nationwide surveillance on antimicrobial susceptibility of bacterial respiratory pathogens from patients in Japan, was conducted by Japanese Society of Chemotherapy, Japanese Association for Infectious Diseases and Japanese Society for Clinical Microbiology in 2010. The isolates were collected from clinical specimens obtained from well-diagnosed adult patients with respiratory tract infections during the period from January and April 2010 by three societies. Antimicrobial susceptibility testing was conducted at the central reference laboratory according to the method recommended by Clinical and Laboratory Standard Institutes using maximum 45 antibacterial agents. Susceptibility testing was evaluable with 954 strains (206 Staphylococcus aureus, 189 Streptococcus pneumoniae, 4 Streptococcus pyogenes, 182 Haemophilus influenzae, 74 Moraxella catarrhalis, 139 Klebsiella pneumoniae and 160 Pseudomonas aeruginosa). Ratio of methicillin-resistant S. aureus was as high as 50.5%, and those of penicillin-intermediate and -resistant S. pneumoniae were 1.1% and 0.0%, respectively. Among H. influenzae, 17.6% of them were found to be β-lactamase-non-producing ampicillin (ABPC)-intermediately resistant, 33.5% to be β-lactamase-non-producing ABPC-resistant and 11.0% to be β-lactamase-producing ABPC-resistant strains. Extended spectrum β-lactamase-producing K. pneumoniae and multi-drug resistant P. aeruginosa with metallo β-lactamase were 2.9% and 0.6%, respectively. Continuous national surveillance of antimicrobial susceptibility of respiratory pathogens is crucial in order to monitor changing patterns of susceptibility and to be able to update treatment recommendations on a regular basis.

  4. [Clinical guidelines for diagnosing, treatment and monitoring patients with bladder cancer--Croatian Oncology Society and Croatian Urology Society, Croatian Medical Association].

    PubMed

    Gamulin, Marija; Ruzić, Ira Pavlović; Grgić, Mislav; Jazvić, Marijana; Solarić, Mladen; Zahirović, Dag; Zorica, Robert; Omrcen, Tomislav; Petković, Marija; Matić, Mate; Fuckar, Zeljko; Ruzić, Boris; Pasini, Josip; Situm, Marijan; Dordević, Gordana; Miletić, Damir; Tadić, Tade; Kastelan, Zeljko; Librenjak, Davor; Gilja, Ivan; Vilović, Katarina; Kruslin, Bozo; Kuvezdić, Hrvoje

    2013-01-01

    Urothelial cancer is the most common bladder cancer. Hematuria is the most common presenting symptom in patients with bladder cancer. The most common diagnostics of bladder cancer is performed by transurethral resection of bladder after which pathohistological diagnosis is set. It is necessary to determine whether the cancer penetrated in muscle layer (muscle-invasive cancer) or not (muscle-noninvasive cancer). Decision on therapeutic modality depends on the clinical stage of disease and on prognostic and risk factors. For muscle non-invasive bladder cancer transurethral resection is preferred with or without intravesical instillation of Bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG). For invasive cancer the method of choice is radical cystectomy. Radiotherapy is used in radical and palliative purposes. Metastatic disease is most frequently treated by chemotherapy metotrexate/vinblastine/doxorubicine/cisplatin (MVAC) or gemcitabine/cisplatin (GC). The purpose of this article is to present clinical recommendations to set standards of procedures and criteria in diagnostics, treatment and follow up of patients with bladder cancer in the Republic of Croatia.

  5. [Guidelines for the treatment of invasive fungal disease by Aspergillus spp. and other fungi issued by the Spanish Society of Infectious Diseases and Clinical Microbiology (SEIMC). 2011 Update].

    PubMed

    Fortún, Jesús; Carratalá, Jordi; Gavaldá, Joan; Lizasoain, Manuel; Salavert, Miguel; de la Cámara, Rafael; Borges, Marcio; Cervera, Carlos; Garnacho, José; Lassaleta, Álvaro; Lumbreras, Carlos; Sanz, Miguel Ángel; Ramos, José T; Torre-Cisneros, Julián; Aguado, José M; Cuenca-Estrella, Manuel

    2011-01-01

    The guidelines on the treatment of invasive fungal disease by Aspergillus spp. and other fungi issued by the Spanish Society of Infectious Diseases and Clinical Microbiology (SEIMC) are presented. These recommendations are focused on four clinical categories: oncology-haematology patients, solid organ transplant recipients, patients admitted to intensive care units, and children. An extensive review is made of therapeutical advances and scientific evidence in these settings. These guidelines have been prepared according the SEIMC consensus rules by a working group composed of specialists in infectious diseases, clinical microbiology, critical care medicine, paediatrics and oncology-haematology. Specific recommendations on the prevention of fungal infections in these patients are included.

  6. Clinical cancer advances 2006: major research advances in cancer treatment, prevention, and screening--a report from the American Society of Clinical Oncology.

    PubMed

    Ozols, Robert F; Herbst, Roy S; Colson, Yolonda L; Gralow, Julie; Bonner, James; Curran, Walter J; Eisenberg, Burton L; Ganz, Patricia A; Kramer, Barnett S; Kris, Mark G; Markman, Maurie; Mayer, Robert J; Raghavan, Derek; Reaman, Gregory H; Sawaya, Raymond; Schilsky, Richard L; Schuchter, Lynn M; Sweetenham, John W; Vahdat, Linda T; Winn, Rodger J

    2007-01-01

    A MESSAGE FROM ASCO's PRESIDENT For the second consecutive year, the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) is publishing Clinical Cancer Advances: Major Research Advances in Cancer Treatment, Prevention, and Screening, an annual review of the most significant cancer research presented or published over the past year. ASCO developed this report to demonstrate the enormous progress being made on the front lines of cancer research today. The report is intended to give all those with an interest in cancer care-the general public, cancer patients and physicians, policymakers, oncologists, and other medical professionals-an accessible summary of the year's most important cancer research advances. These pages report on new targeted therapies that are improving survival and response rates in hard-to-treat cancers such as kidney cancer, HER-2-positive breast cancer, head and neck cancer, and chronic myelogenous leukemia; the FDA's approval of the world's first preventive vaccine for human papillomavirus (HPV), which has the potential to dramatically reduce the global burden of cervical cancer; and advances in the fast-growing field of personalized medicine, including a new lung cancer test that could help physicians better target treatments and predict prognosis. These advances are only part of the landscape. Survival rates are on the rise, the number of cancer deaths in the United States began declining for the first time since 1930, and new research is showing that the rates of certain common cancers, such as those of the breast and colon, have stabilized, and may have even begun to decline. However, cancer research still faces a number of major obstacles. At a time of extraordinary scientific potential, declining federal funding of cancer research threatens to stall or even reverse recent progress. Such funding cuts have already led to fewer clinical trials, fewer talented young physicians entering the field, and a growing bottleneck of basic science discoveries

  7. American Society of Clinical Oncology Clinical Practice Guideline Update on the Use of Pharmacologic Interventions Including Tamoxifen, Raloxifene, and Aromatase Inhibition for Breast Cancer Risk Reduction

    PubMed Central

    Visvanathan, Kala; Chlebowski, Rowan T.; Hurley, Patricia; Col, Nananda F.; Ropka, Mary; Collyar, Deborah; Morrow, Monica; Runowicz, Carolyn; Pritchard, Kathleen I.; Hagerty, Karen; Arun, Banu; Garber, Judy; Vogel, Victor G.; Wade, James L.; Brown, Powel; Cuzick, Jack; Kramer, Barnett S.; Lippman, Scott M.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose To update the 2002 American Society of Clinical Oncology guideline on pharmacologic interventions for breast cancer (BC) risk reduction. Methods A literature search identified relevant randomized trials published since 2002. Primary outcome of interest was BC incidence (invasive and noninvasive). Secondary outcomes included BC mortality, adverse events, and net health benefits. An expert panel reviewed the literature and developed updated consensus guidelines. Results Seventeen articles met inclusion criteria. In premenopausal women, tamoxifen for 5 years reduces the risk of BC for at least 10 years, particularly estrogen receptor (ER) –positive invasive tumors. Women ≤ 50 years of age experience fewer serious side effects. Vascular and vasomotor events do not persist post-treatment across all ages. In postmenopausal women, raloxifene and tamoxifen reduce the risk of ER-positive invasive BC with equal efficacy. Raloxifene is associated with a lower risk of thromboembolic disease, benign uterine conditions, and cataracts than tamoxifen in postmenopausal women. No evidence exists establishing whether a reduction in BC risk from either agent translates into reduced BC mortality. Recommendations In women at increased risk for BC, tamoxifen (20 mg/d for 5 years) may be offered to reduce the risk of invasive ER-positive BC, with benefits for at least 10 years. In postmenopausal women, raloxifene (60 mg/d for 5 years) may also be considered. Use of aromatase inhibitors, fenretinide, or other selective estrogen receptor modulators to lower BC risk is not recommended outside of a clinical trial. Discussion of risks and benefits of preventive agents by health providers is critical to patient decision making. PMID:19470930

  8. Use of 5-α-Reductase Inhibitors for Prostate Cancer Chemoprevention: American Society of Clinical Oncology/American Urological Association 2008 Clinical Practice Guideline

    PubMed Central

    Kramer, Barnett S.; Hagerty, Karen L.; Justman, Stewart; Somerfield, Mark R.; Albertsen, Peter C.; Blot, William J.; Ballentine Carter, H.; Costantino, Joseph P.; Epstein, Jonathan I.; Godley, Paul A.; Harris, Russell P.; Wilt, Timothy J.; Wittes, Janet; Zon, Robin; Schellhammer, Paul

    2009-01-01

    Purpose To develop an evidence-based guideline on the use of 5-α-reductase inhibitors (5-ARIs) for prostate cancer chemoprevention. Methods The American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) Health Services Committee (HSC), ASCO Cancer Prevention Committee, and the American Urological Association Practice Guidelines Committee jointly convened a Panel of experts, who used the results from a systematic review of the literature to develop evidence-based recommendations on the use of 5-ARIs for prostate cancer chemoprevention. Results The systematic review completed for this guideline identified 15 randomized clinical trials that met the inclusion criteria, nine of which reported prostate cancer period prevalence. Conclusion Asymptomatic men with a prostate-specific antigen (PSA) ≤ 3.0 ng/mL who are regularly screened with PSA or are anticipating undergoing annual PSA screening for early detection of prostate cancer may benefit from a discussion of both the benefits of 5-ARIs for 7 years for the prevention of prostate cancer and the potential risks (including the possibility of high-grade prostate cancer). Men who are taking 5-ARIs for benign conditions such as lower urinary tract [obstructive] symptoms (LUTS) may benefit from a similar discussion, understanding that the improvement of LUTS relief should be weighed with the potential risks of high-grade prostate cancer from 5-ARIs (although the majority of the Panel members judged the latter risk to be unlikely). A reduction of approximately 50% in PSA by 12 months is expected in men taking a 5-ARI; however, because these changes in PSA may vary across men, and within individual men over time, the Panel cannot recommend a specific cut point to trigger a biopsy for men taking a 5-ARI. No specific cut point or change in PSA has been prospectively validated in men taking a 5-ARI. PMID:19252137

  9. Management of Adults With Hospital-acquired and Ventilator-associated Pneumonia: 2016 Clinical Practice Guidelines by the Infectious Diseases Society of America and the American Thoracic Society.

    PubMed

    Kalil, Andre C; Metersky, Mark L; Klompas, Michael; Muscedere, John; Sweeney, Daniel A; Palmer, Lucy B; Napolitano, Lena M; O'Grady, Naomi P; Bartlett, John G; Carratalà, Jordi; El Solh, Ali A; Ewig, Santiago; Fey, Paul D; File, Thomas M; Restrepo, Marcos I; Roberts, Jason A; Waterer, Grant W; Cruse, Peggy; Knight, Shandra L; Brozek, Jan L

    2016-09-01

    It is important to realize that guidelines cannot always account for individual variation among patients. They are not intended to supplant physician judgment with respect to particular patients or special clinical situations. IDSA considers adherence to these guidelines to be voluntary, with the ultimate determination regarding their application to be made by the physician in the light of each patient's individual circumstances.These guidelines are intended for use by healthcare professionals who care for patients at risk for hospital-acquired pneumonia (HAP) and ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP), including specialists in infectious diseases, pulmonary diseases, critical care, and surgeons, anesthesiologists, hospitalists, and any clinicians and healthcare providers caring for hospitalized patients with nosocomial pneumonia. The panel's recommendations for the diagnosis and treatment of HAP and VAP are based upon evidence derived from topic-specific systematic literature reviews.

  10. Canadian Cardiovascular Society Consensus Conference guidelines on heart failure, update 2009: Diagnosis and management of right-sided heart failure, myocarditis, device therapy and recent important clinical trials

    PubMed Central

    Howlett, Jonathan G; McKelvie, Robert S; Arnold, J Malcolm O; Costigan, Jeannine; Dorian, Paul; Ducharme, Anique; Estrella-Holder, Estrellita; Ezekowitz, Justin A; Giannetti, Nadia; Haddad, Haissam; Heckman, George A; Herd, Anthony M; Isaac, Debra; Jong, Philip; Kouz, Simon; Liu, Peter; Mann, Elizabeth; Moe, Gordon W; Tsuyuki, Ross T; Ross, Heather J; White, Michel

    2009-01-01

    The Canadian Cardiovascular Society published a comprehensive set of recommendations on the diagnosis and management of heart failure in January 2006. Based on feedback obtained through a national program of heart failure workshops and through active solicitation of stakeholders, several topics were identified because of their importance to the practicing clinician. Topics chosen for the present update include best practices for the diagnosis and management of right-sided heart failure, myocarditis and device therapy, and a review of recent important or landmark clinical trials. These recommendations were developed using the structured approach for the review and assessment of evidence adopted and previously described by the Society. The present update has been written from a clinical perspective to provide a user-friendly and practical approach. Specific clinical questions that are addressed include: What is right-sided heart failure and how should one approach the diagnostic work-up? What other clinical entities may masquerade as this nebulous condition and how can we tell them apart? When should we be concerned about the presence of myocarditis and how quickly should patients with this condition be referred to an experienced centre? Among the myriad of recently published landmark clinical trials, which ones will impact our standards of clinical care? The goals are to aid physicians and other health care providers to optimally treat heart failure patients, resulting in a measurable impact on patient health and clinical outcomes in Canada. PMID:19214293

  11. Clinical Cancer Advances 2008: Major Research Advances in Cancer Treatment, Prevention, and Screening—A Report From the American Society of Clinical Oncology

    PubMed Central

    Winer, Eric; Gralow, Julie; Diller, Lisa; Karlan, Beth; Loehrer, Patrick; Pierce, Lori; Demetri, George; Ganz, Patricia; Kramer, Barnett; Kris, Mark; Markman, Maurie; Mayer, Robert; Pfister, David; Raghavan, Derek; Ramsey, Scott; Reaman, Gregory; Sandler, Howard; Sawaya, Raymond; Schuchter, Lynn; Sweetenham, John; Vahdat, Linda; Schilsky, Richard L.

    2009-01-01

    most significant clinical research is conducted increasingly overseas. In addition, talented young physicians in the United States, seeing less opportunity in the field of oncology, are choosing other specialties instead. Although greater investment in research is critical, the need for new therapies is only part of the challenge. Far too many people in the United States lack access to the treatments that already exist, leading to unnecessary suffering and death. Uninsured cancer patients are significantly more likely to die than those with insurance, racial disparities in cancer incidence and mortality remain stark, and even insured patients struggle to keep up with the rapidly rising cost of cancer therapies. As this annual American Society of Clinical Oncology report of the major cancer research advances during the last year demonstrates, we are making important progress against cancer. But sound public policies are essential to accelerate that progress. In 2009, we have an opportunity to reinvest in cancer research, and to support policies that will help ensure that every individual in the United States receives potentially life-saving cancer prevention, early detection, and treatment. Sincerely, Richard L. Schilsky, MD President American Society of Clinical Oncology PMID:19103723

  12. Clinical cancer advances 2008: major research advances in cancer treatment, prevention, and screening--a report from the American Society of Clinical Oncology.

    PubMed

    Winer, Eric; Gralow, Julie; Diller, Lisa; Karlan, Beth; Loehrer, Patrick; Pierce, Lori; Demetri, George; Ganz, Patricia; Kramer, Barnett; Kris, Mark; Markman, Maurie; Mayer, Robert; Pfister, David; Raghavan, Derek; Ramsey, Scott; Reaman, Gregory; Sandler, Howard; Sawaya, Raymond; Schuchter, Lynn; Sweetenham, John; Vahdat, Linda; Schilsky, Richard L

    2009-02-10

    significant clinical research is conducted increasingly overseas. In addition, talented young physicians in the United States, seeing less opportunity in the field of oncology, are choosing other specialties instead. Although greater investment in research is critical, the need for new therapies is only part of the challenge. Far too many people in the United States lack access to the treatments that already exist, leading to unnecessary suffering and death. Uninsured cancer patients are significantly more likely to die than those with insurance, racial disparities in cancer incidence and mortality remain stark, and even insured patients struggle to keep up with the rapidly rising cost of cancer therapies. As this annual American Society of Clinical Oncology report of the major cancer research advances during the last year demonstrates, we are making important progress against cancer. But sound public policies are essential to accelerate that progress. In 2009, we have an opportunity to reinvest in cancer research, and to support policies that will help ensure that every individual in the United States receives potentially life-saving cancer prevention, early detection, and treatment. Sincerely, Richard L. Schilsky, MD President American Society of Clinical Oncology.

  13. Current issues in medically assisted reproduction and genetics in Europe: research, clinical practice, ethics, legal issues and policy. European Society of Human Genetics and European Society of Human Reproduction and Embryology.

    PubMed

    Harper, Joyce C; Geraedts, Joep; Borry, Pascal; Cornel, Martina C; Dondorp, Wybo; Gianaroli, Luca; Harton, Gary; Milachich, Tanya; Kääriäinen, Helena; Liebaers, Inge; Morris, Michael; Sequeiros, Jorge; Sermon, Karen; Shenfield, Françoise; Skirton, Heather; Soini, Sirpa; Spits, Claudia; Veiga, Anna; Vermeesch, Joris Robert; Viville, Stéphane; de Wert, Guido; Macek, Milan

    2013-11-01

    In March 2005, a group of experts from the European Society of Human Genetics and European Society of Human Reproduction and Embryology met to discuss the interface between genetics and assisted reproductive technology (ART), and published an extended background paper, recommendations and two Editorials. Seven years later, in March 2012, a follow-up interdisciplinary workshop was held, involving representatives of both professional societies, including experts from the European Union Eurogentest2 Coordination Action Project. The main goal of this meeting was to discuss developments at the interface between clinical genetics and ARTs. As more genetic causes of reproductive failure are now recognised and an increasing number of patients undergo testing of their genome before conception, either in regular health care or in the context of direct-to-consumer testing, the need for genetic counselling and preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD) may increase. Preimplantation genetic screening (PGS) thus far does not have evidence from randomised clinical trials to substantiate that the technique is both effective and efficient. Whole-genome sequencing may create greater challenges both in the technological and interpretational domains, and requires further reflection about the ethics of genetic testing in ART and PGD/PGS. Diagnostic laboratories should be reporting their results according to internationally accepted accreditation standards (International Standards Organisation - ISO 15189). Further studies are needed in order to address issues related to the impact of ART on epigenetic reprogramming of the early embryo. The legal landscape regarding assisted reproduction is evolving but still remains very heterogeneous and often contradictory. The lack of legal harmonisation and uneven access to infertility treatment and PGD/PGS fosters considerable cross-border reproductive care in Europe and beyond. The aim of this paper is to complement previous publications and provide

  14. [Evaluation of the status of patients with severe infection, criteria for intensive care unit admittance. Spanish Society for Infectious Diseases and Clinical Microbiology. Spanish Society of Intensive and Critical Medicine and Coronary Units].

    PubMed

    Olaechea, Pedro M; Alvarez-Lerma, Francisco; Sánchez, Miguel; Torres, Antonio; Palomar, Mercedes; Fernández, Pedro; Miró, José M; Cisneros, José Miguel; Torres, Manuel

    2009-06-01

    Recent studies have shown that early attention in patients with serious infections is associated with a better outcome. Assistance in intensive care units (ICU) can effectively provide this attention; hence patients should be admitted to the ICU as soon as possible, before clinical deterioration becomes irreversible. The objective of this article is to compile the recommendations for evaluating disease severity in patients with infections and describe the criteria for ICU admission, updating the criteria published 10 years ago. A literature review was carried out, compiling the opinions of experts from the Sociedad Española de Enfermedades Infecciosas y Microbiología Clínica (SEIMC, Spanish Society for Infectious Diseases and Clinical Microbiology) and the Sociedad Española de Medicina Intensiva, Crítica y Unidades Coronarias (SEMICYUC, Spanish Society for Intensive Medicine, Critical Care and Coronary Units) as well as the working groups for infections in critically ill patients (GEIPC-SEIMC and GTEI-SEMICYUC). We describe the specific recommendations for ICU admission related to the most common infections affecting patients, who will potentially benefit from critical care. Assessment of the severity of the patient's condition to enable early intensive care is stressed.

  15. North American Menopause Society

    MedlinePlus

    ... Advertisements NAMS in the News Press Room Assistance Society Overview Top 10 reasons why NAMS is your ... fully updated and referenced 5th edition of the Society’s leading professional resource, featuring the latest comprehensive clinical ...

  16. Autism Society

    MedlinePlus

    ... and fun! Register Today Improving the lives of all affected by autism. The Autism Society is the ... and advocacy. Learn more Improving the lives of all affected by autism. The Autism Society is the ...

  17. [Analysis of the results of the 2010 External Quality Control Program of the Spanish Society of Infectious Diseases and Clinical Microbiology].

    PubMed

    Ruiz de Gopegui Bordes, Enrique; Serrano, M del Remedio Guna; Orta Mira, Nieves; Ovies, María Rosario; Poveda, Marta; Cardona, Concepción Gimeno

    2011-12-01

    The External Quality Control Program of the Spanish Society of Infectious Diseases and Clinical Microbiology includes controls for bacteriology, serology, mycology, parasitology, mycobacteria, virology and molecular microbiology. This article presents the most important conclusions and lessons of the 2010 controls. As a whole, the results obtained in 2010 confirm the excellent skill and good technical standards found in previous years. However, erroneous results can be obtained in any laboratory and in clinically relevant determinations. The results of this program highlight the need to implement both internal and external controls to ensure maximal quality of microbiological tests(1).

  18. Removal of foreign bodies in the upper gastrointestinal tract in adults: European Society of Gastrointestinal Endoscopy (ESGE) Clinical Guideline.

    PubMed

    Birk, Michael; Bauerfeind, Peter; Deprez, Pierre H; Häfner, Michael; Hartmann, Dirk; Hassan, Cesare; Hucl, Tomas; Lesur, Gilles; Aabakken, Lars; Meining, Alexander

    2016-05-01

    This Guideline is an official statement of the European Society of Gastrointestinal Endoscopy (ESGE). It addresses the removal of foreign bodies in the upper gastrointestinal tract in adults. Recommendations Nonendoscopic measures 1 ESGE recommends diagnostic evaluation based on the patient's history and symptoms. ESGE recommends a physical examination focused on the patient's general condition and to assess signs of any complications (strong recommendation, low quality evidence). 2 ESGE does not recommend radiological evaluation for patients with nonbony food bolus impaction without complications. We recommend plain radiography to assess the presence, location, size, configuration, and number of ingested foreign bodies if ingestion of radiopaque objects is suspected or type of object is unknown (strong recommendation, low quality evidence). 3 ESGE recommends computed tomography (CT) scan in all patients with suspected perforation or other complication that may require surgery (strong recommendation, low quality evidence). 4 ESGE does not recommend barium swallow, because of the risk of aspiration and worsening of the endoscopic visualization (strong recommendation, low quality evidence). 5 ESGE recommends clinical observation without the need for endoscopic removal for management of asymptomatic patients with ingestion of blunt and small objects (except batteries and magnets). If feasible, outpatient management is appropriate (strong recommendation, low quality evidence). 6 ESGE recommends close observation in asymptomatic individuals who have concealed packets of drugs by swallowing ("body packing"). We recommend against endoscopic retrieval. We recommend surgical referral in cases of suspected packet rupture, failure of packets to progress, or intestinal obstruction (strong recommendation, low quality evidence). Endoscopic measures 7 ESGE recommends emergent (preferably within 2 hours, but at the latest within 6 hours) therapeutic esophagogastroduodenoscopy for

  19. Electronic nicotine delivery systems: a policy statement from the American Association for Cancer Research and the American Society of Clinical Oncology.

    PubMed

    Brandon, Thomas H; Goniewicz, Maciej L; Hanna, Nasser H; Hatsukami, Dorothy K; Herbst, Roy S; Hobin, Jennifer A; Ostroff, Jamie S; Shields, Peter G; Toll, Benjamin A; Tyne, Courtney A; Viswanath, Kasisomayajula; Warren, Graham W

    2015-03-10

    Combustible tobacco use remains the number-one preventable cause of disease, disability, and death in the United States. Electronic nicotine delivery systems (ENDS), which include electronic cigarettes, are devices capable of delivering nicotine in an aerosolized form. ENDS use by both adults and youth has increased rapidly, and some have advocated these products could serve as harm-reduction devices and smoking cessation aids. ENDS may be beneficial if they reduce smoking rates or prevent or reduce the known adverse health effects of smoking. However, ENDS may also be harmful, particularly to youth, if they increase the likelihood that nonsmokers or former smokers will use combustible tobacco products or if they discourage smokers from quitting. The American Association for Cancer Research (AACR) and the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) recognize the potential ENDS have to alter patterns of tobacco use and affect the health of the public; however, definitive data are lacking. The AACR and ASCO recommend additional research on these devices, including assessing the health impacts of ENDS, understanding patterns of ENDS use, and determining what role ENDS have in cessation. Key policy recommendations include supporting federal, state, and local regulation of ENDS; requiring manufacturers to register with the US Food and Drug Administration and report all product ingredients, requiring childproof caps on ENDS liquids, and including warning labels on products and their advertisements; prohibiting youth-oriented marketing and sales; prohibiting child-friendly ENDS flavors; and prohibiting ENDS use in places where cigarette smoking is prohibited. This policy statement was developed by a joint writing group composed of members from the Tobacco and Cancer Subcommittee of the American Association for Cancer Research (AACR) Science Policy and Government Affairs (SPGA) Committee and American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) Tobacco Cessation and Control

  20. Planetary Society

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murdin, P.

    2000-11-01

    Carl Sagan, Bruce Murray and Louis Friedman founded the non-profit Planetary Society in 1979 to advance the exploration of the solar system and to continue the search for extraterrestrial life. The Society has its headquarters in Pasadena, California, but is international in scope, with 100 000 members worldwide, making it the largest space interest group in the world. The Society funds a var...

  1. An Official American Thoracic Society Workshop Report. A Framework for Addressing Multimorbidity in Clinical Practice Guidelines for Pulmonary Disease, Critical Illness, and Sleep Disorders.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Kevin C; Gould, Michael K; Krishnan, Jerry A; Boyd, Cynthia M; Brozek, Jan L; Cooke, Colin R; Douglas, Ivor S; Goodman, Richard A; Joo, Min J; Lareau, Suzanne; Mularski, Richard A; Patel, Minal R; Rosenfeld, Richard M; Shanawani, Hasan; Slatore, Christopher; Sockrider, Marianna; Sufian, Beth; Thomson, Carey C; Wiener, Renda Soylemez

    2016-03-01

    Coexistence of multiple chronic conditions (i.e., multimorbidity) is the most common chronic health problem in adults. However, clinical practice guidelines have primarily focused on patients with a single disease, resulting in uncertainty about the care of patients with multimorbidity. The American Thoracic Society convened a workshop with the goal of establishing a strategy to address multimorbidity within clinical practice guidelines. In this Workshop Report, we describe a framework that addresses multimorbidity in each of the key steps of guideline development: topic selection, panel composition, identifying clinical questions, searching for and synthesizing evidence, rating the quality of that evidence, summarizing benefits and harms, formulating recommendations, and rating the strength of the recommendations. For the consideration of multimorbidity in guidelines to be successful and sustainable, the process must be both feasible and pragmatic. It is likely that this will be achieved best by the step-wise addition and refinement of the various components of the framework.

  2. Management of hepatocellular carcinoma in Japan: Consensus-Based Clinical Practice Guidelines proposed by the Japan Society of Hepatology (JSH) 2010 updated version.

    PubMed

    Kudo, Masatoshi; Izumi, Namiki; Kokudo, Norihiro; Matsui, Osamu; Sakamoto, Michiie; Nakashima, Osamu; Kojiro, Masamichi; Makuuchi, Masatoshi

    2011-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is one of the leading causes of cancer death not only in Japan but also worldwide. Clinical practice guidelines for HCC were first published in 2001 by the European Society of Study of the Liver (EASL) followed by the American Association for the Study of Liver Disease (AASLD) published in 2005 and updated in 2010. However, these guidelines have proven to be somewhat unsuitable for Japanese patients. In 2005, supported by the Japanese Ministry of Health, Labour and Welfare, evidence-based clinical practice guidelines for HCC were compiled in Japan. In 2009, a revised version of evidence-based guidelines was published. Based on both 'evidence-based' guidelines and the consensus of an expert panel on HCC, the Japan Society of Hepatology (JSH) published the Consensus-Based Clinical Practice Manual in 2007 and updated in 2010. In this article, the 2010 updated version of this manual, especially issues on prevention, surveillance, pathology, diagnosis, staging, and treatment algorithm are summarized.

  3. A report from the 47th Annual Meeting of the American Society of Clinical Oncology (June 3-7, 2011 - Chicago, Illinois, USA).

    PubMed

    Rabasseda, X; Gómez-Zaera, M

    2011-09-01

    Improving survival, as well as the quality of life and functioning of survivors, is the main objective of cancer therapy, for which a very large number of drugs are currently available or under development as therapeutic candidates. Information on many of these compounds was discussed during the 2011 American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) meeting in Chicago. The number of news presentations discussed during the meeting was incredibly high, with plenary, oral abstract, poster discussion and general poster sessions filling room upon room. The following report provides a quick review of major new research into drug and support therapies for cancer as presented at the meeting.

  4. Clinical management of primary non-acute promyelocytic leukemia acute myeloid leukemia: Practice Guidelines by the Italian Society of Hematology, the Italian Society of Experimental Hematology, and the Italian Group for Bone Marrow Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Morra, Enrica; Barosi, Giovanni; Bosi, Alberto; Ferrara, Felicetto; Locatelli, Franco; Marchetti, Monia; Martinelli, Giovanni; Mecucci, Cristina; Vignetti, Marco; Tura, Sante

    2009-01-01

    As many options are now available to treat patients with de novo acute myeloid leukemia, the Italian Society of Hematology and two affiliated societies (SIES and GITMO) commissioned project to an Expert Panel aimed at developing clinical practice guidelines for acute myeloid leukemia treatment. After systematic comprehensive literature review, the Expert Panel formulated recommendations for the management of primary acute myeloid leukemia (with the exception of acute promyelocytic leukemia) and graded them according to the supporting evidence. When evidence was lacking, consensus-based statements have been added. First-line therapy for all newly diagnosed patients eligible for intensive treatment should include one cycle of induction with standard dose cytarabine and an anthracycline. After achieving complete remission, patients aged less than 60 years should receive consolidation therapy including high-dose cytarabine. Myeloablative allogeneic stem cell transplantation from an HLA-compatible sibling should be performed in first complete remission: 1) in children with intermediate-high risk cytogenetics or who achieved first complete remission after the second course of therapy; 2) in adults less than 40 years with an intermediate-risk; in those aged less than 55 years with either high-risk cytogenetics or who achieved first complete remission after the second course of therapy. Stem cell transplantation from an unrelated donor is recommended to be performed in first complete remission in adults 30 years old or younger, and in children with very high-risk disease lacking a sibling donor. Alternative donor stem cell transplantation is an option in high-risk patients without a matched donor who urgently need transplantation. Patients aged less than 60 years, who either are not candidate for allogeneic stem cell transplantation or lack a donor, are candidates for autologous stem cell transplantation. We describe the results of a systematic literature review and an

  5. Methodology for Developing Evidence-Based Clinical Imaging Guidelines: Joint Recommendations by Korean Society of Radiology and National Evidence-Based Healthcare Collaborating Agency

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Sol Ji; Jeong, Woo Kyoung; Jo, Ae Jeong; Choi, Jin A; Kim, Min-Jeong; Lee, Min; Jung, Seung Eun; Do, Kyung Hyun; Yong, Hwan Seok; Sheen, Seungsoo

    2017-01-01

    This paper is a summary of the methodology including protocol used to develop evidence-based clinical imaging guidelines (CIGs) in Korea, led by the Korean Society of Radiology and the National Evidence-based Healthcare Collaborating Agency. This is the first protocol to reflect the process of developing diagnostic guidelines in Korea. The development protocol is largely divided into the following sections: set-up, process of adaptation, and finalization. The working group is composed of clinical imaging experts, and the developmental committee is composed of multidisciplinary experts to validate the methodology. The Korean CIGs will continue to develop based on this protocol, and these guidelines will act for decision supporting tools for clinicians as well as reduce medical radiation exposure. PMID:28096730

  6. Chronic kidney disease certification process manual by the Italian Society of Nephrology (SIN): Part I: clinical care delivery and performance measurements and improvement.

    PubMed

    Quintaliani, Giuseppe; Cappelli, Gianni; Lodetti, Laura; Manno, Corrado; Petrucci, Virgilio; Spinelli, Cosimo; Tarchini, Renzo; Virgilio, Michele; Faini, Mario; Alloatti, Sandro; Cancarini, Giovanni; Zoccali, Carmine

    2009-01-01

    Chronic kidney diseases (CKD) has now emerged as a public health priority, and there is an increasing demand by patients and health care organisations that the quality of care delivered by renal units to CKD patients be systematically monitored and evaluated. The Italian Society of Nephrology (SIN) has started an initiative aimed at promoting a quality certification process specifically focused on CKD. To this end, SIN started a collaboration with an independent Italian company which is a partner of Joint Commission International (JCI), a nonprofit international organisation dedicated to the promotion of quality improvement and safety of health services. As a result of this collaboration, a document describing a voluntary certification process developed based on JCI criteria was produced by SIN. This document comprises 2 parts. Herein (Part I) we deal with standards for clinical care delivery and performance measurements related to CKD care. Programme management and clinical information management will be presented in a separate manuscript (Part II).

  7. [Guidelines for the treatment of Invasive Candidiasis and other yeasts. Spanish Society of Infectious Diseases and Clinical Microbiology (SEIMC). 2010 Update].

    PubMed

    Aguado, José María; Ruiz-Camps, Isabel; Muñoz, Patricia; Mensa, José; Almirante, Benito; Vázquez, Lourdes; Rovira, Montserrat; Martín-Dávila, Pilar; Moreno, Asunción; Alvarez-Lerma, Francisco; León, Cristóbal; Madero, Luis; Ruiz-Contreras, Jesús; Fortún, Jesús; Cuenca-Estrella, Manuel

    2011-05-01

    These guidelines are an update of the recommendations of the Spanish Society of Infectious Diseases and Clinical Microbiology (SEIMC) that were issued in 2004 (Enferm Infecc Microbiol Clin. 2004, 22:32-9) on the treatment of Invasive Candidiasis and infections produced by other yeasts. This 2010 update includes a comprehensive review of the new drugs that have appeared in recent years, as well as the levels of evidence for recommending them. These guidelines have been developed following the rules of the SEIMC by a working group composed of specialists in infectious diseases, clinical microbiology, critical care medicine, paediatrics and oncology-haematology. It provides a series of general recommendations regarding the management of invasive candidiasis and other yeast infections, as well as specific guidelines for prophylaxis and treatment, which have been divided into four sections: oncology-haematology, solid organ transplantation recipients, critical patients, and paediatric patients.

  8. Diabetes and cardiovascular disease: from evidence to clinical practice – position statement 2014 of Brazilian Diabetes Society

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    There is a very well known correlation between diabetes and cardiovascular disease but many health care professionals are just concerned with glycemic control, ignoring the paramount importance of controlling other risk factors involved in the pathogenesis of serious cardiovascular diseases. This Position Statement from the Brazilian Diabetes Society was developed to promote increased awareness in relation to six crucial topics dealing with diabetes and cardiovascular disease: Glicemic Control, Cardiovascular Risk Stratification and Screening Coronary Artery Disease, Treatment of Dyslipidemia, Hypertension, Antiplatelet Therapy and Myocardial Revascularization. The issue of what would be the best algorithm for the use of statins in diabetic patients received a special attention and a new Brazilian algorithm was developed by our editorial committee. This document contains 38 recommendations which were classified by their levels of evidence (A, B, C and D). The Editorial Committee included 22 specialists with recognized expertise in diabetes and cardiology. PMID:24855495

  9. The European Society for Medical Oncology Magnitude of Clinical Benefit Scale in daily practice: a single institution, real-life experience at the Medical University of Vienna

    PubMed Central

    Kiesewetter, Barbara; Raderer, Markus; Steger, Günther G; Bartsch, Rupert; Pirker, Robert; Zöchbauer-Müller, Sabine; Prager, Gerald; Krainer, Michael; Preusser, Matthias; Schmidinger, Manuela; Zielinski, Christoph C

    2016-01-01

    Background The European Society for Medical Oncology (ESMO) Magnitude of Clinical Benefit Scale (MCBS) has been designed to stratify the therapeutic benefit of a certain drug registered for the treatment of cancer. However, though internally validated, this tool has not yet been evaluated for its feasibility in the daily practice of a major center of medical oncology. Methods The practicability of the MCBS for advanced oncological diseases at the Clinical Division of Oncology, Medical University of Vienna, which constitutes one of the largest oncological centres in Europe, was analysed in a three-step approach. First, retrospectively collected data were analysed to gain an overview of treatments in regular use. Second, data were scored by using the MCBS. Third, the ensuing results were evaluated within corresponding programme directorships to assess feasibility in a real-life clinical context. Results In the majority of tumour entities, the MCBS results reported earlier are consistent with daily clinical practice. Thus, in metastatic breast cancer or advanced lung cancer, there was a high level of clinical benefit for first-line treatment standards, and these results reflected well real-life experience. However, analyses based on the first version of the MCBS are limited if it comes to salvage treatment in tumour entities in which optimal sequencing of potential treatment options is of major importance, as in metastatic colorectal or renal cell cancer. In contrast to this, it is remarkable that certain novel therapies such as nivolumab assessed for heavily pretreated advanced renal cancer reached the highest level of clinical benefit due to prolongation in survival and a favourable toxicity profile. The MCBS clearly underlines the potential benefit of these compounds. Conclusions The MCBS is an excellent tool for daily clinical practice of a tertiary referral centre. It supports treatment decisions based on the clinical benefit to be expected from a novel approach

  10. Brigham and Women's Hospital three-time winner of the American Pain Society Clinical Centers of Excellence Award.

    PubMed

    Ross, Edgar

    2017-01-01

    Edgar Ross speaks to Jade Parker, Commissioning Editor: Dr Edgar Ross is a member of the Anesthesia Department at Brigham and Women's Hospital. His main office is in Chesnut Hill, an ambulatory care center for Brigham and Women's hospital. He received his medical degree from Wayne State University School of Medicine and has been in practice for more than 30 years, 20 years in his current position at Brigham and Women's Hospital. His two main clinical interests are; the phone app which is designed to become the main clinical tool for patients and second, the relationship between opioids and angiogenesis.

  11. Success of an International Learning Health Care System in Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation: The American Society of Blood and Marrow Transplantation Clinical Case Forum.

    PubMed

    Barba, Pere; Burns, Linda J; Litzow, Mark R; Juckett, Mark B; Komanduri, Krishna V; Lee, Stephanie J; Devlin, Sean M; Costa, Luciano J; Khan, Shakila; King, Andrea; Klein, Andreas; Krishnan, Amrita; Malone, Adriana; Mir, Muhammad A; Moravec, Carina; Selby, George; Roy, Vivek; Cochran, Melissa; Stricherz, Melisa K; Westmoreland, Michael D; Perales, Miguel-Angel; Wood, William A

    2016-03-01

    The American Society for Blood and Marrow Transplantation (ASBMT) Clinical Case Forum (CCF) was launched in 2014 as an online secure tool to enhance interaction and communication among hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) professionals worldwide through the discussion of challenging clinical care issues. After 14 months, we reviewed clinical and demographical data of cases posted in the CCF from January 29, 2014 to March 18, 2015. A total of 137 cases were posted during the study period. Ninety-two cases (67%) were allogeneic HCT, 29 (21%) were autologous HCT, and in 16 (12%), the type of transplantation (autologous versus allogeneic) was still under consideration. The diseases most frequently discussed included non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL; n = 30, 22%), acute myeloid leukemia (n = 23, 17%), and multiple myeloma (MM; n = 20, 15%). When compared with the US transplantation activity reported by the US Department of Health and Human Services, NHL and acute lymphoblastic leukemia cases were over-represented in the CCF, whereas MM was under-represented (P < .001). A total of 259 topics were addressed in the CCF with a median of 2 topics/case (range, 1 to 6). Particularly common topics included whether transplantation was indicated (n = 57, 41%), conditioning regimen choice (n = 44, 32%), and post-HCT complications after day 100 (n = 43, 31%). The ASBMT CCF is a successful tool for collaborative discussion of complex cases in the HCT community worldwide and may allow identification of areas of controversy or unmet need from clinical, educational and research perspectives.

  12. Clinical Practice Guideline for the Management of Candidiasis: 2016 Update by the Infectious Diseases Society of America

    PubMed Central

    Pappas, Peter G.; Kauffman, Carol A.; Andes, David R.; Clancy, Cornelius J.; Marr, Kieren A.; Ostrosky-Zeichner, Luis; Reboli, Annette C.; Schuster, Mindy G.; Vazquez, Jose A.; Walsh, Thomas J.; Zaoutis, Theoklis E.; Sobel, Jack D.

    2016-01-01

    It is important to realize that guidelines cannot always account for individual variation among patients. They are not intended to supplant physician judgment with respect to particular patients or special clinical situations. IDSA considers adherence to these guidelines to be voluntary, with the ultimate determination regarding their application to be made by the physician in the light of each patient's individual circumstances. PMID:26679628

  13. Executive Summary: Clinical Practice Guideline for the Management of Candidiasis: 2016 Update by the Infectious Diseases Society of America.

    PubMed

    Pappas, Peter G; Kauffman, Carol A; Andes, David R; Clancy, Cornelius J; Marr, Kieren A; Ostrosky-Zeichner, Luis; Reboli, Annette C; Schuster, Mindy G; Vazquez, Jose A; Walsh, Thomas J; Zaoutis, Theoklis E; Sobel, Jack D

    2016-02-15

    It is important to realize that guidelines cannot always account for individual variation among patients. They are not intended to supplant physician judgment with respect to particular patients or special clinical situations. IDSA considers adherence to these guidelines to be voluntary, with the ultimate determination regarding their application to be made by the physician in the light of each patient's individual circumstances.

  14. Clinical Practice Guideline for the Management of Candidiasis: 2016 Update by the Infectious Diseases Society of America.

    PubMed

    Pappas, Peter G; Kauffman, Carol A; Andes, David R; Clancy, Cornelius J; Marr, Kieren A; Ostrosky-Zeichner, Luis; Reboli, Annette C; Schuster, Mindy G; Vazquez, Jose A; Walsh, Thomas J; Zaoutis, Theoklis E; Sobel, Jack D

    2016-02-15

    It is important to realize that guidelines cannot always account for individual variation among patients. They are not intended to supplant physician judgment with respect to particular patients or special clinical situations. IDSA considers adherence to these guidelines to be voluntary, with the ultimate determination regarding their application to be made by the physician in the light of each patient's individual circumstances.

  15. [Present Execution of and Problems with Clinical Lipid Examination and Application of "the Japan Atherosclerotic Society (JAS) Guidelines for Prevention of Atherosclerotic Cardiovascular Diseases 2012"].

    PubMed

    Igarashi, Masahiko; Tanji, Yasuhiro; Nomura, Takashi; Yamaguchi, Hiroshi

    2014-09-01

    It is well known that dyslipidemia is one of the most crucial risk factors for atherosclerosis, including cardiovascular diseases (ASCVD). In order to prevent the onset of ASCVD, the Japan Atherosclerotic Society (JAS) published the JAS Guidelines in 2012 for appropriate lipid examination and treatment. However, it is unknown how the guidelines are practically used by Japanese clinicians. Therefore, we conducted a questionnaire survey to assess the present execution of and problems with clinical lipid examination and the application of the JAS Guidelines by doctors working in hospitals and clinics of Yamagata district in Japan. We found that 16% of doctors carried out clinical lipid examination every time, but some did not examine lipids at all. Fasting blood sampling for lipid examination was performed by 44% of doctors, and the items of triglycerides, HDL-cholesterol (HDL-C), and LDL-cholesterol (LDL-C) were measured by more than 95%. Regarding problems with clinical lipid examination, more than 40% of doctors requested the early achievement of the standardization of LDL-C. The JAS Guidelines in 2012 were unfortunately recognized by only 55% of doctors. In addition, the rate of the clinical application of the guidelines, including the absolute risk, the flowchart of LDL-C, and non-HDL-C, was less than 30%, and more than half of the doctors measured LDL-C with the direct method, but did not use the "recommended" Friedewald method. In contrast, the cardiologists and endocrinologists generally accepted the guidelines, and their clinical application rate was higher than in other doctors. Through the questionnaire survey, it was revealed that doctors in various fields have not properly accepted the use and significance of lipid examination and the JAS Guidelines, and so further educational activities are necessary.

  16. Changing the brain, changing the society: clinical and ethical implications of neuromodulation techniques in neurology and psychiatry.

    PubMed

    Vuilleumier, Patrik; Sander, David; Baertschi, Bernard

    2014-01-01

    New neurotechnologies for modulating brain functions are becoming increasingly powerful and applicable to diverse diseases, but raise new questions for clinicians, ethicists, policy makers, and laymen. This issue of Brain Topography gathers several papers exploring the clinical and ethical implications of several invasive and noninvasive neuromodulation approaches. The opportunities and challenges associated with the emergence of neuro-engineering solutions to brain research and brain repair require a close dialogue between multiple disciplines, as well as open discussion with the general public.

  17. OPTICAL PRINCIPLES, BIOMECHANICS, AND INITIAL CLINICAL PERFORMANCE OF A DUAL-OPTIC ACCOMMODATING INTRAOCULAR LENS (AN AMERICAN OPHTHALMOLOGICAL SOCIETY THESIS)

    PubMed Central

    McLeod, Stephen D.

    2006-01-01

    Purpose To design and develop an accommodating intraocular lens (IOL) for endocapsular fixation with extended accommodative range that can be adapted to current standard extracapsular phacoemulsification technique. Methods Ray tracing analysis and lens design; finite element modeling of biomechanical properties; cadaver eye implantation; initial clinical evaluation. Results Ray tracing analysis indicated that a dual-optic design with a high plus-power front optic coupled to an optically compensatory minus posterior optic produced greater change in conjugation power of the eye compared to that produced by axial movement of a single-optic IOL, and that magnification effects were unlikely to account for improved near vision. Finite element modeling indicated that the two optics can be linked by spring-loaded haptics that allow anterior and posterior axial displacement of the front optic in response to changes in ciliary body tone and capsular tension. A dual-optic single-piece foldable silicone lens was constructed based on these principles. Subsequent initial clinical evaluation in 24 human eyes after phacoemulsification for cataract indicated mean 3.22 diopters of accommodation (range, 1 to 5 D) based on defocus curve measurement. Accommodative amplitude evaluation at 1- and 6-month follow-up in all eyes indicated that the accommodative range was maintained and that the lens was well tolerated. Conclusions A dual-optic design increases the accommodative effect of axial optic displacement, with minimal magnification effect. Initial clinical trials suggest that IOLs designed on this principle might provide true pseudophakic accommodation following cataract extraction and lens implantation. PMID:17471355

  18. [Home childbirth and clinical delivery in the 3d Reich. On a memorial to the German Society of Gynecology 1939].

