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Sample records for helen orav-kotta velda

  1. Helen Keller: A Remembrance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lowenfeld, Berthold

    1980-01-01

    A well-known educator and author in the field of work with the blind recalls times he spent with Helen Keller, including her visit to the California School for the Blind, where he was superintendent, for the consecration of the Helen Keller Building. (Author/SBH)

  2. Mt. St. Helens Memories.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sharp, Len

    1992-01-01

    Provides a personal account of one science teacher's participation in a teacher workshop in which teachers learned about volcanic development, types of eruption, geomorphology, plate tectonics, volcano monitoring, and hazards created by volcanoes by examining Mt. St. Helens. Provides a graphic identifying volcanoes active since 1975. (MDH)

  3. The Helen of Geometry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martin, John

    2010-01-01

    The cycloid has been called the Helen of Geometry, not only because of its beautiful properties but also because of the quarrels it provoked between famous mathematicians of the 17th century. This article surveys the history of the cycloid and its importance in the development of the calculus.

  4. Who's Helen Keller?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hubbard, Ruth Shagoury

    2003-01-01

    Helen Keller was someone who worked throughout her long life to achieve social change; she was an integral part of many important social movements in the 20th century. Her life story could serve as a fascinating example for children, but most picture books about Keller are silent about her life's work. In this article, the author examines the…

  5. Mount St. Helens Flyover

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    This Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) image of Mt. St. Helens volcano in Washington State was acquired on August 8, 2000 and covers an area of 37 by 51 km. Mount Saint Helens, a volcano in the Cascade Range of southwestern Washington that had been dormant since 1857, began to show signs of renewed activity in early 1980. On 18 May 1980, it erupted with such violence that the top of the mountain was blown off, spewing a cloud of ash and gases that rose to an altitude of 19 kilometers. The blast killed about 60 people and destroyed all life in an area of some 180 square kilometers (some 70 square miles), while a much larger area was covered with ash and debris. It continues to spit forth ash and steam intermittently. As a result of the eruption, the mountain's elevation decreased from 2,950 meters to 2,549 meters. The simulated fly-over was produced by draping ASTER visible and near infrared image data over a digital topography model, created from ASTER's 3-D stereo bands. The color was computer enhanced to create a 'natural' color image, where the vegetation appears green. The topography has been exaggerated 2 times to enhance the appearance of the relief. Landsat7 aquired an image of Mt. St. Helens on August 22, 1999. Image and animation courtesy NASA/GSFC/MITI/ERSDAC/JAROS, and U.S./Japan ASTER Science Team.

  6. Mount St. Helens Rebirth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    The catastrophic eruption of Mt. St. Helens 20 years ago today (on May 18, 1980), ranks among the most important natural events of the twentieth century in the United States. Because Mt. St. Helens is in a remote area of the Cascades Mountains, only a few people were killed by the eruption, but property damage and destruction totaled in the billions of dollars. Mount St. Helens is an example of a composite or stratovolcano. These are explosive volcanoes that are generally steep-sided, symmetrical cones built up by the accumulation of debris from previous eruptions and consist of alternating layers of lava flows, volcanic ash and cinder. Some of the most photographed mountains in the world are stratovolcanoes, including Mount Fuji in Japan, Mount Cotopaxi in Ecuador, Mount Hood in Oregon, and Mount Rainier in Washington. The recently erupting Mount Usu on the island of Hokkaido in Japan is also a stratovolcano. Stratovolcanoes are characterized by having plumbing systems that move magma from a chamber deep within the Earth's crust to vents at the surface. The height of Mt. St. Helens was reduced from about 2950 m (9677 ft) to about 2550 m (8364 ft) as a result of the explosive eruption on the morning of May 18. The eruption sent a column of dust and ash upwards more than 25 km into the atmosphere, and shock waves from the blast knocked down almost every tree within 10 km of the central crater. Massive avalanches and mudflows, generated by the near-instantaneous melting of deep snowpacks on the flanks of the mountain, devastated an area more than 20 km to the north and east of the former summit, and rivers choked with all sorts of debris were flooded more than 100 km away. The area of almost total destruction was about 600 sq. km. Ash from the eruption cloud was rapidly blown to the northeast and east producing lightning which started many small forest fires. An erie darkness caused by the cloud enveloped the landscape more than 200 km from the blast area, and ash

  7. Mt. St. Helens

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Figure 1 Movie

    This 3-D anaglyph image of Mt. St. Helens volcano combines the nadir-looking and back-looking band 3 images of ASTER. To view the image in stereo, you will need blue-red glasses. Make sure to look through the red lens with your left eye. Figure 1: This ASTER image of Mt. St. Helens volcano in Washington was acquired on August 8, 2000 and covers an area of 37 by 51 km. Mount Saint Helens, a volcano in the Cascade Range of southwestern Washington that had been dormant since 1857, began to show signs of renewed activity in early 1980. On 18 May 1980, it erupted with such violence that the top of the mountain was blown off, spewing a cloud of ash and gases that rose to an altitude of 19 kilometers. The blast killed about 60 people and destroyed all life in an area of some 180 square kilometers (some 70 square miles), while a much larger area was covered with ash and debris. It continues to spit forth ash and steam intermittently. As a result of the eruption, the mountain's elevation decreased from 2,950 meters to 2,549 meters. The image is centered at 46.2 degrees north latitude, 122.2 degrees west longitude.

    Movie: The simulated fly-over was produced by draping ASTER visible and near infrared image data over a digital topography model, created from ASTER's 3-D stereo bands. The color was computer enhanced to create a natural color image, where the vegetation appears green. The topography has been exaggerated 2 times to enhance the appearance of the relief.

    The U.S. science team is located at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. The Terra mission is part of NASA's Science Mission Directorate.

  8. Rebuilding Mount St. Helens

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schilling, Steve P.; Ramsey, David W.; Messerich, James A.; Thompson, Ren A.

    2006-01-01

    On May 18, 1980, Mount St. Helens, Washington exploded in a spectacular and devastating eruption that shocked the world. The eruption, one of the most powerful in the history of the United States, removed 2.7 cubic kilometers of rock from the volcano's edifice, the bulk of which had been constructed by nearly 4,000 years of lava-dome-building eruptions. In seconds, the mountain's summit elevation was lowered from 2,950 meters to 2,549 meters, leaving a north-facing, horseshoe-shaped crater over 2 kilometers wide. Following the 1980 eruption, Mount St. Helens remained active. A large lava dome began episodically extruding in the center of the volcano's empty crater. This dome-building eruption lasted until 1986 and added about 80 million cubic meters of rock to the volcano. During the two decades following the May 18, 1980 eruption, Crater Glacier formed tongues of ice around the east and west sides of the lava dome in the deeply shaded niche between the lava dome and the south crater wall. Long the most active volcano in the Cascade Range with a complex 300,000-year history, Mount St. Helens erupted again in the fall of 2004 as a new period of dome building began within the 1980 crater. Between October 2004 and February 2006, about 80 million cubic meters of dacite lava erupted immediately south of the 1980-86 lava dome. The erupting lava separated the glacier into two parts, first squeezing the east arm of the glacier against the east crater wall and then causing equally spectacular crevassing and broad uplift of the glacier's west arm. Vertical aerial photographs document dome growth and glacier deformation. These photographs enabled photogrammetric construction of a series of high-resolution digital elevation models (DEMs) showing changes from October 4, 2004 to February 9, 2006. From the DEMs, Geographic Information Systems (GIS) applications were used to estimate extruded volumes and growth rates of the new lava dome. The DEMs were also used to quantify dome

  9. Helene: A Plastic Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Umurhan, O. M.; Moore, J. M.; Howard, A. D.; Schenk, P.; White, O. L.

    2014-12-01

    Helene, the Saturnian L4 Trojan satellite co-orbiting Dionne and sitting within the E-ring, possesses an unusual morphology characteristic of broad km-scale basins and depressions and a generally smooth surface patterned with streaks and grooves which are indicative of non-typical mass transport. Elevation angles do not appear to exceed 10o at most. The nature and origin of the surface materials forming these grooved patterns is unknown. Given the low surface gravity (<5mm/s2), it hard to imagine how such transport features can come about with such low grades and surface gravities. Preliminary examinations of classical linear and nonlinear mass wasting mechanisms do not appear to reproduce these curious features. A suite of hypothesis that we examine is the possibility that the fine grain material on the surface has been either (i) accreted or (ii) generated as refractory detritus resulting from sublimation of the icy bedrock, and that these materials subsequently mass-waste like a non-Newtonian highly non-linear creeping flow. Modifying the landform evolution model MARSSIM to handle two new mass-wasting mechanism, the first due to glacial-like flow via Glen's Law and the second due to plastic-like flow like a Bingham fluid, we setup and test a number of likely scenarios to explain the observations. The numerical results qualitatively indicate that treating the mass-wasting materials as a Bingham material reproduces many of the qualitative features observed. We also find that in those simulations in which accretion is concomitant with Bingham mass-wasting, the long time-evolution of the surface flow shows intermittency in the total surface activity (defined as total surface integral of the absolute magnitude of the mass-flux). Detailed analyses identify the locations where this activity is most pronounced and we will discuss these and its implications in further detail.

  10. Mount St. Helens

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    This Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) image of Mount St. Helens was captured one week after the March 8, 2005, ash and steam eruption, the latest activity since the volcano's reawakening in September 2004. The new lava dome in the southeast part of the crater is clearly visible, highlighted by red areas where ASTER's infrared channels detected hot spots from incandescent lava. The new lava dome is 155 meters (500 feet) higher than the old lava dome, and still growing.

    With its 14 spectral bands from the visible to the thermal infrared wavelength region, and its high spatial resolution of 15 to 90 meters (about 50 to 300 feet), ASTER images Earth to map and monitor the changing surface of our planet.

    ASTER is one of five Earth-observing instruments launched December 18, 1999, on NASA's Terra satellite. The instrument was built by Japan's Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry. A joint U.S./Japan science team is responsible for validation and calibration of the instrument and the data products.

    The broad spectral coverage and high spectral resolution of ASTER provides scientists in numerous disciplines with critical information for surface mapping, and monitoring of dynamic conditions and temporal change. Example applications are: monitoring glacial advances and retreats; monitoring potentially active volcanoes; identifying crop stress; determining cloud morphology and physical properties; wetlands evaluation; thermal pollution monitoring; coral reef degradation; surface temperature mapping of soils and geology; and measuring surface heat balance.

    The U.S. science team is located at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. The Terra mission is part of NASA's Science Mission Directorate.

    Size: 21.9 by 24.4 kilometers (13.6 by 15.1 miles) Location: 46.2 degrees North latitude, 122.2 degrees West longitude Orientation: North at top Image Data: ASTER bands 8, 3, and 1 Original Data Resolution

  11. Mount Saint Helens aerosol evolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oberbeck, V. R.; Farlow, N. H.; Snetsinger, K. G.; Ferry, G. V.; Fong, W.; Hayes, D. M.

    1982-01-01

    Stratospheric aerosol samples were collected using a wire impactor during the year following the eruption of Mt. St. Helens. Analysis of samples shows that aerosol volume increased for 6 months due to gas-to-particle conversion and then decreased to background levels in the following 6 months.

  12. Mount St. Helens aerosol evolution

    SciTech Connect

    Oberbeck, V.R.; Farlow, N.H.

    1982-08-01

    Stratospheric aerosol samples were collected using a wire impactor during the year following the eruption of Mount St. Helens. Analysis of samples shows that aerosol volume increased for 6 months due to gas-to-particle conversion and then decreased to background levels in the following 6 months.

  13. Mount St. Helens aerosol evolution

    SciTech Connect

    Oberbeck, V.R.; Farlow, N.H.; Fong, W.; Snetsinger, K.G.; Ferry, G.V.; Hayes, D.M.

    1982-09-01

    Stratospheric aerosol samples were collected using a wire impactor during the year following the eruption of Mt. St. Helens. Analysis of samples show that aerosol volume increased for 6 months due to gas-to-particle conversion and then decreased to background levels in the following 6 months.

  14. Mount St. Helens: the aftermath

    SciTech Connect

    Flaherty, D.C.

    1983-01-01

    During the May 18, 1980 eruption of Mount St. Helens, ash fell over a 100,000 sq mile area to the east. The Idaho studies showed that, although the ashfall altered the food chains of some forest streams, within a year they fully recovered. The effects of ashfall on lake benthic organisms are still being assessed by sediment sampling. The Montana studies reported on snow avalanche models adapted to mudflows, trophic impact of ash deposits on Montana lakes, and the volcanic ash as nutrient subsidy to sub-alpine lakes. The Oregon studies reported herring and smelt egg and larvae damage due to suspended ash. The drainage patterns in eruption debris were studied along with the filling of Columbia River berths with ash.

  15. Mount St. Helens Volcano, WA, USA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    Mount St. Helens Volcano (46.0N, 122.0W) and its blast zone can be seen in this northeast looking infrared view. Mt. Rainier and Mt. Adams can also be seen in the near area. The Columbia River can be seen at the bottom of the view. When Mt. St. Helens erupted on 18 May 80, the top 1300 ft. disappeared within minutes. The blast area covered an area of more than 150 sq. miles and sent thousands of tons of ash into the upper atmosphere.

  16. Mount St. Helens Classroom Activities: Secondary.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Washington State Educational Service District 112, Vancouver.

    This teacher's guide is designed to provide secondary teachers with an assortment of classroom activities dealing with the Mt. St. Helens eruption of May 18, 1980, in the areas of science, social studies, math, language arts and school newspaper activities. Copy masters and teacher versions of all activities are contained within this guide,…

  17. Mount St. Helens Classroom Activities: Elementary.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Washington State Educational Service District 112, Vancouver.

    This teacher's guide is designed to provide elementary teachers with an assortment of classroom activities dealing with the Mt. St. Helens eruption of May 18, 1980, in the areas of science, social studies, math, language arts, and school newspaper activities. Copy masters and teacher versions of all activities are contained with this guide,…

  18. Mount St. Helens and Kilauea volcanoes

    SciTech Connect

    Barrat, J. )

    1989-01-01

    Mount St. Helens' eruption has taught geologists invaluable lessons about how volcanoes work. Such information will be crucial in saving lives and property when other dormant volcanoes in the northwestern United States--and around the world--reawaken, as geologists predict they someday will. Since 1912, scientists at the U.S. Geological Survey's Hawaiian Volcano Observatory have pioneered the study of volcanoes through work on Mauna Loa and Kilauea volcanoes on the island of Hawaii. In Vancouver, Wash., scientists at the Survey's Cascades Volcano Observatory are studying the after-effects of Mount St. Helens' catalysmic eruption as well as monitoring a number of other now-dormant volcanoes in the western United States. This paper briefly reviews the similarities and differences between the Hawaiian and Washington volcanoes and what these volcanoes are teaching the volcanologists.

  19. Mount St. Helens and Kilauea volcanoes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Barrat, J.

    1989-01-01

    From the south, snow-covered Mount St. Helens looms proudly under a fleecy halo of clouds, rivaling the majestic beauty of neighboring Mount Rainer, Mount Hood, and Mount Adams. Salmon fishermen dot the shores of lakes and streams in the mountain's shadow, trucks loaded with fresh-cut timber barrel down backroads, and deer peer out from stands of tall fir trees. 

  20. 30 Cool Facts about Mount St. Helens

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Driedger, Carolyn; Liz, Westby; Faust, Lisa; Frenzen, Peter; Bennett, Jeanne; Clynne, Michael

    2010-01-01

    Commemorating the 30th anniversary of the 1980 eruptions of Mount St. Helens 1-During the past 4,000 years, Mount St. Helens has erupted more frequently than any other volcano in the Cascade Range. 2-Most of Mount St. Helens is younger than 3,000 years old (younger than the pyramids of Egypt). 3-Some Native American names that refer to smoke at the volcano include- Lawala Clough, Low-We- Lat-Klah, Low-We-Not- Thlat, Loowit, Loo-wit, Loo-wit Lat-kla, and Louwala-Clough. 4-3,600 years ago-Native Americans abandoned hunting grounds devastated by an enormous eruption four times larger than the May 18, 1980 eruption. 5-1792-Captain George Vancouver named the volcano for Britain's ambassador to Spain, Alleyne Fitzherbert, also known as Baron St. Helens. 6-1975-U.S. Geological Survey geologists forecasted that Mount St. Helens would erupt again, 'possibly before the end of the century.' 7-March 20, 1980-A magnitude 4.2 earthquake signaled the reawakening of the volcano after 123 years. 8-Spring 1980-Rising magma pushed the volcano's north flank outward 5 feet per day. 9-Morning of May 18, 1980- The largest terrestrial landslide in recorded history reduced the summit by 1,300 feet and triggered a lateral blast. 10-Within 3 minutes, the lateral blast, traveling at more than 300 miles per hour, blew down and scorched 230 square miles of forest. 11-Within 15 minutes, a vertical plume of volcanic ash rose over 80,000 feet. 12-Afternoon of May 18, 1980-The dense ash cloud turned daylight into darkness in eastern Washington, causing streetlights to turn on in Yakima and Ritzville. 13-The volcanic ash cloud drifted east across the United States in 3 days and encircled Earth in 15 days. 14-Lahars (volcanic mudflows) filled rivers with rocks, sand, and mud, damaging 27 bridges and 200 homes and forcing 31 ships to remain in ports upstream. 15-The May 18, 1980 eruption was the most economically destructive volcanic event in U.S. history. 16-Small plants and trees beneath winter snow

  1. Crossing the Divide: Helen Keller and Yvonne Pitrois Dialogue on Diversity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hartig, Rachel

    2007-01-01

    How do those who are living with a difference most effectively cross the cultural divide and explain themselves to mainstream society? This is a central question raised by Yvonne Pitrois in her biography of Helen Keller, titled "Une nuit rayonnante: Helen Keller" [A Shining Night: Helen Keller]. Helen Keller responded to Pitrois' book in a…

  2. Electrical impact of Mt. St. Helens

    SciTech Connect

    Stemler, G.E.; Batiste, A.R.

    1981-08-01

    Ash fallout from the Mount Saint Helens eruptions affected high-voltage transmission in a four-state area as volatile gases caused conductivity changes and corrosion. The Bonneville Power Authority (BPA) found that it was possible to maintain electric service except for a few short, localized outages. Cleaning ash from transformers and substations was the first priority. Tests were underway within 48 hours to determine ash characteristics and cleaning procedures. A summary to what happened and what was learned is presented in two lists. (DCK)

  3. Obituary: Helen Dodson Prince, 1905-2002

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindner, Rudi Paul

    2009-01-01

    Helen Dodson Prince, a pioneer in the observation of solar flares, a pioneer in women's rise in the profession of astronomy, and a respected and revered educator of future astronomers, died on 4 February 2002 in Arlington, Virginia. Helen Dodson was born in Baltimore, Maryland, on 31 December 1905. Her parents were Helen Walter and Henry Clay Dodson. Helen went to Goucher College in nearby Towson with a full scholarship in mathematics. She turned to astronomy under the influence of a legendary teacher, Professor Florence P. Lewis, and she graduated in 1927. Funded by grants and private charity, she earned the Ph.D. in astronomy at the University of Michigan under the direction of Heber Doust Curtis in 1933. Dodson taught at Wellesley College from 1933 until 1943, when she went on leave to spend the last three years of World War II at the MIT Radiation Laboratory. She returned to Goucher after the war as professor of astronomy and mathematics, and in 1947 she came back to Michigan both as professor of astronomy and staff member of the McMath-Hulbert Observatory, of which she became associate director. In 1976 she retired from Michigan and spent her later years in Alexandria, Virginia. In 1932 Dodson held the Dean Van Meter fellowship from Goucher; in 1954 she received the Annie Jump Cannon Prize from the AAS; and in 1974 The University of Michigan honored her with its Faculty Distinguished Achievement Award. She published over 130 articles, mostly on her research specialty, solar flares. Dodson's interest in the Sun began at Michigan, although her dissertation was, like so many Michigan dissertations of the era, on stellar spectroscopy, "A Study of the Spectrum of 25 Orionis." She came to Michigan during the establishment and growth of the solar observatory at Lake Angelus, the creation of three gifted and industrious amateurs. Heber Curtis fostered the growth of the McMath-Hulbert enterprise and brought it into the University. Dodson's solar activity grew as a

  4. Helen Keller Centers for Deaf-Blind Youth and Adults.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Annals of the Deaf, 2003

    2003-01-01

    This listing provides directory information for the national Helen Keller Center and its 10 regional offices. The centers provide extensive evaluative and rehabilitation services to people who are deaf and blind. (CR)

  5. Mount St. Helens' volcanic ash: hemolytic activity.

    PubMed

    Vallyathan, V; Mentnech, M S; Stettler, L E; Dollberg, D D; Green, F H

    1983-04-01

    Volcanic ash samples from four Mount St. Helens' volcanic eruptions were subjected to mineralogical, analytical, and hemolytic studies in order to evaluate their potential for cytotoxicity and fibrogenicity. Plagioclase minerals constituted the major component of the ash with free crystalline silica concentrations ranging from 1.5 to 7.2%. The in vitro hemolytic activity of the volcanic ash was compared to similar concentrations of cytotoxic and inert minerals. The ash was markedly hemolytic, exhibiting an activity similar to chrysotile asbestos, a known fibrogenic agent. The hemolysis of the different ash samples varied with particle size but not with crystalline silica concentration. The results of these studies taken in conjunction with the results of our animal studies indicate a fibrogenic potential of volcanic ash in heavily exposed humans.

  6. A visit to Mount St. Helens

    SciTech Connect

    Meadows, D.G.

    1994-04-01

    The May 18, 1980, eruption displaced roughly 2.6 km[sup 3] of rock and devastated more than 500 km[sup 2] of forest, mostly to the north of the mountain. Trees within 10--15 km of the mountain peak were burned and uprooted. Beyond that, high winds and flying debris created a blowdown zone. Up to 150 m of rock and ice covered some areas. Accumulations of ash were measured as much as 330 km from the volcano. Mud flows choked nearby rivers and streams. Two years later, the US Congress established the 44,000-hectare Mount St. Helens National Volcanic Monument. The Act essentially directed the USDA Forest Service to allow the area to recover naturally. The paper reviews what changes the ecosystem has been going through since the eruption and the lessons learned that suggest some new resource management techniques.

  7. In the wake of Mount St Helens.

    PubMed

    Nania, J; Bruya, T E

    1982-04-01

    On May 18, 1980, Mount St Helens, Washington State's most active volcano, erupted violently. Volcanic eruptions in recent geologic history have demonstrated tremendous environmental impact and caused significant loss of human life. Volcanic ash expelled during the eruption was deposited on much of eastern Washington and had a profound effect on local air quality. Although ash is relatively inert, analysis revealed a small but significant amount of free crystalline silica, the causative agent of silicosis. The fine particles of ash were of respirable size, and there was a remarkable increase in the volume of respiratory cases seen in emergency departments during the period of high airborne particulate levels. Numerous cases of injury indirectly related to the fall of ash were also seen. The long-term effect of exposure to this volcanic ash is unknown. A prompt, coordinated community medical response is necessary to protect the general population from the potential hazard of exposure to volcanic ash.

  8. In the wake of Mount St Helens

    SciTech Connect

    Nania, J.; Bruya, T.E.

    1982-04-01

    On May 18, 1980, Mount St Helens, Washington State's most active volcano, erupted violently. Volcanic eruptions in recent geologic history have demonstrated tremendous environmental impact and caused significant loss of human life. Volcanic ash expelled during the eruption was deposited on much of eastern Washington and had a profound effect on local air quality. Although ash is relatively inert, analysis revealed a small but significant amount of free crystalline silica, the causative agent of silicosis. The fine particles of ash were of respirable size, and there was a remarkable increase in the volume of respiratory cases seen in emergency departments during the period of high airborne particulate levels. Numerous cases of injury indirectly related to the fall of ash were also seen. The long-term effect of exposure to this volcanic ash is unknown. A prompt, coordinated community medical response is necessary to protect the general population from the potential hazard of exposure to volcanic ash.

  9. Psychiatric reactions to disaster: the Mount St. Helens experience.

    PubMed

    Shore, J H; Tatum, E L; Vollmer, W M

    1986-05-01

    Following the 1980 Mount St. Helens volcanic eruption, psychiatric reactions were studied in the disaster area and in a control community. Using the new criterion-based diagnostic method for psychiatric epidemiologic research, the Diagnostic Interview Schedule, the authors found a significant prevalence of disaster-related psychiatric disorders. These Mount St. Helens disorders included depression, generalized anxiety, and posttraumatic stress reaction. There was a progressive "dose-response" relationship in the comparison of control, low-exposure, and high-exposure groups. The dose-response pattern occurred among both the bereaved and the property-loss victims.

  10. Mineral dust transport toward Hurricane Helene (2006)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwendike, Juliane; Jones, Sarah C.; Vogel, Bernhard; Vogel, Heike

    2016-05-01

    This study investigates the transport of mineral dust from its source regions in West Africa toward the developing tropical cyclone Helene (2006) and diagnoses the resulting properties of the air influencing the tropical cyclonegenesis. The model system COSMO-ART (Consortium for Small-Scale Modelling-Aerosols and Reactive Trace gases) in which the emission and transport of mineral dust as well as the radiation feedback are taken into account, was used. The emission of mineral dust between 9 and 14 September 2006 occurred in association with the relatively strong monsoon flow and northeasterly trade winds, with gust fronts of convective systems over land, and with the Atlantic inflow. Additionally, increased surface wind speed was linked to orographical effects at the Algerian Mountains, Atlas Mountains, and the Hoggar. The dust, as part of the Saharan air layer, is transported at low levels by the monsoon flow, the Harmattan, the northeasterly trade winds, and the monsoon trough, and is transported upward in the convergence zone between Harmattan and monsoon flow, in the baroclinic zone along the West African coastline, and by convection. At around 700 hPa the dust is transported by the African easterly jet. Dry and dust-free air is found to the north-northwest of the developing tropical depression due to descent in an anticyclone. Based on the model data, it was possible to distinguish between dry (from the anticyclone), dry and dusty (from the Harmattan and northeasterly trade winds), and dusty and moist air (from the monsoon flow and in the tropical depression due to convection).

  11. Learning from Mount St. Helens: Catastrophic Events as Educational Opportunities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, Jeremy

    1987-01-01

    Maintains that the study of catastrophic events should be given temporary precedence over the normal curriculum in order to help students understand the causes, consequences, and recovery alternatives, deal with trauma, and allay fear of recurrence and feelings of helplessness. Uses the May 1980 eruption of Mount St. Helens to demonstrate how…

  12. Boise Inc. St. Helens Paper Mill Achieves Significant Fuel Savings

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2008-05-01

    This case study describes how the Boise Inc. paper mill in St. Helens, Oregon, achieved annual savings of approximately 154,000 MMBtu and more than $1 million after receiving a DOE Save Energy Now energy assessment and implementing recommendations to improve the efficiency of its steam system.

  13. Boise Inc. St. Helens Paper Mill Achieves Significant Fuel Savings

    SciTech Connect

    2008-05-01

    This case study describes how the Boise Inc. paper mill in St. Helens, Oregon, achieved annual savings of approximately 154,000 MMBtu and more than $1 million. This was accomplished after receiving a DOE Save Energy Now energy assessment and implementing recommendations to improve the efficiency of its steam system.

  14. Blind Rage: An Open Letter to Helen Keller

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kleege, Georgina

    2007-01-01

    In a letter addressed to Helen Keller, the author discusses the frustrations of being blind in the modern-day world. She reflects on the seeming pettiness of her complaints next to the difficulties Keller would have faced, especially given all of the new technologies and accommodations available to the blind. She wonders how Keller dealt with her…

  15. Mount St. Helens related aerosol properties from solar extinction measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Michalsky, J.J.; Kleckner, E.W.; Stokes, G.M.

    1980-11-01

    The optical extinction due to the introduction of aerosols and aerosol-precursors into the troposphere and stratosphere during the major eruptive phase of Mount St. Helens, Washington, is quantified. The concentration is on the two-week period centered on the major eruption of 22 July 1980. (ACR)

  16. Mount st. Helens volcano: recent and future behavior.

    PubMed

    Crandell, D R; Mullineaux, D R; Rubin, M

    1975-02-07

    Mount St. Helens volcano in southern Washington has erupted many times during the last 4000 years, usually after brief dormant periods. This behavior pattern. suggests that the volcano, last active in 1857, will erupt again-perhaps within the next few decades. Potential volcanic hazards of several kinds should be considered in planning for land use near the volcano.

  17. Pulmonary toxicity of Mount St. Helens volcanic ash

    SciTech Connect

    Sanders, C.L.; Gelman, A.; Conklin, A.; Adee, R.R.

    1980-01-01

    The distribution, clearance, translocation and pathobiology of intratracheally instilled (IT) Mount St. Helens volcanic ash samples are discussed and compared with NIOSH quartz and Ritzville sandy loam samples as positive controls and saline as a negative control. Comparisons are also made with similar studies in rats using chrysotile asbestos, beryllium oxide and cadmium oxide.

  18. Mt. St. Helens Seen Close Up on May 18.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stoffel, Dorothy B.; Stoffel, Keith L.

    1980-01-01

    Describes eruption steps in Mt. St. Helens' top surface deformation: constant shaking of earthquakes, minor steaming from vents, and sudden catastrophic eruption. Explosions caused black projectile-laden ash clouds, vertical white steam clouds, and vertical gray ash-laden clouds. (SK)

  19. Stereo Pair, Mount St Helens, Washington State

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    On May 18, 1980, Mount St. Helens catastrophically erupted, causing the worst volcanic disaster in the recorded history of the United States. An earthquake shook loose the northern flank of the volcano, and about 2.8 cubic kilometers (0.67 cubic miles) of rock slid downslope in the world's largest recorded landslide. The avalanche released pressure on the volcano and unleashed a huge explosion, which was directed generally northward. The mountain ultimately lost 227 meters (1314 feet) of its height and devastated about 600 square kilometers (230 square miles) of forest.

    This stereoscopic view combines a Landsat satellite image with a Shuttle Radar Topography Mission elevation model to show the volcanic crater and most of the zone of devastation. Areas now relatively devoid of vegetation appear bright. Note the landslide debris clogging the northern drainages and forming natural dams (or enlarging previously existing ones). Also note the volcanic dome built up within the crater, and the extensive floating debris still present on Spirit Lake (northeast of the crater) 12 years after the eruption.

    This stereoscopic image was generated by draping a Landsat satellite image over a Shuttle Radar Topography Mission digital elevation model. Two differing perspectives were then calculated, one for each eye. They can be seen in 3-D by viewing the left image with the right eye and the right image with the left eye (cross-eyed viewing or by downloading and printing the image pair and viewing them with a stereoscope. When stereoscopically merged, the result is a vertically exaggerated view of Earth's surface in its full three dimensions.

    Landsat has been providing visible and infrared views of the Earth since 1972. SRTM elevation data matches the 30-meter (98-foot) resolution of most Landsat images and will substantially help in analyzing the large and growing Landsat image archive, managed by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS).

    Elevation data used in this image was

  20. Anaglyph, Mount St Helens, Washington State

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    On May 18, 1980, Mount St. Helens catastrophically erupted, causing the worst volcanic disaster in the recorded history of the United States. An earthquake shook loose the northern flank of the volcano, and about 2.8 cubic kilometers (0.67 cubic miles) of rock slid downslope in the world's largest recorded landslide. The avalanche released pressure on the volcano and unleashed a huge explosion, which was directed generally northward. The mountain ultimately lost 227 meters (1314 feet) of its height and devastated about 600 square kilometers (230 square miles) of forest.

    This anaglyph combines a Landsat satellite image with a Shuttle Radar Topography Mission elevation model to show the volcanic crater and most of the zone of devastation. Areas now relatively devoid of vegetation appear bright. Note the landslide debris clogging the northern drainages and forming natural dams (or enlarging previously existing ones). Also note the volcanic dome built up within the crater, and the extensive floating debris still present on Spirit Lake (northeast of the crater) 12 years after the eruption.

    The stereoscopic effect of this anaglyph was created by first draping a Landsat satellite image over a digital elevation data from the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM), and then generating two differing perspectives, one for each eye. When viewed through special glasses, the result is a vertically exaggerated view of the Earth's surface in its full three dimensions. Anaglyph glasses cover the left eye with a red filter and cover the right eye with a blue filter.

    Landsat has been providing visible and infrared views of the Earth since 1972. SRTM elevation data matches the 30-meter (98-foot)resolution of most Landsat images and will substantially help in analyzing the large and growing Landsat image archive, managed by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS).

    Elevation data used in this image was acquired by the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM) aboard the Space

  1. Mount St. Helens Project. Cowlitz River Levee Systems, 2009 Level of Flood Protection Update Summary

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-02-04

    mountainous region between Mount St. Helens and Mt. Rainier to the Columbia River at Longview, WA. The upstream-most levee is at Castle Rock where a... Mount St. Helens Project Cowlitz River Levee Systems 2009 Level of Flood Protection Update Summary Cowlitz River at Longview... Mount St. Helens Project. Cowlitz River Levee Systems, 2009 Level of Flood Protection Update Summary 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM

  2. Imaging the Mount St. Helens Magmatic Systems using Magnetotellurics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hill, G. J.; Caldwell, T. G.; Heise, W.; Bibby, H. M.; Chertkoff, D. G.; Burgess, M. K.; Cull, J. P.; Cas, R. A.

    2009-05-01

    A detailed magnetotelluric survey of Mount St. Helens shows that a conduit like zone of high electrical conductivity beneath the volcano is connected to a larger zone of high conductivity at 15 km depth that extends eastward to Mount Adams. We interpret this zone to be a region of connected melt that acts as the reservoir for the silicic magma being extruded at the time of the magnetotelluric survey. This interpretation is consistent with a mid-crustal origin for the silicic component of the Mount St. Helens' magmas and provides an elegant explanation for a previously unexplained feature of the seismicity observed at the time of the catastrophic eruption in 1980. This zone of high mid-crustal conductivity extends northwards to near Mount Rainier suggesting a single region of connected melt comparable in size to the largest silicic volcanic systems known.

  3. Effects of volcanism on the glaciers of Mount St. Helens

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brugman, Melinda M.; Post, Austin

    1981-01-01

    The cataclysmic eruption of Mount St. Helens May 18, 1980, removed 2.9 km2 (about 0.13 km3) of glacier snow and ice including a large part of Shoestring, Forsyth, Wishbone, Ape, Nelson, and all of Loowit and Leschi Glaciers. Minor eruptions and bulging of the volcano from March 27 to May 17 shattered glaciers which were on the deforming rock and deposited ash on other glaciers. Thick ash layers persisted after the May 18 eruption through the summer on most of the remaining snow and ice, and protected winter snow from melting on Swift and Dryer Glaciers. Melting and recrystalization of snow and ice surviving on Mount St. Helens could cause and lubricate mudflows and generate outburst floods. Study of glaciers that remain on this active volcano may assist in recognizing potential hazards on other volcanoes and lead to new contributions to knowledge of the transient response of glaciers to changes in mass balance or geometry.

  4. Effects of volcanism on the glaciers of Mount St. Helens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brugman, M. M.; Post, A.

    The cataclysmic eruption of Mount St. Helens May 18, 1980, removed 2.9 sq/km of glacier snow and ice including a large part of Shoestring Forsyth, Wishbone, Ape, Nelson, and all of Loowit and Leschi Glaciers. Minor eruptions and bulging of the volcano from March 27 to May 17 shattered glaciers which were on the deforming rock and deposited ash on other glaciers. Thick ash layers persisted after the May 18 eruption through the summer on most of the remaining snow and ice, and protected winter snow from melting on Swift and Dryer Glaciers. Melting and recrystallization of snow and ice surviving on Mount St. Helens could cause and lubricate mud flows and generate outburst floods.

  5. Lead 210 and polonium 210 in Mount St. Helens ash

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nevissi, A. E.

    1984-07-01

    During the Mount St. Helens eruptions, lead 210 and polonium 210 were measured in volcanic ash samples. Polonium 210 was consistently higher than lead 210 in all samples, with the 210Po/210Pb ratios ranging from 2 to 12. The overequilibrium of the ratios is due to the enrichment of polonium compounds in the volcanic gases from hot magma relative to less volatile lead compounds.

  6. Deformation monitoring at mount st. Helens in 1981 and 1982.

    PubMed

    Chadwick, W W; Swanson, D A; Iwatsubo, E Y; Heliker, C C; Leighley, T A

    1983-09-30

    For several weeks before each eruption of Mount St. Helens in 1981 and 1982, viscous magma rising in the feeder conduit inflated the lava dome and shoved the crater floor laterally against the immobile crater walls, producing ground cracks and thrust faults. The rates of deformation accelerated before eruptions, and thus it was possible to predict eruptions 3 to 19 days in advance. Lack of deformation outside the crater showed that intrusion of magma during 1981 and 1982 was not voluminous.

  7. Deformation monitoring at Mount St. Helens in 1981 and 1982

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chadwick, W.W.; Swanson, D.A.; Iwatsubo, E.Y.; Heliker, C.C.; Leighley, T.A.

    1983-01-01

    For several weeks before each eruption of Mount St. Helens in 1981 and 1982, viscous magma rising in the feeder conduit inflated the lava dome and shoved the crater floor laterally against the immobile crater walls, producing ground cracks and thrust faults. The rates of deformation accelerated before eruptions, and thus it was possible to predict eruptions 3 to 19 days in advance. Lack of deformation outside the crater showed that intrusion of magma during 1981 and 1982 was not voluminous.

  8. Friendly Letters on the Correspondence of Helen Keller, Anne Sullivan, and Alexander Graham Bell.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blatt, Burton

    1985-01-01

    Excerpts from the letters between Alexander Graham Bell and Anne Sullivan and Helen Keller are given to illustrate the educational and personal growth of Helen Keller as well as the educational philosophy of Bell regarding the education of the deaf blind. (DB)

  9. Isolation and Analysis of Bacteria in Recreational Waters of the Chattahoochee River, Helen, GA

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Helen is a tourism destination in the Appalachian Mountains. A popular activity during warm weather is tubing in the Chattahoochee River. This study was to determine the variety of bacteria in the Chattahoochee River in Helen, GA. Eight samples were collected during a 5km tubing trip down the Chatta...

  10. The Challenge of Advocacy: The Different Voices of Helen Keller and Burton Blatt.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, J. David

    1997-01-01

    Comparison of the different advocacy roles of Helen Keller and Burton Blatt finds that Helen Keller's role supports the belief in miracles resulting from unconditional and sustained commitments, whereas Burton Blatt's role illustrates the value of a commitment to human rights and human dignity regardless of any expectation of productivity or…

  11. Helene: The Face that Launched a Thousand Slips

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, J. M.; Howard, A. D.; Schenk, P.; Thomas, P. C.

    2013-12-01

    Helene, (~17.6 km mean radius) is a L4 Trojan co-orbital of Saturn's moon Dione. Its hemisphere features an unusual morphology consisting of broad depressions and a generally smooth surface patterned with streaks and grooves. The streaks appear to be oriented down-gradient, as are the grooves. This pattern suggests intensive mass-wasting as a dominant process on the leading hemisphere. Kilometer-scale impact craters are very sparse on the leading hemisphere other than the degraded km-scale basins defining the overall satellite shape, and many small craters have a diffuse appearance suggesting ongoing mass wasting. Thus mass wasting must dominate surface-modifying processes at present. In fact, the mass wasting appears to have been sufficient in magnitude to narrow the divides between adjacent basins to narrow septa, similar, but in lower relief, to the honeycomb pattern of Hyperion. The prominent groves occur primarily near topographic divides and appear have cut into a broad, slightly lower albedo surface largely conforming to the present topography but elevated a few meters above the smooth surfaces undergoing mass wasting flow. Low ridges and albedo markings on the surface suggest surface flow of materials traveling up to several kilometers. Diffusive mass wasting produces smooth surfaces - such a pattern characterizes most of the low-lying surfaces. The grooves, however, imply that the transport process is advective at those locations where they occur, that is, erosion tends to concentrate along linear pathways separated by divides. In fact, in many places grooves have a fairly regular spacing of 125-160 m, defining a characteristic erosional scale. Several questions are prompted by the unusual morphology of Helene: 1) What is the nature of the surface materials? 2) Are the transport processes gradual or catastrophic motion from one or a few events? 3) What mechanisms drive mass wasting and groove development? 4) Have the formative processes been active in the

  12. Observations of volcanic tremor at Mount St. Helens volcano

    SciTech Connect

    Fehler, M.

    1983-04-10

    Digital recordings of ground motion during tremor episodes accompanying eruptions at Mount St. Helens Volcano in the state of Washington on August 7 and October 16-18, 1980, are studied. The spectra of the vertical component waveforms contain at least two dominant peaks at 1.0 and 1.3 Hz for all events recorded during both eruptions that were studied. Spectra of horizontal ground motion show peaks at 0.9 and 1.1 Hz. The relative amplitude of the two peaks changes between tremor episodes and during single tremor episodes and shows no consistent relation to amplitude of ground motion. Spectra of long-period earthquakes are very similar to those of tremor events, suggesting that tremor is composed of many long-period earthquakes that occur over a period of time. The unique waveform of tremor events observed at Mount St. Helens must be due to a source effect, since the relative amplitude of the two dominant peaks changes during tremor episodes. The path effect on tremor waveforms is small since there are no peaks in the spectra of waveforms recorded during tectonic earthquakes occurring in the vicinity of Mount S. Helens. The consistency of the location of the spectral peaks for the wide range of tremor amplitudes means that there must be a physical length at the source that is constant, independent of the amplitude of motion at the source. Amplitude of ground motion varies between 0.11 and 4.7 ..mu..m. Seismic moment rates during the two eruptions are found to vary between 6 x 10/sup 18/ and 1 x 10/sup 20/ dynes cm/s. Study of tremor amplitudes recorded at Corvallis, Oregon, leads to the conclusion that tremor accompanying the cataclysmic May 18, 1980, eruption was at least one order of magnitude larger in amplitude than tremor during August and October.

  13. Air pressure waves from Mount St. Helens eruptions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reed, Jack W.

    1987-10-01

    Infrasonic recordings of the pressure wave from the Mount St. Helens (MSH) eruption on May 18, 1980, together with the weather station barograph records were used to estimate an equivalent explosion airblast yield for this eruption. Pressure wave amplitudes versus distance patterns were found to be comparable with patterns found for a small-scale nuclear explosion, the Krakatoa eruption, and the Tunguska comet impact, indicating that the MSH wave came from an explosion equivalent of about 5 megatons of TNT. The peculiar audibility pattern reported, with the blast being heard only at ranges beyond about 100 km, is explained by consideration of finite-amplitude shock propagation developments.

  14. Regenerating the blast zone of Mount St. Helens

    SciTech Connect

    Winjum, J.K.; Keatley, J.E.; Stevens, R.G.; Gutzwiler, J.R.

    1986-05-01

    On May 18, 1980 an earthquake beneath the north side of Mt. St. Helens triggered the eruption of this volcano. This eruption caused damage to 160,000 acres of forests, meadows, lakes and streams. This paper discussed the reforestation of approximately 68,000 acres of commercial forest lands owned by Weyerhaeuser Company. This five year operation was the result of the cooperation of a team of research and operations foresters. The progress was reassuring but some areas will require more time before regeneration will be complete.

  15. Long-wave stratospheric transmission of Mount St. Helens ejecta

    SciTech Connect

    Kuhn, P.M.; Haughney, L.C.; Innis, R.C.

    1981-01-01

    The NASA/Ames Research C-141 aircraft underflew the Mount St. Helens ejecta plume in Utah three days after the eruption. Upward-looking 20--40-..mu..m on-board radiometry provided data resulting in a calculated long-wave transmission of 0.93. From this value, an optical depth of 0.073 is inferred. This value is compared with an accepted background, stratospheric infrared optical depth of 0.06. Assumptions on particle size, shortwave albedo, and thermal warming imply little surface temperature change caused by the ejecta on the third day immediately following the eruption.

  16. Long-wave stratospheric transmission of Mount St. Helens ejecta.

    PubMed

    Kuhn, P M; Haughney, L C; Innis, R C

    1981-01-01

    The NASA/Ames Research C-141 aircraft underflew the Mount St. Helens ejecta plume in Utah three days after the eruption. Upward-looking 20-40-microm on-board radiometry provided data resulting in a calculated long-wave transmission of 0.93. From this value, an optical depth of 0.073 is inferred. This value is compared with an accepted background, stratospheric infrared optical depth of 0.06. Assumptions on particle size, shortwave albedo, and thermal warming imply little surface temperature change caused by the ejecta on the third day immediately following the eruption.

  17. Ocular effects following the volcanic eruptions of Mount St Helens.

    PubMed

    Fraunfelder, F T; Kalina, R E; Buist, A S; Bernstein, R S; Johnson, D S

    1983-03-01

    Three hundred thirty-two ophthalmologists examined 1,523 patients with immediate ocular complaints following the 1980 eruptions of Mount St Helens. Loggers working up to 18 months in environments with high concentrations of volcanic ash were compared with a control group of loggers without volcanic ash contact. Although the ash particles acted as ocular foreign bodies, the small particles were apparently well tolerated for the most part, except for acute irritation. Patients with contact lenses or sicca syndrome had the most frequent ocular complaints. To date, no long-term ocular effects have been noted secondary to volcanic ash exposure.

  18. Geochemical precursors to volcanic activity at Mount St. Helens, USA.

    PubMed

    Berlo, Kim; Blundy, Jon; Turner, Simon; Cashman, Kathy; Hawkesworth, Chris; Black, Stuart

    2004-11-12

    The importance of the interplay between degassing and crystallization before and after the eruption of Mount St. Helens (Washington, USA) in 1980 is well established. Here, we show that degassing occurred over a period of decades to days before eruptions and that the manner of degassing, as deduced from geochemical signatures within the magma, was characteristic of the eruptive style. Trace element (lithium) and short-lived radioactive isotope (lead-210 and radium-226) data show that ascending magma stalled within the conduit, leading to the accumulation of volatiles and the formation of lead-210 excesses, which signals the presence of degassing magma at depth.

  19. Fluvial sedimentation following Quaternary eruptions of Mount St. Helens, Washington

    SciTech Connect

    Janda, R.J.; Meyer, D.F

    1985-01-01

    Depositional records of convulsive volcanic events at Mount St. Helens are in many places obscured by rapid fluvial erosion and deposition close to the volcano. Some major eruptions are recorded primarily by lahars and alluvium deposited tens of kilometers away. About 35 percent of the distinctive hummocky topography of the 1980 North Fork Toutle debris avalanche deposit now resembles an alluvial fan or a braided glacial outwash plain covered with 10 m or more of alluvium. Deposits of small (20 x 10/sup 6/m/sup 3/) but damaging lahars, such as those generated in the afternoon of 18 May 1980 and on 19 March 1982, have been largely eroded away. Rivers draining rapidly eroding areas surrounding Mount St. Helens presently have sediment yields that are among the highest in the world for nonglaciated streams of comparable size. These sediment loads are capable of causing aggradation-induced flooding in populated areas along the lower Toutle and Cowlitz Rivers. Sediment retention structures and dredging have prevented such flooding. Immediately following prehistoric eruptions, however, coarse-grained volcanic alluvium was deposited in the Cowlitz River to levels more than 1 m above the 1980 mud flow inundation level. Post-1980 rapid landscape modifications and high sediment yields are noteworthy because the eruption-impact area has not yet had a major regional storm and potentially catastrophic breachings of avalanche-impounded lakes have been prevented through engineering measures.

  20. Morphologic Evolution of the Mount St. Helens Crater Area, Washington

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beach, G. L.

    1985-01-01

    The large rockslide-avalanche that preceded the eruption of Mount St. Helens on 18 May 1980 removed approximately 2.8 cubic km of material from the summit and north flank of the volcano, forming a horseshoe-shaped crater 2.0 km wide and 3.9 km long. A variety of erosional and depositional processes, notably mass wasting and gully development, acted to modify the topographic configuration of the crater area. To document this morphologic evolution, a series of annual large-scale topographic maps is being produced as a base for comparitive geomorphic analysis. Four topographic maps of the Mount St. Helens crater area at a scale of 1:4000 were produced by the National Mapping Division of the U. S. Geological Survey. Stereo aerial photography for the maps was obtained on 23 October 1980, 10 September 1981, 1 September 1982, and 17 August 1983. To quantify topographic changes in the study area, each topographic map is being digitized and corresponding X, Y, and Z values from successive maps are being computer-compared.

  1. Deep long-period earthquakes (DLPs) beneath Mount St. Helens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, J.; Vidale, J. E.; Schmidt, D. A.; Creager, K. C.; Houston, H.

    2015-12-01

    The volcanic deep long-period earthquakes (DLPs) have been observed for a long time but remain poorly understood. Hypotheses associated with magmatic process have been proposed for the mechanisms of these DLPs, including dehydration embrittlement, flow of magma and/or magmatic fluid and cooling of magma. DLPs are commonly characterized by weak signal on the waveforms, deficiency in high-frequency energy, long-duration coda and their rare occurrence. They are located at 10-35 km depth, which are the mid- to lower-crust and/or uppermost mantle. The imaging Magma Under St Helens (iMUSH) experiment began in late June 2014, and since then the broadband seismometers have recorded six DLPs, two of which are also captured by dense array of Nodal stations. We use the iMUSH data and seismic data from nearby network stations to study the DLPs beneath St. Helens. Catalog DLPs are taken as templates to search for repeating events that might be too small to be detected otherwise. So far, we have searched for cross-station correlation detections for four template DLPs for the period 2007 to 2015. Three of the four seems to be isolated one-offs, while the fourth has at least 56 repetitions, three times more than were already in the catalog, and hints of many more. Many of the DLPs have several bursts within tens of seconds or several minutes. Overall the DLPs show an episodic activity with a period of roughly sixteen months. Several, but not all, episodes are temporally correlated with the subduction zone tremor activity west of St. Helens (Figure 1), which we are still investigating. We are locating these detections, and preliminary results suggest concentrated loci within a distance of one or two kilometers. We will conduct correlations between all detections, search farther back in time, and search with other templates as well, to better characterize their timeline and fine-scale geometry and analyze the waveforms to understand their physical mechanisms and the complicated

  2. [Helen of Troy and medicine, a picture of the "Salle des Actes"].

    PubMed

    Lafont, Olivier

    2012-05-01

    The picture of the 17th century, placed upon the great chimney in the "Salle des Actes", is attributed to the painter Simon Vouet or to his co-workers. It depicts a scene extracted from Odyssey by Homer. During their way-back to Greece, after the fall and the fire of Troia, Helen and Menelaus received in Egypt the famous nepenthes from the hands of Polydamna. An inventory of the possessions of the College of Pharmacy mentioned also helenium and moly. Nepenthes was really cited by Homer as a medicine used by Helen, but helenium was only related to Helen by euphony and moly referred to a totally different part of Odyssey and was not linked at all to Helen. This study points out the importance of mythology so far as origins of Pharmacy are concerned.

  3. Road guide to volcanic deposits of Mount St. Helens and vicinity, Washington

    SciTech Connect

    Doukas, M.P.

    1990-01-01

    Mount St. Helens, the most recently active and most intensively studied Cascade volcano, is located in southwestern Washington. The volcano is a superb outdoor laboratory for studying volcanic processes, deposits of observed events, and deposits whose origins are inferred by classic geologic techniques, including analogy to Recent deposits. This road log is a guide to Mount St. Helens Volcano, with emphasis on effects and deposits of the 1980 eruption.

  4. Mount St. Helens Long-Term Sediment Management Plan for Flood Risk Reduction

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-06-01

    includes three major lakes : Castle, Coldwater, and Spirit (see Figure 1). The area affected by potential flooding varies from bottomland along the...the Mount St. Helens project are described below. a. Spirit Lake Outlet Tunnel . Spirit Lake is located about 5 miles north of Mount St. Helens...see Figure 1). By 1982, water in Spirit Lake was rising dangerously high behind a debris dam left by the eruption. A sudden break in the debris

  5. Volatiles of Mount St. Helens and their origins

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Barnes, I.

    1984-01-01

    Analyses have been made of gases in clouds apparently emanating from Mount St. Helens. Despite appearances, most of the water in these clouds does not issue from the volcano. Even directly above a large fumarole ??D and ?? 18O data indicate that only half the water can come from the volcano. Isotopic and chemical evidence also shows the steam in the volcano (-33.0 per mol ??D) from which a condensate of 0.2 N HCI was obtained is not a major cause of the explosions. The steam in the volcano is derived from a metamorphic brine in the underlying Tertiary meta andesite. The gas that caused the explosive eruptions is carbon dioxide. ?? 1984.

  6. Evaluation of mental effects of disaster, Mount St. Helens eruption.

    PubMed Central

    Shore, J H; Tatum, E L; Vollmer, W M

    1986-01-01

    This psychiatric epidemiology study following the Mount St. Helens volcanic disaster revealed a significant morbidity for psychiatric disorders. The increased prevalence showed a dose response pattern in three population groups. The findings are reported as relative and attributable risk for the two exposed populations as compared to a control group. Patterns of significant risk are presented for sex, age, and for victims with pre-existing physical illness. The research utilized a new criteria-based interview schedule for the identification of psychiatric disorders. The methodology is reviewed in the context of the controversies and assumptions within the field of behavioral response to disaster stress. There are important implications for public health planning and intervention. PMID:3946730

  7. Pyroclastic flow injury. Mount St. Helens, May 18, 1980

    SciTech Connect

    Parshley, P.F.; Kiessling, P.J.; Antonius, J.A.; Connell, R.S.; Miller, S.H.; Green, F.H.

    1982-05-01

    Three patients who were on the periphery of the pyroclastic flow of the Mount St. Helens eruption on May 18, 1980 were treated for severe thermal and inhalation injuries. Although exposed in identical manner, two patients arrived with heavily colonized burn wounds and developed adult respiratory distress syndrome leading directly to their death, whereas the third patient, with a noncolonized burn wound and little evidence of adult respiratory distress syndrome, survived. Evidence of inhaled ash complicating various stages of adult respiratory distress syndrome was confirmed by energy dispersive roentgenographic analysis. In the Pacific Northwest, Alaska, and the Aleutian Islands, potential for further injuries of this type in even larger numbers exists. Should these occur, those who treat the victims should be aware of the potential for severe inhalation problems in addition to the obvious burns.

  8. Trajectories of the mount st. Helens eruption plume.

    PubMed

    Danielsen, E F

    1981-02-20

    The plume of the major eruption of Mount St. Helens on 18 May 1980 penetrated 10 to 11 kilometers into the stratosphere, attaining heights of 22 to 23 kilometers. Wind shears rapidly converted the plume from an expanding vertical cone to a thin, slightly inclined lamina. The lamina was extruded zonally in the stratosphere as the lower part moved eastward at jet stream velocities, while the upper part slowly moved westward in the region of nonsteady transition from the westerlies to the summer stratospheric easterlies. Trajectories computed to position the NASA U-2 aircraft for sampling in the plume are described. Plume volume after 8 hours of strong volcanic emission is estimated at 2 x 10(6) cubic kilometers. Only about 1 percent of this volume is attributed to the volcano; the rest was entrained from the environment.

  9. Evaluation of mental effects of disaster, Mount St. Helens eruption.

    PubMed

    Shore, J H; Tatum, E L; Vollmer, W M

    1986-03-01

    This psychiatric epidemiology study following the Mount St. Helens volcanic disaster revealed a significant morbidity for psychiatric disorders. The increased prevalence showed a dose response pattern in three population groups. The findings are reported as relative and attributable risk for the two exposed populations as compared to a control group. Patterns of significant risk are presented for sex, age, and for victims with pre-existing physical illness. The research utilized a new criteria-based interview schedule for the identification of psychiatric disorders. The methodology is reviewed in the context of the controversies and assumptions within the field of behavioral response to disaster stress. There are important implications for public health planning and intervention.

  10. Trajectories of the Mount St. Helens eruption plume

    SciTech Connect

    Danielsen, E.F.

    1981-01-01

    The plume of the major eruption of Mount St. Helens on 18 May 1980 penetrated 10 to 11 kilometers into the stratosphere, attaining heights of 22 to 23 kilometers. Wind shears rapidly converted the plume from expanding vertical cone to a thin, slightly inclined lamina. The lamina was extruded zonally in the stratosphere as the lower part moved eastward at jet stream velocities, while the upper part slowly moved westward in the region of nonsteady transition from the westerlies to the summer stratospheric easterlies. Trajectories computed to position the NASA U-2 aircraft for sampling in the plume are described. Plume volume after 8 hours of strong volcanic emission is estimated at 2 x 10/sup +6/ cubic kilometers. Only about 1 percent of this volume is attributed to the volcano; the rest was entrained from the environment.

  11. Characterization of aerosols from eruptions of Mount St. Helens

    SciTech Connect

    Chuan, R.L.; Woods, D.C.; McCormick, M.P.

    1981-01-01

    Measurements of mass concentration and size distribution of aerosols from eruptions of Mount St. Helens as well as morphological and elemental analyses were obtained between 7 April and 7 August 1980. In situ measurements were made in early phreatic and later, minor phreatomagmatic eruption clouds near the vent of the volcano and in plumes injected into the stratosphere from the major eruptions of 18 and 25 May. The phreatic aerosol was characterized by an essentially monomodal size distribution dominated by silicate particles larger than 10 micrometers in diameter. The phreatomagmatic eruption cloud was multimodal; the large size mode consisted of silicate particles and the small size modes were made up of mixtures of sulfuric acid and silicate particles. The stratospheric aerosol from the main eruption exhibited a characteristic narrow single mode with particles less than 1 micrometer in diameter and nearly all of the mass made up of sulfuric acid droplets.

  12. Pyroclastic flow injury. Mount St. Helens, May 18, 1980.

    PubMed

    Parshley, P F; Kiessling, P J; Antonius, J A; Connell, R S; Miller, S H; Green, F H

    1982-05-01

    Three patients who were on the periphery of the pyroclastic flow of the Mount St. Helens eruption on May 18, 1980 were treated for severe thermal and inhalation injuries. Although exposed in identical manner, two patients arrived with heavily colonized burn wounds and developed adult respiratory distress syndrome leading directly to their death, whereas the third patient, with a noncolonized burn wound and little evidence of adult respiratory distress syndrome, survived. Evidence of inhaled ash complicating various stages of adult respiratory distress syndrome was confirmed by energy dispersive roentgenographic analysis. In the Pacific Northwest, Alaska, and the Aleutian Islands, potential for further injuries of this type in even larger numbers exists. Should these occur, those who treat the victims should be aware of the potential for severe inhalation problems in addition to the obvious burns.

  13. Characterization of aerosols from eruptions of mount st. Helens.

    PubMed

    Chuan, R L; Woods, D C; McCormick, M P

    1981-02-20

    Measurements of mass concentration and size distribution of aerosols from eruptions of Mount St. Helens as well as morphological and elemental analyses were obtained between 7 April and 7 August 1980. In situ measurements were made in early phreatic and later, minor phreatomagmatic eruption clouds near the vent of the volcano and in plumes injected into the stratosphere from the major eruptions of 18 and 25 May. The phreatic aerosol was characterized by an essentially monomodal size distribution dominated by silicate particles larger than 10 micrometers in diameter. The phreatomagmatic eruption cloud was multimodal; the large size mode consisted of silicate particles and the small size modes were made up of mixtures of sulfuric acid and silicate particles. The stratospheric aerosol from the main eruption exhibited a characteristic narrow single mode with particles less than 1 micrometer in diameter and nearly all of the mass made up of sulfuric acid droplets.

  14. Mount St. Helens: A 30-year legacy of volcanism

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Vallance, James W.; Gardner, Cynthia A.; Scott, William E.; Iverson, Richard M.; Pierson, Thomas C.

    2010-01-01

    The spectacular eruption of Mount St. Helens on 18 May 1980 electrified scientists and the public. Photodocumentation of the colossal landslide, directed blast, and ensuing eruption column—which reached as high as 25 kilometers in altitude and lasted for nearly 9 hours—made news worldwide. Reconnaissance of the devastation spurred efforts to understand the power and awe of those moments (Figure 1). The eruption remains a seminal historical event—studying it and its aftermath revolutionized the way scientists approach the field of volcanology. Not only was the eruption spectacular, but also it occurred in daytime, at an accessible volcano, in a country with the resources to transform disaster into scientific opportunity, amid a transformation in digital technology. Lives lost and the impact of the eruption on people and infrastructure downstream and downwind made it imperative for scientists to investigate events and work with communities to lessen losses from future eruptions.

  15. LANDSLIDE DAMMED LAKES AT MOUNT ST. HELENS, WASHINGTON.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Meyer, William; Sabol, Martha A.; Schuster, Robert; ,

    1986-01-01

    The collapse of the north face of Mount St. Helens on May 18, 1980, and the debris avalanche that resulted blocked outflow from Spirit Lake and Coldwater and South Fork Castle Creeks. Spirit Lake began to increase in size and lakes began to form in the canyons of Coldwater and South Fork Castle Creeks. Coldwater and Castle Lakes would have overtopped their respective blockages in late 1981 or early 1982. Catastrophic flooding would have occurred from the breakout of Coldwater Lake while serious flooding probably would have resulted from the breakout of Castle Lake. As a result, the level of both lakes was stabilized with spillways in 1981. The three blockages are stable against liquefaction and gravitationally induced slope failure. The existence of groundwater in the blockages was observed in piezometers installed between 1981 and 1983. Groundwater mounds with water levels above lake level exist under the crest of all of the blockages.

  16. The isotopic and chemical evolution of Mount St. Helens

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Halliday, A.N.; Fallick, A.E.; Dickin, A.P.; Mackenzie, A.B.; Stephens, W.E.; Hildreth, W.

    1983-01-01

    Isotopic and major and trace element analysis of nine samples of eruptive products spanning the history of the Mt. St. Helens volcano suggest three different episodes; (1) 40,000-2500 years ago: eruptions of dacite with ??{lunate}Nd = +5, ??{lunate}Sr = -10, variable ??18O, 206Pb/204Pb ??? 18.76, Ca/Sr ??? 60, Rb/Ba ??? 0.1, La/Yb ??? 18, (2) 2500-1000 years ago: eruptions of basalt, andesite and dacite with ??{lunate}Nd = +4 to +8, ??{lunate}Sr = -7 to -22, variable ??18O (thought to represent melting of differing mantle-crust reservoirs), 206Pb/204Pb = 18.81-18.87, variable Ca/Sr, Rb/Ba, La/Yb and high Zr, (3) 1000 years ago to present day: eruptions of andesite and dacite with ??{lunate}Nd = +6, ??{lunate}Sr = -13, ??18O ???6???, variable 206Pb/204Pb, Ca/Sr ??? 77, Rb/Ba = 0.1, La/Yb ??? 11. None of the products exhibit Eu anomalies and all are LREE enriched. There is a strong correlation between 87Sr/86Sr and differentiation indices. These data are interpreted in terms of a mantle heat source melting young crust bearing zircon and garnet, but not feldspar, followed by intrusion of this crustal reservoir by mantle-derived magma which caused further crustal melting and contaminated the crustal magma system with mafic components. Since 1000 years ago all the eruptions have been from the same reservoir which has displayed a much more gradual re-equilibration of Pb isotopic compositions than other components suggesting that Pb is being transported via a fluid phase. The Nd and Sr isotopic compositions lie along the mantle array and suggest that the mantle underneath Mt. St. Helens is not as depleted as MORB sources. There is no indication of seawater involvement in the source region. ?? 1983.

  17. Observations of volcanic tremor at Mt. St. Helens volcano

    SciTech Connect

    Fehler, M.

    1982-06-25

    Digital recordings of ground motion during tremor episodes accompanying eruptions at Mt. St. Helens Volcano in the state of Washington on August 7 and October 16-18, 1980 are studied. The spectra of the vertical component waveforms contain at least two dominant peaks at 1.0 and 1.3 Hz for all events recorded during both eruptions that were studied. Spectra of horizontal ground motion show peaks at .9 and 1.1 Hz. the relative amplitudes of the two peaks changes between tremor episodes and during single tremor episodes and show no consistent relation to amplitude of ground motion. Spectra of long period earthquakes are very similar to those of tremor events suggesting that tremor is composed of many long period earthquakes that occur over a period of time. The path effect of tremor waveforms is small since there are no peaks in the spectra of waveforms recorded during tectonic earthquakes occurring in the vicinity of Mt. St. Helens. Amplitudes of ground motion varies between .11 ..mu..m and 4.7 ..mu..m. Seismic moment rates during the two eruptions are calculated using the model of Aki et al. (1977) and found to vary between 6 x 10/sup 18/ and 1 x 10/sup 20/ dynes cm sec/sup -1/ which are larger than values found by Aki et al. (1977) who studied amplitudes of shallow tremor events recorded during the October, 1963 eruption of Kilauea volcano in Hawaii. Study of tremor amplitudes recorded at Corvallis, Oregon leads to the conclusion that tremor accompanying the cataclysmic May 18, 1980 eruption was at least one order of magnitude larger in amplitude than tremor during August and October.

  18. Linking community and ecosystem development on Mount St. Helens.

    PubMed

    Gill, Richard A; Boie, Jennifer A; Bishop, John G; Larsen, Lindsay; Apple, Jennifer L; Evans, R David

    2006-06-01

    In the two decades following the 1980 eruption of Mount St. Helens in Washington State, the N2-fixing colonizer Lupinus lepidus is associated with striking heterogeneity in plant community and soil development. We report on differences in nutrient availability and plant tissue chemistry between older, dense patches (core) of L. lepidus and more recently established low density patches (edge). In addition, we conducted a factorial nitrogen and phosphorus fertilization experiment in core patches to examine the degree of N and P limitation in early primary succession. We found that there were no significant differences in N or P availability between core and edge L. lepidus patches during the dry summer months, although nutrient availability is very low across the landscape. In the high density patches we found lower tissue N content and higher fiber content in L. lepidus tissue than in the younger edge patches. The addition of nutrients substantially altered plant community composition, with N addition causing an increase in other forb biomass and a corresponding competition-induced decline in L. lepidus biomass. The majority of the positive biomass response came from Hypochaeris radicata. In the second year of the fertilization experiment, the addition of N significantly increased total community biomass while L. lepidus biomass declined by more than 50%. The response of every species other than L. lepidus to N additions suggests that N may be the macronutrient most limiting plant production on Mount St. Helens but that the gains in productivity were somewhat offset by a decline of the dominant species. By the third year of the experiment, L. lepidus began to increase in abundance with P addition. This result suggests co-limitation of the community by N and P.

  19. Surtsey and Mount St. Helens: a comparison of early succession rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    del Moral, R.; Magnússon, B.

    2013-12-01

    Surtsey and Mount St. Helens are celebrated, but very different volcanoes. Permanent plots allow comparisons that reveal mechanisms that control succession and its rate and suggest general principles. We estimated rates from structure development, species composition using detrended correspondence analysis (DCA), changes in Euclidean distance (ED) of DCA vectors and by principal components analysis (PCA) of DCA. On Surtsey, rates determined from DCA trajectory analyses decreased as follows: gull colony on lava with sand > gull colony on lava, no sand ≫ lava with sand > sand spit > block lava > tephra. On Mount St. Helens, plots on lahar deposits near woodlands were best developed. The succession rates of open meadows declined as follows: Lupinus-dominated pumice > protected ridge with Lupinus > other pumice and blasted sites > isolated lahar meadows > barren plain. Despite the prominent contrasts between the volcanoes, common themes were revealed. Isolation restricted the number of colonists on Surtsey and to a lesser degree on Mount St. Helens. Nutrient input from outside the system was crucial. On Surtsey, seabirds fashioned very fertile substrates, while on Mount St. Helens wind brought a sparse nutrient rain, then Lupinus enhanced fertility to promote succession. Environmental stress limits succession in both cases. On Surtsey, bare lava, compacted tephra and infertile sands restrict development. On Mount St. Helens, exposure to wind and infertility slow succession.

  20. Surtsey and Mount St. Helens: a comparison of early succession rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    del Moral, R.; Magnússon, B.

    2014-04-01

    Surtsey and Mount St. Helens are celebrated but very different volcanoes. Permanent plots allow for comparisons that reveal mechanisms that control succession and its rate and suggest general principles. We estimated rates from structure development, species composition using detrended correspondence analysis (DCA), changes in Euclidean distance (ED) of DCA vectors, and by principal components analysis (PCA) of DCA. On Surtsey, rates determined from DCA trajectory analyses decreased as follows: gull colony on lava with sand > gull colony on lava, no sand ≫ lava with sand > sand spit > block lava > tephra. On Mount St. Helens, plots on lahar deposits near woodlands were best developed. The succession rates of open meadows declined as follows: Lupinus-dominated pumice > protected ridge with Lupinus > other pumice and blasted sites > isolated lahar meadows > barren plain. Despite the prominent contrasts between the volcanoes, we found several common themes. Isolation restricted the number of colonists on Surtsey and to a lesser degree on Mount St. Helens. Nutrient input from outside the system was crucial. On Surtsey, seabirds fashioned very fertile substrates, while on Mount St. Helens wind brought a sparse nutrient rain, then Lupinus enhanced fertility to promote succession. Environmental stress limits succession in both cases. On Surtsey, bare lava, compacted tephra and infertile sands restrict development. On Mount St. Helens, exposure to wind and infertility slow succession.

  1. Inclusions in Mount St. Helens dacite erupted from 1980 through 1983

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Heliker, C.

    1995-01-01

    Inclusions of plutonic, metavolcanic and volcanic rocks are abundant in dacite pumice and lava from the 1980-1986 eruption sequence at Mount St. Helens. Point counts of inclusions exposed in talus blocks from the dome from 1980 through 1983 show that inclusions form approximately 3.5 vol.% of the lava. Eighty-five percent of the inclusions are medium-grained gabbros. The gabbroic inclusions are of four distinct type. The most abundant type is laminated gabbronorite. Various types of gabbroic inclusions, including the laminated gabbronorite, are common in Mount St. Helens lavas of approximately the last 3000 years. This coincides with the interval in which Mount St. Helens first erupted basalt and basaltic andesite lavas. These observations, together with the fact that the gabbroic inclusions are compositionally unlike any of the Tertiary intrusive rocks in the Mount St. Helens area, strongly suggest that the inclusions are related to the introduction of basalt to the Mount St. Helens magmatic system. -from Author

  2. Pulmonary toxicity of Mount St. Helens volcanic ash

    SciTech Connect

    Sanders, C.L.; Conklin, A.W.; Gelman, R.A.; Adee, R.R.; Rhoads, K.

    1982-02-01

    The effects of Mount St. Helens volcanic ash, a sandy loam soil, and quartz particles on the lung and mediastinal lymph nodes of Fischer rats were studied at time intervals of up to 109 days after in tratracheal instillation of 40 mg ash, soil, or quartz in a single dose or after multiple doses of ash instilled in seven consecutive weekly doses for a total deposition of 77 mg. Quartz caused early granuloma formation, later fibrosis was also seen in lymph nodes. Volcanic ash caused an ill-defined inflammatory reaction with a few rats showing granuloma formulation, a very limited linear fibrosis, and a moderate lipoproteinosis, and lymph nodes were enlarged with numerous microgranulomas but without reticulin and collagen formation. Pulmonary reactions to soil particles were less intense but similar to those in ash- exposed animals; lymph nodes were not enlarged. No significant clearance of ash was found at 3 months after instillation. Volcanic ash produced a simple pneumoconiosis similar to what has been described for animals and humans living for prolonged periods of time in dusty desert areas of the United States.

  3. Geologic Map of the Helen Planitia Quadrangle (V-52), Venus

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lopez, Ivan; Hansen, Vicki L.

    2008-01-01

    The Magellan spacecraft orbited Venus from August 10, 1990, until it plunged into the Venusian atmosphere on October 12, 1994. Magellan Mission objectives included (1) improving the knowledge of the geological processes, surface properties, and geologic history of Venus by analysis of surface radar characteristics, topography, and morphology and (2) improving the knowledge of the geophysics of Venus by analysis of Venusian gravity. The Helen Planitia quadrangle (V-52), located in the southern hemisphere of Venus between lat 25 deg S. and 50 deg S. and between long 240 deg E. and 270 deg E., covers approximately 8,000,000 km2. Regionally, the map area is located at the southern limit of an area of enhanced tectonomagmatic activity and extensional deformation, marked by a triangle that has highland apexes at Beta, Atla, and Themis Regiones (BAT anomaly) and is connected by the large extensional belts of Devana, Hecate, and Parga Chasmata. The BAT anomaly covers approximately 20 percent of the Venusian surface.

  4. Reestablishment of endogonaceae on Mount St. Helens: survival of residuals

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, M.F.; MacMahon, J.A.; Andersen, D.C.

