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Sample records for heel pain calcaneal

  1. [Heel pain and calcaneal spurs].

    PubMed

    Lu, H; Gu, G; Zhu, S

    1996-05-01

    The authors of this paper have reviewed 137 X-ray films of the involved feet and followed up 30 patients all of them suffering from heel pain treated in the authors' hospital during 1980-1985, in order to find out the relationship between the length, shape and the direction of the spurs with the heel pain. We have found: (1) There are no clear relationship between heel pain and the length, shape and the direction of the calcaneal spur. (2) The plantar soft tissue of the painful foot was thickened, indicating the heel pain was due to inflammation in the plantar soft tissue. (3) Heel pain is related to the patient's age and sex. (4) The spurs still exist and grow even bigger after the syndrome disappears.

  2. The relationship of pes planus and calcaneal spur to plantar heel pain.

    PubMed

    Prichasuk, S; Subhadrabandhu, T

    1994-09-01

    A prospective study of pes planus by using calcaneal pitch and calcaneal spur was carried out in 82 patients with plantar heel pain and in 400 normal subjects. The mean normal calcaneal pitch was 20.54 degrees. The mean calcaneal pitch in patients with plantar heel pain was 15.99 degrees, which was significantly lower than in normal subjects. The incidence of calcaneal spur in normal subjects and in patients with plantar heel pain was 15.5% percent (62 of 400) and 65.9% (54 of 82), respectively. Again, this was a highly significant difference. Excessive weight gain, aging, and gender may be important factors effecting the lowering of the pitch and the increasing of spur formation. These factors could lead to the development of plantar heel pain.

  3. Plantar fascia release and calcaneal spur excision for sub-calcaneal heel pain.

    PubMed

    Torudom, Yingyong

    2009-06-01

    Aim of this study was to evaluate the results of open plantar fascia release and calcaneal spur excision in patients with plantar fasciitis. The author studied retrospectively the results in 16 patients who had been treated with open plantar fascia release and calcaneal spur excision from 2002 to 2008. Two patients were men and fourteen were women. Their mean age was 43.3 years (39 to 52). Based on visual analog scale the results were pain free in 12 feet and some pain in four. There are two patients with superficial skin infection which can be manage with local wound care and oral antibiotic. We conclude that open plantar fascia release and calcaneal spur excision can relieve pain in patients who resist conservative treatment.

  4. Heel pain

    MedlinePlus

    Pain - heel ... Heel pain is most often the result of overuse. However, it may be caused by an injury. Your heel ... on the heel Conditions that may cause heel pain include: Swelling and pain in the Achilles tendon ...

  5. Diagnosing heel pain in adults.

    PubMed

    Aldridge, Tracy

    2004-07-15

    Heel pain is a common condition in adults that may cause significant discomfort and disability. A variety of soft tissue, osseous, and systemic disorders can cause heel pain. Narrowing the differential diagnosis begins with a history and physical examination of the lower extremity to pinpoint the anatomic origin of the heel pain. The most common cause of heel pain in adults is plantar fasciitis. Patients with plantar fasciitis report increased heel pain with their first steps in the morning or when they stand up after prolonged sitting. Tenderness at the calcaneal tuberosity usually is apparent on examination and is increased with passive dorsiflexion of the toes. Tendonitis also may cause heel pain. Achilles tendonitis is associated with posterior heel pain. Bursae adjacent to the Achilles tendon insertion may become inflamed and cause pain. Calcaneal stress fractures are more likely to occur in athletes who participate in sports that require running and jumping. Patients with plantar heel pain accompanied by tingling, burning, or numbness may have tarsal tunnel syndrome. Heel pad atrophy may present with diffuse plantar heel pain, especially in patients who are older and obese. Less common causes of heel pain, which should be considered when symptoms are prolonged or unexplained, include osteomyelitis, bony abnormalities (such as calcaneal stress fracture), or tumor. Heel pain rarely is a presenting symptom in patients with systemic illnesses, but the latter may be a factor in persons with bilateral heel pain, pain in other joints, or known inflammatory arthritis conditions.

  6. Diagnosis of heel pain.

    PubMed

    Tu, Priscilla; Bytomski, Jeffrey R

    2011-10-15

    Heel pain is a common presenting symptom in ambulatory clinics. There are many causes, but a mechanical etiology is most common. Location of pain can be a guide to the proper diagnosis. The most common diagnosis is plantar fasciitis, a condition that leads to medial plantar heel pain, especially with the first weight-bearing steps in the morning and after long periods of rest. Other causes of plantar heel pain include calcaneal stress fracture (progressively worsening pain following an increase in activity level or change to a harder walking surface), nerve entrapment (pain accompanied by burning, tingling, or numbness), heel pad syndrome (deep, bruise-like pain in the middle of the heel), neuromas, and plantar warts. Achilles tendinopathy is a common condition that causes posterior heel pain. Other tendinopathies demonstrate pain localized to the insertion site of the affected tendon. Posterior heel pain can also be attributed to a Haglund deformity, a prominence of the calcaneus that may cause bursa inflammation between the calcaneus and Achilles tendon, or to Sever disease, a calcaneal apophysitis in children. Medial midfoot heel pain, particularly with continued weight bearing, may be due to tarsal tunnel syndrome, which is caused by compression of the posterior tibial nerve as it courses through the flexor retinaculum, medial calcaneus, posterior talus, and medial malleolus. Sinus tarsi syndrome occurs in the space between the calcaneus, talus, and talocalcaneonavicular and subtalar joints. The syndrome manifests as lateral midfoot heel pain. Differentiating among causes of heel pain can be accomplished through a patient history and physical examination, with appropriate imaging studies, if indicated.

  7. [Heel pain].

    PubMed

    Cizmár, I; Svizenská, I; Pilný, J; Repko, M; Ira, D

    2005-01-01

    Heel pain is quite frequent clinical symptom in our population. Successful therapy derives from the problem aetiology. The most frequent source of pain is the mechanical basis, both on dorsal and plantar side of calcaneum. Therapy includes a variety of procedures, from routine measures to surgical intervention.

  8. Heel Pain in Recreational Runners.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bazzoli, Allan S.; Pollina, Frank S.

    1989-01-01

    Provides physicians with the signs, symptoms, and management of heel/sole pain in recreational runners (usually due to plantar fasciitis, Achilles tendinitis, and calcaneal stress fractures). Remedies involve palliative treatment of symptoms, correction of underlying biomechanical problems, and flexibility exercises. (SM)

  9. Treatment of Chronic Plantar Heel Pain With Radiofrequency Neural Ablation of the First Branch of the Lateral Plantar Nerve and Medial Calcaneal Nerve Branches.

    PubMed

    Arslan, Aydın; Koca, Tuba Tulay; Utkan, Ali; Sevimli, Resit; Akel, İbrahim

    2016-01-01

    From March 2012 to February 2013, 37 patients experiencing plantar heel pain for ≥6 months despite treatment with physical therapy and other conservative treatment modalities were followed up. If neurogenic heel pain originating from the first branch of the lateral plantar nerve was present, with or without the medial calcaneal nerve, diagnostic nerve blocks to these nerves were performed for confirmation. If the pain was determined to be of neurogenic origin, radiofrequency neural ablation (RFNA) was applied to the corresponding sensory nerve endings. Pain was evaluated using the visual analog scale, and patients were followed for at least one year. A total of 41 feet from 37 patients (30 [81.1%] females, 7 [18.9%] males; mean age, 50.7 ± 1.6 years; mean body mass index, 30.6 ± 0.7 kg/m(2)) were included. The mean visual analog scale scores improved significantly from 1 to 6 to 12 months after the procedure relative to before the procedure, with 88% of all patients rating the treatment as either very successful or successful at 12 months postoperatively. RFNA applied to both the first branch of the lateral plantar nerve and the medial calcaneal nerve sensory branches (16 [39%] feet) and only the first branch of the lateral plantar nerve sensory branches (25 [61%] feet) showed similarly high levels of success. Of the 41 feet, 28 [68.3%] had received extracorporeal shockwave therapy, 35 [85.4%] had received steroid injections, and 22 [53.7%] had received both extracorporeal shockwave therapy and steroid injections before RFNA as an index procedure. All were unresponsive to these previous treatments. In contrast, almost all (88%) were treated successfully with RFNA. Despite a high incidence of neurologic variations, with a precise diagnosis and good application of the technique using the painful points, chronic plantar heel pain can be treated successfully with RFNA.

  10. Retrospective analysis of calcaneal spur removal and complete fascial release for the treatment of chronic heel pain.

    PubMed

    Gormley, J; Kuwada, G T

    1992-01-01

    Doctors Gormley and Kuwada investigate the pathology of chronic heel pain secondary to soft tissue and osseous inflammatory conditions. Pertinent literature review regarding success following fascial release as well as bone spur removal is provided. Ninety-four patients are reported having sustained spur removal with fascia resection according to the authors' technique. They report a 95% success rate postoperatively.

  11. Black heel, talon noir or calcaneal petechiae?

    PubMed

    Urbina, Francisco; León, Lorena; Sudy, Emilio

    2008-08-01

    We describe a series of six patients with superficial cutaneous haemorrhages of the feet, including a classical case of black heel (talon noir) and other similar cases with diverse clinical presentations that do not match the typical description of that process. The main differences lay in production mechanism, morphology and location. The causes of these 'atypical' lesions were: burns with hot sand, friction against the rough edge of a swimming pool, wearing new shoes, jogging, or pricking a blister with a needle. Clinically, they consisted of isolated or multiple, small, large or linear, brown or black lesions located in areas that did not include the convex part of the heel, in which talon noir usually appears; on the contrary, the lesions affected the back third of the soles, the toes, periungual fold and plantar arch. As the presence of blood in the horny layer was a common final factor in all these cases, a better name for this process would be 'post-traumatic cutaneous intracorneal blood' to describe black heel and its diverse clinical presentations.

  12. Plantar heel pain.

    PubMed

    Rosenbaum, Andrew J; DiPreta, John A; Misener, David

    2014-03-01

    Plantar heel pain is a common complaint encountered by orthopedic surgeons, internists, and family practitioners. Although it is most often caused by plantar fasciitis, this is a diagnosis of exclusion. Other mechanical, rheumatologic, and neurologic causes must be considered first. The history and physical examination are typically all that is needed to make the proper diagnosis, but diagnostic adjuncts are available to assist the clinician. When plantar fasciitis is diagnosed, conservative modalities must be tried first. Corticosteroid injections and extracorporeal shock-wave therapy may also be used. After 6 months of failed conservative treatments, surgical intervention should be considered.

  13. Heel Pain in the Athlete

    PubMed Central

    Hunt, Kenneth John; Anderson, Robert B.

    2009-01-01

    Context: Heel pain, a relatively common problem in the athlete, can present a diagnostic and therapeutic dilemma. The purpose of this article is to review treatment techniques for common causes of heel pain in the athlete. Evidence Acquisition: Articles in the English literature through August 2008 were selected and reviewed in the context of the management of heel pain in the athlete. Clinical and surgical photographs are presented as an illustration of preferred techniques and pertinent pathologic findings. Results: Although nonoperative treatment remains the mainstay for most painful heel pathologies, a number of surgical interventions have shown encouraging results in carefully selected patients. Conclusions: The management of heel pain in the athlete requires diagnostic skill, appropriate imaging evaluation, and a careful, initially conservative approach to treatment. Surgical treatment can be successful in carefully selected patients. PMID:23015903

  14. Diagnosis of hyperostosis of the medial calcaneal tubercle similar to a heel spur.

    PubMed

    Altan, Egemen; Senaran, Hakan; Can, Nuray; Aydin, Bahattin Kerem; Erkocak, Omer Faruk

    2013-01-01

    Calcaneal osteochondromas are rare conditions. To our knowledge, we present the first report of a calcaneal osteochondroma in an adolescent patient that was surprisingly similar to a heel spur, and, in addition, symptoms due to compression of the medial plantar nerve were present.

  15. A review of plantar heel pain of neural origin: differential diagnosis and management.

    PubMed

    Alshami, Ali M; Souvlis, Tina; Coppieters, Michel W

    2008-05-01

    Plantar heel pain is a symptom commonly encountered by clinicians. Several conditions such as plantar fasciitis, calcaneal fracture, rupture of the plantar fascia and atrophy of the heel fat pad may lead to plantar heel pain. Injury to the tibial nerve and its branches in the tarsal tunnel and in the foot is also a common cause. Entrapment of these nerves may play a role in both the early phases of plantar heel pain and recalcitrant cases. Although the contribution of nerve entrapment to plantar heel pain has been well documented in the literature, its pathophysiology, diagnosis and management are still controversial. Therefore, the purpose of this article was to critically review the available literature on plantar heel pain of neural origin. Possible sites of nerve entrapment, effectiveness of diagnostic clinical tests and electrodiagnostic tests, differential diagnoses for plantar heel pain, and conservative and surgical treatment will be discussed.

  16. Painful heel: MR imaging findings.

    PubMed

    Narváez, J A; Narváez, J; Ortega, R; Aguilera, C; Sánchez, A; Andía, E

    2000-01-01

    Heel pain is a common and frequently disabling clinical complaint that may be caused by a broad spectrum of osseous or soft-tissue disorders. These disorders are classified on the basis of anatomic origin and predominant location of heel pain to foster a better understanding of this complaint. The disorders include plantar fascial lesions (fasciitis, rupture, fibromatosis, xanthoma), tendinous lesions (tendinitis, tenosynovitis), osseous lesions (fractures, bone bruises, osteomyelitis, tumors), bursal lesions (retrocalcaneal bursitis, retroachilleal bursitis), tarsal tunnel syndrome, and heel plantar fat pad abnormalities. With its superior soft-tissue contrast resolution and multiplanar capability, magnetic resonance (MR) imaging can help determine the cause of heel pain and help assess the extent and severity of the disease in ambiguous or clinically equivocal cases. Careful analysis of MR imaging findings and correlation of these findings with patient history and findings at physical examination can suggest a specific diagnosis in most cases. The majority of patients with heel pain can be successfully treated conservatively, but in cases requiring surgery (eg, plantar fascia rupture in competitive athletes, deeply infiltrating plantar fibromatosis, masses causing tarsal tunnel syndrome), MR imaging is especially useful in planning surgical treatment by showing the exact location and extent of the lesion.

  17. Gastrocnemius shortening and heel pain.

    PubMed

    Solan, Matthew C; Carne, Andrew; Davies, Mark S

    2014-12-01

    Pain and reduced function caused by disorders of either the plantar fascia or the Achilles tendon are common. Although heel pain is not a major public health problem it affects millions of people each year. For most patients, time and first-line treatments allow symptoms to resolve. A proportion of patients have resistant symptoms. Managing these recalcitrant cases is a challenge. Gastrocnemius contracture produces increased strain in both the Achilles tendon and the plantar fascia. This biomechanical feature must be properly assessed otherwise treatment is compromised.

  18. Calcaneal stress fractures.

    PubMed

    Weber, Jason M; Vidt, Louis G; Gehl, Richard S; Montgomery, Travis

    2005-01-01

    The majority of plantar heel pain is diagnosed as plantar fasciitis or heel spur syndrome. When historic or physical findings are unusual or when routine treatment proves ineffective, one should consider an atypical cause of heel pain. Stress fractures of the calcaneus are a frequently unrecognized source of heel pain. In some cases they can continue to go unrecognized because the symptoms of calcaneal stress fractures sometimes improves with treatments aimed at plantar fasciitis. Calcaneal stress fractures can occur in any population of adults and even children and are common among active people, such as athletes, sports enthusiasts, and military personnel. It is likely that the number of diagnosed calcaneal stress fractures will rise among practitioners with an increased recognition of their possibility.

  19. The Haglund painful heel syndrome. Experimental investigation of cause and therapeutic implications.

    PubMed

    Heneghan, M A; Pavlov, H

    1984-01-01

    Haglund syndrome, a common cause of pain in the posterior heel, consists of a painful swelling of the local soft tissues (the so-called pump bump) and prominence of the calcaneal bursal projection. The condition is caused by compression of the distal Achilles tendon and surrounding soft tissue between the os calcis and the posterior shoe counter. Osseous plantar projections appear to be a critical etiologic factor in Haglund syndrome. With an experimental model, it has been demonstrated that osseous projections on the plantar surface of the calcaneus adversely influence the bone-soft tissue relation of the posterior heel. Shoe heel elevation has been shown to be clinically effective in alleviating symptoms. It is demonstrated with an experimental model that elevation of the shoe heel decreases the pitch angle. This diminishes the prominence of the bursal projection and allows the foot to slip forward, displacing the posterior calcaneus away from the shoe counter.

  20. Heel pain-plantar fasciitis and Achilles enthesopathy.

    PubMed

    Williams, Seth K; Brage, Michael

    2004-01-01

    Plantar fasciitis and Achilles enthesopathy are two of the most common causes of posterior heel pain. In the vast majority of cases, nonsurgical treatment methods are effective. In recalcitrant cases, surgery has been shown to be generally effective. There are a variety of described techniques for both conditions. Endoscopic treatment of plantar fasciitis leads to slightly enhanced recovery times compared with the traditional open release, but in the long term the results seem to be equivalent. Open debridement of the retrocalcaneal bursa, calcaneal osteophyte, and diseased tendon is the underlying principle behind surgical treatment of Achilles enthesopathy. This can be performed through a variety of approaches, and augmentation with suture anchors, tendon transfers, or allograft may be necessary when more than 50% of the tendon is excised.

  1. Partial Heel Pad Avulsion with Open Calcaneal Tuberosity Fracture with Tendo-achilles Rupture: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, Shameem; Ifthekar, Syed; Ahmed Khan, R Pathan Rameez; Ranjan, Rahul

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: The management of heel pad avulsion injuries has been challenging because of the precarious blood supply. The difficulties get compounded when it is associated with tendo-achilles rupture and calcaneal fracture. Here, it is a description of a case with the above features managed with a unique technique. Case Report: A 63-year-old woman presented to casualty with injury to right ankle after a road traffic accident. On clinical and radiological examination, there was avulsion of heel pad with calcaneal tuberosity fracture and tendo-achilles rupture. It was managed with debridement of the wound, repair of tendo-achilles, and fixation of calcaneal tuberosity and heel pad. The functional outcome was assessed in terms of the ability of the patient to return to painless barefoot weight bearing. The uniqueness of this method is the combined use of suture material (Ethibond) and stainless steel (cannulated cancellous screws [CCS]), by tying the Ethibond from tendo-achilles to the head of CCS rather than bone. When the CCS were tightened, two things were achieved; one being the reduction of the fracture and the second to bring a good apposition of tendo-achilles with the calcaneum. As this method worked on tension band principle and Ethibond was used instead of stainless steel wire, if no objections, this technique can be called as “soft tension band technique.” Conclusion: This case report illustrates a method of preserving heel pad when it is viable along with definitive treatment of associated soft tissue and bony injuries by a simple technique. This method has described the fixation of open fracture of calcaneal tuberosity with tendo-achilles rupture with heel pad avulsion in one sitting with excellent clinical results. PMID:27299125

  2. Neuromas of the calcaneal nerves.

    PubMed

    Kim, J; Dellon, A L

    2001-11-01

    A neuroma of a calcaneal nerve has never been reported. A series of 15 patients with heel pain due to a neuroma of a calcaneal nerve are reviewed. These patients previously had either a plantar fasciotomy (n = 4), calcaneal spur removal (n = 2), ankle fusion (n = 2), or tarsal tunnel decompression (n = 7). Neuromas occurred on calcaneal branches that arose from either the posterior tibial nerve (n = 1), lateral plantar nerve (n = 1), the medial plantar nerve (n = 9), or more than one of these nerves (n = 4). Operative approach was through an extended tarsal tunnel incision to permit identification of all calcaneal nerves. The neuroma was resected and implanted into the flexor hallucis longus muscle. Excellent relief of pain occurred in 60%, and good relief in 33%. One patient (17%) had no improvement and required resection of the lateral plantar nerve. Awareness that the heel may be innervated by multiple calcaneal branches suggests that surgery for heel pain of neural origin employ a surgical approach that permits identification of all possible calcaneal branches.

  3. “Effectiveness of interventions in reducing pain and maintaining physical activity in children and adolescents with calcaneal apophysitis (Sever’s disease): a systematic review”

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Calcaneal apophysitis, also commonly known as sever’s disease, is a condition seen in children usually aged between 8–15 years. Conservative therapies, such as taping, heel lifts and orthotic intervention are accepted management practices for calcaneal apophysitis, though there is very little high quality research examining the efficacy of such treatment modalities. Previous narrative literature reviews and opinion pieces provide some evidence for the use of heel raises or orthoses. The aim of this manuscript was to complete a systemic review on the treatment options for calcaneal apophysitis as measured by pain reduction and maintenance of physical activity. Methods A search strategy completed by two reviewers examined nine databases from inception to May 2012. Search terms included heel pain, children, adolescent, calcaneal apophysitis, sever’s disease, treatment, and management (full text publications, human studies). Systematic reviews, randomised control trials, case series, and case studies were included. The reference lists of the selected articles were also examined. The methodology, quality and risk of bias was examined and assessed using the PEDro scale. Results Nine articles were retrieved including three clinical trials involving randomisation, two case series, two retrospective case reviews, and two case reports. Effect size calculations and a meta analysis were unable to be completed due to the limited data reported within the literature. Numerous treatment options were reported throughout the literature, though few were examined against a control or alternate treatment option in well-designed trials. The limited evidence indicated that orthoses provided greater short-term pain relief than heel raises. Health practitioners should view these results with caution, as there were apparent methodological problems with the employed study design and limited follow-up of participants. Conclusion There is limited evidence to support the use

  4. Combination of diagnostic medial calcaneal nerve block followed by pulsed radiofrequency for plantar fascitis pain: A new modality.

    PubMed

    Thapa, Deepak; Ahuja, Vanita

    2014-03-01

    Plantar fasciitis (PF) is the most common cause of chronic heel pain which may be bilateral in 20 to 30% of patients. It is a very painful and disabling condition which can affect the quality of life. The management includes both pharmacological and operative procedures with no single proven effective treatment modality. In the present case series, we managed three patients with PF (one with bilateral PF). Following a diagnostic medial calcaneal nerve (MCN) block at its origin, we observed reduction in verbal numerical rating scale (VNRS) in all the three patients. Two patients has relapse of PF pain which was managed with MCN block followed with pulsed radio frequency (PRF). All the patients were pain-free at the time of reporting. This case series highlights the possible role of combination of diagnostic MCN block near its origin followed with PRF as a new modality in management of patients with PF.

  5. Heel pain and Achilles tendonitis -- aftercare

    MedlinePlus

    ... walking or standing on your foot References Achilles Tendinitis. In: Safran MR, Zachazewski J, Stone DA, eds. ... Related MedlinePlus Health Topics Heel Injuries and Disorders Tendinitis Browse the Encyclopedia A.D.A.M., Inc. ...

  6. Bilateral calcaneal stress fractures: a case report.

    PubMed

    Imerci, Ahmet; Incesu, Mustafa; Bozoglan, Muhammet; Canbek, Umut; Ursavas, Hüseyin Tamer

    2012-01-01

    The majority of plantar heel pain is diagnosed as plantar fasciitis or heel spur syndrome. When history or physical findings are unusual or when routine treatment proves ineffective, one should consider an atypical cause of heel pain. Stress fractures of the calcaneus are a frequently unrecognized source of heel pain. In a normal populatıon, the possibility of calcaneal stress fractures must be borne in mind with patients who have bilateral heel pain. When a stress fracture is considered, clinicans have different imaging options. First of all, x-rays must be used to evaluate for any visible osseous pathology. If plain films are inconclusive, the clinician can proceed with a bone scan or Magnetic Resonance Imaging. In the literature, calcaneal stress fractures are mostly reported in soldiers or athletes, but our case is one of a 44-year-old housewife with bilateral heel pain treated as Achilles tendinitis and plantar faciitis for a long time. Her final diagnosis was bilateral calcaneal fracture by Magnetic Resonance Imaging.

  7. Aspects of treatment for posterior heel pain in young athletes

    PubMed Central

    Elengard, Thomas; Karlsson, Jón; Silbernagel, Karin Grävare

    2010-01-01

    Posterior heel pain occurs in young athletes involved in running and jumping. Due to the pain, the child often limits his/her physical activity level, with a possible negative effect on health and well-being. Although numerous research studies have examined the cause and treatment of heel and Achilles tendon pain in adults, there are no randomized clinical trials on treatment in children and adolescents. Therefore, there is limited evidence for how to treat young athletes with this type of complaint. The purpose of this review was to analyze critically and summarize the literature in regards to the cause and treatment of posterior heel pain in young athletes. The various diagnoses and clinical presentations relating to posterior heel and Achilles tendon pain are discussed. The theory and mechanism behind various recommended treatment strategies are also reviewed in the context of use in the young athlete. In summary, it is important to perform a thorough evaluation of each young athlete with heel pain to determine the appropriate diagnosis and to treat the deficits found and allow for a gradual progression to training. However, the recommendations at this time are based on clinical experience and a few retrospective studies, so further well designed prospective studies with validated outcome measures are urgently needed for the young athlete. PMID:24198561

  8. Retained viable plant material in the calcaneus: a case report of a 22-year-old soldier with atypical heel pain.

    PubMed

    Jones, Marc D; Sweet, Kerry J; Hoffer, Zachary S

    2015-01-01

    Foreign bodies can be difficult to diagnose and should be considered in the differential diagnosis of unexplained pain, even in the absence of recalled trauma. We present the case of a 22-year-old male with a painful left heel. The patient did not recall a specific traumatic incident, and there were no clinical signs of trauma or infection. Plain films of the foot were nonrevealing, but magnetic resonance imaging revealed a sinus tract and left calcaneal defect. A biopsy of the calcaneal defect revealed viable woody material embedded and partially integrated with the surrounding bone. Postoperatively the patient's pain completely resolved. This case illustrates the importance of radiopathologic pursuit of an etiology of unexplained foot pain in an otherwise healthy person.

  9. Classification of Calcaneal Spurs and Their Relationship With Plantar Fasciitis.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Binghua; Zhou, You; Tao, Xu; Yuan, Chengsong; Tang, Kanglai

    2015-01-01

    Calcaneal spurs, as a cause of plantar fasciitis, are currently debatable. A prospective study was performed to classify calcaneal spurs according to the findings from an investigation of the relationship between calcaneal spurs and plantar fasciitis. Thirty patients with calcaneal spurs and plantar heel pain underwent calcaneal spur removal and endoscopic plantar fasciotomy. The relationship between the classification of calcaneal spurs and plantar fasciitis was evaluated by endoscopic findings, clinical symptoms, radiographic images, and biopsy findings. The visual analog scale for pain and the American Orthopedic Foot and Ankle Society ankle-hindfoot scores for functional evaluation were used preoperatively and postoperatively, respectively. The mean follow-up period was 24 months. Two separate types of calcaneal spurs were recognized. Type A calcaneal spurs were located superior to the plantar fascia insertion, and type B calcaneal spurs were located within the plantar fascia. Magnetic resonance imaging results showed a more severe plantar fasciitis grade in type B calcaneal spurs preoperatively. Histologic examination showed that the numbers of granulocytes per image in type B spurs were significantly increased compared with those in type A spurs. Statistically significant improvements were found in the mean visual analog scale and American Orthopedic Foot and Ankle Society scores and magnetic resonance imaging results in both groups. The amount of change in the visual analog scale score and American Orthopedic Foot and Ankle Society score, the number of granulocytes per image, and calcaneal spur length showed a high association with the classification of the calcaneal spurs. Calcaneal spurs were completely removed and did not recur in any of the patients on radiographic assessment during the follow-up period. Calcaneal spurs can be classified into 2 distinct types that are indicative of the severity of plantar fasciitis.

  10. A study of calcaneal enthesophytes (spurs) in Indian population

    PubMed Central

    Kullar, Jagdev Singh; Randhawa, Gurpreet Kaur; Kullar, Keerat Kaur

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Calcaneus or os calcis forms a major component of the skeleton of foot providing posterior pillars for bony arches of the foot. It is largest of seven tarsal bones of foot and forms prominence of heel. Many times anterior to calcaneal tuberosity an osteophytic outgrowth has been observed (calcaneal or heel spur) extending along entire width, for about 2-2.5 cm. The apex of spur seen embedded in plantar fascia, directly anterior to its origin. Hence, the study of calcaneal spurs has been undertaken. Materials and Methods: The material for the study consisted of 200 dry (100 right and 100 left), adult calcanei of unknown age and sex obtained from Department of Anatomy. The calcaneal enthesophytes/spurs were studied in detail and classified according to types of calcaneum. Results: Maximum incidence of calcaneal spurs were found in Type I calcanei (11%) and no calcaneal spurs were found in Type III calcanei. Total incidence of dorsal calcaneal spurs in all types of calcanei was maximal (15.5%). The incidence of plantar spurs was 6.5% being highest in Type I calcanei (4%). The incidence and type of calcaneal spurs were compared with those of previous studies and etiology of heel pain has been discussed. Correlation between type of calcanei and spurs has been studied for the 1st time. Conclusion: Calcaneal spurs are related to type of calcanei with the highest frequency in Type I and least in Type III (no spurs seen in Type III and least in Type IV). Other factors, which contribute toward increase in incidence of spurs, are increasing age and weight, concurrent orthopedic diseases, and heel pain. PMID:25298934

  11. Heel Spur and Acupuncture: Does it Work?

    PubMed

    Sahin, A E; Cayir, Y; Imerci, A; Uzkeser, H; Akcay, F

    2015-11-11

    Heel spur is also known as a result of plantar calcaneal bone spur which is a common complaint associated with pain at heel. Heel spur is more common in females. Anti-inflammatory drugs, local steroid injections, physical therapy, low-dose radiotherapy and shock wave therapy are the commonly used treatment choices. There is no evidence that acupuncture is an effective method for heel spur in the literature. However, we know that acupuncture can be used for many orthopaedic diseases like frozen shoulder, tennis elbow, sciatic pain, joint sprains, several forms of bursitis and arthritis. In this case, we aimed to demonstrate whether acupuncture is effective in a patient with heel spur. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first case in which only acupuncture is used alone for treatment of heel spur up-to-date in the literature.

  12. Efficacy of a single-formula acupuncture treatment for horses with palmar heel pain

    PubMed Central

    Robinson, Katherine A.; Manning, Stephen T.

    2015-01-01

    Acupuncture is used without strong scientific evidence to treat many diseases of the horse, including palmar heel pain. Research is needed to provide evidence for the application of these treatments. Within the confines of our study, acupuncture did not reliably modulate palmar heel pain in horses. PMID:26663921

  13. Synovitis of the Tarsal Canal: An Uncommon Cause of Lateral Heel Pain After Triple Arthrodesis.

    PubMed

    Lui, Tun Hing

    Lateral heel pain after triple arthrodesis can have numerous causes, including nonunion of the fusion site, hindfoot malalignment, degenerative arthritis in adjacent joints, and deep infection. We present a case of lateral heel pain after triple arthrodesis due to synovitis of the tarsal canal that was successfully treated with anterior subtalar arthroscopy.

  14. Heel pain due to psoriatic arthritis in a 50 year old recreational male athlete: case report

    PubMed Central

    Yedon, Dominique Forand; Howitt, Scott

    2011-01-01

    Heel pain is a common presentation in a sports injury practice, with a list of common differentials including achilles tendinopathy and retrocalcaneal bursitis. However, seronegative arthritis can also cause enthesopathies that produce heel pain and should be considered in a differential diagnosis list. In this case, a 50 year old recreationally active male presented with non-traumatic insidious heel pain and without history of any skin conditions or any other symptoms of seronegative spondyloarthritis. Clinical suspicion led to laboratory testing and radiographs/bone scan which yielded the diagnosis of psoriatic arthritis. PMID:22131565

  15. Effect of Monophasic Pulsed Current on Heel Pain and Functional Activities caused by Plantar Fasciitis

    PubMed Central

    Alotaibi, Abdullah K.; Petrofsky, Jerrold S.; Daher, Noha S.; Lohman, Everett; Laymon, Michael; Syed, Hasan M.

    2015-01-01

    Background Plantar fasciitis (PF) is a soft tissue disorder considered to be one of the most common causes of inferior heel pain. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of monophasic pulsed current (MPC) and MPC coupled with plantar fascia-specific stretching exercises (SE) on the treatment of PF. Material/Methods Forty-four participants (22 women and 22 men, with a mean age of 49 years) diagnosed with PF were randomly assigned to receive MPC (n=22) or MPC coupled with plantar fascia-specific SE (n=22). Prior to and after 4 weeks of treatment, participants underwent baseline evaluation; heel pain was evaluated using a visual analogue scale (VAS), heel tenderness threshold was quantified using a handheld pressure algometer (PA), and functional activities level was assessed using the Activities of Daily Living subscale of the Foot and Ankle Ability Measure (ADL/FAAM). Results Heel pain scores showed a significant reduction in both groups compared to baseline VAS scores (P<0.001). Heel tenderness improved significantly in both groups compared with baseline PA scores (P<0.001). Functional activity level improved significantly in both groups compared with baseline (ADL/FAAM) scores (P<0.001). However, no significant differences existed between the 2 treatment groups in all post-intervention outcome measures. Conclusions This trial showed that MPC is useful in treating inferior heel symptoms caused by PF. PMID:25791231

  16. The use of low-energy radial shockwave in the treatment of entrapment neuropathy of the medial calcaneal nerve: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Barrett, Stephen L; Reese, Matthew M; Tassone, John; Buitrago, Maria

    2008-08-01

    Medial calcaneal nerve entrapment is a well-recognized cause of heel pain. In addition, the development of an amputation neuroma of the medial calcaneal nerve from prior heel surgery via an open incision on the medial aspect of the heel is a serious common postoperative complication and can be extremely difficult to treat. This preliminary pilot study demonstrates that the use of low-energy extracorporeal shockwave is safe and efficacious in the treatment of this disorder without the morbidity associated with denervation surgery, which would be one of the most common methods to treat this complicated situation. Four patients, 2 with bilateral affectation, for a total of 6 medial calcaneal nerves, had a series of treatments with low-energy radial shockwave with the Swiss DolorClast machine. All 4 patients had improvement in their pain scores, to the point that none elected surgical treatment, and there were no complications.

  17. Diagnosis and treatment of heel pain in chronic inflammatory arthritis using ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Cunnane, G; Brophy, D P; Gibney, R G; FitzGerald, O

    1996-06-01

    The authors examined the role of ultrasound (US) in diagnosis and management of heel pain in chronic inflammatory arthritis. Nineteen patients underwent US examination. Eight patients (2 with previously unsuccessful nonguided injections), had 11 US-guided corticosteroid injections for treatment of retrocalcaneal bursitis (n = 6), plantar fasciitis (n = 3), and posterior tibial tenosynovitis (n = 2). US-demonstrated Achilles tendon rupture (n = 2), Achilles tendinitis (n = 8), posterior tibial tenosynovitis (n = 6), peroneus longus tenosynovitis (n = 2), retrocalcaneal bursitis (n = 13), and plantar fasciitis (n = 4). Loss of smooth bone contour (n = 13) correlated with bone erosions on plain radiographs in all but one case. Ten of 11 guided injections resulted in full resolution of heel pain. The diverse causes of heel pain are highlighted, and the ability of US to provide information with management implications is confirmed. US-guided corticosteroid injection is beneficial, especially after failure of nonguided injection.

  18. Endoscopic treatment of calcaneal spur syndrome: A comprehensive technique.

    PubMed

    Blanco, C E; Leon, H O; Guthrie, T B

    2001-05-01

    We describe a comprehensive approach to the endoscopic treatment of calcaneal spur syndrome developed by the Arthroscopic Group of the Orthopedic Service of Hospital Hermanos Ameijeiras in Havana, Cuba. The surgical technique involves treatment of the heel spur and plantar fasciitis commonly found in calcaneal spur syndrome, but it also addresses adjacent calcaneal periostitis and allows decompression of the nerve to the abductor digiti quinti. Medial endoscopy and lateral instrumentation are used in a sequential approach with exposure and debridement of the posterior roof of the calcaneal arch, followed by removal of the calcaneal spur, lateral to medial release of the medial 75% of the plantar fascia, and if necessary, debridement of the calcaneal tuberosity periosteum. This technique was used in a prospective case series from June 1997 to May 1998 to treat a select group of 38 feet in 30 patients who reported unacceptable levels of pain despite 5 months of conservative treatment, which included an aggressive 8-week physical therapy program prescribed by the treating physician. Good to excellent results were obtained at 3 months postoperatively in all patients with regard to pain relief and return to normal activity, although 5 patients required a short course of physical therapy to resolve symptoms brought on by sports, trauma, or impact loading before 1-year follow-up, at which time all patients reported good to excellent results. Complications included 3 superficial wound infections cured by oral antibiotics and 2 transient lateral paresthesias that resolved with rest and nonsteroidal inflammatory medications. The described technique may provide a useful method for treating refractory heel spur syndrome and warrants further study.

  19. [Arthroscopic treatment for calcaneal spur syndrome].

    PubMed

    Stropek, S; Dvorák, M

    2008-10-01

    PURPOSE OF THE STUDY Arthroscopic treatment of calcaneal spur syndrome is a tissue-sparing and effective approach when conservative therapy has failed. This method, its results and our experience with the treatment of this syndrome are presented here. MATERIAL Between January 2003 and November 2007, 26 patients underwent an arthroscopic procedure for calcaneal spur syndrome; of these, 20 were women with an average age of 49 years, and six were men with an average age of 45 years. Four, three women and one man, were lost to follow-up, therefore 22 patients with 24 heels were eventually evaluated. All had conservative therapy for 3 to 6 monts. METHODS The arthroscopic method used was developed by the arthroscopic group of the Orthopaedic Service of Hospital Hermanos Ameijeiras in Havana, Cuba. The surgical technique insolves treatment of the spur and plantar fasciitis commonly found in calcaneal spur syndrome, but it also addresses adjacent calcaneal periostitis. RESULTS The results were evaluated on the scale that is part of the foot function index developed by Budiman-Mak for measuring rheumatoid arthritis pain. The patients were asked mine questions on pain intensity during various activities before and after surgery. Pain was evaluated on a scale with grades from 0 to 9. The average value was 5.9 before surgery and 1.4 after surgery. A 0-1 pain range was reported by 25 %, 1-2 by 26 % and 2-4 by 22 % of the patients. All patients reported improvement. DISCUSSION The orthopaedic group in Havana led by Carlos achieved 85 % excellent outcomes (pain range, 0-2) at one-year followup; this was 79 % in our study, in which no problems with foot arches or wound infection were recorded. CONCLUSIONS The heel spur syndrome is a result of an inflamed ligament (plantar fascia) due to repeated microtrauma. It is not a traction osteophyte,but a reaction of the tissue where it attaches to the calcaneus. Adjacent calcaneal periostitis is usually present as well. Therefore, this

  20. [High energy shock wave treatment of the painful heel spur].

    PubMed

    Perlick, L; Boxberg, W; Giebel, G

    1998-12-01

    Extracorporal shock wave application (ESWA) has been used in the treatment of stones located in kidneys, bile, pancreas and the glandula parotis. In the last 2 years several studies have shown the benefit of the ESWA on the treatment of soft tissue disorders. The aim of this study was to explore the effect of high energy extracorporal shock waves in patients with painful calcaneus spurs. 83 patients who underwent medicophysical treatment without benefit were treated with 3000 impulses of 0.30 mj/mm2. Follow-ups after 12 weeks and 12 months showed that 51 of 83 patients became pain-free and 20 patients improved from the treatment. The results are showing the benefit of the high energy extracorporal shock wave application in the treatment of chronic plantar fasciitis.

  1. Heel pain and HIV-associated lipodystrophy: a report of two cases

    PubMed Central

    Stupar, Maja; Tibbles, Anthony

    2008-01-01

    Plantar fasciitis is diagnosed based on a pathognomonic clinical presentation and physical examination including plantar heel pain with the initial few steps after a period of inactivity. People living with HIV/AIDS, who are taking anti-retroviral medications, often have an associated redistribution of body fat (lipodystrophy). Lipoatrophy of the extremities may involve the heel fat-pad in this population and result in the signs and symptoms of plantar fasciitis. Two cases of plantar heel pain in HIV-associated lipodystrophy are presented to discuss the possible clinical association between the two conditions. Although conservative therapies have limited evidence, they are commonly used and have been seen, clinically, to result in a resolution of symptoms. In the presented cases, the individuals benefited from soft tissue therapy, modalities, activity modification and education on proper footwear. Clinicians should be aware that the association between these two conditions may be a significant cause of morbidity in a population of patients with HIV. PMID:18516231

  2. Plantar fasciitis/calcaneal spur among security forces personnel.

    PubMed

    Sadat-Ali, M

    1998-01-01

    A prospective single survey was conducted among Security Forces personnel at the Mobile Hospital, Ministry of Interior, Makkah Al-Mukarramah, Saudi Arabia. One hundred three patients presented to the orthopedic clinic with painful heel. A control group of patients from the other clinics without painful heel was also screened. The average age was 38.81 years and 38.1 years in the patient and the control group, respectively. The mean Quetelet index of body mass in the patient group was 30.36 kg/m2 and in the control group it was 26.71 kg/m2. There was a statistically significant difference of p < 0.05 between the two groups for Quetelet index of body mass. The right side was affected in 37 patients, the left side was involved in 45 patients, and 21 patients had pain bilaterally. Seventy-one patients had spur on the calcaneum. The prevalence of painful heel attributable to plantar fasciitis/calcaneum spur was 1.18%. This study suggests that obesity is a cause and initiator of heel pain and plantar fasciitis/calcaneal spur and that improper footwear aggravates the condition.

  3. Effectiveness of trigger point dry needling for plantar heel pain: study protocol for a randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Plantar heel pain (plantar fasciitis) is a common and disabling condition, which has a detrimental impact on health-related quality of life. Despite the high prevalence of plantar heel pain, the optimal treatment for this disorder remains unclear. Consequently, an alternative therapy such as dry needling is increasingly being used as an adjunctive treatment by health practitioners. Only two trials have investigated the effectiveness of dry needling for plantar heel pain, however both trials were of a low methodological quality. This manuscript describes the design of a randomised controlled trial to evaluate the effectiveness of dry needling for plantar heel pain. Methods Eighty community-dwelling men and woman aged over 18 years with plantar heel pain (who satisfy the inclusion and exclusion criteria) will be recruited. Eligible participants with plantar heel pain will be randomised to receive either one of two interventions, (i) real dry needling or (ii) sham dry needling. The protocol (including needling details and treatment regimen) was formulated by general consensus (using the Delphi research method) using 30 experts worldwide that commonly use dry needling for plantar heel pain. Primary outcome measures will be the pain subscale of the Foot Health Status Questionnaire and "first step" pain as measured on a visual analogue scale. The secondary outcome measures will be health related quality of life (assessed using the Short Form-36 questionnaire - Version Two) and depression, anxiety and stress (assessed using the Depression, Anxiety and Stress Scale - short version). Primary outcome measures will be performed at baseline, 2, 4, 6 and 12 weeks and secondary outcome measures will be performed at baseline, 6 and 12 weeks. Data will be analysed using the intention to treat principle. Conclusion This study is the first randomised controlled trial to evaluate the effectiveness of dry needling for plantar heel pain. The trial will be reported in

  4. The effect of melody on the physiological responses of heel sticks pain in neonates

    PubMed Central

    Marofi, Maryam; Nikobakht, Farzaneh; Badiee, Zohreh; Golchin, Mehri

    2015-01-01

    Background: During health care in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU), infants undergo extremely painful procedures, which may cause problems, if not controlled, such as changes in the pattern of respiratory rate, heart rate, and blood oxygen saturation. The present study aimed to find the effect of melody on the physiological responses of neonates’ heel stick pain. Materials and Methods: This quasi-experimental study was conducted in Alzahra Hospital (Isfahan, Iran) for 5 months. Fifty infants were selected through convenient sampling method and were randomly assigned in equal numbers to two groups (n = 25). In the melody group (intervention), a selected melody was played for the infants at a distance of 1 m from them, with a sound intensity of 65 dB, from 3 minutes before, during, and after the heel stick procedure, respectively, and their physiological responses were observed with a monitoring system and recorded at the afore-mentioned time periods. Physiological responses were also recorded in the control group (no intervention) 3 min before, during, and after the heel stick procedure, respectively. Results: Means of respiratory and pulse rates in the melody and control groups showed a significant difference at different time points. But the mean blood oxygen saturation in the melody group showed no significant difference at different time points, although the difference was significant in the control group. Conclusions: The results showed that melody could maintain more balance in some physiological responses of infants, such as the respiratory rate and pulse rate during the Guthrie test. Therefore, melody is recommended to be used to prevent the destructive effects of pain in infants during painful procedures. PMID:26120343

  5. [To reduce the pain of heel prick in the newborn: comparison of six types of lancets].

    PubMed

    Ballardini, G; Spruzzola, A; Boneschi, L; Visentin, R; Boscardini, L; Barbaglia, M; Guala, L A

    2012-01-01

    Heel prick is an usual method performed to get a blood sample for newborn screening. Its wide use justifies the effort in reducing the pain as much as possible and some simple steps, including the use of spring heelsticks, are recommended by national and international guide-lines. But not all the heelsticks cause the same pain and allow to get enough blood for the screening. The aim of this work was to test six automatic heelstick devices with regard to the pain in heel prick measured with NIPS scale and, at the same time, to value their effectiveness in getting a blood sample suitable for filter paper for newborn screening. The following devices were assessed: Amnes Minilet Lancets, Wuxi Xinda Ltd, Exxe Safe Blade, Lifescan Stik Johnson & Johnson, One Touch Ultra Soft, Accu-Chek Safe T Pro Plus. The device Exxe Safe Blade statistically differs from all others: it is the least painful and it doesn't need any prick repetition.

  6. Impaired Foot Plantar Flexor Muscle Performance in Individuals With Plantar Heel Pain and Association With Foot Orthosis Use.

    PubMed

    McClinton, Shane; Collazo, Christopher; Vincent, Ebonie; Vardaxis, Vassilios

    2016-08-01

    Study Design Controlled laboratory study. Background Plantar heel pain is one of the most common foot and ankle conditions seen in clinical practice, and many individuals continue to have persisting or recurrent pain after treatment. Impaired foot plantar flexor muscle performance is a factor that may contribute to limited treatment success, but reliable methods to identify impairments in individuals with plantar heel pain are needed. In addition, foot orthoses are commonly used to treat this condition, but the implications of orthosis use on muscle performance have not been assessed. Objectives To assess ankle plantar flexor and toe flexor muscle performance in individuals with plantar heel pain using clinically feasible measures and to examine the relationship between muscle performance and duration of foot orthosis use. Methods The rocker-board plantar flexion test (RBPFT) and modified paper grip test for the great toe (mPGTGT) and lesser toes (mPGTLT) were used to assess foot plantar flexor muscle performance in 27 individuals with plantar heel pain and compared to 27 individuals without foot pain who were matched according to age, sex, and body mass. Pain ratings were obtained before and during testing, and self-reported duration of foot orthosis use was recorded. Results Compared to the control group, individuals with plantar heel pain demonstrated lower performance on the RBPFT (P = .001), the mPGTGT (P = .022), and the mPGTLT (P = .037). Longer duration of foot orthosis use was moderately correlated to lower performance on the RBPFT (r = -0.52, P = .02), the mPGTGT (r = -0.54, P = .01), and the mPGTLT (r = -0.43, P = .03). Conclusion Ankle plantar flexor and toe flexor muscle performance was impaired in individuals with plantar heel pain and associated with longer duration of self-reported foot orthosis use. J Orthop Sports Phys Ther 2016;46(8):681-688. Epub 3 Jul 2016. doi:10.2519/jospt.2016.6482.

  7. Malunited calcaneal fracture fragments causing tarsal tunnel syndrome: a rare cause.

    PubMed

    Manasseh, Nithyananth; Cherian, Vinoo Mathew; Abel, Livingston

    2009-01-01

    This is a report of tarsal tunnel syndrome (TTS) due to a specific malunited calcaneal fracture fragment in a 46-year-old man. He was treated non-operatively for extra-articular calcaneal fracture. Four months later he presented with pain, tingling and hypoaesthesia over the medial aspect of the heel. He had a positive Tinel's sign and a positive dorsiflexion-eversion test. Radiography revealed malunited calcaneal fracture along medial wall producing bony prominence. The tarsal tunnel was surgically decompressed by excising the malunited fragments. The branches of the posterior tibial nerve were stretched over these fragments intra-operatively. There was symptomatic improvement with surgical excision of the fragment, however, the hypoesthesia did not resolve completely. Appropriate initial treatment will help to prevent this complication.

  8. Heel Pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... the muscles and ligaments of the foot, by stretching of the long band of tissue that connects ... inward motion—can create an abnormal amount of stretching and pulling on the ligaments and tendons attaching ...

  9. Clinical Presentation and Self-Reported Patterns of Pain and Function in Patients with Plantar Heel Pain

    PubMed Central

    Klein, Sandra E.; Dale, Ann Marie; Hayes, Marcie Harris; Johnson, Jeffrey E.; McCormick, Jeremy J.; Racette, Brad A.

    2014-01-01

    Background Plantar heel pain is a common disorder of the foot for which patients seek medical treatment. The purpose of this study is to explore the relationship between duration of symptoms in plantar fasciitis patients and demographic factors, the intensity and location of pain, extent of previous treatment and self reported pain and function. Methods The charts of patients presenting with plantar heel pain between June 2008 and October 2010 were reviewed retrospectively and 182 patients with a primary diagnosis of plantar fasciitis were identified. Patients with symptoms less than 6 months were identified as acute and patients with symptoms greater than or equal to six months were defined as having chronic symptoms. Comparisons based on duration of symptoms were performed for age, gender, BMI, comorbidities, pain location and intensity, and a functional score measured by the Foot and Ankle Ability Measure (FAAM). Results The two groups were similar in age, BMI, gender, and comorbidities. Pain severity, as measured by a VAS, was not statistically significant between the two groups (6.6 and 6.2). The acute and chronic groups of patients reported similar levels of function on both the activity of daily living (62 and 65) and sports (47 and 45) subscales of the FAAM. Patients in the chronic group were more likely to have seen more providers and tried more treatment options for this condition. Conclusion As plantar fasciitis symptoms extend beyond 6 months, patients do not experience increasing pain intensity or functional limitation. No specific risk factors have been identified to indicate a risk of developing chronic symptoms. PMID:22995253

  10. Kangaroo mother care diminishes pain from heel lance in very preterm neonates: A crossover trial

    PubMed Central

    Johnston, C Celeste; Filion, Francoise; Campbell-Yeo, Marsha; Goulet, Celine; Bell, Linda; McNaughton, Kathryn; Byron, Jasmine; Aita, Marilyn; Finley, G Allen; Walker, Claire-Dominique

    2008-01-01

    Background Skin-to-skin contact, or kangaroo mother care (KMC) has been shown to be efficacious in diminishing pain response to heel lance in full term and moderately preterm neonates. The purpose of this study was to determine if KMC would also be efficacious in very preterm neonates. Methods Preterm neonates (n = 61) between 28 0/7 and 31 6/7 weeks gestational age in three Level III NICU's in Canada comprised the sample. A single-blind randomized crossover design was employed. In the experimental condition, the infant was held in KMC for 15 minutes prior to and throughout heel lance procedure. In the control condition, the infant was in prone position swaddled in a blanket in the incubator. The primary outcome was the Premature Infant Pain Profile (PIPP), which is comprised of three facial actions, maximum heart rate, minimum oxygen saturation levels from baseline in 30-second blocks from heel lance. The secondary outcome was time to recover, defined as heart rate return to baseline. Continuous video, heart rate and oxygen saturation monitoring were recorded with event markers during the procedure and were subsequently analyzed. Repeated measures analysis-of-variance was employed to generate results. Results PIPP scores at 90 seconds post lance were significantly lower in the KMC condition (8.871 (95%CI 7.852–9.889) versus 10.677 (95%CI 9.563–11.792) p < .001) and non-significant mean differences ranging from 1.2 to1.8. favoring KMC condition at 30, 60 and 120 seconds. Time to recovery was significantly shorter, by a minute(123 seconds (95%CI 103–142) versus 193 seconds (95%CI 158–227). Facial actions were highly significantly lower across all points in time reaching a two-fold difference by 120 seconds post-lance and heart rate was significantly lower across the first 90 seconds in the KMC condition. Conclusion Very preterm neonates appear to have endogenous mechanisms elicited through skin-to-skin maternal contact that decrease pain response, but not as

  11. Management of pain from heel lance with lidocaine-prilocaine (EMLA) cream: is it safe and efficacious in preterm infants?

    PubMed

    Stevens, B; Johnston, C; Taddio, A; Jack, A; Narciso, J; Stremler, R; Koren, G; Aranda, J

    1999-08-01

    Hospitalized preterm infants undergo multiple painful heel lances. A two-phase, randomized, controlled trial was undertaken to determine the safety and efficacy of lidocaine-prilocaine 5% cream (EMLA, Astra Pharmaceuticals, L.P, Westborough, MA) for relieving pain from heel lance. One hundred twenty infants were randomly assigned to receive 0.5 g of EMLA or placebo cream for 30 minutes (Phase 1) or 60 minutes (Phase 2) before a routine heel lance. Efficacy was assessed using the Premature Infant Pain Profile (PIPP). Safety was determined by methemoglobin concentration 8 hours after EMLA application and by clinical signs of methemoglobinemia. No significant differences existed on PIPP scores between EMLA and placebo groups in Phase 1 (p < .480) or Phase 2 (p < .831). No infant had any clinical signs of methemoglobinemia. The mean methemoglobin concentration was 1.19% (.47). Approximately 10% of infants had minor skin reactions, and approximately 20% of EMLA-treated infants had blanching at the application site. The authors conclude that EMLA is safe but not efficacious for relieving pain from heel lance in preterm infants.

  12. Calcaneal spurs among San and Khoi skeletons.

    PubMed

    Caroline, Cermak; Kirchengast, Sylvia

    2015-01-01

    Only few studies considered the prevalence of calcaneal enthesophytes commonly called heel spurs among historic skeleton samples. In the present study the frequency of plantar calcaneal spurs among 54 19(th) century Khoisan skeletons was analyzed. Five individuals (9.6 %) had a plantar calcaneal spur at the right side or left side. Calcaneal spurs were more likely to occur in older individuals. More than 20 % of the individuals aged between 40 and 60 years (mature) showed plantar spurs, while 6.2 % of the individuals aged between 20 and 40 years had plantar spurs; however this difference was not significant. No sex differences were present in the prevalence of calcaneal spurs. Male and female individuals did not differ in the metric dimensions of the calcanceal spurs significantly.

  13. Diagnostic imaging for chronic plantar heel pain: a systematic review and meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Chronic plantar heel pain (CPHP) is a generalised term used to describe a range of undifferentiated conditions affecting the plantar heel. Plantar fasciitis is reported as the most common cause and the terms are frequently used interchangeably in the literature. Diagnostic imaging has been used by many researchers and practitioners to investigate the involvement of specific anatomical structures in CPHP. These observations help to explain the underlying pathology of the disorder, and are of benefit in forming an accurate diagnosis and targeted treatment plan. The purpose of this systematic review was to investigate the diagnostic imaging features associated with CPHP, and evaluate study findings by meta-analysis where appropriate. Methods Bibliographic databases including Medline, Embase, CINAHL, SportDiscus and The Cochrane Library were searched electronically on March 25, 2009. Eligible articles were required to report imaging findings in participants with CPHP unrelated to inflammatory arthritis, and to compare these findings with a control group. Methodological quality was evaluated by use of the Quality Index as described by Downs and Black. Meta-analysis of study data was conducted where appropriate. Results Plantar fascia thickness as measured by ultrasonography was the most widely reported imaging feature. Meta-analysis revealed that the plantar fascia of CPHP participants was 2.16 mm thicker than control participants (95% CI = 1.60 to 2.71 mm, P < 0.001) and that CPHP participants were more likely to have plantar fascia thickness values greater than 4.0 mm (OR = 105.11, 95% CI = 3.09 to 3577.28, P = 0.01). CPHP participants were also more likely to show radiographic evidence of subcalcaneal spur than control participants (OR = 8.52, 95% CI = 4.08 to 17.77, P < 0.001). Conclusion This systematic review has identified 23 studies investigating the diagnostic imaging appearance of the plantar fascia and inferior calcaneum in people with CPHP

  14. Variations in the origin of the medial calcaneal nerve.

    PubMed

    Dellon, A Lee; Kim, Jaesuk; Spaulding, Cecily M

    2002-02-01

    Previous anatomic studies of the medial heel region were done on embalmed human cadavers. Here, the innervation of the medial heel region was studied by dissecting living tissue with the use of 3.5-power loupe magnification during decompression of the medial ankle for tarsal tunnel syndrome in 85 feet. The medial heel was found to be innervated by just one medial calcaneal nerve in 37% of the feet, by two medial calcaneal nerves in 41%, by three medial calcaneal nerves in 19%, and by four medial calcaneal nerves in 3%. An origin for a medial calcaneal nerve from the medial plantar nerve was found in 46% of the feet. This nerve most often innervates the skin of the posteromedial arch, where it is at risk for injury during calcaneal spur removal or plantar fasciotomy. Knowledge of the variations in location of the medial calcaneal nerves may prevent neuroma formation during surgery and provide insight into the variability of heel symptoms associated with tarsal tunnel syndrome.

  15. Bursitis of the heel

    MedlinePlus

    ... It may be caused by too much walking, running, or jumping. This condition is very often linked ... include: Pain in the heel, especially with walking, running, or when the area is touched Pain may ...

  16. A comparison of the effectiveness of extracorporeal shock wave and ultrasound therapy in the management of heel pain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheing, G. L. Y.; Chang, H.; Lo, S. K.

    2007-11-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the effectiveness of extracorporeal shock wave therapy (ESWT) and ultrasound therapy (US) for managing heel pain. Thirty-seven subjects received either: ESWT (once a week), US (three times a week), or CONTROL (no treatment) for 3 consecutive weeks and were followed-up for 3 more weeks. A visual analogue scale (VAS), the maximum tolerable duration for prolonged walking or standing, and the Mayo clinical scoring system (MCSS) were evaluated. Mixed models treating baseline measures as covariates were adopted for statistical analysis. By week 3, intensity of heel pain on palpation was reduced by 37% (VAS score from 7.5 to 4.6) in the ESWT group, 24% (from 5.3 to 4.2) in the US group, and increased by 3% (5.6-5.7) in the control group; this difference was significant after adjusting for baseline VAS scores ( p = 0.022). The improvements in the maximum tolerable duration of prolonged walking or standing was only significant in the ESWT group (157% increase, p = 0.043) but not the other two groups. Both active treatment groups maintained the treatment effect at the three-week follow-up. We conclude that ESWT is potentially more effective in reducing heel pain than ultrasound therapy but additional evidence is needed due to the various limitations of the study.

  17. [Calcaneal spur].

    PubMed

    Arenberg, A A

    1991-12-01

    The clinical picture, diagnosis, and treatment of calcaneal spurs are described on the basis of 190 cases (102 females and 88 males whose ages ranged from 38 to 79 years). All were treated by local administration of various steroid hormones. A good immediate result was produced by a single administration of the hormone in 90% of cases; the favourable result persisted in the late-term periods in 78 persons. The author claims hormone therapy to be the most effective among all the known methods of nonoperative treatment of calcaneal spurs and recommends it for a wide surgical practice.

  18. Calcaneal Plantar Flexion During the Stance Phase of Gait.

    PubMed

    Stamm, Stacy E; Chiu, Loren Z F

    2016-04-01

    When the rear- and forefoot are constrained, calcaneal plantar flexion may occur, deforming the longitudinal arch. Previous research has reported calcaneal motion relative to the tibia or forefoot; these joint rotations may not accurately describe rotation of the calcaneus alone. This investigation: (1) characterized the calcaneus and leg segment and ankle joint rotations during stance in gait, and (2) described the range of calcaneal plantar flexion in different structural arch types. Men (n = 14) and women (n = 16) performed gait in a motion analysis laboratory. From heel strike to heel off, the leg rotated forward while the calcaneus plantar flexed. Before foot flat, calcaneal plantar flexion was greater than forward leg rotation, resulting in ankle plantar flexion. After foot flat, forward leg rotation was greater than calcaneal plantar flexion, resulting in ankle dorsiflexion. Structural arch type was classified using the longitudinal arch angle. The range of calcaneal plantar flexion from foot flat to heel off was small in low (-2° to -8°), moderate in high (-3° to -12°), and large in normal (-2° to -20°) structural arches. Calcaneal plantar flexion in gait during midstance may reflect functional arch characteristics, which vary depending on structural arch type.

  19. Percutaneous Posterior Calcaneal Osteotomy.

    PubMed

    Lui, Tun Hing

    2015-01-01

    Different types of posterior calcaneal osteotomy are used for calcaneal realignment in the management of hindfoot deformity. We describe a percutaneous technique of posterior calcaneal osteotomy that can be either a Dwyer-type closing wedge osteotomy or displacement osteotomy.

  20. Calcaneal osteotomies.

    PubMed

    Malerba, Francesco; De Marchi, Fabrizio

    2005-09-01

    The current trend is to preserve the hindfoot joints to allow for more normal biomechanics and avoid arthritic changes in adjacent joints. Calcaneal osteotomies are effective in the treatment of hindfoot and foot malalignment with an acceptable rate of complications at medium-term follow-up. An important prerequisite should be flexibility and the absence of joint arthritis.

  1. Three-dimensional printed calcaneal prosthesis following total calcanectomy☆

    PubMed Central

    Imanishi, Jungo; Choong, Peter F.M.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The majority of patients with extremity sarcoma can be surgically treated without amputation. However, limb-salvage surgery for foot sarcomas including the calcaneus remains challenging. Presentation of case A 71-year-old man presented with a 5-year history of right heel persistent pain. Imaging studies revealed an osteolytic, destructive and highly metabolic lesion in the right calcaneus. Computed tomography guided core needle biopsy confirmed the diagnosis of grade 2 chondrosarcoma. A total calcanectomy was performed, and the defect was reconstructed with a patient matched three-dimensional printed titanium calcaneal prosthesis. Intra-operatively, ligaments including the Achilles tendon, and plantar fascia were reattached. The post-operative course was uneventful, and at the 5-month clinical follow-up, the patient was fully weightbearing, with a mobile ankle without pain. Discussion This case is the first to use additive manufacturing to create a prosthetic calcaneus. The complex peri-calcaneal articular surfaces and reattachment of tendinous structures facilitate efforts to stabilize the prosthesis in situ. Conclusion Three-dimensional-printed prosthesis of the calcaneus is a viable alternative to amputation. PMID:25827294

  2. Dry needling in patients with chronic heel pain due to plantar fasciitis: A single-blinded randomized clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    Eftekharsadat, Bina; Babaei-Ghazani, Arash; Zeinolabedinzadeh, Vahideh

    2016-01-01

    Background: This study examined the effects of dry needling on chronic heel pain due to plantar fasciitis. Methods: During this single-blinded clinical trial, 20 eligible patients were randomized into two groups: A case group treated with dry needling and a control group. Patients’ plantar pain severity, (using modified visual analog scale [VAS] scoring system), range of motion of ankle joint in dorsiflexion [ROMDF] and plantar extension[ROMPE] and foot function index (using standard questionnaires of SEM5 and MDC7) were assessed at baseline, four weeks after intervention and four weeks after withdrawing treatment. Independent sample t-test, Mann-Whitney U test, paired t-test, Wilcoxon signed rank tests, and chi square test were used for data analysis. Results: The mean VAS scores in the case group was significantly lower than the control group after four weeks of intervention (p<0.001). Comparison of the ROMDF and ROMPE did not reveal any significant changes after four weeks of intervention in the case and control groups (p=0.7 and p=0.65, respectively). The mean of MDC7 and SEM5 scores in the case group were significantly lower than the control group following four weeks of intervention (p<0.001). Conclusion: Despite the insignificant effect on ROMDF and ROMPE, trigger point dry needling, by improving the severity of heel pain, can be used as a good alternative option before proceeding to more invasive therapies of plantar fasciitis. PMID:27683642

  3. [Physiotherapeutic proceeding in symptomatic calcaneal spur treatment].

    PubMed

    Kociuga, Natalia; Kociuga, Jerzy; Woldańska-Okońska, Marta; Kubsik, Anna

    2016-01-01

    Calcaneal spur is one of the most common disorders associated with foot pain. According to appearance of pain in each step during the day, it is important to find the most effective method of treatment. This article is a review of medical reports about non-operative treatment method. It shows that ultrasound therapy was the most common physical intervetion used so far, and mostly occurs to be effective. However one of the comparative studies improves higher efficiency of phonopheresis. Another comparative study, shows higher efficiency of combined ultrasound and laser therapy, than exclusive laser therapy. There haven't been found any articles that would evaluate efficacy of electrotherapy and short wave diathermy (electric field) in the treatment of mentioned disorder. Studies that describe the effect of ESWT treatment were also analyzed in this article, and all of them confirm its effectiveness in heel spur therapy, showing no side-effects. Cryotherapy also causes positive effect in treatment of this disorder. However Cryoultrasound therapy that uses the energy of two interconnected terapeutic techniques which is cryotherapy and ultrasounds, proved to be more effective.