    PubMed

    Zander, J; Goetz, E

    1985-12-01

    There have always been controversies on the pros and cons of home delivery and childbirth in a hospital. During the Nazi regime, the official "health command" policy monitored by the Nazi party promoted home delivery under midwife supervision, both by pertinacious propaganda and partly also by decrees and ordinances. The official line of argument against clinical obstetrics consisted of a queer and highly questionable mélange of ideology and distored facts brought forward by the so-called "Reichsgesundheitsführer" Dr. Leonardo Conti and his mother, Mrs Nanna Conti as head of the Party-sponsored Midwives Association. The "Midwives Law" was promulgated on 21 December 1938 prescribing compulsory consultation of a midwife for every delivery. By the end of 1939 gynaecologists eventually rallied in protest against legislative measures to restrict clinical obstetrics, by means of a memorandum penned by the German Association for Gynaecology. This memorandum was scheduled for circulation among all the members of the association. The pressure exercised by this memorandum resulted in tough negotiations amounting to a tug-of-war between representatives of the German Association for Gynaecology and Dr. Conti. This led eventually not only to an abandonment of the attacks against clinical obstetrics but also to an official and unreserved recognition of its achievements. In addition, the "Reichsgesundheitsführer" issued "Directives for regulating obstetrics procedures" in 1940/41 in which it was laid down that it would be left to the decision of the expectant mother to choose where she would prefer to deliver her child.

  19. [Best practices for the safe use of parenteral nutrition multi-chamber bags. Spanish Society of Hospital Pharmacist's Clinical Nutrition Group].

    PubMed

    Sirvent, M; Calvo, M V; Pérez-Pons, J C; Rodríguez-Penín, I; Marti-Bonmatí, E; Vázquez, A; Romero, R; Crespo, C L; Tejada, P

    2014-09-16

    Patient security is one of the key aspects of the Health-System. Parenteral Nutrition is included in the ISMP's list of high-alert medication, being its appropiate use an essential element in maximizing effectiviness while minimizing the potential risk of errors associated with its use. Multi-chamber bags offer several advantages versus pharmacy bespoke bags. However, their apparent simplicity may induce to misuse, asuming their use requires limited consideration, thus increasing the risk of potential errors. For this reason, the Spanish Society of Hospital Pharmacist's Clinical Nutrition Group considered it essential to develop a list of safety practices regarding the use of parenteral nutrition multi-chamber bags. These recommendations are based on practices globally accepted to diminish errors in PN therapy.

  20. Controversial issues in CKD clinical practice: position statement of the CKD-treatment working group of the Italian Society of Nephrology.

    PubMed

    Bellizzi, Vincenzo; Conte, Giuseppe; Borrelli, Silvio; Cupisti, Adamasco; De Nicola, Luca; Di Iorio, Biagio R; Cabiddu, Gianfranca; Mandreoli, Marcora; Paoletti, Ernesto; Piccoli, Giorgina B; Quintaliani, Giuseppe; Ravera, Maura; Santoro, Domenico; Torraca, Serena; Minutolo, Roberto

    2017-04-01

    This position paper of the study group "Conservative treatment of Chronic Kidney Disease-CKD" of the Italian Society of Nephrology addresses major practical, unresolved, issues related to the conservative treatment of chronic renal disease. Specifically, controversial topics from everyday clinical nephrology practice which cannot find a clear, definitive answer in the current literature or in nephrology guidelines are discussed. The paper reports the point of view of the study group. Concise and practical advice is given on several common issues: renal biopsy in diabetes; dual blockade of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (RAAS); management of iron deficiency; low protein diet; dietary salt intake; bicarbonate supplementation; treatment of obesity; the choice of conservative therapy vs. dialysis. For each topic synthetic statements, guideline-style, are reported.

  1. CLINICAL PRACTICE GUIDELINES FOR THE PERIOPERATIVE NUTRITIONAL, METABOLIC, AND NONSURGICAL SUPPORT OF THE BARIATRIC SURGERY PATIENT—2013 UPDATE: COSPONSORED BY AMERICAN ASSOCIATION OF CLINICAL ENDOCRINOLOGISTS, THE OBESITY SOCIETY, AND AMERICAN SOCIETY FOR METABOLIC & BARIATRIC SURGERY★

    PubMed Central

    Mechanick, Jeffrey I.; Youdim, Adrienne; Jones, Daniel B.; Garvey, W. Timothy; Hurley, Daniel L.; McMahon, M. Molly; Heinberg, Leslie J.; Kushner, Robert; Adams, Ted D.; Shikora, Scott; Dixon, John B.; Brethauer, Stacy

    2014-01-01

    The development of these updated guidelines was commissioned by the AACE, TOS, and ASMBS Board of Directors and adheres to the AACE 2010 protocol for standardized production of clinical practice guidelines (CPG). Each recommendation was re-evaluated and updated based on the evidence and subjective factors per protocol. Examples of expanded topics in this update include: the roles of sleeve gastrectomy, bariatric surgery in patients with type-2 diabetes, bariatric surgery for patients with mild obesity, copper deficiency, informed consent, and behavioral issues. There are 74 recommendations (of which 56 are revised and 2 are new) in this 2013 update, compared with 164 original recommendations in 2008. There are 403 citations, of which 33 (8.2%) are EL 1, 131 (32.5%) are EL 2, 170 (42.2%) are EL 3, and 69 (17.1%) are EL 4. There is a relatively high proportion (40.4%) of strong (EL 1 and 2) studies, compared with only 16.5% in the 2008 AACE- TOS-ASMBS CPG. These updated guidelines reflect recent additions to the evidence base. Bariatric surgery remains a safe and effective intervention for select patients with obesity. A team approach to perioperative care is mandatory with special attention to nutritional and metabolic issues. PMID:23529351

  2. Clinical Practice Guidelines for the Perioperative Nutritional, Metabolic, and Nonsurgical Support of the Bariatric Surgery Patient—2013 Update: Cosponsored by American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists, The Obesity Society, and American Society for Metabolic & Bariatric Surgery*

    PubMed Central

    Mechanick, Jeffrey I.; Youdim, Adrienne; Jones, Daniel B.; Garvey, W. Timothy; Hurley, Daniel L.; McMahon, Molly; Heinberg, Leslie J.; Kushner, Robert; Adams, Ted D.; Shikora, Scott; Dixon, John B.; Brethauer, Stacy

    2014-01-01

    The development of these updated guidelines was commissioned by the AACE, TOS, and ASMBS Board of Directors and adheres to the AACE 2010 protocol for standardized production of clinical practice guidelines (CPG). Each recommendation was re-evaluated and updated based on the evidence and subjective factors per protocol. Examples of expanded topics in this update include: the roles of sleeve gastrectomy, bariatric surgery in patients with type-2 diabetes, bariatric surgery for patients with mild obesity, copper deficiency, informed consent, and behavioral issues. There are 74 recommendations (of which 56 are revised and 2 are new) in this 2013 update, compared with 164 original recommendations in 2008. There are 403 citations, of which 33 (8.2%) are EL 1, 131 (32.5%) are EL 2, 170 (42.2%) are EL 3, and 69 (17.1%) are EL 4. There is a relatively high proportion (40.4%) of strong (EL 1 and 2) studies, compared with only 16.5% in the 2008 AACE-TOS-ASMBS CPG. These updated guidelines reflect recent additions to the evidence base. Bariatric surgery remains a safe and effective intervention for select patients with obesity. A team approach to perioperative care is mandatory with special attention to nutritional and metabolic issues. PMID:23529939

  3. [Consensus for antimicrobial susceptibility testing for Enterobacteriaceae. Subcommittee on Antimicrobials, SADEBAC (Argentinian Society of Clinical Bacteriology), Argentinian Association of Microbiology].

    PubMed

    Famiglietti, A; Quinteros, M; Vázquez, M; Marín, M; Nicola, F; Radice, M; Galas, M; Pasterán, F; Bantar, C; Casellas, J M; Kovensky Pupko, J; Couto, E; Goldberg, M; Lopardo, H; Gutkind, G; Soloaga, R

    2005-01-01

    Taking into account previous recommendations from the National Committee for Clinical Laboratory Standards (NCCLS), the Antimicrobial Committee, Sociedad Argentina de Bacteriología Clínica (SADEBAC), Asociación Argentina de Microbiología (AAM), and the experience from its members and some invited microbiologists, a consensus was obtained for antimicrobial susceptibility testing and interpretation in most frequent enterobacterial species isolated from clinical samples in our region. This document describes the natural antimicrobial resistance of some Enterobacteriaceae family members, including the resistance profiles due to their own chromosomal encoded beta-lactamases. A list of the antimicrobial agents that should be tested, their position on the agar plates, in order to detect the most frequent antimicrobial resistance mechanisms, and considerations on which antimicrobial agents should be reported regarding to the infection site and patient characteristics are included. Also, a description on appropriate phenotypic screening and confirmatory test for detection of prevalent extended spectrum beta-lactamases in our region are presented. Finally, a summary on frequent antimicrobial susceptibility profiles and their probably associated resistance mechanisms, and some infrequent antimicrobial resistance profiles that deserve confirmation are outlined.

  4. A standardised, generic, validated approach to stratify the magnitude of clinical benefit that can be anticipated from anti-cancer therapies: the European Society for Medical Oncology Magnitude of Clinical Benefit Scale (ESMO-MCBS).

    PubMed

    Cherny, N I; Sullivan, R; Dafni, U; Kerst, J M; Sobrero, A; Zielinski, C; de Vries, E G E; Piccart, M J

    2015-08-01

    The value of any new therapeutic strategy or treatment is determined by the magnitude of its clinical benefit balanced against its cost. Evidence for clinical benefit from new treatment options is derived from clinical research, in particular phase III randomised trials, which generate unbiased data regarding the efficacy, benefit and safety of new therapeutic approaches. To date, there is no standard tool for grading the magnitude of clinical benefit of cancer therapies, which may range from trivial (median progression-free survival advantage of only a few weeks) to substantial (improved long-term survival). Indeed, in the absence of a standardised approach for grading the magnitude of clinical benefit, conclusions and recommendations derived from studies are often hotly disputed and very modest incremental advances have often been presented, discussed and promoted as major advances or 'breakthroughs'. Recognising the importance of presenting clear and unbiased statements regarding the magnitude of the clinical benefit from new therapeutic approaches derived from high-quality clinical trials, the European Society for Medical Oncology (ESMO) has developed a validated and reproducible tool to assess the magnitude of clinical benefit for cancer medicines, the ESMO Magnitude of Clinical Benefit Scale (ESMO-MCBS). This tool uses a rational, structured and consistent approach to derive a relative ranking of the magnitude of clinically meaningful benefit that can be expected from a new anti-cancer treatment. The ESMO-MCBS is an important first step to the critical public policy issue of value in cancer care, helping to frame the appropriate use of limited public and personal resources to deliver cost-effective and affordable cancer care. The ESMO-MCBS will be a dynamic tool and its criteria will be revised on a regular basis.

  5. Dog-bite injuries at the Animal Bite Clinic of the Thai Red Cross Society in Bangkok.

    PubMed

    Mitmoonpitak, C; Tepsumethanon, V; Raksaket, S; Nayuthaya, A B; Wilde, H

    2000-12-01

    Canine rabies remains a public health problem in Thailand and other developing countries. This study of animal bites at the Animal Bite Clinic at the Queen Saovabha Memorial Institute revealed that: (1) The majority of patients were bitten by dogs and the time of the attack was mostly during the day. (2) School-aged children are at the highest risk for animal bites. (3) The most common site of injury are the legs and foot (64.2%), with the second most common site being the hands and fingers (21.2%). (4) Only 48 per cent of patients received rabies vaccine 1-2 days after being exposed. There was considerable delay before the rest received treatment. Solving Thailand' s rabies problem depends on control of canine rabies and educational campaigns. Public education must be an integral part of efforts to decrease the incidence of animal bites and assurance that they are managed properly.

  6. International Cartilage Repair Society (ICRS) Recommended Guidelines for Histological Endpoints for Cartilage Repair Studies in Animal Models and Clinical Trials

    PubMed Central

    Hoemann, Caroline; Kandel, Rita; Roberts, Sally; Saris, Daniel B.F.; Creemers, Laura; Mainil-Varlet, Pierre; Méthot, Stephane; Hollander, Anthony P.; Buschmann, Michael D.

    2011-01-01

    Cartilage repair strategies aim to resurface a lesion with osteochondral tissue resembling native cartilage, but a variety of repair tissues are usually observed. Histology is an important structural outcome that could serve as an interim measure of efficacy in randomized controlled clinical studies. The purpose of this article is to propose guidelines for standardized histoprocessing and unbiased evaluation of animal tissues and human biopsies. Methods were compiled from a literature review, and illustrative data were added. In animal models, treatments are usually administered to acute defects created in healthy tissues, and the entire joint can be analyzed at multiple postoperative time points. In human clinical therapy, treatments are applied to developed lesions, and biopsies are obtained, usually from a subset of patients, at a specific time point. In striving to standardize evaluation of structural endpoints in cartilage repair studies, 5 variables should be controlled: 1) location of biopsy/sample section, 2) timing of biopsy/sample recovery, 3) histoprocessing, 4) staining, and 5) blinded evaluation with a proper control group. Histological scores, quantitative histomorphometry of repair tissue thickness, percentage of tissue staining for collagens and glycosaminoglycan, polarized light microscopy for collagen fibril organization, and subchondral bone integration/structure are all relevant outcome measures that can be collected and used to assess the efficacy of novel therapeutics. Standardized histology methods could improve statistical analyses, help interpret and validate noninvasive imaging outcomes, and permit cross-comparison between studies. Currently, there are no suitable substitutes for histology in evaluating repair tissue quality and cartilaginous character. PMID:26069577

  7. Use of Biomarkers to Guide Decisions on Adjuvant Systemic Therapy for Women With Early-Stage Invasive Breast Cancer: American Society of Clinical Oncology Clinical Practice Guideline

    PubMed Central

    Harris, Lyndsay N.; McShane, Lisa M.; Andre, Fabrice; Collyar, Deborah E.; Gonzalez-Angulo, Ana M.; Hammond, Elizabeth H.; Kuderer, Nicole M.; Liu, Minetta C.; Mennel, Robert G.; Van Poznak, Catherine; Bast, Robert C.; Hayes, Daniel F.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To provide recommendations on appropriate use of breast tumor biomarker assay results to guide decisions on adjuvant systemic therapy for women with early-stage invasive breast cancer. Methods A literature search and prospectively defined study selection sought systematic reviews, meta-analyses, randomized controlled trials, prospective-retrospective studies, and prospective comparative observational studies published from 2006 through 2014. Outcomes of interest included overall survival and disease-free or recurrence-free survival. Expert panel members used informal consensus to develop evidence-based guideline recommendations. Results The literature search identified 50 relevant studies. One randomized clinical trial and 18 prospective-retrospective studies were found to have evaluated the clinical utility, as defined by the guideline, of specific biomarkers for guiding decisions on the need for adjuvant systemic therapy. No studies that met guideline criteria for clinical utility were found to guide choice of specific treatments or regimens. Recommendations In addition to estrogen and progesterone receptors and human epidermal growth factor receptor 2, the panel found sufficient evidence of clinical utility for the biomarker assays Oncotype DX, EndoPredict, PAM50, Breast Cancer Index, and urokinase plasminogen activator and plasminogen activator inhibitor type 1 in specific subgroups of breast cancer. No biomarker except for estrogen receptor, progesterone receptor, and human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 was found to guide choices of specific treatment regimens. Treatment decisions should also consider disease stage, comorbidities, and patient preferences. PMID:26858339

  8. Brachytherapy for Patients With Prostate Cancer: American Society of Clinical Oncology/Cancer Care Ontario Joint Guideline Update.

    PubMed

    Chin, Joseph; Rumble, R Bryan; Kollmeier, Marisa; Heath, Elisabeth; Efstathiou, Jason; Dorff, Tanya; Berman, Barry; Feifer, Andrew; Jacques, Arthur; Loblaw, D Andrew

    2017-03-27

    Purpose To jointly update the Cancer Care Ontario guideline on brachytherapy for patients with prostate cancer to account for new evidence. Methods An Update Panel conducted a targeted systematic literature review and identified more recent randomized controlled trials comparing dose-escalated external beam radiation therapy (EBRT) with brachytherapy in men with prostate cancer. Results Five randomized controlled trials provided the evidence for this update. Recommendations For patients with low-risk prostate cancer who require or choose active treatment, low-dose rate brachytherapy (LDR) alone, EBRT alone, and/or radical prostatectomy (RP) should be offered to eligible patients. For patients with intermediate-risk prostate cancer choosing EBRT with or without androgen-deprivation therapy, brachytherapy boost (LDR or high-dose rate [HDR]) should be offered to eligible patients. For low-intermediate risk prostate cancer (Gleason 7, prostate-specific antigen < 10 ng/mL or Gleason 6, prostate-specific antigen, 10 to 20 ng/mL), LDR brachytherapy alone may be offered as monotherapy. For patients with high-risk prostate cancer receiving EBRT and androgen-deprivation therapy, brachytherapy boost (LDR or HDR) should be offered to eligible patients. Iodine-125 and palladium-103 are each reasonable isotope options for patients receiving LDR brachytherapy; no recommendation can be made for or against using cesium-131 or HDR monotherapy. Patients should be encouraged to participate in clinical trials to test novel or targeted approaches to this disease. Additional information is available at www.asco.org/Brachytherapy-guideline and www.asco.org/guidelineswiki .

  9. An Official American Thoracic Society Clinical Practice Guideline: Diagnosis, Risk Stratification, and Management of Pulmonary Hypertension of Sickle Cell Disease

    PubMed Central

    Klings, Elizabeth S.; Machado, Roberto F.; Barst, Robyn J.; Morris, Claudia R.; Mubarak, Kamal K.; Gordeuk, Victor R.; Kato, Gregory J.; Ataga, Kenneth I.; Gibbs, J. Simon; Castro, Oswaldo; Rosenzweig, Erika B.; Sood, Namita; Hsu, Lewis; Wilson, Kevin C.; Telen, Marilyn J.; DeCastro, Laura M.; Krishnamurti, Lakshmanan; Steinberg, Martin H.; Badesch, David B.; Gladwin, Mark T.

    2014-01-01

    Background: In adults with sickle cell disease (SCD), an increased tricuspid regurgitant velocity (TRV) measured by Doppler echocardiography, an increased serum N-terminal pro–brain natriuretic peptide (NT-pro-BNP) level, and pulmonary hypertension (PH) diagnosed by right heart catheterization (RHC) are independent risk factors for mortality. Methods: A multidisciplinary committee was formed by clinician-investigators experienced in the management of patients with PH and/or SCD. Clinically important questions were posed, related evidence was appraised, and questions were answered with evidence-based recommendations. Target audiences include all clinicians who take care of patients with SCD. Results: Mortality risk stratification guides decision making. An increased risk for mortality is defined as a TRV equal to or greater than 2.5 m/second, an NT-pro-BNP level equal to or greater than 160 pg/ml, or RHC-confirmed PH. For patients identified as having increased mortality risk, we make a strong recommendation for hydroxyurea as first-line therapy and a weak recommendation for chronic transfusions as an alternative therapy. For all patients with SCD with elevated TRV alone or elevated NT-pro-BNP alone, and for patients with SCD with RHC-confirmed PH with elevated pulmonary artery wedge pressure and low pulmonary vascular resistance, we make a strong recommendation against PAH-specific therapy. However, for select patients with SCD with RHC-confirmed PH who have elevated pulmonary vascular resistance and normal pulmonary capillary wedge pressure, we make a weak recommendation for either prostacyclin agonist or endothelin receptor antagonist therapy and a strong recommendation against phosphodiesterase-5 inhibitor therapy. Conclusions: Evidence-based recommendations for the management of patients with SCD with increased mortality risk are provided, but will require frequent reassessment and updating. PMID:24628312

  10. American Society of Clinical Oncology/College of American Pathologists Guideline Recommendations for Immunohistochemical Testing of Estrogen and Progesterone Receptors in Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Hammond, M. Elizabeth H.; Hayes, Daniel F.; Dowsett, Mitch; Allred, D. Craig; Hagerty, Karen L.; Badve, Sunil; Fitzgibbons, Patrick L.; Francis, Glenn; Goldstein, Neil S.; Hayes, Malcolm; Hicks, David G.; Lester, Susan; Love, Richard; Mangu, Pamela B.; McShane, Lisa; Miller, Keith; Osborne, C. Kent; Paik, Soonmyung; Perlmutter, Jane; Rhodes, Anthony; Sasano, Hironobu; Schwartz, Jared N.; Sweep, Fred C.G.; Taube, Sheila; Torlakovic, Emina Emilia; Valenstein, Paul; Viale, Giuseppe; Visscher, Daniel; Wheeler, Thomas; Williams, R. Bruce; Wittliff, James L.; Wolff, Antonio C.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose To develop a guideline to improve the accuracy of immunohistochemical (IHC) estrogen receptor (ER) and progesterone receptor (PgR) testing in breast cancer and the utility of these receptors as predictive markers. Methods The American Society of Clinical Oncology and the College of American Pathologists convened an international Expert Panel that conducted a systematic review and evaluation of the literature in partnership with Cancer Care Ontario and developed recommendations for optimal IHC ER/PgR testing performance. Results Up to 20% of current IHC determinations of ER and PgR testing worldwide may be inaccurate (false negative or false positive). Most of the issues with testing have occurred because of variation in preanalytic variables, thresholds for positivity, and interpretation criteria. Recommendations The Panel recommends that ER and PgR status be determined on all invasive breast cancers and breast cancer recurrences. A testing algorithm that relies on accurate, reproducible assay performance is proposed. Elements to reliably reduce assay variation are specified. It is recommended that ER and PgR assays be considered positive if there are at least 1% positive tumor nuclei in the sample on testing in the presence of expected reactivity of internal (normal epithelial elements) and external controls. The absence of benefit from endocrine therapy for women with ER-negative invasive breast cancers has been confirmed in large overviews of randomized clinical trials. PMID:20404251

  11. American Society of Clinical Oncology/College of American Pathologists Guideline Recommendations for Immunohistochemical Testing of Estrogen and Progesterone Receptors in Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Hammond, M. Elizabeth H.; Hayes, Daniel F.; Dowsett, Mitch; Allred, D. Craig; Hagerty, Karen L.; Badve, Sunil; Fitzgibbons, Patrick L.; Francis, Glenn; Goldstein, Neil S.; Hayes, Malcolm; Hicks, David G.; Lester, Susan; Love, Richard; Mangu, Pamela B.; McShane, Lisa; Miller, Keith; Osborne, C. Kent; Paik, Soonmyung; Perlmutter, Jane; Rhodes, Anthony; Sasano, Hironobu; Schwartz, Jared N.; Sweep, Fred C. G.; Taube, Sheila; Torlakovic, Emina Emilia; Valenstein, Paul; Viale, Giuseppe; Visscher, Daniel; Wheeler, Thomas; Williams, R. Bruce; Wittliff, James L.; Wolff, Antonio C.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose To develop a guideline to improve the accuracy of immunohistochemical (IHC) estrogen receptor (ER) and progesterone receptor (PgR) testing in breast cancer and the utility of these receptors as predictive markers. Methods The American Society of Clinical Oncology and the College of American Pathologists convened an international Expert Panel that conducted a systematic review and evaluation of the literature in partnership with Cancer Care Ontario and developed recommendations for optimal IHC ER/PgR testing performance. Results Up to 20% of current IHC determinations of ER and PgR testing worldwide may be inaccurate (false negative or false positive). Most of the issues with testing have occurred because of variation in preanalytic variables, thresholds for positivity, and interpretation criteria. Recommendations The Panel recommends that ER and PgR status be determined on all invasive breast cancers and breast cancer recurrences. A testing algorithm that relies on accurate, reproducible assay performance is proposed. Elements to reliably reduce assay variation are specified. It is recommended that ER and PgR assays be considered positive if there are at least 1% positive tumor nuclei in the sample on testing in the presence of expected reactivity of internal (normal epithelial elements) and external controls. The absence of benefit from endocrine therapy for women with ER-negative invasive breast cancers has been confirmed in large overviews of randomized clinical trials. PMID:20524868

  12. The American Thoracic Society methods in epidemiologic, clinical, and operations research program. A research capacity-building program in low- and middle-income countries.

    PubMed

    Buist, A Sonia; Parry, Vivienne

    2013-08-01

    Respiratory diseases are a major cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. The greatest impact of many of these diseases is felt in low- and middle-income countries, but their control and management is hampered by lack of accurate estimates of their prevalence, risk factors, and distribution, and knowledge of the social and cultural setting in which they occur. Providing enough information for cost-effective response to respiratory diseases requires research by trained investigators and public health personnel. The American Thoracic Society (ATS) Methods in Epidemiologic, Clinical, and Operations Research (MECOR) Program was launched in 1994 to provide a sustainable means of increasing local and national research capacity aimed at addressing this need. As of March 2013, approximately 1,015 students have completed at least one level of the training program. Post-MECOR, 64% of participants have published a medical paper, 79% have presented at a scientific or academic meeting, 51% have submitted a research protocol for funding, and 42% have had one funded. One-quarter have been awarded an academic or clinical fellowship, and 78% reported that MECOR had made a significant or extremely important contribution to their professional life and accomplishments. Future challenges include funding, recruitment of local faculty, helping to build the research infrastructure in MECOR countries, and providing ongoing mentoring for research.

  13. Almanac 2011: acute coronary syndromes. The national society journals present selected research that has driven recent advances in clinical cardiology.

    PubMed

    Knight, Charles J; Timmis, Adam D

    2011-12-01

    This overview highlights some recent advances in the epidemiology, diagnosis, risk stratification and treatment of acute coronary syndromes. The sheer volume of new studies reflects the robust state of global cardiovascular research but the focus here is on findings that are of most interest to the practising cardiologist. Incidence and mortality rates for myocardial infarction are in decline, probably owing to a combination of lifestyle changes, particularly smoking cessation, and improved pharmacological and interventional treatment. Troponins remain central for diagnosis and new high-sensitivity assays are further lowering detection thresholds and improving outcomes. The incremental diagnostic value of other circulating biomarkers remains unclear and for risk stratification simple clinical algorithms such as the GRACE score have proved more useful. Primary PCI with minimal treatment delay is the most effective reperfusion strategy in ST elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI). Radial access is associated with less bleeding than with the femoral approach, but outcomes appear similar. Manual thrombectomy limits distal embolisation and infarct size while drug-eluting stents reduce the need for further revascularisation procedures. Non-culprit disease is best dealt with electively as a staged procedure after primary PCI has been completed. The development of antithrombotic and antiplatelet regimens for primary PCI continues to evolve, with new indications for fondaparinux and bivalirudin as well as small-molecule glycoprotein (GP)IIb/IIIa inhibitors. If timely primary PCI is unavailable, fibrinolytic treatment remains an option but a strategy of early angiographic assessment is recommended for all patients. Non-ST segment elevation myocardial infarction(NSTEMI) is now the dominant phenotype and out-comes after the acute phase are significantly worse than for STEMI. Many patients with NSTEMI remain undertreated and there is a large body of recent work seeking to

  14. European Society of Gastrointestinal Endoscopy (ESGE): recommendations (2009) on clinical use of video capsule endoscopy to investigate small-bowel, esophageal and colonic diseases.

    PubMed

    Ladas, S D; Triantafyllou, K; Spada, C; Riccioni, M E; Rey, J-F; Niv, Y; Delvaux, M; de Franchis, R; Costamagna, G

    2010-03-01

    These recommendations on video capsule endoscopy, an emerging technology with an impact on the practice of endoscopy, were developed by the European Society of Gastrointestinal Endoscopy (ESGE) Guidelines Committee. The first draft of each section was prepared by one or two members of the writing team, who were selected as experts on the content of that section on the basis of their published work. They used evidence-based methodology, performing MEDLINE and PubMed literature searches to identify relevant clinical studies. Abstracts from scientific meetings were included only if there was no published full paper on a particular topic. If there was disagreement, the first author of the Guideline made the final decision. Recommendations were graded according to the strength of the supporting evidence. The draft guideline was critically reviewed by all authors and submitted to the ESGE councillors for their critical review before approval of the final document. The ESGE Guidelines Committee acknowledges that this document is based on a critical review of the data available at the time of preparation and that further studies may be needed to clarify some aspects. Moreover, this Guideline may be revised as necessary to account for changes in technology, new data, or other aspects of clinical practice. This document should be regarded as supplying recommendations only to gastroenterologists in providing care to their patients. It is not a set of rules and should not be construed as establishing a legal standard of care, or as encouraging, advocating, requiring, or discouraging any particular treatment. These recommendations must be interpreted according to the clinician's knowledge, expertise, and clinical judgment in the management of individual patients and, if necessary, a course of action that varies from recommendations must be undertaken.

  15. Clinical practice guideline for the use of antimicrobial agents in neutropenic patients with cancer: 2010 update by the infectious diseases society of america.

    PubMed

    Freifeld, Alison G; Bow, Eric J; Sepkowitz, Kent A; Boeckh, Michael J; Ito, James I; Mullen, Craig A; Raad, Issam I; Rolston, Kenneth V; Young, Jo-Anne H; Wingard, John R

    2011-02-15

    This document updates and expands the initial Infectious Diseases Society of America (IDSA) Fever and Neutropenia Guideline that was published in 1997 and first updated in 2002. It is intended as a guide for the use of antimicrobial agents in managing patients with cancer who experience chemotherapy-induced fever and neutropenia. Recent advances in antimicrobial drug development and technology, clinical trial results, and extensive clinical experience have informed the approaches and recommendations herein. Because the previous iteration of this guideline in 2002, we have a developed a clearer definition of which populations of patients with cancer may benefit most from antibiotic, antifungal, and antiviral prophylaxis. Furthermore, categorizing neutropenic patients as being at high risk or low risk for infection according to presenting signs and symptoms, underlying cancer, type of therapy, and medical comorbidities has become essential to the treatment algorithm. Risk stratification is a recommended starting point for managing patients with fever and neutropenia. In addition, earlier detection of invasive fungal infections has led to debate regarding optimal use of empirical or preemptive antifungal therapy, although algorithms are still evolving. What has not changed is the indication for immediate empirical antibiotic therapy. It remains true that all patients who present with fever and neutropenia should be treated swiftly and broadly with antibiotics to treat both gram-positive and gram-negative pathogens. Finally, we note that all Panel members are from institutions in the United States or Canada; thus, these guidelines were developed in the context of North American practices. Some recommendations may not be as applicable outside of North America, in areas where differences in available antibiotics, in the predominant pathogens, and/or in health care-associated economic conditions exist. Regardless of venue, clinical vigilance and immediate treatment are

  16. Clinical practice guideline for the use of antimicrobial agents in neutropenic patients with cancer: 2010 Update by the Infectious Diseases Society of America.

    PubMed

    Freifeld, Alison G; Bow, Eric J; Sepkowitz, Kent A; Boeckh, Michael J; Ito, James I; Mullen, Craig A; Raad, Issam I; Rolston, Kenneth V; Young, Jo-Anne H; Wingard, John R

    2011-02-15

    This document updates and expands the initial Infectious Diseases Society of America (IDSA) Fever and Neutropenia Guideline that was published in 1997 and first updated in 2002. It is intended as a guide for the use of antimicrobial agents in managing patients with cancer who experience chemotherapy-induced fever and neutropenia. Recent advances in antimicrobial drug development and technology, clinical trial results, and extensive clinical experience have informed the approaches and recommendations herein. Because the previous iteration of this guideline in 2002, we have a developed a clearer definition of which populations of patients with cancer may benefit most from antibiotic, antifungal, and antiviral prophylaxis. Furthermore, categorizing neutropenic patients as being at high risk or low risk for infection according to presenting signs and symptoms, underlying cancer, type of therapy, and medical comorbidities has become essential to the treatment algorithm. Risk stratification is a recommended starting point for managing patients with fever and neutropenia. In addition, earlier detection of invasive fungal infections has led to debate regarding optimal use of empirical or preemptive antifungal therapy, although algorithms are still evolving. What has not changed is the indication for immediate empirical antibiotic therapy. It remains true that all patients who present with fever and neutropenia should be treated swiftly and broadly with antibiotics to treat both gram-positive and gram-negative pathogens. Finally, we note that all Panel members are from institutions in the United States or Canada; thus, these guidelines were developed in the context of North American practices. Some recommendations may not be as applicable outside of North America, in areas where differences in available antibiotics, in the predominant pathogens, and/or in health care-associated economic conditions exist. Regardless of venue, clinical vigilance and immediate treatment are

  17. International Society for Cellular Therapy perspective on immune functional assays for mesenchymal stromal cells as potency release criterion for advanced phase clinical trials

    PubMed Central

    Galipeau, Jacques; Krampera, Mauro; Barrett, John; Dazzi, Francesco; Deans, Robert J.; Debruijn, Joost; Dominici, Massimo; Fibbe, Willem E.; Gee, Adrian P.; Gimble, Jeffery M.; Hematti, Peiman; Koh, Mickey B.C.; Leblanc, Katarina; Martin, Ivan; Mcniece, Ian K.; Mendicino, Michael; Oh, Steve; Ortiz, Luis; Phinney, Donald G.; Planat, Valerie; Shi, Yufang; Stroncek, David F.; Viswanathan, Sowmya; Weiss, Daniel J.; Sensebe, Luc

    2016-01-01

    Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) as a pharmaceutical for ailments characterized by pathogenic autoimmune, alloimmune and inflammatory processes now cover the spectrum of early- to late-phase clinical trials in both industry and academic sponsored studies. There is a broad consensus that despite different tissue sourcing and varied culture expansion protocols, human MSC-like cell products likely share fundamental mechanisms of action mediating their anti-inflammatory and tissue repair functionalities. Identification of functional markers of potency and reduction to practice of standardized, easily deployable methods of measurements of such would benefit the field. This would satisfy both mechanistic research as well as development of release potency assays to meet Regulatory Authority requirements for conduct of advanced clinical studies and their eventual registration. In response to this unmet need, the International Society for Cellular Therapy (ISCT) addressed the issue at an international workshop in May 2015 as part of the 21st ISCT annual meeting in Las Vegas. The scope of the workshop was focused on discussing potency assays germane to immunomodulation by MSC-like products in clinical indications targeting immune disorders. We here provide consensus perspective arising from this forum. We propose that focused analysis of selected MSC markers robustly deployed by in vitro licensing and metricized with a matrix of assays should be responsive to requirements from Regulatory Authorities. Workshop participants identified three preferred analytic methods that could inform a matrix assay approach: quantitative RNA analysis of selected gene products; flow cytometry analysis of functionally relevant surface markers and protein-based assay of secretome. We also advocate that potency assays acceptable to the Regulatory Authorities be rendered publicly accessible in an “open-access” manner, such as through publication or database collection. PMID:26724220

  18. Diagnosis and treatment of bacteremia and endocarditis due to Staphylococcus aureus. A clinical guideline from the Spanish Society of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases (SEIMC).

    PubMed

    Gudiol, Francesc; Aguado, José María; Almirante, Benito; Bouza, Emilio; Cercenado, Emilia; Domínguez, M Ángeles; Gasch, Oriol; Lora-Tamayo, Jaime; Miró, José M; Palomar, Mercedes; Pascual, Alvaro; Pericas, Juan M; Pujol, Miquel; Rodríguez-Baño, Jesús; Shaw, Evelyn; Soriano, Alex; Vallés, Jordi

    2015-11-01

    Both bacteremia and infective endocarditis caused by Staphylococcus aureus are common and severe diseases. The prognosis may darken not infrequently, especially in the presence of intracardiac devices or methicillin-resistance. Indeed, the optimization of the antimicrobial therapy is a key step in the outcome of these infections. The high rates of treatment failure and the increasing interest in the influence of vancomycin susceptibility in the outcome of infections caused by both methicillin-susceptible and -resistant isolates has led to the research of novel therapeutic schemes. Specifically, the interest raised in recent years on the new antimicrobials with activity against methicillin-resistant staphylococci has been also extended to infections caused by susceptible strains, which still carry the most important burden of infection. Recent clinical and experimental research has focused in the activity of new combinations of antimicrobials, their indication and role still being debatable. Also, the impact of an appropriate empirical antimicrobial treatment has acquired relevance in recent years. Finally, it is noteworthy the impact of the implementation of a systematic bundle of measures for improving the outcome. The aim of this clinical guideline is to provide an ensemble of recommendations in order to improve the treatment and prognosis of bacteremia and infective endocarditis caused by S. aureus, in accordance to the latest evidence published.

  19. Guideline on allergen-specific immunotherapy in IgE-mediated allergic diseases: S2k Guideline of the German Society for Allergology and Clinical Immunology (DGAKI), the Society for Pediatric Allergy and Environmental Medicine (GPA), the Medical Association of German Allergologists (AeDA), the Austrian Society for Allergy and Immunology (ÖGAI), the Swiss Society for Allergy and Immunology (SGAI), the German Society of Dermatology (DDG), the German Society of Oto- Rhino-Laryngology, Head and Neck Surgery (DGHNO-KHC), the German Society of Pediatrics and Adolescent Medicine (DGKJ), the Society for Pediatric Pneumology (GPP), the German Respiratory Society (DGP), the German Association of ENT Surgeons (BV-HNO), the Professional Federation of Paediatricians and Youth Doctors (BVKJ), the Federal Association of Pulmonologists (BDP) and the German Dermatologists Association (BVDD).

    PubMed

    Pfaar, Oliver; Bachert, Claus; Bufe, Albrecht; Buhl, Roland; Ebner, Christof; Eng, Peter; Friedrichs, Frank; Fuchs, Thomas; Hamelmann, Eckard; Hartwig-Bade, Doris; Hering, Thomas; Huttegger, Isidor; Jung, Kirsten; Klimek, Ludger; Kopp, Matthias Volkmar; Merk, Hans; Rabe, Uta; Saloga, Joachim; Schmid-Grendelmeier, Peter; Schuster, Antje; Schwerk, Nicolaus; Sitter, Helmut; Umpfenbach, Ulrich; Wedi, Bettina; Wöhrl, Stefan; Worm, Margitta; Kleine-Tebbe, Jörg; Kaul, Susanne; Schwalfenberg, Anja

    The present guideline (S2k) on allergen-specific immunotherapy (AIT) was established by the German, Austrian and Swiss professional associations for allergy in consensus with the scientific specialist societies and professional associations in the fields of otolaryngology, dermatology and venereology, pediatric and adolescent medicine, pneumology as well as a German patient organization (German Allergy and Asthma Association; Deutscher Allergie- und Asthmabund, DAAB) according to the criteria of the Association of the Scientific Medical Societies in Germany (Arbeitsgemeinschaft der Wissenschaftlichen Medizinischen Fachgesellschaften, AWMF). AIT is a therapy with disease-modifying effects. By administering allergen extracts, specific blocking antibodies, toler-ance-inducing cells and mediators are activated. These prevent further exacerbation of the allergen-triggered immune response, block the specific immune response and attenuate the inflammatory response in tissue. Products for SCIT or SLIT cannot be compared at present due to their heterogeneous composition, nor can allergen concentrations given by different manufacturers be compared meaningfully due to the varying methods used to measure their active ingredients. Non-modified allergens are used for SCIT in the form of aqueous or physically adsorbed (depot) extracts, as well as chemically modified allergens (allergoids) as depot extracts. Allergen extracts for SLIT are used in the form of aqueous solutions or tablets. The clinical efficacy of AIT is measured using various scores as primary and secondary study endpoints. The EMA stipulates combined symptom and medication scores as primary endpoint. A harmonization of clinical endpoints, e. g., by using the combined symptom and medication scores (CSMS) recommended by the EAACI, is desirable in the future in order to permit the comparison of results from different studies. The current CONSORT recommendations from the ARIA/GA2LEN group specify standards for the

  20. Executive summary of management of prosthetic joint infections. Clinical practice guidelines by the Spanish Society of Infectious Diseases and Clinical Microbiology (SEIMC).

    PubMed

    Ariza, Javier; Cobo, Javier; Baraia-Etxaburu, Josu; Benito, Natividad; Bori, Guillermo; Cabo, Javier; Corona, Pablo; Esteban, Jaime; Horcajada, Juan Pablo; Lora-Tamayo, Jaime; Murillo, Oscar; Palomino, Julián; Parra, Jorge; Pigrau, Carlos; Del Pozo, José Luis; Riera, Melchor; Rodríguez, Dolores; Sánchez-Somolinos, Mar; Soriano, Alex; Del Toro, M Dolores; de la Torre, Basilio

    2017-03-01

    The incidence of prosthetic joint infection (PJI) is expected to increase in the coming years. PJI has serious consequences for patients, and high costs for the health system. The complexity of these infections makes it necessary to organize the vast quantity of information published in the last several years. The indications for the choice of a given surgical strategy and the corresponding antimicrobial therapy are specifically reviewed. The authors selected clinically relevant questions and then reviewed the available literature in order to give recommendations according to a pre-determined level of scientific evidence. The more controversial aspects were debated, and the final composition was agreed at an ad hoc meeting. Before its final publication, the manuscript was made available online in order that all SEIMC members were able to read it and make comments and suggestions.

  1. Official Positions for FRAX® clinical regarding international differences from Joint Official Positions Development Conference of the International Society for Clinical Densitometry and International Osteoporosis Foundation on FRAX®.

    PubMed

    Cauley, Jane A; El-Hajj Fuleihan, Ghada; Arabi, Asma; Fujiwara, Saeko; Ragi-Eis, Sergio; Calderon, Andrew; Chionh, Siok Bee; Chen, Zhao; Curtis, Jeffrey R; Danielson, Michelle E; Hanley, David A; Kroger, Heikki; Kung, Annie W C; Lesnyak, Olga; Nieves, Jeri; Pluskiewicz, Wojciech; El Rassi, Rola; Silverman, Stuart; Schott, Anne-Marie; Rizzoli, Rene; Luckey, Marjorie

    2011-01-01

    Osteoporosis is a serious worldwide epidemic. Increased risk of fractures is the hallmark of the disease and is associated with increased morbidity, mortality and economic burden. FRAX® is a web-based tool developed by the Sheffield WHO Collaborating Center team, that integrates clinical risk factors, femoral neck BMD, country specific mortality and fracture data and calculates the 10 year fracture probability in order to help health care professionals identify patients who need treatment. However, only 31 countries have a FRAX® calculator at the time paper was accepted for publication. In the absence of a FRAX® model for a particular country, it has been suggested to use a surrogate country for which the epidemiology of osteoporosis most closely approximates the index country. More specific recommendations for clinicians in these countries are not available. In North America, concerns have also been raised regarding the assumptions used to construct the US ethnic specific FRAX® calculators with respect to the correction factors applied to derive fracture probabilities in Blacks, Asians and Hispanics in comparison to Whites. In addition, questions were raised about calculating fracture risk in other ethnic groups e.g., Native Americans and First Canadians. In order to provide additional guidance to clinicians, a FRAX® International Task Force was formed to address specific questions raised by physicians in countries without FRAX® calculators and seeking to integrate FRAX® into their clinical practice. The main questions that the task force tried to answer were the following: The Task Force members conducted appropriate literature reviews and developed preliminary statements that were discussed and graded by a panel of experts at the ISCD-IOF joint conference. The statements approved by the panel of experts are discussed in the current paper.

  2. Screening, Assessment, and Management of Fatigue in Adult Survivors of Cancer: An American Society of Clinical Oncology Clinical Practice Guideline Adaptation

    PubMed Central

    Bower, Julienne E.; Bak, Kate; Berger, Ann; Breitbart, William; Escalante, Carmelita P.; Ganz, Patricia A.; Schnipper, Hester Hill; Lacchetti, Christina; Ligibel, Jennifer A.; Lyman, Gary H.; Ogaily, Mohammed S.; Pirl, William F.; Jacobsen, Paul B.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose This guideline presents screening, assessment, and treatment approaches for the management of adult cancer survivors who are experiencing symptoms of fatigue after completion of primary treatment. Methods A systematic search of clinical practice guideline databases, guideline developer Web sites, and published health literature identified the pan-Canadian guideline on screening, assessment, and care of cancer-related fatigue in adults with cancer, the National Comprehensive Cancer Network (NCCN) Clinical Practice Guidelines In Oncology (NCCN Guidelines) for Cancer-Related Fatigue and the NCCN Guidelines for Survivorship. These three guidelines were appraised and selected for adaptation. Results It is recommended that all patients with cancer be evaluated for the presence of fatigue after completion of primary treatment and be offered specific information and strategies for fatigue management. For those who report moderate to severe fatigue, comprehensive assessment should be conducted, and medical and treatable contributing factors should be addressed. In terms of treatment strategies, evidence indicates that physical activity interventions, psychosocial interventions, and mind-body interventions may reduce cancer-related fatigue in post-treatment patients. There is limited evidence for use of psychostimulants in the management of fatigue in patients who are disease free after active treatment. Conclusion Fatigue is prevalent in cancer survivors and often causes significant disruption in functioning and quality of life. Regular screening, assessment, and education and appropriate treatment of fatigue are important in managing this distressing symptom. Given the multiple factors contributing to post-treatment fatigue, interventions should be tailored to each patient's specific needs. In particular, a number of nonpharmacologic treatment approaches have demonstrated efficacy in cancer survivors. PMID:24733803

  3. Asthma and allergy: short texts and recommendations of the expert conference of the French Speaking Pneumology Society (SPLF), in partnership with the French Society of Allergology and Clinical Immunology (SFAIC), the French Society of Occupational Medicine (SFMT) and the "Asthma-Allergy" association.

    PubMed

    Tillie-Leblond, Isabelle; Magnan, Antoine; Pauli, Gabrielle; Vervloet, Daniel; Wallaert, Benoît; Didier, Alain; Ameille, Jacques; Godard, Philippe

    2008-10-01

    The Asthma Plan published by the French Health Ministry in 2002, the experts conferences edited by ANAES on therapeutic education and follow-up of asthma, the inclusion of this disease in the Public Health Law have been remarkable steps in France during the last few years. The medical community, more particularly the pneumological community, has shown its commitment in the treatment of this public health problem. But allergy was not sufficiently taken into account, although it is responsible for nearly 50 to 60% cases of asthma. In most so-called developed countries the prevalence of asthma and of allergies has increased in the last twenty years. Its progress varies according to country and age group: the increased prevalence of allergy, more specifically of rhinitis and eczema, is most marked in children aged 6-7 year. The prevalence of asthma seems to have reached a plateau in certain northern countries or seems to have decreased in 13-14 year olds (Anglo-Saxon countries). There were multiple reasons, generally attributed to changes in life-style. Asthma is the result of an interaction between a genetic predisposition and the environment, where allergens are present, but also smoking. The relationships between allergy and asthma are complex. This conference discussed the various essential issues that face doctors who treat patients with asthma in their daily practice. The risk factors, the methods of exploration in children and adults and the specific treatments are, indeed, essential issues to be evaluated in a frequent pathology that interests a large number of physicians. The variety of experts is wide, representing pneumology (French Speaking Pneumology Society), the occupational medicine world (French Society of Occupational Medicine), the allergic pathology (French Society of Allergology and Clinical Immunology), and patients with the patient association "Asthma & Allergy", physicians belonging to the general medicine community, general hospitals, private

  4. Clinical recommendations of cardiac magnetic resonance, Part I: ischemic and valvular heart disease: a position paper of the working group 'Applicazioni della Risonanza Magnetica' of the Italian Society of Cardiology.

    PubMed

    Aquaro, Giovanni Donato; Di Bella, Gianluca; Castelletti, Silvia; Maestrini, Viviana; Festa, Pierluigi; Ait-Ali, Lamia; Masci, Pier Giorgio; Monti, Lorenzo; di Giovine, Gabriella; De Lazzari, Manuel; Cipriani, Alberto; Guaricci, Andrea I; Dellegrottaglie, Santo; Pepe, Alessia; Marra, Martina Perazzolo; Pontone, Gianluca

    2017-04-01

    Cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) has emerged as a reliable and accurate diagnostic tool for the evaluation of patients with cardiac disease in several clinical settings and with proven additional diagnostic and prognostic value compared with other imaging modalities. This document has been developed by the working group on the 'application of CMR' of the Italian Society of Cardiology to provide a perspective on the current state of technical advances and clinical applications of CMR and to inform cardiologists on how to implement their clinical and diagnostic pathways with the inclusion of this technique in clinical practice. The writing committee consisted of members of the working group of the Italian Society of Cardiology and two external peer reviewers with acknowledged experience in the field of CMR.

  5. Methodological background and strategy for the 2012-2013 updated consensus definitions and clinical practice guidelines from the abdominal compartment society.