    1984-01-01

    The 18 May 1980 eruption of Mount St. Helens resulted in the burial of relatively well developed soils under variable depths of sterile tephra and ash. During summer 1982, we examined a series of sites and estimated the numbers of spores of Endogonaceae that had been transported from the buried soil to the new ground surface by either abiotic or biotic vectors. There was no difference between spore counts of Endogone spp. or Glomus spp. in the buried soils of forests and clear-cuts; spores were rare in the tephra at any site. In areas featuring less than or equal to 50 cm of tephra, spores were transported to the surface by gophers (in previous clear-cut areas) and by ants (in previous forest and clear-cut habitats). In the Pumice Plain, an area devoid of gophers and ants, erosion exposed spores to the surface. We found no evidence to suggest that endogonaceous fungi grow back up root systems from buried horizons. We hypothesize that small-scale perturbations (erosion, gopher and ant mounds) following the major volcanic disturbance may drive succession by exposing buried mycorrhizal and decomposer fungi. 26 references, 2 figures, 3 tables.

  5. Early succession on lahars spawned by Mount St. Helens.

    PubMed

    Del Moral, R

    1998-06-01

    The effects of isolation on primary succession are poorly documented. I monitored vegetation recovery on two Mount St. Helens lahars (mud flows) with different degrees of isolation using contiguous plots. Seventeen years after the eruption, species richness was stable, but cover continued to increase. That isolation affects community structure was confirmed in several ways. The dominance hierarchies of the lahars differed sharply. Detrended correspondence analysis on Lahar I showed a trend related to distance from an adjacent woodland, whereas vegetation on Lahar II was relatively homogeneous. Spectra of growth forms and dispersal types also differed. Lahar I was dominated by species with modest dispersal ability, while Lahar II was dominated by species with better dispersal. Variation between plots should decline through time, a prediction confirmed on Lahar II. Lahar I remained heterogeneous despite having developed significantly higher cover. Here, the increasing distance from the forest has prevented plots from becoming more homogeneous. At this stage of early primary succession, neither lahar is converging towards the species composition of adjacent vegetation. This study shows that isolation and differential dispersal ability combine to determine initial vegetation structure. Stochastic effects resulting from dispersal limitations may resist the more deterministic effects of competition that could lead to floristic convergence.

  6. Measurements of SO2 in the Mount St. Helens debris

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kerr, J. B.; Evans, F. J.; Mateer, C. L.

    1982-01-01

    Routine measurements of ozone and SO2 are made with the Dobson and Brewer spectrophotometers at the Atmospheric Environment Service in Downsview Ontario. On May 20 and 21, 1980, large values of column SO2 were observed with both spectrophotometers at the time of passage of the Mount St. Helens debris. Enhanced SO2 values were first observed at 1800Z on May 20. The maximum column amount of SO2 measured was 0.06 cm at 2200 Z. On May 21, SO2 values slowly decreased from 0.03 cm at 1100 Z cm to 0.01 cm at 2000Z. Typical SO2 amounts due to pollution at the Downsview site are approximately 0.003 to 0.005 cm. At the same time of maximum SO2 enhancement, both Dobson and Brewer spectrophotometers measured a 0.040 cm decrease of total ozone. It is not clear whether the decrease of total ozone was caused by the volcanic cloud or natural ozone variability. Air mass trajectories indicate that the altitude of the debris cloud, which passed over Downsview at the time, was between 10 km and 12 km.

  7. Ice Nucleus Characteristics of Mount St. Helens Effluents

    SciTech Connect

    Schnell, R.C.; Pueschel, R.F.; Wellman, D.L.

    1982-12-20

    Aerosols were studied in situ and captured on membrane filters from an aircraft flown around Mount St. Helens during its phreatic period in April 1980. Bulk samples of volcanic ash were collected at ground level 120 km downwind on May 19, 1980 and reaerosolized in a laboratory in ash cloud simulation studies. The aerosol and/or ash samples were tested for ice nucleus (IN) activity using four different IN measurement systems (NCAR acoustical counter, bulk drop freezing, NCAR dynamic thermal diffusion chamber, and filter drop freezing). Although threshold IN activity was observed at -8/sup 0/C in bulk ash, in aerosols there were few IN active at temperatures warmer than -12/sup 0/C. At -12/sup 0/C, IN concentrations were less than 0.4 l/sup -1/ (400 m/sup -3/) even when the aerosol concentrations were as high as 3000 ..mu..g m/sup -3/. At aerosol concentrations of 500 ..mu..g m/sup -3/ and less, the IN content of the ash was below background threshold temperatures of -18/sup 0/C.

  8. Airborne radiological sampling of Mount St. Helens plumes

    SciTech Connect

    Andrews, V.E.

    1981-04-01

    Particulate and gaseous samples for radiologial analyses were collected from the plumes created by eruptions of Mount St. Helens. The sampling aircraft and equipment used are routinely employed in aerial radiological surveillance at the Nevada Test Site by the Environmental Protection Agency's Environmental Monitoring Systems Laboratory in Las Vegas, Nevada. An initial sample set was collected on April 4, 1980, during the period of recurring minor eruptions. Samples were collected again on May 19 and 20 following the major eruption of May 18. The Environmental Protection Agency's Office of Radiation Programs analyzed the samples for uranium and thorium isotopes, radium-226, lead-210, polonium-210, and radon-222. Other laboratories analyzed samples to determine particle size distribution and elemental composition. The only samples containing radioactivity above normal ambient levels were collected on May 20. Polonium-210 concentrations in the plume, determined from a sample collected between 5 and 30 km from the crater, were approximately an order of magnitude above background. Radon-222 concentrations in samples collected from the plume centerline at a distance of 15 km averaged approximately four times the average surface concentrations. The small increases in radioactivity would cause no observable adverse health effects.

  9. Impact on agriculture of the mount st. Helens eruptions.

    PubMed

    Cook, R J; Barron, J C; Papendick, R I; Williams, G J

    1981-01-02

    Ash from Mount St. Helens has fallen over a diverse agricultural area, with deposits of up to 30 kilograms per square meter. Crop losses in eastern Washington are estimated at about $100 million in 1980-about 7 percent of the normal crop value in the affected area and less than was expected initially. Production of wheat, potatoes, and apples will be normal or above normal because the favorable conditions for growth of these crops since the ashfall helped offset the losses. Alfalfa hay was severely lodged under the weight of the ash, but ash-contaminated hay is apparently nontoxic when eaten by livestock. The ash as an abrasive is lethal to certain insects, such as bees and grasshoppers, but populations are recovering. The ash has increased crop production costs by necessitating machinery repairs and increased tillage. On soil, the ash reduces water infiltration, increases surface albedo, and may continue to affect water runoff, erosion, evaporation, and soil temperature even when tilled into the soil. Ash on plant leaves reduced photosynthesis by up to 90 percent. Most plants have tended to shed the ash. With the possible exception of sulfur, the elements in the ash are either unavailable or present in very low concentrations; and no significant contribution to the nutrient status of soils is expected.

  10. Pulmonary response to Mount St. Helens' volcanic ash.

    PubMed

    Vallyathan, V; Mentnech, M S; Tucker, J H; Green, F H

    1983-04-01

    The pulmonary response to a sedimented sample of Mount St. Helens' volcanic ash from the first eruption was studied at 1, 7, 28, 90, and 180 days postintratracheal administration of 1 or 10 mg of ash in specific-pathogen-free rats. One day administration of volcanic ash all animals exhibited a marked inflammatory cell response centered on respiratory bronchioles in which polymorphonuclear leukocytes predominated. At 7 days the reaction was characterized by mononuclear cellular infiltrates. The macrophages within the respiratory bronchioles and alveoli contained intracytoplasmic ash particles. At 28 days the intraalveolar aggregates of mononuclear cells had condensed to form granulomas. Most of the granulomas contained foreign body-type giant cells and some showed central necrosis. The granulomas enlarged in size from 28 days until the termination of the experiment at 180 days with progressive increase in the amount of collagenous tissue. The results of these studies suggest that the volcanic ash may pose a risk for pneumoconiosis in heavily exposed human populations.

  11. Pressure wave generated by the Mount St. Helens eruption

    SciTech Connect

    Banister, J.B.

    1984-06-20

    Histories of the air pressure wave radiated from the eruption of Mount St. Helens on May 18, 1980, were calculated for two models of the eruption cloud expansion. The first considered the wave radiated from an accelerated plane surface, while the second examined the wave radiated from an expanding hemisphere. Two histories of eruption cloud motion based on photographs were used. Peak positive overpressures were about the same for these cloud motion histories of expansion into a hemisphere was assumed. If an accelerated planar source model was used, the peak positive pressures have again about the same value in east and west direction, but values are about half in the north and south direction. Observed peak overpressures at microbarograph stations are somewhat higher than the calculated with the most marked departures at the greater surface ranges. These observed overpressures may have been about half the correct values, however. Microbarograph records show a weaker rarefaction than calculated histories or none at all. This can be explained, in part, by a lack of a real motion coherence in the slowing eruption cloud. If it is also possible the net ash cloud volume increased considerably after its vertical growth ceased and weakened the negative phase as well as lengthening the positive phase.

  12. Volcanic Plume Above Mount St. Helens Detected with GPS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Houlié, N.; Briole, P.; Nercessian, A.; Murakami, M.

    2005-07-01

    Eruptions can produce not only flows of incandescent material along the slopes of a volcano but also ash plumes in the troposphere [Sparks et al., 1997] that can threaten aircraft flying in the vicinity [Fisher et al., 1997]. To protect aircraft, passengers, and crews, the International Civil Aviation Organization and the World Meteorological Organization created eight Volcanic Ash Advisory Centers (VAAC, http://www.ssd.noaa.gov/VAAC/vaac.html) around the globe with the goal of tracking volcanic plumes and releasing eruption alerts to airports, pilots, and companies. Currently, the VAAC monitoring system is based mostly on the monitoring systems of any local volcano observatories and on real-time monitoring of data acquired by meteorological satellites. In the case of the 18 August 2000 eruption of the Miyakejima volcano in Japan, Houlié et al. [2005] showed that the Global Positioning System(GPS) might be used as an additional tool for monitoring volcanic plumes. The present article indicates that the 9 March 2005 eruption of Mount St. Helens, Washington, also produced detectable anomalies in GPS data.>

  13. Analysis of Mount St. Helens ash from optical photoelectric photometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cardelli, J. A.; Ackerman, T. P.

    1983-01-01

    The optical properties of suspended dust particles from the eruption of Mt. St. Helens on July 23, 1980 are investigated using photoelectric observations of standard stars obtained on the 0.76-m telescope at the University of Washington 48 hours after the eruption. Measurements were made with five broad-band filters centered at 3910, 5085, 5480, 6330, and 8050 A on stars of varying color and over a wide range of air masses. Anomalous extinction effects due to the volcanic ash were detected, and a significant change in the wavelength-dependent extinction parameter during the course of the observations was established by statistical analysis. Mean particle size (a) and column density (N) are estimated using the Mie theory, assuming a log-normal particle-size distribution: a = 0.18 micron throughout; N = 1.02 x 10 to the 9th/sq cm before 7:00 UT and 2.33 x 10 to the 9th/sq cm after 8:30 UT on July 25, 1980. The extinction is attributed to low-level, slowly migrating ash, possibly combined with products of gas-to-particle conversion and coagulation.

  14. Road guide to volcanic deposits of Mount St. Helens and vicinity, Washington

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Doukas, Michael P.

    1990-01-01

    Mount St. Helens, the most recently active and most intensively studied Cascades volcano, is in southwestern Washington. The volcano is a superb outdoor laboratory for studying volcanic processes, deposits of observed events, and deposits whose origins are inferred by classic geologic techniques, including analogy to recent deposits. During the past 4,500 years, Mount St. Helens has been more active and more explosive than any other volcano in the conterminous United States. Mount St. Helens became active in mid-March 1980, and eruptive activity began on March 27. Since the climactic eruption of May 18, 1980, the volcano has continued to be active at least until 1988. The 1890 activity of Mount St. Helens is summarized in U.S. Geological Survey Professional Papers 1249 and 1250. This road guide is a tour of Mount St. Helens volcano and vicinity, with emphasis on the effects and deposits of the 1980 eruption. The road log starts from the U.S. Geological Survey's David A. Johnston Cascades Volcano Observatory, Vancouver, Washington. The guide is organized around two primary routes. LEG I is on paved and gravel roads from Vancouver to areas east of Mount St. Helens, including Windy Ridge Overlook near Spirit Lake. This is possibly the most scenic route described in the guide, including a transect of the devastated zone of May 18, 1980, Spirit Lake, and numerous vistas of the volcano. LEG II leads to areas west of the volcano from Vancouver via U.S. Interstate Highway 5, then on a paved ... road along the Toutle River. Highlights include the spectacular effects of mudflows and a view of the huge debris-avalanche deposit that was formed on May 18, 1980.

  15. Counting, accounting, and accountability: Helen Verran's relational empiricism.

    PubMed

    Kenney, Martha

    2015-10-01

    Helen Verran uses the term 'relational empiricism' to describe situated empirical inquiry that is attentive to the relations that constitute its objects of study, including the investigator's own practices. Relational empiricism draws on and reconfigures Science and Technology Studies' traditional concerns with reflexivity and relationality, casting empirical inquiry as an important and non-innocent world-making practice. Through a reading of Verran's postcolonial projects in Nigeria and Australia, this article develops a concept of empirical and political 'accountability' to complement her relational empiricism. In Science and an African Logic, Verran provides accounts of the relations that materialize her empirical objects. These accounts work to decompose her original objects, generating new objects that are more promising for the specific postcolonial contexts of her work. The process of decomposition is part of remaining accountable for her research methods and accountable to the worlds she is working in and writing about. This is a practice of narrating relations and learning to tell better technoscientific stories. What counts as better, however, is not given, but is always contextual and at stake. In this way, Verran acts not as participant-observer, but as participant-storyteller, telling stories to facilitate epistemic flourishing within and as part of a historically located community of practice. The understanding of accountability that emerges from this discussion is designed as a contribution, both practical and evocative, to the theoretical toolkit of Science and Technology Studies scholars who are interested in thinking concretely about how we can be more accountable to the worlds we study.

  16. Air pressure waves from Mount St. Helens eruptions

    SciTech Connect

    Reed, J.W.

    1987-10-20

    Weather station barograph records as well as infrasonic recordings of the pressure wave from the Mount St. Helens eruption of May 18, 1980, have been used to estimate an equivalent explosion airblast yield for this event. Pressure amplitude versus distance patterns in various directions compared with patterns from other large explosions, such as atmospheric nuclear tests, the Krakatoa eruption, and the Tunguska comet impact, indicate that the wave came from an explosion equivalent of a few megatons of TNT. The extent of tree blowdown is considerably greater than could be expected from such an explosion, and the observed forest damage is attributed to outflow of volcanic material. The pressure-time signature obtained at Toledo, Washington, showed a long, 13-min duration negative phase as well as a second, hour-long compression phase, both probably caused by ejacta dynamics rather than standard explosion wave phenomenology. The peculiar audibility pattern, with the blast being heard only at ranges beyond about 100 km, is explicable by finite amplitude propagation effects. Near the source, compression was slow, taking more than a second but probably less than 5 s, so that it went unnoticed by human ears and susceptible buildings were not damaged. There was no damage as Toledo (54 km), where the recorded amplitude would have broken windows with a fast compression. An explanation is that wave emissions at high elevation angles traveled to the upper stratosphere, where low ambient air pressures caused this energetic pressure oscillation to form a shock wave with rapid, nearly instantaneous compression. Atmospheric refraction then returned part of this wave to ground level at long ranges, where the fast compressions were clearly audible. copyright American Geophysical Union 1987

  17. Source parameters of microearthquakes at Mount St Helens (USA)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tusa, Giuseppina; Brancato, Alfonso; Gresta, Stefano; Malone, Stephen D.

    2006-01-01

    We estimate the source parameters for a selection of microearthquakes that occurred at Mount St Helens in the period 1995–1998. Excluding the activity of 2004 September, this time period includes the most intense episode of earthquake activity since the last dome-building eruption in 1986 October. 200 seismograms were processed to obtain seismic moments, source radii, stress drops and average fault slip. The source parameters were determined from the spectral analysis of P waves, after correction for attenuation and site effects. In particular, P-wave quality (Qp) and site (S) factors have been previously calculated in the frequency ranges 2–7 Hz and 18–30 Hz. Because it was impossible to perform corrections for Qp and S over the whole spectrum we applied a new approach, based on the notion of ‘holed spectrum’, to estimate spectral parameters. The term ‘holed spectrum’ indicates a spectrum lacking corrected spectral amplitude values at certain frequencies. We carried out a statistical study to verify that dealing with the ‘holed spectrum’ does not lead to significant differences in the estimates of spectral parameters. We also investigated the dependence of spectral parameters (low-frequency level, corner frequency and high-frequency decay) on the bandwidth of spectral hole, and defined the threshold values for three different spectral models. Displacement ‘holed spectra’, corrected by attenuation and site response, are then used to determine spectral parameters in order to calculate seismic source parameters. Seismic moments range from 1017 to 1019 dyne-cm, source dimensions from 100 to 350 m, and average fault slip from 0.003 to 0.1 cm. Self-similarity seems to break down in that stress drops are very low (0.1–1 bars). We postulate that seismicity is associated with a brittle shear failure mechanism occurring in a highly heterogeneous material under a relatively low stress regime.

  18. Physical and chemical characteristics of Mt. St. Helens airborne debris

    SciTech Connect

    Sedlacek, W.A.; Heiken, G.H.; Mroz, E.J.; Gladney, E.S.; Perrin, D.R.; Leifer, R.; Fisenne, I.; Hinchliffe, L.; Chuan, R.L.

    1980-01-01

    Tephra and aerosols from the May 18, 1980 eruption of Mt. St. Helens, Washington were sampled in the lower stratosphere with a WB-57F aircraft. The main body of the plume was intercepted over western Kansas on May 20, 48 hours after the eruption, at an altitude of 15.2 km. Concentrations on filter samples were 26 ng of SO/sub 4//g of air and 579 ng of ash/g of air. Angular glass pyroclasts ranged in size from 0.5 to 10 ..mu..m, with a mean grain size of 2 ..mu..m. Samples collected at altitudes of 16.7 and 12.5 km had only traces of SO/sub 4/ and ash. A second flight was flown, 72 hours after the eruption, on May 21. From north Texas to central Wyoming, at an altitude of 15.2 km, < 0.5 to 38 ng of ash/g of air and 1.0 to 2.2 ng of SO/sub 4//g of air were sampled. At an altitude of 18.3 km, from central Wyoming to NW New Mexico, the plume density and character were variable. Glassy pyroclasts similar to those sampled on the first flight range in size from 0.5 to 4 ..mu..m dia. Trace element analysis revealed some volatile element enrichment, but far less than previously observed in the plume from St. Augustine Volcano, 1976. Values of /sup 210/Po//sup 210/Pb were 0.7 to 1.32 comparable to the secular equilibrium value of 1.0 and far less than ratios previously reported by Lambert.

  19. Evolution of Crater Glacier, Mount St. Helens, Washington, September 2006-November 2009

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Walder, Joseph S.; Schilling, Steven P.; Sherrod, David R.; Vallance, James W.

    2010-01-01

    Lava-dome emplacement through a glacier was observed for the first time during the 2004-08 eruption of Mount St. Helens and documented using photography, photogrammetry, and geodetic measurements. Previously published reports present such documentation through September 2006; this report extends that documentation until November 2009.

  20. Atmospheric Effects and Potential Climatic Impact of the 1980 Eruptions of Mount St. Helens

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deepak, A. (Editor)

    1982-01-01

    Measurements and studies of the 1980 Mount St. Helens volcanic eruptions and their atmospheric effects and climatic impact are addressed. Specific areas discussed include: (1) nature and impact of volcanic eruptions; (2) in situ measurements of effluents; (3) remote sensing measurements; (4) transport and dispersion of volcanic effluents; (5) chemistry of volcanic effluents; and (6) weather and potential climate impact.

  1. Seismic evidence for a cold serpentinized mantle wedge beneath Mount St Helens

    PubMed Central

    Hansen, S. M.; Schmandt, B.; Levander, A.; Kiser, E.; Vidale, J. E.; Abers, G. A.; Creager, K. C.

    2016-01-01

    Mount St Helens is the most active volcano within the Cascade arc; however, its location is unusual because it lies 50 km west of the main axis of arc volcanism. Subduction zone thermal models indicate that the down-going slab is decoupled from the overriding mantle wedge beneath the forearc, resulting in a cold mantle wedge that is unlikely to generate melt. Consequently, the forearc location of Mount St Helens raises questions regarding the extent of the cold mantle wedge and the source region of melts that are responsible for volcanism. Here using, high-resolution active-source seismic data, we show that Mount St Helens sits atop a sharp lateral boundary in Moho reflectivity. Weak-to-absent PmP reflections to the west are attributed to serpentinite in the mantle-wedge, which requires a cold hydrated mantle wedge beneath Mount St Helens (<∼700 °C). These results suggest that the melt source region lies east towards Mount Adams. PMID:27802263

  2. Could Separate Be Equal? Helene Lange and Women's Education in Imperial Germany.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Albisetti, James C.

    1982-01-01

    Helene Lange worked to obtain equal educational opportunities for women in Germany at the end of the nineteenth century. She tried to improve teacher training for women, enhance the curriculum in girls' high schools, and increase professional training opportunities for women. (AM)

  3. Mt. St. Helens ash in lakes in the Lower Grand Coulee, Washington State

    SciTech Connect

    Edmondson, W.T.; Litt, A.H.

    1983-01-01

    In 1979, an experiment to assess the effects of an introduced predator, cutthroat trout (Salmo clarki henshawi), on the biota of two alkaline lakes, Soap Lake and Lake Lenore, in Washington was initiated. This report discusses the effects of the Mt. St. Helens eruption and associated ash fall on the experiment. (ACR)

  4. I Do and I Understand (Glen Helen Workshop: April 29-May 1, 1971).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pinson, Rosie Barajas; And Others

    During the teacher workshop conducted at the Glen Helen Outdoor Education Center at Yellow Springs, Ohio, oral language techniques, Mexican American culture, and outdoor education were given high priority in training teachers to serve migrant children effectively. Four of the workshop presentations have been adapted for this publication. One of…

  5. The Larry Jarret House Program at the Helen Beebe Speech and Hearing Center.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goldberg, Donald M.; Talbot, Pamela J.

    1993-01-01

    The Larry Jarret House is a one-week in-residence program of the Helen Beebe Speech and Hearing Center in Easton, Pennsylvania, for parents of children with hearing impairments. The program is designed to help parents maximize their child's use of residual hearing in daily life situations to develop spoken language. (JDD)

  6. An Interview: Helen B. Landgarten, MA, MFCC, A.T.R.-BC, HLM.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Warren, Linda A.

    1995-01-01

    An interview with Helen B. Landgarten, a pioneer in art psychotherapy, addresses how she came to work in this field, her training, her experience with Jungian therapy, current approaches to training art therapists, her own painting, and the role of the American Art Therapy Association today. (DB)

  7. Novel peach flower types in a segregating population from ‘Helen Borchers’

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Several new peach (Prunus persica) flower types were discovered in an F2 segregating population from an open-pollinated, non-showy-flowered F1 seedling of ‘Helen Borchers’, a double-flowered ornamental cultivar. The novel flower types were white and red single-flowered, non-showy blooms, as well as ...

  8. Mount st. Helens eruption of 18 may 1980: air waves and explosive yield.

    PubMed

    Donn, W L; Balachandran, N K

    1981-07-31

    Strong atmospheric acoustic-gravity waves were recorded by sensitive microbarographs and seismographs at large distances from the Mount St. Helens eruption of 18 May 1980. Wave signatures were similar to those of waves from large nuclear explosions. Independent theoretical and empirical analyses indicate that the explosive yield of the eruption was approximately 35 megatons.

  9. Geothermal exploration philosophy for Mount St. Helens (and other cascade volcanoes)

    SciTech Connect

    Schuster, J.E.; Ruscetta, C.A.; Foley, D.

    1981-05-01

    Factors which hampered geothermal exploration of Cascade stratovolcanoes are listed. What was known about geothermal energy in the Mount Saint Helen's area prior to 1980 and what has been learned as a result of the 1980 eruptions are reviewed. An exploration philosophy is presented. (MHR)

  10. Deposits of large volcanic debris avalanches at Mount St. Helens and Mount Shasta volcanoes

    SciTech Connect

    Glicken, H.

    1985-01-01

    Large volcanic debris avalanches are among the world's largest mass movements. The rockslide-debris avalanche of the May 18, 1980, eruption of Mount St. Helens produced a 2.8 km/sup 3/ deposit and is the largest historic mass movement. A Pleistocene debris avalanche at Mount Shasta produced a 26 km/sup 3/ deposit that may be the largest Quaternary mass movement. The hummocky deposits at both volcanoes consist of rubble divided into (1) block facies that comprises unconsolidated pieces of the old edifice transported relatively intact, and (2) matrix facies that comprises a mixture of rocks from the old mountain and material picked up from the surrounding terrain. At Mount St. Helens, the juvenile dacite is found in the matrix facies, indicating that matrix facies formed from explosions of the erupting magma as well as from disaggregation and mixing of blocks. The block facies forms both hummocks and interhummock areas in the proximal part of the St. Helens avalanche deposit. At Mount St. Helens, the density of the old cone is 21% greater than the density of the avalanche deposit. Block size decreases with distance. Clast size, measured in the field and by sieving, coverages about a mean with distance, which suggests that blocks disaggregated and mixed together during transport.

  11. Seismic evidence for a cold serpentinized mantle wedge beneath Mount St Helens.

    PubMed

    Hansen, S M; Schmandt, B; Levander, A; Kiser, E; Vidale, J E; Abers, G A; Creager, K C

    2016-11-01

    Mount St Helens is the most active volcano within the Cascade arc; however, its location is unusual because it lies 50 km west of the main axis of arc volcanism. Subduction zone thermal models indicate that the down-going slab is decoupled from the overriding mantle wedge beneath the forearc, resulting in a cold mantle wedge that is unlikely to generate melt. Consequently, the forearc location of Mount St Helens raises questions regarding the extent of the cold mantle wedge and the source region of melts that are responsible for volcanism. Here using, high-resolution active-source seismic data, we show that Mount St Helens sits atop a sharp lateral boundary in Moho reflectivity. Weak-to-absent PmP reflections to the west are attributed to serpentinite in the mantle-wedge, which requires a cold hydrated mantle wedge beneath Mount St Helens (<∼700 °C). These results suggest that the melt source region lies east towards Mount Adams.

  12. Effects on the Mount St. Helens volcanic cloud on turbidity at Ann Arbor, Michigan

    SciTech Connect

    Ryznar, E.; Weber, M.R.; Hallaron, T.S.

    1981-11-01

    Measurements of turbidity were made at the University of Michigan irradiance and metorlogical measurement facility just prior to, during and after the passage of the volcanic cloud from the 18 May 1980 eruption of Mount St. Helens. They were made with a Volz sunphotometer at wavelengths of 500 and 880 nm.

  13. Contingency Planning for Natural Disasters: The Mount St. Helens Experience. AIR Forum 1981 Paper.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burns, James A.; Concordia, Louis R.

    The effectiveness of existing contingency planning efforts at five community colleges, three colleges, and five universities during the Mount St. Helens eruptions in 1980 in Washington state was assessed. Planning efforts in the areas of institutional policy, academic policy, business office, physical plant, residence halls, financial aid, and…

  14. Seismic evidence for a cold serpentinized mantle wedge beneath Mount St Helens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansen, S. M.; Schmandt, B.; Levander, A.; Kiser, E.; Vidale, J. E.; Abers, G. A.; Creager, K. C.

    2016-11-01

    Mount St Helens is the most active volcano within the Cascade arc; however, its location is unusual because it lies 50 km west of the main axis of arc volcanism. Subduction zone thermal models indicate that the down-going slab is decoupled from the overriding mantle wedge beneath the forearc, resulting in a cold mantle wedge that is unlikely to generate melt. Consequently, the forearc location of Mount St Helens raises questions regarding the extent of the cold mantle wedge and the source region of melts that are responsible for volcanism. Here using, high-resolution active-source seismic data, we show that Mount St Helens sits atop a sharp lateral boundary in Moho reflectivity. Weak-to-absent PmP reflections to the west are attributed to serpentinite in the mantle-wedge, which requires a cold hydrated mantle wedge beneath Mount St Helens (<~700 °C). These results suggest that the melt source region lies east towards Mount Adams.

  15. Sediment-discharge characteristics of the Toutle River following the Mount St. Helens eruption

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Culbertson, J.K.; Dinehart, R.L.

    1982-01-01

    Dinehart, R.L., Culbertson, J.K., 1982, Sediment-discharge characteristics of the Toutle River following the Mount St. Helens eruption, [abs.]: in Proceedings from the Conference on Mount St. Helens— Effects on water resources: State of Washington Water Research Center, p. 149.

  16. Meet Helen J. Post-Brown, Director: Sunbeam Child Care Center, Fairmont, West Virginia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Exchange: The Early Childhood Leaders' Magazine Since 1978, 2005

    2005-01-01

    This article profiles Helen J. Post-Brown, director of Sunbeam Child Care Center in Fairmont and president of West Virginia Childcare Centers United, and explains how Post-Brown faced the obstacles when managing a child care business. In the fall of 1980, Post-Brown started Sunbeam as a small preschool with 12 children. Over the years, Sunbeam has…

  17. The structure, dynamics, and chemical composition of noneruptive plumes from Mount St. Helens, 1980-1988

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McGee, K.A.

    1992-01-01

    From May 1980 to September 1988, more than 1000 fixed-wing aircraft flights were made with a correlation spectrometer to measure the sulfur dioxide flux from Mount St. Helens volcano. These flights also provided valuable data on the structure and dynamics of noneruptive plumes emanating from Mount St. Helens. During 1980 and part of 1981, an infrared spectrometer was also used to measure carbon dioxide emission rates. At distances up to 25 km from Mount St. Helens, plume widths can range up to 20 km or more, with width/thickness ratios from 3 to about 30. Maximum sulfur dioxide concentrations in these plumes depend on wind speed and are typically under 5 ppm and usually 1 ppm or less. Close examination of the plume data reveals that the characteristics of quiescent plumes from Mount St. Helens are strongly affected by certain meteorological conditions such as thermal and wind stratification in the troposphere, as well as by the topography of the volcano. ?? 1992.

  18. EPA Brownfields Grant Will Aid City of St. Helens with Plans to Revitalize Waterfront Area

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    (Seattle - March 17, 2015) The City of St. Helens, Oregon has been selected to receive a $200,000 Brownfields Area-Wide Planning (AWP) grant from EPA to help move towards the goal of revitalizing a former industrial property along the Columbia River waterf

  19. Lateral blasts at Mount St. Helens and hazard zonation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Crandell, D.R.; Hoblitt, R.P.

    1986-01-01

    Lateral blasts at andesitic and dacitic volcanoes can produce a variety of direct hazards, including ballistic projectiles which can be thrown to distances of at least 10 km and pyroclastic density flows which can travel at high speed to distances of more than 30 km. Indirect effect that may accompany such explosions include wind-borne ash, pyroclastic flows formed by the remobilization of rock debris thrown onto sloping ground, and lahars. Two lateral blasts occurred at a lava dome on the north flank of Mount St. Helens about 1200 years ago; the more energetic of these threw rock debris northeastward across a sector of about 30?? to a distance of at least 10 km. The ballistic debris fell onto an area estimated to be 50 km2, and wind-transported ash and lapilli derived from the lateral-blast cloud fell on an additional lobate area of at least 200 km2. In contrast, the vastly larger lateral blast of May 18, 1980, created a devastating pyroclastic density flow that covered a sector of as much as 180??, reached a maximum distance of 28 km, and within a few minutes directly affected an area of about 550 km2. The May 18 lateral blast resulted from the sudden, landslide-induced depressurization of a dacite cryptodome and the hydrothermal system that surrounded it within the volcano. We propose that lateral-blast hazard assessments for lava domes include an adjoining hazard zone with a radius of at least 10 km. Although a lateral blast can occur on any side of a dome, the sector directly affected by any one blast probably will be less than 180??. Nevertheless, a circular hazard zone centered on the dome is suggested because of the difficulty of predicting the direction of a lateral blast. For the purpose of long-term land-use planning, a hazard assessment for lateral blasts caused by explosions of magma bodies or pressurized hydrothermal systems within a symmetrical volcano could designate a circular potential hazard area with a radius of 35 km centered on the volcano

  20. Blast dynamics at Mount St Helens on 18 May 1980

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kieffer, S.W.

    1981-01-01

    At 8.32 a.m. on 18 May 1980, failure of the upper part of the north slope of Mount St Helens triggered a lateral eruption ('the blast') that devastated the conifer forests in a sector covering ???500 km2 north of the volcano. I present here a steady flow model for the blast dynamics and propose that through much of the devastated area the blast was a supersonic flow of a complex multiphase (solid, liquid, vapour) mixture. The shape of the blast zone; pressure, temperature, velocity (Mach number) and density distributions within the flow; positions of weak and strong internal shocks; and mass flux, energy flux, and total energy are calculated. The shape of blast zone was determined by the initial areal expansion from the reservoir, by internal expansion and compression waves (including shocks), and by the density of the expanding mixture. The pressure within the flow dropped rapidly away from the source of the blast until, at a distance of ???11 km, the flow became underpressured relative to the surrounding atmosphere. Weak shocks within the flow subparallel to the east and west margins coalesced at about this distance into a strong Mach disk shock, across which the flow velocities would have dropped from supersonic to subsonic as the pressure rose back towards ambient. The positions of the shocks may be reflected in differences in the patterns of felled trees. At the limits of the devastated area, the temperature had dropped only 20% from the reservoir temperature because the entrained solids thermally buffered the flow (the dynamic and thermodynamic effects of the admixture of the surrounding atmosphere and the uprooted forest and soils into the flow are not considered). The density of the flow decreased with distance until, at the limits of the blast zone, 20-25 km from the volcano, the density became comparable with that of the surrounding (dirty) atmosphere and the flow became buoyant and ramped up into the atmosphere. According to the model, the mass flux per

  1. Large-N Nodal Seismic Deployment at Mount St Helens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansen, S. M.; Schmandt, B.; Vidale, J. E.; Creager, K. C.; Levander, A.; Kiser, E.; Barklage, M.; Hollis, D.

    2014-12-01

    In late July of 2014 over 900 autonomous short period seismometers were deployed within 12 km of the summit crater at Mount St Helens. In concert with the larger iMUSH experiment, these data constitute the largest seismic interrogation of an active volcano ever conducted. The array was deployed along the road and trail system of the national volcanic monument and adjacent regions with an average station spacing of 250 meters and included several station clusters with increased sampling density. The 10 Hz phones recorded the vertical component wavefield continuously at 250 Hz sampling rate over a period of approximately two weeks. During the recording time, the Pacific Northwest Seismic Network detected ~65 earthquakes within the array footprint ranging in magnitude from -0.9 to 1.1, the majority of which were located beneath the crater at less than 10 km depth. In addition to the natural seismicity, 23 explosion sources from the iMUSH active source experiment were recorded, several of which exceeded magnitude 2. Preliminary results for this project will include an expanded event catalog as the array should significantly reduce the detection threshold. The sheer number of instruments allows for stacking of station clusters producing high signal-to-noise beam traces which can be used for event triggering and for creating waveform templates to measure relative travel-times across the array via cross-correlation. The ability of the array to estimate focal mechanisms from event radiation patterns and delineate complex path effects will also be investigated. The density and azimuthal coverage provide by this array offers an excellent opportunity to investigate short-wavelength variations of the seismic wavefield in a complex geologic environment. Previous seismic tomography results suggest the presence of a shallow magma chamber at 1-3 km depth near the region of shallow seismicity as evidenced by a P wave low-velocity anomaly of at least -5.5% [Waite and Moran, 2009

  2. Double-Difference Earthquake Locations Using imaging Magma Under St. Helens (iMUSH) Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, M. C. B.; Ulberg, C. W.; Creager, K. C.

    2015-12-01

    The imaging Magma Under St. Helens (iMUSH) project deployed a magnetotelluric survey, high-resolution active-source experiment, two-year passive-source experiment, and gathered geochemical-petrological data to better understand the magmatic architecture of Mount St. Helens. A primary goal of the passive source experiment is to create 3-D P-wave and S-wave velocity models under the volcano from the surface to the slab. We use hypoDD, a double-difference algorithm, to gain high-precision relative earthquake locations for several hundred events within tens of kilometers of the Mount St. Helens crater. We use data from the first half (2014 June- 2015 July) of the two-year passive-source component of the iMUSH array recording six hundred useable earthquakes with a high-event density near the volcanic crater. The array includes seventy evenly-spaced broadband seismometers continuously sampling at 50 Hz within a 50 km radius of Mount St. Helens, and is augmented by dozens of permanent network stations. Precise relative earthquake locations are determined for spatially clustered hypocenters using a combination of hand picked P-wave arrivals and high-precision relative times determined by cross correlation of waveforms recorded at a common station for event pairs using a 1-D velocity structure. These high-quality relative times will be used to help constrain seismic tomography models as well. We will interrupt earthquake clusters in the context of emerging 3-D wave-speed models from the active-source and passive-source observations. We are examining the relationship between hypocentral locations and regions of partial melt, as well as the relationship between hypocentral locations and the NNW-SSE trending Saint Helens seismic Zone.

  3. A Gentle Frost: Poet Helen Frost Talks about the Healing Power of Poetry and Her Latest Novel

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Margolis, Rick

    2006-01-01

    This article presents an interview with poet Helen Frost. Frost talked about how poetry can help at-risk children. She also related the challenges she faced when she wrote her latest book titled "The Braid."

  4. Geologic Map of Mount St. Helens, Washington Prior to the 1980 Eruption

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hopson, Clifford A.

    2008-01-01

    It is rare that a geologic map exists for a volcano prior to such a catastrophic modification as that produced by the eruption of Mount St. Helens in 1980. As such, this map provides an important historical record of the volcano prior to that eruption. The map has not been reviewed or checked for conformity to USGS editorial standards or stratigraphic nomenclature, and it has not been digitized. This version of the map is unchanged from that submitted to the USGS for publication shortly after the 1980 eruption of Mount St. Helens and includes unresolved inconsistencies with the subsequently published work of Crandell (1987) and Mullineaux (1996). Nevertheless, it is the most accurate available depiction of the pre-1980 edifice and is published here for comparison with more recent geologic mapping and historical perspectives.

  5. Processing and interpretation of microbarograph signals generated by the explosion of Mount St. Helens

    SciTech Connect

    Delclos, C.; Blanc, E. ); Broche, P. ); Glangeaud, F.; Lacoume, J.L. )

    1990-04-20

    Following the eruption of the Mount St. Helens volcano on May 18, 1980, atmospheric waves were recorded by a network of micrographs located over 7,000 km from the source. Analysis of these data requires the use of complex processing techniques based on a high-resolution method to extract the signals produced by the St. Helens source from spurious waves or noise in each record. This facilitates interpretation of the wave trains in terms of propagation modes. It is thus shown that Lamb mode L{sub 0} is present in the low-frequency part of all signals, whereas acoustic modes (more probably A{prime}{sub 2}) are needed to explain all the properties of the high-frequency part, which is clearly observed for a westward and a southward propagation.

  6. Monitoring vegetation recovery patterns on Mount St. Helens using thermal infrared multispectral data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Langran, Kenneth J.

    1986-01-01

    The Mount St. Helens 1980 eruption offers an opportunity to study vegetation recovery rates and patterns in a perturbed ecosystem. The eruptions of Mount St. Helens created new surfaces by stripping and implacing large volumes of eroded material and depositing tephra in the blast area and on the flanks of the mountain. Areas of major disturbance are those in the blast zone that were subject to debris avalanche, pyroclastic flows, mudflows, and blowdown and scorched timber; and those outside the blast zone that received extensive tephra deposits. It was observed that during maximum daytime solar heating, surface temperatures of vegetated areas are cooler than surrounding nonvegetated areas, and that surface temperature varies with percent vegetation cover. A method of measuring the relationship between effective radiant temperature (ERT) and percent vegetation cover in the thermal infrared (8 to 12 microns) region of the electromagnetic spectrum was investigated.

  7. Radio interferometric detection of a traveling ionospheric disturbance excited by the explosion of Mount St. Helens

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roberts, D. H.; Rogers, A. E. E.; Allen, B. R.; Bennett, C. L.; Burke, B. F.; Greenfield, P. E.; Lawrence, C. R.; Clark, T. A.

    1982-01-01

    A large-amplitude traveling ionospheric disturbance (TID) was detected over Owens Valley, California, on May 18, 1980, by a highly sensitive very long baseline interferometry (VLBI) radio astronomy experiment. This TID is interpreted as the response of the ionosphere to a gravity wave excited in the neutral atmosphere by the explosion of Mount St. Helens that took place at 1532 UT on that day. A model, invoking the point-excitation of internal gravity waves in an isothermal atmosphere, which fits observations of the TID at several other stations, leads to identification of the features observed in the VLBI data. Small-amplitude higher-frequency changes in the ionosphere were detected for several hours after the passage of the large-amplitude Mount St. Helens TID, but it is not clear whether these were excited by the passage of the gravity wave or were background fluctuations.

  8. Radio interferometric detection of a traveling ionospheric disturbance excited by the explosion of Mount St. Helens

    SciTech Connect

    Roberts, D.H.; Rogers, A.E.E.; Allen, B.R.; Bennett, C.L.; Burke, B.F.; Greenfield, P.; Lawrence, C.R.; Clark, T.A.

    1982-08-01

    A large-amplitude traveling ionospheric disturbance (TID) was detected over Owens Valley, California, on May 18, 1980, by a highly sensitive very long baseline interferometry (VLBI) radio astronomy experiment. This TID is interpreted as the response of the ionosphere to a gravity wave excited in the neutral atmosphere by the explosion of Mount St. Helens that took place at 1532 UT on that day. A model, invoking the point-excitation of internal gravity waves in an isothermal atmosphere, which fits observations of the TID at several other stations, leads to identification of the features observed in the VLBI data. Small-amplitude higher-frequency changes in the ionosphere were detected for several hours after the passage of the large-amplitude Mount St. Helens TID, but it is not clear whether these were excited by the passage of the gravity wave or were background fluctuations.

  9. Mount St. Helens erupts again: activity from September 2004 through March 2005

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Major, Jon J.; Scott, William E.; Driedger, Carolyn; Dzurisin, Dan

    2005-01-01

    Eruptive activity at Mount St. Helens captured the world’s attention in 1980 when the largest historical landslide on Earth and a powerful explosion reshaped the volcano, created its distinctive crater, and dramatically modified the surrounding landscape. Over the next 6 years, episodic extrusions of lava built a large dome in the crater. From 1987 to 2004, Mount St. Helens returned to a period of relative quiet, interrupted by occasional, short-lived seismic swarms that lasted minutes to days, by months-to-yearslong increases in background seismicity that probably reflected replenishment of magma deep underground, and by minor steam explosions as late as 1991. During this period a new glacier grew in the crater and wrapped around and partly buried the lava dome. Although the volcano was relatively quiet, scientists with the U.S. Geological Survey and University of Washington’s Pacific Northwest Seismograph Network continued to closely monitor it for signs of renewed activity.

  10. Preliminary Shear Velocity Tomography of Mt St Helens, Washington from iMUSH Array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crosbie, K.; Abers, G. A.; Creager, K. C.; Moran, S. C.; Denlinger, R. P.; Ulberg, C. W.

    2015-12-01

    The imaging Magma Under Mount St Helens (iMUSH) experiment will illuminate the crust beneath Mt St Helens volcano. The ambient noise tomography (ANT) component of this experiment measures shear velocity structure, which is more sensitive than P velocity to the presence of melt and other pore fluids. Seventy passive-source broadband seismometers for iMUSH were deployed in the summer of 2014 in a dense array of 100 Km diameter with a 10 km station spacing. We cross correlated ambient noise in 120 s windows and summed the result over many months for pairs of stations. Then frequency-domain methods on these cross correlations are employed to measure the phase velocities (Ekström et al. Geophys Rev Lett, 2009). Unlike velocities attained by group velocity methods, velocities for path lengths as small as one wavelength can be measured, enabling analysis of higher frequency signals and increasing spatial resolution. The minimum station spacing from which signals can be recovered ranges from 12 km at 0.18 Hz, a frequency that dominantly samples the upper crust to 20 km, to 37 km at 0.04 Hz, a frequency sensitive to structure through the crust and uppermost mantle, with lower spacing at higher frequencies. These phase velocities are tomographically inverted to obtain shear velocity maps for each frequency, assuming ray theory. Initial shear velocity maps for frequencies between 0.04-0.18 Hz reveal low-velocity sediments in the Puget Lowland west of Mount St Helens at 0.16-0.18 Hz, and a low velocity zone near 0.10 Hz between Mt Rainier and Mt Adams, east of Mount St Helens. The latter may reflect large-scale crustal plumbing of the arc between volcanic centers. In subsequent analyses these ANT results will be jointly inverted with receiver functions in order to further resolve crustal and upper mantle structure.

  11. VLF electromagnetic investigations of the crater and central dome of Mount St. Helens, Washington

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Towle, J.N.

    1983-01-01

    A very low frequency (VLF) electromagnetic induction survey in the crater of Mount St. Helens has identified several electrically conductive structures that appear to be associated with thermal anomalies and ground water within the crater. The most interesting of these conductive structures lies beneath the central dome. It is probably a partial melt of dacite similar to that comprising the June 1981 lobe of the central dome. ?? 1983.

  12. Mount St. Helens, Washington Feasibility Report & Environmental Impact Statement. Volume 1: Main Report

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-12-01

    reduces summer water temperature to tolerable levels. Tree growth rate data for Mount St. Helens mudflows soils indicate 5-6 years would be required for...huckleberry, salal, and Oregon 8 grape be planted on Corps lands outside the sediment inundation zone to replace forage lost to sediment coverage...red clover mix continue throughout the life of the projec.t. 9. Elk forage such as ninebark, Oregon grape be planted on sediment inundation zone to

  13. Hydrologic consequences of hot-rock/snowpack interactions at Mount St. Helens Volcano, Washington

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pierson, Thomas C.

    1999-01-01

    Emplacement of hot volcanic debris onto a thick snowpack can trigger hazardous rapid flows of sediment (including ice grains) and water, which can travel far beyond the flanks of a volcano. Five papers in this volume document aspects of rapid-snowmelt events that occurred in Mount St. Helens between 1982 and 1984; one paper offers a theoretical explanation of features present at depositional contacts between hot rock and snow.

  14. Multi-scale roughness spectra of Mount St. Helens debris flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Austin, Richard T.; England, Anthony W.

    1993-01-01

    A roughness spectrum allows surface structure to be interpreted as a sum of sinusoidal components with differing wavelengths. Knowledge of the roughness spectrum gives insight into the mechanisms responsible for electromagnetic scattering at a given wavelength. Measured spectra from 10-year-old primary debris flow surfaces at Mount St. Helens conform to a power-law spectral model, suggesting that these surfaces are scaling over the measured range of spatial frequencies. Measured spectra from water-deposited surfaces deviate from this model.

  15. Impact of Mount St. Helens eruption on hydrology and water quality

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bonelli, J. E.; Taylor, H. E.; Klein, J. M.

    1982-01-01

    The 1980 eruptions of Mount St. Helens in southeast Washington resulted in a pronounced effect on the surface and ground water resources of the state. In response to the volcanic activity, the U.S. Geological Survey intensified statewide surface and ground water sampling programs to determine the nature and magnitude of the volcanic-induced variations. Streams to the east of Mount St. Helens received the major ash fallout. Chemical effects were best noted in smaller streams sampled 60 to 70 miles northeast of Mount St. Helens. The chemical variations observed were pronounced but short lived. Sulfate and chloride increases in anionic composition were prevalent immediately following the eruption; however, the original bicarbonate predominance was again attained within several days. Suspended iron and aluminum concentrations were similarly elevated during the period of greatest ash deposition (highest turbidity); however, the dissolved concentrations remained relatively constant. Depressions of pH were minor and short lived. Streams draining to the south, tributaries to the Columbia river, showed little observable changes in water chemistry. Streams draining to the west (Toutle river and its tributaries) were compositionally affected by the various volcanic activities. Chloride and sulfate anion percentage exceeded the bicarbonate percentage up to one month following the eruption period. Streams and lakes sampled in the immediate vicinity of Mount St. Helens, in addition to trace metals, contained organic compounds derived from decomposing wood buried in the debris deposits. This organic material may constitute a significant source of organic compounds to surface and ground water for some time to come.

  16. The Evolution and Role of the Saharan Air Layer During Hurricane Helene (2006)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Braun, Scott A.; Sippel, Jason A.; Shie, Chung-Lin; Boller, Ryan A.

    2013-01-01

    The Saharan air layer (SAL) has received considerable attention in recent years as a potential negative influence on the formation and development of Atlantic tropical cyclones. Observations of substantial Saharan dust in the near environment of Hurricane Helene (2006) during the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) African Monsoon Multidisciplinary Activities (AMMA) Experiment (NAMMA) field campaign led to suggestions about the suppressing influence of the SAL in this case. In this study, a suite of satellite remote sensing data, global meteorological analyses, and airborne data are used to characterize the evolution of the SAL in the environment of Helene and assess its possible impact on the intensity of the storm. The influence of the SAL on Helene appears to be limited to the earliest stages of development, although the magnitude of that impact is difficult to determine observationally. Saharan dust was observed on the periphery of the storm during the first two days of development after genesis when intensification was slow. Much of the dust was observed to move well westward of the storm thereafter, with little SAL air present during the remainder of the storm's lifetime and with the storm gradually becoming a category-3 strength storm four days later. Dry air observed to wrap around the periphery of Helene was diagnosed to be primarily non-Saharan in origin (the result of subsidence) and appeared to have little impact on storm intensity. The eventual weakening of the storm is suggested to result from an eyewall replacement cycle and substantial reduction of the sea surface temperatures beneath the hurricane as its forward motion decreased.

  17. Carbonyl sulfide and carbon disulfide from the eruptions of mount st. Helens.

    PubMed

    Rasmussen, R A; Khalil, M A; Dalluge, R W; Penkett, S A; Jones, B

    1982-02-05

    Ash from the massive 18 May 1980 eruption of Mount St. Helens readily gave off large amounts of carbonyl sulfide and carbon disulfide gases at room temperature. These findings suggest that the sulfur that enhances the Junge sulfate layer in the stratosphere after volcanic eruptions could be carried directly to the upper atmosphere as carbonyl sulfide and carbon disulfide adsorbed on ash particles from major volcanic eruptions.

  18. Filter measurements of stratospheric sulfate and chloride in the eruption plume of Mount St. Helens

    SciTech Connect

    Gandrud, B.W.; Lazrus, A.L.

    1981-01-01

    Five flights of the U-2 aircraft with a filter sampler aboard were flown in the Mount St. Helens debris from 19 May to 17 June 1980. Sulfate concentrations as large as 216 times the expected background were observed. The enhancements of acid chloride vapor were considerably smaller, suggesting an insignificant increase of background values of hydrogen chloride once the plume is well mixed throughout the lower stratosphere.

  19. Atmospheric Effects and Potential Climatic Impact of the 1980 Eruptions of Mount St. Helens

    SciTech Connect

    Deepak, A.

    1982-10-01

    Measurements and studies of the 1980 Mount St. Helens volcanic eruptions and their atmospheric effects and climatic impact are addressed. Specific areas discussed include: (1) nature and impact of volcanic eruptions, (2) in situ measurements of effluents, (3) remote sensing measurements, (4) transport and dispersion of volcanic effluents, (5) chemistry of volcanic effluents, and (6) weather and potential climate impact. For individual titles, see N83-11535 through N83-11562.

  20. Temporal change in coda wave attenuation observed during an eruption of Mount St. Helens

    SciTech Connect

    Fehler, M.; Roberts, P.; Fairbanks, T.

    1988-05-10

    During the past few years there have been numerous reports of changes in coda wave attenuation occurring before major earthquakes. These observations are important because they may provide insight into stress-related structural changes taking place in the focal region prior to the occurrence of large earthquakes. The results of these studies led us to suspect that temporal changes in coda wave attenuation might also accompany volcanic eruptions. By measuring power decay envelopes for earthquakes at Mount St. Helens recorded before, during, and after an eruption that took place during September 3--6, 1981, we found that coda Q/sup -1/ for frequencies between 6 and 30 Hz was 20--30% higher before the eruption than after. The change is attributed to an increase in the density of open microcracks in the rock associated with inflation of the volcano prior to the eruption. Q/sup -1/ was found to be only weakly dependent on frequency and displayed a slight peak near 10 Hz. The weak frequency dependence is attributed to the dominance of intrinsic attenuation over scattering attenuation, since it is generally accepted that intrinsic attenuation is constant with frequency, whereas scattering attenuation decreases strongly at higher frequencies. The weak frequency dependence of Q/sup -1/ at Mount St. Helens contrasts with results reported for studies in nonvolcanic regions. The peak in Q/sup -1/ near 10 Hz at Mount St. Helens is attributed to the scale length of heterogeneity responsible for generating backscattered waves. Results for nonvolcanic regions have shown this peak to occur near 0.5 Hz. Thus a smaller scale length of heterogeneity is required to explain the 10-Hz peak at Mount St. Helens. copyright American Geophysical Union 1988

  1. Impact of Mount St. Helens eruption on hydrology and water quality

    SciTech Connect

    Bonelli, J.E.; Taylor, H.E.; Klein, J.M.

    1982-10-01

    The 1980 eruptions of Mount St. Helens in southeast Washington resulted in a pronounced effect on the surface and ground water resources of the state. In response to the volcanic activity, the U.S. Geological Survey intensified statewide surface and ground water sampling programs to determine the nature and magnitude of the volcanic-induced variations. Streams to the east of Mount St. Helens received the major ash fallout. Chemical effects were best noted in smaller streams sampled 60 to 70 miles northeast of Mount St. Helens. The chemical variations observed were pronounced but short lived. Sulfate and chloride increases in anionic composition were prevalent immediately following the eruption however, the original bicarbonate predominance was again attained within several days. Suspended iron and aluminum concentrations were similarly elevated during the period of greatest ash deposition (highest turbidity) however, the dissolved concentrations remained relatively constant. Depressions of pH were minor and short lived. Streams draining to the south, tributaries to the Columbia river, showed little observable changes in water chemistry. Streams draining to the west (Toutle river and its tributaries) were compositionally affected by the various volcanic activities. Chloride and sulfate anion percentage exceeded the bicarbonate percentage up to one month following the eruption period. Streams and lakes sampled in the immediate vicinity of Mount St. Helens, in addition to trace metals, contained organic compounds derived from decomposing wood buried in the debris deposits. This organic material may constitute a significant source of organic compounds to surface and ground water for some time to come.

  2. Measurements of cloud condensation nuclei in the stratosphere around the plume of Mount St. Helens

    SciTech Connect

    Rogers, C.F.; Hudson, J.G.; Kocmond, W.C.

    1981-01-01

    Measurements of cloud condensation nuclei were made from small samples of stratospheric air taken from a U-2 aircraft at altitudes ranging from 13 to 19 kilometers. The measured concentrations of nuclei both in and outside the plume from the May and June 1980 eruptions of Mount St. Helens were higher than expected, ranging from about 100 to about 1000 per cubic centimeter active at 1 percent supersaturation.

  3. Size distributions and mineralogy of ash particles in the stratosphere from eruptions of Mount St. Helens

    SciTech Connect

    Farlow, N.H.; Oberbeck, V.R.; Snetsinger, K.G.; Ferry, G.V.; Polkowski, G.; Hayes, D.M.

    1981-01-01

    Samples from the stratosphere obtained by U-2 aircraft after the first three major eruptions of Mount St. Helens contained large globules of liquid acid and ash. Because of their large size, these globules had disappeared from the lower stratosphere by late June 1980, leaving behind only smaller acid droplets. Particle-size distributions and mineralogy of the stratospheric ash grains demonstrate inhomogeneity in the eruption clouds.

  4. The mount st. Helens volcanic eruption of 18 may 1980: minimal climatic effect.

    PubMed

    Robock, A

    1981-06-19

    An energy-balance numerical climate model was used to simulate the effects of the Mount St. Helens volcanic eruption of 18 May 1980. The resulting surface temperature depression is a maximum of 0.1 degrees C in the winter in the polar region, but is an order of magnitude smaller than the observed natural variability from other effects and will therefore be undetectable.

  5. Measurements of cloud condensation nuclei in the stratosphere around the plume of mount st. Helens.

    PubMed

    Rogers, C F; Hudson, J G; Kocmond, W C

    1981-02-20

    Measurements of cloud condensation nuclei were made from small samples of stratospheric air taken from a U-2 aircraft at altitudes ranging from 13 to 19 kilometers. The measured concentrations of nuclei both in and outside the plume from the May and June 1980 eruptions of Mount St. Helens were higher than expected, ranging from about 100 to about 1000 per cubic centimeter active at 1 percent supersaturation.

  6. Mount St. Helens, Washington, 1980 volcanic eruption: magmatic gas component during the first 16 days

    SciTech Connect

    Stoiber, R.E.; Williams, S.N.; Malinconico, L.L.

    1980-01-01

    Eruption plumes of Mount St. Helens, Washington, showed low rates of sulfur dioxide emission, and ash leachates had low ratios of sulfur to chlorine. These data and the nonvesicularity of ash fragments are indicative of only a small eruptive magmatic component. The low amounts of soluble fluorine on the ashes pose no health problems. Violent magmatic activity is possible, and thus continued geochemical monitoring is advised.

  7. Initial effects of ashfall from mount st. Helens on vegetation in eastern washington and adjacent idaho.

    PubMed

    Mack, R N

    1981-07-31

    Extensive plant damage from the 18 May 1980 eruption of Mount St. Helens was largely restricted to acaulescent andprostrate dicot species in the ashfall area east of the Cascade Range (more than 150 kilometersfrom the vent). Veratrum californicum, a large monocot, displayed widespread stem death through mechanical overloading of the plant's clasping leaves. The ash surface in this area presents new opportunities for both seeds and seed predators.

  8. Mercury content of equisetum plants around mount st. Helens one year after the major eruption.

    PubMed

    Siegel, B Z; Siegel, S M

    1982-04-16

    The mercury content of young Equisetum plants collected around Mount St. Helens was higher in the direction of Yakima and Toppenish, Washington (northeast to east-northeast), than at any other compass heading and was about 20 times that measured around Portland, Oregon. The increase in substratum mercury was not as pronounced as that in plants but was also higher toward the northeast, the direction taken by the May 1980 volcanic plume.

  9. Mount st. Helens, washington, 1980 volcanic eruption: magmatic gas component during the first 16 days.

    PubMed

    Stoiber, R E; Williams, S N; Malinconico, L L

    1980-06-13

    Eruption plumes of Mount St. Helens, Washington, showed low rates of sulfur dioxide emission, and ash leachates had low ratios of sulfur to chlorine. These data and the nonvesicularity of ash fragments are indicative of only a small eruptive magmatic component. The low amounts of soluble fluorine on the ashes pose no health problems. Violent magmatic activity is possible, and thus continued geochemical monitoring is advised.

  10. A gravity current model for the May 18, 1980 Mount St. Helens plume

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bursik, M. I.; Carey, S. N.; Sparks, R. S. J.

    1992-01-01

    Observations of the stratospheric plume from the May 18, 1980 Mount St. Helens eruption suggest that it spread in the crosswind direction as an intrusive gravity current, as it was transported downwind. Grain size analyses of the plinian tephra are consistent with this model, suggesting that to distances of many hundreds of kilometers, turbulent atmospheric diffusion played a secondary role in plume spreading and tephra dispersal.

  11. Filter measurements of stratospheric sulfate and chloride in the eruption plume of mount st. Helens.

    PubMed

    Gandrud, B W; Lazrus, A L

    1981-02-20

    Five flights of the U-2 aircraft with a filter sampler aboard were flown in the Mount St. Helens debris from 19 May to 17 June 1980. Sulfate concentrations as large as 216 times the expected background were observed. The enhancements of acid chloride vapor were considerably smaller, suggesting an insignificant increase of background values of hydrogen chloride once the plume is well mixed throughout the lower stratosphere.

  12. Rayleigh wave tomography of Mount St. Helens, Washington from ambient seismic noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Y.; Lin, F. C.; Farrell, J.; Schmandt, B.

    2015-12-01

    Mount St. Helens is the most active volcano of the Cascade range in the Western U.S. Given its recent eruptions in 1980 and 2005, it is clear that magma transport has recently occurred in the shallow crust beneath the volcanic edifice. A dense seismic array was deployed around Mount St. Helens for two weeks in summer 2014. The array was composed of 904 vertical-component 10-Hz geophones distributed within 20 km of the caldera. We cross-correlated all the seismic ambient noise data from this array to measure Rayleigh wave travel times and invert for the seismic shear velocity structure beneath the volcano. Clear Rayleigh waves are observed between 2 to 5 sec period in most directions and the signal is particularly strong in the Southwest-Northeast direction likely caused by ocean waves off the west coast of Washington State. We applied frequency-time analysis to measure phase velocity dispersions for all available station pairs, and we applied surface wave tomography for each period to determine 2-D Rayleigh wave phase velocity maps between 2 to 5 second period. Finally, we inverted these maps for a preliminary 3D velocity model from surface to 5 km depth. The model shows a low-velocity anomaly beneath the center of the caldera. This anomaly could be related to shallow magma storage beneath Mount St. Helens as well as the highly fractured rock of the volcanic edifice. Further analysis of short period surface wave propagation will improve understanding of upper crustal structure beneath Mount St. Helens and how it is linked to supply of silicate melts and volatiles from greater depths.

  13. Carbonyl sulfide and carbon disulfide from the eruptions of Mount St. Helens

    SciTech Connect

    Rasmussen, R.A.; Khalil, M.A.K.; Dalluge, R.W.; Penkett, S.A.; Jones, B.

    1982-01-01

    Ash from the massive 18 May 1980 eruption of Mount St. Helens readily gave off large amounts of carbonyl sulfide and carbon disulfide gases at room temperature. These findings suggest that the sulfur that enhances the Junge sulfate layer in the stratosphere after volcanic eruptions could be carried directly to the upper atmosphere as carbonyl sulfide and carbon disulfide adsorbed on ash particles from major volcanic eruptions.

  14. Absorption of visible radiation by aerosols in the volcanic plume of mount st. Helens.

    PubMed

    Ogren, J A; Charlson, R J; Radke, L F; Domonkos, S K

    1981-02-20

    Samples of particles from Mount St. Helens were collected in both the stratosphere and troposphere for measurement of the light absorption coefficient. Results indicate that the stratospheric dust had a small but finite absorption coefficient ranging up to 2 x 10(-7) per meter at a wavelength of 0.55 micrometer, which is estimated to yield an albedo for single scatter of 0.98 or greater. Tropospheric results showed similar high values of an albedo for single scatter.

  15. Trace element composition of the mount st. Helens plume: stratospheric samples from the 18 may eruption.

    PubMed

    Vossler, T; Anderson, D L; Aras, N K; Phelan, J M; Zoller, W H

    1981-02-20

    Atmospheric particulate material collected from the stratosphere in the plume of the 18 May 1980 eruption of the Mount St. Helens volcano was quite similar in composition to that of ash that fell to the ground in western Washington. However, there were small but significant differences in concentrations of some elements with altitude, indicating that the stratospheric material was primarily produced from fresh magma, not fragments of the mountain.

  16. Absorption of visible radiation by aerosols in the volcanic plume of Mount St. Helens

    SciTech Connect

    Ogren, J.A.; Charlson, R.J.; Radke, L.F.; Domonkos, S.K.

    1981-01-01

    Samples of particles from Mount St. Helens were collected in both the stratosphere and troposhere for measurement of the light absorption coefficient. Results indicate that the stratospheric dust had a small but finite absorption coefficient ranging up to 2 x 10-7 per meter at a wavelength of 0.55 micrometer, which is estimated to yield an albedo for single scatter of 0.98 or greater. Tropospheric results showed similar high values of an albedo for single scatter.

  17. Histopathological reaction of the lung to Mount St. Helens volcanic ash

    SciTech Connect

    Sanders, C.L.

    1987-06-01

    The pulmonary toxicity of respirable particle size (count median diameter, 0.5 to 1.6 ..mu..m) Mount St. Helens volcanic ash was studied. Total particulate doses of 22 to 77 mg suspended in sterile 0.9% sodium chloride solution were given in 1 to 7 consecutive weekly intratracheal instillations. The lungs and mediastinal lymph nodes were histologically examined at intervals up to 400 days after instillation.

  18. Sequence of pumiceous tephra layers and the late quaternary environmental record near mount st. Helens.

    PubMed

    Heusser, C J; Heusser, L E

    1980-11-28

    Tephra in lake beds within 40 kilometers of Mount St. Helens was deposited an average of once every 2,700 years over the past 35,000 years, for a total of 13 layers. Times of deposition span the period of the Fraser Glaciation and intervals before and after it, and include the series of climates prevailing when vegetation west of the Cascade Range shifted between a park-tundra type and the modern western hemlock forest.

  19. Trace element composition of the Mount St. Helens plume: stratospheric samples from the 18 May eruption

    SciTech Connect

    Vossler, T.; Anderson, D.L.; Aras, N.K.; Phelan, J.M.; Zoller, W.H.

    1981-01-01

    Atmospheric particulate material collected from the stratosphere in plume of the 18 May 1980 eruption of the Mount St. Helens volcano was quite similar in composition to that of ash that fell to the ground in western Washington. However, there were small but significant differences in concentrations of some elements with altitude, indicating that the statospheric material was primarily produced from fresh magma, but fragments of the mountain.

  20. Size distributions and mineralogy of ash particles in the stratosphere from eruptions of mount st. Helens.

    PubMed

    Farlow, N H; Oberbeck, V R; Snetsinger, K G; Ferry, G V; Polkowski, G; Hayes, D M

    1981-02-20

    Samples from the stratosphere obtained by U-2 aircraft after the first three major eruptions of Mount St. Helens contained large globules of liquid acid and ash. Because of their large size, these globules had disappeared from the lower stratosphere by late June 1980, leaving behind only smaller acid droplets. Particle-size distributions and mineralogy of the stratospheric ash grains demonstrate in-homogeneity in the eruption clouds.

  1. Eruption-triggered avalanche, flood, and lahar at mount st. Helens--effects of winter snowpack.

    PubMed

    Waitt, R B; Pierson, T C; Macleod, N S; Janda, R J; Voight, B; Holcomb, R T

    1983-09-30

    An explosive eruption of Mount St. Helens on 19 March 1982 had substantial impact beyond the vent because hot eruption products interacted with a thick snowpack. A blast of hot pumice, dome rocks, and gas dislodged crater-wall snow that avalanched through the crater and down the north flank. Snow in the crater swiftly melted to form a transient lake, from which a destructive flood and lahar swept down the north flank and the North Fork Toutle River.

  2. Eruption-triggered avalanche, flood, and lahar at Mount St. Helens - Effects of winter snowpack

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Waitt, R.B.; Pierson, T.C.; MacLeod, N.S.; Janda, R.J.; Voight, B.; Holcomb, R.T.

    1983-01-01

    An explosive eruption of Mount St. Helens on 19 March 1982 had substantial impact beyond the vent because hot eruption products interacted with a thick snowpack. A blast of hot pumice, dome rocks, and gas dislodged crater-wall snow that avalanched through the crater and down the north flank. Snow in the crater swiftly melted to form a transient lake, from which a destructive flood and lahar swept down the north flank and the North Fork Toutle River.

  3. Distribution of melt beneath Mount St Helens and Mount Adams inferred from magnetotelluric data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hill, Graham J.; Caldwell, T. Grant; Heise, Wiebke; Chertkoff, Darren G.; Bibby, Hugh M.; Burgess, Matt K.; Cull, James P.; Cas, Ray A. F.

    2009-11-01

    Three prominent volcanoes that form part of the Cascade mountain range in Washington State (USA)-Mounts St Helens, Adams and Rainier-are located on the margins of a mid-crustal zone of high electrical conductivity. Interconnected melt can increase the bulk conductivity of the region containing the melt, which leads us to propose that the anomalous conductivity in this region is due to partial melt associated with the volcanism. Here we test this hypothesis by using magnetotelluric data recorded at a network of 85 locations in the area of the high-conductivity anomaly. Our data reveal that a localized zone of high conductivity beneath this volcano extends downwards to join the mid-crustal conductor. As our measurements were made during the recent period of lava extrusion at Mount St Helens, we infer that the conductivity anomaly associated with the localized zone, and by extension with the mid-crustal conductor, is caused by the presence of partial melt. Our interpretation is consistent with the crustal origin of silicic magmas erupting from Mount St Helens, and explains the distribution of seismicity observed at the time of the catastrophic eruption in 1980 (refs 9, 10).

  4. Forecasts and predictions of eruptive activity at Mount St. Helens, USA: 1975-1984

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Swanson, D.A.; Casadevall, T.J.; Dzurisin, D.; Holcomb, R.T.; Newhall, C.G.; Malone, S.D.; Weaver, C.S.

    1985-01-01

    Public statements about volcanic activity at Mount St. Helens include factual statements, forecasts, and predictions. A factual statement describes current conditions but does not anticipate future events. A forecast is a comparatively imprecise statement of the time, place, and nature of expected activity. A prediction is a comparatively precise statement of the time, place, and ideally, the nature and size of impending activity. A prediction usually covers a shorter time period than a forecast and is generally based dominantly on interpretations and measurements of ongoing processes and secondarily on a projection of past history. The three types of statements grade from one to another, and distinctions are sometimes arbitrary. Forecasts and predictions at Mount St. Helens became increasingly precise from 1975 to 1982. Stratigraphic studies led to a long-range forecast in 1975 of renewed eruptive activity at Mount St. Helens, possibly before the end of the century. On the basis of seismic, geodetic and geologic data, general forecasts for a landslide and eruption were issued in April 1980, before the catastrophic blast and landslide on 18 May 1980. All extrusions except two from June 1980 to the end of 1984 were predicted on the basis of integrated geophysical, geochemical, and geologic monitoring. The two extrusions that were not predicted were preceded by explosions that removed a substantial part of the dome, reducing confining pressure and essentially short-circuiting the normal precursors. ?? 1985.

  5. Proximal ecological effects of the 1980 eruptions of Mount St. Helens

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swanson, F. J.

    1988-01-01

    The diversity of ecosystems and volcanic processes involved in the 1980 eruptions of Mount St. Helens, southwest Washington, provide an excellent setting for examining effects of volcanic events on ecosystems. These eruptions included a lateral blast, debris avalanche, mudflows, pyroclastic flows, and airfall tephra. Affected ecosystems within 30 km of the vent were lakes, streams, upland and riparian forest, and meadows. Ecological disturbances imposed by the Mount St. Helens events were predominantly physical, rather than climatic or chemical which are the dominant classes of disturbances considered in analysis of global catastrophes. Analysis of ecosystem response to disturbance should be based on consideration of composition and structure of the predisturbance system in terms that represent potential survivability of organisms, mechanisms in the primary disturbance, initial survivors, secondary disturbances arising from the primary disturbance and the biological responses to secondary disturbances, invasion of the site by new propagules, interactions among secondary disturbance processes and surviving and invading organisms. Predicting ecosystem response to disturbance is enchanced by considering the mechanisms of disturbance rather than type of disturbance. In the 1980 Mount St. Helens events, the disturbance types, involved primarily the mechanisms of sedimentation, heating, and shear stress. Each disturbance type involved one or more mechanisms. Ecosystem response varied greatly across the landscape. Analysis of ecosystem response to disturbance, regardless of type, should include detailed consideration of the properties of individual species, primary and secondary disturbance mechanisms, and their distributions across landscapes.

  6. Deposition and dose from the 18 May 1980 eruption of Mount St. Helens

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peterson, K. R.

    1982-01-01

    The downwind deposition and radiation doses was calculated for the tropospheric part of the ash cloud from the May 18, 1980 eruption of Mount St. Helens, by using a large cloud diffusion model. The naturally occurring radionnuclides of radium and thorium, whose radon daughters normally seep very slowly from the rocks and soil, were violently released to the atmosphere. The largest dose to an individual from these nuclides is small, but the population dose to those affected by the radioactivity in the ash is about 100 person rem. This population dose from Mount St. Helens is much greater than the annual person rem routinely released by a typical large nuclear power plant. It is estimated that subsequent eruptions of Mount St. Helens have doubled or tripled the person rem calculated from the initial large eruption. The long range global ash deposition of the May 18 eruption is estimated through 1984, by use of a global deposition model. The maximum deposition is nearly 1000 kg square km and occurs in the spring of 1981 over middle latitudes of the Northern Hemisphere.

  7. Distribution of melt beneath Mount St Helens and Mount Adams inferred from magnetotelluric data

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hill, G.J.; Caldwell, T.G.; Heise, W.; Chertkoff, D.G.; Bibby, H.M.; Burgess, M.K.; Cull, J.P.; Cas, Ray A.F.

