Science.gov

Sample records for helium 8

  1. 48 CFR 52.208-8 - Required Sources for Helium and Helium Usage Data.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... Helium and Helium Usage Data. 52.208-8 Section 52.208-8 Federal Acquisition Regulations System FEDERAL... Provisions and Clauses 52.208-8 Required Sources for Helium and Helium Usage Data. As prescribed in 8.505, insert the following clause: Required Sources for Helium and Helium Usage Data (APR 2002) (a)...

  2. 48 CFR 52.208-8 - Required Sources for Helium and Helium Usage Data.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... Helium and Helium Usage Data. 52.208-8 Section 52.208-8 Federal Acquisition Regulations System FEDERAL... Provisions and Clauses 52.208-8 Required Sources for Helium and Helium Usage Data. As prescribed in 8.505, insert the following clause: Required Sources for Helium and Helium Usage Data (APR 2002) (a)...

  3. 48 CFR 52.208-8 - Required Sources for Helium and Helium Usage Data.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... Helium and Helium Usage Data. 52.208-8 Section 52.208-8 Federal Acquisition Regulations System FEDERAL... Provisions and Clauses 52.208-8 Required Sources for Helium and Helium Usage Data. As prescribed in 8.505, insert the following clause: Required Sources for Helium and Helium Usage Data (APR 2002) (a)...

  4. 8. ORIGINAL HELIUM COMPRESSOR, CIRCA 1957, BY HASKELL ENGINEERING, GLENDALE, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    8. ORIGINAL HELIUM COMPRESSOR, CIRCA 1957, BY HASKELL ENGINEERING, GLENDALE, CALIFORNIA. Looking north. - Edwards Air Force Base, Air Force Rocket Propulsion Laboratory, Helium Compression Plant, Test Area 1-115, intersection of Altair & Saturn Boulevards, Boron, Kern County, CA

  5. 48 CFR 52.208-8 - Required Sources for Helium and Helium Usage Data.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... Office's Authorized List of Federal Helium Suppliers available via the Internet at http://www.nm.blm.gov..., insert the following clause: Required Sources for Helium and Helium Usage Data (APR 2002) (a)...

  6. 48 CFR 52.208-8 - Required Sources for Helium and Helium Usage Data.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... pressure and 70 degrees Fahrenheit temperature) of gaseous helium or 7510 liters of liquid helium delivered... provide to the Contracting Officer the following data within 10 days after the Contractor or...

  7. Operational tests of the BNL 24.8 kW, 3.8 K helium refrigerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, D. P.; Farah, Y.; Gibbs, R. J.; Schlafke, A. P.; Sondericker, J. H.; Wu, K. C.; Freeman, M.; Ganni, V.; Kowalski, R.; McWilliams, R.

    1985-06-01

    The BNL 24.8 kW refrigeration system is completely installed and major portions of the acceptance tests have been completed. So far, the equipment tested has performed at or above design levels. The room temperature helium compressor station has been completely tested and accepted. The two-stage oil injected screw compressor system exhibited an isothermal efficiency of 57% while delivering a helium flow in excess of 4400 g/s. Data on the performance of the make-up gas cryogenic purifier is given. The refrigerator turbomachinery, 13 expanders and three cold compressors, has been tested at room temperature for mechanical integrity and control stability. The first cooldown to operating temperature will be attempted in late August, 1985.

  8. Properties of V-(8-9)Cr-(5-6)Ti alloys irradiated in the dynamic helium charging experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Chung, H.M.; Nowicki, L.; Smith, D.L.

    1996-10-01

    In the Dynamic Helium Charging Experiment (DHCE), helium was produced uniformly in vanadium alloy specimens by the decay of tritium during irradiation to 18-31 dpa at 425-600{degrees}C in lithium-filled capsules in the Fast Flux Test Facility. This report presents results of postirradiation tests of tensile properties and density change in V-8Cr-6Ti and V-9Cr-5Ti. Compared to tensile properties of the alloys irradiated in the non-DHCE (helium generation negligible), the effect of helium on tensile strength and ductility of V-8Cr-6Ti and V-9Cr-5Ti was insignificant after irradiation and testing at 420, 500, and 600{degrees}C. Both alloys retained a total elongation of >11 % at these temperatures. Density change was <0.48% for both alloys.

  9. Thermophysical properties of Helium-4 from 0.8 to 1500 K with pressures to 2000 MPa

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arp, Vincent D.; Mccarty, Robert D.

    1989-01-01

    Tabular summary data of the thermophysical properties of fluid helium are given for temperatures from 0.8 to 1500 K, with pressures to 2000 MPa between 75 and 300 K, or to 100 MPa outside of this temperature band. Properties include density, specific heats, enthalpy, entropy, internal energy, sound velocity, expansivity, compressibility, thermal conductivity, and viscosity. The data are calculated from a computer program which is available from the National Institute of Standards and Technology. The computer program is based on carefully fitted state equations for both normal and superfluid helium.

  10. Studies on the effects of helium on the microstructural evolution of V-3.8Cr-3.9Ti

    SciTech Connect

    Doraiswamy, N.; Kestel, B.; Alexander, D.E.

    1997-04-01

    The favorable physical and mechanical properties of V-3.8Cr-3.9Ti (wt.%), when subjected to neutron irradiation, has lead to considerable attention being focused on it for use in fusion reactor structural applications. However, there is limited data on the effects of helium on physical and mechanical properties of this alloy. Understanding these effects are important since helium will be generated by direct {alpha}-injection or transmutation reactions in the fusion environment, typically at a rate of {approx}5 appm He/dpa. Helium has been shown to cause substantial embrittlement, even at room temperature in vanadium and its alloys. Recent simulations of the fusion environment using the Dynamic Helium Charging Experiments (DHCE) have also indicated that the mechanical properties of vanadium alloys are altered by the presence of helium in post irradiation tests performed at room temperature. While the strengths were lower, room temperature ductilities of the DHCE specimens were higher than those of non-DHCE specimens. These changes have been attributed to the formation of different types of hardening centers in these alloys due to He trapping. Independent thermal desorption experiments suggest that these hardening centers may be associated with helium-vacancy-X (where X = O, N, and C) complexes. These complexes are stable below 290{degrees}C and persist at room temperature. However, there has been no direct microstructural evidence correlating the complexes with irradiation effects. An examination of the irradiation induced microstructure in samples preimplanted with He to different levels would enable such a correlation.

  11. Design, Project Execution, and Commissioning of the 1.8 K Superfluid Helium Refrigeration System for SRF Cryomodule Testing

    SciTech Connect

    Treite, P.; Nuesslein, U.; Jia, Yi; Klebaner, A.; Theilacker, J.

    2015-07-15

    The Fermilab Cryomodule Test Facility (CMTF) provides a test bed to measure the performance of superconducting radiofrequency (SRF) cryomodules (CM). These SRF components form the basic building blocks of future high intensity accelerators such as the International Linear Collider (ILC) and a Muon Collider. Linde Kryotechnik AG and Linde Cryogenics have designed, constructed and commissioned the superfluid helium refrigerator needed to support SRF component testing at the CMTF Facility. The hybrid refrigerator is designed to operate in a variety of modes and under a wide range of boundary conditions down to 1.8 Kelvin set by CM design. Special features of the refrigerator include the use of warm and cold compression and high efficiency turbo expanders.This paper gives an overview on the wide range of the challenging cooling requirements, the design, fabrication and the commissioning of the installed cryogenic system.

  12. Design, Project Execution, and Commissioning of the 1.8 K Superfluid Helium Refrigeration System for SRF Cryomodule Testing

    DOE PAGES

    Treite, P.; Nuesslein, U.; Jia, Yi; ...

    2015-07-15

    The Fermilab Cryomodule Test Facility (CMTF) provides a test bed to measure the performance of superconducting radiofrequency (SRF) cryomodules (CM). These SRF components form the basic building blocks of future high intensity accelerators such as the International Linear Collider (ILC) and a Muon Collider. Linde Kryotechnik AG and Linde Cryogenics have designed, constructed and commissioned the superfluid helium refrigerator needed to support SRF component testing at the CMTF Facility. The hybrid refrigerator is designed to operate in a variety of modes and under a wide range of boundary conditions down to 1.8 Kelvin set by CM design. Special features ofmore » the refrigerator include the use of warm and cold compression and high efficiency turbo expanders.This paper gives an overview on the wide range of the challenging cooling requirements, the design, fabrication and the commissioning of the installed cryogenic system.« less

  13. 14 kA HTS Current Leads with one 4.8 K Helium Stream for the Prototype Test Facility at GSI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raach, Henning; Schroeder, Claus H.; Floch, Eric; Bleile, Alexander; Schnizer, Pierre; Andersen, Torben P.

    The key part of the international FAIR project in Darmstadt, Germany, is the synchrotron SIS100, for which superconducting mag- nets are employed. For the First of Series Dipole a pair of HTS current leads with a nominal current of 14 kA DC were specified, manufactured and successfully tested. The motivation for these current leads was a high operation current and the liquefaction limit of 1 g/s of the cooling plant. In the design it has to be taken into account that per lead only one helium stream is available for the entirely inner cooling. For I=0 (8 kA DC) only 0.25 g/s/lead (0.38) were necessary to be compared to 0.365 (0.51) specified. Slow ramping with 50 A/s up to 17 kA was accomplished. Triangular cycles with 27 kA/s up to 14 kA were achieved. The current leads withstood the test voltage of 3 kV between two leads and between lead and ground. The one stream helium flow is regulated by the temperature at the warm end of the HTS to be 50 K. The reliability of the first pair, especially of the cold terminal, is a clear go for the series of HTS current leads needed for the Series Test Facility, the String Test and the SIS100 ring. There is a separate 50 K helium gas supply which allows a significant reduction of cooling requirements. These 19 pairs in total shall have a common design which will be slightly different to that of the first pair for the Prototype Test Facility.

  14. Helium defectoscopy of cerium gadolinium ceramics Ce0.8Gd0.2O1.9 with a submicrocrystalline structure in the impurity disorder region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koromyslov, A. V.; Zhiganov, A. N.; Kovalenko, M. A.; Kupryazhkin, A. Ya.

    2013-12-01

    The concentration of impurity anion vacancies formed upon the dissociation of gadolinium-vacancy complexes has been determined using helium defectoscopy of the cerium gadolinium ceramics Ce0.8Gd0.2O1.9 with a submicrocrystalline structure in the temperature range T = 740-1123 K and at saturation pressures ranging from 0.05 to 15 MPa. It has been found that the energy of dissociation of gadoliniumvacancy complexes is E {eff/ D }= 0.26 ± 0.06 eV, and the energy of dissolution of helium in anion vacancies in the impurity disorder region is E P = -0.31 ± 0.09 eV. The proposed mechanism of dissolution has been confirmed by the investigation of the electrical conductivity of the cerium gadolinium ceramics, as well as by the high-speed molecular dynamics simulation of the dissociation of gadolinium-vacancy complexes. It has been assumed that a decrease in the effective dissolution energy in comparison with the results of the previously performed low-temperature investigations is caused by the mutual repulsion of vacancies formed upon the dissociation of gadolinium-vacancy complexes in highly concentrated solutions of gadolinium in CeO2 with increasing temperature.

  15. Helium tables.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Havill, Clinton H

    1928-01-01

    These tables are intended to provide a standard method and to facilitate the calculation of the quantity of "Standard Helium" in high pressure containers. The research data and the formulas used in the preparation of the tables were furnished by the Research Laboratory of Physical Chemistry, of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology.

  16. 21 CFR 868.1640 - Helium gas analyzer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Helium gas analyzer. 868.1640 Section 868.1640...) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 868.1640 Helium gas analyzer. (a) Identification. A helium gas analyzer is a device intended to measure the concentration of helium in a...

  17. 21 CFR 868.1640 - Helium gas analyzer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Helium gas analyzer. 868.1640 Section 868.1640...) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 868.1640 Helium gas analyzer. (a) Identification. A helium gas analyzer is a device intended to measure the concentration of helium in a...

  18. 21 CFR 868.1640 - Helium gas analyzer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Helium gas analyzer. 868.1640 Section 868.1640...) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 868.1640 Helium gas analyzer. (a) Identification. A helium gas analyzer is a device intended to measure the concentration of helium in a...

  19. 21 CFR 868.1640 - Helium gas analyzer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Helium gas analyzer. 868.1640 Section 868.1640...) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 868.1640 Helium gas analyzer. (a) Identification. A helium gas analyzer is a device intended to measure the concentration of helium in a...

  20. 21 CFR 868.1640 - Helium gas analyzer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Helium gas analyzer. 868.1640 Section 868.1640...) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 868.1640 Helium gas analyzer. (a) Identification. A helium gas analyzer is a device intended to measure the concentration of helium in a...

  1. Ras Laffan helium recovery unit 2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fauve, Eric Arnaud; Grabié, Veronique; Grillot, David; Delcayre, Franck; Deschildre, Cindy

    2012-06-01

    In May 2010, Air Liquide was awarded a contract for the Engineering Procurement and Construction (Turnkey EPC) for a second helium recovery unit [RLH II] dedicated to the Ras Laffan refinery in Qatar. This unit will come in addition to the one [RLH I] delivered and commissioned by Air Liquide in 2005. It will increase the helium production of Qatar from 10% to 28% of worldwide production. RLH I and RLH II use Air Liquide Advanced Technologies helium liquefiers. With a production of 8 tons of liquid helium per day, the RLH I liquefier is the world largest, but not for long. Thanks to the newly developed turbine TC7, Air Liquide was able to propose for RLH II a single liquefier able to produce over 20 tons per day of liquid helium without liquid nitrogen pre-cooling. This liquefier using 6 Air Liquide turbines (TC series) will set a new record in the world of helium liquefaction.

  2. Effect of dislocations on helium retention in deformed pure iron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gong, Y. H.; Cao, X. Z.; Jin, S. X.; Lu, E. Y.; Hu, Y. C.; Zhu, T.; Kuang, P.; Xu, Q.; Wang, B. Y.

    2016-12-01

    The effects of dislocations created by deformation on helium retention in pure iron, including the helium atoms diffusion along the dislocation line and desorption from dislocation trapping sites, were investigated. The dislocation defect was introduced in specimens by cold-rolling, and then 5 keV helium ions were implanted into the deformed specimens. Slow positron beam technology and thermal desorption spectroscopy were used to investigate the evolution of dislocation defects and the desorption behavior of helium atoms under influence of dislocation. The behaviors of S-E, W-E and S-W plots indicate clearly that lots of helium atoms remain in the deformed specimen and helium atoms combining with dislocation change the distribution of electron density. The helium desorption plot indicates that dislocation accelerates helium desorption at 293 K-600 K and facilitates helium dissociation from HenVm (n/m = 1.8) cluster.

  3. Use of double and triple-ion irradiation to study the influence of high levels of helium and hydrogen on void swelling of 8-12% Cr ferritic-martensitic steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kupriiyanova, Y. E.; Bryk, V. V.; Borodin, O. V.; Kalchenko, A. S.; Voyevodin, V. N.; Tolstolutskaya, G. D.; Garner, F. A.

    2016-01-01

    In accelerator-driven spallation (ADS) devices, some of the structural materials will be exposed to intense fluxes of very high energy protons and neutrons, producing not only displacement damage, but very high levels of helium and hydrogen. Unlike fission flux-spectra where most helium and hydrogen are generated by transmutation in nickel and only secondarily in iron or chromium, gas production in ADS flux-spectra are rather insensitive to alloy composition, such that Fe-Cr base ferritic alloys also generate very large gas levels. While ferritic alloys are known to swell less than austenitic alloys in fission spectra, there is a concern that high gas levels in fusion and especially ADS facilities may strongly accelerate void swelling in ferritic alloys. In this study of void swelling in response to helium and hydrogen generation, irradiation was conducted on three ferritic-martensitic steels using the Electrostatic Accelerator with External Injector (ESUVI) facility that can easily produce any combination of helium to dpa and/or hydrogen to dpa ratios. Irradiation was conducted under single, dual and triple beam modes using 1.8 MeV Cr+3, 40 keV He+, and 20 keV H+. In the first part of this study we investigated the response of dual-phase EP-450 to variations in He/dpa and H/dpa ratio, focusing first on dual ion studies and then triple ion studies, showing that there is a diminishing influence on swelling with increasing total gas content. In the second part we investigated the relative response of three alloys spanning a range of starting microstructure and composition. In addition to observing various synergisms between He and H, the most important conclusion was that the tempered martensite phase, known to lag behind the ferrite phase in swelling in the absence of gases, loses much of its resistance to void nucleation when irradiated at large gas/dpa levels.

  4. The effects of convective overshooting on naked helium stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Jing-Zhi; Zhu, Chun-Hua; Wang, Zhao-Jun; Lü, Guo-Liang

    2016-09-01

    Using stellar evolutionary models, we investigate the effects of convective overshooting on naked helium stars. We find that a larger value of overshooting parameter δov results in a larger convective core, which prolongs the lifetimes of naked helium stars on the helium main sequence and leads to higher effective temperatures and luminosities. For naked helium stars with masses lower than about 0.8 M⊙, they hardly become giant stars as a result of a weak burning shell. However, naked helium stars with masses between about 0.8 M⊙ and 1.1 M⊙ can evolve into giant branch phases, and finally become carbon oxygen white dwarfs.

  5. Helium-Recycling Plant

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cook, Joseph

    1996-01-01

    Proposed system recovers and stores helium gas for reuse. Maintains helium at 99.99-percent purity, preventing water vapor from atmosphere or lubricating oil from pumps from contaminating gas. System takes in gas at nearly constant low back pressure near atmospheric pressure; introduces little or no back pressure into source of helium. Concept also extended to recycling of other gases.

  6. Helium diffusion in the sun

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bahcall, J. N.; Pinsonneault, M. H.

    1992-01-01

    We calculate improved standard solar models using the new Livermore (OPAL) opacity tables, an accurate (exportable) nuclear energy generation routine which takes account of recent measurements and analyses, and the recent Anders-Grevesse determination of heavy element abundances. We also evaluate directly the effect of the diffusion of helium with respect to hydrogen on the calculated neutrino fluxes, on the primordial solar helium abundance, and on the depth of the convective zone. Helium diffusion increases the predicted event rates by about 0.8 SNU, or 11 percent of the total rate, in the chlorine solar neutrino experiment, by about 3.5 SNU, or 3 percent, in the gallium solar neutrino experiments, and by about 12 percent in the Kamiokande and SNO solar neutrino experiments. The best standard solar model including helium diffusion and the most accurate nuclear parameters, element abundances, and radiative opacity predicts a value of 8.0 SNU +/- 3.0 SNU for the C1-37 experiment and 132 +21/-17 SNU for the Ga - 71 experiment, where the uncertainties include 3 sigma errors for all measured input parameters.

  7. 48 CFR 8.501 - Definitions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... REQUIRED SOURCES OF SUPPLIES AND SERVICES Acquisition of Helium 8.501 Definitions. As used in this subpart... Office, Helium Operations, 801 South Fillmore Street, Suite 500, Amarillo, TX 79101-3545. Federal helium supplier means a private helium vendor that has an in-kind crude helium sales contract with the Bureau...

  8. 48 CFR 8.502 - Policy.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... REQUIRED SOURCES OF SUPPLIES AND SERVICES Acquisition of Helium 8.502 Policy. Agencies and their contractors and subcontractors must purchase major helium requirements from Federal helium suppliers, to...

  9. 48 CFR 8.502 - Policy.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... REQUIRED SOURCES OF SUPPLIES AND SERVICES Acquisition of Helium 8.502 Policy. Agencies and their contractors and subcontractors must purchase major helium requirements from Federal helium suppliers, to...

  10. 48 CFR 8.502 - Policy.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... REQUIRED SOURCES OF SUPPLIES AND SERVICES Acquisition of Helium 8.502 Policy. Agencies and their contractors and subcontractors must purchase major helium requirements from Federal helium suppliers, to...

  11. 48 CFR 8.502 - Policy.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... REQUIRED SOURCES OF SUPPLIES AND SERVICES Acquisition of Helium 8.502 Policy. Agencies and their contractors and subcontractors must purchase major helium requirements from Federal helium suppliers, to...

  12. 48 CFR 8.502 - Policy.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... REQUIRED SOURCES OF SUPPLIES AND SERVICES Acquisition of Helium 8.502 Policy. Agencies and their contractors and subcontractors must purchase major helium requirements from Federal helium suppliers, to...

  13. Helium diffusion in carbonates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amidon, W. H.; Cherniak, D. J.; Watson, E. B.; Hobbs, D.

    2013-12-01

    The abundance and large grain size of carbonate minerals make them a potentially attractive target for 4He thermochronology and 3He cosmogenic dating, although the diffusive properties of helium in carbonates remain poorly understood. This work characterizes helium diffusion in calcite and dolomite to better understand the crystal-chemical factors controlling He transport and retentivity. Slabs of cleaved natural calcite and dolomite, and polished sections of calcite cut parallel or normal to c, were implanted with 3He at 3 MeV with a dose of 5x1015/cm2. Implanted carbonates were heated in 1-atm furnaces, and 3He distributions following diffusion anneals were profiled with Nuclear Reaction Analysis using the reaction 3He(d,p)4He. For 3He transport normal to cleavage surfaces in calcite, we obtain the following Arrhenius relation over the temperature range 78-300°C: Dcalcite = 9.0x10-9exp(-55 × 6 kJ mol-1/RT) m2sec-1. Diffusion in calcite exhibits marked anisotropy, with diffusion parallel to c about two orders of magnitude slower than diffusion normal to cleavage faces. He diffusivities for transport normal to the c-axis are similar in value to those normal to cleavage surfaces. Our findings are broadly consistent with helium diffusivities from step-heating measurements of calcite by Copeland et al. (2007); these bulk degassing data may reflect varying effects of diffusional anisotropy. Helium diffusion normal to cleavage surfaces in dolomite is significantly slower than diffusion in calcite, and has a much higher activation energy for diffusion. For dolomite, we obtain the following Arrhenius relation for He diffusion over the temperature range 150-400°C: Ddolomite = 9.0x10-8exp(-92 × 9 kJ mol-1/RT) m2sec-1. The role of crystallographic structure in influencing these differences among diffusivities was evaluated using the maximum aperture approach of Cherniak and Watson (2011), in which crystallographic structures are sectioned along possible diffusion

  14. Thermal desorption behavior of helium in aged titanium tritide films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, G. J.; Shi, L. Q.; Zhou, X. S.; Liang, J. H.; Wang, W. D.; Long, X. G.; Yang, B. F.; Peng, S. M.

    2015-11-01

    The desorption behavior of helium in TiT(1.5∼1.8)-x3Hex film samples (x = 0.0022-0.22) was investigated by thermal desorption technique in vacuum condition in this paper. The thermal helium desorption spectrometry (THDS) of aging titanium tritide films prepared by electron beam evaporation revealed that, depending on the decayed 3He concentration in the samples, there are more than four states of helium existing in the films. The divided four zones in THDS based on helium states represent respectively: (1) the mobile single helium atoms with low activation energy in all aging samples resulted from the interstitial sites or dissociated from interstitial clusters, loops and dislocations, (2) helium bubbles inside the grain lattices, (3) helium bubbles in the grain boundaries and interconnected networks of dislocations in the helium concentration of 3Hegen/Ti > 0.0094, and (4) helium bubbles near or linked to the film surface by interconnected channel for later aging stage with 3Hegen/Ti > 0.18. The proportion of helium desorption in each zone was estimated, and dissociated energies of helium for different trapping states were given.

  15. 48 CFR 8.505 - Contract clause.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... REQUIRED SOURCES OF SUPPLIES AND SERVICES Acquisition of Helium 8.505 Contract clause. Insert the clause at 52.208-8, Required Sources for Helium and Helium Usage Data, in solicitations and contracts if it is anticipated that performance of the contract involves a major helium requirement....

  16. 48 CFR 8.505 - Contract clause.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... REQUIRED SOURCES OF SUPPLIES AND SERVICES Acquisition of Helium 8.505 Contract clause. Insert the clause at 52.208-8, Required Sources for Helium and Helium Usage Data, in solicitations and contracts if it is anticipated that performance of the contract involves a major helium requirement....

  17. 48 CFR 8.505 - Contract clause.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... REQUIRED SOURCES OF SUPPLIES AND SERVICES Acquisition of Helium 8.505 Contract clause. Insert the clause at 52.208-8, Required Sources for Helium and Helium Usage Data, in solicitations and contracts if it is anticipated that performance of the contract involves a major helium requirement....

  18. 48 CFR 8.505 - Contract clause.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... REQUIRED SOURCES OF SUPPLIES AND SERVICES Acquisition of Helium 8.505 Contract clause. Insert the clause at 52.208-8, Required Sources for Helium and Helium Usage Data, in solicitations and contracts if it is anticipated that performance of the contract involves a major helium requirement....

  19. CHARACTERIZING TRITIUM WASTE USING HELIUM RATIOS

    SciTech Connect

    Ovink, R.W.; McMahon, W.J.; Borghese, J.V.; Olsen, K.B.

    2003-02-27

    When routine sampling revealed greatly elevated tritium levels (3.14 x 105 Bq/L [8.5-million pCi/liter]) in the groundwater near a solid waste landfill at the Hanford Site, an innovative technique was used to assess the extent of the plume. Helium-3/helium-4 ratios, relative to ambient air-in-soil gas samples, were used to identify the tritium source and initially delineate the extent of the groundwater tritium plume. This approach is a modification of a technique developed in the late 1960s to age-date deep ocean water as part of the GEOSECS ocean monitoring program. Poreda, et al. (1) and Schlosser, et al. (2) applied this modified technique to shallow aquifers. A study was also conducted to demonstrate the concept of using helium-3 as a tool to locate vadose zone sources of tritium and tracking groundwater tritium plumes at Hanford (3). Seventy sampling points were installed around the perimeter and along four transects downgradient of the burial ground. Soil gas samples were collected, analyzed for helium isotopes, and helium-3/helium-4 ratios were calculated for these 70 points. The helium ratios indicated a vadose zone source of tritium along the northern edge of the burial ground that is likely the source of tritium in the groundwater. The helium ratios also indicate the groundwater plume is traveling east-northeast from the burial ground and that no up-gradient tritium sources are affecting the burial ground. Based on the helium ratio results, six downgradient groundwater sampling locations were identified to verify the tritium plume extent and groundwater tritium concentrations. The tritium results from the initial groundwater samples confirmed that elevated helium ratios were indicative of tritium contamination in the local groundwater. The measurement of helium isotopes in soil gas provided a rapid and cost- effective technique to define the shape and extent of tritium contamination from the burial ground. Using this soil gas sampling approach, the

  20. Noncavitating Pump For Liquid Helium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hasenbein, Robert; Izenson, Michael; Swift, Walter; Sixsmith, Herbert

    1996-01-01

    Immersion pump features high efficiency in cryogenic service. Simple and reliable centrifugal pump transfers liquid helium with mass-transfer efficiency of 99 percent. Liquid helium drawn into pump by helical inducer, which pressurizes helium slightly to prevent cavitation when liquid enters impeller. Impeller then pressurizes liquid. Purpose of pump to transfer liquid helium from supply to receiver vessel, or to provide liquid helium flow for testing and experimentation.

  1. The Descending Helium Balloon

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Helseth, Lars Egil

    2014-01-01

    I describe a simple and fascinating experiment wherein helium leaks out of a rubber balloon, thereby causing it to descend. An estimate of the volumetric leakage rate is made by measuring its rate of descent.

  2. 48 CFR 8.504 - Procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... REQUIRED SOURCES OF SUPPLIES AND SERVICES Acquisition of Helium 8.504 Procedures. The contracting officer... each fiscal quarter: (a) The name of any company that supplied a major helium requirement. (b) The amount of helium purchased. (c) The delivery date(s). (d) The location where the helium was used....

  3. 48 CFR 8.504 - Procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... REQUIRED SOURCES OF SUPPLIES AND SERVICES Acquisition of Helium 8.504 Procedures. The contracting officer... each fiscal quarter: (a) The name of any company that supplied a major helium requirement. (b) The amount of helium purchased. (c) The delivery date(s). (d) The location where the helium was used....

  4. 48 CFR 8.504 - Procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... REQUIRED SOURCES OF SUPPLIES AND SERVICES Acquisition of Helium 8.504 Procedures. The contracting officer... each fiscal quarter: (a) The name of any company that supplied a major helium requirement. (b) The amount of helium purchased. (c) The delivery date(s). (d) The location where the helium was used....

  5. 48 CFR 8.504 - Procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... REQUIRED SOURCES OF SUPPLIES AND SERVICES Acquisition of Helium 8.504 Procedures. The contracting officer... each fiscal quarter: (a) The name of any company that supplied a major helium requirement. (b) The amount of helium purchased. (c) The delivery date(s). (d) The location where the helium was used....

  6. 48 CFR 8.504 - Procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... REQUIRED SOURCES OF SUPPLIES AND SERVICES Acquisition of Helium 8.504 Procedures. The contracting officer... each fiscal quarter: (a) The name of any company that supplied a major helium requirement. (b) The amount of helium purchased. (c) The delivery date(s). (d) The location where the helium was used....

  7. Is solid helium a supersolid?

    SciTech Connect

    Hallock, Robert

    2015-05-15

    Recent experiments suggest that helium-4 atoms can flow through an experimental cell filled with solid helium. But that incompletely understood flow is quite different from the reported superfluid-like motion that so excited physicists a decade ago.

  8. Helium-refrigeration system

    SciTech Connect

    Specht, J.R.; Millar, B.; Sutherland, A.

    1995-08-01

    The design, procurement, and preliminary construction was completed for adding two more wet expansion engines to two helium refrigerators. These will be added in mid-year FY 1995. In addition a variable speed drive will be added to an existing helium compressor. This is part of an energy conservation upgrade project to reduce operating costs from the use of electricity and liquid nitrogen. This project involves the replacement of Joule-Thompson valves in the refrigerators with expansion engines resulting in system efficiency improvements of about 30% and improved system reliability.

  9. Cavitation in flowing superfluid helium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daney, D. E.

    1988-01-01

    Flowing superfluid helium cavitates much more readily than normal liquid helium, and there is a marked difference in the cavitation behavior of the two fluids as the lambda point is traversed. Examples of cavitation in a turbine meter and centrifugal pump are given, together with measurements of the cavitation strength of flowing superfluid helium. The unusual cavitation behavior of superfluid helium is attributed to its immense thermal conductivity .

  10. The selection and characterization of the mutants in bioflocculant bacteria C8 induced by 3 MeV helium ion irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, L. L.; Yang, Y. N.; Xue, J. M.; Ding, X. L.; Guo, R. Q.

    2009-01-01

    A 3 MeV He 2+ beam was used to irradiate C8 (a flocculant-producing bacteria) with a fluence ranging from 10 11 to 10 13 ions/cm 2. The effects on the survival ratio, TTC-dehydrogenase activity, flocculating activity and RAPD analysis are reported. The survival ratio curve caused by irradiation is proved to be "saddle-shaped". Eleven mutants were obtained, all of which had a significant change in dehydrogenase activity and most showed a positive change in flocculating activity. RAPD measurements were used to analyse the DNA of mutants with a flocculating activity over 80%, which indicated that all their DNA had been changed by irradiation.

  11. Helium anion formation inside helium droplets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jabbour Al Maalouf, Elias; Reitshammer, Julia; Ribar, Anita; Scheier, Paul; Denifl, Stephan

    2016-07-01

    The formation of He∗- is examined with improved electron energy resolution of about 100 meV utilizing a hemispherical electron monochromator. The work presented provides a precise determination of the three previously determined resonance peak positions that significantly contribute to the formation of He∗- inside helium nanodroplets in the energy range from 20 eV to 29.5 eV. In addition, a new feature is identified located at 27.69 ± 0.18 eV that we assign to the presence of O2 as a dopant inside the droplet. With increasing droplet size a small blue shift of the resonance positions is observed. Also for the relatively low electron currents used in the present study (i.e., 15-70 nA) a quadratic dependence of the He∗- ion yield on the electron current is observed.

  12. 48 CFR 8.505 - Contract clause.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Contract clause. 8.505... REQUIRED SOURCES OF SUPPLIES AND SERVICES Acquisition of Helium 8.505 Contract clause. Insert the clause at 52.208-8, Required Sources for Helium and Helium Usage Data, in solicitations and contracts if it...

  13. Feasibility of lunar Helium-3 mining

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kleinschneider, Andreas; Van Overstraeten, Dmitry; Van der Reijnst, Roy; Van Hoorn, Niels; Lamers, Marvin; Hubert, Laurent; Dijk, Bert; Blangé, Joey; Hogeveen, Joel; De Boer, Lennaert; Noomen, Ron

    -3 fusion were calculated using a predicted minimum energy price in 2040 of 30.4 Euro/MWh. Annual costs are between 427.7 to 1,347.9 billion Euro, with annual expected profit ranging from -724.0 to 260.0 billion Euro. Due to the large scale of the mission, it has also been evaluated for providing 0.1% and 1% of the global energy demand in 2040. For 1%, the annual costs are 45.6 to 140.3 billion Euro and the expected annual profits are -78.0 to 23.1 billion Euro. For 0.1%, the annual costs are 7.7 to 20.5 billion Euro. The annual expected profits are -14.3 to -0.8 billion Euro. Feasibility has been addressed in three aspects. Technically, the mission is extremely challenging and complex. However, most required technologies exist or could be developed within a reasonable time span. From a political and legal perspective, the current international treaties hardly provide any framework for a lunar mining operation. Financially, the mission only produces a net profit in the best case, and only for medium- to large-scale operations, which require a very large initial investment. To make lunar Helium-3 usage possible, further research should concentrate on the mining operation and costs of fusion plants, as their impact by far outranks all other mission elements. Different transportation concepts may be investigated nevertheless. Many - not only technical - challenges concerning Helium-3 mining are still to be addressed. Although only a starting point for further investigations, this study shows that, despite popular claims, lunar Helium-3 is unsuitable to provide a significant percentage of the global energy demand in 2040.

  14. Auroral helium precipitation.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Axford, W. I.; Chivers, H. J. A.; Eberhardt, P.; Geiss, J.; Buehler, F.

    1972-01-01

    Application of the metal foil sampling technique, which has been used to measure helium, neon, and argon fluxes in the solar wind, to the problem of measuring the fluxes of these gases in the auroral primary radiation. Aluminum and platinum foils have been flown into two bright auroras and have been recovered. The foils have been analyzed for helium and neon isotopes with a mass spectrometer; so far only He4 has been detected. In the first flight the precipitating flux of He4 with particle energies above about 1 keV was approximately 1,000,000 per sq cm per sec, and the backscattered flux was smaller by about a factor of 10. In the second flight the aurora was less bright, and the He4 fluxes were lower by a factor of about 2. A rough analysis suggests that the mean energy of the incident particles was greater than 3 keV.

  15. Applications of Groundwater Helium

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kulongoski, Justin T.; Hilton, David R.

    2011-01-01

    Helium abundance and isotope variations have widespread application in groundwater-related studies. This stems from the inert nature of this noble gas and the fact that its two isotopes ? helium-3 and helium-4 ? have distinct origins and vary widely in different terrestrial reservoirs. These attributes allow He concentrations and 3He/4He isotope ratios to be used to recognize and quantify the influence of a number of potential contributors to the total He budget of a groundwater sample. These are atmospheric components, such as air-equilibrated and air-entrained He, as well as terrigenic components, including in situ (aquifer) He, deep crustal and/or mantle He and tritiogenic 3He. Each of these components can be exploited to reveal information on a number of topics, from groundwater chronology, through degassing of the Earth?s crust to the role of faults in the transfer of mantle-derived volatiles to the surface. In this review, we present a guide to how groundwater He is collected from aquifer systems and quantitatively measured in the laboratory. We then illustrate the approach of resolving the measured He characteristics into its component structures using assumptions of endmember compositions. This is followed by a discussion of the application of groundwater He to the types of topics mentioned above using case studies from aquifers in California and Australia. Finally, we present possible future research directions involving dissolved He in groundwater.

  16. Education in Helium Refrigeration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gistau Baguer, G. M.

    2004-06-01

    On the one hand, at the end of the time I was active in helium refrigeration, I noticed that cryogenics was stepping into places where it was not yet used. For example, a conventional accelerator, operating at room temperature, was to be upgraded to reach higher particle energy. On the other hand, I was a little bit worried to let what I had so passionately learned during these years to be lost. Retirement made time available, and I came gradually to the idea to teach about what was my basic job. I thought also about other kinds of people who could be interested in such lessons: operators of refrigerators or liquefiers who, often by lack of time, did not get a proper introduction to their job when they started, young engineers who begin to work in cryogenics… and so on. Consequently, I have assembled a series of lessons about helium refrigeration. As the audiences have different levels of knowledge in the field of cryogenics, I looked for a way of teaching that is acceptable for all of them. The course is split into theory of heat exchangers, refrigeration cycles, technology and operation of main components, process control, and helium purity.

  17. Education in Helium Refrigeration

    SciTech Connect

    Gistau Baguer, G. M.

    2004-06-23

    On the one hand, at the end of the time I was active in helium refrigeration, I noticed that cryogenics was stepping into places where it was not yet used. For example, a conventional accelerator, operating at room temperature, was to be upgraded to reach higher particle energy. On the other hand, I was a little bit worried to let what I had so passionately learned during these years to be lost. Retirement made time available, and I came gradually to the idea to teach about what was my basic job. I thought also about other kinds of people who could be interested in such lessons: operators of refrigerators or liquefiers who, often by lack of time, did not get a proper introduction to their job when they started, young engineers who begin to work in cryogenics... and so on.Consequently, I have assembled a series of lessons about helium refrigeration. As the audiences have different levels of knowledge in the field of cryogenics, I looked for a way of teaching that is acceptable for all of them. The course is split into theory of heat exchangers, refrigeration cycles, technology and operation of main components, process control, and helium purity.

  18. Helium anion formation inside helium droplets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maalouf, Elias Jabbour Al; Reitshammer, Julia; Ribar, Anita; Scheier, Paul; Denifl, Stephan

    2016-07-01

    The formation of He∗- is examined with improved electron energy resolution of about 100 meV utilizing a hemispherical electron monochromator. The work presented provides a precise determination of the three previously determined resonance peak positions that significantly contribute to the formation of He∗- inside helium nanodroplets in the energy range from 20 eV to 29.5 eV. In addition, a new feature is identified located at 27.69 ± 0.18 eV that we assign to the presence of O2 as a dopant inside the droplet. With increasing droplet size a small blue shift of the resonance positions is observed. Also for the relatively low electron currents used in the present study (i.e., 15-70 nA) a quadratic dependence of the He∗- ion yield on the electron current is observed. Contribution to the Topical Issue "Advances in Positron and Electron Scattering", edited by Paulo Limao-Vieira, Gustavo Garcia, E. Krishnakumar, James Sullivan, Hajime Tanuma and Zoran Petrovic.

  19. The winter helium bulge revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xianjing; Wang, Wenbin; Thayer, Jeffrey P.; Burns, Alan; Sutton, Eric; Solomon, Stanley C.; Qian, Liying; Lucas, Greg

    2014-10-01

    A newly implemented helium module in the National Center for Atmospheric Research-Thermosphere Ionosphere Electrodynamics general circulation model offers the first opportunity in three decades to describe helium behavior in the context of a first principles, self-consistent model and to test early theories of wintertime helium bulge formation. This study shows general agreement with the findings of Reber and Hays (1973) but articulates the definitive role of vertical advection in the bulge formation. Our findings indicate vertical advection and molecular diffusion are the dominate processes responsible for the solstice helium distribution. Horizontal winds indirectly contribute to the helium bulge formation by their divergent wind field that leads to vertical winds in order to maintain thermosphere mass continuity. As a minor gas, thermospheric helium does not contribute to mass continuity and its distribution is dictated by more local interactions and constraints.

  20. Energetic helium particles trapped in the magnetosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Jiasheng; Guzik, T. Gregory; Sang, Yeming; Wefel, John P.; Cooper, John F.

    1994-01-01

    High energy (approximately 40-100 MeV/nucleon) geomagnetically trapped helium nuclei have been measured, for the first time, by the ONR-604 instrument during the 1990/1991 Combined Release and Radiation Effects Satellite (CRRES) mission. The helium events observed at L less than 2.3 have a pitch angle distribution peaking perpendicular to the local magnetic field and are contained in peaks located at L = 1.2 and 1.9. The events in each peak can be characterized by power law energy spectra with indices of 10.0 +/- 0.7 for L = 1.9-2.3 and 6.8 +/- 1.0 for L = 1.15-1.3, before the large storm of 24 March 1991. CRRES was active during solar maximum when the anomalous component is excluded from the inner heliosphere, making it unlikely that the observed events derived from the anomalous component. The trapped helium counting rates decrease gradually with time indicating that these high energy ions were not injected by flares during the 1990/91 mission. Flare injection prior to mid-1990 may account for the highest energy particles, while solar wind injection during magnetic storms and subsequent acceleration could account for the helium at lower energies.

  1. Helium jet dispersion to atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khan, Hasna J.

    On the event of loss of vacuum guard of superinsulated helium dewar, high rate of heat transfer into the tank occurs. The rapid boiling of liquid helium causes the burst disk to rupture at four atmospheres and consequently the helium passes to the atmosphere through vent lines. The gaseous helium forms a vertical buoyant jet as it exits the vent line into a stagnant environment. Characterization of the gaseous jet is achieved by detailed analysis of the axial and radial dependence of the flow parameters.

  2. 48 CFR 8.503 - Exception.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... REQUIRED SOURCES OF SUPPLIES AND SERVICES Acquisition of Helium 8.503 Exception. The requirements of this subpart do not apply to contracts or subcontracts in which the helium was acquired by the contractor...

  3. 48 CFR 8.503 - Exception.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... REQUIRED SOURCES OF SUPPLIES AND SERVICES Acquisition of Helium 8.503 Exception. The requirements of this subpart do not apply to contracts or subcontracts in which the helium was acquired by the contractor...

  4. 48 CFR 8.503 - Exception.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... REQUIRED SOURCES OF SUPPLIES AND SERVICES Acquisition of Helium 8.503 Exception. The requirements of this subpart do not apply to contracts or subcontracts in which the helium was acquired by the contractor...

  5. 48 CFR 8.503 - Exception.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... REQUIRED SOURCES OF SUPPLIES AND SERVICES Acquisition of Helium 8.503 Exception. The requirements of this subpart do not apply to contracts or subcontracts in which the helium was acquired by the contractor...

  6. 48 CFR 8.503 - Exception.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... REQUIRED SOURCES OF SUPPLIES AND SERVICES Acquisition of Helium 8.503 Exception. The requirements of this subpart do not apply to contracts or subcontracts in which the helium was acquired by the contractor...

  7. Influence of flowing helium gas on plasma plume formation in atmospheric pressure plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Yambe, Kiyoyuki; Konda, Kohmei; Ogura, Kazuo

    2015-05-15

    We have studied atmospheric pressure plasma generated using a quartz tube, helium gas, and a foil electrode by applying RF high voltage. The atmospheric pressure plasma in the form of a bullet is released as a plume into the atmosphere. The helium gas flowing out of quartz tube mixes with air, and the flow channel is composed of the regions of flowing helium gas and air. The plasma plume length is equivalent to the reachable distance of flowing helium gas. Although the amount of helium gas on the flow channel increases by increasing the inner diameter of quartz tube at the same gas flow velocity, the plasma plume length peaks at around 8 m/s of gas flow velocity, which is the result that a flow of helium gas is balanced with the amount of gas. The plasma plume is formed at the boundary region where the flow of helium gas is kept to the wall of the air.

  8. Rayleigh Scattering by Helium in Stellar Atmospheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fišák, J.; Kubát, J.; Krtička, J.

    2017-02-01

    We study the influence of Rayleigh scattering by helium on synthetic spectra and stellar atmosphere models. Rayleigh scattering by helium is often neglected in hot star atmosphere models. This approximation is justified by the small population of helium in stars with solar composition (about 10% by number) and lower Rayleigh scattering total cross section of helium with respect to neutral hydrogen. However, for stars with large helium abundances Rayleigh scattering by helium can be a significant opacity source.

  9. Helium dilution refrigeration system

    DOEpatents

    Roach, P.R.; Gray, K.E.

    1988-09-13

    A helium dilution refrigeration system operable over a limited time period, and recyclable for a next period of operation is disclosed. The refrigeration system is compact with a self-contained pumping system and heaters for operation of the system. A mixing chamber contains [sup 3]He and [sup 4]He liquids which are precooled by a coupled container containing [sup 3]He liquid, enabling the phase separation of a [sup 3]He rich liquid phase from a dilute [sup 3]He-[sup 4]He liquid phase which leads to the final stage of a dilution cooling process for obtaining low temperatures. The mixing chamber and a still are coupled by a fluid line and are maintained at substantially the same level with the still cross sectional area being smaller than that of the mixing chamber. This configuration provides maximum cooling power and efficiency by the cooling period ending when the [sup 3]He liquid is depleted from the mixing chamber with the mixing chamber nearly empty of liquid helium, thus avoiding unnecessary and inefficient cooling of a large amount of the dilute [sup 3]He-[sup 4]He liquid phase. 2 figs.

  10. Helium dilution refrigeration system

    DOEpatents

    Roach, Patrick R.; Gray, Kenneth E.

    1988-01-01

    A helium dilution refrigeration system operable over a limited time period, and recyclable for a next period of operation. The refrigeration system is compact with a self-contained pumping system and heaters for operation of the system. A mixing chamber contains .sup.3 He and .sup.4 He liquids which are precooled by a coupled container containing .sup.3 He liquid, enabling the phase separation of a .sup.3 He rich liquid phase from a dilute .sup.3 He-.sup.4 He liquid phase which leads to the final stage of a dilution cooling process for obtaining low temperatures. The mixing chamber and a still are coupled by a fluid line and are maintained at substantially the same level with the still cross sectional area being smaller than that of the mixing chamber. This configuration provides maximum cooling power and efficiency by the cooling period ending when the .sup.3 He liquid is depleted from the mixing chamber with the mixing chamber nearly empty of liquid helium, thus avoiding unnecessary and inefficient cooling of a large amount of the dilute .sup.3 He-.sup.4 He liquid phase.

  11. Characterization of gaseous helium jet dispersion to atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khan, H. J.; Figueroa, O.; Rhee, M.

    A major ground-based experiment to be performed for the Superfluid Helium On Orbit Transfer (SHOOT) program is the accidental loss of the vacuum guard of the super-insulated dewar. The design of the dewar vent-path requires adequate mass removal after a preset pressure is reached due to external heat transfer. The existing helium creates a turbulent buoyant jet, expanding in air with entrainment of the jet interface to the surrounding. Transient analysis is performed for axial and radial jet temperature prediction using the self-similarity assumption applied to mass, momentum, and the energy-balance equations of helium. The predicted jet temperature profiles with vertical and radial expansion up to 1.6 and 1.0 m, respectively, demonstrate the low temperature core established by gaseous helium. For all time steps, the axial and radial temperature predictions are observed to be within 8 and 20 percent, respectively.

  12. The evolution of hydrogen-helium stars.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ezer, D.; Cameron, A. G. W.

    1971-01-01

    Investigation of the premain sequence evolution and the main sequence evolution of stars of 5, 10, 20, 30, 100, and 200 solar masses. Normal stars in this entire mass range normally convert hydrogen into helium by the CN-cycle on the main sequence. The present hydrogen-helium stars of 5 and 10 solar masses must reach higher central temperatures in order to convert hydrogen to helium by the proton-proton chains. Consequently, the mean densities in the stars are greater, and the surface temperatures are higher than in normal stars. In the stars of 20 solar masses and larger, the proton-proton chains do not succeed in supplying the necessary luminosity of the stars by the time the contraction has produced a central temperature near 10 to the 8th K. At that point triple-alpha reactions generate small amounts of C12, which then acts as a catalyst in the CN-cycle, the rate of which is then limited by the beta-decays occurring within the cycle. During the evolution of these more massive stars, the central temperature remains in the vicinity of 10 to the 8th K, and the surface temperature on the main sequence approaches 100,000.

  13. Helium isotope ratios in Ethiopian Rift basalts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scarsi, P.; Craig, H.

    1996-11-01

    Helium isotope ratios were measured in olivine and pyroxene phenocrysts from basalts of the Ethiopian Rift Valley and Afar Depression between 6° and 15°N and 37° and 43°E. 3He/4He ratios range from 6 to 17 times the atmospheric value (RA = 1.4 × 10-6), that is, from ratios less than typical MORB (depleted mantle) helium (R/RA= 8 ± 1) to ratios similar to high-3He hotspots and to the Yellowstone hotspot (R/RA= 16.5). The high 3He/4He ratios occur all along the Ethiopian Rift and well up into the Afar Depression, with a maximum value of 17.0 RA at 8°N in the Rift Axis and a high value of 14.2 RA in the central Tat'Ali sector of the Afar Depression. The ratios decrease to MORB-like values near the edge of the Red Sea, and to sub-MORB ratios (5-6 RA) at the northern end of the Rift (Zula Peninsula) and at the southern end, at lakes Abaya and Chamo. The Ethiopian Rift provides the only continental hotspot terrain in which helium isotope ratios can be compared in detail between volcanic lavas and associated geothermal and volcanic gases, a primary motivation for this work. Comparison with our previously measured ratios in fluids and gases (range 2-15 RA) shows excellent agreement in the areas sampled for both lavas and fluids, and indicates that high-temperature volcanic fluids can be used for establishing helium isotope signatures in such terrains. The high-3He values in both fluids and basalts show that a Primitive Mantle (PM) component is required and that a Lower Mantle High-3He plume is strongly involved as a driving force in the rifting process of the East African Rift System.

  14. Precision spectroscopy of Helium

    SciTech Connect

    Cancio, P.; Giusfredi, G.; Mazzotti, D.; De Natale, P.; De Mauro, C.; Krachmalnicoff, V.; Inguscio, M.

    2005-05-05

    Accurate Quantum-Electrodynamics (QED) tests of the simplest bound three body atomic system are performed by precise laser spectroscopic measurements in atomic Helium. In this paper, we present a review of measurements between triplet states at 1083 nm (23S-23P) and at 389 nm (23S-33P). In 4He, such data have been used to measure the fine structure of the triplet P levels and, then, to determine the fine structure constant when compared with equally accurate theoretical calculations. Moreover, the absolute frequencies of the optical transitions have been used for Lamb-shift determinations of the levels involved with unprecedented accuracy. Finally, determination of the He isotopes nuclear structure and, in particular, a measurement of the nuclear charge radius, are performed by using hyperfine structure and isotope-shift measurements.

  15. Resource Letter SH-1: Superfluid Helium.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hallock, Robert B.

    1982-01-01

    Provides an annotated list of books, textbooks, and films on superfluid helium. Also lists research reports/reviews arranged by category, including among others, early history, microscopic understanding, ions in helium, helium in rotation, vortices and quantization, helium films and constricted geometrics, persistence flow, and superfluid helium…

  16. Test program, helium II orbital resupply coupling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hyatt, William S.

    1991-01-01

    The full scope of this program was to have included development tests, design and production of custom test equipment and acceptance and qualification testing of prototype and protoflight coupling hardware. This program was performed by Ball Aerospace Systems Division, Boulder, Colorado until its premature termination in May 1991. Development tests were performed on cryogenic face seals and flow control devices at superfluid helium (He II) conditions. Special equipment was developed to allow quantified leak detection at large leak rates up to 8.4 x 10(exp -4) SCCS. Two major fixtures were developed and characterized: The Cryogenic Test Fixture (CTF) and the Thermal Mismatch Fixture (Glovebox). The CTF allows the coupling hardware to be filled with liquid nitrogen (LN2), liquid helium (LHe) or sub-cooled liquid helium when hardware flow control valves are either open or closed. Heat leak measurements, internal and external helium leakage measurements, cryogenic proof pressure tests and external load applications are performed in this fixture. Special reusable MLI closures were developed to provide repeatable installations in the CTF. The Thermal Mismatch Fixture allows all design configurations of coupling hardware to be engaged and disengaged while measuring applied forces and torques. Any two hardware components may be individually thermally preconditioned within the range of 117 deg K to 350 deg K prior to engage/disengage cycling. This verifies dimensional compatibility and operation when thermally mismatched. A clean, dry GN2 atmosphere is maintained in the fixture at all times. The first shipset of hardware was received, inspected and cycled at room temperature just prior to program termination.

  17. Test program, helium II orbital resupply coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hyatt, William S.

    1991-12-01

    The full scope of this program was to have included development tests, design and production of custom test equipment and acceptance and qualification testing of prototype and protoflight coupling hardware. This program was performed by Ball Aerospace Systems Division, Boulder, Colorado until its premature termination in May 1991. Development tests were performed on cryogenic face seals and flow control devices at superfluid helium (He II) conditions. Special equipment was developed to allow quantified leak detection at large leak rates up to 8.4 x 10(exp -4) SCCS. Two major fixtures were developed and characterized: The Cryogenic Test Fixture (CTF) and the Thermal Mismatch Fixture (Glovebox). The CTF allows the coupling hardware to be filled with liquid nitrogen (LN2), liquid helium (LHe) or sub-cooled liquid helium when hardware flow control valves are either open or closed. Heat leak measurements, internal and external helium leakage measurements, cryogenic proof pressure tests and external load applications are performed in this fixture. Special reusable MLI closures were developed to provide repeatable installations in the CTF. The Thermal Mismatch Fixture allows all design configurations of coupling hardware to be engaged and disengaged while measuring applied forces and torques. Any two hardware components may be individually thermally preconditioned within the range of 117 deg K to 350 deg K prior to engage/disengage cycling. This verifies dimensional compatibility and operation when thermally mismatched. A clean, dry GN2 atmosphere is maintained in the fixture at all times. The first shipset of hardware was received, inspected and cycled at room temperature just prior to program termination.

  18. Swelling and structure of vanadium-base alloys irradiated in the dynamic helium charging experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Chung, H.M.; Loomis, B.A.; Smith, D.L.

    1994-08-01

    Combined effects of dynamically charged helium and neutron damage on density change, void distribution, and microstructural evolution of V-4Cr-4Ti alloy have been determined after irradiation to 18--31 dpa at 425--600 C in the Dynamic Helium Charging Experiment (DHCE), and the results were compared with those from a non-DHCE in which helium generation and negligible. For specimens irradiated to {approx}18-31 dpa at 500--600 with a helium generation rate of 0.4--4.2 appm He/dpa, only a few helium bubbles were observed at the interface of grain matrices and some of the Ti(O,N,C) precipitates, and no microvoids or helium bubbles were observed either in grain matrices or near grain boundaries. Under these conditions, dynamically produced helium atoms seem to be trapped in the grain matrix without significant bubble nucleation or growth, and in accordance with this, density changes from DHCE and non-DHCE (negligible helium generation) were similar for comparable fluence and irradiation temperature. Only for specimens irradiated to {approx}31 dpa at 425 C, when helium was generated at a rage of 0.4--0.8 appm helium/dpa, were diffuse helium bubbles observed in limited regions of grain matrices and near {approx}15% of the grain boundaries in densities significantly lower than those in the extensive coalescences of helium bubbles typical of other alloys irradiated in tritium-trick experiments. Density changes of specimens irradiated at 425 C in the DHCE were significantly higher than those from non-DHCE irradiation. Microstructural evolution in V-4Cr-4Ti was similar for DHCE and non-DHCE except for helium bubble number density and distribution. As in non-DHCE, the irradiation-induced precipitation of ultrafine Ti{sub 5}Si{sub 3} was observed for DHCE at >500 C but not at 425 C.