    PubMed

    Kirkpatrick, Andrew W; Roberts, Derek J; Jaeschke, Roman; De Waele, Jan J; De Keulenaer, Bart L; Duchesne, Juan; Bjorck, Martin; Leppäniemi, Ari; Ejike, Janeth C; Sugrue, Michael; Cheatham, Michael L; Ivatury, Rao; Ball, Chad G; Reintam Blaser, Annika; Regli, Adrian; Balogh, Zsolt; D'Amours, Scott; De Laet, Inneke; Malbrain, Manu L N G

    2015-01-01

    The Abdominal Compartment Society (www.wsacs.org) previously created highly cited Consensus Definitions/Management Guidelines related to intra-abdominal hypertension (IAH) and abdominal compartment syndrome (ACS). Implicit in this previous work, was a commitment to regularly reassess and update in relation to evolving research. Two years preceding the Fifth World Congress on Abdominal Compartment Syndrome, an International Guidelines committee began preparation. An oversight/steering committee formulated key clinical questions regarding IAH/ /ACS based on polling of the Executive to redundancy, structured according to the Patient, Intervention, Comparator, and Outcome (PICO) format. Scientific consultations were obtained from Methodological GRADE experts and a series of educational teleconferences were conducted to educate scientific review teams from among the wscacs. org membership. Each team conducted systematic or structured reviews to identify relevant studies and prepared evidence summaries and draft Grades of Recommendation Assessment, Development and Evaluation (GRADE) recommendations. The evidence and draft recommendations were presented and debated in person over four days. Updated consensus definitions and management statements were derived using a modified Delphi method. A writingcommittee subsequently compiled the results utilizing frequent Internet discussion and Delphi voting methods to compile a robust online Master Report and a concise peer-reviewed summarizing publication. A dedicated Paediatric Guidelines Subcommittee reviewed all recommendations and either accepted or revised them for appropriateness in children. Of the original 12 IAH/ACS definitions proposed in 2006, three (25%) were accepted unanimously, with four (33%) accepted by > 80%, and four (33%) accepted by > 50%, but required discussion to produce revised definitions. One (8%) was rejected by > 50%. In addition to previous 2006 definitions, the panel also defined the open abdomen

  6. Validation of International Society of Urological Pathology (ISUP) grading for prostatic adenocarcinoma in thin core biopsies using TROG 03.04 'RADAR' trial clinical data.

    PubMed

    Delahunt, B; Egevad, L; Srigley, J R; Steigler, A; Murray, J D; Atkinson, C; Matthews, J; Duchesne, G; Spry, N A; Christie, D; Joseph, D; Attia, J; Denham, J W

    2015-10-01

    In 2014 a consensus conference convened by the International Society of Urological Pathology (ISUP) adopted amendments to the criteria for Gleason grading and scoring (GS) for prostatic adenocarcinoma. The meeting defined a modified grading system based on 5 grading categories (grade 1, GS 3+3; grade 2, GS 3+4; grade 3, GS 4+3; grade 4, GS 8; grade 5, GS 9-10). In this study we have evaluated the prognostic significance of ISUP grading in 496 patients enrolled in the TROG 03.04 RADAR Trial. There were 19 grade 1, 118 grade 2, 193 grade 3, 88 grade 4 and 79 grade 5 tumours in the series, with follow-up for a minimum of 6.5 years. On follow-up 76 patients experienced distant progression of disease, 171 prostate specific antigen (PSA) progression and 39 prostate cancer deaths. In contrast to the 2005 modified Gleason system (MGS), the hazards of the distant and PSA progression endpoints, relative to grade 2, were significantly greater for grades 3, 4 and 5 of the 2014 ISUP grading scheme. Comparison of predictive ability utilising Harrell's concordance index, showed 2014 ISUP grading to significantly out-perform 2005 MGS grading for each of the three clinical endpoints.

  7. Electronic nicotine delivery systems: a policy statement from the American Association for Cancer Research and the American Society of Clinical Oncology.

    PubMed

    Brandon, Thomas H; Goniewicz, Maciej L; Hanna, Nasser H; Hatsukami, Dorothy K; Herbst, Roy S; Hobin, Jennifer A; Ostroff, Jamie S; Shields, Peter G; Toll, Benjamin A; Tyne, Courtney A; Viswanath, Kasisomayajula; Warren, Graham W

    2015-02-01

    Combustible tobacco use remains the number one preventable cause of disease, disability, and death in the United States. Electronic nicotine delivery systems (ENDS), which include e-cigarettes, are devices capable of delivering nicotine in an aerosolized form. ENDS use by both adults and youth has increased rapidly, and some have advocated these products could serve as harm-reduction devices and smoking cessation aids. ENDS may be beneficial if they reduce smoking rates or prevent or reduce the known adverse health effects of smoking. However, ENDS may also be harmful, particularly to youth, if they increase the likelihood that nonsmokers or formers smokers will use combustible tobacco products or if they discourage smokers from quitting. The American Association for Cancer Research (AACR) and the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) recognize the potential ENDS have to alter patterns of tobacco use and affect the public's health; however, definitive data are lacking. AACR and ASCO recommend additional research on these devices, including assessing the health impacts of ENDS, understanding patterns of ENDS use, and determining what role ENDS have in cessation. Key policy recommendations include supporting federal, state, and local regulation of ENDS; requiring manufacturers to register with the FDA and report all product ingredients, requiring childproof caps on ENDS liquids, and including warning labels on products and their advertisements; prohibiting youth-oriented marketing and sales; prohibiting child-friendly ENDS flavors; and prohibiting ENDS use in places where cigarette smoking is prohibited.

  8. American Society for Clinical Pathology

    MedlinePlus

    ... Cancer ePolicy News November 2016 Head of the Rwanda Biomedical Center/National Reference Laboratory Dr. Jean Baptiste Mazarati Announces Innovative Telepathology Lab ‘Goes Live’ in Rwanda ISAC, ICCS and ASCP BOC to Launch New ...

  9. The Official Positions of the International Society for Clinical Densitometry: acquisition of dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry body composition and considerations regarding analysis and repeatability of measures.

    PubMed

    Hangartner, Thomas N; Warner, Sarah; Braillon, Pierre; Jankowski, Larry; Shepherd, John

    2013-01-01

    In preparation for the International Society for Clinical Densitometry Position Development Conference of 2013 in Tampa, Florida, Task Force 2 was created as 1 of 3 task forces in the area of body composition assessment by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA). The assignment was to review the literature, summarize the relevant findings, and formulate positions covering (1) accuracy and precision assessment, (2) acquisition of DXA body composition measures in patients, and (3) considerations regarding analysis and repeatability of measures. There were 6 primary questions proposed to the task force by the International Society for Clinical Densitometry board and expert panel. Based on a series of systematic reviews, 14 new positions were developed, which are intended to augment and define good clinical practice in quantitative assessment of body composition by DXA.

  10. An Official American Thoracic Society/American College of Chest Physicians Policy Statement: Implementation of Low-Dose Computed Tomography Lung Cancer Screening Programs in Clinical Practice

    PubMed Central

    Wiener, Renda Soylemez; Gould, Michael K.; Arenberg, Douglas A.; Au, David H.; Fennig, Kathleen; Lamb, Carla R.; Mazzone, Peter J.; Midthun, David E.; Napoli, Maryann; Ost, David E.; Powell, Charles A.; Rivera, M. Patricia; Slatore, Christopher G.; Tanner, Nichole T.; Vachani, Anil; Wisnivesky, Juan P.; Yoon, Sue H.

    2015-01-01

    Rationale: Annual low-radiation-dose computed tomography (LDCT) screening for lung cancer has been shown to reduce lung cancer mortality among high-risk individuals and is now recommended by multiple organizations. However, LDCT screening is complex, and implementation requires careful planning to ensure benefits outweigh harms. Little guidance has been provided for sites wishing to develop and implement lung cancer screening programs. Objectives: To promote successful implementation of comprehensive LDCT screening programs that are safe, effective, and sustainable. Methods: The American Thoracic Society (ATS) and American College of Chest Physicians (CHEST) convened a committee with expertise in lung cancer screening, pulmonary nodule evaluation, and implementation science. The committee reviewed the evidence from systematic reviews, clinical practice guidelines, surveys, and the experience of early-adopting LDCT screening programs and summarized potential strategies to implement LDCT screening programs successfully. Measurements and Main Results: We address steps that sites should consider during the main three phases of developing an LDCT screening program: planning, implementation, and maintenance. We present multiple strategies to implement the nine core elements of comprehensive lung cancer screening programs enumerated in a recent CHEST/ATS statement, which will allow sites to select the strategy that best fits with their local context and workflow patterns. Although we do not comment on cost-effectiveness of LDCT screening, we outline the necessary costs associated with starting and sustaining a high-quality LDCT screening program. Conclusions: Following the strategies delineated in this policy statement may help sites to develop comprehensive LDCT screening programs that are safe and effective. PMID:26426785

  11. Clinical Characteristics and Outcomes of Patients With Myocardial Infarction and Cardiogenic Shock Undergoing Coronary Artery Bypass Surgery: Data From The Society of Thoracic Surgeons National Database

    PubMed Central

    Acharya, Deepak; Gulack, Brian C.; Loyaga-Rendon, Renzo Y.; Davies, James E.; He, Xia; Brennan, J. Matthew; Thourani, Vinod H.; Williams, Matthew L.

    2016-01-01

    Background Acute myocardial infarction complicated by cardiogenic shock (AMI-CS) is associated with substantial mortality. We evaluated outcomes of patients in The Society of Thoracic Surgeons Adult Cardiac Surgery Database who underwent coronary artery bypass graft surgery (CABG) in the setting of AMI-CS. Methods All patients with AMI-CS who underwent nonelective CABG or CABG with ventricular assist device implantation within 7 days after myocardial infarction were enrolled. The primary analysis sample consisted of patients who underwent surgery between June 2011 and December 2013. Baseline characteristics, operative findings, outcomes, and the utilization of mechanical circulatory support (MCS) were assessed in detail in this population. We also evaluated trends in unadjusted mortality for all patients undergoing CABG or CABG with ventricular assist device for AMI-CS from January 2005 to December 2013. Results A total of 5,496 patients met study criteria, comprising 1.5% of all patients undergoing CABG during the study period. Overall operative mortality was 18.7%, decreasing from 19.3% in 2005 to 18.1% in 2013 (p < 0.001). Use of MCS increased from 5.8% in 2011 to 8.8% in 2013 (p = 0.008). Patients receiving MCS had a high proportion of cardiovascular risk factors or high clinical acuity. Patients requiring preoperative and patients requiring intraoperative or postoperative MCS had operative mortality of 37.2% and 58.4%, respectively. Patients undergoing CABG as a salvage procedure had an operative mortality of 53.3%, and a high incidence of reoperation (21.8%), postoperative respiratory failure requiring prolonged ventilation (59.7%), and renal failure (18.5%). Conclusions Most patients undergoing CABG for AMI-CS have a sizeable but not prohibitive risk. Patients who require MCS and those undergoing operation as a salvage procedure reflect higher risk populations. PMID:26718859

  12. Clinical efficacy of carbapenems on hospital-acquired pneumonia in accordance with the Japanese Respiratory Society Guidelines for management of HAP.

    PubMed

    Ito, Masaru; Kaneko, Takeshi; Goto, Hideto; Yamaguchi, Nobuhiro; Fujisawa, Shin; Ono, Shigeru; Morita, Satoshi; Miyazawa, Naoki; Kanamori, Heiwa; Watanuki, Yuji; Ishigatsubo, Yoshiaki

    2011-12-01

    Hospital-acquired pneumonia (HAP) is the second most common cause of hospital-acquired infection and is the leading cause of death. In 2002, the Japanese Respiratory Society (JRS) published guidelines for the diagnosis and treatment of HAP (JRS GL 2002). In these guidelines, treatment with carbapenems is recommended for all disease types of HAP, excluding cases of mild or moderate pneumonia with no risk factors, and cases with early-onset ventilation-acquired pneumonia. To evaluate the efficacy of carbapenems on HAP in accordance with JRS GL 2002, we conducted a prospective study of HAP patients treated with carbapenems based on JRS GL 2002. The results of this study were also analyzed based on the revised guidelines published in June 2008 (JRS GL 2008), and the validity of the new guidelines was examined. Of the 33 subjects, 19 were judged as responders to the treatment, corresponding to a response rate of 57.6%. There were 3 deaths, corresponding to a mortality rate of 9.1%. The efficacy of carbapenems for the treatment of HAP based on JRS GL 2002 was confirmed. The severity rating system in JRS GL 2002 has a tendency to overestimate the severity of the cases and may lead to overtreatment in some cases. On the other hand, the severity rating system by JRS GL 2008 seemed to be more accurate and closely correlated with the efficacy of the treatment. It is suggested that JRS GL 2008 is more useful in clinical practice for accurately judging the severity of the disease and initiating appropriate subsequent antibiotic therapy.

  13. Comprehensive Description of Clinical Characteristics of a Large Systemic Lupus Erythematosus Cohort from the Spanish Rheumatology Society Lupus Registry (RELESSER) With Emphasis on Complete Versus Incomplete Lupus Differences

    PubMed Central

    Rúa-Figueroa, Íñigo; Richi, Patricia; López-Longo, Francisco Javier; Galindo, María; Calvo-Alén, Jaime; Olivé-Marqués, Alejandro; Loza-Santamaría, Estíbaliz; Vicente, Sabina Pérez; Erausquin, Celia; Tomero, Eva; Horcada, Loreto; Uriarte, Esther; Sánchez-Atrio, Ana; Rosas, José; Montilla, Carlos; Fernández-Nebro, Antonio; Rodríguez-Gómez, Manuel; Vela, Paloma; Blanco, Ricardo; Freire, Mercedes; Silva, Lucía; Díez-Álvarez, Elvira; Ibáñez-Barceló, Mónica; Zea, Antonio; Narváez, Javier; Martínez-Taboada, Víctor; Marenco, José Luis; de Castro, Mónica Fernández; Fernández-Berrizbeitia, Olaia; Hernández-Beriain, José Ángel; Gantes, Marian; Hernández-Cruz, Blanca; Pérez-Venegas, José J.; Pecondón, Ángela; Marras, Carlos; Carreira, Patricia; Bonilla, Gema; Torrente, Vicente; Castellví, Iván; Alegre, Juan; Moreno, Mireia; Raya, Enrique; de la Peña, Paloma García; Vázquez, Tomás; Aguirre, Ángeles; Quevedo, Víctor; Pego-Reigosa, José M.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is an autoimmune disease characterized by multiple organ involvement and pronounced racial and ethnic heterogeneity. The aims of the present work were (1) to describe the cumulative clinical characteristics of those patients included in the Spanish Rheumatology Society SLE Registry (RELESSER), focusing on the differences between patients who fulfilled the 1997 ACR-SLE criteria versus those with less than 4 criteria (hereafter designated as incomplete SLE (iSLE)) and (2) to compare SLE patient characteristics with those documented in other multicentric SLE registries. RELESSER is a multicenter hospital-based registry, with a collection of data from a large, representative sample of adult patients with SLE (1997 ACR criteria) seen at Spanish rheumatology departments. The registry includes demographic data, comprehensive descriptions of clinical manifestations, as well as information about disease activity and severity, cumulative damage, comorbidities, treatments and mortality, using variables with highly standardized definitions. A total of 4.024 SLE patients (91% with ≥4 ACR criteria) were included. Ninety percent were women with a mean age at diagnosis of 35.4 years and a median duration of disease of 11.0 years. As expected, most SLE manifestations were more frequent in SLE patients than in iSLE ones and every one of the ACR criteria was also associated with SLE condition; this was particularly true of malar rash, oral ulcers and renal disorder. The analysis—adjusted by gender, age at diagnosis, and disease duration—revealed that higher disease activity, damage and SLE severity index are associated with SLE [OR: 1.14; 95% CI: 1.08–1.20 (P < 0.001); 1.29; 95% CI: 1.15–1.44 (P < 0.001); and 2.10; 95% CI: 1.83–2.42 (P < 0.001), respectively]. These results support the hypothesis that iSLE behaves as a relative stable and mild disease. SLE patients from the RELESSER register do not appear to differ

  14. Differences in antimicrobial susceptibility breakpoints for Pseudomonas aeruginosa, isolated from blood cultures, set by the Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI) and the Japanese Society of Chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Tatsuya; Shimizu, Chihiro; Kasahara, Mayumi; Nakata, Chiyo; Munakata, Machiko; Takahashi, Hakuo

    2007-02-01

    A study was made of the antimicrobial susceptibility to and efficacy of various kinds of antimicrobial agents against 179 strains of Pseudomonas aeruginosa that were isolated from blood cultures at Kansai Medical University Hospital from 1990 through 2004. The annual detection rate was highest in 1994, at 22 strains (6.5%). There were 9 multidrug resistant strains of Pseudomonas aeruginosa (5.0%). Among 14 antimicrobial agents tested for measurements, ciprofloxacin (CPFX) showed the best minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) 50 value, of 0.25 microg/ml, followed by pazufloxacin (PZFX) and biapenem (BIPM), each at 0.5 microg/ml. When the period of 15 years was divided into three stages, the MIC50 value for each antimicrobial agent was highest in the middle stage (1995 to 1999). Assuming that the percentage of sensitive strains according to the breakpoints set by the Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI) represents the antimicrobial susceptibility rate, amikacin (AMK) showed the best value, of 85.5%. According to the sepsis breakpoint set by the Japanese Society of Chemotherapy (JSC), the efficacy of CPFX showed the highest rate (77.1%) of all the antimicrobial agents tested. Among beta-lactams, BIPM showed the highest efficacy rate, of 67.0%. When the efficacy rates were compared with each other, the difference in efficacy rate between the breakpoint set by the CLSI and the sepsis breakpoint set by the JSC was large for beta-lactams. Comparisons made based on the CLSI criteria showed no difference in cross-resistance rates between CPFX, meropenem (MEPM), and BIPM. However, when comparisons were made using the JSC sepsis breakpoint, MEPM showed a cross-resistance rate of 87.8%, while the rate for BIPM was lower, at 56.1%, with the chi2 test showing a significant difference, at P = 0.0014. In accordance with the pharmacokinetics/pharmacodynamics theory that has been advocated, breakpoints which are more suitable for the clinical setting in Japan should

  15. Society of Reproductive Surgeons

    MedlinePlus

    The Society of Reproductive Surgeons Home About Us About SRS Mission Statement Officers The Role of Reproductive Surgeons For ... Fact Sheets and Booklets SRS is an affiliated society to the American Society for Reproductive Medicine . Below ...

  16. S3-Guideline on allergy prevention: 2014 update: Guideline of the German Society for Allergology and Clinical Immunology (DGAKI) and the German Society for Pediatric and Adolescent Medicine (DGKJ).

    PubMed

    Schäfer, Torsten; Bauer, Carl-Peter; Beyer, Kirsten; Bufe, Albrecht; Friedrichs, Frank; Gieler, Uwe; Gronke, Gerald; Hamelmann, Eckard; Hellermann, Mechthild; Kleinheinz, Andreas; Klimek, Ludger; Koletzko, Sibylle; Kopp, Matthias; Lau, Susanne; Müsken, Horst; Reese, Imke; Schmidt, Sabine; Schnadt, Sabine; Sitter, Helmut; Strömer, Klaus; Vagts, Jennifer; Vogelberg, Christian; Wahn, Ulrich; Werfel, Thomas; Worm, Margitta; Muche-Borowski, Cathleen

    The continued high prevalence of allergic diseases in Western industrialized nations combined with the limited options for causal therapy make evidence-based primary prevention necessary. The recommendations last published in the S3-guideline on allergy prevention in 2009 have been revised and a consensus reached on the basis of an up-to-date systematic literature search. Evidence was sought for the period between May 2008 and May 2013 in the Cochrane and MEDLINE electronic databases, as well as in the reference lists of recent review articles. In addition, experts were surveyed for their opinions. The relevance of retrieved literature was checked by means of two filter processes: firstly according to title and abstract, and secondly based on the full text of the articles. Included studies were given an evidence grade, and a bias potential (low/high) was specified for study quality. A formal consensus on the revised recommendations was reached by representatives of the relevant specialist societies and (self-help) organizations (nominal group process). Of 3,284 hits, 165 studies (one meta-analysis, 15 systematic reviews, 31 randomized controlled trials, 65 cohort studies, 12 case-control studies and 41 cross-sectional studies) were included and evaluated. Recommendations on the following remain largely unaltered: full breastfeeding for 4 months as a means of allergy prevention (hypoallergenic infant formula in the case of infants at risk); avoidance of overweight; fish consumption (during pregnancy/lactation and in the introduction of solid foods for infants); vaccination according to the recommendations of the German Standing Committee on Vaccination (Ständige Impfkommission, STIKO); avoidance of air pollutants and tobacco exposure and avoidance of indoor conditions conducive to the development of mold. The assertion that a reduction in house-dust mite allergen content as a primary preventive measure is not recommended also remains unchanged. The introduction of

  17. Infectious Diseases Society of America

    MedlinePlus

    ... Walter E. Stamm Mentor Award Clinical Teacher Award World AIDS Day IDSA Recognizes World AIDS Day HIVMA Statement The Hill: Commemorating WAD ... Society of America welcomes the announcement from the World Health Organization of its “priority pathogens” list to ...

  18. Breast cancer screening with imaging: recommendations from the Society of Breast Imaging and the ACR on the use of mammography, breast MRI, breast ultrasound, and other technologies for the detection of clinically occult breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Lee, Carol H; Dershaw, D David; Kopans, Daniel; Evans, Phil; Monsees, Barbara; Monticciolo, Debra; Brenner, R James; Bassett, Lawrence; Berg, Wendie; Feig, Stephen; Hendrick, Edward; Mendelson, Ellen; D'Orsi, Carl; Sickles, Edward; Burhenne, Linda Warren

    2010-01-01

    Screening for breast cancer with mammography has been shown to decrease mortality from breast cancer, and mammography is the mainstay of screening for clinically occult disease. Mammography, however, has well-recognized limitations, and recently, other imaging including ultrasound and magnetic resonance imaging have been used as adjunctive screening tools, mainly for women who may be at increased risk for the development of breast cancer. The Society of Breast Imaging and the Breast Imaging Commission of the ACR are issuing these recommendations to provide guidance to patients and clinicians on the use of imaging to screen for breast cancer. Wherever possible, the recommendations are based on available evidence. Where evidence is lacking, the recommendations are based on consensus opinions of the fellows and executive committee of the Society of Breast Imaging and the members of the Breast Imaging Commission of the ACR.

  19. Executive Summary: Management of Adults With Hospital-acquired and Ventilator-associated Pneumonia: 2016 Clinical Practice Guidelines by the Infectious Diseases Society of America and the American Thoracic Society.

    PubMed

    Kalil, Andre C; Metersky, Mark L; Klompas, Michael; Muscedere, John; Sweeney, Daniel A; Palmer, Lucy B; Napolitano, Lena M; O'Grady, Naomi P; Bartlett, John G; Carratalà, Jordi; El Solh, Ali A; Ewig, Santiago; Fey, Paul D; File, Thomas M; Restrepo, Marcos I; Roberts, Jason A; Waterer, Grant W; Cruse, Peggy; Knight, Shandra L; Brozek, Jan L

    2016-09-01

    It is important to realize that guidelines cannot always account for individual variation among patients. They are not intended to supplant physician judgment with respect to particular patients or special clinical situations. IDSA considers adherence to these guidelines to be voluntary, with the ultimate determination regarding their application to be made by the physician in the light of each patient's individual circumstances.These guidelines are intended for use by healthcare professionals who care for patients at risk for hospital-acquired pneumonia (HAP) and ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP), including specialists in infectious diseases, pulmonary diseases, critical care, and surgeons, anesthesiologists, hospitalists, and any clinicians and healthcare providers caring for hospitalized patients with nosocomial pneumonia. The panel's recommendations for the diagnosis and treatment of HAP and VAP are based upon evidence derived from topic-specific systematic literature reviews.

  20. Clinical recommendations of cardiac magnetic resonance, Part II: inflammatory and congenital heart disease, cardiomyopathies and cardiac tumors: a position paper of the working group 'Applicazioni della Risonanza Magnetica' of the Italian Society of Cardiology.

    PubMed

    Pontone, Gianluca; Di Bella, Gianluca; Silvia, Castelletti; Maestrini, Viviana; Festa, Pierluigi; Ait-Ali, Lamia; Masci, Pier Giorgio; Monti, Lorenzo; di Giovine, Gabriella; De Lazzari, Manuel; Cipriani, Alberto; Guaricci, Andrea I; Dellegrottaglie, Santo; Pepe, Alessia; Marra, Martina Perazzolo; Aquaro, Giovanni D

    2017-04-01

    The current document was developed by the working group on the 'application of cardiac magnetic resonance' of the Italian Society of Cardiology to provide a perspective on the current state of technical advances and clinical cardiac magnetic resonance applications and to inform cardiologists how to implement their clinical and diagnostic pathway with the introduction of this technique in the clinical practice. Appropriateness criteria were defined using a score system: score 1-3 = inappropriate (test is not generally acceptable and is not a reasonable approach for the indication), score 4-6 = uncertain (test may be generally acceptable and may be a reasonable approach for the indication but more research and/or patient information is needed to classify the indication definitively) and score 7-9 = appropriate (test is generally acceptable and is a reasonable approach for the indication).

  1. AMERICAN ASSOCIATION OF CLINICAL ENDOCRINOLOGISTS, AMERICAN COLLEGE OF ENDOCRINOLOGY, AND ANDROGEN EXCESS AND PCOS SOCIETY DISEASE STATE CLINICAL REVIEW: GUIDE TO THE BEST PRACTICES IN THE EVALUATION AND TREATMENT OF POLYCYSTIC OVARY SYNDROME--PART 1.

    PubMed

    Goodman, Neil F; Cobin, Rhoda H; Futterweit, Walter; Glueck, Jennifer S; Legro, Richard S; Carmina, Enrico

    2015-11-01

    Polycystic Ovary Syndrome (PCOS) is recognized as the most common endocrine disorder of reproductive-aged women around the world. This document, produced by the collaboration of the American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists (AACE) and the Androgen Excess and PCOS Society (AES) aims to highlight the most important clinical issues confronting physicians and their patients with PCOS. It is a summary of current best practices in 2015. PCOS has been defined using various criteria, including menstrual irregularity, hyperandrogenism, and polycystic ovary morphology (PCOM). General agreement exists among specialty society guidelines that the diagnosis of PCOS must be based on the presence of at least two of the following three criteria: chronic anovulation, hyperandrogenism (clinical or biological) and polycystic ovaries. There is need for careful clinical assessment of women's history, physical examination, and laboratory evaluation, emphasizing the accuracy and validity of the methodology used for both biochemical measurements and ovarian imaging. Free testosterone (T) levels are more sensitive than the measurement of total T for establishing the existence of androgen excess and should be ideally determined through equilibrium dialysis techniques. Value of measuring levels of androgens other than T in patients with PCOS is relatively low. New ultrasound machines allow diagnosis of PCOM in patients having at least 25 small follicles (2 to 9 mm) in the whole ovary. Ovarian size at 10 mL remains the threshold between normal and increased ovary size. Serum 17-hydroxyprogesterone and anti-Müllerian hormone are useful for determining a diagnosis of PCOS. Correct diagnosis of PCOS impacts on the likelihood of associated metabolic and cardiovascular risks and leads to appropriate intervention, depending upon the woman's age, reproductive status, and her own concerns. The management of women with PCOS should include reproductive function, as well as the care of hirsutism

  2. Recommendations on the use of biosimilars by the Brazilian Society of Rheumatology, Brazilian Society of Dermatology, Brazilian Federation of Gastroenterology and Brazilian Study Group on Inflammatory Bowel Disease--Focus on clinical evaluation of monoclonal antibodies and fusion proteins used in the treatment of autoimmune diseases.

    PubMed

    Azevedo, Valderílio Feijó; Meirelles, Eduardo de Souza; Kochen, Jussara de Almeida Lima; Medeiros, Ana Cristina; Miszputen, Sender J; Teixeira, Fábio Vieira; Damião, Adérson Osmar Mourão Cintra; Kotze, Paulo Gustavo; Romiti, Ricardo; Arnone, Marcelo; Magalhães, Renata Ferreira; Maia, Cláudia Pires Amaral; de Carvalho, André Vicente E

    2015-09-01

    The Brazilian Societies of Rheumatology (SBR) and Dermatology (SBD), the Brazilian Federation of Gastroenterology (FBG) and the Brazilian Study Group on Inflammatory Bowel Disease (GEDIIB) gathered a group of their respective specialists on the topic of interest to discuss the most relevant issues regarding the clinical use of biosimilar medicines in Brazil. The main aim of that meeting was to prepare a document with recommendations to guide medical specialists and to help the national regulatory and policy-making agencies as concerns the authorization for marketing biosimilars used in autoimmune diseases, such as rheumatoid arthritis, ankylosing spondylitis, psoriatic arthritis, Crohn's disease, juvenile idiopathic arthritis and ulcerative colitis. In addition to considerations on the typical differences between innovator medicines and biosimilars, the specialists established a set of seven recommendations on regulatory advances related to clinical studies, indication extrapolation, nomenclature, interchangeability, automatic substitution and pharmacovigilance.

  3. Approach to suspected food allergy in atopic dermatitis. Guideline of the Task Force on Food Allergy of the German Society of Allergology and Clinical Immunology (DGAKI) and the Medical Association of German Allergologists (ADA) and the German Society of Pediatric Allergology (GPA).

    PubMed

    Werfel, Thomas; Erdmann, Stephan; Fuchs, Thomas; Henzgen, Margot; Kleine-Tebbe, Jörg; Lepp, Ute; Niggemann, Bodo; Raithel, Martin; Reese, Imke; Saloga, Joachim; Vieths, Stefan; Zuberbier, Torsten

    2009-03-01

    The following guideline of the "Arbeitsgruppe Nahrungsmittelallergie der DGAKI" (Task Force on Food Allergy of the German Society of Allergology and Clinical Immunology) and the ADA ("Arzteverband Deutscher Allergologen", Medical Association of German Allergologists) and the GPA (German Society of Pediatric Allergology) summarizes the approach to be taken when food allergy is suspected in patients with atopic dermatitis (neurodermatitis, atopic eczema). The problem is clinically relevant because many patients assume that allergic reactions against foods are responsible for triggering or worsening their eczema. It is important to identify those patients who will benefit from an elimination diet but also to avoid unnecessary diets. Elimination diets (especially in early childhood) are associated with the risk of malnutrition and additional emotional stress for the patients. The gold standard for the diagnosis of food-dependent reactions is to perform placebo-controlled, double-blind oral food challenges because specific IgE, prick tests and history often do not correlate with clinical reactivity. This is particularly true in the case of delayed eczematous skin reactions. Diagnostic elimination diets should be used before an oral provocation test. If multiple sensitizations against foods are discovered in a patient, an oligoallergenic diet and a subsequent stepwise supplementation of the nutrition should be performed. If a specific food is suspected of triggering food allergy, oral provocation should be performed after a diagnostic elimination diet. As eczema-tous skin reactions may develop slowly (i. e. within one or two day), the skin be inspected the day after the provocation test and that a repetitive test be performed if the patient has not reacted to a given food on the first day of oral provocation. The guideline discusses various clinical situations for patients with atopic dermatitis to facilitate differentiated diagnostic procedures.

  4. Seasonal influenza in adults and children--diagnosis, treatment, chemoprophylaxis, and institutional outbreak management: clinical practice guidelines of the Infectious Diseases Society of America.

    PubMed

    Harper, Scott A; Bradley, John S; Englund, Janet A; File, Thomas M; Gravenstein, Stefan; Hayden, Frederick G; McGeer, Allison J; Neuzil, Kathleen M; Pavia, Andrew T; Tapper, Michael L; Uyeki, Timothy M; Zimmerman, Richard K

    2009-04-15

    Guidelines for the treatment of persons with influenza virus infection were prepared by an Expert Panel of the Infectious Diseases Society of America. The evidence-based guidelines encompass diagnostic issues, treatment and chemoprophylaxis with antiviral medications, and issues related to institutional outbreak management for seasonal (interpandemic) influenza. They are intended for use by physicians in all medical specialties with direct patient care, because influenza virus infection is common in communities during influenza season and may be encountered by practitioners caring for a wide variety of patients.

  5. Measuring Quality of Care in Patients With Multiple Clinical Conditions: Summary of a Conference Conducted by the Society of General Internal Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Greenfield, Sheldon; Fung, Constance; Turner, Barbara J.

    2007-01-01

    Performance measurement has been widely advocated as a means to improve health care delivery and, ultimately, clinical outcomes. However, the evidence supporting the value of using the same quality measures designed for patients with a single clinical condition in patients with multiple conditions is weak. If clinically complex patients, defined here as patients with multiple clinical conditions, present greater challenges to achieving quality goals, providers may shun them or ignore important, but unmeasured, clinical issues. This paper summarizes the proceedings of a conference addressing the challenge of measuring quality of care in the patient with multiple clinical conditions with the goal of informing the implementation of quality measurement systems and future research programs on this topic. The conference had three main areas of discussion. First, the potential problems caused by applying current quality standards to patients with multiple conditions were examined. Second, the advantages and disadvantages of three strategies to improve quality measurement in clinically complex patients were evaluated: excluding certain clinically complex patients from a given standard, relaxing the performance target, and assigning a greater weight to some measures based on the expected clinical benefit or difficulty of reaching the performance target. Third, the strengths and weaknesses of potential novel measures such change in functional status were considered. The group concurred that, because clinically complex patients present a threat to the implementation of quality measures, high priority must be assigned to a research agenda on this topic. This research should evaluate the impact of quality measurement on these patients and expand the range of quality measures relevant to the care of clinically complex patients. PMID:17516106

  6. Abortion in a just society.

    PubMed

    Hunt, M E

    1993-01-01

    A female Catholic theologian imagines a just society that does not judge women who decide to undergo an abortion. The Church, practitioners, and the courts must trust that women do make person-enhancing choices about the quality of life. In the last 15 years most progress in securing a woman's right to abortion has been limited to white, well-educated, and middle or upper middle class women. A just society would consider reproductive options a human right. Abortion providers are examples of a move to a just society; they are committed to women's well-being. There are some facts that make one pessimistic about achieving abortion in a just society. The US Supreme Court plans to review important decisions establishing abortion as a civil right. Further, some men insist on suing women who want to make their own reproductive decisions--an anti-choice tactic to wear away women's right to reproductive choice. Bombings of abortion clinics and harassment campaigns by anti-choice groups are common. These behaviors strain pro-choice proponents emotionally, psychically, and spiritually. Their tactics often lead to theologians practicing self-censorship because they fear backlash. Abortion providers also do this. Further, the reaction to AIDS is that sex is bad. Anti-abortion groups use AIDS to further their campaigns, claiming that AIDS is a punishment for sex. Strategies working towards abortion in a just society should be education and persuasion of policymakers and citizens about women's right to choose, since they are the ones most affected by abortion. Moreover, only women can secure their rights to abortion. In a just society, every health maintenance organization, insurance company, and group practice would consider abortion a normal service. A just society provides for the survival needs of the most marginalized.

  7. Society for Vascular Medicine

    MedlinePlus

    ... Certification with this new online course from the Society for Vascular Medicine. Learn more. Looking for a ... jobs are listed right now. Copyright © 2016 The Society for Vascular Medicine. All Rights Reserved.

  8. American Cancer Society

    MedlinePlus

    ... your friends, your family, and the American Cancer Society help you take a step closer toward a ... DNA Offers Lung Cancer Clues An American Cancer Society grantee discovers a non-coding gene that may ...

  9. American Rocket Society

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    In addition to Dr. Robert Goddard's pioneering work, American experimentation in rocketry prior to World War II grew, primarily in technical societies. This is an early rocket motor designed and developed by the American Rocket Society in 1932.

  10. Society of Gynecologic Surgeons

    MedlinePlus

    ... Myers, MD SGS Mission The mission of the Society of Gynecologic Surgeons is to promote excellence in ... research, and professional and public education. Research The Society prides itself in mentoring young gynecologic surgeons and ...

  11. American Urogynecologic Society

    MedlinePlus

    ... Patient Site » PFD Registry » Contact Us American Urogynecologic Society 1100 Wayne Avenue, Suite 670 Silver Spring, MD ... Us | Privacy Policy | HONcode Accredited © 2017 American Urogynecologic Society. All rights reserved.

  12. Society for Ambulatory Anesthesia

    MedlinePlus

    ... We Represent Ambulatory and Office-Based Anesthesia The Society for Ambulatory Anesthesia provides educational opportunities, encourages research ... 6620 | E-mail: info@sambahq.org Copyright | 2017 Society for Ambulatory Anesthesia Home | Search | Terms | Privacy Policy | ...

  13. Scoliosis Research Society

    MedlinePlus

    Scoliosis Research Society Close Menu Member Login Become a Member Home Find a Specialist | Calendar Contact | Donate Patients and Families Professionals ... Find a Specialist Calendar Contact Donate Scoliosis Research Society Dedicated to the optimal care of patients with ...

  14. Society for Vascular Medicine

    MedlinePlus

    ... Journal Scientific Sessions Website FAQ Copyright © 2017 The Society for Vascular Medicine. All Rights Reserved. Phone: +1- ... page Videos Training Programs Journal Access the Journal Society Communications Patient Information Pages Vascular Medicine Journal CME ...

  15. Breakthrough cancer medicine and its impact on novel drug development in China: report of the US Chinese Anti-Cancer Association (USCACA) and Chinese Society of Clinical Oncology (CSCO) Joint Session at the 17th CSCO Annual Meeting

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Feng Roger; Ding, Jian; Chen, Helen X.; Liu, Hao; Fung, Man-Cheong; Koehler, Maria; Armand, Jean Pierre; Jiang, Lei; Xu, Xiao; Zhang, Ge; Xu, Li; Qian, Pascal; Yan, Li

    2014-01-01

    The US Chinese Anti-Cancer Association (USCACA) teamed up with Chinese Society of Clinical Oncology (CSCO) to host a joint session at the17th CSCO Annual Meeting on September 20th, 2014 in Xiamen, China. With a focus on breakthrough cancer medicines, the session featured innovative approaches to evaluate breakthrough agents and established a platform to interactively share successful experiences from case studies of 6 novel agents from both the United States and China. The goal of the session is to inspire scientific and practical considerations for clinical trial design and strategy to expedite cancer drug development in China. A panel discussion further provided in-depth advice on advancing both early and full development of novel cancer medicines in China. PMID:25418191

  16. AMERICAN ASSOCIATION OF CLINICAL ENDOCRINOLOGISTS, AMERICAN COLLEGE OF ENDOCRINOLOGY, AND ANDROGEN EXCESS AND PCOS SOCIETY DISEASE STATE CLINICAL REVIEW: GUIDE TO THE BEST PRACTICES IN THE EVALUATION AND TREATMENT OF POLYCYSTIC OVARY SYNDROME - PART 2.

    PubMed

    Goodman, Neil F; Cobin, Rhoda H; Futterweit, Walter; Glueck, Jennifer S; Legro, Richard S; Carmina, Enrico

    2015-12-01

    Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is recognized as the most common endocrine disorder of reproductive-aged women around the world. This document, produced by the collaboration of the American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists and the Androgen Excess Society aims to highlight the most important clinical issues confronting physicians and their patients with PCOS. It is a summary of current best practices in 2014. Insulin resistance is believed to play an intrinsic role in the pathogenesis of PCOS. The mechanism by which insulin resistance or insulin give rise to oligomenorrhea and hyperandrogenemia, however, is unclear. Hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamp studies have shown that both obese and lean women with PCOS have some degree of insulin resistance. Insulin resistance is implicated in the ovulatory dysfunction of PCOS by disrupting the hypothalamic-pituitary-ovarian axis. Given the association with insulin resistance, all women with PCOS require evaluation for the risk of metabolic syndrome (MetS) and its components, including type 2 diabetes, hypertension, hyperlipidemia, and the possible risk of clinical events, including acute myocardial infarction and stroke. Obese women with PCOS are at increased risk for MetS with impaired glucose tolerance (IGT; 31 to 35%) and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM; 7.5 to 10%). Rates of progression from normal glucose tolerance to IGT, and in turn to T2DM, may be as high as 5 to 15% within 3 years. Data suggest the need for baseline oral glucose tolerance test every 1 to 2 years based on family history of T2DM as well as body mass index (BMI) and yearly in women with IGT. Compared with BMI- and age-matched controls, young, lean PCOS women have lower high-density lipoprotein (HDL) size, higher very-low-density lipoprotein particle number, higher low-density lipoprotein (LDL) particle number, and borderline lower LDL size. Statins have been shown to lower testosterone levels either alone or in combination with oral

  17. Persistent pain in the older adult: what should we do now in light of the 2009 American geriatrics society clinical practice guideline?

    PubMed

    Katz, James D; Shah, Tina

    2009-12-01

    The recent publication of revised guidelines for the management of persistent pain in the older adult (American Geriatric Society, 2009) has posed a dilemma for clinicians. In essence, these revised guidelines now downplay the use of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) relative to prior year's recommendations. The strong recommendation for caution when employing NSAIDs is because of the numerous, well-documented, potential adverse effects including renal failure, stroke, hypertension, heart failure exacerbations, and gastrointestinal complications. Nevertheless, physicians still have a substantial arsenal for combating chronic pain due to such conditions as degenerative arthritis and back problems. Options for intervention include physical therapy, topical nonsteroidals, capsaicin, topical lidocaine, intra-articular therapies, and judicious use of narcotics. In the future, cyclooxygenase-inhibiting nitric oxide-donating drugs may represent a technical improvement in the toxicity profile of traditional NSAIDs.

  18. Diagnosis, prevention, and treatment of catheter-associated urinary tract infection in adults: 2009 International Clinical Practice Guidelines from the Infectious Diseases Society of America.

    PubMed

    Hooton, Thomas M; Bradley, Suzanne F; Cardenas, Diana D; Colgan, Richard; Geerlings, Suzanne E; Rice, James C; Saint, Sanjay; Schaeffer, Anthony J; Tambayh, Paul A; Tenke, Peter; Nicolle, Lindsay E

    2010-03-01

    Guidelines for the diagnosis, prevention, and management of persons with catheter-associated urinary tract infection (CA-UTI), both symptomatic and asymptomatic, were prepared by an Expert Panel of the Infectious Diseases Society of America. The evidence-based guidelines encompass diagnostic criteria, strategies to reduce the risk of CA-UTIs, strategies that have not been found to reduce the incidence of urinary infections, and management strategies for patients with catheter-associated asymptomatic bacteriuria or symptomatic urinary tract infection. These guidelines are intended for use by physicians in all medical specialties who perform direct patient care, with an emphasis on the care of patients in hospitals and long-term care facilities.

  19. Clinical trials update from the joint European Society and World Congress of Cardiology meeting: PEP-CHF, ACCLAIM and the HHH study.

    PubMed

    Cleland, John G F; Coletta, Alison P; Clark, Andrew L

    2006-10-01

    This article provides information and a commentary on trials relevant to the pathophysiology, prevention and treatment of heart failure, presented at the joint European Society and World Congress of Cardiology meeting held in Barcelona in September 2006. All reports should be considered as preliminary data, as analyses may change in the final publication. The PEP-CHF study suggests that perindopril improves symptoms and functional capacity and may reduce heart failure hospitalisations in patients with diastolic heart failure. Although immune modulation therapy failed to reduce the incidence of all-cause mortality and cardiovascular hospitalisations in the ACCLAIM study, the observed differences in outcome in some heart failure patients warrants further investigation. The HHH study failed to show a beneficial effect of telemonitoring over usual care in patients with heart failure but potentially important country interactions were observed.

  20. Steroid Differentiation: The Safety Profile of Various Steroids on Retinal Cells in Vitro and their Implications for Clinical Use (An American Ophthalmological Society Thesis)

    PubMed Central

    Kuppermann, Baruch D.; Zacharias, Leandro Cabral; Kenney, M. Cristina

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To determine if potentially viable alternatives to the clinical use of intravitreal triamcinolone acetonide should be considered based on a comparative assessment of the in vitro effects of five commercially available corticosteroids. We hypothesized that dexamethasone, betamethasone, methylprednisolone, loteprednol etabonate, and fluocinolone acetonide, at clinically relevant doses, may show different levels of in vitro cytotoxicity to retinal cells. Methods: Cultures of human retinal pigment epithelial cells (ARPE-19) and rat embryonal neurosensory precursor retinal cells (R28) were treated with dexamethasone, betamethasone, methylprednisolone, loteprednol, or fluocinolone acetonide. Cell viability as a measure of cell death was determined by trypan blue dye exclusion assay. The mechanical effect of drug crystals was evaluated by solubilizing the steroid formulations. Mitochondrial dehydrogenase and membrane potential were assessed to measure cell damage. Results: Betamethasone, loteprednol, and methylprednisolone, in commercially available forms, caused significant cytotoxic changes to retinal cells in vitro at clinically relevant doses. This effect was less pronounced with solubilized betamethasone. Dexamethasone at concentrations up to 5 times the clinical dose of free drug injections and 1000 times greater than a drug implant did not cause decreased cell viability. Fluocinolone acetonide at doses 1000 times higher than observed with drug delivery systems showed no cytotoxic effect. Conclusions: Betamethasone, loteprednol, and methylprednisolone exhibited cytotoxicity at clinically relevant doses and do not appear to be good therapeutic options for intravitreal use. In comparison, dexamethasone and fluocinolone acetonide, which exhibited fewer cytotoxic effects than other steroids, may be potentially viable alternatives to triamcinolone acetonide for clinical use. PMID:25646032

  1. Clinical evaluation of cardiovascular devices: principles, problems, and proposals for European regulatory reform. Report of a policy conference of the European Society of Cardiology.

    PubMed

    Fraser, Alan G; Daubert, Jean-Claude; Van de Werf, Frans; Estes, N A Mark; Smith, Sidney C; Krucoff, Mitchell W; Vardas, Panos E; Komajda, Michel

    2011-07-01

    The European Commission announced in 2008 that a fundamental revision of the medical device directives is being considered in order to clarify and strengthen the current legal framework. The system for testing and approving devices in Europe was established >20 years ago as a 'New Approach' to a previously little-regulated industry. It is recognized by many that the regulatory system has not kept pace with technological advances and changing patterns of medical practice. New legislation will be drafted during 2011, but medical experts have been little involved in this important process. This context makes it an opportune time for a professional association to advise from both clinical and academic perspectives about changes which should be made to improve the safety and efficacy of devices used in clinical practice and to develop more appropriate systems for their clinical evaluation and post-marketing surveillance. This report summarizes how medical devices are regulated and it reviews some serious clinical problems that have occurred with cardiovascular devices. Finally, it presents the main recommendations from a Policy Conference on the Clinical Evaluation of Cardiovascular Devices that was held at the European Heart House in January 2011.

  2. Comparison between National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) and European Society of Cardiology (ESC) guidelines for the diagnosis and management of stable angina: implications for clinical practice

    PubMed Central

    Archbold, R Andrew

    2016-01-01

    Cardiologists in the UK use clinical practice guidelines from the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) and from the European Society of Cardiology (ESC) to aid clinical decision-making. This review compares their recommendations regarding stable angina. NICE's diagnostic algorithm changed clinical practice in the UK, with most cardiologists moving from the exercise ECG towards newer, more accurate imaging modalities such as CT and MRI for diagnostic testing in patients with a low or medium probability of coronary artery disease (CAD), and directly to invasive coronary angiography in patients with a high probability of CAD. ESC guidelines are based around stress imaging for most patient groups. Both guidelines stress the importance of optimal medical therapy for patients with stable angina. NICE recommends coronary artery bypass graft surgery to improve prognosis for patients with left main stem and/or proximal 3-vessel disease, whereas the ESC also includes proximal left anterior descending artery disease among its indications for revascularisation to improve prognosis, particularly if there is evidence of myocardial ischaemia. The relation between disease complexity and 5-year clinical outcomes after revascularisation in patients with left main stem and/or 3-vessel CAD has been integrated into ESC guidance through the use of the SYNTAX score to aid treatment selection in this group of patients. Patients with stable angina who have disease involving the proximal left anterior descending artery are less likely to undergo myocardial revascularisation if they are managed according to NICE's guidance compared with the ESC's guidance. PMID:27335655

  3. Types of Programs and Evaluation Processes Needed to Maximize the Pharmacist's Contribution to Society: 2--The Role of the Clinical Sciences.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gans, John A.; Downs, George E.

    1978-01-01

    The role of clinical sciences in the continuing education of pharmacists is seen to be primarily in the area of changing the practice of pharmacy. Programs are described that would alter pharmacists' practice setting, namely the services they provide, and thus establish a rationale for pharmacists' need for continuing education. (JMD)

  4. AME evidence series 001—The Society for Translational Medicine: clinical practice guidelines for diagnosis and early identification of sepsis in the hospital

    PubMed Central

    Smischney, Nathan J.; Zhang, Haibo; Van Poucke, Sven; Tsirigotis, Panagiotis; Rello, Jordi; Honore, Patrick M.; Sen Kuan, Win; Ray, Juliet June; Zhou, Jiancang; Shang, You; Yu, Yuetian; Jung, Christian; Robba, Chiara; Taccone, Fabio Silvio; Caironi, Pietro; Grimaldi, David; Hofer, Stefan; Dimopoulos, George; Leone, Marc; Hong, Sang-Bum; Bahloul, Mabrouk; Argaud, Laurent; Kim, Won Young; Spapen, Herbert D.; Rocco, Jose Rodolfo

    2016-01-01

    Sepsis is a heterogeneous disease caused by an infection stimulus that triggers several complex local and systemic immuno-inflammatory reactions, which results in multiple organ dysfunction and significant morbidity and mortality. The diagnosis of sepsis is challenging because there is no gold standard for diagnosis. As a result, the clinical diagnosis of sepsis is ever changing to meet the clinical and research requirements. Moreover, although there are many novel biomarkers and screening tools for predicting the risk of sepsis, the diagnostic performance and effectiveness of these measures are less than satisfactory, and there is insufficient evidence to recommend clinical use of these new techniques. As a consequence, diagnostic criteria for sepsis need regular revision to cope with emerging evidence. This review aims to present the most updated information on diagnosis and early recognition of sepsis. Recommendations for clinical use of different diagnostic tools rely on the Grades of Recommendation Assessment, Development and Evaluation (GRADE) framework. Because most of the studies were observational and did not allow a reliable assessment of these tools, a two-step inference approach was employed. Future trials need to confirm or refute a particular index test and should directly explore relevant patient outcome parameters. PMID:27747021

  5. Clinical trials update from the European Society of Cardiology heart failure meeting: TNT subgroup analysis, darbepoetin alfa, FERRIC-HF and KW-3902.