    2009-01-01

    Three prominent volcanoes that form part of the Cascade mountain range in Washington State (USA)Mounts StHelens, Adams and Rainierare located on the margins of a mid-crustal zone of high electrical conductivity1,5. Interconnected melt can increase the bulk conductivity of the region containing the melt6,7, which leads us to propose that the anomalous conductivity in this region is due to partial melt associated with the volcanism. Here we test this hypothesis by using magnetotelluric data recorded at a network of 85 locations in the area of the high-conductivity anomaly. Our data reveal that a localized zone of high conductivity beneath thisvolcano extends downwards to join the mid-crustal conductor. As our measurements were made during the recent period of lava extrusion at Mount St Helens, we infer that the conductivity anomaly associated with the localized zone, and by extension with the mid-crustal conductor, is caused by the presence of partial melt. Our interpretation is consistent with the crustal origin of silicic magmas erupting from Mount St Helens8, and explains the distribution of seismicity observed at the time of the catastrophic eruption in 1980 (refs9, 10). ?? 2009 Macmillan Publishers Limited. All rights reserved.

  8. Deposition and dose from the May 18, 1980 eruption of Mount St. Helens

    SciTech Connect

    Peterson, K.R.

    1980-11-01

    The downwind deposition and radiation dose have been calculated for the tropospheric part of the ash cloud from the May 18, 1980 eruption of Mount St. Helens, using a large-cloud diffusion model. At that time the naturally occurring radionuclides of radium and thorium, whose radon daughters normally seep very slowly from the rocks and soil, were violently released to the atmosphere. The largest dose to an individual from these nuclides is small (in the microrem range), but the population dose to those affected by the radioactivity in the ash is about 100 person-rem. This population dose from Mount St. Helens is much greater than the annual person-rem routinely released by a typical large nuclear power plant. It is estimated that subsequent eruptions of Mount St. Helens have doubled or tripled the person-rem calculated for the initial large eruption; this total population dose is about the same as the lower-bound estimate of the population dose from the 1979 accident at the Three Mile Island nuclear power plant. The long-range global ash deposition of the May 18 eruption has been estimated through 1984, using a global deposition model. The maximum deposition is nearly 1000 kg/km/sup 2/ and occurs in the spring of 1981 over middle latitudes of the Northern Hemisphere.

  9. Holocene geomagnetic secular variation recorded by volcanic deposits at Mount St. Helens, Washington

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hagstrum, J.T.; Hoblitt, R.P.; Gardner, C.A.; Gray, T.E.

    2002-01-01

    A compilation of paleomagnetic data from volcanic deposits of Mount St. Helens is presented in this report. The database is used to determine signature paleomagnetic directions of products from its Holocene eruptive events, to assign sampled units to their proper eruptive period, and to begin the assembly of a much larger database of paleomagnetic directions from Holocene volcanic rocks in western North America. The paleomagnetic results from Mount St. Helens are mostly of high quality, and generally agree with the division of its volcanic deposits into eruptive episodes based on previous geologic mapping and radiocarbon dates. The Muddy River andesite's paleomagnetic direction, however, indicates that it is more likely part of the Pine Creek eruptive period rather than the Castle Creek period. In addition, the Two-Fingers andesite flow is more likely part of the Middle Kalama eruptive period and not part of the Goat Rocks period. The paleomagnetic data from Mount St. Helens and Mount Hood document variation in the geomagnetic field's pole position over the last ~2,500 years. A distinct feature of the new paleosecular variation (PSV) record, similar to the Fish Lake record (Oregon), indicates a sudden change from rapid clockwise movement of the pole about the Earth's spin axis to relatively slow counterclockwise movement at ???800 to 900 years B.P.

  10. A new tree-ring date for the "floating island" lava flow, Mount St. Helens, Washington

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Yamaguchi, D.K.; Hoblitt, R.P.; Lawrence, D.B.

    1990-01-01

    Anomalously narrow and missing rings in trees 12 m from Mount St. Helens' "floating island" lava flow, and synchronous growth increases in trees farther from the flow margin, are evidence that this andesitic flow was extruded between late summer 1799 and spring 1800 a.d., within a few months after the eruption of Mount St. Helens' dacitic layer T tephra. For ease of reference, we assign here an 1800 a.d. date to this flow. The new date shows that the start of Mount St. Helens' Goat Rocks eruptive period (1800-1857 a.d.) resembled the recent (1980-1986) activity in both petrochemical trends and timing. In both cases, an initial explosive eruption of dacite was quickly succeeded by the eruption of more mafic lavas; dacite lavas then reappeared during an extended concluding phase of activity. This behavior is consistent with a recently proposed fluid-dynamic model of magma withdrawal from a compositionally zoned magma chamber. ?? 1990 Springer-Verlag.

  11. The dust environment surrounding the E-ring moons Dione, Helene and Polydeuce

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moldenhawer, T.; Hoffmann, H.; Seiß, M.; Sachse, M.; Spahn, F.

    2015-10-01

    Compared to the dust clouds around three of the Galilean satellites of Jupiter, no clear Saturnian pendants have been found yet by the CDA detector aboardthe Cassini spacecraft. However, three dust tori and arcs have been detected along the orbits of Pallene, Methone and Anthe in ISS images [1] and the Pallene dust torus was confirmed by in situ CDA measurements [4]. These observations have sparked interest whether the small co-orbital companions to E-ring moons like Dione or Thetys are efficient dust sources. We simulate the motion of dust particles, which originate from hypervelocity impacts of micrometeoroids onto Dione, Helene and Polydeuce [2]. Gravity, Lorentz force, solar radiation pressure and plasma drag are considered for the dynamic evolution of small dust particles. Assuming a steady state distribution, we scale the phase space data with dust production rates based on recent IDP measurements at Saturn [3]. We will present dust particle number densities along the orbits of Dione, Helene and Polydeuce and we will make predictions for the Cassini flybys of Helene and Polydeuce, which take place in the summer and fall this year.

  12. Mount St. Helens, 1980 to now—what’s going on?

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dzurisin, Daniel; Driedger, Carolyn L.; Faust, Lisa M.

    2013-01-01

    Mount St. Helens seized the world’s attention in 1980 when the largest historical landslide on Earth and a powerful explosive eruption reshaped the volcano, created its distinctive crater, and dramatically modified the surrounding landscape. An enormous lava dome grew episodically in the crater until 1986, when the volcano became relatively quiet. A new glacier grew in the crater, wrapping around and partly burying the lava dome. From 1987 to 2003, sporadic earthquake swarms and small steam explosions indicated that magma (molten rock) was being replenished deep underground. In 2004, steam-and-ash explosions heralded the start of another eruption. A quieter phase of continuous lava extrusion followed and lasted until 2008, building a new dome and doubling the volume of lava on the crater floor. Scientists with the U.S. Geological Survey and University of Washington’s Pacific Northwest Seismograph Network maintain constant watch for signs of renewed activity at Mount St. Helens and other Cascade volcanoes. Now is an ideal time for both actual and virtual visitors to Mount St. Helens to learn more about dramatic changes taking place on and beneath this active volcano.

  13. Eruptive activity at Mount St Helens, Washington, USA, 1984-1988: a gas geochemistry perspective

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McGee, K.A.; Sutton, A.J.

    1994-01-01

    The results from two different types of gas measurement, telemetered in situ monitoring of reducing gases on the dome and airborne measurements of sulfur dioxide emission rates in the plume by correlation spectrometry, suggest that the combination of these two methods is particularly effective in detecting periods of enhanced degassing that intermittently punctuate the normal background leakage of gaseous effluent from Mount St Helens to the atmosphere. Gas events were recorded before lava extrusion for each of the four dome-building episodes at Mount St Helens since mid-1984. For two of the episodes, precursory reducing gas peaks were detected, whereas during three of the episodes, COSPEC measurements recorded precursory degassing of sulfur dioxide. During one episode (October 1986), both reducing gas monitoring and SO2 emission rate measurements simultaneously detected a large gas release several hours before lava extrusion. Had both types of gas measurements been operational during each of the dome-building episodes, it is thought that both would have recorded precursory signals for all four episodes. Evidence from the data presented herein suggests that increased degassing at Mount St Helens becomes detectable when fresh upward-moving magma is between 2 km and a few hundred meters below the base of the dome and between about 60 and 12 hours before the surface extrusion of lava. ?? 1994 Springer-Verlag.

  14. Catalog of Mount St. Helens 2004 - 2005 Tephra Samples with Major- and Trace-Element Geochemistry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rowe, Michael C.; Thornber, Carl R.; Gooding, Daniel J.; Pallister, John S.

    2008-01-01

    This open-file report presents a catalog of information about 135 ash samples along with geochemical analyses of bulk ash, glass and individual mineral grains from tephra deposited as a result of volcanic activity at Mount St. Helens, Washington, from October 1, 2004 until August 15, 2005. This data, in conjunction with that in a companion report on 2004?2007 Mount St. Helens dome samples by Thornber and others (2008a) are presented in support of the contents of the U.S. Geological Survey Professional Paper 1750 (Sherrod and others, ed., 2008). Readers are referred to appropriate chapters in USGS Professional Paper 1750 for detailed narratives of eruptive activity during this time period and for interpretations of sample characteristics and geochemical data presented here. All ash samples reported herein are currently archived at the David A. Johnston Cascades Volcano Observatory in Vancouver, Washington. The Mount St. Helens 2004?2005 Tephra Sample Catalogue along with bulk, glass and mineral geochemistry are tabulated in 6 worksheets of the accompanying Microsoft Excel file, of2008-1131.xls. Samples in all tables are organized by collection date. Table 1 is a detailed catalog of sample information for tephra deposited downwind of Mount St. Helens between October 1, 2004 and August 18, 2005. Table 2 provides major- and trace-element analyses of 8 bulk tephra samples collected throughout that interval. Major-element compositions of 82 groundmass glass fragments, 420 feldspar grains, and 213 mafic (clinopyroxene, amphibole, hypersthene, and olivine) mineral grains from 12 ash samples collected between October 1, 2004 and March 8, 2005 are presented in tables 3 through 5. In addition, trace-element abundances of 198 feldspars from 11 ash samples (same samples as major-element analyses) are provided in table 6. Additional mineral and bulk ash analyses from 2004 and 2005 ash samples are published in chapters 30 (oxide thermometry; Pallister and others, 2008), 32

  15. Effects of the 1980 eruption of Mount St Helens on the limnological characteristics of selected lakes in western Washington

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Embrey, S.S.; Dion, N.P.

    1988-01-01

    The 1980 eruption of Mount St. Helens provided the opportunity to study its effect on the physical, chemical, and biological characteristics of lakes near the volcano, and to describe two newly created lakes. Concentrations of dissolved solids and organic carbon, measured in June 1980, had increased from 2 to 30 times those observed in the 1970 's in Spirit, St. Helens, and Venus Lakes. Water in the lakes was altered from preeruption calcium-bicarbonate types to calcium-sulfate, calcium sulfate-chloride, or lake surface, as in St. Helens Lake; transparency in Venus Lake had improved to a depth of 24 ft by 1982. Spirit Lake was anoxic into fall 1980, but had reaerated to 5.2 mg/L of dissolved oxygen by May 1981. Phytoplankton communities in existing lakes in the blast zone in 1980 were primarily green and bluegreen algae; diatoms were sparse until summer 1982. Small numbers of zooplankton in Spirit, St. Helens, and Venus Lakes, compared to numbers in Walupt and Fawn Lakes, may indicate some post-eruption mortality. Rotifers were absent from lakes in the blast zone, but by 1981 were observed in all the lakes. The recovery of the physical, chemical, and biological characteristics of the lakes will depend on stabilization of the surrounding environment and biological processes within each lake. Excluding Spirit Lake, it is estimated that St. Helens Lake would be the slowest to recover and Venus Lake the fastest. (USGS)

  16. Frictional properties of the Mount St. Helens gouge: Chapter 20 in A volcano rekindled: the renewed eruption of Mount St. Helens, 2004-2006

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Moore, Peter L.; Iverson, Neal R.; Iverson, Richard M.; Sherrod, David R.; Scott, William E.; Stauffer, Peter H.

    2008-01-01

    Rate-weakening friction is a requirement for stick-slip behavior that is satisfied by the Mount St. Helens gouge. Indeed, regular stick-slip oscillations were observed in two experiments performed at the highest normal stress and lowest rates of shear. The conditions under which this stick-slip motion occurred indicate that the gouge also satisfies a second criterion for stick-slip behavior of materials exhibiting rateand-state dependent friction-gouge stiffness exceeds that of the ascending magma that drives upward motion of the plug. The presence of highly compliant magma as a driving element may be crucial for generating stick-slip instabilities at the shallow earthquake focal depths observed during the eruption.

  17. Large-amplitude traveling ionospheric distrubance produced by the May 18, 1980, explosion of Mount St. Helens

    SciTech Connect

    Roberts, D.H.; Klobuchar, J.A.; Fougere, P.F.; Hendrickson, D.H.

    1982-08-01

    A remarkable long-lived, large-scale traveling ionospheric disturbance (TID), excited by the May 18, 1980, explosion of Mount St. Helens, has been detected in total electron content monitor data. Oscillatory perturbations in the electron column density of the ionosphere with amplitudes about 10% of the nominal daytime content were detected at three stations whose ionospheric penetration points lie between 1610 and 1890 km from Mount St. Helens. Smaller perturbations were detected at five of six additional stations between 3760 and 4950 km away. The period of the TID increased linearly with great-circle distance from Mount St. Helens, ranging from roughly-equal37 min at the nearest station to roughly-equal116 min at the most distant one. The TID persisted for at least four cycles at the three close stations and three cycles at the more distant stations and was qualitatively similar to TID's produced by the low-altitude thermonuclear detonations of the 1960's. The disturbance front of this TID accelerated from an average velocity of roughly-equal350 m/s between Mt. St. Helens and the close stations to an average velocity of roughly-equal550 m/s to the more distant ones.A model based on the free wave response of an isothermal atmosphere to a point disturbance provides a good fit to the data at the three closest stations, but no such model can account for all of the data. Modeling of the long-distance behavior of the Mount St. Helens TID in terms of upper-atmosphere guided gravity waves is complicated by the requirement of exciting them by a ground-level explosion. There was no evidence for a strong supersonic shock wave in the ionosphere. As a result, the Mount St. Helens disturbance may prove to be a cleaner test of detailed theories of the point excitation and propagation of gravity waves in a realistic atmosphere than were TID's excited by thermonuclear weapons.

  18. VP Structure of Mount St. Helens, Washington, USA, imaged with local earthquake tomography

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Waite, G.P.; Moran, S.C.

    2009-01-01

    We present a new P-wave velocity model for Mount St. Helens using local earthquake data recorded by the Pacific Northwest Seismograph Stations and Cascades Volcano Observatory since the 18 May 1980 eruption. These data were augmented with records from a dense array of 19 temporary stations deployed during the second half of 2005. Because the distribution of earthquakes in the study area is concentrated beneath the volcano and within two nearly linear trends, we used a graded inversion scheme to compute a coarse-grid model that focused on the regional structure, followed by a fine-grid inversion to improve spatial resolution directly beneath the volcanic edifice. The coarse-grid model results are largely consistent with earlier geophysical studies of the area; we find high-velocity anomalies NW and NE of the edifice that correspond with igneous intrusions and a prominent low-velocity zone NNW of the edifice that corresponds with the linear zone of high seismicity known as the St. Helens Seismic Zone. This low-velocity zone may continue past Mount St. Helens to the south at depths below 5??km. Directly beneath the edifice, the fine-grid model images a low-velocity zone between about 2 and 3.5??km below sea level that may correspond to a shallow magma storage zone. And although the model resolution is poor below about 6??km, we found low velocities that correspond with the aseismic zone between about 5.5 and 8??km that has previously been modeled as the location of a large magma storage volume. ?? 2009 Elsevier B.V.

  19. Measurements of the stratospheric plume from the Mount St. Helens eruption - Radioactivity and chemical composition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leifer, R.; Hinchliffe, L.; Fisenne, I.; Franklin, H.; Knutson, E.; Olden, M.; Sedlacek, W.; Mroz, E.; Cahill, T.

    1981-11-01

    Gas measurements made in the stratospheric plume from the eruption of Mount St. Helens on 18 May 1980 were not consistent with a reported large injection of radon-222 into the atmosphere. No enrichment in the volatile element polonium was found in filter samples, and the ratio of polonium-210 to lead-210 was not different from background values. Data obtained with an experimental impactor, flown shortly after the eruption, showed an increase of 10 to the 3rd in the stratospheric number concentration of submicrometer sulfate particles compared to concentrations before the eruption.

  20. Characterization of organic contaminants in environmental samples associated with mount St. Helens 1980 volcanic eruption

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pereira, W.E.

    1982-01-01

    Volcanic ash, surface-water, and bottom-material samples obtained in the vicinity of Mount St. Helens after the May 18, 1980, eruption were analyzed for organic contaminants by using capillary gas chromatography-mass spectrometry-computer techniques. Classes of compounds identified include n-alkanes, fatty acids, dicarboxylic acids, aromatic acids and aldehydes, phenols, resin acids, terpenes, and insect juvenile hormones. The most probable source of these compounds is from pyrolysis of plant and soil organic matter during and after the eruption. The toxicity of selected compounds and their environmental significance are discussed.

  1. Direct temperature measurements of deposits, Mount St. Helens, Washington, 1980-1981

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Banks, N.G.; Hoblitt, R.P.

    1996-01-01

    A program of temperature studies of the eruptive products of Mount St. Helens was established May 20, 1980, just 2 days after the catastrophic eruption of May 18. In general, the more recent deposits were emplaced at higher temperatures than the earlier ones. Emplacement temperatures of deposits of the debris avalanche of May 18 ranged from about 70 to 100 deg C, of the directed blast of May 18 from about 100 to 325 deg C (depending on azimuth from the vent), and of the subsequent pumiceous pyroclastic flows from about 300 to 850 deg C. Temperatures of the summit domes were as high as 897 deg C.

  2. Revised tephra volumes for Mount St. Helens and Glacier Peak volcanoes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nathenson, M.

    2015-12-01

    Isopach maps from 8 tephra eruptions from Mount St. Helens were reported in Carey et al. (1995) and for 3 eruptions from Glacier Peak in Gardner et al. (1998). These isopach data only define single slopes on a thickness versus square root of area plot (Fierstein and Nathenson, 1992) whereas one expects a second slope in the medial to distal region for larger eruptions. A model was proposed by Carey et al. (1995) for estimating the second slope to calculate volumes. A more recent study by Sulpizio (2005) for estimating the second slope involves a systematic analysis of many eruptions to provide correlation equations. The purpose of this study is to recalculate the volumes of Mount St. Helens and Glacier Peak eruptions and compare results from the two methods for estimating second slopes. In order to gain some perspective on the methods for estimating the second slope, we use data for thickness versus distance beyond the last isopach that is available for some of the eruptions. The thickness versus square root of area method is extended to thickness versus distance by developing an approximate relation between the two, assuming elliptical isopachs. Thickness versus distance data tend to support the Sulpizio method. The volumes derived using the Sulpizio method are 20 % or less of the values for the Mount St. Helens layers given in Carey et al. (1995) and about 50 % of the values for the Glacier Peak layers given in Gardner et al (1998). For example, for Mount St. Helens layer Wn, the volume calculated from the isopachs is 0.55 km3, using the Carey et al. (1995) method it is 7.7 km3, and using the Sulpizio (2005) method it is 1.4 km3. Carey, S., Gardner, J., and Sigurdsson, H., 1995, J. Volc. and Geoth. Res. 66, 185-202. Fierstein, J., and Nathenson, M., 1992, Bull. Volc. 54, 156-167. Gardner, J.E., Carey, S., and Sigurdsson, H., 1998, Geol. Soc. of Am. Bull. 110, 173-187. Sulpizio, R., 2005, J. Volc. Geoth. Res. 145, 315-336.

  3. Helen Flanders Dunbar, John Dewey, and clinical pragmatism: reflections on method in psychosomatic medicine and bioethics.

    PubMed

    Hart, Curtis W

    2002-01-01

    This article outlines the method utilized by physicians and major figures in the founding of Clinical Pastoral Education, Helen Flanders Dunbar, in her work of 1943, Psychosomatic Diagnosis, and relates it to the currently evolving approach in bioethics known as clinical pragmatism. It assesses Dewey's influence on both Dunbar in psychosomatic medicine and clinical pragmatism in bioethics, and illustrates the breadth of influence of the school of philosophical thought known as pragmatism with which Dewey's name and those of William James and Charles Sanders Pierce are most often identified.

  4. Measurements of the stratospheric plume from the Mount St. Helens eruption: radioactivity and chemical composition

    SciTech Connect

    Leifer, R.; Hinchliffe, L.; Fisenne, I.; Franklin, H.; Knutson, E.; Olden, M.; Sedlacek, W.; Mroz, E.; Cahill, T.

    1981-11-20

    Gas measurements made in the stratospheric plume from the eruption of Mount St. Helens on 18 May 1980 were not consistent with a reported large injection of radon-222 into the atmosphere. No enrichment in the volatile element polonium was found in filter samples, and the ratio of polonium-210 to lead-210 was not different from background values. Data obtained with an experimental impactor, flown shortly after the eruption, showed an increase of 10/sup 3/ in the stratospheric number concentration of submicrometer sulfate particles compared to concentrations before the eruption.

  5. Changes in stratospheric water vapor associated with the Mount St. Helens eruption

    SciTech Connect

    Murcray, D.G.; Murcray, F.J.; Barker, D.B.; Mastenbrook, H.J.

    1981-01-01

    A frost point hygrometer designed for aircraft operation was included in the complement of instruments assembled for the NASA U-2 flights through the plume of Mount St. Helens. Measurements made on the 22 May flight showed the water vapor to be closely associated with the aerosol plume. The water vapor mixing ratio by mass in the plume was as high as 40 x 10/sup -6/. This compares with values of 2 x 10/sup -6/ to 3 x 10/sup -6/ outside of the plume.

  6. Measurements of the stratospheric plume from the mount st. Helens eruption: radioactivity and chemical composition.

    PubMed

    Leifer, R; Hinchliffe, L; Fisenne, I; Franklin, H; Knutson, E; Olden, M; Sedlacek, W; Mroz, E; Cahill, T

    1981-11-20

    Gas measurements made in the stratospheric plume from the eruption of Mount St. Helens on 18 May 1980 were not consistent with a reported large injection of radon-222 into the atmosphere. No enrichment in the volatile element polonium was found in filter samples, and the ratio of polonium-210 to lead-210 was not different from background values. Data obtained with an experimental impactor, flown shortly after the eruption, showed an increase of 10(3) in the stratospheric number concentration of submicrometer sulfate particles compared to concentrations before the eruption.

  7. Changes in stratospheric water vapor associated with the mount st. Helens eruption.

    PubMed

    Murcray, D G; Murcray, F J; Barker, D B; Mastenbrook, H J

    1981-02-20

    A frost point hygrometer designed for aircraft operation was included in the complement of instruments assembled for the NASA U-2 flights through the plume of Mount St. Helens. Measurements made on the 22 May flight showed the water vapor to be closely associated with the aerosol plume. The water vapor mixing ratio by mass in the plume was as high as 40 x 10(-6). This compares with values of 2 x 10(-6) to 3 x 10(-6) outside of the plume.

  8. Airborne studies of the emissions from the volcanic eruptions of mount st. Helens.

    PubMed

    Hobbs, P V; Radke, L F; Eltgroth, M W; Hegg, D A

    1981-02-20

    The concentrations of particles less than 10 micrometers in diameter in the ash emissions from Mount St. Helens have been more than 1000 times greater than those in the ambient air. Mass loadings of particles less than 2 micrometers in diameter were generally several hundred micrograms per cubic meter. In the ash clouds, produced by the large eruption on 18 May 1980, the concentrations of several trace gases generally were low. In other emissions, significant, but variable, concentrations of sulfur gases were measured. The 18 May eruption produced nuées ardentes, lightning flashes, and volcanic hail.

  9. Predicting eruptions at mount st. Helens, june 1980 through december 1982.

    PubMed

    Swanson, D A; Casadevall, T J; Dzurisin, D; Malone, S D; Newhall, C G; Weaver, C S

    1983-09-30

    Thirteen eruptions of Mount St. Helens between June 1980 and December 1982 were predicted tens of minutes to, more generally, a few hours in advance. The last seven of these eruptions, starting with that of mid-April 1981, were predicted between 3 days and 3 weeks in advance. Precursory seismicity, deformation of the crater floor and the lava dome, and, to a lesser extent, gas emissions provided telltale evidence of forthcoming eruptions. The newly developed capability for prediction reduced risk to life and property and influenced land-use decisions.

  10. Remanent magnetization of ash from the 18 May 1980 eruption of Mount St. Helens

    SciTech Connect

    Steele, W.K.

    1981-03-01

    Ash from the May 1980 eruption of Mount St. Helens deposited from air faithfully records the direction of the local geomagnetic field in eastern Washington, whereas ash settled from suspension in water in fluvial environments exhibits significant inclination and current-rotation errors in magnetic direction similar to those reported in other subaqueously deposited sediments. The current-rotation errors are associated with partial alignment of the major axes of magnetic susceptibility in the direction of water currents. Subaerial deposition produces strong stable remanent magnetization in ash with or without postdepositional wetting by rain.

  11. Rheological properties of mudflows associated with the spring 1980 eruptions of Mount St. Helens volcano, Washington

    SciTech Connect

    Fink, J.H.; Malin, M.C.; D'Alli, R.E.; Greeley, R.

    1981-01-01

    Rhelogoical properties of three recent mudflows at Mount St. Helens were estimated using technique developed for deterimining the properties of debris flows based on the geometry of their deposits. Calculated yield strengths of 1100, 1000, and 400 Pa, maximum flow velocities of 10 to 31 m/s, volumetric flow rates of 300 to 3400 m/sup 3//s, and plastic viscosities of 20 to 320 Ps-s all compare favorably with measured and estimated values cited in the literature. A method for determining likely sites of future mudflow initiation based on these data is outlined.

  12. Evaluation of radon progeny from Mount St. Helens eruptions. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Lepel, E.A.; Olsen, K.B.; Thomas, V.W.; Eichner, F.N.

    1982-09-01

    A network of twelve monitoring sites around Mount St. Helens was established to evaluate possible short-lived radioactivity in the fallen ash. Seven sites were located near major population centers of Washington and Oregon, and five sites were located within 80 km of the volcano. Each site monitored the radioactivity present by the use of thermoluminescent dosimeters which recorded the total exposure to radioactivity over the exposure period. Eruptions occurring on July 22, August 7, and October 16 to 18, 1980 were monitored. No statistically significant quantities of measurable radon daughters were observed.

  13. Airborne studies of the emissions from the volcanic eruptions of Mount St. Helens

    SciTech Connect

    Hobbs, P.V.; Radke, L.F.; Eltgroth, M.W.; Hegg, D.A.

    1981-01-01

    The concentrations of particles less than 10 micrometers in diameter in the ash emissions from Mount St. Helens have been more than 1000 times greater than those in the ambient air. Mass loadings of particles less than 2 micrometers in diameter were generally several hundred micrograms per cubic meter. In the ash clouds, produced by the large eruption on 18 May 1980, the concentrations of several trace gases generally were low. In other emissions, significant, but variable, concentrations of sulfur gases were measured. The 18 May eruption produced nuees ardentes, lightning flashes, and volcanic hail.

  14. Chemical changes of lakes within the Mount St. Helens blast zone

    SciTech Connect

    Wissmar, R.C.; Devol, A.H.; Nevissi, A.E.; Sedell, J.R.

    1982-01-01

    Differences in the dissolved chemistry of lakes devastated by the 18 May 1980 eruption of Mount St. Helens are attributable to location relative to the lateral blast trajectory of the eruption and to the emplacement of mineral deposits. Elemental enrichment ratios of pre- and posteruption measurements for Spirit Lake and comparisons of the chemical concentrations and elemental ratios for lakes inside and outside the blast zone reflect the influences of the dissolution of magmatic and lithic deposits. The pH changes were minor because of buffering by carbonic acid and reactions involving mineral alteration, dissolved organics, and biological processes.

  15. Biological responses of lakes in the mount st. Helens blast zone.

    PubMed

    Wissmar, R C; Devol, A H; Staley, J T; Sedell, J R

    1982-04-09

    Loadings of dissolved organics and suspended particulates from destroyed forests and volcanic debris produced by the 18 May 1980 eruption of Mount St. Helens altered the trophic structure of many blast zone lakes to the extent that anoxic conditions and chemoorganotrophic and chemolithotrophic microorganisms prevailed. High bacterial counts and high adenosine triphosphate concentrations were directly related to enhanced concentrations of dissolved organic carbon, and plankton chlorophyll a was inversely related to light extinction. The recovery of these lakes to the preeruption state appears dependent upon the oxidation of organics and the stabilization of watersheds.

  16. Eruption prediction aided by electronic tiltmeter data at mount st. Helens.

    PubMed

    Dzurisin, D; Westphal, J A; Johnson, D J

    1983-09-30

    Telemetry from electronic tiltmeters in the crater at Mount St. Helens contributed to accurate predictions of all six effusive eruptions from June 1981 to August 1982. Tilting of the crater floor began several weeks before each eruption, accelerated sharply for several days, and then abruptly changed direction a few minutes to days before extrusion began. Each episode of uplift was caused by the intrusion of magma into the lava dome from a shallow source, causing the dome to inflate and eventually rupture. Release of magma pressure and increased surface loading by magma added to the dome combined to cause subsidence just prior to extrusion.

  17. Chemical changes of lakes within the mount st. Helens blast zone.

    PubMed

    Wissmar, R C; Devol, A H; Nevissi, A E; Sedell, J R

    1982-04-09

    Differences in the dissolved chemistry of lakes devastated by the 18 May 1980 eruption of Mount St. Helens are attributable to location relative to the lateral blast trajectory of the eruption and to the emplacement of mineral deposits. Elemental enrichment ratios of pre- and posteruption measurements for Spirit Lake and comparisons of the chemical concentrations and elemental ratios for lakes inside and outside the blast zone reflect the influences of the dissolution of magmatic and lithic deposits. The pH changes were minor because of buffering by carbonic acid and reactions involving mineral alteration, dissolved organics, and biological processes.

  18. The Stars Belong to Everyone: Astronomer and Science Writer Helen Sawyer Hogg (1905-1993)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cahill, Maria J.

    2012-06-01

    As a scientist and science educator, Helen Sawyer Hogg served astronomy, and especially variable star astronomy, in diverse ways while raising a family. Her long interest in and support of the AAVSO over many years took place in the context of not only that busy scientific and writing career, but also one of personal struggle to achieve parity as a female in a largely male profession. This biographical sketch demonstrates that her path to eventual status as “the Canadian face of astronomy” was both difficult and filled with uncertainty.

  19. The Stars Belong to Everyone: Astronomer and Science Writer Dr. Helen Sawyer Hogg (1905-1993)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cahill, Maria J.

    2011-05-01

    University of Toronto astronomer and science writer Helen Sawyer Hogg (President of the AAVSO 1939-41) served her field through research, teaching, and administrative leadership. Additionally, she reached out to students and the public through her Toronto Star newspaper column entitled "With the Stars" for thirty years; she wrote The Stars Belong to Everyone, a book that speaks to a lay audience; she hosted a successful television series entitled Ideas; and she delivered numerous speeches at scientific conferences, professional women's associations, school programs, libraries, and other venues. This paper will illumine her life and the personal and professional forces that influenced her work.

  20. Correlation between atmospheric precipitation and recent explosions at Mount St. Helens, Washington

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mastin, L.

    1992-01-01

    Scientists attribute the recent small explosion-like seismic signals at Mount St. Helens to either the geyser-like flashing of superheated groundwater to steam or the release of magmatic gas from the cooling magma system, or both. The contribution of magmaic gas in these events is not currently known. If meteoric water from rain or melting snow is the source, however, we might expect these events to occur most frequently during the rainy season, perhaps even during or immediately following individual storms. 

  1. The mechanisms of fine particle generation and electrification during Mount St. Helens volcanic eruption

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cheng, R. J.

    1982-01-01

    Microscopical investigation of volcanic ash collected from ground stations during Mount St. Helens eruptions reveal a distinctive bimodel size distribution with high concentrations of particle ranges at (1) 200-100 microns and (2) 20-0.1 microns. Close examination of individual particles shows that most larger ones are solidified magma particles of porous pumice with numerous gas bubbles in the interior and the smaller ones are all glassy fragments without any detectable gas bubbles. Elemental analysis demonstrates that the fine fragments all have a composition similar to that of the larger pumice particles. Laboratory experiments suggest that the formation of the fine fragments is by bursting of glassy bubbles from a partially solidified surface of a crystallizing molten magma particle. The production of gas bubbles is due to the release of absorbed gases in molten magma particles when solubility decreases during phase transition. Diffusion cloud chamber experiments strongly indicate that sub-micron volcanic fragments are highly hygroscopic and extremely active as cloud condensation nuclei. Ice crystals also are evidently formed on those fragments in a supercooled (-20 C) cloud chamber. It has been reported that charge generation from ocean volcanic eruptions is due to contact of molten lava with sea water. This seems to be insufficient to explain the observed rapid and intense lightning activities over Mount St. Helens eruptions. Therefore, a hypothesis is presented here that highly electrically charged fine solid fragments are ejected by bursting of gas bubbles from the surface of a crystallizing molten magma particles.

  2. Water fact sheet; evolution of sediment yield from Mount St. Helens, Washington, 1980-1993

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Costa, John E.

    1994-01-01

    The most enduring geological consequence of the eruption of Mount St. Helens, Washington, on May 18, 1980, and the most costly single element in the recovery effort, has been the persistent downstream sedimentation caused by erosion of the approximately 3 cubic kilometers (km3) of sediment deposited on the landscape surrounding the volcano. Most of the sediment was associated with the emplacement of a 2.8 km3 debris avalanche in the upper part of the watershed of the North Fork Toutle River, and debris flows in the channels of the South Fork Toutle River, Pine Creek, Swift Creek, and Muddy River. An additional 0.2-0.3 km3 of volcanic material was emplaced by pyroclastic flows, blasts, and ash fall. Part of this vast quantity of volcaniclastic sediment has been subsequently eroded by runoff and streamflow. This brief report summarizes the changes in sediment yield at five locations around Mount St. Helens in the first 13 years following the May 18, 1980 eruption.

  3. Particle geochemistry of volcanic plumes of Etna and Mount St. Helens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varekamp, Johan C.; Thomas, Ellen; Germani, Mark; Buseck, Peter R.

    1986-11-01

    Particles in volcanic plumes include vapor condensates and reaction products of ash with vapors or condensed liquids, in addition to abundant silicate particles. In the 1980 Mount St. Helens plume we detected abundant (Na, K) Cl crystals as well as Ca sulfates, the latter commonly as overgrowths on ash or anthropogenic particles. Many of the chloride particles contained zinc and cadmium. High-temperature fumarolic incrustations showed strong enrichments of arsenic, zinc, alkalis, and iron. At Etna we did not detect chloride crystals but found abundant Al, Fe, and Ca sulfates. Sulfuric acid droplets were ubiquitous in both plumes. Bulk analyses of fumarole incrustations at Etna showed an enrichment in the rare earth elements (REE). The chemical and textural data of the plume particles indicate that chloride particles form relatively early and react later with sulfuric acid droplets to form sulfates. At Etna, aluminum as well as some REE are probably transported as volatile fluorine compounds. The differences in plume chemistry between Etna and Mount St. Helens are most likely related to differences in F/Cl ratios of the vapors. Based on the abundance of particulate chlorine in plumes, we suggest that only a small fraction of the total chlorine released during an eruption might reach the stratosphere in the vapor phase.

  4. Sediment data for streams near Mount St. Helens, Washington; Volume 1, 1980 water year

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dinehart, Randal L.; Ritter, John R.; Knott, J.M.

    1981-01-01

    This report presents fluvial sediment data collected primarily in response to the eruption of Mount St. Helens. To monitor the sediment transported by streams in the Mount St. Helens area and the particle-size distributions of the sediment, the Water Resources Division of the U.S. Geological Survey initially established 18 fluvial sediment stations. In this report, concentrations and discharges of suspended sediment are given for 16 fluvial-sediment stations (5 are in the Toutle River basin) and for 11 miscellaneous sampling sites. Also included are particle-size distributions of suspended sediment and bed material, water discharge, and water temperature for many of the sediment samples. Daily sediment discharges for the period May 18 to September 30 were calculated for Toutle River at Highway 99 near Castle Rock and Cowlitz River at Castel Rock. Over 150 million tons of sediment are estimated to have passed the Toutle River at Highway 99 station on May 18-19, 1980. High concentrations of suspended sediment persisted at several stations throughout the spring and summer of 1980. (USGS)

  5. Recovery of lakes in the 1980 blast zone of Mount St. Helens

    SciTech Connect

    Wissmar, R.C. )

    1990-11-01

    Over the past 10 years, following the catastrophic 1980 eruption of Mount St. Helens, considerable research has been conducted on altered and newly created lake ecosystems in different depositional regions of the blast zone. Impact and recovery characteristics have been followed for the altered Spirit Lake and two newly created lakes S. F. Castle and Coldwater Lakes. During the 1980 eruption, Spirit Lake was directly impacted by debris avalanches and pyroclastic flows. The unique characteristics of the Mount St. Helens volcanic eruption and geochemistry, such as low inputs of sulfate and high loadings of organics from devastated forests to lakes, combined to form chemical environments favorable to biological activity. Even though weathering, organic and microbial reactions were evidently the important processes regulating alkalinity of these lakes, patterns of changes in pH, total alkalinity, and dissolved organic carbon and changes in microbial assemblages and processes also suggested a sequence of biological reactions that occurred during the early recovery period of 1980 and 1981. The biological recovery of the lakes via succession of microbial reactions suggests a tendency for the higher energy producing reactions to dominate lesser energy producing reactions. As turbid and high suspended particulate matter levels decreased, phytoplankton primary production increased to produce mixed bacteria-phytoplankton-zooplankton communities.

  6. Comparison of Mount Saint Helens volcanic eruption to a nuclear explosion. Technical note

    SciTech Connect

    Gould, K.E.

    1981-01-01

    The phenomena and effects of airblast, ground shock, thermal radiation, cratering and ejecta, and debris cloud and deposition from the eruption of Mt. St. Helens were compared to those that would result from a nuclear explosion to determine if phenomena or effects were analogous and thus might provide useful data for military nuclear weapon effects studies. It is concluded that the phenomena are not analogous. In particular, airblast destruction was caused by clouds of ash driven by subsonic winds, rather than by a supersonic shock wave that would be the damage mechanism of a nuclear explosion. Because of the lack of analogy between the eruption and nuclear explosion phenomena, it appears questionable that any of the effects are analogous; therefore, it is unlikely that anything more of military interest can be gained from studying the effects of the eruption. However, key contacts for further information on the eruption and the associated research studies are given. The comparison of the eruption of Mt. St. Helens to the explosion of a 10- to 20-megaton nuclear weapon is misleading. Such comparisons serve no useful purpose and should be avoided.

  7. Posteruption glacier development within the crater of Mount St. Helens, Washington, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schilling, S.P.; Carrara, P.E.; Thompson, R.A.; Iwatsubo, E.Y.

    2004-01-01

    The cataclysmic eruption of Mount St. Helens on May 18, 1980, resulted in a large, north-facing amphitheater, with a steep headwall rising 700 m above the crater floor. In this deeply shaded niche a glacier, here named the Amphitheater glacier, has formed. Tongues of ice-containing crevasses extend from the main ice mass around both the east and the west sides of the lava dome that occupies the center of the crater floor. Aerial photographs taken in September 1996 reveal a small glacier in the southwest portion of the amphitheater containing several crevasses and a bergschrund-like feature at its head. The extent of the glacier at this time is probably about 0.1 km2. By September 2001, the debris-laden glacier had grown to about 1 km2 in area, with a maximum thickness of about 200 m, and contained an estimated 120,000,000 m3 of ice and rock debris. Approximately one-third of the volume of the glacier is thought to be rock debris derived mainly from rock avalanches from the surrounding amphitheater walls. The newly formed Amphitheater glacier is not only the largest glacier on Mount St. Helens but its aerial extent exceeds that of all other remaining glaciers combined. Published by University of Washington.

  8. Zircon reveals protracted magma storage and recycling beneath Mount St. Helens

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Claiborne, L.L.; Miller, C.F.; Flanagan, D.M.; Clynne, M.A.; Wooden, J.L.

    2010-01-01

    Current data and models for Mount St. Helens volcano (Washington, United States) suggest relatively rapid transport from magma genesis to eruption, with no evidence for protracted storage or recycling of magmas. However, we show here that complex zircon age populations extending back hundreds of thousands of years from eruption age indicate that magmas regularly stall in the crust, cool and crystallize beneath the volcano, and are then rejuvenated and incorporated by hotter, young magmas on their way to the surface. Estimated dissolution times suggest that entrained zircon generally resided in rejuvenating magmas for no more than about a century. Zircon elemental compositions reflect the increasing influence of mafic input into the system through time, recording growth from hotter, less evolved magmas tens of thousands of years prior to the appearance of mafic magmas at the surface, or changes in whole-rock geochemistry and petrology, and providing a new, time-correlated record of this evolution independent of the eruption history. Zircon data thus reveal the history of the hidden, long-lived intrusive portion of the Mount St. Helens system, where melt and crystals are stored for as long as hundreds of thousands of years and interact with fresh influxes of magmas that traverse the intrusive reservoir before erupting. ?? 2010 Geological Society of America.

  9. Trioctahedral vermiculite in a 1980 pyroclastic flow, Mt. St. Helens, Washington

    SciTech Connect

    LaManna, J.M.; Ugolini, F.C.

    1987-03-01

    Trioctahedral vermiculite, previously unreported, is an abundant phyllosilicate in a Mt. St. Helens pyroclastic flow that was emplaced during the 18 May 1980 eruption. The response of this mineral to various treatments suggests its layer charge is approximately 0.6 per O/sub 10/(OH)/sub 2/. In the pyroclastic flow, vermiculite is present in samples collected in 1981 from the surface-to-90-cm depth, but it is present only from 5 to 90 cm deep in samples collected in 1983. The apparent depletion in trioctahedral vermiculite of the 1983 surface (0-1.5 cm) is believed to be caused by weathering due to the prevailing acidic rainfall (pH = 4.0-4.6). One crucial problem in tephritic soils is to establish the origin of the 2:1 phyllosilicates. The authors findings show that these layer silicates, possessing different layer charges, were most likely present with the lithic fragments of the ejecta. Consequently trioctahedral vermiculite and the previously reported saponite present in Mt. St. Helens tephra should be considered detrital minerals.

  10. Precipitation Data for the Mount St. Helens Area, Washington--1981-86

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Uhrich, Mark A.

    1990-01-01

    This report is a compilation of precipitation data from U.S. Geological Survey telemetered 'Early Flood Warning' sites near Mount St. Helens, Washington, and from telemetered hydrologic data sites in the Toutle River and Muddy River basins for the years 1981-86. It also includes precipitation data for 1981-86 from non-telemetered recording rain gages established near the debris-avalanche blockages of Spirit Lake, Coldwater Lake, and Castle Lake. Daily values (midnight to midnight) are listed by station and calendar year for 32 sites. Hourly data, where available, are presented for the storm that generated the highest peak discharge in the North Fork Toutle River each water year. Instrumentation includes 25 tipping-bucket, and 7 weighing-bucket rain gages all without windshields. The seven sites with weighing-bucket gages were the only U.S. Geological Survey sites at which snowfall was measured. Additional snowfall measurements for the same time period in the Mount St. Helens area were collected by the National Weather Service, the U.s. Soil Conservation Service, and the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers and also are presented in this report.

  11. Legionella sainthelensi: a new species of Legionella isolated from water near Mt. St. Helens.

    PubMed Central

    Campbell, J; Bibb, W F; Lambert, M A; Eng, S; Steigerwalt, A G; Allard, J; Moss, C W; Brenner, D J

    1984-01-01

    Six strains of a new species, Legionella sainthelensi, were isolated from freshwater in areas affected by the volcanic eruptions of Mt. St. Helens in the state of Washington. Strains of L. sainthelensi are culturally and biochemically similar to other legionellae. They grow on buffered charcoal yeast agar but not on media that lack cysteine. They are gram-negative, nonsporeforming, motile rods that are positive in reactions for catalase, oxidase, gelatin liquefaction, and beta-lactamase. They are negative in reactions for urease, hydrolysis of hippurate, reduction of nitrates, fermentation of glucose, and blue-white autofluorescence. Their cell wall fatty acid composition is qualitatively similar to those of other legionellae, with 50 to 62% branched-chain fatty acids. They contain the isobranched-chain 14- and 16-carbon acids and anteisobranched-chain 15- and 17-carbon acids and relatively large amounts of straight-chain 16-carbon acid. All strains of L. sainthelensi contain approximately equal amounts of ubiquinones Q9, Q10, Q11, and Q12, a pattern similar to those of Legionella bozemanii, Legionella dumoffi, and Legionella longbeachae. Serological cross-reactions were observed between L. sainthelensi, both serogroups of L. longbeachae, and Legionella oakridgensis. Three strains of L. sainthelensi were greater than 90% related by DNA hybridization. The type strain of L. sainthelensi, Mt. St. Helens 4, was 36% related to the type strain of L. longbeachae and 3 to 14% related to the other nine described Legionella species. PMID:6712210

  12. Towards a Transactional View of Rhetorical and Feminist Theory: Rereading Helen Cixous's "The Laugh of the Medusa."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Biesecker, Barbara A.

    1992-01-01

    Argues that by rereading Helene Cixous's "The Laugh of Medusa" as a rhetoric--that is, an essay which posits what can and must be done by women if they are to intervene effectively in the public sphere through written or oral discourse--both rhetorical and feminist theory and criticism are enriched. (SR)

  13. Educating Black Girls in the Early 20th Century: The Pioneering Work of Nannie Helen Burroughs (1879-1961)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bair, Sarah D.

    2008-01-01

    Using social education as a theoretical framework, this article examines the educational theories of Nannie Helen Burroughs (1883-1961), founder of the National Training School for Women and Girls in 1909, and discusses the social studies curriculum at her school. Burroughs's papers reveal her efforts to build a curriculum that blended practical,…

  14. Impossible Practice and Theories of the Impossible: A Response to Helene Illeris's "Potentials of Togetherness"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kallio-Tavin, Mira

    2014-01-01

    In a recent commentary in "Studies in Art Education," Helene Illeris (2013) discussed the idea of "performative experimental communities" via a critique of visual culture pedagogy and the romanticism of community-oriented art education in Nordic countries. Illeris underpinned her arguments with Jean-Luc Nancy's (1997)…

  15. Democracy and Schooling in California: The Legacy of Helen Heffernan and Corinne Seeds. Historical Studies in Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weiler, Kathleen

    2011-01-01

    Helen Heffernan and Corinne Seeds were nationally recognized as leaders of the progressive education movement and were key figures in what was probably the most concerted attempt to put the ideals of progressive education into practice in a state-wide system of public education in the United States. This book examines the struggle over public…

  16. An investigation of pre-eruptive deformation for the 2004 eruption of Mount St. Helens using persistent scatterer interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Welch, M.; Schmidt, D. A.

    2014-12-01

    The volcanoes of the Cascade Range pose a legitimate threat to people living in the Pacific Northwest. Mt St Helens, which erupted in 2004 as a part of a dome building event, is a notable example of this danger. Deformation and seismicity are known indicators of volcanic activity and can provide warning of an imminent eruption. In the weeks leading up to the 2004 eruption, a shallow earthquake swarm was detected under St. Helens, suggesting ongoing deformation with its source beneath the edifice. A campaign GPS survey conducted in 2000 found no evidence of deformation. The sole continuous GPS station that was operational prior to the eruption (located ~9 km away from the crater) began moving only with the onset of the earthquake swarm. Because of the lack of ground based geodetic instruments in the near-field of Mt St Helens at the time of the 2004 eruption, it is unknown whether pre-eruptive deformation occurred on the edifice or solely within crater. InSAR is the only method available to conclusively determine whether the 2004 eruption was preceded by deformation of the edifice. Previous work explored this question using standard 2-pass interferometry, but the results were inconclusive. The main obstacle to implementing InSAR methods in the Cascades region is phase decorrelation due to the presence of both dense forest and snow for most of the year. We revisit the available InSAR data for St. Helens by experimenting with the application of the Persistent Scatterers and Distributed Scatterers processing techniques in order to overcome the decorrelation problem. By using these techniques on the question of Mt St Helens pre-eruptive deformation, we will demonstrate the viability of their application to the entire Northwest region as a low cost, low maintenance, monitoring tool.

  17. Scattering matrices of volcanic ash particles of Mount St. Helens, Redoubt, and Mount Spurr Volcanoes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MuñOz, O.; Volten, H.; Hovenier, J. W.; Veihelmann, B.; van der Zande, W. J.; Waters, L. B. F. M.; Rose, W. I.

    2004-08-01

    We present measurements of the whole scattering matrix as a function of the scattering angle at a wavelength of 632.8 nm in the scattering angle range 3°-174° of randomly oriented particles taken from seven samples of volcanic ashes corresponding to four different volcanic eruptions: the 18 May 1980 Mount St. Helens eruption, the 1989-1990 Redoubt eruption, and the 18 August and 17 September 1992 Mount Spurr eruptions. The samples were collected at different distances from the vent. The samples studied contain large mass fractions of fine particles and were chosen to represent ash that could remain in the atmosphere for at least hours or days. They include fine ashfall samples that fell at a variety of distances from the volcano and pyroclastic flows that retained their fine fractions. Together, they represent a range of ashes likely to remain in the atmosphere in volcanic clouds following eruptions from convergent plate boundary volcanoes, Earth's most important group of explosive sources of ash. All measured scattering matrix elements are confined to rather limited domains when plotted as functions of the scattering angle following the general trends presented by irregular mineral particles. This similarity in the scattering behavior justifies the construction of an average scattering matrix for volcanic ash particles as a function of the scattering angle. To facilitate the use of the average scattering matrix for multiple-scattering calculations with polarization included, we present a synthetic scattering matrix based on the average scattering matrix for volcanic ashes and the assumption that the diffraction forward scattering peak is the same for randomly oriented nonspherical particles and projected-surface-area-equivalent spheres. This synthetic scattering matrix is normalized so that the average of its 1-1 element over all directions equals unity. It is available in the full range from 0° to 180° and can be used, for example, for interpretation of

  18. Photogeologic maps of the 2004-2005 Mount St. Helens eruption: Chapter 10 in A volcano rekindled: the renewed eruption of Mount St. Helens, 2004-2006

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Herriott, Trystan M.; Sherrod, David R.; Pallister, John S.; Vallance, James W.; Sherrod, David R.; Scott, William E.; Stauffer, Peter H.

    2008-01-01

    The 2004-5 eruption of Mount St. Helens, still ongoing as of this writing (September 2006), has comprised chiefly lava dome extrusion that produced a series of solid, faultgouge-mantled dacite spines. Vertical aerial photographs taken every 2 to 4 weeks, visual observations, and oblique photographs taken from aircraft and nearby observation points provide the basis for two types of photogeologic maps of the dome--photo-based maps and rectified maps. Eight map pairs, covering the period from October 1, 2004, through December 15, 2005, document the development of seven spines: an initial small, fin-shaped vertical spine; a north-south elongate wall of dacite; two large and elongate recumbent spines (“whalebacks”); a tall and elongate inclined spine; a smaller bulbous spine; and an initially endogenous spine extruded between remnants of preceding spines. All spines rose from the same general vent area near the southern margin of the 1980s lava dome. Maps also depict translation and rotation of active and abandoned spines, progressive deformation affecting Crater Glacier, and distribution of ash on the crater floor from phreatic and phreatomagmatic explosions. The maps help track key geologic and geographic features in the rapidly changing crater and help date dome, gouge, and ash samples that are no longer readily correlated to their original context because of deformation in a dynamic environment where spines extrude, deform, slough, and are overrun by newly erupted material.

  19. Seismic and acoustic recordings of an unusually large rockfall at Mount St. Helens, Washington

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Moran, S.C.; Matoza, R.S.; Garces, M.A.; Hedlin, M.A.H.; Bowers, D.; Scott, W.E.; Sherrod, D.R.; Vallance, J.W.

    2008-01-01

    On 29 May 2006 a large rockfall off the Mount St. Helens lava dome produced an atmospheric plume that was reported by airplane pilots to have risen to 6,000 m above sea level and interpreted to be a result of an explosive event. However, subsequent field reconnaissance found no evidence of a ballistic field, indicating that there was no explosive component. The rockfall produced complex seismic and infrasonic signals, with the latter recorded at sites 0.6 and 13.4 km from the source. An unusual, very long-period (50 s) infrasonic signal was recorded, a signal we model as the result of air displacement. Two high-frequency infrasonic signals are inferred to result from the initial contact of a rock slab with the ground and from interaction of displaced air with a depression at the base of the active lava dome. Copyright 2008 by the American Geophysical Union.

  20. In the path of destruction - eyewitness chronicles of Mount St. Helens

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Waitt, Richard B.

    2015-01-01

    “The air had no oxygen, like being trapped underwater…I was being cremated, the pain unbearable.”-- Jim Scymanky“I was on my knees, my back to the hot wind. It blew me along, lifting my rear so I was up on my hands…It was hot but I didn’t feel burned—until I felt my ears curl.”—Mike HubbardA napping volcano blinked awake in March 1980. Two months later, the mountain roared. Author Richard Waitt was one of the first to arrive following the mountain’s early rumblings. A geologist with intimate knowledge of Mount St. Helens, Waitt delivers a detailed and accurate chronicle of events. The eruption story unfolds through unforgettable, riveting narratives—the heart of a masterful chronology that also delivers engrossing science, history, and journalism.

  1. Atmospheric oscillations after the May 18, 1980 eruption of Mount St. Helens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bolt, Bruce A.; Tanimoto, Toshiro

    Air waves corresponding both to direct (A1) and antipodean (A2) travel paths were clearly recorded on a sensitive microbarograph at Berkeley after the violent eruption of Mount St. Helens on May 18, 1980 (see Figure 1). These unusual complementary recordings throw light on the acoustic energy released as compared with Krakatoa [Strachey, 1888], atmospheric oscillations and their attenuation, and the directive properties of the phreatic blast. The principal explosive eruptions followed closely on an earthquake, Richter magnitude 4.9, origin time 1532 GMT, centered near the volcano. Atmospheric waves and associated magnetic perturbations [Fougere and Tsacoyeanes, 1980] from these eruptions were recorded by microbarographs, seismographs, and magnetometers around the world. In particular, Ritsema [1980] has published records of the A1 atmospheric wave train and the A2 wave (called B1 by him) recorded at De Bilt, Holland. The A2 waves at De Bilt, however, are barely visible on the paper record.

  2. Gaseous constituents in the plume from eruptions of Mount St. Helens

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Inn, E. C. Y.; Vedder, J. F.; Condon, E. P.; Ohara, D.

    1981-01-01

    Measurements in the stratosphere of gaseous constituents in the plume of Mount St. Helens were obtained during five flights of the NASA U-2 aircraft between 19 May and 17 June 1980. Mixing ratios from gas chromatographic measurements on samples acquired about 24 hours after the initial eruption show considerable enhancement over nonvolcanic concentrations for sulfur dioxide (more than 1000 times), methyl chloride (about 10 times), and carbon disulfide (more than 3 times). The mixing ratio of carbonyl sulfide was comparable to nonvolcanic mixing ratios although 3 days later it was enhanced two to three times. Ion chromatography measurements on water-soluble constituents are also reported. Very large concentrations of chloride, nitrate, and sulfate ions were measured, implying large mixing ratios for the water-soluble gaseous constituents from which the anions are derived. Measurements of radon-222 present in the plume are also reported.

  3. Thermal property measurements in a fresh pumice flow at Mt. St. Helens

    SciTech Connect

    Hardee, H.C.

    1981-03-01

    A thermal penetrator that was air dropped into a freshly emplaced pumice flow at Mt. St. Helens yielded information on the in-situ thermal properties of the pumice. The in-situ conductivity-density-specific heat product at a depth of 60 cm was found to be 7.24 x 10/sup -5/ cal/sup 2/cm//sup 4/ s- /sup 0/C/sup 2/ at an average pumice temperature of 200 /sup 0/C. Using this data, values for the average in-situ thermal conductivity (2.9 x 10/sup -4/ cal/cm-s-/sup 0/C) and thermal diffusivity (1.2 x 10/sup -3/ cm/sup 2//s) were estimated. These thermal properties are of use in studies of pumice cooling and in the interpretation of infrared remote sensing data.

  4. Evaluation of heat flow and its geological implications on Mt. St. Helens

    SciTech Connect

    Grady, T.; Adams, E.; Brown, R.L.; Sato, A.

    1982-04-01

    A study to determine the heat flux pattern in the vicinity of Mt. St. Helens was undertaken as part of a program to evaluate the effects of the eruption on future snowpack conditions in the area. Subsurface temperature and low energy refraction seismic studies were made during the early spring in 1981 to determine both the heat flux in the area of pyroclastic deposition and its potential source. In addition, samples were collected for later laboratory determination of thermal conductivity and diffusivity. Results indicate that the heat flow values in the area of pyroclastic deposition are as large as forty times greater than the heat flow values measured on Mt. Adams and Mt. Hood during the same period. The highest heat flow values appear to coincide with a pumice flow unit on the north side of the mountain.. Comparison with work done on the eruption of Mt. Komagatake indicates that the large heat flow values continue for several years.

  5. Chronology and pyroclastic stratigraphy of the May 18, 1980, eruption of Mount St. Helens, Washington

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Criswell, C. William

    1987-01-01

    The eruption of Mount St. Helens on May 18, 1980 can be subdivided into six phases: the paroxysmal phase I, the early Plinian phase II, the early ash flow phase III, the climactic phase IV, the late ash flow phase V, and phase VI, the activity of which consisted of a low-energy ash plume. These phases are correlated with stratigraphic subunits of ash-fall tephra and pyroclastic flow deposits. Sustained vertical discharge of phase II produced evolved dacite with high S/Cl ratios. Ash flow activity of phase III is attributed to decreases in gas content, indicated by reduced S/Cl ratios and increased clast density of the less evolved gray pumice. Climactic events are attributed to vent clearing and exhaustion of the evolved dacite.

  6. Low cost volcano deformation monitoring: optical strain measurement and application to Mount St. Helens data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walter, Thomas R.

    2011-08-01

    This paper describes an innovative method of volcano deformation measurements, applied to camera images taken from the 2004-2008 eruption period at Mount St. Helens. Dome growth was thought to be characterized by sustained, near-linear rates of a solid dacite plug. Through spatial digital image correlation (DIC) analysis of the camera images, new evidences arise that the deformation and strain rate of the spine was more complex. DIC yielded cumulative and incremental displacements, strain and shear planes at decimetre resolution. It was found that dome extrusion rates are highly non-linear, decelerating prior to partial collapse, followed by a pronounced dome extrusion increase and direction change. Associated processes have been identified through DIC, such as shallow landslides and reworking of talus apron material. The work highlights the strengths of camera strain monitoring, and illustrates that dome growth and collapse is a very dynamic process complexly interplaying with the surrounding.

  7. Didymus the blind: an unknown precursor of Louis Braille and Helen Keller.

    PubMed

    Lascaratos, J; Marketos, S

    1994-01-01

    The present study presents the case of Didymus the Blind, worthy author, philosopher and theologian of the 4th century AD. Blinded by ophthalmia at the age of four years, Didymus succeeded in achieving great learning in the philosophical and natural sciences. He began his education by using a system which was remarkably like Braille, that is reading letters engraved into the surface of wood by touch and subsequently furthering his knowledge by listening. This learning process of Didymus the Blind appears as the precursor of Louis Braille who invented the educational system of reading embossed dots by touch. Like Didymus, Braille lost his vision in infancy (at three years of age). Another parallel of Didymus' career and written works is found in the example and achievements of Helen Keller.

  8. The role of mycorrhizal fungi and microsites in primary succession on Mount St. Helens.

    PubMed

    Titus, J; Del Moral, R

    1998-03-01

    This study was designed to examine the role of vesicular-arbuscular mycorrhizae (VAM) and microsites on the growth of pioneer species. Flat, rill, near-rock, and dead lupine microsites were created in plots in barren areas of the Pumice Plain of Mount St. Helens. VAM propagules were added to the soil in half of the plots. Six pioneer species were planted into both VAM and non-VAM inoculated microsites. Plants in dead lupine microsites were greater in biomass than those in flat, rill, and near-rock microsites. Significant effects of VAM on plant biomass did not occur. Microsites continue to be important to plant colonization on the Pumice Plain, but VAM do not yet appear to play an important role. This may be due to limited nutrient availability and the facultatively mycotrophic nature of the colonizing plant species. It is unlikely that VAM play an important role in successional processes in newly emplaced nutrient-poor surfaces.

  9. Dynamics of seismogenic volcanic extrusion at Mount St Helens in 2004-05

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Iverson, R.M.; Dzurisin, D.; Gardner, C.A.; Gerlach, T.M.; LaHusen, R.G.; Lisowski, M.; Major, J.J.; Malone, S.D.; Messerich, J.A.; Moran, S.C.; Pallister, J.S.; Qamar, A.I.; Schilling, S.P.; Vallance, J.W.

    2006-01-01

    The 2004-05 eruption of Mount St Helens exhibited sustained, near-equilibrium behaviour characterized by relatively steady extrusion of a solid dacite plug and nearly periodic shallow earthquakes. Here we present a diverse data set to support our hypothesis that these earthquakes resulted from stick-slip motion along the margins of the plug as it was forced incrementally upwards by ascending, solidifying, gas-poor magma. We formalize this hypothesis with a dynamical model that reveals a strong analogy between behaviour of the magma-plug system and that of a variably damped oscillator. Modelled stick-slip oscillations have properties that help constrain the balance of forces governing the earthquakes and eruption, and they imply that magma pressure never deviated much from the steady equilibrium pressure. We infer that the volcano was probably poised in a near-eruptive equilibrium state long before the onset of the 2004-05 eruption. ??2006 Nature Publishing Group.

  10. Was the 18 May 1980 lateral blast at Mt St Helens the product of two explosions?

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hoblitt, R.P.

    2000-01-01

    The 18 May 1980 lateral blast at Mt St Helens has been interpreted as the product of a single explosion by some stratigraphers and as two closely spaced explosions by others. The stratigraphic evidence that bears on this question is inconclusive; strata change dramatically over short distances and this complexity provides wide latitude for interpretation. Some independent non-stratigraphic evidence, however, suggests that the blast was the product of two explosions or clusters of explosions. The independent evidence comes from eyewitness accounts and photographs, from satellite sensors, and from seismic records. This paper reviews the pertinent evidence, offers a new interpretation, and concludes that the blast was indeed the product of two explosions or clusters of explosions.

  11. Volcano collapse promoted by progressive strength reduction: New data from Mount St. Helens

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Reid, Mark E.; Keith, Terry E.C.; Kayen, Robert; Iverson, Neal R.; Iverson, Richard M.; Brien, Dianne

    2010-01-01

    Rock shear strength plays a fundamental role in volcano flank collapse, yet pertinent data from modern collapse surfaces are rare. Using samples collected from the inferred failure surface of the massive 1980 collapse of Mount St. Helens (MSH), we determined rock shear strength via laboratory tests designed to mimic conditions in the pre-collapse edifice. We observed that the 1980 failure shear surfaces formed primarily in pervasively shattered older dome rocks; failure was not localized in sloping volcanic strata or in weak, hydrothermally altered rocks. Our test results show that rock shear strength under large confining stresses is reduced ∼20% as a result of large quasi-static shear strain, as preceded the 1980 collapse of MSH. Using quasi-3D slope-stability modeling, we demonstrate that this mechanical weakening could have provoked edifice collapse, even in the absence of transiently elevated pore-fluid pressures or earthquake ground shaking. Progressive strength reduction could promote collapses at other volcanic edifices.

  12. Target diagnostics for commissioning the AWE HELEN Laser Facility 100 TW chirped pulse amplification beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eagleton, R. T.; Clark, E. L.; Davies, H. M.; Edwards, R. D.; Gales, S.; Girling, M. T.; Hoarty, D. J.; Hopps, N. W.; James, S. F.; Kopec, M. F.; Nolan, J. R.; Ryder, K.

    2006-10-01

    The capability of the HELEN laser at the Atomic Weapons Establishment Aldermaston has been enhanced by the addition of a short-pulse laser beam to augment the twin opposing nanosecond time scale beams. The short-pulse beam utilizes the chirped pulse amplification (CPA) technique and is capable of delivering up to 60J on target in a 500fs pulse, around 100TW, at the fundamental laser wavelength of 1.054μm. During the commissioning phase a number of diagnostic systems have been fielded, these include: x-ray pinhole imaging of the laser heated spot, charged particle time of flight, thermoluminescent dosimeter array, calibrated radiochromic film, and CR39 nuclear track detector. These diagnostic systems have been used to verify the performance of the CPA beam to achieve a focused intensity of around 1019Wcm-2 and to underwrite the facility radiological safety system.

  13. Forward scattering and backscattering of solar radiation by the stratospheric limb after Mount St. Helens eruption

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ackerman, M.; Lippens, C.

    1982-01-01

    Stratospheric limb radiance profiles versus altitude of closest approach of the line of sight to the Earth's surface have been measured before and after the Mount St. Helens eruptions by means of photographs taken from a Sun-oriented balloon gondola floating above 35 km altitude over France. Preliminary data were reported for flights in October 1979 and in May and June 1980. The radiance integrated along the line of sight as in-situ radiance (R) can be derived taking into account absorption by ozone and air. The onion peeling inversion method was used to derive the vertical radiance (R) profiles respectively. The values of R were determined in the solar azimuth. The solar elevation angles are chosen larger for the backscattering observation than for the forward scattering observation to deal with as similar illumination conditions as possible despite the Earth's sphericity.

  14. Anthropology in a postcolonial colony: Helen I. Safa's contribution to Puerto Rican ethnography.

    PubMed

    Duany, Jorge

    2010-01-01

    This article assesses Helen I. Safa's legacy to anthropological thought in Puerto Rico. The first part of the article locates Safa's research on the Island within a long tradition of fieldwork by U.S. scholars since the early twentieth century. More recent research, conducted mostly by Puerto Rican women anthropologists and other social scientists, has expanded upon Safa's insights on gender and work. The second part of the essay analyzes Safa's major empirical work, The Urban Poor of Puerto Rico: A Study in Development and Inequality. Above all, this book helped overcome the theoretical impasse over the culture of poverty that characterized much of urban anthropology during the 1960s and 1970s. The article concludes with an appraisal of the relevance of Safa's work for the ethnography of contemporary Puerto Rico.

  15. Monitoring the 1980-1982 eruptions of mount st. Helens: compositions and abundances of glass.

    PubMed

    Melson, W G

    1983-09-30

    The Mount St. Helens eruptive sequence of 1980 through 1982 reflects the tapping of successively less water-rich, more highly crystallized, and more viscous, highly phyric dacitic magmas. These changes reflect both syn- and preeruption processes. The decreasing water content points to a continued decline in the volume and intensity of explosive pyroclastic activity. This decreasing water content appears to be composed of a long-term trend established during a long period of repose (about 130 years) imposed on short-term trends established during short periods (about 7 to 100 days) of repose between eruptions in the present eruptive cycle. The last two eruptive cycles of this volcano, the T (A.D. 1800) and W cycles (about A. D. 1500), exhibited similar trends. These changes are inferred from a combination of petrographic, bulk chemical, and electron- and ion-microprobe analyses of matrix and melt-inclusion glasses.

  16. Dynamics of seismogenic volcanic extrusion at Mount St Helens in 2004-05.

    PubMed

    Iverson, Richard M; Dzurisin, Daniel; Gardner, Cynthia A; Gerlach, Terrence M; LaHusen, Richard G; Lisowski, Michael; Major, Jon J; Malone, Stephen D; Messerich, James A; Moran, Seth C; Pallister, John S; Qamar, Anthony I; Schilling, Steven P; Vallance, James W

    2006-11-23

    The 2004-05 eruption of Mount St Helens exhibited sustained, near-equilibrium behaviour characterized by relatively steady extrusion of a solid dacite plug and nearly periodic shallow earthquakes. Here we present a diverse data set to support our hypothesis that these earthquakes resulted from stick-slip motion along the margins of the plug as it was forced incrementally upwards by ascending, solidifying, gas-poor magma. We formalize this hypothesis with a dynamical model that reveals a strong analogy between behaviour of the magma-plug system and that of a variably damped oscillator. Modelled stick-slip oscillations have properties that help constrain the balance of forces governing the earthquakes and eruption, and they imply that magma pressure never deviated much from the steady equilibrium pressure. We infer that the volcano was probably poised in a near-eruptive equilibrium state long before the onset of the 2004-05 eruption.

  17. Gas emissions and the eruptions of mount st. Helens through 1982.

    PubMed

    Casadevall, T; Rose, W; Gerlach, T; Greenland, L P; Ewert, J; Wunderman, R; Symonds, R

    1983-09-30

    The monitoring of gas emissions from Mount St. Helens includes daily airborne measurements of sulfur dioxide in the volcanic plume and monthly sampling of gases from crater fumaroles. The composition of the fumarolic gases has changed slightly since 1980: the water content increased from 90 to 98 percent, and the carbon dioxide concentrations decreased from about 10 to 1 percent. The emission rates of sulfur dioxide and carbon dioxide were at their peak during July and August 1980, decreased rapidly in late 1980, and have remained low and decreased slightly through 1981 and 1982. These patterns suggest steady outgassing of a single batch of magma (with a volume of not less than 0.3 cubic kilometer) to which no significant new magma has been added since mid-1980. The gas data were useful in predicting eruptions in August 1980 and June 1981.

  18. Seismic precursors to the mount st. Helens eruptions in 1981 and 1982.

    PubMed

    Malone, S D; Boyko, C; Weaver, C S

    1983-09-30

    Six categories of seismic events are recognized on the seismograms from stations in the vicinity of Mount St. Helens. Two types of high-frequency earthquakes occur near the volcano and under the volcano at depths of more than 4 kilometers. Medium- and low-frequency earthquakes occur at shallow depths (less than 3 kilometers) within the volcano and increase in number and size before eruptions. Temporal changes in the energy release of the low-frequency earthquakes have been used in predicting all the eruptions since October 1980. During and after eruptions, two types of low-frequency emergent surface events occur, including rockfalls and steam or gas bursts from the lava dome.

  19. Gas emissions and the eruptions of Mount St. Helens through 1982

    SciTech Connect

    Casadevall, T.; Rose, W.; Gerlach, T.; Greenland, L.P.; Ewert, J.; Wunderman, R.; Symonds, R.

    1983-09-30

    The monitoring of gas emissions from Mount St. Helens includes daily airborne measurements of sulfur dioxide in the volcanic plume and monthly sampling of gases from crater fumaroles. The composition of the fumarolic gases has changed slightly since 1980: the water content increased from 90 to 98 percent, and the carbon dioxide concentrations decreased from about 10 to 1 percent. The emission rates of sulfur dioxide and carbon dioxide were at their peak during July and August 1980, decreased rapidly in late 1980, and have remained low and decreased slightly through 1981 and 1982. These patterns suggest steady outgassing of a single batch of magma has been added since mid-1980. The gas data were useful in predicting eruptions in August 1980 and June 1981.

  20. Monitoring vegetation recovery patterns on Mount St. Helens using thermal infrared multispectral data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Langran, K. J.

    1985-01-01

    The eruptions of Mount St. Helens created new surfaces by stripping and implacing large volumes of eroded material and depositing tephra in the blast area and on the flanks of the mountain. Areas of major disturbance are those in the blast zone that were subject to debris avalanche, pyroclastic flows, mudflows, and blowdown and scorched timber; and those outside the blast zone that received extensive tephra deposits. These zones represent a spectrum of disturbance types and intensities that can be indexed by temperature, impact force, and depth of subsequent deposition. This paper describes an application of NASA's Thermal Infrared Multispectral Scanner (TIMS) in monitoring vegetation recovery patterns in disturbed areas. Preliminary study results indicate a significant correlation between measured effective radiant temperature and vegetated/nonvegetated areas, percent vegetation cover, and vegetation type.

  1. Gaseous constituents in the plume from eruptions of mount st. Helens.

    PubMed

    Inn, E C; Vedder, J F; Condon, E P; O'hara, D

    1981-02-20

    Measurements in the stratosphere of gaseous constituents in the plume of Mount St. Helens were obtained during five flights of the NASA U-2 aircraft between 19 May and 17 June 1980. Mixing ratios from gas chromatographic measurements on samples acquired about 24 hours after the initial eruption show considerable enhancement over nonvolcanic concentrations for sulfur dioxide (more than 1000 times), methyl chloride (about 10 times), and carbon disulfide (more than 3 times). The mixing ratio of carbonyl sulfide was comparable to nonvolcanic mixing ratios although 3 days later it was enhanced two to three times. Ion chromatography measurements on water-soluble constituents are also reported. Very large concentrations of chloride, nitrate, and sulfate ions were measured, implying large mixing ratios for the water-soluble gaseous constituents from which the anions are derived. Measurements of radon-222 present in the plume are also reported.