  19. Perspectives on Lunar Helium-3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmitt, Harrison H.

    1999-01-01

    Global demand for energy will likely increase by a factor of six or eight by the mid-point of the 21st Century due to a combination of population increase, new energy intensive technologies, and aspirations for improved standards of living in the less-developed world (1). Lunar helium-3 (3He), with a resource base in the Tranquillitatis titanium-rich lunar maria (2,3) of at least 10,000 tonnes (4), represents one potential energy source to meet this rapidly escalating demand. The energy equivalent value of 3He delivered to operating fusion power plants on Earth would be about 3 billion per tonne relative to today's coal which supplies most of the approximately 90 billion domestic electrical power market (5). These numbers illustrate the magnitude of the business opportunity. The results from the Lunar Prospector neutron spectrometer (6) suggests that 3He also may be concentrated at the lunar poles along with solar wind hydrogen (7). Mining, extraction, processing, and transportation of helium to Earth requires new innovations in engineering but no known new engineering concepts (1). By-products of lunar 3He extraction, largely hydrogen, oxygen, and water, have large potential markets in space and ultimately will add to the economic attractiveness of this business opportunity (5). Inertial electrostatic confinement (IEC) fusion technology appears to be the most attractive and least capital intensive approach to terrestrial fusion power plants (8). Heavy lift launch costs comprise the largest cost uncertainty facing initial business planning, however, many factors, particularly long term production contracts, promise to lower these costs into the range of 1-2000 per kilogram versus about 70,000 per kilogram fully burdened for the Apollo Saturn V rocket (1). A private enterprise approach to developing lunar 3He and terrestrial IEC fusion power would be the most expeditious means of realizing this unique opportunity (9). In spite of the large, long-term potential

  20. Liquid Helium 3 and Solid Helium at Yale and Beyond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, D. M.

    2006-03-01

    Many of the foundations of low temperature physics in the latter half of the twentieth century were built at Yale University under the leadership of Professor Cecil T. Lane who came to Yale in 1932 and Henry A. Fairbank who obtained his Ph.D. at Yale in 1944 under Lane's guidance. This discussion will mainly treat the contributions of Henry Fairbank and his students during the period between 1954 and 1963, when Henry Fairbank left Yale to become chairman of the Physics Dept. at Duke University. Following World War II small amounts of helium three became available to low temperature experimenters. Henry Fairbank’s graduate students were provided with the opportunity to investigate second sound in dilute and later concentrated mixtures of helium three in superfluid helium four. These measurements showed strong effects of the phase separation in helium 3 - helium 4 mixtures previously discovered in the laboratory of William Fairbank (a student of Lane and a brother of Henry Fairbank). As more helium three became available, studies of pure helium three were performed, including measurements of the thermal conductivity, the density and the specific heat. Early evidence for the melting curve minimum was found. The main emphasis in this work was to search for Fermi liquid behavior. Much of the later work in this area was performed by the group of John Wheatley at the University of Illinois. In studies of solid helium four at Yale, a surprising observation was made. Hitherto it had been thought that hcp was the stable phase throughout the low temperature part of the phase diagram. It was found via ultrasound experiments that a small silver of bcc solid existed at the lowest pressures. While this author was a graduate student at Yale, Henry Fairbank pointed out to him the possibility of cooling helium three via adiabatic compression from the liquid into the solid phase. (Pomeranchuk Cooling). A brief discussion is given of the use of this technique in the discovery of

  1. Helium and Neon in Comets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jewitt, David

    1996-01-01

    Two comets were observed with EUVE in late 1994. Both comet Mueller and comet Borrelly are short-period comets having well established orbital elements and accurate ephemerides. Spectra of 40 ksec were taken of each. No evidence for emission lines from either Helium or Neon was detected. We calculated limits on the production rates of these atoms (relative to solar) assuming a standard isotropic outflow model, with a gas streaming speed of 1 km/s. The 3-sigma (99.7% confidence) limits (1/100,000 for He, 0.8 for Ne) are based on a conservative estimate of the noise in the EUVE spectra. They are also weakly dependent on the precise pointing and tracking of the EUVE field of view relative to the comet during the integrations. These limits are consistent with ice formation temperatures T greater than or equal to 30 K, as judged from the gas trapping experiments of Bar-Nun. For comparison, the solar abundances of these elements are He/O = 110, Ne/O = 1/16. Neither limit was as constraining as we had initially hoped, mainly because comets Mueller and Borrelly were intrinsically less active than anticipated.

  2. Helium in deep circulating groundwater in the Great Hungarian Plain: Flow dynamics and crustal and mantle helium fluxes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stute, M.; Sonntag, C.; Deák, J.; Schlosser, P.

    1992-05-01

    Observed helium concentrations in deep circulating groundwater of the sedimentary basin of the Great Hungarian Plain (GHP), Hungary, cover a range of three orders of magnitude (≈4 ·10 -8 to 4 · 10 -5 ccSTP g-1). 3He /4He ratios and noble gas concentrations are used to separate helium components originating from the atmosphere, tritium decay, crustal production, and mantle degassing. The characteristic distribution of measured helium concentrations and isotope ratios can be reproduced qualitatively by a simple two-dimensional advection/diffusion model. Other simple models isolating parts of the regional flow domain (recharge, discharge, and horizontal flow) are discussed and applied to derive quantitative information on helium fluxes due to degassing of the Earth's crust /mantle and on the dynamics of groundwater flow. The estimated helium flux of 0.7-4.5 · 10 9 atoms 4He m -2 s -1 is lower than values derived from other deep groundwater circulation systems, probably because the relatively young upper few thousand meters of the sedimentary basin (Tertiary to Quaternary age) shield the flux from the deeper crust. The high mantle helium flux of up to 4.2 · 10 8 atoms 4He m -2 s -1 is probably related to the Miocene volcanism or to continuing intrusion accompanying extension. By fitting calculated helium depth profiles to measured data in the discharge area, vertical flow velocities of the order of 1.5 mm y -1 are estimated. Assuming that a flux of 0.7-4.5 · 10 9 atoms 4He m -2 s -1 is representative for the entire basin, the turnover time of the regional groundwater flow system is estimated to be about 10 6 y.

  3. Anomalous behavior of cristobalite in helium under high pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Tomoko; Takada, Hiroto; Yagi, Takehiko; Gotou, Hirotada; Okada, Taku; Wakabayashi, Daisuke; Funamori, Nobumasa

    2013-01-01

    We have investigated the high-pressure behavior of cristobalite in helium by powder X-ray diffraction. Cristobalite transformed to a new phase at about 8 GPa. This phase is supposed to have a molar volume of about 30 % larger than cristobalite, suggesting the dissolution of helium atoms in its interstitial voids. On further compression, the new phase transformed to a different phase which showed an X-ray diffraction pattern similar to cristobalite X-I at about 21 GPa. On the other hand, when the new phase was decompressed, it transformed to another new phase at about 7 GPa, which is also supposed to have a molar volume of about 25 % larger than cristobalite. On further decompression, the second new phase transformed to cristobalite II at about 2 GPa. In contrast to cristobalite, quartz did not show anomalous behavior in helium. The behavior of cristobalite in helium was also consistent with that in other mediums up to about 8 GPa, where the volume of cristobalite became close to that of quartz. These results suggest that dissolution of helium may be controlled not only by the density (amount of voids) but also by the network structure of SiO4 tetrahedra (topology of voids).

  4. COSMIC-RAY HELIUM HARDENING

    SciTech Connect

    Ohira, Yutaka; Ioka, Kunihito

    2011-03-01

    Recent observations by the CREAM and ATIC-2 experiments suggest that (1) the spectrum of cosmic-ray (CR) helium is harder than that of CR protons below the knee energy, 10{sup 15}eV, and (2) all CR spectra become hard at {approx}>10{sup 11}eV nucleon{sup -1}. We propose a new idea, that higher energy CRs are generated in a more helium-rich region, to explain the hardening without introducing different sources for CR helium. The helium-to-proton ratio at {approx}100 TeV exceeds the Big Bang abundance Y = 0.25 by several times, and the different spectrum is not reproduced within the diffusive shock acceleration theory. We argue that CRs are produced in a chemically enriched region, such as a superbubble, and the outward-decreasing abundance naturally leads to the hard spectrum of CR helium if CRs escape from the supernova remnant shock in an energy-dependent way. We provide a simple analytical spectrum that also fits well the hardening due to the decreasing Mach number in the hot superbubble with {approx}10{sup 6} K. Our model predicts hard and concave spectra for heavier CR elements.

  5. Helium processing for deuterium/helium burns in ITER's physics phase

    SciTech Connect

    Finn, P.A.; Sze, D.K.

    1991-01-01

    The requirements for vacuum pumping and fuel processing for deuterium/helium (D/{sup 3}He) burns in the physics operating phase for the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) were assessed. These burns are expected to have low fusion power (100 MW), short burn times ({le}30 s), limited operation (2000 shots), and a fractional burn {approximately}0.3%. For the physics phase, the fuel processing system will include several units to separate deuterium and helium (activated charcoal bed, SAES getter and a Pd/Ag diffuser), as well as an isotopic separation system to separate {sup 3}He and {sup 4}He. The needed vacuum system's cryosorption surface area may be as large as 10 m{sup 2} if the burn time is {approximately}200 s, the fractional burn is <0.3%, or the fusion power is >100 MW. 8 refs., 1 fig., 4 tabs.

  6. Irradiation damage effects on helium migration in sintered uranium dioxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, G.; Sabathier, C.; Carlot, G.; Desgardin, P.; Raepsaet, C.; Sauvage, T.; Khodja, H.; Garcia, P.

    2012-02-01

    In this study, the effects of radiation on helium migration are investigated through the analysis of polycrystalline uranium dioxide samples irradiated at fluences up to 5 × 10 15 at. cm -2 with 8 MeV iodine ions. Following irradiation, samples are implanted with 500 keV 3He + ions at fluences in the range of 10 16 at. cm -2. Three nuclear reaction analysis (NRA) techniques are subsequently implemented using the 3He( 2H, 1H) 4He reaction. The influence of temperature using NRA was first studied based upon 3He depth profile changes and the on-line monitoring of helium release. The effect of the sample microstructure was also investigated at the grain scale by performing analyses of the helium spatial distribution with a nuclear microprobe. Neither substantial helium release nor depth profile changes are observed at temperatures below 900 °C in irradiated samples. Following annealing at temperatures above 1000 °C, a substantial proportion of the implanted helium is released from the samples. From this temperature upwards, the two dimensional He cartographies reveal that the gas has been preferentially released in the vicinity of grain boundaries. These results can be interpreted in the light of previous studies in terms of gas precipitation and re-solution. Helium precipitation is enhanced in irradiated samples up to 900 °C because of the presence of irradiation induced defects. At temperatures in excess of 1000 °C, the precipitated helium is partly returned to the matrix hence it is preferentially released in regions adjacent to grain boundaries, which appear to act as defect sinks.

  7. Rogue mantle helium and neon.

    PubMed

    Albarède, Francis

    2008-02-15

    The canonical model of helium isotope geochemistry describes the lower mantle as undegassed, but this view conflicts with evidence of recycled material in the source of ocean island basalts. Because mantle helium is efficiently extracted by magmatic activity, it cannot remain in fertile mantle rocks for long periods of time. Here, I suggest that helium with high 3He/4He ratios, as well as neon rich in the solar component, diffused early in Earth's history from low-melting-point primordial material into residual refractory "reservoir" rocks, such as dunites. The difference in 3He/4He ratios of ocean-island and mid-ocean ridge basalts and the preservation of solar neon are ascribed to the reservoir rocks being stretched and tapped to different extents during melting.

  8. Helium release during shale deformation: Experimental validation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bauer, Stephen J.; Gardner, W. Payton; Heath, Jason E.

    2016-07-01

    This work describes initial experimental results of helium tracer release monitoring during deformation of shale. Naturally occurring radiogenic 4He is present in high concentration in most shales. During rock deformation, accumulated helium could be released as fractures are created and new transport pathways are created. We present the results of an experimental study in which confined reservoir shale samples, cored parallel and perpendicular to bedding, which were initially saturated with helium to simulate reservoir conditions, are subjected to triaxial compressive deformation. During the deformation experiment, differential stress, axial, and radial strains are systematically tracked. Release of helium is dynamically measured using a helium mass spectrometer leak detector. Helium released during deformation is observable at the laboratory scale and the release is tightly coupled to the shale deformation. These first measurements of dynamic helium release from rocks undergoing deformation show that helium provides information on the evolution of microstructure as a function of changes in stress and strain.

  9. Study of helium embrittlement in boron doped EUROFER97 steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaganidze, E.; Petersen, C.; Aktaa, J.

    2009-04-01

    To simulate helium effects in Reduced Activation Ferritic/Martensitic steels, experimental heats ADS2, ADS3 and ADS4 with the basic composition of EUROFER97 (9%Cr-WVTa) were doped with different contents of natural boron and separated 10B-isotope (0.008-0.112 wt.%) and irradiated in High Flux Reactor (HFR) Petten up to 16.3 dpa at 250-450 °C and in Bor-60 fast reactor in Dimitrovgrad up to 31.8 dpa at 332-338 °C. The embrittlement and hardening are investigated by instrumented Charpy-V tests with subsize specimens. Complete burn-up of 10B isotope under neutron irradiation in HFR Petten led to generation of 84, 432 and 5580 appm He and partial boron-to-helium transformation in Bor-60 led to generation of 9, 46, 880 appm He in ADS2, ADS3 and ADS4 heats, respectively. At low irradiation temperatures Tirr ⩽ 340 °C the boron doped steels show progressive embrittlement with increasing helium amount. Irradiation induced DBTT shift of EUROFER97 based heat doped with 1120 wppm separated 10B isotope could not be quantified due to large embrittlement found in the investigated temperature range. At Tirr ⩽ 340 °C helium induced extra embrittlement is attributed to material hardening induced by helium bubbles and described in terms of phenomenological model.

  10. Pulsed helium ionization detection system

    DOEpatents

    Ramsey, R.S.; Todd, R.A.

    1985-04-09

    A helium ionization detection system is provided which produces stable operation of a conventional helium ionization detector while providing improved sensitivity and linearity. Stability is improved by applying pulsed dc supply voltage across the ionization detector, thereby modifying the sampling of the detectors output current. A unique pulse generator is used to supply pulsed dc to the detector which has variable width and interval adjust features that allows up to 500 V to be applied in pulse widths ranging from about 150 nsec to about dc conditions.

  11. Pulsed helium ionization detection system

    DOEpatents

    Ramsey, Roswitha S.; Todd, Richard A.

    1987-01-01

    A helium ionization detection system is provided which produces stable operation of a conventional helium ionization detector while providing improved sensitivity and linearity. Stability is improved by applying pulsed dc supply voltage across the ionization detector, thereby modifying the sampling of the detectors output current. A unique pulse generator is used to supply pulsed dc to the detector which has variable width and interval adjust features that allows up to 500 V to be applied in pulse widths ranging from about 150 nsec to about dc conditions.

  12. 21 CFR 184.1355 - Helium.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Helium. 184.1355 Section 184.1355 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN... Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1355 Helium. (a) Helium (empirical formula He, CAS Reg. No. 7440-59-7) is...

  13. 21 CFR 582.1355 - Helium.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Helium. 582.1355 Section 582.1355 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS... Helium. (a) Product. Helium. (b) Conditions of use. This substance is generally recognized as safe...

  14. 43 CFR 3100.1 - Helium.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Helium. 3100.1 Section 3100.1 Public Lands: Interior Regulations Relating to Public Lands (Continued) BUREAU OF LAND MANAGEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE... Helium. The ownership of and the right to extract helium from all gas produced from lands leased...

  15. 43 CFR 3100.1 - Helium.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Helium. 3100.1 Section 3100.1 Public Lands: Interior Regulations Relating to Public Lands (Continued) BUREAU OF LAND MANAGEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE... Helium. The ownership of and the right to extract helium from all gas produced from lands leased...

  16. 21 CFR 582.1355 - Helium.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Helium. 582.1355 Section 582.1355 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS... Helium. (a) Product. Helium. (b) Conditions of use. This substance is generally recognized as safe...

  17. 21 CFR 184.1355 - Helium.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Helium. 184.1355 Section 184.1355 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN... Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1355 Helium. (a) Helium (empirical formula He, CAS Reg. No. 7440-59-7) is...

  18. 21 CFR 184.1355 - Helium.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Helium. 184.1355 Section 184.1355 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) DIRECT FOOD....1355 Helium. (a) Helium (empirical formula He, CAS Reg. No. 7440-59-7) is a colorless,...

  19. 21 CFR 582.1355 - Helium.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Helium. 582.1355 Section 582.1355 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS... Helium. (a) Product. Helium. (b) Conditions of use. This substance is generally recognized as safe...

  20. 43 CFR 3100.1 - Helium.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Helium. 3100.1 Section 3100.1 Public Lands: Interior Regulations Relating to Public Lands (Continued) BUREAU OF LAND MANAGEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE... Helium. The ownership of and the right to extract helium from all gas produced from lands leased...

  1. Applying the helium ionization detector in chromatography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gibson, E. K.; Andrawes, F. F.; Brazell, R. S.

    1981-01-01

    High noise levels and oversensitivity of helium detector make flame-ionization and thermal-conductivity detectors more suitable for chromotography. Deficiencies are eliminated by modifying helium device to operate in saturation rather than multiplication mode. Result is low background current, low noise, high stability, and high sensitivity. Detector analyzes halocarbons, hydrocarbons, hydrogen cyanide, ammonia, and inorganics without requiring expensive research-grade helium.

  2. 21 CFR 582.1355 - Helium.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Helium. 582.1355 Section 582.1355 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS... Helium. (a) Product. Helium. (b) Conditions of use. This substance is generally recognized as safe...

  3. 21 CFR 184.1355 - Helium.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Helium. 184.1355 Section 184.1355 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN... Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1355 Helium. (a) Helium (empirical formula He, CAS Reg. No. 7440-59-7) is...

  4. 43 CFR 3100.1 - Helium.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Helium. 3100.1 Section 3100.1 Public Lands: Interior Regulations Relating to Public Lands (Continued) BUREAU OF LAND MANAGEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE... Helium. The ownership of and the right to extract helium from all gas produced from lands leased...

  5. 21 CFR 582.1355 - Helium.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Helium. 582.1355 Section 582.1355 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS... Helium. (a) Product. Helium. (b) Conditions of use. This substance is generally recognized as safe...

  6. 21 CFR 184.1355 - Helium.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Helium. 184.1355 Section 184.1355 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN... Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1355 Helium. (a) Helium (empirical formula He, CAS Reg. No. 7440-59-7) is...

  7. Helium sequestration at nanoparticle-matrix interfaces in helium + heavy ion irradiated nanostructured ferritic alloys

    DOE PAGES

    Parish, Chad M.; Unocic, Kinga A.; Tan, Lizhen; ...

    2016-10-24

    Here we irradiated four ferritic alloys with energetic Fe and He ions: one castable nanostructured alloy (CNA) containing Ti-W-Ta-carbides, and three nanostructured ferritic alloys (NFAs). The NFAs were: 9Cr containing Y-Ti-O nanoclusters, and two Fe-12Cr-5Al NFAs containing Y-Zr-O or Y-Hf-O clusters. All four were subjected to simultaneous dual-beam Fe + He ion implantation (650 °C, ~50 dpa, ~15 appm He/dpa), simulating fusion-reactor conditions. Examination using scanning/transmission electron microscopy (STEM) revealed high-number-density helium bubbles of ~8 nm, ~1021 m-3 (CNA), and of ~3 nm, 1023 m-3 (NFAs). STEM combined with multivariate statistical analysis data mining suggests that the precipitate-matrix interfaces inmore » all alloys survived ~50 dpa at 650 °C and serve as effective helium trapping sites. All alloys appear viable structural material candidates for fusion or advanced fission energy systems. Finally, among these developmental alloys the NFAs appear to sequester the helium into smaller bubbles and away from the grain boundaries more effectively than the early-generation CNA.« less

  8. Helium sequestration at nanoparticle-matrix interfaces in helium + heavy ion irradiated nanostructured ferritic alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parish, C. M.; Unocic, K. A.; Tan, L.; Zinkle, S. J.; Kondo, S.; Snead, L. L.; Hoelzer, D. T.; Katoh, Y.

    2017-01-01

    We irradiated four ferritic alloys with energetic Fe and He ions: one castable nanostructured alloy (CNA) containing Ti-W-Ta-carbides, and three nanostructured ferritic alloys (NFAs). The NFAs were: 9Cr containing Y-Ti-O nanoclusters, and two Fe-12Cr-5Al NFAs containing Y-Zr-O or Y-Hf-O clusters. All four were subjected to simultaneous dual-beam Fe + He ion implantation (650 °C, ∼50 dpa, ∼15 appm He/dpa), simulating fusion-reactor conditions. Examination using scanning/transmission electron microscopy (STEM) revealed high-number-density helium bubbles of ∼8 nm, ∼1021 m-3 (CNA), and of ∼3 nm, 1023 m-3 (NFAs). STEM combined with multivariate statistical analysis data mining suggests that the precipitate-matrix interfaces in all alloys survived ∼50 dpa at 650 °C and serve as effective helium trapping sites. All alloys appear viable structural material candidates for fusion or advanced fission energy systems. Among these developmental alloys the NFAs appear to sequester the helium into smaller bubbles and away from the grain boundaries more effectively than the early-generation CNA.

  9. Helium sequestration at nanoparticle-matrix interfaces in helium + heavy ion irradiated nanostructured ferritic alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Parish, Chad M.; Unocic, Kinga A.; Tan, Lizhen; Zinkle, S. J.; Kondo, Sosuke; Snead, Lance Lewis; Hoelzer, David T.; Katoh, Yutai

    2016-10-24

    Here we irradiated four ferritic alloys with energetic Fe and He ions: one castable nanostructured alloy (CNA) containing Ti-W-Ta-carbides, and three nanostructured ferritic alloys (NFAs). The NFAs were: 9Cr containing Y-Ti-O nanoclusters, and two Fe-12Cr-5Al NFAs containing Y-Zr-O or Y-Hf-O clusters. All four were subjected to simultaneous dual-beam Fe + He ion implantation (650 °C, ~50 dpa, ~15 appm He/dpa), simulating fusion-reactor conditions. Examination using scanning/transmission electron microscopy (STEM) revealed high-number-density helium bubbles of ~8 nm, ~1021 m-3 (CNA), and of ~3 nm, 1023 m-3 (NFAs). STEM combined with multivariate statistical analysis data mining suggests that the precipitate-matrix interfaces in all alloys survived ~50 dpa at 650 °C and serve as effective helium trapping sites. All alloys appear viable structural material candidates for fusion or advanced fission energy systems. Finally, among these developmental alloys the NFAs appear to sequester the helium into smaller bubbles and away from the grain boundaries more effectively than the early-generation CNA.

  10. Measurements of the nonthermal helium escape from Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barabash, S.; Kallio, E.; Lundin, R.; Koskinen, H.

    1995-11-01

    The automatic space plasma experiment with a rotating analyzer (ASPERA) onboard the Phobos 2 spacecraft has recently revealed the presence of planetary He+ ions at Mars (Barabash and Norberg, 1994). In the present work the analysis is continued in order to estimate the total outflow of the He+ ions which are swept away by the solar wind. For the Phobos epoch the total He+ outflow rate was found to be (1.2+/-0.6)×1024 ions/s. The escape occurs mainly near the Martian magnetopause. Considering extreme errors in the measurements, the maximum helium outflow could range up to 2.4×1024 s-1. From a scaling of the helium profile suggested by Moroz et al. (1990) to obtain the measured loss rate, one can deduce the helium abundance in the Martian upper atmosphere. It turns out that helium is a dominant gas in the Martian exosphere at altitudes between 500 and 1250 km. However, recently reported observations of the weak EUV emissions (108 photons) from the Martian He I suggest an abundance that is 18.5 times lower (Krasnopolsky et al., 1994). Possible reasons for this disagreement are discussed. The helium production rate near Mars can, in turn, be roughly estimated from the production rate for the Earth by using a scaling argument, since the only source of helium in the atmospheres of the terrestrial planets is radioactive decay of certain isotopes of uranium and thorium. Present estimates suggest a degassing rate of 8×1022 atoms/s only (Krasnopolsky et al., 1993). However, under steady state conditions one would expect the production and loss rates to be equal. The discrepancy leads us to the conclusion that either the helium degassing rate should be corrected (or the amount of uranium is higher on Mars than anticipated) or helium may also be delivered on Mars by other sources, for example, as solar wind α particles. The observed high total outflow of ions which are 4 times heavier than protons may result in an effective mass loading. Thus helium may play an important

  11. 48 CFR 8.501 - Definitions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Definitions. 8.501 Section... REQUIRED SOURCES OF SUPPLIES AND SERVICES Acquisition of Helium 8.501 Definitions. As used in this subpart... Suppliers available via the Internet at http://blm.gov/8pjd. Major helium requirement means an...

  12. 48 CFR 8.501 - Definitions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Definitions. 8.501 Section... REQUIRED SOURCES OF SUPPLIES AND SERVICES Acquisition of Helium 8.501 Definitions. As used in this subpart... Suppliers available via the Internet at http://blm.gov/8pjd. Major helium requirement means an...

  13. Why Helium Ends in "-Ium"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jensen, William B.; Holme, Thomas; Cooper, Melanie; White, Carol

    2004-01-01

    Edward Frankland and Norman Lockyer researched upon a gaseous spectra in relation to the physical constitution of the sun and named it as "helium" (from Greek "helios" meaning "sun"). Since Lockyer apparently never formally proposed the name in print, it is not known why he chose to use a metallic end "ium".

  14. Applicability of Henry's Law to helium solubility in olivine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jackson, C.; Parman, S. W.; Kelley, S. P.; Cooper, R. F.

    2013-12-01

    Applicability of Henry's Law to helium solubility in olivine We have experimentally determined helium solubility in San Carlos olivine across a range of helium partial pressures (PHe) with the goal of quantifying how noble gases behave during partial melting of peridotite. Helium solubility in olivine correlates linearly with PHe between 55 and 1680 bar. This linear relationship suggests Henry's Law is applicable to helium dissolution into olivine up to 1680 bar PHe, providing a basis for extrapolation of solubility relationships determined at high PHe to natural systems. This is the first demonstration of Henry's Law for helium dissolution into olivine. Averaging all the data of the PHe series yields a Henry's coefficient of 3.8(×3.1)×10-12 mol g-1 bar-1. However, the population of Henry's coefficients shows a positive skew (skewness = 1.17), i.e. the data are skewed to higher values. This skew is reflected in the large standard deviation of the population of Henry's coefficients. Averaging the median values from each experiment yields a lower Henry's coefficient and standard deviation: 3.2(× 2.3)×10-12 mol g-1 bar-1. Combining the presently determined helium Henry's coefficient for olivine with previous determinations of helium Henry's coefficients for basaltic melts (e.g. 1) yields a partition coefficient of ~10-4. This value is similar to previous determinations obtained at higher PHe (2). The applicability of Henry's Law here suggests helium is incorporated onto relatively abundant sites within olivine that are not saturated by 1680 bar PHe or ~5×10-9 mol g-1. Large radius vacancies, i.e. oxygen vacancies, are energetically favorable sites for noble gas dissolution (3). However, oxygen vacancies are not abundant enough in San Carlos olivine to account for this solubility (e.g. 4), suggesting the 3x10-12 mol g-1 bar-1 Henry's coefficient is associated with interstitial dissolution of helium. Helium was dissolved into olivine using an externally heated

  15. Helium behavior in α-SiC ceramics investigated by NRA technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sauvage, T.; Carlot, G.; Martin, G.; Vincent, L.; Garcia, P.; Barthe, M. F.; Gentils, A.; Desgardin, P.

    2007-04-01

    The mechanisms involved in helium migration in α-SiC are investigated through the evolution of its microstructure and of the concentration profiles following annealing at 1300 °C/30 min for fluences of 1 and 5 × 1015 3He cm-2 and a He implantation energy of 500 keV. Helium profiling is performed using the 3He(d,α)1H NRA technique with an improved detection limit of 5 at ppm. The NRA and TEM techniques clearly show that depending on the initial fluence, a proportion of the helium is trapped within the grain and a part of the helium is released. Analysis of the helium profile changes after annealing enabled to determine a value of the volume diffusion coefficient close to (8 ± 1) × 10-17 m2 s-1 for both fluences studied.

  16. Variable helium diffusion characteristics in fluorite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolff, R.; Dunkl, I.; Kempe, U.; Stockli, D.; Wiedenbeck, M.; von Eynatten, H.

    2016-09-01

    Precise analysis of the diffusion characteristics of helium in fluorite is crucial for establishing the new fluorite (U-Th-Sm)/He thermochronometer (FHe), which potentially provides a powerful tool for dating ore deposits unsuitable for the application of conventional geochronometers. Incremental helium outgassing experiments performed on fluorites derived from a spectrum of geological environments suggest a thermally activated volume diffusion mechanism. The diffusion behaviour is highly variable and the parameters range between log D0/a2 = 0.30 ± 0.27-7.27 ± 0.46 s-1 and Ea = 96 ± 3.5-182 ± 3.8 kJ/mol. Despite the fact that the CaF2 content of natural fluorites in most cases exceeds 99 weight percent, the closure temperature (Tc) of the fluorite (U-Th-Sm)/He thermochronometer as calculated from these diffusion parameters varies between 46 ± 14 °C and 169 ± 9 °C, considering a 125 μm fragment size. Here we establish that minor substitutions of calcium by rare earth elements and yttrium (REE + Y) and related charge compensation by sodium, fluorine, oxygen and/or vacancies in the fluorite crystal lattice have a significant impact on the diffusivity of helium in the mineral. With increasing REE + Y concentrations F vacancies are reduced and key diffusion pathways are narrowed. Consequently, a higher closure temperature is to be expected. An empirical case study confirms this variability: two fluorite samples from the same deposit (Horni Krupka, Czech Republic) with ca. 170 °C and ca. 43 °C Tc yield highly different (U-Th-Sm)/He ages of 290 ± 10 Ma and 79 ± 10 Ma, respectively. Accordingly, the fluorite sample with the high Tc could have quantitatively retained helium since the formation of the fluorite-bearing ores in the Permian, despite subsequent Mesozoic burial and associated regional hydrothermal heating. In contrast, the fluorite with the low Tc yields a Late Cretaceous age close to the apatite fission track (AFT) and apatite (U-Th)/He ages (AHe

  17. High-temperature helium-loop facility

    SciTech Connect

    Tokarz, R.D.

    1981-09-01

    The high-temperature helium loop is a facility for materials testing in ultrapure helium gas at high temperatures. The closed loop system is capable of recirculating high-purity helium or helium with controlled impurities. The gas loop maximum operating conditions are as follows: 300 psi pressure, 500 lb/h flow rate, and 2100/sup 0/F temperature. The two test sections can accept samples up to 3.5 in. diameter and 5 ft long. The gas loop is fully instrumented to continuously monitor all parameters of loop operation as well as helium impurities. The loop is fully automated to operate continuously and requires only a daily servicing by a qualified operator to replenish recorder charts and helium makeup gas. Because of its versatility and high degree of parameter control, the helium loop is applicable to many types of materials research. This report describes the test apparatus, operating parameters, peripheral systems, and instrumentation system.

  18. Helium damage and helium effusion in fully stabilised zirconia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Damen, P. M. G.; Matzke, Hj.; Ronchi, C.; Hiernaut, J.-P.; Wiss, T.; Fromknecht, R.; van Veen, A.; Labohm, F.

    2002-05-01

    Fully stabilised zirconia (FSZ) samples have been implanted with helium-ions of different energies (200 keV and 1 MeV) and with different fluences (1.4×10 13-1.4×10 16 He +/cm 2). Neutron depth profiling (NDP) for different annealing temperatures and effusion experiments in two different experimental systems with different thermal annealings have been performed on these samples. The samples were analysed by electron microscopy during the various annealing stages. For the low-fluence samples, the diffusion of helium is probably caused by vacancy assisted interstitial diffusion with an activation energy of 1.6 eV. In the highest fluence samples probably high pressure bubbles are formed during thermal annealing.

  19. Approximating the Helium Wavefunction in Positronium-Helium Scattering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DiRienzi, Joseph; Drachman, Richard J.

    2003-01-01

    In the Kohn variational treatment of the positronium- hydrogen scattering problem the scattering wave function is approximated by an expansion in some appropriate basis set, but the target and projectile wave functions are known exactly. In the positronium-helium case, however, a difficulty immediately arises in that the wave function of the helium target atom is not known exactly, and there are several ways to deal with the associated eigenvalue in formulating the variational scattering equations to be solved. In this work we will use the Kohn variational principle in the static exchange approximation to d e t e e the zero-energy scattering length for the Ps-He system, using a suite of approximate target functions. The results we obtain will be compared with each other and with corresponding values found by other approximation techniques.

  20. Component separation of oceanic helium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roether, Wolfgang; Well, Roland; Putzka, Alfred; Rüth, Christine

    1998-11-01

    A new procedure to quantify the components of oceanic helium ("terrigenic" 3He and 4He released from the ocean floor and "tritiugenic" 3He from tritium decay) is described. Terrigenic He and nonatmospheric 3He (i.e., terrigenic and tritiugenic combined) are obtained in terms of measured concentrations of the He isotopes and also of neon (Ne) (which improves the separation considerably), assuming terrigenic He to vanish in the mixed layer. For the subsequent separation of terrigenic and tritiugenic 3He, additional information is required and 3He due to natural tritium represents a complication. The procedure is applied to data from a hydrographic section in the South Atlantic (19°S, 1991) and one in the Eastern Mediterranean (1987). The 1σ data precisions and a systematic error accounting for uncertainties in mixed-layer He are approximately 0.3%. Sections of the new representations of oceanic He and 3He and comparisons to the nearest classical quantities (i.e., 3He, He) are presented. In the South Atlantic the 3He distribution reflects the hydrographic structure. East of 20°W the average 3He/4He ratio of terrigenic He below 800 m is 4.5±0.8 times the atmospheric ratio, which implies a substantial contribution of crustal He. In the upper waters, tritiugenic 3He (0.5 tritium units, ±20%) is separated from terrigenic 3He. In the Eastern Mediterranean, tritiugenic 3He is quantified throughout the water column in the presence of substantial levels of terrigenic He; the release rate of terrigenic He from the sea floor is found to be 3.1±1.2 1010 atoms m-2 s-1, similar to the rate for continental crust, with a mantle He contribution of 5±1.2% only. Recommendations for future work are to reduce the mentioned systematic error and the uncertainty margins of the He and Ne solubilities and of 3He due to natural tritium.

  1. Highly Excited States of cs Atoms on Helium Nanodroplets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lackner, F.; Theisen, M.; Koch, M.; Ernst, W. E.

    2011-06-01

    Cs atoms on the surface of helium nanodroplets have been excited to high lying nS (n = 8-11), nP (n = 8-11), and nD (n = 6-10) levels. A two-step excitation scheme via the 62P1/2(2Π1/2) state using two cw lasers was applied. This intermediate state has the advantage that a large fraction of the excited Cs atoms does not desorb from the helium nanodroplets. An absorption spectrum was recorded by detecting laser induced fluorescence light from the 62P3/2→62S1/2 transition. The pseudo-diatomic model for helium nanodroplets doped with single alkali-metal atoms holds for the observed spectrum. An investigation of spectral trends shows that the n'2P(Π)←62P1/2(2Π1/2) and n'2D(Δ)←62P1/2(2Π1/2) (n' > 9) transitions are lower in energy than the corresponding free-atom transitions. This indicates that the Cs*--HeN potential becomes attractive for these highly excited states. Our results suggest a possibility of generating an artificial super-atom with a positive ion core inside a helium nanodroplet and the electron outside, which will be subject to future experiments. M. Theisen, F. Lackner, F. Ancilotto, C. Callegari, and W.E. Ernst, Eur. Phys. J. D 61, 403-408 (2011)

  2. 48 CFR 8.500 - Scope of subpart.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... REQUIRED SOURCES OF SUPPLIES AND SERVICES Acquisition of Helium 8.500 Scope of subpart. This subpart implements the requirements of the Helium Act (50 U.S.C. 167, et seq.) concerning the acquisition of liquid or gaseous helium by Federal agencies or by Government contractors or subcontractors for use in...

  3. 48 CFR 8.500 - Scope of subpart.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... REQUIRED SOURCES OF SUPPLIES AND SERVICES Acquisition of Helium 8.500 Scope of subpart. This subpart implements the requirements of the Helium Act (50 U.S.C. 167, et seq.) concerning the acquisition of liquid or gaseous helium by Federal agencies or by Government contractors or subcontractors for use in...

  4. 48 CFR 8.500 - Scope of subpart.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... REQUIRED SOURCES OF SUPPLIES AND SERVICES Acquisition of Helium 8.500 Scope of subpart. This subpart implements the requirements of the Helium Act (50 U.S.C. 167, et seq.) concerning the acquisition of liquid or gaseous helium by Federal agencies or by Government contractors or subcontractors for use in...

  5. 48 CFR 8.500 - Scope of subpart.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... REQUIRED SOURCES OF SUPPLIES AND SERVICES Acquisition of Helium 8.500 Scope of subpart. This subpart implements the requirements of the Helium Act (50 U.S.C. 167, et seq.) concerning the acquisition of liquid or gaseous helium by Federal agencies or by Government contractors or subcontractors for use in...

  6. 48 CFR 8.500 - Scope of subpart.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... REQUIRED SOURCES OF SUPPLIES AND SERVICES Acquisition of Helium 8.500 Scope of subpart. This subpart implements the requirements of the Helium Act (50 U.S.C. 167, et seq.) concerning the acquisition of liquid or gaseous helium by Federal agencies or by Government contractors or subcontractors for use in...

  7. Helium on Mars and Venus: EUVE observations and modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krasnopolsky, Vladimir A.; Gladstone, G. Randall

    2005-08-01

    Long-exposure spectroscopy of Mars and Venus with the Extreme Ultraviolet Explorer (EUVE) has revealed emissions of He 584 Å on both planets and He 537 Å/O + 539 Å and He + 304 Å on Venus. Our knowledge of the solar emission at 584 Å, eddy diffusion in Mars' upper atmosphere, electron energy distributions above Mars' ionopause, and hot oxygen densities in Mars' exosphere has been significantly improved since our analysis of the first EUVE observation of Mars [Krasnopolsky, Gladstone, 1996, Helium on Mars: EUVE and Phobos data and implications for Mars' evolution, J. Geophys. Res. 101, 15,765-15,772]. These new results and a more recent EUVE observation of Mars are the motivation for us to revisit the problem in this paper. We find that the abundance of helium in the upper atmosphere, where the main loss processes occur, is similar to that in the previous paper, though the mixing ratio in the lower and middle atmosphere is now better estimated at 10±6 ppm. Our estimate of the total loss of helium is almost unchanged at 8×10 s, because a significant decrease in the loss by electron impact ionization above the ionopause is compensated by a higher loss in collisions with hot oxygen. We neglect the outgassing of helium produced by radioactive decay of U and Th because of the absence of current volcanism and a very low upper limit to the seepage of volcanic gases. The capture of solar wind α-particles is currently the only substantial source of helium on Mars, and its efficiency remains at 0.3. A similar analysis of EUV emissions from Venus results in a helium abundance in the upper atmosphere which is equal to the mean of the abundances measured previously with two optical and two mass spectrometers, and a derived helium mixing ratio in the middle and lower atmosphere of 9±6 ppm. Helium escape by ionization and sweeping out of helium ions by the solar wind above the ionopause is smaller than that calculated by Prather and McElroy [1983, Helium on Venus

  8. Superfluid helium leak sealant study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vorreiter, J. W.

    1981-01-01

    Twenty-one leak specimens were fabricated in the ends of stainless steel and aluminum tubes. Eighteen of these tubes were coated with a copolymer material to seal the leak. The other three specimens were left uncoated and served as control specimens. All 21 tubes were cold shocked in liquid helium 50 times and then the leak rate was measured while the tubes were submerged in superfluid helium at 1.7 K. During the cold shocks two of the coated specimens were mechanically damaged and eliminated from the test program. Of the remaining 16 coated specimens one suffered a total coating failure and resulting high leak rate. Another three of the coated specimens suffered partial coating failures. The leak rates of the uncoated specimens were also measured and reported. The significance of various leak rates is discussed in view of the infrared astronomical satellite (IRAS) Dewar performance.

  9. Confined helium on Lagrange meshes.

    PubMed

    Baye, D; Dohet-Eraly, J

    2015-12-21

    The Lagrange-mesh method has the simplicity of a calculation on a mesh and can have the accuracy of a variational method. It is applied to the study of a confined helium atom. Two types of confinement are considered. Soft confinements by potentials are studied in perimetric coordinates. Hard confinement in impenetrable spherical cavities is studied in a system of rescaled perimetric coordinates varying in [0,1] intervals. Energies and mean values of the distances between electrons and between an electron and the helium nucleus are calculated. A high accuracy of 11 to 15 significant figures is obtained with small computing times. Pressures acting on the confined atom are also computed. For sphere radii smaller than 1, their relative accuracies are better than 10(-10). For larger radii up to 10, they progressively decrease to 10(-3), still improving the best literature results.

  10. Detecting scintillations in liquid helium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huffman, P. R.; McKinsey, D. N.

    2013-09-01

    We review our work in developing a tetraphenyl butadiene (TPB)-based detection system for a measurement of the neutron lifetime using magnetically confined ultracold neutrons (UCN). As part of the development of the detection system for this experiment, we studied the scintillation properties of liquid helium itself, characterized the fluorescent efficiencies of different fluors, and built and tested three detector geometries. We provide an overview of the results from these studies as well as references for additional information.

  11. Superfluid Helium Tanker (SFHT) study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eberhardt, Ralph N.; Dominick, Sam M.; Anderson, John E.; Gille, John P.; Martin, Tim A.; Marino, John S.; Paynter, Howard L.; Traill, R. Eric; Herzl, Alfred; Gotlib, Sam

    1988-01-01

    Replenishment of superfluid helium (SFHe) offers the potential of extending the on-orbit life of observatories, satellite instruments, sensors and laboratories which operate in the 2 K temperature regime. A reference set of resupply customers was identified as representing realistic helium servicing requirements and interfaces for the first 10 years of superfluid helium tanker (SFHT) operations. These included the Space Infrared Telescope Facility (SIRTF), the Advanced X-ray Astrophysics Facility (AXAF), the Particle Astrophysics Magnet Facility (Astromag), and the Microgravity and Materials Processing Sciences Facility (MMPS)/Critical Point Phenomena Facility (CPPF). A mixed-fleet approach to SFHT utilization was considered. The tanker permits servicing from the Shuttle cargo bay, in situ when attached to the OMV and carried to the user spacecraft, and as a depot at the Space Station. A SFHT Dewar ground servicing concept was developed which uses a dedicated ground cooling heat exchanger to convert all the liquid, after initial fill as normal fluid, to superfluid for launch. This concept permits the tanker to be filled to a near full condition, and then cooled without any loss of fluid. The final load condition can be saturated superfluid with any desired ullage volume, or the tank can be totally filed and pressurized. The SFHT Dewar and helium plumbing system design has sufficient component redundancy to meet fail-operational, fail-safe requirements, and is designed structurally to meet a 50 mission life usage requirement. Technology development recommendations were made for the selected SFHT concept, and a Program Plan and cost estimate prepared for a phase C/D program spanning 72 months from initiation through first launch in 1997.

  12. Vorticity matching in superfluid helium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samuels, David C.

    1991-12-01

    Recent experiments have rekindled interest in high Reynolds number flows using superfluid helium. In a continuing series of experiments, the flow of helium II through various devices (smooth pipes, corrugated pipes, valves, venturies, turbine flowmeters, and coanda flowmeters for example) was investigated. In all cases, the measured values (typically, mass flow rates and pressure drops) were found to be well described by classical relations for high Reynolds flows. This is unexpected since helium II consists of two interpenetrating fluids; one fluid with nonzero viscosity (the normal fluid) and one with zero viscosity (the superfluid). Only the normal fluid component should directly obey classical relations. Since the experiments listed above only measure the external behavior of the flow (i.e., pressure drops over devices), there is a great deal of room for interpretation of their results. One possible interpretation is that in turbulent flows the normal fluid and the superfluid velocity fields are somehow 'locked' together, presumably by the mutual friction force between the superfluid vortex filaments and the normal fluid. We refer to this locking together of the two fluids as 'vorticity matching.'

  13. 48 CFR 8.501 - Definitions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... Suppliers available via the Internet at http://www.nm.blm.gov/www/amfo/amfo_home.html. Major helium... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Definitions. 8.501 Section... REQUIRED SOURCES OF SUPPLIES AND SERVICES Acquisition of Helium 8.501 Definitions. As used in this...

  14. Investigations of levitated helium drops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whitaker, Dwight Lawrence

    1999-11-01

    We report on the development of two systems capable of levitating drops of liquid helium. Helium drops of ˜20 mum have been levitated with the radiation pressure from two counter-propagating Nd:YAG laser beams. Drops are produced with a submerged piezoelectric transducer, and could be held for up to three minutes in our optical trap. Calculations show that Brillouin and Raman scattering of the laser light in the liquid helium produces a negligible rate of evaporation of the drop. Evaporation caused by the enhanced vapor pressure of the curved drop surfaces appears to be a significant effect limiting the drop lifetimes. Helium drops as large as 2 cm in diameter have been suspended in the earth's gravitational field with a magnetic field. A commercial superconducting solenoid provides the necessary field, field-gradient product required to levitate the drops. Drops are cooled to 0.5 K with a helium-3 refrigerator, and can be held in the trap indefinitely. We have found that when two or more drops are levitated in the same magnetic trap, the drops often remain in a state of apparent contact without coalescing. This effect is a result of the evaporation of liquid from between the two drops, and is found to occur only for normal fluid drops. We can induce shape oscillations in charged, levitated drops with an applied ac electric field. We have measured the resonance frequencies and damping rates for the l = 2 mode of oscillation as function of temperature. We have also developed a theory to describe the small amplitude shape oscillations of a He II drop surrounded by its saturated vapor. In our theory, we have considered two sets of boundary conditions---one where the drop does not evaporate and another in which the liquid and vapor are in thermodynamic equilibrium. We have found that both solutions give a frequency that agrees well with experiment, but that the data for the damping rate agree better with the solution without evaporation.

  15. Focusing a helium atom beam using a quantum-reflection mirror

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schewe, H. Christian; Zhao, Bum Suk; Meijer, Gerard; Schöllkopf, Wieland

    2009-11-01

    We demonstrate one-dimensional (1D) focusing of a thermal helium atom beam by quantum reflection from a cylindrical concave quartz mirror at near-grazing incidence. The smallest width of the focus achieved is 1.8 μm, essentially limited by spherical aberration. The various effects that contribute to the finite focal width have been investigated. We propose to apply near-grazing reflection from two concave elliptical mirrors in a Kirkpatrick-Baez arrangement for two-dimensional (2D) focusing of a helium atom beam, paving the way for a helium atom microprobe.

  16. 43 CFR 16.2 - Applications for helium disposition agreements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Applications for helium disposition... HELIUM § 16.2 Applications for helium disposition agreements. The application for a helium disposition... Secretary to determine that the proposal will conserve helium that will otherwise be wasted, drained,...

  17. 43 CFR 16.2 - Applications for helium disposition agreements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2012-10-01 2011-10-01 true Applications for helium disposition... HELIUM § 16.2 Applications for helium disposition agreements. The application for a helium disposition... Secretary to determine that the proposal will conserve helium that will otherwise be wasted, drained,...

  18. 43 CFR 16.2 - Applications for helium disposition agreements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Applications for helium disposition... HELIUM § 16.2 Applications for helium disposition agreements. The application for a helium disposition... Secretary to determine that the proposal will conserve helium that will otherwise be wasted, drained,...

  19. 43 CFR 16.2 - Applications for helium disposition agreements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Applications for helium disposition... HELIUM § 16.2 Applications for helium disposition agreements. The application for a helium disposition... Secretary to determine that the proposal will conserve helium that will otherwise be wasted, drained,...

  20. 43 CFR 16.2 - Applications for helium disposition agreements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Applications for helium disposition... HELIUM § 16.2 Applications for helium disposition agreements. The application for a helium disposition... Secretary to determine that the proposal will conserve helium that will otherwise be wasted, drained,...

  1. Helium recovery and purification at CHMFL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, J.; Meng, Q.; Ouyang, Z.; Shi, L.; Ai, X.; Chen, X.

    2017-02-01

    Currently, rising demand and declining reserves of helium have led to dramatic increases in the helium price. The High Magnetic Field Laboratory of Chinese Academy of Sciences (CHMFL) has made efforts since its foundation to increase the percentage of helium recovered. The piping network connects all the helium experimental facilities to the recovery system, and even exhaust ports of pressure relief valves and vacuum pumps are also connected. In each year, about 30,000 cubic meters helium gas is recovered. The recovery gas is purified, liquefied and supplied to the users again. This paper will provide details about the helium recovery and purification system at CHMFL, including system flowchart, components, problems and solutions.

  2. Thermodynamic properties of hydrogen-helium plasmas.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nelson, H. F.

    1972-01-01

    Calculation of the thermodynamic properties of an atomic hydrogen-helium plasma for postulated conditions present in a stagnation shock layer of a spacecraft entering the atmosphere of Jupiter. These properties can be used to evaluate transport properties, to calculate convective heating, and to investigate nonequilibrium behavior. The calculations have been made for temperatures from 10,000 to 100,000 K, densities of 10 to the minus 7th and .00001 g cu cm, and three plasma compositions: pure hydrogen, 50% hydrogen/50% helium, and pure helium. The shock layer plasma consists of electrons, protons, atomic hydrogen, atomic helium, singly ionized helium, and doubly atomized helium. The thermodynamic properties which have been investigated are: pressure, average molecular weight, internal energy, enthalpy, entropy, specific heat, and isentropic speed of sound. A consistent model was used for the reduction of the ionization potential in the calculation of the partition functions.

  3. Electronic structure and enthalpy of hydrogen and helium mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ross, M.; Klepeis, J. E.; Schafer, K. J.; Barbee, T. W., III

    1992-11-01

    The first local density approximation (LDA) calculations of the electronic structure, equation of state, and enthalpy of mixing were carried out for a number of different compositions of hydrogen and helium in bcc and fcc lattices. These are fully quantum mechanical, self-consistent calculations utilizing state-of-the-art methods of electron band theory, which make no assumptions regarding pressure ionization. The major approximation in the LDA method is that the exchange and correlation energy is given by a free electron functional in terms of the local electron density. The majority of previous mixture calculations start with the assumption that both hydrogen and helium are pressure-ionized so that the electronic structure is approximately that of free or weakly screened electrons in the presence of positive ions. Stevenson used a hard-sphere mixture model for the ions with an ion-ion pseudopotential to account for electron screening and predicted that a mixture containing 7% helium by number, the composition believed to be present in Jupiter and Saturn, would phase separate at a temperature of about 7000 K at 8 Mbar. Subsequent calculations carried out for the fully ionized mixture and for a mixture of screened ions (linear response theory) have all arrived at predictions similar to those of Stevenson. MacFarlane and Hubbard performed Thomas-Fermi-Dirac calculations for mixing enthalpies of hydrogen and helium in bcc and fcc lattices and predicted that phase separation would not occur at any temperature.

  4. Helium isotope ratios in Easter microplate basalts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poreda, R. J.; Schilling, J. G.; Craig, H.

    1993-09-01

    He-3/He-4 ratios in Easter Microplate basalt glasses show clear evidence of the effects of a mantle plume. The East Rift of the microplate between 26 and 28 deg S, identified by La/Sm, Sr and Pb isotopes and ridge crest elevation as the region of maximum plume influence, has He-3/He-4 ratios spanning the entire range from 7.5 to 11.7 R(sub A). The Easter Microplate is the only section of the entire East Pacific Rise that is associated with a known `hotspot' track (mantle plume) and has elevated He-3/He-4 ratios. Although most of the West Rift basalts contain MORB helium (8.0 - 8.7 (R sub A)), the basalt closest to the East Rift has an elevated He-3/He-4 ratio (11.3 R(sub A)), consistent with a significant plume component. The diversity in isotopic signatures also indicates that homogenization of isotopic anomalies does not occur, even in this region of `super-fast' spreading. The overall He-3/He-4-Pb-206/Pb-204 and He-3/He-4-Sr-87/Sr-86 trends have positive correlations, although the high between the He and Sr isotope distribution is modeled in the context of a plume source-migrating ridge sink. During channeling of the plume toward the ridge, helium if preferentially lost from the center of the channeled plume, resulting in lower He/Pb and He/Sr concentration ratios in the high He-3/He-4 component. Mixing trajectories in He-Sr isotopic space between a LILE depleted asthenosphere and a variably degassed plume component provide a reasonably good fit to the data and may explain the isotope systematics of plume-ridge interactions in the context of modern theories of plume dynamics.

  5. Energy, helium, and the future: II

    SciTech Connect

    Krupka, M.C.; Hammel, E.F.

    1980-01-01

    The importance of helium as a critical resource material has been recognized specifically by the scientific community and more generally by the 1960 Congressional mandate to institute a long-range conservation program. A major study mandated by the Energy Reorganization Act of 1974 resulted in the publication in 1975 of the document, The Energy-Related Applications of Helium, ERDA-13. This document contained a comprehensive review and analysis relating to helium resources and present and future supply/demand relationships with particular emphasis upon those helium-dependent energy-related technologies projected to be implemented in the post-2000 year time period, e.g., fusion. An updated overview of the helium situation as it exists today is presented. Since publication of ERDA-13, important changes in the data base underlying that document have occurred. The data have since been reexamined, revised, and new information included. Potential supplies of helium from both conventional and unconventional natural gas resources, projected supply/demand relationships to the year 2030 based upon a given power-generation scenario, projected helium demand for specific energy-related technologies, and the supply options (national and international) available to meet that demand are discussed. An updated review will be given of the energy requirements for the extraction of helium from natural gas as they relate to the concentration of helium. A discussion is given concerning the technical and economic feasibility of several methods available both now and conceptually possible, to extract helium from helium-lean natural gas, the atmosphere, and outer space. Finally, a brief review is given of the 1980 Congressional activities with respect to the introduction and possible passage of new helium conservation legislation.

  6. Helium cyclotron resonance within the earth's magnetosphere

    SciTech Connect

    Mauk, B.H.; McIlwain, C.E.; McPherron, R.L.

    1981-01-01

    A histogram of electromagnetic Alfven/ion cyclotron wave frequencies, sampled within the geostationary enviroment and normalized by the equatorial proton cyclotron frequency, shows a dramatic gap centered near the helium (He/sup +/) cyclotron frequency. Also, strongly cyclotron phase bunched helium ions (20--200 eV) have been observed directly within the vicinity of wave environments. These observations are interpreted as resulting from the absorption of the waves through cyclotron resonance by cool ambient populations of helium ions.

  7. Helium isotopic abundance variation in nature

    SciTech Connect

    Holden, N.E.

    1993-08-01

    The isotopic abundance of helium in nature has been reviewed. This atomic weight value is based on the value of helium in the atmosphere, which is invariant around the world and up to a distance of 100,000 feet. Helium does vary in natural gas, volcanic rocks and gases, ocean floor sediments, waters of various types and in radioactive minerals and ores due to {alpha} particle decay of radioactive nuclides.

  8. Radioactive transitions in the helium isoelectronic sequence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dalgarno, A.

    1971-01-01

    The principles of the atomic spectrum theory are used to quantitatively analyze radiation transitions in two-electron helium-like atomic systems. Quantum theoretical methods, describing absorption and emission of a single photon in a radiative transition between two stationary states of an atomic system, reproduced the energy level diagram for the low lying states of helium. Reliable values are obtained from accurate variationally determined two-electron nonrelativistic wave functions for radiative transition probabilities of 2 3p states in the helium isoelectric sequence, and for the 2 1s and 2 3s1 states of the helium sequence.

  9. 43 CFR 3195.35 - What happens if I have an outstanding obligation to purchase refined helium under a Helium...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... obligation to purchase refined helium under a Helium Distribution Contract? 3195.35 Section 3195.35 Public... OF THE INTERIOR MINERALS MANAGEMENT (3000) HELIUM CONTRACTS Federal Helium Supplier Requirements § 3195.35 What happens if I have an outstanding obligation to purchase refined helium under a...

  10. 43 CFR 3195.35 - What happens if I have an outstanding obligation to purchase refined helium under a Helium...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... obligation to purchase refined helium under a Helium Distribution Contract? 3195.35 Section 3195.35 Public... OF THE INTERIOR MINERALS MANAGEMENT (3000) HELIUM CONTRACTS Federal Helium Supplier Requirements § 3195.35 What happens if I have an outstanding obligation to purchase refined helium under a...