    PubMed

    Coletta, Alison P; Tin, Lwin; Loh, P Huan; Clark, Andrew L; Cleland, John G F

    2006-08-01

    This article provides information and a commentary on trials relevant to the pathophysiology, prevention and treatment of heart failure, presented at the European Society of Cardiology heart failure meeting held in June 2006. All reports should be considered as preliminary data, as analyses may change in the final publication. In a sub-group analysis of the TNT study, intensive treatment with high-dose atorvastatin significantly reduced hospitalisations for heart failure in patients with stable coronary heart disease, compared with low-dose atorvastatin; this benefit was most evident in patients with a history of heart failure at baseline. In a combined analysis of two studies of darbepoetin alfa, which included 475 patients, treatment increased and maintained haemoglobin levels and produced non-significant improvements in symptoms and morbidity in anaemic heart failure patients compared to placebo. In the FERRIC-HF study (n=35), intravenous iron sucrose therapy improved exercise capacity and symptom status in iron-deficient heart failure patients. In a combined analysis of two studies (n=186), the adenosine A(1) receptor antagonist KW-3902 showed diuretic properties and appeared to enhance response to loop diuretics in heart failure patients hospitalised with fluid overload.

  6. Clinical practice guidelines for the management of metastatic colorectal cancer: a consensus statement of the Hellenic Society of Medical Oncologists (HeSMO)

    PubMed Central

    Dervenis, Christos; Xynos, Evaghelos; Sotiropoulos, George; Gouvas, Nikolaos; Boukovinas, Ioannis; Agalianos, Christos; Androulakis, Nikolaos; Athanasiadis, Athanasios; Christodoulou, Christos; Chrysou, Evangelia; Emmanouilidis, Christos; Georgiou, Panagiotis; Karachaliou, Niki; Katopodi, Ourania; Kountourakis, Panteleimon; Kyriazanos, Ioannis; Makatsoris, Thomas; Papakostas, Pavlos; Papamichael, Demetris; Pechlivanides, George; Pentheroudakis, Georgios; Pilpilidis, Ioannis; Sgouros, Joseph; Tekkis, Paris; Triantopoulou, Charina; Tzardi, Maria; Vassiliou, Vassilis; Vini, Louiza; Xynogalos, Spyridon; Ziras, Nikolaos; Souglakos, John

    2016-01-01

    There is discrepancy and failure to adhere to current international guidelines for the management of metastatic colorectal cancer (CRC) in hospitals in Greece and Cyprus. The aim of the present document is to provide a consensus on the multidisciplinary management of metastastic CRC, considering both special characteristics of our Healthcare System and international guidelines. Following discussion and online communication among the members of an executive team chosen by the Hellenic Society of Medical Oncology (HeSMO), a consensus for metastastic CRC disease was developed. Statements were subjected to the Delphi methodology on two voting rounds by invited multidisciplinary international experts on CRC. Statements reaching level of agreement by ≥80% were considered as having achieved large consensus, whereas statements reaching 60-80% moderate consensus. One hundred and nine statements were developed. Ninety experts voted for those statements. The median rate of abstain per statement was 18.5% (range: 0-54%). In the end of the process, all statements achieved a large consensus. The importance of centralization, care by a multidisciplinary team, adherence to guidelines, and personalization is emphasized. R0 resection is the only intervention that may offer substantial improvement in the oncological outcomes. PMID:27708505

  7. Guideline for the diagnosis of drug hypersensitivity reactions: S2K-Guideline of the German Society for Allergology and Clinical Immunology (DGAKI) and the German Dermatological Society (DDG) in collaboration with the Association of German Allergologists (AeDA), the German Society for Pediatric Allergology and Environmental Medicine (GPA), the German Contact Dermatitis Research Group (DKG), the Swiss Society for Allergy and Immunology (SGAI), the Austrian Society for Allergology and Immunology (ÖGAI), the German Academy of Allergology and Environmental Medicine (DAAU), the German Center for Documentation of Severe Skin Reactions and the German Federal Institute for Drugs and Medical Products (BfArM).

    PubMed

    Brockow, Knut; Przybilla, Bernhard; Aberer, Werner; Bircher, Andreas J; Brehler, Randolf; Dickel, Heinrich; Fuchs, Thomas; Jakob, Thilo; Lange, Lars; Pfützner, Wolfgang; Mockenhaupt, Maja; Ott, Hagen; Pfaar, Oliver; Ring, Johannes; Sachs, Bernhardt; Sitter, Helmut; Trautmann, Axel; Treudler, Regina; Wedi, Bettina; Worm, Margitta; Wurpts, Gerda; Zuberbier, Torsten; Merk, Hans F

    Drug hypersensitivity reactions are unpredictable adverse drug reactions. They manifest either within 1-6 h following drug intake (immediate reactions) with mild to life-threatening symptoms of anaphylaxis, or several hours to days later (delayed reactions), primarily as exanthematous eruptions. It is not always possible to detect involvement of the immune system (allergy). Waiving diagnostic tests can result in severe reactions on renewed exposure on the one hand, and to unjustified treatment restrictions on the other. With this guideline, experts from various specialist societies and institutions have formulated recommendations and an algorithm for the diagnosis of allergies. The key principles of diagnosing allergic/hypersensitivity drug reactions are presented. Where possible, the objective is to perform allergy diagnostics within 4 weeks-6 months following the reaction. A clinical classification of symptoms based on the morphology and time course of the reaction is required in order to plan a diagnostic work-up. In the case of typical symptoms of a drug hypersensitivity reaction and unequivocal findings from validated skin and/or laboratory tests, a reaction can be attributed to a trigger with sufficient confidence. However, skin and laboratory tests are often negative or insufficiently reliable. In such cases, controlled provocation testing is required to clarify drug reactions. This method is reliable and safe when attention is paid to indications and contraindications and performed under appropriate medical supervision. The results of the overall assessment are discussed with the patient and documented in an "allergy passport" in order to ensure targeted avoidance in the future and allow the use of alternative drugs where possible.

  8. Psychosocial Issues in Pediatric Inflammatory Bowel Disease: A Clinical Report of the North American Society for Pediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition

    PubMed Central

    Mackner, Laura M.; Greenley, Rachel Neff; Szigethy, Eva; Herzer, Michele; Deer, Kate; Hommel, Kevin A.

    2013-01-01

    Pediatric inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) can affect many areas of psychosocial functioning, and comprehensive medical care includes consideration of psychosocial issues as well as disease factors. The purpose of this clinical report is to review research on psychosocial functioning in pediatric IBD and to provide recommendations for care providers in the areas of psychopathology, health related quality of life and social, family and school functioning. Youth with IBD are at increased risk for difficulty in all areas reviewed, and many psychosocial factors are associated with disease activity, which highlights the importance of monitoring psychosocial functioning as part of clinical care. Several interventions have empirical support or show promise for addressing psychosocial difficulty, and recommendations for monitoring and treating these issues are provided. PMID:23287808

  9. Small-bowel capsule endoscopy and device-assisted enteroscopy for diagnosis and treatment of small-bowel disorders: European Society of Gastrointestinal Endoscopy (ESGE) Clinical Guideline.

    PubMed

    Pennazio, Marco; Spada, Cristiano; Eliakim, Rami; Keuchel, Martin; May, Andrea; Mulder, Chris J; Rondonotti, Emanuele; Adler, Samuel N; Albert, Joerg; Baltes, Peter; Barbaro, Federico; Cellier, Christophe; Charton, Jean Pierre; Delvaux, Michel; Despott, Edward J; Domagk, Dirk; Klein, Amir; McAlindon, Mark; Rosa, Bruno; Rowse, Georgina; Sanders, David S; Saurin, Jean Christophe; Sidhu, Reena; Dumonceau, Jean-Marc; Hassan, Cesare; Gralnek, Ian M

    2015-04-01

    This Guideline is an official statement of the European Society of Gastrointestinal Endoscopy (ESGE). The Guideline was also reviewed and endorsed by the British Society of Gastroenterology (BSG). It addresses the roles of small-bowel capsule endoscopy and device-assisted enteroscopy for diagnosis and treatment of small-bowel disorders. Main recommendations 1 ESGE recommends small-bowel video capsule endoscopy as the first-line investigation in patients with obscure gastrointestinal bleeding (strong recommendation, moderate quality evidence). 2 In patients with overt obscure gastrointestinal bleeding, ESGE recommends performing small-bowel capsule endoscopy as soon as possible after the bleeding episode, optimally within 14 days, in order to maximize the diagnostic yield (strong recommendation, moderate quality evidence). 3 ESGE does not recommend the routine performance of second-look endoscopy prior to small-bowel capsule endoscopy; however whether to perform second-look endoscopy before capsule endoscopy in patients with obscure gastrointestinal bleeding or iron-deficiency anaemia should be decided on a case-by-case basis (strong recommendation, low quality evidence). 4 In patients with positive findings at small-bowel capsule endoscopy, ESGE recommends device-assisted enteroscopy to confirm and possibly treat lesions identified by capsule endoscopy (strong recommendation, high quality evidence). 5 ESGE recommends ileocolonoscopy as the first endoscopic examination for investigating patients with suspected Crohn's disease (strong recommendation, high quality evidence). In patients with suspected Crohn's disease and negative ileocolonoscopy findings, ESGE recommends small-bowel capsule endoscopy as the initial diagnostic modality for investigating the small bowel, in the absence of obstructive symptoms or known stenosis (strong recommendation, moderate quality evidence).ESGE does not recommend routine small-bowel imaging or the use of the PillCam patency capsule

  10. Ethical and Clinical Aspects of Intensive Care Unit Admission in Patients with Hematological Malignancies: Guidelines of the Ethics Commission of the French Society of Hematology

    PubMed Central

    Malak, Sandra; Sotto, Jean-Jacques; Ceccaldi, Joël; Colombat, Philippe; Casassus, Philippe; Jaulmes, Dominique; Rochant, Henri; Cheminant, Morgane; Beaussant, Yvan; Zittoun, Robert; Bordessoule, Dominique

    2014-01-01

    Admission of patients with hematological malignancies to intensive care unit (ICU) raises recurrent ethical issues for both hematological and intensivist teams. The decision of transfer to ICU has major consequences for end of life care for patients and their relatives. It also impacts organizational human and economic aspects for the ICU and global health policy. In light of the recent advances in hematology and critical care medicine, a wide multidisciplinary debate has been conducted resulting in guidelines approved by consensus by both disciplines. The main aspects developed were (i) clarification of the clinical situations that could lead to a transfer to ICU taking into account the severity criteria of both hematological malignancy and clinical distress, (ii) understanding the process of decision-making in a context of regular interdisciplinary concertation involving the patient and his relatives, (iii) organization of a collegial concertation at the time of the initial decision of transfer to ICU and throughout and beyond the stay in ICU. The aim of this work is to propose suggestions to strengthen the collaboration between the different teams involved, to facilitate the daily decision-making process, and to allow improvement of clinical practice. PMID:25349612

  11. Self-Management in Pediatric Inflammatory Bowel Disease: A Clinical Report of the North American Society for Pediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology, and Nutrition

    PubMed Central

    Hommel, Kevin A.; Greenley, Rachel N.; Maddux, Michele Herzer; Gray, Wendy N.; Mackner, Laura M.

    2013-01-01

    This clinical report aims to review key self-management and adherence issues in pediatric inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) and to provide recommendations for health care providers regarding evidence-based assessment and treatment approaches to promote optimal self-management. Self-management difficulties in the form of nonadherence to treatment regimens are common in pediatric IBD and are influenced by various disease-related, individual, family, and health-professional relationship factors. To promote adaptive self-management, health care providers are encouraged to adopt a long-term preventive orientation which includes routine screening of barriers to self-management and nonadherence in the context of routine clinic appointments. The use of a multimethod approach to assessment which incorporates objective measures (e.g., pill counts or bioassays) may be particularly advantageous. Individualized treatment approaches that incorporate evidence-based practices, such as providing written treatment plans and offering opportunities to practice and receive feedback on skills may help to ameliorate minor self-management concerns; however, more severe or chronic self-management problems may require a referral for behavioral health intervention. Additional research to broaden our understanding of self-management in domains beyond medication adherence and to evaluate the impact of clinic-based interventions is imperative. PMID:23648790

  12. Self-management in pediatric inflammatory bowel disease: A clinical report of the North American Society for Pediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology, and Nutrition.

    PubMed

    Hommel, Kevin A; Greenley, Rachel N; Maddux, Michele Herzer; Gray, Wendy N; Mackner, Laura M

    2013-08-01

    This clinical report aims to review key self-management and adherence issues in pediatric inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) and to provide recommendations for health care providers regarding evidence-based assessment and treatment approaches to promote optimal self-management. Self-management difficulties in the form of nonadherence to treatment regimens are common in pediatric IBD and are influenced by various disease-related, individual, family, and health professional relationship factors. To promote adaptive self-management, health care providers are encouraged to adopt a long-term preventive orientation, which includes routine screening of barriers to self-management and nonadherence in the context of routine clinic appointments. The use of a multimethod approach to assessment that incorporates objective measures (eg, pill counts or bioassays) may be particularly advantageous. Individualized treatment approaches that incorporate evidence-based practices, such as providing written treatment plans and offering opportunities to practice and receive feedback on skills, may help to ameliorate minor self-management concerns; however, more severe or chronic self-management problems may require a referral for behavioral health intervention. Additional research to broaden our understanding of self-management in domains beyond medication adherence and to evaluate the effect of clinic-based interventions is imperative.

  13. [Spanish Society of Pediatric Infectious Diseases, Spanish Society of Paediatric Clinical Immunology and Allergy, Spanish Association of Paediatric Primary Care, and the Spanish Society of Extra-hospital Paediatrics and Primary Health Care consensus document on antibiotic treatment in penicillin or amoxicillin allergy].

    PubMed

    Baquero-Artigao, Fernando; Michavila, Antonio; Suárez-Rodriguez, Ángeles; Hernandez, Anselmo; Martínez-Campos, Leticia; Calvo, Cristina

    2017-02-01

    The suspected allergy to beta-lactam antibiotics, especially penicillin and amoxicillin, is the most frequent reason for consultation in Child Allergy Units. In this consensus document, the clinical and diagnostic criteria of allergic reactions are described, as well as alternative antibiotic treatment for the most common infections diagnosed in paediatrics for patients with known or suspected allergy.

  14. Mexican Society of Bioelectromagnetism

    SciTech Connect

    Canedo, Luis

    2008-08-11

    In July 2007 physicians, biologists and physicists that have collaborated in previous meetings of the medical branch of the Mexican Physical Society constituted the Mexican Society of Bioelectromagnetism with the purpose of promote scientific study of the interaction of electromagnetic energy (at frequencies ranging from zero Hertz through those of visible light) and acoustic energy with biological systems. A second goal was to increase the contribution of medical and biological professionals in the meetings of the medical branch of the Mexican Physical Society. The following paragraphs summarize some objectives of the Mexican Society of Bioelectromagnetism for the next two years.

  15. Realizing the promise of reverse phase protein arrays for clinical, translational, and basic research: a workshop report: the RPPA (Reverse Phase Protein Array) society.

    PubMed

    Akbani, Rehan; Becker, Karl-Friedrich; Carragher, Neil; Goldstein, Ted; de Koning, Leanne; Korf, Ulrike; Liotta, Lance; Mills, Gordon B; Nishizuka, Satoshi S; Pawlak, Michael; Petricoin, Emanuel F; Pollard, Harvey B; Serrels, Bryan; Zhu, Jingchun

    2014-07-01

    Reverse phase protein array (RPPA) technology introduced a miniaturized "antigen-down" or "dot-blot" immunoassay suitable for quantifying the relative, semi-quantitative or quantitative (if a well-accepted reference standard exists) abundance of total protein levels and post-translational modifications across a variety of biological samples including cultured cells, tissues, and body fluids. The recent evolution of RPPA combined with more sophisticated sample handling, optical detection, quality control, and better quality affinity reagents provides exquisite sensitivity and high sample throughput at a reasonable cost per sample. This facilitates large-scale multiplex analysis of multiple post-translational markers across samples from in vitro, preclinical, or clinical samples. The technical power of RPPA is stimulating the application and widespread adoption of RPPA methods within academic, clinical, and industrial research laboratories. Advances in RPPA technology now offer scientists the opportunity to quantify protein analytes with high precision, sensitivity, throughput, and robustness. As a result, adopters of RPPA technology have recognized critical success factors for useful and maximum exploitation of RPPA technologies, including the following: preservation and optimization of pre-analytical sample quality, application of validated high-affinity and specific antibody (or other protein affinity) detection reagents, dedicated informatics solutions to ensure accurate and robust quantification of protein analytes, and quality-assured procedures and data analysis workflows compatible with application within regulated clinical environments. In 2011, 2012, and 2013, the first three Global RPPA workshops were held in the United States, Europe, and Japan, respectively. These workshops provided an opportunity for RPPA laboratories, vendors, and users to share and discuss results, the latest technology platforms, best practices, and future challenges and

  16. The treatment of bacterial vaginosis in pregnancy with clindamycin to reduce the risk of infection-related preterm birth: a response to the Danish Society of Obstetrics and Gynecology guideline group's clinical recommendations.

    PubMed

    Lamont, Ronald F; Keelan, Jeffrey A; Larsson, Per G; Jørgensen, Jan S

    2017-02-01

    Preterm birth is the major cause of perinatal mortality and morbidity worldwide. Infection/inflammation is responsible for a significant percentage of preterm birth, particularly at early gestations. A recent clinical recommendation by a guidelines group of the Danish Society of Obstetrics and Gynecology advised against the use of clindamycin for the treatment of bacterial vaginosis in pregnancy to reduce the risk of spontaneous preterm birth based on lack of evidence of efficacy. We believe that the evidence for the use of clindamycin for this indication is robust and that this recommendation was reached erroneously on the basis of flawed inclusion criteria: the inclusion of an unpublished study with poorly diagnosed bacterial vaginosis and the exclusion of an important pivotal study on the use of clindamycin in early pregnancy for the prevention of preterm birth. Had these errors been corrected, the conclusions would have been different.

  17. Public-private collaboration in clinical research during pregnancy, lactation, and childhood: joint position statement of the Early Nutrition Academy and the European Society for Pediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology, and Nutrition.

    PubMed

    Koletzko, Berthold; Benninga, Marc A; Godfrey, Keith M; Hornnes, Peter J; Kolaček, Sanja; Koletzko, Sibylle; Lentze, Michael J; Mader, Silke; McAuliffe, Fionnuala M; Oepkes, Dick; Oddy, Wendy H; Phillips, Alan; Rzehak, Peter; Socha, Piotr; Szajewska, Hania; Symonds, Michael E; Taminiau, Jan; Thapar, Nikhil; Troncone, Riccardo; Vandenplas, Yvan; Veereman, Gigi

    2014-04-01

    This position statement summarises a view of academia regarding standards for clinical research in collaboration with commercial enterprises, focussing on trials in pregnant women, breast-feeding women, and children. It is based on a review of the available literature and an expert workshop cosponsored by the Early Nutrition Academy and the European Society for Pediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology, and Nutrition. Clinical research collaborations between academic investigators and commercial enterprises are encouraged by universities, public funding agencies, and governmental organisations. One reason is a pressing need to obtain evidence on the effects, safety, and benefits of drugs and other commercial products and services. The credibility and value of results obtained through public-private research collaborations have, however, been questioned because many examples of inappropriate research practice have become known. Clinical research in pregnant and breast-feeding women, and in infants and children, raises sensitive scientific, ethical, and societal questions and requires the application of particularly high standards. Here we provide recommendations for the conduct of public-private research collaborations in these populations. In the interest of all stakeholders, these recommendations should contribute to more reliable, credible, and acceptable results of commercially sponsored trials and to reducing the existing credibility gap.

  18. [Implementation of quality standard UNE-EN ISO/IEC 17043 in the External Quality Control Program of the Spanish Society of Infectious Diseases and Clinical Microbiology].

    PubMed

    Poveda Gabaldón, Marta; Ovies, María Rosario; Orta Mira, Nieves; Serrano, M del Remedio Guna; Avila, Javier; Giménez, Alicia; Cardona, Concepción Gimeno

    2011-12-01

    The quality standard "UNE-EN-ISO 17043: 2010. Conformity assessment. General requirements for proficiency testing" applies to centers that organize intercomparisons in all areas. In the case of clinical microbiology laboratories, these intercomparisons must meet the management and technical standards required to achieve maximum quality in the performance of microbiological analysis and the preparation of test items (sample, product, data or other information used in the proficiency test) to enable them to be accredited. Once accredited, these laboratories can operate as a tool for quality control laboratories and competency assessment. In Spain, accreditation is granted by the Spanish Accreditation Body [Entidad Nacional de Acreditación (ENAC)]. The objective of this review is to explain how to apply the requirements of the standard to laboratories providing intercomparisons in the field of clinical microbiology (the organization responsible for all the tasks related to the development and operation of a proficiency testing program). This requires defining the scope and specifying the technical requirements (personnel management, control of equipment, facilities and environment, the design of the proficiency testing and data analysis for performance evaluation, communication with participants and confidentiality) and management requirements (document control, purchasing control, monitoring of complaints / claims, non-compliance, internal audits and management reviews).

  19. Executive summary of the diagnosis and treatment of urinary tract infection: Guidelines of the Spanish Society of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases (SEIMC).

    PubMed

    de Cueto, Marina; Aliaga, Luis; Alós, Juan-Ignacio; Canut, Andres; Los-Arcos, Ibai; Martínez, Jose Antonio; Mensa, Jose; Pintado, Vicente; Rodriguez-Pardo, Dolors; Yuste, Jose Ramon; Pigrau, Carles

    2016-12-22

    Most urinary tract infections (UTI) are uncomplicated infections occurring in young women. An extensive evaluation is not required in the majority of cases, and they can be safely managed as outpatients with oral antibiotics. Escherichia coli is by far the most common uropathogen, accounting for >80% of all cases. Other major clinical problems associated with UTI include asymptomatic bacteriuria, and patients with complicated UTI. Complicated UTIs are a heterogeneous group associated with conditions that increase the risk of acquiring infection or treatment failure. Distinguishing between complicated and uncomplicated UTI is important, as it influences the initial evaluation, choice, and duration of antimicrobial therapy. Diagnosis is especially challenging in the elderly and in patients with in-dwelling catheters. The increasing prevalence of resistant uropathogens, including extended-spectrum β-lactamases and carbapenemase-producing Enterobacteriaceae, and other multidrug-resistant Gram-negative organisms further compromises treatment of both complicated and uncomplicated UTIs. The aim of these Clinical Guidelines is to provide a set of recommendations for improving the diagnosis and treatment of UTI.

  20. Food allergies resulting from immunological cross-reactivity with inhalant allergens: Guidelines from the German Society for Allergology and Clinical Immunology (DGAKI), the German Dermatology Society (DDG), the Association of German Allergologists (AeDA) and the Society for Pediatric Allergology and Environmental Medicine (GPA).

    PubMed

    Worm, Margitta; Jappe, Uta; Kleine-Tebbe, Jörg; Schäfer, Christiane; Reese, Imke; Saloga, Joachim; Treudler, Regina; Zuberbier, Torsten; Waßmann, Anja; Fuchs, Thomas; Dölle, Sabine; Raithel, Martin; Ballmer-Weber, Barbara; Niggemann, Bodo; Werfel, Thomas

    A large proportion of immunoglobulin E (IgE)-mediated food allergies in older children, adolescents and adults are caused by cross-reactive allergenic structures. Primary sensitization is most commonly to inhalant allergens (e.g. Bet v 1, the major birch pollen allergen). IgE can be activated by various cross-reactive allergens and lead to a variety of clinical manifestations. In general, local and mild - in rare cases also severe and systemic - reactions occur directly after consumption of the food containing the cross-reactive allergen (e. g. plant-derived foods containing proteins of the Bet v 1 family). In clinical practice, sensitization to the primary responsible inhalant and/or food allergen can be detected by skin prick tests and/or in vitro detection of specific IgE. Component-based diagnostic methods can support clinical diagnosis. For individual allergens, these methods may be helpful to estimate the risk of systemic reactions. Confirmation of sensitization by oral provocation testing is important particulary in the case of unclear case history. New, as yet unrecognized allergens can also cause cross-reactions. The therapeutic potential of specific immunotherapy (SIT) with inhalant allergens and their effect on pollen-associated food allergies is currently unclear: results vary and placebo-controlled trials will be necessary in the future. Pollen allergies are very common. Altogether allergic sensitization to pollen and cross-reactive food allergens are very common in our latitudes. The actual relevance has to be assessed on an individual basis using the clinical information. Cite this as Worm M, Jappe U, Kleine-Tebbe J, Schäfer C, Reese I, Saloga J, Treudler R, Zuberbier T, Wassmann A, Fuchs T, Dölle S, Raithel M, Ballmer-Weber B, Niggemann B, Werfel T. Food allergies resulting from immunological cross-reactivity with inhalant allergens. Allergo J Int 2014; 23: 1-16 DOI 10.1007/s40629-014-0004-6.

  1. Status report from the American Acne & Rosacea Society on medical management of acne in adult women, part 1: overview, clinical characteristics, and laboratory evaluation.

    PubMed

    Del Rosso, James Q; Harper, Julie C; Graber, Emmy M; Thiboutot, Diane; Silverberg, Nanette B; Eichenfield, Dawn Zhang; Eichenfield, Lawrence F

    2015-10-01

    Acne presenting in adult women is commonly encountered in clinical practice. Many affected women have had acne during their teenaged years, have tried several therapies in the past, and are seeking effective treatment. Others are frustrated by the inexplicable emergence of acne as an adult when they never had it as a teenager. Both groups seek an explanation of why they have acne, are often psychosocially affected by its effects on appearance and self-esteem, and all are wanting effective and safe treatment. Clinicians are encouraged to connect favorably with each patient through careful history and physical examination and to consider underlying causes of androgen excess. Practical approaches to examination and laboratory evaluation are discussed.

  2. Review of American Society for Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition (ASPEN) Clinical Guidelines for Nutrition Support in Cancer Patients: nutrition screening and assessment.

    PubMed

    Huhmann, Maureen B; August, David A

    2008-01-01

    It is clear that cancer patients develop complex nutrition issues. Nutrition support may or may not be indicated in these patients depending on individual patient characteristics. This review article, the first in a series of articles to examine the A.S.P.E.N. Guidelines for the Use of Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition in Adult and Pediatric Patients Cancer Guidelines, evaluates the evidence related to the use of nutrition screening and nutrition assessment in cancer patients. This first article will provide background concerning nutrition issues in cancer patients as well as discuss the role of nutrition screening and nutrition assessment in the care of cancer patients. The goal of this review is to enrich the discussion contained in the Clinical Guidelines, cite the primary literature more completely, and suggest updates to the guideline statements in light of subsequent published studies. Future articles will explore the guidelines related to nutrition support in oncology patients receiving anticancer therapies.

  3. Clinical forensic medicine and its main fields of activity from the foundation of the German Society of Legal Medicine until today.

    PubMed

    Pollak, S

    2004-09-10

    The fields mainly covered by clinical forensic medicine are subject to time-related changes which are described on the basis of the German literature of the 20th century. Some fields of forensic sexual medicine (diagnosis of virginity, proof of criminal abortion, potentia coeundi, potentia generandi, potentia concipiendi) have become less important in the daily work of medicolegal institutes, whereas victims of rape and sexual abuse continue to form a major part of the forensic examination material in the German-speaking countries. The evaluation of suspected physical child abuse has grown in importance since the 60s, and it is essentially the merit of Elisabeth Trube-Becker that this problem is now dealt with also in scientific medicine. More recently, medicolegal experts are increasingly confronted with further groups of persons: victims of domestic violence, abused/neglected seniors, refugees from countries where torture is used. A new special field, which established itself only in the 90s, is the estimation of age with regard to the criminal responsibility of suspects who have no identity papers or pretend to have none. A phenomenon frequently observed in the last two decades is the non-accidental self-infliction of injuries. Whereas in the first half of the 20th century the motive for self-mutilation was typically to evade military service, this category of injury was later mainly seen in the context of insurance fraud; more recently most forensically relevant self-inflicted injuries refer to simulated offenses (fictitious sexual offenses and robbery, attacks allegedly having a political background). One of the traditional fields of clinical forensic medicine continues to be the evaluation of victims and suspects following bodily harm and attempted homicides. In the field of civil law medicolegal experts are particularly often concerned with controversial consequences of traffic accidents (e.g. alleged whiplash injuries after rear-end collisions at low

  4. The Society for Vascular Medicine: the first quarter century.

    PubMed

    Creager, Mark A; Hiatt, William R; Hirsch, Alan T; Olin, Jeffrey W; Jaff, Michael R; Cooke, John P; Rooke, Thom; Beckman, Joshua A; Froehlich, James B

    2015-02-01

    The Society for Vascular Medicine was founded in 1989. During the subsequent 25 years, the Society has grown to approximately 500 members and has achieved international recognition while making important contributions to vascular disease education, clinical vascular medicine and biology research, and patient care. In celebration of the Society's 25th anniversary, its past and current presidents reflect on the Society's history, challenges, and achievements, and emphasize the vital role of the SVM in the discipline of vascular medicine.

  5. Indian Vacuum Society: The Indian Vacuum Society

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saha, T. K.

    2008-03-01

    The Indian Vacuum Society (IVS) was established in 1970. It has over 800 members including many from Industry and R & D Institutions spread throughout India. The society has an active chapter at Kolkata. The society was formed with the main aim to promote, encourage and develop the growth of Vacuum Science, Techniques and Applications in India. In order to achieve this aim it has conducted a number of short term courses at graduate and technician levels on vacuum science and technology on topics ranging from low vacuum to ultrahigh vacuum So far it has conducted 39 such courses at different parts of the country and imparted training to more than 1200 persons in the field. Some of these courses were in-plant training courses conducted on the premises of the establishment and designed to take care of the special needs of the establishment. IVS also regularly conducts national and international seminars and symposia on vacuum science and technology with special emphasis on some theme related to applications of vacuum. A large number of delegates from all over India take part in the deliberations of such seminars and symposia and present their work. IVS also arranges technical visits to different industries and research institutes. The society also helped in the UNESCO sponsored post-graduate level courses in vacuum science, technology and applications conducted by Mumbai University. The society has also designed a certificate and diploma course for graduate level students studying vacuum science and technology and has submitted a syllabus to the academic council of the University of Mumbai for their approval, we hope that some colleges affiliated to the university will start this course from the coming academic year. IVS extended its support in standardizing many of the vacuum instruments and played a vital role in helping to set up a Regional Testing Centre along with BARC. As part of the development of vacuum education, the society arranges the participation of

  6. Towards the Learning Society.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ranson, Stewart

    1992-01-01

    Britain's education system is a beleaguered service accused of failing young people who leave school early without developing their potential. Education will always fail if youngsters' capacities are sectioned off to match a pyramidal, hierarchical society. The conditions for a learning society are basically political, requiring creation of a…

  7. Schools, Violence, and Society.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoffman, Allan M., Ed.

    The seeming increase of violence in American society and its schools has become a pressing issue. Some researchers argue that the American education system mirrors the dynamics of society. The articles in this book address the following issues: the extent of violence in American schools; the forms that violence takes; its root causes; the effects…

  8. Geologists' Role in Society

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bally, A. W.; And Others

    1976-01-01

    At a meeting sponsored by the Geological Society of America, earth scientists examined their function in society. Participants concluded that earth scientists are not providing a rationale for value judgments concerning the use and limitations of the earth and a program aimed at understanding solid-Earth resource systems is needed. (BT)

  9. [Consensus on antimicrobial sensitivity tests in gram-positive cocci. Subcommittee on Antimicrobials, SADEBAC (Argentinian Society of Clinical Bacteriology), Argentinian Association of Microbiology].

    PubMed

    Famiglietti, A; Quinteros, M; Predari, S C; Corso, A; Lopardo, H; Casellas, J M; Bantar, C; Couto, E; Galas, M; Goldberg, M; Gutkind, G; Kovensky Pupko, J; Marín, M; Nicola, F; Pasterán, F; Radice, M; Soloaga, R

    2003-01-01

    Antimicrobial susceptibility testing is mainly performed in Argentina by disk diffusion method, following National Committee for Clinical Laboratory Standards (NCCLS) recommendations. We worked out new recommendations for the reporting and interpretation of this test when dealing with gram-positive cocci, in accordance to local trends and epidemiology. General considerations for performing the diffusion assay, quality control, and an update on susceptibility testing for gram-positive cocci are reported in this first document. The present update should be considered as a group of recommendations summarized by Argentinean experts and as the result of a consensus meeting coordinated by the Subcomisión de Antimicrobianos of the Sociedad Argentina de Bacteriología Clínica (Asociación Argentina de Microbiología). Experts in antimicrobial agents were convened in order to prepare this final document. These recommendations take into account local needs, affordability and availability to be used in current practice, tending to contribute to the correct antimicrobial treatment election, according to the particular microorganism and the infection sites.

  10. Postpartum hemorrhage: guidelines for clinical practice from the French College of Gynaecologists and Obstetricians (CNGOF): in collaboration with the French Society of Anesthesiology and Intensive Care (SFAR).

    PubMed

    Sentilhes, Loïc; Vayssière, Christophe; Deneux-Tharaux, Catherine; Aya, Antoine Guy; Bayoumeu, Françoise; Bonnet, Marie-Pierre; Djoudi, Rachid; Dolley, Patricia; Dreyfus, Michel; Ducroux-Schouwey, Chantal; Dupont, Corinne; François, Anne; Gallot, Denis; Haumonté, Jean-Baptiste; Huissoud, Cyril; Kayem, Gilles; Keita, Hawa; Langer, Bruno; Mignon, Alexandre; Morel, Olivier; Parant, Olivier; Pelage, Jean-Pierre; Phan, Emmanuelle; Rossignol, Mathias; Tessier, Véronique; Mercier, Frédéric J; Goffinet, François

    2016-03-01

    Postpartum haemorrhage (PPH) is defined as blood loss ≥500mL after delivery and severe PPH as blood loss ≥1000mL, regardless of the route of delivery (professional consensus). The preventive administration of uterotonic agents just after delivery is effective in reducing the incidence of PPH and its systematic use is recommended, regardless of the route of delivery (Grade A). Oxytocin is the first-line prophylactic drug, regardless of the route of delivery (Grade A); a slowly dose of 5 or 10 IU can be administered (Grade A) either IV or IM (professional consensus). After vaginal delivery, routine cord drainage (Grade B), controlled cord traction (Grade A), uterine massage (Grade A), and routine bladder voiding (professional consensus) are not systematically recommended for PPH prevention. After caesarean delivery, placental delivery by controlled cord traction is recommended (grade B). The routine use of a collector bag to assess postpartum blood loss at vaginal delivery is not systematically recommended (Grade B), since the incidence of severe PPH is not affected by this intervention. In cases of overt PPH after vaginal delivery, placement of a blood collection bag is recommended (professional consensus). The initial treatment of PPH consists in a manual uterine examination, together with antibiotic prophylaxis, careful visual assessment of the lower genital tract, a uterine massage, and the administration of 5-10 IU oxytocin injected slowly IV or IM, followed by a maintenance infusion not to exceed a cumulative dose of 40IU (professional consensus). If oxytocin fails to control the bleeding, the administration of sulprostone is recommended within 30minutes of the PPH diagnosis (Grade C). Intrauterine balloon tamponade can be performed if sulprostone fails and before recourse to either surgery or interventional radiology (professional consensus). Fluid resuscitation is recommended for PPH persistent after first line uterotonics, or if clinical signs of

  11. [Molecular diagnostic and targeted therapy--"Barking dogs are going to bite": presentations from the 42nd Annual Meeting of the American Society of Clinical Oncology, Atlanta 2006].

    PubMed

    Rody, A; Loibl, S; Kaufmann, M

    2006-10-01

    This years ASCO-meeting reinforced the trend of the recent years to get off from empirical treatment concepts to tailored and individualized diagnostics and therapy. However, the basis for an individual therapy is a specific molecular diagnostic which can be reflected in the analysis of hormonal receptor, HER-1, HER-2 and topoisomerase IIalpha in breast cancer. All these markers are not only able to prognosticate the course of disease but they also can predict the success of specific treatment approaches. Trastuzumab is standard therapy in HER-2 positive breast cancer both in the adjuvant and palliative setting. But new therapeutic agents, as e. g. lapatinib, are promising in the treatment of HER-2 positive breast cancer even if trastuzumab is failing. Otherwise it might possibly be an alternative option but adequate clinical results have to be awaited. The targeted inactivation of EGFR-related signal transduction pathways by e. g. gefitinib did not show a substantial improvement neither as a single agent nor in combination with endocrine treatment. However, the appropriate subgroup which might benefit from this therapy has to be defined even if molecular data suggest that patients with ER positive and PR negative breast cancer might be such a group. The increasing knowledge in terms of the biology of bone metastasis led to the development of new treatment options as e. g. denosumab, a humanized monoclonal antibody for RANK ligand. Two adjuvant cytotoxic treatment trials revealed that taxanes improve the prognosis of node positive breast cancer and should be administered sequentially. The advantage of switching to an aromatase inhibitor after two to three years of tamoxifen in endocrine treatment of postmenopausal patients is proved by two clinical trials (IES, ARNO) which could demonstrate a survival benefit. In conclusion it seems to be evident that new targeted therapy options are effective and will set new standards for the treatment of breast cancer patients

  12. Improving survival with deferiprone treatment in patients with thalassemia major: a prospective multicenter randomised clinical trial under the auspices of the Italian Society for Thalassemia and Hemoglobinopathies.

    PubMed

    Maggio, Aurelio; Vitrano, Angela; Capra, Marcello; Cuccia, Liana; Gagliardotto, Francesco; Filosa, Aldo; Magnano, Carmelo; Rizzo, Michele; Caruso, Vincenzo; Gerardi, Calogera; Argento, Crocetta; Campisi, Saveria; Cantella, Francesco; Commendatore, Francesca; D'Ascola, Domenico Giuseppe; Fidone, Carmelo; Ciancio, Angela; Galati, Maria Concetta; Giuffrida, Gaetano; Cingari, Rocca; Giugno, Giovanni; Lombardo, Turi; Prossomariti, Luciano; Malizia, Roberto; Meo, Anna; Roccamo, Gaetano; Romeo, Maria Antonietta; Violi, Pietro; Cianciulli, Paolo; Rigano, Paolo

    2009-01-01

    The prognosis for thalassemia major has dramatically improved in the last two decades. However, many transfusion-dependent patients continue to develop progressive accumulation of iron. This can lead to tissue damage and eventually death, particularly from cardiac disease. Previous studies that investigated iron chelation treatments, including retrospective and prospective non-randomised clinical trials, suggested that mortality, due mainly to cardiac damage, was reduced or completely absent in patients treated with deferiprone (DFP) alone or a combined deferiprone-deferoxamine (DFP-DFO) chelation treatment. However, no survival analysis has been reported for a long-term randomised control trial. Here, we performed a multicenter, long-term, randomised control trial that compared deferoxamine (DFO) versus DFP alone, sequential DFP-DFO, or combined DFP-DFO iron chelation treatments. The trial included 265 patients with thalassemia major, with 128 (48.3%) females and 137 (51.7%) males. No deaths occurred with the DFP-alone or the combined DFP-DFO treatments. One death occurred due to graft versus host disease (GVHD) in a patient that had undergone bone marrow transplantation; this patient was censored at the time of transplant. Only one death occurred with the DFP-DFO sequential treatment in a patient that had experienced an episode of heart failure one year earlier. Ten deaths occurred with the deferoxamine treatment. The main factors that correlated with an increase in the hazard ratio for death were: cirrhosis, arrhythmia, previous episode of heart failure, diabetes, hypogonadism, and hypothyroidism. In a Cox regression model, the interaction effect of sex and age was statistically significant (p-value<0.013). For each increasing year of age, the hazard ratio for males was 1.03 higher than that for females (p-value<0.013). In conclusion, the results of this study show that the risk factors for predicting mortality in patients with thalassemia major are deferoxamine

  13. Acupuncture in modern society.

    PubMed

    Vanderploeg, Kristin; Yi, Xiaobin

    2009-03-01

    For at least 2,500 years, acupuncture has been an integral part of traditional Chinese medicine. However, recently as more people in western countries are diagnosed with chronic disease poorly treated with modern medical therapies, many are turning to acupuncture and other forms of alternative medical treatments. Based on the theory of harmonious flowing qi being the basis of good health, acupuncture focuses on restoring qi by manipulation of the complementary and opposing elements of yin and yang. However, in the modern medical community we struggle to with the concept of qi, given a lack of anatomic and histological evidence supporting its existence. However, with the surge in public interest in acupuncture, the scientific community begun heavy investigation of acupuncture's efficacy, as well as the physiologic basis behind it. Thus far, evidence supports the use of acupuncture in post-operative nausea and vomiting, postoperative dental pain, chronic pain conditions such as lower back pain, and possibly also such psychologic conditions as addiction. It is possible that by affecting afferent nerve signaling, acupuncture may influence the release of endogenous opioids to promote pain relief. This effect may be augmented by release of ACTH and cortisol, as well as through down-regulation of signaling through pain fibers. When treating patients who may utilize alternative forms of medicine, it is important that medical practitioners be educated in regards to the basic fundamental beliefs behind acupuncture, as well as the scientific evidence supporting its use and revealing its efficacy. The purpose of this review is to give western trained physicians exposure to history, basic knowledge and its clinical applications of acupuncture to accommodate accelerating interests in acupuncture in modern society.

  14. A consensus statement on the European Society for Clinical and Economic Aspects of Osteoporosis and Osteoarthritis (ESCEO) algorithm for the management of knee osteoarthritis-From evidence-based medicine to the real-life setting.

    PubMed

    Bruyère, Olivier; Cooper, Cyrus; Pelletier, Jean-Pierre; Maheu, Emmanuel; Rannou, François; Branco, Jaime; Luisa Brandi, Maria; Kanis, John A; Altman, Roy D; Hochberg, Marc C; Martel-Pelletier, Johanne; Reginster, Jean-Yves

    2016-02-01

    The European Society for Clinical and Economic Aspects of Osteoporosis and Osteoarthritis (ESCEO) published a treatment algorithm for the management of knee osteoarthritis (OA) in 2014, which provides practical guidance for the prioritization of interventions. Further analysis of real-world data for OA provides additional evidence in support of pharmacological interventions, in terms of management of OA pain and function, avoidance of adverse events, disease-modifying effects and long-term outcomes, e.g., delay of total joint replacement surgery, and pharmacoeconomic factors such as reduction in healthcare resource utilization. This article provides an updated assessment of the literature for selected interventions in OA, focusing on real-life data, with the aim of providing easy-to-follow advice on how to establish a treatment flow in patients with knee OA in primary care clinical practice, in support of the clinicians' individualized assessment of the patient. In step 1, background maintenance therapy with symptomatic slow-acting drugs for osteoarthritis (SYSADOAs) is recommended, for which high-quality evidence is provided only for the prescription formulations of patented crystalline glucosamine sulfate and chondroitin sulfate. Paracetamol may be added for rescue analgesia only, due to limited efficacy and increasing safety signals. Topical non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) may provide additional symptomatic treatment with the same degree of efficacy as oral NSAIDs without the systemic safety concerns. Oral NSAIDs maintain a central role in step 2 advanced management of persistent symptoms. However, oral NSAIDs are highly heterogeneous in terms of gastrointestinal and cardiovascular safety profile, and patient stratification with careful treatment selection is advocated to maximize the risk:benefit ratio. Intra-articular hyaluronic acid as a next step provides sustained clinical benefit with effects lasting up to 6 months after a short-course of

  15. Thank you, Royal Society

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toumey, Chris

    2015-04-01

    More than a decade after it was first published, Chris Toumey revisits a report from the Royal Society on the opportunities and uncertainties of nanotechnology, and finds that it still has plenty to offer.

  16. American Headache Society

    MedlinePlus

    ... NEWS VIEW ALL NEWS FIRST ANNUAL “MIGRAINE MOMENT” FILM CONTEST WINNERS The American Headache Society and American ... RT @mrobbinsmd : A7 See the recent @amfmigraine #MigraineMoment film competition & stories like @brainstorm83 to understand the gravity & ...

  17. Society of Interventional Radiology

    MedlinePlus

    ... decoded SIR’s Health Policy and Economics team provides information on the varied activities the society engages in to ensure proper coding of interventional radiology services. SIR is committed to assisting you, your institution ...

  18. Radiation and Society

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shaw, Edward I.

    1974-01-01

    Presents a discussion of the risks, to society, from radiation-associated technologies and urges that science teachers help the public understand the decision-making process relative to nuclear power as well as the problems and alternatives. (PEB)

  19. Consumption in the Information Society

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zherebin, V. M.; Ermakova, N. A.; Makhrova, O. N.

    2010-01-01

    The current state of the economy in the developed countries make it possible to characterize them using concepts and terms such as the postindustrial society, the new economy, the service economy, the creative economy, the posteconomic society, the information society, the knowledge society, and the consumer society. Among these terms and…

  20. Advancing clinical governance Advancing clinical governance Myriam Lugon Jonathan Secker-Walker The Royal Society of Medical Press Ltd 215 £18.50 1 85315 471 7 1853154717 [Formula: see text].

    PubMed

    2001-10-01

    Making Clinical Governance Work For You sounds like the title of a book which is focused on the 'here and now'. And that is exactly what it is. The authors, Ruth Chambers and Gill Wakley, guide the reader through what they see as the key themes to achieving quality health care. This is certainly recommended reading for nurses who understand that clinical governance is something that they must do, but are unsure of how to do it, and perhaps more importantly, are unsure what to do. Any nurse looking to move on from the basics or simply gain inspiration around one of the current topics of debate should perhaps look elsewhere.

  1. Cardiovascular risk assessment in diabetes mellitus: comparison of the general Framingham risk profile versus the World Health Organization/International Society of Hypertension risk prediction charts in Arabs--clinical implications.

    PubMed

    Al-Lawati, Jawad A; Barakat, Mohammed N; Al-Lawati, Najla A; Al-Maskari, Masoud Y; Elsayed, Medhat K; Mikhailidis, Dimitri P; Al-Zakwani, Ibrahim S

    2013-07-01

    We estimated the prevalence of cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk and its clinical implications among 1 110 Omani patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM) using 2 different CVD risk tools: the general Framingham risk profile (GFRP) and the joint World Health Organization/International Society of Hypertension (WHO/ISH) risk prediction charts. The GFRP tool identified higher proportion of patients compared with joint WHO/ISH tool at 10-year CVD risk 10% to <20% and at 20% to <30%. At CVD risk ≥30%, both assessment tools identified similar proportions of patients (22% vs 24%; P=.120). Compared with WHO/ISH charts, the GFRP identified almost double the number of men eligible for aspirin treatment at CVD risk thresholds of ≥10% (86% vs 43%). In women, the proportions were, 66% and 45%, respectively. For statins, the figures were, 60% and 37%, for men and 28% and 36%, for women. In conclusion, the GFRP overestimates the number of patients eligible for primary prevention of CVD compared with the joint WHO/ISH method.

  2. The role of calcium supplementation in healthy musculoskeletal ageing : An expert consensus meeting of the European Society for Clinical and Economic Aspects of Osteoporosis, Osteoarthritis and Musculoskeletal Diseases (ESCEO) and the International Foundation for Osteoporosis (IOF).