  2. Deep earthquakes beneath mount st. Helens: evidence for magmatic gas transport?

    PubMed

    Weaver, C S; Zollweg, J E; Malone, S D

    1983-09-30

    Small-magnitude earthquakes began beneath Mount St. Helens 40 days before the eruption of 20 March 1982. Unlike earlier preeruption seismicity for this volcano, which had been limited to shallow events (less than 3 kilometers), many of these earthquakes were deep (between 5 and 11 kilometers). The location of these preeruptive events at such depth indicates that a larger volume of the volcanic system was affected prior to the 20 March eruption than prior to any of the earlier dome-building eruptions. The depth-time relation between the deep earthquakes and the explosive onset of the eruption is compatible with the upward migration of magmatic gas released from a separate deep reservoir.

  3. Intrusive and extrusive growth of the Mount St Helens lava dome

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fink, Jonathan H.; Malin, Michael C.; Anderson, Steven W.

    1990-01-01

    High-resolution, digital topographic maps of the Mount St. Helens dome derived from aerial photographs are used here to make a quantitative assessment of the partitioning of magma into endogenous intrusion and exogenous lobes. The endogenous growth is found to be predictable, which shows that the cooling dome controls its own development independently of such deep-seated factors as magma overpressure and extrusion rate. The observed regular decrease in exogenous growth rate also allows volume prediction. Knowledge of the volume can be used to determine when an ongoing eruptive event should end. Finally, the observed transition from predominantly exogenous to predominantly endogenous growth reflects the increase in crust thickness, which in turn seems to depend on long repose periods rather than some fundamental change in the character of the dome.

  4. Petrologic monitoring of 1981 and 1982 eruptive products from mount st. Helens.

    PubMed

    Cashman, K V; Taggart, J E

    1983-09-30

    New material from the dacite lava dome of Mount St. Helens, collected soon after the start of each successive extrusion, is subjected to rapid chemical and petrologic analysis. The crystallinity of the dacite lava produced in 1981 and 1982 is 38 to 42 percent, about 10 percent higher than for products of the explosive 1980 eruptions. This increase in crystallinity accompanies a decrease in the ratio of hornblende to hornblende plus orthopyroxene, which suggests that the volatile-rich, crystal-poor material explosively erupted in 1980 came from the top of a zoned magma chamber and that a lower, volatile-poor and crystal-rich region is now being tapped. The major-element chemistry of the dacite lava has remained essentially constant (62 to 63 percent silica) since August 1980, ending a trend of decreasing silica seen in the products of the explosive eruptions of May through August 1980.

  5. Petrologic monitoring of 1981 and 1982 eruptive products from Mount St. Helens

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cashman, K.V.; Taggart, J.E.

    1983-01-01

    New material from the dacite lava dome of Mount St. Helens, collected soon after the start of each successive extrusion, is subjected to rapid chemical and petrologic analysis. The crystallinity of the dacite lava produced in 1981 and 1982 is 38 to 42 percent, about 10 percent higher than for products of the explosive 1980 eruptions. This increase in crystallinity accompanies a decrease in the ratio of hornblende to hornblende plus orthopyroxene, which suggests that the volatile-rich, crystal-poor material explosively erupted in 1980 came from the top of a zoned magma chamber and that a lower, volatile-poor and crystal-rich region is now being tapped. The major-element chemistry of the dacite lava has remained essentially constant (62 to 63 percent silica) since August 1980, ending a trend of decreasing silica seen in the products of the explosive eruptions of May through August 1980.

  6. Deep earthquakes beneath Mount St. Helens: Evidence for magmatic gas transport?

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Weaver, C.S.; Zollweg, J.E.; Malone, S.D.

    1983-01-01

    Small-magnitude earthquakes began beneath Mount St. Helens 40 days before the eruption of 20 March 1982. Unlike earlier preeruption seismicity for this volcano, which had been limited to shallow events (less than 3 kilometers), many of these earthquakes were deep (between 5 and 11 kilometers). The location of these preeruptive events at such depth indicates that a larger volume of the volcanic system was affected prior to the 20 March eruption than prior to any of the earlier dome-building eruptions. The depth-time relation between the deep earthquakes and the explosive onset of the eruption is compatible with the upward migration of magmatic gas released from a separate deep reservoir.

  7. Thrust faults and related structures in the crater floor of Mount St. Helens volcano, Washington

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chadwick, W.W.; Swanson, D.A.

    1989-01-01

    A lava dome was built in the crater of Mount St. Helens by intermittent intrusion and extrusion of dacite lava between 1980 and 1986. Spectacular ground deformation was associated with the dome-building events and included the development of a system of radial cracks and tangential thrust faults in the surrounding crater floor. These cracks and thrusts, best developed and studied in 1981-1982, formed first and, as some evolved into strike-slip tear faults, influenced the subsequent geometry of thrusting. Once faulting began, deformation was localized near the thrust scarps and their bounding tear faults. The magnitude of displacements systematically increased before extrusions, whereas the azimuth and inclination of displacements remained relatively constant. The thrust-fault scarps were bulbous in profile, lobate in plan, and steepened during continued fault movement. The hanging walls of each thrust were increasingly disrupted as cumulative fault slip increased. -from Authors

  8. Hydrogen-isotope evidence for extrusion mechanisms of the Mount St Helens lava dome

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, Steven W.; Fink, Jonathan H.

    1989-01-01

    Hydrogen isotope analyses were used to determine water content and deuterium content for 18 samples of the Mount St Helens dome dacite in an attempt to identify the triggering mechanisms for periodic dome-building eruptions of lava. These isotope data, the first ever collected from an active lava dome, suggest a steady-state process of magma evolution combining crystallization-induced volatile production in the chamber with three different degassing mechanisms: closed-system volatile loss in the magma chamber, open-system volatile release during ascent, and kinetically controlled degassing upon eruption at the surface. The data suggest the future dome-building eruptions may require a new influx of volatile-rich magma into the chamber.

  9. Magmatic model for the Mount St. Helens blast of May 18, 1980

    SciTech Connect

    Eichelberger, J.C.; Hayes, D.B.

    1982-09-10

    Analytical and numerical solutions to the hydrodynamic equations of motion, constrained by physical properties of juvenile ejecta in the Mount St. Helens blast deposit, were used to investigate magmatic conditions required to produce the initial devastating blast phase of the eruption of May 18, 1980. Evidence that the blast was magmatic includes equivalence in volume of juvenile blast ejecta to preeruption inflation of the cone, substantial vesicularity of this ejecta, and continued vesiculation of large juvenile clasts after eruption. Observed or inferred ejecta velocities of 100 to 250 m/s are shown to require 0.2 to 0.7 wt% water vapor preexisting in magma unloaded by a landslide 200 to 900 m thick. These conditions imply total magmatic water contents of 0.7 to 1.7 wt%, respectively. Such low required water content suggests that volcanic blasts may be regarded as a normal consequence of magma intrusion into an unstable edifice.

  10. Vapor transfer prior to the October 2004 eruption of Mount St. Helens, Washington

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kent, A.J.R.; Blundy, J.; Cashman, K.V.; Copper, K.M.; Donnelly, C.; Pallister, J.S.; Reagan, M.; Rowe, M.C.; Thornber, C.R.

    2007-01-01

    Dome lavas from the 2004 eruption of Mount St. Helens show elevated Li contents in plagioclase phenocrysts at the onset of dome growth in October 2004. These cannot be explained by variations in plagioclase-melt partitioning, but require elevated Li contents in coexisting melt, a fact confirmed by measurements of Li contents as high as 207 ??g/g in coexisting melt inclusions. Similar Li enrichment has been observed in material erupted prior to and during the climactic May 1980 eruption, and is likewise best explained via pre-eruptive transfer of an exsolved alkali-rich vapor phase derived from deeper within the magma transport system. Unlike 1980, however, high Li samples from 2004 show no evidence of excess (210Pb)/(226 Ra), implying that measurable Li enrichments may occur despite significant differences in the timing and/or extent of magmatic degassing. Diffusion modeling shows that Li enrichment occurred within -1 yr before eruption, and that magma remained Li enriched until immediately before eruption and cooling. This short flux time and the very high Li contents in ash produced by phreatomagmatic activity prior to the onset of dome extrusion suggest that vapor transfer and accumulation were associated with initiation of the current eruption. Overall, observation of a high Li signature in both 1980 and 2004 dacites indicates that Li enrichment may be a relatively common phenomenon, and may prove useful for petrologic monitoring of Mount St. Helens and other silicic volcanoes. Lithium diffusion is also sufficiently rapid to constrain vapor transfer on similar time scales to short-lived radionuclides. ?? 2007 Geological Society of America.

  11. Attenuation and Scattering Tomography of the Deep Plumbing System of Mount St. Helens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Siena, L.; Thomas, C.; Waite, G. P.; Moran, S. C.; Klemme, S.

    2014-12-01

    We present a combined 3D P-wave attenuation, 2D S-coda attenuation, and 3D S-coda scattering tomography model of fluid pathways, feeding systems, and sediments below Mount St. Helens (MSH) volcano between depths of 0 and 18 km. High-scattering and high-attenuation shallow anomalies are indicative of magma and fluid-rich zones within and below the volcanic edifice down to 6 km depth, where a high-scattering body outlines the top of a deeper aseismic velocity anomaly. Both the volcanic edifice and these structures induce a combination of strong scattering and attenuation on any seismic wave-field, particularly those recorded on the northern and eastern flanks of the volcanic cone. North of the cone, between depths of 0 and 10 km, a low-velocity, high-scattering, and high-attenuation north-south trending trough is attributed to thick piles of Tertiary marine sediments within the St. Helens Seismic Zone. A laterally-extended 3D scattering contrast at depths of 10 to 14 km is related to the boundary between upper and lower crust, and caused in our interpretation by the large scale interaction of the Siletz terrane with the Cascade arc crust. This contrast presents a low scattering, 4-6 km2 "hole" under the north-eastern flank of the volcano. We infer that this section represents the main path of magma ascent from depths greater than 6 km at MSH, with a small north-east shift in the lower plumbing system of the volcano. We conclude that combinations of different non-standard tomographic methods, and particularly the application of full-waveform tomography to highly heterogeneous media, represent the future of seismic volcano imaging.

  12. Attenuation and scattering tomography of the deep plumbing system of Mount St. Helens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Siena, Luca; Waite, Greg; Moran, Seth; Klemme, Stephan; Thomas, Christine

    2014-05-01

    We present a combined 3D P-wave attenuation, 2D S-coda attenuation, and 3D S-coda scattering tomography model of magmatic/fluid chambers, feeding systems, and sediments below Mount St. Helens (MSH) volcano between depths of 0 and 18 km. High scattering and high attenuation shallow anomalies are indicative of magma and fluid cumulates within and below the volcanic edifice down to 6 km depth. These structures induce a combination of resonant-scattering and strong attenuation on any seismic wave-field recorded north and east of the volcanic cone. North of the cone between depths of 0 and 10 km a low-velocity, high-scattering, and high-attenuation north-south trending trough is attributed to thick piles of Tertiary marine sediments inferred to lie within the Saint Helens Seismic Zone (SHZ). A laterally-extended 3D scattering contrast at depths of 10 to 14 km is related to the boundary between upper and lower crust, and caused in our interpretation by the large scale interaction of the Siletz terrane with the Cascade arc crust. This contrast presents a low scattering, 4-6 km2 "hole" under the north-eastern flank of the volcano: we infer that this section represents the main path of magma ascent from depths larger than 6 km at MSH. The images suggest a small north-east shift in the lower plumbing system of the volcano as well as the absence of any large melt sill extending between depths of 0 and 18 km. We conclude that combinations of different non-standard tomographic methods, and particularly the application of full-waveform tomography to highly heterogeneous media, represent the future of seismic volcano imaging.

  13. Attenuation and scattering tomography of the deep plumbing system of Mount St. Helens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Siena, Luca; Thomas, Christine; Waite, Greg; Moran, Seth; Klemme, Stephan

    2015-04-01

    We present a combined 3-D P wave attenuation, 2-D S coda attenuation, and 3-D S coda scattering tomography model of fluid pathways, feeding systems, and sediments below Mount St. Helens (MSH) volcano between depths of 0 and 18 km. High-scattering and high-attenuation shallow anomalies are indicative of magma and fluid-rich zones within and below the volcanic edifice down to 6 km depth, where a high-scattering body outlines the top of deeper aseismic velocity anomalies. Both the volcanic edifice and these structures induce a combination of strong scattering and attenuation on any seismic wavefield, particularly those recorded on the northern and eastern flanks of the volcanic cone. North of the cone between depths of 0 and 10 km, a low-velocity, high-scattering, and high-attenuation north-south trending trough is attributed to thick piles of Tertiary marine sediments within the St. Helens Seismic Zone. A laterally extended 3-D scattering contrast at depths of 10 to 14 km is related to the boundary between upper and lower crust and caused in our interpretation by the large-scale interaction of the Siletz terrane with the Cascade arc crust. This contrast presents a low-scattering, 4-6 km2 "hole" under the northeastern flank of the volcano. We infer that this section represents the main path of magma ascent from depths greater than 6 km at MSH, with a small north-east shift in the lower plumbing system of the volcano. We conclude that combinations of different nonstandard tomographic methods, leading toward full-waveform tomography, represent the future of seismic volcano imaging.

  14. Attenuation and scattering tomography of the deep plumbing system of Mount St. Helens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Siena, L.; Thomas, C.; Waite, G. P.; Moran, S. C.; Klemme, S.

    2014-11-01

    We present a combined 3-D P wave attenuation, 2-D S coda attenuation, and 3-D S coda scattering tomography model of fluid pathways, feeding systems, and sediments below Mount St. Helens (MSH) volcano between depths of 0 and 18 km. High-scattering and high-attenuation shallow anomalies are indicative of magma and fluid-rich zones within and below the volcanic edifice down to 6 km depth, where a high-scattering body outlines the top of deeper aseismic velocity anomalies. Both the volcanic edifice and these structures induce a combination of strong scattering and attenuation on any seismic wavefield, particularly those recorded on the northern and eastern flanks of the volcanic cone. North of the cone between depths of 0 and 10 km, a low-velocity, high-scattering, and high-attenuation north-south trending trough is attributed to thick piles of Tertiary marine sediments within the St. Helens Seismic Zone. A laterally extended 3-D scattering contrast at depths of 10 to 14 km is related to the boundary between upper and lower crust and caused in our interpretation by the large-scale interaction of the Siletz terrane with the Cascade arc crust. This contrast presents a low-scattering, 4-6 km2 "hole" under the northeastern flank of the volcano. We infer that this section represents the main path of magma ascent from depths greater than 6 km at MSH, with a small north-east shift in the lower plumbing system of the volcano. We conclude that combinations of different nonstandard tomographic methods, leading toward full-waveform tomography, represent the future of seismic volcano imaging.

  15. A continuous record of intereruption velocity change at Mount St. Helens from coda wave interferometry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hotovec-Ellis, Alicia J.; Gomberg, Joan S.; Vidale, John; Creager, Ken C.

    2014-01-01

    In September 2004, Mount St. Helens volcano erupted after nearly 18 years of quiescence. However, it is unclear from the limited geophysical observations when or if the magma chamber replenished following the 1980–1986 eruptions in the years before the 2004–2008 extrusive eruption. We use coda wave interferometry with repeating earthquakes to measure small changes in the velocity structure of Mount St. Helens volcano that might indicate magmatic intrusion. By combining observations of relative velocity changes from many closely located earthquake sources, we solve for a continuous function of velocity changes with time. We find that seasonal effects dominate the relative velocity changes. Seismicity rates and repeating earthquake occurrence also vary seasonally; therefore, velocity changes and seismicity are likely modulated by snow loading, fluid saturation, and/or changes in groundwater level. We estimate hydrologic effects impart stress changes on the order of tens of kilopascals within the upper 4 km, resulting in annual velocity variations of 0.5 to 1%. The largest nonseasonal change is a decrease in velocity at the time of the deep Mw = 6.8 Nisqually earthquake. We find no systematic velocity changes during the most likely times of intrusions, consistent with a lack of observable surface deformation. We conclude that if replenishing intrusions occurred, they did not alter seismic velocities where this technique is sensitive due to either their small size or the finite compressibility of the magma chamber. We interpret the observed velocity changes and shallow seasonal seismicity as a response to small stress changes in a shallow, pressurized system.

  16. A continuous record of intereruption velocity change at Mount St. Helens from coda wave interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hotovec-Ellis, A. J.; Gomberg, J.; Vidale, J. E.; Creager, K. C.

    2014-03-01

    In September 2004, Mount St. Helens volcano erupted after nearly 18 years of quiescence. However, it is unclear from the limited geophysical observations when or if the magma chamber replenished following the 1980-1986 eruptions in the years before the 2004-2008 extrusive eruption. We use coda wave interferometry with repeating earthquakes to measure small changes in the velocity structure of Mount St. Helens volcano that might indicate magmatic intrusion. By combining observations of relative velocity changes from many closely located earthquake sources, we solve for a continuous function of velocity changes with time. We find that seasonal effects dominate the relative velocity changes. Seismicity rates and repeating earthquake occurrence also vary seasonally; therefore, velocity changes and seismicity are likely modulated by snow loading, fluid saturation, and/or changes in groundwater level. We estimate hydrologic effects impart stress changes on the order of tens of kilopascals within the upper 4 km, resulting in annual velocity variations of 0.5 to 1%. The largest nonseasonal change is a decrease in velocity at the time of the deep Mw = 6.8 Nisqually earthquake. We find no systematic velocity changes during the most likely times of intrusions, consistent with a lack of observable surface deformation. We conclude that if replenishing intrusions occurred, they did not alter seismic velocities where this technique is sensitive due to either their small size or the finite compressibility of the magma chamber. We interpret the observed velocity changes and shallow seasonal seismicity as a response to small stress changes in a shallow, pressurized system.

  17. Mass Intrusion at Mount St. Helens (WA) From Temporal Gravity Variations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Battaglia, M.; Lisowski, M.; Dzurisin, D.; Poland, M. P.; Schilling, S. P.; Diefenbach, A. K.; Wynn, J.

    2015-12-01

    Repeated high-precision gravity measurements made at Mount St. Helens (WA) have revealed systematic temporal variations in the gravity field several years after the end of the 2004-2008 dome-building eruption. Changes in gravity with respect to a stable reference station 36 km NW of the volcano were measured at 10 sites on the volcanic edifice and at 4 sites far afield (10 to 36 km) from the summit in August 2010, August 2012 and August 2014. After simulating and removing the gravity signal associated with changes in mass of the crater glacier, the local hydrothermal aquifer, and vertical deformation, the residual gravity field observed at sites near the volcano's summit significantly increased with respect to the stable reference site during 2010-2012 (maximum change 48 ± 15 mgal). No significant change was measured during 2012-2014. The pattern of gravity increase is radially symmetrical, with a half-width of about 2.5 km and a point of maximum change centered at the 2004-2008 lava dome. Forward modeling of residual gravity data using the same source geometry, depth, and location as that inferred from geodetic data (a spheroidal source centered 7.5 km beneath the 2004-2008 dome) indicates a mass increase rate of the order of 1011 kg/year. For a reasonable magma density (~2250 kg/m3), the volume rate of magma intrusion beneath the summit region inferred from gravity (~ 0.1 km3/yr) greatly exceeds the volume inferred from inversion of geodetic data (0.001 km3/yr between 2008-2011), suggesting that either magma compressibility or other processes are important aspects of magma storage at Mount St. Helens, or that the data argue for a different source.

  18. Trophic Interactions during Primary Succession: Herbivores Slow a Plant Reinvasion at Mount St. Helens.

    PubMed

    Fagan; Bishop

    2000-02-01

    Lupines (Lupinus lepidus var. lobbii), the earliest plant colonists of primary successional habitats at Mount St. Helens, were expected to strongly affect successional trajectories through facilitative effects. However, their effects remain localized because initially high rates of reinvasive spread were short lived, despite widespread habitat availability. We experimentally tested whether insect herbivores, by reducing plant growth and fecundity at the edge of the expanding lupine population, could curtail the rate of reinvasion and whether those herbivores had comparable impacts in the older, more successionally advanced core region. We found that removing insect herbivores increased both the areal growth of individual lupine plants and the production of new plants in the edge region, thereby accelerating the lupine's intrinsic rate of increase at the front of the lupine reinvasion. We found no such impacts of herbivory in the core region, where low plant quality or a complex of recently arrived natural enemies may hold herbivores in check. In the context of invasion theory, herbivore-mediated decreases in lupine population growth rate in the edge region translate into decreased rates of lupine spread, which we quantify here using diffusion models. In the Mount St. Helens system, decreased rate of lupine reinvasion will result in reductions in rates of soil formation, nitrogen input, and entrapment of seeds and detritus that are likely to postpone or alter trajectories of primary succession. If the type of spatial subtleties in herbivore effects we found here are common, with herbivory focused on the edge of an expanding plant population and suppressed or ineffective in the larger, denser central region (where the plants might be more readily noticed and studied), then insect herbivores may have stronger impacts on the dynamics of primary succession and plant invasions than previously recognized.

  19. Attenuation and scattering tomography of the deep plumbing system of Mount St. Helens

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    De Siena, Luca; Thomas, Christine; Waite, Greg P.; Moran, Seth C.; Klemme, Stefan

    2014-01-01

    We present a combined 3-D P wave attenuation, 2-D S coda attenuation, and 3-D S coda scattering tomography model of fluid pathways, feeding systems, and sediments below Mount St. Helens (MSH) volcano between depths of 0 and 18 km. High-scattering and high-attenuation shallow anomalies are indicative of magma and fluid-rich zones within and below the volcanic edifice down to 6 km depth, where a high-scattering body outlines the top of deeper aseismic velocity anomalies. Both the volcanic edifice and these structures induce a combination of strong scattering and attenuation on any seismic wavefield, particularly those recorded on the northern and eastern flanks of the volcanic cone. North of the cone between depths of 0 and 10 km, a low-velocity, high-scattering, and high-attenuation north-south trending trough is attributed to thick piles of Tertiary marine sediments within the St. Helens Seismic Zone. A laterally extended 3-D scattering contrast at depths of 10 to 14 km is related to the boundary between upper and lower crust and caused in our interpretation by the large-scale interaction of the Siletz terrane with the Cascade arc crust. This contrast presents a low-scattering, 4–6 km2 “hole” under the northeastern flank of the volcano. We infer that this section represents the main path of magma ascent from depths greater than 6 km at MSH, with a small north-east shift in the lower plumbing system of the volcano. We conclude that combinations of different nonstandard tomographic methods, leading toward full-waveform tomography, represent the future of seismic volcano imaging.

  20. The effects of catastrophic ecosystem disturbance: the residual mammals at Mount St. Helens

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Andersen, Douglas C.; MacMahon, James A.

    1985-01-01

    Individuals that survive the direct effects of community- or ecosystem-level disturbances, i.e., "residuals", can have major roles in determining the rate and pathway of subsequent secondary succession. The explosive eruption of the Mount St. Helens volcano on 19 May 1980 resulted in severe damage to a cast array of animal and plant populations (Edwards and Schwartz, 1981; MacMahon, 1982; Hayward et al., 1982). We apply the term "catastrophic" to this event because of its intensity and the large area (>600 km2) over which successional processes were initiated. We present here the results of surveys for mammals, particularly small mammals (excluding bats), conducted in the Mount St. Helens region during the 40 months following the eruption. Our purpose was to elucidate any patterns in species representation that might exist along a gradient of disturbance "intensity", and thus document which species could potentially influence early plant successional patterns there. We infer whether individuals captured were more likely to have been residuals (or their descendants), or immigrants from areas less affected by the eruption, from consideration of the time span between the eruption and the capture date, the trapping location, and life history data. We also make inferences concerning the animal-environment relationships that led to our survey results, and thereby address the question of the likelihood of other types of disturbance, either natural or anthropogenic, producing similar results. Data concerning survival of Thomomys talpoides, the northern pocket gopher, have been presented elsewhere (Andersen, 1982). Initial results from our studies of the relationships among residual small mammals and plant population dynamics are detailed in MacMahon and Warner (1984), Allen et al. (1984) and Andersen and MacMahon (in press).

  1. Catalog of Mount St. Helens 2004-2007 Dome Samples with Major- and Trace-Element Chemistry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thornber, Carl R.; Pallister, John S.; Rowe, Michael C.; McConnell, Siobhan; Herriott, Trystan M.; Eckberg, Alison; Stokes, Winston C.; Cornelius, Diane Johnson; Conrey, Richard M.; Hannah, Tammy; Taggart, Joseph E.; Adams, Monique; Lamothe, Paul J.; Budahn, James R.; Knaack, Charles M.

    2008-01-01

    Sampling and analysis of eruptive products at Mount St. Helens is an integral part of volcano monitoring efforts conducted by the U.S. Geological Survey?s Cascades Volcano Observatory (CVO). The objective of our eruption sampling program is to enable petrological assessments of pre-eruptive magmatic conditions, critical for ascertaining mechanisms for eruption triggering and forecasting potential changes in eruption behavior. This report provides a catalog of near-vent lithic debris and new dome-lava collected during 34 intra-crater sampling forays throughout the October 2004 to October 2007 (2004?7) eruptive interval at Mount St. Helens. In addition, we present comprehensive bulk-rock geochemistry for a time-series of representative (2004?7) eruption products. This data, along with that in a companion report on Mount St. Helens 2004 to 2006 tephra by Rowe and others (2008), are presented in support of the contents of the U.S. Geological Survey Professional Paper 1750 (Sherrod and others, eds., 2008). Readers are referred to appropriate chapters in USGS Professional Paper 1750 for detailed narratives of eruptive activity during this time period and for interpretations of sample characteristics and geochemical data. The suite of rock samples related to the 2004?7 eruption of Mount St. Helens and presented in this catalog are archived at the David A. Johnson Cascades Volcano Observatory, Vancouver, Wash. The Mount St. Helens 2004?7 Dome Sample Catalogue with major- and trace-element geochemistry is tabulated in 3 worksheets of the accompanying Microsoft Excel file, of2008-1130.xls. Table 1 provides location and sampling information. Table 2 presents sample descriptions. In table 3, bulk-rock major and trace-element geochemistry is listed for 44 eruption-related samples with intra-laboratory replicate analyses of 19 dacite lava samples. A brief overview of the collection methods and lithology of dome samples is given below as an aid to deciphering the dome sample

  2. Seismicity and infrasound associated with explosions at Mount St. Helens, 2004-2005: Chapter 6 in A volcano rekindled: the renewed eruption of Mount St. Helens, 2004-2006

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Moran, Seth C.; McChesney, Patrick J.; Lockhart, Andrew B.; Sherrod, David R.; Scott, William E.; Stauffer, Peter H.

    2008-01-01

    Six explosions occurred during 2004-5 in association with renewed eruptive activity at Mount St. Helens, Washington. Of four explosions in October 2004, none had precursory seismicity and two had explosion-related seismic tremor that marked the end of the explosion. However, seismicity levels dropped following each of the October explosions, providing the primary instrumental means for explosion detection during the initial vent-clearing phase. In contrast, explosions on January 16 and March 8, 2005, produced noticeable seismicity in the form of explosion-related tremor, infrasonic signals, and, in the case of the March 8 explosion, an increase in event size ~2 hours before the explosion. In both 2005 cases seismic tremor appeared before any infrasonic signals and was best recorded on stations located within the crater. These explosions demonstrated that reliable explosion detection at volcanoes like Mount St. Helens requires seismic stations within 1-2 km of the vent and stations with multiple acoustic sensors.

  3. Multiphase-flow numerical modeling of the 18 May 1980 lateral blast at Mount St. Helens, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ongaro, T.E.; Widiwijayanti, C.; Clarke, A.B.; Voight, B.; Neri, A.

    2011-01-01

    Volcanic lateral blasts are among the most spectacular and devastating of natural phenomena, but their dynamics are still poorly understood. Here we investigate the best documented and most controversial blast at Mount St. Helens (Washington State, United States), on 18 May 1980. By means of three-dimensional multiphase numerical simulations we demonstrate that the blast front propagation, fi nal runout, and damage can be explained by the emplacement of an unsteady, stratifi ed pyroclastic density current, controlled by gravity and terrain morphology. Such an interpretation is quantitatively supported by large-scale observations at Mount St. Helens and will infl uence the defi nition and predictive mapping of hazards on blast-dangerous volcanoes worldwide. ?? 2011 Geological Society of America.

  4. Ambient airborne solids concentrations including volcanic ash at Hanford, Washington sampling sites subsequent to the Mount St. Helens eruption

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sehmel, G. A.

    1982-01-01

    Airborne solids concentrations were measured on a near daily basis at two Hanford, Washington sites after the eruption of Mount St. Helens on May 18, 1980. These sites are about 211 km east of Mount St. Helens. Collected airborne solids included resuspended volcanic ash plus normal ambient solids. Average airborne solids concentrations were greater at the Hanford meteorological station sampling site which is 24 km northwest of the Horn Rapids dam sampling site. These increased concentrations reflect the sampling site proximity to greater ash fallout depths. Both sites are in low ash fallout areas although the Hanford meteorological station site is closer to the greater ash fallout areas. Airborne solids concentrations were decreased by rain, but airborne solids concentrations rapidly increased as surfaces dried. Airborne concentrations tended to become nearly the same at both sampling sites only for July 12 and 13.

  5. Deep long-period earthquakes under Mount St. Helens captured with dense recordings by iMUSH

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vidale, J. E.; Moran, S. C.; Creager, K. C.; Levander, A.; Malone, S. D.; Sisson, T. W.; Hotovec-Ellis, A. J.; Schmandt, B.

    2014-12-01

    Mysteries abound regarding the mechanism generating deep-long-period earthquakes (DLPs). DLPs are most commonly associated with the process of magma ascent from a deep source to a crustal reservoir, and plausible ideas include dehydration embrittlement, sluggish faulting, gurgling flow of magmatic fluids, and cooling of relic magma conduits. By good fortune, at least four DLPs occurred since the imaging Magma Under St Helens (iMUSH) experiment began in late June 2014. The DLPs were captured by 70 broadband seismometers in the passive array, and several were also recorded by the 3500 short-period seismometers deployed for the active experiment. These lower crust/upper mantle events were 20-35 km deep, offset less than 15 km from the crater, and have the low-frequency, long-duration reverberative waveforms, and lower crust/upper mantle locations characteristic of DLPs. One DLP had numerous bursts across ~100s, and two others consisted of two bursts within a minute. These are similar to the 19 DLPs seen beneath Mount St. Helens (MSH) previously [Nichols et al., 2011, JVGR]. We will also use these DLPs as templates in the search for others that are too small to be found otherwise. DLPs at MSH occur beneath the St. Helens Seismic Zone, proposed to be the block boundary between the Southern Washington Cascades Conductor and Siletzia rocks to the west. This actively-slipping and weak structural boundary could enhance the ability of magmatic fluids to reach the surface, and the co-located DLPs provide evidence for such fluid migration. We plan to investigate the frequency content, time evolution, spatial location, and clustering of DLPs under Mount St. Helens to shed light on the underlying physics and implications for shallower activity.

  6. Total sulfur dioxide emissions and pre-eruption vapor-saturated magma at Mount St. Helens, 1980-88

    SciTech Connect

    Gerlach, T.M.; McGee, K.A.

    1994-12-15

    SO{sub 2} from explosive volcanism can cause significant climatic and atmospheric impacts, but the source of the sulfur is controversial. TOMS, COSPEC, and ash leachate data for Mount St. Helens from the time of the climactic eruption on 18 May 1980 to the final stages of non-explosive degassing in 1988 give a total SO{sub 2} emission of 2 Mt. COSPEC data show a sharp drop in emission rate that was apparently controlled by a decreasing rate of magma supply. A total SO{sub 2} emission of only 0.08 Mt is estimated from melt inclusion data and the conventional assumption that the main sulfur source was pre-eruption melt; commonly invoked sources of {open_quotes}excess sulfur{close_quotes} (anhydrite decomposition, basaltic magma, and degassing of non-erupted magma) are unlikely in this case. Thus melt inclusions may significantly underestimate SO{sub 2} emissions and impacts of explosive volcanism on climate and the atmosphere. Measured CO{sub 2} emissions, together with the H{sub 2}O content of melt inclusions and experimental solubility data, indicate the Mount St. Helens dacite was vapor-saturated at depth prior to ascent and suggest that a vapor phase was the main source of sulfur for the 2-Mt of SO{sub 2}. A vapor source is consistent with experimental studies on the Mount St. Helens dacite and removes the need for a much debated shallow magma body. 23 refs., 3 figs.

  7. Petrology and geochemistry of high cascade volcanics in southern Washington: Mount St. Helens volcano and the Indian Heaven basalt field

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, D.R.

    1984-01-01

    Mount St. Helens volcano (Washington, USA) has been characterized by four eruptive periods during the last 2200 years. Eruptive products include a wide spectrum of rock types including basaltic to andesitic lavas, andesitic to dacitic pyroclastic flows and tephra, and dacite domes. The major and trace element compositions of some andesites and dacites are broadly consistent with their derivation from a basaltic andesite parental magma by fractional cyrstallization processes involving the observed phenocryst assemblages. However, the strontium and oxygen isotopic compositions of representative samples of the Mount St. Helens suite indicate that closed system processes cannot explain the isotopic variations. The isotopic rations are positively correlated with one another and the bulk composition (SiO/sub 2/, Mg number, etc.). The vents of the nearby Indian Heaven Quaternary volcanic field erupted several basalt types which can be defined on the basis of major and trace element composition - calcalkaline (low and high TiO/sub 2/ varieties), transitional, and tholeiitic. Several of these basalt types occur at Mount St. Helens as well, but Indian Heaven lavas are generally more primitive as indicated by higher Mg/(Mg + Fe) ratios. The distribution of volcanic rock types in relation to local structures in the Cascade Range of southern Washington and northern Oregon suggests that crustal structure may influence the degree of evolution of specific volcanic fields. Cascade arc suggests that volcanic arc magma evolution does not necessarily produce a continuous sequence from tholeiitic to calcalkaline rocks in time or space.

  8. Environmental Impact of the Helen, Research, and Chicago Mercury Mines on Water, Sediment, and Biota in the Upper Dry Creek Watershed, Lake County, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rytuba, James J.; Hothem, Roger L.; May, Jason T.; Kim, Christopher S.; Lawler, David; Goldstein, Daniel; Brussee, Brianne E.

    2009-01-01

    The Helen, Research, and Chicago mercury (Hg) deposits are among the youngest Hg deposits in the Coast Range Hg mineral belt and are located in the southwestern part of the Clear Lake volcanic field in Lake County, California. The mine workings and tailings are located in the headwaters of Dry Creek. The Helen Hg mine is the largest mine in the watershed having produced about 7,600 flasks of Hg. The Chicago and Research Hg mines produced only a small amount of Hg, less than 30 flasks. Waste rock and tailings have eroded from the mines, and mine drainage from the Helen and Research mines contributes Hg-enriched mine wastes to the headwaters of Dry Creek and contaminate the creek further downstream. The mines are located on federal land managed by the U.S. Bureau of Land Management (USBLM). The USBLM requested that the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) measure and characterize Hg and geochemical constituents in tailings, sediment, water, and biota at the Helen, Research, and Chicago mines and in Dry Creek. This report is made in response to the USBLM request to conduct a Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA - Removal Site Investigation (RSI). The RSI applies to removal of Hg-contaminated mine waste from the Helen, Research, and Chicago mines as a means of reducing Hg transport to Dry Creek. This report summarizes data obtained from field sampling of mine tailings, waste rock, sediment, and water at the Helen, Research, and Chicago mines on April 19, 2001, during a storm event. Further sampling of water, sediment, and biota at the Helen mine area and the upper part of Dry Creek was completed on July 15, 2003, during low-flow conditions. Our results permit a preliminary assessment of the mining sources of Hg and associated chemical constituents that could elevate levels of monomethyl Hg (MMeHg) in the water, sediment, and biota that are impacted by historic mining.

  9. Geologic Map of the Saint Helens Quadrangle, Columbia County, Oregon, and Clark and Cowlitz Counties, Washington

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Evarts, Russell C.

    2004-01-01

    The Saint Helens 7.5' quadrangle is situated in the Puget-Willamette Lowland approximately 35 km north Portland, Oregon. The lowland, which extends from Puget Sound into west-central Oregon, is a complex structural and topographic trough that lies between the Coast Range and the Cascade Range. Since late Eocene time, Cascade Range has been the locus of a discontinuously active volcanic arc associated with underthrusting of oceanic lithosphere beneath the North American continent along the Cascadia Subduction Zone. The Coast Range occupies the forearc position within the Cascadia arc-trench system and consists of a complex assemblage of Eocene to Miocene volcanic and marine sedimentary rocks. The Saint Helens quadrangle lies in the northern part of the Portland Basin, a roughly 2000-km2 topographic and structural depression. It is the northernmost of several sediment-filled structural basins that collectively constitute the Willamette Valley segment of the Puget-Willamette Lowland (Beeson and others, 1989; Swanson and others, 1993; Yeats and others, 1996). The rhomboidal basin is approximately 70 km long and 30 km wide, with its long dimension oriented northwest. The Columbia River flows west and north through the Portland Basin at an elevation near sea level and exits through a confined bedrock valley less than 2.5 km wide about 16 km north of Saint Helens. The flanks of the basin consist of Eocene through Miocene volcanic and sedimentary rocks that rise to elevations exceeding 2000 ft (610 m). Seismic-reflection profiles (L.M. Liberty, written commun., 2003) and lithologic logs of water wells (Swanson and others, 1993; Mabey and Madin, 1995) indicate that as much as 550 m of late Miocene and younger sediments have accumulated in the deepest part of the basin near Vancouver. Most of this basin-fill material was carried in from the east by the Columbia River but contributions from streams draining the adjacent highlands are locally important. The Portland Basin has

  10. Leaching characteristics of ash from the May 18, 1980, eruption of Mount St. Helens volcano, Washington

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, D. B.; Zielinski, R. A.; Taylor, H. E.; Sawyer, M. B.

    1983-06-01

    Leaching of freshly erupted air-fall ash, unaffected by rain, from the May 18, 1980, eruption of Mount St. Helens volcano, Washington, shows that Ca2+, Na+, Mg2+, SO{4/2-}, and Cl- are the predominant chemical species released on first exposure of the ash to water. Extremely high correlation of Ca with SO4 and Na with Cl in water leachates suggests the presence of CaSO4 and NaCl salts on the ash. The amount of water soluble material on ash increases with distance from source and with the weight fraction of small (less than 63 micrometers) ash particles of high-surface area. This suggests that surface reactions such as adsorption are responsible for concentrating the soluble material. CaSO4, NaCl, and other salts are probably formed as microscopic crystals in the high-temperature core of the eruption column and are then adsorbed by silicate ash particles. The environmentally important elements Zn, Cu, Cd, F. Pb, and Ba are released by a water leach in concentrations which could pose short-term hazards to some forms of aquatic life. However, calculated concentrations are based on a water-to-ash ratio of 4:1 or less, which is probably an underestimation of the regionally operative ratio. A subsequent leach of ash by warm alkaline solution shows dramatic increases, in the amount of dissolved SiO2, U, and V, which are probably caused by increased dissolution of the glassy component of ash. Glass dissolution by alkaline ground water is a mechanism for providing these three elements to sedimentary traps where they may coaccumulate as uraniferous silica or U-V minerals. Leaching characteristics of ash from Mount St. Helens are comparable to characteristics of ash of similar composition from volcanoes in Guatemala. Ashes from each locality show similar ions predominating for a given leachate and similar fractions of a particular element in the ash removed on contact with the leach solution.

  11. Effects of lava-dome emplacement on the Mount St. Helens crater glacier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walder, J. S.; Schilling, S. P.; Denlinger, R. P.; Vallance, J. W.

    2004-12-01

    Since the end of the 1981-1986 episode of lava-dome growth at Mount St. Helens, an unusual glacier has grown rapidly within the crater of the volcano. The glacier, which is fed primarily by avalanching from the crater walls, contains about 30% rock debris by volume, has a maximum thickness of about 220 m and a volume of about 120 million cubic m, and forms a crescent that wraps around the old lava dome on both east and west sides. The new (October 2004) lava dome in the south of the crater began to grow centered roughly on the contact between the old lava dome and the glacier, in the process uplifting both ice and old dome rock. As the new dome is spreading to the south, the adjacent glacier is bulging upward. Firn layers on the outer flank of the glacier bulge have been warped upward almost vertically. In contrast, ice adjacent to the new dome has been thoroughly fractured. The overall style of deformation is reminiscent of that associated with salt-dome intrusion. Drawing an analogy to sand-box experiments, we suggest that the glacier is being deformed by high-angle reverse faults propagating upward from depth. Comparison of Lidar images of the glacier from September 2003 and October 2004 reveals not only the volcanogenic bulge but also elevated domains associated with the passage of kinematic waves, which are caused by glacier-mass-balance perturbations and have nothing to do with volcanic activity. As of 25 October 2004, growth of the new lava dome has had negligible hydrological consequences. Ice-surface cauldrons are common consequences of intense melting caused by either subglacial eruptions (as in Iceland) or subglacial venting of hot gases (as presently taking place at Mount Spurr, Alaska). However, there has been a notable absence of ice-surface cauldrons in the Mount St. Helens crater glacier, aside from a short-lived pond formed where the 1 October eruption pierced the glacier. We suggest that heat transfer to the glacier base is inefficient because

  12. Rockslide-debris avalanche of May 18, 1980, Mount St. Helens Volcano, Washington

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Glicken, Harry

    1996-01-01

    This report provides a detailed picture of the rockslide-debris avalanche of the May 18, 1980, eruption of Mount St. Helens volcano. It provides a characterization of the deposit, a reinterpretation of the details of the first minutes of the eruption of May 18, and insight into the transport mechanism of the mass movement. Details of the rockslide event, as revealed by eyewitness photographs, are correlated with features of the deposit. The photographs show three slide blocks in the rockslide movement. Slide block I was triggered by a magnitude 5.1 earthquake at 8:32 a.m. Pacific Daylight Time (P.D.T.). An exploding cryptodome burst through slide block II to produce the 'blast surge.' Slide block III consisted of many discrete failures that were carried out in continuing pyroclastic currents generated from the exploding cryptodome. The cryptodome continued to depressurize after slide block III, producing a blast deposit that rests on top of the debris-avalanche deposit. The hummocky 2.5 cubic kilometer debris-avalanche deposit consists of block facies (pieces of the pre-eruption Mount St. Helens transported relatively intact) and matrix facies (a mixture of rocks from the old mountain and cryptodome dacite). Block facies is divided into five lithologic units. Matrix facies was derived from the explosively generated current of slide block III as well as from disaggregation and mixing of debris-avalanche blocks. The mean density of the old cone was measured to be abut 20 percent greater than the mean density of the avalanche deposit. Density in the deposit does not decrease with distance which suggests that debris-avalanche blocks were dilated at the mountain, rather than during transport. Various grain-size parameters that show that clast size converges about a mean with distance suggest mixing during transport. The debris-avalanche flow can be considered a grain flow, where particles -- either debris-avalanche blocks or the clasts within the blocks -- collided and

  13. Investigating microseismicity and crustal structure beneath Mount St. Helens with a 900-geophone array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmandt, B.; Hansen, S. M.; Kiser, E.; Levander, A.; Wang, Y.; Lin, F. C.

    2015-12-01

    During Summer 2014 we deployed ~900 cable-free seismographs within ~12 km of Mount St. Helens. Each seismograph contained a 10-Hz geophone and recorded continuously for two weeks with a sample rate of 250 Hz. The array temporarily provides a major increase in spatial coverage compared to the 10-station long-term monitoring array, but each of the geophone has a high noise floor compared to the force-feedback sensors of the long-term array that is part of the Pacific Northwest Seismic Network (PNSN). We are investigating the utility of the geophone array for source and structural analyses using ambient noise, high-frequency microseismicity, deep long-period seismicity, and 23 controlled sources from the concurrent iMUSH active source project. Surface waves extracted from ambient noise cross-correlation have adequate signal to noise ratios for upper crustal tomography using frequencies ~0.2-0.5 Hz. Efforts to extract higher frequency body waves with interferometry are ongoing and include focusing on time periods with stronger high frequency noise or coda from controlled sources and earthquakes. Continuous back-projection of the array data into the 3-D subsurface was used to automatically detect and locate high-frequency (>5 Hz) microseismicity extending down to ~M-2, with a completeness magnitude of ~0.3. Two deep crustal low frequency earthquakes (<5 Hz) detected by PNSN occurred during our survey. We relocated these events and are using them to optimize back-projection parameters and create matched filters to search for additional deep low frequency seismicity. One of the deep low frequency events locates at approximately Moho depth using back-projection of S-wave energy and S-P times from dense geophone sub-arrays. This event occurs just southeast of Mount St. Helens in an area where controlled source refraction tomography images anomalously slow lower crust and common midpoint stacking images a bright Moho indicative of a locally high impedance contrast between

  14. Subsurface Imaging at Mount St. Helens with a Large-N Geophone Array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansen, S. M.; Schmandt, B.; Levander, A.; Kiser, E.; Vidale, J. E.; Moran, S. C.

    2015-12-01

    The 900-instrument Mount St. Helens nodal array recorded continuous data for approximately two weeks in the summer of 2014 and provides a remarkable opportunity to interrogate the structure beneath an active arc volcano. Two separate imaging techniques are applied to constrain both the distribution of microseismicity and subsurface velocity structure. Reverse-time source imaging is applied to the 10 km3 region beneath the volcanic edifice where most of cataloged seismicity occurred during the experiment. These efforts resulted in an order of magnitude increase in earthquake detections over the normal monitoring operations of the Pacific Northwest Seismic Network. Earthquake locations resolve a narrow, ≤1 km wide, vertical lineament of seismicity that extends from the surface to 4 km depth directly beneath the summit crater, consistent with the historical event distribution of Waite and Moran[2009]. This feature is interpreted as a fracture network that acts as a conduit connecting an underlying magma chamber to the surface. Moho imaging is achieved using the near-offset (< 30 km) PmP phase generated by the iMUSH active source shots that occurred during the deployment. The PmP arrivals are enhanced using short-term-average over long-term-average processing and then migrated using a 3D velocity model. The observed Moho depths range from 35-40 km with a slight eastward deepening across the Mt St Helens fracture zone. Significant variations are observed in the Moho reflectivity. Large amplitude PmP energy is observed in shots originating from the north and east whereas shots from the south-west display little-to-no PmP energy. The region above the reflective Moho is approximately coincident with areas displaying reduced lower-crustal velocities in the initial iMUSH tomography models and may therefore contain fluids and/or partial melt. Additional evidence for lower crustal fluids in this region is provided by deep-long-period (DLP) events which have historically been

  15. Leaching characteristics of ash from the May 18, 1980, eruption of Mount St. Helens Volcano, Washington

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Smith, David Burl; Zielinski, Robert A.; Taylor, Howard Edward

    1982-01-01

    Leaching of freshly erupted air-fall ash, unaffected by rain, from the May 18, 1.980,eruption of Mount St. Helens volcano, Washington, shows that Ca 2+, Na+, Mg+, SO4 2-, and Cl- are the predominant chemical species released on first exposure of the ash to water. Extremely high correlation of Ca with SO4 and Na with Cl in water leachates suggests the presence of CaSO4 and NaCl salts on the ash. The amount of water soluble material on ash increases with distance from source and with the weight fraction of small (less than 63 micrometers) ash particles of high-surface area. This suggests that surface reactions such as adsorption are responsible for concentrating the soluble material. CaSO4, NaCl, and other salts are probably formed as microscopic crystals in the high-temperature core of the eruption column and are then adsorbed by silicate ash particles. The environmentally important elements Zn, Cu, Cd, F, Pb, and Ba are released by a water leach in concentrations which could pose short-term hazards to some forms of aquatic life. However, calculated concentrations are based on a water-to-ash ratio of 4:1 or less, which is probably an underestimation of the regionally operative ratio. A subsequent leach of ash by warm alkaline solution shows dramatic increases in the amount of dissolved SiO2, U, and V, which are probably caused by increased dissolution of the glassy component of ash. Glass dissolution by alkaline ground water is a mechanism for providing these three elements to sedimentary traps where they may co-accumulate as uraniferous silica or U-V minerals. Leaching characteristics of ash from Mount St. Helens are comparable to characteristics of ash of similar composition from volcanoes in Guatemala. Ashes from each locality show similar ions predominating for a given leachate and similar fractions of a particular element in the ash removed on contact with the leach solution.

  16. Magma reservoirs from the upper crust to the Moho inferred from high-resolution Vp and Vs models beneath Mount St. Helens, Cascades, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiser, Eric; Levander, Alan; Zelt, Colin; Palomeras, Imma; Schmandt, Brandon; Hansen, Steven; Creager, Kenneth; Ulberg, Carl

    2016-04-01

    Mount St. Helens is currently the most active volcano along the Cascadia arc. Though several studies investigated the magmatic system beneath Mount St. Helens following the May 18, 1980 eruption, tomographic imaging of the system has been limited to ~10 km depth due to the distribution of earthquakes in the region. This has made it difficult to estimate the volume of the shallow magma reservoir beneath the volcano, the regions of magma entry into the lower crust, and the connectivity of this magma system throughout the crust. The latter is particularly interesting as one interpretation of the Southern Washington Cascades Conductor (SWCC) suggests that the Mount St Helens and Mount Adams volcanic systems are connected in the middle crust (Hill et al., 2009). The multi-disciplinary iMUSH (imaging Magma Under St. Helens) project is designed to investigate these and other fundamental questions associated with Mount St. Helens. Here we present the first high-resolution 2D Vp and Vs models derived from travel-time data from the iMUSH 3D active-source seismic experiment. The experiment consisted of ~6000 seismograph stations which recorded 23 explosions and hundreds of local earthquakes. Directly beneath Mount St. Helens, we observe a high Vp/Vs body, inferred to be the upper/middle crustal magma reservoir, between 4 and 13 km depth. We observe a second high Vp/Vs body, likely of magmatic origin, at roughly the same depth beneath Indian Heaven Volcanic Field, which last erupted 9 ka. Southeast of Mount St. Helens is a low Vp column extending from the middle crust, ~15 km depth, to the Moho at ~40 km depth. A cluster of deep long-period events, typically associated with injection of magma, occurs at the northwestern boundary of this low Vp column. We interpret this as the middle-lower crust magma reservoir. In the lower crust, high Vp features bound the magma reservoir directly beneath Mount St. Helens and the Indian Heaven Volcanic Field. One explanation for these high Vp

  17. Emplacement of a silicic lava dome through a crater glacier: Mount St Helens, 2004-06

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Walder, J.S.; LaHusen, R.G.; Vallance, J.W.; Schilling, S.P.

    2007-01-01

    The process of lava-dome emplacement through a glacier was observed for the first time after Mount St Helens reawakened in September 2004. The glacier that had grown in the crater since the cataclysmic 1980 eruption was split in two by the new lava dome. The two parts of the glacier were successively squeezed against the crater wall. Photography, photogrammetry and geodetic measurements document glacier deformation of an extreme variety, with strain rates of extraordinary magnitude as compared to normal alpine glaciers. Unlike normal temperate glaciers, the crater glacier shows no evidence of either speed-up at the beginning of the ablation season or diurnal speed fluctuations during the ablation season. Thus there is evidently no slip of the glacier over its bed. The most reasonable explanation for this anomaly is that meltwater penetrating the glacier is captured by a thick layer of coarse rubble at the bed and then enters the volcano's groundwater system rather than flowing through a drainage network along the bed.

  18. Mount St. Helens Ash from the 18 May 1980 Eruption: Chemical, Physical, Mineralogical, and Biological Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fruchter, Jonathan S.; Robertson, David E.; Evans, John C.; Olsen, Khris B.; Lepel, Elwood A.; Laul, Jagdish C.; Abel, Keith H.; Sanders, Ronald W.; Jackson, Peter O.; Wogman, Ned S.; Perkins, Richard W.; van Tuyl, Harold H.; Beauchamp, Raymond H.; Shade, John W.; Leland Daniel, J.; Erikson, Robert L.; Sehmel, George A.; Lee, Richard N.; Robinson, Alfred V.; Moss, Owen R.; Briant, James K.; Cannon, William C.

    1980-09-01

    Samples of ash from the 18 May 1980 eruption of Mount St. Helens were collected from several locations in eastern Washington and Montana. The ash was subjected to a variety of analyses to determine its chemical, physical, mineralogical, and biological characteristics. Chemically, the ash samples were of dacitic composition. Particle size data showed bimodal distributions and differed considerably with location. However, all samples contained comparable amounts of particles less than 3.5 micrometers in diameter (respirable fraction). Mineralogically, the samples ranged from almost totally glassy to almost totally crystalline. Crystalline samples were dominated by plagioclase feldspar (andesine) and orthopyroxene (hypersthene), with smaller amounts of titanomagnetite and hornblende. All but one of the samples contained from less than 1 percent to 3 percent free crystalline silica (quartz, trydimite, or cristobalite) in both the bulk samples and 1 to 2 percent in the fractions smaller than 3.5 micrometers. The long-lived natural radionuclide content of the ash was comparable to that of crustal material; however, relatively large concentrations of short-lived radon daughters were present and polonium-210 content was inversely correlated with particle size. In vitro biological tests showed the ash to be nontoxic to alveolar macrophages, which are an important part of the lungs' natural clearance mechanism. On the basis of a substantial body of data that has shown a correlation between macrophage cytotoxicity and fibrogenicity of minerals, the ash is not predicted to be highly fibrogenic.

  19. Potential impact of dust aerosols on the pre-Helene (2006) mesoscale convective vortex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, H.; Sokolik, I. N.; Curry, J. A.

    2011-12-01

    The potential impact of dust aerosols on the early development of Hurricane Helene (2006) was examined using the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) and WRF-Chem model. The goal of this study is to examine the extent to which dust aerosols can influence the intensity, track, and structure of a developing TC through the microphysical and radiation processes. Remote sensing observations from Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observation (CALIPSO), CloudSat, Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS), and Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) were utilized to examine the distributions and characteristics of dust particles, hydrometeors, cloud top temperature, latent heat release and precipitation, as well as to constrain and evaluate the model simulations. The WRF simulations were conducted by implementing an ice nucleation parameterization accounting for the deliquescent heterogeneous freezing (DHF) mode. The DHF mode refers to the freezing process for internally mixed aerosols with soluble and insoluble species that can serve as both cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) and ice nuclei (IN), such as dust. Simulations showed the tendency of DHF mode to promote ice formation at lower altitudes in strong updraft cores, increase the local latent heat release, and produce more low clouds and less high clouds. Further more, a series of WRF-Chem simulations were conducted, which includes aerosol emission scheme, a radiative transfer scheme accounting for aerosol optical properties, and a dual moment microphysics scheme that will account for environmental aerosols as nuclei. Differences between the results from WRF and WRF-Chem simulations were examined.

  20. Impact of dust aerosols on Hurricane Helene's early development through the deliquescent heterogeneous freezing mode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, H.; Sokolik, I. N.; Curry, J. A.

    2011-05-01

    An ice nucleation parameterization accounting for the deliquescent heterogeneous freezing (DHF) mode was implemented into the Weather Research Forecast (WRF) model. The DHF mode refers to the freezing process for internally mixed aerosols with soluble and insoluble species that can serve as both cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) and ice nuclei (IN), such as dust. A modified version of WRF was used to examine the effect of Saharan dust on the early development of Hurricane Helene (2006) via acting as CCN and IN. The WRF simulations showed the tendency of DHF mode to promote ice formation at lower altitudes in strong updraft cores, increase the local latent heat release, and produce more low clouds and less high clouds. The inclusion of dust acting as CCN and IN through the DHF mode modified the storm intensity, track, hydrometeor distribution, cloud top temperature (hence the storm radiative energy budget), and precipitation and latent heat distribution. However, changes in storm intensity, latent heating rate, and total precipitation exhibit nonlinear dependence on the dust concentration. Improvement in the representation of atmospheric aerosols and cloud microphysics has the potential to contribute to better prediction of tropical cyclone development.

  1. Bimodal Density Distribution of Cryptodome Dacite from the 1980 Eruption of Mount St. Helens, Washington

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hoblitt, R.P.; Harmon, R.S.

    1993-01-01

    The explosion of a cryptodome at Mount St. Helens in 1980 produced two juvenile rock types that are derived from the same source magma. Their differences-color, texture and density-are due only to vesicularity differences. The vesicular gray dacite comprises bout 72% of the juvenile material; the black dacite comprises the other 28%. The density of juvenile dacite is bimodally distributed, with peaks at 1.6 g cm-3 (gray dacite) and 2.3 g cm-3 (black dacite). Water contents, deuterium abundances, and the relationship of petrographic structures to vapor-phase crystals indicate both rock types underwent pre-explosion subsurface vesiculation and degassing. The gray dacite underwent a second vesiculation event, probably during the 18 May explosion. In the subsurface, gases probably escaped through interconnected vesicles into the permeable volcanic edifice. We suggest that nonuniform degassing of an initially homogeneous magma produced volatile gradients in the cryptodome and that these gradients were responsible for the density bimodality. That is, water contents less than about 0.2-0.4 wt% produced vesicle growth rates that were slow in comparison to the pyroclast cooling rates; greater water contents produced vesicle growth rates that were fast in comparison to cooling rates. In this scheme, the dacite densities are bimodally distributed simply because, following decompression on 18 May 1980, one clast population vesiculated while the other did not. For clasts that did vesiculate, vesicle growth continued until it was arrested by fragmentation. ?? 1993 Springer-Verlag.

  2. Geologic map of the Sasquatch Steps area, north flank of Mount St. Helens, Washington

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hausback, Brian P.

    2000-01-01

    The 1980 eruption of Mount St. Helens resulted in both new volcanic deposits and deeply incised exposures into pre-1980 deposits. These exposures were produced by excavation of the crater by the 1980 landslides and lateral explosion as well as the subsequent erosion of Step and Loowit creeks by northerly stream flow out of the horseshoe-shaped crater. The map covers the area known as the Sasquatch Steps (commonly called the Steps), which lies between the Pumice Plain on the north and the lowermost portion of the crater on the south. Rapid alluvial aggradation at the base of the Steps is presently burying some of the lowest exposures, and erosion is stripping many of the upland deposits. The stratigraphic sequence exposed in the map area includes deposits from the eruptive periods listed in table 1 (Crandell, 1987). Assignment of deposits to the various eruptive periods is based on lithology and ferromagnesian-mineral suites typical for each of the eruptive periods (Mullineaux and Crandell, 1981; Mullineaux, 1986), as well as three 14 C dates from wood found in the deposits. Faults displayed on the map are largely confined to the older part of the stratigraphic section. These older units are highly shattered, with an extremely complicated fracture pattern, and it is only possible to show the largest and most distinctive of these structures at the map scale. Interpretation of the stratigraphy and structure of this area is given in Hausback and Swanson (1990).

  3. GOES weather satellite observations and measurements of the May 18, 1980, Mount St. Helens eruption

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holasek, R. E.; Self, S.

    1995-01-01

    We demonstrate the use of Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite (GOES) images of the May 18, 1980, Mount St. Helens volcanic plume in providing details of the dynamics and changing character of this major explosive eruption. Visible and thermal infrared (IR) data from a sequence of images at 30-min intervals from 0850 to 1720 Local Time (LT) give information on dispersal and plume top temperature. Initial visible and IR images at 0850 show the top of a spreading co-ignimbrite-like umbrella plume and an overshooting column emerging from it, both rising off the ground-hugging pyroclastic gravity flow generated by the opening directed blast. The overshooting column had a minimum temperature significantly colder than local ambient atmosphere, indicating substantial undercooling, and a maximum altitude of 31 +/- 2 km at 0920. This large plume system then formed a high-velocity, radially spreading, gravitationally driven current before becoming advected in the wind field at an average downwind velocity of 29 m/s. Reflectance values from visible GOES data change from lower to higher during periods of transition from darker toned Plinian to lighter toned co-ignimbrite plumes indicating that in this case satellite data resolved changes in eruptive style from plumes with a coarser to a finer dominant particle size.

  4. Drainage evolution in the debris avalanche deposits near Mount Saint Helens, Washington

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beach, G. L.; Dzurisin, D.

    1984-01-01

    The 18 May 1980 eruption of Mount St. Helens was initiated by a massive rockslide-debris avalanche which completely transformed the upper 25 km of the North Fork Toutle River valley. The debris was generated by one of the largest gravitational mass movements ever recorded on Earth. Moving at an average velocity of 35 m/s, the debris avalanche buried approximately 60 sq km of terrain to an average depth of 45 m with unconsolidated, poorly sorted volcaniclastic material, all within a period of 10 minutes. Where exposed and unaltered by subsequent lahars and pyroclastic flows, the new terrain surface was characterized predominantly by hummocks, closed depressions, and the absence of an identifiable channel network. Following emplacement of the debris avalanche, a complex interrelationship of fluvial and mass wasting processes immediately began operating to return the impacted area to an equilibrium status through the removal of material (potential energy) and re-establishment of graded conditions. In an attempt to chronicle the morphologic evolution of this unique environmental setting, a systematic series of interpretative maps of several selected areas was produced. These maps, which document the rate and character of active geomorphic processes, are discussed.

  5. Sediment yield following severe volcanic disturbance - A two-decade perspective from Mount St. Helens

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Major, J.J.; Pierson, T.C.; Dinehart, R.L.; Costa, J.E.

    2000-01-01

    Explosive volcanic eruptions perturb water and sediment fluxes in watersheds; consequently, posteruption sediment yields can exceed pre-eruption yields by several orders of magnitude. Annual suspended-sediment yields following the catastrophic 1980 Mount St. Helens eruption were as much as 500 times greater than typical background level, and they generally declined nonlinearly for more than a decade. Although sediment yields responded primarily to type and degree of disturbance, streamflow fluctuations significantly affected sediment-yield trends. Consecutive years (1995-1999) of above-average discharge reversed the nonlinear decline and rejuvenated yields to average values measured within a few years of the eruption. After 20 yr, the average annual suspended-sediment yield from the 1980 debris-avalanche deposit remains 100 times (104 Mg [megagrams]/km2) above typical background level (~102 Mg/km2). Within five years of the eruption, annual yields from valleys coated by lahar deposits roughly plateaued, and average yields remain about 10 times (103 Mg/km2) above background level. Yield from a basin devastated solely by a blast pyroclastic current diminished to background level within five years. These data demonstrate long-term instability of eruption-generated detritus, and show that effective mitigation measures must remain functional for decades.

  6. Changes in Seismic Velocity During the 2004 - 2008 Eruption of Mount St. Helens Volcano

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hotovec-Ellis, A. J.; Vidale, J. E.; Gomberg, J. S.; Moran, S. C.; Thelen, W. A.

    2013-12-01

    Mount St. Helens (MSH) effusively erupted in late 2004, following an 18-year quiescence. Many swarms of repeating earthquakes accompanied the extrusion and in some cases the waveforms from these earthquakes evolved slowly, possibly reflecting changes in the properties of the volcano that affect seismic wave propagation. We use coda-wave interferometry to quantify these changes in terms of small (usually <1%) changes in seismic velocity structure by determining how relatively condensed or stretched the coda is between two similar earthquakes. We then utilize several hundred distinct families of repeating earthquakes at once to create a continuous function of velocity change observed at any station in the seismic network. The rate of earthquakes allows us to track these changes on a daily or even hourly time scale. Following years of no seismic velocity changes larger than those due to climatic processes (tenths of a percent), we observed decreases in seismic velocity of >1% coincident with the onset of increased earthquake activity beginning September 23, 2004. These changes are largest near the summit of the volcano, and likely related to shallow deformation as magma first worked its way to the surface. Changes in velocity are often attributed to deformation, especially volumetric strain and the opening or closing of cracks, but also with nonlinear responses to ground shaking and fluid intrusion. We compare velocity changes across the eruption with other available observations, such as deformation (e.g., GPS, tilt, photogrammetry), to better constrain the relationships between velocity change and its possible causes.

  7. Temporal changes in stress preceding the 2004-2008 eruption of Mount St. Helens, Washington

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lehto, H.L.; Roman, D.C.; Moran, S.C.

    2010-01-01

    The 2004-2008 eruption of Mount St. Helens (MSH), Washington, was preceded by a swarm of shallow volcano-tectonic earthquakes (VTs) that began on September 23, 2004. We calculated locations and fault-plane solutions (FPS) for shallow VTs recorded during a background period (January 1999 to July 2004) and during the early vent-clearing phase (September 23 to 29, 2004) of the 2004-2008 eruption. FPS show normal and strike-slip faulting during the background period and on September 23; strike-slip and reverse faulting on September 24; and a mixture of strike-slip, reverse, and normal faulting on September 25-29. The orientation of ??1 beneath MSH, as estimated from stress tensor inversions, was found to be sub-horizontal for all periods and oriented NE-SW during the background period, NW-SE on September 24, and NE-SW on September 25-29. We suggest that the ephemeral ~90?? change in ??1 orientation was due to intrusion and inflation of a NE-SW-oriented dike in the shallow crust prior to the eruption onset. ?? 2010 Elsevier B.V.

  8. Source Mechanism of Tiny Long-Period Events at Mount St. Helens in July 2005

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matoza, R. S.; Chouet, B. A.; Dawson, P. B.; Shearer, P. M.; Haney, M. M.; Waite, G. P.; Moran, S. C.; Mikesell, T. D.

    2015-12-01

    Long-period (LP, 0.5-5 Hz) seismicity is a recognized signature of unrest and eruption at volcanoes worldwide. The characteristic seismicity during the sustained dome-building phase of the 2004-2008 eruption of Mount St. Helens (MSH), USA was cyclic LP "drumbeating". However, accompanying the LP drumbeating was a near-continuous, randomly occurring series of tiny LP seismic events (LP "subevents"), which may hold important additional information on the mechanism of seismogenesis at restless volcanoes. We employ template matching, phase-weighted stacking, and full-waveform inversion to image the source mechanism of one multiplet of these LP subevents at MSH in July 2005. We apply network-based template matching to 8 days of continuous velocity waveform data from 29 June to 7 July 2005. We stack waveforms for high-quality triggers at each station and component, using a combination of linear and phase-weighted stacking to produce clean stacks for use in waveform inversion. The derived source mechanism points to the volumetric oscillation (~10 m3) of a subhorizontal crack located at shallow depth (~30 m) in an area to the south of Crater Glacier in the southern portion of the breached MSH crater. A possible excitation mechanism is the sudden condensation of metastable steam from a shallow pressurized hydrothermal system as it encounters cool meteoric water in the outer parts of the edifice.

  9. Monitoring eruptive activity at Mount St. Helens with TIR image data

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Vaughan, R.G.; Hook, S.J.; Ramsey, M.S.; Realmuto, V.J.; Schneider, D.J.

    2005-01-01

    Thermal infrared (TIR) data from the MASTER airborne imaging spectrometer were acquired over Mount St. Helens in Sept and Oct, 2004, before and after the onset of recent eruptive activity. Pre-eruption data showed no measurable increase in surface temperatures before the first phreatic eruption on Oct 1. MASTER data acquired during the initial eruptive episode on Oct 14 showed maximum temperatures of ???330??C and TIR data acquired concurrently from a Forward Looking Infrared (FLIR) camera showed maximum temperatures ???675??C, in narrow (???1-m) fractures of molten rock on a new resurgent dome. MASTER and FLIR thermal flux calculations indicated a radiative cooling rate of ???714 J/m2/S over the new dome, corresponding to a radiant power of ???24 MW. MASTER data indicated the new dome was dacitic in composition, and digital elevation data derived from LIDAR acquired concurrently with MASTER showed that the dome growth correlated with the areas of elevated temperatures. Low SO2 concentrations in the plume combined with sub-optimal viewing conditions prohibited quantitative measurement of plume SO2. The results demonstrate that airborne TIR data can provide information on the temperature of both the surface and plume and the composition of new lava during eruptive episodes. Given sufficient resources, the airborne instrumentation could be deployed rapidly to a newly-awakening volcano and provide a means for remote volcano monitoring. Copyright 2005 by the American Geophysical Union.

  10. Monitoring Eruptive Activity at Mount St. Helens with TIR Image Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vaughan, R. G.; Hook, S. J.; Ramsey, M. S.; Realmuto, V. J.; Schneider, D. J.

    2005-01-01

    Thermal infrared (TIR) data from the MASTER airborne imaging spectrometer were acquired over Mount St. Helens in Sept and Oct, 2004, before and after the onset of recent eruptive activity. Pre-eruption data showed no measurable increase in surface temperatures before the first phreatic eruption on Oct 1. MASTER data acquired during the initial eruptive episode on Oct 14 showed maximum temperatures of similar to approximately 330 C and TIR data acquired concurrently from a Forward Looking Infrared (FLIR) camera showed maximum temperatures similar to approximately 675 C, in narrow (approximately 1-m) fractures of molten rock on a new resurgent dome. MASTER and FLIR thermal flux calculations indicated a radiative cooling rate of approximately 714 J/m(exp 2)/s over the new dome, corresponding to a radiant power of approximately 24 MW. MASTER data indicated the new dome was dacitic in composition, and digital elevation data derived from LIDAR acquired concurrently with MASTER showed that the dome growth correlated with the areas of elevated temperatures. Low SO2 concentrations in the plume combined with sub-optimal viewing conditions prohibited quantitative measurement of plume SO2. The results demonstrate that airborne TIR data can provide information on the temperature of both the surface and plume and the composition of new lava during eruptive episodes. Given sufficient resources, the airborne instrumentation could be deployed rapidly to a newly-awakening volcano and provide a means for remote volcano monitoring.

  11. Mt. St. Helens: Influence of Magmatic Activity on the Biogeochemistry of Thermal Springs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montross, S. N.; Skidmore, M.; Abrahamson, I. S.

    2005-12-01

    Mt St. Helens erupted explosively in 1980, and the intense heat of this event effectively sterilized the crater. The crater is filled with significant ash and volcanic debris and the crater environment has limited vegetation despite relatively abundant water, from rainfall and snowmelt. However, microorganisms thrive in the hot springs that have developed in the crater since the 1980 eruption in this otherwise biologically hostile environment. Channelized drainages exiting the crater contain numerous hot spring sources which result from thermal heating of meteoric water and gain solutes from water-rock interactions. These solutes are important inputs for the microbial communities found within the crater thermal systems. Water samples collected in August 2004 and August 2005 from thermal springs in Step Canyon allow the opportunity to assess the effects of recent magmatic activity in the crater since September 2004, on the aqueous chemistry and microbiology of thermal spring water. We have investigated the composition of microbial communities in crater hot spring ecosystems by identifying small subunit ribosomal RNA sequences amplified directly from extracted genomic DNA. Initial screening of cloned DNA (16S rRNA gene sequence) by restriction fragment length polymorphism and sequencing indicates moderate microbial diversity in this environment with representatives from the domains Bacteria and Archaea. The presentation will examine relationships between the aqueous geochemistry and the microbial communities and temporal changes in these related to the recent magmatic activity.

  12. Yellow Cat revisited: a review of Helen Cannon's selenium indicator plants

    SciTech Connect

    Arp, G.K.

    1983-03-01

    In the late 1940s, Helen Cannon of the USGS conducted her famous studies on the association of plants to selenium. She used this association for detection of sedimentary uranium deposits on the Colorado plateau. Cannon demonstrated that locoweeds (Astragalus) from the Yellow Cat area of the Thompson district in eastern Utah did reflect the presence of selenium-rich uranium deposits by their colonization of the soils over the deposits. During the subsequent 30 years, Cannon's work has repeatedly been cited as a classic example of the use of indicator geobotany in mineral exploration. During the same 30-year period, geobotanical techniques have not found wide utilization as an exploration tool. Further, Cannon's work has not been demonstrated elsewhere to any extent. In 1980, the author returned to Yellow Cat to see what changes, if any, may have transpired at the site. The author also wanted to gather insight into why geobotanical methods have not gained wider acceptance and perhaps determine why subsequent work is so rare. Results of this study support Cannon's basic work. The results also suggest that the methods are ecologically sound and have applicability to modern mineral exploration programs. Limitations to the method are also discussed, along with some speculation as to why geobotanical methods have not seen wider application.

  13. Precursor gases of aerosols in the Mount St. Helens eruption plumes at stratospheric altitudes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Inn, E. C. Y.; Vedder, J. F.; Condon, E. P.; Ohara, D.

    1982-01-01

    Nineteen stratospheric samples from the eruption plumes of Mount St. Helens were collected in five flight experiments. The plume samples were collected at various altitudes from 13.1 to 20.7 km by using the Ames cryogenic sampling system on board the NASA U-2 aircraft. The enriched, cryogenically collected samples were analyzed by chromatography. The concentrations of aerosols precursor gases (OCS, SO2, and CS2), CH3Cl, N2O, CF2Cl2, and CFCl3 were measured by gas chromatography. Large enhancement of the mixing ratio of SO2 and moderate enhancement of CS2 and OCS were found in the plume samples compared with similar measurement under pre-volcanic conditions. A fast decay rate of the SO2 mixing ratio in the plume was observed. Measurement of Cl(-), SO2(2-), and NO3(-) by ion chromatography was also carried out on water solutions prepared from the plume samples. The results obtained with this technique imply large mixing ratios of HCl, (NO + NO2 + HNO3), and SO2, in which these constituents are the respective sources of the anions. Measurement of the Rn222 concentration in the plume was made. Other stratospheric constituents in the plume samples, such as H2O, CO2, CH4, and CO, were also observed.