  4. Aneurysmal Bone Cyst: An Uncommon Secondary Event in Calcaneal Chondroblastoma.

    PubMed

    Barman, Sandip; Diwaker, Preeti; Bansal, Divya; Wadhwa, Neelam; Singh, Gurvinder

    2016-06-01

    Chondroblastoma is an uncommon benign bone tumour, involvement of epiphysis of long bones is typical. Chondroblastoma of the calcaneum is uncommon and its association with secondary aneurysmal bone cyst is even rarer. Only two cases of calcaneal chondroblastoma associated with secondary aneurysmal bone cyst have been reported till date. A 22-year-old male presented to the department of orthopaedics with complains of pain and swelling in the left heel since the last 10 months. On clinico-radiological grounds differentials considered were giant cell tumour of bone and aneurysmal bone cyst. In view of the histopathological findings of bone curettage and results of special stain and immunohistochemical marker, final diagnosis of chondroblastoma with secondary aneurysmal bone cyst, left calcaneum was rendered. Although rare, chondroblastoma should always be considered in osteolytic lesions of calcaneum. The identification of secondary aneurysmal bone cyst component is important as it has higher chances of recurrence than usual chondroblastoma.

  5. Aneurysmal Bone Cyst: An Uncommon Secondary Event in Calcaneal Chondroblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Barman, Sandip; Bansal, Divya; Wadhwa, Neelam; Singh, Gurvinder

    2016-01-01

    Chondroblastoma is an uncommon benign bone tumour, involvement of epiphysis of long bones is typical. Chondroblastoma of the calcaneum is uncommon and its association with secondary aneurysmal bone cyst is even rarer. Only two cases of calcaneal chondroblastoma associated with secondary aneurysmal bone cyst have been reported till date. A 22-year-old male presented to the department of orthopaedics with complains of pain and swelling in the left heel since the last 10 months. On clinico-radiological grounds differentials considered were giant cell tumour of bone and aneurysmal bone cyst. In view of the histopathological findings of bone curettage and results of special stain and immunohistochemical marker, final diagnosis of chondroblastoma with secondary aneurysmal bone cyst, left calcaneum was rendered. Although rare, chondroblastoma should always be considered in osteolytic lesions of calcaneum. The identification of secondary aneurysmal bone cyst component is important as it has higher chances of recurrence than usual chondroblastoma. PMID:27504302

  6. Familial hypophosphatemia: an unusual presentation with low back ache, heel pain, and a limp in a young man, and literature review.

    PubMed

    Arthur, Sharon; Chopra, Arvind

    2011-04-01

    A case of young man with low back ache and heel pains who was examined in a rheumatology outpatient and diagnosed as familial hypophosphatemia (FH), probably X-linked (XL), is presented. FH is most commonly transmitted as XL. The role of PHEX gene and fibroblast growth factor 23 is also described.

  7. Efficacy of extracorporeal shock wave treatment in calcaneal enthesophytosis

    PubMed Central

    Cosentino, R; Falsetti, P; Manca, S; De Stefano, R; Frati, E; Frediani, B; Baldi, F; Selvi, E; Marcolongo, R

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVE—To evaluate the efficacy of extracorporeal shock wave treatment (ESWT) in calcaneal enthesophytosis.
METHODS—60 patients (43 women, 17 men) were examined who had talalgia associated with heel spur. A single blind randomised study was performed in which 30 patients underwent a regular treatment (group 1) and 30 a simulated one (shocks of 0 mJ/mm2 energy were applied) (group 2). Variations in symptoms were evaluated by visual analogue scale (VAS). Variations in the dimension of enthesophytosis were evaluated by x ray examination. Variations in the grade of enthesitis were evaluated by sonography.
RESULTS—A significant decrease of VAS was seen in group 1. Examination by x ray showed morphological modifications (reduction of the larger diameter >1 mm) of the enthesophytosis in nine (30%) patients. Sonography did not show significant changes in the grade of enthesitis just after the end of the treatment, but a significant reduction was seen after one month. In the control group no significant decrease of VAS was seen. No modification was observed by x ray examination or sonography.
CONCLUSION—ESWT is safe and improves the symptoms of most patients with a painful heel, it can also structurally modify enthesophytosis, and reduce inflammatory oedema.

 PMID:11602481

  8. Effects of extracorporal shock wave therapy on symptomatic heel spurs: a correlation between clinical outcome and radiologic changes.

    PubMed

    Yalcin, E; Keskin Akca, A; Selcuk, B; Kurtaran, A; Akyuz, M

    2012-02-01

    Plantar heel pain, a chronic and disabling foot alignment, occurs in the adult population. Extracorporal shock wave therapy (ESWT) offers a nonsurgical option in addition to stretching exercises, heel cups, NSAI, and corticosteroid injections. This study aimed to investigate the effects of ESWT on calcaneal bone spurs and the correlation between clinical outcomes and radiologic changes. The study involved 108 patients with heel pain and radiologically diagnosed heel spurs. All patients underwent ESWT once a week for 5 weeks at the clinic. Each patient received 2,000 impulses of shock waves, starting with 0.05 mJ/mm2 (1.8 bar) and increasing to 0.4 mJ/mm2 (4.0 bar). Standard radiographies of the affected heels were obtained before and after the therapy. Clinical results demonstrated excellent (no pain) in 66.7% of the cases, good (50% of pain reduced) in 15.7% of the cases, and unsatisfactory (no reduction in pain) in 17.6%. After five ESWT treatments, no patients who received shock wave applications had significant spur reductions, but 19 patients (17.6%) had a decrease in the angle of the spur, 23 patients (21.3%) had a decrease in the dimensions of the spur, and one patient had a broken spur. Therefore, results showed no correlation between clinical outcome and radiologic changes. The present study supports the finding that even with no radiologic change after ESWT therapy, the therapy produces significant effects in reducing patients' complaints about heel spurs.

  9. Calcaneal acrometastasis from urothelial carcinoma of the ureter: a case report and literature review

    PubMed Central

    Ryder, Jonathan H; McGarry, Sean V; Wang, Jue

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Ureteral cancer is a rare entity. Typical symptoms are painless hematuria as well as flank pain. Bone metastasis of ureteral cancer can occur in nearby bone structures, such as the spine, pelvis, and hip bone. Distal bone metastasis, such as that in the calcaneus bone, however, is rare. Case report An 82-year-old woman presented to the orthopedic clinic at the university hospital with a 3-month history of left heel pain. A magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of her foot demonstrated a calcaneal lytic lesion. A biopsy of the lytic lesion showed urothelial carcinoma with squamous differentiation. A computed tomography (CT) scan of the abdomen and pelvis showed left hydronephrosis and an obstructive mass in the left ureter, at the iliac crossing. The patient received combined therapy that included local radiation, bisphosphonate, and chemotherapy, with complete resolution of her cancer-related symptoms. However, she eventually died from the progressive disease, 20 months after the initial diagnosis. Conclusion This case highlights the rare presentation of ureter cancer with an initial presentation of foot pain, secondary to calcaneal metastasis. Multimodality therapy provides effective palliation of symptoms and improved quality of life. We also reviewed the literature and discuss the clinical benefits of multidisciplinary cancer care in elderly patients. PMID:23610517

  10. Orthosis-Shaped Sandals Are as Efficacious as In-Shoe Orthoses and Better than Flat Sandals for Plantar Heel Pain: A Randomized Control Trial

    PubMed Central

    Vicenzino, Bill; McPoil, Thomas G.; Stephenson, Aoife; Paul, Sanjoy K.

    2015-01-01

    Objective To investigate efficacy of a contoured sandal being marketed for plantar heel pain with comparison to a flat flip-flop and contoured in-shoe insert/orthosis. Method 150 volunteers aged 50 (SD: 12) years with plantar heel pain (>4 weeks) were enrolled after responding to advertisements and eligibility determined by telephone and at first visit. Participants were randomly allocated to receive commercially available contoured sandals (n = 49), flat flip-flops (n = 50) or over the counter, pre-fabricated full-length foot orthotics (n = 51). Primary outcomes were a 15-point Global Rating of Change scale (GROC: 1 = a very great deal worse, 15 = a very great deal better), 13 to 15 representing an improvement and the 20-item Lower Extremity Function Scale (LEFS) on which participants rate 20 common weight bearing activities and activities of daily living on a 5-point scale (0 = extreme difficulty, 4 = no difficulty). Secondary outcomes were worst level of heel pain in the preceding week, and the foot and ankle ability measure. Outcomes were collected blind to allocation. Analyses were done on an intention to treat basis with 12 weeks being the primary outcome time of interest. Results The contoured sandal was 68% more likely to report improvement in terms of GROC compared to flat flip-flop. On the LEFS the contoured sandal was 61% more likely than flat flip-flop to report improvement. The secondary outcomes in the main reflected the primary outcomes, and there were no differences between contoured sandal and shoe insert. Conclusions and Relevance Physicians can have confidence in supporting a patient's decision to wear contoured sandals or in-shoe orthoses as one of the first and simple strategies to manage their heel pain. Trial Registration The Australian New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry ACTRN12612000463875 PMID:26669302

  11. Demographic, clinical and treatment related predictors for event-free probability following low-dose radiotherapy for painful heel spurs - a retrospective multicenter study of 502 patients.

    PubMed

    Muecke, Ralph; Micke, Oliver; Reichl, Berthold; Heyder, Rainer; Prott, Franz-Josef; Seegenschmiedt, M Heinrich; Glatzel, Michael; Schneider, Oliver; Schäfer, Ulrich; Kundt, Guenther

    2007-01-01

    A total of 502 patients treated between 1990 and 2002 with low-dose radiotherapy (RT) for painful heel spurs were analysed for prognostic factors for long-term treatment success. The median follow-up was 26 months, ranging from 1 to 103 months. Events were defined as (1) slightly improved or unchanged pain after therapy, or (2) recurrent pain sensations during the follow-up period. Overall 8-year event-free probability was 60.9%. Event-free probabilities of patients with one/two series (414/88) were 69.7%/32.2% (p<0.001); >58/ < or = 58 years (236/266), 81.3%/47.9% (p=0.001); high voltage/orthovoltage (341/161), 67.9%/60.6% (p=0.019); pain anamnesis < or = 6 months/ >6 months (308/194), 76.3%/43.9% (p=0.001); single dose 0.5/1.0 Gy (100/401), 86.2%/55.1% (p=0.009); without/with prior treatment (121/381), 83.1%/54.9% (p=0.023); men/women (165/337), 61.2%/61.5% (p=0.059). The multivariate Cox regression analysis with inclusion of the number of treatment series, age, photon energy, pain history, single-dose and prior treatments revealed patients with only one treatment series (p<0.001), an age >58 years (p=0.011) and therapy with high voltage photons (p=0.050) to be significant prognostic factors for pain relief. Overall low-dose RT is a very effective treatment in painful heel spurs.

  12. Effect of extracorporeal shock waves on calcaneal bone spurs.

    PubMed

    Lee, Gregory P; Ogden, John A; Cross, G Lee

    2003-12-01

    In a prospective study of 435 patients with chronic proximal plantar fasciitis, 283 (65%) had an inferior calcaneal bone spur of variable size evident prior to treatment with electrohydraulic high-energy extracorporeal shock waves (ESW). This included 308 patients who received extracorporeal shock wave treatments and 127 placebo (sham control) patients. At both initial (3 months) and final (12 months) evaluations after receiving ESW, no patient who received shock wave applications had significant disappearance or change in the radiographic appearance of the heel spur. Clinical outcome after ESW was satisfactory in 168 patients (82%) with a radiographically demonstrable inferior heel spur and in 81 patients (79%) without such a heel spur. The results showed no correlation between the presence or absence of the heel spur and the eventual treatment outcome.

  13. The plantar calcaneal spur: a review of anatomy, histology, etiology and key associations.

    PubMed

    Kirkpatrick, Joshua; Yassaie, Omid; Mirjalili, Seyed Ali

    2017-03-29

    The plantar calcaneal spur (PCS) is a bony outgrowth from the calcaneal tuberosity and has been studied using various methods including cadavers, radiography, histology and surgery. However, there are currently a number of discrepancies in the literature regarding the anatomical relations, histological descriptions and clinical associations of PCS. Historically, authors have described the intrinsic muscles of the foot and/or the plantar fascia as attaching to the PCS. In this article we review the relationship between the PCS and surrounding soft tissues as well as examining the histology of the PCS. We identify a number of key associations with PCS, including age, weight, gender, arthritides, plantar fasciitis and foot position; these factors may function as risk factors in PCS formation. The etiology of these spurs is a contentious issue and it has been explained through a number of theories including the degenerative, inflammatory, traction, repetitive trauma, bone-formers and vertical compression theories. We review these and finish by looking clinically at the evidence that PCS causes heel pain.

  14. Endoscopic Decompression of the First Branch of the Lateral Plantar Nerve and Release of the Plantar Aponeurosis for Chronic Heel Pain.

    PubMed

    Lui, Tun Hing

    2016-06-01

    Entrapment of the first branch of the lateral plantar nerve is a commonly missed cause of recalcitrant plantar heel pain. The diagnosis is made on a clinical ground with maximal tenderness at the site of nerve entrapment. Treatment of the nerve entrapment is similar to that for plantar fasciitis, with rest, activity modification, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, stretching exercise, and local steroid injection. Surgical release of the deep abductor hallucis fascia is indicated when conservative treatment failed. Endoscopic release of the nerve through the dorsal and plantar portals, as well as endoscopic plantar aponeurosis release, is a feasible approach.

  15. Heel lipoma mimicking plantar fasciitis in a ballroom dancer.

    PubMed

    Taweel, Nicholas R; Raikin, Steven M

    2015-01-01

    The present case illustrates a lipoma as an unusual cause of heel pain. A 64-year-old female ballroom dancer presented with 8 months of pain that was unresponsive to previous treatment of plantar fasciitis. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed a heel lipoma. Her pain was fully resolved after surgical excision. Soft tissue tumors should be included in the differential diagnosis of heel pain, especially when symptoms and treatment response do not follow the typical course of plantar fasciitis.

  16. Randomized multicenter trial on the effect of radiotherapy for plantar Fasciitis (painful heel spur) using very low doses – a study protocol

    PubMed Central

    Niewald, Marcus; Seegenschmiedt, M Heinrich; Micke, Oliver; Gräber, Stefan

    2008-01-01

    Background A lot of retrospective data concerning the effect of radiotherapy on the painful heel spur (plantar fasciitis) is available in the literature. Nevertheless, a randomized proof of this effect is still missing. Thus, the GCGBD (German cooperative group on radiotherapy for benign diseases) of the DEGRO (German Society for Radiation Oncology) decided to start a randomized multicenter trial in order to find out if the effect of a conventional total dose is superior compared to that of a very low dose. Methods/Design In a prospective, controlled and randomized phase III trial two radiotherapy schedules are to be compared: standard arm: total dose 6.0 Gy in single fractions of 1.0 Gy applied twice a week experimental arm: total dose 0.6 Gy in single fractions of 0.1 Gy applied twice a week (acting as a placebo) Patients aged over 40 years who have been diagnosed clinically and radiologically to be suffering from a painful heel spur for at least six months can be included. Former trauma, surgery or radiotherapy to the heel are not allowed nor are patients with a severe psychiatric disease or women during pregnancy and breastfeeding. According to the statistical power calculation 100 patients have to be enrolled into each arm. After having obtaining a written informed consent a patient is randomized by the statistician to one of the arms mentioned above. After radiotherapy, the patients are seen first every six weeks, then regularly up to 48 months after therapy, they additionally receive a questionnaire every six weeks after the follow-up examinations. The effect is measured using several target variables (scores): Calcaneodynia-score according to Rowe et al., SF-12 score, and visual analogue scale of pain. The most important endpoint is the pain relief three months after therapy. Patients with an inadequate result are offered a second radiotherapy series applying the standard dose (equally in both arms). This trial protocol has been approved by the expert panel

  17. Complications in operative fixation of calcaneal fractures

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ying; Bao, Rong-Hua; Jiang, Zhi-Qiang; Wu, Huo-Yan

    2016-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of this study focused on a number of factors that have been implicated in calcaneal complications and find the incidence of wound complications. Methods: This was a retrospective study. A total of 162 patients (176 feet) who underwent calcaneal fractures between 2007 and 2012 were included. The patient’s personal details, age, time from injury to surgery, cause of injury, type of fracture, operative details, operating and tourniquet times were collected from hospital computers and paper records. Evidence of complications including wound infection, wound necrosis, pain, malunion, nonunion, impingement, loss of fixation, ect were studied. Results: Forty-seven of one hundred and seventy-six fractures (26.704%) had complications, wound infection was noted in seven fractures (3.977%), twelve fractures developed necrosis (6.818%), 14 fractures (7.955%) developed pain. Malunion was found in five fractures (2.841%), nonunion in two fractures (1.136%) and loss of fixation in four fractures (2.272%). Three neurologic injury was also seen in our study (1.705%). Operating time, time from injury to surgery and type of fracture had some association with complications in operative fixation of calcaneal fractures, which showed a statistically significant improvement (P=0.000, 0.031, 0.020, respectively), but there were no evidence that age and tourniquet time affect the incidence of complication after calcaneal fracture surgery (P=0.119, 0.682, respectively). Conclusions: Despite developments in the surgical treatment of calcaneal fracture, wound complications still remain inevitable. Advanced imaging techniques, less invasive surgical procedures, wealth of anatomical knowledge, surgical experience and better postoperative care should be ensured. PMID:27648028

  18. Resection of a plantar calcaneal spur using the holmium:yttrium-aluminum-garnet (Ho:YAG) laser.

    PubMed

    Smith, W K; Noriega, J A; Smith, W K

    2001-03-01

    Many procedures have been described for the resection of plantar calcaneal spurs as treatment of heel spur syndrome and chronic plantar fasciitis. Most of these techniques involve a medial incision of between 2 and 6 cm for adequate exposure of the calcaneal spur. This article describes a new technique for resecting a calcaneal spur with a smaller medial incision using the holmium:yttrium-aluminum-garnet (Ho:YAG) laser. This laser permits adequate resection of a plantar calcaneal spur as well as coagulation of the bone and surrounding tissues. This minimally invasive procedure has been used with good results over the past year by the senior author (W.K.S.) for the resection of calcaneal spurs.

  19. [Excessively long calcaneal spur. A rudimentary form of calcaneo-navicular synostosis].

    PubMed

    Hardy, J; Pouliquen, J C

    1983-01-01

    The authors have seen 5 children aged between 12 and 16 years suffering from a painful foot described as a recurrent sprain. Movements of the subtalar joint were limited and radiographs showed a hypertrophic calcaneal spur projecting towards the navicular but without fusion between the calcaneus and navicular. The calcaneal spurs were resected with good results and with an immediate symptomatic improvement.

  20. Bilateral Heel Numbness due to External Compression during Obstetric Epidural Analgesia

    PubMed Central

    Kamphuis, Vivian P.; Zegers, Marie P.A.; Koppen, Hille

    2015-01-01

    We describe the case of a 32-year-old woman who developed bilateral heel numbness after obstetric epidural analgesia. We diagnosed her with bilateral neuropathy of the medial calcaneal nerve, most likely due to longstanding pressure on both heels. Risk factors for the development of this neuropathy were prolonged labour with spinal analgesia and a continuation of analgesia during episiotomy. Padded footrests decrease pressure and can possibly prevent this neuropathy. PMID:25802500

  1. Epidemiology of Posterior Heel Pain in the General Population: Cross‐Sectional Findings From the Clinical Assessment Study of the Foot

    PubMed Central

    Muller, Sara; Roddy, Edward

    2015-01-01

    Objective To identify the population prevalence of posterior heel pain (HP), related disability, and associated factors. Methods A total of 9,334 adults ages ≥50 years were mailed a questionnaire. Participants reporting foot pain in the last month shaded the foot pain location on a manikin. The Manchester Foot Pain and Disability Index assessed disabling foot pain. Population prevalence of any, bilateral, and disabling posterior HP was estimated using weighted logistic regression accounting for nonresponse. Odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (95% CIs) were calculated between posterior HP and age, sex, neighborhood deprivation, occupational class (professional, intermediate, and manual), body mass index (BMI, kg/m2), physical activity, heel height, and diabetes mellitus. Results A total of 5,109 questionnaires were received (adjusted response 56%). Six hundred seventy‐five respondents (13%) reported posterior HP, of whom 382 had bilateral symptoms. A total of 398 (8%) reported disabling posterior HP. Posterior HP in either foot was associated with increasing BMI (25.0–29.9 [OR 1.58], 30.0–34.9 [OR 2.13], and ≥35.0 [OR 4.09]) and with manual occupations (OR 1.96, 95% CI 1.47–2.62). Bilateral posterior HP was associated with increasing BMI (25.0–29.9 [OR 1.79], 30.0–34.9 [OR 2.43], and ≥35.0 [OR 5.79]), diabetes mellitus (OR 1.48, 95% CI 1.07–2.05), and manual occupations (OR 2.21, 95% CI 1.48–3.30). Disabling posterior HP was associated with increasing BMI (25.0–29.9 [OR 1.44], 30.0–34.9 [OR 2.50], and ≥35.0 [OR 4.69]), age (≥75 years OR 1.41, 95% CI 1.01–1.96), manual occupations (OR 1.97, 95% CI 1.35–2.88), and diabetes mellitus (OR 1.56, 95% CI 1.04–1.95). High physical activity was negatively associated with posterior HP in either heel (OR 0.43, 95% CI 0.33–0.56), bilateral posterior HP (OR 0.35, 95% CI 0.25–0.49), and disabling posterior HP (OR 0.33, 95% CI 0.23–0.46). Conclusion Posterior HP is prevalent and

  2. Bilateral and unilateral increases in calcaneal eversion affect pelvic alignment in standing position.

    PubMed

    Pinto, Rafael Z A; Souza, Thales R; Trede, Renato G; Kirkwood, Renata N; Figueiredo, Elyonara M; Fonseca, Sérgio T

    2008-12-01

    Excessive foot pronation has been associated with the occurrence of low back pain, possibly for generating changes in the lumbopelvic alignment. However, the influence of foot pronation (measured as calcaneal eversion) on pelvic alignment during standing has not been well established. Fourteen young healthy subjects participated in the study. A Motion Analysis System was used to obtain pelvic positions in sagittal and frontal planes and calcaneal position in the frontal plane. Volunteers were filmed in relaxed standing position during three trials, in three conditions: control; unilateral experimental with increased right calcaneal eversion and bilateral experimental with increased bilateral calcaneal eversion. Increased calcaneal eversion was obtained using wedges tilted 10 degrees medially, unilaterally and bilaterally. Repeated measures ANOVAs with Bonferroni corrections were used for statistical analysis. Unilateral and bilateral use of medially tilted wedges produced a significant increase of calcaneal eversion (Pcalcaneal eversion caused average pelvic anteversion of 1.57 degrees (P=0.003) and 1.41 degrees (P=0.021), respectively. Unilaterally increased everted position generated an average pelvic lateral tilt of 1.46 degrees (P<0.001). Excessive calcaneal eversion during standing changes pelvic alignment and should be considered, associated with other relevant factors, when assessing pelvic misalignments.

  3. Quantitative scintigraphy in diagnosis and management of plantar fasciitis (Calcaneal periostitis): concise communication

    SciTech Connect

    Sewell, J.R.; Black, C.M.; Chapman, A.H.; Statham, J.; Hughes, G.R.V.; Lavender, J.P.

    1980-07-01

    We have found that Tc-99m methylene diphosphonate imaging of the heel is of diagnostic value in the painful heel syndrome, permitting positive identification of the site of inflammation in cases where radiography is unhelpful. With this technique, tracer uptake in the heel is susceptible to quantification, allowing a serial and objective assessment of response to therapy.

  4. Minimally Invasive Calcaneal Displacement Osteotomy Site Using a Reference Kirschner Wire: A Technique Tip.

    PubMed

    Lee, Moses; Guyton, Gregory P; Zahoor, Talal; Schon, Lew C

    2016-01-01

    As a standard open approach, the lateral oblique incision has been widely used for calcaneal displacement osteotomy. However, just as with other orthopedic procedures that use an open approach, complications, including wound healing problems and neurovascular injury in the heel, have been reported. To help avoid these limitations, a percutaneous technique using a Shannon burr for calcaneal displacement osteotomy was introduced. However, relying on a free-hand technique without direct visualization at the osteotomy site has been a major obstacle for this technique. To address this problem, we developed a technical tip using a reference Kirschner wire. A reference Kirschner wire technique provides a reliable and accurate guide for minimally invasive calcaneal displacement osteotomy. Also, the technique should be easy to learn for surgeons new to the procedure.

  5. The treatment of calcaneal malunion.

    PubMed

    Atkins, Roger M

    2014-09-01

    The surgical treatment of calcaneal malunion is technically very demanding and requires a careful assessment of the exact cause of the problem. A number of different surgeries are available depending on the precise cause of symptoms. The results are reasonable and justify surgery in an otherwise disabled group of patients. Calcaneal malunion surgery should not be performed by the occasional surgeon, as the price of error is usually amputation.

  6. Comparison of usual podiatric care and early physical therapy intervention for plantar heel pain: study protocol for a parallel-group randomized clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background A significant number of individuals suffer from plantar heel pain (PHP) and many go on to have chronic symptoms and continued disability. Persistence of symptoms adds to the economic burden of PHP and cost-effective solutions are needed. Currently, there is a wide variation in treatment, cost, and outcomes of care for PHP with limited information on the cost-effectiveness and comparisons of common treatment approaches. Two practice guidelines and recent evidence of effective physical therapy intervention are available to direct treatment but the timing and influence of physical therapy intervention in the multidisciplinary management of PHP is unclear. The purpose of this investigation is to compare the outcomes and costs associated with early physical therapy intervention (ePT) following initial presentation to podiatry versus usual podiatric care (uPOD) in individuals with PHP. Methods A parallel-group, block-randomized clinical trial will compare ePT and uPOD. Both groups will be seen initially by a podiatrist before allocation to a group that will receive physical therapy intervention consisting primarily of manual therapy, exercise, and modalities, or podiatric care consisting primarily of a stretching handout, medication, injections, and orthotics. Treatment in each group will be directed by practice guidelines and a procedural manual, yet the specific intervention for each participant will be selected by the treating provider. Between-group differences in the Foot and Ankle Ability Measure 6 months following the initial visit will be the primary outcome collected by an independent investigator. In addition, differences in the European Quality of Life – Five Dimensions, Numeric Pain Rating Scale, Global Rating of Change (GROC), health-related costs, and cost-effectiveness at 6 weeks, 6 months, and 1 year will be compared between groups. The association between successful outcomes based on GROC score and participant expectations of recovery

  7. Surgical management of a diabetic calcaneal ulceration and osteomyelitis with a partial calcanectomy and a sural neurofasciocutaneous flap.

    PubMed

    Ignatiadis, Ioannis A; Tsiampa, Vassiliki A; Arapoglou, Dimitrios K; Georgakopoulos, Georgios D; Gerostathopoulos, Nicolaos E; Polyzois, Vasilios D

    2010-01-01

    The treatment of calcaneal osteomyelitis in diabetic patients poses a great challenge to the treating physician and surgeon. The use of a distally based sural neurofasciocutaneous flap after an aggressive debridement of non-viable and poorly vascularized tissue and bone that is combined with a thorough antibiotic regimen provides a great technique for adequate soft tissue coverage of the heel. In this case report, the authors describe the aforementioned flap as a versatile alternative to the use of local or distant muscle flaps for diabetic patients with calcaneal osteomyelitis and concomitant large wounds.

  8. Surgical management of a diabetic calcaneal ulceration and osteomyelitis with a partial calcanectomy and a sural neurofasciocutaneous flap

    PubMed Central

    Ignatiadis, Ioannis A.; Tsiampa, Vassiliki A.; Arapoglou, Dimitrios K.; Georgakopoulos, Georgios D.; Gerostathopoulos, Nicolaos E.; Polyzois, Vasilios D.

    2010-01-01

    The treatment of calcaneal osteomyelitis in diabetic patients poses a great challenge to the treating physician and surgeon. The use of a distally based sural neurofasciocutaneous flap after an aggressive debridement of non-viable and poorly vascularized tissue and bone that is combined with a thorough antibiotic regimen provides a great technique for adequate soft tissue coverage of the heel. In this case report, the authors describe the aforementioned flap as a versatile alternative to the use of local or distant muscle flaps for diabetic patients with calcaneal osteomyelitis and concomitant large wounds. PMID:22396813

  9. Delayed Reconstruction by Total Calcaneal Allograft following Calcanectomy: Is It an Option?

    PubMed Central

    Degeorge, Benjamin; Forget, David; Gaillard, Florent; Canovas, François

    2016-01-01

    Many options are available in literature for the management of delayed reconstruction following calcanectomy. In cases of low-grade tumor lesions, conservative surgery can be considered. We describe a case of delayed reconstruction by calcaneal allograft after calcanectomy for low-grade chondrosarcoma. At 12-month follow-up, the patient had no pain; MSTS score and AOFAS score were satisfactory. Subtalar nonunion was observed with no secondary displacement or graft necrosis. The aim of conservative treatment for this patient was to restore normal gait with plantigrade locomotion and function of the Achilles tendon. Calcaneal reconstruction by total allograft is an alternative approach following calcanectomy for calcaneal tumors. We also discussed other options of calcaneal reconstruction. PMID:27990308

  10. Heritability of calcaneal quantitative ultrasound measures in healthy adults from the Fels Longitudinal Study.

    PubMed

    Lee, Miryoung; Czerwinski, Stefan A; Choh, Audrey C; Towne, Bradford; Demerath, Ellen W; Chumlea, Wm Cameron; Sun, Shumei S; Siervogel, Roger M

    2004-11-01

    Quantitative ultrasound (QUS) measurements of bone have been reported to predict osteoporotic fracture risk in postmenopausal women and older men. Although many studies have examined the heritability of bone mineral density (BMD), few studies have estimated the heritability of calcaneal QUS phenotypes. In the present study, we examined the genetic regulation of calcaneal QUS parameters in individuals from nuclear and extended families. The study population includes 260 men and 295 women aged 18-91 years (mean+/-SD: 46+/-16 years) who belong to 111 pedigrees in the Fels Longitudinal Study. Three measures of calcaneal structure were collected from both the right and left heel using the Sahara bone sonometer. These measures included broadband ultrasound attenuation (BUA), speed of sound (SOS), and the quantitative ultrasound index (QUI). We used a variance components based maximum likelihood method to estimate the heritability of QUS parameters while simultaneously adjusting for covariate effects. Additionally, we used bivariate extensions of these methods to calculate additive genetic and random environmental correlations among QUS measures. All phenotypes demonstrated statistically significant heritabilities (P<0.0000001). Heritabilities in the right heel (h2+/-SE) were h2=0.59+/-0.10 for BUA, h2=0.73+/-0.09 for SOS, and h2=0.72+/-0.09 for QUI. Similarly, heritabilities for the left heel were h2=0.52+/-0.10, h2=0.75+/-0.10, and h2=0.70+/0.10, respectively. There was evidence for significant genetic and environmental correlations among these six QUS measures. Combinations of QUS measures in the right and left heel demonstrated genetic correlations of 0.94-0.99 and all were significantly different from one indicating at least a partially unique genetic architecture for each of these measures. This study demonstrates that QUS measures of the calcaneus among healthy men and women are heritable, and there are large shared additive genetic effects among all of the traits

  11. Plating for intra-articular calcaneal fractures…. Is it an overkill?

    PubMed Central

    Kulkarni, Himanshu Gurunath; Mane, Vilas S.; Gaonkar, Kiran L.; Patil, Pravin P.; Shaha, Mandar S.; Patel, Nirav S.; Desai, Nagesh R.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Even after evolution of computerized tomography and improved surgical measures, treatment of intraarticular calcaneal fractures remains a controversy. Hence this study was carried out to compare functional outcomes of displaced intraarticular calcaneal fractures, treated with operative management with plating and conservative management with cast. Material and methods This study was carried out as a prospective, comparative study. Twenty nine (30 fractures) patients with acute, displaced intraarticular fractures of calcaneum aged 18–50 years, were enrolled in the study. Open fractures and fractures older than two weeks were excluded. 30 fractures were divided into two groups (operative and conservative; n = 15 in each). Evaluation in form of post treatment restoration of Bohler's angle, heel varus angle and with Creighton–Nebraska (C–N) score for functional outcome was done at the end of 12 months. Results When we consider the clinical evaluation under the C–N score, the results of operatively managed calcaneal fractures are slightly better than those of the conservative group. But this did not have any statistical significance. Also, there was significant difference in pre and post treatment Bohler's angle and heel varus angle in operative group. Three cases of plating suffered from post-operative wound dehiscence. Conclusion A relatively better functional outcome was observed in displaced and comminuted fractures in plating, provided that the Bohler's angle was restored. In conservative group, functional outcome of minimally displaced fractures were better than displaced comminuted fractures. Post treatment Bohlers angle has prognostic importance in functional outcome. PMID:26155050

  12. Muscle activation of paraspinal muscles in different types of high heels during standing

    PubMed Central

    Han, Dongwook

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] This study researched the effects of different types of high heels on the muscles surrounding the cervical spine, the thoracic spine, and the lumbar spine by analyzing muscle activation of the paraspinal muscles during standing while wearing high heels. The high heels were all of the same height: 8 cm. [Subjects and Methods] The 28 subjects in this experiment were females in their 20s with a foot size of 225–230 mm and a normal gait pattern. To measure the muscle activation of the paraspinal muscles, EMG electrodes were attached on the paraspinal muscles around C6, T7, and L5. The muscle activation during standing while wearing 8-cm-high wedge heels, setback heels, and French heels was then measured. The measurements were performed 3 times each, and the mean value was used for analysis. [Results] The levels of muscle activation of the paraspinal muscles induced by standing on wedge heels, setback heels, and French heels in the cervical and lumbar areas were significantly higher than those induced by standing on bare feet. But there was no significant difference according to the heel types. [Conclusion] The height of the heels presented a greater variable than the width of the heels on the muscle activation of paraspinal muscles. Therefore, wearing high heels is not recommended for those who have pain or functional problems in the cervical and/or lumbar spine. PMID:25642040

  13. Muscle activation of paraspinal muscles in different types of high heels during standing.

    PubMed

    Han, Dongwook

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] This study researched the effects of different types of high heels on the muscles surrounding the cervical spine, the thoracic spine, and the lumbar spine by analyzing muscle activation of the paraspinal muscles during standing while wearing high heels. The high heels were all of the same height: 8 cm. [Subjects and Methods] The 28 subjects in this experiment were females in their 20s with a foot size of 225-230 mm and a normal gait pattern. To measure the muscle activation of the paraspinal muscles, EMG electrodes were attached on the paraspinal muscles around C6, T7, and L5. The muscle activation during standing while wearing 8-cm-high wedge heels, setback heels, and French heels was then measured. The measurements were performed 3 times each, and the mean value was used for analysis. [Results] The levels of muscle activation of the paraspinal muscles induced by standing on wedge heels, setback heels, and French heels in the cervical and lumbar areas were significantly higher than those induced by standing on bare feet. But there was no significant difference according to the heel types. [Conclusion] The height of the heels presented a greater variable than the width of the heels on the muscle activation of paraspinal muscles. Therefore, wearing high heels is not recommended for those who have pain or functional problems in the cervical and/or lumbar spine.

  14. Anatomic relationship of heel spur to surrounding soft tissues: greater variability than previously reported.

    PubMed

    Li, J; Muehleman, C

    2007-11-01

    The stimulating factor for the development of heel spur (calcaneal exostosis) is controversial. In a sample of elderly cadaveric specimens, using radiographic, gross morphological, and histological investigation, we demonstrate that heel spurs are generally not found in the trajectory of traction from the plantar aponeurosis enthesis or plantar muscles. Rather, they are variably associated with soft tissues including loose connective tissue, fibrocartilage, muscle, and aponeurosis. Furthermore, the bony trabeculae of the spur are not aligned in the direction of soft tissue traction, but rather in the direction of stress on the calcaneus during walking and standing. These results substantiate the view that the heel spur may be a skeletal response to stress and may serve to protect the bone against the development of microfractures.

  15. Calcaneus (Heel Bone) Fractures

    MedlinePlus

    ... Calcaneus (Heel Bone) Fractures cont. Page ( 5 ) • Early motion. Many doctors encourage motion of the foot and ankle early in the ... therapy. Specific exercises can improve the range of motion in your foot and ankle, and strengthen supporting ...

  16. Is calcaneal inclination higher in patients with insertional Achilles tendinosis? A case-controlled, cross-sectional study.

    PubMed

    Shibuya, Naohiro; Thorud, Jakob C; Agarwal, Monica R; Jupiter, Daniel C

    2012-01-01

    Insertional Achilles tendinosis is a condition where a patient complains of isolated pain at the Achilles tendon insertion site due to intratendinous degeneration. It has been suggested that this condition is associated with cavus foot deformity. However, to our knowledge, there is no study that has confirmed this observation. We carried out a cross-sectional, case-controlled study to explore the association of increased calcaneal inclination-a surgically important characteristic of cavus foot deformity-with insertional Achilles tendinosis. Patients with Achilles tendinosis and matched controls without the pathology were compared. Although a statistically significant difference was detected in calcaneal inclination angle between these 2 groups (p = .038), we felt that the difference was not clinically significant (calcaneal inclination angle = 20.9 vs. 18.9, respectively). Within the limitations of the study, we conclude that there is no clinically significant difference in calcaneal inclination between those with or without insertional Achilles tendinosis.

  17. Long-term follow-up of heel spur surgery. A 10-year retrospective study.

    PubMed

    Vohra, P K; Giorgini, R J; Sobel, E; Japour, C J; Villalba, M A; Rostkowski, T

    1999-02-01

    A comparative retrospective study of 48 open heel spur surgeries and 20 endoscopic plantar fasciotomies was conducted involving 59 patients over a 10-year period. There was a significant reduction in heel pain at the time of follow-up (average, 3 years) for both groups. Overall, 85% of procedures were associated with patient satisfaction with the results, and patients said that they would recommend heel spur surgery for relief of severe heel pain in 94% of cases. Factors influencing the postoperative outcome, such as duration of preoperative symptoms, extent of conservative care, and obesity, are discussed.

  18. Dual energy x-ray laser measurement of calcaneal bone mineral density

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hakulinen, M. A.; Saarakkala, S.; Töyräs, J.; Kröger, H.; Jurvelin, J. S.

    2003-06-01

    In dual energy x-ray absorptiometry (DXA) the photon attenuation is assumed to be similar in soft tissue overlying, adjacent to and inside the measured bone. In the calcaneal dual energy x-ray laser (DXL) technique, this assumption is not needed as attenuation by soft tissues at the local bone site is determined by combining DXA and heel thickness measurements. In the present study, 38 subjects were measured with DXL Calscan, Lunar PIXI and Lunar DPX-IQ DXA instruments and Hologic Sahara ultrasound instrument, and the performance and agreement of the instruments were analysed. Furthermore, numerical simulations on the effect of non-uniform fat-to-lean tissue ratio within soft tissue in heel were conducted. In vivo short-term precision (CV%, sCV%) of DXL Calscan (1.24%, 1.48%) was similar to that of Lunar PIXI (1.28%, 1.60%). Calcaneal areal bone mineral densities (BMD, g cm-2) measured using DXL Calscan and Lunar PIXI predicted equally well variations in BMD of femoral neck (r2 = 0.63 and 0.52, respectively) or lumbar spine (r2 = 0.61 and 0.64, respectively), determined with Lunar DPX-IQ. BMD values measured with DXL Calscan were, on average, 19% lower (p < 0.01) than those determined with Lunar PIXI. Interestingly, the difference in BMD values between instruments increased as a function of body mass index (BMI) (r2 = 0.17, p < 0.02) or heel thickness (r2 = 0.37, p < 0.01). Numerical simulations suggested that the spatial variation of soft tissue composition in heel can induce incontrollable inaccuracy in BMD when measured with the DXA technique. Theoretically, in contrast to DXA instruments, elimination of the effect of non-uniform soft tissue is possible with DXL Calscan.

  19. Corrective Osteotomies for Malunited Tongue-Type Calcaneal Fractures.

    PubMed

    Yu, Guang-Rong; Zhang, Ming-Zhu; Yang, Yun-Feng

    2016-03-01

    Displaced tongue-type fractures of the calcaneus can lead to severe pain and disability if not treated appropriately. Failure to reduce articular displacement may require subtalar joint arthrodesis with subsequent loss of function. The subtalar joint is crucial for normal foot and ankle function. In selected cases, if the malunited joint is still in good condition, it is preserved by corrective osteotomy. A joint-preserving osteotomy with axial realignment is a treatment option for malunited tongue-type calcaneal fractures encountered early on, before the development of subtalar arthrosis in carefully selected patients.

  20. [Evaluation of the effectiveness of the calcaneal spurs radiotherapy].

    PubMed

    Miszczyk, Leszek; Woźniak, Grzegorz; Jochymek, Bozena; Trela, Krystyna; Urban, Andrzej

    2003-01-01

    The radiotherapy results of 46 calcaneal spurs were analysed. Patients were irradiated using fraction dose of 1.0 Gy, 1.5 Gy or 2.0 Gy up to total dose of 2.0-22.5 Gy. All patients previously had chronic pain in the plantar region influencing possibility of walking and not reacting for conventional treatment. Whole group was periodically controlled after the treatment completion. The mean follow-up period was 12.5 months. The complete pain relief was observed in 9% cases one month after treatment and in 52% during the last control. The lack of analgetic effect was noted only in 3% cases as well one month after the treatment as during the last examination. Performed statistical analysis showed only inverse significant correlation between degree of pain relief six months after the treatment and duration of symptoms. Obtained results allow to form conclusion that radiotherapy of calcaneal spurs is easy, effective and safe way of analgetic treatment giving good results after low fraction and total delivered doses and that its efficacy depends on symptoms duration what is correlated to disease stage.

  1. OPTIMAL POSITION OF THE HEEL FOLLOWING RECONSTRUCTION OF THE STAGE II ADULT ACQUIRED FLATFOOT DEFORMITY

    PubMed Central

    Conti, Matthew S.; Ellis, Scott J.; Chan, Jeremy Y.; Do, Huong T.; Deland, Jonathan T.

    2016-01-01

    Background While previous work has demonstrated a linear relationship between the amount of medializing calcaneal osteotomy (MCO) and the change in radiographic hindfoot alignment following reconstruction, an ideal postoperative hindfoot alignment has yet to be reported. The aim of this study was to identify an optimal postoperative hindfoot alignment by correlating radiographic alignment with patient outcomes. Methods Fifty-five feet in 55 patients underwent flatfoot reconstruction for stage II AAFD by two fellowship-trained foot and ankle orthopedic surgeons. Hindfoot alignment was determined as previously described by Saltzman and El-Khoury. Changes in pre- and postoperative scores in each FAOS subscale were calculated for patients in postoperative hindfoot valgus (≥0 mm valgus, n=18), mild varus (>0 to 5 mm varus, n=17), and moderate varus (>5 mm varus, n=20). Analysis of variance and post-hoc Tukey’s tests were used to compare the change in FAOS scores between these three groups. Results At 22 months or more postoperatively, patients corrected to mild hindfoot varus showed a significantly greater improvement in the FAOS pain subscale compared to patients in valgus (p=0.04) and symptoms subscale compared to patients in moderate varus (p=0.03). Although mild hindfoot varus did not differ significantly from moderate varus or valgus in the other subscales, mild hindfoot varus did not perform worse than these alignments in any FAOS subscale. No statistically significant correlations between intraoperative MCO slide distances and FAOS subscales were found. Conclusions Our study indicates that correction of hindfoot alignment to between 0 and 5 mm of varus on the hindfoot alignment view (clinically a straight heel) following stage II flatfoot reconstruction was associated with the greatest improvement in clinical outcomes following hindfoot reconstruction in stage II AAFD. PMID:25948692

  2. Achilles Pain.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Connors, G. Patrick

    Five ailments which can cause pain in the achilles tendon area are: (1) muscular strain, involving the stretching or tearing of muscle or tendon fibers; (2) a contusion, inflammation or infection called tenosynovitis; (3) tendonitis, the inflammation of the tendon; (4) calcaneal bursitis, the inflammation of the bursa between the achilles tendon…

  3. The effect of heel elevation on strain within the plantar aponeurosis: in vitro study.

    PubMed

    Kogler, G F; Veer, F B; Verhulst, S J; Solomonidis, S E; Paul, J P

    2001-05-01

    Mild, temporary reduction of symptoms from plantar fasciitis have been reported with the use of high heeled shoes (i.e. cowboy boots, ladies pumps). However, little is known on how heel elevation may contribute to a decrease in the pain and inflammation. The aim of this study was to quantify strain in the plantar aponeurosis in cadaveric feet with the use of various heel elevation configurations. An in vitro method that simulated "static" stance was used to determine the loading characteristics of the plantar aponeurosis (n = 12). Heel elevation was evaluated with blocks placed beneath the heel and with a contoured platform that simulated the arch profile of a shoe at three different heel heights (2.0, 4.0, 6.0 cm) with a level plane serving as the control. Strain in the plantar aponeurosis decreased with elevations of the heel that simulated the arch profile of a shoe at load levels (337, 450 N) (P < 0.05). Elevations of the heel with blocks did not significantly affect strain in the plantar aponeurosis (P < 0.05). Contrasting results of some specimen limbs compared with the overall means suggests that the influence of heel elevation on loading of the plantar aponeurosis may be dependent on individual variation and foot structure differences. Therefore, clinicians should be cautious in recommending heel elevation as a treatment for plantar fasciitis since some subjects may not achieve the desired decrease in plantar aponeurosis strain.

  4. The Pathomechanics Of Calcaneal Gait

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sutherland, David H.; Cooper, Les

    1980-07-01

    The data acquisition system employed in our laboratory includes optical, electronic and computer subsystems. Three movie camera freeze the motion for analysis. The film is displayed on a motion analyzer, and the body segment positions are recorded in a three dimensional coordinate system with Graf/pen sonic digitizer. The angular rotations are calculated by computer and automatically plotted. The force plate provides measurements of vertical force, foreaft shear, medial-lateral shear, torque, and center of pressure. Electromyograms are superimposed upon gait movies to permit measurement of muscle phasic activity. The Hycam movie camera si-multaneously films (through separate lens) the subject and oscilloscope. Movement measurements, electromyograms, and floor reaction forces provide the data base for analysis. From a study of the gait changes in five normal subjects following tibial nerve block, and from additional studies of patients with paralysis of the ankle plantar flexors, the pathomechanics of calcaneal gait can be described. Inability to transfer weight to the forward part of the foot produces ankle instability and reduction of contralateral step length. Excessive drop of the center of mass necessitates com-pensatory increased lift energy output through the sound limb to restore the height of the center of mass. Excessive stance phase ankle dorsiflexion produces knee instability requiring prolonged quadriceps muscle phasic activity.

  5. The effect of different depths of medial heel skive on plantar pressures

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Foot orthoses are often used to treat lower limb injuries associated with excessive pronation. There are many orthotic modifications available for this purpose, with one being the medial heel skive. However, empirical evidence for the mechanical effects of the medial heel skive modification is limited. This study aimed to evaluate the effect that different depths of medial heel skive have on plantar pressures. Methods Thirty healthy adults (mean age 24 years, range 18–46) with a flat-arched or pronated foot posture and no current foot pain or deformity participated in this study. Using the in-shoe pedar-X® system, plantar pressure data were collected for the rearfoot, midfoot and forefoot while participants walked along an 8 metre walkway wearing a standardised shoe. Experimental conditions included a customised foot orthosis with the following 4 orthotic modifications: (i) no medial heel skive, (ii) a 2 mm medial heel skive, (iii) a 4 mm medial heel skive and (iv) a 6 mm medial heel skive. Results Compared to the foot orthosis with no medial heel skive, statistically significant increases in peak pressure were observed at the medial rearfoot – there was a 15% increase (p = 0.001) with the 4 mm skive and a 29% increase (p < 0.001) with the 6 mm skive. No significant change was observed with the 2 mm medial heel skive. With respect to the midfoot and forefoot, there were no significant differences between the orthoses. Conclusions This study found that a medial heel skive of 4 mm or 6 mm increases peak pressure under the medial rearfoot in asymptomatic adults with a flat-arched or pronated foot posture. Plantar pressures at the midfoot and forefoot were not altered by a medial heel skive of 2, 4 or 6 mm. These findings provide some evidence for the effects of the medial heel skive orthotic modification. PMID:22889267

  6. Correlation between Parameters of Calcaneal Quantitative Ultrasound and Hip Structural Analysis in Osteoporotic Fracture Patients

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Hailiang; Li, Ming; Yin, Pengbin; Peng, Ye; Gao, Yuan; Zhang, Lihai; Tang, Peifu

    2015-01-01

    Background Calcaneal quantitative ultrasound (QUS), which is used in the evaluation of osteoporosis, is believed to be intimately associated with the characteristics of the proximal femur. However, the specific associations of calcaneal QUS with characteristics of the hip sub-regions remain unclear. Design A cross-sectional assessment of 53 osteoporotic patients was performed for the skeletal status of the heel and hip. Methods We prospectively enrolled 53 female osteoporotic patients with femoral fractures. Calcaneal QUS, dual energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA), and hip structural analysis (HSA) were performed for each patient. Femoral heads were obtained during the surgery, and principal compressive trabeculae (PCT) were extracted by a three-dimensional printing technique-assisted method. Pearson’s correlation between QUS measurement with DXA, HSA-derived parameters and Young’s modulus were calculated in order to evaluate the specific association of QUS with the parameters for the hip sub-regions, including the femoral neck, trochanteric and Ward’s areas, and the femoral shaft, respectively. Results Significant correlations were found between estimated BMD (Est.BMD) and BMD of different sub-regions of proximal femur. However, the correlation coefficient of trochanteric area (r = 0.356, p = 0.009) was higher than that of the neck area (r = 0.297, p = 0.031) and total proximal femur (r = 0.291, p = 0.034). Furthermore, the quantitative ultrasound index (QUI) was significantly correlated with the HSA-derived parameters of the trochanteric area (r value: 0.315–0.356, all p<0.05) as well as with the Young’s modulus of PCT from the femoral head (r = 0.589, p<0.001). Conclusion The calcaneal bone had an intimate association with the trochanteric cancellous bone. To a certain extent, the parameters of the calcaneal QUS can reflect the characteristics of the trochanteric area of the proximal hip, although not specifically reflective of those of the femoral neck

  7. [Controversies over heel pressure ulcers].

    PubMed

    Rueda López, J

    2013-02-01

    Article whose content was exposed in the workshops of the GNEAUPP Congress, held in Seville in November2012, and which refers to ulcers by pressure on the heels as a location exposed to the analysis. A pressure ulcer is a lesion located in skin I underlying tissue usually over a bone prominence, as a result of the pressure, or pressure in combination with the shears. A number of contributing factors or confounding factors are also associated with ulcers by pressure; the importance of these factors still not been elucidated. The heels are next to the sacred area, parts of the body that most frequently presents ulcers by pressure, The importance of the predisposing factors for ulcers in the sacral area as humidity has been studied in recent years, but in heels, remains one of the most important locations in the extremities, which entails adverse outcomes such as amputation in persons with comorbid diseases like Diabetes Mellitus (DM). The incidence of ulcers on heels in patients with DM and without it, is approximately 19-32%. Everything and be a problem associated with elderly people and chronic pathologies, in acute patients are a problem that this underrated, but not devoid of controversy. In hospitals of treble in 2006, the NPUAP encrypted the incidence of UPPin heels in a 43%; in one systematic review conducted by Reddy et al. (2006) puts revealed that 60% of pressure ulcers is produced. The problem of the UPP in heels is present in all the areas of intervention and particularly in paediatric units intensive care, where the first localization it is the occipital area followed by the heels.

  8. High Heels Increase Women's Attractiveness.

    PubMed

    Guéguen, Nicolas

    2015-11-01

    Research has found that the appearance of women's apparel helps increase their attractiveness as rated by men and that men care more about physical features in potential opposite-sex mates. However, the effect of sartorial appearance has received little interest from scientists. In a series of studies, the length of women's shoe heels was examined. A woman confederate wearing black shoes with 0, 5, or 9 cm heels asked men for help in various circumstances. In Study 1, she asked men to respond to a short survey on gender equality. In Study 2, the confederate asked men and women to participate in a survey on local food habit consumption. In Study 3, men and women in the street were observed while walking in back of the female confederate who dropped a glove apparently unaware of her loss. It was found that men's helping behavior increased as soon as heel length increased. However, heel length had no effect on women's helping behavior. It was also found that men spontaneously approached women more quickly when they wore high-heeled shoes (Study 4). Change in gait, foot-size judgment, and misattribution of sexiness and sexual intent were used as possible explanations.

  9. Treatment of Calcaneal Fracture With Severe Soft Tissue Injury and Osteomyelitis: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Karns, Michael; Dailey, Steven K; Archdeacon, Michael T

    2015-01-01

    Advancements in surgical technique have resulted in the ability to reconstruct lower extremity injuries that would have previously been treated by amputation. Currently, a paucity of data is available specifically addressing limb amputation versus reconstruction for calcaneal fractures with severe soft tissue compromise. Reconstruction leaves the patient with their native limb; however, multiple surgeries, infections, chronic pain, and a poor functional outcome are very real possibilities. We present the case of a complex calcaneal fracture complicated by soft tissue injury and osteomyelitis that highlights the importance of shared decision-making between patient and surgeon when considering reconstruction versus amputation. This case exemplifies the need for open communication concerning the risks and benefits of treatment modalities while simultaneously considering the patient's expectations and desired outcomes.

  10. How I Manage Heel Spur Syndrome.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seder, Joseph I.

    1987-01-01

    This article discusses plantar fascitis and heel spurs, the two contributing causes of heel spur syndrome. Treatment methods, which include rest, anti-inflammatory medication, shoe padding, and, as a last resort, surgery are described. (Author/MT)

  11. Getting to the heel of the problem: plantar fascia lesions.

    PubMed

    Jeswani, T; Morlese, J; McNally, E G

    2009-09-01

    Heel pain is a frequent disabling symptom. Clinical diagnosis is often difficult with a large range of possible diagnoses. Lesions of the plantar fascia form an important group. We present a review describing the common lesions of the plantar fascia, including plantar fasciitis, plantar fascia rupture, plantar fibromatosis, and plantar xanthoma, and illustrate them with appropriate magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and ultrasound imaging. We also address foreign-body reactions, enthesopathy, and diabetic fascial disease.

  12. Calcaneal loading during walking and running

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Giddings, V. L.; Beaupre, G. S.; Whalen, R. T.; Carter, D. R.

    2000-01-01

    PURPOSE: This study of the foot uses experimentally measured kinematic and kinetic data with a numerical model to evaluate in vivo calcaneal stresses during walking and running. METHODS: External ground reaction forces (GRF) and kinematic data were measured during walking and running using cineradiography and force plate measurements. A contact-coupled finite element model of the foot was developed to assess the forces acting on the calcaneus during gait. RESULTS: We found that the calculated force-time profiles of the joint contact, ligament, and Achilles tendon forces varied with the time-history curve of the moment about the ankle joint. The model predicted peak talocalcaneal and calcaneocuboid joint loads of 5.4 and 4.2 body weights (BW) during walking and 11.1 and 7.9 BW during running. The maximum predicted Achilles tendon forces were 3.9 and 7.7 BW for walking and running. CONCLUSIONS: Large magnitude forces and calcaneal stresses are generated late in the stance phase, with maximum loads occurring at approximately 70% of the stance phase during walking and at approximately 60% of the stance phase during running, for the gait velocities analyzed. The trajectories of the principal stresses, during both walking and running, corresponded to each other and qualitatively to the calcaneal trabecular architecture.

  13. Operative compared to non-operative treatment of displaced intra-articular calcaneal fractures

    PubMed Central

    Nouraei, Mohammad Hadi; Moosa, Farhad Mostafa

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The aim of this study was to compare outcomes of open reduction and rigid internal fixation of displaced calcaneal fractures with that of non operative treatment. METHODS: Seventy two consecutive patients with displaced intra-articular calcaneal fractures were selected regarding inclusive and exclusive criteria and then were randomly allocated to surgical and non surgical groups. First group underwent open reduction and internal fixation with reconstruction plate and screws fixation and the other group were treated with closed reduction and cast immobilization. Data were collected by clinical observation and a check list. Data was analyzed by chi-square and student's t-test. RESULTS: The results showed significant difference between outcomes of surgical treatment and nonsurgical method (p = 0.001). There were some differences between two methods in terms of decreasing pain [Odd Ratio (OR): 6.72, p = 0.001], swelling (OR: 6.80, p = 0.001), increased range of motion of the joints (p = 0.001), decreased late osteoarthritis (OR: 2.33, p = 0.22) in favor of surgical group. CONCLUSIONS: Open reduction and internal fixation of displaced calcaneal fractures in absence of open fracture, severe osteoporosis, or comminution, poor general condition may be the preferred method of treatment. PMID:22279476

  14. Regional plantar foot pressure distributions on high-heeled shoes-shank curve effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cong, Yan; Lee, Winson; Zhang, Ming

    2011-12-01

    Forefoot pain is common in high-heeled shoe wearers due to the high pressure caused by the center of body mass moving forward and the increased arch height with heel elevation. Sufficient arch support could reduce the high pressure over forefoot. However, too much arch support could lead to abnormal foot alignment and pain over midfoot. Little information is reported on the relationship among plantar arch height, shank curve design and plantar pressure. This study aimed at quantifying the plantar arch height changes at different heel heights and investigating the effect of shank curve on plantar pressure distribution. The plantar arch height increased to (7.6±1.3)mm at heel height of 75 mm. The Chinese standard suggests the depth of last should be 8.5mm for heel height of 75 mm. When a shank curve with higher depth of last (11 mm) was used, the peak pressure over forefoot further decreased in midstance phase, which might ease the forefoot problems, while the peak pressure over midfoot increased but not exceeded the discomfort pressure thresholds. To achieve a more ideal pressure distribution in high-heeled shoes, a higher than expected depth of last would be suggested that would not cause discomfort over midfoot.

  15. Music modulates behaviour of premature infants following heel lance.

    PubMed

    Butt, M L; Kisilevsky, B S

    2000-03-01

    The physiological and behavioural effects of music during recovery from heel lance were examined in 14 preterm infants at 29 to 36 weeks post-conceptual age (PCA). Infants were tested on 2 occasions: during a music condition and during a no-music control condition. Each condition was videotaped during 3 periods: baseline, heel lance, and recovery. Infants were divided into 2 age groups for data analyses: less than and greater than 31 weeks PCA. Mixed model ANOVAs showed that heel lance elicited a stress response (i.e., increased heart rate, decreased oxygen saturation, increased state-of-arousal, and increased facial actions indicative of pain) in both age groups. The stress response was greater in the older group. During recovery, the older group had a more rapid return of heart rate, behavioural state, and facial expressions of pain to baseline levels in the presence of compared to the absence of music. It was concluded that music is an effective NICU intervention following a stress-provoking stimulus in infants older than 31 weeks PCA.

  16. [Underfoot pressure distribution of a patient after fracture of the calcaneal bone and bilateral hallux amputation--case report].

    PubMed

    Lorkowski, Jacek; Trybus, Marek; Hładki, Waldemar; Brongel, Leszek

    2006-01-01

    The aim of our study was to estimate underfoot pressure distribution of a patient after bilateral hallux amputation and the unilateral calcaneal bone fracture on the left side at the end of orthopaedic end rehabilitation treatment. The pedobarographic examination during bipedal standing revealed localisation of maximal pressure at H region on the side of fracture and on MT1 and H foot regions on the other side. After the and of orthopaedic treatment underfoot pressure distribution changes persists in spite of pain regression.

  17. Calcaneal chondrosarcoma: a case report.

    PubMed

    de Moraes, Frederico Barra; Linhares, Nicolle Diniz; de Souza Domingues, Pryscilla Moreira; Warzocha, Vanessa Nogueira Machado; Soares, Jefferson Martins

    2014-01-01

    The objective was to report on a rare case of chondrosarcoma of the bones of the foot, and specifically the calcaneus. The patient was a 30-year-old woman with a complaint of painless nodulation on the lateral face of the calcaneus, which she had had for around eight years, which then started to present significant pain. Radiography showed a tumor with imprecise limits, compromising the calcaneus, talus and lateral malleolus. The lesion had a destructive, aggressive and osteolytic appearance, with invasion of the surrounding soft tissues and the presence of points of calcification. Amputation was performed in the middle third of the right lower leg, with a histological diagnosis of chondrosarcoma. The case evolved with local recurrence of the tumor formation and subsequent amputation in the middle third of the right thigh. One year after the second amputation, the patient evolved with metastasis from the chondrosarcoma in soft tissues throughout the body and in the lungs, and she died one year and ten months after the diagnosis was made. Chondrosarcomas that involve the calcaneus are rare in young adults, with few reports in the literature. For this reason, the present report becomes important in that it shows that even though this is a rare condition, it is present in our environment. Early investigation is essential, especially by means of imaging examinations, with the aim of diminishing the chances of malignant transformation and consequent complications, so as to avoid death.

  18. Examining the degree of pain reduction using a multielement exercise model with a conventional training shoe versus an ultraflexible training shoe for treating plantar fasciitis.

    PubMed

    Ryan, Michael; Fraser, Scott; McDonald, Kymberly; Taunton, Jack

    2009-12-01

    Plantar fasciitis is a common injury to the plantar aponeurosis, manifesting as pain surrounding its proximal insertion at the medial calcaneal tubercle. Pain is typically worse in the morning when getting out of bed, and may subside after the tissue is sufficiently warmed up. For running-based athletes and individuals who spend prolonged periods of time on their feet at work, plantar fasciitis may become recalcitrant to conservative treatments such as ice, rest, and anti-inflammatory medication. Exercise-based therapies have received only limited attention in the literature for this common problem, yet they are becoming increasingly validated for pain relief and positive tissue remodeling at other sites of similar soft-tissue overuse injury. This study reports on pain outcomes in individuals experiencing chronic plantar fasciitis while wearing a shoe with an ultraflexible midsole (Nike Free 5.0) (FREE) versus a conventional training (CON) shoe in a 12-week multielement exercise regimen, and after a 6-month follow-up. Adults with >or= 6-month history of painful heel pain were recruited and randomly assigned to wear 1 of the 2 shoes. All subjects completed the same exercise protocol. A visual analogue scale item tracked peak pain in the preceding 24 hours taken at baseline, 6- and 12-week points, and at the 6-month follow-up. Twenty-one subjects completed the program (9 FREE; 12 CON). Both groups reported significant improvements in pain by the 6-month follow-up, and the FREE group reported an overall reduced level of pain throughout the study as a result of lower mean pain scores at the midpoint and post-test compared with the CON group. The exercise regimen employed in this study appears to reduce pain associated with chronic plantar fasciitis, and in doing so, the Nike 5.0 shoe may result in reductions in pain earlier than conventional running shoes.

  19. Significance of heel pad confinement for the shock absorption at heel strike.

    PubMed

    Jørgensen, U; Ekstrand, J

    1988-12-01

    Shock absorption (SA) is a simple way to reduce the body load and can be used in the prevention and treatment of injuries. The heel pad is the most important shock absorber in the shoe heel complex. The purpose of this study was to investigate whether the SA at heel strike can be increased by heel support in people and shoes with high or low SA. The impact forces at heel strike were measured on an AMTI (R) force platform. Fourteen legs were tested in seven persons (nine with normal and five with low heel pad SA) in gait analysis and in human drop tests. The tests were performed barefooted, and in a soccer and a running shoe (selected by shoe drop test), with and without the distal 2 cm of the heel counter. The heel pad confinement produced by the heel counter (the heel counter effect) increased the SA in both shoe types significantly in both impact situations. The mean increase in SA was 8.8% (range 5.8%-15.5%). The heel counter effect was in all situations significantly higher in persons with low heel pad shock absorbency (LHPSA) than in those with normal heel pads. The barefoot impact peak force per kg body weight was significantly higher (6% mean) on the side with LHPSA. The running shoe provided the significantly greatest SA compared with the soccer shoe. It is concluded that the shock absorbency at heel strike can be increased significantly by heel support, with highest effect in persons with LHPSA, both in shoes with high and low SA.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  20. A retrospective descriptive study of nursing home residents with heel eschar or blisters.

    PubMed

    Shannon, Mary M

    2013-01-01

    Pressure ulcers on heels are a serious problem in nursing home patients and can lead to complications. Current clinical guidelines recommend leaving dry heel eschar intact, but the evidence for this recommendation is largely based on expert opinion and not always followed. To examine outcomes of heel pressure ulcers in nursing home patients, a retrospective study was conducted by reviewing the charts of patients in 15 different nursing homes who had a heel eschar or a heel blister during a period of 50 months. In all facilities, standard protocol of care consisted of offloading the area and keeping eschar and blisters dry and debriding only if the eschar or blister became loose. A total of 263 heel wounds were identified. Of those, 179 (68%) had eschar and 84 (32%) were blisters. Almost half of all patients (41%) were lost to follow-up. All but one (amputation related to pain from ischemia) of the remaining wounds (n = 154) healed. Ninety-four of the 95 wounds with eschar and 57 of 57 wounds with blisters healed after an average of 11 (SD 9.44) weeks for wounds with eschar and 6 (SD 4.75) weeks for blister-covered wounds. These results suggest practitioners can follow current clinical guidelines for the management of these wounds until further research comparing different protocols of care has been conducted.

  1. Calcaneal Fracture Management: Extensile Lateral Approach Versus Small Incision Technique.

    PubMed

    Kiewiet, Nathan J; Sangeorzan, Bruce J

    2017-03-01

    Calcaneal fracture management has historically been a controversial topic and represents an area of sustained interest over the past several decades. The authors review current methods for calcaneal fracture fixation with an extensile lateral approach and small incision techniques. Early reports of small incision techniques have reported promising outcomes and reduced risks for complications. These techniques may be beneficial to reduce the risk of soft tissue complications and improve the rate of recovery.

  2. [Prevention of pressure ulcers in heels].

