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Sample records for helium compound transfer

  1. Resistor monitors transfer of liquid helium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hesketh, W. D.

    1966-01-01

    Large resistance change of a carbon resistor at the liquid helium temperature distinguishes between the transfer of liquid helium and gaseous helium into a closed Dewar. The resistor should be physically as small as possible to reduce the heat load to the helium.

  2. High efficiency pump for space helium transfer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hasenbein, Robert; Izenson, Michael G.; Swift, Walter L.; Sixsmith, Herbert

    1991-01-01

    A centrifugal pump was developed for the efficient and reliable transfer of liquid helium in space. The pump can be used to refill cryostats on orbiting satellites which use liquid helium for refrigeration at extremely low temperatures. The pump meets the head and flow requirements of on-orbit helium transfer: a flow rate of 800 L/hr at a head of 128 J/kg. The overall pump efficiency at the design point is 0.45. The design head and flow requirements are met with zero net positive suction head, which is the condition in an orbiting helium supply Dewar. The mass transfer efficiency calculated for a space transfer operation is 0.99. Steel ball bearings are used with gas fiber-reinforced teflon retainers to provide solid lubrication. These bearings have demonstrated the longest life in liquid helium endurance tests under simulated pumping conditions. Technology developed in the project also has application for liquid helium circulation in terrestrial facilities and for transfer of cryogenic rocket propellants in space.

  3. BASG thermomechanical pump helium 2 transfer tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mills, G. L.; Newell, D. A.; Urbach, A. R.

    1990-01-01

    The purpose of the effort described was to perform experiments and calculations related to using a thermomechanical pump in the space-based resupply of the Space Infrared Telescope Facility (SIRTF) with Helium 2. Thermomechanical (fountain effect) pumps have long been suggested as a means for pumping large quantities of Helium 2. The unique properties of Helium 2 have made it useful for cooling space instruments. Several space science missions, including SIRTF, are now being planned which would benefit greatly from on-orbit resupply of Helium 2. A series of experiments were performed to demonstrate that large volumes of Helium 2 can be transferred with a thermomechanical pump at high flow rates and at high efficiency from one dewar to another through valves and lines that are similar to the plumbing arrangement that would be necessary to accomplish such a transfer on-orbit. In addition, temperature, pressure, and flow rate data taken during the tests were used to verify and refine a computer model which was developed.

  4. Lifetime of a Chemically Bound Helium Compound

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chaban, Galina M.; Lundell, Jan; Gerber, R. Benny; Kwak, Dochan (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The rare-gas atoms are chemically inert, to an extent unique among all elements. This is due to the stable electronic structure of the atoms. Stable molecules with chemically bound rare-gas atoms are, however, known. A first such compound, XePtF6, W2S prepared in 1962 and since then a range of molecules containing radon, xenon and krypton have been obtained. Most recently, a first stable chemically bound compound of argon was prepared, leaving neon and helium as the only elements for which stable chemically bound molecules are not yet known. Electronic structure calculations predict that a metastable species HHeF exists, but significance of the result depends on the unknown lifetime. Here we report quantum dynamics calculations of the lifetime of HHeF, using accurate interactions computed from electronic structure theory. HHeF is shown to disintegrate by tunneling through energy barriers into He + HF and H + He + F the first channel greatly dominating. The lifetime of HHeF is more than 120 picoseconds, that of DHeF is 14 nanoseconds. The relatively long lifetimes are encouraging for the preparation prospects of this first chemically bound helium compound.

  5. Superfluid Helium On-Orbit Transfer (SHOOT) operatons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kittel, P.; Dipirro, M. J.

    1988-01-01

    The in-flight tests and the operational sequences of the Superfluid Helium On-Orbit Transfer (SHOOT) experiment are outlined. These tests include the transfer of superfluid helium at a variety of rates, the transfer into cold and warm receivers, the operation of an extravehicular activity coupling, and tests of a liquid acquisition device. A variety of different types of instrumentation will be required for these tests. These include pressure sensors and liquid flow meters that must operate in liquid helium, accurate thermometry, two types of quantity gauges, and liquid-vapor sensors.

  6. Liquid acquisition devices for superfluid helium transfer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dipirro, M. J.

    1990-01-01

    To transfer superfluid helium (He II) in the milli-g or micro-g environment in orbit, it is necessary to provide a reasonably steady supply of liquid to the inlet of the pump in the supply dewar. To accomplish this without providing an artificial gravity through acceleration requires a liquid acquisition device. Fluid swirl and electrostatic devices have been proposed to orientate the fluid. However, the simplest mechanisms appear to be the use of surface tension or the thermomechanical effect. This paper examines four concepts for providing He II to the inlet of a thermomechanical pump. The devices are a distributed thermomechanical pump, a distributed pump with a main thermomechanical pump, a screened channel system and a vane/sponge combination. Calculations on the efficiency of these types of liquid acquisition devices are made using laboratory data from tests involving small scale devices where applicable. These calculations show that the latter two types of liquid acquisition devices are the most efficient. Questions as to the probability of cavitation and the effect of the residual shuttle acceleration on their operation remain to be answered, however.

  7. Methods of Helium Injection and Removal for Heat Transfer Augmentation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haight, Harlan; Kegley, Jeff; Bourdreaux, Meghan

    2008-01-01

    While augmentation of heat transfer from a test article by helium gas at low pressures is well known, the method is rarely employed during space simulation testing because the test objectives usually involve simulation of an orbital thermal environment. Test objectives of cryogenic optical testing at Marshall Space Flight Center's X-ray Cryogenic Facility (XRCF) have typically not been constrained by orbital environment parameters. As a result, several methods of helium injection have been utilized at the XRCF since 1999 to decrease thermal transition times. A brief synopsis of these injection (and removal) methods including will be presented.

  8. Methods of Helium Injection and Removal for Heat Transfer Augmentation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kegley, Jeffrey

    2008-01-01

    While augmentation of heat transfer from a test article by helium gas at low pressures is well known, the method is rarely employed during space simulation testing because the test objectives are to simulate an orbital thermal environment. Test objectives of cryogenic optical testing at Marshall Space Flight Center's X-ray Calibration Facility (XRCF) have typically not been constrained by orbital environment parameters. As a result, several methods of helium injection have been utilized at the XRCF since 1999 to decrease thermal transition times. A brief synopsis of these injection (and removal) methods including will be presented.

  9. Mechanical pumps for superfluid helium transfer in space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Izenson, M. G.; Swift, W. L.

    1988-02-01

    Two alternate mechanical pump concepts have been identified for the transfer of superfluid helium in space. Both pumps provide flow at sufficient head and have operating characteristics suitable for the Space Infrared Telescope Facility (SIRTF) refill mission. One pump operates at a relatively low speed and utilizes mechanical roller bearings, while the other operates at a higher rotational speed using either electromagnetic or tilting pad gas-dynamic bearings. The use of gas bearings requires transfer of normal helium so that the gas pressure within the pump casing is high enough to operate the bearings. The operating characteristics of both pumps are predicted, the dimensions are estimated and major technology issues are identified. The major issues for each pump design are cavitation performance and bearing development. Roller bearings require quantified reliability for operation in space while electromagnetic bearings require basic development as well as a complex control system. The low speed pump has significantly poorer hydraulic efficiency than the high speed pump.

  10. Model for the charge-transfer probability in helium nanodroplets following electron-impact ionization

    SciTech Connect

    Ellis, Andrew M.; Yang Shengfu

    2007-09-15

    A theoretical model has been developed to describe the probability of charge transfer from helium cations to dopant molecules inside helium nanodroplets following electron-impact ionization. The location of the initial charge site inside helium nanodroplets subject to electron impact has been investigated and is found to play an important role in understanding the ionization of dopants inside helium droplets. The model is consistent with a charge migration process in small helium droplets that is strongly directed by intermolecular forces originating from the dopant, whereas for large droplets (tens of thousands of helium atoms and larger) the charge migration increasingly takes on the character of a random walk. This suggests a clear droplet size limit for the use of electron-impact mass spectrometry for detecting molecules in helium droplets.

  11. The effects of dual-domain mass transfer on the tritium-helium-3 dating method.

    PubMed

    Neumann, Rebecca B; Labolle, Eric M; Harvey, Charles F

    2008-07-01

    Diffusion of tritiated water (referred to as tritium) and helium-3 between mobile and immobile regions in aquifers (mass transfer) can affect tritium and helium-3 concentrations and hence tritium-helium-3 (3H/3He) ages that are used to estimate aquifer recharge and groundwater residence times. Tritium and helium-3 chromatographically separate during transport because their molecular diffusion coefficients differ. Simulations of tritium and helium-3 transport and diffusive mass transfer along stream tubes show that mass transfer can shift the 3H/3He age of the tritium and helium-3 concentration ([3H + 3He]) peak to dates much younger than the 1963 peak in atmospheric tritium. Furthermore, diffusive mass-transfer can cause the 3H/3He age to become younger downstream along a stream tube, even as the mean water-age must increase. Simulated patterns of [3H + 3He] versus 3H/3He age using a mass transfer model appear consistent with a variety of field data. These results suggest that diffusive mass transfer should be considered, especially when the [3H + 3He] peak is not well defined or appears younger than the atmospheric peak. 3H/3He data provide information about upstream mass-transfer processes that could be used to constrain mass-transfer models; however, uncritical acceptance of 3H/3He dates from aquifers with immobile regions could be misleading.

  12. Study of helium transfer technology for STICCR: Fluid management

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frank, D. J.; Yuan, S. W. K.; Grove, R. K.; Lheureux, J. M.

    1987-01-01

    The Space Infrared Telescope Facility (SIRTF) is a long life cryogenically cooled space based telescope for infrared astronomy from 2 to 700 microns currently under study and planned for launch in the mid 90's. SIRTF will operate as a multi-user facility, initially carrying 3 instruments at the focal plane. It will be cooled to below 2 K by superfluid liquid helium to achieve radiometric sensitivity limited only by the statistical fluctuations in the natural infrared background radiation over most of its spectral range. The lifetime of the mission will be limited by the lifetime of the liquid helium supply, and is currently baselined to be 2 years. Candidates are reviewed for a liquid management device to be used in the resupply of liquid helium, and for the selection of an appropriate candidate.

  13. Experimental investigation of the heat transfer characteristics of a helium cryogenic thermosyphon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Long, Z. Q.; Zhang, P.

    2013-10-01

    The heat transfer performance of a cryogenic thermosyphon filled with helium as the working fluid is investigated experimentally with a G-M cryocooler as the heat sink in this study. The cryogenic thermosyphon acts as a thermal link between the cryocooler and the cooled target (the copper evaporator with a large mass). Helium is charged in different filling ratios, and the cooling down process and the heat transfer characteristics of the cryogenic thermosyphon are investigated. The cooling down process of the cooled target can be significantly accelerated by the presence of helium in the cryogenic thermosyphon and the cooling down period can be further shortened by the increase of filling ratio. The heat transfer mode changes from the liquid-vapor phase change to natural convection as the increase of the heating power applied on the evaporator. The heat transfer limit and thermal resistance are discussed for the liquid-vapor phase change heat transfer, and they can be estimated by empirical correlations. For the natural convection heat transfer, it can be enhanced by increasing the filling ratio, and the natural convection of supercritical helium is much stronger than that of gaseous helium.

  14. A Study on the Heat Transfer Properties of Pressurized Helium II through Fine Channels

    SciTech Connect

    Kimura, N.; Nakai, H.; Yamamoto, A.; Murakami, M.; Shintomi, T.

    2006-04-27

    An experimental study was carried out on the heat transfer properties of pressurized superfluid helium in the Gorter-Mellink heat transfer region. By using channels of hydraulic diameter from 5.6 x 10- through 4.81 x 10-3 m, the heat transfer properties of pressurized superfluid helium were measured in the experiment. The temperature dependence of Gorter-Mellink parameter, AGM, is revealed from the experimental results. It is also proven that AGM depend only on temperature, and not on the channel size and shape. The effect of quantized vortices on heat transfer of pressurized superfluid helium is discussed in comparison of the channel diameter with the mean vortex line spacing.

  15. Electron-impact ionization of helium with large energy transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Bray, I.; Fursa, D. V.; Stelbovics, A. T.

    2006-09-15

    We consider the recently measured case of 730 eV electron-impact ionization of the ground state of helium with 205 and 500 eV coplanar outgoing electrons by Catoire et al. [J. Phys. B 39, 2827 (2006)]. These measurements, which are on a relative scale, show some unexpected structure and variation from the second-order distorted-wave Born approximation R-matrix and Brauner-Briggs-Klar theories. Using the convergent close-coupling method we provide an improved agreement with experiment, but some discrepancies still remain.

  16. Effects of helium and nitrogen as pressurants in nitrogen tetroxide transfer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bizjak, F.; Simkin, D. J.

    1967-01-01

    Study investigates effects of helium and nitrogen as pressurants in nitrogen tetroxide transfer from one vessel to another at a higher elevation. Results may contribute to creation of new environmental systems and improved oxygen solubility in water to promote fish life.

  17. Proton transfer in histidine-tryptophan heterodimers embedded in helium droplets

    SciTech Connect

    Bellina, Bruno; Merthe, Daniel J.; Kresin, Vitaly V.

    2015-03-21

    We used cold helium droplets as nano-scale reactors to form and ionize, by electron bombardment and charge transfer, aromatic amino acid heterodimers of histidine with tryptophan, methyl-tryptophan, and indole. The molecular interaction occurring through an N–H ⋅ ⋅ ⋅ N hydrogen bond leads to a proton transfer from the indole group of tryptophan to the imidazole group of histidine in a radical cationic environment.

  18. Proton transfer in histidine-tryptophan heterodimers embedded in helium droplets.

    PubMed

    Bellina, Bruno; Merthe, Daniel J; Kresin, Vitaly V

    2015-03-21

    We used cold helium droplets as nano-scale reactors to form and ionize, by electron bombardment and charge transfer, aromatic amino acid heterodimers of histidine with tryptophan, methyl-tryptophan, and indole. The molecular interaction occurring through an N-H···N hydrogen bond leads to a proton transfer from the indole group of tryptophan to the imidazole group of histidine in a radical cationic environment.

  19. Characterisation and optimisation of flexible transfer lines for liquid helium. Part I: Experimental results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dittmar, N.; Haberstroh, Ch.; Hesse, U.; Krzyzowski, M.

    2016-04-01

    The transfer of liquid helium (LHe) into mobile dewars or transport vessels is a common and unavoidable process at LHe decant stations. During this transfer reasonable amounts of LHe evaporate due to heat leak and pressure drop. Thus generated helium gas needs to be collected and reliquefied which requires a huge amount of electrical energy. Therefore, the design of transfer lines used at LHe decant stations has been optimised to establish a LHe transfer with minor evaporation losses which increases the overall efficiency and capacity of LHe decant stations. This paper presents the experimental results achieved during the thermohydraulic optimisation of a flexible LHe transfer line. An extensive measurement campaign with a set of dedicated transfer lines equipped with pressure and temperature sensors led to unique experimental data of this specific transfer process. The experimental results cover the heat leak, the pressure drop, the transfer rate, the outlet quality, and the cool-down and warm-up behaviour of the examined transfer lines. Based on the obtained results the design of the considered flexible transfer line has been optimised, featuring reduced heat leak and pressure drop.

  20. Helium I heat transfer in a small natural circulation loop with self-sustaining recondensation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Yu; Four, Aurélien; Baudouy, Bertrand

    2014-01-01

    Heat transfer of helium I in a natural circulation loop is experimentally studied around atmospheric pressure. The test section of the loop has an inner diameter of 4 mm and a height of 23 cm and can be uniformly heated by wire heater. On top of the loop, a condenser is mounted and thermally connected to the second-stage of a 1.5 W at 4.2 K GM cryocooler. Helium can be recondensed in the condenser, where the pressure is regulated around the atmospheric pressure. While the dissipated heat flux is increased from 0 to 1 W, one encounters the different heat transfer regimes as single phase liquid convection, two phase nucleate boiling and single phase vapor convection. The wall superheat varies up to 11 K in the single phase vapor convection regime. The wall temperature measurement allows obtaining the boiling curve and determining the heat transfer coefficient.

  1. Measurement of the charge transfer efficiency of electrons clocked on superfluid helium

    SciTech Connect

    Sabouret, G.; Lyon, S.A.

    2006-06-19

    Electrons floating on the surface of liquid helium are possible qubits for quantum information processing. Varying electric potentials do not modify spin states, which allows their transport on helium using a charge-coupled device (CCD)-like array of underlying gates. This scheme depends on an efficient intergate electron transfer and on the absence of electron traps. We will present a measurement of the charge transfer efficiency (CTE) of electrons clocked back and forth above a short CCD-like structure. The CTE obtained at low clocking frequencies is 0.999 with an electron density of about 4 electrons/{mu}m{sup 2}. We find no evidence for deep electron trapping.

  2. Dewar to dewar model for superfluid helium transfer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Snyder, H. A.

    1988-01-01

    A model has been developed to predict the flow of He II between a source and a receiving dewar. The model uses a finite difference aproximation to integrate the describing equations. The transfer path may contain porous plugs or mechanical pumps, heater sections, heat leaks, constrictions due to valves, and bends. These line elements may occur in any order and in any quantity. The line elements are easily reconfigured by changing the input data. The input consists of the number of finite element cells, the pressure in each dewar, the heat input to each section and the dimensions of each section. The output is the temperature, pressure, flow rate, velocities and heat flux in each section. An internal reference table provides the properties of He II. The model is programmed for a LOTUS work sheet. It converges rapidly and usually requires 10 to 15 iterations. For most applications an iteration takes 30 s on an AT. The predictions agree well with experimental data.

  3. Characterisation and optimisation of flexible transfer lines for liquid helium. Part II: Thermohydraulic modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dittmar, N.; Haberstroh, Ch.; Hesse, U.; Krzyzowski, M.

    2016-10-01

    In part one of this publication experimental results for a single-channel transfer line used at liquid helium (LHe) decant stations are presented. The transfer of LHe into mobile dewars is an unavoidable process since the places of storage and usage are generally located apart from each other. The experimental results have shown that reasonable amounts of LHe evaporate due to heat leak and pressure drop. Thus, generated helium cold gas has to be collected and reliquefied, demanding a huge amount of electrical energy. Although this transfer process is common in cryogenic laboratories, no existing code could be found to model it. Therefore, a thermohydraulic model has been developed to model the LHe flow at operating conditions using published heat transfer and pressure drop correlations. This paper covers the basic equations used to calculate heat transfer and pressure drop, as well as the validation of the thermohydraulic code, and its application within the optimisation process. The final transfer line design features reduced heat leak and pressure drop values based on a combined measurement and modelling campaign in the range of 0.112 < pin < 0.148 MPa, 190 < G < 450 kg/(m2 s), and 0.04 < xout < 0.12.

  4. Toward Femtosecond Time-Resolved Studies of Solvent-Solute Energy Transfer in Doped Helium Nanodroplets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bacellar, C.; Ziemkiewicz, M. P.; Leone, S. R.; Neumark, D. M.; Gessner, O.

    2015-05-01

    Superfluid helium nanodroplets provide a unique cryogenic matrix for high resolution spectroscopy and ultracold chemistry applications. With increasing photon energy and, in particular, in the increasingly important Extreme Ultraviolet (EUV) regime, the droplets become optically dense and, therefore, participate in the EUV-induced dynamics. Energy- and charge-transfer mechanisms between the host droplets and dopant atoms, however, are poorly understood. Static energy domain measurements of helium droplets doped with noble gas atoms (Xe, Kr) indicate that Penning ionization due to energy transfer from the excited droplet to dopant atoms may be a significant relaxation channel. We have set up a femtosecond time-resolved photoelectron imaging experiment to probe these dynamics directly in the time-domain. Droplets containing 104 to 106 helium atoms and a small percentage (<10-4) of dopant atoms (Xe, Kr, Ne) are excited to the 1s2p Rydberg band by 21.6 eV photons produced by high harmonic generation (HHG). Transiently populated states are probed by 1.6 eV photons, generating time-dependent photoelectron kinetic energy distributions, which are monitored by velocity map imaging (VMI). The results will provide new information about the dynamic timescales and the different relaxation channels, giving access to a more complete physical picture of solvent-solute interactions in the superfluid environment. Prospects and challenges of the novel experiment as well as preliminary experimental results will be discussed.

  5. Measurements of mixed convective heat transfer to low temperature helium in a horizontal channel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yeroshenko, V. M.; Kuznetsov, Y. V.; Shevchenko, O. A.; Hendricks, R. C.; Daney, D. E.

    1979-01-01

    A horizontal 2.85 m long, 19 mm i.d. stainless steel heated circular channel was employed to measure coefficients of heat transfer to low temperature helium flow. Experimental parameters range from 6.5 to 15 K, from 0.12 to 0.3 MPa at heat fluxes up to 1000 W/m square and Reynolds numbers from 9,000 to 20,000. A significantly nonuniform distribution of heat transfer coefficients over the tube periphery is observed. Difference between temperatures on the upper and lower surfaces of the stainless steel channel wall was found to reach 9 K. It was noted that the highest temperature on the wall outer surface is displaced from its uppermost point. Measurements of local flow temperatures revealed vortical structure of the flow. The displacement of the point with the highest temperature is attributable to the effect of vortices. The relationships for calculating local and averaged coefficients of heat transfer are proposed.

  6. Charge transfer dissociation (CTD) mass spectrometry of peptide cations using kiloelectronvolt helium cations.

    PubMed

    Hoffmann, William D; Jackson, Glen P

    2014-11-01

    A kiloelectronvolt beam of helium ions is used to ionize and fragment precursor peptide ions starting in the 1+ charge state. The electron affinity of helium cations (24.6 eV) exceeds the ionization potential of protonated peptides and can therefore be used to abstract an electron from--or charge exchange with--the isolated precursor ions. Kiloelectronvolt energies are used, (1) to overcome the Coulombic repulsion barrier between the cationic reactants, (2) to overcome ion-defocussing effects in the ion trap, and (3) to provide additional activation energy. Charge transfer dissociation (CTD) of the [M+H](+) precursor of Substance P gives product ions such as [M+H](2+•) and a dominant series of a ions in both the 1+ and 2+ charge states. These observations, along with the less-abundant a + 1 ions, are consistent with ultraviolet photodissociation (UVPD) results of others and indicate that C-C(α) cleavages are possible through charge exchange with helium ions. Although the efficiencies and timescale of CTD are not yet suitable for on-line chromatography, this new approach to ion activation provides an additional potential tool for the interrogation of gas phase ions.

  7. Charge transfer and penning ionization of dopants in or on helium nanodroplets exposed to EUV radiation.

    PubMed

    Buchta, Dominic; Krishnan, Siva R; Brauer, Nils B; Drabbels, Marcel; O'Keeffe, Patrick; Devetta, Michele; Di Fraia, Michele; Callegari, Carlo; Richter, Robert; Coreno, Marcello; Prince, Kevin C; Stienkemeier, Frank; Moshammer, Robert; Mudrich, Marcel

    2013-05-30

    Helium nanodroplets are widely used as a cold, weakly interacting matrix for spectroscopy of embedded species. In this work, we excite or ionize doped He droplets using synchrotron radiation and study the effect onto the dopant atoms depending on their location inside the droplets (rare gases) or outside at the droplet surface (alkali metals). Using photoelectron-photoion coincidence imaging spectroscopy at variable photon energies (20-25 eV), we compare the rates of charge-transfer to Penning ionization of the dopants in the two cases. The surprising finding is that alkali metals, in contrast to the rare gases, are efficiently Penning ionized upon excitation of the (n = 2)-bands of the host droplets. This indicates rapid migration of the excitation to the droplet surface, followed by relaxation, and eventually energy transfer to the alkali dopants.

  8. Use of Multiple Reheat Helium Brayton Cycles to Eliminate the Intermediate Heat Transfer Loop for Advanced Loop Type SFRs

    SciTech Connect

    Haihua Zhao; Hongbin Zhang; Samuel E. Bays

    2009-05-01

    The sodium intermediate heat transfer loop is used in existing sodium cooled fast reactor (SFR) plant design as a necessary safety measure to separate the radioactive primary loop sodium from the water of the steam Rankine power cycle. However, the intermediate heat transfer loop significantly increases the SFR plant cost and decreases the plant reliability due to the relatively high possibility of sodium leakage. A previous study shows that helium Brayton cycles with multiple reheat and intercooling for SFRs with reactor outlet temperature in the range of 510°C to 650°C can achieve thermal efficiencies comparable to or higher than steam cycles or recently proposed supercritical CO2 cycles. Use of inert helium as the power conversion working fluid provides major advantages over steam or CO2 by removing the requirement for safety systems to prevent and mitigate the sodium-water or sodium-CO2 reactions. A helium Brayton cycle power conversion system therefore makes the elimination of the intermediate heat transfer loop possible. This paper presents a pre-conceptual design of multiple reheat helium Brayton cycle for an advanced loop type SFR. This design widely refers the new horizontal shaft distributed PBMR helium power conversion design features. For a loop type SFR with reactor outlet temperature 550°C, the design achieves 42.4% thermal efficiency with favorable power density comparing with high temperature gas cooled reactors.

  9. Lab tests of a thermomechanical pump for shoot. [Superfluid Helium On-Orbit Transfer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dipirro, Michael J.; Boyle, Robert F.

    1988-01-01

    Laboratory tests of a thermomechanical (TM) pump utilizing a commercially available porous disk have been conducted. Various size disks, heater configurations, and outlet flow impedances have been used to characterize scale models of the pump proposed for the Superfluid Helium On-Orbit Transfer (SHOOT) Flight Experiment. The results yield the scalability of the TM pump to larger diameters, and hence larger pumping rates, the dependence of flow rate on back pressure and heater power, and the limits of pumping speed due to internal losses within the porous disk due to mutual and superfluid friction. Analysis indicates that for low back pressures the flow rate is limited by the superfluid friction rather than the mutual friction. For the porous plug used in the early tests this amounts to a practical limit of 4.4 liters per hour per square centimeter. For a baselined flight plug area of 180 sq cm this yields 790 liters per hour.

  10. A review of surface effects in Kapitza's experiments on heat transfer between solids and helium II (Review Article)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amrit, Jay

    2016-08-01

    In a recent paper, it is shown that the thermal boundary Kapitza resistance between a solid and superfluid helium is explained by resonant scattering of phonons from surface roughness heights, as described in the Adamenko and Fuks (AF) model. We reexamine the original experiments of thermal transfer between a solid (platinum and copper) and superfluid helium conducted by Kapitza in 1940. In particular, we analyze his experimental results for the different surface treatments of the solid in light of the AF model. Time scales for diffuse scattering of phonons at the interface are estimated. Also the role of a layer of varnish on a copper surface is reinterpreted.

  11. Transient heat transfer in helium II due to a sudden vacuum break

    SciTech Connect

    Bosque, Ernesto S.; Dhuley, Ram C.; Van Sciver, Steven W.

    2014-01-29

    To ensure future cryogenic devices meet safety and operational specifications, significant value is gained from a developed understanding of the transient heat fluxes that result from failure of an insulating vacuum jacket around a helium II (He II)-cooled device. A novel, one-dimensional experiment is successfully performed examining the phenomena immediately following a vacuum rupture onto a cryosurface. In the experiment, a fast-opening (∼10 ms) valve isolates a rigid container of ultra high purity nitrogen (N{sub 2}) gas kept at room temperature and adjustable pressure from a vertically oriented, highly evacuated (∼10{sup −3} Pa) tube roughly 1 m in length. The bottom of the evacuated tube is sealed via a 2.54 mm thick copper disk, whose bottom surface is in intimate contact with an open column of He II (∼1.8 K). The evacuated tube, disk, and He II column share a diameter of 24 mm. Opening the valve results in a vacuum rupture. N{sub 2} gas is immediately drawn into the evacuated space and cryopumped onto the disk as a growing layer of solid cryodeposit. Various coupled transient heat transfer processes proceed as the internal energy of the warm gas is transferred through the growing layer of solid N{sub 2}, through the copper disk, and into the He II column. This work examines the qualitative nature of these transient phenomena and the magnitude of the heat fluxes present through each of the series of thermal resistances.

  12. Development of a silicone transfer molding compound

    SciTech Connect

    Parker, B.G.

    1992-05-01

    Molding compound MS 2072067, designated BRP 50206, is currently used in the manufacture of bobbins and coils. This material was developed as a compression molding compound and is reinforced with 1/4 inch glass fibers. The production yield for coils and bobbins has improved over the years; however, it is still not at a desirable level. A milled glass reinforced version of MS 2072067 silicone molding compound was developed in the laboratory. Milled glass fibers with lengths of 1/32, 1/16, and 1/8 inch were used in place of the 1/4 inch chopped glass fibers in the formulations. The tensile strength, tensile moduli, thermal expansion, and flow properties of these materials were evaluated. These materials exhibited improved flow properties over the existing 1/4 inch glass fiber reinforced material. The new materials also had the same or better tensile strength, as compared to the current production material, and maintained similar thermal expansion characteristics.

  13. Exploration of solid helium 4 at multiple frequencies using a compound torsional oscillator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keiderling, Michael C.

    Apparent but controversial evidence of supersolidity, a coexistence of crystalline and superfluid states, was observed in 2004. Samples of solid 4He were grown, in a chamber, inside a torsion oscillator (TO). The samples showed evidence of apparent decoupling from their container in the form of a resonant frequency increase of the TO as the temperature was lowered. We have developed a Compound torsion oscillator (CTO), with two resonant modes, that allows us to observe a single solid helium sample at two frequencies simultaneously. This thesis will cover the first comprehensive study on the frequency dependence of the apparent supersolid effect. This includes a study of the effect of varying 3He concentrations (x3) on the frequency dependence. Additionally a study on how changes in x3 affect the dissipation, which previous studies of x3 dependence have not explored. Also studied is how varying x3 affected the hysteresis first observed by Aoki et al. The CTO has allowed the exploration of the amplitude dependent effects in new ways. By exciting the sample at both frequencies simultaneously and varying the driving amplitude of one mode one can see how excitations at one mode affect what is observed at the other. The studies of the effects of varying x3 show results that are consistent with the dislocation movement model proposed by Iwasa. The collected data was not consistent with the simple supersolid model initially proposed. The studies of hysteresis show that the onset of hysteresis was dependent on x3 but was not frequency dependent. This lends credit to the hysteresis being due to the pinning and unpinning of 3He impurities. The studies of the effect of amplitude dependent effects show an asymmetry between the two frequencies. The higher frequency has a larger effect on the lower frequency than the lower frequency has on the higher. This is also inconsistent with the initial simple supersolid model.

  14. Dielectronic recombination and resonant transfer excitation processes for helium-like krypton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Xiao-Li; Qu, Yi-Zhi; Zhang, Song-Bin; Zhang, Yu

    2012-10-01

    The relativistic configuration interaction method is employed to calculate the dielectronic recombination (DR) cross sections of helium-like krypton via the 1s2lnl' (n = 2, 3, ..., 15) resonances. Then, the resonant transfer excitation (RTE) processes of Kr34+ colliding with H, He, H2, and CHx (x = 0-4) targets are investigated under the impulse approximation. The needed Compton profiles of targets are obtained from the Hartree—Fock wave functions. The RTE cross sections are strongly dependent on DR resonant energies and strengths, and the electron momentum distributions of the target. For H2 and H targets, the ratio of their RTE cross sections changes from 1.85 for the 1s2l2l' to 1.88 for other resonances, which demonstrates the weak molecular effects on the Compton profiles of H2. For CHx (x = 0-4) targets, the main contribution to the RTE cross section comes from the carbon atom since carbon carries 6 electrons; as the number of hydrogen increases in CHx, the RTE cross section almost increases by the same value, displaying the strong separate atom character for the hydrogen. However, further comparison of the individual orbital contributions of C(2p, 2s, 1s) and CH4(1t2, 2a1, 1a1) to the RTE cross sections shows that the molecular effects induce differences of about 25.1%, 19.9%, and 0.2% between 2p-1t2, 2s-2a1, and 1s-1a1 orbitals, respectively.

  15. Air-sea transfer of gas phase controlled compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, M.; Bell, T. G.; Blomquist, B. W.; Fairall, C. W.; Brooks, I. M.; Nightingale, P. D.

    2016-05-01

    Gases in the atmosphere/ocean have solubility that spans several orders of magnitude. Resistance in the molecular sublayer on the waterside limits the air-sea exchange of sparingly soluble gases such as SF6 and CO2. In contrast, both aerodynamic and molecular diffusive resistances on the airside limit the exchange of highly soluble gases (as well as heat). Here we present direct measurements of air-sea methanol and acetone transfer from two open cruises: the Atlantic Meridional Transect in 2012 and the High Wind Gas Exchange Study in 2013. The transfer of the highly soluble methanol is essentially completely airside controlled, while the less soluble acetone is subject to both airside and waterside resistances. Both compounds were measured concurrently using a proton-transfer-reaction mass spectrometer, with their fluxes quantified by the eddy covariance method. Up to a wind speed of 15 m s-1, observed air-sea transfer velocities of these two gases are largely consistent with the expected near linear wind speed dependence. Measured acetone transfer velocity is ∼30% lower than that of methanol, which is primarily due to the lower solubility of acetone. From this difference we estimate the “zero bubble” waterside transfer velocity, which agrees fairly well with interfacial gas transfer velocities predicted by the COARE model. At wind speeds above 15 m s-1, the transfer velocities of both compounds are lower than expected in the mean. Air-sea transfer of sensible heat (also airside controlled) also appears to be reduced at wind speeds over 20 m s-1. During these conditions, large waves and abundant whitecaps generate large amounts of sea spray, which is predicted to alter heat transfer and could also affect the air-sea exchange of soluble trace gases. We make an order of magnitude estimate for the impacts of sea spray on air-sea methanol transfer.

  16. Study of metal transfer in CO2 laser+GMAW-P hybrid welding using argon-helium mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Wang; Hua, Xueming; Liao, Wei; Li, Fang; Wang, Min

    2014-03-01

    The metal transfer in CO2 Laser+GMAW-P hybrid welding by using argon-helium mixtures was investigated and the effect of the laser on the mental transfer is discussed. A 650 nm laser, in conjunction with the shadow graph technique, is used to observe the metal transfer process. In order to analyze the heat input to the droplet and the droplet internal current line distribution. An optical emission spectroscopy system was employed to estimate default parameter and optimized plasma temperature, electron number densities distribution. The results indicate that the CO2 plasma plume have a significant impact to the electrode melting, droplet formation, detachment, impingement onto the workpiece and weld morphology. Since the current distribution direction flow changes to the keyhole, to obtain a metal transfer mode of one droplet per pulse, the welding parameters should be adjusted to a higher pulse time (TP) and a lower voltage.

  17. Heat transfer through Rutherford superconducting cable with novel pattern of polyimide electrical insulation in pressurized superfluid helium environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chorowski, Maciej; Polinski, Jaroslaw; Strychalski, Michal

    2012-06-01

    Future LHC accelerator luminosity upgrade will increase a beam losses heat deposition in the superconducting magnet coils. Main barrier of the heat evacuation from the coils made of Rutherford type cables is a cable electrical insulation. The insulation is made of polyimide tapes wrapped around the cable in a special configuration. Presently used insulation wrapping schemes constitute very good electrical insulation with relatively low heat transport ability. Therefore a new insulation wrapping schemes with enhanced helium permeability and adequate dielectric properties have been developed at CERN. An experimental comparative study of heat transfer perpendicular to the Rutherford type cable, for an old and new insulation wrapping schemes have been accomplished at Wroclaw University of Technology. The tests have been performed in pressurized superfluid helium conditions, and at 60 MPa of the sample applied external pressure simulating the Lorentz forces. This paper presents the measurements methodology and gives experimental results.

  18. Quasiclassical trajectory study of collisional energy transfer in toluene systems. II. Helium bath gas: Energy and temperature dependences, and angular momentum transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, Kieran F.

    1994-11-01

    The collisional deactivation of highly vibrationally excited toluene-d0 and toluene-d8 by helium bath gas has been investigated using quasiclassical trajectory simulations. Collisional energy transfer was found to increase with initial toluene internal energy, in agreement with the experiments of Toselli and Barker [J. Chem. Phys. 97, 1809 (1992), and references therein]. The temperature dependence of <ΔE2>1/2 is predicted to be T(0.44±0.10), in agreement with the experiments of Heymann, Hippler, and Troe [J. Chem. Phys. 80, 1853 (1984)]. Toluene is found to have no net angular-momentum (rotational-energy) transfer to helium bath gas, although <ΔJ2>1/2 has a temperature dependence of T(0.31±0.07). Re-evaluation of earlier calculations [``Paper I:'' Lim, J. Chem. Phys. 100, 7385 (1994)] found that rotational energy transfer could be induced by increasing the mass of the collider, or by increasing the strength of the intermolecular interaction: in these cases, angular-momentum transfer depended on the initial excitation energy. In all cases, the final rotational distributions remained Boltzmann.

  19. Differential transfer of dietary flavour compounds into human breast milk.

    PubMed

    Hausner, Helene; Bredie, Wender L P; Mølgaard, Christian; Petersen, Mikael Agerlin; Møller, Per

    2008-09-01

    Transfer of dietary flavour compounds into human milk is believed to constitute the infant's early flavour experiences. This study reports on the time-dependent transfer of flavour compounds from the mother's diet to her breast milk using a within-subject design. Eighteen lactating mothers completed three test days on which they provided a baseline milk sample prior to ingestion of capsules containing 100 mg d-carvone, l-menthol, 3-methylbutyl acetate and trans-anethole. Milk samples were collected 2, 4, 6 and 8 h post-ingestion and analysed by a dynamic headspace method and gas chromatography-mass spectroscopy. The recovery quantities were adjusted for variations in milk fat content. Concentration-time profiles for d-carvone and trans-anethole revealed a maximum around 2 h post-ingestion, whereas the profile for l-menthol showed a plateau pattern. The ester 3-methylbutyl acetate could not be detected in the milk, but a single determination showed traces (<0.4 ppb) in a 1 h milk collection. Flavour compounds appeared to be transmitted differentially from the mother's diet to her milk. The results imply that human milk provides a reservoir for time-dependent chemosensory experiences to the infant; however, volatiles from the diet are transferred selectively and in relatively low amounts.

  20. Compounds which mediate Gallium-67 transfer from lactoferrin to ferritin

    SciTech Connect

    Weiner, R.E.; Schreiber, G.J.; Hoffer, P.B.; Bushberg, J.T.

    1985-08-01

    The influence of various low molecular weight compounds on the transfer of /sup 67/Ga from human lactoferrin (LF) to horse spleen ferritin (HoFE) has been examined in vitro. When LF/sup *//sup 67/Ga complex was placed in competition with HoFE using a dialysis system the initial transfer rate (TR) of /sup 67/Ga to HoFE was slow and continuous. In the presence of 1 mM pyrophosphate (PP/sub i/) ascorbate and adenosine triphosphate (ATP), the TR was dramatically enhanced. This effect was concentration sensitive since reduction of the ATP to 0.1 mM eliminated the enhancement. Although PP/sub i/ and ascorbate ions yielded larger TR's, ATP was more effective in the promotion of /sup 67/Ga transfer to HoFE. When the LF/HoFE concentration ratio was decreased, in the presence of ATP, the transfer of /sup 67/Ga was significantly increased. These results suggest that ferritin present intracellularly could remove and retain /sup 67/Ga entering the cell in the form of a LF/sub *//sup 67/Ga complex. Moreover, increased synthesis of ferritin and cytosolic phosphate compounds would appear to enhance this process.

  1. Charge transfer vibronic transitions in uranyl tetrachloride compounds;

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, G. K.; Deifel, N. P.; Cahill, C. L.

    2012-01-01

    The electronic and vibronic interactions of uranyl (UO{sub 2}){sup 2+} in three tetrachloride crystals have been investigated with spectroscopic experiments and theoretical modeling. Analysis and simulation of the absorption and photoluminescence spectra have resulted in a quantitative understanding of the charge transfer vibronic transitions of uranyl in the crystals. The spectra obtained at liquid helium temperature consist of extremely narrow zero-phonon lines (ZPL) and vibronic bands. The observed ZPLs are assigned to the first group of the excited states formed by electronic excitation from the 3{sigma} ground state into the f{sub {delta}{phi}}, orbitals of uranyl. The Huang-Rhys theory of vibronic coupling is modified successfully for simulating both the absorption and luminescence spectra. It is shown that only vibronic coupling to the axially symmetric stretching mode is Franck-Condon allowed, whereas other modes are involved through coupling with the symmetric stretching mode. The energies of electronic transitions, vibration frequencies of various local modes, and changes in the O=U=O bond length of uranyl in different electronic states and in different coordination geometries are evaluated in empirical simulations of the optical spectra. Multiple uranyl sites derived from the resolution of a superlattice at low temperature are resolved by crystallographic characterization and time- and energy-resolved spectroscopic studies. The present empirical simulation provides insights into fundamental understanding of uranyl electronic interactions and is useful for quantitative characterization of uranyl coordination.

  2. Charge transfer vibronic transitions in uranyl tetrachloride compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Guokui; Deifel, Nicholas P.; Cahill, Christopher L.; Zhurov, Vladimir V.; Pinkerton, A. Alan

    2012-01-01

    The electronic and vibronic interactions of uranyl (UO₂)2+ in three tetrachloride crystals have been investigated with spectroscopic experiments and theoretical modeling. Analysis and simulation of the absorption and photoluminescence spectra have resulted in a quantitative understanding of the charge transfer vibronic transitions of uranyl in the crystals. The spectra obtained at liquid helium temperature consist of extremely narrow zero-phonon lines (ZPL) and vibronic bands. The observed ZPLs are assigned to the first group of the excited states formed by electronic excitation from the 3σ ground state into the fδ,Φ orbitals of uranyl. The Huang–Rhys theory of vibronic coupling is modified successfully for simulating both the absorption and luminescence spectra. It is shown that only vibronic coupling to the axially symmetric stretching mode is Franck–Condon allowed, whereas other modes are involved through coupling with the symmetric stretching mode. The energies of electronic transitions, vibration frequencies of various local modes, and changes in the O=U=O bond length of uranyl in different electronic states and in different coordination geometries are evaluated in empirical simulations of the optical spectra. Multiple uranyl sites derived from the resolution of a superlattice at low temperature are resolved by crystallographic characterization and time- and energy-resolved spectroscopic studies. The present empirical simulation provides insights into fundamental understanding of uranyl electronic interactions and is useful for quantitative characterization of uranyl coordination.

  3. Effects of Floodplain Vegetation on Momentum Transfer in Compound Channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasegawa, Fumiaki; Yamamoto, Takuya; Jahra, Fatima; Kawahara, Yoshihisa

    Better management of riparian vegetation for flood control and environmental preservation requires in-depth understanding of flow characteristics in the presence of vegetation. This study aims at clarifying the flow structure and lateral momentum transfer process in vegetated compound channels through experiments and numerical simulations. Two types of vegetation zone on a floodplain are discussed. In the first case a floodplain is fully covered by vegetation. In the other case a floodplain has a belt of vegetation zone along the interface between main channel and floodplain. The measured data are compared with the numerical results that are obtained using a non-linear k-ɛ model and a vegetation model. It is found that the numerical model can reproduce the main characteristics of the flow and that the convection and the turbulent diffusion play important roles in the lateral momentum transfer across the interface between vegetated floodplain and main channel.

  4. A high-pressure van der Waals compound in solid nitrogen-helium mixtures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vos, W. L.; Finger, L. W.; Hemley, R. J.; Hu, J. Z.; Mao, H. K.; Schouten, J. A.

    1992-01-01

    A detailed diamond anvil-cell study using synchrotron X-ray diffraction, Raman scattering, and optical microscopy has been conducted for the He-N system, with a view to the weakly-bound van der Waals molecule interactions that can be formed in the gas phase. High pressure is found to stabilize the formation of a stoichiometric, solid van der Waals compound of He(N2)11 composition which may exemplify a novel class of compounds found at high pressures in the interiors of the outer planets and their satellites.

  5. Experimental study of forced convection heat transfer during upward and downward flow of helium at high pressure and high temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Francisco Valentin; Narbeh Artoun; Masahiro Kawaji; Donald M. McEligot

    2015-08-01

    Fundamental high pressure/high temperature forced convection experiments have been conducted in support of the development of a Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) with a prismatic core. The experiments utilize a high temperature/high pressure gas flow test facility constructed for forced convection and natural circulation experiments. The test section has a single 16.8 mm ID flow channel in a 2.7 m long, 108 mm OD graphite column with four 2.3kW electric heater rods placed symmetrically around the flow channel. This experimental study presents the role of buoyancy forces in enhancing or reducing convection heat transfer for helium at high pressures up to 70 bar and high temperatures up to 873 degrees K. Wall temperatures have been compared among 10 cases covering the inlet Re numbers ranging from 500 to 3,000. Downward flows display higher and lower wall temperatures in the upstream and downstream regions, respectively, than the upward flow cases due to the influence of buoyancy forces. In the entrance region, convection heat transfer is reduced due to buoyancy leading to higher wall temperatures, while in the downstream region, buoyancyinduced mixing causes higher convection heat transfer and lower wall temperatures. However, their influences are reduced as the Reynolds number increases. This experimental study is of specific interest to VHTR design and validation of safety analysis codes.

  6. Heat transfer in a compact tubular heat exchanger with helium gas at 3.5 MPa

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Olson, Douglas A.; Glover, Michael P.

    1990-01-01

    A compact heat exchanger was constructed consisting of circular tubes in parallel brazed to a grooved base plate. This tube specimen heat exchanger was tested in an apparatus which radiatively heated the specimen on one side at a heat flux of up to 54 W/sq cm, and cooled the specimen with helium gas at 3.5 MPa and Reynolds numbers of 3000 to 35,000. The measured friction factor of the tube specimen was lower than that of a circular tube with fully developed turbulent flow, although the uncertainty was high due to entrance and exit losses. The measured Nusselt number, when modified to account for differences in fluid properties between the wall and the cooling fluid, agreed with past correlations for fully developed turbulent flow in circular tubes.

  7. Metastable charge-transfer state of californium(iii) compounds.

    PubMed

    Liu, Guokui; Cary, Samantha K; Albrecht-Schmitt, Thomas E

    2015-06-28

    Among a series of anomalous physical and chemical properties of Cf(iii) compounds revealed by recent investigations, the present work addresses the characteristics of the optical spectra of An(HDPA)3·H2O (An = Am, Cm, and Cf), especially the broadband photoluminescence from Cf(HDPA)3·H2O induced by ligand-to-metal charge transfer (CT). As a result of strong ion-ligand interactions and the relative ease of reducing Cf(iii) to Cf(ii), a CT transition occurs at low energy (<3 eV) via the formation of a metastable Cf(ii) state. It is shown that the systematic trend in CT transitions of the lanthanide series is not paralleled by actinide elements lighter than Cf(iii), and californium represents a turning point in the periodicity of the actinide series. Analyses and modeling of the temperature-dependent luminescence dynamics indicate that the metastable Cf(ii) charge-transfer state undergoes radiative and non-radiative relaxations. Broadening of the CT transition arises from strong vibronic coupling and hole-charge interactions in the valence band. The non-radiative relaxation of the metastable CT state results from a competition between phonon-relaxation and thermal tunneling that populates the excited states of Cf(iii).

  8. Heat transfer in a compact heat exchanger containing rectangular channels and using helium gas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Olson, D. A.

    1991-01-01

    Development of a National Aerospace Plane (NASP), which will fly at hypersonic speeds, require novel cooling techniques to manage the anticipated high heat fluxes on various components. A compact heat exchanger was constructed consisting of 12 parallel, rectangular channels in a flat piece of commercially pure nickel. The channel specimen was radiatively heated on the top side at heat fluxes of up to 77 W/sq cm, insulated on the back side, and cooled with helium gas flowing in the channels at 3.5 to 7.0 MPa and Reynolds numbers of 1400 to 28,000. The measured friction factor was lower than that of the accepted correlation for fully developed turbulent flow, although the uncertainty was high due to uncertainty in the channel height and a high ratio of dynamic pressure to pressure drop. The measured Nusselt number, when modified to account for differences in fluid properties between the wall and the cooling fluid, agreed with past correlations for fully developed turbulent flow in channels. Flow nonuniformity from channel-to-channel was as high as 12 pct above and 19 pct below the mean flow.

  9. Steady-state heat transfer to boiling liquid helium in simulated coil windings

    SciTech Connect

    Walstrom, P.L.

    1981-01-01

    The present data show that the worst case steady-state stability in the GE/LCT magnet windings is at a horizontal conductor orientation. The heat transfer improves with inclination of the conductor from horizontal. Calculations show that for these small regions normal zones will recover by cold-end conduction from the inclined conductor on either end.

  10. Parity propensities in rotational energy transfer of OH X 2Pi(i) with helium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wysong, Ingrid J.; Jeffries, Jay B.; Crosley, David R.

    1991-01-01

    Preliminary results of rotational energy transfer in ground state OH in collisions in He are reported. A surprising propensity is found: conservation of total parity is favored in collisions which change in spin-orbit component, the reversible reaction 2Pi3/2 yields 2Pi1/2. This has implications concerning the OH-He potential surface.

  11. Microsolvation in superfluid helium droplets studied by the electronic spectra of six porphyrin derivatives and one chlorine compound.

    PubMed

    Riechers, R; Pentlehner, D; Slenczka, A

    2013-06-28

    After almost two decades of high resolution molecular spectroscopy in superfluid helium droplets, the understanding of microsolvation is still the subject of intense experimental and theoretical research. According to the published spectroscopic work including microwave, infrared, and electronic spectroscopy, the latter appears to be particularly promising to study microsolvation because of the appearance of pure molecular transitions and spectrally separated phonon wings. Instead of studying the very details of the influence of the helium environment for one particular dopant molecule as previously done for phthalocyanine, the present study compares electronic spectra of a series of non-polar porphyrin derivatives when doped into helium droplets consisting of 10(4)-10(5) helium atoms. Thereby, we focus on the helium-induced fine structure, as revealed most clearly at the corresponding electronic origin. The interpretation and the assignment of particular features obtained in the fluorescence excitation spectra are based on additional investigations of dispersed emission spectra and of the saturation behavior. Besides many dopant-specific results, the experimental study provides strong evidence for a particular triple peak feature representing the characteristic signature of helium solvation for all seven related dopant species.

  12. Helium Leak Detection of Vessels in Fuel Transfer Cell (FTC) of Prototype Fast Breeder Reactor (PFBR)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dutta, N. G.

    2012-11-01

    Bharatiya Nabhikiya Vidyut Nigam (BHAVINI) is engaged in construction of 500MW Prototype Fast Breeder Reactor (PFBR) at Kalpak am, Chennai. In this very important and prestigious national programme Special Product Division (SPD) of M/s Kay Bouvet Engg.pvt. ltd. (M/s KBEPL) Satara is contributing in a major way by supplying many important sub-assemblies like- Under Water trolley (UWT), Airlocks (PAL, EAL) Container and Storage Rack (CSR) Vessels in Fuel Transfer Cell (FTC) etc for PFBR. SPD of KBEPL caters to the requirements of Government departments like - Department of Atomic Energy (DAE), BARC, Defense, and Government undertakings like NPCIL, BHAVINI, BHEL etc. and other precision Heavy Engg. Industries. SPD is equipped with large size Horizontal Boring Machines, Vertical Boring Machines, Planno milling, Vertical Turret Lathe (VTL) & Radial drilling Machine, different types of welding machines etc. PFBR is 500 MWE sodium cooled pool type reactor in which energy is produced by fissions of mixed oxides of Uranium and Plutonium pellets by fast neutrons and it also breeds uranium by conversion of thorium, put along with fuel rod in the reactor. In the long run, the breeder reactor produces more fuel then it consumes. India has taken the lead to go ahead with Fast Breeder Reactor Programme to produce electricity primarily because India has large reserve of Thorium. To use Thorium as further fuel in future, thorium has to be converted in Uranium by PFBR Technology.

  13. Mechanistic Study of Oxygen Atom Transfer Catalyzed by Rhenium Compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Xiaopeng Shan

    2003-08-05

    Two ionic and one neutral methyl(oxo)rhenium(V) compounds were synthesized and structurally characterized. They were compared in reactivity towards the ligands triphenylphosphane, pyridines, pyridine N-oxides. Assistance from Broensted bases was found on ligand displacement of ionic rhenium compounds as well as nucleophile assistance on oxidation of all compounds. From the kinetic data, crystal structures, and an analysis of the intermediates, a structural formula of PicH{sup +}3{sup -} and mechanisms of ligand displacement and oxidation were proposed.

  14. Maternal transfer of organohalogenated compounds in sharks and stingrays.

    PubMed

    Weijs, Liesbeth; Briels, Nathalie; Adams, Douglas H; Lepoint, Gilles; Das, Krishna; Blust, Ronny; Covaci, Adrian

    2015-03-15

    Elasmobranchs can bioaccumulate considerable amounts of persistent organic pollutants (POPs) and utilize several reproductive strategies thereby influencing maternal transfer of contaminants. This study provides preliminary data on the POP transfer from pregnant females to offspring of three species (Atlantic stingrays, bonnethead, blacktip sharks) with different reproduction modes (aplacental, placental viviparity). Polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) levels were generally higher than any other POPs. Stingrays and blacktip shark embryos contained the lowest POP concentrations while bonnetheads and the blacktip adult female had the highest concentrations. Results suggest that POPs are more readily transferred from the mother to the embryo compared to what is transferred to ova in stingrays. Statistically significant differences in levels of selected POPs were found between embryos from the left and right uterus within the same litter as well as between female and male embryos within the same litter for bonnetheads, but not for the blacktip sharks. PMID:25595490

  15. Maternal transfer of organohalogenated compounds in sharks and stingrays.

    PubMed

    Weijs, Liesbeth; Briels, Nathalie; Adams, Douglas H; Lepoint, Gilles; Das, Krishna; Blust, Ronny; Covaci, Adrian

    2015-03-15

    Elasmobranchs can bioaccumulate considerable amounts of persistent organic pollutants (POPs) and utilize several reproductive strategies thereby influencing maternal transfer of contaminants. This study provides preliminary data on the POP transfer from pregnant females to offspring of three species (Atlantic stingrays, bonnethead, blacktip sharks) with different reproduction modes (aplacental, placental viviparity). Polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) levels were generally higher than any other POPs. Stingrays and blacktip shark embryos contained the lowest POP concentrations while bonnetheads and the blacktip adult female had the highest concentrations. Results suggest that POPs are more readily transferred from the mother to the embryo compared to what is transferred to ova in stingrays. Statistically significant differences in levels of selected POPs were found between embryos from the left and right uterus within the same litter as well as between female and male embryos within the same litter for bonnetheads, but not for the blacktip sharks.

  16. Development of a silicone transfer molding compound. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Parker, B.G.

    1992-05-01

    Molding compound MS 2072067, designated BRP 50206, is currently used in the manufacture of bobbins and coils. This material was developed as a compression molding compound and is reinforced with 1/4 inch glass fibers. The production yield for coils and bobbins has improved over the years; however, it is still not at a desirable level. A milled glass reinforced version of MS 2072067 silicone molding compound was developed in the laboratory. Milled glass fibers with lengths of 1/32, 1/16, and 1/8 inch were used in place of the 1/4 inch chopped glass fibers in the formulations. The tensile strength, tensile moduli, thermal expansion, and flow properties of these materials were evaluated. These materials exhibited improved flow properties over the existing 1/4 inch glass fiber reinforced material. The new materials also had the same or better tensile strength, as compared to the current production material, and maintained similar thermal expansion characteristics.

  17. Intermolecula transfer and elimination of molecular hydrogen in thermal reactions of unsaturated organic compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Suria, S.

    1995-02-10

    Two reactions which are important to coal liquefaction include intermolecular transfer and the elimination of two hydrogen atoms. We have designed several model reactions to probe the viability of several hydrogen transfer and elimination pathways. This report described studies on these reactions using organic model compounds.

  18. Cross-Language Transfer of Insight into the Structure of Compound Words

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zhang, Jie; Anderson, Richard C.; Li, Hong; Dong, Qiong; Wu, Xinchun; Zhang, Yan

    2010-01-01

    Cross-language transfer of awareness of the structure of compound words was investigated among native speakers of Chinese who were learning English as a second language. Chinese fifth graders received instruction in the morphology of four types of compound words in either Chinese or English. They then completed both the Chinese and English…

  19. Oligomer and mixed-metal compounds potential multielectron transfer catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Rillema, D.P.

    1992-03-30

    Projects related to the design and characterization of multimetallic complexes has proceeded forward with a number of achievements. First, photoprocesses in hydrogel matrices lead to the conclusion that cationic metallochromophores could be ion exchanged into a hydrogel matrix ({kappa}-carageenan) and substantial photocurrents could be generated. Second, X-ray structures of Ru(bpy){sub 3}{sup 2+}, Ru(bpm){sub 3}{sup 2+} and Ru(bpz){sub 3}{sup 2+}, where bpy is 2,2{prime}-bipyridine, bpm is 2,2{prime}-bipyrimidine and bpz is 2,2{prime}-bipyrizine, were obtained and revealed similar Ru-N bond distances in each complex even though their {sigma}-donor and {pi}-acceptor character differ markedly. The structure parameters are expected to provide theoreticians with the information needed to probe the electronic character of the molecular systems and provide us with direction in our synthetic strategies. Third, a copper(I) complex was synthesized with a dimeric-ethane-bridged, 1,10-phenanthroline ligand that resulted in isolation of a bimetallic species. The copper(I) complex did luminesce weakly, suggesting that the dimer possesses potential electron transfer capability. Fourth, the photophysical properties of (Re(CO){sub 4}(L-L)){sup +}, where L-L = heterocyclic diimine ligands, and Pt(bph)X{sub 2}, where bph = the dianion of biphenyl and X = CH{sub 3}CN, py or ethylendiamine, displayed luminescence at high energy and underwent excited-state electron transfer. Such high energy emitters provide high driving forces for undergoing excited-state electron transfer. Fifth, both energy and electron transfer were observed in mixed-metal complexes bridged by 1,2-bis(2,2{prime}-bipyridyl-4{prime}-yl) ethane.

  20. Helium jet dispersion to atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khan, Hasna J.

    1986-01-01

    On the event of loss of vacuum guard of superinsulated helium dewar, high rate of heat transfer into the tank occurs. The rapid boiling of liquid helium causes the burst disk to rupture at four atmospheres and consequently the helium passes to the atmosphere through vent lines. The gaseous helium forms a vertical buoyant jet as it exits the vent line into a stagnant environment. Characterization of the gaseous jet is achieved by detailed analysis of the axial and radial dependence of the flow parameters.

  1. Automatic Refilling System For Liquid Helium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Serlemitsos, Aristides; Sansebastian, Mark; Geagen, Jay; Warner, Brent

    1990-01-01

    Cryogenic experiments left unattended for days. System automatically replenishes liquid helium in cryogenic experimental apparatus as liquid evaporates. Automatic filling system transfers liquid helium from storage vessel to experimental apparatus under computer control. Gaseous helium from cylinder supplies pumping pressure. Circuit senses level of liquid helium by sensing voltage across measuring resistors in series with silicon resistance thermometers (SRT's). Low voltage indicates SRT covered, while high voltage indicates uncovered.

  2. 2-D numerical simulations of groundwater flow, heat transfer and 4He transport — implications for the He terrestrial budget and the mantle helium heat imbalance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castro, Maria Clara; Patriarche, Delphine; Goblet, Patrick

    2005-09-01

    Because helium and heat production results from a common source, a continental 4He crustal flux of 4.65 * 10 - 14 mol m - 2 s - 1 has been estimated based on heat flow considerations. In addition, because the observed mantle He / heat flux ratio at the proximity of mid-ocean ridges (6.6 * 10 - 14 mol J - 1 ) is significantly lower than the radiogenic production ratio (1.5 * 10 - 12 mol J - 1 ), the presence of a terrestrial helium-heat imbalance was suggested. The latter could be explained by the presence of a layered mantle in which removal of He is impeded from the lower mantle [R.K. O'Nions, E.R. Oxburgh, Heat and helium in the Earth, Nature 306 (1983) 429-431; E.R. Oxburgh, R.K. O'Nions, Helium loss, tectonics, and the terrestrial heat budget, Science 237 (1987) 1583-1588]. van Keken et al. [P.E. van Keken, C.J. Ballentine, D. Porcelli, A dynamical investigation of the heat and helium imbalance, Earth Planet, Sci. Lett. 188 (2001) 421-434] have recently claimed that the helium-heat imbalance remains a robust observation. Such conclusions, however, were reached under the assumption that a steady-state regime was in place for both tracers and that their transport properties are similar at least in the upper portion of the crust. Here, through 2-D simulations of groundwater flow, heat transfer and 4He transport carried out simultaneously in the Carrizo aquifer and surrounding formations in southwest Texas, we assess the legitimacy of earlier assumptions. Specifically, we show that the driving transport mechanisms for He and heat are of a fundamentally different nature for a high range of permeabilities ( k ≤ 10 - 16 m 2) found in metamorphic and volcanic rocks at all depths in the crust. The assumption that transport properties for these two tracers are similar in the crust is thus unsound. We also show that total 4He / heat flux ratios lower than radiogenic production ratios do not reflect a He deficit in the crust or mantle original reservoir. Instead, they

  3. Resonant-transfer-and-excitation for highly charged ions (16 less than or equal to Z less than or equal to 23) in collisions with helium

    SciTech Connect

    Tanis, J.A.; Bernstein, E.M.; Oglesby, C.S.; Graham, W.G.; Clark, M.; McFarland, R.H.; Morgan, T.J.; Stockli, M.P.; Berkner, K.H.; Johnson, B.M.

    1984-01-01

    Significant new evidence is presented for resonant-transfer-and-excitation (RTE) in ion-atom collisions. This process occurs when a target electron is captured simultaneously with the excitation of the projectile followed by deexcitation via photon emission. RTE, which is analogous to dielectronic recombination (DR), proceeds via the inverse of an Auger transition, and is expected to be resonant for projectile velocities corresponding to the energy of the ejected electron in the Auger process. RTE was investigated by measuring cross sections for projectile K x-ray emission coincident with single electron capture for 15 to 200 MeV /sub 16/S/sup 13 +/, 100 to 360 MeV /sub 20/Ca/sup 16 +/ /sup 17 +/ /sup 18 +/ and 180 to 460 MeV /sub 23/V/sup 19 +/ /sup 20 +/ /sup 21 +/ ions colliding with helium. Strong resonant behavior, in agreement with theoretical calculations of RTE, was observed in the coincidence cross sections.

  4. Magnetically Recoverable Supported Ruthenium Catalyst for Hydrogenation of Alkynes and Transfer Hydrogenation of Carbonyl Compounds

    EPA Science Inventory

    A ruthenium (Ru) catalyst supported on magnetic nanoparticles (NiFe2O4) has been successfully synthesized and used for hydrogenation of alkynes at room temperature as well as transfer hydrogenation of a number of carbonyl compounds under microwave irradiation conditions. The cata...

  5. Magnetic Silica-Supported Ruthenium Nanoparticles: An Efficient Catalyst for Transfer Hydrogenation of Carbonyl Compounds

    EPA Science Inventory

    One-pot synthesis of ruthenium nanoparticles on magnetic silica is described which involve the in situ generation of magnetic silica (Fe3O4@ SiO2) and ruthenium nano particles immobilization; the hydration of nitriles and transfer hydrogenation of carbonyl compounds occurs in hi...

  6. Triplet energy transfer in conjugated polymers. I. Experimental investigation of a weakly disordered compound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sudha Devi, Lekshmi; Al-Suti, Mohammad K.; Dosche, Carsten; Khan, Muhammad S.; Friend, Richard H.; Köhler, Anna

    2008-07-01

    Efficient triplet exciton emission has allowed improved operation of organic light-emitting diodes (LEDs). To enhance the device performance, it is necessary to understand what governs the motion of triplet excitons through the organic semiconductor. Here, we have investigated triplet diffusion using a model compound that has weak energetic disorder. The Dexter-type triplet energy transfer is found to be thermally activated down to a transition temperature TT , below which the transfer rate is only weakly temperature dependent. We show that above the transition temperature, Dexter energy transfer can be described within the framework of Marcus theory. We suggest that below TT , the nature of the transfer changes from phonon-assisted hopping to quantum-mechanical tunneling. The lower electron-phonon coupling and higher electronic coupling in the polymer compared to the monomer results in an enhanced triplet diffusion rate.