  14. Analysis of seismic body waves excited by the Mount Saint Helens eruption of May 18, 1980

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kanamori, H.; Given, J. W.; Lay, T.

    1982-01-01

    Seismic body waves which were excited by eruption of Mt. St. Helens, and recorded by the Global Digital Seismographic Network (GDSN) stations are analyzed to determine the nature and the time sequence of the events associated with the eruption. The polarity of teleseismic P waves (period 20 sec) is identical at six stations which are distributed over a wide azimuthal range. This observation, together with a very small S to P amplitude ratio (at 20 sec), suggests that the source is a nearly vertical single force that represents the counter force of the eruption. The time history of the vertical force suggests two distinct groups of events, about two minutes apart, each consisting of several subevents with a duration of about 25 sec. The magnitude of the force is approximately 2.6 to the 17th power dyne. this vertical force is in contrast with the long period (approximately 150 sec) southward horizontal single force which was determined by a previous study and interpreted to be due to the massive landslide.

  15. Geospatial and statistical analysis of volcanic ash leachate data from Mt. St. Helens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ayris, P. M.; Delmelle, P.; Pereira, B.; Damby, D. E.; Durant, A. J.; Maters, E. C.; Dingwell, D. B.

    2014-12-01

    Upon contact with water, freshly-fallen volcanic ash releases a pulse of readily soluble material, derived from dissolution of S-, Cl- and F-bearing salts formed on ash surfaces during transport through the volcanic eruption plume. Analysis of leachate solutions can provide insight into the spatial and temporal variations in surface salt loadings, and hence the processes by which they were emplaced, and the hazards which they may induce upon mobilisation within receiving environments. However, excluding a small number of publications from the 1970's and 1980's, leachate studies are often limited by the use of small datasets with an uncertain capacity to adequately represent their parent ash deposit. Here we illustrate the significance of such limitations through the compilation and interrogation of a database of 96 published leachate compositions from 6 studies which investigated the May 18th, 1980 eruption of Mt. St. Helens. Utilising statistical analysis techniques, we removed outliers and biases between studies by linear transformation in order to produce a useable ash leachate dataset. The corrected data were mapped by kriging method to derive the spatial distribution of soluble S and Cl concentrations downwind of the volcano. Our treatment highlighted spatial trends in leachate data which may reflect various volcanic and atmospheric processes. In order to be able to disentangle these processes, we emphasise the need to obtain a homogeneous spatial distribution when sampling ash for leaching purposes, and to conduct those analyses according to a standardized protocol.

  16. Digital database of channel cross-section surveys, Mount St. Helens, Washington

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mosbrucker, Adam R.; Spicer, Kurt R.; Major, Jon J.; Saunders, Dennis R.; Christianson, Tami S.; Kingsbury, Cole G.

    2015-08-06

    Stream-channel cross-section survey data are a fundamental component to studies of fluvial geomorphology. Such data provide important parameters required by many open-channel flow models, sediment-transport equations, sediment-budget computations, and flood-hazard assessments. At Mount St. Helens, Washington, the long-term response of channels to the May 18, 1980, eruption, which dramatically altered the hydrogeomorphic regime of several drainages, is documented by an exceptional time series of repeat stream-channel cross-section surveys. More than 300 cross sections, most established shortly following the eruption, represent more than 100 kilometers of surveyed topography. Although selected cross sections have been published previously in print form, we present a comprehensive digital database that includes geospatial and tabular data. Furthermore, survey data are referenced to a common geographic projection and to common datums. Database design, maintenance, and data dissemination are accomplished through a geographic information system (GIS) platform, which integrates survey data acquired with theodolite, total station, and global navigation satellite system (GNSS) instrumentation. Users can interactively perform advanced queries and geospatial time-series analysis. An accuracy assessment provides users the ability to quantify uncertainty within these data. At the time of publication, this project is ongoing. Regular database updates are expected; users are advised to confirm they are using the latest version.

  17. Analysis of seismic body waves excited by the Mount St. Helens eruption of May 18, 1980

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kanamori, H.; Given, J. W.; Lay, T.

    1984-01-01

    Seismic body waves which were excited by eruption of Mt. St. Helens, and recorded by the Global Digital Seismographic Network (GDSN) stations are analyzed to determine the nature and the time sequence of the events associated with the eruption. The polarity of teleseismic P waves (period 20 sec) is identical at six stations which are distributed over a wide azimuthal range. This observation, together with a very small S to P amplitude ratio (at 20 sec), suggests that the source is a nearly vertical single force that represents the counter force of the eruption. The time history of the vertical force suggests two distinct groups of events, about two minutes apart, each consisting of several subevents with a duration of about 25 sec. The magnitude of the force is approximately 2.6 to the 17th power dyne. This vertical force is in contrast with the long period (approximately 150 sec) southward horizontal single force which was determined by a previous study and interpreted to be due to the massive landslide. Previously announced in STAR as N83-15968

  18. Interaction of Mount St. Helens' volcanic ash with cells of the respiratory epithelium.

    PubMed

    Adler, K B; Mossman, B T; Butler, G B; Jean, L M; Craighead, J E

    1984-12-01

    Respirable-sized dust from the Mount St. Helens (MSH) eruption of Spring 1980, and minerals similar to the major components of the volcanic ash, were examined comparatively for interactions with epithelial cells of rodent respiratory airways in vitro. MSH dust, Na feldspar, cristobalite, and alpha-quartz, in concentrations of 0.4 to 40 mg/ml, had neither significant effects on mucin release by tracheal explants nor acute toxic effects after exposure for 2 hr. Long-term incubation (1 and 3 weeks) of explants after a 1-hr exposure to MSH dust failed to elicit widespread toxic or proliferative changes in airway epithelial cells. In contrast, long-term exposure to Na feldspar, cristobalite, and alpha-quartz caused significant toxicity to the explants, although metaplastic changes were not observed. Ultrastructural evidence of associations (e.g., phagocytosis) between particulates and respiratory epithelium was not observed. The results of these studies suggest that volcanic ash from MSH interacts minimally with cells of the respiratory mucosa.

  19. Influence of Mount St. Helens volcanic ash on alfalfa growth and nutrient uptake

    SciTech Connect

    Mahler, R.L.

    1984-01-01

    Concern has been expressed that large amounts of volcanic ash from the May 18, 1980 eruption of Mount St. Helens may have created potential nutritional problems associated with forage production in northern Idaho and eastern Washington to the extent that adjustments need to be made in soil test correlation data. The objectives of this greenhouse study were to : (1) determine the effect of varying amounts of volcanic ash mixed into soils of northern Idaho on total alfalfa biomass production, and (2) to determine the effect of various soil/ash mixtures on the nutrient concentrations of P, K, S, Ca, Mg, Mn and Zn in alfalfa. Alfalfa was grown in eight different northern Idaho soils amended with differing levels of volcanic ash (0, 20, 35, 50 and 75%) in the greenhouse. The alfalfa seeds were inoculated and fertilizer P and S were added to all treatments. Total plant biomass and P, K, S, Ca, Mg, Mn and Zn plant concentrations were measured. The eight were pooled for analysis and it was found that increasing amounts of volcanic ash increased alfalfa biomass production. Plant P, S, Ca, Mg and Zn concentrations also increased with increasing levels of ash. Conversely, increasing levels of ash resulted in lower alfalfa tissue K and Mn concentrations. 13 references, 7 figures.

  20. Airborne aerosol measurements in the quiescent plume of Mount St. Helens: September, 1980

    SciTech Connect

    Phelan, J.M.; Finnegan, D.L.; Ballantine, D.S.; Zoller, W.H.; Hart, M.A.; Moyers, J.L.

    1982-09-01

    Atmospheric particulate matter and condensed volatile species were collected in the quiescent plume of Mount St. Helens volcano in Sept. 1980 using air filter systems mounted aboard a NASA turbo-prop P-3 aircraft. Concentrations of 27 elements were determined by instrumental neutron activation analysis and ion chromotagraphy. The volatile elements Cl, Br, F, Zn, W, In, S, Cd, Se, Sb, Hg, As and Au were enriched relative to bulk ash emitted during the earlier eruptions by factors of 50 to 20,000. Particulate S concentrations were approx.3 ..mu..g/m/sup 3/ and accounted for 6% of the total plume sulfur. Gas-phase Hg concentrations were 2.5 to 16 ng/m/sup 3/. Fluxes of elements were estimated by normalizing elemental concentrations to the concurrently measured total sulfur flux. Emission rates vary from 3500 kg/day for particulate Cl to 3 kg/day for Au, with substantial quantities of the enriched elements Zn, As, Hg, Sb, Se, and Cd also being released. Estimated global fluxes of these elements from volcanoes to the atmosphere are in reasonable agreement with other literature estimates.

  1. Response of hamster trachea in organ culture to Mount St. Helens volcano ash.

    PubMed

    Schiff, L J; Byrne, M M; Elliott, S F; Moore, S J; Ketels, K V; Graham, J A

    1981-01-01

    The effects of Mount St. Helens volcanic ash on rings of hamster tracheal epithelium in organ culture were studied. Volcanic ash samples with mass median aerodynamic diameters (MMAD) of 7.7 micrometers and 1.6 micrometers caused markedly different alterations in the tracheal mucosa. Examination by SEM of the ventral epithelial surface of tissue from untreated control explants after 2 weeks in culture showed equal numbers of ciliated and microvillous cells. Examination by SEM of tracheas exposed to the smaller size particles revealed that ash concentrations as low as 1 microgram/ml increased mucous secretion after one 2-hr exposure. After four or nine 2-hr exposures, cells contained cilia that were short and blunt. Ciliary activity after these exposures showed a significant depression in beating frequency. Tracheal ring cultures exposed to the larger volcanic ash particles exhibited moderate cytomorphological changes after one 2-hr exposure at concentrations of 1, 10 and 100 micrograms/ml. As the number of exposures increased, most of the columnar cell layer was lost, resulting in exposure of the basal cells. After nine exposures at the two highest concentrations of ash (10 and 100 micrograms/ml), only a few ciliated cells were remaining. Statistically significant reductions in ciliary activity paralleled the epithelial damage. The degree of epithelial damage and changes in the cilia beating frequency were related to the dose and the number of exposures to the volcanic ash.

  2. The 1980 eruptions of Mount St. Helens - Physical and chemical processes in the stratospheric clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turco, R. P.; Toon, O. B.; Whitten, R. C.; Hamill, P.; Keesee, R. G.

    1983-01-01

    The large and diverse set of observational data collected in the high-altitude plumes of the May 18, May 25, and June 13, 1980 eruptions is organized and analyzed with a view to discerning the processes at work. The data serve to guide and constrain detailed model simulations of the volcanic clouds. For this purpose, use is made of a comprehensive one-dimensional model of stratospheric sulfate aerosols, sulfur precursor gases, and volcanic ash and dust. The model takes into account gas-phase and condensed-phase (heterogeneous) chemistry in the clouds, aerosol nucleation and growth, and cloud expansion. Computational results are presented for the time histories of the gaseous species concentrations, aerosol size distributions, and ash burdens of the eruption clouds. Also investigated are the long-term buildup of stratospheric aerosols in the Northern Hemisphere and the persistent effects of injected chlorine and water vapor on stratospheric ozone. It is concluded that SO2, water vapor, and ash were probably the most important substances injected into the stratosphere by the Mount St. Helens volcano, both with respect to their widespread effects on composition and their effect on climate.

  3. Vegetation patterns 25 years after the eruption of Mount St. Helens, Washington, USA.

    PubMed

    Del Moral, Roger; Lacher, Iara L

    2005-12-01

    In 2004, we surveyed the vegetation on Mount St. Helens to document changes since 1992. We asked how communities differentiate and if they develop predictable relationships with local environments. We sought evidence from links between species and environment and changes in community structure in 271 250-m(2) plots. The habitats of the seven community types (CTs) overlapped broadly. Ordination methods demonstrated weak correlations among species distributions and location, elevation, and surface variables. Comparisons to 1992 by habitat demonstrated a large increase in plant cover and substantial development of vegetation structure. Pioneer species declined while mosses increased proportionately leading to more pronounced dominance hierarchies in most habitats. In Lupinus colonies, dominance declined, and diversity increased due to the increased abundance of formerly rare species. On once barren sites, dominance increased, but diversity changed slightly, which suggested the incipient development of competitive hierarchies. Weak correlations between vegetation and the environment suggested that initially stochastic establishment patterns had not yet been erased by deterministic factors. A vegetation mosaic that is loosely controlled by environmental factors may produce different successional trajectories that lead to alternative stable communities in similar habitats. This result has implications for restoration planning.

  4. Comparative in vitro cytotoxicity of volcanic ashes from Mount St. Helens, El Chichon, and Galunggung.

    PubMed

    Vallyathan, V; Robinson, V; Reasor, M; Stettler, L; Bernstein, R

    1984-01-01

    Dry sedimented volcanic ash samples from each of three widely separated volcanoes of the "Circum Pacific" region have been subjected to mineralogic analysis and in vitro tests for cytotoxicity. The ash samples from the three different volcanoes varied in particle size, surface area, and concentration of silica. Total crystalline silica in the respirable fraction of ashes was 1.5% (Mount St. Helens, Moses Lake); 1.36% (Galunggung, Bandung-1); 1.95% (Gallunggung, Bandung-2); and 1.72% (El Chichon, Tuxtla). Hemolysis as an index of cytotoxicity was measured by in vitro tests on sheep blood erythrocytes and indicated wide differences in hemolytic activity among ash samples. Alveolar macrophage cytosolic (lactate dehydrogenase) and lysosomal (beta-glucuronidase and beta-N-acetyl glucosaminidase) enzymes were measured as an index of cellular integrity following dust exposure. Hemolysis and release of enzymes from alveolar macrophages were greater with volcanic ash from Galunggung (Bandung-1) and El Chichon (Tuxtla) than the other ashes. Although crystalline silica induced an effect similar to volcanic ash from Galunggung (Bandung-1) on the release of enzymes from alveolar macrophages, the hemolytic potency of silica was much greater. Light and electron microscopic observations of dust-exposed alveolar macrophages indicated that the ash particles were readily phagocytized. These results indicate that volcanic ash is moderately cytotoxic and that exposure may lead to overt reactions and the exacerbation of preexisting chronic inflammatory processes.

  5. Mount St. Helens eruptions: the acute respiratory effects of volcanic ash in a North American community.

    PubMed

    Baxter, P J; Ing, R; Falk, H; Plikaytis, B

    1983-01-01

    After the May 18, 1980 volcanic eruption of Mount St. Helens, increases were observed in the number of patients who, because of asthma or bronchitis, sought medical care at emergency rooms of major hospitals in areas of ashfall. An interview study of 39 asthma and 44 bronchitis patients who became sick during the 4 wk following the eruption and who attended the emergency rooms of two major hospitals in Yakima, Washington, and of healthy matched controls indicated that a history of asthma, and possibly of bronchitis, were risk factors for contracting respiratory problems. The interview study also indicated that the main exacerbating factor was the elevated level of airborne total suspended particulates (in excess of 30,000 micrograms/m3) after the eruption. An interview study of 97 patients who had chronic lung disease and who lived in the same area as the above-mentioned patients, but who did not go to a hospital, showed that the ashfall exacerbated the condition in about one-third of these. Emergency planners and their geologist advisers should be aware that special preventive measures are justified for people with a history of asthma or chronic lung disease who live in communities at risk to volcanic ashfalls.

  6. Mount St. Helens ash fall in the Bull Run watershed, Oregon, May-June 1980

    SciTech Connect

    Shulters, M.V.; Clifton, D.G.

    1980-07-01

    On May 25-26, May 30-June 2, and June 12-13, 1980, strong, high-altitude winds from the north occurred during periods of volcanic-ash eruption at Mount St. Helens in southwestern Washington. As a result, ash fell in the Bull Run watershed, Oregon, some 50 miles to the south, the principal water-supply source for the Portland area. Samples from precipitation collectors and from stream sites in the Bull Run watershed were collected on several dates during May and June 1980. Analyses were made and are tabulated for pH, conductivity, acidity, sulfate, and nitrate plus nitrite. Field pH values of the precipitation ranged from 4.0 to 5.6 pH units and the stream samples from 6.7 to 7.5 units. Particle-size analyses for ash samples collected in the Bull Run watershed and Portland, Oregon, are also shown. Volcanic events, precipitation and high-altitude speeds for northerly winds are given for May 18-June 15, 1980. 6 references, 5 figures, 3 tables.

  7. Mount St. Helens ash from the 18 May 1980 eruption: chemical, physical, mineralogical, and biological properties

    SciTech Connect

    Fruchter, J.S.; Robertson, D.E.; Evans, J.C.

    1980-09-05

    Samples of ash from the 18 May 1980 eruption of Mount St. Helens were collected from several locations in eastern Washington and Montana. The ash was subjected to a variety of analyses to determine its chemical, physical, mineralogical, and biological characteristics. Chemically, the ash samples were of dacitic composition. Particle size data showed bimodal distributions and differed considerably with location. However, all samples contained comparable amounts of particles less than 3.5 micrometers in diameter (respirable fraction). Mineralogically, the samples ranged from almost totally glassy to almost totally crystalline. Crystalline samples were dominated by plagioclase feldspar (andesine) and orthopyroxene (hypersthene), with smaller amounts of titanomagnetite and hornblende. All but one of the samples contained from less than 1% to 3% free crystalline silica (quartz, trydimite, or cristobalite) in both the bulk samples and 1 to 2% in the fractions smaller than 3.5 micrometers. The long-lived natural radionuclide content of the ash was comparable to that of crustal material; however, relatively large concentrations of short-lived radon daughters were present and polonium-210 content was inversely correlated with particle size. In vitro biological tests showed the ash to be nontoxic to alveolar macrophages, which are an important pat of the lungs' natural clearance mechanism. On the basis of a substantial body of data that has shown a correlation between macrophage cytotoxicity and fibrogenicity of minerals, the ash is not predicted to be highly fibrogenic.

  8. Colonization genetics of an animal-dispersed plant (Vaccinium membranaceum) at Mount St Helens, Washington.

    PubMed

    Yang, S; Bishop, J G; Webster, M S

    2008-02-01

    Population founding and spatial spread may profoundly influence later population genetic structure, but their effects are difficult to quantify when population history is unknown. We examined the genetic effects of founder group formation in a recently founded population of the animal-dispersed Vaccinium membranaceum (black huckleberry) on new volcanic deposits at Mount St Helens (Washington, USA) 24 years post-eruption. Using amplified fragment length polymorphisms and assignment tests, we determined sources of the newly founded population and characterized genetic variation within new and source populations. Our analyses indicate that while founders were derived from many sources, about half originated from a small number of plants that survived the 1980 eruption in pockets of remnant soil embedded within primary successional areas. We found no evidence of a strong founder effect in the new population; indeed genetic diversity in the newly founded population tended to be higher than in some of the source regions. Similarly, formation of the new population did not increase among-population genetic variance, and there was no evidence of kin-structured dispersal in the new population. These results indicate that high gene flow among sources and long-distance dispersal were important processes shaping the genetic diversity in this young V. membranaceum population. Other species with similar dispersal abilities may also be able to colonize new habitats without significant reduction in genetic diversity or increase in differentiation among populations.

  9. Impact of mount st. Helens eruption on bacteriology of lakes in the blast zone.

    PubMed

    Staley, J T; Lehmicke, L G; Palmer, F E; Peet, R W; Wissmar, R C

    1982-03-01

    Lakes lying within the blast zone of Mount St. Helens showed dramatic increases in heterotrophic bacterial numbers after the eruption of 18 May 1980. The total microscopic counts of bacteria in some of the most severely affected lakes were more than 10 cells per ml, an order of magnitude above the counts in outlying control lakes. Likewise, the numbers of viable bacteria reached levels of more than 10 cells per ml, compated with fewer than 10 cells per ml in control lakes. The CPS medium used for enumeration provided growth of up to 81.5% of the bacteria during sampling of one of the blast zone lakes. The high numbers of bacteria and the efficacy of the viable enumeration procedure are evidence that the lakes have been transformed rapidly from oligotrophy to eutrophy due to the eruption and its aftermath. Organic material leached from the devastated forest vegetation is thought to be responsible for the enrichment of heterotrophs. Total coliform bacteria were found in all of the blast zone lakes, and some lakes contained fecal coliform bacteria. Klebsiella pneumoniae was the predominant total coliform and was also identified as one of the fecal coliform bacteria, although Escherichia coli was the predominant species in that category. Our data indicate that bacterial populations peaked in the outer blast zone lakes in the summer of 1980 and in most of the inner lakes during the summer of 1981.

  10. Acute effects of volcanic ash from Mount Saint Helens on lung function in children.

    PubMed

    Buist, A S; Johnson, L R; Vollmer, W M; Sexton, G J; Kanarek, P H

    1983-06-01

    To evaluate the acute effects of volcanic ash from Mt. St. Helens on the lung function of children, we studied 101 children 8 to 13 yr of age who were attending a 2-wk summer camp for children with diabetes mellitus in an area where about 1.2 cm of ash had fallen after the June 12, 1980, eruption. The outcome variables used were forced vital capacity, forced expiratory volume in one second, their ratio and mean transit time. Total and respirable dust levels were measured using personal sampling pumps. The children were tested on arrival and twice (early morning [A.M.] and late afternoon [P.M.]) every second or third day during the session. A within-day effect was measured by the P.M./A.M. ratio for the lung function variables; a between-day effect was measured by the change in the P.M. measurements over the 2 wk of camp. We found no strong evidence of either a within-day or a between-day effect on lung function, even in a subgroup of children who had preexisting lung disease or symptoms, despite daytime dust/ash levels that usually exceeded the Environmental Protection Agency's significant harm level for particulate matter.

  11. Mount st. Helens ash from the 18 may 1980 eruption: chemical, physical, mineralogical, and biological properties.

    PubMed

    Fruchter, J S; Robertson, D E; Evans, J C; Olsen, K B; Lepel, E A; Laul, J C; Abel, K H; Sanders, R W; Jackson, P O; Wogman, N S; Perkins, R W; VAN Tuyl, H H; Beauchamp, R H; Shade, J W; Daniel, J L; Erikson, R L; Sehmel, G A; Lee, R N; Robinson, A V; Moss, O R; Briant, J K; Cannon, W C

    1980-09-05

    Samples of ash from the 18 May 1980 eruption of Mount St. Helens were collected from several locations in eastern Washington and Montana. The ash was subjected to a variety of analyses to determine its chemical, physical, mineralogical, and biological characteristics. Chemically, the ash samples were of dacitic composition. Particle size data showed bimodal distributions and differed considerably with location. However, all samples contained comparable amounts of particles less than 3.5 micrometers in diameter (respirable fraction). Mineralogically, the samples ranged from almost totally glassy to almost totally crystalline. Crystalline samples were dominated by plagioclase feldspar (andesine) and orthopyroxene (hypersthene), with smaller amounts of titanomagnetite and hornblende. All but one of the samples contained from less than 1 percent to 3 percent free crystalline silica (quartz, trydimite, or cristobalite) in both the bulk samples and 1 to 2 percent in the fractions smaller than 3.5 micrometers. The long-lived natural radionuclide content of the ash was comparable to that of crustal material; however, relatively large concentrations of short-lived radon daughters were present and polonium-210 content was inversely correlated with particle size. In vitro biological tests showed the ash to be nontoxic to alveolar macrophages, which are an important part of the lungs' natural clearance mechanism. On the basis of a substantial body of data that has shown a correlation between macrophage cytotoxicity and fibrogenicity of minerals, the ash is not predicted to be highly fibrogenic.

  12. Equisetum plants and the cycling of mercury at Mount St. Helens

    SciTech Connect

    Siegel, B.Z.; Siegel, S.M.; Horsky, S.J.

    1984-03-01

    Samples of Equisetum arvense collected in July 1982 at nine stations around Mount St. Helens have increased by 63-158 ppb in mercury content since the last sampling at the same locations in June 1981. Associated soils show little change by comparison. Unlike the highly directional pattern of June 1981, suggestive of the plume vector of the major 1980 eruption, the July 1982 distribution is more diffuse. It seems consistent with a continuous and extended mercury output distributed around the compass by seasonal and local wind variation. Mercury in follow-up samples at four stations in Sept 1982 had decreased 20-91 ppb without significant soil change. The authors propose that these variations are based on a predominat atmospheric source of plant mercury, the episodic character of volcanic mercury emission into the atmosphere, and relatively steady rates of volatilization of mercury from the plants. Calculated loss rates in the field samples agree well with measured rates of mercury release by Equisetum in the laboratory.

  13. Ash loading and insolation at Hanford, Washington during and after the eruption of Mount St. Helens

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Laulainen, N. S.

    1982-01-01

    The effects of volcanic ash suspended in the atmosphere on the incident solar radiation was monitored at the Hanford Meteorological Station (HMS) subsequent to the major eruption of Mount St. Helens on May 18, 1980. Passage of the ash plume over Hanford resulted in a very dramatic decrease of solar radiation intensity to zero. A reduction in visibility to less than 1 km was observed, as great quantities of ash fell out of the plume onto the ground. Ash loading in the atmosphere remained very high for several days following the eruption, primarily as a result of resuspension from the surface. Visibilities remained low (2 to 8 km) during this period. Estimates of atmospheric turbidity were made from the ratio of diffuse-to-direct solar radiation; these turbidities were used to estimate extinction along a horizontal path, a quantity which can be related to visibility. Comparisons of observed and estimated visibilities were very good, in spite of the rather coarse approximations used in the estimates. Atmospheric clarity and visibility improved to near pre-eruption conditions following a period of rain showers. The diffuse-to-direct ratio of solar radiation provided a useful index for estimating volcanic ash loading of the atmosphere.

  14. Erosion by flowing lava: Geochemical evidence in the Cave Basalt, Mount St. Helens, Washington

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Williams, D.A.; Kadel, S.D.; Greeley, R.; Lesher, C.M.; Clynne, M.A.

    2004-01-01

    We sampled basaltic lava flows and underlying dacitic tuff deposits in or near lava tubes of the Cave Basalt, Mount St. Helens, Washington to determine whether the Cave Basalt lavas contain geochemical evidence of substrate contamination by lava erosion. The samples were analyzed using a combination of wavelength-dispersive X-ray fluorescence spectrometry and inductively-coupled plasma mass spectrometry. The results indicate that the oldest, outer lava tube linings in direct contact with the dacitic substrate are contaminated, whereas the younger, inner lava tube linings are uncontaminated and apparently either more evolved or enriched in residual liquid. The most heavily contaminated lavas occur closer to the vent and in steeper parts of the tube system, and the amount of contamination decreases with increasing distance downstream. These results suggest that erosion by lava and contamination were limited to only the initially emplaced flows and that erosion was localized and enhanced by vigorous laminar flow over steeper slopes. After cooling, the initial Cave Basalt lava flows formed an insulating lining within the tubes that prevented further erosion by later flows. This interpretation is consistent with models of lava erosion that predict higher erosion rates closer to sources and over steeper slopes. A greater abundance of xenoliths and xenocrysts relative to xenomelts in hand samples indicates that mechanical erosion rather than thermal erosion was the dominant erosional process in the Cave Basalt, but further sampling and petrographic analyses must be performed to verify this hypothesis. ?? Springer-Verlag 2003.

  15. Secondary hydroeruptions in pyroclastic-flow deposits: Examples from Mount St. Helens

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Moyer, T.C.; Swanson, D.A.

    1987-01-01

    Secondary hydroeruptions occur in pyroclastic-flow deposits when water or ice is trapped beneath hot pyroclastic debris and rapidly heated to steam. These eruptions display various styles of activity including fumarolic degassing, tephra fountaining, and explosive cratering. The deposits, which occupy the layer 3 stratigraphic position on the top of pyroclastic-flow units, can be distinguished from ash-cloud material by lateral thickness variation, clast composition, and other sedimentary features. The ejecta of secondary hydroeruptions comprise a subset of hydrovolcanic pyroclastic deposits. A small secondary hydroeruption observed on the Mount St. Helens pumice plain in 1981 produced tephra that was emplaced ballistically, by deposition from base surges, and by fallout from an eruption column. Stratigraphic descriptions and grain-size analysis of the ejecta from several secondary craters on the pumice plain demonstrate that the bedforms produced by a hydroeruption change with crater diameter. In particular, craters of small diameter are surrounded by interbedded ripple-laminated ash horizons and nonstratified, fines-depleted units; large craters have ejecta ramparts comprised of coarse dunes and antidunes. These bedform changes are related to a progressive increase in eruptive energy, which produces base surges of greater power and eruptive columns of greater height. We suggest that the style of activity displayed during a secondary hydroeruption is controlled by both the total thermal energy of the system and the permeability of the pyroclastic overburden. ?? 1987.

  16. Hydrothermal circulation at Mount St. Helens determined by self-potential measurements

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bedrosian, P.A.; Unsworth, M.J.; Johnston, M.J.S.

    2007-01-01

    The distribution of hydrothermal circulation within active volcanoes is of importance in identifying regions of hydrothermal alteration which may in turn control explosivity, slope stability and sector collapse. Self-potential measurements, indicative of fluid circulation, were made within the crater of Mount St. Helens in 2000 and 2001. A strong dipolar anomaly in the self-potential field was detected on the north face of the 1980-86 lava dome. This anomaly reaches a value of negative one volt on the lower flanks of the dome and reverses sign toward the dome summit. The anomaly pattern is believed to result from a combination of thermoelectric, electrokinetic, and fluid disruption effects within and surrounding the dome. Heat supplied from a cooling dacite magma very likely drives a shallow hydrothermal convection cell within the dome. The temporal stability of the SP field, low surface recharge rate, and magmatic component to fumarole condensates and thermal waters suggest the hydrothermal system is maintained by water vapor exsolved from the magma and modulated on short time scales by surface recharge. ?? 2006 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Erosional furrows formed during the lateral blast at Mount St. Helens, May 18, 1980

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kieffer, S.W.; Sturtevant, B.

    1988-01-01

    Nearly horizontal, quasi-periodic erosional features of 7-m average transverse wavelength and of order 100-m length occur in scattered locations from 3.5 to 9 km from the crater at Mount St. Helens under deposits of the lateral blast of May 18, 1980. We attribute the erosional features to scouring by longitudinal vortices resulting from flow instabilities induced by complex topography, namely, by streamline curvature in regions of reattachment downstream of sheltered regions, and by the cross-flow component of flow subparallel to ridge crests. The diameter of the vortices and their transverse spacing, inferred from the distance between furrows, are taken to be of the order of the boundary layer thickness. The inferred boundary layer thickness (???14 m at 9 km from the source of the blast) is consistent with the running length from the mountain to the furrow locations. The orientation of furrows induced by the cross-flow instability can be used to measure the upwash angle and estimate the flow Mach number: at the central ridge of Spirit Lake the Mach number is inferred to have been about 2.5, and the flow velocity approximately 235 m/s. -from Authors

  18. Timing of degassing and plagioclase growth in lavas erupted from Mount St. Helens, 2004-2005, from 210Po-210Pb-226Ra disequilibria: Chapter 37 in A volcano rekindled: the renewed eruption of Mount St. Helens, 2004-2006

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Reagan, Mark K.; Cooper, Kari M.; Pallister, John S.; Thornber, Carl R.; Wortel, Matthew; Sherrod, David R.; Scott, William E.; Stauffer, Peter H.

    2008-01-01

    Disequilibrium between 210Po, 210Pb, and 226Ra was measured on rocks and plagioclase mineral separates erupted during the first year of the ongoing eruption of Mount St. Helens. The purpose of this study was to monitor the volatile fluxing and crystal growth that occurred in the weeks, years, and decades leading up to eruption. Whole-rock samples were leached in dilute HCl to remove 210Po precipitated in open spaces. Before leaching, samples had variable initial (210Po) values, whereas after leaching, the groundmasses of nearly all juvenile samples were found to have had (210Po) ≈ 0 when they erupted. Thus, most samples degassed 210Po both before and after the magmas switched from open- to closed-system degassing. All juvenile samples have (210Pb)/(226Ra) ratios within 2 δ of equilibrium, suggesting that the magmas involved in the ongoing eruption did not have strong, persistent fluxes of 222Rn in or out of magmas during the decades and years leading to eruption. These equilibrium values also require a period of at least a century after magma generation and the last significant differentiation of the Mount St. Helens dacites. Despite this, the elevated (210Pb)/(226Ra) value measured in a plagioclase mineral separate from lava erupted in 2004 suggests that a significant proportion of this plagioclase grew within a few decades of eruption. The combined dataset suggests that for most 2004-5 lavas, the last stage of open-system degassing of the dacite magmas at Mount St. Helens is confined to the period between 1-2 years and 1-2 weeks before eruption, whereas plagioclase large enough to be included in the mineral separate grew around the time of the 1980s eruption or earlier.

  19. Constraints and conundrums resulting from ground-deformation measurements made during the 2004-2005 dome-building eruption of Mount St. Helens, Washington: Chapter 14 in A volcano rekindled: the renewed eruption of Mount St. Helens, 2004-2006

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dzurisin, Daniel; Lisowski, Michael; Poland, Michael P.; Sherrod, David R.; LaHusen, Richard G.; Sherrod, David R.; Scott, William E.; Stauffer, Peter H.

    2008-01-01

    Lack of precursory inflation suggests that the volcano was poised to erupt magma already stored in a crustal reservoir when JRO1 was installed in 1997. Trilateration and campaign GPS data indicate surface dilatation, presumably caused by reservoir expansion between 1982 and 1991, but no measurable deformation between 1991 and 2003. We conclude that all three of the traditionally reliable eruption precursors (seismicity, ground deformation, and volcanic gas emission) failed to provide warning that an eruption was imminent until a few days before a visible welt appeared at the surface--a situation reminiscent of the 1980 north-flank bulge at Mount St. Helens.

  20. Seismic-monitoring changes and the remote deployment of seismic stations (seismic spider) at Mount St. Helens, 2004-2005: Chapter 7 in A volcano rekindled: the renewed eruption of Mount St. Helens, 2004-2006

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McChesney, Patrick J.; Couchman, Marvin R.; Moran, Seth C.; Lockhart, Andrew B.; Swinford, Kelly J.; LaHusen, Richard G.; Sherrod, David R.; Scott, William E.; Stauffer, Peter H.

    2008-01-01

    The instruments in place at the start of volcanic unrest at Mount St. Helens in 2004 were inadequate to record the large earthquakes and monitor the explosions that occurred as the eruption developed. To remedy this, new instruments were deployed and the short-period seismic network was modified. A new method of establishing near-field seismic monitoring was developed, using remote deployment by helicopter. The remotely deployed seismic sensor was a piezoelectric accelerometer mounted on a surface-coupled platform. Remote deployment enabled placement of stations within 250 m of the active vent.

  1. Identifying Water on Mt. Baker and Mt. St. Helens, WA with Geophysics: Implications for Volcanic Landslide Hazards

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Finn, C.; Bedrosian, P.; Wisniewski, M.; Deszcz-Pan, M.

    2015-12-01

    Groundwater position, abundance, and flow rates within a volcano affect the transmission of fluid pressure, transport of mass and heat and formation of mechanically weak hydrothermal alteration influencing the stability of volcanoes. In addition, eruptions can shatter volcanic rocks, weakening the edifice. Helicopter magnetic and electromagnetic (HEM) data collected over Mt. Baker and Mt. St. Helens volcanoes reveal the distribution of water, shattered volcanic rocks and hydrothermal alteration essential to evaluating volcanic landslide hazards. These data, combined with geological mapping and rock property measurements, indicate the presence of localized <100 m thick zones of water-saturated hydrothermally altered rock beneath Sherman Crater and the Dorr Fumarole Fields at Mt. Baker. Nuclear magnetic resonance data indicate that the hydrothermal clays contain ~50% bound water with no evidence for free water ponded beneath the ice. The HEM data suggest water-saturated fresh volcanic rocks from the surface to the detection limit (~100 m) over the entire summit of Mt. Baker (below the ice). A 50-100 m thick high resistivity layer (>1500 ohm-m) corresponding to domes, debris avalanche, volcanic rocks and glaciers mantles the crater at Mt. St. Helens. Shallow low resistivity layers corresponding to fresh, cold water and hot brines are observed below the high resistivity surface in EM data. Shallow ground water mainly concentrates in shattered dome material in the crater of Mt. St. Helens. Aeromagnetic data indicate the location of basalts sandwiched between debris avalanche deposits and shattered dome material. The combination of the EM and magnetic data help map the location of the shattered dome material that is considered to be the failure surface for the 1980 debris avalanche. The EM data image the regional groundwater table near the base of the volcano. The geophysical identification of groundwater and weak layers constrain landslide hazards assessments.

  2. GeoGirls: A Geology and Geophysics Field Camp for Middle School Girls at Mount St. Helens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samson, C.; Allstadt, K.; Melander, S.; Groskopf, A.; Driedger, C. L.; Westby, E.

    2015-12-01

    The August 2015 GeoGirls program was a project designed to inspire girls to gain an appreciation and enthusiasm for Earth sciences using Mount St. Helens as an outdoor volcanic laboratory. Occupations in the field of science and engineering tend to be held by more males than females. One way to address this is to introduce girls to possible opportunities within the geosciences and encourage them to learn more about the dynamic environment in which they live. In 2015, the GeoGirls program sought to accomplish this goal through organizing a five day-long field camp for twenty middle school-aged girls, along with four high school-aged mentors and two local teachers. This group explored Mount St. Helens guided by female scientists from the USGS Cascade Volcano Observatory (CVO), the Mount St. Helens Institute (MSHI), UNAVCO, Boise State, Georgia Tech, University of Washington and Oregon State University. To introduce participants to techniques used by volcanologists, the girls participated in hands-on experiments and research projects focusing on seismology, GPS, terrestrial lidar, photogrammetry, water and tephra. Participants also learned to collect samples, analyze data and use microscopes. Through this experience, participants acquired strategies for conducting research by developing hypotheses, making observations, thinking critically and sharing their findings with others. The success of the GeoGirls program was evaluated by participant and parent survey questionnaires, which allowed assessment of overall enthusiasm and interest in pursuing careers in the geosciences. The program was free to participants and was run jointly by MSHI and CVO and funded by NSF, the American Association of University Women, the Association for Women Geoscientists, the Association of Environmental & Engineering Geologists and private donors. The program will run again in the summer of 2016.

  3. Experimental phase equilibria of a Mount St. Helens rhyodacite: a framework for interpreting crystallization paths in degassing silicic magmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riker, Jenny M.; Blundy, Jonathan D.; Rust, Alison C.; Botcharnikov, Roman E.; Humphreys, Madeleine C. S.

    2015-07-01

    We present isothermal (885 °C) phase equilibrium experiments for a rhyodacite from Mount St. Helens (USA) at variable total pressure (25-457 MPa) and fluid composition (XH2Ofl = 0.6-1.0) under relatively oxidizing conditions (NNO to NNO + 3). Run products were characterized by SEM, electron microprobe, and SIMS. Experimental phase assemblages and phase chemistry are consistent with those of natural samples from Mount St. Helens from the last 4000 years. Our results emphasize the importance of pressure and melt H2O content in controlling phase proportions and compositions, showing how significant textural and compositional variability may be generated in the absence of mixing, cooling, or even decompression. Rather, variations in the bulk volatile content of magmas, and the potential for fluid migration relative to surrounding melts, mean that magmas may take varied trajectories through pressure-fluid composition space during storage, transport, and eruption. We introduce a novel method for projecting isothermal phase equilibria into CO2-H2O space (as conventionally done for melt inclusions) and use this projection to interpret petrological data from Mount St. Helens dacites. By fitting the experimental data as empirical functions of melt water content, we show how different scenarios of isothermal magma degassing (e.g., water-saturated ascent, vapor-buffered ascent, and vapor fluxing) can have quite different textural and chemical consequences. We explore how petrological data might be used to infer degassing paths of natural magmas and conclude that melt CO2 content is a much more useful parameter in this regard than melt H2O.

  4. Magma reservoirs from the upper crust to the Moho inferred from high-resolution Vp and Vs models beneath Mount St. Helens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiser, E.; Palomeras, I.; Levander, A.; Zelt, C. A.; Harder, S. H.; Schmandt, B.; Hansen, S. M.; Creager, K. C.; Ulberg, C. W.

    2015-12-01

    Seismic investigations following the 1980 eruption of Mount St. Helens have led to a detailed model of the magmatic and tectonic structure directly beneath the volcano. These studies suffer from limited resolution below ~10 km, making it difficult to estimate the volume of the shallow magma reservoir beneath the volcano, the regions of magma entry into the lower crust, and the connectivity of this magma system throughout the crust. The latter is particularly interesting as one interpretation of the Southern Washington Cascades Conductor (SWCC) suggests that the Mount St Helens and Mount Adams volcanic systems are connected in the crust (Hill et al., 2009). The multi-disciplinary iMUSH (imaging Magma Under St. Helens) project is designed to investigate these and other fundamental questions associated with Mount St. Helens. Here we present the first high-resolution 2D Vp and Vs models derived from travel-time data from the iMUSH 3D active-source seismic experiment. Significant lateral heterogeneity exists in both the Vp and Vs models. Directly beneath Mount St. Helens we observe a high Vp/Vs body, inferred to be the upper/middle crustal magma reservoir, between 4 and 13 km depth. Southeast of this body is a low Vp column extending from the Moho to approximately 15 km depth. A cluster of low frequency events, typically associated with injection of magma, occurs at the northwestern boundary of this low Vp column. Much of the recorded seismicity between the shallow high Vp/Vs body and deep low Vp column took place in the months preceding and hours following the May 18, 1980 eruption. This may indicate a transient migration of magma between these two reservoirs associated with this eruption. Outside of the inferred magma bodies that feed Mount St. Helens, we observe several other interesting velocity anomalies. In the lower crust, high Vp features bound the low Vp column. One explanation for these features is the presence of lower crustal cumulates associated with

  5. Operation of a digital seismic network on Mount St. Helens volcano and observations of long-period seismic events that originate under the volcano

    SciTech Connect

    Fehler, M.; Chouet, B.

    1982-01-01

    During the period May through October 1981, a nine station digital seismic array was operated on the flanks of Mount St. Helens volcano in the state of Washington. The purpose was to obtain high quality digital seismic data from a dense seismic array operating near and in the summit crater of the volcano to facilitate study of near field seismic waveforms generated under the volcano. Our goal is to investigate the source mechanism of volcanic tremor and seismic activity associated with magma intrusion, dome growth and steam-ash emissions occurring within the crater of Mount St. Helens.

  6. Measurements of the imaginary part of the refractive index between 300 and 700 nanometers for mount st. Helens ash.

    PubMed

    Patterson, E M

    1981-02-20

    The absorption properties, expressed as a wavelength-dependent imaginary index of refraction, of the Mount St. Helens ash from the 18 May 1980 eruption were measured between 300 and 700 nanometers by diffuse reflectance techniques. The measurements were made for both surface and stratospheric samples. The stratospheric samples show imaginary index values that decrease from approximately 0.01 to 0.02 at 300 nanometers to about 0.0015 at 700 nanometers. The surface samples show less wavelength variation in imaginary refractive index over this spectral range.

  7. A comparison of thermal observations of mount st. Helens before and during the first week of the initial 1980 eruption.

    PubMed

    Lawrence, W S; Qamar, A; Moore, J; Kendrick, G

    1980-09-26

    Before and during the first week of the March-April 1980 eruptions of Mount St. Helens, Washington, infrared thermal surveys were conducted to monitor the thermal activity of the volcano. The purpose was to determine if an increase in thermal activity had taken place since an earlier airborne survey in 1966. Nine months before the eruption there was no evidence of an increase in thermal activity. The survey during the first week of the 1980 eruptions indicated that little or no change in thermal activity had taken place up to 4 April. Temperatures of ejected ash and steam were low and never exceeded 15 degrees C directly above the vent.

  8. Composition of the mount st. Helens ashfall in the moscow-pullman area on 18 may 1980.

    PubMed

    Hooper, P R; Herrick, I W; Laskowski, E R; Knowles, C R

    1980-09-05

    Mineralogical and chemical analyses of the ashfall from Mount St. Helens on 18 May 1980 indicate that there were two distinct ashes. The early dark ash is composed principally of plagioclase and lithic fragments of plagioclase and glass with titanium-rich magnetite and some basaltic hornblende and orthopyroxene. The later pale ash, four-fifths by weight of the whole fallout, is 80 percent glass with plagioclase as the principal crystalline phase. Quartz and potassium feldspar are rare to absent in both ashes. Chemical analyses of nine ash fractions and of the glass in each type emphasize the differences between the two ash types and their chemical homogeneity.

  9. Measurements of the imaginary part of the refractive index between 300 and 700 nanometers for Mount St. Helens ash

    SciTech Connect

    Patterson, E.M.

    1981-01-01

    The absorption properties, expressed as a wavelength-dependent imaginary index of refraction, of the Mount St. Helens ash from the 18 May 1980 eruption were measured between 300 and 700 nanometers by diffuse reflectance techniques. The measurements were made for both surface and stratospheric samples. The stratospheric samples show imaginary index values that decrease from approximately 0.01 to 0.02 at 300 nanometers to about 0.0015 at 700 nanometers. The surface samples show less wavelength variation in imaginary refractive index over this spectral range.

  10. Trace metals in the Columbia River Estuary following the 18 May 1980 eruption of Mount St. Helens

    SciTech Connect

    Riedel, G.F.; Wilson, S.L.; Holton, R.L.

    1984-10-01

    Dissolved and suspended concentrations of cadmium, copper, iron, manganese, nickel, lead, and zinc were measured in the Columbia River Estuary following the 18 May 1980 eruption of Mount St. Helens. Soluble concentrations of these trace elements were not substantially elevated by the influx of volcanic ash and mud into the estuary during this period, except for somewhat higher than usual concentrations of manganese and copper. A laboratory experiment indicates that manganese leached from volcanic debris in fresh water and in the transition from fresh to slightly saline water probably caused the elevated Mn leaching from the material into fresh water.

  11. Amphibole trace elements as indicators of magmatic processes at Mount St. Helens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hampel, T. R.; Rowe, M. C.; Kent, A.; Thornber, C. R.

    2011-12-01

    Amphibole has the capability of incorporating a wide variety of trace elements resulting from a range of magmatic processes. Prior studies have used trace elements such as Li and Cu in amphibole to investigate volatile mobility associated with magma ascent regarding the 2004-2008 eruption of Mount St. Helens (Rowe et al. 2008). In order to investigate magmatic processes associated with the 2004-2008 eruption of Mount St. Helens we have measured a range of fluid-mobile trace elements in conjunction with major element compositions of amphibole phenocrysts in dacite lava. Major elements and volatiles (Cl, F) were measured by electron microprobe analysis at Washington State University and trace elements (Li, Sc, Co, Cu, Zn, Sr, Y, Zr, Mo, Ag, Sn, Sb, Te, Ba, Ce, W, and Pb) were analyzed by laser ablation (LA)-ICP-MS at Oregon State University. Amphibole crystallization temperatures were calculated after Ridolfi et al. (2010). Core to rim transects were measured by electron microprobe to evaluate volatile concentrations and temperature profiles across individual phenocrysts. Core temperatures from 17 days and 226 days post eruption are consistently hotter than the rim temperatures 997 to 881 degrees C, respectively. Amphiboles from the end of the eruption (811 days post eruption) appear to be more complex, with phenocrysts having both increasing and decreasing temperatures toward the rims. The overall calculated temperature range of the amphiboles at the end of the eruption is 1022 to 919 degrees C. There is much diversity in the concentrations of Li and Cu within the phenocrysts in both the samples and throughout the eruption. Concentrations steadily increase in the beginning of the eruption then drop dramatically toward the middle, slowly increase toward the end eruption. Overall concentrations of Sr, Sb, Co, Sn, Mo, Ba, Ce, Sc, and Y do not change over the course of the eruption but do vary sample to sample. Preliminary data for Zn, Sb, Ag, and W suggest the

  12. The source of infrasound associated with long-period events at Mount St. Helens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matoza, Robin S.; GarcéS, Milton A.; Chouet, Bernard A.; D'Auria, Luca; Hedlin, Michael A. H.; de Groot-Hedlin, Catherine; Waite, Gregory P.

    2009-04-01

    During the early stages of the 2004-2008 Mount St. Helens eruption, the source process that produced a sustained sequence of repetitive long-period (LP) seismic events also produced impulsive broadband infrasonic signals in the atmosphere. To assess whether the signals could be generated simply by seismic-acoustic coupling from the shallow LP events, we perform finite difference simulation of the seismo-acoustic wavefield using a single numerical scheme for the elastic ground and atmosphere. The effects of topography, velocity structure, wind, and source configuration are considered. The simulations show that a shallow source buried in a homogeneous elastic solid produces a complex wave train in the atmosphere consisting of P/SV and Rayleigh wave energy converted locally along the propagation path, and acoustic energy originating from the source epicenter. Although the horizontal acoustic velocity of the latter is consistent with our data, the modeled amplitude ratios of pressure to vertical seismic velocity are too low in comparison with observations, and the characteristic differences in seismic and acoustic waveforms and spectra cannot be reproduced from a common point source. The observations therefore require a more complex source process in which the infrasonic signals are a record of only the broadband pressure excitation mechanism of the seismic LP events. The observations and numerical results can be explained by a model involving the repeated rapid pressure loss from a hydrothermal crack by venting into a shallow layer of loosely consolidated, highly permeable material. Heating by magmatic activity causes pressure to rise, periodically reaching the pressure threshold for rupture of the "valve" sealing the crack. Sudden opening of the valve generates the broadband infrasonic signal and simultaneously triggers the collapse of the crack, initiating resonance of the remaining fluid. Subtle waveform and amplitude variability of the infrasonic signals as

  13. Inter-Eruption Evolution of Mount St. Helens Tracked by Coda Wave Interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hotovec-Ellis, A. J.; Gomberg, J. S.; Thelen, W. A.; Vidale, J. E.; Creager, K. C.

    2012-12-01

    Mount St. Helens (MSH) erupted in 2004 after 18 years of quiescence, but the spatio-temporal movement underground of the magma that erupted at the surface remains a mystery. Swarms of deep (3-8 km) seismicity consistent with magmatic recharge beneath MSH occurred in 1989-1991 and 1995-1998, coincident with steam explosions and anomalous CO2 emission, respectively. Ground deformation observed between 1982 and 1991 was similarly consistent with magma recharge. However, there was no measurable ground deformation between 1991 and 2004. This evidence suggests that magma recharge likely took place during the 1989-1991 swarm, or alternatively, that it had already been mostly loaded to further erupt at the end of the 1980-1986 eruption. On other volcanoes, small changes in seismic wavespeed have been observed prior to eruptions and coincident with possible intrusions of fluids. Seismic velocity changes may have also occurred at MSH, and we speculate that the nature of these changes could provide additional constraints on how the system evolved leading up to the 2004 eruption. We compared the waveforms of thousands of pairs of repeating high frequency (>5 Hz) earthquakes in the PNSN catalog that occurred beneath the volcano's summit between the last explosion in 1986 and the onset of eruption in 2004. We measure temporal changes in repeater coda arrivals and interpret them in terms of possible changes in seismic structure and/or source processes using coda wave interferometry. Preliminary results show many pairs of coda waves have linearly increasing or decreasing lag with time within the waveforms, indicative of systematic wavespeed changes. If attributed to shear velocity variations alone, they would need to be as large as 2% spread over several years and change most around the times of increased deep seismicity.

  14. Hydrometeor-enhanced tephra sedimentation: Constraints from the 18 May 1980 eruption of Mount St. Helens

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Durant, A.J.; Rose, William I.; Sarna-Wojcicki, A. M.; Carey, Steven; Volentik, A.C.M.

    2009-01-01

    Uncertainty remains on the origin of distal mass deposition maxima observed in many recent tephra fall deposits. In this study the link between ash aggregation and the formation of distal mass deposition maxima is investigated through reanalysis of tephra fallout from the Mount St. Helens 18 May 1980 (MSH80) eruption. In addition, we collate all the data needed to model distal ash sedimentation from the MSH80 eruption cloud. Four particle size subpopulations were present in distal fallout with modes at 2.2 ??, 4.2 ??, 5.9 ??, and 8.3 ??. Settling rates of the coarsest subpopulation closely matched predicted single-particle terminal fall velocities. Sedimentation of particles <100 ??m was greatly enhanced, predominantly through aggregation of a particle subpopulation with modal diameter 5.9 ?? 0.2 ?? (19 ?? 3 ??m). Mammatus on the MSH80 cloud provided a mechanism to transport very fine ash particles, with predicted atmospheric lifetimes of days to weeks, from the upper troposphere to the surface in a matter of hours. In this mechanism, ash particles initiate ice hydrometeor formation high in the troposphere. Subsequently, the volcanic cloud rapidly subsides as mammatus develop from increased particle loading and cloud base sublimation. Rapid fallout occurs as the cloud passes through the melting level in a process analogous to snowflake aggregation. Aggregates sediment en masse and form the distal mass deposition maxima observed in many recent volcanic ash fall deposits. This work provides a data resource that will facilitate tephra sedimentation modeling and allow model intercomparisons. Copyright 2009 by the American Geophysical Union.

  15. Cessation of the 2004-2008 Dome-Building Eruption at Mount St. Helens, Washington

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moran, S. C.; Dzurisin, D.; Lisowski, M.; Schilling, S. P.; Anderson, K. R.; Werner, C. A.

    2015-12-01

    The 2004-2008 dome-building eruption at Mount St. Helens ended during the winter of 2007-2008 at a time when field observations were hampered by persistent bad weather. As a result, recognizing the end of the eruption was challenging. Also challenging was the fact that signs of continued eruption were increasingly subtle — earthquakes were small, deformation signals tiny, gas content close to background — and observing these phenomena was critically dependent on recordings and measurements made close (< 2 km) to the vent. In hindsight, the end of the eruption was presaged by a slight increase in seismicity in December 2007 that culminated on January 12-13, 2008, with a flurry of more than 500 events, most of which occurred in association with several tremor-like signals and a spasmodic burst of long-period earthquakes. At about the same time, a series of regular, localized, small-amplitude tilt events — thousands of which had been recorded during earlier phases of the eruption — came to an end. Thereafter, seismicity declined to 10-20 events per day until January 27-28, when a spasmodic burst of about 50 volcano-tectonic earthquakes occurred over a span of 3 hours. This was followed by a brief return of repetitive "drumbeat" earthquakes that characterized much of the eruption. By January 31, seismicity had declined to 1-2 earthquakes per day, a rate similar to pre-eruption levels. We attribute the tilt and seismic observations to progressive stagnation of an increasingly stiffened plug of magma in the upper part of the conduit. Upward movement of the plug ceased when the excess driving pressure, which had gradually decreased throughout the eruption as a result of reservoir deflation and increasing overburden from the growing dome, was overcome by increasing sidewall friction as a result of cooling and crystallization of the plug.

  16. Plant reestablishment 15 years after the debris avalanche at Mount St Helens, Washington.

    PubMed

    Dale, Virginia H; Adams, Wendy M

    2003-09-01

    Vegetation has slowly reestablished on the debris avalanche deposit in the 15 years after the 1980 eruption of Mount St. Helens that created a 60-km(2) debris avalanche, the largest landslide in recorded history. There has been a gradual increase in species richness and cover, but only 61% of the species present on the mountain before the eruption have established on the debris avalanche deposit. Plant cover averages 38% and is extremely patchy. Life form composition changed over successional time, because part of the avalanche deposit was invaded by introduced plant species aerially seeded to reduce erosion, the site offers the opportunity to compare successional processes occurring with and without introduced species. Long-term recovery trends and effects of nonnative species on succession are important to understand since plant reestablishment practices often rely on nonnative species for enhancing vegetation recovery of denuded sites along road sides, strip mines, or other human-generated clearing. Fifteen years after the eruption and 10 years since the invasion by introduced species, plots invaded by nonnative species had greater vegetation cover and more native plant richness than plots that were not inundated. Significantly greater mortality of conifers occurred in the plots dominated by introduced species shortly after the invasion of those species, but no difference in conifer mortality occurred in the last 5 years. Even so, the plots dominated by introduced species still have fewer conifer trees. Thus, the short-term pulse of conifer mortality after the invasion of introduced species may have long-term effects on the recovery of the dominant vegetation. It will likely be decades before there is 100% plant cover on the debris avalanche deposit and a century or more before full recovery of the vegetation system.

  17. The 2004-2008 dome-building eruption at Mount St. Helens, Washington: epilogue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dzurisin, Daniel; Moran, Seth C.; Lisowski, Michael; Schilling, Steve P.; Anderson, Kyle R.; Werner, Cynthia

    2015-10-01

    The 2004-2008 dome-building eruption at Mount St. Helens ended during winter 2007-2008 at a time when field observations were hampered by persistent bad weather. As a result, recognizing the end of the eruption was challenging—but important for scientists trying to understand how and why long-lived eruptions end and for public officials and land managers responsible for hazards mitigation and access restrictions. In hindsight, the end of the eruption was presaged by a slight increase in seismicity in December 2007 that culminated on January 12-13, 2008, with a burst of more than 500 events, most of which occurred in association with several tremor-like signals and a spasmodic burst of long-period earthquakes. At about the same time, a series of regular, localized, small-amplitude tilt events—thousands of which had been recorded during earlier phases of the eruption—came to an end. Thereafter, seismicity declined to 10-20 events per day until January 27-28, when a spasmodic burst of about 50 volcano-tectonic earthquakes occurred over a span of 3 h. This was followed by a brief return of repetitive "drumbeat" earthquakes that characterized much of the eruption. By January 31, however, seismicity had declined to 1-2 earthquakes per day, a rate similar to pre-eruption levels. We attribute the tilt and seismic observations to convulsive stagnation of a semisolid magma plug in the upper part of the conduit. The upward movement of the plug ceased when the excess driving pressure, which had gradually decreased throughout the eruption as a result of reservoir deflation and increasing overburden from the growing dome, was overcome by increasing friction as a result of cooling and crystallization of the plug.

  18. The 2004–2008 dome-building eruption at Mount St. Helens, Washington: Epilogue

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dzurisin, Daniel; Moran, Seth C.; Lisowski, Michael; Schilling, Steve P.; Anderson, Kyle R.; Werner, Cynthia A.

    2015-01-01

    The 2004–2008 dome-building eruption at Mount St. Helens ended during winter 2007–2008 at a time when field observations were hampered by persistent bad weather. As a result, recognizing the end of the eruption was challenging—but important for scientists trying to understand how and why long-lived eruptions end and for public officials and land managers responsible for hazards mitigation and access restrictions. In hindsight, the end of the eruption was presaged by a slight increase in seismicity in December 2007 that culminated on January 12–13, 2008, with a burst of more than 500 events, most of which occurred in association with several tremor-like signals and a spasmodic burst of long-period earthquakes. At about the same time, a series of regular, localized, small-amplitude tilt events—thousands of which had been recorded during earlier phases of the eruption—came to an end. Thereafter, seismicity declined to 10–20 events per day until January 27–28, when a spasmodic burst of about 50 volcano-tectonic earthquakes occurred over a span of 3 h. This was followed by a brief return of repetitive “drumbeat” earthquakes that characterized much of the eruption. By January 31, however, seismicity had declined to 1–2 earthquakes per day, a rate similar to pre-eruption levels. We attribute the tilt and seismic observations to convulsive stagnation of a semisolid magma plug in the upper part of the conduit. The upward movement of the plug ceased when the excess driving pressure, which had gradually decreased throughout the eruption as a result of reservoir deflation and increasing overburden from the growing dome, was overcome by increasing friction as a result of cooling and crystallization of the plug.

  19. A Volcano Rekindled: The Renewed Eruption of Mount St. Helens, 2004-2006

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sherrod, David R.; Scott, William E.; Stauffer, Peter H.

    2008-01-01

    Mount St. Helens began a dome-building eruption in September 2004 after nearly two decades of quiescence. Dome growth was initially robust, became more sluggish with time, and ceased completely in late January 2008. The volcano has been quiet again since January 2008. Professional Paper 1750 describes the first 1 1/2 years of this eruptive activity, chiefly from September 2004 until December 2005. Its 37 chapters contain contributions of 87 authors from 23 institutions, including the U.S. Geological Survey, Forest Service, many universities, and local and State emergency management agencies. Chapter topics range widely - from seismology, geology, geodesy, gas geochemistry, and petrology to the human endeavor required for managing the public volcanic lands and distributing information during the hectic early days of a renewed eruption. In PDF format, the book may be downloaded in its entirety or by its topical sections, each section including a few prefatory paragraphs that describe the general findings, recurrent themes, and, in some cases, the unanswered questions that arise repeatedly. Those readers who prefer downloading the smaller files of only a chapter or two have this option available as well. Readers are directed to chapter 1 for a general overview of the eruption and the manner in which different chapters build our knowledge of events. More detailed summaries for specific topics can be found in chapter 2 (seismology), chapter 9 (geology), chapter 14 (deformation), chapter 26 (gas geochemistry), and chapter 30 (petrology). The printed version of the book may be purchased as a hardback weighty tome (856 printed pages) that includes a DVD replete with the complete online version, including all chapters and several additional appendixes not in the printed book.

  20. Mount St. Helens: Controlled-source audio-frequency magnetotelluric (CSAMT) data and inversions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wynn, Jeff; Pierce, Herbert A.

    2015-01-01

    The apparent conductivity (or its inverse, apparent resistivity) measured by a geoelectrical system is caused by several factors. The most important of these are water-filled rock porosity and the presence of water-filled fractures; however, rock type and minerals (for instance, sulfides and clay content) also contribute to apparent conductivity. In situations with little recharge (for instance, in arid regions), variations in ionic content of water occupying pore space and fractures sampled by the measurement system must also be factored in (Wynn, 2006). Variations in ionic content may also be present in hydrothermal fluids surrounding volcanoes in wet regions. In unusual cases, temperature may also affect apparent conductivity (Keller, 1989; Palacky, 1989). There is relatively little hydrothermal alteration (and thus fewer clay minerals that might add to the apparent conductivity) in the eruptive products of Mount St. Helens (Reid and others, 2010), so conductors observed in the Fischer, Occam, and Marquardt inversion results later in this report are thus believed to map zones with significant water content. Geoelectrical surveys thus have the potential to reveal subsurface regions with significant groundwater content, including perched and regional aquifers. Reid and others (2001) and Reid (2004) have suggested that groundwater involvement may figure in both the scale and the character of some if not all volcanic edifice collapse events. Ongoing research by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) and others aims to better understand the contribution of groundwater to both edifice pore pressure and rock alteration as well as its direct influence on eruption processes by violent interaction with magma (Schmincke, 1998).

  1. Airborne thermal infrared imaging of the 2004-2005 eruption of Mount St. Helens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneider, D. J.; Vallance, J. W.; Logan, M.; Wessels, R.; Ramsey, M.

    2005-12-01

    A helicopter-mounted forward-looking infrared imaging radiometer (FLIR) documented the explosive and effusive activity at Mount St. Helens during the 2004-2005 eruption. A gyrostabilzed gimbal controlled by a crew member houses the FLIR radiometer and an optical video camera attached at the lower front of the helicopter. Since October 1, 2004 the system has provided an unprecedented data set of thermal and video dome-growth observations. Flights were conducted as frequently as twice daily during the initial month of the eruption (when changes in the crater and dome occurred rapidly), and have been continued on a tri-weekly basis during the period of sustained dome growth. As with any new technology, the routine use of FLIR images to aid in volcano monitoring has been a learning experience in terms of observation strategy and data interpretation. Some of the unique information that has been derived from these data to date include: 1) Rapid identification of the phreatic nature of the early explosive phase; 2) Observation of faulting and associated heat flow during times of large scale deformation; 3) Venting of hot gas through a short lived crater lake, indicative of a shallow magma source; 4) Increased heat flow of the crater floor prior to the initial dome extrusion; 5) Confirmation of new magma reaching the surface; 6) Identification of the source of active lava extrusion, dome collapse, and block and ash flows. Temperatures vary from ambient, in areas insulated by fault gouge and talus produced during extrusion, to as high as 500-740 degrees C in regions of active extrusion, collapse, and fracturing. This temperature variation needs to be accounted for in the retrieval of eruption parameters using satellite-based techniques as such features are sub-pixel size in satellite images.

  2. Effects of lava-dome growth on the crater glacier of Mount St. Helens, Washington: Chapter 13 in A volcano rekindled: the renewed eruption of Mount St. Helens, 2004-2006

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Walder, Joseph S.; Schilling, Steve P.; Vallance, James W.; LaHusen, Richard G.; Sherrod, David R.; Scott, William E.; Stauffer, Peter H.

    2008-01-01

    The process of lava-dome emplacement through a glacier was observed for the first time as the 2004-6 eruption of Mount St. Helens proceeded. The glacier that had grown in the crater since the cataclysmic 1980 eruption was split in two by the new lava dome. The two parts of the glacier were successively squeezed against the crater wall. Photography, photogrammetry, and geodetic measurements document glacier deformation of an extreme variety, with strain rates of extraordinary magnitude as compared to normal temperate alpine glaciers. Unlike such glaciers, the Mount St. Helens crater glacier shows no evidence of either speed-up at the beginning of the ablation season or diurnal speed fluctuations during the ablation season. Thus there is evidently no slip of the glacier over its bed. The most reasonable explanation for this anomaly is that meltwater penetrating the glacier is captured by a thick layer of coarse rubble at the bed and then enters the volcano’s groundwater system rather than flowing through a drainage network along the bed. Mechanical consideration of the glacier-squeeze process also leads to an estimate for the driving pressure applied by the growing lava dome.

  3. Radar interferometry observations of surface displacements during pre- and coeruptive periods at Mount St. Helens, Washington, 1992-2005: Chapter 18 in A volcano rekindled: the renewed eruption of Mount St. Helens, 2004-2006

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Poland, Michael; Lu, Zhong; Sherrod, David R.; Scott, William E.; Stauffer, Peter H.

    2008-01-01

    We analyzed hundreds of interferograms of Mount St. Helens produced from radar images acquired by the ERS-1/2, ENVISAT, and RADARSAT satellites during the 1992-2004 preeruptive and 2004-2005 coeruptive periods for signs of deformation associated with magmatic activity at depth. Individual interferograms were often contaminated by atmospheric delay anomalies; therefore, we employed stacking to amplify any deformation patterns that might exist while minimizing random noise. Preeruptive interferograms show no signs of volcanowide deformation between 1992 and the onset of eruptive activity in 2004. Several patches of subsidence in the 1980 debris-avalanche deposit were identified, however, and are thought to be caused by viscoelastic relaxation of loosely consolidated substrate, consolidation of water-saturated sediment, or melting of buried ice. Coeruptive interferometric stacks are dominated by atmospheric noise, probably because individual interferograms span only short time intervals in 2004 and 2005. Nevertheless, we are confident that at least one of the seven coeruptive stacks we constructed is reliable at about the 1-cm level. This stack suggests deflation of Mount St. Helens driven by contraction of a source beneath the volcano.

  4. The mechanics of ground deformation precursory to dome-building extrusions at Mount St. Helens 1981-1982.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chadwick, W.W.; Archuleta, R.J.; Swanson, D.A.

    1988-01-01

    Detailed monitoring at Mount St. Helens since 1980 has enabled prediction of the intermittent eruptive activity (mostly dome growth) with unprecedented success. During 1981 and 1982, accelerating deformation of the crater floor around the vent (including radial cracks, thrust faults, and ground tilt) was the earliest indicator of impending activity. The magnitude of the shear stress required to match observed dipslacements (1-7 MPa) is inversely proportional to the conduit diameter (estimated to be 25-100 m). The most probable source of this shear stress is the flow of viscous magma up to the conduit and into the lava dome. A model is proposed in which the accelerating deformation, beginning as much as 4 weeks before extrusions, is caused by the increasing velocity of ascending magma in the conduit. This model is examined by using deformation data of the dome before four extrusions in 1981 and 1982 to estimate the volumetric flow rate through the conduit. This flow rate and an estimate of the effective viscosity of the magma enable calculation of an ascent velocity and an applied shear stress that, again, depend on the conduit diameter. The results of these calculations are consistent with the finite element experiments and show that the proposed model is feasible. Precursory deformation like that measured at Mount St. Helens should be observable at similar volcanoes elsewhere because it is caused by the fundamental process of magma ascent.-from Authors

  5. Mount St Helens eruptions, May 18 to June 12, 1980. An overview of the acute health impact.

    PubMed

    Baxter, P J; Ing, R; Falk, H; French, J; Stein, G F; Bernstein, R S; Merchant, J A; Allard, J

    1981-12-04

    Thirty-five known deaths were caused by the landslide and lateral blast of the May 18 eruption of Mount St Helens and at least 23 persons are missing. In 18 of 23 cases that reached autopsy, asphyxiation from ash inhalation was the cause of death. A rapidly established hospital surveillance system detected increases in the number of emergency room (ER) visits and admissions for asthma and bronchitis in communities with the heaviest ashfall after the May 18 eruption and the eruptions on May 25 and June 12. There were also increases in the number of ER visits for ash-related eye complaints in some areas. laboratory studies indicated that the May 18 ash was not acutely toxic, but the respirable portion contained 3% to 7% of crystalline free silica, a potential pneumoconiosis hazard to certain heavily exposed occupational groups. Continuing volcanic activity of Mount St Helens and future eruption of other volcanoes in the Cascade Range may pose a variety of health hazards, including blast, ashfalls, flooding, damage to public utilities, and possible psychosocial effects.

  6. Ambient Airborne Solids Concentrations Including Volcanic Ash at Hanford, Washington Sampling Sites Subsequent to the Mount St. Helens Eruption

    SciTech Connect

    Sehmel, G.A.

    1982-12-20

    A major eruption of Mount St. Helens occurred on May 18, 1980. Subsequently, airborne solid concentrations were measured as a function of time at two sites within the southern edge of the fallout plume about 211 km east of Mount St. Helens. This ash was a source for investigating area-wide resuspension. Rain had a variable effect on decreasing airborne concentrations from resuspension. From 0.5 to 1.5 cm of rain were required to significantly reduce airborne solid concentrations through July. For a more aged resuspension source in September, a rain of 2.0 cm had a negligible effect. A monthly average threshold-wind speed for resuspension was defined as 3.6 m/s. For monthly-average wind speeds less than the threshold wind speed, monthly-average airborne concentrations tended to decrease with time. A decrease was recorded between September and October. For this 4-month time period, the half-life was on the order of 50 days, corresponding to a weathering rate of 5.1 year/sup -1/.

  7. Evaluation of physical health effects due to volcanic hazards: crystalline silica in Mount St. Helens volcanic ash.

    PubMed

    Dollberg, D D; Bolyard, M L; Smith, D L

    1986-03-01

    This investigation has shown that crystalline silica has been identified as being present in the Mount St. Helens volcanic ash at levels of 3 to 7 per cent by weight. This identification has been established using X-ray powder diffraction, infrared spectrophotometry, visible spectrophotometry, electron microscopy, and Laser Raman spectrophotometry. Quantitative analysis by IR, XRD, and visible spectrophotometry requires a preliminary phosphoric acid digestion of the ash sample to remove the plagioclase silicate material which interferes with the determination by these methods. Electron microscopic analysis as well as Laser Raman spectrophotometric analysis of the untreated ash confirms the presence of silica and at levels found by the XRD and IR analysis of the treated samples. An interlaboratory study of volcanic ash samples by 15 laboratories confirms the presence and levels of crystalline silica. Although several problems with applying the digestion procedure were observed in this hastily organized supply, all laboratories employing the digestion procedure reported the presence of crystalline silica. These results unequivocally put to rest the question of the presence of silica in the volcanic ash from eruptions of Mount St. Helens in 1980.

  8. Evaluation of physical health effects due to volcanic hazards: crystalline silica in Mount St. Helens volcanic ash

    SciTech Connect

    Dollberg, D.D.; Balyard, M.L.; Smith, D.L.

    1986-03-01

    This investigation has shown that crystalline silica has been identified as being present in the Mount St. Helens volcanic ash at levels of 3 to 7 per cent by weight. This identification has been established using X-ray powder diffraction, infrared spectrophotometry, visible spectrophotometry, electron microscopy, and Laser Raman spectrophometry. Quantitative analysis by IR, XRD, and visible spectrophotometry requires a preliminary phosphoric acid digestion of the ash sample to remove the plagioclase silicate material which interferes with the determination by these methods. Electron microscopic analysis as well as Laser Raman spectrophotometric analysis of the untreated ash confirms the presence of silica and at levels found by the XRD and IR analysis of the treated samples. An interlaboratory study of volcanic ash samples by 15 laboratories confirms the presence and levels of crystalline silica. Although several problems with applying the digestion procedure were observed in this hastily organized study, all laboratories employed the digestion procedure reported the presence of crystalline silica. These results unequivocally put to rest the question of the presence of silica in the volcanic ash from eruptions of Mount St. Helens in 1980.

  9. Little Black Sambo: A Closer Look. A History of Helen Bannerman's The Story of Little Black Sambo and its Popularity/Controversy in the United States.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yuill, Phyllis J.