    PubMed

    Harvey, N C; Biver, E; Kaufman, J-M; Bauer, J; Branco, J; Brandi, M L; Bruyère, O; Coxam, V; Cruz-Jentoft, A; Czerwinski, E; Dimai, H; Fardellone, P; Landi, F; Reginster, J-Y; Dawson-Hughes, B; Kanis, J A; Rizzoli, R; Cooper, C

    2017-02-01

    The place of calcium supplementation, with or without concomitant vitamin D supplementation, has been much debated in terms of both efficacy and safety. There have been numerous trials and meta-analyses of supplementation for fracture reduction, and associations with risk of myocardial infarction have been suggested in recent years. In this report, the product of an expert consensus meeting of the European Society for Clinical and Economic Aspects of Osteoporosis, Osteoarthritis and Musculoskeletal Diseases (ESCEO) and the International Foundation for Osteoporosis (IOF), we review the evidence for the value of calcium supplementation, with or without vitamin D supplementation, for healthy musculoskeletal ageing. We conclude that (1) calcium and vitamin D supplementation leads to a modest reduction in fracture risk, although population-level intervention has not been shown to be an effective public health strategy; (2) supplementation with calcium alone for fracture reduction is not supported by the literature; (3) side effects of calcium supplementation include renal stones and gastrointestinal symptoms; (4) vitamin D supplementation, rather than calcium supplementation, may reduce falls risk; and (5) assertions of increased cardiovascular risk consequent to calcium supplementation are not convincingly supported by current evidence. In conclusion, we recommend, on the basis of the current evidence, that calcium supplementation, with concomitant vitamin D supplementation, is supported for patients at high risk of calcium and vitamin D insufficiency, and in those who are receiving treatment for osteoporosis.

  3. Advanced information society(2)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masuyama, Keiichi

    Our modern life is full of information and information infiltrates into our daily life. Networking of the telecommunication is extended to society, company, and individual level. Although we have just entered the advanced information society, business world and our daily life have been steadily transformed by the advancement of information network. This advancement of information brings a big influence on economy, and will play they the main role in the expansion of domestic demands. This paper tries to view the image of coming advanced information society, focusing on the transforming businessman's life and the situation of our daily life, which became wealthy by the spread of daily life information and the visual information by satellite system, in the development of the intelligent city.

  4. Science and Society Colloquium

    SciTech Connect

    2008-03-10

    Mr. Randi will give an update of his lecture to the American Physical Society on the occasion of his award of the 1989 Forum Prize. The citation said: "for his unique defense of Science and the scientific method in many disciplines, including physics, against pseudoscience, frauds and charlatans. His use of scientific techniques has contributed to refuting suspicious and fraudulent claims of paranormal results. He has contributed significantly to public understanding of important issues where science and society interact". He is a professional magician and author of many books. He worked with John Maddox, the Editor of Nature to investigate the claims of "water with memory".

  5. Society's expectations of health

    PubMed Central

    Leach, Edmund

    1975-01-01

    Sir Edmund Leach argues that doctors in the modern world, fortified by the traditional concept that the life of the sick person must at all costs be preserved, are to some extent guilty of the false antitheses current today between youth and age. Moreover youth means health, age illness and senility. Until this imbalance is corrected society will be in danger of `a kind of civil war between the generations'. Society must be taught again that mortality cannot be avoided or conquered by medical science, and at the same time that `health' is not enshrined in the young alone. PMID:1177271

  6. Advanced information society(7)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiba, Toshihiro

    Various threats are hiding in advanced informationalized society. As we see car accident problems in motorization society light aspects necessarily accompy shady ones. Under the changing circumstances of advanced informationalization added values of information has become much higher. It causes computer crime, hacker, computer virus to come to the surface. In addition it can be said that infringement of intellectual property and privacy are threats brought by advanced information. Against these threats legal, institutional and insurance measures have been progressed, and newly security industry has been established. However, they are not adequate individually or totally. The future vision should be clarified, and countermeasures according to the visions have to be considered.

  7. Science and Society Colloquium

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2016-07-12

    Mr. Randi will give an update of his lecture to the American Physical Society on the occasion of his award of the 1989 Forum Prize. The citation said: "for his unique defense of Science and the scientific method in many disciplines, including physics, against pseudoscience, frauds and charlatans. His use of scientific techniques has contributed to refuting suspicious and fraudulent claims of paranormal results. He has contributed significantly to public understanding of important issues where science and society interact". He is a professional magician and author of many books. He worked with John Maddox, the Editor of Nature to investigate the claims of "water with memory".

  8. Assessment of Capacity in an Aging Society

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moye, Jennifer; Marson, Daniel C.; Edelstein, Barry

    2013-01-01

    Over the past 40 years, the assessment and scientific study of capacity in older adults has emerged as a distinct field of clinical and research activity for psychologists. This new field reflects the convergence of several trends: the aging of American society, the growing incidence and prevalence of dementia, and the patient rights,…

  9. ["Baltic Declaration"--telemedicine and mHealth as support for clinical processes in cardiology. The opinion of the Committee of Informatics and Telemedicine of the Polish Society of Cardiology and Telemedicine Clinical Sciences Committee of the PAS].

    PubMed

    Piotrowicz, Ryszard; Grabowski, Marcin; Balsam, Paweł; Kołtowski, Łukasz; Kozierkiewicz, Adam; Zajdel, Justyna; Piotrowicz, Ewa; Kowalski, Oskar; Mitkowski, Przemysław; Kaźmierczak, Jarosław; Kalarus, Zbigniew; Opolski, Grzegorz

    2015-01-01

    For several decades we have observed the development of data transmission technology on an unprecedented scale. With the development of such technology there has also appeared concepts on the use of these solutions in health care systems. Over the last decade telemedicine has been joined by the concept of mHealth, which is based on mobile devices mainly to monitor selected biomedical parameters. On 10 October 2014, during the conference Baltic Electrocardiology Autumn - Telemedicine and Arrhythmia (BEATA), a debate was held with the participation of physicians, politicians, businessmen, and representatives of the Government (Ministry of Health, National Health Fund, Social Insurance Institution) concerning the use of telecardiology services in daily practice. During the meeting issues were discussed such as: telemedicine solutions available throughout the world, analysis of their effectiveness based on clinical trials, funding opportunities, their legal status, and the development perspectives of telecardiology in Poland. The result of the meeting was a document called the "Baltic Declaration". The declaration is a call for proven and profitable technologies to be introduced into clinical practice. The declaration also indicates that the variety of available technological solutions are merely tools, and the utility of such tools stems not only from their modernity, but also primarily from matching their functionality to the features of the health interventions that are to be improved.

  10. Homozygous familial hypercholesterolaemia: new insights and guidance for clinicians to improve detection and clinical management. A position paper from the Consensus Panel on Familial Hypercholesterolaemia of the European Atherosclerosis Society

    PubMed Central

    Cuchel, Marina; Bruckert, Eric; Ginsberg, Henry N.; Raal, Frederick J.; Santos, Raul D.; Hegele, Robert A.; Kuivenhoven, Jan Albert; Nordestgaard, Børge G.; Descamps, Olivier S.; Steinhagen-Thiessen, Elisabeth; Tybjærg-Hansen, Anne; Watts, Gerald F.; Averna, Maurizio; Boileau, Catherine; Borén, Jan; Catapano, Alberico L.; Defesche, Joep C.; Hovingh, G. Kees; Humphries, Steve E.; Kovanen, Petri T.; Masana, Luis; Pajukanta, Päivi; Parhofer, Klaus G.; Ray, Kausik K.; Stalenhoef, Anton F. H.; Stroes, Erik; Taskinen, Marja-Riitta; Wiegman, Albert; Wiklund, Olov; Chapman, M. John; Cuchel, Marina; Bruckert, Eric; Chapman, M. John; Descamps, Olivier S.; Ginsberg, Henry N.; Hegele, Robert A.; Kuivenhoven, Jan Albert; Nordestgaard, Børge G.; Raal, Frederick J.; Santos, Raul D.; Steinhagen-Thiessen, Elisabeth; Tybjærg-Hansen, Anne; Watts, Gerald F.; Chapman, M. John; Ginsberg, Henry N.; Averna, Maurizio; Boileau, Catherine; Borén, Jan; Catapano, Alberico L.; Defesche, Joep C.; Hovingh, G. Kees; Humphries, Steve E.; Kovanen, Petri T.; Masana, Luis; Pajukanta, Päivi; Parhofer, Klaus G.; Ray, Kausik K.; Stalenhoef, Anton F. H.; Stroes, Erik; Taskinen, Marja-Riitta; Wiegman, Albert; Wiklund, Olov

    2014-01-01

    Aims Homozygous familial hypercholesterolaemia (HoFH) is a rare life-threatening condition characterized by markedly elevated circulating levels of low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) and accelerated, premature atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease (ACVD). Given recent insights into the heterogeneity of genetic defects and clinical phenotype of HoFH, and the availability of new therapeutic options, this Consensus Panel on Familial Hypercholesterolaemia of the European Atherosclerosis Society (EAS) critically reviewed available data with the aim of providing clinical guidance for the recognition and management of HoFH. Methods and results Early diagnosis of HoFH and prompt initiation of diet and lipid-lowering therapy are critical. Genetic testing may provide a definitive diagnosis, but if unavailable, markedly elevated LDL-C levels together with cutaneous or tendon xanthomas before 10 years, or untreated elevated LDL-C levels consistent with heterozygous FH in both parents, are suggestive of HoFH. We recommend that patients with suspected HoFH are promptly referred to specialist centres for a comprehensive ACVD evaluation and clinical management. Lifestyle intervention and maximal statin therapy are the mainstays of treatment, ideally started in the first year of life or at an initial diagnosis, often with ezetimibe and other lipid-modifying therapy. As patients rarely achieve LDL-C targets, adjunctive lipoprotein apheresis is recommended where available, preferably started by age 5 and no later than 8 years. The number of therapeutic approaches has increased following approval of lomitapide and mipomersen for HoFH. Given the severity of ACVD, we recommend regular follow-up, including Doppler echocardiographic evaluation of the heart and aorta annually, stress testing and, if available, computed tomography coronary angiography every 5 years, or less if deemed necessary. Conclusion This EAS Consensus Panel highlights the need for early identification of Ho

  11. Values and Society.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nelson, Jack L.

    The idea of a democratic society based on human rights and social justice is the social issue examined in this book which is one of a series on challenges and choices in American values. The format followed in the series includes the following for secondary students: case studies illustrating the issue by focusing on human institutions, factual…

  12. The School in Society.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tasmanian Education Dept., Hobart (Australia).

    This document is an English-language abstract (approximately 1,500 words) of the role of school in Tasmania as seen in a report by a committee appointed to determine that question. At present, Tasmanian children are required to attend school between the ages of 6 and 16. About 20% of children attend private schools. The demands of society for…

  13. Man--Society--Technology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taxis, Linda A., Ed.

    The 32nd annual American Industrial Arts Association (AIAA) Convention was held in Louisville in 1970. Topics for the AIAA general session addresses were: (1) "Industrial Arts--The Blender Between Social Form and Technical Function," (2) "Technology and Society: Present and Future Challenges," (3) "A Student-Oriented Industrial Arts," (4) "Man:…

  14. Teaching Global Society.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peet, Richard

    2002-01-01

    Describes the course, "Global Society," for first-year International Studies students at a Massachusetts liberal arts college. The course, which takes a historical approach, informs students about the nature, history, and present characteristics of the global system, taking theoretical, historical, and critical approaches that stress the…

  15. Time and Society.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kazancigil, Ali, Ed.

    1986-01-01

    The articles in this issue review the history of the sociological study of different societies' conceptions of time. Social time is the way people regard and employ time dependent on economic conditions, the organization of daily life, the cultural setting, and religion. (JDH)

  16. Art, Society and Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Ralph A.

    1976-01-01

    In considering the relation of art with society the author comments on the ideas of the American philosopher, John Dewey, the art historian, Lord Kenneth Clark, a popular humanistic educator, Clifton Fadiman, and a major cultural critic, Jacques Barzun. (Author/RK)

  17. Education for Jobless Society

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sidorkin, Alexander M.

    2017-01-01

    The advent of societies with low employment rates will present a challenge to education. Education must move away from the discourse of skills and towards the discourse of meaning and motivation. The paper considers three kinds of non-waged optional labor that may form the basis of the future economy: prosumption, volunteering, and self-design.…

  18. The Learning Society.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van der Zee, Hendrik

    1991-01-01

    Strategic issues in the development of a learning society are (1) broadening the definition of learning; (2) making the goal of learning growth toward completeness; (3) increasing collective competence; (4) fostering autonomy in learners; and (5) stressing a political approach to learning (the right to learn as a civil right). (SK)

  19. Big Society, Big Deal?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomson, Alastair

    2011-01-01

    Political leaders like to put forward guiding ideas or themes which pull their individual decisions into a broader narrative. For John Major it was Back to Basics, for Tony Blair it was the Third Way and for David Cameron it is the Big Society. While Mr. Blair relied on Lord Giddens to add intellectual weight to his idea, Mr. Cameron's legacy idea…

  20. Air pollution and society

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brimblecombe, P.

    2010-12-01

    Air pollution is as much a product of our society as it is one of chemistry and meteorology. Social variables such as gender, age, health status and poverty are often linked with our exposure to air pollutants. Pollution can also affect our behaviour, while regulations to improve the environment can often challenge of freedom.

  1. Science Serves Society.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sneed, G. C.

    This book discusses how some of the topics taught in a conventional physics course have been used to solve interesting technical problems in industry, medicine, agriculture, transportation, and other areas of society. The topics include heat, optics, magnetism and electricity, nuclear physics, and sound. (MLH)

  2. Education, Change and Society.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Karmel, Peter, Ed.

    The conference papers in this publication focus on the interrelationship between change in the education sector and change in the wider society. The papers were generated by an invitational conference held in 1980 to mark the golden jubilee year of the Australian Council for Educational Research. While many of the papers have an Australian…

  3. The New Rural Society.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goldmark, Peter C.

    The New Rural Society project concerns itself with the deterioration of America through urban overcrowding and rural depletion. Coupled with experimentation and pilot testing, the study is designed to demonstrate that imaginative application of telecommunication will enable business and government departments to function effectively though their…

  4. Executive summary of the diagnosis and treatment of bacteremia and endocarditis due to Staphylococcus aureus. A clinical guideline from the Spanish Society of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases (SEIMC).

    PubMed

    Gudiol, Francesc; Aguado, José María; Almirante, Benito; Bouza, Emilio; Cercenado, Emilia; Domínguez, M Ángeles; Gasch, Oriol; Lora-Tamayo, Jaime; Miró, José M; Palomar, Mercedes; Pascual, Alvaro; Pericas, Juan M; Pujol, Miquel; Rodríguez-Baño, Jesús; Shaw, Evelyn; Soriano, Alex; Vallés, Jordi

    2015-11-01

    Bacteremia and infective endocarditis caused by Staphylococcus aureus are common and severe diseases. Optimization of treatment is fundamental in the prognosis of these infections. The high rates of treatment failure and the increasing interest in the influence of vancomycin susceptibility in the outcome of infections caused by both methicillin-susceptible and -resistant isolates have led to research on novel therapeutic schemes. The interest in the new antimicrobials with activity against methicillin-resistant staphylococci has been extended to susceptible strains, which still carry the most important burden of infection. New combinations of antimicrobials have been investigated in experimental and clinical studies, but their role is still being debated. Also, the appropriateness of the initial empirical therapy has acquired relevance in recent years. The aim of this guideline is to update the 2009 guidelines and to provide an ensemble of recommendations in order to improve the treatment of staphylococcal bacteremia and infective endocarditis, in accordance with the latest published evidence.

  5. History of the Congenital Heart Surgeons' Society.

    PubMed

    Mavroudis, Constantine; Williams, William G

    2015-10-01

    The Congenital Heart Surgeons' Society is a group of over 100 pediatric heart surgeons representing 72 institutions that specialize in the treatment of patients with congenital heart defects. The Society began in 1972 and incorporated as a not-for-profit charitable organization in 2004. It has become the face and voice of congenital heart surgery in North America. In 1985, the Society established a data center for multicenter clinical research studies to encourage congenital heart professionals to participate in improving outcomes for our patients. The goals of the Congenital Heart Surgeons' Society are to stimulate the study of congenital cardiac physiology, pathology, and management options which are instantiated in data collection, multi-institutional studies, and scientific meetings. Honest and open discussion of problems with possible solutions to the challenges facing congenital heart professionals have been the strength of the Congenital Heart Surgeons' Society. It is imperative for the growth of an organization to know from where it came in order to know to where it is going. The purpose of this article is to review the history of the Congenital Heart Surgeons' Society.

  6. [Analysis of the results of the 2010 External Quality Control Program of the Spanish Society of Infectious Diseases and Clinical Microbiology for HIV-1, HCV, and HBV viral loads].

    PubMed

    Orta Mira, Nieves; Serrano, María del Remedio Guna; Martínez, José-Carlos Latorre; Ovies, María Rosario; Poveda, Marta; de Gopegui, Enrique Ruiz; Cardona, Concepción Gimeno

    2011-12-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) and hepatitis B (HBV) and C virus (HCV) viral load determinations are among the most important markers for the follow-up of patients infected with these viruses. External quality control tools are crucial to ensure the accuracy of the results obtained by microbiology laboratories. This article summarized the results obtained in the 2010 External Quality Control Program of the Spanish Society of Infectious Diseases and Clinical Microbiology for HIV-1, HCV, and HBV viral loads and HCV genotyping. In the HIV-1 program, a total of five standards were sent. One standard consisted of seronegative human plasma, while the remaining four contained plasma from three different viremic patients, in the range of 3-5 log(10) copies/mL; two of these standards were identical, with the aim of determining repeatability. A significant proportion of the laboratories (22.6% on average) obtained values out of the accepted range (mean ± 0.2 log(10)copies/mL), depending on the standard and on the method used for quantification. Repeatability was very good, with up to 95% of laboratories reporting results within the limits (Δ<0.5 log(10)copies/mL). The HBV and HCV program consisted of two standards with different viral load contents. Most of the participants, 86.1% in the case of HCV and 87.1% in HBV, obtained all the results within the accepted range (mean ± 1.96 SD log(10)UI/mL). Post-analytical errors due to mistranscription of the results were detected in these controls. Data from this analysis reinforce the utility of proficiency programs to ensure the quality of the results obtained by a particular laboratory, as well as the importance of the post-analytical phase in overall quality. Due to interlaboratory variability, use of the same method and the same laboratory for patient follow-up is advisable.

  7. Pairing smoking-cessation services with lung cancer screening: A clinical guideline from the Association for the Treatment of Tobacco Use and Dependence and the Society for Research on Nicotine and Tobacco.

    PubMed

    Fucito, Lisa M; Czabafy, Sharon; Hendricks, Peter S; Kotsen, Chris; Richardson, Donna; Toll, Benjamin A

    2016-04-15

    Smoking cessation is crucial for reducing cancer risk and premature mortality. The US Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) has recommended annual lung cancer screening with low-dose computed tomography (LDCT), and the Center for Medicare and Medicaid Services recently approved lung screening as a benefit for patients ages 55 to 77 years who have a 30 pack-year history. The Society for Research on Nicotine and Tobacco (SRNT) and the Association for the Treatment of Tobacco Use and Dependence (ATTUD) developed the guideline described in this commentary based on an illustrative literature review to present the evidence for smoking-cessation health benefits in this high-risk group and to provide clinical recommendations for integrating evidence-based smoking-cessation treatment with lung cancer screening. Unfortunately, extant data on lung cancer screening participants were scarce at the time this guideline was written. However, in this review, the authors summarize the sufficient evidence on the benefits of smoking cessation and the efficacy of smoking-cessation interventions for smokers ages 55 to 77 years to provide smoking-cessation interventions for smokers who seek lung cancer screening. It is concluded that smokers who present for lung cancer screening should be encouraged to quit smoking at each visit. Access to evidence-based smoking-cessation interventions should be provided to all smokers regardless of scan results, and motivation to quit should not be a necessary precondition for treatment. Follow-up contacts to support smoking-cessation efforts should be arranged for smokers. Evidence-based behavioral strategies should be used at each visit to motivate smokers who are unwilling to try quitting/reducing smoking or to try evidence-based treatments that may lead to eventual cessation.

  8. Assessing the New American Society of Clinical Oncology/College of American Pathologists Guidelines for HER2 Testing by Fluorescence In Situ Hybridization: Experience of an Academic Consultation Practice.

    PubMed

    Press, Michael F; Villalobos, Ivonne; Santiago, Angela; Guzman, Roberta; Cervantes, Monica; Gasparyan, Armen; Campeau, Anaamika; Ma, Yanling; Tsao-Wei, Denice D; Groshen, Susan

    2016-04-15

    Context .- Evaluation of HER2 gene amplification by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) was changed by recent American Society of Clinical Oncology/College of American Pathologists (ASCO-CAP) guidelines. Objective . -To determine frequencies and assess patterns of HER2 protein expression for each ASCO-CAP guideline FISH category among 7526 breast cancers accrued to our consultation practice. Design .- We retrospectively reevaluated the HER2 FISH status of breast cancers in our consultation practice according to ASCO-CAP FISH guidelines, and documented HER2 protein levels in each category. Results . -According to new guidelines, 17.7% of our consultation breast cancers were "ISH-positive" with HER2:CEP17 FISH ratios ≥2.0 and average HER2 gene copies per cell ≥4.0 (group 1); 0.4% were "ISH-positive" with ratios ≥2.0 and average copies <4.0 (group 2); 0.6% were "ISH-positive" with ratios <2.0 and average copies ≥6.0 (group 3); 4.6% were "ISH-equivocal" with ratios <2.0 and average copies ≥4.0 and <6.0 (group 4); and 76.7% were "ISH-negative" with ratios <2.0 and average copies <4.0 (group 5). However, only groups 1 (HER2 amplified) and 5 (HER2 not amplified) agreed with our previously reported status, and only these groups demonstrated the expected immunohistochemistry status, overexpression and low expression, respectively. Groups 2 and 4 breast cancers lacked overexpression, whereas group 3 was not significantly associated with either increased or decreased HER2 expression. Conclusions .- Although the status of approximately 95% of our cases (groups 1 and 5) is not affected by the new guidelines, those of the other 5% (groups 2-4) conflict with previous HER2 gene amplification status and with HER2 status by immunohistochemistry.

  9. High concordance between HercepTest immunohistochemistry and ERBB2 fluorescence in situ hybridization before and after implementation of American Society of Clinical Oncology/College of American Pathology 2007 guidelines.

    PubMed

    Vergara-Lluri, Maria E; Moatamed, Neda A; Hong, Elizabeth; Apple, Sophia K

    2012-10-01

    Human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2, ERBB2) is an important critical predictive marker in patients with invasive breast cancer. It is thus imperative to ensure accuracy and precision in HER2 and ERBB2 testing. In 2007, the American Society of Clinical Oncology and College of American Pathologists (ASCO/CAP) proposed new guidelines for immunohistochemistry and fluorescence in-situ hybridization scoring in an effort to improve accuracy and utility of these companion diagnostic tests. The goal of the 2007 guidelines was to improve concordance rates between the diagnostic tests and decrease the number of inconclusive cases. This study examines the impact in concordance rates and number of inconclusive cases based on the recent change in guidelines in a large study cohort. HER2 immunohistochemistry and ERBB2 fluorescence in-situ hybridization were performed on all specimens from our facility from years 2003 through 2010 (n=1437). Cases from 2003-2007 (n=1016) were scored using Food and Drug Administration guidelines, with immunohistochemical 3+ cases staining >10% of tumor cells and fluorescence in-situ hybridization amplification cutoff value of 2.0. The 2007 guidelines were implemented and scored accordingly for cases from 2008-2010 (n=421), with immunohistochemical 3+ cases staining >30% of tumor cells and fluorescence in-situ hybridization amplification cutoff value of 2.2. We compared concordance rates before and after 2007 guidelines. For the 2003-2007 study population, the concordance rate between the assays was 97.6% with a corresponding kappa coefficient (k) of 0.90. For the 2008-2010 study population, concordance rate was 97.6% with a corresponding k of 0.89. There was no significant difference in number of inconclusive rates before and after 2007 guidelines. In our study, implementation of the new ASCO/CAP 2007 HER2 guidelines did not show a significant difference in concordance rates and did not decrease the number of inconclusive cases.

  10. The role of dietary protein and vitamin D in maintaining musculoskeletal health in postmenopausal women: a consensus statement from the European Society for Clinical and Economic Aspects of Osteoporosis and Osteoarthritis (ESCEO).

    PubMed

    Rizzoli, René; Stevenson, John C; Bauer, Jürgen M; van Loon, Luc J C; Walrand, Stéphane; Kanis, John A; Cooper, Cyrus; Brandi, Maria-Luisa; Diez-Perez, Adolfo; Reginster, Jean-Yves

    2014-09-01

    From 50 years of age, postmenopausal women are at an increased risk of developing sarcopenia and osteoporosis as a result of deterioration of musculoskeletal health. Both disorders increase the risk of falls and fractures. The risk of developing sarcopenia and osteoporosis may be attenuated through healthy lifestyle changes, which include adequate dietary protein, calcium and vitamin D intakes, and regular physical activity/exercise, besides hormone replacement therapy when appropriate. Protein intake and physical activity are the main anabolic stimuli for muscle protein synthesis. Exercise training leads to increased muscle mass and strength, and the combination of optimal protein intake and exercise produces a greater degree of muscle protein accretion than either intervention alone. Similarly, adequate dietary protein intake and resistance exercise are important contributors to the maintenance of bone strength. Vitamin D helps to maintain muscle mass and strength as well as bone health. These findings suggest that healthy lifestyle measures in women aged >50 years are essential to allow healthy ageing. The European Society for Clinical and Economic Aspects of Osteoporosis and Osteoarthritis (ESCEO) recommends optimal dietary protein intake of 1.0-1.2g/kgbodyweight/d with at least 20-25g of high-quality protein at each main meal, with adequate vitamin D intake at 800IU/d to maintain serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D levels >50nmol/L as well as calcium intake of 1000mg/d, alongside regular physical activity/exercise 3-5 times/week combined with protein intake in close proximity to exercise, in postmenopausal women for prevention of age-related deterioration of musculoskeletal health.

  11. Changing roles of academic societies due to globalization.

    PubMed

    Ehara, Shigeru; Aoki, Shigeki; Honda, Hiroshi

    2016-10-01

    Because of the globalization of environment around the academic society, the expected roles have changed significantly. In this short communication, we present the current situation in our international activities of the Japan Radiological Society, particularly in the academic activities and clinical practice. Establishing and reinforcing international network is one process of their promotion.

  12. The National Cardiac Societies of the European Society of Cardiology.

    PubMed

    Atar, Dan

    2015-06-01

    The National Cardiac Societies are one of the Constituent Bodies of the European Society of Cardiology (ESC). They are the backbone of the ESC and together form the "Cardiology of Europe" in 56 European and Mediterranean countries.

  13. Society for Assisted Reproductive Technology

    MedlinePlus

    The Society for Assisted Reproductive Technology PATIENTS Patient Information What Is SART? Risks of IVF Third Party Reproduction A ... Read Article View All News ©1996 - 2016 SART, Society for Assisted Reproductive Technology . All Rights Reserved. ASRM/ ...

  14. Heart Failure Society of America

    MedlinePlus

    ... hfsa.org Events Calendar>> Copyright © 2017 Heart Failure Society of America. All Rights Reserved 2017 Call for ... for Organ Sharing (UNOS) asks the Heart Failure Society of America (HFSA) members to comment on the ...

  15. Rethinking Cells to Society

    PubMed Central

    Antonucci, Toni C.; Webster, Noah J.

    2015-01-01

    It is an exciting time to be a developmental scientist. We have advanced theoretical frameworks and developed ground-breaking methods for addressing questions of interest, ranging literally from cells to society. We know more now than we have ever known about human development and the base of acquired knowledge is increasing exponentially. In this paper we share some thoughts about where we are in the science of human development, how we got there, what may be going wrong and what may be going right. Finally, we offer some thoughts about where we go from here to assure that in the future we achieve the best developmental science possible. PMID:25642155

  16. Advanced information society (9)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamata, Hiroki

    This article discusses the U.S. and European national strategies and policies for information society. Coping with the declining competitiveness in high-tech products and Japanese technological advantages both have been trying hard to strengthen technology base and to deregulate the telecommunications services markets. The U.S. approach in 1980's, unlike its liberalist principle, has been characterized by technological protectlonism and defense-oriented policies. European Communities' approach has been more comprehensive and systematic, investing heavily telecommunication infrastructure, deregulating domestic market, and promoting cooperation of member countries. However, both of these approaches have, so far, been unable to achieve a considerable success.

  17. A qualitative study comparing the assay performance characteristics between the 2007 and the 2013 American Society for Clinical Oncology and College of American Pathologists HER2 scoring methods in mucinous epithelial ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chi-Kuan; Lee, Ming-Yung; Lin, Wea-Lung; Wang, Yu-Ting; Han, Chih-Ping; Yu, Cheng-Ping; Chao, Wan-Ru

    2014-12-01

    The remarkable success of trastuzumab and other newly developed anti-HER2 (human epidermal growth factor receptor 2) therapies in breast, gastric, or gastroesophageal junction cancer patients has supported us to investigate the HER2 status and its possible therapeutic implication in mucinous epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC). However, there is currently no standardization of HER2 scoring criteria in mucinous EOC. In this study, we aimed to compare both the assay performance characteristics of the 2007 and the 2013 American Society for Clinical Oncology and College of American Pathologists scoring methods. Forty-nine tissue microarray samples of mucinous EOC from Asian women were analyzed by immunohistochemistry (IHC) and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) tests using the 2007 and the 2013 criteria, respectively. The overall concordance between IHC and FISH by the 2007 criteria was 97.92 % (kappa = 0.921), and that by the 2013 criteria was 100% (kappa = 1.000). The percentage of Her2 FISH-amplified cases showed an increasing trend significantly through their corresponding HER2 IHC ordinals by the 2007 and the 2013 criteria, respectively (P < 0.001, P < 0.001). After excluding equivocal cases, the specificity (100%) and positive predictive value (100%) were unchanged under either the 2007 or the 2013 criteria. The sensitivity (100%), negative predictive value (NPV) (100%), and accuracy (100%) of HER2 IHC were higher under the 2013 criteria than those (sensitivity 87.5%, NPV 97.6%, and accuracy 97.9%) under the 2007 criteria. Of the total 49 cases, the number (n = 4) of HER2 IHC equivocal results under the 2013 criteria was 4-fold higher than that (n = 1) under the 2007 criteria (8.16% vs 2.04%). Conclusively, if first tested by IHC, the 2013 criteria caused more equivocal HER2 IHC cases to be referred to Her2 FISH testing than the 2007 criteria. That decreased the false-negative rate of HER2 status and increased the detection rates of HER2 positivity in mucinous

  18. Communicating Science to Society

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Illingworth, Samuel; Muller, Jennifer; Leather, Kimberley; Morgan, William; O'Meara, Simon; Topping, David; Booth, Alastair; Llyod, Gary; Young, Dominique; Bannan, Thomas; Simpson, Emma; Percival, Carl; Allen, Grant; Clark, Elaine; Muller, Catherine; Graves, Rosemarie

    2014-05-01

    "Nothing in science has any value to society if it is not communicated." So goes the 1952 quote from Anne Roe, the noted twentieth century American psychologist and writer. She went on to say that "scientists are beginning to learn their social obligations", and now over 60 years later there is certainly evidence to support her assertions. As scientists, by communicating our research to the general public we not only better inform the tax payer where their money is being spent, but are also able to help put into context the topical environmental challenges and issues that society faces, as well as inspiring a whole new generation of future scientists. This process of communication is very much a two-way street; by presenting our work to people outside of our usual spheres of contemporaries, we expose ourselves to alternative thoughts and insights that can inspire us, as scientists, to take another look at our research from angles that we had never before considered. This work presents the results and experiences from a number of public engagement and outreach activities across the UK, in which geoscientists engaged and interacted with members of the general public. These include the design and implementation of Raspberry Pi based outreach activities for several hundred high school students; the process of running a successful podcast (http://thebarometer.podbean.com); hosting and participating in science events for thousands of members of the general public (e.g. http://www.manchestersciencefestival.com and http://sse.royalsociety.org/2013); and creating a citizen science activity that involved primary school children from across the UK. In communicating their research it is imperative that scientists interact with their audience in an effective and engaging manner, whether in an international conference, a classroom, or indeed down the pub. This work also presents a discussion of how these skills can be developed at an early stage in the careers of a research

  19. International Transplant Nurses Society

    MedlinePlus

    ... and professional practice in nursing." Demonstration of professional development support and clinical advancement programs are hallmarks of a professional nursing practice environment and critical components of Nursing Magnet status. The ...

  20. Society of Thoracic Surgeons

    MedlinePlus

    ... STS Participant User File Research Program Videos Lung Cancer Screening Adoption How to Build Your Academic Career New Technologies in Mitral Valve Replacement Enhanced Recovery Pathways in Thoracic Surgery New STS Clinical Practice Guidelines ...

  1. American Pain Society

    MedlinePlus

    ... Statement Enduring Materials APS Bulletin Webinars Resources Resource - Fibromyalgia Resources - Sickle Cell Disease Clinical Centers Guide Funding ... Patients Study Explores Role of Impaired Sleep in Fibromyalgia Pain Study Evaluates Frequency of Pediatric Pain Assessments ...

  2. Advanced information society(5)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanizawa, Ippei

    Based on the advancement of information network technology information communication forms informationalized society giving significant impact on business activities and life style in it. The information network has been backed up technologically by development of computer technology and has got great contribution by enhanced computer technology and communication equipments. Information is transferred by digital and analog methods. Technical development which has brought out multifunctioned modems of communication equipments in analog mode, and construction of advanced information communication network which has come out by joint work of computer and communication under digital technique, are described. The trend in institutional matter and standardization of electrical communication is also described showing some examples of value-added network (VAN).

  3. Advanced information society (1)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohira, Gosei

    In considering the relationship of informationization and industrial structure, this paper analize some factors such as information revolution, informationization of industries and industrialization of information as background of informationization of Japanese society. Next, some information indicators such as, information coefficient of household which is a share of information related expenditure, information coefficient of industry which is a share of information related cost to total cost of production, and information transmission census developed by Ministry of Post and Telecommunication are introduced. Then new information indicator by Economic Planning Agency, that is, electronic info-communication indicator is showed. In this study, the information activities are defined to produce message or to supply services on process, stores or sale of message using electronic information equipment. International comparisons of information labor force are also presented.

  4. Science, Technology and Society

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bridgstock, Martin; Burch, David; Forge, John; Laurent, John; Lowe, Ian

    1998-03-01

    This book provides a comprehensive introduction to the human, social and economic aspects of science and technology. It examines a broad range of issues from a variety of perspectives, using examples and experiences from around the world. The authors present complex issues, including the responsibilities of scientists, ethical dilemmas and controversies, the Industrial Revolution, economic issues, public policy, and science and technology in developing countries. The book ends with a thoughtful and provocative look toward the future. It features extensive guides to further reading, as well as a useful section on information searching skills. This book will provoke, engage, inform and stimulate thoughtful discussion about culture, society and science. Broad and interdisciplinary, it will be of considerable value to both students and teachers.

  5. Behaviorism and Society.

    PubMed

    Krapfl, Jon E

    2016-05-01

    A probable list of causes for the limited acceptance of behaviorism in our society is identified. This is followed by a summary review of the proposed solutions identified in other papers in this special issue of The Behavior Analyst, most of which relate to either better marketing of either the behavior analytic process or the results achieved as a consequence. One paper proposes a more broad conception of behavior analysis. This paper endorses the solutions identified in previous papers and then goes on to propose an even more broad conception of behavior analysis and makes the point that behavior analysis is unlikely to flourish unless behavior analysts understand a good deal more about the cultural and other contextual features of the environments in which they work.

  6. Birth of the Angle Society of Europe.

    PubMed

    Jacquin, Michel

    2006-01-01

    The history of the Angle Society of Europe began in 1971 with the meeting of two men: Juan Canut from Spain and Ernst Hösl from Germany. They decided to launch the idea of an association to get ready for the emergence of a new wave of Orthodontics in Europe. The first step was the creation of a Society with small groups of fourteen Orthodontists. The very first principle to be followed was "the plaster on the table" demonstration together with presentations on clinical or general interest subjects. The First Official Meeting took place in Zurich. 32 initial members were in attendance trying to set up the requirements for the development of a high quality Society. The second meeting focused on a scientific program centered on Treatment Timing Topic and the emergence of a new set of Bylaws. The third meeting was devoted to the display of 215 treated cases presented by temporary members to be evaluated by a Scientific Committee under the presidency of Dr. Alton Moore as official representative of the USA Edward H. Angle Society of Orthodontists. The following meetings demonstrated a constant and well monitored increase of new candidates and active members motivated to reach the required excellence level.

  7. [Pets, veterinarians, and multicultural society].

    PubMed

    Klumpers, M; Endenburg, N

    2009-01-15

    Dutch society comprises a growing percentage of non-Western ethnic minority groups. Little is known about pet ownership among these groups. This study explores some aspects of pet ownership, and the position of veterinarians, among the four largest non-Western ethnic minority groups in the Netherlands. Information was gathered through street interviews with people from a Moroccan, Turkish, Surinamese, or Antillean (including Aruban) background. Five hundred people where interviewed, including 41 pet owners. Results showed that people from non-Western ethnic minorities kept pets less often than Dutch people, with fish and birds being the most frequently kept pets. The number of visits to the veterinary clinic was comparable to that of Dutch pet owners; however, reasons given for the last visit were different. People from non-Western ethnic minorities mostly visited a veterinarian if their pet was ill whereas Dutch people visited the veterinarian if their pet needed to be vaccinated. People from non-Western ethnic minorities were positive about veterinarians, considering that they had sufficient knowledge about and concern for their pets. Moreover, veterinarians were trusted and provided understandable information--the respondents felt that they could go to their veterinarian with any question or problem regarding their pets. Although most respondents considered a visit to the veterinarian expensive, they were more than willing to invest in their pet's health.

  8. [Practical study for seminar program certified by Japanese Society of Hospital Pharmacists for Clinical Psychiatric Pharmacists organized by Chiba Society of Hospital Pharmacists, and investigation of participants' background and issues for taking board certified psychiatric pharmacy specialists and board certified pharmacists in psychiatric pharmacy certifications using questionnaires].

    PubMed

    Tsukiji, Mariko; Furuyama, Hikaru; Hasegawa, Takeshi; Ishida, Keiko; Matsuda, Kimiko; Fukuda, Keiko; Shimizu, Hideyuki

    2010-09-01

    Recently, certification systems for Board-Certified Psychiatric Pharmacy Specialists (BCPPS) and Board-Certified Pharmacists in Psychiatric Pharmacy (BCPPP) were established by the Japanese Society of Hospital Pharmacists (JSHP) in 2008, to meet the increasing needs for specialists in psychiatric pharmacy. However, there was no report on the background and opinion of pharmacists who have intention to take the BCPPS or BCPPP and/or seminar programs for BCPPS or BCPPP. The Chiba Society of Hospital Pharmacists has started to provide a seminar program certified by the JSHP to study psychiatry for pharmacists and also investigated the participants' background, demand for the program, and issues in taking the BCPPS or BCPPP using questionnaires. We found that many participants wanted lectures to obtain information on issues they face in routine work as well as for certification testing. For many participants, satisfying the requirements for applying for the BCPPS or BCPPP was one of the most important issues in receiving the qualifications. We found that over 40% of participants working at community pharmacies intended to take the BCPPS or BCPPP, although working experience at a community pharmacy does not entitle them to apply for the BCPPS or BCPPP. The intention of community pharmacists indicates that discussion of the requirements for BCPPS or BCPPP certification systems is necessary to improve psychiatric community care. We will plan a practical seminar program with feedback from this investigation.

  9. Commitment to quality of the Spanish scientific societies.

    PubMed

    García-Alegría, J; Vázquez-Fernández Del Pozo, S; Salcedo-Fernández, F; García-Lechuz Moya, J M; Andrés Zaragoza-Gaynor, G; López-Orive, M; García-San Jose, S; Casado-Durández, P

    2017-03-14

    This article summarises the objectives, methodology and initial conclusions of the project "Commitment to Quality of the Spanish Scientific Societies", coordinated by the Ministry of Health, Social Services and Equality, the Spanish Society of Internal Medicine and the Aragon Institute of Health Sciences, in which 48 scientific societies participate. This project's objectives are to decrease the use of unnecessary medical interventions, which are those that have shown no efficacy, have little or questionable effectiveness or are not cost-effective; decrease variability in clinical practice; promote the commitment among physicians and patients to properly use healthcare resources; and to promote clinical safety. The document includes 135 final recommendations for what not to do, prepared by 30 Spanish scientific societies.

  10. Making the Good Society Work

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Field, John

    2010-01-01

    Everyone is talking about civil society. Perhaps it's the election, and the shock of seeing more voters at the polling booths than anyone had expected. Now David Cameron's idea of a "big society" is being translated into some early policy measures. Does today's debate have anything to do with adult learning? The author believes that the…

  11. The Learning Society: Two Justifications

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Su, Ya-hui

    2010-01-01

    This article examines the view that has long been fashionable in related policies and literature that the establishment of the learning society is a necessary response to changing times. This article suggests that the association between the learning society and current change may be defensible but is limited. The justification of the learning…

  12. Numeracy in Society and Environment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cooper, Cath; Dole, Shelley; Geiger, Vince; Goos, Merrilyn

    2012-01-01

    This article describes a project that focuses on how a Society and Environment unit could develop required numeracy. This is more of an integrated unit organised around a theme rather than a Society and Environment unit that required specific aspects of numeracy. Suggested data sources for examining students numeracy development included (1) a…

  13. American Society of Human Genetics

    MedlinePlus

    ... Deficiency October 20, 2016 Parents of Children with Cancer Value Sequencing Results, Even if Non-actionable October 20, 2016 The American Society of Human Genetics, Incorporated 9650 Rockville Pike • Bethesda, Maryland 20814 society@ashg.org • 1-866-HUM-GENE • (301) 634-7300 Privacy Policy

  14. Annual scientific meeting--American Headache Society Washington 2011--highlights.

    PubMed

    Purdy, R Allan

    2012-05-01

    The 53rd Annual Scientific Meeting of the American Headache Society was held in Washington from June 2 to 5, 2011. Important clinical and basic science information was presented at this meeting. This is a review of the highlights of that meeting dealing in many areas of headache medicine. Once again, this meeting, which is the premier scientific meeting of the American Headache Society, provided lots of new and exciting information about multiple facets of migraine headache and other disorders.

  15. Paperless or vanishing society

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turner Luke, Joy

    2002-06-01

    In the 1940s color photography became available and within a few years, extremely popular. As people switched from black and white photographs made with the old metallic silver process to the new color films, pictures taken to record their lives and families began a slow disappearing act. The various color processes, coupled with the substrates they were printed on, affected their longevity, but many color photographs taken from the late 1950s through the 1970s, and even into the 1980s, faded not only when exposed to the light, but also when stored in the dark. Henry Wilhelm's excellent book 'The Permanence and Care of Color Photographs' documents this history in detail. Today we are making another transition in the storage of pictures and information. There are questions about the longevity of different types of digital storage, and also of the images printed by various types of inkjet printers, or by laser printers using colored toners. Very expensive and very beautiful works of art produced on Iris printers are appearing in art exhibitions. Some of these are referred to as Giclee prints and are offered on excellent papers. Artists are told the prints will last a lifetime; and if by change they don't it is only necessary to make another print. Henry Wilhelm has begun to test and rate these images for lightfastness; however, his test method was developed for examining longevity in colored photographs. It is of interest to find out how these prints will hold up in the tests required for fine art materials. Thus far companies producing digital inks and printers have not invested the time and money necessary to develop an American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) standard method for evaluating the lightfastness of digital prints. However, it is possible to use ASTM D 5383, Standard Practice for Visual Determination of the Lightfastness of Art Materials by Art Technologists, to pinpoint colors that will fade in a short time, even though the test is not as

  16. Parent-teacher agreement on children's problems in 21 societies.

    PubMed

    Rescorla, Leslie A; Bochicchio, Lauren; Achenbach, Thomas M; Ivanova, Masha Y; Almqvist, Fredrik; Begovac, Ivan; Bilenberg, Niels; Bird, Hector; Dobrean, Anca; Erol, Nese; Fombonne, Eric; Fonseca, Antonio; Frigerio, Alessandra; Fung, Daniel S S; Lambert, Michael C; Leung, Patrick W L; Liu, Xianchen; Marković, Ivica; Markovic, Jasminka; Minaei, Asghar; Ooi, Yoon Phaik; Roussos, Alexandra; Rudan, Vlasta; Simsek, Zeynep; van der Ende, Jan; Weintraub, Sheila; Wolanczyk, Tomasz; Woo, Bernardine; Weiss, Bahr; Weisz, John; Zukauskiene, Rita; Verhulst, Frank C

    2014-01-01

    Parent-teacher cross-informant agreement, although usually modest, may provide important clinical information. Using data for 27,962 children from 21 societies, we asked the following: (a) Do parents report more problems than teachers, and does this vary by society, age, gender, or type of problem? (b) Does parent-teacher agreement vary across different problem scales or across societies? (c) How well do parents and teachers in different societies agree on problem item ratings? (d) How much do parent-teacher dyads in different societies vary in within-dyad agreement on problem items? (e) How well do parents and teachers in 21 societies agree on whether the child's problem level exceeds a deviance threshold? We used five methods to test agreement for Child Behavior Checklist (CBCL) and Teacher's Report Form (TRF) ratings. CBCL scores were higher than TRF scores on most scales, but the informant differences varied in magnitude across the societies studied. Cross-informant correlations for problem scale scores varied moderately across societies studied and were significantly higher for Externalizing than Internalizing problems. Parents and teachers tended to rate the same items as low, medium, or high, but within-dyad item agreement varied widely in every society studied. In all societies studied, both parental noncorroboration of teacher-reported deviance and teacher noncorroboration of parent-reported deviance were common. Our findings underscore the importance of obtaining information from parents and teachers when evaluating and treating children, highlight the need to use multiple methods of quantifying cross-informant agreement, and provide comprehensive baselines for patterns of parent-teacher agreement across 21 societies.

  17. Development of clinical scientists.

    PubMed

    Smith, R V

    1987-01-01

    The education and training of clinical scientists has served society in several ways. For academic pharmacy, the emergence of clinical science has provided research and scholarship opportunities for clinical faculty development. Clinical scientists have also begun to play important roles in industrial drug research and development. For all faculty and students, clinical science research reinforces a "research mindset" that will become increasingly important as our society moves from a production/extraction to an information-based economy. Pharmacy will best evolve by increasing its commitment to clinical science research. In the process, academic pharmacy must continue to improve and support excellent education and training programs for clinical scientists.

  18. Phoenix Society for Burn Survivors

    MedlinePlus

    ... Medical Professionals Phoenix Society is the leader in connecting the burn recovery community and creating resources for survivors. Since 1977, we have partnered with survivors, families, health care professionals, burn centers, and the fire ...

  19. The Engineering Societies & Continuing Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Professional Engineer, 1979

    1979-01-01

    Gives a description of what the major engineering societies (ASCE, ASME, AICHE, and IEEE) are doing in the area of continuing education. The description includes the short courses, their costs, duration, type and scope of the content. (GA)

  20. ISS Update: American Physical Society

    NASA Video Gallery

    NASA Public Affairs Officer Dan Huot talks with Becky Thompson, head of Public Outreach for the American Physical Society, a professional organization for physicists whose web site hosts astronaut ...

  1. New York Zoological Society Library.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Steven P.

    1988-01-01

    Describes the institutional setting, history, and services of the New York Zoological Society Library. Topics covered include clientele; library collections and special collections; library staffing and organizational structure; computer applications; and relationships with other libraries. (11 references) (CLB)

  2. Society Membership 1980 Profile: Stability and Change.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Porter, Beverly Fearn; Czujko, Roman

    This 1980 profile provides an overview of employment stability and change among a small random sample of U.S. and Canadian members of The American Institute of Physics (AIP) member societies: The American Physical Society; Optical Society of America; Acoustical Society of America; The Society of Rheology; American Association of Physics Teachers;…

  3. XXXVI Polish Astronomical Society Meeting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Różańska, Agata; Bejger, Michał

    2014-12-01

    XXXVI meeting of Polish Astronomical Society was held in Warsaw on Sept. 11-14, 2013. The conference brought together 150 astronomers working in different institutes in Poland and abroad. The highlight of the Congress was the first awarding of the Paczynski's Medal. The first laureate of the Medal is Professor Martin Rees from University of Cambridge. Medal was given by the President of the Polish Astronomical Society prof. Bozena Czerny.

  4. [GEIPC-SEIMC (Study Group for Infections in the Critically Ill Patient of the Spanish Society for Infectious Diseases and Clinical Microbiology) and GTEI-SEMICYUC ( Working Group on Infectious Diseases of the Spanish Society of Intensive Medicine, Critical Care, and Coronary Units) recommendations for antibiotic treatment of gram-positive cocci infections in the critical patient].