    PubMed

    Verdú Soriano, José; López Casanaova, Pablo; Fuentes Pagés, Gemma; Torra i Bou, Joan-Enric

    2004-09-01

    Heels are, for all assistance levels, one of the most frequent locations for the development of pressure ulcers (PU). In this study we deal to investigate in order to determine in patients at risk in an Internal Medicine Unit, the PU incidence on heels, after applying a specific prevention protocol. This protocol particularly designed for pressure ulcers on heels included a combined application of special hydrocellular dressings specially shaped for heels (Allevyn Heel), hyper-oxygenated fatty acids (Mepentol) and special surfaces for pressure management (Aerocare); afterwards, we attempted a comparison of our results with those from previous similar studies. We designed a prospective study which lasted from May 1-2002 until June 30-2003, with a sample of 100 patients without PU included in the study when admitted to the unit. The cumulated incidence established for PU in heels is a 4% which means an incidence rate of 2.06 PU in heels per 1000 persons/day. After observing the results we may affirm that applying the protocol is, under a clinical point of view, as effective as other measures used in previous studies. If we focus on the cost-benefit, the protocol studied represents an option with an excellent cost-efficiency relationship.

  3. Shock absorbency of factors in the shoe/heel interaction--with special focus on role of the heel pad.

    PubMed

    Jørgensen, U; Bojsen-Møller, F

    1989-06-01

    The heel pad acts as a shock absorber in walking and in heel-strike running. In some patients, a reduction of its shock-absorbing capacity has been connected to the development of overuse injuries. In this article, the shock absorption of the heel pad as well as external shock absorbers are studied. Individual variation and the effect of trauma and confinement on the heel pad were specifically investigated. Drop tests, imitating heel impacts, were performed on a force plate. The test specimens were cadaver heel pads (n = 10); the shoe sole component consisted of ethyl vinyl acetate (EVA) foam and Sorbothane inserts. The shock absorption was significantly greater in the heel pad than in the external shock absorbers. The mean heel pad shock absorption was 1.1 times for EVA foam and 2.1 times for Sorbothane. The shock absorption varied by as much as 100% between heel pads. Trauma caused a decrease in the heel pad shock absorbency (24%), whereas heel pad confinement increased the shock absorbency (49% in traumatized heel pads and 29.5% in nontraumatized heel pads). These findings provide a biomechanical rationale for the clinical observations of a correlation between heel pad shock absorbency loss and heel strike-dependent overuse injuries. To increase shock absorbency, confinement of the heel pad should be attempted in vivo.

  4. Effect of non-sucrose sweet tasting solution on neonatal heel prick responses.

    PubMed Central

    Ramenghi, L. A.; Griffith, G. C.; Wood, C. M.; Levene, M. I.

    1996-01-01

    A substance commercially described as 'sugar free,' used as a sweetener for paracetamol suspension, was evaluated on measures of neonatal pain. Sixty infants were randomly allocated to receive one of four solutions before heel stab blood sampling: sterile water (placebo); 25 or 50% sucrose (weight/volume); and the commercial sweet-tasting solution. There was a significant reduction in crying time and pain score 3 minutes after the painful stimulus in all groups compared with the controls. It is concluded that this sweet-tasting solution has analgesic effects as potent as those of concentrated sucrose solutions. PMID:8777661

  5. High-heeled shoes and musculoskeletal injuries: a narrative systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Barnish, Maxwell S; Barnish, Jean

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To conduct the first systematic review from an epidemiological perspective regarding the association between high-heeled shoe wear and hallux valgus, musculoskeletal pain, osteoarthritis (OA) and both first-party and second-party injury in human participants without prior musculoskeletal conditions. Setting A systematic review of international peer-reviewed scientific literature across seven major languages. Data sources Searches were conducted on seven major bibliographic databases in July 2015 to initially identify all scholarly articles on high-heeled shoes. Supplementary manual searches were conducted. Titles, abstracts and full-text articles were sequentially screened to identify all articles assessing epidemiological evidence regarding the association between high-heeled shoe wear and hallux valgus, musculoskeletal pain, OA and both first-party and second-party injury in human participants without prior musculoskeletal conditions. Standardised data extraction and quality assessment (Threats to Validity tool) were conducted. Primary and secondary outcome measures Musculoskeletal pain or OA as assessed by clinical diagnosis or clinical assessment tool. First-party or second-party injury. Results 644 unique records were identified, 56 full-text articles were screened and 18 studies included in the review. Four studies assessed the relationship with hallux valgus and three found a significant association. Two studies assessed the association with OA and neither found a significant association. Five studies assessed the association with musculoskeletal pain and three found a significant association. Eight studies assessed first-party injury and seven found evidence of a significant injury toll associated with high-heeled shoes. One study provided data on second-party injury and the injury toll was low. Conclusions High-heeled shoes were shown to be associated with hallux valgus, musculoskeletal pain and first-party injury. No conclusive evidence

  6. Clinical Importance of the Heel Drop Test and a New Clinical Score for Adult Appendicitis

    PubMed Central

    Ahn, Shin; Lee, Hyeji; Choi, Wookjin; Ahn, Ryeok; Hong, Jung-Suk; Sohn, Chang Hwan; Seo, Dong Woo; Lee, Yoon-Seon; Lim, Kyung Soo; Kim, Won Young

    2016-01-01

    Objective We tried to evaluate the accuracy of the heel drop test in patients with suspected appendicitis and tried to develop a new clinical score, which incorporates the heel drop test and other parameters, for the diagnosis of this condition. Methods We performed a prospective observational study on adult patients with suspected appendicitis at two academic urban emergency departments between January and August 2015. The predictive characteristics of each parameter, along with heel drop test results were calculated. A composite score was generated by logistic regression analysis. The performance of the generated score was compared to that of the Alvarado score. Results Of the 292 enrolled patients, 165 (56.5%) had acute appendicitis. The heel drop test had a higher predictive value than rebound tenderness. Variables and their points included in the new (MESH) score were pain migration (2), elevated white blood cell (WBC) >10,000/μL (3), shift to left (2), and positive heel drop test (3). The MESH score had a higher AUC than the Alvarado score (0.805 vs. 0.701). Scores of 5 and 11 were chosen as cut-off values; a MESH score ≥5 compared to an Alvarado score ≥5, and a MESH score ≥8 compared to an Alvarado score ≥7 showed better performance in diagnosing appendicitis. Conclusion MESH (migration, elevated WBC, shift to left, and heel drop test) is a simple clinical scoring system for assessing patients with suspected appendicitis and is more accurate than the Alvarado score. Further validation studies are needed. PMID:27723842

  7. On high heels and short muscles: a multiscale model for sarcomere loss in the gastrocnemius muscle.

    PubMed

    Zöllner, Alexander M; Pok, Jacquelynn M; McWalter, Emily J; Gold, Garry E; Kuhl, Ellen

    2015-01-21

    High heels are a major source of chronic lower limb pain. Yet, more than one third of all women compromise health for looks and wear high heels on a daily basis. Changing from flat footwear to high heels induces chronic muscle shortening associated with discomfort, fatigue, reduced shock absorption, and increased injury risk. However, the long-term effects of high-heeled footwear on the musculoskeletal kinematics of the lower extremities remain poorly understood. Here we create a multiscale computational model for chronic muscle adaptation to characterize the acute and chronic effects of global muscle shortening on local sarcomere lengths. We perform a case study of a healthy female subject and show that raising the heel by 13cm shortens the gastrocnemius muscle by 5% while the Achilles tendon remains virtually unaffected. Our computational simulation indicates that muscle shortening displays significant regional variations with extreme values of 22% in the central gastrocnemius. Our model suggests that the muscle gradually adjusts to its new functional length by a chronic loss of sarcomeres in series. Sarcomere loss varies significantly across the muscle with an average loss of 9%, virtually no loss at the proximal and distal ends, and a maximum loss of 39% in the central region. These changes reposition the remaining sarcomeres back into their optimal operating regime. Computational modeling of chronic muscle shortening provides a valuable tool to shape our understanding of the underlying mechanisms of muscle adaptation. Our study could open new avenues in orthopedic surgery and enhance treatment for patients with muscle contracture caused by other conditions than high heel wear such as paralysis, muscular atrophy, and muscular dystrophy.

  8. Analysis of heel pad tissues mechanics at the heel strike in bare and shod conditions.

    PubMed

    Fontanella, C G; Forestiero, A; Carniel, E L; Natali, A N

    2013-04-01

    A combined experimental and numerical approach is used to investigate the interaction phenomena occurring between foot and footwear during the heel strike phase of the gait. Two force platforms are utilised to evaluate the ground reaction forces of a subject in bare and shod walking. The reaction forces obtained from the experimental tests are assumed as loading conditions for the numerical analyses using three dimensional models of the heel region and of the running shoe. The heel pad region, as fat and skin tissues, is described by visco-hyperelastic and fibre-reinforced hyperelastic formulations respectively and bone region by a linear orthotropic formulation. Different elastomeric foams are considered with regard to the outsole, the midsole and the insole layers. The mechanical properties are described by a hyperfoam formulation. The evaluation of the mechanical behaviour of the heel pad tissues at the heel strike in bare and shod conditions is performed considering different combinations of materials for midsole and insole layers. Results allow for the definition of the influence of different material characteristics on the mechanical response of the heel pad region, in particular showing the compressive stress differentiation in the bare and shod conditions.

  9. Spontaneous calcaneal fracture in patients with diabetic foot ulcer: Four cases report and review of literature

    PubMed Central

    Evran, Mehtap; Sert, Murat; Tetiker, Tamer; Akkuş, Gamze; Biçer, Ömer Sunkar

    2016-01-01

    Spontaneous calcaneal fractures in diabetic patients without obvious trauma may occur, sometimes accompanying diabetic foot ulcers. In the current study we report four cases who were hospitalized for diabetic foot ulcer with concomitant calcaneal fractures. There were four diabetic patients (one type 1 and three type 2) who registered with diabetic foot ulcers with coexisting calcaneal fractures, all of which were classified as Type A according to Essex Lopresti Calcaneal Fracture Classification. Two of the patients with renal failure were in a routine dialysis program, as well as vascular compromise and osteomyelitis in all of the patients. The diabetic foot ulcer of the 61 years old osteoporotic female patient healed with local debridement, vacuum assisted closure and then epidermal growth factor while the calcaneal fracture was then followed by elastic bandage. In two patients could not prevent progression of diabetic foot ulcers and calcaneal fractures to consequent below-knee amputation. The only patient with type 1 diabetes mellitus improved with antibiotic therapy and split thickness skin grafting, while the calcaneal fracture did not heal. In the current study we aimed to emphasize the spontaneous calcaneal fractures as possible co-existing pathologies in patients with diabetic foot ulcers. After all the medical treatment, amputation below knee had to be performed in 2 patients. It should be noted that other accompanying conditions such as impaired peripheral circulation, osteomyelitis, chronic renal failure, and maybe osteoporosis is a challenge of the recovery of calcaneal fractures and accelerate the progress to amputation in diabetic patients. PMID:27458594

  10. Primary subtalar arthrodesis for the treatment of comminuted intra-articular calcaneal fractures.

    PubMed

    Potenza, V; Caterini, R; Farsetti, P; Bisicchia, S; Ippolito, E

    2010-07-01

    We report the short- and mid-term results in six patients (seven feet) affected by markedly comminuted intra-articular calcaneal fractures (Sanders type IV), treated by primary subtalar arthrodesis. The average age at surgery was 40 years. In all patients, arthrodesis of the subtalar joint was performed using a limited lateral approach to the calcaneus; it was stabilised with two or three cannulated screws. No patient had a preliminary reduction and internal fixation of the fracture. The time from injury to surgery averaged 20 days because all of the patients had associated visceral and/or other skeletal injuries. All of the patients were followed up clinically and radiographically 2 times, at an average of 12 months and 53 months after surgery. At the short-term follow-up, the mean AOFAS score was 70 points; the X-rays showed a complete fusion of the subtalar joint in all seven feet, without any sign of osteoarthritis of the calcaneo-cuboid and the talo-navicular joints. In all cases, an altered shape of the calcaneus was present. At the mid-term follow-up, the mean AOFAS score increased to 85 points; in one patient, radiographic signs of osteoarthritis of the calcaneo-cuboid and the talo-navicular joints were present and, in another patient, only talo-navicular joint was present, although both patients were free from pain. The difference between the two AOFAS scores was statistically significant. We believe that primary subtalar arthrodesis performed for markedly comminuted Sanders type IV calcaneal fractures yielded good mid-term results, and it is especially indicated when surgical treatment is delayed for whatever reason. A preliminary open reduction and internal fixation to restore the normal height of the calcaneus before performing the subtalar arthrodesis, as suggested by several authors, does not seem indispensable to obtain good clinical results.

  11. The Heel Pad in Congenital Idiopathic Clubfoot: Implications of Empty Heel for Clinical Severity Assessment

    PubMed Central

    Adegbehingbe, Olayinka O.; Asuquo, J. E.; Joseph, Mejabi O.; Alzahrani, Mohammed; Morcuende, Jose A.

    2015-01-01

    Background Clubfoot has been evaluated in many ways, including the most common classifications of clubfoot, described by Caterrall and Piraniis based on six clinical signs. The purpose of this study was to gain better understanding of the heel pad in relation to the term “empty heel”, and to propose modification of clubfoot severity scoring system based on “empty heel”. Methods A combination of prospective study of 79 clubfoot patients treated with Ponseti method and literature review of heel pad anatomy and biomechanics. The setting was a university teaching hospital. The ethical research committee approved study protocol and informed consent of patients' parent obtained. The selection criteria included patients' diagnosed congenital idiopathic clubfoot, age < 2years, no history of previous treatment and tenotomy indicated. An evaluation of patient was assessed by orthopaedic surgeons trained on Ponseti method and has above 5 years experience. Data analysis performed on the age, sex, Pirani scores at onset of treatment, tenotomy, and 6 month after initial full correction. Results One hundred and thirty-two clubfeet in 79 patients (56 males, 23 females) completed Ponseti protocol. The median age at presentation was 5.2 months (range 0.1–23.7 months). The mean right foot abduction after correction 57.30(S.D. 9.20), and for the left foot, was 56.30 (S.D. 9.40). The mean right foot dorsiflexion was −13.70 (S.D. 18.40) before correction while after correction, it was 20.00 (S.D. 4.50) and for the left, the mean was −8.50 (S.D. 9.60) before correction and 21.00 (S.D. 4.30) after correction. Eighteen (22.8%) patients (10 bilateral, 9 unilateral) had clubfeet with empty heel score above zero point at initial full correction (p<0.001). Clinic anatomy shows the heel pad is a solid complex structure existing in normal, moderate and severe atrophied form. Heel pad is attached tightly to calcaneus without a cavity for the calcaneus to drop. Conclusions Heel pad

  12. Effect of repeated doses of sucrose during heel stick procedure in preterm neonates.

    PubMed

    Johnston, C C; Stremler, R; Horton, L; Friedman, A

    1999-03-01

    The purpose of this randomized clinical trial was to test the efficacy of repeated versus single dose sucrose to decrease pain from routine heel stick procedures in preterm neonates. Infants (n = 48) in the first week of life with a mean gestational age of 31 weeks received 0.05 ml of 24% sucrose solution or sterile water by mouth (1) 2 min prior to actual lancing of the heel; (2) just prior to lancing, and (3) 2 min after lancing. The single-dose group received sucrose for the first dose and water for the second and third dose; the repeated-dose group received sucrose three times, and the placebo group received only water. The Premature Infant Pain Profile (PIPP) scores were obtained for five 30-second blocks from lancing. Both sucrose groups had lower PIPP scores (single sucrose pain scores, 6.8-8.2, p = 0.07; repeated sucrose pain scores, 5.3-6. 2, p < 0.01) than water (pain scores 7.9-9.1), and in the last block, the repeated dose had lower scores than the single dose (6.2 vs. 8. 2, p < 0.05).

  13. Clinical efficacy and prognosis factors of open calcaneal fracture: a retrospective study

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xuebin; Liu, Yueju; Peng, Aqin; Wang, Haili; Zhang, Yingze

    2015-01-01

    Background: Treatment of open calcaneal fractures remains to be a challenge for orthopaedic surgeons. The aim of this study is to assess factors affecting the treatment results of open calcaneal fractures. Methods: A total of 98 patients who have 101 open calcaneal fractures were recruited in our hospital, they were all treated with a standard protocol based on the appearance of the traumatic wound. Data on mechanism of injury, location and size of wound, classification, fixation methods and subsequent soft-tissue complications were collected and evaluated. AOFAS Ankle-Hindfoot Survey and physical examinations were performed to access outcomes. Results: No statistical difference was found in complication and AOFAS score in open calcaneal fractures treated with different fixation, and no statistical difference was found in AOFAS between gustilo I and II type open calcaneal fractures (P > 0.05). There was significant difference between gustilo I and III type or gustilo II and III type fractures (P < 0.05). The more serious soft tissue injury of open calcaneal fracture lead to the worse outcome and higher incidence of complications obtained. Conclusion: Open calcaneal fractures have a high propensity for soft-tissue complications no matter which fixation method was chose. There was no significant difference between patients who had been treated with different fixations in complication rates. Soft-tissue injury played an important role in outcomes of open calcaneal fractures. Deep infections and osteomyelitis were rare by means of emergency debridement and following repeated debridement. PMID:26064282

  14. CT findings of a unicameral calcaneal bone cyst containing a fluid-fluid level.

    PubMed

    Gallagher, Thomas A; Lim-Dunham, Jennifer E; Vade, Aruna

    2007-03-01

    Calcaneal unicameral bone cysts often contain fluid, but rarely contain fluid-fluid levels. We present a case focusing on the CT findings of a large calcaneal bone cyst with a fluid-fluid level and a review of the literature.

  15. Evolution and allometry of calcaneal elongation in living and extinct primates.

    PubMed

    Boyer, Doug M; Seiffert, Erik R; Gladman, Justin T; Bloch, Jonathan I

    2013-01-01

    Specialized acrobatic leaping has been recognized as a key adaptive trait tied to the origin and subsequent radiation of euprimates based on its observed frequency in extant primates and inferred frequency in extinct early euprimates. Hypothesized skeletal correlates include elongated tarsal elements, which would be expected to aid leaping by allowing for increased rates and durations of propulsive acceleration at takeoff. Alternatively, authors of a recent study argued that pronounced distal calcaneal elongation of euprimates (compared to other mammalian taxa) was related primarily to specialized pedal grasping. Testing for correlations between calcaneal elongation and leaping versus grasping is complicated by body size differences and associated allometric affects. We re-assess allometric constraints on, and the functional significance of, calcaneal elongation using phylogenetic comparative methods, and present an evolutionary hypothesis for the evolution of calcaneal elongation in primates using a Bayesian approach to ancestral state reconstruction (ASR). Results show that among all primates, logged ratios of distal calcaneal length to total calcaneal length are inversely correlated with logged body mass proxies derived from the area of the calcaneal facet for the cuboid. Results from phylogenetic ANOVA on residuals from this allometric line suggest that deviations are explained by degree of leaping specialization in prosimians, but not anthropoids. Results from ASR suggest that non-allometric increases in calcaneal elongation began in the primate stem lineage and continued independently in haplorhines and strepsirrhines. Anthropoid and lorisid lineages show stasis and decreasing elongation, respectively. Initial increases in calcaneal elongation in primate evolution may be related to either development of hallucal-grasping or a combination of grasping and more specialized leaping behaviors. As has been previously suggested, subsequent increases in calcaneal

  16. Evolution and Allometry of Calcaneal Elongation in Living and Extinct Primates

    PubMed Central

    Boyer, Doug M.; Seiffert, Erik R.; Gladman, Justin T.; Bloch, Jonathan I.

    2013-01-01

    Specialized acrobatic leaping has been recognized as a key adaptive trait tied to the origin and subsequent radiation of euprimates based on its observed frequency in extant primates and inferred frequency in extinct early euprimates. Hypothesized skeletal correlates include elongated tarsal elements, which would be expected to aid leaping by allowing for increased rates and durations of propulsive acceleration at takeoff. Alternatively, authors of a recent study argued that pronounced distal calcaneal elongation of euprimates (compared to other mammalian taxa) was related primarily to specialized pedal grasping. Testing for correlations between calcaneal elongation and leaping versus grasping is complicated by body size differences and associated allometric affects. We re-assess allometric constraints on, and the functional significance of, calcaneal elongation using phylogenetic comparative methods, and present an evolutionary hypothesis for the evolution of calcaneal elongation in primates using a Bayesian approach to ancestral state reconstruction (ASR). Results show that among all primates, logged ratios of distal calcaneal length to total calcaneal length are inversely correlated with logged body mass proxies derived from the area of the calcaneal facet for the cuboid. Results from phylogenetic ANOVA on residuals from this allometric line suggest that deviations are explained by degree of leaping specialization in prosimians, but not anthropoids. Results from ASR suggest that non-allometric increases in calcaneal elongation began in the primate stem lineage and continued independently in haplorhines and strepsirrhines. Anthropoid and lorisid lineages show stasis and decreasing elongation, respectively. Initial increases in calcaneal elongation in primate evolution may be related to either development of hallucal-grasping or a combination of grasping and more specialized leaping behaviors. As has been previously suggested, subsequent increases in calcaneal

  17. Don't Ignore Your Kid's Heel Pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... foot and ankle surgeons. All Fellows of the College are board certified by the American Board of Foot and Ankle Surgery. Copyright © 2017 American College of Foot and Ankle Surgeons (ACFAS), All Rights ...

  18. Presence of a long accessory flexor tendon of the toes in surgical treatment for tendinopathy of the insertion of the calcaneal tendon: case report☆

    PubMed Central

    Gomes Júnior, Nelson Pelozo; Andreoli, Carlos Vicente; Pochini, Alberto de Castro; Raduan, Fernando Cipolini; Ejnisman, Benno; Cohen, Moisés

    2015-01-01

    The presence of accessory tendons in the foot and ankle needs to be recognized, given that depending on their location, they may cause disorders relating either to pain processes or to handling of the surgical findings. We describe the presence of an accessory flexor tendon of the toes, seen in surgical exposure for transferring the long flexor tendon of the hallux to the calcaneus, due to the presence of a disorder of tendinopathy of the insertion of the calcaneal tendon in association with Haglund's syndrome. PMID:26962495

  19. Presence of a long accessory flexor tendon of the toes in surgical treatment for tendinopathy of the insertion of the calcaneal tendon: case report.

    PubMed

    Gomes Júnior, Nelson Pelozo; Andreoli, Carlos Vicente; Pochini, Alberto de Castro; Raduan, Fernando Cipolini; Ejnisman, Benno; Cohen, Moisés

    2016-01-01

    The presence of accessory tendons in the foot and ankle needs to be recognized, given that depending on their location, they may cause disorders relating either to pain processes or to handling of the surgical findings. We describe the presence of an accessory flexor tendon of the toes, seen in surgical exposure for transferring the long flexor tendon of the hallux to the calcaneus, due to the presence of a disorder of tendinopathy of the insertion of the calcaneal tendon in association with Haglund's syndrome.

  20. Autograft versus sterilized allograft for lateral calcaneal lengthening osteotomies

    PubMed Central

    Müller, Sebastian A.; Barg, Alexej; Vavken, Patrick; Valderrabano, Victor; Müller, Andreas M.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Sterilized allografts may be less resistant to collapse and prone to nonunion leading to loss of correction in open wedge osteotomies. These adverse events usually occur at early time points (i.e., < 9 months postoperatively). The goal of this study was to compare sterilized allografts to autologous grafts in respect to secondary loss of hindfoot alignment and graft incorporation after lateral calcaneal lengthening osteotomies. Fifty patients (22 F/ 28 M, age: 16–69 years) who had undergone 50 lateral calcaneal lengthening osteotomies for adult flatfoot deformity were included in this retrospective study. Cortical sterilized allografts were used in 25 patients, autologous grafts in the remaining 25. Patients’ preoperative, 6 and 12 weeks, and 6 to 9 months follow-up weight-bearing radiographs of the affected foot were analyzed by 2 blinded radiologists: on each radiograph, graft incorporation, the talo-first metatarsal angle (TFMA), the talo-navicular coverage angle (TNCA), and the calcaneal pitch angle (CPA) were assessed. Loss of hindfoot alignment was defined as an increase of the TFMA or the TNCA or a decrease of the CPA, each by 5°. Inter- and intraclass correlation coefficients for TFMA, TNCA, and CPA measurements ranged from 0.93 to 0.99. At all follow-up visits, the ratio of patients with loss of hindfoot alignment and graft incorporation was not significantly different between the allograft and autograft group. However, loss of correction was associated with failure of graft incorporation. Compared with autografts, sterilized allografts do not increase the risk for loss of hindfoot alignment in lateral column lengthening of the calcaneus. With respect to mechanical resistance, allografts thus mean an equal and valid alternative without risk of donor site morbidities. PMID:27472719

  1. Corrective Osteotomies for Malunited Extra-Articular Calcaneal Fractures.

    PubMed

    Ketz, John; Clare, Michael; Sanders, Roy

    2016-03-01

    The most effective way to treat calcaneal malunions is avoidance. With any articular fracture, progressive arthrosis and dysfunction are common. By restoring the anatomy initially through reduction, late reconstructive options become less complicated. Numerous studies have shown that restoration of the anatomic alignment either through percutaneous or open techniques is effective. In patients with no or minimal articular degeneration, extrarticular joint-sparing procedures can be performed. This represents a small select group who may benefit from simple osteotomy procedures with associated soft tissue reconstruction, if needed.

  2. Reliability and Validity of the Standing Heel-Rise Test

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yocum, Allison; McCoy, Sarah Westcott; Bjornson, Kristie F.; Mullens, Pamela; Burton, Gay Naganuma

    2010-01-01

    A standardized protocol for a pediatric heel-rise test was developed and reliability and validity are reported. Fifty-seven children developing typically (CDT) and 34 children with plantar flexion weakness performed three tests: unilateral heel rise, vertical jump, and force measurement using handheld dynamometry. Intraclass correlation…

  3. Using an alternating pressure mattress to offload heels in ICU.

    PubMed

    Masterson, Sarah; Younger, Caroline

    2014-08-12

    The heel continues to be one of the most common sites of pressure damage. This article reviews the anatomy and physiology of the heel and explores significant risk factors, including those found in the critically ill patient. Interventions to prevent heel pressure ulceration by offloading the heel are explored. An evaluation of the Nimbus 4 alternating pressure mattress was undertaken within an intensive care unit (ICU) to consider the efficacy of its unique Wound Valve Technology, which is designed to help prevent heel pressure ulceration. During the evaluation period none of the patients using the Nimbus 4 developed a pressure ulcer. Staff observed that the Wound Valves provided effective pressure redistribution and, although the cells frequently needed to be adjusted, patient safety was maintained throughout. The Wound Valves were most effective on patients who were less prone to voluntary movement.

  4. INTRA ARTICULAR CALCANEAL FRACTURES: A CLINICAL AND BIOMECHANICAL ANALYSIS

    PubMed Central

    Kuschnaroff Contreras, Marcos Emilio; Kroth, Luciano Manoel; Kotani, Keith Lúcia; Da Silva Junior, Jorge Luiz; De Andrade, Mário Cesar; Vargas Ávila, Aluísio Otávio; Berral, Francisco José

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Verify the variables of plantar pressure distribution of patients submitted to surgical procedure for calcaneal fracture, and correlate them with two different surgical approaches. Method: The authors studied 15 patients between 20 and 53 years of age (average 40.06 yrs.) who had intra-joint calcaneal fractures, submitted to surgical treatment by means of two different approaches: the lateral and the sinus tarsi. The authors checked the plantar pressure distribution by correlating these variables with the two different surgical approaches. The plantar pressure distribution was assessed using the Pedar System (Novel, Gmbh, Munich, Germany), by checking the maximum peak of the hindfoot and forefoot pressure on the affected and the normal sides. Results: the mean maximum pressure of the hindfoot plantigram in both approaches showed no statistical difference (t=0.11; p=0.91), as well as the mean maximum pressure of the forefoot plantigram (t=-0,48; p=0,64). Conclusion: The authors have concluded that there were no significant statistical differences between the average maximum peak of the hindfoot and forefoot pressure on the affected side as compared to the normal side, and these variables have showed no differences when compared to the surgical approach used. PMID:27077059

  5. Is calcaneal broadband ultrasound attenuation a valid index of dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry-derived bone mass in children?

    PubMed Central

    Hirsch, R.; Nogueira, R. C.; Beck, B. R.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives The aim of the current study was to assess whether calcaneal broadband ultrasound attenuation (BUA) can predict whole body and regional dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry (DXA)-derived bone mass in healthy, Australian children and adolescents at different stages of maturity. Methods A total of 389 boys and girls across a wide age range (four to 18 years) volunteered to participate. The estimated age of peak height velocity (APHV) was used to classify children into pre-, peri-, and post-APHV groups. BUA was measured at the non-dominant heel with quantitative ultrasonometry (QUS) (Lunar Achilles Insight, GE), while bone mineral density (BMD) and bone mineral content (BMC) were examined at the femoral neck, lumbar spine and whole body (DXA, XR-800, Norland). Associations between BUA and DXA-derived measures were examined with Pearson correlations and linear regression. Participants were additionally ranked in quartiles for QUS and DXA measures in order to determine agreement in rankings. Results For the whole sample, BUA predicted 29% of the study population variance in whole body BMC and BMD, 23% to 24% of the study population variance in lumbar spine BMC and BMD, and 21% to 24% of the variance in femoral neck BMC and BMD (p < 0.001). BUA predictions were strongest for the most mature participants (pre-APHV R2 = 0.03 to 0.19; peri-APHV R2 = 0.05 to 0.17; post-APHV R2 = 0.18 to 0.28) and marginally stronger for girls (R2 = 0.25-0.32, p < 0.001) than for boys (R2 = 0.21-0.27, p < 0.001). Agreement in quartile rankings between QUS and DXA measures of bone mass was generally poor (27.3% to 38.2%). Conclusion Calcaneal BUA has a weak to moderate relationship with DXA measurements of bone mass in children, and has a tendency to misclassify children on the basis of quartile rankings. Cite this article: B. K. Weeks, R. Hirsch, R. C. Nogueira, B. R. Beck. Is calcaneal broadband ultrasound attenuation a valid index of dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry-derived bone mass

  6. Calcaneal robusticity in Plio-Pleistocene hominins: implications for locomotor diversity and phylogeny.

    PubMed

    Prang, Thomas C

    2015-03-01

    A key pedal adaptation to bipedality is a relatively large, weight-bearing calcaneus. The earliest evidence for a human-like, robust calcaneus is at 3.2 Ma in Australopithecus afarensis (A.L. 333-8, A.L. 333-55, A.L. 333-37) from Hadar, Ethiopia. Australopithecus sediba at 1.98 Ma from Malapa, South Africa displays a unique combination of primitive australopith features and more derived Homo-like features, but surprisingly is characterized by a gracile, chimpanzee-like calcaneus. The differences in calcaneal morphology suggest that these taxa differed in the frequency of arboreality and in the manner of foot function during terrestrial bipedal locomotion. This study examines calcaneal morphology in extant hominids (i.e., great apes and humans; N = 95) and fossil hominins (N = 5) to better understand the evolutionary development of calcaneal robusticity in early hominins. In particular, this study focuses on two additional fossil hominin calcanei that have not figured prominently in previous discussions of calcaneal robusticity: StW 352 and Omo 33-74-896. A measure of calcaneal robusticity was quantified as the ratio of calcaneal tuber cross-sectional area to calcaneal tuber length, which significantly differs between humans and non-humans using a sequential Bonferroni alpha adjustment for multiple comparisons. Additional multivariate analyses using Mosimann shape variables show that StW 352 and Omo 33-74-896 are more similar to Au. sediba in calcaneal tuber morphology than to Au. afarensis, suggesting that the latter taxon is better adapted for terrestrial bipedalism than at least some later species of Australopithecus. This finding implies the possibility of several complex evolutionary scenarios involving either multiple reversals in postcranial morphology in Australopithecus or the independent acquisition of adaptations to terrestrial bipedalism in Au. afarensis and Homo.

  7. The results of transfer of the tibialis anterior to the heel in patients who have a myelomeningocele.

    PubMed

    Bliss, D G; Menelaus, M B

    1986-10-01

    To study the long-term utility of transfer of the tibialis anterior tendon to the heel in patients who have a myelomeningocele, we reviewed the cases of twenty-five patients who had reached maturity. Forty-six transfers had been performed in these patients, and all of the patients had been followed for at least twelve years. At follow-up, four of the forty-six transferred muscles were functioning in a foot that was plantigrade, eleven were functioning but the foot had a persistent calcaneal deformity, and seventeen transferred muscles had never functioned. Of the fourteen remaining feet, eight had required a release of the transferred tendon because of progressive equinus deformity after the transfer and six had a minor degree of the same deformity but additional surgical treatment was not deemed necessary for them. Patients who had been operated on after the age of five years generally benefited more from the operation, in that additional surgical procedures were not necessary and the transfer was functional at the time of our review. Most of the patients in whom an equinus deformity developed after the procedure were later found to have spasticity in some of the muscles of the leg. It is likely that these patients originally had unrecognized spasticity in the transferred muscles.

  8. The effects of increasing heel height on forefoot peak pressure.

    PubMed

    Mandato, M G; Nester, E

    1999-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of increasing heel height on peak forefoot pressure. Thirty-five women were examined while wearing sneakers and shoes with 2-inch and 3-inch heels. An in-shoe pressure-measurement system was used to document the magnitude and location of plantar peak pressures. Pressure under the forefoot was found to increase significantly with increasing heel height. As the heel height increased, the peak pressure shifted toward the first metatarsal and the hallux. The reproducibility of data obtained with the in-shoe pressure-measurement system was tested in five subjects; the data were found to be reproducible to within approximately 3% of measured pressures.

  9. Older women track and field athletes have enhanced calcaneal stiffness.

    PubMed

    Welch, J M; Rosen, C J

    2005-08-01

    Vigorous weight-bearing exercise is recommended to women as a method of osteoporosis prevention. This study examined older women athletes to see if they indeed were less likely to develop osteoporosis than those in the general population, and to investigate which factors could have contributed to these results. One hundred and thirty-nine women 40-88 years old, all competitors in a USA National Masters Track and Field Championships, volunteered for the study. Masters refers to competitors > or =40 years old. Their calcaneal stiffness (SI) was measured by a Lunar Achilles+ ultrasonometer. Subjects were also measured for height and weight, and completed a questionnaire on exercise history, diet, lifestyle factors, medical and menopausal issues, and use of hormone replacement therapy (HRT). The women, mean age 57.3 years, had an overall average SI of 99.5 (T-score = 0.04) which is equivalent to that of a 20-year-old woman and 20.8% higher than expected for women of their age. Their median SI remained not different from expected peak bone SI until the age of 70. For analysis, this cohort of women was divided into two groups: premenopausal and postmenopausal athletes. The SI of both groups was correlated with the earliest age at which they had first participated in sports or exercises that impart moderate to high strain rates to the lower limbs and with current participation in high impact track and field events. Variables correlated with SI in the general population, such as weight, HRT, previous fracture, hysterectomy, and current menopausal status, did not predict SI in this cohort. In conclusion, women competing in Masters track and field at the national level had calcaneal stiffness substantially higher than expected for women of their age in the general population, and their participation in vigorous sports and activities, either currently or at a younger age, was predictive of this association.

  10. Impact reduction through long-term intervention in recreational runners: midfoot strike pattern versus low-drop/low-heel height footwear.

    PubMed

    Giandolini, Marlène; Horvais, Nicolas; Farges, Yohann; Samozino, Pierre; Morin, Jean-Benoît

    2013-08-01

    Impact reduction has become a factor of interest in the prevention of running-related injuries such as stress fractures. Currently, the midfoot strike pattern (MFS) is thought as a potential way to decrease impact. The purpose was to test the effects of two long-term interventions aiming to reduce impact during running via a transition to an MFS: a foot strike retraining versus a low-drop/low-heel height footwear. Thirty rearfoot strikers were randomly assigned to two experimental groups (SHOES and TRAIN). SHOES progressively wore low-drop/low-heel height shoes and TRAIN progressively adopted an MFS, over a 3-month period with three 30-min running sessions per week. Measurement sessions (pre-training, 1, 2 and 3 months) were performed during which subjects were equipped with three accelerometers on the shin, heel and metatarsals, and ran for 15 min on an instrumented treadmill. Synchronized acceleration and vertical ground reaction force signals were recorded. Peak heel acceleration was significantly lower as compared to pre-training for SHOES (-33.5 ± 12.8 % at 2 months and -25.3 ± 18.8 % at 3 months, p < 0.001), and so was shock propagation velocity (-12.1 ± 9.3 %, p < 0.001 at 2 months and -11.3 ± 4.6 %, p < 0.05 at 3 months). No change was observed for TRAIN. Important inter-individual variations were noted in both groups and reported pains were mainly located at the shin and calf. Although it induced reversible pains, low-drop/low-heel height footwear seemed to be more effective than foot strike retraining to attenuate heel impact in the long term.

  11. Soft tissue reconstruction for calcaneal fractures or osteomyelitis.

    PubMed

    Attinger, C; Cooper, P

    2001-01-01

    A systematic approach of the surgical management of a calcaneal fracture can minimize the potential of soft tissue complications. When reducing a closed calcaneal fracture, the incision used affects the postoperative complications. The L-shaped incision with the horizontal limb lying on the lateral glabrous junction ensures maximum blood flow to either side of the incision. Whether or not the wound can be closed primarily depends on the preexisting edema, the lost calcaneal height, and the delay between the fracture and reduction (Fig. 20). The wrinkle test is a good indicator that the incision can be closed primarily if the amount of height restored is minimal. If the edema is too great, steps should be taken to reduce it sufficiently to allow successful wound closure. If the wound, after reduction, is too wide to allow primary closure, an ADM flap laterally or an AHM flap medially should be used. For larger defects, a free flap should be considered. The three important steps to reconstruction of soft tissue defects around the calcaneus include good blood supply, a infection-free wound, and the simplest soft tissue reconstructive option that covers the wound successfully. Adequate blood supply can be determined by the use of Doppler. If the supply is inadequate, revascularization is necessary before proceeding. Achieving a clean wound requires aggressive debridement, intravenous antibiotics, and good wound care. Adjuncts that can help in achieving a clean wound include topical antibiotics (silver sulfadiazine), the VAC, and hyperbaric oxygen. Osteomyelitis has to be treated aggressively. Any suspicious bone has to be removed. Only clean, healthy, bleeding bone is left behind. Antibiotic beads can be useful when there is doubt as to whether the cancellous bone is infection-free. The beads are not a substitute for good debridement, however. Soft tissue reconstruction ranges from delayed primary closure to the use of microsurgical free flaps (Fig. 21). When bone or

  12. The effects of rocker sole and SACH heel on kinematics in gait.

    PubMed

    Wu, Wen-Lan; Rosenbaum, Dieter; Su, Fong-Chin

    2004-10-01

    The rocker sole and solid-ankle cushion-heel (SACH) heels are the most commonly prescribed external shoe modification. Only a limited number of scientific evidence exists to support these interventions in clinical practice. The objective of this study was to determine the effects of rocker soles and SACH heels on kinematics during gait. In this study, we investigated the gait parameters during level walking, stair climbing and stair descending in healthy volunteers and assessed the effects of the modified shoes on the motion of the forefoot and hindfoot compared with the traditional shoes. Eleven normal subjects participated in this study. A six-camera motion analysis system was used to capture motion trajectories. The three-dimensional (3D) coordinates of the markers were used to calculate the angles of flexion-extension, valgus-varus, and internal-external rotation at the hindfoot and forefoot joints in a gait cycle by the custom software for foot kinematic analysis. The results showed that the rocker soles offer several advantages from the viewpoint of gait kinematics. The forefoot joint excursion in sagittal plane while wearing rocker shoes was significantly less than that while wearing traditional shoes during level walking, stair climbing and stair descending. It means that they could mimic the action of the forefoot joint, aid in roll off, and simulate forefoot dorsiflexion. Since the bony structures mechanically link the forefoot joint and hindfoot joint to a triplanar axis of motion, they could be used whenever there is minimal or no motion at the forefoot joint or hindfoot joint, because of, for example, fusion, fracture, cast immobilization, orthosis design, pain, or arthritis.

  13. Assessment of medial and lateral neurovascular structures after percutaneous posterior calcaneal displacement osteotomy: a cadaver study.

    PubMed

    Didomenico, Lawrence A; Anain, Joseph; Wargo-Dorsey, Mari

    2011-01-01

    A prospective investigation of the effects on the medial and lateral neurovascular structures of the rearfoot after percutaneous posterior calcaneal displacement osteotomy was performed using 20 below the knee fresh frozen cadaver specimens. This anatomic study aimed to examine the medial and lateral neurovascular structures to determine whether they were jeopardized during execution of the osteotomy. After completion of the osteotomy, the medial plantar, lateral plantar, medial calcaneal, sural, and posterior tibial neurovascular structures, along with their respective branches, were inspected for iatrogenic injury. Our findings demonstrated that the percutaneous, subperiosteal osteotomy minimized trauma to the local soft tissue envelope and protected the adjacent neurovascular structures. Because no iatrogenic injury was observed in the cadaveric specimens, we postulated that percutaneous calcaneal displacement osteotomy is a safe, predictable, and advantageous alternative compared with open techniques for osteotomy and could result in reduced postoperative complications. The results of this investigation remain to be confirmed in the clinical setting.

  14. Pattern of outsole shoe heel wear in infantry recruits

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Excessive shoe heel abrasion is of concern to patients, parents and shoe manufacturers, but little scientific information is available. The purpose of this study was to describe the phenomenon in a group of infantry recruits performing similar physical activity, and search for biomechanical factors that might be related. Methods Seventy-six subjects (median age 19) enrolled. Pre-training parameters measured included height, weight, tibial length, foot arch height and foot progression angle. Digital plantar pressure maps were taken to calculate arch indexes. Shoe heel abrasion was assessed manually after 14 weeks of training with different-sized clock transparencies and a calliper. Results Outsole abrasion was posterolateral, averaging 12 degrees on each shoe. The average heel volume that was eroded was almost 5 cm3. The angle of maximum wear was related to right foot progression angle (r = 0.27, p = 0.02). Recruits with lateral ankle sprains had higher angles of maximal abrasion (17° versus 10°, p = 0.26) and recruits with lateral heel abrasion had more lateral ankle sprains (14% versus 3%, p = 0.12). Conclusion While shoe heel wear affects many people, very little has been done to measure it. In this study in healthy subjects, we found the main abrasion to be posterolateral. This seems to be related to foot progression angle. It was not related to hindfoot valgus/varus or other factors related to subtalar joint motion. These findings do not warrant modification of subtalar joint motion in order to limit shoe heel abrasion. PMID:23098624

  15. Open Reduction and Internal Fixation of Displaced Calcaneum, Intra-Articular Fractures by Locking Calcaneal Plate

    PubMed Central

    Santosha; Singh, Arambam Mahendra; Waikhom, Sanjib; Pakhrin, Vishal; Mukherjee, Sagnik; Debbarma, Rajkumar; Prashant, Prabhu Shrinivas

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Calcaneal fractures constitute the most common fractures in hindfoot. Lots of controversies exist in the management of calcaneal fractures but now-a-days, it is preferable to perform open reduction and internal fixation and early mobilizatation. Aim To evaluate the functional outcome after open reduction and internal fixation of displaced intra-articular fractures of the calcaneum by locking calcaneal plate. Materials and Methods The study was conducted in the Department of Orthopaedic Surgery from September 2013 to April 2016. Thirty intra-articular fractures of the calcaneum were treated by locking calcaneal plate. Patients were followed up for a period of 24 months. Bohler’s angle was measured in preoperative, immediate Post-operative period and after 2 years, follow-up was compared. Results were evaluated according to American Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Society (AOFAS) Score. Results After 24 months of follow-up, all 24 patients were available for evaluation. Radiological union was achieved in a mean time of 12.5 weeks. Mean duration of hospital stay was 21 days. Bohler’s angle was significantly higher after 2 years of follow-up when compared with preoperative x-ray. According to the AOFAS, Ankle–Hind foot Scale outcome score results were excellent in 43.3% of the patients, good in 33.3%, fair in 10%, and poor in 13.3% of patients. The mean AOFAS score was 79.9 (Range 49-96). Conclusion Open reduction and internal fixation of intra-articular fractures of the calcaneum with locking calcaneal plate gives good results. Maintenance of calcaneal height and Bohler’s angle helps to decrease the incidence of subtalar arthritis. PMID:28208957

  16. Heel strike detection using split force-plate treadmill.

    PubMed

    Rouhani, Hossein; Abe, Masaki O; Nakazawa, Kimitaka; Popovic, Milos R; Masani, Kei

    2015-03-01

    A common source of error when detecting heel-strike moments utilizing split force-plate treadmills is unwillingly stepping on contra-lateral force-plate. In this study, we quantified this error when heel-strike was detected based on such erroneous data and compared three methods to investigate how well the heel-strikes and stride-intervals were detected with erroneous data. Eleven subjects walked on a split force-plate treadmill for more than 20min. We used 20N and 50% body-weight thresholds to detect the heel-strike moments (HS20N and HS50%, respectively). Besides, we used linear approximation to estimate the unaffected force profile from affected force-plate data, and subsequently to detect the heel-strike moments (HSest). We used heel-strike moments detected by a foot-switch as a reference to compare accuracy of HS20N, HS50% and HSest. HS20N and HSest detected heel-strike moments accurately for unaffected force-plate data (median(max) errors for all subjects: 9(23) and 9(37) ms) but HS50% showed significantly larger errors (52(74) ms). Unlike HS50% and HSest, HS20N was considerably affected by the affected force-plate data (23(68) ms). The error in stride-interval measurement was relatively small using any methods for unaffected force-plate data (3(7), 6(8), and 6(12) ms), while stride-interval errors were large for some subjects when using HS20N for affected data (6(175) ms). We concluded that unwillingly stepping on contra-lateral force-plate occurred a few percent and up to 37.7% of all strides (median: 12.9%). Our proposed method (HSest) robustly showed small errors for heel-strike detection and stride-interval calculation consistently among subjects, while HS50% and HS20N showed large errors depending on subjects.

  17. Effect of revised high-heeled shoes on foot pressure and static balance during standing.

    PubMed

    Bae, Young-Hyeon; Ko, Mansoo; Park, Young-Soul; Lee, Suk-Min

    2015-04-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of revised high-heeled shoes on the foot pressure ratio and static balance during standing. [Subjects and Methods] A single-subject design was used, 15 healthy women wearing revised high-heeled shoes and general high-heeled shoes in a random order. The foot pressure ratio and static balance scores during standing were measured using a SpaceBalance 3D system. [Results] Forefoot and rearfoot pressures were significantly different between the 2 types of high-heeled shoes. Under the 3 conditions tested, the static balance score was higher for the revised high-heeled shoes than for the general high-heeled shoes, but this difference was not statistically significant. [Conclusion] Revised high-heeled shoes are preferable to general high-heeled shoes, as they result in normalization of normalized foot pressure and a positive effect on static balance.

  18. 46 CFR 174.055 - Calculation of wind heeling moment (Hm).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Calculation of wind heeling moment (Hm). 174.055 Section... Units § 174.055 Calculation of wind heeling moment (Hm). (a) The wind heeling moment (Hm) of a unit in a given normal operating condition or severe storm condition is the sum of the individual wind...

  19. 46 CFR 174.055 - Calculation of wind heeling moment (Hm).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Calculation of wind heeling moment (Hm). 174.055 Section... Units § 174.055 Calculation of wind heeling moment (Hm). (a) The wind heeling moment (Hm) of a unit in a given normal operating condition or severe storm condition is the sum of the individual wind...

  20. 46 CFR 174.055 - Calculation of wind heeling moment (Hm).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Calculation of wind heeling moment (Hm). 174.055 Section... Units § 174.055 Calculation of wind heeling moment (Hm). (a) The wind heeling moment (Hm) of a unit in a given normal operating condition or severe storm condition is the sum of the individual wind...

  1. 46 CFR 174.055 - Calculation of wind heeling moment (Hm).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Calculation of wind heeling moment (Hm). 174.055 Section... Units § 174.055 Calculation of wind heeling moment (Hm). (a) The wind heeling moment (Hm) of a unit in a given normal operating condition or severe storm condition is the sum of the individual wind...

  2. 46 CFR 174.055 - Calculation of wind heeling moment (Hm).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Calculation of wind heeling moment (Hm). 174.055 Section... Units § 174.055 Calculation of wind heeling moment (Hm). (a) The wind heeling moment (Hm) of a unit in a given normal operating condition or severe storm condition is the sum of the individual wind...

  3. Biomechanical simulation of high-heeled shoe donning and walking.

    PubMed

    Yu, Jia; Cheung, Jason Tak-Man; Wong, Duo Wai-Chi; Cong, Yan; Zhang, Ming

    2013-08-09

    Footwear serves to protect the foot in various activities, to enhance athletic performance in sports and in many cases to fulfill aesthetic and cultural needs of urban society. Most women like wearing high-heeled shoes (HHS) for the benefit of sensuous attractiveness, while foot problems are often associated. Computational modeling based on finite element (FE) analysis is a useful tool for deep understanding of foot and footwear biomechanics and incorporating footwear with foot in the model is the prerequisite. In this study, a three-dimensional FE model of coupled foot-ankle-shoe complex and preceding gait simulation were established. Interfacial contact simulation was employed to complete the donning process of foot and shoe upper contact. Three major stance phases namely heel strike, midstance and push off were simulated to investigate the biomechanical response of high-heeled shod walking. It was found that the contact pressure at all metatarsophalangeal (MTP) joints intensified and reached their maximum at push off phase during locomotion, meanwhile the first MTP had the largest magnitude. The first and fifth MTP joints had larger movements in transverse plane among all MTP joints, indicating that these two joints bended more significantly by toe box restraint during locomotion. The dorsal contact pressure at the first toe increased by four times from heel strike to push off. The established HHS donning and walking simulation in this study proved the versatility and promising potential of computational approach for realistic biomechanical evaluation and optimization of footwear design in a virtual environment.

  4. A Three-Dimensional Finite Element Analysis of Displaced Intra-Articular Calcaneal Fractures.

    PubMed

    Xu, Can; Liu, Hua; Li, Mingqing; Wang, Chenggong; Li, Kanghua

    A better understanding of displaced intra-articular calcaneal fractures, their effect on joint mechanics, and the relationship between altered mechanics and osteoarthritis could aid in the development or refinement of treatment methods. Finite element modeling is accepted as the reference standard for evaluating joint contact stresses. The objective of the present study was to analyze the in vivo joint mechanical data from finite element modeling for normal and injured subtalar joints. A 3-dimensional model of the ankle-hindfoot was developed and validated. Both height loss and width increases in the calcaneus were simulated. Next, they were used to investigate the relationship between calcaneal height or width and the contact mechanics of the posterior facet of the subtalar joint. The contact area/joint area ratio increased in the subtalar joint with injury when the calcaneal width increased. Moreover, the peak contact pressure and the proportion of the area under high contact pressure (>6 MPa) increased. The contact area/joint area ratio decreased with reduced calcaneal height, but the peak contact pressure remained almost constant. The width increases of the calcaneus somewhat limited the subtalar joint motion, especially for eversion; however, the height loss mostly resulted in subtalar rotatory instability. The height loss diminished the subtalar joint's stability in eversion, internal rotation, and external rotation. The results of the present study support the advisability of surgery for these complex injuries. Reestablishing the calcaneal height and width could restore the normal kinematics and contact stress distribution in the subtalar joint, improve the tibiotalar position, and diminish long-term degeneration in the ankle.

  5. Venepuncture is preferable to heel lance for blood sampling in term neonates

    PubMed Central

    Ogawa, S; Ogihara, T; Fujiwara, E; Ito, K; Nakano, M; Nakayama, S; Hachiya, T; Fujimoto, N; Abe, H; Ban, S; Ikeda, E; Tamai, H

    2005-01-01

    Background: The analgesic effect of oral sucrose in newborn infants undergoing painful procedures is generally accepted. For blood sampling, some studies have shown that venepuncture (VP) is less painful than heel lance (HL). Objective: To determine the least painful and most effective method among blood sampling by VP or HL with or without sucrose. Design: Randomised, double blind, placebo controlled trial. Subjects: A total of 100 healthy, full term newborn infants being screened for inborn errors of metabolism were randomly allocated to one of four experimental groups (25 infants in each). Intervention and outcome measure: Seven specially trained nurses took turns to carry out blood sampling two minutes after administration of oral sucrose or water. Neonatal pain was assessed by the neonatal facial coding system (NFCS), as well as by crying. Results: Without sucrose, the NFCS score was higher in the HL group than the VP group during blood sampling (median 58 v 23, p<0.001). Oral sucrose significantly reduced the score of the HL group (58 v 47, p<0.01) and also tended to reduce the score of the VP group (23 v 2, p<0.1). However, the HL with sucrose group still had a higher score than the VP without sucrose group (47 v 23, p<0.01). Crying and the total procedure time showed the same trends as the NFCS score. Conclusions: VP is less painful and more effective than HL for blood sampling in newborn infants. Although oral sucrose may have an additive analgesic effect, it is not necessarily required if VP is used for blood sampling. PMID:15871991

  6. Heel and toe driving on fuel cell vehicle

    DOEpatents

    Choi, Tayoung; Chen, Dongmei

    2012-12-11

    A system and method for providing nearly instantaneous power in a fuel cell vehicle. The method includes monitoring the brake pedal angle and the accelerator pedal angle of the vehicle, and if the vehicle driver is pressing both the brake pedal and the accelerator pedal at the same time and the vehicle is in a drive gear, activating a heel and toe mode. When the heel and toe mode is activated, the speed of a cathode compressor is increased to a predetermined speed set-point, which is higher than the normal compressor speed for the pedal position. Thus, when the vehicle brake is removed, the compressor speed is high enough to provide enough air to the cathode, so that the stack can generate nearly immediate power.

  7. Material properties of the heel fat pad across strain rates.

    PubMed

    Grigoriadis, Grigoris; Newell, Nicolas; Carpanen, Diagarajen; Christou, Alexandros; Bull, Anthony M J; Masouros, Spyros D

    2017-01-01

    The complex structural and material behaviour of the human heel fat pad determines the transmission of plantar loading to the lower limb across a wide range of loading scenarios; from locomotion to injurious incidents. The aim of this study was to quantify the hyper-viscoelastic material properties of the human heel fat pad across strains and strain rates. An inverse finite element (FE) optimisation algorithm was developed and used, in conjunction with quasi-static and dynamic tests performed to five cadaveric heel specimens, to derive specimen-specific and mean hyper-viscoelastic material models able to predict accurately the response of the tissue at compressive loading of strain rates up to 150s(-1). The mean behaviour was expressed by the quasi-linear viscoelastic (QLV) material formulation, combining the Yeoh material model (C10=0.1MPa, C30=7MPa, K=2GPa) and Prony׳s terms (A1=0.06, A2=0.77, A3=0.02 for τ1=1ms, τ2=10ms, τ3=10s). These new data help to understand better the functional anatomy and pathophysiology of the foot and ankle, develop biomimetic materials for tissue reconstruction, design of shoe, insole, and foot and ankle orthoses, and improve the predictive ability of computational models of the foot and ankle used to simulate daily activities or predict injuries at high rate injurious incidents such as road traffic accidents and underbody blast.

  8. Constitutive formulation and analysis of heel pad tissues mechanics.

    PubMed

    Natali, A N; Fontanella, C G; Carniel, E L

    2010-06-01

    This paper presents a visco-hyperelastic constitutive model developed to describe the biomechanical response of heel pad tissues. The model takes into account the typical features of the mechanical response such as large displacement, strain phenomena, and non-linear elasticity together with time-dependent effects. The constitutive model was formulated, starting from the analysis of the complex structural and micro-structural configuration of the tissues, to evaluate the relationship between tissue histology and mechanical properties. To define the constitutive model, experimental data from mechanical tests were analyzed. To obtain information about the mechanical response of the tissue so that the constitutive parameters could be established, data from both in vitro and in vivo tests were investigated. Specifically, the first evaluation of the constitutive parameters was performed by a coupled deterministic and stochastic optimization method, accounting for data from in vitro tests. The comparison of constitutive model results and experimental data confirmed the model's capability to describe the compression behaviour of the heel pad tissues, regarding both constant strain rate and stress relaxation tests. Based on the data from additional experimental tests, some of the constitutive parameters were modified in order to interpret the in vivo mechanical response of the heel pad tissues. This approach made it possible to interpret the actual mechanical function of the tissues.

  9. Creation of the Driver Fixed Heel Point (FHP) CAD Accommodation Model for Military Ground Vehicle Design

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-08-04

    NOTES N/A 14. ABSTRACT The objective of this effort is to create a parametric Computer- Aided Design (CAD) accommodation model for the Fixed Heel...Heel Point (FHP), accommodation model, occupant work space, central 90% of the Soldier population, encumbrance, posture and position, computer aided ...Arbor, MI ABSTRACT The objective of this effort is to create a parametric Computer- Aided Design (CAD) accommodation model for the Fixed Heel

  10. Pain Intensity after an Ice Pack Application Prior to Venipuncture among School-Age Children: An Experimental Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alalo, Fadeelah Mansour Ahmed; Ahmad, Awatef El Sayed; El Sayed, Hoda Mohamed Nafee

    2016-01-01

    Venipuncture and other invasive procedures as blood draws, intramuscular injections or heel pricks are the most commonly performed painful procedures in children. These can be a terrifying and painful experience for children and their families. The present study aimed to identify Pain intensity after an ice pack application prior to venipuncture…

  11. Surgical treatment of intraarticular calcaneous fractures of sanders' types II and III. Systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Pelliccioni, Adriano Augusto Antoniazzi; Bittar, Cíntia Kelly; Zabeu, José Luis Amim

    2012-01-01

    Objective This paper aims to identify the most effective surgical technique for intraarticular calcaneal fractures of Sanders' types II and III. Methods Systematic review of comparative randomized clinical trials on surgical treatment of the intraarticular fractures of the calcaneus (Sanders types II and III) that used the questionnaire of the American Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Society. The studies were identified and retrieved in the following databases - LILACS, MEDLINE/PubMed, Cochrane Library, SciELO, EMBASE, Science Direct, Scopus, Journals@Ovid, ISI Web of Knowledge, Evidence Based Medicine, besides consulting the references of studies accessed. The keywords used Boolean logic (AND and OR): "calcaneus fracture, calcaneous, calcaneal; surgical treatment, management; open reduction, minimally invasive, percutaneous reduction; internal fixation, external fixation. Results We identified only three randomized comparative trials. Each study compared a different technique (external fixation, percutaneous fixation with Kirchner wires and cannulated screws fixation) to the open reduction with internal fixation using plate and screws (considered the standard technique). Conclusion Comparing the series, percutaneous fixation using Kirschner wires presented the best results, however, evidence is insufficient to assert superiority of this treatment in comparison with other surgical techniques. PMID:24453579

  12. [Anatomical variants of the medial calcaneal nerve and the Baxter nerve in the tarsal tunnel].

    PubMed

    Martín-Oliva, X; Elgueta-Grillo, J; Veliz-Ayta, P; Orosco-Villaseñor, S; Elgueta-Grillo, M; Viladot-Perice, R

    2013-01-01

    The tarsal tunnel is composed of the posterior border of the medial malleoulus, the posterior aspect of the talus and the medial aspect of the calcaneus. The medial calcaneal nerve emerges from the posterior aspect of the posterior tibial nerve in 75% of cases and from the lateral plantar nerve in the remaining 25%. Finally, the medial calcaneal nerve ends as a single terminal branch in 79% of cases and in numerous terminal branches in the remaining 21%. To describe the anatomical variants of the posterior tibial nerve and its terminal branches. To describe the steps for tarsal tunnel release. To describe Baxter nerve release. The anatomical variants of the posterior tibial nerve and its terminal branches within the tarsal tunnel were studied. Then the Lam technique was performed; it consists of: 1) opening of the laciniate ligament, 2) opening of the fascia over the abductor hallucis muscle, 3) exoneurolysis of the posterior tibial nerve and its terminal branches, identifying the emergence and pathway of the medial calcaneal branch, the lateral plantar nerve and its Baxter nerve branch and the medial plantar nerve. Baxter nerve was found in 100% of cases. In 100% of cases in our series the nerve going to the abductor digiti minimi muscle of the foot was found; 87.5% of cases had two terminal branches. The dissections proved that a crucial step was the release of the distal tarsal tunnel.

  13. Branching Patterns of Medial and Inferior Calcaneal Nerves Around the Tarsal Tunnel

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Beom Suk; Choung, Phil Woo; Kwon, Soon Wook; Rhyu, Im Joo

    2015-01-01

    Objective To demonstrate the bifurcation pattern of the tibial nerve and its branches. Methods Eleven legs of seven fresh cadavers were dissected. The reference line for the bifurcation point of tibial nerve branches was an imaginary horizontal line passing the tip of the medial malleolus. The distances between the reference line and the bifurcation points were measured. The bifurcation branching patterns were categorized as type I, the pattern in which the medial calcaneal nerve (MCN) branched most proximally; type II, the pattern in which the three branches occurred at the same point; and type III, in which MCN branched most distally. Results There were seven cases (64%) of type I, three cases (27%) of type III, and one case (9%) of type II. The median MCN branching point was 0.2 cm (range, -1 to 3 cm). The median bifurcation points of the lateral plantar nerves and inferior calcaneal nerves was -0.6 cm (range, -1.5 to 1 cm) and -2.5 cm (range, -3.5 to -1 cm), respectively. Conclusion MCN originated from the tibial nerve in most cases, and plantar nerves were bifurcated below the medial malleolus. In all cases, inferior calcaneal nerves originated from the lateral plantar nerve. These anatomical findings could be useful for performing procedures, such as nerve block or electrophysiologic studies. PMID:25750872

  14. The use of nanocrystalline hydroxyapatite for the reconstruction of calcaneal fractures: Preliminary results.

    PubMed

    Huber, Franz-Xaver; Hillmeier, Joachim; McArthur, Nicholas; Kock, Hans-Jürgen; Meeder, Peter Jürgen

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to evaluate the feasibility of a nanocrystalline hydroxyapatite compound in the treatment of calcaneal fractures with osseous defects after reduction. The study included 21 patients, representing 24 closed intraarticular calcaneus fractures with large defects remaining after operative reduction. All cases were supplemented with the hydroxyapatite bone substitute and stabilized with a calcaneal honeycomb plate. Radiographs were taken at 6 weeks, 12 weeks, 6 months, and 1 year postoperatively, with specific attention given to measurement of Gissane's angle, Böhler's angle, and calcaneal height. A postoperative subjective and objective evaluation of the fracture, using the Creighton Nebraska Health Foundation scale, was performed 1 year postoperatively. Böhler's angle improved from a mean 8.6 +/- 5.3 degrees preoperatively to an immediate postoperative mean result of 31.5 +/- 6.5 degrees and 27.7 +/- 8.6 1 year postoperatively. The mean Creighton-Nebraska functional score was 86 +/- 10 at the 1-year follow-up evaluation. These results suggest that open reduction with plate fixation combined with nanocrystalline hydroxyapatite augmentation presents a good and reliable surgical technique for treatment of calcaneus fractures.

  15. Calcaneal Osteomyelitis due to Non-tuberculous Mycobacteria: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Yi, Tae-Im; Choe, Yeo-Reum; Kim, Joo-Sup; Kwon, Kye-Won

    2016-01-01

    Osteomyelitis is a bone infection caused by bacteria or other germs. Gram-positive cocci are the most common etiological organisms of calcaneal osteomyelitis; whereas, non-tuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) are rarely documented. We reported a case of NTM calcaneal osteomyelitis in a 51-year-old female patient. She had been previously treated in many local clinics with multiple local steroid injection over 50 times and extracorporeal shock-wave therapy over 20 times with the impression of plantar fasciitis for 3 years prior. Diagnostic workup revealed a calcaneal osteomyelitis and polymerase chain reaction assay on bone aspirate specimens confirmed the diagnosis of non-tuberculous mycobacterial osteomyelitis. The patient had a partial calcanectomy with antitubercular therapy. Six months after surgery, a follow-up magnetic resonance imaging showed localized chronic osteomyelitis with abscess formation. We continued anti-tubercular therapy without operation. At 18-month follow-up after surgery and comprehensive rehabilitation therapy, she was ambulating normally and able to carry out her daily activities without any discomfort. PMID:26949685

  16. Current concepts in the treatment of intra-articular calcaneal fractures: results of a nationwide survey

    PubMed Central

    van Lieshout, E. M. M.; van Ginhoven, T. M.; Heetveld, M. J.; Patka, P.