    Surprisingly little research has been done on Little Black Sambo and the meager material is often contradictory. This study examines the origins of the book and traces its history in the United States through its overlapping periods of popularity and controversy. The story of Little Black Sambo, written in 1898 by Helen Bannerman, a white English…

  10. An Overview of the Project on the Imaging and Full-Text Retrieval of the Ava Helen and Linus Pauling Papers at the Oregon State University Libraries.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Krishnamurthy, Ramesh S.; Mead, Clifford S.

    1995-01-01

    Presents plan of Oregon State University Libraries to convert all paper documents from the Ava Helen and Linus Pauling archives to digital format. The scope, goals, tasks and objectives set by the project coordinators are outlined, and issues such as protection of equipment, access, copyright and management are discussed. (JKP)

  11. Commentary on: "On the Need for a Specialist Service within the Generic Hospital Setting" by Robyn A. Wallace and Helen Beange (2008)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kerr, Michael

    2008-01-01

    This commentary discusses whether a sufficient case has been made for specialism in hospital services as a viable alternative to existing generic services. The impact of developments in specialist care such as those outlined by Robyn A. Wallace and Helen Beange should be assessed as a means of reducing inequality. In particular, model services…

  12. The source of infrasound associated with long-period events at mount St. Helens

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Matoza, R.S.; Garces, M.A.; Chouet, B.A.; D'Auria, L.; Hedlin, M.A.H.; De Groot-Hedlin, C.; Waite, G.P.

    2009-01-01

    During the early stages of the 2004-2008 Mount St. Helens eruption, the source process that produced a sustained sequence of repetitive long-period (LP) seismic events also produced impulsive broadband infrasonic signals in the atmosphere. To assess whether the signals could be generated simply by seismic-acoustic coupling from the shallow LP events, we perform finite difference simulation of the seismo-acoustic wavefield using a single numerical scheme for the elastic ground and atmosphere. The effects of topography, velocity structure, wind, and source configuration are considered. The simulations show that a shallow source buried in a homogeneous elastic solid produces a complex wave train in the atmosphere consisting of P/SV and Rayleigh wave energy converted locally along the propagation path, and acoustic energy originating from , the source epicenter. Although the horizontal acoustic velocity of the latter is consistent with our data, the modeled amplitude ratios of pressure to vertical seismic velocity are too low in comparison with observations, and the characteristic differences in seismic and acoustic waveforms and spectra cannot be reproduced from a common point source. The observations therefore require a more complex source process in which the infrasonic signals are a record of only the broadband pressure excitation mechanism of the seismic LP events. The observations and numerical results can be explained by a model involving the repeated rapid pressure loss from a hydrothermal crack by venting into a shallow layer of loosely consolidated, highly permeable material. Heating by magmatic activity causes pressure to rise, periodically reaching the pressure threshold for rupture of the "valve" sealing the crack. Sudden opening of the valve generates the broadband infrasonic signal and simultaneously triggers the collapse of the crack, initiating resonance of the remaining fluid. Subtle waveform and amplitude variability of the infrasonic signals as

  13. Investigation into the erosive capacity of pyroclastic density currents at Mount Saint Helens, Washington (USA)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pollock, N. M.; Brand, B. D.

    2012-12-01

    Two fundamental aspects of PDC dynamics that remain poorly understood are the primary control(s) on substrate erosion and the effect of erosion on downstream flow dynamics. The gap in understanding reflects the lack of sufficient field exposures with evidence for these processes. In the 32 years since the May 18th, 1980 eruption of Mount St Helens (MSH), kilometers of new outcrops have been exposed throughout the PDC and debris avalanche hummock deposits that provide substantial evidence of substrate erosion and entrainment by the PDCs produced throughout the afternoon of the eruption. Field observations include a reappearance of large lithics (>1 m) in PDC deposits at distances of 4-5 km from the vent, suggesting that these lithics were entrained locally. For this study, detailed componentry and roundness analyses are utilized to determine the source of lithics in PDC deposits and to quantify the erosive capacity of the PDCs at MSH. Comparison of componentry data from the PDC deposits with debris avalanche deposits ~200 m upstream indicate that >50% of the lithics were locally entrained. The entrainment of these lithics appears to have significantly altered the dynamics of the current as contacts between flow units change from purely depositional upstream from the hummocks to erosive and scouring following the entrainment of dense lithics. This evidence suggests that the capacity of a PDC to behave erosively could be a self-perpetuating process; entrainment of dense lithics at the base of the current results in an increased density gradient, which in turn enhances a current's ability to continue to erode. In addition, the presence of locally entrained lithics at various heights within a single flow unit and within close proximity to the source of the lithics suggests both a progressive entrainment of the substrate as well as a progressive aggradation of the deposits, depending on localized flow conditions. While erosion may have initially occurred due to the

  14. Evaluation of gas data from high-temperature fumaroles at Mount St. Helens, 1980-1982

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gerlach, T.M.; Casadevall, T.J.

    1986-01-01

    The Mount St. Helens fumarole gases show linear composition trends during periods of noneruptive degassing between September 1980 and October 1981. The trends are characterized by increasing H2O and decreasing CO2 and sulfur. Maximum fumarole temperatures also show a linear decrease during this period. High-temperature fumarole gases collected from the crater and dome between September 1980 and July 1982 are all H2O-rich (> 90%) with 1-10% CO2 and small amounts of H2S, SO2, H2, CO, HC, and HF. Trace amounts of COS and S2 are present, and occasional observations of minor CH4 appear to result from contamination or low-temperature reactions in sample vessels. The O2 fugacities of the gases remain near Ni-NiO during cooling. The low sulfur content of the gases obviates the need for extensive gas-rock oxygen exchange to maintain fO2's near Ni-NiO. A detailed thermodynamic analysis of 50 gas samples collected between September 1980 and December 1981 led to improved compositions for 22 samples. The gases were initially in a state of equilibrium, but disequilibrium modifications from atmospheric oxidation of H2 and, to a lesser extent, CO occurred within the upper portions of the fumarole vents. The last temperatures of equilibrium for the fumarole gases range from 800??C to 650??C and are nearly always higher than the collection temperatures. No evidence was found of disequilibrium admixture of surface waters; if such modifications of the fumarole gases occurred, the water must have been added at depth and have reequilibrated with the other gas species at magmatic or near-magmatic temperatures. The highest quality analytical data are obtained by field gas chromatograph measurements and from caustic soda bottle samples. Samples collected in evacuated bottles or by pumping through double stopcock tubes tend to be severely deficient in sulfur due to post-collection reactions between H2S and SO2. It is also necessary to infer the water content of the latter samples. ?? 1986.

  15. Spatial analysis of Mount St. Helens tephra leachate compositions: implications for future sampling strategies.

    PubMed

    Ayris, P M; Delmelle, P; Pereira, B; Maters, E C; Damby, D E; Durant, A J; Dingwell, D B

    Tephra particles in physically and chemically evolving volcanic plumes and clouds carry soluble sulphate and halide salts to the Earth's surface, ultimately depositing volcanogenic compounds into terrestrial or aquatic environments. Upon leaching of tephra in water, these salts dissolve rapidly. Previous studies have investigated the spatial and temporal variability of tephra leachate compositions during an eruption in order to gain insight into the mechanisms of gas-tephra interaction which emplace those salts. However, the leachate datasets analysed are typically small and may poorly represent the natural variability and complexity of tephra deposits. Here, we have conducted a retrospective analysis of published leachate analyses from the 18 May 1980 eruption of Mount St. Helens, Washington, analysing the spatial structure of the concentrations and relative abundances of soluble Ca, Cl, Na and S across the deposits. We have identified two spatial features: (1) concentrated tephra leachate compositions in blast deposits to the north of the volcano and (2) low S/Cl and Na/Cl ratios around the Washington-Idaho border. By reference to the bulk chemistry and granulometry of the deposit and to current knowledge of gas-tephra interactions, we suggest that the proximal enrichments are the product of pre-eruptive gas uptake during cryptodome emplacement. We speculate that the low S/Cl and Na/Cl ratios reflect a combination of compositional dependences on high-temperature SO2 uptake and preferential HCl uptake by hydrometeor-tephra aggregates, manifested in terrestrial deposits by tephra sedimentation and fallout patterns. However, despite our interrogation of the most exhaustive tephra leachate dataset available, it has become clear in this effort that more detailed insights into gas-tephra interaction mechanisms are prevented by the prevalent poor temporal and spatial representativeness of the collated data and the limited characterisation of the tephra deposits. Future

  16. Spatial analysis of Mount St. Helens tephra leachate compositions: implications for future sampling strategies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ayris, P. M.; Delmelle, P.; Pereira, B.; Maters, E. C.; Damby, D. E.; Durant, A. J.; Dingwell, D. B.

    2015-07-01

    Tephra particles in physically and chemically evolving volcanic plumes and clouds carry soluble sulphate and halide salts to the Earth's surface, ultimately depositing volcanogenic compounds into terrestrial or aquatic environments. Upon leaching of tephra in water, these salts dissolve rapidly. Previous studies have investigated the spatial and temporal variability of tephra leachate compositions during an eruption in order to gain insight into the mechanisms of gas-tephra interaction which emplace those salts. However, the leachate datasets analysed are typically small and may poorly represent the natural variability and complexity of tephra deposits. Here, we have conducted a retrospective analysis of published leachate analyses from the 18 May 1980 eruption of Mount St. Helens, Washington, analysing the spatial structure of the concentrations and relative abundances of soluble Ca, Cl, Na and S across the deposits. We have identified two spatial features: (1) concentrated tephra leachate compositions in blast deposits to the north of the volcano and (2) low S/Cl and Na/Cl ratios around the Washington-Idaho border. By reference to the bulk chemistry and granulometry of the deposit and to current knowledge of gas-tephra interactions, we suggest that the proximal enrichments are the product of pre-eruptive gas uptake during cryptodome emplacement. We speculate that the low S/Cl and Na/Cl ratios reflect a combination of compositional dependences on high-temperature SO2 uptake and preferential HCl uptake by hydrometeor-tephra aggregates, manifested in terrestrial deposits by tephra sedimentation and fallout patterns. However, despite our interrogation of the most exhaustive tephra leachate dataset available, it has become clear in this effort that more detailed insights into gas-tephra interaction mechanisms are prevented by the prevalent poor temporal and spatial representativeness of the collated data and the limited characterisation of the tephra deposits. Future

  17. Fumarole emissions at Mount St. Helens volcano, June 1980 to October 1981: Degassing of a magma-hydrothermal system

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gerlach, T.M.; Casadevall, T.J.

    1986-01-01

    This study is an investigation of the chemical changes in the Mount St. Helens fumarole gases up to October 1981, the sources of the fumarole gases, and the stability of gas species in the shallow magma system. These problems are investigated by calculations of element compositions, thermodynamic equilibria, and magmatic volatile-hydrothermal steam mixing models. The fumarole gases are treated as mixtures of magmatic volatiles and hydrothermal steam formed by magma degassing and boiling of local waters in a dryout zone near conduit and dome magma. The magmatic volatile fraction is significant in fumaroles with temperatures in excess of the magma cracking-temperature (??? 700??C) - i.e., the temperature below which cracking is induced by thermal stresses during cooling and solidification. Linear composition changes of the fumarole gases over time appear to be the result of a steady decline in the magmatic volatile mixing fraction, which may be due to the tapping of progressively volatile-depleted magma. The maximum proportion of hydrothermal steam in the fumaroles rose from about 25-35% in September 1980 to around 50-70% by October 1981. Fractional degassing of magmatic CO2 and sulfur also contributed to the chemical changes in the fumarole gases. The steady chemical changes indicate that replenishment of the magma system with undegassed magma was not significant between September 1980 and September 1981. Extrapolations of chemical trends suggest that fumarole gases emitted at the time of formation of the first dome in mid-June 1980 were more enriched in a magmatic volatile fraction and contained a minimum of 9% CO2. Calculations show H2S is the predominant sulfur species in Mount St. Helens magma below depths of 200 m. Rapid release of gases from magma below this depth is a plausible mechanism for producing the high H2S/SO2 observed in Mount St. Helens plumes during explosive eruptions. This study suggests that dacite-andesite volcanos may emit gases richer in CO2

  18. Fumarole emissions at Mount St. Helens volcano, June 1980 to October 1981: Degassing of a magma-hydrothermal system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerlach, Terrence M.; Casadevall, Thomas J.

    1986-05-01

    This study is an investigation of the chemical changes in the Mount St. Helens fumarole gases up to October 1981, the sources of the fumarole gases, and the stability of gas species in the shallow magma system. These problems are investigated by calculations of element compositions, thermodynamic equilibria, and magmatic volatile—hydrothermal steam mixing models. The fumarole gases are treated as mixtures of magmatic volatiles and hydrothermal steam formed by magma degassing and boiling of local waters in a dryout zone near conduit and dome magma. The magmatic volatile fraction is significant in fumaroles with temperatures in excess of the magma cracking-temperature (˜ 700°C) — i.e., the temperature below which cracking is induced by thermal stresses during cooling and solidification. Linear composition changes of the fumarole gases over time appear to be the result of a steady decline in the magmatic volatile mixing fraction, which may be due to the tapping of progressively volatile-depleted magma. The maximum proportion of hydrothermal steam in the fumaroles rose from about 25-35% in September 1980 to around 50-70% by October 1981. Fractional degassing of magmatic CO 2 and sulfur also contributed to the chemical changes in the fumarole gases. The steady chemical changes indicate that replenishment of the magma system with undegassed magma was not significant between September 1980 and September 1981. Extrapolations of chemical trends suggest that fumarole gases emitted at the time of formation of the first dome in mid-June 1980 were more enriched in a magmatic volatile fraction and contained a minimum of 9% CO 2. Calculations show H 2S is the predominant sulfur species in Mount St. Helens magma below depths of 200 m. Rapid release of gases from magma below this depth is a plausible mechanism for producing the high H 2S/SO 2 observed in Mount St. Helens plumes during explosive eruptions. This study suggests that dacite-andesite volcanos may emit gases richer

  19. Separating long-term deformation cycles and atmospheric signals at Mount St. Helens using PS-InSAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Welch, M.

    2015-12-01

    Since its eruption in 1980, Mount St. Helens has experienced multiple inflation-deflation cycles associated with dome building eruptions. During the most recent dome-building episode, which spanned 2004 to 2008, GPS recorded the transition from pre-eruptive inflation to co-eruptive deflation and a final transition back to inflation. Such observations provide important constraints on the timing and mechanics of cyclic magma recharge and extrusion. Currently, the subtle surface deformation signal at St Helens is monitored primarily by ground based geodetic techniques like GPS. Satellite-based InSAR has the potential to substantially augment these techniques by providing spatially continuous, precise measurements of surface displacements, and may also reveal other volcanic or surficial processes too localized to be detected by ground based methods. Traditional interferometry is challenging to apply to volcanoes in the Cascades. Widespread phase decorrelation caused by persistent snow cover and dense vegetation, combined with large, elevation dependent atmospheric phase delays, mask or make deformation signals difficult to detect. By applying StaMPS, a Persistent Scatterers (PS) technique, phase decorrelation is mitigated by utilizing only the pixels with the highest, statistically derived, signal to noise ratio. However, atmospheric water vapor, which delays the radar signal, remains problematic, particularly on the volcano edifice. To assess the bias imposed by the atmosphere, we perform a series of sensitivity tests using a suite of methods including several that rely on the linear or power-law correlation of phase delay to topography and knowledge of the spatial scale of the signal. We also apply methods that calculate wet and dry phase delay from atmospheric reanalysis datasets such as ERA-Interim provided by the ECMWF. SAR data from the ERS, Envisat, and ALOS satellites, along with newer datasets, are processed with these tools to create a time series spanning

  20. Crystallization of microlites during magma ascent: the fluid mechanics of 1980 1986 eruptions at Mount St Helens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geschwind, C.-H.; Rutherford, Malcolm J.

    1995-11-01

    Eruptions of Mount St Helens (Washington, USA) decreased in intensity and explosivity after the main May 18, 1980 eruption. As the post-May 18 eruptions progressed, albitic plagioclase microlites began to appear in the matrix glass, although the bulk composition of erupted products, the phenocryst compositions and magmatic temperatures remained fairly constant. Equilibrium experiments on a Mount St Helens white pumice show that at 160 MPa water pressure and 900°C, conditions deduced for the 8 km deep magma storage zone, the stable plagioclase is An47. The microlites in the natural samples, which are more albitic, had to grow at lower water pressures during ascent. Isothermal decompression experiments reported here demonstrate that a decrease in water pressure from 160 to 2 MPa over four to eight days is capable of producing the albitic groundmass plagioclase and evolved melt compositions observed in post-May 18 1980 dacites. Because groundmass crystallization occurs over a period of days during and after decreases in pressure, microlite crystallization in the Mount St Helens dacites must have occurred during the ascent of each magma batch from a deep reservoir rather than continuously in a shallow holding chamber. This is consistent with data on the kinetics of amphibole breakdown, which require that a significant portion of magma vented in each eruption ascended from a depth of at least 6.5 km (˜160 MPa water pressure) in a matter of days. The size and shape of the microlite population have not been studied because of the small size of the experimental samples; it is possible that the texture continues to mature long after chemical equilibrium is approached. As the temperature, composition, crystal content and water content of magma in the deep reservoir remained approximately constant from May 1980 to at least March 1982, the spectacular decrease in eruption intensity during this period cannot be attributed to changes in viscosity or density of the magma

  1. Remote camera observations of lava dome growth at Mount St. Helens, Washington, October 2004 to February 2006: Chapter 11 in A volcano rekindled: the renewed eruption of Mount St. Helens, 2004-2006

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Poland, Michael P.; Dzurisin, Daniel; LaHusen, Richard G.; Major, John J.; Lapcewich, Dennis; Endo, Elliot T.; Gooding, Daniel J.; Schilling, Steve P.; Janda, Christine G.; Sherrod, David R.; Scott, William E.; Stauffer, Peter H.

    2008-01-01

    Images from a Web-based camera (Webcam) located 8 km north of Mount St. Helens and a network of remote, telemetered digital cameras were used to observe eruptive activity at the volcano between October 2004 and February 2006. The cameras offered the advantages of low cost, low power, flexibility in deployment, and high spatial and temporal resolution. Images obtained from the cameras provided important insights into several aspects of dome extrusion, including rockfalls, lava extrusion rates, and explosive activity. Images from the remote, telemetered digital cameras were assembled into time-lapse animations of dome extrusion that supported monitoring, research, and outreach efforts. The wide-ranging utility of remote camera imagery should motivate additional work, especially to develop the three-dimensional quantitative capabilities of terrestrial camera networks.

  2. From dome to dust: shallow crystallization and fragmentation of conduit magma during the 2004-2006 dome extrusion of Mount St. Helens, Washington: Chapter 19 in A volcano rekindled: the renewed eruption of Mount St. Helens, 2004-2006

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cashman, Katharine V.; Thornber, Carl R.; Pallister, John S.; Sherrod, David R.; Scott, William E.; Stauffer, Peter H.

    2008-01-01

    Comparison of eruptive conditions during the 2004-6 activity at Mount St. Helens with those of other spine-forming eruptions suggests that magma ascent rates of about 10-4 m/s or less allow sufficient degassing and crystallization within the conduit to form large volcanic spines of intermediate composition (andesite to dacite). Solidification deep within the conduit, in turn, requires transport of the solid plug over long distances (hundreds of meters); resultant large strains are responsible for extensive brittle breakage and development of thick gouge zones. Moreover, similarities between gouge textures and those of ash emitted by explosions from spine margins indicate that fault gouge is the origin for the ash. As the comminution and generation of ash-sized particles was clearly a multistep process, this observation suggests that fragmentation preceded, rather than accompanied, these explosions.

  3. Petrology of the 2004-2006 Mount St. Helens lava dome -- implications for magmatic plumbing and eruption triggering: Chapter 30 in A volcano rekindled: the renewed eruption of Mount St. Helens, 2004-2006

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pallister, John S.; Thornber, Carl R.; Cashman, Katharine V.; Clynne, Michael A.; Lowers, Heather; Mandeville, Charles W.; Brownfield, Isabelle K.; Meeker, Gregory P.; Sherrod, David R.; Scott, William E.; Stauffer, Peter H.

    2008-01-01

    The question of new versus residual magma has implications for the long-term eruptive behavior of Mount St. Helens, because arrival of a new batch of dacitic magma from the deep crust could herald the beginning of a new long-term cycle of eruptive activity. It is also important to our understanding of what triggered the eruption and its future course. Two hypotheses for triggering are considered: (1) top-down fracturing related to the shallow groundwater system and (2) an increase in reservoir pressure brought about by recent magmatic replenishment. With respect to the future course of the eruption, similarities between textures and character of eruption of the 2004-6 dome and the long-duration (greater than 100 years) pre-1980 summit dome, along with the low eruptive rate of the current eruption, suggest that the eruption could continue sluggishly or intermittently for years to come.

  4. Extrusion rate of the Mount St. Helens lava dome estimated from terrestrial imagery, November 2004-December 2005: Chapter 12 in A volcano rekindled: the renewed eruption of Mount St. Helens, 2004-2006

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Major, Jon J.; Kingsbury, Cole G.; Poland, Michael P.; LaHusen, Richard G.; Sherrod, David R.; Scott, William E.; Stauffer, Peter H.

    2008-01-01

    Oblique, terrestrial imagery from a single, fixed-position camera was used to estimate linear extrusion rates during sustained exogenous growth of the Mount St. Helens lava dome from November 2004 through December 2005. During that 14-month period, extrusion rates declined logarithmically from about 8-10 m/d to about 2 m/d. The overall ebbing of effusive output was punctuated, however, by episodes of fluctuating extrusion rates that varied on scales of days to weeks. The overall decline of effusive output and finer scale rate fluctuations correlated approximately with trends in seismicity and deformation. Those correlations portray an extrusion that underwent episodic, broad-scale stick-slip behavior superposed on the finer scale, smaller magnitude stick-slip behavior that has been hypothesized by other researchers to correlate with repetitive, nearly periodic shallow earthquakes.

  5. Mass Intrusion at Mount St. Helens (WA) Between 2010 and 2014 from Temporal Gravity Variations Mass Intrusion at Mount St. Helens (WA) Between 2010 and 2014 from Temporal Gravity Variations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Battaglia, M.; Lisowski, M.; Dzurisin, D.; Poland, M. P.

    2014-12-01

    Repeated high-precision gravity measurements made at Mount St. Helens (WA) have revealed systematic temporal variations in the gravity field several years after the 2004-2008 dome-building eruption. Changes in gravity with respect to a stable reference station 36 km NW of the volcano were measured at 10 sites in the summit region and at 4 sites far afield (10 to 36 km) from the summit in August 2010 and August 2012. After removing the gravity signal associated with changes in mass of the crater glacier and the local (perched) hydrothermal aquifer, the gravity field observed at sites near the volcano's summit significantly increased with respect to sites far from the summit (maximum change 146 ±7 μgal). The pattern of gravity increase is radially symmetrical, with a half-width around 3 km and a point of maximum change centered 1.5 km NW of the 2004-2008 lava dome. Inversion of residual gravity data using the same source geometry, depth and location inferred from geodetic data (a spheroidal source centered 7.5 km beneath the 2004-2008 dome) indicates a mass increase of about 1012 kg. For a reasonable magma density (~2250 kg/m3), the volume of magma intrusion beneath the summit region inferred from gravity exceeds the volume inferred from inversion of geodetic data, suggesting that magma compressibility and other processes are important aspects of magma storage at Mount St. Helens. A third survey will be completed in August 2014, and we will present results of those measurements in the context of the 2010-2012 gravity changes.

  6. Explosive tephra emissions of Mount St. Helens, 1989-1991: the violent escape of magmatic gas following storms?

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mastin, L.G.

    1994-01-01

    From 24 August 1989 until 18 June 1991, Mount St. Helens produced at least 28 shallow, explosion-like seismic events with signatures similar to those produced by gas explosions on the dome during the mid 1980s. At least six were accompanied by violent emission of non-juvenile tephra, ejection of blocks of rock nearly 1 km from the vent, and avalanching of debris off the north side of the dome. All six confirmed emissions and most (although not all) other seismic events took place hours to days after storms. The short delay between storms and emissions suggests that the events that follow storms originate at very shallow depth, probably within the dome itself. Although the exact causal mechanism is not known, it is speculated that slope instability or accelerated growth of cooling fractures following storms may have released gas trapped within or at the base of the dome. -from Author

  7. Rates and processes of channel development and recovery following the 1980 eruption of Mount St. Helens, Washington

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Meyer, D.F.; Martinson, H.A.

    1989-01-01

    Stream channel development in response to the eruption of Mount St. Helens on 18 May 1980, resulted in some of the largest sediment yields documented anywhere on earth. Development of new channels on the 2.7 km3 debris-avalanche deposit in the North Fork Toutle River caused net erosion of as much as 1.3 X 105 t km-2 annually. The principal effect of the blast on channels throughout the 550 km2 devastated area was the subsequent rapid delivery of sand- and silt-size sediment eroded from hillslopes. Since 1984, instability and sedimentation in lahar and blast-affected channels have been within the range of pre-1980 levels. -from Authors

  8. Human radiation studies: Remembering the early years. Oral history of Oncologist Helen Vodopick, M.D., December 28, 1994

    SciTech Connect

    1995-08-01

    This report is a transcript of an interview with Dr. Helen Vodopick by representatives of the US DOE Office of Human Radiation Experiments. Dr. Vodopick was chosen for this interview because of her involvement with the Oak Ridge Institute of Nuclear Studies (ORINS) and Oak Ridge Associated Universities (ORAU) experimental cancer-therapy program involving total-body irradiation. After a short biographical sketch Dr. Vodopick relates her remembrances of the Medium-Exposure-Rate Total Body Irradiator (METBI), ORINS radioisotope tracer studies, treatment of cancer patients with the METBI, radiation treatment for leukemia patients, bone marrow treatment of leukemia, the Low-Exposure-Rate Total Body Irradiation (LETBI), treatment of radiation accident victims at ORAU, research with radioactive phosphorus and sulfur, and public opinion issues.

  9. The mount st. Helens volcanic eruption of 18 may 1980: large short-term surface temperature effects.

    PubMed

    Robock, A; Mass, C

    1982-05-07

    The surface temperature effects of the 18 May 1980 eruption of Mount St. Helens Volcano were examinedfor 1 day immediately after the eruption; 24-hour temperature differences and Model Output Statistics errors as well as the detailed temporal evolution of surface temperature at selected stations were used. During the daytime hours immediately after the eruption, the temperature was suppressed by the volcanic plume by as much as 8 degrees C. That night, low-level volcanic dust produced temperature enhancements of up to 8 degrees C. These effects quickly diminished the next day as the volcanic dust cloud dissipated and moved toward the east. The net local effect of the eruption appears to be warming, in contrast to cooling which might be expected over climatic time scales.

  10. Growth of cells in culture treated with the soluble component of volcanic ash from Mount St. Helens.

    PubMed

    Hosick, H L; Carrington, C A; Angello, J C; Zamora, P O

    1982-12-01

    Volcanic ash was collected immediately after the eruption of Mount St. Helens on May 18, 1980. This ash was extracted with water. The elemental composition of the extracted portion was determined by atomic absorption spectrometry. The aqueous extract was applied at high concentrations (up to 37.5 micrograms/ml) to non-confluent mixed cultures of mouse lung cells. Even after treatment for up to 10 days, cell number was typically unaffected by the ash extract. Cell viability was also unaltered, and no grossly observable changes were noted in the cells by light microscopy. We conclude that the water-soluble portion of the ash we tested does not markedly affect growth of the cells most at risk, those of the lung.

  11. Automated detection and location of microseismicity at Mount St. Helens with a large-N geophone array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansen, Steven M.; Schmandt, Brandon

    2015-09-01

    In the summer of 2014 a dense array of 904 geophones was deployed at Mount St. Helens along the road and trail system within 15 km distance of the summit crater. The array recorded continuous data for approximately 2 weeks and presents an unprecedented seismic observation of an active volcano. A reverse-time imaging method is applied to short-term-average over long-term-average time series data to automatically detect and locate microseismicity. These efforts resulted in an order of magnitude increase in earthquake detections over the normal monitoring operations of the Pacific Northwest Seismic Network. Earthquake locations resolve a narrow, ≤1 km wide, vertical lineament of seismicity which extends from the surface to 4 km depth directly beneath the summit crater. This feature is interpreted as a fracture network that acts as a conduit connecting an underlying magma chamber to the surface.

  12. Chemistry of thermal waters and mineralogy of the new deposits at Mount St. Helens: a preliminary report

    SciTech Connect

    Dethier, D.P.; Frank, D.; Peavear, D.R.

    1980-12-01

    After May 18, 1980 eruption of Mount St. Helens, Washington, interactions between the hot deposits and shallow ground water produced ephemeral phreatic eruptions and thermal ponds and streams. In early June water and sediment samples were collected from about 20 sites in the devastated zone to study the initial alteration of the new deposits, and the effects of the eruption on water chemistry. The levels of certain trace elements in thermal waters, and whether these mineralized waters were reaching the North Fork Toutle River in appreciable quantities were studied. Collection and analysis procedures, the mineralogy of the new deposits, and the chemistry of the thermal waters are discussed. Finally, the chemistry of water from different deposits is compared, alteration reactions suggested by the water chemistry, and the mineralogy of the deposits is discussed.

  13. Fluoride distribution and biological availability in the fallout from mount st. Helens, 18 to 21 may 1980.

    PubMed

    Taves, D R

    1980-12-19

    Concentrations of fluoride in the ash fallout in central Washington from the 18 May 1980 eruption of Mount St. Helens varied severalfold, but none are high enough to constitute any immediate hazard to animal life. The heaviest fallout (Moses Lake) contained 113 parts per million (ppm) of acid-labile fluoride, but of this only 11 ppm was water-soluble and 20 ppm was available to rats. The fluoride concentrations in the urine of cattle feeding for 4 days on hay contaminated with this ash were essentially normal. Samples of ash from other areas generally had higher concentrations of acid-labile fluoride but lower concentrations of water-soluble fluoride. The concentration of water-soluble fluoride was inversely correlated with the coarseness of the fallout.

  14. Development of a multidisciplinary plan for evaluation of the long-term health effects of the Mount St. Helens eruptions

    SciTech Connect

    Buist, A.S.; Martin, T.R.; Shore, J.H.; Butler, J.; Lybarger, J.A.

    1986-03-01

    The emphasis of this article is on the approach that was taken to evaluating the chronic or delayed effects of the volcanic eruptions of Mount St. Helens in 1980. This strategy has been very successful and may be useful as a model for addressing the possible health effects of other environmental hazards. The steps in this process were: 1) identification of the physical and physicochemical characteristics of the hazard; 2) formation of hypotheses about biologically plausible effects of the hazard on human health; and 3) development of a plan for evaluating the health effects and, were possible, for controlling or minimizing adverse health effects. The third step involved a multidisciplinary group that included public health officials, medical specialists, and research scientists, including a geologist.

  15. Fluoride distribution and biological availability in the fallout from Mount St. Helens, 18 to 21 May 1980

    SciTech Connect

    Taves, D.R.

    1980-12-19

    Concentrations of fluoride in the ash fallout in central Washington from the 18 May 1980 eruption of Mount St. Helens varied severalfold, but none are high enough to constitute any immediate hazard to animal life. The heaviest fallout (Moses Lake) contained 113 parts per million (ppm) of acid-labile fluoride, but of this only 11 ppm was water-soluble and 20 ppm was available to rats. The fluoride concentrations in the urine of cattle feeding for 4 days on hay contaminated with this ash were essentially normal. Samples of ash from other areas generally had higher concentrations of acid-labile fluoride but lower concentrations of water-soluble fluoride. The concentrations of water-soluble fluoride was inversely correlated with the coarseness of the fallout. 8 references, 1 figure, 1 table.

  16. Ambient airborne-solids concentrations including volcanic ash at Hanford, Washington sampling sites subsequent to the Mount St. Helens eruption

    SciTech Connect

    Sehmel, G.A.

    1981-06-01

    A major eruption of Mount St. Helens, state of Washington, USA, occurred on May 18, 1980. The resulting volcanic ash plume was transported to the east. The Hanford area, northwest of Richland, Washington, was within the southern edge of the fallout plume. Airborne solid concentrations and airborne particle size distributions were measured at two sites in the Hanford area, a southern and northern site. During the initial sampling day (May 19), the average concentration for respirable particles, < 5.5-..mu..m diameter, was 1430-..mu..g/m/sup 3/ at the southern site; the total collection was 2610-..mu..g/m/sup 3/. The respirable content of the total airborne solids was 55%. At both sites average airborne solid concentrations decreased to 10- to 20-..mu..g/m/sup 3/ in December.

  17. Volcano dome dynamics at Mount St. Helens: Deformation and intermittent subsidence monitored by seismicity and camera imagery pixel offsets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salzer, Jacqueline T.; Thelen, Weston A.; James, Mike R.; Walter, Thomas R.; Moran, Seth; Denlinger, Roger

    2016-11-01

    The surface deformation field measured at volcanic domes provides insights into the effects of magmatic processes, gravity- and gas-driven processes, and the development and distribution of internal dome structures. Here we study short-term dome deformation associated with earthquakes at Mount St. Helens, recorded by a permanent optical camera and seismic monitoring network. We use Digital Image Correlation (DIC) to compute the displacement field between successive images and compare the results to the occurrence and characteristics of seismic events during a 6 week period of dome growth in 2006. The results reveal that dome growth at Mount St. Helens was repeatedly interrupted by short-term meter-scale downward displacements at the dome surface, which were associated in time with low-frequency, large-magnitude seismic events followed by a tremor-like signal. The tremor was only recorded by the seismic stations closest to the dome. We find a correlation between the magnitudes of the camera-derived displacements and the spectral amplitudes of the associated tremor. We use the DIC results from two cameras and a high-resolution topographic model to derive full 3-D displacement maps, which reveals internal dome structures and the effect of the seismic activity on daily surface velocities. We postulate that the tremor is recording the gravity-driven response of the upper dome due to mechanical collapse or depressurization and fault-controlled slumping. Our results highlight the different scales and structural expressions during growth and disintegration of lava domes and the relationships between seismic and deformation signals.

  18. Tomographic Imaging of the Magmatic System at Mount St. Helens with the iMUSH Broadband Array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ulberg, C. W.; Creager, K. C.; Levander, A.; Kiser, E.; Moran, S. C.; Abers, G. A.; Schmandt, B.; Vidale, J. E.; Houston, H.; Denlinger, R. P.; Williams, M. C. B.

    2015-12-01

    We deployed 70 broadband seismometers in the summer of 2014 to image the velocity structure beneath Mount St. Helens (MSH), Washington, USA as part of a collaborative project called imaging Magma Under St. Helens (iMUSH). Our goal is to illuminate the MSH magmatic system, using active- and passive-source seismology, magnetotellurics and petrology. Details of the velocity structure, coupled with other geophysical and geologic data, can help constrain the geometry and physical state of any bodies of melt beneath the volcano. The broadband array has a diameter of ~100 km centered on MSH with an average station spacing of 10 km, and will remain deployed through summer 2016. It is augmented by dozens of permanent stations in the area. We determine P-wave arrival times using Antelope software and incorporate permanent network picks for the region. We use the program struct3DP to invert travel times to obtain a 3-D seismic velocity model and relocate hypocenters, computing travel times using a 3-D eikonal-equation solver. There were more than 500 useable local events during the first year of iMUSH broadband recording, which to date have provided 5000 arrival times, with the number growing rapidly. The local events include 23 active shots that were set off in the summer of 2014 as part of the iMUSH experiment, which recorded with good signal-to-noise ratios across the entire array. The absolute P times will be augmented by differential times calculated by cross-correlation between observations at the same station for nearby event pairs. These will be incorporated into our model using double-difference tomography. We anticipate that our 3D velocity model will provide the highest resolution image of volcanic plumbing at MSH thus far. Our model interpretation will incorporate results from active-source and ambient noise tomography, receiver functions, magnetotellurics, and petrology.

  19. Seismic scattering and absorption mapping of debris flows, feeding paths, and tectonic units at Mount St. Helens volcano

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Siena, L.; Calvet, M.; Watson, K. J.; Jonkers, A. R. T.; Thomas, C.

    2016-05-01

    Frequency-dependent peak-delay times and coda quality factors have been used jointly to separate seismic absorption from scattering quantitatively in Earth media at regional and continental scale; to this end, we measure and map these two quantities at Mount St. Helens volcano. The results show that we can locate and characterize volcanic and geological structures using their unique contribution to seismic attenuation. At 3 Hz a single high-scattering and high-absorption anomaly outlines the debris flows that followed the 1980 explosive eruption, as deduced by comparison with remote sensing imagery. The flows overlay a NNW-SSE interface, separating rocks of significant varying properties down to 2-4 km, and coinciding with the St. Helens Seismic Zone. High-scattering and high-absorption anomalies corresponding to known locations of magma emplacement follow this signature under the volcano, showing the important interconnections between its feeding systems and the regional tectonic boundaries. With frequency increasing from 6 to 18 Hz the NNW-SSE tectonic/feeding trends rotate around an axis centered on the volcano in the direction of the regional-scale magmatic arc (SW-NE). While the aseismic high-scattering region WSW of the volcano shows no evidence of high absorption, the regions of highest-scattering and absorption are consistently located at all frequencies under either the eastern or the south-eastern flank of the volcanic edifice. From the comparison with the available geological and geophysical information we infer that these anomalies mark both the location and the trend of the main feeding systems at depths greater than 4 km.

  20. Spatial and temporal patterns of dome extrusion during the 2004-2008 eruption of Mount St. Helens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salzer, J. T.; Denlinger, R. P.; Diefenbach, A. K.; Walter, T. R.

    2014-12-01

    Extensive efforts by the USGS Cascades Volcano Observatory in response to the 2004-2008 dome building eruption at Mount St. Helens recorded the extrusion of seven dacite spines. Efforts included a network of time-lapse cameras. Published studies of decimated data from these cameras show strong correlations between (long-term) extrusion velocities determined from the camera imagery and ancillary geophysical data, such as dome tilt and RSAM seismicity. However, more detailed analysis of these data should provide better constraints on physical processes behind dome extrusion. Here we apply modern computer vision techniques to explore the spatiotemporal variability and interactions occurring during spine extrusion and dome growth. Digital Image Correlation (DIC) delineates the deformation field in a series of images at sub-pixel level, and quantifies dome, talus and glacier deformation at unprecedented resolution, revealing spatiotemporal variability of the strain field on the time scale of hours. We identify sharp boundaries between the vertically extruding spine, laterally displaced material, and downward-creeping talus. The spine growth at Mount St. Helens appears locally constrained and structurally separated into distinct segments. The velocities of different dome segments are generally correlated, but displacement patterns of the talus are more complex. We identify short term fluctuations with periods of hours to days superimposed on longer term fluctuations having periods of several weeks. The short term episodes of high displacement rates are often associated with strongly degassing plumes observed in the camera imagery. Over longer periods (days to weeks), extrusion rates form a sinusoidal fluctuating pattern, marked by sharp increases and gradual decreases in velocity. These observations substantiate the correlations with seismic and geodetic data shown in previous studies, but more closely constrain the velocity fluctuations of each spine. These fluctuations

  1. Seismic scattering and absorption mapping of debris flows, feeding paths, and tectonic units at Mount St. Helens volcano

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Siena, Luca; Calvet, Marie; Watson, Keira J.; Jonkers, Art R. D.; Thomas, Christine

    2016-04-01

    Frequency-dependent peak-delay times and coda quality factors have been used jointly to separate seismic absorption from scattering quantitatively in Earth media at regional and lithospheric scale; to this end, we measure and map these two quantities at Mount St. Helens volcano. The results show that we can locate and characterise volcanic and geological structures using their unique contribution to seismic attenuation. At 3 Hz a single high-scattering and high-absorption anomaly outlines the debris flows that followed the 1980 explosive eruption, as deduced by comparison with remote sensing imagery. The flows overlay a NNW-SSE interface, separating rocks of significant varying properties down to 2-4 km, and coinciding with the Saint Helens Seismic Zone. High-scattering and high-absorption anomalies corresponding to known locations of magma emplacement follow this signature under the volcano, showing the important interconnections between its feeding systems and the regional tectonic boundaries. With frequency increasing from 6 to 18 Hz the NNW-SSE tectonic/feeding trends rotate around an axis centered on the volcano in the direction of the regional-scale magmatic arc (SW-NE). While the aseismic high-scattering region WSW of the volcano shows no evidence of high absorption, the regions of highest-scattering and absorption are consistently located at all frequencies under either the eastern or the south-eastern flank of the volcanic edifice. From the comparison with the available geological and geophysical information we infer that these anomalies mark both the location and the trend of the main feeding systems at depths greater than 4 km.

  2. Doing more with short period data: Determining magnitudes from clipped and over-run seismic data at Mount St. Helens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wellik, John J., II

    How can we calculate earthquake magnitudes when the signal is clipped and over-run? When a volcano is very active, the seismic record may saturate (i.e., the full amplitude of the signal is not recorded) or be over-run (i.e., the end of one event is covered by the start of a new event). The duration, and sometimes the amplitude, of an earthquake signal are necessary for determining event magnitudes; thus, it may be impossible to calculate earthquake magnitudes when a volcano is very active. This problem is most likely to occur at volcanoes with limited networks of short period seismometers. This study outlines two methods for calculating earthquake magnitudes when events are clipped and over-run. The first method entails modeling the shape of earthquake codas as a power law function and extrapolating duration from the decay of the function. The second method draws relations between clipped duration (i.e., the length of time a signal is clipped) and the full duration. These methods allow for magnitudes to be determined within 0.2 to 0.4 units of magnitude. This error is within the range of analyst hand-picks and is within the acceptable limits of uncertainty when quickly quantifying volcanic energy release during volcanic crises. Most importantly, these estimates can be made when data are clipped or over-run. These methods were developed with data from the initial stages of the 2004-2008 eruption at Mount St. Helens. Mount St. Helens is a well-studied volcano with many instruments placed at varying distances from the vent. This fact makes the 2004-2008 eruption a good place to calibrate and refine methodologies that can be applied to volcanoes with limited networks.

  3. Peak flow responses to landscape disturbances caused by the cataclysmic 1980 eruption of Mount St. Helens, Washington

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Major, Jon J.; Mark, Linda E.

    2006-01-01

    Years of discharge measurements that precede and follow the cataclysmic 1980 eruption of Mount St. Helens, Washington, provide an exceptional opportunity to examine the responses of peak flows to abrupt, widespread, devastating landscape disturbance. Multiple basins surrounding Mount St. Helens (300–1300 km2 drainage areas) were variously disturbed by: (1) a debris avalanche that buried 60 km2 of valley; (2) a lateral volcanic blast and associated pyroclastic flow that destroyed 550 km2 of mature forest and blanketed the landscape with silt-capped lithic tephra; (3) debris flows that reamed riparian corridors and deposited tens to hundreds of centimeters of gravelly sand on valley floors; and (4) a Plinian tephra fall that blanketed areas proximal to the volcano with up to tens of centimeters of pumiceous silt, sand, and gravel. The spatially complex disturbances produced a variety of potentially compensating effects that interacted with and influenced hydrological responses. Changes to water transfer on hillslopes and to flow storage and routing along channels both enhanced and retarded runoff. Rapid post-eruption modifications of hillslope surface textures, adjustments of channel networks, and vegetation recovery, in conjunction with the complex nature of the eruptive impacts and strong seasonal variability in regional climate hindered a consistent or persistent shift in peak discharges. Overall, we detected a short-lived (5–10 yr) increase in the magnitudes of autumn and winter peak flows. In general, peak flows were larger, and moderate to large flows (>Q2 yr) were more substantively affected than predicted by early modeling efforts. Proportional increases in the magnitudes of both small and large flows in basins subject to severe channel disturbances, but not in basins subject solely to hillslope disturbances, suggest that eruption-induced modifications to flow efficiency along alluvial channels that have very mobile beds differentially affected flows of

  4. Volcanic Gas Measurements During the 2004 Unrest at Mount St. Helens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGee, K. A.; Gerlach, T. M.; Doukas, M. P.; Sutton, A. J.

    2004-12-01

    Volcanic gas observations during the 2004 unrest at Mount St. Helens began with helicopter measurements on September 27 and shifted to fixed-wing aircraft measurements on October 7. Helicopter measurements were done by downwind plume profiling at the crater rim and crater breach, orbiting the dome and cross traversing the top of the dome. Fixed-wing aircraft measurements consisted of profiling the downwind plume as it spilled over the crater rim. Target gases included CO2, SO2, and H2S measured by LI-COR, COSPEC and Interscan analyzers. These measurements defined three periods of volcanic degassing: (a) an initial period of negligible volcanic degassing characterized by scrubbing or sealing-in of all gases; (b) an intermediate period of wet volcanic degassing when gas scrubbing dominated volcanic degassing; and (c) a period of dry volcanic degassing when volcanic degassing exceeded gas scrubbing. Measurements during the September 27-30 period of negligible volcanic degassing showed little or no CO2 above atmospheric levels; SO2 and H2S were not detected. The absence of these gases implies fairly complete gas scrubbing at high water to gas mass ratios (greater than 100) or confinement of the gases by post-1986 sealing of gas transport channel ways. Scrubbing seems likely to have dominated sealing; the high rates of concurrent seismicity and deformation favored reestablishment of transport along fractures, and the unrest followed a period with an unusually large potential for groundwater recharge. No August-September interval since the cessation of dome-building eruptions in 1986 has had heavier rainfall than in 2004, and growth of the crater glacier since 1986 has increased the amount of water available for recharge in late summer. Measurements during the period of wet volcanic degassing that began on October 1 after the first steam and ash eruption showed an increase in the frequency and size of CO2 peaks together with the increasingly common detection of H2S

  5. Evolution of Channels Draining Mount St. Helens: Linking Non-Linear and Rapid, Threshold Responses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simon, A.

    2010-12-01

    The catastrophic eruption of Mount St. Helens buried the valley of the North Fork Toutle River (NFT) to a depth of up to 140 m. Initial integration of a new drainage network took place episodically by the “filling and spilling” (from precipitation and seepage) of depressions formed during emplacement of the debris avalanche deposit. Channel incision to depths of 20-30 m occurred in the debris avalanche and extensive pyroclastic flow deposits, and headward migration of the channel network followed, with complete integration taking place within 2.5 years. Downstream reaches were converted from gravel-cobble streams with step-pool sequences to smoothed, infilled channels dominated by sand-sized materials. Subsequent channel evolution was dominated by channel widening with the ratio of changes in channel width to changes in channel depth ranging from about 60 to 100. Widening resulted in significant adjustment of hydraulic variables that control sediment-transport rates. For a given discharge over time, flow depths were reduced, relative roughness increased and flow velocity and boundary shear stress decreased non-linearly. These changes, in combination with coarsening of the channel bed with time resulted in systematically reduced rates of degradation (in upstream reaches), aggradation (in downstream reaches) and sediment-transport rates through much of the 1990s. Vertical adjustments were, therefore, easy to characterize with non-linear decay functions with bed-elevation attenuating with time. An empirical model of bed-level response was then created by plotting the total dimensionless change in elevation against river kilometer for both initial and secondary vertical adjustments. High magnitude events generated from the generated from upper part of the mountain, however, can cause rapid (threshold) morphologic changes. For example, a rain-on-snow event in November 2006 caused up to 9 m of incision along a 6.5 km reach of Loowit Creek and the upper NFT. The event

  6. Reconstructing the 1980-86 Mount St. Helens Magma Reservoir Using Melt Inclusions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blundy, J.; Cashman, K.

    2006-12-01

    In an attempt to reconstruct conditions in the magma body that fuelled the 1980-86 eruption of Mount St. Helens we have analysed 187 rhyolitic melt inclusions and 25 groundmass glasses for major, minor and trace elements, CO2 and H2O, using a combination of electron- and ion-microprobes. Major and trace element concentrations of melt inclusions lie at the high-SiO2 end of the array defined by MSH whole- rocks over the past 40 ka. For several major and trace elements, the glasses define a trend that is oblique to the whole-rock trend, indicating that different mineral assemblages were responsible for the two trends. We interpret the whole-rock trends as the result of fractional crystallisation of hydrous basaltic parents in the lower crust, while the glass trends were generated by closed-system crystallisation of the phenocryst and microlite mineral assemblages at low pressures. Dissolved H2O in the melt inclusions ranges from 0 to 6.7 wt%, with the highest values from the Plinian phase of May 18, 1980. H2O contents decrease, and incompatible trace elements increase, with increasing SiO2, indicative of decompression-driven crystallisation. CO2 contents of bubble-free inclusions indicate that XH2O in the vapour phase was in the range 0.8 to 0.95, irrespective of H2O content, suggestive of closed system degassing with a high bubble fraction. The volatile contents of the melt inclusions have been used to calculate trapping pressures. These are greatest for the Plinian magma, which shows a range from 180 to 320 MPa. Lower trapping pressures, down to a few MPa, are recorded by samples of the pre-Plinian cryptodome, and all post-May 18th magmas. Elevated contents of Li in melt inclusions from the cryptodome and post-May 18 samples are consistent with upward transport of Li in a magmatic vapour phase. Li enrichment attains its maximum extent at a pressure of ~180 MPa, which we ascribe to condensation of a single vapour phase to H2O-rich gas and dense Li-rich brine at lower

  7. Modeling deformation associated with the 2004-2008 dome-building eruption of Mount St. Helens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lisowski, M.; Battaglia, M.

    2011-12-01

    We estimate deformation sources active during and after the 2004-2008 dome-building eruption of Mount St. Helens (MSH) by inverting campaign and continuous GPS (CGPS) measured deformation between 2000 and 2011. All data are corrected for background deformation using a tectonic model that includes block rotation and uniform strain accumulation. The campaign GPS surveys characterize the deformation over a large area, and the CGPS data allow estimates of time-dependent changes in the rate of deformation. Only one CGPS station, JRO1, was operating near MSH prior to the start of unrest on September 23, 2004. Most other CGPS stations, installed by the Plate Boundary Observatory and Cascade Volcano Observatory, were operating by mid-October, 2004. The inward displacement of JRO1 started with the seismic unrest on September 23, 2004, and continued at a rate of 0.5 mm/day until the last phreatic explosion on October 5, 2004 (note there was another explosion in March 2005). The deformation then decayed exponentially until activity ceased in January, 2008. The rate of decay was estimated using a number of clean CGPS time series, and then it was fixed to estimate amplitudes for all CGPS station displacements. The inward and downward movements (deflation) observed at all stations during the eruption (2004-2008) were best-fit by a prolate spheroid with geometric aspect ratio 0.19 ± 0.6, a depth of 7.4 ± 1.7 km, and a cavity volume decrease of 0.028 ± 0.005 cubic km. This source is practically vertical (dip angle: 84 ± 5; strike angle 298 ± 84) and is located beneath the dome. All errors are 95% bounds and have been estimated using jackknife. The post-eruption deformation (2008 - present) is characterized by deflation in the near field (within 2 km from the dome) and inflation in the far field. The near-field deflation signal is best fit by a very shallow sill-like source (~0.18 ± 0.05 km below the crater floor) with a radius of 0.5 ± 0.3 km and a cavity volume decrease of

  8. Effects of the 1980 eruption of Mount St. Helens on the limnological characteristics of selected lakes in western Washington. Water resources investigations

    SciTech Connect

    Embrey, S.S.; Dion, N.P.

    1988-01-01

    The 1980 eruption of Mount St. Helens, Washington, afforded an opportunity to study its physical, chemical, and biological effects on lakes near the volcano and to describe two newly created lakes. From June 1980 to August 1982, water samples were collected from four lakes in the blast zone and two outside the blast zone, as well as from the two newly created lakes. Concentrations of chemical constituents were inversely related to the distance of a lake from the volcano. The recovery of physical, chemical, and biological characteristics of the lakes will depend on stabilization of the volcano and lake watersheds, dilution and water-exchange rates, and biological processes within each lake. Excluding Spirit Lake from consideration, it was estimated from the study that St. Helens Lake would be the slowest of the study lakes to recover, and Venus Lake would be the fastest.

  9. Long-term reactivity of lung and mediastinal lymph nodes following intratracheal instillation of sandy loam soil or Mount St. Helens volcanic ash

    SciTech Connect

    Sanders, C.L.; Rhoads, K.; Mahaffey, J.A.

    1983-01-01

    The effects of Ritzville sandy loam soil and Mount St. Helens volcanic ash particles on the lung and mediastinal lymph nodes of Fischer rats were studied about 400 days after intratracheal instillation. A total of 22 or 77 mg of soil or ash was given in two or seven equally divided, consecutive, weekly intervals as a suspension in 0.5 ml saline. Significantly elevated levels of lipid-phosphorus and protein were found in lung lavages of rats given ash compared to those given soil. An enhanced histological degree of granulomatous reactivity, lipoproteinosis, fibrosis, and bronchiolar hyperplasia was seen in ash-exposed rats as compared to soil-exposed rats. Mediastinal lymph nodes of ash-exposed rats were 8-18 times larger than those of soil-exposed rats due to abundant cellular microgranuloma formation and early fibrosis. Mount St. Helens volcanic ash is apparently more biologically reactive than soil particles commonly found in eastern Washington.

  10. Long-term reactivity of lung and mediastinal lymph nodes following intratracheal instillation of sandy loam soil or Mount St. Helens volcanic ash.

    PubMed

    Sanders, C L; Rhoads, K; Mahaffey, J A

    1983-10-01

    The effects of Ritzville sandy loam soil and Mount St. Helens volcanic ash particles on the lung and mediastinal lymph nodes of Fischer rats were studied about 400 days after intratracheal instillation. A total of 22 or 77 mg of soil or ash was given in two or seven equally divided, consecutive, weekly intervals as a suspension in 0.5 ml saline. Significantly elevated levels of lipid-phosphorus and protein were found in lung lavages of rats given ash compared to those given soil. An enhanced histological degree of granulomatous reactivity, lipoproteinosis, fibrosis, and bronchiolar hyperplasia was seen in ash-exposed rats as compared to soil-exposed rats. Mediastinal lymph nodes of ash-exposed rats were 8-18 times larger than those of soil-exposed rats due to abundant cellular microgranuloma formation and early fibrosis. Mount St. Helens volcanic ash is apparently more biologically reactive than soil particles commonly found in eastern Washington.

  11. Observations of the eruptions of July 22 and August 7, 1980, at Mount St. Helens, Washington

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hoblitt, Richard P.

    1986-01-01

    The explosive eruptions of July 22 and August 7, 1980, at Mount St. Helens, Wash., both included multiple eruptive pulses. The beginnings of three of the pulses-two on July 22 and one on August 7-were witnessed and photographed. Each of these three began with a fountain of gases and pyroclasts that collapsed around the vent and generated a pyroclastic density flow. Significant vertical-eruption columns developed only after the density flows were generated. This behavior is attributable to either an increase in the gas content of the eruption jet or a decrease in vent radius with time. An increase in the gas content may have occurred as the vent was cleared (by expulsion of a plug of pyroclasts) or as the eruption began to tap deeper, gas-rich magma after first expelling the upper, gas-depleted part of the magma body. An effective decrease of the vent radius with time may have occurred as the eruption originated from progressively deeper levels in the vent. All of these processes-vent clearing; tapping of deeper, gas-rich magma; and effective decrease in vent radius-probably operated to some extent. A 'relief-valve' mechanism is proposed here to account for the occurrence of multiple eruptive pulses. This mechanism requires that the conduit above the magma body be filled with a bed of pyroclasts, and that the vesiculation rate in the magma body be inadequate to sustain continuous eruption. During a repose interval, vesiculation of the magma body would cause gas to flow upward through the bed of pyroclasts. If the rate at which the magma produced gas exceeded the rate at which gas escaped to the atmosphere, the vertical pressure difference across the bed of pyroclastic debris would increase, as would the gas-flow rate. Eventually a gas-flow rate would be achieved that would suddenly diminish the ability of the bed to maintain a pressure difference between the magma body and the atmosphere. The bed of pyroclasts would then be expelled (that is, the relief valve would

  12. Using amphibole phenocrysts to track vapor transfer during magma crystallization and transport: An example from Mount St. Helens, Washington

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rowe, M.C.; Kent, A.J.R.; Thornber, C.R.

    2008-01-01

    In order to evaluate and further constrain models for volatile movement and vapor enrichment of magma stored at shallow levels, amphibole phenocrysts from 2004-2005 Mount St. Helens dacite were analyzed for major and selected trace elements (Li, Cu, Zn, Mn, and REE) and Li isotopes. Several recent studies have examined fluid-mobile trace element abundances in phencryst phases and melt inclusions as a means of tracking volatile movement within subvolcanic magmatic systems, and high Li contents in plagioclase phenocrysts from 1980 and 2004 Mount St. Helens dacites have been interpreted as evidence that shallow magma was fluxed by a Li-bearing vapor phase prior to eruption. In amphibole phenocrysts, Zn and Mn behave compatibly, correlating to FeO* and Al2O3, and show no systematic change with time. In contrast, Li and Cu abundances in amphibole vary by up to 3 orders of magnitude (7.6-1140????g/g and 1.7 to 94????g/g, respectively), and do not generally correlate with either major or trace elements. However, they do correlate moderately well (R2 = 0.54, >> 95% confidence) with each other and show systematic temporal variations that are opposite to those observed for plagioclase, precluding a simple 1-step diffusion model for Li enrichment. We propose a Diffusion-Crystallization Multi-Stage (DCMS) model to explain the temporal variations and co-variations of Li and Cu. In early erupted dacite (October-December 2004) profiles of Li isotopes in conjunction with measured 7Li intensities and core-to-rim increases in Li concentration are characteristic of Li diffusion into the amphiboles, consistent with prior models of plagioclase enrichment. In amphiboles from 2005 dacite, average Li and Cu concentrations are high (??? 260-660????g/g and ??? 29-45????g/g, respectively) and in contrast to amphiboles from earlier-erupted dacite, correlate weakly with Al2O3??wt.%. Amphibole Al2O3 concentrations are an indicator of pressure, with high-Al amphiboles crystallizing at higher

  13. Volcano dome dynamics at Mount St. Helens: Deformation and intermittent subsidence monitored by seismicity and camera imagery pixel offsets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salzer, J. T.; Thelen, W. A.; James, M. R.; Walter, T. R.; Moran, S. C.; Denlinger, R. P.

    2015-12-01

    The morphology of a volcanic lava dome and its rate of change play key roles in the estimation of dome stability. While long term variations of dome morphology can be quantified using aerial remote sensing, changes over shorter time scales and smaller spatial scales are more difficult to determine. However, intermittent destabilization of the dome, in particular on flanks of the domes, can be significant. This study focuses on short term deformation associated with earthquakes and tremor at Mount St. Helens, observed over a 6 week period in the summer of 2006. We use Digital Image Correlation (DIC) to compute the displacement field between successive optical images acquired by multiple fixed cameras with clear views of the dome. The results of the these calculations are compared to the occurrence of seismic events. A systematic time-series DIC analysis of image pairs showed no sharp changes in the dome morphology during periods without seismic events. However, the results reveal that the steady dome growth at Mount St. Helens was interrupted by short term displacements reaching magnitudes on the order of a meter. These displacements are only observed in association with low frequency, large magnitude seismic events, followed by tremor with frequencies between 5 Hz and likely exceeding 30 Hz. For selected events that coincide with the timing of the acquisition of an accurate DEM of the crater floor, we reproject the displacement fields obtained from two cameras onto the topography. This enables 3D displacement vectors to be derived, showing that the co-seismic deformation is marked by subsidence of the dome in a segmented fashion, the central region displaying mainly vertical motion, while the displacements on the talus are more slope-parallel. The exact relationship between the recorded seismic energy and the observed deformation of the dome can not be resolved because the cameras were only sampling every 15 - 60 minutes. However, our analysis suggests that the

  14. Scattering and absorption mapping of tectonic and feeding structures under the pre-eruptive Mount St. Helens volcano.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Siena, Luca; Calvet, Marie; Thomas, Christine

    2015-04-01

    Knowing how seismic waves lose their energy in space and frequency is both critical for understating volcanic structures and important to detect eventual changes in their seismic and volcanic activity. We measure both the peak-delay time and the coda quality factor on seismic envelopes recorded at Mount St. Helens volcano between 2000 and 2003, just before its 2004 explosive eruption. By the 2D mapping of these two frequency-dependent quantities we obtain S-wave scattering and absorption maps in the pre-eruptive phase of the volcano. We use a 2D K-means cluster analysis to highlight correlations in the frequency-dependent spatial patterns and interpret the results in terms of tectonic and feeding structures. The transition between the high-velocity and high-scattering Siletz terrane and the low-velocity and high-absorption Cascade arc crust is a persistent signature in the entire frequency range. At high frequencies, we observe strong correlation between high-scattering, high-absorption, and high P-wave heterogeneity (this last tomographically derived between depths of 0 and 10 km). In our interpretation, this correlation is a direct consequence of resonance effects, induced by the presence of melt and fluid inclusions as well as residuals of previous eruptions. The area of maximum heterogeneity is located south-south-west of the central crater: the region shows selective high absorption characteristics at 6 Hz only. If this supports the presence of a previously-inferred aseismic magma chamber intersecting the south-south-western flank of the volcano, the selectivity suggests a depth extension of the magma chamber lower than 1 km. The most important high-scattering and high-absorption signature at high frequencies remains a NNW-SSE suture crossing the volcanic cone and parallel to the St. Helens Seismic Zone. The trend confirms the persistent major role of the main direction of regional structural stress in the uprise of magma/fluid filled materials in the first

  15. Long-term autonomous volcanic gas monitoring with Multi-GAS at Mount St. Helens, Washington, and Augustine Volcano, Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelly, P. J.; Ketner, D. M.; Kern, C.; Lahusen, R. G.; Lockett, C.; Parker, T.; Paskievitch, J.; Pauk, B.; Rinehart, A.; Werner, C. A.

    2015-12-01

    In recent years, the USGS Volcano Hazards Program has worked to implement continuous real-time in situ volcanic gas monitoring at volcanoes in the Cascade Range and Alaska. The main goal of this ongoing effort is to better link the compositions of volcanic gases to other real-time monitoring data, such as seismicity and deformation, in order to improve baseline monitoring and early detection of volcanic unrest. Due to the remote and difficult-to-access nature of volcanic-gas monitoring sites in the Cascades and Alaska, we developed Multi-GAS instruments that can operate unattended for long periods of time with minimal direct maintenance from field personnel. Our Multi-GAS stations measure H2O, CO2, SO2, and H2S gas concentrations, are comprised entirely of commercial off-the-shelf components, and are powered by small solar energy systems. One notable feature of our Multi-GAS stations is that they include a unique capability to perform automated CO2, SO2, and H2S sensor verifications using portable gas standards while deployed in the field, thereby allowing for rigorous tracking of sensor performances. In addition, we have developed novel onboard data-processing routines that allow diagnostic and monitoring data - including gas ratios (e.g. CO2/SO2) - to be streamed in real time to internal observatory and public web pages without user input. Here we present over one year of continuous data from a permanent Multi-GAS station installed in August 2014 in the crater of Mount St. Helens, Washington, and several months of data from a station installed near the summit of Augustine Volcano, Alaska in June 2015. Data from the Mount St. Helens Multi-GAS station has been streaming to a public USGS site since early 2015, a first for a permanent Multi-GAS site. Neither station has detected significant changes in gas concentrations or compositions since they were installed, consistent with low levels of seismicity and deformation.

  16. Use of thermal infrared imaging for monitoring renewed dome growth at Mount St. Helens, 2004: Chapter 17 in A volcano rekindled: the renewed eruption of Mount St. Helens, 2004-2006

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schneider, David J.; Vallance, James W.; Wessels, Rick L.; Logan, Matthew; Ramsey, Michael S.; Sherrod, David R.; Scott, William E.; Stauffer, Peter H.

    2008-01-01

    A helicopter-mounted thermal imaging radiometer documented the explosive vent-clearing and effusive phases of the eruption of Mount St. Helens in 2004. A gyrostabilized gimbal controlled by a crew member housed the radiometer and an optical video camera attached to the nose of the helicopter. Since October 1, 2004, the system has provided thermal and video observations of dome growth. Flights conducted as frequently as twice daily during the initial month of the eruption monitored rapid changes in the crater and 1980-86 lava dome. Thermal monitoring decreased to several times per week once dome extrusion began. The thermal imaging system provided unique observations, including timely recognition that the early explosive phase was phreatic, location of structures controlling thermal emissions and active faults, detection of increased heat flow prior to the extrusion of lava, and recognition of new lava extrusion. The first spines, 1 and 2, were hotter when they emerged (maximum temperature 700-730°C) than subsequent spines insulated by as much as several meters of fault gouge. Temperature of gouge-covered spines was about 200°C where they emerged from the vent, and it decreased rapidly with distance from the vent. The hottest parts of these spines were as high as 500-730°C in fractured and broken-up regions. Such temperature variation needs to be accounted for in the retrieval of eruption parameters using satellite-based techniques, as such features are smaller than pixels in satellite images.

  17. Near-real-time information products for Mount St. Helens -- tracking the ongoing eruption: Chapter 3 in A volcano rekindled: the renewed eruption of Mount St. Helens, 2004-2006

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Qamar, Anthony I.; Malone, Stephen; Moran, Seth C.; Steele, William P.; Thelen, Weston A.; Sherrod, David R.; Scott, William E.; Stauffer, Peter H.

    2008-01-01

    The rapid onset of energetic seismicity on September 23, 2004, at Mount St. Helens caused seismologists at the Pacific Northwest Seismic Network and the Cascades Volcano Observatory to quickly improve and develop techniques that summarized and displayed seismic parameters for use by scientists and the general public. Such techniques included webicorders (Web-based helicorder-like displays), graphs showing RSAM (real-time seismic amplitude measurements), RMS (root-mean-square) plots, spectrograms, location maps, automated seismic-event detectors, focal mechanism solutions, automated approximations of earthquake magnitudes, RSAM-based alarms, and time-depth plots for seismic events. Many of these visual-information products were made available publicly as Web pages generated and updated routinely. The graphs and maps included short written text that explained the concepts behind them, which increased their value to the nonseismologic community that was tracking the eruption. Laypeople could read online summaries of the scientific interpretations and, if they chose, review some of the basic data, thereby providing a better understanding of the data used by scientists to make interpretations about ongoing eruptive activity, as well as a better understanding of how scientists worked to monitor the volcano.

  18. Broadband characteristics of earthquakes recorded during a dome-building eruption at Mount St. Helens, Washington, between October 2004 and May 2005: Chapter 5 in A volcano rekindled: the renewed eruption of Mount St. Helens, 2004-2006

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Horton, Stephen P.; Norris, Robert D.; Moran, Seth C.; Sherrod, David R.; Scott, William E.; Stauffer, Peter H.

    2008-01-01

    From October 2004 to May 2005, the Center for Earthquake Research and Information of the University of Memphis operated two to six broadband seismometers within 5 to 20 km of Mount St. Helens to help monitor recent seismic and volcanic activity. Approximately 57,000 earthquakes identified during the 7-month deployment had a normal magnitude distribution with a mean magnitude of 1.78 and a standard deviation of 0.24 magnitude units. Both the mode and range of earthquake magnitude and the rate of activity varied during the deployment. We examined the time domain and spectral characteristics of two classes of events seen during dome building. These include volcano-tectonic earthquakes and lower-frequency events. Lower-frequency events are further classified into hybrid earthquakes, low-frequency earthquakes, and long-duration volcanic tremor. Hybrid and low-frequency earthquakes showed a continuum of characteristics that varied systematically with time. A progressive loss of high-frequency seismic energy occurred in earthquakes as magma approached and eventually reached the surface. The spectral shape of large and small earthquakes occurring within days of each other did not vary with magnitude. Volcanic tremor events and lower-frequency earthquakes displayed consistent spectral peaks, although higher frequencies were more favorably excited during tremor than earthquakes.

  19. Managing public and media response to a reawakening volcano: lessons from the 2004 eruptive activity of Mount St. Helens: Chapter 23 in A volcano rekindled: the renewed eruption of Mount St. Helens, 2004-2006

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Frenzen, Peter M.; Matarrese, Michael T.; Sherrod, David R.; Scott, William E.; Stauffer, Peter H.

    2008-01-01

    Volcanic eruptions and other infrequent, large-scale natural disturbances pose challenges and opportunities for public-land managers. In the days and weeks preceding an eruption, there can be considerable uncertainty surrounding the magnitude and areal extent of eruptive effects. At the same time, public and media interest in viewing developing events is high and concern for public safety on the part of local land managers and public safety officials is elevated. Land managers and collaborating Federal, State, and local officials must decide whether evacuations or restrictions to public access are necessary, the appropriate level of advance preparation, and how best to coordinate between overlapping jurisdictions. In the absence of a formal Federal or State emergency declaration, there is generally no identified source of supplemental funding for emergency-response preparation or managing extraordinary public and media response to developing events. In this chapter, we examine responses to escalating events that preceded the 2004 Mount St. Helens eruption and changes in public perception during the extended period of the largely nonexplosive, dome-building eruption that followed. Lessons learned include the importance of maintaining up-to-date emergency-response plans, cultivating close working relationships with collaborating agencies, and utilizing an organized response framework that incorporates clearly defined roles and responsibilities and effective communication strategies.

  20. Progress in Improving the Accuracy of Hugoniot Equation-of-State Measurements at the AWE Helen Laser.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rothman, Stephen; Evans, Andrew; Graham, Peter; Horsfield, Colin

    1998-11-01

    For several years we have been conducting a series of equation-of-state (EOS) experiments using the Helen laser at AWE with the aim of an accuracy of 1% in shock velocity measurements(A.M. Evans, N.J. Freeman, P. Graham, C.J. Horsfield, S.D. Rothman, B.R. Thomas and A.J. Tyrrell, Laser and Particle Beams, vol. 14, no. 2, pp. 113-123, 1996.). Our best results to date are 1.2% in velocity on copper and aluminium double-step targets which lead to 4% in copper principal Hugoniot pressures. The accuracy in pressure depends not only on two measured shock velocities but also target density and the EOS of Al which is used here as a standard. In order to quantify sources of error and to improve accuracy we have measured the preheat-induced expansion of target surfaces using a Michelson interferometer. Analysis of streaks from this has also given reflectivity measurements. We are also investigating the use of a shaped laser pulse designed to give constant pressure for 2.5ns which will reduce the fractional errors in both step transit time and height by allowing the use of a thicker step.

  1. Cooling rate and thermal structure determined from progressive magnetization of the dacite dome at Mount St. Helens, Washington

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dzurisin, D.; Denlinger, R.P.; Rosenbaum, J.G.

    1990-01-01

    Our study of a magnetic anomaly associated with the recently active dacite dome at Mount St. Helens suggests that the dome consists of a hot, nonmagnetized core surrounded by a cool, magnetized carapace and flanking talus. Temporal changes in the magnetic anomaly indicate that the magnetized carapace thickened at an average rate of 0.03 ?? 0.01 m/d from 1984 to 1986. Petrographic and rock magnetic properties of dome samples indicate that the dominant process responsible for these changes is magnetization of extensively oxidized rock at progressively deeper levels within the dome as the rock cools through its blocking temperature, rather than subsequent changes in magnetization caused by further oxidation. Newly extruded material cools rapidly for a short period as heat is conducted outward in response to convective heat loss from its surface. The cooling rate gradually declines for several weeks, and thereafter the material cools at a relatively constant rate by convective heat loss from its interior along fractures that propagate inward. -from Authors

  2. Mount St. Helens (Washington, USA) and World Trade Center (New York, USA) collapse: a fluid dynamic analogy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doronzo, Domenico; de Tullio, Marco; Pascazio, Giuseppe; Dellino, Pierfrancesco

    2013-04-01

    When a skyscraper collapses, the non-fragmented material is rapidly deposited close to the source, whereas the fragmented counterpart is loaded turbulently in the associated currents. Indeed, on impact with the ground, collapses of volcanic columns, domes, or sectors of volcanoes generate thick deposits of coarser material, and from there on the finer material is suspended over the landscape, to be re-deposited far away in thin deposits. Here, we explore the multiphase fluid dynamic behavior of the World Trade Center (New York, USA) collapse, which on 11 September 2001 followed the fragmentation of the Twin Towers, and generated shear dusty currents. These currents had a multiphase and turbulent behavior, and resemble the volcanic flow generated during the 18 May 1980 explosive eruption of Mount St. Helens (Washington, USA), in which a sector of the volcano collapsed, then a highly mobile, multiphase turbulent current followed and heavily interacted with the surrounding landscape. This analogy allows to focus on the comparison between volcanic and skyscraper collapse. A computational fluid dynamic investigation, along with a locally refined Cartesian grid, are adopted to simulate numerically the propagation of the 11 September dusty currents in Manhattan. Results of flow dynamic pressure, the parameter of volcanic hazard, and particle deposition reveal that the pressure can locally increase up to a factor 10 because of flow-building interaction. Also, the surrounding buildings make the urban setting as of a high turbulence and exponential decay of deposit thickness.