  11. 43 CFR 3195.35 - What happens if I have an outstanding obligation to purchase refined helium under a Helium...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... obligation to purchase refined helium under a Helium Distribution Contract? 3195.35 Section 3195.35 Public... OF THE INTERIOR MINERALS MANAGEMENT (3000) HELIUM CONTRACTS Federal Helium Supplier Requirements § 3195.35 What happens if I have an outstanding obligation to purchase refined helium under a...

  12. 43 CFR 3195.35 - What happens if I have an outstanding obligation to purchase refined helium under a Helium...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... obligation to purchase refined helium under a Helium Distribution Contract? 3195.35 Section 3195.35 Public... OF THE INTERIOR MINERALS MANAGEMENT (3000) HELIUM CONTRACTS Federal Helium Supplier Requirements § 3195.35 What happens if I have an outstanding obligation to purchase refined helium under a...

  13. 43 CFR 3195.20 - Who must purchase major helium requirements from Federal helium suppliers?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Who must purchase major helium requirements from Federal helium suppliers? 3195.20 Section 3195.20 Public Lands: Interior Regulations Relating... (3000) HELIUM CONTRACTS Federal Agency Requirements § 3195.20 Who must purchase major...

  14. 43 CFR 3195.20 - Who must purchase major helium requirements from Federal helium suppliers?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Who must purchase major helium requirements from Federal helium suppliers? 3195.20 Section 3195.20 Public Lands: Interior Regulations Relating... (3000) HELIUM CONTRACTS Federal Agency Requirements § 3195.20 Who must purchase major...

  15. 43 CFR 3195.20 - Who must purchase major helium requirements from Federal helium suppliers?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Who must purchase major helium requirements from Federal helium suppliers? 3195.20 Section 3195.20 Public Lands: Interior Regulations Relating... (3000) HELIUM CONTRACTS Federal Agency Requirements § 3195.20 Who must purchase major...

  16. 43 CFR 3195.20 - Who must purchase major helium requirements from Federal helium suppliers?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Who must purchase major helium requirements from Federal helium suppliers? 3195.20 Section 3195.20 Public Lands: Interior Regulations Relating... (3000) HELIUM CONTRACTS Federal Agency Requirements § 3195.20 Who must purchase major...

  17. Scooping helium out in the early B-type main sequence stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Staritsin, E. I.

    The observed process of surface helium enrichment through the main sequence phase of B-stars evolution is analysed on the basis of current hydrodynamical model of matter mixing in rotating star interior. It is shown that shear turbulence and semiconvection are the main processes of partial matter mixing in the interiors of a rotating star with a mass of 8 M⊙. The calculated surface helium enhancement during the second half of main sequence stage of evolution looks like an observable one.

  18. Spectral shifts and helium configurations in 4HeN-tetracene clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whitley, Heather D.; DuBois, Jonathan L.; Whaley, K. Birgitta

    2009-09-01

    Spectral shifts of electronic transitions of tetracene in helium droplets are investigated in a theoretical study of H4eN-tetracene clusters with 1≤N≤150. Utilizing a pairwise interaction for the S0 state of tetracene with helium that is extended by semiempirical terms to construct a potential for the S1 state of tetracene with helium, the spectral shift is calculated from path integral Monte Carlo calculations of the helium equilibrium properties with tetracene in the S0 and S1 states at T =0 and at T =0.625 K. The calculated spectral shifts are in quantitative agreement with available experimental measurements for small values of N (≤8) at T ˜0.4 K and show qualitative agreement for larger N (10-20). The extrapolated value of the spectral shift in large droplets (N ˜104) is ˜90% of the experimentally measured value. We find no evidence of multiple configurations of helium for any cluster size for either the S0 or S1 state of tetracene. These results suggest that the observed spectral splitting of electronic transitions of tetracene in large helium droplets is not due to the coexistence of static metastable helium densities, unlike the situation previously analyzed for the phthalocyanine molecule.

  19. Helium II level measurement techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Celik, D.; Hilton, D. K.; Zhang, T.; Van Sciver, S. W.

    2001-05-01

    In this paper, a survey of cryogenic liquid level measurement techniques applicable to superfluid helium (He II) is given. The survey includes both continuous and discrete measurement techniques. A number of different probes and controlling circuits for this purpose have been described in the literature. They fall into one of the following categories: capacitive liquid level gauges, superconducting wire liquid level gauges, thermodynamic (heat transfer-based) liquid level gauges, resistive gauges, ultrasound and transmission line-based level detectors. The present paper reviews these techniques and their suitability for He II service. In addition to these methods, techniques for measuring the total liquid volume and mass gauging are also discussed.

  20. Superfluid Helium Tanker (SFHT) study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1988-01-01

    The accomplishments and recommendations of the two-phase Superfluid Helium Tanker (SFHT) study are presented. During the first phase of the study, the emphasis was on defining a comprehensive set of user requirements, establishing SFHT interface parameters and design requirements, and selecting a fluid subsystem design concept. During the second phase, an overall system design concept was constructed based on appropriate analyses and more detailed definition of requirements. Modifications needed to extend the baseline for use with cryogens other than SFHT have been determined, and technology development needs related to the recommended design have been assessed.

  1. Helium bubble bursting in tungsten

    SciTech Connect

    Sefta, Faiza; Juslin, Niklas; Wirth, Brian D.

    2013-12-28

    Molecular dynamics simulations have been used to systematically study the pressure evolution and bursting behavior of sub-surface helium bubbles and the resulting tungsten surface morphology. This study specifically investigates how bubble shape and size, temperature, tungsten surface orientation, and ligament thickness above the bubble influence bubble stability and surface evolution. The tungsten surface is roughened by a combination of adatom “islands,” craters, and pinholes. The present study provides insight into the mechanisms and conditions leading to various tungsten topology changes, which we believe are the initial stages of surface evolution leading to the formation of nanoscale fuzz.

  2. Quantum Dynamics of Helium Clusters

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-03-01

    helium clusters [10-12]. (10) DMC starts with the time - dependent Schr ~ dinger equation in imaginary time and has been employed most- The approximate...bound. (For example, the binding values may be computed by the Metropolis approach . energy of He 3 is five times greater than that of 1l1lie I We first...or four times for computational effort. If this is also the case with the the larger clusters) its original size. If the maximum en- DMC approach

  3. Design of subcooled helium II refrigerator with helium-3 cold compressor

    SciTech Connect

    Kato, D.; Saji, N.; Ohya, H.; Asakura, H.; Kubota, M.; Kaneko, Y.; Nagai, S.

    1994-12-31

    This paper will study the possibility of a He II refrigerator made up of three cold compressors by making use of helium-3 characteristics. This system is compact enough to fit inside a small cold box, so it can be easily connected with an existing helium-4 refrigerator. The authors designed the compressors, calculated the He II cooling capacity, 4.4 K refrigeration load, required inventory of helium-3, and Carnot efficiency. Though helium-3 is expensive, the required inventory of helium-3 to be filled inside this He II refrigerator was calculated to be small enough to prove practicality of constructing this refrigerator.

  4. Helium Speech: An Application of Standing Waves

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wentworth, Christopher D.

    2011-01-01

    Taking a breath of helium gas and then speaking or singing to the class is a favorite demonstration for an introductory physics course, as it usually elicits appreciative laughter, which serves to energize the class session. Students will usually report that the helium speech "raises the frequency" of the voice. A more accurate description of the…

  5. Paramagnetic Attraction of Impurity-Helium Solids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bernard, E. P.; Boltnev, R. E.; Khmelenko, V. V.; Lee, D. M.

    2003-01-01

    Impurity-helium solids are formed when a mixture of impurity and helium gases enters a volume of superfluid helium. Typical choices of impurity gas are hydrogen deuteride, deuterium, nitrogen, neon and argon, or a mixture of these. These solids consist of individual impurity atoms and molecules as well as clusters of impurity atoms and molecules covered with layers of solidified helium. The clusters have an imperfect crystalline structure and diameters ranging up to 90 angstroms, depending somewhat on the choice of impurity. Immediately following formation the clusters aggregate into loosely connected porous solids that are submerged in and completely permeated by the liquid helium. Im-He solids are extremely effective at stabilizing high concentrations of free radicals, which can be introduced by applying a high power RF dis- charge to the impurity gas mixture just before it strikes the super fluid helium. Average concentrations of 10(exp 19) nitrogen atoms/cc and 5 x 10(exp 18) deuterium atoms/cc can be achieved this way. It shows a typical sample formed from a mixture of atomic and molecular hydrogen and deuterium. It shows typical sample formed from atomic and molecular nitrogen. Much of the stability of Im-He solids is attributed to their very large surface area to volume ratio and their permeation by super fluid helium. Heat resulting from a chance meeting and recombination of free radicals is quickly dissipated by the super fluid helium instead of thermally promoting the diffusion of other nearby free radicals.

  6. Theoretical model of the helium pinhole microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palau, Adrià Salvador; Bracco, Gianangelo; Holst, Bodil

    2016-12-01

    In recent years, the development of neutral helium microscopes has gained increasing interest. The low energy, charge neutrality, and inertness of the helium atoms makes helium microscopy an attractive candidate for the imaging of a range of samples. The simplest neutral helium microscope is the so-called pinhole microscope. It consists of a supersonic expansion helium beam collimated by two consecutive apertures (skimmer and pinhole), which together determine the beam spot size and hence the resolution at a given working distance to the sample. Due to the high ionization potential of neutral helium atoms, it is difficult to build efficient helium detectors. Therefore, it is crucial to optimize the microscope design to maximize the intensity for a given resolution and working distance. Here we present an optimization model for the helium pinhole microscope system. We show that for a given resolution and working distance, there is a single intensity maximum. Further we show that with present-day state-of-the-art detector technology (ionization efficiency 1 ×10-3 ), a resolution of the order of 600 nm at a working distance of 3 mm is possible. In order to make this quantification, we have assumed a Lambertian reflecting surface and calculated the beam spot size that gives a signal 100 cts/s within a solid angle of 0.02 π sr, following an existing design. Reducing the working distance to the micron range leads to an improved resolution of around 40 nm.

  7. LOX Tank Helium Removal for Propellant Scavenging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chato, David J.

    2009-01-01

    System studies have shown a significant advantage to reusing the hydrogen and oxygen left in these tanks after landing on the Moon in fuel cells to generate power and water for surface systems. However in the current lander concepts, the helium used to pressurize the oxygen tank can substantially degrade fuel cell power and water output by covering the reacting surface with inert gas. This presentation documents an experimental investigation of methods to remove the helium pressurant while minimizing the amount of the oxygen lost. This investigation demonstrated that significant quantities of Helium (greater than 90% mole fraction) remain in the tank after draining. Although a single vent cycle reduced the helium quantity, large amounts of helium remained. Cyclic venting appeared to be more effective. Three vent cycles were sufficient to reduce the helium to small (less than 0.2%) quantities. Two vent cycles may be sufficient since once the tank has been brought up to pressure after the second vent cycle the helium concentration has been reduced to the less than 0.2% level. The re-pressurization process seemed to contribute to diluting helium. This is as expected since in order to raise the pressure liquid oxygen must be evaporated. Estimated liquid oxygen loss is on the order of 82 pounds (assuming the third vent cycle is not required).

  8. Cellular effects of helium in different organs.

    PubMed

    Oei, Gezina T M L; Weber, Nina C; Hollmann, Markus W; Preckel, Benedikt

    2010-06-01

    Experimental research in cardiac and neuronal tissue has shown that besides volatile anesthetics and xenon, the nonanesthetic noble gas helium also reduces ischemia-reperfusion damage. Even though the distinct mechanisms of helium-induced organ protection are not completely unraveled, several signaling pathways have been identified. Beside the protective effects on heart and brain that are mainly obtained by different pre- and postconditioning protocols, helium also exerts effects in the lungs, the immune system, and the blood vessels. Obviously, this noble gas is biochemically not inert and exerts biologic effects, although until today the question remains open on how these changes are mediated. Because of its favorable characteristics and the lack of hemodynamic side effects, helium is suitable for use also in critically ill patients. This review covers the cellular effects of helium, which may lead to new clinical strategies of tissue salvage in ischemia-reperfusion situations, both within and outside the perioperative setting.

  9. Cryogenic helium 2 systems for space applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Urban, E.; Katz, L.; Hendricks, J.; Karr, G.

    1978-01-01

    Two cryogenic systems are described which will provide cooling for experiments to be flown on Spacelab 2 in the early 1980's. The first system cools a scanning infrared telescope by the transfer of cold helium gas from a separate superfluid helium storage dewar. The flexible design permits the helium storage dewar and transfer assembly to be designed independent of the infrared experiment. Where possible, modified commerical apparatus is used. The second cryogenic system utilizes a specially designed superfluid dewar in which a superfluid helium experiment chamber is immersed. Each dewar system employs a porous plug as a phase separator to hold the liquid helium within the dewar and provide cold gas to a vent line. To maintain the low vapor pressure of the superfluid, each system requires nearly continuous prelaunch vacuum pump service, and each will vent to space during the Spacelab 2 flight.

  10. Bronchomotor response to cold air or helium-oxygen at normal and high ambient pressures.

    PubMed

    Jammes, Y; Burnet, H; Cosson, P; Lucciano, M

    1988-05-01

    Effects of inhalation of cold air or helium-oxygen mixture on lung resistance (RL) were studied in anesthetized and tracheotomized rabbits under normal ambient pressure and in human volunteers under normo- and hyperbaric conditions. In artificially ventilated rabbits, an increase in RL occurred when the tracheal temperature fell to 10 degrees C. This effect was more than double with helium breathing compared to air, despite a lower respiratory heat loss by convection (Hc) with helium. In 3 normal humans, inhalation of cold air (mouth temperature = 8 degrees C) at sea level had no effect on RL value. However, with a helium-nitrogen-oxygen mixture, a weak but significant increase in RL due to cold gas breathing was measured in 1 subject at 2 ATA and in 2 individuals at 3.5 ATA. The density of inhaled gas mixture (air or He-N2-O2) was near the same in the three circumstances (1, 2, and 3.5 ATA) but Hc value increased with helium. At 8 ATA a 30-55% increase in RL occurred in the 3 divers during inhalation of cold gas (Hc was multiplied by 6 compared to air at sea level) and at 25 ATA the cold-induced bronchospasm ranged between 38 and 95% (Hc multiplied by 27). Thus, in rabbits and humans helium breathing enhanced the cold-induced increase in RL at normal or elevated ambient pressure, and this effect was interpreted as resulting from different mechanisms in the two circumstances.

  11. Diffusion of helium isotopes in silicate glasses and minerals: Implications for petrogenesis and geochronology. Doctoral thesis

    SciTech Connect

    Trull, T.W.

    1989-06-01

    Helium diffusivities in basaltic glasses at seafloor temperatures are about 10 to the -16th power sq cm/s suggesting only very low concentration samples will be compromised, and that U/He geochronology of submarine basalts may be feasible. Helium diffusivities at magmatic temperatures are 10 to the -11th power, to 10 to the -8th power sq cm/s in silicate minerals, too low to regionally homogenize helium in the mantle. Helium exchange rates limit xenolith origin depths and transport times. Faster He diffusion in pyroxene than olivine allows diffusive loss to be evaluated. Diffusivities of {sup 3}He produced by cosmic rays in surface rocks are less than 10 to the -20th power sq cm/s in olivine and quartz, suggesting exposure dating will not be limited by helium loss for ages up to 10,000,000 years. Similar conclusions were found for U/{sup 4}He dating of quartz. Part of the {sup 3}He/{sup 4}He variability (.01 to 9 R{sub a}) of island arc basalts from the western Pacific reflects post-eruptive helium addition. In unaltered samples, Kavachi submarine volcano has different {sup 3}He/{sup 4}He (6.9 + or - .2 R{sub a}) than the Woodlark Spreading Center (8-9 R{sub a}). A contribution from subducted Pacific lithosphere may explain this and 87 Sr/86 Sr variations.

  12. Neovascular glaucoma after helium ion irradiation for uveal melanoma

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, M.K.; Char, D.H.; Castro, J.L.; Saunders, W.M.; Chen, G.T.; Stone, R.D.

    1986-02-01

    Neovascular glaucoma developed in 22 of 169 uveal melanoma patients treated with helium ion irradiation. Most patients had large melanomas; no eyes containing small melanomas developed anterior segment neovascularization. The mean onset of glaucoma was 14.1 months (range, 7-31 months). The incidence of anterior segment neovascularization increased with radiation dosage; there was an approximately three-fold increase at 80 GyE versus 60 GyE of helium ion radiation (23% vs. 8.5%) (P less than 0.05). Neovascular glaucoma occurred more commonly in larger tumors; the incidence was not affected by tumor location, presence of subretinal fluid, nor rate of tumor regression. Fifty-three percent of patients had some response with intraocular pressures of 21 mmHg or less to a combination of antiglaucoma treatments.

  13. Elastic Electron Scattering from Tritium and Helium-3

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Collard, H.; Hofstadter, R.; Hughes, E. B.; Johansson, A.; Yearian, M. R.; Day, R. B.; Wagner, R. T.

    1964-10-01

    The mirror nuclei of tritium and helium-3 have been studied by the method of elastic electron scattering. Absolute cross sections have been measured for incident electron energies in the range 110 - 690 MeV at scattering angles lying between 40 degrees and 135 degrees in this energy range. The data have been interpreted in a straightforward manner and form factors are given for the distributions of charge and magnetic moment in the two nuclei over a range of four-momentum transfer squared 1.0 - 8.0 F{sup -2}. Model-independent radii of the charge and magnetic moment distributions are given and an attempt is made to deduce form factors describing the spatial distribution of the protons in tritium and helium-3.

  14. Electric response in superfluid helium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chagovets, Tymofiy V.

    2016-05-01

    We report an experimental investigation of the electric response of superfluid helium that arises in the presence of a second sound standing wave. It was found that the signal of the electric response is observed in a narrow range of second sound excitation power. The linear dependence of the signal amplitude has been derived at low excitation power, however, above some critical power, the amplitude of the signal is considerably decreased. It was established that the rapid change of the electric response is not associated with a turbulent regime generated by the second sound wave. A model of the appearance of the electric response as a result of the oscillation of electron bubbles in the normal fluid velocity field in the second sound wave is presented. Possible explanation for the decrease of the electric response are presented.

  15. Nondipole effects in helium photoionization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Argenti, Luca; Moccia, Roberto

    2010-12-01

    An accurate calculation of the nondipole anisotropy parameter γ in the photoionization of helium below the N = 2 threshold is presented. The calculated results are in fairly good agreement with the experimental results of Krässig et al (2002 Phys. Rev. Lett. 88 203002), but not as good as the accuracy of the calculation should have warranted. A careful examination of the possible causes for the observed discrepancies between theory and experiment seems to rule out any role either of the multipolar terms higher than the electric quadrupole, or of the singlet-triplet spin-orbit mixing. It is argued that such discrepancies might have an instrumental origin, due to the difficulty of measuring vanishingly small total cross sections σtot with the required accuracy. In such eventuality, it might be more appropriate to use a parameter other than γ, such as for instance the drag current, to measure the nondipole anisotropy of the photoelectron angular distribution.

  16. Atom lithography with metastable helium

    SciTech Connect

    Allred, Claire S.; Reeves, Jason; Corder, Christopher; Metcalf, Harold

    2010-02-15

    A bright metastable helium (He*) beam is collimated sequentially with the bichromatic force and three optical molasses velocity compression stages. Each He* atom in the beam has 20 eV of internal energy that can destroy a molecular resist assembled on a gold coated silicon wafer. Patterns in the resist are imprinted onto the gold layer with a standard selective etch. Patterning of the wafer with the He{sup *} was demonstrated with two methods. First, a mesh was used to protect parts of the wafer making an array of grid lines. Second, a standing wave of {lambda}=1083 nm light was used to channel and focus the He* atoms into lines separated by {lambda}/2. The patterns were measured with an atomic force microscope establishing an edge resolution of 80 nm. Our results are reliable and repeatable.

  17. Helium Saturation of Liquid Propellants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yavrouian, A. H.; Moran, Clifford M.

    1990-01-01

    The research is in three areas which are: (1) techniques were devised for achieving the required levels of helium (He) saturation in liquid propellants (limited to monomethylhydrazine (MMH) and nitrogen tetroxide (NTO)); (2) the values were evaluated for equilibrium solubilities of He in liquid propellants as currently used in the industry; and (3) the He dissolved in liquid propellants were accurately measured. Conclusions drawn from these studies include: (1) Techniques for dissolving He in liquid propellants depending upon the capabilities of the testing facility (Verification of the quantity of gas dissolved is essential); (2) Until greater accuracy is obtained, the equilibrium solubility values of He in MMH and NTO as cited in the Air Force Propellant Handbooks should be accepted as standard (There are still enough uncertainties in the He saturation values to warrant further basic experimental studies); and (3) The manometric measurement of gas volume from a frozen sample of propellant should be the accepted method for gas analysis.

  18. Helium refrigeration considerations for cryomodule design

    SciTech Connect

    Ganni, V.; Knudsen, P.

    2014-01-29

    Many of the present day accelerators are based on superconducting radio frequency (SRF) cavities, packaged in cryo-modules (CM), which depend on helium refrigeration at sub-atmospheric pressures, nominally 2 K. These specialized helium refrigeration systems are quite cost intensive to produce and operate. Particularly as there is typically no work extraction below the 4.5-K supply, it is important that the exergy loss between this temperature level and the CM load temperature(s) be minimized by the process configuration choices. This paper will present, compare and discuss several possible helium distribution process arrangements to support the CM loads.

  19. Crystallization of electrons on the surface of liquid helium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grimes, C. C.; Adams, G.

    1980-08-01

    The classical, two-dimensional Coulomb system formed by a monolayer of electrons trapped on the surface of liquid helium has been observed to crystallize into a triangular lattice. Measured melting temperatures range from 0.37 to 0.65 K for areal densities of electrons from 3 × 10 8 cm -2 to 9 × 10 8 cm -2. Melting occurs at Γ = 131 ± 7 where Γ is a measure of the ratio of potential energy to kinetic energy per electron. The measured value of Γ at melting is consistent with dislocation mediated melting of a two-dimensional crystal.

  20. Effect of 800 keV argon ions pre-damage on the helium blister formation of tungsten exposed to 60 keV helium ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Zhe; Han, Wenjia; Yu, Jiangang; Zhu, Kaigui

    2016-04-01

    This study aims to investigate the effect of Ar8+ ions pre-damage on the following He2+ irradiation behavior of polycrystalline tungsten. We compared the irradiation resistance performance against 60 keV He2+ ions of undamaged tungsten samples with that of pre-damaged samples which were preliminarily exposed to 800 keV Ar8+ ions at a fluence of 4 × 1019 ions m-2. The experimental results indicate that the helium blistering of tungsten could be effectively relieved by the Ar8+ ions pre-damage, while the retention of helium around low energy desorption sites in the pre-damaged tungsten was larger than that of the undamaged samples. A strong orientation dependence of blistering had been observed, with the blister occurred preferentially on the surface of grains with normal direction close to <111>. The Ar8+ ions irradiation-induced damage altered the morphology of helium bubbles in tungsten exposed to the following He2+ irradiation significantly. The intensity of helium release peaks at relatively low temperatures (<600 K) was enhanced due to Ar8+ ions pre-damage.

  1. Helium resources of the United States, 1987. Information Circular/1988

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, R.D.

    1987-01-01

    The helium-resources base of the United States was estimated by the Bureau of Mines to be 1040 Bcf as of January 1, 1987. These resources are divided into four categories in decreasing degree of assurance of their existence: (1) helium in storage and in proved natural gas reserves, 265 Bcf, (2) helium in probable natural gas resources, 228 Bcf, (3) helium in possible natural gas resources, 320 Bcf, and (4) helium in speculative natural gas resources, 227 Bcf. These helium resources are further divided into depleting and nondepleting, with the helium in storage being in a separate classification.

  2. Helium preconditioning attenuates hypoxia/ischemia-induced injury in the developing brain.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yi; Xue, Feng; Liu, Guoke; Shi, Xin; Liu, Yun; Liu, Wenwu; Luo, Xu; Sun, Xuejun; Kang, Zhimin

    2011-02-28

    Recent studies show helium may be one kind of neuroprotective gas. This study aimed to examine the short and long-term neuroprotective effects of helium preconditioning in an established neonatal cerebral hypoxia-ischemia (HI) model. Seven-day-old rat pups were subjected to left common carotid artery ligation and then 90 min of hypoxia (8% oxygen at 37°C). The preconditioning group inhaled 70% helium-30% oxygen for 5 min three times with an interval of 5 min 24h before HI insult. Pups were decapitated 24h after HI and brain morphological injury was assessed by 2,3,5-triphenyltetrazolium chloride (TTC) staining, Nissl and TUNEL staining. Caspase-3 activity in the brain was measured. Five weeks after HI, postural reflex testing and Morris water maze testing were conducted. Our results showed that helium preconditioning reduced the infarct ratio, increased the number of survival neurons, and inhibited apoptosis at the early stage of HI insult. Furthermore, the sensorimotor function and the cognitive function were improved significantly in rats with helium preconditioning. The results indicate that helium preconditioning attenuates HI induced brain injury.

  3. Cryosorption of helium on argon frost TFTR (Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor) neutral beamlines

    SciTech Connect

    Kamperschroer, J.H.; Cropper, M.B.; Dylla, H.F.; Garzotto, V.; Dudek, L.E.; Grisham, L.R.; Martin, G.D.; O'Connor, T.E.; Stevenson, T.N.; von Halle, A. . Plasma Physics Lab.)

    1989-11-01

    Helium pumping on argon frost has been investigated on TFTR neutral beam injectors and shown to be viable for limited helium beam operation. Maximum pumping speeds are {approximately} 25% less than those measured for pumping of deuterium. Helium pumping efficiency is low, > 20 argon atoms are required to pump each helium atom. Adsorption isotherms are exponential and exhibit a two-fold increase in adsorption capacity as the cryopanel temperature is reduced from 4.3 K to 3.7 K. Pumping speed was found to be independent of cryopanel temperature over the temperature range studied. After pumping a total of 2000 torr-l of helium, the beamline base pressure rose to 2{times}10{sup -5} torr from an initial value of 10{sup -8} torr. Accompanying this three order of magnitude increase in pressure was a modest 40% decrease in pumping speed. The introduction of 168 torr-l of deuterium prior to helium injection reduced the pumping speed by a factor of two with no decrease in adsorption capacity. 29 refs., 7 figs.

  4. THE GREEN BANK TELESCOPE H II REGION DISCOVERY SURVEY. IV. HELIUM AND CARBON RECOMBINATION LINES

    SciTech Connect

    Wenger, Trey V.; Bania, T. M.; Balser, Dana S.; Anderson, L. D.

    2013-02-10

    The Green Bank Telescope H II Region Discovery Survey (GBT HRDS) found hundreds of previously unknown Galactic regions of massive star formation by detecting hydrogen radio recombination line (RRL) emission from candidate H II region targets. Since the HRDS nebulae lie at large distances from the Sun, they are located in previously unprobed zones of the Galactic disk. Here, we derive the properties of helium and carbon RRL emission from HRDS nebulae. Our target sample is the subset of the HRDS that has visible helium or carbon RRLs. This criterion gives a total of 84 velocity components (14% of the HRDS) with helium emission and 52 (9%) with carbon emission. For our highest quality sources, the average {sup 4}He{sup +}/H{sup +} abundance ratio by number, (y {sup +}), is 0.068 {+-} 0.023(1{sigma}). This is the same ratio as that measured for the sample of previously known Galactic H II regions. Nebulae without detected helium emission give robust y {sup +} upper limits. There are 5 RRL emission components with y {sup +} less than 0.04 and another 12 with upper limits below this value. These H II regions must have either a very low {sup 4}He abundance or contain a significant amount of neutral helium. The HRDS has 20 nebulae with carbon RRL emission but no helium emission at its sensitivity level. There is no correlation between the carbon RRL parameters and the 8 {mu}m mid-infrared morphology of these nebulae.

  5. Properties of vanadium-base alloys irradiated in the dynamic helium charging experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Chung, H.M.; Loomis, B.A.; Smith, D.L.

    1996-02-01

    One property of vanadium-base alloys that is not well understood in terms of their potential use as fusion reactor structural materials is the effect of simultaneous generation of helium and neutron damage. In the present Dynamic Helium Charging Experiment (DHCE), helium was produced uniformly in the specimen at linear rates of {approx} 0.4 to 4.2 appm helium/dpa by the decay of tritium during irradiation to 18--31 dpa at 425--600 C in Li-filled capsules in a sodium-cooled fast reactor. This paper presents results of postirradiation examination and tests of microstructure and mechanical properties of V-5Ti, V-3Ti-1Si, V-8Cr-6Ti, and V-4Cr-4Ti (the latter alloy has been identified as the most promising candidate vanadium alloy). Effects of helium on tensile strength and ductility were insignificant after irradiation and testing at > 420 C. However, postirradiation ductilities at < 250 C were higher than those of the non-DHCE specimens (< 0.1 appm helium), whereas strengths were lower, indicating that different types of hardening centers are produced during DHCE and non-DHCE irradiation. Ductile-brittle transition behavior of the DHCE specimens was also determined from bend tests and fracture appearance of transmission electron microscopy (TEM) disks and broken tensile specimens. No brittle behavior was observed at temperatures > {minus}150 C in DHCE specimens. Predominantly brittle-cleavage fracture morphologies were observed only at {minus}196 C in some specimens that were irradiated to 31 dpa at 425 C during the DHCE. For the helium generation rates in this experiment ({approx} 0.4--4.2 appm He/dpa), grain-boundary coalescence of helium microcavities was negligible and intergranular fracture was not observed.

  6. Helium-neon laser improves skin repair in rabbits.

    PubMed

    Peccin, Maria Stella; Renno, Ana Claudia Muniz; de Oliveira, Flavia; Giusti, Paulo Ricardo; Ribeiro, Daniel Araki

    2012-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the influence of helium-neon laser on skin injury in rabbits. For this purpose, 15 New Zealand rabbits underwent bilateral skin damage in leg. Helium-neon laser light, at a fluence of 6 J∕cm2 and wavelength of 632.8 nm, was applied on the left legs (laser group). The right leg lesions (control group) served as negative control. All sections were histopathologically analyzed using HE sections. The results showed little infiltration of inflammatory cells, with proliferation of fibroblasts forming a few fibrous connective tissue after 1 week post-injury. The lesion on the 3rd week was characterized by granulation tissue, which formed from proliferated fibrous connective tissue, congested blood vessels and mild mononuclear cell infiltration. On the 5th week, it was observed that debris material surrounded by a thick layer of connective tissue and dense collage, fibroblasts cells present in the dermis covered by a thick epidermal layer represented by keratinized epithelium. Taken together, our results suggest that helium-neon laser is able to improve skin repair in rabbits at early phases of recovery.

  7. Operating experiences and test results of six cold helium compressors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, D. P.; Gibbs, R. J.; Schlafke, A. P.; Sondericker, J. H.; Wu, K. C.

    Three small and three large cold helium centrifugal compressors have been operated at Brookhaven National Laboratory between 1981 and 1986. The three small cold compressors have been installed on a 1000 W refrigerator for testing a string of superconducting magnets and for R and D purposes. The three large units are components of the BNL 24.8 KW refrigerator to be used to provide cooling for the RHIC project. These compressors are used either to circulate a large amount of supercritical helium through a group of magnets or to pump on the helium bath to reduce temperature in the system. One small circulating compressor tested employs tilting-pad gas bearings and is driven by a DC motor. The two small cold vacuum pumps tested use oil bearings and are driven by oil turbines. The three large oil-bearing cold compressors are driven by DC motors through a gear box. A unique feature of the large vacuum pump is the combination of two pumps with a total of four stages on the same shaft. The adiabatic efficiencies are found to be 57% for the large vacuum pumps and close to 50% for the large circulating compressor. Good overall reliability has been experienced.

  8. Development of a transferline connecting a helium liquefier coldbox and a liquid helium Dewar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menon, Rajendran S.; Rane, Tejas; Chakravarty, Anindya; Joemon, V.

    2017-02-01

    A helium liquefier with demonstrated capacity of 32 1/hr has been developed by BARC. Mumbai. A transferline for two way flow of helium between the helium liquefier coldbox and receiver Dewar has been developed in-house at BARC. Further, a functionally similar, but structurally improved transferline has been developed through a local fabricator. This paper describes and discusses issues related to the development of these cryogenic transferlines. The developed transferlines have been tested with a flow of liquid nitrogen and successfully utilised later in the helium liquefier plant.

  9. Contrasting pressure-support ventilation and helium-oxygen during exercise in severe COPD.

    PubMed

    Hussain, Omar; Collins, Eileen G; Adiguzel, Nalan; Langbein, W Edwin; Tobin, Martin J; Laghi, Franco

    2011-03-01

    Helium-oxygen mixtures and pressure-support ventilation have been used to unload the respiratory muscles and increase exercise tolerance in COPD. Considering the different characteristics of these techniques, we hypothesized that helium-oxygen would be more effective in reducing exercise-induced dynamic hyperinflation than pressure-support. We also hypothesized that patients would experience greater increases in respiratory rate and minute ventilation with helium-oxygen than with pressure-support. The hypotheses were tested in ten patients with severe COPD (FEV(1) = 28 ± 3% predicted [mean ± SE]) during constant-load cycling (80% maximal workrate) while breathing 30% oxygen-alone, helium-oxygen, and pressure-support in randomized order. As hypothesized, helium-oxygen had greater impact on dynamic hyperinflation than did pressure-support (end-exercise; p = 0.03). For the most part of exercise, respiratory rate and minute ventilation were greater with helium-oxygen than with pressure-support (p ≤ 0.008). During the initial phases of exercise, helium-oxygen caused less rib-cage muscle recruitment than did pressure-support (p < 0.03), and after the start of exercise it caused greater reduction in inspiratory reserve volume (p ≤ 0.02). Despite these different responses, helium-oxygen and pressure-support caused similar increases in exercise duration (oxygen-alone: 6.9 ± 0.8 min; helium-oxygen: 10.7 ± 1.4 min; pressure-support: 11.2 ± 1.6 min; p = 0.003) and similar decreases in inspiratory effort (esophageal pressure-time product), respiratory drive, pulmonary resistance, dyspnea and leg effort (p < 0.03). In conclusion, helium-oxygen reduced exercise-induced dynamic hyperinflation by improving the relationship between hyperinflation and minute ventilation. In contrast, pressure-support reduced hyperinflation solely as a result of lowering ventilation. Helium-oxygen was more effective in reducing exercise-induced dynamic hyperinflation in severe COPD, and was

  10. Trapping of helium in nano-bubbles in euxenite: Positive identification and implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seydoux-Guillaume, Anne-Magali; David, Marie-Laure; Alix, Kevin; Datas, Lucien; Bingen, Bernard

    2016-08-01

    The (Y,REE,U,Th)-(Nb,Ta,Ti) oxides, like euxenite, fergusonite, pyrochlore, zirconolite, are known to contain nanometric spherical cavities or bubbles, interpreted to contain radiogenic helium. In-situ analyses by Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy (STEM) coupled with Electron Energy Loss Spectroscopy (EELS) inside nano-bubbles from an euxenite crystal, sampled in its host c. 920 Ma old pegmatite in Norway, deliver, for the first time, a positive identification of helium and an estimation of helium pressure in such bubbles. The chemically unaltered euxenite crystal proves amorphous and homogeneously speckled with bubbles ranging from 5 to 68 nm in diameter, around a log-normal distribution centered at 19 nm. The euxenite contains 9.87 wt% UO2 and 3.15 wt% ThO2. It accumulated a theoretical alpha-decay dose of 3.46 ×1020 α / g (i.e. 170 He/nm3), at a dose rate of 11 926 α / g / s. This corresponds to production of 0.23 wt% He. The density of helium inside the bubbles, estimated from EELS data, ranges from 2 to 45 He/nm3, leading to a pressure of 8 to 500 MPa. The proportion of produced helium trapped in bubbles is about 10%. Helium bubbles clearly influence helium diffusion. They may contribute to the swelling of euxenite during amorphization and to the fracturing of the host rock. Our results suggest that dose, dose rate and structural state seem to be important parameters for the nucleation, growth and coalescence of helium bubbles but also demonstrate the crucial need of experimental studies to be able to develop a predictive model of the long term behavior of materials in response to helium irradiation. Furthermore, chemical alteration of euxenite, here materialized by fluid driven dissolution-precipitation towards silica bearing euxenite, removes the bubbles and mobilizes helium into the rock via cracks and grain boundaries. It is then suggested that helium-rich fluid released from such U-Th rich sources may percolate into surrounding rock units

  11. Helium Plants and Storage. Design Manual 24.2.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-06-01

    Helium Air Separation System for a Supersonic Wind Tunnel.. 24.2-6 4 Four-Way Four-Port Valve ................................... 24.2-11 5 Friction...7) Weather and climatic conditions. 5. FACTS ON HELIUM. Federal agencies use helium in helium-shielded arc weld- ing, supersonic wind tunnels, and...station at the nearest railroad connection for transferring helium from railroad tank car to truck trailer. c. Compressor Station. Generally , the initial

  12. Development of charcoal sorbents for helium cryopumping

    SciTech Connect

    Sedgley, D.W.; Tobin, A.G.

    1984-01-01

    Testing of the cryogenically cooled charcoal using fusion-compatible binders for pumping helium has shown promising results. The program demonstrated comparable or improved performance with these binders compared to the charcoal (type and size) using an epoxy binder.

  13. Primary helium heater for propellant pressurization systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reichmuth, D. M.; Nguyen, T. V.; Pieper, J. L.

    1991-01-01

    The primary helium heater is a unique design that provides direct heating of pressurant gas for large pressure fed propulsion systems. It has been conceptually designed to supply a heated (800-1000 R) pressurization gas to both a liquid oxygen and an RP-1 propellant tank. This pressurization gas is generated within the heater by mixing super critical helium (40-300 R and 3000-1600 psi) with an appropriate amount of combustion products from a 4:1 throttling stoichiometric LO2/LH2 combustor. This simple, low cost and reliable mixer utilizes the large quantity of helium to provide stoichiometric combustor cooling, extend the throttling limits and enhance the combustion stability margin. Preliminary combustion, thermal, and CFD analyses confirm that this low-pressure-drop direct helium heater can provide the constant-temperature pressurant suitable for tank pressurization of both fuel and oxidizer tanks of large pressure fed vehicles.

  14. Helium Dilution Cryocooler for Space Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roach, Pat; Hogan, Robert (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    NASA's New Millenium Program Space Technology presents the Helium Dilution Cryocooler for Space Applications. The topics include: 1) Capability; 2) Applications; and 3) Advantages. This paper is in viewgraph form.

  15. Helium Find Thaws the Cold Fusion Trail.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pennisi, E.

    1991-01-01

    Reported is a study of cold fusion in which trace amounts of helium, possible evidence of an actual fusion reaction, were found. Research methodology is detailed. The controversy over the validity of experimental results with cold fusion are reviewed. (CW)

  16. Helium and Enhanced Image of the Sun

    NASA Video Gallery

    This video blinks between an image in Helium and an enhanced image. The original image is from AIA on SDO and the enhanced image was created at the LM Solar and Astrophysics Laboratory (LMSAL) by D...

  17. Helium-neon laser preirradiation induces protection against UVC radiation in wild-type E. coli strain K12AB1157.

    PubMed

    Kohli, R; Gupta, P K; Dube, A

    2000-02-01

    We have observed that preirradiation with a helium-neon laser (632.8 nm) induces protection against UVC radiation in wild-type E. coli strain K12AB1157. The magnitude of protection was found to depend on the helium-neon laser irradiance, exposure time, and period of incubation between helium-neon laser exposure and subsequent UVC irradiation. The optimum values for dose, irradiance and interval between the two exposures were found to be 7 kJ/m(2), 100 W/m(2) and 1 h, respectively. The possible involvement of singlet oxygen in the helium-neon laser-induced protection is also discussed.

  18. Radioactive Ions and Atoms in Superfluid Helium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dendooven, P.; Purushothaman, S.; Gloos, K.; ńystö, J.; Takahashi, N.; Huang, W. X.

    2006-04-01

    We are investigating the use of superfluid helium as a medium to handle and manipulate radioactive ions and atoms. Preliminary results on the extraction of positive ions from superfluid helium at temperatures close to 1 K are described. Increasing the electric field up to 1.2 kV/cm did not improve the extraction. Evaporating a thin surface layer of the liquid using second-sound pulses gave an extraction efficiency of 7.2 %.

  19. Helium Reionization in From New Sightlines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Syphers, David

    2017-01-01

    A very small number of sightlines to z~3 quasars have been studied in detail to show the progress of helium reionization. Although studying the same sightlines with each new UV spectrograph lead to a better understanding of them, the sightline variance is very strong during this patchy and extended process. We discuss detailed R>10,000 COS data from new sightlines, and what they reveal about the progress and end of helium reionization.

  20. Cosmogenic helium in a terrestrial igneous rock

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kurz, M. D.

    1986-01-01

    New helium isotopic measurements on samples from the Kula formation of Haleakala volcano of Hawaii are presented that are best explained by an in situ cosmogenic origin for a significant fraction of the He-3. Results from crushing and stepwise heating experiments, and consideration of the exposure age of the sample at the surface and the cosmic ray fluxes strongly support this hypothesis. Although crustal cosmogenic helium has been proposed previously, this represents its first unambiguous identification in a terrestrial sample.

  1. Sonic helium detectors in the Fermilab Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    Bossert, R.J.; /Fermilab

    2006-01-01

    In the Fermilab Tevatron cryogenic system there are many remotely located low-pressure plate relief valves that must vent large volumes of cold helium gas when magnet quenches occur. These valves can occasionally stick open or not reseat completely, resulting in a large helium loss. As such, the need exists for a detector to monitor the relief valve's discharge area for the presence of helium. Due to the quantity needed, cost is an important factor. A unit has been developed and built for this purpose that is quite inexpensive. Its operating principle is based on the speed of sound, where two closely matched tubes operate at their acoustic resonant frequency. When helium is introduced into one of these tubes, the resulting difference in acoustic time of flight is used to trigger an alarm. At present, there are 39 of these units installed and operating in the Tevatron. They have detected many minor and major helium leaks, and have also been found useful in detecting a rise in the helium background in the enclosed refrigerator buildings. This paper covers the construction, usage and operational experience gained with these units over the last several years.

  2. Advanced helium magnetometer for space applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slocum, Robert E.

    1987-01-01

    The goal of this effort was demonstration of the concepts for an advanced helium magnetometer which meets the demands of future NASA earth orbiting, interplanetary, solar, and interstellar missions. The technical effort focused on optical pumping of helium with tunable solid state lasers. We were able to demonstrate the concept of a laser pumped helium magnetometer with improved accuracy, low power, and sensitivity of the order of 1 pT. A number of technical approaches were investigated for building a solid state laser tunable to the helium absorption line at 1083 nm. The laser selected was an Nd-doped LNA crystal pumped by a diode laser. Two laboratory versions of the lanthanum neodymium hexa-aluminate (LNA) laser were fabricated and used to conduct optical pumping experiments in helium and demonstrate laser pumped magnetometer concepts for both the low field vector mode and the scalar mode of operation. A digital resonance spectrometer was designed and built in order to evaluate the helium resonance signals and observe scalar magnetometer operation. The results indicate that the laser pumped sensor in the VHM mode is 45 times more sensitive than a lamp pumped sensor for identical system noise levels. A study was made of typical laser pumped resonance signals in the conventional magnetic resonance mode. The laser pumped sensor was operated as a scalar magnetometer, and it is concluded that magnetometers with 1 pT sensitivity can be achieved with the use of laser pumping and stable laser pump sources.

  3. High efficiency pump for space helium transfer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hasenbein, Robert; Izenson, Michael G.; Swift, Walter L.; Sixsmith, Herbert

    1991-01-01

    A centrifugal pump was developed for the efficient and reliable transfer of liquid helium in space. The pump can be used to refill cryostats on orbiting satellites which use liquid helium for refrigeration at extremely low temperatures. The pump meets the head and flow requirements of on-orbit helium transfer: a flow rate of 800 L/hr at a head of 128 J/kg. The overall pump efficiency at the design point is 0.45. The design head and flow requirements are met with zero net positive suction head, which is the condition in an orbiting helium supply Dewar. The mass transfer efficiency calculated for a space transfer operation is 0.99. Steel ball bearings are used with gas fiber-reinforced teflon retainers to provide solid lubrication. These bearings have demonstrated the longest life in liquid helium endurance tests under simulated pumping conditions. Technology developed in the project also has application for liquid helium circulation in terrestrial facilities and for transfer of cryogenic rocket propellants in space.

  4. Helium measurements of pore-fluids obtained from SAFOD drillcore

    SciTech Connect

    Ali, S.; Stute, M.; Torgersen, T.; Winckler, G.; Kennedy, B.M.

    2010-04-15

    {sup 4}He accumulated in fluids is a well established geochemical tracer used to study crustal fluid dynamics. Direct fluid samples are not always collectable; therefore, a method to extract rare gases from matrix fluids of whole rocks by diffusion has been adapted. Helium was measured on matrix fluids extracted from sandstones and mudstones recovered during the San Andreas Fault Observatory at Depth (SAFOD) drilling in California, USA. Samples were typically collected as subcores or from drillcore fragments. Helium concentration and isotope ratios were measured 4-6 times on each sample, and indicate a bulk {sup 4}He diffusion coefficient of 3.5 {+-} 1.3 x 10{sup -8} cm{sup 2}s{sup -1} at 21 C, compared to previously published diffusion coefficients of 1.2 x 10{sup -18} cm{sup 2}s{sup -1} (21 C) to 3.0 x 10{sup -15} cm{sup 2}s{sup -1} (150 C) in the sands and clays. Correcting the diffusion coefficient of {sup 4}He{sub water} for matrix porosity ({approx}3%) and tortuosity ({approx}6-13) produces effective diffusion coefficients of 1 x 10{sup -8} cm{sup 2}s{sup -1} (21 C) and 1 x 10{sup -7} (120 C), effectively isolating pore fluid {sup 4}He from the {sup 4}He contained in the rock matrix. Model calculations indicate that <6% of helium initially dissolved in pore fluids was lost during the sampling process. Complete and quantitative extraction of the pore fluids provide minimum in situ porosity values for sandstones 2.8 {+-} 0.4% (SD, n=4) and mudstones 3.1 {+-} 0.8% (SD, n=4).

  5. Measurement of Helium-3/Helium-4 Ratios in Soil Gas at the 618-11 Burial Ground

    SciTech Connect

    Olsen, Khris B.; Dresel, P Evan; Evans, John C.

    2001-10-31

    Seventy soil gas-sampling points were installed around the perimeter of the 618-11 Burial Ground, approximately 400 feet downgradient of well 699-13-3A, and in four transects downgradient of the burial ground to a maximum distance of 3,100 feet. Soil gas samples were collected and analyzed for helium-3/helium-4 ratios from these 70 points. Helium-3/helium-4 ratios determined from the soil gas sampling points showed significant enrichments, relative to ambient air helium-3 concentrations. The highest concentrations were located along the northern perimeter of the burial ground. Helium-3/helium-4 ratios (normalized to the abundances in ambient air) ranged from 1.0 to 62 around the burial ground. The helium-3/helium-4 ratios from the 4 transect downgradient of the burial ground ranged from 0.988 to 1.68. The helium-3/helium-4 ratios from around the burial ground suggest there is a vadose zone source of tritium along the north side of the burial ground. This vadose zone source is likely the source of tritium in the groundwater. The helium-3/helium-4 ratios also suggest the groundwater plume is traveling east-northeast from the burial ground and the highest groundwater tritium value may be to the north of well 699-13-3A. Finally, there appears to be no immediately upgradient sources of tritium impacting the burial ground since all the upgradient helium-3/helium-4 ratios are approximately 1.0.

  6. Helium-induced cardioprotection of healthy and hypertensive rat myocardium in vivo.

    PubMed

    Oei, Gezina T M L; Huhn, Ragnar; Heinen, Andre; Hollmann, Markus W; Schlack, Wolfgang S; Preckel, Benedikt; Weber, Nina C

    2012-06-05

    Helium protects healthy myocardium against ischemia/reperfusion injury by early and late preconditioning (EPC, LPC) and postconditioning (PostC). We investigated helium-induced PostC of the hypertensive heart and enhancement by addition of LPC and EPC. We also investigated involvement of signaling kinases glycogen synthase kinase 3 beta (GSK-3β) and protein kinase C-epsilon (PKC-ε). To assess myocardial cell damage, we performed infarct size measurements in healthy Wistar Kyoto (WKY rats, n=8-9) and Spontaneous Hypertensive rats (SHR, n=8-9) subjected to 25 min ischemia and 120 min reperfusion. Rats inhaled 70% helium for 15 min after index ischemia (PostC), combined with 15 min helium 24h prior to index ischemia (LPC+PostC), a triple intervention with additional 3 short cycles of 5 min helium inhalation shortly before ischemia (EPC+LPC+PostC), or no further treatment. In WKY rats, PostC reduced infarct size from 46 ± 2% (mean ± S.E.M) in the control group to 29 ± 2%. LPC+PostC or EPC+LPC+PostC reduced infarct sizes to a similar extent (30 ± 3% and 32 ± 2% respectively). In SHR, EPC+LPC+PostC reduced infarct size from 53 ± 3% in control to 39 ± 3%, while PostC or LPC+PostC alone were not protective; infarct size 48 ± 4% and 44 ± 4%, respectively. Neither PostC in WKY rats nor EPC+LPC+PostC in SHR was associated with an increase in phosphorylation of GSK-3β and PKC-ε after 15 min of reperfusion. Concluding, a triple intervention of helium conditioning results in cardioprotection in SHR, whereas a single intervention does not. In WKY rats, the triple intervention does not further augment protection. Helium conditioning is not associated with a mechanism involving GSK-3β and PKC-ε.

  7. Helium transport in plasma edge regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abou-Gabal, Hanaa Hassan

    The transport of neutral helium atoms near diverter or limiter target plates in fusion devices was studied. Two simulation codes, based on Monte Carlo techniques, were developed. The first treats the problem in one-dimensional geometry and the second considers two-dimensional effects. The atomic processes of ionization of helium atoms by electron impact and elastic scattering with plasma ions are included. The total and differential elastic scattering cross-sections were calculated classically using an ab initio calculation of the interatomic potential. The thermal motion and the streaming of the ions along the magnetic field, which can be at an angle to the target plate, are included. Results obtained with the one-dimensional code show significant effects of elastic collisions below about 10 eV, causing a substantial fraction of the helium atoms to be reflected back to the target plate. This effect can be beneficial for the pumping of helium from the discharge chamber. The two-dimensional Monte Carlo code was used to study helium recycling near a flat, vented target plate. A parametric study is performed to examine the dependence of the pumping efficiency on plasma parameters and geometric aspects. Results show that the pumping of neutral helium can be increased by shortening and widening the ports as well as by increasing the angle between the magnetic field and the target plate. Also, keeping the ion temperature below about 10 eV and the plasma density around a few 10(exp 14) cu cm near the targe plate can be beneficial for the pumping of helium gas.

  8. Helium-neon laser therapy in the treatment of hydroxyapatite orbital implant exposure: A superior option.

    PubMed

    Xu, Qi-Hua; Zhao, Chen; Zhu, Jian-Gang; Chen, Mei-Juan; Liu, Qing-Huai

    2015-09-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the efficacy of helium-neon laser therapy in the treatment of hydroxyapatite orbital implant exposure and compare the results with those of a combined drugs and surgery regimen. A total of 70 patients with hydroxyapatite orbital implant exposure in 70 eyes were randomly divided into two groups: Helium-neon laser therapy (group A) and drugs plus surgery (group B). Each group contained 35 patients. The healing rates and times of the conjunctival wound were recorded and compared following helium-neon laser treatment or the drugs plus surgery regimen. Changes in the hydroxyapatite orbital implant prior to and following helium-neon laser irradiation were analyzed. A similar animal study was conducted using 24 New Zealand white rabbits, which received orbital implants and were then received drug treatment or helium-neon therapy. In the human experiment, the rates for conjunctival wound healing were 97.14% in group A and 74.29% in group B, with a significant difference between the groups (χ(2)=5.71, P<0.05). Patients with mild exposure were healed after 7.22±2.11 days of helium-neon laser therapy and 14.33±3.20 days of drugs plus surgery. A statistically significant difference was found between the groups (t=8.97, P<0.05). Patients with moderate to severe exposure were healed after 18.19±2.12 days of helium-neon laser therapy and 31.25±4.21 days of drugs plus surgery. The difference between the groups was statistically significant (t=7.91, P<0.05). Enhanced magnetic resonance imaging showed that the helium-neon laser therapy significantly promoted vascularization of the hydroxyapatite orbital implant. These results, combined with pathological findings in animals, which showed that a helium-neon laser promoted vascularization and had anti-inflammatory effects, suggest that helium-neon laser irradiation is an effective method for treating hydroxyapatite orbital implant exposure, thereby avoiding secondary surgery.

  9. Design and development of a helium injection system to improve external leakage detection during liquid nitrogen immersion tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Townsend, Andrew; Mishra, Rakesh

    2016-10-01

    The testing of assemblies for use in cryogenic systems commonly includes evaluation at or near operating (therefore cryogenic) temperature. Typical assemblies include valves and pumps for use in liquid oxygen-liquid hydrogen rocket engines. One frequently specified method of cryogenic external leakage testing requires the assembly, pressurized with gaseous helium (GHe), be immersed in a bath of liquid nitrogen (LN2) and allowed to thermally stabilize. Component interfaces are then visually inspected for leakage (bubbles). Unfortunately the liquid nitrogen will be boiling under normal, bench-top, test conditions. This boiling tends to mask even significant leakage. One little known and perhaps under-utilized property of helium is the seemingly counter-intuitive thermodynamic property that when ambient temperature helium is bubbled through boiling LN2 at a temperature of -195.8 °C, the temperature of the liquid nitrogen will reduce. This paper reports on the design and testing of a novel proof-of-concept helium injection control system confirming that it is possible to reduce the temperature of an LN2 bath below boiling point through the controlled injection of ambient temperature gaseous helium and then to efficiently maintain a reduced helium flow rate to maintain a stabilized liquid temperature, enabling clear visual observation of components immersed within the LN2. Helium saturation testing is performed and injection system sizing is discussed.

  10. Experimental and numerical investigation of time evolution of discharge current and optical emission in helium-nitrogen cryoplasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muneoka, Hitoshi; Urabe, Keiichiro; Choi, Jai Hyuk; Stauss, Sven; Terashima, Kazuo

    2014-12-01

    Cryoplasmas represent a class of non-equilibrium plasmas whose gas temperature can be controlled below room temperature. However, so far, the influence of the plasma gas temperature on the plasma chemical reactions has not yet been examined in detail. Here we investigated the time-dependent reaction dynamics related to optical emission in helium-nitrogen cryoplasmas. We acquired voltage and discharge current waveforms, optical emission spectra, and observed a temporal change of the emission intensity in helium-nitrogen cryoplasmas at two experimental conditions (temperatures of temperature detector: 5 K and plasma gas temperature: 28 K (condition A), 40 K and 54 K (condition B)). Two time-dependent phenomena were observed: the first was a longer duration of the discharge current compared to that of helium emission at both conditions A and B, and the second was nitrogen ion emission delayed by about 8 µs with respect to the emissions of atomic helium and helium dimers at 40 K. The experimental observations could be reproduced qualitatively by a global reaction model, which took into account the effect of the plasma gas temperature on the reaction rate constants and the diffusion coefficients. The simulations suggested that the reactions related to metastable helium atom were the key reactions, and that the long lifetimes of metastable helium atoms at cryogenic gas temperatures are crucial for the appearance of the time-dependent phenomena. These results imply that the plasma gas temperature is one of the key parameters in non-equilibrium plasma chemistry.