    2007-01-01

    The treatment of intra-articular calcaneal fractures is controversial and randomised clinical trials are scarce. Moreover, the socio-economic cost remains unclear. The aim of this study was to estimate the incidence, treatment preferences and socio-economic cost of this complex fracture in the Netherlands. This data may aid in planning future clinical trials and support education. The method of study was of a cross-sectional survey design. A written survey was sent to one representative of both the traumatology and the orthopaedic staff in each hospital in the Netherlands. Data on incidence, treatment modalities, complications and follow-up strategies were recorded. The socio-economic cost was calculated. The average response rate was 70%. Fracture classifications, mostly by Sanders and Essex-Lopresti, were applied by 29%. Annually, 920 intra-articular calcaneal fractures (0.4% incidence rate) were treated, mainly with ORIF (46%), conservative (39%) and percutaneous (10%) treatment. The average non-weight-bearing mobilisation was 9 weeks (SD 2 weeks). An outcome score, mainly AOFAS, was documented by 7%. A secondary arthrodesis was performed in 21% of patients. The socio-economic cost was estimated to be €21.5–30.7 million. Dutch intra-articular calcaneal fracture incidence is at least 0.4% of all fractures presenting to hospitals. Better insight into treatment modalities currently employed and costs in the Netherlands was obtained. PMID:17564705

  17. Partial calcanectomy and Ilizarov external fixation may reduce amputation need in severe diabetic calcaneal ulcers

    PubMed Central

    Akkurt, Mehmet Orçun; Demirkale, Ismail; Öznur, Ali

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: The treatment of diabetic hindfoot ulcers is a challenging problem. In addition to serial surgical debridements, hyperbaric oxygen therapy and local wound care play important roles in the surgeon’s armamentarium, for both superficial infection and gangrene of the soft tissue, often complicated by osteomyelitis of the calcaneus. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the results of an aggressive approach from diagnosis to treatment of calcaneal osteomyelitis in foot-threatening diabetic calcaneal ulcers. Methods: The study included 23 patients with diabetic hindfoot ulcers who were treated with radical excision of the necrotic tissue and application of circular external fixation. The treatment protocol was a combination of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-guided debridement of the necrotic tissues and application of an Ilizarov external fixator in plantarflexion to decrease the soft-tissue defect. Primary outcome measures were total cure of infection and obvious healing of the osteomyelitis at 12 weeks determined by MRI, and clinical cure through objective assessment of the appearance of the wound. Results: The wounds healed in 18 of the 23 patients (78%), partial recovery occurred and subsequent flap operation was performed in three patients (13%), and below-the-knee amputation was performed in two patients (9%). Conclusions: This surgical protocol is effective in ameliorating diabetic hindfoot ulcers with concomitant calcaneal osteomyelitis, and satisfactorily reduces the need for amputation. PMID:28326157

  18. Biomechanical evaluation of heel elevation on load transfer — experimental measurement and finite element analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luximon, Yan; Luximon, Ameersing; Yu, Jia; Zhang, Ming

    2012-02-01

    In spite of ill-effects of high heel shoes, they are widely used for women. Hence, it is essential to understand the load transfer biomechanics in order to design better fit and comfortable shoes. In this study, both experimental measurement and finite element analysis were used to evaluate the biomechanical effects of heel height on foot load transfer. A controlled experiment was conducted using custom-designed platforms. Under different weight-bearing conditions, peak plantar pressure, contact area and center of pressure were analyzed. A three-dimensional finite element foot model was used to simulate the high-heel support and to predict the internal stress distributions and deformations for different heel heights. Results from both experiment and model indicated that heel elevations had significant effects on all variables. When heel elevation increased, the center of pressure shifted from the midfoot region to the forefoot region, the contact area was reduced by 26% from 0 to 10.2 cm heel and the internal stress of foot bones increased. Prediction results also showed that the strain and total tension force of plantar fascia was minimum at 5.1 cm heel condition. This study helps to better understand the biomechanical behavior of foot, and to provide better suggestions for design parameters of high heeled shoes.

  19. Calcaneal Insufficiency Fracture after Ipsilateral Total Knee Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Jeong, Min; Shin, Sung Jin; Kang, Byoung Youl

    2016-01-01

    Insufficiency fracture of the calcaneus is a rare entity. In the absence of trauma, evaluating a painful ankle in an elderly patient can be difficult and also it might be overlook the insufficiency fracture. We experienced a case of insufficiency calcaneus fracture that occurred after ipsilateral total knee arthroplasty. Here, we report our case with a review of literatures. PMID:26981521

  20. The relationship of calcaneal apophyseal ossification and Sanders hand scores to the timing of peak height velocity in adolescents.

    PubMed

    Nicholson, A D; Sanders, J O; Liu, R W; Cooperman, D R

    2015-12-01

    The accurate assessment of skeletal maturity is essential in the management of orthopaedic conditions in the growing child. In order to identify the time of peak height velocity (PHV) in adolescents, two systems for assessing skeletal maturity have been described recently; the calcaneal apophyseal ossification method and the Sanders hand scores. The purpose of this study was to compare these methods in assessing skeletal maturity relative to PHV. We studied the radiographs of a historical group of 94 healthy children (49 females and 45 males), who had been followed longitudinally between the ages of three and 18 years with serial radiographs and physical examination. Radiographs of the foot and hand were undertaken in these children at least annually between the ages of ten and 15 years. We reviewed 738 radiographs of the foot and 694 radiographs of the hand. PHV was calculated from measurements of height taken at the time of the radiographs. Prior to PHV we observed four of six stages of calcaneal apophyseal ossification and two of eight Sanders stages. Calcaneal stage 3 and Sanders stage 2 was seen to occur about 0.9 years before PHV, while calcaneal stage 4 and Sanders stage 3 occurred approximately 0.5 years after PHV. The stages of the calcaneal and Sanders systems can be used in combination, offering better assessment of skeletal maturity with respect to PHV than either system alone.

  1. Kangaroo care and behavioral and physiologic pain responses in very-low-birth-weight twins: a case study.

    PubMed

    Cong, Xiaomei; Cusson, Regina M; Hussain, Naveed; Zhang, Di; Kelly, Sharon P

    2012-09-01

    The purpose of this case study was to describe pain responses in three study conditions: longer (30 minutes) kangaroo care (KC) before and throughout heel stick (KC30), shorter (15 minutes) KC before and throughout heel stick (KC15), and incubator care throughout heel stick (IC) in 28-week gestational age twins. Pain responses were measured by crying time, Preterm Infant Pain Profile (PIPP), and heart rate variability indexes, including low-frequency power (LF, representing sympathetic activity), high-frequency power (HF, parasympathetic activity), and LF/HF ratio (sympathetic-parasympathetic balance). Both twins cried more and had higher PIPP pain scores and tachycardia during heel stick in the IC condition. Infant B had an incident of apnea and tachycardia by the end of the heel stick and a bradycardia episode during recovery in the IC condition. The twins had lower LF/HF ratios (better autonomic nervous system balance) during recovery in both longer and shorter KC conditions compared with the IC condition. Infant B had difficulty returning to LF/HF ratio baseline level after the painful procedure in the IC condition. These data suggest that both longer and shorter KC before and throughout painful procedures can be helpful in reducing behavioral and physiologic pain responses in preterm infants.

  2. Reliability of the Kinetic Measures under Different Heel Conditions during Normal Walking

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liu, Yuanlong; Wang, Yong Tai

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine and compare the reliability of 3 dimension reaction forces and impulses in walking with 3 different heel shoe conditions. These results suggest that changing the height of the heels affects mainly the reliability of the ground reaction force and impulse measures on the medial and lateral dimension and not…

  3. The influence of heel height on utilized coefficient of friction during walking.

    PubMed

    Blanchette, Mark G; Brault, John R; Powers, Christopher M

    2011-05-01

    Wearing high heel shoes has been associated with an increased potential for slips and falls. The association between wearing high heels and the increased potential for slipping suggests that the friction demand while wearing high heels may be greater when compared to wearing low heel shoes. The purpose of this study was to determine if heel height affects utilized friction (uCOF) during walking. A secondary purpose of this study was to compare kinematics at the ankle, knee, and hip that may explain uCOF differences among shoes with varied heel heights. Fifteen healthy women (mean age 24.5±2.5yrs) participated. Subjects walked at self-selected velocity under 3 different shoe conditions that varied in heel height (low: 1.27cm, medium: 6.35cm, and high: 9.53cm). Ground reaction forces (GRFs) were recorded using a force platform (1560Hz). Kinematic data were obtained using an 8 camera motion analysis system (120Hz). Utilized friction was calculated as the ratio of resultant shear force to vertical force. One-way repeated measures ANOVAs were performed to test for differences in peak uCOF, GRFs at peak uCOF and lower extremity joint angles at peak uCOF. On average, peak uCOF was found to increase with heel height. The increased uCOF observed in high heel shoes was related to an increase in the resultant shear force and decrease in the vertical force. Our results signify the need for proper public education and increased footwear industry awareness of how high heel shoes affect slip risk.

  4. Estimating the material properties of heel pad sub-layers using inverse Finite Element Analysis.

    PubMed

    Ahanchian, Nafiseh; Nester, Christopher J; Howard, David; Ren, Lei; Parker, Daniel

    2017-02-01

    Detailed information about the biomechanical behaviour of plantar heel pad tissue contributes to our understanding of load transfer when the foot impacts the ground. The objective of this work was to obtain the hyperelastic and viscoelastic material properties of heel pad sub-layers (skin, micro-chamber and macro-chamber layers) in-vivo. An anatomically detailed 3D Finite Element model of the human heel was used to derive the sub-layer material properties. A combined ultrasound imaging and motorised platform system was used to compress heel pad and to create input data for the Finite Element model. The force-strain responses of the heel pad and its sub-layers under slow compression (5mm/s) and rapid loading-hold-unloading cycles (225mm/s), were measured and hyperelastic and viscoelastic properties of the three heel pad sub-layers were estimated by the model. The loaded (under ∼315N) thickness of the heel pad was measured from MR images and used for hyperelastic model validation. The capability of the model to predict peak plantar pressure was used for further validation. Experimental responses of the heel pad under different dynamic loading scenarios (loading-hold-unloading cycles at 141mm/s and sinusoidal loading with maximum velocity of 300mm/s) were used to validate the viscoelastic model. Good agreement was achieved between the predicted and experimental results for both hyperelastic (<6.4% unloaded thickness, 4.4% maximum peak plantar pressure) and viscoelastic (Root Mean Square errors for loading and unloading periods <14.7%, 5.8% maximum force) simulations. This paper provides the first definition of material properties for heel pad sub-layers by using in-vivo experimental force-strain data and an anatomically detailed 3D Finite Element model of the heel.

  5. A minimally invasive modified reverse sural adipofascial flap for treating posttraumatic distal tibial and calcaneal osteomyelitis.

    PubMed

    Yang, Chenglin; Geng, Shuo; Fu, Chunjiang; Sun, Jiabing; Bi, Zhenggang

    2013-12-01

    Our aim was to report a modified reverse sural adipofascial flap for treating posttraumatic distal tibial or calcaneal osteomyelitis. We retrospectively reviewed the records of 15 patients with posttraumatic distal tibial or calcaneal osteomyelitis treated with modified reverse sural adipofascial flaps between 2005 and 2010. The flap was raised through 2 short incisions in the posterior aspect of the lower leg. The raw surface of the flap was covered with a full-thickness skin graft. Donor sites were closed primarily. Lower Extremity Functional Scale (LEFS) scores and 2-point discrimination (TPD) were recorded preoperatively and postoperatively. There were 12 males and 3 females, with an average age of 39 years (range = 18-55 years). Twelve lesions were in the distal tibia and 3 in the calcaneus. The flap ranged in size from 11 × 5 cm to 16 × 7 cm. All flaps survived, and skin grafts healed without complications. Recipient sites had an anatomic contour, and all patients were able to ambulate without the assistance of special shoes or orthoses. No infections recurred, and no ulcers of the grafted skin occurred with the regular wearing of shoes. The follow-up duration was 18.7 ± 6.8 months (range = 12-36 months). The mean LEFS score increased from 22.4 ± 8.3 preoperatively to 53.0 ± 11.2 postoperatively (P = .001). TPD markedly recovered at 24 months postoperatively. The modified reverse sural adipofascial flap provides good outcomes in treating distal tibial and calcaneal osteomyelitis with minimal donor site morbidity.

  6. A case of acute tarsal tunnel syndrome following lateralizing calcaneal osteotomy.

    PubMed

    Walls, Raymond J; Chan, Jeremy Y; Ellis, Scott J

    2015-03-01

    Surgical correction of hindfoot varus is frequently performed with a lateral displacement calcaneal osteotomy. It has rarely been associated with iatrogenic tarsal tunnel syndrome in patients with pre-existing neurological disease. We report the first case of acute postoperative tarsal tunnel syndrome in a neurologically intact patient with post-traumatic hindfoot varus. Early diagnosis and emergent operative release afforded an excellent clinical outcome. Imaging studies can help outrule a compressive hematoma and assess for possible nerve transection; however it is paramount that a high index of suspicion is utilized with judicious operative intervention to minimize long-term sequelae.

  7. Multi-criterion optimization for heel-toe running.

    PubMed

    Wang, Nenzi

    2005-08-01

    This paper presents an optimization procedure for multi-criterion analysis essential in many biomechanical studies. The optimization is illustrated with a heel-toe running analysis wherein the rate of load and the passive load on support leg are minimized concurrently. The goal of multi-criterion optimization is achieved by incorporating the criterion of Pareto optimality in the genetic algorithm. The proposed procedure can replace the popular weighted-sum approach for problems with multiple objectives. The selection of a final design from the Pareto optimum points (non-dominated designs) can be determined, based on the min-max objective deviation criterion. Nevertheless, a different decision can be made in the final selection without incurring recalculations. The scheme is readily adoptable for parallel computing, which deserves further study to reduce the execution time in a complex biomechanical analysis.

  8. Radiation levels on empty cylinders containing heel material

    SciTech Connect

    Shockley, C.W.

    1991-12-31

    Empty UF{sub 6} cylinders containing heel material were found to emit radiation levels in excess of 200 mr/hr, the maximum amount stated in ORO-651. The radiation levels were as high as 335 mr/hr for thick wall (48X and 48Y) cylinders and 1050 mr/hr for thin wall (48G and 48H) cylinders. The high readings were found only on the bottom of the cylinders. These radiation levels exceeded the maximum levels established in DOT 49 CFR, Part 173.441 for shipment of cylinders. Holding periods of four weeks for thick-wall cylinders and ten weeks for thin-wall cylinders were established to allow the radiation levels to decay prior to shipment.

  9. Are mitochondria the Achilles' heel of the Kingdom Fungi?

    PubMed

    Chatre, Laurent; Ricchetti, Miria

    2014-08-01

    A founding event in the origin of eukaryotes is the acquisition of an extraordinary organelle, the mitochondrion, which contains its own genome. Being linked to energy metabolism, oxidative stress, cell signalling, and cell death, the mitochondrion to a certain extent controls life and death in eukaryotic cells. The large metabolic diversity and living strategies of the Kingdom Fungi make their mitochondria of particular evolutionary interest. The review focuses first on the characteristics of mitochondria in the Kingdom Fungi, then on their implications in the organism survival, pathogenicity and resistance, and finally on proposing unconventional strategies to investigate the biology of fungal mitochondria, unveiling the possibility that mitochondria play as the Achilles' heel of this kingdom.

  10. Double calcaneal osteotomy with percutaneous Steinmann pin fixation as part of treatment for flexible flatfoot deformity: a review of consecutive cases highlighting our experience with pin fixation.

    PubMed

    Boffeli, Troy J; Abben, Kyle W

    2015-01-01

    Surgical correction of flexible flatfoot deformity and posterior tibial tendon dysfunction has been extensively reported in published studies. When appropriate, calcaneal osteotomies for flatfoot correction have been a favorite of foot and ankle surgeons because of the corrective power achieved without the need to fuse any rearfoot joints. The medial displacement calcaneal osteotomy and Evans calcaneal osteotomy, together termed the double calcaneal osteotomy, have been reported several times by various investigators with a wide variety of fixation options. We undertook an institutional review board-approved retrospective review of 9 consecutive patients (11 feet), who had undergone double calcaneal osteotomy with 2 percutaneous Steinmann pin fixation for the correction of flexible flatfoot deformity, with or without posterior tibial tendon dysfunction. All patients had radiographic evidence of bone healing of the posterior calcaneal osteotomy and incorporation of the Evans osteotomy bone graft at 6 weeks and demonstrated clinical healing at 6 weeks. All patients had 2 percutaneous Steinmann pins placed through both osteotomies, and these were removed an average of 6 weeks postoperatively. No patient developed pin site complications. The only complication noted was sural neuritis, which was likely incision related. No patients had delayed union or nonunion, and we did not identify any graft shifting postoperatively. The present retrospective series highlights our experience with 2 percutaneous Steinmann pin fixation, demonstrating equal or better results than many previous published fixation methods for double calcaneal osteotomy. It is cost-effective and minimizes the potential risk of iatrogenic Achilles pathologic features associated with screw fixation.

  11. Quantitative heel ultrasound variables in powerlifters and controls

    PubMed Central

    Jawed, S; Horton, B; Masud, T

    2001-01-01

    Objective—To compare by cross sectional study the quantitative heel ultrasound (QUS) variables broadband ultrasound attenuation (BUA) and velocity of sound (VOS) in male powerlifters and controls. Methods—Twenty four powerlifters and 21 sedentary male controls were recruited to the study. All the powerlifters were members of the British Drug Free Powerlifting Association and actively competing at the time of the study. A questionnaire was completed by all those entered into the study. This included a history of smoking and an estimation of daily intake of alcohol and calcium. For the powerlifters, the number of years spent training and time spent training each week was also recorded. The QUS variables of all powerlifters and controls were measured using a Cubaclinical II (McCue) ultrasound scanner. Results—The powerlifters had been training for a mean (SEM) of 10.6 (1.6) years and they trained for 6.5 (0.4) hours a week. The powerlifters were non-significantly older and had a significantly higher body mass index (BMI) than the controls. Calcium intake and consumption of alcohol and tobacco were similar in the two groups. The mean BUA in the powerlifters was a significant 9.5% (95% confidence interval 0.7 to 18.3%) higher than the controls (105 v 96 dB/MHZ) and 15.6% (95% confidence interval 6.8 to 24.4%) higher after adjustment using analysis of covariance for age, BMI, and alcohol and tobacco consumption (108 v 93 dB/MHZ). The mean VOS was similar in the two groups, but after adjustment it was significantly higher in the powerlifters (1671 v 1651 m/s, p<0.01). Conclusions—The study shows the ability of heel ultrasound to discriminate between QUS variables in powerlifters and controls. The results indicate that the QUS variables BUA and VOS are significantly higher for powerlifters than for controls. PMID:11477028

  12. Influence of heel lifts during standing in children with motor disorders.

    PubMed

    Bartonek, Asa; Lidbeck, Cecilia M; Pettersson, Robert; Weidenhielm, Eva Broström; Eriksson, Marie; Gutierrez-Farewik, Elena

    2011-07-01

    Heel wedges may influence standing posture but how and to what extent are unknown. Thirty-two children with motor disorders - 16 with arthrogryposis multiplex congenita (AMC) and 16 with cerebral palsy (CP) - and 19 control children underwent a three-dimensional motion analysis. Unassisted standing during 20s with shoes only and with heel lifts of 10, 20 and 30mm heights was recorded in a randomized order. The more weight-bearing limb or the right limb was chosen for analysis. In both the AMC and CP groups, significant changes were seen between various heel lifts in ankle, knee and pelvis, and in the control group in the ankle only. Between orthosis and non-orthosis users significant differences were seen between different heel lift conditions in ankle, knee and trunk in the AMC group and in the ankle in the CP group. Pelvis position changed toward less anterior tilt with increasing heel height, but led to increasing knee flexion in most of the children, except for the AMC Non-Ort group. Children with AMC and CP represent different motor disorders, but the heel wedges had a similar influence on pelvis, hip and knee positions in all children with CP and in the AMC orthosis users. A challenge is to apply heel heights adequate to each individual's orthopaedic and neurologic conditions to improve biomechanical alignment with respect to all body segments.

  13. Heel Ultrasound Scan in Detecting Osteoporosis in Low Trauma Fracture Patients.

    PubMed

    Hashmi, Faiz R; Elfandi, Khaled O

    2016-06-27

    Osteoporosis is the most common metabolic disease with significant impact on the morbidity and mortality of affected patients. Osteoporosis has a significant impact on the economy worldwide. The aim of this study was to find out whether heel ultrasound is as good as central bone densitometry scanning in diagnosing osteoporosis in patients who are at high risk of osteoporosis. This was a prospective study of patients comparing heel ultrasound to central bone densitometry scanning (dual X-ray absorptiometry, DEXA) in patients. The recruited patients attended for a DEXA scan of the left hip and lumbar spine. All subjects had an ultrasound of the left heel using the quantitative heel ultrasound machine. The results of DEXA scan were blinded from the results of ultrasound and vice versa. There were 59 patients who took part in the study, 12 men and 47 women. The mean age was 66 years (SD 11.9) and mean weight was 62.5 kg (SD 10.7). The sensitivity and specificity of the ultrasound heel test to predict osteoporosis were 53% (95%CI: 29-77) and 86% (95%CI: 75-96) respectively. Specificity for predicting bone mineral density (BMD)-defined osteoporosis was high (86%), but sensitivity was low (53%). A heel ultrasound result in the osteoporotic range was highly predictive of BMD-defined osteoporosis. A positive ultrasound heel test in high risk patients is more useful in ruling in osteoporosis than a negative test to rule out osteoporosis.

  14. Sex differences in pain responses at maturity following neonatal repeated minor pain exposure in rats.

    PubMed

    Page, Gayle G; Hayat, Matthew J; Kozachik, Sharon L

    2013-01-01

    There is mounting evidence of long-lasting changes in pain sensitivity in school-age children who were cared for in a neonatal intensive care unit. Such care involves multiple pain exposures, 70% of which are accounted for by heel lance to monitor physiological well-being. The authors sought to model the repeated brief pain resulting from heel lance by administering repeated paw needle stick to neonatal rat pups. Repeated needle stick during the first 8 days of life was sex-specific in altering responses to mechanical and inflammatory stimuli, but not to a thermal stimulus, at maturity. Specifically, neonatal paw needle stick males exhibited significantly greater mechanical sensitivity in response to von Frey hair testing, whereas neonatal paw needle stick females exhibited significantly greater pain behavior scores following hindpaw formalin injection. This is the first study to show such sex-dependent changes in pain responsiveness at maturity in animals having experienced repeated neonatal needle stick pain. These findings support existing evidence that there are long-term sensory sequelae following neonatal pain experiences in rats and further suggest that there are sex-linked differences in the nature of the consequences. If these relationships hold in humans, these findings suggest that even mild painful insults early in life are not without sensory consequences.

  15. Calcaneal chondrosarcoma: a case report☆☆☆

    PubMed Central

    de Moraes, Frederico Barra; Linhares, Nicolle Diniz; de Souza Domingues, Pryscilla Moreira; Warzocha, Vanessa Nogueira Machado; Soares, Jefferson Martins

    2014-01-01

    The objective was to report on a rare case of chondrosarcoma of the bones of the foot, and specifically the calcaneus. The patient was a 30-year-old woman with a complaint of painless nodulation on the lateral face of the calcaneus, which she had had for around eight years, which then started to present significant pain. Radiography showed a tumor with imprecise limits, compromising the calcaneus, talus and lateral malleolus. The lesion had a destructive, aggressive and osteolytic appearance, with invasion of the surrounding soft tissues and the presence of points of calcification. Amputation was performed in the middle third of the right lower leg, with a histological diagnosis of chondrosarcoma. The case evolved with local recurrence of the tumor formation and subsequent amputation in the middle third of the right thigh. One year after the second amputation, the patient evolved with metastasis from the chondrosarcoma in soft tissues throughout the body and in the lungs, and she died one year and ten months after the diagnosis was made. Chondrosarcomas that involve the calcaneus are rare in young adults, with few reports in the literature. For this reason, the present report becomes important in that it shows that even though this is a rare condition, it is present in our environment. Early investigation is essential, especially by means of imaging examinations, with the aim of diminishing the chances of malignant transformation and consequent complications, so as to avoid death. PMID:26229837

  16. The Changes of COP and Foot Pressure after One Hour's Walking Wearing High-heeled and Flat Shoes.

    PubMed

    Ko, Dong Yeol; Lee, Han Suk

    2013-10-01

    [Purpose] This study aimed to determine the most appropriate height for shoe heels by measuring the displacement of the COP (center of pressure) and changes in the distribution of foot pressure after walking in flat (0.5 cm), middle-heeled (4 cm), and high-heeled (9 cm) shoes for 1 hour. [Methods] A single-subject design was used, with 15 healthy women wearing shoes with heels of each height in a random order. The foot pressure and displacement of COP before and after walking in an ordinary environment for 1 hour were measured using an FDM-S (zebris Medical GmbH, Germany). [Results] The distribution of foot pressure did not change significantly after walking in middle-heeled (4 cm) shoes but did change significantly after walking in either flat (0.5 cm) or high-heeled (9 cm) shoes. Similarly, the COP was not significantly displaced after walking in middle-heeled (4 cm) shoes but was significantly displaced after walking in either flat (0.5 cm) or high-heeled (9 cm) shoes. [Conclusion] Both flat and high-heeled shoes had adverse effects on the body. Middle-heeled (4 cm) shoes are preferable to both flat (0.5 cm) and high-heeled (9 cm) shoes for the health and comfort of the feet.

  17. The Changes of COP and Foot Pressure after One Hour's Walking Wearing High-heeled and Flat Shoes

    PubMed Central

    Ko, Dong Yeol; Lee, Han Suk

    2013-01-01

    [Purpose] This study aimed to determine the most appropriate height for shoe heels by measuring the displacement of the COP (center of pressure) and changes in the distribution of foot pressure after walking in flat (0.5 cm), middle-heeled (4 cm), and high-heeled (9 cm) shoes for 1 hour. [Methods] A single-subject design was used, with 15 healthy women wearing shoes with heels of each height in a random order. The foot pressure and displacement of COP before and after walking in an ordinary environment for 1 hour were measured using an FDM-S (zebris Medical GmbH, Germany). [Results] The distribution of foot pressure did not change significantly after walking in middle-heeled (4 cm) shoes but did change significantly after walking in either flat (0.5 cm) or high-heeled (9 cm) shoes. Similarly, the COP was not significantly displaced after walking in middle-heeled (4 cm) shoes but was significantly displaced after walking in either flat (0.5 cm) or high-heeled (9 cm) shoes. [Conclusion] Both flat and high-heeled shoes had adverse effects on the body. Middle-heeled (4 cm) shoes are preferable to both flat (0.5 cm) and high-heeled (9 cm) shoes for the health and comfort of the feet. PMID:24259782

  18. A three-dimensional inverse finite element analysis of the heel pad.

    PubMed

    Chokhandre, Snehal; Halloran, Jason P; van den Bogert, Antonie J; Erdemir, Ahmet

    2012-03-01

    Quantification of plantar tissue behavior of the heel pad is essential in developing computational models for predictive analysis of preventive treatment options such as footwear for patients with diabetes. Simulation based studies in the past have generally adopted heel pad properties from the literature, in return using heel-specific geometry with material properties of a different heel. In exceptional cases, patient-specific material characterization was performed with simplified two-dimensional models, without further evaluation of a heel-specific response under different loading conditions. The aim of this study was to conduct an inverse finite element analysis of the heel in order to calculate heel-specific material properties in situ. Multidimensional experimental data available from a previous cadaver study by Erdemir et al. ("An Elaborate Data Set Characterizing the Mechanical Response of the Foot," ASME J. Biomech. Eng., 131(9), pp. 094502) was used for model development, optimization, and evaluation of material properties. A specimen-specific three-dimensional finite element representation was developed. Heel pad material properties were determined using inverse finite element analysis by fitting the model behavior to the experimental data. Compression dominant loading, applied using a spherical indenter, was used for optimization of the material properties. The optimized material properties were evaluated through simulations representative of a combined loading scenario (compression and anterior-posterior shear) with a spherical indenter and also of a compression dominant loading applied using an elevated platform. Optimized heel pad material coefficients were 0.001084 MPa (μ), 9.780 (α) (with an effective Poisson's ratio (ν) of 0.475), for a first-order nearly incompressible Ogden material model. The model predicted structural response of the heel pad was in good agreement for both the optimization (<1.05% maximum tool force, 0.9% maximum tool

  19. Biomechanical evaluation of reconstruction plates with locking, nonlocking, and hybrid screws configurations in calcaneal fracture: a finite element model study.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ching-Hsuan; Hung, Chinghua; Hsu, Yu-Chun; Chen, Chen-Sheng; Chiang, Chao-Ching

    2017-02-21

    Calcaneal fractures are the most common fractures of the tarsal bones. The stability of fixation is an important factor for successful reconstruction of calcaneal fractures. The purpose of this study was to analyze the biomechanical influence of plate fixation with different combinations of locking and nonlocking screws during early weight-bearing phase. A three-dimensional FE foot model was established using ANSYS software, which comprised bones, cartilages, plantar fascia, and soft tissue. Calcaneal plate was fixed with whole locking (WLS), whole nonlocking (WNS), and hybrid screw configurations for FE analysis. The WNS generated a 6.1° and 2.2° Bohler angle decrease compared with the intact model and WLS (WNS: 18.9; WLS: 21.1; intact: 25.0°). Some hybrid screw configurations (Bohler angle: 21.5° and 21.2°) generated stability similar to WLS. The FE results showed that the fragments at the posterior facet and the posterior tuberosity sustained more stress. This study recommends that the hybrid screw configuration with at least four locking screws, two at the posterior facet fragment and two at the posterior tuberosity fragment, is the optimal choice for the fixation of Sanders type IIB calcaneal fractures.

  20. The relationship between the calcaneal bone mineral density and the mental index in post-menopausal females

    PubMed Central

    Jagelaviciene, E; Krasauskiene, A; Zalinkevicius, R; Kubilius, R; Vaitkeviciene, I

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: The aim of the study was to determine the relationship between the bone mineral density in the calcaneus and the mental index (MI) of the mandible in post-menopausal females, and to evaluate the diagnostic threshold of the index. Methods: The post-menopausal females aged 50 years and older were examined using panoramic radiography of the mandible for mandibular cortical width measurements at the mental foramen (mental index, MI) determination and DXL Calscan P/N 031000 (Demetech AB, Solna, Sweden) for the examination of calcaneal bone mineral density (BMD). The statistical analysis was performed to determine the tendencies between the data. Results: According to the T-score values of calcaneal BMD, the subjects were distributed into T1, T2 and T3 groups. BMD differences between the groups were statistically significant (p < 0.001). The panoramic radiographic examination of the mandible was performed, MI (mm) was determined and the mean values in the groups were calculated. The differences of MI mean values between the groups were statistically significant (p < 0.001). In the general group, a statistically significant relationship was found between calcaneal BMD, T-score and MI (p < 0.001). In the logistic analysis, the diagnostic threshold of MI was 3 mm (sensitivity 73.5%; specificity 72.6%). Conclusions: A diagnostic threshold for MI of 3 mm or less is suggested as the appropriate threshold for referral of calcaneal BMD reduction. PMID:23420860

  1. Risk of injury to vascular-nerve bundle after calcaneal fracture: comparison among three techniques

    PubMed Central

    Labronici, Pedro José; Reder, Vitor Rodrigues; de Araujo Marins Filho, Guilherme Ferreira; Pires, Robinson Esteves Santos; Fernandes, Hélio Jorge Alvachian; Mercadante, Marcelo Tomanik

    2016-01-01

    Objective To ascertain whether the number of screws or pins placed in the calcaneus might increase the risk of injury when three different techniques for treating calcaneal fractures. Method 126 radiographs of patients who suffered displaced calcaneal fractures were retrospectively analyzed. Three surgical techniques were analyzed on an interobserver basis: 31 radiographs of patients treated using plates that were not specific for the calcaneus, 48 using specific plates and 47 using an external fixator. The risk of injury to the anatomical structures in relation to each Kirschner wire or screw was determined using a graded system in accordance with the Licht classification. The total risk of injury to the anatomical structures through placement of more than one wire/screw was quantified using the additive law of probabilities for the product, for independent events. Results All of the models presented high explanatory power for the risk evaluated, since the coefficient of determination values (R2) were greater than 98.6 for all the models. Therefore, the set of variables studied explained more than 98.6% of the variations in the risks of injury to arteries, veins or nerves and can be classified as excellent models for prevention of injuries. Conclusion The risk of injury to arteries, veins or nerves is not defined by the total number of pins/screws. The region and the number of pins/screws in each region define and determine the best distribution of the risk. PMID:27069891

  2. Traitement chirurgical des fractures articulaires du calcanéum par plaque vissée

    PubMed Central

    Hammou, Nassreddine; Abid, Hatim; Shimi, Mohammed; El Ibrahimi, Abdelhalim; El Mrini, Abdelmajid

    2015-01-01

    Les fractures du calcanéum sont peu fréquentes mais le plus souvent graves. Le traitement chirurgical par plaque vissée est ardemment défendu. L'objectif de notre travail rétrospectif est d’évaluer les résultats du traitement chirurgical des fractures articulaires du calcanéum à travers une série de 12 patients opérée aux service d'orthopédie du CHU Hassan II de Fès sur une durée de 3 ans, et les comparer aux données de la littérature. L’âge moyen dans notre série était de 34 ans, le geste opératoire était réalisé au 7ème jour. Tous nos patient ont bénéficie d'une réduction à foyer ouvert avec une ostéosynthèse par plaques vissées. Le recul moyen était de 12 mois et les résultats fonctionnels ont été évaluer selon le score de Kitaoka. PMID:26161214

  3. Calcaneal osteotomy preoperative planning system with 3D full-sized computer-assisted technology.

    PubMed

    Chou, Yi-Jiun; Sun, Shuh-Ping; Liu, Hsin-Hua

    2011-10-01

    In this study, we developed a CT-based computer-assisted pre-operative planning and simulating system for the calcaneal osteotomy by integrating different software's function. This system uses the full-scaled 3D reverse engineering technique in designing and developing preoperative planning modules for the calcaneal osteotomy surgery. The planning system presents a real-sized three-dimensional image of the calcaneus, and provides detailed interior measurements of the calcaneus from various cutting planes. This study applied computer-assisted technology to integrate different software's function to a surgical planning system. These functions include 3-D image model capturing, cutting, moving, rotating and measurement for relevant foot anatomy, and can be integrated as the user's function. Furthermore, the system is computer-based and computer-assisted technology. Surgeons can utilize it as part of preoperative planning to develop efficient operative procedures. This system also has a database that can be updated and extended and will provide the clinical cases to different users for experienced based learning.

  4. Effects of bridging plus exercises with heel lift on lower extremity muscles

    PubMed Central

    Yoo, Won-gyu

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] This study investigated the effects of the bridging plus exercise with heel lift on lower extremity muscles. [Subjects and Methods] Nine healthy males participated. The subjects performed bridging exercises under two conditions. Surface electromyography was used to measure the electrical activities of the medial hamstring (MH) and the gluteus maximus (GM) muscles. [Results] Activation of the MH muscle during bridging with heel lift decreased, and activation of the GM muscle during bridging with heel lift increased compared to those with the bridging exercise. [Conclusion] This result showed that bridging plus exercises with heel lift could be an effective exercise for patients with compensatory mechanisms during bridging exercises, such as weak GM with hamstring tightness. PMID:27313376

  5. Reverse sural flap for ankle and heel soft tissues reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Ciofu, RN; Zamfirescu, DG; Popescu, SA; Lascar, I

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: The potential of the medial calf integument, as donor site for a free flap based on musculocutaneous branches of the medial sural artery, was first identified by Taylor and Daniel, following cadaver investigation. In 1981, Pontén described the fasciocutaneous sural flap as a reconstructive option for soft tissue loss of the lower extremity, particularly around the knee. Two years later, Donski and Fogdestram presented the distally based fasciocutaneous flap from the sural region followed by Montegut and Allen who considered the sural artery perforator flap as a viable alternative for the gastrocnemius myocutaneous flap. The sural flap proved a considerable versatility at the level of the lower leg (from the knee to the ankle and heel) as well as for other anatomical regions. The most common usage of the flap is for the distal-third defects of the leg. Materials and method: A group of 10 patients with soft tissue losses at the ankle or heal due to a various etiopathogeny represented by cancer excision, trauma, unstable scars, chronic osteomyelitis, in which a microsurgical free transfer had no indication or was not wanted, was presented. Our group reported a 30% complication rate in a high-risk patient population, including patients with diabetes mellitus, peripheral vascular disease, and venous insufficiency. Results: All the defects were covered successfully, without major complications. Usually, only a minor margin of the tip of the flap was lost, which was easily solved with a guided secondary healing. Most flaps showed a slight venous congestion, which cleared in a few days. The functional result was very good in all the patients, while the aesthetic appearance was acceptable even in female patients. Discussion: An ideal indication of a reverse sural flap may be a defect over an intact but partially exposed Achilles tendon. Conclusions: The sural reverse flap is useful in the ankle and foot soft tissues reconstruction whenever we have reasons not

  6. Interference of high-heeled shoes in static balance among young women.

    PubMed

    Gerber, Susana Bacelete; Costa, Rafael Vital; Grecco, Luanda André Collange; Pasini, Hugo; Marconi, Nádia Fernanda; Oliveira, Claudia Santos

    2012-10-01

    The aim of the present study was to assess the effect of the use of high-heeled shoes on static balance in young adult women. Fifty-three women between 18 and 30 years of age and accustomed to wearing high-heeled shoes participated in the study. None of the participants had any orthopedic or neurologic alterations. Static balance was assessed using a force plate. Oscillations from the center of pressure in the mediolateral and anteroposterior directions were measured both when barefoot and when wearing high-heeled shoes [7 centimeters (cm) in height and 1cm in diameter] under the conditions of eyes open and eyes closed. Two-way analysis of variance was employed for the statistical analysis, with the level of significance set at 5% (p<.05). The results revealed statistically significant differences between tests when barefoot and when wearing high-heeled shoes as well as with eyes open and eyes closed (p<.01). With the use of high-heeled shoes, there was a significant increase in mediolateral oscillation with eyes closed (p<.01). The present study demonstrates that the use of seven-cm high heels altered static balance in the healthy young women analyzed, increasing the oscillation of the center of pressure, regardless of visual restriction.

  7. Development of inexpensive prosthetic feet for high-heeled shoes using simple shoe insole model.

    PubMed

    Meier, Margrit R; Tucker, Kerice A; Hansen, Andrew H

    2014-01-01

    The large majority of prosthetic feet are aimed at low-heeled shoes, with a few models allowing a heel height of up to 5 cm. However, a survey by the American Podiatric Medical Association indicates that most women wear heels over 5 cm; thus, current prosthetic feet limit most female prosthesis users in their choice. Some prosthetic foot components are heel-height adjustable; however, their plantar surface shapes do not change to match the insole shapes of the shoes with different heel heights. The aims of the study were therefore (1) to develop a model that allows prediction of insole shape for various heel height shoes in combination with different shoe sizes and (2) to develop and field-test low-cost prototypes of prosthetic feet whose insole shapes were based on the new model. An equation was developed to calculate insole shapes independent of shoe size. Field testing of prototype prosthetic feet fabricated based on the equation was successful and demonstrated the utility of the equation.

  8. Study on lumbar kinematics and the risk of low back disorder in female university students by using shoes of different heel heights.

    PubMed

    Iqbal, Rauf; De, Amitabha; Mishra, Wricha; Maulik, Shreya; Chandra, A M

    2012-01-01

    The study was taken up to investigate the effects of heel heights on lumbar kinematics and the risk of Low Back Disorder (LBD) in females. Nineteen female university students (24.5 ± 3.36 yrs) volunteered in the study. Lumbar kinematics was measured by using Industrial Lumbar Motion Monitor (iLMM). The volunteers were asked to walk for a distance of 50 meters in 3 different given conditions i.e bare foot (Heel 0), with flat heels (Heel 1) and with high heels (Heel 2). Heights of Heel 1 and Heel 2 were 1.5 ± 0.84 cm and 5.5 ± 1.70 cm respectively. The Lumbar kinematic parameters studied were- Average Twisting Velocity (ATV), Maximum Sagital Flexion (MSF) and Maximum Lateral Velocity (MLV). It was observed that all the above mentioned Lumbar kinematics - ATV, MSF and MLV increases with increase of heel heights, which in turn increases the risk of LBD. As a result of increase in Lumbar kinematic values with increase in heel heights, LBD risk has also increased. Mean and SD of the LBD risk with Heel 0, Heel 1 and Heel 2 were 16.79 ± 6.04%, 19.00 ± 7.38% and 22.11 ± 6.98% respectively. Lower stature with high heels showed higher risk of LBD than the higher stature with high heels.

  9. Floodplains as an Achilles' heel of Amazonian forest resilience.

    PubMed

    Flores, Bernardo M; Holmgren, Milena; Xu, Chi; van Nes, Egbert H; Jakovac, Catarina C; Mesquita, Rita C G; Scheffer, Marten

    2017-04-10

    The massive forests of central Amazonia are often considered relatively resilient against climatic variation, but this view is challenged by the wildfires invoked by recent droughts. The impact of such fires that spread from pervasive sources of ignition may reveal where forests are less likely to persist in a drier future. Here we combine field observations with remotely sensed information for the whole Amazon to show that the annually inundated lowland forests that run through the heart of the system may be trapped relatively easily into a fire-dominated savanna state. This lower forest resilience on floodplains is suggested by patterns of tree cover distribution across the basin, and supported by our field and remote sensing studies showing that floodplain fires have a stronger and longer-lasting impact on forest structure as well as soil fertility. Although floodplains cover only 14% of the Amazon basin, their fires can have substantial cascading effects because forests and peatlands may release large amounts of carbon, and wildfires can spread to adjacent uplands. Floodplains are thus an Achilles' heel of the Amazon system when it comes to the risk of large-scale climate-driven transitions.

  10. Biomechanical Performance of Lateral Versus Dual Locking Plates for Calcaneal Fractures.

    PubMed

    Maxwell, Abby B; Owen, John R; Gilbert, Todd M; Romash, Michael M; Wayne, Jennifer S; Adelaar, Robert S

    2015-01-01

    Given the high rates of wound complications with a standard lateral extensile incision, small dual incision techniques might result in less soft tissue destruction. The goal of the present study was to compare the biomechanical performance between a single locking plate and a dual locking plating system for an intra-articular calcaneal fracture model. A Sanders IIB type joint depression calcaneal fracture was created in 10 paired, fresh-frozen, cadaveric calcanei (age 47 ± 12, range 35 to 78 years). The calcanei of each pair were randomly assigned for fixation using either a lateral locking reconstruction plate or lateral and medial locking reconstruction plates. The specimens were axially loaded in cyclic fashion for 1000 cycles, followed by load to failure. The relative fragment movement was monitored optically in both the sagittal and the coronal planes. The amount of overall construct displacement increased with cycling, although no difference was found between the plating techniques. For fragment movement during cycling, the lateral joint fragment migrated anteroinferiorly along the fracture line relative to the tuberosity fragment for dual plated specimens by a small, but statistically significant, amount. This same translation was smaller for lateral plated specimens but was not found to be significant. During load to failure testing, no statistically significant differences were found for construct stiffness. A tendency was seen toward more interfragmentary motion in the sagittal plane (lateral joint fragment movement relative to the fracture line), with less movement overall in the coronal plane (anterior fragment translation and twist) for dual plating, although the difference from the lateral plate was not statistically significant. The present study demonstrated that for this calcaneal fracture model, the dual plating technique experienced a small amount of fragment translation during cycling that was significantly different statistically from that

  11. Neonatal pain facial expression: evaluating the primal face of pain.

    PubMed

    Schiavenato, Martin; Byers, Jacquie F; Scovanner, Paul; McMahon, James M; Xia, Yinglin; Lu, Naiji; He, Hua

    2008-08-31

    The primal face of pain (PFP) is postulated to be a common and universal facial expression to pain, hardwired and present at birth. We evaluated its presence by applying a computer-based methodology consisting of "point-pair" comparisons captured from video to measure facial movement in the pain expression by way of change across two images: one image before and one image after a painful stimulus (heel-stick). Similarity of facial expression was analyzed in a sample of 57 neonates representing both sexes and 3 ethnic backgrounds (African American, Caucasian and Hispanic/Latino) while controlling for these extraneous and potentially modulating factors: feeding type (bottle, breast, or both), behavioral state (awake or asleep), and use of epidural and/or other perinatal anesthesia. The PFP is consistent with previous reports of expression of pain in neonates and is characterized by opening of the mouth, drawing in of the brows, and closing of the eyes. Although facial expression was not identical across or among groups, our analyses showed no particular clustering or unique display by sex, or ethnicity. The clinical significance of this commonality of pain display, and of the origin of its potential individual variation begs further evaluation.

  12. Groin pain

    MedlinePlus

    Pain - groin; Lower abdominal pain; Genital pain; Perineal pain ... Common causes of groin pain include: Pulled muscle, tendon, or ligaments in the leg: This problem often occurs in people who play sports such as ...

  13. Dual Fixation of Calcaneal Tuberosity Avulsion with Concomitant Achilles Tendon Rupture: A Novel Hybrid Technique

    PubMed Central

    Kusnezov, Nicholas; Rensing, Nicholas

    2017-01-01

    Fracture of the calcaneal tuberosity with a concomitant Achilles tendon rupture presents a difficult challenge for the treating surgeon. The ultimate goal of treatment is to restore function of both the gastrocnemius-soleus complex and the Achilles tendon. This particular subset of fractures occurs often in diabetics and elderly patients with osteoporosis making fixation of the displaced fragment rather complex. If the Achilles tendon disruption is only discovered later once the fracture is healed, subsequent management is difficult with surgical treatment being more morbid. While this is a rare injury, the consequences of a missed chronic Achilles tendon disruption are severe with significant dysfunction. It is therefore important to have a high index of suspicion for concomitant injury and to be prepared for dual fixation. We present a novel hybrid surgical fixation technique, which may be used in this instance. PMID:28357147

  14. Calcaneal osteomyelitis following steroid injection for plantar fasciitis: a case report.

    PubMed

    Wronka, Konrad Sebastian; Sinha, Amit

    2012-08-01

    This study reports a case of a 57-year-old woman diabetic patient who presented to the authors' institution with signs and symptoms typical of plantar fasciitis. Her condition did not resolve with nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug therapy, podiatry, and physiotherapy input and she was given a steroid injection for treatment of plantar fasciitis. She was admitted to the hospital 17 days following injection with signs of acute infection. Diagnostic workup revealed an acute calcaneal osteomyelitis. Infection did not respond to conservative treatment and the patient required a partial calcanectomy. This case highlights the significant risk of steroid injection in plantar fasciitis, especially in diabetic patient. The authors urge surgeons to consider this when obtaining consent for injection and they advise very close follow-up of such patients.

  15. Factors in Daily Physical Activity Related to Calcaneal Mineral Density in Men

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hutchinson, Teresa M.; Whalen, Robert T.; Cleek, Tammy M.; Vogel, John M.; Arnaud, Sara B.

    1995-01-01

    To determine the factors in daily physical activity that influence the mineral density of the calcaneus, we recorded walking steps and the type and duration of exercise in 43 healthy 26-to 51-yr-old men. Areal (g/sq cm) calcaneal bone mineral density (CBMD) was measured by single energy x-ray densitometry. Subjects walked a mean (+/- SD) of 7902(+/-2534) steps per day or approximately 3.9(+/-1.2) miles daily. Eight subjects reported no exercise activities. The remaining 35 subjects spent 143(2-772) (median and range) min/wk exercising. Twenty-eight men engaged in exercise activities that generate single leg peak vertical ground reaction forces (GRF(sub z)) of 2 or more body weights (high loaders, HL), and 15 reported exercise or daily activities that typically generate GRF(sub z) less than 1.5 body weights (low loaders, LL). CBMD was 12% higher in HL than LL (0.668 +/- 0.074 g/sq cm vs 0.597 +/- 0.062 g/sq cm, P less than 0.004). In the HL group, CBMD correlated to reported minutes of high load exercise (r = 0.41, P less than 0.03). CBMD was not related to the number of daily walking steps (N = 43, r = 0.03, NS). The results of this study support the concept that the dominant factor in daily physical activity relating to bone mineral density is the participation in site specific high loading activities, i.e., for the calcaneus, high calcaneal loads.

  16. Effects of medially wedged foot orthoses on knee and hip joint running mechanics in females with and without patellofemoral pain syndrome.

    PubMed

    Boldt, Andrew R; Willson, John D; Barrios, Joaquin A; Kernozek, Thomas W

    2013-02-01

    We examined the effects of medially wedged foot orthoses on knee and hip joint mechanics during running in females with and without patellofemoral pain syndrome (PFPS). We also tested if these effects depend on standing calcaneal eversion angle. Twenty female runners with and without PFPS participated. Knee and hip joint transverse and frontal plane peak angle, excursion, and peak internal knee and hip abduction moment were calculated while running with and without a 6° full-length medially wedged foot orthoses. Separate 3-factor mixed ANOVAs (group [PFPS, control] x condition [medial wedge, no medial wedge] x standing calcaneal angle [everted, neutral, inverted]) were used to test the effect of medially wedged orthoses on each dependent variable. Knee abduction moment increased 3% (P = .03) and hip adduction excursion decreased 0.6° (P < .01) using medially wedged foot orthoses. No significant group x condition or calcaneal angle x condition effects were observed. The addition of medially wedged foot orthoses to standardized running shoes had minimal effect on knee and hip joint mechanics during running thought to be associated with the etiology or exacerbation of PFPS symptoms. These effects did not appear to depend on injury status or standing calcaneal posture.

  17. Effects of Kangaroo Care on Neonatal Pain in South Korea.

    PubMed

    Seo, Young Sun; Lee, Joohyun; Ahn, Hye Young

    2016-06-01

    Blood sampling for a newborn screening test is necessary for all neonates in South Korea. During the heel stick, an appropriate intervention should be implemented to reduce neonatal pain. This study was conducted to identify the effectiveness of kangaroo care (KC), skin contact with the mother, on pain relief during the neonatal heel stick. Twenty-six neonates undergoing KC and 30 control neonates at a university hospital participated in this study. Physiological responses of neonates, including heart rate, oxygen saturation, duration of crying and Premature Infant Pain Profile (PIPP) scores were measured and compared before, during and 1 min and 2 min after heel sticks. The heart rate of KC neonates was lower at both 1 and 2 min after sampling than those of the control group. Also, PIPP scores of KC neonates were significantly lower both during and after sampling. The duration of crying for KC neonates was around 10% of the duration of the control group. In conclusion, KC might be an effective intervention in a full-term nursery for neonatal pain management.

  18. A mathematical method for quantifying in vivo mechanical behaviour of heel pad under dynamic load.

    PubMed

    Naemi, Roozbeh; Chatzistergos, Panagiotis E; Chockalingam, Nachiappan

    2016-03-01

    Mechanical behaviour of the heel pad, as a shock attenuating interface during a foot strike, determines the loading on the musculoskeletal system during walking. The mathematical models that describe the force deformation relationship of the heel pad structure can determine the mechanical behaviour of heel pad under load. Hence, the purpose of this study was to propose a method of quantifying the heel pad stress-strain relationship using force-deformation data from an indentation test. The energy input and energy returned densities were calculated by numerically integrating the area below the stress-strain curve during loading and unloading, respectively. Elastic energy and energy absorbed densities were calculated as the sum of and the difference between energy input and energy returned densities, respectively. By fitting the energy function, derived from a nonlinear viscoelastic model, to the energy density-strain data, the elastic and viscous model parameters were quantified. The viscous and elastic exponent model parameters were significantly correlated with maximum strain, indicating the need to perform indentation tests at realistic maximum strains relevant to walking. The proposed method showed to be able to differentiate between the elastic and viscous components of the heel pad response to loading and to allow quantifying the corresponding stress-strain model parameters.

  19. Effects of duration of wearing high-heeled shoes on plantar pressure.

    PubMed

    Yin, Chun-Ming; Pan, Xiao-Hua; Sun, Yu-Xin; Chen, Zhi-Bin

    2016-10-01

    In the present study we investigated the effects of different durations of using high-heeled shoes on plantar pressure and gait. A questionnaire survey and dynamic plantar pressure measurements were performed in 20 control females and 117 females who had worn high-heeled shoes for a long time. According to the duration of using high-heeled shoes (as specified in the questionnaire), subjects were divided into a control group and five groups with different durations of use (i.e. <2years, 2-5years, 6-10years, 11-20years and >20years). Parameters, including peak pressure, impulse and pressure duration, in different plantar regions were measured with the Footscan pressure plate. The 2-5years group had smaller midfoot contact areas for both feet and higher subtalar joint mobility, while the 6-10years group had larger midfoot contact areas for both feet and prolonged foot flat phase during gait. The peak pressure and impulse under the second and fourth metatarsus were increased with the prolonged wearing of high-heeled shoes, and the pressure and impulse under the midfoot were substantially reduced in the 2-5years group. The findings suggest that long-term use of high-heeled shoes can induce changes in arch morphology: the longitudinal arch tends to be elevated within 2-5years; the longitudinal arch tends to be flattened within 6-10years; and the forefoot latitudinal arch tends to collapse in more than 20years.

  20. Urinary Mineral Concentrations in European Pre-Adolescent Children and Their Association with Calcaneal Bone Quantitative Ultrasound Measurements †

    PubMed Central

    Van den Bussche, Karen; Herrmann, Diana; De Henauw, Stefaan; Kourides, Yiannis A.; Lauria, Fabio; Marild, Staffan; Molnár, Dénes; Moreno, Luis A.; Veidebaum, Toomas; Ahrens, Wolfgang; Sioen, Isabelle

    2016-01-01

    This study investigates differences and associations between urinary mineral concentrations and calcaneal bone measures assessed by quantitative ultrasonography (QUS) in 4322 children (3.1–11.9 years, 50.6% boys) from seven European countries. Urinary mineral concentrations and calcaneal QUS parameters differed significantly across countries. Clustering revealed a lower stiffness index (SI) in children with low and medium urinary mineral concentrations, and a higher SI in children with high urinary mineral concentrations. Urinary sodium (uNa) was positively correlated with urinary calcium (uCa), and was positively associated with broadband ultrasound attenuation and SI after adjustment for age, sex and fat-free mass. Urinary potassium (uK) was negatively correlated with uCa but positively associated with speed of sound after adjustment. No association was found between uCa and QUS parameters after adjustment, but when additionally adjusting for uNa, uCa was negatively associated with SI. Our findings suggest that urinary mineral concentrations are associated with calcaneal QUS parameters and may therefore implicate bone properties. These findings should be confirmed in longitudinal studies that include the food intake and repeated measurement of urinary mineral concentrations to better estimate usual intake and minimize bias. PMID:27164120

  1. The correlation between calcaneal valgus angle and asymmetrical thoracic-lumbar rotation angles in patients with adolescent scoliosis

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jaeyong; Lee, Sang Gil; Bae, Jongjin; Lee, Jung Chul

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] This study aimed to provide a predictable evaluation method for the progression of scoliosis in adolescents based on quick and reliable measurements using the naked eye, such as the calcaneal valgus angle of the foot, which can be performed at public facilities such as schools. [Subjects and Methods] Idiopathic scoliosis patients with a Cobb’s angle of 10° or more (96 females, 22 males) were included in this study. To identify relationships between factors, Pearson’s product-moment correlation coefficient was computed. The degree of scoliosis was set as a dependent variable to predict thoracic and lumbar scoliosis using ankle angle and physique factors. Height, weight, and left and right calcaneal valgus angles were set as independent variables; thereafter, multiple regression analysis was performed. This study extracted variables at a significance level (α) of 0.05 by applying a stepwise method, and calculated a regression equation. [Results] Negative correlation (R=−0.266) was shown between lumbar lordosis and asymmetrical lumbar rotation angles. A correlation (R=0.281) was also demonstrated between left calcaneal valgus angles and asymmetrical thoracic rotation angles. [Conclusion] Prediction of scoliosis progress was revealed to be possible through ocular inspection of the calcaneus and Adams forward bending test and the use of a scoliometer. PMID:26834376

  2. The correlation between calcaneal valgus angle and asymmetrical thoracic-lumbar rotation angles in patients with adolescent scoliosis.

    PubMed

    Park, Jaeyong; Lee, Sang Gil; Bae, Jongjin; Lee, Jung Chul

    2015-12-01

    [Purpose] This study aimed to provide a predictable evaluation method for the progression of scoliosis in adolescents based on quick and reliable measurements using the naked eye, such as the calcaneal valgus angle of the foot, which can be performed at public facilities such as schools. [Subjects and Methods] Idiopathic scoliosis patients with a Cobb's angle of 10° or more (96 females, 22 males) were included in this study. To identify relationships between factors, Pearson's product-moment correlation coefficient was computed. The degree of scoliosis was set as a dependent variable to predict thoracic and lumbar scoliosis using ankle angle and physique factors. Height, weight, and left and right calcaneal valgus angles were set as independent variables; thereafter, multiple regression analysis was performed. This study extracted variables at a significance level (α) of 0.05 by applying a stepwise method, and calculated a regression equation. [Results] Negative correlation (R=-0.266) was shown between lumbar lordosis and asymmetrical lumbar rotation angles. A correlation (R=0.281) was also demonstrated between left calcaneal valgus angles and asymmetrical thoracic rotation angles. [Conclusion] Prediction of scoliosis progress was revealed to be possible through ocular inspection of the calcaneus and Adams forward bending test and the use of a scoliometer.

  3. Traitement chirurgical à ciel ouvert des ruptures récentes du tendon calcanéen

    PubMed Central

    Mahdane, Hicham; Khaissidi, Abdesslam; Hammou, Nasserdine; Elidrissi, Mohammed; Mohamed, Shimi; Elibrahim, Abdelhalim; Elmrini, Abdelmajid

    2014-01-01

    Les ruptures du tendon calcanéen quelles soient sous cutanées ou par section direct sont de plus en plus fréquentes. Plusieurs techniques chirurgicales, qu'elles soient à ciel ouvert ou percutanées ont été mises au point pour traitée ce type de lésion. À travers une étude rétrospective descriptive sur la prise en charge chirurgicale des ruptures de tendon calcanéen fraiches. Nous avons analysé les résultats fonctionnels de 38 patients, tous opéré par une chirurgie à ciel ouvert. Les points forts de notre étude étaient l'absence de rupture itérative, principale complication du traitement chirurgicale des ruptures du tendon calcanéen, un faible taux de complications liées à la chirurgie à ciel ouvert, ainsi que les résultats fonctionnels satisfaisants. PMID:25419282

  4. Effects of shoe heel height on the end-point and joint kinematics of the locomotor system when crossing obstacles of different heights.

    PubMed

    Chien, Hui-Lien; Lu, Tung-Wu

    2017-03-01

    High-heeled shoes increase the risk of falling during walking, especially in the presence of obstacles. The study aimed to compare the end-point (foot/shoe) trajectories and joint angles of the lower extremities in 12 healthy females crossing obstacles of different heights while barefoot and when wearing narrow-heeled shoes (heel heights: 3.9, 6.3 and 7.3 cm). During obstacle-crossing, young females in narrow-heeled shoes maintained the same leading toe-clearance as when barefoot, irrespective of the heel height, primarily through increased plantarflexion of the leading swing ankle. However, the shoe heel-clearance was significantly reduced when compared with barefoot, presumably related to the difficulty in precisely sensing the position of the shoe-heel tip. With an increasing obstacle height, the toe-clearance, heel-clearance and shoe heel-clearance were reduced linearly, indicating an increasing risk of tripping over the obstacle. The results will be helpful for the design and development of strategies to reduce the risk of falling when wearing narrow-heeled shoes. Practitioner Summary: Knowledge of the influence of narrow-heeled shoes and obstacles on lower limb joint and end-point kinematics helps in shoe design to address fall risks. Compared to barefoot, narrow-heeled shoes reduced shoe heel-clearances, which were further reduced linearly with increasing obstacle height, indicating an increasing risk of tripping over the obstacle.

  5. Effect of Different Forefoot and Heel Support Surfaces on the Activities of the RF and HAM Muscles during the Sit-to-stand Task while Wearing High-heel Shoes.

    PubMed

    Yoo, Won-Gyu

    2014-10-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to show the effect of different forefoot and heel support surfaces on the activities of the rectus femoris and medial hamstring muscles during the sit-to-stand task while wearing high-heel shoes. [Subjects] Fifteen female subjects were recruited. [Methods] The muscle activities of the rectus femoris and hamstring muscles were recorded using an MP150 system during the sit-to-stand task while wearing various high-heeled shoes. [Results] The activities of the rectus femoris and medial hamstring muscles significantly decreased when subjects wore condition 1 shoes compared with when they wore condition 2, 3 or 4 high-heeled shoes. The activities of the rectus femoris and medial hamstring muscles significantly decreased when subjects wore condition 2 high-heeled shoes compared with condition 3 or 4 high-heeled shoes. [Conclusion] The results can be interpreted as indicating that the size of the forefoot supporting surface can influence the lower extremity muscles of women wearing high-heeled shoes more than the size of the heel supporting surface.

  6. Influence of knee flexion angle and age on triceps surae muscle fatigue during heel raises.

    PubMed

    Hébert-Losier, Kim; Schneiders, Anthony G; García, José A; Sullivan, S John; Simoneau, Guy G

    2012-11-01

    The triceps surae (TS) muscle-tendon unit is 1 of the most commonly injured in elite and recreational athletes, with a high prevalence in middle-aged adults. The performance of maximal numbers of unilateral heel raises is used to assess, train, and rehabilitate TS endurance and conventionally prescribed in 0° knee flexion (KF) for the gastrocnemius and 45° for the soleus (SOL). However, the extent of muscle selectivity conferred through the change in the knee angle is lacking for heel raises performed to volitional fatigue. This study investigated the influence of knee angle on TS muscle fatigue during heel raises and determined whether fatigue differed between middle-aged and younger-aged adults. Forty-eight healthy individuals aged 18-25 and 35-45 years performed maximal numbers of unilateral heel raises in 0° and 45° KF. Median frequencies and linear regression slopes were calculated from the SOL, gastrocnemius medialis (GM), and gastrocnemius lateralis (GL) surface electromyographic signals. Stepwise mixed-effect regressions were used for analysis. The subjects completed an average of 45 and 48 heel raises in 0° and 45° KF, respectively. The results indicated that the 3 muscles fatigued during testing as all median frequencies decreased, and regression slopes were negative. Consistent with muscle physiology and fiber typing, fatigue was greater in the GM and GL than in the SOL (p < 0.001). However, knee angle did not influence TS muscle fatigue parameters (p = 0.814), with similar SOL, GM, and GL fatigue in 0° and 45° KF. These findings are in contrast with the traditionally described clinical use of heel raises in select knee angles for the gastrocnemius and the SOL. Furthermore, no difference in TS fatigue between the 2 age groups was able to be determined, despite the reported higher prevalence of injury in middle-aged individuals.

  7. Haglund's syndrome. Two case reports.

    PubMed

    Jiménez Martín, Florencio; Alonso Valdazo, María Dolores; Díaz Peña, Gara; Fernández Leroy, Julia; Hernández Herrero, David; Díaz García, Fermín

    Haglund's syndrome produces posterior impingement of the heel, which is caused by a posterosuperior calcaneal exostosis, known as Haglund's deformity, associated with Achilles tendinitis and retrocalcaneal bursitis. Its pathogenesis is unknown. We report two cases that were diagnosed clinically and confirmed radiographically. One patient was treated conservatively and the other underwent surgery. The diagnosis is based on clinical signs and radiological images, using the measurement of the parallel pitch lines, in a lateral radiograph of the ankle. Initial treatment is usually conservative and includes anti-inflammatory or analgesic agents, physiotherapy and low-heeled, open-heeled shoes. If conservative treatment does not relieve the pain, surgery may be necessary.

  8. Chronic Pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... a problem you need to take care of. Chronic pain is different. The pain signals go on for ... there is no clear cause. Problems that cause chronic pain include Headache Low back strain Cancer Arthritis Pain ...

  9. Abdominal pain

    MedlinePlus

    Stomach pain; Pain - abdomen; Belly ache; Abdominal cramps; Bellyache; Stomachache ... Almost everyone has pain in the abdomen at some point. Most of the time, it is not serious. How bad your pain is ...

  10. Flank pain

    MedlinePlus

    Pain - side; Side pain ... Flank pain can be a sign of a kidney problem. But, since many organs are in this area, other causes are possible. If you have flank pain and fever , chills, blood in the urine, or ...

  11. Anterior cruciate ligament rupture secondary to a 'heel hook': a dangerous martial arts technique.

    PubMed

    Baker, Joseph F; Devitt, Brian M; Moran, Ray

    2010-01-01

    The 'heel hook' is a type of knee lock used in some forms of martial arts to stress the knee and cause opponent to concede defeat. While the knee is in a flexed and valgus disposition, an internal rotation force is applied to the tibia. Reports are lacking on serious knee trauma as a result of this technique. We report the case of a 32-year-old Mixed Martial Arts exponent who sustained complete anterior cruciate ligament rupture and an medial collateral ligament injury from the use of a 'heel hook'.

  12. A Protocol for Percutaneous Transarticular Fixation of Sanders Type II and III Calcaneal Fractures With or Without an Added Mini-Open Approach.

    PubMed

    Gamal, Osama; Shams, Ahmed; El-Sayed Semaya, Ahmad

    Intra-articular fracture of the calcaneus is one of the most displeasing fractures if not properly managed. Open reduction and internal fixation have been associated with a high incidence of postoperative soft tissue complications. Closed reduction and percutaneous fixation have resulted in a greater incidence of postoperative subtalar osteoarthritis with improper reduction of the articular surface. In the present study, a mini-open approach was used in cases of failure of articular surface restoration with closed reduction. A total of 64 feet in 57 consecutive patients with an intra-articular calcaneal fracture underwent the proposed minimally invasive surgical protocol. Of the 57 patients, 7 (12.3%) had bilateral fractures. According to Sanders classification, 33 (51.6%) fractures were type II and 31 (48.4%) were type III. Seven (12.3%) patients had wedge fractures of the dorsolumbar spine without neurologic manifestations. The postoperative evaluation included radiographs and completion of the Maryland Foot Score and visual analog scale for pain. The mean follow-up period was 16 (range 12 to 36) months. The mean operative time was 42 (range 35 to 60) minutes. The mean period until union of the fracture was 12 (range 10 to 16) weeks. The clinical results according to the Maryland Foot Score revealed 52 (81%) with satisfactory (27 excellent and 25 good) and 12 (19%) with unsatisfactory (10 fair and 2 poor) results. The mean visual analog scale score was 1.5 ± 0.3 when radiographic fracture healing was observed. Six patients (9.4%) developed superficial pin tract infections that responded to local care and parenteral antibiotic therapy and resolved completely after removal of the Kirschner wires. In conclusion, the presented surgical protocol combining closed reduction with or without an added mini-open approach and percutaneous fixation improves the functional outcome and minimizes the incidence of complications.