  7. Heat transfer through cyanate ester epoxy mix and epoxy TGPAP - DETDA electrical insulations at superfluid helium temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pietrowicz, Slawomir; Four, Aurelian; Canfer, Simon; Jones, Stephanie; Baudouy, Bertrand

    2012-06-01

    A high magnetic field accelerator magnet of 13 T is being developed in Work Package 7 of the European Union FP7 project EuCARD. The application is to enable higher luminosities and energies for accelerators such as the LHC. The high magnetic field demands superconductors that require a heat treatment step such as Nb3Sn. This paper reports thermal tests on conventional composite electrical insulation with pressurized superfluid helium at atmospheric pressure as a coolant. Two composite insulation systems composed of cyanate ester epoxy mix or a tri-functional epoxy (TGPAP-DETDA) with Sglass fiber, have been chosen as candidate materials. The knowledge of their thermal properties is necessary for the thermal design and therefore samples have been tested in pressurized He II where heat is applied perpendicularly to the fibers between 1.6 K and 2.0 K. Overall thermal resistance is determined as a function of temperature and the results are compared with other electrical insulation systems used for accelerator magnets.

  8. Understanding and controlling airborne organic compounds in the indoor environment: mass transfer analysis and applications.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Y; Xiong, J; Mo, J; Gong, M; Cao, J

    2016-02-01

    Mass transfer is key to understanding and controlling indoor airborne organic chemical contaminants (e.g., VVOCs, VOCs, and SVOCs). In this study, we first introduce the fundamentals of mass transfer and then present a series of representative works from the past two decades, focusing on the most recent years. These works cover: (i) predicting and controlling emissions from indoor sources, (ii) determining concentrations of indoor air pollutants, (iii) estimating dermal exposure for some indoor gas-phase SVOCs, and (iv) optimizing air-purifying approaches. The mass transfer analysis spans the micro-, meso-, and macroscales and includes normal mass transfer modeling, inverse problem solving, and dimensionless analysis. These representative works have reported some novel approaches to mass transfer. Additionally, new dimensionless parameters such as the Little number and the normalized volume of clean air being completely cleaned in a given time period were proposed to better describe the general process characteristics in emissions and control of airborne organic compounds in the indoor environment. Finally, important problems that need further study are presented, reflecting the authors' perspective on the research opportunities in this area.

  9. A diffusible compound can enhance conjugal transfer of the Ti plasmid in Agrobacterium tumefaciens.

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, L H; Kerr, A

    1991-01-01

    Several octopine strains of Agrobacterium tumefaciens were tested for Ti plasmid (pTi) transfer after induction by 400 micrograms of octopine per ml for 24 h. The strains could be divided into two groups, transfer efficient (Trae) and transfer inefficient (Traie); the respective rates of transfer were 0.77 x 10(-2) to 1.14 x 10(-2) and 0.33 x 10(-6) to 9.8 x 10(-6) plasmid transconjugant per donor cell. Transfer efficiencies of Traie strains were greatly increased when the time of induction was 72 h. A diffusible conjugation factor (CF) that can enhance conjugal transfer of pTi in A. tumefaciens was discovered when both Trae and Traie donor strains were induced in the same plate. The evidence indicates that CF is a key factor affecting transfer efficiency of pTi but is not sufficient by itself to induce transfer. Trac mutants can produce CF constitutively, and Trae strains can produce it after induction by low octopine concentrations. The transfer efficiency of Traie strains was greatly increased by adding CF to the induction medium. The thermosensitive strain B6S, which normally cannot conjugate at temperatures above 30 degrees C, could transfer pTi efficiently at 32 and 34 degrees C in the presence of CF. Production of CF is dependent on the presence of pTi but appears to be common for different opine strains; it was first detected in octopine strains, but nopaline strains also produced the same or a similar compound. CF is very biologically active, affecting donor but not recipient bacterial cells, but CF does not promote aggregation. Data suggest that CF might be an activator or derepressor in the conjugation system of A. tumefaciens. CF is a dialyzable small molecule and is resistant to DNase, RNase, protease, and heating to 100 degrees C for 10 min, but autoclaving (121 degrees C for 15 min) and alkaline treatment removed all activity. Images PMID:2001991

  10. Heat transfer analysis of compound multi-layer insulation for cryogenic tank under different service conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, H. L.; Yao, C.; Li, Y.; Pan, H. L.

    2016-05-01

    Future space missions require efficient delivery of large payloads over great distances, necessitating the use of high-energy cryogenic propellant. Therefore, reliable compound multi-layer insulation on cryogenic tank is a crucial part of future space exploration. Compound multi-layer insulation is composed of double-aluminized radiation shielding and separated by a combination of netting and bumper strips, with a foam substrate. Considering conduction, convection, and radiation in heat transfer, the thermal field of multi-layer insulation is analysis by theoretical analysis with different thickness of foam substrate and MLI. Based on the formerly theoretical analysis, the heat flux and apparent thermal conductivity are discussed under the different thickness of foam substrate and MLI. Finally, the optimum design of multi-layer thermal insulation is present in consideration of the thickness and insulation performance of multi-layer insulation.

  11. From Olive Fruits to Olive Oil: Phenolic Compound Transfer in Six Different Olive Cultivars Grown under the Same Agronomical Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Talhaoui, Nassima; Gómez-Caravaca, Ana María; León, Lorenzo; De la Rosa, Raúl; Fernández-Gutiérrez, Alberto; Segura-Carretero, Antonio

    2016-01-01

    Phenolic compounds are responsible of the nutritional and sensory quality of extra-virgin olive oil (EVOO). The composition of phenolic compounds in EVOO is related to the initial content of phenolic compounds in the olive-fruit tissues and the activity of enzymes acting on these compounds during the industrial process to produce the oil. In this work, the phenolic composition was studied in six major cultivars grown in the same orchard under the same agronomical and environmental conditions in an effort to test the effects of cultivars on phenolic composition in fruits and oils as well as on transfer between matrices. The phenolic fractions were identified and quantified using high-performance liquid chromatography-diode array detector-time-of-flight-mass spectrometry. A total of 33 phenolic compounds were determined in the fruit samples and a total of 20 compounds in their corresponding oils. Qualitative and quantitative differences in phenolic composition were found among cultivars in both matrices, as well as regarding the transfer rate of phenolic compounds from fruits to oil. The results also varied according to the different phenolic groups evaluated, with secoiridoids registering the highest transfer rates from fruits to oils. Moreover, wide-ranging differences have been noticed between cultivars for the transfer rates of secoiridoids (4.36%–65.63% of total transfer rate) and for flavonoids (0.18%–0.67% of total transfer rate). ‘Picual’ was the cultivar that transferred secoiridoids to oil at the highest rate, whereas ‘Changlot Real’ was the cultivar that transferred flavonoids at the highest rates instead. Principal-component analysis confirmed a strong genetic effect on the basis of the phenolic profile both in the olive fruits and in the oils. PMID:26959010

  12. From Olive Fruits to Olive Oil: Phenolic Compound Transfer in Six Different Olive Cultivars Grown under the Same Agronomical Conditions.

    PubMed

    Talhaoui, Nassima; Gómez-Caravaca, Ana María; León, Lorenzo; De la Rosa, Raúl; Fernández-Gutiérrez, Alberto; Segura-Carretero, Antonio

    2016-01-01

    Phenolic compounds are responsible of the nutritional and sensory quality of extra-virgin olive oil (EVOO). The composition of phenolic compounds in EVOO is related to the initial content of phenolic compounds in the olive-fruit tissues and the activity of enzymes acting on these compounds during the industrial process to produce the oil. In this work, the phenolic composition was studied in six major cultivars grown in the same orchard under the same agronomical and environmental conditions in an effort to test the effects of cultivars on phenolic composition in fruits and oils as well as on transfer between matrices. The phenolic fractions were identified and quantified using high-performance liquid chromatography-diode array detector-time-of-flight-mass spectrometry. A total of 33 phenolic compounds were determined in the fruit samples and a total of 20 compounds in their corresponding oils. Qualitative and quantitative differences in phenolic composition were found among cultivars in both matrices, as well as regarding the transfer rate of phenolic compounds from fruits to oil. The results also varied according to the different phenolic groups evaluated, with secoiridoids registering the highest transfer rates from fruits to oils. Moreover, wide-ranging differences have been noticed between cultivars for the transfer rates of secoiridoids (4.36%-65.63% of total transfer rate) and for flavonoids (0.18%-0.67% of total transfer rate). 'Picual' was the cultivar that transferred secoiridoids to oil at the highest rate, whereas 'Changlot Real' was the cultivar that transferred flavonoids at the highest rates instead. Principal-component analysis confirmed a strong genetic effect on the basis of the phenolic profile both in the olive fruits and in the oils. PMID:26959010

  13. Synthesis and Hydride Transfer Reactions of Cobalt and Nickel Hydride Complexes to BX3 Compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Mock, Michael T.; Potter, Robert G.; O'Hagan, Molly J.; Camaioni, Donald M.; Dougherty, William G.; Kassel, W. S.; DuBois, Daniel L.

    2011-12-05

    Hydrides of numerous transition metal complexes can be generated by the heterolytic cleavage of H{sub 2} gas such that they offer alternatives to using main group hydrides in the regeneration of ammonia borane, a compound that has been intensely studied for hydrogen storage applications. Previously, we reported that HRh(dmpe){sub 2}, dmpe = 1,2-bis(dimethylphosphinoethane) was capable of reducing a variety of BX{sub 3} compounds having hydride affinity (HA) greater than or equal to HA of BEt{sub 3}. This study examines the reactivity of less expensive cobalt and nickel hydride complexes, (HCo(dmpe){sub 2} and [HNi(dmpe){sub 2}]{sup +}), to form B-H bonds. The hydride donor abilities ({Delta}G{sub H{sup -}}{sup o}) of HCo(dmpe){sub 2} and [HNi(dmpe){sub 2}]{sup +} were positioned on a previously established scale in acetonitrile that is cross-referenced with calculated HAs of BX{sub 3} compounds. The collective data guided our selection of BX{sub 3} compounds to investigate and aided our analysis of factors that determine favorability of hydride transfer. HCo(dmpe){sub 2} was observed to transfer H{sup -} to BX{sub 3} compounds with X = H, OC{sub 6}F{sub 5} and SPh. The reaction with B(SPh){sub 3} is accompanied by formation of (BH{sub 3}){sub 2}-dmpe and (BH{sub 2}SPh){sub 2}-dmpe products that follow from reduction of multiple BSPh bonds and loss of a dmpe ligand from Co. Reactions between HCo(dmpe){sub 2} and B(SPh){sub 3} in the presence of triethylamine result in formation of Et{sub 3}N-BH{sub 2}SPh and Et{sub 3}N-BH{sub 3} with no loss of dmpe ligand. Reactions of the cationic complex [HNi(dmpe){sub 2}]{sup +} with B(SPh){sub 3} under analogous conditions give Et{sub 3}N-BH{sub 2}SPh as the final product along with the nickel-thiolate complex [Ni(dmpe){sub 2}(SPh)]{sup +}. The synthesis and characterization of HCo(dedpe){sub 2} (dedpe = diethyldiphenyl(phosphino)ethane) from H{sub 2} and a base is also discussed; including the formation of an uncommon trans

  14. Electrochemical and theoretical analysis of the reactivity of shikonin derivatives: dissociative electron transfer in esterified compounds.

    PubMed

    Armendáriz-Vidales, Georgina; Frontana, Carlos

    2014-09-01

    An electrochemical and theoretical analysis of a series of shikonin derivatives in aprotic media is presented. Results showed that the first electrochemical reduction signal is a reversible monoelectronic transfer, generating a stable semiquinone intermediate; the corresponding E(I)⁰ values were correlated with calculated values of electroaccepting power (ω(+)) and adiabatic electron affinities (A(Ad)), obtained with BH and HLYP/6-311++G(2d,2p) and considering the solvent effect, revealing the influence of intramolecular hydrogen bonding and the substituting group at position C-2 in the experimental reduction potential. For the second reduction step, esterified compounds isobutyryl and isovalerylshikonin presented a coupled chemical reaction following dianion formation. Analysis of the variation of the dimensionless cathodic peak potential values (ξ(p)) as a function of the scan rate (v) functions and complementary experiments in benzonitrile suggested that this process follows a dissociative electron transfer, in which the rate of heterogeneous electron transfer is slow (~0.2 cm s(-1)), and the rate constant of the chemical process is at least 10(5) larger. PMID:25007856

  15. Hafnium metallocene compounds used as cathode interfacial layers for enhanced electron transfer in organic solar cells.

    PubMed

    Park, Keunhee; Oh, Seungsik; Jung, Donggeun; Chae, Heeyeop; Kim, Hyoungsub; Boo, Jin-Hyo

    2012-01-09

    We have used hafnium metallocene compounds as cathode interfacial layers for organic solar cells [OSCs]. A metallocene compound consists of a transition metal and two cyclopentadienyl ligands coordinated in a sandwich structure. For the fabrication of the OSCs, poly[3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene]:poly(styrene sulfonate), poly(3-hexylthiophene-2,5-diyl) + 66-phenyl C61 butyric acid methyl ester, bis-(ethylcyclopentadienyl)hafnium(IV) dichloride, and aluminum were deposited as a hole transport layer, an active layer, a cathode interfacial layer, and a cathode, respectively. The hafnium metallocene compound cathode interfacial layer improved the performance of OSCs compared to that of OSCs without the interfacial layer. The current density-voltage characteristics of OSCs with an interfacial layer thickness of 0.7 nm and of those without an interfacial layer showed power conversion efficiency [PCE] values of 2.96% and 2.34%, respectively, under an illumination condition of 100 mW/cm2 (AM 1.5). It is thought that a cathode interfacial layer of an appropriate thickness enhances the electron transfer between the active layer and the cathode, and thus increases the PCE of the OSCs.

  16. Performance evaluation of the Scent Transfer Unit (STU-100) for organic compound collection and release.

    PubMed

    Eckenrode, Brian A; Ramsey, Scott A; Stockham, Rex A; Van Berkel, Gary J; Asano, Keiji G; Wolf, Dennis A

    2006-07-01

    The Scent Transfer Unit (STU-100) is a portable vacuum that uses airflow through a sterile gauze pad to capture a volatiles profile over evidentiary items for subsequent canine presentation to assist law enforcement personnel. This device was evaluated to determine its ability to trap and release organic compounds at ambient temperature under controlled laboratory conditions. Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) analyses using a five-component volatiles mixture in methanol injected directly into a capture pad indicated that compound release could be detected initially and 3 days after the time of collection. Additionally, 15 compounds of a 39-component toxic organic gaseous mixture (10-1000 parts per billion by volume [p.p.b.(v)]) were trapped, released, and detected in the headspace of a volatiles capture pad after being exposed to this mixture using the STU-100 with analysis via GC-MS. Component release efficiencies at ambient temperature varied with the analyte; however, typical values of c. 10% were obtained. Desorption at elevated temperatures of reported human odor/scent chemicals and colognes trapped by the STU-100 pads was measured and indicated that the STU-100 has a significant trapping efficiency at ambient temperature. Multivariate statistical analysis of subsequent mass spectral patterns was also performed.

  17. Performance Evaluation of the Scent Transfer Unit (STU) for Organic Compound Collection and Release

    SciTech Connect

    Eckenrode, Brian A.; Ramsey, Scott A.; StockhamMFS, Rex A.; Van Berkel, Gary J; Asano, Keiji G; Wolf, Dennis A

    2006-01-01

    The Scent Transfer UnitTM (STU-100) is a portable vacuum that uses airflow through a sterile gauze pad to capture a volatiles profile over evidentiary items for subsequent canine presentation to assist law enforcement personnel. This device was evaluated to determine its ability to trap and release organic compounds at ambient temperature under controlled laboratory conditions. Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) analyses using a five-component volatiles mixture in methanol injected directly into a capture pad indicated that compound release could be detected initially and three days after time of collection. Additionally, fifteen compounds of a 39-component toxic organics gaseous mixture (10-1,000 ppbv) were trapped, released, and detected in the headspace of a volatiles capture pad after being exposed to this mixture using the STU-100 with analysis via GC-MS. Component release efficiencies at ambient temperature varied with the analyte; however, typical values of approximately 10 percent were obtained. Desorption at elevated temperatures of reported human odor/scent chemicals and colognes trapped by the STU-100 pads was measured and indicated that the STU-100 has a significant trapping efficiency at ambient temperature. Multivariate statistical analysis of subsequent mass spectral patterns was also performed.

  18. Maternally transferred dioxin-like compounds can affect the reproductive success of European eel.

    PubMed

    Foekema, Edwin M; Kotterman, Michiel; de Vries, Pepijn; Murk, Albertinka J

    2016-01-01

    Reported concentrations of dioxin-like compounds accumulated in the European eel (Anguilla anguilla) were used to perform a risk assessment for eel larval survival, taking into account a modeled amplification of tissue concentrations with a factor of 1.33 during spawning migration. The calculated concentrations of dioxin-like compounds finally deposited in the eggs were compared with the internal effect concentrations for survival of early life stages of the European eel; these concentrations, by lack of experimental data, were estimated from a sensitivity distribution based on literature data by assuming that eel larvae are among the 10% most sensitive teleost fish species. Given concentrations of dioxin-like contaminants and assuming a relatively high sensitivity, it can be expected that larvae from eggs produced by eel from highly contaminated locations in Europe will experience increased mortality as a result of maternally transferred dioxin-like contaminants. As historical persistent organic pollutant concentrations in eel tissue were higher, this impact must have been stronger in the past. Potential effects of other compounds or effects on the migration, condition, and fertility of the parental animals were not taken into account. It is important to further study the overall impact of contaminants on the reproductive success of the European eel as this may have been underestimated until now. PMID:26223357

  19. Element and chemical compounds transfer in bio-crude from hydrothermal liquefaction of microalgae.

    PubMed

    Tang, Xiaohan; Zhang, Chao; Li, Zeyu; Yang, Xiaoyi

    2016-02-01

    In this study, hydrothermal liquefaction (HTL) experiments of Nannochloropsis and Spirulina were carried out at different temperatures (220-300 °C) to explore the effects of temperature on bio-crude yield and properties. The optimal temperature for bio-crude yield was around 260-280 °C. Transfers of element and chemical compounds in bio-crude were discussed in detail to deduce the reaction mechanism. The hydrogen and carbon recoveries were consistent with the results of bio-crude yields at every temperature point. The relative percentage of fatty acid in bio-crude decreased and the amine and amide increased for both microalgae with temperature rising. The N-heterocyclic compounds in bio-crude increased with temperature rising for Nannochloropsis, while decreased when temperature increased from 220 °C to 280 °C for Spirulina. Bio-crude gained at higher temperature or from microalgae with high protein content may contain high heteroatom compounds.

  20. Element and chemical compounds transfer in bio-crude from hydrothermal liquefaction of microalgae.

    PubMed

    Tang, Xiaohan; Zhang, Chao; Li, Zeyu; Yang, Xiaoyi

    2016-02-01

    In this study, hydrothermal liquefaction (HTL) experiments of Nannochloropsis and Spirulina were carried out at different temperatures (220-300 °C) to explore the effects of temperature on bio-crude yield and properties. The optimal temperature for bio-crude yield was around 260-280 °C. Transfers of element and chemical compounds in bio-crude were discussed in detail to deduce the reaction mechanism. The hydrogen and carbon recoveries were consistent with the results of bio-crude yields at every temperature point. The relative percentage of fatty acid in bio-crude decreased and the amine and amide increased for both microalgae with temperature rising. The N-heterocyclic compounds in bio-crude increased with temperature rising for Nannochloropsis, while decreased when temperature increased from 220 °C to 280 °C for Spirulina. Bio-crude gained at higher temperature or from microalgae with high protein content may contain high heteroatom compounds. PMID:26700753

  1. Maternally transferred dioxin-like compounds can affect the reproductive success of European eel.

    PubMed

    Foekema, Edwin M; Kotterman, Michiel; de Vries, Pepijn; Murk, Albertinka J

    2016-01-01

    Reported concentrations of dioxin-like compounds accumulated in the European eel (Anguilla anguilla) were used to perform a risk assessment for eel larval survival, taking into account a modeled amplification of tissue concentrations with a factor of 1.33 during spawning migration. The calculated concentrations of dioxin-like compounds finally deposited in the eggs were compared with the internal effect concentrations for survival of early life stages of the European eel; these concentrations, by lack of experimental data, were estimated from a sensitivity distribution based on literature data by assuming that eel larvae are among the 10% most sensitive teleost fish species. Given concentrations of dioxin-like contaminants and assuming a relatively high sensitivity, it can be expected that larvae from eggs produced by eel from highly contaminated locations in Europe will experience increased mortality as a result of maternally transferred dioxin-like contaminants. As historical persistent organic pollutant concentrations in eel tissue were higher, this impact must have been stronger in the past. Potential effects of other compounds or effects on the migration, condition, and fertility of the parental animals were not taken into account. It is important to further study the overall impact of contaminants on the reproductive success of the European eel as this may have been underestimated until now.

  2. Applications of Groundwater Helium

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kulongoski, Justin T.; Hilton, David R.

    2011-01-01

    Helium abundance and isotope variations have widespread application in groundwater-related studies. This stems from the inert nature of this noble gas and the fact that its two isotopes ? helium-3 and helium-4 ? have distinct origins and vary widely in different terrestrial reservoirs. These attributes allow He concentrations and 3He/4He isotope ratios to be used to recognize and quantify the influence of a number of potential contributors to the total He budget of a groundwater sample. These are atmospheric components, such as air-equilibrated and air-entrained He, as well as terrigenic components, including in situ (aquifer) He, deep crustal and/or mantle He and tritiogenic 3He. Each of these components can be exploited to reveal information on a number of topics, from groundwater chronology, through degassing of the Earth?s crust to the role of faults in the transfer of mantle-derived volatiles to the surface. In this review, we present a guide to how groundwater He is collected from aquifer systems and quantitatively measured in the laboratory. We then illustrate the approach of resolving the measured He characteristics into its component structures using assumptions of endmember compositions. This is followed by a discussion of the application of groundwater He to the types of topics mentioned above using case studies from aquifers in California and Australia. Finally, we present possible future research directions involving dissolved He in groundwater.

  3. What's the difference between 'toilet paper' and 'paper toilet'? French-English bilingual children's crosslinguistic transfer in compound nouns.

    PubMed

    Nicoladis, Elena

    2002-11-01

    Bilingual acquisition can shed light on the cues children used in acquiring language. The purpose of this paper was to examine whether frequency, ambiguity or language dominance could explain crosslinguistic transfer in compound nouns. Crosslinguistic transfer would appear in the form of compound reversals. 25 monolingual English children between the ages of three and four years and 25 age-matched French-English bilingual children were asked to create and indicate their understanding of novel compound nouns. In production, the bilingual children reversed compounds in English more often than the monolingual children but equally often in French and English. In comprehension, there were no differences between groups. These results cannot be explained by any previous explanation of transfer. Implications for the theory of language acquisition are discussed.

  4. Versatile iridicycle catalysts for highly efficient and chemoselective transfer hydrogenation of carbonyl compounds in water.

    PubMed

    Talwar, Dinesh; Wu, Xiaofeng; Saidi, Ourida; Salguero, Noemí Poyatos; Xiao, Jianliang

    2014-09-26

    Cyclometalated iridium complexes are shown to be highly efficient and chemoselective catalysts for the transfer hydrogenation of a wide range of carbonyl groups with formic acid in water. Examples include α-substituted ketones (α-ether, α-halo, α-hydroxy, α-amino, α-nitrile or α-ester), α-keto esters, β-keto esters and α,β-unsaturated aldehydes. The reduction was carried out at substrate/catalyst ratios of up to 50 000 at pH 4.5 and required no organic solvent. The protocol provides a practical, easy and efficient way for the synthesis of β-functionalised secondary alcohols, such as β-hydroxyethers, β-hydroxyamines and β-hydroxyhalo compounds, which are valuable intermediates in pharmaceutical, fine chemical, perfume and agrochemical synthesis.

  5. A proton transfer reaction mass spectrometry based system for determining plant uptake of volatile organic compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tani, Akira; Kato, Shungo; Kajii, Yoshizumi; Wilkinson, Michael; Owen, Sue; Hewitt, Nick

    In order to evaluate the contribution that higher plants make to the removal of volatile organic compounds from the atmosphere, a measurement system consisting of a proton transfer reaction mass spectrometer (PTR-MS), CO 2 analyzer, diffusion devise and leaf enclosure was established. The uptake of VOCs by Golden Pothos ( Epipremnum aureum) was investigated. The overall relative error associated with measurements made using this system was <2.2% when a Golden Pothos leaf was exposed to 75-750 ppbv of methyl isobutyl ketone (MIBK). Even at the lowest MIBK concentration, more than 2.2% of the inflowing VOC was lost to the leaf, representing a detectable and positive MIBK uptake rate by the plant. The results of the investigation were compared with a measurement system based on gas chromatography analysis and it was shown that the use of a PTR-MS based system can significantly increase the certainties in determining the rate of VOC uptake by plants.

  6. Role of dense shelf water cascading in the transfer of organochlorine compounds to open marine waters.

    PubMed

    Salvadó, Joan A; Grimalt, Joan O; López, Jordi F; Palanques, Albert; Heussner, Serge; Pasqual, Catalina; Sanchez-Vidal, Anna; Canals, Miquel

    2012-03-01

    Settling particles were collected by an array of sediment trap moorings deployed along the Cap de Creus (CCC) and Lacaze-Duthiers (LDC) submarine canyons and on the adjacent southern open slope (SOS) between October 2005 and October 2006. This array collected particles during common settling processes and particles transferred to deep waters by dense shelf water cascading (DSWC). Polychlorobiphenyls (PCBs), dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane and its metabolites (DDTs), chlorobenzenes (CBzs)--pentachlorobenzene and hexachlorobenzene--and hexachlorocyclohexanes were analyzed in all samples. The results show much higher settling fluxes of these compounds during DSWC than during common sedimentation processes. The area of highest deposition was located between 1000 and 1500 m depth and extended along the canyons and outside them showing their channelling effects but also overflows of dense shelf water from these canyons. Higher fluxes were observed near the bottom (30 m above bottom; mab) than at intermediate waters (500 mab) which is consistent with the formation and sinking of dense water close to the continental shelf and main displacement through the slope by the bottom. DSWC involved the highest settling fluxes of these compounds ever described in marine continental slopes and pelagic areas, e.g., peak values of PCBs (960 ng · m(-2) · d(-1)), DDTs (2900 ng · m(-2) · d(-1)), CBzs (340 ng · m(-2) · d(-1)) and lindane (180 ng · m(-2) · d(-1)). PMID:22296346

  7. Role of dense shelf water cascading in the transfer of organochlorine compounds to open marine waters.

    PubMed

    Salvadó, Joan A; Grimalt, Joan O; López, Jordi F; Palanques, Albert; Heussner, Serge; Pasqual, Catalina; Sanchez-Vidal, Anna; Canals, Miquel

    2012-03-01

    Settling particles were collected by an array of sediment trap moorings deployed along the Cap de Creus (CCC) and Lacaze-Duthiers (LDC) submarine canyons and on the adjacent southern open slope (SOS) between October 2005 and October 2006. This array collected particles during common settling processes and particles transferred to deep waters by dense shelf water cascading (DSWC). Polychlorobiphenyls (PCBs), dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane and its metabolites (DDTs), chlorobenzenes (CBzs)--pentachlorobenzene and hexachlorobenzene--and hexachlorocyclohexanes were analyzed in all samples. The results show much higher settling fluxes of these compounds during DSWC than during common sedimentation processes. The area of highest deposition was located between 1000 and 1500 m depth and extended along the canyons and outside them showing their channelling effects but also overflows of dense shelf water from these canyons. Higher fluxes were observed near the bottom (30 m above bottom; mab) than at intermediate waters (500 mab) which is consistent with the formation and sinking of dense water close to the continental shelf and main displacement through the slope by the bottom. DSWC involved the highest settling fluxes of these compounds ever described in marine continental slopes and pelagic areas, e.g., peak values of PCBs (960 ng · m(-2) · d(-1)), DDTs (2900 ng · m(-2) · d(-1)), CBzs (340 ng · m(-2) · d(-1)) and lindane (180 ng · m(-2) · d(-1)).

  8. How To Reach Intense Luminescence for Compounds Capable of Excited-State Intramolecular Proton Transfer?

    PubMed

    Skonieczny, Kamil; Yoo, Jaeduk; Larsen, Jillian M; Espinoza, Eli M; Barbasiewicz, Michał; Vullev, Valentine I; Lee, Chang-Hee; Gryko, Daniel T

    2016-05-23

    Photoinduced intramolecular direct arylation allows structurally unique compounds containing phenanthro[9',10':4,5]imidazo[1,2-f]phenanthridine and imidazo[1,2-f]phenanthridine skeletons, which mediate excited-state intramolecular proton transfer (ESIPT), to be efficiently synthesized. The developed polycyclic aromatics demonstrate that the combination of five-membered ring structures with a rigid arrangement between a proton donor and a proton acceptor provides a means for attaining large fluorescence quantum yields, exceeding 0.5, even in protic solvents. Steady-state and time-resolved UV/Vis spectroscopy reveals that, upon photoexcitation, the prepared protic heteroaromatics undergo ESIPT, converting them efficiently into their excited-state keto tautomers, which have lifetimes ranging from about 5 to 10 ns. The rigidity of their structures, which suppresses nonradiative decay pathways, is believed to be the underlying reason for the nanosecond lifetimes of these singlet excited states and the observed high fluorescence quantum yields. Hydrogen bonding with protic solvents does not interfere with the excited-state dynamics and, as a result, there is no difference between the occurrences of ESIPT processes in MeOH versus cyclohexane. Acidic media has a more dramatic effect on suppressing ESIPT by protonating the proton acceptor. As a result, in the presence of an acid, a larger proportion of the fluorescence of ESIPT-capable compounds originates from their enol excited states.

  9. Trophic transfer of naturally produced brominated aromatic compounds in a Baltic Sea food chain.

    PubMed

    Dahlgren, Elin; Lindqvist, Dennis; Dahlgren, Henrik; Asplund, Lillemor; Lehtilä, Kari

    2016-02-01

    Brominated aromatic compounds (BACs) are widely distributed in the marine environment. Some of these compounds are highly toxic, such as certain hydroxylated polybrominated diphenyl ethers (OH-PBDEs). In addition to anthropogenic emissions through use of BACs as e.g. flame retardants, BACs are natural products formed by marine organisms such as algae, sponges, and cyanobacteria. Little is known of the transfer of BACs from natural producers and further up in the trophic food chain. In this study it was observed that total sum of methoxylated polybrominated diphenyl ethers (MeO-PBDEs) and OH-PBDEs increased in concentration from the filamentous red alga Ceramium tenuicorne, via Gammarus sp. and three-spined stickleback (Gasterosteus aculeatus) to perch (Perca fluviatilis). The MeO-PBDEs, which were expected to bioaccumulate, increased in concentration accordingly up to perch, where the levels suddenly dropped dramatically. The opposite pattern was observed for OH-PBDEs, where the concentration exhibited a general trend of decline up the food web, but increased in perch, indicating metabolic demethylation of MeO-PBDEs. Debromination was also indicated to occur when progressing through the food chain resulting in high levels of tetra-brominated MeO-PBDE and OH-PBDE congeners in fish, while some penta- and hexa-brominated congeners were observed to be the dominant products in the alga. As it has been shown that OH-PBDEs are potent disruptors of oxidative phosphorylation and that mixtures of different congener may act synergistically in terms of this toxic mode of action, the high levels of OH-PBDEs detected in perch in this study warrants further investigation into potential effects of these compounds on Baltic wildlife, and monitoring of their levels.

  10. Superfluid Helium Heat Pipe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gully, P.

    This paper reports on the development and the thermal tests of three superfluid helium heat pipes. Two of them are designed to provide a large transport capacity (4 mW at 1.7 K). They feature a copper braid located inside a 6 mm outer diameter stainless tube fitted with copper ends for mechanical anchoring. The other heat pipe has no copper braid and is designed to get much smaller heat transport capacity (0.5 mW) and to explore lower temperature (0.7 - 1 K). The copper braid and the tube wall is the support of the Rollin superfluid helium film in which the heat is transferred. The low filling pressure makes the technology very simple with the possibility to easily bend the tube. We present the design and discuss the thermal performance of the heat pipes tested in the 0.7 to 2.0 K temperature range. The long heat pipe (1.2 m with copper braid) and the short one (0.25 m with copper braid) have similar thermal performance in the range 0.7 - 2.0 K. At 1.7 K the long heat pipe, 120 g in weight, reaches a heat transfer capacity of 6.2 mW and a thermal conductance of 600 mW/K for 4 mW transferred power. Due to the pressure drop of the vapor flow and Kapitza thermal resistance, the conductance of the third heat pipe dramatically decreases when the temperature decreases. A 3.8 mW/K is obtained at 0.7 K for 0.5 mW transferred power.

  11. An efficient helium circulation system with small GM cryocoolers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takeda, Tsunehiro; Okamoto, Masayoshi; Atsuda, Kazuhiro; Kobayashi, Akihiro; Owaki, Takashi; Katagiri, Keishi

    2008-01-01

    We developed a helium circulating system that re-liquefies all the evaporating helium gas and consumes far less power than conventional systems, because warm helium gas at about 40 K collected high above the surface of the liquid helium in the Dewar is used to keep the Dewar cold, and because cold helium gas just above the liquid helium surface is collected and re-liquefied while still cold. A special transfer tube with multi-concentric pipes was developed to make the system operate efficiently. The system can produce up to 35.5 l/D of liquid helium from the evaporated helium using two 1.5 W@4.2 K GM cryocoolers.

  12. Fundamental mass transfer modeling of emission of volatile organic compounds from building materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bodalal, Awad Saad

    In this study, a mass transfer theory based model is presented for characterizing the VOC emissions from building materials. A 3-D diffusion model is developed to describe the emissions of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) from individual sources. Then the formulation is extended to include the emissions from composite sources (system comprising an assemblage of individual sources). The key parameters for the model (The diffusion coefficient of the VOC in the source material D, and the equilibrium partition coefficient k e) were determined independently (model parameters are determined without the use of chamber emission data). This procedure eliminated to a large extent the need for emission testing using environmental chambers, which is costly, time consuming, and may be subject to confounding sink effects. An experimental method is developed and implemented to measure directly the internal diffusion (D) and partition coefficients ( ke). The use of the method is illustrated for three types of VOC's: (i) Aliphatic Hydrocarbons, (ii) Aromatic Hydrocarbons and ( iii) Aldehydes, through typical dry building materials (carpet, plywood, particleboard, vinyl floor tile, gypsum board, sub-floor tile and OSB). Then correlations for predicting D and ke based solely on commonly available properties such as molecular weight and vapour pressure were proposed for each product and type of VOC. These correlations can be used to estimate the D and ke when direct measurement data are not available, and thus facilitate the prediction of VOC emissions from the building materials using mass transfer theory. The VOC emissions from a sub-floor material (made of the recycled automobile tires), and a particleboard are measured and predicted. Finally, a mathematical model to predict the diffusion coefficient through complex sources (floor adhesive) as a function of time was developed. Then this model (for diffusion coefficient in complex sources) was used to predict the emission rate from

  13. Design scheme of new tetragonal Heusler compounds for spin-transfer torque applications and its experimental realization.

    PubMed

    Winterlik, Jürgen; Chadov, Stanislav; Gupta, Arunava; Alijani, Vajiheh; Gasi, Teuta; Filsinger, Kai; Balke, Benjamin; Fecher, Gerhard H; Jenkins, Catherine A; Casper, Frederick; Kübler, Jürgen; Liu, Guo-Dong; Gao, Li; Parkin, Stuart S P; Felser, Claudia

    2012-12-11

    Band Jahn-Teller type structural instabilities of cubic Mn(2)YZ Heusler compounds causing tetragonal distortions can be predicted by ab initio band-structure calculations. This allows for identification of new Heusler materials with tunable magnetic and structural properties that can satisfy the demands for spintronic applications, such as in spin-transfer torque-based devices.

  14. Bond-Length Change as a Tool to Determine Charge Transfer and Electron-Phonon Coupling in Graphite Intercalation Compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pietronero, L.; Strässler, S.

    1981-08-01

    A theory is formulated that explains the observed bond-length change in graphite intercalation compounds in terms of the charge transfer f. The values of f obtained via the bond-length changes are in good agreement with those derived with other methods. The present analysis also provides information on the electron-phonon coupling that defines the maximum conductivity.

  15. Ruthenium supported on magnetic nanoparticles: An efficient and recoverable catalyst for hydrogenation of alkynes and transfer hydrogenation of carbonyl compounds

    EPA Science Inventory

    Ruthenium supported on surface modified magnetic nanoparticles (NiFe2O4) has been successfully synthesized and applied for hydrogenation of alkynes at room temperature as well as transfer hydrogenation of a number of carbonyl compounds under microwave irradiation conditions. The ...

  16. Formation of Nanoscale Composites of Compound Semiconductors Driven by Charge Transfer.

    PubMed

    Gao, Weiwei; Dos Reis, Roberto; Schelhas, Laura T; Pool, Vanessa L; Toney, Michael F; Yu, Kin Man; Walukiewicz, Wladek

    2016-08-10

    Composites are a class of materials that are formed by mixing two or more components. These materials often have new functional properties compared to their constituent materials. Traditionally composites are formed by self-assembly due to structural dissimilarities or by engineering different layers or structures in the material. Here we report the synthesis of a uniform and stoichiometric composite of CdO and SnTe with a novel nanocomposite structure stabilized by the dissimilarity of the electronic band structure of the constituent materials. The composite has interesting electronic properties which range from highly n-type in CdO to semi-insulating in the intermediate composition range to highly p-type in SnTe. This can be explained by the overlap of the conduction and valence band of the constituent compounds. Ultimately, our work identifies a new class of composite semiconductors in which nanoscale self-organization is driven and stabilized by charge transfer between constituent materials. PMID:27459505

  17. Formation of Nanoscale Composites of Compound Semiconductors Driven by Charge Transfer.

    PubMed

    Gao, Weiwei; Dos Reis, Roberto; Schelhas, Laura T; Pool, Vanessa L; Toney, Michael F; Yu, Kin Man; Walukiewicz, Wladek

    2016-08-10

    Composites are a class of materials that are formed by mixing two or more components. These materials often have new functional properties compared to their constituent materials. Traditionally composites are formed by self-assembly due to structural dissimilarities or by engineering different layers or structures in the material. Here we report the synthesis of a uniform and stoichiometric composite of CdO and SnTe with a novel nanocomposite structure stabilized by the dissimilarity of the electronic band structure of the constituent materials. The composite has interesting electronic properties which range from highly n-type in CdO to semi-insulating in the intermediate composition range to highly p-type in SnTe. This can be explained by the overlap of the conduction and valence band of the constituent compounds. Ultimately, our work identifies a new class of composite semiconductors in which nanoscale self-organization is driven and stabilized by charge transfer between constituent materials.

  18. Cryopumping of hydrogen and helium

    SciTech Connect

    Halama, H.J.; Hseuh, H.C.; Chou, T.S.

    1981-01-01

    Results obtained in numerous tests on small (approx. 1000 l/S) and large (approx. 10/sup 5/ l/S) cryopumps cooled to 4.2/sup 0/K by LHe or between 10 to 20/sup 0/K by closed-cycle helium refrigerator are summarized. Then, measurements of the compound cryopump, designed to work on Tokamaks to handle the exhaust gases from the Torus are presented.

  19. Transfer of bioactive compounds from pasture to meat in organic free-range chickens.

    PubMed

    Dal Bosco, A; Mugnai, C; Mattioli, S; Rosati, A; Ruggeri, S; Ranucci, D; Castellini, C

    2016-10-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze the transfer of bioactive compounds from the pasture to the body and meat of organic free-range chickens and to verify the effect of these compounds on the oxidative processes of the meat. Starting at 21 d of age, 100 male naked-neck birds were divided into two homogeneous groups: an indoor group (0.12 m(2)/bird) and an outdoor group (0.12 m(2)/bird indoor and 10 m(2)/bird of forage paddock). At slaughter (81 d of age), blood samples were collected, and the carcasses were stored for 24 h at 4°C (20 birds/group). The grass samples had higher values of carotenoids, tocopherols, and flavonoids respect to standard feed (based on dry matter comparison). The polyunsaturated fatty acid ( PUFA: ) content was also greater in grass, especially the n-3 series (so named because its first double bond occurs after the third carbon atom counting from the methyl at the end of the molecule). The antioxidant profile of the grass improved the antioxidant status of the crop and gizzard contents in the outdoor chickens. The higher antioxidant intake resulted in a higher plasma concentration of antioxidants in outdoor birds; thiobarbituric acid reactive substances ( TBARS: ) and the antioxidant capacity of the plasma were also better in the outdoor than the indoor group. The meat of the outdoor birds had higher levels of antioxidants, mainly due to the higher amount of tocopherols and tocotrienols. Despite the higher antioxidant protection in the drumstick of the outdoor group, the TBARs value was greater, probably due to the kinetic activity of birds, the higher percentage of PUFAs, and the peroxidability index. In conclusion, grazing improved the nutritional value of the meat (PUFA n-3 and the ratio between n-6 and n-3 PUFA) with a minor negative effect on the oxidative stability. Suitable strategies to reduce such negative effects (e.g., reduction of kinetic activity in the last days of rearing) should be studied.

  20. Charge transfer on the metallic atom-pair bond, and the crystal structures adopted by intermetallic compounds.

    PubMed

    Rajasekharan, T; Seshubai, V

    2012-01-01

    It has been argued in our recent papers that the heat of formation of intermetallic compounds is mostly concentrated in the nearest neighbor unlike atom-pair bonds, and that the positive term in Miedema's equation is associated with charge transfer on the bond to maintain electroneutrality. In this paper, taking examples of some well populated crystal-structure types such as MgCu(2), AsNa(3), AuCu(3), MoSi(2) and SiCr(3) types, the effect of such charge transfer on the crystal structures adopted by intermetallic compounds is examined. It is shown that the correlation between the observed size changes of atoms on alloying and their electronegativity differences is supportive of the idea of charge transfer between atoms. It is argued that the electronegativity and valence differences need to be of the required magnitude and direction to alter, through charge transfer, the elemental radius ratios R(A)/R(B) to the internal radius ratios r(A)/r(B) allowed by the structure types. Since the size change of atoms on alloying is highly correlated to how different R(A)/R(B) is from the ideal radius ratio for a structure type, the lattice parameters of intermetallic compounds can be predicted with excellent accuracy knowing R(A)/R(B). A practical application of the approach developed in our recent papers to superalloy design is presented. PMID:22186292

  1. Helium-Recycling Plant

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cook, Joseph

    1996-01-01

    Proposed system recovers and stores helium gas for reuse. Maintains helium at 99.99-percent purity, preventing water vapor from atmosphere or lubricating oil from pumps from contaminating gas. System takes in gas at nearly constant low back pressure near atmospheric pressure; introduces little or no back pressure into source of helium. Concept also extended to recycling of other gases.

  2. Mass transfer and biodegradation of PAH compounds from coal tar. Quarterly technical report, April--June 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Ramaswami, A.; Ghoshal, S.; Luthy, R.G.

    1994-09-01

    This study, examines the role of physico-chemical mass transfer processes on the rate of biotransformation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) compounds released from non-aqueous phase liquid (NAPL) coal tar present at residual saturation within a microporous medium. A simplified coupled dissolution-degradation model is developed that describes the concurrent mass transfer and biokinetic processes occurring in the system. Model results indicate that a dimensionless Damkohler number can be utilized to distinguish between systems that are mass transfer limited, and those that are limited by biological phenomena. The Damkohler number is estimated from independent laboratory experiments that measure the rates of aqueous phase dissolution and biodegradation of naphthalene from coal tar. Experimental data for Stroudsburg coal tar imbibed within 236 {mu}m diameter silica particles yield Damkohler numbers smaller than unity, indicating, for the particular system under study, that the overall rate of biotransformation of naphthalene is not limited by the mass transfer of naphthalene from coal tar to the bulk aqueous phase. There is a need for investigation of mass transfer for larger particles and/or other PAH compounds, and study, of microbial rate-limiting phenomena including toxicity, inhibition and competitive substrate utilization.

  3. Monitoring single coffee bean roasting by direct volatile compound analysis with proton transfer reaction time-of-flight mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Yener, Sine; Navarini, Luciano; Lonzarich, Valentina; Cappellin, Luca; Märk, Tilmann D; Bonn, Günther K; Biasioli, Franco

    2016-09-01

    This study applies proton transfer reaction time-of-flight mass spectrometry for the rapid analysis of volatile compounds released from single coffee beans. The headspace volatile profiles of single coffee beans (Coffeea arabica) from different geographical origins (Brazil, Guatemala and Ethiopia) were analyzed via offline profiling at different stages of roasting. The effect of coffee geographical origin was reflected on volatile compound formation that was supported by one-way ANOVA. Clear origin signatures were observed in the formation of different coffee odorants. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:27476633

  4. Helium technology issues

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kittel, Peter

    1987-01-01

    A number of future space missions require liquid helium for cooling scientific payloads. These missions will require the long term storage and resupply of liquid helium at temperatures of 1.4 - 2.1 Kelvin. In addition, some of the proposed instruments will require refrigeration to temperatures as low as 50 mK. A variety of liquid helium based refrigerator systems could provide this subkelvin cooling. The status of helium storage and refrigeration technologies and of several alternative technologies is presented here along with areas where further research and development are needed. (Helium resupply technologies are the topic of another presentation at this symposium). The technologies covered include passive and dynamic liquid helium storage, alternatives to liquid helium storage, He -3 refrigerators, He -3/He -4 dilution refrigerators, and alternative sub-kelvin coolers.

  5. Bacterial conversion of hydroxylamino aromatic compounds by both lyase and mutase enzymes involves intramolecular transfer of hydroxyl groups.

    PubMed

    Nadeau, Lloyd J; He, Zhongqi; Spain, Jim C

    2003-05-01

    Hydroxylamino aromatic compounds are converted to either the corresponding aminophenols or protocatechuate during the bacterial degradation of nitroaromatic compounds. The origin of the hydroxyl group of the products could be the substrate itself (intramolecular transfer mechanism) or the solvent water (intermolecular transfer mechanism). The conversion of hydroxylaminobenzene to 2-aminophenol catalyzed by a mutase from Pseudomonas pseudoalcaligenes JS45 proceeds by an intramolecular hydroxyl transfer. The conversions of hydroxylaminobenzene to 2- and 4-aminophenol by a mutase from Ralstonia eutropha JMP134 and to 4-hydroxylaminobenzoate to protocatechuate by a lyase from Comamonas acidovorans NBA-10 and Pseudomonas sp. strain 4NT were proposed, but not experimentally proved, to proceed by the intermolecular transfer mechanism. GC-MS analysis of the reaction products formed in H(2)(18)O did not indicate any (18)O-label incorporation during the conversion of hydroxylaminobenzene to 2- and 4-aminophenols catalyzed by the mutase from R. eutropha JMP134. During the conversion of 4-hydroxylaminobenzoate catalyzed by the hydroxylaminolyase from Pseudomonas sp. strain 4NT, only one of the two hydroxyl groups in the product, protocatechuate, was (18)O labeled. The other hydroxyl group in the product must have come from the substrate. The mutase in strain JS45 converted 4-hydroxylaminobenzoate to 4-amino-3-hydroxybenzoate, and the lyase in Pseudomonas strain 4NT converted hydroxylaminobenzene to aniline and 2-aminophenol but not to catechol. The results indicate that all three types of enzyme-catalyzed rearrangements of hydroxylamino aromatic compounds proceed via intramolecular transfer of hydroxyl groups.

  6. Volatile trace compounds released from municipal solid waste at the transfer stage: Evaluation of environmental impacts and odour pollution.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yan; Lu, Wenjing; Wang, Hongtao

    2015-12-30

    Odour pollution caused by municipal solid waste is a public concern. This study quantitatively evaluated the concentration, environmental impacts, and olfaction of volatile trace compounds released from a waste transfer station. Seventy-six compounds were detected, and ethanol presented the highest releasing rate and ratio of 14.76 kg/d and 12.30 g/t of waste, respectively. Life cycle assessment showed that trichlorofluoromethane and dichlorodifluoromethane accounted for more than 99% of impact potentials to global warming and approximately 70% to human toxicity (non-carcinogenic). The major contributor for both photochemical ozone formation and ecotoxicity was ethanol. A detection threshold method was also used to evaluate odour pollution. Five compounds including methane thiol, hydrogen sulphide, ethanol, dimethyl disulphide, and dimethyl sulphide, with dilution multiples above one, were considered the critical compounds. Methane thiol showed the highest contribution to odour pollution of more than 90%, as indicated by its low threshold. Comparison of the contributions of the compounds to different environmental aspects indicated that typical pollutants varied based on specific evaluation targets and therefore should be comprehensively considered. This study provides important information and scientific methodology to elucidate the impacts of odourant compounds to the environment and odour pollution.

  7. Volatile trace compounds released from municipal solid waste at the transfer stage: Evaluation of environmental impacts and odour pollution.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yan; Lu, Wenjing; Wang, Hongtao

    2015-12-30

    Odour pollution caused by municipal solid waste is a public concern. This study quantitatively evaluated the concentration, environmental impacts, and olfaction of volatile trace compounds released from a waste transfer station. Seventy-six compounds were detected, and ethanol presented the highest releasing rate and ratio of 14.76 kg/d and 12.30 g/t of waste, respectively. Life cycle assessment showed that trichlorofluoromethane and dichlorodifluoromethane accounted for more than 99% of impact potentials to global warming and approximately 70% to human toxicity (non-carcinogenic). The major contributor for both photochemical ozone formation and ecotoxicity was ethanol. A detection threshold method was also used to evaluate odour pollution. Five compounds including methane thiol, hydrogen sulphide, ethanol, dimethyl disulphide, and dimethyl sulphide, with dilution multiples above one, were considered the critical compounds. Methane thiol showed the highest contribution to odour pollution of more than 90%, as indicated by its low threshold. Comparison of the contributions of the compounds to different environmental aspects indicated that typical pollutants varied based on specific evaluation targets and therefore should be comprehensively considered. This study provides important information and scientific methodology to elucidate the impacts of odourant compounds to the environment and odour pollution. PMID:26292056

  8. Influence of dissolved humic substances on the mass transfer of organic compounds across the air-water interface.

    PubMed

    Ramus, Ksenia; Kopinke, Frank-Dieter; Georgi, Anett

    2012-01-01

    The effect of dissolved humic substances (DHS) on the rate of water-gas exchange of two volatile organic compounds was studied under various conditions of agitation intensity, solution pH and ionic strength. Mass-transfer coefficients were determined from the rate of depletion of model compounds from an apparatus containing a stirred aqueous solution with continuous purging of the headspace above the solution (dynamic system). Under these conditions, the overall transfer rate is controlled by the mass-transfer resistance on the water side of the water-gas interface. The experimental results show that the presence of DHS hinders the transport of the organic molecules from the water into the gas phase under all investigated conditions. Mass-transfer coefficients were significantly reduced even by low, environmentally relevant concentrations of DHS. The retardation effect increased with increasing DHS concentration. The magnitude of the retardation effect on water-gas exchange was compared for Suwannee River fulvic and humic acids, a commercially available leonardite humic acid and two synthetic surfactants. The observed results are in accordance with the concept of hydrodynamic effects. Surface pressure forces due to surface film formation change the hydrodynamic characteristics of water motion at the water-air interface and thus impede surface renewal.

  9. Enhancement of Electron Transfer in Various Photo-Assisted Oxidation Processes for Nitro-Phenolic Compound Conversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khue, Do Ngoc; Lam, Tran Dai; Minh, Do Binh; Loi, Vu Duc; Nam, Nguyen Hoai; Bach, Vu Quang; Van Anh, Nguyen; Van Hoang, Nguyen; Hu'ng, Dao Duy

    2016-08-01

    The present study focuses on photo-assisted advanced oxidation processes (AOPs) with strongly enhanced electron transfer for degradation of nitro-phenolic compounds in aqueous medium. The effectiveness of these processes was estimated based on the pseudo-first order rate constant k determined from high-performance liquid chromatography. The degradation of four different nitro-phenolic compounds was systematically studied using selected AOPs; these four compounds were nitrophenol, dinitrophenol, trinitrophenol and trinitroresorcin. It was observed that the combination of ultraviolet light with hydrogen peroxide H2O2 enhanced and maintained hydroxyl radicals, and therefore increased the conversion yield of organic pollutants. These AOPs provided efficient and green removal of stable organic toxins found in a wide range of industrial wastewater.

  10. Fate of pharmaceutical compounds and steroid hormones in soil: study of transfer and degradation in soil columns.

    PubMed

    Salvia, Marie-Virginie; Experton, Julie; Geandel, Claire; Cren-Olivé, Cécile; Vulliet, Emmanuelle

    2014-09-01

    Numerous chemical products are dispersed into the environment, and the consequences can be sometimes harmful to humans and ecosystems. Pharmaceutical compounds and hormone steroids are among these substances that concern the scientific community. Currently, little data are available on the presence and fate of these compounds in the environment and, in particular, for solid matrices. Therefore, the aim of this work was to perform soil column experiments to evaluate the accumulation, transfer and degradation of these substances in soil. The analyses were based on efficient sample preparation followed by sensitive and selective liquid chromatography coupled to tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). For this purpose, 23 compounds were chosen including both pharmaceutical compounds as well as steroid hormones. In addition, this experiment was performed on two soils with different properties (% clay, pH, etc.). To the best of our knowledge, no soil column experiments have been performed previously on a large number of pharmaceutical compounds and steroid hormones. Significant transfer was observed only for sulphonamides that can be justified by their polarity (log K ow < 3). Furthermore, some compounds have a cationic characteristic and are likely to be not much mobiles in soil due to cation exchange process. However, it was observed that the migration of the substances depends on the soil characteristics, such as the amount of clay and the pH values. Regarding the degradation, it was noticed that substances degraded rapidly in the two soils. Indeed, for most substances, their half-lives were lower than 20 days. Furthermore, it was observed that the degradation rate depended on the soil.

  11. Nitrate Remediation of Soil and Groundwater Using Phytoremediation: Transfer of Nitrogen Containing Compounds from the Subsurface to Surface Vegetation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nelson, Sheldon

    2013-04-01

    Nitrate Remediation of Soil and Groundwater Using Phytoremediation: Transfer of Nitrogen Containing Compounds from the Subsurface to Surface Vegetation Sheldon Nelson Chevron Energy Technology Company 6001 Bollinger Canyon Road San Ramon, California 94583 snne@chevron.com The basic concept of using a plant-based remedial approach (phytoremediation) for nitrogen containing compounds is the incorporation and transformation of the inorganic nitrogen from the soil and/or groundwater (nitrate, ammonium) into plant biomass, thereby removing the constituent from the subsurface. There is a general preference in many plants for the ammonium nitrogen form during the early growth stage, with the uptake and accumulation of nitrate often increasing as the plant matures. The synthesis process refers to the variety of biochemical mechanisms that use ammonium or nitrate compounds to primarily form plant proteins, and to a lesser extent other nitrogen containing organic compounds. The shallow soil at the former warehouse facility test site is impacted primarily by elevated concentrations of nitrate, with a minimal presence of ammonium. Dissolved nitrate (NO3-) is the primary dissolved nitrogen compound in on-site groundwater, historically reaching concentrations of 1000 mg/L. The initial phases of the project consisted of the installation of approximately 1750 trees, planted in 10-foot centers in the areas impacted by nitrate and ammonia in the shallow soil and groundwater. As of the most recent groundwater analytical data, dissolved nitrate reductions of 40% to 96% have been observed in monitor wells located both within, and immediately downgradient of the planted area. In summary, an evaluation of time series groundwater analytical data from the initial planted groves suggests that the trees are an effective means of transfering nitrogen compounds from the subsurface to overlying vegetation. The mechanism of concentration reduction may be the uptake of residual nitrate from the

  12. Crosslinguistic Transfer in the Acquisition of Compound Words in Persian-English Bilinguals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Foroodi-Nejad, Farzaneh; Paradis, Johanne

    2009-01-01

    Crosslinguistic transfer in bilingual language acquisition has been widely reported in various linguistic domains (e.g., Dopke, 1998; Nicoladis, 1999; Paradis, 2001). In this study we examined structural overlap (Dopke, 2000; Muller and Hulk, 2001) and dominance (Yip and Matthews, 2000) as explanatory factors for crosslinguistic transfer in…

  13. Investigation of helium injection cooling to liquid oxygen propellant chamber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Namkyung; Kwon, Ohsung; Kim, Youngmog; Jeong, Sangkwon

    2006-02-01

    Sub-cooling of cryogenic propellant by helium injection is one of the most effective methods for suppressing bulk boiling and keeping sub-cooled liquid oxygen before rocket launch. In order to design the cooling system, understanding of the limitations of heat and mass transfer is required. In this paper, an analytical model for the helium injection system is presented. This model's main feature is the representation of bubbling system using finite-rate heat transfer and instantaneous mass transfer concept. With this simplified approach, the effect of helium injection to liquid oxygen system under several circumstances is examined. Experimental results along with simulations of single bubble rising in liquid oxygen and bubbling system are presented with various helium injection flow rates, helium temperatures, and injection methods. The overall cooling effect for rocket application is also discussed.

  14. Electron transfer within a reaction path model calibrated by constrained DFT calculations: application to mixed-valence organic compounds.

    PubMed

    Mangaud, E; de la Lande, A; Meier, C; Desouter-Lecomte, M

    2015-12-14

    The quantum dynamics of electron transfer in mixed-valence organic compounds is investigated using a reaction path model calibrated by constrained density functional theory (cDFT). Constrained DFT is used to define diabatic states relevant for describing the electron transfer, to obtain equilibrium structures for each of these states and to estimate the electronic coupling between them. The harmonic analysis at the diabatic minima yields normal modes forming the dissipative bath coupled to the electronic states. In order to decrease the system-bath coupling, an effective one dimensional vibronic Hamiltonian is constructed by partitioning the modes into a linear reaction path which connects both equilibrium positions and a set of secondary vibrational modes, coupled to this reaction coordinate. Using this vibronic model Hamiltonian, dissipative quantum dynamics is carried out using Redfield theory, based on a spectral density which is determined from the cDFT results. In a first benchmark case, the model is applied to a series of mixed-valence organic compounds formed by two 1,4-dimethoxy-3-methylphenylene fragments linked by an increasing number of phenylene bridges. This allows us to examine the coherent electron transfer in extreme situations leading to a ground adiabatic state with or without a barrier and therefore to the trapping of the charge or to an easy delocalization.

  15. N-H-Type Excited-State Proton Transfer in Compounds Possessing a Seven-Membered-Ring Intramolecular Hydrogen Bond.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yi-An; Meng, Fan-Yi; Hsu, Yen-Hao; Hung, Cheng-Hsien; Chen, Chi-Lin; Chung, Kun-You; Tang, Wei-Feng; Hung, Wen-Yi; Chou, Pi-Tai

    2016-10-01

    A series of compounds containing 5-(2-aminobenzylidene)-2,3-dimethyl-3,5-dihydro-4H-imidazol-4-one (o-ABDI) as the core chromophore with a seven-membered-ring N-H-type intramolecular hydrogen bond have been synthesized and characterized. The acidity of the N-H proton and thus the hydrogen-bond strength can be fine-tuned by replacing one of the amino hydrogen atoms by a substituent R, the acidity increasing with increasing electron-withdrawing strength of R, that is, in the order Htransfer (ESIPT) that results in proton-transfer emission solely in the red region. Reversible ESIPT, and hence dual emission, involving the normal and proton-transfer tautomers was resolved for the acetyl- and benzyl-substituted counterparts. For o-ABDI, which has the weakest acidity, ESIPT is prohibited due to its highly endergonic reaction. The results clearly demonstrate the harnessing of ESIPT by modifying the proton acidity and hydrogen-bonding strength in a seven-membered-ring intramolecular hydrogen-bonding system. For all the compounds studied, the emission quantum yields are weak (ca. 10(-3) ) in dichloromethane, but strong in the solid form, ranging from 3.2 to 47.4 %. PMID:27539818

  16. Surface activity of branched alkylamino-compounds and their influence on phase transfer behavior in water solutions of dyes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Cuiqin; Guo, Suyue; Lin, Zhiyu; Wang, Jun; Ge, Tengjie

    2016-02-01

    Two branched alkylamino-compounds (AAC, R12-0.5G, and R12-1.0G), were synthesized from dodecylamine, methyl acrylate and ethylenediamine. The surface tension measurements on branched alkylamino- compounds demonstrated that surface activity of R12-1.0G is superior to that of R12-0.5G at 25°C. It has been found that the self-assembly of R12-1.0G and lauric acid formed by electrostatic interaction and the self-assembly of the molecule might transfer water-soluble dyes from water to toluene. These AAC might be applied for treating dyes in wastewater. The mass ratio of lauric to toluene, the concentration of R12-1.0G, and hydrophilic groups of dyes affected the transfer rate of the water-soluble dyes. The transfer rates of the watersoluble dyes by R12-1.0G were higher than that of 1.0G polyacrylamide-acrylamide.

  17. Photoinduced intramolecular electron transfer reactions in fullerene-phenothiazine linked compounds: effects of magnetic field and spacer chain length

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yonemura, Hiroaki; Noda, Masakazu; Hayashi, Kazuya; Tokudome, Hiromasa; Moribe, Shinya; Yamada, Sunao

    Spectroscopic and electrochemical properties of two fullerene(C60)-phenothiazine(PH) linked compounds with different spacer chain length have been compared in benzonitrile (polar solvent) and in benzene (non-polar solvent). Transient absorption and fluorescence spectra indicated that photoinduced intramolecular electron transfer occurred in benzonitrile, but not in benzene. The results are due to solvent effect on energy levels of the photogenerated biradical. The driving forces for the electron transfer were determined by measuring the redox potentials of the C60 and PH moieties. Thermodynamic parameters for the electron transfer processes were evaluated and compared. In benzonitrile, the lifetime of the photogenerated biradical was very long, in spite of being around the top region in Marcus theory. The decay rate of the biradicals was retarded in the presence of magnetic fields. The decay rate constant decreased quickly with increasing the magnetic field and became constant above about 0.2 T. The magnetic field effects verified that the triplet biradical was generated by the intramolecular electron transfer from PH to the triplet excited state of C60 . The long lifetime is most probably ascribed to the spin multiplicities of the biradical.