  11. Suicide by asphyxiation due to helium inhalation.

    PubMed

    Howard, Matthew O; Hall, Martin T; Edwards, Jeffrey D; Vaughn, Michael G; Perron, Brian E; Winecker, Ruth E

    2011-03-01

    Suicide by asphyxiation using helium is the most widely-promoted method of "self-deliverance" by right-to-die advocates. However, little is known about persons committing such suicides or the circumstances and manner in which they are completed. Prior reports of suicides by asphyxiation involving helium were reviewed and deaths determined by the North Carolina Office of the Chief Medical Examiner to be helium-associated asphyxial suicides occurring between January 1, 2000 and December 31, 2008 were included in a new case series examined in this article. The 10 asphyxial suicides involving helium identified in North Carolina tended to occur almost exclusively in non-Hispanic, white men who were relatively young (M age = 41.1 T 11.6). In 6 of 10 cases, decedents suffered from significant psychiatric dysfunction; in 3 of these 6 cases, psychiatric disorders were present comorbidly with substance abuse. In none of these cases were decedents suffering from terminal illness. Most persons committing suicide with helium were free of terminal illness but suffered from psychiatric and/or substance use disorders.

  12. Thermal Performance of the XRS Helium Insert

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Breon, Susan R.; DiPirro, Michael J.; Tuttle, James G.; Shirron, Peter J.; Warner, Brent A.; Boyle, Robert F.; Canavan, Edgar R.

    1999-01-01

    The X-Ray Spectrometer (XRS) is an instrument on the Japanese Astro-E satellite, scheduled for launch early in the year 2000. The XRS Helium Insert comprises a superfluid helium cryostat, an Adiabatic Demagnetization Refrigerator (ADR), and the XRS calorimeters with their cold electronics. The calorimeters are capable of detecting X-rays over the energy range 0.1 to 10 keV with a resolution of 12 eV. The Helium Insert completed its performance and verification testing at Goddard in January 1999. It was shipped to Japan, where it has been integrated with the neon dewar built by Sumitomo Heavy Industries. The Helium Insert was given a challenging lifetime requirement of 2.0 years with a goal of 2.5 years. Based on the results of the thermal performance tests, the predicted on-orbit lifetime is 2.6 years with a margin of 30%. This is the result of both higher efficiency in the ADR cycle and the low temperature top-off, more than compensating for an increase in the parasitic heat load. This paper presents a summary of the key design features and the results of the thermal testing of the XRS Helium Insert.

  13. BASG thermomechanical pump helium 2 transfer tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mills, G. L.; Newell, D. A.; Urbach, A. R.

    1990-01-01

    The purpose of the effort described was to perform experiments and calculations related to using a thermomechanical pump in the space-based resupply of the Space Infrared Telescope Facility (SIRTF) with Helium 2. Thermomechanical (fountain effect) pumps have long been suggested as a means for pumping large quantities of Helium 2. The unique properties of Helium 2 have made it useful for cooling space instruments. Several space science missions, including SIRTF, are now being planned which would benefit greatly from on-orbit resupply of Helium 2. A series of experiments were performed to demonstrate that large volumes of Helium 2 can be transferred with a thermomechanical pump at high flow rates and at high efficiency from one dewar to another through valves and lines that are similar to the plumbing arrangement that would be necessary to accomplish such a transfer on-orbit. In addition, temperature, pressure, and flow rate data taken during the tests were used to verify and refine a computer model which was developed.

  14. Hydrodynamic simulations of the core helium flash

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mocák, Miroslav; Müller, Ewald; Weiss, Achim; Kifonidis, Konstantinos

    2008-10-01

    We desribe and discuss hydrodynamic simulations of the core helium flash using an initial model of a 1.25 M⊙ star with a metallicity of 0.02 near at its peak. Past research concerned with the dynamics of the core helium flash is inconclusive. Its results range from a confirmation of the standard picture, where the star remains in hydrostatic equilibrium during the flash (Deupree 1996), to a disruption or a significant mass loss of the star (Edwards 1969; Cole & Deupree 1980). However, the most recent multidimensional hydrodynamic study (Dearborn et al. 2006) suggests a quiescent behavior of the core helium flash and seems to rule out an explosive scenario. Here we present partial results of a new comprehensive study of the core helium flash, which seem to confirm this qualitative behavior and give a better insight into operation of the convection zone powered by helium burning during the flash. The hydrodynamic evolution is followed on a computational grid in spherical coordinates using our new version of the multi-dimensional hydrodynamic code HERAKLES, which is based on a direct Eulerian implementation of the piecewise parabolic method.

  15. TRANSPARENT HELIUM IN STRIPPED ENVELOPE SUPERNOVAE

    SciTech Connect

    Piro, Anthony L.; Morozova, Viktoriya S.

    2014-09-01

    Using simple arguments based on photometric light curves and velocity evolution, we propose that some stripped envelope supernovae (SNe) show signs that a significant fraction of their helium is effectively transparent. The main pieces of evidence are the relatively low velocities with little velocity evolution, as are expected deep inside an exploding star, along with temperatures that are too low to ionize helium. This means that the helium should not contribute to the shaping of the main SN light curve, and thus the total helium mass may be difficult to measure from simple light curve modeling. Conversely, such modeling may be more useful for constraining the mass of the carbon/oxygen core of the SN progenitor. Other stripped envelope SNe show higher velocities and larger velocity gradients, which require an additional opacity source (perhaps the mixing of heavier elements or radioactive nickel) to prevent the helium from being transparent. We discuss ways in which similar analysis can provide insights into the differences and similarities between SNe Ib and Ic, which will lead to a better understanding of their respective formation mechanisms.

  16. Subtask 12G1: Effects of dynamically charged helium on swelling and microstructure of vanadium-base alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Chung, H.M.; Nowicki, L.; Gazda, J.; Smith, D.L.

    1995-03-01

    The objective of this work is to determine void structure, distribution, and density changes of several vanadium-base alloys irradiated in the Dynamic Helium Charging Experiment (DHCE). Combined effects of dynamically charged helium and neutron damage on density change, void distribution, and microstructural evolution of V-4Cr-4Ti alloy have been determined after irradiation to 18-31 dpa at 425-600{degrees}C in the DHCE, and the results compared with those from a non-DHCE in which helium generation was negligible. For specimens irradiated to {approx}18-31 dpa at 500-600{degrees}C with a helium generation rate of 0.4-4.2 appm He/dpa, only a few helium bubbles were observed at the interface of grain matrices and some of the Ti(O,N,C) precipitates, and no microvoids or helium bubbles were observed either in grain matrices or near grain boundaries. Under these conditions, dynamically produced helium atoms seem to be trapped in the grain matrix without significant bubble nucleation or growth, and in accordance with this, density changes from DHCE and non-DHCE (negligible helium generation) were similar for comparable fluence and irradiation temperature. Only for specimens irradiated to {approx}31 dpa at 425{degrees}C, when helium was generated at a rate of 0.4-0.8 appm helium/dpa, were diffuse helium bubbles observed in limited regions of grain matrices and near {approx}15% of the grain boundaries in densities significantly lower than those in the extensive coalescences of helium bubbles typical of other alloys irradiated in tritium-trick experiments. Density changes of specimens irradiated at 425{degrees}C in the DHCE were significantly higher than those from non-DHCE irradiation. Microstructural evolution in V-4Cr-4Ti was similar for DHCE and non-DHCE except for helium bubble number density and distribution. As in non-DHCE, the irradiation-induced precipitation of ultrafine Ti{sub 5}Si{sub 3} was observed for DHCE at >500{degrees}C but not at 425{degrees}C.

  17. D0 Silicon Upgrade: Commissioning Test Results for D-Zero's Helium Refrigerator

    SciTech Connect

    Rucinski, Russ; /Fermilab

    1997-06-30

    The test objectives are: (1) Make liquid helium and measure refrigerator capacity; (2) Measure liquid helium dewar heat leak, transfer line heat leak, and liquid nitrogen consumption rates; (3) Operate all cryogenic transfer lines; (4) Get some running time on all components; (5) Debug mechanical components, instrumentation, DMACs user interface, tune loops, and otherwise shake out any problems; (6) Get some operating time in to get familiar with system behavior; (7) Revise and/or improve operating procedures to actual practice; and (8) Identify areas for future improvement. D-Zero's stand alone helium refrigerator (STAR) liquified helium at a rate of 114 L/hr. This is consistent with other STAR installations. Refrigeration capacity was not measured due to lack of a calibrated heat load. Measured heat leaks were within design values. The helium dewar loss was measured at 2 to 4 watts or 9% per day, the solenoid and VLPC helium transfer lines had a heat leak of about 20 watts each. The liquid nitrogen consumption rates of the mobile purifier, STAR, and LN2 subcooler were measured at 20 gph, 20 to 64 gph, and 3 gph respectively. All cryogenic transfer lines including the solenoid and visible light photon counter (VLPC) transfer lines were cooled to their cryogenic operating temperatures. This included independent cooling of nitrogen shields and liquid helium components. No major problems were observed. The system ran quite well. Many problems were identified and corrected as they came up. Areas for improvement were noted and will be implemented in the future. The instrumentation and control system operated commendably during the test. The commissioning test run was a worthwhile and successful venture.

  18. Helium irradiation effects in single crystals of MgAl 2O 4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neeft, E. A. C.; Schram, R. P. C.; van Veen, A.; Labohm, F.; Fedorov, A. V.

    2000-05-01

    Magnesium aluminate spinel, (MgAl2O4), is a promising material as a uranium free matrix for the transmutation of americium. Fission products and α-particles are produced during the transmutation. The impact of α-particles is simulated by 30 keV 3He ion implantations at room temperature (RT) with the doses 6.2, 16, 20 and 53×1015 cm-2. In another set of experiments a single crystal MgAl2O4 (1 0 0) sample is irradiated with α-particles (4.5 MeV) from a 241Am source at RT to a dose of 1.3×1012 cm-2. Helium release from the implanted samples was studied by thermal desorption spectrometry (TDS). The numerical analysis of the experimental thermal desorption results of α-implanted samples to a very low helium concentration (0.0288 appm in the irradiation zone of 12.4 μm) show that helium release is dominated by helium interstitial diffusion with an activation energy of 1.8 eV. In the case of high dose implantation to 1.74 at.% in the implantation zone approximately of 100 nm, helium is released from He-vacancy clusters with the activation energy of 2.35 eV. The evolution of the helium concentration profile in the temperature range from RT to 1483 K is monitored by neutron depth profiling (NDP). It confirms that the release of helium is governed by dissociation from vacancy clusters.

  19. Enhancement of helium exhaust by resonant magnetic perturbation fields at LHD and TEXTOR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmitz, O.; Ida, K.; Kobayashi, M.; Bader, A.; Brezinsek, S.; Evans, T. E.; Funaba, H.; Goto, M.; Mitarai, O.; Morisaki, T.; Motojima, G.; Nakamura, Y.; Narushima, Y.; Nicolai, D.; Samm, U.; Tanaka, H.; Yamada, H.; Yoshinuma, M.; Xu, Y.; TEXTOR, the; LHD Experiment Groups

    2016-10-01

    The ability to exhaust helium as the fusion born plasma impurity is a critical requirement for burning plasmas. We demonstrate in this paper that resonant magnetic perturbation (RMP) fields can be used to actively manipulate helium exhaust characteristics. We present results from puff/pump studies at TEXTOR as example for a tokamak with a pumped limiter and from the Large Helical Device (LHD) with the closed helical divertor as example for a heliotron/stellarator device. For LHD, the effective helium confinement time τ p,\\text{He}\\ast is a factor of 7-8 higher in the low and high density regimes explored when compared to TEXTOR discharges. This is attributed to ion root impurity transport which is one particular impurity transport regime assessed experimentally at LHD and which facilitates helium penetration to the plasma core. However, when an edge magnetic island is induced by externally applied RMP fields, τ p,\\text{He}\\ast is decreased by up to 30% and hence τ p,\\text{He}\\ast values closer to those of TEXTOR can be established. The combination of TEXTOR and LHD results suggest that a magnetic island induced by the RMP field in the plasma source region is an important ingredient for improving helium exhaust. The reduction in τ p,\\text{He}\\ast seen is caused by a combination of improved helium exhaust due to an enhanced coupling to the pumping systems, increased outward transport and a reduced fueling efficiency for the helium injected and recycling from the wall elements.

  20. Helium Speech: An Application of Standing Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wentworth, Christopher D.

    2011-04-01

    Taking a breath of helium gas and then speaking or singing to the class is a favorite demonstration for an introductory physics course, as it usually elicits appreciative laughter, which serves to energize the class session. Students will usually report that the helium speech "raises the frequency" of the voice. A more accurate description of the phenomenon requires that we distinguish between the frequencies of sound produced by the larynx and the filtering of those frequencies by the vocal tract. We will describe here an experiment done by introductory physics students that uses helium speech as a context for learning about the human vocal system and as an application of the standing sound-wave concept. Modern acoustic analysis software easily obtained by instructors for student use allows data to be obtained and analyzed quickly.

  1. Quantum Halo States in Helium Tetramers.

    PubMed

    Stipanović, Petar; Vranješ Markić, Leandra; Boronat, Jordi

    2017-01-12

    The universality of quantum halo states enables a comparison of systems from different fields of physics, as demonstrated in two- and three-body clusters. In the present work, we studied weakly bound helium tetramers in order to test whether some of these four-body realistic systems qualify as halos. Their ground-state binding energies and structural properties were thoroughly estimated using the diffusion Monte Carlo method with pure estimators. Helium tetramer properties proved to be less sensitive on the potential model than previously evaluated trimer properties. We predict the existence of realistic four-body halo (4)He2(3)He2, whereas (4)He4 and (4)He3(3)He are close to the border and thus can be used as prototypes of quasi-halo systems. Our results could be tested by the experimental determination of the tetramers' structural properties using a setup similar to the one developed for the study of helium trimers.

  2. Helium corona-assisted air discharge

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang Nan; Gao Lei; Ji Ailing; Cao Zexian

    2011-10-15

    Operation of atmospheric discharge of electronegative gases including air at low voltages yet without consuming any inert gas will enormously promote the application of non-thermal plasmas. By taking advantage of the low onset voltage for helium corona, air discharge was successfully launched at much reduced voltages with a needle-plate system partly contained in a helium-filled glass bulb--for a needle-plate distance of 12 mm, 1.0 kV suffices. Ultraviolet emission from helium corona facilitates the discharging of air, and the discharge current manifests distinct features such as relatively broad Trichel pulses in both half periods. This design allows safe and economic implementation of atmospheric discharge of electronegative gases, which will find a broad palette of applications in surface modification, plasma medicine and gas treatment, etc.

  3. Thermodynamic properties of hydrogen-helium plasmas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nelson, H. F.

    1971-01-01

    The thermodynamic properties of an atomic hydrogen-helium plasma are calculated and tabulated for temperatures from 10,000 to 100,000 K as a function of the mass fraction ratio of atomic hydrogen. The tabulation is for densities from 10 to the minus 10th power to 10 to the minus 6th power gm/cu cm and for hydrogen mass fraction ratios of 0, 0.333, 0.600, 0.800, and 1.0, which correspond to pure helium, 50 percent hydrogen per unit volume, 75 percent hydrogen per unit volume, 89 percent hydrogen per unit volume, and pure hydrogen plasmas, respectively. From an appended computer program, calculations can be made at other densities and mass fractions. The program output agrees well with previous thermodynamic property calculations for limiting cases of pure hydrogen and pure helium plasmas.

  4. Laser spectroscopic measurement of helium isotope ratios.

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, L.-B.; Mueller, P.; Holt, R. J.; Lu, Z.-T.; O'Connor, T. P.; Sano, Y.; Sturchio, N.; Univ. of Illinois; Univ. of Tokyo; Univ. of Illinois at Chicago

    2003-06-13

    A sensitive laser spectroscopic method has been applied to the quantitative determination of the isotope ratio of helium at the level of {sup 3}He/{sup 4}He = 10{sup -7}--10{sup -5}. The resonant absorption of 1083 nm laser light by the metastable {sup 3}He atoms in a discharge cell was measured with the frequency modulation saturation spectroscopy technique while the abundance of {sup 4}He was measured by a direct absorption technique. The results on three different samples extracted from the atmosphere and commercial helium gas were in good agreement with values obtained with mass spectrometry. The achieved 3{sigma} detection limit of {sup 3}He in helium is 4 x 10{sup -9}. This demonstration required a 200 {mu}L STP sample of He. The sensitivity can be further improved, and the required sample size reduced, by several orders of magnitude with the addition of cavity enhanced spectroscopy.

  5. Superfluid helium-4 in one dimensional channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Duk Y.; Banavar, Samhita; Chan, Moses H. W.; Hayes, John; Sazio, Pier

    2013-03-01

    Superfluidity, as superconductivity, cannot exist in a strict one-dimensional system. However, the experiments employing porous media showed that superfluid helium can flow through the pores of nanometer size. Here we report a study of the flow of liquid helium through a single hollow glass fiber of 4 cm in length with an open id of 150 nm between 1.6 and 2.3 K. We found the superfluid transition temperature was suppressed in the hollow cylinder and that there is no flow above the transition. Critical velocity at temperature below the transition temperature was determined. Our results bear some similarity to that found by Savard et. al. studying the flow of helium through a nanohole in a silicon nitrite membrane. Experimental study at Penn State is supported by NSF Grants No. DMR 1103159.

  6. Dynamics of the Galapagos hotspot from helium isotope geochemistry

    SciTech Connect

    Kurz, M.D.; Geist, D.

    1999-12-01

    The authors have measured the isotopes of He, Sr, Nd and Pb in a number of lava flows from the Galapagos Archipelago; the main goal is to use magmatic helium as a tracer of plume influence in the western volcanoes. Because the Galapagos lava flows are so well preserved, it is also possible to measure surface exposure ages using in situ cosmic-ray-produced {sup 3}He. The exposure ages range from {lt}0.1 to 580 Ka, are consistent with other chronological constrains, and provide the first direct dating of these lava flows. The new age data demonstrate the utility of the technique in this important age range and show that the western Galapagos volcanoes have been erupting distance compositions simultaneously for the last {approximately}10 Ka. The magmatic {sup 3}He/{sup 4}He ratios range from 6.0 to 27 times atmospheric (R{sub a}), with the highest values found on the islands of Isabella (16.8 R{sub a} for Vulcan Sierra Negra) and Fernandina (23 to 27 R{sub a}). Values from Santa Cruz are close to typical mid-ocean ridge basalt values (MORB, of {approximately}9 R{sub 2}) and Pinta has a {sup 3}He/{sup 4}He ratio lower than MORB (6.9 R{sub a}). These data confirm that the plume is centered beneath Fernandina which is the most active volcano in the archipelago and is at the leading edge of plate motion. The data are consistent with previous isotopic studies, confirming extensive contributions from depleted asthenospheric or lithospheric mantle sources, especially to the central islands. The most striking aspect of the helium isotopic data is that the {sup 3}He/{sup 4}He ratios decrease systematically in all directions from Fernandina. This spatial variability is assumed to reflect the contribution of the purest plume component to Fernandina magmatism, and shows that helium is a sensitive indicator of plume influence. The highest {sup 3}He/{sup 4}He ratios are found in volcanoes with lowest Na{sub 2}O(8) and FeO(8), which may relate to source composition as well as degree

  7. Helium-neon laser irradiation stimulates migration and proliferation in melanocytes and induces repigmentation in segmental-type vitiligo.

    PubMed

    Yu, Hsin-Su; Wu, Chieh-Shan; Yu, Chia-Li; Kao, Ying-Hsien; Chiou, Min-Hsi

    2003-01-01

    Low-energy helium-neon lasers (632.8 nm) have been employed in a variety of clinical treatments including vitiligo management. Light-mediated reaction to low-energy laser irradiation is referred to as biostimulation rather than a thermal effect. This study sought to determine the theoretical basis and clinical evidence for the effectiveness of helium-neon lasers in treating vitiligo. Cultured keratinocytes and fibroblasts were irradiated with 0.5-1.5 J per cm2 helium-neon laser radiation. The effects of the helium-neon laser on melanocyte growth and proliferation were investigated. The results of this in vitro study revealed a significant increase in basic fibroblast growth factor release from both keratinocytes and fibroblasts and a significant increase in nerve growth factor release from keratinocytes. Medium from helium-neon laser irradiated keratinocytes stimulated [3H]thymidine uptake and proliferation of cultured melanocytes. Furthermore, melanocyte migration was enhanced either directly by helium-neon laser irradiation or indirectly by the medium derived from helium-neon laser treated keratinocytes. Thirty patients with segmental-type vitiligo on the head and/or neck were enrolled in this study. Helium-neon laser light was administered locally at 3.0 J per cm2 with point stimulation once or twice weekly. The percentage of repigmented area was used for clinical evaluation of effectiveness. After an average of 16 treatment sessions, initial repigmentation was noticed. Marked repigmentation (>50%) was observed in 60% of patients with successive treatments. Basic fibroblast growth factor is a putative melanocyte growth factor, whereas nerve growth factor is a paracrine factor for melanocyte survival in the skin. Both nerve growth factor and basic fibroblast growth factor stimulate melanocyte migration. It is reasonable to propose that helium-neon laser irradiation clearly stimulates melanocyte migration and proliferation and mitogen release for melanocyte growth

  8. Pharmaceutical container/closure integrity. III: Validation of the helium leak rate method for rigid pharmaceutical containers.

    PubMed

    Kirsch, L E; Nguyen, L; Gerth, R

    1997-01-01

    Validation of a helium leak rate method for pharmaceutical container/closure integrity quality assurance required the demonstration that this physical testing method was as good or better than microbial immersion challenge testing in detecting potential integrity failures. One lot of rubber-stoppered, broth-filled glass vials also containing defective vials with known leaks were subjected to both helium leak rate and microbial challenge testing. The defective vials were prepared by affixing glass micropipettes (0.1 to 10 microns) into the vial side walls. The validation lot included a 10% seeded defect rate of which about 50% contained leaks with a predicted probability of failing a microbial challenge (> 10%). Helium tracer was placed in the test units by charging them for 4 hours under a 40 psi helium pressure. The critical leak rate after charging was determined to be 10(-7) standard cc/second, and test units with measured leak rates greater than this value were considered helium leak rate failures. Microbial immersion challenge was conducted by exposing the test units in a bath inoculated with 10(9-10) viable E. coli and B. diminuta organisms for 24 hours followed by a 13 day (35 degrees C) incubation. Microbial failures were determined visually. The helium and microbial leak test methods were compared statistically using mean failure rates. The mean helium failure rate was 6.9%, whereas the mean microbial failure rate was 2.8%. The difference between helium and microbial failure rates was significantly greater than zero. Thus, helium leak rate testing was demonstrated to be a suitable pharmaceutical container/closure integrity method for microbial quality assurance of rigid containers.

  9. Development of a Helium/Carbon Dioxide/Hydrogen Sensor System for SCUBA.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-08-16

    mixed gas mixture (10.4% oxygen and balance helium) over an 8-hour measurement period. 4) The helium sensor is non -specific. Because it is built on the...i.e., non -porous) polymeric membrane serving as a CO2 diffusion barrier. 3.2.1 Sensor Construction The construction and the basic monitoring circuitry...reduction. The choice of porous gold-black as the anode material in the present pCO2 sensor was 39 largely due to non -availability of other more suitable

  10. Pump performance requirement for the liquid helium orbital resupply tanker

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, J. H.; Ng, Y. S.

    1988-01-01

    The Liquid Helium Orbital Resupply Tanker (currently renamed to Superfluid Helium Tanker) will greatly enhance the lifetime of the space missions which require superfluid helium. The Superfluid Helium Tanker pump performance requirement is driven by the superfluid helium replenishment needs of the Space Infrared Telescope Facility (SIRTF). SIRTF is one of the space missions which will require on-orbit superfluid helium resupply in the 1990s. The Superfluid Helium Tanker will carry at least 10,000 L of superfluid helium and provide a minimum pump head of 170 torr (0 to 200 L/h) to cool SIRTF from 150 to 2 K. When the SIRTF tank starts to collect liquid, a minimum flow rate of 300 L/h with a pump head of 60 torr is required to fill the 4000-liter tank.

  11. 5. INTERIOR, LOOKING PAST HELIUM COMPRESSORS NO. 3 AND NO. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. INTERIOR, LOOKING PAST HELIUM COMPRESSORS NO. 3 AND NO. 2, TO NORTHEAST FRONT. - Edwards Air Force Base, Air Force Rocket Propulsion Laboratory, Helium Compression Plant, Test Area 1-115, intersection of Altair & Saturn Boulevards, Boron, Kern County, CA

  12. 2. SOUTHEAST SIDE. HIGH PRESSURE HELIUM STORAGE TANKS AT LEFT. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. SOUTHEAST SIDE. HIGH PRESSURE HELIUM STORAGE TANKS AT LEFT. - Edwards Air Force Base, Air Force Rocket Propulsion Laboratory, Helium Compression Plant, Test Area 1-115, intersection of Altair & Saturn Boulevards, Boron, Kern County, CA

  13. Helium building no. 2 west and south sides. Looking 70 ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Helium building no. 2 west and south sides. Looking 70 ENE. - Marine Corps Air Station Tustin, Helium Tank Building No. 1, Near intersection of Meffett Avenue & Maxfield Street, Tustin, Orange County, CA

  14. Helium building no. 2 east and north sides. Looking 270 ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Helium building no. 2 east and north sides. Looking 270 W. - Marine Corps Air Station Tustin, Helium Tank Building No. 1, Near intersection of Meffett Avenue & Maxfield Street, Tustin, Orange County, CA

  15. Numerical analysis of temperature stratification in a subatmospheric cold helium line

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fydrych, J.; Pietrowicz, S.

    2017-02-01

    In last decades the technology of superfluid helium has become very advantageous for large-scale scientific facilities dedicated to high-energy physics. Superconducting cavities or magnets are usually immersed in helium baths at a temperature of 1.8 to 2.0 K. This temperature is produced by a JT cycle where the return line works at a subatmospheric pressure of 16 to 31 mbar. The subatmospheric line lengths can reach even several thousand meters. The helium flows in the subatmospheric lines are driven by cold compressors or vacuum pumps. Due to a limited pressure drop requirement the line diameters can exceed even 300 mm. Since the thermal conductivity of the line material is very small and the flow rate at some operation conditions can be much lower than at the normal operating conditions, a thermal stratification in the helium flow can appear together with a significant temperature gradient along the pipe circumference. These phenomena can affect the thermo-hydraulic behaviour of the line as well as the operation of the entire cryogenic system. The paper presents the numerical simulations of cold helium vapour flows in a long straight line. The stratification phenomenon is discussed and the potential temperature gradient in the pipe wall is evaluated.

  16. Helium Shells on Sub-Chandrasekhar White Dwarfs: Ignition and Convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacobs, Adam M.; Zingale, Michael; Nonaka, Andrew; Almgren, Ann; Bell, John

    2015-01-01

    Sub-Chandrasekhar white dwarfs accreting an envelope of helium allow for a range of explosive phenomena that could yield a variety of observable transients. Helium novae, so-called "point" Ia supernovae (.Ia SNe), rapid decline type Ia, and normal type Ia supernovae are all potential outcomes of helium accretion onto sub-Chandrasekhar white dwarfs. In this talk we outline why these systems have received a great deal of scrutiny recently and present our 3D models of convective nuclear burning in the helium envelope. We focus on thin, low-mass envelopes that are the best candidates for yielding normal type Ia supernovae. The envelope is modeled with the low-Mach hydrodynamics code Maestro. Maestro is optimized for modeling sub-sonic convective flow over long timescales while still being able to capture local compressibility effects due to nuclear burning as well as large-scale adjustments of stellar hydrostatic equilibrium. With it we model the convective burning in low-mass helium shells for carbon/oxygen white dwarf cores of 0.8, 1.0, 1.1, and 1.2 solar masses. For a suite of models we characterize the geometry, timing, and thermodynamics of ignition as well as the envelope's convective properties. Finally, we discuss the implications of our results for the viability of these systems as transient progenitors with a focus on normal type Ia supernovae.

  17. The dynamics and helium distribution in hydrogen-helium fluid planets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stevenson, D. J.; Salpeter, E. E.

    1977-01-01

    The simple case of a homogeneous planet without first-order phase transitions is considered and an investigation is conducted concerning a pure hydrogen planet in which a first-order phase transition takes place from fluid molecular hydrogen to fluid metallic hydrogen. Attention is also given to convection in the presence of a compositional gradient, the effects of helium insolubility in a cooling hydrogen-helium planet, a hydrogen-helium planet in its early evolution, and the case in which influence of phase transition occurs much later in the evolution of the planet.

  18. Neutron-scattering investigation of the excitation spectrum of liquid helium

    SciTech Connect

    Kalinin, I. V. Lauter, H.; Puchkov, A. V.

    2007-07-15

    The results of the investigation of the temperature evolution of the scattering law S(Q, {omega}) of superfluid helium measured in the wave-vector range 0.3 < Q < 0.8 A{sup -1} and helium temperatures from 1.0 to 2.2 K are reported. The investigations have been performed on the high-flux reactor at the Institut Laue-Langevin (France) with the IN6 neutron inelastic-scattering spectrometer. The deviation of the experimental scattering law of liquid helium from the damping harmonic oscillator model, which was previously observed independently in the experiments with the IN6 spectrometer and with the DIN-2PI spectrometer (at the IBR-2 reactor, Dubna, Russia) and were more recently called extrapeak, has been corroborated. The temperature dependence of the extrapeak parameters has been determined. This dependence makes it possible to propose hypotheses on the nature of the extrapeak.

  19. Density decrease in vanadium-base alloys irradiated in the dynamic helium charging experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Chung, H.M.; Galvin, T.M.; Smith, D.L.

    1996-04-01

    Combined effects of dynamically charged helium and neutron damage on density decrease (swelling) of V-4Cr-4Ti, V-5Ti, V-3Ti-1Si, and V-8Cr-6Ti alloys have been determined after irradiation to 18-31 dpa at 425-600{degrees}C in the Dynamic helium Charging Experiment (DHCE). To ensure better accuracy in density measurement, broken pieces of tensile specimens {approx} 10 times heavier than a transmission electron microscopy (TEM) disk were used. Density increases of the four alloys irradiated in the DHCE were <0.5%. This small change seems to be consistent with the negligible number density of microcavities characterized by TEM. Most of the dynamically produced helium atoms seem to have been trapped in the grain matrix without significant cavity nucleation or growth.

  20. Optimization of Helium Vessel Design for ILC Cavities

    SciTech Connect

    Fratangelo, Enrico

    2009-01-01

    The ILC (International Linear Collider) is a proposed new major particle accelerator. It consists of two 20 km long linear accelerators colliding electrons and positrons at an energy exceeding 500 GeV, Achieving this collision energy while keeping reasonable accelerator dimensions requires the use of high electric field superconducting cavities as the main acceleration element. These cavities are operated at l.3 GHz inside an appropriate container (He vessel) at temperatures as low as 1.4 K using superfluid Helium as the refrigerating medium. The purpose of this thesis, in the context of the ILC R&D activities currently in progress at Fermilab (Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory), is the mechanical study of an ILC superconducting cavity and Helium vessel prototype. The main goals of these studies are the determination of the limiting working conditions of the whole He vessel assembly, the simulation of the manufacturing process of the cavity end-caps and the assessment of the Helium vessel's efficiency. In addition this thesis studies the requirements to certify the compliance with the ASME Code of the whole cavity/vessel assembly. Several Finite Elements Analyses were performed by the candidate himself in order to perform the studies listed above and described in detail in Chapters 4 through 8. ln particular the candidate has developed an improved procedure to obtain more accurate results with lower computational times. These procedures will be accurately described in the following chapters. After an introduction that briefly describes the Fennilab and in particular the Technical Division (where all the activities concerning with this thesis were developed), the first part of this thesis (Chapters 2 and 3) explains some of the main aspects of modem particle accelerators. Moreover it describes the most important particle accelerators working at the moment and the basic features of the ILC project. Chapter 4 describes all the activities that were done to certify

  1. THE VISCOSITY OF HELIUM-CESIUM MIXTURES,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    The viscosities of helium-cesium mixtures having mole fractions of cesium from zero to unity were evaluated using a Lennard - Jones 6-12 interaction potential for all encounters in the Enskog Chapman expressions for the viscosity of a binary mixture. (Author)

  2. Electrons on helium — The ``polaron'' transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrei, E. Y.; Grimes, C. C.; Adams, G.

    1984-07-01

    We describe the observation of the polaronic transition of a system of electrons supported above a helium film. The electron mobility drops sharply by more than four orders of magnitude as the film thickness is reduced below ≈ 1000 Å. The transition was observed in the temperature range 0.4 ⩽ T ⩽ 1 K.

  3. Excitation of helium ion by positron impact

    SciTech Connect

    Khan, P.; Ghosh, A.S.

    1986-01-01

    Three (1s,2s,2p) and five (1s,2s,2p,3s-bar,3p-bar) -state close-coupling methods have been employed to calculate the n = 2 excitation cross sections of helium ion by positron impact. The effect of pseudostate is found to be very pronounced in the case of 1s-2s excitation.

  4. The Weakest Link: Bonding between Helium Atoms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lohr, Lawrence L.; Blinder, S. M.

    2007-01-01

    A highly simplified model for helium dimers that reproduces their essential features without the need for elaborate computation is presented. The He-He potential is predicted to have minimum of 10.9 K at a nuclear separation of 5.61 bohrs.

  5. 30 CFR 256.11 - Helium.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Helium. 256.11 Section 256.11 Mineral Resources BUREAU OF OCEAN ENERGY MANAGEMENT, REGULATION, AND ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR OFFSHORE LEASING OF SULPHUR OR OIL AND GAS IN THE OUTER CONTINENTAL SHELF Outer Continental Shelf Oil, Gas,...

  6. Thermal flickers: A semianalytical approach. [helium stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perdang, J.; Buchler, J. R.

    1980-01-01

    In order to enhance physical insight into the nature of thermal oscillations arising from a thin helium burning shell, the behavior in its phase plane of a simple two zone model which, however, contains all the relevant physics is analyzed. This simple model very naturally reproduces thermal flickers and is relatively insensitive to all but two parameters.

  7. Atmospheric helium and geomagnetic field reversals.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sheldon, W. R.; Kern, J. W.

    1972-01-01

    The problem of the earth's helium budget is examined in the light of recent work on the interaction of the solar wind with nonmagnetic planets. It is proposed that the dominant mode of helium (He4) loss is ion pumping by the solar wind during geomagnetic field reversals, when the earth's magnetic field is very small. The interaction of the solar wind with the earth's upper atmosphere during such a period is found to involve the formation of a bow shock. The penetration altitude of the shock-heated solar plasma is calculated to be about 700 km, and ionization rates above this level are estimated for a cascade ionization (electron avalanche) process to average 10 to the 9th power ions/sq cm/sec. The calculated ionization rates and the capacity of the solar wind to remove ionized helium (He4) from the upper atmosphere during geomagnetic dipole reversals are sufficient to yield a secular equilibrium over geologic time scales. The upward transport of helium from the lower atmosphere under these conditions is found to be adequate to sustain the proposed loss rate.

  8. 30 CFR 556.11 - Helium.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... BUREAU OF OCEAN ENERGY MANAGEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR OFFSHORE LEASING OF SULPHUR OR OIL AND GAS IN THE OUTER CONTINENTAL SHELF Outer Continental Shelf Oil, Gas, and Sulphur Management, General... helium from all gas produced from the leased area. (b) In case the United States elects to take...

  9. 30 CFR 556.11 - Helium.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... BUREAU OF OCEAN ENERGY MANAGEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR OFFSHORE LEASING OF SULPHUR OR OIL AND GAS IN THE OUTER CONTINENTAL SHELF Outer Continental Shelf Oil, Gas, and Sulphur Management, General... helium from all gas produced from the leased area. (b) In case the United States elects to take...

  10. 30 CFR 556.11 - Helium.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... BUREAU OF OCEAN ENERGY MANAGEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR OFFSHORE LEASING OF SULPHUR OR OIL AND GAS IN THE OUTER CONTINENTAL SHELF Outer Continental Shelf Oil, Gas, and Sulphur Management, General... helium from all gas produced from the leased area. (b) In case the United States elects to take...

  11. Helium and Sulfur Hexafluoride in Musical Instruments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Forinash, Kyle; Dixon, Cory L.

    2014-01-01

    The effects of inhaled helium on the human voice were investigated in a recent article in "The Physics Teacher." As mentioned in that article, demonstrations of the effect are a popular classroom activity. If the number of YouTube videos is any indication, the effects of sulfur hexafluoride on the human voice are equally popular.…

  12. 43 CFR 3195.24 - What must I do before contacting a non-Federal helium supplier for my helium needs?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...-Federal helium supplier for my helium needs? 3195.24 Section 3195.24 Public Lands: Interior Regulations... MANAGEMENT (3000) HELIUM CONTRACTS Federal Agency Requirements § 3195.24 What must I do before contacting a non-Federal helium supplier for my helium needs? You must make an initial determination about...

  13. 43 CFR 3195.24 - What must I do before contacting a non-Federal helium supplier for my helium needs?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...-Federal helium supplier for my helium needs? 3195.24 Section 3195.24 Public Lands: Interior Regulations... MANAGEMENT (3000) HELIUM CONTRACTS Federal Agency Requirements § 3195.24 What must I do before contacting a non-Federal helium supplier for my helium needs? You must make an initial determination about...

  14. 43 CFR 3195.24 - What must I do before contacting a non-Federal helium supplier for my helium needs?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...-Federal helium supplier for my helium needs? 3195.24 Section 3195.24 Public Lands: Interior Regulations... MANAGEMENT (3000) HELIUM CONTRACTS Federal Agency Requirements § 3195.24 What must I do before contacting a non-Federal helium supplier for my helium needs? You must make an initial determination about...

  15. 43 CFR 3195.24 - What must I do before contacting a non-Federal helium supplier for my helium needs?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...-Federal helium supplier for my helium needs? 3195.24 Section 3195.24 Public Lands: Interior Regulations... MANAGEMENT (3000) HELIUM CONTRACTS Federal Agency Requirements § 3195.24 What must I do before contacting a non-Federal helium supplier for my helium needs? You must make an initial determination about...

  16. An Assessment of Helium Evolution from Helium-Saturated Propellant Depressurization in Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, Bich N.; Best, Frederick; Wong, Tony; Kurwitz, Cable; McConnaughey, H. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Helium evolution from the transfer of helium-saturated propellant in space is quantified to assess its impacts from creating two-phase gas/liquid flow from the supply tank, gas injection into the receiving tank, and liquid discharge from the receiving tank. Propellant transfer takes place between two similar tanks whose maximum storage capacity is approximately 2.55 cubic meters each. The maximum on-orbit propellants transfer capability is 9000 lbm (fuel and oxidizer). The transfer line is approximately 1.27 cm in diameter and 6096 cm in length and comprised of the fluid interconnect system (FICS), the orbiter propellant transfer system (OPTS), and the International Space Station (ISS) propulsion module (ISSPM). The propellant transfer rate begins at approximately 11 liter per minute (lpm) and subsequently drops to approximately 0.5 lpm. The tank nominal operating pressure is approximately 1827 kPa (absolute). The line pressure drops for Monomethy1hydrazine (MMH) and Nitrogen tetroxide (NTO) at 11.3 lpm are approximately 202 kPa and 302 kPa, respectively. The pressure-drop results are based on a single-phase flow. The receiving tank is required to vent from approximately 1827 kPa to a lower pressure to affect propellant transfer. These pressure-drop scenarios cause the helium-saturated propellants to release excess helium. For tank ullage venting, the maximum volumes of helium evolved at tank pressure are approximately 0.5 ft3 for MMH and 2 ft3 for NTO. In microgravity environment, due to lack of body force, the helium evolution from a liquid body acts to propel it, which influences its fluid dynamics. For propellant transfer, the volume fractions of helium evolved at line pressure are 0.1% by volume for MMH and 0.6 % by volume for NTO at 11.3 lpm. The void fraction of helium evolved varies as an approximate second order power function of flow rate.

  17. Helium induced fine structure in the electronic spectra of anthracene derivatives doped into superfluid helium nanodroplets

    SciTech Connect

    Pentlehner, D.; Slenczka, A.

    2015-01-07

    Electronic spectra of organic molecules doped into superfluid helium nanodroplets show characteristic features induced by the helium environment. Besides a solvent induced shift of the electronic transition frequency, in many cases, a spectral fine structure can be resolved for electronic and vibronic transitions which goes beyond the expected feature of a zero phonon line accompanied by a phonon wing as known from matrix isolation spectroscopy. The spectral shape of the zero phonon line and the helium induced phonon wing depends strongly on the dopant species. Phonon wings, for example, are reported ranging from single or multiple sharp transitions to broad (Δν > 100 cm{sup −1}) diffuse signals. Despite the large number of example spectra in the literature, a quantitative understanding of the helium induced fine structure of the zero phonon line and the phonon wing is missing. Our approach is a systematic investigation of related molecular compounds, which may help to shed light on this key feature of microsolvation in superfluid helium droplets. This paper is part of a comparative study of the helium induced fine structure observed in electronic spectra of anthracene derivatives with particular emphasis on a spectrally sharp multiplet splitting at the electronic origin. In addition to previously discussed species, 9-cyanoanthracene and 9-chloroanthracene will be presented in this study for the first time.

  18. Evaluation of helium cooling for fusion divertors

    SciTech Connect

    Baxi, C.B.

    1993-09-01

    The divertors of future fusion reactors will have a power throughput of several hundred MW. The peak heat flux on the diverter surface is estimated to be 5 to 15 MW/m{sup 2} at an average heat flux of 2 MW/m{sup 2}. The divertors have a requirement of both minimum temperature (100{degrees}C) and maximum temperature. The minimum temperature is dictated by the requirement to reduce the absorption of plasma, and the maximum temperature is determined by the thermo-mechanical properties of the plasma facing materials. Coolants that have been considered for fusion reactors are water, liquid metals and helium. Helium cooling has been shown to be very attractive from safety and other considerations. Helium is chemically and neutronically inert and is suitable for power conversion. The challenges associated with helium cooling are: (1) Manifold sizes; (2) Pumping power; and (3) Leak prevention. In this paper the first two of the above design issues are addressed. A variety of heat transfer enhancement techniques are considered to demonstrate that the manifold sizes and the pumping power can be reduced to acceptable levels. A helium-cooled diverter module was designed and fabricated by GA for steady-state heat flux of 10 MW/m{sup 2}. This module was recently tested at Sandia National Laboratories. At an inlet pressure of 4 MPa, the module was tested at a steady-state heat flux of 10 MW/m{sup 2}. The pumping power required was less than 1% of the power removed. These results verified the design prediction.

  19. Survey of helium in soil gases of Long Valley, Califorina

    SciTech Connect

    Hinkle, M.E.; Kilburn, J.E.

    1980-01-01

    Soil and water samples in and around the Long Valley geothermal area, Mono County, California, were collected and analyzed for helium by means of a modified mass spectrometer leak detector to see what relationship helium concentrations might have to geothermal features of the area, and to previously studied mercury anomalies in the area. Anomalously high concentrations of helium occurred over part of a major Sierra Nevada frontal fault and over other faults outside of the caldera. Anomalously low concentrations of helium occurred in several areas of high mercury concentrations, which were also areas of hydrothermal alteration. Quantities of helium exsolved from water samples did not fit any pattern.

  20. Method to control the amount of helium during leak testing

    SciTech Connect

    Frank E. Jurvic, Jr.

    2002-03-29

    The purpose of this paper is to demonstrate a method for limiting the amount of helium administered during leak testing and provide a method for keeping the atmospheric helium in a location to a minimum to eliminate backstreaming into the system. This method utilizes the permeability of a balloon. The transporting of helium to the leak check area is also safer by not requiring a cylinder in the leak check location. Utilizing the many shapes of balloons and partially filling of the balloon, any configuration can deliver helium to the leak location. The balloon I filled for the test fell to the floor with the amount of helium I put into the balloon.

  1. Two-color magneto-optical trap for metastable helium

    SciTech Connect

    Tychkov, A.S.; Koelemeij, J.C.J.; Jeltes, T.; Hogervorst, W.; Vassen, W.

    2004-05-01

    We describe a powerful scheme which combines laser cooling on two transitions of metastable helium to obtain a high phase-space density. By running a sequence of a large 1083 nm magneto-optical trap (MOT) and a compressed 389 nm MOT, a density increase of more than one order of magnitude is achieved within 5 ms. After compression, 8x10{sup 8} atoms at a central density of 5x10{sup 10} cm{sup -3} remain, while the temperature of the cloud has been reduced from 1 mK to 0.4 mK. The resulting phase-space density (4.1x10{sup -6}) is more than one order of magnitude higher than what we achieved by 1083 nm laser cooling only.

  2. Molecular dynamics study of helium bubble pressure in tungsten

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, Jiechao; Li, Min; Wang, Jun; Hou, Qing

    2015-06-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations were performed to calculate the stress field in a tungsten matrix containing a nano-scale helium bubble. A helium bubble in tungsten is found to consist of a core and an interface of finite thickness of approximately 0.6 nm. The core contains only helium atoms that are uniformly distributed. The interface is composed of both helium and tungsten atoms. In the periphery region of the helium bubble, the stress filed is found to follow the stress formula based on the elasticity theory of solid. The pressure difference between both sides of the interface can be well described by the Young-Laplace equation for the core size of a helium bubble as small as 0.48 nm. A comparison was performed between the pressure in the helium bubble core and the pressure in pure helium. For a core size larger than 0.3 nm, the pressure in the core of a helium bubble is in good agreement with the pressure in pure helium of the same helium density. These results provide guidance to larger scale simulation methods, such as in kinetic Monte Carlo methods and rate theory.

  3. Review of Membranes for Helium Separation and Purification.

    PubMed

    Scholes, Colin A; Ghosh, Ujjal K

    2017-02-17

    Membrane gas separation has potential for the recovery and purification of helium, because the majority of membranes have selectivity for helium. This review reports on the current state of the research and patent literature for membranes undertaking helium separation. This includes direct recovery from natural gas, as an ancillary stage in natural gas processing, as well as niche applications where helium recycling has potential. A review of the available polymeric and inorganic membranes for helium separation is provided. Commercial gas separation membranes in comparable gas industries are discussed in terms of their potential in helium separation. Also presented are the various membrane process designs patented for the recovery and purification of helium from various sources, as these demonstrate that it is viable to separate helium through currently available polymeric membranes. This review places a particular focus on those processes where membranes are combined in series with another separation technology, commonly pressure swing adsorption. These combined processes have the most potential for membranes to produce a high purity helium product. The review demonstrates that membrane gas separation is technically feasible for helium recovery and purification, though membranes are currently only applied in niche applications focused on reusing helium rather than separation from natural sources.

  4. Review of Membranes for Helium Separation and Purification

    PubMed Central

    Scholes, Colin A.; Ghosh, Ujjal K.

    2017-01-01

    Membrane gas separation has potential for the recovery and purification of helium, because the majority of membranes have selectivity for helium. This review reports on the current state of the research and patent literature for membranes undertaking helium separation. This includes direct recovery from natural gas, as an ancillary stage in natural gas processing, as well as niche applications where helium recycling has potential. A review of the available polymeric and inorganic membranes for helium separation is provided. Commercial gas separation membranes in comparable gas industries are discussed in terms of their potential in helium separation. Also presented are the various membrane process designs patented for the recovery and purification of helium from various sources, as these demonstrate that it is viable to separate helium through currently available polymeric membranes. This review places a particular focus on those processes where membranes are combined in series with another separation technology, commonly pressure swing adsorption. These combined processes have the most potential for membranes to produce a high purity helium product. The review demonstrates that membrane gas separation is technically feasible for helium recovery and purification, though membranes are currently only applied in niche applications focused on reusing helium rather than separation from natural sources. PMID:28218644

  5. Helium Accumulation Behavior in Iron Based Model Alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Sugano, R.; Morishita, K.; Kimura, A.

    2003-09-15

    Helium desorption from Fe-based model alloys irradiated by energetic helium ions was measured during post-irradiation annealing to investigate the energetics and kinetics of formation and annihilation of helium-related defects. Desorption temperatures were observed to be widely ranged from 450 to 1500 K, indicating that helium is bound to a wide variety of trapping sites such as vacancies and dislocations at various binding states. Such a feature is also observed in fusion ferritic steel. A comparison of helium desorption spectra obtained using Fe, Fe-Cr and Fe-Cr-Ni alloys showed that helium is more strongly trapped in bcc Fe than fcc Fe. It indicates that the long distance migration of helium takes place less frequently in bcc matrix, which may reduce the probability of helium clustering. Fusion ferric steel has a lot of trapping sites for helium such as dislocations, solute atoms, the interface of precipitates, impurities and lath boundaries, and so on, and in addition, it has bct matrix, indicating that most of helium atoms must be dispersed in the matrix and therefore it is difficult for them to cluster as a bubble. This may be a reason for higher helium resistance of the steel.

  6. Helium-3 from the mantle - Primordial signal or cosmic dust?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, Don L.

    1993-01-01

    Helium-3 in hotspot magmas has been used as unambiguous evidence for the existence of a primordial, undegassed reservoir deep in the Earth's mantle. However, a large amount of helium-3 is delivered to the Earth's surface by interplanetary dust particles (IDPs). Recycling of deep-sea sediments containing these particles to the mantle, and eventual incorporation in magma, can explain the high helium-3/helium-4 ratios of hotspot magmas. Basalts with high helium-3/helium-4 ratios may represent degassing of helium introduced by ancient (probably 1.5 to 2.0 billion years old) pelagic sediments rather than degassing of primordial lower mantle material brought to the surface in plumes. Influx of IDPs can also explain the neon and siderophile compositions of mantle samples.

  7. A superfluid helium system for an LST IR experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Breckenridge, R. W., Jr.; Moore, R. W., Jr.

    1975-01-01

    The results are presented of a study program directed toward evaluating the problems associated with cooling an LST instrument to 2 K for a year by using superfluid helium as the cooling means. The results include the parametric analysis of systems using helium only, and systems using helium plus a shield cryogen. A baseline system, using helium only is described. The baseline system is sized for an instrument heat leak of 50 mw. It contains 71 Kg of superfluid helium and has a total, filled weight of 217 Kg. A brief assessment of the technical problems associated with a long life, spaceborne superfluid helium storage system is also made. It is concluded that a one year life, superfluid helium cooling system is feasible, pending experimental verification of a suitable low g vent system.

  8. Ignition and extinction phenomena in helium micro hollow cathode discharges

    SciTech Connect

    Kulsreshath, M. K.; Schwaederle, L.; Dufour, T.; Lefaucheux, P.; Dussart, R.; Overzet, L. J.

    2013-12-28

    Micro hollow cathode discharges (MHCD) were produced using 250 μm thick dielectric layer of alumina sandwiched between two nickel electrodes of 8 μm thickness. A through cavity at the center of the chip was formed by laser drilling technique. MHCD with a diameter of few hundreds of micrometers allowed us to generate direct current discharges in helium at up to atmospheric pressure. A slowly varying ramped voltage generator was used to study the ignition and the extinction periods of the microdischarges. The analysis was performed by using electrical characterisation of the V-I behaviour and the measurement of He*({sup 3}S{sub 1}) metastable atoms density by tunable diode laser spectroscopy. At the ignition of the microdischarges, 2 μs long current peak as high as 24 mA was observed, sometimes followed by low amplitude damped oscillations. At helium pressure above 400 Torr, an oscillatory behaviour of the discharge current was observed just before the extinction of the microdischarges. The same type of instability in the extinction period at high pressure also appeared on the density of He*({sup 3}S{sub 1}) metastable atoms, but delayed by a few μs relative to the current oscillations. Metastable atoms thus cannot be at the origin of the generation of the observed instabilities.

  9. Helium-neon laser treatment transforms fibroblasts into myofibroblasts.

    PubMed Central

    Pourreau-Schneider, N.; Ahmed, A.; Soudry, M.; Jacquemier, J.; Kopp, F.; Franquin, J. C.; Martin, P. M.

    1990-01-01

    The differentiation of myofibroblastic cells from normal human gingival fibroblasts in vitro has been established by transmission electron microscopy and quantitated by immunohistochemistry, using antigelsolin monoclonal antibodies. Untreated control cultures were compared to cultures exposed to Helium-Neon (He-Ne) laser irradiation. A direct and massive transformation of the cultured fibroblasts into myofibroblasts was observed as early as 24 hours after laser treatment, whereas control cultures were comprised of only resting fibroblasts and active fibroblasts. This in vitro induction of myofibroblasts may be analogous to that which occurs in vivo. Therefore we undertook a similar study using biopsies from gingival tissues after wisdom tooth extraction. Myofibroblasts were present in the connective tissue of laser-treated gums 48 hours after irradiation, but not in untreated contralateral control tissues. These data provide evidence that the primary biologic effect of the Helium-Neon laser on connective tissue is the rapid generation of myofibroblasts from fibroblasts. The induction of a phenotype with contractile properties may have clinical significance in the acceleration of the wound-healing process. Images Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 9 Figure 10 Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 PMID:2372040

  10. Measurement of Helium-3/Helium-4 Ratios in Soil Gas at the 618-11 Burial Ground

    SciTech Connect

    Olsen, Khris B; Dresel, P Evan; Evans, John C

    2001-10-31

    Seventy soil gas-sampling points were installed around the perimeter of the 618-11 Burial Ground, approximately 400 feet downgradient of well 699-13-3A, and in four transects downgradient of the burial ground to a maximum distance of 3,100 feet. Soil gas samples were collected and analyzed for helium-3/helium-4 ratios from these 70 points. Helium-3/helium-4 ratios determined from the soil gas sampling points showed significant enrichments, relative to ambient air helium-3 concentrations. The highest concentrations were located along the northern perimeter of the burial ground. Helium-3/helium-4 ratios (normalized to the abundances in ambient air) ranged from 1.0 to 62 around the burial ground. The helium-3/helium-4 ratios from the 4 transect downgradient of the burial ground ranged from 0.988 to 1.68. The helium-3/helium-4 ratios from around the burial ground suggest there is a vadose zone source of tritium along the north side of the burial ground.

  11. Development and Dissemination of a Nationwide Helium Database for a National Assessment of Helium Resources.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brennan, S. T.; East, J. A., II; Garrity, C. P.

    2015-12-01

    In 2013, Congress passed the Helium Stewardship Act requiring the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) to undertake a national helium gas resource assessment to determine the nation's helium resources. An important initial component necessary to complete this assessment was the development of a comprehensive database of Helium (He) concentrations from petroleum exploration wells. Because Helium is often used as the carrier gas for compositional analyses for commercial and exploratory oil and gas wells, this limits the available helium concentration data. A literature search in peer-reviewed publications, state geologic survey databases, USGS energy geochemical databases, and the Bureau of Land Management databases provided approximately 16,000 data points from wells that had measurable He concentrations in the gas composition analyses. The data from these wells includes, date of sample collection, American Petroleum Institute well number, formation name, field name, depth of sample collection, and location. The gas compositional analyses, some performed as far back as 1934, do not all have the same level of precision and accuracy, therefore the date of the analysis is critical to the assessment as it indicates the relative amount of uncertainty in the analytical results. Non-proprietary data was used to create a GIS based interactive web interface that allows users to visualize, inspect, interact, and download our most current He data. The user can click on individual locations to see the available data at that location, as well as zoom in and out on a data density map. Concentrations on the map range from .04 mol% (lowest concentration of economic value) to 12% (highest naturally occurring values). This visual interface will allow users to develop a rapid appreciation of the areas with the highest potential for high helium concentrations within oil and gas fields.

  12. Electron-helium scattering in Debye plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Zammit, Mark C.; Fursa, Dmitry V.; Bray, Igor; Janev, R. K.

    2011-11-15

    Electron-helium scattering in weakly coupled hot-dense (Debye) plasma has been investigated using the convergent close-coupling method. The Yukawa-type Debye-Hueckel potential has been used to describe plasma Coulomb screening effects. Benchmark results are presented for momentum transfer cross sections, excitation, ionization, and total cross sections for scattering from the ground and metastable states of helium. Calculations cover the entire energy range up to 1000 eV for the no screening case and various Debye lengths (5-100 a{sub 0}). We find that as the screening interaction increases, the excitation and total cross sections decrease, while the total ionization cross sections increase.