  13. The effects of shoe heel height and gait velocity on position sense of the knee joint and balance

    PubMed Central

    Jang, Il-Yong; Kang, Da-Haeng; Jeon, Jae-Keun; Jun, Hyun-Ju; Lee, Joon-Hee

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The aim of this study was to examine the effects of increased heel height and gait velocity on balance control and knee joint position sense. [Subjects and Methods] Forty healthy adults were randomly allocated to 4 groups: low-heel, low-speed group (3 cm, 2 km/h), low-heel, high-speed group (3 cm, 4 km/h), high-heel, low-speed group (9 cm, 2 km/h), high-heel, and high-speed group (9 cm, 4 km/h), with 10 subjects per group. Static and dynamic balance was evaluated using the I-Balance system and knee joint position sense using a goniometer. Measurements were compared using a pre- and posttest design. [Results] Increasing heel height and gait velocity decreased knee joint position sense and significantly increased the amplitude of body sway under conditions of static and dynamic balance, with highest sway amplitude induced by the high-heel, high-speed condition. [Conclusion] Increased walking speed in high heels produced significant negative effects on knee joint sense and balance control. PMID:27799675

  14. Percutaneous Reduction and Fixation with Kirschner Wires versus Open Reduction Internal Fixation for the Management of Calcaneal Fractures: A Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Jianbin; Zhou, Feiya; Yang, Lei; Tan, Jun

    2016-01-01

    The aim of our meta-analysis was to compare outcomes for two surgical treatments of calcaneal fractures, percutaneous reduction and fixation with Kirschner wires (PRFK) and open reduction internal fixation (ORIF), with the intent of evaluating the quality of evidence to inform practice. Search of MEDLINE, Cochrane and CNKI databases to identify randomized controlled trials (RCTs) comparing PRKF and ORIF on the following outcomes: post-operative function, complications and quality of the reduction. Odd ratios (OR) and weighted mean differences were pooled using either a fixed-effects or random-effects model, depending on the heterogeneity of the trials included in the analysis. Eighteen RCTs provided the data from 1407 patients. PRFK was associated with a lower risk of surgical wound complications, and ORIF with better post-operative function, angle of Gissane, calcaneal height, and calcaneal width. There were no statistically significant differences between the techniques with regards to post-operative Böhler’s angle. PRFK does not provide a substantive advantage over ORIF for the treatment of calcaneal fractures in adults. PRFK may, however, yield comparable functional outcomes to ORIF for closed Sanders type II calcaneal fractures but with less complication related to surgical wound healing. PMID:27457262

  15. Effect of Breast-Feeding and Maternal Holding in Relieving Painful Responses in Full-Term Neonates: A Randomized Clinical Trial.

    PubMed

    Obeidat, Hala M; Shuriquie, Mona A

    2015-01-01

    This randomized clinical trial was conducted to determine the efficacy of breast-feeding with maternal holding as compared with maternal holding without breast-feeding in relieving painful responses during heel lance blood drawing in full-term neonates. A convenience sample of 128 full-term newborn infants, in their fourth to sixth days of life, undergoing heel lance blood drawing for screening of hypothyroidism were included in the study. The neonates were randomly assigned into 2 equivalent groups. During heel lance blood drawing for infants, they either breast-fed with maternal holding (group I) or were held in their mother's lap without breast-feeding (group II). The painful responses were assessed simultaneously by 2 neonatal nurses blinded to the purpose of the study. Outcome measures for painful responses of the full-term neonates were evaluated with the Premature Infant Pain Profile scale. Independent t test showed significant differences in Premature Infant Pain Profile scale scores among the 2 groups (t = -8.447, P = .000). Pain scores were significantly lower among infants who were breast-fed in addition to maternal holding. Evidence from this study indicates that the combination of breast-feeding with maternal holding reduces painful responses of full-term infants during heel lance blood drawing.

  16. Effects of heel base size, walking speed, and slope angle on center of pressure trajectory and plantar pressure when wearing high-heeled shoes.

    PubMed

    Luximon, Yan; Cong, Yan; Luximon, Ameersing; Zhang, Ming

    2015-06-01

    High-heeled shoes are associated with instability and a high risk of fall, fracture, and ankle sprain. This study investigated the effects of heel base size (HBS) on walking stability under different walking speeds and slope angles. The trajectory of the center of pressure (COP), maximal peak pressure, pressure time integral, contact area, and perceived stability were analyzed. The results revealed that a small HBS increased the COP deviations, shifting the COP more medially at the beginning of the gait cycle. The slope angle mainly affected the COP in the anteroposterior direction. An increased slope angle shifted the COP posterior and caused greater pressure and a larger contact area in the midfoot and rearfoot regions, which can provide more support. Subjective measures on perceived stability were consistent with objective measures. The results suggested that high-heeled shoes with a small HBS did not provide stable plantar support, particularly on a small slope angle. The changes in the COP and pressure pattern caused by a small HBS might increase joint torque and muscle activity and induce lower limb problems.

  17. Occurrence, Characterization and Synthesis of Hanford and SRS Tank Heel Materials

    SciTech Connect

    KRUMHANSL, JAMES L.

    2002-07-01

    The long-range objective of this study was to develop chemically assisted technologies for removing heels from tanks. In FY 01, the first two steps toward this objective were taken: (1) catalogue the occurrence and nature of tank heels and assess which materials are available for study and (2) develop methods for synthesizing non-radioactive surrogate heel materials for use in testing potential removal technologies. The chief finding of Task 1 was the existence of ''heels'', depending on the definition used. Hard materials that would be almost impossible to remove by sluicing are all but absent from the records of both Savannah River and Hanford. Historical usage suggests that the term ''heel'' may also apply to chunky, granular, or semi-solid pasty accumulations. These materials are documented and may also be difficult to remove by conventional sluicing technologies. Such heels may be comprised of normal sludge components, dominantly iron and aluminum hydroxides, or they may result from added materials which were not part of the normal fuel reprocessing operations: Portland cement, diatomaceous earth, sand and soil and spent zeolite ion exchange ''resins''. The occurrence and chemistry of the most notable ''heel'', that of the zeolite mass in Tank 19F at Savannah River, is reviewed in some detail. Secondly, no clear correlation was found between high tank temperatures and difficulties encountered in removing materials from a tank at a later date; nor did the sludges from these tanks give any indication of being particularly solid. Experimental studies to develop synthetic heel materials were caned out using a number of different approaches. For normal sludge materials settling, even when assisted by a centrifuge, it proved ineffective. The same result was obtained from drying sludge samples. Even exposing sludges to a molten salt melt at 233 C, only produced a fine powder, rather than a resilient ceramic which resisted disaggregation. A cohesive material, however

  18. Use of Body Surface Heat Patterns for Predicting and Evaluating Acute Lower Extremity Pain Among Soldiers

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-01-31

    for plantar fasciitis . Both produced abnormal thermograms. One had been abnormal during the baseline period. One subject was seen for heel blisters...nerve damage (sciatic, peroneal, sural, mixed with lower limb weakness), two ankle pain, two plantar warts, and two generalized leg pain with no know...open skin wound, rash, or a fresh surgery scar this procedure was not performed. At the early stages of the study we tried to get a contact thermograph

  19. Acute effect of heel-drop exercise with varying ranges of motion on the gastrocnemius aponeurosis-tendon's mechanical properties.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Siwoo; Lee, Dae-Yeon; Choi, Dong-Sung; Lee, Hae-Dong

    2014-06-01

    The objectives of this study was to investigate the acute effects of various magnitudes of tendon strain on the mechanical properties of the human medial gastrocnemius (MG) in vivo during controlled heel-drop exercises. Seven male and seven female volunteers performed two different exercises executed one month apart: one was a heel-drop exercise on a block (HDB), and the other was a heel-drop exercise on level floor (HDL). In each regimen, the subjects completed a session of 150 heel-drop exercises (15 repetitions×10 sets; with a 30 s rest following each set). Before and immediately after the heel-drop exercise, the ankle plantar flexor torque and elongation of the MG were measured using a combined measurement system of dynamometry and ultrasonography and then the MG tendon strain and stiffness were evaluated in each subject. The tendon stiffness measured prior to the exercises was not significantly different between the two groups 23.7±10.6N/mm and 24.1±10.0N/mm for the HDB and HDL, respectively (p>.05). During the heel-drop exercise, it was found that the tendon strain during the heel-drop exercise on a block (8.4±3.7%) was significantly higher than the strain measured on the level floor (5.4±3.8%) (p<.05). In addition, the tendon stiffness following the heel-drop exercise on a block (32.3±12.2N/mm) was significantly greater than the tendon stiffness measured following the heel-drop exercise on the level floor (25.4±11.4N/mm) (p<.05). The results of this study suggest that tendon stiffness immediately following a heel-drop exercise depends on the magnitude of tendon strain.

  20. [The incidence, age dependence and sex distribution of the calcaneal spur. An analysis of its x-ray morphology in 1027 patients of the central European population].

    PubMed

    Riepert, T; Drechsler, T; Urban, R; Schild, H; Mattern, R

    1995-06-01

    In 1027 lateral radiograms of the ankle in a Caucasian population, 161 plantar and/or dorsal calcaneal spurs (15.7%) were diagnosed. Plantar spurs were more common than dorsal spurs (11.2 and 9.3% respectively). Prevalence of both spurs increases considerably with the rising age. Dorsal spurs appear slightly earlier than plantar spurs. The spur frequencies are similar in left and right feet. The plantar spurs were significantly (p < 0.0001) more common in women than in men in general, while dorsal spurs were more frequent in men than in women up to the age of 70. The previously reported higher frequencies of plantar and dorsal calcaneal spurs in women than in men are probably a result of a disproportionally higher number of women in higher age in the groups studied. In forensic medicine, calcaneal spurs provide evidence for identity and age of unknown corpses, and to certain extend their profession, physical activities and constitution during life.

  1. Previous physical exercise slows down the complications from experimental diabetes in the calcaneal tendon

    PubMed Central

    Bezerra, Márcio Almeida; da Silva Nery, Cybelle; de Castro Silveira, Patrícia Verçoza; de Mesquita, Gabriel Nunes; de Gomes Figueiredo, Thainá; Teixeira, Magno Felipe Holanda Barboza Inácio; de Moraes, Silvia Regina Arruda

    2016-01-01

    Summary Background the complications caused by diabetes increase fragility in the muscle-tendon system, resulting in degeneration and easier rupture. To avoid this issue, therapies that increase the metabolism of glucose by the body, with physical activity, have been used after the confirmation of diabetes. We evaluate the biomechanical behavior of the calcaneal tendon and the metabolic parameters in rats induced to experimental diabetes and submitted to pre- and post-induction exercise. Methods 54-male-Wistar rats were randomly divided into four groups: Control Group (CG), Swimming Group (SG), Diabetic Group (DG), and Diabetic Swimming Group (DSG). The trained groups were submitted to swimming exercise, while unexercised groups remained restricted to the cages. Metabolic and biomechanical parameters were assessed. Results the clinical parameters of DSG showed no change due to exercise protocol. The tendon analysis of the DSG showed increased values for the elastic modulus (p<0.01) and maximum tension (p<0.001) and lowest value for transverse area (p<0.001) when compared to the SG, however it showed no difference when compared to DG. Conclusion the homogeneous values presented by the tendons of the DG and DSG show that physical exercise applied in the pre- and post-induction wasn’t enough to promote a protective effect against the tendinopathy process, but prevent the progress of degeneration. PMID:27331036

  2. Calcaneal Quantitative Ultrasound Indicates Reduced Bone Status Among Physically Active Adult Forager-Horticulturalists

    PubMed Central

    Stieglitz, Jonathan; Madimenos, Felicia; Kaplan, Hillard; Gurven, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Sedentary lifestyle contributes to osteoporosis and fragility fracture risks among modern humans, but whether such risks are prevalent in physically active pre-industrial societies with lower life expectancies is unclear. Osteoporosis should be readily observable in pre-industrial societies if it was regularly experienced over human history. In this study of 142 older adult Tsimane forager-horticulturalists (mean age±SD=62.1±8.6, range=50-85, 51% female) we use calcaneal quantitative ultrasonography (qUS) to assess bone status, document prevalence of adults with reduced bone status, and identify factors (demographic, anthropometric, immunological, kinesthetic) associated with reduced bone status. Men (23%) are as likely as women (25%) to have reduced bone status, although age-related decline in qUS parameters is attenuated for men. Adiposity and fat-free mass positively co-vary with qUS parameters for women but not men. Leukocyte count is inversely associated with qUS parameters controlling for potential confounders; leukocyte count is positively correlated within adults over time, and adults with persistently low counts have higher adjusted qUS parameters (6-8%) than adults with a high count. Reduced bone status characteristic of osteoporosis is common among active Tsimane with minimal exposure to osteoporosis risk factors found in industrialized societies, but with energetic constraints and high pathogen burden. PMID:26460548

  3. Xeroradiography in the diagnosis of the Haglund syndrome.

    PubMed

    Burhenne, L J; Connell, D G

    1986-09-01

    Xeroradiography is the radiographic method of choice for assessment of soft tissues and calcaneal detail in patients suffering from a painful swelling localized in the heel. The radiographic triad of retrocalcaneal bursitis, superficial tendo Achillis bursitis, and Achilles tendon thickening, in the presence of an intact posterior superior calcaneal margin, are readily evaluated with xeroradiography. The Haglund syndrome is a painful inflammation involving the two bursae which surround the Achilles tendon. It is associated with a prominent posterior superior calcaneal margin. Of the two objective measurements devised to assess this prominence, neither the posterior calcaneal angle of Philip and Fowler of greater than 75 degrees nor the parallel pitch line (PPL) has proved to be a reliable index. In the present study, we evaluated four patients with heel pain and swelling as well as 100 control patients. The findings suggest that the prominence of the posterior calcaneal angle should be assessed relative to the known normal range rather than by comparison to a single fixed angulation which is arbitrarily designated as being abnormal.

  4. Collar height and heel counter-stiffness for ankle stability and athletic performance in basketball.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hui; Wu, Zitian; Lam, Wing-Kai

    2017-01-25

    This study examined the effects of collar height and heel counter-stiffness of basketball shoes on ankle stability during sidestep cutting and athletic performance. 15 university basketball players wore customized shoes with different collar heights (high and low) and heel counter-stiffness (regular, stiffer and stiffest) for this study. Ankle stability was evaluated in sidestep cutting while athletic performance evaluated in jumping and agility tasks. All variables were analysed using two-way repeated ANOVA. Results showed shorter time to peak ankle inversion for both high collar and stiff heel counter conditions (P < 0.05), while smaller initial ankle inversion angle, peak inversion velocity and total range of inversion for wearing high collar shoes (P < 0.05). No shoe differences were found for performance variables. These findings imply that the collar height might play a larger role in lateral stability than heel counter-stiffness, while both collar height and counter-stiffness have no effect on athletic performance.

  5. Tank Farm WM-182 and WM-183 Heel Slurry Samples PSD Results

    SciTech Connect

    Batcheller, T.A.; Huestis, G.M.

    2000-08-31

    Particle size distribution (PSD) analysis of INTEC Tank Farm WM-182 and WM-183 heel slurry samples were performed using a modified Horiba LA-300 PSD analyzer at the RAL facility. There were two types of testing performed: typical PSD analysis, and setting rate testing. Although the heel slurry samples were obtained from two separate vessels, the particle size distribution results were quite similar. The slurry solids were from approximately a minimum particle size of 0.5 mm to a maximum of 230 mm with about 90% of the material between 2-to-133 mm, and the cumulative 50% value at approximately 20 mm. This testing also revealed that high frequency sonication with an ultrasonic element may break-up larger particles in the WM-182 and WM-183 tank from heel slurries. This finding represents useful information regarding ultimate tank heel waste processing. Settling rate testing results were also fairly consistent with material from both vessels in that it appears that most of the mass of solids settle to an agglomerated, yet easily redispersed layer at the bottom. A dispersed and suspended material remained in the ''clear'' layer above the settled layer after about one-half an hour of settling time. This material had a statistical mode of approximately 5 mm and a maximum particle size of 30 mm.

  6. Tank Farm WM-182 and WM 183 Heel Slurry Samples PSD Results

    SciTech Connect

    Batcheller, Thomas Aquinas

    2000-09-01

    Particle size distribution (PSD) analysis of INTEC Tank Farm WM-182 and WM-183 heel slurry samples were performed using a modified Horiba LA-300 PSD analyzer at the RAL facility. There were two types of testing performed: typical PSD analysis, and setting rate testing. Although the heel slurry samples were obtained from two separate vessels, the particle size distribution results were quite similar. The slurry solids were from approximately a minimum particle size of 0.5 mm to a maximum of 230 mm-with about 90% of the material between 2-to-133 mm, and the cumulative 50% value at approximately 20 mm. This testing also revealed that high frequency sonication with an ultrasonic element may break-up larger particles in the WM-182 and WM-183 tank from heel slurries. This finding represents useful information regarding ultimate tank heel waste processing. Settling rate testing results were also fairly consistent with material from both vessels in that it appears that most of the mass of solids settle to an agglomerated, yet easily redispersed layer at the bottom. A dispersed and suspended material remained in the "clear" layer above the settled layer after about one-half an hour of settling time. This material had a statistical mode of approximately 5 mm and a maximum particle size of 30 mm.

  7. The influence of whole body vibration on the plantarflexors during heel raise exercise.

    PubMed

    Robbins, D; Goss-Sampson, M

    2013-06-01

    Whole body vibration (WBV) during exercise offers potential to augment the effects of basic exercises. However, to date there is limited information on the basic physiological and biomechanical effects of WBV on skeletal muscles. The aim of this study was to determine the effects of WBV (40Hz, 1.9mm synchronous vertical displacement) on the myoelectrical activity of selected plantarflexors during heel raise exercise. 3D motion capture of the ankle, synchronised with sEMG of the lateral gastrocnemius and soleus, was obtained during repetitive heel raises carried out at 0.5Hz on 10 healthy male subjects (age 27±5 years, height 1.78±0.04m, weight 75.75±11.9kg). During both vibration and non vibration the soleus activation peaked earlier than that of the lateral gastrocnemius. The results indicate that WBV has no effect on the timing of exercise completion or the amplitude of the lateral gastrocnemius activity, however significant increases in amplitudes of the soleus muscle activity (77.5-90.4% MVC P<0.05). WBV had no significant effect on median frequencies of either muscle. The results indicate that the greatest effect of WBV during heel raise activity is in the soleus muscles during the early phases of heel raise.

  8. Lower limb mechanics during moderate high-heel jogging and running in different experienced wearers.

    PubMed

    Fu, Fengqin; Zhang, Yan; Shu, Yang; Ruan, Guoqing; Sun, Jianjun; Baker, Julien S; Gu, Yaodong

    2016-08-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate the differences in lower limb kinematics and kinetics between experienced (EW) and inexperienced (IEW) moderate high-heel wearers during jogging and running. Eleven experienced female wearers of moderate high-heel shoes and eleven matched controls participated in jogging and running tests. A Vicon motion analysis system was used to capture kinematic data and a Kistler force platform was used to collect ground reaction force (GRF). There were no significant differences in jogging and running speed respectively. Compared with IEW, EW adopted larger stride length (SL) with lower stride frequency (SF) at each corresponding speed. During running, EW enlarged SL significantly while IEW increased both SL and SF significantly. Kinematic data showed that IEW had generally larger joint range of motion (ROM) and peak angles during stance phase. Speed effect was not obvious within IEW. EW exhibited a significantly increased maximal vertical GRF (Fz2) and vertical average loading rate (VALR) during running, which was potentially caused by overlong stride. These suggest that both EW and IEW are at high risk of joint injuries when running on moderate high heels. For wearers who have to do some running on moderate high heels, it is crucial to control joint stability and balance SL and SF consciously.

  9. Feasibility of Quantitative Ultrasound Measurement of the Heel Bone in People with Intellectual Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mergler, S.; Lobker, B.; Evenhuis, H. M.; Penning, C.

    2010-01-01

    Low bone mineral density (BMD) and fractures are common in people with intellectual disabilities (ID). Reduced mobility in case of motor impairment and the use of anti-epileptic drugs contribute to the development of low BMD. Quantitative ultrasound (QUS) measurement of the heel bone is a non-invasive and radiation-free method for measuring bone…

  10. Investigating the Effects of Knee Flexion during the Eccentric Heel-Drop Exercise

    PubMed Central

    Weinert-Aplin, Robert A.; Bull, Anthony M.J.; McGregor, Alison H.

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to characterise the biomechanics of the widely practiced eccentric heel-drop exercises used in the management of Achilles tendinosis. Specifically, the aim was to quantify changes in lower limb kinematics, muscle lengths and Achilles tendon force, when performing the exercise with a flexed knee instead of an extended knee. A musculoskeletal modelling approach was used to quantify any differences between these versions of the eccentric heel drop exercises used to treat Achilles tendinosis. 19 healthy volunteers provided a group from which optical motion, forceplate and plantar pressure data were recorded while performing both the extended and flexed knee eccentric heel-drop exercises over a wooden step when barefoot or wearing running shoes. This data was used as inputs into a scaled musculoskeletal model of the lower limb. Range of ankle motion was unaffected by knee flexion. However, knee flexion was found to significantly affect lower limb kinematics, inter-segmental loads and triceps muscle lengths. Peak Achilles load was not influenced despite significantly reduced peak ankle plantarflexion moments (p < 0.001). The combination of reduced triceps lengths and greater ankle dorsiflexion, coupled with reduced ankle plantarflexion moments were used to provide a basis for previously unexplained observations regarding the effect of knee flexion on the relative loading of the triceps muscles during the eccentric heel drop exercises. This finding questions the role of the flexed knee heel drop exercise when specifically treating Achilles tendinosis. Key points A more dorsiflexed ankle and a flexing knee are characteristics of performing the flexed knee heel-drop eccentric exercise. Peak ankle plantarflexion moments were reduced with knee flexion, but did not reduce peak Achilles tendon force. Kinematic changes at the knee and ankle affected the triceps muscle length and resulted in a reduction in the amount of Achilles tendon work performed. A version

  11. Long-term use of high-heeled shoes alters the neuromechanics of human walking.

    PubMed

    Cronin, Neil J; Barrett, Rod S; Carty, Christopher P

    2012-03-01

    Human movement requires an ongoing, finely tuned interaction between muscular and tendinous tissues, so changes in the properties of either tissue could have important functional consequences. One condition that alters the functional demands placed on lower limb muscle-tendon units is the use of high-heeled shoes (HH), which force the foot into a plantarflexed position. Long-term HH use has been found to shorten medial gastrocnemius muscle fascicles and increase Achilles tendon stiffness, but the consequences of these changes for locomotor muscle-tendon function are unknown. This study examined the effects of habitual HH use on the neuromechanical behavior of triceps surae muscles during walking. The study population consisted of 9 habitual high heel wearers who had worn shoes with a minimum heel height of 5 cm at least 40 h/wk for a minimum of 2 yr, and 10 control participants who habitually wore heels for less than 10 h/wk. Participants walked at a self-selected speed over level ground while ground reaction forces, ankle and knee joint kinematics, lower limb muscle activity, and gastrocnemius fascicle length data were acquired. In long-term HH wearers, walking in HH resulted in substantial increases in muscle fascicle strains and muscle activation during the stance phase compared with barefoot walking. The results suggest that long-term high heel use may compromise muscle efficiency in walking and are consistent with reports that HH wearers often experience discomfort and muscle fatigue. Long-term HH use may also increase the risk of strain injuries.

  12. [Calcaneus fractures as a complication of the percutaneous treatment of plantar fasciitis. Case report].

    PubMed

    Apóstol-González, S; Herrera, J; Herrera, I

    2014-01-01

    Plantar fasciitis, a self-limiting pathologic entity, is a common cause of heel pain in adult patients. Surgical treatment is indicated when the patient does not improve after receiving conservative treatment for 4-6 months with proper surveillance. The complications of percutaneous techniques include: infection, persistent pain, and neurologic injuries, among others. We report the case of a patient with calcaneus fracture following percutaneous plantar fasciotomy and resection of a calcaneal spur. We conducted a review and discussion of the literature.

  13. The influence of revised high-heeled shoes on foot pressure and center of pressure during standing in young women.

    PubMed

    Bae, Young-Hyeon; Ko, Mansoo; Lee, Suk Min

    2015-12-01

    [Purpose] Revised high-heeled shoes were developed to minimize foot deformities by reducing excessive load on the forefoot during walking or standing in adult females, who frequently wear standard high-heeled shoes. Specifically, this study aimed to investigate the effects of revised high-heeled shoes on foot pressure distribution and center of pressure distance during standing in adult females. [Subjects and Methods] Twelve healthy adult females were recruited to participate in this study. Foot pressures were obtained under 3 conditions: barefoot, in revised high-heeled shoes, and in standard 7-cm high-heeled shoes. Foot pressure was measured using the Tekscan HR mat scan system. One-way repeated analysis of variance was used to compare the foot pressure distribution and center of pressure distance under these 3 conditions. [Results] The center of pressure distance between the two lower limbs and the fore-rear distribution of foot pressure were significantly different for the 3 conditions. [Conclusion] Our findings support the premise that wearing revised high-heeled shoes seems to provide enhanced physiologic standing posture compared to wearing standard high-heeled shoes.

  14. The influence of revised high-heeled shoes on foot pressure and center of pressure during standing in young women

    PubMed Central

    Bae, Young-Hyeon; Ko, Mansoo; Lee, Suk Min

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] Revised high-heeled shoes were developed to minimize foot deformities by reducing excessive load on the forefoot during walking or standing in adult females, who frequently wear standard high-heeled shoes. Specifically, this study aimed to investigate the effects of revised high-heeled shoes on foot pressure distribution and center of pressure distance during standing in adult females. [Subjects and Methods] Twelve healthy adult females were recruited to participate in this study. Foot pressures were obtained under 3 conditions: barefoot, in revised high-heeled shoes, and in standard 7-cm high-heeled shoes. Foot pressure was measured using the Tekscan HR mat scan system. One-way repeated analysis of variance was used to compare the foot pressure distribution and center of pressure distance under these 3 conditions. [Results] The center of pressure distance between the two lower limbs and the fore-rear distribution of foot pressure were significantly different for the 3 conditions. [Conclusion] Our findings support the premise that wearing revised high-heeled shoes seems to provide enhanced physiologic standing posture compared to wearing standard high-heeled shoes. PMID:26834343

  15. Cancer pain

    SciTech Connect

    Swerdlow, M.; Ventafridda, V.

    1987-01-01

    This book contains 13 chapters. Some of the chapter titles are: Importance of the Problem; Neurophysiology and Biochemistry of Pain; Assessment of Pain in Patients with Cancer; Drug Therapy; Chemotherapy and Radiotherapy for Cancer Pain; Sympton Control as it Relates to Pain Control; and Palliative Surgery in Cancer Pain Treatment.

  16. A biomechanical comparison of conventional versus an anatomic plate and compression bolts for fixation of intra-articular calcaneal fractures.

    PubMed

    Wang, Haili; Yang, Zhaoxu; Wu, Zhanpo; Chen, Wei; Zhang, Qi; Li, Ming; Li, Zhiyong; Zhang, Yingze

    2012-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the biomechanical stability obtained by using our technique featured an anatomical plate and compression bolts versus that of the conventional anatomic plate and cancellous screws in the fixation of intraarticular calcaneal fractures. Eighteen fresh frozen lower limbs of cadavers were used to create a reproductive Sanders type-III calcaneal fracture model by using osteotomy. The calcaneus fractures were randomly selected to be fixed either using our anatomical plate and compression bolts or conventional anatomic plate and cancellous screws. Reduction of fracture was evaluated through X radiographs. Each calcaneus was successively loaded at a frequency of 1 Hz for 1000 cycles through the talus using an increasing axial force 20 N to 200 N and 20 N to 700 N, representing the partial weight bearing and full weight bearing, respectively, and then the specimens were loaded to failure. Data extracted from the mechanical testing machine were recorded and used to test for difference in the results with the Wilcoxon signed rank test. No significant difference was found between our fixation technique and conventional technique in displacement during 20-200 N cyclic loading (P=0.06), while the anatomical plate and compression bolts showed a great lower irreversible deformation during 20-700 N cyclic loading (P=0.008). The load achieved at loss of fixation of the constructs for the two groups had significant difference: anatomic plate and compression bolts at 3839.6±152.4 N and anatomic plate and cancellous screws at 3087.3±58.9 N (P=0.008). There was no significant difference between the ultimate displacements. Our technique featured anatomical plate and compression bolts for calcaneus fracture fixation was demonstrated to provide biomechanical stability as good as or better than the conventional anatomic plate and cancellous screws under the axial loading. The study supports the mechanical viability of using our plate and

  17. Administration of Tranexamic Acid Reduces Postoperative Blood Loss in Calcaneal Fractures: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    PubMed

    Xie, Bing; Tian, Jing; Zhou, Da-peng

    2015-01-01

    The present randomized controlled trial was undertaken to evaluate the effect of tranexamic acid (TXA) on reducing postoperative blood loss in calcaneal fractures. A total of 90 patients with a unilateral closed calcaneal fracture were randomized to the TXA (n = 45) and control (n = 45) groups. The corresponding groups received 15 mg/kg body weight of TXA or placebo (0.9% sodium chloride solution) intravenously before the skin incision was made. Open reduction and internal fixation was performed for all patients and selective bone grafting was performed. The patients were examined 3 months after surgery. The intraoperative and postoperative blood loss, blood test results, and wound complications were compared between the 2 groups. The complications of TXA were also investigated. No statistically significant differences were found in the baseline characteristics between the TXA and control groups. Also, no significant difference was noted in the intraoperative blood loss between the 2 groups. However, in the TXA group, the postoperative blood loss during the first 24 hours was significantly lower than that in the control group (110.0 ± 160.0 mL versus 320.0 ± 360.0 mL; p < .001). The incidence of wound complications was also reduced compared with that in the control group (7.3% versus 23.8%; p = .036). No significant difference was found in the incidence of thromboembolic events or adverse drug reactions between the 2 groups. We concluded that preoperative single-dose TXA can effectively reduce postoperative blood loss and wound complications in patients with calcaneal fractures and that no significant side effects developed compared with the control group.

  18. Calcaneal fillet flap: a new osteocutaneous free tissue transfer for emergency salvage of traumatic below-knee amputation stumps.

    PubMed

    Januszkiewicz, J S; Mehrotra, O N; Brown, G E

    1996-09-01

    Traumatic below-knee amputations do not always leave enough soft tissue of bone with which to fashion a stump of sufficient length and durability to support a prosthesis. Composite free flaps can often be harvested from the amputated limb to provide immediate one-stage stump salvage and to preserve knee function. We report a new technique to increase stump length by incorporating the calcaneus into a foot fillet flap as a vascularized bone transfer. The calcaneal fillet flap is a useful addition to the inventory of available composite flaps. It is recommended for knee joint salvage when there is less than 11 cm of tibial remnant length.

  19. Foetal pain?

    PubMed

    Derbyshire, Stuart W G

    2010-10-01

    The majority of commentary on foetal pain has looked at the maturation of neural pathways to decide a lower age limit for foetal pain. This approach is sensible because there must be a minimal necessary neural development that makes pain possible. Very broadly, it is generally agreed that the minimal necessary neural pathways for pain are in place by 24 weeks gestation. Arguments remain, however, as to the possibility of foetal pain before or after 24 weeks. Some argue that the foetus can feel pain earlier than 24 weeks because pain can be supported by subcortical structures. Others argue that the foetus cannot feel pain at any stage because it is maintained in a state of sedation in the womb and lacks further neural and conceptual development necessary for pain. Much of this argument rests on the definition of terms such as 'wakefulness' and 'pain'. If a behavioural and neural reaction to a noxious stimulus is considered sufficient for pain, then pain is possible from 24 weeks and probably much earlier. If a conceptual subjectivity is considered necessary for pain, however, then pain is not possible at any gestational age. Regardless of how pain is defined, it is clear that pain for conceptual beings is qualitatively different than pain for non-conceptual beings. It is therefore a mistake to draw an equivalence between foetal pain and pain in the older infant or adult.

  20. Neck Pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... injuries and conditions that cause pain and restrict motion. Neck pain causes include: Muscle strains. Overuse, such ... body then forms bone spurs that affect joint motion and cause pain. Nerve compression. Herniated disks or ...

  1. Ankle pain

    MedlinePlus

    Pain - ankle ... Ankle pain is often due to an ankle sprain. An ankle sprain is an injury to the ligaments, which ... the joint. In addition to ankle sprains, ankle pain can be caused by: Damage or swelling of ...

  2. Knee pain

    MedlinePlus

    Pain - knee ... Knee pain can have different causes. Being overweight puts you at greater risk for knee problems. Overusing your knee can trigger knee problems that cause pain. If you have a history of arthritis, it ...

  3. Elbow pain

    MedlinePlus

    Pain - elbow ... Elbow pain can be caused by many problems. A common cause in adults is tendinitis . This is inflammation and ... a partial dislocation ). Other common causes of elbow pain are: Bursitis -- inflammation of a fluid-filled cushion ...

  4. Eye pain

    MedlinePlus

    Ophthalmalgia; Pain - eye ... Pain in the eye can be an important symptom of a health problem. Make sure you tell your health care provider if you have eye pain that does not go away. Tired eyes or ...

  5. Wrist pain

    MedlinePlus

    Pain - wrist; Pain - carpal tunnel; Injury - wrist; Arthritis - wrist; Gout - wrist; Pseudogout - wrist ... Carpal tunnel syndrome: A common cause of wrist pain is carpal tunnel syndrome . You may feel aching, ...

  6. Foot pain

    MedlinePlus

    Pain - foot ... Foot pain may be due to: Aging Being on your feet for long periods of time Being overweight A ... sports activity Trauma The following can cause foot pain: Arthritis and gout . Common in the big toe, ...

  7. Phantom Pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... be an effective treatment for some types of chronic pain. In acupuncture, the practitioner inserts extremely fine, sterilized ... and Stroke. http://www.ninds.nih.gov/disorders/chronic_pain/detail_chronic_pain.htm. Accessed Sept. 16, 2014. ...

  8. Hip pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... pain involves any pain in or around the hip joint. You may not feel pain from your hip ... 2012:chap 48. Read More Hip fracture surgery Hip joint replacement Patient Instructions Hip fracture - discharge Hip or ...

  9. Depression, Pain, and Pain Behavior.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keefe, Francis J.; And Others

    1986-01-01

    Examined the degree to which depression predicted pain and pain behavior. The Beck Depression Inventory was administered to 207 low back pain patients. Depression and physical findings were the most important predictors of pain and pain behavior. Depression proved significant even after controlling for important demographic and medical status…

  10. EM-31 RETRIEVAL KNOWLEDGE CENTER MEETING REPORT: MOBILIZE AND DISLODGE TANK WASTE HEELS

    SciTech Connect

    Fellinger, A.

    2010-02-16

    The Retrieval Knowledge Center sponsored a meeting in June 2009 to review challenges and gaps to retrieval of tank waste heels. The facilitated meeting was held at the Savannah River Research Campus with personnel broadly representing tank waste retrieval knowledge at Hanford, Savannah River, Idaho, and Oak Ridge. This document captures the results of this meeting. In summary, it was agreed that the challenges to retrieval of tank waste heels fell into two broad categories: (1) mechanical heel waste retrieval methodologies and equipment and (2) understanding and manipulating the heel waste (physical, radiological, and chemical characteristics) to support retrieval options and subsequent processing. Recent successes and lessons from deployments of the Sand and Salt Mantis vehicles as well as retrieval of C-Area tanks at Hanford were reviewed. Suggestions to address existing retrieval approaches that utilize a limited set of tools and techniques are included in this report. The meeting found that there had been very little effort to improve or integrate the multiple proven or new techniques and tools available into a menu of available methods for rapid insertion into baselines. It is recommended that focused developmental efforts continue in the two areas underway (low-level mixing evaluation and pumping slurries with large solid materials) and that projects to demonstrate new/improved tools be launched to outfit tank farm operators with the needed tools to complete tank heel retrievals effectively and efficiently. This document describes the results of a meeting held on June 3, 2009 at the Savannah River Site in South Carolina to identify technology gaps and potential technology solutions to retrieving high-level waste (HLW) heels from waste tanks within the complex of sites run by the U. S. Department of Energy (DOE). The meeting brought together personnel with extensive tank waste retrieval knowledge from DOE's four major waste sites - Hanford, Savannah River

  11. Influence of knee flexion angle and age on triceps surae muscle activity during heel raises.

    PubMed

    Hébert-Losier, Kim; Schneiders, Anthony G; García, José A; Sullivan, S John; Simoneau, Guy G

    2012-11-01

    Triceps surae and Achilles tendon injuries are frequent in sports medicine, particularly in middle-aged adults. Muscle imbalances and weakness are suggested to be involved in the etiology of these conditions, with heel-raise testing often used to assess and treat triceps surae (TS) injuries. Although heel raises are recommended with the knee straight for gastrocnemius and bent for soleus (SOL), the extent of muscle selectivity in these positions is not clear. This study aimed to determine the influence of knee angle and age on TS muscle activity during heel raises. Forty-eight healthy men and women were recruited from a younger-aged (18-25 years) and middle-aged (35-45 years) population. All the subjects performed unilateral heel raises in 0° and 45° knee flexion (KF). Soleus, gastrocnemius medialis (GM) and gastrocnemius lateralis (GL) surface electromyography signals were processed to compute root-mean-square amplitudes, and data were analyzed using mixed-effects models and stepwise regression. The mean TS activity during heel raises was 23% of maximum voluntary isometric contraction when performed in 0° KF and 21% when in 45°. Amplitudes were significantly different between TS muscles (p < 0.001) and KF angles (p < 0.001), with a significant interaction (p < 0.001). However, the age of the population did not influence the results (p = 0.193). The findings demonstrate that SOL activity was 4% greater when tested in 45° compared with 0° KF and 5% lower in the GM and GL. The results are consistent with the recommended use of heel raises in select knee positions for assessing, training, and rehabilitating the SOL and gastrocnemius muscles; however, the 4-5% documented change in activity might not be enough to significantly influence clinical outcome measures or muscle-specific benefits. Contrary to expectations, TS activity did not distinguish between middle-aged and younger-aged adults, despite the higher injury prevalence in middle age.

  12. Lateral Calcaneal Artery Flaps in Atherosclerosis: Cadaveric Study, Vascular Assessment and Clinical Applications

    PubMed Central

    Tanthanatip, Pattaya; Kuhaphensaeng, Paiboon; Ruamthanthong, Anuchit; Pitiseree, Anont; Suwantemee, Chaichoompol

    2015-01-01

    Background: Soft tissue defects of the lateral malleolus (LM) and Achilles tendon pose difficult reconstructive problems due to the bony prominence and limited local tissue available. The objectives were to study the anatomical landmarks of the lateral calcaneal artery (LCA) and patency of LCA in atherosclerotic patients. Methods: Part I: Thirty-four cadaveric feet were dissected to identify the LCA. The distance between the LCA and the most prominent point of the LM was measured horizontally (LCAa-LM), obliquely (LCAb-LM), and vertically (LCAc-LM). Part II: Thirty-two patients were divided in 2 groups as nonatherosclerotic and atherosclerotic groups. The LCA was assessed by both Doppler ultrasonography and computed tomographic angiography (CTA). Part III: Clinical applications were demonstrated. Results: Part I: Mean distances of LCAa-LM, LCAb-LM, and LCAc-LM were 24.76, 33.68, and 35.03 mm, respectively. The LCA originated 94.12% from the peroneal artery. Part II: Doppler ultrasonography detected the LCA at 90.62% and 87.50% in nonatherosclerotic and atherosclerotic groups, respectively, whereas 100.00% and 93.75%, respectively, were detected by CTA. No statistically significant difference was found in the patency of the LCA between nonatherosclerotic and atherosclerotic patients. Part III: Clinical applications were performed in atherosclerotic patients. Conclusions: The LM is a reliable point to identify the LCA, and the LCA flap can be raised safely in atherosclerotic patients. Preoperative CTA should be performed in severely atherosclerotic patients or cases of major lower extremity vascular injuries. PMID:26495230

  13. The "Heel Hook"-A Climbing-Specific Technique to Injure the Leg.

    PubMed

    Schöffl, Volker; Lutter, Christoph; Popp, Dominik

    2016-06-01

    Acute injuries in rock climbing either come from a fall onto the lower leg or from performing a hard move and injuring the upper extremity. Further evaluations of lower leg injuries in rock climbing athletes have been performed recently finding sport characteristics such as peroneal tendon dislocations or chronic deformations of the feet. One injury mechanism described in case reports is the so-called heel hook position, which is used more frequently today compared with the beginngs of rock climbing. In addition, the number of these injuries is expected to rise with the increase in popularity of climbing and bouldering. Therefore, it is important to further analyze this pathology. We investigated 17 patients with injuries of the lower extremities after performing a heel hook.

  14. The effects of high heeled shoes on female gait: a review.

    PubMed

    Cronin, Neil J

    2014-04-01

    Walking is the most common form of human locomotion. From a motor control perspective, human bipedalism makes the task of walking extremely complex. For parts of the step cycle, there is only one foot on the ground, so both balance and propulsion are required in order for the movement to proceed smoothly. One condition known to compound the difficulty of walking is the use of high heeled shoes, which alter the natural position of the foot-ankle complex, and thereby produce a chain reaction of (mostly negative) effects that travels up the lower limb at least as far as the spine. This review summarises recent studies that have examined acute and chronic effects of high heels on balance and locomotion in young, otherwise healthy women. Controversial issues, common study limitations and directions for future research are also addressed in detail.

  15. [Ulceration of the heel in a woman from Djibouti: squamous cell carcinoma with carcinomatous lymphangitis].

    PubMed

    Bertani, A; Massoure, P L; Menguy, P; Lamblin, G; Eve, O; Morand, J J

    2011-02-01

    The purpose of this report is to describe a case in which a heel ulcer with atypical features, i.e., large size and rapid progression, led to diagnosis of squamous cell carcinoma. Patient management was based on specialist advice obtained by "tele-dermatology" based on pictures and comments transmitted over the Internet. However, due to the risk of spreading and impossibility of providing other medical treatment (radiotherapy-chemotherapy), the lower limb was amputated at the top of the thigh.

  16. Shoulder pain

    MedlinePlus

    Pain - shoulder ... changes around the rotator cuff can cause shoulder pain. You may have pain when lifting the arm above your head or ... The most common cause of shoulder pain occurs when rotator cuff tendons ... The tendons become inflamed or damaged. This condition ...

  17. Pelvic Pain

    MedlinePlus

    Pelvic pain occurs mostly in the lower abdomen area. The pain might be steady, or it might come and go. If the pain is severe, it might get in the way ... re a woman, you might feel a dull pain during your period. It could also happen during ...

  18. Narcissistic rage: The Achilles' heel of the patient with chronic physical illness.

    PubMed

    Hyphantis, Thomas; Almyroudi, Augustina; Paika, Vassiliki; Goulia, Panagiota; Arvanitakis, Konstantinos

    2009-11-03

    Based on the psychoanalytic reading of Homer's Iliad whose principal theme is "Achilles' rage" (the semi-mortal hero invulnerable in all of his body except for his heel, hence "Achilles' heel" has come to mean a person's principal weakness), we aimed to assess whether "narcissistic rage" has an impact on several psychosocial variables in patients with severe physical illness across time. In 878 patients with cancer, rheumatological diseases, multiple sclerosis, inflammatory bowel disease, and glaucoma, we assessed psychological distress (SCL-90 and GHQ-28), quality of life (WHOQOL-BREF), interpersonal difficulties (IIP-40), hostility (HDHQ), and defense styles (DSQ). Narcissistic rage comprised DSQ "omnipotence" and HDHQ "extraverted hostility". Hierarchical multiple regressions analyses were performed. We showed that, in patients with disease duration less than one year, narcissistic rage had a minor impact on psychosocial variables studied, indicating that the rage was rather part of a "normal" mourning process. On the contrary, in patients with longer disease duration, increased rates of narcissistic rage had a great impact on all outcome variables, and the opposite was true for patients with low rates of narcissistic rage, indicating that narcissistic rage constitutes actually an "Achilles' Heel" for patients with long-term physical illness. These findings may have important clinical implications.

  19. Inertial sensor based and shoe size independent gait analysis including heel and toe clearance estimation.

    PubMed

    Kanzler, Christoph M; Barth, Jens; Rampp, Alexander; Schlarb, Heiko; Rott, Franz; Klucken, Jochen; Eskofier, Bjoern M

    2015-01-01

    Falls are a major cause for morbidity and mortality in the ageing society. Inertial sensor based gait assessment including the analysis of the heel and toe clearance can be an indicator for the risk of falling. This paper presents a method for calculating the continuous heel and toe clearance without the knowledge of the shoe dimensions as well as the foot angle in the sagittal plane. These gait parameters were validated using an optical motion capture system. 20 healthy subjects from 3 different age groups (young, mid age, old) performed gait trials with different stride lengths and stride velocities. We obtained low mean absolute errors, low standard deviations and high Pearson correlations (0.91-0.99) for all gait parameters. In summary, we implemented a viable algorithm for the calculation of the heel and toe clearance without knowing the shoe dimensions as well as the foot angle in sagittal plane. We conclude that the given method is applicable for a mobile and unobtrusive gait assessment for healthy subjects from all age classes.

  20. Three-dimensional morphology of heel fat pad: an in vivo computed tomography study

    PubMed Central

    Campanelli, Valentina; Fantini, Massimiliano; Faccioli, Niccolò; Cangemi, Alessio; Pozzo, Antonio; Sbarbati, Andrea

    2011-01-01

    Heel fat pad cushioning efficiency is the result of its structure, shape and thickness. However, while a number of studies have investigated heel fat pad (HFP) anatomy, structural behavior and material properties, no previous study has described its three-dimensional morphology in situ. The assessment of the healthy, unloaded, three-dimensional morphology of heel pad may contribute to deepen the understanding of its role and behavior during locomotion. It is the basis for the assessment of possible HFP morphological modifications due to changes in the amount or distribution of the loads normally sustained by the foot. It may also help in guiding the surgical reconstruction of the pad and in improving footwear design, as well as in developing a correct heel pad geometry for finite element models of the foot. Therefore the purpose of this study was to obtain a complete analysis of HFP three-dimensional morphology in situ. The right foot of nine healthy volunteers was scanned with computed tomography. A methodological approach that maximizes reliability and repeatability of the data was developed by building a device to lock the foot in a neutral position with respect to the scan planes during image acquisition. Scan data were used to reconstruct virtual three-dimensional models for both the calcaneus and HFP. A set of virtual coronal and axial sections were extracted from the three-dimensional model of each HFP and processed to extract a set of one- and two-dimensional morphometrical measurements for a detailed description of heel pad morphology. The tissue exhibited a consistent and sophisticated morphology that may reflect the biomechanics of the foot support. HFP was found to be have a crest on its anterior dorsal surface, flanges on the sides and posteriorly, and a thick portion that reached and covered the posterior surface of the calcaneus and the achilles tendon insertion. Its anterior internal portion was thinner and a lump of fat was consistently present in

  1. Degenerative lesions of the plantar fascia: surgical treatment by fasciectomy and excision of the heel spur. A report on 38 cases.

    PubMed

    Jarde, Olivier; Diebold, Patrice; Havet, Eric; Boulu, Gilles; Vernois, Joël

    2003-06-01

    The authors studied 38 cases of degenerative lesions of the plantar fascia which were treated surgically between 1989 and 1999. MRI showed chronic fasciitis in eight cases and an old rupture of the plantar fascia in 30 cases. Surgical treatment, which was performed in all cases after failure of conservative treatment of several months duration, combined excision of the fascia with resection of the heel spur. Histological examination found inflammation in all cases (fasciitis or rupture), calcification of the aponeurosis in four cases, cartilaginous metaplasia in four and fibromatosis in four. Patients were assessed a minimum of one year and a maximum of seven years after operation. The postoperative results were assessed using three criteria: resolution of pain, results on the static foot and patients' functional activity. Overall there were 24 very good and good results, nine fair and five poor. MRI performed at the time of follow-up revealed good healing of the plantar fascia in 16 cases, defects in two cases, inflammation in seven cases and defects associated with inflammation in 13 cases. Surgical treatment may be considered in cases where conservative treatment of talalgia has failed. Symptoms originating from degenerative damage to the plantar fascia, such as rupture or fasciitis, may benefit from fasciectomy. Short-term results show resolution of pain in 75% of cases, and a slight sagging of the plantar arch. Pre-operative MRI study is useful to determine the exact location of the lesions.

  2. Sexual pain.

    PubMed

    Boardman, Lori A; Stockdale, Colleen K

    2009-12-01

    Sexual pain is an underrecognized and poorly treated constellation of disorders that significantly impact affected women and their partners. Recognized as a form of chronic pain, sexual pain disorders are heterogeneous and include dyspareunia (superficial and deep), vaginismus, vulvodynia, vestibulitis, and noncoital sexual pain disorder. Women too often tolerate pain in the belief that this will meet their partners' needs. This article provides a review of the terminology and definition of the condition, theories on the pathophysiology, diagnostic considerations, and recommendations on the management of female sexual pain.

  3. Methods for Heel Retrieval for Tanks C-101, C-102, and C-111 at the Hanford Site - 13064

    SciTech Connect

    Sams, T.L.; Kirch, N.W.; Reynolds, J.H.

    2013-07-01

    The purpose of this paper is to evaluate the prospects of using bulk waste characteristics to determine the most appropriate heel retrieval technology. If the properties of hard to remove heels can be determined before bulk retrieval, then a heel retrieval technology can be selected before bulk retrieval is complete. This would save substantially on sampling costs and would allow the deployment of the heel retrieval technology immediately after bulk retrieval. The latter would also accelerate the heel removal schedule. A number of C-farm retrievals have been fully or partially completed at the time of this writing. Thus, there is already substantial information on the success of different technologies and the composition of the heels. There is also substantial information on the waste types in each tank based on historical records. Therefore, this study will correlate the performance of technologies used so far and compare them to the known waste types in the tanks. This will be used to estimate the performance of future C Farm heel retrievals. An initial decision tree is developed and employed on tanks C-101, C-102, and C 111. An assumption of this study is that no additional characterization information would be available, before or after retrieval. Note that collecting additional information would substantially increase the probability of success. Deploying some in-situ testing technologies, such as a water lance or an in-situ Raman probe, might substantially increase the probability of successfully selecting the process conditions without having to take samples from the tanks for laboratory analysis. (authors)

  4. Methods for heel retrieval for tanks C-101, C-102, and C-111 at the Hanford Site

    SciTech Connect

    Sams, Terry L.; Kirch, N. W.; Reynolds, Jacob G.

    2013-01-11

    The purpose of this paper is to evaluate the prospects of using bulk waste characteristics to determine the most appropriate heel retrieval technology. If the properties of hard to remove heels can be determined before bulk retrieval, then a heel retrieval technology can be selected before bulk retrieval is complete. This would save substantially on sampling costs and would allow the deployment of the heel retrieval technology immediately after bulk retrieval. The latter would also accelerate the heel removal schedule. A number of C-farm retrievals have been fully or partially completed at the time of this writing. Thus, there is already substantial information on the success of different technologies and the composition of the heels. There is also substantial information on the waste types in each tank based on historical records. Therefore, this study will correlate the performance of technologies used so far and compare them to the known waste types in the tanks. This will be used to estimate the performance of future C Farm heel retrievals. An initial decision tree is developed and employed on tanks C-101, C-102, and C 111. An assumption of this study is that no additional characterization information would be available, before or after retrieval. Note that collecting additional information would substantially increase the probability of success. Deploying some in-situ testing technologies, such as a water lance or an in-situ Raman probe, might substantially increase the probability of successfully selecting the process conditions without having to take samples from the tanks for laboratory analysis.

  5. Pain Assessment

    MedlinePlus

    ... acupuncture, chiropractic care, massage or other manual therapies, yoga, herbal and nutritional therapies, or others. This information helps the health care provider understand the nature of the pain or the potential benefits of treatment. The goals of the comprehensive pain ...

  6. Anal Pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... change in bowel habit or rectal bleeding. A hemorrhoid that develops quickly or is particularly painful may ... your doctor. The blood clot of a thrombosed hemorrhoid, although painful, can't break loose and travel, ...

  7. Back Pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... specific points on the body. Some people with low back pain report that acupuncture helps relieve their symptoms. Massage. ... Accessed May 29, 2015. Adult acute and subacute low back pain. Bloomington, Minn.: Institute for Clinical Systems Improvement. http:// ...

  8. Period Pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... You may also have other symptoms, such as lower back pain, nausea, diarrhea, and headaches. Period pain is not ... Taking a hot bath Doing relaxation techniques, including yoga and meditation You might also try taking over- ...

  9. Finger pain

    MedlinePlus

    Pain - finger ... Nearly everyone has had finger pain at some time. You may have: Tenderness Burning Stiffness Numbness Tingling Coldness Swelling Change in skin color Redness Many conditions, such ...

  10. Back Pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... Oh, my aching back!", you are not alone. Back pain is one of the most common medical problems, ... 10 people at some point during their lives. Back pain can range from a dull, constant ache to ...

  11. Breast Pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... before your period and sometimes continuing through your menstrual cycle. The pain may be moderate or severe, and ... breasts. Throughout the month, not related to your menstrual cycle. Postmenopausal women sometimes have breast pain, but breast ...

  12. Hip Pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... clues about the underlying cause. Problems within the hip joint itself tend to result in pain on the ... tendons and other soft tissues that surround your hip joint. Hip pain can sometimes be caused by diseases ...

  13. Usefulness of calcaneal quantitative ultrasound stiffness for the evaluation of bone health in HIV-1-infected subjects: comparison with dual X-ray absorptiometry

    PubMed Central

    Fantauzzi, Alessandra; Floridia, Marco; Ceci, Fabrizio; Cacciatore, Francesco; Vullo, Vincenzo; Mezzaroma, Ivano

    2016-01-01

    Objectives With the development of effective treatments and the resulting increase in life expectancy, bone mineral density (BMD) alteration has emerged as an important comorbidity in human immunodeficiency virus type-1 (HIV-1)-infected individuals. The potential contributors to the pathogenesis of osteopenia/osteoporosis include a higher prevalence of risk factors, combined antiretroviral therapy (cART)-exposure, HIV-1 itself and chronic immune activation/inflammation. Dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) is the “gold standard” technique for assessing bone status in HIV-1 population. Methods We conducted a cross-sectional study to investigate bone mineral status in a group of 158 HIV-1-infected subjects. The primary endpoint was the feasibility of calcaneal quantitative ultrasound (QUS) as a screening tool for BMD. All subjects were receiving stable cART and were virologically suppressed (HIV-RNA <37 copies/mL) from at least 12 months. Calcaneal QUS parameters were analyzed to obtain information on bone mass and microarchitecture. The results were compared with those obtained by DXA. Results No correlations were found between DXA/QUS parameters and demographic or HIV-1-specific characteristics, also including cART strategies. In the univariate analyses BMD, QUS indexes, and Fracture Risk Assessment Tool scores conversely showed significant associations with one or more demographic or HIV-1-related variables. Moreover, a significant relationship between calcaneal quantitative ultrasound index/stiffness and femoral/lumbar BMD values from DXA was described. The multivariate analysis showed an independent association between calcaneal quantitative ultrasound index/stiffness and body mass index, higher CD4+ T-cell numbers and low 25-OH D2/D3 vitamin D levels <10 ng/mL (P-values: 0.004, 0.016, and 0.015, respectively). Conclusion As an alternative and/or integrative examination to DXA, calcaneal QUS could be proposed as a useful screening in HIV-1-infected

  14. Patellofemoral Pain.

    PubMed

    Dutton, Rebecca A; Khadavi, Michael J; Fredericson, Michael

    2016-02-01

    Patellofemoral pain is characterized by insidious onset anterior knee pain that is exaggerated under conditions of increased patellofemoral joint stress. A variety of risk factors may contribute to the development of patellofemoral pain. It is critical that the history and physical examination elucidate those risk factors specific to an individual in order to prescribe an appropriate and customized treatment plan. This article aims to review the epidemiology, risk factors, diagnosis, and management of patellofemoral pain.

  15. The damping properties of the venous plexus of the heel region of the foot during simulated heelstrike.

    PubMed

    Weijers, René E; Kessels, Alphons G H; Kemerink, Gerrit J

    2005-12-01

    The damping mechanisms that are operational in the heel pad during the impact phase of locomotion have the important function to protect the musculo-skeletal system from injuries. How this is achieved is still not fully understood, as is for instance illustrated by the 'heel pad paradox', the observation that in vivo and in vitro experiments yielded widely different results. This paradox could so far only partially be explained. In the light of this paradox, and a previous study by our group, we conjectured that the venous plexus might contribute as a hydraulic shock absorber to the damping properties of the heel pad. To investigate this hypothesis in vivo, heel pads of 11 volunteers were subjected to pendulum impact tests, using velocities of 0.2, 0.4, and 0.6 m/s, and three physiologically different, consecutive conditions: (i) a relatively empty venous plexus, (ii) a congested venous plexus, and (iii) a decongested venous plexus. At congestion, the maximum impact force decreased slightly but significantly by 2.6% at 0.2 m/s and 1.8% at 0.4 m/s. This effect was no longer found at 0.6 m/s. Although these effects are rather small, they confirm the fundamental hypothesis that the venous plexus contributes to the damping properties of the heel pad during walking. It is likely that some underestimation of the effect has occurred.

  16. The comparison of manual lymph drainage and ultrasound therapy on the leg swelling caused by wearing high heels.

    PubMed

    Lee, Dong-Yeop; Han, Ji-Su; Jang, Eun-Ji; Seo, Dong-Kwon; Hong, Ji-Heon; Lee, Sang-Sook; Lee, Dong-Geol; Yu Lee, Jae-Ho

    2014-01-01

    One of the major symptoms when women are wearing high heels for a long time is leg swelling. The purpose of this study was to compare the effect of manual lymph drainage with ultrasound therapy. The forty-five healthy women of twenties were participated in this study and divided randomly into three groups; manual lymph drainage group (n=15), ultrasound therapy group (n=15) and control group (n=15). Swelling was measured before wearing the high heels (10 cm-height), after one-hour of wearing the high heels, wearing the high heels of one-hour after the intervention of 15 minutes. Also swelling was calculated by using a tape measure, volumeter and body composition analyzer. Statistical analysis of the comparison between the three groups was performed by one-way ANOVA. Also comparison to the mean value in swelling according to the time was performed by repeated measure ANOVA. As the result of this study, a significant changes have emerged within each of manual lymph drainage, ultrasound therapy and control group (p< 0.05). However, there were no significant differences between each group (p> 0.05). But the mean value of manual lymph drainage group showed the tendency of fast recovering before causing swelling. Therefore, we consider that the clinical treatment of manual lymph drainage and ongoing studies will be made since manual lymph drainage is very effective in releasing the leg swelling caused by wearing high heels and standing for a long time at work.

  17. Low heel ultrasound parameters predict mortality in men: results from the European Male Ageing Study (EMAS)

    PubMed Central

    Pye, Stephen R.; Vanderschueren, Dirk; Boonen, Steven; Gielen, Evelien; Adams, Judith E.; Ward, Kate A.; Lee, David M.; Bartfai, György; Casanueva, Felipe F.; Finn, Joseph D.; Forti, Gianni; Giwercman, Aleksander; Han, Thang S.; Huhtaniemi, Ilpo T.; Kula, Krzysztof; Lean, Michael E.; Pendleton, Neil; Punab, Margus; Wu, Frederick C.; O'Neill, Terence W.

    2015-01-01

    Background: low bone mineral density measured by dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry is associated with increased mortality. The relationship between other skeletal phenotypes and mortality is unclear. The aim of this study was to determine the relationship between quantitative heel ultrasound parameters and mortality in a cohort of European men. Methods: men aged 40–79 years were recruited for participation in a prospective study of male ageing: the European Male Ageing Study (EMAS). At baseline, subjects attended for quantitative ultrasound (QUS) of the heel (Hologic—SAHARA) and completed questionnaires on lifestyle factors and co-morbidities. Height and weight were measured. After a median of 4.3 years, subjects were invited to attend a follow-up assessment, and reasons for non-participation, including death, were recorded. The relationship between QUS parameters (broadband ultrasound attenuation [BUA] and speed of sound [SOS]) and mortality was assessed using Cox proportional hazards model. Results: from a total of 3,244 men (mean age 59.8, standard deviation [SD] 10.8 years), 185 (5.7%) died during the follow-up period. After adjusting for age, centre, body mass index, physical activity, current smoking, number of co-morbidities and general health, each SD decrease in BUA was associated with a 20% higher risk of mortality (hazard ratio [HR] per SD = 1.2; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.0–1.4). Compared with those in higher quintiles (2nd–5th), those in the lowest quintile of BUA and SOS had a greater mortality risk (BUA: HR = 1.6; 95% CI = 1.1–2.3 and SOS: HR = 1.6; 95% CI = 1.2–2.2). Conclusion: lower heel ultrasound parameters are associated with increased mortality in European men. PMID:26162912

  18. SLUDGE HEEL REMOVAL BY ALUMINUM DISSOLUTION AT SAVANNAH RIVER SITE 12390

    SciTech Connect

    Keefer, M.

    2012-01-12

    High Level Waste (HLW) at the Savannah River Site (SRS) is currently stored in aging underground storage tanks. This waste is a complex mixture of insoluble solids, referred to as sludge, and soluble salts. Continued long-term storage of these radioactive wastes poses an environmental risk. Operations are underway to remove and disposition the waste, clean the tanks and fill with grout for permanent closure. Heel removal is the intermediate phase of the waste retrieval and tank cleaning process at SRS, which is intended to reduce the volume of waste prior to treatment with oxalic acid. The goal of heel removal is to reduce the residual amount of radioactive sludge wastes to less than 37,900 liters (10,000 gallons) of wet solids. Reducing the quantity of residual waste solids in the tank prior to acid cleaning reduces the amount of acid required and reduces the amount of excess acid that could impact ongoing waste management processes. Mechanical heel removal campaigns in Tank 12 have relied solely on the use of mixing pumps that have not been effective at reducing the volume of remaining solids. The remaining waste in Tank 12 is known to have a high aluminum concentration. Aluminum dissolution by caustic leaching was identified as a treatment step to reduce the volume of remaining solids and prepare the tank for acid cleaning. Dissolution was performed in Tank 12 over a two month period in July and August, 2011. Sample results indicated that 16,440 kg of aluminum oxide (boehmite) had been dissolved representing 60% of the starting inventory. The evolution resulted in reducing the sludge solids volume by 22,300 liters (5900 gallons), preparing the tank for chemical cleaning with oxalic acid.

  19. Results of Characterization and Retrieval Testing on Tank 241-C-110 Heel Solids

    SciTech Connect

    Callaway, William S.

    2013-09-30

    Nine samples of heel solids from tank 241-C-110 were delivered to the 222-S Laboratory for characterization and dissolution testing. After being drained thoroughly, the sample solids were primarily white to light-brown with minor dark-colored inclusions. The maximum dimension of the majority of the solids was <2 mm; however, numerous pieces of aggregate, microcrystalline, and crystalline solids with maximum dimensions ranging from 5-70 mm were observed. In general, the larger pieces of aggregate solids were strongly cemented. Natrophosphate [Na{sub 7}F(PO{sub 4}){sub 2}°19H{sub 2}O] was the dominant solid phase identified in the heel solids. Results of chemical analyses suggested that 85-87 wt% of the heel solids were the fluoridephosphate double salt. The average bulk density measured for the heel solids was 1.689 g/mL; the reference density of natrophosphate is 1.71 g/mL. Dissolution tests on composite samples indicate that 94 to 97 wt% of the tank 241-C-110 heel solids can be retrieved by dissolution in water. Dissolution and recovery of the soluble components in 1 kg (0.59 L) of the heel solids required the addition of ≈9.5 kg (9.5 L) of water at 15 °C and ≈4.4 kg (4.45 L) of water at 45 °C. Calculations performed using the Environmental Simulation Program indicate that dissolution of the ≈0.86 kg of natrophosphate in each kilogram of the tank 241-C-110 heel solids would require ≈9.45 kg of water at 15 °C and ≈4.25 kg of water at 45 °C. The slightly larger quantities of water determined to be required to retrieve the soluble components in 1 kg of the heel solids are consistent with that required for the dissolution of solids composed mainly of natrophosphate with a major portion of the balance consisting of highly soluble sodium salts. At least 98% of the structural water, soluble phosphate, sodium, fluoride, nitrate, carbonate, nitrite, sulfate, oxalate, and chloride in the test composites was dissolved and recovered in the

  20. Is there an association between the use of heeled footwear and schizophrenia?

    PubMed

    Flensmark, Jarl

    2004-01-01

    Existing etiological and pathogenetical theories of schizophrenia have only been able to find support in some epidemiological, clinical, and pathophysiological facts. A selective literature review and synthesis is used to present a hypothesis that finds support in all facts and is contradicted by none. Heeled footwear began to be used more than a 1000 years ago, and led to the occurrence of the first cases of schizophrenia. Industrialization of shoe production increased schizophrenia prevalence. Mechanization of the production started in Massachusetts, spread from there to England and Germany, and then to the rest of Western Europe. A remarkable increase in schizophrenia prevalence followed the same pattern. In Baden in Germany the increasing stream of young patients more or less hastily progrediating to a severe state of cognitive impairment made it possible for Kraepelin to delineate dementia praecox as a nosological entity. The patients continued to use heeled shoes after they were admitted to the hospitals and the disease progrediated. High rates of schizophrenia are found among first-generation immigrants from regions with a warmer climate to regions with a colder climate, where the use of shoes is more common. Still higher rates among second-generation immigrants are caused by the use of shoes during the onset of walking at an age of about 11-12 months. Other findings point to the importance of this in the later development of schizophrenia. A child born in January-March begins to walk in December-March, when it's cold outside and the chances of going barefoot are smaller. They are also smaller in urban settings. During walking synchronised stimuli from mechanoreceptors in the lower extremities increase activity in cerebello-thalamo-cortico-cerebellar loops through their action on NMDA-receptors. Using heeled shoes leads to weaker stimulation of the loops. Reduced cortical activity changes dopaminergic function which involves the basal ganglia

  1. Temporomandibular pain

    PubMed Central

    Prasad, S Raghavendra; Kumar, N Ravi; Shruthi, HR; Kalavathi, SD

    2016-01-01

    Temporomandibular joint pain has various medical and dental etiological factors. The etiology of the temporomandibular joint pain is enigmatic, no single etiological factor is regarded as the cause. Its distribution is also not confined to a single area. This article presents the basic etiologic factors, its epidemiology, distribution of pain, classification of patients and the psychosocial behavior of patients suffering with temporomandibular pain. As overwhelming majority of medical and dental conditions/issues related to etiology of temporomandibular pain in patients have traditionally been presented and interpreted from the clinician's point of view. PMID:27601822

  2. Percutaneous reduction and fixation of an intra-articular calcaneal fracture using an inflatable bone tamp: description of a novel and safe technique

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Calcaneal fractures are common injuries involving the hind foot and often a source of significant long-term morbidity. Treatment options have changed throughout the ages from periods of preferred nonoperative management to closed reduction with a mallet, and more recently, open reduction and anatomic internal fixation. The current treatment of choice; however, is often debated, as open management of these fractures carries many risks to include wound breakdown and infection. A less invasive form of surgical management through small incisions, while maintaining the ability to obtain joint congruency, anatomic alignment, and restore calcaneal height and width would be ideal. We propose a novel form of fracture reduction using an inflatable bone tamp and percutaneous fracture fixation. Preoperative planning and experienced fluoroscopy is crucial to successful management using this method. Although we achieved successful radiographic outcome in this case, long-term functional outcome of this technique are yet to be published. PMID:22420710

  3. Abdominal Pain (Stomach Pain), Short-Term

    MedlinePlus

    ... myhealthfinder Immunization Schedules Nutrient Shortfall Questionnaire Abdominal Pain (Stomach Pain), Short-termJust about everyone has had a " ... time or another. But sudden severe abdominal pain (stomach pain), also called acute pain, shouldn't be ...