  18. Proton-Coupled Electron Transfer Reactions at a Heme-Propionate in an Iron-Protoporphyrin-IX Model Compound

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    A heme model system has been developed in which the heme-propionate is the only proton donating/accepting site, using protoporphyrin IX-monomethyl esters (PPIXMME) and N-methylimidazole (MeIm). Proton-coupled electron transfer (PCET) reactions of these model compounds have been examined in acetonitrile solvent. (PPIXMME)FeIII(MeIm)2-propionate (FeIII~CO2) is readily reduced by the ascorbate derivative 5,6-isopropylidine ascorbate to give (PPIXMME)FeII(MeIm)2-propionic acid (FeII~CO2H). Excess of the hydroxylamine TEMPOH or of hydroquinone similarly reduce FeIII~CO2, and TEMPO and benzoquinone oxidize FeII~CO2H to return to FeIII~CO2. The measured equilibrium constants, and the determined pKa and E1/2 values, indicate that FeII~CO2H has an effective bond dissociation free energy (BDFE) of 67.8 ± 0.6 kcal mol–1. In these PPIX models, electron transfer occurs at the iron center and proton transfer occurs at the remote heme propionate. According to thermochemical and other arguments, the TEMPOH reaction occurs by concerted proton-electron transfer (CPET), and a similar pathway is indicated for the ascorbate derivative. Based on these results, heme propionates should be considered as potential key components of PCET/CPET active sites in heme proteins. PMID:21524059

  19. Charge Transfer in FeOCl Intercalation Compounds and its Pressure Dependence: An X-ray Spectroscopic Study

    SciTech Connect

    I Jarrige; Y Cai; S Shieh; H Ishii; N Hiraoka; S Karna; W Li

    2011-12-31

    We present a study of charge transfer in Na-intercalated FeOCl and polyaniline-intercalated FeOCl using high-resolution x-ray absorption spectroscopy and resonant x-ray emission spectroscopy at the Fe-K edge. By comparing the experimental data with ab initio simulations, we are able to unambiguously distinguish the spectral changes which appear due to intercalation into those of electronic origin and those of structural origin. For both systems, we find that about 25% of the Fe sites are reduced to Fe{sup 2+} via charge transfer between FeOCl and the intercalate. This is about twice as large as the Fe{sup 2+} fraction reported in studies using Moessbauer spectroscopy. This discrepancy is ascribed to the fact that the charge transfer occurs on the same time scale as the Moessbauer effect itself. Our result suggests that every intercalated atom or molecule is involved in the charge-transfer process, thus making this process a prerequisite for intercalation. The Fe{sup 2+} fraction is found to increase with pressure for polyaniline-FeOCl, hinting at an enhancement of the conductivity in the FeOCl intercalation compounds under pressure.

  20. Charge transfer in FeOCl intercalation compounds and its pressure dependence: An x-ray spectroscopic study

    SciTech Connect

    Jarrige, I.; Cai, Y. Q.; Shieh, S. R.; Ishii, H.; Hiraoka, N.; Karna, S.; Li, W.-H.

    2010-10-15

    We present a study of charge transfer in Na-intercalated FeOCl and polyaniline-intercalated FeOCl using high-resolution x-ray absorption spectroscopy and resonant x-ray emission spectroscopy at the Fe K edge. By comparing the experimental data with ab initio simulations, we are able to unambiguously distinguish the spectral changes which appear due to intercalation into those of electronic origin and those of structural origin. For both systems, we find that about 25% of the Fe sites are reduced to Fe{sup 2+} via charge transfer between FeOCl and the intercalate. This is about twice as large as the Fe{sup 2+} fraction reported in studies using Moessbauer spectroscopy. This discrepancy is ascribed to the fact that the charge transfer occurs on the same time scale as the Moessbauer effect itself. Our result suggests that every intercalated atom or molecule is involved in the charge-transfer process, thus making this process a prerequisite for intercalation. The Fe{sup 2+} fraction is found to increase with pressure for polyaniline-FeOCl, hinting at an enhancement of the conductivity in the FeOCl intercalation compounds under pressure.

  1. Proton transfer reaction-mass spectrometry: online and rapid determination of volatile organic compounds of microbial origin.

    PubMed

    Romano, Andrea; Capozzi, Vittorio; Spano, Giuseppe; Biasioli, Franco

    2015-05-01

    Analytical tools for the identification and quantification of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) produced by microbial cultures have countless applications in an industrial and research context which are still not fully exploited. The various techniques for VOC analysis generally arise from the application of different scientific and technological philosophies, favoring either sample throughput or chemical information. Proton transfer reaction-mass spectrometry (PTR-MS) represents a valid compromise between the two aforementioned approaches, providing rapid and direct measurements along with highly informative analytical output. The present paper reviews the main applications of PTR-MS in the microbiological field, comprising food, environmental, and medical applications.

  2. Compound heat transfer enhancement for shell side of double-pipe heat exchanger by helical fins and vortex generators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Li; Guo, Hongmei; Wu, Jianhua; Du, Wenjuan

    2012-07-01

    To improve heat transfer performance of shell side of double-pipe heat exchanger with helical fins on its inner tube, some vortex generators (VGs) were installed along the centerline of the helical channel. Heat transfer performance and pressure drop characteristic of the enhanced heat exchangers were investigated using air as the working fluid and steam as the heating medium. The helical fins were in the annulus and span its full width at different helical pitch. Wing-type VGs (delta or rectangular wing) and winglet-type VGs (delta or rectangular winglet pair) were used to combine with helical fins. The friction factor and Nusselt number can be well correlated by power-law correlations in the Reynolds number range studied. In order to evaluate the thermal performance of the shell side enhanced over the shell side without enhancement, comparisons were made under three constraints: (1) identical mass flow rate, IMF; (2) identical pressure drop, IPD and (3) identical pumping power, IPP. The results show the shell side enhanced by the compound heat transfer enhancement has better performance than the shell side only enhanced by helical fins at shorter helical pitch under the three constraints.

  3. Ab initio calculations on the mechanism of charge transfer in Co-Fe Prussian-blue compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawamoto, T.; Asai, Y.; Abe, S.

    1999-11-01

    The mechanism of the heat-induced charge transfer observed in Prussian-blue compounds K1-2xCo1+xFe(CN)6 is studied theoretically in connection with photoinduced magnetism. In the case of x=0, our first-principles band calculation confirms that the band-gap excitation corresponds to charge transfer from Fe-dɛ to Co-dγ orbitals. By increasing the lattice constant (specifically, by elongating the Co-N bond in the crystal), the band gap decreases systematically due to the variation of the crystal field at each Co site. In the nonstoichiometric case (x≠0), we demonstrate on the basis of ab initio cluster calculations that a small increase in the Co-N distance is sufficient to cause charge transfer between Fe and Co atoms located near Fe vacancies accompanied by water molecules. This mechanism by electron-lattice coupling combined with disorder explains most of experimental findings on heat-induced changes and is suggested to be responsible also for the photoinduced magnetic transition.

  4. Mass transfer of volatile organic compounds from drinking water to indoor air: The role of residential dishwashers

    SciTech Connect

    Howard-Reed, C.; Corsi, R.L.; Moya, J.

    1999-07-01

    Contaminated tap water may be a source of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in residential indoor air. To better understand the extent and impact of chemical emissions from this source, a two-phase mass balance model was developed based on mass transfer kinetics between each phase. Twenty-nine experiments were completed using a residential dishwasher to determine model parameters. During each experiment, inflow water was spiked with a cocktail of chemical tracers with a wide range of physicochemical properties. In each case, the effects of water temperature, detergent, and dish-loading pattern on chemical stripping efficiencies and mass transfer coefficients were determined. Dishwasher headspace ventilation rates were also measured using an isobutylene tracer gas. Chemical stripping efficiencies for a single cycle ranged from 18% to 55% for acetone, from 96% to 98% for toluene, and from 97% to 98% for ethylbenzene and were consistently 100% for cyclohexane. Experimental results indicate that dishwashers have a relatively low but continuous ventilation rate that results in significant chemical storage within the headspace of the dishwasher. In conjunction with relatively high mass transfer coefficients, low ventilation rates generally lead to emissions that are limited by equilibrium conditions after approximately 1--2 min of dishwasher operation.

  5. TOL plasmid transfer during bacterial conjugation in vitro and rhizoremediation of oil compounds in vivo.

    PubMed

    Jussila, Minna M; Zhao, Ji; Suominen, Leena; Lindström, Kristina

    2007-03-01

    Molecular profiling methods for horizontal transfer of aromatics-degrading plasmids were developed and applied during rhizoremediation in vivo and conjugations in vitro. pWW0 was conjugated from Pseudomonas to Rhizobium. The xylE gene was detected both in Rhizobium galegae bv. officinalis and bv. orientalis, but it was neither stably maintained in orientalis nor functional in officinalis. TOL plasmids were a major group of catabolic plasmids among the bacterial strains isolated from the oil-contaminated rhizosphere of Galega orientalis. A new finding was that some Pseudomonas migulae and Pseudomonas oryzihabitans strains harbored a TOL plasmid with both pWW0- and pDK1-type xylE gene. P. oryzihabitans 29 had received the archetypal TOL plasmid pWW0 from Pseudomonas putida PaW85. As an application for environmental biotechnology, the biodegradation potential of oil-polluted soil and the success of bioremediation could be estimated by monitoring changes not only in the type and amount but also in transfer of degradation plasmids.

  6. TOL plasmid transfer during bacterial conjugation in vitro and rhizoremediation of oil compounds in vivo.

    PubMed

    Jussila, Minna M; Zhao, Ji; Suominen, Leena; Lindström, Kristina

    2007-03-01

    Molecular profiling methods for horizontal transfer of aromatics-degrading plasmids were developed and applied during rhizoremediation in vivo and conjugations in vitro. pWW0 was conjugated from Pseudomonas to Rhizobium. The xylE gene was detected both in Rhizobium galegae bv. officinalis and bv. orientalis, but it was neither stably maintained in orientalis nor functional in officinalis. TOL plasmids were a major group of catabolic plasmids among the bacterial strains isolated from the oil-contaminated rhizosphere of Galega orientalis. A new finding was that some Pseudomonas migulae and Pseudomonas oryzihabitans strains harbored a TOL plasmid with both pWW0- and pDK1-type xylE gene. P. oryzihabitans 29 had received the archetypal TOL plasmid pWW0 from Pseudomonas putida PaW85. As an application for environmental biotechnology, the biodegradation potential of oil-polluted soil and the success of bioremediation could be estimated by monitoring changes not only in the type and amount but also in transfer of degradation plasmids. PMID:17000041

  7. Initial yields of DNA double-strand breaks and DNA Fragmentation patterns depend on linear energy transfer in tobacco BY-2 protoplasts irradiated with helium, carbon and neon ions.

    PubMed

    Yokota, Yuichiro; Yamada, Shinya; Hase, Yoshihiro; Shikazono, Naoya; Narumi, Issay; Tanaka, Atsushi; Inoue, Masayoshi

    2007-01-01

    The ability of ion beams to kill or mutate plant cells is known to depend on the linear energy transfer (LET) of the ions, although the mechanism of damage is poorly understood. In this study, DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) were quantified by a DNA fragment-size analysis in tobacco protoplasts irradiated with high-LET ions. Tobacco BY-2 protoplasts, as a model of single plant cells, were irradiated with helium, carbon and neon ions having different LETs and with gamma rays. After irradiation, DNA fragments were separated into sizes between 1600 and 6.6 kbp by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis. Information on DNA fragmentation was obtained by staining the gels with SYBR Green I. Initial DSB yields were found to depend on LET, and the highest relative biological effectiveness (about 1.6) was obtained at 124 and 241 keV/microm carbon ions. High-LET carbon and neon ions induced short DNA fragments more efficiently than gamma rays. These results partially explain the large biological effects caused by high-LET ions in plants.

  8. An Evaluation of Sensor Performance for Harmful Compounds by Using Photo-Induced Electron Transfer from Photosynthetic Membranes to Electrodes

    PubMed Central

    Kasuno, Megumi; Kimura, Hiroki; Yasutomo, Hisataka; Torimura, Masaki; Murakami, Daisuke; Tsukatani, Yusuke; Hanada, Satoshi; Matsushita, Takayuki; Tao, Hiroaki

    2016-01-01

    Rapid, simple, and low-cost screening procedures are necessary for the detection of harmful compounds in the effluent that flows out of point sources such as industrial outfall. The present study investigated the effects on a novel sensor of harmful compounds such as KCN, phenol, and herbicides such as 3-(3,4-dichlorophenyl)-1,1-dimethylurea (DCMU), 2-chloro-4-ethylamino-6-isopropylamino-1,3,5-triazine (atrazine), and 2-N-tert-butyl-4-N-ethyl-6-methylsulfanyl-1,3,5-triazine-2,4-diamine (terbutryn). The sensor employed an electrode system that incorporated the photocurrent of intra-cytoplasmic membranes (so-called chromatophores) prepared from photosynthetic bacteria and linked using carbon paste electrodes. The amperometric curve (photocurrent-time curve) of photo-induced electron transfer from chromatophores of the purple photosynthetic bacterium Rhodobacter sphaeroides to the electrode via an exogenous electron acceptor was composed of two characteristic phases: an abrupt increase in current immediately after illumination (I0), and constant current over time (Ic). Compared with other redox compounds, 2,5-dichloro-1,4-benzoquinone (DCBQ) was the most useful exogenous electron acceptor in this system. Photo-reduction of DCBQ exhibited Michaelis-Menten-like kinetics, and reduction rates were dependent on the amount of DCBQ and the photon flux intensity. The Ic decreased in the presence of KCN at concentrations over 0.05 μM (=μmol·dm−3). The I0 decreased following the addition of phenol at concentrations over 20 μM. The Ic was affected by terbutryn at concentrations over 10 μM. In contrast, DCMU and atrazine had no effect on either I0 or Ic. The utility of this electrode system for the detection of harmful compounds is discussed. PMID:27023553

  9. An Evaluation of Sensor Performance for Harmful Compounds by Using Photo-Induced Electron Transfer from Photosynthetic Membranes to Electrodes.

    PubMed

    Kasuno, Megumi; Kimura, Hiroki; Yasutomo, Hisataka; Torimura, Masaki; Murakami, Daisuke; Tsukatani, Yusuke; Hanada, Satoshi; Matsushita, Takayuki; Tao, Hiroaki

    2016-01-01

    Rapid, simple, and low-cost screening procedures are necessary for the detection of harmful compounds in the effluent that flows out of point sources such as industrial outfall. The present study investigated the effects on a novel sensor of harmful compounds such as KCN, phenol, and herbicides such as 3-(3,4-dichlorophenyl)-1,1-dimethylurea (DCMU), 2-chloro-4-ethylamino-6-isopropylamino-1,3,5-triazine (atrazine), and 2-N-tert-butyl-4-N-ethyl-6-methylsulfanyl-1,3,5-triazine-2,4-diamine (terbutryn). The sensor employed an electrode system that incorporated the photocurrent of intra-cytoplasmic membranes (so-called chromatophores) prepared from photosynthetic bacteria and linked using carbon paste electrodes. The amperometric curve (photocurrent-time curve) of photo-induced electron transfer from chromatophores of the purple photosynthetic bacterium Rhodobacter sphaeroides to the electrode via an exogenous electron acceptor was composed of two characteristic phases: an abrupt increase in current immediately after illumination (I₀), and constant current over time (Ic). Compared with other redox compounds, 2,5-dichloro-1,4-benzoquinone (DCBQ) was the most useful exogenous electron acceptor in this system. Photo-reduction of DCBQ exhibited Michaelis-Menten-like kinetics, and reduction rates were dependent on the amount of DCBQ and the photon flux intensity. The Ic decreased in the presence of KCN at concentrations over 0.05 μM (=μmol·dm(-3)). The I₀ decreased following the addition of phenol at concentrations over 20 μM. The Ic was affected by terbutryn at concentrations over 10 μM. In contrast, DCMU and atrazine had no effect on either I₀ or Ic. The utility of this electrode system for the detection of harmful compounds is discussed. PMID:27023553

  10. Emissions of volatile organic compounds from Quercus ilex L. measured by Proton Transfer Reaction Mass Spectrometry under different environmental conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holzinger, R.; Sandoval-Soto, L.; Rottenberger, S.; Crutzen, P. J.; Kesselmeier, J.

    2000-08-01

    Volatile organic compound (VOC) emissions of the Mediterranean holm oak (Quercus ilex L.) were investigated using a fast Proton Transfer Reaction Mass Spectrometry (PTR-MS) instrument for analysis. This technique is able to measure compounds with a proton affinity higher than water with a high time resolution of 1 s per compound. Hence nearly all VOCs can be detected on-line. We could clearly identify the emission of methanol, acetaldehyde, ethanol, acetone, acetic acid, isoprene, monoterpenes, toluene, and C10-benzenes. Some other species could be tentatively denominated. Among these are the masses 67 (cyclo pentadiene), mass 71 (tentatively attributed to methyl vinyl ketone (MVK) and metacrolein (MACR)), 73 (attributed to methyl ethyl ketone (MEK)), 85 (C6H12 or hexanol), and 95 (vinylfuran or phenol). The emissions of all these compounds (identified as well as nonidentified) together represent 99% of all masses detected and account for a carbon loss of 0.7-2.9% of the net photosynthesis. Of special interest was a change in the emission behavior under changing environmental conditions such as flooding or fast light/dark changes. Flooding of the root system caused an increase of several VOCs between 60 and 2000%, dominated by the emission of ethanol and acetaldehyde, which can be explained by the well described production of ethanol under anoxic conditions of the root system and the recently described subsequent transport and partial oxidation to acetaldehyde within the green leaves. However, ethanol emissions were dominant. Additionally, bursts of acetaldehyde with lower ethanol emission were also found under fast light/dark changes. These bursts are not understood.

  11. A density functional theory study of dimers of hydrophosphoryl compounds and proton transfer in them

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babin, Yu. V.; Prisyazhnyuk, A. V.; Ustynyuk, Yu. A.

    2008-01-01

    The structures of dimers of several types of dimethylphosphinous acid (CH3)2POH and dimethylphosphine oxide (CH3)2P(O)H and dimers of the corresponding perfluorinated derivatives (CF3)2POH and (CF3)2P(O)H were studied in detail by density functional theory with the PBE gradient-corrected functional and the TZ2 p basis set. Fairly strong dimeric associates (2.50-10.5 kcal/mol) were shown to form thanks to O-H···O, O-H···P, and C-H···O H-bonds and dipole-dipole interactions of polar phosphoryl groups P → O of two monomer molecules. The existence of C-H···O and the absence of P-H···O H-bonds in (CH3)2P(O)H dimers was substantiated by an AIM (atoms in molecules) analysis of their structures according to Bader. The reaction coordinates were calculated for synchronous transfer of two protons in (CH3)2POH and (CF3)2P(O)H dimers. Both rearrangements were shown to occur via symmetrical six-membered planar transition states with activation barriers of less than 20 kcal/mol, which was much lower than for intramolecular transfer in the corresponding monomers (47 kcal/mol for the (CH3)2P(O)H → (CH3)2POH pair). The tautomeric transitions between the phosphinous acid and phosphine oxide forms observed experimentally in nonpolar media under mild conditions in the absence of molecules that could act as proton carriers were shown to proceed as bimolecular reactions with the intermediate formation of the corresponding dimers.

  12. Core helium flash

    SciTech Connect

    Cole, P.W.; Deupree, R.G.

    1980-01-01

    The role of convection in the core helium flash is simulated by two-dimensional eddies interacting with the thermonuclear runaway. These eddies are followed by the explicit solution of the 2D conservation laws with a 2D finite difference hydrodynamics code. Thus, no phenomenological theory of convection such as the local mixing length theory is required. The core helium flash is violent, producing a deflagration wave. This differs from the detonation wave (and subsequent disruption of the entire star) produced in previous spherically symmetric violent core helium flashes as the second dimension provides a degree of relief which allows the expansion wave to decouple itself from the burning front. Our results predict that a considerable amount of helium in the core will be burned before the horizontal branch is reached and that some envelope mass loss is likely.

  13. The Descending Helium Balloon

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Helseth, Lars Egil

    2014-01-01

    I describe a simple and fascinating experiment wherein helium leaks out of a rubber balloon, thereby causing it to descend. An estimate of the volumetric leakage rate is made by measuring its rate of descent.

  14. D-π-A Compounds with Tunable Intramolecular Charge Transfer Achieved by Incorporation of Butenolide Nitriles as Acceptor Moieties.

    PubMed

    Moreno-Yruela, Carlos; Garín, Javier; Orduna, Jesús; Franco, Santiago; Quintero, Estefanía; López Navarrete, Juan T; Diosdado, Beatriz E; Villacampa, Belén; Casado, Juan; Andreu, Raquel

    2015-12-18

    Chromophores where a polyenic spacer separates a 4H-pyranylidene or benzothiazolylidene donor and three different butenolide nitriles have been synthesized and characterized. The role of 2(5H)-furanones as acceptor units on the polarization and the second-order nonlinear (NLO) properties has been studied. Thus, their incorporation gives rise to moderately polarized structures with NLO responses that compare favorably to those of related compounds featuring more efficient electron-withdrawing moieties. Derivatives of the proaromatic butenolide PhFu show the best nonlinearities. Benzothiazolylidene-containing chromophores present less alternated structures than their pyranylidene analogues, and, unlike most merocyanines, the degree of charge transfer does not decrease on lengthening the π-bridge. PMID:26588012

  15. D-π-A Compounds with Tunable Intramolecular Charge Transfer Achieved by Incorporation of Butenolide Nitriles as Acceptor Moieties.

    PubMed

    Moreno-Yruela, Carlos; Garín, Javier; Orduna, Jesús; Franco, Santiago; Quintero, Estefanía; López Navarrete, Juan T; Diosdado, Beatriz E; Villacampa, Belén; Casado, Juan; Andreu, Raquel

    2015-12-18

    Chromophores where a polyenic spacer separates a 4H-pyranylidene or benzothiazolylidene donor and three different butenolide nitriles have been synthesized and characterized. The role of 2(5H)-furanones as acceptor units on the polarization and the second-order nonlinear (NLO) properties has been studied. Thus, their incorporation gives rise to moderately polarized structures with NLO responses that compare favorably to those of related compounds featuring more efficient electron-withdrawing moieties. Derivatives of the proaromatic butenolide PhFu show the best nonlinearities. Benzothiazolylidene-containing chromophores present less alternated structures than their pyranylidene analogues, and, unlike most merocyanines, the degree of charge transfer does not decrease on lengthening the π-bridge.

  16. Advances in Helium Cryogenics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sciver, S. W. Van

    This review provides a survey of major advances that have occurred in recent years in the area of helium cryogenics. Helium-temperature cryogenics is the enabling technology for a substantial and growing number of low-temperature systems from superconducting magnets to space-based experimental facilities. In recent years there have been many advances in the technology of low-temperature helium, driven mostly by new applications. However, to keep the review from being too broad, this presentation focuses mainly on three of the most significant advances. These are: (1) the development of large-scale recuperative refrigeration systems mainly for superconducting magnet applications in accelerators and other research facilities; (2) the use of stored superfluid helium (He II) as a coolant for spacebased astrophysics experiments; and (3) the application of regenerative cryocoolers operating at liquid helium temperatures primarily for cooling superconducting devices. In each case, the reader should observe that critical technologies were developed to facilitate these applications. In addition to these three primary advances, other significant helium cryogenic technologies are briefly reviewed at the end of this chapter, along with some vision for future developments in these areas.

  17. Density functional theory-based derivation of an interatomic pair potential for helium impurities in nickel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torres, E.; Pencer, J.; Radford, D. D.

    2016-10-01

    Helium is formed in nickel as a by-product of neutron irradiation. Although helium is chemically inert and essentially insoluble in metals, under specific conditions it is known to cause metal embrittlement. Early experimental and theoretical studies on helium diffusion mechanisms have been a source of controversy. Recent density functional theory (DFT) studies of helium impurities in nickel contradict earlier theoretical studies. In this paper, a new functional form and parameters for a helium-nickel interatomic potential are proposed. The new potential used in molecular dynamics (MD) simulations correctly reproduces the relative stability of helium defects and the interstitial migration of helium in nickel. Furthermore, the computed activation energy for diffusion of helium in nickel corroborates experimental findings. The transferability of the potential is verified through a comparison with DFT predictions of the formation energies of the most stable He clusters in a Ni monovacancy.

  18. Helium induced fine structure in the electronic spectra of anthracene derivatives doped into superfluid helium nanodroplets

    SciTech Connect

    Pentlehner, D.; Slenczka, A.

    2015-01-07

    Electronic spectra of organic molecules doped into superfluid helium nanodroplets show characteristic features induced by the helium environment. Besides a solvent induced shift of the electronic transition frequency, in many cases, a spectral fine structure can be resolved for electronic and vibronic transitions which goes beyond the expected feature of a zero phonon line accompanied by a phonon wing as known from matrix isolation spectroscopy. The spectral shape of the zero phonon line and the helium induced phonon wing depends strongly on the dopant species. Phonon wings, for example, are reported ranging from single or multiple sharp transitions to broad (Δν > 100 cm{sup −1}) diffuse signals. Despite the large number of example spectra in the literature, a quantitative understanding of the helium induced fine structure of the zero phonon line and the phonon wing is missing. Our approach is a systematic investigation of related molecular compounds, which may help to shed light on this key feature of microsolvation in superfluid helium droplets. This paper is part of a comparative study of the helium induced fine structure observed in electronic spectra of anthracene derivatives with particular emphasis on a spectrally sharp multiplet splitting at the electronic origin. In addition to previously discussed species, 9-cyanoanthracene and 9-chloroanthracene will be presented in this study for the first time.

  19. Synthesis, characterization and antiglaucoma activity of a novel proton transfer compound and a mixed-ligand Zn(II) complex.

    PubMed

    Yenikaya, Cengiz; Sari, Musa; Bülbül, Metin; Ilkimen, Halil; Celik, Hülya; Büyükgüngör, Orhan

    2010-01-15

    A novel proton transfer compound, pyridin-2-ylmethanaminium 2,4-dichloro-5-sulfamoylbenzoate (1), and a mixed-ligand Zn(II) complex, bis(2,4-dichloro-5-sulfamoylbenzoate)(2-aminomethylpyridine)aquazinc(II) monohydrate (2), have been synthesized from the same free ligands, which are 2,4-dichloro-5-sulfamoylbenzoic acid (Hsba) and 2-aminomethylpyridine (amp). They have been characterized by elemental, spectral ((1)H NMR, IR and UV-vis.) and thermal analyses. Additionally, magnetic measurement and single crystal X-ray diffraction technique were applied to compound 2. In the complex, Zn(II) ion exhibits a distorted octahedral configuration coordinated by O1 and O1(i) atoms of two mono dentante sba anions and N1, N2, N2(i) atoms of bidentante amp anion and a water molecule (O1w). The free ligands Hsba and amp, and the products 1 and 2, and acetazolamide (AAZ) as the control compound, were also evaluated for their in vitro inhibitor effects on human Carbonic Anhydrase isoenzymes (hCA I and hCA II) purified from erythrocyte cell by affinity chromatography for their hydratase and esterase activities. The IC(50) values of products 1 and 2 for hydratase activity are 0.26 and 0.13microM for hCA I and 0.30 and 0.15microM for hCA II, respectively. The IC(50) values of the same inhibitors for esterase activity are 0.32 and 0.045microM for hCA I and 0.29 and 0.23microM for hCA II, respectively. In relation to esterase activities, the inhibition equilibrium constants (K(i)) were also determined and found 0.25 and 0.058microM on hCA I and 0.22 and 0.24microM on hCA II for 1 and 2, respectively. The comparison of the inhibition studies of newly synthesized compounds 1 and 2 to parent compounds Hsba and amp and to AAZ indicated that 1 and 2 have effective inhibitory activity on hCA I and II, and might be used potential inhibitors. PMID:20006931

  20. Proton-transfer-reaction mass spectrometry for the study of the production of volatile compounds by bakery yeast starters.

    PubMed

    Makhoul, Salim; Romano, Andrea; Cappellin, Luca; Spano, Giuseppe; Capozzi, Vittorio; Benozzi, Elisabetta; Märk, Tilmann D; Aprea, Eugenio; Gasperi, Flavia; El-Nakat, Hanna; Guzzo, Jean; Biasioli, Franco

    2014-09-01

    The aromatic impact of bakery yeast starters is currently receiving considerable attention. The flavor characteristics of the dough and the finished products are usually evaluated by gas chromatography and sensory analysis. The limit of both techniques resides in their low-throughput character. In the present work, proton-transfer-reaction mass spectrometry (PTR-MS), coupled to a time-of-flight mass analyzer, was employed, for the first time, to measure the volatile fractions of dough and bread, and to monitor Saccharomyces cerevisiae volatile production in a fermented food matrix. Leavening was performed on small-scale (1 g) dough samples inoculated with different commercial yeast strains. The leavened doughs were then baked, and volatile profiles were determined during leavening and after baking. The experimental setup included a multifunctional autosampler, which permitted the follow-up of the leavening process on a small scale with a typical throughput of 500 distinct data points in 16 h. The system allowed to pinpoint differences between starter yeast strains in terms of volatile emission kinetics, with repercussions on the final product (i.e. the corresponding micro-loaves). This work demonstrates the applicability of PTR-MS for the study of volatile organic compound production during bread-making, for the automated and online real-time monitoring of the leavening process, and for the characterization and selection of bakery yeast starters in view of their production of volatile compounds.

  1. A Measurement of the neutron electric form factor at very large momentum transfer using polaried electrions scattering from a polarized helium-3 target

    SciTech Connect

    Kelleher, Aidan

    2010-02-01

    Knowledge of the electric and magnetic elastic form factors of the nucleon is essential for an understanding of nucleon structure. Of the form factors, the electric form factor of the neutron has been measured over the smallest range in Q2 and with the lowest precision. Jefferson Lab experiment 02-013 used a novel new polarized 3 He target to nearly double the range of momentum transfer in which the neutron form factor has been studied and to measure it with much higher precision. Polarized electrons were scattered off this target, and both the scattered electron and neutron were detected. Gn E was measured to be 0.0242 ± 0.0020(stat) ± 0.0061(sys) and 0.0247 ± 0.0029(stat) ± 0.0031(sys) at Q2 = 1.7 and 2.5 GeV2 , respectively.

  2. Anthropometric, socioeconomic, and maternal health determinants of placental transfer of organochlorine compounds

    PubMed Central

    Patayová, Henrieta; Wimmerová, Soňa; Lancz, Kinga; Palkovičová, Ľubica; Drobná, Beata; Fabišková, Anna; Kováč, Ján; Hertz-Picciotto, Irva; Jusko, Todd A.

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to relate placental transfer, quantified by the cord to maternal serum concentration ratio (C/M), of five organochlorine pesticides (OCP) hexachlorobenzene (HCB), β-hexachlorocyclohexane (β-HCH), γ-hexachlorocyclohexane (γ-HCH) , p,p'-DDT, p,p'-DDE and 15 polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) congeners (28, 52, 101, 105, 114, 118, 123+149, 138+163, 153, 156+171, 157, 167, 170, 180, and 189) to anthropometric, socioeconomic, and maternal health characteristics. We included into the study 1,134 births during the period 2002–2004 from two districts in eastern Slovakia with high organochlorine concentrations relative to other areas of the world. Only concentrations >LOD were taken into account. Variables as age, weight and height of mothers, parity, ethnicity, alcohol consumption, illness during pregnancy, smoking during pregnancy, hypertension, respiratory diseases, rheumatoid arthritis and diabetes mellitus, and birth weight were related to C/M. Results of regression analyses showed that C/M was predicted by several factors studied. Positive associations were observed for gestational alcohol consumption, fewer illnesses during pregnancy, maternal age, and maternal weight. Caucasians had a greater C/M compared to Romani for wet weight data of congeners 170 and 180 and in contrast C/M for HCB was greater in Romani. Our results show that drinking mothers compared to abstaining expose their fetuses not only to alcohol but to an increased level of several PCB congeners. A straightforward explanation of associations between C/M shifts and factors studied is very difficult, however, with regard to the high lipophilicity of OCPs and PCBs, changes in their kinetics probably reflect lipid kinetics. PMID:23677752

  3. Off-flavours in wines through indirect transfer of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) from coatings.

    PubMed

    Fumi, M D; Lambri, M; De Faveri, D M

    2009-05-01

    This paper assesses the impact of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) from the drying of coatings on the sensory characters of corks and wines. According to Italian National Standard Method 11021:2002, a small-scale chamber was used (1) to expose wines to the drying of coatings with both low and high VOCs, and (2) to expose corks to the same coatings. After exposure to the coatings, the corks were then placed in direct contact with wine. Different styles of white, red and rose wines were tested. In both directly exposed wines and in wines after contact with the exposed cork, the taste and smell off-flavour perception and intensity were assessed by a panel of eight experienced wine tasters using a five-point numerical scale according to International Organization for Standardization (ISO) standard methods. The results showed that the sensory characters of wines, especially taste, were influenced by the VOC content of the coatings. The taste off-flavour perception was found to be higher than the smell in wines exposed to coatings with either high or low VOCs contents. Analysis of variance (ANOVA) and Duncan analysis prove that: (1) panellist's answers were significantly different, (2) it was difficult to differentiate the off-flavour perception on the high-level scale, and (3) the panellist off-flavour perceptions versus wine style discriminated the wines into two groups (red and white/rose). For all the wine styles, Pearson's test showed no significant correlation between off-flavour perception levels and the main chemical characters of the wines. For the wines that were in direct contact with the exposed corks, the panellists detect the off-flavours according to the levels of VOCs in the coating and wine styles and they assessed the highest levels of alteration were to the taste.

  4. On-line measurements of gaseous nitro-organic compounds in diesel vehicle exhaust by proton-transfer-reaction mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inomata, Satoshi; Tanimoto, Hiroshi; Fujitani, Yuji; Sekimoto, Kanako; Sato, Kei; Fushimi, Akihiro; Yamada, Hiroyuki; Hori, Shigeo; Kumazawa, Yasuko; Shimono, Akio; Hikida, Toshihide

    2013-07-01

    Nitro-organic compounds, some of which cause adverse health effects in humans, are emitted in diesel engine exhaust. Speciation and quantification of these nitro-organic compounds in diesel engine exhaust particles have been extensively conducted; however, investigations into the emissions of gaseous nitro-organic compounds in diesel engine exhaust have not. In the present study, the properties of gaseous nitro-organic compounds in diesel engine exhaust were investigated through time-resolved measurement with a proton-transfer-reaction mass spectrometer and a chassis dynamometer. Three diesel trucks were tested, each with a different type of exhaust-gas treatment system (i.e., aftertreatment). Among the nitro-organic compounds detected, the emission of nitromethane was commonly observed and found to be related to the emissions of carbon monoxide, benzene, and acetone. The emission of other nitro-organic compounds, such as nitrophenol, depended on the vehicle, possibly due to the type of aftertreatment installed.

  5. Feasibility of lunar Helium-3 mining

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kleinschneider, Andreas; Van Overstraeten, Dmitry; Van der Reijnst, Roy; Van Hoorn, Niels; Lamers, Marvin; Hubert, Laurent; Dijk, Bert; Blangé, Joey; Hogeveen, Joel; De Boer, Lennaert; Noomen, Ron

    With fossil fuels running out and global energy demand increasing, the need for alternative energy sources is apparent. Nuclear fusion using Helium-3 may be a solution. Helium-3 is a rare isotope on Earth, but it is abundant on the Moon. Throughout the space community lunar Helium-3 is often cited as a major reason to return to the Moon. Despite the potential of lunar Helium-3 mining, little research has been conducted on a full end-to-end mission. This abstract presents the results of a feasibility study conducted by students from Delft University of Technology. The goal of the study was to assess whether a continuous end-to-end mission to mine Helium-3 on the Moon and return it to Earth is a viable option for the future energy market. The set requirements for the representative end-to-end mission were to provide 10% of the global energy demand in the year 2040. The mission elements have been selected with multiple trade-offs among both conservative and novel concepts. A mission architecture with multiple decoupled elements for each transportation segment (LEO, transfer, lunar surface) was found to be the best option. It was found that the most critical element is the lunar mining operation itself. To supply 10% of the global energy demand in 2040, 200 tons of Helium-3 would be required per year. The resulting regolith mining rate would be 630 tons per second, based on an optimistic concentration of 20 ppb Helium-3 in lunar regolith. Between 1,700 to 2,000 Helium-3 mining vehicles would be required, if using University of Wisconsin’s Mark III miner. The required heating power, if mining both day and night, would add up to 39 GW. The resulting power system mass for the lunar operations would be in the order of 60,000 to 200,000 tons. A fleet of three lunar ascent/descent vehicles and 22 continuous-thrust vehicles for orbit transfer would be required. The costs of the mission elements have been spread out over expected lifetimes. The resulting profits from Helium

  6. Acquisition system testing with superfluid helium. [cryopumping for space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, John E.; Fester, Dale A.; Dipirro, Michael J.

    1988-01-01

    Minus one-g outflow tests were conducted with superfluid helium in conjunction with a thermomechanical pump setup in order to study the use of capillary acquisition systems for NASA's Superfluid Helium On-Orbit Transfer (SHOOT) flight experiment. Results show that both fine mesh screen and porous sponge systems are capable of supplying superfluid helium to the thermomechanical pump inlet against a one-g head up to 4 cm, fulfilling the SHOOT requirements. Sponge results were found to be reproducible, while the screen results were not.

  7. Interactions of satellite-speed helium atoms with satellite surfaces. 2: Energy distributions of reflected helium atoms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, S. M.; Knuth, E. L.

    1976-01-01

    Energy transfer in collisions of satellite-speed (7,000 m/sec) helium atoms with a cleaned 6061-T6 satellite-type aluminum surface was investigated using the molecular-beam technique. The amount of energy transferred was determined from the measured energy of the molecular-beam and the measured spatial and energy distributions of the reflected atoms. Spatial distributions of helium atoms scattered from a 6061-T6 aluminum surface were measured. The scattering pattern exhibits a prominent backscattering, probably due to the gross surface roughness and/or the relative lattice softness of the aluminum surface. Energy distributions of reflected helium atoms from the same surface were measured for six different incidence angles. For each incidence angle, distributions were measured at approximately sixty scattering positions. At a given scattering position, the energy spectra of the reflected helium atoms and the background gas were obtained using the retarding-field energy analyzer.

  8. Analysis of trace halocarbon contaminants in ultra high purity helium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fewell, Larry L.

    1994-01-01

    This study describes the analysis of ultra high purity helium. Purification studies were conducted and containment removal was effected by the utilization of solid adsorbent purge-trap systems at cryogenic temperatures. Volatile organic compounds in ultra high purity helium were adsorbed on a solid adsorbent-cryogenic trap, and thermally desorbed trace halocarbon and other contaminants were analyzed by combined gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

  9. Transferable potentials for phase equilibria. 10. Explicit-hydrogen description of substituted benzenes and polycyclic aromatic compounds.

    PubMed

    Rai, Neeraj; Siepmann, J Ilja

    2013-01-10

    The explicit-hydrogen version of the transferable potentials for phase equilibria (TraPPE-EH) force field is extended to various substituted benzenes through the parametrization of the exocyclic groups -F, -Cl, -Br, -C≡N, and -OH and to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons through the parametrization of the aromatic linker carbon atom for multiple rings. The linker carbon together with the TraPPE-EH parameters for aromatic heterocycles constitutes a force field for fused-ring heterocycles. Configurational-bias Monte Carlo simulations in the Gibbs ensemble were carried out to compute vapor-liquid coexistence curves for fluorobenzene; chlorobenzene; bromobenzene; di-, tri-, and hexachlorobenzene isomers; 2-chlorofuran; 2-chlorothiophene; benzonitrile; phenol; dihydroxybenzene isomers; 1,4-benzoquinone; naphthalene; naphthalene-2-carbonitrile; naphthalen-2-ol; quinoline; benzo[b]thiophene; benzo[c]thiophene; benzoxazole; benzisoxazole; benzimidazole; benzothiazole; indole; isoindole; indazole; purine; anthracene; and phenanthrene. The agreement with the limited experimental data is very satisfactory, with saturated liquid densities and vapor pressures reproduced to within 1.5% and 15%, respectively. The mean unsigned percentage errors in the normal boiling points, critical temperatures, and critical densities are 0.9%, 1.2%, and 1.4%, respectively. Additional simulations were carried out for binary systems of benzene/benzonitrile, benzene/phenol, and naphthalene/methanol to illustrate the transferability of the developed potentials to binary systems containing compounds of different polarity and hydrogen-bonding ability. A detailed analysis of the liquid-phase structures is provided for selected neat systems and binary mixtures. PMID:23205778

  10. Helium-refrigeration system

    SciTech Connect

    Specht, J.R.; Millar, B.; Sutherland, A.

    1995-08-01

    The design, procurement, and preliminary construction was completed for adding two more wet expansion engines to two helium refrigerators. These will be added in mid-year FY 1995. In addition a variable speed drive will be added to an existing helium compressor. This is part of an energy conservation upgrade project to reduce operating costs from the use of electricity and liquid nitrogen. This project involves the replacement of Joule-Thompson valves in the refrigerators with expansion engines resulting in system efficiency improvements of about 30% and improved system reliability.

  11. Is solid helium a supersolid?

    SciTech Connect

    Hallock, Robert

    2015-05-15

    Recent experiments suggest that helium-4 atoms can flow through an experimental cell filled with solid helium. But that incompletely understood flow is quite different from the reported superfluid-like motion that so excited physicists a decade ago.

  12. Cavitation in flowing superfluid helium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daney, D. E.

    1988-01-01

    Flowing superfluid helium cavitates much more readily than normal liquid helium, and there is a marked difference in the cavitation behavior of the two fluids as the lambda point is traversed. Examples of cavitation in a turbine meter and centrifugal pump are given, together with measurements of the cavitation strength of flowing superfluid helium. The unusual cavitation behavior of superfluid helium is attributed to its immense thermal conductivity .

  13. Follow up: Compound data sets and software tools for chemoinformatics and medicinal chemistry applications: update and data transfer.

    PubMed

    Hu, Ye; Bajorath, Jürgen

    2014-01-01

    In 2012, we reported 30 compound data sets and/or programs developed in our laboratory in a data article and made them freely available to the scientific community to support chemoinformatics and computational medicinal chemistry applications. These data sets and computational tools were provided for download from our website. Since publication of this data article, we have generated 13 new data sets with which we further extend our collection of publicly available data and tools. Due to changes in web servers and website architectures, data accessibility has recently been limited at times. Therefore, we have also transferred our data sets and tools to a public repository to ensure full and stable accessibility. To aid in data selection, we have classified the data sets according to scientific subject areas. Herein, we describe new data sets, introduce the data organization scheme, summarize the database content and provide detailed access information in ZENODO (doi: 10.5281/zenodo.8451 and doi:10.5281/zenodo.8455).

  14. A new V-shaped organic fluorescent compound integrated with crystallization-induced emission enhancement and intramolecular charge transfer.

    PubMed

    Gu, Pei-Yang; Zhang, You-Hao; Liu, Gao-Yan; Ge, Jian-Feng; Xu, Qing-Feng; Zhang, Qichun; Lu, Jian-Mei

    2013-09-01

    The emission behavior of a new V-shaped organic fluorescent compound (p,p′-bis(2-aryl-1,3,4-oxadiazol-5-yl)diphenyl sulfone (OZA-SO)), consisting of diethylamino (donor) and sulfone (acceptor) units, has been studied in various polar solvents and with different morphologies. As expected, there is the gradual transition from the locally excited state to the intramolecular charge-transfer (ICT) state with the increasing solvent polarity. The photoluminescence intensity of OZA-SO initially decreases with a low water fraction (f(w)), owing to ICT effect, and then increases with a high f(w), owing to crystallization-induced emission enhancement. At the same time, the fluorescence lifetime of OZA-SO increases from 0.062 ns in dimethylformamide (DMF) to 5.80 ns in a solution containing 90 % water, and then to 7.49 ns in a solution containing 60 % water. Furthermore, the solid-state emission of OZA-SO can be tuned reversibly from green to yellow by fuming/grinding or fuming/heating owing to morphological changes. This color-switchable feature of OZA-SO may have potential applications in optical-recording and temperature-sensing materials.

  15. Photochemistry of 3-hydroxyflavone inside superfluid helium nanodroplets

    SciTech Connect

    Lehnig, R.; Pentlehner, D.; Vdovin, A.; Dick, B.; Slenczka, A.

    2009-11-21

    3-hydroxyflavone is a prototype system for excited state intramolecular proton transfer which is one step of a closed loop photocycle. It was intensively studied for the bare molecule and for the influence of solvents. In the present paper this photocycle is investigated for 3-hydroxyflavone and some hydrated complexes when doped into superfluid helium droplets by the combined measurement of fluorescence excitation spectra and dispersed emission spectra. Significant discrepancies in the proton transfer behavior to gas phase experiments provide evidence for the presence of different complex configurations of the hydrated complexes in helium droplets. Moreover, for bare 3-hydroxyflavone and its hydrated complexes the proton transfer appears to be promoted by the helium environment.

  16. Calculation of hydrogen and helium concentrations for CSNS target

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Dong-Dong; Liang, Tai-Ran; Yin, Wen; Yao, Ze-En

    2016-03-01

    The China Spallation Neutron Source (CSNS) is driven by protons whose energies are about 1.6 GeV. At such high energies, the spallation neutrons lead to the formation of large amounts of helium, hydrogen and new heavier species in the form of transmutation products. These hydrogen, helium and transmutation products have a critical effect on the mechanical properties on the one hand and exacerbate the displacement radiation damage on the other hand. In this paper, the background hydrogen/helium concentrations and the maximum hydrogen/helium concentrations near cracks in a tungsten target for CSNS have been calculated at temperatures of 100°C and 300°C by applying a theoretical model. For the CSNS tungsten target plate, we find the maximum hydrogen concentration near the tips of cracks ranges from 3.0 × 10-2-2 × 10-1, which exceeds the hydrogen background concentration by 1.2-1.8 times; the maximum helium concentration near the tips of cracks ranges from 3.0 × 10-4 -1.2 × 10-3, which exceeds the helium background concentration by 2-4 times; the maximum hydrogen/helium concentration increases with the increase of the transfer length across the surfaces of the target and it decreases with the increase of temperature. Supported by National Science Foundation of China (51371195, 11174358)

  17. Airborne and ground based measurements of volatile organic compounds using proton transfer reaction mass spectrometry in Texas and Mexico City

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fortner, Edward Charles

    Measurements of ambient volatile organic compounds (VOCs) by proton transfer reaction mass spectrometry (PTR-MS) are reported from recent airborne and surface based field campaigns. The Southeast Texas Tetroon Study (SETTS) was a project within the TEXAQS 2005 field campaign, conducting airborne measurements that investigated the nocturnal Lagrangian transport of industrial plumes downwind of the Houston, Texas metropolitan area. On the evening of July 26-27, a polluted air mass with elevated mass 43, mass 45 and mass 57 VOCs along with elevated O3, CO, and NOx was tracked from the Houston metropolitan area to an area northwest of Shreveport, LA, a distance of over 200 miles. This campaign demonstrated that the PTR-MS is capable of tracking a VOC plume over large distances and these measurements indicate that transport of VOCs, particularly light alkenes and their oxidation products, out of the Houston metropolitan area may need to be considered by areas downwind of the Houston area when they are determining how to attain their air quality goals. During the MILAGRO field campaign in March 2006 VOCs were measured by PTR-MS instrumentation on a rooftop in the urban mixed residential and industrial area north northeast of downtown Mexico City. Diurnal profiles of weekday and weekend/holiday aromatic VOC concentrations clearly show the influence of vehicular traffic during the morning rush hour time period and during the afternoon hours although a separate late afternoon peak is not seen. Plumes of toluene elevated as much as 216 parts per billion by volume (ppbv) and ethyl acetate elevated as much as 183 ppbv above background levels were observed during the late night and early morning hours. These plumes indicate the probability of significant industrial sources of these two compounds in the region. The high levels of toluene measured by our PTR-MS exceed levels that would be predicted by examination of the Mexico City Metropolitan Area (MCMA) emission inventory and

  18. Superfluid helium cryogenic systems for superconducting RF cavities at KEK

    SciTech Connect

    Nakai, H.; Hara, K.; Honma, T.; Hosoyama, K.; Kojima, Y.; Nakanishi, K.; Kanekiyo, T.; Morita, S.

    2014-01-29

    Recent accelerator projects at KEK, such as the Superconducting RF Test Facility (STF) for R and D of the International Linear Collider (ILC) project and the compact Energy Recovery Linac (cERL), employ superconducting RF cavities made of pure niobium, which can generate high gradient acceleration field. Since the operation temperature of these cavities is selected to be 2 K, we have developed two 2 K superfluid helium cryogenic systems for stable operation of superconducting RF cavities for each of STF and cERL. These two 2 K superfluid helium cryogenic systems are identical in principle. Since the operation mode of the cavities is different for STF and cERL, i.e. the pulse mode for STF and the continuous wave mode for cERL, the heat loads from the cavities are quite different. The 2 K superfluid helium cryogenic systems mainly consists of ordinary helium liquefiers/refrigerators, 2 K refrigerator cold boxes, helium gas pumping systems and high-performance transfer lines. The 2 K refrigerators and the high-performance transfer lines are designed by KEK. Some superconducting RF cavity cryomodules have been already connected to the 2 K superfluid helium cryogenic systems for STF and cERL respectively, and cooled down to 2 K successfully.

  19. The Early Phases of the Evolution of Hot Helium Cores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nelson, L. A.; MacCannell, K.

    2000-10-01

    We examine the evolution of close binary systems containing a mass accreting compact object and a post-main-sequence donor. Using the best available input physics, we have calculated the evolutionary tracks of these systems for a wide range of metallicities and evolutionary states of the donor star (i.e., when it first starts to lose mass to its compact companion). Assuming that a sufficiently massive helium core has formed within the donor at the onset of mass transfer, the donor will be stripped of its hydrogen-rich envelope and will rapidly evolve from a cool "giant" to a relatively hot, compact object composed almost entirely of helium. Mass transfer ceases and these objects are destined to cool forever to become fully electron-degenerate helium dwarfs. A number of helium dwarfs have recently been discovered in isolation and in binary systems. We have established the range of initial conditions of the progenitors of these helium dwarfs for a wide array of core masses and metallicities. While this range of variations (for a fixed mass and metallicity) becomes unimportant to the observable properties of old helium dwarfs that have had a long time to cool, it is quite significant for young dwarfs that are quite luminous and are likely to be preferentially selected in any observational survey. This work was supported in part by the Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council (NSERC) of Canada.

  20. The Hall D solenoid helium refrigeration system at JLab

    SciTech Connect

    Laverdure, Nathaniel A.; Creel, Jonathan D.; Dixon, Kelly d.; Ganni, Venkatarao; Martin, Floyd D.; Norton, Robert O.; Radovic, Sasa

    2014-01-01

    Hall D, the new Jefferson Lab experimental facility built for the 12GeV upgrade, features a LASS 1.85 m bore solenoid magnet supported by a 4.5 K helium refrigerator system. This system consists of a CTI 2800 4.5 K refrigerator cold box, three 150 hp screw compressors, helium gas management and storage, and liquid helium and nitrogen storage for stand-alone operation. The magnet interfaces with the cryo refrigeration system through an LN2-shielded distribution box and transfer line system, both designed and fabricated by JLab. The distribution box uses a thermo siphon design to respectively cool four magnet coils and shields with liquid helium and nitrogen. We describe the salient design features of the cryo system and discuss our recent commissioning experience.

  1. THERMAL OSCILLATIONS IN LIQUID HELIUM TARGETS.

    SciTech Connect

    WANG,L.; JIA,L.X.

    2001-07-16

    A liquid helium target for the high-energy physics was built and installed in the proton beam line at the Alternate Gradient Synchrotron of Brookhaven National Laboratory in 2001. The target flask has a liquid volume of 8.25 liters and is made of thin Mylar film. A G-M/J-T cryocooler of five-watts at 4.2K was used to produce liquid helium and refrigerate the target. A thermosyphon circuit for the target was connected to the J-T circuit by a liquid/gas separator. Because of the large heat load to the target and its long transfer lines, thermal oscillations were observed during the system tests. To eliminate the oscillation, a series of tests and analyses were carried out. This paper describes the phenomena and provides the understanding of the thermal oscillations in the target system.

  2. Electron-helium scattering in Debye plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Zammit, Mark C.; Fursa, Dmitry V.; Bray, Igor; Janev, R. K.

    2011-11-15

    Electron-helium scattering in weakly coupled hot-dense (Debye) plasma has been investigated using the convergent close-coupling method. The Yukawa-type Debye-Hueckel potential has been used to describe plasma Coulomb screening effects. Benchmark results are presented for momentum transfer cross sections, excitation, ionization, and total cross sections for scattering from the ground and metastable states of helium. Calculations cover the entire energy range up to 1000 eV for the no screening case and various Debye lengths (5-100 a{sub 0}). We find that as the screening interaction increases, the excitation and total cross sections decrease, while the total ionization cross sections increase.

  3. Magnetic field effects on the decay rate of photogenerated biradical from intramolecular electron transfer of triplet excited fullerene in a fullerene phenothiazine linked compound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yonemura, Hiroaki; Tokudome, Hiromasa; Yamada, Sunao

    2001-10-01

    Transient absorption spectra of a fullerene (C 60)-phenothiazine (PH) linked compound indicated that the intramolecular electron transfer occurred in benzonitrile, while not in benzene. In benzonitrile, the lifetime (118 ns) of photogenerated biradical was very long, in spite of being around the top region in Marcus theory. The lifetime of the biradical was enhanced by 1.8 times in the presence of magnetic fields (>0.2 T). The magnetic field effects verified that the triplet biradical was generated from the intramolecular electron transfer from PH to the triplet C 60. The long lifetime is most likely ascribed to spin multiplicities of the biradical.

  4. Education in Helium Refrigeration

    SciTech Connect

    Gistau Baguer, G. M.

    2004-06-23

    On the one hand, at the end of the time I was active in helium refrigeration, I noticed that cryogenics was stepping into places where it was not yet used. For example, a conventional accelerator, operating at room temperature, was to be upgraded to reach higher particle energy. On the other hand, I was a little bit worried to let what I had so passionately learned during these years to be lost. Retirement made time available, and I came gradually to the idea to teach about what was my basic job. I thought also about other kinds of people who could be interested in such lessons: operators of refrigerators or liquefiers who, often by lack of time, did not get a proper introduction to their job when they started, young engineers who begin to work in cryogenics... and so on.Consequently, I have assembled a series of lessons about helium refrigeration. As the audiences have different levels of knowledge in the field of cryogenics, I looked for a way of teaching that is acceptable for all of them. The course is split into theory of heat exchangers, refrigeration cycles, technology and operation of main components, process control, and helium purity.

  5. Helium anion formation inside helium droplets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maalouf, Elias Jabbour Al; Reitshammer, Julia; Ribar, Anita; Scheier, Paul; Denifl, Stephan

    2016-07-01

    The formation of He∗- is examined with improved electron energy resolution of about 100 meV utilizing a hemispherical electron monochromator. The work presented provides a precise determination of the three previously determined resonance peak positions that significantly contribute to the formation of He∗- inside helium nanodroplets in the energy range from 20 eV to 29.5 eV. In addition, a new feature is identified located at 27.69 ± 0.18 eV that we assign to the presence of O2 as a dopant inside the droplet. With increasing droplet size a small blue shift of the resonance positions is observed. Also for the relatively low electron currents used in the present study (i.e., 15-70 nA) a quadratic dependence of the He∗- ion yield on the electron current is observed. Contribution to the Topical Issue "Advances in Positron and Electron Scattering", edited by Paulo Limao-Vieira, Gustavo Garcia, E. Krishnakumar, James Sullivan, Hajime Tanuma and Zoran Petrovic.

  6. Catalytic functionalization of low reactive C(sp(3))-H and C(sp(2))-H bonds of alkanes and arenes by carbene transfer from diazo compounds.

    PubMed

    Caballero, Ana; Díaz-Requejo, M Mar; Fructos, Manuel R; Olmos, Andrea; Urbano, Juan; Pérez, Pedro J

    2015-12-21

    The direct functionalization of low reactive C(sp(3))-H and C(sp(2))-H bonds of alkanes and arenes, respectively, by metal-induced carbene transfer from diazo compounds is reviewed. To date, this methodology has enabled the incorporation of CR(1)R(2) moieties from N2[double bond, length as m-dash]CR(1)R(2) in a chemo, regio, enantio or diastereoselective manner in those substrates with the appropriate selection of metal and ligands.

  7. Spectral characteristics and energy transfer from Ce3+ to Tb3+ in compounds Lu1 - x - y Ce x Tb y BO3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shmurak, S. Z.; Kedrov, V. V.; Kiselev, A. P.; Fursova, T. N.; Smyt'ko, I. M.

    2016-03-01

    The structure, IR absorption spectra, morphology, and spectral characteristics of compounds Lu1 - x - y Ce x Tb y BO3 have been investigated. It has been shown that the Tb3+ luminescence excitation spectrum of the Lu1 - x - y Ce x Tb y BO3 compounds is dominated by a broad band coinciding with the excitation band of Ce3+ ions, which clearly indicates energy transfer from the Ce3+ ions to the Tb3+ ions. The spectral position of this band depends on the structural state of the sample: in the structures of calcite and vaterite, the band has maxima at ~339 and ~367 nm, respectively. By varying the ratio between the calcite and vaterite phases in the sample, it is possible to purposefully change the Tb3+ luminescence excitation spectrum, which is important for the optimization of the spectral characteristics of Lu1 - x - y Ce x Tb y BO3 when it is used in light-emitting diode sources. An estimate has been obtained for the maximum distance between Ce3+ and Tb3+ ions, which corresponds to electronic excitation energy transfer. It has been shown that the high intensity of Tb3+ luminescence in these compounds is due to the high efficiency of electronic excitation energy transfer from the Ce3+ ions to the Tb3+ ions as a result of the dipole-dipole interaction.

  8. Monitoring of volatile compound emissions during dry anaerobic digestion of the Organic Fraction of Municipal Solid Waste by Proton Transfer Reaction Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Papurello, Davide; Soukoulis, Christos; Schuhfried, Erna; Cappellin, Luca; Gasperi, Flavia; Silvestri, Silvia; Santarelli, Massimo; Biasioli, Franco

    2012-12-01

    Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs) formed during anaerobic digestion of aerobically pre-treated Organic Fraction of Municipal Solid Waste (OFMSW), have been monitored over a 30 day period by a direct injection mass spectrometric technique: Proton Transfer Reaction Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometry (PTR-ToF-MS). Most of the tentatively identified compounds exhibited a double-peaked emission pattern which is probably the combined result from the volatilization or oxidation of the biomass-inherited organic compounds and the microbial degradation of organic substrates. Of the sulfur compounds, hydrogen sulfide had the highest accumulative production. Alkylthiols were the predominant sulfur organic compounds, reaching their maximum levels during the last stage of the process. H(2)S formation seems to be influenced by the metabolic reactions that the sulfur organic compounds undergo, such as a methanogenesis induced mechanism i.e. an amino acid degradation/sulfate reduction. Comparison of different batches indicates that PTR-ToF-MS is a suitable tool providing information for rapid in situ bioprocess monitoring. PMID:23079412

  9. Helium cryopumping for fusion applications

    SciTech Connect

    Sedgley, D.W.; Batzer, T.H.; Call, W.R.

    1988-05-01

    Large quantities of helium and hydrogen isotopes will be exhausted continuously from fusion power reactors. This paper summarizes two development programs undertaken to address vacuum pumping for this application: (i) A continuous duty cryopump for pumping helium and/or hydrogen species using charcoal sorbent and (ii) a cryopump configuration with an alternative shielding arrangement using charcoal sorbent or argon spray. A test program evaluated automatic pumping of helium, helium pumping by charcoal cryosorption and with argon spray, and cryosorption of helium/hydrogen mixtures. The continuous duty cryopump pumped helium continuously and conveniently. Helium pumping speed was 7.7 l/s/cm/sup 2/ of charcoal, compared to 5.8 l/s/cm/sup 2/ for the alternative pump. Helium speed using argon spray was 18% of that obtained by charcoal cryosorption in the same (W-panel) pump. During continuous duty cryopump mixture tests with helium and hydrogen copumped on charcoal, gas was released sporadically. Testing was insufficient to explain this unacceptable event.

  10. Virtual Disjunct Eddy Covariance Flux Measurements of Biogenic Volatile Organic Compounds from Ponderosa and Loblolly Pine Forests using Proton Transfer Reaction Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jardine, K. J.; Baker, B.

    2003-12-01

    Biogenic emissions of trace organic compounds into the atmosphere impact the levels of oxidants such as ozone and hydroxyl radicals and effects secondary organic aerosol formation. In an attempt to quantify these emissions, we used the virtual disjunct eddy covariance method and a Proton Transfer Reaction Mass Spectrometer (PTR-MS) during two summer 2003 field campaigns to measure the flux of several biogenic volatile organic compounds (VOCs). The first campaign was part of the CELTIC study in a North Carolina Loblolly pine plantation (Duke Forest) designed to study Chemical Emission, Loss, Transformation, and Interactions within Canopies. The second campaign was at the Black Hills Ameriflux Tower near Rapid City, South Dakota. Significant fluxes of acetaldehyde, isoprene, acetone, methanol, methylbutenol, and monoterpenes were measured and a comparison between isoprene flux measurements from the PTR-MS and a Fast Isoprene System was performed. Compound identities were verified using gas chromatography with a PTR-MS as the detector.

  11. The role of charge-transfer integral in determining and engineering the carrier mobilities of 9,10-di(2-naphthyl)anthracene compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tse, S. C.; So, S. K.; Yeung, M. Y.; Lo, C. F.; Wen, S. W.; Chen, C. H.

    2006-05-01

    The charge transporting properties of t-butylated 9,10-di(2-naphthyl)anthracene (ADN) compounds have been investigated experimentally and computationally in relation to their molecular structures. The ADN compounds are found to be ambipolar with both electron and hole mobilities in the range of 1-4 × 10 -7 cm 2 V -1 s -1 (electric field 0.5-0.8 MV/cm). As the degree of t-butylation increases, the carrier mobility decreases progressively. The mobility reduction was examined by Marcus theory of reorganization energies. All ADN compounds possess similar reorganization energies of ˜0.3 eV. The reduction of carrier mobilities with increasing t-butylation can be attributed to a decrease in the charge-transfer integral or the wavefunction overlap.

  12. 48 CFR 52.208-8 - Required Sources for Helium and Helium Usage Data.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... Helium and Helium Usage Data. 52.208-8 Section 52.208-8 Federal Acquisition Regulations System FEDERAL... Provisions and Clauses 52.208-8 Required Sources for Helium and Helium Usage Data. As prescribed in 8.505, insert the following clause: Required Sources for Helium and Helium Usage Data (APR 2002) (a)...

  13. 48 CFR 52.208-8 - Required Sources for Helium and Helium Usage Data.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... Helium and Helium Usage Data. 52.208-8 Section 52.208-8 Federal Acquisition Regulations System FEDERAL... Provisions and Clauses 52.208-8 Required Sources for Helium and Helium Usage Data. As prescribed in 8.505, insert the following clause: Required Sources for Helium and Helium Usage Data (APR 2002) (a)...

  14. 48 CFR 52.208-8 - Required Sources for Helium and Helium Usage Data.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... Helium and Helium Usage Data. 52.208-8 Section 52.208-8 Federal Acquisition Regulations System FEDERAL... Provisions and Clauses 52.208-8 Required Sources for Helium and Helium Usage Data. As prescribed in 8.505, insert the following clause: Required Sources for Helium and Helium Usage Data (APR 2014) (a)...

  15. 48 CFR 52.208-8 - Required Sources for Helium and Helium Usage Data.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... Helium and Helium Usage Data. 52.208-8 Section 52.208-8 Federal Acquisition Regulations System FEDERAL... Provisions and Clauses 52.208-8 Required Sources for Helium and Helium Usage Data. As prescribed in 8.505, insert the following clause: Required Sources for Helium and Helium Usage Data (APR 2002) (a)...

  16. 48 CFR 52.208-8 - Required Sources for Helium and Helium Usage Data.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... Helium and Helium Usage Data. 52.208-8 Section 52.208-8 Federal Acquisition Regulations System FEDERAL... Provisions and Clauses 52.208-8 Required Sources for Helium and Helium Usage Data. As prescribed in 8.505, insert the following clause: Required Sources for Helium and Helium Usage Data (APR 2002) (a)...