  13. Helium-ion-induced human cataractogenesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blakely, E. A.; Daftari, I. K.; Meecham, W. J.; Alonso, L. C.; Collier, J. M.; Kroll, S. M.; Gillette, E. L.; Lee, A. C.; Lett, J. T.; Cox, A. B.

    1994-01-01

    Retrospective and ongoing analyses of clinical records from 347 primary intraocular melanoman patients treated with helium ions at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL) will allow examination of the exposure-response data for human cataract; which is a complication of the therapy from incidental exposure of the lens. Direct particle beam traversal of at least a portion of the lens usually is unavoidable in treatment of posterior intraocular tumors. The precise treatment planned for each patient permits quantitative assessment of the lenticular dose and its radiation quality. We are reporting our preliminary results on the development of helium-ion-induced lens opacifications and cataracts in 54 of these patients who had 10% or less of their lens in the treatment field. We believe these studies will be relevant to estimating the human risk for cataract in space flight.

  14. Quantum model of the Thomson helium atom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kazaryan, E. M.; Shakhnazaryan, V. A.; Sarkisyan, H. A.; Gusev, A. A.

    2014-03-01

    A quantum model of the Thomson helium atom is considered within the framework of stationary perturbation theory. It is shown that from a formal point of view this problem is similar to that of two-electron states in a parabolic quantum dot. The ground state energy of the quantum Thomson helium atom is estimated on the basis of Heisenberg's uncertainty principle. The ground state energies obtained in the first order of perturbation theory and qualitative estimate provide, respectively, upper and lower estimates of eigenvalues derived by numerically solving the problem for a quantum model. The conditions under which the Kohn theorem holds in this system, when the values of resonance absorption frequencies are independent of the Coulomb interaction between electrons, are discussed.

  15. Three Dimensional Particle Tracking in Superfluid Helium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Megson, Peter

    2016-11-01

    Superfluid helium is a macroscopic quantum state which exhibits exotic physical properties, such as flow without friction and ballistic heat transport. Superfluid flow is irrotational except about line-like topological phase defects with quantized circulation, known as quatized vortices. The presence of these vortices and their dynamics is the dominating factor of turbulence in superfluid flows. One commonly studied regime of superfluid turbulence is thermal counterflow, where a local heat flux drives the formation and growth of a tangle of vortices. This talk will present experimental studies of counterflow turbulence performed using a multi-camera three-dimensional imaging apparatus with micron-sized ice tracer particles as well as fluorescent nanoparticles. In particular, we will discuss the measurement of three-dimensional velocties and their autocorrelations. Additionally, we are developing new techniques for optical studies of bulk superfluid helium, with particular focus on characterizing tracer particles and particle dispersal mechanisms. Funding from NSF DMR-1407472.

  16. Particle-Vortex Interaction in Superfluid Helium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barenghi, Carlo F.

    2008-11-01

    The application of the classical Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) technique in liquid helium has opened the way to better visualization of superfluid turbulence. To interpret the data, it is necessary to understand the interaction between micron-size tracer particles and vortex lines. This talk summarizes current understanding of this interaction resulting from theoretical and numerical calculations. In collaboration with Yuri A. Sergeev, Newcastle University.

  17. Correlation of Helium Solubility in Liquid Nitrogen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    VanDresar, Neil T.; Zimmerli, Gregory A.

    2012-01-01

    A correlation has been developed for the equilibrium mole fraction of soluble gaseous helium in liquid nitrogen as a function of temperature and pressure. Experimental solubility data was compiled and provided by National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST). Data from six sources was used to develop a correlation within the range of 0.5 to 9.9 MPa and 72.0 to 119.6 K. The relative standard deviation of the correlation is 6.9 percent.

  18. Helium synthesis, neutrino flavors, and cosmological implications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stecker, F. W.

    1979-01-01

    The problem of the production of helium in big bang cosmology is re-examined in the light of several recent astrophysical observations. These data, and theoretical particle physics considerations, lead to some important inconsistencies in the standard big bang model and suggest that a more complicated picture is needed. Thus, recent constraints on the number of neutrino flavors, as well as constraints on the mean density (openness) of the universe, need not be valid.

  19. Combined cold compressor/ejector helium refrigerator

    DOEpatents

    Brown, Donald P.

    1985-01-01

    A refrigeration apparatus having an ejector operatively connected with a cold compressor to form a two-stage pumping system. This pumping system is used to lower the pressure, and thereby the temperature of a bath of boiling refrigerant (helium). The apparatus as thus arranged and operated has substantially improved operating efficiency when compared to other processes or arrangements for achieving a similar low pressure.

  20. Combined cold compressor/ejector helium refrigerator

    DOEpatents

    Brown, D.P.

    1984-06-05

    A refrigeration apparatus having an ejector operatively connected with a cold compressor to form a two-stage pumping system. This pumping system is used to lower the pressure, and thereby the temperature of a bath of boiling refrigerant (helium). The apparatus as thus arranged and operated has substantially improved operating efficiency when compared to other processes or arrangements for achieving a similar low pressure.

  1. Closed-loop pulsed helium ionization detector

    DOEpatents

    Ramsey, Roswitha S.; Todd, Richard A.

    1987-01-01

    A helium ionization detector for gas chromatography is operated in a constant current, pulse-modulated mode by configuring the detector, electrometer and a high voltage pulser in a closed-loop control system. The detector current is maintained at a fixed level by varying the frequency of fixed-width, high-voltage bias pulses applied to the detector. An output signal proportional to the pulse frequency is produced which is indicative of the charge collected for a detected species.

  2. Tkachenko waves in rotating superfluid helium

    SciTech Connect

    Andereck, C.D.; Chalupa, J.; Glaberson, W.I.

    1980-01-07

    The resonant response of a stack of disks driven into torsional oscillation within a container of rotating superfluid helium has been observed. It is shown that the oscillation modes excited are related to Tkachenko waves, that is, vortex displacement waves in the vortex array propagating in a direction transverse to the vortex lines. In particular, the resonances occur at peaks in the vortex wave density of states.

  3. Magnetic Levitation and Noncoalescence of Liquid Helium

    SciTech Connect

    Weilert, M.; Whitaker, D.; Maris, H.; Seidel, G.

    1996-12-01

    We describe experiments in which drops of liquid helium-4, as large as 2cm in diameter, are magnetically levitated. We have found that, when two or more drops are levitated in the same magnetic trap, the drops often remain in a state of apparent contact without coalescing. It appears that this effect is caused by the slow evaporation of liquid from the drops. {copyright} {ital 1996 The American Physical Society.}

  4. Compact Instruments Measure Helium-Leak Rates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stout, Stephen; Immer, Christopher

    2003-01-01

    Compact, lightweight instruments have been developed for measuring small flows of helium and/or detecting helium leaks in solenoid valves when the valves are nominally closed. These instruments do not impede the flows when the valves are nominally open. They can be integrated into newly fabricated valves or retrofitted to previously fabricated valves. Each instrument includes an upstream and a downstream thermistor separated by a heater, plus associated analog and digital heater-control, signal- conditioning, and data-processing circuits. The thermistors and heater are off-the-shelf surface mount components mounted on a circuit board in the flow path. The operation of the instrument is based on a well-established thermal mass-flow-measurement technique: Convection by the flow that one seeks to measure gives rise to transfer of heat from the heater to the downstream thermistor. The temperature difference measured by the thermistors is directly related to the rate of flow. The calibration curve from temperature gradient to helium flow is closely approximated via fifth-order polynomial. A microprocessor that is part of the electronic circuitry implements the calibration curve to compute the flow rate from the thermistor readings.

  5. Feasibility study for long lifetime helium dewar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parmley, R. T.

    1981-01-01

    A feasible concept for a launchable three year lifetime helium dewar was investigted. Current helium dewar designs were examined to see where the largest potential reductions in parasitic heat loads can be made. The study was also devoted to examining support concepts. The support concept chosen, a passive orbital disconnect strut (PODS), has an orbital support conductance that is lower by more than an order of magnitude over current tension band supports. This lower support conductance cuts the total dewar weight in half for the same three year life time requirements. Effort was also concentrated on efficient wire feed through designs and vapor cooling of the multilayer insulation, supports, wire feed throughs and plumbing penetrations. A single stage helium dewar vs. dual stage dewars with a guard cryogen of nitrogen or neon was examined. The single stage dewar concept was selected. Different support concepts were analyzed from which the PODS support concepts was chosen. A preliminary design of the dewar was thermally and structurally analyzed and laid out including system weights, thermal performance and performance sensitivities.

  6. Surface tension effects in levitated helium drops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vicente, Carlos Luis

    We report our investigations of surface tension driven flows in magnetically levitated 4He drops. By levitating helium drops in a magnetic trap we are able to observe the free surface of drops as they undergo shape oscillations. We also study the dynamics of the free surface during the process of coalescence. Our experimental method allows us to excite shape oscillations in the levitated helium drops and measure their normal mode frequencies. By measuring the frequency of the fundamental (l = 2) mode, we obtain new measurements of the surface tension of helium for temperatures between 1.5 and 0.5 K. Our measurements extrapolate to a value of 0.375 erg cm -2 at T = 0 K. Our results agree with the capillary wave measurements of Roche et al., and Atkins and Narahra. We study how the shape of the trap used to levitate the drops influences the resonant frequency of the l = 2 mode. Measurements of the frequency spectrum were performed using different trap potentials. We have calculated the resonant frequencies for the trap shapes produced by different magnet coil currents. We compare our measurements of the resonant frequencies at various magnet currents with these theoretical predictions and find good agreement. We describe experiments to study the coalescence of He II drops levitated in a magnetic trap. Using a high speed CCD camera, we have produced movies of drops coalescing at temperatures as low as 0.7 K. We examine some interesting features of the motion during and following coalescence.

  7. Helium refrigeration system for hydrogen liquefaction applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nair, J. Kumar, Sr.; Menon, RS; Goyal, M.; Ansari, NA; Chakravarty, A.; Joemon, V.

    2017-02-01

    Liquid hydrogen around 20 K is used as cold moderator for generating “cold neutron beam” in nuclear research reactors. A cryogenic helium refrigeration system is the core upon which such hydrogen liquefaction applications are built. A thermodynamic process based on reversed Brayton cycle with two stage expansion using high speed cryogenic turboexpanders (TEX) along with a pair of compact high effectiveness process heat exchangers (HX), is well suited for such applications. An existing helium refrigeration system, which had earlier demonstrated a refrigeration capacity of 470 W at around 20 K, is modified based on past operational experiences and newer application requirements. Modifications include addition of a new heat exchanger to simulate cryogenic process load and two other heat exchangers for controlling the temperatures of helium streams leading out to the application system. To incorporate these changes, cryogenic piping inside the cold box is suitably modified. This paper presents process simulation, sizing of new heat exchangers as well as fabrication aspects of the modified cryogenic process piping.

  8. Helium-flow measurement using ultrasonic technique

    SciTech Connect

    Sondericker, J.H.

    1983-01-01

    While designing cryogenic instrumentation for the Colliding Beam Accelerator (CBA) helium-distribution system it became clear that accurate measurement of mass flow of helium which varied in temperature from room to sub-cooled conditions would be difficult. Conventional venturi flow meters full scale differential pressure signal would decrease by more than an order of magnitude during cooldown causing unacceptable error at operating temperature. At sub-cooled temperatures, helium would be pumped around cooling loops by an efficient, low head pressure circulating compressor. Additional pressure drop meant more pump work was necessary to compress the fluid resulting in a higher outlet temperature. The ideal mass flowmeter for this application was one which did not add pressure drop to the system, functioned over the entire temperature range, has high resolution and delivers accurate mass flow measurement data. Ultrasonic flow measurement techniques used successfully by the process industry, seemed to meet all the necessary requirements. An extensive search for a supplier of such a device found that none of the commercial stock flowmeters were adaptable to cryogenic service so the development of the instrument was undertaken by the CBA Cryogenic Control and Instrumentation Engineering Group at BNL.

  9. Quantum entanglement in helium-like ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Y.-C.; Ho, Y. K.

    2012-06-01

    Recently, there have been considerable interests to investigate quantum entanglement in two-electron atoms [1-3]. Here we investigate quantum entanglement for the ground and excited states of helium-like ions using correlated wave functions, concentrating on the particle-particle entanglement coming from the continuous spatial degrees of freedom. We use the two-electron wave functions constructed by employing B-spline basis to calculate the linear entropy of the reduced density matrix L=1-TrA(ρA^2 ) as a measure of the spatial entanglement. HereρA=TrB(| >AB AB<|) is the one-electron reduced density matrix obtained after tracing the two-electron density matrix over the degrees of freedom of the other electron. We have investigated the spatial entanglement for the helium-like systems with Z=1 to Z=10. For the helium atoms (Z=2), we have calculated the linear entropy for the ground state and the 1sns ^1S^e (n=2-10) excited states. Results are compared with other calculations [1-3]. [4pt] [1] J. P. Coe and I. D'Amico, J. Phys.: Conf. Ser. 254, 012010 (2010) [0pt] [2] D. Manzano et. al., J. Phys. A: Math. Theor. 43, 275301 (2010) [0pt] [3] J. S. Dehesa et. al., J. Phys. B 45, 015504 (2012)

  10. Development of charcoal sorbents for helium cryopumping

    SciTech Connect

    Sedgley, D.W.; Tobin, A.G.

    1985-09-30

    Improved methods for cryopumping helium were developed for application to fusion reactors where high helium generation rates are expected. This study period evaluated charcoal particle size, bonding agent type and thickness, and substrate thickness. The optimum combination of charcoal, bond, and substrate was used to form a scaled-up panel for evaluation in the Tritium Systems Test Assembly (TSTA) at Los Alamos. The optimum combination is a 12 x 30 mesh coconut charcoal attached to a 0.48 cm thick copper substrate by a 0.015 cm thick silver phosphorus copper braze. A copper cement bond for attaching charcoal to a substrate was identified and tested. Helium pumping performance of this combination was comparable to that of the charcoal braze system. Environmental tests showed the charcoal's susceptibility to vacuum chamber contamination. Performance degradation followed exposure of ambient temperature charcoal to a vacuum for prolonged periods. Maintaining a liquid nitrogen-cooled shield between the charcoal and the source of contamination prevented this degradation. A combination of bake-out and LN shielding effected recovery of degraded performance.

  11. In situ controlled modification of the helium density in single helium-filled nanobubbles

    SciTech Connect

    David, M.-L. Pailloux, F.; Alix, K.; Mauchamp, V.; Pizzagalli, L.; Couillard, M.; Botton, G. A.

    2014-03-28

    We demonstrate that the helium density and corresponding pressure can be modified in single nano-scale bubbles embedded in semiconductors by using the electron beam of a scanning transmission electron microscope as a multifunctional probe: the measurement probe for imaging and chemical analysis and the irradiation source to modify concomitantly the pressure in a controllable way by fine tuning of the electron beam parameters. The control of the detrapping rate is achieved by varying the experimental conditions. The underlying physical mechanisms are discussed; our experimental observations suggest that the helium detrapping from bubbles could be interpreted in terms of direct ballistic collisions, leading to the ejection of the helium atoms from the bubble.

  12. Attainable superheat of argon-helium, argon-neon solutions.

    PubMed

    Baidakov, Vladimir G; Kaverin, Aleksey M; Andbaeva, Valentina N

    2008-10-16

    The method of lifetime measurement has been used to investigate the kinetics of spontaneous boiling-up of superheated argon-helium and argon-neon solutions. Experiments were made at a pressure of p = 1.5 MPa and concentrations up to 0.33 mol% in the range of nucleation rates from 10 (4) to 10 (8) s (-1) m (-3). The homogeneous nucleation regime has been distinguished. With good agreement between experimental data and homogeneous nucleation theory in temperature and concentration dependences of the nucleation rate, a systematic underestimation by 0.25-0.34 K has been revealed in superheat temperatures over the saturated line attained by experiment as compared with theoretical values calculated in a macroscopic approximation. The revealed disagreement between theory and experiment is connected with the dependence of the properties of new-phase nuclei on their size.

  13. Global model including multistep ionizations in helium plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oh, Seung-Ju; Lee, Hyo-Chang; Chung, Chin-Wook

    2016-12-01

    Particle and power balance equations including stepwise ionizations are derived and solved in helium plasmas. In the balance equations, two metastable states (21S1 in singlet and 23S1 triplet) are considered and the followings are obtained. The plasma density linearly increases and the electron temperature is relatively in a constant value against the absorbed power. It is also found that the contribution to multi-step ionization with respect to the single-step ionization is in the range of 8%-23%, as the gas pressure increases from 10 mTorr to 100 mTorr. Compared to the results in the argon plasma, there is little variation in the collisional energy loss per electron-ion pair created (ɛc) with absorbed power and gas pressure due to the small collision cross section and higher inelastic collision threshold energy.

  14. a Measurement of Cross-Sections for Charge Transfer in Proton + Helium ---> Helium Ion + Hydrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brower, Michael Chadbourne

    A microwave-resonance, optical-detection technique is used to measure the cross sections for charge transfer into the n = 3,L,m(,L) states of hydrogen by protons colliding with a helium gas target at energies between 30 and 80 keV. The feeding of the n = 3 states by states in higher n manifolds created by the collisions has been taken into account for the first time in this type of measurement, with a significant effect on the results. The final cross sections are one of only two measurements of the L,m(,L) cross sections in this system, and the only one to be able to resolve the 3d cross sections. The. uncertainties are 10% to 30% of the cross sections at all energies. The results are (UNFORMATTED TABLE FOLLOWS). Energy (keV). 30 50 60 80. (sigma)(,3s). 10('-18)cm('2) 1.6(3) 2.4(5) 2.0(4) 1.4(3). 3s(,0) 1 1 1 1. p(,0) 0.58(8) 0.19(2) 0.18(2) 0.13(1). p(,1) 0.36(6) 0.08(1) 0.04(1) 0.05(1). TOTAL 0.94(10) 0.27(2) 0.22(2) 0.18(1). d(,0) 0.055(10) 0.017(4) 0.019(4) 0.013(3). d(,1) 0.046(7) 0.014(3) 0.014(3) 0.010(2). d(,2) 0.022(4) 0.001(2) -0.002(2) -0.002(2). TOTAL 0.123(12) 0.032(5) 0.031(5) 0.021(4). (TABLE ENDS).

  15. Direct Evidence for an Enhancement of Helium in Giant Stars in Omega Centauri

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dupree, A. K.; Strader, Jay; Smith, Graeme H.

    2011-02-01

    The double main sequence identified in the globular cluster Omega Centauri has been interpreted using isochrones to indicate a large variation in the abundance of helium. If true, a helium enhancement carries strong implications for the chemical and stellar evolutionary history of this cluster. However, only indirect measures currently support this conjecture. We report the discovery of a variation in the line strength of the near-infrared He I 10830 Å transition in 12 similar red giants in Omega Centauri observed with PHOENIX on Gemini-S. Abundances of these stars derived from Magellan/MIKE spectra taken at the Las Campanas Observatory show that the helium transition is not detected in the most metal-poor population ([Fe/H] < -1.8), yet is present in the majority of stars with [Fe/H] >= -1.8. These observations give the first direct evidence for an enhancement of helium in Omega Centauri. The appearance of helium appears better correlated with increased [Al/Fe] and [Na/Fe] abundances than as a function of [Fe/H], giving observational support to the presence of high-temperature H burning in a prior generation of stars. Data presented herein were obtained at the Gemini Observatory, which is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc., under a cooperative agreement with the NSF on behalf of the Gemini partnership: the National Science Foundation (United States), the Science and Technology Facilities Council (United Kingdom), the National Research Council (Canada), CONICYT (Chile), the Australian Research Council (Australia), Ministério da Ciência e Tecnologia (Brazil), and Ministerio de Ciencia, Tecnología e Innovación Productiva (Argentina). This paper also includes spectra gathered with the 6.5 m Magellan Telescope/CLAY located at Las Campanas Observatory, Chile.

  16. Neutron-induced helium implantation in GCFR cladding

    SciTech Connect

    Yamada, H.; Poeppel, R. B.; Sevy, R. H.

    1980-10-01

    The neutron-induced implantation of helium atoms on the exterior surfaces of the cladding of a prototypic gas-cooled fast reactor (GCFR) has been investigated analytically. A flux of recoil helium particles as high as 4.2 x 10/sup 10/ He/cm/sup 2/.s at the cladding surface has been calculated at the peak power location in the core of a 300-MWe GCFR. The calculated profile of the helium implantation rates indicates that although some helium is implanted as deep as 20 ..mu..m, more than 99% of helium particles are implanted in the first 2-..mu..m-deep layer below the cladding surface. Therefore, the implanted helium particles should mainly affect surface properties of the GCFR cladding.

  17. THERMAL UNIFORMITY OF LIQUID HELIUM IN ELECTRON BUBBLE CHAMBER.

    SciTech Connect

    WANG,L.; JIA,L.

    2002-07-22

    A CRYOGENIC RESEARCH APPARATUS TO MEASURE THE MOVEMENT OF ELECTRONS UNDER A HIGH ELECTRIC FIELD IN A LIQUID HELIUM BATH WAS DESIGNED AND BUILT AT THE BROOKHAVEN NATIONAL LABORATORY AND THE NEVIS LABORATORY OF COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY. THE LIQUID HELIUM CHAMBER IS A DOUBLE WALLED CYLINDRICAL CONTAINER EQUIPPED WITH 5 OPTICS WINDOWS AND 10 HIGH VOLTAGE CABLES. TO SHIELD THE LIQUID HELIUM CHAMBER AGAINST THE EXTERNAL HEAT LOADS AND TO PROVIDE THE THERMAL UNIFORMITY IN THE LIQUID HELIUM CHAMBER, THE DOUBLE WALLED JACKET WAS COOLED BY A PUMPED HELIUM BATH. THE HELIUM CHAMBER WAS BUILT INTO A COMMERICAL LN2 / LHE CRYOSTAT. THIS PAPER PRESENTS THE DESIGN AND THE NUMERICAL SIMULATION ANALYSIS ON THERMAL UNIFORMITY OF THE ELECTRON BUBBLE CHAMBER.

  18. Metastable Aluminum Atoms Floating on the Surface of Helium Nanodroplets.

    PubMed

    Jeffs, Jay; Besley, Nicholas A; Stace, Anthony J; Sarma, Gautam; Cunningham, Ethan M; Boatwright, Adrian; Yang, Shengfu; Ellis, Andrew M

    2015-06-12

    Metal atoms have proved to be sensitive probes of the properties of superfluid helium nanodroplets. To date, all experiments on the doping of helium droplets have concentrated on the attachment of metal atoms in their ground electronic states. Here we report the first examples of metal atoms in excited states becoming attached to helium nanodroplets. The atoms in question are aluminum, and they have been generated by laser ablation in a metastable quartet state, which attaches to and remains on the surface of helium droplets. Evidence for a surface location comes from electronic spectra, which consist of very narrow absorption profiles that show very small spectral shifts. Supporting ab initio calculations show there to be an energy incentive for a metastable Al atom to remain on the surface of a helium droplet rather than move to the interior. The results suggest that helium droplets may provide a method for the capture and transport of metastable excited atomic and molecular species.

  19. Dynamics of small mobile helium clusters near tungsten surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Lin; Hammond, Karl D.; Wirth, Brian D.; Maroudas, Dimitrios

    2014-08-01

    We report the results of a systematic atomic-scale analysis of the dynamics of small mobile helium clusters in tungsten, near tungsten surfaces. These helium clusters are attracted to tungsten surfaces due to an elastic interaction force that drives surface segregation. As the clusters migrate toward the surface, trap mutation and cluster dissociation are activated at rates higher than in the bulk. These kinetic processes are responsible for important structural, morphological, and compositional features in plasma-exposed tungsten, including surface adatoms, near-surface immobile helium-vacancy complexes, and retained helium content. Detailed results are presented for di-helium and tri-helium clusters near low-Miller-index tungsten surfaces.

  20. Charge transfer in helium-rich supernova plasma

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swartz, Douglas A.

    1994-01-01

    Charge transfer rate coefficients are estimated using Landau-Zener and modified Demkov approximations. The coefficients, augmented by those available from the literature, are used in statistical equilibrium equations describing the state of helium-rich supernova plasma. Such a plasma may describe both Type Ib and Type Ic supernova ejecta. The hypothesis that extensive mixing of metals with helium in Type Ic supernovae may provide a catalyst for rapid charge transfer that weakens the helium line emission by altering the excitation balance is tested. It is shown that charge transfer as a mechanism for suppressing helium line emission is ineffective unless the metal abundance is comparable to or larger than the helium abundance. This result supports an earlier conclusion that Type Ic supernovae must be helium poor relative to Type Ib events.

  1. Capacity enhancement of indigenous expansion engine based helium liquefier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doohan, R. S.; Kush, P. K.; Maheshwari, G.

    2017-02-01

    Development of technology and understanding for large capacity helium refrigeration and liquefaction at helium temperature is indispensable for coming-up projects. A new version of helium liquefier designed and built to provide approximately 35 liters of liquid helium per hour. The refrigeration capacity of this reciprocating type expansion engine machine has been increased from its predecessor version with continuous improvement and deficiency debugging. The helium liquefier has been built using components by local industries including cryogenic Aluminum plate fin heat exchangers. Two compressors with nearly identical capacity have been deployed for the operation of system. Together they consume about 110 kW of electric power. The system employs liquid Nitrogen precooling to enhance liquid Helium yield. This paper describes details of the cryogenic expander design improvements, reconfiguration of heat exchangers, performance simulation and their experimental validation.

  2. Helium isotopic variations in volcanic rocks from Loihi Seamount and the Island of Hawaii

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kurz, M.D.; Jenkins, W.J.; Hart, S.R.; Clague, D.

    1983-01-01

    Helium isotopic ratios ranging from 20 to 32 times the atmospheric 3He 4He(RA) have been observed in a suite of 15 basaltic glasses from the Loihi Seamount. These ratios, which are up to four times higher than those of MORB glasses and more than twice those of nearby Kilauea, are strongly suggestive of a primitive source of volatiles supplying this volcanism. The Loihi glasses measured span a broad compositional range, and the 3He/4He ratios were found to be generally lower for the alkali basalts than for the tholeiites. The component with a lower 3He 4He ratio appears to be associated with olivine xenocrysts, within which fluid inclusions are probably the carrier of contaminant helium. One Loihi sample has a much lower isotopic ratio ( 30 RA) helium with some (variable) component of lithospheric contamination added during "breakthrough", while the later stages are characterized by a relaxation toward lithospheric 3He 4He ratios (??? 8 RA) due to isolation of the diapir from the mantle below (as the plate moves on), and subsequent mining of the inherited helium and contamination from the surrounding lithosphere. The abrupt contrast in 3He 4He ratios between Kilauea and Loihi, despite their close proximity, is indicative of the small lateral extent of the plume. ?? 1983.

  3. A computational modeling study on the helium atmospheric pressure plasma needle discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qian, Mu-Yang; Yang, Cong-Ying; Liu, San-Qiu; Wang, Zhen-Dong; Lv, Yan; Wang, De-Zhen

    2015-12-01

    A two-dimensional coupled model of neutral gas flow and plasma dynamics is employed to investigate the streamer dynamics in a helium plasma needle at atmospheric pressure. A parametric study of the streamer propagation as a function of needle tip curvature radius and helium gas flow rate is presented. The key chemical reactions at the He/air mixing layer which drive the streamer propagation are the direct ionization via collision with electrons, the Penning effect being not so crucial. With increasing the gas flow rate from 0.2 standard liter per minute (SLM) to 0.8 SLM, however, the emissions resulting from reactive oxygen and nitrogen species change from a solid circle to a hollow profile and the average streamer propagation velocity decreases. Air impurities (backdiffusion from ambient air) in the helium jet result in a significant increase in the streamer propagation velocity. Besides, with decreasing the tip curvature radiusfrom 200 μm to 100 μm, the electron avalanche process around the near-tip region is more pronounced. However, the spatially resolved plasma parameters distributions (electron, helium metastables, ground state atomic oxygen, etc.) remain almost the same, except that around the near-tip region where their peak values are more than doubled. Project supported partly by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 11465013), the Natural Science Foundation of Jiangxi Province, China (Grant No. 20151BAB212012), and in part by the International Science and Technology Cooperation Program of China (Grant No. 2015DFA61800).

  4. Super-Maxwellian helium evaporation from pure and salty water

    SciTech Connect

    Hahn, Christine; Kann, Zachary R.; Faust, Jennifer A.; Skinner, J. L. E-mail: nathanson@chem.wisc.edu; Nathanson, Gilbert M. E-mail: nathanson@chem.wisc.edu

    2016-01-28

    Helium atoms evaporate from pure water and salty solutions in super-Maxwellian speed distributions, as observed experimentally and modeled theoretically. The experiments are performed by monitoring the velocities of dissolved He atoms that evaporate from microjets of pure water at 252 K and 4–8.5 molal LiCl and LiBr at 232–252 K. The average He atom energies exceed the flux-weighted Maxwell-Boltzmann average of 2RT by 30% for pure water and 70% for 8.5m LiBr. Classical molecular dynamics simulations closely reproduce the observed speed distributions and provide microscopic insight into the forces that eject the He atoms from solution. Comparisons of the density profile and He kinetic energies across the water-vacuum interface indicate that the He atoms are accelerated by He–water collisions within the top 1-2 layers of the liquid. We also find that the average He atom kinetic energy scales with the free energy of solvation of this sparingly soluble gas. This free-energy difference reflects the steeply decreasing potential of mean force on the He atoms in the interfacial region, whose gradient is the repulsive force that tends to expel the atoms. The accompanying sharp decrease in water density suppresses the He–water collisions that would otherwise maintain a Maxwell-Boltzmann distribution, allowing the He atom to escape at high energies. Helium is especially affected by this reduction in collisions because its weak interactions make energy transfer inefficient.

  5. Super-Maxwellian helium evaporation from pure and salty water.

    PubMed

    Hahn, Christine; Kann, Zachary R; Faust, Jennifer A; Skinner, J L; Nathanson, Gilbert M

    2016-01-28

    Helium atoms evaporate from pure water and salty solutions in super-Maxwellian speed distributions, as observed experimentally and modeled theoretically. The experiments are performed by monitoring the velocities of dissolved He atoms that evaporate from microjets of pure water at 252 K and 4-8.5 molal LiCl and LiBr at 232-252 K. The average He atom energies exceed the flux-weighted Maxwell-Boltzmann average of 2RT by 30% for pure water and 70% for 8.5m LiBr. Classical molecular dynamics simulations closely reproduce the observed speed distributions and provide microscopic insight into the forces that eject the He atoms from solution. Comparisons of the density profile and He kinetic energies across the water-vacuum interface indicate that the He atoms are accelerated by He-water collisions within the top 1-2 layers of the liquid. We also find that the average He atom kinetic energy scales with the free energy of solvation of this sparingly soluble gas. This free-energy difference reflects the steeply decreasing potential of mean force on the He atoms in the interfacial region, whose gradient is the repulsive force that tends to expel the atoms. The accompanying sharp decrease in water density suppresses the He-water collisions that would otherwise maintain a Maxwell-Boltzmann distribution, allowing the He atom to escape at high energies. Helium is especially affected by this reduction in collisions because its weak interactions make energy transfer inefficient.

  6. Radiation effects on microstructure and hardness of a titanium aluminide alloy irradiated by helium ions at room and elevated temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Tao; Zhu, Hanliang; Ionescu, Mihail; Dayal, Pranesh; Davis, Joel; Carr, David; Harrison, Robert; Edwards, Lyndon

    2015-04-01

    A 45XD TiAl alloy possessing a lamellar microstructure was irradiated using 5 MeV helium ions to a fluence of 5 × 1021 ion m-2 (5000 appm) with a dose of about 1 dpa (displacements per atom). A uniform helium ion stopping damage region about 17 μm deep from the target surface was achieved by applying an energy degrading wheel. Radiation damage defects including helium-vacancy clusters and small helium bubbles were found in the microstructure of the samples irradiated at room temperature. With increasing irradiation temperature to 300 °C and 500 °C helium bubbles were clearly observed in both the α2 and γ phases of the irradiated microstructure. By means of nanoindentation significant irradiation hardening was measured. For the samples irradiated at room temperature the hardness increased from 5.6 GPa to 8.5 GPa and the irradiation-hardening effect reduced to approximately 8.0 GPa for the samples irradiated at 300 °C and 500 °C.

  7. Transport and extraction of radioactive ions stopped in superfluid helium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, W. X.; Dendooven, P.; Gloos, K.; Takahashi, N.; Arutyunov, K.; Pekola, J. P.; Äystö, J.

    2003-05-01

    A new approach to convert a high energy beam to a low energy one, which is essential for the next generation radioactive ion beam facilities, has been proposed and tested at Jyväskylä, Finland. An open 223Ra alpha-decay-recoil source has been used to produce radioactive ions in superfluid helium. The alpha spectra demonstrate that the recoiling 219Rn ions have been extracted out of liquid helium. This first observation of the extraction of heavy positive ions across the superfluid helium surface was possible thanks to the high sensitivity of radioactivity detection. An efficiency of 36% was obtained for the ion extraction out of liquid helium.

  8. A tight-binding potential for helium in carbon systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Granot, Rebecca; Baer, Roi

    2008-12-01

    The presence of helium in carbon systems, such as diamonds and fullerenes is of interest for planetary sciences, geophysics, astrophysics, and evolution biology. Such systems typically involve a large number of atoms and require a fast method for assessing the interaction potential and forces. We developed a tight-binding approach, based on density functional calculations, which includes a many-body potential term. This latter term is essential for consolidating the density functional results of helium in bulky diamond and Helium passing through a benzene ring which is important for helium-fullerene applications. The method is simple to apply and exhibits good transferability properties.

  9. A study of helium mobility in polycrystalline uranium dioxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia, P.; Martin, G.; Desgardin, P.; Carlot, G.; Sauvage, T.; Sabathier, C.; Castellier, E.; Khodja, H.; Barthe, M.-F.

    2012-11-01

    The mobility of Helium in polycrystalline uranium dioxide was studied by implanting samples with 3He ions at depths of approximately 1 μm and at concentrations in the region of 0.1 at.%. Samples were subsequently annealed at temperatures ranging between 700 °C and 1100 °C. Helium movement was then characterised using three different types of Nuclear Reaction Analysis (NRA) techniques based on the 3He(d,α)p reaction. The fraction of helium released from samples was measured during annealing at high temperature as a function of time. After each annealing sequence, helium depth profiles were obtained for each sample. In some cases, samples were characterised over small areas (60 × 60 μm2), using a micrometre size deuteron beam. This enables the measurement of helium distributions at the surface of samples. Using this novel approach which provides time and space dependent information relating to helium atom location, we show that grain boundaries act as effective short circuits for helium movement and release at all temperatures. Also, at temperatures above approximately 800 °C, in areas around the grain boundaries extending into the grain over distances of the order of microns, helium diffusion is high. In areas further into the grain, diffusion proceeds much more slowly presumably as a result of helium cluster formation. These observations are interpreted based on radiation damage production and annealing processes.

  10. Helium vs. Proton Induced Displacement Damage in Electronic Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ringo, Sawnese; Barghouty, A. F.

    2010-01-01

    In this project, the specific effects of displacement damage due to the passage of protons and helium nuclei on some typical electronic materials will be evaluated and contrasted. As the electronic material absorbs the energetic proton and helium momentum, degradation of performance occurs, eventually leading to overall failure. Helium nuclei traveling at the same speed as protons are expected to impart more to the material displacement damage; due to the larger mass, and thus momentum, of helium nuclei compared to protons. Damage due to displacement of atoms in their crystalline structure can change the physical properties and hence performance of the electronic materials.

  11. Helium resources of the United States, 1989. Information Circular/1990

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, R.D.; Hamak, J.E.

    1990-01-01

    The helium resources base of the United States was estimated by the Bureau of Mines to be 894.6 Bcf as of January 1, 1989. These resources are divided into four categories in decreasing degree of the assurance of their existence: (1) helium in storage and in proved natural gas reserves, 282.4 Bcf, (2) helium in probable natural gas resources, estimated at 237.7 Bcf, (3) helium in possible natural gas resources, estimated to be 263.1 Bcf, and (4) helium in speculative natural gas resources, 111.4 Bcf. These helium resources are further divided into depleting and nondepleting, with the helium in storage being in a separate classification. The depleting resources are those associated with natural gasfields that are, or will be, produced for the natural gas they contain. Almost all of the helium in potential (probable, possible, and speculative) natural gas resources is included in this classification. These depleting resources are estimated to contain 775 Bcf of the total helium resource base.

  12. Simplified Helium Refrigerator Cycle Analysis Using the `Carnot Step'

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knudsen, P.; Ganni, V.

    2006-04-01

    An analysis of the Claude form of an idealized helium liquefier for the minimum input work reveals the `Carnot Step' for helium refrigerator cycles. As the `Carnot Step' for a multi-stage polytropic compression process consists of equal pressure ratio stages; similarly for an idealized helium liquefier the `Carnot Step' consists of equal temperature ratio stages for a given number of expansion stages. This paper presents the analytical basis and some useful equations for the preliminary examination of existing and new Claude helium refrigeration cycles.

  13. Modeling of helium transport and exhaust in the LHD edge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bader, A.; Kobayashi, M.; Schmitz, O.; Akerson, A. R.; Effenberg, F.; Frerichs, H.; Feng, Y.; Hegna, C. C.; Ida, K.; The LHD Experimental Group

    2016-12-01

    Experimental results from LHD show a reduction of helium concentration in the plasma with the introduction of a magnetic island on the m/n  =  1/1 resonant surface in the plasma edge. Simulations of the plasma with and without the island are carried out with the coupled code EMC3-EIRENE and compared to charge exchange recombination spectroscopy measurements of ionized core helium, and visible spectroscopy measurements of edge neutral helium. The numerical simulations indicate that the experimental parameters lie in a high density regime where the impurity transport is dominated by the outward directed friction force. The EMC3-EIRENE simulations capture the reduction in helium transport well and indicate that: (1) the reduction in core helium is a result of increased outward transport caused by the magnetic island and an increased opening of the edge-surface layer to the divertor plates; (2) the dominant source of neutral helium is best modeled by recycled helium at the targets; and (3) ionized helium density profiles are best matched in the simulations when there is a large core helium source in addition to a smaller edge source.

  14. Redetermination of the Helium Abundances in HII Regions in Blue Compact Dwarf Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holovatyi, V. V.; Melekh, B. Ya.

    2005-09-01

    The He/H abundances in HII regions in Blue Compact Dwarf Galaxies are redetermined using the new recombination coefficients of Benjamin et al. The electron number density n e in the He+ region, optical depth τ 3889 in the HeI λ3889 Å line, and coefficient of underlying stellar absorption a HeI are determined using the self-consistent method of Olive and Skillman. The primordial helium abundance and its enrichment are found using the helium abundances obtained in this paper and heavy-element abundances from our recent paper I: Y p = 0.244 ± 0.004 and dY/dZ = 8.8 ± 4.6.

  15. Nucleosynthesis in helium-enriched asymptotic giant branch models: Implications for heavy element enrichment in ω Centauri

    SciTech Connect

    Karakas, Amanda I.; Marino, Anna F.; Nataf, David M.

    2014-03-20

    We investigate the effect of helium enrichment on the evolution and nucleosynthesis of low-mass asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars of 1.7 M {sub ☉} and 2.36 M {sub ☉} with a metallicity of Z = 0.0006 ([Fe/H] ≈–1.4). We calculate evolutionary sequences with the primordial helium abundance (Y = 0.24) and with helium-enriched compositions (Y = 0.30, 0.35, 0.40). For comparison, we calculate models of the same mass but at a lower metallicity Z = 0.0003 ([Fe/H] ≈–1.8) with Y = 0.24. Post-processing nucleosynthesis calculations are performed on each of the evolutionary sequences to determine the production of elements from hydrogen to bismuth. Elemental surface abundance predictions and stellar yields are presented for each model. The models with enriched helium have shorter main sequence and AGB lifetimes, and they enter the AGB with a more massive hydrogen-exhausted core than the primordial helium model. The main consequences are as follows: (1) low-mass AGB models with enhanced helium will evolve more than twice as fast, giving them the chance to contribute sooner to the chemical evolution of the forming globular clusters, and (2) the stellar yields will be strongly reduced relative to their primordial helium counterparts. An increase of ΔY = 0.10 at a given mass decreases the yields of carbon by up to ≈60% and of fluorine by up to 80%; it also decreases the yields of the s-process elements barium and lanthanum by ≈45%. While the yields of first s-process peak elements strontium, yttrium, and zirconium decrease by up to 50%, the yields of rubidium either do not change or increase.

  16. Helium embrittlement of a lamellar titanium aluminide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magnusson, P.; Chen, J.; Jung, P.; Sauvage, T.; Hoffelner, W.; Spätig, Ph.

    2013-03-01

    Embrittlement by helium was investigated in a lamellar TiAl alloy under two conditions: Specimens were implanted to various amounts of helium up to 762 appm at temperatures from 630 °C to 1000 °C and some of them subsequently creep-tested at the same temperature under stresses from 150 to 300 MPa. The microstructure and fracture surfaces of creep-deformed and non-creep-deformed specimens were then studied by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), respectively. Specimens were implanted to various amounts of helium at a low temperature (150 °C) and post-implantation annealed at elevated temperatures for TEM studies. Embrittlement was revealed by reduction in time- and strain-to-rupture and by a transition in fracture surface from ductile to an inter-lamellar appearance. Embrittlement occurred above a critical He concentration, which decreased from about 10 appm at 700 °C to below 6 appm at 900 °C. TEM showed that embrittlement could be associated to reaching a critical bubble diameter of about 5 nm. Bubble diameters increased with increasing temperature ranging in high-temperature implanted specimens from about 3 nm (630 °C) to 20 nm (1000 °C) and in post-implantation annealed ones from 1.2 nm (600 °C) to 2.2 nm (900 °C), respectively. With increasing temperature, the bubble distribution grew less homogenous with a lower density of larger bubbles situated preferentially at interfaces and sinks. This was ascribed to a change in bubble nucleation mode from homogeneous di-atomic nucleation at lower temperatures to multi-atomic nucleation at sinks at higher temperature.

  17. Helium transport and ash control studies

    SciTech Connect

    Miley, G.H.

    1992-01-01

    The Primary goal of this research is to develop a helium (ash) transport scaling law based on experimental data from devices such as TFTR and JET. To illustrate the importance of this, we have studied ash accumulation effects on ignition requirements using a O-D transport model. Ash accumulation is characterized in the model by the ratio of the helium particle confinement time to the energy confinement time t{sub {alpha}}/t{sub E}. Results show that the ignition window'' shrinks rapidly as t{sub {alpha}}/t{sub E} increases, closing for high t{sub {alpha}}/t{sub E} increases, closing for high t{sub {alpha}}/t{sub E}. A best'' value for t{sub {alpha}}/t{sub E} will ultimately be determined from our scaling law studies. A helium transport scaling law is being sought that expresses the transport coefficients (D{sub {alpha}}, V{sub {alpha}}) as a function of the local plasma parameters. This is necessary for use in transport code calculations, e.g. for BALDUR. Based on experimental data from L-mode plasma operation in TFTR, a scaling law to a power law expression has been obtained using a least-square fit method. It is found that the transport coefficients are strongly affected by the local magnetic field and safety factor q. A preliminary conclusion from this work is that active control of ash buildup must be developed. To study control, we have developed a O-D plasma model which employs a simple pole-placement control model. Some preliminary calculations with this model are presented.

  18. 76 FR 30362 - Federal Acquisition Regulation; Submission for OMB Review; Acquisition of Helium

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-25

    ...; Submission for OMB Review; Acquisition of Helium AGENCY: Department of Defense (DOD), General Services... approved information collection requirement concerning acquisition of helium. Public comments are... Collection 9000- 0113, Acquisition of Helium, by any of the following methods: Regulations.gov :...

  19. Higher resolution helium measuring system for deuterium plasma on EAST tokamak via normal Penning gauge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Houyin, Wang; Jiansheng, Hu; Yaowei, Yu; Bin, Cao; Jinhua, Wu; Guoqing, Shen; Zhao, Wan; EAST, Contributors

    2017-01-01

    Although the deuterium and helium have almost the same mass, a Penning Optical Gas Analyzer (POGA) system on the basis of the spectroscopic method and Penning discharging has been designed on EAST, since 2014. The POGA system was developed successfully in 2015, it was the first time that EAST could detect helium partial pressure in deuterium plasma (wall conditioning and plasma operation scenario). With dedicated calibration and proper adjustment of the parameters, the minimum concentration of helium in deuterium gas can be measured as about 0.5% instead of 1% on the other tokamak devices. Moreover, the He and D2 partial pressures are measured simultaneously. At present, the measurable range of deuterium partial pressure is 1 × 10-7 mbar to 1 × 10-5 mbar, meanwhile the range of helium is 1 × 10-8 mbar to 1 × 10-5 mbar. The measurable range can be modified by means of the adjustment of POGA system’s parameters. It is possible to detect the interesting part of the gas with a time resolution of less than 5 ms (the 200 ms because of conductance of transfer pipe at present). The POGA system was routinely employed to wall conditioning and helium enrichment investigation in 2015. Last but not the least, the low temperature plasma of POGA is generated by normal penning gauge Pfeiffer IKR gauge instead of Alcatel CF2P, which has been suspended for a few years and was used for almost all the POGA systems in the world.

  20. Helium isotope studies in the Mojave Desert, California: Implications for groundwater chronology and regional seismicity

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kulongoski, J.T.; Hilton, David R.; Izbicki, J.A.

    2003-01-01

    We report helium isotope and concentration results for groundwaters from the western Mojave River Basin (MRB), 130 km east of Los Angeles, CA. The basin lies adjacent to the NW-SE trending San Andreas Fault (SAF) system. Samples were collected along two groundwater flowpaths that originate in the San Gabriel Mountains and discharge to the Mojave River located ???32 km to the northeast. Additional groundwater samples were collected from Mojave River Deposits underlying the Mojave River. The primary objective of this study is to identify and quantify crustal and mantle helium contributions to the regional groundwater system. A total of 27 groundwaters, sampled previously for chemistry and isotope systematics (including 14C activity) have measured helium concentrations that increase along flowpaths from 9.9??10-8 to 1.0??10-4 cm3 STP g-1 H2O. Concomitantly, 3He/4He ratios decrease from 0.84RA to 0.11RA (RA equals the 3He/4He ratio in air=1.4??10-6). We did not record 3He/4He ratios equivalent to crustal-production values (???0.02RA) in any sample. Dissolved helium concentrations were resolved into components associated with solubility equilibration, air entrainment, mantle-derivation, in-situ production within the aquifer, and extraneous crustal fluxes. All samples contained the first four components, but only older samples had the superimposed effects of helium derived from a crustal flux. The radiogenic He component has chronological significance, and good concordance between 4He and 14C ages for younger groundwaters (<25,000 year) demonstrates the integrity of the 4 He-chronometer in this setting. Helium-rich waters could also be dated with the 4He technique, but only by first isolating the whole crustal flux (3-10??10-6 cm3 STP cm-2 year-1). Mantle-derived 3He (3Hem) is present in all MRB samples irrespective of distance from the SAF. However, regional-aquifer groundwaters near the terminus of the flowpath have a significantly greater content of mantle-derived 3He

  1. Production of thorium-229 using helium nuclei

    DOEpatents

    Mirzadeh, Saed [Knoxville, TN; Garland, Marc Alan [Knoxville, TN

    2010-12-14

    A method for producing .sup.229Th includes the steps of providing .sup.226Ra as a target material, and bombarding the target material with alpha particles, helium-3, or neutrons to form .sup.229Th. When neutrons are used, the neutrons preferably include an epithermal neutron flux of at least 1.times.10.sup.13 n s.sup.-1cm.sup.-2. .sup.228Ra can also be bombarded with thermal and/or energetic neutrons to result in a neutron capture reaction to form .sup.229Th. Using .sup.230Th as a target material, .sup.229Th can be formed using neutron, gamma ray, proton or deuteron bombardment.

  2. Energy loss of helium ions in zinc

    SciTech Connect

    Lantschner, G.H.; Eckardt, J.C.; Lifschitz, A.F.; Arista, N.R.; Araujo, L.L.; Duarte, P.F.; Santos, J.H.R. dos; Behar, M.; Dias, J.F.; Grande, P.L.; Montanari, C.C.; Miraglia, J.E.

    2004-06-01

    The energy loss of helium ions in zinc has been measured in the energy range from 37.5 to 1750 keV/amu using the transmission technique and the Rutherford backscattering method. In addition, calculations using the extended Friedel sum rule, the unitary convolution approximation, and the local plasma approximation have been performed. The contributions of the inner-shell and valence electrons to the total energy loss are separately evaluated. The measurements and calculations are in good agreement over an extended range of energies, and both of them yield stopping values higher than those provided by SRIM 2003.

  3. Attosecond quantum-beat spectroscopy in helium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shivaram, Niranjan; Tong, Xiao-Min; Timmers, Henry; Sandhu, Arvinder

    2016-03-01

    The evolution of electron wavepackets determines the course of many physical and chemical phenomena, and attosecond spectroscopy aims to measure and control such dynamics in real time. Here, we investigate radial electron wavepacket motion in helium by using an XUV attosecond pulse train to prepare a coherent superposition of excited states and a delayed femtosecond IR pulse to ionize them. Quantum-beat signals observed in the high resolution photoelectron spectrogram allow us to follow the field-free evolution of the bound electron wavepacket and determine the time-dependent ionization dynamics of the low-lying 2{{p}} state.

  4. Temperature rise in superfluid helium pumps

    SciTech Connect

    Kittel, P.

    1988-07-01

    The temperature rise of a fountain effect pump (FEP) and of a centrifugal pump (CP) are compared. Calculations and estimates presented here show that under the operating conditions expected during the resupply of superfluid helium in space, a centrifugal pump will produce a smaller temperature rise than will a fountain effect pump. The temperature rise for the FEP is calculated assuming an ideal pump, while the temperature rise of the CP is estimated from the measured performance of a prototype pump. As a result of this smaller temperature rise and of the different operating characteristics of the two types of pumps, transfers will be more effective using a centrifugal pump.

  5. Simulation program for central helium liquefier

    SciTech Connect

    Kawamura, S.

    1984-02-20

    The computer program described here analyzes the performance of Fermilab Central Helium Liquefier (CHL) and predicts the values of the plant thermodynamic variables at all process points in the plant. To simulate CHL, this program is modified from the prototype program which was developed by Hitachi Ltd. a couple of years ago. This program takes care of only the steady state simulation and takes account of the change of the turbine efficiency, the pressure drops and the UA values of the heat exchangers. How to use the program is shown.

  6. Stability of the Helium-Antiproton System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Drachman, Richard J.

    2006-01-01

    In the course of their Born-Oppenheimer calculations of this system Todd and Armour noted that the lowest-lying state closely resembles the hydrogen negative ion, since the antiproton lies very close to the helium nucleus and shields one unit of nuclear charge. In the present paper this observation will be taken seriously to produce a variationally correct estimate of the total energy of this system, along with a similar estimate of the energy of the once-ionized system. The nonadiabatic effect of exactly treating the reduced masses improves the results.

  7. Heat capacity of helium in cylindrical environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gatica, S. M.; Hernández, E. S.; Szybisz, L.

    2003-10-01

    We perform a systematic investigation of the structure, elementary, and phonon excitations of quantum fluid 4He adsorbed in the interior of carbon nanotubes. We show that the helium fluid inside the cylinder behaves exactly as in planar films on a graphite substrate, presenting the same kind of layering transition. This tendency is confirmed by the behavior of a single 3He impurity diluted into adsorbed 4He. We also present a simple description of the lowest excitation modes of the adsorbed fluid and compute the low-temperature contribution of the phonon spectrum to the specific heat, which displays the dimensionality characteristics reported in previous works.

  8. Lamb shift in the muonic helium ion

    SciTech Connect

    Martynenko, A. P.

    2007-07-15

    The Lamb shift (2P{sub 1/2}-2S{sub 1/2}) in the muonic helium ion ({mu}-{sub 2}{sup 4}He){sup +} is calculated with the account of contributions of orders {alpha}{sup 3}, {alpha}{sup 4}, {alpha}{sup 5}, and {alpha}{sup 6}. Special attention is given to corrections of the electron vacuum polarization, the nuclear structure, and recoil effects. The obtained numerical value of the Lamb shift 1381.72 meV can be considered as a reliable estimate for the comparison with experimental data.

  9. Temperature rise in superfluid helium pumps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kittel, Peter

    1988-01-01

    The temperature rise of a fountain effect pump (FEP) and of a centrifugal pump (CP) are compared. Calculations and estimates presented here show that under the operating conditions expected during the resupply of superfluid helium in space, a centrifugal pump will produce a smaller temperature rise than will a fountain effect pump. The temperature rise for the FEP is calculated assuming an ideal pump, while the temperature rise of the CP is estimated from the measured performance of a prototype pump. As a result of this smaller temperature rise and of the different operating characteristics of the two types of pumps, transfers will be more effective using a centrifugal pump.

  10. 48 CFR 8.501 - Definitions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Definitions. 8.501 Section... REQUIRED SOURCES OF SUPPLIES AND SERVICES Acquisition of Helium 8.501 Definitions. As used in this subpart... Suppliers available via the Internet at http://www.nm.blm.gov/www/amfo/amfo_home.html. Major...

  11. Thermal helium desorption behavior in advanced ferritic steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kimura, Akihiko; Sugano, R.; Matsushita, Y.; Ukai, S.

    2005-02-01

    Thermal helium desorption measurements were performed to investigate the difference in the helium trapping and accumulation behavior among a reduced activation ferritic (RAF) steel and oxide dispersion strengthening (ODS) steels after implantation of He+ ions at room temperature. Thermal helium desorption spectra (THDS) were obtained during annealing to 1200 °C at a heating rate of 1 °C/s. The THDS of the ODS steels are very similar to that of the RAF steel, except for the presence of the peak in the temperature range from 800 to 1000 °C, where the α γ transformation related helium desorption from the γ-phase is considered to occur in the 9Cr-ODS martensitic steels. The fraction of helium desorption becomes larger at higher temperatures, and this trend is increased with the amount of implanted helium. In the 9Cr-ODS steels, the fraction of helium desorption by bubble migration mechanism was smaller than that in the RAF steel. This suggests that the bubble formation was suppressed in the ODS steels. In the 12Cr-ODS steel, the fraction of helium desorption by bubble migration reached more than 90%, suggesting that the trapping capacity of martensite phase in the 9Cr-ODS steel is rather large.

  12. DIRECT EVALUATION OF THE HELIUM ABUNDANCES IN OMEGA CENTAURI

    SciTech Connect

    Dupree, A. K.; Avrett, E. H. E-mail: eavrett@cfa.harvard.edu

    2013-08-20

    A direct measure of the helium abundances from the near-infrared transition of He I at 1.08 {mu}m is obtained for two nearly identical red giant stars in the globular cluster Omega Centauri. One star exhibits the He I line; the line is weak or absent in the other star. Detailed non-local thermal equilibrium semi-empirical models including expansion in spherical geometry are developed to match the chromospheric H{alpha}, H{beta}, and Ca II K lines, in order to predict the helium profile and derive a helium abundance. The red giant spectra suggest a helium abundance of Y {<=} 0.22 (LEID 54064) and Y = 0.39-0.44 (LEID 54084) corresponding to a difference in the abundance {Delta}Y {>=} 0.17. Helium is enhanced in the giant star (LEID 54084) that also contains enhanced aluminum and magnesium. This direct evaluation of the helium abundances gives observational support to the theoretical conjecture that multiple populations harbor enhanced helium in addition to light elements that are products of high-temperature hydrogen burning. We demonstrate that the 1.08 {mu}m He I line can yield a helium abundance in cool stars when constraints on the semi-empirical chromospheric model are provided by other spectroscopic features.