  4. Cracked Heels

    MedlinePlus

    ... foot and ankle surgeons. All Fellows of the College are board certified by the American Board of Foot and Ankle Surgery. Copyright © 2017 American College of Foot and Ankle Surgeons (ACFAS), All Rights ...

  5. Low back pain - chronic

    MedlinePlus

    Nonspecific back pain; Backache - chronic; Lumbar pain - chronic; Pain - back - chronic; Chronic back pain - low ... Low back pain is common. Almost everyone has back pain at some time in their life. Often, the exact cause of ...

  6. Correlation between ultrasonic power spectrum and bone density on the heel.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yubing; Xu, Yang; Ding, Zenghui; Chen, Yanyan; Su, Benyue; Ma, Zuchang; Sun, Yi-Ning

    2017-01-01

    The purposes of this paper were to evaluate the correlation between ultrasonic power spectrum and bone density and to extract the effectiveness of parameters from power spectrum for evaluating bone density. A total of 50 persons 24-72years of age were recruited. All study participants underwent bone mineral density (BMD) measurements of the lumbar spine (vertebral levels L1-L4). The participants also underwent calcaneal measurements to determine ultrasonic power spectrum with central frequencies of 0.5MHz. Three parameters from normalized power spectrum, called principle frequency (PF), frequency band (FB), and amplitude for principle frequency (APF), were chosen and be evaluated the correlation with the lumbar spine BMD. The correlation coefficient of PF, FB and APF with BMD was r=-0.48 (p<0.001), r=0.48 (p<0.001), and r=-0.71 (p<0.001), respectively. The results showed that the correlation between APF and BMD was better than the correlation among PF, FB and BMD, and APF have a significant correlation with BMD. In conclusion, the correlations among the parameters of ultrasonic power spectrum and BMD are significant, and especially APF performs better than PF and FB in evaluating bone density of participants. These results suggest that ultrasonic power spectrum may contain substantial information not already contained in BUA and SOS. A multiple regression model including all three QUS variables was somewhat more predictive of BMD than a model including only BUA and SOS.

  7. Neuropathic pain

    PubMed Central

    Colloca, Luana; Ludman, Taylor; Bouhassira, Didier; Baron, Ralf; Dickenson, Anthony H.; Yarnitsky, David; Freeman, Roy; Truini, Andrea; Attal, Nadine; Finnerup, Nanna B.; Eccleston, Christopher; Kalso, Eija; Bennett, David L.; Dworkin, Robert H.; Raja, Srinivasa N.

    2017-01-01

    Neuropathic pain is caused by a lesion or disease of the somatosensory system, including peripheral fibres (Aβ, Aδ and C fibres) and central neurons, and affects 7–10% of the general population. Multiple causes of neuropathic pain have been described and its incidence is likely to increase owing to the ageing global population, increased incidence of diabetes mellitus and improved survival from cancer after chemotherapy. Indeed, imbalances between excitatory and inhibitory somatosensory signalling, alterations in ion channels and variability in the way that pain messages are modulated in the central nervous system all have been implicated in neuropathic pain. The burden of chronic neuropathic pain seems to be related to the complexity of neuropathic symptoms, poor outcomes and difficult treatment decisions. Importantly, quality of life is impaired in patients with neuropathic pain owing to increased drug prescriptions and visits to health care providers, as well as the morbidity from the pain itself and the inciting disease. Despite challenges, progress in the understanding of the pathophysiology of neuropathic pain is spurring the development of new diagnostic procedures and personalized interventions, which emphasize the need for a multidisciplinary approach to the management of neuropathic pain. PMID:28205574

  8. Central pain.

    PubMed

    Singh, Supreet

    2014-12-01

    Questions from patients about pain conditions and analgesic pharmacotherapy and responses from authors are presented to help educate patients and make them more effective self-advocates. The topic addressed in this issue is central pain, a neuropathic pain syndrome caused by a lesion in the brain or spinal cord that sensitizes one's perception of pain. It is a debilitating condition caused by various diseases such as multiple sclerosis, strokes, spinal cord injuries, or brain tumors. Varied symptoms and the use of pharmacological medicines and nonpharmacological therapies will be addressed.

  9. The Haglund syndrome: initial and differential diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Pavlov, H; Heneghan, M A; Hersh, A; Goldman, A B; Vigorita, V

    1982-07-01

    Haglund syndrome is a common cause of posterior heel pain, characterized clinically by a painful soft-tissue swelling at the level of the achilles tendon insertion. On the lateral heel radiograph the syndrome is characterized by a prominent calcaneal bursal projection, retrocalcaneal bursitis, thickening of the Achilles tendon, and a convexity of the superficial soft tissues at the level of the Achilles tendon insertion, a "pump-bump." An objective method for evaluating prominence of the bursal projection is measurement using the parallel pitch lines. This measurement helps to identify patients with Haglund syndrome and patients predisposed to develop this condition, and also to differentiate local causes of posterior heel pain from systemic causes. The parallel pitch line measurement was determined in 10 symptomatic feet and 78 control feet and the results were analyzed statistically.

  10. Results of Characterization and Retrieval Testing on Tank 241-C-109 Heel Solids

    SciTech Connect

    Callaway, William S.

    2013-09-26

    Eight samples of heel solids from tank 241-C-109 were delivered to the 222-S Laboratory for characterization and dissolution testing. After being drained thoroughly, one-half to two-thirds of the solids were off-white to tan solids that, visually, were fairly evenly graded in size from coarse silt (30-60 μm) to medium pebbles (8-16 mm). The remaining solids were mostly strongly cemented aggregates ranging from coarse pebbles (16-32 mm) to fine cobbles (6-15 cm) in size. Solid phase characterization and chemical analysis indicated that the air-dry heel solids contained ≈58 wt% gibbsite [Al(OH){sub 3}] and ≈37 wt% natrophosphate [Na{sub 7}F(PO{sub 4}){sub 2}·19H{sub 2}O]. The strongly cemented aggregates were mostly fine-grained gibbsite cemented with additional gibbsite. Dissolution testing was performed on two test samples. One set of tests was performed on large pieces of aggregate solids removed from the heel solids samples. The other set of dissolution tests was performed on a composite sample prepared from well-drained, air-dry heel solids that were crushed to pass a 1/4-in. sieve. The bulk density of the composite sample was 2.04 g/mL. The dissolution tests included water dissolution followed by caustic dissolution testing. In each step of the three-step water dissolution tests, a volume of water approximately equal to 3 times the initial volume of the test solids was added. In each step, the test samples were gently but thoroughly mixed for approximately 2 days at an average ambient temperature of 25 °C. The caustic dissolution tests began with the addition of sufficient 49.6 wt% NaOH to the water dissolution residues to provide ≈3.1 moles of OH for each mole of Al estimated to have been present in the starting composite sample and ≈2.6 moles of OH for each mole of Al potentially present in the starting aggregate sample. Metathesis of gibbsite to sodium aluminate was then allowed to proceed over 10 days of gentle mixing of the

  11. [Facial pain].

    PubMed

    Makhinov, K A; Barinov, A N; Zhestikova, M G; Mingazova, L R; Parkhomenko, E V

    2015-01-01

    Diagnosis and treatment of facial pain is a problem for physicians of different specialties (neurologists, dentists, surgeons, oculists, otolaryngologists and psychiatrists). A classification of this pathology is far from ideal and an interdisciplinary comprehensive approach is needed. Current approaches to etiotropic, symptomatic and pathogenetic treatment of patients with most frequent variants of orofacial pain are presented.

  12. Does shoe heel design influence ground reaction forces and knee moments during maximum lunges in elite and intermediate badminton players?

    PubMed Central

    Cheung, Jason Tak-Man; Ryu, Jiseon

    2017-01-01

    Background Lunge is one frequently executed movement in badminton and involves a unique sagittal footstrike angle of more than 40 degrees at initial ground contact compared with other manoeuvres. This study examined if the shoe heel curvature design of a badminton shoe would influence shoe-ground kinematics, ground reaction forces, and knee moments during lunge. Methods Eleven elite and fifteen intermediate players performed five left-forward maximum lunge trials with Rounded Heel Shoe (RHS), Flattened Heel Shoe (FHS), and Standard Heel Shoes (SHS). Shoe-ground kinematics, ground reaction forces, and knee moments were measured by using synchronized force platform and motion analysis system. A 2 (Group) x 3 (Shoe) ANOVA with repeated measures was performed to determine the effects of different shoes and different playing levels, as well as the interaction of two factors on all variables. Results Shoe effect indicated that players demonstrated lower maximum vertical loading rate in RHS than the other two shoes (P < 0.05). Group effect revealed that elite players exhibited larger footstrike angle, faster approaching speed, lower peak horizontal force and horizontal loading rates but higher vertical loading rates and larger peak knee flexion and extension moments (P < 0.05). Analysis of Interactions of Group x Shoe for maximum and mean vertical loading rates (P < 0.05) indicated that elite players exhibited lower left maximum and mean vertical loading rates in RHS compared to FHS (P < 0.01), while the intermediate group did not show any Shoe effect on vertical loading rates. Conclusions These findings indicate that shoe heel curvature would play some role in altering ground reaction force impact during badminton lunge. The differences in impact loads and knee moments between elite and intermediate players may be useful in optimizing footwear design and training strategy to minimize the potential risks for impact related injuries in badminton. PMID:28334016

  13. Chemical and mechanical clogging of groundwater abstraction wells at well field Heel, the Netherlands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Beek, C. G. E. M.; Hubeek, A. A.; de la Loma Gonzalez, B.; Stuyfzand, P. J.

    2016-09-01

    Well field Heel, in the south east of the Netherlands, consists of a row of wells drilled in an anoxic pyrite-containing aquifer alongside a former gravel pit, which now serves as a recharge basin, where water is actively aerated. All wells are seriously affected by chemical (screen slot) and/or mechanical (well bore) clogging. The objective of this study is to explain this combined occurrence. A combination of chemical, hydraulic and well-maintenance data indicate three groundwater quality types: (1) oxic basin water, (2) anoxic iron-containing basin water after oxidation of the traversed aquifer, and (3) deeply anoxic native groundwater. Wells abstracting a mixture of oxic basin water and anoxic basin water and/or native groundwater experience chemical well clogging, whereas wells abstracting (only or partly) native groundwater are vulnerable to mechanical well clogging. In the end, after oxic basin water has completely oxidized the traversed the aquifer, only two groundwater quality types will be present. Wells abstracting only oxic basin water will show no clogging, and wells abstracting a mixture of native groundwater and oxic basin water will experience chemical and possibly also mechanical well clogging. In this reasoning, the sequence in abstracted groundwater quality types coincides with a sequence in well clogging: from mechanical to chemical to no clogging. As well field Heel is situated in sloping terrain, the interplay between regional hydraulic gradient and different water qualities results in one-sided chemical clogging in the upper part of the well screen during abstraction, and in the lower part during the resting phase.

  14. [Musculoskeletal pain].

    PubMed

    Casser, H-R; Schaible, H-G

    2015-10-01

    Among the clinically relevant pain conditions, pain in the musculoskeletal system is most frequent. This article reports extensive epidemiological data on musculoskeletal system pain in Germany and worldwide. Since back pain is most frequent, the diagnostics and therapeutic algorithms of acute, recurring, and chronic lower back pain in Germany will be particularly addressed. The importance of the physiologic-organic, the cognitive-emotional, the behavioral, and the social level to diagnostics and treatment will be discussed. We will also focus on osteoarthritic pain and address its epidemiology, clinical importance, and significance for the health care system. This article will list some reasons why the musculoskeletal system in particular is frequently the site of chronic pain. The authors believe that these reasons are to be sought in the complex structures of the musculoskeletal system; in the particular sensitivity of the deep somatic nociceptive system for long-term sensitization processes, as well as the ensuing nervous system reactions; and in the interactions between the nervous and immune systems. The article will give some insights into the research carried out on this topic in Germany.

  15. Fetal pain?

    PubMed

    Vanhatalo, S; van Nieuwenhuizen, O

    2000-05-01

    During the last few years a vivid debate, both scientifically and emotionally, has risen in the medical literature as to whether a fetus is able to feel pain during abortion or intrauterine surgery. This debate has mainly been inspired by the demonstration of various hormonal or motor reactions to noxious stimuli at very early stages of fetal development. The aims of this paper are to review the literature on development of the pain system in the fetus, and to speculate about the relationship between "sensing" as opposed to "feeling" pain and the number of reactions associated with painful stimuli. While a cortical processing of pain theoretically becomes possible after development of the thalamo-cortical connections in the 26th week of gestation, noxious stimuli may trigger complex reflex reactions much earlier. However, more important than possible painfulness is the fact that the noxious stimuli, by triggering stress responses, most likely affect the development of an individual at very early stages. Hence, it is not reasonable to speculate on the possible emotional experiences of pain in fetuses or premature babies. A clinically relevant aim is rather to avoid and/or treat any possibly noxious stimuli, and thereby prevent their potential adverse effects on the subsequent development.

  16. Ecomorphological analysis of the astragalo-calcaneal complex in rodents and inferences of locomotor behaviours in extinct rodent species

    PubMed Central

    Hautier, Lionel; Marivaux, Laurent; Vianey-Liaud, Monique

    2016-01-01

    Studies linking postcranial morphology with locomotion in mammals are common. However, such studies are mostly restricted to caviomorphs in rodents. We present here data from various families, belonging to the three main groups of rodents (Sciuroidea, Myodonta, and Ctenohystrica). The aim of this study is to define morphological indicators for the astragalus and calcaneus, which allow for inferences to be made about the locomotor behaviours in rodents. Several specimens were dissected and described to bridge the myology of the leg with the morphology of the bones of interest. Osteological characters were described, compared, mechanically interpreted, and correlated with a “functional sequence” comprising six categories linked to the lifestyle and locomotion (jumping, cursorial, generalist, fossorial, climber and semi-aquatic). Some character states are typical of some of these categories, especially arboreal climbers, fossorial and “cursorial-jumping” taxa. Such reliable characters might be used to infer locomotor behaviours in extinct species. Linear discriminant analyses (LDAs) were used on a wider sample of species and show that astragalar and calcaneal characters can be used to discriminate the categories among extant species whereas a posteriori inferences on extinct species should be examined with caution. PMID:27761303

  17. Ecomorphological analysis of the astragalo-calcaneal complex in rodents and inferences of locomotor behaviours in extinct rodent species.

    PubMed

    Ginot, Samuel; Hautier, Lionel; Marivaux, Laurent; Vianey-Liaud, Monique

    2016-01-01

    Studies linking postcranial morphology with locomotion in mammals are common. However, such studies are mostly restricted to caviomorphs in rodents. We present here data from various families, belonging to the three main groups of rodents (Sciuroidea, Myodonta, and Ctenohystrica). The aim of this study is to define morphological indicators for the astragalus and calcaneus, which allow for inferences to be made about the locomotor behaviours in rodents. Several specimens were dissected and described to bridge the myology of the leg with the morphology of the bones of interest. Osteological characters were described, compared, mechanically interpreted, and correlated with a "functional sequence" comprising six categories linked to the lifestyle and locomotion (jumping, cursorial, generalist, fossorial, climber and semi-aquatic). Some character states are typical of some of these categories, especially arboreal climbers, fossorial and "cursorial-jumping" taxa. Such reliable characters might be used to infer locomotor behaviours in extinct species. Linear discriminant analyses (LDAs) were used on a wider sample of species and show that astragalar and calcaneal characters can be used to discriminate the categories among extant species whereas a posteriori inferences on extinct species should be examined with caution.

  18. What a Pain! Kids and Growing Pains

    MedlinePlus

    ... What Happens in the Operating Room? What a Pain! Kids and Growing Pains KidsHealth > For Kids > What a Pain! Kids and ... something doctors call growing pains . What Are Growing Pains? Growing pains aren't a disease. You probably ...

  19. What a Pain! Kids and Growing Pains

    MedlinePlus

    ... dientes Video: Getting an X-ray What a Pain! Kids and Growing Pains KidsHealth > For Kids > What a Pain! Kids and ... something doctors call growing pains . What Are Growing Pains? Growing pains aren't a disease. You probably ...

  20. Recreational Sports Activities After Calcaneal Fractures and Subsequent Subtalar Joint Arthrodesis.

    PubMed

    Romeo, Giovanni; Martinelli, Nicolò; Bonifacini, Carlo; Bianchi, Alberto; Sartorelli, Elena; Malerba, Francesco

    2015-01-01

    Subtalar joint arthrodesis is a common treatment for the management of hindfoot pathologic entities. Despite pain reduction, hindfoot stiffness is a common concern of active patients, who wish to continue or start exercising for fitness. The purpose of the present retrospective observational clinical study was to assess the rate and type of recreational sports activities in patients before and after subtalar joint arthrodesis and to correlate the clinical outcome and the level of sports activities. In 33 patients (22 males, 11 females) treated with subtalar joint arthrodesis, the pre- and postoperative participation in sports and recreational activities was evaluated. The American Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Society hindfoot scale score, 36-item Short Form Health Survey, and a visual analog scale for pain were used as clinical outcome measures. The weekly session number, session time, and interval to activity recovery after surgery were registered. Patients with a subtalar joint arthrodesis returned to a satisfactory level of activity postoperatively. The sports participation almost reached levels similar to those preoperatively but with a shift from high- to low-impact activities.

  1. Chronic Pelvic Pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... Events Advocacy For Patients About ACOG Chronic Pelvic Pain Home For Patients Search FAQs Chronic Pelvic Pain ... Pain FAQ099, August 2011 PDF Format Chronic Pelvic Pain Gynecologic Problems What is chronic pelvic pain? What ...

  2. Chronic pain - resources

    MedlinePlus

    Pain - resources; Resources - chronic pain ... The following organizations are good resources for information on chronic pain: American Chronic Pain Association -- theacpa.org National Fibromyalgia and Chronic Pain Association -- www.fmcpaware.org National ...

  3. Pain Management

    MedlinePlus

    ... analgesia, identify new targets for analgesic drugs, and test the efficacy and adverse reactions of newly developed or currently used drugs to treat pain. Researchers are currently using these technologies to discover the mechanisms by which drugs such ...

  4. Urination - painful

    MedlinePlus

    ... and vagina Other causes of painful urination include: Interstitial cystitis Prostate infection ( prostatitis ) Radiation cystitis - damage to the ... Editorial team. Related MedlinePlus Health Topics Bladder ... Cystitis Prostate Diseases Sexually Transmitted Diseases Urinary Tract Infections ...

  5. Joint pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... that may be done include: CBC or blood differential C-reactive protein Joint x-ray Sedimentation rate ... chap 256. Schaible H-G. Joint pain: basic mechanisms. In: McMahon SB, Koltzenburg M, Tracey I, Turk ...

  6. Testicle pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... be caused by a hernia or kidney stone. Testicular cancer is almost always painless. But any testicle lump ... Read More Abdominal pain Scrotum Testes Testicle lump Testicular cancer Testicular torsion Review Date 8/31/2015 Updated ...

  7. Chest Pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... causes Chest pain can also be caused by: Panic attack. If you have periods of intense fear accompanied ... fear of dying, you may be experiencing a panic attack. Shingles. Caused by a reactivation of the chickenpox ...

  8. Chronic Pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... Strategy Current Research Research Funded by NINDS Basic Neuroscience Clinical Research Translational Research Research at NINDS Focus ... pain has done. Scientists believe that advances in neuroscience will lead to more and better treatments for ...

  9. [Abdominal pain].

    PubMed

    Gschossmann, J M; Holtmann, G; Netzer, P; Essig, M; Balsiger, B M; Scheurer, U

    2005-10-01

    Abdominal pain can result from a variety of different intra- and extra-abdominal disorders. Given the wide variety of etiological triggers for this pain, the primary task during the first stage of the diagnostic work-up is to determine as soon as possible the underlying cause and the degree of emergency. The aim of this evaluation is to adapt the therapeutic measures which are necessary for a causal treatment to the individual situation. Contrary to somatic causes of abdominal pain, the availability of such a causal therapy for functional bowel disorders is still very limited. Given this dilemma, the therapeutic focus of abdominal pain associated with these functional syndromes has to be placed on symptom-oriented treatment.

  10. Fetal pain.

    PubMed

    Rokyta, Richard

    2008-12-01

    The fetus reacts to nociceptive stimulations through different motor, autonomic, vegetative, hormonal, and metabolic changes relatively early in the gestation period. With respect to the fact that the modulatory system does not yet exist, the first reactions are purely reflexive and without connection to the type of stimulus. While the fetal nervous system is able to react through protective reflexes to potentially harmful stimuli, there is no accurate evidence concerning pain sensations in this early period. Cortical processes occur only after thalamocortical connections and pathways have been completed at the 26th gestational week. Harmful (painful) stimuli, especially in fetuses have an adverse effect on the development of humans regardless of the processes in brain. Moreover, pain activates a number of subcortical mechanisms and a wide spectrum of stress responses influence the maturation of thalamocortical pathways and other cortical activation which are very important in pain processing.

  11. Breast pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... chocolate in your diet helps reduce breast pain. Vitamin E, thiamine, magnesium, and evening primrose oil are not harmful, but most studies have not shown any benefit. Talk to your health care provider before starting ...

  12. Neonatal pain

    PubMed Central

    Walker, Suellen M

    2014-01-01

    Effective management of procedural and postoperative pain in neonates is required to minimize acute physiological and behavioral distress and may also improve acute and long-term outcomes. Painful stimuli activate nociceptive pathways, from the periphery to the cortex, in neonates and behavioral responses form the basis for validated pain assessment tools. However, there is an increasing awareness of the need to not only reduce acute behavioral responses to pain in neonates, but also to protect the developing nervous system from persistent sensitization of pain pathways and potential damaging effects of altered neural activity on central nervous system development. Analgesic requirements are influenced by age-related changes in both pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic response, and increasing data are available to guide safe and effective dosing with opioids and paracetamol. Regional analgesic techniques provide effective perioperative analgesia, but higher complication rates in neonates emphasize the importance of monitoring and choice of the most appropriate drug and dose. There have been significant improvements in the understanding and management of neonatal pain, but additional research evidence will further reduce the need to extrapolate data from older age groups. Translation into improved clinical care will continue to depend on an integrated approach to implementation that encompasses assessment and titration against individual response, education and training, and audit and feedback. PMID:24330444

  13. Neonatal pain.

    PubMed

    Walker, Suellen M

    2014-01-01

    Effective management of procedural and postoperative pain in neonates is required to minimize acute physiological and behavioral distress and may also improve acute and long-term outcomes. Painful stimuli activate nociceptive pathways, from the periphery to the cortex, in neonates and behavioral responses form the basis for validated pain assessment tools. However, there is an increasing awareness of the need to not only reduce acute behavioral responses to pain in neonates, but also to protect the developing nervous system from persistent sensitization of pain pathways and potential damaging effects of altered neural activity on central nervous system development. Analgesic requirements are influenced by age-related changes in both pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic response, and increasing data are available to guide safe and effective dosing with opioids and paracetamol. Regional analgesic techniques provide effective perioperative analgesia, but higher complication rates in neonates emphasize the importance of monitoring and choice of the most appropriate drug and dose. There have been significant improvements in the understanding and management of neonatal pain, but additional research evidence will further reduce the need to extrapolate data from older age groups. Translation into improved clinical care will continue to depend on an integrated approach to implementation that encompasses assessment and titration against individual response, education and training, and audit and feedback.

  14. Up-regulation of the chemo-attractive receptor ChemR23 and occurrence of apoptosis in human chondrocytes isolated from fractured calcaneal osteochondral fragments

    PubMed Central

    Sena, Paola; Manfredini, Giuseppe; Benincasa, Marta; Mariani, Francesco; Smargiassi, Alberto; Catani, Fabio; Palumbo, Carla

    2014-01-01

    To study the expression level of a panel of pro/anti-apoptotic factors and inflammation-related receptors in chondral fragments from patients undergoing surgical treatment for intra-articular calcaneal fractures, cartilage fragments were retrieved from calcaneal fractures of 20 patients subjected to surgical treatment. Primary cultures were performed using chondral fragments from fractured and control patients. Chondrocyte cultures from each patient of the fractured and control groups were subjected to immunofluorescence staining and quantitatively analyzed under confocal microscopy. Proteins extracted from the cultured chondrocytes taken from the fractured and control groups were processed for Western blot experiments and densitometric analysis. The percentage of apoptotic cells was determined using the cleaved PARP-1 antibody. The proportion of labelled cells was 35% for fractured specimens, compared with 7% for control samples. Quantification of caspase-3 active and Bcl-2 proteins in chondrocyte cultures showed a significant increase of the apoptotic process in fractured specimens compared with control ones. Fractured chondrocytes were positively stained for ChemR23 with statistically significant differences with respect to control samples. Densitometric evaluation of the immunoreactive bands confirmed these observations. Human articular chondrocytes obtained from patients with intra-articular calcaneal fractures express higher levels of pivotal pro-apoptotic factors, and of the chemo-attractive receptor ChemR23, compared with control cultures. On the basis of these observations, the authors hypothesize that consistent prolonged chondrocyte death, associated with the persistence of high levels of pro-inflammatory factors, could enhance the deterioration of cartilage tissue with consequent development of post-traumatic arthritis following intra-articular bone fracture. PMID:24689495

  15. Up-regulation of the chemo-attractive receptor ChemR23 and occurrence of apoptosis in human chondrocytes isolated from fractured calcaneal osteochondral fragments.

    PubMed

    Sena, Paola; Manfredini, Giuseppe; Benincasa, Marta; Mariani, Francesco; Smargiassi, Alberto; Catani, Fabio; Palumbo, Carla

    2014-06-01

    To study the expression level of a panel of pro/anti-apoptotic factors and inflammation-related receptors in chondral fragments from patients undergoing surgical treatment for intra-articular calcaneal fractures, cartilage fragments were retrieved from calcaneal fractures of 20 patients subjected to surgical treatment. Primary cultures were performed using chondral fragments from fractured and control patients. Chondrocyte cultures from each patient of the fractured and control groups were subjected to immunofluorescence staining and quantitatively analyzed under confocal microscopy. Proteins extracted from the cultured chondrocytes taken from the fractured and control groups were processed for Western blot experiments and densitometric analysis. The percentage of apoptotic cells was determined using the cleaved PARP-1 antibody. The proportion of labelled cells was 35% for fractured specimens, compared with 7% for control samples. Quantification of caspase-3 active and Bcl-2 proteins in chondrocyte cultures showed a significant increase of the apoptotic process in fractured specimens compared with control ones. Fractured chondrocytes were positively stained for ChemR23 with statistically significant differences with respect to control samples. Densitometric evaluation of the immunoreactive bands confirmed these observations. Human articular chondrocytes obtained from patients with intra-articular calcaneal fractures express higher levels of pivotal pro-apoptotic factors, and of the chemo-attractive receptor ChemR23, compared with control cultures. On the basis of these observations, the authors hypothesize that consistent prolonged chondrocyte death, associated with the persistence of high levels of pro-inflammatory factors, could enhance the deterioration of cartilage tissue with consequent development of post-traumatic arthritis following intra-articular bone fracture.

  16. Less wound complications of a sinus tarsi approach compared to an extended lateral approach for the treatment of displaced intraarticular calcaneal fracture

    PubMed Central

    Li, Lian-hua; Guo, Yong-zhi; Wang, Hao; Sang, Qing-hua; Zhang, Jian-zheng; Liu, Zhi; Sun, Tian-sheng

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: We conducted a prospective randomized clinical trial to compare the clinical and radiological outcomes of the sinus tarsi and extended lateral approaches for the surgical treatment of displaced intraarticular calcaneal fractures. Methods: Between January 2009 and January 2014, patients with displaced intraarticular calcaneal fracture were randomly assigned to receive surgical treatment by the sinus tarsi approach or the extended lateral approach using block randomization. We recorded and analyzed data on demographics, time to surgery, wound complications, Böhler angles pre- and postoperatively, and American Orthopedic Foot & Ankle Society score. Results: Sixty-four patients met the inclusion criteria and were randomly assigned to the 2 groups: 32 patients underwent sinus tarsi approach, and 32 patients the extended lateral approach. Baseline characteristics of both groups were similar. The time to surgery in the sinus tarsi approach group was significantly shorter than in the extended lateral approach group (P = 0.04). The wound complication rates were 6.3% and 31.2% in the sinus tarsi approach and extended lateral approach groups, respectively, which was significantly different (P = 0.01). Regarding the clinical outcomes, the groups did not differ significantly on walking visual analogue scale or American Orthopedic Foot & Ankle Society scores at 6 months and 1 year postoperatively. No significant differences existed between groups regarding the Böhler angle at different times and reduction quality of the articular surface and the medial wall. Conclusion: Compared with the extended lateral approach, the sinus tarsi approach decreased wound complications and preoperative waiting time, and achieved similar functional and radiological outcomes for displaced intraarticular calcaneal fractures. PMID:27603354

  17. Post-surgical care of a professional ballet dancer following calcaneal exostectomy and debridement with re-attachment of the left Achilles tendon.

    PubMed

    Kobsar, Bradley; Alcantara, Joel

    2009-03-01

    The extraordinary physical demands placed upon ballet dancers are only now being appreciated as comparable to that of other highly competitive athletic pursuits. The professional ballet dancer presents with an array of injuries associated with their physically vigorous performance requirements. In keeping with evidence-based practice, we describe the chiropractic care of a professional ballet dancer following surgical calcaneal exostectomy and debridement with re-attachment of the left Achilles tendon. The care provided involves an array of modalities from exercise and rehabilitation to spinal manipulative therapy.

  18. REMOVING SLUDGE HEELS FROM SAVANNAH RIVER SITE WASTE TANKS BY OXALIC ACID DISSOLUTION

    SciTech Connect

    Poirier, M; David Herman, D; Fernando Fondeur, F; John Pareizs, J; Michael Hay, M; Bruce Wiersma, B; Kim Crapse, K; Thomas Peters, T; Samuel Fink, S; Donald Thaxton, D

    2009-03-01

    The Savannah River Site (SRS) will remove sludge as part of waste tank closure operations. Typically the bulk sludge is removed by mixing it with supernate to produce a slurry, and transporting the slurry to a downstream tank for processing. Experience shows that a residual heel may remain in the tank that cannot be removed by this conventional technique. In the past, SRS used oxalic acid solutions to disperse or dissolve the sludge heel to complete the waste removal. To better understand the actual conditions of oxalic acid cleaning of waste from carbon steel tanks, the authors developed and conducted an experimental program to determine its effectiveness in dissolving sludge, the hydrogen generation rate, the generation rate of other gases, the carbon steel corrosion rate, the impact of mixing on chemical cleaning, the impact of temperature, and the types of precipitates formed during the neutralization process. The test samples included actual SRS sludge and simulated SRS sludge. The authors performed the simulated waste tests at 25, 50, and 75 C by adding 8 wt % oxalic acid to the sludge over seven days. They conducted the actual waste tests at 50 and 75 C by adding 8 wt % oxalic acid to the sludge as a single batch. Following the testing, SRS conducted chemical cleaning with oxalic acid in two waste tanks. In Tank 5F, the oxalic acid (8 wt %) addition occurred over seven days, followed by inhibited water to ensure the tank contained enough liquid to operate the mixer pumps. The tank temperature during oxalic acid addition and dissolution was approximately 45 C. The authors analyzed samples from the chemical cleaning process and compared it with test data. The conclusions from the work are: (1) Oxalic acid addition proved effective in dissolving sludge heels in the simulant demonstration, the actual waste demonstration, and in SRS Tank 5F. (2) The oxalic acid dissolved {approx} 100% of the uranium, {approx} 100% of the iron, and {approx} 40% of the manganese

  19. Low back pain - acute

    MedlinePlus

    Backache; Low back pain; Lumbar pain; Pain - back; Acute back pain; Back pain - new; Back pain - short-term; Back strain - new ... lower back supports most of your body's weight. Low back pain is the number two reason that Americans see ...

  20. The origin and relief of common pain.

    PubMed

    Irvin, R E

    1998-01-01

    kinds of motion: translation, rotation and oscillation. An example of postural boundaries that are rigid with respect to compression and tensile character are the bones that bear weight. In contrast, ligaments provide a tractive rigidity and musculotendons a relatively elastic boundary. Joint surfaces are considered boundaries that are rigid but not perfectly so. Of fundamental importance are those joints that arc lowermost in a column of the musculoskeletal system namely: (1) the feet and ankles that support the entirety of the musculoskeletal system and; (2) the base of the sacrum that supports the vertebral spine. This broadened definition of posture leads to a greatly enhanced manipulability of posture in the upright stance and alleviation of more than two-thirds of common pain by the coherent combination of (1) manual manipulation to reduce somatic dysfunction; (2) foot orthotics to optimize the amplitude of the arches of the feet and vertically align the ankle; (3) a heel lift to level the sacral base; (4) and a group of therapeutic postures configured to minimize restriction of peripheral soft tissue reflective of the earlier posture, all aimed to optimize posture. Mediated by the postural control system, manipulation of postural boundaries accordingly modifies the structure and function of the entire musculoskeletal system. Typically, this relief is maintained by foot orthotic and heel lift alone without maintenance by manual manipulation, medication, or exercise.

  1. The influence of high-heeled shoes on strain and tension force of the anterior talofibular ligament and plantar fascia during balanced standing and walking.

    PubMed

    Yu, Jia; Wong, Duo Wai-Chi; Zhang, Hongtao; Luo, Zong-Ping; Zhang, Ming

    2016-10-01

    High-heeled shoes have the capability to alter the strain and tension of ligamentous structures between the foot and ankle, which may result in ankle instability. However, high-heeled shoes can also reduce the strain on plantar fascia, which may be beneficial for the treatment of plantar fasciitis. In this study, the influence of heel height on strain and tension force applied to the anterior talofibular ligament (ATL) and plantar fascia were investigated. A three-dimensional finite element model of coupled foot-ankle-shoe complex was constructed. Four heel heights were studied in balanced standing: 0 in. (0cm), 1 in. (2.54cm), 2 in. (5.08cm), and 3 in. (7.62cm). A walking analysis was performed using 2-in. (5.08cm) high-heeled shoes. During balanced standing, the tension force on the ATL increased from 14.8N to 97.0N, with a six-fold increase in strain from 0 in. to 3 in. (0-7.62cm). The tension force and the average strain on the plantar fascia decreased from 151.0N (strain: 0.74%) to 59.6N (strain: 0.28%) when the heel height increased from 0 in. to 2 in. (0-5.08cm). When heel height reached 3 in. (7.62cm), the force and average strain increased to 278.3N (strain: 1.33%). The walking simulation showed that the fascia stretched out while the ATL loading decreased during push off. The simulation outcome demonstrated the influence of heel height on ATL alteration and plantar fascia strain, which implies risks for ankle injury and suggests guidance for the treatment of plantar fasciitis.

  2. Effect of Aloe vera application on the content and molecular arrangement of glycosaminoglycans during calcaneal tendon healing.

    PubMed

    Aro, Andrea Aparecida de; Esquisatto, Marcelo Augusto Marretto; Nishan, Umar; Perez, Mylena Oliveira; Rodrigues, Rodney Alexandre Ferreira; Foglio, Mary Ann; Carvalho, João Ernesto de; Gomes, Laurecir; Vidal, Benedicto De Campos; Pimentel, Edson Rosa

    2014-12-01

    Although several treatments for tendon lesions have been proposed, successful tendon repair remains a great challenge for orthopedics, especially considering the high incidence of re-rupture of injured tendons. Our aim was to evaluate the pharmacological potential of Aloe vera on the content and arrangement of glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) during tendon healing, which was based on the effectiveness of A. vera on collagen organization previously observed by our group. In rats, a partial calcaneal tendon transection was performed with subsequent topical A. vera application at the injury site. The tendons were treated with A. vera ointment for 7 days and excised on the 7(th) , 14(th) , or 21(st) day post-surgery. Control rats received ointment without A. vera. A higher content of GAGs and a lower amount of dermatan sulfate were detected in the A. vera-treated group on the 14(th) day compared with the control. Also at 14 days post-surgery, a lower dichroic ratio in toluidine blue stained sections was observed in A. vera-treated tendons compared with the control. No differences were observed in the chondroitin-6-sulfate and TGF-β1 levels between the groups, and higher amount of non-collagenous proteins was detected in the A. vera-treated group on the 21(st) day, compared with the control group. No differences were observed in the number of fibroblasts, inflammatory cells and blood vessels between the groups. The application of A. vera during tendon healing modified the arrangement of GAGs and increased the content of GAGs and non-collagenous proteins.

  3. The X-ray attenuation characteristics and density of human calcaneal marrow do not change significantly during adulthood

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Les, C. M.; Whalen, R. T.; Beaupre, G. S.; Yan, C. H.; Cleek, T. M.; Wills, J. S.

    2002-01-01

    Changes in the material characteristics of bone marrow with aging can be a significant source of error in measurements of bone density when using X-ray and ultrasound imaging modalities. In the context of computed tomography, dual-energy computed techniques have been used to correct for changes in marrow composition. However, dual-energy quantitative computed tomography (DE-QCT) protocols, while increasing the accuracy of the measurement, reduce the precision and increase the radiation dose to the patient in comparison to single-energy quantitative computed tomography (SE-QCT) protocols. If the attenuation properties of the marrow for a particular bone can be shown to be relatively constant with age, it should be possible to use single-energy techniques without experiencing errors caused by unknown marrow composition. Marrow was extracted by centrifugation from 10 mm thick frontal sections of 34 adult cadaver calcanei (28 males, 6 females, ages 17-65 years). The density and energy-dependent linear X-ray attenuation coefficient of each marrow sample were determined. For purposes of comparing our results, we then computed an effective CT number at two GE CT/i scan voltages (80 and 120 kVp) for each specimen. The coefficients of variation for the density, CT number at 80 kVp and CT number at 120 kVp were each less than 1%, and the parameters did not change significantly with age (p > 0.2, r2 < 0.02, power > 0.8 where the minimum acceptable r2 = 0.216). We could demonstrate no significant gender-associated differences in these relationships. These data suggest that calcaneal bone marrow X-ray attenuation properties and marrow density are essentially constant from the third through sixth decades of life.

  4. The relation between bone mineral density in the heel and pixel intensity in the mandibular jaw bone among elderly women

    PubMed Central

    Hedström, L; Baigi, A; Bergh, H

    2010-01-01

    Objectives The purpose of this study was to investigate the correlation between pixel intensity (PI) in digital radiographs of the lower jaw and bone mineral density (BMD) in the heels of post-menopausal women (as measured with DXL, a combination of dual energy X-ray absorptiometry and lasers). Methods Two intraoral periapical digital radiographs were taken in the right and left mandible premolar region, and the digital images were analysed by a computer program (Dimaxis) regarding PI. As the radiographs were taken, the BMD of the patient's left heel was measured via a portable Calscan device. The patient answered a questionnaire concerning risk factors. The correlation between variables was analysed using statistical tests. Results A significant correlation was found between the PI in the left (P = 0.001) and right (P = 0.004) mandible and the BMD of the left heel for the whole group. A pronounced correlation was found to exist for women > 70 years old. Based on a cut-off value of the PI, to differentiate between healthy individuals and those who required further analysis for osteoporosis, the following values were obtained: sensitivity 0.74, specificity 0.50, positive predictive value 0.77 and negative predictive value 0.46. Conclusion A positive correlation was found between PI in digital radiographs of the mandible and the BMD of the heel. The low predictive value does not allow any definite conclusions to be drawn from the present study. A reasonable recommendation could be for future studies to employ a larger study population to explore the effect on this value. PMID:20841458

  5. The oscillatory behavior of the CoM facilitates mechanical energy balance between push-off and heel strike.

    PubMed

    Kim, Seyoung; Park, Sukyung

    2012-01-10

    Humans use equal push-off and heel strike work during the double support phase to minimize the mechanical work done on the center of mass (CoM) during the gait. Recently, a step-to-step transition was reported to occur over a period of time greater than that of the double support phase, which brings into question whether the energetic optimality is sensitive to the definition of the step-to-step transition. To answer this question, the ground reaction forces (GRFs) of seven normal human subjects walking at four different speeds (1.1-2.4 m/s) were measured, and the push-off and heel strike work for three differently defined step-to-step transitions were computed based on the force, work, and velocity. To examine the optimality of the work and the impulse data, a hybrid theoretical-empirical analysis is presented using a dynamic walking model that allows finite time for step-to-step transitions and incorporates the effects of gravity within this period. The changes in the work and impulse were examined parametrically across a range of speeds. The results showed that the push-off work on the CoM was well balanced by the heel strike work for all three definitions of the step-to-step transition. The impulse data were well matched by the optimal impulse predictions (R(2)>0.7) that minimized the mechanical work done on the CoM during the gait. The results suggest that the balance of push-off and heel strike energy is a consistent property arising from the overall gait dynamics, which implies an inherited oscillatory behavior of the CoM, possibly by spring-like leg mechanics.

  6. Epidemiology of Shoe Wearing Patterns Over Time in Older Women: Associations With Foot Pain and Hallux Valgus

    PubMed Central

    Roddy, Edward; Marshall, Michelle; Thomas, Martin J.; Rathod, Trishna; Peat, George M.; Croft, Peter R.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Foot problems are prevalent in older women and are thought to be associated with footwear. This study examined women’s shoe wearing patterns over time and evaluated associations between footwear characteristics and foot pain and hallux valgus. Methods: Women aged 50–89 years (n = 2,627) completed a survey that included drawings of four toe-box shapes and four heel heights. For each life decade, participants indicated which footwear style they wore most of the time. Foot pain in the past 12 months and hallux valgus were documented by self-report. Logistic regression examined associations between heel height, toe-box shape, foot pain and hallux valgus. Results: Wearing shoes with a high heel and very narrow toe box between the ages of 20 and 29 was common, but decreased to less than 10% by the age of 40. Compared with women who had worn shoes with a very wide toe box, the likelihood of hallux valgus increased in those who had worn shoes with a wide (odds ratio [OR] 1.96, 95% CI 1.03–3.71), narrow (2.39, 1.29–4.42) and very narrow (2.70, 1.46–5.00) toe box between the ages of 20 and 29 and those who wore shoes with a very narrow toe box (1.93, 1.10–3.39) between the ages of 30 and 39. Conclusions: Women wear shoes with a lower heel and broader toe box as they age. Wearing constrictive footwear between the ages of 20 and 39 may be critical for developing hallux valgus in later life. PMID:26834078

  7. Effect on the parameters of the high-heel shoe and transfer time of ground reaction force during level walking

    PubMed Central

    Hyun, Seung-Hyun; Kim, Young-Pyo; Ryew, Che-Cheong

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to analyze an effect on the parameters of high-heel shoe and transfer time of ground reaction force during level walking and subjects participated were composed of adult female subjects (n=13) of 20s with height of high heel (0 cm, 9 cm, respectively). Instrument used for the study was 1 set force plate (AMTI-OR9-7) and sampling rate for data collection of analysis parameters was set-up at 1,000 Hz. The revelation of required coefficient of friction (RCOF) maximum showed significant difference with more rapid than that of 1st peak vertical force (1 PVF). Transfer time of body weight showed significant difference with more delay at 9 cm than that of 0 cm. RCOF required more frictional force required because PVF showed significant difference with larger value on 9 cm than that of 3 cm at 1 PVF. Both center of pressure (COP) x and COPy showed rather less displacement on 9 cm than that of 0 cm. In addition, level walking by high heel shoe did not control efficiently the ground reaction force due to restricted control capacity of coefficient of frictional force and therefore could suggest an inducement of muscle fatigue, heightening a possibility of sliding and falling due to decrease of frictional force. PMID:27807524

  8. Effects of heel height and shoe shape on the compressive load between foot and base: a graphic analysis of principle.

    PubMed

    Broch, Nana Lise; Wyller, Thomas; Steen, Harald

    2004-01-01

    Even in the ever-changing and increasingly technical realm of medicine, common sense approaches are needed. We can still learn from our predecessors by using their practical and simple methods. In this article a graphic approach in the sagittal plane is used to explain the relationship between the heel height of a shoe and load under the foot. By using an elementary theoretical model based on schematic sketches, an analysis of principle can be performed to calculate the change in the distribution of mechanical stress in the planta with change in foot orientation. The model shows that when standing posture remains unaltered, load under the forefoot increases and load under the heel decreases with elevated heel height and the corresponding changes in shoe shape. These results can be confirmed by pedobarographic and gait-analysis measurements, but the graphic method can be used without application of advanced instrumentation. The rationale behind the model is to use common terms and simple means to facilitate a more fundamental understanding of complex mechanical orthopedic problems. The method is meant to be a helpful supplement to clinical judgment in the many situations in which advanced instrumentation is not available.

  9. The Effectiveness of Specific Exercise Approach or Modifiable Heel Lift in the Treatment of Functional Leg Length Discrepancy in Early Post-surgery Inpatients after Total Hip Arthroplasty: A Randomized Controlled Trial with a PROBE design

    PubMed Central

    NAKANOWATARI, Tatsuya; SUZUKAMO, Yoshimi; IZUMI, Shin-Ichi

    2016-01-01

    Objective: This study investigated the effectiveness of a specific exercise approach (SEA) or modifiable heel lift (MHL) to improve functional leg length discrepancy (LLD) after total hip arthroplasty (THA). Methods: The study was a randomized controlled trial with a PROBE (prospective, randomized, open, blinded-endpoint) design trial. Patients (n=33) with both functional and perceived LLDs, 1 week after THA, were randomized to the SEA, MHL, or control groups. Patients in the SEA group performed 2 weeks of exercises to improve hip contracture and lumbar scoliosis. Patients in the MHL group used an insole-type heel lift to correct functional LLD. The control group received normal postoperative care, comprising standard rehabilitation after THA. The primary outcomes were functional LLD, measured by a block test, and patient-perceived LLD at 3 weeks after the surgery. Secondary outcomes included the visual analog scale (VAS) for pain, the Timed Up and Go (TUG) test, and the Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis index (WOMAC) at 3 weeks after the surgery. Results: The functional LLDs (mean ± SD) for the SEA (3.3 ± 3.1 mm) and MHL (2.2 ± 2.1 mm) groups were significantly smaller than for the control group (6.4 ± 4.0 mm). The degree of patient-perceived LLD differed significantly between the SEA and the control groups (p=.005). Conclusions: SEA and MHL use, during early post-operative recovery, can produce relevant changes in functional LLD after THA. PMID:28289580

  10. Unsupervised segmentation of heel-strike IMU data using rapid cluster estimation of wavelet features.

    PubMed

    Yuwono, Mitchell; Su, Steven W; Moulton, Bruce D; Nguyen, Hung T

    2013-01-01

    When undertaking gait-analysis, one of the most important factors to consider is heel-strike (HS). Signals from a waist worn Inertial Measurement Unit (IMU) provides sufficient accelerometric and gyroscopic information for estimating gait parameter and identifying HS events. In this paper we propose a novel adaptive, unsupervised, and parameter-free identification method for detection of HS events during gait episodes. Our proposed method allows the device to learn and adapt to the profile of the user without the need of supervision. The algorithm is completely parameter-free and requires no prior fine tuning. Autocorrelation features (ACF) of both antero-posterior acceleration (aAP) and medio-lateral acceleration (aML) are used to determine cadence episodes. The Discrete Wavelet Transform (DWT) features of signal peaks during cadence are extracted and clustered using Swarm Rapid Centroid Estimation (Swarm RCE). Left HS (LHS), Right HS (RHS), and movement artifacts are clustered based on intra-cluster correlation. Initial pilot testing of the system on 8 subjects show promising results up to 84.3%±9.2% and 86.7%±6.9% average accuracy with 86.8%±9.2% and 88.9%±7.1% average precision for the segmentation of LHS and RHS respectively.

  11. Dendritic cells as Achilles’ heel and Trojan horse during varicella zoster virus infection

    PubMed Central

    Schönrich, Günther; Raftery, Martin J.

    2015-01-01

    Varicella zoster virus (VZV), a human alphaherpesvirus, causes varicella and subsequently establishes latency within sensory nerve ganglia. Later in life VZV can reactivate to cause herpes zoster. A reduced frequency of VZV-specific T cells is strongly associated with herpes zoster illustrating that these immune cells are central to control latency. Dendritic cells (DCs) are required for the generation of VZV-specific T cells. However, DCs can also be infected in vitro and in vivo allowing VZV to evade the antiviral immune response. Thus, DCs represent the immune systems’ Achilles heel. Uniquely among the human herpesviruses, VZV infects both DCs and T cells, and exploits both as Trojan horses. During primary infection VZV-infected DCs traffic to the draining lymph nodes and tonsils, where the virus is transferred to T cells. VZV-infected T cells subsequently spread infection throughout the body to give the typical varicella skin rash. The delicate interplay between VZV and DCs and its consequences for viral immune evasion and viral dissemination will be discussed in this article. PMID:26005438

  12. Skin Conductance at Baseline and Post-Heel Lance Reflects Sympathetic Activation in Neonatal Opiate Withdrawal

    PubMed Central

    Oji-Mmuo, Christiana N.; Michael, Eric J.; McLatchy, Jacqueline; Lewis, Mary M.; Becker, Julie E.; Doheny, Kim Kopenhaver

    2015-01-01

    Aim Skin conductance (SC) provides an objective measure of autonomic system regulation through sympathetic-mediated filling of sweat glands. This study aimed to test the utility of SC to detect sympathetic activation in neonatal abstinence syndrome (NAS). Methods 14 term (mean, SE: 38.8 ± 0.35 weeks gestational age) neonates with chronic prenatal opiate exposure were enrolled. SC (peaks/sec and mean of peaks) were measured at baseline, during heel lance/squeeze (HLS) and recovery from HLS at 24-48 (mean 38) hours of life prior to treatment for NAS. Blinded coders with established reliability assessed neonates using the Modified Finnegan Neonatal Scoring System (MFNSS). Non-parametric tests were used to determine group differences, phase differences from baseline to HLS and HLS to recovery, and associations between MFNSS and SC measures. Results Neonates that would later require morphine treatment for NAS (n = 6) had higher baseline SC mean of peaks than those that did not require treatment (n = 8) (P<0.05). Moreover, there were unique phase differences between groups and SC positively correlated with MFNSS (P< 0.05). Conclusion SC provides early identification of NAS severity. However, a larger sample is needed to determine sensitivity and specificity of SC for early identification of NAS and treatment effectiveness. PMID:26613197

  13. EM-31 ALTERNATIVE AND ENHANCED CHEMICAL CLEANING PROGRAM FOR SLUDGE HEEL REMOVAL - 11220

    SciTech Connect

    King, W.; Hay, M.; Wiersma, B.; Pennebaker, F.

    2010-12-10

    Mixtures of oxalic acid with nitric acid have been shown to be superior to oxalic acid alone for the dissolution of iron-rich High Level Waste sludge heels. Optimized conditions resulting in minimal oxalate usage and stoichiometric iron dissolution (based on added oxalate ion) have been determined for hematite (a primary sludge iron phase) in oxalic/nitric acid mixtures. The acid mixtures performed better than expected based on the solubility of hematite in the individual acids through a synergistic effect in which the preferred 1:1 Fe:oxalate complex is formed. This allows for the minimization of oxalate additions to the waste stream. Carbon steel corrosion rates were measured in oxalic/nitric acid mixtures to evaluate the impacts of chemical cleaning with these solutions on waste tank integrity. Manageable corrosion rates were observed in the concentration ranges of interest for an acid contact timescale of 1 month. Kinetics tests involving hematite and gibbsite (a primary sludge aluminum phase) have confirmed that {ge}90% solids dissolution occurs within 3 weeks. Based on these results, the chemical cleaning conditions recommended to promote minimal oxalate usage and manageable corrosion include: 0.5 wt. % oxalic acid/0.175 M nitric acid mixture, 50 C, 2-3 week contact time with agitation.

  14. Narcissistic rage: The Achilles’ heel of the patient with chronic physical illness

    PubMed Central

    Hyphantis, Thomas; Almyroudi, Augustina; Paika, Vassiliki; Goulia, Panagiota; Arvanitakis, Konstantinos

    2009-01-01

    Based on the psychoanalytic reading of Homer’s Iliad whose principal theme is “Achilles’ rage” (the semi-mortal hero invulnerable in all of his body except for his heel, hence “Achilles’ heel” has come to mean a person’s principal weakness), we aimed to assess whether “narcissistic rage” has an impact on several psychosocial variables in patients with severe physical illness across time. In 878 patients with cancer, rheumatological diseases, multiple sclerosis, inflammatory bowel disease, and glaucoma, we assessed psychological distress (SCL-90 and GHQ-28), quality of life (WHOQOL-BREF), interpersonal difficulties (IIP-40), hostility (HDHQ), and defense styles (DSQ). Narcissistic rage comprised DSQ “omnipotence” and HDHQ “extraverted hostility”. Hierarchical multiple regressions analyses were performed. We showed that, in patients with disease duration less than one year, narcissistic rage had a minor impact on psychosocial variables studied, indicating that the rage was rather part of a “normal” mourning process. On the contrary, in patients with longer disease duration, increased rates of narcissistic rage had a great impact on all outcome variables, and the opposite was true for patients with low rates of narcissistic rage, indicating that narcissistic rage constitutes actually an “Achilles’ Heel” for patients with long-term physical illness. These findings may have important clinical implications. PMID:19936167

  15. EM-21 ALTERNATIVE ENHANCED CHEMICAL CLEANING PROGRAM FOR SLUDGE HEEL REMOVAL

    SciTech Connect

    Hay, M; King, W; Martino, C

    2009-12-18

    Preliminary studies in the EM-21 Alternative Chemical Cleaning Program have focused on understanding the dissolution of Hematite (a primary sludge heel phase) in oxalic acid, with a focus on minimizing oxalic acid usage. Literature reviews, thermodynamic modeling, and experimental results have all confirmed that pH control, preferably using a supplemental proton source, is critical to oxalate minimization. With pH control, iron concentrations as high as 0.103 M have been obtained in 0.11 M oxalic acid. This is consistent with the formation of a 1:1 (iron:oxalate) complex. The solubility of Hematite in oxalic acid has been confirmed to increase by a factor of 3 when the final solution pH decreases from 5 to below 1. This is consistent with literature predictions of a shift in speciation from a 1:3 to 1:1 as the pH is lowered. Above a solution pH of 6, little Hematite dissolves. These results emphasize the importance of pH control in optimizing Hematite dissolution in oxalic acid.

  16. Immunoediting and Antigen Loss: Overcoming the Achilles Heel of Immunotherapy with Antigen Non-Specific Therapies

    PubMed Central

    Monjazeb, Arta Monir; Zamora, Anthony E.; Grossenbacher, Steven K.; Mirsoian, Annie; Sckisel, Gail D.; Murphy, William J.

    2013-01-01

    Cancer immunotherapy has emerged as a mainstream therapy option in the battle against cancer. Pre-clinical data demonstrates the ability of immunotherapy to harness the immune system to fight disseminated malignancy. Clinical translation has failed to recapitulate the promising results of pre-clinical studies although there have been some successes. In this review we explore some of the short-comings of cancer immunotherapy that have limited successful clinical translation. We will give special consideration to what we consider the most formidable hurdle to successful cancer immunotherapy: tumor-induced immune suppression and immune escape. We will discuss the need for antigen-specific immune responses for successful immunotherapy but also consider the need for antigen specificity as an Achilles heel of immunotherapy given tumor heterogeneity, immune editing, and antigen loss. Finally, we will discuss how combinatorial strategies may overcome some of the pitfalls of antigen specificity and highlight recent studies from our lab which suggest that the induction of antigen non-specific immune responses may also produce robust anti-tumor effects and bypass the need for antigen specificity. PMID:23898464

  17. Use of calcaneal ultrasound and biochemical markers to assess the density and metabolic state of the bones of adults with hepatic cirrhosis.

    PubMed Central

    VanderJagt, Dorothy J.; Okeke, Edith; Calvin, Christine; Troncoso, Carmen; Crossey, Michael; Glew, Robert H.

    2007-01-01

    Bone loss has been shown to be associated with chronic liver disease (CLD) caused by ethanol consumption or viral infection, and trabecular bone is affected more than cortical bone. We therefore used calcaneal ultrasound to compare the bone status of 54 males and 20 females with CLD in northern Nigeria with 88 age- and gender-matched healthy controls. Serum levels of bone-specific alkaline phosphatase (BSAP) and the N-terminal telopeptide of type-1 collagen (NTx) were also measured to estimate relative rates of bone synthesis and turnover, respectively. The mean stiffness index (SI) of the males with CLD and the male controls were not different; however, the mean SI of the female subjects with CLD was lower than for the female controls (101 vs. 86, p=0.003). The levels of NTx and BSAP were markedly elevated in the males, but not in the females, with CLD. Liver function tests did not correlate with ultrasound parameters or biochemical markers of bone metabolism. These results show that Nigerian women, but not males, with CLD have decreased bone density as assessed by calcaneal ultrasound; however, the high rate of bone turnover in Nigerian males with CLD indicates that they are at risk for bone loss. PMID:17913112

  18. Abdominal Pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... call your doctor. In Spanish— Dolor abdominal en niños menores de 12 años What is recurrent abdominal ... Functional abdominal pain (FAP) typically affects kids ages 4-12, and is quite common, affecting up to ...

  19. [Elbow pain].

    PubMed

    Viikari-Juntura, Eira; Miintyselkii, Pekka; Havulinna, Jouni

    2010-01-01

    Pain and disability in the elbow are not as common as in the neck, shoulder or wrist, for example. The elbow may, however, present disorders that may in a prolonged state be difficult and cause significant loss of working capacity. These include epicondylitis, osteoarthritis and entrapment of the ulnar nerve.

  20. Neck pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... neck. If neck pain involves compression of your nerves, you may feel numbness, tingling, or weakness in your arm or ... When to Contact a Medical Professional ... fever and headache, and your neck is so stiff that you cannot touch your chin to your chest. This may be ...

  1. Oxidative Stress as a Physiological Pain Response in Full-Term Newborns

    PubMed Central

    Bellieni, C. V.; Negro, S.; Longini, M.; Santacroce, A.; Tataranno, M. L.; Bazzini, F.; Picardi, A.; Proietti, F.; Iantorno, L.; Buonocore, G.

    2017-01-01

    This research paper aims to investigate if oxidative stress biomarkers increase after a painful procedure in term newborns and if nonpharmacological approaches, or sex, influence pain degree, and the subsequent OS. 83 healthy term newborns were enrolled to receive 10% oral glucose or sensorial saturation (SS) for analgesia during heel prick (HP). The ABC scale was used to score the pain. Advanced oxidation protein products (AOPP) and total hydroperoxides (TH) as biomarkers of OS were measured at the beginning (early-sample) and at the end (late-sample) of HP. The early-sample/late-sample ratio for AOPP and TH was used to evaluate the increase in OS biomarkers after HP. Higher levels of both AOPP and TH ratio were observed in high degree pain (4–6) compared with low degree pain score (0–3) (AOPP: p = 0.049; TH: p = 0.001). Newborns receiving SS showed a significantly lower pain score (p = 0.000) and AOPP ratio levels (p = 0.021) than those without. Males showed higher TH levels at the end of HP (p = 0.005) compared to females. The current study demonstrates that a relationship between pain degree and OS exists in healthy full-term newborns. The amount of OS is gender related, being higher in males. SS reduces pain score together with pain-related OS in the newborns. PMID:28133505

  2. Employees with Chronic Pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... Home | Accommodation and Compliance Series: Employees with Chronic Pain By Beth Loy, Ph.D. Preface Introduction Information ... at http://AskJAN.org/soar. Information about Chronic Pain How prevalent is chronic pain? Chronic pain has ...

  3. Complex Regional Pain Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    Complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS) is a chronic pain condition. It causes intense pain, usually in the arms, hands, legs, or feet. ... in skin temperature, color, or texture Intense burning pain Extreme skin sensitivity Swelling and stiffness in affected ...

  4. When Sex Is Painful

    MedlinePlus

    ... AQ FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS GYNECOLOGIC PROBLEMS FAQ020 When Sex Is Painful • How common is painful sex? • What causes pain during sex? • Where is pain during sex felt? • When should ...