  3. Generation of pyroclastic flows and surges by hot-rock avalanches from the dome of Mount St. Helens volcano, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mellors, R.A.; Waitt, R.B.; Swanson, D.A.

    1988-01-01

    Several hot-rock avalanches have occurred during the growth of the composite dome of Mount St. Helens, Washington between 1980 and 1987. One of these occurred on 9 May 1986 and produced a fan-shaped avalanche deposit of juvenile dacite debris together with a more extensive pyroclastic-flow deposit. Laterally thinning deposits and abrasion and baking of wooden and plastic objects show that a hot ash-cloud surge swept beyond the limits of the pyroclastic flow. Plumes that rose 2-3 km above the dome and vitric ash that fell downwind of the volcano were also effects of this event, but no explosion occurred. All the facies observed originated from a single avalanche. Erosion and melting of craterfloor snow by the hot debris caused debris flows in the crater, and a small flood that carried juvenile and other clasts north of the crater. A second, broadly similar event occured in October 1986. Larger events of this nature could present a significant volcanic hazard. ?? 1988 Springer-Verlag.

  4. Using Satellite Data to Characterize the Temporal Thermal Behavior of an Active Volcano: Mount St. Helens, WA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vaughan, R. Greg; Hook, Simon J.

    2006-01-01

    ASTER thermal infrared data over Mt. St Helens were used to characterize its thermal behavior from Jun 2000 to Feb 2006. Prior to the Oct 2004 eruption, the average crater temperature varied seasonally between -12 and 6 C. After the eruption, maximum single-pixel temperature increased from 10 C (Oct 2004) to 96 C (Aug 2005), then showed a decrease to Feb 2006. The initial increase in temperature was correlated with dome morphology and growth rate and the subsequent decrease was interpreted to relate to both seasonal trends and a decreased growth rate/increased cooling rate, possibly suggesting a significant change in the volcanic system. A single-pixel ASTER thermal anomaly first appeared on Oct 1, 2004, eleven hours after the first eruption - 10 days before new lava was exposed at the surface. By contrast, an automated algorithm for detecting thermal anomalies in MODIS data did not trigger an alert until Dec 18. However, a single-pixel thermal anomaly first appeared in MODIS channel 23 (4 um) on Oct 13, 12 days after the first eruption - 2 days after lava was exposed. The earlier thermal anomaly detected with ASTER data is attributed to the higher spatial resolution (90 m) compared with MODIS (1 m) and the earlier visual observation of anomalous pixels compared to the automated detection method suggests that local spatial statistics and background radiance data could improve automated detection methods.

  5. When can herbivores slow or reverse the spread of an invading plant? A test case from Mount St. Helens.

    PubMed

    Fagan, William F; Lewis, Mark; Neubert, Michael G; Aumann, Craig; Apple, Jennifer L; Bishop, John G

    2005-12-01

    Here we study the spatial dynamics of a coinvading consumer-resource pair. We present a theoretical treatment with extensive empirical data from a long-studied field system in which native herbivorous insects attack a population of lupine plants recolonizing a primary successional landscape created by the 1980 volcanic eruption of Mount St. Helens. Using detailed data on the life history and interaction strengths of the lupine and one of its herbivores, we develop a system of integrodifference equations to study plant-herbivore invasion dynamics. Our analyses yield several new insights into the spatial dynamics of coinvasions. In particular, we demonstrate that aspects of plant population growth and the intensity of herbivory under low-density conditions can determine whether the plant population spreads across a landscape or is prevented from doing so by the herbivore. In addition, we characterize the existence of threshold levels of spatial extent and/or temporal advantage for the plant that together define critical values of "invasion momentum," beyond which herbivores are unable to reverse a plant invasion. We conclude by discussing the implications of our findings for successional dynamics and the use of biological control agents to limit the spread of pest species.

  6. The effects of Mount St. Helens volcanic ash on the pulmonary function of 120 elementary school children.

    PubMed

    Johnson, K G; Loftsgaarden, D O; Gideon, R A

    1982-12-01

    The 1977 Montana legislature funded an extensive Montana Air Pollution Study (MAPS). One hundred and twenty children in the fourth and fifth grades in Missoula, Montana had their pulmonary functions tested on 6 days during the 1979-80 school year. On May 18, 1980, Mount St. Helens erupted, resulting in very high total suspended particulates (TSP) levels due to ash (peak day = 11,054 micrograms/m3 24-hour average) through May 22. When these children returned to school on May 23, they had their pulmonary functions tested a seventh time. There was no substantial decrease in pulmonary function after the ash exposure. By comparison, the childrens' pulmonary tests did show a significant decrease after 3 days of high urban air pollution (440 micrograms/m3 3-day average). Businesses and schools were closed for 4 days after the eruption and people were advised to remain indoors; hence, lack of measured pulmonary function test effects from the ash may be due to the protective precautions taken by the children.

  7. The effect of consumers and mutualists of Vaccinium membranaceum at Mount St. Helens: dependence on successional context.

    PubMed

    Yang, Suann; Jongejans, Eelke; Yang, Sylvia; Bishop, John G

    2011-01-01

    In contrast to secondary succession, studies of terrestrial primary succession largely ignore the role of biotic interactions, other than plant facilitation and competition, despite the expectation that simplified interaction webs and propagule-dependent demographics may amplify the effects of consumers and mutualists. We investigated whether successional context determined the impact of consumers and mutualists by quantifying their effects on reproduction by the shrub Vaccinium membranaceum in primary and secondary successional sites at Mount St. Helens (Washington, USA), and used simulations to explore the effects of these interactions on colonization. Species interactions differed substantially between sites, and the combined effect of consumers and mutualists was much more strongly negative for primary successional plants. Because greater local control of propagule pressure is expected to increase successional rates, we evaluated the role of dispersal in the context of these interactions. Our simulations showed that even a small local seed source greatly increases population growth rates, thereby balancing strong consumer pressure. The prevalence of strong negative interactions in the primary successional site is a reminder that successional communities will not exhibit the distribution of interaction strengths characteristic of stable communities, and suggests the potential utility of modeling succession as the consequence of interaction strengths.

  8. Volcanic tremor masks its seismogenic source: Results from a study of noneruptive tremor recorded at Mount St. Helens, Washington

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Denlinger, Roger P.; Moran, Seth C.

    2014-03-01

    On 2 October 2004, a significant noneruptive tremor episode occurred during the buildup to the 2004-2008 eruption of Mount St. Helens (Washington). This episode was remarkable both because no explosion followed, and because seismicity abruptly stopped following the episode. This sequence motivated us to consider a model for volcanic tremor that does not involve energetic gas release from magma but does involve movement of conduit magma through extension on its way toward the surface. We found that the tremor signal was composed entirely of Love and Rayleigh waves and that its spectral bandwidth increased and decreased with signal amplitude, with broader bandwidth signals containing both higher and lower frequencies. Our modeling results demonstrate that the forces giving rise to this tremor were largely normal to conduit walls, generating hybrid head waves along conduit walls that are coupled to internally reflected waves. Together these form a crucial part of conduit resonance, giving tremor wavefields that are largely a function of waveguide geometry and velocity. We find that the mechanism of tremor generation fundamentally masks the nature of the seismogenic source giving rise to resonance. Thus multiple models can be invoked to explain volcanic tremor, requiring that information from other sources (such as visual observations, geodesy, geology, and gas geochemistry) be used to constrain source models. With concurrent GPS and field data supporting rapid rise of magma, we infer that tremor resulted from drag of nearly solid magma along rough conduit walls as magma was forced toward the surface.

  9. Temporal variation of mass-wasting activity in Mount St. Helens crater, Washington, U. S. A. indicated by seismic activity

    SciTech Connect

    Mills, H.H. )

    1991-11-01

    In the crater of Mount St. Helens, formed during the eruption of 18 May 1980, thousands of rockfalls may occur in a single day, and some rock and dirty-snow avalanches have traveled more than 1 km from their source. Because most seismic activity in the crater is produced by mass wasting, the former can be used to monitor the latter. The number and amplitude of seismic events per unit time provide a generalized measure of mass-wasting activity. In this study 1-min averages of seismic amplitudes were used as an index of rockfall activity during summer and early fall. Plots of this index show the diurnal cycle of rockfall activity and establish that the peak in activity occurs in mid to late afternoon. A correlation coefficient of 0.61 was found between daily maximum temperature and average seismic amplitude, although this value increases to 0.72 if a composite temperature variable that includes the maximum temperature of 1 to 3 preceding days as well as the present day is used. Correlation with precipitation is much weaker.

  10. Effect of temperature on the permeability of lava dome rocks from the 2004-2008 eruption of Mount St. Helens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaunt, H. Elizabeth; Sammonds, Peter R.; Meredith, Philip G.; Chadderton, Amy

    2016-04-01

    As magma ascends to shallow levels in the volcanic conduit, volatile exsolution can produce a dramatic increase in the crystal content of the magma. During extrusion, low porosity, highly crystalline magmas are subjected to thermal stresses which generate permeable microfracture networks. How these networks evolve and respond to changing temperature has significant implications for gas escape and hence volcano explosivity. Here, we report the first laboratory experimental study on the effect of temperature on the permeability of lava dome rocks under environmental conditions designed to simulate the shallow volcanic conduit and lava dome. Samples were collected for this study from the 2004-2008 lava dome eruption of Mount St. Helens (Washington State, USA). We show that the evolution of microfracture networks, and their permeability, depends strongly on temperature changes. Our results show that permeability decreases by nearly four orders of magnitude as temperature increases from room temperature to 800 °C. Above 800 °C, the rock samples become effectively impermeable. Repeated cycles of heating leads to sample compaction and a reduction in fracture density and therefore a decrease in permeability. We argue that changes in eruption regimes from effusive to explosive activity can be explained by strongly decreasing permeability caused by repeated heating of magma, conduit walls and volcanic plugs or domes. Conversely, magma becomes more permeable as it cools, which will reduce explosivity.

  11. Changes in seismic velocity during the first 14 months of the 2004-2008 eruption of Mount St. Helens, Washington

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hotovec-Ellis, A. J.; Vidale, J. E.; Gomberg, J.; Thelen, W.; Moran, S. C.

    2015-09-01

    Mount St. Helens began erupting in late 2004 following an 18 year quiescence. Swarms of repeating earthquakes accompanied the extrusion of a mostly solid dacite dome over the next 4 years. In some cases the waveforms from these earthquakes evolved slowly, likely reflecting changes in the properties of the volcano that affect seismic wave propagation. We use coda-wave interferometry to quantify small changes in seismic velocity structure (usually <1%) between two similar earthquakes and employed waveforms from several hundred families of repeating earthquakes together to create a continuous function of velocity change observed at permanent stations operated within 20 km of the volcano. The high rate of earthquakes allowed tracking of velocity changes on an hourly time scale. Changes in velocity were largest near the newly extruding dome and likely related to shallow deformation as magma first worked its way to the surface. We found strong correlation between velocity changes and the inverse of real-time seismic amplitude measurements during the first 3 weeks of activity, suggesting that fluctuations of pressure in the shallow subsurface may have driven both seismicity and velocity changes. Velocity changes during the remainder of the eruption likely result from a complex interplay of multiple effects and are not well explained by any single factor alone, highlighting the need for complementary geophysical data when interpreting velocity changes.

  12. Large-scale magnetic field perturbation arising from the 18 May 1980 eruption from Mount St. Helens, Washington

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mueller, R.J.; Johnston, M.J.S.

    1989-01-01

    A traveling magnetic field disturbance generated by the 18 may 1980 eruption of Mount St. Helens at 1532 UT was detected on an 800-km linear array of recording magnetometers installed along the San Andreas fault system in California, from San Francisco to the Salton Sea. Arrival times of the disturbance field, from the most northern of these 24 magnetometers (996 km south of the volcano) to the most southern (1493 km S23?? E), are consistent with the generation of a traveling ionospheric disturbance stimulated by the blast pressure wave in the atmosphere. The first arrivals at the north and the south ends of the array occurred at 26 and 48 min, respectively, after the initial eruption. Apparent average wave velocity through the array is 309 ?? 14 m s-1 but may have approached 600 m s-1 close to the volcano. The horizontal phase and the group velocity of ??? 300 m s-1 at periods of 70-80 min, and the attenuation with distance, strongly suggest that the magnetic field perturbations at distances of 1000-1500 km are caused by gravity mode acoustic-gravity waves propagating at F-region heights in the ionosphere. ?? 1989.

  13. Decadal-scale change of infiltration characteristics of a tephra-mantled hillslope at Mount St Helens, Washington

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Major, J.J.; Yamakoshi, T.

    2005-01-01

    The cataclysmic 1980 eruption of Mount St Helens radically reduced the infiltration characteristics of ???60 000 ha of rugged terrain and dramatically altered landscape hydrology. Two decades of erosional, biogenic, cryogenic, and anthropogenic activity have modified the infiltration characteristics of much of that devastated landscape and modulated the hydrological impact of the eruption. We assessed infiltration and runoff characteristics of a segment of hillslope thickly mantled with tephra, but now revegetated primarily with grasses and other plants, to evaluate hydrological modifications due to erosion and natural turbation. Eruptive disturbance reduced infiltration capacity of the hillslope by as much as 50-fold. Between 1980 and 2000, apparent infiltration capacities of plots on the hillslope increased as much as ten fold, but remain approximately three to five times less than the probable pre-eruption capacities. Common regional rainfall intensities and snowmelt rates presently produce little surface runoff; however, high-magnitude, low-frequency storms and unusually rapid snowmelt can still induce broad infiltration-excess overland flow. After 20 years, erosion and natural mechanical turbation have modulated, but not effaced, the hydrological perturbation caused by the cataclysmic eruption. Copyright ?? 2005 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  14. Mount St. Helens ash: recreating its effects on the steppe environment and ecophysiology. [Artemisia tridentata; Lupinus sulphureus

    SciTech Connect

    Black, R.A.; Mack, R.N.

    1986-10-01

    The 18 May 1980 ash fall from Mount St. Helens was experimentally reproduced in May 1982 by applying silt-sized ash to a stand of the Artemisia tridentata/Agropyron spicatum association in south-central Washington. Compared to the adjacent control site, ash caused an immediate increase in albedo from 13% to 28%, while other parameters of the energy budget were simultaneously lowered: net radiation by approx. = 20%, soil surface temperatures by as much as 10/sup 0/C, and soil heat flux by as much as 50%. The ash's mulching action initially increased water availability and delayed leaf abscission in Artemisia tridentata (Big sagebrush) by 2 wk in summer 1982. But after summer 1982 water availability declined, while water use increased, illustrating the diverse effects of the ash. Increased reflection from the ash-covered surface increased the radiation load on plant canopies. In turn, air temperature at 0.5 m increased, latent heat flux often doubled in summer, and xylem pressure potentials decreased. Available water at the -1 m soil depth eventually decreased as much as 40%. This decrease was the result of the increase in latent heat flux and the decline in infiltration through the stratified layer created by the ash cap. In addition to allowing assessment of the effects of the 18 May 1980 ash fall on arid steppe, application of ash provided an unexpected level of precision in detecting the often subtle effects that occur when some microenvironmental parameters change while the overall macroclimate remains the same.

  15. Rapid, low-cost photogrammetry to monitor volcanic eruptions: an example from Mount St. Helens, Washington, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Diefenbach, Angela K.; Crider, Juliet G.; Schilling, Steve P.; Dzurisin, Daniel

    2012-01-01

    We describe a low-cost application of digital photogrammetry using commercially available photogrammetric software and oblique photographs taken with an off-the-shelf digital camera to create sequential digital elevation models (DEMs) of a lava dome that grew during the 2004–2008 eruption of Mount St. Helens (MSH) volcano. Renewed activity at MSH provided an opportunity to devise and test this method, because it could be validated against other observations of this well-monitored volcano. The datasets consist of oblique aerial photographs (snapshots) taken from a helicopter using a digital single-lens reflex camera. Twelve sets of overlapping digital images of the dome taken during 2004–2007 were used to produce DEMs and to calculate lava dome volumes and extrusion rates. Analyses of the digital images were carried out using photogrammetric software to produce three-dimensional coordinates of points identified in multiple photos. The evolving morphology of the dome was modeled by comparing successive DEMs. Results were validated by comparison to volume measurements derived from traditional vertical photogrammetric surveys by the US Geological Survey Cascades Volcano Observatory. Our technique was significantly less expensive and required less time than traditional vertical photogrammetric techniques; yet, it consistently yielded volume estimates within 5% of the traditional method. This technique provides an inexpensive, rapid assessment tool for tracking lava dome growth or other topographic changes at restless volcanoes.

  16. The Effect of Consumers and Mutualists of Vaccinium membranaceum at Mount St. Helens: Dependence on Successional Context

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Suann; Jongejans, Eelke; Yang, Sylvia; Bishop, John G.

    2011-01-01

    In contrast to secondary succession, studies of terrestrial primary succession largely ignore the role of biotic interactions, other than plant facilitation and competition, despite the expectation that simplified interaction webs and propagule-dependent demographics may amplify the effects of consumers and mutualists. We investigated whether successional context determined the impact of consumers and mutualists by quantifying their effects on reproduction by the shrub Vaccinium membranaceum in primary and secondary successional sites at Mount St. Helens (Washington, USA), and used simulations to explore the effects of these interactions on colonization. Species interactions differed substantially between sites, and the combined effect of consumers and mutualists was much more strongly negative for primary successional plants. Because greater local control of propagule pressure is expected to increase successional rates, we evaluated the role of dispersal in the context of these interactions. Our simulations showed that even a small local seed source greatly increases population growth rates, thereby balancing strong consumer pressure. The prevalence of strong negative interactions in the primary successional site is a reminder that successional communities will not exhibit the distribution of interaction strengths characteristic of stable communities, and suggests the potential utility of modeling succession as the consequence of interaction strengths. PMID:22028808

  17. Modeling the dynamic response of a crater glacier to lava-dome emplacement: Mount St Helens, Washington, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Price, Stephen F.; Walder, Joseph S.

    2007-01-01

    The debris-rich glacier that grew in the crater of Mount St Helens after the volcano's cataclysmic 1980 eruption was split in two by a new lava dome in 2004. For nearly six months, the eastern part of the glacier was squeezed against the crater wall as the lava dome expanded. Glacier thickness nearly doubled locally and surface speed increased substantially. As squeezing slowed and then stopped, surface speed fell and ice was redistributed downglacier. This sequence of events, which amounts to a field-scale experiment on the deformation of debris-rich ice at high strain rates, was interpreted using a two-dimensional flowband model. The best match between modeled and observed glacier surface motion, both vertical and horizontal, requires ice that is about 5 times stiffer and 1.2 times denser than normal, temperate ice. Results also indicate that lateral squeezing, and by inference lava-dome growth adjacent to the glacier, likely slowed over a period of about 30 days rather than stopping abruptly. This finding is supported by geodetic data documenting dome growth.

  18. Absolute and relative locations of earthquakes at Mount St. Helens, Washington, using continuous data: implications for magmatic processes: Chapter 4 in A volcano rekindled: the renewed eruption of Mount St. Helens, 2004-2006

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thelen, Weston A.; Crosson, Robert S.; Creager, Kenneth C.; Sherrod, David R.; Scott, William E.; Stauffer, Peter H.

    2008-01-01

    This study uses a combination of absolute and relative locations from earthquake multiplets to investigate the seismicity associated with the eruptive sequence at Mount St. Helens between September 23, 2004, and November 20, 2004. Multiplets, a prominent feature of seismicity during this time period, occurred as volcano-tectonic, hybrid, and low-frequency earthquakes spanning a large range of magnitudes and lifespans. Absolute locations were improved through the use of a new one-dimensional velocity model with excellent shallow constraints on P-wave velocities. We used jackknife tests to minimize possible biases in absolute and relative locations resulting from station outages and changing station configurations. In this paper, we show that earthquake hypocenters shallowed before the October 1 explosion along a north-dipping structure under the 1980-86 dome. Relative relocations of multiplets during the initial seismic unrest and ensuing eruption showed rather small source volumes before the October 1 explosion and larger tabular source volumes after October 5. All multiplets possess absolute locations very close to each other. However, the highly dissimilar waveforms displayed by each of the multiplets analyzed suggest that different sources and mechanisms were present within a very small source volume. We suggest that multiplets were related to pressurization of the conduit system that produced a stationary source that was highly stable over long time periods. On the basis of their response to explosions occurring in October 2004, earthquakes not associated with multiplets also appeared to be pressure dependent. The pressure source for these earthquakes appeared, however, to be different from the pressure source of the multiplets.

  19. Hazard information management during the autumn 2004 reawakening of Mount St. Helens volcano, Washington: Chapter 24 in A volcano rekindled: the renewed eruption of Mount St. Helens, 2004-2006

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Driedger, Carolyn L.; Neal, Christina A.; Knappenberger, Tom H.; Needham, Deborah H.; Harper, Robert B.; Steele, William P.; Sherrod, David R.; Scott, William E.; Stauffer, Peter H.

    2008-01-01

    The 2004 reawakening of Mount St. Helens quickly caught the attention of government agencies as well as the international news media and the public. Immediate concerns focused on a repeat of the catastrophic landslide and blast event of May 18, 1980, which remains a vivid memory for many individuals. Within several days of the onset of accelerating seismicity, media inquiries increased exponentially. Personnel at the U.S. Geological Survey, the Pacific Northwest Seismic Network, and the Gifford Pinchot National Forest soon handled hundreds of press inquiries and held several press briefings per day. About one week into the event, a Joint Information Center was established to help maintain a consistent hazard message and to provide a centralized information source about volcanic activity, hazards, area closures, and media briefings. Scientists, public-affairs specialists, and personnel from emergency-management, health, public-safety, and land-management agencies answered phones, helped in press briefings and interviews, and managed media access to colleagues working on science and safety issues. For scientists, in addition to managing the cycle of daily fieldwork, challenges included (1) balancing accurate interpretations of data under crisis conditions with the need to share information quickly, (2) articulating uncertainties for a variety of volcanic scenarios, (3) minimizing scientific jargon, and (4) frequently updating and effectively distributing talking points. Success of hazard information management during a volcanic crisis depends largely on scientists’ clarity of communication and thorough preplanning among interagency partners. All parties must commit to after-action evaluation and improvement of communication plans, incorporating lessons learned during each event.

  20. Identification and evolution of the juvenile component in 2004-2005 Mount St. Helens ash: Chapter 29 in A volcano rekindled: the renewed eruption of Mount St. Helens, 2004-2006

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rowe, Michael C.; Thornber, Carl R.; Kent, Adam J.R.; Sherrod, David R.; Scott, William E.; Stauffer, Peter H.

    2008-01-01

    Petrologic studies of volcanic ash are commonly used to identify juvenile volcanic material and observe changes in the composition and style of volcanic eruptions. During the 2004-5 eruption of Mount St. Helens, recognition of the juvenile component in ash produced by early phreatic explosions was complicated by the presence of a substantial proportion of 1980-86 lava-dome fragments and glassy tephra, in addition to older volcanic fragments possibly derived from crater debris. In this report, we correlate groundmass textures and compositions of glass, mafic phases, and feldspar from 2004-5 ash in an attempt to identify juvenile material in early phreatic explosions and to distinguish among the various processes that generate and distribute ash. We conclude that clean glass in the ash is derived mostly from nonjuvenile sources and is not particularly useful for identifying the proportion of juvenile material in ash samples. High Li contents (>30 μg/g) in feldspars provide a useful tracer for juvenile material and suggest an increase in the proportion of the juvenile component between October 1 and October 4, 2004, before the emergence of hot dacite on the surface of the crater on October 11, 2004. The presence of Li-rich feldspar out of equilibrium (based on Liplagioclase/melt partitioning) with groundmass and bulk dacite early in the eruption also suggests vapor enrichment in the initially erupted dacite. If an excess vapor phase was, indeed, present, it may have provided a catalyst to initiate the eruption. Textural and compositional comparisons between dome fault gouge and the ash produced by rockfalls, rock avalanches, and vent explosions indicate that the fault gouge is a likely source of ash particles for both types of events. Comparison of the ash from vent explosions and rockfalls suggests that the fault gouge and new dome were initially heterogeneous, containing a mixture of conduit and crater debris and juvenile material, but became increasingly

  1. Partners in International Research and Education: Student Contributions to the Collaborative Investigation of Bezymianny, Shiveluch, and Karymsky Volcanoes, Kamchatka, Russia and Mount St. Helens, WA, USA.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shipman, J. S.; Kayzar, T. M.; Team, P.

    2008-12-01

    Undergraduate and graduate students as well as senior researchers from the U.S., Russia, and Japan are investigating volcanism as participants of the National Science Foundation initiative Partners in International Research and Education (PIRE). The goal of this study is to use the benefits of global comparisons to increase our understanding of explosive volcanism while at the same time developing international collaboration between scientists in the U.S., Russia, and Japan. International collaboration is established through field work in Kamchatka, Russia investigating the active systems of Bezymianny, Shiveluch, and Karymsky volcanoes with a specific focus on historic collapse-blast type eruptions. The Kamchatka volcanic arc provides unique access to multiple active volcanic systems that can be compared and contrasted to the well-studied behavior at Mount St. Helens, WA., USA. Conversely, Mount St. Helens also provides a field setting for Russian and Japanese students to be incorporated in U.S. research. Student participants employ their respective techniques in geochemistry, geophysics, petrology, and remote sensing to study the eruption response of Bezymianny and Shiveluch volcanoes, which have experienced edifice collapse. During the 2008 field season, the increased activity at Bezymianny volcano shortened a planned field expedition. In order to preserve the integrity of the program and provide a safer environment for researchers, alternative field studies began at Karymsky volcano. In July, an anonymously large eruption at Karymsky volcano permitted the collection of unique real-time data of the eruptive event. Here we present student research from three field seasons in the Kamchatka volcanic arc and associated workshops at Mount St. Helens, WA. Results include estimates of magma storage depth, gas emissions measurements, evidence for dynamic thermal regime changes in fresh volcanic deposits, and data constraining magma inputs and sources at each volcano. By

  2. Where is the hot rock and where is the ground water – Using CSAMT to map beneath and around Mount St. Helens

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wynn, Jeff; Mosbrucker, Adam; Pierce, Herbert; Spicer, Kurt R.

    2016-01-01

    We have observed several new features in recent controlled-source audio-frequency magnetotelluric (CSAMT) soundings on and around Mount St. Helens, Washington State, USA. We have identified the approximate location of a strong electrical conductor at the edges of and beneath the 2004–08 dome. We interpret this conductor to be hot brine at the hot-intrusive-cold-rock interface. This contact can be found within 50 meters of the receiver station on Spine 5, which extruded between April and July of 2005. We have also mapped separate regional and glacier-dome aquifers, which lie one atop the other, out to considerable distances from the volcano.

  3. Chronology, morphology and stratigraphy of pumiceous pyroclastic-flow (ignimbrite) deposits from the eruption of Mount St. Helens on 18 May 1983

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Criswell, C. W.; Elston, W. E.

    1984-01-01

    Between 1217 and 1620 hours (PDT), on May 18, 1980, the magmatic eruption column of Mount St. Helens formed an ash fountain and pyroclastic flows dominated the eruption process over tephra ejection. Eurption-rate pulsations generally increased to a maximum at 1600 to 1700 hrs. After 1620 hrs, the eruption assumed an open-vent discharge with strong, vertical ejection of tephra. Relative eruption rates (relative mass flux rates) of the pyroclastic flows were determined by correlating sequential photographs and SLAR images, obtained during the eruption, with stratigraphy and surface morphology of the deposits.

  4. Factors controlling permeability and fluid flow within the 2004-2008 Mount St Helens lava dome complex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaunt, H. E.; Meredith, P. G.; Sammonds, P.; Smith, R.; Kilburn, C.

    2011-12-01

    Magma degassing is an important control on whether an eruption will be explosive or effusive. Although the process of gas exsolution has been well-studied, the factors that determine how gases subsequently escape are still poorly understood, especially from high-viscosity magmas with evolved compositions, such as dacite. A preferred model for viscous magmas is that shear fracturing during ascent can occur along conduit margins and lead to the development of a permeable fracture network. Such fracture networks facilitate gas escape and the effusion of magma as a lava dome or flow. The model, however, has yet to be tested against direct laboratory measurements on the potential for magma to develop permeable networks of fractures. Between 2004 and 2008, dacite magma was extruded almost continuously from Mount St Helens (Cascade Range, USA) as a succession of gas-poor and solidified lava spines. The dacite is thought to have solidified about 1 km below the vent and to have experienced intense strain localisation at the conduit margins during ascent. The most prominent of all the spines, Spine 4, formed a smooth 'whaleback' feature and had a distinct internal structure analogous to that of a tectonic fault zone. Extruded dacite lava was coated with a thick (~1m) layer of fault gouge, containing multiple sets of sub-parallel slickensides and shear bands orientated preferentially in the direction of spine growth. To investigate the controls on degassing processes, we have measured how permeability varied progressively with increasing temperature and deformation on samples from the 2004-2008 dome at Mount St Helens. Permeability was measured on cylindrical samples, 25 mm in diameter, in a hydrostatic permeameter at confining pressures up to 30 MPa (a depth of c.1.2 km) and, also, in a high temperature deformation apparatus at temperatures up to 900oC, confining pressures of 12 MPa and pore fluid pressures of 4 MPa. Samples of intact dacite from the interior of Spine 4 were

  5. Mount St. Helens a decade after the 1980 eruptions: magmatic models, chemical cycles, and a revised hazards assessment

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pallister, J.S.; Hoblitt, R.P.; Crandell, D.R.; Mullineaux, D.R.

    1992-01-01

    Available geophysical and geologic data provide a simplified model of the current magmatic plumbing system of Mount St. Helens (MSH). This model and new geochemical data are the basis for the revised hazards assessment presented here. The assessment is weighted by the style of eruptions and the chemistry of magmas erupted during the past 500 years, the interval for which the most detailed stratigraphic and geochemical data are available. This interval includes the Kalama (A. D. 1480-1770s?), Goat Rocks (A.D. 1800-1857), and current eruptive periods. In each of these periods, silica content decreased, then increased. The Kalama is a large amplitude chemical cycle (SiO2: 57%-67%), produced by mixing of arc dacite, which is depleted in high field-strength and incompatible elements, with enriched (OIB-like) basalt. The Goat Rocks and current cycles are of small amplitude (SiO2: 61%-64% and 62%-65%) and are related to the fluid dynamics of magma withdrawal from a zoned reservoir. The cyclic behavior is used to forecast future activity. The 1980-1986 chemical cycle, and consequently the current eruptive period, appears to be virtually complete. This inference is supported by the progressively decreasing volumes and volatile contents of magma erupted since 1980, both changes that suggest a decreasing potential for a major explosive eruption in the near future. However, recent changes in seismicity and a series of small gas-release explosions (beginning in late 1989 and accompanied by eruption of a minor fraction of relatively low-silica tephra on 6 January and 5 November 1990) suggest that the current eruptive period may continue to produce small explosions and that a small amount of magma may still be present within the conduit. The gas-release explosions occur without warning and pose a continuing hazard, especially in the crater area. An eruption as large or larger than that of 18 May 1980 (???0.5 km3 dense-rock equivalent) probably will occur only if magma rises from

  6. Duration of exposure--histological effects on broiler lungs, performance, and house environment with Mt. St. Helens volcanic ash dust

    SciTech Connect

    Bland, M.C.; Nakaue, H.S.; Goeger, M.P.; Helfer, D.H.

    1985-01-01

    Fourteen hundred broilers were exposed to Mt. St. Helens volcanic ash (VA) dust (D) from 28 to 49 days of age to correlate the duration of exposure time to histological effect on lungs and to determine the effects on broiler performance and house environment. Histological examinations of the lungs from birds exposed each day for 4 days to either VAD for 60 min (VAD 60) in the morning and afternoon (3276 g VA/day), or VAD after one direct application (DiAp) (20 kg/m2) on wood shaving litter revealed mild lymphoid hyperplasia and granuloma formation accompanied by phagocytized crystalline material seen in some alveolar macrophages; however, no effect was observed in lung tissues from broilers exposed each day for 4 days to VAD for 15 min (VAD 15) in the morning and afternoon (82 g VAD/day). Birds exposed to all VAD treatments and examined after 7 days had histological changes in the lungs, including giant cell granuloma formation, similar to those seen at 4 days. No significant histopathological changes were found in the turbinates with any VAD treatments. Levels of mean body weight, ammonia concentration, mortality, and respiratory dust (particles ranging in size from .5 to 10 micron) levels were not significantly different among the treatments. Significantly poorer mean feed conversion was observed with broilers exposed to VAD 60 than the VA DiAp exposure. No difference in feed conversion was observed between the control and either VAD 15 or VAD 60 treatments. From this experiment, the observed histological changes in the lungs occurred with 4 days or less exposure to VAD 60 (3276 g/day).

  7. The 18 May 1980 eruption of Mount St. Helens: The nature of the eruption, with an atmospheric perspective

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rose, W. I., Jr.; Hoffman, M. F.

    1982-01-01

    Mount St. Helens erupted somewhat less than 0.5 cu km of magma (dense rock equivalent) on May 18, 1980. The May 18 event was usually violent. As much 35% of the volume of the airfall material fell outside of the 2.5 mm isopach, which encloses about 88,000 sq km. This extraordinary dispersive power was transmitted by an eruption column which reached heights of more than 20 km. There was a lateral blast (or surge) of unusually large dimensions associated with the onset of the eruption. The magma is dacitic in composition and had a low ( 500 ppm) sulfur content. Distal ashes contain much nonmagmatic (lithic) material, but smaller ( 50 microns m) particles are mostly finely divided magmatic dacite. The grain size distributions of the ash are multimodal, frequently with peaks at 90, 25, and 10 microns. The finer populations fell out faster than their terminal velocities as simple particles would suggest. It is inferred that large proportions of the fine ash fell out as composite particles. This condition greatly reduces the atmospheric burden of silicate particles. Some of the unusual aspects (violence, intense surges, multimodal grain size distributions, lithic content of the ashes) of the eruption may be due to its phreatomagmatic character. The hydrothermal system above the magma may have infiltrated the magma body at the onset of the eruption. An "overprint" of the geochemistry of this hydrothermal system on the geochemistry of the magmatic gas system is likely. One important feature is that reduced gas species may be much more abundant than in many eruptions. Another is that fine ash may form aggregates more readily.

  8. Ground-coupled acoustic airwaves from Mount St. Helens provide constraints on the May 18, 1980 eruption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Jeffrey B.; Malone, Stephen D.

    2007-06-01

    The May 18, 1980 Mount St. Helens eruption perturbed the atmosphere and generated atmosphere-to-ground coupled airwaves, which were recorded on at least 35 seismometers operated by the Pacific Northwest Seismograph Network (PNSN). From 102 distinct travel time picks we identify coherent airwaves crossing Washington State primarily to the north and east of the volcano. The travel time curves provide evidence for both stratospheric refractions (at 200 to 300 km from the volcano) as well as probable thermospheric refractions (at 100 to 350 km). The very few first-hand reports of audible volcano sounds within about 80 km of the volcano coincide with a general absence of ground-coupled acoustic arrivals registered within about 100 km and are attributed to upward refraction of sound waves. From the coherent refracted airwave arrivals, we identify at least four distinct sources which we infer to originate 10 s, 114 s, ˜ 180 s and 319 s after the onset of an 8:32:11 PDT landslide. The first of these sources is attributed to resultant depressurization and explosion of the cryptodome. Most of the subsequent arrivals also appear to be coincident with a source located at or near the presumed volcanic conduit, but at least one of the later arrivals suggests an epicenter displaced about 9 km to the northwest of the vent. This dislocation is compatible with the direction of the sector collapse and lateral blast. We speculate that this concussion corresponds to a northern explosion event associated with hot cryptodome entering the Toutle River Valley.

  9. Influence of particle aggregation on deposition of distal tephra from the May 18, 1980, eruption of Mount St. Helens volcano

    SciTech Connect

    Carey, S.N.; Sigurdsson, H.

    1982-08-10

    The May 18, 1980, eruption of Mount St. Helens (MSH) produced an extensive ashfall deposit in Washington, Idaho, and Montana with a minimum volume of 0.55 km/sup 3/ (tephra). An unusual feature of the deposit is the occurrence of a second thickness maximum 325 km ENE of MSH near Ritzville, Washington. Grain size and component abundance analysis of samples along the main is very fine grained (mean size, 2 ..mu..m), poorly sorted, polymodal, and rich in glass shards and pumice fragments. A computer simulation of ash fallout from an atmospherically dispersed eruption plume was developed to evaluate various hypotheses for the origin of the distal ash characteristics, particularly the thickness versus distance relationship. The model was constrained by observations of the eruption column height, elevation of major ash transport, lateral spreading of the eruption plume, and atmospheric wind structure in the vicinity of MSH. Results of different simulations indicate that the second thickness maximum cannot be attributed to either decreased wind velocities over central Washington or injection of fine ash above the horizontal wind velocity maximum near the tropopause. For the model to fit the observed characteristics of the deposit, significant particle aggregation of ash finer than 63 ..mu..m must be invoked. The best fit occurs when ash less than 63 ..mu..m is aggregated into particles several hundred microns in diameter with a settling velocity of 0.35 m/s. Support for this process comes from the observation and collection of fragile ash clusters of similar size which fell at Pullman, Washington, during the May 18 eruption (Sorem, 1982). The premature fallout of fine ash as particle aggregates is a fundamental process in the origin of the grain size characteristics, variations in component abundances, and thickness versus distance relationship of the May 18 MSH ash fall deposit.

  10. The controls and consequences of substrate entrainment by pyroclastic density currents at Mount St Helens, Washington (USA)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pollock, N. M.; Brand, B. D.; Roche, O.

    2016-10-01

    Evidence in the deposits from the May 18, 1980 eruption at Mount St Helens demonstrates that pyroclastic density currents (PDCs) produced during the afternoon of the eruption became intermittently erosive. Using detailed componentry and granulometry we constrain the sources for lithic blocks in the deposits and identify deposits from PDCs that became locally erosive. The componentry of the lithics in the fall deposits is used as a proxy for vent erosion and assumed to represent the starting componentry for PDCs prior to entrainment from any other source. We find little evidence in the PDC deposits nearest to the base of the volcano for entrainment from the steep flanks; however, significant evidence indicates that PDCs eroded into the debris avalanche hummocks, suggesting that entrainment is favored as PDCs interact with highly irregular topography. Evidence for locally entrained material downstream from debris avalanche hummocks decreases with height in the outcrop, suggesting that less entrainment occurs as local relief decreases and upstream topography is buried. The prevalence of lithofacies containing locally entrained material at the base of unit contacts and only 10s of meters downstream from debris avalanche hummocks suggests that the majority of entrainment occurs at or near the head of the current. Occasionally, entrained material is located high above unit contacts and deposited well after the initial head of the current is inferred to have passed, indicating that entrainment can occur during periods of non-deposition either from the semi-sustained body of the current or from a pulsating current. Additionally, self-channelization of PDCs, either by levee deposition or scouring into earlier PDC deposits, occurs independently of interaction with topographic obstacles and can affect carrying capacity and runout distance. While we begin to explore the mechanisms and effects of erosion on current dynamics, additional laboratory and numerical studies are

  11. Monitoring Renewed Volcanic Activity at Mount St. Helens with High-Resolution Thermal Infrared Data: ASTER, MASTER and FLIR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaughan, R. G.; Wessels, R.; Ramsey, M. S.

    2005-12-01

    Since the beginning of renewed eruptive activity at Mount St. Helens numerous thermal infrared (TIR) remote sensing data sets have been acquired to monitor changes in temperature and thermal flux from the new dome. High-resolution (5 m) TIR data from the MODIS-ASTER airborne simulator (MASTER) were acquired during the first 20 days of activity along with several Forward-Looking Infrared (FLIR) camera surveys from both helicopter and ground-based stations. The Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) instrument has acquired a total of 10 cloud-free data sets from October 2004 to August 2005 with 90-m spatial resolution in the TIR. The pre-eruption data show no measurable increase in surface temperature before the first eruption on October 1. MASTER TIR data acquired during the first 3 weeks of activity show maximum temperatures of ~330 C (on October 14) and concurrent FLIR camera data show maximum temperatures of ~675 C, in narrow (~1-m) fractures of molten rock on the new dome. Thermal flux calculations from both MASTER and FLIR data at that time indicate a radiative cooling rate of ~700 J/m2/s over the new dome, corresponding to a radiant power of ~24 MW. Preliminary results from ASTER data analysis show a general increase in the number of "warm pixels" in the crater throughout the year and temperature information extracted from these areas will be presented as a chronology of temperature and thermal flux changes. Higher-resolution FLIR surveys that were approximately concurrent with some of the ASTER images compared to the ASTER-derived temperatures have been used to validate ASTER measurements and model sub-pixel temperature components. The results so far demonstrate that TIR data provide important information on the thermal evolution of the surface during eruptive episodes.

  12. Bayesian Inversion using Physics-based Models Applied to Dome Extrusion at Mount St. Helens 2004-2008

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, Y. Q.; Segall, P.; Anderson, K. R.; Bradley, A. M.

    2015-12-01

    Physics-based models of volcanic eruptions have grown more sophisticated over the past few decades. These models, combined with Bayesian inversion, offer the potential of integrating diverse geological and geophysical datasets to better understand volcanic systems. Using a Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) algorithm with a physics-based conduit model, we invert data from the 2004-2008 dome-forming eruption at Mount St. Helens, USA. We extend the 1D cylindrical conduit model of Anderson and Segall [2011] to include vertical and lateral gas loss from the magma, as well as equilibrium crystallization. The melt viscosity increases strongly with crystal content. Magma permeability obeys the Kozeny-Carman law with a threshold porosity. Excess pressure in the magma chamber drives Newtonian flow of magma upwards until the viscous resistance to flow exceeds the rate-dependent frictional strength on the conduit wall, at which point the magma transitions from viscous flow to plug flow. We investigate the steady-state solutions for lava dome growth between March and December 2005, in which magma chamber pressure, initial water content, permeability and friction parameters are unknown model parameters. These parameters are constrained by: dome rock porosity, extrusion rate from photogrammetry, plug depth from drumbeat earthquakes, and crystallization pressure from petrologic studies. Posterior probability density functions (PDFs) reveal the constraints on the model parameters and their correlations. Assuming lithostatic normal stress on the plug, low coefficients of friction (0.1-0.3) are required to allow extrusion at the observed rate while maintaining reasonable magma chamber pressures. Lower effective normal stress or melt viscosity could allow for larger friction coefficients. Future work will investigate the time-dependent system, thereby allowing us to incorporate time-evolving geodetic and eruption rate data into the inversion.

  13. Ground-coupled acoustic airwaves from Mount St. Helens provide constraints on the May 18, 1980 eruption

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Johnson, J.B.; Malone, S.D.

    2007-01-01

    The May 18, 1980 Mount St. Helens eruption perturbed the atmosphere and generated atmosphere-to-ground coupled airwaves, which were recorded on at least 35 seismometers operated by the Pacific Northwest Seismograph Network (PNSN). From 102 distinct travel time picks we identify coherent airwaves crossing Washington State primarily to the north and east of the volcano. The travel time curves provide evidence for both stratospheric refractions (at 200 to 300 km from the volcano) as well as probable thermospheric refractions (at 100 to 350 km). The very few first-hand reports of audible volcano sounds within about 80 km of the volcano coincide with a general absence of ground-coupled acoustic arrivals registered within about 100 km and are attributed to upward refraction of sound waves. From the coherent refracted airwave arrivals, we identify at least four distinct sources which we infer to originate 10 s, 114 s, ∼ 180 s and 319 s after the onset of an 8:32:11 PDT landslide. The first of these sources is attributed to resultant depressurization and explosion of the cryptodome. Most of the subsequent arrivals also appear to be coincident with a source located at or near the presumed volcanic conduit, but at least one of the later arrivals suggests an epicenter displaced about 9 km to the northwest of the vent. This dislocation is compatible with the direction of the sector collapse and lateral blast. We speculate that this concussion corresponds to a northern explosion event associated with hot cryptodome entering the Toutle River Valley.

  14. Initial effects of the mount st. Helens eruption on nitrogen cycle and related chemical processes in ryan lake.

    PubMed

    Dahm, C N; Baross, J A; Ward, A K; Lilley, M D; Sedell, J R

    1983-05-01

    Ryan Lake, a 1.6-hectare basin lake near the periphery of the tree blowdown area in the blast zone 19 km north of Mount St. Helens, was studied from August to October 1980 to determine the microbial and chemical response of the lake to the eruption. Nutrient enrichment through the addition of fresh volcanic material and the organic debris from the surrounding conifer forest stimulated intense microbial activity. Concentrations of such nutrients as phosphorus, sulfur, manganese, iron, and dissolved organic carbon were markedly elevated. Nitrogen cycle activity was especially important to the lake ecosystem in regulating biogeochemical cycling owing to the limiting abundance of nitrogen compounds. Nitrogen fixation, both aerobic and anaerobic, was active from aerobic benthic and planktonic cyanobacteria with rates up to 210 nmol of N(2) cm h and 667 nmol of N(2) liter h, respectively, and from anaerobic bacteria with rates reaching 220 nmol of N(2) liter h. Nitrification was limited to the aerobic epilimnion and littoral zones where rates were 43 and 261 nmol of NO(2) liter day, respectively. Potential denitrification rates were as high as 30 mumol of N(2)O liter day in the anaerobic hypolimnion. Total bacterial numbers ranged from 1 x 10 to 3 x 10 ml with the number of viable sulfur-metal-oxidizing bacteria reaching 2 x 10 ml in the hypolimnion. A general scenario for the microbial cycling of nitrogen, carbon, sulfur, and metals is presented for volcanically impacted lakes. The important role of nitrogen as these lakes recover from the cataclysmic eruption and proceed back towards their prior status as oligotrophic alpine lakes is emphasized.

  15. Methane production and oxidation in lakes impacted by the May 18, 1980 eruption of Mount St. Helens

    SciTech Connect

    Lilley, M.D.; Baross, J.A.; Dahm, C.N. )

    1988-12-01

    The concentrations of CH{sub 4} and CH{sub 4} oxidation rates were measured in lakes impacted by the May 18, 1980 eruption of Mount St. Helens. The highest CH{sub 4} concentrations were recorded during the first summer after the eruption and ranged in surface waters from 5 microM in the moderately impacted Ryan Lake to 28 microM in the heavily impacted North Coldwater Lake. At depths below the oxic/anoxic interface, CH{sub 4} levels reached 250 microM in North Coldwater Lake, 184 microM in Spirit Lake, 70 microM in Castle Creek lake, and 60 microM in Ryan Lake. The CH{sub 4} flux measurements from these lakes during the summer following the May 18, 1980 eruption were the highest ever recorded in lakes with ranges of 1.1-2.9 mmol CH{sub 4}/sq m/day in the light to moderately impacted McBride and Ryan Lakes to ranges of 17.4-25.3 mmol CH{sub 4}/sq m/day in the heavily impacted Castle Creek, North Coldwater, and Spirit Lakes. Evidence of CH{sub 4} oxidation was seen in all of the lakes during the summer of 1981, and rates of CH{sub 4} oxidation using C{sup 14}-CH{sub 4} were measured in spirit Lake from 1982 to 1986. The highest rates of CH{sub 4} oxidation measured were during the summer stratification and ranged from 50 to 150 nmol CH{sub 4} oxidized/L/day. methane oxidation rates were measured in waters having oxygen concentrations less than 100 microM with highest activity occurring at concentrations of 30-60 microM. 36 refs., 12 figs. 3 tabs.

  16. Genetic structure among coastal tailed frog populations at Mount St. Helens is moderated by post-disturbance management.

    PubMed

    Spear, Stephen F; Crisafulli, Charles M; Storfer, Andrew

    2012-04-01

    Catastrophic disturbances often provide "natural laboratories" that allow for greater understanding of ecological processes and response of natural populations. The 1980 eruption of the Mount St. Helens volcano in Washington, USA, provided a unique opportunity to test biotic effects of a large-scale stochastic disturbance, as well as the influence of post-disturbance management. Despite severe alteration of nearly 600 km2 of habitat, coastal tailed frogs (Ascaphus truei) were found within a portion of the blast area five years after eruption. We investigated the genetic source of recolonization within the blast area and tested whether post-eruption salvage logging and subsequent tree planting influenced tailed frog movement patterns. Our results support widespread recolonization across the blast area from multiple sources, as all sites are grouped into one genetic cluster. Landscape genetic models suggest that gene flow through the unmanaged portion of the blast area is influenced only by distance between sites and the frost-free period (r2 = 0.74). In contrast, gene flow pathways within the blast area where salvage logging and replanting occurred post-eruption are strongly limited (r2 = 0.83) by the physiologically important variables of heat load and precipitation. These data suggest that the lack of understory and coarse wood (downed and standing dead tree boles) refugia in salvaged areas may leave frogs more susceptible to desiccation and mortality than those frogs moving through the naturally regenerated area. Simulated populations based on the landscape genetic models show an increase in the inbreeding coefficient in the managed area relative to the unmanaged blast area. In sum, we show surprising resilience of an amphibian species to a catastrophic disturbance, and we suggest that, at least for this species, naturally regenerating habitat may better maintain long-term genetic diversity of populations than actively managed habitat.

  17. The Stars Belong to Everyone: The rhetorical practices of astronomer and science writer Dr. Helen Sawyer Hogg (1905--1993)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cahill, Maria J.

    Astronomer and science writer Dr. Helen Sawyer Hogg (University of Toronto) reached a variety of audiences through different rhetorical forms. She communicated to her colleagues through her scholarly writings; she reached out to students and the public through her Toronto Star newspaper column entitled "With the Stars," which she authored for thirty years; she wrote The Stars Belong to Everyone , a book that speaks to a lay audience; she hosted a successful television series entitled Ideas ; and she delivered numerous speeches at scientific conferences, professional women's associations, school programs, libraries, and other venues. Adapting technical information for different audiences is at the heart of technical communication, and Sawyer Hogg's work exemplifies adaptation as she moves from writing for the scientific community (as in her articles on globular cluster research) to science writing for lay audiences (as in her newspaper column, book, and script for her television series). Initially she developed her sense of audience through a male perspective informed largely by her scholarly work with two men (Harlow Shapley and her husband, Frank Hogg) as well as the pervasive masculine culture of academic science. This dissertation situates Sawyer Hogg in what is slowly becoming a canon of technical communication scholarship on female scientists. Toward this end, I discuss how she rhetorically engaged two different audiences, one scholarly and one popular, how Sawyer Hogg translated male dominated scientific rhetoric to writing for the public, and how science writing helped her achieve her professional goals. Complementing the archival research in addressing the questions of this study, I employ social construction analysis (also known as the social perspective) for my research methodology. She was ahead of her time and embodied the social perspective years before its definition as a rhetorical concept. In short, my study illuminates one scientific woman's voice

  18. After the disaster: the hydrogeomorphic, ecological, and biological responses to the 1980 eruption of Mount St. Helens, Washington

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Major, Jon J.; Crisafulli, Charlie; Bishop, John

    2009-01-01

    The 1980 eruption of Mount St. Helens caused instantaneous landscape disturbance on a grand scale. On 18 May 1980, an ensemble of volcanic processes, including a debris avalanche, a directed pyroclastic density current, voluminous lahars, and widespread tephra fall, abruptly altered landscape hydrology and geomorphology, and created distinctive disturbance zones having varying impacts on regional biota. Response to the geological and ecological disturbances has been varied and complex. In general, eruption-induced alterations in landscape hydrology and geomorphology led to enhanced stormflow discharge and sediment transport. Although the hydrological response to landscape perturbation has diminished, enhanced sediment transport persists in some basins. In the nearly 30 years since the eruption, 350 million (metric) tons of suspended sediment has been delivered from the Toutle River watershed to the Cowlitz River (roughly 40 times the average annual preeruption suspended-sediment discharge of the Columbia River). Such prodigious sediment loading has wreaked considerable socioeconomic havoc, causing significant channel aggradation and loss of flood conveyance capacity. Significant and ongoing engineering efforts have been required to mitigate these problems. The overall biological evolution of the eruption-impacted landscape can be viewed in terms of a framework of survivor legacies. Despite appearances to the contrary, a surprising number of species survived the eruption, even in the most heavily devastated areas. With time, survivor “hotspots” have coalesced into larger patches, and have served as stepping stones for immigrant colonization. The importance of biological legacies will diminish with time, but the intertwined trajectories of geophysical and biological successions will influence the geological and biological responses to the 1980 eruption for decades to come.

  19. Initial Effects of the Mount St. Helens Eruption on Nitrogen Cycle and Related Chemical Processes in Ryan Lake

    PubMed Central

    Dahm, Clifford N.; Baross, John A.; Ward, Amelia K.; Lilley, Marvin D.; Sedell, James R.

    1983-01-01

    Ryan Lake, a 1.6-hectare basin lake near the periphery of the tree blowdown area in the blast zone 19 km north of Mount St. Helens, was studied from August to October 1980 to determine the microbial and chemical response of the lake to the eruption. Nutrient enrichment through the addition of fresh volcanic material and the organic debris from the surrounding conifer forest stimulated intense microbial activity. Concentrations of such nutrients as phosphorus, sulfur, manganese, iron, and dissolved organic carbon were markedly elevated. Nitrogen cycle activity was especially important to the lake ecosystem in regulating biogeochemical cycling owing to the limiting abundance of nitrogen compounds. Nitrogen fixation, both aerobic and anaerobic, was active from aerobic benthic and planktonic cyanobacteria with rates up to 210 nmol of N2 cm−1 h−1 and 667 nmol of N2 liter−1 h−1, respectively, and from anaerobic bacteria with rates reaching 220 nmol of N2 liter−1 h−1. Nitrification was limited to the aerobic epilimnion and littoral zones where rates were 43 and 261 nmol of NO2 liter−1 day−1, respectively. Potential denitrification rates were as high as 30 μmol of N2O liter−1 day−1 in the anaerobic hypolimnion. Total bacterial numbers ranged from 1 × 106 to 3 × 108 ml−1 with the number of viable sulfur-metal-oxidizing bacteria reaching 2 × 106 ml−1 in the hypolimnion. A general scenario for the microbial cycling of nitrogen, carbon, sulfur, and metals is presented for volcanically impacted lakes. The important role of nitrogen as these lakes recover from the cataclysmic eruption and proceed back towards their prior status as oligotrophic alpine lakes is emphasized. Images PMID:16346298

  20. Eruption dynamics at Mount St. Helens imaged from broadband seismic waveforms: Interaction of the shallow magmatic and hydrothermal systems

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Waite, G.P.; Chouet, B.A.; Dawson, P.B.

    2008-01-01

    The current eruption at Mount St. Helens is characterized by dome building and shallow, repetitive, long-period (LP) earthquakes. Waveform cross-correlation reveals remarkable similarity for a majority of the earthquakes over periods of several weeks. Stacked spectra of these events display multiple peaks between 0.5 and 2 Hz that are common to most stations. Lower-amplitude very-long-period (VLP) events commonly accompany the LP events. We model the source mechanisms of LP and VLP events in the 0.5-4 s and 8-40 s bands, respectively, using data recorded in July 2005 with a 19-station temporary broadband network. The source mechanism of the LP events includes: 1) a volumetric component modeled as resonance of a gently NNW-dipping, steam-filled crack located directly beneath the actively extruding part of the new dome and within 100 m of the crater floor and 2) a vertical single force attributed to movement of the overlying dome. The VLP source, which also includes volumetric and single-force components, is 250 m deeper and NNW of the LP source, at the SW edge of the 1980s lava dome. The volumetric component points to the compression and expansion of a shallow, magma-filled sill, which is subparallel to the hydrothermal crack imaged at the LP source, coupled with a smaller component of expansion and compression of a dike. The single-force components are due to mass advection in the magma conduit. The location, geometry and timing of the sources suggest the VLP and LP events are caused by perturbations of a common crack system.

  1. Monitoring lava-dome growth during the 2004-2008 Mount St. Helens, Washington, eruption using oblique terrestrial photography

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Major, J.J.; Dzurisin, D.; Schilling, S.P.; Poland, Michael P.

    2009-01-01

    We present an analysis of lava dome growth during the 2004–2008 eruption of Mount St. Helens using oblique terrestrial images from a network of remotely placed cameras. This underutilized monitoring tool augmented more traditional monitoring techniques, and was used to provide a robust assessment of the nature, pace, and state of the eruption and to quantify the kinematics of dome growth. Eruption monitoring using terrestrial photography began with a single camera deployed at the mouth of the volcano's crater during the first year of activity. Analysis of those images indicates that the average lineal extrusion rate decayed approximately logarithmically from about 8 m/d to about 2 m/d (± 2 m/d) from November 2004 through December 2005, and suggests that the extrusion rate fluctuated on time scales of days to weeks. From May 2006 through September 2007, imagery from multiple cameras deployed around the volcano allowed determination of 3-dimensional motion across the dome complex. Analysis of the multi-camera imagery shows spatially differential, but remarkably steady to gradually slowing, motion, from about 1–2 m/d from May through October 2006, to about 0.2–1.0 m/d from May through September 2007. In contrast to the fluctuations in lineal extrusion rate documented during the first year of eruption, dome motion from May 2006 through September 2007 was monotonic (± 0.10 m/d) to gradually slowing on time scales of weeks to months. The ability to measure spatial and temporal rates of motion of the effusing lava dome from oblique terrestrial photographs provided a significant, and sometimes the sole, means of identifying and quantifying dome growth during the eruption, and it demonstrates the utility of using frequent, long-term terrestrial photography to monitor and study volcanic eruptions.

  2. Liftoff of the 18 May 1980 surge of Mount St. Helens (USA) and the deposits left behind

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gardner, James E.; Andrews, Benjamin J.; Dennen, Robert

    2017-01-01

    The distance that ground-hugging pyroclastic density currents travel is limited partly by when they reverse buoyancy and liftoff into the atmosphere. It is not clear, however, what deposits are left behind by lofting flows. One current that was seen to liftoff was the surge erupted from Mount St. Helens on the morning of 18 May 1980. Before lofting, it had leveled a large area of thick forest (the blowdown zone). The outer edge of the devastated area—where trees were scorched but left standing (the scorched zone)—is where the surge is thought to have lifted off. Deposits in the outer parts of the blowdown and in the scorched zone were examined at 32 sites. The important finding is that the laterally moving surge traveled through the scorched zone, and hence, the change in tree damage does not mark the runout distance of the surge. Buoyancy reversal and liftoff are thus not preserved in the deposits where the surge lofted upwards. We propose, based on interpretation of eyewitness accounts and the impacts of the surge on trees and vehicles, that the surge consisted of a faster, dilute "overcurrent" and a slower "undercurrent," where most of the mass (and heat) was retained. Reasonable estimates for flow density and velocity show that dynamic pressure of the surge (i.e., its ability to topple trees) peaked near the base of the overcurrent. We propose that where the overcurrent began to liftoff, the height of peak dynamic pressure rose above the trees and stopped toppling them. The slower undercurrent continued forward, however, scorching trees, but lacked the dynamic pressure needed to topple them. Grain-size variations argue that it slowed from ˜30 m s-1 when it entered the scorched zone to ˜3 m s-1 at the far end.

  3. Swift snowmelt and floods (lahars) caused by great pyroclastic surge at Mount St Helens volcano, Washington, 18 May 1980

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Waitt, R.B.

    1989-01-01

    The initial explosions at Mount St. Helens, Washington, on the moring of 18 May 1980 developed into a huge pyroclastic surge that generated catastrophic floods off the east and west flanks of the volcano. Near-source surge deposits on the east and west were lithic, sorted, lacking in accretionary lapilli and vesiculated ash, not plastered against upright obstacles, and hot enough to char wood - all attributes of dry pyroclastic surge. Material deposited at the surge base on steep slopes near the volcano transformed into high-concentration lithic pyroclastic flows whose deposits contain charred wood and other features indicating that these flows were hot and dry. Stratigraphy shows that even the tail of the surge had passed the east and west volcano flanks before the geomorphically distinct floods (lahars) arrived. This field evidence undermines hypotheses that the turbulent surge was itself wet and that its heavy components segregated out to transform directly into lahars. Nor is there evidence that meters-thick snow-slab avalanches intimately mixed with the surge to form the floods. The floods must have instead originated by swift snowmelt at the base of a hot and relatively dry turbulent surge. Impacting hot pyroclasts probably transferred downslope momentum to the snow surface and churned snow grains into the surge base. Melting snow and accumulating hot surge debris may have moved initially as thousands of small thin slushflows. As these flows removed the surface snow and pyroclasts, newly uncovered snow was partly melted by the turbulent surge base; this and accumulating hot surge debris in turn began flowing, a self-sustaining process feeding the initial flows. The flows thus grew swiftly over tens of seconds and united downslope into great slushy ejecta-laden sheetfloods. Gravity accelerated the floods to more than 100 km/h as they swept down and off the volcano flanks while the snow component melted to form great debris-rich floods (lahars) channeled into

  4. Effects of ground water, slope stability, and seismic hazard on the stability of the South Fork Castle Creek blockage in the Mount St. Helens Area, Washington

    SciTech Connect

    Meyer, W.; Sabol, M.A.; Glicken, H.X.; Voight, B.

    1984-01-01

    South Fork Castle Creek was blocked by the debris avalanche that occurred during the May 18, 1980, eruption of Mount St. Helens, Washington. A lake formed behind the blockage, eventually reaching a volume of approximately 19,000 acre-feet prior to construction of a spillway - a volume sufficiently large to pose a flood hazard of unknown magnitude to downstream areas if the lake were to break out as a result of blockage failure. Breakout of lakes formed in a similar fashion is fairly common and several such events occurring in recent times have posed hazards around the world. Analyses of blockage stability included determining the effects of gravitational forces and horizontal forces induced by credible earthquakes from the Mount St. Helens seismic zone, which passes within several miles of the blockage. The blockage is stable at September 1983 water levels under static gravitational forces. If an earthquake with magnitude near 6.0 occurred with September 1983 water levels, movement on the order of 5 feet on both upstream and downstream parts of the blockage over much of its length could potentially occur. If the sliding blocks liquified, retrogressive failure could lead to lake breakout, but this is not considered to be probable. 24 refs., 25 figs., 5 tabs.

  5. Dynamics of seismogenic volcanic extrusion resisted by a solid surface plug, Mount St. Helens, 2004-2005: Chapter 21 in A volcano rekindled: the renewed eruption of Mount St. Helens, 2004-2006

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Iverson, Richard M.; Sherrod, David R.; Scott, William E.; Stauffer, Peter H.

    2008-01-01

    The 2004-5 eruption of Mount St. Helens exhibited sustained, near-equilibrium behavior characterized by nearly steady extrusion of a solid dacite plug and nearly periodic occurrence of shallow earthquakes. Diverse data support the hypothesis that these earthquakes resulted from stick-slip motion along the margins of the plug as it was forced incrementally upward by ascending, solidifying, gas-poor magma. I formalize this hypothesis with a mathematical model derived by assuming that magma enters the base of the eruption conduit at a steady rate, invoking conservation of mass and momentum of the magma and plug, and postulating simple constitutive equations that describe magma and conduit compressibilities and friction along the plug margins. Reduction of the model equations reveals a strong mathematical analogy between the dynamics of the magma-plug system and those of a variably damped oscillator. Oscillations in extrusion velocity result from the interaction of plug inertia, a variable upward force due to magma pressure, and a downward force due to the plug weight. Damping of oscillations depends mostly on plug-boundary friction, and oscillations grow unstably if friction exhibits rate weakening similar to that observed in experiments. When growth of oscillations causes the extrusion rate to reach zero, however, gravity causes friction to reverse direction, and this reversal instigates a transition from unstable oscillations to self-regulating stick-slip cycles. The transition occurs irrespective of the details of rate-weakening behavior, and repetitive stick-slip cycles are, therefore, robust features of the system’s dynamics. The presence of a highly compressible elastic driving element (that is, magma containing bubbles) appears crucial for enabling seismogenic slip events to occur repeatedly at the shallow earthquake focal depths (8 N. These results imply that the system’s self-regulating behavior is not susceptible to dramatic change--provided that the

  6. Topographic controls on pyroclastic density current dynamics: Insight from 18 May 1980 deposits at Mount St. Helens, Washington (USA)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brand, Brittany D.; Bendaña, Sylvana; Self, Stephen; Pollock, Nicholas

    2016-07-01

    Our ability to interpret the deposits of pyroclastic density currents (PDCs) is critical for understanding the transport and depositional processes that control PDC dynamics. This paper focuses on the influence of slope on flow dynamics and criticality as recorded in PDC deposits from the 18 May 1980 eruption of Mt. St. Helens (USA). PDC deposits are found along the steep flanks (10°-30°) and across the pumice plain ( 5°) up to 8 km north of the volcano. Granulometry, componentry and descriptions of depositional characteristics (e.g., bedform morphology) are recorded with distance from source. The pumice plain deposits are primarily thick (3-12 m), massive and poorly-sorted, and represent deposition from a series of concentrated PDCs. By contrast, the steep flank deposits are stratified to cross-stratified, suggesting deposition from PDCs where turbulence strongly influenced transport and depositional processes. We propose that acceleration of the concentrated PDCs along the steep flanks resulted in thinning of the concentrated, basal region of the current(s). Enhanced entrainment of ambient air, and autofluidization from upward fluxes of air from substrate interstices and plunging breakers across rugged, irregular topography further inflated the currents to the point that the overriding turbulent region strongly influenced transport and depositional mechanisms. Acceleration in combination with partial confinement in slot canyons and high surface roughness would also increase basal shear stress, further promoting shear and traction transport in the basal region of the current. Conditions along the steep flank resulted in supercritical flow, as recorded by regressive bedforms, which gradually transitioned to subcritical flow downstream as the concentrated basal region thickness increased as a function of decreasing slope and flow energy. We also find that (1) PDCs were erosive into the underlying granular substrate along high slopes (> 25°) where currents were

  7. Discrete Slip, Amorphous Silica and Pore Structure of Slickensided Gouge Layers in 2004-2006 Mt. St. Helens Lava Domes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, J. C.; Kennedy, L. A.; Russell, J. K.; Friedlander, B.

    2012-12-01

    Spines of dacite lava formed during the 2004-2006 Mt. St. Helens (MSH) effusion event are enveloped by extrusion gouges created during upward movement of crystallized magma. Multiple slickenside sets form one of the most distinctive feature types within this gouge carapace. Macroscopically, slickenside surfaces are seen to be composite features composed of discrete slip surfaces in Y- and R-shear orientations. In general, the spacing between the slip surfaces decreases toward the outer, exposed slickensided surface until they appear to coalesce. Slickensides are formed in association with all MSH spines, unlike some other fault rock fabrics within the gouge; therefore, their morphology can be inferred to be independent of syn-faulting residence time. As a significant record of the extrusion process, the MSH slickensides have been characterized by analytical scanning/transmission electron microscopy (STEM) to elucidate the mechanisms of energy dissipation and material transport. At the scale of these observations, the individual surfaces within a slickenside set comprise comminution bands (10-20 μm wide), each bounded by a discrete slip surface. The internal structure of these shear bands consists of a consistent sense of decreasing grain size toward the slip surface away and away from the spire core; grain size is routinely less than 100nm within the bands. The 1-5 μm wide slip layers that bound comminution bands are variously composed of amorphous silica or polycrystalline aggregates of sub-100nm grain size plagioclase, k-feldspar and quartz. Grain aggregates in the slip layer form an extended fabric parallel to the displacement direction, creating a "flow" foliation at edges of the shears. Specific to the slip bands are nano-scale pores, often silica-filled, whose circular cross-sections indicate the presence of fluids throughout slickenside formation. It is contended that the development of discrete slip surfaces is consistent with formation of the gouge by

  8. A characteristic earthquake model of the seismicity preceding the eruption of Mount St. Helens on 18 May 1980

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Main, Ian G.

    1987-12-01

    The two classes of earthquakes which preceded the explosive eruption of Mount St. Helens, Washington, on 18 May 1980, can be related to two different forms of energy release. This is manifest both in the predominant periods of the two classes of seismic energy release at 1.0 and 0.55 s, and in the ratio of their source dimensions, in the range 2 : 1 to 6 : 1, inferred from characteristic magnitudes of the two possible classes of earthquakes apparent in the discrete frequency-magnitude distribution. The observed increase in the ratio of long to short period amplitudes of surface waves recorded on MSO, a local WWSSN station, can be numerically related to the growth of a magma chamber or conduit within which are generated the transient oscillations thought to be responsible for volcanic tremor. These calculations predict an increase in the chamber's diameter at a rate of 2-7 m day -1 at depth in the 2 months preceding the eruption, and this is consistent with an observed growth rate of 2 m day -1 of the precursory bulge which appeared at the surface on the mountain's north flank at the time. The frequency-magnitude distribution is analysed in two parts corresponding to a power law at low magnitudes and a Gaussian distribution of typical fault lengths at high magnitudes—an extension of the characteristic earthquake model first developed for individual fault zones. The power law can in general have a non-integer exponent, which can be equated to a fractal self-similarity dimension D. Temporal changes in D, which is proportional to the seismic b-value, are proposed as an alternative and complementary description of the way seismic energy is released to the more commonly used viewpoints of changes in stress and heterogeneity. Despite a reassessment of the completeness of the magnitude catalogue, no clear seismic precursor to the explosive eruption is observed in the b-value, although an earlier phase of phreatic eruptions was strongly associated with a b-value anomaly.

  9. Reanalysis of the Pyroclastic Fall Deposit from the 18 May 1980 Eruption of Mount Saint Helens, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durant, A. J.; Rose, W. I.; Horwell, C. J.; Sarna-Wojcicki, A. M.; Wan, E.; Dartevelle, S.; Volentik, A. C.

    2006-12-01

    A new analysis of the distal fall deposit from the 18 May 1980 Eruption of Mount Saint Helens (MSH80) is presented. The removal of fine distal volcanic ash from the atmosphere is complex: From the data presented here, it is clear that meteorological processes and atmospheric dynamics influence particle settling. Original samples were analysed by a Malvern Instruments Mastersizer 2000 to determine particle size through the range 0.1-2000 μm. MSH80 fallout consists of material from an initial directed blast and ~9 hour Plinian phase, which was later dominated by coignimbrite input. A striking feature of the distal ashfall deposit is a secondary maximum in mass deposited located ~300 km from the volcano, previously attributed to ash aggregation and enhanced particle settling. Median particle size averaged by transect decreases with distance from 2.91 Φ at ~150 km to 5.35 Φ at ~300 km, then increases again before decreasing to a minimum of 5.22 Φ at ~650 km. Investigation of size fractions averaged by transect show 0-3 Φ proportions decrease with distance and >4 Φ proportions increase with distance. Contribution of 5-7 Φ size fractions peak at the secondary maximum, which may suggest that ash aggregation selectively binds particles of this size. Proportions of particles >9 Φ (<1.95 μm diameter ~ PM2.5; the most pertinent phi size fraction for health hazard assessment) remain fairly constant over the deposit at ~4-5 wt%. Samples beyond ~300 km had remarkably similar grainsize characteristics. All samples are poorly sorted with transect average σ values ranging from 2.30-1.64 Φ; samples in the secondary maximum region have the highest measured sorting coefficients. By transect average, all samples are positively skewed (0.5-0.79 Φ) and strongly leptokurtic (2.75-3.21 Φ). Some bimodal samples are present at distances less than ~300 km. Enhancement of coarse fractions between 0-3 Φ was observed to the south of these transects and may represent the footprint

  10. iMUSH-aided fault-plane studies at Mount St. Helens, Washington: Evidence for magma recharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moran, S. C.; Abers, G. A.; Creager, K. C.; Denlinger, R. P.; Ulberg, C. W.; Vidale, J. E.

    2014-12-01

    Background seismicity has been relatively low at Mount St. Helens (MSH) following its last eruption in 2004-2008, with an average of 95 located M > 0 events per year. This is in marked contrast to the five years immediately following the 1980-86 eruptive period, when the yearly average rate was about 400 events. During that time there was clear evidence, in the form of rotated fault-plane solutions (FPS), that magma recharge was occurring at depths > 2 km. Despite lower seismicity rates and generally smaller earthquakes, an improved seismic network recorded data sufficient to allow for computation of 88 FPS for the period 2008-2013. These FPS show that stress fields at depths > 2 km were rotated in a manner similar to that seen post-1980-86, providing evidence that magma recharge is again occurring at MSH. A subtle trend towards slightly deeper earthquakes since 2011 is consistent with this hypothesis, as is previously reported outward motion on GPS stations that has been modeled with an inflationary source beneath the volcano at ~8-9 km depth. In the summer of 2014, 70 broadband seismometers were installed within 50 km of MSH as part of the iMUSH experiment, greatly increasing the number of stations close enough to MSH to obtain good recordings of MSH-generated events. By the Fall AGU meeting we expect to have several months of data collected and processed from iMUSH stations. These data should greatly improve constraints on first-motion FPS and/or the number of events for which well-constrained FPS can be computed. In addition, the density of three-component stations may allow for computation of moment tensor solutions for larger events (M > 1), which typically occur ~20 times per year. This would allow us to assess whether recent MSH events have significant non-double-couple components, something that could indicate fluid involvement and that has previously only been seen during eruptive periods at MSH via short-term deployments of broadband stations.