  13. Helium nanobubble release from Pd surface: An atomic simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Liang; Hu, Wangyu; Deng, Huiqiu; Xiao, Shifang; Yang, Jianyu; Gao, Fei; Heinisch, Howard L.; Hu, Shilin

    2011-02-14

    Molecular dynamic simulations of helium atoms escaping from a helium-filled nano-bubble near the surface of crystalline palladium reveal unexpected behavior. Significant deformation and cracking near the helium bubble occur initially, and then a channel forms between the bubble and the surface, providing a pathway for helium atoms to propagate towards the surface. The helium atoms erupt from the bubble in an instantaneous and volcano-like process, which leads to surface deformation consisting of cavity formation on the surface, along with modification and atomic rearrangement at the periphery of the cavity. The present simulation results show that, near the palladium surface, there is a helium-bubble-free zone, or denuded zone, with a typical thickness of about 3.0 nm. Combined with experimental measurements and continuum-scale evolutionary model predictions, the present atomic simulations demonstrate that the thickness of the denuded zone, which contains a low concentration of helium atoms, is somewhat larger than the diameter of the helium bubbles in the metal tritide. Furthermore, a relationship between the tensile strength and thickness of metal film is also determined.

  14. Coupling of the coronal helium abundance to the solar wind

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hansteen, Viggo H.; Leer, Egil; Holzer, Thomas E.

    1994-01-01

    Models of the transition region-corona-solar wind system are investigated in order to find the coronal helium abundance and to study the role played by coronal helium in controlling the solar wind proton flux. The thermal force on alpha-particles in the transition region sets the flow of helium into the corona. The frictional coupling between alpha-particles and protons and/or the electric polarization field determines the proton flux in the solar wind as well as the fate of the coronal helium content. The models are constructed by solving the time-dependent population and momentum equations for all species of hydrogen and helium in an atmosphere with a given temperature profile. Several temperature profiles are considered in order to very the roles of frictional coupling and electric polarization field in the solar wind, and the thermal force in the transition region. Steady-state solutions are found for coronae with a hydrogen flux at 1 AU of 1.0 x 10(exp 9)/cm(exp 2)/sec or larger. For coronae with lower hydrogen fluxes, the helium flux into the corona is larger than the flux 'pulled out' by the solar wind protons, and solutions with increasing coronal helium content are found. The timescale for forming a helium-filled corona, that may allow for a steady outflow, is long compared to the mixing time for the corona.

  15. Characterization of charcoals for helium cryopumping in fusion devices

    SciTech Connect

    Sedgley, D.W.; Tobin, A.G.; Batzer, T.H.; Call, W.R.

    1987-07-01

    The capability of charcoal as a sorbent for helium at cryogenic temperatures depends upon charcoal characteristics that are not well understood. Previous work by the authors has indicated that the charcoals' pumping capability for helium depends as much on their source as on their particle size distributions. To develop a correlation between the physical characteristics of charcoal and helium pumping performance, different charcoals based on wood, coal, coconut, and a petroleum by-product were obtained from commercial sources. They were bonded to an aluminum substrate, and cooled to liquid-helium temperatures in a vacuum chamber. The helium pumping speed at constant throughput versus quantity of helium absorbed was measured for each charcoal grade. Porosimetry measurements on each charcoal grade using nitrogen as the sorbent gas were made that included total surface area, adsorption and desorption isotherms, and pore area and pore volume distributions. Significant differences in helium pumping performance and in pore size distribution were observed. Comparisons are made between helium pumping performance and charcoal characteristics and a possible correlation is identified.

  16. The adsorption of helium atoms on coronene cations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurzthaler, Thomas; Rasul, Bilal; Kuhn, Martin; Lindinger, Albrecht; Scheier, Paul; Ellis, Andrew M.

    2016-08-01

    We report the first experimental study of the attachment of multiple foreign atoms to a cationic polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH). The chosen PAH was coronene, C24H12, which was added to liquid helium nanodroplets and then subjected to electron bombardment. Using mass spectrometry, coronene cations decorated with helium atoms were clearly seen and the spectrum shows peaks with anomalously high intensities ("magic number" peaks), which represent ion-helium complexes with added stability. The data suggest the formation of a rigid helium layer consisting of 38 helium atoms that completely cover both faces of the coronene ion. Additional magic numbers can be seen for the further addition of 3 and 6 helium atoms, which are thought to attach to the edge of the coronene. The observation of magic numbers for the addition of 38 and 44 helium atoms is in good agreement with a recent path integral Monte Carlo prediction for helium atoms on neutral coronene. An understanding of how atoms and molecules attach to PAH ions is important for a number of reasons including the potential role such complexes might play in the chemistry of the interstellar medium.

  17. Turnkey Helium Purification and Liquefaction Plant for DARWIN, Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindemann, U.; Boeck, S.; Blum, L.; Kurtcuoglu, K.

    2010-04-01

    The Linde Group, through its Australian subsidiary BOC Limited, has signed an agreement with Darwin LNG Pty Ltd for the supply of feed-gas to Linde's new helium refining and liquefaction facility in Darwin, Australia. Linde Kryotechnik AG, located in Switzerland, has carried out the engineering and fabrication of the equipment for the turn key helium plant. The raw feed gas flow of 20'730 Nm3/h contains up to of 3 mol% helium. The purification process of the feed gas consists of partial condensation of nitrogen in two stages, cryogenic adsorption and finally catalytic oxidation of hydrogen followed by a dryer system. Downstream of the purification the refined helium is liquefied using a modified Bryton process and stored in a 30'000 gal LHe tank. For further distribution and export of the liquid helium there are two stations available for filling of truck trailers and containers. The liquid nitrogen, required for refrigeration capacity to the nitrogen removal stages in the purification process as well as for the pre-cooling of the pure helium in the liquefaction process, is generated on site during the feed gas purification process. The optimized process provides low power consumption, maximum helium recovery and a minimum helium loss.

  18. Helium on Venus - Implications for uranium and thorium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prather, M. J.; Mcelroy, M. B.

    1983-01-01

    Helium is removed at an average rate of 10 to the 6th atoms per square centimeter per second from Venus's atmosphere by the solar wind following ionization above the plasmapause. The surface source of helium-4 on Venus is similar to that on earth, suggesting comparable abundances of crustal uranium and thorium.

  19. Flight model performance test results of a helium dewar for the soft X-ray spectrometer onboard ASTRO-H

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshida, Seiji; Miyaoka, Mikio; Kanao, Ken'ichi; Tsunematsu, Shoji; Otsuka, Kiyomi; Hoshika, Shunji; Mitsuda, Kazuhisa; Yamasaki, Noriko; Takei, Yoh; Fujimoto, Ryuichi; Sato, Yoichi; DiPirro, Mike; Shirron, Peter

    2016-03-01

    ASTRO-H is a Japanese X-ray astronomy satellite, scheduled to be launched in fiscal year 2015. The mission includes a soft X-ray spectrometer instrument (SXS), which contains an X-ray micro calorimeter operating at 50 mK by using an adiabatic demagnetization refrigerator (ADR). The heat sink of the ADR is superfluid liquid helium below 1.3 K. The required lifetime of the superfluid helium is 3 years or more. In order to realize this lifetime, we have improved the thermal performance from the engineering model (EM) while maintaining the mechanical performance. Then, we have performed a thermal test of the flight model (FM). The results were that the heat load to the helium tank was reduced to below 0.8 mW in the FM from 1.2 mW in the EM. Therefore, the lifetime of the superfluid helium is more than 3 years with 30 L of liquid helium. In this paper, the thermal design and thermal test results are described.

  20. Liquid uranium alloy-helium fission reactor

    DOEpatents

    Minkov, Vladimir

    1986-01-01

    This invention teaches a nuclear fission reactor having a core vessel and at least one tandem heat exchanger vessel coupled therewith across upper and lower passages to define a closed flow loop. Nuclear fuel such as a uranium alloy in its liquid phase fills these vessels and flow passages. Solid control elements in the reactor core vessel are adapted to be adjusted relative to one another to control fission reaction of the liquid fuel therein. Moderator elements in the other vessel and flow passages preclude fission reaction therein. An inert gas such as helium is bubbled upwardly through the heat exchanger vessel operable to move the liquid fuel upwardly therein and unidirectionally around the closed loop and downwardly through the core vessel. This helium gas is further directed to heat conversion means outside of the reactor vessels to utilize the heat from the fission reaction to generate useful output. The nuclear fuel operates in the 1200.degree.-1800.degree. C. range, and even higher to 2500.degree. C., limited only by the thermal effectiveness of the structural materials, increasing the efficiency of power generation from the normal 30-35% with 300.degree.-500.degree. C. upper limit temperature to 50-65%. Irradiation of the circulating liquid fuel, as contrasted to only localized irradiation of a solid fuel, provides improved fuel utilization.

  1. Liquid uranium alloy-helium fission reactor

    DOEpatents

    Minkov, V.

    1984-06-13

    This invention describes a nuclear fission reactor which has a core vessel and at least one tandem heat exchanger vessel coupled therewith across upper and lower passages to define a closed flow loop. Nuclear fuel such as a uranium alloy in its liquid phase fills these vessels and flow passages. Solid control elements in the reactor core vessel are adapted to be adjusted relative to one another to control fission reaction of the liquid fuel therein. Moderator elements in the other vessel and flow passages preclude fission reaction therein. An inert gas such as helium is bubbled upwardly through the heat exchanger vessel operable to move the liquid fuel upwardly therein and unidirectionally around the closed loop and downwardly through the core vessel. This helium gas is further directed to heat conversion means outside of the reactor vessels to utilize the heat from the fission reaction to generate useful output. The nuclear fuel operates in the 1200 to 1800/sup 0/C range, and even higher to 2500/sup 0/C.

  2. Lifetime of a Chemically Bound Helium Compound

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chaban, Galina M.; Lundell, Jan; Gerber, R. Benny; Kwak, Dochan (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The rare-gas atoms are chemically inert, to an extent unique among all elements. This is due to the stable electronic structure of the atoms. Stable molecules with chemically bound rare-gas atoms are, however, known. A first such compound, XePtF6, W2S prepared in 1962 and since then a range of molecules containing radon, xenon and krypton have been obtained. Most recently, a first stable chemically bound compound of argon was prepared, leaving neon and helium as the only elements for which stable chemically bound molecules are not yet known. Electronic structure calculations predict that a metastable species HHeF exists, but significance of the result depends on the unknown lifetime. Here we report quantum dynamics calculations of the lifetime of HHeF, using accurate interactions computed from electronic structure theory. HHeF is shown to disintegrate by tunneling through energy barriers into He + HF and H + He + F the first channel greatly dominating. The lifetime of HHeF is more than 120 picoseconds, that of DHeF is 14 nanoseconds. The relatively long lifetimes are encouraging for the preparation prospects of this first chemically bound helium compound.

  3. Electron impact ionization-excitation of Helium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ancarani, Lorenzo Ugo; Gomez, A. I.; Gasaneo, G.; Mitnik, D. M.; Ambrosio, M. J.

    2016-09-01

    We calculate triple differential cross sections (TDCS) for the process of ionization-excitation of Helium by fast electron impact in which the residual ion is left in the n =2 excited state. We chose the strongly asymmetric kinematics used in the experiment performed by Dupré et al.. In a perturbative scheme, for high projectile energies the four-body problem reduces to a three-body one and, within that framework, we solve the time- independent Schrödinger equation with a Sturmian approach. The method, based on Generalized Sturmian Functions (GSF), is employed to obtain the initial ground state of Helium, the single-continuum state and the scattering wave function; for each of them, the GSF basis is constructed with the corresponding adequate asymptotic conditions. Besides, the method presents the following advantage: the scattering amplitudes can be extracted directly in the asymptotic region of the scattering solution, and thus the TDCS can be obtained without requiring a matrix element evaluation.

  4. Fiber-Cavity Optomechanics with Superfluid Helium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flowers-Jacobs, Nathan E.; Kashkanova, Anna D.; Shkarin, Alexey B.; Hoch, Scott W.; Deutsch, Christian; Reichel, Jakob; Harris, Jack G. E.

    2014-03-01

    In a typical optomechanical device, the resonance frequency of a cavity is coupled to mechanical motion through the radiation pressure force. To date, experimental cavities have predominately coupled to a resonant mechanical mode of a solid structure, often a lithographically-defined beam or membrane. We will describe our progress towards realizing an optomechanical device in which an optical fiber-cavity couples to the acoustic modes of superfluid helium. In this system, the optical modes and the acoustic modes of the superfluid are co-located between the mirrored ends of two fiber optic cables. Changes in the density of the superfluid change the effective length of the cavity which results in a standard, linear optomechanical coupling between the 300 MHz acoustic resonances and the 200 THz optical resonances. This type of device is motivated by the self-aligning nature of the acoustic and optical modes (which eases the difficulties of operating at cryogenic temperatures) and by the low optical and mechanical losses of superfluid helium. Although we expect the mechanical quality factor to be limited by acoustic radiation into the glass fiber, we will describe a proposal to realize a dual-band Bragg mirror to confine the optical and acoustic modes more efficiently. Supported by NSF Grant #1106110, ARO Grant #W911NF-13-1-0104, and the DARPA/MTO ORCHID program through a grant from AFOSR.

  5. Neutrons on a surface of liquid helium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grigoriev, P. D.; Zimmer, O.; Grigoriev, A. D.; Ziman, T.

    2016-08-01

    We investigate the possibility of ultracold neutron (UCN) storage in quantum states defined by the combined potentials of the Earth's gravity and the neutron optical repulsion by a horizontal surface of liquid helium. We analyze the stability of the lowest quantum state, which is most susceptible to perturbations due to surface excitations, against scattering by helium atoms in the vapor and by excitations of the liquid, comprised of ripplons, phonons, and surfons. This is an unusual scattering problem since the kinetic energy of the neutron parallel to the surface may be much greater than the binding energies perpendicular. The total scattering time of these UCNs at 0.7 K is found to exceed 1 h, and rapidly increases with decreasing temperature. Such low scattering rates should enable high-precision measurements of the sequence of discrete energy levels, thus providing improved tests of short-range gravity. The system might also be useful for neutron β -decay experiments. We also sketch new experimental propositions for level population and trapping of ultracold neutrons above a flat horizontal mirror.

  6. Numerical Studies of Properties of Confined Helium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Manousakis, Efstratios

    2003-01-01

    We carry out state of the art simulations of properties of confined liquid helium near the superfluid transition to a degree of accuracy which allows to make predictions for the outcome of fundamental physics experiments in microgravity. First we report our results for the finite-size scaling behavior of heat capacity of superfluids for cubic and parallel-plate geometry. This allows us to study the crossover from zero and two dimensions to three dimensions. Our calculated scaling functions are in good agreement with recently measured specific heat scaling functions for the above mentioned geometries. We also present our results of a quantum simulation of submonolayer of molecular hydrogen deposited on an ideal graphite substrate using path-integral quantum Monte Carlo simulation. We find that the monolayer phase diagram is rich and very similar to that of helium monolayer. We are able to uncover the main features of the complex monolayer phase diagram, such as the commensurate solid phases and the commensurate to incommensurate transition, in agreement with the experiments and to find some features which are missing from the experimental analysis.

  7. Submersion of potassium clusters in helium nanodroplets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    An der Lan, Lukas; Bartl, Peter; Leidlmair, Christian; Schöbel, Harald; Denifl, Stephan; Märk, Tilmann D.; Ellis, Andrew M.; Scheier, Paul

    2012-03-01

    Small alkali clusters do not submerge in liquid helium nanodroplets but instead survive predominantly in high spin states that reside on the surface of the nanodroplet. However, a recent theoretical prediction by Stark and Kresin [Phys. Rev. BPLRBAQ1098-012110.1103/PhysRevB.81.085401 81, 085401 (2010)], based on a classical description of the energetics of bubble formation for a fully submerged alkali cluster, suggests that the alkali clusters can submerge on energetic grounds when they exceed a critical size. Following recent work on sodium clusters, where ion yield data from electron impact mass spectrometry was used to obtain the first experimental evidence for alkali cluster submersion, we report here on similar experiments for potassium clusters. Evidence is presented for full cluster submersion at n>80 for Kn clusters, which is in good agreement with the recent theoretical prediction. In an additional observation, we report “magic number” sizes for both Kn+ and Kn2+ ions derived from helium droplets, which are found to be consistent with the jellium model.

  8. The primordial helium abundance from updated emissivities

    SciTech Connect

    Aver, Erik; Olive, Keith A.; Skillman, Evan D.; Porter, R.L. E-mail: olive@umn.edu E-mail: skillman@astro.umn.edu

    2013-11-01

    Observations of metal-poor extragalactic H II regions allow the determination of the primordial helium abundance, Y{sub p}. The He I emissivities are the foundation of the model of the H II region's emission. Porter, Ferland, Storey, and Detisch (2012) have recently published updated He I emissivities based on improved photoionization cross-sections. We incorporate these new atomic data and update our recent Markov Chain Monte Carlo analysis of the dataset published by Izotov, Thuan, and Stasi'nska (2007). As before, cuts are made to promote quality and reliability, and only solutions which fit the data within 95% confidence level are used to determine the primordial He abundance. The previously qualifying dataset is almost entirely retained and with strong concordance between the physical parameters. Overall, an upward bias from the new emissivities leads to a decrease in Y{sub p}. In addition, we find a general trend to larger uncertainties in individual objects (due to changes in the emissivities) and an increased variance (due to additional objects included). From a regression to zero metallicity, we determine Y{sub p} = 0.2465 ± 0.0097, in good agreement with the BBN result, Y{sub p} = 0.2485 ± 0.0002, based on the Planck determination of the baryon density. In the future, a better understanding of why a large fraction of spectra are not well fit by the model will be crucial to achieving an increase in the precision of the primordial helium abundance determination.

  9. Ionoluminescence in the helium ion microscope.

    PubMed

    Boden, Stuart A; Franklin, Thomas M W; Scipioni, Larry; Bagnall, Darren M; Rutt, Harvey N

    2012-12-01

    Ionoluminescence (IL) is the emission of light from a material due to excitation by an ion beam. In this work, a helium ion microscope (HIM) has been used in conjunction with a luminescence detection system to characterize IL from materials in an analogous way to how cathodoluminescence (CL) is characterized in a scanning electron microscope (SEM). A survey of the helium ion beam induced IL characteristics, including images and spectra, of a variety of materials known to exhibit CL in an SEM is presented. Direct band-gap semiconductors that luminesce strongly in the SEM are found not do so in the HIM, possibly due to defect-related nonradiative pathways created by the ion beam. Other materials do, however, exhibit IL, including a cerium-doped garnet sample, quantum dots, and rare-earth doped LaPO4 nanocrystals. These emissions are a result of transitions between f electron states or transitions across size dependent band gaps. In all these samples, IL is found to decay with exposure to the beam, fitting well to double exponential functions. In an exploration of the potential of this technique for biological tagging applications, imaging with the IL emitted by rare-earth doped LaPO4 nanocrystals, simultaneously with secondary electron imaging, is demonstrated at a range of magnifications.

  10. From Liquid Helium to Granular Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Behringer, Robert P.

    2016-11-01

    This article provides a brief history of work that I have either carried out with Horst Meyer, or that was connected in some way with experiences reaching back to the laboratory known as LTM for low temperature [physics] Meyer, at Duke University. It is not intended as a complete review of all relevant work, but rather to hit highlights. My work with Horst started with studies of critical phenomena in liquid helium. This system provided an extremely rich and diverse testing ground for then newly emerging theories of static and dynamic critical phenomena. A key aspect of the experimental work with Horst was high-precision measurements of temperature and pressure. The ability to measure thermal properties with exceptional precision was at the core of this work. It also provided a natural springboard for entirely different investigations of Rayleigh-Bénard convection, which had just been initiated by Guenter Ahlers. My postdoc with Guenter provided a whole new set of experiences involving convection, dynamical instabilities, and chaos, where again the special properties, measurement techniques, and creative approaches to research associated with liquid helium were critical. In fact, later, knowledge of these techniques allowed me to start a whole new research direction in granular materials, which is a primary focus of my current research.

  11. Blow-down analysis of helium from a cryogenic dewar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khan, H. J.; Zhang, Q. Q.; Rhee, M.; Figueroa, O.

    1992-01-01

    NASA is currently developing Space Shuttle-based refilling of helium using superfluid helium on-orbit transfer (SHOOT). All the critical components of SHOOT need to be developed through ground-based tests. The helium dewar is one of these components. The Dewar consists of a vacuum vessel enclosing a superinsulated tank. The space between the vacuum vessel and the liquid tank is considered a common vacuum space. In the event that the vacuum is lost, the heat transfers to the dewar and the pressure inside the dewar increases rapidly, resulting in rupture of the dewar due to excessive pressure. Therefore, an emergency vent line is required for release of helium to prevent the dewar from rupturing. The study describes a numerical model for blow-down analysis in an emergency. This qualifies the design of the emergency vent line to be adequate for the assumed heat loads to the helium dewar.

  12. Efficient helium recondensing using a 4 K pulse tube cryocooler

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Chao

    2005-12-01

    This paper introduces helium recondensing in a 4000 l dewar using a 4 K pulse tube cryocooler at Amundsen-Scott research station at the South Pole. The helium dewar has a normal boil-off rate of 14 l/day. Two features of cooling the dewar neck by helium vapor and precooling helium gas to be liquefied ensured high efficiency of the pulse tube recondenser in this application. The liquefier/recondenser has being successfully operating in the dewar at South Pole station since February 2005. It not only maintains zero boil-off of the dewar, but also liquefies helium gas supplied from outside of the dewar with a rate around 2.7 l/day.

  13. Detailed and simplified nonequilibrium helium ionization in the solar atmosphere

    SciTech Connect

    Golding, Thomas Peter; Carlsson, Mats; Leenaarts, Jorrit E-mail: mats.carlsson@astro.uio.no

    2014-03-20

    Helium ionization plays an important role in the energy balance of the upper chromosphere and transition region. Helium spectral lines are also often used as diagnostics of these regions. We carry out one-dimensional radiation-hydrodynamics simulations of the solar atmosphere and find that the helium ionization is set mostly by photoionization and direct collisional ionization, counteracted by radiative recombination cascades. By introducing an additional recombination rate mimicking the recombination cascades, we construct a simplified three-level helium model atom consisting of only the ground states. This model atom is suitable for modeling nonequilibrium helium ionization in three-dimensional numerical models. We perform a brief investigation of the formation of the He I 10830 and He II 304 spectral lines. Both lines show nonequilibrium features that are not recovered with statistical equilibrium models, and caution should therefore be exercised when such models are used as a basis for interpretating observations.

  14. Helium cooling systems for large superconducting physics detector magnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Green, M. A.

    The large superconducting detector magnets used for high energy physics experiments are virtually all indirectly cooled. In general, these detector magnets are not cryogenically stabilized. Therefore, there are a number of choices for cooling large indirectly cooled detector magnets. These choices include; 1) forced two-phase helium cooling driven by the helium refrigerator J-T circuit, 2) forced two-phase helium cooling driven by a helium pump, and 3) a peculation gravity feed cooling system which uses liquid helium from a large storage dewar. The choices for the cooling of a large detector magnet are illustrated by applying these concepts to a 4.2 meter diameter 0.5 tesla thin superconducting solenoid for an experiment at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC).

  15. Double photoionization of helium with synchrotron x-rays: Proceedings

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-01-01

    This report contains papers on the following topics: Overview and comparison of photoionization with charged particle impact; The ratio of double to single ionization of helium: the relationship of photon and bare charged particle impact ionization; Double photoionization of helium at high energies; Compton scattering of photons from electrons bound in light elements; Electron ionization and the Compton effect in double ionization of helium; Elimination of two atomic electrons by a single energy photon; Double photoionization of helium at intermediate energies; Double Photoionization: Gauge Dependence, Coulomb Explosion; Single and Double Ionization by high energy photon impact; The effect of Compton Scattering on the double to single ionization ratio in helium; and Double ionization of He by photoionization and Compton scattering. These papers have been cataloged separately for the database.

  16. Blow-down analysis of helium from a cryogenic dewar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khan, H. J.; Zhang, Q. Q.; Rhee, M.; Figueroa, O.

    NASA is currently developing Space Shuttle-based refilling of helium using superfluid helium on-orbit transfer (SHOOT). All the critical components of SHOOT need to be developed through ground-based tests. The helium dewar is one of these components. The Dewar consists of a vacuum vessel enclosing a superinsulated tank. The space between the vacuum vessel and the liquid tank is considered a common vacuum space. In the event that the vacuum is lost, the heat transfers to the dewar and the pressure inside the dewar increases rapidly, resulting in rupture of the dewar due to excessive pressure. Therefore, an emergency vent line is required for release of helium to prevent the dewar from rupturing. The study describes a numerical model for blow-down analysis in an emergency. This qualifies the design of the emergency vent line to be adequate for the assumed heat loads to the helium dewar.

  17. Cosmic Ray Helium Intensities over the Solar Cycle from ACE

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DeNolfo, G. A.; Yanasak, N. E.; Binns, W. R.; Cohen, C. M. S.; Cummings, A. C.; Davis, A. J.; George, J. S.; Hink. P. L.; Israel, M. H.; Lave, K.; Leske, R. A.; Mewaldt, R. A.; Moskalenko, I. V.; Ogliore, R.; Stone, E. C.; Von Rosenvinge, T. T.; Wiedenback, M. E.

    2007-01-01

    Observations of cosmic-ray helium energy spectra provide important constraints on cosmic ray origin and propagation. However, helium intensities measured at Earth are affected by solar modulation, especially below several GeV/nucleon. Observations of helium intensities over a solar cycle are important for understanding how solar modulation affects galactic cosmic ray intensities and for separating the contributions of anomalous and galactic cosmic rays. The Cosmic Ray Isotope Spectrometer (CRIS) on ACE has been measuring cosmic ray isotopes, including helium, since 1997 with high statistical precision. We present helium elemental intensities between approx. 10 to approx. 100 MeV/nucleon from the Solar Isotope Spectrometer (SIS) and CRIS observations over a solar cycle and compare these results with the observations from other satellite and balloon-borne instruments, and with GCR transport and solar modulation models.

  18. 43 CFR 3195.31 - What are the general terms of an In-Kind Crude Helium Sales Contract?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... Crude Helium Sales Contract? 3195.31 Section 3195.31 Public Lands: Interior Regulations Relating to...) HELIUM CONTRACTS Federal Helium Supplier Requirements § 3195.31 What are the general terms of an In-Kind Crude Helium Sales Contract? A BLM helium In-Kind Crude Helium Sales Contract requires you to:...

  19. 43 CFR 3195.31 - What are the general terms of an In-Kind Crude Helium Sales Contract?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... Crude Helium Sales Contract? 3195.31 Section 3195.31 Public Lands: Interior Regulations Relating to...) HELIUM CONTRACTS Federal Helium Supplier Requirements § 3195.31 What are the general terms of an In-Kind Crude Helium Sales Contract? A BLM helium In-Kind Crude Helium Sales Contract requires you to:...

  20. 43 CFR 3195.31 - What are the general terms of an In-Kind Crude Helium Sales Contract?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... Crude Helium Sales Contract? 3195.31 Section 3195.31 Public Lands: Interior Regulations Relating to...) HELIUM CONTRACTS Federal Helium Supplier Requirements § 3195.31 What are the general terms of an In-Kind Crude Helium Sales Contract? A BLM helium In-Kind Crude Helium Sales Contract requires you to:...

  1. 43 CFR 3195.31 - What are the general terms of an In-Kind Crude Helium Sales Contract?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... Crude Helium Sales Contract? 3195.31 Section 3195.31 Public Lands: Interior Regulations Relating to...) HELIUM CONTRACTS Federal Helium Supplier Requirements § 3195.31 What are the general terms of an In-Kind Crude Helium Sales Contract? A BLM helium In-Kind Crude Helium Sales Contract requires you to:...

  2. Heating rate measurements over 30 deg and 40 deg (half angle) blunt cones in air and helium in the Langley expansion tube facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reddy, N. M.

    1980-01-01

    Convective heat transfer measurements, made on the conical portion of spherically blunted cones (30 deg and 40 deg half angle) in an expansion tube are discussed. The test gases used were helium and air; flow velocities were about 6.8 km/sec for helium and about 5.1 km/sec for air. The measured heating rates are compared with calculated results using a viscous shock layer computer code. For air, various techniques to determine flow velocity yielded identical results, but for helium, the flow velocity varied by as much as eight percent depending on which technique was used. The measured heating rates are in satisfactory agreement with calculation for helium, assuming the lower flow velocity, the measurements are significantly greater than theory and the discrepancy increased with increasing distance along the cone.

  3. Using Uncertainty Principle to Find the Ground-State Energy of the Helium and a Helium-like Hookean Atom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harbola, Varun

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, we accurately estimate the ground-state energy and the atomic radius of the helium atom and a helium-like Hookean atom by employing the uncertainty principle in conjunction with the variational approach. We show that with the use of the uncertainty principle, electrons are found to be spread over a radial region, giving an electron…

  4. Standard solar models, with and without helium diffusion, and the solar neutrino problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bahcall, J. N.; Pinsonneault, M. H.

    1992-10-01

    We first show that, with the same input parameters, the standard solar models of Bahcall and Ulrich; of Sienkiewicz, Bahcall, and Paczyński of Turck-Chièze, Cahen, Cassé, and Doom; and of the current Yale code all predict event rates for the chlorine experiment that are the same within +/-0.1 SNU (solar neutrino units), i.e., approximately 1% of the total calculated rate. We then construct new standard solar models using the Yale stellar evolution computer code supplemented with a more accurate (exportable) nuclear energy generation routine, an improved equation of state, recent determinations of element abundances, and the new Livermore (OPAL) opacity calculations. We evaluate the individual effects of different improvements by calculating a series of precise models, changing only one aspect of the solar model at a time. We next add a new subroutine that calculates the diffusion of helium with respect to hydrogen with the aid of the Bahcall-Loeb formalism. Finally, we compare the neutrino fluxes computed from our best solar models constructed with and without helium diffusion. We find that helium diffusion increases the predicted event rates by about 0.8 SNU, or 11% of the total rate, in the chlorine experiment; by about 3.5 SNU, or 3%, in the gallium experiments; and by about 12% in the Kamiokande and SNO experiments. The best standard solar model including helium diffusion and the most accurate nuclear parameters, element abundances, radiative opacity, and equation of state predicts a value of 8.0+/-3.0 SNU for the 37Cl experiment and 132+21-17 SNU for the 71Ga experiment. The quoted errors represent the total theoretical range and include the effects on the model predictions of 3σ errors in measured input parameters. All 15 calculations since 1968 of the predicted rate in the chlorine experiment given in this series of papers are consistent with both the range estimated in the present work and the 1968 best-estimate value of 7.5+/-2.3 SNU. Including the

  5. A 1.8K refrigeration cryostat with 100 hours continuous cooling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Dong; Li, Jian; Huang, Rongjin; Li, Laifeng

    2017-02-01

    A refrigeration cryostat has been developed to produce continuous cooling to a sample below 1.8 K over 100 hours by using a cryocooler. A two-stage 4K G-M cryocooler is used to liquefy helium gas from evacuated vapor and cylinder helium bottle which can be replaced during the cooling process. The liquid helium transfer into superfluid helium in a Joule-Thomson valve in connection with a 1000 m3/h pumping unit. The pressure of evacuated helium vapor is controlled by air bag and valves. A copper decompression chamber, which is designed as a cooling station to control the superfluid helium, is used to cool the sample attached on it uniformly. The sample connects to the copper chamber in cryostat with screw thread. The cryostat can reach the temperature of 1.7 K without load and the continuous working time is more than 100 hours.

  6. A new approach to constrain basal helium flux into aquifers for better estimation of groundwater ages by Helium 4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsumoto, Takuya; Sturchio, Neil C.; Chang, Hung K.; Gastmans, Didier; Araguas-Araguas, Luis J.; Jiang, Wei; Lu, Zheng-Tian; Mueller, Peter; Yokochi, Reika; Purtschert, Roland; Zongyu, Chen; Shuiming, Hu; Aggarwal, Pradeep K.

    2016-04-01

    beams, minimizing the size of the sample to be processed for analysis. Being a noble gas, krypton does not form compounds in the aquifer and is only derived from atmospheric sources. The long half-life and the lack of geochemical interactions make this radionuclide an excellent tracer to estimate groundwater ages in deep aquifer systems. Krypton-81 results offer also the possibility of calibrating groundwater ages derived from helium-4 accumulation method. Until recently, helium-4 ages were calibrated to account for the basal helium flux on carbon-14 ages, but the relatively short half-life of carbon-14 often led to inaccurate age estimates for groundwater ages older than about 100 000 years. We will present a new approach to utilize 81Kr to optimize the parameters of conceptual groundwater flow model and the size of 4He basal flux, which yielded a reasonable agreement between 81Kr and 4He ages in two large and old aquifers in Brazil (Aggarwal et al., Nature Geoscience, 8, 35-39, 2015) and in the North China Plain.

  7. Exergy Analysis of the Cryogenic Helium Distribution System for the Large Hadron Collider (lhc)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Claudet, S.; Lebrun, Ph.; Tavian, L.; Wagner, U.

    2010-04-01

    The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN features the world's largest helium cryogenic system, spreading over the 26.7 km circumference of the superconducting accelerator. With a total equivalent capacity of 145 kW at 4.5 K including 18 kW at 1.8 K, the LHC refrigerators produce an unprecedented exergetic load, which must be distributed efficiently to the magnets in the tunnel over the 3.3 km length of each of the eight independent sectors of the machine. We recall the main features of the LHC cryogenic helium distribution system at different temperature levels and present its exergy analysis, thus enabling to qualify second-principle efficiency and identify main remaining sources of irreversibility.

  8. Using polycrystalline bismuth filter in an ultracold neutron source with superfluid helium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serebrov, A. P.; Lyamkin, V. A.; Runov, V. V.; Ivanov, S. A.; Onegin, M. S.; Fomin, A. K.

    2015-10-01

    Placing polycrystalline bismuth filter in front of an ultracold neutron (UCN) source with superfluid helium at 1 K is shown to be effective. The use of this filter ensures a 30-fold decrease (down to 0.5 W) in the level of heat load in the UCN source, while reducing by 30% the flux of neutrons with 9-Å wavelength (which are converted into UCNs). The phenomenon of small-angle scattering on polycrystalline bismuth has been studied and shown to be insignificant. Cooling of the filter to liquid nitrogen temperature increases the transmission of 9-Å neutrons by only 8%; hence, creation of this cooling system is inexpedient. A project of a technological complex designed for the UCN source at the PIK reactor is presented, which ensures the removal of 1-W heat load from the UCN source with superfluid helium at a 1-K temperature level.

  9. Surface morphology of tungsten exposed to helium plasma at temperatures below fuzz formation threshold 1073 K

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakamoto, Ryuichi; Bernard, Elodie; Kreter, Arkadi; Yoshida, Naoaki

    2017-01-01

    Impact of crystal orientation on the surface morphology of the helium plasma exposed tungsten has been investigated on the linear device PSI-2. A nanoscale undulating surface structure having a periodic arrangement is formed for temperatures below 1073 K, in contrast to the fuzz nanostructure formation in a higher temperature range. The crests of undulation align with the < 1 0 0> direction. The interval of the undulation is narrowest at the crystal grain of {1 1 0} surface. The interval becomes wider as the crystal grain surface tilts away from the {1 1 0} surface, and the undulating surface structure is not formed near the {1 0 0} surface. The height of undulations is ∼ 8 nm, independently of the interval of the undulations, and it corresponds to the depth of the layer heavily damaged due to helium plasma exposure.

  10. [Oxygen metabolism in the body during substitution of nitrogen by helium in the air].

    PubMed

    Troshikhin, G V; Isaakian, L A; Bekirova, G G

    1975-01-01

    The total gas exchange, body temperature, content of free oxygen in the quadriceps muscle and its changes upon oxygen inhalation of a known dosage (oxygen test) were measured in the Wistar rats during their one-hour exposure to a helium-oxygen atmosphere (21%) at 25 degrees C. In this atmosphere the animals displayed a 1.8 degrees decline in the body temperature, a 20.5% increase in the gas exchange and a 26% decrease of oxygen in the muscular tissue as compared with the respective parameters in the air. After the experiment during the first 20 min exposure to the normal atmosphere oxygen tests were 10-15% lower than before the experiment. These findings give evidence for an increase of oxygen exchange in the muscles of animals exposed to the helium-oxygen atmosphere at a temperature below the comfortable level.

  11. The structure of triply excited, negative-ion resonances in the autoionizing region of helium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trantham, K. W.; Jacka, M.; Rau, A. R. P.; Buckman, S. J.

    1999-02-01

    The formation and decay of the two lowest-lying, triply excited 0953-4075/32/3/021/img7 resonances in the autoionizing region of the helium spectrum (57-60 eV) have been studied by measuring electron-impact excitation functions for the n = 2 singly excited states of helium as a function of electron scattering angle. These results offer unambiguous confirmation of the classification of these states as 0953-4075/32/3/021/img8 and 0953-4075/32/3/021/img9, respectively. Furthermore, the observation of the relative strengths of the decay of these features into the various final states enables some speculation as to the structure of the three excited electrons.

  12. A pyroloysis technique for determining microamounts of hydrogen in lunar soil using the helium ionization detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bustin, R.

    1983-01-01

    A method has been developed which will determine hydrogen in sub-milligram samples of lunar soil. It consists of heating the sample in a pyroprobe followed by the gas chromatographic determination of hydrogen using the helium ionization detector. Using a 7 foot, 1/8 OD stainless steel column packed with Carbosieve S, 120/140 mesh, hydrogen was well-separated from the other gases released from lunar soil. Standards of hydrogen in helium were used for calibration. The limit to detection under the conditions used was about 2 ng. The method was linear from 2 ng to 270 ng. The method was checked using some actual lunar samples. Results were typical of those obtained for lunar soils using other methods.

  13. A liquid-helium-cooled absolute reference cold load for long-wavelength radiometric calibration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bensadoun, Marc; Witebsky, Chris; Smoot, George; De Amici, Giovanni; Kogut, AL; Levin, Steve

    1992-01-01

    Design, radiometric and thermal performance, and operation of a large diameter (78 cm) liquid-helium-cooled blackbody absolute reference cold load (CL) for the calibration of microwave radiometers is described. CL provides an absolute calibration near the liquid-helium (LHe) boiling point, with total uncertainty in the radiometric temperature of less than 30 mK over the 2.5-23 cm wavelength operating range. CL was used at several wavelengths at the South Pole, Antarctica and the White Mountain Research Center, California. Results show that, for the instruments operated at 20-, 12-, 7.9-, and 4.0 cm wavelength at the South Pole, the total corrections to the LHe boiling-point temperature (about 3.8 K) were 48 +/-23, 18 +/-10, 10 +/-18, and 15 +/-mK.

  14. Analisys of Helium fluxes and Helium Enhancement in 24th solar cycle with PAMELA Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mergé, Matteo

    2015-04-01

    The properties of solar energetic particles (SEPs) have long been modeled to constrain the proposed scenarios for particle acceleration. The challenge, however, is that the signatures of acceleration gleaned from SEP observations are modified as a consequence of transport within interplanetary space. PAMELA (Payload for Antimatter Matter Exploration and Light-nuclei Astrophysics) is a space-borne experiment launched in a semi-polar orbit on 15 June 2006 and continuously collecting data since then. On-board instrumentation is built around a permanent magnet with a silicon microstrip tracker, providing charge and track deflection information. The unique observations from PAMELA provide an essential link between highest and lowest energy particles. Several events registered during the 24th solar activity cycle showed an increase in the helium particle density, those events are good candidates to study the helium enhancement phenomena (an increase in H to He ratio at low energies) and to address the charge/mass dependence of acceleration mechanisms.

  15. Three-body recombination in cold helium-helium-alkali-metal-atom collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Suno, Hiroya; Esry, B. D.

    2009-12-15

    Three-body recombination in helium-helium-alkali-metal collisions at cold temperatures is studied using the adiabatic hyperspherical representation. The rates for the three-body recombination processes {sup 4}He+{sup 4}He+X->{sup 4}He+{sup 4}HeX and {sup 4}He+{sup 4}He+X->{sup 4}He{sub 2}+X, with X={sup 7}Li, {sup 23}Na, {sup 39}K, {sup 85}Rb, and {sup 133}Cs, are calculated at nonzero collision energies by including not only zero total angular momentum, J=0, states but also J>0 states. The three-body recombination rates show a relatively weak dependence on the alkali-metal species, differing from each other only by about one order of magnitude, except for the {sup 4}He-{sup 4}He-{sup 23}Na system.

  16. Superconducting cable cooling system by helium gas and a mixture of gas and liquid helium

    DOEpatents

    Dean, John W.

    1977-01-01

    Thermally contacting, oppositely streaming cryogenic fluid streams in the same enclosure in a closed cycle that changes from a cool high pressure helium gas to a cooler reduced pressure helium fluid comprised of a mixture of gas and boiling liquid so as to be near the same temperature but at different pressures respectively in go and return legs that are in thermal contact with each other and in thermal contact with a longitudinally extending superconducting transmission line enclosed in the same cable enclosure that insulates the line from the ambient at a temperature T.sub.1. By first circulating the fluid in a go leg from a refrigerator at one end of the line as a high pressure helium gas near the normal boiling temperature of helium; then circulating the gas through an expander at the other end of the line where the gas becomes a mixture of reduced pressure gas and boiling liquid at its boiling temperature; then by circulating the mixture in a return leg that is separated from but in thermal contact with the gas in the go leg and in the same enclosure therewith; and finally returning the resulting low pressure gas to the refrigerator for compression into a high pressure gas at T.sub.2 is a closed cycle, where T.sub.1 >T.sub.2, the temperature distribution is such that the line temperature is nearly constant along its length from the refrigerator to the expander due to the boiling of the liquid in the mixture. A heat exchanger between the go and return lines removes the gas from the liquid in the return leg while cooling the go leg.

  17. Effect of ion flux on helium retention in helium-irradiated tungsten

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rivera, A.; Valles, G.; Caturla, M. J.; Martin-Bragado, I.

    2013-05-01

    Helium retention in irradiated tungsten leads to swelling, pore formation, sample exfoliation and embrittlement with deleterious consequences in many applications. In particular, the use of tungsten in future nuclear fusion plants is proposed due to its good refractory properties. However, serious concerns about tungsten survivability stems from the fact that it must withstand severe irradiation conditions. In magnetic fusion as well as in inertial fusion (particularly with direct drive targets), tungsten components will be exposed to low and high energy ion irradiation (helium), respectively. A common feature is that the most detrimental situations will take place in pulsed mode, i.e., high flux irradiation. There is increasing evidence of a correlation between a high helium flux and an enhancement of detrimental effects on tungsten. Nevertheless, the nature of these effects is not well understood due to the subtleties imposed by the exact temperature profile evolution, ion energy, pulse duration, existence of impurities and simultaneous irradiation with other species. Object Kinetic Monte Carlo is the technique of choice to simulate the evolution of radiation-induced damage inside solids in large temporal and space scales. We have used the recently developed code MMonCa (Modular Monte Carlo simulator), presented at COSIRES 2012 for the first time, to study He retention (and in general defect evolution) in tungsten samples irradiated with high intensity helium pulses. The code simulates the interactions among a large variety of defects and during the irradiation stage and the subsequent annealing steps. The results show that the pulsed mode leads to significantly higher He retention at temperatures higher than 700 K. In this paper we discuss the process of He retention in terms of trap evolution. In addition, we discuss the implications of these findings for inertial fusion.

  18. Helium and Sulfur Hexafluoride in Musical Instruments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forinash, Kyle; Dixon, Cory L.

    2014-11-01

    The effects of inhaled helium on the human voice were investigated in a recent article in The Physics Teacher.1 As mentioned in that article, demonstrations of the effect are a popular classroom activity. If the number of YouTube videos is any indication, the effects of sulfur hexafluoride on the human voice are equally popular. However, there appears to be little information available on the effects of either of these gases on musical instruments.2 We describe here the results of a student project that involved measuring the frequency shifts in an organ pipe, a trumpet, and a trombone as the result of filling the instruments with these two gases. The project was one of several possible end-of-semester projects required in an elective science of sound course for non-science majors.

  19. Investigating Electrical Breakdown in Liquid Helium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouman, Nathaniel; SNS nEDM Collaboration

    2016-09-01

    The SNS nEDM experiment at Oak Ridge National Laboratory aims to search for the electric dipole moment of the neutron (nEDM) at the 3x10-28 level. The experiment is currently in the critical component demonstration phase. The design of the experiment calls for an electric field of 75 kV/cm across the experimental cells between electrodes within a bath of liquid helium (LHe). However, the electric breakdown phenomenon in LHe is poorly understood. Experiments investigating the breakdown of LHe were carried out at Los Alamos National Laboratory using a small-scale high voltage (SSHV) test apparatus at temperatures from 1.7K to 4K. Effects of varying temperature, pressure, and electrode surface conditions on LHe breakdown were investigated. Results and their implications to the SNS nEDM experiment will be presented.

  20. Positronium and Electron Scattering on Helium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DiRienzi, Joseph

    2011-01-01

    A recent work [1] establishes experimentally that Positronium scattering by atoms of various elements is surprisingly close in total cross-section to that of an isolated electron of the same velocity. In this work we will look at the scattering of Ps on Helium and compare it to a determination of the scattering of an e- with the same element. For both the Ps scattering and the e- scattering on He, we assume the symmetrization of the e- with the closed shell He electrons is the dominant interaction. A local effective potential employed in [2] and [3] is used to model the electron exchange and cross- sections are determined for a set of partial waves. For the Ps scattering we include as a secondary effect the Van der Waals interaction. For single e- scattering of He, we also employ a short range Coulomb potential and dispersion as contributing effects. Results of the cross-sections determined in each case are then compared

  1. Lunar Helium-3 and Fusion Power

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1988-01-01

    The NASA Office of Exploration sponsored the NASA Lunar Helium-3 and Fusion Power Workshop. The meeting was held to understand the potential of using He-3 from the moon for terrestrial fusion power production. It provided an overview, two parallel working sessions, a review of sessions, and discussions. The lunar mining session concluded that mining, beneficiation, separation, and return of He-3 from the moon would be possible but that a large scale operation and improved technology is required. The fusion power session concluded that: (1) that He-3 offers significant, possibly compelling, advantages over fusion of tritium, principally increased reactor life, reduced radioactive wastes, and high efficiency conversion, (2) that detailed assessment of the potential of the D/He-3 fuel cycle requires more information, and (3) D/He-3 fusion may be best for commercial purposes, although D/T fusion is more near term.

  2. Helium isotopes and tectonics in southern Italy

    SciTech Connect

    Sano, Yuji; Wakita, Hiroshi ); Nuccio, M.P. ); Italiano, F.

    1989-06-01

    Geodynamic evolution of southern Italy can be understood within the framework of the Mediterranean-Alpine System. Subduction of a plate along the Sicily-Calabrian forearc under the Tyrrhenian Sea has been suggested by many geophysicists, although it is not yet confirmed and remains somewhat controversial. Helium isotope ratios provide useful information on the geotectonic structure of the region. The authors report here the {sup 3}H/{sup 4}He ratios of terrestrial gas samples from southern Italy. The observed {sup 3}He/{sup 4}He ratios are relatively high in the Eolian volcanic arc region and low in the other areas. Dichotomous explanations are presented. Firstly, volcanic arc-forearc hypothesis suggests the subduction along the Sicily-Calabrian forearc. Secondly, horizontal transport hypothesis is described based on the relationship between the ratios and radial distance from the recent spreading basin in Southern Tyrrhenian Sea.

  3. Testing CPT Invariance with Antiprotonic Helium Atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Horvath, Dezso

    2008-08-08

    The structure of matter is related to symmetries at every level of study. CPT symmetry is one of the most important laws of field theory: it states the invariance of physical properties when one simultaneously changes the signs of the charge and of the spatial and time coordinates of free elementary particles. Although in general opinion CPT symmetry is not violated in Nature, there are theoretical attempts to develop CPT-violating models. The Antiproton Decelerator at CERN has been built to test CPT invariance. The ASACUSA experiment compares the properties of particles and antiparticles by studying the antiprotonic helium atom via laser spectroscopy and measuring the mass, charge and magnetic moment of the antiproton as compared to those of the proton.

  4. An Update of the Primordial Helium Abundance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peimbert, Antonio; Peimbert, Manuel; Luridiana, Valentina

    2015-08-01

    Three of the best determinations of the primordial helium abundance (Yp) are those obtained from low metallicity HII regions by Aver, Olive, Porter, & Skillman (2013); Izotov, Thuan, & Guseva (2014); and Peimbert, Peimbert, & Luridiana (2007). In this poster we update the Yp determination by Peimbert et al. taking into account, among other aspects, recent advances in the determination of the He atomic physical parameters, the temperature structure, the collisional effects of high temperatures on the Balmer lines, as well as the effect of H and He bound-bound absorption.We compare our results with those of Aver et al. and Izotov et al. and point out possible explanations for the differences among the three determinations. We also compare our results with those obtained with the Plank satellite considering recent measurements of the neutron mean life; this comparison has implications on the determination of the number of light neutrino families.

  5. Compact hydrogen/helium isotope mass spectrometer

    DOEpatents

    Funsten, Herbert O.; McComas, David J.; Scime, Earl E.

    1996-01-01

    The compact hydrogen and helium isotope mass spectrometer of the present invention combines low mass-resolution ion mass spectrometry and beam-foil interaction technology to unambiguously detect and quantify deuterium (D), tritium (T), hydrogen molecule (H.sub.2, HD, D.sub.2, HT, DT, and T.sub.2), .sup.3 He, and .sup.4 He concentrations and concentration variations. The spectrometer provides real-time, high sensitivity, and high accuracy measurements. Currently, no fieldable D or molecular speciation detectors exist. Furthermore, the present spectrometer has a significant advantage over traditional T detectors: no confusion of the measurements by other beta-emitters, and complete separation of atomic and molecular species of equivalent atomic mass (e.g., HD and .sup.3 He).

  6. Characterization of reconnecting vortices in superfluid helium

    PubMed Central

    Bewley, Gregory P.; Paoletti, Matthew S.; Sreenivasan, Katepalli R.; Lathrop, Daniel P.

    2008-01-01

    When two vortices cross, each of them breaks into two parts and exchanges part of itself for part of the other. This process, called vortex reconnection, occurs in classical and superfluids, and in magnetized plasmas and superconductors. We present the first experimental observations of reconnection between quantized vortices in superfluid helium. We do so by imaging micrometer-sized solid hydrogen particles trapped on quantized vortex cores and by inferring the occurrence of reconnection from the motions of groups of recoiling particles. We show that the distance separating particles on the just-reconnected vortex lines grows as a power law in time. The average value of the scaling exponent is approximately ½, consistent with the self-similar evolution of the vortices. PMID:18768790

  7. Vacancy-induced flow of solid helium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benedek, Giorgio; Kalinin, Anton; Nieto, Pablo; Toennies, J. Peter

    2016-03-01

    The pulsed flow of solid 4He through a narrow capillary in a flow system which issues into vacuum is investigated at temperatures between 1.64 and 2.66 K and pressures between 54 and 104 bars. After each pulse three different capillary flow regimes are observed as the upstream pressure decreases: an oscillatory [mini-geyser (MG)] regime, a constant flow (CF) regime with a linearly decreasing pressure difference, and a nonresistant (NR) regime. A quantitative analysis of the three regimes suggests that the flow of solid 4He is driven by a counterflow of excess vacancies, which are injected downstream of the capillary at the solid/liquid interface near the micrometric orifice exposed to vacuum. The CF regime, where the flow velocity is found to be independent of the pressure difference, and the NR regime, where the solid flows as a Bernoulli fluid, suggest a new dynamic phase of solid helium induced by a steady influx of vacancies.

  8. Ion Beam Scattering by Background Helium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grillet, Anne; Hughes, Thomas; Boerner, Jeremiah

    2015-11-01

    The presence of background gases can cause charged particle beams to become more diffuse due to scattering. Calculations for the transport of an ion beam have been performed using Aleph, a particle-in-cell plasma modeling code, and verified against a general envelop equation for charged particle beams. We have investigated the influence of background helium on the coherence and transmitted current of the ion beam. Collisions between ions and neutral particles were calculated assuming isotropic elastic scattering. Since this tends to predict larger scattering angles than are expected at high energies, these are conservative estimates for beam scattering. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration.

  9. Radiative corrections to the polarizability of helium.

    PubMed

    Łach, Grzegorz; Jeziorski, Bogumił; Szalewicz, Krzysztof

    2004-06-11

    The complete alpha(3) QED correction to the helium atom polarizability is computed assuming an infinite nuclear mass and found to be equal to 0.000030666(3) a.u., with the contribution from the electric-field dependence of the Bethe logarithm amounting to 0.000000193(2) a.u. After including the alpha(2) and alpha(3) corrections for the nuclear recoil and the leading part of the alpha(4) QED correction, we find that the molar polarizability of 4He is 0.51725419(9)(4) cm(3)/mol. The first of the two error bounds is dominated by the uncertainty of alpha(4) and higher-order QED corrections and the second reflects the uncertainty of the Avogadro constant.

  10. Radiative Corrections to the Polarizability of Helium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Łach, Grzegorz; Jeziorski, Bogumił; Szalewicz, Krzysztof

    2004-06-01

    The complete α3 QED correction to the helium atom polarizability is computed assuming an infinite nuclear mass and found to be equal to 0.000 030 666(3)a.u., with the contribution from the electric-field dependence of the Bethe logarithm amounting to 0.000 000 193(2)a.u. After including the α2 and α3 corrections for the nuclear recoil and the leading part of the α4 QED correction, we find that the molar polarizability of 4He is 0.517 254 19(9)(4) cm3/mol. The first of the two error bounds is dominated by the uncertainty of α4 and higher-order QED corrections and the second reflects the uncertainty of the Avogadro constant.

  11. Helium behavior in vanadium-based alloys irradiated in the dynamic helium charging experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Fukumoto, K.; Matsui, H.; Chung, H.M.; Gazda, J.; Smith, D.L.

    1996-12-31

    Helium effect of neutron irradiated vanadium alloys, containing titanium, has been studied using Dynamic Helium Charging Experiment (DHCE) in FFTF. Cavity formation was observed only in pure vanadium irradiated at 430 to 600 C and in V-5Ti irradiated at 600 C. No apparent cavity formation was obtained in V-3Ti-1Si and V-4Cr-4Ti. The precipitation of titanium oxide in V-5Ti, V-3Ti-1Si and V-4Cr-4Ti occurred in all irradiation conditions in this study and the precipitates of Ti{sub 5}Si{sub 3} only appeared in V-3Ti-1Si irradiated at 600 C up to 15 dpa with helium generation rate of 4 appmHe/dpa. It is suggested that titanium oxide plays an important role for suppression of cavity formation and swelling from early stage of irradiation. Detail characterization of precipitates and He effect for neutron damages in vanadium alloys are discussed here.

  12. Liquid Oxygen Thermodynamic Vent System Testing with Helium Pressurization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    VanDresar, Neil T.