  5. A blinded randomised placebo-controlled trial investigating the efficacy of morphine analgesia for procedural pain in infants: Trial protocol

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Infant pain has both immediate and long-term negative consequences, yet in clinical practice it is often undertreated. To date, few pain-relieving drugs have been tested in infants. Morphine is a potent analgesic that provides effective pain relief in adults, but there is inconclusive evidence for its effectiveness in infants. The purpose of this study is to establish whether oral morphine provides effective analgesia for procedural pain in infants. A blinded, placebo-controlled, parallel-group randomized, phase II, clinical trial will be undertaken to determine whether morphine sulphate administered orally prior to clinically-required retinopathy of prematurity (ROP) screening and heel lancing provides effective analgesia. 
156 infants between 34 and 42 weeks’ gestational age who require a clinical heel lance and ROP screening on the same test occasion will be included in the trial. Infants will be randomised to receive either a single dose of morphine sulphate (100 μg/kg) or placebo. Each infant will be monitored for 48 hours and safety data will be collected during the 24 hours following drug administration. The primary outcome will be the Premature Infant Pain Profile–revised (PIPP-R) score 30 seconds after ROP screening. The co-primary outcome will be the magnitude of nociceptive-specific brain activity evoked by a clinically-required heel lance. Infant clinical stability will be assessed by comparing the number of episodes of bradycardia, tachycardia, desaturation and apnoea, and changes in respiratory support requirements in the 24-hour periods before and after the clinical intervention. In addition, drug safety will be assessed by considering the occurrence of apnoeic and hypotensive episodes requiring intervention in the 24-hour period following drug administration. This study has been published as an Accepted Protocol Summary by The Lancet. PMID:28066825

  6. Neck pain

    PubMed Central

    2008-01-01

    Introduction Non-specific neck pain has a postural or mechanical basis and affects about two thirds of people at some stage, especially in middle age. Acute neck pain resolves within days or weeks, but may become chronic in about 10% of people. Whiplash injuries follow sudden acceleration–deceleration of the neck, such as in road traffic or sporting accidents. Up to 40% of people continue to report symptoms 15 years after the accident, although this varies between countries. Methods and outcomes We conducted a systematic review and aimed to answer the following clinical questions: What are the effects of treatments for people with non-specific neck pain without severe neurological deficit? What are the effects of treatments for acute whiplash injury? What are the effects of treatments for chronic whiplash injury? What are the effects of treatments for neck pain with radiculopathy? We searched: Medline, Embase, The Cochrane Library, and other important databases up to May 2007 (BMJ Clinical Evidence reviews are updated periodically; please check our website for the most up-to-date version of this review). We included harms alerts from relevant organisations such as the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the UK Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA). Results We found 91 systematic reviews, RCTs, or observational studies that met our inclusion criteria. We performed a GRADE evaluation of the quality of the evidence for interventions. Conclusions In this systematic review we present information relating to the effectiveness and safety of the following interventions: acupuncture, biofeedback, drug treatments (analgesics, antidepressants, epidural steroid injections, muscle relaxants, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs [NSAIDs]), early mobilisation, early return to normal activity, exercise, heat or cold, manipulation (alone or plus exercise), mobilisation, multimodal treatment, patient education, percutaneous radiofrequency neurotomy

  7. Influence of lifestyle factors on quantitative heel ultrasound measurements in middle-aged and elderly men

    PubMed Central

    Pye, Stephen R; Devakumar, Vinodh; Boonen, Steven; Borghs, Herman; Vanderschueren, Dirk; Adams, Judith E; Ward, Kate A; Bartfai, Gyorgy; Casanueva, Felipe F; Finn, Joseph D; Forti, Gianni; Giwercman, Aleksander; Han, Thang S; Huhtaniemi, Ilpo T; Kula, Krzysztof; Lean, Michael EJ; Pendleton, Neil; Punab, Margus; Silman, Alan J; Wu, Frederick CW; O’Neill, Terence W

    2014-01-01

    We examined the distribution of quantitative heel ultrasound (QUS) parameters in population samples of European men, and looked at the influence of lifestyle factors on the occurrence of these parameters. Men aged between 40 and 79 years were recruited from eight European centres and invited to attend for an interviewer-assisted questionnaire, assessment of physical performance and quantitative ultrasound (QUS) of the calcaneus (Hologic - SAHARA). The relationships between QUS parameters and lifestyle variables were assessed using linear regression with adjustments for age, centre and weight. 3,258 men, mean age 60.0 years were included in the analysis. A higher PASE score (upper vs lower tertile) was associated with higher BUA (β coefficient = 2.44 dB/Mhz), SOS (β coefficient = 6.83 m/s) and QUI (β coefficient = 3.87). Compared to those who were inactive, those who walked or cycled more than an hour per day had a higher BUA (β coeff =3.71 dB/Mhz), SOS (β coeff = 6.97 m/s) and QUI (β coeff = 4.50). A longer time to walk 50 feet was linked with lower BUA (β coeff = −0.62 dB/Mhz), SOS (β coeff = −1.06 m/s) and QUI (β coeff = −0.69). Smoking was associated with a reduction in BUA, SOS and QUI. There was a U shaped association with frequency of alcohol consumption. Modification of lifestyle, including increasing physical activity and stopping smoking may help optimise bone strength and reduce the risk of fracture in middle aged and elderly European men. PMID:20205346

  8. On Heels and Toes: How Ants Climb with Adhesive Pads and Tarsal Friction Hair Arrays.

    PubMed

    Endlein, Thomas; Federle, Walter

    2015-01-01

    Ants are able to climb effortlessly on vertical and inverted smooth surfaces. When climbing, their feet touch the substrate not only with their pretarsal adhesive pads but also with dense arrays of fine hairs on the ventral side of the 3rd and 4th tarsal segments. To understand what role these different attachment structures play during locomotion, we analysed leg kinematics and recorded single-leg ground reaction forces in Weaver ants (Oecophylla smaragdina) climbing vertically on a smooth glass substrate. We found that the ants engaged different attachment structures depending on whether their feet were above or below their Centre of Mass (CoM). Legs above the CoM pulled and engaged the arolia ('toes'), whereas legs below the CoM pushed with the 3rd and 4th tarsomeres ('heels') in surface contact. Legs above the CoM carried a significantly larger proportion of the body weight than legs below the CoM. Force measurements on individual ant tarsi showed that friction increased with normal load as a result of the bending and increasing side contact of the tarsal hairs. On a rough sandpaper substrate, the tarsal hairs generated higher friction forces in the pushing than in the pulling direction, whereas the reverse effect was found on the smooth substrate. When the tarsal hairs were pushed, buckling was observed for forces exceeding the shear forces found in climbing ants. Adhesion forces were small but not negligible, and higher on the smooth substrate. Our results indicate that the dense tarsal hair arrays produce friction forces when pressed against the substrate, and help the ants to push outwards during horizontal and vertical walking.

  9. An Ethylene-Protected Achilles’ Heel of Etiolated Seedlings for Arthropod Deterrence

    PubMed Central

    Boex-Fontvieille, Edouard; Rustgi, Sachin; von Wettstein, Diter; Pollmann, Stephan; Reinbothe, Steffen; Reinbothe, Christiane

    2016-01-01

    A small family of Kunitz protease inhibitors exists in Arabidopsis thaliana, a member of which (encoded by At1g72290) accomplishes highly specific roles during plant development. Arabidopsis Kunitz-protease inhibitor 1 (Kunitz-PI;1), as we dubbed this protein here, is operative as cysteine PI. Activity measurements revealed that despite the presence of the conserved Kunitz-motif the bacterially expressed Kunitz-PI;1 was unable to inhibit serine proteases such as trypsin and chymotrypsin, but very efficiently inhibited the cysteine protease RESPONSIVE TO DESICCATION 21. Western blotting and cytolocalization studies using mono-specific antibodies recalled Kunitz-PI;1 protein expression in flowers, young siliques and etiolated seedlings. In dark-grown seedlings, maximum Kunitz-PI;1 promoter activity was detected in the apical hook region and apical parts of the hypocotyls. Immunolocalization confirmed Kunitz-PI;1 expression in these organs and tissues. No transmitting tract (NTT) and HECATE 1 (HEC1), two transcription factors previously implicated in the formation of the female reproductive tract in flowers of Arabidopsis, were identified to regulate Kunitz-PI;1 expression in the dark and during greening, with NTT acting negatively and HEC1 acting positively. Laboratory feeding experiments with isopod crustaceans such as Porcellio scaber (woodlouse) and Armadillidium vulgare (pillbug) pinpointed the apical hook as ethylene-protected Achilles’ heel of etiolated seedlings. Because exogenous application of the ethylene precursor 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid (ACC) and mechanical stress (wounding) strongly up-regulated HEC1-dependent Kunitz-PI;1 gene expression, our results identify a new circuit controlling herbivore deterrence of etiolated plants in which Kunitz-PI;1 is involved. PMID:27625656

  10. Pain Management: Post-Amputation Pain

    MedlinePlus

    Pain Management Post-Amputation Pain Volume 8 · Issue 2 · March/April 1998 Text size Larger text Smaller text Java Required Print page Save and share ... by G. Edward Jeffries, MD, FACS Post-Amputation Pain Post-amputation pain is one of the most ...

  11. Subtalar Joint Instability and Calcaneal Spurs Associated with the Configuration of the Articular Facets of Adult Human Calcaneum in Indian Population

    PubMed Central

    Garg, Shilpi; Vasudeva, Neelam

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Morphological variations of articular facets of calcaneum may predispose people to joint instability, ligamentous laxity and development of arthritic changes in the subtalar joint. Knowledge of such variations is essential for treatment and diagnostic procedures in orthopaedic surgeries. Aim The aim of this study was to determine patterns of articular facets of calcanei and to establish its correlation with calcaneal spurs. Materials and Methods The study was conducted on 580 adult calcanei of Indian origin at Maulana Azad Medical College and pattern of articular facets were observed and classified according to five patterns described in literature. A digital vernier calliper was used to measure separation between anterior and middle facet. Degree of intersecting angle between anterior and medial facets was calculated using UTHSCSA Image Tool software. The calcaneal spurs were observed by visual inspection. Results Out of 580 calcanei, 66.55% had fused anterior and middle facets (Pattern I), 27.59% had all three facets separate (Pattern II), 5.52% had absence of anterior facet (Pattern III), 0.17% had all three facets fused (Pattern IV) and 0.17% had fused middle and posterior facets (Pattern V). A significant side variation was present in Pattern III with predominance on left side. Mean angle of intersection was 147.700 in Pattern I and 133.340 in Pattern II calcaneum. Calcaneal spurs were found in 61.38% out of which it was associated with Pattern I in 43.62%, Pattern II in 14.66% and Pattern III in 2.76%. Conclusion Individuals with Pattern I and III calcaneum were found to be at a greater risk of subtalar joint instability than individuals with Pattern II. Angle of intersection was obtuse in Pattern I which resulted in ligament laxity and unstable joint. Pattern I was more common in Indian population and this fact necessitates modifications of the western surgical techniques to suit the Indian scenario. An association between the presence of spur

  12. Undertreatment of caner pain.

    PubMed

    Wang, Cheng-Hsu; Lee, Shiu-Yu C

    2015-06-01

    Pain is a burdensome symptom that can commonly exist chronically along the cancer trajectory. Uncontrolled pain will impact on cancer patients' quality of life, even further negatively affect cancer survivors' employment. Based on systemic reviews of studies for past 10 years, the paper reported that although there is enormous advancement on the knowledge of cancer pain and pain management, studies still documented undertreatment of cancer pain globally. Additionally, pain distress a significant portion of cancer survivors. The pain in cancer survivors distinct from the pain related with cancer, instead emphasize on pain related with cancer treatment, such as neuropathic pain, muscular syndrome. Evidence-based pain management with common pain problems in cancer survivors is lacking. Further studies are needed to understand the pain in cancer survivors and to develop effective strategies in helping cancer survivors to manage their pain.

  13. Pressure plate analysis of toe-heel and medio-lateral hoof balance at the walk and trot in sound sport horses.

    PubMed

    Oosterlinck, M; Hardeman, L C; van der Meij, B R; Veraa, S; van der Kolk, J H; Wijnberg, I D; Pille, F; Back, W

    2013-12-01

    Empirically, equine distal limb lameness is often linked to hoof imbalance. To objectively quantify dynamic toe-heel and medio-lateral hoof balance of the vertical ground reaction force in sound sport horses, seven Royal Dutch Sport Horses were led at the walk and trot over a dynamically calibrated pressure plate. Forelimb hoof prints were divided into a toe and heel region and a medial and lateral zone. Toe-heel and medio-lateral hoof balance of the vertical ground reaction force were calculated throughout the stance. Toe-heel balance was highly symmetrical between contralateral limbs at both gaits. At the walk, medio-lateral balance of both forelimbs presented higher loading in the lateral part of the hoof throughout the stance. However, at the trot, left medio-lateral balance presented higher loading of the medial part of the hoof at impact, whereas the right limb showed higher loading of the lateral part of the hoof in all horses, and both limbs presented increased lateral loading at the end of the stance. This study provides objective data for toe-heel and medio-lateral hoof balance in sound sport horses.

  14. Definitions and Types of Pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... Therapy Pain Management Recommendations References April 15, 2017 Definitions and Types of Pain Defining Pain Pain is ... there are many mechanisms involved in nociception. More definitions ... Classifying Pain Pain can be "acute" or "chronic." ...

  15. Staged correction of an equinovarus deformity due to pyoderma gangrenosum using a Taylor spatial frame and tibiotalar calcaneal fusion with an intramedullary device.

    PubMed

    Bellamy, Jaime L; Holland, Courtney A; Hsiao, Mark; Hsu, Joseph R

    2011-11-01

    Pyoderma gangrenosum is a rare autoinflammatory syndrome manifested by skin lesions eventually creating ulcers. Surgical management can lead to scarring and contracture at the site of the lesion due to the pathergy phenomenon. A 43-year-old woman presented with a 5-year history of severe equinovarus deformity due to chronic pyoderma gangrenosum on her posteromedial ankle. She underwent a staged fusion. A gradual "closed" correction was performed in a Taylor spatial frame for 8 weeks in order to obviate the need for a surgical release in the area of the ulcer. She was ambulatory and full weight-bearing within 4 weeks of her frame removal. She maintained her correction with an accommodative foot orthosis until she had an uneventful tibiotalar calcaneal fusion with an intramedullary device. This case represents the success of using a Taylor spatial frame for staged fusion involving soft-tissue correction of severe, rigid equinovarus deformity due to pyoderma gangrenosum.

  16. La ténorraphie percutanée dans les ruptures fraîches du tendon calcanéen: à propos de 67 cas

    PubMed Central

    Bessam, Aman; Hassani, Zouhir Ameziane; Kharmaz, Mohamed; Steinmetz, Alain

    2014-01-01

    La rupture du tendon calcanéen est une des lésions les plus fréquentes en pathologie du sport, les deux options thérapeutiques classiques sont le traitement orthopédique et la chirurgie à ciel ouvert. Dans le but de minimiser ces complications, des techniques mini-invasives de ténorraphie percutanée ont été proposées dont les résultats sont encourageants. Il s'agit d'une étude rétrospective d'une série de cas de rupture sous cutanée du tendon d'Achille s’étalant de Avril 2005 au Juin 2012 concernant 67 patients; 11 femmes et 56 hommes avec un âge moyen de 41 ans. La cause principale était un accident de sport dans 45 cas. Le diagnostic était évident à l'examen chez tous les patients. Dans deux cas il s'agissait d'une rerupture survenant à 1 et 5 ans d'un traitement orthopédique. Dans un cas il s'agissait d'une rerupture survenant après une ténorraphie percutanée. Dans deux cas il s'agissait d'une rupture sur tendinopathie chronique. Tous les patients avaient bénéficié d'une radio de la cheville qui avait montré une horizontalisation du calcanéum chez 5 patients et surtout elle n'avait pas montré de fracture associée, alors que 15 patients avaient bénéficié d'une échographie qui a confirmé le diagnostic. Tous les patients avaient été opérés dans un délai de moins de 48 heures Une ténorraphie percutanée a été pratiqué chez tous les patients. Le recul moyen est de 43 mois, trois patients ont été perdus de vue Nous avons noté une reprise des activités professionnelle effective en moyen 90 jours après l'intervention et celle des activités sportive à 6 mois en moyenne L’état cutané local a été jugée bon dans 63 cas. Par ailleurs les complications ont été marquées par un seul cas d'infection ayant nécessité une reprise chirurgical a été noté mise à plat, trois cas de rerupture repris par suture à ciel ouvert, un cas d'algodystrophie et un cas de tendinopathie Il n'y a eu aucune complication

  17. Central Neuropathic Pain Syndromes.

    PubMed

    Watson, James C; Sandroni, Paola

    2016-03-01

    Chronic pain is common in patients with neurologic complications of a central nervous system insult such as stroke. The pain is most commonly musculoskeletal or related to obligatory overuse of neurologically unaffected limbs. However, neuropathic pain can result directly from the central nervous system injury. Impaired sensory discrimination can make it challenging to differentiate central neuropathic pain from other pain types or spasticity. Central neuropathic pain may also begin months to years after the injury, further obscuring recognition of its association with a past neurologic injury. This review focuses on unique clinical features that help distinguish central neuropathic pain. The most common clinical central pain syndromes-central poststroke pain, multiple sclerosis-related pain, and spinal cord injury-related pain-are reviewed in detail. Recent progress in understanding of the pathogenesis of central neuropathic pain is reviewed, and pharmacological, surgical, and neuromodulatory treatments of this notoriously difficult to treat pain syndrome are discussed.

  18. SOLID PHASE CHARACTERIZATION OF HEEL SAMPLES FROM TANK 241-C-110

    SciTech Connect

    PAGE JS; COOKE GA; PESTOVICH JA; HUBER HJ

    2011-12-01

    During sluicing operations of tank 241-C-110, a significant amount of solids were unable to be retrieved. These solids (often referred to as the tank 'heel') were sampled in 2010 and chemically and mineralogically analyzed in the 222-S Laboratory. Additionally, dissolution tests were performed to identify the amount of undissolvable material after using multiple water contacts. This report covers the solid phase characterization of six samples from these tests using scanning electron microscopy, polarized light microscopy, and X-ray diffraction. The chemical analyses, particle size distribution analysis, and dissolution test results are reported separately. Two of the samples were from composites created from as-received material - Composite A and Composite B. The main phase in these samples was sodium-fluoride-phosphate hydrate (natrophosphate) - in the X-ray diffraction spectra, this phase was the only phase identifiable. Polarized light microscopy showed the presence of minor amounts of gibbsite and other phases. These phases were identified by scanning electron microscopy - energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy as sodium aluminosilicates, sodium diuranate, and sodium strontium phosphate hydrate (nastrophite) crystals. The natrophosphate crystals in the scanning electron microscopy analysis showed a variety of erosive and dissolution features from perfectly shaped octahedral to well-rounded appearance. Two samples were from water-washed Composites A and B, with no change in mineralogy compared to the as-received samples. This is not surprising, since the water wash had only a short period of water contact with the material as opposed to the water dissolution tests. The last two samples were residual solids from the water dissolution tests. These tests included multiple additions of water at 15 C and 45 C. The samples were sieved to separate a coarser fraction of > 710 {mu}m and a finer fraction of < 710 {mu}m. These two fractions were analyzed separately. The

  19. The rs3736228 polymorphism in the LRP5 gene is associated with calcaneal ultrasound parameter but not with body composition in a cohort of young Caucasian adults.

    PubMed

    Correa-Rodríguez, María; Schmidt-RioValle, Jacqueline; Rueda-Medina, Blanca

    2016-12-27

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the possible influence of low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 5 (LRP5) and sclerostin (SOST) genes as genetic factors contributing to calcaneal quantitative ultrasound (QUS) and body composition variables in a population of young Caucasian adults. The study population comprised a total of 575 individuals (mean age 20.41years; SD 2.36) whose bone mass was assessed through QUS to determine broadband ultrasound attenuation (BUA, dB/MHz). Body composition measurements were performed using a body composition analyser. Seven single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) of LRP5 (rs2306862, rs599083, rs556442 and rs3736228) and SOST (rs4792909, rs851054 and rs2023794) were selected as genetic markers and genotyped using TaqMan OpenArray(®) technology. Linear regression analysis was used to test the possible association of the tested SNPs with QUS and body composition parameters. Linear regression analysis revealed that the rs3736228 SNP of LPR5 was significantly associated with BUA after adjustment for age, sex, weight, height, physical activity and calcium intake (P = 0.028, β (95% CI) = 0.089 (0.099-1.691). For the remaining SNPs, no significant association with the QUS measurement was observed. Regarding body composition, no significant association was found between LRP5 and SOST polymorphisms and body mass index, total fat mass and total lean mass after adjustment for age and sex as covariates. We concluded that the rs3736228 LRP5 genetic polymorphism influences calcaneal QUS parameter in a population of young Caucasian adults. This finding suggests that LRP5 might be an important genetic marker contributing to bone mass accrual early in life.

  20. Neuropathic Pain After Lung Surgery

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-11-08

    Chronic Neuropathic Pain, Postoperative; Chronic Pain, Postoperative; Chronic Chemotherapy-induced Neuropathic Pain; Chronic Chemotherapy-induced Pain; Chronic Chemotherapy-induced Peripheral Neuropathy

  1. Pain and pain management in haemophilia

    PubMed Central

    Auerswald, Günter; Dolan, Gerry; Duffy, Anne; Hermans, Cedric; Jiménez-Yuste, Victor; Ljung, Rolf; Morfini, Massimo; Lambert, Thierry; Šalek, Silva Zupančić

    2016-01-01

    Joint pain is common in haemophilia and may be acute or chronic. Effective pain management in haemophilia is essential to reduce the burden that pain imposes on patients. However, the choice of appropriate pain-relieving measures is challenging, as there is a complex interplay of factors affecting pain perception. This can manifest as differences in patients’ experiences and response to pain, which require an individualized approach to pain management. Prophylaxis with factor replacement reduces the likelihood of bleeds and bleed-related pain, whereas on-demand therapy ensures rapid bleed resolution and pain relief. Although use of replacement or bypassing therapy is often the first intervention for pain, additional pain relief strategies may be required. There is an array of analgesic options, but consideration should be paid to the adverse effects of each class. Nevertheless, a combination of medications that act at different points in the pain pathway may be beneficial. Nonpharmacological measures may also help patients and include active coping strategies; rest, ice, compression, and elevation; complementary therapies; and physiotherapy. Joint aspiration may also reduce acute joint pain, and joint steroid injections may alleviate chronic pain. In the longer term, increasing use of prophylaxis or performing surgery may be necessary to reduce the burden of pain caused by the degenerative effects of repeated bleeds. Whichever treatment option is chosen, it is important to monitor pain and adjust patient management accordingly. Beyond specific pain management approaches, ongoing collaboration between multidisciplinary teams, which should include physiotherapists and pain specialists, may improve outcomes for patients. PMID:27439216

  2. Effect of Field Size and Length of Plantar Spur on Treatment Outcome in Radiation Therapy of Plantar Fasciitis: The Bigger the Better?

    SciTech Connect

    Hermann, Robert Michael; Meyer, Andreas; Reible, Michael; Carl, Ulrich Martin; Nitsche, Mirko

    2013-12-01

    Purpose: Radiation therapy is well established in the treatment of painful plantar fasciitis or heel spur. A retrospective analysis was conducted to investigate the effect of field definition on treatment outcome and to determine the impact of factors potentially involved. Methods and Materials: A review of treatment data of 250 patients (285 heels) with a mean follow-up time of 11 months showed that complete symptom remission occurred in 38%, partial remission in 32%, and no change in 19% (11% were lost to follow-up). Variables such as radiologic evidence of plantar spurs, their length, radiation dose, field size, age, sex, and onset of pain before administration of radiation therapy were investigated in univariate and multivariate regression analyses. Results: Treatment response depended upon age >53 years, length of heel spur ≤6.5 mm (or no radiologic evidence of a heel spur), and onset of pain <12 months before radiation therapy. Patients with these clinical prerequisites stood a 93% chance of clinical response. Without these prerequisites, only 49% showed any impact. No influence of field size on treatment outcome became evident. Conclusion: Patients with short plantar heel spurs benefit from radiation therapy equally well as patients without any radiologic evidence. Moreover, smaller field sizes have the same positive effect as commonly used large field definitions covering the entire calcaneal bone. This leads to a recommendation of a considerable reduction of field size in future clinical practice.

  3. Healthcare professionals' perceptions of pain in infants at risk for neurological impairment

    PubMed Central

    Breau, Lynn M; McGrath, Patrick J; Stevens, Bonnie; Beyene, Joseph; Camfield, Carol S; Finley, G Allen; Franck, Linda; Howlett, Alexandra; O'Brien, Karel; Ohlsson, Arne

    2004-01-01

    Background To determine whether healthcare professionals perceive the pain of infants differently due to their understanding of that infant's level of risk for neurological impairment. Method Neonatal Intensive Care Units (NICU's) at two tertiary pediatric centers. Ninety-five healthcare professionals who practice in the NICU (50 nurses, 19 physicians, 17 respiratory therapists, 9 other) participated. They rated the pain (0–10 scale and 0–6 Faces Pain Scale), distress (0–10), effectiveness of cuddling to relieve pain (0–10) and time to calm without intervention (seconds) for nine video clips of neonates receiving a heel stick. Prior to each rating, they were provided with descriptions that suggested the infant had mild, moderate or severe risk for neurological impairment. Ratings were examined as a function of the level of risk described. Results Professionals' ratings of pain, distress, and time to calm did not vary significantly with level of risk, but ratings of the effectiveness of cuddling were significantly lower as risk increased [F (2,93) = 4.4, p = .02]. No differences in ratings were found due to participants' age, gender or site of study. Physicians' ratings were significantly lower than nurses' across ratings. Conclusion Professionals provided with visual information regarding an infants' pain during a procedure did not display the belief that infants' level of risk for neurological impairment affected their pain experience. Professionals' estimates of the effectiveness of a nonpharmacological intervention did differ due to level of risk. PMID:15541179

  4. Medications for back pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... doses of these medicines can help with chronic low back pain , even if the person does not feel sad ... notices pain. Antidepressants most commonly used for chronic low back pain also help you sleep. Antidepressants most often used ...

  5. Back Pain During Pregnancy

    MedlinePlus

    ... Education & Events Advocacy For Patients About ACOG Back Pain During Pregnancy Home For Patients Search FAQs Back ... During Pregnancy FAQ115, January 2016 PDF Format Back Pain During Pregnancy Pregnancy What causes back pain during ...

  6. Pain medications - narcotics

    MedlinePlus

    Painkillers; Drugs for pain; Analgesics; Opioids ... Narcotics are also called opioid pain relievers. They are used only for pain that is severe and is not helped by other types of painkillers. When used ...

  7. Complex Regional Pain Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... regional pain syndrome is an uncommon form of chronic pain that usually affects an arm or a leg. ... exercises may be. Transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) . Chronic pain is sometimes eased by applying electrical impulses to ...

  8. [Chronic postoperative pain].

    PubMed

    Cachemaille, Matthieu; Blanc, Catherine

    2016-06-22

    Chronic postoperative pain remains a frequent pathology whose global impact approximates 20 and 30% and accounts for 20% of the consultations in a pain center. Risk factors consider firstly each patient's feature and comorbidity and also different surgical procedures with their technical approach. Neuropathic pain compared to nociceptive pain is a great component in the postoperative period and needs to be recognized by specific tests (DN4). Pain prevention involves risk factors' detection, appropriate anesthetic support and effective postoperative pain management. Treatment is based on the type of pain and includes a multimodal analgesia with interventional pain therapy.

  9. Preliminary study report: topological texture features extracted from standard radiographs of the heel bone are correlated with femoral bone mineral density

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boehm, H. F.; Lutz, J.; Koerner, M.; Notohamiprodjo, M.; Reiser, M.

    2009-02-01

    With the growing number of eldery patients in industrialized nations the incidence of geriatric, i.e. osteoporotic fractures is steadily on the rise. It is of great importance to understand the characteristics of hip fractures and to provide diagnostic tests for the assessment of an individual's fracture-risk that allow to take preventive action and give therapeutic advice. At present, bone-mineral-density (BMD) obtained from DXA (dual-energy x-ray-absorptiometry) is the clinical standard of reference for diagnosis and follow-up of osteoporosis. Since availability of DXA - other than that of clinical X-ray imaging - is usually restricted to specialized medical centers it is worth trying to implement alternative methods to estimate an individual's BMD. Radiographs of the peripheral skeleton, e.g. the ankle, range among the most ordered diagnostic procedures in surgery for exclusion or confirmation of fracture. It would be highly beneficial if - as a by-product of conventional imaging - one could obtain a quantitative parameter that is closely correlated with femoral BMD in addition to the original diagnostic information, e.g. fracture status at the peripheral site. Previous studies could demonstrate a correlation between calcaneal BMD and osteoporosis. The objective of our study was to test the hypothesis that topological analysis of calcaneal bone texture depicted by a lateral x-ray projection of the ankle allows to estimate femoral BMD. Our analysis on 34 post-menopausal patients indicate that texture properties based on graylevel topology in calcaneal x-ray-films are closely correlated with BMD at the hip and may qualify as a substitute indicator of femoral fracture risk.

  10. Pain and musculoskeletal pain syndromes in adolescents.

    PubMed

    Zapata, Aura Ligia; Moraes, Ana Julia Pantoja; Leone, Claudio; Doria-Filho, Ulysses; Silva, Clovis Artur Almeida

    2006-06-01

    The presence of musculoskeletal pain was evaluated in adolescents. Pain was reported by 40% of respondents, benign joint hypermobility syndrome by 10%, myofascial syndrome by 5%, tendonitis by 2%, and fibromialgia by 1%. Logistical regression analysis indicated that sex and age were predictive of pain.

  11. Fetal pain perception and pain management.

    PubMed

    Van de Velde, Marc; Jani, Jacques; De Buck, Frederik; Deprest, J

    2006-08-01

    This paper gives an overview of current science related to the concept of fetal pain. We have answered three important questions: (1) does fetal pain exist? (2) does management of fetal pain benefit the unborn child? and (3) which techniques are available to provide good fetal analgesia?

  12. Diagnosis and treatment of plantar fasciitis.

    PubMed

    Goff, James D; Crawford, Robert

    2011-09-15

    Plantar fasciitis, a self-limiting condition, is a common cause of heel pain in adults. It affects more than 1 million persons per year, and two-thirds of patients with plantar fasciitis will seek care from their family physician. Plantar fasciitis affects sedentary and athletic populations. Obesity, excessive foot pronation, excessive running, and prolonged standing are risk factors for developing plantar fasciitis. Diagnosis is primarily based on history and physical examination. Patients may present with heel pain with their first steps in the morning or after prolonged sitting, and sharp pain with palpation of the medial plantar calcaneal region. Discomfort in the proximal plantar fascia can be elicited by passive ankle/first toe dorsiflexion. Diagnostic imaging is rarely needed for the initial diagnosis of plantar fasciitis. Use of ultrasonography and magnetic resonance imaging is reserved for recalcitrant cases or to rule out other heel pathology; findings of increased plantar fascia thickness and abnormal tissue signal the diagnosis of plantar fasciitis. Conservative treatments help with the disabling pain. Initially, patient-directed treatments consisting of rest, activity modification, ice massage, oral analgesics, and stretching techniques can be tried for several weeks. If heel pain persists, then physician-prescribed treatments such as physical therapy modalities, foot orthotics, night splinting, and corticosteroid injections should be considered. Ninety percent of patients will improve with these conservative techniques. Patients with chronic recalcitrant plantar fasciitis lasting six months or longer can consider extracorporeal shock wave therapy or plantar fasciotomy.

  13. [Postoperative pain in craniotomy].

    PubMed

    Peón, Andréa Ungaro; Diccini, Solange

    2005-01-01

    In the postoperative period, 47% to 75% of the patients report some degree of pain. This study aimed to evaluate pain in the pre and postoperative period of patients submitted to craniotomy. This prospective research was carried out at the neurosurgery unit of a large Brazilian hospital. For a quantitative evaluation of pain, the verbal numeric 0-10 rating scale was used. Forty patients with a mean age of 36 years were evaluated. In the preoperative period, 34 (85%) patients indicated headache as the main cause of pain. In the postoperative period, 37 (93%) patients complained of pain while three (7%) reported absence of pain. Pain peaks were observed on the 2nd postoperative day, when 12 (32%) of the patients reported severe pain and 10 (27%) moderate pain. Absence of severe pain occurred after the 8th postoperative day. It was concluded that protocols of analgesia in craniotomy are needed, such as training nurses to better evaluate and handle pain.

  14. Pain management in neonates.

    PubMed

    Carbajal, Ricardo; Gall, Olivier; Annequin, Daniel

    2004-05-01

    Multiple lines of evidence suggest an increased sensitivity to pain in neonates. Repeated and prolonged pain exposure may affect the subsequent development of pain systems, as well as potentially contribute to alterations in long-term development and behavior. Despite impressive gains in the knowledge of neonatal pain mechanisms and strategies to treat neonatal pain acquired during the last 15 years, a large gap still exists between routine clinical practice and research results. Accurate assessment of pain is crucial for effective pain management in neonates. Neonatal pain management should rely on current scientific evidence more than the attitudes and beliefs of care-givers. Parents should be informed of pain relief strategies and their participation in the health care plan to alleviate pain should be encouraged. The need for systemic analgesia for both moderate and severe pain, in conjunction with behavioral/environmental approaches to pain management, is emphasized. A main sources of pain in the neonate is procedural pain which should always be prevented and treated. Nonpharmacological approaches constitute important treatment options for managing procedural pain. Nonpharmacological interventions (environmental and preventive measures, non-nutritive sucking, sweet solutions, skin-skin contact, and breastfeeding analgesia) can reduce neonatal pain indirectly by reducing the total amount of noxious stimuli to which infants are exposed, and directly, by blocking nociceptive transduction or transmission or by activation of descending inhibitory pathways or by activating attention and arousal systems that modulate pain. Opioids are the mainstay of pharmacological pain treatment but there are other useful medications and techniques that may be used for pain relief. National guidelines are necessary to improve neonatal pain management at the institutional level, individual neonatal intensive care units need to develop specific practice guidelines regarding pain

  15. Facts and Figures on Pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... Room Position Statements AAPM Facts and Figures on Pain Overview What is Chronic Pain? Incidence of Pain, ... of them. Back to Top What is Chronic Pain? While acute pain is a normal sensation triggered ...

  16. Back pain - returning to work

    MedlinePlus

    Nonspecific back pain - work; Backache - work; Lumbar pain - work; Pain - back - chronic; Low back pain - work; Lumbago - work ... Exercise helps to prevent future back pain: Exercise a little ... keep your heart healthy and your muscles strong. If walking is ...

  17. Managing Chemotherapy Side Effects: Pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... ational C ancer I nstitute Managing Chemotherapy Side Effects Pain It’s important to treat pain. If you ... to pay for pain medicine. Managing Chemotherapy Side Effects: Pain Keep track of the pain. Each day, ...

  18. A pedestrian dead-reckoning system that considers the heel-strike and toe-off phases when using a foot-mounted IMU

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ju, Hojin; Lee, Min Su; Park, So Young; Song, Jin Woo; Park, Chan Gook

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we propose an advanced pedestrian dead-reckoning (PDR) algorithm that considers the heel-strike and toe-off phases. Generally, PDR systems that use a foot-mounted inertial measurement unit are based on an inertial navigation system with an extended Kalman filter (EKF). To reduce the influence of the bias and white noises in the gyroscope and accelerometer signals, a zero-velocity update is often adopted at the stance phase. However, transient and large acceleration, which cannot be measured by the accelerometer used in pedestrian navigation, occur momentarily in the heel-strike phase. The velocity information from integration of the acceleration is not reliable because the acceleration is not measured in the heel-strike phase. Therefore, the designed EKF does not correctly reflect the actual environment, because conventional algorithms do not take the non-measurable acceleration into consideration. In order to reflect the actual environment, we propose a PDR system that considers the non-measurable acceleration from the heel-strike impact. To improve the PDR system’s performance, the proposed algorithm uses a new velocity measurement obtained using the constraint between the surface and the foot during the toe-off phase. The experimental results show improved filter performance after comparison of the proposed algorithm and a conventional algorithm.

  19. A Novel and Alternative Treatment Method for Diabetic Heel Ulceration Exposing the Calcaneus Which Is Not Suitable for Flap Surgery: Vacuum Assisted Sandwich Dermal Matrix

    PubMed Central

    Bingol, Ugur A.; Cinar, Can; Arslan, Hakan; Altındas, Muzaffer

    2015-01-01

    Background. Currently, free flaps and pedicled flaps are the first treatment choices for large heel ulcer reconstruction. However, flap reconstruction of heel ulcerations cannot be performed in all diabetics especially with concurrent severe peripheral vascular disease because of higher flap failure rate. In recent years, the use of acellular dermal matrix (ADM) has emerged as an alternative treatment option for extremity ulcers. Methods. We present 13 diabetic patients with a large heel ulceration exposing the calcaneus, who were not eligible for flap surgery due to the presence of only one patent artery of trifurcation. These cases were treated with the vacuum assisted sandwich dermal matrix (VASDEM) method. Results. None of the patients required amputation. Skin grafting was successful in ten patients. Although partial losses were observed in three patients, they were healed spontaneously without surgical interventions. During the follow-up period none of the patients developed ulceration on the treatment area. All patients maintained their preoperative ambulatory ability. Conclusion. VASDEM is a novel method offering opportunity for treatment before proceeding to amputation in diabetic heel ulceration exposing the calcaneus which is not suitable for flap surgery. It also has the potential to close wounds of all sizes independent of the vessel status and wound size in selected diabetic patients. PMID:26516626

  20. Large heel soft tissue defects managed successfully with reverse medial crural fasciocutaneous flap: a 7-year single-center experience with 21 consecutive cases.

    PubMed

    Jing-Chun, Zhao; Kai, Shi; Jia-Ao, Yu; Chun-Jing, Xian; Lai-Jin, Lu; Chun-Hui, Xie

    2015-01-01

    The medial crural fasciocutaneous flap is a reliable cutaneous flap that can be used for soft tissue reconstruction in the extremities. The purpose of this article is to evaluate the application and clinical significance of this surgical technique in the reconstruction of heel soft tissue defects. Twenty-one cases of heel soft tissue defect between March 2005 and March 2012 were included in this study. Wound sizes varied from 5.0 × 5.5 to 7.5 × 10.0 cm. All cases were managed with a reverse medial crural fasciocutaneous flap. Patient demographics and case information were analyzed and are reported. The sizes of the reverse medial crural fasciocutaneous flap varied from 6.5 × 10.0 to 9.0 × 15.0 cm; the average size was 7.7 × 13.8 cm. Out of the 21 consecutive cases, 20 flaps survived intact and one flap underwent partial necrosis. Follow-up observations were conducted for 6-36 months. The cosmetic results were satisfactory, without apparent bulkiness; the weight-bearing outcomes were satisfactory. The donor site can be closed primarily or by skin graft. Reverse medial crural fasciocutaneous flap transfer is appropriate for the reconstruction of heel soft tissue defects. The method is safe and can cover large heel defects.

  1. Pain Management Task Force

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-05-01

    conditions [e.g., peripheral neuropathies , lower extremity arthritis, non-specific LBP], cancer-related pain, post-surgical pain, and other acute pain...Integrative Pain Treatment Medicine .......................................................... 42 4.2.2 Osteopathic Manipulation...VHA and civilian hospitals. Visits outside of Army Medical Treatment Facilities (MTFs) were scheduled based on recommendations from Service

  2. Breakthrough cancer pain.

    PubMed

    Davies, Andrew N

    2014-06-01

    Breakthrough pain is a distinct pain state that is common in patients with cancer pain and which is associated with significant morbidity in this group of patients. The aim of this article is to highlight important journal articles relating to breakthrough pain that have been published within the last year, including a systematic review of the epidemiology of breakthrough pain, the largest-ever study of the clinical features of breakthrough pain, and a network meta-analysis of the treatment of breakthrough pain.

  3. Pain, emotion, headache.

    PubMed

    Bussone, Gennaro; Grazzi, Licia; Panerai, Alberto E

    2012-10-01

    Pain has been considered as part of a defensive strategy whose specific role is to signal an immediate active danger to the organism. This definition fits well for acute pain. It does not work well, however, for chronic pain that is maintained even in absence of an ongoing, active threat. Currently, acute and chronic pain are considered to be separate conditions. What follows is a review of the different theories about pain and its history. Different hypotheses regarding pain mechanisms are illustrated. New data emerging from scientific research on chronic pain (migraine in particular) involving innovative imaging techniques are reported and discussed.

  4. Hispanic Inpatient Pain Intensity.

    PubMed

    McDonald, Deborah Dillon; Ambrose, Margaret; Morey, Barbara

    2015-11-01

    Hispanic adults experience significant pain, but little is known about their pain during hospitalization. The purpose of this research was to describe Hispanic inpatients' pain intensity and compare their pain intensity with that of non-Hispanic patients. A post hoc descriptive design was used to examine 1,466 Hispanic inpatients' medical records (63.2% English speakers) and 12,977 non-Hispanic inpatients' medical records from one hospital for 2012. Mean documented pain intensity was mild for both Hispanic and non-Hispanic inpatients. Pain intensity was greater for English-speaking Hispanic patients than Spanish speakers. The odds of being documented with moderate or greater pain intensity decreased 30% for Spanish-speaking patients. Greater pain intensity documented for English-speaking Hispanic inpatients suggests underreporting of pain intensity by Spanish-speaking patients. Practitioners should use interpreter services when assessing and treating pain with patients who speak languages different from the practitioners' language(s).

  5. The Association between Unilateral Heel-Rise Performance with Static and Dynamic Balance in Community Dwelling Older Adults

    PubMed Central

    Hashish, Rami; Samarawickrame, Sachithra D.; Wang, Man-Ying; Yu, Sean S-Y; Salem, George J.

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION As a measure of both strength and muscle endurance of the plantar flexors, the unilateral heel rise (UHR) test has been suggested as a method to evaluate balance capabilities in older adults. Thus, the purpose of this study was to examine the association between UHR performance with biomechanical measures of balance in seniors. MATERIALS AND METHODS Twenty-two older adults completed two testing sessions. The first visit included UHR performance; the second visit included dynamic and static motion analysis. RESULTS UHR performance was significantly associated with dynamic balance capability as measured by medial-lateral inclination angle during gait. As indicated by an analysis of center of pressure, there were significant associations between UHR performance and measures of static balance. DISCUSSION AND CONCLUSION Balance is influenced by plantar flexor performance as measured by the UHR test. We therefore suggest incorporating the UHR test in analyses of balance in seniors. PMID:25457285

  6. Effect of toe and heel elevation on calculated tendon strains in the horse and the influence of the proximal interphalangeal joint.

    PubMed

    Lawson, Siân E M; Chateau, Henry; Pourcelot, Philippe; Denoix, Jean-Marie; Crevier-Denoix, Nathalie

    2007-05-01

    The sagittal alteration of hoof balance is a common intervention in horses, with corrective shoeing being one of the most frequently applied methods of managing tendonitis. However, the effect of toe or heel elevation on tendon strains is poorly understood. This study aimed to examine the effect of toe and heel wedges on the superficial digital flexor tendon, deep digital flexor tendon, and the third interosseous muscle or suspensory ligament strains using in vivo data and an accurate subject-specific model. Kinematic data were recorded using invasive markers at the walk and trot. Computerized tomography was then used to create a subject-specific model of an equine distal forelimb and strains were calculated for the superficial digital flexor tendon, the deep digital flexor tendon accessory ligament and the suspensory ligament for seven trials each of normal shoes, and toe and heel elevation. As the proximal interphalangeal joint is often ignored in strain calculations, its influence on the strain calculations was also tested. The deep ligament showed the same results for walk and trot with the heel wedge decreasing peak strain and the toe wedge increasing it. The opposite results were seen in the suspensory ligament and the superficial digital flexor tendon with the heel wedge increasing peak strain and the toe wedge decreasing it. The proximal interphalangeal joint was shown to be influential on the strains calculated with normal shoes and the calculated effect of the wedges. Our results imply that corrective shoeing appears to decrease strain in the tendon being targeted; the possibility of increases in strain in other structures should also be considered.

  7. Clinics in diagnostic imaging (170)

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Mohammad Taufik Bin Mohamed; Wong, Bak Siew Steven

    2016-01-01

    A 30-year-old woman presented with a six-month history of left posterior heel pain. Physical examination revealed a tender, inflamed and indurated posterior heel with a visible bony prominence of the posterosuperior aspect of the calcaneus. Lateral ankle radiography showed a prominent left posterosuperior calcaneal tuberosity and thickening of the distal Achilles tendon outline. Magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated high-signal inflammatory fluid in the retrocalcaneal bursa, increased signal intensity and thickening of the Achilles tendon, and prominence of the posterior calcaneus tuberosity with reactive marrow oedema. The findings are consistent with Haglund’s deformity. The patient underwent hind foot surgery after failing a six-month course of conservative therapy. There was no further recurrence of symptoms after surgery. The clinical and radiological features of Haglund’s deformity are described, including a short discussion of other causes of hind foot pain. PMID:27663032

  8. Imaging Athletic Groin Pain.

    PubMed

    Chopra, Annu; Robinson, Philip

    2016-09-01

    This article outlines adductor-related groin pain, pubic-related groin pain, inguinal-related groin pain, and iliopsoas-related groin pain, with a description of the corresponding functional anatomy and imaging findings. The imaging has been described mainly in terms of MR imaging findings as this is the principal imaging modality used to investigate groin pain, although plain radiographs and ultrasound can be very useful adjuncts in specific circumstances, especially if an alternative pathology needs to be excluded.

  9. A Cross-Sectional Study of the Association of VDR Gene, Calcium Intake, and Heel Ultrasound Measures in Early Adulthood.

    PubMed

    Correa-Rodríguez, María; Schmidt Rio-Valle, Jacqueline; González-Jiménez, Emilio; Rueda-Medina, Blanca

    2016-03-01

    The acquisition of a high adult peak bone mass (PBM) is considered an important determinant of osteoporotic risk later in life. Genetic and environmental factors determine optimal PBM acquisition in early adulthood. The aim of this study was to test the association of vitamin D receptor (VDR) gene polymorphisms and dietary calcium intake with the bone mass of young adults. The study population comprised a total of 305 individuals (mean age 20.41; SD 2.36) whose bone mass was assessed through heel ultrasound [quantitative ultrasound measurements (QUS)] measurements (BUA, dB/MHz). The FokI G/A, rs9729 G/T, and TaqI G/A polymorphisms were selected as genetic markers of VDR. A significant difference in BUA values was observed according to gender (females 82.96; SD 15.89 vs. males 97.72; SD 16.50; p < 0.00001). The mean dietary calcium intake of the study group (827.84 mg/day; SD 347.04) was lower than the dietary reference intake for young adults (1000 mg/day) and had no association with BUA. None of the three VDR polymorphisms tested showed an association with BUA. Similarly, the analysis of VDR 3' haplotypes, estimated using rs9729 and Taq1 as tag SNPs, did not reveal any significant association with QUS traits. Our results confirm the existence of different heel QUS for women and men, as well as a tendency towards low calcium consumption by young adults, and they also suggest that the VDR gene does not play a major role in the genetic determination of QUS parameter in early adulthood.

  10. The ESR1 (6q25) Locus Is Associated with Calcaneal Ultrasound Parameters and Radial Volumetric Bone Mineral Density in European Men

    PubMed Central

    Thomson, Wendy; Boonen, Steven; Borghs, Herman; Vanderschueren, Dirk; Gielen, Evelien; Huhtaniemi, Ilpo T.; Adams, Judith E.; Ward, Kate A.; Bartfai, Gyorgy; Casanueva, Felipe; Finn, Joseph D.; Forti, Gianni; Giwercman, Aleksander; Han, Thang S.; Kula, Krzysztof; Labrie, Fernand; Lean, Michael E. J.; Pendleton, Neil; Punab, Margus; Wu, Frederick C. W.; O'Neill, Terence W.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified 6q25, which incorporates the oestrogen receptor α gene (ESR1), as a quantitative trait locus for areal bone mineral density (BMDa) of the hip and lumbar spine. The aim of this study was to determine the influence of this locus on other bone health outcomes; calcaneal ultrasound (QUS) parameters, radial peripheral quantitative computed tomography (pQCT) parameters and markers of bone turnover in a population sample of European men. Methods Eight single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) in the 6q25 locus were genotyped in men aged 40–79 years from 7 European countries, participating in the European Male Ageing Study (EMAS). The associations between SNPs and measured bone parameters were tested under an additive genetic model adjusting for centre using linear regression. Results 2468 men, mean (SD) aged 59.9 (11.1) years had QUS measurements performed and bone turnover marker levels measured. A subset of 628 men had DXA and pQCT measurements. Multiple independent SNPs showed significant associations with BMD using all three measurement techniques. Most notably, rs1999805 was associated with a 0.10 SD (95%CI 0.05, 0.16; p = 0.0001) lower estimated BMD at the calcaneus, a 0.14 SD (95%CI 0.05, 0.24; p = 0.004) lower total hip BMDa, a 0.12 SD (95%CI 0.02, 0.23; p = 0.026) lower lumbar spine BMDa and a 0.18 SD (95%CI 0.06, 0.29; p = 0.003) lower trabecular BMD at the distal radius for each copy of the minor allele. There was no association with serum levels of bone turnover markers and a single SNP which was associated with cortical density was also associated with cortical BMC and thickness. Conclusions Our data replicate previous associations found between SNPs in the 6q25 locus and BMDa at the hip and extend these data to include associations with calcaneal ultrasound parameters and radial volumetric BMD. PMID:21760950

  11. Syringing method as an alternative to Śṛṇga therapy in Vātakaṇṭaka.

    PubMed

    Joshi, Suma; Toshikhane, Sangeeta Hemant; Toshikhane, Hemant D

    2014-01-01

    Calcaneus forms the bone of the foot. Due to abnormal pressures, foot muscles and ligaments are stretched beyond their normal limits that lead to chronic plantar heel pain, among which calcaneal spur tops the list. In Ayurveda, it can be correlated to "Vātakaṇṭaka" (pricking sensation in the foot)-a painful condition of heel caused by its improper placement on the ground. To assess the effect of syringing method (modified Śṛṅga) in the treatment of Vātakaṇṭaka. A 10 ml syringe was for ease, hygiene, and to enable the case to be managed in the outpatient department. A diagnosed case of calcaneal spurs with pain, tenderness, and swelling visited KLE University's Shri BMK Ayurveda Hospital and Research Centre, Belgaum, Karnataka, India. After Snigdha Patrapoṭṭali sveda (a form of sudation therapy), bloodletting was performed by syringing method. In total procedure was performed for 4 times on the patient. Marked subjective relief was observed. Pain from 8 visual analog scale (VAS) came to 2 visual analog scale (VAS) and tenderness and swelling relived completely.

  12. Syringing method as an alternative to Śṛṇga therapy in Vātakaṇṭaka

    PubMed Central

    Joshi, Suma; Toshikhane, Sangeeta Hemant; Toshikhane, Hemant D.

    2014-01-01

    Calcaneus forms the bone of the foot. Due to abnormal pressures, foot muscles and ligaments are stretched beyond their normal limits that lead to chronic plantar heel pain, among which calcaneal spur tops the list. In Ayurveda, it can be correlated to “Vātakaṇṭaka” (pricking sensation in the foot)-a painful condition of heel caused by its improper placement on the ground. To assess the effect of syringing method (modified Śṛṅga) in the treatment of Vātakaṇṭaka. A 10 ml syringe was for ease, hygiene, and to enable the case to be managed in the outpatient department. A diagnosed case of calcaneal spurs with pain, tenderness, and swelling visited KLE University's Shri BMK Ayurveda Hospital and Research Centre, Belgaum, Karnataka, India. After Snigdha Patrapoṭṭali sveda (a form of sudation therapy), bloodletting was performed by syringing method. In total procedure was performed for 4 times on the patient. Marked subjective relief was observed. Pain from 8 visual analog scale (VAS) came to 2 visual analog scale (VAS) and tenderness and swelling relived completely. PMID:25737611

  13. Distal posterior tibial artery perforator flaps for the management of calcaneal and Achilles tendon injuries in diabetic and non-diabetic patients.

    PubMed

    Ignatiadis, Ioannis A; Georgakopoulos, Georgios D; Tsiampa, Vassiliki A; Polyzois, Vasilios D; Arapoglou, Dimitrios K; Papalois, Apostolos E

    2011-01-01

    Management of Achilles tendon and heel area defects is a common challenge for the reconstructive surgeon due to the lack of soft tissue availability in that region. In this article, we present our experience in covering these defects by using the distal perforator propeller flaps based on the posterior tibial artery. Perforator flaps are based on cutaneous, small diameter vessels that originate from a main pedicle and perforate the fascia or muscle to reach the skin. Their development has followed the understanding of the blood supply from a source artery to the skin. Six patients (five males and one female) underwent reconstruction by using the posterior tibial artery distal perforator flap for covering defects in the distal Achilles tendon region in patients with and without diabetes mellitus. Postoperative complications included a hypertrophic scar formation in one patient, partial marginal flap necrosis in another patient, and a wound infection in a third patient. All wounds were eventually healed by the last postoperative visit. In conclusion, perforator flaps based on the distal posterior tibial artery may be a reliable option for the coverage of small to moderate size defects of the Achilles tendon and heel area regions.

  14. Distal posterior tibial artery perforator flaps for the management of calcaneal and Achilles tendon injuries in diabetic and non-diabetic patients

    PubMed Central

    Ignatiadis, Ioannis A.; Georgakopoulos, Georgios D.; Tsiampa, Vassiliki A.; Polyzois, Vasilios D.; Arapoglou, Dimitrios K.; Papalois, Apostolos E.

    2011-01-01

    Management of Achilles tendon and heel area defects is a common challenge for the reconstructive surgeon due to the lack of soft tissue availability in that region. In this article, we present our experience in covering these defects by using the distal perforator propeller flaps based on the posterior tibial artery. Perforator flaps are based on cutaneous, small diameter vessels that originate from a main pedicle and perforate the fascia or muscle to reach the skin. Their development has followed the understanding of the blood supply from a source artery to the skin. Six patients (five males and one female) underwent reconstruction by using the posterior tibial artery distal perforator flap for covering defects in the distal Achilles tendon region in patients with and without diabetes mellitus. Postoperative complications included a hypertrophic scar formation in one patient, partial marginal flap necrosis in another patient, and a wound infection in a third patient. All wounds were eventually healed by the last postoperative visit. In conclusion, perforator flaps based on the distal posterior tibial artery may be a reliable option for the coverage of small to moderate size defects of the Achilles tendon and heel area regions. PMID:22396820

  15. Update in cancer pain syndromes.

    PubMed

    Chang, Victor T; Janjan, Nora; Jain, Subash; Chau, Chi

    2006-12-01

    Cancer pain assessment and management are integral to palliative medicine. This paper reviews recent publications in the period 1999-2004 in the broad categories of epidemiology, pain assessment, nonpharmacologic approaches to cancer pain (radiation therapy, anesthetic blocks, palliative surgery and chemotherapy, complementary and alternative medicine), and in nociceptive pain, neuropathic pain, visceral pain, and bone pain.

  16. Spirituality, religion, and pain.

    PubMed

    Unruh, Anita M

    2007-06-01

    Understanding the relationships between spirituality and health has become increasingly important in health research, including nursing research. Very little of the research thus far has focused on spirituality, religion, and pain even though spiritual views have been intertwined with beliefs about pain and suffering throughout history. Spiritual views can have a substantial impact on patients' understanding of pain and decisions about pain management. The author reviews the research literature on spirituality and pain from a historical perspective. The analysis is concerned with how spirituality and religion have been used to construct a meaning of pain that shapes appraisal, coping, and pain management. The clinical implications include respectful communication with patients about spirituality and pain, inclusion of spirituality in education and support programs, integration of spiritual preferences in pain management where feasible and appropriate, consultation with pastoral care teams, and reflection by nurses about spirituality in their own lives. A discussion of research implications is included.

  17. Pain, objectivity and history: understanding pain stigma.

    PubMed

    Goldberg, Daniel S

    2017-02-21

    The primary claim of this paper is that understanding the stigma so commonly endured by chronic pain sufferers today in the USA and the UK is unlikely without proper appreciation of the history of pain. Ameliorating such stigma is an ethical imperative, and yet most approaches eschew even an attempt to trace connections between historical attitudes, practices and beliefs towards pain and the stigmatisation so many pain sufferers currently endure. The manuscript aims to help fill this gap by framing pain in the modern era in context of two crucial intellectual schemes that waxed in the 19th and 20th centuries: mechanical objectivity and somaticism. The analysis explains these frameworks and applies them to exploration of primary sources connected to contested pain conditions such as railway spine. By properly situating the historical roots of what it means to cite the 'subjectivity' of pain as a problem, the modern roots of stigmatising attitudes and practices towards chronic pain sufferers become much clearer. The manuscript concludes by suggesting that interventions expressly intended to target the root causes of such stigma are much more likely to be successful than approaches that proceed in ignorance of the historical forces shaping and driving pain stigma in the present.

  18. [The pain from burns].

    PubMed

    Latarjet, J

    2002-03-01

    The painful events associated with the treatment of a severe burn can, because of their long-lasting and repetitive characteristics, be one of the most excruciating experiences in clinical practice. Moreover, burn pain has been shown to be detrimental to burn patients. Although nociception and peripheral hyperalgesia are considered the major causes of burn pain, the study of more hypothetical mechanisms like central hyperalgesia and neuropathic pain may lead to a better understanding of burn pain symptoms and to new therapeutic approaches. Continuous pain and intermittent pain due to therapeutic procedures are two distinct components of burn pain. They have to be evaluated and managed separately. Although continuous pain is by far less severe than intermittent pain, the treatment is, in both cases, essentially pharmacological relying basically on opioids. Because of wide intra- and inter-individual variations, protocols will have to leave large possibilities of adaptation for each case, systematic pain evaluation being mandatory to achieve the best risk/benefit ratio. Surprisingly, the dose of medication decreases only slowly with time, a burn often remaining painful for long periods after healing. Non pharmacological treatments are often useful and sometimes indispensable adjuncts; but their rationale and their feasibility depends entirely on previous optimal pharmacological control of burn pain. Several recent studies show that burn pain management is inadequate in most burn centres.

  19. Older Adults’ Pain Descriptions

    PubMed Central

    McDonald, Deborah Dillon

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe the types of pain information described by older adults with chronic osteoarthritis pain. Pain descriptions were obtained from older adults’ who participated in a posttest only double blind study testing how the phrasing of healthcare practitioners’ pain questions affected the amount of communicated pain information. The 207 community dwelling older adults were randomized to respond to either the open-ended or closed-ended pain question. They viewed and orally responded to a computer displayed videotape of a practitioner asking them the respective pain question. All then viewed and responded to the general follow up question, ““What else can you tell me?” and lastly, “What else can you tell me about your pain, aches, soreness or discomfort?” Audio-taped responses were transcribed and content analyzed by trained, independent raters using 16 a priori criteria from the American Pain Society (2002) Guidelines for the Management of Pain in Osteoarthritis, Rheumatoid Arthritis, and Juvenile Chronic Arthritis. Older adults described important but limited types of information primarily about pain location, timing, and intensity. Pain treatment information was elicited after repeated questioning. Therefore, practitioners need to follow up older adults’ initial pain descriptions with pain questions that promote a more complete pain management discussion. Routine use of a multidimensional pain assessment instrument that measures information such as functional interference, current pain treatments, treatment effects, and side effects would be one way of insuring a more complete pain management discussion with older adults. PMID:19706351

  20. Pediatric pain management.

    PubMed

    Lederhaas, G

    1997-01-01

    It is now recognized that from the newborn period onwards, children are capable of experiencing pain. This includes the premature infant. The challenge for healthcare providers is to incorporate methods of pain assessment and treatment into their daily practices. The child's understanding of pain closely follows the cognitive and behavioral model developed by Jean Piaget. Based on these developmental stages, pain assessment measures have been developed. Pharmacologic advances have accompanied this improved understanding of infant, child, and adolescent psychology. While acute pain accounts for the majority of children's experiences, recurrent/chronic pain states do occur (e.g. sickle cell related and neuropathic) and can be effectively treated.

  1. Pain Management in Horses.

    PubMed

    Guedes, Alonso

    2017-04-01

    There has been great progress in the understanding of basic neurobiologic mechanisms of pain, but this body of knowledge has not yet translated into new and improved analgesics. Progress has been made regarding pain assessment in horses, but more work is needed until sensitive and accurate pain assessment tools are available for use in clinical practice. This review summarizes and updates the knowledge concerning the cornerstones of pain medicine (understand, assess, prevent, and treat). It highlights the importance of understanding pain mechanisms and expressions to enable a rational approach to pain assessment, prevention, and management in the equine patient.

  2. Central modulation of pain

    PubMed Central

    Ossipov, Michael H.; Dussor, Gregory O.; Porreca, Frank

    2010-01-01

    It has long been appreciated that the experience of pain is highly variable between individuals. Pain results from activation of sensory receptors specialized to detect actual or impending tissue damage (i.e., nociceptors). However, a direct correlation between activation of nociceptors and the sensory experience of pain is not always apparent. Even in cases in which the severity of injury appears similar, individual pain experiences may vary dramatically. Emotional state, degree of anxiety, attention and distraction, past experiences, memories, and many other factors can either enhance or diminish the pain experience. Here, we review evidence for “top-down” modulatory circuits that profoundly change the sensory experience of pain. PMID:21041960

  3. Chiropractic care for back pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... Society Low Back Pain Guideline Panel. Interventional therapies, surgery, and interdisciplinary rehabilitation for low back pain: an evidence-based clinical practice guideline from the American Pain Society. ...

  4. Advanced Innovations for Pain.

    PubMed

    Lamer, Tim J; Deer, Timothy R; Hayek, Salim M

    2016-02-01

    Chronic pain represents one of the most important public health problems in terms of both the number of patients afflicted and health care costs. Most patients with chronic pain are treated with medications as the mainstay of therapy, and yet most medically treated patients continue to report ongoing pain. Additionally, adverse effects from pain medications represent a major challenge for clinicians and patients. Spinal cord stimulation and intrathecal drug delivery systems are well-established techniques that have been utilized for over 25 years. Intrathecal drug delivery systems have proven efficacy for a wide variety of intractable pain conditions and fewer adverse effects than systemic medical therapy in patients with refractory cancer-related pain. Spinal cord stimulation is cost-effective and provides improved pain control compared with medical therapy in patients with a variety of refractory pain conditions including complex regional pain syndrome, painful diabetic neuropathy, and chronic radiculopathy. Patients who have intractable pain that has not responded to reasonable attempts at conservative pain care measures should be referred to a qualified interventional pain specialist to determine candidacy for the procedures discussed in this article.

  5. Loin pain hematuria syndrome.

    PubMed

    Taba Taba Vakili, Sahar; Alam, Tausif; Sollinger, Hans

    2014-09-01

    Loin pain hematuria syndrome is a rare disease with a prevalence of ∼0.012%. The most prominent clinical features include periods of severe intermittent or persistent unilateral or bilateral loin pain accompanied by either microscopic or gross hematuria. Patients with loin pain hematuria syndrome initially present with hematuria, flank pain, or most often both hematuria and flank pain. Kidney biopsies from patients with loin pain hematuria typically reveal only minor pathologic abnormalities. Further, loin pain hematuria syndrome is not associated with loss of kidney function or urinary tract infections. Loin pain hematuria syndrome-associated hematuria and pain are postulated to be linked to vascular disease of the kidney, coagulopathy, renal vasospasm with microinfarction, hypersensitivity, complement activation on arterioles, venocalyceal fistula, abnormal ureteral peristalsis, and intratubular deposition of calcium or uric acid microcrystals. Many patients with loin pain hematuria syndrome also meet criteria for a somatoform disorder, and analgesic medications, including narcotics, commonly are used to treat loin pain hematuria syndrome-associated pain. Interventional treatments include renal denervation, kidney autotransplantation, and nephrectomy; however, these methods should be used only as a last resort when less invasive measures have been tried unsuccessfully. In this review article, we discuss and critique current clinical practices related to loin pain hematuria syndrome pathophysiology, diagnosis, treatment, and prognosis.

  6. Pain in Parkinson's Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... for increased overall health care costs. A person’s perception of pain can be affected by emotional factors. ... medications such as levodopa can affect a person’s perception of pain. People with Parkinson’s who are in ...

  7. Block That Pain!

    MedlinePlus

    ... 314. This combination produces a unique effect, blocking pain-sensing neurons without impairing signals from other cells. In contrast, most pain relievers used for surgical procedures block activity in ...

  8. Prescription Pain Medications (Opioids)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Drug Facts / Prescription Pain Medications (Opioids) Prescription Pain Medications (Opioids) Print What is prescription opioid misuse? Also ... Hillbilly Heroin, OC, or Vikes Prescription opioids are medications that are chemically similar to endorphins – opioids that ...

  9. Fighting Chronic Pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... Navigation Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues Fighting Chronic Pain Past Issues / Fall 2007 Table of Contents For ... diagnose, health care professionals and scientists know that chronic pain is very complex. Below are some of the ...

  10. Belly Pain (For Kids)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Dictionary of Medical Words En Español What Other Kids Are Reading Video: Am I Normal? (For Girls) ... in the Operating Room? Belly Pain KidsHealth > For Kids > Belly Pain Print A A A What's in ...

  11. Rib cage pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... not cause the pain in someone who has pleurisy (swelling of the lining of the lungs) or ... Inflammation of cartilage near the breastbone ( costochondritis ) Osteoporosis Pleurisy (the pain is worse when breathing deeply) Home ...

  12. American Pain Society

    MedlinePlus

    ... Statement Enduring Materials APS Bulletin Webinars Resources Resource - Fibromyalgia Resources - Sickle Cell Disease Clinical Centers Guide Funding ... Patients Study Explores Role of Impaired Sleep in Fibromyalgia Pain Study Evaluates Frequency of Pediatric Pain Assessments ...

  13. Alternative medicine - pain relief

    MedlinePlus

    ... relieve pain due to: Cancer Carpal tunnel syndrome Fibromyalgia Childbirth (labor) Musculoskeletal injuries (such as the neck, ... pain for: After surgery or labor Arthritis Cancer Fibromyalgia Irritable bowel syndrome Migraine headache Tension headache Both ...

  14. Myofascial Pain Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... worsens. Treatment options for myofascial pain syndrome include physical therapy and trigger point injections. Pain medications and relaxation ... syndrome typically includes medications, trigger point injections or physical therapy. No conclusive evidence supports using one therapy over ...

  15. Sacroiliac joint pain.

    PubMed

    Dreyfuss, Paul; Dreyer, Susan J; Cole, Andrew; Mayo, Keith

    2004-01-01

    The sacroiliac joint is a source of pain in the lower back and buttocks in approximately 15% of the population. Diagnosing sacroiliac joint-mediated pain is difficult because the presenting complaints are similar to those of other causes of back pain. Patients with sacroiliac joint-mediated pain rarely report pain above L5; most localize their pain to the area around the posterior superior iliac spine. Radiographic and laboratory tests primarily help exclude other sources of low back pain. Magnetic resonance imaging, computed tomography, and bone scans of the sacroiliac joint cannot reliably determine whether the joint is the source of the pain. Controlled analgesic injections of the sacroiliac joint are the most important tool in the diagnosis. Treatment modalities include medications, physical therapy, bracing, manual therapy, injections, radiofrequency denervation, and arthrodesis; however, no published prospective data compare the efficacy of these modalities.

  16. Effects of therapeutic massage on gait and pain after delayed onset muscle soreness

    PubMed Central

    Han, Jun-Ho; Kim, Min-Jeong; Yang, Hyuk-Jin; Lee, Yu-Jin; Sung, Yun-Hee

    2014-01-01

    Unfamiliar or sudden exercise can induce delayed onset muscle soreness (DOMS) within 12–24 h. So, several researchers have reported various interventions to treat DOMS. Massage is generally known to eliminate muscle fatigue. However, effect of massage after DOMS is still not clear. We investigated whether the massage is effective on pain and gait after DOMS. The participants were divided into a control group (n= 10) with DOMS and an experimental group (n= 11) with the massage treated after DOMS. We induced DOMS by taking isotonic exercise with going up and down 20 times in 5-story building. We applied the massage and assessment on gastrocnemius of dominant foot. The change of gait and pain was assessed using gaitrite and algometer. In the present results, the massage on gastrocnemius after DOMS showed significant difference in pain (P< 0.05). Also, there was a significant difference in gait (P< 0.05), especially, spatial parameters (distance, step length, stride length) and temporal parameters (ambulation, heel on off time, stride velocity). Moreover, the pain relief after massage-treated in DOMS correlated with gait. These results suggest that the massage on gastrocnemius after DOMS has influence on pain and gait performance. Therefore, massage can be applied as intervention for delayed onset muscle soreness. PMID:24877051

  17. Effects of therapeutic massage on gait and pain after delayed onset muscle soreness.

    PubMed

    Han, Jun-Ho; Kim, Min-Jeong; Yang, Hyuk-Jin; Lee, Yu-Jin; Sung, Yun-Hee

    2014-04-01

    Unfamiliar or sudden exercise can induce delayed onset muscle soreness (DOMS) within 12-24 h. So, several researchers have reported various interventions to treat DOMS. Massage is generally known to eliminate muscle fatigue. However, effect of massage after DOMS is still not clear. We investigated whether the massage is effective on pain and gait after DOMS. The participants were divided into a control group (n= 10) with DOMS and an experimental group (n= 11) with the massage treated after DOMS. We induced DOMS by taking isotonic exercise with going up and down 20 times in 5-story building. We applied the massage and assessment on gastrocnemius of dominant foot. The change of gait and pain was assessed using gaitrite and algometer. In the present results, the massage on gastrocnemius after DOMS showed significant difference in pain (P< 0.05). Also, there was a significant difference in gait (P< 0.05), especially, spatial parameters (distance, step length, stride length) and temporal parameters (ambulation, heel on off time, stride velocity). Moreover, the pain relief after massage-treated in DOMS correlated with gait. These results suggest that the massage on gastrocnemius after DOMS has influence on pain and gait performance. Therefore, massage can be applied as intervention for delayed onset muscle soreness.