  17. Liquid Helium Acoustic Microscope.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steer, Andrew Paul

    Available from UMI in association with The British Library. In an acoustic microscope, images are generated by monitoring the intensity of the ultrasonic reflection, or echo, from the surface of a sample. In order to achieve this a pulse of acoustic energy is produced by the excitation of a thin film transducer. The pulse thus generated propagates through a crystal and is incident upon the acoustic lens surface, which is the boundary between the crystal and an acoustic coupling liquid. The acoustic lens is a converging element, and brings the ultrasonic beam to a focus within the liquid. A sample, placed at the focus, can act as a reflector, and the returned pulse then contains information regarding the acoustic reflectivity of this specimen. Acoustic pulses are repeatedly launched and detected while the acoustic lens is scanned over the surface of the sample. In this manner an acoustic image is constructed. Acoustic losses in room temperature liquid coupling media represent a considerable source of difficulty in the recovery of acoustic echo signals. At the frequencies of operation required in a microscope which is capable of high resolution, the ultrasonic attenuation is not only large but increases with the square of frequency. In superfluid liquid helium at temperatures below 0.1 K, however, the ultrasonic attenuation becomes negligible. Furthermore, the low sound velocity in liquid helium results in an increase in resolution, since the acoustic wavelength is proportional to velocity. A liquid helium acoustic microscope has been designed and constructed. Details of the various possible detection methods are given, and comparisons are made between them. Measurements of the performance of the system that was adopted are reported. The development of a cooled preamplifier is also described. The variation of reflected signal with object distance has been measured and compared with theoretical predictions. This variation is important in the analysis of acoustic

  18. Ketyl Radical Formation via Proton-Coupled Electron Transfer in an Aqueous Solution versus Hydrogen Atom Transfer in Isopropanol after Photoexcitation of Aromatic Carbonyl Compounds.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiting; Ma, Jiani; Li, Songbo; Li, Ming-De; Guan, Xiangguo; Lan, Xin; Zhu, Ruixue; Phillips, David Lee

    2016-07-01

    The excited nπ* and ππ* triplets of two benzophenone (BP) and two anthraquinone (AQ) derivatives have been observed in acetonitrile, isopropanol, and mixed aqueous solutions using time-resolved resonance Raman spectroscopic and nanosecond transient absorption experiments. These experimental results, combined with results from density functional theory calculations, reveal the effects of solvent and substituents on the properties, relative energies, and chemical reactivities of the nπ* and ππ* triplets. The triplet nπ* configuration was found to act as the reactive species for a subsequent hydrogen atom transfer reaction to produce a ketyl radical intermediate in the isopropanol solvent, while the triplet ππ* undergoes a proton-coupled electron transfer (PCET) in aqueous solutions to produce a ketyl radical intermediate. This PCET reaction, which occurs via a concerted proton transfer (to the excited carbonyl group) and electron transfer (to the excited phenyl ring), can account for the experimental observation by several different research groups over the past 40 years of the formation of ketyl radicals after photolysis of a number of BP and AQ derivatives in aqueous solutions, although water is considered to be a relatively "inert" hydrogen-donor solvent. PMID:27266916

  19. Online volatile organic compound measurements using a newly developed proton-transfer ion-trap mass spectrometry instrument during New England Air Quality Study--Intercontinental Transport and Chemical Transformation 2004: performance, intercomparison, and compound identification.

    PubMed

    Warneke, Carsten; Kato, Shuji; De Gouw, Joost A; Goldan, Paul D; Kuster, William C; Shao, Min; Lovejoy, Edward R; Fall, Ray; Fehsenfeld, Fred C

    2005-07-15

    We have used a newly developed proton-transfer ion-trap mass spectrometry (PIT-MS) instrument for online trace gas analysis of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) during the 2004 New England Air Quality Study-Intercontinental Transport and Chemical Transformation study. The PIT-MS instrument uses proton-transfer reactions with H3O+ ions to ionize VOCs, similarto a PTR-MS (proton-transfer reaction mass spectrometry) instrument but uses an ion trap mass spectrometer to analyze the product ions. The advantages of an ion trap are the improved identification of VOCs and a near 100% duty cycle. During the experiment, the PIT-MS instrument had a detection limit between 0.05 and 0.3 pbbv (S/N = 3 (signal-to-noise ratio)) for 2-min integration time for most tested VOCs. PIT-MS was used for ambient air measurements onboard a research ship and agreed well with a gas chromatography mass spectrometer). The comparison included oxygenated VOCs, aromatic compounds, and others such as isoprene, monoterpenes, acetonitrile, and dimethyl sulfide. Automated collision-induced dissociation measurements were used to determine the contributions of acetone and propanal to the measured signal at 59 amu; both species are detected at this mass and are thus indistinguishable in conventional PTR-MS.

  20. Helium behaviour in waste conditioning matrices during thermal annealing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiss, T. A. G.; Hiernaut, J.-P.; Damen, P. M. G.; Lutique, S.; Fromknecht, R.; Weber, W. J.

    2006-06-01

    Reprocessing of spent fuel produces high level waste including minor actinides and long living fission products that might be disposed in waste conditioning matrices. Several natural mineral phases were proven to be able to incorporate fission products or actinides in their crystalline structure for long periods of time. In this study, synthetic compounds of zirconolite (CaZrTi2O7) and pyrochlores (Gd2Ti2O7 and Nd2Zr2O7) were fabricated and doped with the short-lived alpha-emitter 244Cm to increase the total amount of helium and damage generated in a laboratory time scale. Helium implantations were also used to simulate the damage caused by the alpha-decay and the build-up of helium in the matrix. The samples were annealed in a Knudsen cell, and the helium release profile interpreted in conjunction with radiation damage studies and previous analysis of annealing behaviour. Several processes like diffusion, trapping or phase changes could then be attributed to the helium behaviour depending on the material considered. Despite high damage and large amount of helium accumulated, the integrity of the studied materials was preserved during storage.

  1. Compact Instruments Measure Helium-Leak Rates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stout, Stephen; Immer, Christopher

    2003-01-01

    Compact, lightweight instruments have been developed for measuring small flows of helium and/or detecting helium leaks in solenoid valves when the valves are nominally closed. These instruments do not impede the flows when the valves are nominally open. They can be integrated into newly fabricated valves or retrofitted to previously fabricated valves. Each instrument includes an upstream and a downstream thermistor separated by a heater, plus associated analog and digital heater-control, signal- conditioning, and data-processing circuits. The thermistors and heater are off-the-shelf surface mount components mounted on a circuit board in the flow path. The operation of the instrument is based on a well-established thermal mass-flow-measurement technique: Convection by the flow that one seeks to measure gives rise to transfer of heat from the heater to the downstream thermistor. The temperature difference measured by the thermistors is directly related to the rate of flow. The calibration curve from temperature gradient to helium flow is closely approximated via fifth-order polynomial. A microprocessor that is part of the electronic circuitry implements the calibration curve to compute the flow rate from the thermistor readings.

  2. 80. DETAIL OF TYPICAL PRESSURE GAUGE IN NITROGEN AND HELIUM ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    80. DETAIL OF TYPICAL PRESSURE GAUGE IN NITROGEN AND HELIUM STORAGE AND TRANSFER CONTROL SKIDS ON NORTH END OF SLC-3W FUEL APRON - Vandenberg Air Force Base, Space Launch Complex 3, Launch Pad 3 West, Napa & Alden Roads, Lompoc, Santa Barbara County, CA

  3. Resolution of volatile fuel compound profiles from Ascocoryne sarcoides: a comparison by proton transfer reaction-mass spectrometry and solid phase microextraction gas chromatography-mass spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Volatile hydrocarbon production by Ascocoryne sacroides was studied over its growth cycle. Gas-phase compounds were measured continuously with a proton transfer reaction-mass spectrometry (PTR-MS) and at distinct time points with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) using head space solid phase microextraction (SPME). The PTR-MS ion signal permitted temporal resolution of the volatile production while the SPME results revealed distinct compound identities. The quantitative PTR-MS results showed the volatile production was dominated by ethanol and acetaldehyde, while the concentration of the remainder of volatiles consistently reached 2,000 ppbv. The measurement of alcohols from the fungal culture by the two techniques correlated well. Notable compounds of fuel interest included nonanal, 1-octen-3-ol, 1-butanol, 3-methyl- and benzaldehyde. Abiotic comparison of the two techniques demonstrated SPME fiber bias toward higher molecular weight compounds, making quantitative efforts with SPME impractical. Together, PTR-MS and SPME GC-MS were shown as valuable tools for characterizing volatile fuel compound production from microbiological sources. PMID:22480438

  4. Helium dilution refrigeration system

    DOEpatents

    Roach, Patrick R.; Gray, Kenneth E.

    1988-01-01

    A helium dilution refrigeration system operable over a limited time period, and recyclable for a next period of operation. The refrigeration system is compact with a self-contained pumping system and heaters for operation of the system. A mixing chamber contains .sup.3 He and .sup.4 He liquids which are precooled by a coupled container containing .sup.3 He liquid, enabling the phase separation of a .sup.3 He rich liquid phase from a dilute .sup.3 He-.sup.4 He liquid phase which leads to the final stage of a dilution cooling process for obtaining low temperatures. The mixing chamber and a still are coupled by a fluid line and are maintained at substantially the same level with the still cross sectional area being smaller than that of the mixing chamber. This configuration provides maximum cooling power and efficiency by the cooling period ending when the .sup.3 He liquid is depleted from the mixing chamber with the mixing chamber nearly empty of liquid helium, thus avoiding unnecessary and inefficient cooling of a large amount of the dilute .sup.3 He-.sup.4 He liquid phase.

  5. Helium dilution refrigeration system

    DOEpatents

    Roach, P.R.; Gray, K.E.

    1988-09-13

    A helium dilution refrigeration system operable over a limited time period, and recyclable for a next period of operation is disclosed. The refrigeration system is compact with a self-contained pumping system and heaters for operation of the system. A mixing chamber contains [sup 3]He and [sup 4]He liquids which are precooled by a coupled container containing [sup 3]He liquid, enabling the phase separation of a [sup 3]He rich liquid phase from a dilute [sup 3]He-[sup 4]He liquid phase which leads to the final stage of a dilution cooling process for obtaining low temperatures. The mixing chamber and a still are coupled by a fluid line and are maintained at substantially the same level with the still cross sectional area being smaller than that of the mixing chamber. This configuration provides maximum cooling power and efficiency by the cooling period ending when the [sup 3]He liquid is depleted from the mixing chamber with the mixing chamber nearly empty of liquid helium, thus avoiding unnecessary and inefficient cooling of a large amount of the dilute [sup 3]He-[sup 4]He liquid phase. 2 figs.

  6. Pyridine-2,6-bis(monothiocarboxylic) acid and 2-aminopyridine as building blocks of a novel proton transfer compound: Solution and X-ray crystal structural studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moghimi, A.; Moosavi, S. M.; Kordestani, D.; Maddah, B.; Shamsipur, M.; Aghabozorg, H.; Ramezanipour, F.; Kickelbick, G.

    2007-02-01

    The synthesis of a novel proton transfer compound (2-apyH)(pdtcH), L, derived from pyridine-2,6-bis(monothiocarboxylic) acid, (pdtcH 2), is reported. This compound was prepared from the reaction between pdtcH 2, and 2-aminopyridine, (2-apy), in water as solvent. The characterization was performed using 1H and 13C solution NMR and single crystal X-ray diffraction analysis. Crystal structure analysis reveals that intra- and intermolecular proton transfer from the diacid pdtcH 2 to the base 2-apy results in the formation of a supramolecular network, which is self-assembled via non-covalent interactions. The monocationic (2-apyH) + and monoanionic (pdtcH) - building blocks are connected through H-bonding, π-π interactions and ion-pairing simultaneously as shown in the X-ray crystal structure. The monoanionic fragments are located almost parallel to each other and the cationic species have also situations nearly parallel to each other, positioning almost perpendicular to anions. The aqueous solution studies were accomplished by spectrophotometric and potentiometric pH titrations. The most abundant proton transfer species present at pH < 6 is (2-apyH)(pdtcH), in support of association between (2-apyH) + and (pdtcH) - in L, being similar to that observed by NMR spectroscopy and X-ray crystal structure analysis.

  7. First-principles description of charge transfer in donor-acceptor compounds from self-consistent many-body perturbation theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caruso, Fabio; Atalla, Viktor; Ren, Xinguo; Rubio, Angel; Scheffler, Matthias; Rinke, Patrick

    2014-08-01

    We investigate charge transfer in prototypical molecular donor-acceptor compounds using hybrid density functional theory (DFT) and the GW approximation at the perturbative level (G0W0) and at full self-consistency (sc-GW). For the systems considered here, no charge transfer should be expected at large intermolecular separation according to photoemission experiments and accurate quantum-chemistry calculations. The capability of hybrid exchange-correlation functionals of reproducing this feature depends critically on the fraction of exact exchange α, as for small values of α spurious fractional charge transfer is observed between the donor and the acceptor. G0W0 based on hybrid DFT yields the correct alignment of the frontier orbitals for all values of α. However, G0W0 has no capacity to alter the ground-state properties of the system because of its perturbative nature. The electron density in donor-acceptor compounds thus remains incorrect for small α values. In sc-GW, where the Green's function is obtained from the iterative solution of the Dyson equation, the electron density is updated and reflects the correct description of the level alignment at the GW level, demonstrating the importance of self-consistent many-body approaches for the description of ground- and excited-state properties in donor-acceptor systems.

  8. Theoretical investigation of the interaction between aromatic sulfur compounds and [BMIM](+)[FeCl4](-) ionic liquid in desulfurization: A novel charge transfer mechanism.

    PubMed

    Li, Hongping; Zhu, Wenshuai; Chang, Yonghui; Jiang, Wei; Zhang, Ming; Yin, Sheng; Xia, Jiexiang; Li, Huaming

    2015-06-01

    In this work, interaction nature between a group of aromatic sulfur compounds and [BMIM](+)[FeCl4](-) have been investigated by density functional theory (DFT). A coordination structure is found to be critical to the mechanism of extractive desulfurization. Interaction energy and extractive selectivity follow the order: thiophene (TH)transfer effect. During extractive desulfurization, electrons on aromatic sulfur compounds transfer into the Lewis part of ionic liquid, namely, [FeCl4](-). Furthermore, it is better to consider the Lewis acidity of Fe-containing ionic liquid by the whole unit (such as [FeCl4](-) and aromatic sulfur compounds (X)) rather than only Fe or S atom.

  9. Precision spectroscopy of Helium

    SciTech Connect

    Cancio, P.; Giusfredi, G.; Mazzotti, D.; De Natale, P.; De Mauro, C.; Krachmalnicoff, V.; Inguscio, M.

    2005-05-05

    Accurate Quantum-Electrodynamics (QED) tests of the simplest bound three body atomic system are performed by precise laser spectroscopic measurements in atomic Helium. In this paper, we present a review of measurements between triplet states at 1083 nm (23S-23P) and at 389 nm (23S-33P). In 4He, such data have been used to measure the fine structure of the triplet P levels and, then, to determine the fine structure constant when compared with equally accurate theoretical calculations. Moreover, the absolute frequencies of the optical transitions have been used for Lamb-shift determinations of the levels involved with unprecedented accuracy. Finally, determination of the He isotopes nuclear structure and, in particular, a measurement of the nuclear charge radius, are performed by using hyperfine structure and isotope-shift measurements.

  10. Measurement of the radiative L3-M vacancy transfer probabilities of some 4f elements and compounds using Indus-2 synchrotron radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krishnananda; Mirji, Santosh; Badiger, N. M.; Tiwari, M. K.

    2016-08-01

    The L X-ray intensity ratios (ILα/ILl, ILα/ILβ, ILα/ILγ) and the radiative L3-M vacancy transfer probabilities (ηL3-M) of some 4f elements such as Gd, Tb, Ho and compounds; Pr2O3, Pr2(CO3)3·8H2O, Nd2O3, Sm2O3, Sm2(CO3)3·2.85H2O, Sm2(SO4)3·8H2O, Gd2(CO3)3, Tb2O3, Dy2(SO4)3, Ho2O3 and HoF3 have been measured using Indus-2 synchrotron radiation. The elements and compounds are excited by synchrotron radiation and the emitted characteristic L X-ray photons are measured with high resolution silicon drift detector. The measured intensity ratios of compounds are not influenced by the chemical environment. However, the ηL3-M values of compound targets indicate the effect of crystal structure.

  11. A needle-free reconstitution and transfer system for compounded sterile intravenous drug solutions in compliance with United States Pharmacopeia Chapter <797> standards.

    PubMed

    Marks, Zach

    2014-01-01

    Today's health-system pharmacists and those in independent practice face risks, including exposure to potent cytotoxic drugs via needlesticks, that are associated with preparing intravenous compounded sterile preparations for immediate use. Healthcare givers who administer such medications also risk exposure to needlesticks. Those hazards can be minimized when the pharmacist thoroughly understands and complies with current standard operating procedures for preparing intravenous compounded sterile preparations and the healthcare giver uses a needle-free system for drug reconstitution and administration. The components of an overall needlestick risk-reduction strategy to ensure safety in the preparation (and eventual administration) of intravenous compounded sterile preparations should therefore include the use of needle-free connection and administration devices as well as hand-hygiene training, aseptic technique competency evaluation and training, and the maximum use of commercially available or ready-to-use dosage forms. This article, which focuses on the pharmacist's use of a needle-free reconstitution and transfer system for compounded sterile intravenous drug solutions, uses as an example the Vial2Bag (Medimop Medical Projects, Ltd., [a subsidiary of West Pharmaceutical Services, Inc., Exton, Pennsylvania], Ra'anana, Israel), which complies with United States Pharmacopeia Chapter <797> standards. Features of that system are summarized for easy reference. PMID:24881111

  12. A needle-free reconstitution and transfer system for compounded sterile intravenous drug solutions in compliance with United States Pharmacopeia Chapter <797> standards.

    PubMed

    Marks, Zach

    2014-01-01

    Today's health-system pharmacists and those in independent practice face risks, including exposure to potent cytotoxic drugs via needlesticks, that are associated with preparing intravenous compounded sterile preparations for immediate use. Healthcare givers who administer such medications also risk exposure to needlesticks. Those hazards can be minimized when the pharmacist thoroughly understands and complies with current standard operating procedures for preparing intravenous compounded sterile preparations and the healthcare giver uses a needle-free system for drug reconstitution and administration. The components of an overall needlestick risk-reduction strategy to ensure safety in the preparation (and eventual administration) of intravenous compounded sterile preparations should therefore include the use of needle-free connection and administration devices as well as hand-hygiene training, aseptic technique competency evaluation and training, and the maximum use of commercially available or ready-to-use dosage forms. This article, which focuses on the pharmacist's use of a needle-free reconstitution and transfer system for compounded sterile intravenous drug solutions, uses as an example the Vial2Bag (Medimop Medical Projects, Ltd., [a subsidiary of West Pharmaceutical Services, Inc., Exton, Pennsylvania], Ra'anana, Israel), which complies with United States Pharmacopeia Chapter <797> standards. Features of that system are summarized for easy reference.

  13. Distinguishing N-oxide and hydroxyl compounds: impact of heated capillary/heated ion transfer tube in inducing atmospheric pressure ionization source decompositions.

    PubMed

    Peiris, Dilrukshi M; Lam, Wing; Michael, Steven; Ramanathan, Ragu

    2004-06-01

    In the pharmaceutical industry, a higher attrition rate during the drug discovery process means a lower drug failure rate in the later stages. This translates into shorter drug development time and reduced cost for bringing a drug to market. Over the past few years, analytical strategies based on liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry (LC/MS) have gone through revolutionary changes and presently accommodate most of the needs of the pharmaceutical industry. Among these LC/MS techniques, collision induced dissociation (CID) or tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS and MS(n)) techniques have been widely used to identify unknown compounds and characterize metabolites. MS/MS methods are generally ineffective for distinguishing isomeric compounds such as metabolites involving oxygenation of carbon or nitrogen atoms. Most recently, atmospheric pressure ionization (API) source decomposition methods have been shown to aid in the mass spectral distinction of isomeric oxygenated (N-oxide vs hydroxyl) products/metabolites. In previous studies, experiments were conducted using mass spectrometers equipped with a heated capillary interface between the mass analyzer and the ionization source. In the present study, we investigated the impact of the length of a heated capillary or heated ion transfer tube (a newer version of the heated capillary designed for accommodating orthogonal API source design) in inducing for-API source deoxygenation that allows the distinction of N-oxide from hydroxyl compounds. 8-Hydroxyquinoline (HO-Q), quinoline-N-oxide (Q-NO) and 8-hydroxyquinoline-N-oxide (HO-Q-NO) were used as model compounds on three different mass spectrometers (LCQ Deca, LCQ Advantage and TSQ Quantum). Irrespective of heated capillary or ion transfer tube length, N-oxides from this class of compounds underwent predominantly deoxygenation decomposition under atmospheric pressure chemical ionization conditions and the abundance of the diagnostic [M + H - O](+) ions increased with

  14. Numerical Simulation of Cold Helium Safety Discharges into a Long Relief Line

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andersson, R.; Fydrych, J.; Weisend, J. G.

    All existing and currently constructed large superconducting particle accelerators use liquid or supercritical helium for transferring cooling power from the cryogenic plant to the accelerator magnets and cavities. These accelerators have extremely elongated structures and therefore require widespread cryogenic distribution systems as well as advanced gas management systems. The design and operation of their cryogenic system are strongly affected by the requirements of high reliability and operating cost minimization. This strongly influences pressure equipment safety strategies. Becauseaccidental helium discharges from the accelerator cryostats and cryomodules cannot be excluded, possibilities of recovering helium releases from safety devices are taken into consideration. Collecting discharged helium and transferring it back to the cryoplant via a long recovery line is not only an option, but also a must. Usually the baseline design choice for the helium recovery system is a set of safety valves connected to a bare relief line that ends in a gas bag. However, rapid and fast discharges of cold helium into warm relief lines can result in significantly unsteady, compressible and thermal flows. Therefore the proper designing and sizing of the recovery system have to be supported by detailed analyses of all expected fluid dynamics and thermodynamics phenomena. This paper describes the numerical simulations of cold helium discharges into a long, warm safety relief line. The simulations have been done for the helium recovery system of the superconducting proton accelerator that is under construction at ESS in Lund, Sweden. The paper discusses the model assumptions and presents some example results.

  15. Resource Letter SH-1: Superfluid Helium.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hallock, Robert B.

    1982-01-01

    Provides an annotated list of books, textbooks, and films on superfluid helium. Also lists research reports/reviews arranged by category, including among others, early history, microscopic understanding, ions in helium, helium in rotation, vortices and quantization, helium films and constricted geometrics, persistence flow, and superfluid helium…

  16. A helium gas probe for use in cryosurgery.

    PubMed

    Bald, W B

    1984-10-01

    The design and testing of a prototype cryosurgical probe utilizing helium gas precooled with liquid nitrogen are described. An 8-mm-diameter probe produced an ice ball with a diameter of 28 mm after 10 min freezing using a helium gas flow rate of 42 liter/min. This indicated a surface heat transfer coefficient of 0.34 W/cm2 degrees K and temperature of -138 degrees C at the probe tip. Improved performance figures can be achieved using higher gas pressures and flow rates. A helium gas flow system schematic for use with this new type of cryoprobe is also presented. It is claimed that this system will overcome the problems of developing both multiple-tipped probes and small-diameter needle probes for use in cryoanalgesia. PMID:6499503

  17. Performance of the Helium Circulation System on a Commercialized MEG

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    T, Takeda; M, Okamoto; T, Miyazaki; K, Katagiri

    2012-12-01

    We report the performance of a helium circulation system (HCS) mounted on a MEG (Magnetoencephalography) at Nagoya University, Japan. This instrument is the first commercialized version of an HCS. The HCS collects warm helium gas at approximately 300 K and then cools it to approximately 40 K. The gas is returned to the neck tube of a Dewar of the MEG to keep it cold. It also collects helium gas in the region just above the liquid helium surface while it is still cold, re-liquefies the gas and returns it to the Dewar. A special transfer tube (TT) of approximately 3 m length was developed to allow for dual helium streams. This tube separates the HCS using a MEG to reduce magnetic noise. A refiner was incorporated to effectively collect contaminating gases by freezing them. The refiner was equipped with an electric heater to remove the frozen contaminants as gases into the air. A gas flow controller was also developed, which automatically controlled the heater and electric valves to clean up contamination. The developed TT exhibited a very low heat inflow of less than 0.1 W/m to the liquid helium, ensuring efficient operation. The insert tube diameter, which was 1.5 in. was reduced to a standard 0.5 in. size. This dimensional change enabled the HCS to mount onto any commercialized MEG without any modifications to the MEG. The HCS can increase liquid helium in the Dewar by at least 3 liters/Day using two GM cryocoolers (SRDK-415D, Sumitomo Heavy Industries, Ltd.). The noise levels were virtually the same as before this installation.

  18. A computer simulation of the turbocharged turbo compounded diesel engine system: A description of the thermodynamic and heat transfer models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Assanis, D. N.; Ekchian, J. E.; Frank, R. M.; Heywood, J. B.

    1985-01-01

    A computer simulation of the turbocharged turbocompounded direct-injection diesel engine system was developed in order to study the performance characteristics of the total system as major design parameters and materials are varied. Quasi-steady flow models of the compressor, turbines, manifolds, intercooler, and ducting are coupled with a multicylinder reciprocator diesel model, where each cylinder undergoes the same thermodynamic cycle. The master cylinder model describes the reciprocator intake, compression, combustion and exhaust processes in sufficient detail to define the mass and energy transfers in each subsystem of the total engine system. Appropriate thermal loading models relate the heat flow through critical system components to material properties and design details. From this information, the simulation predicts the performance gains, and assesses the system design trade-offs which would result from the introduction of selected heat transfer reduction materials in key system components, over a range of operating conditions.

  19. Low temperature uses of helium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, G. V.

    1970-01-01

    Helium is used for purging and pressurizing cryogenic rocket propellants, welding, atmosphere control, leak detection, and refrigeration. It provides the lowest possible liquid-bath temperature and produces superconductivity in certain materials. Its superfluid effects are used in superconducting magnets.

  20. In vivo analysis of palm wine (Elaeis guineensis) volatile organic compounds (VOCs) by proton transfer reaction-mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lasekan, Ola; Otto, Sabine

    2009-04-01

    The in vivo volatile organic compounds (VOCs) release patterns in palm wine was carried out using the PTR-MS. In order to analyze the complex mixtures of VOCs in palm wine, the fragmentation patterns of 14 known aroma compounds of palm wine were also investigated. Results revealed masses m/z (43, 47, 61, 65, 75, 89 and 93) as the predominant ones measured in-breathe exhaled from the nose, during consumption of palm wine. Further studies of aroma's fragmentation patterns, showed that the m/z 43 is characteristic of fragment of various compounds, while m/z 47 is ethanol, m/z 61(acetic acid), m/z 65 (protonated ethanol cluster ions), m/z 75 (methyl acetate), m/z 89 (acetoin) and m/z 93 (2-phenylethanol) respectively. The dynamic release parameters (Imax and tmax) of the 7 masses revealed significant (P = 0.05) differences, between maximum intensity (Imax) and no significant (P = 0.05) differences between tmax among VOCs respectively.

  1. Radiation source for helium magnetometers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slocum, Robert E. (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    A radiation source (12) for optical magnetometers (10) which use helium isotopes as the resonance element (30) includes an electronically pumped semiconductor laser (12) which produces a single narrow line of radiation which is frequency stabilized to the center frequency of the helium resonance line to be optically pumped. The frequency stabilization is accomplished using electronic feedback (34, 40, 42, 44) to control a current sources (20) thus eliminating the need for mechanical frequency tuning.

  2. Helium heater design for the helium direct cycle component test facility. [for gas-cooled nuclear reactor power plant

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Larson, V. R.; Gunn, S. V.; Lee, J. C.

    1975-01-01

    The paper describes a helium heater to be used to conduct non-nuclear demonstration tests of the complete power conversion loop for a direct-cycle gas-cooled nuclear reactor power plant. Requirements for the heater include: heating the helium to a 1500 F temperature, operating at a 1000 psia helium pressure, providing a thermal response capability and helium volume similar to that of the nuclear reactor, and a total heater system helium pressure drop of not more than 15 psi. The unique compact heater system design proposed consists of 18 heater modules; air preheaters, compressors, and compressor drive systems; an integral control system; piping; and auxiliary equipment. The heater modules incorporate the dual-concentric-tube 'Variflux' heat exchanger design which provides a controlled heat flux along the entire length of the tube element. The heater design as proposed will meet all system requirements. The heater uses pressurized combustion (50 psia) to provide intensive heat transfer, and to minimize furnace volume and heat storage mass.

  3. Real-time analysis of organic compounds in ship engine aerosol emissions using resonance-enhanced multiphoton ionisation and proton transfer mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Radischat, Christian; Sippula, Olli; Stengel, Benjamin; Klingbeil, Sophie; Sklorz, Martin; Rabe, Rom; Streibel, Thorsten; Harndorf, Horst; Zimmermann, Ralf

    2015-08-01

    Organic combustion aerosols from a marine medium-speed diesel engine, capable to run on distillate (diesel fuel) and residual fuels (heavy fuel oil), were investigated under various operating conditions and engine parameters. The online chemical characterisation of the organic components was conducted using a resonance-enhanced multiphoton ionisation time-of-flight mass spectrometer (REMPI TOF MS) and a proton transfer reaction-quadrupole mass spectrometer (PTR-QMS). Oxygenated species, alkenes and aromatic hydrocarbons were characterised. Especially the aromatic hydrocarbons and their alkylated derivatives were very prominent in the exhaust of both fuels. Emission factors of known health-hazardous compounds (e.g. mono- and poly-aromatic hydrocarbons) were calculated and found in higher amounts for heavy fuel oil (HFO) at typical engine loadings. Lower engine loads lead in general to increasing emissions for both fuels for almost every compound, e.g. naphthalene emissions varied for diesel fuel exhaust between 0.7 mg/kWh (75 % engine load, late start of injection (SOI)) and 11.8 mg/kWh (10 % engine load, late SOI) and for HFO exhaust between 3.3 and 60.5 mg/kWh, respectively. Both used mass spectrometric techniques showed that they are particularly suitable methods for online monitoring of combustion compounds and very helpful for the characterisation of health-relevant substances. Graphical abstract Three-dimensional REMPI data of organic species in diesel fuel and heavy fuel oil exhaust.

  4. Dietary exposure to, and internal organ transfer of, selected halogenated organic compounds in birds eating fish from the Southern Baltic.

    PubMed

    Falkowska, Lucyna; Reindl, Andrzej R

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the effect of a marine diet on the accumulation, magnification, maternal transfer and detoxification of chlorinated organic pollutants on the highest trophic level in the Baltic Sea. Results showed that birds eating whole herring received the highest doses of herbicides > pesticides > fungicides > polychlorinated dibenzofurans (PCDFs) > polychlorinated dibenzo-para-dioxins (PCDDs). The toxicity of PCDD/Fs in a penguin's 24-h alimentary exposure was estimated at 7.77 ng TEQ-WHO2005. Among pesticides, the highest concentrations--both in fish and penguin tissue--were those of the pp-DDE isomer. In terms of herbicides, simazine and terbutrine were predominant. The majority of Persistent Organic Pollutants (POPs) underwent accumulation and magnification, and these factors were observed to increase with the birds' age. Guano was found to be an effective means of elimination for all of the studied xenobiotics. Maternal transfer of PCDD/Fs into eggs from internal tissues was most prominent for highly chlorinated dioxins and low chlorinated furans. PMID:26121018

  5. Effectiveness of a Closed-System Transfer Device in Reducing Surface Contamination in a New Antineoplastic Drug-Compounding Unit: A Prospective, Controlled, Parallel Study

    PubMed Central

    Pinturaud, Marine; Soichot, Marion; Richeval, Camille; Humbert, Luc; Lebecque, Michèle; Sidikou, Ousseini; Barthelemy, Christine; Bonnabry, Pascal; Allorge, Delphine; Décaudin, Bertrand; Odou, Pascal

    2016-01-01

    Background The objective of this randomized, prospective and controlled study was to investigate the ability of a closed-system transfer device (CSTD; BD-Phaseal) to reduce the occupational exposure of two isolators to 10 cytotoxic drugs and compare to standard compounding devices. Methods and Findings The 6-month study started with the opening of a new compounding unit. Two isolators were set up with 2 workstations each, one to compound with standard devices (needles and spikes) and the other using the Phaseal system. Drugs were alternatively compounded in each isolator. Sampling involved wiping three surfaces (gloves, window, worktop), before and after a cleaning process. Exposure to ten antineoplastic drugs (cyclophosphamide, ifosfamide, dacarbazine, 5-FU, methotrexate, gemcitabine, cytarabine, irinotecan, doxorubicine and ganciclovir) was assessed on wipes by LC-MS/MS analysis. Contamination rates were compared using a Chi2 test and drug amounts by a Mann-Whitney test. Significance was defined for p<0.05. Overall contamination was lower in the “Phaseal” isolator than in the “Standard” isolator (12.24% vs. 26.39%; p < 0.0001) although it differed according to drug. Indeed, the contamination rates of gemcitabine were 49.3 and 43.4% (NS) for the Standard and Phaseal isolators, respectively, whereas for ganciclovir, they were 54.2 and 2.8% (p<0.0001). Gemcitabine amounts were 220.6 and 283.6 ng for the Standard and Phaseal isolators (NS), and ganciclovir amounts were 179.9 and 2.4 ng (p<0.0001). Conclusion This study confirms that using a CSTD may significantly decrease the chemical contamination of barrier isolators compared to standard devices for some drugs, although it does not eliminate contamination totally. PMID:27391697

  6. Helium Diffusion in Olivine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cherniak, D. J.; Watson, E. B.

    2011-12-01

    Diffusion of helium has been characterized in natural Fe-bearing olivine (~Fo90) and synthetic forsterite. Polished, oriented slabs of olivine were implanted with 3He, at 100 keV at a dose of 5x1015/cm2 or at 3.0 MeV at a dose of 1x1016/cm2. A set of experiments on the implanted olivine were run in 1-atm furnaces. In addition to the one-atm experiments, experiments on implanted samples were also run at higher pressures (2.6 and 2.7 GPa) to assess the potential effects of pressure on He diffusion and the applicability of the measured diffusivities in describing He transport in the mantle. The high-pressure experiments were conducted in a piston-cylinder apparatus using an "ultra-soft" pressure cell, with the diffusion sample directly surrounded by AgCl. 3He distributions following experiments were measured with Nuclear Reaction Analysis using the reaction 3He(d,p)4He. This direct profiling method permits us to evaluate anisotropy of diffusion, which cannot be easily assessed using bulk-release methods. For diffusion in forsterite parallel to c we obtain the following Arrhenius relation over the temperatures 250-950°C: D = 3.91x10-6exp(-159 ± 4 kJ mol-1/RT) m2/sec. The data define a single Arrhenius line spanning more than 7 orders of magnitude in D and 700°C in temperature. Diffusion parallel to a appears slightly slower, yielding an activation energy for diffusion of 135 kJ/mol and a pre-exponential factor of 3.73x10-8 m2/sec. Diffusion parallel to b is slower than diffusion parallel to a (by about two-thirds of a log unit); for this orientation an activation energy of 138 kJ/mol and a pre-exponential factor of 1.34x10-8 m2/sec are obtained. This anisotropy is broadly consistent with observations for diffusion of Ni and Fe-Mg in olivine. Diffusion in Fe-bearing olivine (transport parallel to b) agrees within uncertainty with findings for He diffusion in forsterite. The higher-pressure experiments yield diffusivities in agreement with those from the 1-atm

  7. Carbon Shell or Core Ignitions in White Dwarfs Accreting from Helium Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brooks, Jared; Bildsten, Lars; Schwab, Josiah; Paxton, Bill

    2016-04-01

    White dwarfs accreting from helium stars can stably burn at the accreted rate and avoid the challenge of mass loss associated with unstable helium burning that is a concern for many SNe Ia scenarios. We study binaries with helium stars of mass 1.25{M}⊙ ≤slant {M}{{He}}≤slant 1.8{M}⊙ , which have lost their hydrogen rich envelopes in an earlier common envelope event and now orbit with periods ({P}{{orb}}) of several hours with non-rotating 0.84 and 1.0{M}⊙ C/O WDs. The helium stars fill their Roche lobes after exhaustion of central helium and donate helium on their thermal timescales (˜ {10}5 years). As shown by others, these mass transfer rates coincide with the steady helium burning range for WDs, and grow the WD core up to near the Chandrasekhar mass ({M}{{Ch}}) and a core carbon ignition. We show here, however, that many of these scenarios lead to an ignition of hot carbon ashes near the outer edge of the WD and an inward going carbon flame that does not cause an explosive outcome. For {P}{{orb}}=3 hr, 1.0{M}⊙ C/O WDs with donor masses {M}{{He}}≳ 1.8{M}⊙ experience a shell carbon ignition, while {M}{{He}}≲ 1.3{M}⊙ will fall below the steady helium burning range and undergo helium flashes before reaching core C ignition. Those with 1.3{M}⊙ ≲ {M}{{He}}≲ 1.7{M}⊙ will experience a core C ignition. We also calculate the retention fraction of accreted helium when the accretion rate leads to recurrent weak helium flashes.

  8. On-road measurements of volatile organic compounds in the Mexico City metropolitan area using proton transfer reaction mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rogers, T. M.; Grimsrud, E. P.; Herndon, S. C.; Jayne, J. T.; Kolb, C. Ee; Allwine, E.; Westberg, H.; Lamb, B. K.; Zavala, M.; Molina, L. T.; Molina, M. J.; Knighton, W. B.

    2006-05-01

    A proton transfer reaction mass spectrometer (PTR-MS) was redesigned and deployed to monitor selected hydrocarbon emissions from in-use vehicles as part of the Mexico City Metropolitan Area (MCMA) 2003 field campaign. This modified PTR-MS instrument provides the necessary time response (<2 s total cycle time) and sensitivity to monitor the rapidly changing hydrocarbon concentrations, within intercepted dilute exhaust emission plumes. Selected hydrocarbons including methanol, acetaldehyde, acetone, methyl tertiary butyl ether (MTBE), benzene and toluene were among the vehicle exhaust emission components monitored. A comparison with samples collected in canisters and analyzed by gas chromatography provides validation to the interpretation of the ion assignments and the concentrations derived using the PTR-MS. The simultaneous detection of multiple hydrocarbons in dilute vehicle exhaust plumes provides a valuable tool to study the impact of driving behavior on the exhaust gas emissions.

  9. Electronic structure of novel charge transfer compounds: application of Fermi orbital self-interaction corrected density functional theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hahn, Torsten; Rückerl, Florian; Liebing, Simon; Pederson, Mark

    We present our experimental and theoretical results on novel Picene/F4TCNQ and Manganese-Phthalocyanine/F4TCNQ donor / acceptor systems. We apply the recently developed Fermi-orbital based approach for self-interaction corrected density functional theory (FO-SIC DFT) to these materials and compare the results to standard DFT calculations and to experimental data obtained by photoemission spectroscopy. We focus our analysis on the description of the magnitude of the ground state charge transfer and on the details of the formed hybrid orbitals. Further, we show that for weakly bound donor / acceptor systems the FO-SIC approach delivers a more realistic description of the electronic structure compared to standard DFT calculations Support by DFG FOR1154 is greatly acknowledged.

  10. Modeling the heat and mass transfers in temperature-swing adsorption of volatile organic compounds onto activated carbons

    SciTech Connect

    Sylvain Giraudet; Pascaline Pre; Pierre Le Cloirec

    2009-02-15

    A theoretical model was built to simulate the adsorption of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) onto activated carbons in a fixed bed. This model was validated on a set of experimental data obtained for the adsorption of acetone, ethyl formate, and dichloromethane onto five commercial activated carbons. The influence of operating conditions was modeled with various VOC contents at the inlet of the adsorber and superficial velocities of the gas-phase from 0.14 to 0.28 m.s{sup -1}. Breakthrough times and maximum temperature rises were computed with a coefficient of determination of 0.988 and 0.901, respectively. The simulation was then extended to the adsorption of mixtures of VOCs. From the comparison of simulation and experimental results, the advantage of accounting for dispersions of heat and mass is shown and the importance in taking into account the temperature effect on the equilibrium data is demonstrated. 29 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  11. COSMIC-RAY HELIUM HARDENING

    SciTech Connect

    Ohira, Yutaka; Ioka, Kunihito

    2011-03-01

    Recent observations by the CREAM and ATIC-2 experiments suggest that (1) the spectrum of cosmic-ray (CR) helium is harder than that of CR protons below the knee energy, 10{sup 15}eV, and (2) all CR spectra become hard at {approx}>10{sup 11}eV nucleon{sup -1}. We propose a new idea, that higher energy CRs are generated in a more helium-rich region, to explain the hardening without introducing different sources for CR helium. The helium-to-proton ratio at {approx}100 TeV exceeds the Big Bang abundance Y = 0.25 by several times, and the different spectrum is not reproduced within the diffusive shock acceleration theory. We argue that CRs are produced in a chemically enriched region, such as a superbubble, and the outward-decreasing abundance naturally leads to the hard spectrum of CR helium if CRs escape from the supernova remnant shock in an energy-dependent way. We provide a simple analytical spectrum that also fits well the hardening due to the decreasing Mach number in the hot superbubble with {approx}10{sup 6} K. Our model predicts hard and concave spectra for heavier CR elements.

  12. Exchange-spring like magnetic behavior of the tetragonal Heusler compound Mn2FeGa as a candidate for spin-transfer torque

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gasi, Teuta; Nayak, Ajaya K.; Winterlik, Jürgen; Ksenofontov, Vadim; Adler, Peter; Nicklas, Michael; Felser, Claudia

    2013-05-01

    We report structural, magnetic, and Mössbauer studies of the Heusler compound Mn2FeGa. Theoretical calculations predict that a tetragonal phase in Mn2FeGa could be an interesting candidate for spin torque transfer applications due to the presence of perpendicular magnetic anisotropy. Experimentally, we found that Mn2FeGa crystallizes in a tetragonal structure after annealing at low temperatures (≤400 °C), whereas, it becomes pseudocubic for higher annealing temperatures. The sample annealed at 400 °C shows a high Curie temperature of 650 K and a hard-magnetic behavior. We observed a nonsaturating and exchange-spring type of hysteresis loops, which indicates that the sample contains two different magnetic states. The Mössbauer measurements clearly support the structural and magnetic data. All these properties make the material a potential candidate for spintronic devices, especially in thin films with perpendicular magnetic anisotropy.

  13. The Arctic seasonal snow pack as a transfer mechanism and a reactor for lower atmosphere chemical compounds (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Douglas, T. A.

    2013-12-01

    The Polar Regions are snow covered for two thirds of the year (or longer) and in many locations there are few melt events during the winter. As a consequence, the late winter snow pack presents a spatial and temporal archive of the previous winter's precipitation, snow-atmosphere exchange, and within snow pack physical and chemical processes. However, to use the snow pack as a 'sensor' we have to understand the physical and chemical exchange processes between atmospheric compounds and snow and ice surfaces. Of equal importance is knowledge of the reactions that occur in and on snow and ice particle surfaces. Recent research has provided insights on the pathways individual compounds take from the lower atmosphere to snow and on the physical and chemical processes occurring within the snow pack at a variety of scales. Snow on or near sea ice has markedly higher major ion concentrations than snow on the terrestrial snow pack, most notably for chloride and bromide. This difference in chemical composition can be dramatic even in coastal regions where the land is only hundreds of meters away. As a consequence, we have to treat chemical cycling processes in/on snow on sea ice and snow on land differently. Since these halogens, particularly bromine, play critical roles in the spring time photochemical reactions that oxidize ozone and mercury their presence and fate on the sea ice snow pack is of particular interest. A future Arctic is expected to have a thinner, more dynamic sea ice cover that will arrive later and melt earlier. The areal extent of young ice production will likely increase markedly. This would lead to a different snow depositional and chemical regime on sea ice with potential ramifications for chemical exchange with the lower atmosphere. The roles of clear sky precipitation ('diamond dust') and surface hoar deposition in providing a unique lower atmospheric 'reactor' and potential source of water equivalence have been largely overlooked. This despite the

  14. Control of volatile organic compounds indoors—Development of an integrated mass-transfer-based model and its application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Feng; Niu, Jianlei

    Building envelopes are usually comprised of several different layers of building materials, which may alternatively act as VOC sources or sinks depending on their emission and sorption potentials and the indoor environmental conditions as well. In this research, a whole room IAQ model consisting of multi-phase emission/sorption model for wall materials and room volume mass balance model catering for practical ventilation schemes was developed. The interactions of VOC and building materials composing different building components can be modeled based on fundamental mass transfer theories. The effects of various construction materials and ventilation strategies on the emission characteristics were investigated. Results show that measures like pre-occupancy flush-out, lead-time ventilation, etc. have substantial impacts on indoor VOC concentration and the model can successfully handle different building scenarios. Although more rigorous validation, in particular more experimental verification, is needed, the proposed model has proven to be valuable in handling different building scenarios. It is useful in analyzing the levels of contaminant buildup that would occur during no ventilation period for intermittent ventilation situations and in determining the amount of outdoor air and the lead-time period required to flush out the contaminants prior to occupancy. It is likely to be a simple routine tool for building owners, designers and operators to attain acceptable indoor VOC concentration level.

  15. Binding of a cyclic organoselenium compound with gold nanoparticles (GNP) and its effect on electron transfer properties.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Pavitra V; Singh, Beena G; Maiti, Nandita; Iwaoka, Michio; Priyadarsini, K Indira

    2014-12-15

    Binding of a cyclic organoselenium compound, DL-trans-3,4-dihydroxy-1-selenolane (DHSred) with gold nanoparticles (GNP) of different sizes was studied by absorption spectroscopy, dynamic light scattering (DLS), transmission electron microscope (TEM), surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) and zeta-potential (ζ) measurements. GNP of different size were synthesized by varying the reaction conditions and their size was determined by DLS and TEM techniques. The absorption spectral data showed red shift in the surface plasmon resonance (SPR) band indicating increase in the size of GNP on binding to DHSred. SERS studies confirmed that the binding of DHSred with GNP is through selenium center with planar orientation of DHSred on the GNP surface. The product of the number of binding sites (n) in GNP and the binding constant (K) was estimated for GNP of different particle size. The zeta potential (ζ) value of GNP decreased marginally in the presence of DHSred. Further, the binding of DHSred with GNP was found to enhance its reactivity with 2,2'-azino-bis(3-ethylbenzthiazoline-6-sulfonic acid) radicals (ABTS(·-)) and the reactivity increased with decrease in the GNP size. Such enhancement in the reducing ability may have a greater impact on the antioxidant activity of DHSred. PMID:25268822

  16. Role of phosphate-containing compounds in the transfer of indium-111 and gallium-67 from transferrin to ferritin.

    PubMed

    Weiner, R E

    1989-01-01

    Physiologic concentrations of ATP stimulate the translocation of gallium-67 (67Ga) from human transferrin (TF) to horse ferritin (HoFE). The mechanism of this translocation was examined. One millimolar ATP did not speed the binding of 67Ga or indium-111 (111In) to HoFE. ATP and pyrophosphate (PPi) at 1 mM, did not form high affinity complexes with 67Ga or 111In. ATP and PPi interacted directly with the [67Ga]TF complex and could within minutes increase the amount of nonprotein-bound 67Ga. Serum HCO3- concentration, 30 mM, prevented the ATP-induced dissociation of 67Ga from TF, whereas intracellular concentrations (0.4 and 5 mM) did not. Using a dialysis technique, ATP also stimulated the translocation of 111In from TF to HoFE; however, this process was much slower than with 67Ga. ATP caused an increase in the nonprotein-bound 111In compared to the control. These results suggest the formation of nonprotein-bound nuclide by these phosphate-containing compounds in a kinetically labile form is important to the translocation mechanism. PMID:2536083

  17. International solar polar mission: The vector helium magnetometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1982-01-01

    The functional requirements for the vector helium magnetometer (VHM) on the Solar Polar spacecraft are presented. The VHM is one of the two magnetometers on board that will measure the vector magnetic field along the Earth to Jupiter transfer trajectory, as well as in the vicinity of Jupiter and along the solar polar orbit following the Jupiter encounter. The interconnection between these two magnetometers and their shared data processing unit is illustrated.

  18. Counting Electrons on Liquid Helium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glasson, Phillip

    2004-03-01

    Electrons on liquid helium, localised in an array of quantum dots, have been proposed as condensed matter qubits [M.I.Dykman et al. Phys.Rev. B 67, 155402 (2003)]. The ground and first excited Rydberg states in the vertical potential well on the helium surface would represent |0> and |1>. This requires (a) novel electronic devices on helium using microstructured substrates, (b) excitation of Rydberg states using millimetric microwaves and (c) detection of individual electrons and their quantum states. Progress in meeting these challenges will be presented. An AC-coupled Field Effect Transistor (FET) has been made on GaAs, using free electrons on suspended liquid helium microchannels, 16 micron wide and 1.6 microns deep [P.Glasson et al, Phys.Rev.Lett. 87 176802 (2001)]. The microwave absorption to the first excited Rydberg state near 200 GHz has been measured below 1 K [E.Collin et al. Phys.Rev.Lett. 89, 245301 (2002)], where the temperature-dependent contribution to the linewidth is small. High values of the ratio of the Rabi frequency to the linewidth are obtained. Electrons are trapped on a 5 micron diameter pool of superfluid helium, above a single-electron-transistor (SET) as a detector. The pool is charged from a surface electron reservoir and we count the electrons into and out of the trap. Individual electrons can be stored, detected and counted: the next stage is quantum state detection. The prospects for qubits and quantum information processing with electrons on helium will be assessed.

  19. Pulsed helium ionization detection system

    DOEpatents

    Ramsey, Roswitha S.; Todd, Richard A.

    1987-01-01

    A helium ionization detection system is provided which produces stable operation of a conventional helium ionization detector while providing improved sensitivity and linearity. Stability is improved by applying pulsed dc supply voltage across the ionization detector, thereby modifying the sampling of the detectors output current. A unique pulse generator is used to supply pulsed dc to the detector which has variable width and interval adjust features that allows up to 500 V to be applied in pulse widths ranging from about 150 nsec to about dc conditions.

  20. Pulsed helium ionization detection system

    DOEpatents

    Ramsey, R.S.; Todd, R.A.

    1985-04-09

    A helium ionization detection system is provided which produces stable operation of a conventional helium ionization detector while providing improved sensitivity and linearity. Stability is improved by applying pulsed dc supply voltage across the ionization detector, thereby modifying the sampling of the detectors output current. A unique pulse generator is used to supply pulsed dc to the detector which has variable width and interval adjust features that allows up to 500 V to be applied in pulse widths ranging from about 150 nsec to about dc conditions.

  1. Controlling Interfacial Reactions and Intermetallic Compound Growth at the Interface of a Lead-free Solder Joint with Layer-by-Layer Transferred Graphene.

    PubMed

    Ko, Yong-Ho; Lee, Jong-Dae; Yoon, Taeshik; Lee, Chang-Woo; Kim, Taek-Soo

    2016-03-01

    The immoderate growth of intermetallic compounds (IMCs) formed at the interface of a solder metal and the substrate during soldering can degrade the mechanical properties and reliability of a solder joint in electronic packaging. Therefore, it is critical to control IMC growth at the solder joints between the solder and the substrate. In this study, we investigated the control of interfacial reactions and IMC growth by the layer-by-layer transfer of graphene during the reflow process at the interface between Sn-3.0Ag-0.5Cu (in wt %) lead-free solder and Cu. As the number of graphene layers transferred onto the surface of the Cu substrate increased, the thickness of the total IMC (Cu6Sn5 and Cu3Sn) layer decreased. After 10 repetitions of the reflow process for 50 s above 217 °C, the melting temperature of Sn-3.0Ag-0.5Cu, with a peak temperature of 250 °C, the increase in thickness of the total IMC layer at the interface with multiple layers of graphene was decreased by more than 20% compared to that at the interface of bare Cu without graphene. Furthermore, the average diameter of the Cu6Sn5 scallops at the interface with multiple layers of graphene was smaller than that at the interface without graphene. Despite 10 repetitions of the reflow process, the growth of Cu3Sn at the interface with multiple layers of graphene was suppressed by more than 20% compared with that at the interface without graphene. The multiple layers of graphene at the interface between the solder metal and the Cu substrate hindered the diffusion of Cu atoms from the Cu substrate and suppressed the reactions between Cu and Sn in the solder. Thus, the multiple layers of graphene transferred at the interface between dissimilar metals can control the interfacial reaction and IMC growth occurring at the joining interface. PMID:26856638

  2. In cleanroom, sub-ppb real-time monitoring of volatile organic compounds using proton-transfer reaction/time of flight/mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayeck, Nathalie; Maillot, Philippe; Vitrani, Thomas; Pic, Nicolas; Wortham, Henri; Gligorovski, Sasho; Temime-Roussel, Brice; Mizzi, Aurélie; Poulet, Irène

    2014-04-01

    Refractory compounds such as Trimethylsilanol (TMS) and other organic compounds such as propylene glycol methyl ether acetate (PGMEA) used in the photolithography area of microelectronic cleanrooms have irreversible dramatic impact on optical lenses used on photolithography tools. There is a need for real-time, continuous measurements of organic contaminants in representative cleanroom environment especially in lithography zone. Such information is essential to properly evaluate the impact of organic contamination on optical lenses. In this study, a Proton-Transfer Reaction-Time-of-Flight Mass spectrometer (PTR-TOF-MS) was applied for real-time and continuous monitoring of fugitive organic contamination induced by the fabrication process. Three types of measurements were carried out using the PTR-TOF-MS in order to detect the volatile organic compounds (VOCs) next to the tools in the photolithography area and at the upstream and downstream of chemical filters used to purge the air in the cleanroom environment. A validation and verification of the results obtained with PTR-TOF-MS was performed by comparing these results with those obtained with an off-line technique that is Automated Thermal Desorber - Gas Chromatography - Mass Spectrometry (ATD-GC-MS) used as a reference analytical method. The emerged results from the PTR-TOF-MS analysis exhibited the temporal variation of the VOCs levels in the cleanroom environment during the fabrication process. While comparing the results emerging from the two techniques, a good agreement was found between the results obtained with PTR-TOF-MS and those obtained with ATD-GC-MS for the PGMEA, toluene and xylene. Regarding TMS, a significant difference was observed ascribed to the technical performance of both instruments.

  3. HELIUM CORE WHITE DWARFS IN CATACLYSMIC VARIABLES

    SciTech Connect

    Shen, Ken J.; Bildsten, Lars; Idan, Irit

    2009-11-01

    Binary evolution predicts a population of helium core (M < 0.5 M{sub sun}) white dwarfs (WDs) that are slowly accreting hydrogen-rich material from low-mass main-sequence or brown dwarf donors with orbital periods less than 4 hr. Four binaries are presently known in the Milky Way that will reach such a mass-transferring state in a few Gyr. Despite these predictions and observations of progenitor binaries, there are still no secure cases of helium core WDs among the mass-transferring cataclysmic variables. This led us to calculate the fate of He WDs once accretion begins at a rate M-dot<10{sup -10}M-odot yr{sup -1} set by angular momentum losses. We show here that the cold He core temperatures (T{sub c} < 10{sup 7} K) and low M-dot thermonuclear runaway. Shara and collaborators noted that these large accumulated masses may lead to exceptionally long classical nova (CN) events. For a typical donor star of 0.2 M{sub sun}, such binaries will only yield a few hundred CNe, making these events rare among all CNe. We calculate the reheating of the accreting WD, allowing a comparison to the measured WD effective temperatures in quiescent dwarf novae and raising the possibility that WD seismology may be the best way to confirm the presence of a He WD. We also find that a very long (>1000 yr) stable burning phase occurs after the CN outburst, potentially explaining enigmatic short orbital period supersoft sources like RX J0537-7034 (P{sub orb} = 3.5 hr) and 1E 0035.4-7230 (P{sub orb} = 4.1 hr).

  4. Helium release during shale deformation: Experimental validation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bauer, Stephen J.; Gardner, W. Payton; Heath, Jason E.

    2016-07-01

    This work describes initial experimental results of helium tracer release monitoring during deformation of shale. Naturally occurring radiogenic 4He is present in high concentration in most shales. During rock deformation, accumulated helium could be released as fractures are created and new transport pathways are created. We present the results of an experimental study in which confined reservoir shale samples, cored parallel and perpendicular to bedding, which were initially saturated with helium to simulate reservoir conditions, are subjected to triaxial compressive deformation. During the deformation experiment, differential stress, axial, and radial strains are systematically tracked. Release of helium is dynamically measured using a helium mass spectrometer leak detector. Helium released during deformation is observable at the laboratory scale and the release is tightly coupled to the shale deformation. These first measurements of dynamic helium release from rocks undergoing deformation show that helium provides information on the evolution of microstructure as a function of changes in stress and strain.

  5. D0 Silicon Upgrade: Commissioning Test Results for D-Zero's Helium Refrigerator

    SciTech Connect

    Rucinski, Russ; /Fermilab

    1997-06-30

    The test objectives are: (1) Make liquid helium and measure refrigerator capacity; (2) Measure liquid helium dewar heat leak, transfer line heat leak, and liquid nitrogen consumption rates; (3) Operate all cryogenic transfer lines; (4) Get some running time on all components; (5) Debug mechanical components, instrumentation, DMACs user interface, tune loops, and otherwise shake out any problems; (6) Get some operating time in to get familiar with system behavior; (7) Revise and/or improve operating procedures to actual practice; and (8) Identify areas for future improvement. D-Zero's stand alone helium refrigerator (STAR) liquified helium at a rate of 114 L/hr. This is consistent with other STAR installations. Refrigeration capacity was not measured due to lack of a calibrated heat load. Measured heat leaks were within design values. The helium dewar loss was measured at 2 to 4 watts or 9% per day, the solenoid and VLPC helium transfer lines had a heat leak of about 20 watts each. The liquid nitrogen consumption rates of the mobile purifier, STAR, and LN2 subcooler were measured at 20 gph, 20 to 64 gph, and 3 gph respectively. All cryogenic transfer lines including the solenoid and visible light photon counter (VLPC) transfer lines were cooled to their cryogenic operating temperatures. This included independent cooling of nitrogen shields and liquid helium components. No major problems were observed. The system ran quite well. Many problems were identified and corrected as they came up. Areas for improvement were noted and will be implemented in the future. The instrumentation and control system operated commendably during the test. The commissioning test run was a worthwhile and successful venture.

  6. 21 CFR 582.1355 - Helium.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Helium. 582.1355 Section 582.1355 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS... Helium. (a) Product. Helium. (b) Conditions of use. This substance is generally recognized as safe...

  7. 43 CFR 3100.1 - Helium.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Helium. 3100.1 Section 3100.1 Public Lands: Interior Regulations Relating to Public Lands (Continued) BUREAU OF LAND MANAGEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE... Helium. The ownership of and the right to extract helium from all gas produced from lands leased...

  8. 43 CFR 3100.1 - Helium.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Helium. 3100.1 Section 3100.1 Public Lands: Interior Regulations Relating to Public Lands (Continued) BUREAU OF LAND MANAGEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE... Helium. The ownership of and the right to extract helium from all gas produced from lands leased...

  9. 21 CFR 582.1355 - Helium.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Helium. 582.1355 Section 582.1355 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS... Helium. (a) Product. Helium. (b) Conditions of use. This substance is generally recognized as safe...

  10. 21 CFR 582.1355 - Helium.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Helium. 582.1355 Section 582.1355 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS... Helium. (a) Product. Helium. (b) Conditions of use. This substance is generally recognized as safe...

  11. 30 CFR 556.11 - Helium.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Helium. 556.11 Section 556.11 Mineral Resources... § 556.11 Helium. (a) Each lease issued or continued under these regulations shall be subject to a... helium from all gas produced from the leased area. (b) In case the United States elects to take...

  12. 30 CFR 556.11 - Helium.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Helium. 556.11 Section 556.11 Mineral Resources... § 556.11 Helium. (a) Each lease issued or continued under these regulations shall be subject to a... helium from all gas produced from the leased area. (b) In case the United States elects to take...

  13. 43 CFR 3100.1 - Helium.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Helium. 3100.1 Section 3100.1 Public Lands: Interior Regulations Relating to Public Lands (Continued) BUREAU OF LAND MANAGEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE... Helium. The ownership of and the right to extract helium from all gas produced from lands leased...

  14. 30 CFR 556.11 - Helium.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Helium. 556.11 Section 556.11 Mineral Resources... § 556.11 Helium. (a) Each lease issued or continued under these regulations shall be subject to a... helium from all gas produced from the leased area. (b) In case the United States elects to take...

  15. Multipurpose top for liquid helium Dewar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murphy, R. S.; Anderholm, J. R.

    1972-01-01

    Multipurpose top was fabricated for liquid helium Dewar flask which guards against flash vaporization of liquid helium and allows boiling temperature of liquid helium to be lowered by reduction of ambient pressure in Dewar flask. Device is rugged and simple, and does not require frequent calibrations or adjustments.

  16. Applying the helium ionization detector in chromatography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gibson, E. K.; Andrawes, F. F.; Brazell, R. S.

    1981-01-01

    High noise levels and oversensitivity of helium detector make flame-ionization and thermal-conductivity detectors more suitable for chromotography. Deficiencies are eliminated by modifying helium device to operate in saturation rather than multiplication mode. Result is low background current, low noise, high stability, and high sensitivity. Detector analyzes halocarbons, hydrocarbons, hydrogen cyanide, ammonia, and inorganics without requiring expensive research-grade helium.

  17. 21 CFR 582.1355 - Helium.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Helium. 582.1355 Section 582.1355 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS... Helium. (a) Product. Helium. (b) Conditions of use. This substance is generally recognized as safe...

  18. 21 CFR 582.1355 - Helium.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Helium. 582.1355 Section 582.1355 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS... Helium. (a) Product. Helium. (b) Conditions of use. This substance is generally recognized as safe...

  19. 43 CFR 3100.1 - Helium.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Helium. 3100.1 Section 3100.1 Public Lands: Interior Regulations Relating to Public Lands (Continued) BUREAU OF LAND MANAGEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE... Helium. The ownership of and the right to extract helium from all gas produced from lands leased...

  20. An investigation of thermally driven acoustical oscillations in helium systems

    SciTech Connect

    Fuerst, J.D.

    1990-08-01

    The phenomenon of thermal-acoustic oscillation is seen to arise spontaneously in gas columns subjected to steep temperature gradients, particularly in tubes connecting liquid helium reservoirs with the ambient environment. This if often the arrangement for installed cryogenic instrumentation and is accompanied by undesirably large heat transfer rates to the cold region. Experimental data are collected and matched to theoretical predictions of oscillatory behavior; these results are in good agreement with the analytical model and with previously collected data. The present experiment places the open ends of oscillating tubes of the various lengths and cross sections in communication with flowing helium in the subcooled, 2-phase, or superheated state while the other ends are maintained at some controlled, elevated temperature. Assorted cold end conditions are achieved through adjustments to the Fermilab Tevatron satellite test refrigerator to which the test cryostat is connected. The warm, closed ends of the tubes are maintained by isothermal baths of liquid nitrogen, ice water, and boiling water. The method is contrasted to previous arrangements whereby tubes are run from room temperature into or adjacent to a stagnant pool of liquid helium. Additionally, the effect of pulsations in the flowing helium stream is explored through operation of the refrigerator's wet and dry expanders during data collection. These data confirm the theory to which try were compared and support its use in the design of cryogenic sensing lines for avoidance of thermoacoustic oscillation.

  1. Vortex Rings in Superfluid Helium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alamri, Sultan Z.; Barenghi, Carlo F.

    2008-11-01

    We present results of numerical simulations of large-scale vortex rings in superfluid helium. These large-scale vortex rings consists of many discrete (quantized) vortex filaments which interact with each other moving according to the Biot-Savart law. Lifetime, structural stability and speed of large-scale vortex rings will be discussed and compared to experimental results.