    2014-01-01

    This report presents the results of several thermodynamic vent system (TVS) tests with liquid oxygen plus a test with liquid nitrogen. In all tests, the liquid was heated above its normal boiling point to 111 K for oxygen and 100 K for nitrogen. The elevated temperature was representative of tank conditions for a candidate lunar lander ascent stage. An initial test series was conducted with saturated oxygen liquid and vapor at 0.6 MPa. The initial series was followed by tests where the test tank was pressurized with gaseous helium to 1.4 to 1.6 MPa. For these tests, the helium mole fraction in the ullage was quite high, about 0.57 to 0.62. TVS behavior is different when helium is present than when helium is absent. The tank pressure becomes the sum of the vapor pressure and the partial pressure of helium. Therefore, tank pressure depends not only on temperature, as is the case for a pure liquid-vapor system, but also on helium density (i.e., the mass of helium divided by the ullage volume). Thus, properly controlling TVS operation is more challenging with helium pressurization than without helium pressurization. When helium was present, the liquid temperature would rise with each successive TVS cycle if tank pressure was kept within a constant control band. Alternatively, if the liquid temperature was maintained within a constant TVS control band, the tank pressure would drop with each TVS cycle. The final test series, which was conducted with liquid nitrogen pressurized with helium, demonstrated simultaneous pressure and temperature control during TVS operation. The simultaneous control was achieved by systematic injection of additional helium during each TVS cycle. Adding helium maintained the helium partial pressure as the liquid volume decreased because of TVS operation. The TVS demonstrations with liquid oxygen pressurized with helium were conducted with three different fluid-mixer configurations-a submerged axial jet mixer, a pair of spray hoops in the tank

  13. Neutral atom lithography with metastable helium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allred, Claire Shean

    In this dissertation we describe our performance of resist assisted neutral atom lithography using a bright beam of metastable 23S1 Helium (He*). Metastable Helium atoms have 20 eV of internal energy making them easy to detect and able to destroy a resist. The He* is produced by a reverse flow DC discharge source and then collimated with the bichromatic force, followed by three optical molasses velocity compression stages. The atoms in the resulting beam have a mean longitudinal velocity of 1125 m/s and a divergence of 1.1 mrad. The typical beam flux is 2 x 109 atoms/mm2s through a 0.1mm diameter aperture 70 cm away from the source. The internal energy of the atoms damages the molecules of a self assembled monolayer (SAM) of nonanethiol. The undisturbed SAM protects a 200 A layer of gold that has been evaporated onto a prepared Silicon wafer from a wet chemical etch. Two methods are used to pattern the He* atoms before they destroy the SAM. First, a Nickel micro mesh was used to protect the SAM. These experiments established an appropriate dosage and etch time for patterning. The samples were analyzed with an atomic force microscope and found to have an edge resolution of 63 nm. Then, patterning was accomplished using the dipole force the atoms experience while traversing a standing wave of lambda = 1083nm light tuned 500MHz below the 23S 1 → 23P2 transition. Depending on the intensity of the light, the He* atoms are focused or channeled into lines separated by lambda/2. The lines cover the entire exposed length of the substrate, about 3 mm. They are about 3 mm long, corresponding to about twice the beam waist of the laser standing wave. Thus there are 6 x 10 3 lines of length 5500lambda. These results agree with our numerical simulations of the experiment.

  14. STIRAP on helium: Excitation to Rydberg states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Deqian

    Research in optically induced transitions between dierent atomic levels has a long history. For transitions between states driven by a coherent optical eld, the theoretical eciency could be ideally high as 100% but there could be many factors preventing this. In the three state helium atom excitation process, i.e. 23S→33P→nL , the stimulated emission from intermediate state makes it hard to achieve ecient population transfer to the nal state through an intuitive excitation order. One technique to achieve a higher eciency is Stimulated Raman Adiabatic Passage (STIRAP) which is being studied and under research in our lab. Unlike traditional three level excitation processes, STIRAP actually uses a counter intuitive pulsed laser beams timing arrangement. The excitation objects are metastable helium atoms traveling in a vacuum system with a longitudinal velocity of ~ 1070 m/s. We are using a 389 nm UV laser to connect the 23S and the 33P state and a frequency tunable ~790 nm IR laser to connect the 33P state and the dierent Rydberg states. A third 1083 nm wavelength laser beam drives the 23S → 23P transition to transversely separate the residual metastable atoms and the Rydberg atoms for eciency measurements. The data is taken by a stainless steel detector in the vacuum system. As the Rydberg atoms will get ionized by blackbody radiation under room temperature, we can utilize this for their detection. An ion detector sitting on the eld plate is capable to collect the ion signals of the Rydberg atoms for detection. So far the whole system has not been ready for data collection and measurement, so here we are using data and results from previous theses for discussions. The highest transition frequency that has ever been achieved in our lab is around 70% after corrections.

  15. Primordial helium and the cosmic background radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Steigman, Gary

    2010-04-01

    The products of primordial nucleosynthesis, along with the cosmic microwave background (CMB) photons, are relics from the early evolution of the Universe whose observations probe the standard model of cosmology and provide windows on new physics beyond the standard models of cosmology and of particle physics. According to the standard, hot big bang cosmology, long before any stars have formed a significant fraction ( ∼ 25%) of the baryonic mass in the Universe should be in the form of helium-4 nuclei. Since current observations of {sup 4}He are restricted to low redshift regions where stellar nucleosynthesis has occurred, an observation of high redshift, prestellar, truly primordial {sup 4}He would constitute a fundamental test of the hot, big bang cosmology. At recombination, long after big bang nucleosynthesis (BBN) has ended, the temperature anisotropy spectrum imprinted on the CMB depends on the {sup 4}He abundance through its connection to the electron density and the effect of the electron density on Silk damping. Since the relic abundance of {sup 4}He is relatively insensitive to the universal density of baryons, but is sensitive to a non-standard, early Universe expansion rate, the primordial mass fraction of {sup 4}He, Yp, offers a test of the consistency of the standard models of BBN and the CMB and, provides constraints on non-standard physics. Here, the WMAP seven year data (supplemented by other CMB experiments), which lead to an indirect determination of Yp at high redshift, are compared to the BBN predictions and to the independent, direct observations of {sup 4}He in low redshift, extragalactic HII regions. At present, given the very large uncertainties in the CMB-determined primordial {sup 4}He abundance (as well as for the helium abundances inferred from HII region observations), any differences between the BBN predictions and the CMB observations are small, at a level ∼<1.5σ.

  16. Analytical modeling of helium turbomachinery using FORTRAN 77

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balaji, Purushotham

    Advanced Generation IV modular reactors, including Very High Temperature Reactors (VHTRs), utilize helium as the working fluid, with a potential for high efficiency power production utilizing helium turbomachinery. Helium is chemically inert and nonradioactive which makes the gas ideal for a nuclear power-plant environment where radioactive leaks are a high concern. These properties of helium gas helps to increase the safety features as well as to decrease the aging process of plant components. The lack of sufficient helium turbomachinery data has made it difficult to study the vital role played by the gas turbine components of these VHTR powered cycles. Therefore, this research work focuses on predicting the performance of helium compressors. A FORTRAN77 program is developed to simulate helium compressor operation, including surge line prediction. The resulting design point and off design performance data can be used to develop compressor map files readable by Numerical Propulsion Simulation Software (NPSS). This multi-physics simulation software that was developed for propulsion system analysis has found applications in simulating power-plant cycles.

  17. Helium solubility in SON68 nuclear waste glass

    SciTech Connect

    Fares, Toby; Peuget, Sylvain; Bouty, Olivier; Broudic, Veronique; Maugeri, Emilio; Bes, Rene; Jegou, Christophe; Chamssedine, Fadel; Sauvage, Thierry; Deschanels, Xavier

    2012-12-15

    Helium behavior in a sodium borosilicate glass (SON68) dedicated to the immobilization of high-level nuclear waste is examined. Two experimental approaches on nonradioactive glass specimens are implemented: pressurized helium infusion experiments and {sup 3}He ion implantation experiments. The temperature variation of helium solubility in SON68 glass was determined and analyzed with the harmonic oscillator model to determine values of the energy of interaction E(0) at the host sites (about -4000 J/mol), the vibration frequency (about 1.7 x 10{sup 11} s{sup -1}), and the density of solubility sites (2.2 x 10{sup 21} sites cm{sup -3}). The implantation experiments show that a non diffusive transport phenomenon (i.e., athermal diffusion) is involved in the material when the helium concentration exceeds 2.3 x 10{sup 21} He cm{sup -3}, and thus probably as soon as it exceeds the density of solubility sites accessible to helium in the glass. We propose that this transport mechanism could be associated with the relaxation of the stress gradient induced by the implanted helium profile, which is favored by the glass damage. Microstructural characterization by TEM and ESEM of glass specimens implanted with high helium concentrations showed a homogeneous microstructure free of bubbles, pores, or cracking at a scale of 10 nm. (authors)

  18. Atomic interactions between plutonium and helium.

    SciTech Connect

    Valone, S. M.; Baskes, M. I.; Martin, R. L.

    2002-01-01

    An essential issue in gallium (Ga)-stabilized fcc-phase plutonium ({delta}-Pu) is the formation of helium (He) voids and bubbles emanating from the radiolytic decay of the Pu. The rate of formation of He voids and bubbles is related to the He-defect formation energies and their associated migration barriers. The size and shape distributions of the bubbles are coupled to these critical migration processes. The values of the defect formation energies, internal pressure, and migration barriers can be estimated from atomistic calculations. Complicating this picture is the destruction of He-filled voids and bubbles by subsequent radiolytic decay events. The present study concerns the construction of the necessary potential energy surfaces for the Pu-He and He-He interactions within the modified embedded atom method (MEAM). Once fully tested, the potentials will be used to estimate the He-defect formation energies and barriers to the migration of these defects for both interstitial and substitutional He on an fcc Pu lattice. The He-He interactions are modeled from ab initio electronic structure calculations for the He{sub 2} dimer and the equilateral He, trimer. The experimental data and the electronic structure calculations on He{sub 2} agree very well. These data were fit to a Rose function fn{sub R}(x) = A P({alpha}x) exp(-{alpha}x), where P is a polynomial, x = R/R{sub 0}-1, R is the bond length, and R{sub 0} is its equilibrium value. The fits are very satisfactory. Both linear (P = 1+{alpha}x, zeroth-order Rose) and rational (P = 1+{alpha}x+a{sub 3} ({alpha}x){sup 3}/(1+x) first-order Rose) polynomials in the Rose function were tried. The more flexible rational form does improve the fit, but only marginally. Only the linear form was used thereafter. The resulting MEAM potential was used to predict the behavior of the linear trimer and the fcc cold compression curve. The results are shown in Fig. 2 and appear to be satisfactory. The compression regions of the curves

  19. Effects of helium and air inhalation on the innate and early adaptive immune system in healthy volunteers ex vivo

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Helium inhalation protects myocardium, brain and endothelium against ischemia/reperfusion injury in animals and humans, when applied according to specific “conditioning” protocols. Before widespread use of this “conditioning” agent in clinical practice, negative side effects have to be ruled out. We investigated the effect of prolonged helium inhalation on the responsiveness of the human immune response in whole blood ex vivo. Methods Male healthy volunteers inhaled 30 minutes heliox (79%He/21%O2) or air in a cross over design, with two weeks between measurements. Blood was withdrawn at T0 (baseline), T1 (25 min inhalation) and T2-T5 (1, 2, 6, 24 h after inhalation) and incubated with lipopolysaccharide (LPS), lipoteichoic acid (LTA), T-cell stimuli anti-CD3/ anti-CD28 (TCS) or RPMI (as control) for 2, 4 and 24 hours or not incubated (0 h). An additional group of six volunteers inhaled 60 minutes of heliox or air, followed by blood incubation with LPS and RPMI. Tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), interleukin-1β (IL-1β), interleukin-6 (IL-6), interleukin-8 (IL-8), interferon-γ (IFN-γ) and interleukin-2 (IL-2) was analyzed by cytometric bead array. Statistical analysis was performed by the Wilcoxon test for matched samples. Results Incubation with LPS, LTA or TCS significantly increased TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-6, IL-8, IFN-γ and IL-2 in comparison to incubation with RPMI alone. Thirty min of helium inhalation did not influence the amounts of TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-6, IL-8, IFN-γ and IL-2 in comparison to air. Sixty min of helium inhalation did not affect cytokine production after LPS stimulation. Conclusions We conclude that 79% helium inhalation does not affect the responsiveness of the human immune system in healthy volunteers. Trial registration Dutch Trial Register: http://www.trialregister.nl/ NTR2152 PMID:23006534

  20. Cosmogenic Helium In Alluvial Diamonds From Namaqualand, South Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burgess, R.; Harris, J. W.

    2005-12-01

    The interpretation of He in diamonds is not straightforward, potential sources include trapped mantle-derived He, radiogenic 4He, and 3He produced in situ by cosmic-ray spallation. The presence of cosmogenic 3He is manifested by high 3He/4He values and ratios of >200 Ra have been measured. 3He contents can be used to distinguish pipe from alluvial diamonds and the time interval that they have been involved in the sedimentary cycle, i.e. their surface exposure history. This is important information for locating the source of alluvial diamonds, understanding their transport histories and may provide a useful tool for diamond exploration. In this study we are analysing the He composition of ten alluvial diamonds from the Koignass-Namaqualand area along the south-west coast of South Africa and Namibia. Diamonds are currently mined at a depth of 100m below the surface from deposits of gravel beaches and river channels. Helium is extracted from the diamonds using a newly developed high temperature filament furnace having a blank approximately 200x lower than conventional resistance furnaces. The low blank of this system means it is possible to extract He by stepwise heating of diamonds weighing 0.05 g. Helium isotopes were analysed using a mass spectrometer with a 3He detection limit of 2,000,000 atoms equivalent to about 20 ka of surface exposure. Results from one diamond from Namaqualand illustrate the range of data obtained so far. This diamond was analysed using eight temperature steps and shows an overall increase in 3He/4He value with temperature from 8.8 x 10-6 to 2.6 x 10-2, the latter being only 10x lower than the pure spallogenic ratio. The cosmogenic 3He content is estimated at 73.5 x 10-12 cm3/g which is at the upper end of the range determined previously in alluvial diamonds from west African sources. Assuming a sea level 3He production rate at 30°S, then the 3He content of this diamond is equivalent to 16 Ma of surface exposure. Most of this exposure is

  1. Pretreatment with helium does not attenuate liver injury after warm ischemia-reperfusion.

    PubMed

    Braun, Sebastian; Plitzko, Gabriel; Bicknell, Leonie; van Caster, Patrick; Schulz, Jan; Barthuber, Carmen; Preckel, Benedikt; Pannen, Benedikt H; Bauer, Inge

    2014-05-01

    Preconditioning with noble gases serves as an effective strategy to diminish tissue injury in different organs. The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of pretreatment with the nonanesthetic noble gas helium on hepatic injury after warm ischemia and reperfusion (IR) in comparison to ischemic preconditioning (IPC). Anesthetized and ventilated rats were randomized into six groups (n = 8/group): sham: after laparotomy, the portal triad was exposed without clamping; IPC was performed with 10 min of partial liver ischemia and 10 min of reperfusion; HePC: three cycles of 5 min with inhalation of helium 70 vol% and intermittent washout; IR: 45 min of ischemia followed by 240 min of reperfusion; IPC-IR: IPC followed by hepatic IR; HePC-IR: pretreatment with helium 70 vol% followed by hepatic IR. Hepatic injury was evaluated by measurement of serum enzymes aspartate aminotransferase and alanine aminotransferase. Hepatic mRNA expression and serum levels of tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α) and interleukin 10 (IL-10) were measured with real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, respectively. Myeloperoxidase in liver tissue was assessed spectrophotometrically as a marker of neutrophil accumulation. mRNA levels of heme oxygenase 1 in liver tissue were assessed to investigate a protein of the most abundant protective system in the liver. Aspartate aminotransferase and alanine aminotransferase serum activities increased after hepatic IR (sham vs. IR; P < 0.05). The serum levels of liver enzymes after IR were significantly diminished with IPC (P < 0.05), whereas helium pretreatment had no effect. mRNA expression of TNF-α increased in all groups except IPC-IR compared with sham, whereas mRNA expression of IL-10 increased only after helium pretreatment. Serum levels of IL-10 were not affected by any intervention, whereas serum levels of TNF-α and liver myeloperoxidase were increased after IR, but not after HePC-IR. In

  2. Multi-objective Optimization on Helium Liquefier Using Genetic Algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, H. R.; Xiong, L. Y.; Peng, N.; Meng, Y. R.; Liu, L. Q.

    2017-02-01

    Research on optimization of helium liquefier is limited at home and abroad, and most of the optimization is single-objective based on Collins cycle. In this paper, a multi-objective optimization is conducted using genetic algorithm (GA) on the 40 L/h helium liquefier developed by Technical Institute of Physics and Chemistry of the Chinese Academy of Science (TIPC, CAS), steady solutions are obtained in the end. In addition, the exergy loss of the optimized system is studied in the case of with and without liquid nitrogen pre-cooling. The results have guiding significance for the future design of large helium liquefier.

  3. Helium at White Dwarf Photospheric Conditions: Preliminary Laboratory Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaeuble, M.; Falcon, R. E.; Gomez, T. A.; Winget, D. E.; Montgomery, M. H.; Bailey, J. E.

    2017-03-01

    We present preliminary results of an experimental study exploring helium at photospheric conditions of white dwarf stars. These data were collected at Sandia National Laboratories' Z-machine, the largest x-ray source on earth. Our helium results could have many applications ranging from validating current DB white dwarf model atmospheres to providing accurate He pressure shifts at varying temperatures and densities. In a much broader context, these helium data can be used to guide theoretical developments in new continuum-lowering models for two-electron atoms. We also discuss future applications of our updated experimental design, which enables us to sample a greater range of densities, temperatures, and gas compositions.

  4. Acquisition system testing with superfluid helium. [cryopumping for space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, John E.; Fester, Dale A.; Dipirro, Michael J.

    1988-01-01

    Minus one-g outflow tests were conducted with superfluid helium in conjunction with a thermomechanical pump setup in order to study the use of capillary acquisition systems for NASA's Superfluid Helium On-Orbit Transfer (SHOOT) flight experiment. Results show that both fine mesh screen and porous sponge systems are capable of supplying superfluid helium to the thermomechanical pump inlet against a one-g head up to 4 cm, fulfilling the SHOOT requirements. Sponge results were found to be reproducible, while the screen results were not.

  5. Performance of Oil-Injected Scroll Compressors for Helium Refrigerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shiibayashi, Masao; Izunaga, Yasushi; Sado, Shintaro

    In recent years there arises growing demand of helium liquefaction refrigerators for the magnetic resonance imaging systems, magnetically levitated vehicles and other systems using superconducting magnet. From this background, a small size, scroll type of hermetic helium compressor capable of compressing helium gas to the pressure ratio of 20 in a single stage is developed. Main features of this compressor are as follows. 1) Discharge capacity can be varied from 7 to 20 Nm3/h by changing driving motor frequency from 30 to 80 Hz. 2) The overall adiabatic efficiency showed 72%∼79% under the pressure ratio range of 11∼20 at 60 Hz using oil injection cooling device.

  6. Evaluation of charcoal sorbents for helium cryopumping in fusion reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Tobin, A.G.; Sedgley, D.W.; Batzer, T.H.; Call, W.R.

    1987-01-01

    Improved methods for cryopumping helium were developed for application to fusion reactors where high helium generation rates are expected. In this study, small coconut charcoal granules were utilized as the sorbent, and braze alloys and low temperature curing cements were used as the bonding agents for attachment to a copper support structure. Problems of scale-up of the bonding agent to a 40 cm diam panel were also investigated. Our results indicate that acceptable helium pumping performance of braze bonded and cement bonded charcoals can be achieved over the range of operating conditions expected in fusion reactors.

  7. Observation of a superfluid component within solid helium.

    PubMed

    Lauter, H; Apaja, V; Kalinin, I; Kats, E; Koza, M; Krotscheck, E; Lauter, V V; Puchkov, A V

    2011-12-23

    We demonstrate by neutron scattering that a localized superfluid component exists at high pressures within solid helium in aerogel. Its existence is deduced from the observation of two sharp phonon-roton spectra which are clearly distinguishable from modes in bulk superfluid helium. These roton excitations exhibit different roton gap parameters than the roton observed in the bulk fluid at freezing pressure. One of the roton modes disappears after annealing the samples. Comparison with theoretical calculations suggests that the model that reproduces the observed data best is that of superfluid double layers within the solid and at the helium-substrate interface.

  8. 43 CFR 3195.36 - What happens if there is a shortage of helium?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... helium? 3195.36 Section 3195.36 Public Lands: Interior Regulations Relating to Public Lands (Continued) BUREAU OF LAND MANAGEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR MINERALS MANAGEMENT (3000) HELIUM CONTRACTS Federal Helium Supplier Requirements § 3195.36 What happens if there is a shortage of helium? If there is...

  9. 43 CFR 3195.34 - What happens to my Helium Distribution Contracts?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false What happens to my Helium Distribution...) BUREAU OF LAND MANAGEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR MINERALS MANAGEMENT (3000) HELIUM CONTRACTS Federal Helium Supplier Requirements § 3195.34 What happens to my Helium Distribution Contracts?...

  10. 43 CFR 3195.34 - What happens to my Helium Distribution Contracts?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false What happens to my Helium Distribution...) BUREAU OF LAND MANAGEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR MINERALS MANAGEMENT (3000) HELIUM CONTRACTS Federal Helium Supplier Requirements § 3195.34 What happens to my Helium Distribution Contracts?...

  11. 43 CFR 3195.30 - How do I apply to become a Federal helium supplier?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false How do I apply to become a Federal helium...) BUREAU OF LAND MANAGEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR MINERALS MANAGEMENT (3000) HELIUM CONTRACTS Federal Helium Supplier Requirements § 3195.30 How do I apply to become a Federal helium supplier? In order...

  12. 43 CFR 3195.30 - How do I apply to become a Federal helium supplier?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false How do I apply to become a Federal helium...) BUREAU OF LAND MANAGEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR MINERALS MANAGEMENT (3000) HELIUM CONTRACTS Federal Helium Supplier Requirements § 3195.30 How do I apply to become a Federal helium supplier? In order...

  13. 43 CFR 3195.36 - What happens if there is a shortage of helium?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... helium? 3195.36 Section 3195.36 Public Lands: Interior Regulations Relating to Public Lands (Continued) BUREAU OF LAND MANAGEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR MINERALS MANAGEMENT (3000) HELIUM CONTRACTS Federal Helium Supplier Requirements § 3195.36 What happens if there is a shortage of helium? If there is...

  14. 43 CFR 3195.30 - How do I apply to become a Federal helium supplier?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false How do I apply to become a Federal helium...) BUREAU OF LAND MANAGEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR MINERALS MANAGEMENT (3000) HELIUM CONTRACTS Federal Helium Supplier Requirements § 3195.30 How do I apply to become a Federal helium supplier? In order...

  15. 43 CFR 3195.34 - What happens to my Helium Distribution Contracts?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false What happens to my Helium Distribution...) BUREAU OF LAND MANAGEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR MINERALS MANAGEMENT (3000) HELIUM CONTRACTS Federal Helium Supplier Requirements § 3195.34 What happens to my Helium Distribution Contracts?...

  16. 43 CFR 3195.36 - What happens if there is a shortage of helium?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... helium? 3195.36 Section 3195.36 Public Lands: Interior Regulations Relating to Public Lands (Continued) BUREAU OF LAND MANAGEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR MINERALS MANAGEMENT (3000) HELIUM CONTRACTS Federal Helium Supplier Requirements § 3195.36 What happens if there is a shortage of helium? If there is...

  17. 43 CFR 3195.34 - What happens to my Helium Distribution Contracts?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false What happens to my Helium Distribution...) BUREAU OF LAND MANAGEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR MINERALS MANAGEMENT (3000) HELIUM CONTRACTS Federal Helium Supplier Requirements § 3195.34 What happens to my Helium Distribution Contracts?...

  18. 43 CFR 3195.30 - How do I apply to become a Federal helium supplier?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false How do I apply to become a Federal helium...) BUREAU OF LAND MANAGEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR MINERALS MANAGEMENT (3000) HELIUM CONTRACTS Federal Helium Supplier Requirements § 3195.30 How do I apply to become a Federal helium supplier? In order...

  19. 43 CFR 3195.36 - What happens if there is a shortage of helium?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... helium? 3195.36 Section 3195.36 Public Lands: Interior Regulations Relating to Public Lands (Continued) BUREAU OF LAND MANAGEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR MINERALS MANAGEMENT (3000) HELIUM CONTRACTS Federal Helium Supplier Requirements § 3195.36 What happens if there is a shortage of helium? If there is...

  20. How to make Raman-inactive helium visible in Raman spectra of tritium-helium gas mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Schloesser, M.; Pakari, O.; Rupp, S.; Mirz, S.; Fischer, S.

    2015-03-15

    Raman spectroscopy, a powerful method for the quantitative compositional analysis of molecular gases, e.g. mixtures of hydrogen isotopologues, is not able to detect monoatomic species like helium. This deficit can be overcome by using radioluminescence emission from helium atoms induced by β-electrons from tritium decay. We present theoretical considerations and combined Raman/radioluminescence spectra. Furthermore, we discuss the linearity of the method together with validation measurements for determining the pressure dependence. Finally, we conclude how this technique can be used for samples of helium with traces of tritium, and vice versa. (authors)

  1. Helium exchange gas based variable temperature insert for cryogen-free magnet system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nadaf, A.; Kar, S.; Kumar, M.; Dutt, R. N.; Das, A.; Singh, F.; Posa, L.; Datta, T. S.; Sarangi, S. K.

    2017-02-01

    A cryocooler based variable temperature inserts (VTI) has been designed and developed for measurement of physical properties at low temperature and high magnetic field. The VTI, designed using the helium exchange gas principle, needs to be integrated in the warm bore of an existing 6 T cryogen free magnet system. The lowest temperature achieved at the sample is 5 K at 34.5 kPa (∼5 psi) gaseous helium environment in the sample space. The equilibrium temperature of the sample, at the vacuum condition, is 8.7 K. The cool-down time of the sample at vacuum environment is 9 hrs whereas it takes 7 hrs in presence of helium exchange gas. The temperature of the sample was varied up to 325 K. The stability of the temperature achieved is less than 50 mK. The cooling and heating curves has been studied to estimate time required for a complete cycle of experiment. This paper will briefly present the design and performance of VTI system in temperature range of 5-325 K.

  2. The Bremen mass spectrometric facility for the measurement of helium isotopes, neon, and tritium in water.

    PubMed

    Sültenfuss, Jürgen; Roether, Wolfgang; Rhein, Monika

    2009-06-01

    We describe the mass spectrometric facility for measuring helium isotopes, neon, and tritium that has been operative at this institute since 1989, and also the sampling and sample preparation steps that precede the mass spectrometric analysis. For water samples in a near-equilibrium with atmospheric air, the facility achieves precision for (3)He/(4)He ratios of+/-0.4% or better, and+/-0.8 % or better for helium and neon concentrations. Tritium precision is typically+/-3 % and the detection limit 10 mTU ( approximately 1.2.10(-3) Bq/kg of pure water). Sample throughputs can reach some thousands per year. These achievements are enabled, among other features, by automation of the measurement procedure and by elaborate calibration, assisted by continual development in detail. To date, we have measured more than 15,000 samples for tritium and 23,000 for helium isotopes and neon, mostly in the context of oceanographic and hydrologic work. Some results of such work are outlined. Even when atmospheric tritium concentrations have become rather uniform, tritium provides water ages if (3)He data are taken concurrently. The technique can resolve tritium concentrations in waters of the pre-nuclear era.

  3. Helium-neon laser improves bone repair in rabbits: comparison at two anatomic sites.

    PubMed

    Peccin, Maria Stella; de Oliveira, Flavia; Muniz Renno, Ana Claudia; Pacheco de Jesus, Gustavo Protasio; Pozzi, Renan; Gomes de Moura, Carolina Foot; Giusti, Paulo Ricardo; Ribeiro, Daniel Araki

    2013-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the influence of helium-neon laser on bone repair of femur and tibia in rabbits. For this purpose, 15 New Zealand rabbits underwent bilateral bone damage (tibia and femur) using a spherical bur. Helium-neon laser light, at a fluency of 6 J∕cm(2) and wavelength of 632.8 nm was applied on the left legs (laser group). The right tibia or femur lesions (control group) served as negative control. All sections were histopathologically analyzed using HE sections and the morphometric data from bone tissue and hyaline cartilage were achieved. Histopathological analysis showed regular bone trabeculae covered by osteoblastic cells after 1 week in the group exposed to laser therapy from femur and tibia indistinctly. After 3 weeks, the laser group showed new bone formation coming from the bony walls in the femur and tibia as well. On the 5th week, well-defined trabecula undergoing remodeling process was detected for the most intense pattern in tibia only. Morphometric analysis revealed significant statistical differences (p < 0.05) in the bone tissue for the laser-exposed group on 1st and 3rd weeks. After 5th week, bone formation was increased to tibia only. Taken together, such findings suggest that helium-neon laser is able to improve bone repair in rabbits being the most pronounced effect in tibia.

  4. Numerical simulation of low-temperature helium plasma source for biomedical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bekasov, Vladimir; Zamchy, Roman; Kudryavtsev, Anatoly

    2016-09-01

    Numerical simulation of low-temperature helium plasma for biomedical applications was conducted. The plasma source is presented as a rod electrode located above the grounded plate. Helium acts as a working gas, which is supplied to the discharge through a quartz tube surrounding the rod electrode. An AC voltage with a frequency of 13 kHz and amplitude of up to 3 kV is applied to the electrode. Distance between rod tip and plate varies from 1 to 8 centimeters. Helium blow rate is considered in the range from 1 to 10 m / s. For a description of the discharge, in this paper, two-dimensional extended fluid model was presented. It consists of the continuity equations for calculating the concentration of particles, the energy balance equation for finding the electron temperature and the Poisson equation for electric fields. To calculate the velocity of neutral particles Navier-Stokes equations was solved, and thermal conductivity equation was solved for calculating the heating of the neutral gas. The work was supported by Saint Petersburg State University (Grant ?11.37.212.2016).

  5. Time Variations of Cosmic-Ray Helium Isotopes with Bess-Polar I

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abe, K.; Fuke, H.; Haino, S.; Hams, T.; Hasegawa, M.; Horikoshi, A.; Itazaki, A.; Kim, K. C.; Kumazawa, T.; Kusumoto, A.; Lee, M. H.; Makida, Y.; Matsuda, S.; Matsukawa, Y.; Matsumoto, K.; Mitchell, John W.; Moiseev, A. A.; Nishimura, J.; Nozaki, M.; Orito, R.; Ormes, J. F.; Picot-Clemente, N.; Sakai, K.; Sasaki, M.; Seo, E. S.; Shikaze, Y.; Shinoda, R.; Streitmatter, R. E.; Suzuki, J.; Takasugi, Y.; Takeuchi, K.; Tanaka, K.; Thakur, N.; Yamagami, T.; Yamamoto, A.

    2013-01-01

    The Balloon-borne Experiment with a Superconducting Spectrometer (BESS) is configured with a solenoidal superconducting magnet and a suite of precision particle detectors, including time-of-flight hodoscopes based on plastic scintillators, a silica-aerogel Cherenkov detector, and a high resolution tracking system with a central jet-type drift chamber. The charges of incident particles are determined from energy losses in the scintillators. Their magnetic rigidities (momentum charge) are measured by reconstructing each particle trajectory in the magnetic field, and their velocities are obtained by using the time-of-flight system. Together, these measurements can accurately identify helium isotopes among the incoming cosmic-ray helium nuclei up to energies in the GeV per nucleon region. The BESS-Polar I instrument flew for 8.5 days over Antarctica from December 13th to December 21st, 2004. Its long-duration flight and large geometric acceptance allow the time variations of isotopic fluxes to be studied for the first time. The time variations of helium isotope fluxes are presented here for rigidities from 1.2 to 2.5 GV and results are compared to previously reported proton data and neutron monitor data.

  6. Time Variations of Cosmic-Ray Helium Isotopes with BESS-Polar I

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abe, K.; Fuke, H.; Haino, S.; Hams, T.; Hasegawa, M.; Horikoshi, A.; Itazaki, A.; Kim, K. C.; Kumazawa, T.; Kusumoto, A.; Lee, M. H..; Makida, Y.; Matsuda, S.; Matsukawa, Y.; Matsumoto, K.; Mitchell, J. W.; Moiseev, A. A.; Nishimura, J.; Nozaki, M.; Orito, R.; Ormes, J. F.; Picot-Clemente, N.; Sakai, K.; Sasaki, M.; Seo, E. S.; Shikaze, Y.; Streitmatter, R. E.

    2013-01-01

    The Balloon-borne Experiment with a Superconducting Spectrometer (BESS) is configured with a solenoidal superconducting magnet and a suite of precision particle detectors, including time-of-flight hodoscopes based on plastic scintillators, a silica-aerogel Cherenkov detector, and a high resolution tracking system with a central jet-type drift chamber. The charges of incident particles are determined from energy losses in the scintillators. Their magnetic rigidities (momentum/charge) are measured by reconstructing each particle trajectory in the magnetic field, and their velocities are obtained by using the time-of-flight system. Together, these measurements can accurately identify helium isotopes among the incoming cosmic-ray helium nuclei up to energies in the GeV per nucleon region. The BESS-Polar I instrument flew for 8.5 days over Antarctica from December 13th to December 21st, 2004. Its long-duration flight and large geometric acceptance allow the time variations of isotopic fluxes to be studied for the first time. The time variations of helium isotope fluxes are presented here for rigidities from 1.2 to 2.5 GV and results are compared to previously reported proton data and neutron monitor data.

  7. BESS-Polar II Measurements of the Cosmic-ray Proton and Helium Spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakai, Kenichi

    The energy spectra of cosmic-ray protons and helium near solar minimum were precisely measured with BESS-Polar II (Balloon-borne Experiment with a Superconducting Spectrometer) during a long-duration flight over Antarctica in December 2007 and January 2008. The absolute fluxes and spectral shapes of primary protons and helium probe the origin and the propagation history of cosmic rays in the Galaxy. The spectra are also essential as inputs to calculate the spectrum of cosmic-ray antiprotons, which are secondary products of cosmic-ray interactions with the interstellar gas. To optimize the measurement of the magnetic rigidity of incident particles, obtained from the curvature of their trajectories in a solenoidal magnetic field of 0.8 Tesla, an improved calibration of the central JET-type drift chamber and two inner drift chambers was developed. We report absolute spectra of primary cosmic-ray protons to ˜ 120 GeV and helium to ˜ 50 GeV/nucleon, and compare these to other current measurements. We also report antiproton/proton ratio in the range 0.17 to 3.5 GeV. The temporal variation of the antiproton/proton ratio, measured by BESS since 1993, covering solar minimum, solar maximum, and solar magnetic field reversal, provides a crucial test of charge-sign dependence of solar modulation.

  8. Time variations of cosmic-ray helium isotopes with BESS-Polar I

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abe, K.; Fuke, H.; Haino, S.; Hams, T.; Hasegawa, M.; Horikoshi, A.; Itazaki, A.; Kim, K. C.; Kumazawa, T.; Kusumoto, A.; Lee, M. H.; Makida, Y.; Matsuda, S.; Matsukawa, Y.; Matsumoto, K.; Mitchell, J. W.; Moiseev, A. A.; Nishimura, J.; Nozaki, M.; Orito, R.; Ormes, J. F.; Picot-Clémente, N.; Sakai, K.; Sasaki, M.; Seo, E. S.; Shikaze, Y.; Shinoda, R.; Streitmatter, R. E.; Suzuki, J.; Takasugi, Y.; Takeuchi, K.; Tanaka, K.; Thakur, N.; Yamagami, T.; Yamamoto, A.; Yoshida, T.; Yoshimura, K.

    2014-05-01

    The Balloon-borne Experiment with a Superconducting Spectrometer (BESS) is configured with a solenoidal superconducting magnet and a suite of precision particle detectors, including time-of-flight hodoscopes based on plastic scintillators, a silica-aerogel Cherenkov detector, and a high resolution tracking system with a central jet-type drift chamber. The charges of incident particles are determined from energy losses in the scintillators. Their magnetic rigidities (momentum/charge) are measured by reconstructing each particle trajectory in the magnetic field, and their velocities are obtained by using the time-of-flight system. Together, these measurements can accurately identify helium isotopes among the incoming cosmic-ray helium nuclei up to energies in the GeV per nucleon region. The BESS-Polar I instrument flew for 8.5 days over Antarctica from December 13th to December 21st, 2004. Its long-duration flight and large geometric acceptance allow the time variations of isotopic fluxes to be studied for the first time. The time variations of helium isotope fluxes are presented here for rigidities from 1.2 to 2.5 GV and results are compared to previously reported proton data and neutron monitor data.

  9. A systematic regional trend in helium isotopes across the northernbasin and range province, Western North America

    SciTech Connect

    Kennedy, B. Mack; van Soest, Matthijs C.

    2006-05-01

    An extensive study of helium isotopes in fluids collectedfrom surface springs, fumaroles and wells across the northern Basin andRange Province reveals a systematic trend of decreasing 3He/4He ratiosfrom west to east. The western margin of the Basin and Range ischaracterized by mantle-like ratios (6-8 Ra) associated with active orrecently active crustal magma systems (e.g., Coso, Long Valley,Steamboat, and the Cascade volcanic complex). Moving towards the east,the ratios decline systematically to a background value of ~;0.1 Ra. Theregional trend is consistent with extensive mantle melting concentratedalong the western margin and is coincident with an east-to-west increasein the magnitude of northwest strain. The increase in shear strainenhances crustal permeability resulting in high vertical fluid flow ratesthat preserve the high helium isotope ratios at the surface. Superimposedon the regional trend are "helium spikes," local anomalies in the heliumisotope composition. These "spikes" reflect either local zones of mantlemelting or locally enhanced crustal permeability. In the case of theDixie Valley hydrothermal system, it appears to be a combination ofboth.

  10. Phase separation in hydrogen–helium mixtures at Mbar pressures

    PubMed Central

    Morales, Miguel A.; Schwegler, Eric; Ceperley, David; Pierleoni, Carlo; Hamel, Sebastien; Caspersen, Kyle

    2009-01-01

    The properties of hydrogen–helium mixtures at Mbar pressures and intermediate temperatures (4000 to 10000 K) are calculated with first-principles molecular dynamics simulations. We determine the equation of state as a function of density, temperature, and composition and, using thermodynamic integration, we estimate the Gibbs free energy of mixing, thereby determining the temperature, at a given pressure, when helium becomes insoluble in dense metallic hydrogen. These results are directly relevant to models of the interior structure and evolution of Jovian planets. We find that the temperatures for the demixing of helium and hydrogen are sufficiently high to cross the planetary adiabat of Saturn at pressures ≈5 Mbar; helium is partially miscible throughout a significant portion of the interior of Saturn, and to a lesser extent in Jupiter. PMID:19171896

  11. 79. VIEW FROM SOUTH OF NITROGEN AND HELIUM STORAGE TANKS ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    79. VIEW FROM SOUTH OF NITROGEN AND HELIUM STORAGE TANKS AND CONTROL SKIDS ON SLC-3W FUEL APRON - Vandenberg Air Force Base, Space Launch Complex 3, Launch Pad 3 West, Napa & Alden Roads, Lompoc, Santa Barbara County, CA

  12. Germanium resistance thermometer calibration at superfluid helium temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mason, F. C.

    1985-01-01

    The rapid increase in resistance of high purity semi-conducting germanium with decreasing temperature in the superfluid helium range of temperatures makes this material highly adaptable as a very sensitive thermometer. Also, a germanium thermometer exhibits a highly reproducible resistance versus temperature characteristic curve upon cycling between liquid helium temperatures and room temperature. These two factors combine to make germanium thermometers ideally suited for measuring temperatures in many cryogenic studies at superfluid helium temperatures. One disadvantage, however, is the relatively high cost of calibrated germanium thermometers. In space helium cryogenic systems, many such thermometers are often required, leading to a high cost for calibrated thermometers. The construction of a thermometer calibration cryostat and probe which will allow for calibrating six germanium thermometers at one time, thus effecting substantial savings in the purchase of thermometers is considered.

  13. Development of helium refrigeration/ liquefaction system at BARC, India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ansari, N. A.; Goyal, M.; Chakravarty, A.; Menon, Rajendran S.; Jadhav, M.; Rane Nair, T., Sr.; Kumar, J.; Kumar, N.; Bharti, SK; Chakravarty, Abhilash; Jain, A.; Joemon, V.

    2017-02-01

    An experimental helium refrigerator/liquefier, using ultra high speed cryogenic turboexpanders, is designed and developed at Cryo-Technology Division, BARC. The developed system is based on the modified Claude cycle. The developed system is presently fully functional consisting of process compressor with gas management system, coldbox, helium receiver Dewar, tri-axial transfer line and helium recovery system. Extended trial runs are conducted to evaluate the performance of the developed system. During these trials, liquefaction rate of around 32 l/hr and refrigeration capacity of around 190W is achieved. The paper addresses design, development and commissioning aspects of the developed helium liquefier along with results of performance evaluation trial runs.

  14. Ab initio study of helium behavior in titanium tritides

    SciTech Connect

    Liang, J. H.; Dai, Yunya; Yang, Li; Peng, SM; Fan, K. M.; Long, XG; Zhou, X. S.; Zu, Xiaotao; Gao, Fei

    2013-03-01

    Ab initio calculations based on density functional theory have been performed to investigate the relative stability of titanium tritides and the helium behavior in stable titanium tritides. The results show that the β-phase TiT1.5 without two tritium along the [100] direction (TiT1.5[100]) is more stable than other possible structures. The stability of titanium tritides decrease with the increased generation of helium in TiT1.5[100]. In addition, helium generated by tritium decay prefers locating at a tetrahedral site, and favorably migrates between two neighbor vacant tetrahedral sites through an intermediate octahedral site in titanium tritides, with a migration energy of 0.23 eV. Furthermore, helium is easily accumulated on a (100) plane in β-phase TiT1.5[100].

  15. Mg and Na clusters in a helium matrix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Höller, Johannes; Krotscheck, Eckhard; Zillich, Robert E.

    2015-08-01

    We have studied the adsorption properties of liquid 4He on small Mg and Na clusters. The calculation requires three components: a calculation of the cluster structure, a path-integral Monte Carlo calculation of the structure of the surrounding helium, and the determination of the cluster-helium interaction. The two types of clusters are examples for two physically very different situations: small Mg clusters are insulating and their interaction with the surrounding helium is relatively strong. We find for all cases considered here that these clusters are submersed in the helium droplet and reside basically at its center. Na clusters, on the other hand, are conducting down to very small particle numbers. More important, however, is the fact that the Na-He interaction is much weaker than the He-He attraction which causes small Na clusters to reside at the cluster surface.

  16. The Hall D solenoid helium refrigeration system at JLab

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laverdure, N.; Creel, J.; Dixon, K.; Ganni, V.; Martin, F.; Norton, R.; Radovic, S.

    2014-01-01

    Hall D, the new Jefferson Lab experimental facility built for the 12GeV upgrade, features a LASS 1.85 m bore solenoid magnet supported by a 4.5 K helium refrigerator system. This system consists of a CTI 2800 4.5 K refrigerator cold box, three 150 hp screw compressors, helium gas management and storage, and liquid helium and nitrogen storage for stand-alone operation. The magnet interfaces with the cryo refrigeration system through an LN2-shielded distribution box and transfer line system, both designed and fabricated by JLab. The distribution box uses a thermo siphon design to respectively cool four magnet coils and shields with liquid helium and nitrogen. We describe the salient design features of the cryo system and discuss our recent commissioning experience.

  17. Helium bubble distributions in reactor tank repair specimens. Part 1

    SciTech Connect

    Tosten, M.H.; Kestin, P.A.

    1992-03-01

    This report discusses the Reactor Tank Repair (RTR) program was initiated to develop an in-tank repair process capable of repairing stress corrosion cracks within the SRS reactor tank walls, in the event that such a repair is needed. Previous attempts to repair C-reactor tank with a gas tungsten arc (GTA) welding process were unsuccessful due to significant cracking that occurred in the heat-affected-zones adjacent to the repair welds. It was determined that this additional cracking was a result of helium embrittlement caused by the combined effects of helium (existing within the tank walls), the high heat input associated with the GTA process, and weld shrinkage stresses. Based on the results of earlier studies it was suggested that the effects of helium embrittlement could be minimized by using a low heat input GMA process. Metallographic analysis played an important role throughout the investigation of alternative welding methods for the repair of helium-containing materials.

  18. Technique to eliminate helium induced weld cracking in stainless steels

    SciTech Connect

    Chin-An Wang; Chin, B.A.; Grossbeck, M.L.

    1992-12-31

    Experiments have shown that Type 316 stainless steel is susceptible to heat-affected-zone (HAZ) cracking upon cooling when welded using the gas tungsten arc (GTA) process under lateral constraint. The cracking has been hypothesized to be caused by stress-assisted helium bubble growth and rupture at grain boundaries. This study utilized an experimental welding setup which enabled different compressive stresses to be applied to the plates during welding. Autogenous GTA welds were produced in Type 316 stainless steel doped with 256 appm helium. The application of a compressive stress, 55 Mpa, during welding suppressed the previously observed catastrophic cracking. Detailed examinations conducted after welding showed a dramatic change in helium bubble morphology. Grain boundary bubble growth along directions parallel to the weld was suppressed. Results suggest that stress-modified welding techniques may be used to suppress or eliminate helium-induced cracking during joining of irradiated materials.

  19. Heat capacity and thermal expansion of water and helium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Putintsev, N. M.; Putintsev, D. N.

    2017-04-01

    Original expressions for heat capacity CV and its components, vibrational and configurational components of thermal expansion coefficient were established. The values of CV, Cvib, Cconf, αvib and αconf for water and helium 4He were calculated.

  20. The U.S. Geological Survey National Helium Resource Assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brennan, S. T.; East, J. A., II

    2015-12-01

    In 2013, the U.S. Congress passed legislation directing the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) to complete a national assessment of subsurface helium gas resources. As part of this assessment, the USGS has constructed a database of helium concentration from compositional analyses of produced gas. Though most data of this data is non-proprietary, helium data have been taken from both public and proprietary sources, with a majority taken from the USGS geochemical database (http://energy.usgs.gov/GeochemistryGeophysics/GeochemistryLaboratories/GeochemistryLaboratories-GeochemistryDatabase.aspx#4413382-introduction) and from the U.S. Bureau of Land Management (BLM) natural gas database. Altogether, there are over 16,000 analyses of natural gas composition compiled. In order to complete the assessment, it was necessary to correlate the well data with geologic reservoir data so that the helium concentrations could be compared with the reservoir and field-level gas production, in place gas volumes, and gas recovery factors. The well data from the compiled database were initially cross-referenced with the proprietary IHS Inc. well database, where possible. The results of that effort were then cross-referenced with three additional databases: the proprietary NRG Associates database of significant oil and gas fields of the United States, the non-proprietary U.S. Department of Energy's gas information system (GASIS), and an internal BLM reservoir and field database. These field and reservoir databases provide the data needed to estimate the in-place helium resources for fields with economic concentrations of helium. In order for helium production to be economic, the gas produced from geologic reservoirs must be greater than 0.3 mole percent (mol%), or in the case of liquefied natural gas processing, greater than 0.04 mol%. The field and reservoir specific estimates of total gas in place volumes, gas recovery factors, and helium concentrations, can be used as inputs for a

  1. Analysis of trace halocarbon contaminants in ultra high purity helium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fewell, Larry L.

    1994-01-01

    This study describes the analysis of ultra high purity helium. Purification studies were conducted and containment removal was effected by the utilization of solid adsorbent purge-trap systems at cryogenic temperatures. Volatile organic compounds in ultra high purity helium were adsorbed on a solid adsorbent-cryogenic trap, and thermally desorbed trace halocarbon and other contaminants were analyzed by combined gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

  2. Breakdown of helium nuclei in matter processed near black holes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gould, R. J.

    1985-01-01

    The rate of breakup of helium nuclei by particle induced reactions is computed. It is shown that the rate is determined by the endothermic reaction p + 4He 3He + d, becoming effective at kT approx. few MeV. It is suggested that matter having been processed to these temperatures will be depleted in helium and in the elements C, N, O, and Ne.

  3. Future Energy Source. [Mining Helium-3 on the Moon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    This video describes the efforts of the Center for the Commercial Development of Space in Wisconsin to develop a strategy for mining Helium-3, an efficient, environmentally safe alternative to fossil fuels that exists on the moon. Animated sequences depict the equipment that could mine the lunar surface, boil away Helium-3 to be transported back to earth, and return the soil to the moon without destroying the lunar surface.

  4. Miscibility of hydrogen and helium mixtures at megabar pressures

    SciTech Connect

    Klepeis, J.E.; Schafer, K.J.; Barbee, T.W. III; Ross, M.

    1991-09-01

    Models of Jupiter and Saturn postulate a central rock core surrounded by a fluid mixture of hydrogen and helium. These models suggest that the mixture is undergoing phase separation in Saturn but not Jupiter. State-of-the-art total energy calculations of the enthalpy of mixing for ordered alloys of hydrogen and helium confirm that at least partial phase separation has occurred in Saturn and predict that this process has also begun in Jupiter. 15 refs., 2 figs.

  5. Second virial coefficient of helium adsorbed on liquid hydrogen

    SciTech Connect

    Paine, C.G.; Seidel, G.M. )

    1994-08-01

    The nonlinear dependence of the surface energy of liquid hydrogen as a function of the density of helium gas in equilibrium with the liquid surface has been used to determine the second virial coefficient of the two-dimensional gas of helium atoms adsorbed on the surface. The surface energy of both liquid hydrogen and liquid deuterium has been measured in the presence of [sup 4]He and [sup 3]He. The experimental results are in rough agreement with theoretical prediction.

  6. Thermal spectrum of uranus: implications for large helium abundance.

    PubMed

    Orton, G S

    1986-02-21

    An analysis of the infrared spectrum of Uranus' disk between 7 micrometers and 3 millimeters suggests a volume mixing ratio for helium in the atmosphere of 40 +/- 20 percent, more than for the sun, Jupiter, or Saturn. Alternative explanations require even more extreme assumptions regarding gas abundances or aerosol vertical distribution and spectral properties. The most serious difficulty with a model containing large amounts of helium is devising a credible evolutionary or chemical model explaining the absence or segregation of so much hydrogen.

  7. Glass-to-Metal Seal Against Liquid Helium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watkins, John L.; Gatewood, John R.

    1987-01-01

    Simple compression joint with indium gasket forms demountable seal for superfluids. Seal developed for metal lid on glass jar used in experiments on liquid helium. Glass container allows contents to be viewed for such purposes as calibration of liquid-level detectors and adjustments of displacement plungers. Seal contains liquid helium even when temperature drops below 2.19K. Made from inexpensive, commercially available materials and parts.

  8. Helium segregation on surfaces of plasma-exposed tungsten

    SciTech Connect

    Maroudas, Dimitrios; Blondel, Sophie; Hu, Lin; Hammond, Karl D.; Wirth, Brian D.

    2016-01-21

    Here we report a hierarchical multi-scale modeling study of implanted helium segregation on surfaces of tungsten, considered as a plasma facing component in nuclear fusion reactors. We employ a hierarchy of atomic-scale simulations based on a reliable interatomic interaction potential, including molecular-statics simulations to understand the origin of helium surface segregation, targeted molecular-dynamics (MD) simulations of near-surface cluster reactions, and large-scale MD simulations of implanted helium evolution in plasma-exposed tungsten. We find that small, mobile He-n (1 <= n <= 7) clusters in the near-surface region are attracted to the surface due to an elastic interaction force that provides the thermodynamic driving force for surface segregation. Elastic interaction force induces drift fluxes of these mobile Hen clusters, which increase substantially as the migrating clusters approach the surface, facilitating helium segregation on the surface. Moreover, the clusters' drift toward the surface enables cluster reactions, most importantly trap mutation, in the near-surface region at rates much higher than in the bulk material. Moreover, these near-surface cluster dynamics have significant effects on the surface morphology, near-surface defect structures, and the amount of helium retained in the material upon plasma exposure. We integrate the findings of such atomic-scale simulations into a properly parameterized and validated spatially dependent, continuum-scale reaction-diffusion cluster dynamics model, capable of predicting implanted helium evolution, surface segregation, and its near-surface effects in tungsten. This cluster-dynamics model sets the stage for development of fully atomistically informed coarse-grained models for computationally efficient simulation predictions of helium surface segregation, as well as helium retention and surface morphological evolution, toward optimal design of plasma facing components.

  9. Status of the dynamic helium charging experiment (DHCE)

    SciTech Connect

    Loomis, B.A.; Smith, D.L.; Hamilton, M.L.; Greenwood, L.R.; Clemmer, R.G.; Matsui, H.; Pearce, K.L.; Kopasz, J.P.; Johnson, C.E.

    1992-12-31

    The objective of this experiment is to provide baseline irradiation data on the effects of concurrent helium production and neutron irradiation on the physical and mechanical properties of vanadium alloys. Effects of helium production and irradiation on the alloy microstructures will also be characterized. This report summarizes the status of the DHCE in FFTF-MOTA, the preparations for retrieval of specimens from the irradiation capsules, and experimental results on procedures for the removal of tritium from the irradiated specimens.

  10. Process options for nominal 2-K helium refrigeration system designs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knudsen, Peter; Ganni, Venkatarao

    2012-06-01

    Nominal 2-K helium refrigeration systems are frequently used for superconducting radio frequency and magnet string technologies used in accelerators. This paper examines the trade-offs and approximate performance of four basic types of processes used for the refrigeration of these technologies; direct vacuum pumping on a helium bath, direct vacuum pumping using full or partial refrigeration recovery, cold compression, and hybrid compression (i.e., a blend of cold and warm sub-atmospheric compression).

  11. Diffusion of radiogenic helium in natural uranium oxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roudil, Danièle; Bonhoure, Jessica; Pik, Raphaël; Cuney, Michel; Jégou, Christophe; Gauthier-Lafaye, F.

    2008-08-01

    The issue of nuclear waste management - and especially spent fuel disposal - demands further research on the long-term behavior of helium and its impact on physical changes in UO 2 and (U,Pu)O 2 matrices subjected to self-irradiation. Helium produced by radioactive decay of the actinides concentrates in the grains or is trapped at the grain boundaries. Various scenarios can be considered, and can have a significant effect on the radionuclide source terms that will be accessible to water after the canisters have been breached. Helium production and matrix damage is generally simulated by external irradiation or with actinide-doped materials. A natural uranium oxide sample was studied to acquire data on the behavior of radiogenic helium and its diffusion under self-irradiation in spent fuel. The sample from the Pen Ar Ran deposit in the Vendée region of France dated at 320 ± 9 million of years was selected for its simple geological history, making it a suitable natural analog of spent fuel under repository conditions during the initial period in a closed system not subject to mass transfer with the surrounding environment. Helium outgassing measured by mass spectrometry to determine the He diffusion coefficients through the ore shows that: (i) a maximum of 5% (2.1% on average) of the helium produced during the last 320 Ma in this natural analog was conserved, (ii) about 33% of the residual helium is occluded in the matrix and vacancy defects (about 10 -5 mol g -1) and 67% in bubbles that were analyzed by HRTEM. A similar distribution has been observed in spent fuel and in (U 0.9,Pu 0.1)O 2. The results obtained for the natural Pen Ar Ran sample can be applied by analogy to spent fuel, especially in terms of the apparent solubility limit and the formation, characteristics and behavior of the helium bubbles.

  12. Recovery of purified helium or hydrogen from gas mixtures

    DOEpatents

    Merriman, J.R.; Pashley, J.H.; Stephenson, M.J.; Dunthorn, D.I.

    1974-01-15

    A process is described for the removal of helium or hydrogen from gaseous mixtures also containing contaminants. The gaseous mixture is contacted with a liquid fluorocarbon in an absorption zone maintained at superatomspheric pressure to preferentially absorb the contaminants in the fluorocarbon. Unabsorbed gas enriched in hydrogen or helium is withdrawn from the absorption zone as product. Liquid fluorocarbon enriched in contaminants is withdrawn separately from the absorption zone. (10 claims)

  13. Operations aspects of the Fermilab Central Helium Liquefier Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Geynisman, M.G.; Makara, J.N.

    1995-03-01

    The Fermilab Central Helium Liquefier (CHL) facility consists of helium and nitrogen reliquefier plants operated 24 hours-a-day to supply LHe at 4.6{degrees}K and LN{sub 2} for the Fermilab Tevatron superconducting proton-antiproton collider ring and to recover warm return gases. Operating aspects of CHL, including different equipment and systems reliability, availability, maintenance experience, safety concerns, and economics aspects are discussed.