    PubMed

    Astigarraga, P M Olaechea; Montero, J Garnacho; Cerrato, S Grau; Colomo, O Rodríguez; Martínez, M Palomar; Crespo, R Zaragoza; García-Paredes, P Muñoz; Cerdá, E Cerdá; Lerma, F Alvarez

    2007-01-01

    In recent years, an increment of infections caused by gram-positive cocci has been documented in nosocomial and hospital-acquired-infections. In diverse countries, a rapid development of resistance to common antibiotics against gram-positive cocci has been observed. This situation is exceptional in Spain but our country might be affected in the near future. New antimicrobials active against these multi-drug resistant pathogens are nowadays available. It is essential to improve our current knowledge about pharmacokinetic properties of traditional and new antimicrobials to maximize its effectiveness and to minimize toxicity. These issues are even more important in critically ill patients because inadequate empirical therapy is associated with therapeutic failure and a poor outcome. Experts representing two scientific societies (Grupo de estudio de Infecciones en el Paciente Crítico de la SEIMC and Grupo de trabajo de Enfermedades Infecciosas de la SEMICYUC) have elaborated a consensus document based on the current scientific evidence to summarize recommendations for the treatment of serious infections caused by gram-positive cocci in critically ill patients.

  5. Clinical trials update from the European Society of Cardiology-Heart Failure meeting 2015: AUGMENT-HF, TITRATION, STOP-HF, HARMONIZE, LION HEART, MOOD-HF, and renin-angiotensin inhibitors in patients with heart and renal failure.

    PubMed

    Pellicori, Pierpaolo; Clark, Andrew L

    2015-09-01

    This article provides an overview on the key trials relevant to the pathophysiology, prevention, and treatment of heart failure (HF) presented at the Heart Failure Association (HFA) of the European Society of Cardiology (ESC) annual meeting held in Seville, Spain in May 2015. Trials reported include AUGMENT-AF (myocardial injections of calcium-alginate hydrogel), a propensity score-matched study of renin-angiotensin system antagonists in patients with HF and severe renal dysfunction, HARMONIZE (sodium zirconium cyclosilicate used to bind potassium), TITRATION, comparing two regimes for introducing LCZ696, STOP-HF, a trial of intramyocardial stromal cell-derived factor-1, MOOD-HF (escitalopram for patients with heart failure and depression), and LION HEART, a trial of intermittent levosimendan therapy. Unpublished reports should be considered as preliminary, since analyses may change in the final publication.

  6. Clinical Trial Updates and Hotline Sessions presented at the European Society of Cardiology Congress 2007: (FINESSE, CARESS, OASIS 5, PRAGUE-8, OPTIMIST, GRACE, STEEPLE, SCAAR, STRATEGY, DANAMI-2, ExTRACT-TIMI-25, ISAR-REACT 2, ACUITY, ALOFT, 3CPO, PROSPECT, EVEREST, COACH, BENEFiT, MERLIN-TIMI 36, SEARCH-MI, ADVANCE, WENBIT, EUROASPIRE I-III, ARISE, getABI, RIO).

    PubMed

    Kindermann, Michael; Adam, Oliver; Werner, Nikos; Böhm, Michael

    2007-11-01

    This article provides information and commentaries on trials which were presented at the Hotline and Clinical Trial Update Sessions at the European Society of Cardiology Congress 2007 in Vienna. The key presentations were performed by leading experts in the field with relevant positions in the trials or registries. It is important to note that unpublished reports should be considered as preliminary data, as the analysis may change in the final publications. The comprehensive summaries have been generated from the oral presentation and the webcasts of the European Society of Cardiology and should provide the readers with the most comprehensive information of relevant publications.

  7. Society for Reproductive Endocrinology and Infertility

    MedlinePlus

    The Society for Reproductive Endocrinology and Infertility SREI Members-only Forum Home About Us About SREI Vision and Mission ... Fact Sheets and Booklets SREI is an affiliated society to the American Society for Reproductive Medicine . Below ...

  8. An official American Thoracic Society workshop report: tobacco control initiatives within the American Thoracic Society.

    PubMed

    Wewers, Mary Ellen; Bailey, William C; Carlsen, Kai-Häkon; Eisner, Mark D; Folan, Patricia; Heath, Janie; Klinnert, Mary D; Kovesi, Tom; Pien, Grace W; Reichart, Virginia C; Talwar, Arunabh; Thompson, Katherine

    2010-02-01

    Cigarette smoking represents the single most preventable cause of premature morbidity and mortality in the United States and the burden of tobacco use is apparent world-wide. Cigarette smoking is a major risk factor for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, the third leading cause of death in the United States in 2004. The American Thoracic Society (ATS) and its members have contributed significantly to an understanding of the biological and pathophysiologic mechanisms responsible for the development and management of tobacco-attributable disease and disability. The society's active involvement in tobacco control advocacy and policy-related initiatives are central to its mission. Within the ATS, there is also increased interest in accelerating the society's efforts to understand the mechanisms responsible for the uptake, persistence, and cessation of tobacco use. Scientific, clinical, and educational activities that include an examination of these underlying mechanisms are warranted. This paper describes findings from an ATS initiative that developed a preliminary strategy for enhancing scientific, clinical, educational, and policy-related tobacco control efforts that are consistent with the vision of the ATS. The specific aims of this project included the identification of existing mechanisms, as well as the current governance in place within the ATS infrastructure, to address tobacco control issues related to scientific inquiry, policy initiatives, and advocacy for tobacco control. This assessment generated recommendations to inform the ATS leadership with regard to the future development of relevant tobacco control initiatives.

  9. Recommendations for the standardization and interpretation of the electrocardiogram: part I: The electrocardiogram and its technology: a scientific statement from the American Heart Association Electrocardiography and Arrhythmias Committee, Council on Clinical Cardiology; the American College of Cardiology Foundation; and the Heart Rhythm Society: endorsed by the International Society for Computerized Electrocardiology.

    PubMed

    Kligfield, Paul; Gettes, Leonard S; Bailey, James J; Childers, Rory; Deal, Barbara J; Hancock, E William; van Herpen, Gerard; Kors, Jan A; Macfarlane, Peter; Mirvis, David M; Pahlm, Olle; Rautaharju, Pentti; Wagner, Galen S; Josephson, Mark; Mason, Jay W; Okin, Peter; Surawicz, Borys; Wellens, Hein

    2007-03-13

    This statement examines the relation of the resting ECG to its technology. Its purpose is to foster understanding of how the modern ECG is derived and displayed and to establish standards that will improve the accuracy and usefulness of the ECG in practice. Derivation of representative waveforms and measurements based on global intervals are described. Special emphasis is placed on digital signal acquisition and computer-based signal processing, which provide automated measurements that lead to computer-generated diagnostic statements. Lead placement, recording methods, and waveform presentation are reviewed. Throughout the statement, recommendations for ECG standards are placed in context of the clinical implications of evolving ECG technology.

  10. Recommendations for the standardization and interpretation of the electrocardiogram: part I: the electrocardiogram and its technology a scientific statement from the American Heart Association Electrocardiography and Arrhythmias Committee, Council on Clinical Cardiology; the American College of Cardiology Foundation; and the Heart Rhythm Society endorsed by the International Society for Computerized Electrocardiology.

    PubMed

    Kligfield, Paul; Gettes, Leonard S; Bailey, James J; Childers, Rory; Deal, Barbara J; Hancock, E William; van Herpen, Gerard; Kors, Jan A; Macfarlane, Peter; Mirvis, David M; Pahlm, Olle; Rautaharju, Pentti; Wagner, Galen S; Josephson, Mark; Mason, Jay W; Okin, Peter; Surawicz, Borys; Wellens, Hein

    2007-03-13

    This statement examines the relation of the resting ECG to its technology. Its purpose is to foster understanding of how the modern ECG is derived and displayed and to establish standards that will improve the accuracy and usefulness of the ECG in practice. Derivation of representative waveforms and measurements based on global intervals are described. Special emphasis is placed on digital signal acquisition and computer-based signal processing, which provide automated measurements that lead to computer-generated diagnostic statements. Lead placement, recording methods, and waveform presentation are reviewed. Throughout the statement, recommendations for ECG standards are placed in context of the clinical implications of evolving ECG technology.

  11. Clinical Practice Guideline for the Management of Chronic Kidney Disease in Patients Infected With HIV: 2014 Update by the HIV Medicine Association of the Infectious Diseases Society of America

    PubMed Central

    Lucas, Gregory M.; Ross, Michael J.; Stock, Peter G.; Shlipak, Michael G.; Wyatt, Christina M.; Gupta, Samir K.; Atta, Mohamed G.; Wools-Kaloustian, Kara K.; Pham, Paul A.; Bruggeman, Leslie A.; Lennox, Jeffrey L.; Ray, Patricio E.; Kalayjian, Robert C.

    2014-01-01

    It is important to realize that guidelines cannot always account for individual variation among patients. They are not intended to supplant physician judgment with respect to particular patients or special clinical situations. IDSA considers adherence to these guidelines to be voluntary, with the ultimate determination regarding their application to be made by the physician in the light of each patient's individual circumstances. PMID:25234519

  12. Clinical practice guideline for the management of chronic kidney disease in patients infected with HIV: 2014 update by the HIV Medicine Association of the Infectious Diseases Society of America.

    PubMed

    Lucas, Gregory M; Ross, Michael J; Stock, Peter G; Shlipak, Michael G; Wyatt, Christina M; Gupta, Samir K; Atta, Mohamed G; Wools-Kaloustian, Kara K; Pham, Paul A; Bruggeman, Leslie A; Lennox, Jeffrey L; Ray, Patricio E; Kalayjian, Robert C

    2014-11-01

    It is important to realize that guidelines cannot always account for individual variation among patients. They are not intended to supplant physician judgment with respect to particular patients or special clinical situations. IDSA considers adherence to these guidelines to be voluntary, with the ultimate determination regarding their application to be made by the physician in the light of each patient's individual circumstances.

  13. End points and trial design in geriatric oncology research: a joint European organisation for research and treatment of cancer--Alliance for Clinical Trials in Oncology--International Society Of Geriatric Oncology position article.

    PubMed

    Wildiers, Hans; Mauer, Murielle; Pallis, Athanasios; Hurria, Arti; Mohile, Supriya G; Luciani, Andrea; Curigliano, Giuseppe; Extermann, Martine; Lichtman, Stuart M; Ballman, Karla; Cohen, Harvey Jay; Muss, Hyman; Wedding, Ulrich

    2013-10-10

    Selecting the most appropriate end points for clinical trials is important to assess the value of new treatment strategies. Well-established end points for clinical research exist in oncology but may not be as relevant to the older cancer population because of competing risks of death and potentially increased impact of therapy on global functioning and quality of life. This article discusses specific clinical end points and their advantages and disadvantages for older individuals. Randomized or single-arm phase II trials can provide insight into the range of efficacy and toxicity in older populations but ideally need to be confirmed in phase III trials, which are unfortunately often hindered by the severe heterogeneity of the older cancer population, difficulties with selection bias depending on inclusion criteria, physician perception, and barriers in willingness to participate. All clinical trials in oncology should be without an upper age limit to allow entry of eligible older adults. In settings where so-called standard therapy is not feasible, specific trials for older patients with cancer might be required, integrating meaningful measures of outcome. Not all questions can be answered in randomized clinical trials, and large observational cohort studies or registries within the community setting should be established (preferably in parallel to randomized trials) so that treatment patterns across different settings can be compared with impact on outcome. Obligatory integration of a comparable form of geriatric assessment is recommended in future studies, and regulatory organizations such as the European Medicines Agency and US Food and Drug Administration should require adequate collection of data on efficacy and toxicity of new drugs in fit and frail elderly subpopulations.

  14. Japan-Russia Pediatric Society.

    PubMed

    Nihei, K; Thunemathu, Y; Kobayashi, N

    1993-12-01

    In March 1990, medical interchange between Japan and the Soviet Union began with a letter from the local health bureau of Khabarovsk. We visited Khabarovsk three times and Kamchatka once, and saw many hospitals and patients. Russian doctors of pediatrics visited Japan. Medical information was exchanged and discussed. The Japan-Russia Pediatric Society was established to perform interchange of medical information, technology and staff such as doctors, nurses and technicians between Japan and Russia, especially the Far East district of Russia. The Society meeting has been held three times: Tokyo (1991), Khabarovsk (1992) and Niigata (1993). It is necessary to continue the interchange between the two countries.

  15. The Bockus International Society of Gastroenterology: Historical review

    PubMed Central

    Chaun, Hugh

    2012-01-01

    The Bockus International Society of Gastroenterology was founded in 1958 in honour of Dr Henry L Bockus (1894–1982) by his former students, residents and fellows at the Graduate School of Medicine of the University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, USA. It was a celebrated tribute to Dr Bockus’ outstanding leadership in the development and teaching of clinical gastroenterology as a subspecialty, which was in its infancy in the post-World War II era. He established the first formal training course in clinical gastroenterology in America. His department of gastroenterology became the leading graduate school of clinical gastroenterology in the world, training many clinical gastroenterologists in America and from many regions around the world. For many years, Dr Bockus was the most prominent American in world gastroenterology. The Bockus Society holds biennial scientific congresses in different continents, thus continuing to foster Dr Bockus’ lifelong interest and vision to promote international medical friendship, and excellence in education and research collaboration. PMID:22506261

  16. NASPGHAN Clinical Practice Guideline for the Diagnosis and Treatment of Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease in Children: Recommendations from the Expert Committee on NAFLD (ECON) and the North American Society of Pediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition (NASPGHAN).

    PubMed

    Vos, Miriam B; Abrams, Stephanie H; Barlow, Sarah E; Caprio, Sonia; Daniels, Stephen R; Kohli, Rohit; Mouzaki, Marialena; Sathya, Pushpa; Schwimmer, Jeffrey B; Sundaram, Shikha S; Xanthakos, Stavra A

    2017-02-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is a highly prevalent chronic liver disease that occurs in the setting of insulin resistance and increased adiposity. It has rapidly evolved into the most common liver disease seen in the pediatric population and is a management challenge for general pediatric practitioners, subspecialists, and for health systems. In this guideline, the expert committee on NAFLD reviewed and summarized the available literature, formulating recommendations to guide screening and clinical care of children with NAFLD.

  17. Diminished Ovarian Reserve (DOR) in the US ART Population: Diagnostic Trends Among 181,536 Cycles from the Society for Assisted Reproductive Technology Clinic Outcomes Reporting System (SART CORS)

    PubMed Central

    Devine, Kate; Mumford, Sunni L.; Wu, Mae; DeCherney, Alan H.; Hill, Micah J.; Propst, Anthony

    2015-01-01

    Objective To evaluate trends in DOR assignment in the SART CORS database and to evaluate its accuracy in predicting poor ovarian response (POR) as defined in ESHRE’s ‘Bologna Criteria’ (2011). Design Retrospective cohort study. Setting Not applicable. Patients 181,536 fresh, autologous ART cycles reported to SART by US clinics in 2004 and 2011 (earliest and most recent available reporting years). Intervention(s) None. Main Outcome Measure(s) DOR assignment was the primary exposure. POR, defined as cycle cancellation for poor response or <4 oocytes retrieved following conventional gonadotropin stimulation (>149 IU FSH daily), was the primary outcome. Secondary outcomes were live birth and number of oocytes retrieved. DOR prevalence, power of DOR and FSH (clinically assigned as DOR, incidence of POR decreased from 32 to 30%, and live birth improved from 15 to 17%. Comparing basal FSH ≥12 versus clinical assignment of DOR, basal FSH had a higher specificity (92.2% vs.81.6%) and PPV (38.3%vs.30.9%) for predicting POR. Live birth among POR cycles was 4%. Conclusions DOR diagnosis is increasing, and accuracy remains poor, despite the availability of additional diagnostic parameters such as antral follicle count and anti-mullerian hormone. POR entailed poor outcomes, but the majority of patients clinically assigned as DOR did not experience POR. Development and utilization of more accurate predictors of POR are needed to minimize patient distress resulting from over-diagnosis. PMID:26049057

  18. The clinical impact of IKZF1 deletions in paediatric B-cell precursor acute lymphoblastic leukaemia is independent of minimal residual disease stratification in Nordic Society for Paediatric Haematology and Oncology treatment protocols used between 1992 and 2013.

    PubMed

    Olsson, Linda; Ivanov Öfverholm, Ingegerd; Norén-Nyström, Ulrika; Zachariadis, Vasilios; Nordlund, Jessica; Sjögren, Helene; Golovleva, Irina; Nordgren, Ann; Paulsson, Kajsa; Heyman, Mats; Barbany, Gisela; Johansson, Bertil

    2015-09-01

    Paediatric B-cell precursor acute lymphoblastic leukaemias (BCP ALL) with IKZF1 deletions (∆IKZF1) are associated with a poor outcome. However, there are conflicting data as to whether ∆IKZF1 is an independent risk factor if minimal residual disease (MRD) and other copy number alterations also are taken into account. We investigated 334 paediatric BCP ALL, diagnosed 1992-2013 and treated according to Nordic Society for Paediatric Haematology and Oncology ALL protocols, with known IKZF1 status based on either single nucleotide polymorphism array (N = 218) or multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (N = 116) analyses. ∆IKZF1, found in 15%, was associated with inferior 10-year probabilities of event-free (60% vs. 83%; P < 0·001) and overall survival (pOS; 73% vs. 89%; P = 0·001). Adjusting for known risk factors, including white blood cell (WBC) count and MRD, ∆IKZF1 was the strongest independent factor for relapse and death. ∆IKZF1 was present in 27% of cases with non-informative cytogenetics ('BCP-other') and a poor 10-year pOS was particularly pronounced in this group (58% vs. 90%; P < 0·001). Importantly, neither MRD nor WBC count predicted events in the ∆IKZF1-positive cases. Co-occurrence of pseudoautosomal region 1 (PAR1) deletions in Xp22.33/Yp11.32 (P2RY8-CRLF2) and ∆IKZF1 increased the risk of relapse (75% vs. 30% for cases with only ∆IKZF1; P = 0·045), indicating that BCP-other ALL with both P2RY8-CRLF2 and ∆IKZF1 constitutes a particularly high-risk group.

  19. Safety Pharmacology Society: 9th Annual Meeting.

    PubMed

    Cavero, Icilio

    2010-03-01

    The keynote presentation of the Safety Pharmacology (SP) Society 9th Annual Meeting addressed the urgency, for pharmaceutical organizations, to implement strategies for effectively communicating drug risks to all concerned stakeholders and, in particular, the general public. The application of chronobiology to SP investigational protocols can improve the search of drug-induced adverse effects. The Distinguished Service Award Lecture reviewed a life-long journey through trials and tribulations in the quest of the ever-distant scientific truth. The revision process of Directive 86/609/EC for improving animal welfare should be conducted with the purpose of maintaining a fair balance among animal protection, human health and research imperatives in order to prevent the migration of pharmaceutical activities outside Europe. Additional topics of interest were the behavioral, metabolic and cardiovascular problems experienced by small animals housed at the standard laboratory temperature. A technology for the automated collection of blood and urine samples in rats implanted with telemetry sensors was presented. Non-clinical, clinical, regulatory and legal aspects of abuse liability were expertly reviewed. The 'degradability' of pharmaceuticals into environment-friendly chemicals should be an actively searched and optimized feature of future pharmaceuticals in order to prevent drug pollution of ecosystems. Transgenic and diseased animal models should be selected whenever they can facilitate the determination of drug-induced adverse effects. SP strategies to investigate the safety of drug combination products were exemplified and analyzed in depth. The future of SP was proposed to lie not in the performance of regulatory studies of pharmacodynamic nature but in developing and early applying an array of screening assays for clearing clinical candidates against known drug-induced organ function injuries. In conclusion, the 2009 SP Society annual meeting offered a wealth of

  20. International Ergonomics Association Activities and Constituent Societies

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-05-01

    Soci~t d’Ergonomie de Langue Francaise Hungary: IHungarian Society for Organization and Management Science Italy: Societa Italiana di Ergonomia ...Human Ergology Society Korea: Korean Ergonomics Society Mexico: Association Mexicana de Ergonomia New Zealand: New Zealand Ergonomics Soceity South...34.-, NATIONAL & REGIONAL ERGONOMICS SOCIETIES Association Mexicana de Ergonomia AC Javier Castellanos, Secretario Ejecutivo Periferico Sur 4271 - "Mexico 20

  1. American Chemical Society, Preprints symposia

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1987-01-01

    The Division of Petroleum Chemistry of the American Chemical Society met August 30-September 4, 1987, in New Orleans and presented symposia on advances in fluid cracking catalysts, advances in naphtha reforming, refinery waste cleanup, hydrocarbon oxidation, and methane conversion. Forty-two abstracts were prepared.

  2. Reconstructing Death in Postmodern Society.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kastenbaum, Robert

    1993-01-01

    Examines interaction between emerging thanatological movement and its sociohistorical context. Notes that thanatology will take on new shape as individuals and society attempt to cope with postmodernistic forces and deconstructive mentality. Considers prospect for authentic solidarity against distress in reconstructed death system. (Author/NB)

  3. Building a MicroSociety

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dunton, Sheryl

    2006-01-01

    Talbot Hill Elementary School in Renton, Washington, uses the MicroSociety model to make learning relevant and engaging for its diverse student population. Three afternoons each week, every student participates in a for-profit business, a governmental agency, or a nonprofit organization. Teachers prepare students to participate in the school's…

  4. Educating in a Postconventional Society

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kim, Hyun-Sook

    2006-01-01

    Today many people experience more frustration and confusion about many moral issues and norms than their ancestors. Traditional values and norms do not seem to serve Christian adults in today's situation. Christians are therefore challenged to develop Christian moral norms and values relevant to contemporary society and culture. In this article,…

  5. Society Membership Survey: 1986 Salaries.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Skelton, W. Keith; And Others

    The fourth in a series of reports produced by the Education and Employment Statistics division of the American Insititute of Physics (AIP) is presented. Data are based on a stratified random sample survey of one-sixth of the U.S. and Canadian membership of the AIP member societies. In the spring of 1986, every individual in the sample received a…

  6. White Resentment in Settler Society

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schick, Carol

    2014-01-01

    Teaching about the history and culture of aboriginal peoples in schools of white settler societies can serve as a counter to the dominant story that serves as the national narrative. Even though the actual teaching may well be among the least political and least disruptive type of curricular knowledge on offer, the inclusion of counter stories can…

  7. Science in Society, Teacher's Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Association for Science Education, Cambridge (England).

    This teacher's guide was designed for use in a course developed by The Science in Society Project. The aims of the project, course description and content, and suggestions for introducing the course are included in a general introduction. Objectives, content, commentary on supplementary reading materials developed specifically for the course,…

  8. Huntington's Disease Society of America

    MedlinePlus

    ... Andrews HDSA Researcher Spotlight- Dr. Amber Southwell Advocacy Huntington’s Disease Parity Act Affordable Care Act Social Security Administration ... Shop HDSA Events Donate Connect with us! News Huntington’s Disease Society of America AWARDS $930,000 to nine ...

  9. Socialization for the Knowledge Society

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Karpov, Alexander O.

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of the study is to give an overview and present special features of socialization of the research type that prepares young people for life in the knowledge society. Methods of cultural and historical epistemology, of hermeneutic and structural-functional analysis of social action have been used in the study, as well as elements of the…

  10. Chemical society hosts biotech gathering

    SciTech Connect

    Stone, R.

    1992-08-28

    Last week more than 1,200 scientists attended the Ninth International Biotechnology Symposium sponsored by the American Chemical Society (ACS) in Crystal City, Virginia. The conference, held every 4 years, ranged from basic science topics (such as finding structural motifs in protein data banks) to applied work (including the latest advances in making human proteins in transgenic animals).

  11. Marketing and Society. Study Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Welsh, Robert S.; Blake, Rowland S.

    This self-instructional study guide is part of the materials for a college-level programmed course entitled "Marketing and Society." The study guide is intended for use by students in conjunction with a related textbook, a workbook, a review guide, and a series of instructional tape casettes. The study guide contains a brief introductory section…

  12. Shapes of a Renewable Society.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Deudney, Daniel; Flavin, Christopher

    1983-01-01

    To rely on coal and nuclear power as sources of energy is to narrow society's future options and to present numerous problems. Renewable solar energy, on the other hand, can preserve rather than reduce options. More jobs, rising self-reliance, and new equalities between nations will be the result. (RM)

  13. Pluralism in a Democratic Society.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tumin, Melvin M., Ed.; Plotch, Walter, Ed.

    A conference on Pluralism in a Democratic Society: An Interdisciplinary Inquiry into its Meaning and Educational Uses, was held in April 1975 in New York. The goals of this conference were: (1) to clearly define cultural pluralism; and (2) to find the best ways of teaching and learning about cultural pluralism in the classroom. The papers that…

  14. Credentialism in Our Ignorant Society.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marien, Michael

    All societies have procedures for selecting who will occupy important positions. The use of credentials characterizes our system of social selection, and our worship of them has created the following problems: an artificial demand for education, artificial restraints to learning, the overlooking of obsolescence, generational inversion (wherein the…

  15. The American Montessori Society, Inc.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Donahue, Gilbert E.

    2010-01-01

    This article offers a brief history of the establishment of the American Montessori Society (AMS) and takes a closer look at its structure. The history of AMS has essentially been a search for standards and a search for community in its efforts to further the welfare of children in America. It has been an indigenous effort by American parents, and…

  16. [History of the German Spine Society].

    PubMed

    Wilke, H-J; Carstens, C

    2015-12-01

    The objective of this article is to summarize the history of the German Spine Society (DWG). This society resulted in the year 2006 after several attempts from the fusion of two established German societies, which were dealing with topics around the spine, der "German Society for Spine Research" founded in the year 1958 and the "German Society for Spine Surgery" founded in the year 1987. This fusion was the beginning of a success story, as from this time on the annual membership increased so much that the DWG became the largest spine society in Europe and one of all spine societies worldwide.

  17. Clinical trials in acute heart failure: simpler solutions to complex problems. Consensus document arising from a European Society of Cardiology cardiovascular round-table think tank on acute heart failure, 12 May 2009.

    PubMed

    McDonagh, Theresa A; Komajda, Michel; Maggioni, Aldo P; Zannad, Faiez; Gheorghiade, Mihai; Metra, Marco; Dargie, Henry J

    2011-12-01

    This European consensus document aims to identify the main reasons for the apparent lack of progress in the introduction of new medicines for acute heart failure. Relevant issues include not only the heterogeneity of the patient group but also the pharmacology of the medicines themselves and the design of the trials. Above all, this document attempts to provide some pragmatic solutions to this complex syndrome to simplify the execution of meaningful therapeutic endeavours in this area of undoubted unmet clinical need in the future.

  18. European Federation of Neurological Societies/Peripheral Nerve Society guideline on management of multifocal motor neuropathy. Report of a joint task force of the European Federation of Neurological Societies and the Peripheral Nerve Society--first revision.

    PubMed

    2010-12-01

    A European Federation of Neurological Societies/Peripheral Nerve Society consensus guideline on the definition, investigation, and treatment of multifocal motor neuropathy (MMN) was published in 2006. The aim is to revise this guideline. Disease experts considered references retrieved from MEDLINE and Cochrane Systematic Reviews published between August 2004 and July 2009 and prepared statements that were agreed to in an iterative fashion. The Task Force agreed on Good Practice Points to define clinical and electrophysiological diagnostic criteria for MMN, investigations to be considered, and principal recommendations for treatment.

  19. [ANOREXIA AND BULIMIA: IMPACT ON NETWORK SOCIETY].

    PubMed

    Alex Sánchez, María Dolores

    2015-01-01

    The Information and Communication Technologies (ICT) have an increasing influence on the way we relate and in shaping personal identity. The phenomenon of online social networking emerges strongly and contributes to the development of new spaces breaking with the official discourse that marks the scientific evidence on health. This paper analyzes the impact of ICT in relation to the identity of the digital natives and eating disorders (ED). Particular attention to how the network society determines the response of young people in situations of social tension is dedicated. To do this, provides a perspective on the concept of interaction from the analysis of the discourse on anorexia and bulimia in the network, and how to care nurses should consider these factors to improve efficiency and quality in clinical care and patient care.

  20. European Society of Cardiology (ESC) Congress Report from London 2015.

    PubMed

    Nishiguchi, Tsuyoshi; Akasaka, Takashi

    2015-01-01

    The Annual Congress of the European Society of Cardiology (ESC) was held in London from 29 August to 2 September 2015. It is the leading conference in cardiology in the world, with presentations on the latest scientific discoveries, innovations, technology, education, and clinical practices. More than 32,000 delegates and 5,000 exhibitors from 140 countries participated, sharing a number of scientific presentations, including 28 clinical hot lines, 18 clinical trial updates, 20 registry studies, 12 basic and translational science hot line studies, and 4,533 abstract studies. Japan had the highest number of accepted abstracts at the Congress, indicating the great contribution of Japanese scientists and the Japanese Circulation Society.

  1. Leadership in an egalitarian society.

    PubMed

    von Rueden, Christopher; Gurven, Michael; Kaplan, Hillard; Stieglitz, Jonathan

    2014-12-01

    Leadership is instrumental to resolution of collective action dilemmas, particularly in large, heterogeneous groups. Less is known about the characteristics or effectiveness of leadership in small-scale, homogeneous, and relatively egalitarian societies, in which humans have spent most of our existence. Among Tsimane' forager-horticulturalists of Bolivia, we (1) assess traits of elected leaders under experimental and naturalistic conditions and (2) test whether leaders impact or differentially benefit from collective action outcomes. We find that elected leaders are physically strong and have more kin and other exchange partners. Their ranks on physical dominance, kin support, and trustworthiness predict how well their groups perform, but only where group members have a history of collaborative interaction. Leaders do not take more of the spoils. We discuss why physically strong leaders can be compatible with egalitarianism, and we suggest that leaders in egalitarian societies may be more motivated by maintaining an altruistic reputation than by short-term rewards of collective action.

  2. Risk, society and system failure.

    PubMed

    Scalliet, Pierre

    2006-09-01

    Modern societies are risk societies. Together with the formidable development of complex technologies (chemical industry, energy production, mass transportation, etc), new hazards have emerged. Sharing danger is the hallmark of modernity, as large industrial accidents can now have countrywide, or even, worldwide consequences. The Chernobyl explosion for example, has smeared large European surfaces with radioactive materials, across borders and nations, without any regard for who was responsible and who was the victim. Complex technologies should therefore be managed with great foresightness, particularly focusing on preventive management. A sound understanding of the (minor) role of human errors of operators and the (major) role of process design is a pre-requisite for appropriate management. This also applies to the complex business of radiotherapy, as the same organisational principles apply than in the heavy industry: restrict the role of operators, expect their mistakes, design in a mistake-proof way, accept the burden of preventive maintenances, supervise maintenance carefully and, above all, invest in safety.

  3. Leadership in an Egalitarian Society

    PubMed Central

    von Rueden, Christopher; Gurven, Michael; Kaplan, Hillard; Stieglitz, Jonathan

    2014-01-01

    Leadership is instrumental to resolution of collective action dilemmas, particularly in large, heterogeneous groups. Less is known about the characteristics or effectiveness of leadership in small-scale, homogeneous, and relatively egalitarian societies, in which humans have spent most of our existence. Among Tsimane’ forager-horticulturalists of Bolivia, we (1) assess traits of elected leaders under experimental and naturalistic conditions and (2) test whether leaders impact collective action outcomes. We find that elected leaders are physically strong and have more kin and other exchange partners. Their ranks on physical dominance, kin support, and trustworthiness predict how well their groups perform, but only where group members have a history of collaborative interaction. Leaders do not take more of the spoils. We discuss why physically strong leaders can be compatible with egalitarianism, and we suggest that leaders in egalitarian societies may be more motivated by maintaining an altruistic reputation than by short-term rewards of collective action. PMID:25240393

  4. Human cloning and 'posthuman' society.

    PubMed

    Blackford, Russell

    2005-01-01

    Since early 1997, when the creation of Dolly the sheep by somatic cell nuclear transfer was announced in Nature, numerous government reports, essays, articles and books have considered the ethical problems and policy issues surrounding human reproductive cloning. In this article, I consider what response a modern liberal society should give to the prospect of human cloning, if it became safe and practical. Some opponents of human cloning have argued that permitting it would place us on a slippery slope to a repugnant future society, comparable to that portrayed in Aldous Huxley's novel, Brave New World. I conclude that, leaving aside concerns about safety, none of the psychological or social considerations discussed in this article provides an adequate policy justification for invoking the state's coercive powers to prevent human cloning.

  5. [Civil bioethics in pluralistics societies].

    PubMed

    Cortina, A

    2000-01-01

    The author examines how Bioethics should be approached in a pluralist society. She argues that through the gradual discovery of shared ethical values and principles for judging which practices are humanizing and which or not, ever-more dense civil Bioethics helps bring out--in contrast to relativism and subjectivism--an ethical intersubjectiveness, the fundaments of which should be addressed by moral philosophy if it hopes to fulfill one of its main tasks.

  6. Natural hazards society is born

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Sabh, M. I.

    A new professional society for natural hazards is being founded. The objectives of the International Society for the Prevention and Mitigation of Natural Hazards (NHS) are to promote research in all aspects of natural hazards, the distribution of preparedness and emergency-response plans for all countries, and the formulation and implementation of education programs on hazards prevention and mitigation.The founding organizational meeting was held August 17, 1988 in Ensenada, Mexico. About 100 scientists from 14 countries were at this meeting. A constitution and bylaws for the society were adopted and the following officers were elected: President, M. I. El-Sabh, University of Quebec, Canada Vice-president, G. Pararas-Carayannis, International Tsunami Information Center, Honolulu, Hawaii Secretary, T. S. Murty, Institute of Ocean Sciences, Sidney, Canada Treasurer, S. Venkatesh, Atmospheric Environment Service, Downsview, Canada Representatives-at-Large, S. F. Farreras, CICESE, Ensenada, Mexico; S. K. Ghosh, Indian Meteorological Department, New Delhi, India; and F. S. Liu, Academic Sinica, Qindao, PRC.

  7. Inter-Society Research Committee

    SciTech Connect

    Akiyama, Mamoru; Higuchi, Masahisa

    1996-09-01

    World-wide tendencies and circumstances for nuclear power cannot be said to be moving full of sail with a favorable wind, due to nuclear power plant accidents and comparatively little economical benefit. The present Nuclear Power Plant situation is that some personnel understand a need for the development from the viewpoint of efficient energy usage in the world and environmental problems like global warming. At the same time others oppose future nuclear development from the viewpoint of safety problems and economic cost. These issues may end nuclear development worldwide. Nuclear development must be considered from an international viewpoint and other various aspects. Therefore, all countries concerned should cooperative in the adjustment of research carried out by each country. Nuclear power`s future must be efficient in the utilization of limited resources (money, manpower and facilities). It is concluded that the ISRC should only discuss technical matters on nuclear engineering, independent from political influence. Societies agreeing to this idea, provide the ISRC with money and/or manpower and/or facilities. The ISRC will consist of a research program committee and research task forces. Members of the Research Program Committee are the chairmen of the research task forces who are also society representatives. The Committee will discuss research programs and resources. The research task forces will consist of one society representative chairman and specialists on the program.

  8. Recommended immunization schedules for adults: Clinical practice guidelines by the Escmid Vaccine Study Group (EVASG), European Geriatric Medicine Society (EUGMS) and the World Association for Infectious Diseases and Immunological Disorders (WAidid).

    PubMed

    Esposito, Susanna; Bonanni, Paolo; Maggi, Stefania; Tan, Litjan; Ansaldi, Filippo; Lopalco, Pier Luigi; Dagan, Ron; Michel, Jean-Pierre; van Damme, Pierre; Gaillat, Jacques; Prymula, Roman; Vesikari, Timo; Mussini, Cristina; Frank, Uwe; Osterhaus, Albert; Celentano, Lucia Pastore; Rossi, Marta; Guercio, Valentina; Gavazzi, Gaetan

    2016-07-02

    Rapid population aging has become a major challenge in the industrialized world and progressive aging is a key reason for making improvement in vaccination a cornerstone of public health strategy. An increase in age-related disorders and conditions is likely to be seen in the near future, and these are risk factors for the occurrence of a number of vaccine-preventable diseases. An improvement in infectious diseases prevention specifically aimed at adults and the elderly can therefore also decrease the burden of these chronic conditions by reducing morbidity, disability, hospital admissions, health costs, mortality rates and, perhaps most importantly, by improving the quality of life. Among adults, it is necessary to identify groups at increased risk of vaccine-preventable diseases and highlight the epidemiological impact and benefits of vaccinations using an evidence-based approach. This document provides clinical practice guidance on immunization for adults in order to provide recommendations for decision makers and healthcare workers in Europe. Although immunization is considered one of the most impactful and cost-effective public health measures that can be undertaken, vaccination coverage rates among adults are largely lower than the stated goal of ≥ 95% among adults, and stronger efforts are needed to increase coverage in this population. Active surveillance of adult vaccine-preventable diseases, determining the effectiveness of the vaccines approved for marketing in the last 5 y, the efficacy and safety of vaccines in immunocompromised patients, as well as in pregnant women, represent the priorities for future research.

  9. Management of patients with refractory angina: Canadian Cardiovascular Society/Canadian Pain Society joint guidelines.

    PubMed

    McGillion, Michael; Arthur, Heather M; Cook, Allison; Carroll, Sandra L; Victor, J Charles; L'allier, Philippe L; Jolicoeur, E Marc; Svorkdal, Nelson; Niznick, Joel; Teoh, Kevin; Cosman, Tammy; Sessle, Barry; Watt-Watson, Judy; Clark, Alexander; Taenzer, Paul; Coyte, Peter; Malysh, Louise; Galte, Carol; Stone, James

    2012-01-01

    Refractory angina (RFA) is a debilitating disease characterized by cardiac pain resistant to conventional treatments for coronary artery disease including nitrates, calcium-channel and β-adrenoceptor blockade, vasculoprotective agents, percutaneous coronary interventions, and coronary artery bypass grafting. The mortality rate of patients living with RFA is not known but is thought to be in the range of approximately 3%. These individuals suffer severely impaired health-related quality of life with recurrent and sustained pain, poor general health status, psychological distress, impaired role functioning, and activity restriction. Effective care for RFA sufferers in Canada is critically underdeveloped. These guidelines are predicated upon a 2009 Canadian Cardiovascular Society (CCS) Position Statement which identified that underlying the problem of RFA management is the lack of a formalized, coordinated, interprofessional strategy between the cardiovascular and pain science/clinical communities. The guidelines are therefore a joint initiative of the CCS and the Canadian Pain Society (CPS) and make practice recommendations about treatment options for RFA that are based on the best available evidence. Concluding summary recommendations are also made, giving direction to future clinical practice and research on RFA management in Canada.

  10. An official European Respiratory Society/American Thoracic Society research statement: interstitial pneumonia with autoimmune features.

    PubMed

    Fischer, Aryeh; Antoniou, Katerina M; Brown, Kevin K; Cadranel, Jacques; Corte, Tamera J; du Bois, Roland M; Lee, Joyce S; Leslie, Kevin O; Lynch, David A; Matteson, Eric L; Mosca, Marta; Noth, Imre; Richeldi, Luca; Strek, Mary E; Swigris, Jeffrey J; Wells, Athol U; West, Sterling G; Collard, Harold R; Cottin, Vincent

    2015-10-01

    Many patients with an idiopathic interstitial pneumonia (IIP) have clinical features that suggest an underlying autoimmune process but do not meet established criteria for a connective tissue disease (CTD). Researchers have proposed differing criteria and terms to describe these patients, and lack of consensus over nomenclature and classification limits the ability to conduct prospective studies of a uniform cohort.The "European Respiratory Society/American Thoracic Society Task Force on Undifferentiated Forms of Connective Tissue Disease-associated Interstitial Lung Disease" was formed to create consensus regarding the nomenclature and classification criteria for patients with IIP and features of autoimmunity.The task force proposes the term "interstitial pneumonia with autoimmune features" (IPAF) and offers classification criteria organised around the presence of a combination of features from three domains: a clinical domain consisting of specific extra-thoracic features, a serologic domain consisting of specific autoantibodies, and a morphologic domain consisting of specific chest imaging, histopathologic or pulmonary physiologic features.A designation of IPAF should be used to identify individuals with IIP and features suggestive of, but not definitive for, a CTD. With IPAF, a sound platform has been provided from which to launch the requisite future research investigations of a more uniform cohort.

  11. [Management of Ethical Problems in the Japanese Society of Laboratory Medicine].

    PubMed

    Murakami, Masami

    2015-02-01

    The Ethics Committee of the Japanese Society of Laboratory Medicine published "Opinions of Japanese Society of Laboratory Medicine about utilization of specimens after laboratory examinations for laboratory work, education and clinical studies" in 2002, and amended it in 2008. The Ethics Committee, Committee for Conflict of Interest, Compliance Committee, and Editorial Committee for Rinsho Byori, the official journal of the Japanese Society of Laboratory Medicine, cooperate to solve ethical problems in laboratory medicine. The management of ethical problems in the Japanese Society of Laboratory Medicine is discussed.

  12. Science in Its Confrontation with Society.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Calvora, Robert G.

    1988-01-01

    Discusses the issue of society-controlled science. Analyzes the present state of science with respect to society, including moral issues, attitude differences between nineteenth century scientists and contemporary ones, risk management, and reductionism. (YP)

  13. Science Policy: World's Chemical Society Presidents Meet.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carpenter, Ernest L.

    1979-01-01

    Related are the results of the discussions at a meeting of the world's chemical society presidents in Washington, D.C. Members of the executive committee involved in formation of an international chemical society are listed. (SA)

  14. Joseph Henry and the American Philosophical Society

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gross, Walter E.

    1972-01-01

    A study of the extent to which Henry was affiliated with the Society and its influence on his work including his evolving relationship with the Society in the scope of the changing nature of American scientific institutions. (DF)

  15. American Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Society

    MedlinePlus

    ... education site of the American Orthopaedic Foot & Ankle Society. Patients Visit the official patient education site of the American Orthopaedic Foot & Ankle Society. Patients Visit the official patient education site of ...

  16. American Society for Colposcopy and Cervical Pathology

    MedlinePlus

    ... Join/Renew Member Resources Careers About History Bylaws Society Leadership Awards CME Mission and Goals Annual Report ... 7227 Toll-Free (240) 575-9880 Fax © American Society for Colposcopy and Cervical Pathology * Required * First Name: * ...

  17. Society for Cardiovascular Angiography and Interventions

    MedlinePlus

    ... jointly produced, collaborated with, or endorsed by the Society of Cardiovascular Angiography and Interventions. Press & News » Review ... SCAI Member? Create an Account Advertisement Advertisement The Society for Cardiovascular Angiography and Interventions Foundation, 1100 17th ...

  18. Society of NeuroInterventional Surgery

    MedlinePlus

    ... membership and to apply online. SNIS Mission The Society of NeuroInterventional Surgery is dedicated to excellence in ... 703-691-2272 Fax 703-537-0650 © 2016 Society of NeuroInterventional Surgery. All Rights Reserved.

  19. International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine

    MedlinePlus

    ... Join the ISMRM Journals History & Mission Central Office Society Award Winners Strategic Plan Policies Corporate Members Contact ... E-Library Virtual Meetings Connect With Us International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine 2300 Clayton Road, ...

  20. The Impact of Science on Society

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burke, J.; Bergman, J.; Asimov, I.

    1985-01-01

    Four speeches delivered as part of a public lecture series to assess the impact of science on society are presented. The computerization of society, space exploration and habitation, the mechanisms of technological change, and cultural responses are addressed.

  1. Material civilization: things and society.

    PubMed

    Dant, Tim

    2006-06-01

    This paper argues that although classical sociology has largely overlooked the importance of social relations with the material world in shaping the form of society, Braudel's concept of 'material civilization' is a useful way to begin to understand the sociological significance of this relationship. The limitations of Braudel's historical and general concept can be partially overcome with Elias's analysis of the connection between 'technization' and 'civilization' that allows for both a civilizing and a de-civilizing impact of emergent forms of material relation that both lengthen and shorten the chains of interdependence between the members of a society. It is suggested that the concept of the 'morality of things' employed by a number of commentators is useful in summarizing the civilizing effects of material objects and addressing their sociological significance. From the sociology of consumption the idea of materiality as a sign of social relationships can be drawn, and from the sociology of technology the idea of socio-technical systems and actor-networks can contribute to the understanding of material civilization. It is argued that the concept of 'material capital' can usefully summarize the variable social value of objects but to understand the complexity of material civilization as it unfolds in everyday life, an analysis of 'material interaction' is needed. Finally the paper suggests some initial themes and issues apparent in contemporary society that the sociological study of material civilization might address; the increased volume, functional complexity and material specificity of objects and the increased social complexity, autonomy and substitutability that is entailed. A theory of 'material civilization' is the first step in establishing a sociology of objects.

  2. Tripartite meeting in gene and cell therapy, 2008: Irish Society for Gene and Cell Therapy, British Society for Gene Therapy, and International Society for Cell and Gene Therapy of Cancer.

    PubMed

    Guinn, Barbara; Casey, Garrett; Collins, Sara; O'Brien, Tim; Alexander, M Yvonne; Tangney, Mark

    2008-10-01

    The second annual meeting of the Irish Society for Gene and Cell Therapy was held in Cork, Ireland on May 15 and 16, 2008 (http://crr.ucc.ie/isgct/). The meeting was jointly organized with the British Society for Gene Therapy and the International Society for Cell and Gene Therapy of Cancer. Because of the location of the conference and the co-organization of this meeting with the British and International Gene Therapy societies, the meeting enjoyed a range of talks from some of the major leaders in the field. Particularly notable were the talented molecular and cell biologists from Ireland who have contributed cutting edge science to the field of gene therapy. Topics including cardiovascular disease, repair of single-gene disorders, and cancer gene therapy were discussed with presentations ranging from basic research to translation into the clinic. Here we describe some of the most exciting presentations and their potential impact on imminent clinical gene therapy trials.

  3. Annual Meeting of International Neural Network Society

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-07-31

    by Session and Alphabetized by First Author Within Session Session: Pattern Recognition) 1 Network Analysis 63 Cognition and Learning, 155 Neurobiology...Nielsen Neurocomputer Corp. Cognition and Learning Session Vision Session James Anderson John Daugman Brown University Harvard University Geoffrey Hinton...this meeting. American Mathematical Society Association for Behavior Analysis Cognitive Science Society IEEE Computer Society IEEE Control Systems

  4. Allgemeinbildung: Readiness for Living in Risk Society

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elmose, Steffen; Roth, Wolff-Michael

    2005-01-01

    Sociologists increasingly note that one lives in a risk society, characterized by the unpredictable consequences of techno-scientific innovation and production and by increasing complexity. Life in risk society, particularly in truly democratic societies, increasingly requires competencies not only to understand and change one's own circumstances…

  5. Languages in Contemporary Anglophone Caribbean Societies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davids, Melva P.

    2013-01-01

    The paper Languages in Contemporary Anglophone Caribbean Societies examines how language is treated in Jamaica and other Anglophone Caribbean societies and the effects of a haphazard approach to language planning on the social dynamics of the society as well as the individual. It briefly explores how Language is handled in Francophone or…

  6. Civil Society Participation at CONFINTEA VI

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haddad, Sergio

    2012-01-01

    This article analyzes the participation of civil society in the Sixth International Conference on Adult Education held in Belem do Para, Brazil, 1-4 December 2009. As a foundation, the discussion first illuminates the important role that civil society in general plays in democratic issues and the relation between the state and society followed by…

  7. 76 FR 47531 - Approval of Classification Societies

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-05

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard 46 CFR Part 2 RIN 1625-AB35 Approval of Classification Societies AGENCY: Coast Guard... comment period before issuing a final rule regarding the Approval of Classification Societies (USCG- 2007... and performance standards that classification societies must meet in order to obtain approval by...

  8. American Society of Gene & Cell Therapy

    MedlinePlus

    ... Join ASGCT! Job Bank Donate Media The American Society of Gene & Cell Therapy The American Society of Gene & Cell Therapy is the primary professional membership organization for gene and cell therapy. The Society's members are scientists, physicians, patient advocates, and other ...