  2. Why Helium Ends in "-Ium"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jensen, William B.; Holme, Thomas; Cooper, Melanie; White, Carol

    2004-01-01

    Edward Frankland and Norman Lockyer researched upon a gaseous spectra in relation to the physical constitution of the sun and named it as "helium" (from Greek "helios" meaning "sun"). Since Lockyer apparently never formally proposed the name in print, it is not known why he chose to use a metallic end "ium".

  3. Helium diffusion in the sun

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bahcall, J. N.; Pinsonneault, M. H.

    1992-01-01

    We calculate improved standard solar models using the new Livermore (OPAL) opacity tables, an accurate (exportable) nuclear energy generation routine which takes account of recent measurements and analyses, and the recent Anders-Grevesse determination of heavy element abundances. We also evaluate directly the effect of the diffusion of helium with respect to hydrogen on the calculated neutrino fluxes, on the primordial solar helium abundance, and on the depth of the convective zone. Helium diffusion increases the predicted event rates by about 0.8 SNU, or 11 percent of the total rate, in the chlorine solar neutrino experiment, by about 3.5 SNU, or 3 percent, in the gallium solar neutrino experiments, and by about 12 percent in the Kamiokande and SNO solar neutrino experiments. The best standard solar model including helium diffusion and the most accurate nuclear parameters, element abundances, and radiative opacity predicts a value of 8.0 SNU +/- 3.0 SNU for the C1-37 experiment and 132 +21/-17 SNU for the Ga - 71 experiment, where the uncertainties include 3 sigma errors for all measured input parameters.

  4. Structures of CoII and ZnII complexes of the proton-transfer compound derived from pyrazine-2,3-dicarboxylic acid and piperazine.

    PubMed

    Ghadermazi, Mohammad; Gharamaleki, Jafar Attar; Olmstead, Marilyn M; Almasi, Mehdi

    2015-07-01

    The reaction of the proton-transfer compound piperazine-1,4-diium pyrazine-2,3-dicarboxylate 4.5-hydrate, C4H12N2(2+)·C6H2N2O4(2-)·4.5H2O or (pipzH2)(pyzdc)·4.5H2O (pyzdcH2 is pyrazine-2,3-dicarboxylic acid and pipz is piperazine), (I), with Zn(NO3)2·6H2O and CoCl2·6H2O results in the formation of bis(piperazine-1,4-diium) bis(μ-pyrazine-2,3-dicarboxylato)-κ(3)N(1),O(2):O(3);κ(3)O(3):N(1),O(2)-bis[aqua(pyrazine-2,3-dicarboxylato-κ(2)N(1),O(2))zinc(II)] decahydrate, (C4H12N2)2[Zn2(C6H2N2O4)4(H2O)2]·10H2O or (pipzH2)2[Zn(pyzdc)2(H2O)]2·10H2O, (II), and catena-poly[piperazine-1,4-diium [cobalt(II)-bis(μ-pyrazine-2,3-dicarboxylato)-κ(3)N(1),O(2):O(3);κ(3)O(3):N(1),O(2)] hexahydrate], {(C4H12N2)[Co(C6H2N2O4)2]·6H2O}n or {(pipzH2)[Co(pyzdc)2]·6H2O}n, (III), respectively. In (I), pyzdcH2 is doubly deprotonated on reaction with piperazine as a base. Compound (II) crystallizes as a dimer, whereas compound (III) exists as a one-dimensional coordination polymer. In (II), two pyzdc(2-) groups chelate to each of the two Zn(II) atoms through a ring N atom and an O atom of the 2-carboxylate group. In one ligand, the adjacent 3-carboxylate group bridges to a neighbouring metal atom. A water molecule ligates in the sixth coordination site. The structure of (II) can be described as a commensurate superlattice due to an ordering in the hydrogen-bonded network. In (III), no water is coordinated to the metal atom and the coordination sphere is comprised of two N,O-chelates plus two bridging O atoms. A large number of hydrogen bonds are observed in all three compounds. These interactions, as well as π-π and C=O...π stacking interactions, play important structural roles. PMID:26146390

  5. Geomagnetically trapped energetic helium nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, J.; Gregory Guzik, T.; Wefel, J.P.; Roger Pyle, K.; Cooper, J.F.

    1996-07-01

    Geomagnetically trapped helium nuclei, at high energy ({approximately}40{endash}100 MeV/nucleon), have been measured by the ONR-604 instrument during the 1990/1991 CRRES mission. The ONR-604 instrument resolved the isotopes of helium with a mass resolution of 0.1 amu. The energetic helium observed at {ital L}{lt}2.3 have a pitch angle distribution peaking perpendicular to the local magnetic field, which is characteristic of a trapped population. Both the trapped {sup 3}He and {sup 4}He show two peaks at {ital L}=1.2 and 1.9. Each isotope{close_quote}s flux, in each peak, can be characterized by a power law energy spectrum. The energy spectrum of the {sup 3}He is different from that of {sup 4}He, indicating that the {sup 3}He/{sup 4}He ratio is energy dependent. Over the energy range of 51{endash}86 MeV/nucleon, the {sup 3}He/{sup 4}He ratio is 8.7{plus_minus}3.1 at {ital L}=1.1{endash}1.5 and is 2.4{plus_minus}0.6 at {ital L}=1.5{endash}2.3. The trapped helium counting rates decrease gradually with time during the CRRES mission, when the anomalous component is excluded from the inner heliosphere, indicating that these high energy ions were not injected by flares during this time period. The decrease in intensity is attributed mainly to the events around {ital L}=1.9. The helium around {ital L}=1.2, dominated by {sup 3}He, does not show a significant temporal evolution, which implies a long-term energetic trapped {sup 3}He population. Two possible origins of the geomagnetically trapped helium isotopes are the interactions of energetic protons with the upper atmosphere and/or the inward diffusion and acceleration of helium ions due to electric-field fluctuations. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  6. Helium enrichment during convective carbon dioxide dissolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larson, T.; Hesse, M. A.

    2013-12-01

    Motivated by observed variations of the CO2/He ratios in natural carbon dioxide (CO2) reservoirs, such as the Bravo Dome field in northeastern New Mexico, we have performed laboratory experiments equilibrating gas mixtures containing Helium (He) and CO2 with water, at close to ambient conditions in a closed system. The experimental design allows for continuous measurement of headspace pressure as well as timed interval measurements of the CO2/He ratios and the δ13C value of CO2 in the headspace. Results from three dissolution experiments are reported: 1) pure Helium system, 2) 98% CO2 + 2% Nitrogen system, and 3) 97% CO2 and 3% Helium. Final equilibrated experimental results are compared to theoretical results obtained using Henry's Law relationships. The evolution of the amount of dissolved CO2 computed from gas pressure and gas compositions are in good agreement with Henry's Law relationships. For example, the CO2 + N2 system was initially pressurized with pure CO2 to 1323 mbar and after six days it equilibrated to a measured headspace pressure of 596 mbar. This compares very well with a calculated equilibrium headspace pressure of 592 mbar for this system. The CO2 + He system was pressurized to 1398 mbar CO2 and after six days equilibrated to a measured headspace pressure of 397 mbar. This measured pressure is slightly higher than the predicted equilibrated headspace pressure of 341 mbar, indicating a possible leak in the system during this particular experiment. In both experiments the initial pH of the water was 9.3 and the final equilibrated pH was 5.4. The δ13C value of equilibrated headspace CO2 was within 0.25‰ of its starting δ13C value, demonstrating insignificant carbon isotope fractionation at low pH. Measured Helium/ CO2 ratios throughout the CO2+Helium experiment preserve a non-linear trend of increasing He/ CO2 ratios through time that correlate very well with the measured pressure drop from CO2 dissolution. This indicates that gas composition

  7. High-temperature helium-loop facility

    SciTech Connect

    Tokarz, R.D.

    1981-09-01

    The high-temperature helium loop is a facility for materials testing in ultrapure helium gas at high temperatures. The closed loop system is capable of recirculating high-purity helium or helium with controlled impurities. The gas loop maximum operating conditions are as follows: 300 psi pressure, 500 lb/h flow rate, and 2100/sup 0/F temperature. The two test sections can accept samples up to 3.5 in. diameter and 5 ft long. The gas loop is fully instrumented to continuously monitor all parameters of loop operation as well as helium impurities. The loop is fully automated to operate continuously and requires only a daily servicing by a qualified operator to replenish recorder charts and helium makeup gas. Because of its versatility and high degree of parameter control, the helium loop is applicable to many types of materials research. This report describes the test apparatus, operating parameters, peripheral systems, and instrumentation system.

  8. Tropical Greenhouse Measurements of Volatile Organic Compounds Using Switchable Reagent Ion Proton-Transfer-Reaction Time-of-Flight Mass Spectromety (PTR-TOF-MS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veres, P.; Auld, J.; Williams, J.

    2012-04-01

    In this presentation, we will summarize the results of measurements made in an approximately 1300 m3 tropical greenhouse at the Johannes Gutenberg University botanical garden in Mainz Germany conducted over a one month period. The greenhouse is home to a large variety of plant species from hot and humid regions of the world. The greenhouse is also host to several crops such as Cocoa and Cola Nut as well as ornamental plants. A particular focus of the species maintained are those which are considered ant plants, or plants which have an intimate relationship with ants in tropical habitats. Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) were measured using a Switchable Reagent Ion Proton-Transfer-Reaction Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometer (PTR-TOF-MS) using H3O+, NO+, and O2+ ion chemistry. Measurements will be presented both for primary emissions observed in the closed greenhouse atmosphere as well as the oxidation products observed after the introduction of ambient ozone. The high resolving power (5000 m/Δm) of the time-of-flight instrument allows for the separation of isobaric species. In particular, both isoprene (68.1170 amu) and furan (68.0740 amu) were observed and separated as primary emissions during this study. The significance of this will be discussed in terms of both atmospheric implications as well as with respect to previous measurements of isoprene obtained using quadrupole PTR-MS where isobaric separation of these compounds is not possible. Additionally observed species (e.g. Methanol, Acetaldehyde, MVK and MEK) will be discussed in detail with respect to their behavior as a function of light, temperature and relative humidity. The overall instrument performance of the PTR-TOF-MS technique using the H3O+, NO+, and O2+ primary ions for the measurement of VOCs will be evaluated.

  9. Performance Improvement of Pulse Tube Refrigerator for Space Application with Helium-hydrogen mixture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, G. B.; Yu, J. P.; Gan, Z. H.

    Weight or size of the cryocoolers used is a key factor in space applications This can be acquired by the selection of high efficiency cryocoolers or through the optimization of structural parameters. Given the type of regenerator, another way to improve the cooling performance is the adoption of gas mixture instead of pure helium as the working fluids. Gas mixtures have been proved very useful to J-T cryocoolers at 80K temperature range. In this paper, we do some theoretical and experimental study to probe into the possibility of using gas mixture to improve the coefficient of performance of regenerative cryocoolers such as pulse tube refrigerators. The performance comparison of regenerator using helium-hydrogen mixtures to pure helium gas is presented based on the analysis of the heat transfer and fluid flow. The pressure drop for helium-hydrogen mixture decreased more rapidly than the increase of thermal loss compared with pure helium, so the improvement of overall regenerator performance can be obtained. Experiments have been done with helium-hydrogen mixture in a coaxial valveless pulse tube refrigerator. Experimental results show that the cooling capacity with He-H2 mixture is 10~20 percent larger than that with pure helium, which is in coincidence with the theoretical analysis.

  10. Approximating the Helium Wavefunction in Positronium-Helium Scattering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DiRienzi, Joseph; Drachman, Richard J.

    2003-01-01

    In the Kohn variational treatment of the positronium- hydrogen scattering problem the scattering wave function is approximated by an expansion in some appropriate basis set, but the target and projectile wave functions are known exactly. In the positronium-helium case, however, a difficulty immediately arises in that the wave function of the helium target atom is not known exactly, and there are several ways to deal with the associated eigenvalue in formulating the variational scattering equations to be solved. In this work we will use the Kohn variational principle in the static exchange approximation to d e t e e the zero-energy scattering length for the Ps-He system, using a suite of approximate target functions. The results we obtain will be compared with each other and with corresponding values found by other approximation techniques.

  11. Investigation of helium injection cooling to liquid oxygen under pressurized condition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Namkyung; Kwon, Ohsung; Kim, Youngmog; Jeong, Sangkwon

    2006-11-01

    Sub-cooling of cryogenic propellant by helium injection is one of the most effective methods for suppressing bulk boiling and keeping sub-cooled liquid oxygen before rocket launch. Compared with the helium injection cooling under atmospheric condition, helium injection cooling under pressurized condition has advantage that it can greatly reduce re-warming time of the sub-cooled liquid oxygen. Helium injection cooling under pressurized condition is characterized by cooling of initially sub-cooled cryogenic liquid, which is significantly different from that of the atmospheric condition where liquid oxygen usually exists at saturated condition. In this paper, we discuss the characteristics of helium injection cooling under pressurized condition, with the associated physical understanding of the process. Experimental results are presented along the simulations of variously combined system parameters based on the finite heat transfer and instantaneous diffusion mass transfer model. A non-dimensional parameter for identifying the cooling regime is conceived. The critical values of the non-dimensional parameters and injected helium temperatures are also estimated.

  12. Radiation and gas conduction heat transport across a helium dewer multilayer insulation system

    SciTech Connect

    Green, M.A.

    1995-02-01

    This report describes a method for calculating mixed heat transfer through the multilayer insulation used to insulated a 4K liquid helium cryostat. The method described permits one to estimate the insulation potential for a multilayer insulation system from first principles. The heat transfer regimes included are: radiation, conduction by free molecule gas conduction, and conduction through continuum gas conduction. Heat transfer in the transition region between the two gas conduction regimes is also included.

  13. Ab initio Investigation of Helium in Vanadium Oxide Nanoclusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Danielson, Thomas; Tea, Eric; Hin, Celine

    Nanostructured ferritic alloys (NFAs) are strong candidate materials for the next generation of fission reactors and future fusion reactors. They are characterized by a large number density of oxide nanoclusters dispersed throughout a BCC iron matrix, where current oxide nanoclusters are primarily comprised of Y-Ti-O compounds. The oxide nanoclusters provide the alloy with high resistance to neutron irradiation, high yield strength and high creep strength at the elevated temperatures of a reactor environment. In addition, the oxide nanoclusters serve as trapping sites for transmutation product helium providing substantially increased resistance to catastrophic cracking and embrittlement. Although the mechanical properties and radiation resistance of the existing NFAs is promising, the problem of forming large scale reactor components continues to present a formidable challenge due to the high hardness and unpredictable fracture behavior of the alloys. An alternative alloy has been previously proposed and fabricated where vanadium is added in order to form vanadium oxide nanoclusters that serve as deflection sites for crack propagation. Although experiments have shown evidence that the fracture behavior of the alloys is improved, it is unknown whether or not the vanadium oxide nanoclusters are effective trapping sites for helium. We present results obtained using density functional theory investigating the thermodynamic stability of helium with the vanadium oxide matrix to make a comparison of trapping effectiveness to traditional Y-Ti-O compounds.

  14. STIRAP on helium: Excitation to Rydberg states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Deqian

    Research in optically induced transitions between dierent atomic levels has a long history. For transitions between states driven by a coherent optical eld, the theoretical eciency could be ideally high as 100% but there could be many factors preventing this. In the three state helium atom excitation process, i.e. 23S→33P→nL , the stimulated emission from intermediate state makes it hard to achieve ecient population transfer to the nal state through an intuitive excitation order. One technique to achieve a higher eciency is Stimulated Raman Adiabatic Passage (STIRAP) which is being studied and under research in our lab. Unlike traditional three level excitation processes, STIRAP actually uses a counter intuitive pulsed laser beams timing arrangement. The excitation objects are metastable helium atoms traveling in a vacuum system with a longitudinal velocity of ~ 1070 m/s. We are using a 389 nm UV laser to connect the 23S and the 33P state and a frequency tunable ~790 nm IR laser to connect the 33P state and the dierent Rydberg states. A third 1083 nm wavelength laser beam drives the 23S → 23P transition to transversely separate the residual metastable atoms and the Rydberg atoms for eciency measurements. The data is taken by a stainless steel detector in the vacuum system. As the Rydberg atoms will get ionized by blackbody radiation under room temperature, we can utilize this for their detection. An ion detector sitting on the eld plate is capable to collect the ion signals of the Rydberg atoms for detection. So far the whole system has not been ready for data collection and measurement, so here we are using data and results from previous theses for discussions. The highest transition frequency that has ever been achieved in our lab is around 70% after corrections.

  15. Note: Control of liquid helium supply to cryopanels of Kolkata superconducting cyclotron

    SciTech Connect

    Bhattacharyya, T. K. Pal, G.

    2015-02-15

    The Kolkata superconducting cyclotron utilises liquid helium to cool the main magnet niobium-titanium (NbTi) coil and the cryopanels. Three liquid helium cooled cryopanels, placed inside the dees of the radio-frequency system, maintain the high vacuum in the acceleration region of the superconducting cyclotron. The small cryostat placed inside the cryogenic distribution manifold located at the basement of the superconducting cyclotron building supplies liquid helium in parallel branches to three cold heads, used for cooling their associated cryopanels. The level in the cryostat has to be maintained at an optimum value to ensure uninterrupted flow of liquid helium to these three cold heads. This paper describes the transfer function of the overall system, its tuning parameters, and discusses the actual control of cryostat level by using these parameters.

  16. Note: control of liquid helium supply to cryopanels of Kolkata superconducting cyclotron.

    PubMed

    Bhattacharyya, T K; Pal, G

    2015-02-01

    The Kolkata superconducting cyclotron utilises liquid helium to cool the main magnet niobium-titanium (NbTi) coil and the cryopanels. Three liquid helium cooled cryopanels, placed inside the dees of the radio-frequency system, maintain the high vacuum in the acceleration region of the superconducting cyclotron. The small cryostat placed inside the cryogenic distribution manifold located at the basement of the superconducting cyclotron building supplies liquid helium in parallel branches to three cold heads, used for cooling their associated cryopanels. The level in the cryostat has to be maintained at an optimum value to ensure uninterrupted flow of liquid helium to these three cold heads. This paper describes the transfer function of the overall system, its tuning parameters, and discusses the actual control of cryostat level by using these parameters. PMID:25725894

  17. Note: control of liquid helium supply to cryopanels of Kolkata superconducting cyclotron.

    PubMed

    Bhattacharyya, T K; Pal, G

    2015-02-01

    The Kolkata superconducting cyclotron utilises liquid helium to cool the main magnet niobium-titanium (NbTi) coil and the cryopanels. Three liquid helium cooled cryopanels, placed inside the dees of the radio-frequency system, maintain the high vacuum in the acceleration region of the superconducting cyclotron. The small cryostat placed inside the cryogenic distribution manifold located at the basement of the superconducting cyclotron building supplies liquid helium in parallel branches to three cold heads, used for cooling their associated cryopanels. The level in the cryostat has to be maintained at an optimum value to ensure uninterrupted flow of liquid helium to these three cold heads. This paper describes the transfer function of the overall system, its tuning parameters, and discusses the actual control of cryostat level by using these parameters.

  18. Fragmentation of HCN in optically selected mass spectrometry: Nonthermal ion cooling in helium nanodroplets

    SciTech Connect

    Lewis, William K.; Bemish, Raymond J.; Miller, Roger E.

    2005-10-08

    A technique that combines infrared laser spectroscopy and helium nanodroplet mass spectrometry, which we refer to as optically selected mass spectrometry, is used to study the efficiency of ion cooling in helium. Electron-impact ionization is used to form He{sup +} ions within the droplets, which go on to transfer their charge to the HCN dopant molecules. Depending upon the droplet size, the newly formed ion either fragments or is cooled by the helium before fragmentation can occur. Comparisons with gas-phase fragmentation data suggest that the cooling provided by the helium is highly nonthermal. An 'explosive' model is proposed for the cooling process, given that the initially hot ion is embedded in such a cold solvent.

  19. Confined helium on Lagrange meshes.

    PubMed

    Baye, D; Dohet-Eraly, J

    2015-12-21

    The Lagrange-mesh method has the simplicity of a calculation on a mesh and can have the accuracy of a variational method. It is applied to the study of a confined helium atom. Two types of confinement are considered. Soft confinements by potentials are studied in perimetric coordinates. Hard confinement in impenetrable spherical cavities is studied in a system of rescaled perimetric coordinates varying in [0,1] intervals. Energies and mean values of the distances between electrons and between an electron and the helium nucleus are calculated. A high accuracy of 11 to 15 significant figures is obtained with small computing times. Pressures acting on the confined atom are also computed. For sphere radii smaller than 1, their relative accuracies are better than 10(-10). For larger radii up to 10, they progressively decrease to 10(-3), still improving the best literature results.

  20. Superfluid helium leak sealant study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vorreiter, J. W.

    1981-01-01

    Twenty-one leak specimens were fabricated in the ends of stainless steel and aluminum tubes. Eighteen of these tubes were coated with a copolymer material to seal the leak. The other three specimens were left uncoated and served as control specimens. All 21 tubes were cold shocked in liquid helium 50 times and then the leak rate was measured while the tubes were submerged in superfluid helium at 1.7 K. During the cold shocks two of the coated specimens were mechanically damaged and eliminated from the test program. Of the remaining 16 coated specimens one suffered a total coating failure and resulting high leak rate. Another three of the coated specimens suffered partial coating failures. The leak rates of the uncoated specimens were also measured and reported. The significance of various leak rates is discussed in view of the infrared astronomical satellite (IRAS) Dewar performance.

  1. Rapidly pulsed helium droplet source

    SciTech Connect

    Pentlehner, Dominik; Riechers, Ricarda; Dick, Bernhard; Slenczka, Alkwin; Even, Uzi; Lavie, Nachum; Brown, Raviv; Luria, Kfir

    2009-04-15

    A pulsed valve connected to a closed-cycle cryostat was optimized for producing helium droplets. The pulsed droplet beam appeared with a bimodal size distribution. The leading part of the pulse consists of droplets suitable for doping with molecules. The average size of this part can be varied between 10{sup 4} and 10{sup 6} helium atoms, and the width of the distribution is smaller as compared to a continuous-flow droplet source. The system has been tested in a single pulse mode and at repetition rates of up to 500 Hz with almost constant intensity. The droplet density was found to be increased by more than an order of magnitude as compared to a continuous-flow droplet source.

  2. Elastic Electron Scattering from Tritium and Helium-3

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Collard, H.; Hofstadter, R.; Hughes, E. B.; Johansson, A.; Yearian, M. R.; Day, R. B.; Wagner, R. T.

    1964-10-01

    The mirror nuclei of tritium and helium-3 have been studied by the method of elastic electron scattering. Absolute cross sections have been measured for incident electron energies in the range 110 - 690 MeV at scattering angles lying between 40 degrees and 135 degrees in this energy range. The data have been interpreted in a straightforward manner and form factors are given for the distributions of charge and magnetic moment in the two nuclei over a range of four-momentum transfer squared 1.0 - 8.0 F{sup -2}. Model-independent radii of the charge and magnetic moment distributions are given and an attempt is made to deduce form factors describing the spatial distribution of the protons in tritium and helium-3.

  3. Exotic Ions in Superfluid Helium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Wanchun; Xie, Zhuolin; Cooper, Leon N.; Maris, Humphrey J.

    2016-11-01

    Exotic ions are negatively charged objects which have been detected in superfluid helium-4 at temperatures in the vicinity of 1 K. Mobility experiments in several different labs have revealed the existence of at least 18 such objects. These ions have a higher mobility than the normal negative ion and appear to be singly charged and smaller. We summarize the experimental situation, the possible structure of these objects, and how these objects might be formed.

  4. Superfluid Helium Tanker (SFHT) study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eberhardt, Ralph N.; Dominick, Sam M.; Anderson, John E.; Gille, John P.; Martin, Tim A.; Marino, John S.; Paynter, Howard L.; Traill, R. Eric; Herzl, Alfred; Gotlib, Sam

    1988-01-01

    Replenishment of superfluid helium (SFHe) offers the potential of extending the on-orbit life of observatories, satellite instruments, sensors and laboratories which operate in the 2 K temperature regime. A reference set of resupply customers was identified as representing realistic helium servicing requirements and interfaces for the first 10 years of superfluid helium tanker (SFHT) operations. These included the Space Infrared Telescope Facility (SIRTF), the Advanced X-ray Astrophysics Facility (AXAF), the Particle Astrophysics Magnet Facility (Astromag), and the Microgravity and Materials Processing Sciences Facility (MMPS)/Critical Point Phenomena Facility (CPPF). A mixed-fleet approach to SFHT utilization was considered. The tanker permits servicing from the Shuttle cargo bay, in situ when attached to the OMV and carried to the user spacecraft, and as a depot at the Space Station. A SFHT Dewar ground servicing concept was developed which uses a dedicated ground cooling heat exchanger to convert all the liquid, after initial fill as normal fluid, to superfluid for launch. This concept permits the tanker to be filled to a near full condition, and then cooled without any loss of fluid. The final load condition can be saturated superfluid with any desired ullage volume, or the tank can be totally filed and pressurized. The SFHT Dewar and helium plumbing system design has sufficient component redundancy to meet fail-operational, fail-safe requirements, and is designed structurally to meet a 50 mission life usage requirement. Technology development recommendations were made for the selected SFHT concept, and a Program Plan and cost estimate prepared for a phase C/D program spanning 72 months from initiation through first launch in 1997.

  5. Helium in interplanetary dust particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nier, A. O.; Schlutter, D. J.

    1993-01-01

    Helium and neon were extracted from fragments of individual stratosphere-collected interplanetary dust particles (IDP's) by subjecting them to increasing temperature by applying short-duration pulses of power in increasing amounts to the ovens containing the fragments. The experiment was designed to see whether differences in release temperatures could be observed which might provide clues as to the asteroidal or cometary origin of the particles. Variations were observed which show promise for elucidating the problem.

  6. The Chemical Evolution of Helium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balser, Dana S.

    2006-12-01

    We report on measurements of the 4He abundance toward the outer Galaxy H II region S206 with the NRAO Green Bank Telescope. Observations of hydrogen and helium radio recombination lines between 8 and 10 GHz were made toward the peak radio continuum position in S206. We derive 4He/H=0.08459+/-0.00088 (random)+/-0.0010 (known systematic), 20% lower than optical recombination line results. It is difficult to reconcile the large discrepancy between the optical and radio values even when accounting for temperature, density, and ionization structure or for optical extinction by dust. Using only M17 and S206 we determine ΔY/ΔZ=1.41+/-0.62 in the Galaxy, consistent with standard chemical evolution models. High helium abundances in the old stellar population of elliptical galaxies can help explain the increase in UV emission with shorter wavelength between 2000 and 1200 Å, called the ``UV upturn'' or UVX. Our lower values of ΔY/ΔZ are consistent with a normal helium abundance at higher metallicity and suggest that other factors, such as a variable red giant branch mass loss with metallicity, may be important. When combined with 4He abundances in metal-poor galaxy H II regions, Magellanic Cloud H II regions, and M17 that have been determined from optical recombination lines, including the effects of temperature fluctuations, our radio 4He/H abundance ratio for S206 is consistent with a helium evolution of ΔY/ΔZ=1.6. A linear extrapolation to zero metallicity predicts a 4He/H primordial abundance ratio about 5% lower than that given by the Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe and standard big bang nucleosynthesis. The measured 4He abundances may be systematically underestimated by a few percent if clumping exists in these H II regions.

  7. Detecting scintillations in liquid helium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huffman, P. R.; McKinsey, D. N.

    2013-09-01

    We review our work in developing a tetraphenyl butadiene (TPB)-based detection system for a measurement of the neutron lifetime using magnetically confined ultracold neutrons (UCN). As part of the development of the detection system for this experiment, we studied the scintillation properties of liquid helium itself, characterized the fluorescent efficiencies of different fluors, and built and tested three detector geometries. We provide an overview of the results from these studies as well as references for additional information.

  8. Dynamics of Superfluid Helium in Low-Gravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frank, David J.

    1997-01-01

    This report summarizes the work performed under a contract entitled 'Dynamics of Superfluid Helium in Low Gravity'. This project performed verification tests, over a wide range of accelerations of two Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) codes of which one incorporates the two-fluid model of superfluid helium (SFHe). Helium was first liquefied in 1908 and not until the 1930s were the properties of helium below 2.2 K observed sufficiently to realize that it did not obey the ordinary physical laws of physics as applied to ordinary liquids. The term superfluidity became associated with these unique observations. The low temperature of SFHe and it's temperature unifonrmity have made it a significant cryogenic coolant for use in space applications in astronomical observations with infrared sensors and in low temperature physics. Superfluid helium has been used in instruments such as the Shuttle Infrared Astronomy Telescope (IRT), the Infrared Astronomy Satellite (IRAS), the Cosmic Background Observatory (COBE), and the Infrared Satellite Observatory (ISO). It is also used in the Space Infrared Telescope (SIRTF), Relativity Mission Satellite formally called Gravity Probe-B (GP-B), and the Test of the Equivalence Principle (STEP) presently under development. For GP-B and STEP, the use of SFHE is used to cool Superconducting Quantum Interference Detectors (SQUIDS) among other parts of the instruments. The Superfluid Helium On-Orbit Transfer (SHOOT) experiment flown in the Shuttle studied the behavior of SFHE. This experiment attempted to get low-gravity slosh data, however, the main emphasis was to study the low-gravity transfer of SFHE from tank to tank. These instruments carried tanks of SFHE of a few hundred liters to 2500 liters. The capability of modeling the behavior of SFHE is important to spacecraft control engineers who must design systems that can overcome disturbances created by the movement of the fluid. In addition instruments such as GP-B and STEP are very

  9. Vorticity matching in superfluid helium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samuels, David C.

    1991-12-01

    Recent experiments have rekindled interest in high Reynolds number flows using superfluid helium. In a continuing series of experiments, the flow of helium II through various devices (smooth pipes, corrugated pipes, valves, venturies, turbine flowmeters, and coanda flowmeters for example) was investigated. In all cases, the measured values (typically, mass flow rates and pressure drops) were found to be well described by classical relations for high Reynolds flows. This is unexpected since helium II consists of two interpenetrating fluids; one fluid with nonzero viscosity (the normal fluid) and one with zero viscosity (the superfluid). Only the normal fluid component should directly obey classical relations. Since the experiments listed above only measure the external behavior of the flow (i.e., pressure drops over devices), there is a great deal of room for interpretation of their results. One possible interpretation is that in turbulent flows the normal fluid and the superfluid velocity fields are somehow 'locked' together, presumably by the mutual friction force between the superfluid vortex filaments and the normal fluid. We refer to this locking together of the two fluids as 'vorticity matching.'

  10. Particle detection using superfluid helium

    SciTech Connect

    Bandler, S.R.; Lanou, R.E.; Maris, H.J.; More, T.; Porter, F.S.; Seidel, G.M.; Torii, R.

    1991-01-01

    We have observed 5 MeV {alpha} particles stopped in volumes-up to two liters of liquid helium at 70 mK. A fraction of the kinetic energy of an {alpha} particle is converted to elementary excitations (rotons and phonons), which progagate ballistically in isotopically pure {sup 4}He below 0.1 K. Most of these excitations have sufficient energy to evaporate helium atoms on hitting a free surface. The evaporated helium atoms can be detected calorimetrically when adsorbed on a thin silicon wafer ({approximately}1.7 g, 35 cm{sup 2}) suspended above the liquid. Temperature changes of the silicon are measured with a NTD germanium bolometer. For the geometry studied the observed temperature change of the silicon resulting from an {alpha} event in the liquid is approximately 5% of the temperature rise from an {alpha} hitting the silicon directly. The implications of these measurements will be discussed as they relate to the possible construction of a large scale detector of solar neutrinos.

  11. Particle detection using superfluid helium

    SciTech Connect

    Bandler, S.R.; Lanou, R.E.; Maris, H.J.; More, T.; Porter, F.S.; Seidel, G.M.; Torii, R.

    1991-12-31

    We have observed 5 MeV {alpha} particles stopped in volumes-up to two liters of liquid helium at 70 mK. A fraction of the kinetic energy of an {alpha} particle is converted to elementary excitations (rotons and phonons), which progagate ballistically in isotopically pure {sup 4}He below 0.1 K. Most of these excitations have sufficient energy to evaporate helium atoms on hitting a free surface. The evaporated helium atoms can be detected calorimetrically when adsorbed on a thin silicon wafer ({approximately}1.7 g, 35 cm{sup 2}) suspended above the liquid. Temperature changes of the silicon are measured with a NTD germanium bolometer. For the geometry studied the observed temperature change of the silicon resulting from an {alpha} event in the liquid is approximately 5% of the temperature rise from an {alpha} hitting the silicon directly. The implications of these measurements will be discussed as they relate to the possible construction of a large scale detector of solar neutrinos.

  12. Performance of BNL-TSTA compound cryopump

    SciTech Connect

    Hseuh, H C; Worwetz, H A

    1980-01-01

    A compound cryopump using cryocondensation pumping for hydrogen isotopes and cryosorption pumping with coconut charcoal as adsorbent for helium was designed. This compound cryopump was subsequently built (by Janis Research, Stoneham, MA) and has been tested at Brookhaven, fulfilling the design requirements and are delivered to Tritium Systems Test Assembly (TSTA) Vacuum Facility at Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory (LASL) for on-line operations.

  13. Broadening of the Interplanetary Helium Cone Structure Due to Elastic Collisions of LISM Helium Atoms with Solar Wind Ions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fahr, H. J.; Nass, H. U.; Rucinski, D.

    1984-01-01

    Neutral interstellar particles penetrating into the heliosphere, besides being subject there to specific loss processes, suffer elastic collisions with KeV-solar wind ions. The momentum transfer to the neutrals connected with these collisions leads to a loss of angular momentum with respect to the Sun and to a fractional compensation of the effective solar gravity. The dynamical particle trajectories hence are changed into non-Keplerians leading to density and temperature distributions differing from those calculated in the past. This is found from a solution of the Boltzmann equation that linearizes the effect of this additional force. It is shown that the HeI-584A resonance glow of the heliospheric helium cone lead to substantially lower interstellar helium temperatures if re-interpreted on the basis of this revised theory. These temperatures now seem to be in accordance with the derived temperatures for interstellar hydrogen.

  14. Broadening of the interplanetary helium cone structure due to elastic collisions of LISM helium atoms with solar wind ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fahr, H. J.; Nass, H. U.; Rucinski, D.

    1984-11-01

    Neutral interstellar particles penetrating into the heliosphere, besides being subject there to specific loss processes, suffer elastic collisions with KeV-solar wind ions. The momentum transfer to the neutrals connected with these collisions leads to a loss of angular momentum with respect to the Sun and to a fractional compensation of the effective solar gravity. The dynamical particle trajectories hence are changed into non-Keplerians leading to density and temperature distributions differing from those calculated in the past. This is found from a solution of the Boltzmann equation that linearizes the effect of this additional force. It is shown that the HeI-584A resonance glow of the heliospheric helium cone lead to substantially lower interstellar helium temperatures if re-interpreted on the basis of this revised theory. These temperatures now seem to be in accordance with the derived temperatures for interstellar hydrogen.

  15. Variation in Atmospheric Helium Isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mabry, J. C.; Marty, B.; Burnard, P.; Blard, P.

    2010-12-01

    Anthropogenic activity such as oil and gas exploitation releases crustal helium, which has excess 4He compared to atmospheric helium. This may give rise to both spatial and temporal variations in the atmospheric 3He/4He. Helium is present in trace quantities in the air (5 ppm) and has a very low ratio (3He/4Heair = 1.38 x 10-6), consequently high precision measurements of atmospheric He presents a significant analytical challenge. Recent work by Sano et al. [1] has endeavored to experimentally quantify these potential variations in the atmospheric 3He/4He by measuring the helium isotopes from air samples collected around the globe and from samples of ancient trapped atmosphere. Their results indicate an increase in the atmospheric 3He/4He from northern to southern latitudes of the order 2 - 4 ‰, which they attribute to greater use of fossil fuels in the northern hemisphere. However, since most of their data points overlap at the 2-3 ‰ (2σ) level, additional measurements (with increased precision if possible) are needed. We have constructed an automated extraction line dedicated to measuring He in samples of air which can rapidly switch between measuring aliquots of sample with standards. It additionally features an adjustable bellows on the sample aliquot volume that enables us to adjust the size of a sample aliquot to precisely match the standard, eliminating biases arising from nonlinear pressure effects in the mass spectrometer. The measurements are made using a Helix SFT multi-collector mass spectrometer. At present, repeat measurements of 3He/4He from our standard (purified air) have a reproducibility of 2‰ (2σ), while measurements of local (Nancy, France) air samples have a reproducibility of 3He/4He of 3‰ (2σ), which are at a similar level to the uncertainties reported by Sano. Modifications are underway to improve 3He measurements which are the principal source of error. We have collected atmospheric samples from around the globe over a wide

  16. Investigations of levitated helium drops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whitaker, Dwight Lawrence

    1999-11-01

    We report on the development of two systems capable of levitating drops of liquid helium. Helium drops of ˜20 mum have been levitated with the radiation pressure from two counter-propagating Nd:YAG laser beams. Drops are produced with a submerged piezoelectric transducer, and could be held for up to three minutes in our optical trap. Calculations show that Brillouin and Raman scattering of the laser light in the liquid helium produces a negligible rate of evaporation of the drop. Evaporation caused by the enhanced vapor pressure of the curved drop surfaces appears to be a significant effect limiting the drop lifetimes. Helium drops as large as 2 cm in diameter have been suspended in the earth's gravitational field with a magnetic field. A commercial superconducting solenoid provides the necessary field, field-gradient product required to levitate the drops. Drops are cooled to 0.5 K with a helium-3 refrigerator, and can be held in the trap indefinitely. We have found that when two or more drops are levitated in the same magnetic trap, the drops often remain in a state of apparent contact without coalescing. This effect is a result of the evaporation of liquid from between the two drops, and is found to occur only for normal fluid drops. We can induce shape oscillations in charged, levitated drops with an applied ac electric field. We have measured the resonance frequencies and damping rates for the l = 2 mode of oscillation as function of temperature. We have also developed a theory to describe the small amplitude shape oscillations of a He II drop surrounded by its saturated vapor. In our theory, we have considered two sets of boundary conditions---one where the drop does not evaporate and another in which the liquid and vapor are in thermodynamic equilibrium. We have found that both solutions give a frequency that agrees well with experiment, but that the data for the damping rate agree better with the solution without evaporation.

  17. AM Canum Venaticorum Progenitors with Helium Star Donors and the Resultant Explosions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brooks, Jared; Bildsten, Lars; Marchant, Pablo; Paxton, Bill

    2015-07-01

    We explore the outcome of mass transfer via Roche lobe overflow of {M}{He}≲ 0.51{M}⊙ pure helium burning stars in close binaries with WDs. The evolution is driven by the loss of angular momentum through gravitational wave radiation (GWR), and both stars are modeled using Modules for Experiments in Stellar Astrophysics (MESA). The donors have masses of {M}{He}=0.35,0.4,{and}0.51{M}⊙ and accrete onto WDs of mass MWD from 0.6{M}⊙ to 1.26{M}⊙ . The initial orbital periods (Porb) span 20-80 minutes. For all cases, the accretion rate onto the WD is below the stable helium burning range, leading to accumulation of helium followed by unstable ignition. The mass of the convective core in the donors is small enough so that the WD accretes enough helium-rich matter to undergo a thermonuclear runaway in the helium shell before any carbon-oxygen enriched matter is transferred. The mass of the accumulated helium shell depends on MWD and the accretion rate. We show that for {M}{He}≳ 0.4{M}⊙ and {M}{WD}≳ 0.8{M}⊙ , the first flash is likely vigorous enough to trigger a detonation in the helium layer. These thermonuclear runaways may be observed as either faint and fast Ia SNe or, if the carbon in the core is also detonated, Type Ia SNe. Those that survive the first flash and eject mass will have a temporary increase in orbital separation, but GWR drives the donor back into contact, resuming mass transfer and triggering several subsequent weaker flashes.

  18. Critical Landau velocity in helium nanodroplets.

    PubMed

    Brauer, Nils B; Smolarek, Szymon; Loginov, Evgeniy; Mateo, David; Hernando, Alberto; Pi, Marti; Barranco, Manuel; Buma, Wybren J; Drabbels, Marcel

    2013-10-11

    The best-known property of superfluid helium is the vanishing viscosity that objects experience while moving through the liquid with speeds below the so-called critical Landau velocity. This critical velocity is generally considered a macroscopic property as it is related to the collective excitations of the helium atoms in the liquid. In the present work we determine to what extent this concept can still be applied to nanometer-scale, finite size helium systems. To this end, atoms and molecules embedded in helium nanodroplets of various sizes are accelerated out of the droplets by means of optical excitation, and the speed distributions of the ejected particles are determined. The measurements reveal the existence of a critical velocity in these systems, even for nanodroplets consisting of only a thousand helium atoms. Accompanying theoretical simulations based on a time-dependent density functional description of the helium confirm and further elucidate this experimental finding.

  19. On charged impurity structures in liquid helium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pelmenev, A. A.; Krushinskaya, I. N.; Bykhalo, I. B.; Boltnev, R. E.

    2016-03-01

    The thermoluminescence spectra of impurity-helium condensates (IHC) submerged in superfluid helium have been observed for the first time. Thermoluminescence of impurity-helium condensates submerged in superfluid helium is explained by neutralization reactions occurring in impurity nanoclusters. Optical spectra of excited products of neutralization reactions between nitrogen cations and thermoactivated electrons were rather different from the spectra observed at higher temperatures, when the luminescence due to nitrogen atom recombination dominates. New results on current detection during the IHC destruction are presented. Two different mechanisms of nanocluster charging are proposed to describe the phenomena observed during preparation and warm-up of IHC samples in bulk superfluid helium, and destruction of IHC samples out of liquid helium.

  20. 43 CFR 16.2 - Applications for helium disposition agreements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Applications for helium disposition... HELIUM § 16.2 Applications for helium disposition agreements. The application for a helium disposition... Secretary to determine that the proposal will conserve helium that will otherwise be wasted, drained,...

  1. 43 CFR 16.2 - Applications for helium disposition agreements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2012-10-01 2011-10-01 true Applications for helium disposition... HELIUM § 16.2 Applications for helium disposition agreements. The application for a helium disposition... Secretary to determine that the proposal will conserve helium that will otherwise be wasted, drained,...

  2. 43 CFR 16.2 - Applications for helium disposition agreements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Applications for helium disposition... HELIUM § 16.2 Applications for helium disposition agreements. The application for a helium disposition... Secretary to determine that the proposal will conserve helium that will otherwise be wasted, drained,...

  3. 43 CFR 16.2 - Applications for helium disposition agreements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Applications for helium disposition... HELIUM § 16.2 Applications for helium disposition agreements. The application for a helium disposition... Secretary to determine that the proposal will conserve helium that will otherwise be wasted, drained,...

  4. 43 CFR 16.2 - Applications for helium disposition agreements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Applications for helium disposition... HELIUM § 16.2 Applications for helium disposition agreements. The application for a helium disposition... Secretary to determine that the proposal will conserve helium that will otherwise be wasted, drained,...

  5. Photoinduced charge, ion & energy transfer processes at transition-metal coordination compounds anchored to mesoporous, nanocrystalline metal-oxide thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ardo, Shane

    Photovoltaics provide a direct means of converting photons into useful, electric power; however traditional silicon-based technologies are too expensive for global commercialization. Dye-sensitized mesoporous semiconducting thin films, when utilized in regenerative photoelectrochemical cells, are one category of next generation photovoltaics that could eventually circumvent this issue. In fact, their architecture also affords a clear platform for implementation of a direct, solar fuel-forming system. The mechanisms involved in the myriad of molecular processes that occur in these molecular--solid-state hybrid materials are poorly understood. Thus, the overriding goal of this dissertation was to evaluate sensitized mesoporous, nanocrystalline metal-oxide thin films critically so as to elucidate mechanistic phenomena. Using transient and steady-state absorption and emission spectroscopies as well as (photo)electrochemistry, various previously unobserved processes have been identified. Chapter 2 demonstrates for the first time that the electric fields emanating from these charged thin films affect surface-anchored molecular sensitizers via a Stark effect. In most cases, further, but incomplete, ionic screening of the charged nanoparticles from the sensitizers, as non-Faradaic electrolyte redistribution, was spectroscopically inferred after rapid semiconductor charging. Chapter 3 highlights the reactivity of Co(I) coordination-compound catalysts anchored to anatase TiO2 thin-film electrodes. Visible-light excitation resulted in prompt excited-state electron injection into TiO2 while introduction of benzylbromide into the fluid solution surrounding the thin film led to a 2e--transfer, oxidative-addition reaction to Co1 forming a stable Co--benzyl product. Subsequent visible-light excitation initiated a photocatalytic cycle for C--C bond formation. Unique to the nanocrystalline thin films employed here, Chapter 4 demonstrates that traditional time-resolved polarization

  6. Energy, helium, and the future: II

    SciTech Connect

    Krupka, M.C.; Hammel, E.F.

    1980-01-01

    The importance of helium as a critical resource material has been recognized specifically by the scientific community and more generally by the 1960 Congressional mandate to institute a long-range conservation program. A major study mandated by the Energy Reorganization Act of 1974 resulted in the publication in 1975 of the document, The Energy-Related Applications of Helium, ERDA-13. This document contained a comprehensive review and analysis relating to helium resources and present and future supply/demand relationships with particular emphasis upon those helium-dependent energy-related technologies projected to be implemented in the post-2000 year time period, e.g., fusion. An updated overview of the helium situation as it exists today is presented. Since publication of ERDA-13, important changes in the data base underlying that document have occurred. The data have since been reexamined, revised, and new information included. Potential supplies of helium from both conventional and unconventional natural gas resources, projected supply/demand relationships to the year 2030 based upon a given power-generation scenario, projected helium demand for specific energy-related technologies, and the supply options (national and international) available to meet that demand are discussed. An updated review will be given of the energy requirements for the extraction of helium from natural gas as they relate to the concentration of helium. A discussion is given concerning the technical and economic feasibility of several methods available both now and conceptually possible, to extract helium from helium-lean natural gas, the atmosphere, and outer space. Finally, a brief review is given of the 1980 Congressional activities with respect to the introduction and possible passage of new helium conservation legislation.

  7. Helium isotopic abundance variation in nature

    SciTech Connect

    Holden, N.E.

    1993-08-01

    The isotopic abundance of helium in nature has been reviewed. This atomic weight value is based on the value of helium in the atmosphere, which is invariant around the world and up to a distance of 100,000 feet. Helium does vary in natural gas, volcanic rocks and gases, ocean floor sediments, waters of various types and in radioactive minerals and ores due to {alpha} particle decay of radioactive nuclides.

  8. Radioactive transitions in the helium isoelectronic sequence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dalgarno, A.

    1971-01-01

    The principles of the atomic spectrum theory are used to quantitatively analyze radiation transitions in two-electron helium-like atomic systems. Quantum theoretical methods, describing absorption and emission of a single photon in a radiative transition between two stationary states of an atomic system, reproduced the energy level diagram for the low lying states of helium. Reliable values are obtained from accurate variationally determined two-electron nonrelativistic wave functions for radiative transition probabilities of 2 3p states in the helium isoelectric sequence, and for the 2 1s and 2 3s1 states of the helium sequence.

  9. Helium transport studies on DIII-D

    SciTech Connect

    Finkenthal, D.F.; Hillis, D.L.; Wade, M.R.; Hogan, J.T.; Klepper, C.C.; Mioduszewski, P.K.; West, W.P.; Burrell, K.H.; Seraydarian, R.P.; Groebner, R.J.; Gohil, P.

    1992-05-01

    The measurement of Helium density profiles in tokamak plasmas is necessary for helium transport studies. These studies are important in predicting the helium ash transport properties for ITER and win have important implications for the design. Poor helium transport in reactors could lead to a buildup of fusion ash, causing fuel dilution and increased radiation that will result in degraded fusion power and possibly quench ignition altogether. Present estimates indicate that He concentrations in the core must be kept below 10% in order to maintain continuous reactor operation. Helium transport studies have begun on the DM-D tokamak using charge exchange recombination (CER) spectroscopy for helium density measurements. Helium transport behavior has been observed by injecting helium gas puffs into DM-D plasmas and measuring the He density profile evolution. The profiles are used to calculate the relevant helium transport properties. This paper covers the results obtained from puffing He gas into L-mode plasmas of various electron densities. The results obtained in DIII-D L-mode plasmas are similar to measurements made at TEXTOR and JT-60.

  10. Observations of solar-wind helium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neugebauer, M.

    1981-01-01

    It is pointed out that the concentration of helium in the solar wind relative to hydrogen fluctuates wildly. Under certain circumstances, the helium to hydrogen abundance ratio is strongly enhanced over probable solar values; at other times, the amount of helium in the solar wind is immeasurably small. In spite of the fact that helium is heavier than hydrogen, solar-wind helium often leaves the solar gravitational field with a higher velocity than does the hydrogen. It is thought that the mechanisms responsible for helium behavior may contain clues to unanswered questions concerning the acceleration and energy exchange processes of the entire solar wind. A brief review is given of the principal features and theories of the solar wind as a whole. In addition, measurement techniques are discussed. Emphasis throughout is on the experimental data concerning the dynamics of solar-wind helium. On the basis of coronal temperatures, it is shown that helium in the solar wind is almost always doubly ionized. It is also shown that the average abundance of helium ions in the solar wind is usually in the range of 3 to 6% by number.

  11. Helium-3 emission related to volcanic activity

    SciTech Connect

    Sano, Y.; Nakamura, Y.; Wakita, H.; Urabe, A.; Tominaga, T.

    1984-04-13

    The helium-3/helium-4 ratio in bubbling gases from ten hot springs located around Mount Ontake, an active volcano in central Japan, ranges from 1.71 R/sub atm/ (1.71 times the atmospheric ratio of 1.40 x 10/sup -6/) to 6.15 R/sub atm/. The value of the ratio decreases with distance from the central cone of the volcano. Such a tendency may be a characteristic of helium-3 emission in volcanic areas and suggests more primitive helium-3 is carried with fluid flowing through a conduit during volcanic activity. 6 references, 1 figure, 1 table.

  12. 43 CFR 3195.35 - What happens if I have an outstanding obligation to purchase refined helium under a Helium...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... obligation to purchase refined helium under a Helium Distribution Contract? 3195.35 Section 3195.35 Public... OF THE INTERIOR MINERALS MANAGEMENT (3000) HELIUM CONTRACTS Federal Helium Supplier Requirements § 3195.35 What happens if I have an outstanding obligation to purchase refined helium under a...

  13. 43 CFR 3195.35 - What happens if I have an outstanding obligation to purchase refined helium under a Helium...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... obligation to purchase refined helium under a Helium Distribution Contract? 3195.35 Section 3195.35 Public... OF THE INTERIOR MINERALS MANAGEMENT (3000) HELIUM CONTRACTS Federal Helium Supplier Requirements § 3195.35 What happens if I have an outstanding obligation to purchase refined helium under a...

  14. 43 CFR 3195.35 - What happens if I have an outstanding obligation to purchase refined helium under a Helium...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... obligation to purchase refined helium under a Helium Distribution Contract? 3195.35 Section 3195.35 Public... OF THE INTERIOR MINERALS MANAGEMENT (3000) HELIUM CONTRACTS Federal Helium Supplier Requirements § 3195.35 What happens if I have an outstanding obligation to purchase refined helium under a...

  15. 43 CFR 3195.35 - What happens if I have an outstanding obligation to purchase refined helium under a Helium...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... obligation to purchase refined helium under a Helium Distribution Contract? 3195.35 Section 3195.35 Public... OF THE INTERIOR MINERALS MANAGEMENT (3000) HELIUM CONTRACTS Federal Helium Supplier Requirements § 3195.35 What happens if I have an outstanding obligation to purchase refined helium under a...

  16. 43 CFR 3195.20 - Who must purchase major helium requirements from Federal helium suppliers?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Who must purchase major helium requirements from Federal helium suppliers? 3195.20 Section 3195.20 Public Lands: Interior Regulations Relating... (3000) HELIUM CONTRACTS Federal Agency Requirements § 3195.20 Who must purchase major...

  17. 43 CFR 3195.20 - Who must purchase major helium requirements from Federal helium suppliers?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Who must purchase major helium requirements from Federal helium suppliers? 3195.20 Section 3195.20 Public Lands: Interior Regulations Relating... (3000) HELIUM CONTRACTS Federal Agency Requirements § 3195.20 Who must purchase major...

  18. 43 CFR 3195.20 - Who must purchase major helium requirements from Federal helium suppliers?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Who must purchase major helium requirements from Federal helium suppliers? 3195.20 Section 3195.20 Public Lands: Interior Regulations Relating... (3000) HELIUM CONTRACTS Federal Agency Requirements § 3195.20 Who must purchase major...

  19. 43 CFR 3195.20 - Who must purchase major helium requirements from Federal helium suppliers?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Who must purchase major helium requirements from Federal helium suppliers? 3195.20 Section 3195.20 Public Lands: Interior Regulations Relating... (3000) HELIUM CONTRACTS Federal Agency Requirements § 3195.20 Who must purchase major...

  20. Superfluid Helium Tanker (SFHT) study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1988-01-01

    The accomplishments and recommendations of the two-phase Superfluid Helium Tanker (SFHT) study are presented. During the first phase of the study, the emphasis was on defining a comprehensive set of user requirements, establishing SFHT interface parameters and design requirements, and selecting a fluid subsystem design concept. During the second phase, an overall system design concept was constructed based on appropriate analyses and more detailed definition of requirements. Modifications needed to extend the baseline for use with cryogens other than SFHT have been determined, and technology development needs related to the recommended design have been assessed.

  1. Helium in Earth's Early Core

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jephcoat, A. P.; Bouhifd, M. A.; Heber, V.; Kelley, S. P.

    2006-12-01

    The high 3He/4He ratios for some ocean-island basalts, and more recent observations for solar components of the other rare gases (Ne, Ar and possibly Xe), continue to raise questions on primordial source reservoirs as well as on accretionary and incorporation processes of rare gases. A number of geochemical mantle models have been made to explain the observed 3He/4He ratios, the most popular of which has been an undegassed primordial reservoir. Isotope systematics of other radiogenic elements do not support such an isolated source and changes in the accepted models of mantle convection style have made it harder to rely on the deep mantle as a reservoir. The core has remained a particularly unfavourable location either because of difficulty in constructing a retention mechanism during planetary accretion or simply because of a lack of data: Partitioning studies at pressure are rare and complicated by the difficulty in reproducing not only absolute concentrations, but confinement of gas in high-pressure apparatus and post-run analysis. We present experiments on helium solubility and partitioning between molten silicates and Fe-rich metal liquids up to 16 GPa and 3000 K, with the laser-heated diamond-anvil cell, and the quenched run products analysed by ultra-violet laser ablation mass spectrometry (UVLAMP). Our results indicate a significantly higher partition coefficient for He between molten silicates and Fe-rich alloy liquids of about 10-2 at 16 GPa and 3000~K -- two orders of magnitude more helium is measured in the metal phase compared to the only previous data of Matsuda et al., (1993). The solubility mechanism is varied and involves a distinguishable bulk component and an apparent surface signature (that may be the result of the quench process). Whether surface effects are included or not, the early Earth's core would have incorporated non-negligible amounts of primordial helium if its segregation took place under mid-depth, magma-ocean conditions. The process

  2. Helium bubble bursting in tungsten

    SciTech Connect

    Sefta, Faiza; Juslin, Niklas; Wirth, Brian D.

    2013-12-28

    Molecular dynamics simulations have been used to systematically study the pressure evolution and bursting behavior of sub-surface helium bubbles and the resulting tungsten surface morphology. This study specifically investigates how bubble shape and size, temperature, tungsten surface orientation, and ligament thickness above the bubble influence bubble stability and surface evolution. The tungsten surface is roughened by a combination of adatom “islands,” craters, and pinholes. The present study provides insight into the mechanisms and conditions leading to various tungsten topology changes, which we believe are the initial stages of surface evolution leading to the formation of nanoscale fuzz.

  3. Formation of Au and tetrapyridyl porphyrin complexes in superfluid helium.

    PubMed

    Feng, Cheng; Latimer, Elspeth; Spence, Daniel; Al Hindawi, Aula M A A; Bullen, Shem; Boatwright, Adrian; Ellis, Andrew M; Yang, Shengfu

    2015-07-14

    Binary clusters containing a large organic molecule and metal atoms have been formed by the co-addition of 5,10,15,20-tetra(4-pyridyl)porphyrin (H2TPyP) molecules and gold atoms to superfluid helium nanodroplets, and the resulting complexes were then investigated by electron impact mass spectrometry. In addition to the parent ion H2TPyP yields fragments mainly from pyrrole, pyridine and methylpyridine ions because of the stability of their ring structures. When Au is co-added to the droplets the mass spectra are dominated by H2TPyP fragment ions with one or more Au atoms attached. We also show that by switching the order in which Au and H2TPyP are added to the helium droplets, different types of H2TPyP-Au complexes are clearly evident from the mass spectra. This study suggests a new route for the control over the growth of metal-organic compounds inside superfluid helium nanodroplets.

  4. A helium based pulsating heat pipe for superconducting magnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fonseca, Luis Diego; Miller, Franklin; Pfotenhauer, John

    2014-01-01

    This study was inspired to investigate an alternative cooling system using a helium-based pulsating heat pipes (PHP), for low temperature superconducting magnets. In addition, the same approach can be used for exploring other low temperature applications. The advantages of PHP for transferring heat and smoothing temperature profiles in various room temperature applications have been explored for the past 20 years. An experimental apparatus has been designed, fabricated and operated and is primarily composed of an evaporator and a condenser; in which both are thermally connected by a closed loop capillary tubing. The main goal is to measure the heat transfer properties of this device using helium as the working fluid. The evaporator end of the PHP is comprised of a copper winding in which heat loads up to 10 watts are generated, while the condenser is isothermal and can reach 4.2 K via a two stage Sumitomo RDK408A2 GM cryocooler. Various experimental design features are highlighted. Additionally, performance results in the form of heat transfer and temperature characteristics are provided as a function of average condenser temperature, PHP fill ratio, and evaporator heat load. Results are summarized in the form of a dimensionless correlation and compared to room temperature systems. Implications for superconducting magnet stability are highlighted.

  5. Elusive structure of helium trimers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stipanović, Petar; Vranješ Markić, Leandra; Boronat, Jordi

    2016-09-01

    Over the years many He–He interaction potentials have been developed, some very sophisticated, including various corrections beyond the Born–Oppenheimer approximation. Most of them were used to predict properties of helium dimers and trimers, examples of exotic quantum states, whose experimental study proved to be very challenging. Recently, detailed structural properties of helium trimers were measured for the first time, allowing a comparison with theoretical predictions and possibly enabling the evaluation of different interaction potentials. The comparisons already made included adjusting the maxima of both theoretical and experimental correlation functions to one, so the overall agreement between theory and experiment appeared satisfactory. However, no attempt was made to evaluate the quality of the interaction potentials used in the calculations. In this work, we calculate the experimentally measured correlation functions using both new and old potentials, compare them with experimental data and rank the potentials. We use diffusion Monte Carlo simulations at T = 0, which give within statistical noise exact results of the ground state properties. All models predict both trimers 4He3 and 4He{}2{}3He to be in a quantum halo state.

  6. Elusive structure of helium trimers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stipanović, Petar; Vranješ Markić, Leandra; Boronat, Jordi

    2016-09-01

    Over the years many He-He interaction potentials have been developed, some very sophisticated, including various corrections beyond the Born-Oppenheimer approximation. Most of them were used to predict properties of helium dimers and trimers, examples of exotic quantum states, whose experimental study proved to be very challenging. Recently, detailed structural properties of helium trimers were measured for the first time, allowing a comparison with theoretical predictions and possibly enabling the evaluation of different interaction potentials. The comparisons already made included adjusting the maxima of both theoretical and experimental correlation functions to one, so the overall agreement between theory and experiment appeared satisfactory. However, no attempt was made to evaluate the quality of the interaction potentials used in the calculations. In this work, we calculate the experimentally measured correlation functions using both new and old potentials, compare them with experimental data and rank the potentials. We use diffusion Monte Carlo simulations at T = 0, which give within statistical noise exact results of the ground state properties. All models predict both trimers 4He3 and 4He{}2{}3He to be in a quantum halo state.

  7. Helium-flow measurement using ultrasonic technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sondericker, J. H.

    1983-08-01

    The ideal cryogenic instrumentation for the colliding beam accelerator helium distribution system does not add pressure drop to the system, functions over the entire temperature range, has high resolution, and delivers accurate mass flow measurement data. The design and testing of an ultrasonic flowmeter which measures helium flow under different temperatures are described.

  8. Detection of Hydrogen and Helium with EPHIN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gómez-Herrero, R.; Rodríguez-Frías, M. D.; del Peral, L.; Sequeiros, J.; Müller-Mellin, R.; Kunow, H.; Sierks, H.

    2001-08-01

    A Monte Carlo simulation code based on GEANT 3.21 has been used to follow the SOHO (Solar and Heliospheric Observatory)/EPHIN (Electron, Proton and Helium Instrument) response to the detection of hydrogen and helium nuclei. The geometrical factor dependence on the energy has been evaluated and the contamination of the EPHIN channels has been obtained.

  9. Stability of Helium Clusters during Displacement Cascades

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Li; Zu, Xiaotao T.; Xiao, H. Y.; Gao, Fei; Heinisch, Howard L.; Kurtz, Richard J.; Wang, Zhiguo; Liu, K. Z.

    2007-02-01

    The interaction of displacement cascades with helium-vacancy clusters is investigated using molecular dynamics simulations. The He-vacancy clusters initially consist of 20 vacancies with a Helium-to-vacancy ratio ranging from 0.2 to 3. The primary knock-on atom (PKA) energy, Ep, varies from 2 keV to 10 keV, and the PKA direction is chosen such that a displacement cascade is able to directly interact with a helium-vacancy cluster. The simulation results show that the effect of displacement cascades on a helium-vacancy cluster strongly depends on both the helium-to-vacancy ratio and the PKA energy. For the same PKA energy, the size of helium-vacancy clusters increases with the He/V ratio, but for the same ratio, the cluster size changes more significantly with increasing PKA energy. It has been observed that the He-vacancy clusters can be dissolved when the He/V ratio less than 1, but they are able to re-nucleate during the thermal spike phase, forming small He-V nuclei. When the He/V ratio is larger than 1, the He-V clusters can absorb a number of vacancies produced by displacement cascades, forming larger He-V clusters. These results are discussed in terms of PKA energy, helium-to-vacancy ratio, number of vacancies produced by cascades, and mobility of helium atoms.

  10. LOX Tank Helium Removal for Propellant Scavenging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chato, David J.

    2009-01-01

    System studies have shown a significant advantage to reusing the hydrogen and oxygen left in these tanks after landing on the Moon in fuel cells to generate power and water for surface systems. However in the current lander concepts, the helium used to pressurize the oxygen tank can substantially degrade fuel cell power and water output by covering the reacting surface with inert gas. This presentation documents an experimental investigation of methods to remove the helium pressurant while minimizing the amount of the oxygen lost. This investigation demonstrated that significant quantities of Helium (greater than 90% mole fraction) remain in the tank after draining. Although a single vent cycle reduced the helium quantity, large amounts of helium remained. Cyclic venting appeared to be more effective. Three vent cycles were sufficient to reduce the helium to small (less than 0.2%) quantities. Two vent cycles may be sufficient since once the tank has been brought up to pressure after the second vent cycle the helium concentration has been reduced to the less than 0.2% level. The re-pressurization process seemed to contribute to diluting helium. This is as expected since in order to raise the pressure liquid oxygen must be evaporated. Estimated liquid oxygen loss is on the order of 82 pounds (assuming the third vent cycle is not required).

  11. Helium Speech: An Application of Standing Waves

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wentworth, Christopher D.