  18. Effects of human contact and vagal regulation on pain reactivity and visual attention in newborns.

    PubMed

    Arditi, Hadar; Feldman, Ruth; Eidelman, Arthur I

    2006-11-01

    In two experiments we examined the effects of human contact and vagal regulation on newborns' pain reactivity and visual attention. Baseline cardiac vagal tone was measured during quiet sleep and during the experiment, and vagal withdrawal was indexed as change in vagal tone from baseline to pain (study 1) or attention (study 2). In study 1, 62 healthy newborns were videotaped during a heel-prick procedure and pain reactivity was assessed from micro-level coding of facial expressions, cry behavior, and body movements. Infants were randomly assigned to a contact condition, held by a female assistant, or a no contact condition, on an infant-seat in a similar angle. In study 2, 62 additional healthy newborns, randomly assigned to contact and noncontact conditions, were presented with 2 visual stimuli for a 60 s familiarization period, which were then paired with a novel stimulus. Visual interest, alertness, and novelty preference were coded. Human contact had no effect on the newborns' pain response. Visual attention increased with human contact and newborns in the contact condition looked at the stimuli more frequently, with higher alertness, for longer durations, and had a higher novelty preference. Autonomic reactivity-as indexed by vagal withdrawal-differentiated newborns with intense and mild pain response. Discussion focused on proximity to conspecifics as a contributor to emerging regulatory and adaptive functioning in the human infant.

  19. Low back pain, radiculopathy.

    PubMed

    Selkirk, Stephen M; Ruff, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Low back pain is a pervasive problem in the adult population. Most patients with low back pain will not require imaging as spontaneous recovery within 12 weeks is the rule. However, a small percentage of patients with low back pain will have serious underlying pathology requiring more intensive investigation. This chapter delineates the signs and symptoms related to potential serious underlying causes and discusses appropriate imaging modalities that should be utilized in patients with low back pain.

  20. Palliative care - managing pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... page, please enable JavaScript. Palliative care is a holistic approach to care that focuses on treating pain and ... Pain can be stressful for you and your family. But with treatment, pain can be ... medicines, such as: Acetaminophen (Tylenol) Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory ...

  1. Paine Appointed Administrator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1969-01-01

    President Richard M. Nixon announcing the appointment of Dr. Thomas O. Paine as Administrator for the National Aeronautics and Space Administration. The ceremony was held at the White House. Paine had been serving as acting administrator. From left to right: President Richard M. Nixon NASA Administrator Dr. Thomas O. Paine Vice President Spiro T. Agnew

  2. Forebrain Pain Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Neugebauer, Volker; Galhardo, Vasco; Maione, Sabatino; Mackey, Sean C.

    2009-01-01

    Emotional-affective and cognitive dimensions of pain are less well understood than nociceptive and nocifensive components, but the forebrain is believed to play an important role. Recent evidence suggests subcortical and cortical brain areas outside the traditional pain processing network contribute critically to emotional-affective responses and cognitive deficits related to pain. These brain areas include different nuclei of the amygdala and certain prefrontal cortical areas. Their roles in various aspects of pain will be discussed. Biomarkers of cortical dysfunction are being identified that may evolve into therapeutic targets to modulate pain experience and improve pain-related cognitive impairment. Supporting data from preclinical studies in neuropathic pain models will be presented. Neuroimaging analysis provides evidence for plastic changes in the pain processing brain network. Results of clinical studies in neuropathic pain patients suggest that neuroimaging may help determine mechanisms of altered brain functions in pain as well as monitor the effects of pharmacologic interventions to optimize treatment in individual patients. Recent progress in the analysis of higher brain functions emphasizes the concept of pain as a multidimensional experience and the need for integrative approaches to determine the full spectrum of harmful or protective neurobiological changes in pain. PMID:19162070

  3. Pediatric Procedural Pain

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blount, Ronald L.; Piira, Tiina; Cohen, Lindsey L.; Cheng, Patricia S.

    2006-01-01

    This article reviews the various settings in which infants, children, and adolescents experience pain during acute medical procedures and issues related to referral of children to pain management teams. In addition, self-report, reports by others, physiological monitoring, and direct observation methods of assessment of pain and related constructs…

  4. Pain Medications After Surgery

    MedlinePlus

    ... for you and what didn't. Talk about chronic pain. If you have chronic pain, you'll likely have to deal with that ... called tolerance — if you're taking medications for chronic pain. Discuss this in detail with your doctor before ...

  5. Treating Pain with Opioids

    MedlinePlus

    ... with using opioids to treat acute pain, or chronic pain if a Opioid p s a : t H ie o n w ... these options before you take an opioid because opioids alone are rarely enough to treat chronic pain over a long period of time. 2 Medicines ...

  6. Chronic Pelvic Pain in Women

    MedlinePlus

    Chronic pelvic pain in women Overview By Mayo Clinic Staff Chronic pelvic pain is pain in the area below your bellybutton ... your hips that lasts six months or longer. Chronic pelvic pain can have multiple causes. It can be a ...

  7. Pain inhibits pain; human brainstem mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Youssef, A M; Macefield, V G; Henderson, L A

    2016-01-01

    Conditioned pain modulation is a powerful analgesic mechanism, occurring when a painful stimulus is inhibited by a second painful stimulus delivered at a different body location. Reduced conditioned pain modulation capacity is associated with the development of some chronic pain conditions and the effectiveness of some analgesic medications. Human lesion studies show that the circuitry responsible for conditioned pain modulation lies within the caudal brainstem, although the precise nuclei in humans remain unknown. We employed brain imaging to determine brainstem sites responsible for conditioned pain modulation in 54 healthy individuals. In all subjects, 8 noxious heat stimuli (test stimuli) were applied to the right side of the mouth and brain activity measured using functional magnetic resonance imaging. This paradigm was then repeated. However, following the fourth noxious stimulus, a separate noxious stimulus, consisting of an intramuscular injection of hypertonic saline into the leg, was delivered (conditioning stimulus). During this test and conditioning stimulus period, 23 subjects displayed conditioned pain modulation analgesia whereas 31 subjects did not. An individual's analgesic ability was not influenced by gender, pain intensity levels of the test or conditioning stimuli or by psychological variables such as pain catastrophizing or fear of pain. Brain images were processed using SPM8 and the brainstem isolated using the SUIT toolbox. Significant increases in signal intensity were determined during each test stimulus and compared between subjects that did and did not display CPM analgesia (p<0.05, small volume correction). The expression of analgesia was associated with reduction in signal intensity increases during each test stimulus in the presence of the conditioning stimulus in three brainstem regions: the caudalis subdivision of the spinal trigeminal nucleus, i.e., the primary synapse, the region of the subnucleus reticularis dorsalis and in the

  8. Subcalcaneal bursitis with plantar fasciitis treated by arthroscopy.

    PubMed

    Yamakado, Kotaro

    2013-05-01

    We report the successful arthroscopic treatment of a case of subcalcaneal bursitis with plantar fasciitis. To our knowledge, this is the first report on arthroscopic excision of a subcalcaneal bursa. Right heel pain developed in a 50-year-old woman, without any obvious cause. She reported that the heel pain occurred immediately after waking and that the heel ached when she walked. Magnetic resonance imaging showed an extra-articular, homogeneous, high-intensity lesion in the fat pad adjacent to the calcaneal tubercle on T2-weighted sagittal and coronal images and thickening of the plantar fascia on T2-weighted sagittal images. A diagnosis of a recalcitrant subcalcaneal bursitis with plantar fasciitis was made, and surgery was performed. The arthroscope was placed between the calcaneus and the plantar fascia. With the surgeon viewing from the lateral portal and working from the medial portal, the dorsal surface of the degenerative plantar fascia was debrided and the medial half of the plantar fascia was released, followed by debridement of the subcalcaneal bursal cavity through the incised plantar fascia. Full weight bearing and gait were allowed immediately after the operation. At the latest follow-up, the patient had achieved complete resolution of heel pain without a recurrence of the mass, confirmed by magnetic resonance imaging.

  9. Subcalcaneal Bursitis With Plantar Fasciitis Treated by Arthroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Yamakado, Kotaro

    2013-01-01

    We report the successful arthroscopic treatment of a case of subcalcaneal bursitis with plantar fasciitis. To our knowledge, this is the first report on arthroscopic excision of a subcalcaneal bursa. Right heel pain developed in a 50-year-old woman, without any obvious cause. She reported that the heel pain occurred immediately after waking and that the heel ached when she walked. Magnetic resonance imaging showed an extra-articular, homogeneous, high-intensity lesion in the fat pad adjacent to the calcaneal tubercle on T2-weighted sagittal and coronal images and thickening of the plantar fascia on T2-weighted sagittal images. A diagnosis of a recalcitrant subcalcaneal bursitis with plantar fasciitis was made, and surgery was performed. The arthroscope was placed between the calcaneus and the plantar fascia. With the surgeon viewing from the lateral portal and working from the medial portal, the dorsal surface of the degenerative plantar fascia was debrided and the medial half of the plantar fascia was released, followed by debridement of the subcalcaneal bursal cavity through the incised plantar fascia. Full weight bearing and gait were allowed immediately after the operation. At the latest follow-up, the patient had achieved complete resolution of heel pain without a recurrence of the mass, confirmed by magnetic resonance imaging. PMID:23875139

  10. Finite element analysis as a tool for parametric prosthetic foot design and evaluation. Technique development in the solid ankle cushioned heel (SACH) foot.

    PubMed

    Saunders, Marnie M; Schwentker, Edwards P; Kay, David B; Bennett, Gordon; Jacobs, Christopher R; Verstraete, Mary C; Njus, Glen O

    2003-02-01

    In this study, we developed an approach for prosthetic foot design incorporating motion analysis, mechanical testing and computer analysis. Using computer modeling and finite element analysis, a three-dimensional (3D), numerical foot model of the solid ankle cushioned heel (SACH) foot was constructed and analyzed based upon loading conditions obtained from the gait analysis of an amputee and validated experimentally using mechanical testing. The model was then used to address effects of viscoelastic heel performance numerically. This is just one example of the type of parametric analysis and design enabled by this approach. More importantly, by incorporating the unique gait characteristics of the amputee, these parametric analyses may lead to prosthetic feet more appropriately representing a particular user's needs, comfort and activity level.

  11. Dancing in pain: pain appraisal and coping in dancers.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Ruth; Hanrahan, Stephanie J

    2008-01-01

    This study investigated the relationships between the type of pain experienced (performance pain and injury pain), the cognitive appraisal of pain and pain coping styles in dancers. Fifty-one professional ballet and contemporary dancers (17 males and 34 females), with the mean age of 25.9 years, completed a general pain questionnaire, the Pain Appraisal Inventory, the Survey of Pain Attitudes Control Subscale, and the Sports Inventory for Pain. Multivariate analyses of variance indicated that both the cognitive appraisal of the pain and pain coping styles did not differ according to the type of pain experienced or the pain severity. However, it was found that dancers with performance pain of either low or high severity were more likely to dance in pain than dancers experiencing injury pain. Multiple regression analyses indicated that the appraisal of pain as threatening was predictive of the use of avoidance and catastrophizing pain coping styles. Overall, results indicated that dancers may not differentiate between performance pain and injury pain, or modify their appraisal and coping strategies according to the characteristics of the pain experienced. The study highlighted an opportunity for increased education for dancers in recognizing the difference between pain considered to be a routine aspect of training and pain which is a signal of serious injury.

  12. The influence of children's pain memories on subsequent pain experience.

    PubMed

    Noel, Melanie; Chambers, Christine T; McGrath, Patrick J; Klein, Raymond M; Stewart, Sherry H

    2012-08-01

    Healthy children are often required to repeatedly undergo painful medical procedures (eg, immunizations). Although memory is often implicated in children's reactions to future pain, there is a dearth of research directly examining the relationship between the 2. The current study investigated the influence of children's memories for a novel pain stimulus on their subsequent pain experience. One hundred ten healthy children (60 boys) between the ages of 8 and 12 years completed a laboratory pain task and provided pain ratings. Two weeks later, children provided pain ratings based on their memories as well as their expectancies about future pain. One month following the initial laboratory visit, children again completed the pain task and provided pain ratings. Results showed that children's memory of pain intensity was a better predictor of subsequent pain reporting than their actual initial reporting of pain intensity, and mediated the relationship between initial and subsequent pain reporting. Children who had negatively estimated pain memories developed expectations of greater pain prior to a subsequent pain experience and showed greater increases in pain ratings over time than children who had accurate or positively estimated pain memories. These findings highlight the influence of pain memories on healthy children's expectations of future pain and subsequent pain experiences and extend predictive models of subsequent pain reporting.

  13. Occlusion and facial pain.

    PubMed

    Klineberg, I

    1978-02-01

    The role of the occlusion in the aetiology of reflex jaw muscle hyperactivity and myofacial pain is analysed. Neurological mechanisms are proposed to explain how variations in occlusal morphology of sufficient magnitude (segmental influences), and the presence of anxiety states (suprasegmental influences) affect jaw muscle activity and contribute to myofascial pain. Controlled occlusal therapy may alter the segmental neurological control of jaw muscle activity to facilitate resolution of muscle hyperactivity in acute myofascial pain. Chronic myofascial pain dysfunction is not primarily related to occlusal factors and a complex psychophysiological mechanism is involved in this type of pain problem.

  14. Myofascial low back pain.

    PubMed

    Ramsook, Ryan R; Malanga, Gerard A

    2012-10-01

    Low back pain is a common condition that is encountered by both primary care physicians as well as various specialists, which include: orthopedic surgeons, physical medicine and rehabilitation specialists, neurologists, rheumatologists, and pain management specialists. Associated muscular pain is very common and often a reactive response from nociception from other structures. Myofascial pain may arise, which is characterized by the presence of myofascial trigger points (MTrPs) that are located in fascia, tendons, and/or muscle. This article reviews the current evidence regarding the pathophysiology, assessment, and recommended treatment options for myofascial low back pain.

  15. Morphological study on the pressure ulcer-like dermal lesions formed in the rat heel skin after transection of the sciatic nerves.

    PubMed

    Haba, Daijiro; Minami, Chie; Miyagawa, Miki; Arakawa, Takamitsu; Miki, Akinori

    2017-01-01

    Due to transection of bilateral sciatic nerves, pressure ulcer-like dermal lesion occurred in the hairy skin covering of the heel skin in almost all rats. In the present study, chronological changes of the rat heel skin after the transection were morphologically and immunohistochemically examined. In the heel skin, redness and swelling began by 3days after the operation, and open wound formed by 17days. At the redness and swelling stage, edema extensively occurred in the dermis. At the thickening stage, the epidermis at the pressed site became transiently thicker, and at the whitening stage, rapidly thinner. At these stages, the epidermis in the skin surrounding the pressed site became gradually thicker. At the yellow scar stage, the skin was covered only by necrotic tissues and horny layer. These layers were scratched during walking and turning, and the yellow scar stage became the open wound stage. Inflammatory reaction began at the thickening stage, and at the yellow scar and open wound stages, necrosis, infiltration of inflammatory cells and dilation of small blood vessels were observed. These morphological features are quite similar to those in the human pressure ulcer. These findings suggest that these dermal injuries could compare the human pressure ulcer for medical treatment and depressurization in future study.

  16. Pain in burn patients.

    PubMed

    Latarjet, J; Choinère, M

    1995-08-01

    While severe pain is a constant component of the burn injury, inadequate pain management has been shown to be detrimental to burn patients. Pain-generating mechanisms in burns include nociception, primary and secondary hyperalgesia and neuropathy. The clinical studies of burn pain characteristics reveal very clear-cut differences between continuous pain and pain due to therapeutic procedures which have to be treated separately. Some of the main features of burn pain are: (1) its long-lasting course, often exceeding healing time, (2) the repetition of highly nociceptive procedures which can lead to severe psychological disturbances if pain control is inappropriate. Pharmaco-therapy with opioids is the mainstay for analgesia in burned patients, but non-pharmacological techniques may be useful adjuncts. Routine pain evaluation is mandatory for efficient and safe analgesia. Special attention must be given to pain in burned children which remains too often underestimated and undertreated. More educational efforts from physicians and nursing staff are necessary to improve pain management in burned patients.

  17. Avicenna's concept of pain.

    PubMed

    Tashani, Osama A; Johnson, Mark I

    2010-09-08

    Ibn Sina (Latin name - Avicenna, 980-1037) is a famous Muslim physician who wrote The Canon of Medicine. Pain-related writings within The Canon were identified and analysed and compared to Galen and Modern Pain Theory. We found evidence in The Canon that Avicenna challenged Galen's concept of pain. Galen insisted that injuries (breach of continuity) were the only cause of pain. In contrast, Avicenna suggested that the true cause of pain was a change of the physical condition (temperament change) of the organ whether there was an injury present or not. Avicenna extended Galen's descriptions of 4 to 15 types of pain and used a terminology that is remarkably similar to that used in the McGill Pain Questionnaire.

  18. Common medical pains

    PubMed Central

    Jacobson, Sheila

    2007-01-01

    Pain in infancy and childhood is extremely common. Sources of pain include illness, injury, and medical and dental procedures. Over the past two decades, tremendous progress has been made in the assessment, prevention and treatment of pain. It is important for the paediatric health care provider to be aware of the implications and consequences of pain in childhood. A multitude of interventions are available to reduce or alleviate pain in children of all ages, including neonates. These include behavioural and psychological methods, as well as a host of pharmacological preparations, which are safe and effective when used as indicated. Many complementary and alternative treatments appear to be promising in treating and relieving pain, although further research is required. The present article reviews the most common sources of pain in childhood and infancy, as well as current treatment strategies and options. PMID:19030348

  19. Pain emotion and homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Panerai, Alberto E

    2011-05-01

    Pain has always been considered as part of a defensive strategy, whose specific role is to signal an immediate, active danger. This definition partially fits acute pain, but certainly not chronic pain, that is maintained also in the absence of an active noxa or danger and that nowadays is considered a disease by itself. Moreover, acute pain is not only an automatic alerting system, but its severity and characteristics can change depending on the surrounding environment. The affective, emotional components of pain have been and are the object of extensive attention and research by psychologists, philosophers, physiologists and also pharmacologists. Pain itself can be considered to share the same genesis as emotions and as a specific emotion in contributing to the maintenance of the homeostasis of each unique subject. Interestingly, this role of pain reaches its maximal development in the human; some even argue that it is specific for the human primate.

  20. Effects of racetrack surface and nail placement on movement between heels of the hoof and horseshoes of racehorses.

    PubMed

    Dahl, Vanessa E; Hitchens, Peta L; Stover, Susan M

    2016-09-01

    OBJECTIVE To determine the effects of racetrack surface and shoe characteristics on formation of wear grooves in the horseshoes of racehorses. SAMPLES 1,121 horseshoes from 242 Thoroughbred racehorses collected during routine horseshoeing procedures at 4 racetracks with dirt or synthetic surfaces. PROCEDURES Data for 1,014 horseshoes from 233 racehorses were analyzed. Horseshoes were photographed, and length and width of grooves formed at the heels of the solar surface of horseshoes were measured on the photographs. Effects of racetrack, racetrack surface, and shoe characteristics (eg, shoe size, clips, and nails) on length and width of grooves were assessed by use of a mixed-model anova. RESULTS Length and width of wear grooves differed significantly on the basis of racetrack, nail placement, and limb side (left vs right). Differences in groove dimensions between types of racetrack surface (dirt vs synthetic) were less apparent than differences among racetracks. CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE Measurements of the length and width of wear grooves in the horseshoes of racehorses may be useful for understanding some aspects of hoof interactions with various racetrack surfaces. Interpretation of differences in wear grooves for various racetrack surfaces will likely require quantitation of the mechanical behavior of the surfaces.

  1. Changes in Achilles tendon mechanical properties following eccentric heel drop exercise are specific to the free tendon.

    PubMed

    Obst, S J; Newsham-West, R; Barrett, R S

    2016-04-01

    Mechanical loading of the Achilles tendon during isolated eccentric contractions could induce immediate and region-dependent changes in mechanical properties. Three-dimensional ultrasound was used to examine the immediate effect of isolated eccentric exercise on the mechanical properties of the distal (free tendon) and proximal (gastrocnemii) regions of the Achilles tendon. Participants (n = 14) underwent two testing sessions in which tendon measurements were made at rest and during a 30% and 70% isometric plantar flexion contractions immediately before and after either: (a) 3 × 15 eccentric heel drops or (b) 10-min rest. There was a significant time-by-session interaction for free tendon length and strain for all loading conditions (P < 0.05). Pairwise comparisons revealed a significant increase in free tendon length and strain at all contraction intensities after eccentric exercise (P < 0.05). There was no significant time-by-session interaction for the gastrocnemii (medial or lateral) aponeurosis or tendon for any of the measured parameters. Immediate changes in Achilles tendon mechanical properties were specific to the free tendon and consistent with changes due to mechanical creep. These findings suggest that the mechanical properties of the free tendon may be more vulnerable to change with exercise compared with the gastrocnemii aponeurosis or tendon.

  2. Resurfacing weight bearing areas of the heel. The role of the dorsalis pedis innervated free tissue transfer.

    PubMed

    Duncan, M J; Zuker, R M; Manktelow, R T

    1985-01-01

    Five cases of chronic ulceration following skin graft resurfacing of the weight bearing surface of the heel are presented. All were managed with debridement and coverage with a free innervated dorsalis pedis tissue transfer. The technical refinements that have contributed to the reliability of the flap include careful distal identification of the first dorsal metatarsal artery (FDMA) and division of the dorsalis pedis artery (DPA) under direct vision below the takeoff of the FDMA. Donor site morbidity has been minimized by taking care to preserve the extensor paratenon as a bed for the subsequent skin graft and by immobilization of the donor foot with plaster and bed rest for 10 days. Four of the patients were followed for 2, 4, 4, and 6 years; one was lost to follow-up. All were active with protective sensation in their flaps. No instances of flap breakdown and no significant donor site morbidity were noted. The dorsalis pedis innervated free tissue transfer is recommended as a reliable procedure for resurfacing weight bearing areas of the foot when simpler methods have failed.

  3. Effect of a rocker non-heeled shoe on EMG and ground reaction forces during gait without previous training.

    PubMed

    Sacco, Isabel C N; Sartor, Cristina D; Cacciari, Licia P; Onodera, Andrea N; Dinato, Roberto C; Pantaleão, Elcio; Matias, Alessandra B; Cezário, Fernanda G; Tonicelli, Lucas M G; Martins, Maria Cecília S; Yokota, Mariane; Marques, Paulo Eduardo C; Costa, Paulo Henrique C

    2012-06-01

    Unstable shoes have been designed to promote "natural instability" and during walking they should simulate barefoot gait, enhancing muscle activity and, thus, attributing an advantage over regular tennis shoes. Recent studies showed that, after special training on the appropriate walking pattern, the use of the Masai Barefoot Technology (MBT) shoe increases muscle activation during walking. Our study presents a comparison of muscle activity as well as horizontal and vertical forces during gait with the MBT, a standard tennis shoe and barefoot walking of healthy individuals without previous training. These variables were compared in 25 female subjects and gait conditions were compared using ANOVA repeated measures (effect size:0.25). Walking with the MBT shoe in this non-instructed condition produced higher vertical forces (first vertical peak and weight acceptance rate) than walking with a standard shoe or walking barefoot, which suggests an increase in the loads received by the musculoskeletal system, especially at heel strike. Walking with the MBT shoe did not increase muscle activity when compared to walking with the standard shoe. The barefoot condition was more effective than the MBT shoe at enhancing muscle activation. Therefore, in healthy individuals, no advantage was found in using the MBT over a standard tennis shoe without a special training period. Further studies using the MBT without any instruction over a longer period are needed to evaluate if the higher loads observed in the present study would return to their baseline values after a period of adaptation, and if the muscle activity would increase over time.

  4. An equine pain face

    PubMed Central

    Gleerup, Karina B; Forkman, Björn; Lindegaard, Casper; Andersen, Pia H

    2015-01-01

    Objective The objective of this study was to investigate the existence of an equine pain face and to describe this in detail. Study design Semi-randomized, controlled, crossover trial. Animals Six adult horses. Methods Pain was induced with two noxious stimuli, a tourniquet on the antebrachium and topical application of capsaicin. All horses participated in two control trials and received both noxious stimuli twice, once with and once without an observer present. During all sessions their pain state was scored. The horses were filmed and the close-up video recordings of the faces were analysed for alterations in behaviour and facial expressions. Still images from the trials were evaluated for the presence of each of the specific pain face features identified from the video analysis. Results Both noxious challenges were effective in producing a pain response resulting in significantly increased pain scores. Alterations in facial expressions were observed in all horses during all noxious stimulations. The number of pain face features present on the still images from the noxious challenges were significantly higher than for the control trial (p = 0.0001). Facial expressions representative for control and pain trials were condensed into explanatory illustrations. During pain sessions with an observer present, the horses increased their contact-seeking behavior. Conclusions and clinical relevance An equine pain face comprising ‘low’ and/or ‘asymmetrical’ ears, an angled appearance of the eyes, a withdrawn and/or tense stare, mediolaterally dilated nostrils and tension of the lips, chin and certain facial muscles can be recognized in horses during induced acute pain. This description of an equine pain face may be useful for improving tools for pain recognition in horses with mild to moderate pain. PMID:25082060

  5. The genetics of pain and pain inhibition.

    PubMed Central

    Mogil, J S; Sternberg, W F; Marek, P; Sadowski, B; Belknap, J K; Liebeskind, J C

    1996-01-01

    The present review summarizes the current state of knowledge about the genetics of pain-related phenomena and illustrates the scope and power of genetic approaches to the study of pain. We focus on work performed in our laboratories in Jastrzebiec, Poland; Portland, OR; and Los Angeles, which we feel demonstrates the continuing usefulness of classical genetic approaches, especially when used in combination with newly available molecular genetic techniques. PMID:8610166

  6. Epidemiological survey of the feasibility of broadband ultrasound attenuation measured using calcaneal quantitative ultrasound to predict the incidence of falls in the middle aged and elderly

    PubMed Central

    Ou, Ling-Chun; Chang, Yin-Fan; Chang, Chin-Sung; Chiu, Ching-Ju; Chao, Ting-Hsing; Sun, Zih-Jie; Lin, Ruey-Mo; Wu, Chih-Hsing

    2017-01-01

    Objectives We investigated whether calcaneal quantitative ultrasound (QUS-C) is a feasible tool for predicting the incidence of falls. Design Prospective epidemiological cohort study. Setting Community-dwelling people sampled in central western Taiwan. Participants A cohort of community-dwelling people who were ≥40 years old (men: 524; women: 676) in 2009–2010. Follow-up questionnaires were completed by 186 men and 257 women in 2012. Methods Structured questionnaires and broadband ultrasound attenuation (BUA) data were obtained in 2009–2010 using QUS-C, and follow-up surveys were done in a telephone interview in 2012. Using a binary logistic regression model, the risk factors associated with a new fall during follow-up were analysed with all significant variables from the bivariate comparisons and theoretically important variables. Primary outcome measures The incidence of falls was determined when the first new fall occurred during the follow-up period. The mean follow-up time was 2.83 years. Results The total incidence of falls was 28.0 per 1000 person-years for the ≥40 year old group (all participants), 23.3 per 1000 person-years for the 40–70 year old group, and 45.6 per 1000 person-years for the ≥70 year old group. Using multiple logistic regression models, the independent factors were current smoking, living alone, psychiatric drug usage and lower BUA (OR 0.93; 95% CI 0.88 to 0.99, p<0.05) in the ≥70 year old group. Conclusions The incidence of falls was highest in the ≥70 year old group. Using QUS-C-derived BUA is feasible for predicting the incidence of falls in community-dwelling elderly people aged ≥70 years. PMID:28069623

  7. Pain Management in Newborns

    PubMed Central

    Hall, Richard W.; Anand, Kanwaljeet J. S.

    2014-01-01

    Effective pain management is a desirable standard of care for preterm and term newborns and may potentially improve their clinical and neurodevelopmental outcomes. Neonatal pain should be assessed routinely using context-specific, validated and objective pain methods, despite the limitations of currently available tools. Reducing invasive procedures, and using pharmacological, behavioral or environmental measures can be used to manage neonatal pain. Non-pharmacologic approaches include kangaroo care, facilitated tucking, non-nutritive sucking, sucrose and other sweeteners, massage and acupuncture therapy. They are used for procedures causing acute, transient, or mild pain, or as adjunctive therapy for moderate or severe pain. Local and topical anesthetics can reduce the acute pain caused by skin-breaking or mucosa-injuring procedures. Opioids form the mainstay for treatment of severe pain; morphine and fentanyl are the most commonly used drugs, although other opioids are also available. Non-opioid drugs include various sedatives and anesthetic agents, mostly used as adjunctive therapy in ventilated neonates. Acetaminophen, ibuprofen and other drugs are used for neonates, although their efficacy and safety remains unproven. Approaches for implementing an effective pain management program in the Neonatal ICU are summarized, together with practical protocols for procedural, postoperative, and mechanical ventilation-associated neonatal pain and stress. PMID:25459780

  8. Pain in Cancer Survivors

    PubMed Central

    Glare, Paul A.; Davies, Pamela S.; Finlay, Esmé; Gulati, Amitabh; Lemanne, Dawn; Moryl, Natalie; Oeffinger, Kevin C.; Paice, Judith A.; Stubblefield, Michael D.; Syrjala, Karen L.

    2014-01-01

    Pain is a common problem in cancer survivors, especially in the first few years after treatment. In the longer term, approximately 5% to 10% of survivors have chronic severe pain that interferes with functioning. The prevalence is much higher in certain subpopulations, such as breast cancer survivors. All cancer treatment modalities have the potential to cause pain. Currently, the approach to managing pain in cancer survivors is similar to that for chronic cancer-related pain, pharmacotherapy being the principal treatment modality. Although it may be appropriate to continue strong opioids in survivors with moderate to severe pain, most pain problems in cancer survivors will not require them. Moreover, because more than 40% of cancer survivors now live longer than 10 years, there is growing concern about the long-term adverse effects of opioids and the risks of misuse, abuse, and overdose in the nonpatient population. As with chronic nonmalignant pain, multimodal interventions that incorporate nonpharmacologic therapies should be part of the treatment strategy for pain in cancer survivors, prescribed with the aim of restoring functionality, not just providing comfort. For patients with complex pain issues, multidisciplinary programs should be used, if available. New or worsening pain in a cancer survivor must be evaluated to determine whether the cause is recurrent disease or a second malignancy. This article focuses on patients with a history of cancer who are beyond the acute diagnosis and treatment phase and on common treatment-related pain etiologies. The benefits and harms of the various pharmacologic and nonpharmacologic options for pain management in this setting are reviewed. PMID:24799477

  9. Pain after earthquake

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Introduction On 6 April 2009, at 03:32 local time, an Mw 6.3 earthquake hit the Abruzzi region of central Italy causing widespread damage in the City of L Aquila and its nearby villages. The earthquake caused 308 casualties and over 1,500 injuries, displaced more than 25,000 people and induced significant damage to more than 10,000 buildings in the L'Aquila region. Objectives This observational retrospective study evaluated the prevalence and drug treatment of pain in the five weeks following the L'Aquila earthquake (April 6, 2009). Methods 958 triage documents were analysed for patients pain severity, pain type, and treatment efficacy. Results A third of pain patients reported pain with a prevalence of 34.6%. More than half of pain patients reported severe pain (58.8%). Analgesic agents were limited to available drugs: anti-inflammatory agents, paracetamol, and weak opioids. Reduction in verbal numerical pain scores within the first 24 hours after treatment was achieved with the medications at hand. Pain prevalence and characterization exhibited a biphasic pattern with acute pain syndromes owing to trauma occurring in the first 15 days after the earthquake; traumatic pain then decreased and re-surged at around week five, owing to rebuilding efforts. In the second through fourth week, reports of pain occurred mainly owing to relapses of chronic conditions. Conclusions This study indicates that pain is prevalent during natural disasters, may exhibit a discernible pattern over the weeks following the event, and current drug treatments in this region may be adequate for emergency situations. PMID:22747796

  10. Neurological diseases and pain

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Chronic pain is a frequent component of many neurological disorders, affecting 20–40% of patients for many primary neurological diseases. These diseases result from a wide range of pathophysiologies including traumatic injury to the central nervous system, neurodegeneration and neuroinflammation, and exploring the aetiology of pain in these disorders is an opportunity to achieve new insight into pain processing. Whether pain originates in the central or peripheral nervous system, it frequently becomes centralized through maladaptive responses within the central nervous system that can profoundly alter brain systems and thereby behaviour (e.g. depression). Chronic pain should thus be considered a brain disease in which alterations in neural networks affect multiple aspects of brain function, structure and chemistry. The study and treatment of this disease is greatly complicated by the lack of objective measures for either the symptoms or the underlying mechanisms of chronic pain. In pain associated with neurological disease, it is sometimes difficult to obtain even a subjective evaluation of pain, as is the case for patients in a vegetative state or end-stage Alzheimer's disease. It is critical that neurologists become more involved in chronic pain treatment and research (already significant in the fields of migraine and peripheral neuropathies). To achieve this goal, greater efforts are needed to enhance training for neurologists in pain treatment and promote greater interest in the field. This review describes examples of pain in different neurological diseases including primary neurological pain conditions, discusses the therapeutic potential of brain-targeted therapies and highlights the need for objective measures of pain. PMID:22067541

  11. Basic science of pain.

    PubMed

    DeLeo, Joyce A

    2006-04-01

    The origin of the theory that the transmission of pain is through a single channel from the skin to the brain can be traced to the philosopher and scientist René Descartes. This simplified scheme of the reflex was the beginning of the development of the modern doctrine of reflexes. Unfortunately, Descartes' reflex theory directed both the study and treatment of pain for more than 330 years. It is still described in physiology and neuroscience textbooks as fact rather than theory. The gate control theory proposed by Melzack and Wall in 1965 rejuvenated the field of pain study and led to further investigation into the phenomena of spinal sensitization and central nervous system plasticity, which are the potential pathophysiologic correlates of chronic pain. The processing of pain takes place in an integrated matrix throughout the neuroaxis and occurs on at least three levels-at peripheral, spinal, and supraspinal sites. Basic strategies of pain control monopolize on this concept of integration by attenuation or blockade of pain through intervention at the periphery, by activation of inhibitory processes that gate pain at the spinal cord and brain, and by interference with the perception of pain. This article discusses each level of pain modulation and reviews the mechanisms of action of opioids and potential new analgesics. A brief description of animal models frames a discussion about recent advances regarding the role of glial cells and central nervous system neuroimmune activation and innate immunity in the etiology of chronic pain states. Future investigation into the discovery and development of novel, nonopioid drug therapy may provide needed options for the millions of patients who suffer from chronic pain syndromes, including syndromes in which the pain originates from peripheral nerve, nerve root, spinal cord, bone, muscle, and disc.

  12. Maintenance of Pain in Children with Functional Abdominal Pain

    PubMed Central

    Czyzewski, Danita I.; Self, Mariella M.; Williams, Amy E.; Weidler, Erica M.; Blatz, Allison M.; Shulman, Robert J.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives A significant proportion of children with functional abdominal pain develop chronic pain. Identifying clinical characteristics predicting pain persistence is important in targeting interventions. We examined whether child anxiety and/or pain-stooling relations were related to maintenance of abdominal pain frequency and compared the predictive value of three methods for assessing pain-stooling relations (i.e., diary, parent report, child report). Methods Seventy-six children (7–10-years-old at baseline) who presented for medical treatment of functional abdominal pain were followed up 18–24 months later. Baseline anxiety and abdominal pain-stooling relations based on pain and stooling diaries and child- and parent-questionnaires were examined in relationship to the persistence of abdominal pain frequency. Results Children’s baseline anxiety was not related to persistence of pain frequency. However, children who displayed irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) symptoms at baseline maintained pain frequency at follow-up, whereas in children in whom there was no relationship between pain and stooling, pain frequency decreased. Pain and stool diaries and parent report of pain-stooling relations were predictive of pain persistence but child-report questionnaires were not. Conclusions The presence of IBS symptoms in school age children with functional abdominal pain appears to predict persistence of abdominal pain over time, while anxiety does not. Prospective pain and stooling diaries and parent report of IBS symptoms were predictors of pain maintenance, but child report of symptoms was not. PMID:26301615

  13. Pain and functional imaging.

    PubMed Central

    Ingvar, M

    1999-01-01

    Functional neuroimaging has fundamentally changed our knowledge about the cerebral representation of pain. For the first time it has been possible to delineate the functional anatomy of different aspects of pain in the medial and lateral pain systems in the brain. The rapid developments in imaging methods over the past years have led to a consensus in the description of the central pain responses between different studies and also to a definition of a central pain matrix with specialized subfunctions in man. In the near future we will see studies where a systems perspective allows for a better understanding of the regulatory mechanisms in the higher-order frontal and parietal cortices. Also, pending the development of experimental paradigms, the functional anatomy of the emotional aspects of pain will become better known. PMID:10466155

  14. [Buttocks sciatic pain].

    PubMed

    Labat, J-J; Robert, R; Riant, T; Louppe, J-M; Lucas, O; Hamel, O

    2009-10-01

    Confusion between radicular and nerve trunk syndrome is not rare. With sciatic pain, any nerve trunk pain or an atypical nerve course should suggest nerve trunk pain of the sciatic nerve in the buttocks. The usual reflex with sciatic pain is vertebral-radicular conflict. The absence of spinal symptoms and the beginning of pain in the buttocks and not in the lumbar region should reorient the etiologic search. Once a tumor of the nerve trunk has been ruled out (rarely responsible for pain other than that caused by tumor pressure), a myofascial syndrome should be explored searching for clinical, electrophysiological, and radiological evidence of compression of the sciatic trunk by the piriform muscle but also the obturator internus muscle. Hamstring syndrome may be confused with this syndrome. Treatment is first and foremost physical therapy. Failures can be treated with classical CT-guided infiltrations with botulinum toxin. Surgery should only be entertained when all these solutions have failed.

  15. Abdominal pain - children under age 12

    MedlinePlus

    Stomach pain in children; Pain - abdomen - children; Abdominal cramps in children; Belly ache in children ... When your child complains of abdominal pain, see if they can describe ... kinds of pain: Generalized pain or pain over more than half ...

  16. Characterizing individual painDETECT symptoms by average pain severity

    PubMed Central

    Sadosky, Alesia; Koduru, Vijaya; Bienen, E Jay; Cappelleri, Joseph C

    2016-01-01

    Background painDETECT is a screening measure for neuropathic pain. The nine-item version consists of seven sensory items (burning, tingling/prickling, light touching, sudden pain attacks/electric shock-type pain, cold/heat, numbness, and slight pressure), a pain course pattern item, and a pain radiation item. The seven-item version consists only of the sensory items. Total scores of both versions discriminate average pain-severity levels (mild, moderate, and severe), but their ability to discriminate individual item severity has not been evaluated. Methods Data were from a cross-sectional, observational study of six neuropathic pain conditions (N=624). Average pain severity was evaluated using the Brief Pain Inventory-Short Form, with severity levels defined using established cut points for distinguishing mild, moderate, and severe pain. The Wilcoxon rank sum test was followed by ridit analysis to represent the probability that a randomly selected subject from one average pain-severity level had a more favorable outcome on the specific painDETECT item relative to a randomly selected subject from a comparator severity level. Results A probability >50% for a better outcome (less severe pain) was significantly observed for each pain symptom item. The lowest probability was 56.3% (on numbness for mild vs moderate pain) and highest probability was 76.4% (on cold/heat for mild vs severe pain). The pain radiation item was significant (P<0.05) and consistent with pain symptoms, as well as with total scores for both painDETECT versions; only the pain course item did not differ. Conclusion painDETECT differentiates severity such that the ability to discriminate average pain also distinguishes individual pain item severity in an interpretable manner. Pain-severity levels can serve as proxies to determine treatment effects, thus indicating probabilities for more favorable outcomes on pain symptoms. PMID:27555789

  17. Low-back pain.

    PubMed

    Violante, Francesco S; Mattioli, Stefano; Bonfiglioli, Roberta

    2015-01-01

    Low-back pain is one of the most common painful conditions experienced by humans throughout their life. Some occupational risk factors (namely, heavy manual material handling) may also contribute to the development of low-back pain: due to the high prevalence of both low-back pain and manual material handling in the adult working population, it has been estimated that low-back pain is probably the most common occupational disorder worldwide. Lifetime prevalence of low-back pain has been reported to be as high as 84%, depending on the case definition used, and no age group is spared, even children. Although low-back pain is not a lethal condition, it was estimated at the third rank among all diseases by disability-adjusted life-years in 2010 in the USA, after ischemic heart disease and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, and at the first rank by years lived with disability. It also ranked high (13th) globally for the same year, in disability-adjusted life-years. Low-back pain is currently classified as nonspecific/specific as to putative cause and as acute (lasting less than 6 weeks), subacute (6-12 weeks), or chronic (more than 12 weeks) according to duration of symptoms. The distinction between nonspecific/specific and acute/subacute/chronic low-back pain is useful not only for epidemiologic studies, but also (mainly) for choosing the appropriate strategy for the diagnosis and treatment of the disorder. Workplace risk factors for low-back pain include manual lifting and whole-body vibration exposure. This chapter will provide an overview of modern concepts of low-back pain (in general) and will then outline some distinctive features of work-related low-back pain.

  18. Cancer and orofacial pain

    PubMed Central

    Salvemini, Daniela

    2016-01-01

    Background Cancer pain is a devastating condition. Pain in the orofacial region, may be present as the single symptom of cancer or as a symptom of cancer in its later stages. This manuscript revises in a comprehensive manner the content of the conference entitled “Orofacial Pain and Cancer” (Dolor Orofacial y Cancer) given at the VI Simposio International “Advances in Oral Cancer” on the 22 July, 2016 in Donostia. Material and Methods We have reviewed (pubmed-medline) from the most relevant literature including reviews, systematic reviews and clinical cases, the significant and evidence-based mechanisms and mediators of cancer-associated facial pain, the diverse types of cancers that can be present in the craniofacial region locally or from distant sites that can refer to the orofacial region, cancer therapy that may induce pain in the orofacial region as well as discussed some of the new advancements in cancer pain therapy. Results There is still a lack of understanding of cancer pain pathophysiology since depends of the intrinsic heterogeneity, type and anatomic location that the cancer may present, making more challenging the creation of better therapeutic options. Orofacial pain can arise from regional or distant tumor effects or as a consequence of cancer therapy. Conclusions The clinician needs to be aware that the pain may present the characteristics of any other orofacial pain disorder so a careful differential diagnosis needs to be given. Cancer pain diagnosis is made by exclusion and only can be reached after a thorough medical history, and all the common etiologies have been carefully investigated and ruled out. The current management tools are not optimal but there is hope for new, safer and effective therapies coming in the next years. Key words:Pain, orofacial, facial, cancer. PMID:27694791

  19. Painful Boney Metastases

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Howard S.

    2013-01-01

    Boney metastasis may lead to terrible suffering from debilitating pain. The most likely malignancies that spread to bone are prostate, breast, and lung. Painful osseous metastases are typically associated with multiple episodes of breakthrough pain which may occur with activities of daily living, weight bearing, lifting, coughing, and sneezing. Almost half of these breakthrough pain episodes are rapid in onset and short in duration and 44% of episodes are unpredictable. Treatment strategies include: analgesic approaches with "triple opioid therapy", bisphosphonates, chemotherapeutic agents, hormonal therapy, interventional and surgical approaches, steroids, radiation (external beam radiation, radiopharmaceuticals), ablative techniques (radiofrequency ablation, cryoablation), and intrathecal analgesics. PMID:23861996

  20. Athletes' leg pains.

    PubMed Central

    Orava, S.; Puranen, J.

    1979-01-01

    The frequency and nature of exertion pains of the leg in athletes were studied in 2,750 cases of overuse injuries treated at the Sports Clinic of the Deaconess Institute of Oulu, Finland, during the years 1972-1977. 465 cases of exertion pain (18%) were located in the shin. The medial tibial syndrome was the most common overuse injury among these athletes, comprising 9.5% of all exertion injuries and 60% of the leg exertion pains. Together with stress fracture of the tibia, the second most common exertion pain of the leg, it accounted for 75% of the total leg pains. There are certain difficulties in differentiating between the medial tibial syndrome and stress fracture of the tibia. They both occur at the same site with similar symptoms. Radiological examination and isotope scanning are needed. The medial tibial syndrome is an overuse injury at the medial tibial border caused by running exercises. The pain is elicited by exertional ischaemia. The pathogenesis is explained by increased pressure in the fascial compartment of the deep flexor muscles due to prolonged exercise. Similar chronic ischaemic pains from exercise are also found in other fascial compartments of the leg, especially in the anterior compartment. The only treatment needed for stress fractures is rest from training. Fascial compartment pains also usually subside. If chronic fascial syndromes prevent training, fasciotomy is recommended as a reliable method to restore the athlete to normal training without pains. PMID:486888

  1. Patellofemoral pain syndrome.

    PubMed

    Collado, Hervé; Fredericson, Michael

    2010-07-01

    Patellofemoral pain (PFP) syndrome is a frequently encountered overuse disorder that involves the patellofemoral region and often presents as anterior knee pain. PFP can be difficult to diagnose. Not only do the etiology, diagnosis, and treatment remain challenging, but the terminology used to describe PFP is used inconsistently and can be confusing. Patellofemoral pain syndrome (PFPS) seems to be multifactorial, resulting from a complex interaction among intrinsic anatomic and external training factors. Although clinicians frequently make the diagnosis of PFPS, no consensus exists about its etiology or the factors most responsible for causing pain. This article discusses the pathophysiology, diagnosis, and management of PFP.

  2. Pain management in ferrets.

    PubMed

    van Oostrom, Hugo; Schoemaker, Nico J; Uilenreef, Joost J

    2011-01-01

    The growing popularity of ferrets as pets has created the demand for advanced veterinary care for these patients. Pain is associated with a broad range of conditions, including acute or chronic inflammatory disease, neoplasia, and trauma, as well as iatrogenic causes, such as surgery and diagnostic procedures. Effective pain management requires knowledge and skills to assess pain, good understanding of the pathophysiology of pain, and general knowledge of pharmacologic and pharmacodynamic principles. Unfortunately, scientific studies on efficacy, pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics, and safety of analgesic drugs in the ferret are limited. However, basic rules on the treatment of pain and mechanisms of action, safety, and efficacy of analgesic drugs in other species can be adapted and applied to pain management in ferrets. This article aims to make an inventory of what is known on the recognition of pain in ferrets, what analgesic drugs are currently used in ferrets, and how they can be adopted in a patient-orientated pain management plan to provide effective pain relief while reducing and monitoring for unwanted side effects.

  3. Outpatient Pain Rehabilitation Programs

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Joseph J

    2006-01-01

    Outpatient pain rehabilitation programs that include an interdisciplinary approach have been shown to be effective treatments for patients with chronic pain. The objectives of this article are to describe the common interdisciplinary pain rehabilitation programs available, the appropriate indications for use, the components of typical pain rehabilitation programs, the short-term and long-term success rates, the costs of attending these programs, and the significant societal costs of those patients who do not complete these programs and do not return to work. PMID:16789457

  4. Myofascial pelvic pain.

    PubMed

    Spitznagle, Theresa Monaco; Robinson, Caitlin McCurdy

    2014-09-01

    Individuals with pelvic pain commonly present with complaints of pain located anywhere below the umbilicus radiating to the top of their thighs or genital region. The somatovisceral convergence that occurs within the pelvic region exemplifies why examination of not only the organs but also the muscles, connective tissues (fascia), and neurologic input to the region should be performed for women with pelvic pain. The susceptibility of the pelvic floor musculature to the development of myofascial pain has been attributed to unique functional demands of this muscle. Conservative interventions should be considered to address the impairments found on physical examination.

  5. Effects of long-term wearing of high-heeled shoes on the control of the body's center of mass motion in relation to the center of pressure during walking.

    PubMed

    Chien, Hui-Lien; Lu, Tung-Wu; Liu, Ming-Wei

    2014-04-01

    High-heeled shoes are associated with instability and falling, leading to injuries such as fracture and ankle sprain. This study investigated the effects of habitual wearing of high-heeled shoes on the body's center of mass (COM) motion relative to the center of pressure (COP) during gait. Fifteen female experienced wearers and 15 matched controls walked with high-heeled shoes (7.3cm) while kinematic and ground reaction force data were measured and used to calculate temporal-distance parameters, joint moments, COM-COP inclination angles (IA) and the rate of IA changes (RCIA). Compared with inexperienced wearers, experienced subjects showed significantly reduced frontal IA with increased ankle pronator moments during single-limb support (p<0.05). During double-limb support (DLS), they showed significantly increased magnitudes of the frontal RCIA at toe-off and contralateral heel-strike, and reduced DLS time (p<0.05) but unaltered mean RCIA over DLS. In the sagittal plane experienced wearers showed significantly increased mean RCIA (p<0.05) and significant differences in the RCIA at toe-off and contralateral heel-strike (p<0.05). Significantly increased hip flexor moments and knee extensor moments at toe-off (p<0.05) were needed for forward motion of the trailing limb. The current results identified the change in the balance control in females after long-term use of high-heeled shoes, providing a basis for future design of strategies to minimize the risk of falling during high-heeled gait.

  6. Fatigue Fracture of the Calcaneus: From Early Diagnosis to Treatment: A Case Report of a Triathlon Athlete.

    PubMed

    Serrano, Simão; Figueiredo, Pedro; Páscoa Pinheiro, João

    2016-06-01

    Stress fractures are frequently underdiagnosed and undertreated despite being common in sports. Early diagnosis is crucial; therefore, a high index of clinical suspicion is required. Complementary examinations are essential for diagnosis and follow-up. The authors report a clinical case of a young adult triathlon athlete referring mechanical pain in the rear left foot, with 2 weeks' progression. An earlier increase in daily training intensity was recorded. Complementary examinations confirmed a calcaneal fatigue fracture. Immobilization and no weight bearing were introduced for an initial period of 4 weeks, and the rehabilitation process was started. Progressive weight bearing was introduced between fourth and eighth weeks. Sports activity started at the 12th week. Boundaries to sports activity were eliminated by the 24th week, without pain or functional limitation. Repetitive overload to the heel and intense axial weight bearing in association to repetitive concentric/eccentric gastrocnemius contraction are related to calcaneal stress fracture, the second most common stress fracture in the foot. Calcaneal stress fractures can be adequately treated with activity modification, without casting or surgical intervention. When in the presence of bilateral stress fractures, metabolic and nutritional issues must be considered. The case report highlights the importance of sports medicine examination for detecting intrinsic and extrinsic fatigue fracture risk factors.

  7. Native American lithic procurement along the international border in the boot heel region of southwestern New Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeigler, K. E.; Hogan, P.; Hughes, C.; Kurota, A.

    2011-06-01

    Multidisciplinary field projects can be very useful to a more fundamental understanding of the world around us, though these projects are not as common as they should be. In particular, the combination of archeology and geology combines our understanding of human behavior and human use of the landscape with an intimate knowledge of geologic processes and the materials available for human use in order to gain a broader understanding of human-Earth interaction. Here we present data from a cross-disciplinary project that uses a common dataset, archeological artifacts, to explore the anthropological and geologic implications of useage patterns. Archeological excavations and surveys conducted by the Office of Contract Archeology in 2007 along the route of the proposed international border fence reveal patterns of use of geologic materials by Archaic, Formative and Protohistoric Native Americans in the Boot Heel of southwestern New Mexico. Thousands of artifacts were recorded in multiple sites from Guadalupe Pass in the southern Peloncillo Mountains to the Carrizalillo Hills west of Columbus. We identified the lithologies of artifacts, ranging from projectile points to groundstones, and then constructed material movement maps based on either known procurement sites ("quarries") or outcrops identified as the closest source to a given site for each lithology. Not unexpectedly, the majority of the rock types utilized by native peoples are local siliceous volcanic materials. However, several artifacts constructed from obsidian were transported into the region from northern Mexico and eastern Arizona, indicating long-distance travel and/or trade routes. We also examine useage pattern difference between Archaic, Formative and Protohistoric sites. Additionally, a dramatic change in distribution of sources for geologic materials occurs between one pre-Spanish site and one post-Spanish site that are adjacent to one another.

  8. Native American lithic procurement along the international border in the boot heel region of southwestern New Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeigler, K. E.; Hughes, C.; Kurota, A.; Hogan, P.

    2010-12-01

    Multidisciplinary field projects can be very useful to a more fundamental understanding of the world around us, though these projects are not as common as they should be. In particular, the combination of archeology and geology combines our understanding of human behavior and human use of the landscape with an intimate knowledge of geologic processes and the materials available for human use in order to gain a broader understanding of human-Earth interaction. Here we present data from a cross-disciplinary project that uses a common dataset, archeological artifacts, to explore the anthropological and geologic implications of useage patterns. Archeological excavations and surveys conducted by the Office of Contract Archeology in 2007 along the route of the proposed international border fence reveal patterns of use of geologic materials by Archaic, Formative and Protohistoric Native Americans in the Boot Heel of southwestern New Mexico. Thousands of artifacts were recorded in multiple sites from Guadalupe Pass in the southern Peloncillo Mountains to the Carrizalillo Hills west of Columbus. We identified the lithologies of artifacts, ranging from projectile points to groundstones, and then constructed material movement maps based on either known procurement sites ("quarries") or outcrops identified as the closest source to a given site for each lithology. Not unexpectedly, the majority of the rock types utilized by native peoples are local siliceous volcanic materials. However, several artifacts constructed from obsidian were transported into the region from northern Mexico and eastern Arizona, indicating long-distance travel and/or trade routes. We also examine useage pattern difference between Archaic, Formative and Protohistoric sites. Additionally, a dramatic change in distribution of sources for geologic materials occurs between one pre-Spanish site and one post-Spanish site that are adjacent to one another.

  9. Utilization of the MPI Process for in-tank solidification of heel material in large-diameter cylindrical tanks

    SciTech Connect

    Kauschinger, J.L.; Lewis, B.E.

    2000-01-01

    A major problem faced by the US Department of Energy is remediation of sludge and supernatant waste in underground storage tanks. Exhumation of the waste is currently the preferred remediation method. However, exhumation cannot completely remove all of the contaminated materials from the tanks. For large-diameter tanks, amounts of highly contaminated ``heel'' material approaching 20,000 gal can remain. Often sludge containing zeolite particles leaves ``sand bars'' of locally contaminated material across the floor of the tank. The best management practices for in-tank treatment (stabilization and immobilization) of wastes require an integrated approach to develop appropriate treatment agents that can be safely delivered and mixed uniformly with sludge. Ground Environmental Services has developed and demonstrated a remotely controlled, high-velocity jet delivery system termed, Multi-Point-Injection (MPI). This robust jet delivery system has been field-deployed to create homogeneous monoliths containing shallow buried miscellaneous waste in trenches [fiscal year (FY) 1995] and surrogate sludge in cylindrical (FY 1998) and long, horizontal tanks (FY 1999). During the FY 1998 demonstration, the MPI process successfully formed a 32-ton uniform monolith of grout and waste surrogates in about 8 min. Analytical data indicated that 10 tons of zeolite-type physical surrogate were uniformly mixed within a 40-in.-thick monolith without lifting the MPI jetting tools off the tank floor. Over 1,000 lb of cohesive surrogates, with consistencies similar to Gunite and Associated Tank (GAAT) TH-4 and Hanford tank sludges, were easily intermixed into the monolith without exceeding a core temperature of 100 F during curing.

  10. Cognitive behavioral therapy for back pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... back pain - cognitive behavioral; Backache - chronic - cognitive behavioral; Lumbar pain - chronic - cognitive behavioral; Pain - back - chronic - cognitive behavioral; Chronic back pain - low - cognitive behavioral

  11. Management of painful neuropathies.

    PubMed

    Brix Finnerup, Nanna; Hein Sindrup, Søren; Staehelin Jensen, Troels

    2013-01-01

    Neuropathic pain is the most common type of pain in neuropathy. In painful polyneuropathies the pain usually has a "glove and stocking" distribution. The pain may be predominantly spontaneous, e.g., with a burning, pricking, or shooting character or characterized by evoked pain such as mechanical or cold allodynia. In the clinical setting, the prevention of painful neuropathies and treatment of underlying neuropathy remains inadequate and thus symptomatic treatment of the pain and related disability needs to be offered. Most randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trials (RCTs) published in painful neuropathy have been conducted in patients with diabetes and to what extent a treatment which is found effective in painful diabetic polyneuropathy can be expected to relieve other conditions like chemotherapy- or HIV-induced neuropathy is unknown. Tricyclic antidepressants (TCAs), gabapentin, pregabalin, and serotonin noradrenaline reuptake inhibitors (SNRIs) are first drug choices. In patients with localized neuropathic pain, a topical lidocaine patch may also be considered. Second-line treatments are tramadol and other opioids. New types of treatment include botulinum toxin type A (BTX-A), high-dose capsaicin patches, and cannabinoids. Other types of anticonvulsant drugs such as lamotrigine, oxcarbazepine, and lacosamide have a more questionable efficacy in painful polyneuropathy but may have an effect in a subgroup of patients. Combination therapy may be considered in patients with insufficient effect from one drug. Treatment is usually a trial-and-error process and has to be individualized to the single patient, taking into account all comorbidities such as possible concomitant depression, anxiety, diseases, and drug interactions. Side-effects to antidepressants include dry mouth, nausea, constipation, orthostatic hypotension, and sedation. ECG should always be obtained prior to treatment with TCAs, which also should not be used in patients with cardiac

  12. Back Pain at Work: Preventing Pain and Injury

    MedlinePlus

    ... pain are steps in the right direction. References Low back pain fact sheet. National Institute of Neurological Disorders and ... backpain/detail_backpain.htm. Accessed March 30, 2016. Low back pain. American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons. http://orthoinfo.aaos. ...

  13. The pain management approach to chronic pelvic pain.

    PubMed

    Rapkin, A J; Kames, L D

    1987-05-01

    Chronic pelvic pain remains a difficult management problem that is often refractory to traditional medical or surgical therapy. The pain management center approach used successfully for the treatment of cancer pain and headache can be adapted to the treatment of chronic pelvic pain. The results of this pilot study suggest that the multidisciplinary techniques of pain management promise to be an effective modality for the treatment of chronic pelvic pain.

  14. Chronic pain after childbirth.

    PubMed

    Landau, R; Bollag, L; Ortner, C

    2013-04-01

    With over four million deliveries annually in the United States alone and a constant increase in cesarean delivery rate, childbirth is likely to have a huge impact on the occurrence of acute and possibly chronic postpartum pain. Recent awareness that chronic pain may occur after childbirth has prompted clinicians and researchers to investigate this topic. Current evidence points towards a relatively low incidence of chronic pain after cesarean delivery, with rates ranging between 1% and 18%. To provide a potential mechanistic explanation for the relatively low occurrence of chronic pain after cesarean delivery compared with that after other types of surgery, it has been proposed that endogenous secretion of oxytocin may confer specific protection. Clinical interventions to reduce the incidence and severity of chronic post-surgical pain have not been consistently effective. Likely explanations are that the drugs that have been investigated were truly ineffective or that the effect was too modest because with a low incidence of chronic pain, studies were likely to be underpowered and failed to demonstrate an effect. In addition, since not all women require preventive therapies, preoperative testing that may identify women vulnerable to pain may be highly beneficial. Further research is needed to identify valid models that predict persistent pain to allow targeted interventions to women most likely to benefit from more tailored anti-hyperalgesic therapies.

  15. Regional cancer pain syndromes.

    PubMed

    Chang, Victor T; Janjan, Nora; Jain, Subash; Chau, Chi

    2006-12-01

    Cancer pain often presents in a body region. This review summarizes articles from 1999-2004 relevant to cancer pain syndromes in the head and neck, chest, back, abdomen, pelvis, and limbs. Although the evidence is limited, progress is being made in further development of the evidence base to support and guide current practice.

  16. Pain and palliative medicine.

    PubMed

    Chang, Victor T; Sorger, Brooke; Rosenfeld, Kenneth E; Lorenz, Karl A; Bailey, Amos F; Bui, Trinh; Weinberger, Lawrence; Montagnini, Marcos

    2007-01-01

    Severe pain is highly prevalent, with rates of 40% to 70% in patients with advanced cancer, liver disease, heart failure, human immunodeficiency virus, and renal failure. Wide variations in pain assessment and reporting methods and the measurement of multiple symptoms should be addressed in future studies. Regarding psychological approaches, determining whether hypnotherapy or other individual psychotherapeutic interventions reduce pain and/or psychological distress in a palliative care population is difficult. Interest is increasing in the concept of demoralization syndromes and the role of posttraumatic stress disorder in modulating responses to pain at the end of life. We review evidence from multiple studies that the use of rehabilitative therapy improves functional status and pain control among patients with advanced cancer, and we raise the possibility that rehabilitation therapy will be helpful in patients with other advanced diseases. We summarize ongoing clinical trials of electronic order sets, clinical care pathways, and care management pathways to improve pain management in palliative care. Wagner's Chronic Illness Model provides a way of analyzing how healthcare systems can be changed to provide adequate and continuing pain management in palliative care. Much work remains to ensure that pain is recognized, treated, and monitored effectively.

  17. Counseling for Pain Control

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Espin, Olivia M.; Ganikos, Mary L.

    1975-01-01

    New techniques are being developed that enhance the effectiveness of psychological forces in controlling bodily reactions. All of them are powerful tools for the psychological control of pain. This article reviews such techniques and addresses itself to the contributions that counselors can make to alleviate physical pain. (Author)

  18. Chemical Interventions for Pain.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aronoff, Gerald M.; And Others

    1986-01-01

    Reviews properties and pharmacological effects of medications for pain, including peripherally acting analgesics, centrally acting narcotics, and adjuvant analgesics including antidepressants. Discusses the role of the endogenous opioid system in pain and depression. Explores clinical management issues in both inpatient and outpatient settings,…

  19. Pain description and severity of chronic orofacial pain conditions.

    PubMed

    Vickers, E R; Cousins, M J; Woodhouse, A

    1998-12-01

    A multidisciplinary pain centre study of 120 consecutive chronic orofacial pain patients assessed pain description and intensity ratings, gender differences, prevalence of concurrent conditions, and interinstrument relationships of the McGill Pain Questionnaire and visual analogue scale. Pain words chosen by patients to describe conditions were predominantly sensory words, and patients with concurrent conditions often listed words indicating a substantial affective component. Results showed pain intensity ratings of chronic orofacial pain conditions have similar or higher pain ratings when compared with other medical chronic pain conditions such as back pain, cancer pain and arthritis. There was a significantly higher female: male ratio (88:32) with gender playing an important but poorly understood causal role. The most frequent condition diagnosed was atypical facial pain (n = 40), followed by temporomandibular disorder (n = 32), atypical odontalgia (n = 29) and pathology of the orofacial region (n = 19). Temporomandibular disorder was present in 75 of the 120 subjects, as the sole pain complaint (n = 32) or as an associated secondary condition (n = 43), indicating concurrent pain conditions exist and may be related. There were significantly higher total pain scores of the McGill Pain Questionnaire in patients with multiple conditions compared with patients with a single condition. The visual analogue scale showed a significant correlation to the number of words chosen index of the McGill Pain Questionnaire for orofacial pain.

  20. Early visceral pain predicts chronic pain after laparoscopic cholecystectomy.

    PubMed

    Blichfeldt-Eckhardt, Morten Rune; Ording, Helle; Andersen, Claus; Licht, Peter B; Toft, Palle

    2014-11-01

    Chronic pain after laparoscopic cholecystectomy is related to postoperative pain during the first postoperative week, but it is unknown which components of the early pain response is important. In this prospective study, 100 consecutive patients were examined preoperatively, 1 week postoperatively, and 3, 6, and 12 months postoperatively for pain, psychological factors, and signs of hypersensitivity. Overall pain, incisional pain (somatic pain component), deep abdominal pain (visceral pain component), and shoulder pain (referred pain component) were registered on a 100-mm visual analogue scale during the first postoperative week. Nine patients developed chronic unexplained pain 12 months postoperatively. In a multivariate analysis model, cumulated visceral pain during the first week and number of preoperative biliary pain attacks were identified as independent risk factors for unexplained chronic pain 12 months postoperatively. There were no consistent signs of hypersensitivity in the referred pain area either pre- or postoperatively. There were no significant associations to any other variables examined. The risk of chronic pain after laparoscopic cholecystectomy is relatively low, but significantly related to the visceral pain response during the first postoperative week.