  9. A Troubled Society: Children in Crisis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fontana, Vincent J.

    America's children and their families are in trouble, trouble so deep as to constitute a serious threat to the future of our society. The major source of that threat is bureaucratic "benign neglect." We have failed to recognize that the problems of the multitroubled family in a changing society are the problems of the entire society in the midst…

  10. Assessment of capacity in an aging society.

    PubMed

    Moye, Jennifer; Marson, Daniel C; Edelstein, Barry

    2013-04-01

    Over the past 40 years, the assessment and scientific study of capacity in older adults has emerged as a distinct field of clinical and research activity for psychologists. This new field reflects the convergence of several trends: the aging of American society, the growing incidence and prevalence of dementia, and the patient rights, deinstitutionalization, and disability rights movements. Because of these forces, capacity issues now permeate the fabric of everyday life, whether in the form of guardianship petitions, questions of capacity to consent to treatment, the ability to make a new will, or participation in human research. In seeking to resolve these issues, families, clinicians, and legal professionals increasingly turn to psychologists to assess a capacity and to provide empirically supported judgments that properly balance autonomy and protection for the individual. Psychologists have taken a leading role in the development of functional assessment instruments that measure important aspects of the capacity construct. In addition, psychology has been a major contributor to the scientific study of capacity. In collaboration with colleagues from medicine and law, psychologists have articulated crucial theoretical frameworks that integrate legal, clinical, and ethical dimensions of the capacity problem. This article focuses on the evolution of theory, law, science, and practice in the evaluation of capacity in older adults and its recent culmination in a series of interdisciplinary handbooks sponsored by the American Psychological Association and the American Bar Association.

  11. Assessment of Capacity in an Aging Society

    PubMed Central

    Moye, Jennifer; Marson, Daniel C.; Edelstein, Barry

    2014-01-01

    Over the past 40 years, the assessment and scientific study of capacity in older adults has emerged as a distinct field of clinical and research activity for psychologists. This new field reflects the convergence of several trends: the aging of American society, the growing incidence and prevalence of dementia, and the patient rights, deinstitutionalization, and disability rights movements. Because of these forces, capacity issues now permeate the fabric of everyday life, whether in the form of guardianship petitions, questions of capacity to consent to treatment, the ability to make a new will, or participation in human research. In seeking to resolve these issues, families, clinicians, and legal professionals increasingly turn to psychologists to assess a capacity and to provide empirically supported judgments that properly balance autonomy and protection for the individual. Psychologists have taken a leading role in the development of functional assessment instruments that measure important aspects of the capacity construct. In addition, psychology has been a major contributor to the scientific study of capacity. In collaboration with colleagues from medicine and law, psychologists have articulated crucial theoretical frameworks that integrate legal, clinical, and ethical dimensions of the capacity problem. This article focuses on the evolution of theory, law, science, and practice in the evaluation of capacity in older adults and its recent culmination in a series of interdisciplinary handbooks sponsored by the American Psychological Association and the American Bar Association. PMID:23586491

  12. From Information Society to Knowledge Society: The Ontology Issue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roche, Christophe

    2002-09-01

    Information society, virtual enterprise, e-business rely more and more on communication and knowledge sharing between heterogeneous actors. But, no communication is possible, and all the more so no co-operation or collaboration, if those actors do not share the same or at least a compatible meaning for the terms they use. Ontology, understood as an agreed vocabulary of common terms and meanings, is a solution to that problem. Nevertheless, although there is quite a lot of experience in using ontologies, several barriers remain which stand against a real use of ontology. As a matter of fact, it is very difficult to build, reuse and share ontologies. We claim that the ontology problem requires a multidisciplinary approach based on sound epistemological, logical and linguistic principles. This article presents the Ontological Knowledge Station (OK Station©), a software environment for building and using ontologies which relies on such principles. The OK Station is currently being used in several industrial applications.

  13. Did Educational Expansion Trigger the Development of an Education Society? Chances and Risks of a New Model of Society

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haunberger, Sigrid

    2010-01-01

    This article focuses on the question of whether educational expansion leads to a new type of society, the education society. Taking into consideration the combined elements of three models of society (the post-industrial society, the knowledge society and the information society)--the chances and risks of an educational society will be elicited…

  14. Innovations in American Society of Clinical Oncology Practice Guideline Development.

    PubMed

    Somerfield, Mark R; Bohlke, Kari; Browman, George P; Denduluri, Neelima; Einhaus, Kaitlin; Hayes, Daniel F; Khorana, Alok A; Miller, Robert S; Mohile, Supriya G; Oliver, Thomas K; Ortiz, Eduardo; Lyman, Gary H

    2016-09-10

    Since the beginning of its guidelines program in 1993, ASCO has continually sought ways to produce a greater number of guidelines while maintaining its commitment to using the rigorous development methods that minimize the biases that threaten the validity of practice recommendations. ASCO is implementing a range of guideline development and implementation innovations. In this article, we describe innovations that are designed to (1) integrate consideration of multiple chronic conditions into practice guidelines; (2) keep more of its guidelines current by applying evolving signals or (more) rapid, for-cause updating approaches; (3) increase the number of high-quality guidelines available to its membership through endorsement and adaptation of other groups' products; (4) improve coverage of its members' guideline needs through a new topic nomination process; and (5) enhance dissemination and promote implementation of ASCO guidelines in the oncology practice community through a network of volunteer ambassadors. We close with a summary of ASCO's plans to facilitate the integration of data from its rapid learning system, CancerLinQ, into ASCO guidelines and to develop tactics through which guideline recommendations can be embedded in clinicians' workflow in digital form. We highlight the challenges inherent in reconciling the need to provide clinicians with more interactive, point-of-care guidance with ASCO's abiding commitment to methodologic rigor in guideline development.

  15. Colon capsule endoscopy: European Society of Gastrointestinal Endoscopy (ESGE) Guideline.

    PubMed

    Spada, C; Hassan, C; Galmiche, J P; Neuhaus, H; Dumonceau, J M; Adler, S; Epstein, O; Gay, G; Pennazio, M; Rex, D K; Benamouzig, R; de Franchis, R; Delvaux, M; Devière, J; Eliakim, R; Fraser, C; Hagenmuller, F; Herrerias, J M; Keuchel, M; Macrae, F; Munoz-Navas, M; Ponchon, T; Quintero, E; Riccioni, M E; Rondonotti, E; Marmo, R; Sung, J J; Tajiri, H; Toth, E; Triantafyllou, K; Van Gossum, A; Costamagna, G

    2012-05-01

    PillCam colon capsule endoscopy (CCE) is an innovative noninvasive, and painless ingestible capsule technique that allows exploration of the colon without the need for sedation and gas insufflation. Although it is already available in European and other countries, the clinical indications for CCE as well as the reporting and work-up of detected findings have not yet been standardized. The aim of this evidence-based and consensus-based guideline, commissioned by the European Society of Gastrointestinal Endoscopy (ESGE) is to furnish healthcare providers with a comprehensive framework for potential implementation of this technique in a clinical setting.

  16. Molecular Testing for Selection of Patients With Lung Cancer for Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor and Anaplastic Lymphoma Kinase Tyrosine Kinase Inhibitors: American Society of Clinical Oncology Endorsement of the College of American Pathologists/International Association for the Study of Lung Cancer/Association for Molecular Pathology Guideline

    PubMed Central

    Leighl, Natasha B.; Rekhtman, Natasha; Biermann, William A.; Huang, James; Mino-Kenudson, Mari; Ramalingam, Suresh S.; West, Howard; Whitlock, Sara; Somerfield, Mark R.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose The College of American Pathologists (CAP), the International Association for the Study of Lung Cancer (IASLC), and the Association for Molecular Pathology (AMP) guideline on molecular testing for the selection of patients with lung cancer for epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) tyrosine kinase inhibitors was considered for endorsement. Methods American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) staff reviewed the CAP/IASLC/AMP guideline for developmental rigor; an ASCO ad hoc review panel of experts reviewed the guideline content. Results The ASCO panel concurred that the recommendations are clear, thorough, and based on the most relevant scientific evidence in this content area and present options that will be acceptable to patients. The CAP/IASLC/AMP guideline comprises 37 recommendations (evidence grade A or B), expert consensus opinions, or suggestions that address the following five principal questions: (1) When should molecular testing be performed? (2) How should EGFR testing be performed? (3) How should ALK testing be performed? (4) Should other genes be routinely tested in lung adenocarcinoma? (5) How should molecular testing be implemented and operationalized? Conclusion The ASCO review panel endorses the CAP/IASLC/AMP guideline. This guideline represents an important advance toward standardization of EGFR and ALK testing practices and is of major clinical relevance in advancing the care of patients with lung cancer. In the Discussion section, the ASCO review panel highlights three evolving areas: advances in ALK testing methodology, considerations for selecting appropriate populations for molecular testing, and emergence of other targetable molecular alterations. PMID:25311215

  17. An official American Thoracic Society/European Respiratory Society statement: research questions in COPD.

    PubMed

    Celli, Bartolome R; Decramer, Marc; Wedzicha, Jadwiga A; Wilson, Kevin C; Agustí, Alvar; Criner, Gerard J; MacNee, William; Make, Barry J; Rennard, Stephen I; Stockley, Robert A; Vogelmeier, Claus; Anzueto, Antonio; Au, David H; Barnes, Peter J; Burgel, Pierre-Regis; Calverley, Peter M; Casanova, Ciro; Clini, Enrico M; Cooper, Christopher B; Coxson, Harvey O; Dusser, Daniel J; Fabbri, Leonardo M; Fahy, Bonnie; Ferguson, Gary T; Fisher, Andrew; Fletcher, Monica J; Hayot, Maurice; Hurst, John R; Jones, Paul W; Mahler, Donald A; Maltais, François; Mannino, David M; Martinez, Fernando J; Miravitlles, Marc; Meek, Paula M; Papi, Alberto; Rabe, Klaus F; Roche, Nicolas; Sciurba, Frank C; Sethi, Sanjay; Siafakas, Nikos; Sin, Don D; Soriano, Joan B; Stoller, James K; Tashkin, Donald P; Troosters, Thierry; Verleden, Geert M; Verschakelen, Johny; Vestbo, Jorgen; Walsh, John W; Washko, George R; Wise, Robert A; Wouters, Emiel F M; ZuWallack, Richard L

    2015-04-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a leading cause of morbidity, mortality, and resource use worldwide. The goal of this official American Thoracic Society (ATS)/European Respiratory Society (ERS) research statement is to describe evidence related to diagnosis, assessment and management; identify gaps in knowledge; and make recommendations for future research. It is not intended to provide clinical practice recommendations on COPD diagnosis and management. Clinicians, researchers, and patient advocates with expertise in COPD were invited to participate. A literature search of Medline was performed, and studies deemed relevant were selected. The search was not a systematic review of the evidence. Existing evidence was appraised and summarised, and then salient knowledge gaps were identified. Recommendations for research that addresses important gaps in the evidence in all areas of COPD were formulated via discussion and consensus. Great strides have been made in the diagnosis, assessment and management of COPD, as well as understanding its pathogenesis. Despite this, many important questions remain unanswered. This ATS/ERS research statement highlights the types of research that leading clinicians, researchers, and patient advocates believe will have the greatest impact on patient-centred outcomes.

  18. An official American Thoracic Society/European Respiratory Society statement: research questions in COPD.

    PubMed

    Celli, Bartolome R; Decramer, Marc; Wedzicha, Jadwiga A; Wilson, Kevin C; Agustí, Alvar A; Criner, Gerard J; MacNee, William; Make, Barry J; Rennard, Stephen I; Stockley, Robert A; Vogelmeier, Claus; Anzueto, Antonio; Au, David H; Barnes, Peter J; Burgel, Pierre-Regis; Calverley, Peter M; Casanova, Ciro; Clini, Enrico M; Cooper, Christopher B; Coxson, Harvey O; Dusser, Daniel J; Fabbri, Leonardo M; Fahy, Bonnie; Ferguson, Gary T; Fisher, Andrew; Fletcher, Monica J; Hayot, Maurice; Hurst, John R; Jones, Paul W; Mahler, Donald A; Maltais, François; Mannino, David M; Martinez, Fernando J; Miravitlles, Marc; Meek, Paula M; Papi, Alberto; Rabe, Klaus F; Roche, Nicolas; Sciurba, Frank C; Sethi, Sanjay; Siafakas, Nikos; Sin, Don D; Soriano, Joan B; Stoller, James K; Tashkin, Donald P; Troosters, Thierry; Verleden, Geert M; Verschakelen, Johny; Vestbo, Jorgen; Walsh, John W; Washko, George R; Wise, Robert A; Wouters, Emiel F M; ZuWallack, Richard L

    2015-06-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a leading cause of morbidity, mortality and resource use worldwide. The goal of this official American Thoracic Society (ATS)/European Respiratory Society (ERS) Research Statement is to describe evidence related to diagnosis, assessment, and management; identify gaps in knowledge; and make recommendations for future research. It is not intended to provide clinical practice recommendations on COPD diagnosis and management. Clinicians, researchers and patient advocates with expertise in COPD were invited to participate. A literature search of Medline was performed, and studies deemed relevant were selected. The search was not a systematic review of the evidence. Existing evidence was appraised and summarised, and then salient knowledge gaps were identified. Recommendations for research that addresses important gaps in the evidence in all areas of COPD were formulated via discussion and consensus. Great strides have been made in the diagnosis, assessment and management of COPD, as well as understanding its pathogenesis. Despite this, many important questions remain unanswered. This ATS/ERS research statement highlights the types of research that leading clinicians, researchers and patient advocates believe will have the greatest impact on patient-centred outcomes.

  19. Asian society of gynecologic oncology workshop 2010

    PubMed Central

    Suh, Dong Hoon; Kim, Jae Weon; Aziz, Mohamad Farid; Devi, Uma K.; Ngan, Hextan Y. S.; Nam, Joo-Hyun; Kim, Seung Cheol; Kato, Tomoyasu; Ryu, Hee Sug; Fujii, Shingo; Lee, Yoon Soon; Kim, Jong Hyeok; Kim, Tae-Joong; Kim, Young Tae; Wang, Kung-Liahng; Lee, Taek Sang; Ushijima, Kimio; Shin, Sang-Goo; Chia, Yin Nin; Wilailak, Sarikapan; Park, Sang Yoon; Katabuchi, Hidetaka; Kamura, Toshiharu

    2010-01-01

    This workshop was held on July 31-August 1, 2010 and was organized to promote the academic environment and to enhance the communication among Asian countries prior to the 2nd biennial meeting of Australian Society of Gynaecologic Oncologists (ASGO), which will be held on November 3-5, 2011. We summarized the whole contents presented at the workshop. Regarding cervical cancer screening in Asia, particularly in low resource settings, and an update on human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination was described for prevention and radical surgery overview, fertility sparing and less radical surgery, nerve sparing radical surgery and primary chemoradiotherapy in locally advanced cervical cancer, were discussed for management. As to surgical techniques, nerve sparing radical hysterectomy, optimal staging in early ovarian cancer, laparoscopic radical hysterectomy, one-port surgery and robotic surgery were introduced. After three topics of endometrial cancer, laparoscopic surgery versus open surgery, role of lymphadenectomy and fertility sparing treatment, there was a special additional time for clinical trials in Asia. Finally, chemotherapy including neo-adjuvant chemotherapy, optimal surgical management, and the basis of targeted therapy in ovarian cancer were presented. PMID:20922136

  20. European Society of Cardiology Congress 2013 highlights.

    PubMed

    Fox, Keith A A

    2014-01-01

    The European Society of Cardiology (ESC) Congress in 2013 met in Amsterdam (The Netherlands) as an innovative and interactive congress involving more than 30,000 participants. There were 10,490 abstract submissions and a total of 227 hotline, basic science hotline and trial update submissions. Participants were involved from more than 150 countries. To make the congress manageable for participants, related topics were grouped together in ‘villages’ and a smart electronic application allowed the participants to guide their way through the congress and choose the sessions of interest. The innovative new program was initiated by the ESC Congress Programme Committee and the Congress Chair (Keith AA Fox, Chair 2012–2014) has responsibility for the design and delivery of the scientific program. The spotlight of the congress was ‘the heart interacting with systemic organs’, chosen because of the importance of cardiovascular disease conditions crossing conventional boundaries. In all 572 abstracts, the work involved an interaction between the heart and another organ, such as the brain, lungs, kidney, vasculature or inflammation system. In addition, innovative new approaches linked basic science and clinical science and the new ‘hubs of the congress’ allowed excellent interaction and exchange of ideas.

  1. American Cancer Society Lung Cancer Screening Guidelines

    PubMed Central

    Wender, Richard; Fontham, Elizabeth T. H.; Barrera, Ermilo; Colditz, Graham A.; Church, Timothy R.; Ettinger, David S.; Etzioni, Ruth; Flowers, Christopher R.; Gazelle, G. Scott; Kelsey, Douglas K.; LaMonte, Samuel J.; Michaelson, James S.; Oeffinger, Kevin C.; Shih, Ya-Chen Tina; Sullivan, Daniel C.; Travis, William; Walter, Louise; Wolf, Andrew M. D.; Brawley, Otis W.; Smith, Robert A.

    2013-01-01

    Findings from the National Cancer Institute’s National Lung Screening Trial established that lung cancer mortality in specific high-risk groups can be reduced by annual screening with low-dose computed tomography. These findings indicate that the adoption of lung cancer screening could save many lives. Based on the results of the National Lung Screening Trial, the American Cancer Society is issuing an initial guideline for lung cancer screening. This guideline recommends that clinicians with access to high-volume, high-quality lung cancer screening and treatment centers should initiate a discussion about screening with apparently healthy patients aged 55 years to 74 years who have at least a 30-pack-year smoking history and who currently smoke or have quit within the past 15 years. A process of informed and shared decision-making with a clinician related to the potential benefits, limitations, and harms associated with screening for lung cancer with low-dose computed tomography should occur before any decision is made to initiate lung cancer screening. Smoking cessation counseling remains a high priority for clinical attention in discussions with current smokers, who should be informed of their continuing risk of lung cancer. Screening should not be viewed as an alternative to smoking cessation. PMID:23315954

  2. Charles Dickens: Impact on Medicine and Society

    PubMed Central

    Kryger, Meir

    2012-01-01

    In 1836 Charles Dickens published the first installment of The Posthumous Papers of the Pickwick Club. In this novel he introduces the reader to a character, Joe, the Fat Boy who is obese, sleepy, difficult to arouse, snores, and has peripheral edema. This description so intrigued the medical field that many hypotheses about the symptoms were examined, but it was not until 120 years after the novel was published that physicians started to interrelate these features and a new field of medicine emerged. Although he is best known for this description, Dickens impacted medicine and medical care in many ways. Besides his brilliant clinical descriptions (many of which were unrecognized in his day) and his activities as a social reformer, he was instrumental in facilitating the development of homeless shelters for women, the first pediatric hospital in the United Kingdom, and the development of orthopedics. Citation: Kryger M. Charles Dickens: impact on medicine and society. J Clin Sleep Med 2012;8(3):333-338. PMID:22701393

  3. American Cancer Society lung cancer screening guidelines.

    PubMed

    Wender, Richard; Fontham, Elizabeth T H; Barrera, Ermilo; Colditz, Graham A; Church, Timothy R; Ettinger, David S; Etzioni, Ruth; Flowers, Christopher R; Gazelle, G Scott; Kelsey, Douglas K; LaMonte, Samuel J; Michaelson, James S; Oeffinger, Kevin C; Shih, Ya-Chen Tina; Sullivan, Daniel C; Travis, William; Walter, Louise; Wolf, Andrew M D; Brawley, Otis W; Smith, Robert A

    2013-01-01

    Findings from the National Cancer Institute's National Lung Screening Trial established that lung cancer mortality in specific high-risk groups can be reduced by annual screening with low-dose computed tomography. These findings indicate that the adoption of lung cancer screening could save many lives. Based on the results of the National Lung Screening Trial, the American Cancer Society is issuing an initial guideline for lung cancer screening. This guideline recommends that clinicians with access to high-volume, high-quality lung cancer screening and treatment centers should initiate a discussion about screening with apparently healthy patients aged 55 years to 74 years who have at least a 30-pack-year smoking history and who currently smoke or have quit within the past 15 years. A process of informed and shared decision-making with a clinician related to the potential benefits, limitations, and harms associated with screening for lung cancer with low-dose computed tomography should occur before any decision is made to initiate lung cancer screening. Smoking cessation counseling remains a high priority for clinical attention in discussions with current smokers, who should be informed of their continuing risk of lung cancer. Screening should not be viewed as an alternative to smoking cessation.

  4. Mobilising Data in a Knowledge Society

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wessels, Bridgette; Finn, Rachel; Wadhwa, Kush; Bigagli, Lorenzo; Nativi, Stefano; Noorman, Merel

    2016-04-01

    We address how the open data movement is fostering change in institutions, in data, and in social participation in the mobilisation of knowledge society. The idea of a knowledge society has been raised over the last two decades but the transition to such as society has not been realised. Up to the present time, discussion about a knowledge society have largely focused on a knowledge economy and information society rather than a mobilisation to a knowledge society. These debates have, however, taken place before the rise of open data and big data and the development of an open data movement. We consider the role of the open data movement in fostering transformation to a knowledge society. The characteristics of the open data movement that include the strong conviction of the value of open data for society, the attention to the institutional aspects of making data open in an inclusive way, the practical focus on the technological infrastructure are key in mobilising a knowledge society. At the heart of any mobilisation is an emerging open data ecosystem and new ways of producing and using data - whether 'born digital' data, digitised data or big data - and how that data, when made openly available, can be used in a knowledgeable way by societal actors.

  5. Science, Society, and Social Networking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, K. S.; Lohwater, T.

    2009-12-01

    The increased use of social networking is changing the way that scientific societies interact with their members and others. The American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) uses a variety of online networks to engage its members and the broader scientific community. AAAS members and non-members can interact with AAAS staff and each other on AAAS sites on Facebook, YouTube, and Twitter, as well as blogs and forums on the AAAS website (www.aaas.org). These tools allow scientists to more readily become engaged in policy by providing information on current science policy topics as well as methods of involvement. For example, members and the public can comment on policy-relevant stories from Science magazine’s ScienceInsider blog, download a weekly policy podcast, receive a weekly email update of policy issues affecting the scientific community, or watch a congressional hearing from their computer. AAAS resource websites and outreach programs, including Communicating Science (www.aaas.org/communicatingscience), Working with Congress (www.aaas.org/spp/cstc/) and Science Careers (http://sciencecareers.sciencemag.org) also provide tools for scientists to become more personally engaged in communicating their findings and involved in the policy process.

  6. Standards for polysomnography in Canada. The Standards Committees of the Canadian Sleep Society and the Canadian Thoracic Society.

    PubMed Central

    George, C F

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To develop standards for polysomnography in Canada in order to assist in the uniform provision of diagnostic and therapeutic services related to sleep disorders. OPTIONS: Uniform testing versus no current Canadian standards. OUTCOMES: Uniform delivery of health care; reduction in number of repeat studies and their attendant costs. EVIDENCE: Availability of diagnostic laboratories and services, and survey responses (written and oral) from directors of sleep laboratories; the American Thoracic Society statement on indications and standards for cardiopulmonary sleep studies was used as a template. VALUES: Acceptable standards of practice were based on consensus opinion of the standards committees of the Canadian Sleep Society and the Canadian Thoracic Society. The committees comprised specialists in neurology, psychiatry, psychology, respirology and polysomnographic technology; family practitioners and otolaryngologists were also consulted. BENEFITS, HARMS, COSTS: Improved level of care and reduction in duplicate or unnecessary testing; establishment, with available resources, of diagnostic sleep laboratories by appropriately qualified physicians in areas where polysomnography is unavailable. RECOMMENDATIONS: Health care practitioners involved in the diagnosis and treatment of sleep disorders should possess a minimum amount of training (both clinical and research) in sleep disorders medicine. The variables recorded and findings entered in a patient's report must be relevant to the sleep disorder under investigation. The recording equipment must provide reliable, accurate and reproducible data and lend itself to appropriate calibration and quality-control procedures. Facilities for sleep studies must meet patient care safety standards, with provisions for emergency or resuscitative measures when necessary; all personnel must be trained in basic cardiopulmonary resuscitation. VALIDATION: No previous standards concerning polysomnography in Canada exist. The

  7. Human identity and the evolution of societies.

    PubMed

    Moffett, Mark W

    2013-09-01

    Human societies are examined as distinct and coherent groups. This trait is most parsimoniously considered a deeply rooted part of our ancestry rather than a recent cultural invention. Our species is the only vertebrate with society memberships of significantly more than 200. We accomplish this by using society-specific labels to identify members, in what I call an anonymous society. I propose that the human brain has evolved to permit not only the close relationships described by the social brain hypothesis, but also, at little mental cost, the anonymous societies within which such alliances are built. The human compulsion to discover or invent labels to "mark" group memberships may originally have been expressed in hominins as vocally learned greetings only slightly different in function from chimpanzee pant hoots (now known to be society-specific). The weight of evidence suggests that at some point, conceivably early in the hominin line, the distinct groups composed of several bands that were typical of our ancestors came to be distinguished by their members on the basis of multiple labels that were socially acquired in this way, the earliest of which would leave no trace in the archaeological record. Often overlooked as research subjects, these sizable fission-fusion communities, in recent egalitarian hunter-gatherers sometimes 2,000 strong, should consistently be accorded the status of societies, in the same sense that this word is used to describe tribes, chiefdoms, and other cultures arising later in our history. The capacity of hunter-gatherer societies to grow sufficiently populous that not all members necessarily recognize one another would make the transition to larger agricultural societies straightforward. Humans differ from chimpanzees in that societal labels are essential to the maintenance of societies and the processes giving birth to new ones. I propose that anonymous societies of all kinds can expand only so far as their labels can remain

  8. Policy statement on antimicrobial stewardship by the Society for Healthcare Epidemiology of America (SHEA), the Infectious Diseases Society of America (IDSA), and the Pediatric Infectious Diseases Society (PIDS).

    PubMed

    2012-04-01

    Antimicrobial resistance has emerged as a significant healthcare quality and patient safety issue in the twenty-first century that, combined with a rapidly dwindling antimicrobial armamentarium, has resulted in a critical threat to the public health of the United States. Antimicrobial stewardship programs optimize antimicrobial use to achieve the best clinical outcomes while minimizing adverse events and limiting selective pressures that drive the emergence of resistance and may also reduce excessive costs attributable to suboptimal antimicrobial use. Therefore, antimicrobial stewardship must be a fiduciary responsibility for all healthcare institutions across the continuum of care. This position statement of the Society for Healthcare Epidemiology of America, the Infectious Diseases Society of America, and the Pediatric Infectious Diseases Society of America outlines recommendations for the mandatory implementation of antimicrobial stewardship throughout health care, suggests process and outcome measures to monitor these interventions, and addresses deficiencies in education and research in this field as well as the lack of accurate data on antimicrobial use in the United States.

  9. Beyond the Learning Society: The Learning World?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Preece, Julia

    2006-01-01

    In today's post-modern world of difference, and amidst globalising forces of insidious convergence, this paper explores how far the concepts of lifelong learning and learning society embrace international worldviews. It conducts a brief excursion into literature that has explored learning society models. It also looks at an increasing number of…

  10. Naming and Address in Afghan Society.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miran, M. Alam

    Forms of address in Afghan society reflect the relationships between the speakers as well as the society's structure. In Afghan Persian, or Dari, first, second, and last names have different semantic dimensions. Boys' first names usually consist of two parts or morphemes, of which one may be part of the father's name. Girls' names usually consist…

  11. Remaking Public Spaces for Civil Society

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ranson, Stewart

    2012-01-01

    The collective action predicaments of the time require citizens to participate in remaking the governance of civil society so that they can become engaged and cooperate together. Can citizens become makers of civil society? This article draws upon Hannah Arendt's "On Revolution" to provide a theory of remaking in which citizens come together to…

  12. Tolerance and Education in Multicultural Societies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wiater, Werner, Ed.; Manschke, Doris, Ed.

    2011-01-01

    This book examines the concepts of tolerance and education in multicultural societies. It focuses on different aspects of multiculturalism in these societies and considers possible conflicts and tensions as well as best-practice examples of co-existence among different cultural groups. Special emphasis is placed on educational issues and schools.…

  13. Universities, the Social Sciences, and Civil Society.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pesmazoglou, Stephanos

    1999-01-01

    Discussion of the university's role in contributing to a civil society offers examples from the recent history of Yugoslavia showing that universities have frequently contributed to chauvinism, intolerance, racism, and ethnic cleansing. Urges institutions of higher education to foster a civil society by emphasizing: (1) an understanding of the…

  14. The Black Man in American Society.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Framingham Public Schools, MA.

    GRADE OR AGES: Junior high school. SUBJECT MATTER: The black man in American society. ORGANIZATION AND PHYSICAL APPEARANCE: There are four major parts each with an overview. The four parts concern a) the African heritage of the black man, b) the American exploitation of the black man, c) the black man's contribution to American society, d) the…

  15. Asia Society's Ongoing Chinese Language Initiatives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Livaccari, Chris; Wang, Jeff

    2009-01-01

    Asia Society remains committed to promoting the teaching and learning of Chinese in American schools as an integral part of the broader agenda of building students' global competency, the key goal of its Partnership for Global Learning. Under the leadership of Asia Society's new Vice President for Education Tony Jackson and with continuing…

  16. Recent Developments in Japan's Lifelong Learning Society.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Makino, Atsushi

    In the wake of economic and social change in Japan, several lifelong learning initiatives have been implemented. Structural changes such as internationalization, the coming of the information age, and the maturation of Japanese society caused the formerly homogeneous society to become more flexible, paving the way for lifelong learning. Additional…

  17. Just Say Know? Schooling the Knowledge Society

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Willinsky, John

    2005-01-01

    This review essay challenges the practice of rooting educational theory in the economic assumptions that underlie the current championing of a knowledge society. It examines the approaches of three recent works: one book, Andy Hargreaves's Teaching in a Knowledge Society, and two edited collections, Barry Smith's Liberal Education in a Knowledge…

  18. America's Scholarly Societies Raise Their Flags Abroad.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McMurtrie, Beth

    2000-01-01

    Reports that greater numbers of scholarly societies, though American in name, are increasingly international in membership and outlook. Suggests that this trend has been driven by the expanding global outlook of scholars, the collapse of communism, and growth of the Internet. Efforts to encourage local professional societies, fears of American…

  19. Introduction to Ageing: science, medicine, and society

    PubMed Central

    Klug, A.

    1997-01-01

    Introduction to Ageing: science, medicine, and society, the proceedings of a Discussion held at The Royal Society on 7 and 8 May 1997. Organized and edited by J. Grimley Evans, R. Holliday, T. B. L. Kirkwood, P. Laslett and L. Tyler.

  20. The Impact of Science on Society.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burke, James; And Others

    The impact of science on society is examined in this publication's coverage of a series of public lectures that commemorated the 25th anniversary of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration. Edited versions of four speeches are presented which address the impact of science on society from the time of humanity's first significant…

  1. State or Society? We Need Both

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taylor, Jane; Appleton, Victoria

    2011-01-01

    The concept of Big Society provides inspiration--working "bottom up" to promote "collective action, reciprocity and a new, more engaged relationship between local people and public services". With so much written about the theory of the Big Society, this seems like an ideal time to put a little more practical detail into the mix. The authors argue…

  2. Teacher Education in a Global Society

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jenlink, Patrick M.

    2008-01-01

    These are strange times for teacher education in a democratic society because globalization dominates economic, political, and technological interfaces among social institutions, nation-states, and the world. These are also dangerous times for teacher education in a democratic society because the expansion of neoliberalism as form of contemporary…

  3. Autonomy and Liberalism in a Multicultural Society

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jewell, Paul

    2005-01-01

    That children should be educated to be ideal citizens, capable of making rational and informed decisions, has been proposed in cultures ranging from Ancient Greece to current societies. In particular, societies that favour liberalism preach the primacy of the individual autonomous citizen and a concomitant tolerance for others. In modern…

  4. History of Tri-M Honor Society.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harley, Frances M.

    1984-01-01

    The Modern Music Masters Society had its origins during the Great Depression in the Maine Music Masters, formed to honor high school students who performed at school and on local church and civic programs. Incorporated in 1952, the society today has chapters in all states and in foreign countries. (RM)

  5. Behind the Banner: Whither the Learning Society?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edwards, Richard

    1995-01-01

    Substantially different meanings are ascribed to the "learning society": (1) an educated society committed to citizenship and democracy; (2) a learning market preparing individuals for the competitive economy; and (3) a learning network supporting a lifelong approach. The learning market currently predominates, but it does not produce a…

  6. Knowledge Society Discourse and Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Valimaa, Jussi; Hoffman, David

    2008-01-01

    The growing importance of knowledge, research and innovation are changing the social role of universities in the globalized world. One of the most popular concepts used to approach these changes in post-industrial and post-modern societies is the concept of "Knowledge Society". In this paper, we will analyse the roles higher education is expected…

  7. The Weeding of a Historical Society Library.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Drake, Cindy Steinhoff

    1992-01-01

    Describes a major deaccessioning (weeding) project begun in 1985 at the library of the Nebraska State Historical Society, including a brief history of the Society and the events leading to the decision to weed. Public controversy over the handling of the project, benefits of the weeding, and new acquisitions policies are also discussed. (MES)

  8. The Information Society, Schools, and the Media.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Balle, Francis

    This report begins by examining the transition from the industrial society to the informatics society which began in the 1960s, when the newspaper's monopoly on information was destroyed by radio and television, followed by the development of an information-based economy. The salient features of the new area are identified as: (1) the ever…

  9. Lessons from the United Kingdom's Royal Society

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allen, Henry Lee

    2010-01-01

    Celebrating its 350th anniversary as a scholarly association devoted to scientific pursuits, the Royal Society (UK), in March 2010, published "The Scientific Century: Securing Our Future Prosperity." In its report, the Royal Society argues against both the notion of withdrawing public investment from its world-class universities and the…

  10. Boston Society's 11th Annual Applied Pharmaceutical Analysis conference.

    PubMed

    Lee, Violet; Liu, Ang; Groeber, Elizabeth; Moghaddam, Mehran; Schiller, James; Tweed, Joseph A; Walker, Gregory S

    2016-02-01

    Boston Society's 11th Annual Applied Pharmaceutical Analysis conference, Hyatt Regency Hotel, Cambridge, MA, USA, 14-16 September 2015 The Boston Society's 11th Annual Applied Pharmaceutical Analysis (APA) conference took place at the Hyatt Regency hotel in Cambridge, MA, on 14-16 September 2015. The 3-day conference affords pharmaceutical professionals, academic researchers and industry regulators the opportunity to collectively participate in meaningful and relevant discussions impacting the areas of pharmaceutical drug development. The APA conference was organized in three workshops encompassing the disciplines of regulated bioanalysis, discovery bioanalysis (encompassing new and emerging technologies) and biotransformation. The conference included a short course titled 'Bioanalytical considerations for the clinical development of antibody-drug conjugates (ADCs)', an engaging poster session, several panel and round table discussions and over 50 diverse talks from leading industry and academic scientists.

  11. Investment analysts and the American Society of Hematology.

    PubMed

    Steensma, David P

    2008-07-01

    Investment analysts are a growing presence at the Annual Meeting of the American Society of Hematology (ASH), and financial professionals frequently contact ASH members for information and perspective on drugs, devices, and scientific developments. Recent incidents have raised concerns about consulting relationships between physicians and the investment industry; the appropriate role of medical societies in influencing these relationships is unclear. In this essay, I summarize the current situation, discuss potential risks and benefits from interactions between physicians and investment analysts, and outline issues that all individuals involved in investment industry consulting should consider. I also propose changes in ASH policy that may help safeguard public trust as well as preserve the access of clinicians and scientists to clinically relevant data presented at the Annual Meeting.

  12. Roe v. Abortion Abolition Society, 9 March 1987.

    PubMed

    1987-01-01

    The plaintiffs, two patients, two physicians, a clinic providing abortion services, members of its staff, and an escort service, sought to bring a class action against an anti-abortion society and its members under the Ku Klux Klan Act of 1871, which prohibits private conspiracies to deprive persons or classes of persons of the equal protection of the laws or of equal privileges and immunities under the laws. They claimed that the defendants had harassed, intimidated, and assaulted them. The Court held that the plaintiffs did not constitute a class for purposes of the statute because holding similar religious views on abortion was not sufficient to meet the common characteristics requirement of a class. The Court, however, allowed class action suits based on different statutory provisions to continue against several municipalities for failure to protect the plaintiffs' rights against the society and its members.

  13. 2010 Canadian Cardiovascular Society/Canadian Society of Echocardiography Guidelines for Training and Maintenance of Competency in Adult Echocardiography.

    PubMed

    Burwash, Ian G; Basmadjian, Arsene; Bewick, David; Choy, Jonathan B; Cujec, Bibiana; Jassal, Davinder S; MacKenzie, Scott; Nair, Parvathy; Rudski, Lawrence G; Yu, Eric; Tam, James W

    2011-01-01

    Guidelines for the provision of echocardiography in Canada were jointly developed and published by the Canadian Cardiovascular Society and the Canadian Society of Echocardiography in 2005. Since their publication, recognition of the importance of echocardiography to patient care has increased, along with the use of focused, point-of-care echocardiography by physicians of diverse clinical backgrounds and variable training. New guidelines for physician training and maintenance of competence in adult echocardiography were required to ensure that physicians providing either focused, point-of-care echocardiography or comprehensive echocardiography are appropriately trained and proficient in their use of echocardiography. In addition, revision of the guidelines was required to address technological advances and the desire to standardize echocardiography training across the country to facilitate the national recognition of a physician's expertise in echocardiography. This paper summarizes the new Guidelines for Physician Training and Maintenance of Competency in Adult Echocardiography, which are considerably more comprehensive than earlier guidelines and address many important issues not previously covered. These guidelines provide a blueprint for physician training despite different clinical backgrounds and help standardize physician training and training programs across the country. Adherence to the guidelines will ensure that physicians providing echocardiography have acquired sufficient expertise required for their specific practice. The document will also provide a framework for other national societies to standardize their training programs in echocardiography and will provide a benchmark by which competency in adult echocardiography may be measured.

  14. More Participation, Happier Society? A Comparative Study of Civil Society and the Quality of Life

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wallace, Claire; Pichler, Florian

    2009-01-01

    A "good society" has recently been portrayed as one in which citizens engage in voluntary associations to foster democratic processes. Arguably, such a good society is considered as one where people are content with their own lives as well as public life. We consider whether participation in civil society leads to more satisfied…

  15. The Joint Society of Nephrology in Germany, Switzerland and Austria - Five Decades of Successful Activities.

    PubMed

    Heidland, August; Ritz, Eberhard; Lang, Florian

    2016-02-01

    The joint Society of Nephrology in Germany, Switzerland and Austria was founded on April 10th, 1961 in Wiesbaden. Board members were Hans Sarre, Kurt Kramer, Klaus Rother, Francois Reubi, Bruno Watschinger, Wolfgang Dutz, Ernst Wollheim and Karl Ullrich. The mission of the society was an intensive interaction between basic science of the kidney (anatomy, physiology, pathophysiology, biochemistry and molecular biology) and clinical research in nephrology and hypertension. Every year scientific symposia took place in different venues in one of the three countries, except in the years between 1963-1987, when the congresses of the International Society of Nephrology took place. Practical issues of clinical nephrology, in particular renal replacement therapy (dialysis and transplantation), were covered since 1971 by a specific Working Group. In 1994 the Advisory Board (Kuratorium) of the Society of Nephrology was founded as a result of an initiative of Peter Weidmann (Bern). Its main goals were Update Seminars in Nephrology and Hypertensionin Eastern Europe, in part together with the Joint Action of Nephrology and an Eastern European ScholarshipProgram. Despite the prosperous work of this European society within nearly five decades in Germany a national society was founded as well, which combined all activities of nephrology in one organization. The German Society of Nephrology was founded in 2009.

  16. The Society of Thoracic Surgeons Adult Cardiac Surgery Database: 2016 Update on Outcomes and Quality.

    PubMed

    D'Agostino, Richard S; Jacobs, Jeffrey P; Badhwar, Vinay; Paone, Gaetano; Rankin, J Scott; Han, Jane M; McDonald, Donna; Shahian, David M

    2016-01-01

    The Society of Thoracic Surgeons Adult Cardiac Database is one of the longest-standing, largest, and most highly regarded clinical data registries in health care. It serves as the foundation for all quality measurement and improvement activities of The Society of Thoracic Surgeons. This report summarizes current aggregate national outcomes in adult cardiac surgery and reviews database-related activities in the areas of quality measurement and performance improvement.

  17. Guidelines from the Japanese Society of Echocardiography: Guidance for the management and maintenance of echocardiography equipment.

    PubMed

    Nakatani, S; Akaishi, M; Asanuma, T; Hashimoto, S; Izumi, C; Iwanaga, S; Kawai, H; Daimon, M; Toide, H; Hayashida, A; Yamada, H

    2015-03-01

    Echocardiography plays a pivotal role as an imaging modality in modern cardiology practice. Information derived from echocardiography is definitely helpful for patient care. The Japanese Society of Echocardiography has promoted echocardiography in routine clinical and research use. One of the missions of the Society is to provide information that is useful for high-quality examinations. To ensure this, we believe that equipment in good condition and a comfortable environment are important for both patient and examiner. Here, the Guideline Preparation Committee of the Japanese Society of Echocardiography has established brief guidance for the routine use of echocardiography equipment.

  18. [Underwater delivery. Consensus of the Spanish Neonatology Society and the Perinatal Section of the Spanish Obstetrics and Gynecology Society].

    PubMed

    Iriondo Sanz, M; Sánchez Luna, M; Botet Mussons, F; Martínez-Astorquiza, T; Lailla Vicens, J M; Figueras Aloy, J

    2015-02-01

    Immersion in water during labor and delivery as an alternative to traditional delivery is a practice that has increased in many countries. This technique is effective in reducing pain and duration of labor. The American Academy of Pediatrics and The American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists have published a clinical report which indicates the potential maternal benefits during the first stage of labor but, questions the performance of this technique during delivery and birth of the newborn. In this report, the Spanish Society of Neonatology and the Spanish Society of Obstetrics and Gynecology analyze the current scientific evidence on water immersion delivery, and the impact this practice could have in the mother and especially in the wellbeing of newborn.

  19. Obstructive sleep apnea and driving: A Canadian Thoracic Society and Canadian Sleep Society position paper.

    PubMed

    Ayas, Najib; Skomro, Robert; Blackman, Adam; Curren, Kristen; Fitzpatrick, Michael; Fleetham, John; George, Charles; Hakemi, Tom; Hanly, Patrick; Li, Christopher; Morrison, Debra; Series, Frédéric

    2014-01-01

    Untreated patients with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) are at increased risk for motor vehicle collisions; however, it is unclear how this should be translated into fitness-to-drive recommendations. Accordingly, the Canadian Thoracic Society (CTS) Sleep Disordered Breathing Clinical Assembly and the Canadian Sleep Society (CSS) assembled a CTS-CSS working group to propose recommendations with regard to driving in patients with OSA. Recommendations for assessing fitness to drive in noncommercial drivers: 1. Severity of OSA alone is not a reliable predictor of collision risk and, therefore, should not be used in isolation to assess fitness to drive; 2. The severity of sleep apnea should be considered in the context of other factors to assess fitness to drive; 3. The decision to restrict driving is ultimately made by the motor vehicle licensing authority; however, they should take into account the information and recommendations provided by the sleep medicine physician and should follow provincial guidelines; 4. For patients prescribed continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) therapy, objective CPAP compliance should be documented. Efficacy should also be documented in terms of reversing the symptoms and improvement in sleep apnea based on physiological monitoring; 5. For patients treated with surgery or an oral appliance, verification of adequate sleep apnea treatment should be obtained; and 6. A driver diagnosed with OSA may be recertified as fit to drive based on assessment of symptoms and demonstrating compliance with treatment. The assessment should be aligned with the provincial driver's license renewal period. Commercial vehicles: Assessment of fitness to drive should be more stringent for patients operating commercial vehicles. In general, the CTS-CSS working group was in agreement with the Medical Expert Panel recommendations to the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration in the United States; these recommendations were adapted for Canadian practitioners.

  20. Social Value Orientation and Capitalism in Societies

    PubMed Central

    Shahrier, Shibly; Kakinaka, Makoto

    2016-01-01

    Cooperation and competition are core issues in various fields, since they are claimed to affect the evolution of human societies and ecological organizations. A long-standing debate has existed on how social behaviors and preferences are shaped with culture. Considering the economic environment as part of culture, this study examines whether the ongoing modernization of competitive societies, called “capitalism,” affects the evolution of people’s social preferences and behaviors. To test this argument, we implemented field experiments of social value orientation and surveys with 1002 respondents for three different areas of Bangladesh: (i) rural, (ii) transitional and (iii) capitalistic societies. The main result reveals that with the evolution from rural to capitalistic societies, people are likely to be less prosocial and more likely to be competitive. In a transitional society, there is a considerable proportion of “unidentified” people, neither proself nor prosocial, implying the potential existence of unstable states during a transformation period from rural to capitalistic societies. We also find that people become more proself with increasing age, education and number of children. These results suggest that important environmental, climate change or sustainability problems, which require cooperation rather than competition, will pose more danger as societies become capitalistic. PMID:27792756

  1. Social Value Orientation and Capitalism in Societies.

    PubMed

    Shahrier, Shibly; Kotani, Koji; Kakinaka, Makoto

    2016-01-01

    Cooperation and competition are core issues in various fields, since they are claimed to affect the evolution of human societies and ecological organizations. A long-standing debate has existed on how social behaviors and preferences are shaped with culture. Considering the economic environment as part of culture, this study examines whether the ongoing modernization of competitive societies, called "capitalism," affects the evolution of people's social preferences and behaviors. To test this argument, we implemented field experiments of social value orientation and surveys with 1002 respondents for three different areas of Bangladesh: (i) rural, (ii) transitional and (iii) capitalistic societies. The main result reveals that with the evolution from rural to capitalistic societies, people are likely to be less prosocial and more likely to be competitive. In a transitional society, there is a considerable proportion of "unidentified" people, neither proself nor prosocial, implying the potential existence of unstable states during a transformation period from rural to capitalistic societies. We also find that people become more proself with increasing age, education and number of children. These results suggest that important environmental, climate change or sustainability problems, which require cooperation rather than competition, will pose more danger as societies become capitalistic.

  2. [Gender equality activity in the Bioimaging Society].

    PubMed

    Suzaki, Etsuko

    2013-09-01

    Gender equality activity in the Bioimaging Society was initiated in 2005 when it joined the Japan Inter-Society Liaison Association Committee for Promoting Equal Participation of Men and Women in Science and Engineering (EPMEWSE). The Gender Equality Committee of the Bioimaging Society is acting on this issue by following the policy of the EPMEWSE, and has also been planning and conducting lectures at annual meetings of the society to gain the understanding, consents, and cooperation of the members of the society to become conscious of gender equality. Women's participation in the society has been promoted through the activities of the Gender Equality Committee, and the number of women officers in the society has since increased from two women out of 40 members in 2005 to five out of 44 in 2013. The activities of the Gender Equality Committee of the Japanese Association of Anatomists (JAA) have just started. There are more than 400 women belonging to the JAA. When these women members join together and collaborate, women's participation in the JAA will increase.

  3. [Ageing society and laboratory medicine].

    PubMed

    Okabe, H

    2000-09-01

    An interest in the ageing process has increased greatly with increasing the population of the aged. The goal of this interest is to improve the quality of life(QOL) in the aged. In this paper, the presidential address "Ageing Society and Laboratory Medicine" at the 46th annual meeting of JSCP in Kumamoto'99 was summarized on the important research for ageing in the past decades. The paper presented was age- and gene-related changes, the latent variation of serum constituents and lipids abnormality in the ageing process. Concerning to the definition of reference value of healthy populations and the subjects who had no combined ailments, the reference interval of individuals(intra-personal), followed 5 years categorized by age, sex, and social conditions, gave a narrow range of variation than did a larger mixed populations(inter-personal). The reference intervals set would be a more sensitive reference than is the customary "normal range" for values occurring in inter-personal. Concerning to the study of the relationship between laboratory test and activity of daily living(ADL), the higher serum levels for TP, Alb, Hb, Glu, TC were observed in the higher ADL. The basic research techniques were also evaluated in the paper. The serum lipoperoxides were correlated with serum lipoprotein free radicals which caused atherosclerosis. The higher frequency of cerebral- and myocardial-infarction in the aged were observed in the higher serum LDL-C and lower serum level of arachidonic acid(AA), eicosapentaenoic acid(EPA), and AA/EPA ratio were observed in AMI patients with lower HDL-C groups than the healthy aged. Although Alzheimer(AD)'s disease had a progressive memory loss and immobile dementia and was reported the decrease of acetyltransferase activity in the brain, decrease of serum level of free choline, lyso-phosphatidylcholine, phosphatidylcholine(PC) and sphingomyelin(SM)/PC ratio were observed in spite of keeping normal serum level of SM. The decreased serum levels of

  4. Education in an Information Society

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, John W.