  11. Interpreting Degassing Paths in Crystallizing Magmas: The Role of CO2 in Coupled Degassing and Crystallization at Mount St. Helens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riker, J. M.; Blundy, J.; Rust, A.

    2012-12-01

    Coupled degassing and crystallization exert a first-order control on the physical properties of erupting magmas. Although the compositions and textures of natural volcanic rocks give evidence of varied and complex degassing histories, few experimental studies examine the role of multi-component fluids in degassing-induced crystallization. To address this problem, we have performed a series of isothermal experiments on synthetic Mount St. Helens rhyodacite saturated with binary H2O-CO2 fluids, added to starting materials as water ± carbonate or silver oxalate. Our runs simulate equilibrium crystallization driven by volatile exsolution at depths between a mid-crustal magma storage region and the near-surface (4000 to 250 bars). Fluid compositions range from XH2Ovapor 0.6-1.0, as estimated by mass balance using glass H2O and CO2 contents measured by ion microprobe. Within this parameter space, the stability of all phases (plagioclase, amphibole, orthopyroxene, Fe-Ti oxides, and rarer apatite and silica) varies as a function of melt H2O content, such that phase assemblages and proportions depend strongly on fluid composition. Plagioclase becomes increasingly sodic with decreasing pressure and XH2Ovapor (An52 to An33), while redox conditions exert a primary control on the compositions of mafic phases. Total crystallinity of run products varies systematically with pressure and XH2Ovapor from 0 to 44 wt%; importantly, the extent to which changes in vapor composition drive crystallization is sensitive to pressure. We use our experimental results to compare the compositional and textural evolution of magmas subject to different gas transport scenarios, including closed-system degassing, isobaric vapor fluxing, and vapor-buffered ascent. In each scenario, magmas evolve along crystallization trajectories that are distinct from one another and from the simpler case of H2O-saturated ascent. A preliminary suite of dynamic decompression experiments incorporating H2O-CO2 fluids

  12. Subevents of long-period seismicity: implications for hydrothermal dynamics during the 2004-2008 eruption of Mount St. Helens

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Matoza, Robin S.; Chouet, Bernard A.

    2010-01-01

    One of the most striking aspects of seismicity during the 2004–2008 eruption of Mount St. Helens (MSH) was the precise regularity in occurrence of repetitive long-period (LP) or “drumbeat” events over sustained time periods. However, this precise regularity was not always observed, and at times the temporal occurrence of LP events became more random. In addition, accompanying the dominant LP class of events during the 2004–2008 MSH eruption, there was a near-continuous, randomly occurring series of smaller seismic events. These subevents are not always simply small-amplitude versions of the dominant LP class of events but appear instead to result from a separate random process only loosely coupled to the main LP source mechanism. We present an analysis of the interevent time and amplitude distributions of the subevents, using waveform cross correlation to separate LP events from the subevents. We also discuss seismic tremor that accompanied the 8 March 2005 phreatic explosion event at MSH. This tremor consists of a rapid succession of LPs and subevents triggered during the explosion, in addition to broadband noise from the sustained degassing. Immediately afterward, seismicity returned to the pre-explosion occurrence pattern. This triggering in relation to the rapid ejection of steam from the system, and subsequent return to pre-explosion seismicity, suggests that both seismic event types originated in a region of the subsurface hydrothermal system that was (1) in contact with the reservoir feeding the 8 March 2005 phreatic explosion but (2) not destroyed or drained by the explosion event. Finally, we discuss possible thermodynamic conditions in a pressurized hydrothermal crack that could give rise to seismicity. Pressure drop estimates for typical LP events are not generally large enough to perturb pure water in a shallow hydrothermal crack into an unstable state. However, dissolved volatiles such as CO2 may lead to a more unstable system, increasing the

  13. Effects of slope on the formation of dunes in dilute, turbulent pyroclastic currents: May 18th, 1980 Mt. St. Helens eruption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bendana, Sylvana; Brand, Brittany D.; Self, Stephen

    2014-05-01

    The flanks of Mt St Helens volcano (MSH) are draped with thin, cross-stratified and stratified pyroclastic density current (PDC) deposits. These are known as the proximal bedded deposits produced during the May 18th, 1980 eruption of MSH. While the concentrated portions of the afternoon PDCs followed deep topographic drainages down the steep flanks of the volcano, the dilute overriding cloud partially decoupled to develop fully dilute, turbulent PDCs on the flanks of the volcano (Beeson, D.L. 1988. Proximal Flank Facies of the May 18, 1980 Ignimbrite: Mt. St. Helens, Washington.). The deposits along the flank thus vary greatly from those found in the pumice plain, which are generally thick, massive, poorly-sorted, block-rich deposits associated with the more concentrated portions of the flow (Brand et al, accepted. Dynamics of pyroclastic density currents: Conditions that promote substrate erosion and self-channelization - Mount St Helens, Washington (USA). JVGR). We explore the influence of topography on the formation of these dilute currents and influence of slope on the currents transport and depositional mechanisms. The deposits on steeper slopes (>15°) are fines depleted relative to the proximal bedded deposits on shallower slopes (<15°). Bedform amplitude and wavelength increase with increasing slope, as does the occurrence of regressive dunes. Increasing slope causes an increase in flow velocity and thus an increase in flow turbulence. The fines depleted deposits suggest that fine ash elutriation is more efficient in flows with stronger turbulence. The longer wavelength and amplitudes suggest that bedform morphology is directly related to flow velocity, an important finding since the controls on bedform wavelength and amplitude in density stratified flows remains poorly constrained. The occurrence of regressive dunes, often interpreted as high flow-regime bedforms, on steeper slopes relative to progressive dunes on shallower slopes further attests to the

  14. Evolving magma storage conditions beneath Mount St. Helens inferred from chemical variations in melt inclusions from the 1980-1986 and current (2004-2006) eruptions: Chapter 33 in A volcano rekindled: the renewed eruption of Mount St. Helens, 2004-2006

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Blundy, Jon; Cashman, Katharine V.; Berlo, Kim; Sherrod, David R.; Scott, William E.; Stauffer, Peter H.

    2008-01-01

    O contents, consistent with magma extraction from shallow depths. Highly enriched Li in melt inclusions suggests that vapor transport of Li is a characteristic feature of Mount St. Helens. Melt inclusions from the current eruption have subtly different trace-element chemistry from all but one of the 1980-86 melt inclusions, with steeper rareearth-element (REE) patterns and low U, Th, and high-fieldstrength elements (HFSE), indicating addition of a new melt component to the magma system. It is anticipated that increasing involvement of the new melt component will be evident as the current eruption proceeds.

  15. Overview of the 2004 to 2006, and continuing, eruption of Mount St. Helens, Washington: Chapter 1 in A volcano rekindled: the renewed eruption of Mount St. Helens, 2004-2006

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Scott, William E.; Sherrod, David R.; Gardner, Cynthia A.; Sherrod, David R.; Scott, William E.; Stauffer, Peter H.

    2008-01-01

    Rapid onset of unrest at Mount St. Helens on September 23, 2004, initiated an uninterrupted lava-dome-building eruption that continues to the time of writing this overview (spring 2006) for a volume of papers focused on this eruption. About three weeks of intense seismic unrest and localized surface uplift, punctuated by four brief explosions, constituted a ventclearing phase, during which there was a frenzy of media attention and considerable uncertainty regarding the likely course of the eruption. The third week exhibited lessened seismicity and only minor venting of steam and ash, but rapid growth of the uplift, or welt, south of the 1980-86 lava dome proceeded as magma continued to push upward. Crystalrich dacite (~65 weight percent SiO2) lava first appeared at the surface on October 11, 2004, beginning the growth of a complex lava dome of uniform chemical composition accompanied by persistent but low levels of seismicity, rare explosions, low gas emissions, and frequent rockfalls. Petrologic studies suggest that the dome lava is chiefly of 1980s vintage, but with an admixed portion of new dacite. Alternatively, it may derive from a part of the magma chamber not tapped by 1980s eruptions. Regardless, detailed investigations of crystal chemistry, melt inclusions, and isotopes reveal a complex magmatic history. Largely episodic extrusion between 1980 and 1986 produced a relatively symmetrical lava dome composed of stubby lobes. In contrast, continuous extrusion at mean rates of about 5 m3/s in autumn 2004 to 3/s in early 2006 has produced an east-west ridge of three mounds with total volume about equal to that of the old dome. During much of late 2004 to summer 2005, a succession of spines, two recumbent and one steeply sloping and each mantled by striated gouge, grew to nearly 500 m in length in the southeastern sector of the 1980 crater and later disintegrated into two mounds. Since then, growth has been concentrated in the southwestern sector, producing a

  16. Changes in channel geometry of six eruption-affected tributaries of the Lewis River, 1980-82, Mount St. Helens, Washington

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Martinson, H.A.; Finneran, S.D.; Topinka, L.J.

    1984-01-01

    The May 18, 1980, eruption of Mount St. Helens generated a lateral blast, lahars and tephra deposits that altered tributary channels in the Lewis River drainage basin. In order to assess potential flood hazards, study channel adjustments, and construct a sediment budget for the perturbed drainages on the east and southeast flanks of the volcano, channel cross sections were monumented and surveyed on Pine Creek, Muddy River, and Smith Creek during September and October of 1980. Additional cross sections were monumented and surveyed on Swift Creek, Bean Creek, and Clearwater Creek during the summer of 1981. The network of 88 channel cross sections has been resurveyed annually. Selected cross sections have been surveyed more frequently, following periods of higher flow. The repetitive cross-section surveys provide measurements of bank erosion or accretion and of channel erosion or aggradation. The report presents channel cross-section profiles constructed from the survey data collected during water years 1980-82. (USGS)

  17. Biography as an art form: the story of Helen Flanders Dunbar, M.D., Ph.D., B.D., and Med. Sci. D.

    PubMed

    Hart, Curtis W

    2014-06-01

    Helen Flanders Dunbar (1902-1959) was a physician, medieval and Renaissance scholar, theologian, and founder of the American Psychosomatic Society and its journal Psychosomatic Medicine. Her contributions are not currently well known but deserve recognition from all those involved or interested in the dialogue between medicine and spirituality. This essay explores Dunbar's personal history and professional achievements. It focuses particular attention on a feminist perspective regarding her life and work. It will conclude with a discussion of how biography, as an art form, transforms both author and audience. This essay was originally presented as the Second Annual J.R. Williams Memorial Lecture on Spirituality and Medicine at the Tulane School of Medicine in fall 2013.

  18. Archive of Digital Boomer Seismic Reflection Data Collected During USGS Field Activity 08LCA04 in Lakes Cherry, Helen, Hiawassee, Louisa, and Prevatt, Central Florida, September 2008

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Harrison, Arnell S.; Dadisman, Shawn V.; Davis, Jeffrey B.; Flocks, James G.; Wiese, Dana S.

    2009-01-01

    From September 2 through 4, 2008, the U.S. Geological Survey and St. Johns River Water Management District (SJRWMD) conducted geophysical surveys in Lakes Cherry, Helen, Hiawassee, Louisa, and Prevatt, central Florida. This report serves as an archive of unprocessed digital boomer seismic reflection data, trackline maps, navigation files, GIS information, FACS logs, and formal FGDC metadata. Filtered and gained digital images of the seismic profiles are also provided. The archived trace data are in standard Society of Exploration Geophysicists (SEG) SEG-Y format (Barry and others, 1975) and may be downloaded and processed with commercial or public domain software such as Seismic Unix (SU). Example SU processing scripts and USGS software for viewing the SEG-Y files (Zihlman, 1992) are also provided.

  19. The past, present, and future of paediatric cardiology training at the Johns Hopkins Hospital, in the tradition of Dr Helen Taussig.

    PubMed

    Beasley, Gary S; Murphy, Anne M; Brenner, Joel I; Ravekes, William J

    2016-12-01

    Johns Hopkins has been a leader in paediatric cardiology for over 85 years. In the 1940s, Dr Helen Taussig began training fellows in paediatric cardiology at Johns Hopkins at a time when the diagnosis and treatment of CHD were in the earliest stage. Under her leadership, the fellowship developed a strong foundation that has continued to evolve to meet the current needs of learners and educators. In the current era, the Johns Hopkins programme implements the current theories of adult education and actively engages our fellows in learning as well as teaching. The programme uses techniques such as flipped classroom, structured case-based small-group learning, observed and structured clinical examination, simulations, and innovative educational technology. These strategies combined with our faculty and rich history give our fellows a unique educational experience.

  20. Analysis of long-period seismic waves excited by the May 18, 1980, eruption of Mount St. Helens - A terrestrial monopole

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kanamori, H.; Given, J. W.

    1982-01-01

    The eruption of Mount St. Helens on May 18, 1980, excited long-period seismic waves, and high-quality digital seismograms were recorded. The present investigation is concerned with the results of detailed analyses of Rayleigh and Love waves excited by this eruption. Since the elastic response of the earth is very accurately known, it is possible to retrieve the source parameters of this unique event from observations at far-field. It is shown that the source can be represented by a nearly horizontal single force. The conducted analysis is concerned with only long-period characteristics of the source. The short-period behavior of the source is difficult to determine from surface waves because the available knowledge of the earth's response is less accurate than at long periods.

  1. Hydrologic data for computation of sediment discharge : Toutle and North Fork Toutle Rivers near Mount St. Helens, Washington, water years 1980-84

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Childers, Dallas; Hammond, Stephen E.; Johnson, William P.

    1988-01-01

    Immediately after the devastating May 18, 1980, eruption of Mount St. Helens, a program was initiated by the U.S. Geological Survey to study the streamflow and sediment characteristics of streams impacted by the eruption. Some of the data gathered in that program are presented in this report. Data are presented for two key sites in the Toutle River basin: North Fork Toutle River near Kid Valley, and Toutle River at Tower Road, near Silver Lake. The types of data presented are appropriate for use with sediment transport formulas; however, the data are also intended for use in a wide variety of additional applications. The data presented in this report are unique because they delineate flow conditions possessing great potential fo sediment transport. The data define unusually high suspended-sediment concentration. Data defining hydraulic, peak discharge, suspended-sediment, and bed-material characteristics are presented. (USGS)

  2. Preliminary report on physical, chemical and mineralogical composition and health implications of ash from the Mount St. Helens eruption of May 18, 1980

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-06-01

    On May 18, 1980 at 8:32 AM Pacific Daylight Time, a major eruption of ash and pyroclastics occurred from the Mount St. Helens volcano in Washington State. These and subsequent eruptions resulted in deposition of volcanic ash on large areas of the state of Washington and neighboring states. Beginning the day of the eruption and continuing through the following week, samples of the ash were collected for analysis by Battelle staff from various parts of eastern Washington and Montana. Specifically, samples were obtained from Richland, Yakima, Ahtanum, Tieton Ranger Station, Pullman, Rosalia, Moses Lake, Spokane, Ellensburg, Washington and Missoula, Montana. These materials were subjected to a variety of analyses including chemical, mineralogical and physical characterization and an in vitro biological assay to determine the effects of the ash on the pulmonary macrophage. This test gives an indication of the potential of the ash to cause respiratory diseases such as silicosis. Preliminary results of these various analyses are described.

  3. Post-Eruption Changes in Channel Geometry of Streams in the Toutle River Drainage Basin, 1980-82, Mount St. Helens, Washington

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Meyer, D.F.; Nolan, K. Michael; Dodge, J.E.

    1985-01-01

    The May 18, 1980, eruption of Mount St. Helens, Washington, generated a debris avalanche, lateral blast, lahars, and tephra deposits that altered mainstem and tributary channels within the Toutle River drainage basin. Channel cross sections were monumented and surveyed on North Fork Toutle River and its tributaries, on South Fork Toutle River, on Green River, and on Toutle River in 1980 and 1981. These streams drain the north and west flanks of the volcano. The network of channel cross sections was surveyed more frequently following periods of higher flow. The repetitive cross-section surveys provide measurements of bank erosion or accretion and of channel erosion or aggradation. These data can be used to determine erosion rates, and to identify sources and storage sites of sediment in sediment budget computations. This report presents channel cross-section profiles constructed from the survey data collected during water years 1980 through 1982.

  4. Patterns of earthquakes and the effect of solid earth and ocean load tides at Mount St. Helens prior to the May 18, 1980, eruption

    SciTech Connect

    McNutt, S.R.; Beavan, R.J.

    1984-05-10

    Seismographs near Mount St. Helens Volcano recorded an earthquake swarm lasting nearly 2 months prior to the May 18, 1980, eruption. The earthquakes are divided into four classes based on station CPW (..delta.. = 116 km) seismogram characteristics: (1) events with Sv:P amplitude ratio > 3 and dominant frequency > 3 Hz; (2) events with Sv:P ratio between 1 and 3 and dominant frequency > 2 Hz; (3) events similar to characteristic 2 but with a strong (probably surface wave) phase just after the S phase; and (4) events with frequencies between 1 and 2 Hz lacking a clear S phase. The seismicity pattern for each of the four classes is unique. Solid earth stress and strain tides were calculated at the average hypocentral depth of 4 km. Stress and strain tides induced by ocean loading were also calculated; their amplitudes are typically 20-40% those of the solid earth tides at the location of Mount St. Helens. A weak but significant correlation exists between the latter two classes of events and the tides for a time interval of about 5 days preceding the first onset of volcanic tremor and about 5 days thereafter. The polarity of the correlation is opposite for the two classes of events. In each case, the phase of the correlation changes systematically with time, the changes coinciding with the onset of tremor on March 31 and with a pronounced decrease in earthquake energy release rate on April 3. There are no significant correlations between the tides and the number of events or energy release of these two classes of earthquakes during any other interval between March 20 and May 18, 1980. The first two classes of events show no evidence of significant tidal correlation at any time during the study period. 20 references, 8 figures, 2 tables.

  5. Dynamics of pyroclastic density currents: Conditions that promote substrate erosion and self-channelization - Mount St Helens, Washington (USA)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brand, Brittany D.; Mackaman-Lofland, Chelsea; Pollock, Nicholas M.; Bendaña, Sylvana; Dawson, Blaine; Wichgers, Pamela

    2014-04-01

    The May 18th, 1980 eruption of Mount St. Helens (MSH) produced multiple pyroclastic density currents (PDCs), burying the area north of the volcano under 10s of meters of deposits. Detailed measurements of recently exposed strata from these PDCs provide substantial insight into the dynamics of concentrated currents including inferences on particle-particle interactions, current mobility due to sedimentation fluidization and internal pore pressure, particle support mechanisms, the influence of surface roughness and the conditions that promote substrate erosion and self-channelization. Four primary flow units are identified along the extensive drainage system north of the volcano. Each flow unit has intricate vertical and lateral facies changes and complex cross-cutting relationships away from source. Each flow unit is an accumulation from an unsteady but locally sustained PDC or an amalgamation of several PDC pulses. The PDCs associated with Units I and II likely occurred during the pre-climactic, waxing phase of the eruption. These currents flowed around and filled in the hummocky topography, leaving the massive to diffusely-stratified deposits of Units I and II. The deposits of both Units I and II are generally more massive in low lying areas and more stratified in areas of high surface roughness, suggesting that surface roughness enhanced basal shear stress within the flow boundary. Units III and IV are associated with the climactic phase of the eruption, which produced the most voluminous and wide-spread PDCs. Both flow units are characteristically massive and enriched in vent-derived lithic blocks. These currents flowed over and around the debris avalanche deposits, as evidenced by the erosion of blocks from the hummocks. Unit III is massive, poorly sorted, and shows little to no evidence of elutriation or segregation of lithics and pumice, suggesting a highly concentrated current where size-density segregation was suppressed. Unit IV shows similar depositional

  6. Dynamics of pyroclastic density currents: Conditions that promote substrate erosion and self-channelization - Mount St Helens, Washington (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brand, B. D.; Pollock, N. M.; Mackaman-Lofland, C. A.; Bendana, S.

    2013-12-01

    The May 18th, 1980 eruption of Mount St. Helens (MSH) produced multiple pyroclastic density currents (PDCs), burying the area north of the volcano under 10s of meters of deposits. Detailed measurements of recently exposed strata from these PDCs provide substantial insight into the dynamics of concentrated currents including inferences on particle-particle interactions, current mobility due to sedimentation fluidization and internal pore pressure, particle support mechanisms, the influence of surface roughness and the conditions that promote substrate erosion and self-channelization. Four primary flow units are identified along the extensive drainage system north of the volcano. The PDCs associated with Units I and II likely occurred during the pre-climactic, waxing phase of the eruption. These currents flowed around and filled in the hummocky topography left behind by the earlier debris avalanche, leaving the massive to diffusely-stratified deposits of Units I and II. The deposits of both Units I and II are generally massive in low lying areas and stratified in areas of high surface roughness, suggesting that surface roughness enhanced basal shear stress within the flow boundary. Units III and IV are associated with the climactic phase of the eruption, which produced the most voluminous and wide-spread PDCs. Both flow units are characteristically massive and enriched in vent-derived lithic blocks. However, an increase in the proportion and size of lithic blocks is found (1) downstream of debris avalanche hummocks, suggesting the PDCs flowed over and around debris avalanche hummocks and were energetic enough to locally entrain accidental lithics from the hummocks and transport them tens of meters downstream, and (2) within large channels cut by later PDCs into earlier PDC deposits, suggesting self-channelization of the flows increased the carrying capacity of the subsequent channelized currents. Unit III is massive, poorly sorted, and shows little to no evidence of

  7. Analysis of recently digitized continuous seismic data recorded during the March-May, 1980, eruption sequence at Mount St. Helens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moran, S. C.; Malone, S. D.

    2013-12-01

    The May 18, 1980, eruption of Mount St. Helens (MSH) was an historic event, both for society and for the field of volcanology. However, our knowledge of the eruption and the precursory period leading up it is limited by the fact that most of the data, particularly seismic recordings, were not kept due to severe limitations in the amount of digital data that could be handled and stored using 1980 computer technology. Because of these limitations, only about 900 digital event files have been available for seismic studies of the March-May seismic sequence out of a total of more than 4,000 events that were counted using paper records. Fortunately, data from a subset of stations were also recorded continuously on a series of 24 analog 14-track IRIG magnetic tapes. We have recently digitized these tapes and time-corrected and cataloged the resultant digital data streams, enabling more in-depth studies of the (almost) complete pre-eruption seismic sequence using modern digital processing techniques. Of the fifteen seismic stations operating near MSH for at least a part of the two months between March 20 and May 18, six stations have relatively complete analog recordings. These recordings have gaps of minutes to days because of radio noise, poor tape quality, or missing tapes. In addition, several other stations have partial records. All stations had short-period vertical-component sensors with very limited dynamic range and unknown response details. Nevertheless, because the stations were at a range of distances and were operated at a range of gains, a variety of earthquake sizes were recorded on scale by at least one station, and therefore a much more complete understanding of the evolution of event types, sizes and character should be achievable. In our preliminary analysis of this dataset we have found over 10,000 individual events as recorded on stations 35-40 km from MSH, spanning a recalculated coda-duration magnitude range of ~1.5 to 4.1, including many M < 3

  8. Construction and Evolution of the Mount St. Helens Magmatic System During the Swift Creek Eruptive Stage (16-9 ka) Revealed by Zircon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flanagan, D. M.; Claiborne, L. L.; Miller, C. F.; Clynne, M. A.; Wooden, J. L.

    2009-05-01

    U-series geochronology and trace element analyses of zircon record the evolution and construction of the sub- volcanic magmatic system of Mount St. Helens during its Swift Creek eruptive stage (16-9 ka). This timeframe was characterized by episodic eruptions of relatively cool, wet, and evolved lavas and tephras followed by emplacement of hotter, drier, and less evolved eruptive products. These fluctuations between magma types potentially represent the first evidence of well-developed magmatic cycles within the Mount St. Helens plumbing system (Clynne et al., in press). We compare the geochronology and geochemistry of zircons from Swift Creek rock samples to those from samples that span the rest of the eruptive history (Claiborne et al., 2008). U-Th age spectra demonstrate that zircon within Swift Creek rocks predominantly crystallized between 20 and 80 ka (˜70% of analyses), with crystallization peaks at ˜30 and 55 ka. Minor populations of ages are also present at ˜105, 160, 210, and 250 ka (˜25% of analyses). Most crystallization ages range from tens to hundreds of thousands of years before eruption, indicating that Swift Creek magmas extracted crystals from previous episodes of crystallization. However, some zircon analyses (<10%) yield U-Th ages within error of eruption age, potentially allowing us to track Swift Creek magmatic evolution from its incipient stages to eruption. Both of these observations are consistent with previously documented zircon populations from samples spanning the eruptive history of the volcano (Claiborne et al., 2008). Although some age populations observed in zircons from early (300-250 ka) and late (160-35 ka) Ape Canyon eruptive stage rock samples reappear in zircons from Swift Creek samples, the major populations from these earlier eruptive episodes are absent or sparse. Conversely, zircons from the Cougar stage (28-18 ka) exhibit comparable age peaks to Swift Creek zircons. These observations suggest that Swift Creek and

  9. Pre-eruptive volatile content of mafic magma from the 2.0-1.7 ka Castle Creek eruptive period, Mount St. Helens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rea, J.; Wallace, P. J.; Clynne, M. A.

    2012-12-01

    Among global convergent margins, the Cascade arc (Pacific Northwest, North America) has an atypically warm thermal profile due to the young age of the subducting ocean crust (≤10 Ma) and slow rate of subduction (3.5 cm/yr) in this region. Slab dehydration is thus expected to occur at relatively shallow subduction depths, resulting in high fluid fluxes in the mantle wedge below the forearc, with minimal addition of volatiles directly beneath the main volcanic front. Across-arc trends in magmatic volatiles should be most visible within particularly wide (E-W) portions of the active volcanic arc, such as are observed in Southern Washington, Central Oregon, and Northern California. As part of an ongoing study aimed at constraining variations in magmatic volatiles using monogenetic cinder cones across the Southern Washington Cascades, we analyzed the H2O and CO2 contents of olivine-hosted melt inclusions in basaltic scoria (Bu tephra) from the Castle Creek eruptive period (2.0-1.7 ka) of Mount St. Helens (MSH). The defining feature of this period is the first appearance of mafic magma at the surface, which initiated the modern Mount St. Helens and its variety of rock compositions (Mullineaux, 1996). Andesite, dacite, and basalt all were erupted during Castle Creek time, producing pyroclastic flows, surges, and tephra as well as lava flows. Our initial results show pre-eruptive H2O contents of 0.4-1.3 wt. % H2O and CO2 values that are below detection (<25-50 ppm). The morphology of the olivine crystals and their melt inclusions indicate relatively rapid crystallization. Given the low CO2 values, we conclude that the melt inclusions trapped partially degassed melts at relatively low pressure in a volcanic conduit or shallow storage reservoir. MSH represents the western extent of a stretch of volcanism extending ~100 km to the east; MSH magmas are thus expected to have high volatile contents relative to the other volcanic centers at this latitude.

  10. Imaging Magma Under St. Helens (iMUSH): Details of passive-source seismic deployment and preliminary 3-D velocity structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ulberg, C. W.; Creager, K. C.; Moran, S. C.; Abers, G. A.; Denlinger, R. P.; Hotovec-Ellis, A. J.; Vidale, J. E.; Kiser, E.; Levander, A.; Schultz, A.

    2014-12-01

    The imaging Magma Under St. Helens (iMUSH) experiment aims to delineate the extent of the magmatic system beneath Mount St. Helens (MSH) in Washington State. The experiment involves active- and passive-source seismology, magnetotellurics, and geochemistry/petrology. Seventy passive-source broadband seismometers were deployed in a 100-km-diameter array centered on MSH, with an average spacing of 10 km, and a planned duration of two years. The deployment over two weeks in June 2014 involved a group of 18 people split into 6 teams. Approximately half of the seismic stations have aircell batteries and/or pole-mounted solar panels in order to maintain power through deep snow at higher elevations during the winter months. Data will be retrieved 2-4 times a year throughout the duration of the experiment. The first service run performed in mid-July 2014 had a 98.4% data recovery. This is one of the largest wide-aperture two-dimensional arrays covering a volcano anywhere. The active-source portion of the experiment successfully set off 23 shots in late-July 2014. These were recorded clearly at permanent stations run by the Pacific Northwest Seismic Network up to 200 km away, and are expected to be well-recorded on many of the 70 broadband seismometers in addition to the 2500 Reftek "Texans" deployed temporarily for this purpose. For the 2-4 weeks of broadband data collected in July, local earthquakes down to magnitude 0 are recorded across the array, with clear P- and S- arrivals. Earthquakes of this size occur daily within 50 km of MSH. We are keeping a careful catalog of all activity in the region for the duration of the iMUSH experiment. We will pick P- and S-wave travel times at the 70 broadband stations from local earthquakes and active shots, for available data from between June and October 2014. We will also use a tomographic code (Preston et al, 2003, Science) to invert the travel times to obtain preliminary earthquake location and 3-D velocity structure.

  11. An updated numerical simulation of the ground-water flow system for the Castle Lake debris dam, Mount St. Helens, Washington, and implications for dam stability against heave

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Roeloffs, Evelyn A.

    1994-01-01

    A numerical simulation of the ground-water flow system in the Castle Lake debris dam, calibrated to data from the 1991 and 1992 water years, was used to estimate factors of safety against heave and internal erosion. The Castle Lake debris dam, 5 miles northwest of the summit of Mount St. Helens, impounds 19,000 acre-ft of water that could pose a flood hazard in the event of a lake breakout. A new topographic map of the Castle Lake area prior to the 1980 eruption of Mount St. Helens was prepared and used to calculate the thickness of the debris avalanche deposits that compose the dam. Water levels in 22 piezometers and discharges from seeps on the dam face measured several times per year beginning in 1990 supplemented measurements in 11 piezometers and less frequent seep discharge measurements made since 1983. Observations in one group of piezometers reveal heads above the land surface and head gradients favoring upward flow that correspond to factors of safety only slightly greater than 2. The steady-state ground-water flow system in the debris dam was simulated using a threedimensional finite difference computer program. A uniform, isotropic model having the same shape as the dam and a hydraulic conductivity of 1.55 ft/day simulates the correct water level at half the observation points, but is in error by 10 ft or more at other points. Spatial variations of hydraulic conductivity were required to calibrate the model. The model analysis suggests that ground water flows in both directions between the debris dam and Castle Lake. Factors of safety against heave and internal erosion were calculated where the model simulated upward flow of ground water. A critical gradient analysis yields factors of safety as low as 2 near the piezometers where water level observations indicate low factors of safety. Low safety factors are also computed near Castle Creek where slumping was caused by a storm in January, 1990. If hydraulic property contrasts are present in areas of the

  12. High-resolution digital elevation model of Mount St. Helens crater and upper North Fork Toutle River basin, Washington, based on an airborne lidar survey of September 2009

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mosbrucker, Adam

    2014-01-01

    The lateral blast, debris avalanche, and lahars of the May 18th, 1980, eruption of Mount St. Helens, Washington, dramatically altered the surrounding landscape. Lava domes were extruded during the subsequent eruptive periods of 1980–1986 and 2004–2008. More than three decades after the emplacement of the 1980 debris avalanche, high sediment production persists in the North Fork Toutle River basin, which drains the northern flank of the volcano. Because this sediment increases the risk of flooding to downstream communities on the Toutle and Cowlitz Rivers, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE), under the direction of Congress to maintain an authorized level of flood protection, built a sediment retention structure on the North Fork Toutle River in 1989 to help reduce this risk and to prevent sediment from clogging the shipping channel of the Columbia River. From September 16–20, 2009, Watershed Sciences, Inc., under contract to USACE, collected high-precision airborne lidar (light detection and ranging) data that cover 214 square kilometers (83 square miles) of Mount St. Helens and the upper North Fork Toutle River basin from the sediment retention structure to the volcano's crater. These data provide a digital dataset of the ground surface, including beneath forest cover. Such remotely sensed data can be used to develop sediment budgets and models of sediment erosion, transport, and deposition. The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) used these lidar data to develop digital elevation models (DEMs) of the study area. DEMs are fundamental to monitoring natural hazards and studying volcanic landforms, fluvial and glacial geomorphology, and surface geology. Watershed Sciences, Inc., provided files in the LASer (LAS) format containing laser returns that had been filtered, classified, and georeferenced. The USGS produced a hydro-flattened DEM from ground-classified points at Castle, Coldwater, and Spirit Lakes. Final results averaged about five laser last

  13. Channel geometry and hydrologic data for six eruption-affected tributaries of the Lewis River, Mount St. Helens, Washington, water years 1983-84

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Martinson, H.A.; Hammond, H.E.; Mast, W.W.; Mango, P.D.

    1986-01-01

    The May 18, 1980, eruption of Mount St. Helens generated a lateral blast, lahars, and tephra deposits that altered stream channels in the Lewis River drainage basin. In order to assess potential flood hazards, monitor channel adjustments, and construct a sediment budget for disturbed drainages on the east and southeast flanks of the volcano, channel cross sections were monumented and surveyed on Pine Creek, Muddy River, and Smith Creek during September and October of 1980. Additional cross sections were monumented and surveyed on Swift Creek, Bean Creek , and Clearwater Creek during 1981. This network of channel cross sections has been resurveyed annually. Selected cross sections have been surveyed more frequently, following periods of higher flow. Longitudinal stream profiles of the low-water thalweg and (or) water surfaces were surveyed periodically for selected short reaches of channel. Corresponding map views for these reaches were constructed using the survey data and aerial photographs. This report presents plots of channel cross-section profiles, longitudinal stream profiles, and channel maps constructed from survey data collected during water years 1983-84. (USGS)

  14. Changes in seismic velocity during the first 14 months of the 2004–2008 eruption of Mount St. Helens, Washington

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hotovec-Ellis, A.J.; Vidale, J.E.; Gomberg, Joan S.; Thelen, Weston A.; Moran, Seth C.

    2015-01-01

    Mount St. Helens began erupting in late 2004 following an 18 year quiescence. Swarms of repeating earthquakes accompanied the extrusion of a mostly solid dacite dome over the next 4 years. In some cases the waveforms from these earthquakes evolved slowly, likely reflecting changes in the properties of the volcano that affect seismic wave propagation. We use coda-wave interferometry to quantify small changes in seismic velocity structure (usually <1%) between two similar earthquakes and employed waveforms from several hundred families of repeating earthquakes together to create a continuous function of velocity change observed at permanent stations operated within 20 km of the volcano. The high rate of earthquakes allowed tracking of velocity changes on an hourly time scale. Changes in velocity were largest near the newly extruding dome and likely related to shallow deformation as magma first worked its way to the surface. We found strong correlation between velocity changes and the inverse of real-time seismic amplitude measurements during the first 3 weeks of activity, suggesting that fluctuations of pressure in the shallow subsurface may have driven both seismicity and velocity changes. Velocity changes during the remainder of the eruption likely result from a complex interplay of multiple effects and are not well explained by any single factor alone, highlighting the need for complementary geophysical data when interpreting velocity changes.

  15. Self-similar rupture implied by scaling properties of volcanic earthquakes occurring during the 2004-2008 eruption of Mount St. Helens, Washington

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Harrington, Rebecca M.; Kwiatek, Grzegorz; Moran, Seth C.

    2015-01-01

    We analyze a group of 6073 low-frequency earthquakes recorded during a week-long temporary deployment of broadband seismometers at distances of less than 3 km from the crater at Mount St. Helens in September of 2006. We estimate the seismic moment (M0) and spectral corner frequency (f0) using a spectral ratio approach for events with a high signal-to-noise (SNR) ratio that have a cross-correlation coefficient of 0.8 or greater with at least five other events. A cluster analysis of cross-correlation values indicates that the group of 421 events meeting the SNR and cross-correlation criteria forms eight event families that exhibit largely self-similar scaling. We estimate the M0 and f0 values of the 421 events and calculate their static stress drop and scaled energy (ER/M0) values. The estimated values suggest self-similar scaling within families, as well as between five of eight families (i.e.,  and  constant). We speculate that differences in scaled energy values for the two families with variable scaling may result from a lack of resolution in the velocity model. The observation of self-similar scaling is the first of its kind for such a large group of low-frequency volcanic tectonic events occurring during a single active dome extrusion eruption.

  16. Correlations of turbidity to suspended-sediment concentration in the Toutle River Basin, near Mount St. Helens, Washington, 2010-11

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Uhrich, Mark A.; Kolasinac, Jasna; Booth, Pamela L.; Fountain, Robert L.; Spicer, Kurt R.; Mosbrucker, Adam R.

    2014-01-01

    Researchers at the U.S. Geological Survey, Cascades Volcano Observatory, investigated alternative methods for the traditional sample-based sediment record procedure in determining suspended-sediment concentration (SSC) and discharge. One such sediment-surrogate technique was developed using turbidity and discharge to estimate SSC for two gaging stations in the Toutle River Basin near Mount St. Helens, Washington. To provide context for the study, methods for collecting sediment data and monitoring turbidity are discussed. Statistical methods used include the development of ordinary least squares regression models for each gaging station. Issues of time-related autocorrelation also are evaluated. Addition of lagged explanatory variables was used to account for autocorrelation in the turbidity, discharge, and SSC data. Final regression model equations and plots are presented for the two gaging stations. The regression models support near-real-time estimates of SSC and improved suspended-sediment discharge records by incorporating continuous instream turbidity. Future use of such models may potentially lower the costs of sediment monitoring by reducing time it takes to collect and process samples and to derive a sediment-discharge record.

  17. Source mechanisms of persistent shallow earthquakes during eruptive and non-eruptive periods between 1981 and 2011 at Mount St. Helens, Washington

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lehto, Heather L.; Roman, Diana C.; Moran, Seth C.

    2013-04-01

    Shallow seismicity between 0 and 3-km depth has persisted at Mount St. Helens, Washington (MSH) during both eruptive and non-eruptive periods for at least the past thirty years. In this study we investigate the source mechanisms of shallow volcano-tectonic (VT) earthquakes at MSH by calculating high-quality hypocenter locations and fault plane solutions (FPS) for all VT events recorded during two eruptive periods (1981-1986 and 2004-2008) and two non-eruptive periods (1987-2004 and 2008-2011). FPS show a mixture of normal, reverse, and strike-slip faulting during all periods, with a sharp increase in strike-slip faulting observed in 1987-1997 and an increase in normal faulting in 1998-2004. FPS P-axis orientations show a ~ 90° rotation with respect to regional σ1 (N23°E) during 1981-1986 and 2004-2008, bimodal orientations (~ N-S and ~ E-W) during 1987-2004, and bimodal orientations at ~ N-E and ~ S-W from 2008-2011. We interpret these orientations to likely be due to pressurization accompanying the shallow intrusion and subsequent eruption of magma as domes during 1981-1986 and 2004-2008 and the buildup of pore pressure beneath a seismogenic volume (located at 0-1 km) with a smaller component due to the buildup of tectonic forces during 1987-2004 and 2008-2011.

  18. Source mechanisms of persistent shallow earthquakes during eruptive and non-eruptive periods between 1981 and 2011 at Mount St. Helens, Washington

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lehto, Heather L.; Roman, Diana C.; Moran, Seth C.

    2013-01-01

    Shallow seismicity between 0 and 3-km depth has persisted at Mount St. Helens, Washington (MSH) during both eruptive and non-eruptive periods for at least the past thirty years. In this study we investigate the source mechanisms of shallow volcano-tectonic (VT) earthquakes at MSH by calculating high-quality hypocenter locations and fault plane solutions (FPS) for all VT events recorded during two eruptive periods (1981–1986 and 2004–2008) and two non-eruptive periods (1987–2004 and 2008–2011). FPS show a mixture of normal, reverse, and strike-slip faulting during all periods, with a sharp increase in strike-slip faulting observed in 1987–1997 and an increase in normal faulting in 1998–2004. FPS P-axis orientations show a ~ 90° rotation with respect to regional σ1 (N23°E) during 1981–1986 and 2004–2008, bimodal orientations (~ N-S and ~ E-W) during 1987–2004, and bimodal orientations at ~ N-E and ~ S-W from 2008–2011. We interpret these orientations to likely be due to pressurization accompanying the shallow intrusion and subsequent eruption of magma as domes during 1981–1986 and 2004–2008 and the buildup of pore pressure beneath a seismogenic volume (located at 0–1 km) with a smaller component due to the buildup of tectonic forces during 1987–2004 and 2008–2011.

  19. Bayesian inversion of data from effusive volcanic eruptions using physics-based models: Application to Mount St. Helens 2004--2008

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Anderson, Kyle; Segall, Paul

    2013-01-01

    Physics-based models of volcanic eruptions can directly link magmatic processes with diverse, time-varying geophysical observations, and when used in an inverse procedure make it possible to bring all available information to bear on estimating properties of the volcanic system. We develop a technique for inverting geodetic, extrusive flux, and other types of data using a physics-based model of an effusive silicic volcanic eruption to estimate the geometry, pressure, depth, and volatile content of a magma chamber, and properties of the conduit linking the chamber to the surface. A Bayesian inverse formulation makes it possible to easily incorporate independent information into the inversion, such as petrologic estimates of melt water content, and yields probabilistic estimates for model parameters and other properties of the volcano. Probability distributions are sampled using a Markov-Chain Monte Carlo algorithm. We apply the technique using GPS and extrusion data from the 2004–2008 eruption of Mount St. Helens. In contrast to more traditional inversions such as those involving geodetic data alone in combination with kinematic forward models, this technique is able to provide constraint on properties of the magma, including its volatile content, and on the absolute volume and pressure of the magma chamber. Results suggest a large chamber of >40 km3 with a centroid depth of 11–18 km and a dissolved water content at the top of the chamber of 2.6–4.9 wt%.

  20. Marine accident report - grounding of United States Tankship SS MOBILOIL, in the Columbia River near Saint Helens, Oregon, March 19, 1984

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1984-11-20

    About 0006 P.S.T. on March 19, 1984, the fully loaded 618-foot-long United States tankship SS MOBILOIL experienced a steering gear malfunction and grounded in the Columbia River on the right ascending bank about 1 mile upstream from Saint Helens, Oregon. There were no injuries to the 36 persons aboard, but five cargo tanks and the forepeak tank were ruptured, and more than 170,000 gallons of oil polluted the river and its shores. The cleanup cost of the oil spill was estimated to be $3 million, and the cost of the repair to the ship was estimated to be $5 million. The National Transportation Safety Board determines that the probable cause of the grounding of the United States tankship SS MOBILOIL was a steering gear failure caused by the disconnection of the control linkage to the starboard steering gear pump when an improperly secured clevis pin vibrated loose while the pump was in the full starboard stroke position, which held the rudder at the 25 degrees right position.

  1. Immediate public health concerns and actions in volcanic eruptions: lessons from the Mount St. Helens eruptions, May 18-October 18, 1980

    SciTech Connect

    Bernstein, R.S.; Baxter, P.J.; Falk, H.; Ing, R.; Foster, L.; Frost, F.

    1986-03-01

    The Centers for Disease Control in collaboration with affected state and local health departments, clinicians, and private institutions carried out a compulsive epidemiologic evaluation of mortality and morbidity associated with volcanic activity following the 1980 eruption of Mount St. Helens. Excession morbidity were limited to transient increases to emergency room visits and hospital admissions for troumatic injuries and respiratory problems. Excessive mortality due to suffocation (76%) thermal injuries (12%), or trauma (12%) by ash and other volcanic hazards was directly proportional to the degree of environmental damage. De novo appearance of asthma was not observed, but excess adverse respiratory effects were observed in persons with preexisting respiratory disease and in heavy smokers. The volcanic ash had a mild to moderate fibrogenic potential. Community exposures to resuspended ash only transiently exceeded health limits normally applied to entire working lifetime exposures to free silica. There were no excessive exposures to toxic metals, fibrous minerals, organic chemicals, radon, or toxic gases of volcanic origin in community water supplies on air.

  2. Self-similar rupture implied by scaling properties of volcanic earthquakes occurring during the 2004-2008 eruption of Mount St. Helens, Washington

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harrington, Rebecca M.; Kwiatek, Grzegorz; Moran, Seth C.

    2015-07-01

    We analyze a group of 6073 low-frequency earthquakes recorded during a week-long temporary deployment of broadband seismometers at distances of less than 3 km from the crater at Mount St. Helens in September of 2006. We estimate the seismic moment (M0) and spectral corner frequency (f0) using a spectral ratio approach for events with a high signal-to-noise (SNR) ratio that have a cross-correlation coefficient of 0.8 or greater with at least five other events. A cluster analysis of cross-correlation values indicates that the group of 421 events meeting the SNR and cross-correlation criteria forms eight event families that exhibit largely self-similar scaling. We estimate the M0 and f0 values of the 421 events and calculate their static stress drop and scaled energy (ER/M0) values. The estimated values suggest self-similar scaling within families, as well as between five of eight families (i.e., M0∝f0-3 and ER/M0∝ constant). We speculate that differences in scaled energy values for the two families with variable scaling may result from a lack of resolution in the velocity model. The observation of self-similar scaling is the first of its kind for such a large group of low-frequency volcanic tectonic events occurring during a single active dome extrusion eruption.

  3. Improved constraints on the estimated size and volatile content of the Mount St. Helens magma system from the 2004-2008 history of dome growth and deformation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mastin, L.G.; Lisowski, M.; Roeloffs, E.; Beeler, N.

    2009-01-01

    The history of dome growth and geodetic deflation during the 2004-2008 Mount St. Helens eruption can be fit to theoretical curves with parameters such as reservoir volume, bubble content, initial overpressure, and magma rheology, here assumed to be Newtonian viscous, with or without a solid plug in the conduit center. Data from 2004-2008 are consistent with eruption from a 10-25 km3 reservoir containing 0.5-2% bubbles, an initial overpressure of 10-20 MPa, and no significant, sustained recharge. During the eruption we used curve fits to project the eruption's final duration and volume. Early projections predicted a final volume only about half of the actual value; but projections increased with each measurement, implying a temporal increase in reservoir volume or compressibility. A simple interpretation is that early effusion was driven by a 5-10 km3, integrated core of fluid magma. This core expanded with time through creep of semi-solid magma and host rock. Copyright 2009 by the American Geophysical Union.

  4. Improved constraints on the estimated size and volatile content of the Mount St. Helens magma system from the 2004-2008 history of dome growth and deformation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mastin, Larry G.; Lisowski, Mike; Roeloffs, Evelyn; Beeler, Nick

    2009-01-01

    The history of dome growth and geodetic deflation during the 2004-2008 Mount St. Helens eruption can be fit to theoretical curves with parameters such as reservoir volume, bubble content, initial overpressure, and magma rheology, here assumed to be Newtonian viscous, with or without a solid plug in the conduit center. Data from 2004-2008 are consistent with eruption from a 10-25 km3 reservoir containing 0.5-2% bubbles, an initial overpressure of 10-20 MPa, and no significant, sustained recharge. During the eruption we used curve fits to project the eruption's final duration and volume. Early projections predicted a final volume only about half of the actual value; but projections increased with each measurement, implying a temporal increase in reservoir volume or compressibility. A simple interpretation is that early effusion was driven by a 5-10 km3, integrated core of fluid magma. This core expanded with time through creep of semi-solid magma and host rock.

  5. An investigation of vegetation and other Earth resource/feature parameters using LANDSAT and other remote sensing data. 1: LANDSAT. 2: Remote sensing of volcanic emissions. [New England forest and emissions from Mt. St. Helens and Central American volcanoes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Birnie, R. W.; Stoiber, R. E. (Principal Investigator)

    1981-01-01

    A fanning technique based on a simplistic physical model provided a classification algorithm for mixture landscapes. Results of applications to LANDSAT inventory of 1.5 million acres of forest land in Northern Maine are presented. Signatures for potential deer year habitat in New Hampshire were developed. Volcanic activity was monitored in Nicaragua, El Salvador, and Guatemala along with the Mt. St. Helens eruption. Emphasis in the monitoring was placed on the remote sensing of SO2 concentrations in the plumes of the volcanoes.

  6. Calculation of multicomponent chemical equilibria in gas-solid- liquid systems: calculation methods, thermochemical data, and applications to studies of high-temperature volcanic gases with examples from Mount St. Helens

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Symonds, R.B.; Reed, M.H.

    1993-01-01

    This paper documents the numerical formulations, thermochemical data base, and possible applications of computer programs, SOLVGAS and GASWORKS, for calculating multicomponent chemical equilibria in gas-solid-liquid systems. SOLVGAS and GASWORKS compute simultaneous equilibria by solving simultaneously a set of mass balance and mass action equations written for all gas species and for all gas-solid or gas-liquid equilibria. Examples of gas-evaporation-from-magma and precipitation-with-cooling calculations for volcanic gases collected from Mount St. Helens are shown. -from Authors

  7. Impact of the lateral blast on the spatial pattern and grain size characteristics of the 18 May 1980 Mount St. Helens fallout deposit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eychenne, Julia; Cashman, Katharine; Rust, Alison; Durant, Adam

    2015-09-01

    The 18 May 1980 eruption of Mount St. Helens started with a lateral blast that fed a pyroclastic surge, which then uplifted to form a co-blast plume. Thirty minutes later, Plinian activity started at the vent and fluctuated in intensity for ~9 h. The resulting fallout deposit, documented to > 600 km from vent, presents some striking features: (1) displacement of the overall deposit to the north of the vent, (2) a secondary thickness and mass maximum at ~300 km from vent, (3) a total grain size distribution dominated by fine ash (62 wt % of the deposit < 63 µm), and (4) individual grain size distributions that vary dramatically in the crosswind direction from strongly bimodal in the south to skewed unimodal in the north. Results from a new deconvolution of the individual grain size distributions show that they are a combination of a coarse subpopulation that decreases in size with distance from vent and a constant fine subpopulation with a mean of ˜15 µm. Relative proportions of each subpopulation vary asymmetrically in the crosswind directions, with the fine subpopulation preponderant toward the north and the coarse one dominating the south of the deposit, both reach their absolute maxima in mass on the deposit axis. Componentry analyses of selected samples show that blast-derived material is greatly enriched toward the north of the deposit. These results indicate that the co-blast plume dispersed fine-grained material over great distances and dominated the fine subpopulation. Comparison with reanalysis data of atmospheric wind fields and satellite images of the spreading ash cloud suggests contrasting ash transport and depositional processes for the (early) co-blast plume and the (later) vent-derived Plinian plumes. The co-blast plume is displaced to the north; it had a high overshoot height, and eastward dispersion via strong winds low in the stratosphere (~10-15 km). The Plinian plumes were lower and dispersed most of the material to the southeast as the

  8. Zircon from Mount St. Helens Reveals Residence Times of Tens to Hundreds of Thousands of Years at Low Magmatic Temperatures Prior to Eruption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Claiborne, L. L.; Miller, C. F.; Clynne, M. A.; Wooden, J. L.; Pallister, J. S.; Lowenstern, J. B.; Mazdab, F. K.

    2007-12-01

    U-series and U-Pb geochronology of zircons from four samples that span the 300,000 year eruptive history of Mount St. Helens, combined with zircon trace element geochemistry and application of the Ti-in-zircon thermometer, provide critical constraints on the time-temperature-compositional history of the sub-volcanic magmatic system. Preliminary results indicate that prior to and throughout its eruptive history, one or more relatively cool, crystal-rich reservoirs have been accumulating beneath the volcano. SHRIMP-RG U-Pb ages of the oldest sample, a dacite erupted ~300 ka, reveal that zircons grew between ~320 and 520 ka, suggesting magmatic activity may have begun 200 ka before eruption. 238U-230Th age spectra in the three youngest samples indicate multiple ages of growth for each sample. The oldest of these three young samples (eruption constrained to ~35-50 ka) contains zircons ranging from ~50 to ~200 ka, with the main concentration of ages ~100 ka. Zircons from a 35 ka dacite range from ~65 to ~230 ka in age, with a dominant episode of growth ~130 ka. Dacite from the current eruption, sampled from the dome in 2005, contains zircons from ~40 to ~170 ka in age, with distinct populations at ~130 and ~170 ka. Taken together, these ages of tens to hundreds of thousands of years prior to eruption and the distinct episodes of growth suggest repeated injection and accumulation of one or more crystal-rich reservoirs beneath the volcanic edifice, a scenario that is further supported by Ti-in-zircon geothermometry (Watson et al. 2006). Ti concentrations indicate zircons grew at temperatures from ~840 to ~640 C, with 90% of analyzed spots recording temperatures between ~770 and ~670 C (T's carry uncertainties of tens of degrees, mostly from uncertainty in a(TiO2)). These temperatures are significantly lower than the eruption temperatures of their host magmas, which range from ~950-800 C. The rounded, resorbed surface morphology of many of the grains attests to the

  9. Source mechanism of small long-period events at Mount St. Helens in July 2005 using template matching, phase-weighted stacking, and full-waveform inversion

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Matoza, Robin S.; Chouet, Bernard A.; Dawson, Phillip B.; Shearer, Peter M.; Haney, Matthew M.; Waite, Gregory P.; Moran, Seth C.; Mikesell, T. Dylan

    2015-01-01

    Long-period (LP, 0.5-5 Hz) seismicity, observed at volcanoes worldwide, is a recognized signature of unrest and eruption. Cyclic LP “drumbeating” was the characteristic seismicity accompanying the sustained dome-building phase of the 2004–2008 eruption of Mount St. Helens (MSH), WA. However, together with the LP drumbeating was a near-continuous, randomly occurring series of tiny LP seismic events (LP “subevents”), which may hold important additional information on the mechanism of seismogenesis at restless volcanoes. We employ template matching, phase-weighted stacking, and full-waveform inversion to image the source mechanism of one multiplet of these LP subevents at MSH in July 2005. The signal-to-noise ratios of the individual events are too low to produce reliable waveform-inversion results, but the events are repetitive and can be stacked. We apply network-based template matching to 8 days of continuous velocity waveform data from 29 June to 7 July 2005 using a master event to detect 822 network triggers. We stack waveforms for 359 high-quality triggers at each station and component, using a combination of linear and phase-weighted stacking to produce clean stacks for use in waveform inversion. The derived source mechanism pointsto the volumetric oscillation (~10 m3) of a subhorizontal crack located at shallow depth (~30 m) in an area to the south of Crater Glacier in the southern portion of the breached MSH crater. A possible excitation mechanism is the sudden condensation of metastable steam from a shallow pressurized hydrothermal system as it encounters cool meteoric water in the outer parts of the edifice, perhaps supplied from snow melt.

  10. Digital Elevation Models of the Pre-Eruption 2000 Crater and 2004-07 Dome-Building Eruption at Mount St. Helens, Washington, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Messerich, J.A.; Schilling, S.P.; Thompson, R.A.

    2008-01-01

    Presented in this report are 27 digital elevation model (DEM) datasets for the crater area of Mount St. Helens. These datasets include pre-eruption baseline data collected in 2000, incremental model subsets collected during the 2004-07 dome building eruption, and associated shaded-relief image datasets. Each dataset was collected photogrammetrically with digital softcopy methods employing a combination of manual collection and iterative compilation of x,y,z coordinate triplets utilizing autocorrelation techniques. DEM data points collected using autocorrelation methods were rigorously edited in stereo and manually corrected to ensure conformity with the ground surface. Data were first collected as a triangulated irregular network (TIN) then interpolated to a grid format. DEM data are based on aerotriangulated photogrammetric solutions for aerial photograph strips flown at a nominal scale of 1:12,000 using a combination of surveyed ground control and photograph-identified control points. The 2000 DEM is based on aerotriangulation of four strips totaling 31 photographs. Subsequent DEMs collected during the course of the eruption are based on aerotriangulation of single aerial photograph strips consisting of between three and seven 1:12,000-scale photographs (two to six stereo pairs). Most datasets were based on three or four stereo pairs. Photogrammetric errors associated with each dataset are presented along with ground control used in the photogrammetric aerotriangulation. The temporal increase in area of deformation in the crater as a result of dome growth, deformation, and translation of glacial ice resulted in continual adoption of new ground control points and abandonment of others during the course of the eruption. Additionally, seasonal snow cover precluded the consistent use of some ground control points.

  11. Source mechanism of small long-period events at Mount St. Helens in July 2005 using template matching, phase-weighted stacking, and full-waveform inversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matoza, Robin S.; Chouet, Bernard A.; Dawson, Phillip B.; Shearer, Peter M.; Haney, Matthew M.; Waite, Gregory P.; Moran, Seth C.; Mikesell, T. Dylan

    2015-09-01

    Long-period (LP, 0.5-5 Hz) seismicity, observed at volcanoes worldwide, is a recognized signature of unrest and eruption. Cyclic LP "drumbeating" was the characteristic seismicity accompanying the sustained dome-building phase of the 2004-2008 eruption of Mount St. Helens (MSH), WA. However, together with the LP drumbeating was a near-continuous, randomly occurring series of tiny LP seismic events (LP "subevents"), which may hold important additional information on the mechanism of seismogenesis at restless volcanoes. We employ template matching, phase-weighted stacking, and full-waveform inversion to image the source mechanism of one multiplet of these LP subevents at MSH in July 2005. The signal-to-noise ratios of the individual events are too low to produce reliable waveform inversion results, but the events are repetitive and can be stacked. We apply network-based template matching to 8 days of continuous velocity waveform data from 29 June to 7 July 2005 using a master event to detect 822 network triggers. We stack waveforms for 359 high-quality triggers at each station and component, using a combination of linear and phase-weighted stacking to produce clean stacks for use in waveform inversion. The derived source mechanism points to the volumetric oscillation (˜10 m3) of a subhorizontal crack located at shallow depth (˜30 m) in an area to the south of Crater Glacier in the southern portion of the breached MSH crater. A possible excitation mechanism is the sudden condensation of metastable steam from a shallow pressurized hydrothermal system as it encounters cool meteoric water in the outer parts of the edifice, perhaps supplied from snow melt.

  12. Operation of a digital seismic network on Mount St. Helens volcano and observations of long period seismic events that originate under the volcano

    SciTech Connect

    Fehler, M.; Chouet, B.

    1982-09-01

    A 9 station digital seismic array was operated on Mount St. Helens volcano in Washington State during 1981. One of the stations was placed inside the crater of the volcano, six were located on the flanks of the volcano within two km of the crater and two were approximately ten km from the crater. Four of the instruments recorded three components of motion and the remaining five recorded only the vertical component. A one day experiment was carried out during which the crater monitoring seismometer was complimented by the addition of two ink recording instruments. During the one day experiment six observers recorded times of rockfall, felt-earthquake occurrences, and changes in steam emissions from the dome in the crater. Using information obtained during the one day experiment seismic events recorded by the digital instruments were classified as earthquakes, rockfalls, helicopter noise and a type of event that is unique to volcanoes which is called long period. Waveforms of these long period events have a duration of up to 30 seconds and a spectrum that is peaked at approximately 2 Hz. The frequency at which the peak in the spectrum occurs is nearly the same at all stations which means that the unique waveform of long period events is due to a source effect, not a path effect. The peak frequency is fairly insensitive to the amplitude of the signal which means that the size of the source region is constant, independent of the signal amplitude. Long period events were not felt and were accompanied by no visible changes inside the crater which lead to the conclusion that they are some sort of seismic disturbance generated inside the Volcano.

  13. A New Perspective on Mount St. Helens - Dramatic Landform Change and Associated Hazards at the Most Active Volcano in the Cascade Range

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ramsey, David W.; Driedger, Carolyn L.; Schilling, Steve P.

    2008-01-01

    Mount St. Helens has erupted more frequently than any other volcano in the Cascade Range during the past 4,000 years. The volcano has exhibited a variety of eruption styles?explosive eruptions of pumice and ash, slow but continuous extrusions of viscous lava, and eruptions of fluid lava. Evidence of the volcano?s older eruptions is recorded in the rocks that build and the deposits that flank the mountain. Eruptions at Mount St. Helens over the past three decades serve as reminders of the powerful geologic forces that are reshaping the landscape of the Pacific Northwest. On May 18, 1980, a massive landslide and catastrophic explosive eruption tore away 2.7 cubic kilometers of the mountain and opened a gaping, north-facing crater. Lahars flowed more than 120 kilometers downstream, destroying bridges, roads, and buildings. Ash from the eruption fell as far away as western South Dakota. Reconstruction of the volcano began almost immediately. Between 1980 and 1986, 80 million cubic meters of viscous lava extruded episodically onto the crater floor, sometimes accompanied by minor explosions and small lahars. A lava dome grew to a height of 267 meters, taller than the highest buildings in the nearby city of Portland, Oregon. Crater Glacier formed in the deeply shaded niche between the 1980-86 lava dome and the south crater wall. Its tongues of ice flowed around the east and west sides of the dome. Between 1989 and 1991, multiple explosions of steam and ash rocked the volcano, possibly a result of infiltrating rainfall being heated in the still-hot interior of the dome and underlying crater floor. In September 2004, rising magma caused earthquake swarms and deformation of the crater floor and glacier, which indicated that Mount St. Helens might erupt again soon. On October 1, 2004, a steam and ash explosion signaled the beginning of a new phase of eruptive activity at the volcano. On October 11, hot rock reached the surface and began building a new lava dome immediately

  14. Instrumentation in remote and dangerous settings; examples using data from GPS “spider” deployments during the 2004-2005 eruption of Mount St. Helens, Washington: Chapter 16 in A volcano rekindled: the renewed eruption of Mount St. Helens, 2004-2006

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    LaHusen, Richard G.; Swinford, Kelly J.; Logan, Matthew; Lisowski, Michael; Sherrod, David R.; Scott, William E.; Stauffer, Peter H.

    2008-01-01

    Self-contained, single-frequency GPS instruments fitted on lightweight stations suitable for helicopter-sling payloads became a critical part of volcano monitoring during the September 2004 unrest and subsequent eruption of Mount St. Helens. Known as “spiders” because of their spindly frames, the stations were slung into the crater 29 times from September 2004 to December 2005 when conditions at the volcano were too dangerous for crews to install conventional equipment. Data were transmitted in near-real time to the Cascades Volcano Observatory in Vancouver, Washington. Each fully equipped unit cost about $2,500 in materials and, if not destroyed by natural events, was retrieved and redeployed as needed. The GPS spiders have been used to track the growth and decay of extruding dacite lava (meters per day), thickening and accelerated flow of Crater Glacier (meters per month), and movement of the 1980-86 dome from pressure and relaxation of the newly extruding lava dome (centimeters per day).

  15. Interrelations among pyroclastic surge, pyroclastic flow, and lahars in Smith Creek valley during first minutes of 18 May 1980 eruption of Mount St. Helens, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brantley, S.R.; Waitt, R.B.

    1988-01-01

    A devastating pyroclastic surge and resultant lahars at Mount St. Helens on 18 May 1980 produced several catastrophic flowages into tributaries on the northeast volcano flank. The tributaries channeled the flows to Smith Creek valley, which lies within the area devastated by the surge but was unaffected by the great debris avalanche on the north flank. Stratigraphy shows that the pyroclastic surge preceded the lahars; there is no notable "wet" character to the surge deposits. Therefore the lahars must have originated as snowmelt, not as ejected water-saturated debris that segregated from the pyroclastic surge as has been inferred for other flanks of the volcano. In stratigraphic order the Smith Creek valley-floor materials comprise (1) a complex valley-bottom facies of the pyroclastic surge and a related pyroclastic flow, (2) an unusual hummocky diamict caused by complex mixing of lahars with the dry pyroclastic debris, and (3) deposits of secondary pyroclastic flows. These units are capped by silt containing accretionary lapilli, which began falling from a rapidly expanding mushroom-shaped cloud 20 minutes after the eruption's onset. The Smith Creek valley-bottom pyroclastic facies consists of (a) a weakly graded basal bed of fines-poor granular sand, the deposit of a low-concentration lithic pyroclastic surge, and (b) a bed of very poorly sorted pebble to cobble gravel inversely graded near its base, the deposit of a high-concentration lithic pyroclastic flow. The surge apparently segregated while crossing the steep headwater tributaries of Smith Creek; large fragments that settled from the turbulent surge formed a dense pyroclastic flow along the valley floor that lagged behind the front of the overland surge. The unusual hummocky diamict as thick as 15 m contains large lithic clasts supported by a tough, brown muddy sand matrix like that of lahar deposits upvalley. This unit contains irregular friable lenses and pods meters in diameter, blocks incorporated from

  16. Using semi-automated photogrammetry software to generate 3D surfaces from oblique and vertical photographs at Mount St. Helens, WA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schilling, S.; Diefenbach, A. K.

    2012-12-01

    Photogrammetry has been used to generate contours and Digital Elevation Models (DEMs) to monitor change at Mount St. Helens, WA since the 1980 eruption. We continue to improve techniques to monitor topographic changes within the crater. During the 2004-2008 eruption, 26 DEMs were used to track volume and rates of growth of a lava dome and changes of Crater Glacier. These measurements constrained seismogenic extrusion models and were compared with geodetic deflation volume to constrain magma chamber behavior. We used photogrammetric software to collect irregularly spaced 3D points primarily by hand and, in reasonably flat areas, by automated algorithms, from commercial vertical aerial photographs. These models took days to months to complete and the areal extent of each surface was determined by visual inspection. Later in the eruption, we pioneered the use of different software to generate irregularly spaced 3D points manually from oblique images captured by a hand-held digital camera. In each case, the irregularly spaced points and intervening interpolated points formed regular arrays of cells or DEMs. Calculations using DEMs produced from the hand-held images duplicated volumetric and rate results gleaned from the vertical aerial photographs. This manual point capture technique from oblique hand-held photographs required only a few hours to generate a model over a focused area such as the lava dome, but would have taken perhaps days to capture data over the entire crater. Here, we present results from new photogrammetric software that uses robust image-matching algorithms to produce 3D surfaces automatically after inner, relative, and absolute orientations between overlapping photographs are completed. Measurements using scans of vertical aerial photographs taken August 10, 2005 produced dome volume estimates within two percent of those from a surface generated using the vertical aerial photograph manual method. The new August 10th orientations took less than 8

  17. Immediate public health concerns and actions in volcanic eruptions: lessons from the Mount St. Helens eruptions, May 18-October 18, 1980.

    PubMed Central

    Bernstein, R S; Baxter, P J; Falk, H; Ing, R; Foster, L; Frost, F

    1986-01-01

    A comprehensive epidemiological evaluation of mortality and short-term morbidity associated with explosive volcanic activity was carried out by the Centers for Disease Control in collaboration with affected state and local health departments, clinicians, and private institutions. Following the May 18, 1980 eruption of Mount St. Helens, a series of public health actions were rapidly instituted to develop accurate information about volcanic hazards and to recommend methods for prevention or control of adverse effects on safety and health. These public health actions included: establishing a system of active surveillance of cause-specific emergency room (ER) visits and hospital admissions in affected and unaffected communities for comparison; assessing the causes of death and factors associated with survival or death among persons located near the crater; analyzing the mineralogy and toxicology of sedimented ash and the airborne concentration of resuspended dusts; investigating reported excesses of ash-related adverse respiratory effects by epidemiological methods such as cross-sectional and case-control studies; and controlling rumors and disseminating accurate, timely information about volcanic hazards and recommended preventive or control measures by means of press briefings and health bulletins. Surveillance and observational studies indicated that: excess in morbidity were limited to transient increases in ER visits and hospital admissions for traumatic injuries and respiratory problems (but not for communicable disease or mental health problems) which were associated in time, place, and person with exposures to volcanic ash; excessive mortality due to suffocation (76 per cent), thermal injuries (12 per cent), or trauma (12 per cent) by ash and other volcanic hazards was directly proportional to the degree of environmental damage--that is, it was more pronounced among those persons (48/65, or about 74 per cent) who, at the time of the eruption, were residing

  18. Changing patterns of seismicity and ground deformation at the end of the Mount St. Helens 2004-2008 dome-building eruption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lisowski, M.; Moran, S. C.; Dzurisin, D.; Anderson, K. R.

    2012-12-01

    The onset and character of the 2004-2008 dome-building eruption at Mount St. Helens has been reported in detail through 2006-2007; our purpose here is to describe activity near the end of the eruption in early 2008. Overall, seismicity, deformation, and extrusion rates progressively declined throughout the eruption. As measured from SEP, the continuously-running seismic station closest to the vent, the number of detected earthquakes declined from ~1000/day during January-October 2006 to hundreds per day by September 2007 and to near zero by late October 2007. Starting in December 2007 the seismicity rate increased slightly , culminating in a short-lived episode of about 500 events on January 12-13, most of which accompanied several tremor-like signals and a spasmodic burst of LPs. At this time, distinctive sawtooth-shaped tilt events that had accompanied dome growth ceased; these had been recorded throughout the earlier part of the eruption at three locations on the 1980s lava dome adjacent to the 2004-2008 vent. Seismicity rapidly declined back to rates of 10-20 per day for the next two weeks. The "last gasp" from the seismic perspective was on January 27-28, when a spasmodic burst of ~50 VT earthquakes occurred over the space of 3 hours early on January 27. This burst followed by a brief return of drumbeat-style earthquakes that had characterized much of the 2004-2008 eruption, with hybrid-style earthquakes occurring every 35-40 minutes through the end of January 28. By the end of January, seismicity had declined to 1-2 earthquakes per day, consistent with pre-2004-eruption background levels. In conjunction with the decline in seismicity rate, depths of locatable earthquakes increased from the 0-1 km depth range seen during the eruption to 2-3 km by the end of January 2008, a depth range typical of pre-2004-eruption seismicity. Remote-camera photography confirmed the cessation of dome growth and also the subsequent subsidence of the 2004-2008 dome as a result of

  19. High-resolution digital elevation model of lower Cowlitz and Toutle Rivers, adjacent to Mount St. Helens, Washington, based on an airborne lidar survey of October 2007

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mosbrucker, Adam

    2015-01-01

    The lateral blast, debris avalanche, and lahars of the May 18th, 1980, eruption of Mount St. Helens, Washington, dramatically altered the surrounding landscape. Lava domes were extruded during the subsequent eruptive periods of 1980–1986 and 2004–2008. More than three decades after the emplacement of the 1980 debris avalanche, high sediment production persists in the Toutle River basin, which drains the northern and western flanks of the volcano. Because this sediment increases the risk of flooding to downstream communities on the Toutle and lower Cowlitz Rivers, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE), under the direction of Congress to maintain an authorized level of flood protection, continues to monitor and mitigate excess sediment in North and South Fork Toutle River basins to help reduce this risk and to prevent sediment from clogging the shipping channel of the Columbia River. From October 22–27, 2007, Watershed Sciences, Inc., under contract to USACE, collected high-precision airborne lidar (light detection and ranging) data that cover 273 square kilometers (105 square miles) of lower Cowlitz and Toutle River tributaries from the Columbia River at Kelso, Washington, to upper North Fork Toutle River (below the volcano's edifice), including lower South Fork Toutle River. These data provide a digital dataset of the ground surface, including beneath forest cover. Such remotely sensed data can be used to develop sediment budgets and models of sediment erosion, transport, and deposition. The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) used these lidar data to develop digital elevation models (DEMs) of the study area. DEMs are fundamental to monitoring natural hazards and studying volcanic landforms, fluvial and glacial geomorphology, and surface geology. Watershed Sciences, Inc., provided files in the LASer (LAS) format containing laser returns that had been filtered, classified, and georeferenced. The USGS produced a hydro-flattened DEM from ground-classified points at

  20. Immediate public health concerns and actions in volcanic eruptions: lessons from the Mount St. Helens eruptions, May 18-October 18, 1980.

    PubMed

    Bernstein, R S; Baxter, P J; Falk, H; Ing, R; Foster, L; Frost, F

    1986-03-01

    A comprehensive epidemiological evaluation of mortality and short-term morbidity associated with explosive volcanic activity was carried out by the Centers for Disease Control in collaboration with affected state and local health departments, clinicians, and private institutions. Following the May 18, 1980 eruption of Mount St. Helens, a series of public health actions were rapidly instituted to develop accurate information about volcanic hazards and to recommend methods for prevention or control of adverse effects on safety and health. These public health actions included: establishing a system of active surveillance of cause-specific emergency room (ER) visits and hospital admissions in affected and unaffected communities for comparison; assessing the causes of death and factors associated with survival or death among persons located near the crater; analyzing the mineralogy and toxicology of sedimented ash and the airborne concentration of resuspended dusts; investigating reported excesses of ash-related adverse respiratory effects by epidemiological methods such as cross-sectional and case-control studies; and controlling rumors and disseminating accurate, timely information about volcanic hazards and recommended preventive or control measures by means of press briefings and health bulletins. Surveillance and observational studies indicated that: excess in morbidity were limited to transient increases in ER visits and hospital admissions for traumatic injuries and respiratory problems (but not for communicable disease or mental health problems) which were associated in time, place, and person with exposures to volcanic ash; excessive mortality due to suffocation (76 per cent), thermal injuries (12 per cent), or trauma (12 per cent) by ash and other volcanic hazards was directly proportional to the degree of environmental damage--that is, it was more pronounced among those persons (48/65, or about 74 per cent) who, at the time of the eruption, were residing