    2011-01-01

    Taking a breath of helium gas and then speaking or singing to the class is a favorite demonstration for an introductory physics course, as it usually elicits appreciative laughter, which serves to energize the class session. Students will usually report that the helium speech "raises the frequency" of the voice. A more accurate description of the…

  12. 30 CFR 256.11 - Helium.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... of and the right to extract helium from all gas produced from the leased area. (b) In case the United... helium extracted. The United States shall determine the amount of reasonable compensation. The United... substantial delays in the delivery of natural gas produced to the purchaser of that gas....

  13. 30 CFR 256.11 - Helium.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... the United States, under section 12(f) of the Act, of the ownership of and the right to extract helium... other loss for which he is not reasonably compensated, except for the value of the helium extracted. The... delivery of natural gas produced to the purchaser of that gas....

  14. Paramagnetic Attraction of Impurity-Helium Solids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bernard, E. P.; Boltnev, R. E.; Khmelenko, V. V.; Lee, D. M.

    2003-01-01

    Impurity-helium solids are formed when a mixture of impurity and helium gases enters a volume of superfluid helium. Typical choices of impurity gas are hydrogen deuteride, deuterium, nitrogen, neon and argon, or a mixture of these. These solids consist of individual impurity atoms and molecules as well as clusters of impurity atoms and molecules covered with layers of solidified helium. The clusters have an imperfect crystalline structure and diameters ranging up to 90 angstroms, depending somewhat on the choice of impurity. Immediately following formation the clusters aggregate into loosely connected porous solids that are submerged in and completely permeated by the liquid helium. Im-He solids are extremely effective at stabilizing high concentrations of free radicals, which can be introduced by applying a high power RF dis- charge to the impurity gas mixture just before it strikes the super fluid helium. Average concentrations of 10(exp 19) nitrogen atoms/cc and 5 x 10(exp 18) deuterium atoms/cc can be achieved this way. It shows a typical sample formed from a mixture of atomic and molecular hydrogen and deuterium. It shows typical sample formed from atomic and molecular nitrogen. Much of the stability of Im-He solids is attributed to their very large surface area to volume ratio and their permeation by super fluid helium. Heat resulting from a chance meeting and recombination of free radicals is quickly dissipated by the super fluid helium instead of thermally promoting the diffusion of other nearby free radicals.

  15. Helium, Carbon, and Helium Isotopes in the Northern Lau Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lupton, J. E.; Butterfield, D. A.; Lilley, M. D.; Resing, J.; Embley, R. W.; Arculus, R. J.; Rubin, K. H.; Evans, L.; Greene, R.

    2009-12-01

    Helium isotope ratios in hydrothermal fluids and volcanic rocks in the northern Lau Basin show a complex pattern reflecting influences from diverse mantle sources, including the Samoan hotspot, the Tofua Arc, and mid-ocean ridge (MOR)-type upper mantle. The Samoan Islands represent a “high 3He” hotspot with 3He/4He ratios up to 38 Ra (where Ra is the 3He/4He ratio in air, 1.39 x 10-6) [Farley et al, 1992; Jackson et al., 2007]. In contrast to the 3He-rich helium in Samoa, typical back-arc spreading centers have MOR-type helium values of 7-9 Ra, while volcanic arcs have lower ratios of 5-7 Ra. In the northwestern part of the Lau Basin, basalt samples from the Northwest Lau Spreading Center and the Rochambeau Rifts have 3He/4He varying from 11 to 28 Ra, far above typical back-arc or MOR values. These elevated 3He/4He ratios indicate that the Samoan hotspot signal has somehow penetrated southward into the northern Lau Basin, presumably through a tear in the subducting Pacific Plate. In the northeastern Lau Basin, 3He/4He ratios in hydrothermal fluids from two sites on the Northeast Lau Spreading Center have 3He/4He of 8.0 and 8.7 Ra. These are MOR-type values typical for a back-arc spreading center. At the actively erupting West Mata volcano, vent fluids have 3He/4He of 7.3 Ra, while farther east at Volcano P analysis of water-column plume samples gave a value of 6.7 Ra for the estimated end-member 3He/4He value. This decrease in 3He/4He going toward the east indicates increasing arc influence with increasing proximity to the Tofua Arc. This interpretation is supported by the C/3He ratios in the hydrothermal fluids, which average 1-3 x 109 at vent sites on the NELSC (typical MOR values) and increase to a typical arc value of 2 x 1010 at West Mata. Analyses of volcanic rocks from the eruption sites on the NELSC and West Mata are in progress and should help to further define these variations.

  16. Gemini helium closed cycle cooling system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lazo, Manuel; Galvez, Ramon; Rogers, Rolando; Solis, Hernan; Tapia, Eduardo; Maltes, Diego; Collins, Paul; White, John; Cavedoni, Chas; Yamasaki, Chris; Sheehan, Michael P.; Walls, Brian

    2008-07-01

    The Gemini Observatory presents the Helium Closed Cycle Cooling System that provides cooling capacity at cryogenic temperatures for instruments and detectors. It is implemented by running three independent helium closed cycle cooling circuits with several banks of compressors in parallel to continuously supply high purity helium gas to cryocoolers located about 100-120 meters apart. This poster describes how the system has been implemented, the required helium pressures and gas flow to reach cryogenic temperature, the performance it has achieved, the helium compressors and cryocoolers in use and the level of vibration the cryocoolers produce in the telescope environment. The poster also describes the new technology for cryocoolers that Gemini is considering in the development of new instruments.

  17. Helium Migration Mechanisms in Polycrystalline Uranium Dioxide

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, Guillaume; Desgardin, Pierre; Sauvage, Thierry; Barthe, Marie-France; Garcia, Philippe; Carlot, Gaelle

    2007-07-01

    This study aims at identifying the release mechanisms of helium in uranium dioxide. Two sets of polycrystalline UO{sub 2} sintered samples presenting different microstructures were implanted with {sup 3}He ions at concentrations in the region of 0.1 at.%. Changes in helium concentrations were monitored using two Nuclear Reaction Analysis (NRA) techniques based on the {sup 3}He(d,{alpha}){sup 1}H reaction. {sup 3}He release is measured in-situ during sample annealing at temperatures ranging between 700 deg. C and 1000 deg. C. Accurate helium depth profiles are generated after each annealing stage. Results that provide data for further understanding helium release mechanisms are discussed. It is found that helium diffusion appears to be enhanced above 900 deg. C in the vicinity of grain boundaries possibly as a result of the presence of defects. (authors)

  18. Highly efficient D2 generation by dehydrogenation of formic acid in D2O through H+/D+ exchange on an iridium catalyst: application to the synthesis of deuterated compounds by transfer deuterogenation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wan-Hui; Hull, Jonathan F; Muckerman, James T; Fujita, Etsuko; Hirose, Takuji; Himeda, Yuichiro

    2012-07-23

    Deuterated compounds have received increasing attention in both academia and industrial fields. However, preparations of these compounds are limited for both economic and practical reasons. Herein, convenient generation of deuterium gas (D(2)) and the preparation of deuterated compounds on a laboratory scale are demonstrated by using a half-sandwich iridium complex with 4,4'-dihydroxy-2,2'-bipyridine. The "umpolung" (i.e., reversal of polarity) of a hydrogen atom of water was achieved in consecutive reactions, that is, a cationic H(+)/D(+) exchange reaction and anionic hydride or deuteride transfer, under mild conditions. Selective D(2) evolution (purity up to 89 %) was achieved by using HCO(2)H as an electron source and D(2)O as a deuterium source; a rhodium analogue provided HD gas (98 %) under similar conditions. Furthermore, pressurized D(2) (98 %) without CO gas was generated by using DCO(2)D in D(2)O in a glass autoclave. Transfer deuterogenation of ketones gave α-deuterated alcohols with almost quantitative yields and high deuterium content by using HCO(2)H in D(2)O. Mechanistic studies show that the H(+)/D(+) exchange reaction in the iridium hydride complex was much faster than β-elimination and hydride (deuteride) transfer. PMID:22718518

  19. Optical Forces on Metastable Helium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corder, Christopher Scott

    Optical forces using lasers allow precise control over the motion of atoms. The bichromatic optical force (BF) is unique in its large magnitude and velocity range, arising from the absorption and stimulated emission processes. These properties were used to transversely collimate a beam of metastable helium (He*) using the 23S - 23P transition. The collimation created a very bright beam of He*, allowing experiments of neutral atom lithography. The He* beam was used to pattern material surfaces using a resist-based lithography technique, where the pattern was determined by either mechanical or optical masks. The optical masks produced features with a separation of half the wavelength of the light used. Patterning was successfully demonstrated with both IR and UV optical masks. The etched pattern resolution was ˜ 100 nm and limited by the material surface. Further experiments were performed studying the ability of the bichromatic force to cool. The finite velocity range of the BF allows estimation of a characteristic cooling time which is independent of the excited state lifetime, only depending on the atomic mass and optical transition energy. Past experiments, including the helium collimation used for neutral atom lithography, have demonstrated that the BF can collimate and longitudinally slow atomic beams, but required long interaction times that included many spontaneous emission (SE) events. The effect of SE can be mitigated, and is predicted to not be necessary for BF cooling. Since the BF cooling time is not related to the excited state lifetime, a transition can be chosen such that the cooling time is shorter than the SE cycle time, allowing direct laser cooling on atoms and molecules that do not have cycling transitions. Experiments using the helium 2 3S-3P transition were chosen because the BF cooling time (285 ns) is on the order of the average SE cycle time (260 ns). Numerical simulations of the experimental system were run predicting compression of the

  20. The Elusive Excited Quintet [superscript 5]D of Tb(III): A Source of Luminescence and Resonance Energy Transfer in Terbium Compounds

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klier, Kamil

    2010-01-01

    The understanding of electronic structure of atomic and molecular term states involved in spectroscopic transitions is aided by projecting combinations of micro-configurations to multi-electron states with "good" quantum numbers of angular momenta. In rare-earth (RE) compounds, atomic term labels are justifiably carried over to compounds, because…

  1. Cryogenic system with GM cryocooler for krypton, xenon separation from hydrogen-helium purge gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chu, X. X.; Zhang, M. M.; Zhang, D. X.; Xu, D.; Qian, Y.; Liu, W.

    2014-01-01

    In the thorium molten salt reactor (TMSR), fission products such as krypton, xenon and tritium will be produced continuously in the process of nuclear fission reaction. A cryogenic system with a two stage GM cryocooler was designed to separate Kr, Xe, and H2 from helium purge gas. The temperatures of two stage heat exchanger condensation tanks were maintained at about 38 K and 4.5 K, respectively. The main fluid parameters of heat transfer were confirmed, and the structural heat exchanger equipment and cold box were designed. Designed concentrations after cryogenic separation of Kr, Xe and H2 in helium recycle gas are less than 1 ppb.

  2. Cryogenic system with GM cryocooler for krypton, xenon separation from hydrogen-helium purge gas

    SciTech Connect

    Chu, X. X.; Zhang, D. X.; Qian, Y.; Liu, W.; Zhang, M. M.; Xu, D.

    2014-01-29

    In the thorium molten salt reactor (TMSR), fission products such as krypton, xenon and tritium will be produced continuously in the process of nuclear fission reaction. A cryogenic system with a two stage GM cryocooler was designed to separate Kr, Xe, and H{sub 2} from helium purge gas. The temperatures of two stage heat exchanger condensation tanks were maintained at about 38 K and 4.5 K, respectively. The main fluid parameters of heat transfer were confirmed, and the structural heat exchanger equipment and cold box were designed. Designed concentrations after cryogenic separation of Kr, Xe and H{sub 2} in helium recycle gas are less than 1 ppb.

  3. Helium Saturation of Liquid Propellants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yavrouian, A. H.; Moran, Clifford M.

    1990-01-01

    The research is in three areas which are: (1) techniques were devised for achieving the required levels of helium (He) saturation in liquid propellants (limited to monomethylhydrazine (MMH) and nitrogen tetroxide (NTO)); (2) the values were evaluated for equilibrium solubilities of He in liquid propellants as currently used in the industry; and (3) the He dissolved in liquid propellants were accurately measured. Conclusions drawn from these studies include: (1) Techniques for dissolving He in liquid propellants depending upon the capabilities of the testing facility (Verification of the quantity of gas dissolved is essential); (2) Until greater accuracy is obtained, the equilibrium solubility values of He in MMH and NTO as cited in the Air Force Propellant Handbooks should be accepted as standard (There are still enough uncertainties in the He saturation values to warrant further basic experimental studies); and (3) The manometric measurement of gas volume from a frozen sample of propellant should be the accepted method for gas analysis.

  4. Atom lithography with metastable helium

    SciTech Connect

    Allred, Claire S.; Reeves, Jason; Corder, Christopher; Metcalf, Harold

    2010-02-15

    A bright metastable helium (He*) beam is collimated sequentially with the bichromatic force and three optical molasses velocity compression stages. Each He* atom in the beam has 20 eV of internal energy that can destroy a molecular resist assembled on a gold coated silicon wafer. Patterns in the resist are imprinted onto the gold layer with a standard selective etch. Patterning of the wafer with the He{sup *} was demonstrated with two methods. First, a mesh was used to protect parts of the wafer making an array of grid lines. Second, a standing wave of {lambda}=1083 nm light was used to channel and focus the He* atoms into lines separated by {lambda}/2. The patterns were measured with an atomic force microscope establishing an edge resolution of 80 nm. Our results are reliable and repeatable.

  5. Helium Reionization Simulations. I. Modeling Quasars as Radiation Sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    La Plante, Paul; Trac, Hy

    2016-09-01

    We introduce a new project to understand helium reionization using fully coupled N-body, hydrodynamics, and radiative transfer simulations. This project aims to capture correctly the thermal history of the intergalactic medium as a result of reionization and make predictions about the Lyα forest and baryon temperature-density relation. The dominant sources of radiation for this transition are quasars, so modeling the source population accurately is very important for making reliable predictions. In this first paper, we present a new method for populating dark matter halos with quasars. Our set of quasar models includes two different light curves, a lightbulb (simple on/off) and symmetric exponential model, and luminosity-dependent quasar lifetimes. Our method self-consistently reproduces an input quasar luminosity function given a halo catalog from an N-body simulation, and propagates quasars through the merger history of halo hosts. After calibrating quasar clustering using measurements from the Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey, we find that the characteristic mass of quasar hosts is {M}h˜ 2.5× {10}12 {h}-1 {M}⊙ for the lightbulb model, and {M}h˜ 2.3× {10}12 {h}-1 {M}⊙ for the exponential model. In the latter model, the peak quasar luminosity for a given halo mass is larger than that in the former, typically by a factor of 1.5-2. The effective lifetime for quasars in the lightbulb model is 59 Myr, and in the exponential case, the effective time constant is about 15 Myr. We include semi-analytic calculations of helium reionization, and discuss how to include these quasars as sources of ionizing radiation for full hydrodynamics with radiative transfer simulations in order to study helium reionization.

  6. Helium Reionization Simulations. I. Modeling Quasars as Radiation Sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    La Plante, Paul; Trac, Hy

    2016-09-01

    We introduce a new project to understand helium reionization using fully coupled N-body, hydrodynamics, and radiative transfer simulations. This project aims to capture correctly the thermal history of the intergalactic medium as a result of reionization and make predictions about the Lyα forest and baryon temperature–density relation. The dominant sources of radiation for this transition are quasars, so modeling the source population accurately is very important for making reliable predictions. In this first paper, we present a new method for populating dark matter halos with quasars. Our set of quasar models includes two different light curves, a lightbulb (simple on/off) and symmetric exponential model, and luminosity-dependent quasar lifetimes. Our method self-consistently reproduces an input quasar luminosity function given a halo catalog from an N-body simulation, and propagates quasars through the merger history of halo hosts. After calibrating quasar clustering using measurements from the Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey, we find that the characteristic mass of quasar hosts is {M}h∼ 2.5× {10}12 {h}-1 {M}ȯ for the lightbulb model, and {M}h∼ 2.3× {10}12 {h}-1 {M}ȯ for the exponential model. In the latter model, the peak quasar luminosity for a given halo mass is larger than that in the former, typically by a factor of 1.5–2. The effective lifetime for quasars in the lightbulb model is 59 Myr, and in the exponential case, the effective time constant is about 15 Myr. We include semi-analytic calculations of helium reionization, and discuss how to include these quasars as sources of ionizing radiation for full hydrodynamics with radiative transfer simulations in order to study helium reionization.

  7. Dicobalt-μ-oxo polyoxometalate compound, [(α(2)-P2W17O61Co)2O](14-): a potent species for water oxidation, C-H bond activation, and oxygen transfer.

    PubMed

    Barats-Damatov, Delina; Shimon, Linda J W; Weiner, Lev; Schreiber, Roy E; Jiménez-Lozano, Pablo; Poblet, Josep M; de Graaf, Coen; Neumann, Ronny

    2014-02-01

    High-valent oxo compounds of transition metals are often implicated as active species in oxygenation of hydrocarbons through carbon-hydrogen bond activation or oxygen transfer and also in water oxidation. Recently, several examples of cobalt-catalyzed water oxidation have been reported, and cobalt(IV) species have been suggested as active intermediates. A reactive species, formally a dicobalt(IV)-μ-oxo polyoxometalate compound [(α2-P2W17O61Co)2O](14-), [(POMCo)2O], has now been isolated and characterized by the oxidation of a monomeric [α2-P2W17O61Co(II)(H2O)](8-), [POMCo(II)H2O], with ozone in water. The crystal structure shows a nearly linear Co-O-Co moiety with a Co-O bond length of ∼1.77 Å. In aqueous solution [(POMCo)2O] was identified by (31)P NMR, Raman, and UV-vis spectroscopy. Reactivity studies showed that [(POMCo)2O]2O] is an active compound for the oxidation of H2O to O2, direct oxygen transfer to water-soluble sulfoxides and phosphines, indirect epoxidation of alkenes via a Mn porphyrin, and the selective oxidation of alcohols by carbon-hydrogen bond activation. The latter appears to occur via a hydrogen atom transfer mechanism. Density functional and CASSCF calculations strongly indicate that the electronic structure of [(POMCo)2O]2O] is best defined as a compound having two cobalt(III) atoms with two oxidized oxygen atoms.

  8. Helium-3 and diffuse Helium-4 emissions prior the 2014-15 Fogo eruption, Cape Verde

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asensio-Ramos, María; Padrón, Eleazar; Dionis, Samara; Sumino, Hirochika; Fernandes, Paulo; Melián, Gladys V.; Barrancos, José; Hernández, Pedro A.; Rodríguez, Fátima; Silva, Sónia; Pérez, Nemesio M.; Padilla, Germán; Bandomo, Zuleyka; Cabral, Jeremias; Calvo, David; Pereira, José Manuel; Semedo, Helio

    2015-04-01

    On November 23, 2014 a new volcanic eruption started at the southwestern flank of Pico do Fogo volcano (Fogo Island, Cape Verde) after 19 years of the last eruptive event. Helium-3 emission from fumarole discharges and diffuse helium-4 degassing studies have been carried out regularly at the summit crater of Pico do Fogo since May 2007 until March 2014. The first published data on helium isotopes and diffuse helium-4 degassing from Pico do Fogo volcano is related to the field work performed on February 2010 which shows already relatively high helium-3 emission, 8.53 ± 0.9 R/RA (being R and RA the sample and atmospheric 3He/4He isotope ratio, respectively), and diffuse helium-4 degassing rate, 4.2 ± 0.2 kg d-1 (Dionis et al., 2015). During the eight year period 2007-2014, helium-4 emission rate was measured yearly at 50 different sampling sites selected in the surface environment of the summit crater of Pico do Fogo (0.14 km2) following the Darcy's law, and assuming that helium-4 emission is mainly governed by convection. The distribution of the sampling sites was carefully chosen to homogeneously cover the target area, allowing the computation of the total helium-4 emission by sequential Gaussian simulation (sGs). In addition, helium-3 emission was measured in the fumarole gases following the method described by Sumino et al. (2001). During the eight year period, convective helium-4 emission ranged between 1.2 and 5.7 kg d-1, and helium-3 emission between 7.73 and 8.82 R/RA. Both helium-4 and helium-3 emission showed significant increases on February 2010, suggesting a potential magma intrusion into the volcanic system of Pico do Fogo. However, the highest observed values of both parameters were observed on November, 2013 (helium-3 emission) and on March 2014 (diffuse helium-4 emission) suggesting a second magma intrusion giving rise to the volcanic eruption on November 23, 2014. As was observed in other volcanic systems (Padrón et al., 2013), helium degassing

  9. Helium refrigeration considerations for cryomodule design

    SciTech Connect

    Ganni, V.; Knudsen, P.

    2014-01-29

    Many of the present day accelerators are based on superconducting radio frequency (SRF) cavities, packaged in cryo-modules (CM), which depend on helium refrigeration at sub-atmospheric pressures, nominally 2 K. These specialized helium refrigeration systems are quite cost intensive to produce and operate. Particularly as there is typically no work extraction below the 4.5-K supply, it is important that the exergy loss between this temperature level and the CM load temperature(s) be minimized by the process configuration choices. This paper will present, compare and discuss several possible helium distribution process arrangements to support the CM loads.

  10. Trapping helium in Y2Ti2O7 compared to in matrix iron: A first principles study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Litong; Jiang, Yong; Robert Odette, G.; Yamamoto, Takuya; Liu, Zuming; Liu, Yong

    2014-04-01

    Pyrochlore Y2Ti2O7 is a primary precipitate phase in nano-structured ferritic alloys (NFAs) for fission and fusion energy applications. We report a theoretical study for assessing the relative stability of trapping helium in Y2Ti2O7 versus in matrix iron. Various defect structures and the associated energies are examined and compared. Results reveal that helium can be deeply trapped in Y2Ti2O7 and that the corresponding self-interaction is essentially repulsive. Transmutant helium in NFAs prefers to occupy individual octa-interstitial sites in Y2Ti2O7, before forming small clusters in Y2Ti2O7. Helium partitioning in NFAs depends on the number and dispersion of Y2Ti2O7; and thus initially, bubble formation and growth in iron matrix can be largely suppressed. Charge transfer occurs from helium to neighboring oxygen anions, but not to neighboring metal cations, suggesting a general effectiveness of trapping helium in oxides. Reasons for the ultimate fate of helium to form small nm-scale interface bubbles are also discussed.

  11. Analysis of the Effect of Time, Temperature, and Fuel Age on Helium Release from 238-Plutonium Dioxide Fuel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barklay, Chadwick D.; Kramer, Daniel P.; Ruhkamp, Joseph D.

    2005-02-01

    The compound 238-plutonium dioxide has been employed over the last several decades as the fuel of choice in fabricating nuclear powered thermal to electrical converters. The alpha decay of 238-plutonium results in the generation of helium ions as a function of time. While the quantity of helium formed within the fuel can be easily calculated, its diffusion and/or release mechanism as a function of time, temperature, fuel quantity and age needs to be characterized. Within the scope of this paper the principle interest centers on determining the expected quantity of helium that will be released from solid 238-plutonium dioxide fuel forms enclosed within a primary containment vessel (PCV) under Hypothetical Accident Conditions (HAC) as described in 10 CFR 71.73(4). Once the quantity of helium released during HAC has been determined, the partial pressure increase due to the helium release can be calculated for a given shipping configuration. This partial pressure increase due to helium release during HAC for a selected shipping configuration can then be used to determine if the structural integrity of the package will be maintained or compromised during HAC. However, it is important to recognize that helium release is not a function of a particular shipping package, but as shall be demonstrated is a function of time, temperature, and fuel quantity and age.

  12. Analysis of the Effect of Time, Temperature, and Fuel Age on Helium Release from 238-Plutonium Dioxide Fuel

    SciTech Connect

    Barklay, Chadwick D.; Kramer, Daniel P.; Ruhkamp, Joseph D.

    2005-02-06

    The compound 238-plutonium dioxide has been employed over the last several decades as the fuel of choice in fabricating nuclear powered thermal to electrical converters. The alpha decay of 238-plutonium results in the generation of helium ions as a function of time. While the quantity of helium formed within the fuel can be easily calculated, its diffusion and/or release mechanism as a function of time, temperature, fuel quantity and age needs to be characterized. Within the scope of this paper the principle interest centers on determining the expected quantity of helium that will be released from solid 238-plutonium dioxide fuel forms enclosed within a primary containment vessel (PCV) under Hypothetical Accident Conditions (HAC) as described in 10 CFR 71.73(4). Once the quantity of helium released during HAC has been determined, the partial pressure increase due to the helium release can be calculated for a given shipping configuration. This partial pressure increase due to helium release during HAC for a selected shipping configuration can then be used to determine if the structural integrity of the package will be maintained or compromised during HAC. However, it is important to recognize that helium release is not a function of a particular shipping package, but as shall be demonstrated is a function of time, temperature, and fuel quantity and age.

  13. 21 CFR 868.1640 - Helium gas analyzer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Helium gas analyzer. 868.1640 Section 868.1640...) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 868.1640 Helium gas analyzer. (a) Identification. A helium gas analyzer is a device intended to measure the concentration of helium in a...

  14. 21 CFR 868.1640 - Helium gas analyzer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Helium gas analyzer. 868.1640 Section 868.1640...) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 868.1640 Helium gas analyzer. (a) Identification. A helium gas analyzer is a device intended to measure the concentration of helium in a...

  15. 21 CFR 868.1640 - Helium gas analyzer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Helium gas analyzer. 868.1640 Section 868.1640...) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 868.1640 Helium gas analyzer. (a) Identification. A helium gas analyzer is a device intended to measure the concentration of helium in a...

  16. 21 CFR 868.1640 - Helium gas analyzer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Helium gas analyzer. 868.1640 Section 868.1640...) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 868.1640 Helium gas analyzer. (a) Identification. A helium gas analyzer is a device intended to measure the concentration of helium in a...

  17. Lightweight Liquid Helium Dewar for High-Altitude Balloon Payloads

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kogut, Alan; James, Bryan; Fixsen, Dale

    2013-01-01

    evacuates the dewar vacuum space to provide the necessary thermal isolation. Liquid helium may then be transferred from the storage dewar into the bucket dewar to cool the telescope inside the bucket dewar. By splitting the functions of helium storage and in-flight thermal isolation, the parasitic mass associated with the dewar pressure vessel is eliminated to achieve factor-of-five or better reduction in mass. The lower mass allows flight on conventional scientific research balloons, even for telescopes 3 to 5 meters in diameter.

  18. A Structured Approach to Analyze the Influence of Channel Dimensions on Heat Extraction via Superfluid Helium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bielert, E. R.; ten Kate, H. H. J.; Verweij, A. P.

    For the luminosity upgrade of the LHC at CERN, the final focusing quadrupole magnets will be exposed to an increased energy deposition in their coil windings. To have a higher heat transfer rate between cable and superfluid helium bath, the cable insulation has been subject of many studies. Improved cable insulation designs, making use of several layers of Kapton tape wound around Rutherford type cables, allow helium to penetrate via micro-channels, which are left open between adjacent Kapton tape sections. To better understand the thermal behaviour at operating temperatures below and some degrees above the helium lambda transition, besides experimental work, several numerical models have been developed to study the influence of the cable insulation. Here we present a new numerical model based on an earlier presented FEM model, which makes use of coupling variables such that the user can easily and quickly change the parameters of interest, giving the possibility to analyse new ideas effectively.

  19. Calculated Regenerator Performance at 4 K with HELIUM-4 and HELIUM-3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radebaugh, Ray; Huang, Yonghua; O'Gallagher, Agnes; Gary, John

    2008-03-01

    The helium-4 working fluid in regenerative cryocoolers operating with the cold end near 4 K deviates considerably from an ideal gas. As a result, losses in the regenerator, given by the time-averaged enthalpy flux, are increased and are strong functions of the operating pressure and temperature. Helium-3, with its lower boiling point, behaves somewhat closer to an ideal gas in this low temperature range and can reduce the losses in 4 K regenerators. An analytical model is used to find the fluid properties that strongly influence the regenerator losses as well as the gross refrigeration power. The thermodynamic and transport properties of helium-3 were incorporated into the latest NIST regenerator numerical model, known as REGEN3.3, which was used to model regenerator performance with either helium-4 or helium-3. With this model we show how the use of helium-3 in place of helium-4 can improve the performance of 4 K regenerative cryocoolers. The effects of operating pressure, warm-end temperature, and frequency on regenerators with helium-4 and helium-3 are investigated and compared. The results are used to find optimum operating conditions. The frequency range investigated varies from 1 Hz to 30 Hz, with particular emphasis on higher frequencies.

  20. Helium Dilution Cryocooler for Space Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roach, Pat; Hogan, Robert (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    NASA's New Millenium Program Space Technology presents the Helium Dilution Cryocooler for Space Applications. The topics include: 1) Capability; 2) Applications; and 3) Advantages. This paper is in viewgraph form.

  1. Helium and Enhanced Image of the Sun

    NASA Video Gallery

    This video blinks between an image in Helium and an enhanced image. The original image is from AIA on SDO and the enhanced image was created at the LM Solar and Astrophysics Laboratory (LMSAL) by D...

  2. Helium Find Thaws the Cold Fusion Trail.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pennisi, E.

    1991-01-01

    Reported is a study of cold fusion in which trace amounts of helium, possible evidence of an actual fusion reaction, were found. Research methodology is detailed. The controversy over the validity of experimental results with cold fusion are reviewed. (CW)

  3. Commissioning of a new helium pipeline

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    Center Director Roy Bridges addresses the audience at the commissioning of a new high-pressure helium pipeline at Kennedy Space Center that will service launch needs at the new Delta IV Complex 37 at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station. The nine-mile- long buried pipeline will also serve as a backup helium resource for Shuttle launches. Nearly one launch's worth of helium will be available in the pipeline to support a Shuttle pad in an emergency. The line originates at the Helium Facility on KSC and terminates in a meter station at the perimeter of the Delta IV launch pad. Others at the ceremony were Jerry Jorgensen, pipeline project manager, Space Gateway Support (SGS); Col. Samuel Dick, representative of the 45th Space Wing; Ramon Lugo, acting executive director, JPMO; David Herst, director, Delta IV Launch Sites; Pierre Dufour, president and CEO, Air Liquide America Corporation; and Michael Butchko, president, SGS.

  4. Commissioning of a new helium pipeline

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    Jerry Jorgensen welcomes the audience to the commissioning of a new high-pressure helium pipeline at Kennedy Space Center. Jorgensen, with Space Gateway Support (SGS), is the pipeline project manager. To the right is Ramon Lugo, acting executive director, JPMO. Others at the ceremony were Center Director Roy Bridges; Col. Samuel Dick, representative of the 45th Space Wing; David Herst, director, Delta IV Launch Sites; Pierre Dufour, president and CEO, Air Liquide America Corporation; and Michael Butchko, president, SGS. The pipeline will service launch needs at the new Delta IV Complex 37 at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station. The nine-mile-long buried pipeline will also serve as a backup helium resource for Shuttle launches. Nearly one launch's worth of helium will be available in the pipeline to support a Shuttle pad in an emergency. The line originates at the Helium Facility on KSC and terminates in a meter station at the perimeter of the Delta IV launch pad.

  5. Commissioning of a new helium pipeline

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    At the commissioning of a new high-pressure helium pipeline at Kennedy Space Center, Ramon Lugo, acting executive director, JPMO , presents a plaque to Center Director Roy Bridges. The pipeline will service launch needs at the new Delta IV Complex 37 at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station. Others at the ceremony were Jerry Jorgensen, pipeline project manager, Space Gateway Support (SGS); Col. Samuel Dick, representative of the 45th Space Wing; David Herst, director, Delta IV Launch Sites; Pierre Dufour, president and CEO, Air Liquide America Corporation; and Michael Butchko, president, SGS. The nine-mile-long buried pipeline will also serve as a backup helium resource for Shuttle launches. Nearly one launch's worth of helium will be available in the pipeline to support a Shuttle pad in an emergency. The line originates at the Helium Facility on KSC and terminates in a meter station at the perimeter of the Delta IV launch pad.

  6. Development of charcoal sorbents for helium cryopumping

    SciTech Connect

    Sedgley, D.W.; Tobin, A.G.

    1984-01-01

    Testing of the cryogenically cooled charcoal using fusion-compatible binders for pumping helium has shown promising results. The program demonstrated comparable or improved performance with these binders compared to the charcoal (type and size) using an epoxy binder.

  7. Recondensation performance of liquid helium cryostat for a 28 GHz electron cyclotron resonance ion source.

    PubMed

    Choi, Seyong; Lee, Byoung-Seob; Park, Jin Yong; Ok, Jung-Woo; Shin, Chang Seouk; Yoon, Jang-Hee; Won, Mi-Sook; Kim, Byoung-Chul

    2014-02-01

    Cryostat performance is essential for the stable operation of a superconducting magnet. A closed-cycle liquid helium cryostat was adopted for use for a superconducting electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) ion source by recondensing liquid helium vapor. The goal was to maintain the liquid helium filled reservoir at a constant level without transferring any liquid helium during the normal operation of the ECR ion source. To accomplish this, Gifford-McMahon (GM) refrigerators, which have two cold heads, were installed on the top of the cryostat. The cooling power of the GM cryocooler is 1.5 W at the second stage and 50 W at the first stage. Each stage was connected to the liquid helium reservoir, a radiation shield including high-Tc current lead, and related items. Before commissioning the ECR ion source, a preliminary evaluation of the recondensation performance was carried out with the magnet in partial operation. The design of the cryostat, its fabrication, and the experimental results are reported.

  8. Recondensation performance of liquid helium cryostat for a 28 GHz electron cyclotron resonance ion source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Seyong; Lee, Byoung-Seob; Park, Jin Yong; Ok, Jung-Woo; Shin, Chang Seouk; Yoon, Jang-Hee; Won, Mi-Sook; Kim, Byoung-Chul

    2014-02-01

    Cryostat performance is essential for the stable operation of a superconducting magnet. A closed-cycle liquid helium cryostat was adopted for use for a superconducting electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) ion source by recondensing liquid helium vapor. The goal was to maintain the liquid helium filled reservoir at a constant level without transferring any liquid helium during the normal operation of the ECR ion source. To accomplish this, Gifford-McMahon (GM) refrigerators, which have two cold heads, were installed on the top of the cryostat. The cooling power of the GM cryocooler is 1.5 W at the second stage and 50 W at the first stage. Each stage was connected to the liquid helium reservoir, a radiation shield including high-Tc current lead, and related items. Before commissioning the ECR ion source, a preliminary evaluation of the recondensation performance was carried out with the magnet in partial operation. The design of the cryostat, its fabrication, and the experimental results are reported.

  9. Cosmogenic helium in a terrestrial igneous rock

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kurz, M. D.

    1986-01-01

    New helium isotopic measurements on samples from the Kula formation of Haleakala volcano of Hawaii are presented that are best explained by an in situ cosmogenic origin for a significant fraction of the He-3. Results from crushing and stepwise heating experiments, and consideration of the exposure age of the sample at the surface and the cosmic ray fluxes strongly support this hypothesis. Although crustal cosmogenic helium has been proposed previously, this represents its first unambiguous identification in a terrestrial sample.

  10. Trace organic impurities in gaseous helium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schehl, T. A.

    1973-01-01

    A program to determine trace organic impurities present in helium has been initiated. The impurities were concentrated in a cryogenic trap to permit detection and identification by a gas chromatographic-mass spectrometric technique. Gaseous helium (GHe) exhibited 63 GC flame ionization response peaks. Relative GC peak heights and identifications of 25 major impurities by their mass spectra are given. As an aid to further investigation, identities are proposed for 16 other components, and their mass spectra are given.

  11. Equation of state of metallic helium

    SciTech Connect

    Shvets, V. T.

    2013-01-15

    The effective ion-ion interaction, free energy, pressure, and electric resistance of metallic liquid helium have been calculated in wide density and temperature ranges using perturbation theory in the electron-ion interaction potential. In the case of conduction electrons, the exchange interaction has been taken into account in the random-phase approximation and correlations have been taken into account in the local-field approximation. The solid-sphere model has been used for the nuclear subsystem. The diameter of these spheres is the only parameter of this theory. The diameter and density of the system at which the transition of helium from the singly ionized to doubly ionized state occurs have been estimated by analyzing the pair effective interaction between helium atoms. The case of doubly ionized helium atoms has been considered. Terms up to the third order of perturbation theory have been taken into account in the numerical calculations. The contribution of the third-order term is significant in all cases. The electric resistance and its temperature dependence for metallic helium are characteristic of simple divalent metals in the liquid state. The thermodynamic parameters-temperature and pressure densities-are within the ranges characteristic of the central regions of giant planets. This makes it possible to assume the existence of helium in the metallic state within the solar system.

  12. Sonic helium detectors in the Fermilab Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    Bossert, R.J.; /Fermilab

    2006-01-01

    In the Fermilab Tevatron cryogenic system there are many remotely located low-pressure plate relief valves that must vent large volumes of cold helium gas when magnet quenches occur. These valves can occasionally stick open or not reseat completely, resulting in a large helium loss. As such, the need exists for a detector to monitor the relief valve's discharge area for the presence of helium. Due to the quantity needed, cost is an important factor. A unit has been developed and built for this purpose that is quite inexpensive. Its operating principle is based on the speed of sound, where two closely matched tubes operate at their acoustic resonant frequency. When helium is introduced into one of these tubes, the resulting difference in acoustic time of flight is used to trigger an alarm. At present, there are 39 of these units installed and operating in the Tevatron. They have detected many minor and major helium leaks, and have also been found useful in detecting a rise in the helium background in the enclosed refrigerator buildings. This paper covers the construction, usage and operational experience gained with these units over the last several years.

  13. Advanced helium magnetometer for space applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slocum, Robert E.

    1987-01-01

    The goal of this effort was demonstration of the concepts for an advanced helium magnetometer which meets the demands of future NASA earth orbiting, interplanetary, solar, and interstellar missions. The technical effort focused on optical pumping of helium with tunable solid state lasers. We were able to demonstrate the concept of a laser pumped helium magnetometer with improved accuracy, low power, and sensitivity of the order of 1 pT. A number of technical approaches were investigated for building a solid state laser tunable to the helium absorption line at 1083 nm. The laser selected was an Nd-doped LNA crystal pumped by a diode laser. Two laboratory versions of the lanthanum neodymium hexa-aluminate (LNA) laser were fabricated and used to conduct optical pumping experiments in helium and demonstrate laser pumped magnetometer concepts for both the low field vector mode and the scalar mode of operation. A digital resonance spectrometer was designed and built in order to evaluate the helium resonance signals and observe scalar magnetometer operation. The results indicate that the laser pumped sensor in the VHM mode is 45 times more sensitive than a lamp pumped sensor for identical system noise levels. A study was made of typical laser pumped resonance signals in the conventional magnetic resonance mode. The laser pumped sensor was operated as a scalar magnetometer, and it is concluded that magnetometers with 1 pT sensitivity can be achieved with the use of laser pumping and stable laser pump sources.

  14. Helium and Neon in Comets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jewitt, David

    1996-01-01

    Two comets were observed with EUVE in late 1994. Both comet Mueller and comet Borrelly are short-period comets having well established orbital elements and accurate ephemerides. Spectra of 40 ksec were taken of each. No evidence for emission lines from either Helium or Neon was detected. We calculated limits on the production rates of these atoms (relative to solar) assuming a standard isotropic outflow model, with a gas streaming speed of 1 km/s. The 3-sigma (99.7% confidence) limits (1/100,000 for He, 0.8 for Ne) are based on a conservative estimate of the noise in the EUVE spectra. They are also weakly dependent on the precise pointing and tracking of the EUVE field of view relative to the comet during the integrations. These limits are consistent with ice formation temperatures T greater than or equal to 30 K, as judged from the gas trapping experiments of Bar-Nun. For comparison, the solar abundances of these elements are He/O = 110, Ne/O = 1/16. Neither limit was as constraining as we had initially hoped, mainly because comets Mueller and Borrelly were intrinsically less active than anticipated.

  15. Pulsating Helium Atmosphere White Dwarfs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Provencal, Judith; Montgomery, Michael H.; Bischoff-Kim, Agnes; Shipman, Harry; Nitta, Atsuko; Whole Earth Telescope Collaboration

    2015-08-01

    The overwhelming majority of all stars currently on the main sequence as well as those from earlier generations will or have ended their stellar lives as white dwarf stars. White dwarfs are rich forensic laboratories linking the history and future evolution of our Galaxy. Their structure and atmospheric composition provide evidence of how the progenitors lived, how they evolved, and how they died. This information reveals details of processes governing the behavior of contemporary main sequence stars. Combined with their distribution in luminosity/temperature, white dwarfs strongly constrain models of galactic and cosmological evolution.GD358 is among the brightest (mv =13.7) and best studied of the pulsating white dwarfs. This helium atmoshere pulsator (DBV) has an extensive photometric database spanning 30 years, including nine multisite Whole Earth Telescope campaigns. GD358 exhibits a range of behaviors, from drastic changes in excited pulsation modes to variable multiplet splittings. We use GD358 as a template for an examination of the DBV class, combining photometric results with recent COS spectroscopy. The results present new questions concerning DB formation and evolution.

  16. Transferring resist microlenses into silicon by reactive ion etching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eisner, Martin; Schwider, Johannes

    1996-10-01

    Reactive ion etching (RIE) is known as an effective technique for high precision anisotropic etching with a minimum loss of the critical dimensions provided by the photoresist or other masking materials. RIE can also be used to transfer continuous forms such as spherical resist microlenses into substrate materials (e.g., quartz glass or silicon). The form of the lenses can be considerably controlled by changing the etch rate ratio between resist and the substrate. This was achieved by varying the etch gas compound, especially the amount of oxygen, during the etching or by changing the applied power. Measured etch rates for silicon are given to demonstrate the possibilities of lens shaping. The surface roughness of the etched lenses was one of the main problems. The roughness could be minimized by adding helium to the etch gases for heat removal and by increasing the resist rinse time after the wet chemical development.

  17. Redox-neutral rhodium-catalyzed C-H functionalization of arylamine N-oxides with diazo compounds: primary C(sp(3))-H/C(sp(2))-H activation and oxygen-atom transfer.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Bing; Chen, Zhaoqiang; Yang, Yaxi; Ai, Wen; Tang, Huanyu; Wu, Yunxiang; Zhu, Weiliang; Li, Yuanchao

    2015-10-01

    An unprecedented rhodium(III)-catalyzed regioselective redox-neutral annulation reaction of 1-naphthylamine N-oxides with diazo compounds was developed to afford various biologically important 1H-benzo[g]indolines. This coupling reaction proceeds under mild reaction conditions and does not require external oxidants. The only by-products are dinitrogen and water. More significantly, this reaction represents the first example of dual functiaonalization of unactivated a primary C(sp(3) )H bond and C(sp(2) )H bond with diazocarbonyl compounds. DFT calculations revealed that an intermediate iminium is most likely involved in the catalytic cycle. Moreover, a rhodium(III)-catalyzed coupling of readily available tertiary aniline N-oxides with α-diazomalonates was also developed under external oxidant-free conditions to access various aminomandelic acid derivatives by an O-atom-transfer reaction.

  18. Experimental assessment and modeling of interphase mass transfer rates of organic compounds in multiphase subsurface systems. Final report, July 1, 1989--June 30, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Abriola, L.M.; Weber, W.J. Jr.

    1993-10-01

    Results of an experimental investigation into strady state dissolution of nonaqueous phase liquids (NAPLS) entrapped within water saturated porous media are presented. Influence of porous media type, NAPL characteristics, and aqueous phase flow velocity are examined for transient and steady-state dissolution of NAPL. Entrapped NAPL distributions are examined and are found to influence mass transfer between the phases. A phenomenological model for the steady state mass transfer process is developed which expresses a lumped mass transfer coefficient as a function of the hydrodynamics of the system and grain size parameters as a surrogate measure of the NAPL distribution. Transient dissolution data is used to develop two alternative phenomenological models for mass transfer. The models are incorporated into a onedimensional numerical simulator and are shown to be effective predictors of transient dissolution data in similar experimental systems. In order to further explore the effects of scale and heterogeneities on NAPL dissolution, the sphere model is incorporated into a two-dimensional simulator and is used to explore long-term dissolution of a TCE (trichloroethylene) spill in a layered system of sands. The simulation demonstrates the significance of heterogeneity, both in controlling the initial distribution of NAPL and the rate of NAPL dissolution.

  19. Hot topic: Brown marmorated stink bug odor compounds do not transfer into milk by feeding bug-contaminated corn silage to lactating dairy cattle.

    PubMed

    Baldwin, R L; Zhang, A; Fultz, S W; Abubeker, S; Harris, C; Connor, E E; Van Hekken, D L

    2014-01-01

    Brown marmorated stink bug (BMSB; Halyomorpha halys) is an emerging invasive species of grave concern to agriculture as a polyphagous plant pest with potential negative effects on the dairy industry. The purpose of this study was to determine the risk of including BMSB-contaminated silage in lactating dairy cow rations. First, 6 dairies, either highly infested (n=3; 30 to 100 bugs per stalk) or not infested (n=3), were sampled to assess the prevalence of bug secretion compounds tridecane (major component) and E-2-decenal (stink odor component) in silage and milk. Second, using wild BMSB, a mini-silo dose-response experiment (adding 100, 50, 25, 10, and 1 freshly crushed bugs/0.5kg of chopped corn) was conducted to assess the effect of ensiling on BMSB stink odor compounds. Finally, synthetic BMSB stink odor compounds (10g of tridecane and 5g of E-2-decenal) were ruminally infused twice daily over 3 d, and samples of milk, urine, and rumen fluid were collected to evaluate disposition. Bug stink odor compounds were sampled by solid-phase microextraction (SPME) and analyzed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). Milk production and feed composition were unaffected when BMSB-contaminated silage was fed. Moreover, no E-2-decenal was detected in silage or milk (detection threshold = 0.00125μg/mL). The dose-response of tridecane in mini-silo samples exhibited a linear relationship (R(2)=0.78) with the amount of BMSB added; however, E-2-decenal was completely decomposed and undetectable in spiked mini-silos after ensiling. Both synthetic secretion compounds infused into rumen were undetectable in all milk and urine samples. E-2-Decenal was not detectable in rumen fluid, whereas tridecane was detected only at 15 min postinfusion but not present thereafter. Feed intake was unaffected by infusion treatment and BMSB secretion compounds (E-2-decenal and tridecane) were not observed in milk. E-2-Decenal and tridecane from the metathoracic gland of BMSB are not able to

  20. DOUBLE-DETONATION SUB-CHANDRASEKHAR SUPERNOVAE: SYNTHETIC OBSERVABLES FOR MINIMUM HELIUM SHELL MASS MODELS

    SciTech Connect

    Kromer, M.; Sim, S. A.; Fink, M.; Roepke, F. K.; Seitenzahl, I. R.; Hillebrandt, W.

    2010-08-20

    In the double-detonation scenario for Type Ia supernovae, it is suggested that a detonation initiates in a shell of helium-rich material accreted from a companion star by a sub-Chandrasekhar-mass white dwarf. This shell detonation drives a shock front into the carbon-oxygen white dwarf that triggers a secondary detonation in the core. The core detonation results in a complete disruption of the white dwarf. Earlier studies concluded that this scenario has difficulties in accounting for the observed properties of Type Ia supernovae since the explosion ejecta are surrounded by the products of explosive helium burning in the shell. Recently, however, it was proposed that detonations might be possible for much less massive helium shells than previously assumed (Bildsten et al.). Moreover, it was shown that even detonations of these minimum helium shell masses robustly trigger detonations of the carbon-oxygen core (Fink et al.). Therefore, it is possible that the impact of the helium layer on observables is less than previously thought. Here, we present time-dependent multi-wavelength radiative transfer calculations for models with minimum helium shell mass and derive synthetic observables for both the optical and {gamma}-ray spectral regions. These differ strongly from those found in earlier simulations of sub-Chandrasekhar-mass explosions in which more massive helium shells were considered. Our models predict light curves that cover both the range of brightnesses and the rise and decline times of observed Type Ia supernovae. However, their colors and spectra do not match the observations. In particular, their B - V colors are generally too red. We show that this discrepancy is mainly due to the composition of the burning products of the helium shell of the Fink et al. models which contain significant amounts of titanium and chromium. Using a toy model, we also show that the burning products of the helium shell depend crucially on its initial composition. This leads us

  1. Data-driven RBE parameterization for helium ion beams.

    PubMed

    Mairani, A; Magro, G; Dokic, I; Valle, S M; Tessonnier, T; Galm, R; Ciocca, M; Parodi, K; Ferrari, A; Jäkel, O; Haberer, T; Pedroni, P; Böhlen, T T

    2016-01-21

    Helium ion beams are expected to be available again in the near future for clinical use. A suitable formalism to obtain relative biological effectiveness (RBE) values for treatment planning (TP) studies is needed. In this work we developed a data-driven RBE parameterization based on published in vitro experimental values. The RBE parameterization has been developed within the framework of the linear-quadratic (LQ) model as a function of the helium linear energy transfer (LET), dose and the tissue specific parameter (α/β)ph of the LQ model for the reference radiation. Analytic expressions are provided, derived from the collected database, describing the RBEα = αHe/αph and Rβ = βHe/βph ratios as a function of LET. Calculated RBE values at 2 Gy photon dose and at 10% survival (RBE10) are compared with the experimental ones. Pearson's correlation coefficients were, respectively, 0.85 and 0.84 confirming the soundness of the introduced approach. Moreover, due to the lack of experimental data at low LET, clonogenic experiments have been performed irradiating A549 cell line with (α/β)ph = 5.4 Gy at the entrance of a 56.4 MeV u(-1)He beam at the Heidelberg Ion Beam Therapy Center. The proposed parameterization reproduces the measured cell survival within the experimental uncertainties. A RBE formula, which depends only on dose, LET and (α/β)ph as input parameters is proposed, allowing a straightforward implementation in a TP system.

  2. The liquid helium thermosyphon for the GEM detector magnet

    SciTech Connect

    Warren, R.P.

    1993-05-04

    The GEM detector magnet, a horizontal solenoid 19.5 m in diameter and wound with a niobium-titanium cable in conduit, will be located with it`s axis 19.5 m below grade. The conductor is wound on the inside of an aluminum bobbin which is cooled by liquid helium which flows by natural convection in a thermosyphon loop from a large storage dewar located at the ground surface. The function of the thermosyphon system is to absorb the environmental heat load as well as any internally generated heat. In the first category is included that heat which is transfered to the magnet by way of the mechanical supports, the insulation and the current leads. The internally generated heat includes the resistive heating within the normally conducting conductor splices and the inductive heating of the bobbin during current transients. Though similar systems have been employed elsewhere, there are some unique aspects to the present design. By taking advantage of the large vertical head available, the parallel heat exchanger passes within the magnet remain sub-cooled, thus insuring single phase coolant within the magnet. It is believed that this will be the first instance of such a large vertical head being used to this advantage in a helium system.

  3. Observations of interstellar helium pickup ions in the inner heliosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gershman, D. J.; Gloeckler, G.; Raines, J. M.; Fisk, L. A.; Solomon, S. C.; Stone, E. C.

    2011-12-01

    During the inner heliosphere transfer orbit of the MESSENGER spacecraft, the Fast Imaging Plasma Spectrometer (FIPS) measured the first pickup ion distributions at heliospheric distances of 0.3-0.75 AU. From several transits of MESSENGER through the interstellar helium gravitational focusing cone at 0.3 AU and 0.6 AU, we find an enhancement by a factor of 4 in measured pickup ion densities centered directly downwind from the direction of interstellar flow. These enhancements extend approximately 30 degrees around the cone center, consistent with corresponding observations made at 1 AU. For approximately time-stationary conditions from 2007 to 2009, we find a nearly 1/R dependence of pickup ion density in the inner heliosphere. We also present the first pitch-angle distributions of helium pickup ions in the inner heliosphere. Near the cone center at 0.3 AU, we observe a strong anti-sunward anisotropy with respect to the bulk solar wind flow, consistent with ions picked up in a nearly radial magnetic field and swept out into the heliosphere with inhibited pitch-angle scattering across 90 degrees. These data are compared with observations of He+ near 1 AU with the Solar Wind Ion Composition Spectrometer (SWICS) that is part of the ACE spacecraft. These measurements cover passes through the heliospheric focusing cone during the same time period. We compare FIPS and SWICS data with models of interstellar neutral density, ionization, and transport properties

  4. A Series of Cinchona-Derived N-Oxide Phase-Transfer Catalysts: Application to the Photo-Organocatalytic Enantioselective α-Hydroxylation of β-Dicarbonyl Compounds.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yakun; Yin, Hang; Tang, Xiaofei; Wu, Yufeng; Meng, Qingwei; Gao, Zhanxian

    2016-08-19

    A series of cinchona-derived N-oxide asymmetric phase-transfer catalysts were synthesized and applied in the enantioselective photo-organocatalytic α-hydroxylation of β-keto esters and β-keto amides (23 examples) using molecular oxygen in excellent yields (up to 98%) and high enantioselectivities (up to 83% ee). These new catalysts could be recycled and reused six times for such a reaction with almost the original reactivity and enantioselectivity. PMID:27336753

  5. Transparent Helium in Stripped Envelope Supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piro, Anthony L.; Morozova, Viktoriya S.

    2014-09-01

    Using simple arguments based on photometric light curves and velocity evolution, we propose that some stripped envelope supernovae (SNe) show signs that a significant fraction of their helium is effectively transparent. The main pieces of evidence are the relatively low velocities with little velocity evolution, as are expected deep inside an exploding star, along with temperatures that are too low to ionize helium. This means that the helium should not contribute to the shaping of the main SN light curve, and thus the total helium mass may be difficult to measure from simple light curve modeling. Conversely, such modeling may be more useful for constraining the mass of the carbon/oxygen core of the SN progenitor. Other stripped envelope SNe show higher velocities and larger velocity gradients, which require an additional opacity source (perhaps the mixing of heavier elements or radioactive nickel) to prevent the helium from being transparent. We discuss ways in which similar analysis can provide insights into the differences and similarities between SNe Ib and Ic, which will lead to a better understanding of their respective formation mechanisms.

  6. TRANSPARENT HELIUM IN STRIPPED ENVELOPE SUPERNOVAE

    SciTech Connect

    Piro, Anthony L.; Morozova, Viktoriya S.

    2014-09-01

    Using simple arguments based on photometric light curves and velocity evolution, we propose that some stripped envelope supernovae (SNe) show signs that a significant fraction of their helium is effectively transparent. The main pieces of evidence are the relatively low velocities with little velocity evolution, as are expected deep inside an exploding star, along with temperatures that are too low to ionize helium. This means that the helium should not contribute to the shaping of the main SN light curve, and thus the total helium mass may be difficult to measure from simple light curve modeling. Conversely, such modeling may be more useful for constraining the mass of the carbon/oxygen core of the SN progenitor. Other stripped envelope SNe show higher velocities and larger velocity gradients, which require an additional opacity source (perhaps the mixing of heavier elements or radioactive nickel) to prevent the helium from being transparent. We discuss ways in which similar analysis can provide insights into the differences and similarities between SNe Ib and Ic, which will lead to a better understanding of their respective formation mechanisms.

  7. Thermal Performance of the XRS Helium Insert

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Breon, Susan R.; DiPirro, Michael J.; Tuttle, James G.; Shirron, Peter J.; Warner, Brent A.; Boyle, Robert F.; Canavan, Edgar R.

    1999-01-01

    The X-Ray Spectrometer (XRS) is an instrument on the Japanese Astro-E satellite, scheduled for launch early in the year 2000. The XRS Helium Insert comprises a superfluid helium cryostat, an Adiabatic Demagnetization Refrigerator (ADR), and the XRS calorimeters with their cold electronics. The calorimeters are capable of detecting X-rays over the energy range 0.1 to 10 keV with a resolution of 12 eV. The Helium Insert completed its performance and verification testing at Goddard in January 1999. It was shipped to Japan, where it has been integrated with the neon dewar built by Sumitomo Heavy Industries. The Helium Insert was given a challenging lifetime requirement of 2.0 years with a goal of 2.5 years. Based on the results of the thermal performance tests, the predicted on-orbit lifetime is 2.6 years with a margin of 30%. This is the result of both higher efficiency in the ADR cycle and the low temperature top-off, more than compensating for an increase in the parasitic heat load. This paper presents a summary of the key design features and the results of the thermal testing of the XRS Helium Insert.

  8. Helium release from radioisotope heat sources

    SciTech Connect

    Peterson, D.E.; Early, J.W.; Starzynski, J.S.; Land, C.C.

    1984-05-01

    Diffusion of helium in /sup 238/PuO/sub 2/ fuel was characterized as a function of the heating rate and the fuel microstructure. The samples were thermally ramped in an induction furnace and the helium release rates measured with an automated mass spectrometer. The diffusion constants and activation energies were obtained from the data using a simple diffusion model. The release rates of helium were correlated with the fuel microstructure by metallographic examination of fuel samples. The release mechanism consists of four regimes, which are dependent upon the temperature. Initially, the release is controlled by movement of point defects combined with trapping along grain boundaries. This regime is followed by a process dominated by formation and growth of helium bubbles along grain boundaries. The third regime involves volume diffusion controlled by movement of oxygen vacancies. Finally, the release at the highest temperatures follows the diffusion rate of intragranular bubbles. The tendency for helium to be trapped within the grain boundaries diminishes with small grain sizes, slow thermal pulses, and older fuel.

  9. Commissioning of a new helium pipeline

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    At the commissioning of a new high-pressure helium pipeline at Kennedy Space Center, participants cut the lines to helium-filled balloons. From left, they are Center Director Roy Bridges; Michael Butchko, president, SGS; Pierre Dufour, president and CEO, Air Liquide America Corporation; David Herst, director, Delta IV Launch Sites; Pamela Gillespie, executive administrator, office of Congressman Dave Weldon; and Col. Samuel Dick, representative of the 45th Space Wing. The nine-mile-long buried pipeline will service launch needs at the new Delta IV Complex 37 at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station. It will also serve as a backup helium resource for Shuttle launches. Nearly one launch's worth of helium will be available in the pipeline to support a Shuttle pad in an emergency. The line originates at the Helium Facility on KSC and terminates in a meter station at the perimeter of the Delta IV launch pad. Others at the ceremony were Jerry Jorgensen, pipeline project manager, Space Gateway Support (SGS), and Ramon Lugo, acting executive director, JPMO.

  10. Commissioning of a new helium pipeline

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    At the commissioning of a new high-pressure helium pipeline at Kennedy Space Center, participants watch as helium-filled balloons take to the sky after their lines were cut. From left, they are Center Director Roy Bridges; Michael Butchko, president, SGS; Pierre Dufour, president and CEO, Air Liquide America Corporation; David Herst, director, Delta IV Launch Sites; Pamela Gillespie, executive administrator, office of Congressman Dave Weldon; and Col. Samuel Dick, representative of the 45th Space Wing. The nine-mile-long buried pipeline will service launch needs at the new Delta IV Complex 37 at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station. It will also serve as a backup helium resource for Shuttle launches. Nearly one launch's worth of helium will be available in the pipeline to support a Shuttle pad in an emergency. The line originates at the Helium Facility on KSC and terminates in a meter station at the perimeter of the Delta IV launch pad. Others at the ceremony were Jerry Jorgensen, pipeline project manager, Space Gateway Support (SGS), and Ramon Lugo, acting executive director, JPMO.

  11. The role of phytoplankton composition, biomass and cell volume in accumulation and transfer of endocrine disrupting compounds in the Southern Baltic Sea (The Gulf of Gdansk).

    PubMed

    Staniszewska, Marta; Nehring, Iga; Zgrundo, Aleksandra

    2015-12-01

    Endocrine disrupting compounds (EDCs) like bisphenol A (BPA), 4-tert-octylphenol (OP) and 4-nonylphenol (NP) are introduced to the trophic webs through among others phytoplankton. This paper describes BPA, OP and NP concentrations in phytoplankton in the Gulf of Gdansk (Southern Baltic Sea) in the years 2011-2012. The assays of BPA, OP and NP in samples were performed using HPLC with fluorescence detection. The concentrations of BPA, the most commonly used of the three compounds, were over ten times higher than OP and NP concentrations. The concentrations of the studied EDCs in phytoplankton from the Gulf of Gdansk depended on anthropogenic factors and on phytoplankton properties (species composition, biomass, volume). An increase in phytoplankton biomass did not always result in an increase of BPA, OP and NP concentrations. However, the load of the studied EDCs accumulated in phytoplankton biomass increase with a rise of biomass. An increase in BPA, OP and NP concentrations was effected by biomass growth and the proportions ofciliates, dinoflagellates, diatoms and green algae. A strong positive correlation between OP and NP concentrations and negative correlation between BPA concentrations and biomass of organisms with cells measuring <1000 μm(3) in volume results from the differing properties of these compounds. PMID:26433181

  12. The role of phytoplankton composition, biomass and cell volume in accumulation and transfer of endocrine disrupting compounds in the Southern Baltic Sea (The Gulf of Gdansk).

    PubMed

    Staniszewska, Marta; Nehring, Iga; Zgrundo, Aleksandra

    2015-12-01

    Endocrine disrupting compounds (EDCs) like bisphenol A (BPA), 4-tert-octylphenol (OP) and 4-nonylphenol (NP) are introduced to the trophic webs through among others phytoplankton. This paper describes BPA, OP and NP concentrations in phytoplankton in the Gulf of Gdansk (Southern Baltic Sea) in the years 2011-2012. The assays of BPA, OP and NP in samples were performed using HPLC with fluorescence detection. The concentrations of BPA, the most commonly used of the three compounds, were over ten times higher than OP and NP concentrations. The concentrations of the studied EDCs in phytoplankton from the Gulf of Gdansk depended on anthropogenic factors and on phytoplankton properties (species composition, biomass, volume). An increase in phytoplankton biomass did not always result in an increase of BPA, OP and NP concentrations. However, the load of the studied EDCs accumulated in phytoplankton biomass increase with a rise of biomass. An increase in BPA, OP and NP concentrations was effected by biomass growth and the proportions ofciliates, dinoflagellates, diatoms and green algae. A strong positive correlation between OP and NP concentrations and negative correlation between BPA concentrations and biomass of organisms with cells measuring <1000 μm(3) in volume results from the differing properties of these compounds.

  13. Dynamics of vortex assisted metal condensation in superfluid helium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popov, Evgeny; Mammetkuliyev, Muhammet; Eloranta, Jussi

    2013-05-01

    Laser ablation of copper and silver targets immersed in bulk normal and superfluid 4He was studied through time-resolved shadowgraph photography. In normal fluid, only a sub-millimeter cavitation bubble is created and immediate formation of metal clusters is observed within a few hundred microseconds. The metal clusters remain spatially tightly focused up to 15 ms, and it is proposed that this observation may find applications in particle image velocimetry. In superfluid helium, the cavitation bubble formation process is distinctly different from the normal fluid. Due to the high thermal conductivity and an apparent lag in the breakdown of superfluidity, about 20% of the laser pulse energy was transferred directly into the liquid and a large gas bubble, up to several millimeters depending on laser pulse energy, is created. The internal temperature of the gas bubble is estimated to exceed 9 K and the following bubble cool down period therefore includes two separate phase transitions: gas-normal liquid and normal liquid-superfluid. The last stage of the cool down process was assigned to the superfluid lambda transition where a sudden formation of large metal clusters is observed. This is attributed to high vorticity created in the volume where the gas bubble previously resided. As shown by theoretical bosonic density functional theory calculations, quantized vortices can trap atoms and dimers efficiently, exhibiting static binding energies up to 22 K. This, combined with hydrodynamic Bernoulli attraction, yields total binding energies as high as 35 K. For larger clusters, the static binding energy increases as a function of the volume occupied in the liquid to minimize the surface tension energy. For heliophobic species an energy barrier develops as a function of the cluster size, whereas heliophilics show barrierless entry into vortices. The present theoretical and experimental observations are used to rationalize the previously reported metal nanowire assembly in

  14. Thermal Performance of a Dual-Channel, Helium-Cooled, Tungsten Heat Exchanger

    SciTech Connect

    YOUCHISON,DENNIS L.; NORTH,MART T.