    1999-04-01

    Last month's editorial pointed out that higher education may well change significantly as a result of the tremendous impact that information technologies are having on society. It quoted a white paper (1) by Russell Edgerton, Director of the Education Program of the Pew Charitable Trusts. Edgerton argued that higher education is currently failing to meet three challenges: to provide higher quality education; to reduce costs; and to regain its former stature as an important player in shaping public policy. Edgerton recommended that the Pew Trusts should encourage colleges and universities to set more ambitious goals for undergraduate education, to enter the public arena and play a major role in the reform of K-12 education, and to develop an academic profession interested in working toward these goals. Four new aims for undergraduate education were identified: "encouraging institutions to take learning seriously, encouraging faculty to take pedagogy seriously, demonstrating that technology can be used to reduce costs as well as to enhance learning, and developing new incentives for continuous quality improvement." One wonders why institutions of higher education should need to be encouraged toward goals that seem obviously congruent with their mission and self interest, but today's colleges and universities seem more likely to respond to outside offers of funding than to develop their own plans of action. As members of the faculty of such institutions, it behooves us to consider what some of those outside influences are likely to be and what effects they are likely to have on us, on our institutions, and on our students. Higher education is seen as a growth market by Michael Dolence and Donald Norris (2). In 1995 they projected that in five years there would be an increase of 20 million full-time equivalent enrollments in the U.S. and more than 100 million world wide. However, this growth was not projected to be traditional, on-campus students. Most was expected to

  5. European Society of Cardiology (ESC) congress report from Barcelona 2014.

    PubMed

    Muramatsu, Takashi; Ozaki, Yukio

    2014-01-01

    The Annual Congress of the European Society of Cardiology (ESC) was held in Barcelona from 30th August to 3rd September 2014. More than 30,300 attendees from around the world shared the latest original research, including 27 clinical Hot Line studies, 12 basic science Hot Lines, 15 clinical trial updates, 19 registry studies, and 4,597 abstracts. Many important issues were presented, including novel treatment strategies for heart failure, acute coronary syndrome, interventional treatment for structural heart disease, renal denervation, novel anticoagulant therapies, atrial fibrillation and so on. In addition, 5 new ESC clinical practice guidelines (ie, myocardial revascularization, non-cardiac surgery, acute pulmonary embolism, hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, and aortic disease) were launched. It should be noted that Japan has recently been ranked in the top position in terms of the number of abstract submissions. Based on these activities, the ESC Congress has been recognized as the dominant scientific and educational forum for healthcare professionals in cardiology. We report the highlights and several key presentations of the ESC Congress 2014. The scientific activities and growing contributions of Japanese cardiologists or cardiovascular surgeons enhance the favorable relationship between the ESC and the Japanese Circulation Society.

  6. Sexism and gender inequality across 57 societies.

    PubMed

    Brandt, Mark J

    2011-11-01

    Theory predicts that individuals' sexism serves to exacerbate inequality in their society's gender hierarchy. Past research, however, has provided only correlational evidence to support this hypothesis. In this study, I analyzed a large longitudinal data set that included representative data from 57 societies. Multilevel modeling showed that sexism directly predicted increases in gender inequality. This study provides the first evidence that sexist ideologies can create gender inequality within societies, and this finding suggests that sexism not only legitimizes the societal status quo, but also actively enhances the severity of the gender hierarchy. Three potential mechanisms for this effect are discussed briefly.

  7. Society of Mind project. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Minsky, M.

    1988-08-01

    This project was concerned with developing a theory of intelligent thinking and learning, based on the Society of Mind model of intelligence. The research was funded over a period of years by the Computer Science Office of the Office of Naval Research. The research included the following specific subjects: Connectionism of Parallel Computers, Exploiting Parallel Processing, Connectedness of Commonsense Knowledge Bases, Connectedness and Society of Mind, Advantages and Deficiencies of Connectionist Networks, Insulation and Interaction, Learning and Representation, Intermediate Units and Significance, Associations and Connections, Unifying Frames and K-lines, Clarifying Conceptual Dependency, Computational linguistics, Research tools for society of mind models, Discovery processes, and Bridges between symbolic and connectionist models.

  8. The first President of the Royal Society.

    PubMed

    Fara, Patricia

    2003-12-01

    Few people know the name of the Royal Society's first President, even though he features prominently in Thomas Sprat's famous allegorical frontispiece. In promotional images, his individual identity is irrelevant for proclaiming the Society's allegiance to Francis Bacon and commitment to experimental investigation. By contrast, William Brouncker's name does appear on Peter Lely's large portrait, which hung at the Royal Society. Brouncker was a gifted mathematician as well as a conscientious administrator, and Lely's portrait reproduces the diagram of one of his innovative algebraic proofs.

  9. Rehabilitation Engineering & Assistive Technology Society (RESNA) position on the application of wheelchair standing devices: 2013 current state of the literature.

    PubMed

    Dicianno, Brad E; Morgan, Amy; Lieberman, Jenny; Rosen, Lauren

    2016-01-01

    This article, approved by the Rehabilitation Engineering & Assistive Technology Society of North America Board of Directors on December 23, 2013, shares typical clinical applications and provides evidence from the literature supporting the use of wheelchair standers.

  10. [Consensus statement "Dementia 2010" of the Austrian Alzheimer Society].

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Reinhold; Marksteiner, Michael; Dal-Bianco, Peter; Ransmayr, G; Bancher, C; Benke, T; Wancata, J; Fischer, P; Leblhuber, C F; Psota, G; Ackerl, M; Alf, C; Berek, K; Croy, A; Delazer, M; Fasching, P; Frühwald, T; Fruhwürth, G; Fuchs-Nieder, B; Gatterer, G; Grossmann, J; Hinterhuber, H; Iglseder, B; Imarhiagbe, D; Jagsch, C; Jellinger, K; Kalousek, M; Kapeller, P; Ladurner, G; Lampl, C; Lechner, A; Lingg, A; Nakajima, T; Rainer, M; Reisecker, F; Spatt, J; Walch, T; Uranüs, M; Walter, A

    2010-01-01

    The Austrian Alzheimer Society developed evidence-based guidelines based on a systematic literature search and criteria-guided assessment with subsequent transparent determination of grades of clinical recommendation. The authors evaluated currently available therapeutic approaches for the most common forms of dementia and focused on diagnosis and pharmacological intervention, taking into consideration the situation in Austria. The purpose of these guidelines is the rational and cost-effective use of diagnostic and therapeutic measures in dementing illnesses. Users are physicians and all other providers of care for patients with dementia in Austria.

  11. [Spanish Society of Cardiology ethical framework (executive summary)].

    PubMed

    de los Reyes López, Manuel; Martín Luengo, Cándido; Brugada Terradellas, Josep; Sanz Romero, Ginés; Lidón Corbí, Rosa María; Martín Burrieza, Fernando

    2006-12-01

    The Spanish Society of Cardiology (SEC) has produced an Ethical Framework Document. This document is divided into two distinct parts that deal, respectively, with the responsibilities of the SEC as an organization and the responsibilities of its professional members. The SEC makes recommendations on how its members should carry out their daily clinical practice, provides a professional perspective on public commitments as a scientific association, and aims to ensure that any views, recommendations, and advice expressed provide the basis for an informed debate on ethical problems in our field of work.

  12. "Science and Society" in the Planetarium.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scott, Roger L.; And Others

    1986-01-01

    Planetarium presentations at Ball State University have been integrated into a science and society course titled Colloquium in Science and Mathematics. A brief description and educational objectives for six of the presentations are provided. (JN)

  13. The German Physical Society Under National Socialism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoffmann, Dieter; Walker, Mark

    2004-12-01

    The history of the German Physical Society from 1933 to 1945 is not the same as a comprehensive history of physics under Adolf Hitler, but it does reflect important aspects of physicists' work and life during the Third Reich.

  14. Henry Oldenburg - Shaping the Royal Society

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boas Hall, Marie

    2002-03-01

    Henry Oldenburg, born in 1619 in Bremen, Germany, first came to England as a diplomat on a mission to see Oliver Cromwell. He stayed on in England and in 1662 became the Secretary of the Royal Society, and its best known member to the entire learned world of his time. Through his extensive correspondence, now published, he disseminated the Society's ideals and methods at home and abroad. He fostered and encouraged the talents of many scientists later to be far more famous than he, including Newton, Flamsteed, Malpighi, and Leeuwenhoek with whom, as with many others, he developed real friendship. He founded and edited the Philosophical Transactions, the world's oldest scientific journal.His career sheds new light on the intellectual world of his time, especially its scientific aspects, and on the development of the Royal Society; his private life expands our knowledge of social mobility, the urban society, and the religious views of his time.

  15. Origins of the American Astronomical Society

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berendzen, Richard

    1974-01-01

    Analyzes the historical context that led to the founding of the society. Relates the ideas and reactions of key figures of the time such as James Lick, George Hale, E.C. Pickering, and S. Newcomb. (GS)

  16. Fragmentation in Science and in Society

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bohm, David

    1971-01-01

    Fragmentation" is a general social condition. The author presents a case for wholeness and its dynamic, cyclic character. Science and society need not be fragmented. They should be considered part of a holocyclation." (LS)

  17. Professionalism and medicine's social contract with society.

    PubMed

    Cruess, Sylvia R

    2006-08-01

    Medicine's relationship with society has been described as a social contract: an "as if" contract with obligations and expectations on the part of both society and medicine, "each of the other". The term is often used without elaboration by those writing on professionalism in medicine. Based on the literature, society's expectations of medicine are: the services of the healer, assured competence, altruistic service, morality and integrity, accountability, transparency, objective advice, and promotion of the public good. Medicine's expectations of society are: trust, autonomy, self-regulation, a health care system that is value-driven and adequately funded, participation in public policy, shared responsibility for health, a monopoly, and both non-financial and financial rewards. The recognition of these expectations is important as they serve as the basis of a series of obligations which are necessary for the maintenance of medicine as a profession. Mutual trust and reasonable demands are required of both parties to the contract.

  18. New Groups Study Science's Effect on Society

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Sullivan, Dermot A.

    1973-01-01

    Describes the chief aims of the Council for Science and Society in London and the International Institute for Applied Systems Analysis in Vienna. Indicates that both groups are planning to function as a multinational interdisciplinary organization. (CC)

  19. Civil Society in Nigeria: Reasons for Ineffectiveness

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-03-01

    why the Nigerian state, through its democratic system , has not been able to meet reasonable expectations of good governance. While the country suffers...argues that the state responds to civil society. Civil society, then, is the tool that shapes state behavior. Thus, the question is why Nigerian civil...number of theories are posited on the methods, tools , and elements required to engender good governance: parliamentary development, a free press

  20. Sustainable Society Formed by Unselfish Agents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kikuchi, Toshiko

    It has been pointed out that if the social configuration of the three relations (market, communal and obligatory relations) is not balanced, a market based society as a total system fails. Using multi-agent simulations, this paper shows that a sustainable society is formed when all three relations are integrated and function respectively. When agent trades are based on the market mechanism (i.e., agents act in their own interest and thus only market relations exist), weak agents who cannot perform transactions die. If a compulsory tax is imposed to enable all weak agents to survive (i.e., obligatory relations exist), then the fiscal deficit increases. On the other hand, if agents who have excess income undertake the unselfish action of distributing their surplus to the weak agents (i.e., communal relations exist), then trade volume increases. It is shown that the existence of unselfish agents is necessary for the realization of a sustainable society. However, the survival of all agents is difficult in a communal society. In an artificial society, for all agents survive and fiscal balance to be maintained, all three social relations need to be fully integrated. These results show that adjusting the balance of the three social relations well lead to the realization of a sustainable society.

  1. History of Japanese Society of Toxicology.

    PubMed

    Satoh, Tetsuo

    2016-01-01

    Founded in 1981, the Japanese Society of Toxicology (JSOT) has grown into an organization of nearly 3,000 members working together to advance the nation's scientific knowledge and understanding of toxicology through the implementation of planning that ensures a systematic and efficient expenditure of energies and resources, and is closely aligned with a strategy for accomplishing the Society's long-range plans. To promote public education in toxicology, the Society organizes public lectures during each year's annual meeting. Other activities include hosting scientific conferences, promoting continuing education, and facilitating international collaboration. Internally, the JSOT operates five standing committees: General Affairs, Educational, Editorial, Finance, and Science and Publicity to handle its necessary relationships. To bestow official recognition, the Society established its Toxicologist Certification Program in 1997, and has certified 536 members as Diplomat Toxicologists (DJSOT) as of May 1, 2016. Furthermore, on the same date, 43 JSOT members were certified as Emeritus Diplomats of the JSOT (EDJSOT). The Society has launched two official journals, the "Journal of Toxicological Sciences (JTS)" in 1981 and "Fundamental Toxicological Sciences (Fundam. Toxicol. Sci.)" in 2014. As for participation in the international organizations, the JSOT (then known as the Toxicological Research Group) joined the International Union of Toxicology as a charter member in 1980, and became a founding member of the Asian Society of Toxicology at its inauguration in 1994. Into the future, the JSOT will continue working diligently to advance knowledge and understanding of toxicology and secure its place among the interdisciplinary fields of science, humane studies, and ethics.

  2. [Clinical guidelines for epilepsy].

    PubMed

    Tsuji, Sadatoshi

    2014-05-01

    Many international guidelines for epilepsy from the countries in Europe, USA and Asia have been published since the introduction of evidence-based medicine. In Japan, the clinical guidelines for epilepsy management were published by the Japanese Society of Neurology (JSN) in 2002 and 2010. The clinical guideline for epilepsy 2010 primarily targets general practitioners treating epilepsy patients. The Japan Epilepsy Society has been publishing 16 guidelines for several topics since 2005. The clinical guideline for epilepsy 2010 recommends that carbamazepine can be regarded for new onset partial epilepsy and sodium valproate is for new onset generalized epilepsy as anti-epileptic drug (AED) monotherapy. The new AEDs received approval by the Ministry of Health, Labour and Welfare, Japan, mainly in the add-on treatment of adults with partial epilepsy. The clinical guideline for epilepsy 2010 will contribute to improvement in the management of epilepsy in Japan.

  3. An Official American Thoracic Society/European Respiratory Society Statement: Update on Limb Muscle Dysfunction in Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease

    PubMed Central

    Maltais, François; Decramer, Marc; Casaburi, Richard; Barreiro, Esther; Burelle, Yan; Debigaré, Richard; Dekhuijzen, P. N. Richard; Franssen, Frits; Gayan-Ramirez, Ghislaine; Gea, Joaquim; Gosker, Harry R.; Gosselink, Rik; Hayot, Maurice; Hussain, Sabah N. A.; Janssens, Wim; Polkey, Micheal I.; Roca, Josep; Saey, Didier; Schols, Annemie M. W. J.; Spruit, Martijn A.; Steiner, Michael; Taivassalo, Tanja; Troosters, Thierry; Vogiatzis, Ioannis; Wagner, Peter D.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Limb muscle dysfunction is prevalent in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and it has important clinical implications, such as reduced exercise tolerance, quality of life, and even survival. Since the previous American Thoracic Society/European Respiratory Society (ATS/ERS) statement on limb muscle dysfunction, important progress has been made on the characterization of this problem and on our understanding of its pathophysiology and clinical implications. Purpose: The purpose of this document is to update the 1999 ATS/ERS statement on limb muscle dysfunction in COPD. Methods: An interdisciplinary committee of experts from the ATS and ERS Pulmonary Rehabilitation and Clinical Problems assemblies determined that the scope of this document should be limited to limb muscles. Committee members conducted focused reviews of the literature on several topics. A librarian also performed a literature search. An ATS methodologist provided advice to the committee, ensuring that the methodological approach was consistent with ATS standards. Results: We identified important advances in our understanding of the extent and nature of the structural alterations in limb muscles in patients with COPD. Since the last update, landmark studies were published on the mechanisms of development of limb muscle dysfunction in COPD and on the treatment of this condition. We now have a better understanding of the clinical implications of limb muscle dysfunction. Although exercise training is the most potent intervention to address this condition, other therapies, such as neuromuscular electrical stimulation, are emerging. Assessment of limb muscle function can identify patients who are at increased risk of poor clinical outcomes, such as exercise intolerance and premature mortality. Conclusions: Limb muscle dysfunction is a key systemic consequence of COPD. However, there are still important gaps in our knowledge about the mechanisms of development of this problem

  4. The life and work of Melanie Klein in the British Psycho-Analytical Society.

    PubMed

    King, P H

    1983-01-01

    This paper describes certain aspects of the life and work of Melanie Klein in the British Psycho-Analytical Society. It attempts to highlight the reciprocity of the relationship between Melanie Klein and other members of that Society by showing how the climate of psychoanalytical opinion that was prevalent among members of that Society during the first decade of her stay in London, and which encouraged discussion of clinical work and interest in psychoanalytical discovery, provided a congenial setting for her to become firmly established as an active member of the British Society and to continue her contributions to psychoanalytic theory and clinical expertise. The paper also traces the development of Melanie Klein's main theoretical contributions, together with relevant criticisms of them as they emerged, against the background of the history of the British Psycho-Analytical Society. It describes the controversies that arose as to whether or not her ideas could properly be viewed within the framework of psychoanalytic theory, as formulated by Freud, and the attempted resolution of these controversies, together with some comments on the repercussions of these theoretical disagreements on relationships within the Society. An extensive list of references is included to facilitate a more detailed study of the subject.

  5. [Board-certifying systems of the Japan Surgical Society and subspecialty surgical societies].

    PubMed

    Kondo, Satoshi

    2009-05-01

    In postgraduate training courses to develop superior surgeons with both general and subspecialty surgery competence, board-certifying systems play an important role as guideposts. The board-certified surgeon designation of the Japan Surgical Society as the first guidepost has provided the foundations for board-certified surgeon systems of subspecialty surgical societies as the second guidepost. A committee consisting of representatives from nine surgical societies has been working actively to make these board-certifying systems more reasonable and consistent.

  6. Professional societies and industry support: what is the quid pro quo?

    PubMed

    Kassirer, Jerome P

    2007-01-01

    Professional medical societies have become increasingly dependent on pharmaceutical, device, and biotechnology companies for ongoing support of their programs, but the internal influence of this financial largesse on medical societies' practices is well hidden. Many examples exist in which societies' educational products, including clinical practice guidelines and professional publications, have been tainted by involvement by industry-paid individuals. These examples show that professional judgments of organizations can be affected in ways that are not in the best interests of our patients. Society leaders should develop policies that leave critical decisions, especially those that affect patient care, in the hands of members without financial ties to industry. Society leaders should not accept funds designated for specific industry-recommended projects unless such programs are already part of their planned agenda. These leaders, who typically serve for only a year or two, should delve into arrangements that salaried society executives make with industry, and insure that no promises are made that compromise an organization's professional goals. Professional societies should also find ways of reducing the vast, embarrassing industry involvement at their national meetings, especially the vulgar circus-like displays and the drug company-sponsored symposia. We must reduce commercialism and restore professionalism to our medical meetings.

  7. Fasting is not routinely required for determination of a lipid profile: clinical and laboratory implications including flagging at desirable concentration cut-points—a joint consensus statement from the European Atherosclerosis Society and European Federation of Clinical Chemistry and Laboratory Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Nordestgaard, Børge G.; Langsted, Anne; Mora, Samia; Kolovou, Genovefa; Baum, Hannsjörg; Bruckert, Eric; Watts, Gerald F.; Sypniewska, Grazyna; Wiklund, Olov; Borén, Jan; Chapman, M. John; Cobbaert, Christa; Descamps, Olivier S.; von Eckardstein, Arnold; Kamstrup, Pia R.; Pulkki, Kari; Kronenberg, Florian; Remaley, Alan T.; Rifai, Nader; Ros, Emilio; Langlois, Michel

    2016-01-01

    Aims To critically evaluate the clinical implications of the use of non-fasting rather than fasting lipid profiles and to provide guidance for the laboratory reporting of abnormal non-fasting or fasting lipid profiles. Methods and results Extensive observational data, in which random non-fasting lipid profiles have been compared with those determined under fasting conditions, indicate that the maximal mean changes at 1–6 h after habitual meals are not clinically significant [+0.3 mmol/L (26 mg/dL) for triglycerides; −0.2 mmol/L (8 mg/dL) for total cholesterol; −0.2 mmol/L (8 mg/dL) for LDL cholesterol; +0.2 mmol/L (8 mg/dL) for calculated remnant cholesterol; −0.2 mmol/L (8 mg/dL) for calculated non-HDL cholesterol]; concentrations of HDL cholesterol, apolipoprotein A1, apolipoprotein B, and lipoprotein(a) are not affected by fasting/non-fasting status. In addition, non-fasting and fasting concentrations vary similarly over time and are comparable in the prediction of cardiovascular disease. To improve patient compliance with lipid testing, we therefore recommend the routine use of non-fasting lipid profiles, while fasting sampling may be considered when non-fasting triglycerides >5 mmol/L (440 mg/dL). For non-fasting samples, laboratory reports should flag abnormal concentrations as triglycerides ≥2 mmol/L (175 mg/dL), total cholesterol ≥5 mmol/L (190 mg/dL), LDL cholesterol ≥3 mmol/L (115 mg/dL), calculated remnant cholesterol ≥0.9 mmol/L (35 mg/dL), calculated non-HDL cholesterol ≥3.9 mmol/L (150 mg/dL), HDL cholesterol ≤1 mmol/L (40 mg/dL), apolipoprotein A1 ≤1.25 g/L (125 mg/dL), apolipoprotein B ≥1.0 g/L (100 mg/dL), and lipoprotein(a) ≥50 mg/dL (80th percentile); for fasting samples, abnormal concentrations correspond to triglycerides ≥1.7 mmol/L (150 mg/dL). Life-threatening concentrations require separate referral when triglycerides >10 mmol/L (880 mg/dL) for the risk of pancreatitis, LDL cholesterol >13 mmol/L (500 mg/dL) for

  8. Endocrine-Disrupting Chemicals: An Endocrine Society Scientific Statement

    PubMed Central

    Diamanti-Kandarakis, Evanthia; Bourguignon, Jean-Pierre; Giudice, Linda C.; Hauser, Russ; Prins, Gail S.; Soto, Ana M.; Zoeller, R. Thomas; Gore, Andrea C.

    2009-01-01

    There is growing interest in the possible health threat posed by endocrine-disrupting chemicals (EDCs), which are substances in our environment, food, and consumer products that interfere with hormone biosynthesis, metabolism, or action resulting in a deviation from normal homeostatic control or reproduction. In this first Scientific Statement of The Endocrine Society, we present the evidence that endocrine disruptors have effects on male and female reproduction, breast development and cancer, prostate cancer, neuroendocrinology, thyroid, metabolism and obesity, and cardiovascular endocrinology. Results from animal models, human clinical observations, and epidemiological studies converge to implicate EDCs as a significant concern to public health. The mechanisms of EDCs involve divergent pathways including (but not limited to) estrogenic, antiandrogenic, thyroid, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ, retinoid, and actions through other nuclear receptors; steroidogenic enzymes; neurotransmitter receptors and systems; and many other pathways that are highly conserved in wildlife and humans, and which can be modeled in laboratory in vitro and in vivo models. Furthermore, EDCs represent a broad class of molecules such as organochlorinated pesticides and industrial chemicals, plastics and plasticizers, fuels, and many other chemicals that are present in the environment or are in widespread use. We make a number of recommendations to increase understanding of effects of EDCs, including enhancing increased basic and clinical research, invoking the precautionary principle, and advocating involvement of individual and scientific society stakeholders in communicating and implementing changes in public policy and awareness. PMID:19502515

  9. American Society of Nephrology Quiz and Questionnaire 2015: Glomerular Diseases.

    PubMed

    Bomback, Andrew S; Perazella, Mark A; Choi, Michael J

    2016-05-06

    The Nephrology Quiz and Questionnaire remains an extremely popular session for attendees of the annual Kidney Week meeting of the American Society of Nephrology. Once again, the conference hall was overflowing with audience members and eager quiz participants. Topics covered by the expert discussants included electrolyte and acid-base disorders, glomerular disease, ESRD/dialysis, and kidney transplantation. Complex cases representing each of these categories, along with single-best-answer questions, were prepared and submitted by the panel of experts. Before the meeting, training program directors of United States nephrology fellowship programs and nephrology fellows answered the questions through an Internet-based questionnaire. During the live session, members of the audience tested their knowledge and judgment on a series of case-oriented questions prepared and discussed by the experts. They compared their answers in real time using their cell phones with a special app with the answers of the nephrology fellows and training program directors. The correct and incorrect answers were then discussed after the results of the questionnaire were displayed. As always, the audience, lecturers, and moderators enjoyed this educational session. This article recapitulates the session and reproduces its educational value for Clinical Journal of the American Society of Nephrology readers. Enjoy the clinical cases and expert discussions.

  10. American Society of Nephrology Quiz and Questionnaire 2015: Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Josephson, Michelle A; Perazella, Mark A; Choi, Michael J

    2016-06-06

    The Nephrology Quiz and Questionnaire remains an extremely popular session for attendees of the Annual Kidney Week Meeting of the American Society of Nephrology. Once again, the conference hall was overflowing with audience members and eager quiz participants. Topics covered by the expert discussants included electrolyte and acid-base disorders, glomerular disease, ESRD/dialysis, and kidney transplantation. Complex cases representing each of these categories along with single best answer questions were prepared and submitted by the panel of experts. Before the meeting, training program directors of US nephrology fellowship programs and nephrology fellows answered the questions through an internet-based questionnaire. During the live session, members of the audience tested their knowledge and judgment on a series of case-oriented questions prepared and discussed by the experts. They compared their answers in real time using their cell phones with a special application with the answers of the nephrology fellows and training program directors. The correct and incorrect answers were then discussed after the results of the questionnaire were displayed. As always, the audience, lecturers, and moderators enjoyed this highly educational session. This article recapitulates the session and reproduces its educational value for the Clinical Journal of the American Society of Nephrology readers. Enjoy the clinical cases and expert discussions.

  11. American Society of Nephrology Quiz and Questionnaire 2014: RRT.

    PubMed

    Mehrotra, Rajnish; Perazella, Mark A; Choi, Michael J

    2015-06-05

    The Nephrology Quiz and Questionnaire (NQ&Q) remains an extremely popular session for attendees of the Annual Kidney Week Meeting of the American Society of Nephrology (ASN). Once again, the conference hall was overflowing with audience members and eager quiz participants. Topics covered by the expert discussants included electrolyte and acid-base disorders, glomerular disease, end-stage renal disease/dialysis, and transplantation. Complex cases representing each of these categories along with single best answer questions were prepared and submitted by the panel of experts. Prior to the meeting, program directors of U.S. nephrology training programs and nephrology fellows answered the questions through an internet-based questionnaire. During the live session, members of the audience tested their knowledge and judgment on a series of case-oriented questions prepared and discussed by experts. They compared their answers in real time using audience response devices with the answers of the nephrology fellows and training program directors (TPDs). The correct and incorrect answers were then discussed after the audience responses and the results of the questionnaire were displayed. As always, the audience, lecturers, and moderators enjoyed this educational session. This article recapitulates the session and reproduces its educational value for the readers of the Clinical Journal of the American Society of Nephrology. Enjoy the clinical cases and expert discussions.

  12. 3. Historic American Buildings Survey Photocopy, National Geographic Society Photograph, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. Historic American Buildings Survey Photocopy, National Geographic Society Photograph, 1971 Courtesy, National Geographic Society LIBRARY, 1971 - Townsend House, 2121 Massachusetts Avenue Northwest, Washington, District of Columbia, DC

  13. American Cancer Society Recommendations for Prostate Cancer Early Detection

    MedlinePlus

    ... Prostate Cancer Prevention and Early Detection American Cancer Society Recommendations for Prostate Cancer Early Detection The American Cancer Society (ACS) recommends that men have a chance to ...

  14. Guidelines for biomarker testing in gastroenteropancreatic neuroendocrine neoplasms: a national consensus of the Spanish Society of Pathology and the Spanish Society of Medical Oncology.

    PubMed

    García-Carbonero, R; Vilardell, F; Jiménez-Fonseca, P; González-Campora, R; González, E; Cuatrecasas, M; Capdevila, J; Aranda, I; Barriuso, J; Matías-Guiu, X

    2014-03-01

    The annual incidence of neuroendocrine tumours in the Caucasian population ranges from 2.5 to 5 new cases per 100,000 inhabitants. Gastroenteropancreatic neuroendocrine tumours is a family of neoplasms widely variable in terms of anatomical location, hormone composition, clinical syndromes they cause and in their biological behaviour. This high complexity and clinical heterogeneity, together with the known difficulty of predicting their behaviour from their pathological features, are reflected in the many classifications that have been developed over the years in this field. This article reviews the main tissue and clinical biomarkers and makes recommendations for their use in medical practice. This document represents a consensus reached jointly by the Spanish Society of Medical Oncology (SEOM) and the Spanish Society of Pathology (SEAP).

  15. [Recommendations of the Infectious Diseases Work Group (GTEI) of the Spanish Society of Intensive and Critical Care Medicine and Coronary Units (SEMICYUC) and the Infections in Critically Ill Patients Study Group (GEIPC) of the Spanish Society of Infectious Diseases and Clinical Microbiology (SEIMC) for the diagnosis and treatment of influenza A/H1N1 in seriously ill adults admitted to the Intensive Care Unit].

    PubMed

    Rodríguez, A; Alvarez-Rocha, L; Sirvent, J M; Zaragoza, R; Nieto, M; Arenzana, A; Luque, P; Socías, L; Martín, M; Navarro, D; Camarena, J; Lorente, L; Trefler, S; Vidaur, L; Solé-Violán, J; Barcenilla, F; Pobo, A; Vallés, J; Ferri, C; Martín-Loeches, I; Díaz, E; López, D; López-Pueyo, M J; Gordo, F; del Nogal, F; Marqués, A; Tormo, S; Fuset, M P; Pérez, F; Bonastre, J; Suberviola, B; Navas, E; León, C

    2012-03-01

    The diagnosis of influenza A/H1N1 is mainly clinical, particularly during peak or seasonal flu outbreaks. A diagnostic test should be performed in all patients with fever and flu symptoms that require hospitalization. The respiratory sample (nasal or pharyngeal exudate or deeper sample in intubated patients) should be obtained as soon as possible, with the immediate start of empirical antiviral treatment. Molecular methods based on nucleic acid amplification techniques (RT-PCR) are the gold standard for the diagnosis of influenza A/H1N1. Immunochromatographic methods have low sensitivity; a negative result therefore does not rule out active infection. Classical culture is slow and has low sensitivity. Direct immunofluorescence offers a sensitivity of 90%, but requires a sample of high quality. Indirect methods for detecting antibodies are only of epidemiological interest. Patients with A/H1N1 flu may have relative leukopenia and elevated serum levels of LDH, CPK and CRP, but none of these variables are independently associated to the prognosis. However, plasma LDH> 1500 IU/L, and the presence of thrombocytopenia <150 x 10(9)/L, could define a patient population at risk of suffering serious complications. Antiviral administration (oseltamivir) should start early (<48 h from the onset of symptoms), with a dose of 75 mg every 12h, and with a duration of at least 7 days or until clinical improvement is observed. Early antiviral administration is associated to improved survival in critically ill patients. New antiviral drugs, especially those formulated for intravenous administration, may be the best choice in future epidemics. Patients with a high suspicion of influenza A/H1N1 infection must continue with antiviral treatment, regardless of the negative results of initial tests, unless an alternative diagnosis can be established or clinical criteria suggest a low probability of influenza. In patients with influenza A/H1N1 pneumonia, empirical antibiotic therapy should

  16. Coevolution of nutrigenomics and society: ethical considerations.

    PubMed

    Korthals, Michiel

    2011-12-01

    To optimize the coevolution of nutrigenomics and society (ie, the reciprocal stimulation of both developments), I analyzed chances for a fruitful match between normative concepts and strategies of both developments. Nutrigenomics embodies ≥ 3 normative concepts. First, food is exclusively interpreted in terms of disease prevention. Second, striving for health is interpreted as the quantification of risks and prevention of diseases through positive food-gene interactions. The third normative idea is that disease prevention by the minimization of risks is an individual's task. My thesis was that these concepts of nutrigenomics would not easily match with concepts of food and health of various food styles in Western societies, which, for instance, parents in the case of metabolic programming endorse and with a philosophical view of the relation between food, health, and the meaning of life. Next, I reflected on the nonsynchronized coevolution of nutrigenomics and society because of this mismatch and introduced the concept of the fair representation of food styles in nutrigenomic developments. To synchronize and optimize the coevolution of nutrigenomics and society, I propose that the research policy of nutrigenomics should change to a research partnership with society on the basis of fair representation.

  17. History of the Society for Invertebrate Pathology.

    PubMed

    Davidson, Elizabeth W; Burges, H Denis

    2005-05-01

    Scientists studying diseases of invertebrates in the USA, Europe, and Asia began to meet at international congresses in the 1950s and early 1960s, and soon recognized that they needed both a society and a journal where their common interests could be discussed and their findings presented. Edward A. Steinhaus played a major role in bringing together scientists from across the globe with common interests in these diseases. As a consequence, the Journal of Invertebrate Pathology (then Journal of Insect Pathology) was initiated in 1959 and Steinhaus became its first editor. Along with Albert Sparks he organized a meeting at Seattle, Washington in 1967 that led to the founding of the Society for Invertebrate Pathology with Steinhaus as its first President. The Society held its first meeting at Ohio State University in 1968, and has continued to meet annually. The Society has instituted a Founder's Lecture series, graduate student awards, and Divisions of Microbial Control, Microsporidia, Bacteriology, Fungi, Viruses, and Nematodes. Members enjoy several social functions at meetings as well as symposia, submitted papers, and poster sessions. The Society for Invertebrate Pathology is a truly international organization which to date has held meetings in 13 countries and 14 US states, usually attended by members from at least 20 countries.

  18. Teaching the Intersection of Climate and Society

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomson, C.; Ting, M.; Orlove, B. S.

    2014-12-01

    As the first program of its kind, the M.A. in Climate and Society at Columbia University educates students on how climate affects society and vice versa. The 12-month interdisciplinary Master's program is designed to allow students from a wide variety of backgrounds to gain knowledge in climate science and a deep understanding of social sciences and how they related to climate. There are currently more than 250 alumni applying their skills in fields including energy, economics, disaster mitigation, journalism and climate research in more than a dozen countries worldwide. The presentation will highlight three key components of the program that have contributed to its growth and helped alumni become brokers that can effectively put climate science in the hands of the public and policymakers for the benefit of society. Those components include working with other academic departments at Columbia to successfully integrate social science classes into the curriculum; the development of the course Applications in Climate and Society to help students make an overt link between climate and its impacts on society; and providing students with hands-on activities with practitioners in climate-related fields.

  19. European Society for Swallowing Disorders – European Union Geriatric Medicine Society white paper: oropharyngeal dysphagia as a geriatric syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Baijens, Laura WJ; Clavé, Pere; Cras, Patrick; Ekberg, Olle; Forster, Alexandre; Kolb, Gerald F; Leners, Jean-Claude; Masiero, Stefano; Mateos-Nozal, Jesús; Ortega, Omar; Smithard, David G; Speyer, Renée; Walshe, Margaret

    2016-01-01

    This position document has been developed by the Dysphagia Working Group, a committee of members from the European Society for Swallowing Disorders and the European Union Geriatric Medicine Society, and invited experts. It consists of 12 sections that cover all aspects of clinical management of oropharyngeal dysphagia (OD) related to geriatric medicine and discusses prevalence, quality of life, and legal and ethical issues, as well as health economics and social burden. OD constitutes impaired or uncomfortable transit of food or liquids from the oral cavity to the esophagus, and it is included in the World Health Organization’s classification of diseases. It can cause severe complications such as malnutrition, dehydration, respiratory infections, aspiration pneumonia, and increased readmissions, institutionalization, and morbimortality. OD is a prevalent and serious problem among all phenotypes of older patients as oropharyngeal swallow response is impaired in older people and can cause aspiration. Despite its prevalence and severity, OD is still underdiagnosed and untreated in many medical centers. There are several validated clinical and instrumental methods (videofluoroscopy and fiberoptic endoscopic evaluation of swallowing) to diagnose OD, and treatment is mainly based on compensatory measures, although new treatments to stimulate the oropharyngeal swallow response are under research. OD matches the definition of a geriatric syndrome as it is highly prevalent among older people, is caused by multiple factors, is associated with several comorbidities and poor prognosis, and needs a multidimensional approach to be treated. OD should be given more importance and attention and thus be included in all standard screening protocols, treated, and regularly monitored to prevent its main complications. More research is needed to develop and standardize new treatments and management protocols for older patients with OD, which is a challenging mission for our societies

  20. European Society for Swallowing Disorders - European Union Geriatric Medicine Society white paper: oropharyngeal dysphagia as a geriatric syndrome.

    PubMed

    Baijens, Laura Wj; Clavé, Pere; Cras, Patrick; Ekberg, Olle; Forster, Alexandre; Kolb, Gerald F; Leners, Jean-Claude; Masiero, Stefano; Mateos-Nozal, Jesús; Ortega, Omar; Smithard, David G; Speyer, Renée; Walshe, Margaret

    2016-01-01

    This position document has been developed by the Dysphagia Working Group, a committee of members from the European Society for Swallowing Disorders and the European Union Geriatric Medicine Society, and invited experts. It consists of 12 sections that cover all aspects of clinical management of oropharyngeal dysphagia (OD) related to geriatric medicine and discusses prevalence, quality of life, and legal and ethical issues, as well as health economics and social burden. OD constitutes impaired or uncomfortable transit of food or liquids from the oral cavity to the esophagus, and it is included in the World Health Organization's classification of diseases. It can cause severe complications such as malnutrition, dehydration, respiratory infections, aspiration pneumonia, and increased readmissions, institutionalization, and morbimortality. OD is a prevalent and serious problem among all phenotypes of older patients as oropharyngeal swallow response is impaired in older people and can cause aspiration. Despite its prevalence and severity, OD is still underdiagnosed and untreated in many medical centers. There are several validated clinical and instrumental methods (videofluoroscopy and fiberoptic endoscopic evaluation of swallowing) to diagnose OD, and treatment is mainly based on compensatory measures, although new treatments to stimulate the oropharyngeal swallow response are under research. OD matches the definition of a geriatric syndrome as it is highly prevalent among older people, is caused by multiple factors, is associated with several comorbidities and poor prognosis, and needs a multidimensional approach to be treated. OD should be given more importance and attention and thus be included in all standard screening protocols, treated, and regularly monitored to prevent its main complications. More research is needed to develop and standardize new treatments and management protocols for older patients with OD, which is a challenging mission for our societies.

  1. How members of the Society for Reproductive Endocrinology and Infertility and Society of Reproductive Surgeons evaluate, define, and manage hydrosalpinges

    PubMed Central

    Omurtag, Kenan; Grindler, Natalia M.; Roehl, Kimberly A.; Bates, Gordon Wright; Beltsos, Angeline N.; Odem, Randall R.; Jungheim, Emily S.

    2013-01-01

    Objective To describe the management of hydrosalpinges among Society for Reproduction Endocrinology and Infertility (SREI)/Society of Reproductive Surgeons (SRS) members. Design Cross-sectional survey of SREI/SRS members. Setting Academic and private practice–based reproductive medicine physicians. Participant(s) A total of 442 SREI and/or SRS members. Intervention(s) Internet-based survey. Main Outcome Measure(s) To understand how respondents evaluate, define, and manage hydrosalpinges. Result(s) Of 1,070 SREI and SRS members surveyed, 442 responded to all items, for a 41% response rate. Respondents represented both academic and private practice settings, and differences existed in the evaluation and management of hydrosalpinges. More than one-half (57%) perform their own hysterosalpingograms (HSGs), and 54.5% involve radiologists in their interpretation of tubal disease. Most respondents thought that a clinically significant hydrosalpinx on HSG is one that is distally occluded (80.4%) or visible on ultrasound (60%). Approximately one in four respondents remove a unilateral hydrosalpinx before controlled ovarian hyperstimulation (COH)/intrauterine insemination (IUI) and clomiphene citrate (CC)/IUI (29.3% and 22.8%, respectively), and physicians in private practice were more likely to intervene (COH: risk ratio [RR] 1.81, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.31–2.51; CC: RR 1.98, 95% CI 1.33–2.95). Although laparoscopic salpingectomy was the preferred method of surgical management, nearly one-half responded that hysteroscopic tubal occlusion should have a role as a primary method of intervention. Conclusion(s) SREI/SRS members define a “clinically significant hydrosalpinx” consistently, and actual practice among members reflects American Society for Reproductive Medicine/SRS recommendations, with variation attributed to individual patient needs. Additionally, one in four members intervene before other infertility treatments when there is a unilateral

  2. Olympic and world sport: making transnational society?

    PubMed

    Giulianotti, Richard; Brownell, Susan

    2012-06-01

    This paper introduces the special issue of the British Journal of Sociology on the subject of the transnational aspects of Olympic and world sport. The special issue is underpinned by the perspective that because sport provides a space for the forging of transnational connections and global consciousness, it is increasingly significant within contemporary processes of globalization and the making of transnational society. In this article, we examine in turn eight social scientific themes or problems that are prominent within the special issue: globalization, glocalization, neo-liberal ideologies and policies, transnational society, securitization, global civil society, transnational/global public sphere, and fantasy/imagination. We conclude by highlighting five 'circles' of future research inquiry within world sport that should be explored by social scientists.

  3. Mineral resources of Peru's ancient societies

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brooks, W.E.

    2003-01-01

    Northern Peru has an exceptionally rich archaeological heritage that includes metalwork, ceramics and textiles. The success of at least a half-dozen pre-Columbian societies dating back 3,000 years and subsequent Spanish colonization in the 1400s has rested on the effective use of northern Peru's abundant resources. In the summer of 2000, my son Matt and I learned about that connection firsthand by volunteering at the Santa Rita B archaeological site in the Chao Valley near Trujillo in northern Peru. Riding donkey-back through the Andes and talking with local people, we got our hands dirty in the rich archaeology and geology of the area. We were able to correlate mineral occurrences to their various roles in society - opening a window into the region's fascinating past. From construction to metallurgy, pre-Columbian societies flourished and advanced because of their understanding and use of the available mineral resources.

  4. 4. The transectional structure of society: the basic societal functions.

    PubMed

    2014-05-01

    For the purposes of research and/or evaluation, a society is organised into 13 basic societal functions (BSFs) within an overall Coordination and Control system. This organisation facilitates transectional descriptions of society or a component of a society for assessment at any given time across the longitudinal phases of a disaster. An assessment results in a picture or description of function(s) limited to the point in time of the assessment. Together with simultaneous assessments of the functional status of all, some, or one of the other BSFs, such assessments deliver a transectional picture of the situation of a society. Since no function operates in isolation from the other functions, information of the concomitant status of several BSFs is crucial to gain a better understanding of functional losses and of the effects and side effects of an intervention. The 13 BSFs include: (1) Public Health (dominantly preventive); (2) Medical Care (dominantly curative); (3) Water and Sanitation; (4) Shelter and Clothing; (5) Food and Nutrition; (6) Energy Supplies; (7) Public Works and Engineering; (8) Social Structure; (9) Logistics And Transportation; (10) Security; (11) Communications; (12); Economy; and (13) Education. These BSFs relate with each other through the Coordination and Control function. Many functions of the BSFs and their respective subfunctions and elements overlap (they share some common subfunctions and elements). However, for the purposes of research/evaluation, it is necessary to assign subfunctions and elements to only one of the BSFs. Just as in the practice of clinical medicine, the sum of assessments provides the transectional description of the status of each of these BSFs at a given time. From this information, compared to the pre-event description of the society, interventions are selected that are likely to meet the defined objectives and their overarching goal(s), and respective plans are developed and implemented. The effects of each

  5. [Medical safety and the Japan Surgical Society].

    PubMed

    Kokudo, Norihiro

    2013-03-01

    Medical safety has been one of the most important issues addressed by the Japan Surgical Society (JSS), and the topic has been discussed at every annual meeting of the JSS since 2004. In 2008, the Medical Safety Committee was established under the JSS. The JSS is one of the principal founding members of the Japan Council for Quality Health Care (JCQHR) and has placed many members on evaluation committees for a majority of malpractice cases. In cooperation with the Japanese Society of Internal Medicine and JCQHR, the JSS is trying to lead the Japanese medical community to create an official third-party organization for medical safety.

  6. Programs organized by the American Nuclear Society`s Public Information Committee

    SciTech Connect

    Swenson, L.; Price, J.; Kerrick, S.

    1994-12-31

    The American Nuclear Society (ANS) has consistently placed significant emphasis on the public communications role of the society. This has been translated into a significant effort in terms of providing teacher training and outreach. The importance of this effort is reflected in the formation of the Public Education Program, which has been chartered to raise funds from members and corporate sources to augment the society`s funding of the public communications program, especially as related to the educational outreach program. The ANS has a lengthy history of teacher training activities. In about 1975 it was realized that public education needed to become a significant focus of the society. This was further refined in 1980 to focus on teacher training, based on requests for assistance that were received at ANS headquarters. The teacher training program has consequently evolved as the top priority of the public communications activities.

  7. Infusing Science, Technology, and Society Into an Elementary Teacher Education Program: The Impact on Preservice Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Henning, Mary Beth; Peterson, Barbara R.; King, Kenneth Paul

    2011-01-01

    In an effort to improve science and social studies instruction, preservice teachers developed original science, technology, and society units to teach in elementary and middle school classrooms during their clinical field experience. Data revealed that the preservice teachers fell into categories of being skeptics, open-minded instructors, or…

  8. The 22nd annual meeting of the European Tissue Repair Society (ETRS) in Athens, Greece

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    The 22nd Annual Meeting of the European Tissue Repair Society, Athens, Greece, October 4 to 5, 2012 informed about pathophysiological mechanisms in tissue repair and on the development of clinical treatments of chronic wounds, fibrosis, and cancer, considering recent advances in molecular biology and biotechnology. PMID:23374673

  9. 46 CFR 8.260 - Revocation of classification society recognition.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Revocation of classification society recognition. 8.260... VESSEL INSPECTION ALTERNATIVES Recognition of a Classification Society § 8.260 Revocation of classification society recognition. A recognized classification society which fails to maintain the...

  10. 46 CFR 8.330 - Termination of classification society authority.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Termination of classification society authority. 8.330... classification society authority. (a) The Coast Guard may terminate an authorization agreement with a classification society if: (1) The Commandant revokes the classification society's recognition, as specified...

  11. 46 CFR 8.220 - Recognition of a classification society.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Recognition of a classification society. 8.220 Section 8... INSPECTION ALTERNATIVES Recognition of a Classification Society § 8.220 Recognition of a classification society. (a) A classification society must be recognized by the Commandant before it may receive...

  12. 46 CFR 42.05-60 - Recognized classification society.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Recognized classification society. 42.05-60 Section 42... society. The term recognized classification society means the American Bureau of Shipping or other classification society recognized by the Commandant, as provided in 46 U.S.C. 5107, and who also may be...

  13. 46 CFR 8.330 - Termination of classification society authority.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Termination of classification society authority. 8.330... classification society authority. (a) The Coast Guard may terminate an authorization agreement with a classification society if: (1) The Commandant revokes the classification society's recognition, as specified...

  14. 46 CFR 8.220 - Recognition of a classification society.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Recognition of a classification society. 8.220 Section 8... INSPECTION ALTERNATIVES Recognition of a Classification Society § 8.220 Recognition of a classification society. (a) A classification society must be recognized by the Commandant before it may receive...

  15. 46 CFR 8.330 - Termination of classification society authority.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Termination of classification society authority. 8.330... classification society authority. (a) The Coast Guard may terminate an authorization agreement with a classification society if: (1) The Commandant revokes the classification society's recognition, as specified...

  16. 46 CFR 8.260 - Revocation of classification society recognition.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Revocation of classification society recognition. 8.260... VESSEL INSPECTION ALTERNATIVES Recognition of a Classification Society § 8.260 Revocation of classification society recognition. A recognized classification society which fails to maintain the...

  17. 46 CFR 8.260 - Revocation of classification society recognition.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Revocation of classification society recognition. 8.260... VESSEL INSPECTION ALTERNATIVES Recognition of a Classification Society § 8.260 Revocation of classification society recognition. A recognized classification society which fails to maintain the...

  18. 46 CFR 90.10-35 - Recognized classification society.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Recognized classification society. 90.10-35 Section 90... classification society. The term recognized classification society means the American Bureau of Shipping or other classification society recognized by the Commandant....

  19. 46 CFR 8.220 - Recognition of a classification society.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Recognition of a classification society. 8.220 Section 8... INSPECTION ALTERNATIVES Recognition of a Classification Society § 8.220 Recognition of a classification society. (a) A classification society must be recognized by the Commandant before it may receive...

  20. 46 CFR 90.10-35 - Recognized classification society.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Recognized classification society. 90.10-35 Section 90... classification society. The term recognized classification society means the American Bureau of Shipping or other classification society recognized by the Commandant....