  14. Process Options for Nominal 2-K Helium Refrigeration System Designs

    SciTech Connect

    Peter Knudsen, Venkatarao Ganni

    2012-07-01

    Nominal 2-K helium refrigeration systems are frequently used for superconducting radio frequency and magnet string technologies used in accelerators. This paper examines the trade-offs and approximate performance of four basic types of processes used for the refrigeration of these technologies; direct vacuum pumping on a helium bath, direct vacuum pumping using full or partial refrigeration recovery, cold compression, and hybrid compression (i.e., a blend of cold and warm sub-atmospheric compression).

  15. Helium segregation on surfaces of plasma-exposed tungsten

    DOE PAGES

    Maroudas, Dimitrios; Blondel, Sophie; Hu, Lin; ...

    2016-01-21

    Here we report a hierarchical multi-scale modeling study of implanted helium segregation on surfaces of tungsten, considered as a plasma facing component in nuclear fusion reactors. We employ a hierarchy of atomic-scale simulations based on a reliable interatomic interaction potential, including molecular-statics simulations to understand the origin of helium surface segregation, targeted molecular-dynamics (MD) simulations of near-surface cluster reactions, and large-scale MD simulations of implanted helium evolution in plasma-exposed tungsten. We find that small, mobile He-n (1 <= n <= 7) clusters in the near-surface region are attracted to the surface due to an elastic interaction force that provides themore » thermodynamic driving force for surface segregation. Elastic interaction force induces drift fluxes of these mobile Hen clusters, which increase substantially as the migrating clusters approach the surface, facilitating helium segregation on the surface. Moreover, the clusters' drift toward the surface enables cluster reactions, most importantly trap mutation, in the near-surface region at rates much higher than in the bulk material. Moreover, these near-surface cluster dynamics have significant effects on the surface morphology, near-surface defect structures, and the amount of helium retained in the material upon plasma exposure. We integrate the findings of such atomic-scale simulations into a properly parameterized and validated spatially dependent, continuum-scale reaction-diffusion cluster dynamics model, capable of predicting implanted helium evolution, surface segregation, and its near-surface effects in tungsten. This cluster-dynamics model sets the stage for development of fully atomistically informed coarse-grained models for computationally efficient simulation predictions of helium surface segregation, as well as helium retention and surface morphological evolution, toward optimal design of plasma facing components.« less

  16. Helium segregation on surfaces of plasma-exposed tungsten

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maroudas, Dimitrios; Blondel, Sophie; Hu, Lin; Hammond, Karl D.; Wirth, Brian D.

    2016-02-01

    We report a hierarchical multi-scale modeling study of implanted helium segregation on surfaces of tungsten, considered as a plasma facing component in nuclear fusion reactors. We employ a hierarchy of atomic-scale simulations based on a reliable interatomic interaction potential, including molecular-statics simulations to understand the origin of helium surface segregation, targeted molecular-dynamics (MD) simulations of near-surface cluster reactions, and large-scale MD simulations of implanted helium evolution in plasma-exposed tungsten. We find that small, mobile He n (1  ⩽  n  ⩽  7) clusters in the near-surface region are attracted to the surface due to an elastic interaction force that provides the thermodynamic driving force for surface segregation. This elastic interaction force induces drift fluxes of these mobile He n clusters, which increase substantially as the migrating clusters approach the surface, facilitating helium segregation on the surface. Moreover, the clusters’ drift toward the surface enables cluster reactions, most importantly trap mutation, in the near-surface region at rates much higher than in the bulk material. These near-surface cluster dynamics have significant effects on the surface morphology, near-surface defect structures, and the amount of helium retained in the material upon plasma exposure. We integrate the findings of such atomic-scale simulations into a properly parameterized and validated spatially dependent, continuum-scale reaction-diffusion cluster dynamics model, capable of predicting implanted helium evolution, surface segregation, and its near-surface effects in tungsten. This cluster-dynamics model sets the stage for development of fully atomistically informed coarse-grained models for computationally efficient simulation predictions of helium surface segregation, as well as helium retention and surface morphological evolution, toward optimal design of plasma facing components.

  17. Helium Diagnostic for Alcator C-Mod Edge Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pappas, D. A.; Labombard, B.; Lipschultz, B.; Pitcher, C. S.; Brix, M.; Schweer, B.

    1997-11-01

    We are developing a diagnostic based on the thermal helium beam technique pioneered on TEXTOR [1,2], which is intended to continuously measure electron temperature and density profiles in the edge plasma at the midplane with high radial and temporal resolution (Δr=1 mm, Δt=1 ms). As a He neutral source, we are presently using a simple gas capillary embedded in one of the C-Mod limiters at the midplane, typically 10 to 15 mm away from the location of the plasma separatrix. Four fibers from a tangentially viewing telescope, which are fed to a visible spectrometer, are used to monitor the HeI lines of interest. We are looking at both the red (667.8 nm, 706.5 nm, 728.1 nm) and the green (471.3 nm, 501.5 nm, 504.7 nm) lines [2], whose intensity ratios can be used to obtain electron temperature and density. The experiments are performed under a variety of plasma conditions and the results are compared to those obtained with a scanning probe. [1] B. Schweer, et al., J. Nucl. Mat. 196-198, 174 (1992). [2] M. Brix and B. Schweer, 24^th EPS Conference, Berchtesgaden, Germany, June 1997. * Work Supported by D.o.E. Contract DE-AC02-78ET51013

  18. Slow dynamics at Re =108 in turbulent Helium flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burguete, Javier; Roche, Philippe; Rousset, Bernard

    2014-11-01

    The presence of slow dynamics is a recurrent feature of many turbulent flows. This behaviour can be created by instabilities of the mean flow or by other mechanisms. In this work we analyze the behavior of a highly turbulent flow (maximum Reynolds number Re =108 , with a Reynolds based on the Taylor microscale Reλ = 2000). The experimental cell consists on a closed cavity filled with liquid Helium (330 liters) close to the lambda point (between 1.8 and 2.5 K) where two inhomogeneous and strongly turbulent flows collide in a thin region. The cylindrical cavity has a diameter of 78cm and two impellers rotate in opposite directions with rotation frequencies up to 2 Hz. The distance between the propellers is 70 cm. Different experimental runs have been performed, both in the normal and superfluid phases. We have performed velocity measurements using home-made Pitot tubes. Here we would like to present preliminary results on this configuration. The analysis of the data series reveals that below the injection frequencies there are different dynamical regimes with time scales two orders of magnitude below the injection scale. We acknowledge support from the EuHIT network and the SHREK Collaboration.

  19. Analysis of helium-ion scattering with a desktop computer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Butler, J. W.

    1986-04-01

    This paper describes a program written in an enhanced BASIC language for a desktop computer, for simulating the energy spectra of high-energy helium ions scattered into two concurrent detectors (backward and glancing). The program is designed for 512-channel spectra from samples containing up to 8 elements and 55 user-defined layers. The program is intended to meet the needs of analyses in materials sciences, such as metallurgy, where more than a few elements may be present, where several elements may be near each other in the periodic table, and where relatively deep structure may be important. These conditions preclude the use of completely automatic procedures for obtaining the sample composition directly from the scattered ion spectrum. Therefore, efficient methods are needed for entering and editing large amounts of composition data, with many iterations and with much feedback of information from the computer to the user. The internal video screen is used exclusively for verbal and numeric communications between user and computer. The composition matrix is edited on screen with a two-dimension forms-fill-in text editor and with many automatic procedures, such as doubling the number of layers with appropriate interpolations and extrapolations. The control center of the program is a bank of 10 keys that initiate on-event branching of program flow. The experimental and calculated spectra, including those of individual elements if desired, are displayed on an external color monitor, with an optional inset plot of the depth concentration profiles of the elements in the sample.

  20. Dynamics of two-electron excitations in helium

    SciTech Connect

    Caldwell, C.D.; Menzel, A.; Frigo, S.P.

    1997-04-01

    Excitation of both electrons in helium offers a unique window for studying electron correlation at the most basic level in an atom in which these two electrons and the nucleus form a three-body system. The authors utilized the first light available at the U-8 undulator-SGM monochromator beamline to investigate the dynamic parameters, partial cross sections, differential cross sections, and photoelectron angular distribution parameters ({beta}), with a high resolving power for the photon beam and at the highly differential level afforded by the use of their electron spectrometer. In parallel, they carried out detailed calculations of the relevant properties by a theoretical approach that is based on the hyperspherical close-coupling method. Partial photoionization cross sections {sigma}{sub n}, and photoelectron angular distributions {beta}{sub n} were measured for all possible final ionic states He{sup +}(n) in the region of the double excitations N(K,T){sup A} up to the N=5 threshold. At a photon energy bandpass of 12 meV below the thresholds N=3, 4, and 5, this level of differentiation offers the most critical assessment of the dynamics of the two-electron excitations to date. The experimental data were seen to be very well described by the most advanced theoretical calculations.

  1. Helium penetrates into silica glass and reduces its compressibility.

    PubMed

    Sato, Tomoko; Funamori, Nobumasa; Yagi, Takehiko

    2011-06-14

    SiO(2) glass has a network structure with a significant amount of interstitial voids. Gas solubilities in silicates are expected to become small under high pressure due to compaction of voids. Here we show anomalous behaviour of SiO(2) glass in helium. Volume measurements clarify that SiO(2) glass is much less compressible than normal when compressed in helium, and the volume in helium at 10 GPa is close to the normal volume at 2 GPa. X-ray diffraction and Raman scattering measurements suggest that voids are prevented from contracting when compressed in helium because helium penetrates into them. The estimated helium solubility is very high and is between 1.0 and 2.3 mol per mole of SiO(2) glass at 10 GPa, which shows marked contrast with previous models. These results may have implications for discussions of the Earth's evolution as well as interpretations of various high-pressure experiments, and also lead to the creation of new materials.

  2. Formation of the helium extreme-UV resonance lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golding, T. P.; Leenaarts, J.; Carlsson, M.

    2017-01-01

    Context. While classical models successfully reproduce intensities of many transition region lines, they predict helium extreme-UV (EUV) line intensities roughly an order of magnitude lower than the observed value. Aims: Our aim is to determine the relevant formation mechanism(s) of the helium EUV resonance lines capable of explaining the high intensities under quiet Sun conditions. Methods: We synthesised and studied the emergent spectra from a 3D radiation-magnetohydrodynamics simulation model. The effects of coronal illumination and non-equilibrium ionisation of hydrogen and helium are included self-consistently in the numerical simulation. Results: Radiative transfer calculations result in helium EUV line intensities that are an order of magnitude larger than the intensities calculated under the classical assumptions. The enhanced intensity of He iλ584 is primarily caused by He ii recombination cascades. The enhanced intensity of He iiλ304 and He iiλ256 is caused primarily by non-equilibrium helium ionisation. Conclusions: The analysis shows that the long standing problem of the high helium EUV line intensities disappears when taking into account optically thick radiative transfer and non-equilibrium ionisation effects.

  3. Helium-3 behavior in some nickel-based amorphous alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Unlu, K.; Vincent, D.H. )

    1992-04-01

    In this paper, helium trapping and release are studied for the nickel-rich amorphous alloys Ni{sub 75.1}Cr{sub 14.0}P{sub 10.1}C{sub 0.08}, Ni{sub 63.5}Zr{sub 36.5}, and Ni{sub 87.7}P{sub 12.3}. Helium-3 is introduced into the samples by implantation at 150-kev energy. The depth distribution of the implanted helium is observed by neutron depth profiling employing he reaction {sup 3}He(n,p){sup 3}H. Two implantation doses are used: 1 {times} 10{sup 16} and 5 {times} 10{sup 16} {sup 3}He/cm{sup 2}. Both implantation doses were chosen to be low enough to avoid blistering or flaking of the surface of the samples. The helium release behavior of the samples is studied by taking depth profiles after each annealing stage. At the same time, electron diffraction is used on parallel samples to observe the microstructure of the samples as a function of annealing. The annealing sequence for each material is broken off when electron diffraction indicated the existence of relatively large crystals in a sample. Only a small fraction of the implanted helium is released in most cases, and a clear correlation between helium release and recrystallization can be found in only one case.

  4. Helium-induced weld degradation of HT-9 steel

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Chin-An; Chin, B.A.; Lin, Hua T.; Grossbeck, M.L.

    1992-12-31

    Helium-bearing Sandvik HT-9 ferritic steel was tested for weldability to simulate the welding of structural components of a fusion reactor after irradiation. Helium was introduced into HT-9 steel to 0.3 and 1 atomic parts per million (appm) by tritium doping and decay. Autogenous single pass full penetration welds were produced using the gas tungsten arc (GTA) welding process under laterally constrained conditions. Macroscopic examination showed no sign of any weld defect in HT-9 steel containing 0.3 appm helium. However, intergranular micro cracks were observed in the HAZ of HT-9 steel containing 1 appm helium. The microcracking was attributed to helium bubble growth at grain boundaries under the influence of high stresses and temperatures that were present during welding. Mechanical test results showed that both yield strength (YS) and ultimate tensile strength (UTS) decreased with increasing temperature, while the total elongation increased with increasing temperature for all control and helium-bearing HT-9 steels.

  5. Superfluid helium cryogenic systems for superconducting RF cavities at KEK

    SciTech Connect

    Nakai, H.; Hara, K.; Honma, T.; Hosoyama, K.; Kojima, Y.; Nakanishi, K.; Kanekiyo, T.; Morita, S.

    2014-01-29

    Recent accelerator projects at KEK, such as the Superconducting RF Test Facility (STF) for R and D of the International Linear Collider (ILC) project and the compact Energy Recovery Linac (cERL), employ superconducting RF cavities made of pure niobium, which can generate high gradient acceleration field. Since the operation temperature of these cavities is selected to be 2 K, we have developed two 2 K superfluid helium cryogenic systems for stable operation of superconducting RF cavities for each of STF and cERL. These two 2 K superfluid helium cryogenic systems are identical in principle. Since the operation mode of the cavities is different for STF and cERL, i.e. the pulse mode for STF and the continuous wave mode for cERL, the heat loads from the cavities are quite different. The 2 K superfluid helium cryogenic systems mainly consists of ordinary helium liquefiers/refrigerators, 2 K refrigerator cold boxes, helium gas pumping systems and high-performance transfer lines. The 2 K refrigerators and the high-performance transfer lines are designed by KEK. Some superconducting RF cavity cryomodules have been already connected to the 2 K superfluid helium cryogenic systems for STF and cERL respectively, and cooled down to 2 K successfully.

  6. Helium Isotopes in Basalt-Hosted Olivines From the Yellowstone Plateau: Implications on Volcanic Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abedini, A. A.; van Soest, M.; Hurwitz, S.; Kennedy, B. M.

    2006-12-01

    The Yellowstone Plateau volcanic field is the youngest part of a magmatic system that began its northeastward propagation along the path of the eastern Snake River Plain in the mid-Miocene. Previous noble gas isotopic studies in Yellowstone have focused on samples from hydrothermal features. Such samples are often subject to shallow crustal contamination that may mask a deeper magmatic component. Most of the reported He-isotope ratios within the Yellowstone caldera perimeter are ~7 ± 1 RA, with peaks occurring around Mud Volcano (~16 RA) and Gibbon Geyser Basin (~13 RA). Outside the caldera, the He-isotope ratios generally drop to <3 RA. The elevated helium isotope data from Mud Volcano and Gibbon Geyser Basin was interpreted as unequivocal evidence for the presence of a deep mantle plume underlying the Yellowstone volcanic field (Craig et al., 1978; Kennedy et al., 1985). However, in an attempt to reconcile the available geochemical and geophysical data some researchers argue solely for a shallow mantle source for the magmatism related to Yellowstone (Christiansen et al., 2002). To gain a better understanding of the helium isotope composition of the mantle source below Yellowstone and its possible changes in time, we have started a study of helium isotopes in basalt-hosted olivines from the Yellowstone volcanic field. A total of 28 samples representing most basalt units from Yellowstone's three eruptive cycles were collected. All of the exposed basalts are located outside the Yellowstone caldera, mainly near Mammoth Hot Springs and Tower Junction to the north and in the Island Park area to the southwest. Most basalts contain 46-52 wt% SIO2, 8-12 wt% FeO, and 0.16-0.23 wt% MgO. Helium was released from aliquots of ~1.5 g olivine by crushing in vacuo, and initial helium isotope results, corrected for 10-15% procedural blank include: 1. The Gerrit basalt from Island Park, with a ratio of 15.7 ± 2.2 RA; 2. Falls River basalt from Island Park, 15.1 ± 0.8 RA; 3. Warm

  7. Interactions of satellite-speed helium atoms with satellite surfaces. 2: Energy distributions of reflected helium atoms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, S. M.; Knuth, E. L.

    1976-01-01

    Energy transfer in collisions of satellite-speed (7,000 m/sec) helium atoms with a cleaned 6061-T6 satellite-type aluminum surface was investigated using the molecular-beam technique. The amount of energy transferred was determined from the measured energy of the molecular-beam and the measured spatial and energy distributions of the reflected atoms. Spatial distributions of helium atoms scattered from a 6061-T6 aluminum surface were measured. The scattering pattern exhibits a prominent backscattering, probably due to the gross surface roughness and/or the relative lattice softness of the aluminum surface. Energy distributions of reflected helium atoms from the same surface were measured for six different incidence angles. For each incidence angle, distributions were measured at approximately sixty scattering positions. At a given scattering position, the energy spectra of the reflected helium atoms and the background gas were obtained using the retarding-field energy analyzer.

  8. Helium Loop Cooling Channel Hydraulic Characterization

    SciTech Connect

    Olivas, Eric Richard; Morgan, Robert Vaughn; Woloshun, Keith Albert

    2015-07-02

    New methods for generating ⁹⁹Mo are being explored in an effort to eliminate proliferation issues and provide a domestic supply of ⁹⁹mTc for medical imaging. Electron accelerating technology is used by sending an electron beam through a series of ¹⁰⁰Mo targets. During this process a large amount of heat is created, which directly affects the operating temperature set for the system. In order to maintain the required temperature range, helium gas is used to serve as a cooling agent that flows through narrow channels between the target disks. Currently we are tailoring the cooling channel entrance and exits to decrease the pressure drop through the targets. Currently all hardware has be procured and manufactured to conduct flow measurements and visualization via solid particle seeder. Pressure drop will be studied as a function of mass flow and diffuser angle. The results from these experiments will help in determining target cooling geometry and validate CFD code results.

  9. Sloshing dynamics on rotating helium dewar tank

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hung, R. J.

    1993-01-01

    The generalized mathematical formulation of sloshing dynamics for partially filled liquid of cryogenic superfluid helium II in dewar containers driven by both the gravity gradient and jitter accelerations applicable to scientific spacecraft which is eligible to carry out spinning motion and/or slew motion for the purpose to perform scientific observation during the normal spacecraft operation are investigated. An example is given with Gravity Probe-B (GP-B) spacecraft which is responsible for the sloshing dynamics. The jitter accelerations include slew motion, spinning motion, atmospheric drag on the spacecraft, spacecraft attitude motions arising from machinery vibrations, thruster firing, pointing control of spacecraft, crew motion, etc. Explicit mathematical expressions to cover these forces acting on the spacecraft fluid systems are derived. The numerical computation of sloshing dynamics were based on the non-inertia frame spacecraft bound coordinate, and solve time dependent, three-dimensional formulations of partial differential equations subject to initial and boundary conditions. The explicit mathematical expressions of boundary conditions to cover capillary force effect on the liquid vapor interface in microgravity environments are also derived. The formulations of fluid moment and angular moment fluctuations in fluid profiles induced by the sloshing dynamics, together with fluid stress and moment fluctuations exerted on the spacecraft dewar containers were derived. Results were widely published in the open journals.

  10. Helium-Shell Nucleosynthesis and Extinct Radioactivities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meyer, B. S.; The, L.-S.; Clayton, D. D.; ElEid, M. F.

    2004-01-01

    Although the exact site for the origin of the r-process isotopes remains mysterious, most thinking has centered on matter ejected from the cores of massive stars in core-collapse supernovae [13]. In the 1970's and 1980's, however, difficulties in understanding the yields from such models led workers to consider the possibility of r-process nucleosynthesis farther out in the exploding star, in particular, in the helium burning shell [4,5]. The essential idea was that shock passage through this shell would heat and compress this material to the point that the reactions 13C(alpha; n)16O and, especially, 22Ne(alpha; n)25Mg would generate enough neutrons to capture on preexisting seed nuclei and drive an "n process" [6], which could reproduce the r-process abundances. Subsequent work showed that the required 13C and 22Ne abundances were too large compared to the amounts available in realistic models [7] and recent thinking has returned to supernova core material or matter ejected from neutron star-neutron star collisions as the more likely r-process sites.

  11. Classical helium atom with radiation reaction.

    PubMed

    Camelio, G; Carati, A; Galgani, L

    2012-06-01

    We study a classical model of helium atom in which, in addition to the Coulomb forces, the radiation reaction forces are taken into account. This modification brings in the model a new qualitative feature of a global character. Indeed, as pointed out by Dirac, in any model of classical electrodynamics of point particles involving radiation reaction one has to eliminate, from the a priori conceivable solutions of the problem, those corresponding to the emission of an infinite amount of energy. We show that the Dirac prescription solves a problem of inconsistency plaguing all available models which neglect radiation reaction, namely, the fact that in all such models, most initial data lead to a spontaneous breakdown of the atom. A further modification is that the system thus acquires a peculiar form of dissipation. In particular, this makes attractive an invariant manifold of special physical interest, the zero-dipole manifold that corresponds to motions in which no energy is radiated away (in the dipole approximation). We finally study numerically the invariant measure naturally induced by the time-evolution on such a manifold, and this corresponds to studying the formation process of the atom. Indications are given that such a measure may be singular with respect to that of Lebesgue.

  12. Liquid acquisition devices for superfluid helium transfer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dipirro, M. J.

    1990-01-01

    To transfer superfluid helium (He II) in the milli-g or micro-g environment in orbit, it is necessary to provide a reasonably steady supply of liquid to the inlet of the pump in the supply dewar. To accomplish this without providing an artificial gravity through acceleration requires a liquid acquisition device. Fluid swirl and electrostatic devices have been proposed to orientate the fluid. However, the simplest mechanisms appear to be the use of surface tension or the thermomechanical effect. This paper examines four concepts for providing He II to the inlet of a thermomechanical pump. The devices are a distributed thermomechanical pump, a distributed pump with a main thermomechanical pump, a screened channel system and a vane/sponge combination. Calculations on the efficiency of these types of liquid acquisition devices are made using laboratory data from tests involving small scale devices where applicable. These calculations show that the latter two types of liquid acquisition devices are the most efficient. Questions as to the probability of cavitation and the effect of the residual shuttle acceleration on their operation remain to be answered, however.

  13. 43 CFR 3195.27 - What do I do if my helium requirement becomes a major helium requirement after the initial...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false What do I do if my helium requirement becomes a major helium requirement after the initial determination has been made? 3195.27 Section 3195.27..., DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR MINERALS MANAGEMENT (3000) HELIUM CONTRACTS Federal Agency Requirements §...

  14. 43 CFR 3195.27 - What do I do if my helium requirement becomes a major helium requirement after the initial...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false What do I do if my helium requirement becomes a major helium requirement after the initial determination has been made? 3195.27 Section 3195.27..., DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR MINERALS MANAGEMENT (3000) HELIUM CONTRACTS Federal Agency Requirements §...

  15. 43 CFR 3195.27 - What do I do if my helium requirement becomes a major helium requirement after the initial...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false What do I do if my helium requirement becomes a major helium requirement after the initial determination has been made? 3195.27 Section 3195.27..., DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR MINERALS MANAGEMENT (3000) HELIUM CONTRACTS Federal Agency Requirements §...

  16. Helium-3/Helium-4 Ratios in Soil Gas as an Indicator of Tritium Contamination Near the 618-11 Burial Ground, Hanford Site, Washington

    SciTech Connect

    Olsen, Khris B.; Dresel, P Evan; Evans, J. C.; Poreda, Robert

    2004-10-09

    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory sampled and analyzed soil gas for helium-3 and helium-4 concentrations from the vicinity of the 618-11 burial ground. The results of the measurement of helium isotopes in soil gas provided a rapid and cost-effective technique to define the shape and extent of tritium contamination from the 618-11 burial ground.

  17. 43 CFR 3195.27 - What do I do if my helium requirement becomes a major helium requirement after the initial...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false What do I do if my helium requirement becomes a major helium requirement after the initial determination has been made? 3195.27 Section 3195.27..., DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR MINERALS MANAGEMENT (3000) HELIUM CONTRACTS Federal Agency Requirements §...

  18. Detection of significant differences between absorption spectra of neutral helium and low temperature photoionized helium plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Bartnik, A.; Wachulak, P.; Fiedorowicz, H.; Fok, T.; Jarocki, R.; Szczurek, M.

    2013-11-15

    In this work, spectral investigations of photoionized He plasmas were performed. The photoionized plasmas were created by irradiation of helium stream, with intense pulses from laser-plasma extreme ultraviolet (EUV) source. The EUV source was based on a double-stream Xe/Ne gas-puff target irradiated with 10 ns/10 J Nd:YAG laser pulses. The most intense emission from the source spanned a relatively narrow spectral region below 20 nm, however, spectrally integrated intensity at longer wavelengths was also significant. The EUV radiation was focused onto a gas stream, injected into a vacuum chamber synchronously with the EUV pulse. The long-wavelength part of the EUV radiation was used for backlighting of the photoionized plasmas to obtain absorption spectra. Both emission and absorption spectra in the EUV range were investigated. Significant differences between absorption spectra acquired for neutral helium and low temperature photoionized plasmas were demonstrated for the first time. Strong increase of intensities and spectral widths of absorption lines, together with a red shift of the K-edge, was shown.

  19. Temporal helium isotopic variations within Hawaiian volcanoes: Basalts from Mauna Loa and Haleakala

    SciTech Connect

    Kurz, M.D.; O'Brien, P.A. ); Garcia, M.O. ); Frey, F.A. )

    1987-11-01

    Helium isotope ratios in basalts spanning the subaerial eruptive history of Mauna Loa and Haleakala vary systematically with eruption age. In both volcanoes, olivine mineral separates from the oldest samples have the highest {sup 3}He/{sup 4}he ratios. The Haleakala samples studied range in age from roughly one million years to historic time, while the Mauna Loa samples are radiocarbon dated flows younger than 30,000 years old. The Honomanu tholeiites are the oldest samples from Haleakala and have {sup 3}He/{sup 4}he ratios that range from 13 to 16.8X atmospheric, while the younger Kula and Hana series alkali basalts all have {sup 3}He/{sup 4}He close to 8X atmospheric. A similar range is observed on Manua Loa; the oldest samples have {sup 3}He/{sup 4}He ratios of 15 to 20X atmospheric, with a relatively smooth decrease to 8X atmospheric with decreasing age. The consistent trend of decreasing {sup 3}He/{sup 4}he ratio with time in both volcanoes, coherence between the helium and Sr and Nd isotopes (for Haleakala), and the similarity of {sup 3}He/{sup 4}He in the late stage basalts to depleted mid-ocean ridge basalt (MORB) helium, argue against the decrease being the result of radiogenic ingrowth of {sup 4}He. The data strongly suggest an undegassed mantle source for the early shield building stages of Hawaiian volcanism, and are consistent with the hotspot/mantle plume model. The data are difficult to reconcile with models for Hawaiian volcanism that require recycled oceanic crust or derivation from a MORB-related upper mantle source. The authors interpret the decrease in {sup 3}He/{sup 4}He with volcano evolution to result from an increasing involvement of depleted mantle and/or lithosphere during the late stages of Hawaiian volcanism.

  20. Hopping diffusion of helium isotopes from samples of lunar soil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anufriev, G. S.

    2010-10-01

    This paper reports on a detailed study of diffusion of helium isotopes from a sample of lunar soil (weight, 3.3 mg; bulk grain size, <74 μm; sampling depth, 118 cm in a 1.6-m-long core of lunar soil brought from the Moon by the Soviet automatic station Luna-24). The studies have been performed using step heating in the temperature range 300-1000°C in combination with a mass spectrometric isotope analysis of helium extracted at each temperature step. It has been demonstrated that the diffusion does not obey Fick’s law, which should be attributed to a large number of radiation damages in crystals of lunar soil minerals and can be described in terms of the formalism accepted for jump diffusion. The diffusion activation energy for both helium isotopes (4He, 3He) has been found to be identical and equal to 0.5 eV, and the frequency factors amount to 0.51 and 0.59 s-1, respectively. The random errors σ in the determination of these parameters are approximately equal to 5%. The lunar soil delivered to the Earth loses helium during the storage. At the beginning of the storage at room temperature, one gram of the lunar material under investigation loses approximately 3 × 109 helium atoms every second. It has been revealed that the jump diffusion of helium exhibits a strong isotopic effect: the light isotope 3He escapes at substantially higher rates. In order to prevent helium losses accompanied by isotope fractionation, the brought lunar soil should be stored at a low temperature.

  1. Proposed method for laser spectroscopy of pionic helium atoms to determine the charged-pion mass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hori, Masaki; Sótér, Anna; Korobov, Vladimir I.

    2014-04-01

    Metastable pionic helium (πHe+) is a three-body atom composed of a helium nucleus, an electron occupying the 1s ground state, and a negatively charged pion π- in a Rydberg state with principal and orbital angular momentum quantum numbers of n ˜ℓ+1˜16. We calculate the spin-independent energies of the π3He+ and π4He+ isotopes in the region n =15-19. These include relativistic and quantum electrodynamics corrections of orders R∞α2 and R∞α3 in atomic units, where R∞ and α denote the Rydberg and fine structure constants. The fine-structure splitting due to the coupling between the electron spin and the orbital angular momentum of the π- and the radiative and Auger decay rates of the states are also calculated. Some states (n,ℓ)=(16,15) and (17,16) retain nanosecond-scale lifetimes against π- absorption into the helium nucleus. We propose the use of laser pulses to induce π- transitions from these metastable states to states with large (˜1011 s-1) Auger rates. The πHe2+ ion that remains after Auger emission of the 1s electron undergoes Stark mixing with the s, p, and d states during collisions with the helium atoms in the experimental target. This leads to immediate nuclear absorption of the π -. The resonance condition between the laser beam and the atom is thus revealed as a sharp spike in the rates of neutrons, protons, deuterons, and tritons that emerge. A resonance curve is obtained from which the πHe+ transition frequency can in principle be determined with a fractional precision of 10-8-10-6 provided the systematic uncertainties can be controlled. By comparing the measured πHe+ frequencies with the calculated values, the π- mass may be determined with a similar precision. The πHe+ will be synthesized by allowing a high-intensity (>108 s-1) beam of π-produced by a cyclotron to come to rest in a helium target. The precise time structure of the π- beam is used to ensure a sufficient rate of coincidence between the resonant laser pulses

  2. Laterally Propagating Detonations in Thin Helium Layers on Accreting White Dwarfs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Townsley, Dean M.; Moore, Kevin; Bildsten, Lars

    2012-08-01

    Theoretical work has shown that intermediate mass (0.01 M ⊙ < M He < 0.1 M ⊙) helium shells will unstably ignite on the accreting white dwarf (WD) in an AM CVn binary. For more massive (M > 0.8 M ⊙) WDs, these helium shells can be dense enough (>5 × 105 g cm-3) that the convectively burning region runs away on a timescale comparable to the sound travel time across the shell, raising the possibility for an explosive outcome rather than an Eddington limited helium novae. The nature of the explosion (i.e., deflagration or detonation) remains ambiguous, is certainly density dependent, and likely breaks spherical symmetry. In the case of detonation, this causes a laterally propagating front whose properties in these geometrically thin and low-density shells we begin to study here. Our calculations show that the radial expansion time of <0.1 s leads to incomplete helium burning, in agreement with recent work by Sim and collaborators, but that the nuclear energy released is still adequate to realize a self-sustaining laterally propagating detonation. These detonations are slower than the Chapman-Jouguet speed of 1.5 × 109 cm s-1, but still fast enough at 0.9 × 109 cm s-1 to go around the star prior to the transit through the star of the inwardly propagating weak shock. Our simulations resolve the subsonic region behind the reaction front in the detonation wave. The two-dimensional nucleosynthesis is shown to be consistent with a truncated one-dimensional Zeldovich-von Neumann-Döring calculation at the slower detonation speed. The ashes from the lateral detonation are typically He rich, and consist of predominantly 44Ti, 48Cr, along with a small amount of 52Fe, with very little 56Ni and with significant 40Ca in carbon-enriched layers. If this helium detonation results in a Type Ia supernova, its spectral signatures would appear for the first few days after explosion.

  3. LATERALLY PROPAGATING DETONATIONS IN THIN HELIUM LAYERS ON ACCRETING WHITE DWARFS

    SciTech Connect

    Townsley, Dean M.; Moore, Kevin; Bildsten, Lars

    2012-08-10

    Theoretical work has shown that intermediate mass (0.01 M{sub Sun} < M{sub He} < 0.1 M{sub Sun }) helium shells will unstably ignite on the accreting white dwarf (WD) in an AM CVn binary. For more massive (M > 0.8 M{sub Sun }) WDs, these helium shells can be dense enough (>5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 5} g cm{sup -3}) that the convectively burning region runs away on a timescale comparable to the sound travel time across the shell, raising the possibility for an explosive outcome rather than an Eddington limited helium novae. The nature of the explosion (i.e., deflagration or detonation) remains ambiguous, is certainly density dependent, and likely breaks spherical symmetry. In the case of detonation, this causes a laterally propagating front whose properties in these geometrically thin and low-density shells we begin to study here. Our calculations show that the radial expansion time of <0.1 s leads to incomplete helium burning, in agreement with recent work by Sim and collaborators, but that the nuclear energy released is still adequate to realize a self-sustaining laterally propagating detonation. These detonations are slower than the Chapman-Jouguet speed of 1.5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 9} cm s{sup -1}, but still fast enough at 0.9 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 9} cm s{sup -1} to go around the star prior to the transit through the star of the inwardly propagating weak shock. Our simulations resolve the subsonic region behind the reaction front in the detonation wave. The two-dimensional nucleosynthesis is shown to be consistent with a truncated one-dimensional Zeldovich-von Neumann-Doering calculation at the slower detonation speed. The ashes from the lateral detonation are typically He rich, and consist of predominantly {sup 44}Ti, {sup 48}Cr, along with a small amount of {sup 52}Fe, with very little {sup 56}Ni and with significant {sup 40}Ca in carbon-enriched layers. If this helium detonation results in a Type Ia supernova, its spectral signatures would

  4. Fabrication of carbon nanotube nanogap electrodes by helium ion sputtering for molecular contacts

    SciTech Connect

    Thiele, Cornelius; Vieker, Henning; Beyer, André; Gölzhäuser, Armin; Flavel, Benjamin S.; Hennrich, Frank; Muñoz Torres, David; Eaton, Thomas R.; Mayor, Marcel; Kappes, Manfred M.; Löhneysen, Hilbert v.; and others

    2014-03-10

    Carbon nanotube nanogaps have been used to contact individual organic molecules. However, the reliable fabrication of a truly nanometer-sized gap remains a challenge. We use helium ion beam lithography to sputter nanogaps of only (2.8 ± 0.6) nm size into single metallic carbon nanotubes embedded in a device geometry. The high reproducibility of the gap size formation provides a reliable nanogap electrode testbed for contacting small organic molecules. To demonstrate the functionality of these nanogap electrodes, we integrate oligo(phenylene ethynylene) molecular rods, and measure resistance before and after gap formation and with and without contacted molecules.

  5. Observation of the antimatter helium-4 nucleus

    SciTech Connect

    Agakishiev, H.; Tang, A.; et al.

    2011-04-24

    High-energy nuclear collisions create an energy density similar to that of the Universe microseconds after the Big Bang; in both cases, matter and antimatter are formed with comparable abundance. However, the relatively short-lived expansion in nuclear collisions allows antimatter to decouple quickly from matter, and avoid annihilation. Thus, a high-energy accelerator of heavy nuclei provides an efficient means of producing and studying antimatter. The antimatter helium-4 nucleus ({sup 4}He), also known as the anti-{alpha} ({alpha}), consists of two antiprotons and two antineutrons (baryon number B = -4). It has not been observed previously, although the {alpha}-particle was identified a century ago by Rutherford and is present in cosmic radiation at the ten per cent level. Antimatter nuclei with B < -1 have been observed only as rare products of interactions at particle accelerators, where the rate of antinucleus production in high-energy collisions decreases by a factor of about 1,000 with each additional antinucleon. Here we report the observation of {sup 4}He, the heaviest observed antinucleus to date. In total, 18 {sup 4}He counts were detected at the STAR experiment at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) in 10{sup 9} recorded gold-on-gold (Au+Au) collisions at centre-of-mass energies of 200 GeV and 62 GeV per nucleon-nucleon pair. The yield is consistent with expectations from thermodynamic and coalescent nucleosynthesis models, providing an indication of the production rate of even heavier antimatter nuclei and a benchmark for possible future observations of {sup 4}He in cosmic radiation.

  6. LRO-LAMP Observations of Lunar Exospheric Helium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grava, Cesare; Retherford, Kurt D.; Hurley, Dana M.; Feldman, Paul D.; Gladstone, Randy; Greathouse, Thomas K.; Cook, Jason C.; Stern, Alan; Pryor, Wayne R.; Halekas, Jasper S.; Kaufmann, David E.

    2015-11-01

    We present results from Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter’s (LRO) UV spectrograph LAMP (Lyman-Alpha Mapping Project) campaign to study the lunar atmosphere. Two kinds of off-nadir maneuvers (lateral rolls and pitches towards and opposite the direction of motion of LRO) were performed to search for resonantly scattering species, increasing the illuminated line-of-sight (and hence the signal from atoms resonantly scattering the solar photons) compared to previously reported LAMP “twilight observations” [Cook & Stern, 2014]. Helium was the only element distinguishable on a daily basis, and we present latitudinal profiles of its line-of-sight column density in December 2013. We compared the helium line-of-sight column densities with solar wind alpha particle fluxes measured from the ARTEMIS (Acceleration, Reconnection, Turbulence, & Electrodynamics of Moon’s Interaction with the Sun) twin spacecraft. Our data show a correlation with the solar wind alpha particle flux, confirming that the solar wind is the main source of the lunar helium, but not with a 1:1 relationship. Assuming that the lunar soil is saturated with helium atoms, our results suggest that not all of the incident alpha particles are converted to thermalized helium, allowing for a non-negligible fraction (~50 %) to escape as suprathermal helium or simply backscattered from the lunar surface. We also support the finding by Benna et al. [2015] and Hurley et al. [2015], that a non-zero contribution from endogenic helium, coming from radioactive decay of 232Th and 238U within the mantle, is present, and is estimated to be (4.5±1.2) x 106 He atoms cm-2 s-1. Finally, we compare LAMP-derived helium surface density with the one recorded by the mass spectrometer LACE (Lunar Atmospheric Composition Experiment) deployed on the lunar surface during the Apollo 17 mission, finding good agreement between the two measurements. These LRO off-nadir maneuvers allow LAMP to provide unique coverage of local solar time and

  7. Theoretical model of the helium zone plate microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salvador Palau, Adrià; Bracco, Gianangelo; Holst, Bodil

    2017-01-01

    Neutral helium microscopy is a new technique currently under development. Its advantages are the low energy, charge neutrality, and inertness of the helium atoms, a potential large depth of field, and the fact that at thermal energies the helium atoms do not penetrate into any solid material. This opens the possibility, among others, for the creation of an instrument that can measure surface topology on the nanoscale, even on surfaces with high aspect ratios. One of the most promising designs for helium microscopy is the zone plate microscope. It consists of a supersonic expansion helium beam collimated by an aperture (skimmer) focused by a Fresnel zone plate onto a sample. The resolution is determined by the focal spot size, which depends on the size of the skimmer, the optics of the system, and the velocity spread of the beam through the chromatic aberrations of the zone plate. An important factor for the optics of the zone plate is the width of the outermost zone, corresponding to the smallest opening in the zone plate. The width of the outermost zone is fabrication limited to around 10 nm with present-day state-of-the-art technology. Due to the high ionization potential of neutral helium atoms, it is difficult to build efficient helium detectors. Therefore, it is crucial to optimize the microscope design to maximize the intensity for a given resolution and width of the outermost zone. Here we present an optimization model for the helium zone plate microscope. Assuming constant resolution and width of the outermost zone, we are able to reduce the problem to a two-variable problem (zone plate radius and object distance) and we show that for a given beam temperature and pressure, there is always a single intensity maximum. We compare our model with the highest-resolution zone plate focusing images published and show that the intensity can be increased seven times. Reducing the width of the outermost zone to 10 nm leads to an increase in intensity of more than 8000

  8. Laser Induced Fluorescence Spectroscopy of the Ca Dimer Deposited on Helium and Mixed Helium/Argon Clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Masson, A.; Briant, M.; Mestdagh, J. M.; Gaveau, M. A.

    2011-05-20

    We study the laser induced fluorescence spectroscopy of the calcium dimer deposited on helium and mixed helium/argon clusters. In the wavelength range between 365 and 385 nm, the Ca dimer is excited from its ground state up to two excited electronic states leading to its photodissociation in Ca({sup 1}P)+Ca({sup 1}S): this process is monitored by recording the Ca({sup 1}P) fluorescence about 422.7 nm. These electronic excited states of Ca{sub 2} are respectively a diexcited one correlating to the Ca(4s 4p {sup 3}P)+Ca(4s 3d {sup 3}D) and a repulsive one correlating diabatically to the Ca(4s 4p {sup 1}P)+Ca(4s{sup 2} {sup 1}S) asymptote, accounting for the dissociation of Ca{sub 2} and the observation of the subsequent Ca({sup 1}P) emission. On pure helium clusters, the fluorescence consists of the calcium atomic resonance line Ca({sup 1}S(leftarrow){sup 1}P) at 422.7 nm (23652 cm{sup -1}) assigned to ejected calcium, and a narrow red sided band corresponding to calcium that remains solvated on the helium cluster. Interestingly, the branching ratio to the ejection of Ca({sup 1}P) increases along with the wavelength of the excitation photon, i.e. when its energy decreases. This is contrary to what is intuitively expected and to what is really found on pure argon clusters. On mixed helium/argon clusters, a new spectral band appears on the red side of the calcium resonance line; the intensity and the red shift of this component increase along with the argon quantity deposited on the helium cluster: it is assigned to the emission of Ca({sup 1}P) associated with the small argon aggregate embedded inside the helium cluster.

  9. Helium turbomachine design for GT-MHR power plant

    SciTech Connect

    McDonald, C.F.; Orlando, R.J.; Cotzas, G.M.

    1994-07-01

    The power conversion system in the gas turbine modular helium reactor (GT-MHR) power plant is based on a highly recuperated closed Brayton cycle. The major component in the direct cycle system is a helium closed-cycle gas turbine rated at 286 MW(e). The rotating group consists of an intercooled helium turbocompressor coupled to a synchronous generator. The vertical rotating assembly is installed in a steel vessel, together with the other major components (i.e., recuperator, precooler, intercooler, and connecting ducts and support structures). The rotor is supported on an active magnetic bearing system. The turbine operates directly on the reactor helium coolant, and with a temperature of 850{degree}C (1562{degree}F) the plant efficiency is over 47%. This paper addresses the design and development planning of the helium turbomachine, and emphasizes that with the utilization of proven technology, this second generation nuclear power plant could be in service in the first decade of the 21st century.

  10. Nanostructures from hydrogen and helium implantation of aluminum.

    SciTech Connect

    McWatters, Bruce Ray; Causey, Rion A.; DePuit, Ryan J.; Yang, Nancy Y. C.; Ong, Markus D.

    2010-03-01

    This study investigates a pathway to nanoporous structures created by hydrogen and helium implantation in aluminum. Previous experiments for fusion applications have indicated that hydrogen and helium ion implantations are capable of producing bicontinuous nanoporous structures in a variety of metals. This study focuses specifically on implantations of hydrogen and helium ions at 25 keV in aluminum. The hydrogen and helium systems result in remarkably different nanostructures of aluminum at the surface. Scanning electron microscopy, focused ion beam, and transmission electron microscopy show that both implantations result in porosity that persists approximately 200 nm deep. However, hydrogen implantations tend to produce larger and more irregular voids that preferentially reside at defects. Implantations of helium at a fluence of 10{sup 18} cm{sup -2} produce much smaller porosity on the order of 10 nm that is regular and creates a bicontinuous structure in the porous region. The primary difference driving the formation of the contrasting structures is likely the relatively high mobility of hydrogen and the ability of hydrogen to form alanes that are capable of desorbing and etching Al (111) faces.

  11. Electronically excited rubidium atom in a helium cluster or film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leino, Markku; Viel, Alexandra; Zillich, Robert E.

    2008-11-01

    We present theoretical studies of helium droplets and films doped with one electronically excited rubidium atom Rb∗ (P2). Diffusion and path integral Monte Carlo approaches are used to investigate the energetics and the structure of clusters containing up to 14 helium atoms. The surface of large clusters is approximated by a helium film. The nonpair additive potential energy surface is modeled using a diatomic in molecule scheme. Calculations show that the stable structure of Rb∗Hen consists of a seven helium atom ring centered at the rubidium, surrounded by a tirelike second solvation shell. A very different structure is obtained when performing a "vertical Monte Carlo transition." In this approach, a path integral Monte Carlo equilibration starts from the stable configuration of a rubidium atom in the electronic ground state adsorbed to the helium surface after switching to the electronically excited surface. In this case, Rb∗Hen relaxes to a weakly bound metastable state in which Rb∗ sits in a shallow dimple. The interpretation of the results is consistent with the recent experimental observations [G. Auböck et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 101, 035301 (2008)].

  12. Helium shells and faint emission lines from slitless flash spectra

    PubMed Central

    Bazin, Cyril; Koutchmy, Serge

    2013-01-01

    At the time of the two last solar total eclipses of August 1st, 2008 in Siberia and July 11th, 2010 in French Polynesia, high frame rate CCD flash spectra were obtained. These eclipses occurred in quiet Sun period and after. The slitless flash spectra show two helium shells, in the weak Paschen α 4686 Å line of the ionized helium HeII and in the neutral helium HeI line at 4713 Å. The extensions of these helium shells are typically 3 Mm. In prominences, the extension of the interface with the corona is much more extended. The observations and analysis of these lines can properly be done only in eclipse conditions, when the intensity threshold reaches the coronal level, and the parasitic scattered light is virtually zero. Under the layers of 1 Mm above the limb, many faint low FIP lines were also seen in emission. These emission lines are superposed on the continuum containing absorption lines. The solar limb can be defined using the weak continuum appearing between the emission lines at the time of the second and third contact. The variations of the singly ionized iron line, the HeI and HeII lines and the continuum intensity are analyzed. The intensity ratio of ionized to neutral helium is studied for evaluating the ionization rate in low layers up to 2 Mm and also around a prominence. PMID:25685435

  13. Helium and ground temperature surveys at Steamboat Springs, Colorado

    SciTech Connect

    McCarthy, K.P.; Been, J.; Reimer, G.M.; Bowles, C.G.; Murrey, D.G.; Ruscetta, C.A.

    1982-07-01

    As demonstrated in Steamboat Springs, Colorado, helium and shallow temperature surveys are quick, inexpensive geothermal exploration methods that can be used together with excellent results. Steamboat Springs, in northwestern Colorado, lies primarily upon terrace gravels and alluvium with the major structure being a north-trending normal fault passing through the western portion of the city. Work by Christopherson (1979) indicates that the Steamboat warm springs are not laterally connected at shallow depth with Routt Hot Springs, 6 km to the north, although both resource areas are fault controlled. A shallow temperature survey was conducted in the city to determine the usefulness of this method in a low temperature resource area. Several extraneous factors influencing shallow temperature measurements were dealt with by field technique or subsequent analysis. A helium survey was conducted to compare with temperature results. Sixty-two soil helium samples were taken, using an interval of .1 to .2 Km, twice the density of the 18 temperature probe stations. A mobile spectrometer allowed immediate analysis of helium samples. A direct correlation of temperature to helium value at each site is not valid due to the high solubility of this gas. The contoured data from each method does correlate well and indicates that two faults control the resource in Steamboat Springs. Although these surveys should always be used to supplement other data, their utility in this study was readily apparent.

  14. Stabilization of Multi-electron Bubbles in Superfluid Helium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silvera, Isaac F.; Fang, Jieping; Tempere, Jacques

    2014-12-01

    Multielectron bubbles (MEBs) in liquid helium were first observed in the late 1970s, but their properties have never been explored experimentally due to their short lifetimes and the difficulty to localize them. We report the observation of long- lived MEBs in a novel cell filled with superfluid helium at static negative pressures. MEBs were extracted from the electron filled vapor sheath of a heated filament loop embedded in the superfluid helium and observed by high-speed photography. MEBs are 2D electron gases on the 3D surface of hollow helium bubbles. Diameters can range from nanometers to millimeters, depending on the number of enclosed electrons. Electrons move in angular momentum states; deformations of the surface are called spherical ripplons. The attractive electron-ripplon interaction leads to an unusual form of superconductivity. If they can be compressed, Wigner crystallization and quantum melting can be observed, as well as a new phase for localization called the ripplo- polaron lattice. MEBs are unstable to tunneling discharge when pressed against a surface. Just as Bose gases are captured in a trap for study, MEBs must also be localized away from walls. We shall discuss methods of capturing them in an electromagnetic trap embedded in the liquid helium.

  15. A helium-3 refrigerator employing capillary confinement of liquid cryogen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ennis, D. J.; Kittel, P.; Brooks, W.; Miller, A.; Spivak, A. L.

    1983-01-01

    A condensation refrigerator suitable for operation in a zero gravity space environment was constructed. The condensed liquid refrigerant is confined by surface tension inside a porous metal matrix. Helium-4 and helium-3 gases were condensed and held in a copper matrix. Evaporative cooling of confined liquid helium-4 resulted in a temperature of 1.4K. Using a zeolite adsorption pump external to the cryostat, a temperature of 0.6 K was achieved through evaporative cooling of liquid helium-3. The amount of time required for complete evaporation of a controlled mass of liquid helium-4 contained in the copper matrix was measured as a function of the applied background power. For heating powers below 18 mW the measured times are consistent with the normal boiling of the confined volume of liquid refrigerant. At background powers above 18 mW the rapid rise in the temperature of the copper matrix the signature of the absence of confined liquid occurs in a time a factor of two shorter than that expected on the basis of an extrapolation of the low power data.

  16. Helium shells and faint emission lines from slitless flash spectra.

    PubMed

    Bazin, Cyril; Koutchmy, Serge

    2013-05-01

    At the time of the two last solar total eclipses of August 1st, 2008 in Siberia and July 11th, 2010 in French Polynesia, high frame rate CCD flash spectra were obtained. These eclipses occurred in quiet Sun period and after. The slitless flash spectra show two helium shells, in the weak Paschen α 4686 Å line of the ionized helium HeII and in the neutral helium HeI line at 4713 Å. The extensions of these helium shells are typically 3 Mm. In prominences, the extension of the interface with the corona is much more extended. The observations and analysis of these lines can properly be done only in eclipse conditions, when the intensity threshold reaches the coronal level, and the parasitic scattered light is virtually zero. Under the layers of 1 Mm above the limb, many faint low FIP lines were also seen in emission. These emission lines are superposed on the continuum containing absorption lines. The solar limb can be defined using the weak continuum appearing between the emission lines at the time of the second and third contact. The variations of the singly ionized iron line, the HeI and HeII lines and the continuum intensity are analyzed. The intensity ratio of ionized to neutral helium is studied for evaluating the ionization rate in low layers up to 2 Mm and also around a prominence.

  17. Study of dense helium plasma in the optimal hypernetted chain approximation

    SciTech Connect

    Mueller, H.; Langanke, K. )

    1994-01-01

    We have studied the helium plasma in the hypernetted chain approximation considering both short-ranged internuclear and long-ranged Coulomb interactions. The optimal two-particle wave function has been determined in fourth order; fifth-order corrections have been considered in the calculation of the two-body and three-body correlation functions. The latter has been used to determine the pycnonuclear triple-alpha-fusion rate in the density regime 10[sup 8] g/cm[sup 3][le][rho][le]10[sup 10] g/cm[sup 3], which is of importance for the crust evolution of an accreting old neutron star. The influence of three-particle terms in the many-body wave function on the rate is estimated within an additional variational hypernetted chain calculation. Our results support the idea that the helium liquid undergoes a phase transition to stable [sup 8]Be matter at densities [rho][approx]3[times]10[sup 9] g/cm[sup 3] as the plasma induced screening potential then becomes strong enough to bind the [sup 8]Be ground state.

  18. The subcontinental mantle beneath southern New Zealand, characterised by helium isotopes in intraplate basalts and gas-rich springs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoke, L.; Poreda, R.; Reay, A.; Weaver, S. D.

    2000-07-01

    New helium isotope data measured in Cenozoic intraplate basalts and their mantle xenoliths are compared with present-day mantle helium emission on a regional scale from thermal and nonthermal gas discharges on the South Island of New Zealand and the offshore Chatham Islands. Cenozoic intraplate basaltic volcanism in southern New Zealand has ocean island basalt affinities but is restricted to continental areas and absent from adjacent Pacific oceanic crust. Its distribution is diffuse and widespread, it is of intermittent timing and characterised by low magma volumes. Most of the 3He/ 4He ratios measured in fluid inclusions in mantle xenocrysts and basalt phenocrysts such as olivine, garnet, and amphibole fall within the narrow range of 8.5 ± 1.5 Ra (Ra is the atmospheric 3He/ 4He ratio) with a maximum value of 11.5 Ra. This range is characteristic of the relatively homogeneous and degassed upper MORB-mantle helium reservoir. No helium isotope ratios typical of the lower less degassed mantle (>12 Ra), such as exemplified by the modern hot-spot region of Hawaii (with up to 32 Ra) were measured. Helium isotope ratios of less than 8 Ra are interpreted in terms of dilution of upper mantle helium with a radiogenic component, due to either age of crystallisation or small-scale mantle heterogeneities caused by mixing of crustal material into the upper mantle. The crude correlation between age of samples and helium isotopes with generally lower R/Ra values in mantle xenoliths compared with host rock phenocrysts and the in general depleted Nd and Sr isotope ratios and the light rare earth element enrichment of the basalts supports derivation of melts as small melt fractions from a depleted upper mantle, with posteruptive ingrowth of radiogenic helium as a function of lithospheric age. In comparison, the regional helium isotope survey of thermal and nonthermal gas discharges of the South Island of New Zealand shows that mantle 3He anomalies in general do not show an obvious

  19. Application of a pulse-discharge helium detector to the determination of neon in air and water.

    PubMed

    Lasa, J; Mochalski, P; Lokas, E; Kedzior, L

    2002-08-30

    A pulse-discharge helium detector (Valco, PD-D2-I) is used to measure neon concentrations in air and water. The detection level is 0.5 x 10(-8) g/cm3 (0.2 ppm). Discharge gas doped with neon results in a linear response to the neon mass up to 10(-6) g. For measuring the neon concentration in water, a simple enrichment system is used.

  20. TRANSL8GDECIM8

    SciTech Connect

    Janucik, F.X.; Ross, D.M. )

    1993-09-01

    The TRANSL8GDECIM8 system consists of two programs: TRANSL8G and DECIM8. The TRANSL8G program facilitates the interchange, topology generation, error checking, and enhancement of large 3D triangle meshes. Such data is frequently used to represent conceptual designs, scientific visualization volume modeling, or discrete sample data. Interchange is provided between several popular commercial and defacto standard geometry formats. Error checking is included to identify duplicate and zero area triangles. Model enhancement features include common vertex joining, consistent triangle vertex ordering, vertex normal vector averaging, and triangle strip generation. Many of the traditional O(n squared) algorithms required to provide the above features have been recast and are O(n) which support large mesh sizes. The DECIM8 program is based on a data filter algorithm that significantly reduces the number of triangles required to represent three dimensional (3D) models of geometry, scientific visualization results, and discretely sampled data. The algorithm uses a combined incremental and iterative strategy. It eliminates local patches of triangles whose geometries are not appreciably different and replaces them with fewer larger triangles. The algorithm has been used to reduce triangles in large conceptual design models to facilitate virtual walk throughs and to enable interactive viewing of large 3D iso-surface volume visualizations.