    2000-11-22

    Helium-cooled, refractory heat exchangers are now under consideration for first wall and divertor applications. These refractory devices take advantage of high temperature operation with large delta-Ts to effectively handle high heat fluxes. The high temperature helium can then be used in a gas turbine for high-efficiency power conversion. Over the last five years, heat removal with helium was shown to increase dramatically by using porous metal to provide a very large effective surface area for heat transfer in a small volume. Last year, the thermal performance of a bare-copper, dual-channel, helium-cooled, porous metal divertor mock-up was evaluated on the 30 kW Electron Beam Test System at Sandia National Laboratories. The module survived a maximum absorbed heat flux of 34.6 MW/m{sup 2} and reached a maximum surface temperature of 593 C for uniform power loading of 3 kW absorbed on a 2-cm{sup 2} area. An impressive 10 kW of power was absorbed on an area of 24 cm{sup 2}. Recently, a similar dual-module, helium-cooled heat exchanger made almost entirely of tungsten was designed and fabricated by Thermacore, Inc. and tested at Sandia. A complete flow test of each channel was performed to determine the actual pressure drop characteristics. Each channel was equipped with delta-P transducers and platinum RTDs for independent calorimetry. One mass flow meter monitored the total flow to the heat exchanger, while a second monitored flow in only one of the channels. The thermal response of each tungsten module was obtained for heat fluxes in excess of 5 MW/m{sup 2} using 50 C helium at 4 MPa. Fatigue cycles were also performed to assess the fracture toughness of the tungsten modules. A description of the module design and new results on flow instabilities are also presented.

  15. Laser spectroscopic measurement of helium isotope ratios.

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, L.-B.; Mueller, P.; Holt, R. J.; Lu, Z.-T.; O'Connor, T. P.; Sano, Y.; Sturchio, N.; Univ. of Illinois; Univ. of Tokyo; Univ. of Illinois at Chicago

    2003-06-13

    A sensitive laser spectroscopic method has been applied to the quantitative determination of the isotope ratio of helium at the level of {sup 3}He/{sup 4}He = 10{sup -7}--10{sup -5}. The resonant absorption of 1083 nm laser light by the metastable {sup 3}He atoms in a discharge cell was measured with the frequency modulation saturation spectroscopy technique while the abundance of {sup 4}He was measured by a direct absorption technique. The results on three different samples extracted from the atmosphere and commercial helium gas were in good agreement with values obtained with mass spectrometry. The achieved 3{sigma} detection limit of {sup 3}He in helium is 4 x 10{sup -9}. This demonstration required a 200 {mu}L STP sample of He. The sensitivity can be further improved, and the required sample size reduced, by several orders of magnitude with the addition of cavity enhanced spectroscopy.

  16. Thermodynamic properties of hydrogen-helium plasmas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nelson, H. F.

    1971-01-01

    The thermodynamic properties of an atomic hydrogen-helium plasma are calculated and tabulated for temperatures from 10,000 to 100,000 K as a function of the mass fraction ratio of atomic hydrogen. The tabulation is for densities from 10 to the minus 10th power to 10 to the minus 6th power gm/cu cm and for hydrogen mass fraction ratios of 0, 0.333, 0.600, 0.800, and 1.0, which correspond to pure helium, 50 percent hydrogen per unit volume, 75 percent hydrogen per unit volume, 89 percent hydrogen per unit volume, and pure hydrogen plasmas, respectively. From an appended computer program, calculations can be made at other densities and mass fractions. The program output agrees well with previous thermodynamic property calculations for limiting cases of pure hydrogen and pure helium plasmas.

  17. Ages of globular clusters and helium diffusion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chaboyer, Brian; Sarajedini, Ata; Demarque, Pierre

    1992-01-01

    Evolutionary tracks have been calculated with alpha-enhanced compositions which cover the entire globular cluster metallicity range and have constructed isochrones which include the effects of microscopic diffusion of helium. The turnoff magnitudes from the isochrones were combined with the theoretical RR Lyrae magnitudes from Lee to determine the ages of 32 Galactic globular clusters using the magnitude difference between the turnoff and horizontal branch. It is found that including the effects of helium diffusion has a negligible effect on the derived ages of globular clusters. Regardless of the inclusion of helium diffusion, a significant age spread of 5 Gyr among the globular clusters is found. The oldest globular clusters studied here are 17 +/- 2 Gyr old.

  18. SCREW COMPRESSOR CHARACTERISTICS FOR HELIUM REFRIGERATION SYSTEMS

    SciTech Connect

    Ganni, Venkatarao; Knudsen, Peter; Creel, Jonathan; Arenius, Dana; Casagrande, Fabio; Howell, Matt

    2008-03-01

    The oil injected screw compressors have practically replaced all other types of compressors in modern helium refrigeration systems due to their large displacement capacity, minimal vibration, reliability and capability of handling helium's high heat of compression.At the present state of compressor system designs for helium systems, typically two-thirds of the lost input power is due to the compression system. Therefore it is important to understand the isothermal and volumetric efficiencies of these machines to help properly design these compression systems to match the refrigeration process. This presentation summarizes separate tests that have been conducted on Sullair compressors at the Superconducting Super-Collider Laboratory (SSCL) in 1993, Howden compressors at Jefferson Lab (JLab) in 2006 and Howden compressors at the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) in 2006. This work is part of an ongoing study at JLab to understand the theoretical basis for these efficiencies and their loss

  19. Helium Speech: An Application of Standing Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wentworth, Christopher D.

    2011-04-01

    Taking a breath of helium gas and then speaking or singing to the class is a favorite demonstration for an introductory physics course, as it usually elicits appreciative laughter, which serves to energize the class session. Students will usually report that the helium speech "raises the frequency" of the voice. A more accurate description of the phenomenon requires that we distinguish between the frequencies of sound produced by the larynx and the filtering of those frequencies by the vocal tract. We will describe here an experiment done by introductory physics students that uses helium speech as a context for learning about the human vocal system and as an application of the standing sound-wave concept. Modern acoustic analysis software easily obtained by instructors for student use allows data to be obtained and analyzed quickly.

  20. Helium corona-assisted air discharge

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang Nan; Gao Lei; Ji Ailing; Cao Zexian

    2011-10-15

    Operation of atmospheric discharge of electronegative gases including air at low voltages yet without consuming any inert gas will enormously promote the application of non-thermal plasmas. By taking advantage of the low onset voltage for helium corona, air discharge was successfully launched at much reduced voltages with a needle-plate system partly contained in a helium-filled glass bulb--for a needle-plate distance of 12 mm, 1.0 kV suffices. Ultraviolet emission from helium corona facilitates the discharging of air, and the discharge current manifests distinct features such as relatively broad Trichel pulses in both half periods. This design allows safe and economic implementation of atmospheric discharge of electronegative gases, which will find a broad palette of applications in surface modification, plasma medicine and gas treatment, etc.

  1. Laser-induced reconstruction of Ag clusters in helium droplets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomez, Luis F.; O'Connell, Sean M. O.; Jones, Curtis F.; Kwok, Justin; Vilesov, Andrey F.

    2016-09-01

    Silver clusters were assembled in helium droplets of different sizes ranging from 105 to 1010 atoms. The absorption of the clusters was studied upon laser irradiation at 355 nm and 532 nm, which is close to the plasmon resonance maximum in spherical Ag clusters and in the range of the absorption of the complex, branched Ag clusters, respectively. The absorption of the pulsed (7 ns) radiation at 532 nm shows some pronounced saturation effects, absent upon the continuous irradiation. This phenomenon has been discussed in terms of the melting of the complex Ag clusters at high laser fluence, resulting in a loss of the 532 nm absorption. Estimates of the heat transfer also indicate that a bubble may be formed around the hot cluster at high fluences, which may result in ejection of the cluster from the droplet, or disintegration of the droplet entirely.

  2. Ab Initio Simulations of Dense Helium Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Cong; He Xiantu; Zhang Ping

    2011-04-08

    We study the thermophysical properties of dense helium plasmas by using quantum molecular dynamics and orbital-free molecular dynamics simulations, where densities are considered from 400 to 800 g/cm{sup 3} and temperatures up to 800 eV. Results are presented for the equation of state. From the Kubo-Greenwood formula, we derive the electrical conductivity and electronic thermal conductivity. In particular, with the increase in temperature, we discuss the change in the Lorenz number, which indicates a transition from strong coupling and degenerate state to moderate coupling and partial degeneracy regime for dense helium.

  3. Experiments with single electrons in liquid helium

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, W.; Jin, D.; Seidel, G. M.; Maris, H. J.

    2009-02-01

    We describe experiments we have performed in which we are able to image the motion of individual electrons moving in liquid helium 4. Electrons in helium form bubbles of radius {approx}19 A. We use the negative pressure produced by a sound wave to expand these bubbles to a radius of about 10 {mu}m. The bubbles are then illuminated with light from a flash lamp and their position recorded. We report on several interesting phenomena that have been observed in these experiments. It appears that the majority of the electrons that we detect result from cosmic rays passing through the experimental cell. We discuss this mechanism for electron production.

  4. Comparison of Carbon Dioxide and Helium as Fire Extinguishing Agents for Spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gokoglu, Suleyman; Son, Youngjin; Ronney, Paul D.

    2004-01-01

    The effects of radiation heat transfer in microgravity compared to convection heat transfer in earth gravity for opposed-flow (downward) over thermally-thick fuel using low density foam fuel were investigated. Microgravity experiments on flame spread over thermally-thick fuels were conducted using foam fuels to obtain low density and thermal conductivity, and thus large flame spread rate compared to dense fuels such as PMMA. And thereby valid microgravity results were obtained even in 2.2 second drop-tower experiments not to mention for the longer duration tests in Zero Gravity Facility. Contrast to the conventional understanding, it was found that steady flame spread can occur over thick fuels in quiescent microgravity environments, especially when radiatively-active diluent gases such as CO2 were employed. This is proposed to result from radiative heat transfer from the flame to the fuel surface, which could lead to steady spread even when the amount of the heat transfer via conduction from the flame to the fuel bed is negligible. Radiative effects are more significant at microgravity conditions because the flame is thicker and thus the volume of radiating combustion products is larger as well. These results suggested that helium may be a better inert or extinguishment agent on both a mass and a mole bases at microgravity even though CO2 is much better on a mole bases at earth gravity, and these are relevant to studies of fire safety in manned spacecraft, particularly the International Space Station that uses CO2 fire extinguishers. CO2 may not be as effective as an extinguishing agent at microgravity as it is at earth gravity in some conditions because of the differences in spread mechanisms between the two cases. In particular, the difference between conduction-dominated heat transport to the fuel bed at earth gravity and radiation-dominated heat transport at microgravity indicates that radiatively-inert diluent such as helium could be preferable in

  5. Comparison of Carbon Dioxide and Helium as Fire Extinguishing Agents for Spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gokoglu, Suleyman; Son, Youngjin; Ronney, Paul D.

    2004-01-01

    The effects of radiation heat transfer in microgravity compared to convection heat transfer in earth gravity for opposed-flow (downward) over thermally-thick fuel using low density foam fuel were investigated. Microgravity experiments on flame spread over thermally-thick fuels were conducted using foam fuels to obtain low density and thermal conductivity, and thus large flame spread rate compared to dense fuels such as PMMA. And thereby valid microgravity results were obtained even in 2.2 second drop-tower experiments not to mention for the longer duration tests in Zero Gravity Facility. Contrast to the conventional understanding, it was found that steady flame spread can occur over thick fuels in quiescent microgravity environments, especially when radiatively-active diluent gases such as CO2 were employed. This is proposed to result from radiative heat transfer from the flame to the fuel surface, which could lead to steady spread even when the amount of the heat transfer via conduction from the flame to the fuel bed is negligible. Radiative effects are more significant at microgravity conditions because the flame is thicker and thus the volume of radiating combustion products is larger as well. These results suggested that helium may be a better inert or extinguishment agent on both a mass and a mole bases at microgravity even though CO2 is much better on a mole bases at earth gravity, and these are relevant to studies of fire safety in manned spacecraft, particularly the International Space Station that uses CO2 fire extinguishers. CO2 may not be as effective as an extinguishing agent at g as it is at earth gravity in some conditions because of the differences in spread mechanisms between the two cases. In particular, the difference between conduction-dominated heat transport to the fuel bed at earth gravity and radiation-dominated heat transport at g indicates that radiatively-inert diluent such as helium could be preferable in g applications. Helium may be a

  6. Helium building no. 2 west and south sides. Looking 70 ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Helium building no. 2 west and south sides. Looking 70 ENE. - Marine Corps Air Station Tustin, Helium Tank Building No. 1, Near intersection of Meffett Avenue & Maxfield Street, Tustin, Orange County, CA

  7. 8. ORIGINAL HELIUM COMPRESSOR, CIRCA 1957, BY HASKELL ENGINEERING, GLENDALE, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    8. ORIGINAL HELIUM COMPRESSOR, CIRCA 1957, BY HASKELL ENGINEERING, GLENDALE, CALIFORNIA. Looking north. - Edwards Air Force Base, Air Force Rocket Propulsion Laboratory, Helium Compression Plant, Test Area 1-115, intersection of Altair & Saturn Boulevards, Boron, Kern County, CA

  8. Helium building no. 2 east and north sides. Looking 270 ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Helium building no. 2 east and north sides. Looking 270 W. - Marine Corps Air Station Tustin, Helium Tank Building No. 1, Near intersection of Meffett Avenue & Maxfield Street, Tustin, Orange County, CA

  9. 5. INTERIOR, LOOKING PAST HELIUM COMPRESSORS NO. 3 AND NO. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. INTERIOR, LOOKING PAST HELIUM COMPRESSORS NO. 3 AND NO. 2, TO NORTHEAST FRONT. - Edwards Air Force Base, Air Force Rocket Propulsion Laboratory, Helium Compression Plant, Test Area 1-115, intersection of Altair & Saturn Boulevards, Boron, Kern County, CA

  10. Adsorption of Helium Atoms on Two-Dimensional Substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burganova, Regina; Lysogorskiy, Yury; Nedopekin, Oleg; Tayurskii, Dmitrii

    2016-01-01

    The study of the adsorption phenomenon of helium began many decades ago with the discovery of graphite as a homogeneous substrate for the investigation of physically adsorbed monolayer films. In particular, helium monoatomic layers on graphite were found to exhibit a very rich phase diagram. In the present work we have investigated the adsorption phenomenon of helium atoms on graphene and silicene substrates by means of density functional theory with Born-Oppenheimer approximation. Helium-substrate and helium-helium interactions were considered from first principles. Vibrational properties of adsorbed monolayers have been used to explore the stability of the system. This approach reproduces results describing the stability of a helium monolayer on graphene calculated by quantum Monte Carlo (QMC) simulations for low and high coverage cases. However, for the moderate coverage value there is a discrepancy with QMC results due to the lack of helium zero point motion.

  11. A helium liquefier using three 4 k pulse tube cryocoolers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Chao; Oviedo, Abner

    2012-06-01

    We have developed a helium liquefier which can be used for recondensing/reliquefying helium vapor in a helium cryostat or liquefying helium gas in a storage dewar. The helium liquefier employs three 4 K pulse tube cryocoolers, Cryomech model PT415. Each PT415 has remote motor/rotary valve assembly to minimize vibration, providing ≥ 1.5W at 4.2K. The liquefier can liquefy room temperature helium gas with a liquefaction rate of 62 Liter/day. When installing it in the cryostat, it can recondense and reliquefy helium vapor with a rate of 78 L/day. The liquefier will be installed in a gravitational wave detector in Brazil to recondense/reliquefy the helium boil off from the cryostat.

  12. 2. SOUTHEAST SIDE. HIGH PRESSURE HELIUM STORAGE TANKS AT LEFT. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. SOUTHEAST SIDE. HIGH PRESSURE HELIUM STORAGE TANKS AT LEFT. - Edwards Air Force Base, Air Force Rocket Propulsion Laboratory, Helium Compression Plant, Test Area 1-115, intersection of Altair & Saturn Boulevards, Boron, Kern County, CA

  13. The dynamics and helium distribution in hydrogen-helium fluid planets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stevenson, D. J.; Salpeter, E. E.

    1977-01-01

    The simple case of a homogeneous planet without first-order phase transitions is considered and an investigation is conducted concerning a pure hydrogen planet in which a first-order phase transition takes place from fluid molecular hydrogen to fluid metallic hydrogen. Attention is also given to convection in the presence of a compositional gradient, the effects of helium insolubility in a cooling hydrogen-helium planet, a hydrogen-helium planet in its early evolution, and the case in which influence of phase transition occurs much later in the evolution of the planet.

  14. Transient heat transfer to a closed volume of He I and its influence on superconductor stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, C.

    Transient heat transfer is one of the key parameters determining the stability of superconducting magnets. A large proportion of the experimental and theoretical work has been concerned with transient heat transfer from a solid surface to a liquid helium bath, whereas only few workers have investigated the case of a small, closed helium volume. The latter case is however, the relevant boundary condition of cable-in-conduit conductors, which are often preferred for the construction of big magnets. In a small helium volume the transient heat input leads to a rapid rise in pressure which drastically reduces the heat removal capability of the coolant. Above the critical pressure of 2.3 bar the transient heat transfer is governed by thermal diffusion, as is the case for supercritical helium. This article describes some experimental work and theoretical approaches to this problem. The cases of liquid and supercritical helium are considered and some special examples of superconductor stability are discussed.

  15. Intensification of volatile organic compounds mass transfer in a compact scrubber using the O3/H2O2 advanced oxidation process: kinetic study and hydroxyl radical tracking.

    PubMed

    Biard, Pierre-François; Couvert, Annabelle; Renner, Christophe; Levasseur, Jean-Pierre

    2011-11-01

    This study assesses the potential of ozonation and advanced oxidation process O(3)/H(2)O(2) to enhance the dimethyldisulfide (DMDS) mass transfer in a compact chemical scrubber developed for air treatment applications. Theoretical calculations, through Hatta number and enhancement factor evaluations for two parallel irreversible reactions, were compared to experimental data and enabled the description of the mass transfer mechanisms. These calculations required the determination of the kinetic constant of the DMDS oxidation by molecular ozone ( [Formula: see text] ) and the measurement of the hydroxyl radical concentration within the scrubber. The competitive kinetic method using the 1,2-dihydroxybenzene (resorcinol) enabled to determine a value of the kinetic constant [Formula: see text] of 1.1×10(6)M(-1)s(-1) at 293K. Then, experiments using para-chlorobenzoic acid in solution allowed measuring the average hydroxyl concentration in the scrubber between the inlet and the outlet depending on the chemical conditions (pH and inlet O(3) and H(2)O(2) concentrations). High hydroxyl radical concentrations (10(-8)M) and ratio of the HO°-to-O(3) exposure (R(ct)≈10(-4)) were put in evidence.

  16. High-resolution heat-transfer-coefficient maps applicable to compound-curve surfaces using liquid crystals in a transient wind tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, T. V.; Hippensteele, S. A.

    1987-01-01

    Tests were performed in a transient heat transfer tunnel in which the model under test was preheated prior to allowing room temperature air to be suddenly drawn over the model. The resulting movement of isothermal contours on the model is revealed using a surface coating of thermochromic liquid crystals that display distinctive colors at particular temperatures. A video record is obtained of a temperature and time data pair for all points on the model during a single test. Experiments on a duct model are reported in which the model was preheated using a hot air stream. A manner in which initial model temperature nonuniformities could be taken into account was investigated. The duct model was also tested with a steady-state measurement technique and results were compared with the transient measurements, but recognizing that differences existed between the upstream thermal boundary conditions. The steady-state and transient measurements were shown to be consistent with predicted values. The main advantage of this transient heat transfer technique using liquid crystals is that since the test model need not be actively heated, high-resolution measurements on surfaces with complex shapes may be obtained.

  17. High-resolution heat-transfer-coefficient maps applicable to compound-curve surfaces using liquid crystals in a transient wind tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Terry V.; Hippensteele, Steven A.

    1988-01-01

    Tests were performed in a transient heat transfer tunnel in which the model under test was preheated prior to allowing room temperature air to be suddenly drawn over the model. The resulting movement of isothermal contours on the model is revealed using a surface coating of thermochromic liquid crystals that display distinctive colors at particular temperatures. A video record is obtained of a temperature and time data pair for all points on the model during a single test. Experiments on a duct model are reported in which the model was preheated using a hot air stream. A manner in which initial model temperature nonuniformities could be taken into account was investigated. The duct model was also tested with a steady-state measurement technique and results were compared with the transient measurements, but recognizing that differences existed between the upstream thermal boundary conditions. The steady-state and transient measurements were shown to be consistent with predicted values. The main advantage of this transient heat transfer technique using liquid crystals is that since the test model need not be actively heated, high-resolution measurements on surfaces with complex shapes may be obtained.

  18. Rogue Mantle Helium and Neon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albarede, F.

    2007-12-01

    mid- ocean ridges, the characteristic times of melt extraction in each of these two environments are 10,000 y and 1 My, respectively, and the maximum thickness of refractory layers contributing their He to the magmas are 10 m and 100 m, respectively. The difference in 3He/4He ratios of ocean-island and mid-ocean ridge basalts and the preservation of solar neon are ascribed to the reservoirs rocks being stretched to a different extent during melting. Old fragments of oceanic lithosphere, and possibly cumulates from the magma ocean, rather than primordial mantle 'nuggets', should host most of the primordial He and Ne presently observed in oceanic basalts. Helium with high 3He/4He ratios may contain a component of primordial origin, but not necessarily reflect the reservoir in which it has been residing for most of the Earth's history.

  19. Investigating differences in the root to shoot transfer and xylem sap solubility of organic compounds between zucchini, squash and soybean using a pressure chamber method.

    PubMed

    Garvin, Naho; Doucette, William J; White, Jason C

    2015-07-01

    A pressure chamber method was used to examine differences in the root to shoot transfer and xylem sap solubility of caffeine (log Kow=-0.07), triclocarban (log Kow=3.5-4.2) and endosulfan (log Kow=3.8-4.8) for zucchini (cucurbita pepo ssp pepo), squash (cucurbita pepo ssp ovifera), and soybean (glycine max L.). Transpiration stream concentration factors (TSCF) for caffeine (TSCF=0.8) were statistically equivalent for all plant species. However, for the more hydrophobic endosulfan and triclocarban, the TSCF values for zucchini (TSCF=0.6 and 0.4, respectively) were 3 and 10 times greater than the soybean and squash (TSCF=0.2 and 0.05, respectively). The difference in TSCF values was examined by comparing the measured solubilities of caffeine, endosulfan and triclocarban in deionized water to those in soybean and zucchini xylem saps using a modified shake flask method. The measured solubility of organic contaminants in xylem sap has not previously been reported. Caffeine solubilities in the xylem saps of soybean and zucchini were statistically equal to deionized water (21500mgL(-1)) while endosulfan and triclocarban solubilities in the zucchini xylem sap were significantly greater (0.43 and 0.21mgL(-1), respectively) than that of the soybean xylem sap (0.31 and 0.11mgL(-1), respectively) and deionized water (0.34 and 0.11mgL(-1), respectively). This suggests that the enhanced root to shoot transfer of hydrophobic organics reported for zucchini is partly due to increased solubility in the xylem sap. Further xylem sap characterization is needed to determine the mechanism of solubility enhancement.

  20. Investigating differences in the root to shoot transfer and xylem sap solubility of organic compounds between zucchini, squash and soybean using a pressure chamber method.

    PubMed

    Garvin, Naho; Doucette, William J; White, Jason C

    2015-07-01

    A pressure chamber method was used to examine differences in the root to shoot transfer and xylem sap solubility of caffeine (log Kow=-0.07), triclocarban (log Kow=3.5-4.2) and endosulfan (log Kow=3.8-4.8) for zucchini (cucurbita pepo ssp pepo), squash (cucurbita pepo ssp ovifera), and soybean (glycine max L.). Transpiration stream concentration factors (TSCF) for caffeine (TSCF=0.8) were statistically equivalent for all plant species. However, for the more hydrophobic endosulfan and triclocarban, the TSCF values for zucchini (TSCF=0.6 and 0.4, respectively) were 3 and 10 times greater than the soybean and squash (TSCF=0.2 and 0.05, respectively). The difference in TSCF values was examined by comparing the measured solubilities of caffeine, endosulfan and triclocarban in deionized water to those in soybean and zucchini xylem saps using a modified shake flask method. The measured solubility of organic contaminants in xylem sap has not previously been reported. Caffeine solubilities in the xylem saps of soybean and zucchini were statistically equal to deionized water (21500mgL(-1)) while endosulfan and triclocarban solubilities in the zucchini xylem sap were significantly greater (0.43 and 0.21mgL(-1), respectively) than that of the soybean xylem sap (0.31 and 0.11mgL(-1), respectively) and deionized water (0.34 and 0.11mgL(-1), respectively). This suggests that the enhanced root to shoot transfer of hydrophobic organics reported for zucchini is partly due to increased solubility in the xylem sap. Further xylem sap characterization is needed to determine the mechanism of solubility enhancement. PMID:25537866

  1. Theoretical research of helium pulsating heat pipe under steady state conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, D.; Liu, H. M.; Li, L. F.; Huang, R. J.; Wang, W.

    2015-12-01

    As a new-type heat pipe, pulsating heat pipe (PHP) has several outstanding features, such as great heat transport ability, strong adjustability, small size and simple construction. PHP is a complex two-phase flow system associated with many physical subjects and parameters, which utilizes the pressure and temperature changes in volume expansion and contraction during phase changes to excite the pulsation motion of liquid plugs and vapor bubbles in the capillary tube between the evaporator and the condenser. At present time, some experimental investigation of helium PHP have been done. However, theoretical research of helium PHP is rare. In this paper, the physical and mathematical models of operating mechanism for helium PHP under steady state are established based on the conservation of mass, momentum, and energy. Several important parameters are correlated and solved, including the liquid filling ratio, flow velocity, heat power, temperature, etc. Based on the results, the operational driving force and flow resistances of helium PHP are analysed, and the flow and heat transfer is further studied.

  2. Energetic helium particles trapped in the magnetosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Jiasheng; Guzik, T. Gregory; Sang, Yeming; Wefel, John P.; Cooper, John F.

    1994-01-01

    High energy (approximately 40-100 MeV/nucleon) geomagnetically trapped helium nuclei have been measured, for the first time, by the ONR-604 instrument during the 1990/1991 Combined Release and Radiation Effects Satellite (CRRES) mission. The helium events observed at L less than 2.3 have a pitch angle distribution peaking perpendicular to the local magnetic field and are contained in peaks located at L = 1.2 and 1.9. The events in each peak can be characterized by power law energy spectra with indices of 10.0 +/- 0.7 for L = 1.9-2.3 and 6.8 +/- 1.0 for L = 1.15-1.3, before the large storm of 24 March 1991. CRRES was active during solar maximum when the anomalous component is excluded from the inner heliosphere, making it unlikely that the observed events derived from the anomalous component. The trapped helium counting rates decrease gradually with time indicating that these high energy ions were not injected by flares during the 1990/91 mission. Flare injection prior to mid-1990 may account for the highest energy particles, while solar wind injection during magnetic storms and subsequent acceleration could account for the helium at lower energies.

  3. NUCLEAR CONDENSATE AND HELIUM WHITE DWARFS

    SciTech Connect

    Bedaque, Paulo F.; Berkowitz, Evan; Cherman, Aleksey E-mail: evanb@umd.edu

    2012-04-10

    We consider a high-density region of the helium phase diagram, where the nuclei form a Bose-Einstein condensate rather than a classical plasma or a crystal. Helium in this phase may be present in helium-core white dwarfs. We show that in this regime there is a new gapless quasiparticle not previously noticed, arising when the constraints imposed by gauge symmetry are taken into account. The contribution of this quasiparticle to the specific heat of a white dwarf core turns out to be comparable in a range of temperatures to the contribution from the particle-hole excitations of the degenerate electrons. The specific heat in the condensed phase is two orders of magnitude smaller than in the uncondensed plasma phase, which is the ground state at higher temperatures, and four orders of magnitude smaller than the specific heat that an ion lattice would provide, if formed. Since the specific heat of the core is an important input for setting the rate of cooling of a white dwarf star, it may turn out that such a change in the thermal properties of the cores of helium white dwarfs has observable implications.

  4. Diffusion of cyclooctane (1); helium (2)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winkelmann, J.

    This document is part of Subvolume A `Gases in Gases, Liquids and their Mixtures' of Volume 15 `Diffusion in Gases, Liquids and Electrolytes' of Landolt-Börnstein Group IV `Physical Chemistry'. It is part of the chapter of the chapter `Diffusion in Pure Gases' and contains data on diffusion of (1) cyclooctane; (2) helium

  5. The Weakest Link: Bonding between Helium Atoms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lohr, Lawrence L.; Blinder, S. M.

    2007-01-01

    A highly simplified model for helium dimers that reproduces their essential features without the need for elaborate computation is presented. The He-He potential is predicted to have minimum of 10.9 K at a nuclear separation of 5.61 bohrs.

  6. Excitation of helium ion by positron impact

    SciTech Connect

    Khan, P.; Ghosh, A.S.

    1986-01-01

    Three (1s,2s,2p) and five (1s,2s,2p,3s-bar,3p-bar) -state close-coupling methods have been employed to calculate the n = 2 excitation cross sections of helium ion by positron impact. The effect of pseudostate is found to be very pronounced in the case of 1s-2s excitation.

  7. Helium-Shell Nucleosynthesis and Extinct Radioactivities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyer, B. S.; The, L.-S.; Clayton, D. D.; El Eid, M. F.

    2004-03-01

    We present details of explosive nucleosynthesis in the helium-burning shell of a 25 solar mass star. We describe the production of short-lived radioactivities in this environment. We finally describe how to access the details of our calculations over the world-wide web.

  8. Commissioning of a new helium pipeline

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    Jerry Jorgensen, pipeline project manager, Space Gateway Support (SGS) presents an award of appreciation to H.T. Everett, KSC Propellants manager, at the commissioning of a new high-pressure helium pipeline at Kennedy Space Center. The pipeline will service launch needs at the new Delta IV Complex 37 at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station. The nine-mile-long buried pipeline will also serve as a backup helium resource for Shuttle launches. Nearly one launch's worth of helium will be available in the pipeline to support a Shuttle pad in an emergency. The line originates at the Helium Facility on KSC and terminates in a meter station at the perimeter of the Delta IV launch pad. Others at the ceremony were Center Director Roy Bridges;); Col. Samuel Dick, representative of the 45th Space Wing; Ramon Lugo, acting executive director, JPMO; David Herst, director, Delta IV Launch Sites; Pierre Dufour, president and CEO, Air Liquide America Corporation; and Michael Butchko, president, SGS.

  9. Helium and Sulfur Hexafluoride in Musical Instruments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Forinash, Kyle; Dixon, Cory L.

    2014-01-01

    The effects of inhaled helium on the human voice were investigated in a recent article in "The Physics Teacher." As mentioned in that article, demonstrations of the effect are a popular classroom activity. If the number of YouTube videos is any indication, the effects of sulfur hexafluoride on the human voice are equally popular.…

  10. 43 CFR 3195.24 - What must I do before contacting a non-Federal helium supplier for my helium needs?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...-Federal helium supplier for my helium needs? 3195.24 Section 3195.24 Public Lands: Interior Regulations... MANAGEMENT (3000) HELIUM CONTRACTS Federal Agency Requirements § 3195.24 What must I do before contacting a non-Federal helium supplier for my helium needs? You must make an initial determination about...

  11. 43 CFR 3195.24 - What must I do before contacting a non-Federal helium supplier for my helium needs?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...-Federal helium supplier for my helium needs? 3195.24 Section 3195.24 Public Lands: Interior Regulations... MANAGEMENT (3000) HELIUM CONTRACTS Federal Agency Requirements § 3195.24 What must I do before contacting a non-Federal helium supplier for my helium needs? You must make an initial determination about...

  12. 43 CFR 3195.24 - What must I do before contacting a non-Federal helium supplier for my helium needs?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...-Federal helium supplier for my helium needs? 3195.24 Section 3195.24 Public Lands: Interior Regulations... MANAGEMENT (3000) HELIUM CONTRACTS Federal Agency Requirements § 3195.24 What must I do before contacting a non-Federal helium supplier for my helium needs? You must make an initial determination about...

  13. 43 CFR 3195.24 - What must I do before contacting a non-Federal helium supplier for my helium needs?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...-Federal helium supplier for my helium needs? 3195.24 Section 3195.24 Public Lands: Interior Regulations... MANAGEMENT (3000) HELIUM CONTRACTS Federal Agency Requirements § 3195.24 What must I do before contacting a non-Federal helium supplier for my helium needs? You must make an initial determination about...

  14. a Helium Re-Liquefier for Recovering and Liquefying Helium Vapor from Cryostat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, C.

    2010-04-01

    We have developed a helium re-liquefier to provide a solution for recovering and liquefying helium vapor from open-loop helium cryostats. The helium re-liquefier is designed to retrofit into the cryostat and form a closed helium loop for the system. The re-liquefier employs a 4 K pulse tube cryocooler, model PT410, which simultaneously provides 39 W at 45 K and 1.0 W at 4.1 K on the 1st and 2nd stages respectively with a power input of 7.5 kW. The reliquefier can operate in two modes: reliquefying 100% room temperature helium vapor or recondensing and reliquefying two streams of 4.2 K and room temperature vapor at the same time. The reliquefier has a liquefaction rate of 14.2 L/day for the room temperature gas. It has a condensation capacity of recondensing and re-liquefying up to 29 L/day.

  15. The effects of convective overshooting on naked helium stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Jing-Zhi; Zhu, Chun-Hua; Wang, Zhao-Jun; Lü, Guo-Liang

    2016-09-01

    Using stellar evolutionary models, we investigate the effects of convective overshooting on naked helium stars. We find that a larger value of overshooting parameter δov results in a larger convective core, which prolongs the lifetimes of naked helium stars on the helium main sequence and leads to higher effective temperatures and luminosities. For naked helium stars with masses lower than about 0.8 M⊙, they hardly become giant stars as a result of a weak burning shell. However, naked helium stars with masses between about 0.8 M⊙ and 1.1 M⊙ can evolve into giant branch phases, and finally become carbon oxygen white dwarfs.

  16. Behavior of turbine and Venturi flowmeters in superfluid helium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daney, D. E.

    1988-01-01

    An apparatus which forces liquid helium from a calibrated bellows through a flow meter is used to calibrate turbine and Venturi flow meters in both normal and superfluid helium. The bellows are driven by an ambient temperature stepping motor. Flow rates range up to 0.35 L/s, and helium temperatures range from 1.25-4.0 K. For the case of a 9.3-mm bore turbine meter, identical meter factors are found for normal and superfluid helium. For the Venturi meter, discharge coefficients between 0.98 and 1.0 are found with normal and superfluid helium.

  17. Introduction of distillate rosemary leaves into the diet of the Murciano-Granadina goat: transfer of polyphenolic compounds to goats' milk and the plasma of suckling goat kids.

    PubMed

    Jordán, Maria José; Moñino, María Inmaculada; Martínez, Cristina; Lafuente, Arturo; Sotomayor, José Antonio

    2010-07-28

    The effect of the introduction of distilled rosemary leaves into the diet of the Murciano-Granadina goat on the polyphenolic profile of the goats' milk during the physiological stages of gestation and lactation was studied. The inclusion of rosemary leaves into the animal diet modified neither animal productivity (milk yield) nor milk quality. The following components were found in increased concentration (P < 0.05) in the goats' milk after the introduction of rosemary leaves into their diet: flavonoids hesperidin, naringin, and genkwanin; gallic acid; and phenolic diterpenes carnosol and carnosic acid. With regard to the transfer of polyphenols to the plasma of the suckling goat kid, a statistically significant increase (P < 0.05) in rosmarinic acid, carnosic acid, and carnosol concentrations was detected. From this point of view, distillate rosemary leaves can be proposed as an ingredient in ruminant feed because they both alter neither the yield nor the quality of Murciano-Granadina goats' milk and allow for an increased concentration of polyphenolic components in the goats' milk and in the plasma of the suckling goat kid.

  18. Quantum chemical modeling of magnetically bistable metal coordination compounds. Synchronization of spin crossover, valence tautomerism and charge transfer induced spin transition mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Minkin, V I; Starikova, A A; Starikov, A G

    2016-07-26

    It has been shown that the computationally designed bimetallic complexes formed as the adducts of Co(II) diketonates and salicylaldiminates with Fe(II) chelates of 1,10-phenanthroline-5,6-dione are susceptible to the synchronized thermally induced intramolecular rearrangements between their electromeric forms LSCo(III)-SQ-LSFe(II), LSCo(III)-SQ-HSFe(II), HSCo(II)-BQ-LSFe(II), HSCo(II)-BQ-HSFe(II) and also HSCo(II)-SQ-LSFe(III), which are governed by the spin-crossover (SCO), valence tautomerism (VT) and charge-transfer-induced spin transition (CTIST) mechanisms of spin-state switching. Stability of the adducts with respect to dissociation into components, relative energies and magnetic properties of the electromers and energy barriers against VT and unprecedented one-step (SCO + VT) rearrangements (estimated as minimum energy crossing points on the seams of the intersection of the corresponding potential energy surfaces) were calculated using the DFT (B3LYP*/6-311++G(d,p)) method. The calculations showed that all these characteristics of the system as well as the energy preferred spin-state switchable mechanisms are very sensitive to the structure of the cobalt diketonate (salicylaldiminate) fragment and can be varied and interchanged by the introduction of electron withdrawing substituents into the ligands. PMID:27396475

  19. On-line monitoring of volatile organic compounds at pptv levels by means of proton-transfer-reaction mass spectrometry (PTR-MS) medical applications, food control and environmental research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindinger, W.; Hansel, A.; Jordan, A.

    1998-02-01

    A proton transfer reaction mass spectrometer (PTR-MS) system has been developed which allows for on-line measurements of trace components with concentrations as low as a few pptv. The method is based on reactions of H3O+ ions, which perform non-dissociative proton transfer to most of the common volatile organic compounds (VOCs) but do not react with any of the components present in clean air. Medical applications by means of breath analysis allow for monitoring of metabolic processes in the human body, and examples of food research are discussed on the basis of VOC emissions from fruit, coffee and meat. Environmental applications include investigations of VOC emissions from decaying biomatter which have been found to be an important source for tropospheric acetone, methanol and ethanol. On-line monitoring of the diurnal variations of VOCs in the troposphere yield data demonstrating the present sensitivity of PTR-MS to be in the range of a few pptv. Finally, PTR-MS has proven to be an ideal tool to measure Henry's law constants and their dependencies on temperature as well as on the salt content of water.

  20. Helium-3 from the mantle - Primordial signal or cosmic dust?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, Don L.

    1993-01-01

    Helium-3 in hotspot magmas has been used as unambiguous evidence for the existence of a primordial, undegassed reservoir deep in the Earth's mantle. However, a large amount of helium-3 is delivered to the Earth's surface by interplanetary dust particles (IDPs). Recycling of deep-sea sediments containing these particles to the mantle, and eventual incorporation in magma, can explain the high helium-3/helium-4 ratios of hotspot magmas. Basalts with high helium-3/helium-4 ratios may represent degassing of helium introduced by ancient (probably 1.5 to 2.0 billion years old) pelagic sediments rather than degassing of primordial lower mantle material brought to the surface in plumes. Influx of IDPs can also explain the neon and siderophile compositions of mantle samples.

  1. Trapping helium in Y{sub 2}Ti{sub 2}O{sub 7} compared to in matrix iron: A first principles study

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Litong; Jiang, Yong E-mail: odette@engineering.ucsb.edu; Robert Odette, G. E-mail: odette@engineering.ucsb.edu; Yamamoto, Takuya; Liu, Zuming; Liu, Yong

    2014-04-14

    Pyrochlore Y{sub 2}Ti{sub 2}O{sub 7} is a primary precipitate phase in nano-structured ferritic alloys (NFAs) for fission and fusion energy applications. We report a theoretical study for assessing the relative stability of trapping helium in Y{sub 2}Ti{sub 2}O{sub 7} versus in matrix iron. Various defect structures and the associated energies are examined and compared. Results reveal that helium can be deeply trapped in Y{sub 2}Ti{sub 2}O{sub 7} and that the corresponding self-interaction is essentially repulsive. Transmutant helium in NFAs prefers to occupy individual octa-interstitial sites in Y{sub 2}Ti{sub 2}O{sub 7}, before forming small clusters in Y{sub 2}Ti{sub 2}O{sub 7}. Helium partitioning in NFAs depends on the number and dispersion of Y{sub 2}Ti{sub 2}O{sub 7}; and thus initially, bubble formation and growth in iron matrix can be largely suppressed. Charge transfer occurs from helium to neighboring oxygen anions, but not to neighboring metal cations, suggesting a general effectiveness of trapping helium in oxides. Reasons for the ultimate fate of helium to form small nm-scale interface bubbles are also discussed.

  2. An online method for the analysis of volatile organic compounds in electronic cigarette aerosol based on proton transfer reaction mass spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Breiev, Kostiantyn; Burseg, Kerstin M. M.; O'Connell, Grant; Hartungen, Eugen; Biel, Stefan S.; Cahours, Xavier; Colard, Stéphane; Märk, Tilmann D.

    2016-01-01

    Rationale Due to the recent rapid increase in electronic cigarette (e‐cigarette) use worldwide, there is a strong scientific but also practical interest in analyzing e‐cigarette aerosols. Most studies to date have used standardized but time‐consuming offline technologies. Here a proof‐of‐concept for a fast online quantification setup based on proton transfer reaction mass spectrometry (PTR‐MS) is presented. Methods The combination of a novel sampling interface with a time‐of‐flight PTR‐MS instrument specially designed for three scenarios is introduced: (i) mainstream aerosol analysis (aerosol that the user inhales prior to exhalation), and analysis of exhaled breath following (ii) mouth‐hold (no inhalation) and (iii) inhalation of e‐cigarette aerosols. A double‐stage dilution setup allows the various concentration ranges in these scenarios to be accessed. Results First, the instrument is calibrated for the three principal constituents of the e‐cigarettes' liquids, namely propylene glycol, vegetable glycerol and nicotine. With the double‐stage dilution the instrument's dynamic range was easily adapted to cover the concentration ranges obtained in the three scenarios: 20–1100 ppmv for the mainstream aerosol characterisation; 4–300 ppmv for the mouth‐hold; and 2 ppbv to 20 ppmv for the inhalation experiment. Conclusions It is demonstrated that the novel setup enables fast, high time resolution e‐cigarette studies with online quantification. This enables the analysis and understanding of any puff‐by‐puff variations in e‐cigarette aerosols. Large‐scale studies involving a high number of volunteers will benefit from considerably higher sample throughput and shorter data processing times. © 2016 The Authors. Rapid Communications in Mass Spectrometry Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd. PMID:26864521

  3. Using compound-specific stable carbon isotope analysis to trace metabolism and trophic transfer of PCBs and PBDEs in fish from an e-waste site, South China.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Yan-Hong; Luo, Xiao-Jun; Yu, Le-Huan; Chen, Hua-Shan; Wu, Jiang-Ping; Chen, She-Jun; Mai, Bi-Xian

    2013-05-01

    Two fish species (mud carp and northern snakehead) forming a predator/prey relationship and sediment samples were collected from a pond contaminated by e-waste. The concentrations and stable carbon isotope ratios (δ(13)C) of individual polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) and polybrominated diphenyl ether (PBDE) congeners were measured to determine if compound-specific carbon isotope analysis (CSIA) could be used to provide insight into the metabolism and trophic dynamics of PCBs and PBDEs. Significant correlations were found in the isotopic data of PCB congeners between the sediment and the fish species and between the two fish indicating identical origin of PCBs in sediment and fish. Most PCB congeners in the fish species were enriched in (13)C compared with the PCB congeners in the sediments as a result of isotopic fractionation during the metabolism of PCBs in fish. The isotopic data of several PCB congeners showing isotopic agreement or isotopic depletion could be used for source apportionment or to trace the reductive dechlorination process of PCBs in the environment. The PCB isotopic data covaried more in the northern snakehead than in the mud carp when compared to the sediment, implying that a similar isotopic fractionation occurs from the prey to the predator fish for a PCB congener possibly due to similar metabolic pathways. The PBDE congener patterns differed in the three sample types with a high abundance of BDE209, 183, 99, and 47 in the sediment, BDE47, 153, and 49 in the mud carp and BDE47, 100, and 154 in the northern snakehead. The isotopic change of BDE congeners, such as BDE47 and BDE49, in two fish species, provides evidence for biotransformation of PBDEs in biota. The results of this study suggest that CSIA is a promising tool for deciphering the fate of PCBs and PBDEs in the environment. PMID:23560888

  4. Helium-Liquefaction by a Cryocooler in Closed-Loop Cooling System for 21 T Ft-Icr Magnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Y. S.; Painter, T. A.; Kim, D. L.; Lee, B. S.; Yang, H. S.

    2008-03-01

    The helium liquefaction system using a two-stage pulse tube cryocooler is developed. The main objective of this study is to confirm the feasibility of our recently proposed cryogenic design for a 21 T FT-ICR superconducting magnet system by the closed-loop concept without any replenishment of cryogen. Since the cold surface of a cryocooler is very limited, a cylindrical copper fin is thermally anchored to the first and second stage coldheads in order to extend the available heat transfer surface. A heat exchange tube is soldered on the outer surface of each cylindrical fin and heat exchange occurs between the tube and helium which is passing through the tube. The temperature distributions along the copper cylinder and heat exchanger are analyzed by the numerical method taking into account the fin efficiency of the extended surface. The effect of helium gas flow on the temperature distribution during cool-down process is also presented.

  5. Two phase liquid helium flow testing to simulate the operation of a cryocondensation pump in the D3-D tokamak

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laughon, G. J.; Baxi, C. B.; Campbell, G. L.; Mahdavi, M. A.; Makariou, C. C.; Smith, J. P.; Schaffer, M. J.; Schaubel, K. M.; Menon, M. M.

    1994-06-01

    A liquid helium-cooled cryocondensation pump has been installed in the D3-D tokamak fusion energy research experiment at General Atomics. The pump is located within the tokamak vacuum chamber beneath the divertor baffle plates and is utilized for plasma density and contamination control. Two-phase helium flows through the pump at 5 to 10 g/s utilizing the heat transfer and constant temperature characteristics of boiling liquid . helium. The pump is designed for a pumping speed of 32,000 1/s. Extensive testing was performed with a prototypical pump test fixture. Several pump geometries (simple tube, coaxial flow plug, and coaxial slotted insert) were tested, in an iterative process, to determine which was the most satisfactory for stable cryocondensation pumping. Results from the different tests illustrating the temperature distribution and flow characteristics for each configuration are presented.

  6. Two phase liquid helium flow testing to simulate the operation of a cryocondensation pump in the DIII-D tokamak

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laughon, G. J.; Baxi, C. B.; Campbell, G. L.; Mahdavi, M. A.; Makariou, C. C.; Menon, M. M.; Smith, J. P.; Schaffer, M. J.; Schaubel, K. M.

    A liquid helium-cooled cryocondensation pump has been installed in the DIII=D tokamak fusion energy research experiment at General Atomics. The pump is located within the tokamak vacuum chamber beneath the divertor baffle plates and is utilized for plasma density and contamination control. Two-phase helium flows through the pump at 5 to 10 g/s utilizing the beat transfer and constant temperature characteristics of boiling liquid helium. The pump is designed for a pumping speed of 32,0001/s. Extensive testing was performed with a prototypical pump test fixture. Several pump geometries (simple tube, coaxial flow plug, and coaxial slotted insert) were tested, in an iterative process, to determine which was the most satisfactory for stable cryocondensation pumping. Results from the different tests illustrating the temperature distribution and flow characteristics for each configuration are presented.

  7. Development and Dissemination of a Nationwide Helium Database for a National Assessment of Helium Resources.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brennan, S. T.; East, J. A., II; Garrity, C. P.

    2015-12-01

    In 2013, Congress passed the Helium Stewardship Act requiring the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) to undertake a national helium gas resource assessment to determine the nation's helium resources. An important initial component necessary to complete this assessment was the development of a comprehensive database of Helium (He) concentrations from petroleum exploration wells. Because Helium is often used as the carrier gas for compositional analyses for commercial and exploratory oil and gas wells, this limits the available helium concentration data. A literature search in peer-reviewed publications, state geologic survey databases, USGS energy geochemical databases, and the Bureau of Land Management databases provided approximately 16,000 data points from wells that had measurable He concentrations in the gas composition analyses. The data from these wells includes, date of sample collection, American Petroleum Institute well number, formation name, field name, depth of sample collection, and location. The gas compositional analyses, some performed as far back as 1934, do not all have the same level of precision and accuracy, therefore the date of the analysis is critical to the assessment as it indicates the relative amount of uncertainty in the analytical results. Non-proprietary data was used to create a GIS based interactive web interface that allows users to visualize, inspect, interact, and download our most current He data. The user can click on individual locations to see the available data at that location, as well as zoom in and out on a data density map. Concentrations on the map range from .04 mol% (lowest concentration of economic value) to 12% (highest naturally occurring values). This visual interface will allow users to develop a rapid appreciation of the areas with the highest potential for high helium concentrations within oil and gas fields.

  8. Current status, between-year comparisons and maternal transfer of organohalogenated compounds (OHCs) in Arctic char (Salvelinus alpinus) from Bjørnøya, Svalbard (Norway).

    PubMed

    Bytingsvik, J; Frantzen, M; Götsch, A; Heimstad, E S; Christensen, G; Evenset, A

    2015-07-15

    High levels of organohalogenated compounds (OHCs) have been found in Arctic char from Lake Ellasjøen at Bjørnøya (Svalbard, Norway) compared to char from other arctic lakes. The first aim of the study was to investigate the OHC status, contaminant profile, and partitioning of OHCs between muscle and ovary tissue in spawning female char from the high-polluted Lake Ellasjøen and the low-polluted Lake Laksvatn. The second aim was to investigate if OHC levels in muscle tissue have changed over time. Between-lake comparisons show that the muscle levels (lipid weight) of hexachlorobenzene (HCB), chlordanes (∑CHLs), mirex, dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethanes (∑DDTs) and polychlorinated biphenyls (∑PCBs) were up to 36 times higher in char from Ellasjøen than in Laksvatn, and confirm that the char from Ellasjøen are still heavily exposed compared to char from neighboring lake. A higher proportion of persistent OHCs were found in Ellasjøen compared to Laksvatn, while the proportion of the less persistent OHCs was highest in Laksvatn. A between-year comparison of OHC levels (i.e., HCB, DDTs, PCBs) in female and male char shows higher levels of HCB in female char from Ellasjøen in 2009/2012 compared to in 1999/2001. No other between-year differences in OHC levels were found. Due to small study groups, findings associated with between-year differences in OHC levels should be interpreted with caution. OHCs accumulate in the lipid rich ovaries of spawning females, resulting in up to six times higher levels of OHCs in ovaries compared to in muscle (wet weight). The toxic equivalent (TEQ)-value for the dioxin-like PCBs (PCB-105 and -118) in ovaries of the Ellasjøen char exceeded levels associated with increased egg mortality in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss). Hence, we suggest that future studies should focus on the reproductive health and performance abilities of the high-exposed population of char inhabiting Lake Ellasjøen. PMID:25864154

  9. Data-driven RBE parameterization for helium ion beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mairani, A.; Magro, G.; Dokic, I.; Valle, S. M.; Tessonnier, T.; Galm, R.; Ciocca, M.; Parodi, K.; Ferrari, A.; Jäkel, O.; Haberer, T.; Pedroni, P.; Böhlen, T. T.

    2016-01-01

    Helium ion beams are expected to be available again in the near future for clinical use. A suitable formalism to obtain relative biological effectiveness (RBE) values for treatment planning (TP) studies is needed. In this work we developed a data-driven RBE parameterization based on published in vitro experimental values. The RBE parameterization has been developed within the framework of the linear-quadratic (LQ) model as a function of the helium linear energy transfer (LET), dose and the tissue specific parameter {{(α /β )}\\text{ph}} of the LQ model for the reference radiation. Analytic expressions are provided, derived from the collected database, describing the \\text{RB}{{\\text{E}}α}={α\\text{He}}/{α\\text{ph}} and {{\\text{R}}β}={β\\text{He}}/{β\\text{ph}} ratios as a function of LET. Calculated RBE values at 2 Gy photon dose and at 10% survival (\\text{RB}{{\\text{E}}10} ) are compared with the experimental ones. Pearson’s correlation coefficients were, respectively, 0.85 and 0.84 confirming the soundness of the introduced approach. Moreover, due to the lack of experimental data at low LET, clonogenic experiments have been performed irradiating A549 cell line with {{(α /β )}\\text{ph}}=5.4 Gy at the entrance of a 56.4 MeV u-1He beam at the Heidelberg Ion Beam Therapy Center. The proposed parameterization reproduces the measured cell survival within the experimental uncertainties. A RBE formula, which depends only on dose, LET and {{(α /β )}\\text{ph}} as input parameters is proposed, allowing a straightforward implementation in a TP system.

  10. Super-Maxwellian helium evaporation from pure and salty water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hahn, Christine; Kann, Zachary R.; Faust, Jennifer A.; Skinner, J. L.; Nathanson, Gilbert M.

    2016-01-01

    Helium atoms evaporate from pure water and salty solutions in super-Maxwellian speed distributions, as observed experimentally and modeled theoretically. The experiments are performed by monitoring the velocities of dissolved He atoms that evaporate from microjets of pure water at 252 K and 4-8.5 molal LiCl and LiBr at 232-252 K. The average He atom energies exceed the flux-weighted Maxwell-Boltzmann average of 2RT by 30% for pure water and 70% for 8.5m LiBr. Classical molecular dynamics simulations closely reproduce the observed speed distributions and provide microscopic insight into the forces that eject the He atoms from solution. Comparisons of the density profile and He kinetic energies across the water-vacuum interface indicate that the He atoms are accelerated by He-water collisions within the top 1-2 layers of the liquid. We also find that the average He atom kinetic energy scales with the free energy of solvation of this sparingly soluble gas. This free-energy difference reflects the steeply decreasing potential of mean force on the He atoms in the interfacial region, whose gradient is the repulsive force that tends to expel the atoms. The accompanying sharp decrease in water density suppresses the He-water collisions that would otherwise maintain a Maxwell-Boltzmann distribution, allowing the He atom to escape at high energies. Helium is especially affected by this reduction in collisions because its weak interactions make energy transfer inefficient.

  11. Cryogenic adsorber design in a helium refrigeration system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Zhongjun; Zhang, Ning; Li, Zhengyu; Li, Q.

    2012-06-01

    The cryogenic adsorber is specially designed to eliminate impurities in gaseous helium such as O2, and N2 which is normally difficult to remove, based on the reversible cryotrapping of impurities on an activated carbon bed. The coconut shell activated carbon is adopted because of its developed micropore structure and specific surface area. This activated carbon adsorption is mostly determined by the micropore structure, and the adsorption rate of impurities is inversely proportional to the square of the particle sizes. The active carbon absorber's maximum permissible flow velocity is 0.25 m/s. When the gas flow velocity increases, the adsorption diffusion rate of the adsorbent is reduced, because an increase in the magnitude of the velocity resulted in a reduced amount of heat transfer to a unit volume of impure gas. According to the numerical simulation of N2 adsorption dynamics, the appropriate void tower link speed and the saturated adsorption capacity are determined. Then the diameter and height of the adsorber are designed. The mass transfer length should be taken into account in the adsorber height design. The pressure decrease is also calculated. The important factors that influence the adsorber pressure decrease are the void tower speed, the adsorbed layer height, and the active carbon particle shape and size.

  12. Phase order in superfluid helium films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bramwell, Steven T.; Faulkner, Michael F.; Holdsworth, Peter C. W.; Taroni, Andrea

    2015-12-01

    Classic experimental data on helium films are transformed to estimate a finite-size phase order parameter that measures the thermal degradation of the condensate fraction in the two-dimensional superfluid. The order parameter is found to evolve thermally with the exponent β = 3 π^2/128 , a characteristic, in analogous magnetic systems, of the Berezinskii-Kosterlitz-Thouless (BKT) phase transition. Universal scaling near the BKT fixed point generates a collapse of experimental data on helium and ferromagnetic films, and implies new experiments and theoretical protocols to explore the phase order. These results give a striking example of experimental finite-size scaling in a critical system that is broadly relevant to two-dimensional Bose fluids. This paper is dedicated to the memory of our friend and colleague Maxime Clusel, with whom we enjoyed many stimulating discussions on related topics.

  13. Photoionization from excited states of helium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jacobs, V. L.

    1973-01-01

    The cross sections for photoionization from the 2 1S, 2 3S, 2 1P and 2 3P excited states of helium are calculated for photoelectron energies below the n = 2 threshold of He(+) using Hylleraas bound state wave functions and 1s-2s-2p close coupling final state wave functions. The resonant structures associated with the lowest-lying 1S, 1P, 3P, and 1D autoionizing states of helium are found to be characterized by large values of the line profile parameter q. The cross sections and the photoelectron angular distribution asymmetry parameters for the P-states are calculated for various polarization states of the target atom and the incident photon. Experiments which would lead to the separate determinations of the S- and D- wave partial photoionization cross sections are discussed.

  14. Helium-ion-induced human cataractogenesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blakely, E. A.; Daftari, I. K.; Meecham, W. J.; Alonso, L. C.; Collier, J. M.; Kroll, S. M.; Gillette, E. L.; Lee, A. C.; Lett, J. T.; Cox, A. B.

    1994-01-01

    Retrospective and ongoing analyses of clinical records from 347 primary intraocular melanoman patients treated with helium ions at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL) will allow examination of the exposure-response data for human cataract; which is a complication of the therapy from incidental exposure of the lens. Direct particle beam traversal of at least a portion of the lens usually is unavoidable in treatment of posterior intraocular tumors. The precise treatment planned for each patient permits quantitative assessment of the lenticular dose and its radiation quality. We are reporting our preliminary results on the development of helium-ion-induced lens opacifications and cataracts in 54 of these patients who had 10% or less of their lens in the treatment field. We believe these studies will be relevant to estimating the human risk for cataract in space flight.

  15. An optically trapped mixture of alkali-metal and metastable helium atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flores, Adonis; Mishra, Hari Prasad; Vassen, Wim; Knoop, Steven

    2016-05-01

    Ultracold collisions between alkali-metal and metastable triplet helium (He*) atoms provide the opportunity to study Feshbach resonances in the presence of a strong loss channel, namely Penning ionization, which strongly depends on the internal spin-states of the atoms. Recently we have realized the first optically trapped alkali-metal-metastable helium mixture. To prepare the ultracold 87 Rb+4 He* mixture in a single beam optical dipole trap (ODT), we apply evaporative cooling in a strong quadrupole magnetic trap (QMT) for both species and subsequent transfer to the ODT via a hybrid trap. We will present lifetime measurements of different spin-state mixtures, testing the application of the universal loss model to this interesting multichannel collision system.

  16. Closed-loop pulsed helium ionization detector

    DOEpatents

    Ramsey, Roswitha S.; Todd, Richard A.

    1987-01-01

    A helium ionization detector for gas chromatography is operated in a constant current, pulse-modulated mode by configuring the detector, electrometer and a high voltage pulser in a closed-loop control system. The detector current is maintained at a fixed level by varying the frequency of fixed-width, high-voltage bias pulses applied to the detector. An output signal proportional to the pulse frequency is produced which is indicative of the charge collected for a detected species.

  17. Test program, helium II orbital resupply coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hyatt, William S.

    1991-12-01

    The full scope of this program was to have included development tests, design and production of custom test equipment and acceptance and qualification testing of prototype and protoflight coupling hardware. This program was performed by Ball Aerospace Systems Division, Boulder, Colorado until its premature termination in May 1991. Development tests were performed on cryogenic face seals and flow control devices at superfluid helium (He II) conditions. Special equipment was developed to allow quantified leak detection at large leak rates up to 8.4 x 10(exp -4) SCCS. Two major fixtures were developed and characterized: The Cryogenic Test Fixture (CTF) and the Thermal Mismatch Fixture (Glovebox). The CTF allows the coupling hardware to be filled with liquid nitrogen (LN2), liquid helium (LHe) or sub-cooled liquid helium when hardware flow control valves are either open or closed. Heat leak measurements, internal and external helium leakage measurements, cryogenic proof pressure tests and external load applications are performed in this fixture. Special reusable MLI closures were developed to provide repeatable installations in the CTF. The Thermal Mismatch Fixture allows all design configurations of coupling hardware to be engaged and disengaged while measuring applied forces and torques. Any two hardware components may be individually thermally preconditioned within the range of 117 deg K to 350 deg K prior to engage/disengage cycling. This verifies dimensional compatibility and operation when thermally mismatched. A clean, dry GN2 atmosphere is maintained in the fixture at all times. The first shipset of hardware was received, inspected and cycled at room temperature just prior to program termination.

  18. Correlation of Helium Solubility in Liquid Nitrogen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    VanDresar, Neil T.; Zimmerli, Gregory A.

    2012-01-01

    A correlation has been developed for the equilibrium mole fraction of soluble gaseous helium in liquid nitrogen as a function of temperature and pressure. Experimental solubility data was compiled and provided by National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST). Data from six sources was used to develop a correlation within the range of 0.5 to 9.9 MPa and 72.0 to 119.6 K. The relative standard deviation of the correlation is 6.9 percent.

  19. Liquid vapour spinodal of pure helium 4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Imre, Attila R.; Kraska, Thomas

    2008-10-01

    Unlike gases, liquids can be overheated or stretched only up to a limit. The determination of the mean-field thermodynamic stability limit-the so-called spinodal-is a very difficult theoretical and a more-or-less impossible experimental task. Based on a recent semi-empirical method, the spinodal pressure of helium-4 at given temperature is determined, using liquid-vapour surface tension, interface thickness and vapour pressure data.

  20. Combined cold compressor/ejector helium refrigerator

    DOEpatents

    Brown, Donald P.

    1985-01-01

    A refrigeration apparatus having an ejector operatively connected with a cold compressor to form a two-stage pumping system. This pumping system is used to lower the pressure, and thereby the temperature of a bath of boiling refrigerant (helium). The apparatus as thus arranged and operated has substantially improved operating efficiency when compared to other processes or arrangements for achieving a similar low pressure.

  1. Combined cold compressor/ejector helium refrigerator

    DOEpatents

    Brown, D.P.

    1984-06-05

    A refrigeration apparatus having an ejector operatively connected with a cold compressor to form a two-stage pumping system. This pumping system is used to lower the pressure, and thereby the temperature of a bath of boiling refrigerant (helium). The apparatus as thus arranged and operated has substantially improved operating efficiency when compared to other processes or arrangements for achieving a similar low pressure.

  2. Proton transfer reaction time-of-flight mass spectrometry: A high-throughput and innovative method to study the influence of dairy system and cow characteristics on the volatile compound fingerprint of cheeses.

    PubMed

    Bergamaschi, M; Biasioli, F; Cappellin, L; Cecchinato, A; Cipolat-Gotet, C; Cornu, A; Gasperi, F; Martin, B; Bittante, G

    2015-12-01

    The aim of this work was to study the effect of dairy system and individual cow-related factors on the volatile fingerprint of a large number of individual model cheeses analyzed by proton transfer reaction time-of-flight mass spectrometry (PTR-ToF-MS). A total of 1,075 model cheeses were produced using milk samples collected from individual Brown Swiss cows reared in 72 herds located in mountainous areas of Trento province (Italy). The herds belonged to 5 main dairy systems ranging from traditional to modern and the cows presented different daily milk yields (24.6±7.9kg × d(-1)), stages of lactation (199±138 d in milk), and parities (2.7±1.8). The PTR-ToF-MS revealed 619 peaks, of which the 240 most intense were analyzed, and 61 of these were tentatively attributed to relevant volatile organic compounds on the basis of their fragmentation patterns and data from the literature. Principal component analysis was used to convert the multiple responses characterizing the PTR-ToF-MS spectra into 5 synthetic variables representing 62% of the total information. These principal components were related to groups of volatile compounds tentatively attributed to different peaks and used to investigate the relationship of the volatile compound profile obtained by PTR-ToF-MS to animal and farm characteristics. Lactation stage is related to 4 principal components which brought together 52.9% of the total variance and 57.9% of the area of analyzed peaks. In particular, 2 principal components were positively related to peaks tentatively attributed to aldehydes and ketones and negatively related to alcohols, esters, and acids, which displayed a linear increase during lactation. The second principal component was affected by dairy system; it was higher in the modern system in which cows received total mixed rations. The third principal component was positively related to daily milk production. In summary, we report the first application of this innovative, high

  3. Proton transfer reaction time-of-flight mass spectrometry: A high-throughput and innovative method to study the influence of dairy system and cow characteristics on the volatile compound fingerprint of cheeses.

    PubMed

    Bergamaschi, M; Biasioli, F; Cappellin, L; Cecchinato, A; Cipolat-Gotet, C; Cornu, A; Gasperi, F; Martin, B; Bittante, G

    2015-12-01

    The aim of this work was to study the effect of dairy system and individual cow-related factors on the volatile fingerprint of a large number of individual model cheeses analyzed by proton transfer reaction time-of-flight mass spectrometry (PTR-ToF-MS). A total of 1,075 model cheeses were produced using milk samples collected from individual Brown Swiss cows reared in 72 herds located in mountainous areas of Trento province (Italy). The herds belonged to 5 main dairy systems ranging from traditional to modern and the cows presented different daily milk yields (24.6±7.9kg × d(-1)), stages of lactation (199±138 d in milk), and parities (2.7±1.8). The PTR-ToF-MS revealed 619 peaks, of which the 240 most intense were analyzed, and 61 of these were tentatively attributed to relevant volatile organic compounds on the basis of their fragmentation patterns and data from the literature. Principal component analysis was used to convert the multiple responses characterizing the PTR-ToF-MS spectra into 5 synthetic variables representing 62% of the total information. These principal components were related to groups of volatile compounds tentatively attributed to different peaks and used to investigate the relationship of the volatile compound profile obtained by PTR-ToF-MS to animal and farm characteristics. Lactation stage is related to 4 principal components which brought together 52.9% of the total variance and 57.9% of the area of analyzed peaks. In particular, 2 principal components were positively related to peaks tentatively attributed to aldehydes and ketones and negatively related to alcohols, esters, and acids, which displayed a linear increase during lactation. The second principal component was affected by dairy system; it was higher in the modern system in which cows received total mixed rations. The third principal component was positively related to daily milk production. In summary, we report the first application of this innovative, high

  4. Formation of Positively Charged Liquid Helium Clusters in Supercritical Helium and their Solidification upon Compression.

    PubMed

    Tarchouna, Hejer Gharbi; Bonifaci, Nelly; Aitken, Frédéric; Mendoza Luna, Luis Guillermo; von Haeften, Klaus

    2015-08-01

    Positively charged ions were produced in supercritical helium at temperatures from 6 to 10 K and up to 2 MPa using a corona discharge. Their mobility was measured via current-voltage curves, and the hydrodynamic radius was derived using Stokes law. An initial increase and subsequent decrease of hydrodynamic radius was observed and interpreted in terms of growth, compression and solidification of ion clusters. The mobility was modeled using a van der Waals-type thermodynamic state equation for the ion-in-helium mixed system and a temperature-dependent Millikan-Cunningham factor, describing experimental data both in the Knudsen and the Stokes flow region. Regions of maximum hydrodynamic radius and large compressibility were interpreted as boiling points. These points were modeled over a large range of pressures and found to match the Frenkel line of pure helium up to 0.7 MPa, reflecting similarity of density fluctuations in pure supercritical helium and gas-liquid phase transitions of ionic helium clusters. PMID:26267199

  5. Formation of Positively Charged Liquid Helium Clusters in Supercritical Helium and their Solidification upon Compression.

    PubMed

    Tarchouna, Hejer Gharbi; Bonifaci, Nelly; Aitken, Frédéric; Mendoza Luna, Luis Guillermo; von Haeften, Klaus

    2015-08-01

    Positively charged ions were produced in supercritical helium at temperatures from 6 to 10 K and up to 2 MPa using a corona discharge. Their mobility was measured via current-voltage curves, and the hydrodynamic radius was derived using Stokes law. An initial increase and subsequent decrease of hydrodynamic radius was observed and interpreted in terms of growth, compression and solidification of ion clusters. The mobility was modeled using a van der Waals-type thermodynamic state equation for the ion-in-helium mixed system and a temperature-dependent Millikan-Cunningham factor, describing experimental data both in the Knudsen and the Stokes flow region. Regions of maximum hydrodynamic radius and large compressibility were interpreted as boiling points. These points were modeled over a large range of pressures and found to match the Frenkel line of pure helium up to 0.7 MPa, reflecting similarity of density fluctuations in pure supercritical helium and gas-liquid phase transitions of ionic helium clusters.

  6. High resistance to helium embrittlement in reduced activation martensitic steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kimura, A.; Kasada, R.; Morishita, K.; Sugano, R.; Hasegawa, A.; Abe, K.; Yamamoto, T.; Matsui, H.; Yoshida, N.; Wirth, B. D.; Rubia, T. D.

    2002-12-01

    Reduced activation martensitic steels (RAMSs) are the prime candidate structural material for the DEMO reactor and beyond where the material has been considered to suffer severe embrittlement caused by high-dose neutron irradiation and several thousands appm of transmutated helium. However, recent several works show high resistance to helium embrittlement of RAMS. Good performance of RAMS in the presence of rather high concentration of helium is considered to be due to high trapping capacity for helium atoms in the martensitic structure that consists of dislocations, lath boundaries, grain boundaries and carbide/matrix interfaces. To make clear the role of dislocations in trapping helium, thermal helium desorption spectra were measured for iron specimens annealed at different temperatures after cold work. A desorption peak, which increased its height with increasing dislocation density, was observed at around 550 °C, suggesting that dislocations trap helium atoms. A molecular dynamics simulation study for investigating the helium trapping behavior at helium-vacancy complexes suggests that helium is rather strongly bound to the complexes and increases the binding energy of vacancy to the complex, resulting in increasing stability of the complexes at elevated temperatures by reducing thermal emission of vacancies.

  7. Feasibility study for long lifetime helium dewar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parmley, R. T.

    1981-01-01

    A feasible concept for a launchable three year lifetime helium dewar was investigted. Current helium dewar designs were examined to see where the largest potential reductions in parasitic heat loads can be made. The study was also devoted to examining support concepts. The support concept chosen, a passive orbital disconnect strut (PODS), has an orbital support conductance that is lower by more than an order of magnitude over current tension band supports. This lower support conductance cuts the total dewar weight in half for the same three year life time requirements. Effort was also concentrated on efficient wire feed through designs and vapor cooling of the multilayer insulation, supports, wire feed throughs and plumbing penetrations. A single stage helium dewar vs. dual stage dewars with a guard cryogen of nitrogen or neon was examined. The single stage dewar concept was selected. Different support concepts were analyzed from which the PODS support concepts was chosen. A preliminary design of the dewar was thermally and structurally analyzed and laid out including system weights, thermal performance and performance sensitivities.

  8. Development of charcoal sorbents for helium cryopumping

    SciTech Connect

    Sedgley, D.W.; Tobin, A.G.

    1985-09-30

    Improved methods for cryopumping helium were developed for application to fusion reactors where high helium generation rates are expected. This study period evaluated charcoal particle size, bonding agent type and thickness, and substrate thickness. The optimum combination of charcoal, bond, and substrate was used to form a scaled-up panel for evaluation in the Tritium Systems Test Assembly (TSTA) at Los Alamos. The optimum combination is a 12 x 30 mesh coconut charcoal attached to a 0.48 cm thick copper substrate by a 0.015 cm thick silver phosphorus copper braze. A copper cement bond for attaching charcoal to a substrate was identified and tested. Helium pumping performance of this combination was comparable to that of the charcoal braze system. Environmental tests showed the charcoal's susceptibility to vacuum chamber contamination. Performance degradation followed exposure of ambient temperature charcoal to a vacuum for prolonged periods. Maintaining a liquid nitrogen-cooled shield between the charcoal and the source of contamination prevented this degradation. A combination of bake-out and LN shielding effected recovery of degraded performance.

  9. The positronium fraction before thermalization in helium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chapuis, C. G. L.; Wallyn, P.; Durouchoux, P.

    1994-06-01

    Positron interactions with the matter of various media have been studied for a long time in astrophysics, expecially since the 511 keV line was detected in the direction of the Galactic center (Johnson, Harnden, & Haymes 1972) and confirmed by gamma-ray line experiments. The abundance of helium in the interstellar medium (the second most important atom after hydrogen) makes the study of the interaction of positrons in that medium a subject of great interest in astrophysics. The positronium fraction before thermalization in helium has already been measured in the laboratory (f1 = 80.7% +/- 0.5%; Brown & Leventhal 1986). The experimental value of the positronium fraction in molecular hydrogen (f1 = 89.7% +/- 0.3%; Brown & Leventhal 1986) has also been evaluated by a Monte Carlo simulation (Bussard, Ramaty, & Drachman 1979) (93%), and recently a reevaluation based on recent measurements of cross sections has been calculated by Wallyn et al. (1993)(90%). Theoretical calculations have already been done (Bussard, Ramaty, & Drachman 1979), (95%) and reevaluated (Wallyn et al. 1993) (98%) for the positronium fraction in atomic hydrogen. We pursue this investigation with helium atoms and obtain 78%. Our result is in excellent agreement with the experimental value of Brown & Leventhal (1986). Astrophysical implications will be emphasized.

  10. Multipurpose closed-cycle cryocooler for liquefying hydrogen, helium-4 or helium-3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winter, Calvin

    1990-08-01

    A cryogenic refrigerator utilizing helium-4 gas in closed-cycle Gifford-McMahon and Joule-Thomson cooling loops was built and achieves continuous operating temperatures of 2.8R. The object cooled is a thin walled (0.1mm) seamless electroformed nickel target sample cell with a volume of 160m1. Room temperature hydrogen, helium-4 or helium-3 gas, supplied at a pressure slightly above atmospheric, is liquefied by the cryocooler and fills the cell. Unusual features include: horizontal operation; a long narrow extension on the vacuum shroud (900mm long, 76mm diameter) and special valves to select an operating temperature appropriate to the sample gas and maximize the cooling power available at that temperature.

  11. In situ controlled modification of the helium density in single helium-filled nanobubbles

    SciTech Connect

    David, M.-L. Pailloux, F.; Alix, K.; Mauchamp, V.; Pizzagalli, L.; Couillard, M.; Botton, G. A.

    2014-03-28

    We demonstrate that the helium density and corresponding pressure can be modified in single nano-scale bubbles embedded in semiconductors by using the electron beam of a scanning transmission electron microscope as a multifunctional probe: the measurement probe for imaging and chemical analysis and the irradiation source to modify concomitantly the pressure in a controllable way by fine tuning of the electron beam parameters. The control of the detrapping rate is achieved by varying the experimental conditions. The underlying physical mechanisms are discussed; our experimental observations suggest that the helium detrapping from bubbles could be interpreted in terms of direct ballistic collisions, leading to the ejection of the helium atoms from the bubble.

  12. THERMAL UNIFORMITY OF LIQUID HELIUM IN ELECTRON BUBBLE CHAMBER.

    SciTech Connect

    WANG,L.; JIA,L.

    2002-07-22

    A CRYOGENIC RESEARCH APPARATUS TO MEASURE THE MOVEMENT OF ELECTRONS UNDER A HIGH ELECTRIC FIELD IN A LIQUID HELIUM BATH WAS DESIGNED AND BUILT AT THE BROOKHAVEN NATIONAL LABORATORY AND THE NEVIS LABORATORY OF COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY. THE LIQUID HELIUM CHAMBER IS A DOUBLE WALLED CYLINDRICAL CONTAINER EQUIPPED WITH 5 OPTICS WINDOWS AND 10 HIGH VOLTAGE CABLES. TO SHIELD THE LIQUID HELIUM CHAMBER AGAINST THE EXTERNAL HEAT LOADS AND TO PROVIDE THE THERMAL UNIFORMITY IN THE LIQUID HELIUM CHAMBER, THE DOUBLE WALLED JACKET WAS COOLED BY A PUMPED HELIUM BATH. THE HELIUM CHAMBER WAS BUILT INTO A COMMERICAL LN2 / LHE CRYOSTAT. THIS PAPER PRESENTS THE DESIGN AND THE NUMERICAL SIMULATION ANALYSIS ON THERMAL UNIFORMITY OF THE ELECTRON BUBBLE CHAMBER.

  13. Helium liquefaction with a 4 K pulse tube cryocooler

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Chao

    2001-07-01

    Helium liquefaction with a two-stage 4 K pulse tube cryocooler is introduced in this paper. The helium liquefier has a feature of precooling helium gas to be liquefied by using inefficiency of the second stage regenerator in the pulse tube cryocooler. This process reduces enthalpy of the incoming helium gas when entering the condenser and significantly increases the condensation rate. Numerical analysis predicts the precooling heat load on the second stage regenerator, decreases the PTC second stage cooling capacity by only 11% of the heat actually absorbed into the regenerator. A prototype pulse tube helium liquefier was built, which has two precooling heat exchangers on the first stage cold head and the second stage regenerator. It continuously liquefies helium with a rate of 4.8 l/day under normal pressure while consumes 4.6 kW power input.

  14. Metastable Aluminum Atoms Floating on the Surface of Helium Nanodroplets.

    PubMed

    Jeffs, Jay; Besley, Nicholas A; Stace, Anthony J; Sarma, Gautam; Cunningham, Ethan M; Boatwright, Adrian; Yang, Shengfu; Ellis, Andrew M

    2015-06-12

    Metal atoms have proved to be sensitive probes of the properties of superfluid helium nanodroplets. To date, all experiments on the doping of helium droplets have concentrated on the attachment of metal atoms in their ground electronic states. Here we report the first examples of metal atoms in excited states becoming attached to helium nanodroplets. The atoms in question are aluminum, and they have been generated by laser ablation in a metastable quartet state, which attaches to and remains on the surface of helium droplets. Evidence for a surface location comes from electronic spectra, which consist of very narrow absorption profiles that show very small spectral shifts. Supporting ab initio calculations show there to be an energy incentive for a metastable Al atom to remain on the surface of a helium droplet rather than move to the interior. The results suggest that helium droplets may provide a method for the capture and transport of metastable excited atomic and molecular species.

  15. IUE Echelle Investigation of Two Peculiar Helium-Rich Degenerates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sion, Edward M.

    PG0112+102 (to be observed). Our scientific objectives in observing PG13464082 are: (1) to look for any evidence of circumstellar/circumbinary gas in the form of either shortward-shifted or longward-shifted CNO absorption/emission features, undetectable at low IUE resolution, as a basis of comparison with the two other similar helium-transfer cataclysmics, all with pure helium optical spectra but showing CNO ions in the IUE range, G61-29 (carbon deficient, nitrogen-rich) which resembles spectroscopically, the classical nova binary V 603 Aquila (Lambert and Slovak 1981) and the similar system A M C Vn, which shows far ultraviolet (IUE) evidence of a hot wind (Solheim and Kjeldseth-Moe), suggesting that high resolution spectra of PGJ346+082 may reveal an ancient nova shell, circumbinary matter connected with the formation process or the binary, or mass outflow from the inner disk/boundary layer region. Our IUE echelle observation of PG1346+082 would enable detection of circumbinary shell/ wind absorption line features as weak as 40-60 mA, as well as weak emission, with a wavelength (velocity) scale accurate to less than 5 km/s.

  16. Helium as a Dynamical Tracer in the Thermosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thayer, J. P.; Liu, X.; Wang, W.; Burns, A. G.

    2014-12-01

    Helium has been a missing constituent in current thermosphere general circulation models. Although typically a minor gas relative to the more abundant major gasses, its unique properties of being chemically inert and light make it an excellent tracer of thermosphere dynamics. Studying helium can help simplify understanding of transport effects. This understanding can then be projected to other gasses whose overall structure and behavior are complex but, by contrasting with helium, can be evaluated for its transport dependencies. The dynamical influences on composition impact estimates of thermosphere mass density, where helium during solar minima can have a direct contribution, as well as ionosphere electron density. Furthermore, helium estimates in the upper thermosphere during solar minima have not been observed since the 1976 minimum. Indirect estimates of helium in the upper thermosphere during the recent extreme solar minimum indicates winter-time helium concentrations exceeded NRL-MSISE00 estimates by 30%-70% during periods of quiet geomagnetic activity. For times of active geomagnetic conditions, helium concentrations near ~450 km altitude are estimated to decrease while oxygen concentrations increase. An investigation of the altitude structure in thermosphere mass density storm-time perturbations reveal the important effects of composition change with maximum perturbation occurring near the He/O transition region and a much weaker maximum occurring near the O/N2 transition region. However, evaluating helium behavior and its role as a dynamical tracer is not straightforward and model development is necessary to adequately establish the connection to specific dynamical processes. Fortunately recent efforts have led to the implementation of helium modules in the NCAR TIEGCM and TIME-GCM. In this invited talk, the simulated helium behavior and structure will be shown to reproduce observations (such as the wintertime helium bulge and storm-time response) and its

  17. Acoustic Resonances in Helium Fluids Excited by Quartz Tuning Forks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salmela, A.; Tuoriniemi, J.; Rysti, J.

    2011-03-01

    Ordinary quartz tuning fork resonators, operated at about 30 or 200 kHz frequency, couple to acoustic first and second sound resonances in helium fluids under certain conditions. We have studied acoustic resonances in supercritical 4He, normal and superfluid 4He, and in isotopic mixtures of helium. Suggestive temperature, pressure, and concentration dependences are given. Furthermore, we propose a thermometric reference point device based on second sound resonances in helium mixtures, and indicate possible differences in the nature of second sound resonances in superfluid 4He and helium mixtures.

  18. Stability of Surface State Electrons on Helium Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leiderer, P.; Scheer, E.; Kono, K.; Lin, J.-J.; Rees, D. G.

    2016-05-01

    Electrons on helium substrates form a model Coulomb system in which the transition from classical electron liquid to Wigner crystal is readily observed. However, attempts to increase the electron density in order to observe the `quantum melting' of the system to a Fermi degenerate gas are hindered by an instability of the helium surface. Here we describe experimental efforts to reach the degenerate regime on thin helium films and microstructured substrates, for which the surface instability is suppressed. We demonstrate that, although the electron densities obtained exceed those for bulk helium substrates, observation of quantum melting remains challenging. We discuss possible solutions to the technical challenges involved.

  19. Simplified Helium Refrigerator Cycle Analysis Using the `Carnot Step'

    SciTech Connect

    P. Knudsen; V. Ganni

    2006-05-01

    An analysis of the Claude form of an idealized helium liquefier for the minimum input work reveals the ''Carnot Step'' for helium refrigerator cycles. As the ''Carnot Step'' for a multi-stage polytropic compression process consists of equal pressure ratio stages; similarly for an idealized helium liquefier the ''Carnot Step'' consists of equal temperature ratio stages for a given number of expansion stages. This paper presents the analytical basis and some useful equations for the preliminary examination of existing and new Claude helium refrigeration cycles.

  20. Helium vs. Proton Induced Displacement Damage in Electronic Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ringo, Sawnese; Barghouty, A. F.

    2010-01-01

    In this project, the specific effects of displacement damage due to the passage of protons and helium nuclei on some typical electronic materials will be evaluated and contrasted. As the electronic material absorbs the energetic proton and helium momentum, degradation of performance occurs, eventually leading to overall failure. Helium nuclei traveling at the same speed as protons are expected to impart more to the material displacement damage; due to the larger mass, and thus momentum, of helium nuclei compared to protons. Damage due to displacement of atoms in their crystalline structure can change the physical properties and hence performance of the electronic materials.

  1. A new approach to constrain basal helium flux into aquifers for better estimation of groundwater ages by Helium 4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsumoto, Takuya; Sturchio, Neil C.; Chang, Hung K.; Gastmans, Didier; Araguas-Araguas, Luis J.; Jiang, Wei; Lu, Zheng-Tian; Mueller, Peter; Yokochi, Reika; Purtschert, Roland; Zongyu, Chen; Shuiming, Hu; Aggarwal, Pradeep K.

    2016-04-01

    beams, minimizing the size of the sample to be processed for analysis. Being a noble gas, krypton does not form compounds in the aquifer and is only derived from atmospheric sources. The long half-life and the lack of geochemical interactions make this radionuclide an excellent tracer to estimate groundwater ages in deep aquifer systems. Krypton-81 results offer also the possibility of calibrating groundwater ages derived from helium-4 accumulation method. Until recently, helium-4 ages were calibrated to account for the basal helium flux on carbon-14 ages, but the relatively short half-life of carbon-14 often led to inaccurate age estimates for groundwater ages older than about 100 000 years. We will present a new approach to utilize 81Kr to optimize the parameters of conceptual groundwater flow model and the size of 4He basal flux, which yielded a reasonable agreement between 81Kr and 4He ages in two large and old aquifers in Brazil (Aggarwal et al., Nature Geoscience, 8, 35-39, 2015) and in the North China Plain.

  2. Time-dependent density functional theory (TD-DFT) study on the excited-state intramolecular proton transfer (ESIPT) in 2-hydroxybenzoyl compounds: Significance of the intramolecular hydrogen bonding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lan, Xin; Yang, Dapeng; Sui, Xiao; Wang, Dandan

    2013-02-01

    The excited-state properties of intramolecular hydrogen bonding (IMHB) in methyl salicylate (MS) and its effects on the excited-state intramolecular proton transfer (ESIPT) have been investigated using theoretical methods. From the geometric optimization and IR spectra in the ground and excited states calculated by density functional theory (DFT) and time-dependent DFT (TD-DFT) methods respectively, the IMHB is demonstrated to be significantly strengthened upon excitation to excited state S1. Thereby, the ESIPT is facilitated by the excited-state IMHB strengthening since ESIPT takes place through IMHB. In addition, the absorption and fluorescence peaks of the S1 state are also calculated using the TD-DFT method. It is noted that the calculated spectra are in good agreement with the experimental results, which has confirmed the ESIPT mechanism of MS first proposed by Weller. Moreover, other four 2-hydroxybenzoyl compounds forming strong IMHB are investigated to understand the effect of substituent R on the ESIPT process. We find that the hydrogen bond strength can be controlled by the inductive field effect of the substituent. Thus it is inferred that the ESIPT reaction can be facilitated by the inductive effect of electron-donating substituent.

  3. Chemodiversity in the fingerprint analysis of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) of 35 old and 7 modern apple cultivars determined by proton-transfer-reaction mass spectrometry (PTR-MS) in two different seasons.

    PubMed

    Ciesa, Flavio; Höller, Irene; Guerra, Walter; Berger, Jennifer; Dalla Via, Josef; Oberhuber, Michael

    2015-05-01

    Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) are chemical species that play an important role in determining the characteristic aroma and flavor of fruits. Apple (Malus × domestica Borkh.) cultivars differ in their aroma and composition of VOCs. To determine varietal differences in the aroma profiles, VOCs emitted by 7 modern and 35 old apple cultivars were analyzed using Proton Transfer Reaction Mass Spectrometry (PTR-MS). PTR-MS is a rapid, reproducible, and non-destructive spectrometric technique for VOC analysis of single fruits, developed for direct injection analysis. In the present study, we analyzed the differences in the emission of VOCs from single fruits at harvest and after a storage period of 60±10 days, followed by 3 d of shelf life. Our results show that VOC profile differences among apple cultivars were more pronounced after storage than at harvest. Furthermore, chemodiversity was higher in old cultivars compared to modern cultivars, probably due to their greater genetic variability. Our data highlight the importance of storage and shelf life are crucial for the development of the typical aroma and flavor of several apple cultivars. The validity of the method is demonstrated by comparison of two different harvest years.

  4. Helium degassing related to the Kobe earthquake.

    SciTech Connect

    Sano, Y.; Takahata, N.; Igarashi, G.; Koizumi, N.; Sturchio, N. C.; Environmental Research; Hiroshima Univ.; Univ. of Tokyo; Geological Survey of Japan

    1998-08-24

    The {sup 3}He/{sup 4}He ratios of groundwaters at Nishinomiya city close to the epicenter decreased immediately after the 1995 Kobe Earthquake in Japan, while the {sup 4}He/{sup 20}Ne ratios increased. The {delta}D and {delta}{sup 18}O values of the groundwaters were identical before and after the earthquake. Apparent groundwater ages calculated by tritium-{sup 3}He concentrations also did not change, if we correct the addition of radiogenic helium into the samples by the earthquake. These observations may be attributed to following phenomenon; (1) release of radiogenic He as a result of micro-fracturing of rocks during the earthquake followed by degassing from the aquifer system, in the amount of about 4.0 {+-}1.3 x 10{sup -9} cm{sup 3} STP/cm{sup 3}-rock, (2) simple mixing of low-tritium water with high radiogenic helium in the clay layer and high-tritium water with atmospheric helium in the aquifer, and (3) flow path mixing in the region of the sample screen. If we take the (1) degassing hypothesis as a function of micro-fracturing, it is possible to calculate the total He degassing related to the Kobe earthquake, 4 x 10{sup 11} cm{sup 3} STP, which is about 3% of the steady-state global He flux of 1.2 x 10{sup 13} cm{sup 3} STP/year. Thus, earthquake may play an important role in He degassing from the solid earth.

  5. Alternatives for Helium-3 in Multiplicity Counters

    SciTech Connect

    Ely, James H.; Siciliano, Edward R.; Lintereur, Azaree T.; Swinhoe, Martyn T.

    2013-04-01

    Alternatives to helium-3 are being actively pursued due to the shortage and rising costs of helium-3. For safeguards applications, there are a number of ongoing investigations to find alternatives that provide the same capability in a cost-effective manner. One of the greatest challenges is to find a comparable alternative for multiplicity counters, since they require high efficiency and short collection or die-away times. Work has been progressing on investigating three commercially available alternatives for high efficiency multiplicity counters: boron trifluoride (BF3) filled proportional tubes, boron-lined proportional tubes, and lithium fluoride with zinc sulfide coated light guides. The baseline multiplicity counter used for the investigation is the Epithermal Neutron Multiplicity Counter with 121 helium-3 filled tubes at 10 atmosphere pressure, which is a significant capability to match. The primary tool for the investigation has been modeling and simulation using the Monte Carlo N-Particle eXtended (MCNPX) radiation transport program, with experiments to validate the models. To directly calculate the coincidence rates in boron-lined (and possibly other) detectors, the MCNPX code has been enhanced to allow the existing coincidence tally to be used with energy deposition rather than neutron capture reactions. This allows boron-lined detectors to be modeled more accurately. Variations of tube number and diameter along with variations in the amount of inter-tube moderator have been conducted for the BF3 and boron-lined cases. Tube pressure was investigated for BF3, up to two atmospheres, as well as optimal boron thickness in the boron-lined tubes. The lithium fluoride was modeled as sheets of material with light guides in between, and the number and thickness of the sheets investigated. The amount of light guide, which in this case doubles as a moderator, was also optimized. The results of these modeling and simulation optimization investigations are described

  6. Pressure-Driven Flow of Solid Helium

    SciTech Connect

    Day, James; Beamish, John

    2006-03-17

    The recent torsional oscillator results of Kim and Chan show an anomalous mass decoupling, interpreted by the authors as a supersolid phase transition, in solid {sup 4}He. We have used a piezoelectrically driven diaphragm to study the flow of solid helium through an array of capillaries. Our measurements showed no indication of low temperature flow, placing stringent restrictions on supersolid flow in response to a pressure difference. The average flow speed at low temperatures was less than 1.2x10{sup -14} m/s, corresponding to a supersolid velocity at least 7 orders of magnitude smaller than the critical velocities inferred from the torsional oscillator measurements.

  7. Heuristic theory of positron-helium scattering.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Drachman, R. J.

    1971-01-01

    An error in a previous modified adiabatic approximation (Drachman, 1966), due to a lack of generality in the form of the short-range correlation part of the wave function for L greater than zero, is corrected heuristically by allowing the monopole suppression parameter to depend on L. An L-dependent local potential is constructed to fit the well-known positron-hydrogen s, p, and d wave phase shifts below the rearrangement threshold. The same form of potential yields a positron-helium cross-section in agreement with a recent experimental measurement near threshold.

  8. Production of thorium-229 using helium nuclei

    DOEpatents

    Mirzadeh, Saed [Knoxville, TN; Garland, Marc Alan [Knoxville, TN

    2010-12-14

    A method for producing .sup.229Th includes the steps of providing .sup.226Ra as a target material, and bombarding the target material with alpha particles, helium-3, or neutrons to form .sup.229Th. When neutrons are used, the neutrons preferably include an epithermal neutron flux of at least 1.times.10.sup.13 n s.sup.-1cm.sup.-2. .sup.228Ra can also be bombarded with thermal and/or energetic neutrons to result in a neutron capture reaction to form .sup.229Th. Using .sup.230Th as a target material, .sup.229Th can be formed using neutron, gamma ray, proton or deuteron bombardment.

  9. Influence of Helium in Gravitational Instabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corona-Galindo, M. G.; Cardona, O.; Klapp, J.

    1990-11-01

    RESUMEN. Hemos analizado los modos hid rod inamicos de un modelo de fluido de dos componentes (hidr6geno y helio), y hemos obtenido la condici6n de inestabilidad para masas mayores que 1.39 veces la bien conocida masa dejeans. ABSTRACT, We have analysed the hydrodynamical modes of a two component fluid model (hydrogen and helium), and we have obtained the instability condition for masses greater than 1.39 times the well-known Jeans mass. K words: COSMOLOGY - GRAVITATION - INSTABILITIES

  10. Variable helium diffusion characteristics in fluorite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolff, R.; Dunkl, I.; Kempe, U.; Stockli, D.; Wiedenbeck, M.; von Eynatten, H.

    2016-09-01

    Precise analysis of the diffusion characteristics of helium in fluorite is crucial for establishing the new fluorite (U-Th-Sm)/He thermochronometer (FHe), which potentially provides a powerful tool for dating ore deposits unsuitable for the application of conventional geochronometers. Incremental helium outgassing experiments performed on fluorites derived from a spectrum of geological environments suggest a thermally activated volume diffusion mechanism. The diffusion behaviour is highly variable and the parameters range between log D0/a2 = 0.30 ± 0.27-7.27 ± 0.46 s-1 and Ea = 96 ± 3.5-182 ± 3.8 kJ/mol. Despite the fact that the CaF2 content of natural fluorites in most cases exceeds 99 weight percent, the closure temperature (Tc) of the fluorite (U-Th-Sm)/He thermochronometer as calculated from these diffusion parameters varies between 46 ± 14 °C and 169 ± 9 °C, considering a 125 μm fragment size. Here we establish that minor substitutions of calcium by rare earth elements and yttrium (REE + Y) and related charge compensation by sodium, fluorine, oxygen and/or vacancies in the fluorite crystal lattice have a significant impact on the diffusivity of helium in the mineral. With increasing REE + Y concentrations F vacancies are reduced and key diffusion pathways are narrowed. Consequently, a higher closure temperature is to be expected. An empirical case study confirms this variability: two fluorite samples from the same deposit (Horni Krupka, Czech Republic) with ca. 170 °C and ca. 43 °C Tc yield highly different (U-Th-Sm)/He ages of 290 ± 10 Ma and 79 ± 10 Ma, respectively. Accordingly, the fluorite sample with the high Tc could have quantitatively retained helium since the formation of the fluorite-bearing ores in the Permian, despite subsequent Mesozoic burial and associated regional hydrothermal heating. In contrast, the fluorite with the low Tc yields a Late Cretaceous age close to the apatite fission track (AFT) and apatite (U-Th)/He ages (AHe

  11. Stability of the Helium-Antiproton System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Drachman, Richard J.

    2006-01-01

    In the course of their Born-Oppenheimer calculations of this system Todd and Armour noted that the lowest-lying state closely resembles the hydrogen negative ion, since the antiproton lies very close to the helium nucleus and shields one unit of nuclear charge. In the present paper this observation will be taken seriously to produce a variationally correct estimate of the total energy of this system, along with a similar estimate of the energy of the once-ionized system. The nonadiabatic effect of exactly treating the reduced masses improves the results.

  12. The response of a helium white dwarf to an exploding Type Ia supernova

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papish, Oded; Soker, Noam; García-Berro, Enrique; Aznar-Siguán, Gabriela

    2015-05-01

    We conduct numerical simulations of the interacting ejecta from an exploding CO white dwarf (WD) with a He WD donor in the double-detonation scenario for Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia), and study the possibility of exploding the companion WD. We also study the long time imprint of the collision on the supernova remnant. When the donor He WD has a low mass, MWD = 0.2 M⊙, it is at a distance of ˜0.08 R⊙ from the explosion, and helium is not ignited. The low-mass He WD casts an `ejecta shadow' behind it. By evolving the ejecta for longer times, we find that the outer parts of the shadowed side are fainter and its boundary with the ambient gas is somewhat flat. More massive He WD donors, MWD ≃ 0.4 M⊙, must be closer to the CO WD to transfer mass. At a distance of a ≲ 0.045 R⊙ helium is detonated and the He WD explodes, leading to a triple detonation scenario. In the explosion of the donor WD approximately 0.15 M⊙ of unburned helium is ejected. This might be observed as a peculiar Type Ib supernova.

  13. Implementation of the thermodynamic and phase transition equations of superfluid helium in CFD software

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruce, R.; Pascali, S.; Vendramini, C.; Baudouy, B.

    2015-12-01

    The cryogenic design of the next generation of superconducting accelerator magnets depends on our ability to simulate the helium heat and mass transfer in the internal structure of these magnets. For that matter accurate tools must be developed such as numerical codes integrating the thermodynamic behavior and phase transition in superfluid helium. We have implemented in 2D and 3D, the He II conservation equations in Fluent© CFD software corresponding to a simplified two-fluid model. It consists of a conventional continuity equation, a modified momentum equation for the total fluid and an energy equation including the Gorter-Mellink internal convection term modeling the turbulence regime. The code is mainly suited to simulate transient and steady-state flow configurations. In addition, a new method has been developed to simulate the He II / He I transition in 2D based on a modified Volume Of Fluid method (VOF). The interface between the two states of liquid helium has been locally recreated in the corresponding cells to properly mimic the second order phase transition (no latent heat). Both steady and unsteady numerical simulation have been performed and compared with different experimental results.

  14. A robust helium-cooled shield/blanket design for ITER

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, C. P. C.; Bourque, R. F.; Baxi, C. B.; Colleraine, A. P.; Grunloh, H. J.; Letchenberg, T.; Leuer, J. A.; Reis, E. E.; Redler, K.; Will, R.

    1993-11-01

    General Atomics Fusion and Reactor Groups have completed a helium-cooled, conceptual shield/blanket design for ITER. The configuration selected is a pressurized tubes design embedded in radially oriented plates. This plate can be made from ferritic steel or from V-alloy. Helium leakage to the plasma chamber is eliminated by conservative, redundant design and proper quality control and inspection programs. High helium pressure at 18 MPa is used to reduce pressure drop and enhance heat transfer. This high gas pressure is believed practical when confined in small diameter tubes. Ample industrial experience exists for safe high gas pressure operations. Inboard shield design is highlighted in this study since the allowable void fraction is more limited. Lithium is used as the thermal contacting medium and for tritium breeding; its safety concerns are minimized by a modular, low inventory design that requires no circulation of the liquid metal for the purpose of heat removal. This design is robust, conservative, reliable, and meets all design goals and requirements. It can also be built with present-day technology.

  15. Helium Isotopic Ratios of Core Samples from IODP Exp. 319 (NanTroSEIZE Stage 2)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horiguchi, K.; Matsuda, J.; Wiersberg, T.; Shimo, Y.; Tamura, H.; Kumagai, H.; Suzuki, K.; Saito, S.; Kinoshita, M.; Araki, E.; Byrne, T.; McNeill, L. C.; Saffer, D.; Takahashi, K.; Eguchi, N. O.; Toczko, S.

    2009-12-01

    IODP Exp.319 of Nankai Trough Seismogenic Zone Drilling Program Stage 2 started at May 2009. Various advanced technologies including first riser-based scientific ocean drilling were carried out at this cruise. The Hole C0009A (Site C0009/ Hole A) recovered cutting and partly core samples from 703.9-1604 mbsf by riser-drilling. The core samples were collected between the depth of 1510.5 and 1593.9 mbsf. Here we report preliminary helium isotopic ratios of these cores. We collected three types of samples for our study: (1) gas of cores, (2) whole round cores (100 cc) and (3) small whole round cores (10 cc). The gas samples were taken immediately after the core recovery. The gas samples were collected from each core section by using a syringe, and it was transferred to the glass bottle using the water displacement method. The glass bottle was made by Pyrex glass with vacuum valve at each end. We collected two sizes of whole round core samples (100 cc and 10 cc) The 100 cc cores were collected from the bottom and top sections of coring. The 10 cc cores were taken from the other sections. The outer parts of these samples were carefully removed to avoid contaminations from drilling fluid. After the removal of contamination, we immediately stored the 100 cc samples into vacuum container and 10 cc samples into plastic bag under a dry condition, respectively. The gas samples were measured for helium isotopic ratios. The noble gas measurement was carried out at Osaka University by using VG5400 mass spectrometer. We measured helium isotopic ratio and 4He/20Ne ratio. The latter is useful for making correction of the air contamination. The obtained result of helium isotopic ratios shows that the radiogenic helium is prominent in all samples. In addition, the helium isotope ratios show a trend that the ratio at shallower part is slightly higher than that at deeper part. It is conceivable that this trend is due to the larger radiogenic ingrowths at the deeper part. However, the

  16. Schlieren imaging investigation of the hydrodynamics of atmospheric helium plasma jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Yashuang; Wang, Lijun; Ning, Wenjun; Jia, Shenli

    2016-03-01

    This work investigates the hydrodynamic characteristics of a coaxial double-ring electrode helium plasma jet by means of a "Z-type" Schlieren imaging system. The Schlieren images and visual optical photographs made show that a transition point from a laminar region to a turbulent region exists for gas flow without plasma when the helium flow rate exceeds a certain value. After plasma ignition, the laminar region shrinks with voltage increases, and the maximum length of the plasma plume is confined to the laminar region. The heat transfer equation and the spectral broadening of the He I 667.8 nm were used to estimate the increased gas temperature in the plasma jet, and the change in gas velocity by ionic momentum transfer was found by application of a double sphere collision model. As a result, gas heating is considered to be the dominant factor for the earlier onset of turbulence after plasma ignition, whereas the role of ion momentum transfer to neutral gas molecules is comparatively weak. The hydrodynamic behaviors of the plasma jet at the impact region for organic glass and silicon substrates are also researched. The ionization front propagates along the organic glass surface and contracts at the impact point on the silicon surface. More visible vortices are observed from Schlieren images with silicon substrates than with organic glass substrates. Possible mechanisms related to the different treatment effects are discussed.

  17. Atmospheric pressure chemical ionization source. 1. Ionization of compounds in the gas phase.

    PubMed

    Andrade, Francisco J; Shelley, Jacob T; Wetzel, William C; Webb, Michael R; Gamez, Gerardo; Ray, Steven J; Hieftje, Gary M

    2008-04-15

    A novel chemical ionization source for organic mass spectrometry is introduced. This new source uses a glow discharge in the flowing afterglow mode for the generation of excited species and ions. The direct-current gas discharge is operated in helium at atmospheric pressure; typical operating voltages and currents are around 500 V and 25 mA, respectively. The species generated by this atmospheric pressure glow discharge are mixed with ambient air to generate reagent ions (mostly ionized water clusters and NO+), which are then used for the ionization of gaseous organic compounds. A wide variety of substances, both polar and nonpolar, can be ionized. The resulting mass spectra generally show the parent molecular ion (M+ or MH+) with little or no fragmentation. Proton transfer from ionized water clusters has been identified as the main ionization pathway. However, the presence of radical molecular ions (M+) for some compounds indicates that other ionization mechanisms are also involved. The analytical capabilities of this source were evaluated with a time-of-flight mass spectrometer, and preliminary characterization shows very good stability, linearity, and sensitivity. Limits of detection in the single to tens of femtomole range are reported for selected compounds. PMID:18345693

  18. A design and critical technology issues for on-orbit resupply of superfluid helium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hopkins, Richard A.; Mord, Allan J.

    1990-01-01

    The issues of and the solutions to the critical design and technology areas of the Superfluid Helium On-Orbit Transfer (SHOOT) experiment, presently under development at the NASA Goddard Spaceflight Center, are discussed. Special attention is given to the SHOOT design requirements for the 10,000-liter superfluid He resupply tanker system, the concept details of the system, and the resupply operations and their analysis. A block diagram of the SHOOT system is included along with fluid management schematic and configuration diagrams of the system and its subsystems. A summary of the dewar performance is also presented.

  19. Ionization of helium atoms under the effect of the antineutrino magnetic moment

    SciTech Connect

    Martemyanov, V. P. Tsinoev, V. G.

    2011-12-15

    Differential cross sections for inelastic antineutrino interaction with a helium atom are calculated. It is shown that, in the energy-transfer range extending up to 1 keV, the cross sections in question are considerably enhanced in the electromagnetic-interaction channel in relation to the cross sections for elastic scattering on a free electron. Absolute cross-section values are of interest in searches for the antineutrino magnetic moment, provided that its value in Bohr magneton units falls within the range (10{sup -13}-10{sup -12}){sub Micro-Sign B}.

  20. Magneto-optical trap for metastable helium at 389 nm

    SciTech Connect

    Koelemeij, J.C.J.; Stas, R.J.W.; Hogervorst, W.; Vassen, W.

    2003-05-01

    We have constructed a magneto-optical trap (MOT) for metastable triplet helium atoms utilizing the 2 {sup 3}S{sub 1}{yields}3 {sup 3}P{sub 2} line at 389 nm as the trapping and cooling transition. The far-red-detuned MOT (detuning {delta}=-41 MHz) typically contains few times 10{sup 7} atoms at a relatively high ({approx}10{sup 9} cm{sup -3}) density, which is a consequence of the large momentum transfer per photon at 389 nm and a small two-body loss rate coefficient (2x10{sup -10} cm{sup 3}/s<{beta}<1.0x10{sup -9} cm{sup 3}/s). The two-body loss rate is more than five times smaller than in a MOT on the commonly used 2 {sup 3}S{sub 1}{yields}2 {sup 3}P{sub 2} line at 1083 nm. Furthermore, laser cooling at 389 nm results in temperatures somewhat lower than those achieved using 1083 nm. The 389-nm MOT exhibits small losses due to two-photon ionization, which have been investigated as well.

  1. Liquid uranium alloy-helium fission reactor

    DOEpatents

    Minkov, V.

    1984-06-13

    This invention describes a nuclear fission reactor which has a core vessel and at least one tandem heat exchanger vessel coupled therewith across upper and lower passages to define a closed flow loop. Nuclear fuel such as a uranium alloy in its liquid phase fills these vessels and flow passages. Solid control elements in the reactor core vessel are adapted to be adjusted relative to one another to control fission reaction of the liquid fuel therein. Moderator elements in the other vessel and flow passages preclude fission reaction therein. An inert gas such as helium is bubbled upwardly through the heat exchanger vessel operable to move the liquid fuel upwardly therein and unidirectionally around the closed loop and downwardly through the core vessel. This helium gas is further directed to heat conversion means outside of the reactor vessels to utilize the heat from the fission reaction to generate useful output. The nuclear fuel operates in the 1200 to 1800/sup 0/C range, and even higher to 2500/sup 0/C.

  2. Liquid uranium alloy-helium fission reactor

    DOEpatents

    Minkov, Vladimir

    1986-01-01

    This invention teaches a nuclear fission reactor having a core vessel and at least one tandem heat exchanger vessel coupled therewith across upper and lower passages to define a closed flow loop. Nuclear fuel such as a uranium alloy in its liquid phase fills these vessels and flow passages. Solid control elements in the reactor core vessel are adapted to be adjusted relative to one another to control fission reaction of the liquid fuel therein. Moderator elements in the other vessel and flow passages preclude fission reaction therein. An inert gas such as helium is bubbled upwardly through the heat exchanger vessel operable to move the liquid fuel upwardly therein and unidirectionally around the closed loop and downwardly through the core vessel. This helium gas is further directed to heat conversion means outside of the reactor vessels to utilize the heat from the fission reaction to generate useful output. The nuclear fuel operates in the 1200.degree.-1800.degree. C. range, and even higher to 2500.degree. C., limited only by the thermal effectiveness of the structural materials, increasing the efficiency of power generation from the normal 30-35% with 300.degree.-500.degree. C. upper limit temperature to 50-65%. Irradiation of the circulating liquid fuel, as contrasted to only localized irradiation of a solid fuel, provides improved fuel utilization.

  3. Argon clusters embedded in helium nanodroplets.

    PubMed

    da Silva, Filipe Ferreira; Bartl, Peter; Denifl, Stephan; Echt, Olof; Märk, Tilmann D; Scheier, Paul

    2009-11-14

    Electron impact ionization of argon clusters embedded in helium droplets is investigated. Superior mass resolution makes it possible to distinguish between nominally isobaric cluster ions. An abundance maximum for ArHe(12)(+) is unambiguously confirmed; the spectra also prove the formation of Ar(2)He(n)(+) complexes that had been claimed to fragment into pure Ar(2)(+). Distributions of larger argon cluster ions containing up to 60 atoms closely resemble distributions observed upon electron impact or photoionization of bare argon clusters; caging and evaporative cooling provided by the helium matrix do not suffice to quench fragmentation of the nascent argon cluster ions. Intriguing abundance anomalies are observed in distributions of argon cluster ions that contain water, nitrogen or oxygen impurities. The strong abundance of Ar(55)H(2)O(+), Ar(54)O(2)(+) and Ar(54)N(2)(+) contrasts with the virtual absence of slightly larger cluster ions containing the corresponding impurities. The features are probably related to enhanced cluster ion stability upon closure of the second icosahedral shell but the difference in magic numbers (54 versus 55) and the well-known reactivity of charged argon-nitrogen complexes suggest structural differences. PMID:19851558

  4. From Liquid Helium to Granular Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Behringer, Robert P.

    2016-11-01

    This article provides a brief history of work that I have either carried out with Horst Meyer, or that was connected in some way with experiences reaching back to the laboratory known as LTM for low temperature [physics] Meyer, at Duke University. It is not intended as a complete review of all relevant work, but rather to hit highlights. My work with Horst started with studies of critical phenomena in liquid helium. This system provided an extremely rich and diverse testing ground for then newly emerging theories of static and dynamic critical phenomena. A key aspect of the experimental work with Horst was high-precision measurements of temperature and pressure. The ability to measure thermal properties with exceptional precision was at the core of this work. It also provided a natural springboard for entirely different investigations of Rayleigh-Bénard convection, which had just been initiated by Guenter Ahlers. My postdoc with Guenter provided a whole new set of experiences involving convection, dynamical instabilities, and chaos, where again the special properties, measurement techniques, and creative approaches to research associated with liquid helium were critical. In fact, later, knowledge of these techniques allowed me to start a whole new research direction in granular materials, which is a primary focus of my current research.

  5. Indirect detection of the Martian helium corona

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barabash, S.; Norberg, O.

    1994-07-01

    The ion composition mass spectrometer ASPERA on board the PHOBOS 2 spacecraft detected particles with M/q = 4 in the vicinity of Mars. A significant difference between the measured particle velocity and the solar wind velocity suggests that these ions are of planetary origin, apparently He(+) from ionisation within the Martian helium corona. The particles had typical energies of either more than 10 keV or about 500 eV. The former correspond to ion pickup in the solar wind and the latter might be ions extracted from the upper ionosphere by an electric field. The observed density of pickup He(+) ions was 0.02-0.1/cc and the He(+) density in the plasmasheet was of 0.2-0.7/cc. According to a recent model of the Martian neutral atmosphere (Moroz et al, 1991) the He(+) density could reach 0.2/cc at the Phobos orbit. Such values give mass densities comparable to those of the solar wind. Thus, helium may play a role in the solar wind mass loading process near Mars.

  6. Fiber-Cavity Optomechanics with Superfluid Helium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flowers-Jacobs, Nathan E.; Kashkanova, Anna D.; Shkarin, Alexey B.; Hoch, Scott W.; Deutsch, Christian; Reichel, Jakob; Harris, Jack G. E.

    2014-03-01

    In a typical optomechanical device, the resonance frequency of a cavity is coupled to mechanical motion through the radiation pressure force. To date, experimental cavities have predominately coupled to a resonant mechanical mode of a solid structure, often a lithographically-defined beam or membrane. We will describe our progress towards realizing an optomechanical device in which an optical fiber-cavity couples to the acoustic modes of superfluid helium. In this system, the optical modes and the acoustic modes of the superfluid are co-located between the mirrored ends of two fiber optic cables. Changes in the density of the superfluid change the effective length of the cavity which results in a standard, linear optomechanical coupling between the 300 MHz acoustic resonances and the 200 THz optical resonances. This type of device is motivated by the self-aligning nature of the acoustic and optical modes (which eases the difficulties of operating at cryogenic temperatures) and by the low optical and mechanical losses of superfluid helium. Although we expect the mechanical quality factor to be limited by acoustic radiation into the glass fiber, we will describe a proposal to realize a dual-band Bragg mirror to confine the optical and acoustic modes more efficiently. Supported by NSF Grant #1106110, ARO Grant #W911NF-13-1-0104, and the DARPA/MTO ORCHID program through a grant from AFOSR.

  7. The primordial helium abundance from updated emissivities

    SciTech Connect

    Aver, Erik; Olive, Keith A.; Skillman, Evan D.; Porter, R.L. E-mail: olive@umn.edu E-mail: skillman@astro.umn.edu

    2013-11-01

    Observations of metal-poor extragalactic H II regions allow the determination of the primordial helium abundance, Y{sub p}. The He I emissivities are the foundation of the model of the H II region's emission. Porter, Ferland, Storey, and Detisch (2012) have recently published updated He I emissivities based on improved photoionization cross-sections. We incorporate these new atomic data and update our recent Markov Chain Monte Carlo analysis of the dataset published by Izotov, Thuan, and Stasi'nska (2007). As before, cuts are made to promote quality and reliability, and only solutions which fit the data within 95% confidence level are used to determine the primordial He abundance. The previously qualifying dataset is almost entirely retained and with strong concordance between the physical parameters. Overall, an upward bias from the new emissivities leads to a decrease in Y{sub p}. In addition, we find a general trend to larger uncertainties in individual objects (due to changes in the emissivities) and an increased variance (due to additional objects included). From a regression to zero metallicity, we determine Y{sub p} = 0.2465 ± 0.0097, in good agreement with the BBN result, Y{sub p} = 0.2485 ± 0.0002, based on the Planck determination of the baryon density. In the future, a better understanding of why a large fraction of spectra are not well fit by the model will be crucial to achieving an increase in the precision of the primordial helium abundance determination.

  8. Neutrons on a surface of liquid helium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grigoriev, P. D.; Zimmer, O.; Grigoriev, A. D.; Ziman, T.

    2016-08-01

    We investigate the possibility of ultracold neutron (UCN) storage in quantum states defined by the combined potentials of the Earth's gravity and the neutron optical repulsion by a horizontal surface of liquid helium. We analyze the stability of the lowest quantum state, which is most susceptible to perturbations due to surface excitations, against scattering by helium atoms in the vapor and by excitations of the liquid, comprised of ripplons, phonons, and surfons. This is an unusual scattering problem since the kinetic energy of the neutron parallel to the surface may be much greater than the binding energies perpendicular. The total scattering time of these UCNs at 0.7 K is found to exceed 1 h, and rapidly increases with decreasing temperature. Such low scattering rates should enable high-precision measurements of the sequence of discrete energy levels, thus providing improved tests of short-range gravity. The system might also be useful for neutron β -decay experiments. We also sketch new experimental propositions for level population and trapping of ultracold neutrons above a flat horizontal mirror.

  9. Numerical Studies of Properties of Confined Helium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Manousakis, Efstratios

    2003-01-01

    We carry out state of the art simulations of properties of confined liquid helium near the superfluid transition to a degree of accuracy which allows to make predictions for the outcome of fundamental physics experiments in microgravity. First we report our results for the finite-size scaling behavior of heat capacity of superfluids for cubic and parallel-plate geometry. This allows us to study the crossover from zero and two dimensions to three dimensions. Our calculated scaling functions are in good agreement with recently measured specific heat scaling functions for the above mentioned geometries. We also present our results of a quantum simulation of submonolayer of molecular hydrogen deposited on an ideal graphite substrate using path-integral quantum Monte Carlo simulation. We find that the monolayer phase diagram is rich and very similar to that of helium monolayer. We are able to uncover the main features of the complex monolayer phase diagram, such as the commensurate solid phases and the commensurate to incommensurate transition, in agreement with the experiments and to find some features which are missing from the experimental analysis.

  10. DIRECT EVALUATION OF THE HELIUM ABUNDANCES IN OMEGA CENTAURI

    SciTech Connect

    Dupree, A. K.; Avrett, E. H. E-mail: eavrett@cfa.harvard.edu

    2013-08-20

    A direct measure of the helium abundances from the near-infrared transition of He I at 1.08 {mu}m is obtained for two nearly identical red giant stars in the globular cluster Omega Centauri. One star exhibits the He I line; the line is weak or absent in the other star. Detailed non-local thermal equilibrium semi-empirical models including expansion in spherical geometry are developed to match the chromospheric H{alpha}, H{beta}, and Ca II K lines, in order to predict the helium profile and derive a helium abundance. The red giant spectra suggest a helium abundance of Y {<=} 0.22 (LEID 54064) and Y = 0.39-0.44 (LEID 54084) corresponding to a difference in the abundance {Delta}Y {>=} 0.17. Helium is enhanced in the giant star (LEID 54084) that also contains enhanced aluminum and magnesium. This direct evaluation of the helium abundances gives observational support to the theoretical conjecture that multiple populations harbor enhanced helium in addition to light elements that are products of high-temperature hydrogen burning. We demonstrate that the 1.08 {mu}m He I line can yield a helium abundance in cool stars when constraints on the semi-empirical chromospheric model are provided by other spectroscopic features.

  11. Turnkey Helium Purification and Liquefaction Plant for DARWIN, Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindemann, U.; Boeck, S.; Blum, L.; Kurtcuoglu, K.

    2010-04-01

    The Linde Group, through its Australian subsidiary BOC Limited, has signed an agreement with Darwin LNG Pty Ltd for the supply of feed-gas to Linde's new helium refining and liquefaction facility in Darwin, Australia. Linde Kryotechnik AG, located in Switzerland, has carried out the engineering and fabrication of the equipment for the turn key helium plant. The raw feed gas flow of 20'730 Nm3/h contains up to of 3 mol% helium. The purification process of the feed gas consists of partial condensation of nitrogen in two stages, cryogenic adsorption and finally catalytic oxidation of hydrogen followed by a dryer system. Downstream of the purification the refined helium is liquefied using a modified Bryton process and stored in a 30'000 gal LHe tank. For further distribution and export of the liquid helium there are two stations available for filling of truck trailers and containers. The liquid nitrogen, required for refrigeration capacity to the nitrogen removal stages in the purification process as well as for the pre-cooling of the pure helium in the liquefaction process, is generated on site during the feed gas purification process. The optimized process provides low power consumption, maximum helium recovery and a minimum helium loss.

  12. Characterization of charcoals for helium cryopumping in fusion devices

    SciTech Connect

    Sedgley, D.W.; Tobin, A.G.; Batzer, T.H.; Call, W.R.

    1987-07-01

    The capability of charcoal as a sorbent for helium at cryogenic temperatures depends upon charcoal characteristics that are not well understood. Previous work by the authors has indicated that the charcoals' pumping capability for helium depends as much on their source as on their particle size distributions. To develop a correlation between the physical characteristics of charcoal and helium pumping performance, different charcoals based on wood, coal, coconut, and a petroleum by-product were obtained from commercial sources. They were bonded to an aluminum substrate, and cooled to liquid-helium temperatures in a vacuum chamber. The helium pumping speed at constant throughput versus quantity of helium absorbed was measured for each charcoal grade. Porosimetry measurements on each charcoal grade using nitrogen as the sorbent gas were made that included total surface area, adsorption and desorption isotherms, and pore area and pore volume distributions. Significant differences in helium pumping performance and in pore size distribution were observed. Comparisons are made between helium pumping performance and charcoal characteristics and a possible correlation is identified.

  13. 21 CFR 868.1640 - Helium gas analyzer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Helium gas analyzer. 868.1640 Section 868.1640 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 868.1640 Helium gas analyzer....

  14. The adsorption of helium atoms on coronene cations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurzthaler, Thomas; Rasul, Bilal; Kuhn, Martin; Lindinger, Albrecht; Scheier, Paul; Ellis, Andrew M.

    2016-08-01

    We report the first experimental study of the attachment of multiple foreign atoms to a cationic polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH). The chosen PAH was coronene, C24H12, which was added to liquid helium nanodroplets and then subjected to electron bombardment. Using mass spectrometry, coronene cations decorated with helium atoms were clearly seen and the spectrum shows peaks with anomalously high intensities ("magic number" peaks), which represent ion-helium complexes with added stability. The data suggest the formation of a rigid helium layer consisting of 38 helium atoms that completely cover both faces of the coronene ion. Additional magic numbers can be seen for the further addition of 3 and 6 helium atoms, which are thought to attach to the edge of the coronene. The observation of magic numbers for the addition of 38 and 44 helium atoms is in good agreement with a recent path integral Monte Carlo prediction for helium atoms on neutral coronene. An understanding of how atoms and molecules attach to PAH ions is important for a number of reasons including the potential role such complexes might play in the chemistry of the interstellar medium.

  15. Characterization of charcoals for helium cryopumping in fusion devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sedgley, D. W.; Tobin, A. G.; Batzer, T. H.; Call, W. R.

    1987-07-01

    The capability of charcoal as a sorbent for helium at cryogenic temperatures depends upon charcoal characteristics that are not well understood. Previous work by the authors has indicated that the charcoals- pumping capability for helium depends as much on their source as on their particle size distributions. To develop a correlation between the physical characteristics of charcoal and helium pumping performance, different charcoals based on wood, coal, coconut, and a petroleum by-product were obtained from commercial sources. They were bonded to an aluminum substrate, and cooled to liquid-helium temperatures in a vacuum chamber. The helium pumping speed at constant throughput versus quantity of helium absorbed was measured for each charcoal grade. Porosimetry measurements on each charcoal grade using nitrogen as the sorbent gas were made that included total surface area, adsorption and desorption isotherms, and pore area and pore volume distributions. Significant differences in helium pumping performance and in pore size distribution were observed. Comparisons are made between helium pumping performance and charcoal characteristics and a possible correlation is identified.

  16. Design and testing of a superfluid liquid helium cooling loop

    SciTech Connect

    Gavin, L.M.; Green, M.A.; Levin, S.M.; Smoot, G.F.; Witebsky, C.

    1989-07-01

    This paper describes the design and preliminary testing of a cryogenic cooling loop that uses a thermomechanical pump to circulate superfluid liquid helium. The cooling loop test apparatus is designed to prove forced liquid helium flow concepts that will be used on the Astromag superconducting magnet facility. 3 refs., 2 figs.

  17. Helium nanobubble release from Pd surface: An atomic simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Liang; Hu, Wangyu; Deng, Huiqiu; Xiao, Shifang; Yang, Jianyu; Gao, Fei; Heinisch, Howard L.; Hu, Shilin

    2011-02-14

    Molecular dynamic simulations of helium atoms escaping from a helium-filled nano-bubble near the surface of crystalline palladium reveal unexpected behavior. Significant deformation and cracking near the helium bubble occur initially, and then a channel forms between the bubble and the surface, providing a pathway for helium atoms to propagate towards the surface. The helium atoms erupt from the bubble in an instantaneous and volcano-like process, which leads to surface deformation consisting of cavity formation on the surface, along with modification and atomic rearrangement at the periphery of the cavity. The present simulation results show that, near the palladium surface, there is a helium-bubble-free zone, or denuded zone, with a typical thickness of about 3.0 nm. Combined with experimental measurements and continuum-scale evolutionary model predictions, the present atomic simulations demonstrate that the thickness of the denuded zone, which contains a low concentration of helium atoms, is somewhat larger than the diameter of the helium bubbles in the metal tritide. Furthermore, a relationship between the tensile strength and thickness of metal film is also determined.

  18. Helium on Venus - Implications for uranium and thorium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prather, M. J.; Mcelroy, M. B.

    1983-01-01

    Helium is removed at an average rate of 10 to the 6th atoms per square centimeter per second from Venus's atmosphere by the solar wind following ionization above the plasmapause. The surface source of helium-4 on Venus is similar to that on earth, suggesting comparable abundances of crustal uranium and thorium.

  19. Testing of a Helium Loop Heat Pipe for Large Area Cryocooling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ku, Jentung; Robinson, Franklin Lee

    2015-01-01

    Future NASA space telescopes and exploration missions require cryocooling of large areas such as optics, detector arrays, and cryogenic propellant tanks. One device that can potentially be used to provide closed-loop cryocooling is the cryogenic loop heat pipe (CLHP). A CLHP has many advantages over other devices in terms of reduced mass, reduced vibration, high reliability, and long life. A helium CLHP has been tested extensively in a thermal vacuum chamber using a cryocooler as the heat sink to characterize its transient and steady performance and verify its ability to cool large areas or components in the 3K temperature range. A copper plate with attached electrical heters was used to simulate the heat source, and heat was collected by the CLHP evaporator and transferred to the cryocooler for ultimate heat rejection. The helium CLHP thermal performance test included cool-down from the ambient temperature, startup, capillary limit, heat removal capability, rapid power changes, and long duration steady state operation. The helium CLHP demonstrated robust operation under steady state and transient conditions. The loop could be cooled from the ambient temperature to subcritical temperatures very effectively, and could start successfully without pre-conditioning by simply applying power to both the capillary pump and the evaporator plate. It could adapt to rapid changes in the heat load, and reach a new steady state very quickly. Heat removal between 10mW and 140mW was demonstrated, yielding a power turn down ratio of 14. When the CLHP capillary limit was exceeded, the loop could resume its normal function by reducing the power to the capillary pump. Steady state operations up to 17 hours at several heat loads were demonstrated. The ability of the helium CLHP to cool large areas was therefore successfully verified.

  20. Testing of a Helium Loop Heat Pipe for Large Area Cryocooling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ku, Jentung; Robinson, Franklin

    2016-01-01

    Future NASA space telescopes and exploration missions require cryocooling of large areas such as optics, detector arrays, and cryogenic propellant tanks. One device that can potentially be used to provide closed-loop cryocooling is the cryogenic loop heat pipe (CLHP). A CLHP has many advantages over other devices in terms of reduced mass, reduced vibration, high reliability, and long life. A helium CLHP has been tested extensively in a thermal vacuum chamber using a cryocooler as the heat sink to characterize its transient and steady performance and verify its ability to cool large areas or components in the 3K temperature range. A copper plate with attached electrical heaters was used to simulate the heat source, and heat was collected by the CLHP evaporator and transferred to the cryocooler for ultimate heat rejection. The helium CLHP thermal performance test included cool-down from the ambient temperature, startup, capillary limit, heat removal capability, rapid power changes, and long duration steady state operation. The helium CLHP demonstrated robust operation under steady state and transient conditions. The loop could be cooled from the ambient temperature to subcritical temperatures very effectively, and could start successfully without pre-conditioning by simply applying power to both the capillary pump and the evaporator plate. It could adapt to rapid changes in the heat load, and reach a new steady state very quickly. Heat removal between 10mW and 140mW was demonstrated, yielding a power turn down ratio of 14. When the CLHP capillary limit was exceeded, the loop could resume its normal function by reducing the power to the capillary pump. Steady state operations up to 17 hours at several heat loads were demonstrated. The ability of the helium CLHP to cool large areas was therefore successfully verified.